Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093680:00011


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VOL. VII.


CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1924.


No. i.


PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL


I -* v -


Discharge from Gatun Spillway thr-ough six gaei.


CONTENTS


Advertisements.. . . . . . . . . CHESTER


L. PIKE, '24. .76-88


Literary-Continued:


Alumni. . . . . . . . . . .. .. M ILDRED MORGAN,
A appreciation ....,,, .. .. .... . ...
By the Shores of the Caribbean. CLARICE STEENBERG,
CARIBBEAN Staff ............ .. .... ..... .
D edication...... ....... ... .. .... .. ..


Editorial........... ......
Exchanges.... . . .


. GLADYS B. LOWANDE,
H.... ELEN ABENDROTH,


Faculty, T he.... ..... ...... .. .. ..... .. .
Freshm an Class ... - - - .. ............
G graduates .. .. - . . . ... .
Jokes. . ... ..... .. CHARLOTTE HOUSEL, '


Junior C lass ........................ .................
Leavings . . ..... . . . . . . SENIOR CLASS OF 1924
Literary... . . . . . . . . . FLORENCE ALBERT, 24.
A Capture.......... f ANDREW D. SMITH, '25.
RICHARD A. FISHER, '25.
A Few Centers of Canal Zone Activity ..... . .. ...
About the Canal..............,DELILAH MAY. '26.
A Coast Defense Garrison, .... GEORGE OAKES, '24
Cristobal Coaling Station..... MILDRED MORGAN. '25.
From the Interior. ...... DOROTHY ABENDROTH, '24.
"Ralpho, Thou Dost Prevaricate"
FLORENCE ALBERT, '24.
The Control Hovse of Gatun Locks
DOROTHEA TUFrTS, '26.
Through the Canal .......... IRENE McCOURT, '24.
"And Things are Not What They Seem" ....... ......
The Dog WroughttheChange..EDITH COULBOURN, '24.
Only a Baby- ......... DOROTHY ABENDROTH, "24.
Average Boy. ................... JOSE AROSEMENA, '24.
Beyond the Chagres............. CALDWELL B. Foos '25
Charcoal.........................CARLOS PULGAR '26.
Do You Remember?. ............ FLORENCE ALBERT '24.
Education by Travel..... .. ... .....


(By the Senior Class in Economics.)


Luc


16


S45


'25. .


Golf ..


..... CHESTER L. PIKE.


ILife in Panama...,. .


.... 54


At Juan Franco. .... JOSE AROSEMENA, '24.
Cariiaval, ...... .. .. DOROTHY ABENDROTHII, '24
Panama Lottery Office.. .GLArnYS B.:LOWANDE, '24,
Shipward Bound . .,,.. .ANDREW SMITH. '25.
The Ice Cream Vender . .. -CHESTER L. PIKE, '24
ks" .... . . . . . CALDWELL B. FoOS. '25.


"Oh. There are Voices of thie Past"
CLARICE STEENBERG,
On the Road to Cativa ..........CHARLOTTE HOUSEL,
Pitcairn-- "Mystic Isle of the South Seas"
MANOLA BLISS.
Places of Interest in Panama . . . . . ..


Cativa ...... ....
Escoval... ...


San Bias as Seen by a Senior.


* 40
S38
. 41
* 43


.. .........JUAN B. PAPI, '26.
.... DOROTHY ABENDROTlH. '24.


. .INZA MARKHAM.,


Sympathetic Sketches of Near-By Scenes..,, .


GEORGE OAKES, '24
DOROTHY ABENDROTH, '24
FLORENCE ALBERT. 24


IRENE


MCCOURT,


GLADYS B. LOWANDE,
lEmIT COULBOURN,


43 Ten Precepts of English . ,. GLAnDYS B. LOWANDE, '24,
The Coral Tree Shark-A Legend
38 MORRIS MARCHOSKY. '25,
40 Ulp-to-the-Minute Dramas .....
69 As It Never Was....... CHESTER L. PIKE, '24.


Shades of the Great....... .
Who Knows Noah's Troubles?


GEORGE OAKES,
JOSE AROSEMENA,


Poetry .............
An Oral Report in English Class...... JOHN ORDWAY, '26.
Moonlight in the Tropics. SENIOR ENGLISH CLASS. '23-'24.
Rest After Toil.................. CHESTER L. PIKE, '24 .
The Washington Pool.........DOROTHY ABENDROTH, '24,


. . .. 48


. 48







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Moonlight in the Tropics.


The moonlight's silver sheen is on the sea
Where rippling wavelets wrap the verdant


shore;


It forms a pathway leading straight from me
To dream-romance through fancy's golden door.
A palm, a silent sentinel leans out
Across the bay-all jewelled by the light.
The glistening, gleaming fireflies flit about
And emphasize the blackness of the night.
The shadows mark the passing of the hours;
From troubles of the day one finds surcease;
The languid odor of the tropic flowers
Perfumes the air and brings a sense of peace.
How calm, serene, and quiet now seems life
"Far from the adding crowd's ignoble strife."
SENIOR ENGLISH CLASS, '23-'24.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Left to Righte


HoDkins. Assistant Editor-in-Chief:


Georee


Oakes. Circulation Manager;


Row 1--Gladva Lowande. Edit4


or-in-Chief: Ruth


A






THE


CARIBBEAN.


Gladys Lowande, '24.


HE CARIBBEAN is to Cristobal High School
far more than is implied in just the word


poster, and to do one's share willingly for the
whether it be in soliciting or by washing


baza r,
dishes;


"annual."


It is a goal-an opportunity


-a challenge.
Have you a talent for literary composition ?


Your


goal will naturally be to concentrate and improve
upon your former English work in order that you
may so perfect one or more articles as to make
them worthy of a coveted place within the covers
of the year book.
Perhaps your ability may follow the line of art.
Does not the book demand the exercise of such


ability? There
development of


is constant opportunity


for the


clever department headings


novel class designs.
Apart from these more evident phases comes the


challenge;


the challenge to aid in the sale of ad-


iance tickets for either the book or the senior play,
5 advertise, by word of mouth or by the making of a


the challenge to the election of staff officers, not
because of popularity but because of capable arid
dependable qualities; and last, the challenge to
those elected to carry on their interesting and im-
portant work with the utmost thought and care.
Although this is, briefly, the function in the school-
room, the school itself is not the only body concerned
with the success of THE CARIBBEAN, for there is al


community,


which,


when called


upon, his


responded with an overwhelming list of kind arts.
As a result, the annual not only serves its purpose
in the school but continues to function as a point of
contact between the high school student and the
community, thereby not only welding a steadfast
friendship, but keeping alive the interest of the com-
munity in school activities and its faith in its youqg
people.


Webication.

O OUR FACULTY, WHO HAVE SO ABLY AND WILLINGLY
E ND ENCOURAGED US IN OUR WORK AND


HEr, D-.rri.J A1i


JLiN\A/Jt IXflISJ.lJ Ut0


II'~ 'S^Jfl


TVnslVna gnflIJ1/


PLAY


SUCCESS


AND


AND


TO WHOM


THAT


GRATITUDE,


WE HAVE


OWE


ANY


ATTAINED,


DEDICATE


THIS,


DEGREE


WITH


OUR


LOVE


SEVENTH


l AUTI1RIR ANT"


4


A MMTT a


"*TLTIT







THE


CARIBBAEN.


THE SOUL OF THE SCHOOL.


George Oakes, '24.


_ -g -II


school what esprit de corps


It is the spirit of the body, the


submergence of self for the good of the whole. It
is manifested in many ways.
As an example of the submergence of self for


the good of the school, consider the boy


or girl


athletic contest with a rival team, and perhaps
is never better shown, than when, in the face of
certain defeat, it loyally urges on its own team
to continue the fight.
But school spirit is not confined to loyally sup-
porting and enthusiastically cheering on the team


who is anxious to appear to good advantage in
athletics, has set his mind on playing on the team
in an important contest against a rival school,
and, at the eleventh hour, gives place willingly to
another, thus defeating his fondest hopes, but en-
suring that the team representing his school shall
win. This is one of the highest forms of school
spirit, the sacrifice of the individual for the good
of the school.
School spirit is also manifested by the student
body under a cheer leader, cheering and encour-


on the athletic field.


The submergence of self is


self-discipline and there is a discipline of the class


room as well as military


discipline, or the disci-


pline of a well regulated business office.


That par-


ticular student body in which the sacrifice of self
and the loyal support extended to teachers are
best manifested, is the best exemplification of
school spirit or esprit de corps.
For, while school spirit on the athletic field is
noisy and easy to acquire, the other must be slowly


acquired in


everyday work


in the


prosaic class-


aging the school while


ts men are engaging in an


room.


5


School spirit is to the


is to an army.







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Miss Dodd. Miss Hornbeak. Miss O'Connell. Mr. Schneppmueller.

BY THE SHORES OF THE
Clarice Steenberg,
On the shores of Caribbean
On the shining Big Sea Water
Stands Cristobal High, the mighty,
Stands in pride the seat of learning
For each loyal son and daughter.
In this building is a teacher,
She, Miss Dodds of Minnesota,
Chief of all that she sets eyes on,
Best chief on the whole horizon.
Chief of old Cristobal High.
She it is who teaches Latin,
Pounds it in until we know it
Wonders then why we don't show it
When we have examinations.
She it is who knows old Julius,
Caesar, of the Roman battles,
She it is from whom the Seniors
Learn sociology and English.
And that English-how she knows it!
Knows it as it should be spoken,
Knows it as it should be written,
Knows it 'way from first to last,
Knows it 'way from last to first,


Knows it
Knows it
Very


with its first side last side,
with its last side first side,
learned is Miss Dodds.


Srom Texas, then, we have Miss Hornbeak,
She, the one who is so little,
Little-yet so awe-inspiring;
She, the one who sternly gazes,
Gazes at us, almost through us,
Gazes through us, never round us,
Wants to have the book report
Which was 'sposed to have been written
But was somehow just forgotten.
Then she tells us we must stay in,
Stay in till the thing is written-
*;!| * irwf- ,n tirt^ eiUttn


Miss Barnhouse. Miss BakewelL.


Miss Currier.


ARIBBEAN.


Then o'er science, mathematics,
Reigns the wondrous Miss O'Connell,
She who talks of a2 b2,
Tells us of an x2 y2
Multiplied by c2 d2,
Then branches off to H2 0
Until we think our brains are slow
So very slow they will not go
When e'er she speaks of H2 0.

In this great Cristobal High School
We have with us Herr Schneppmueller;
He does teach the boys their drawing.
If not drawing, then they're planning,
If not planning, then they're drawing.
Plane geometry he teaches;
With his compass and his ruler
He does work out propositions;
Makes us feel our blank brain's dumbness,
M likes us feel our dumb brain's blankness,
Makes us wish that we were smart as
"Schneppie" is in problem's plane.

Next we have with us Miss Bakewell,
She of household arts and history,
She who makes us learn of Europe
Learn it from the outside inside,
Learn it from the inside outside,
Study till we know it right side,
Bone it till we know it wrongside,
Till we know it all by heart.

Last, not least, our dear Miss Barnhouse.
She from whom we learn the Spanish
Till we think that we can speak it,
Till we think that we can write it,
Till on our Spanish friends we try it
And find they do not understand.
On the shores of Caribbean.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


MR. W. W.


ANDREW,


Miss MABEL JEAN


BARNHOJUS


Watsonville,


Providence, Rhode Island.
Superintendent of Schools.


Leland Standford Jr.


California.


University.


Spanish.


MR. FRANK T.


WILSON,


Sophomore


Class Adviser.


Seattle,


Washington.


University of Washington.
Assistant to Superintendent of Schools.


IN OTT-wA RIMWA
Perhaps you're not so fortunate as we


In having one who takes the u


most


In teaching you so that you plainly see


Miss J. ISABELLA DODDS,
Claremont, Minnesota.


Macalester


Latin, Social
Adviser.


The "why" and "when


Whose wit


College.


Problems


and Economics.


Senior


Class Adviser


of Spanish anJ


"where;


and mirth and jolly company


Afford us merriment beyond compare.
Regardless of the person, place, or town,


One better than Miss


Barnhouse can't


be found.


IN CHAUCERIAN VERSE.


Eek now we'll tell you of our principal
Who's sikerly of port full amyable,
Who does her best always to be of cheer
In school, in church, in clubs, both far and near.


Miss


MARGARET


Grand Rapids,


H. O'CON


NELL,


Minnesota


Creighton University.
University of Minnesota.


Of Caesar,


, economics too


Algebra,


General Science,


Physics,


Solid Geometry.


She knows the p tst and present through
From Claremont four long years ago she ca
Since when we know Miss Dodds by name


Miss


ADELA F.


BAKE


and th


rough.


and fame.


WELL,


Lansing, Iowa.
Iowa State College.
University of California.


IN COMMON METER.


Just one short year she has been here,
But you should see what she has done.
She's made all doubts and puzzles clear;


And with her, work's turned


She's good in


Physics,


into fun.


Algebra;


But that is not the best-


Home


Economics,


Adviser.


Modern


History.


Why so few b


ugs in Panama?


Miss O'Connell has the


IN LONG METER.


MR. HENRY K.


To judge her, you must know her well
In all her classes and her moods:


Of modern hist'rv she can


And how to make the best of foods.
To say this is to say the least-
Search every comment you can find-
To plan a party or a feast


Miss Bakewell


once has declined.


Miss HATTIE LEE HORNBE


Saint


SCHNEPPMUELLER,
. Minnesota.


Stout Institute.


Manual Training, Mechanical Drawing, Geometry.
IN SPENSERIAN STANZA


Of Mr.


Schneppmueller


we'll now relate-


The drawing teacher of Cristobal Hig}
With tourist hat, umbrella, at a rate
Of fifty miles per hour he seems to fly


To school


with giant strides that pass us by.


Waxahachie, Texas.
Trinity University.
Columbia University.


American


Just six feet one as you


can easy see;


With blonde moustache and horn-rimmed b


voice


History and Civics.


Adviser.


right blue eve;


that maketh for us melody,-


The man most liked and worthy of our faculty.


IN RIME ROYAL.


Perhaps


you think it strange that we should


Miss HELEN F. CURRIER,


spend


Minneapolis,
University of


Our time to write of one so very small;
But, if you knew her well who strives to lend
Inspiring thoughts that to our best selves call,
That mold our speech and ideals into all
That's beautiful,-with us then you would seek,
The friendship of Miss Hattie Lee Hornbeak.
But think not that is all that she can do;
Her jolliness close rivals her good will,
Her pleasing smile her enemies can woo;


Minnesota.
Minnesota.


Chorus, Orchestra.
IN SHORT METER.
Miss Currier can jest
Just like the rest of us.
And though we seldom do our be
She'd rather smile than fuss.


English,
Caribbean Stah


care


Junior


English,


Freshman







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Class Motto---Vestigia nulla retrorsum

Class Colors-Green and White.


Class Flower-Buginvillmea.


CHARLOTTE HOUSE.


20-21


Chorus.


'21-'22


School Basket Ball.
Indoor Baseball.
"Olympian Council.
Class Basket Ball.


Track.


Chorus.


22-'23


Girls' Glee Club.


Girls' Athletic Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.


School Basket Ball.


Track


"The Princess and the Sage."


'23-'24


President Senior Class.


Chorus.


President Girls' Athletic Association.


Supper Club.
Basket Ball.
Indoor Baseball.
"Charm School."


Tennis.


Joke Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.


GEORGE OAKES.


'20-21!
'21-'22
'22-'23


Delaware City High School.
Middletown Township High School.
School Basket Ball.


Baseball.
Track.
Chorus.


'23-'24


Class Vice President.
President, Boys' Athletic Association.
Circulation Manager, THE CARIBBEAN.
Baseball.


Class Basket Ball.
School Basket Ball.








THE


CAR IBBEAN. 9


FLORENCE ALBERT.


20-'21


Curtis High School.


22 Class Basketball.


'-22 -'2


High School Chorus.
Supper Club.
Exchange Editor, THE
Class Vice President.


CARIBBEAN.


Supper Club.
Class Secretary.
Literary Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
Supper Club.
"The Charm School"


Chorus.


CHESTER L. PIKE.


Jefferson High School, Portland


Oregon


West Philadelphia High School, Phila-
delphia, Pa.
Camden High School, Camden, N. J.
Class President.
Athletic Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.


School Basket Ball.


Class Basket Ball.


Class Tennis.


President, Upsilon Gamma Gamma.


Business Manager, THE


T rack.


CARIBBEAN.


School Basket Ball.


ClaIss Basket Ball.


Chorus.


"Charm School.


GLADYS B. LOWANDE.


'20-'2I


Class Secretary.


Supper Club.
"Olympian Council.


Bowling.


Indoor Baseball.


21- '22


School Basket Ball.


Class Vice President.


Athletic
Chorus.


Association-Secretary.


Swimming.


Basket Ball.


23 Assistant Editor, T'HE CARIBBEAN.
Secretary, Girls' Athletic Association.
"Trysting Place."


Track.


Basket Ball.


Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.


2 -2 2


Chorus.


2.l-'24


School Tennis.


Track.


'23-'24


'23-'24








THE


CARIBBEAN.


ETHEL SONNEMAN.


'20-"'21


'21-22


22-'23


"Esmeralda.


"Olympian Council.
Chorus.


Glee Club.
Supper Club.
Chorus.


Glee Club.


Tennis.


23-'24


Supper Club.
Chorus.


School Notes Editor, THE CARIBbEAN.
"Charm School."


EDITH COULBOURN.


'20-'21


West Philadelphia High School


for Girls.


'21-'22
'22-'23


Milford High School.
Assistant Circulation Manager, THE


RIBBEAN.


Class Secretary.
Chorus.
Supper Club.
Glee Club.


'23-'24


Chorus.


Supper Club.
"Charm School.


IRENE McCOURT.


'20-'2I
'21-'22


'22-'23


'23-'24


"Olympian Council.
Chorus.
Girls' Glee Club.


Supper Club.
Chorus.
Supper Club.
Supper Club.
Chorus.


"Charm School."








THE


CARIBBEAN.


DOROTHY B. ABENDROTH.


'20-'2I1
'21-'22
'22-'23


Balboa High
Balboa High
Basketball.


School.
School.


Chorus


Supper Club.
Chorus.


"Charm


School."


JOSE AROSEMENA


'19--20
'20-'2I
'21-'22
'22--'2


23-'24


Balboa High
Europe.
Balhoa High
Basket Ball.
"Grumpy."
Chorus.


School.


School.


THE CARIBBEAN,


Assistant Manager.


Track


Class Basket Ball.
School Basket Ball.
School Baseball.


Chorus.


"Charm School."


INZA MARKHAM.


'20-'2I
'2I-'22
'22-'23
'23- 24


"Olympian Council."
Supper Club.
Supper Club.
Supper Club.


'23-'24







THE


CARIBBEAN.


PROGNOSTICATION
I tuned in the radio.


"Station


speaking.


BY RADIATION.


The latest


reports


from station CHS will now be given."
I settled down to spend a pleasant evening.


"LEAVINGS."


We, the members of the class of '24, being about
to pass away (to new fields), do hereby distribute
our several possessions and characteristics as fol-
lows:


"Class of'


21--


Gosh!


I turned it off.


i. Florence Albert leaves


to Olga Arcia


Tuning in again, later, 1 caught the last of a
long-winded speech by Mr. Jos6 Arosemena, who
had, in his capacity of President of Panama, just
concluded a treaty with the United States where-
by no school child was to be forced to study or to
attend school against his wishes.
Then another name caught my attention. Miss


Charlotte Housel, the world-famed pianist,


to play


her famous selection,


was


"Moonlight Son-


ata." I listened enraptured until the


was struck.


nate


Then--


"Mr. George Oakes, forward on the


Celtics Basket


Ball Team,


'Original


will now tell a few


secrets of the game.
There followed the announcements of attrac-
tions in famous playhouses.
"Miss Ethel Sonneman, the greatest emotional


noon-hour monopoly


of the France


Field


phone line, appreciating the latter's rising need


of same.


Her composure she bestows upon Cald-


well B. Foos.
2. Charlotte Housel leaves her vamping ways to
Helen Abendroth with one word of advice, "To be of
any real value, they must be exercised constantly."
3. George Oakes leaves his perpetual grouch to
Richard Fisher to be added to the latter's already
abundant supply. Believing that "variety is the
spice of life," he leaves his Physics marks to Mor-
ris Marchosky.
4. Gladys Lowande with characteristic thought-
fulness bequeaths her small stature to Genevieve


Booth.


And her busy office of editor-in-chief of


the annual she leaves with the best of wishes to
Ruth Hopkins.


actress since


Theda Bara, is acting in


'One Wild


5. Inza


Markham


leaves


Andrew Smith


Night,' at the Strangers
Enough of that!


"Station


ABC,


' Club, Colon.


Philippine


Islands, speaking.


The United States Navy, commanded by Admiral


Chester L. Pike, is anchored here.


Albert,


assistant


photographer of


Miss Florence


the Islands,


took numerous photos of the fleet in formation
this afternoon." Then began a lot of sputtering,
so I tuned in at Station CHS again.
After a short talk on the latest books, I heard
that Miss Gladys Lowande, though she had lately
entered a state of wedded bliss, was acting as pub-
lisher for Miss I)Dorothy Abendroth, who had just


bathing suit.
6. Irene McCourt, after profound consideration,
leaves her permanent wave to Dorothy Deibert.
7. Ethel Sonneman's passion for wild-cat hunts
by moonlight is bestowed, after much thought,
upon Harriet Steenberg.
8. Edith Coulbourn leaves her connections with
the Navy to Ruth Duey.
9. Chester Pike, following the unspoken wishes
of the faculty, leaves his noon-hour laboratory


privilege to Richard Fisher.


His ability to cram


for the Annapolis exams he passes on
Stewart.


to Guy


finished her latest book,
and Individual." Then


"How to be Independent


io. Jos6 Arosemena leaves his sheik methods,
after exercising them all year, to William Cousins.


"Miss Irene McCourt will now talk on


"Practice makes perfect," is the slogan


accom-


Best All-Year Round Care of Barns,


' to be fol-


lowed by a few humorous incidents gathered by
Miss Inza Markham, based on her years of close
association with school teachers."


"Gee," I


thought,


"she ought to know.


lived in the same house with them for five years.


I was about to turn off the radio when,


Sta-


paying the gift.
II. Dorothy


leaves her


Abendroth,. after


"Stacomb"


much


urging,


to Dorothy Stauffer, ask-


ing only that it be used freely and frequently.
Upon consideration, her ability to grind out a
theme a day is bestowed upon Mildred Morgan.
To the members of the faculty, the class as a


- S" C & j -i


Pttt /*m.*


ft ~ t f .


I t l -


I 1 1


.S I S"t *


** A* t.. .fl S t. I 'N. 1t <- A .. I.: <' I" -1 Fkrk.* n 11 ta m .n tt lrf ,tfl flt -- &1 tI, a< U^ 44 fln^- tfl r I








THE


CARIBBEAN.


by Clock Position:
1 Mildred Morgan;
Marchowsky;
Adela Bakewell.


2 Andrew Smith: 3
8 Olga Arcia; 9 Willi
Base 1 Helen Abend


Anniel Heim; 4 Katherine Fischer; 5 Caldwell Foos; 6 Dorothy Stauffer; 7
am Cousins; f10 Dorothy Deibert; 11 Harriet Steenberg; 12 Richard Fisher;
roth; base 2 Ruth Hopkins: base 3 Guy Stewart; base 4 Ruth Duey.
Nut shown-Leo Eberenz, Margot Pugley.


Morris
Center,


TH E


JUNIORS.


RICHARD


"Dick" believes there


is much fame and fortune


awair-


C.LASS OFFICERS ing the dancing
os. CLASS OADEL
FOOS. CALDWEI.I


instructor.


Ruth Hopkins---President.
Guv Stewart-Vice-President.


Dorothy Deibert


-Secretary


"C. B. F." blushingly confessed


a sheik like


that he wanted to be


ack Coffey.


ANNIEL


and Treasurer.


"Niel" told


us in a hushed


voice that she would


adore


being a surgical


ROTH, HELEN


me, "Fluff,


"to be


" rather belies her


secret


Her nickna
bition which i


KINS,


a:nl-


nurse.


RUTH


"Bootie"


a bovy


surprised us by telling


us that she d like to


a jazz composer.


ARCIA, OLGA


wants


is rather


to be terribly


sophisticated,


"Olguita


sweet.


ARCHOSKY,
MacT
"Mac


NORRIS
intends


a millionaire


philanthropist.


KEWELL,


MORGAN, MILDRED


ADELA


Our good adviser has
Junior-Senior banquets.


decided to


swear


oti any


more


Here's


a good


one! "Millv"


wn [ts


to be a tight-rope


walker.


USINS,


\ILLIAM


To be a Paderewski


on the uke


"Willie's"


paramount


SMITH, ANDREW
"Andv" has started


out to be a second John Ba


rrymore


desire.


and he


s well on his


DEIBERT, DOROTHY


STAFFER, DOROTHY


got mad when


we discovered that she wanted to


"Dotty


" said she'd fool


us as she


was going


to lead


be an old maid.


life of leisure.


DUEvE


RurTH


ENBs RG,


HARRIET


"Rufus" has


such musical talent that


we all believe


"C>"-' -


k.*,n-d ,i,.r4 cin,It ri tkh raImni


Isn t


very


S-.. L


secret


because


everyone


knows


ani! own a Cadillac.


Names


ABEND


"Dot


..-I _*-_ . ** ~ ;-







THE


CARIBBEAN.


fltI__L.A. = AWt'T C AfDkltflhTOW A .A:.







THE


CARIBBEAN.


THE SOPHOMORE CLASS

OFFICERS
President-Dorothy Pike.
Vice-President-Wallace Johnson.


Secretary-James Van


Scotter.


Treasurer-Delilah May.


WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO THE


x. Manola Bliss were not worrying about her Latin?
2. Hildegarde Blythe were tending to some one else's busi-
ness?
3. Betty Carson came to school in the afternoon?
4. Jack Coffey were always on time?


5. Arthur Cotton knew his lessons?
6. Maurice Eggleston sat still in class?


SOPHOMORE CLASS


14. Juan Papi didn't have an ample supply of saddle horses?
15. Dorothy Pike bobbed her hair?
16. Carlos Pulgar ran out of hair grease?
17. Clarice Steenberg had no one to pass her notes?
18. Garland Tinsley were noisy?
19. Dorothea Tufts brought a voice amplifier to classes?


20. Gay Turner would


answer


unprepared" in class?


7. Irene Hopkins didn't serve lunch in the fifth period?
8. Wallace Johnson stayed after school when told?
9. Johanna Kleefkens were not always wanting the window
shut?
xo10. Delilah May didn't have to beg for dues?
II. Lola Munoz lost her smile?
12. Mildred Neely knew her history lesson?


13. John Ordway could recite without smiling?


S


21. James Van Scotter studied his lessons instead of reading
novels or lunching?
22. Dorothy Vaughan had a speedometer to regulate her
speech.


Christian Wirtz were six feet and a-half tall?


24. Miss Barnhouse, our faithful class adviser, weren


ways ready and willing to help us?






16 THE CARIBBEAN.








THE


CARIBBEAN:


FRESHMAN CLASS.


Freshmen.


Marion Barrett... ,


Emily Bledsoe..........
Frank Booth.., ........
Genevieve Booth.......

Pauline Briggs..........
Mary Douglas Bronson..
Ward Bronson, ...........
Harry Brown...... .. .
Lawrence Callaway.. ,
William Clinchard .. ..
William Coffey.......

Myrtle Coulbourn..


Grace


Dowell.


Rae Fischer.... . . . . .

Teresa Gallagher. .. .. .
James Grider..... . . . .

Julian Hackett.... .
Louise Heim . . . .

Mary Heim..........
William Henter.... . .
Russell Jones ... ... .
Miss Hattie Lee Hornbeak.

Jeannette Kalendar;. .....
Oliver King..... . ... .


Margurite


Kitt...


Elizabeth Laning. .

Edward Lowande..
Clara May.........
Erma Phillips.....

John Solomon..-. .

Fred Sonneman .
Henry Stevens......


Wilhelmina


Surse


Stute.


Taylor..


Foster Tufts .... . .
Helen Vineyard........
Dorothy Wertz........
Charles Will . . ...

Euphemia Woolnough..


Direction.


E.SE.

N.N.E


S.g. E *
E. by S.,
S.W. by
N.E. by
S.W .....
N. by E.


East........

S. by W ......
S.S.E ...... . .

W. by S. . . .
W. byN.... .


N. by W...
N.W .. . .

W.N.W....
N.W. by W
S. bv S. E,


Center.

N.E. .
South.

(1)


Lower


E.byN...
N.N.W.. .
S.W. by WV

S.E. by E.

West... .


N.E. b


S. by E.

Lower le

W.S.W..
E.N.E...
North...


N.W.


S.S.W.


Chief Ambition.


To outshine the other Maid Marion..

To be an advertisement for Pepsodent


To be
To sini

To be
To be
To be
To rivi
To be


a
g

a


sailor ... ..... ... .. .
in the Metropolitan. .


second Ma


Pickford


a modern Cleopatra .
a great lawyer... . .
ill Charles Chanlmin.....


.


a comedian-..:..


To be demoted.. . . .
To join a circus....-. .


To "sit by the side of the road and be
a friend to man."
To "fiddle away her time"...,.....


To install a secret wireless in


her desk


To be a second Ann Pennington . .
To institute couches in class instead
of chairs.
To be a second Sanzio Raphael... .


To edit a book on How to


To be seen


Concentrate


and not heard...


To be a Rudolph Valentino . .
To know the why's of everything..
To start us along the right road .

To be a heart-breaker. . . . . .


To be allowed


to read wild


novels in peace.
To become a medium ........

To be a second Carrie Chapman

To be a floorwalker ........
To live up to her first name.- .. -


To become


the personification


soundless motion.
To be head waiter at the Biltmore, .

To be tennis champion of the world.
To be a Julian Eltinge .... ..


To be the best-ever dome
teacher.


To be


a naval


stic scien


officer ....


To become a labor leader .. ..
To pose for coconut oil shampoo
To live up to her direction.. . .


To be


a college professor .


To be a whiz in algebra.......


How We Know.


By her devotion to her
Hood."
By her radiant smile.
By his interest in boats.


I By the zest sh


own on


own "Robin


Tuesday's sixth


period.
SBy her flowing locks.


By her
Bv his


speaking eyes.
love. for arguing.


y his antics in the assembly


room.


By the way he seeks the limelight.
By his interest in the eighth grade.
By his Siamese twinshtp with Christian
VWirtz.
By her wholesomespiritof comradeship.

By her rapid progress on the violin.
By her futile attempts to put something
over.
By her grace in dancing.
By his classroom lounging.

By his skill in drawing.
By her faculty for studying under all
conditions.


By her self-effacing


manner.


By his stacombed hair.
Bv his insatiable curiosi


By the efforts she
direction.
By her languishing


has made


in that


glances.


By his actions when caught with a book
in assembly hall.
By her frequent "absence from the body"
in daydreams.
By the dignity with which she presides


over the class
By practice he ha
By her start.


meetings.
s had in school aisles.


By her quiet-as-a-mouse
trances.


By the way he
refreshments.
By his untiring


generals

efforts at


exits


and en-


serving


the game.


Because he makes such a fascinating lady.
By the delicious samples she brings back
from cooking class.
By the way he swanked as Lieutenant
Pinkham in the Freshman play.
By his interest in a full dinner pail.
By her fluffy golden locks.
By the fact that she has gone there.
By the way rn which he dispenses knowl-
edge.
Ask Miss O'Connell.


Alpha Morgan, Jack Nunnery, Melba Baker, Ethel Nelson. Virginia Tucker.


. .


T


' Not shown. Not shown:






THE


CARIBBEAN,


Mildred Morgan, '25.


Although we have lost track of a few of our
graduates, we are living in hopes that THE CARIB-
BEAN of 1924 will reach them and set their minds
in the road that leads back to old Cristobal High.
Many indeed have taken that road, for from


some we have had cherished visits;


from others,


kindly greetings and interesting letters which we


have read eagerly;


from a few, pretty gifts and


checks for our Easter Bazaar,


with perhaps an


order (and money order) for the 1924 issue of this


book.


We don t want an alumnus to wander


away from us, for we are proud of them all and
are anxious that they keep up their old friendly
interest in us who are trying to keep up the stand-
ards of Cristobal High School, standards which
they have set.


be bigger and better, and that much success will
crown your efforts.
MInOT COTTON.
Susie Harrison, 1429 Munsey Building, Balti-


more, Md., is working


as a stenographer.


wishes the best of success to the Annual for this
year.
Catherine Waid of New York City, N. Y., will
be graduated from Columbia University School of
Journalism in June.
As far as we know Burke Welch is still residing
mn Wyoming.
The last address we have for Mary Verner is
Hendersonville, N. C.


1919.


This year another


band goes forth-each


James Raymond,


residing with his parents in


take the part in life for which Cristobal High has
helped tcf prepare him.
"Oh years may come and years may go,
But may our faithful alumni go on forever.
1918.


R. F. D.


3, Box 2586,


Cristobal, is working at the depot commissary.

118 MAPLE AVENUE,
TAKOMA PARK, MD.
I've just come from church where I heard a
good lecture on psychology-and the last thing
he told us was that we were born to be kings and


TAMPA, FLA.
The superintendent of schools was here yester-


queens.


pretty


grand


but nevertheless


don't know what to say in THE CARIBBEAN!


day and saw Mattie's CARIBBEAN.
well that he wanted a copy. Go a


1923.


He liked it so
head and try to


(Mattie says it can't be done.)
LULA PULLIG COMAN.
25I6 BEDFORD AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, N. Y.


I'm still working with the Western Union Tele-


I have been teaching for the past year at the
Washington School for Secretaries. I find the
work very interesting and enjoy it very much.
I'm also, in my spare time, taking an English
course at George Washington University. Best


wishes for the success of the


1924 CARIBBEAN.


graph Company in New York City.


The world


is not so large, for I see Canal Zone people quite
often. and when we aet together there is hound to


That's awful!


Sorryl


ALICE ARLENE BALL.







THE


CARIBBEAN,


1920.


up here, but they do not have to pay the athletes


Etha Bevington
from Woodbury's
Angeles, Calif.


was graduated in


Commercial


College


December


in Los


to come to California.


They come of their own


accord.


ALSO SEARS.


Best wishes for


COLON, R.
THE CARIBBEAN.


ALICE STILSON.


Lillian Cotton


Avenue,


Brooklyn,


Van Wagner, of 2516 Bedford


wishes


every


fortune for THE CARIBBEAN of 1924.
Katherine Burgoon Stewart, a pleasing adjunct
in the Cristobal Clubhouse, wishes every success
for this year's Annual.


Al Doyle


Canal


is working hard at the


Press getting


ready


to sen


The Panama
d little Miss


Eva Jeanne to college when she has been gradu-
ated from her daddy's and mother's alma mater
in 39 or 4o.


R. F. D. 4, COUDERSPORT,
I'm just writing a few lines to wish you s


and plenty of it.


PA.
success


Also, I want, through you, to


greet all my old friends and wish them health and
happiness.
Whatever else you may do, don't forget to put


BANCROFT


WAY,


my name on your mailing list.


I wouldn't miss


BERKELEY, CALIF.
When I received your message I was in the midst
of studying for my final examinations, my final


finals.


I wrote my last one this morning and next


week I shall again be a graduate.
It hardly seems as if it could be four years since


my copy of THE CARIBBEAN for anything.
KENNETH GREENE.


The last


time


we heard


Lindale


Davies he was residing in Boston, Mass.

1921.


I left high school.


They have been


MOUNT ST.


VINCENT-ON-THE-HUDSON.


years and have brought a full share of hard work
and study, but they have also been very happy


years.


I hope I may see some of you in California.


I join with the other alumni in sending you my
hearty greetings and most sincere wishes for hap-


piness and


success.


I am working hard for a B. S. degree and find


college life agreeable, both


tuallv.


am very glad to


socially and intellec-
see so much school


spirit in this year's class, and am sure its Annual
will be better than ever.


ALICE HUNTER.


HARLAN


W. HOLMWOOD.


Carl Duey is working in New


Box 279,


York City.


AUSTIN,


I am a candidate for mv B.


ical engineering this


year at


TEXAS.


. degree in mechan-
the University of


Texas. It seems a long time since I was in Cris-
tobal, but I can recall everything clearly.


JACK B.


FIELDS.


BOWDITCH STREET,


344 EAST 120 STREET,
NEW YORK CITY.


You'll find that there is a much harder life than


that of going to high school.


The way they hand


it to you here at Columbia makes you feel that the
Three Wise Men are at the head of the faculty
supervising the handing out of work and know-
ledge,as no one else could think of as much to have


BERKELEY,


I was


CALIF


very much disappointed at not getting


an Annual last year.


It must have gotten lost


you do.


So you see I have been quite busy and


still am-and shall be until school closes.


Then


for the glorious June when Paul and I see a good


in the mail.


If you have any left please sell one


to my brother and he will send it to me.


also get one for this year.


He will


I am gettjg along fine


place


and school


again.


saying


some good students again, for I think that with
the graduation of the class of '21 there were no


here. I will be graduated in May, 1925.
Next year I have the honor of being the captain


more good
School. D


ones


to be had at Cristobal


High


o you agree with me?







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Kirbv


Ferguson


is residing on


Colon


Beach


with her parents.


FORT RANDOLPH,


CANAL ZONE.


CUHECO FRATERNITY,
STATE COLLEGE, PA.
I am taking an electrical engineering course in


I sincerely hope that this year's Annual will be


a great success.


Although I shall soon be min the


States I shall always have a warm spot in my heart
for Cristobal High School and its faculty.
ELEANOR ZIMMERMAN.


Charles Henter is a radio man on an aeroplane
at Hampton Roads, Va.


Penn State College, Penn State, Pa.


position
summer.


in view


in New


York City


I have a
for this


See that my mother gets an Annual for me. I
hope things are going along fine and old Cristobal
High School is still the best in the land. Give


my regards to the faculty


success


of the graduates.


Best wishes for the


And here is hoping the


1922.


Annual is the best ever.


NEW


YORK- CITY.


I have been receiving news on the sly about a
few of the doings of our school which leads both
Frank and me to believe that each year the stu-


dents get better.


Be sure to save a place for us


GEORGE CARTWRIGHT.


GATUN,


CANAL ZONE.


Best wishes for the class of 1924 and for the


success


of the Annual.


to root for Cristobal High School at commence-


EMMA


TOWNSEND.


Frank says he knows more than I do.


Of course he does-he knows me, and I know him!
PAUL DOYLE.

GATUN, CANAL ZONE.
Thanks to the training I received at Cristobal
High School, I was able to be graduated from the
New York State Ranger School, a branch of the


I1 8 MAPLE AVENUE,
TACOMA PARK, MD.


I'm having a glorious time.
if we do have to work hard.


I love normal even
Best wishes for this


year s annual and the faculty.
MARJORIE D. BALL.


Syracuse


University.


Since


working for the Panamanian
junior surveyor.


Government as a


I have kept in touch, as much as possible, with
the Class of '24, and know that outside of being
the largest class to be graduated from Cristobal
High School they also hold the honor of being the
most wide-awake and ready to work of any class.
With them as the leaders, backed by sturdy work-
ers of Cristobal High School, this year's Annual
will be a record, hard to surpass.


WESLEY


TOWNSEND.


1221 MARSHALL LANE,


SYRACUSE, N.
I am at present a student in the New


Y.
York


State College of Forestry at Syracuse University.
THE CARIBBEAN has my best wishes for a suc-
cessful year.
JORDAN ZIMMERMAN.

Ida Brown (Mrs. Al Doyle), wishes every suc-
cess for THE CARIBBEAN of 1924.


1923.


TAMPA, FLA.
My very best wishes for the brainchild of Cris-


AUSTIN,


TEXAS.


My good wishes to THE CARIBBEAN and its
staff for 1924-may this issue be the best ever.
I am very intent on securing my B. S. degree and
am in love with work and Texas University. My
warmest regards to those who still remember
MARY GLENN FIELDS.


tobal High School-our Annual.


You'll be scan-


dalously proud of it-I get so puffed up when I
show mine to people up here. I showed it to one
man here whose daughter had been graduated
from Hillsboro High, the big school of Tampa,
and I told him, rather emphatically, that I


would put my


Annual


beside that


of Hillsboro


1 1 Ti 1......


ment.


r.







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Well, howdy, friends of C. H. S.,
I wonder how you feel!
My hope is that you're at your best,
So you can listen to me spiel.

How time has flown-'tis but a year
Since I had many things to learn
In C. H. S., that school so dear,
For which I'll never cease to yearn.


My precious paper in my hand,
On graduation night last June,
Gave me a feeling that was grand,
And meant that I'd be working

I tried my hand at managing
A soda fountain at the Base,
But far from home I could not clin;


297 HIGHLAND AVENUE,
ARLINGTON, N J.


Hello Cristobal High!


I am awaiting the pub-


location of the 1924 Annual with the greatest of


expectations.


know


it will be the best yet.


Good luck to the staff and the school.


My life


will always be filled with memories of Cristobal


High-the best


PHILADELPHIA


soon-


Believe me, I have Cristobal High School, Miss


Dodds,


you kids,


our school


teams-in


short


Cristobal High School spirit-to thank for a num-


ber of things.


Do you know it's instilled some-


o'er to another place.


At Jackson's Laundry ev'ry day,
Eight hours' hard work do I put in,
So that when I receive my pay,


'Twill not be with that guilt


thing fine in us, something we graduates can never
lose. Sometimes, do you know, the thought of


all back


home


working,


plugging,


wishing


for the best to those of us who have gone on,


y ginem.


My future plans are not quite made,
And tho I chose the auto line,
I really wish I might have staid,
In C. H. S. a longer time.
Quite like the rest, I must pass o'er-
But raise to you three hearty cheers,
And hope your Book of '24
May prove the best of all the years'.
-Gerald D. Bliss


keeps me going when I get discouraged.


is anything I don't like to do, I
basket ball game and phew! The


If there


picture it's a
whistle blows,


I pitch in, and before I know it the game is over-


and there's another


thing I don t


again!
I am sending my best wishes to


BEAN


mind


doing


THE CARIB-


, may it be the best, no I don't mean


but make it be the best ever, make it truly


represent


t what all


classes ahead of you have


Ernst Euphrat, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio, is attending dental


tried to have it do.


LOUISE HENTER.


college.


He is making his home with Doctor and


Mrs. Morris.

Emogene Nash is residing with her parents in


Balboa.


She sends her best regards to her friends


GATUN


, CANAL ZONE.


Kindly carry to the school and faculty my very
best wishes for a successful year, a more successful
play, and a most successful Annual.


and wishes for the success of the 1924 CARIBBEAN.


EDWARD MAY.


rnr-^T"f^ **'^-r^"^^**


%,
%
K
.- ..


U .
: w *"


school on the map.
HENRY MOORE.


So came


GENERAL HOSPITAL.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


II


.vt


A.>


a


' K.s








THE


CARIBBEAN.


Albert,


TEN PRECEPTS OF ENGLISH.


Gladys B. Lowande, '24.

(Based on Professor Palmer's Self-Cultivation in English


I am English thy


language, who brought thee


out o


land of poorly expressed ideas, out of the house of tedium.
I. Thou shalt place no other study before me.
II. Thou shalt not make unto thee any likeness of anything
that is not a tool of effective speech, or that is not
exact in impression, or that is not equivalent to what


thou shalt mean:


thou shalt not bow down thyself


unto limitations in the expression of thoughts, nor


serve such limitations, for I, English, thy


language,


VIII.


family that


English made


is within th


wondro


y gates:


us nouns,


for in all months


exquisite adjectives,


and appropriate adverbs, and all that with them is,
and rested not in any month, wherefore English bless-
eth all months and claimeth them.
V. Honor thy hearer and thy subject, that thy influence
may be great with the power which English, thy lan-
guage, giveth thee.
VI. Thou shalt not kill thy opportunities for advancement


in genera


1 serviceableness and in consequent delight


through a lassitude in thy daily advancement in
English study.
Thou shalt not be slovenly in speech.
Thou shalt not commit the vagrancy of reporting a


am a jealous


language, visiting


the limitations of the


vague am


1 undetermined meaning


or general emo-


fathers upon the children, unto the third and fourth
generations of them that do not properly use me;
and showing loving kindness unto the thousands of


them that love me and keep my


precepts.


III. Thou shalt not take the possession of English, thy
language, in vain, for English will not hold him guilt-
less who taketh such a possession in vain.


IV. Nine months shalt thou
studies; bur all months


language; in


labor, and do all thy other
are labor unto English, thy


all of them thou shalt work, thou,


teacher, thv chum,


ssmates


even


tion and thou shalt not be afraid to send thy words
wherever they may follow best their purpose.
IX. Thou shalt not bear false witness against any word in
thy Webster's Dictionary.
X. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's strange, technical,
or inflated expressions, nor his poverty of expression
through provinciality, nor his personal command of
just a few approved resources of speech, nor his lack


of unity, nor his inability
of many, nor anything th
of thy neighbor.


to construct one thing out
at is the limited possession


Florence







THE


Beyond the Chagres River
Are paths that lead to death,
To the fever's deadly breezes,
To malaria's poisoned breath!


CARIBBEAN.


the wharf, the thing got slammed hard, and it
didn't break, only rang like a gong, with a pecul-
iar quiverming sound."


Hm-m!


the bed.


I'll speak to him.


He approached


The man roused himself.


"Hello, Doc! he said eagerly.


Listen, Doc,


I've made a wonderful discovery, and these fools


won't believe me.


Beyond the tropic foliage
Where the alligator waits,
Are the mansions of the devil-


You'll believe me, won't you,


Doc?"


"Sure!" the doctor returned calmly.
all about it."


"Tell me


His original estates!


"I've discovered a new people, Doc, and opened
up the greatest field for scientific investigation


that the world has ever known.


Me, Doc, me!


Beyond the Chagres River
Are paths forever unknown,


With a spider


neath each pebble,


And a scorpion


neath each stone.


I'm the only one left.


There were five of us, there


were, all fearing neither God nor man, and all after


one thing-gold!


There was 'Chinese' M'Gee, the


wickedest little death-dealing bunch of humanity
I've ever seen-little and consumptive, but sure


-Gilbert.


death


with either hand at anything under two


"I tell you, its true!


I've seen it!


You might


hundred yards. Then there were Big John, a
giant Slav, dumb but strong, and willing to do


think I'm crazy, but it's God's own truth.
swear it on a stack of Bibles a mile high!"


man's voice broke sharply.


sically


and mentally.


I'll


He was a wreck, phy-
e men lowered him


what he


crook
gentle


was told,


wanted


and Sir


for murder,


as a child,


Harry, an


English


but soft-spoken


and myself,


to say nothing


of Philadelphia Charley, the head of the party.


tenderly to the hospital bed.


With an ecstatic


Brains!


was due to him that we


had all


sigh, he sank back, babbling happily.
"Lord, how I've dreamed about it!" he said.
"White sheets, white people, and the clean white
smell of things." He lay back and rested.
Came the doctor from the other side, who had


escaped that time back in the States, when they


almost caught us in New York.


what


killed


Even Chink obeyed him.


and so


we went


across


His brains were


He was chief all right.


Well, we


had to lie low,


the Chagres and down


been summoned hurriedly.


The interne spoke to


trails that no human foot had trod, cutting our


him in a low tone-"Extraordinary case-came
down the Chagres in what appeared to be a glass


way,


streams.


fording


swimming


alligator-infested


It was hard, bitter hard, and sometimes


boat, with no visible means of propulsion.


Seems


we would meet a native who would warn us back-


half out of his head-almost starving when we
picked him up-raving about some queer people
or some queer place he has been in-can't make
him out at all."


"Glass boat, you said?"
I t I


asked the doctor in-


VIalo, muy malo!' but we kept on.


Our compass


was broken, and we didn't know where we were
going, but we kept on-and then Chink got sick.
Poor devil, he was the weakest of the party, and
when we traveled through a swamp for two days,


r..nr^I.nart IIb ,nls' n/t.* 1~~z fA I~~r~rn Ur


O BEYOND THE CHAGRES
Caldwell B. Foos, 'a5. __
p


IIKTJE







THE CARIBBEAN.


for weeks, and we thought it might cheer poor


Chink up, so w
was sorry for C
and rubbed it
Charley gave a
the scared nigg
had gotten Cha


It v
We
it, t
Chi
it a
swit
asked
was
goo(
front
it, C
was
met
and
was
there
We
didr
die
"i
lectE
dow
stro
beca
had
buri
kno


e
hin
on
ye
er'
rle


b
l


broughtt him o
k, and he took
Chink's foreh
11 and grabbed


s hand.
y too, bui


vas shaped from an ing
passed it around, ever
he fever in our blood n
nk's. We passed it to ]
nd crooned to it as if i
:ched those icy eyes o
ed him where he had
scared blue, but he
d magic and that it hi
i a place where there
nly much, much, big
underground, and th;
al that the idol was ma
that the temples had
sure death to go any n
i, and showed us the
tried to make him gi
't know just where it
if he tried to go there;
Chink died that night.
ed to the last, and we
n the delirium. He ha
nger than death itself.
wuse he said I was the


. -
al
ws)


We t
t he s


ot of pi
y hand
nore dea
him, toe
t were
f his on
gotten
said th
ad come
were m
ger, an
at the
de of fo
roofs o


ver. The native
: out a little idol
ead. Just then
Sthe idol out of
thought the heat
craped the idol.
ure gold. Gold!!
eagerly grasping
idly than that in
), and he fondled
a baby; then he
the nigger and
it. The native
e idol was very
., long, long ago
any statues like
d that this city
people used this
r pots and pans,
f it. He said it


earer to it than we were
general direction of it.
ide us, but he said he
was and that he would


sc

c
d
I
or


Ve buried him that nig
service (where he 1
, and though we wer


Swe
Hev
would
a wil
He le
ily fi
ht.
earn
e all


let
was
St
se
11 t
ft
-ie
C
ed
lh


him go.
s calm and col-
ee him fighting
hat was almost
his guns to me,
nd he had ever
harley gave the
it God only
ard men, there


wasn't a dry eye in the bunch, and I was crying like
a baby.
"But the gold fever had us fast, and next morn-
ing we set out in search of the city. We made slow
time, hacking and slashing at the thick growth.
Then, for a time, we followed a rock outcrop. For
seven days we followed it, as it seemed to lead in
the direction that we wanted to go, and we traveled
far. We couldn't tell where we were, but we kept
on and on.
"Then came the great day. We left the rock
outcrop where it went below the surface again,
and plunged anew into the jungle. Of a sudden we
came to a small river, perhaps fifty feet wide, and


t arch.


But what struck us st


J
fear was the thing that stood beside
was shaped geometrically in the for
cylinderfora head; a truncated cone.
at the top than at the bottom, for
four long, flexible cylinders, with tri
at their extremities, for arms and legs.
saw us at the same time that we
started for us with a curious sliding
extremely fast. Big John and Harr
for him to get to them, but whip
45's and opened up. Charley and I
slightly as the bullets struck him,
clear, ringing sound with which th
off him into thile water, throwing ui
spray. It sounded like fine china bei
silver, or like glasses clinking to
he was on them. With two terrific
prisms on the ends ofhis upper cylind
their skulls. Then Charley went do
the thing perceptibly slacken his
knew Charley was not killed. The
toward me; then everything went b
"When I came to, I was being lift
boat. That is, it looked like glass. I


te 1
mac
look
look
som
imp
He1
uno
the
out
arci


tor. He was handling m
must have been seven fet
de of, or covered with am
:ed like cream-like lenses
ing into the top of a per
thing within looking
session of a great intelli
put me into the boat wit
conscious, and then he h
sides of the boat in his
into the center of the s


1.


-ft.~ I


e as i
et hig
nor of
es. Ii
.iscop
out a
gence
hCha
imsel
prison
trean


ill with staring
the arch. It
m of a man-a
,slightly wider
a body; and
angular prisms
The creature
saw him, and
gait that was
y did not wait
ped out their
saw him falter
and heard the
Ley ricocheted
p fountains of
ng struck with
gether. Then
: blows of the
ers,he crushed
wn, but I saw
swing, and I
thing swung
lack.
ed into a glass
Looked at my
were a feather.
H^e was either


a substance that
t reminded me of
e-that feeling of
t you. I got an
and an alert will.
rley, who wasstill
f got in. Taking
ns, he impelled it
Sand toward the


\


Dipping with the river, we shot down into


darkness.
"It was pitch dark at first, and we
the creature glowing phosphorescent


)om..
iveled
shing
: were
and d
back
hwly.
stare


The bc
at frigh
around
standing
ownwar
by sheet
We did i
d struck


)at, if left to itself, 1
tful speed, because the
the stern and past the
g still and the water ru
d:1. The thing seemed to
r will-power, so that it
not see how this could h
with awe at the thing's


would see
in the


water was
bow, as if
shing past
beholding
descended
happen and
lenses.


a







THE


CARIBBEAN.


white protective covering that was applied to him


like a coat of paint.


He seemed to view the haze


"A small passageway communicated with this
room, and through it he led the way, with us at the


with something very like fear.


Then he looked at


rear.


The corridor opened into what appeared to


us, and we read his thoughts! W e didn t hear them,
we didn't see them, we didn't make them out in


English words, but we
spoken, this idea: 'If
experimented correct


"got"


as plainly as if he had


No. 6780.486 theorized and


ly,


these


unaffected bv the death ravs.


creatures


will be


It is a wonderful


opportunity to prove or disprove his work.'
"Death rays! But we were helpless, held to
the bottom of the boat by some invisible force.


The green light grew brighter.


The creature seem-


ed to be obsessed with the desire to get past it as
quickly as possible. It grew dazzling, blinding, and


be a great audience chamber,


with innumerable


small passageways leading into it as did ours. It
was filling rapidly with creatures like ours, and


more were piling into it every moment.


Every-


thing was done in perfect order.
"Our captor lifted us both to a raised platform


at one end of the hall.


There was one other crea-


ture on the platform, who seemed to act as a sort
of chairman of the meeting, and as soon as we
arrived in sight of the crowd, he began to send
thought waves at tension, just as a speaker raises


we were forced to hide our eves.


Slowly it sub-


his voice to address an assembly.


His discourse, in


sided, and we uncovered our aching eyes. We
were rapidly driving into the darkness again, and


were conscious of our captor's relief.


us minutely,


but without


look through flesh and bone.


slon:


'Evidently unharmed.


moving,


He examined


seeming


We got the impres-
Curious, but I am


unable to receive their mind impressions.


' This at


effect, was this:


'Brother scientists, number 1198.-


658 has returned, as you can see.


He has, by


means of his perfected protection against the green
death rays, penetrated by the River Deathladen
to the outer world, of whose existence we have been
aware, but of which we have known nothing. The
formula for this protection is as yet the secret of


least, was comforting.


We were unharmed, and he


Brother


1198,


but as soon


as he has made it


could not read our thoughts.


"Then


quietly,


smoothly,


we were


scarcely aware of the change, we were turned into


a diversion-a diversion


uphill instead of sharply down.


that evidently


flowed


We followed this


absolutely safe for all, he will make it known.
Brother 1198 will now address the assembly.'
"1 198 gave a brief account of his journey to the
outer world, his discovery of these strange beings
(he referred to us),and the curious ray-hurlers that


for perhaps fifteen minutes-somehow we


could


carried,


that struck


with such


terrific in-


never keep track of time down there;
arrived.


then-we


"It was one great glow-a clear, glorious blue-
exhilarating and yet marvelously restful-the most


tensity


that he was staggered by their impact;


of how the light up above seemed a mixture of all
colors, and contained a large proportion of infra-


red and ultra-violet rays;


of how there seemed to


By its reflection


we could make out the outlines of an immense cave.
It was of tremendous size, with a roof to which one
slender beam of blue light extended, striking out


golden sparks.


The beam was perhaps a half mile


The floor was studded with ten-foot squares,


of a dark red color.


The creature drove us before


him directly to one of the squares, which, as we
approached it, opened before us. Under it was a
platform the size of the square and, on an imperi-
ous motion from the thing, we stood on it. He
stepped on it with us, and it descended under us
like an elevator, until it came to a stop in a large,


be no limit to the roof, that it was so far distant
that the eye was unable to perceive it; of how this
outer world was overrun by immense plants, the
stems of which sometimes approached the height
of a man in width; of how it was lighted by a great
flaming ball hung high up in the roof; and of how,
when he had perfected his ray coating, he intended
to lead a large party to explore further the country
and bring back more specimens of Its inhabitants


for experimentation.


When he was through, a


committee inspected us carefully,


and reported


that I was a splendid physical specimen, but far


below my companion in intelligence;


they were


Et .. 1 1 I


I*' ** *>., 1A i Ut If r Tfltrn


wonderful light I have ever seen.


f~i I







THE


CARIBBEAN.


"This time he took us into a new room, where
there was a queer chair-like contrivance, with three


boats!


You grab aho


of the sides near the stern


and think hard-'Move forward!'


and she moves


polished switches on its arm.


In front of it was a


sweet!


I watched old I-something comining


thing that reminded me of a searchlight, only it
was bigger than the ordinary light, and shining all
over. This room also was white, and bare of all


down, and it'll work the same for anybody! And
as for being tortured when we're caught, why, they


intend to cut us up and torture us anyway t


o see


furnishing except this chair.


I198 seated himself,


how we react!


I'm tellin


you, our best bet is to


and pulled over one of


the shining levers.


stantly he was flooded by a brilliant yellow glow


from the light in front of him.


He basked in it for


cop old Roundy and beat it!


"I grasped his hand.
old kid!' I exclaimed. '


'I'm with you, Charley,
1ell me some more about it!'


a while, then shut it off, and switched on a deep


tust then we were


aware of a strange humming


When he tired of this,


he pressed the third


stop and blue light wavered around him.


Heplayed


that suddenly filled the room. 1i
self from his chair and appeared


[98 roused him-
to listen. He


with it awhile, varying the shades and producing


started over toward us


, and the humming stopped


exquisite colors and


tones;


then switched on a


as suddenly as it had begun.


Picking up Charley


deep marine blue, and sank into a sort of torpor.
As he slipped down in his seat, his arm brushed the


and carrying him under his arm like a sack, he


started out into the passageway.


I tried to follow


yellow 1
resulted.


control,


and a pale,


sickly green


He sat bolt upright with fear and pain,


them,


but the creature hurled


me back


into a


corner, and I lay there-for how long I can not


and switched on the full force of the red.


He lay


tell-until he came back.


He looked over toward


in it for a while, recovering from his narrow escape;
then switched on the light blue and apparently
dozed.


me, and I read his thoughts.


" 'Very


creature


interesting,


evidently


' he was thinking.


had a reasoning intelligence.


"Charley grasped my arm. 'l)D
we're saved!' he whispered tensely.
worked out now!'


ave,


old bo


'I've got it


"I knew Charley, so I wasn't surprised, because


he had brains


enough


to think


out anything.


Too bad he died so quickly.


one next,


and he


vitality than the first.'
"So Charley was right!


in a research


laboratory!


However, we dissect


promises


to have


more


Cut up like a guinea pig
And I was next! I


And his brains were what killed him, as you'll see.


"I have it all fixed


exce


pt how we'll get rid of that


shivered all over with fright.
"I 198 sat down in the light chair, and enveloped


thing.


I had begun to think he was invulnerable,


and there's not a possibility of getting away with


himself with a pur
asleep.


lish glow.


He seemed to be


him watching.


But as soon as we get a good


opportunity-he's not deep enough asleep now to
take a chance-we'll switch the yellow and blue


I could hear Charley's last words ringing in my


ears.
chair.


Now or never! I stealthily crept over to the
I came closer, closer. I could see the levers


lights on him, and he'll croak!


There's something


on the chair arm.


The red and blue controls


were


about green light that gets through their glass suits
and kills the nerves within, and he'll croak sure as


God made little green apples!


part way over, and the yellow control was closed.


I reached over toward them;


an ecstasy of fear.


then jerked back in


1198 had moved!


" 'Yes, and


we'll get tortured


We'll never be able to get out of this plac


to death!
e. Besides


"But he sank back again.


an uneasiness in his sleep or rest.


It was evidently only


Gathering all


how are you certain that green light will kill him?'


" 'I know!


That thing that examined us in the


my courage, I again approached the chair, and with
one motion shoved back the red lever and switched


auditorium was thinking about the physiology of
his own bunch when he was going over me, and I


on the full force of the blue and yellow.


A glaring


green leaped out of the cylinder, and 1198 jumped


got it all!


There is a central nervous system all


up from his seat, and


then fell back, sprawling


cased up in flexible glass that's bullet-proof, jimmy-


awkwardly,


still in that unearthly


green


light.


-r II-- J* J B .IA *- -,J t,> f u ,- - ,-T .>.- - _


P







THE


CARIBBEAN.


and it immediately shot up to the big cave floor.
It was just as I had seen it last, utterly deserted,
with the solitary blue beam extending to the far-


away roof.


I went down to the wharf, wasting


more precious time hunting for it, and took one of


the many boats.


As I put out into midstream, the


blue beam swept over me.


armored men


I looked back;


were pouring from every


s
t


The blue beam was sweeping everywhere.
denlv it focused on my craft. Then I p


square.
Sud-
lunged


into the tunnel, and escaped the searchlight.


"I rushed along


through


that tunnel


speed, because I knew I was being followed.


suddenly it opened


at top
Then


into a chamber with six other


the right entrance.


I greeted the green light with


joy, got through it with many bumps, as it was so
blinding that I could not see, and finally came out
into the outer world.
"I grounded the boat and fell on the ground,


laughing


crying


amazingly good;


hysterically.


it was wonderful to


It looked
see the old


world again with its hot sun overhead, and its


birds and trees and plants.


beautiful.
and Harry.


Even the lizards looked


Then I saw the skeletons of Big John
They were clean and whitened. And


I thought I had been in the underworld only about


twenty-four hours!


How long had I been in there,


anyway? I buried their bones; then took the boat


and followed the river upstream.


It came from a


lake of springs, and I followed another river that
emptied out of it until I got to the sea. I followed
the coast in an easterly direction for three days,
and on the morning of the fourth day I sighted
San Lorenzo. I was weak from hunger;so I put into
the mouth of the Chagres to get something to


Then


these


gentlemen from


the hospital


found me.


That's all, Doc.


You believe me, don't


I'm going to get well, Doc, and show the


world this place.


I will get well.


I will!"


"Sure


you will,"


"Just lie back and


said the doctor soothingly.
get some sleep. That'll help


"Sleep?
night, Do


need it,


God knows.


Well, good-


"Good-night." The doctor turned to the interne:


Coconut palms along the Caribbean.


"Wasn't


there


exploring


party


tunnels running from it.


I groaned,


but there was


National Geographic Society on the boat yester-
day?" he asked.


no time to lose, I chose one near the center and


"Yes,


sir," the


interne


answered.


"They're


plunged into it.


I followed it


for a


while,


at the Washington now.


then it ended at a black wall, with water bubbling
up from below.
"Nothing to do but turn around and come back.
Almost at the entrance to the chamber I stopped


the boat suddenly, and


quarter


darkness of


back in


the tunnel.


the three-


The armored


men were streaming back out of the extreme right-
hand opening, their boats following each other at


regular intervals.
only expressed:


There was one thought cornm-
'If we could only have caught


"Well, let him sleep.


I'll be back in the morning.


I'm going over to see those explorers."
"Then you don't believe he's crazy ?"


asked the


interne in surprise.
"I'll stake any reputation that I may have as
an alienist that the man's absolutely sane, said
the doctor emphatically.


"Well, if you say so, sir,


" replied the interne,


"he must be.'







THE


CARIBBEAN.


ip=to=tbe=1hinute

SHADES OF THE GREAT. a reci


George


Oakes, '24.


Nero


Sramas.


ital with his harp at the opera house to-night.
, being a friend of mine, gave me compli-


Scene.


Ghosts


of Napoleon,


Alexander


Great, Charlemagne, Hannibal, Richard the Lion
Hearted, John Paul Jones, and George Washing-
ton gather in the War Club to discuss the marvel-
ous inventions and improvements of the twentieth


century.


mentary tickets for the crowd.
(Exeunt-Mars and ghosts laughing and joking.)


Curtain.


WHO


They regret not having them in their


time and offer many if's and why's as to what
they could have done.


Alexander


(Stroking


think I died so young!


his beardless


Characters.


chin).


Why if I had had a modern


doctor, I should have lived to conquer the remain-
ing world and other planets.


KNOWS NOAH'S TROUBLES?


Jos6 Arosemena,
Mr. Noah.
Mrs. Noah.


A Salesman.


Place.


Entrance to the Ark.


Time. Afternoon.


Hannibal (Busv shining his helmet).


Yes, and to


Noah.


Two elephants-check; two


sardines-


think I had Rome almost under my power. If
only I could have telegraphed to Carthage to send
more men and supplies, instead of waiting years!
Charlemagne (His strong head weighted with
the iron crown). If I had had motor busses to
carry my soldiers from France to Spain, Roland
and my great army would have never been des-
troyed by the Saracens.
Napoleon (Walking up and down with his right
hand tucked in his military coat). Good gracious!


Charles!


If I had had steam trains to carry my


men and transport supplies, I should never have
lost my grand army in Russia.
Richard (Perspiring in his huge armored suit).


check;


check--
Salesman.


two whales-check;


Afternoon,


two mosquitoes-


Mr. Noah.


you're getting your old tub ready.


see that


I have come


to see if I can interest you in some insect powder-
guaranteed to kill all the bugs around the place.
You'll need it inside the Ark.


Noah. Ti
Salesman.


wo fleas-check;


two iguanas--


Now, this powder will work wonders.


All you have to do is pick up the bug with your
fingers, tickle him in the ribs, and, when he laughs,
throw a pinch of powder down his throat. Five
seconds later he will be dead.


Noah (Impatiently).


Can't you see that I'm


To think I


wasted my time in


the Holy


Land


very busy ?


I have yet to check one thousand nine


while
John.


England
Oh! If


was being


I had


wreck


had a good


i by brother
airplane that


hundred and thirty-seven pairs of animals.
Mrs. Noah.)


(Enter


would have taken me to England in a day instead
of my having to travel for months on my war horse!
John Paul Jones (Deciding to say something


Noah.


Noah, come inside.


Quick


cats are chasing the rats, the fox is trying to kill
a chicken, and everything is in an uproar.


about the sea).


Yes I'll admit I was right when I


Noah.


Can't


leave


a fellow


alone


said, "We have not yet begun to fight.


" Look at the


while?


Let the cats eat the rats, and the fox kill


Navy to-day with submarines and huge warships.
George Washington (Straightening the bow on
his white wig). To think I gave my farewell ad-
dress without having a radio audience.


the chickens.
Mrs. Noah.)


Salesman. May


cages ?


I'll get another set of them.


interest


(Exit


you in some


You can put the rats in them, and don't


Napoleon
think if I


n


walking up and


down).


had the method of map making that


have to worry about them any more.


Noah.


Get away!


Let's see.


Where was


they had during the World War, I should never
have lost the Battle of Waterloo and been exiled


Here it is.


check;


Two horses-check;


two monkeys-


two camels--


II I C, ~I--------


O -_1 ..... -


1T- *.L .


[ |







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Noah (Picking up a dinosaur
I'll crack your bean.
(Exit Salesman.)


Beat it, or


(Rudolph
Queen of


Valentino enters, takes a seat near


Sheba


and Cleopatra.


Lady


Astor


nudges Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt.)


Noah.


At last I got rid of this fool.


Now I can


Lady


Astor.


Watch those ancient flappers vamp


continue with my work.
(Enter Mrs. Noah.)
Mrs. Noah. Noah, somebody has called and
said that he won't be able to deliver the sea lions
until day after to-morrow.


Mr. Valentino.


Aren't t


CaUt (Exceedingly shocked. Shows it).
hey terrible? The very idea of their cornm-


ing here like that!
clothes on!


Why, they have hardly any


Impossible!


off to-morrow.


The great flood will come


I can't wait any longer.


and send him a radio message.-(Exeunt.)

AS IT NEVER WAS.


Chester L.


Characters:


Cleopatra (Whispering in Queen ofSheba's ear).
Isn't he perfectly grand. Just look at his hair.
Smoother and more glossy than Tony ever had his!
Queen of Sheba (Rolling eyes and straightening


hair). He sure is some sheik.
ing on him.


Nero (To Caesar, pointing to


Solomon had noth-


Valentino).


Queen of Sheba.
Cleopatra.
Lady Astor.
Mrs. Carrie C. Catt.
Nero.
Gabriel.
Place. Indianapolis Speed


Time.


July afternoon in 1924.


(The curtain rises


Indianapol
crowded.


is.


disclosing the speedway at


The grandstand and bleachers are


Everywhere are seen bright colors and


the reflection of the sun on the bright helmets and
shields of ancient gladiators and on the armor of
knights. Straw hats bob here and there among


the flowing robes of


the Greeks


and Romans.


Along the side of the speedway are lined automo-
biles, surreys, victorias, buckboards, and chariots.
Robin Hood and his men have tied their horses
beside those of Bill Hart and his broncho busters.)
The Gracchi (Going about the grandstand). Ice
cold Coca Cola.
Doctor Cook (Following the Gracchi wherever
they go). Eskimo Pies. Fresh from the pole.
Nero (Strumming on his violin). Won't they ever
begin? Therewas neversuchdelayduringmyreign.
(The entrants for the feature race of the day are


lining up.


Number one, near the post, is Ben Hur


in a red, white, and blue chariot on whose wheels
are Goodrich balloon tires and which is drawn by


Man-o'-War, Morvich, and Zev.


.1p.. t


Number two is


* T I


The Gracchi.
Smith Brothers.
Saint Peter.
Shylock.
Doctor Cook.


Gods!


Such a poor excuse for a man!


A regular


woman!
(By this time the race is growing exciting.)
Queen of Sheba (Jumps up. Waves fan). Look
at Ben Hur! Gee. He almost lost a tire when he


passed De Palma that time.


(Places hand on Rudolph's arm, but


seeing Queen of Sheba doing same, quickly with-
draws it). Go on woman. What's the matter with


your eyes?


He didn't pass De Palma; De Palma


passed him.
Rudolph (Tapping Queen of Sheba's arm). Par-
don me, madam, but do you see Paddock anywhere?
Queen of Sheba (Pretending scarcely to notice
Valentino). Of course not. What chance has he
against Ben Hur?
(By this time the crowd has shouted until they


are hoarse.
drops). H


Enter Smit
ere you are!


your sore throats!


h Brothers with cough
Just what you need for


(They proceed to distribute


cough drops.)
(The race is almost over, De Palma leading,
with Revere a close second and Ben Hur far be-


hind.


De Palma at a hundred yards from finish,


runs car through fence.


Paddock, who has been


riding on the rear of Palma's car, jumps off and
wins the race by running the remaining one hun-
dred yards in 9 315 seconds.)
(The crowd then leaves for the Colosseum where
Tarzan of the Apes and Robin Hood are putting
on a trapeze performance.)


Noah.


Cleopatra







THE


CARIBBEAN. ,,


4.


E-
* / n

Ja^ pfI
[ d'


M 4


l .- . --
, ?..


'dri


.- *"'. l,


jV
A


:x *







THE


CARIBBEAN.


EDUCATION BY TRAVEL.


GENERAL.


Chester Pike, 24.


The morning of Saturday


bright and sunny.


absent.
the econ
jaunt to
Upon
out-part
seats as


Fickle old Ji


Evidently he did not c
comics class of Cristobal
the various institutions
boarding the train we
y sitting in small groups


near them


comfortable for the


March


dawned


upiter Pluvius was
are to accompany
High School on its
on the Pacific side.
found the rest of
. We tookvacant


as possible, and made ourselves
e hour's ride to Gamboa.


The view which flew past t
freshing. The dark, dense ju
native huts, and the artificial
were all basking in the rays o
sun. Everything seemed to
peace with the world. Before
the train stopped In front of


he win
ngles,
beauty
fthe e
be at
we wer
a low,


dows was re-
the thatched
of the Canal
arly morning
ease and at
e aware of it,
flat building


with a large yard surrounded by a high wire fence
over whose gate was the sign,

CANAL ZONE PENITENTIARY.

Contrary to all expectations, Gamboa Peniten-


tiary is not a large place.
houses about eighty-seven
The building is a long, 1
well ventilated and lighted
space surrounding it. Insi


At the present time it
prisoners.
ow, wooden structure,
, with a large enclosed
ie, the floors are of ce-


ment, and to clean them all that needs to be done
is to attach a hose to a faucet and let the water
run through.
There are sixteen cells, two of which accommo-
date nine prisoners each, all the others, six. In
each cell are shelves for the prisoners' personal


belongings.
ventilated fr
iron rings to


ing him
other dis
position
tit'i i


to
con
mor
*


There are also two punis
om above. On the walls
which the prisoner is man
stand up. However, he
fort, for he can not be k
e than a certain number
.i. 1....*


iment cells,


of these


are


acled, fore-
suffers no
ept in that
of hours.


was struck by a large gray cat, which was lazily
sunning itself.


It took us a
the prison but
and enjoyable,


Outside we
Studebaker au
kindly placed
party divided,
on the next lap


little over five minutes to inspect
we found the visit both instructive
, thanks to Captain Walston.
-Florence Albert, '24.
found waiting the two fine big
tomobiles, Mr. Hopkins had very
at our disposal for the day. The
half to each car, and we started
of our trip. The curving road was


smooth and inviting, the day exhilarating, and
the scenery inspiring, and the cars glided along
so gently that we feared this part of our excursion
would too soon be over. A few miles from the
penitentiary we passed two gangs of its prisoners
working on the road. There were all types of
criminals here, some even wearing a ball and chain.
At the end of about a half hour's ride we drove
into the yard of the
CANAL ZONE HOME FOR THE INSANE.

I had always thought of insane people as being
of an entirely different world from the world as
I knew it. What impressed me most in looking
over the patients in Corozal, was their human
quality and their close resemblance to other hu-
man beings. Then I wondered if, after all, maybe
there weren't just as many "crazy people outside
the asylum as in it; if maybe it wasn't the location
that made the difference.
The inmates who are violently insane, or likely
at any moment to go off in a tantrum of rage, or


the like, are kept sequestered in cell-like rooms.
They are treated sympathetically, as far as lies
in the power of the nurses, in order to have them


as quiet


On er
tonishedc
of the
morons
{i i


and as
entering t
Sat the
inmates.
and idio
1- A -


pea
he
do


Lceful as p
women's
cility and
Evidently
maintain


possible.
barracks, I was as-
apparent meekness
, there were more
d than radically in-


THE TRIP IN


i







THE


CARIBBEAN.


something


" differed in different individuals.


The building that is used for this ward is a


The sight of a very small child would start one old,
chin-whiskered woman off on a wild search for her


cottage
trees.


surrounded


green


grass


and shade


Although the cottage appears very small


baby.


Usually


the mention or remembrance of


even a very small thing would turn a woman vio-
lently crazy for a moment or two; then she would
be herself until another occurrence.


every


inmate


of the asylum


is crazy.


from the outside, we found that it contains three
large rooms, and a very small one where finished
articles are kept.
The room that we entered first was the largest.
My first impression of it was one of emptiness-


Among others present, traveling about in wheeled
chairs, we noticed two colored men whose both


legs were severed.


Upon inquiry, we learned that


they had both, at one time, been brakemen on


Panama Railroad freight trains;


in a moment of


carelessness in their line of duty, their legs had


been amputated


by the train, and


the Govern-


ment, having no other place to keep its pensioners,


placed them here.


They did not seem to mind the


queerness of their companions, but cheerfully en-
gaged in childish repartee with any or all of them.
Of course, among others, there was the preacher,


which


every


asylum


possesses.


though we did not see him, held our attention be-
cause of his extraordinarily vociferous eloquence.
There was a Chinaman who had quite a garden,
of all kinds of weeds, under the highest of the
barracks.


An old


turbaned native of India


was, in his


mind, a Buddha worshipper. He sat all day, with
arms folded, before a post that supported a wind-
mill made by a carpenter of the kingdom.
A little skinny Panamanian, with a black derby
balanced precariously on his small head, walked,
or rather tiptoed, around the grounds with a slim


finger across his lips,


"Sh, Sh!"


Our guide said


she didn't know what was his reason for being
there but he surely was as amusing a specimen as
any of them.
On the whole, in looking them over, we came to
the conclusion that they weren't what we had ex-
pected to find.
Leaving the grounds, we confided to each other
that we were beginning to doubt everyone. If


those folks were


insane,


what could some


the queer people outside be called?


but this did not last.


henequen


green-bright


seem


of vivid


baskets, gay


to remember the many


there were scores of them.


On the walls were hung


colors-purple,
bags-and I


red,
can't


other things, but


In each of two corners


there was an old-fashioned loom
old-fashioned rag rugs were made.


was a half-finished rug.


where equally
In one there


A nurse told us that they


were able to utilize almost all the old clothes and
linen in this manner.
The next room would delight the heart of any


child.


In it were toys of every kind, size, and


description, and in every


stage of


the making.


There were tiny chairs, tables, pianos, doll houses


-some


miniature


furniture-auto-


mobiles of many colors, boats, house-boats-and


almost every sort of toy.


The place seemed fairly


alive with toys-two side walls were hung with


them as well as the ceiling.


There were about five


long tables and benches in this room where many


of the


inmates


worked


making


these


articles.


The floor here was unbelievably clean-for a work
room-only a few shavings and blocks of wood
being strewn about.
The third room was the one in which the brooms
are made-and very good brooms they are. In
fact, they are sold wholesale to the commissaries,


and supply the housewives of the Isthmus.


They


are made by some colored men who lost both legs
during the construction days, and who are given


employment here by the Government.


was to see here was straw,


All there


brooms, and more


straw.
After I had seen the broom room, I went to the


small room


away.


THE OCCUPATION WARD, COROZAL.


Unfortunately


we arrived


at the


occupation


rooms too late to see the morning workers and too


where the finished articles are put


It is almost impossible to describe it.


was very small, and I seemed hemmed in by the
prettiest of baskets done in contrasting colors,
more bass in brilliant colors and fantastic designs,


33







THE CARIBBEAN.


Then, we assembled in the first room we had


But soon we came in sight of Palo Seco itself.


visited;


here we heaped question after question


It is an island apart from any other.


As there is


on the two nurses who had so kindly explained


things for us as we went along.


They had still


no landing place, the boat stopped about a hun-
dred yards from the beach, and a small rowboat


another surprise for us, and when they unrolled
two beautiful rugs made of soft silk-one in three
shades of brown, and the other in old rose and two
shades of luxurious blue-our ejaculations began
anew that people with sick minds could make
such useful, and at the same time attractive-


really exquisite-articles.


Our respect for


insane was growing.-Ruth Hopkins,


came


out to


meet us.


The womenfolk of


party went over in the first boatload, and left


Guy, Chester and me until the next trip.


We sat


in the launch and yarned away, as has been the
fashion of males from time without measure, and
watched the boat slowly approach the beach. It
finally grounded about five feet from the shore,
and a big black carried the girls ashore, one at a


Again we boarded our trusty Studebakers and
set out, this time to satisfy another part of our
body than our eves and mind, for our next stop


was at the Ancon Restaurant.


When we had ap-


peased our hunger, we held a council to find out


how many were going to Palo


Seco.


Five of the


girls decided that, for various reasons, they would
rather not go to the island, so they stayed in


Panama.


The rest of our party then went to the


piers to get our boat for


time.


"Lucky coon,


" remarked we in unison.


Then the boat came back for us, and we climbed
in and settled down, wondering rather uneasily if


a leper had sat there recently.


As we were rowed


toward the beach, we could see a few buildings and


a sign-"Palo
prohibited."


I


Leper


Colony.


Entrance


I, personally, felt qualms, and be-


gan, far down within me, to have a slight wish
that I had stayed back with the girls who had not


come with us.


No, not quite that bad, but I


began to see their viewpoint.


Still I was deter-


mined to go through with it, and I knew the rest


THE TRIP TO PALO SECO LEPER COLONY.


felt the same way.


The boat grounded and I


Caldwell B.Foos, '5.


made a standing broad


jump onto the


beach,


We got out of the car and walked over to the
end of the pier and, looking down the runway,
saw the police launch that was to take us to Palo


followed by Guy and Chester.
We went up the hill, and halfway up met the
girls and Doctor Tucker, the superintendent of the
colony, just coming out of the dining hall. Miss


It was a trim craft with lines that hinted


at its speed.


Its engine was already running, and


we started as soon as we had piled aboard. We
went out of the pier enclosure, and started across


Dodds introduced us to Doctor


that this
visited,


Tucker, and said


building was the first place


that it looked like an army mess hall


inside, and that it served as an auditorium and


the bay to Palo Seco.


It was about a half-hour's


movie hall besides,


movies being


shown


there


trip and the ride was certainly idyllic-the engine
throbbing regularly, the waves rushing past the
bow with a soft swishing sound, and everything
calm, peaceful and sunbathed, with soft breezes


blowing gently all the while.


Now and then a


long string of heron would fly overhead, perhaps
forty in a group, proceeding in perfect formation.
Near-by the Fortified Islands could be seen, and,


in the distance,


Taboga.


The islands were the


once a week.
THE DISEASE.

After we were introduced to Doctor Tucker, he
kindly consented to show us around the colony.
On leaving his office, we walked up a little flower-
bordered path where we met our first patient, a
well-built black, who stopped and talked quite
cheerfully to the doctor. Had I met him on the


direct antithesis of what a tropical island is usually


street, I


should


noticed


nothing unusual


thought to be.


The tropic island of romance and


in his appearance other than some bumps on his


ballads, and in fact, usually seen, is a low, sandy


face and a queer growth on his nose.


I began to


Seco.


F







THE


CARIBBEAN.


on of these two. The outward mani-
of the nodular type are little brown
nodules, and small scars resembling
by smallpox. Doctor Tucker assured us
afflicted with this type suffer no pain.
ned from this little path into a broad,
alk, which seemed to be the main street
ige. At the end of the street is the hos-
e the patients periodically receive their
of chaulmoolgra oil, the salvation of the
rell as treatment for any minor ailments,
tor Tucker reminded us, they are human


and have their stubbed t
aches, and toothaches, too
In the hospital we found
the mixed type. His face
with little patches of nodi
were distorted, were mini
while his body was draw
was in bed because of an in
no pain from his disease.
As we proceeded, Doctor


that in the nei
become paraly
become hard a
and toes fall
man who had 1
who had return
a slight infect
several joints
still bore a few
of healed woun
off, leaving the
All these pa
I was strongly
fortitude with
The whole c
resort to me.
tentedly reading
mango trees ar
as Doctor Tuck
leper might ha
and be under a


:oes, and


their tummy


a patient afflicted with
and arms were covered


rules; hi
us one


hands, which
r two fingers,


n up awkwardly. He
fected foot, but suffered

Tucker explained to us


rvous type the nerves and muscles
zed and contract, while the nails
nd horny, and often entire fingers
off. To illustrate he showed us a
been cured of the nervous type, but
ned to the colony to be treated for
on. His left hand was twisted and
were missing from his fingers. He
scars, but they had the appearance
ds where the dead skin had dropped
new skin rosy and clean.
tients were very cheerful; in fact
y impressed with the remarkable
which they bear their infirmity.
olony seemed more like a summer
When one sees the patients con-
ig magazines under the picturesque
id watches the faces of all light up
er comes near, one wishes that every
ive such comfortable surroundings
.s wise and sympathetic care.


-Guy Stewart, '25.

I disagree with Guy's statement that it seemed
lilo W ciimmrnr reenrt- ft mtov hnvp tn them hut


Tucker,


to see us walking along behind Doctor


being very, very careful not to touch anything, not
even the door knobs.

THE CURE.


Long
athso
ve th
r .ts
rints


combinati
festations
bumps or
those left
that those
We turn
concrete w
of the villa
pital where
treatment
lepers, as w
for, as Doc


r
h
h
n


t


the voi
looking
but hat
But,
recently
the dis
turned
it has b
in our c


ly) clam
have kni
it for ce
The o


mool
found
of its
the s
plant
it ha
been
those
seeds
the si
butd
tried


g ago in the days of Christ
)me disease, for which the
e Divine. Lepers were rega
and were called "the acc
e was given them; they w
homess and were stoned if
.e city walls, as they often
ade their new homes in the
abandoned tombs on the
temple and the synagogue
The law demanded that
Unclean!" if, perchance, an
According to "Ben Hur"
remulous wail, exceedingly
ce of a spirit vanishing froi
back the while." They we
I no hope except in death.
now! How different it is!
y experimented with an oil
ease. The thoughts of ti
from death to the joy of liv
'arely gone beyond the exp4
country, the Asians (the Bui


their 1


n by
own
ntui


il


egends


of pre-B


eprosy was a


re was no cure


Lrded
ursed
ere d
they
did, tt
wild
hills.
were
they
yone
the c
sorry


as unclean


of
river
can
o get
erne
Th,
fort
cry,
cam
ry w
owf


God."
From
ne too
Food.
ss and
e rites
hidden
"Un-
e near
vas a
ul like


uv
m Paradise and
re afraid to die,

Scientists have
that will check
he afflicted are
ing. Although
erimental stage
rmese, especial-
uddha times to


the value of this oil and to have used


ries.


is obtained from the seeds of the


gra tree, whu
1 principally
origin. As
upply, Haw
action, but,
s grown eig
produced. 1


its name is derived.


nurma, inau
demand is fa
has begun a
he tree bears
years, little <
leaves are ab


of an almond tree; the fr
are extracted and distilled
ze of an apple. The oil
oes not remove the scars;
through life, a constant


dreadful
not fully
flnctn


uit, f
d int


c


r,
r


oU
ro
:o


hecks
those
remir


chaul-
It is


the country
greater than
haulmoolgra
o fruit until
Sno oil has
t the size of
'm which the
oil, is about
the disease,
must be car-
ider of that


affliction that even the joy of living can
wipe out.
r Tickorl whn hn' hoon in chzrlae nf t-ha


such as had this patient, nervous, and mixed,


or a


No ca
their
near t
They
in the
of the
them.
clean!
them.
slow.


t,


T T 1







THE


CARIBBEAN.


hard to get people to take it, and those who were
willing were often unable to do so."
The amount of one dose, which is about one-
half teaspoonful, is now administered by injection.
The Asians probably used this in a primitive way,


both internally and


externally.


The oil


as it


appears to-day has the consistency of sugar and


water, and is of a clear, amber color.


It is received


from the laboratories in small five-inch vials tap-
ering to a point at one end.
Doctor Tucker also told us a story concerning
a land where this tree grows near the water. In
July when the fruit ripens, it falls into the water
below. The fish, eating the fruit, are poisoned.
On this account fishing in this land is not allowed


at this time of the year.


had been twenty-nine patients


He also told us that there


discharged from


lent in a certain leper colony in Japan. Moved by
this story they collected ten dollars and gave it


to the traveler to send to the Orient.


months later,


while


Bishop


Several


Morris was in


States, he received a sum of money from the Jap-
anese, in appreciation of what their brother lepers
had done for them, and knowing of no better use
to which to put the money, he purchased this
book rest and sent it to the chapel at Palo Seco.
On a little shelf beside the altar stood two small
glass candlesticks, their white candles bowed over
by the unscrupulous heat. At one end of the altar
rail was a door which may be said to lead from one
religion to another, as it is the front of the confes-
sional for the priest, when opened so that he may
sit behind it, but becomes a panel on the wall when
pushedbackagainstit for the servicesof other sects.


Palo Seco.
As the price of the oil is very high, the scientists,
fearing that a scarcity might ensue in the Orient,
bought a quantity of seeds from the Mawlaikians


and sent them to California to be grown.


Accord-


ing to reports, the transplanted plants are flour-
ishing.
Although the oil is used to a great extent in


Palo Seco, there are no trees on the island.


How-


ever, there are some young plants in the hospital
grounds at both Ancon and Corozal, and these in
time, it is thought, will supply the demand on the
Isthmus.- Katherine Fischer, '25.


Doctor Tucker then took us to


In one corner stood


a battered


organ,


scratched and paint-worn from the many dustings
it has received, while in the opposite corner stood
a neat stack of hymn books dog-eared and be-


thumbed


by who knows how


many


disfigured


hands.
As we turned to leave, we saw through the open
door the calm blue of the Pacific and the purple
islands, while above all floated a mist of carefree


clouds.


Passing through the bougaminvillea-cov-


ered porch we descended the steps and walked
up the path toward the dispensary.


-William Cousins


When we left the dispensary, Doctor Tucker took


us to his office.


It was a typical doctor's office,


THE CHAPEL.


The little chapel had stepped back out of the
path as if to let us pass, but we decided to enter,
attracted by the twin signs standing at the sides
of the door, announcing to this little world the


following: on the left in English,


nesday,


Catholic;


"Services-Wed-


Monday, Episcopalian,


with a bookcase of books on skin and tropical dis-
seases, a map of Panama on the wall, and the
executive touch showing in the desks, safe, and
filing cabinets. He went to the safe and took out
a box of the money, evolved by himself, and used
in the Colony. It was of aluminum or brass, the
size of American coins, with a round or square hole
in the center, and stamped with the name of the


on the right in Spanish,


"Servicios:


Los lunes;


colony.


According to Doctor Tucker, it serves a


Episcopal; los mibrcoles, Cat61ico Romano. Bien
venida."
On stepping in, we visitors saw several rows of
rude wooden pews and a small white altar upon


double purpose:


First, the money


of the outer


world is not infected with germs of leprosy, and
second, this money can not be used anywhere else


but in the colony.


He gave an interesting side


which


rested


a large


brass


crucifix,


two stiff


- a- t t *- 1 i I II 1


light as to this last. He said that in the old days,
i .1 I l 1 1 1 *







THE


CARIBBEAN.


There he would get gloriously drunk, and when


streets


between


two- and


three-story


buildings


money


as Doctor I
offer a nativ
even slow do
station of n
Doctor T
who were a
with us, an
boat, we sta
the beach a
buildings, an
A general


was all


uck
e a
wn.
ronn
'uck
lso
id a
rtec
t P
dflc
fee


the beach faded
Doctor Tucker
came to Palo Se


suddenly
shells, c(
riedly w
We ha
memory
question
at-docks


1


gone,


himself up.


er smilingly rem
bushel of money
" It was certainly
v as a means rat
er and Doctor
visiting the Coli
after two more t
1. We had a las
'alo Seco-the h
'ating over it all ti
ling of relief cam
from sight-a so
told us that m
co on legitimate
1


become int
)llect a few or


thoi
da
Sth
ngs


arked,
and h
y a go
her th;
and
ony, c
p*


ri
t t
iill
he
ie
)rt
an
b


y inter
beach.


"t T "
"Now,"
"he could


e wo
od de
an ar
Mrs.
ame


uldn't
;mon-
end.
Erb,
back


)s in the row-
ading view of
, the wooden
American flag.
over us all as
of relaxation.
y people who
business would
tested in sea


an


leave


ut going up the hill.
ride back that will linger long in my
Len we docked and, amid the eager
of the stay-at-homes-or rather,stay-


-we left for Chiriqui.-Caldw/el/B.Foos,


We drove past the church with the golden altar
and the historic flat arch, and down the narrow


overflowing


with dusky


up in front of Chirh
to visit the place wa:
to the Plaza France


into th
idly in
small t
guide e
invited
Panam


:ted to the F
d, we retrace
were very c
courtvard.
iall groups a:
ikets which
lained every
s to visit t


an Government is


humanity
Prison.
ing sougi
Ssee the
'nch Can


our
liall
e p
loo


1


al


r steps
lv rece
risonei
ked at
tried t(


ng to us,
new pris


Our cars drew
while permission
we walked over
pressive monu-
diggers. When
to the prison
lived and taken
rs stood about
us. Some had
o sell us. Our
and, as we left,
on (which the


erecting), as


soon as it


is completed.
From here we drove to Las Sabanas. We went
along the beaches, past the bull ring, and around
the new Santo Tomas Hospital-a hospital under
construction on an extremely beautiful spot near
the seashore.
We then returned to town and, after another
brief visit to the restaurant, boarded the train
for home. We were a tired bunch that returned to
the Atlantic side that night, but all agreed that
the day had been well spent.--Chester Pike, 2.


1


THE


CORAL


TREE


SHARK-A


LEGEND.


Morris Marchoskvy, '25.


He had guarded for years and years, as had his
fathers and forefathers, that precious, invaluable
coral tree with its majestic outspread branches.


Now he is dead.
ferocious man-eatinu
but he is gone.
The shark of Moi
tives, and to any tou
day at Taboga, Pan
had circulated weirdc
of his size-a great
they had seen,floati
his head formed like
ing teeth, keener th.
ocity shown in the h


might a
"qTL _


attack.
f-_l- _J- j ............


Mayhap some other of those
g sharks will take his place-

rro Isle was known to all na-


rist who had
ama's Palm
tales about
hulk, longer 1
ng lazily on t
a sharp bull


an any razor


stay
Beac
him.
than
:he v
et; o
: an


ed even one
:h. Natives
They told
any cayuco
vaters-; of
f his gleam-
d of his fer-


hurried death of any whom he


1 -' -. -.


swimmer in those parts always wore tucked in
his belt. The guardian of the coral tree had never
forgotten it.
One day the shark discovered someone with a


, gracetu


his hated
1 1 "


, brown body near the tree.


adversary.
C 1


to rob mm or tne cor
which rightly belonged
destroy him for the sacs
commit. There was a
shark turned over, the
ing like a white streak
But where was the bor
if he had not been the
sudden stabbing pain ti
was his Nemesis, for it
1 .. ,1.


It was


He was sure he had come
al tree, the dear heirloom
to him. He must set out to
rilege which he had come to
swish of the waters, the
white of his abdomen show-
below the surface of water.
? He had disappeared as
re. Then the shark felt a
through his back. The bolo
had struck true and deep
1







THE


CARIBBEAN.


jfe


Centers


Canal


Zone


atibity.


THE CONTROL HOUSE OF GATUN LOCKS.


Dorothea Tufts, '26.
See illustration on page 39.


People from every land come to see the Gatun


Locks,


which are the largest in the world.


trol house and witness the process of "locking a
ship through."


A COAST DEFENSE GARRISON.
George Oakes, '24.


rived there, they immediately go to the control
house in which the control and operation of all
lock machinery is centralized, and from which they
can get not only a better view of the Canal but
also a better idea of the control and operation of
the lock machinery.
The lock machinery consistsof: the signal arrows,
one at each end of approach or center wall for


The Atlantic side of the Canal is defended by


various service organizations.


Forts Randolph,


Sherman, and De Lesseps, composing the coast


artillery
Canal.


garrisons,


border the entrance


to the


Forts Davis and Gatun, lying near Gatun


Locks, have garrisons of infantry and field artil-


remaining


posts,


France


Coco Solo, lie near Fort Randolph.


Field


These posts,


signalling to ships; t
which fend ships from


preaching;


the forty


he eight


gat


chain


fenders,


hitting gates when ap-
tes, which separate and


garrisoned with air service and naval troops, can
defend the Canal in the air and on the water.
Situated on the edge of Colon and bordered by


divide the chambers into sections; the fifty-eight
rising stem valves, which control the flow of water
down stream from lake to chamber, from chamber
to chamber, and from chamber to sea; the sixty
cylindrical valves, which control the water across
stream, or from the chamber on one side to the
chamber on the other side.
In the center of the control house is a long
table, or control board on which are slabs of gray


Limon


Isthmus.


lies the smallest


army post on the


FortDeLesseps, the headquarters of the


Coast Defenses of Cristobal has a garrison of one


special duty company and


the Sixteenth


Coast


Artillery Band.
Lying next to the bay is a battery of two six-
inch guns that guard the entrance to the break-


water.


Adjacent to the battery is the post theater


where both soldiers and


townspeople enjoy the


marble representing water in


this table


are the


miniature


the locks.
machines,


Upon
gates,


cool breezes as they watch the entertainment ac-


companies


music by


the orchestra.


Next


chains and arrows, which correspond to the actual
machinery in the locks, and the levers which oper-


come the five sets of officers' quarters surrounded
by tropical palms and flowers, a very pretty sight


ate all said machines.


The most prominent indi-


when


viewed from


the bay.


Near the officers


cators on the control board are the tall thermom-
eter-like towers which indicate the water eleva-


quarters stand large cement barracks.


Here at


one end are the offices of the post, headquarters,


tion throughout the locks.


The chain fenders,


commissary


department,


quartermaster


depart-


gates, and stem valves all have indicators which


ment, and ordnance.


At the other end are the


operate simultaneously


the machines and


show the exact position of each machine at all


company
mess hall.


quarters,


band


quarters, library,


Behind this building and facing Colon


times.


The cylindrical


valves have indicators


are the noncommissioned staff officers' quarters-


which consist of red and green lights and indicate
the opened and closed position of the valves only.
There are various additional indicators showing
the operation of signal arrows, and elevations of
water at the sea end of locks, in the chambers, and


three sets with four apartments in each.


Across


from the entrance to headquarters is a small wood-
en building that houses the hospital and post ex-


change.


The post exchange, known as the can-


teen, is located on the lower floor.


It does much


at the lake end.


All exterior lighting on the locks


business


the soldiers,


who have children's


is controlled from the control house, as are the
range lights for midliny shins through the hreak-


appetites for candy and ice cream.


The rest of


the lnimldln ik elon on hv the hnoniral.


THere











THE


CARIBBEAN.


S. m
4* .M


I'..,.'


..* x/


.3'.; -

^-^:*



.a^ '* -A'-jt*- & _


~4W-


r


m1







-5

-






-i















--.






.. . -


i 0tic











ES.






Ci >



*'*
4



. 4
mmm: .


~. g- r,


i* ;'


---


* rt; < *
. 4A


. .q r


..-







THE


CARIBBEAN.


THROUGH THE CANAL.
Irene McCourt, '24.
A ship coming from New York and bound for


San Francisco through the


the Canal
a pilot and


n Limon Bay, w
several colored


time the pilot gets aboa
the handling of the ship
must assist him in ever
under its own power, the
where the locks are seen
steps, leading to Gatun
As the ship nears the A
waits, if other ships occupy
the ship may advance a
arrow at the entrance has
This arrow is moved by
trol house to designate w


into the east or t
Cables from tl
let out by one
codils from the
mules). Colored
a hand line, whici
ship by other cole
which they carry
wall. The cable,
hand line, is fast
opened and the


pilot then signals
the ship moves
Two locomotives
two behind exert
the ship steady w
More mules are t


4-^
te west
hie towi
-hundre


Lrd
Sa
y


Panam
here it
employ
he is
nd the


a Canal enters
takes on board
ees. From the
responsible for
lock operators


way possible.


Then,


.
ship proceeds to Gatun,
rising like great concrete
Lake.
ktlantic approach wall, it
)y the chambers. If not,
.s soon as the large red
been placed in position.
the operator min the con-
ihether the ship is to go
chamber.
ig locomotives are now
d-eighty-foot-per-minute


locomotives (corn
employees in a sm
h is let down from
red employees, to
With them from
, drawn aboard th
ned to iron bits.
guard chain is d
to the locomotive
)n, towed by foui
are fastened ahea
ing back pull, in


imonly
all boat


called
fasten


the bow of
the cable ri
the appro
e ship by
The gates
dropped.
operators
r locomoti
d pulling,
order to k


ves.
and
eep


while it moves through the locks.
ised in some cases according to


the size of the ship being towed. They tow at the
rate of two miles an hour.
These towing locomotives weight forty-five
tons, are thirty feet long, and have two 75-horse-
power, 220-volt motors. There is a cabin on each
end so that the operators can run them towing and
returning without the mules' being completely
turned around.
The ship makes its ascent in three levels, each
lifting it twenty-eight and one-third feet-the
total being eighty-five feet, representing the dif-
ference between sea level and the lake level.
a a i i i s Y _1 r. ... I . ..


next chamber. Thus, when the gates open from
the third chamber, the ship is at the lake level,
eighty-five feet above the sea-level channel. Here
the plan of the locks can be seen best. The Atlan-


tic entrance, the locks, the lake,
the famed golf course, and the


(Lock City), a
The cables a
and the ship
it proceeds up
vide (the Gaill
Miguel locks,
begins. The 1
single flight or
of thirty feet f


is accomplished.


and the
town


11 lie before the eye of the
ire then taken in by the r
starts on its own power.
the channel, through the


Channel,
of Gatrn
tourist.
apid coils
Thence
great di-


ard Cut), until it reaches the Pedro
where the descent into the Pacific
ocks at Pedro Miguel consist of a
step of twin locks, by which a drop
rom Culebra Cut to Miraflores Lake


From the Miraflores Lake the


ship passes into the Miraflores locks. Here there
are two steps of twin locks, each step representing
a lowering of twenty-seven and one-half feet, a
total drop of fifty-five feet.
Now the ship is in the sea-level channel, with
Ancon Hill ahead in the distance. She turns a
bend in the channel and steams into Panama Bay,
ready, after dropping the pilot, to glide into the
Pacific.

ABOUT THE CANAL.
See illustration on page 39.

On board S. S. Subjunctiva,
Gatun Lake,
Transiting the Panama Canal.
Dear Evelyn:
At last I have the desired information for you.
I was fortunate enough to find the captain in a
talkative mood last night and, taking advantage
of this unusual state, plied him with questions as
to the material advantage of transiting the Canal
rather than circling the Horn.
If we had used the route around Cape Horn, it
would have been necessary to travel ten thousand
five hundred miles from Cristobal on the Atlantic
side, to reach Balboa on the Pacific side. By using
the Canal we are reducing that distance to forty-
four miles, and shall make the trip in less than ten
hours.
The cost of operating the ship is approximately
four hundred and forty dollars per day. If he
I- --I .- -1 j.1 ^r -.11 *>- -rt 4- iif-M~ 1/1 h *"1i-t a*/'>4 h yS


'*
3
i


d
8







THE CARIBBEAN.


As well as I can remember, you especially wanted


the lower chamber from the


, the gates and


to know how the water is opt
during the lockage of a ship. I
this process to you, but the cc
staggers my nontechnical min
I was playing cards below
we had reached the locks un
the porthole and beheld tower
Throwing down my hand, I
followed by the rest of the pla
I found out that we were in
which is one thousand feet lon
ten feet wide, with a depth of
I asked the captain for perm
and look over this wonderful p
A gang plank was pulled aboard
FortunatelyI metoneoftheem
and explained to me the opera


1
We went be
tically the fu
cated the ma
chain, gates,


tunnel is num
ber in the con
The guard c
weighs about
that this chai
pressure and
gates. In ca
tected by a
three hundred
the chain to
is lowered, it


low into the


tun


11 length of the
Lchinery which
valves, etc. E
bered and has a
trol house from
chain,which I ha
ninety pounds t
n is lowered and
is used for th
se a ship hits t
small valve wl
d pounds per sq
3ay out gradually


rated in the


locks


shall try to explain
)mplexity of it still
d.
and didn't realize
til I looked out of
*ing concrete walls.
rushed up on deck
tyers.
the lower chamber,
g, one hundred and
seventy-eight feet.
mission to go ashore


iece or01
Sand I


plo
Ltio


nel
loc
ope
ach
corn
whi


ve men
o the li
Raised
e prot
his cha
which w
uare in
v. Wh


into a recess in the


tomrn of the locks.
The next machine
of the gates. There
halves of these gates
long, seventy-eight fee
each weighing three h
bottoms of these gati
ments which give the
are opened and close
connected to the gate
tunnel, which is gear
driven by an electric
Next was the opei
handled by gravity.
a fresh-water lake wh


was one which


* engineering.
went ashore.
s whoshowed
f the locks.
ch runs prac-
Here is lo-
es the guard
chine in the
)onding num-
t is operated.
tioned above,
nk. I learned
by hydraulic
action of the
in, it is pro-
ill release at
ch, and allow
ien this chain
sides and bot-


h operates one


are twenty sets or forty
, each being sixty-five feet


thigh, eight feet t
hundred and fifty t
es have air-tight
m a buoyancy.
d by a strut-arm
and to the bull wh


ed
mo
rat
It
ich


hick,
ons.
com]
Fhe
whi
eel it


half-way around a
'tor.
ion of the water.
comes from Gatun
i is eighty-five feet


mnd is


It is
Lake,
above


valves at the lower end
The valves at the lower
are opened, allowing t


level
wate
mid
The
the
The
this
Al
pass
to tl
there
each


to pass into the
r in the lower char
dle chamber lower;
valves are closed,
ship then passes
gates are closed an
chamber as in the
after the ship is r
es into the upper
he level of the lake
e and a half milli
lockage. After tU


the upper
mixed with
As soon
chamber, a
get back o:
We are n
expect to
noon. Fro
continue o


level
isal
as t
Sga
nto
low
arri
m t
urj


as we arrive
ready to mail
trip.


of this chamber are closed.
end of the middle chamber
he water from the middle
lower chamber. As the
nber rises, the water in the
s until they are equalized.
the gates are opened, and
into the middle chamber.
id the valves are opened in
lower chamber.
aised in this chamber, it
chamber, where it is raised
It takes approximately
on cubic feet of water for
xe fresh water passes from


into the middle


evel, it becomes


t water


I,
h


ship had been raised in the upper


ng plank was put aboard for me to
the ship.
steaming along on Gatun Lake, and
ve at Balboa sometime this after-
here we go out to sea, and then shall
ourney to San Francisco. As soon
there, I shall have another letter
to you, telling about the rest of the
Sincerely ours,


DELILAH.

CRISTOBAL COALING STATION.
Mildred Morgan, '25.
Cristobal Coaling Plant is located on Mindi
Island, west of Cristobal-Colon, and separated
from the American vicinity by the old French
Canal. Mindi Island runs south of Cristobal to


the inter-section of the
new American Canal.
The construction wo
gan about 1914, and
first step was to sink
north end of Mindi Isl
ing a pier fronting on
the north, east, and w
construction work was
tractors was begun in
unloading and deliverii
its entirety cost about


old French Canal and the

rk on the coaling plant be-
was finished in 1916. The


the large
and, prep;
the watei
est sides.
finished, 1
erecting tl


ng purpose,
three milli


caissons
aratory to
C 1


s or the
After ti
he work
e machi
s. The
on dolla


D
b
he
;o


rs. The


41


s


1


r


I






THE


CARIBBEAN,


line, the carriage being operated on a boom with


bridge are also movable, there being one hopper


track.


When the collier comes to the plant for


for each reclaiming bucket.


These bridges are


unloading, these booms are lowered down to the


built on trucks and run on tracks, in a north and


ship after it is tied up.


All the unloading towers


are operated by steam, and are the only part of the
plant that is not operated by electricity. Each


one of the unloading towers


has an


unloading


capacity of two hundred and fifty tons per hour


when


the digging is not interrupted.


It takes


from twenty to thirty hours to unload a twelve
thousand-ton collier, depending upon other work
being done at the plant at the same time. The


last part of unloading a


collier


is considerably


south direction on the plant.
a capacity of five hundred


These buckets have
tons per hour each.


A track runs through each bridge and connects
with either side of the elevated railroad by means
of a sliding switch, the latter being so constructed
that it fits over the track on the elevated railroad
and slides along said track when the bridge is set.
In addition to the main plant machinery, the
Cristobal plant has a fleet of three barges, equip-


with coal conveyors on elevators,


that are


slowed down on account of getting near the bot-
tom, where there is shoveling work necessary to


bring the coal


toward the center of the hatch.


used for delivering coal to ships away from the
plant, or for delivering coal to vessels at the coaling
plant, when it is necessary to coal such vessels from


These unloading towers are handled by one oper-
ator and one engineer, with a colored crew of six
or seven.
The delivering side of the plant consists of four
reloading towers (operated by electricity), that
have a capacity of five hundred to one thousand


both sides at the same time.


This is done by using


a reloading tower from the dock side and a con-


veyor barge from the opposite side.


are equipped with


generator sets,


These barges
operated by


steam, for making electricity with which to run


the motors in each conveyor.


These conveyors


tons per hour, depending upon
which a ship can receive coal. TI


the speed with
these reloaders are


independent of each other, and also constructed
so that they can be moved along the reloading
dock along similar lines to those of the unloading
towers. Each of these is operated by one operator


and a crew of three or four negroes.


The reload-


ing towers are located on the west side of the plant.
There is also a reloading machine at the north end


of the plant, commonly referred to as the


bunker.


"wharf


" This machine is stationary, and is pro-


are constructed along the lines of the old-fashioned
cistern pump, with cups or small buckets on a re-
volving chain. The conveyors are from forty to
fifty-five feet high. The coal is fed to them from
the bottom of the barge and carried up to the top
by this chain of buckets, and from there emptied
into large, round, telescoping shoots that are con-
nected to the coaling holes or openings in the ship
being coaled.
The coaling plant was built for supplying with
bunker coal, commercial vessels calling at the


vided


two conveyor


booms operating


Isthmus or transiting the Canal;


for supplying


swinging circles that have a radius of forty feet
each. This machine is capable of delivering a
little more than one of the reloading towers, and
requires an operator for each of two conveyor-
booms if they are operated simultaneously, with
a colored crew of the same number for each oper-
ator as is needed for reloading towers.
The elevated railroad, commonly called the via-


the Panama Canal, Panama Railroad, Army and
Navy, and individuals on the Isthmus with coal;
for providing the Navy Department with a coal-


ing station for all Navy vessels.


The storage pile


of this plant is divided into two areas, one a wet
storage basin for storing coal under water for the
Navy, for an indefinite time as a reserve supply;
and a dry storage area for commercial and other


duct, is


located between the unloading and re-


purposes.


The wet storage area occupies about


loading sides of the plant, and serves both of them.
Across the plant and connecting with east and
west sides of it, are built two large bridges. On
each of these bridges are two five-ton capacity re-
claiming buckets, which are used for digging coal


one-third of the storage basin, and the dry about
two-thirds.
The Cristobal plant is reputed to be the most
efficient coaling station in the world, and is thor-
oughly modern in every respect. Unloading or


- .. -*


. 1


.I






THE


CARIBBEAN.


the best records made was the delivery


of one


"Well, I like that, Florence Albert,


" all chimed


thousand and two tons of bunker coal in an hour


in at once.


and ten minutes.


"WVell, wait a minute.


I haven't finished.


"RALPHO,


"Let's see who can tell the biggest lie,"
Ruth, for the want of better inspiration.


"All right,"
You start."


chorused


THOU


DOST


PREVARICATE."


proposed


Let s.


There were four of us, of whom Ruth, eleven or


twelve, was the oldest.


and, tired and hot, had sat down to rest.


to do something, so suggestions as to what to play


We had


if you're nice to me, I'll take you up there and


make him do his tricks for you.


Anyway, now


that I've got him up there, I'm not afraid to walk
through the dark arches because if anyone's there,
he'll tear him all to pieces. And when I go away,
I'm going to take him with me, so that you kids
can go in the dark arches without me."
This was too much!
"Florence Albert, I'll not speak to you again.
My mamma doesn't allow me to associate with
liars," declared Ruth, virtuously, jumping up and
starting to leave.


were called for.


Telling stories, playing colors,


Me, neither,


" echoed Martha.


"And you know


playing house, were suggested-and rejected scorn-
fully. Then came Ruth's idea-something en-
tirely new!


"Well"


she started,


"I was onil one of my uncle's


that you haven't got a bear up there because the
boys are up there, and you are afraid because I
wanted you to go up and you wouldn't go."
"Well, I'm going with Martha and Ruth be-


farms last year during vacation.


He has an awful


cause I


don't like vou anyway,


" declared Elsie,


lot of farms


We listened


different.


twelve or maybe fifteen!"


wide eved.


was something


We fairly hung on her words.


and all three stalked off the porch in righteous
indignation, leaving me to wonder at the perver-
sity of human beings.


"He has lots of grape arbors, too, and let me eat


all the grapes I wanted to.


I used to eat them all


FROM THE INTERIOR.


the time and he just used to laugh because I ate


Dorothy Abendroth, 24.


so many, and he never said a word!
to bust myself."


Just told me


It was on the Randolph road that I first saw him.
He was a shiny, ebony-colored man of absolute-


0-oh, just imagine having somebody around
who didn't keep telling you not to eat between


meals, because if you


, you


would


t eat any


supper and would maybe get sick!
"So one day when I was eating some, I ate a


On his round head re-


posed a monstrosity in the shape of a hat. Be-
neath the tattered brim, peered forth the blackest
and most innocent-looking eyes ever seen, except


What must have been rather full lips,


big spider. I s
She stopped.


aw it and ate it!"


finely


We looked at each other rather


chiseled,


shock of kinky


were


hair which


reached


hidden
down


over


dismayed.


Then


Martha,


Ruth's sister, spoke


where his necktie should have been.


A ragged,


up and said


decidedly,


"That's not true, Ruth


McCombs, and you know it. I'm going straight
home and tell mamma you were telling fibs."
"Aw,Martha,youknow I said we'd see who could


tell the biggest lie. Don
"I'm not a tattletale.


t be such a tattle-tale."
I'm going home and


tell mamma you called me a name.


"Wait,


Martha,


interposed,


hastily,


sleeveless shirt covered his back (literally speak-
ing; for there was no front in the thing). A filthy
pair of trousers, which, I feel sure, must have once
been white, fitted rather snugly and terminated
lust below the knees.
With head held high and shoulders well back,
he walked briskly along swinging a pair of sinewy
arms in time to a tune whistled beneath his breath.


tell my lie now, and then Elsie and you.


Don't


pulled


my camera.


"Say, John,


break up the game.
I began, "You know I have a bear up in the


about a picture?"


answer came in


an unexpected


manner


dark arch.


He follows me everywhere I 0o. but


He nicked up a pair of perfectly proportioned feet.


43


-Butler.


Florence Albert


the rest of us.


We had been playing tag


y perfect proportions.


in a cow.


completely







THE CARIBBEAN.


SYMPATHETIC SKETCHES OF


Situated on a high bluff overlooking the Atlan-
tic Ocean stands the historic fort, San Lorenzo.


NEAR-BY SCENES.


There the sea seems to merge with the white
sky, broken here and there by patches of blue.


Once
grand
jungle.


the stronghold


of Spanish


gallants,


old fort now shelters the beasts


-Florence Albert, 24.


of the


Where the haughty Spaniard once trod


It is a hot sultry afternoon.


Everything seems


now prowl the cat, tapir, and wild hog, making


exhausted-even


the Caribbean,


that ocean


their homes in the crumbling walls.


Where once


ever-changing


moods.


seems-


the iron cannon rested, now roost the wild parrots
and turkeys, rousing the jungle with their strange


motionless, save for a few ripples which, touched
by the idle breeze, wash lazily upon the aged,dull-


cries.


This fort that defied all until captured by


brown coral reef.


Farther out the breakwater


the swarthy pirate Morgan, now lies in a state of


decay


tropical


growth


hiding it from the world.


slowly


but surely


Thus the strange battle


stretches on aimlessly.


the sky and water, a yellowish
let the horizon unite them. Thi,


The sun seems obscure;


drab, seemingly
s scene of monot-


of the centuries goes on, with Nature always sure
of the conquest.-George Oakes, '24.


It was a typical balmy day of dry season. The
sea lay stretched out like a length of shiny satin


ribbon-the


of melted


sapphires.


Blue,


blue, blue, it was-that exotic shade of blue that
makes the heart ache. Motionless white craft
formed raised dots on its smooth, soft surface.
The breakwater made a silver border for the rib-
bon, and at the same time formed a definite divid-
ing line between the blue of the sea and the equally
startling blue of the cloudless sky.
Not a sound, not a motion, nothing but the
perfection of Nature manifested in the unmatch-
able blueness of sea and sky.-Dorothy Abendroth, '24.


ony is broken only by a lonely sea gull as it wends
its way over the waters.-Irene McCourt, '24.


The white-capped waves roared in between the
reefs which guarded the once quiet and peaceful


lagoon.


The sky was as dark and menacing as


the threatening sea below.


Clouds scurried across


it, hither and thither, as if seeking refuge from


the coming storm.


The palm trees bent before


the lashing of the wind, which, shrieking like a
banshee, swept through their branches.
The sky grew darker, the waves rose higher and
tumbled faster and faster in between the sentinel


reefs;


a faint mist rose from the spray and cov-


ered the water as if with a veil;


thunder
hush!


were
The sk


heard
y grew


at intervals.


faint rumbles of


Suddenly


more overcast-and


It is a beautiful tropical March afternoon with


the sun shining brilliantly.


The pervading silence


is broken only by the faint noise of the little waves
as they run up on the shore and break on the
smooth, brown stones, which can be seen at irreg-
ular intervals along the beach.
The bay, a clear blue gray, is disturbed only by
the ripples made on its surface by the breeze.
Occasionally, a fish jumps, describes a flashing
silver arc as he goes through the air, and is gone.
In the distance the breakwater shows silver,


storm broke.


Rain, falling in seemingly never-
4-


ending torrents, hid the land from view.
-Florence Albert, '24.

The sun, a gorgeous fire ball of the melted,
tinted hues of a rainbow, is setting o'er the tran-


quil waters of Colon Harbor.


An almost indis-


tinct gray smudge of smoke just appearing on the
horizon foretells the approach of a steamer. A
tiny sailboat flaunting its glistening white sail
before an impish sea breeze, slowly glides along


beside the silver breakwater.


Only the faint chug-







THE


CARIBBEAN.


The bay is calm and qu


let save for the lapping


whispered in the gentle breeze, making soft mur-


waves


sailbo;
sky.
orang
with
great,
Spang
water
tant sl


view on
gine gra
Silenc
dropped


ats are
Wonder
e are refl
as many
glowing


i Bann
Sthe fla
draws
its wa1
dually
e once
behind


ol udy streaks a


against the
silhouetted
ful sunset t
ected in the
varied and
opal. The


r are
comes i
earer ar
to the
lies dow
again.
the hor
re left i


n


stars peep out and are ref
peaceful and quiet save
waves against the sea wa


sea wall. A f
against the 1
ints of rose, b


'I
\
i


vater, mak
changing
strains of
rd faintly
m'n. A spec
n aeroplan
i. The hu
ntil the pl


and o
sky.
ed in
the 1;


ing
col
"r


aI


ew
be
lu
it
or


1 lit
acro
in t
corn
n of
ne hl
of f
pale
ew e


Small
autiful
e, and
gleam
s as a
SStar-
ss the
he dis-
es into
its en-
rnds.
ire has
tinted
evening


calm bay-
ing of little


-Edith Co nbourn, '24.


A glorious golden moon shone, shedding on the
water a pathway of subdued light. The palm
fronds, silvered in the moonlight, rustled and


during
the lap
water,
moon, 1
as thost
destruc


noises
ping o
turned
ured ai
e water
tion the


Midnight


, which seemed accompany
f the waves on the beac
golden by the rays of the
nd invited, as enticing in it,
nymphs of old, who drew
Sunwary mariners.-Florence


and everywhere


dotted with twinkli
that touches the
sound is heard exc
washes against th
patches, with phosj
waves passing ove
which shows the b
a mossy coating, v
inhabitant sparkli:
ing the shore, th
jungle night only <


sea.


n
C
e
e
p3
r
ot
/i
n
e


gsta
arib


ment to
h. The
tropical
s beauty
to their
Albert, '2a.;.


the black blanket


irs covers the
bean shore.


pt when an
sand. Th
horescence IT
the reef. 1
ttom of the
th diamond
g from its
murmurous


occas
t watt
iade b
This c
reef c
eyes
shelter


t ocean
"celv a
ripple
ows in
gentle
a light


ered with
some sea
Border-


mystery


emphasizes the stillness of the


eorge Oakes, '24.


A CAPTURE.


Andrew D. Smith, '25.


Richard A. Fisher, '25.


Until recently our acquaintance with the octo-


of this


intense


strain


strength of the octopus


pus w
"Toile
pedia
give V
a few
a spec
is not
Octop
The
As we
for a s
in front


confined to the one in
of the Sea," and to those i
-itannica, but we two now
or Hugo and the Encyclope
Inters since we captured, a
ten of the shallow-water t)


so large


Victor Hugo's
n the Encyclo-
think we can
.dia Britannica
few days ago,
Tpe-even if it


and ferocious as the deep-sea type


method we


used w


as ex


proceeded along the coral ree
andy, stone-and-shell-strewn
- C I I 'N "


t of a sm


such an opening
whether or not th
was occupied w
entrance, one o
We found a sit
proceeded to sec
steel harpoon.
we prodded a:o
fastened a long-
TIt, r o n~n s'^ b ct.i


anl opening. L
.g we would
ie octopus was at
e would see, str
f the tentacles
nation of this
*ure our prize w
After we harpo
und in the bac
handled steel h


ceedingly simple.


f,


st
n


reepi


try
:hoi
etc1
bar
natl
ith
one
k o
ook


toc
me
hed
rTin
ure
a s
d t
f t


we searched
pot directly
g up behind
determine
. If the hole
across the
.g intrusion.
. Then we


ma
-he
he


into
nclnn *- t -


,sharp,
>ctopus,
ole and
s body.


gave
of th
he sq
by th
used
to es(
Afi
we sa
of th
was
ture
was
white
and c
were
were
feeds
color
\We
grout
High
4-- ,-. /~\ '


out, and he released his hold o
e niche. After being taken out
uirted a stream of inky fluid, w
ie natives to be very blinding.
as a smoke screen when the oct'
cape from an enemy.
ter the octopus was placed on th,
xw eight waving arms or tentacles
e sack-like body. Between thi
a web-like formation, which helj
to swim. The under side of t
pink in color, and studded with
suckers. The brain is below t
:lose to the base of the tentacles
black with white oblong irises
of thick, elephant-like hide. 1
on crabs and shellfish. He is ab
to some extent, but generally is a
Caught several that evening, ar
Swe selected two specimens for tl
School laboratory. One large on
-'n *-/^ rbrrni-^ao,, tirbaho 'ann\ r


n the walls
of his hole
which is said
This ink is
opus wishes

e coral reef,


le
ps
he
#



t
h






e
1it
1C
"i;


at the base
Stentacles
Sthe crea-
tentacles
vo rows of
e stomach
The eyes
The lids
he octopus
to change
mold gray.
i from the
e Cristobal
, with ten-
n11l e'lnir~h^l,,


i r







THE


CARIBBEAN.


"Oh there are Voices of the Past,
Links of a broken Chain."


Clarice Steenberg, '26.


One late afternoon I was curled up in a corner
of the sofa in my father's studio, drowsily attempt-
ing to read a romantic tale of life in the early nine-
teenth century. My eyes wandered to a large
portrait of my great-great-grandmother, at eigh-
teen, which hangs in state over the large mahogany


This awoke me with a jolt from my rapturous


contemplation of her.


She was referring to my


latest shingle bob, and I rose to defend it.


"Why


indeed


not!"


answered


"This is the latest shingle bob!


indignantly.


It's considered


quite the snake's eyebrow in my crowd.


Your


desk.


Pretty, sweet, little thing!


I could see the


numerous young gallants she surely must have
had, ready to prostrate themselves at her feet.
In some respects, it must have been wonderful to
live at that time.
A creak of the door roused me from my mental
ramblings; probably one of the girls running over
to ask which dress I would wear to the dance that


night.
on in!"


Without turning my head I called,


"Come


hair is pretty, but it's really fixed awfully old-
fashioned, you know."


"Mine!"'


she exclaimed in consternation.


I am not old-fashioned!


"Why


was considered


most fashionably dressed belle of the town.


still pride myself on


the languishing glances


received from all the young gallants, as I rode
through the streets in my barouche behind my
lovely bays."


"Barouche!


There was no answer, but I heard a seductive


Bays!"


ejaculated,


My dear, they're awfully passee!


"Feature
Come on


little rustle


looked
beheld


as someone


around, and


entered


a gasp of


room.
delight,


the daintiest little figure imaginable!


gazed at her and then at the picture above the


desk.


Yes, it was she!


My great-great-grand-


mother, just as if she had stepped from the frame,
only so much more adorable, for she was alive,
breathing, even smiling at me.
She was arrayed in the daintiest of gowns, in


the style fashionable in her day.


satin


bodice,


SIt had a tight
a wide, flounced


out and I'll show you a real ride in my snappy
little red Hudson speedster. If that darned old
speed cop, that's always laying for me, isn't in
sight, I'll step on 'er and show you some speed,
perhaps up to seventy, with the cut-out at full


blast!


Then, oh boy!


"Speedster!
you mean?" s


Speedcop!


Watch our dust!"


Seventy!


ihe asked bewildered.


What do


"But, child,


I'll go with you as soon as you are dressed."
"Dressed!" I exclaimed. "Well, for crying out


loud!


I am dressed."


hooped skirt, covered with net and creamy old
lace, with tiny pink rosebuds peeping from among


the ruffles.


The neck, cut low enough to show her


lovely shoulders, was softened by a lace fichu fast-


She looked with wide eyes at my orange flannel


coat-dress,


perfectly


straight,


as the mode


quires, fastened on the side with one large orange
buckle; then at my white chiffon stockings, with


ened at her breast with a cameo brcoch.


Tiny


orange clocks, and


the wide


roomy flat


puffed sleeves came just above her elbows, where
they were fastened closely with dainty pink rose-


Egyptian sandals, with crepe rubber soles stick-


ing out all around.


With still greater wonder


buds.


Black lace mitts extended to her dimpled


she looked


at the long dangling earrings


elbows.


Loose, short black curls


peeped


under the frilly blue poke bonnet, which made a
lovely setting for her pretty little face.
She proceeded with little mincing steps to come
toward me, and seated herself demurely beside me


on the sofa.


I was conscious of a faint scent of


reached nearly


to my shoulder, at my


hair with a stiff curl pasted across each


clipped
cheek,


and the bangs that covered my forehead.
With a pitying glance at me and a self-satisfied
smile, she looked down at her dainty dress, and
gentlyv patted the ruffles and pink rosebuds with


-Proctor.







THE


CARIBBEAN.


"You don't mean to say you call that a dress,


do you ?


Why it's just a straight piece of hideous


crossed, and his face aflame with a joyous grin,
as he rocked back and forth on an opal basket


goods, and, child, where are the sleeves?"


He was very


happy, because


had been


" I answered condescendingly,


we don't


paying a lot of attention to him lately, and his


wear much sleeve nowadays, and this piece of
hideous goods happens to be the latest creation
from Giddings!"


throne gleamed


flames.
at me.


with a million


varicolored


I patted him fondly, and he grinned back


"Really?


but tell


don't


ever


Then my


"Wufful Boid,"


the companion of m


dance?"


horseback rides, posted merrily up and down on a


'Dance?
"You do?


Sure!"


I replied.


French


But how do you ever dance in that


narrow skirt


"Easily!


You ought to see mv latest cake-eater


officer's saddle,


flapping


wings


crowing lustily:
"Colon, Gatun, any place at all;
Fort San Lorenzo beats them all.


and me do the double-shuffle or the camel walk.
That boy is some finale-hopper."


You may ride there fast, you may ride there slow;
But whichever way you take, it's a long way to go."


"Why


how interesting, granddaughter, dear.


Next in line came my


"Sping-Wow


," proudly


Is it anything like the minuet?"
"Well, I should hope not!" I said with a superior
toss of my head, as I went over to the phonograph
and looked over the records.
"How would you like to hear'She Wouldn't Do
What I asked Her to, so I Socked Her in the
Jaw?' I asked, picking up the latest favorite.


bearing a shield in the form of a tennis racquet,
with two basket ball shoes sable sub three tennis
balls argent on a field verde, bearing the motto:
Vary your spin, vary your pace,
In every game and set;


Remember,


time


to sock


the ball,


Is when you charge the net!


"What!"


she gasped.


Then, last in line, and sadly tarnished and bat-


Quickly putting on the record


snappy steps of the
around the room.


"Oh, stop!"
.ut off that


camel-wal


she cried.


, I performed the
k" once or twice


"How very immodest!


awful


heathenish dance!


tered from neglect, stood myv


"Brainy Boy," the


god of my school work, resting on a square erected
on a side of an equilateral triangle, bearing the


motto,


Intellego.


" I stood for a while, looking


penitently at him, when a magic sound penetrated


I'll show you a minuet.


She arose from the sofa, and humming a little


tune to herself, she began to dance.


A tiny little


mv consciousness.


I rushed into the gym.


Down


at one end three soldiers were engaging in basket


practice.


One of


them,


with a


welcoming


foot in its strapped slipper, peeped out from under
the ruffled gown, pointed, and then drew in again.
Curtseying, smiling, swaying, bowing, she floated


about the room.


the air.


The faint musk scent pervaded


Her slippers seemed barely to touch the


floor, and her skirts rustled fascinatingly. She
made me think of a gracious fairy, and I closed


my eyes h
the spell.
had vanish


ard


smile, hurled the ball far down the hall to me.
I caught it-two dribbles-and tossed it high in


air.
swished


"Boojum!"
through.


I y
"Atta


elled.
boy,


K-CHK!-
Boojum!" I


applauded.


REST AFTER TOIL


daring to breathe, lest I break


But when I opened my eyes again, she
ed! Nothing remained, but the faint,


haunting scent of musk.


"LUCKS."


From the upper end of Gatun Lake,
The natives, in their cayucos, glide
-
To the Gatun docks, where shippers take
Their wares, and then confide
To them the latest prices
Of animal furs and native rices.


Caldwell


As I


B. Foos


sat and looked lone


somely out over the


The natives then to Colon go,
Where they spend the rest of the day







THE


SAN BLAS AS SEEN BY A SENIOR.


Inza Markham, '24.
See illustration-Page 49,


At daybreak we found ourselves working our


way out into the lower San Blas Bay.


arrived


We had


just at sunset the night before at San


Bias Point where we had paid our respects to the


Panamanian


Governor


of San


He it is


CARIBBEAN.


by a tribe of people who have not accepted civili-
zation and are practically the same as they were


generations ago.


Through this same influence we


were able to win the confidence of the chief who
gave us an authentic story of his people. And
from close contact we were able to get first hand
information as regards daily life, customs in mar-
riage, sickness, and burial, and government.


who issues the clearance papers which must be had


by all ships
Bias waters.


captains who wish to travel in San


His is an unusual domain.


Besides


the mainland territory, San Blas comprises three
hundred islands-only fifty of which are, however,


inhabited.


They reach from


San Blas


Point to


the Colombian border-approximately one hun-


dred and fifty miles.


All morning we traveled


past low coral reefs and small islands covered with


waving palms.


On the mainland rose the


Here we


mountains of the Continental Divide.
At noon we anchored off Nargana.


bade good-bye to Captain Rowe, master of the
good ship Arabia, and embarked in a native cayuco
for the village of Diablo. Arriving there we were
met by many Indians who had already been in-


formed of our coming.


My father and I went


The islands,


covered


dense


coconut


groves, rise only a few feet above the water but
are protected to the windward by a coral reef.
These Indians are small in stature, brown in


color,


with straight, black


shoulders and arms, and large head.


yell-developed
All are good


swimmers-in fact they learn to swim when they
are three years old. The Indians are descendants
from the mountain Indians. We suppose that a
band of Indians came down from the mountains
centuries ago to fish, and were perhaps compelled
to stay on one of the islands over night. Realiz-
ing what a lovely spot this would be in which to
live-as these islands are free from snakes, mos-
quitoes, and all other insects, they have continued
to come out of the mountains to live on the islands.
Their government is one of the most just and


to visit the chief of police who treated us royally
and said he would do all in his power to make our


stay in San Bias a pleasant one.


Our next move


was to Nargana, a few rods from Diablo.


Upon


arriving there we inquired for Jake, a chief and


a friend of ours.


"Jake,


" his brother told us


was


on his plantation to the windward," but he him-


democratic existing.


island


Suppose for instance one


becomes overcrowded


people are compelled to move to another.


of the
When


they are settled on this island, a chief is appointed
by old Chief Coleman who lives to the windward.
Before this new chief can govern this island, a
meeting is called by all the people over whom he


self would take charge of us.


He took a cayuco


and went to the Arabia for our baggage; and in
due time we were members of the family-living
with his wife and children, and his three sisters


is to rule.


Every Indian has the right to the floor,


After an open discussion, if the majority accepts
this chief, all well and good-he serves for life
unless he is removed for cause, which can be done


and their children.


I staved two weeks in San


by calling a meeting and voting him out.


If he


visiting


many


islands,


living


many


is not accepted, they nominate and elect one to


families, and learning the customs of this unique


people whose land had so long


white men.


been closed


They had managed to live to them-


their own liking.


The chief wears no


uniform


or insignia of any kind to denote his rank. He
enjoys no privilege that is not enjoyed by any


^^.n/^. *In/ C *tttn fl t bM Pr-iia ,M nitrny ^ (Zn,,ar,,^I-n~an i nihi


"lip rorolxrsc nn f lsarv


Rnf he 5c


PLACES OF INTEREST IN PANAMA.


^










THE


CARIBBEAN


*--9 'r


ABOVYE- SAN BLAS I ND A.,


FM iti


LEFT- 4 CH.tPCC*'L FILE


- 5A.JGG Lr C


CCPL.


BELOW -


L Co .4 TI DE


MAR ,E


r.- T I v E.


T PAJAMA


Pt 4


*-;


riI


I


*-.. ,r -


ZhAWu
'
HAMMIABHE







o50 THE CARIBBEAN.


under him policemen who serve as messengers.
They wear no uniforms, and carry no club, badge,


When


the girl is


about


thirteen and


the boy


eighteen, if the girl is a good cook and a good


or revolver.


There are no prisons;


in case one


worker, and has plenty


coconuts,


of their unwritten laws is violated, the offender is


biy is a good hunter or fisher, the mothers get


punished
flogged.
singers.


bv


being tied to


a coconut


tree and


The chief also has official musicians and
They, like the police, receive no salary


but are supported by the house from which they
are appointed.
The home of the San Bias Indian is sand-floored,
and bamboo-walled, and has a palm roof sup-


together to arrange for the marriage.


If the par-


ents wish to put on style they have a feast. The
mother of the bride informs the chief, who gives
orders to his police to notify all the people of the


coming event.


The Indians bring food such as


bananas, yams, yucca, and dried fish.


distant island comes the


From some


"Official Taster."


ported
ground.


bv four hard-wood


posts


There is a door at each enm


set into the
d. There are


drink is furnished by the parents, for it is the


most important part of the feast.


It is made by


no partitions of any kind.


The Indians sleep in


boiling the juice of sugar cane and corn together,


hammocks which they weave from the bark of a
tree twisted with cotton to form a thread.
Shoes and stockings are unknown among the


Indians.


The clothing of the men consists of a


then covering it and allowing it to stand.


Each


day the taster tastes it. Then comes the day
when he announces it just right. A group of men
now goes to the house of the boy and takes him


pair of baggy trousers, a shirt which has neither
collar nor cuffs and which always hangs on the
outside (perhaps in order to display better the
fullness which is obtained by several rows of shir-
ring in the back and front), sometimes a gay-color-


to the home of the girl.


hammock,


backs


They are placed in a


to each


other.


After


a while the boy is taken out to a small inclosure


and bathed.


This is repeated four times.


After


the last time they are considered married.


ed necktie, and


always


"The Hat"


sometimes


comes the big feast.


The drink is passed around


made by the women, sometimes a panama, some-
times a derby-but always worn and always sev-


eral sizes too small.


The women working on plan-


in a gourd, the women, children, and men taking


a drink.
drunk;


It takes very little to make the Indian
so he soon becomes like a wild animal,


stations or around the house wear a waist and a


short skirt coming to the knees.


When they are


sometimes even killing his own wife and children.
The Indians lie around until they are sober; and


dressed up, they wear a longer skirt, known as


the performance is repeated.


This lasts for three


smoke


sail,


which


reaches


the ground.


days.


At the end of the feast they bury their


The waists are one-piece and consist of several
layers of bright-colored cloth cut and sewed so as
to form picture writing with the various colors.
The women have their ears pierced and wear large


dead, and the bride's father takes the groom to
the jungle where he compels him to cut so much


hardwood.


The boy


goes to live at the girl'


home-they are never allowed to go and build a


brass earrings.


When a child is about two weeks


home of their own.


In one house in Tigre there


old, its nose is pierced.


Through this hole is run


were one


hundred and


thirty people.


After a


a thread.


Each day a larger thread is put in until


the hole is large enough to admit a ring an eighth


girl is married, she bobs her hair
mains the rest of her life.


and so it re-


of an inch thick.


are bound.


Also from infancy their legs


There are yards and yards of colored


beads wound around their legs and arms.


Every


One night we attended a meeting which was
called because of a dispute over coconuts. The
house in which it was held had, as usual, no floor


few days these are tightened so that the flesh often


grows out over them.


When


wound


correctly


but the sand.
long benches;


Down each side of the room were


at one end, a hammock.


We were


these beads form the same patterns as are on the


the first to arrive and took much interest in those


dress.


There are three of these bindings on both


who attended.


The chief came in dressed in a


legs and arms.


On the head


is worn a bright


pair of dark trousers,


white shirt worn on the


I i. . . C 1 ... .. I ........ .. 1







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Next came six men, three


sat down on the chief
The women, children.
the benches. When a
wearing short blue trn
tie, and brown derby


TI


pipe. He was
He gave the pip
handed it back
turn to each of
all had puffed it
out. The chief:
sat down in his
dience rose and
the chief got u]
down in his ham
talked at once.
hour, when the
went out. The
While visiting
to ask about th
in heaven San I
deer, coconuts-
arrow to kill de4


the ex
e to t
to th
the m
:, he p
now a
hamn
Sspo
p, spo
mock.
This
chief
meetir
one o
eir rel:
Bias-
-no I
er. B


walk around blind,
me the story of N
cleverest and best
were great whirlpo
pass. Several Ind
cayuco and all. T
in the whirlpool int


he had
yes, the


been
Sgrea


gone.


4-o n


of whom


's right and three on his left.
and other Indians occupied
ill were gathered, an Indian,
users, white shirt, red neck-
hat, came in carrying a clay
pert canoe man or runner.
he chief, who took a puff and
.e runner, who handed it in
en around the chief. When
ut it in his mouth and went
rose, spoke a few words, and
lock. An Indian in the au-
ke-then another. At last
ke a few minutes, and lay
Now every one got up-all
went on for nearly a half an
rose, said a few words, and
ng was over.
f the chiefs I took the chance
igion. He said, "All people
no white men-plenty fish,


ndian
'ut in


nothing t
elly, the
of them a
ols over
ians had
hen one c
Shis cayi
then he h


use more than
hell-nothing, Ii
o eat." Then he
San Blas Indian


Aroui
ch no
n swal
Nelly
. For
come


reat-grandfather of


nd Nargana
man could
lowed up-
went down
three days
back. "Oh
e chief had


grave for the spirit in the next world.


guidt
time;
In
with
Robi
askec
of its
were
do n
with
Theyv


e ift
S yes
I91
litt
nson
i the
owr
esta
ot li
then
hayv


I asked our


he spirit drank much. He said, "'Some-
, sometimes no."
0 a Catholic school was established but


le


1;
h
b
k,

e


sUCCt
i Ind
mana
)ut i
hed


e the
but t
a bas


ess. r
ian wh
la Gove
t was ni
with su
schools
he youn
eball di


years


o had
rnmern
ot unt
access.
nor a
ger ge
amono


later Charles


been to the
it to found a
il 1916 that s
The older
nothing con:
neration like
I and never


States,
school
schools
people
nected
them.
tire of


telling of the time they beat the crew of some ship.
There is a dance hall where the young people go
and enjoy themselves. Through the influence and
training of teachers from Panama the Indians are


gradually
leg bands.


being induced to discard their arm and


All too soon came the day when an Indian re-
rned in his cavuco and told us that the Arabia


had I
cayuc
to pa
many
That
and 1


)een
:o to
ck up
Sift
even
lome


sighted to the windward. We took a
the island where our belongings were,
our baggage-already increased by the
s of shows and arrows, dresses and spears.
ling we were on our way toward Colon
, with a real feeling of friendliness for


those we had just


CATIVA.
Ju:an B. Papi, '26.


Cativa


es una pequenia poblacion, muv cercana


seen Nelly


Th
people
mean
ness.
and
hamr
I


en I asked about some carved


e had
t noti
Whe
boil t
aock.


to chase o0
songs are
found little
Afewda
an Indian
drive a peg
mock with
ings. The


told me were their gods.
thing and were used only ir
en an Indian is sick, they
:hem together under th
The odor of these herb
it the little devils. Son
chanted. On the whole,
Sickness among the Indi
ys later we visited the cem
dies, they dig a hole and
. Then the Indian is pu
his bows, arrows, and
hammock is hung to the


sticks which
He said they
Time of sick-
gather herbs
e sick man's


s is sup
ietimes
however
ans.


e
tI
t
ot
i


posed
weird
8r, we


terry. When
at each end
in his ham-
ther belong-
pegs and the


a Colon.


noven
man
chas
pobla
razas,
queno


El pueblito es co
metros cuadrados
mnos trecientas pers
iendas retiradas en l
n. El pueblo estai hI
s cuales trabaian 1l


mo de
. Los
onas, a
[os mon
labitad
aborios


unos
habi
unqu
tes v
o por
amen


ochenta
tantes s
e hay min
fuera de
different
te sus p


montes.


Traen sus produ
grandes trabajos
caminos que les pe
mas faiciles, mas q
en bestias.
Cativa estAi habi
tidas, las cuales
muchas de sus neces


ctos a la cercana cuidad, con
y dificultades, por no tener
rmitan acarrearlos por medios
utie el de traerlos al hombro 6


tado 1
estin
sidade


or personal muy diver-
dispuestas a sacrificar
, para divertirse durante


by the chief.


5I


*


v


l







THE' CARIBBEAN.


guardar en forma de ahorro, algo de dinero para
los muv esperados dias del carnaval.


Esos dias
mas iban cr
Por fin lleg6
fiestas y los
umnieron un gi
do una espec
silenciosas ho
de tambores
mente contain
martes, en el
la despedida


deseados se iban acercando, y
ido los deseos y el entusiasmo.
sibado, el dia de principiar las
rtimientos. Sin tardanza se re-


rupo de los mis ilustrados y, forman
ie de comite, decidieron romper las
iras de la noche con alegres sonido
y sonoras voces de alegrfa. Igual
uaron el domingo y el lunes, pero e
dia de mis divertimiento, el dia di
le la bien acogida fiesta del carnaval


en ese dia las fiestas y
temprano y no se vi
miercoles de ceniza.
Lo mis bonito y ec
artistic sal6n de baile
reunieron un grupo d
cantidad de hojas de p
en forma de trenzas,
una barraca o sea el
tal forma de adorno


ranchos i
bello y a
sal6n de I
como la
Cuando 1:
ioso pic,
a bailar i
con tan g


isados en la 6
tractivo de to
baile que tenia
1 1 1


los bailes principiaron muy
meron a terminar hasta e

:on6mico era el espacioso y


Para arreglar
hombres y co
Imnas, las cuales
las clavaron a
queleto de un;


que h
poca d
do era
una su
I


ondulada de u
questa toc6 su r
pic, boom-boom
hello baile native
compis y elega


orquesta era compuesta
tres tambores y un rayo.
Los tres tambores son
diferentes y dos de ellos,
son tocados por medio d
las manos, mientras el bo
es tocado por medio de d
Tan pronto como toca


presents se entregaron <
miento, demostraron su
saltos y gritos de "Viva
mas se divertia era uno


de c


n
mI


acian rec
e piedra.
el piso d
perficie t
mar tern
elodioso y
salieron 1;
"Tambo:


vahlientes cooperadores del divertimento, y esa
pobre iracunda nube, para no verse humillada,
prefiri6 mejor dejarse llevar por la suave briza
veranera al lejano oaisis.


ESCOVAL.


Dorothy Abendroth,


s Escovalis a native
- high on the bank
1 means of approach
e pier projects sullen
That allows the visit
Proper. If he surv


rewarded by the si
as to remind him ol


1


sal6n


taron una
as tijeron
ededor de
chosa, en
ordar los
Lo mis
el amplio
an a niv6l
pestuoso.
harmon-
as parejas


nto


lo bailan.


uatro


mnstrumentos,


de formas y sonidos muy
o sean los mas pequenios,
e continuosos golpes con


m
0os
rc


X), o sea el rr
palitos.
n los tambo
toda gana
egria, por 14
Tamborito
or el apodo


dor," porque bailaba y brincaba mis
derais.
Principiaron las fiestas de despedida c
una de la tarde, y en medio de la mAs
alegria, se deio ver en el vasto firmam


is grande,


es, los alli
al diverti-
s brincos,
' y el que
de "Avia-


ie los


:omo a la
acalurosa
ento una


Mor
Tl
way,
cart
side
high,
small
kitch
shak


gan was the dri
he main street,
wide enough
to wend its rut
with thatched
, skinny stilts.


l,
e
y


village, picturesquely perched


of Gatun Lake.
is by water, a fl
ly out from the
or to wheeze up
'ives the muddy
ght of a village
f the stories of t
ead of every sma
merely a rutted, x
for a single woi
nbling way, is li
huts balanced nr


Underneath


As the only
imsy wooden
steep incline
to the village
climb, he is
so primitive
ie days when
ll boy.
winding path-
oden-wheeled
ned on either
ecariously on
ach of these


one-room structures, are the stable and the
n, saved from being one room only by a
partition of woven reeds stretched from


side to side.
Here in these twenty-foot squares all the busi-


ness of life is c
ten people live
ently, suffer no
having known
At the farthe
fare stands, or
breeze causes it


arried on. Sometimes as many as
in one of these huts and, appar-
discomforts from congestion, never
other homes.


r end of
rather,
to sway


this monotonous thorough-
trembles-for the slightest
dangerously on its wabbly


legs-the village store. Swinging squeakily on the
rusty nails is a crude red sign to the effect that
"SNOBALS" are for sale therein.
Branching off from the main street, numerous


corduroy


tant
one
they
the
lage.
arriv
One
bake
other


anes,


overgrown with


green grass imaginable, trt
to-nowhere. They start
never get anywhere. And t
abit of everything and ever
They start out bravely,
e. However, the exception
of these winding pathways le
shop. A large wooden build
Side of a shallow box over


most luxur-
erously lead
lustily, but
seems to be
e in the vil-


DUt tney
proves th
ads to the
ng squats
which a


never
e rule.
public
on the
skinny


tan
ciern
ese
dive


cara


ev


e;


,


t
'


[







THE


CARIBBEAN.


huge lumps of dough
board. At the conclu


ing,
and


will
ward
corn
on en
but s
on t
initial
bake
Th
side
some
grim'
and
gath
attirn
tons
ing t
smnoo


they are pulled
delivered to the
the visitor survive
emerge only slig
ed by the sight
in a pilon. This
id in which the co
olid log, held in I
he corn, flatteninr
Il preparation of
d in the bakesh
iere is no sign of a
f- . . 11 l-1 -


01
S(
Ys
ys
wh
ers
ed.
of
he
th


a smI
)rt.


a.1


o
<(


are jammed by a long, flat
vision of the ten-minute bak-
out with a rake-like affair
owner.
es the closeness and heat, he


ly wilted an
Sa native la:
s a hollowed
is spread. 1
th hands, is 1
the kernels.


will
ly po
og st
ten a,
ough
This


the corn for the corn bread
op.
school, unless a scene by the
l-.- i i lJ. - f - 1r


ake woud ndcate a schoo o
und two stout negresses, whose
tied up around lumpy waistlines,


y feet a
of very


Here the


abs


the two women
m on flat roc
stones, until


re
yo
or


bare
young
bedly


of covering,
girls similar
watch the o


n, who wash clothes by
ks and beating them
, besides being credit


daily
y un-
pera-
plac-
with
tablyv


ing these poor, maltreated remnants on the grassy
banks, they leave them to dry in the scorching
sun. These silent watchers have evidently gath-
ered to learn the technicalities of a washer-


w Uiiiua
If th
ent on
he will
sides th
ers a h
bearers
edge w
drop it
from si
The


s business.


1

t



h
h


visitor


he buri
see the
it of a w
eavv mn
wend t
ere they


is fortunate enough to be pres-


al da
lake
ashti
etal
heir
Sgrui


y ofc
being
ib. B
coffin,
silent
ntingl


)ne or
put
learin
, the
wayva
v low


scoval's citizens,
another use be-
an sinewy should-
ack-garbed pall-
wn to the lake's
their burden and


into the muddy lake where it quickly sinks
ght.
beauty of Escoval lies in its vegetation.


Immense trees, mango, guava,
vitae, form a dense fringe aroui
settlement. Beautiful tropical
fully in the front yards; velvety
the slopes of the surrounding h
ical flowers seem to spring up
most unusual places, making


omitting


only the squalor


palm, and l
nd the edge
ferns wave
green grass
ills; languh
magically
the whole


introduced b


ignum-
of the
grace-
covers
d trop-
in the
place,
e hum-


clean


, they are nearly threadbare.


Then, spread-


an element, a vivid scene of natural beauty.


0
e .

NH


CHARCOAL.
Caros Pulgar, '26.


See illustration on page 49.


Early on


e morning, I started for a hike to the


small sticks are arranged, covered up with larger


jungles.
entrance
was going
all fence
Nature.
hundred


g.
d
T
ya


soon came to what
> that particular j
It was like the en
on both sides and
'his tunnel wasn't
rds-and I came qu


I made it my bu


siness


Syou
ungle
trance
on t4
so lot
ickly


to hurry


might call the
into which I
Sto a tunnel--
op by Mother
1g-perhaps a
to the end, for


as I never had


ones, forming a


Th
dirt.
put ii
The r
ing w
a stic


I


is, in turn,
A small tu
n, so as to
material in t


'as
k


mnou
is c
nnel
reac
heh


nd.
)vered with green grass and
is left where the fire can be
h the hollow in the middle.
follow is now ignited by burn-


te, which is pushed through the tunnel on
or wire.


been there before and was afraid of wildcats or
snakes.
Coming to the end I entered a clearing where
a man was burning something that looked to me
to be a wigwam covered with dirt. On inquiry
I found out the following: The wigwam was a
charcoal bin. The bin is more or less in the shape
of a fat cone. Inflammable material, such as chips


The
wood f
late thc
all the
layer is
coal bu
ders it,
soon DU


C


)uter


aver of grass and dirt prevents the


rom burning,
roughly thro
gases without
removed, the
rner collects t
and starts out
it to use. frvin


but allows
ugh the woc
t burning.
mound coll
he charcoal
for town, w
Sfish in the


he hea
d and
When
apses.
in a sa
iere his


circu-
.move
outer
char-
shoul-
luct is


charmcoal braierQ


(


n'


* *


e v


J






THE


LIFE IN


CARIBBEAN.


PANAMA.


AT JUAN FRANCO. Evidently


7os6 Arosemena,


Juan Franco race track is already crowded when


we reach it.


On first view we get the impression


a tiny,


every


battleship, destroyer, and sub-


chaser was to be supplied with mascots.
red monkey was perched on a fat shoulder.
a tall gob was dragging a stubborn goat.


Here a
There
Yonder


wise-looking marmoset was comfortably


of a large mass of humanity, but soon we are able
to distinguish that the crowd is divided into small
groups. What a cosmopolitan crowd is assembled
here!-North American tourists, American Army
officers, native Panamanians, South Americans,
Chinese and Hindu merchants, and a thousand
different shades of West Indians.
What strikingly different persons are seen con-


seated in the calloused hand of a fireman.


Nearby


a red-headed Irish lad was gingerly carrying a
land crab, and grinning at the anticipation of fun


caused by placing it in somebody


s bunk.


That


tall, blond-headed chap with the merry, twinkling
blue eyes must have been a naturalist by inclina-
tion, for he had a stuffed iguana and two cases of
Panaman butterflies.


versing together.


An American Army captain is


Hadn't the Colon


merchants grown


talking in confidential tones with a small black
boy. In a corner three Chinamen are doing their
best to understand what an old Jamaican is tell-
ing them, while near to them a group of tourists
are trying out their high school Spanish on a
patient but bewildered Spaniard.
A tall, fat man is endeavoring to squeeze his
way through the crowd, while in his wake follows
a murmur of protests which he answers with an


occasional


excuse


pardon


me.


selling scarfs, silk, cotton, blue, green, pink, scar-
let, purple, striped, checked, of every shape and
size-and a few extra kinds thrown in for good


measure ?
Valentino,


jewelry!


They served as bandanas, sashes a la


neckties,


and knee


bandages.


Fingers were embellished with King Tut


luck rings, and necks with ivory pendants shaped
like Buddhas, roses, elephants, and hearts.
The fruit venders must have had to replace their
stock, for look at the supply here: Pineapples, soft


wonder on how many feet he has stepped or will
step before the day is ended.
A bit of a man about five feet three with a beard
and moustache in the style of Napoleon III seems
to be greatly excited. He gesticulates wildly and
talks at the rate of sixty miles an hour.
A bell rings and everything else is forgotten in
the mad scramble for seats in the balcony. The
horses come out of the paddock and march to their


position


at the


A hush


prevails


i


stands while the starter gives his directions.


n the
The


and mushy,


coconuts.


beads


bunches


mangoes,


A tall
of
greei


marmol,


msperros,


black negro, his face covered


perspiration,
n bananas.


was lugging
That little s


two


hock-


headed fellow's eyes must have been larger than


his stomach;


he was carrying two sour saps and


four pineapples in one arm, and in the other a


bunch of bananas.


Here came a young fellow,


who had evidently read "Swiss Family Robinson,"
for he had six large, yellowish green breadfruit
clutched in his arms.


riders do some clever bits of jockeying in their
desire to get the start on their rivals, and--
"They're off."


And the sailors!


Tall, lanky, short, fat, clean,


dirty sailors were standing, sitting, lounging, lying
flat, laughing, talking, singing, swearing, and even


sleeping.


A shore patrolman was just dragging a


SHIPWARD BOUND.
Andrem Smith, '25.


struggling sailor to his launch.


Someone must


have seen an interesting fight, for the gob's eyes
were black and swollen shut, and the S. P.'s nose


,







THE


CARIBBEAN.


rum-befuddled
"Feed thepolly,


old chap deliriously


called


and offered hisspongy white fore-


What's he disguised as?


clean shirt.


Guess he donned a


Disguise enough!


finger to the bird.


Excited Mr. Parrot, however,


Boom!


Boom


Native


tom-toms!


mistaking his purpose, took a bite.
The liquor-soused sailor let out a blood-curdling
shriek, followed by an amazingly long stream of
profanity, and then swore to do every thing from


they'd


granted.
be "San


dance


"Viva!


tiago.


the "Tamborita.


Santiago!"


" Now they stai


That's a good-looking pollera.


Mv wish


The MAN
rt. Clap!


must
Clap!


She dances well,


punching
parrot.


the owner in


nose


to killing


A shore patrolman gently lead him to a


to:O.


Swirls around.


No stockings!


Can it be-yes, it is-a man dressed up.


Pretty


launch bearing the name


"Texas.


" Into the boats


good!


Others notice the discrepancy.


Clapping


they piled, some crowding, some lagging, some
quarreling, some singing the classic, "Hail, Hail,
the gang's all here."
The docks were cleared as if some master hand


had been


there and swept them clean of their


gets weaker.


All over.


What a fascinating noise from another corner


of the park.
group of negroe
spring faces.


Sounds like a nutmeg grater. A
s. Black grease paint on their per-
All dressed in short, green trousers


human burden. Dong, dong; ding, ding;
chugg, chugg, fainter, fainter, and fainter still.
motor boats have left "the world to darkness


and black


tuxedos.


Goody!


"Lejos de ti, no soy feliz


romantic.


Splendid


harmony


They're going to
, mi amnor. How


They


to me.


pass around the derby.


That reminds me!


a funnv-looking affair a minute ago.


There he is!


CARNAVAL! !


Dorothy


.Ibendroth,


A fat Chinaman in a swallow-tail coat.


derby, with a hole
on his greasy head.


cut in the crown, upsi
Silly idea!


A black
de down


Mi pollera!
D! Carnival


Mi pollera!
is here!


A clear tropic night!
ful combination!


Reds!


Blues!


Green


Blah!


Blah!


Spacious park!


Yellows!


Wheee!


Wonder-


And a seeth-


ming surging mass of multi-colored humanity. Lots
of fun elbowing mv way through the noisy crowd.


A big, fat negro in a sheik costume.


slippers-silver


sheik


turban.


With silver


Ah, he smiles-in real


fashion-at a skinny Chinese girl


nished gold-cloth ballet dress.


bad-looking Syrian in his native dress.


arm with a bathing-beauty.


Ye gods!


in tar-


Jot such a
Arm-in-
She's an


More
Lindo."
him--


music
My
" and,


from
favorite


the bandstand.


Spanish


piece!


"He said to her


don't they go home to talk scandal?


"Cielito
"I told


Gosh! Why
Guess I'll


move on.
Band disperses to a bar for liquid refreshments.


A sudden hush falls on the crowd.


going to speak.
stuff! Phew! I


"Amigos mios--


The queen's
" More soft


Yet's getting close in this jam.


liam's talcum powder!


other


brand!


More


Lilac, I think it is!


perfume


It surely


feels cold when it strikes the back of your neck!


Too much local color.


Guess I'll trot along.


American. A ghastly looking skeleton approaches.
Muttering to a group dressed as-Is it possible?-
grave robbers. Ghouls! Carrying a miniature


coffi n.


Probably a bottle inside!


PANAMA LOTTERY


OFFICE.


Gladyvs Lowande,


La Paloma!
comes the queen.


fhe band's playing.


Viva!


Viva!


Ah! here


La reina!


Sunday morning!
the Panamanian lotte


The time for the drawing of
:ry is fast approaching. The


linda!


Que lihda!


La reina popular!


What a clever get-up!
red satin, tight-fitting suit.


Tall skinny
With a Ion


man in a


office is packed and the street outside thronged
with a multitude of people, most of whom clasp


one or several


tickets on


this week's


drawing.


hate to die-if that's a devil.


Wow!


That perfume smarts.


000!


My eyes.


Perhaps the three Fates have ordained that some
one of them shall hold the winning number.


r- t I . -U -


*
I


"


b







THE


CARIBBEAN.


that jauntily balance over one eye, striped shirts
that fairly screech, flaming ties, suits of the most
modern cut, and highly polished pointed oxfords;


THE ICE CREAM VENDER.


ChAester Pike,


or white silk hats heavily


laden


kaleido-


scopic wreaths of flowers, gorgeous satin dresses,
and dangerously high French-heeled shoes.
In sharp contrast to this violent array are those
poor creatures who have just returned from work.
Dirty, ragged clothes and all, it makes no differ-
ence, for they shuffle their lazy way through the


crowd,


barely


managing


to keep on


dilapidated shoes.
Scattered here and there, are groups of pictur-


esque
somber


Panamanian


attire,


in Spanish.


characters


up incessant


dressed


conversations


They somehow impress one with the


fact that they are the descendants of old aristo-
cratic Castilian families.
Several San Blas Indians have also been attract-
ed by this wheel of fortune. As is their custom,
they are lined up in a row, one directly behind the
other. How do they manage to keep their bare
brown feet from under the crushing heels of the
populace? How queer they are in their ill-fitting
gingham trousers, loose hanging shirts, and funny
hats that seem to perch upon their huge heads!
If theirs be the luck to win, what an assortment of
gaudy cheap beads and bright dress goods will be
carried back to the families in San Blas!
Then there are sailors, not only a few straggling
American boys in their white middies, but a couple
of old sea dogs from the French battleship that is
at anchor in the harbor.


Eskimo!


Eskimos!!


pies befo yo dies.


dies.
creai


Come get yo


Eat Eskimo pies an


Eskimo
yo' nevah


In such a manner the arrival of the ice


m-


vender is announced.


rumbling of the hand truck on which he wheels


his ice cream barrel.
and run down stairs,


"What yo
Wheneve


I grab our commissary book
, where he greets me with,


need, sah?"


hear him say this word


need"


when he means want, I have a hard time to
keep myself from saying, "I don't 'need' anything,


you old fool, but I


would like


to get some Ice


cream.


I ask him what flavors he has, and he answers


"Cherry, cherry make you merrie,


ilia to-day, sah.


" or "Van-


The best vanilla you evah saw.


It is only after I have made my purchase that
I notice what a peculiar person he is-a short,
jolly, old Jamaican with a light brown hat cover-
ing his short, black, curly hair. He wears a large
white butcher's apron over a faded blue shirt and
a pair of old khaki pants, thus giving himself a
semi-sanitary appearance.
Then, remembering that I am holding the ice
cream, and fearing that it will melt if I stay there


much longer, I go upstairs.


When I reach the


top step, I hear him again, as he continues his


rounds, calling,


"Ice cream.


Eat Eskimo pies and yo


Makes


Dream.


nevah dies."


Look!


Martinique


women each


with a


kerchief on her head and another about her neck,


caught gracefully at the throat.


Their flowing


TROPICAL SNOWBALLS.


skirts are held loosely over their arms in such a
manner as to display very stiffly starched, white
lace underskirts.


On the outskirts of


this jibbering, jabbering,


motley mass is a fringe of late comers who, as
the possession of prayer books would seem to indi-


returned


church


services


where, perhaps, they have offered pious prayers
that they may be favored this Sunday morning.


Hark!


The first whir of


the lottery


cage is


JosJ Arosemena, '24.

Snowballs, frescos, fruits of all kinds,
They'll take all the troubles away from your minds.
I know where they sell all these good things to eat.
In the snowball shop right in Bolivar Street.

Strawberry, Pineapple, Lemon, and Peach!


My favorite flavors!


I'11 take one of each.


Orange, Banana, Cherry, and Lime,
Which one shall I take? All I have is a dime!


heard.


A sudden silence falls.


All eyes are turned


anxiously toward that whirlinR contrivance which


"Now, be a sport, you surely know me!


f1 1. l-


-. J







THE


CARIBBEAN.


PITCAIRN-"MYSTIC ISLE OF THE SOUTH


SEAS"


cook stove, brought by the


several


years


Youngs from


ago, cost them sixty-four


Tahiti
dollars.


(Written by Manola Bliss '26, from authentic information-
direct from the island).
Pitcairn Island,
August 20, 1921.
Dear Manola:
Just two weeks have passed since that happy


day when we heard the cry of "Say Lo,


breathlessly down to


the beach


ataka drop anchor about a mile out.


and ran


to see the Rum-


It would


be hard for you to realize just what an event in
our quiet lives the arrival of a steamer is, or how
.
exciting it is to see our men, who have gone out in
little boats, clamber up the ropes carrying articles


Mother says she is a much happier woman since
she has the stove, as cooking on it is such an im-
provement over the old method of the open fire


and the stone oven.


All of


the women on the


island have been making good use of it for their
baking; so, as there are forty families, it has been
kept very busy.
To-morrow we go down to the beach to make


our yearly supply of salt.
many days, we set up camp.
in huge caldrons over open


about


twenty-five


year's supply


pounds


for one


As the process takes
We boil the sea water


fires until


of salt,


family


we have


which
procure


to sell or exchange for jelly, sugar


cloth, overalls, and
used by us for bar-


ter are fresh


dried fruits, such
as bananas and
pineapples, done
up in layers ofdried


banana
strings
made
shells


leaves.;


beads
I dyed
bright-


colored beans; and


baskets
finely


and fans


even perfume.


, soap, flour,
The articles


amount about forty-six bucketsful of water are


necessary.


As our entire population


is Seventh


)ay Adventist, we
go back to the vil-
lage on Friday for


our
which
urdav.


Sabbath,
is your Sat-
Friday is


always the busiest
day of the week,
for on this day we


prepare


all the


meals for the mor-


row.


Abe


woven


women


There are sixty-
six children on the
island between the


dried grasses, split
palm or banana lea


A Chinese junk at anchor in Colon harbor. ageS


ves, and artistically embroidered


seventeen, al


one and


of whom are healthy and robust;


or painted in gay colors.
Imagine our delight when, after several bags of
mail had been thrown into the boats, a large crate


was carefully lowered into one.


We were breath-


forty-six


taught


these attend


by the great


of the Bounty.
to attend school,


the school,


grandson


the children


the fee


which


of the Captain


are required


a barrel


for which is


less with the anticipation that it might be mother's
long-desired stove, and so it proved to be. This


of potatoes, one barrel representing twelve shil-
lings-making school fee one shilling per month.


was set up with great ceremony


in our


house,


We have


few books;


so our teacher


which is in the center of the village, and was con-
sequently visited by all the islanders.
I can't find words to express our gratitude to
your father and mother for procuring the stove


lessons


blackboard.


slates, but not long ago the pencils dwindled down


to half a dozen stubs;


around


to each in


these had


to be passed


turn in order that he might


for us.


For several years we have been carefully


write his lesson;


however, a large package of pen-


saving the money gotten from the sale of fruits
I I r -


cils and crayons soon came to Daddy by a passing






THE


CARIBBEAN.


so I'll begin with the history. Two ships left
England in the summer of 1762 for the purpose of


exploring the
the island o
Cristobal has
(Aunt Edith w
The Swallow,
sighted a roc


Pacific ocean. The Dolphin
f Tahiti, where Doctor Dre
been consul from the United
as their maid while they lived
while looking for "Easter Is
k one morning in 1767. In ho


the midshipman who discover
named it "Pitcairn's Island.
1790, the mutineers of the
Bounty, landed at Pitcairn v
people they had picked up at 1


twelve women
Englishmen.


and fifteen men,
They took all the


they could use off the b
it. Then the Englishr
nine parts and made t]
Our climate is very
(according to the tourism
guavas, yams, bananas,
plantains, breadfruit,
sugarcane, and even p1
a few trees grown from


from
Th
fathe
six.
near
Engl


oat and


Eng
with
rahi


found
her of
States
there).
land,"
)nor of


t, the captain
On April 28,
lish ship, The
some of the
ti. There were


nine of whom were
fittings and things
afterwards burned


men divided the
he others their s
similar to that
sts who visit us).
oranges, pineapj
coconuts, sweet


beaches,


a


a passing ship a few
ie oldest inhabitant o
r, Mr. James Russel
He has been a miss
Pitcairn. He has
and, and California,


land intc
laves.
of Florida
We raise
ples, limes
potatoes


for we have quit


few peach
years ago.
n the island
McCoy, w
onary amot
also been
and hopes


York and Sydney before he di
government secretary and is
best educated person on the
brothers, Warren and Baby
I go to school.
There are one hundred and


on the islan
Los Angeles
Clarke, who
have lived
spoken on o
ested to kn
fair-skinned


d, two of whom are
, a father and son
married on coming t
here for ten years.
ur island is English.
ow what we looked
, others swarthy, bu


stones gotten

I is my grand
ho is seventy
ng the island,
to Brisbane
to go to Nev


es. My father is the
considered to be the
island. I have two
Ivan. Warren and


seventy-four people


Americans from


by the
:o the is
The
You w
like.
t most


name of
land, and
language
ere inter-
Some are
of us are


berths on board a ship) are built along the walls.
Each house has a large garden, and pens for the
pigs, chickens, sheep, goats, or dogs, and in a few
cases shelters for cattle. Our furniture is very
simple, being made by the men from yellow
tefano wood.
The government is carried on by a chief magis-


trate, assisted b


several assessors and an internal


committee. These officials are chosen by the
people, men and women alike voting. This elec-
tion takes place on Christmas Day. Our laWs
are made as the need arises. One law which will
seem peculiar to you, although it is quite import-
ant here, is the law regarding cats. There is a
heavy fine for the killing of a cat, because they
keep the island free of rats, but sometimes they


) kill the fowls and in that case the cat must be
sacrificed.
a I believe you asked me in your letters about
e our celebration of Christmas; it is very simple
, in comparison with yours. Instead of turkey and
, the innumerable good things which you mentioned,
e we have roasted goat and baked sweet potatoes.
1 After dinner is over, all of us go up to the church,
where there are two trees loaded with gifts. And
- do you know what our gifts are? Bananas, pine-
- apples, coconuts, hats, baskets, beads, brooms,
s and fans, each carefully labeled with the name of
the person for whom it is intended and the name


A
of thu
we goc
which
very
close
in sle'
usual
The s
the ol
I h
hearil
I am
reach
Wi


e donor. After we have received our gifts,
down to the beach to see the boat races in
i the men partake. Since many of them are
skillful, this is an exciting pastime. At the
of the day we return home and are soon lost
ep, for on the morrow we must be about our
tasks, as we celebrate only the one day:
un is our alarm clock, and we follow closely
d saying, "Early to bed and early to rise."
iope you will answer soon for I do enjoy
ng about your family, school, and pleasures.
mailing this on the next boat, which will
you about Christmas time.
shing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy


light brown; our features are regular and gentle
(at least people say so).
Our houses are thatched-roofed, wooden struc-
tures, usually two stories high, with a ladder leading
to the upper story, where beds (similar to the


New Year, I remain


Your friend,

Hilda Christian.


V






THE


CARIBBEAN.


"AND THINGS ARE NOT WHAT THEY


SEEM."
-Longfellow.


ONLY


A BABY.


and fastened her restless eyes upon a bit of white-


ness in


the bay;


thinking.


watched, she


narrowed them slightly, and I perceived a coldly


I lounged on the porch of the Hotel Washing-
ton, hoping to see some of the latest styles on the
numerous tourists who thronged the place.


Not being immediately thrilled


any espe-


calculating look in
thinking!


their gray depths.


She was


Then a dapper young fellow drew up a chair


and began a conversation.


They were evidently


cially striking costume, I


must have dozed off.


The tap, tap of very high heels accompanied by


the strong odor of "Jasmin


" brought me out of


my stupor all too suddenly.
The tapping I had heard was caused by a very
beautiful pair of suede slippers on the dainty feet
of a wonderfully garbed woman, who walked, or
rather slunk, gracefully over to a seat across from
me, and sank tiredly into its comfortable depths.
She leaned back and closed her eyes, giving me a


splendid opportunity to


Feet first!


look her over.


The black suede slippers were set


off by enormous silver buckles,


which the silver


stockings matched so well as to seem only a con-


tinuation of their shiny surface.


The black silk-


crepe dress was very chic, being all-over beaded in
silver translucent beads, and having no sleeves
and a very low neckline, which allowed her throat
to rise like a marble column from its blackness.
Her face was very striking, shaped as it was in


that fashion commonly called Oriental.


ing almond
eyelashes.


eyes were protected


The slant-
ong, silky


Her long, thin-lipped mouth was the


color of a ripe strawberry and was beautifully vivi-
fied by the black mole which grew near the lower
left side of her dimpled chin.
She evidently became weary of the chair, for
she got up, approached my haven, and sank her
lithesome slimness into a chair near my elbow.
Leaning back, she closed her eyes, and once more
I gazed upon her beauty.
But "distance lends enchantment!"


Her enviable whiteness was the result
repeated applications of liquid powder.


of patient,
The rosy


lips were not of Nature's coloring, nor even of the


-1r 1 T i i i "ii


old acquaintances, for I caught some very remark-


able scraps of a


which she


"slung


in a


very coarse voice, accompanied by wise shrugs and
knowing winks.


"Evidently a very coarse person.
one of the new cabaret girls," wer


Maybe she's
-e some of the


thoughts that floated through my now thoroughly
aroused brain.
As their voices became louder and their words


more indiscreet,


the object of


my curiosity re-


moved her black satin turban and ran slim white
fingers through the fluffy blondness of her bobbed
hair. This called forth some remarks from


"Monty
exactly
having


to the effect that her locks were not


same


shade


in Honolulu.


he remembered their
Her only response


was a low chuckle and a phrase reminding him
of the fickle preferences of man in regard to the
color of hair.
This word-throwing contest (for it could hardly
be called a conversation) continued for some time,
and I was about to meander along, when out of


the hotel came a nurse carrying a small


baby.


She directed herself straight toward my compan-


ions.


I thought it was a case of mistaken identity,


as she came smiling toward these queer folks, un-


til I saw my


queer


"painted lady


mincing


steps,


starched English nurse and


bundle


expression


in the capable


on the enameled


miraculous transformation.


jump up, and with
run to the stiffly
bend over the tiny


arms.


entire


face underwent


The hard, coldly cal-


culating look became one of glorified mother-love.


Even her thick voice assumed new tones.


It no


:~ i C .L C n


59


Dorothy Abendroth, '24.






THE


CARIBBEAN.


Even


"Monty


was conceded a higher place in


my opinion, as he smoothed a satiny hand of the
child, and remarked, "Quite a rummy little chap,
what?"
Now that I had had a glimpse of their better
natures, my spirits rose, and as I sauntered non-
chalantly by the happy group, I bravely whistled,
"The End of a Perfect Day."


in it. My heart went out to the old fellow.
could I ever have thought him a criminal?


DO YOU REMEMBER?


Florence Albert, '24.

Do you remember the time when mother made
some cookies-just the kind you liked the best,
big crumbly brown ones full of fat raisins, and
told you not to touch them until she came home,


when she would give you one?


She put them in


THE DOG WROUGHT THE CHANGE.
Edith Coulbourn, '24.


on the pantry shelf;


so you resolved that you


would be good and not go near them.


out to play


but it wasn't interesting.


tou went
Midge


He sat beside me at the station waiting for a
tramin. I could imagine all sorts of things about
him. A great red face he had with a heavy dark
moustache. A big old felt hat pulled tightly down
over his ears partly shaded his staring red-rimmed
eyes which rolled apprehensively now here, now


there.


His dark suit was dirty and shiny and was


much too large, for it hung on him like the rags
on a scarecrow.
He pulled out a huge red bandana and wiped
his sweaty face and uncouth-looking hands, then


dusted


his large, clumsy shoes.


He shook


bandana furtively and put It away in his grimy
pocket, then could find no place for those large


hands.


he folded


them


n his lap,
in his lap,


then put them in his pockets, and finally picked
up a big paper bundle and held on to that.
I was sure he was nervous and fidgety because


wasn't out and you didn't like to play with Jane


Page and the others.


You went back into the


house and roamed aimlessly around.
house and roamed aimlessly around.


wandered mi
pantry door.


mother told you.


Lto the kitchen and


Then you


looked


at the


You would be good and do as
You went and got your favorite


doll, the baby doll with real hair, but somehow you
didn't feel like playing with it just then.


Then


you had an idea!


It wouldn't do any


harm just to peek at the cookies. At first the
door resisted all your efforts to open it. You were
.
despairing of carrying out your plan, when sud-
denly you gave the right twist to the knob and


the door swung open.


But the cookies were up


too high for you to reach, and you had to get a


chair.
the jar.


You got up on it and took the cover off


They looked so good.


But you reluc-


tantly and slowly put the lid back on, for you had
told yourself that you would just look at them.


the police were looking for him.


In my mind I


pictured this man doing all conceivable crimes.
Into the station there came a dirty little dog.
On his side was a large sore which he stopped to


You took another peek. Just (
any difference among so many.


mne wouldn't make


But alas!


"Just


one" led to another and another and another until
you had eaten so many you felt as if you would


lick every few minutes.


As he came down the


aisle past where I was sitting I drew back with


burst. You looked into the jar. Y
agined that you had taken so many!


ou never im-
You looked


Soon he crawled


to the feet of that repulsive looking individual-
my criminal. Almost instantly the man leaned
over and tenderly picked up the little cur. "Poor


around for a place to hide but there wasn't any.
You decided to meet her at the door and tell her;
but when the time came, you couldn't say a word.
And when mother went to the pantry to get the


fellow,


" he said,


you have gotten some of the


cookie


she had promised


trembled.


world's hard knocks, haven't you?


So have


When she saw how many cookies were gone, she


Let's chum it together.


" He pulled out his red


turned


and looked


bandana and carefully wiped the dog's side.


ashamed


and sorry that you cried; but mother


grew tender looking.


His hands had found


didn't take you in her arms and pet you as she


S S -- -S -- S 4t 5 4- 4


loathing from such a creature.


1






THE


CARIBBEAN.


AVERAGE BOY.
Jose Arosemena, '24.


club, Self-Denial, he made the first hole, Perma-
nent position.


Average Boy brought out his team on the high
i 1 1 i i 1 II ii^ l ir I I r 1^ C .


sco


ool basket-hall floor


mination, Industry, En
dation, he hoped to c(
ondary Education. T
the whistle, and the tea
the floor. English, Ma
tory, and Industrial A
Secondary Education t
As Mathematics had
fame, Average Boy took
leaving English practi
some minutes of play,
the places of Industry a
rest of the team was
these new substitutes;
suffered badly. Near
another player, Cramn
no avail. The end of
Boy two points behind.
In the second period,
in. Bluff was good for
and had to be put out.
dered. He was unable
team. He despaired o:
whistle sounded for the
Average Boy two more
Between the second
coach, Common Sense,
when the referee called f
age Boy's team was str
ing this period they play
and were able to rega
For the fourth quar
out his strongest team:
Enthusiasm, and Goodc
having recuperated gr
quarter. With this t
Common Sense from t
was able to win the ga


possession of the cup


. vlih tlme am or Deter-
thusiasm, and Good Foun-
)nquer the team of Sec-
'he referee, Faculty, blew
ams took their position on
thematics, Language, His-
rts, made up the strong
eam.
come preceded by great
: special care to guard him,
cally unattended. After
Laziness and Apathy took


nd Deter
not used
therefore
the end


iness,


was p


nation, t
playing
e tean
the q
ut in,


but the
g with
a work
quarter,
but to


the .period found Average
.*


a new player


wnl
Avei
o cat<
winn
end
point;,
and
gave
r the


, but h
age Bo
hupw
ng the
)f the
behind
third


the tea
third


a

t(


engthened by
ed much bett
in two of th
ter, Average
Industry, D
I Foundation
eatly during
earn and th
he side lines,
me handily;


called Gra


, .J . I
e tired b
vy was b
ith the
game.
quarter
1.
periods,


ffulB c a m e


)adly
ewil-
other
The
with

the


m a talk, and
quarter, Aver-
SHope. Dur-
er than before,
e lost points.
Boy brought
determination,
, the last one
the previous
e coaching of
Average Boy
thus securing


uation.


Again teeing off with
landed Ambition near t
Higherposition. Herehe
confidence, and drove to
using his club Efficiency,
With the use of his ch
dence, he made the ne,
which was Employer's
three, increases in salar
Driving for the seventh
in the high grass of Socie
he made no advanceme
Managership of the fir
acquired by using a ne'
placed him far ahead ol
The ground between
eighth (General Mana{
with no difficult obstacle


his


club Confidence


he next hole, which was
took thewrongclub,Over-
o far. In two more shots,
he reached Higher position.
ubs, Efficiency and Confi-
ct four holes, the first of


confidence, a


y.
h ho


ty, that, for
tnt toward
m. This
w club, Ing
f the field o
the seventh
gership) wa
es. and he m


nd the next


anded so deeply


se
th
he
;en
)f c
i h
is
iad


veral shots,
e Assistant
afterwards
uity, which
competitors.
ole and the
fairly level
e hole eight


easily by using his two best clubs, Efficiency and
Ingenuity.
From the eighth hole till the last there was one


rance
Suspi
the s
ral mi
s, Eff
satis
ast he


after
cion
lough
minor ti
cienc'
factio
)le. th


the ot
and Je
, Boar
raps.
y and
n his
e Presi


her.


ealous
d of
With
Confi
ball


There were
y-of-fellow-'
Directors,
the use of
dence, he f
settle comf


the bunk-
employees,
as well as
his trusty
finally saw
bortablv in


dencv of the firm.


ON THE ROAD TO CATIVA
Charlotte Housel, '24.
A crude woven basket sat helplessly on the top


of a turban that
kinky growth o
haggard-looking


ing, unkempt ey
it had been force
had finished gro
considerable spa'
at a thin cigar
mouth, her thick


w
f
ey
eb
ed
wi
ce,


ound itself
hair. Twoc
es peered ou
rows A no
Sto change
ng, flattene
. Now and


that hung


carelessly around a
Narrow, deep-set,
.t from overshadow-
)se that looked as if
its course before it
d itself out over a
then, as she puffed
loosely out of her


ps revealed a few isolated teeth,


or remnants of teeth.


GOLF.
Chester Pike, 'z;.


A ruffled collar and vestee made a pitiful attempt
to make attractive her coarse woven-fabric gar-


After comp


ucatlon,


eting his course in golf,


College-Gradua


te started o


his school
his round


ment.
bonvy


Her long
wrists, as if


sleeves hunt
endeavorin


g loosely around her
g to hide the ragged,


v --







THE


CARIBBEAN.


RTS


Girls-Ruath Duev, 25.


Boys-Guy Stewart, '2s.


STEW

ART SAYS-


During my long and diversified career
as journalist, man-about-school, and soda-
water guzzler in general, I have come to
many conclusions. One of these con-
cerns the utter uselessness of human be-
ings. After listening awhile to Mac, the
anarchist, this becomes even more evi-
dent. Why not a world without human
beings? A Utopia totally devoid of these
incredibly stupid creatures! No hen-
pecked husbands or surfaced wives, no
dumb school children or grinning, tooth-
less hags; no need for census reports,
read now only by proof readers; no
worries about the Mellon plan or oil
stock or--
And gentle reader, pause and think
how much better it would be for the ani-
mals and insects and little fishes! Such
a wonderful opportunity for them to exer-
cise their lurid individualities, untram-
meled by conventions! But after all,


BALBOA HUMBLED ON HOME
GROUNDS.


nine-inn
orsehide


but the fielding was
We had a new ma
Fisher, who has a ni
showed his stuff.
perfect game on
* *. I


JANUARY 26,
1924. It seems that
every time Cris-
tobal beats Balboa
it is on the Bal-
boa'shomeground.
Cristobal t o-d a y
Succeeded in tack-
ing up four runs to
Balboa's hard-
earned three, in an
; game. The crack of
,s continuously heard,
perfect on both teams.
an pitching, Richard
ce curve, and he ably
Juan Papi played a
short, and pitched a
S * ... .


don't you think they would act the same
way we do? Suppose we take an instru-
ment for seeing into the future, recently
invented by Mr. Foos, B. S. J. C. H. S.
Mr. Foos claims that his instrument can
show us anything we want to see in the
future, or anything we want to see any-


way.
We would see a fat coo
back of an ape, reading
spouse the latest news
house Gazette.
"I see where this bird
broken into print again


tie, livi
to his
from t

Grease
with hi


rig on the
esteemed
:he Bug-

Bug has
s famous


troupe of Red, Blue, and Blackjuveniles,
that perfect bunch of performing potato
bugs. And look, our friend J. K. Bee is
slamming Gerald Doodle Bug because he
has the sense to uphold the Atlantic
Side."
Of course, you see, this could be con-
tinued indefinitely, but since I'm paid for
a column only I'll go home and sleep off
my last night's movie show, Baby Peggy,
"The Darling of New York."


G. K. S.


first and third very well while Leo Eber-
enz covered the keystone sack well. The
pitchers did little work but should be
commended on their good batting. On
the whole the game was as perfect as pos-
sible and notwithstanding the ability of
the Balboa team our boys were unbeat-
able. Cristobal was always in the lead
and never in dangerof losing. The action
was fast and peppy all the way through.
The line-ups were:


BALBOA.

Engelke, p.
Stanziola, c.
Foster, ib.
Morris, 2b.
Burgoon, ss.
Crofs, 3b.


CRISTOBAL.

Fisher, p.
Eberenz, c.
Oakes, ib.
Arosemena, 2b.
Papi, ss.
Solomon, jb.


0. H. S. ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
FORMED.
October 1o, 1923. To-day the Athletic
Association representing Cristobal High
School was formed. The attendance was
one hundred per cent, and a sincere co-
operation was promised to the teams.
The meeting was called to order by
Miss Dodds, who, after a brief talk, an-
nounced that nominations were in order
for the presidency of the Association.
George Oakes, '24, was chosen President,
William Cousins, '25, Secretary and
Treasurer, and Guy Stewart, '25, Man-
ager. President Oakes said that in the
f
very near future our athletics would open,
beginning with some scheduled swimming
matches to be swum against Balboa.
The meeting was adjourned with every
one confident that our athletics will be of
the best this year.

ORGANIZATION OF GIRLS'
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.


On the twenty-eighth of October,
high school girls met to organize
Athletic Association. The officers ch
were:
President-Charlotte Housel.
Vice President-Gladys Lowande.
Secretary and Treasurer-Dorothy


the
the
osen


bert.
The first few months we spent on gym
work, which was successfully carried out
only by the able leadership of Miss
Mathee. It is through her that we were
able to have our fun and gain our victory
in basket ball.

DISASTER.


February


2, 1924. It is


feeling


akin to sorrow that we write of this game.
Our boys, buoyed up by last Saturday's
victory over Balboa, through some psy-
chological twist, are plunged into depths
of despondency, and Balboa walks all over
them. The game, considered as a game,
was a poor excuse. Balboa played well
we agree, but Cristobal lost because of
hr nht.el1tlv fultyv teamwork. The








THE


CARIBBEAN.


fell down on the job, and


there


was crabbing.


learned psychologist


plain this;


we can t.


saw its opportunity an
us, the score being 13-4
give credit to Balboa.


everywhere


Probably


will be able


Of course Balboa
Ad waded through
. We really must
They won, and


Buster Burgoon, old time Cristobalite,


helped them do it.


good.
tobal.)


This boy is certainly


(Observe he usel to live


His curves are


perfect


in Cris-
and his


batting consistent.


The line-ups

BALBOA.

Burgoon, p.
Clements, c.
Foster, Ib.
Crofs, 2b.
Engelke, 3b.
Morris, ss.
Hutchins, If.
Newhardt, ci
Elias, rf.


were:


CRISTOBAL.

Fisher, p.
Eberenz, c.
Oakes, Ib.
Arosemena, '
Papi, 3b.
Solomon, ss.
Brown, If.
Marchosky,
Lowande, rf.
Johnson, rf.


CRISTOBAL LOSES IN BASEBALL
TO BALBOA.

January 19, 1924. The first game of the
season was played at Mount Hope to-day,
with Balboa taking back with her a very
hard-earned victory. Owing to the Balboa
team's having to return to Balboa on the


four o'clock train, the
in the sixth inning.


When the Cristobal boys


game was called


went out on


the field they were all discouraged and
didn't think they had a chance with Bal-
boa, which was a veteran of many games.
It was the first game the boys had played
together and there was very faulty team-


work.


Then too,


everyone


was grouchy


and was reluctant about playing.
Nevertheless the Cristobal boys held
Balboa down in the first innings until, in
a final burst, Balboa succeeded in wading


through us.


It seems that now the boys


woke up, but too late.


The prospect


brightened for us and we succeeded in


bringing in one run.


We tightened up,


February


23, 1924.


Generally, Balboa,


suburb of Ancon, has everything


its own


way. This time it got fooled to the tune


ot 31-28.


To-day our space annihilators


carved a niche in the Hall of Fame.


all ye brethren!


The highest point


scorers were both men from Cristobal, and


senior laddies at that.


and George
points each.


Jose Arosemena


Oakes tied for a good nine


Like Grape Nuts,


S"There s


a Reason!"

A SCRAPPY BATTLE.


century,


goal of all speed


was first on the program.


The boys


not have been Paddocks, but still they


made pre
ankled his


tty


time.


Oakes


way to victory, closely followed


but were chagrined when the Balboa boys


had to leave.


The game finally ended in


GIRLS' BASEBALL.


Partly for fun and partly for credits,


we finished out our athletic


baseball.


We had about


year


with


two weeks'


practice before our first game.
was composed of:

Charlotte Housel, p.
Helen Abendroth, c.
Rae Fischer, ib.
Ruth Duey, 2b.
Dorothy Deibert, 3b.
Grace Dowell, 3b.
Gladvs Lowande, ss.
Marion Barrett, rf.
Dorothy Stauffer, If.


Wilhelminma


team


the 6th


To win,


inning, 5-1.


our boys should practice all


next week, and travel to Balboa confident
in themselves because we see that Balboa


really not invincible.


Practice and


more team work and we'll1


Balboa next Saturday.
Juan Papi, a new man, pitched for
Cristobal and very ably showed his stuff.


His underhand is spectacular.


ceeded in securing


several


He suc-
strikeouts.


Then our friend Johnny Solomon played


a consistent, errorless


game at the initial


sack. Also George Oakes played second
base very well, and Harry Brown held


down third ably.
Eberenz as shortstn


Stute, cf.


April 19 we journeyed to Balbo


our mettle.


During the first two


the score was neck and neck.
few wild throws allowed Balboa


a to try
innings
Then a
Girls to


bring in several runs, and we were not
able to rally sufficiently to win; so the
game ended I5-10 in favor of Balboa.


Everyone enjoyed


this first g;


ame so


thoroughly that it was decided we play


another. Accordingly, o
second game took place.


)n May


Some of our


team were not there so our subs were


used.


The playing


of both teams was


Then we have Leo


who can play


better game and should tighten up. We
are very much indebted to Jack Klunk,


who held down th


e keystone


sack.


as follows:


CRISTOBAL.


line-ups were

BALBOA.

Stanziola, c.


Whitlock, p.
Barton, Ib.
Burgoon, 2b.
Morris, ss.
Engelke, 3b. (Capt.)


Klunk,
Papi, p.


c.
(Capt.)


Solomon, Ib.
Oakes, 2b.
Eberenz, ss.
Brown, 3b.


by Arosemen
Balboa, third.


a with


The track


Whitlock of


was very


and in poor condition.
The sixteen-pound shot-put was copped
by Kid Coffey, the demon swimmer, who
flipped the marble thirty-two feet, with


Richard Fisher second and George
third, all these from Cristobal.
We dropped the relay to Balboa.


a funny thing happened.


Oakes


Runner number


two, new at the game, ran about ten


the wrong


way before he was stop-


ped. As it was, the Cristobal fourth man
was not very far behind his Balboa man.
An orange shirt and a pair of legs and


you have
Balboa's
speaking,
any man.


a portrait of Ralph


v jumper,


Clements,


who, literally


rose to greater heights than
He took first place easily in


the high jump, but Chester Pike and
Maurice Eggleston won second and third


places,


respectively.


The running broad jump was easily


won


bv Jose Arosemena, with George


nn) tmtc cernnA nh n, nr frenA (Ielnenrc


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
SURPRISES SUBURBANITES
IN TRACK.


!
.


-
.


nnf- ^IQ o'nnrl a hofnrp htr t-he pverrfmont








THE CARIBBEAN.


mmm -m


64









THE


CARIBBEAN.


Durain


showing


Cousins showed


pretty storm.
good mettle wht


a discouraging start, he pluckily
third.


Willie
en, after
came in


Then the 220-yard dash was barely
taken by Whitlock and Durin of Balboa,
who in a spectacular finish took first


from Arosemena.


Arosemena had


a good lead in the first hundred and fifty
yards but his ankles grew wabbly and he
finished a very close third.
Juan Papi, Henry Stevens, and Guy
Stewart also ran for Cristobal.


In coming


years, ift


Cristobal


takes


wipe Balboa off the map as far as swim-


ming was concerned.


It may be remem-


bered that in the championship


swim-


ming meet, held on the Fourth of July,
a Cristohbal High School team consisting


of Jack


Coffey,


Alan Wallace, James


Burgoon, and Alpha Morgan, carried off
the Senior 220o-yard relay championship
of the Canal Zone.


The boys from Cristobal


came out


Sfor swimming and trained faithfully for Oliver


over a month under the


Morgan were:


Andrew Smith,


leader


Jack Coffey,


Foster


ship of
(capt.),


Tufts, Richard


were


confident of victory, and some fin


are promised.


e games


We note with satisfaction


the names of several newcomers i


n tennis.


The use of courts all over the Atlantic
side has been secured, and the players
mInay be assured a good gallery.


SONNEMAN VICTORIOUS.


November 28, 1923.


and Mau


the semi-finalists


John Ordway,
rice Eggleston
in the tennis


matches for championship of the school;


but Fred Sonneman, stellar


attraction,


good interest in track we can but succeed,
for we have excellent material, and inade-
quate equipment is our greatest handicap.
Mr. Bogda please notice.


Fisher, Oliver King, Billy Coffey, Chris-


tian Wirtz,
Oakes.


Surse


T aylor, and George


who had not played in the first part of the


tournament due to doctor's


orders,


defeated them all, leaving Eggleston


We may add that Cristobal
retain the championship next


expects
Fourth


CRISTOBAL LOSES TO BALBOA
IN HAND BALL.

December 14, 1923. For the first time
in the history of the school, Cristobal
rounded up a hand ball team and traveled
to Balboa; after some long, rather scrap-


py games, we lost to Balboa.
Leo Eberenz, school champ,
ed us in the singles and glor


CRISTOBAL


AND


BALBOA


IN TENNIS.


--v
^< -
r


December


1923.


tennis stars went over
played Balboa some fine


To-daty
to Balboa


games resulting


in a tie, Cristobal boys winning


represent-
iously-we


C-


say gloriously because it was a splendid
fight-lost to Bobby Engelke of Balboa.
Engelke is to be given credit for his superb
playing, and we predict for him a great


future,.


two out


of four series played.
Fred Sonneman was pitted against a
worthy opponent, Horace Foster, who
was forced to put utip a brilliant game of
defense, though at times he showed him-


self well in the


offensive.


Sonneman won the first set


If Eberenz would improve his


defensive, he could be counted on to give


a hard game any day.


were 21-6, 21-8.
It was surely


The final


scores


a queer, almost pathetic


sight to see the two freshman midgets,
Charles Will and Harry Brown, playing


against


Ralph Clements


six feet)


and Fred Brady, also of great height.


GIRLS' SWIMMING.

November 24, 1923. On this date


prelim


mnary swimming meet against


boa took place at the


Washington pool.


This was to prepare us for finals, but due


Unfortunately our boys lost, but as the to the fact that we haven't had


a swim-


Nevertheless
-5-.


The second set was any man s set until
Foster, through sheer weight and very
clever fighting, was able to beat Fred. 9-7.
Sonnemnan soon recuperated and show-
a ed his wonderful torm in the third set,


where he easily slashed his


way to victory,


winning 6-3.


Maurice Eggleston dropped his
Robert Engelke after a plucky


sets to
up-hill


odds were greatly


against them, they


should be given credit for their plucky
fight. It may be said to their credit and
to the credit of Cristobal High School,


ming instructor for
the final meet was n
only through the cou


that


we were


abl


that our men never fall down on a job. factory practices.


As it was,
and fast.
21-14.

BALBOA


the games were spectacular
The final score was 2d-1 I,


length of time fight the score being 6-4, 6-5.


ever held. I
rtesv of Miss


e to obtain a few
Balboa defeated


points, which was as it should be.


t


TENNIS OPENS WITH A RACI


FORFEITS


SWIMMING TO CRISTOBAL.


Balboa and Gristobal were scheduled to
*. 1


NOVEMBER
1923. To-day


'I\


N


first round ol
elimminations


;
: was
Reed
satis-
us in



KET.

t 14,
the
f the
f, i


Caldwell Foos and John Ordway lost
to Ralph Clements and Gerrans after a


strenuous fight in


which victory


St


right in their hand several times,
the superior weight and length


eemned
when
(?) of


their opponents told on them and Balboa


won, 6-4,


>9, 9-7.


John Ordway, the sophomore slasher,


played


a game different from his usual


one, playing cautiously with an eye more


toward accuracy than speed.


He easily


outwitted his opponent, Jimmie Driscoll,


runner-up.


1


o rtl i


-I f ^* *


*-


IT m .....








THE


CARIBBEAN.


GIRLS' TENNIS.

More tennis fans and players have ap-
peared this year than ever before. The
first preliminary match was played at
Balboa, December 1 5.
Ruth Duey Mary Joe Lowe
Helen Abendroth Gladys Blakelv
We easily defeated them, for they had
not had as many practices as we.
During the month of March the girls'
tennis elimination was taking place. A
great deal of fun was derived from these
sets, for everybody tried-even those
who hadn't played for several years. The
final four girls winning were to play
singles and doubles against Balboa's best


April 19 we held our singles
Much interest was shown in th
the supporters who were looki
Charlotte Housel defeated
Lowe, 6-3, 6-3.
Gladys Lowande defeated
tin,'6-2, 6-2.


SENIOR-JUNIORS V
SOPHOMORE-FRE
NOV
p 1923
the
Na'
afte
fast
Sophomore-Freshmen wit
17-13. This was the fi
game of the year and a
were keyed up and full ofp
..
promising material was vie
one is confident that we w
a run for their money.
During the second qu
pretty play was going on,
snapped off for a second,
were turned on again,
Bliss had disappeared. T
to our rescue-sounds p
enlisted man very ably r
mainder of the game.


at Balboa.
e games by
ng on.
Mary Joe


Belle Mar-


VIN FROM
:SHMEN.
EMBER 20,
i. Last night at
old Army and
vy "Y," the
or-Junior boys,
r a very hard,
game beat the
th a score of
first basketball
dl the players
ep. Some very
wed,andevery-
'ill give Balboa


arter, while a
the lights were
and when they
referee Gerald
he Army came
oetic-and an
efereed the re-
]he spectators


were a very sportsmanlike bunch,
heavy cheering was heard continue
The line-ups were as follows:
UPPER CLASSMEN. LOWER CLASSM
Arosemena, f.(capt.) Jones, f.
Eberenz, F. Pulgar, f.
Oakes, c. Solomon, c. (ca
Pike, g. Grider, g.


EN.


pt.)


UPPER CLASSMEN COP GROWN.

December 3, I923. Again the Senior-
Junior boys played the Sophomore-
Freshies and proved that a ripe old age
is no disqualification by beating them to
the score of 28-16. Again we saw won-
derful playing as both teamsran off some
excellent plays. It's rather hard to pick
a star player, but we think that Arose-
mena for the older boys and "Rusty"
Jones for the youngsters are pretty good.
A still larger crowd was in evidence, and
we even had some organized cheering
by the freshman girls, led by Dot Wertz,
which surely raised the roof. Of course
the Senior-Junior young ladies-the
others are mere girls-retaliated and we
think they won. Mr. Schneppmueller
attended this game and commented upon
the good points of the teams, and pointed
out some faults which should be remedied.
The players were:


GRAY-BEARDS.

Arosemena, f.
(capt.)
Eberenz, f.
Oakes, c.
Pike, g.
Cousins, g.
Fisher, sub.
Foos, sub.
Stewart, sub.


STOP!


KIDS.


Jones, f.
Pulgar, f.
Solomon,
Grider, g.
Eggleston
Brown, su
Lowande,


LOOK!


c. (capt.)

,g.
ib.
sub.


READ!


Cristobal High School again plays extra
quarter with Lincoln Five! April 12,
1923. Recipe for Nervous Prostration,
or One Exciting Game."

Ingredients.

Five School Boys.
Five Big Men.
One Scorer with Automatic Adding
Machine.
One Referee.
One Basket Ball.
One Time Keeper.
Place basket ball in center of large
floor. Put boys and men in and mix
for five quarters-sprinkle liberally with
flashy plays. Inject a little bit of referee
when friction becomes too great or when
too strenuous mix-ups occur. Stir con-


eagle-eyed vision; and one scorekeeper
plentifully supplied with sharpened pen-
cils. A series of superhuman plays inter-
mixed with incredible feats of valor,
Hoarse voices. Give boys due honor and
compliment.
This gives a game which we guarantee
to cure the most despondent cases, as
well as to exhilarate mentally. Observe:
This game can not be served to men on a
silver platter because it is apt to burn
their fingers.
Such was last night's game.
For details, use imagination freely.

OUR BOYS.

Arosemena, f.
Jones, f.
Oakes, c.
Solomon, g.
King, g.
By the way, the score was 30-26, and
the Lincoln Five won.

EXTRA! THRILLING-ELEC-
TRIFYING GAME! EXTRA!
LINCOLN FIVE FORCED TO
PLAY TWO EXTRA QUARTERS.


January 4, 1924. In one
clysmic games that fans
rarely ever get, the Cristob


boys
from
23-22
victor
point,
were
ment!


suffered a glori
the Lincoln Fi
. Here is a ca
y, for the gamn
and two extra
played! Wow!
Fast! Thril


noise! We believe ti
ceiving complaints
raised that night. Th
lery, and believe us,


The Lincoln
quered! Vet
hard-earned
handful of b
ters!
Our mind
can think oi
and arms am
we see little
halfway acrc
Then we see
quickly folio
shooting in


I
:e

o
V
0


inv


rains of a
victories !
ys to play


of those cata-
pray for and
al High School


ous, exalted defeat
re, the score being
se where defeat is
e was won by one
quarters, six in all
Talk about excite-
ling! Talk about
he "Y" is still re-
about the racket
ere was a good gal-
they were lucky!
incible and uncon


thousand and one
Forced by a mere
two extra quar-


is still in a whirl and all we
f is legs and ball and arms,
d legs and ball! Occasionally
"Rusty" Jones being flung
oss the floor by a big Marine!
Oakes sink a perfect basket,
wed up by Al Doyle's superb
the opposite basket. But









THE


CARIBBEAN.


point piles up on either side.


Thrills!


Excitement!


Speed!
all the


game


was good and fast with


some


plays throughout.


that made the game worth while was the


friendly spirit of rivalry which


existed


thrills were raindrops,


your imagination run freely!


the Army


Then


up and in a burst of enthusiasm, rend the


air with three lofty cheers, for
has arrived!


The battle-scarred
CRISTOBAL.,

Jones, f.
Arosemena, f.
Oakes, c.
Cousins, g.
Pulgar, g.
Pike, g.


Referee.-Tom


Cristobal


heroes were:
LINCOLN FIVE.

Jones, f.
Al Doyle, f.
Hawkins, c.
Bliss, g.
Eberenz, g.


Collins.


BALBOA CAPTURES FIRST
BASKET BALL GAME.


The line-ups

BALBOA.
Clements, f.
Elias, f.
Sullivan, c.
Burgoon, g.
Engelke, g.
Knabenshue, sM


were:

CRISTOBAL.
Jones, f.
Arosemena, f.
King, c.
Saloon. .
Solomon, e.


Cousins, g.
Pulgar, sub.


GIRLS TAKE SEASON'S SERIES.


OUR form


ur games


naturally,


/,^ Balboa
wr ptobal,
were played.


ostsport,
is basket


A series
games was


between
d Cris-


though


any girls took an interest in basket


between the two sides.


quickly with the
favor.


The end came


close score of9-11 in our


On February 16, Balboa met us at Cris-
tobal playshed, determined to send us to
ignominious defeat, but their efforts were


in vain.


Our rooters witnessed a hard


struggle to the last second.


When the


quarter was up, there was only two point's
difference with Cristobal on the safe side,
9-7.
We were so confident of the third game,
February 23, that the speed of the Balboa


girls took us


by surprise.


ahead in the first quarter and kept us
busy trying to catch up with them. It


took us the whole game to
they were in the lead. At


realize


the end


resolved never to let the score


their favor) happen


again.


April 4,


1924.


With a team consider-


ball that it was difficult


to select a


team,


March i, the final game was held on


ably weakened, our boys traveled to Bal-
boa and lost the first basket ball game of


the season to Balboa, the


As a team Balboa


and the players are all stars.


score being


invincible,
Cristobal


has excellent material but it can't work


together.


Why?


lack of training.


Lack of practice and
The game was played


at the Balboa playshed, and that might
have been why we lost so decisively.
Then it was plainly seen that Balboa had


some well-thought-up
That's something we n


organized


but at a special meeting
were selected:


Charlotte Housel, f.
Dorothy Deibert, f.


Dorothy


the folio


our floor.


Naturally


it was the


game, for both teams were ready


(Capt.


Stauffer, c.


Rae Fischer, sc.
Irene Hopkins, sc.
Gladys Lowande, g.
Ruth Duey, g.


The first game of


ruary


2, was played


the season, on Feb-
at Balboa playshed.


any remarks were heard


eed. Nevertheless did


passwork of the


teams,


on the splen-
but the thing


to the finish.


Balboa's team wa


hardest
to fight
s some-


what dampened in spirit on account of


some of the girls' bei
progressed smoothly


cultvy.
taugh,


ill, but the


in spite


of this diffi-


Much credit is due Florence Mur-


captain of Balboa's


team,


through her ready optimism in the face
of odds, the score was brought up to our


very


heels.


Then time intervened


left us victorious with the


the beginning


game,


same


9-Il.


THE


WASHINGTON


POOL.


Rainy


days, sunny


hot days, cool;


In all kinds of weather there are people at


A lanky man in English tweed


the pool.


comes


loping down


the


And stops to speak to a pair of twins with huge brown


* stairs,
teddy-


Long women, short ones, skinny ones, plump-
Everything's in swimming from a mermaid to a frump.

That tourist swims so funny-he holds his head up high,


And uselessly he works his


feet, just like a gum-stuck fly.


bears.


On the benches all around, loll people of all kinds
Who laugh and talk and smile and stare, with nothing on their
minds.


A little Panamanian lad in a bathing suit too large,


Leaves


behind a trail of foam like a Hudson River barge.


And I sit laughing, talking,
For I am there to gather hi


hiding my


stares


nts upon the latest


with smiles,


styles,


A tiny miss-American-dives gracefully below,


rainy


days, sunny days, hot days,


And comes up smiling with a stone for her little friend


to throw.


In all kinds of weather there are women at the pool.


"Y" would have floated.


Gentle reader, pause and reflect.


42-16.


game


score







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Ethel Sonneman, '24


OCTOBER.


30. The high school gives a rising vote of


Oct. 5. Cristobal High School reopens her doors
with so large an attendance that the Seniors are


relegated to the library.
teacher, Mr. Schneppmuell


stituting until
teacher.


the arrival


We welcome one new
er. Mrs. Noble is sub-
of our mathematics


appreciation to Mr.


S. J. Shreves, father of James


Shreves of the Sophomore class, who, through
tireless effort as a diver, has been able to help
raise a sunken submarine and so save the lives
of two men imprisoned therein.


NOVEMBER.


The Freshmen are initiated.


Nov. 1.


Wallace Johnson presents to C. H. S.


Oct. 12. A bald-headed row is in evidence.


Oct. 15.


THE CARIBBEAN staff is elected, classes


a joke box which he has made.
Nov. 2. The first staff meeting of the school


are organized, and a


very brief meeting of the


Supper Club is held after school.
Oct. 17. The Boys' and Girls'


Athletic Asso-


ciations hold their first meeting this afternoon and
elect their officers.
Oct. I8. A Supper Club meeting is held at the
Y.W.C.A. The following new officers are elected:
President.-Ruth Hopkins.
Vice President.-Mildred Morgan.
Treasurer.-Teresa Gallagher.
Secretary.--Irene Hopkins.
The old members are hostesses at a real jollifi-
cation and again Miss Dodds delights us with a
few readings.
Oct. 19. Mr. Schneppmueller's pleasing barl-


tone is heard in


two solos in assembly period,


"The Song of Hubrias, the Cretan,
Mother of Mine."


and "Little


year is held during lunch hour.
ness occupy the whole hour.


Nov.


3. The Seniors give the


unique Hallowe en party,


World,"


Lunch and busi-


high school


"A Trip Around


and serve delicious refreshments.


member the Peninsula of Death?


And the stunts?


Did the Senior patient have can sir or two more?
Nov. 9. A Supper Club meeting is held at the
Y. W. C. A. The new members are initiated.


Hornbeak


"Books


gives


an interesting


" and the Senior girls serve supper.


Nov. 10. A staff meeting is held this evening at


Gladvs


Lowande's


home.


After


the business


meeting is over, Mrs. Lowande serves an enjoy-
able repast and we spend the remainder of the
evening in playing games and singing songs.
Nov. 12. Chaplain R. C. Deibert gives us a


very interesting talk on


"Youth, its Advantages


22-24.


The skies fairly burst open on these


and Dreams.


" School medical examinations are


days:
Oct. 22. From midnight
fall was 9.02 inches.


Oct. 2


From midnight


to midnight


the rain-


held to-day also.
Nov. 14. The Upsilon Gamma Gamma Club is


organized by the


to midnight the rain-


steps


are taken


Junior-Senior boys.


toward


drawing up


The first
a charter


fall was 4.23 inches.
Oct. 24. From midnight to midnight the rain-
fall was 10.03 inches.
The Gatun bus is held up at Fort Davis on ac-


f*fs. * *^k t-/"i ^ w i r-a


and the following officers are elected:
Oracle.-Chester Pike.
Scribe.-Richard Fisher.


Adviser.-Miss Dodds.


NTik.1 L- -. a -- "C.. d- J^M,,--- 1--I- 1^ Ln ,,1-.^. I.a.n








THE


meeting, a supper which we all enjoy very mu
is served by Mrs. Oakes.


Nov. 26.


Thanksgiving vacation begins.


CARIBBEAN. 69

ich a picture of the Colosseum, doubly welcome be-


cause it is our first piece of real art.


Club girls


vote the Freshman girls'


The Supper
refreshments


DECEMBER.


7. A staff meeting is held after school.


of wieners and sauerkraut both different and de-


licious.


Strictly business.


regular


Supper


Junior Girls are hostesses at


meeting.


Bakewell


I1-15. 0O days of midnight oil and fear,
The first semester tests are here!


gives an instructive talk on
and an interesting playlet,


" The Girls' Budget,"
"The Budget Ghost,"


is given by the program committee.
Dec. 18. The Seniors acquire new


brilliancy.


Shiny new rings and pins are donned.
Dec. 19. Miss Corbett, member of the National


Board of the


Y. W. C. A., pays C. H.


a very


brief visit.


15. The efficiency


of this staff business


meeting at the home of Guy Stewart is rivalled
only by the excellence of those tiny sandwiches.


I'll never tell how many you ate!
expected ice cream?


And who ever


Feb. 16. Advance sales ticket contest
Delilah May's side, losing, has sold 132;
Oakes' side, winning, 142.


closes.
George


Dec. 21. The Juniors give a delightful Christ-
mas party at the Y. W. C. A. Especially appre-
ciated was the mock faculty meeting with
Katherine Fischer as Miss Dodds,
Mildred Morgan as Miss O'Connell,
Ruth Duey as Miss Barnhouse,


Olga Arcia


as Miss Bakewell,


20. Emily


Bledsoe


, '27,


tickets, is presented prize of a


having sold


two-and-one-half


dollar gold piece awarded by Edward May, '23,
for the girl selling the most tickets in the recent
contest, while Surse Taylor, '27, having sold 30,
wins an award of the same amount given by Mr.
V. H. May of Gatun for the boy selling the most.


Dorothy Deibert as Miss Hornbeak,
Richard Fisher as Mr. Schneppmueller.
Christmas vacation begins.
JANUARY.
Jan. 7. School reopens and many new resolu-
tions are made.
Jan. II. A delightful supper is served by the
Sophomore girls at the Supper Club meeting.
Jan. 14. We begin the new school hours. Eight


o'clock seems at least


three


hours earlier


Charlotte


Housel,


'24, selling


and Charles


'27, selling 25, run them close seconds.


Lady


tertains


"Czardas,


Thais, of Czechoslovakia, delightfully en-


three


" Mozart's


"Humoresque.
more effective


violin


"Minuet


solos,


Monti's


and Dvorak's


" Her performance is rendered even
by the sympathetic piano accom-


paniment given by Mrs. L. A. Schandler.
Feb. 20, 2i, 24. Mr. Schneppmueller's mechan-
ical and architectural drawing classes have open


nine.


Jan. 16. Mr. Schneppmueller sings three selec-


tions.


house.
exhibit.


We enjoy them, and then laugh long, while


Only too few visitors see the interesting


29. Another noonday staff meeting.


he tells us about Cousin Olga and something


ood MARCH.


to eat.


18. A staff meeting is held during lunch


hou-r.


Jan. 22.
school and


The faculty and students of the
.the eighth grade visit the U.
the eighth grade visit the U.


high
S. S.


California through the courtesy of Chaplains G. S.
Rentz and B. R. Patrick.


Jan.
gives


25. The Upsilon
a beach party at


of the faculty
wieners, and a


Gamma


Gamma


ew Cristobal in honor


and some girl friends.


good


sing contribute


Games,


to a satis-


March


7. Senior girls are hostesses for the last


time at the Supper Club.


an minstructive talk on


"Star


Miss O'Connell gives
s." After a delicious


supper the meeting is adjourned early on account
of the Sophomore party.
The Sophomore Class gives a Leap Year party.


Charlotte Housel as the vamp, and


stunts with Caldwell B. Foos


the month


impersonation will


long be remembered.
March 8. Feminine members of the faculty and
of the Senior Class plan a hike to Cativa. Only


r -







THE


CARIBBEAN.


makes their two hours interesting as well as in-


held at Jos6 Arosemena's home.


Business occu-


structive.


March 14-16. Twenty-five C. H. S. girls attend
Y. W. C. A. conference at Balboa. "Wasn't that
stunt funny at the frolic luncheon?" "Weren't
the Balboa girls good to us?" "Did Miss Pell


pies most of the time, but we find time to eat a
delicious supper, after which the boys prove their
ability to play a piano (player variety).
May 31. The Junior-Senior Banquet is held at


the Washington


Hotel.


Cheerful


conversation,


to speak


you about going


to sleep?"


"Aren't you glad our'Gipsy Idyll' won in the song
contest?" "We had the grandest ride Sunday
p.m.


March


21. Through


the favor of Mr.


P. R.


Joyce, the Tarpon Club at Gatun is placed at the


disposal of Cristobal High School for


the party


which Delilah and her losing side give for George


and his winning side.


They did not lose out in


choosing a place for the party!
March 22. The social problems class visit Gam-
boa penitentiary, Corozal Hospital, Palo Seco Leper
Home, and Chiriqui Prison. This is made possible


only by Mr. Hopkins' t
nished by Mr. Andrew,


wo cars, the passes fur-


and Captain


Phillips


loan of the police launch.


impromptu toasts, good things to eat, and dancing
keeps us royally entertained for the evening.
JUNE.
June 6. The senior play, "The Charm School,"
is given at the Gatun Clubhouse and draws a large
crowd.


June


The Charm School' Is given again-


at the America Theater.


June I. Again "T
sented at Coco Solo.


he Charm


School" is


Thanks folks, for your


generous applause."
June 14. Again we give our play-this time at
the National Theater to a Pacific side audience.
June 17. Miss Dodds entertains in honor of the
seniors at a dinner at the Old Washington Hotel
with the faculty as guests.


APRIL.


June 22.


Baccalaureate services are held at the


success.


blossom into a


The Easter bazaar is held and voted


"How the old laboratory did
beautiful flower-and-fancy-work


booth." "Oh! the delicious Easter bunmnies and
candies." "Will you ever forget the Tea Room
or the Blue Grotto?"
April 21. Tales of moonlight nights, beautiful
seas, and sailing boats are heard from the Easter
vacatiomnists.
April 29. Mr. Schneppmueller is compelled to
give up teaching on account of ill health, andsails
for the States, carrying a heavy load of our good


wishes.


Mr. Betterly


takes


his duties


mechanical drawing teacher.
MAY.
May 2. Most of THE CARIBBEAN work goes to


Union


Church.


June 23-25. Final examinations.
June 25. Graduation exercises
Washington auditorium.


June 30.


in the Hotel


Cristobal High School closes her doors.


The Junior Class had quite an eventful time
and certainly did a full share in the school activi-
ties. Starting out with the Senior party in which
each class had to give a skit, we pulled off a very
good Ku Klux Klan initiation in which the whole


class acted.
presented.


Of course this skit was the best one
Then we held several candy sales and


collected enough money to hold our party. We
started out with an entirely different kind of a
party, for we gave It at the Y. W. C. A. and the
crowd danced to the music furnished by a loud


the print
success.


ers.


The freshman


party is


a great


"Will you ever forget Butter Scotch or


speaker.
two little


Here we shone again, for our class gave
playlets, "The Bogus Count" and "A


Lt. Pinkin's quaint, sad love


affair?"


"Can't


Faculty Meeting


" in which the whole class co-


you see Emily Bledsoe as the stout lady, Henry


operated.


Then came the Easter Bazaar and here


Stevens


as the beautiful


vampire,


Sonneman as Jack be Nimble?"


Mrs. R.


Wilson takes up the duties of


again


the Juniors did


The Junior


Class gave two luncheons at the domestic science
building for the purpose of collecting funds for


-aaa I .1 ay C' n -1 fl


April 12.


a great









THE


CARIBBEAN.


- w


REFLECTIONS.


The Cambridge


Review.


Cambridge


andLatin


School,


Cambt


Isolated


as we are from so many hig


our exchanges mean much more to us


exchanges of most schools.


They


schools,


than do the


are like


voices


Your cart
EspanLolas"
ranged.


oons are great.


very much.


We enjoyed your


Your


magazine


r adge, A
"Notas


is well


from afar telling of the activities of other students;
of their athletic scores, of the plays thev have


The Gleaner.


Your headings


Pawtucket


are original


School, Pawtucket,
and clever. Th


given, of their clubs and


parties.


An exchange


Tattler is


unique.


gives


us an insight into a school's literary stand-


ards and ability, and into its ideals.
We have been very fortunate in receiving this
year many new monthlies and annuals, but we


The Curtis


Monthly.


Curtis


"The Post Office is a


High School, Staten


Island.


unique idea, and your


tis Blast" brought forth many


apartment headings


are also


a laugh.


N. Y.


"Cur-


Your de-


attractive.


regret to


say that we have not heard from some


of our old friends.
Junta, the Apokee
missed them.


Where


psian and


are the


the Herald?


and the
We've


The Student.


very good
are original


Holmes


magazine.


High School,


Your department head-


Your athletic records


are great.


We welcome all new exchanges, and are


eager


to add to our list any worthy school publications.
We are sorry to say that Balboa, our friendly
rival, published only a pamphlet last year instead


of her usual worthy annual.


However her maga-


TheExhaust.
We should


tents and


various


through t
list in the


South Euclid


High School, South Euclid, Ohio.


suggest that you have


arrange


a table of con-


the different departments under


heads.


he book before


corner


were obliged to look all


we found


your exchange


a page.


zine, though small, showed that she is still alive,


and it is with pleasure that
to put out a year book. V


we learn she is again


Ve hope that


we may


soon have it upon our exchange list.


The Reflector.


You have an
Your ads are to be


Middletown


excellent
envied.


Township High School,
Leonardo, i


exchange


department.


were delighted with


your comment on our magazine.


OUR REFLEXES TO


OTHERS.


thusiastic booster in our


You have an


en-


circulation manager.


The RedandBlack.


ReadingHigh School/for Boys,


Readin


The Scribbler.


FrankEvans


High School,


Spartanburg,


Your literary department contains unusually good


You have a wonderful literary department.


material.


You seem to excel in athletics.


exchange list is very


good, and your list of advertisers


is a delight to


the eve.


The Netop.
You have


Turners Falls


a clever


High School,


magazine.


Greenfield, Mass.
However we


The Spectator.


Johnstown


High School,


Johnstown,


looked in vain


for your exchange


department.


You have an excellent literary department.


We en-


should


suggest


that a table of contents and a few


very


much


your page


entitled


"Just a Mom-


and cuts would greatly improve your book.


Helen A.bendroth, '2S.


A


Lass.


Covington,


f


31


cartoons


cuts to


your


" But why not add a few


book?


ent.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


Neptune Township


Your athletic department is good.


High School,


Ocean Grove, N.
Your cover de-


The Squeedunk.
Through


again


Monroe City
the courtesy o


High School,


f Miss


Octave


received a copy of your worthy annual.


sign is always
arranged.


attractive and your ads are very well


beyond doubt, the best high school book we have ever


been fortunate enough


to receive.


We should ap-


preciate


on your exchange


The Ehco.


Norwalk


High School,


Norwalk, Conn.


very good paper devoted to school activities.


more cartoons


La Riata.


would greatly improve it how-


Albuquerque


Your annual is the


High School, Albuquerque,


second best we


have received


this ye
good.


ar.


Your dramatic department is especially


The cuts and cartoons are excellent. On look-


The Epitome.


Reading


High School for Boys,


Reading,


ing over the magazine


we wondered how such a good


A well-arranged magazine.


Your cuts are extreme-


annual could


be published without advertise-


ly good and your athletic records are to be envied.


ments.


Quoddy Light.
Your cuts
school news a


Lubec


are splendid.
mnd one of which


High School, Lubec,


Your magazine
:h to be proud.


The Pai.


Tamalpais


Union


High School, Sausalito,


Through the courtesy of Elinor Harrold, we


is full of
We con-


ceived this worthy exchange.


The departments are


gratulate you.


well arranged.


The pictures and cartoons are excel-


The cover design


unique


attractive.


The Retina.


M. R. Waite


High School,


Toledo, Ohio.


What more


can we say?


We like the
book is printed.


Your


fine quality of paper on which this
Your cover designs are always good.


headings and


io" is clever and w<


cartoons are
ell written.


excellent.


"Gos-


The Mimir.


La Grande High


This far-west exchange came as


to us.


School, La Grande, (
a pleasant surprise


We like it from the front of its very attractive


cover to the very end.


Your account of


school


The Voice


of South


Youngstown,


Ohio.


activities


indicates that you are very much alive.


A superior


magazine.


A heading for each depart-


would


greatly


improve


however.


The Pinion.


McKinley


High School,


Honolulu,


Hawaii.


We were especially


pleased to receive this far-away


The Torch.


West Philadelphia


High SchoolforGirls,
Philadelphia, I


You have a wonderfully well-developed exchange


exchange.
Linczer, a
yourathlet


Inoneoftheearlyissueswesaw thatOlga
former classmate of ours, was on one of


ic teams.


Your paper is full of local


department. You
always distinctive.


r drawings and cover designs are


We enjoyed the story


and receives our hearty applause.


"I Would


If I Could, But I Can't," by Dorothy Pizor,
appeared in the March number, as swimming
of the principal sports here.


The Oracle.


which
is one


Englewood High School, Englewood,


Your headings are clever.
deed a novel idea.


The poet's


corner is in-


The Monitor.


Wellesley


High School,


Wellesley


Mass.


Pebbles.


Marshalltown


High School, Marshal/town, Iowa.


A few more stories and cuts would greatly


improve


A splendid paper, with good athletic records.


your paper.


Why not tell where it is published too?


bigger


literary


department would improve it, how-


ever.


Reflector.
Your


Woburn


headings


High School, Woburn,


are good, but a more systematic


Mass.


The Round-


Reading


High School,


Reading, Mass.


arrangementof the contents would add greatly to the
attractiveness of your publication.


For so small a paper, you deserve praise.


literary department is


excellent.


The Breccia.


Dueering High


School,


Portland.


"Pebbles" is a unique heading for your clever jokes.


Searchlight.


Bound Brook High School, Bound Brook,


A well-arranged little paper, filled with school


A few


more stories would


very grateful for


help a good deal.


your comment


We are


news.


on our magazine.


A few more stories would improve it.


editor-in-chief


attended school in Bound Brook at


one time.


The Academy Journal.


NorwichFree Academy, Norwich, Conn.


Your cover design is always attractive.


Day" is


clever.


"Day by


cuts would help.


The Westport Crier.
Your paper


Westport High School,


is fully devoted


to school


Kansas City,Mo.


interests.


What greater praise


is there?


n t


tr 1 ft vi. trw I fl.
J L.a I, ~a fllfltt a


The Trident.


ever.


Monroe City,


Schulze we


N.M.


ment


I l f i r


M'y y 1


T f T^.


A/ J


nvi^M'/r









THE


CARIBBEAN.


AS WE ARE REFLECTED.


THE CARIBBEAN.


Your publication is excellent.


THE CARIBBEAN.


The Echo.


Your magazine is


extremely


attractive.


You have


many original ideas and your large number of photo-


THE CARIBBEAN.


graphs makes your


magazine attractive.


The Torch.


We consider ourselves very fortunate


with you.


Your magazine is splendid.


to exchange
To a boy or


THE CARIBBEAN.


girl in the States the photographs and well-written


(The exchange list of this
in the form of poetry.)


magazine, was written up


The first on our list is THE CARIBB


stories of THE CARIBBE


AN are


of special interest.


were delighted to hear about George
classmate of ours.


Oakes, a former


From Cristobal, Panama!
'Tis like a trip to a foreign


And is the best received by far.


The Reflector.


zone,


THE CARIBBEAN.


Quoddv


THE CAR


IBBEAN.


Your magazine is one of the best among our list


THE CARIBBEAN is the best yet.


fine pictures and such interesting
partments are well gotten up.


news.


as so many
All the de-


of exchanges.


It is well balanced and proves itself


The Scribbler.


to be the result of much hard work and student in-


terest.


The pictures


add greatly to the attractiveness


THE CARIBBEAN.


of the issue.


The Monitor.


We wish to give special mention to


of Fort San Lorenzo," by


arner


"The Dungeon
Bowers. Your


THE CARIBBEAN.


We welcome anything that comes such a long jour-


Distance lends enchantment.


well drawn up.

THE CARIBBEAN.


Your annual is


Some of the poems were wonderful.
The Record.


magazine gives a good idea of the country in which
you live.
The Mirror.


THE CARIBBEAN.


We find that this magazine is


We were delighted with our far-away friend, THE


partment.


complete in


ey have numerous pictures


every


of Panama


CARIBBEAN, with its splendid


tropics.


stories ot


life in the


Your cuts are very clever and your alumni


and views around the Canal Zone.


ing, helpful m


agazlne.


It is an interest-


are glad to exchange with


department is well developed.
splendid paper.


Y ours


certainly is a


CARIBBEAN.


The Spectator.


AN ORAL REPORT
(With apologies


Ten thousand


are on me


as I get up from my


Ten thousand'giggles greet me as I trip up on my feet;
And when, bewildered by the laughs, the words I quickly pour,
No stranger in the class can doubt I wish the thing were o'er.


IN ENGLISH CLASS.
:s to "Casey.")
rway, '26.

And there I stand before the
And they look on with laugh


class-a gasping


idiot there-


s and smiles, enjoying


the affair;


And when the words refuse to come and I can not even speak,


And when again the whole class laughs,


"Sit down!"


says Miss


Hornbeak.



THE seventh annual issue of THE CARIBBEAN is completed. We of the staff have worked hard, for we were
Loath to have it fall below the standards set for us by any of our predecessors, and we were anxious
^ Bthat students of future years might look upon our annual as worthy of their emulation. We say it Is
completed. It will never be complete. No one knows that better than we. We see its errors, its
- shortcomings. But in spite of them we are unashamed. We feel that we have put into it that which we most desired
it to have-a bit of the real Cristobal High School spirit. What we have done however could never have been
accomplished without the aid of those of you who read this. You have surprised us, accustomed though we are to
your kindnesses, by your generosity and interest. People of the Atlantic side, ever loyal in their support, have sur-
passed themselves this year. Even people on the Pacific side have given material evidence of their interest.
Personal thanks are out of the question. Consider this is written to yzu. We of Cristobal High School thank you.
We can not close, however, without a special word of gratitude to our tried and true friends of the Panama Canal
Press, who have indubitably proved, in ways which we can not mention, and for which we can never sufficiently


The Trident.







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Char otte Ho:tsel, '24.


SIMPLY


SUGGESTIONS.


WHAT


IF SOMEONE


ELSE HAD


SAID IT?


CharIotte Housel,


We students of Cristobal High School realize
that unless some necessary improvements are car-
ried out within a short time, so as to produce a
reaction in studies and lessen the physical action,
the high school as a whole will continue to suffer.
Speaking not as a critic or cynic but as a person
who is very much interested in the welfare of the
school, I suggest that individual telephones be


installed in
that they m


the desks of certain individuals, so


may


converse


with one another the


entire study period, as some desire, without dis-
turbing the whole assembly.
Comfortable cots are desirable for those tired
exhausted human beings who study so hard and
wonder why they receive only a scarlet "F" or
a timid "P."
A sounding board in front of the assembly room
to throw the teacher's voice, so that she can im-


press upon


the hard-of-hearing pupil what she


wants and expects, would prove a success-pro-
vided nothing else were thrown except the voice.
An inexhaustable supply of paper is imperative
so that the paper in some people's desks won't
prove a magnet to the nails on the fingers of the
less fortunate or forehanded.
A giggle-muffler to silence those who find a joke


in everything


common


sense


in nothing


would not prove unacceptable.
i. .
And last but not least, a machine to utilize the
lost motion caused by individuals who love to


Miss Dodds (to Richard Fisher who had just
come from the luncheon given by the Juniors).-
How was the luncheon to-day?
Richard Fisher.-As good as you could expect
from beans.


WE HOLD
Miss


) THESE
O'Connell


TRUTHS TO BE
(outside the


SELF-EVIDENT.
room).-Miss


Hornbeak?
Miss Hornbeak (inside the room).-Yes.
Miss O'Connell (still outside).-Are you gone?

Three o'clock in the morning-old Ancon Club-
house after a basket ball game.
Z. P.-You fellows open the door now. I've
been up here three times and I'm going to settle
this.
John S. (anxious to help out).-We're all sleep-
ing, sir.
OF COURSE HE DIDN'T KNOW SHE MEANT KIPLING'S
VOLUME.
Miss Hornbeak (in front of room).-I am very
anxious to find "Mine Own People."


(surprised-in


of room).-Why,


thought they were in Texas.
AND THIS IS WORD PLAY!
Guy (talking of giving a play to get money for
expenses for the annual staff).-How would the


"Three Musketeers


do for a staff play?


Chester.-Oh no, that s all sword play, isn't it?


explore


unknown


parts


of the assembly


room


HEARD IN SPANISH CLASS.


would perhaps store the needed energy for the


nnor tired indlividualk who.


when a basket ball


Surse Taylor (in an exercise of original sentences









THE


CARIBBEAN.


$;J-


. -\-\





THE


CARIBBEAN.


Cecilia Theatre America Theatre
PANAMA COLON
Thte Abrince of 1p)oto Dramatic Art
Exhibitors of -
PARAMOUNT, REALART, UNITED ARTISTS, FIRST NATIONAL,
FOX, SELZNICK, HODKINSON, VOGEL, GOLDWYN, ASSOCIATED
PRODUCERS and PATHE PRODUCTIONS. .


QUALITY IS EVERYTHING
I Naturally, having spent many years in the making of portraits, we
have very positive ideas on that subject. To our mind a quality
g portrait should have distinction of pose. Day and night photography.





THE CARIBBEAN.


LI


ANCON,


C. Z.


ANAMA


DISTINCTIVE


HOTEL


Where comfort and


refinement combined with


moderate charges are at your convenience


Overlooking the City of Panama and


the Pacific Ocean


EUROPEAN


Room without bath, one person


PLAN


per day $2.50 and up


Room with bath, one person ............. per day
Room without bath, two persons .. per day
Room with bath, two persons ... ... per day


4.00 and up
6.oo00 and up
7.00 and up


- U -


TIV(





THE


CARIBBEAN.


IMPROVED


EQUIPMENT


MODERN


METHODS


EFFICIENT


SERVICE


JACKSON'S


STEAM


LAUNDRY


BROADWAY


NEAR


FOLKS


RIVER


We


Solicit the


Patronage of


Canal


Employees.


****


Weekly Collections and Deliveries of Laundry Work.


Charge Account if Desired.


CLEANING,


PRESSING,


and


DYEING


SPECIALTY


Pa'nl-1oaf11t-h, C, 7






THE


CARIBBEAN.


BORDEN'S


GARA


GE


Latest


Model


Automobiles


COMPETENT
12th & Bolivar Streets


CHAUFFEURS


AND


RELIABLE

Telephone


CARS

355 Colon, R. P.


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STILSO0NI


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Paints,


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


o the discerning,
H omelike hospitality, coupled with
~Eagerness to serve


Will spell hotel comfort,
A Airplane View of Hotel Washington.
nd efficiency.
Such are conditions at the
HOTEL WASHINGTON.
I t is indeed fortunate in its setting-one of
N natural beauty enhanced by man's artifice;
Grounds bordering on the blue Caribbean;
T rees-stately palms, and starry perfumed
frangapam;
Orchids, roses, and cheery periwinkles;
N atatory privileges afforded in a splendid
salt-water pool.

Here in a beautiful concrete building in
Old Spanish style
T here are conveniences for visitors
from near and far; and
Ending the joyous day, comfort-
able beds where one is
T ulled to sleep by the sound of





THE


CARIBBEAN.


ARBOIZ HERMANOS

I . :. babies' 3Jmporteb areub Jats '..'
FANS, COMBS, SHAWLS and other FANCY ARTICLES
Stores in both
PANAMA and COLON
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SSpalding's Athletic Goods

TRACK
%, <^ BASEBALL
BASKET BALL
GOLF
3rTENNIS
- BOXING I
| SWIMMING
|GYMNASIUM
\and Accessories
2 ^Sole Agents
The Maduro Company
21 Central Ave., Panama
P. O. Box o1078 Telephone 24
3WWWWWWWWWWlWBWW


BINOCULARS
of the Best Quality |
nWWnnnnn


L.C.


Leighton


Photographs


FLASHLIGHT


GROUPS


SPECIALTY


7x17 Doubleweight Sepia


Views of Canal Zone






THE


CARIBBEAN.


- :", ,- ,- -- -- -- -






CRISSTOBA,,CAN AL ZONE
!s


I..


I








PSTUDEBAKERn is the second largest automobile manu-
facturer in the world, and the largest
builder of quality cars in the world. Studebaker's lowest-priced car has
more Timkin bearings throughout than any other car selling within $1500oo
of their price.

R. E. HOPKINS Sole Dealer for Canal Zone and Republic of Panama
THIS IS ANOTHER STUDEBAKER YEAR
^ -- _ ._ _ _ __A


iotarp Club of Cristobal=Colon

MEETINGS EACH MONDAY AT NOON
AT THE STRANGERS CLUB : : :
0........ ~ .


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


FAST
COMFC
LAUNCH
EVERY

Tourist
- WWW


)RTABLE


Lse aspintwall


HIES
DAY


LS-


Don't


Miss It


Jotet


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SWIMMING
HIKING
MOONLIGHT
DANCING

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Phone Corp. 298


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TABOGA


"Typical Tropical Isle"


R. P.


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


m m m m-- m -- W mm m -- -- -


PHONE 395 COLON
h MORGAN'S GARAGE
The Only Reliable Garage on the A4
DEPENDABLE SERVICE
5 nATT A FtAfl AHTTh nDE C'flfTlflT'T'1'


E
tl


PHONE 395 COLON

ntic Side
tntic Side


1






THE


CARIBBEAN.


^ -f



KS


------


--------- m--__-


*& a
3 Richards' Photo Studio


7.o018 Front Street 68 Harbour Street
Phone Colon, No. 9 Kingston, Jamaica
P. O. BOX 523, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH ---

Stamped "RICHARDS"

is a mark of quality and distinction. Many years of
experience in making pictures gives us original ideas.


STUDIES OF LADIES AND INFANTS OUR SPECIALTY
^ fl


COMPLIMENTS OF

Cr. Vrin ari er

Cristobal, C. Z.


I





THE


CARIBBEAN


- --


(COLON


BRANCH)


The last word in


ELECTRICAL


APPLIANCES


at temptingly low prices


CURLING IRONS


DESK


LAMPS


HEATING


FANS
PADS.


GRILLS


IRONS


(Domestic and Tailors'


PERCOLATORS,


SEWING


MACHINE


MOTORS


TOASTERS


VIBRATORS


WAFFLE IRONS


Phone 150, Colon


Corner 9th Street and Balboa Ave,


I I
IMaxwell-Kelso
rSales Company

1 We Have the Gift You Want
For somebody's birthday, for the Bridesmaids and
Ushers, for Prizes and Favors to be distributed to -
--- the lucky ones at the Party-
| Parker Duofold or
| JLady Duotold
o the fountain pen classic. The Over-size Duofold,
$7, is that beautiful big black-tipped,lacquer-red pen
with the super-smooth point that has transformed
hand-writing from a task into a genuine pleasure. MNC T M
IDuofold Jr. same except size, with neat gold pock-
et-clip, $5; or the slender Lady Duofold with hand-
Some gold band and gold ring-end for her ribbon or CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


I


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Full Text

PAGE 2

-.

PAGE 5

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www. arch ive. org/details/caribbean 1924cris

PAGE 7

THE CARIBBEAN V O L VII. CR I S T O B AL, C A N: \1. ZO;\lE No. I _____ ....-__ P U B L I S H E D _BY T H E C RI S T O B A L HIG H SCHOOL CON TENT S .. ... L PIIH:, ',N 76-SM Alumni. 1I.IORGAN, 1 8 Golt C m :STER L PIKE. '24 6 1 f\ppreciati o n 7.l the S h o res of t he Caribbean CAR I8BEAN Siaff CLAI UCP. STEI:SllhRC '26 6 3 Dedicatio n E d it o r ial.. GI . \llVS B LOW"SOE, '1-1 .. Elt c hanges .. liE U::>: "\IlENl>ROTII,'15 7 1 F a c ult)', The. 6 1 6 8 F r es hm a n Class ... Gradu 3 1 t's J o kes Junior Class 13 Lewlngs. SESIOR CLASS 1924 12: Li t erary.. FLORENCE ALIlHRT. '1-1 23 A Capture.. { . A F ew Cente r s of Canal Zone AClh' ity 38 About Ihe Canal DELILAIl ), IA\', '26 -10 A Coost Defense Garri:.on GEORGE 0"10:"<;, '2-t 38 Cristobal Co. 'ding Station l\I ILDRED '15 41 F r o m the Intcrio r DORonl\' '2-1 43 R a l p ho, T h o u Dosl P revaricatc" F I.ORENCE Au;n:RT, '24 43 The Contro l lIo y sc o f GalUli Lock s DOROTHEA '26 Through t h e Can a l I RENE M CCOVRT, '24 "An d Things a r e Not What Seem" The D og Wrought theChangc,.EDITH COL' L BOVRN', '14 Only a Baby DOROTlI Y ABENDROT H '24 Average Boy AROSE:o.I ENA, '24 Beyond the C h ag r es" C' ALDWEL L B. Foos, '25 C h a rcoal CARLOS PUU;AR. '26 D o You R e member ? F LORENCE A I .tlERT, 24 38 0 6. 60 59 6 1 24 53 60 Education b y Travel 32 ( B y the Senior Class III Econom ics.) The Trip ill General,. C HESTER L. Pua:, '2-\ 32 Can a l Zone P enitentiaf)' F I.ORENCE ALUEI(T, 'z,t 32 Can a l Zone H o m e for the Insane RVTH H OI' K IN<", '25 32 The T r i l ) t o Pal o Seeo L epe r Colony CAU)WEI.L B, Foos, '15. 3 4 The D isease GUY STEWART, 25 34 The Cure }o;:ATIlER IN F ISCH ER, '15 35 The C hapel WILL IA.'I '25 36 I ife in Panama 5 4 \t juan Franlo jO",E AROSE.'U:NA, '14 54 C'arna\'al DUROTlIY t \ BNDROTII, '24 55 Panama LottC'ry Office GI..\lH'" B LOWANDE. 'N 55 Shipward BOllnd 'IS 5 4 T he I ce Cream \'cndcr ('IIE",TER L, PIKF., 56 Lucks" CAWWELL B. Foo<., '25 H "Oh, Ther e are \'oices of tile I)ast" '26 46 On the Road to ('ath'a CHARLOTTE HOUSEL, '14 Pitcairn-"lI.lrstic of the South Seas" B I .ISS, '26 P laces of I nterest III Panama Cativ.1. J UAN B p,\pl, 'Z 6 Esco\'al \OENDII.OTII, '24 San Bias as by a Senior ;\IARKIL\.'I '14 Sympathetic of :-,tear-By Scene'! OAI<:K'>, '14 '24 DOROTtI\' '14 GI._\DY'> B. 1..0\\'A:-"t>l>, 'Z-I FLORE:-:O : .\LO&RT '1:4 EUITH '14 6 1 57 48 51 52 T en Precepts of English GI . \ I )\S B. '}4 2J The Coral Tree S hark-A L eKend ;\[ORRI<; 1\I ARCIIOS KV, '15 37 L'p-tothe\lmute 29 .\s It Never Was,. Cm,-sTER L. PIKE, '14 30 Shades of the Great OAKES, '14 29 Who "'::nows Noah's Troubles? jO..,E '24 29 73 .\n Oral Report in English Class, JOIlN ORI)\\'A\', '26 73 1\loonlight in the Tropics SE:-:I OIt ENGLISH C LASS, '23 '24 2 After Toil C HESTER L PIKE, '14 47 The Pool T ropical Snowballs > rogn o ... tication by RJdiJ.tion School Notcs. Sophomor e Class Sports Boys Girl<; T h e Soul of the School DOROTlI\' '24 67 jo-,E AROSUI ENA, '14 56 CLAS" OF tc)24 12 SONNEM,\N, '24 68 Gu' STEWART. '15 Kl'T H DL'EY. '25 GEORG E OAK!>!>, '24 62

PAGE 8

THE CARIBBEAN. M oonlight in the Tro pics. The moonlig h t's s iiv e r s h een i s o n th e sea Wh ere rippl ing wavelets wrap the ve rdant s hore; J [ forms a pathway l eading str aight from m e To d r ea m r omance throug h fancy's go l den d oor. A palm a silent se n t inel l eans o u t A c r oss the bay-nil jewelled b y t h e light The g l istening, g leaming fircAies A ir abo u t And emphasize th e bla c kne ss of the nigh t. The s hadow s mark the pa ss ing o f t h e h o ur s; Fro m t r o uble s of th e day one find s surcease; The lan gu i d odo r of the tropic flo w e r s P e rfume s the air and brings a se n se o f peace. H ow calm, ser ene, and quiet now seems l ife "Far from th e madding c rowd's ignoble SENIOR ENCLI S U C LA SS, '23 'l4.

PAGE 9

THE C A RIBB EAN. &//10 R ow I-GladY8 Lowande, Edito r -in-Chief; Ruth U opkilll!. Assisl:int Editor-in-Chief; Geo r ge Cake!!, Circulation Man:t.gcr ; Deli l ah M ay, Aasist:lTLtCi r eulation Mansger R o w 2-Cheal cr Pike. Business Man:l{;cr ; WiIJi:un Cou;;illl!, Auistant Business M a u age r : Ethel Sonncman, School Notes Edi t or ; Ch r istian Art Editor Ro w 3-JoaC A rosemc n a, A $'!ist1nt BUlIiness M anager; F l o rence Albert, Literary Edito r ; Guy Stewart, Edito r Boys' A thletics; Ruth Duey, Edit t Girls' Athletics. R Olli' -IMis8 J. I sabella D odds, Staff A dvise r ; M ildred M organ, Alumni Editor: H e lell Abendroth Exchange Editor: C h a t lotte Housel. Joke E dito r 3

PAGE 10

4 THE CARfBBE: \ N. DITORIAL. THE CARIBBEAN is to Cristobal Hi gh School far more than is implied in just the word "annual." lc is a goal-an oppo rtunit y -a challenge. Have you a talent for literary co m position ? Y our goal will naturally be to conce ntrate and improve upon your former E.nglish work in orde r that YOli may so perfect one o r more articles as to mak e them worthy of a coveted place within the covers or the I'ea r book. Perhaps your ability may r oll o w t h e lin e o r art. D oes not th e book demand the exe r c i se or s u c h ability? There i s constant oppo rtunit y for th e development o f clever department h ead ing s and n ovel class designs. .Apa rt f rom these m ore eviden t p h ases comes the c h allenge; th e c h allenge to aid in the sale or advance tickets for either the book o r the sen i o r p lay, to advertise, by wo r d of mouth o r by the making o f a poster, and t o doone' s s har e willingly f o r the baza ar, wh e th e r it be in solic iting o r b y wa s hing dishes; the c h alle nge to the election of s taff officers, n o t becau se o r popularity but b eca u se o r capable and dependable qualities; and last, th e challenge t o th ose e l ec t ed to carryon th ei r int e r es ting and im p ortant w ork with th e utmost thought and c are. Althou g h this i s, briefly, the runction in the sc h ool r oo m, the sc h oo l itselris n o t the o nly b o d y concerned with th e s u ccess o f THE CARIBBEAN, for there i s als o t h e comrnunity, whic h wh e n called upon, ha s res pond ed with an overwh e lmin g lis t o f kind acts. .As a r esult, t h e an nual not only se r ves it s purpos e in the sc hool but continues to fun ctio n as a po int of contact b e tw ee n the hig h sc hool student and th e community, t h e r eby not o nly welding a s t e adfast frie nd s hip, but keeping alive th e int eres t o f th e community in sc hool a c tiviti es and it s faith in it s youn g people Illebitation. T O O l R FACULTY, \\'H O H A n : SO ABLY AND WILLlNGLY A:-
PAGE 11

THE CARIBBAEN. 1'1-11:: SOU L OF T H E SC H OO L Grorge Oakes. "2.f. S c h oo l spirit i s to t he sch oo l what esprit de corps i s t o an army. It i s th e spirit o f the body, the suhmerge n ce o f self f o r the good o f the w h o l e I t is manifested in many wa ys A s an example of t h e submerge n ce o f sel f f o r the good o f the sch oo l con s ider the b o)' o r girl wh o i s anxious t o appear to good advantage in athletics, has set his mind o n playing on the team in an importa n t contest against a riva l sc h oo l, and, at the e l eve n t h hour, gives p l ace willingly t o anoth e r thus defea t i ng his f o nclest h o p es, but e n suring that the t eam r eprese n ting his sc h oo l s hall win. This is one o f th e h ig hest forms o f sc h oo l s p irit, the sacrifice o f t h e individual for the good of t h e sc h ool. S c h oo l spirit is a l so manifested by the student body unde r a c heer leader c h ee rin g a n d encou raging the sc h oo l w hil e its I'nc n arc e ngaging in an athletic contes t with a rival t cam, and perhaps i s never b etter s h o wn, t han whe n, i n the face o f certai n defeat, it loyally urges o n its own team to co n ti nu e th e fight But sc h oo l spi rit i s not co nfin ed to l oy all y supporting and enthus iasticall y c h eerin g o n the-.l.eam on the at"leti c field. The submer gence of se l f is sel f-di scip line and t h ere i s a d i scip lin e o f the c la ss ro o m as well as milita r y disc iplin e or t h e disc i p lin e of a well r eg u lated business office. That particular student body i n whi c h t h e s a c rific e o f self and t h e loyal support extended to t eac h e r s arc best manifested, i s t h e best exe mplifi catio n o f sc h oo l spirit or esprit de corps F or, whi l e sc h oo l spirit o n the athletic fie l d i s n oisy and easy to acquire, the oth e r must b e s l ow y acquired in everyday work in t h e prosaic class r oo m

PAGE 12

6 THE CARIBBEAN. Dodd...", Miss H ornbeak. Miss O'Connell. Mr. SchncPPlUueller Miss Barnhouse. Miss Bakewell. MissCUl'Ticr. BY THE S H O RES OF THE CAR IBB EAN. On [he shores of Caribbe.1Il On the shining Big Sea Water Stands Cristobal Hi g h, the might)', Stands in pride the seat of learning For each loyal son and daughter. I n this building i s a teacher, She, 1\lls5 Dodds of l inneso(a, Chief of all that she sets eyes on, B est chief on the whole horizon. Chief of old Cristobal H igh. 5he it is who teaches Latin, P ounds it in until we kn ow it Wonders then why we don't show it \\'hen we have examinations. She it i s who know s old Julius Caesa r, of the Roman battles She it i s fro m whom the Senio r s Learn soc iology and Engli s h. An d that Engli s h how she knows it! Know s it as it s hould be spoken, Know s it as it s houl d be written, Kn ows it 'wa), from firs t to la st, Kn ows it 'way from last to first, Kn ows it with it s firs t s ide la s t s ide, Kn ows it with its la s t side firs t s ide, Ver), learned i s Dodds, From T exas, then, we Il.lve l\l i ss H ornbe.lk, She, the one who i s so littl e, Littie-)'et so awe-inspiring; She, t h e onc who sternl}' gazes, Gazes at u s, almost through u s, Gazes through u s, never round u s, \V ,mts to have the book r eport Wh ic h was 'sposed to have been written But was somehow just forgotten Then she tells us we must S fa )' in, Sta), in till the t hin g is wriucn-Till we get so ti re d of sittin' Till ou r heads a re ncar t o splitfin', Till we write and h a nd It in! W e l ook forward to h e r classes Classes wh e re she h o ld s our interest A s s he gravely stand s expounding Facts which a re a joy to le arn. Clariu Sleenberg, ':?6. Then o'er science, mathematics, R eigns the wondrous Mi ss O'Connell. She who talk s of a'2 b'2, Tells u s of an x'l y'l Multiplied by C2 d'2, Then br,tnches off to I I'l 0 Until we think our brains are slow So very slow they will not go When e'er s he speaks of H 2 0_ I n this great Cristobal H igh Sc h oo l W e have with us H er r Schneppmueller; H e does teach the bo)'s t heir d r : l\ving. I r not d r awing, then they're planning, I r not plannin g then t hey're d r awing. Plane geometry he teach es; With hi s compass and his rule r H e does work ou t propos ition s ; i\l.lkcs us feel our bl:tnk brJ in's dumbness, i\l lkes u s fee l our dumb b r,lin's b la nkness, i\lakes u s wish that we were smart as "Schncppie" is in problem's plane. Next we have with u s 1'vl iss B ,lkewe ll, She of h ou s ehold arts and history, She who makes us Ie I rn of Europe L e lrn it from the outside inside, Learn it (rom the inside outside Study till we know it right side, Bone it till we know it wrongside, T ill we know it all b y h eart_ Last, not least, ou r dea r Mi ss Barnhouse. She from whom we learn the Spanis h Till we think that we C,1n speak it, Till we think that we can write it, Till on our Spanish f r iends we try it And find t hey do not unde r stand. On the s hore s of Caribbean, On thi s s hin ing Big Sea Water, I n this noble seat o f learning Teac her s six whom we have told of, Teachers whom we re very fond of, Teachtrs whom we've l iked to tell o f Prepa r e us for o ur future days.

PAGE 13

THE CARIBBEAN. 7 h. W W ANDREW, P rovi dence, R hode Island. Sup,rilllmdtnl oj Schools. l\h. FRANK 1'. \VILSON, SeHde, Wa shington. Uni\'ersity of Washington. .r/His/a1Jl 1 0 Superinlmdml oj Schools. l\] ISS J ISABELLA DODDS, Clareillont, l\ linnesota. l\lacalcs ter College. En.'{Ush, Lalill, Social Probltms fwd ECOllomiCJ. ClU'jbbrtlll Stall A.fuiur. Senior Clau //dviur. I.' CHAUCERIAN VEIlSE. Eel;; now we'll rell you of our principal Who's sikerly of port full amyable, Who does her best always to be of cheer I n school, in church, in clubs, bot h far and neaf. Of c..esar, too She know s the p 1St :mJ present throug h an.! through. From Cl : m:mont f ou r long ye.lrs ago s he came ; Since when we know l\t i ss Dodds b y n1me and fame. !\IISS AOEI. A F BAKEWELL, Lansing, I owa, I owa State College. University of California. I/omr Eronomics, /\fodern Hi,;I(1)'. 71111ior Class ,-1dfJiur. IN I.ONG M f.n:R, T o judge her, you must know her well I n all her classes and her moods: Of modern h ist'ry s he can tell, And how to make the best of f oods, T o say this is to say th e least -Search every comment you can findT o p l a n a party o r a feast l\l iss B akewell ne'er once ha s declined. l\llss HATTIE LEE HORNBEAK, Waxa h achie, T exas. Trinity University, Columbia Univer sity, EnxliJ/" Ameri{'(lll Hhlory and Ci viC!, Frnlllllll1l CIIIss Adviser, I N ItIME ROYAL Perh aps yo u think it strange that we s h o u l d s p e n d Our time t o write of o n e so very small; But, if yo u knew her well who stri ves to lend I n spi rin g t hought s t hat to our best selves call, That mo l d our speech and ideal s into all That's beautiful,-with us then you woul d seek, The friend ship of Miss Hattie L ee H ornbeak. But think not that i s all that s h e can do; H e r j o llin ess close rival s her good will, Her pleasing smi l e her enemies can '/'00; An d when, in doubt as to a word to fill The vacant space in a new Englis h thrill, W e seek her aidw hate'er our str aits a nd moodS h e win s, b y patience rare, our grati tude, MISS MABEl. JEAN BARNHOUSE, \Vatsonville, California. U!land St::lIldfo rd Jr. Universit)'. Sptl1lisl, Sopho m ort elllss .-1dviur, I N OTTWA RIM \. P e rhaps you'r e not so fortunate as we I n having one who t:tkes the utmost c.l re I n te.1ching you SO that you pl.t inl y see T he "why" and "whe:1" of Sp. lIli s h an I the "where;" Whose wit and mirth and jolly comp:U1Y A ,ffor,1 u s merriment beyond comp.l re ReglrJl ess of the person, place, o r tow n, One better than 1\l iss Barnhouse can', be found, l\llss H O'CONNELl Grand Rapids, Creighton Universit}" University of 1\1 innesota. ."'Igeora, Coural Scimu, Ph:'nics, SoIiJC .. omeiry. I COM.\IOX MeTER, J u s t one s hort ) e.lr s he h 1S been here, Bu t )'ou s hould see what s he has done. She's mlde all doubts and pu zz l es clear; And with her, work's turned into fun. She's good in P hysics, Algebra; But that is not t h e be s t Wh y so few bugs in P a n ama? 1\1 i ss O'Connell h:l s the re st! !\h .. HENR\ K. SCHNEI'PMUELI.ER, S:tint Paul 1\linnesota. Stout Institute. \falllwi Trainin g, ,\{uhal1iral Drtl wjll,{, Ct'olllt'lr )'. I N SVf.NSERI\N STANZA Of 1\l r. Schneppmueller we'll n ow relateThe d r awing teacher of Cristobal H igh, Wi t h tourist hat, umbrella, at a rate Of fifty mile s per hour he seems to A)' T o sc h ool with giant str ides that pass us by, Just six feet o ne as you can easy see ; With blonde moustache and horn-rimmed bri ght hlue e\e; A voice thlt maketh for u s melody,-The man most l iked and worthy of our f.lclllt)', MISS HUEN F CURRIER, 1 \ linneapolis, l\l i nnesota. University of Chorus,Orcheslra. I N :.HORT METER. l\l iss Currier can jest Just like the rest of us, And though we seldom do our be s t S he'd rather smile than fuss. She comes just once a week T o widd her good baton, The best in mus i c here to seek And help u s carryon,

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THE CARIBB EAN. C HARLorr E H OUSEL. ''20-''21 Chorus. Schoo l B asket B all. I nd oo r B aseball. "Olympian Council." Trac k ''2 1 -'22 Class Basket B all. C h o rus. Girl s' Glee Club. ':2'2-''23 Girl s Athletic Editor, THE CARIBBEAN. Schoo l B asket B all. T rac k "The Prin cess and t h e Sage. ''23'24 President Senior Class. Ch o rus. President Girls' Athletic Assoc i ation. Supper Club. Basket B all. I nd oo r B ase ball. T ennis. "Charm School." J oke Editor, THE CARIBBEAN. GEORGE OAf.:ES. 10-''21 D elaware Cit), H igh Sc h ool. ''21 -'2'2 Middl etown T ow n s hip H igh Sc h ool. '21 -''23 Sc h oo l Basket B a ll. B aseball. T rack Chorus. '23 ''24 C I :lss Vice President. President B oys Athletic A ssociation. Circ uLlfion f!.1:mager, THE CARIBBEAN. B aseba ll. Class B a s ket B a ll. S c hool Basket Ball. Track. Swirllming. Chorus. "Charm Sc h oo L"

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THE CARIBBEAN. Curtis Il lgh Schoul. '21 '22 B .l!:.ketball. H igh School Charmi. Supper Club. '.!.! ',!J Editor, THE. CARIBBE.A:>'. V icc P resident Supper C1uL. Gas:. Secret.lfr Literary Editor, Till:; S upper Club. The Charm School." Cnoru:.. CIIEST[R L. PI KE ':0-'11 J efferson High School, P ortl.tnd Oregnll \\est Phl 1.1delphia School, Phibdelphi'l, P .l. 11 Lunden Iligh Srh uul, Camden, :-"', J 'll eLI" .. P rcsidt:nt I .. dnor, THE Choru:.. School B .lsket B.1I1. Cl.ts:. B,I:.J...et B all. Schoo l T enllls. Class T ennis. '13 '2-+ President, l'psilon G.Llnma G,nnma. B u ... int: ...... i\1.magcr THE C\RIBBEAX. T rack. School B .lsket Ihl!. eLlS'> B.I .. kCl B .d!. Choru ... "Ch:lrm School.' GL\DYS B. LOIY.-\:-:DF.. '':::>--'11 Cbs'> .scner.tn', Supper Club. "Olympl,1Il CounciL" T rack. B owling. I ndoo r B .lsehall. Sc h ool B a ll. "21-'.:::. Class V ice P resident. Athl etic A ssociatio n-Secretary. Chorus. Swimming. Basket B.III. '.!.! '!J :-\ssist.lnt Editor, THE CAR1DBE, \ ..... Secret;lr). Girls' Athletic .\::'so<:I;I[ion. T r ysti ng P lace T rack. B asket B.III. '1J-'14 E ditor, THE CARtBSEAS. Yice P resident, Girls' Athletic Association Ch o ru s Supper Club. "Charm School." Basket B all. I n doo r B aseball. T ennis. 9

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1 0 THE CARIBBE"';\. ET H E L SONNHIAN. '20-'11 "Esme r:ll d a. " Ol) mpi a n Counc il.' zl -'n C h or u s. G l ee Club. Suppe r Cluu '22-'23 C h o ru s Glee Club T e nnis. Supper Club '23-'24 Ch o ru s. S c h oo l N otes Editor THE CARIBBEAN. "Cha rm S ch oo l." ED I T H COULBOURN '20-'21 Wc:,t Ph i l a delphi a H i g h S c h oo l f o r Girl s '21 ''2'2 l\l i l f o r d H i g h S c h ool. '22 '23 A ss i stant Cir c u latio n M anager, Til E CARIBBEAN C l a ss Se c r e t a r y Ch o r u s. Su ppe r Club. Gl ee C l ub. 2 3-''2 4 Cho ru s Supper C l ub. "Ch a r m S c h oo!." I RENE '20-' 2 1 "Ol y mpi a n C o un ci1." ''21 -''22 Ch or u s. G irls Gle e Club. S u ppe r Club. 'lZ '23 C h o rus. S u pper C l ub. '23 ''24 S u ppe r C lub. Ch o ru s C h a rm S c h ool."

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THE C AR 1 BBE.-\:--.'. D O R OTHY B. A B EN DR OTH. '20-'21 B alhoa High Sc h oo l : n ''.!2. B a lboa High Sc h ool. '2'2-' 2 3 B as k eth: llI. C h oru s Suppe r Cluh. ''J.J' :1.l-Ch o rus. Ch :um Sc hool." J O S f : 19-'1 0 B a lh oa H i g h S c h ool. '20-' 21 Europe. 2 1 ''2'2 H alh oa Iligh School. n '13 B a'lk e t B :lII. "Grump\ Ch o rne;, '13' 2 4 THE CARI BB E A N A<;<;ist:1nt \\lanager. T r:tck. C l a ss B a s ket B a ll. S c hool B a s ke t B a ll. S c h oo l B:tse b all. Ch o rus. "Charm S c hool." I NZA i\ I A R K H Ai\ t. '20-'21 "Ol y mpi a n C o uncil. 2 1 2'2 Suppe r Club. '22-' 2 3 Suppe r Clu b 2J-''24 Suppe r Club. II

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'1'1-1 E c.-\ R I BY I tllneo in the radio. "Sratioll .I] D speaking. The lates t rep orts from swrion C H \\ill now b e given." I st'rrled down to spend a pleas:1l1t evening. "Class of ':::!.I---" Gosh! 1 turned it ot f. Tuning in again, lata, I caugh t the la s t of a lung-winded speech I\l r .lost: Arosemen
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T H E C.'\RIB B E .-\:-.'. .> Saml"'! iI}' ('lock Position: I )Iildred Mor gan; :2 AndrewSmitb; .3 Annie! U eim ; -I Kathenne Fischer; [, CaldwellJ.oos: 6 Doroth)' Stauffe r: 7 M o rr is 8 Olga-Areta: 9 \\llham ('ou!ul!; 10 D elbe r t: 11 H aml"tSteenberg; 12 Richard Fishe r ; Cenlt'f, .\delli Bak ewell. Ba.'Ie 1 Hrlrn .\llt'lIdroth; b33e:2 Ruth H opkllls: b:tie 3 Guy SteW-,ut; b35e -I RUlh Du .. )", Not berenl, Mar got Pugle),. CLASS OFFIG. RS. Ruth Hopkins-P resident. Gu)' Stewart-\ 'ice_ P residenr. Dorothy D eibert -Secretary and T reasurer. ABESDROTH, HELEX H er nickname, Fluff y rather belles her sec let bit ion whic h i s "to be:l boy." ARC IA OLGA She wallts to he sop h isticated, but "Olguit:!." is r:uher ..,\\eer. BAKEWELl., ADEI.A Our good adviser hac; decided TO ..,weH oft" ;Ul)" morc J uni or-Senior banquet". COUS I =-S, \\"II. I IA", T o be a P aderewski on the uke is Willie\" luramoullt desire. DEIBERT, DOROTHY "Dot" gOt Illad when we discovered that s he wanted to be :In old maid. DUE\-, Rl'TH I {ufu:>" has s u c h Illusical ta l ent that :Ill belie,'C: s he'll elcV:lte th e hum hIe hurdr-gurd \ to tht: r ealms o f hig h er :lrt. F I SCHER, t\: Afln:RI :-.E "Kill)" h onesdy :tlld Iru l ) want:> to be.1 te'lcher s pc:t. Dick" believes there is milch f.llne ,lnd fortune '1" :liting the dancing Instructor. Foos, CALDWE I.I. "c. B. F." blu s hingly confessed t h at he want ed to be a s heik like J ack C oRer HEHoI, .-\"N IEI. told us in a hushed voice th:n she would adore being a surgica l nurse HOPh.INS, RUTH "Bootie" s urpri sed u s by telling u s that s h e'd like to be a j :lZZ com poser. ;\IARCHOl>h.Y. :\IORR'" ";'\Iac" int ends 10 be :l millionaire phibmhropj,t. ;\10kGAN, J\IILDkEO H ert:'s a good one! "i\l ilh" wants to he a lig h tr ope w.Liker. S"ITH, ANDREW ":\ndy" h as Started out to be.1 second J ohn Barrym o re and he' s well on hiS way. STAUFFER, DOROTH\' "Dott}," said s he'd fool us :1, sht: was going to It:. ld :l life of leis ure. STFt:";Bl:RC, HARRIET This isn't \ery ,ccret bt:c:llll>e ever)"one kn o ... rilJ.t "Sis" is going to be a nurse and ow n a Cadillac. SrFwART. GU\' "Gallo" h as ref o rmed and from now on he.:: will ht: a hermit.

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T H E CA RII3I3 EA I 1"'"oRiqhl Cente' -Mill8 MABEL BARN ROUSE Adviser TOP H A I.I-' --olilollidl' Row-Gay Turnf>!', hme5 Van Scotte r D or o thy P i kl!, W allace J ohnson D eli l a h May LoIn Mun o l Irlllid(o ltow M anon B Ufll"', Dnr ot llY Vaugh a n C hr iatian \\'i rtl, M a ur ice EI(IIICi1l 0 n J o h anna Kledke nJl, Arthur COlion. 'JJ"rER If Row-Elilfll)l'lh Car8011, D or o th ea T u rlB. Mall o la 8liy, J ohn Coffey, C l arice S teenhC fl(, I r o n e H O l lkins. Irl8idc Itow-lf ilddtAl'de Blythe. J ohn Ordw ay, Ctlfl and Tin silly, Ju a n P ap i Mildr('d Neely, Cnrl08 Pulg ar Not ahown-JamOllRhr cvte. Mar gare t Jli C k erlta.

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THE CARIBBEAN. 1 5 THE C LASS OFFICEH S Prt' JidmJ-Dorothy Pike. Vice.Presidwt-Waliacc J o h nson. SecrclaYJ'-J arncs Vau Scatter. 1'rcllsurer-Dclil a h fl,l iI) WH A T W OU LD H APPE 1 TO T H E SOPH O M O R E C LASS f F -I {a noia Bl iss were not wo rrying about her Latin? H i l degarde Blyth e wer e tending to some one else' s bu s i ness? 3. Betty Carson came to sc hoo l in t h e afternoon? 4 Jack Coffey we r e always on time? 5. Arthur Cotton knew h is le sso ns? 6. Egg l eston sat st ill in class? 7. Irene Hopkins d idn't serve lunch in the fifth per iod? 8. W allace J o hn son stayed aftcr sc hoo l when told? 9. Johanna Klcefkens were not always wanting the window shut? 10. D elilah May didn't h:tve to beg for dues? II. Lola l\i unoz lost her smile? 1'2. il.l ildred Neel y knew her hi story lesson ? IJ. J ohn O rdway co uld recite without s milin g? Th e W ashington S wimmin g Pool facing the Caribbean 14 Juan P api didn't have an ample supply of saddle h o r s es? 1 5. Dorothy Pike bobbed her hair? 16. Carlos Pulgar ran out of hair grease? 1 7 C l arice Steenbcrg had 110 one to pass her 1 8 Garland T i n s ley were noisy? 19. Doroth ea Tufts h r o ught a voice a m p l ifie r to clas s es? '20 Gay Turner would answer "unprepared" i n class? '21 J .lmes Van Scatter studied h i s lessons instead of rcading noveb or l u nching? '2'2. D orothy Vaug han had a speedometer to regulate h e r s pee c h. '23. Christian Wirtz were :.ix feet and a-half tall? '24 l iss Barnho use, our faithful class adviser weren't always ready and willing to help u s? The WashiuglQD Swimming P oo l S lid e

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THE C:\RIBBE: \;'\'.

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F res h men i\Jar io n B arrett Emi l y Bledsoe .. Fra n k B oot h . G e n evieve Booth P auline B r iggs .. l\Jar y D o ug las B ro n so n . B r o n so n ,_. Harry B r ow n .. L a wr e nce C allaway W illia m Cl inc h a rd. \ y illiam C offey .. l\l y r tlc Coulbourn G r ace D owell R ae F isc h e r .. T eresa G:tl b g h e r J ames G ride r. J u l ian Hackett. L Ollise Heim .. M a r}' H ei nl.. \yilli:l.I11 H e ntcr H ussell J ones. l\l iss Hattie L ee H ornbeak. Jeannette K a l ctlda r .. Oliver K ing .. i\Iargurite Kitt Elilabeth L aning Edward Low:lnde Cbra l\ la y Erma Ph illips John So lomon. F r ed So nneman H e nty Stevens W ilhe lmin a SWtc Surse Taylor. Foster T uft<; H elen V i neyard Dorothy Wertz. C h arles W ill Euphemia W oolnough D irection. E S.E. ('J ('J ('J S.E E b, S .. S. w by S. N. E by E .. S.W .. :-J. b), E .. East S. by \\' .. S.S.E w by S \\'. by N. N.by\\'. N.\\' W .N.\\'. N.\\'. by W S. by S. E Center N. E South L o ..... er right E. by N ... S.\\'. by \v. S.E. by E \\'est ,\I.E-. by ';-.1 S. by E .. L ower left .. :fHE CARIBB EAN : FRESHMAN CLA SS. Chief \ mbition. T o outsh ine the other r..Llid ;\b rion. T o be an advertisement for Pepsodent T o b e a sailor To sing in the r..lctropolitan T o be a second r..lary P ickrord T o be a modern Cleo patra T o be !I g reat lawyer. T o riva l Charles Chaplin T o be a comedian .. T o be demoted .. T o join a circus T o "sit br the side of the road and bt: a friend to man." T o "fiddle away her time". T o install a secret wireless in her desk T o be it second Ann Pennington T o institute couches in class instead of chairs. T o be a second Sanzio R aphat:l.. T o edit a book on flow 10 Conan/mIt' T o be seen and not heard T o be a Rudolph Valentino T o know t h e why's of everything .. T o start us along t h e right rO:ld T o be a heart-breaker T o be allowed to read wild west novels in pe:lce. T o become a medium T o be a second Carrie Chapman Catt. T o he a Roorwalker T o live up to her first name T o become the per-;onific,nion of soundless motioll. T o be head waiter at the Biltmore T o be tennis champion of the world T o be a J ulian E ltinge T o be the best-ever do:nestic science teacher. T o be a wl\'al officer \V.S. W. T o be::ome a 1 .lbor le:lder E.N E.. T o pose for coconut oil ads Xorth T o live up to her dirj!ction j N. br N T o be a college profec;sor S.S.\\' I T o be a wh;, ;n algeb", N ."h.... A-:-:-', ,,h:-:, ,:-:-',,,.,". "'k '''''0. "01", B,k". E,"d N,bo". \ ".,m, T",k<, 7 H ow \\'e K now B y her devotion to her own Robin Hood." B y her radiant smi l e. B y his interest i n boats. B r the zest s h own on Tuesday's siXTh period. B y her R owing locks. B y h er speaking eyes. B y his love for arg.uing. B y his nntics in the assembly room. B y the way h e seeks the limelight. B y h is interest in the eighth gmde. B r his Siamese twinship wit h Christinn Wirtz. B y her wholesomespiritof comradeship. B}' her rapid progress OD the violin. B y her futile attempts to put something over. B y her grace in dancing. B r his classroom lounging. B y his skill in Jrawing. B y her faculty for stud ring under all conditions. B y he r self-effacing manner. B)' his stacombed hair. B y h is inS1tiabie curiosity. B y the efforts she has ill1dc in t hat direction. B y her languishing glances. By his actions w h en caught with a hook in assembh h,dl. her freque'llt from the bod)''' in daHlrearus. By the (lignity with which she prc!>ide!l over the C!.ISS meetings. B y practice he has had in school aisles. B y her start. B y her quiet-as-a-mouse exits and en tr:lnces. B y t h e war he generals t h e se r ving of refreslllncnts. B y his untiring efforts ae the game. B ctallse he makes such a f.lscinating B y the delicio u s samples s h e brings back as I.ieutenant Pinkham in the Freshman play. B y his interest in a full dinner pail. B y her Auff)' golden locks. B y the Lice that s h e has gone there. B y the way rn \\ hich he dispenst:s kno\\ 1-eJge. A sk r..l iss O'Connell.

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Mildred iHorgan, '25. Although we have lost track of a f ew o f our graduates, we are living in hopes that THE CARIBBEAN of 1924 will reach th e m and set their minds in the r oad that leads back to o l d Cristobal High. i'llan)' indeed have taken that road, f or from so m e we have had c h erished visi t s ; from oth e rs, kin d l y greetings and interesting letters which we have r ead eagerl)'; from a few, pretty gifts and c h e cks for our Easter Ba zaar, with perhaps an order (and mone y order) for the 1924 issue of this book. \ Y e don't want an alum nu s to wander away from u s for we a r e proud o f t h e m all and are an x ious that the)' keep up their o l d friendl y inte rest in us w h o are try i ng to keep up the standards o f Cristobal Hig h School, standards whic h th e)' ha v e set. This year another band goes forth eac h to take the part in life for w hi c h Cristobal High ha s h e lp e d to prepare him. Oh ye ar s may com e and years may go, But may our faithfu l alumni go on forever." 1918. R. F. D. 3 B ox 2586, TAMPA, FLA. The superintendent of s c h o o l s was h ere yester d a y a n d s aw Mattie's CARIBBEAN. H e l iked it so w ell that h e wante d a copy. Go a head and try t o beat 1 9 2 3 (Mattie s ay s i t ca n't be done. ) L ULA PULLIG COMAN. 2516 BEDroRD AVENUE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. l'm still w o rking with th e Western Uni o n T e l e g r a ph C o m pany in N e w Y o rk City. The world i s n o t so l a rge, f o r I see Canal Zone peopl e qu i t e o f te n, a n d whe n w e g e t t o g ether t h e r e i s b ound to b e so m e talk o f th e Canal Z o n e l'm certa inl y ve r y glad that Cri stobal Hi g h i s mai n tainin g th e goo d w o rk o f putting out a n An n ual ever y J un e I know this year's book will be bigge r and b ette r, and that mu c h success will c rown your eA-orts MINOT COTTON. Susie H arrison, 142 9 r vIunsey Building, Baltim o r e, M d ., i s working as a s t e nograph er Sh e wishes the best o f s u ccess to th e Annual f or this year Catherine Waid o f New Y ork City, N Y., will b e graduated from Columbia University School o f J o urn alis m in Jun e. As far as we know Burke W elc h i s still r es iding in \yoming. The last address we have f o r Mar y V erne r is H e nd erso n ville, N. C. 1 9 19. James Raymond, residing with his parent s in Cristobal, is working at t h e depot commi ss ary. 118 MAPLE AVENUE, T AKOMA PARK, 1\1D. I've just come from c hurc h where I h eard a good l ecture o n psyc h o logy-and th e last thing h e told u s was that we were b orn to b e king s and queen s. 1 f ee l pretty grand bu t n eve rthel ess don't know what to say in THE CARIBBEAN! But I h ave b ee n teaching f o r t h e past yea r at t h e Was hington Schoo l f o r Secretaries. I find the work ve r y interesting and enjoy i t very mu ch. I'm also, in m y spar e time, takin g an English cou rse at George vVas hingt on University. Best w i s h e s f o r t h e s u ccess of th e 1924 C ARIBBEAN. That's awful! Sorry! ALICE ARLENE BALL. Kenneth Edwar ds' headquart ers are in \ Y ells boro, P a D o roth y Anna M o ntanye i s still livin g in Pittston, Pa

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THE CARIBBEAN. 19 1910 Etha Beving t o n wa s graduated in D ece mb e r from \ V ood bury's C O lllm e rcial College in Los Angele s, Calif. COLON, R. P. Best wis h es f o r THE CARIBBEAN. ALICE STILSON. Lill ian Cotton Van Wa g n e r, o f 251 6 Bedford Avenu e Brooklyn, N. Y ., wishes eve r y good f o rtun e f o r THE CARIBBEAN o f 1924-Kath e rin e Burgoon Stewart, a pleasing adjunct in the Cri s tobal Clubh ollse wis h es ever y success f or thi s year's Annual. 2216 BANCROFT \VAY, BERKEI.EY, CALIF'. \\' h e n 1 rece iv ed your m essage I was in the midst of studying f o r m y final ex aminati o ns, m y final fina l s 1 wrot e m y las t o n e this m or ning and n ext w ee k I s hall a ga in b e a graduate. I t har d ly see m s as if it could b e f oul' years since I left hig h sc h ool. They ha ve been very busy years and have brought a full share o f hard work and study, but they ha ve a l so b ee n very happy ye ar s I h ope I ma y see som e o f you in Califor nia. 1 j oin with th e other alumni in sending you my h e arty greetings and most since r e wis he s f o r hap piness and s u ccess HARLAN \V. HOLM WOOD. B ox 279, A U S T IN, TEX_>\S. 1 am a ca n d idat e f o r Illy B. S. degree in mechan i ca l e ngin ee ring this yea r at th e University of Texas. 1 t seems a l o n g tim e since I was in Cri s tobal, but I can r ecall everything clearly JACK B. FIELDS 2+2 6 BOWDITCH STREET, BERKELEY, C ALIf. I wa s very mu c h disappointed at n o t getting an Annu a l last year. J t must ha ve gotten lost in the mail. I f you hav e any l e ft pl ease sell one to my brothe r and he will se n d it to m e H e will a l so get o n e for thi s ye ar. I am gettifg alo ng fine h e r e I will b e gradllated in May 1 925 N ex t ye ar l ha ve th e h o n o r of b eing t h e c aptain of the ba se ball t eam. I am playin g center fie l d I'm afra i d Alpha and I are more probaseball t h an anything e l se. 1 wish h e cou l d have come up h e r e but they do not have t o pay the athletes t o com e t o California. They co m e of their own accord AI-SON SEARS. AI Doyl e i s w o rkin g hard at the The Panama Canal Pr ess getting ready to se n d littl e Eva J ea nn e to college when s h e h as b ee n graduated fro m h e r daddy's and moth er's alma mater in '39 or '+0. R. F D. 4, COUDERSPORT, P A 1 m just writin g a few lin es to wish you s u ccess and p lent y of it. Al so, I want, through you, to greet all myoi d frie nd s and wis h the m h ealth and happiness \\'h atever else you may do, don't forget to put my nam e o n your m ai lin g list. I wouldn't miss m)' copy of THE CARIBBEAN f or anything. KENNETH GREENE. The last time that we h eard fro m Lindale Davi es h e wa s residing in Boston, Mass. 1 921. MOUNT S T VINCENT-ON-THE-HuDSON. am w orking hard f o r a B. S. degr ee and find college life a gree abl e b oth soc iall y and intellec tuall y I am very glad t o see so mll c h sc h oo l spi rit in thi s year's class, and a m sure i ts Annua l will b e better than ever. ALICE HUNTER. Carl Duey i s w o rkin g in N e w Y ork City. 3 +4 EAST 120 STREET, TEW YORK CITY. Y o u'll find that the r e i s a mu c h harde r lif e t h an that o f go in g to hig h sc h ool. The wa y they hand it to YOLI h e r e at Columbia makes you f ee l that the Three Wi se I\l e n are at the head o f the f ac liit y s up e rvi s ing the handin g o u t o f w ork and knowl edge, as n o o n e e l se could think o f as Illuc h to have ),o u do. S o yo u see I ha ve b een quit e bu sy a n d s till am-and s hall b e until sc h oo l closes. Then f o r t h e glorious June when P aul and 1 see a good place and sc h oo l again. N o t saying we'll see som e good stud ents again, f or T think that with the graduation o f th e class o f '21 th ere were n o m ore good o n es to be had at Cristobal Hi gh School. D o you ag ree with me? G oo d Ilic k and be s t wishes t o ),Oll and THE CARIBBEAN. FRANK RAYMOND.

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20 T H E CARIB BEAN. l\:irby Ferguson is r esiding on C o lon Beach with her parents. FORT RAXDOLPH, CANAL ZONE. I sincerely hope that this year's Annual will be a great success . -\\th ough I s hall 50011 b e in the States I s hall always ha\"e a warm spo t in Ill)' heart for Cristobal H igh School and its facult)". ELEANOR ZInIMERio.1AN. Charles H eIner is a radi o man on an a eroplane at Hampto n R oads \Ta. 192 2 :\IE\\" YORK-CITY. ha ve been receiving n e ws on the s l y about a few o f the doings o f our sc hool whi c h l eads both Frank and me to believe that each year t h e stu dents get better. B e Slire to save a plac e for us to root f o r Cris tobal H i g h Schoo l at commen cement. Frank h e kno ws more t h an J do. Of course h e does-he knows m e, and I know him PAUL DOYLE. GATUN, CANAL ZONE. Thanks to the training I received at Cristobal H igh S c hool, I was abl e to be graduated from t h e X e w Y ork State Ranger Sc hool, a branch o f t h e Syracuse University. Si nce t h e n I have been working for the Panamanian Government as a junior surveyor. ] have kept in t o u ch, as muc h as possibl e, with the Class o f ''14, and know t hat outside of b e ing the larges t cla ss to b e graduated from C ristobal H igh S c hool they al so h o l d t h e honor of be in g t h e most wide-awake and ready to w o rk of any class With them as the leader s, bac ked by sturdy workers o f Cris t obal H igh S c h oo l this year's Annual will be a record, hard to surpass \ESLEY TOWNSEND 12'21 1 A R S H ALL L ANE, AUSTIN, TEXAS i\J y good to THE CARIUUEAN and i ts staff for 19'24-01a)' this issue b e the best eve r. J am very intent on secu rin g 1"11)' H S. degree and am in love with work and T ex a s Unive rsity. l\l y warmest regan.ls to those still r e m embe r MARY GLENN FIELDS :llildrcd, tafford is living in Providence, R I. L c Roy :\ J agnusoll 119 Collt:ge Avenu e ) ClaFemont, Calif., is a student in Pomona C ollege CUHECO FRATERNITY, STATE COLLEGE, PA. am takin g an e lectrical engineerin g course in Penn State College, Penn Stat e, P a 1 have a positi on i n view i n New Ytwk Ci t y f o r this SUlllm e r See t hat my moth e r gets a n A ,l1 l1ual for m e. 1 hope things are goi n g a long fine a n d o l d C ristob a l H ig h Sc hool is still t h e bes t i n t h e l a n d Give my r eg a rds to t h e facu lty. B es t f o r t h e success of t h e g raduates. And h e r e i s hopi ng the Annual is the best ever. GEORGE CARTWRIGHT. GATUN, CANAL ZONE. B es t wis h es for t h e c lass o f 192.; and for the success of t h e Annual. El\'!l\lA TOWNSEND. 1 1 8 MAPLE AVENUE, TACOMA PARK I'm having a g l o rious t im e I love norm a l even if w e do have to work h a r d Best wis h es f o r this year's annu a l a n d the faculty. MARJORI E D B ALL. SYRACUSE, N Y. I alll at present a student i n t h e New Y ork State College o f F o restr y a t Syracu se U ni ve r s ity. THE CARIBBEAN has m y best wi s h es f o r a s u c cessful year. JORDAN Ida Brown (Mrs. A I Doyle), w i s h es ever y s u c cess for T'HE CARIBBEAN o f 1924-. 1 923 TAMPA, F LA 1 \, 1 y ve r y best w i s h es for the b rai n c hil d o f Cris tobal Hig h Sc hool-our An nu al. You'll be scandal o u s l y proud o f i t I get so puff 'ed lip w h e n I s h ow mine to p eo p l e u p here. J s howed i t to o n e rnal1 h e re w hose dau g hter had b ee n graduatetl. fr o m H ills boro H ig h t h e b i g sc hool o f Tampa, and I tol d him, rather ernphat ically th a t 1 would put my An nual bes ide that o f H illsbor o and b e t on it t e n to o n e H e sai d meekl y ''W e wo n't argue about i t, I V li ss i\1"attie." MATTISON P ULLIG

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T H E CARIBBEAN. 21 Well, howdy. friends of C. H S., I wonder how yOli feel! i\ l y hope is tl1:lt yo u r e at you r best, So yOll can listen to me spiel. I l ow time has Aown-'tis but a year Since I had many things to learn I n C. H S . that school so dear, For which I'll never ce:tse to yearn. i\ l r precious paper in 111)' hand, On graduation night last Junc, G:wc me a feeling that was grand, And meant that I'd be working soon. I tried my hand :H managing .-\ soda fountain at the B ase, But far from home J could not ding, So came o'er to another pbce. At J ackson's L : lUntir y cv'r)' Eight hours' h :ml work do [ put it,. So that when I receive Ill)" pay. T will not be with that guilty grin. i\l y future pbne; arc not quite made, And tho J chose the auto line, I really wish I might h:tve staid, I n C. H S. a l onger time. Quire like the rest, I must pass o'erBut rai se to rOll three hearty cheers, And hope your B ook of prove the best of all the years'. -Gerald D. Bliu, Jr Ernst F.uphrat, 3935 Burwood Avenu e, S outh Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohi o, i s attendin g dental college H e is makin g his h ome with D oc tor and M r s Em oge ne Nash is re s idin g with h e r pa r ents in Balb oa. She se n ds h er best regards to h er friends and wis hes for th e success of the 1924 CARIBBE.-\X. 297 HIGHLAND AVENUE, A RLINGTON, N ] I-Iello Cristobal I-li g h I am awaiting the pub lication of th e 1924 Annual w i t h the greatest of expectations. I know i t will b e the best yet. Good luck to the staff and t he schoo!. lif e will always be filled with m e mories of Cri s tobal H igh-the best school on the map. HENRY MOORE. PI-IILADELPHI A GENERAL HOSPITAL. B elieve m e 1 h ave Cristoball-ligh School, Mi ss D odds, you kids, o u r sc h oo l teamsin s hort Cristobal H igh Sch031 sp irit-to thank f o r a numb er of things. D o yo u know it's instilled some t hin g fine in us, so methin g we g ra duates ca n never l ose Sometimes, do yo u know, th e t hought o f you all ba c k h o m e working, p l u gg i ng, wis h in g for t h e best to those o f u s who ha ve gone on, keeps m e going when [ get d i sco ur aged H the r e is a nythin g I don't lik e to do, J picture it's a ba sket ball game and ph ew! The whistle b l ows, I pitc h in, a n d befo r e J know it the game is over and th e re's another t h ing I don't mind d o i ng again! I am sen di n g m y best wis h es t o THE CARI B BEAN, may i t b e the best, n o 1 don't m ea n umay it be" but make it b e the best ever, make it trul y represent what all the classes ahead o f you have tried to ha ve i t do LOUISE HENTER. GATUN, CANAL ZONE. Kin dly ca rr y to the sc h oo l and fac u lty Illy very best wis hes for a successfu l yea r, a m ore s u ccessfu l play, and a Ill')St s u ccessful Annual. EDW.4.RD iVIAY. Cattle g ru.in g o n Panama Ca.nal PaaturCl,

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THE C.-\RIBBE :\:--'-.

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THE CARIBBEAN. 23 Flormce Albert, '2. /. PRE CE PT S OF Glad)'s B. L owal/de, 2';. ( B ased on P rofessor Palmer's Self-Cultivation in E nglish.) I am English t h y language, who brought thee out of the lan d of poorlr expressed ideas, oi the house of tedium. I. Thou shalt place no other "tudy before me. I I Thou shalt not make unto thee any likeness of anything that is not a tool of enc..:tive speech, or th:\t je; not exact in impression, or that is not equi\'"lcnt to what thou shal t mean: thou shalt not how down thyself unto limitations in the c'pression oi thou;!ns, nor serve slich limitation", for 1 English, thy 11I1g:ulge, am a jealolls langu:lge, nsiting the limitations of the fathers upon the c hildren, unto the third and fO:lrth generations of them th:tt do not u<.;c me: and s howing loving kindnes,> unto the tholls:llHls of them that love me and keep my precepts. III. Thou shalt not take the possession of En gli..,h, thy language, in vain, for English will not hold him guiltless who taketh such a possession in vain. I V Nine months s halt thou labor, and do all thy other studies; bur all months are labor unto English, thy language; in all of the:ll thou shalt work, thou, thy teacher, thy chum, thy classmates, and even thy famil}' that is within thy gate,, : for in all month s En glish made wondrous nouns, exquisite adjectives, and appropriate adverbs, and all that with them is, and rested not in an}' month, whercl"o r e Engli s h ble sseth all months and claimeth them. \ .. Iionor thy hearer and th r su bject, that thy in fluence may be great with the power which English, thy Iangiveth thee. \ I.:Thou .. halt not kill thy opportunities for advancement in gener.1I serviceablen ess and in consequent delight a Llssitude in thy daily advancement in English stud}'. \ '11. Thall shalt not be slovenly in speech. \ '111. T hou sh,dt not commit the v:lgr:lIlcy of reporting :l vague and undetermined meaning or general emotion :lllU thou sh:dt 'lOt be afraid to send thy words whcre\'cr ther Illar fat low best their pu r pose. I X. Thall stl.llt not be.1r false witness against an)' word in thy \\'ebster's Dictionary. X. Thou s halt not covet thy neighbor's strange, technical or inR'ltcd cxpressions, nor his poverty of expr essio n provinciality, nor his personal comman d of jmt a fcw approved resources of speech, nor his lac k of unity, nor his inability to construct one thing out of many, nor anything that is the limited possession of thy neighbor. \"icw of Washington rotd.

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THE CARIBBEAN. BEYOND THE C HAGRES Coldwdl B. Faa!, '25 1. Beyond the Chagres River Are paths that lead to d eath, T o the fever's deadl y breezes, T o malaria's poisoned breath! II. Be yond the tropic foliage Where the alligator waits, Are the mansions of the devilHis original estates! Ill. Be yond the Chagres River Are path s f a re'er unknown, With a spider 'neath eac h pebble, And a scorpio n 'neath eac h stone --{;ilbeJI. H I t ell yo u, it s true! J've see n it! You might think I'm crazy, but it's God's own truth. I 'll swear it on a stack of Bibl es a mi l e hig h !" The man' s voi ce broke s h arp l y H e was a wr ec k phys ically and m e ntally. The m e n l owered him tenderly to the h ospital b ed With an ecstati c s igh, h e sank ba c k, babbling h appi l y Lord, how l 'v e dreamed about it! h e s aid. \Vhi te s h ee ts, white peopl e a n d th e clean white smell o f things. I-Ie la y bac k and rested. Came the doct o r from t h e othe r side, who h ad been su mm o n ed hurri ed l y The int erne spok e to him in a l ow tone-"Extraordinary case-came down the Chagres in what appeared to b e a glass boal, with no v i s ible m ea n s o f pro pul s i on. S ee m s half out o f his head-almos t starving w h e n w e picked him up-raving ab out so m e queer peopl e or some q u eer place h e ha s been inca n't mak e him out at a ll." "Glass boat, you sa i d ?" asked th e doctor incredulously. "It appears t o be -it came down the C ha grcs at a thirty-mile clip, and it ha s no scr e ws, sails or oa r s. Another thing-when w e bumped against !Ii the wharf, th e thing got s lammed lIard, and it didn't bre ak, only ran g lik e a gong, with a peCld iar quive ring soun d " I l m -m! I'll spe ak to him." H e approached the b e d The man roused him self. H ello, D oc !" h e said eagerly Listen, D oc, rve mad e a wonderfu l discovery, and these fo o l s won't b e lieve m e You'll b e lieve me, won't you, D oc?" "Sure!" th e doctor return ed ca lmly. T e ll me all about it. " I've discover e d a new people, D oc, and opened up th e greates t field f o r sci e ntifi c investigation that t h e world ha s ever known M e D oc m e I'm the only aile l e ft There wer e fiv e o f us, t h e r e wer e all f e aring n e it h er God nor man, and all after o n e thinggo ld! There was C hin ese' M G ee, t h e wick e d es t little death -dealing bunch o f humanity I've ever seen-littl e and consu mptive, but s ur e d eath with e ith e r h and at anything und e r two hund red yards. The n t h e r e w e re Bi g J o hn a giant S lav, dumb but strong, and willing to do w hat h e was told, and Sir H arry, all Englis h crook wanted for murd er, but soft-s p oken and gentl e a s a c h ild, and myse lf, to say nothing o f Phila delp hia Charley, the h ead o f the party B rain s I t was d u e to him that we h ad all esca p ed that tim e ba c k in t h e States, w h e n t hey a lmost caught u s in New Y o rk. His brain s wer e what kill ed him, too H e wa s chie f all right. Even Chink obeyed him. W ell, w e had to lie l ow, and so w e w ent a cross the Chagres and down trai l s t ha t n o human fo o t h ad trod, cuttin g our wa y, f o r d ing and swimmi ng alligator infest e d str e am s J t wa s h ard, bitter hard and som e times w e wou l d m ee t a native w h o would warn u s back 'WIal o mlly malo!' but w e kept on. Ollr co mpa ss wa s broke n, and we d i d n't kno w w h ere we were going but we kept on and t h e n Chink got s i c k P oo r devil, h e was t h e w e akest of th e party, and w h e n we tra ve l ed thr o u g h a s wamp f o r two days, the malaria got him. \V e did ever y thing we could f o r h im, whi c h wa s n't mu c h but h e got s t eadily worse until o n e day a native came to ou r camp. I I e wa s the firs t hum a n being w e 'd seen

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THE CARl BBEAN. f o r w ee k s, and w e though t it mi ght c h ee r poor Chink up, so we brought h im over. T h e native was sor ry for Chink, and h e [Ook out a little idol and rubbed it o n Chink's forehead .lust thell Charle), gave a yell and grabb ed the idol out of th e scar ed nigger's h a n d \\'e though t t h e heat had gotten Charle)' too, but h e scraped the idol. I t was s haped frol11 an ingot o f pure gold. Golli!! \V e passed it a"ound, ever y hand eagerl y grasping it, t h e f e ver in our b l ood more deadl y than that i n C h ink' s \ V e passed it to him ) [00, and he f ond l ed i t and c rooned to it as i f it were a bab)'; t h e n h e switch ed th ose icy eyes of his o n th e nigge r a n d asked h im wh e r e h e had gotten it. The native was scared blue, but h e said t h e i dol was vcry good magi c and that it had come, long, long ago from
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06 T1-1 E C AR 1 BBEAN. "hire protective that was applied toh im like a coat of paint. H e seemed to \ jew the haze \\ irh something like fear. Then he looked at us, and we read his thoughts! \Y c didn't hear them, w e didn't see thelll, we didn't make them out in Fnglis h words, but we "got" as p lainly as if h e had spoken, this idea: I f 6780.486 t h eorized and expe rim ented correctly, these creatures will be unaffected by rhe death I [ is a wonderful opronuniry t o prove or dispro\'e his work "Death rays! But we were helpl ess, h e l d to the bottom of the boat by some invisibl e f o r ce The green light grew brig h ter. The creatur e seemed to be o bs essed wit h t h e desi r e to get past i t a s quickly as possible. I t grew dazzling, blinding, a n d we were forced to hide o u r eyes. S lowly it su b sided, and we uncovered our a c h ing eyes. W e were rapidly dri\ing into t h e darkness again, and were conscious of our captor's re l ief. H e exam ined us minutely, but without moving, seem i ng to look through A esh and bone. W e got t h e impres sion: '\jdentlr unh a rmed. Curiou s, b u t am unable to receive their mind impressi o ns.' This at least, was comforting. \\'e were unharmed, a n d h e could not read our t hough ts. "Then quietiy, srnooth ly, so t h a t we were scarcely aware o f t h e c hange we were turned i n to a d iversi o n-a diver sion that evidentl y flowed uphill instead of s harply down. W e f ollo wed this for perhaps fifteen minutes-som e how we could never keep track of time down t here; t hen-we arrived. '" t was one great g low-a cit.::ar, gloriou s bluc exhilarating and yet marvelousl y restfult h e most wonderful lig h t I have ever seen. B y i ts reflecti o n we could make out th e outlin es of an im mense ca ve I t was o f tremendou s size, with a roof to w hich Olle slender beam of b l u e lig h t ex t ended, striki ng out golden sparks. T h e b eam was perhaps a half mi l e long. The floo r wa s studded with tenfoo t sq u a r es of a dark red color. The creatu re drove u s b e fore him d irectly to o n e of t h e sq uares, w hich as w e approached it, open cd b e f o r e u s U nder it was a platform the 511.C o f the square and, 011 all imperious motion from the thing, we stood 011 it. I -It;: stepped on it with and it descended under u s like an e levator, until it cam e to a stop in a l a r ge, blue-walled room. \ iotioning u s to follow him, h e l ed liS into t h e next room. J t was pure white, startlingl y so after the clear blue of the rcst o f th e city. A s m all passagewa y communicated with this room, a n d through i t h e led the wa y w ith u s at t h e rear. T he corridor o pened into w hat appeare d t o he a great audien ce c hambe r, with i n numerabl e small passagewa ys l e a d in g i n t o it a s d id o u r s 1 t was filling r a p id l y with c r eatures lik e o u r s, a n d morc ":ere pili n g into it ever y m o m ent. E ve r ything was done i n p e r fect o rder. "Our captor lifted u s b oth to a rai se d p latform at one e n d o f t h e hall. T h e r e wa s o n e o t h e r cre a ture on t h e p l a t for m w h o see m e d t o a c t a s a sort of chairma n o f t h e m eeting, and a s S O OI1 a s we arrived ill s i g h t o f t h e c r owd, h e b eg a n t o se n d t h o u g h t waves a t ten sio n jus t a s a s p eake r rai ses h i s voi ce to addr ess a n a ssembl y H i s d i sc o u r se i n efl'ect, was t hi s : 'Broth e r sc i e n t ists, numbe r I 198 .658 has returned, a s yo u can see H e h a s by means of his p erfected pro t ec ti o n a g ai n s t t h e g r ee n death rays, p e netrated b y th e R i ve r D eathlade n to t h e ou tel' wo rld, o f w h ose ex i s t e nc e w e have b ee n aware, b u t o f w h i c h we have k n o wn n o thing. The formula for this pro t ec ti o n i s as yet t h e sec r e t of Brother 1 1 98, but a s soo n as h e has made it a bso lutel y safe for ali h e will make it known. Brother 1 1 98 will now addr ess t h e a ssembl y.' J J 98 gave a bri e f accoun t o f hi s j o u rney t o t h e outer wo rld, h i s d i sco v e r y o f t h ese strange b e i ngs ( h e re f erred to us), and th e c uri o u s ray-hu r l e r s t hat they ca r r ied, that stru c k with s u c h terri fic inte n s ity t hat h e w as sta gge red b y t h e ir impact; o f h ow th e l ight u p above see m e d a m i xture o f all co lors, and contained a large p r o p o r ti o n o f in fra red and u l t ra -v i o l e t raYSj o f h o w t h e r e see m e d to he n o lim i t to t h e r oo f that it wa s so far di stan t t hat t h e eye was unabl e to per ce i ve it; o f h o w this o uter wo rl d was overrun b y imme n se plants the stems of w hich so m e tim es appro a c h ed t h e h e i g h t o f a m a n in w idth ; of how it w as lig h t ed b y a g r eat A a m ing ball hung hig h up i n the roof; and o f h ow, w h e n h e had p erfec ted his ra y co ati n g, h e intende d to lead a l a r ge part)' t o ex pl o r e f urth e r t h e c ountry and b r in g b a ck m o r e s p ec im c n s o f its in habitan t s f o r experimentation. \\'he n h e w as t h r o u g h a comrnittcc inspected u s car e full y, and r e p orted t hat I was a spl e ndid phys ical s p eci m e n, but far h elow m)' compa n i o n i n in t elli ge nce; t hey w e r e rig h t, but how t hey f o un d i t out 1 can't u nd e r stand, becau se w e we r e evi dently th e first human bei n gs t h ey had see n. T h e)' k e p t u s a w hil e l o n ger; then 119 8 took u s back to h is q uarte r s.

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THE CA R IBBEAN "This time h e took u s into a new rOOI11, w h e r e the r e was a queer chairlik e contrivance with t h r ee p olis hed switc hes on its arm. ] n front of it was a thing that reminded m e of a searc hlight, o nl y it was bigger tha n t h e ordinary light, and shining all ove r. This rOOI11 also wa s white and bar e of all furnishing except this chair. 1[98 seate d h imself, and pulled over one of the shining l e v e r s i n stantly h e was flooded by a brilliant yello w gl o w from t h e light in front o f him H e bas k e d in it for a whi l e, t h e n s hut it oR-', and switc h e d 011 a d ee p red. Whe n h e tired o f thi s h e presse d the t hird s top and blue lig h t wavere d around him. H e p laye d with it awhil e varyin g t h e shades and producing exquisite colors and tOiles ; t h e n switc h e d on a deep marine blue, and sank into a sort of torpo r. As h e slipped down in hi s seat, hi s arm brus h e d t h e yello w light control, and a pale, s i ckl)' gree n r es u lted. H e sat b olt upright with f ear and pain, and switc hed on the full forc e o f the red. H e la y in it for a while, recovering from his narro w escape; then switched o n t h e light blu e and apparently dozed. "Ch arle y graspe d my arm. D a ve o ld bo)' we're saved!' h e whi s p e r e d t e n sely. I've g o t it worked out now!' I knew Charley, s o I wa sn't surprised, b ecause h e ha d brains enough to t hink out anything. And h is brains w e r e what kill e d him, a s you'll see. [ have it all fix e d except how we'll g e t rid of t hat t h ing. I had begun to t hink h e was invulnerable a n d t here's not a p o s sibility o f g etting away with him watch ing. Bu t a s soo n a s w e g e t a good opportunity-he's nOt d ee p e n ough a s l ee p n o w t o take a chance-w e 'll switch the yello w and blue lig h ts o n him, and h e 'll croak! The r e s som e t hing about green lig h t t hat g e t s through t h e ir gla ss s uits and kills the n e r ves within and h e 'll c r oak sure a s God made little gree n apples! "'Yes, and then w e 'll g e t torture d to d eath We'll never be able to get o u t of t hi s place B es ides how are you certain t hat green light will kill him?' .. I know! That thing t ha t examine d us in t h e a uditorium was thinking about t h e phys iology of hi s own bunc h when h e was going ove r m e and I got it all! There is a centr al n ervo u s s y s t e m all cased lip in flex ibl e g l a ss t hat's bull e t -proof, jimmy proof, and proof agains t every t hin g else e x cept lig h t! And no other light afF ects t h e m e x cept gree n, and t hat kill s them! I t's t h e straight d o p e And about gettin g out, 1 'm w ise to how t h e y run the ir b oats You grab aho l d of the s ides n ear the s t e rn and t hink hard'i\l o v e f orward!' and s h e m o ves sweet! See! I watc hed old J' -som e t hi n g coming d own, and it'll w ork the same f o r anybo d y And a s f o r b e in g torture d wh e n w e're caught, wh y t hey inte n d to cut u s up and torture u s anyway t o see h o w w e r e a c t! I'm t e llin' y o u, our b es t b e t i s to cop o ld and b eat it! I gras p e d hi s hallu. I'm with you, Charley, o lu kid!' I e xclaim c u. Tdlmc som e m o r e abo u r it!' ".I u s t t h e n w e w e r e aware o f a strange humming that sudde nl y fille d the ro o m. J '98 r o used himself fr o m h i s chair and appeared to lis t e n. H e starte d ove r toward LIS and t h e humming stopped a s sudde nl y a s it had b egun. P i cking up C h arl e y and carrying h im unde r h i s arm lik e a s a c k, h e stane u o u t into the pass ageway. I tri e d to f ollo w them, but the c r eature hurle d me bac k into a co rn e r, and I h o w lon g I can n o t t ell-until h e came bac k. H e looked over t oward m e and I r ead hi s tho u ghts "'\'er y inte r esting,' h e wa s thinking. 'The c r eature evid ently had a r e a soning i n t e lligen ce T o o bad h e died s o quic kl y HO\ve \Ter, w e dissect t h i s olle n ext, and h e pro mi s e s to have m o r e vitality t han the fir st.' "So Charley wa s rig h t! Cut up lik e a guinea pig in a r esearc h labo rator y And I was n e xt! I shivere d all O Ver with fri g h t. "[ [ 98 sat d o wn in t h e light chair, and envelope d himself with a purplis h g l o w. H e seemed to b e a s l ee p. I could h ear la s t w ords ringin g in m y ears or never! I s t ealthi l y c r ept o ver to the c hair. 1 came closer, clo se r. 1 c ould see t h e l e v e r s o n the chair arm. The r e d anu blue contro l s w e r e part wa y over, and t h e y ello w contro l wa s closed. I r e a c h e d over toward them; then jerke d bac k in an ecstas y o f f ear. 1 1 98 had move d! "Bu t h e sank bac k again. I t was evide nt! y only an une a s i n ess in his s l ee p or rest. Gath ering all m y courage I again approac h e u the c ha ir, and with o ne motion s h o v e d bac k t h e red l e v e r and swi t c h e d o n t h e full for ce of the blue and ye llow A glaring g r ee n l eape d out of the cylinde r and I' 9 8 jumpe d up fr o m his seat, and the n f ell back, sprawlin g awkwardly s till in that unearthl), gree n light. C h arley was right! I s p ent an ago ni ze d fifte e n minutes try in g to fin d the way out of that place and finall y came t o the room \\ i t h the el evator in it. I s t epped o n it,

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THE CAR l BBEA and it immediately shot lip to the big cave R oor I t wa s just as I had see n it last, utterly deserted, with the solitary blue beam extending to the far away r oof. I went down to rhe wharf, wasting more precious time hunting for it, and [Ook one o f the many boats . -\5 1 put Out into midstream, the blue beam swept Q \ 'e r m e I looked back; the armored men w e re pouring from every square. The blue b ea m was s weeping everywhere. Suddenly it f oc u sed o n my craft. Then ] p lunged il1m the tunnel, and escaped the searchlight. h I rushed along thro ugh that tunne l at top speed, because I knew I wa s b eing followed. The n suddenly it opened into a chamber wit h s i x other COCODlIlpafm8a longtheCaribbc3P, tunne l s running fro m it. I g r oaned, but t h ere was n o time to lo se, I chose o n e n ear the center and plunged into it. I followed it for a w h ile, and then it e nded at a black wall, with water bu bblin g up fro m below. t o do but turn around and come back. Almost at th e entrance to the chambe r 1 stopped the boat suddenly and lay back in t h e t h r eequarter darkness o f tht! tunnel. The armored men were streaming bac k out of th e extreme righthand openi ng their b oats f ollowing each oth e r at regu lar intervals. The r e was one th ought commonl)' expr essed: I f we co uld onl), ha ve caught him oefore h e got past the green light!' I t evi <.lently never occurrc<.l to th e m that I had take n the wrong opening. I waited until th e last o n e had long since disappeared; then s lipped Ollt, and into the right e ntrance. l greeted t h e green light with joy, got t hrough i t with many bumps, as it was so blinding that I could not see, a n d finally came out into the outer world. I grounded the boat a n d fell o n the groun d laughin g and cryi n g hysterically. I t looked amazin g!) good; it was wo nderful to see the o l d worl d again wit h its hot sun overhead, and its birds and trees and plants. Even the lizards l oo ked b ea utiful. The n T saw the skeletons o f Big J o h n and Harry. They were clean and whitened. An d 1 t hought I had b ee n in the underworld only about twenty-four h ours! H ow long lJad 1 b ee n in there, anyway? I buried their bones; then took t h e boat and followed t h e river upstream. It carne from a lak e o f springs and I followed anoth e r river that emptied out of i t until I got to the sea I f ollowed t h e coast in a n easterly direction for three days, and on t h e m orning of t h e fourth day I s i ghted San L o r e nzo. 1 was w ea k from hllnger;so 1 put into t h e mouth of t h e Chagres to get somethin g to eat. Then these gentlemen from the h ospital found m e. That'sall, D oc. Youbelieveme,don't yo u ? I'm goi n g to get w e ll, D oc and s how the world thi s pla ce l will get we ll. I will!" "Sure yo u will," said t h e doctor soothing l) J ust lie bac k and get some s l eep T hat'll h e l p you. "Sl eep? I ne ed it, God knows W ell, goodnigh t, D oc "Good-ni ght." The doctor turned to the inte rn e : \asn't the r e an expl o rin g party fro m the Tation a l Geographi c Society o n the boat yes t e rda)'?" h e asked. Y es, sir," t h e i n te rn e a n swered "They'r e at t h e \Vashington now. " W e ll, l e t h im s l ee p. I 'll be back in t h e m o rnin g I'm go ing over to see t h ose explorers." "The n )'o u clon't b e l ieve he's c raz)'?" asked t h e interne in surprise. J 'II stake any reputati on that 1 may have as an ali enist that t h e man's absolute l y sa n e sai d t h e clocto r emphaticall),. "\Ve ll, if )'Oll say so, sir," replied t h e inte rn e h e must be." "There'll b e som e headlin es in the pape rs pretty SOOI1, anyway," the doctor stated. \.vonder what they'll sa)'?" '" wonder!" repeated t h e interne t h o u g htfull y

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THE CARIBBEAN. S HADES OF THE GREAT. George O akts. 2 -/ Sce n e Gh os t s o f Napo l eo n Ale xan de r th e Great, Charlemagne Hannibal, R i chard the L i o n H earted, J o hn P aul J o n es and G eorge \\' a s hin g ton gathe r in the \"ar Club to di scliss the marve l OliS inve nti o n s and improve m ents of the twe nti e t h ce ntury. The y r e gr e t n o t having t h e m in the ir tim e an.! oR"e r many if' s and why's a s to what they c o uld have d o n e Alexande r (Stroking his b eard le ss c hin ) T o think 1 died so young \\' h y if I had had a modern d oc t o r, I s h o uld have live d t o conque r the r emain ing w o rld an d othe r plane t s HaJJnibal ( Bu s)' shining his h e lm e t ) Y es, a nd t o think I had R o m e almos t under Iny p o w e r. J ( only l co ul d have tel egraphed t o Carthage to se n d J'llo r e m e n and s uppli es ins t e a d o f waiting y ears Cizarl emag n e ( H i s stro ng h e a d w e i ghted with the ir o n c r o wn ) If l had had m o t o r bu sses to carry m y s o ldie r s fro m France to Spain, R oland and m y g r eat army w o uld have n e v e r b ee n d estroye d b y t h e Sarace n s A Tapo lfoli ( \Valking up and d o wn with hi s rig h t hand tuc k e d in his military c oat) G ood g r ac i o u s C harles 1 f 1 had had s t eam trains t o carry m y m e n and trans p ort s uppli es I s h o uld never have l os t m y g r a nd army in Russ ia Ricllfl r d ( P e r s pirin g in his huge armo r e d suit) T o think I wa s t e d m y time in the H o l y Land whil e England was b e in g wrec ked b y broth e r J o hn. Oh! I f I had had a goo d airplane that would have t a k e n m e t o England in a day in s t ea d o f m y hav in g to trave l f o r m onths o n m y war h o r se 7 01111 Pnll/ 7 0lles ( D eciding t o s a y so m ething about the se a ) Y es J'II admit T wa s right whe n I s aid W e have n o t yetbegun tofight." L ookatthe Navy t o-day wit h submarines and hu g e wars hips George If/a sizi n g l o n (Straigh t ening the b o w o n his white wig ) T o t hink I gave m y far e w ell addres s with out having a radio audie n ce Nnpo /eoll ( Still walking up and down ) Jus t think if I had th e m etho d o f map making that the y had during the W o rld War, I s h o ul d never have l os t the Battle o f Waterloo and b ee n e xiled to St. H e l e na. lV/ars (Ente rin g wit h his armo r clatte rin g) Hel l o fri e n d s [ have a grand surprise f o r yo u. 1 'II b e t y ou can't g u ess N o l have n o t starte d another war, a lthough y o u can e xp ec t o n e soo n. Ever yon e give up? \V ell, David is going to give a r ecital with his h arp a t t h e o p era h o u se toni g h t. N e r o b eing a frie n d o f min e gave m e compli m entary ti c k e t s f o r the c r o w d ( Ex eunt-Mars and gh os t s laughing and j o kin g ) Curlain. WHO KNOWS NOAH'S TROUBLES? Jose .rlrosemt: fl fl, 2 / C ha ra c l e r s lVI r. N oah. Mrs N oah. A Sal esman. Place Entrance to the Ark. Time. Afte rn oo n. I V oah Two elephants-ch eck; two sard in es c h ec k ; two whales-ch eck; two m osquitoes c h ec k Salesman. Afte rn oon) I V I r. N oah. L see that you're getting your o ld tub r e ady. have co m e t o see if 1 can inte r es t yo u in som e in sec t p o wd e rguarantee d to kill all the bugs around t h e place Y o u'll n ee d it in s ide t h e Ark. l V o all. T w o fle as-ch eck; two ig uanasSalesman. Now, this powde r will work w o nd e r s All yo u have to d o i s pi c k up the bu g with your finge r s, ti c kl e him in the ribs, and whe n h e laug h s thro w a pin c h o f p o wder d o wn his throat. Fi ve seco nds late r h e wlil b e d ead. Nonlt ( Impatie ntl y). Can't yo u see that I m v e r y busy? I have ye t to c h ec k o n e tho u sand nin e hundred and thirty-se v e n pairs o f animals (Ente r N oah.) AlI'S. l V oall. N oah, co m e in s ide. Quic k The cats are chas in g the rats t h e f o x i s trying to kill a chic k e n and e v e r ything i s in an upro ar. A oall. Can' t yo u l e a ve a f ello w al o n e f o r a w hile ? L e t the cats eat the rats, and the f ox kilt th e chic k e n s I 'll ge t anothe r se t o f t h e m. (Exit Mrs N oah.) Salesman i V f a y I inte rest yo u in som e wire c a ges? Y o u can put the rats in t h e m and don't have to w orry about the m any m o r e Aroah. G e t away! L e t's se e. \Vhe r e wa s I ? H e r e it i s Two h o rses-ch eck; two m onkeysc h eckj t wo c amels--Sft/esma ll. Oh, do you s m o k e Came ls? I'm the a gent f o r the m. But I think that yo u w on't have e n o u g h with two i\f a y I place y our o rder f o r a doze n carto n s? A d oltar a cartoll, but in orde r s o f twe l v e o r m o r e they Illa y b e r educe d to nin e t y e i g h t cents e a c h.

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30 THE C:\RIBBEAN. ( Picking lip a dinosaur egg). Beat it, or I'll crack rour bean. ( Exit Salesman. ) At last T got rid of this fool. Now 1 can continue with my work. (En ter i\[rs :--Ioah. ) l \1rs Yoah. somebodr has called anu said that he won't be able to deliver the sea lions until da\' after to-morrow. Impossible! The great flood will come off to-morrow. 1 can't wait any l onger. I'll go and send him a radio message .-(Ex c unl.) '\S IT NEVER WAS. e}leIfer L. Pik e 'z./. Cbaraclt?rs: Queen of Sheba. Cleopatra. Lady Astor. i\lrs Carrie C. Catt. Gabriel. The Gracchi. Smith Brot hers. Saint P eter. Shyl ock D octo r Cook. Place In dianapolis Speedwa),. Time. Jul y afternoon in 1 9'2+ ( The curtai n rises disclosing the speedway at I ndianapolis. The grandstand and bleac hers are crowded. Everywhere are seen brig h t co lor s and th e r e flection of the sun on the bright h elmets and shields of ancient g ladiat o r s and on the armor of knights. Straw hat s bob h ere and there among the flow ing robes of the Greeks and R o man s. Along the side of th e speedway are lined automobiles, surreys) victorias) buckboards) and chariots. R obin H ood and his men have tied their h o r ses b es id e those of Bill Hart and his broncho bu sters.} The Gracchi ( Going about th e grandstand). Ice co ld Coca Cola. Do clo r Cook ( Following the Gracchi wherever th ey go) E s kim o Pies. Fres h frolll the pole. j V ero ( Strummingon his violin) \Von't thc)'ever b eg in? Th e r e was never such ddayduring my r eign. (The entrants for t h e f eat llre race of the day are lining up. one) n ear the post) is Ben Hur in a r ed ) white) and blue c hariot on who se wheel s are G ood rich ballo on tires and which i s drawn br t\I an-o'-\Var, i\10rvic h, and Z cv. Numbe r two i s Paul R eve r e astride his famou s horse Number three is R alph de P alma in his Ford road ster. Number f our is Charli e Padd oc k in a new) laven der Annette K elle rman bathing s uit. I t i s to he a two-mile race with no rules whatsoever.) Gabriel ( On th e starting line). Ever y bod y r c ady? ( Gabriel blow s his h orn and th ey a r c off.) ( Rudolph \'al ent ino e nters, takes a seat near Qu ee n of Sheba and Cleopatra. La dy Astor nudges Carrie Chapman Catt.) Lad), .islor. \\' atch those ancient flapp ers vamp I\lr. Valenti n o AIrs Cnll ( Exceedingl), s h oc ked. S h ows it}. Aren't they terrib le? The very idea o f t h eir com ing h ere like that! \\' hy) they have hardly any clothes on! Cleopnlra ( Whi sper ing in Que e n of Sheba's ear) I sn't h e perfectly grand Just look at his h air. Smoot her and more glossy t han T o n y ever had his .@.ueell oj Sheba ( R olling eyes anu straightening h air ) H e sure i s some s h eik. Solomon had noth ing on h im. A Te ro ( T o Caesar, pointing to Valentino). Ye Gods! Such a poor exc u se for a man! A regular woman! ( B y thi s tim e the race i s growing exciting.) !i!Jlecn oj SI",bn (Jumps up. Waves fan) Look at B e n Hut"! Gee. H e almost l ost a tir e w h e n h e passed D e Palma t h at time. Cleopalra ( P laces hand o n R udolph's arm, but seeing Quee n of S h eba doing sa m e, quick l y wit h draws it ) Go on woman. \\' hat's the matter with your eyes? H e didn't pass D e P alma; P a lma passed him. Rudolph (Tapping Queen of Sheba's arm ) Pardon m e madam) butdo you see Paddock anywhere? !flpCCII oj Sheb" (Pretendi ng scarce l y to n otice Valentino). Of cours e not \\T hat cha n ce h as h e against Ben H ur? ( B y t his time t h e crowd has s h outed until t hey are hO:1rsc. E.nter Smit h Brother s with co u g h drops ) H ere you are! J ust w h at you n eed for your so r e throats! ( Th ey proceed to distribute coug h drops ) (The race is almost over D e Palm a leading, wi th R evere a clos e second and B e n Hur far b e hind. D e P alma at a hundr ed yards from finish, rllns car throug h fence. P addock) who has been r i ding on the r ear o f Palma' s car, j u mps of f and wins the raCe by running t h e remaining one hun dred vards in 9 315 seco nds.} (The c rowd then leav es for the Colosseum where Tar zan of the Apes and R obin I l oad are plltting on a trap eze p e rformance. ) Sllylork ( Ru bbing his hand s and advancing to Saint P eter, who is h olding his usual position at the gate). Vat you take in to-day? Saiw P ele r ( L e aning over and whispering COI1 -fidentially into Shylock's car). Almost enoug h to bribe a politi cian to se llmcsom e Nava l oil stocks. .Quick c urlain

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TilE C c\RIBBI'A:\. : n

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32 THE CARIBBEAN. 0; !I; EDUCATI ON BY TRA \EL. I !I; THE TRIP 1:>1 GENERAL. Ch(s/,r Pi}:" '2/, morning of Saturday, i\larch '2'2, dawned bright and sunny. Fickle old Jupite r Pluviu s was absent. Evidently h e did not ca r e to accompany the economics class of Cristobal Hi g h School o n i ts jaunt to the various institutions o n the P acific side Cpon boarding the train we found the rest of our party sitting in small groups. \\'e took vacant seats as near them as possib l e and made ourse l ves comfortable f o r the hour's ride to Gamboa. The view w hich Aew past t h e windows was r e freshing The dark, dense jungles, the thatched native huts, and the artificia l beauty o f the Canal were all basking in the rays of the early m orning sun. Everything seemed to be a t ease and at peace with the w o rld. B efore we were aware of it, the train stopped in front o f a l ow, Aat building with a larg e yard surrounded by a hig h wir e f ence over whose gate was t h e sign "CANAL ZONE PENITENTIARY." Contrary to all expectati ons, Gamboa Penite n tiary is not a large p l ace .'\ t t h e present time i t h ouses about eighty-seven prisone r s T he building i s a long, l o w, wooden structure, well venti la ted and lig h ted, wit h a larg e enc l osed space surrounding it. L nside, t h e A oors are o f cement, and to c lean them al l t hat n eeds t o b e done is to attach a h ose to a faucet and let t h e water run through. The r e are sixtee n c..:lls, two of whic h a ccommodate nine prisoners eac h all the othe rs, s ix. 1n each cell are s h e l ves for the prisoners' p e r sona l belongings. There are a l so two punishment cells, ventilated from above. On the walls of the se are iron rings to whic h the prisoncr i s manac l ed f o r c ing him to up. H owever, h e suffers no other discomfort, for h e can not be kept in that position more than a certain number of h ours. The dining room, which is impeccabl y clean, i s also used for a movie hall. i\1 ovies are s h own o n ce a week. The kitchen is lik e t h e kitchen in any other large institution, but a note o f was struck by a la rge gr a y cat, which wa s lazi l y sunning its elf. I t took u s a little over five minutes to ins pect the prison but we found the v i sit both i n structi ve and e njoyable) thanks to Captain alston. -Florwu AI/Jeri, '24. Outside we f ound waiting the two fine big Studebaker automo biles, Mr. H opk in s had very kindly placed a t our d isposal for the day. The party divided, half to each car, and we started on the next lap of o ur trip. The curving road was s mooth and inviting, t h e day ex hilarati ng, and the sce n e r y in s pirin g, and the ca r s glided along so gently that we feared this part of our excurs i on wou l d t oo soon be over. A few mil es from the p enitentiary we passed two ga n gs o f its pri so ner s working on t h e road. There were all t ypes o f criminals h ere, so m e even w ea rin g a ball and c h ain. At the e n d of about a half hour's rid e we drove into the yard o f the CANAL ZONE HOr-.'IE fOR THE INSANE. h ad always thought of in sa n e peopl e as be i n g o f an entirely different world fro m t h e wor l d as I kn e w :t. \\'hat im pressed m e most in lookin g over thc patients in Coroz al, was their human quality and their clos e resemblance to oth e r h u man b e ing s The n ] wondered if, after all, maybe th e re weren't just as many "crazy" p eop l e outside the asylulll as in it; if may b e it wasn't th e locatio n that made the difl-erence. The inmates who are violently in s an e o r lik e l y at any mom ent to go off in a tantrum o f ra ge or the lik e, are kept seq uestered in celllik e r oo m s They a r c treate d syrnpathetically, as far as l i es in t h e power o f t h e nurses, in order to have t h e m a s quiet and as p e a ceful as possib le. On entering the wom en's barrac ks) I was a s tonis h ed at the doc ilit y and apparent m eek ne ss o f t h e inmates Evidentl y, there w e r e more m o rons and idiots maintained than radically in sa n e f o lk s And our gu id e told u S that t h o ugh they w e r e peopl e admittedl y b e l ow n or mal inte l ligence, neverth e l ess, they w e r e 110 queerer than many oth e r s, until somethin g wou l d set thelll ofF,

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THE CARIBBEAN. 33 This "something" diffe r ed in difFerent in d i v idual s The s i ght of a very small c hil d would star t one o ld c hin-whiskered woman ofF o n a wil d search for h e r baby Usually the mention or remembrance o f even a very s mall thing would turn a woman vio lentl y crazy f o r a moment or two; t h en s h e would b e herself until a noth e r occurrence. Not every inmate of the asylum i s crazy. Among others present, t r aveling abollt in wheeled c h a i rs, we noticed two co lored men whose both l egs were severed Upon inquiry, we learned that they ha d both at one tim e, been brakemen on Panama Railroad freight trains; in a moment of carelessness in their lin e of duty, their legs had b ee n amputated by the train, and t h e Government, h av ing no oth e r place to keep its pensioners, placed them h e r e They d i d not seem to mind the queerness o f their companio n s, but c h eerfully e n gaged in c hil dis h repartee with any o r all of t h em Of course among oth ers, t h ere \ vas t h e preacher, which every asylum p ossesses This one, although we did not see him h eld our attention be ca u se of hi s extraordinarily vocifero u s eloq u ence There was a Chinaman w h o had quite a garden, o f all kinds of weeds, under t h e hig hest of the barracks An o ld turbaned native o f Ind ia was, in his mind, a Budd ha worshipper. H e sat all day, with arms f o lded, before a post that supported a wind mill made by a carpenter of the kingdom. A little sk inn y P anamania n, with a black derby balanced precariou s l y o n his s m all head, walked, or rather t ip toed, around t h e grounds with a sli m finger across h is lips, "Sh, S hl Our guide said s h e d i dn't know what was his reason for being there but h e surely was as amusi n g a specimen as any o f them. On the whole, in l ooking them over, we came to the concl u s i o n that they weren't what we had expected t o find. Leavin g t h e grounds, w e confided to eac h other that w e were b eg innin g to doubt eve r yo n e. If those f olks were in s an e," what co uld some of th e queer people outside b e c all ed? THE OCCUPATION WARD, COROZAL. Unfortunately we arrived at the occupation r oo m s too late to see the mornin g workers and too early to see those o f the afternoon. Nevertheless, it was a most surprising and interesting places u c h a multitude o f things are made there! The bui lding that is used for this ward i s a cottage surrounded b y green grass and s hade trees Although t h e cottage appears very small from the outside, we found t ha t it contains three lar ge rooms, and a very small one where finished articles are kept. The room that we entered first was t h e l a rgest. 1\,11 y first im press i on o f it was one o f emptiness bu t this did not last. On the walls were hung dyed h e nequen o f v i vid co lors-purpl e, red, greenbright baskets, gay bags -and I can't seem to remember the many other t hin gs, but there were scores o f them. T n eac h of two co rn ers there was an o l d-fas hi o ned l oo m where equally oldf ashioned ra g rugs were made. [ n one there was a halffini s h ed rug. A nurse told us that riley were able to utilize almost all the o ld clothes and lin e n in this manner. The next room would delight t h e heart of any c hil d In it were toys of every kind, size, a n d description, and in eve r y stage o f the makin g. There were ti n y chairs, tables, pianos, doll h ouses -some filled w i t h miniature furniture-autom obiles of many colors, boats, h o use-boats-and almost every sort of toy. The place seemed fairly alive with toys two side walls were hung with them as well as the ceiling The r e were about five l ong tabl es a n d benches in this r oom where m a n y of the inmates worked m ak in g these articles The A oo r h ere was unbelievably clea n-for a work room on l y a few s ha v in gs a n d blocks o f wood str ew n about. The third r oom was the one in which the brooms are made-and very good brooms t hey are. I n fact, they are sold wholesale to the commissari es, and suppl y the h ousew i ves of the Isthmus. They are made b y some co lored men who lost both l egs d urin g t h e construction days, and who are give n employment h ere b y th e Government. All th e r e was to see h ere was straw, brooms, a n d m ore straw. After I h ad seen the broom room, I went to the small r oom where t h e finished articl es are put away. I t is a lmost impossib l e to describe it. L t was very small, and I seemed hemmed in b y the prettiest o f baskets done in contrasting colors, more ba gs in brillia n t co l ors and fantastic desi g n s, bright matting-and other articles made of h emp, not to m e nti on the stacks o f gayl y painted toys, and small pi eces of furni ture

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3-1 THE CARIBBEA T. The n, we assembled in the first room we had \'isited; h ere w e h eaped question after questi o n on the two nurses who had so kin dlr explained things for us as we went along They had still another surprise for liS and when they unrolled two beautiful rugs made of so ft si lk-on e in three shades of brown, and the other in o ld rose and tw o shades of luxurious blue-our ejac ulation s b egan anew that peop l e with s i c k minds could make stich useful, and at the same time attractivereally exquisite-articles. Our re spec t for the insane was growing.-Rulh Hopkim, '25. A gain we boarded Ollr tfusty Studebakers and set out, this tim e t o sati s f y another part of our body t h an our eyes and mind, f o r our next stop was at the A ncon Restaurant. \\' h e n w e had appeased our hunger, w e h e l d a council to find out how many were goi ng to P alo S eco Five o f the girls dec ided that, for various rea so n s the y would rather not go to the i sland, so they stayed in Pana ma. The rest of our party the n went to the pie r s t o get ou r boat f o r THE TRIP TO PALO SECO LEPER COLONY. Caldwtl! B. Foos, '25. \\'e got ou t o f the car and walked over to the end o f the pier and, l oo king down the runway, saw the police launc h that was to take u s to Pal o Seco. 1t was a trim craft with lin es that h i n ted at its speed Its engine was a lready running, and we started as soo n as we had piled aboard. \\'e went out of the pier e ncl osure, and started a c ro ss the bay to Pal o Seco. It wa s about a half-hour's trip and the ride was certainly id yllic-the engine throbbing regularl y, the wa ves ru s hing pas t the bow with a so ft sw i s hin g sound, and everythin g calm, peaceful and sunbathed, with so ft breez es blowing gently all the w hil e Now a n d then a long string of h e r o n wou l d fly overhead, perhaps forty in a group, proceeding in perfect formatio n. :"ear-by the F ortified I s lands co uld be see n, an d in the distance, T aboga. The i s lands were the direct antithesi s of what a tropical i sland i s u s uall y thought to be. The tropic i s l a n d of r omance and balla Is, and in fact, usually seen, i s a low, sandy islet with a foundation of cora l and a c r ow n o f palm trees. These were o f solid r ock and had a heavy vegetation, not unlike that f o un d in the States. But soon we came in sight o f Palo S eco itself. It i s an i s l a nd apart from an y other. As there is n o landin g place, the boat stopped about a hundred yards from the b eac h, and a small rowboat came out to meet u s. The womenfolk o f the party went over in the first boatload, and l e ft Guy, Cheste r and m e until the next trip. \\te sat in the launc h and yarned away, as has be en the fashion o f mal es from tim e without m easure, and watched the b oat s l ow l y approach the beach It finall y grou nded about five feet fro m the s h ore, and a big black carried the girls ashore, one at a tim e. "Lucky coon," remarked we in uni so n. The n the b oat ca m e back f o r u s and we climbed in and settled down, w ondering rather une asil y if a l eper h ad sa t there re ce ntl y As we were r owed t o ward the b e ach, we co ul d see a few building s and a sign-"Palo Seco L eper C o lony. Entrance prohibited." I personall y felt qualms, and b egan, far d o wn within m e, to have a slight wish that I had staye d back with the girls who ha d not co m e with us No, not quite that bad, but I b ega n to see their viewpoint. Still I was determined to go thro ugh with it, and I knew the rest f elt the same way. The boat grounded and I made a s tan ding broad jump onto the beach, f ollowed b y Guy and Chester. W e went up the hill and halfway up met the girls and Doctor Tuc k e r, the superintendent of the co lony, iust co min g out o f the dining hall. Miss Dodds introduced us to D octor Tuc ker, and said that thi s building was the first pla ce they had visite d, that it looked lik e an army mess hall in s i de, and t hat it se rv e d as an auditorium and m ovie h all b es i des, m ovies being s h o wn therr once a week. THE DI SEASE. After w e wer e introduce d to Doctor h e kindl y con sente d t o s h ow u s around the co l o n y On l eaving his office, we walk e d up a little A owe r b o r dered path wh e re w e m e t our first patient, a well -built black, who stopped and talked quite c h ee rfull y to t h e doctor. Had 1 met him on the stree t, I s h o uld ha ve noti ced n othing unusual in his appearance othe r than some bumps o n his face and a queer growth on his n ose. I b egan to think that if all the patients were lik e this one, the ir s was n o t s u c h a bad lot after all. Afte r h e passed all, Doctor Tuckerexplain ed to u s that there are three kinds o f lepr osy ; n odular-

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THE C ARIBBEAN. 35 s u c h a s had this pati e n t, ne r vous, and m i x ed, or a combinati o n of t h ese two. The o utward mani festat ions of t h e nodular type are littl e brown bum ps o r nodu l es, and small scars r esembl ing t h ose left by smallpox. D octor T uck e r assured us t hat t h ose afflict e d w i t h this type suffer no pain. \Ve turn ed frol11 t his little path into a broad, co n c rete wa l k, whic h seemed to b e t h e mai n street o f t h e village. A t t h e e n d of th e street i s t h e h os p i ta l w h e r e t h e patients peri o dically rec e iv e t h e ir treatment of c haulmoolgra oil, t h e s a l vation of the l epers, as well as t r ea tm ent for any minor ailm ents, for, as Doctor Tuc k e r remind ed liS, they are human a n d have t heir stubbed toes, and their tummy ac h es, and toot h a c hes, too. I n t h e ho spital w e found a patient afflicted with t h e m i xed type. H i s face and arms w ere covered with little patches of n odules; hi s hands, whi c h wer e distorted, were minu s one or two fingers, whi l e h i s body was drawn up awkwardly. H e was in b ed b eca u se of an infec t ed foot but s uff e r ed n o pai n from his disease. As w e proceeded, D oc t o r T u c ker explained to u s t hat i n t h e nervou s t y p e t h e n e r ves and mu sc l es b ecome paral yze d and contrac t, while t h e na i l s be co me hard and horny, and often entire fing e r s and to es fall off-. T o illu strate h e s h owed us a man w h o h ad b ee n cured o f the nervou s type, but w h o had returned to the co l o n y t o b e trea t ed f o r a slig h t infec tion. H i s l e ft hand wa s twisted and severa l joints w ere miss ing fro m hi s finge r s H e still b o r e a f e w scars but th ey had the appearance of heal ed w ou nd s where the dead sk in had d ropped off, l eav ing th e new s kin r osy and clean. All t h ese patients w e r e very c h ee rful; in fact J wa s strongly impressed with the r em arkabl e fortitude wit h w h i c h they b e ar t h e ir infirmit y T he w h o l e co l o n y seemed m o re lik e a s urnmer resort to m e \\Th e n one sees th e patients contentedl y r eadi n g maga zines under t h e picturesq u e mango tre es and watch es t h e f aces of all lig h t up as DoctorT uck ercomes n e ar, one w i shes t hat e very l epe r might have s u ch comfortable surroundings a n d b e unde r a s wise and sympath etic care. -Guy Stewart, 25. I disagree with Gu y s statement that it seemed like a summer r esort. 1 t may have to th e m, but I was in constant fear of touching anything. T k ept my anns folded-so did everyone f o r that matte r I t m u s t have looked quee r to an outsider to see u s walking along b e hind Doctor Tuc k e r, b e ing ve r y very c ar eful not to touch anythin g not even th e door kn o b s THE CURE. L o n g ago in t h e days o f C h rist, l eprosy was a l oathso m e di se a se, for whic h th e re was n o c ure save th e D ivine. L epe r s w e r e r egarded a s uncl ea n spirits and w e re called "th e a ccursed o f G od." No care wa s g iv e n them; t h ey wer e driv e n fro m th e i r h o mes and w e re s ton ed if t h ey came too near the city wall s, as th ey often did, to get f ood T h ey mad e their n e w h omes in t h e wil derness and in th e abandoned tombs on th e hill s. T h e rites of th e temple and the syna gogue w ere f o rbidden th e m The law demanded that th ey c r y, "Un clean! Unclean!" if, perchance, anyone ca m e n ea r thern. A cco rdin g to B e n Hur" the cry was "a s l ow, tre mul o u s wail, exceedingly sorrow ful lik e th e v oice o f a sp irit vanishing fro m P aradise and l oo king ba c k the while." They w e r e afraid to die, but had n o h o p e e x cept in death. But, n ow H ow diff"erent it i s Scientists have rec ently experimented w i t h an oil t hat will c h ec k the disease. The t houghts of th e atl1ic t ed arc turned f r o m death to th e j oy o f liv ing. Alth o ugh it h as barel y gone b eyo nd the exp e rimental sta ge i n our country, the A s ian s (th e Burm ese, especial l y) c laim by their l ege nd s o f pre-Buddha times to have known th e value o f this o i l and to have used it f o r centuries The oil i s obtained fro m the seeds o f the c haul m oo lgra tree, whence its nam e i s deri ved 1 t i s f ound prin c ipall y in Burma, I ndia, the country o f its origin. A s the demand is far greater than th e suppl y, H awaii has b eg un a chaull1100 lgra plantatio n, but, as the tree b ea r s n o fruit until it ha s grown eight years, littl e o r n o oil ha s b ee n produced The l eaves are about the s i ze o f those of an alm o nd tree ; t h e fruit, from whi c h the seeds are extracted and distilled into o i l, i s about t h e s i ze o f an apple. The oil c heck s t h e disease, but does not r e mo ve the sca r s ; those must be ca r ried thro ugh lif e, a co nstant r e mind e r of that dreadful affiictiofl that eve n th e joy of livin g ca n not full y wipe out. Doctor Tuc k e r, who has been in charge o f the l e p e r co l o n y at Pal o S eco s in ce 1909, t o l d u s that at o n e time the oil wa s very thi c k and nauseati n g, disturbing digestio n I t was, h e sa id, "very

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THE CARIB BEAN. hard to get peopl e to t a k e i t, a n d those wh o w e r e willing were often unable to do so." T he amount of one dose, w h ic h i s a b out o n e half teaspoon ful, is now a d mini s t e r e d b y i n j ec ti o n T he Asians p robabl y u sed this in a primitive wa y both internally a n d externally The oil a s it appears to-day has the cons i s t e ncy of s u gar a n d water, and is of a clea r amb e r co l o r. I t i s r ece ived from the laboratori es i n small five-inc h vial s tapering to a poin t a t o n e e n d Doctor Tucker a l so tol d u s a s t OfY co n cerning a land where t his t ree g r ows near the wa te r. In w h en t h e fruit r ipens it f alls into the wate r be l ow The fis h ea tin g the fruit are p o i so ned. On t h is a ccount fis h i n g in this l a n d i s n o t all o w e d at this time o f t h e vea r. H e a l so t o l d u s that t h e r e had been twenty-'n in e pati e n ts d i scharged f ro m Palo eeo. A s t h e price o f the oil i s ve r y hig h, the sc i e nti s t s fcaring t hat a sca r city rnight e n s u e in the Ori ent, boug h t a quantity o f seeds f ro m the l\l a wlaikian s and sent t h em to C a l i forn ia to b e gro wn A cco rding to reports, t h e trans pl anted plants are flour is hing. Although t h e oil i s u sed to a g r ea t ex t ent in P alo Seco, t h e r e are n o trees o n the i s land. H o w e\'e r there are some you ng plan t s in the h osp ital grounds at both A nco n a n d C o r oza l, an d these in time, it i s t h o u ght, w ill s uppl y the demand o n the Isthmus.-K alhtr;nt Fischtr, '25 Doctor T ucke r the n took u S to T H E C HAPEL. T he littl e c h apel h ad s tepp ed back out o f the path as if to let us p a ss, b u t we dec ided t o e n te r, attracted by the twi n signs standin g at t h e s i des of the door, annou ncing to t his littl e world the following : o n t h e left in E nglis h, S e r v ices-Wednesday, Cathol icj l\fonda)', E p i sco p alia n, an d on the right in Spanish .. ervicios : L os l unes j Episcopal; los mitrcol es Cat61ico Romano. Bie n venida. On stepping i n, we v i s itor s s a w several rows o f ruue woode n pews and a small w h i t e a ltar u po n which rested a large b r ass cru cifix, two stiff bunches of bright artificial A owers, a n d a b ook rest conct:rning w h ic h an interesting stor y was r e la cd b)' J)octorT ucke r Sever a l ),ea rsagoa travel er told the peop l e of this colon y of t h e poverty p reva-l ent in a certain l e p e r co l o n y in Japan. i\I o v e d by thi s s t o ry they collec t e d t e n dollar s and gave it t o the tra v e l e r to se n d t o the Ori e n t. S e v e ral m onths late r whil e Bi s h o p i\l o rris wa s in the States h e r ece ived a sum of m o ney from th e J apa n ese in appreciation of what the ir brothe r l e p e r s had don e for the m and kno win g o f n o b ette r use t o whi c h t o put the m o ney, h e purc h ase d thi s b oo k r es t and sent it t o the c h a p e l at Pal o S ee o On a little s h elf b es id e the altar s tood two s mall g la ss cand lesti c k s, the ir white c an d l es b o w e d ove r b y the unscrupulo u s h e a t. At o n e end o f th e altar rail wa s a d oo r whi c h may b e s aid to l e a d fro m o n e r elig i o n t o an o th e r a s it i s the front o f the confes s i o nal f o r the pri es t, wh e n o p e n e d so that h e ma), sit be hin d it, but b eco m es a pane l o n the wall when p u s hed ba c k againstit f o r the se rvi ces o f othe r sec t s I n o n e co rn e r s t ood a batte r e d little organ, scratc h ed and paintw o rn fro m th e man y dus tings i t ha s r ece i ve d whil e in the opposite c o rn e r s t ood a n eat stac k o f h ymn b oo k s d og-eare d and b e thumbe d b y wh o kno w s h o w many d i sfigure d hands. A s w e turned t o l eave w e s aw thro ugh the o p e n door the c alm blu e o f the Pacific and the purple i s l a n ds, whil e a bove all R oated a mis t o f care fr e e clo uds. P assing thro u g h the b o u g ain ville a -co v e r ed p o r c h w e descended the s t e p s an d walk eel up the path toward the di s p e n sary -II'il/;a11l CouJi m 2 5 Whe n w e l eftthe di s p e n sary D octor Tuc k ertoo k LIS to hi s office I t wa s a t y pi c al d o ctor's office with a b oo k c a se o f b oo k s all s kin and tropic al di s se a ses, a map o f Panama o n the wall, an d t h e executive t o u c h s h o win g in the d es k s safe and filin g cabinets. H e w ent t o the safe and too k out a b ox o f the m a ne)" evo l ved b y him s elf, an d used in the C o l o n y I t wa s o f aluminum o r brass the s i ze o f Am erican coins, with a r o un d o r square h o l e in the cente r, an d stampe d with the name of the co l o n y A cco rdin g t o Doctor Tuc k er, it se r ves a dou b l e purpose : First, th e m o ney o f the oute r wo rld i s n o t infec t ed with g e rm s o f l eprosy, and seco n d this m ney can n o t b e lIse d anywhe r e e l se but i n the co l o n y H e g a ve an inte r es tin g s id e lig h t as to thi s l as t H e s aid that in th e o ld da),s w h e n eve r one of t h e inhabita n ts ha d accumulate d so m e 1110 ney, h e would go t o a secl u de d co rn e r o f the b e a c h, hail a native fis hin g craft and g iv e the o wn e r a f e w dollar s t o run him in t o Panama.

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THE C ARIBBEAN 37 The r e h e w o ul d g e t g l o ri o u s l y drunk, and w h e n h i s m o n e y wa s all g o n e g iv e h im se l f up. "Now," a s D o ctor T u cker s miling l y r emarked h e co uld ofFe r a native a bu s h e l o f m o ney and h e w o u l dn't even s l o w down." I t wa s c erta in l y a goo d dem oll stratio n o f m o n e y a s a m eans rath e r than a n e n d D octor T u c k e r and D o c t o r and I\i r s E r b w h o w e r e a l so v i s itin g t h e C o l o n y, came ba c k w i t h u s, and afte r tw o m o r c trips in t h e r o w boat, w e starte d. \\'e h a d a last fading v iew o f t h e b e a c h at P alo Seco-the hill, t h e wooden b u ild i n gs and flo ati n g o v e r i t all t h e Ame ri can A ag A g e n e ral f ee ling o f r e l i e f ca m e ove r liS all a s the b e a c h faded fro m sort o f r e la x a t i o n. D o c t o r Tuc k e r tol d liS t h a t many p eople w h o came to P a l o Seea o n l egitima t e bu s in ess w o u l d b eco m e i n t e n se l y inte rested in se a s h ells, collec t a f e w o n t h e b e a c h and l e a ve hur r i e d l y wit h o u t go in g u p the hill. \Ve had a ride b a c k t hat will lin ge r l o n g in m y m e m o ry ; t h e n w e doc ked a nd, amid t h e e a ge r ques t i o nin gs o f t h e stay-ath o mes-or r a t h er s ta yatd oc ks-w e l eft f o r C hiriqui.-Caldwt'll 8. Foos, '25 e d rove pas t t h e c hu r c h w i t h the go lden altar and t h e h i s t o r i c flat arc h, and clown th e narro w stree t s b etwee n two-and t h re e-s t o r y bui l d in gs o v e rflowin g with d u s k y humanity. Our cars dre w up in front o f C h iriqu i Prison. \ \'hil e p e rmi ss i o n to v i sit t h e place was b eing so u g h t we walk ed over t o t h e P la z a Frances t o see t h e im p ress iv e m o n u m e n t e rected t o t h e F re n c h C a n a l d i gge r s \\'h e n summo n ed w e r etraced our s t e p s t o t h e prison wh e r e w e w e r e ve r y co r d i ally r ece i ve d and take n into t h e courtyard. T h e prison e r s stood about i d l y in s mall g r oups and l oo k ed a t u s S o m e had s mall trinke t s w h i c h they tried t o sell u s Our guide expl a i ned everyth i n g t o u s a nd a s w e l e f t inv ited liS t o v i s i t the n ew prison ( w h i c h th e Panaman Government i s e r ec t i n g) a s soo n a s it i s co m p l e t ed Fro m h e r e w e d rove t o L a s Saba n a s \V e w e n t a l o n g the b e a c h es pas t t h e b ull rin g and aro und t h e n e w S a nto T omas H osp ital a h ospital unde r co nstr ucti o n o n an extre m e l y b eautiful s p o t n e a r the se a s h o r e \\'e the n returned t o t o wn a nd, afte r a n o t h e r bri e f v i s i t t o t h e r es t aurant, b oarded t h e train for h o m e \\'e w e r e a tired b u n c h t hat r eturne d t o t h e Atlant i c s ide that night, bu t all a g r eed t hat t h e d a y had b ee n w ell s p e n t .-Cht'sler Pike, '24 TH E COR A L TREE S H A R K A LE GEND. Jfor,-is J\{ardl o sky, '25. H e h a d guarde d ( o r years and ye a rs, a s h a d his fath e r s and f o r efath e r s that p r ec i o u s inva lua b l e co ral tree with its maj es ti c outspr e a d branc h es Now h e i s d e a d M a y h a p so m e other o f those f e r oc i o u s man-eating s h arks w ill tak e h i s p lacebu t h e i s g o n e The s hark o f i V I orro 1 s l e w as kn o wn to all n a ti ves and to any tourist wh o had s ta yed even o n e d a y at Taboga Panama's P alm Beach. Natives had c ir culated w e i rd tal es about h im T hey tol d o f h i s s ize-a g r eat h u l k l o nger t han any cayuco t h e y had see n, floating l a zily o n t h e wa te rs-; o f his h e a d f o r m ed lik e a s harp bull et; o f h i s g l ea m in g t ee t h k ee n e r t han any ra zo r; and o f h i s f e r oc i t y s h o wn ill t h e hurried dea t h o f an y w h o m h e mi g h t attac k. The s hark hate d ever yo n e but the r e wa s o n e w h om h e hated m os t o f all. Thi s wa s a s lim g ra ce ful la d w h o h a d escaped h im o n e d a y, even t ryin g t o llse the sharp s t ee l b o l o w h i c h ever y swimme r in t h ose parts alwa ys w o re tuc k e d in his b e lt. T h e guard i a n o f t h e coral tree had never f o r gotte n i t One day the s h a rk d i scove r e d som eo n e wit h a s lim, gr""ace ful brown body n ear t h e tree It wa s his hated adver sary H e wa s sure h e had co m e to r o b h im o f t h e co ral tree, the dear h e ir l oo m whi c h rig h tl y b e l o n ged t o h i m. H e mus t se t out t o destroy him f o r t h e s a c ril ege w h i c h h e h a d come to commit. The r e wa s a s wish o f the wate r s t h e s hark turned over, t h e white o f hi s a bdom e n s h o w in g lik e a w hite streak b e l o w the s urfa ce o f wate r But w h e r e wa s t h e boy? H e had d i s a p p eared a s i ( h e had n o t b ee n th e r e The n t h e shark ( elt a s udden s t a bbin g pain t h r o u g h h i s b ac k. The b o l o w as h i s N e m es i s f o r i t h a d struc k t r u e a nd d ee p in to the h eart o f t h e se n tinel. Still t h e natives a vo i d t h e co ral tree, b e l i evin g t hat the g h os t o ( t h e dea d s hark haunts t h e pla ce g uarding in d eath w hat h e had g uarded in life

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3 T H E C A R IBB E A N. QI jf ew C!Centeri) of QCanal QIctibitp. THE CO:-\T R O L H O L SE OF G UUN LOCKS. Ttl/IS, 26 See illustrat i on on page 39. Peopl e fr o m e n : r) lan d co m e t o see the Gatlill Loc k s whi c h are the la r g es t in the w o rld. : \ r r i \'ed the re, they immediate l y g o t o t h e contro l h Ollse in whi c h the contro l and o p eratio n o f all lock m ac hin e ry i s centralized, an d fro m w h i c h t h ey ca n ge t n o t onh' a b ette r v i e w o f t h e Canal but also -; bett e r o f t h e contro l and o p erati o n of the l oc k m ac hin ery. The l oc k mac hin ery cOl1s i s tsof : t hesign3 1 arro w s o n e at each e n d o f appro a c h o r c enter wall f o r si gnallin g t o s hip s ; the e i g h t chain f e nder s whi c h f e n d ships fr o m h itting gates w h e n approachin g ; the f orty gates w h i c h separate and d i v ide the chambe r s i n t o sec ti o n s ; t h e fifty-e ig h t risi n g stem \'al ves, w h i c h c ontro l t h e flo w o f wate r down s t rea m fro m lak e to c hambe r fro m cham b e r to c h ambe r, and fro m c hambe r t o sea; t h e s i x t y cylin dric al \ al ves w h i c h contro l t h e wate r across str ea m o r fro m t h e c hambe r o n o n e s ide to t h e c h ambe r o n t h e o t h e r s ide. I n the cente r o f t h e contro l h o u se i s a l o ng table, o r contro l b oard o n w h i c h are s labs o f gray m a rbl e repr esenting wate r in the l oc k s p a n t hi s tabl e are t h e miniature m a c hines gates c h a i ns and arro w s w h i c h corres p ond to the actu a l m ac hin e r y i n the l oc k s a n d t h e l e v e r s w h i c h o p e rate all sai d mac hin es The m os t pro min ent i nd i cator s o n the contro l b oard are t h e tall th e rm o m to w e r s whi c h in d i cate t h e wate r e leva tion thro u g h out th e l oc k s T h e c h a in f ende r s gates, a n d s t e m va l ves all have i n d i cato r s w h i c h operate si multan eo u s l y wit h t h e ma c hines a n d s how th e exact p os i t i o n o f each m ac hine a t al l t imes. The cylin dric al v a l ves ha ve ind i c ator s whic h cons ist o f red a n d gree n lig h ts and ind i cate t h e o p e n ed and closed p os it i o n o f t h e va lv es o n l y There are variou s additi o n a l indica t o r s s h ow i n g t h e operation o f s i g n a l a rrows and e levati o n s o f water at t h e sea e n d o f l ocks in t h e c h a m b e r s a n d at t h e lake e n d All ex t e ri o r lig h t in g o n t h e l oc k s i s controlled fro m t h e control h o u se, as arc t h e range lig hts for gu i d i ng s hip s t h ro u g h th e bre a kwater on e ntering C o \ o n harh o r ; and th e ran ge lights for c(Jnclucr ing ships to t h e l oc k $ f ro m Gawn I.ake. T o r eali7c t h e complicated n
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Cour /t,y QI Mr. MllltT, Gil/lin ..., :r:: tTl () :P "" "" tTl :P :z w '"

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THE CARIBBEA ------------------------THROUGH THE CANAL. jrm( .\f{COflrl. '2/. :\ ship coming from 7'\ew Y ork and bound for ... an Francisco through rhe Panama Canal enters the Canal in Lim on Bay, where it o n board a pilot and se\'eral col ored employees. From the time the pilot gets aboard he is responsible for the handling of the ship, and the l ock operators must assist him in every way possible Then, under irs own power, rhe s hip proceeds to Gatlin, where the locks are seen rising lik e great concrete steps, leading to Gatlin Lake. : \ 5 the ship nears the .:\tlantic approach wall, it waits, if othe r ships occupy the c hamb ers If not, the ship may advance as soon a s the large r ed arrow at the entrance h as been placed in posicion This arrow is moved by the operator in the control house to designate whether the ship is to go into the east or the west c hamb er Cables from th e towing locomotiv es are now let out by one-hundred-cighty-foot-pe r -m inute coils from the locomotives (common l y called mules). Colored employees in a small boat fasten a hand line, which i s let down from the bow of thc ship by oth e r colored empl oyees to the cabl e rope which they carry with them from the approach wall. The cable, drawn aboard the s hip by the hand line, is fastened to iron bits. The gates are opened and the guard c hain i s dropped. The pilot thcn signa l s to the l oco motive ope rator s and the ship moves o n, towed by four locomotiv es. Two locomotives are fastened ahead pulling, and two behind exerting back pull, in order to k eep the ship steady while it m oves through the lock s. ;\lore mules are used in some cases according to the size of the s hip being towed They tow at the rate of two miles an hour. These towing locomotives weight forty-five tons, are thirty feet long, and hav e two 7s-h o r se power, '220-volt motors There is a cabin on eac h end so that the operators can run them towing and returning without the mules' being completely turned around. Th e ship makes its as cent in three levels, each lifting it twentr-e ight and one-third feet-th e wtal being eighty-five feet, representing the dif ference b etween sea levd and the lake level. After the ship has Clltt:rcd one of t h e c hamb ers, the gates are shut behind. Then water is let in from a system of culverts under the l ocks until the ship has been raised another twenty-eight and one-third feet, and so put on a level with the n ext chamber. Thus, when the gates open from the third chamber, the s hip is at the lake level, eighty-fiv e feet above the sea-leve l channel. Here the plan of the l oc ks can be seen b est. The Atlantic e ntranc e, the locks, the lake, and the channel, the famed golf course, and the town of Gatlin ( L ock City), all lie before the eye of the tourist. The cables are then take n in by the rapid coils and the ship starts on its own power T hence it proceeds up the channe l throug h the great divide (th e Gaillard Cut), until it r eaches the Pedro i\l iguel l oc k s, where th e descent into the Pacific begins. The locks at Pedro l\Iiguel consist of a sing l e flight or step o f twin l ocks, by which a drop o f thirty feet fro m Culebra Cut to Miraflores Lake i s accomplished From the l\l iraflores Lak e t h e ship passes into the i\1irafl ores l oc k s H ere there are tw o steps of twin lock s, eac h step r ep r ese nting a l ower ing o f twellty-seven and one-half feet, a total drop of fifty-five f eet. Now the s hip i s in the se a l evel c h anne l with Ancon Hill ahead in the distance She turns a bend in th e c hann e l and stear n s int o Panama Ba)" ready, after dropping the pilot, to glide into the Pac ific. ABOUT T H E CANAL. Dear Evelyn: See illustration 011 p .. 1.ge 39. On board S. S. SlIbjllllCliutl, Gatun L ake, Tran siti ng the Panama Canal. At last have the desired information f o r you. I was fortunate enough to find the captain "in a talkative mood l ast night and, taking advanta ge of this unu sua l state, pli ed him with questions as to the material advantage of transiting the Canal rather than circling the H orn. I f we had u sed the rOllte around Cap e H o rn, it would hav e be e n n ecessary to travel ten thousand fiv e hundr ed mil es from Cristobal on the Atlantic side, to re;lCh Balb oa on the Pacific siJe. B y u s ing the Canal we are reducing that distance t o f J rt)' four miles, and s hall make th e trip i n l ess than ten h ours. Th e cost of operat ing the s hip is approximately four hundred and fort)' dollars p e r day. If h e had lIse d the old route, it would hav e cost him sixtt;;CI1 thousand, sixty dollars to go frOI11 Cristobal to Balboa, but by transiting th e Canal t h o u g h h e pays seven thousand five hundr ed dollars i n tolls, h e saves eight thousand five hundred and sixty dollars.

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THE CAR IBBEAN. A s well as I ca n remember, YOLI especially wanted to know h ow the water i s operated in the locks during the lockage o r a s hip. I s h all try to explain this process to yo u) but the com plexity of i t still stagger s m y nontechnical mind. 1 was playing car ds below and didn't r ealize w e ha d reached the l ocks until I l ooked out or the porthole and beheld towering concrete walls. Throw ing clown my han d, I rushed lip on dec k r o llowed by the rest o r the players. I f o un d out that we were in the lower chamber, which i s olle thousand feet l o n g, one hundred and ten feet wide, with a depth of s eventy-eight feet. I a s ked the c aptain for permission to go ashore and look over this wonderful pi e ce of engineering. A gang plank was pulled a board and I went as h ore. Fortunate l y I Illetone of the employees who s h owed and explained to m e the operation of the locks. \V e went b e low into the tunne l which runs practi ca lly the rull length or the l ocks. H ere is located the mac hinery which operates the guard chain, gates, valves, etc. Each machine in the tunnel i s numbered and h as a correspondin g number in the contro l house f ro m which it is operat ed The guard chain, whi c h I have mentioned above, w e igh s about nin e t y pounds to the link. I learned that t h i s chain i s lowered and raised by hydraulic pressure and is used for the protection of the gates. I n case a ship hits this chain, it is protected b y a small val ve which will release at three hundred pounds per square inch, and allow the c hain to payout gradually \Vh c n this c hain is l owe red, it fits into a recess in t h e sides and bottOI11 o r the l ocks The next mac hin e was one which operates one of the gates. There are twenty sets or forty hal ves o f these gates, each being sixty-five feet long, seventy-ei ght feet hig h, e i ght feet thick, and e ach weighing three hundred and fifty tons. The bottoms o f these gates have air-tight compartm ents which give them a buoyancy. The gates are opened and c losed by a strut-arm which i s connected to the gate and to t h e bull wheel in the tunnel, which is geared half-way around and I S driven by an e lectric motor. Next was the operation of the water. I t IS handled b y gravity. It co m es rrom Gatun L ake, a fr esh-water lake which i s eightyfiv e feet above sea level. The r e is a nineteen-foot c u lvert about seventyfive feet unde r each wall, and through these culverts the water flow s to feed the l oc k s Here the wate r is controlled by a system o f val ves known as rising-stem valves. \Nhen a ship enters the l owe r chamber from the sea, the gates and valves at the lower end o f this chamber are closed The valves at the l owe r e n d of the middle c hamber are opened, allowing the water from the middle level to pass into the lower chamber. As the water in the l owe r c hamber rises, the water in the middle chamber lowers until they are equalized. The valves are closed, the gates are opened, and the ship then passes in to the middle chamber. The gates are closed and the valves are opened in this chamber as in the l owe r chamber. After the ship i s raised in this chamber, it passes into the upper chamber, where it is rai sed to the l eve l o r the lake. I t takes approximatel y three and a half million c ubi c feet of water for eac h l ockage. Arter the rresh water passes rrom the upper level into the middle level, it becomes mixed with salt water. As soon as the ship ha d been raised in the upper chamber, a gang plank was put aboard f o r m e to get back onto the ship. \V e are now steaming along on Gatun Lake, anti expect to arrive at Balboa sometim e this afternoon. From there we go o u t to sea, and then s h all continue our journey to San Francisco As soon as we arrive t h ere, I s hall ha ve another letter read)' to mail to you, telling about the rest o f the trip. Sincerely yours, DELILAH. CR I STOBAL COALING STATION. Mildred M o r g an, '25. Cristobal Coaling Plant i s located on Island, west of Cristobal-Colon, and separated from the American vicinity b y the o ld Fre n c h Canal. l\l illdi Island runs south of Cristobal to the inter-section of the o l d French Canal a n d the new American Canal. The constrllction work o n the coaling plant began about 1 9'4-, and was finished in 1916 The first step was to sink the large caissons at the north end or I sland, preparatory to buildin g a pier fronting on the waters of the bay o n the north, east, and west s ides. After the dockconstruction work was fini s hed, the work of contractors was begun in erecting the machinery for unloading and delivering purposes, The plant in its entirety cost about three million dollars The unloading side o f the plant, which is on the east sfde consists of four unloading towers, each indip e nd ent of the other and each hav in g a two-andone-half ton capacity clams h ell bucket that runs out over a collier by means of a carriage and sted

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THE CA RIBBEAN. line, the carria ge being operated on a b oo m with track. '"h en the collie r co m es to th e plant for unloading, these booms are l o w e r ed down to th e ship :the; it is tied lip. All the unl oading towe r s are operated by steam, and are the only part o f the plant that is not operated by electricity. Ea c h one of the unloading toWers has an unl oading capacity of two hundred and fiftr rons per h our when the digging i s not interrupted I t takes from twenty to thirty h ours to unload a twelve thOllsand-ton co llier, depending upo n other w ork being done at the plant at the same time. The last part of unloading a collie r i s co n s id erabl y slowed d.own on account o f getting n ea r the botrom, where there is s h oveling work n ecessary to bring the coa l toward th e cente r o f the hatc h. These unloading towers are hand led hy o n e operator and one e n gineer, with a co l ored crew of six o r seven The de liv eri n g side o r the plant consists or r O llr reloading towers (operated by electricity), that ha\' e a capacity of fiv e hund red to o n e th o u sand tons per h our, depending upo n the speed with which a s hip can r eceive coal. These reloaders are independent o f each oth er, and a l so co n struc ted so that they ca n be moved along the r e loading <..lock a long similar lin es to those o f the unloading t owe r s. Each o f these i s operated by one o p erato r and a c rew o f three or four negroes The r e loading towers are located on the west side o f the plant. There is a lso a reloading mac hin e at the north e nd of the plant, commo nly r e f erred to a s the "wharf bunker." This mac hin e i s and i s pro vided wit h two cOllveyo r booms operating o n swing in g c ircl es that have a radi u s of fort)' feet each. This machine is capabl e o f delivering a little more than one of the reloading towe r s, and requires an operator for each o f two conve)'orbooms if they are operatecl simultaneo u s ly, with a co l ored c rew of the s am e number f o r each o p e r ator as is needed f o r r e l o a d in g towers The elevated railroad, com m only called the v ia duct, is located between the unl oadi n g and reloading sides or the plant, and serves both o r them. Across the p lant and connecting with east and sides of it, arc huilt two large briuges. On each of these bridges are two five-ton ca pacit y r eclaiming buckets, whic h nr c u sed for digging coal from the pile and loading it into ca r s through a hopper, buil within t h e bridge These Jigging buckets are movahle across the bridge by means of trucks on tracks. The two hoppers within each bridge are also movable, there being o n e hopper ror e a c h reclaiming bucket. These bridges a r e built on truc ks and run on tracks, i n a north and south direc tio n on the p lant. These b u c kets have a capa city o f five hundred tons per h ou r each. A trac k rllns thro ugh each bridge and connects with eithe r s id e of the e levate d railroad by means o f a sliding switch, the latte r b e ing so constructed that it fit s over the track on the elevated rai lroad and s lide s along s aid trac k w h e n t h e b ridge i s set. I n additio n to the mai n pla n t m ac hinery, t h e Cri s t o bal p lant ha s a fleet or t h r ee barge s equipped with co al conveyors o n e levators, t hat are used f o r delivering coal to s hip s away from t h e plant, or for ddi\'ering coa l t o ve ssels at the coaling plant, when it i s n ecessary to coa l sllc h vesse l s from b o th s id es at the same tim e Thi s i s d o n e by lIsing a r e l oading tower frol11 t h e d oc k s ide a n d a co n veyor barge fro m t h e opposite s id e These ba r g es are equipped wit h g e n erator se t s operated by s t eam, f o r making e l ec tricity with whic h to r un the m o toJr s in each conveyor. T h ese co nveyors are constructed along t h e lin es o f t h e o ld-fashioned cistern pump, with cups or s mall buckets 011 a re volving c h ain The conveyors are from forty to fifty -five f ee t h i g h The coal i s r ed to t h em r r o m the bottom o f th e barge and carried u p to t h e top by thi s chain of bu c k e t s and fro m t h ere emptied into large round, t e l escoping s h oots that are con n ec ted to th e co alin g h o l es or opening s in t h e shi p b e ing co a l ed The co aling plant wa s built for supplyin g w i t h bunke r co a l comme rc i al vesse l s calli n g at t h e I sthmus o r trans itin g t h e Canal; for supplying th e Panama Canal Panama R ai l r oad, Army and Navy, and indi\, iduai s o n the I sthmus with coa l ; for prov idin g the :,\Tav)' Department wit h a co a l i n g statio n f o r all Navy v esse l s The storage pi l e o f thi s plant i s divided into two are a s one a wet storage ba s i n for s toring coa l unde r water for t h e Navy for all ind e finit e tim e a s a res e rve supply; and a dry storage area f o r comme r c i a l and other purposes. T h e wet s t orage area occ upi es about o ne-third o f th e storage bas in, :lnd t h e dry nbout two-thirds. r h e Cristobal p lant i s repute d t o b e t h e mo s t efficient coaling statio n in t h e wor ld, and i s t h or o u g h l y moder n in eve r y r es pect. Unl oadi n g o r delive ring o p erations are h eg ull a s soo n as t h e s hip s have h ee n sccurd}' tied up to th e dock; a n d the coa lin g stati o n has a wor l d wid e reputation f o r dispatching a s hip in a s h ort time. One of

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THE CARIBBEAN. 43 t h e best records made was the delive r y of one thousand and two tons of bunke r co al in an hour and ten minu r es RALPHO, THOU D OST P REVARICATE." -Blltfer. Florence Albert, '2-/. H Let's see w h o can tell r h e bigg es t lie pro p osed Ruth, ( o r the want of better inspirati on "All rig ht," c h or u sed th e rest of us. Let's. Y ou start." There were f our o f li S o f whom Ru t h eleven o r twe l ve, was the o l dest. \\'e ha d b ee n p laying tag and, tired and h o t, h ad sat dow n to r es t \\Ie had to do so methin g, so s ug gest i o n s as to what to play were call ed f o r T e lling stories, p laying colors, p laying h o us e, were s u ggested -and r ejecte d sco rn f ully. The n came Ruth's idea-som ething entirely new! \Y ell" s h e started, I was on one of 111)' uncle's farms l ast year during vacati o n. H e ha s an awful lot of farm s, twelv e or maybe fifteen!" \\'e list e ned wide eyed This was so mething diff e r ent. \Y e fairly hun g o n her words H e h as lots o f grape arbors, too, and let m e eat all the grapes I wanted to. J u sed to eat them all the tim e an d h e just u sed to laugh because I ate so many, and h e n eve r said a word! J ust tol d m e t o bust m yse lf." O-oh jus t ima gine having so mebody aro un d w h o didn't k eep te llin g you not to eat b etween m ea l s, b ec au se if yo u did you wouldn't eat any supper a n d w o ul d ma y b e get s i ck "So o n e day when 1 was eating some, I ate a big sp id e r I saw it an d ate it!" Sh e s t opped. W e l oo ked at e a c h oth e r rather dismayed. The n i\[artha, Ruth's sister, spoke up an d said decidedly, "That's not true Ru t h l\IcCombs an d you know it. I'm going straight home and tell mamma you were telling fibs." "Aw,i\Iartha,you kno w I sai d we'd see who cou l d t ell the bigge s t lie Don't b e suc h a tattle-tal e." "I'm not a tattletal e I'm going h o m e an d t ell mamma you called m e a name." \ Vait, l\Iartha," J interposed, 1'11 tell m)' lie n ow, and t h e n E l s i e and you. D on't bre ak up the game." J b egan, Y ou kn ow I h ave a b ea r up in the dark arc h. H e f o llow s m e eve r yw h ere I go, but 1 don't bring him down h e r e b eca u se I 'm afraid he'll c h ew you all up, a n d then t hey'd kill my bear. And so m e tim e wh e n you get mad at m e I'll sic him o nto you, I will. "Well, I lik e t hat, Fl orence Alb ert," all c him ed in at once \V ell, wait a minute I haven't fini s h ed Bu t if yo u're ni ce to me, I 'll take yo u up t h ere a n d mak e him do his tri c k s f o r yo u. Anyway, n o w t hat J've got him up there, I'm not afrai d to walk thro u g h the dark arch es b eca u se i f anyone's t h e r e, h e'll tear him all to pieces An d when I goaway, I'm going to take h im with m e, so that yo u kids ca n go in the dark arches wit hout me." This was too mu c h "Flore n ce Alb ert, I 'll not s p ea k to yo u aga i n M y mamma doesn't all ow me to associate with liar s declared Ruth, virtuo u s l y, jumping up and starting to leave. "i\Ie n e ither," ech oed l\/ farth a. "And you kn o w t ha t you haven't got a bear up t h e r e b eca u se t h e b oys are up there, and yo u are afraid b eca u se 1 wan teu yo u to go lip and yo u would n't go." W e ll, I 'm go in g with i\lartha and Ruth b e ca u se l don't lik e you anyway," declared El sie and all three stalk ed of f t h e porch in rig hteous indignation, leavin g me to wonder at t h e perversity o f human beings. F R O i\I THE I NTERI O R Dorothy llbmdroth, '2./. I t wa s on t h e Ranuolph r oad that T fir s t s aw him. H e wa s a s hin y, ebony-colored man o f absolute l y p erfect pro portion s. On his r ound head r e posed a monstrosity in t h e s ha pe o f a hat. B eneath t h e tattered br i m, peered fort h the bla c kest and most innocent-l oo kin g eyes eve r see n, except in a cow \\'hat must ha ve been rather full lip s fine l y chiseled, were co mpletel y h idden b y a s h ock o f kinky ha ir whic h reached down ove r where his neckti e s h ou l d have b een A ragged, s lee,' e l ess shirt covered his back ( literally s peaking; f or there was n o fro n t in the t h ing) A filt h y pair o f trou sers whic h, I f ee l sure, must ha ve o n ce b een w h ite, fitted rathe r s nu g l y and terminated i ust b e l ow t h e knees Wi t h h ead h e ld hig h and s h oulders w ell ba c k, h e walked br i s kl y al ong sw inging a pair o f sinewy arms in time to a tune whistled beneath his breath. I pulled out m y ca m e ra. Say, J o h n, h o w about a picture?" l\J y answer ca m e in an unexpected manner. H e picked up a pair o f p erfec tl y proportioned feet, worn to waterm e l o n pinkness in the so l es, and was far down the road b e f ore I co ul d start t h e car-a swarthy Ad onis fleeing in a manner not at all b eco ming, n o r worthy of hi s predecesso r

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++ THE CARIBBEAN. snlP.UHETIC S!';:ETCHES OF NEAR-BY SCENES. Ice on a hi g h hilIfr Q\'e rlooking the Atlantic Ocean stands the h istoric fort, San L o r enzo Once the stro ngh o l d o f Spanish gallants, the grand old f ort now shelters the beasts of t h e jungle. 'Yhe r e the haughty paniard once trod n o w prowl rh e cat, tapir, and wild hog, making their h o m es in t h e crumbling walls \Vhere once the ir on can n o n rested, n o w roo s t th e wild parro t s and turkeys, r o u s ing the jungle with thei r stran ge cries. This f ort t hat defied all until captured b y the swarthy pirate l\l o r ga n now lies in a state o f decay with tropical growth s lowl y but sure l y hi d in g it fr o m the world Thus the strang e battle o f the centuries goes on, with :"Jature a lways Slife of t : l e conquest.-Georgr Oll/UJ '2-/. It was a t y pi c al balmy day o f dry season The sea la y stretched out lik e a length o f s hin y satin ribbon-th e co l o r o f melted sapphires Blu e, blue, blu e, it was-that exo ti c s hade o f blu e that makes the heart ach e. iVlotionless white craft formed raised dots on its smooth, soft surface. The breakwater made a si l ve r border for th e ribbon, and at the same ti m e f ormed a definit e dividin g line between the blu e o f the Sea a n d the equally startling blu e o f the c l o u d l ess s k y a sound, not a m o ti o n n othing but the perfection o f :,\ Tarure manif es ted in the unmatch able blueness o f sea and s k y .-Dorothy Abendroth, '24' 1t is a beautiful tropical l\1ar c h afternoon with the su n shining brilliantly. The pervadin g sile nce is broken onl y by t h e faint n o i se of the little waves as they run up o n th e s hore and break o n the smooth, brown stones, whic h can be seen at i rregular intervals along t h e beach The bay, a clea r blue g ra y, i s d isturbed o n l y b y he ripples made on its surface b y the breeze. Occasionally, a fish jumps, describ es a flas hin g s ilver arc as h e goes through t h e air, a n d i s gon e r n the di stance the breakwater s hows s ilv e r, then changes and is jewelled with lig hts a n d shadows. Bcyond, the h o riz o n i s c l ear of b oa t s, with not cven a smudge o f s m o k e t o indicate o n e There the sea see m s to merge with t h e white s k y, broken h e re and the r e b y patches of blu e Florw(t Albert, '2.,. I t i s a hot sultry afternoon. Eve rythin g see m s exhausted-even the Caribbean, that ocean o f ever -c hanging moods. H ow still i t see msmoti o nless, save for a few ripples which, touche d b y the idl e breeze wash lazil y upon the aged, dullbrown co ral r eef. Farthe r out the breakwate r stretch es on aimless l y. The s un see m s obscure ; t h e s k y and water, a yellowis h drab, seemin g l y let t h e h orizon unite t h e m This sce n e of m o n oto n y i s bro k e n only by a l o n e l y sea gull a s it w ends its wa y over the wate r s Irwe l\lcColtrtJ 2.,. The white-capped waves roared in b e tween the r ee f s w hi c h guarded t h e o n ce quiet a n d peaceful lagoon The sky wa s a s dark and m enacing as t h e threatening sea b e low Clouds scurried across it, hit h e r and thithe r, as if seeking r efuge from the coming s t orm. The palm trees b e n t b efore th e la shing o f t h e win d whi c h s hri eking l ik e a bans hee, s wept throu g h their branc h es The s k y grew darke r t h e waves rose hig h e r and tumbled faster a n d f a ster in betw ee n t h e sentine l reef s ; a faint mist r ose fr o m the spra y and covered the wate r as if with a ve il; faint rumbles of thunde r wer e heard at intervals. Suddenly a hu sh! The s k y grew m o r e overcast-and the storm bro k e Rain, fallin g in see mingl y Ilevere n d in g t orrents hid the land fr o m v i ew. Florence Albert, '2.,. The sun, a gorgeou s fir e ball o f t h e m elted, tintej hu es o f a rainbo w, i s settin g o'er the tranquil waters o r C o l o n Harbor. An almost indi stinc t gray smudge o f smoke just appearing o n th e horizon f o r e t ells the approac h o f a steam er. A tin y sailboat flaun t in g its glis ten in g white s ail b e f o r e an impis h se a breeze s l ow l y g lid es a l o n g b es id e the s i lver breakwate r. Only t h e faint c hu g ging o f a rnotor boat a s it w ends its p e acefu l way a c ro ss Lim o n Ba y disturbs th e prevailin g beaut)' o f s i l ence .-Gladys Lowflnde. '2.,.

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THE CAR I BBEAN 45 The bay i s calm and quie t save for the lapping of little wa ves a gains t the se a wall. A f e w small sailboats are s ilh o u ette d agains t the b eautiful s k y \\'ol1tle rful sunse t tints o f r osc blu e and orange are r eflec ted in the water, making it g l eam with a s 111:1ny varie d 3111..1 changing co l o r s as a great, g l o win g opal. The strains o f "The S t ar Spang l e d Banner" are hear d faintl y a c r oss th e wate r a s the fla g c o m es down. A s p ec k in th e di stant s k y draws n eare r and an a e r oplane cornes into vie w on its wa y to th e field. T h e hum o f its e n g in e gradually di es d o wn until the plane lands Sil e n ce once again. The hu ge ball of fir e h as dropp ed b ehind t h e h orizon and only pale tinte d streaks are l e ft in the sky. A f e w evening stars p ee p out and are r eflec t ed in the calm bayp e a ce ful and quie t s a ve f o r the lapping o f little waves a g ain s t the se a wall.-Editll COli/bourn, '2-/. A gl o ri o u s g olde n moon s h o n e s h e d d in g o n the wate r a pathway o f subd u e d light. The palm fr o nd s s ilv e r e d in the m oo nli ght, ru s tl e d and whi s p e r e d in the gentle bree z e, making so f t mur mu r in g n o i ses whi c h see med accompaniment to the lapping o f the waves o n the b e a c h The wate r, turned golden b y the rays o f the tro p ic al 11100n lured and in vite d a s entic in g in its b eauty a s those wate r n ymphs o f o l d w h o dre w t o the ir destru c ti o n the unwary marine r s F/orenu.,l/ber" 2 / i\1 idni ght, and ever y wh e r e the bla c k blanke t dotted with twinkling stars co v e r s the silent ocean that tou c h es the Caribbean s hore. Scar ce l y a sound i s h eard except wh e n an occa s i o nal ripple wa s h es a ga in s t the sand. The water g l o w s in patch es, with phospho r esce nce maJe b y the gentle waves passing o v e r the r eef. This c asts a lig h t whi c h s h o w s the b otto m o f the reef covered wi th a m ossy coating, with diamond eyes o f som e se a inhabitant sparkling fr o m its s h elte r B o rd e r in g the s h o r e the murmurous m ys t ery o f th e jung l e nig h t o nl y emphas i zes the s tillness o f the sea.-George Oakes 24 A CAPTUHE. tindrew D. SlIIi t ll, '25. Until r ece ntl y our a cquaintance with the oc t opus wa s c o nfin e d t o the one in ictol' H u go s "Toile r s o f the S ea," and t o those in the p ed ia Britannica, but w e two n o w think w e can g iv e \ i ctor H ugo and th e Enc ycl o p edia Britannic a a f e w p ointe r s s in ce w e captured a f e w days ago, a s p ec im e n o f the s hall o w -wate r t y pe-even if it i s n o t so large and f e r ocio u s a s the d ee p -se a typ e O c t o poda. The m etho d w e u se d wa s ex ceed in g l y s impl e. A s w e procee ded alo ng the co ral r eef, w e searc h ed f o r a sandy, ston e-and-s h ell-stre wn s p o t d ir ec tl y in fr ont o f a s mall o p e nin g Creeping lip b e hin d su c h an o p e nin g w e would trr to d e t ermine wh ethe r o r n o t the octopus wa s at h o m e I f th e h o l e wa s o cc upi e d w e w o uld see stre t c h e d a c r oss the entrance o n e o f the t e n t a c l es b a rrin g in t ru s i o n. \ V e f ound a situatio n o f this nature The n w e procee d e d to secure our prize with a s mall, sharp, s t e el harpoon After w e h arpo ::me d the octopus, w e prodded a ound in the bac k o f the h o l e an d fa s t e n e d a l o n gh a ndl e d s t ee l hook into its body. The n came the w ork. I t wa s n ecessary that a s t eady strain b e kept o n the hook all the time If we had j erke d o r p e dl e d t oo hard th e body o f th e o c t opus w ould ha ve torn. Afte r several rnil1utcs R ic!wrd ti. F iJ/ur 25 o f this inte n se strain, the stre n gth o f th e octopus gave out, and h e r e l e a se d his h o l d o n the wall s o f the nic h e Afte r b e in g take n out o f his h o l e h e squirte d a stream o f inky flu id whi c h i s said b y the nati ves to b e \'er y blin d in g This ink i s u sed a s a s m o k e sc r ee n wh e n the oc t opus wis h es t o escape fr o m an e n e m y After the oc t opus wa s place d o n the co ral r ee f w e s a w e i ght wa v ing arms o r t entacles at the ba se o f the sack lik e body. B e tw ee n th e t entacles wa s a w e b lik e f ormatio n, whi c h h e lp s the c r e a ture t o s wim. The unde r s id e o f the t entacles wa s pink in co l o r, and studded with two r o w s o f w h i t e s u c k e r s The brain i s b e l o w the s t omac h and c l ose t o the base o f the t entac l es The eyes w e r e bla c k with white oblo n g iri ses The lids w e r e o f thi ck, e l ephantlik e hide. The oc t opus f eeds o n crabs and s h e llfi s h. H e i s able t o change co l o r to so m e ex t ent, but ge n e rall y i s a m o l d g ray. \ \'e cau ght sever a l that evenin g and frorn th e g r oup w e selec t ed tw o s p ec im e n s for th e Cristobal H i g h S c h oo l l a b orator y One la:-ge o n e wit h t e n tacl es about thirtee n in c h es l o ng, wa s slightly to rn. The othe r was a perfect specim e n w i t h t entac l es about f our in c h es l o n g These two s p ec i m e n s we prese rved in f ormaldeh y d e.

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THE CARIBBEAN. "Oh the r e are aices o f th e Past, I Ice Links of a broken Chain," -Proctor. Cloria SUm6rrg, '26. One late afternoon I was curled lip in a corner of the sofa in my father's studio, drowsily attempting to read a romantic tale of life in the early nineteenth century. i\l y wandered [Q a large portrait of my great-grear-grandmoth e r at eighteen, which hangs in state over t h e large mahogany desk. Pretty J sweet, littl e thing! I could see t he numerous young gallants s h e surely must ha\'c had, ready to prostrate themselves at her feet. I n some respects, it mllst ha\"c been wonderful to live at that time. : \ creak of the door rOll sed m e from my m ental ramblings; probablr o n e o f the girls funning over to ask which dress I would wear to the dance that night. \\'ithout turning my head J called, "Come on in!" The r e was no answer, but] heard a seducti ve little rustle as someon e entered the room. 1 looked around, and with a gasp o f del i ght, J beheld the daintiest little figure imaginable! I gazeu at her and then at t h e picture above t h e desk. Y es, it was s h e! j\I y great-great-grandmother, just as if she had stepped fr o m the frame, only so much more adorable, for s h e was alive, breathing, even smiling at me. he was arrayed in the daintiest of gowns, in the style fashionable in h e r day. I t had a tight little blue satin bodice, with a wide, Rounced hooped skin, covered with net and creamy old lace, with tiny pink rosebuus peeping fr J m among the ruffi(;:s The neck, cut low e n ough to s how h e r lovely shoulders, was softened b y a lace fichu fastened at her breast with a cameo breoch Tiny puffed sleeves came just above her elbows, w here they were fastened closely with dainty pink rosebuds Black lace mitts extended to her dimpled elbows. Loose, short black c url s peeped from under the frilly blue poke bonnet, which made a lovel)' setting for h e r prett)' little face She proceeded with little mincing steps to come toward mc, and seated h e rs elf demur e l y beside me on the sofa. I was conscious of a faint scent of musk. "Good aftcrnoon, my dear," she said, givin g me a bewitching smile. You have been ick, haven't you, and had )'our love l)' hair clipped'" This awoke me with a jolt fr o m rn)' raptur o u s contemplation of h e r. She was r e ferring to m y latest shing l e bob, and J ros e to def end it. "\\' h y indeed n od" I answered indignantly. "This is t h e latest shing l e bob! I t's con s idered quite t h e s nake's eyebrow in m)' crowd. Y our hair is pretty, but it's really fixed awfull )' o ldfas hi oned, you know." "l'line!" s h e exclaimed in consternatio n. II\Vh y ] am not old-fashi o ned! I was considered the most fashionabl), dressed belle of the town. I still pride myself on the lang u ishing g l a n ces I r eceived from all the young gallants, as I rode through the streets in m y barouche behind m)' lovel y bays." Barou c h e Bays!" I ejaculated, veature that! M y dear, they're awfully passee! Come on out and I 'll s how yo u a real ride in m y snappy little red Hudson s peedster. I f t hat darned o l d s peed cop, that's a lways l ayi n g f o r me, i s n't in sight, I 'll step o n 'er and s how you so m e speed, p e r haps up to seventy, with the cut-out at full b last! Then, o h boy! Watch our dust!" "Speedster! Speedcop' Seventy! What do YOLI mean?" s h e asked bewildered. I
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THE CARIBBEAN. 47 "You don't mean to say you call that a dress, do rou? \\'hy it's just a straight piece o f hideou s goods, and, c hild, wh ere are t h e s leeves?" "Oh," 1 answered condescending ly, "we don't wear muc h s l ee ve nowadays and thi s piece o f hideou s goods happen s to b e the latest creation from Giddings!" R ealJ)'? Oh, but t elJ m e don't you ever dance?" "Dance? Sure !" I r e plied. "),'o u do? But how do you ever dance in t hat narro w skirt?" "Easily! Y o u ough t t o see m)' latest cake-eater and m e do the doubl e-s huffl e or the camel walk. That boy is so m e final e-hopper. "\\'hy, how interesting, granddaughter, dear. I s it anything lik e t h e minuet?" \ V e ll, I s h o uld h o p e not!" 1 said with a superior t oss of my head, as I went over to the phonograph and looked over the r ecords. H ow w o uld you lik e to hear'Sh e \\'ouldn't D o What I asked Her to, so I S oc k ed Her in the Jaw?' 1 a s k ed pi cking .... the latest favorite. "\\'hat!" s h e gasped. Quickly putting on t h e r ecord, I performed the s nappy steps of t h e "camel -walk" once or twice around the ro o m "Oh, Stop!" s h e cried. How very immodest! Shut off t hat awful n o i se box, and stop that h eathenis h dance! I 'll s h ow you a minuet." S h e arose from the sofa, and humming a littl e tune to h erself, s h e began to dance. .-\ tiny little foot in its strapped slippe r, peeped o u t from under the ruffled gown, pointed, and then drew in again. Curtseyin g, sm iling, swaying, bowing, s h e floated about the r oom T h e fa in t musk scent pervadeJ the air. H e r s lipp e r s seemed barely to touch the floor, and h e r skirts rustled fascinatingl y She made m e think o f a gracious fairy, and I closed my eyes hard l y darin g to breathe, lest I break the spell. Bu t when I opened m y e),es again, s ht: had vanish ed! Nothing remained, but the faint, haunting scent of musk. L L'C K S Caldwdl B. Foo!, '25 A s I sat and looked lonesomely out over the parade ground, I thought o f all my "Luc ks." They were many and varied. The H B oojum," a happy little imp, m y deity of caged baskets, sat wit h hi s arms folded, his l egs crossed, and hi s (ace aflame with a joyous g rin, as h e rocked ba ck and forth on an opal basket ball. H e was very happy because J had bee n paying a lot of attention to him lately, and his opal throne g leamed with a million varicolored flam es I patted h im fon d ly, and h e grin n ed back at m e. Then m)' \Vufful Boid/' t h e companio n o f rny h orse ba c k rides posted merri l y up and down 011 a F renc h officer's s addl e, flapping his wings and crowing lustily : "Col o n, Gatun, any place at all; Fort San Loren zo beats them a ll. Y ou may ride there fast, you may ride there s low; But whichever way you take, it's a long way togo." i\Text in line came my "Sping-\\'ow," proudly bearing a s hield in the form of a tennis racquet, with two basket ball s h oes sabl e sub three tennis balls argent on a field verde, bearing the 1110tto: Vary your spi n, vary your pace, I n ever y ga m e and set; R e member, the time t o sock the ball, I s when you c harge t h e net! The n, last in line, and sadl y tarnished and bat tereu from neg lect, sto: x l B ra i ny B oy," the god of l11y sc h oo l w o rk, resting o n a square e r ec t ed o n a side o f an equilateral triangle, bearing the motto, h L ntellego I stood for a while, l ooking penitentl y at him, w h e n a magic soun d penetrated m" consciousness. I rushed into the gym. Down at' one end three sol d iers were engaging in basket hall practice. One of them, with a welcoming smile, hurl ed the ball far down the hall to me I c:l.ught it-two dribbles-and tossed it h ig h in the air. "i3oojuml I yelled I..:-ClII..:!I t swis hed through, Atta boy, B ooj llln!" I applauded. R EST .-IFTER TOI L From the upper end of Gatlin L ake, The natives, in t h eir cayucos, glide T o the G3[Un docks, where shippers take Their w3res. 3nd then confide To them the latest prices Of animal furs 3nd n3tive rices, The natives then to Colon go, \\'here they spend the rest of the day Going up and down amusement row \ 'isiting the low-type cabaret, Till their maner's gone for cheapest booze And ther leave for Slifer Park to snooze, -ChtJltr Pikt. '24.

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48 THE CARIBBEAN. !I; PL\CES OF I I ."-,,, BL\ .-\S BY -\ SENI O R. IW:'II J/arkhmlJ, '2-/ See iIIu.;tr.ltion Pagc 49. :\t daybreak we found o urselves work in g OUf wa\" out into the l owe r San Bias Ba\', \Ve ha d arri,'ed juSt at sunset t h e night b efore at San Bias Point where we had paid our respects to the Panamanian Go\"erI1Jr o f San Bias. H e it is who issues the clearance papers which mllst b e had by all ships' captains who wish to travel in San Bias waters. His i s an unus ual domain. B es id es the mainland territor),) San Bias compri ses three hundred islands-only fift), of whic h are, however, inhabited. They reac h from San Bias P oint to the Colombian bor ... ler-approximately o n e hundred and fifty miles /III m orning we trave led past low coral r eefs and small islands covered wi th tall, waving palms. On the m ainland r ose the moul1tlins of the Continental Di v ide. At noon we anchored off' Nargana. H ere we bade good-bye to Captain R owe, mas t e r of the good s hip Arabia, and ernbarked in a nati ve cayu co for the village of Diabl o Arriving t h e r e we were met by many Indians who had already b ee n in formed of our corning M y fat h e r and 1 went to visit the chief of pol i ce w h o treated u s royally and said h e would do all in his power to make our stay in San Bia s a pleasant o n e Our next move was to :\argana, a few rods from Diabl o. Upon arriving there we inquired for Jake, a c h ie f and a frit:nd of ours. J ake," hi s brother told us "was on his plantation to the windward," but h e him self would take charge of u s. H e took a cayu co and went to the / h tlbitl for our baggage ; and in dut' time we were members of the fami ly-living with his wife and children, and his t h ree s isters and tht:ir c hildren. I stayed two weeks in San Bias, visiting many islands, livin g wit h many families, and It'arning the c ustom s o f this unique people whose land had so long been closed to white men. They had managed to l ive to t h e m selves until 1916 when the Panama Government established a school opcneu the countr), Through our long friendship with Jake we were able to stay at Devil's "C),, an island inhabited by a tribe o f people who have not a ccepted civil ization and are practically the sa m e as they w e r e generati o n s ago Through this same influen ce we were able t o win the confiden ce o f the chie f w h o gave u S an authe n tic story o f hi s peopl e. And from close contac t w e w ere abl e to get fir s t h and informati o n a s r ega rds daily life, c ustom s in marriage, s i c kn ess, and burial, and government. The islands, covered with dense coconut groves, rise on l y a few f ee t above t h e wate r but are protected to t h e windward by a coral re ef. These Tndians are small in stature, brown in co l o r, with straight, bla c k hair, w ell-developed s h ou lder s and arms, and large head. All are good swimmers-in fact they l earn t o swim when the y are three years o ld. The J n d ian s are d escendants from the mountain] n d ian s \ V e suppose that a band o f Indians ca m e down fr o m the m ountains centuries ago t o fis h, and w e r e perhaps compelle d to stay o n one o f t h e i slands over nig h t. R ealiz in g what a lovel y s pot thi s wou l d b e in whi c h to live-as these i s l ands are fr ee fr o m snakes m osquitoes, and all oth e r in sec t s they have continue d to co m e out of t h e mountains t o liv e on the i s lands. The ir government i s o n e o f the m os t just a n d d e mocratic ex i sti ng. Suppose f o r instan ce o n e i sland becomes overcrowded and part o f the peopl e are compelled to move to anoth e r. h e n t hey are settleJ on this i sland, a chief i s appointe d by o l d Chief Coleman who liv es to the windward. B efore t hi s new chie f can govern this i sland, a m eeting i s called b y all the peopl e over w h o m h e is to ru l e Every I ndian has the rig h t to the floo r. Afte r an open discussion, if th e majority a ccepts this chief, all well a n d good-h e se r ves f o r life unl ess hl! is r e moved for cause, whic h ca n b e don e b y c alling a mCl!ting and votin g him out. I f h e i s not accepted, t hey nominate and e l ec t o n e to t h e ir own likin g. The c hief wears n o uniform or in sig nia o f any kind t o denote his rank. H e e njoys n o privilege t hat i s not e njoyed by any other I n d ian. lie receives 110 salary Bu t h e i s perhaps more respected than any other govern m ent officia l o n earth. The chie f o f each i sland receives his orders from the head c hi ef. H e has

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THE CARIBBE. -\N. 49 ------------------------

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THE CA R IBBEAN. lmda him policemen who sen'e as messengers. They w.:o:1:-ll:1unifi,)rms, and carry no club, bauge, or There are n prisons; in case one of their unwrirrcll laws is \'iolated, rhe otfen,Jer is being rieJ to a coconut tree ingefs. They. like the: police, receive Il'J salar) but afe supported by the hOllse frolll they afe 3!')pointed. The home of th:;! San Bias I ndian is sand-floored, and bamboo-walleJ, and has a pal m roof supportcd hy f)llf hard-wood posts set into the grOullll. Then.! is a d')Jf at each end. There are partitions of any kind. The Indians sleep in hammocks which they weave frol11 the bark of a trce (\\ istcd with cotton to form a thread. Shoes and stockings are unknown =tm : )l1g the Indians. The clothing of the men cOI13ists of a pair of baggy trousers, a shirt which has neith er collar nor cufFs and which always hangs on the outside (perhaps in order to hetter the fullness which is obtained by several rows of s hir ring in the back and front), so metimes a gay-colored necktie, an,j always "The Hat" sometimes made by the women) sometimes a panama} sometimes a derby-but always worn and always several siles toO small. The women work i ng all plantations or around the hOllse wear a waist a n d a short skirt coming to the knees \\'hen t hey are dressed up, they wear a longer skirt, known as the "smoke sail}" whic h reaches the grolillj. The waists arc one-piece and consist of several lavers of bright-coloreu cloth cut and st!wed so as to' form picture writing with the various co lors. The women ha ve their ears pierced and wear large brass earrings. \\' hen a child is about two weeks o ld, its n ose is pierced. Through this h ole is run a thread. Eac h day a larger thread i s p u t in until the h o l e is large enough to admit a rin g an e ighth of an inch thick. Also from infanc), their l egs arc bound. Then.: are yards and yards of co l ored beads wound around their legs and arms Every few days these are tighte.::ned so that t h e fles h ofte.::n grcH\:s out over them. \\' h en wound corr ec tly these beads form the sallll: patterns as arl: on the dre!=is. There arc three of these bindings all hath legs and arms. On the head is worn a bright handkerchief, almost always red One of the interesting customs of the San Bia s J ndianc; concerns marriage. 'l'cithcr the bride nor groom has any "say" in the matter. Wh"n the girl is about thirteen and the b oy eighteen, if the g irl is a good coo k and a good worker, and has p l enty of coconuts, and the b)y is a good hUllter or fisher, the mothers get ug..:thcr to arrange for the marriage. I f the parents to put on style th..:y have a fcast. The mother of the bride informs tht:! chief, who gives or ... iers t) his police to n J t ify all thl: pe J Plc o f the c;Jming (:\'Cilt, T he Indians bring f ood s u c h as ya>JlS, yucca, and dried fis h, Frum som e distant i s la n.J comes the "Offic ial Taster," The drink i s furni s hed by the p arents} for it is t h e most important part o f the feast I t i s made b v b,)iling the juice of sugar cane anu co rn togethe;, then covering it anJ allowing it to stand. Each day the taster taStes it. The n co m es th e day w ht:n hI! annO:'lIlces it just right. A group of m e n n ow goes [Q the h o u se o f the b J)' a n d takes him to the hom e of t h e girl. They are p l aced in a hamlllock, their backs to each oth e r. After a w h i l e the b oy i s taken out to a small incl osure a n d bath ed This is repeated f our tim es. After t h e last time t h ey are conside.::red married Now comes t h e big feast. The dri n k i s passed around in a gourd, the women c hildren, and m e n takin g a drink. I t takes very little to make t h e Jndian drunk; so h e soon b eco mes like a wild animal, somerim es even killing his own wife and c h ildren. The I ndians lie around ulltil th ey are sober; a n d the.:: pe.::rformance i s repeated. T h is lasts for t h ree days. At the end o f the feast they bury t h e ir dead, a n d the bride's father tak es the groom to t h e jungl e w h ere h e compel s him to c u t so much hardwood. The goes to live at t h e girl's home-th ey are never allowed to go and bui ld a home of their own. In o n e h o u se in Tig re th e r e were o n e hundred and thirty peopl e. Afte r a g irl is married, s h e b o b s h e r hail' a n d so i t r e mai n s the rcst o f her life. One night we attended a m ee tin g whi c h wa s c a\l ed becau se o f a dispute ove.::r COCOllutS The h ouse in whic h i t was h e ld had, as u s ual 110 A oo r hut t h e sand. Down each s ide o f t h e r oo m were long ht!nc h es; at one e nd, a hammock. V e were thl! first to arrive and took mu c h inte rest in those who atten ded. The chie f ca m e in dressed in a pair of dark trousers, w hite shirt worn o n th e outside, and a panama hatn o s h oes nor stockings. lie sat down in the hammock. The n in came a man wea rin g s hort b l ue pants, and a shirt tied around his neck H e sat down ill t h e sand

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THE CARIBBEAN. 51 by t h e chief. Next came six men, three of w h om sat down on the c h ief's rig h t and three on his l e ft The women, children, and oth e r J ndians occupied t h e b e n c h es \\' h e n all wer e gathered, an Indian, wearin g s h ort b lue troll se rs, white s hirt, red neckti e and brown derby hat cam e in carry in g a c lay pipe H e was the expert calloe man or ru n ner. H e gave the pipe to the chie f who took a puff and handed i t back to the runner, who handed i t in turn to e a c h of the m e n around t h e c hi ef. \\' h en all had puR'ed i t h e put it in hi s mouth and w ent out. The chie f now arose, spoke a few worels and sat down in hi s hammock. An I ndian i n the aud ience rose and spoke-then anoth er. A t last the c hi e f got up, spoke a few minutes, and lay clown in his h ammock. Now every one got up-all talked at o n ce This went on for nearly a half an hour, when the chief rose, said a few words, and went o u t The meeting was over. \\' hil e v i siting one of the chie f s 1 took the chance to ask abo u t their religion. H e said, "All people in heaven San BIas-no w hite men-pl enty fish, deer, coconuts-no Indian use more than one arrow to kill deer. But in h ell-nothing, Indian walk around blind, n othing to eat." The n h e told m e the story of Nell", the San Bias Tndian, the cleverest and best of them a ll. Around :\Iargana were great whirlpools over whi c h no man could pass. Several] ndians had been swallowed upcayu co and a ll. Then o n e day Kelly went down in the whirlpoo l in his cayu co For three h e had been gone, th e n h e had come back. "Oh yes, t h e great-great-gr a ndfather o f the chief had seen Nelly." The n [ asked about some carved stick s w h ich people had told me were t h eir gods. H e said they meant nothing and were used on l y in time of sick ness. \\' h en an Indian is sick, they gather herbs and b oil them together unde r the s i ck man's hammoc k. The odor of t h ese herbs is supposed t o chase out the little devi l s Sometimes weird son gs are chanted. On t h e w h ole, however, we f o un d little sick n ess among the Indians. A few days late r we v isited the cemetery. \\'hen an ] ndian dies, t hey dig a h o l e and at each end drive a p eg The n th e 1 ndian i s put in his ham m oc k with hi s b ows, arrows, and oth e r be l o n g ing s The hammoc k is hung to the pegs and the h o le filled in with dirt. Over the top i s buil t a thatc h ed roof to keep ofl" the rain. Every f e w days a gourd o r coconut o f water is put on t h e grave for the spirit in t h e next world. r asked our guide if the spirit drank much. H e said, '''Sometimes yes, sometim es no." 1n 1910 a Cathol i c sc ho o l was established but with little s ucc ess Four later Charles Robinson, an I nJian w h o had been to t h e States, asked the Panama Government to found a sc ho o l of its own; but it was not until 1916 that sc hool s w e r e establ ished with s u ccess The o lder people do not like the sc h ools nor anything connected with them, but the younger generation lik e them. They ha \'e a baseball diamond and never tire of telling of the time they beat the crew of some s h ip. There is a dance hall where the young people go and themsel \ 'es Through the influence and training of teachers from Panama t h e I ndians are gradually being induced to discard their arm and leg bands. All too soon came the day when an T ndian returned in his cayuco and told us that t h e ,/rabia had been sighted to the windward. \\'e took a cayu co to t h e island w here our belongi ngs were, to pack up our baggage-already increased by the many gifts of bows and arrows, dresses and spears. That e\ening we were on our way toward Colon and h o me, with a r ea l feeling of frie n d lin ess for those we had just l e ft C.HI \ '". JUflll B. Pap;, '26. Cativa es una pequena poblaci6n, muy cercana a Colon. El pueblito es como de unos oc henta a noventa m etros cuadrados. L os habitantes s uman a unos trecientas personas, aunque hay muchas viviendas retiraclas en lo s montes y fuera de la poblaci6n. EI pueblo est. habitado por diferentes razas, las cual es trabajan laboriosamente sus pequeilos montes. Traen sus productos a la cercana cuicla,j, can grandes trabajos y d ificultad es, por n o tener caminos que l es permitan acarrearl os por medias mas fa ciles mas que el de traerlos al hombro 6 en bestias. Cariva esra habitaclo por p e r sona::: m_u)" divertidas, las cuales estan dispu estas a sacrifi ca r muchas de sus necesidades, para divertirse d urante l os tres dias de la fiesta del D ios Y o presen c i e los trabajos de esas pobres gentes, las tareas y dificultades que tenian, para poder

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52 THE ------------------------------------guardar en forma de ahorro, algo de dinero para los muy esperados dias del carna\'al. sos dias mn deseados se iban acercanLio, ) rna iban creciendo l os deseos y e l entusias m o Por fin lIego ese sabado, el dia 'de principiar la s fiestas y los di\"ertimientos, in tardanza se reunieron un grupo de los mas ilustrados y formando una especie de comite, decidieron romper la s silenciosas homs de la n oc he con al eg r es sonid os de tam bores r sonoras \ 'oces de a legria. J B ual continuaron e l domingo y e l Jun es, pero e l martes, en el dia de m;:l.s divertimiento, e l dia de la despedida de l a bien acogida fiesta del carna\'al, en ese dia las fiestas y los bailes principiarol1 muy temprano y no se \'inieron a terminar hasta cI miercoles de ceniza. L o maS bonito y economico era e l espacioso y artistico salon de baile Para arreglar ese salbn se reunieron un grupo de hombr es y cortaron ulla cantidad de hojas de palmas, las cuales la s tijeron en f orma de trenzas, y la s clavaron alrededor de una barraca 0 sea d esq ueleto de una c hosa, ell tal f orma de adorno, que had'an recordar l os ranchos usados en 101 epaca de piedra. 1..0 mas bello y atractivo de roLlo era e l piso del amplio sa16n de baile que tenia una superfici e tan a nivel como 101 cara ondulada de un mar tempestlloso. Cuando la orquesta toc6 su melodioso y harmonioso pic, pac, pic, boom -boom, salieron las parejas a bailar eI bello baile nativo Tamborito" que con tan gran compas y elega n cia 1 0 bailan. Esa orque ta e r a compuesta de cuatro instrumentos, tres tambores y un raro. Los tres tambores son de formas sonidos I11UY difen:ntes y dos de ellos, 0 sean los mas pequeilos, son (ocados por media de continuo'ios golpes can las manos, mientras cI bomba, 0 sea d mas grande, es tocado por medio de dos palitos. Tan pronto como tocaron los tam bores, l os alii presentes se cntrcgaroll de toda gana "I divertimien to, demostrarOIl su a legria, par los brincos, saltos )' gritos lit: "ri\'a cI Tamborito" y cl que mas divertia cra uno por cI apodo dt! .'-\v i a dor," porquc hailaha y brincaba mas que l os dcmas. Principiaron las fiestas de despedida como a l a una de la tarde, r ell medio de la acalurosa alegria, se dejb vcr en cI \ ':1sto firmamcl1to una esre/a ) negra nu he, que furiosa dcjo acr sobrc la genre sus gruc.:!;as y sc.:guidas gotas de agua. J ... StlJ parcci(, no molestar en 1 0 mcls mininlO a los \"alientes cooperadores del di\'ertirniento, r esa rohre ira cunda Ilube, para no v e rse hUl'nillada, prefiri6 mejor dejarse lIe \+ar p o r la suave briza \ "cra ncra 011 lejan o o asis. ESCO' -\L. D oro/II)' .1btmlrolll, 2-/. Escoval i s a native villag e picturesquely perched hig h o n th e bank of Gatlin Lake. ils the only means o f approach i s by wate r, a Aims wooden pier projects s ull e nl) out from the in c lin e that allows the isito r t o wh eeze up to the \ illag e proper. I f h e sun i\ es the muddy climb, h e i s rewarded by the sight o f a villa ge so primitive as to rcmind him of the stori es of the da ys when ;\lorgan was the dread o f c\'en' small bo,. The main street, merely a windi;lg pathway, wide enough f o r a s in g l e wooden wheeled cart to wend its rumbling way, is lined o n either sidc with thatched huts balanced prec ari ously o n high, skinny sti lt s L nd erneath eac h of thcse s mall, one-room structures are the stable and the kitchen, saved from being one ro o m onl y by a shaky partition o f woven reeds stretched from s ide to side. Here in these twenty-foot squares all t h e business of life is carried on Sometimes a s man)' as ten people li\re in one of these huts and, appare ntl y, suffer n o discomforts (rom co n ges ti o n, ne\'er h'l\"ing known other homes. :\ t the farther end of this m o notonou s thoroughfare stands, or rather, tremblesf o r the slightest breeze causes it to sway dang e rou s l y o n its wabbly l egs ,"illage store. Swinging slJu eakily o n the rusty nails i s a crude red s ign t o the effect that "S :'\OB .-\JS' are for sal e therein. Branching off from the main street, nume rou s corduroy lanes ovcrgrown with th e most luxuriant green grass imaginable treach e r o u s l y l ead onc to "now h ert:. They start out lustily, but they never get anywhere. And that seems t o be the hahit of everythin g and everyone in the vil lagt!. Ther stilrt alit bravely, but they never arrin;!. Ilowcvcr, the excepti o n proves the rul e. On e of tht'sc winding pathwa)'s l eads to the public hakeshop. A large wooden building squats un the othc.:r side of a shallow bog O\"cr whic h a skinn)' plank strctchl:s from the end of the path to the narrow d()or I nside this unsanitary, olle-rnomed s hark yawn great brick-lin ed o\rens, illtC' which

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THE CA RTBBEAN. 53 huge lumps of dough are jammed b)' a long, Rat boa r d. At the concl u s i on of the ten-minute baki ng, they are pulled out wit h a rake-like affair and delivered to the owner. If t h e visitor surviv es t h e closeness and heat, h e will e m erge onl), slightly wilted and will be r ewarded by t h e sight of a native l azily pOllnding corn in a pil o n. This is a h ollowed log standin g on e n d in whi c h t h e corn i s spr e ad. Then a s mall e r but solid l og, h e l d in both hands, i s brought clown o n the co rn, Aattening the kernels. This is the ini tial preparation o f t h e corn for t h e corn bread baked in the bakes hop. There is no sign of a sc h oo l unl ess a scene by the s ide of a small lake would in d icate a sc ho o l of some sort. Ar ound two stout negresses, whose grimy skirts are tied up around lump)' waistlines, and w h ose skinny feet are bare of covering, daily gath e r s a grou p of very young girls sim ilarly UI1 -attired. H ere they absorbedly watch the opera tions of th e two women, who wash clothes by pl:t c ing them on flat rocks and beating them with smooth ston es, until, besides being clean, they are nearly threadbare The n, spread-!II; ing these poor, maltreated remnants on the grassy banks, they leave them to dry in the scorchi ng sun. These si lent watc hers have evidently gath ered to learn the technicalities o f a washerwoman's business. I f the visitor i s fortunate enou g h to be present o n the burial day of o n e of E scova l' s citi ze n s, h e will see the lake being put to another use be s i des t ha t of a was htub. Bearing on sinewy s h ou ld ers a h eav), metal coffin, t h e black-garbed pallbearers wend their silent way down to t h e lake's edge where they gruntingl), lower t heir burden and drop it into th e muddy lake w h ere it quickly sinks from sight. The beauty o f Escoval lies in its vegetati on lmmense tree s, mango, guava, palm, and lignumvitae, form a dense fring e around the edge of the settlement. Beautiful tropical ferns wave gracefull y in the front yards; velvety green grass covers the slopes of the surrounding hill s; languid tropical Rowers see m to spring up magically in the most unusual places, making the whole p l ace, omitting only the sq ualor introduced by t h e human element, a v i vid scene of natural beauty. !II; I e I C H I \J{ COAL. I 0 I Car/os Pulga,-, '2 6 !Il See o n p a g e 19. Early one morning, T started for a hik e to the jungles. I soon ca m e to what you might call the entrance to that particular jungle into which I was going 1 t was lik e the entrance to a tunnel all fenced o n both sides and on top by i\lother Natu re. This tunnel was n't so long-perhaps a hundred yards-and 1 came quickly to t h e end, for ] made it my business to hurry as 1 never had b ee n there before and was afrai d of wildca ts or snakes. C oming to t h e end I entered a clearing where a man was burning something t hat looked to me to be a w igwam covered with dirt. On inquiry [ found out the f ollowing: The wigwam was a c harcoal bin. The bin is more or less in the shape o f a fat cone. lnRammable material, such as c hip s and dr), twigs, is p laced in a h ollow. Around this, small sticks are arranged, covered up with larger o n es, forming a mound. This, in turn, i s covered with g ree n grass and dirt. A small tunnel i s left where the fire can be put in, so as to reach the h ollow in the middle. 'The materia l in the h ollow is now i gnited by burnin g waste, w h ich i s pushed throug h t h e tunne l on a stick o r wir e The ou t e r layer o f grass and dirt preven ts t h e wood from burning, but allows t h e heat to c irculate thoroughly through the wood and so remove all t h e gases without burning. h e n the outer layer i s removed, the mound collapses The char coal burner col lects the charcoa l in a sack, s h ou l ders it, and starts out for town, where his product is soon put to use, frying fish in the charcoal braziers of Bolivar and Broadway.

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THE CARIBBEAN. LIFE I N PANMIA. I e I !Ii A T JOlt .1rostmma, '2-/. Juan Franco race track is already crowded when we reach it. On first view we get the impression of a larg e mass of humanity, but soon we are able co distinguish that the crowd is divided into small groups. \\'hat a cosmopo litan crowd is assembled here!-Xorth American tourists, American Army officers, native Panamanians, SOllth Americans, Chinese and Hindu merchants, and a thousand different shades of West Indians. \"hat strikingly difl"erent persons are seen COI1-versing together. An American Army captain is talking in confidential to n es with a small black boy. I n a corner three Chinamen are doing their to understand what an o l d J amaican is tell ing them, while near to them a group of tourists are trying out their high sc h oo l Spanish on a patient but bewi l dered Spaniard. A tall, fat man is e n deavoring to sq u eeze his way through the crowd, while in his wake follows a murmur of protests which h e answers with an occasional "excuse me" or "pardon me." I wonder on how many feet h e has stepped or will step before the day is ended. A bit of a man about five feet three with a b ea rd and moustache in the style of Napoleon lIT see m s to be greatly excited. H e gest i culates wildly and talks at the rate of sixty miles an h o ur. A bell rings and everythin g e l se i s forgotten in the mad scramble for seats in the balcon y The h o r ses come out of the paddock and march to their position at the post. A hush prevails in the stands while the starter gives his directio n s The riders do so m e clever bits of jockey ing in their desire to get the start on their rivals, and-"They're off." H IPWARD BOUND. Andr(w Smilll, '25. The shades o f night were falling fast on the native dock, the landing dock for th e Am e rican sailors on s h o r e l e a ve. Evidently e\'e:'Y b:lttl es hip, destroyer, and subc ha se r was to be supplied with ma scots Here a red monkey was perched o n a fat shoulder. There a tall gob was dragging a stubborn goat. Yond er a tiny, wise-looking marmoset was comfortably seated in the calloused hand o f a fire man. Nearby a r edheaded Iris h lad was gingerly carrying a land crab, and grinning at the anticipation o f fun ca u sed by placing it in so m e body's bunk. That tall, blond-headed chap with the merry, twinkling blue eyes must hav e been a naturalist by inclina tion, for h e had a stuffed iguana and two cases o f Panaman butterflies. Hadn't the Colon merchants grown tired of se lling scarfs, s ilk, cotton, blue, green, pink, scar let, purple, striped, c h ec k ed, of every shape and s ize-and a few extra kinds thrown in for good measure? They se rved as bandanas, sas h es a la Val enti no, neckties, and kn ee bandages And jewelry! Fingers were embellis h ed with King Tut luck rin gs, and necks with ivory pendants shaped like Buddhas, r oses, e l ephants and hearts. The fruit venders must hav e had to r e plac e their stock, f o r l ook at the s uppl y h ere : Pineapples, soft and mushy, mangoes, marmo l nispe rros, and coconuts A tall, b l ack negro, his fac e covered with b eads o f perspiration, was lug g ing two bunches of green bananas. T hat little s h ock headed fellow's eyes must have b ee n larg e r than his stomach; h e was carrying two sour saps and four pineapples ill one arm, and in the other a bunch of bananas. H ere came a yo ung f e llow, who had evidently r ead "Swiss Famil y R o bin son," f or h e had six l arge, yellowish green breadfruit clutched in his arms. And the sailors! Tall, lanky, short, fat, clean, dirty sailors were standin g, sitting, l ounging, lyin g flat, lau g hing talking, singin g, swear ing and even s l eeping A s h ore patrolman was just dragging a s truggling sailor to his laun c h Someone must hav e seen an interesting fight, for the go b 's eyes wer e black and swollen shut, and the S. P.'s no se was bloody, and o n e eye, b l ack. Squawk! squawk! A jovial baywindowed sai l o r was g ra ce fully ca rr),ing a n oisy parrot on his outstretched finger. A

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THE CARIBBEAN. 55 rum-be fuddled old chap del iriou s ly called out, "Feed the polly," and offered h i s spon gy white for e fing e r to the bird. Excited i\1r. Parrot, however, mistaking his purpose, took a bite. The liqu::>r-soused sailor let out a bloo...l-curdling s hriek, folbwed b y an amazingly long stream of pro f an ity, and then swore to do every thin.6 frol11 punchin g the owner in the nose to killing parrot. A shore patrolman gently leau him to a laun ch the name T exas." 1 nto the b : mts they piled, some cro wding, some la gging, s'): n e quarreling, som e si ngin g th e classic, "Hail, Hail the gang's all h e re," The doc k s w ere cleared as if some master hand had b ee n there and swept them c l ea n of their human burden D o n g, d ong; ding, ding; th en chugg, c hu gg) fainter) fainter) and fainter still. The motor b,)ats have left "the world to darkn ess and tome." CA RNA VA L ' poller a i\l i pollera! Blah! Blah' Wheee' Zip! Carniva l is h ere : \ clear tropic night! Spacious park! \\'onderful combination! R eds! Blues! Greens Y ello ws! And a seeth ing surging mass of mu l ti -co l ored humanity Lots of fun e lb::r,ving my way through th e !Disy crowd. l\. big, fat negro in a s h eik costume \\'ith silver s lippers-silver turban. Ah) h e smi les-in r ea l sheik fashion-at a skinny Chinese girl in tarnis hed go ld-cloth ballet dress. Hm! Not such a badl oo king Syrian in his native d r ess Arm-inarm with a bathing-beauty. Y e gods! She's an Amer i can. A ghastly l ook ing s k e leton approaches. i\1utte rin g to a group dressed as -ls it possible?grave r obbe rs Ghou l s Carryin g a miniature coffin. Probably a bottle in s ide' L a P aloma! T h e band's play ing Ah! her e com es the queen. \'iva! Viva! La rei na! Que l inda! Que li11cia! L a r e ina popular! \\'hat a clever get-up! T all skinn y man 111 a r ed satin, tight-fitting suit. \\,ith a lon g tail. I'd hate to die-if that's a d e vil. W ow! That perf"l11 e SI11"ts. DOD! eyes Part of the fun t110Jgh! H ere b:JY, gimme pair a goggles Glad L wore a hat. That confetti' s awfully hard to comb out o f your hair. I wonder how t hey get it out of their kinky lock s. \\]hat's h e disguised as? Guess h e donned a clean shirt. Disgui se e n o ugh! B 08m! B oom Native tom-toms! 1 wis h they'd d an ce th e "Tamborita." i\ 1 y wish i s granted "Viva! Santiag:J!" T h e !VIAN mu s t b e "Santiago." Now they start. Clap! Clap! That's a gO:JJl ooki l16 pollera. Sh e dan ces well, too. Swirl s a ro unJ. stockings! B ig feet! Can it be-yes, it is-a man dressed up. P retty good Others noti ce the discrepancy. Clapping gets weaker. All over. \\"hat a fascinating n oise from anoth e r corner o f the park. Sounds lik e a nutmeg grater. A g roup o f negro es Bla c k grease paint o n their p e r spirin g faces All d r essed in s hort, green trousers and bla ck tux edos G oocly! T hey're going to sing L ejos de ti, n o so)' f eliz mi amor." H ow romantic Splencliu harmo n y, though. T h ey pass around the derby That reminds m e Saw a funn yl ooking affair a minute ago. T here h e is! A fat Chinaman in a swallo w-tail coat. A black derby, with a h o l e cut in the crown, upside down o n his greasy h ead. Sill y id ea i\I o r e music fro m th e bandstand. "Cielito Lincl o." M y favorit e Spanish piece! I told him--" and, H e said to her--" G osh! Wh y don't they go h o m e t o talk scandal? Guess I 'll move on. Band disperses to a bar for liquid refres h m e n ts A sudden hu s h fall s on the c r o wd. T he queen's going to speak. "Amigos mios--" I V lore so ft stu fl'! Phew! 1 t's getting close in thi s jam. \Vil liam's talcum powder! L ila c, 1 think it is! Another brand! M o re perfume! G ee! r t surel y f eels co l d wh e n it strikes the bac k o f your n ec k! T oo mu c h l oca l color Guess ['11 trot al o ng. LOTTER Y Dr.-F ICE. Gladys Lowtwde, '2/. Sunday morning! T h e time for t h e drawing of the Panamanian lotte r y i s fast appro a c hing. T he office i s packed and the street outside thronged with a multitude o f people, most of whom cla s p one or several ti c k e t s on thi s week's drawing. Perhaps the three Fates have ordained that some one of t h e m s hall h o ld th e winning numbe r T h e Jamaican an d Barbadian n eg ro populatio n seems t o have turned out en masse. S o m e are attired in the i r Sunday b es t, a best whi c h i s probably bette r than most o f us can afford: Straw hats

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S6 T H E CARIBBEA T. that jauntily balance O\"er one eye, striped shirts that fairly screec h flamin g ti es, suit s o f the ll1:)st modern cut, and high ly polished p ointed ox fords; or white si lk hats lad e n with kal eilbscopic wreaths of flowers, gorgeous satin dresses, and dangerousl y high Fre n c h h ee led s h oes I n sharp contrast [Q this "jolent array are those poor creatures who have just returned from work Dirty, ragged clothes and all, it makes n o c1ifl"ercnce for they s huffl e their lazy way through th e crowd, barely managing to keep o n their oU, dilapidated shoes Scattered h ere and there, are groups o f p icturesque Panaman ian character s who, dressed in somber attire, keep up in cessan t conversati o n s in Spanish. They som e how impress o n e with the fact that they are the descendants o f old aristocratic Castilian families Several San Bia s Indians have a l so b ee n attracted by this wheel of fortune. A s i s their c u s t o m, they are lined up in a r ow, o n e directly b e hind the oth er. H ow do they manage t o keep t h e ir bare brown feet fro m unde r the crushing h eels of the populace? How q u ee r they are in the i r ill fitting gingham trousers, l oose hanging shirts, and funn y hats that seem to perch upon their h ug e heads! If theirs be the luck to win, what an a ssortment of gaudy c heap beads and bright d ress goods w ill b e carried back to the famili es in San B ia s Then there are sai l o r s not o nly a few straggl ing Am erican boys i n their white middi es, but a couple of old sea dogs fro'TI the Fre n c h battleship t hat i s at anchor in the harbo r. L ook! Two i\lartinique women e a c h wit h a kerchief on h e r head and an othe r about h e r n eck caught gracefully at the throat. T h e ir A o wing skirts are held l oose l y over their arms in s uc h a manner as to display ve ry stiffly starc hed, white lace underskirts. On the outskirts o f this jibbe r ing jabberi ng, motley mass is a fring e o f late co m e r s who, a s the possession of prayer b oo k s would seem to indi cate, have just returned f rom churc h servi ces where, perhaps, they have offered pious prayers that they may be favJred this Sunday morning. Hark! The hrst w hir of t h e lottery cage i s heard. A sudden silence falls. All eyes are turned anxiously toward that w h i rlin g contrivance which holds within its wire bars t h e ir hopes-and perhaps their fortunes. T H E ICE C R EAM V EN D E R ((Es kim o E s kim os!! C o m e get yo' Eskimo pies b e fo' yo' dies Eat E s kim o pi es an' yo' n e va h dies." 1 n sLlc h a manner the arrival o f t h e ice cream vender is anno u nced. S oo n I h ear t h e rumbling of the hand truck all w h ic h h e w h eels his i ce cream barrel. I grab our co m missary book and run down stairs, w h e r e h e g reets me wit h 'hat yo' need, sah?" \Vh e never I hear h im say this word "need" wh e n h e m eans "want," I have a hard t i me to k ee p m yself from sayi ng, I don't ( need' anything, you old foo l, but I would ike' to get som e i ce c r ea m 1 ask him w hat flavors h e h as, and h e a n s wers m e, "Cherry, c herry make YOLI m e r rie," or Vanilla to-day, sah The vanilla you evah saw." It i s o nly afte r .I have made m y purchase t hat .I noti ce w hat a p eculia r p e rson h e is a s hort, joily, o l d Jamaican with a light brown hat covering h i s short, b lack, curiy h a i r. H e w ears a la rge w hite butch er's apron over a faded b lu e s hirt a n d a pair of old khaki pants, thu s giving h im self a sem i -sanitary appearance. Then, rem embe r i ng that I am h olding t h e i ce cream, and f earing that it will m elt if 1 stay t here much l onger, J go upstairs. \\' h e n I reach t h e t o p step, I h ear him agai n as h e co n::inues his rounds, calling, I ce cream. Makes yo' d ream. Eat E s kim o pies and yo' nevah d i es." T ROP ICAL SNOWBA LLS. Snowballs, frescos, fruits of all kinds, They1 1 take all the troubles away from yo ur min ds. I kn o w where they sell all these good thing s to eat. I n the snowball s h op right in B o livar Street. Strawberry. Pineappl e, L emon, and Pea ch! M y favorite flavors! ['II take one of each. Orange, Ihnan,l, Cherr)" and L ime, Which one s hall I take? All J hav e is a dime! "Now, b e a sport, yo u s ur e l y know me! I 'm :l kid from t h e sch ool. DonIe )'OU see? Won't yOll trllSt me the price of a few?' Get away from here I don't kn o w you!"

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TI-IE CA R I BBEA N. 57 P ITCAI l S LEO[< THE SO TI-I SE.'\S". (Written br J\I(1110/1/ Bli ss '26, from :luthentic inform:ltiondirect from the isl.lIld). Pitcairn I s land, Aug ust '20, 1921. J ust two weeks ha ve passed si n ce that happy day wh e n we heard t h e c ry of "Say Lo," and ran breath l ess l y dow n to t h e b eac h to see t he RI/ma/aka drop an c h or ab o llt a mil e Ollt. I t would be hard for YOLI to realize just w hat an c \'cnt in Ollr quiet l ives t he arri va l o f a steamer i s, o r h ow exciting it i s to see Q lIr men, whohavegonc out in little b oats, clamber lip t h e ropes carrying articles to sell or exc hange for jelly, sugar, soap, flour, cloth, overall s, and even perfume. The articles u sed by u s f o r bart e r are fr es h and dried fruit s slic h as ball a n a sand pineapples, done up inlayc rsofdri cd ban ana leavt:s; strin gs o f beads made from dyed s h ells o r brightcolored beans; and baskets and :1115 fine ly w ove n by cook stove, brought by t h e Youngs from Tahiti several yea r s ago, cost t hem sixty-four dollars. l\lother says s h e i s a much happier woman since s h e ha s t h e stove, as cooking on it is such an improvement over t h e o l d method of the open fire and the stone oven. All of t h e women o n t h e islan d ha ve b een making good u se of it for their baking; so, as t h e r e are forty families, it ha s been kt::pt very busy. fa-morr o w w e go down to t h e beach to make ou r yearl y supply of salt. A s the process takes many clays we set up camp. \\'e boil t h e sea water in huge caldrons over open fires until we have about twenty-five pounds of salt, which i s a year's supply for one family. T o procure t h is amount about f orty-six bucketsful of water are n ecessary. :\s our entire populatio n i s Seventh Day Adventist, we go back to the vil lage all Friday for our Sabbath, which i s your Sa turday. f7riday is always t h e bus iest o f t h e week, for o n this day we p repare all t h e m ea l s f o r t h e morrow. The r e are sixty six c hildren on the the women from island between the dried grasses, split A Chinese juuk 3.l3.lIcbo r in ('olon hllrbor. ages of one and palm or banana leaves, and artistically embroidered seventeen, all of whom are healthy and robust; or painted in gay co l ors. forty-six o f these attend the sc hool which is I magine o u r delight when, after several bags of taugh t by the great grandson of the Captain mail had been thrown into th e boats, a large crate of t h e BOlfn!)'. All t h e c h ildren are required was carefull y l owe r ed into one. \ V e were breath -to attend sc hool, t h e fee f o r whic h i s a barrel l ess with t h e anticipatio n t ha t it might be mother's or potatoes, o n e barrel representing twelve s hil l o ng-desi red stove, and so it proved to be. T h is lings-making sc hool f ee one s hillin g p e r month. was set up with great cere m ony in our h o u se, \\'e have few books; so our teacher puts the whi c h i s in the cent e r of the village, and was con-lessons o n the blackboard. All of u s ha ve seq u ently visited by all t h e islanders. slates, but not l o ng ago t h e p enci l s dwindled down I can't find words to express our gratitude to to h alf a dozen stubs; these had to be passed your father and mother f o r procuring the stove around to each in turn in order that h e might f o r u s For several years we have b een carefull y write his lesson; however, a large package of pensaving t h e m o ney gotten from the sa l e of fruits ci l s and crayon s soon came to Daddy a passing and curios t o passing steam e rs; but we feare'! s hip, and YOLI can't imagine how delighted we were the twentyfiv e dollars would not be en:J u g h, since to get them. the only oth e r stove o n the is land, a two-griddle Y o u asked m e som e q uestion s about our i sland,

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58 THE CARIBBEAN. so I 'll begin with t h e h is t o r y Two ships l eft England in the summer of 1762 for t h e purpose o f exploring the P acific ocean. The Dolphi" f ound the island of T a hiti w here D oc t o r Dre h e r o f Cristobal has been consu l frOI11 t h e U nited States (.-\unt Edith was t h eir maid while the)' lived the r e) The Swallow w h ile l ook in g for "Easter I s l a nd," sighted a rock one mornin g in 1 767 111 h o n o r o f the midshipman w h o discovered it, t h e captain named it Pitcai r n's Island On April '28, J 790, t h e mutineers of t h e Englis h ship, TIle Bount),) l a nded a t P itcai rn w ith som e of the people the\' had picked up at Tah iti. The r e w e r e twelve women and fif tee n me n nin e o f w h o m w e r e Englishmen The)' took all the fittings a n d t h ings they co u ld lise off' t h e boat and a ft e rw a rds burne d it. Then t h e Engl is hm e n divided th e lan d into nine parts and made t h e othe r s the ir s laves. Our cl imate i s ver), similar to that o f Florid a (accordi n g to t h e tou rists wh o v i s i t u s) \ V e r a i se guavas, yam s, banan as o r a n ges, pi neappl es, lim es, plantains, breadfruit, coconuts, s weet p o t a t oes, sugarcane, and even peach es, f o r w e have q ui t e a few t r ees grown from a few pe a c h ston es gotte n from a passi n g ship a f ew years ago. T he o ldest i n h abita n t o n th e i s l a n d i s m y g randfather, J\1r James R u sse l M c Coy, wh o i s seventy s i x H e h as bee n a mi ssionary amo n g the i s lands near P itcai rn H e has a lso b ee n to B ri sbane, England, a n d C alifo rnia, a n d h o p es t o g o to N e w Y o r k a n d Sydney b e f o r e h e d i es M y fathe r i s t h e government secret a r y a n d is co n s ider e d to b e t h e bes t educated per so n o n t h e i s lano J have two brother s, \\'arr e n a n d Baby J van. \Varre n and J go to sc hoo!. The r e are o n e hund r ed and se v e nty-f our p eo pl e on t h e island, t wo o f w hom are America n s fr o m Los Angel es, a father and so n b y the n a m e o f Clarke, w h o married o n co min g to t h e i s l and, a n d have lived h e r e for ten years. The lan guage spoken on o u r is land is E n g l is h Y o u we r e interested to k now w hat we look ed like. Som e a r e fair-skinned, others swarth y, but most of u s a r e light brown; our features are regu l a r and gentle (at least peopl e say so). Our houses arc t hatched-r oo f ed wooden stru ctures, usually two stories h ig h w i t h a ladder l e a d ing to the upper story, w h e r e beds (s imil a r t o t h e b erth s o n b oard a s h i p) are built al o ng t h e walls Eac h h o u se has a large garden and p e n s f o r t h e p i gs, c h i c k e n s, s h ee p goat s o r d o g s, and in a f e w c a ses s h e l t e r s f o r cattle Our fur n iture i s v e r y simple b e in g made b y t h e m e n fro m yello w t e fan o wood. The gov ernment i s carrie d o n b y a c h i e f magi stra t e a ss i s t ed b y seve ral a ssesso r s and a n i n t e rn a l committee. These offic i al s are c h ose n b y t h e p eo p le, m e n and w o m e n alik e v o ti n g. This ele c ti o n takes p la ce o n C h ri stmas Day. Our la\"vs a r e made a s t : 1 C need ari ses One l a w whic h w ill see m p ec ulia r to yo u although it i s quite a n t h e r e i s t h e law r e ga r d ing cats. The r e i s a h e avy fin e f o r t h e killin g o f a c a t b ecause t h e y k ee p t h e i s lan d fr ee o f rats b u t some t i m es t her kill t h e f owls and in t hat c a se t h e cat m u s t b e s a c rificed. ] bel ieve yo u a s k ed m e in yo u r l ette r s a b o u t our ce l e b rati o n o f C h ri s t m a s ; i t i s ve r y s i m pl e in comparison with yours J n s t ead o f t u r key a n d t h e in numerable g o o d things w h i c h yo u m enti o ned, w e h a ve roast ed g o a t and bak e d s w ee t p otato es Afte r di n n e r i s o v er, all o f liS g o up t o t h e c hurch, w h e r e t h e r e are two trees l o aded w i t h gi f t s And d o y o u k n o w w hat o u r g ift s are? Bananas p ineapp l es cocon u t s hats bas k e t s b eads brooms, and fan s e a c h carefully labe l e d w i t h t h e name o f t h e p e r so n f o r w h o m it i s intende d a n d t h e nam e o f t h e d o n o r. Afte r w e h a ve r ece ived our gi f ts w e g o d o w n to t h e beach t o see t h e b oat races in w h i c h t h e m e n partake Sin ce man y o f t hem are ve r y s killful this i s an exciti n g pastime At t h e close o f t h e d a y w e r eturn h o m e and are soon l o s t i n s leep, f o r o n t h e m orro w w e m u s t b e abollt OUT u s u a l task s, a s w e celebrate onl y t h e one day The sun i s Ollr alarm clock, and w e f o llow close l y t h e o l d s a y ing, dEarl y t o b e d and e arl y to ri se." I h o p e yo u w ill a n s w e r soo n f o r I d o e njoy h earing about YOllr fami l y sc hool and p l e a sures I a m m a i lin g t h i s o n t h e n ex t b oat, whic h will r e a c h yo u a b out C h ri stmas time \ V i s hin g yo u a M erry C h r i stmas and a Happy New Y ear, I r e m a in Y our friend, H i l d a C h ri stian.

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THE CARIBBEAN. 59 ONLY A B A BY. Doralh)' 4bendr Ofll, '2-/. 1 l ounge d o n t h e p o r c h o f t h e Hotel W a s h in gton, h o pin g to see so m e o f the l a t es t styl es on the nume r o u s t o uri s t s wh o thr o nged t h e p lace. Not b e ing imm ed iatel y thrill ed b y a n y espec i ally s trikin g costume, I must have dozed oW. The t ap t ap o f ve r y h igh heel s accompanied b y th e stro n g odo r o f "J a s min bro u g ht m e o ut o f m y s tup o r all too s u ddenly The tapping [ h ad h eard w as ca u sed b y a ve r y b eautiful pair o f s u ede s lip pe r s o n t h e dainty feet o f a w o n d e rfull y garb ed woman, wh o w a lked, o r rath e r s lunk g r a cefully over to a sea t a cross (ro m m e and s ank t ir ed l y int o it s comfo rt able dep t h s Sh e l e an e d ba c k an d closed h e r eyes g i ving m e a spl e n d id opportun ity t o l oo k h e r ove r. F ee t fir st! The b l ac k s u ede s l ipper s w e r e se t off b y e n o rm o u s s i l ve r buckles, whi c h th e s i lver s to ckings ma tc h e d so w ell a s to seem only a COI1-tinuati o n o f their shiny s urf ace. Th e b l a c k silkcr epe dress wa s ver y chic b eing all-over b e aded i n si l v e r t r a n slucent b e ad s and h avin g n o s leeves and a ver y l o w necklin e, w h i c h allo wed h e r t h roat t o rise lik e a m a rbl e column fro m it s bla c kn ess H er fac e wa s v e r y s trikin g s haped as it was in that f as hi o n commonly calle d Ori e ntal. The s l an t ing a l m o nd eyes w e r e protect ed b y l o ng, s ilk y e ye la s h es H e r l o n g, thi n lipped m outh wa s the co l o r o f a ripe s trawb erry and w a s b e au t ifull y v i v i fie d b y the bla c k m o l e whi c h g r e w n ear the l owe r left s id e of h e r d i mpl e d c hin. She evidently becam e wear y o f t h e c hair f o r s h e got up, appr o a c h e d m y haven, and s ank h e r lithesom e slimn ess into a c h air n e ar m y e lb o w. L e anin g ba c k s h e cl osed h e r eyes, a n d o nce m o r e I ga zed upo n h e r b e au t)'. But d i s tance l e n ds e n c h a n t m e nt!" H er e nviabl e w h iteness wa s th e result o f patient, repeate d appli catio n s o f liquid p o w de r. The r osy lip s w e r e n o t o f Nature s col o rin g n o r even o f t h e s ize whi c h Nature inte n ded The l o n g s ilk y eyel a s h es simpl y w e r e not, that's a ll. Sh e o pened h e r tinte d eye lids t o g a ze u po n t h e g la ssy se a a n d fastened h e r r estless eyes upo n a bit o f whi te ness i n t h e ba y ; thinkin g A s I watc hed, s h e n arr o w ed t h e m slig htl y and 1 p e rceived a col d l y ca lcul a tin g look in t h eir g ray depth s S h e w as t hinking The n a dapper yo un g f ello w d r e w up a c h a ir a n d b ega n a con ve r s ati o n They w e r e evidentl y o l d a cq u ainta nces, f o r I c au g h t som e ver y r e m ark able sc r a p s o f a "line" whi c h s h e "slun g in a ver y coa rse voi ce, accompa nied b y wise s h r u gs a n d kn o win g w ink s E v identl y a v e r y coa rse person. May b e s h e's o n e o f t h e new c ab a ret girls w e r e som e o f t h e tho ugh ts that Roated thro u g h m y n o w tho r o u ghly ar o used brain. A s t h e i r vo ices becam e l oude r an d t h eir w o rd s m o r e in d iscreet t h e object o f m y c uriosity r e moved h e r b l a c k satin t urban a n d r a n s lim w h it e finge r s thro u g h t h e Ruffy b l ond n ess o f h e r b obbed h a i r This c all ed forth som e r e mark s fro m "LVl onty" t o t h e e ffect that h er l oc k s w e r e n o t ex a ctly t h e sa m e s hade h e r e m embered th e i r h avi n g been in H o n o lulu. H e r only r es p o nse w as a l o w c hu c k l e a nd a p h r ase r e min ding him o f the fickle p re f e r e n ces o f man in r egard t o the col or o f h a ir. This word-thro win g contes t ( f o r i t co ul d ha rd l y b e c alled a conversati o n ) con t inu ed f o r som e tim e, an d 1 wa s ab out to m ea nder alo n g wh e n out o f th e h o t e l c am e a nu rse carrying a s m all bab y S h e directed h e r self s t r a ig h t towar d m y com p an i o n s I t h o u g h t i t wa s a case o f mistak e n iden t ity, as s h e came s milin g towar d these queer fo l ks, un til I saw m y "painted l ady" jump up, a n d with queer littl e min c in g s t e p s run to th e s tiffl y star c hed Englis h nu rse and b e n d over t h e tin y pink bun d l e i n th e capable arm s The e n tire ex pr ess i o n o n the e n a m e led face under we n t a m i r ac ul o u s tran s f ormatio n. The har d col d l y ca lc u l a tin g l oo k b ecame o n e o f g l o r ified moth erlove. Even h e r thi c k vo ice assumed n e w tones. ] t n o l o nger r e minded m e o f th e ca w o f th e c r o w ; it was t h e sof t murmur o f a con te n ted brook, as s h e cooe d t o the s milin g infant.

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60 THE CARIBBEAN. E,"en ";\ Ionty" was conceded a higher p l ace in my opinion, as he smoothed a satiny hand of t h e child, and remarked, "Quite a rummy littl e chap, what?" l\'ow that [ had ha d a glimpse of their better natures, my spirits rose, and as I sauntered 110nby the happy group, I bravel), whistled, "The End of a P erfect Da)'." THE DOG WROUGHT THE C HANGE. H e sat beside me at the station waiting for a train I could imagine all sorts of things about him A great red face h e had wit h a h eav), dark moustache. t'l big old felt hat pulled ti g h tl), dow n o\'er his ears partly s ha ded his staring red-ri m med eyes which rolled appre h e n s iv e l y n o w h e r e, now there. His dark suit was dirty and s hiny a n d was much too l arge, f o r it hung 011 him like th e rags on a scarecrow H e pulled out a hug e r ed bandana and w ip ed his sweaty face and unco uth l ooki ng hand s, t h e n dusted his larg e, clumsy s h oes H e s h ook t h e bandana furtively and put it away i n his grimy pocket, then could find n o p l ace for those la rge ugly hands. First h e folded t h em in hi s lap, then put them in his pockets, and finall y pick ed up a big paper bundle and h e ld on to that. T was sure h e was n e rvou s and fidgety because the police were looking f or h im. I n my min d I pictured this man doing all conce i vable c rim es I nto the station there came a dirty little dog. On his side was a large sore w hich h e s topped to lick every few minu tes. As h e came down the aisle past where ] was sitti ng I drew back with loathing from such a creature. Soon h e crawled to the feet of that repulsive looking individual my criminal. Almost instantly t h e man l e an ed over and tenderly picked up t h e littl e cur. P oor fellow," he said, "you ha ve gotten some o f the world's hard knocks, ha ven 't you? So hav e 1. Let's chum it together." H e pulled out h i s red bandana and carefully wiped t h e dog's side. Hi s eyes grew tender looking Hi s han ds had found work at last. As I looked at him I cOlildn't h e lp my eyes' filling up, and my throat's getting a hu ge lump in it. i\J y h e art went out to t h e old f ellow. H ow could I ever have t h ought him a crim inal? D O YOU REMEMBER? rlorellCe .if/ber', '2-/-. D o YOLI remember the tim e whe n mother mad e some cookies-just t h e kind you lik ed th e b es t, big c rumb l y brown ones full of fat raisins, and told you not to to u c h t h e m until s h e ca m e h o m e, whe n s h e would give YOLI o n e? She put t h e m in o n t h e pa ntr y s h e lf; so you reso l ved that you would b e good a n d not go n ea r t h e m. Y o u went o u t to pla y but i t wasn't int erest ing. i\1id ge wasn't out and you didn't lik e to play wit h J a n e Pa ge a n d t h e oth ers Y ou went back int o the h ouse and roam ed aimlessly around The n you wan de r ed int o the kitchen and l ooked at t h e pantr), door. No' Y ou would be good and do as mot h e r to l d you. Y o u w ent and got YOLir favor i te doll, t h e baby dol l with real hair but some h ow )'o u didn't f ee l l ike p l aying wit h it just t h en. The n you h ad an i dea It wou ldn't do any h arm j ust to p ee k at t h e cookies At first th e doo r r es i s t ed all your e ff orts to open it. Y o u were despairing of carrying out your p l an, w h e n s ud denly you gave t h e rig h t twist to th e k nob and th e door sw un g open. But t h e cookies w e r e u p too hig h for you to reach, and you h ad t o get a c hair. Y o u got u p o n it and took the cover off th e jar_ They l oo k ed so good. But yo u r e lu ctantl y and s l ow l y put t h e lid back o n f o r yo u had told yourself that yo u would just l oo k at them. Y o u took a nother p eek. Ju s t one w ould n 't make any d i ffer e n ce among so many. But alas! Ju s t one" l ed to anoth e r and a noth e r a n d anot h e r until you h ad eaten so man y you f e l t a s if you would bur s t. You look ed into th e jar. Y o u never im agined t hat you h ad tak en so man y You l ooked around f or a p la ce to hide but t h e r e was n't any. Y ou decided to meet h e r at t h e door and tell her; but w h e n t h e t im e came, you co uldn't say a w o rd. And whe n moth e r went to t h e pantr y t o ge t the cookie s h e h ad promi sed you, yo u tr e mbl ed \Vh c n s h e saw h ow many cookies were go ne, s h e just turned and l ooked at you Y o u f elt so ashamed and sorry t hat yo u cried ; but moth e r did n 't take YOll in h e r anns and pet you as s h e lIsllall), did. YOli h ad to cry all b y ),ourse lf and bt:tween sobs you vowed t hat you wou l d never do it again. D o you r e member?

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THE C ARIBBEAN. 61 AVERAGE BO Y 7M/: ."rosell/om, '21 Average Boy bro u ght out his team o n t h e h i g h sc hool basket-ball A oor. \\'ith th e aid of D e t e r m inati o n l ndustry E n t h u s ia sm, and Good F o un dation, h e h o ped to conque r the team o f Secondary Education. T h e r e feree, F a culty blew t h e whi stle, and t h e teams took t h e ir position o n t h e floor. Englis h, i \ lathcmatics Language. H i stOf)" and lndustrial Arts, made lip t h e stron g Secondary Educatio n team. As lVlath cmatics h a d COITIC preceded by great fame, Average Boy took spec ia l care to guard him, leavin g Engl i s h practically unatte nded. Afte r some m inutes o f play, L a z in ess and Apathy took the p l a ces of J n d ustr y and D e terminatio n, but the rest of t h e t eam wa s not used t o playing with t h ese n e w s u bstitu t es ; t h e r e f o r e t h e team w o rk suff'ered badly, N ear tae e nd o f t h e quarte r, another p l a ye r, C ramminess, wa s put in, but to n o avail. The end o f the p e r iod f ound Ave r age Boy two points behind, 1n t h e second p eriod, a n e w player, Bluff', cam e in Bluff' was good f o r a w h i l e but h e tired badly a n d had to b e put out. Average Boy was b e wil dered, H e wa s unable t o catch lip with t h e oth e r team H e d espaired o f winning the game. T h e wh i s tl e sounded for the end of the quarter with Average Boy two m o r e points b ehind. Between the seco n d and t hird p e r iods, th e coac h, Commo n Sense, gave t h e team a talk, and w h e n t h e r e f e"ee called f o r t h e third quarter, Ave r age Boy's t eam wa s str ength e n e d b y Hope. Dur ing t h i s p e riod they played mu c h better than b e fore, a n d w e r e able to regain two o f the lost p:Jints For t h e f ourth quarter, Average Boy brough t o u t h is strongest team: I n d ustry, Determinatio n, E n t h u s iasm, and Good F o undatio n the la s t o n e havi ng rec uperated greatly during the previo u s q u arter. ',lit h t h is team and the coach ing o f Common Sense from t h e s ide l i n es Average Boy was able to win the game handily; t h u s securing possess i o n of the cup c alled Graduatio n. GOLF. CMsle,. Pike, '2/. After completing h i s course in golf, h i s sc h ool education, C ollege-Graduate started o n h i s r ound o f l ife golf. I-Ie set his ball, Ambitio n, on t h e pi x)' o f a splendid p h ys i q u e, took u p h i s clu b, C o nfid e n ce, a n d teed off'. Ambitio n landed far fr o m th e first h o l e in front o f a high knoll, c all ed P l e a sure B y takin g t h re e more s hots, this time lIsing h is clu b, Sel f D e nial, h e made th e first h o l e, P enna!lent p osition. A g ain teeing off' with his club C o nfid e n ce, h e lande d Ambi ti o n near the next h ole, w h i c h was H i g h e r p os ition. H e r e h e to o k t h e w r ongciub, Ove r co nfid e n ce and drove too far. I n two m o r e s h o t s, u s in g h i s club Effi c iency, h e r e a c h ed H i g h erpositi on \ Vit h t h e lise o f h i s clubs, Effic i e ncy and Confi dence, h e made t h e next f our h o l es t h e fir s t of whi c h wa s Employer's co nfid e n ce, and th e n ex t t h r ee, incre a ses in s a lary. Dri v ing f o r t h e seventh h o l e h e landed so deepl y in t h e hig h grass o f S oc i ety, t hat, f o r several s hots, h e made n o advancement toward t h e A ss i stant iVJanagership o f t h e firm. T h i s h e afte r wa r d s a cquired b y u s ing a n e w club, 1 ng e nuity, w h i c h placed him far a h ead o f t h e fie l d o f competito r s The g r ound b etwee n the seventh h o l e and t h e eighth ( G elle r al Managers hip ) was fairl y level with n o d ifficult o bstacles, and h e made hol e eight e a sily b y u s ing h i s two be s t clubs, Effi c i e n cy and I ng enuity. F rom th e e i ghth h o l e till t h e l a s t t h e re wa s o n e hindrance afte r t h e o t h e r. The re were t h e bunk e r s Sus pi c i o n and Jealousy-of f ellow-employees, and th e s l o u g h, Board o f D irector s, a s w ell a s several mino r traps \ Vit h t h e lise of h i s trlls t y clubs, Effic i e ncy and Confiden ce h e finall y saw with sati s facti o n his ball se t tl e comfortabl y In t h e la s t h o le, t h e P re s id e nc y of t h e firm. ON TI-I E R OA D T O CATIVA Clwr/ollt1 H ousel, '24. A c rude woven bas k e t sat h e l plessly o n t h e t o p o f a turban that w ound itse l f car e l ess l y aro llnd a kinky g rowth of hair. Two nar r o w, deep-sel', hagga rd lookin g eyes p ee r e d au t from overshadowing, unkempt eyebrows A n ose t hat looked a s if it had b ee n forced to change its course b e f o r e it had fini s h e d growing) flattened itse l f o u t over a co n s id erable spa ce N o w and the n, as s h e puffed at a t h in cigar that h un g l oose l y out o f h e r m outh, h e r t h i c k lip s revea l ed a f e w isolated teeth or remnants o f teeth. :-\. ruffl ed collar and vestee made a pitiful attempt to make attractive her coarse wov e n fabri c garm ent. H e r l o ng s leeves hu ng l oose ly aroun d her bony wrists, as if e ndeavoring to h id e the ragged s h ; n y, s h riv e l ed hands T wo bare f ee t peep ed out frol11 unde r th e ill hanging dress, Flat, broad, and scarred, they see med to b e l o ng, as did s h e, to t h e surroundi ng entanglem ent of swampy

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6z !f STEW-ART SAYS-During my long .lnd diversified career as journalist, man-about-school, and sodawater guzzler in gener:ll, I ha\'e come to many conclusions. One of these con cerns the uner uselessness of human be ings. After listening awhile to i\lac, the anarchist, this becomes even more e \ 'ident. Why not a world without human beings: .-\ L'topia totally devoid of these incredibly stupid creatures! No hen pecked husbands or sourfaced wives, no dumb school children or grinning, tooth less hags; no need for census reports, read now only by proof readers; no worries about the i\l ellon plan or oil stock or-And gentle reader, pause and think how much better it would be for the ani mals and insects and little fishes! Such a wonderful opportunity for them to exer cise their lurid indi\'idualities, untrammeled by conventions! But after all, THE CARIBBEAN. SPORTS don't you think the r would act t h e same I C H. S. ATHLETI C ASSOC IATION way we do? Suppose we take an instru-FORMED for seeing into the future, recentl r October 10, 19'23. To-day the Athletic Invented by r oos, ,B" S. J C. H S. Association representing Cristobal H igh F oos that hIS can Schoo l was fOfmed. The attendance was show us anythm.g we want to see In the one hundred per cent, and a sincere cofuture, or anything we want to see any-operation was promised to the teams. way; .. The meeting was called to o rder by \\e would see a (at ,cootie, on the D odds, who, after :l brief talk, an-noun ced nominations were in. h:se Gazette. g for the of the George Oakes, :q, was c h osen President, W illiam Cousins, '25, Secretary and Treasure r and Guy Stewart, ''25, i\lanager. Pre sident Oakes said that in the verr futllrcour athlet ics would open, beginning with some schedu l ed swimming matches to bc swum against B a l boa. The meeting was adjourned with eve r y onc confident that our athletics will be of '" see where this bird Grease Bug has broken into print again with h is famou s troupe of R ed, Blue, and Blackjuveniles that perfen bunch of performing potato bugs. And l ook, our friend J K. Bee is slamming Gerald D oodle Bug because h e has the sense to uphold the Atlantic Side." Of course, yOLI see, this could be con tinued indefinitely, but since I' m paid for a column only I'll go home and sleep off m)' last night's mo vie show, Baby P eggy, "The Darl ing of New York." G. K. S. the best this )'ear. ORGANIZATION OF G IRLS' ATHLETI C ASSOCI ATION. On the twenty-eighth of October, the high sch oo l girls met to organize the Ath l etic Association. The officers c h osen BALBOA HUMBLED ON HOME first and third ve r r well while L eo Eber-H ousel. GRO l'DS. keystone sack well. The, t?ict Prnidt1!I-Gladys l .owande. pitchers did little work but shou l d be I SUrtlfln (III(/ Trta.rurcr-D orot h y D eiJAN U A R Y 26, commended on their good baning. On bert. 1924. I tseems that whole the was. as perfect pos-The first few months we spent on gym every time CrisSible and notwithstanding the ability of work, which was successfull). carried out tobal beats B alboa I the team our boys unbeat-onty b y the able le:lders hip of i\l iss it is on the B alable. was ,lIw.ay s the i\\a t h ee. I t is through her that we were boa'shomeground. and never In d:ll1gcr o f loslllg. I he actlOIl able to have Ollr fun and gain our victor}' Cristobal to-da) was fast and peppy .111 the .... a)' t hrou gh in basket ball. succeeded III t.lckI The hne-ups were IIlg up four runs to D ISASTER Balboa's hard-February 2,1924. It i s with a feeling -_____ earned three, in an I akin to sorrow fhat we write of this game. nine-innin!,! game. The c r.lck of p. Fish er, p. Ollr boys, buoyed up bv last Saturday's ruoh on hor<;ehide was contllluou')ty h ea rd, I vic torr over B albo:t, through some p"y-but the fielding was perfect on both teams. 5tal1l.io la, c. Eberell/, c. c h ological twist, arc plun ged II1tO depths We had ;1 new man pitching, Richard F oste r, I b. 1 b. of despondellC) ', and Balboa walks allover Fisher. who has a nice curve, and he abl)' Morris, '.lb. -\r osemena, '.lb. them. The game, considered as :t game, showed his stuff. Juan Papi played a Bur goon, ss. P api, ss. was :t poor exc u se, B alboa pla yed well perfect game on short, and pit c hed a Crofs,3b Solomon,3h. we :Igr ee, but C r istobal lost becau se of little in the seventh inning to relieve I her absolutely faulty t ea mwork. The Fi 'iher. Then we had J ose Arosemena, Clements, If. i\larchoskr, If. day was depressing, SOmeone was late, who made his debut on the second sack. H utchins, cf. Brown, d. and there was an undercurrent of unrcSt George Oakes and John Solomon played Whitlock, rf. i ..<)wandc, d. thro u ghout. everal playcrs deliberatel)

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THE CAR I BBEA N fell down on the job, and everrw h ere CRI STOBAL LOSES I N BASEBALL ther e was crabbing. Pr obably some TO BALBOA. ie:Irned psychologist will be able to ex plain this; we can't. Of course B alboa saw its opportun it)" and waded through LIS, the score being \V e really must give c redit [0 B :llbo:t. T hey won, and B uster B urgoon, old time Cristobalite, h elped them do it. Thi s boy is certainl), good. (Obse rve he u seJ to ii\,c in Cristobal.) His curvC3 arc perfect and his b:ttting consistent. T he line-ups were: BALBOA. B urgoon, p. Clements, c. Fo ster, lb. Crofs, '2b. Engelke,3b. M orris, ss. H utchins, If. Ncw h .:lrdt, cf. Elias, rf. CRISTOUAL. Fisher, p. Eberen1., c. Oakes, lb. Arosemena, '2b, Papi,3b Solomon, ss. lkown, If. rVlarch osky, cf. Lowande, d. J ohnson, rf. January 19, 19'24. The first game of the se:tson was pl:tyed at i\lount H ope to-dar, with B alboa taking back with her a very hard -earned victory. Owing to the B .libo:t team's havin g to return to B alboa on the four o'clock train, the game W,IS called in the sixth inning. When t h e Cristobal boys went OLlt on the field the}' wefe all discouraged and didn't think the\' had a c h :tnce with Bal. I bO,I, which was veter an of many games. I I t was the first game the boys had played together and there W:lS very f:lUlry teamwork. T hen too, everyone W.IS grouc h y a n d was reluctant about pb)'ing. Nevertheless the Cristobal boys held B alboa down in the first innings until, ;n a final burst, B alboa succeedt!d in wading through us. I t seems th:l.t now the boys woke up, but too late. T he prospect brightened for us and we succeeded in bringing in one run. W e tightened up, but were c h agrined when the B alboa boys I' had to leave. The game finally ended in G I RLS' BASEBALL. the 6th inning, 5 -1. r Partly for fun and pardy for c r edits, T o win, our b oys should practict: a l l we finished out our athletic year with is really not invincible. P ractice and was composed of: more team work and we'll surely beat B alboa next Saturday. Charlotte H ousel, p. J uan P api, a new man, pitched for H elen Abendroth, c. Cristobal and very ably showed his stuff. R ae Fischer, t b H is underhand is speCtacular H e sucRuth Due}" "2b. I ceeded in securing several strikeouts. D orot hy D eibert, Jb. Then our friend Johnny Solomon played Grace D owell, 3b. a consistent, errorless game at the initial Gladys Lowande, ss. sack. .Also George Oakes p l ayed second Manon B a rrett, rf I base ver} well, .md Brown held Dorothy Stauffer, If down third ably T hen we have L eo WIlhelmina Stute, cf Eberenz as shortstop, who can playa I better game and should tIghten up We Ap rrl1 9 wCJourneyed to B a lbo.1 to try are ven much Intlebted to J ack Klunk, our mettle D Uring the first two rnnrngs who held down the ke\'stone s:tck. The the sco r e was neck and neck. Then a line-ups were :ts few wild t h rows :tHowed Balboa's girls to I bring in se \ era l runs, and we were not BALBOA. CRISTOBAL, able to rally sufficiently to win; so the game ended 15-10 in favor of Balb o:t. [ S I Ever yone enjoyed t h is first game so t:tnzlo a, c. thor oughly that it was decided we play Whitl ock, p. ano t her. Accordingly, on tvl ay 3 our B:trton, lb. second game took place Some of our B urgoon, '2 b. team were not there so our subs were i\1 orris, ss. Klunk, c. P api, p. (Capt.) Solomon, lb. Oakes, "2b. Eberenz, ss. C RISTOBAL HIG H SCHOOL I SURPRISES S UBURBANITES I N TRACiC February '23, 1924. B:tlboa, suburb of Ancon, h:ts I:!verything its own way. This time ;1 got fooled to the tune of 31-"28. To-dar our space anni h ilators carved :I niche in the H:dl of F ame! Rejoice, all ye brethren! The highest point scorers were both men from Cristobal, and senior bddies at th:tt. Jose: Arosemen:t and George Oakes tied for a good nine points e:tch. L ike Grape Nuts, "There's a R eason!" A BA ITLE. The century, go:tl of all speed king s was first on the program. The boys may not h:tve been P addocks, but still they made pretty good time. Oakes :tbly ankled his w:t}' to victory, close l y followed by Arosemena with Andy Wh itlock of B albo:!, third. The track was very slow and in poor condition. The sixteen-pound shot-put was copped Kid Coffey, the dl:!mon swimmer, who flipped the marble thirty-two feet, with R ichard Fi sher se.:ond and George Oakes third, all these from Cristob:tl. W e dropped the rda}' to B alboa. H ere a funny thing happened. Runner number two, new at the game, ran about ten }':trds the wrong war before h e was Stop ped. As it was, the Cristob:tl fourth man w:ts not ve r y far behind his B alboa man. .'\n orange shirt and a pair of legs and rou h ave a portr.lit of R alph Clements, Balb o.I's loftr jumper, who, literally speaking, r ose to greater heights than any man. H e took first place easily in the high jump, but Chester Pik e and Maurice Eggleston won second and third places, respectively. The running broad jump was easily u sed, The playing of both teams was En gelke, Jb. (Capt.) not as good as before, but the excitement was JUSt as g reat. \Ve seemed unable to Clement", If. c h eck the opposite team and the resulting I H utchins, cf. sco re w:ts 8-1 6 in their favor. Sullivan, rf. B rown, Jb. Kin g, If. I won by J ose Arosernena, with George Oakes seco n d and our friend Clements I third. Fisher, cf. J ones, rf. I The +40-prd dash was won by B .dboa men in first :lnd second p l aces, Elias and

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THE C\RIBBEAN.

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D ur.'in s howing pretty form. \\'illie Cousins showed good mettle when, after a discouraging start, he pluckily came in t h ird. Then t h e '2'2()...)'ard dash W;IS barely t:lken by W hitlock and D ur.'in of Ihlbo I, who in a spectacubr finish took first places from Arosernena. : \rosemena h;ld a good lead III the first hundred and fift} rards bur h is ankles grew wabbly and he finis hed a ver y close thirt!. juan Henry Stevens, and Guy Stewart also r.lIl for Cristobal. I n coming rears, if Cristob;t! takes :I good interest in track we can but succeed, for we h;we excellent material, .1Ilt! inade. q uate equipment isom greateH handicap. l\1 r. Bogda please notice. THE CA R IBBEAN. 65 wipe Balbo:!. off rhe map as far as swimI confident of victory. and some fine games ming was concerned. It mar be remcm are promiscJ. We note with s!nisfaetion bercd th:H in the championship swim-the names of sever,ll newcomers til tenniS. ming meet, held on the Fourth of j uly, The use of courtS all over rht: Atl.lIltlc a Cri<;[oh'll H igh School [ealll consisting side has been se cured, and thl.: pia),crs of J ack Coffer, Alan \\'albee, J ame .. Illay be a ... surcd ;1 good gallery. B urgoon, and A .lpha c.lrrie,] off the Senior :!.20-yard reby ch:unpionslllP of rhe Canal Zone. The boys from Cristobal who came OLil for swimming and trained faithfully for over a mOllth under Ihc le:ulership of AI :'dorgan were: Jack Coffer, (c:tpt.), :\ndrew Smith, Foster Tufte;, Fisher, Oliver King, B illy Coffey, Chris. tian \\'irr-/, Surse Ta) lor, and George Oakes. SONNEMAN VICTORIOU S November 28, 19'23. John Ordway, Oliver K ing, ant! l\laurice Eggleston were the semi.finalists in the tennis matches for ch;lmpionship of the school; but Fred Sonnernan, stelbr anr.lcflon, who had not pl;I} ed in the first p;lrt of the tournament due to doctor's order<;, easi l y defeated t h em all, leaving Eggh::ston as \\'c ma) add that Cristobal expects to runner-up. rCl;lin the championship next Fourth of C RISTOBAL AND BALBOA TIE I N TENNI S CRISTOBAL LOS E S TO BALBOA I Juh IN IIAND BALL. I I fi /-r c..-,, -", in ,'. to and rounded up a hanJ ball team and traveled .... _.,., \ played Balboa some fine gallles resulting to Balboa; after 'lome long, rather scrap-: \ in a tie, Cristobal boys \\inning two out py games, we lost to B alboa_ of four serielo p1a\'ed. I .eo E beren7, sc h ool champ, represent-\ :... / F red Sonnerna:l was pitted against a ed LIS in tht! singles and gloriously-we p worthy oppontnt, Horace Foster, who sa)' gloriously because it was a splendid '<:I d b -II' f fight-lost to Bobby Engelke of Balboa. U P JW:'fs orce h to '1)L1t a rhl lahllt 0 "" tJ e ense, t aug 1 ,It times e s O\\el 1111-Engelke is to begivencredit for his superb rt::> lodf well in the offensive. :\'everthdess p laying, ami we predict for hil11 a gre.lt Sonnem:ln won the first set, -;'-5-future. If Eberenz would improve his defensive, he could be counted on to give T he second set was any man's SICt until a hard game an)' day. T he scores Foster, through sheer weight and very were 21-6, '21-8. I twas smeiy a queer, almost pathe:ic sight to see the twO freshll1;11l midgets, Charles W ill ;lnd Harry B rown, pLlying against Ralph Clements (over six feet) and Fn::d Brady, also of great height_ Unfortunately our bo)'s lost, but ;IS the odds were greatly against thern, they should be given creJit for their plucky fight. I t may be s;lid to t h eir credit ;lnd to t h e credit of Cristob;t1 H igh School, that our men never fall down on a job. : \ s it was, the games were spectacular and List. The final score wal> U -II, 2114 BALBO A FORFEITS ALL TO CRISTOBAL. Balboa and Gristobal were scheduled to swim three swimming meets, and in each one of these, after our boys had trained faith f ull)" B a lboa failed to s h ow up, t hereby giving us the meets. \\'e regret this sino.:rdy bec;lusc we knew could clever fighting, wa<; able to beat Fred, fJi. G IRLS' SWIMMING. Sonneman soon recuperated and show-,,"ovember 24, 1923. On this d:'l.te a ell his wonderful form in the thirJ set, preliminary swimming m.ee.c B :dI he ea=ily sl.ished h is wa)' to victory, boa took place at the \\ .I<;hlllgton pool. Wlrllllng 6-.). This was to prepare liS for fin:tls, but due l\l.lurice Eggleston dropped hi<; sets to to the Llct that we haven't had a swim-Robert Engelke ;Ifter a pluck)' up-hill ming IIlstructor for any length of time, fight, the score being 6 -4, 0 -5. the final meet was never held. I twas only through the courtes), of l\l iss Reed that we were able to ob(;lin a few salis-Ctluwdl F oos ;lnd john Ordw;IY lost to Il.tlph Clements and Gerralls :Ifter a strenuous fight in which victor), seemed factor}' practices. B a l boa defeated us in right in their hand several times, when points, which was as it should be. the superior weight and length (?) of '4. 192.1. To-day the first round of the elimInations for tennis championship of the sc hool their opponents told on them ami B.dboa w0I1,6.j., 9, 9-7 John Ordway, the sophomore slasher, played a game different from his usual one, playing cautiously with an ep:: more toward accuracy than speed. H e easil)' outwitted hIS opponent, jimmie D riscoll, and strode to vicrorr to the tunt: of 6 -3, 6 2. '-_..2>.="'-_-' arranged. A rcturn match sc heduled for i\l a}' 3. The r e art! tweh'c candidates, each one is fa be played at Cristob:tl.

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66 T H E C AR IBBE A N. GIRLS' TENN IS. I UPPER CLASSMEN CO P CROWN. fans and pbrers have December 3. 19::!'J. Ag:lin the Senior-.yea r than ever before. 1 he .I unlor bors played the Sophomore-match W:lS play ed Freshies and proved thH :t ripe old age R:l h ecem er 15 1 J Lo is no disqualification by beating them to ur uer i\ :tr y ae we rhe score o f :28-16. Again we saw wo n H elen .. \bendr oth Gladys B l:tkely derful p l :tying as both teams ran off some W e e:tsily defe:lted them, f or they had excellent play.;;. I ('S rather hard to pick nOt had as many practices:'ks w e. a star pbyer, but we think t h :n Ar ose. During the m onth of i\l:tr c h the girls' men:!. f o r the older boys and "Rusty" tennis elimination wa s taking pla ce. A J o ne s for the youngsters are pretty good. deal o f fun was derived from thes e A still larger crowd was in evidence, and sets, for e \'erybodr tried--even those we even h ad some organized cheering who hadn't played for seve r a l years. The by the freshman girls, led by Dot Wertz, final four girl s winning were to play which surel}. r aised the roof. Of course singles and doubl es against B alboa 's best the SeniorJ unior young bdies-the A.pril 19 we held ou r s ingle s at B alboa. others are mere g irls-retaliated and we .\ I uch interest was show n in the games by think t h ey won. iVlr. Sc h neppmueller the supporters who were looking on, attended t his game :lnd commented upon Charlotte H ouse l defeated l\ 1 :lrY J oe the good points o f t h e teams, and pointed Lowe, 6-3, 6-3 out some faults which should be remedied. Gbdys Lowande defeated B elle l\Iar-The pbyers we r e: tin:6-2,6-1. S E NIOR-JUNIORS WIN FROM SOPHOMORE-FRESHMEN the old Army and -... Navy Y," the -:;.. SeniorJ uni or boys, aftee a veey fwd, fast game beat the Sophomo re Fr es hmen with a sco re o f '71 3. This was the firs t ba s ketball game of the rear and all the player s were keyed up and full of pep. Some very promising material wa s viewed, and everyone is confident that we will give Balboa a run for their money. During the second quarter, while a prettr plar was go ing o n the light s were snapped off for a seco nd and when they were turned on again, referee Gerald Bliss had disappeared. T h e Arm}" came to our rescue-sounds poetic-and an en l isted man very abl y r eferee d the remainder of the game. The spectators were a ve r y sportsmanlik e bunch, and heavy c h eering was heard co ntinuou s ly. T he line-up!) were as follows: .... PPER. CLA'iSME.... LOWER. CLASSMcN. Arosemena, f.(capt.) jones, ( Eberenz, r. Pulgar f. Oakes, c. Solomon, c. (Cl'lpt. ) Pike, g. Grider, g. Cousins, g ,ggleston, g. Fi!>her, sub. Br own, s ub. I-'oos, sub. Lowande, s ub. Stewart, s uh. CRA\-BEARDS K I D S Arosemena, f. (capt,) Eberenz, f. Oakes, c. P ike, g. COllsins, g. F isher, sub. F oos, sub. Stewart, sll b J ones, r. P ulgar, f. Solomon, c. (\:apt. ) Grider, g. Egg l eston, g. B rown, su b Lowande, s ub. STOP! LOOK! READ! Cri s tobal High Sc h ool agai n plays extra quarter with I.incoln F ive! Ap r i l 12, 1 9'23. R ecipe for Nervous P rost ration, or "One Exciting Game." IugredimJs. F ive School Bors. F ive Big l'vl en. One Scorer with Automatic Adding Mac h ine. One R eferee. One Ba s ket Ball. One T ime Keeper. P lace basket ball in center of large A oor. Put bo)' s and men in and mix f o r five quarters-sprink l e l iberally wit h flas h y plays. Injec t a littl e bit of r eferee when friction becomes t oo great or w h e n t oo strenu o u s mix-up s occ ur. Sti r con tinuously, stoppin g only to p l ace ba l l in center H ave timekeep e r in perfe c t co n dition, to wit equipped wit h strong voice t o be h ea rd above din, and one sharp eag l e-eyed vision; and o n e score k ee per p lentifully s u pplied w i th sha r pened pen cils. A series of supe rhuman plays inter mixed wit h inc r edib l e feats of va l o r H oarse voices. G i ve boys d u e honor 3 n d compliment. T his gives a game w hich we guaran tee to c u re the most desponden t cases, as well as to exhila rate me ntally. Observe: T his game can not be served to men o n a sil ver platter bec3 u se it is apt to burn t h eir fingers. Suc h was laSt nig h t s game. F o r detai l s, use imaginatio n freel)'. OUR DO\'S. A.rosemena, r. j ones, f. Oakes, c. Solomon, g. K ing, g. B y the W3Y. t h e score was 30-26, a n d th e L incol n Five won EXTRA! THRILLING-ELEGTRIFYING GAME! EXTRA! LINCOLN FIVE FORCED TO PLA Y TWO EXTRA OUARTERS. J a nuary .. j., 1924. I n one of t h ose cata clysmic games that fans pray for a n d rare l y eve r get, the Cristobal High Sc h oo l boys suffered a glorious, exalted defeat from t h e L incoln Five, c h e score being 23-22. H ere is a case w h ere def ea t is victo r y, for the game was won b y o n e point, and two ext r a q uarters, six in all were p l ayed! Wow T alk about excite ment! F ast! Thri llin g T alk abo u t noise! W e b elieve t h e Y is s t ill re cei\ing compla ints abou t t h e r ac ket raised t hat nig h t. There was a good ga l lery, and believe u s, t hey w ere luc ky! The L i ncol n F ive, i nvincib l e a n d u nco n quered! Veter ans of a t h ousa n d a n d o n e h ard-earned victories! F orced by a m ere handfu l of b oys to p lay two extra q ua r ters! Our mind is still i n a whir l and all we can t h ink of i s legs and b all a n d arm s, and arms and legs and ball! O ccas i o n all} we see little "Rusty" j ones bei n g flu ng halfway ac r oss rhe floor b y a big M a r i n e T hen we see Oakes sink a perfect bas ket, quickly followed up by ,1\ 1 D oyle s superb shooting in t h e opposile basket. But t h en Aro s eme n a and Cou s ins a n d P i k e quick l y get t h e ball in p l ay, a n d acti ng l ike well -o i l ed mannikins s nap t h e b all back and l a -anoth e r basket. P o int a f te r

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THE CARIBBEAN point piles lip on either !lide. SpeccH the game good and fast with some tllar made the game worth while was the Thrills! Excitement! Sa}" if all the good plays throughout. friendly spirit of rivalry which t:xisted thrills were raindrops, the Army and The line-ups were: between the two sides. The end carne Navy Y would have Aoated. quickly with the close scorcor 9 11 in Ollr Gentle reader, pause and reAect. Let favor. your imagination rlill freely! T hen rise up and in a burst of enthusiasm, rend the air with t h ree lofty cheer,,,, for Cristobal has arrived! T he battlc-scarred heroes were: J ones, f. Arosemena, f. Oakes, c, Cousins, g. P ulgar, g P ike, g. J ones, f. Al D oyle, f. Hawkins, c. B liss, g Eberen'l, g. Rt'feree.-Tom Collins. BALBOA CAPTU RES F IRST BASKET BALL CAME April 4, '9'24. With a te:lm considerably weakened, our boys traveled to B alboa and lost the first basket ball game of the season to Balboa, the score being 42-16. As a team Balboa is invincible, and the players are all stars. Cristobal has excellent material but it can't work together. Why? Lack of practice and lack o f training. T he game was played at t h e Balboa playshed, and that might have been why w e lost so decisively. Then it was plainly seen that Balboa had some well-t hought-up organized plays. That's something we need. Nevertheless R a iny days, sunny days, hot days, cool; Clements, (. Elias, f. Sullivan, c. Burgoon, g. Engelke, g. Jones, f. On 16, Balboa met us at Cristobal pbyshcd, determined to send us to ignominious de(cat, but their efforts were in vain. Our rooters witne ssed a hard struggle to the last second. W h en the Knabcnshue, sub. Aroscmena, f. K ing, c. Solomon, g. Cousins, g. Pulgar, sub. qU:lrter was up, there was only two point's GIRLS TAKE SEASON'S S E R I E S. difference with Cristobal on the safe side, iJ U R focemostspon, naturally, is basket ball. A series o( five games was arranged between //v t' ... B a lboa and C r istobal, though onl y (our games were played. So many girls took an interest in basket ball that it was difficult to select a team, but at a special meeting the following were selected; Charlotte Housel, f. (Capt.) Dorothy Deibert, (. Dorothy Stauffer, c. R ae f.'ischer, sc. Irene Hopkins, sc. Gladys Lowande, g. Ruth Duey, g. T he first game of the season, on February 2, was played at Balboa playshed. J\lany remarks were heard on the did pass work o( the teams, but the thing THE WASHI NG T ON POOL. We were so confident of the third game, February 23, that t h e speed of the Balboa girls took LIS by sllrprise. They forged ahead in the first quarter and kept us busy trying to catch up with them. I t took us the whole game to realize that they were in the lead. At the end we resolved never to let the score ( 5 6 in their favor) happen again. March I the final game was held on our Roor. Naturally it was the hardest game, for both teams were ready to fight to the finish. Balboa's team was somewhat dampened in spirit on account of some o( the girb' being ill, but the game progressed smoothly in spite of this difficulty. i\l uch credit is due Florence i\ l urtaugh, captain of Balboa's team, for through her ready optimism in the face of odds, the score was brought up to our very heels. Then time intervened and left us victorious with t h e same score as the beginning game, 9-11. I n all kinds o f weather t here are people at the pool. A lanky man in English tweed comes loping down the stairs, \nd stops to speak to a pair of twins with huge b rown teddybears. Long women, s hort ones, skinny ones, plumpEverything's in swi mming from a mermaid to a frump. That tourist swims so f unny-he holds his head up high, And useless l y h e works his feet, just like a gum-stuck Ry. A little Panamanian lad in a bathing suit too large, Leaves behind a trail o( foam like a Hudson River barge. A tiny m iss-American-dives gracefully below, And comes up smiling with a stone for her little friend to throw. A man in swimming with his son-a baby of one year, Keeps splash ing him wilh salty spray, despite his cries of fear. On the benc hes all around, loll people of all kinds Who laugh and tal k and smile and stare, with nothing on their minds. And I sit laughing, talking, too; hiding my stares with smiles, For I am there to gather hints upon the latest styles, For, rainy days, sunny days, hot cool, I n all kinds of weather there are women at the pool. -Dorothy AbclIdrolh, '2-/.

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THE CARIBBE.-\:". 5[H OCTOBER. Oct. \. Cristobal H igh School reopens h er doors \\ ith so large an ;tnclldance that t h e Seniors are relegated to the library. \\'e welcome one new teacher, ;\ir. Schnepprnueller. i\lr s Nobl e i s substituting until the arrival of our mathematics teacher. Ocr. I I. Th e Freshmen are initiated. Oct. 12 .-\ bald-headed fOW is in evidence Oct 15 -THE staff" is e l ected, classes are organized, and it very brief meeting o f the Supper Clu b is held after sc h ool. Oct. 17. The B oys' and Girls' Athleti c A sso ciation,; h old their first meeting this afternoon and elect their officers Oct. 18. A Supper Club m eeti n g i s h e l d at t h e Y.\\ '.C. A The following n ew officers are e l ected : PrtJidenl.-Ru th H o pkin s Vice Prcsidml.-l\l ildred i\[ organ. TrcaSllre1'.-T eresa Gallagher. Secntfll)'.-l rene H opkins The old members are h ostesses at a r eal jollifi cation and again i\liss D odds de light s u s wit h it few readings. Oct. H). ;\ir. SchncPPITIucller's pleasing bari tone is heard in two solos in assembly period, "The Song of Hubria s, the Cretan," and L ittle of l ine." Oct. 22 24. Th e skies fairly burst o p e n all t h ese da)'s : Oct 22. From midnig h t to midnight t h e rainfall was 9 .02 inches. Oct. 2.1. From midnight to midnight t h e rainfall was 4.23 int:hcs. Oct. 24. I;rom midnight to midnight the rain fall was IO.OJ inches. The Gatun bus is held up at F ort D avis all ac count of the rain. Ott. 2,. \ Iiss O'Connell, our new mathematics teacher arrives and pays us a short visit. Ott. 2,. \Irs. 'ollie leaves us to teach the eighth grade and '\ Iis> O'Connell takes up h er duties. OTES Oct. 30 The hig h sch oo l g i ves a rising vote o f appr eciatio n t o i'lr. S. J. Shr eves, father of J ames S h reves of t h e S op h o more class, who, through tire l ess drort as a d iver has been able to h elp raise a sunke n submarine and so save the lives of two men impri so ned t h erein. NOVEt.1BER. :"ov. J. W allace J o hn so n presents to C. H S a joke box whic h h e ha s mad e. :"0 \'. 2. The firs t s taff m ee ting of th e sch oo l year i s h eld during lunch h our. LUllc h and bus i ness occupy t h e w h o l e h our. Nov. 3 The Seniors give t h e hig h sc h oo l a unIque H allowe'e n party, "A Trip Aro und the \Vorlel," and serve delic i o u s r efreshments. R e m e m b el' the P eninsula o f Deat h ? And the stu n ts? Did the S enio r pat i e nt h ave ca n sir or two more? Nov. 9 A Suppe r Club meeting is h eld at t h e Y. W C. A. The new m e mb e r s are initi ated. Miss H ornbeak gives an int e resting talk o n B ooks" and t h e Senior g irl s se rv e s upper. N ov. 1 0 A sta ff m eeting i s held this evening at Gladys L owande's home Aft e r the busin ess meeting i s ove r i\l r s L owande serves an e n joy able repast and we s p end the remainder of the evening ill playing games a n d s inging so n gs. Nov. 1'2. C h aplain R C D eibert gives u s a very int e r esting talk o n Y out h it s Advantages anu Dreams Schoo l medica l examin ati o n s are h e l d to-day also Nov. 1.+. Th e Upsilon Gamma Gamma Club i s organized by th e J uni o r -Senior boys. The firs t ste p s arc taken towa r d d r awing tip a c h a rter and t h e f ollowing officers arc e l ected : Ort/d".-Ch ester Pik e Scribe -Ric har d F isher .-Idviser -i\ I iss D odds :"ov. 1 9. The first intersc h o la stic basket ball game, in which the .I unior-Scnio r b oys defeat the F reshman-Sophomore boys, is p l ayed and o p e n s the boys' athletic season. Nov. 2J. A staRm eeting i s h e l d at George Oakes' h ome this evening After Ollr business

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TII E CARIBBEAN. meetin g a suppe r whi c h w e all enjoy ver y mu c h i s served b y Mr s Oak es N o v. 2 6 Thanksgi ving v a c ati o n b e gin s D ec 7 A s taff m ee tin g i s h eld aft e r sc hool. Stri ctly business. J lIllio r Girl s arc h ostesses a t r egular Suppe r Club m ee tin g Mi ss Bak e w ell g iv es an in s tructive talk on The Girl s' Budget," an d an int e restin g pla y l e t "The Budget Ghost, i s g i ve n b y the program co mmi t t ee Dec. 1 8 The Senio r s a c quir e n e w brilli a ncy. Shin y ne w rings and pin s ar e donn e d. D ec. 1 9 !\l i ss C orbe tt, m e mb e r o f the Nati o nal B oard o f th e Y. W. C. A., pays C. H S. a ve r y brie f v i sit. Dec. 2 [. The Junio r s g ive a d elig htful Christma s party a t th e Y. W. C. A. E s p ec iall y apprec iated was th e mock faculty meeting wit h Ka t h e rin e Fi sc h e r a s Dodds, Mildred M o r g an a s Mi ss O'Co nn ell, Ru t h Duey a s i\/ l i ss Barnh o u se Ol g a Arc ia a s Mi ss Bak e w ell, D o r o th y D e ib ert a s Mi ss H ornbe ak Ri chard Fis h e r as Mr. S c hn eppmueller. Chri stmas vacatio n b egi n s JANUAR Y J an. 7. S c hool reop e n s an d man y n e w resohl tio n s ar e made. J an. I I. A delig htful s u p p e r i s se r ved b y th e S o ph o m o r e g irl s a t th e Su p p e r Clu b meetin g J an. 14 \Y e begin th e new scho o l h o urs. Ei ght o' clock seem s a t l e a s t three h o ur s e arli e r t han nIne J an. 1 6 S chneppmuelle r sings three se l ectio n s \V e e njoy t h em, and the n l a u g h l o n g w hil e h e t ells u s about C o u sin Olga and somethin g good to e at. J a n I S A. staft meeting i s h e l d d urin g lun c h h o u ; J an. 22. The faculty an d s tu dents o f th e hig h sc h oo l and ,he e ighth g rad e visit t h e U. S S. C ali(o m ia thro u g h th e courtesy o f Chapl ains G. S. R e nt z a n d B. R. Patric k J an. The U p si l o n Gamma Gamma Club g ives a beach part)' a t l\e w Cristobal in h o n o r o f t h e f aculty a n d som e girl fri e nd s Games, wi e n e r s, an d a good s in g contribute t o a s atisf y in g good time. FEB RUAR\'. F eb I. The S enio r Cla ss inv ade Ric hards' s tucii o f or th e annual pi c ture-takin g even t F eb. 8 D e nni s presents to th e hig h sc h oo l a pi c tur e o f th e C o losseum, d o ubl y w e lc o m e b e c ause it i s o ur firs t piece o f real ar t The Su p p e r C lub girl s vote th e Freshm an g irl s r efres hm ents o f wi e n e r s an d saue rkraut b o th diffe r ent an d delic i o u s F eb. I I I S 0 d ays of midnight oil a n d f ea r The firs t se m es t e r test s ar e h e re! F e b. '5. The effic i e ncy o f thi s s taft hu s iness meetin g at th e h o m e o f Gu y Stewart i s riv all e d only b y th e excelle nce o f those t in y s an d wi c h es J 'II n e v e r tell h o w man y yo u ate! An d wh o e v e r ex pected ice c r eam? F e b. 1 6 A d vance s a l es tic k e t contest c loses. D e lilah May's s i de, l osing, ha s so l d 1 3 2; G eo rg e Oakes' s ide, winning, '4'2. F eb. 2 0 Emil y Bledsoe '27, ha v ing so l d 1 3 tic k e ts, i s presented pri ze o f a two-and-one-half dollar go l d pi ece awarded b y E d ward May 2 3 f o r the girl se llin g th e most tic k e t s in the recent contest, whil e Surse Tay lor, 27, having sold 30, win s a n awar d o r t h e s am e am ount g iven b y Mr. V. H Mav o f Gatun f o r t h e b oy se lling th e m os t Ch arlotte H o u se l, '24 selling 12, an d Charles \Vill, '27, sellin g 25 run th e m c lose second s Lad y Thais, o f C zec h os lovakia, delig htfull y e n t e rtain s tiS with three vi o lin solo s Monti's C zardas," iVfoza rt' s H J\1illu e t an d Dvor a k 's Humo r es qu e ." H e r p erfo rmance i s r e nder e d e v e n m o r e e ffective b y th e sympathetic pian o accom paniment g i ve n b y Mrs L. A. S c h an d l e r. F e b. 20,21 '14. l V fr S c hn eppmuelle r 's mechan i cal and arc hitectural drawing cla sses have o p e n h o use. Onl y too f e w v i sito r s see th e inte r es tin g exhibit. F eb. 29 An o th e r noonda y s taft meetin g M A R CH. l\'Iar c h 7 S enio r g irl s are hostesses f o r th e l as t tim e at th e Suppe r Club. Mi ss O'Co nn ell g i ves an in s tru c tiv e talk o n "Stars Afte r a delic i o u s suppe r t h e meeting i s adj o urn e d e arl y o n account o f the S o ph o m o r e part)' The S o ph o m o r e Cla ss g ives a L e ap Year part y Charl otte H o usel a s the vamp, an d th e m O llth S Ulnt s with Cal d w ell B Foos' impe rsonat i o n will l o n g b e r e m embe red. l\1ar c h 8 F e minin e m embe r s o f th e faculty and o f th e S enio r Class p l an a hik e to Cativa. Onl y f o ur, and two gu es ts, ar e abl e to g o. On th eir r e turn, tales o f s n o wball s, h o rseba c k rides, and a "cross year are h e ard. Marc h 1 3 M iss O'Co nn ell takes Physi cs class t o th e ]'vlount H o p e co l d s t o ra ge plant. Mr. J o n e s

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70 T H E CARIBBEAN. makes their tw o hours in t eresting a s well a s i n suucti\"e. ;\larch q-I6. T wen t y-live C. H. S. girls attend Y. \\" C. : \ conference at B alboa. W as n t t hat stunt funny at the frolic luncheon?" \' e r e n '[ the B alboa girls good to us?" D id i\l i ss P ell ha\"e to speak to YOli abollt goin g to s l eep? ";\ren'r you glad our' Gipsr Idyll' w o n in t h e son g contest?" W e had th e g ra ndes t ride Sunday p m. i\l arch 21. Throug h the favor o f M r P R J o)'ce, the Tarpon Cl u b at G atun i s pl aced at the disposal of Cristobal Hi g h Sc h oo l for the p a rty which D elilah and her l os i ng s ide g iv e f o r G eo r ge and his winning side. They d i d n o t l ose ou[ in choosing a place for t h e p art)" i\ l a r ch 22. T he socia l p robl e m s c l ass vi sit Gamboa penitentiary, Corozal Hospit a l P a l o S eea L e p e r Home, and Chiriqui Prison This i s made possi b l e by i\l r. Hopkins' two cars, t h e p asses fur nished by i\l r. An drew a n d Captain Phi llip s' loan of t h e police l au n ch. APRIL. A pril 12. The Easter bazaar i s h e l d an d voted a g reat success. H o w th e o l d l a b orato r y d i d blossom into a bea u t i f ul flower -a nd-fancy-work booth." "Oh the delic i o u s E as t e r bu nnies an d candies." W ill yo u ever f o r ge t t h e Tea R oo m or the B lue Grotto?" A pril 2 1. T ales of moonlig h t nig h ts, bea u t i ful seas, and sail i ng boats a r e h ea r d from th e Easter vacacionists. : \ pril 29 Sc hneppmueller i s co m pelled to give up teac h ing o n account o f ill h ea lth,andsail s for t h e States, carrying a heavy l oad o f o u r good wis h es. Mr. B e[[e rl y t a k es up his d u t ies s mechanica l drawing teac h er. r..' IA\'. May 2 M os t o f THE C ARIBB EAN w ork g oes to t h e printer s. The f res h ma n party i s a g r ea t success. Will you ever forget B u [[ er S cotc h o r Lt. P inkin's quaint, sad )O\ 'c affair?" "Can't you see B ledsoe as the stout lady, H enry Stevens as the beautiful vampire, and F red Sonneman as J ack be ;\ I.y 5. i\l rs. R W ilson takes up t h e duti es o f ;\Ir. Schneppmueller in the teac h ing of t h e p l a n e geometry class. ;\ Iay 7. i\l r. ilcock delights us by s i nging three songs. We certainly hope he will pay us another visit and us again. A staff meeting i s h eld a t J ose Ar osc m cn a' s h o m e B u siness occu pies most o f th e tim e, but w e find time t o eat a de l icious sup p er, aft er whi c h th e b o y s p rove th eir ability to p laya pi a n o (pl,,'er variety). i\l a y 31. The J uni o r -Senio r Ban q u e t i s held at th e 'ashing t o n H o t el. Cheerful conve r sation, improm ptu toas t s, good thin gs to ea t, an d dan cing k ee p s li S royally e nt e rtain ed f o r the even i n g JUNE. J u n e 6 The senio r pla y, T h e C h a rm Sc h oo l i s g i ve n at th e G a tlin Club h ollse an d draw s a l a rge c rowd. J un e 7. "The Charm S c h oo l i s g i ve n again at t h e Am er i c a Thea t er June II. A ga i n "The Ch a rm S c h oo l i s p r e sented at C oco S o l o. "Tha nk s f o lk s, f o r ),our gen e r olls ap p l a use. J un e 14-. A gain w e g i ve our p lay-thi s tim e at th e Nati onal Thea t e r t o a P a cific s i de a u d ience. J un e 1 7 Mi ss Dodds e n te rtain s in h o n o r o f t h e sen i o r s at a din n e r a t t h e Ol d Was hington H o t e l with th e f ac ult y a s g uest s J un e 22. B acca laur eate ser v i ces a r e h eld at t h e Union Chur ch. J un e 23-25. F inal exa minati o n s J un e 25. Gra d uati o n exe r c i ses in t h e H o t e l \\' a s hington a u d i to rium. J un e 30 C r istob a l H i g h S c h oo l closes h e r doo r s The J un ior Cl ass h ad q ui te a n eventfu l tim e a nd certa inl y d i d a full s h a r e in t h e sc h oo l ac ti v i t i es S tart ing o u t w ith th e S e n io r part y in w h ic h each cl ass h ad to g i ve a skit, w e p ull ed o ff a v e r y good Ku Klux Klan init iati o n in w h i c h th e wh o l e cl ass acted. Of course thi s s k i t w as t h e best o n e prese n ted The n we h e l d seve r a l c andy sale s and collec t ed e n o u g h m o n ey to h o l d our party W e s tart ed o u t w i t h a n e ntir e l y diffe r e nt kin d o f a p arty f o r we ga ve it at t h e Y W. C A a n d the c r o wd dance d t o t h e m usic f urni s h ed by a l oud s p ea k er. H e r e we s hone aga i n, f o r o u r cla s s g ave two l ittl e p l ay l e t s, "The B og u s C ount" and "A F aculty i\leeti ng" in whic h th e w h o l e class cooperated. The n ca m e t h e Easter B a zaa r a nd h e r e agai n t ht: J un iors did t h e i r best. The J ul1io r Class gave two l unc heons a t th e dom estic sc i e nce b u i l d i ng for t h e p u r p ose o f collecti n g fun ds f o r t h e J u nior-Senio r Ba n qu e t. 1 n th e Sen i o r p lay, "The C h a r m Sc h oo l," t h e J llni o r C l ass w a s r e p resented by several m e mb e r s An d l as t but n o t least, we gave at t h e Hotel \Vashing t oll a Sen i o r B anq uet w hich everyone enjoyed.

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THE CAR I BBEA N 7 GES Ih/fli .-f bendro/}" '25. H EFLECT I ONS. l so lated a s we are frolll so many high sc h oo l s our exc h a n ges m ea n mu c h m o r c to us than do t h e exc hanges of most sc h oo l s. They are lik e voi ces from afar t e llin g of t h e activities o f other stude nts; o f their athletic sco r es, o f the plays they have give n o f their cl u bs and parties. An exc hange gives u s 3n in sight into a sc hool's lit erary stand a rd s and ability, a n d into its id ea l s \ V e have b ee n ve r y fortunate in rec eiving t his year many n e w monthli es and annual s, but we r eg ret to s a y that w e have not h eard from so m e of our o ld frie nd s Wh e r e ar e th e fiGuill and t h e 7111/1tI, th e /lpokeepsinl/ and the Herald? We've mi ssed the m \\'e welcome all n ew exchanges, and are eager to add to Qur lis t any worth y sc h oo l publications. \ V e are sorry to say t hat Balboa, our friend l), riva l publis h ed o n ly a pamphlet last year instead of her u s ual worthy annual. However her maga zine, t h o ugh s mall, s howed that s h e i s still alive, and it is with pleasure that w e learn s h e i s again t o put out a year b oo k. \ V e h o p e t hat w e may soo n have it upo n our exchange list. OUR REFLEXES TO OTHI:":kS. The R edlwd B lllck. RelulingHigllScllOoljor Bop, I?ellding, Pa. Your l iterary department co n tains unllsllallr good material. Y o u seem to excel in athletics. The Nelop. Tllnurs Fil/ls lIigh School, Grul/firld, .l/(/ss. You have a clever littl e magazine. H owever we l oo k ed in vain for you r exchange department. W e s h ould suggest that a tabl e of contents and a few cartoons and cuts woul d g reatly improve your book. T hr J/irror. Prm:l;(/tawl1q Higl,School, Plll1xataw,U)', PII. We enjoyed your poet r y immensely. Your jokes are origina l, and your l iterary department is excellent. Our assistant edito r hail s from you r town. 'I'll( Cambridge Rrview. Cambridge lligll lind lAtin School, ClUllbridge, .llllss. Your cartoons are gre:lt. W e enjored your "Notas Espanola:;" verr much. Your magazine is well ar ranged. ThrCleaner. Pawtucket Ifigh School, Paultlldul, R. I. Your he : lllings are origina l a n d clever. T he T arrier" is unique. TluCurtis Curtis Higll Scl,ool, St,,'m/sftwd, N. Y. "The P ost Office" is a uniqllt! idea, and your "Curtis Blast" brought forth man)' a laugh. 'I.our department h eadings are also ver y attracti ve Tlu Stlldenl. Holmes lIiglz School Covington, K y. A very good magazine. Your department h ead ings are original. Yom athletic records are g reat. Tlu EX/lIlusl. SOllth Euclid Hig/I School, South Euclid, Ohio. We s h ould suggest that you have a table of contents and arrange the different dt!partments under their various heads W e were obliged to look all through the book before we found your exchange l ist in the corner of a page. TIlt: Rejlulor. l \ liddletown Towns/lip lIixh School, &onllrdo, N.]. YOli h ave a n excellent exchange depar tment. YOllr ads are to be envied. W e were delighted wit h your comment on our magazine. Y ou ha ve an en thusiastic booster in our cir culation manager. Frllnk Evans Higll Scllool, Sparltmullrg, S. C. Y ou have a wonderful literar}' department. Y ou r exchange l ist is ver y good, and rour l ist o f advertisers is a ddight to the eye. TIlt Sputlltor. Yo/autown l ligh Scllool, Johnstown. 1'11. Y ou h ave an (:xcellent l iterary department. W e enjared very much your page entitled J ust a em." But whr not add a few cuts to )'I)ur book? The T radrsman. High School of Commercr, Boston, .\/IlH. A delightful paper. Your cartoons are great. W e especially liked your parodr entitled, "Who K illed Schoo l Spirit?"

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THE C. -\R I BBF:!\N TM Tridmf. S,PIIitU Township High School, Ouall GrOUt N.7. Your :uhletic derlrtmem is good. Your cover de sign IS al .... ;1'" .lttfaCII\'e anJ your ads are very well :lrrangl!'1.l. TIzr Ed!o. .voNC.JIA: lIigh School, .Vorwulk, COlllt, .-\ good paper devoted to school activities. :\ fe .... more c:utoons would gre.u1r it how. Til, ';10"". Nf,It/;'I! I/('(h Schoolfor Bo),!, Rtilding, PII. .-\ we!klrr.LIlged magazine. Your Cuts are extreme_ ly good :mJ vour athletic :lre to be envied. JZlIodd .l'L((hl. Lubu High SdIOO!, Lubu, .\It, Your cutS are splendid. Your m:l.gazine is full of school news and one of which to be proud. We congr:uubte you. TIzr Rtl;'/O. .lI. R. /I-'(l;ft Hi'{h School, Toltdo,Olzio. We like the nne qU31in of p:tper on which this book is printed. Your cover designs 3re alw3)"s good. Your headings 3nd C3rtoons 3re excellen t. "Gossip" is clever and well written. The roiu of South Nigh. } 'oungslown, Ohio. A superior m3gazine. A heading for each department would gre3tly improve it, however. Tht Torch. 11'01 PIII/fldelplli" Ni{{l/ SclloolforGirls, PI/il"delplli", Pa. You h3ve 3 wonderfullr well-developed exchange dep3rtment. Your drawings and cover designs 3re alwa)'s distinctive. W e enjoyed (he story 1 Woul d I f I Could, But I C3n't/' b)' Doroth y Pizor, which appeared in the number, as swimming is one of the principal sports here. The Monitor. Irrl/uley fhgh School, /f/rl/oley l-/i l/s, ,\Ia H. ,0\ few more stories 3nd cuts would g re3tir improve your paper. Why nOt tell where it is published too? Rrjlut(Jr. lI/oIJllrtl lIigh ScI/ooI, Woburn, Mass. Your htldings 3re goo!l, but 3 more systematic arrangement of the contents wo.lkl add gre:tt l y to t h e attracti,'eness of )'our public3tion. Thr Breccia. Ouring ScI/ooI, Porlland, Me. "Pebbles" a unique he3ding for your clever jokes. A few more stories would hdp a good de.d. W e are very grateful for your comment on our maguine. The .1codrm;r 701lTflfll. Norwid,Fru .-/(tu/em.y, Norwicl/, Coml. Your cover design is always 3ttr3Ctive. DOl}' b}' Oa)," is clever. A few cuts would hdp. Tht RU(Jrtl. 701,,, \IllrJ},.'" lIigh School, Riclllnom/, I 'a. You have a wonderful alumni dep3rtment. The "tories, as many'" there are, are verr good. Wh) not have '.orne more? Your headings arc clever and origln:.!1. TItr Sqllrrdulllt.. .lfonror Ci/)' Higll Scllool, .lfol/ror Ci l)" UI. Through t he courtesy of l\l iss Octave Schulze we :Igain received n copy of your worthy 3nnual. I tis. beyond doubt, the best high school book we have ever been (ortun3te enough to receive. W e should ap_ preci Ite being 011 your exchange list. UI Ria/a. High School, Albllqlurqur. N. \1. Your annllal is the seco nd best we have received this )'ear. Your dr:un:ltic department is especial1y goo I. T he cutS and cartoon s are excellent. On lookin g over the IlLigazine w e wondered how s u c h :I gllO.l big; allllll;11 could be published without adverti<;e l11ents. TIJr PIli. Tamfllpilis Union fligl, Scllool, SallJldilO Throllgh the counesy of Elinor H.lrr o ld, we re ceived this worth)' exc h3n ge. The departments are well 3rr:tnged. The pictur es ami C:lrtoons :ire excel lent. The cover design is unique and attractive. \\'hat more can we S3)"? The .\!imir. LII lIigh GrtllIdr. Ore!. This f3r-west exchange came 3S a pleas3nt surpri"t' to us. W e like it from the front of its ver)' 3ttractiv e cover t o the verr end. Your 3CCOUllt of sc hool 3ctivities indic1.tcs th:it rou are very much 3live. The Pi"ioll. "'rKinley lIigh SdJOol /10110111111, /lawflii. \Ve were especi;dly p leased to r ece ive this f lr -aw,l}' exchange. I n olle of the early issues w e saw t hat Olga Linclcr, a former cla ssm3te o f ours, was on o n e of rour athleti c teams. Y our paper is full o f loc.11 co l o r, and receives our heart)" appbuse. The Ortle/r. ElIgltwood lIigh Srhool. E"glewood, N. J. 'r'our he3dings are clever. T he poet's corner is in deed 3 novel idea. PehbltJ. ,\llIrJhallIOWIl High School, M arJh/dhowl/ 1 0wll. .-\ splendid luper, with good athletic records. A bigger liter,lr), department would impro\'e it, how_ ever. T he I
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THE CARIBBEAN. 73 AS WE ARE REFLECTED. THE CARIBBEAN. Your magazine is extremely attractive. Y ou have many original ideas and rour large number of photographs makes your magazine attractive. TIICTordl. THE CARIBBEAN. (The exc han ge list of this magazine, W:lS written up in th e form of poetry.) The first on our list is THE CARIBBEAN, From Cristobal, Panama! 'Tis like a trip to a foreign zone, And is the best received by far. THE CARIBBEAN. !!.//odd)' Lig ll!. Your magazine is one of the best among our list of exchanges. It is well balanced and proves itse l f to be the r esult of much hard work and student in terest. The pictures add greatly to the attractiveness of the issue. The I\[Ol1itor. THE CARIBBEAN. \Ve welcome anything t hat comes such a long journey. D istance lends enchantment. Your annual is well drawn up. Some of the poems were wonderful. The Record. THE CARIBBEAN. W e were delighted with Ollr far-away friend, THE CARIBBEA"', with its splendid stories of life in the tropics. Your cuts are very clever and your alumni department is well devel oped ''{ours certainly is a splendid paper. TIle Spe(/ator. THE CARIBBEAN, Your publication is excellent Tile Echo THE CARIBBEAN. We consider ollrseh'es very fortunate to exchange with you. Your magazine is splendid. To a boyar girl in the States the photographs and well-written stories of THE CARIBBEAN are of spec i al interest. W e were delighted to hear about George Oakes, a former classmate of ours. TIle Reflector. THE CARIBBEA:-'. THE CARIBBEAN is the best yet. It has so many fine pictures :lIld such interesting news. All the departmentS are well gotten up. TIle Scribbler THE CARIBBEAN. We wish to give special mention to "The D ungeo n of Fort San Lorenzo," by \Varner B owers Your magazine gives a good idea of the co untry in which you live Tile Mirror. THE CARIBBEAN. We find that this magazine is complete in every department. They have numerous pictures of Panama :lnd views around the Canal Zone. It is an interest ing, helpful magazine W e are glad to exchange with you CARIBBEAN. AN ORAL REPORT I N ENGLISH (With apol ogies to "Casey.") ]01111 Ordway, '26 Ten thousand eyes ue on me as 1 get up from my seat; T en thousand giggles greet me as I trip up on Illy feet; And w h en, bewildered by the laughs, the words I quickl}" pour, No str anger in the class can doubt 1 wish the thing were o'er. And there r stand before the class-a gasping idiot there-, And ther look on with laughs and smiles, enjoying the affair ; And when the words refu se to come a n d I ca n not even speak, And when again the whole class laughs, "Sit down!" says Miss Hornbeak. TH E seventh annual issue ofTHF. CARIBBEA!-< is completed. We of the staft have worked hard, for we were loath to have it fall below the standards set for us by allY of our predecessors, and we were anxious that students of future rears might look upon our annual as worthy of their emulation. We say it is completed. l t will never be complete, 1\ 0 one knows that better than we. \Ve see its errors, its s h ortcomings, But in spite of them we are unashamed. \\'e feel that we have put into it that which we most desired it to have--a bit of the rent Cristobal H igh School spirit. What we have done however could never have been accomplished without the aid of those of you who read thi s You have surprised us, accustomed though we are to your kindnesses, by your generositr and interest. P eople of the Atlantic side, ever loyal in their support, have sur passed themselves this year. Even people all the P acific side ha\' e given materi:ll evidence of their interest. P ersonal thanks are out of the question. Consider this is written to)'c//. WeofCristobal H igh School thank you. 'Ve can not close, however, without :I special word of gratitude toour tried and true friends of the Panama Canal Press, who have indubitably proved, in ways which we can not mention, and for which we can never sufficiently thank them, their loyalty to and friendship for our high school. And now, just one last r equest. Tell our advertisers that you have seen their advertisements in THE CARIBBEAN, Let them feel that they have been wise as we!! as liberal in giving us their patronage. The B usiness to-lanagers, THE C .... RIBBEAN", 19'2+

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T H E CARIBB E A N JOKES C/i.l1"/OIl( N o:u!'l, '2';. L'lIPL Y SCGGESTlOXS. Char/ollt 1/0UU/, '2/. e students of Cri s tobal High School realize that unl ess som e n ecessary improvements are carried out within a shon time, so as to produ ce a r eac ti o n in studies and lessen the physi ca l action the high schoo l as a whole will continue to suWer Speaking n o t as a critic or cynic but as a person who is very mllch interested in the welfa r e of the school, I suggest that indi, idual telep h ones be installed in the desks of certain individual s, so that they may converse wit h one another t h e entire study p eriod, a s some desire, wit h out disturbing the whole a ssem bly Comf ortable cots are de sirable for t h ose t i red exhausted human beings who study so hard a n d wonder why they r ece ive only a scarlet "F" or a timid "P." A sounding board in front of the assem b ly room t o throw the teacher's voice, so that she ca n i mpress upo n the hard-o f h earing pupi l what she wants and expects, would prove a success-provided nothing else.:: wefe thrown excep t the voi ce An inexhaustabl e suppl y o f paper i s imperati\ 'e so that the papcr in peopl e s desks won't prove a magnet to the nails on the fingers of the Itss fortunate or forehanded. .-\ gigg l e-mufller to silence those who find" joke in everything and common Sen se i n nothing would not unacct,;ptable. And last but not Icast, a n.achine to utili!.e the lost motion caus!,.! .. 1 b y inui\idual s who J ove to explore unknown parts o f the assembly rOOI11 would ptrhaps score the needed energy for t h e pCJor tired indi\'iduals who, whcn a basket ball game comes, are too wt:ary to co m e out to c h eer F rnlllllan Girl. Ain' t I pretty? Qli vcr r __ \'cn a sign is prt:tty when it's painteu \\'HAT IF SOl\IEONE ELSE HAD SAID IT? Miss Dodds (to Ri c h a r d Fi s h e r w h o h"d jus t co m e frol11 the l unc h eon g i ve n b y the Juni o r s) H ow was t h e l unc h eo n to-da),? Richard Fisher -As good a s you co ul d e xpec t fro m beans. WE HOL D THES E TRl'TH S TO H E S E L F-Ev.lDENT. Miss O'Colllleil (outs i de the r ool11) -Miss Hornbeak? Miss Hornbeak (in s ide the r ool11) -}"es i i/iss O'Conn ell (s till outs i de) -Are you g o n e ? Thre e o'clock in the mo rnin g o l d An co n Clubhouse a fter a basket ball game. Z P Y Oll fellows o p e n t h e d oo r n ow, I 've bee n u p here three t i mes a n d 1'111 go in g t o settle this. 'jo"n S. (anxious to h e l p o u t) We'r e all s l ee p ing, sir OF COL'RSE HE DIDN'T KNOW S H E r.IEANT K I PLING'S VOLU!\I E Aliss H ornbeak ( i n fro n t o f r oo m ) l a m ve r y anxious to find "r.,line Own P eop l e Jost! (s urprised-in bac k o f room) -\\' h y, thought they w ere in T exas THIS I S WORD PLAY! GIIY (ta lking of giv in g a p lay to ge t m o n el' f o r expe nst::s for the annual staff) H o w wo ul d the "Three do for a s t aff p lay? Clu'.fll'r, Oh 11':>, that' s all swo r d p l ay i s n t it? HE.\RD I N SPANIS H CI.ASS. Stiroft' Ta )'lor (in an exerc i se o f origina l se n te n ces to illu Citrate lise of de and pnrn).-L a ce r vcz a d e Balboa cs mlly buena. A1iss !Jflm"ollS,' (to p u pils) D o n't a s k m e f o r proof.

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THE CARIBBEAN.

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THE CARIBBEAN. Cecilia Theatre America Theatre PANAMA COLON mbe of itboto ,1l\ramatic ExllibitOl'S of PARAMOUNT, REALART, UNITED ARTISTS, FIRST NATIONAL, FOX SELZNICK, HODKINSON, VOGEL, GOLDWYN, ASSOCIATED PRODUCERS and PATHE PRODUCTIONS. UNITED FRUIT COMPAN Y II from Regular Sailings 1= = Cristobt:l, C. z = N ew York, New Orleans, Cuba, Colombia, Jamaica, and Costa R ica F or furth er particulars, apply: M. C. O'HEARN, General Agent, Cristobal C. Z T H. JACOME, A gent, Panama City !J I QUALITY IS EVERYTHING l atura ll y, having spent many years in the making of portraits, we I h ave ve r y positive ideas on that subject. To our mind a quality portrait should have distinction of posc. Day and night photography. SCRANTON PHOTO STUDIO Z. I Cen t r.!) Ave. P a n :lma C ll y Cit)', R o r p -n"Vi5fliW'j'flnlN/IiWNrrMWd\WWrrWlWd\"WiWtWtWfj

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THE CARIBBEAN. HOTEL TIVOLI ANCON, c. z. PANAMA'S DISTINCTIVE HOTEL Where comfort and refinement combined with moderate charges are at your convenience Overlooking the City of Panama and the Pacific Ocean EUROPEAN PLAN Room without bath, one person Room with bath, one person . Room without bath, two persons Room with bath, two persons .per day .per day .per day ... per day $2.50 and up 4.00 and up 6.00 and up 7.00 and up 77 I i ANDREW JOHNSTON, MANAGER

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T H E C.'\R1BBEA:--r. I IMPR OVED EQUIPMENT M OD E RN METHOD S EFFICIE T SE R V I CE JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY I B RO ADWAY, NEA R FO L K S RIVER We Solicit the Patronage of Canal Employees. -Weekly Co llection s and Deli ver ies of Laundry Work. C harge Account if D esire d CLEANING, PRESSING and DYEING A SPECIALTY Pho n e Co l o n 2 1 P O. B o x 1131 C ri stoba l C Z

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THE CARIBBE AN. .79 r BORDEN'S GARAGE -Latest Model Automobiles C O M PETENT CHAUFFEU R S AND R ELIABLE CARS 12th & Boli var Streets Telephone 355 Colon, R. P. Buy Your Drugs, Paten t Medi ines, -I I Perfumery, T oilet Articles, etc. I Drug Store 5 0 Fron t Street, Colon, R P. Y o u Always D o Better at Sa lazar's -I WE CARRY AN 5 lIlp ,tl1, llllt e ftioba Jronntai n 5 0 Front Street S6 Bo livar Street 1 82 B o livar S tree t .""""-"''''''' 1 m COMPLIMENTS OF Zlin Zliblllirrr o f
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8 0 THE CARIB BEAN. T o th e di sc erning, H o m e lik e h os pitali ty c oupled w ith Eagerness to s erve W ill s pell h o tel comfort, And efficienc y. A ir p l a n e V iew o f Hotel Washington SUCh are condition s at the HOTEL WASHINGTON. I t i s indeed fortunate in it s setting one of Natural beauty enha n c ed b y man' s artifice; Grounds bordering on the blue Caribbean; Trees stately palm s and s tarry perfumed frangapani ; Orchids, ro s es, and cheery periwinkles; Natatory privilege s afforded in a splendid s altwater pool. Here in a beautiful c o n o r e t e building in Entra nce t o H o t e l Washing t o n Old Spani s h s tyle There are con v eniences for vi s itors fr o m near and far; and Ending the jo y ou s day, comfort able beds where one is Lulled t o s l e ep by the sound of the w a ves on the sea wall t ( I I

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THE CARIBBEAN 8 1 ARBOIZ HERMANOS 1Labtc)' 3Jmportcb jjBrc))c) anb FA N S, COMBS, SHAWLS and other FANCY ARTICLES Stores in both and CO L ON rFih Drug Store I 1 -I FRO"""","O,",VA. STS. :I \ BASKET BALL 1 -GOLF Pure Drugs and Chemicals TENNIS I French Perfumery BOXING il Goerz Cameras 1 SWIMMING =1 Filsms other Photographic GYMNASIUM upp les I The A=}='lJ=lY II 21 Central Ave., Panama LI of the Best Quality I POBox 1 078 T elephone ;JI '!'lru ,'Wr'!jWf'lJ!t'flJ}7rY!Jt'flf.'fJi.Wf/Wf'lTtWi __ '!'lru I !J!J1 I L. C. Leighton Photographs I FLASHLIGHT GROUPS A S P EC I ALTY I I 7x17 Doubleweight Sepia Views of Canal Zone c Z'J

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8 0 THE CARIBBEAN. STUDEBAKER is the second largest automobile manu-facturer in the world, and the largest builder of quality cars in the world Studebaker's lowest-priced car has more Timkin bearings throughout than any other car selling within $1500 of their price. R. E. HOPKINS Sol e Deal e r for Canal Zone and Republic of Panama THIS I S ANOTHER STUDEBAKER YEAR J ( j' I (( I I I ( I ( l\otarp ({lub of ({rl!)tobal=({olon MEETINGS EACH MONDAY AT NOON AT THE STRANGERS CLUB : ". ___ l!)isiting 1Il:otarinns OOe(come ___

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THE Ci\RIBBE :\:-<. FAST COMFORTABLE LAUNCHES EVERY DAY m:be j!}otd SWIMMING HIKING MOONLIGHT DANCING TOIl1 isls Dol7'l iI/iss 11 TABOGA "Typical Tropica l Isle" Residenls Yo/{ em!'1 F orget 11 1 ASEPTIC DENTAL PARLOR The American Beauty Parlor = 1 I 1= jlk tWill. J. Ipma SURGEON DENTIST .1\: ,,'\1 11 -jffln( W. Wrigbt PROPRIETOR 8.099 B o livar Street, between 8th and 9th Streets P. O. B ox IIS Pho n e Colon 331 37 Front Street Colon, R. de P. Phone Corp. 298 COLON !JBr. Wrb.liler !JBenti%t AND Colon, R. P. GATUN

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THE CAR I BBEAN. 1::1 1 -1 -, n TIP TO I t i s ge n erally r ecog nized that the Bes t Formula f o r Infant F eeding down in these Tropical Countries i s the Ancol1 Doctors' Formula: 1Part Nestle's Condensed Milk 3-Parts St. Charles Cream I::::: 12-Parts Boiled Water. I tchangeswith theage of the child : Ask your doctor. !I FO R USE I N COFFEE A 0 OTHER P RPO SES Nestle's & St. Charles' A r e the most eco n omical b eca u se they go FARTHEST. II BOYS T ell you r moth e r s to g ive I you 'estle's and St. Charl es' and exc h a nge the Label s for Toy s, Stor y B oo k s, Choco l ate, etc. A T TH E Nestle's Milk Company Co l o n or P a n a m a I LA MASCOTA I -II The Pac k ard Shoe BEST OA' TffE I STJIJIUS Sol e Agent C. W. MULLE R CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA Irl\!JAQlMQJ'Pl\iJA"J'M'PAVJ'QNJl'PN. I British pnarmacg 1 0 .115 BOLIVAR ST. COLON, R .I'. THE SERV I CE STO R E NOSTROLINE The asal Specific T R I M U R-TJ PEPP E R M I T CREAM for Co n stipation MUSTAR D OIL C REAM For all Kind s of Pa in s LACA -FLY K ill s Flies and B ed b u gs

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T H E CARIBBEAN. 85 & II .""""" ........ ... .......... ... ................. ............ "" .... ,, ........ """ ........ """ ........ "" ... "." ... ,,...... & 1= The Caribbean Press I -. 1= I II -:= 1= I II IN I -I -II I I -1= I PHO NES: C r is t oba l 49 P. O. A d d resses: Cristo b a l 1329 Co l o n 371 Co l o n 308 H. A. ARCHER -Proprietor i.u",, .,...< .. .. ,,.. ............... ,."." ... .. .......... .. ...... ...... ....................... "." ........ ..................... : I

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'6 THE C.-\RIBB L \:-J I BICYCLE ei TENNIS BALLS TIRES .... : . I T h e Fa m()lIs Chinese Store -CHONG KEE ESTABLISHED 1 888 PANAMA C ITY Chine se Silk, L l n en, Embroidered a nd Drawn work, I vory Sandalwood Ware, P orce lain, Tea, and Fancy Good s of all kind s. WHOI.ESALE AND RETAIL -MODERATE PRICES Brancn Store In Panama or Canal zone -PHONE 395 COLON WHEN IN PANAMA V isit The Cecilia Theatre CENTRAL AVENUE op I Finest Motion P icture I Theatre in the City. PHONE 395 COLON MORGAN'S GARAGE The Only Reliable Garage on the Atlantic Side DEPENDABLE SERVICE CALL A CAR AND BE CONVINCED T. L MORGAN Prop.

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I 1 1 -7 018 Front Street Phone Colon, NO. 9 THE CARIBBEAN. COMPLIMENTS OF 19r. lJern Cristobal, c. z. P O BOX 523 CRlSTOBAL. C Z. YOUR PHOTOGRAPH -68 H a rbour Street Kingston, Jamaica Stamped "RICHARDS II is a mark of quality and distinction Many years of experience in making pictures gives us original ideas. STUDIES OF LIlDIES IlND INFIlNTS OUR SPECIIlLTV r f ( f ( J!.)ogpital be li)Imama

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THE CARIBBEAN. 1'-<' --COMPO"'" PDHOME"O DE FUEnZO Y LUI al temp/illgly low prices CURLING IRONS DESK LAMPS, FANS I-IEATING PADS, GRILLS I IRONS (Domestic and Tailors') PERCOLATOR S, SEWING MACHINE MOTORS '" TOASTERS, VIBRATORS, WAFFLE IRONS Ph",," 150. Co l o Corner 911 S treet amI Balboa Ave. I ____ We Have the Gilt You Want For some body's birthday, for th e Bridesmaids and i U s h e rs, for Prizes and Favors to be d istribut e d t o ,--.. the lucky ones at the Party -I Il Parker Duofold or il Lady Duofold th e fountain p e n classic The Over-size Duofold J $7 is that beautiful big black-tipp e d lacqu er-re d p e n with th e super-smooth point that ha s transf orme d MASONIC TEMPLE CRISTOBAL C. Z. hand-writing from a task into a genuin e p leasure Duofold Jr. same except size, with neat gold pock et-c1 i p, $5; or the sl ende r L a d y Duofold with h a nd some gold band and gold ringend for h e r ribbon or : cha in, $5. Duofolds in plain black too, if you prefer the m.

PAGE 97

1'),;J book prilltt'd c1I1d hOI/lid ill The Pal/lIma Callal Press, .lfI. lIope, Canal Zom'.


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http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1924cris



THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. VII.



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1924.



No. I.



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL




Dischartjp inun i .atiiii spillway th'-nugh six ga*ei.



CONTENTS



24.
25



"24



924.
24.
25.
25.



Advertisements Chester L. Pike,

Alumni Mildred Morg.\n.

-Appreciation

By the Sliores of the Caribbean Clarice Steenberg,

Caribbean Staff

Dedication ; ....!."....,."..,."..'..'.

Editorial Gladys B. Lowande,

Exchanges Helen Abendroth.

Faculty, The

Freshman Class

Graduates

Jokes Charlotte Housel,

Junior Class

Leavings Senior Cl.4ss of 1

Literary Florence .\lbert,

A Capture / Andrew D. Smith,

\ Richard A. Fisher,
A Few. Centers of Canal Zone Activity

About the Canal Delilah May.

A Coast Defense Garrison George Oakes.

Cristobal Coaling Station Mildred Morgan,

From the Interior Dorothy Abendroth,

'Ralpho. Thou Dost Prevaricate^'

Florence Albert,

The Control Hoyse of Gatun Locks

Dorothea Tin^TS,

Through the Canal Irene McCourt,

".And Things are Not What They Seem'^

The Dog Wrought the Change. .Edith Coulbourn.

Only a Baby Dorothy .Abendroth,

Average Boy Jose Arosemena,

Beyond the Chagres Caldwell B. Fogs,

Charcoal Carlos Pulgar,

Do You Remember? Florence Albert,

Education by Travel

(By the Senior Class in Economics.)

The Trip in General Chester L. Pike, '24.

Canal Zone Penitentiary Florence .Albert, '24.

Canal Zone Home for the Insane. Ruth Hopkins, '25.

The Trip to Palo Seco Leper Colony

Caldwell B. Foos. '25.

The Disease Guy Stewart, '25

The Cure Katherine Fischer, '25

The Chapel William Cousins, '25



'26.
'24.
'25.
'24.



'26.
'24.



76-88

18

73

6

3

4

4

71

6

16

8

. 74

13

12

. 23

45

. 45

. 38

40

38

41

. 43



38
40
69
60
59
61
24
53
60
32

i2
32
32

34
34
35
36



Literary Continued:

Golf Chester L. Pike.

Life in Panama

.At Juan Franco Jose Arosemena.

Carnaval Dorothy Abendroth.

Panama Lottery Office ... Gl.idys B. Lowande.

Shipward Bound .Andrew Smith,

The Ice Cream Vender Chester L. Pike.

"Lucks" Caldwell B. Foos,

"Oh, There are Voices of tlie Past"

Clarice Steenberg,
On the Road to Cativa Charlotte Housel.

Pitcairn "Mystic Isle of the South Seas^^

Manola Bliss,
Places of Interest in Panama

Cativa Juan B. Papi,

Escoval Dorothy Abendroth,

San Bias as Seen by a Senior. . Inza Markham,

Sympathetic Sketches of Near-By Scenes

George Oakes. ^24 Irene McCourt,

Dorothy .Abendroth. ^24 Gl.\dys B. Lowande.
Florence .Albert. '24 Edith Coulbourn.

Ten Precepts of English Gl.u>vs B. Lowande.

The Coral Tree Shark A Legend

Morris Marchoskv.

Up-to-the-Minute Dramas

.As It Never Was Chester L. Pike.

Shades of the Great George Oakes.

Who Knows Noah^s Troubles? Jose .Arosemena.

Poetry

An Oral Report in English Class John Ordway,

Moonlight in the Tropics. Senior English Class, '23-

Rest After Toil.... Chester L. Pike,

The Washington Pool Dorothy .Abendroth,

Tropical Snowballs Jose .Arosemena,

Prognostication by Radiation Senior Cl.\ss of 1

School Notes Ethel Sonnem.\n

Sophomore Class

Sports



'24.
'24.
'24.
'25.
'24.
'25.

'26.

'24.



'26.
'24.
'24.



61
54
54
55

55
54
56
47

46
61

57
48
51
52
48



'24
'24
24
'24.



'24.
'24.
'24.



'26
'24.
'24.
'24.
'24.
924.
'24



Boys Guy Stewart, '25

Girls Ruth Duey, '25

The Soul of the School George Oakes,



37
29
30
29
29
73
73
2
47
67
56
12
68
14
62



THE CARIBBEAN.




Moonlight in the Tropics.



The moonlight's silver sheen is on the sea
Where rippling wavelets wrap the verdant shore;
It forms a pathway leading straight from me
To dream-romance through fancy's golden door.
A palm, a silent sentinel leans out
Across the bay all jewelled by the light.
The glistening, gleaming fireflies flit about
And emphasize the blackness of the night.
The shadows mark the passing of the hours;
p'rom troubles of the day one finds surcease;
The languid odor of the tropic flowers
Perfumes the air and brings a sense of peace.
How calm, serene, and quiet now seems life
"Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife."

SENIOR ENGLISH CLASS, 23-'24.



THE CARIBBEAN.




Left to Right:
Row

Row

Row
Row



1 Gladys Lowande. Editor-in-Cbief: Ruth Hopkins. Assistant Editor-in-Chief; George Oakes, Circulation Manager;

Delilah May, .Assistant Circulation Manager.
2 Chester Pike, Business Manager; William Cousins, Assistant Business Manager; Ethel Sonneman, School Notes

Editor; Christian Wirtz, Art Editor.
3 Jose Arosemena. Assist int Business Manager; Florence Albert, Literary Editor; Guy Stewart, Editor, Boys'

Athletics; Ruth Duey. Edit r. Girls' Athletics.
4 Miss J. Isabella Dodds, Staff Adviser; Mildred Morgan, Alumni Editor; Helen Abendroth, Exchange Editor;

Charlotte Housel, Joke Editor,



THE CARIBBEAN.




ITORIAI



Gladys Lowande, '24.




'HE Caribbean is to Cristobal High School
far more than is implied in just the word
"annual." It is a goal an opportunity
a challenge.
k Have you a talent for literary composition ? Your
goal will naturally be to concentrate and improve
upon your former English work in order that you
may so perfect one or more articles as to make
them worthy of a coveted place within the covers
of the year book.

Perhaps your ability may follow the line of art.
Does not the book demand the exercise of such
ability? There is constant opportunity for the
development o\ clever department headings and
novel class designs.

Apart from these more evident phases comes the
challenge; the challenge to aid in the sale of ad-
vance tickets tor either the book or the senior play,
do advertise, by word ot mouth or by the making of a



poster, and to do one's share willingly for the bazaar,
whether it be in soliciting or by washing dishes;
the challenge to the election of staff officers, not
because of popularity but because ot capable and
dependable qualities; and last, the challenge to
those elected to carry on their interesting and im-
portant work with the utmost thought and care.

Although this is, briefly, the function in the school-
room, the school itself is not the only body concerned
with the success of The Caribbean, for there is also
the community, which, when called upon, has
responded with an overwhelming list of kind acts.

As a result, the annual not only serves its purpose
in the school but continues to function as a point of
contact between the high school student and the
community, thereby not only welding a steadfast
friendship, but keeping alive the interest of the com-
munity in school activities and its faith in its young
people.



Bebication.



To OUR FACULTY, WHO HAVE SO ABLY AND WILLINGLY
HELPED AND ENCOURAGED US IN OUR WORK AND
PLAY, AND TO WHOM WE OWE ANY DEGREE OF
SUCCESS THAT WE HAVE ATTAINED, WE, WITH LOVE
AND GRATITUDE, DEDICATE THIS, OUR SEVENTH
ANNUAL, "THE CARIBBEAN."



THE CARIBBAEN.



T=a^




THE SOUL OF THE SCHOOL.

George Oakes, '24.



m.




School spirit is to the school what esprit de corps
is to an army. It is the spirit of the body, the
submergence ot self for the good of the whole. It
is manifested in many ways.

As an example of the submergence of self for
the good ot the school, consider the boy or girl
who is anxious to appear to good adv'antage in
athletics, has set his mind on playing on the team
in an important contest against a rival school,
and, at the eleventh hour, gives place willingly to
another, thus defeating his fondest hopes, but en-
suring that the team representing his school shall
win. This is one of the highest forms of school
spirit, the sacrifice of the individual for the good
of the school.

School spirit is also manifested by the student
body under a cheer leader, cheering and encour-
aging the school while its men are engaging in an



a

athletic contest with a rival team, and perhaps
is never better shown, than when, in the face of
certain defeat, it loyally urges on its own team
to continue the fight.

But school spirit is not confined to loyally sup-
porting and enthusiastically cheering on theJxam
on the athletic field. The submergence of self is
selt-discipline and there is a discipline of the class
room as well as military discipline, or the disci-
pline of a well regulated business oflice. That par-
ticular student body in which the sacrifice of self
and the loyal support extended to teachers are
best manifested, is the best exemplification of
school spirit or esprit de corps.

For, while school spirit on the athletic field is
noisy and easy to acquire, the other must be slowly
acquired in everyday work in the prosaic class-
room.




Four-masted vessel being towed through GaillarJ Cut.



THE CARIBBEAN.




Miss Dodds. Miss Ht.rnbeak. Miss O'Cormell. Mr. Schneppmueller. Miss Barnhouse. Miss Bakeweli. Miss Currier.



BY THE SHORES OF THE

Clarice Steenierg,



On the shores of Caribbean
On the shining Big Sea Water
Stands Cristobal High, the mighty,
Stands in pride the seat of learning
For each loyal son and daughter.
In this building is a teacher,
She, Miss Dodds of Minnesota,
Chief of all that she sets eyes on.
Best chief on the whole horizon.

Chief of old Cristobal High.
She it is who teaches Latin,
Pounds it in until we know it
Wonders then why we don't show it
When we have examinations.
She it is who knows old Julius,
Caesar, of the Roman battles.
She it is from whom the Seniors
Learn sociology and English.
And that English how she knows it!
Knows it as it should be spoken.
Knows it as it should be written.
Knows it 'way from first to last,
Knows it 'way from last to first.
Knows it with its first side last side.
Knows it with its last side first side.

Very learned is Miss Dodds.

Fro.-n Texas, then, we have Miss Hornbeak,

She, the one who is .so little.

Little yet so awe-inspiring;

She, the one who sternly gazes.

Gazes at us, almost through us.

Gazes through us, never round us.

Wants to have the book report

Which was 'sposed to have been written

But was somehow just forgotten.

Then she tells us we must stay in.

Stay in till the thing is written

Till we get so tired of sittin'

Till our heads are near to splittin'.

Till we write and hand it in!
We l(X)k forward to her classes
Classes where she holds our interest
As she gravely stands expounding
pacts which are a joy to learn.



CARIBBEAN.

i6.

Then o'er science, mathematics.

Reigns the wondrous Miss O'Connell,

She who talks of a2 hi.

Tells us of an \2 yl

Multiplied by c2 dl.

Then branches off to H2 O

L'ntil we think our brains are slow

So very slow they will not go

When e'er she speaks of H2 O.

In this great Cristobal High School
We have with us Herr Schneppmueller;
He does teach the boys their drawing.
If not drawing, then they're planning.
If not planning, then they're drawing.
Plane geometry he teaches;
With his compass and his ruler
He does work out propositions;
Makes us feel our blank br.iin's dumbness,
M ikes us feel our dumb brain's blankness,
Makes us wish that we were smart as
"Schneppie" is in problem's plane.

Next we have with us Miss Bakeweli,
She of household arts and history,
She who makes us le irn of Europe
Le.irn it from the outside inside,
Le.irn it from the inside outside,
Study till we know it right side.
Bone it till we know it wrongside,
Till we know it all by heart.

Last, not least, our dear Miss Barnhouse.
.She from whom we learn the Spanish
Till we think that we cm speak it.
Till we think that we can write it.
Till on our Spanish friends we try it
And find they do not understand.

On the shores of Caribbean,
On this shining Big Sea Water,
In this noble seat of learning
Teachers six whom we have told of.
Teachers whom we're very fond of,
Teachtrs whom we've liked to tell of
Prepare us for our future days.



THE CARIBBEAN.



Mr. W. W. Andrew,
Providence, Rhode Island.
SuperinlendetU of Schools.

Mr. Frank T. Wilson,

Seittle, Washington.

University of Washington.

Assistant to Superintendent of Schools.

Miss J. Isabella Dodds,

Claremont, Minnesota.

Macalester College.

English., Lutin^ Social Problems and Economics.

Caribbean Staff .Idviser. Senior Class Adviser

i\ CHAUCERIAN VERSE.

Eek now we'll teU you of our principal

Who's sikerly ot port full amyable,

Who does her best always to be o( cheer

In school, in church, in clubs, both tar and near.

Of C;,esar, English, economics too

She knows the p ist and present through and through.

From Claremont four long years ago she came;

Since when we know Miss Dodds by name and fame.

Miss .Adela F. Bakewell,

Lansing, Iowa.

Iowa State College.
University of California.

Home Economics, Modern History.

Junior Class Adviser.

IN LONG METER.

To judge her, you must know her well
In all her classes and her moods:

Ot modern hist'ry she can tell.

And how to make the best of toods.

To say this is to say the least

Search every comment you can find

To plan a party or a feast

Miss Bakewell ne'er once has declined.

Miss Hattie Lee Hornbear,
Waxahachie, Texas.

Trinity University.
Columbia University.

English, American History and Civics.

Freshman Class .Adviser.

IN RIME royal.

Perhaps you think it strange that we should spend

Our time to write of one so very small;

But, it you knew her well who strives to lend

Inspiring thoughts that to our best selves call.

That mold our speech and ideals into all

That's beautitui, with us then you would seek.

The friendship of Miss Hattie Lee Hornbeak.

But think not that is all that she can do;

Her jolliness close rivals her good will.

Her pleasing smile her enemies can woo;

And when, in doubt as to a word to fill

The vacant space in a new English thrill.

We seek her aid whate'er our straits and mood

She wins, by patience rare, our gratitude.



Miss Mabel Jean Barnhouse,

Watsonville, California.

Leland Standford Jr. University.

Spanish.
Sophomore Class .-idviser.

IN OTT WA rim K.

Perhaps you're not so fortunate as we

In having one who takes the utmost care

In teaching you so that you plainly see

The "why" and "when" of Spanish and the "where;"

Whose wit and mirth and jolly company
.Afford us merriment beyond co.mpare.

Regardless of the person, place, or town,

One better than Miss Barnhouse can't be found.

Miss Margaret H. O'Connell,

Grand Rapids, Minnesota

CreiglUon University.

University of Minnesota.

Algebra, General Science, Physics, Solid Geometry.

IN COM.MON METER.

Just one short year she has been here.

But you should see what she has done.
She's made all doubts and puzzles clear;

.And with her, work's turned into fun.
She's good in Physics, Algebra;

But that is not the best
Why so few bugs in Panama;'

Miss O'Connell has the rest!

Mr. Henrv K. Schneppmueller,

Saint Paul, Minnesota.

Stout Institute.

.Manual Training, Mechanical Drawing, Geometry.

IN SPENSERIAN STANZA

Of Mr. Schneppmueller we'll now relate

The drawing teacher of Cristobal High,
With tourist hat, umbrella, at a rate

Of fifty miles per hour he seems to fly
To school with giant strides that pass us by.

Just six feet one as you can easy see;
With blonde moustache and horn-rimmed bright blue eve;

.A voice that maketh for us melody,

The man most liked and worthy ot our faculty.

Miss Helen F. Currier.

Minneapolis, Minnesota.

University of Minnesota.

Chorus, Orchestra.

IN SHORT METER.

Miss Currier can jest

Just like the rest of us.
.And though we seldom do our best

She'd rather smile than tuss.

She comes just once a week

To wield her good baton,
The best in music here to seek

And help us carry on.



THE CARIBBEAN.




2o~'2i Chorus.

School Basket Ba

Indoor Baseball

"Olympian Council.
2i-'22 Class Basket Hal

Chorus. Girls' Glee Club.
22-' 23 Girls' Athletic Editor, The Caribbean,

School Basket Ball. Track

"The Princess and the Sage."
23-'24 President Senior Class. Chorus.

President Girls' .Athletic .Association.

Supper Club.

Basket Ball.

Indoor Baseball. Tennis.

"Charm School."

Joke Editor, The Caribbean.



GEORGE OAKES.

2o-'2i Delaware City High School.
2i-'22 Middletown Township High School.
22-'23 School Basket Ball.

Baseball.

Track.

Chorus.
23-'24 Chuss Vice President.

President, Boys' Athletic Association.

Circulation Manager, The Caribbean.

Baseball.

Class Basket Ball.

.School Basket Ball.

Track.

.Swimming.

Chorus.

"Charm .School."



THE CARIBBEAN.




lO



THE CARIBBEAN.




ETHEL SONNEMAN.

"Esmeralda."

"Olympian Council."

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Tennis.

Supper Club

Chorus.

School Notes Editor, The Caribbean.

"Charm School."



-j~ -4



20- 21
for

22-'2J

Ca



2J-^4



EDITH COULBOURN.

West Philadelphia High School

Girls.

MilCord High School.

Assistant Circulation Manager, The

RIBBEAN.

Class Secretary.
Chorus.
Supper Club.
Glee Club.
Chorus.
Supper Club.
"Charm School."



IRENE McCOURT.

20-'2i "Olympian Council."
2i-'22 Chorus.

Girls' Glee Club.

Supper Club.
22-'2j Chorus.

.Supper Club.
2j '24 Supper Club.

Chorus.

"Charm School."



THE CARIBBEAN.




12



THE CARIBBEAN.



PROGNOSTICATION BY RADIATION.

I tuned in the radio.

"Station JID speaking. The latest reports
from station CHS will now he gi\en."

I settled down to spend a pleasant e\ening.

"Class of '21 GoshI I turned it oft.

Tuning in again, later, I caught the last ot a
long-winded speech by Mr. Jost' Arosemena, who
had, in his capacity of President of Panama, just
concluded a treaty with the L^nited States where-
hv no school child was to be forced to study or to
attend school against his wishes.

Then another name caught my attention. Miss
Charlotte Housel, the world-famed pianist, was
to plav her famous selection, "Moonlight Son-
ata." I listened enraptured until the last n;)te
was struck. Then

"Mr. George Oakes, forward on the 'Original
Celtics Basket Ball Team,' will now tell a few
secrets of the game."

There followed the announcements ot attrac-
tions in famous playhouses.

"Miss Ethel Sonneman, the greatest emotional
actress since Theda Bara, is acting in 'One Wikl
Night,' at the Strangers' Club, Colon."

Enough ot that!

"Station ABC, Philippine Islantis, speaking.
The United States Nav)-, commanded by .Admiral
Chester L. Pike, is anchored here. Miss Florence
.Albert, assistant photographer of the Islands,
took numerous photos of the fleet in formation
this afternoon." Then began a lot of sputtering,
so I tuned in at Station CHS again.

.After a short talk on the latest books, I heard
that Miss Gladys Lowande, though she had lately
entered a state of wedded bliss, was acting as pub-
lisher for Miss Dorothy Abendroth, who had just
finished her latest book, "How to be imlependent
and Individual." Then

"Miss Irene McCourt will now talk on 'The
Best .All-Year Rountl Care of Barns,' to be fol-
lowed by a few humorous incidents gathered by
Miss Inza Markham, baseil on her years of close
association with school teachers."

"Gee," I thought, "she ought to know. She
lived in the same house with them for five years."

I was about to turn (jff the radio when, "Sta-
tion O.MH speaking. 'I'he Old Maids' Home in
Delaware has just admitted a nesv member. Miss
Edirh Coul bourn, who is fifty years old and has
never had a beau."

"How (|ueer," I murmured, "What became
of (J, well Guess I'll turn off and turn in."



"LEAVINGS."

We, the members oi the class of '24, being about
to pass away (to new fields), do hereby distribute
our ses'cral possessions and characteristics as fol-
lows:

1. Kloi'cnce .Albert leaves to Olga .Arcia her
noon-hour monopoly of the France Field tele-
phone line, appreciating the latter's rising need
of same. Her composure she bestows upon Cald-
well B. Foos.

2. Charlotte Housel leaves her vamping ways to
Helen .Abendroth with one word of ad vice, "To be of
any real value, they must be exercised constantly."

,V (jeorge Oakes leaves his perpetual grouch to
Richard Fisher to be added to the latter's already
abundant supply. Believing that "variety is the
spice ot lite," he lea\'es his Physics marks to Mor-
ris Marchosky.

4. Gladys Lowande with characteristic thought-
fulness bequeaths her small stature to Genevieve
Booth. -And her busy office of editor-in-chief of
the annual she leaves with the best of wishes to
Ruth Hopkins.

<;. Inza Markham lea\'es .Andrew Smith her
bathing suit.

6. Irene McCcjurt, after protcjuntl consideration,
leaves her permanent wave to Dorothy Deibert.

7. Ethel Sonneman's passion for wild-cat hunts
by moonlight is bestowed, after much thought,
upon Harriet Steenberg.

y. F^dith Coulbourn leaves her connections with
the Navy to Ruth Duey.

9. Chester Pike, following the unspoken wishes
of the faculty, leaves his noon-hour laboratory
privilege to Richard Fisher. His abilits' to cram
for the .Annajiolis exams he passes on to Guy
Stewart.

10. Jose -Arosemena leaves his sheik methods,
after exercising them all year, to William Cousins.
"Practice makes perfect," is the slogan accom-
panying the gift.

11. Dorothy .Abemlroth, after much urging,
leaves her "Stacomb" to Dorothy Stauffer, ask-
ing only that it be used freely and frequently.
L'pon consiileration, her ability to grind out a
theme a day is bestowed upon Mildred Morgan.

T(j the members of the facult\', the ilass as a
whole leaves its best wishes and the Cristobal
High School with all it contains.

We, having disposetl of our gifts ami cherished
|)ossessions in the regular order, do jironounce this
document legal and valid.

(Sgd.) Senior Ci..ass of 1924.



THE CARIBBEAN.




1 Mildred Morgan; 2 .Andrew Smith: 3 Anniel Heim; 4 Katherine Fischer; 5 Caldwell Foos; 6 Dorothy Stauffer; 7 Morns
Marchowsky; 8 Olga Arcia: 9 William Cousins; 10 Dorothy Deibert; 11 Harriet Steenberg; 12 Richard Fisher; Center,
Adela Bakewell. Base 1 Helen Abendroth; base 2 Ruth Hoptins; base 3 Guy Stewart; base 4 Ruth Duey.
Not shown Leo Eberenz, Margot Pugley.



THE JUNIORS.

CLASS OFFICERS.

Ruth Hopkins President.

Guy Stewart V'ice-President.

Dorothy Deibert Secretary and Treasurer.

Abendroth, Helen"

Her nickname, "Fluffy," rather belies her secret am-
bition which is "to be a boy."
Arcia, Olga

She wants to be terribly sophisticated, but "Olguita"
is rather sweet.
Baicewell, Adela

Our good adviser has decided to swenr oft any more
Junior-Senior banquets.
Cousins, William

To be a Paderewski on the uke is "Willie's" paramount
desire.
Deibert, Dorothv

"Dot" got mad when we discovered that she wanted to
be an old maid.
Duey, Ruth

"Rufus" has such musical talent that we all believe
she'll elevate the humble hurdy-gurdy to the realms ot
higher art.
Fischer, Katherine

"Kitty" honestly and truly wants to be a teacher's pet.



Fisher, Richard

"Dick" believes there is much fame and fortune await-
ing the dancing instructor.
Foos, Caldwell

"C. B. F." blushingly confessed that he wanted to be
a sheik like Jack Coffey.
Heim, .^nxiel

"Niel" tokl us in a hushed voice that she would adore
being a surgical nurse.
Hopkins, Ruth

"Bootie" surprised us by telling us that she'd like to
be a jazz composer.
MARCHOSK.V, Morris

"Mac" intends to be a millionaire philanthropist.

Morgan, Mildred

Here's a good one! "Milly" wants to be a tight-rope
walker.
Smith, .Andrew

".^ndy" has started out to be a second John Barrymore
and he's well on his way.
Stauffer, Dorothy

"Dotty" said she'd fool us as she was going to lead a
life ot leisure.
Steenburg, Harriet

This isn't very secret because everyone knows that
"Sis" is going to be a nurse and own a Cadillac.
Stewart, Guy K.

"Gallo" has reformed and from now on he will be a
hermit.



'4



THE CARIBBEAN.




l



, Center Mine MABEL BARNHOUSE, Adviser.

f'fft to Rif/fU

TOP HALF -OutBi'ic Row Gay Turner. James Van Scotter, Dornttiy Pike, Wallace Johriflon. Dplilah May, Lola Munoz.

InHifJi' Row Marion Biir^fwi, Dorothy Vaunhan, Cliristian Wlrtz, Maiirirt- KuKlestuii, Johanna Kli-ofkcris, Arthur Cotton.

r/tWKR HM*r Oiit>ti(le Row Rlizah'-th CarHon. Dorothea Tuft^, Manola BUhs, John (JdlTey, Clarice SteerilM-rj;, Irene Hopkins.

Irwide Row~Hil{ir'i.^^rii<- BIyflie, John Ordway, Carland Tinnley, Juan I'api, Mildred Ncely. C'arloa l*iilKar.

Not shown JamcH Slireven, Marnaret Itirkerttn.



THE CARIBBEAN.



K



THE SOPHOMORE CLASS



OFFICERS

President Dorothy Pike.
l''ice-Presideut Wallace Johnson.
Secretary James Van Scotter.
Treasurer Delilah May.



^



WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO THE SOPHOMORE CLASS

IF



nessr
3-
4-
5-
6.

7-
8.

9-
shut?

lO.

1 1.

12.

13-



Manola Bliss were not worrying about her Latin?
HildegarJe Blythe were tending to some one else's busi-

Betty Carson came to school in the afternoon?

Jack CofFey were always on time?

Arthur Cotton knew his lessons?

Maurice Eggleston sat still in class?

Irene Hopkins didn't serve lunch in the fifth period?

Wallace Johnson stayed after school when told?

Johanna Kleefkens were not always wanting the window

Delilah May didn't have to beg for dues?
Lola Munoz lost her smile?
Mildred Neely knew her history lesson?
John Ordway could recite without smiling?



14. Juan Papi didn't have an amplesupply of saddle horses?

15. Dorothy Pike bobbed her hair?

16. Carlos Pulgar ran out of hair grease?

17. Clarice Steenberg had no one to pass her notes?

18. Garland Tinsley were noisy?

19. Dorothea Tufts brought a voice amplifier to classes?

20. Gay Turner would answer "unprepared" in class?

21. James Van Scotter studied his lessons instead of reading
novels or lunching?

22. Dorothy Vaughan had a speedometer to regulate her
speech.

2j. Christian VVirtz were six feet and a-half tall?
24. Miss Barnhouse, our faithful class adviser, weren't
always ready and willing to help us?




The Wasbin^on Swimming Pool, facing the Caribbean,



The Washington Swimming Pool Slide,



i6



THE CARIBBEAN.




JHE CARIBBEAN;



17



FRESHMAN CLASS.



Freshmen.


Direction.


Chief Ambition.


How We Know.


Marion Barrett


E.S.E


To outshine the other Maid Marion..










Hood."


Emily Bledsoe


N.N.E


To be an advertisement for Pepsodent


By her radiant smile.




(')
(')

()
S.E






Genevieve Booth ....


To smg in the Metropolitan


By the zest shown on Tuesday's sixth
period.






Mary Douglas Bronson

Ward Bronson


To be a modern Cleopatra


By her speaking eyes.
By his love. for arguing.


E. byS


To be a great lawyer ., .....




S.W. by S....
N.E. by E....


To rival Charles Chaplin

To be a comedian-.


Lawrence Callaway


By the way he seeks the limelight.




S.W




By his interest in the. eighth grade.
By his Siamese twinship with Christian
Wirtz.


William Coffey


N. by E








Myrtle Coulbourn


East


To "sit by the side of the road and be
a friend to man."


By her wholesome spirit of comradeship.




Grace Dowell


S. by W


To "fiddle away her time". .


By her rapid progress on the violin.
By her tutile attempts to put something


Rae Fischer


S.S.E


To install a secret wireless in her desk


Teresa Gallagher


W. by S


To be a second .Ann Pennington


By her grace in dancing.




W. bvN




By his classroom lounging.






of chairs.


Julian Hackett


N. by W


To be a second Sanzio Raphael


By his skill in drawing.

By her faculty for studying under all
conditions.




N.W








Mary Heim


W.N.W

N.W. by W. .
S. bvS. E....




By her self-effacing manner.
By his stacombed hair.
By his insatiable curiosity.






Russell Jones


To know the why's of everything.. .


Miss Hattie Lee Hornbeak..


Center


To start us along the right road


By the efforts she has made in that
direction.


Jeannette Kalendar.

Oliver King


N. E


To be a heart-breaker


By her languishing glances.

By his actions when caught with a book


South


To be allowed to read wild west






novels in peace.


in assembly hall.




(")




Bv her frequent "absence from the body"
in daydreams.








Elizabeth Laning


Lower right. .


To be a second Carrie Chapman Catt.


By the dignity with which she presides
over the class meetings.




E. by N

N.N.W

S.W. by W..




By practice he has had in school aisles.
By her start.

By her quiet-as-a-mouse exits and en-
trances.


Clara May.

Erma Phillips




To become the personification of
soundless motion.






John Solomon


S.E. by E


To be head waiter at the Biltmore, .


By the way he generals the serving of
refreshments.


Fred Sonnenian


West


To be tennis champion of the world .


By his untiring efforts at the game.


Henry Stevens '.


N.E. by N. .


To be a Julian Eltinge


Because he makes such a fascinating lady.


Wilhelmina Stute


S. by E


To be the best-ever domestic science


By the delicious samples she brings back






teacher.


trom cooking class.


Surse Taylor


Lower left. .


To be a naval officer


By the way he swanked as Lieutenant
Pinkham in the Freshman play.


Foster Tufts


W.S.W


To become a labor leader


Bv his interest in a full dinner pail.


Helen Vineyard


E.N.E


To pose for coconut oil shampoo ads


By her fluffy golden locks.


Dorothy Wertz


North


To live up to her direction


By the fact that she has gone there.

Bv the way in which he dispenses knowl-

'edge.
Ask Miss O'Connell


Charles Will


N.W. by N...


To be a college professor


Euphemia Woolnough


S.S.W........


To be a whiz in algebra







Not shown. Not shown: Alpha Morgan, Jack Nunnery, Meiba Baker, Ethel Nelson. Virginia Tucker.



i8



THE CARIBBEAN.




Mildred Morgan^ 'jj.



Although we have lost track of a few of our
graduates, we are living in hopes that The Carib-
bean of 1924 will reach them and set their minds
in the road that leads back to old Cristobal High.

Many indeed have taken that road, for from
some we have had cherished visits; from others,
kindly greetings and interesting letters which we
have read eagerly; from a few, pretty gifts and
checks for our Easter Bazaar, with perhaps an
order (and money order) for the 1924 issue of this
book. We don't want an alumnus to wander
away from us, for we are proud of them all and
are anxious that they keep up their old friendly
interest in us who are trying to keep up the stand-
ards of Cristobal High School, standards which
they have set.

This year another band goes forth each to
take the part in life for which Cristobal High has
helped to prepare him.

"Oh years may come and years may go.

But may our faithful alumni go on forever."

1918.

R. F. D. 3, Box 2586,

Tampa, Fla.
The superintendent of schools was here yester-
day and saw Mattie's Caribbean. He liked it so
well that he wanted a copy. Go ahead and try to
beat 1923. (Mattie says it can't be done.)

lula pullig coman.

2516 Bedford Avenue,
Brooklyn, N. Y.

I'm still working with the Western Union Tele-
graph Company in New York City. The world
is not so large, for I see Canal Zone people tjuitc
often, and when we get together there is bound to
be some talk of the Canal Zone.

I'm certainly very glad that Cristobal High is
maintaining the good work of putting out an An-
nual every June. I know this year's book will



be bigger and better, and that much success will
crown your efforts.

MiNOT Cotton.

Susie Harrison, 1429 Munsey Building, Balti-
more, Md., is working as a stenographer. She
wishes the best of success to the Annual for this
year.

Catherine Waid of New York City, N. Y., will
be graduated from Columbia University School of
Journalism in June.

As far as we know Burke Welch is still residing
in Wyoming.

The last address we have for Mary Verner is
Hendersonville, N. C.

1919.

James Raymond, residing with his parents in
Cristobal, is working at the depot commissary.

118 Maple Avenue,

Takoma Park, Md.
I've just come from church where I heard a
good lecture on psychology and the last thing
he told us was that we were born to be kings and
queens. I feel pretty grand but nevertheless
don't know what to say in The Caribbean! But



I have been teaching for the past year at the
Washington School for Secretaries. I find the
work very interesting and enjoy it very much.
I'm also, in my spare time, taking an English
course at George Washington University. Best
wishes for the success of the 1924 Caribbean.



That's awful! Sorry!



Alice Arlene Ball.



Kenneth Edwards' headquarters are in Wells-
boro, Pa.

Dorothy Anna Montanyc is still living in Pitts-
ton, Pa.



THE CARIBBEAN.



19



1920.

Etha Bevington was graduated in December
from Woodbury's Commercial College in Los
Angeles, Calif.

Colon, R. P.
Best wishes for The Caribbean.

Alice Stilson.

Lillian Cotton Van Wagner, of 2516 Bedford
Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y., wishes every good
fortune for The Caribbean of 1924.

Katherine Burgoon Stewart, a pleasing adjunct
in the Cristobal Clubhouse, wishes every success
for this year's Annual.

2216 Bancroft Way,

Berkeley, Calif.

When I received your message I was in the midst
of studying for my final examinations, my final
finals. I wrote my last one this morning and next
week I shall again be a graduate.

It hardly seems as if it could be four years since
I left high school. They have been very busy
years and have brought a full share of hard work
and study, but they have also been very happy
years. I hope I may see some of you in California.

I join with the other alumni in sending you my
hearty greetings and most sincere wishes for hap-
piness and success.

Harlan W. Holmwood.

Box 279,
Austin, Texas.
I am a candidate for my B. S. degree in mechan-
ical engineering this year at the University of
Texas. It seems a long time since I was in Cris-
tobal, but I can recall everything clearlv.

Jack. B. Fields.

2426 BowDiTCH Street,

Berkeley, Calif.

I was very much disappointed at not getting
an Annual last year. It must have gotten lost
in the mail. If you have any left please sell one
to my brother and he will send it to me. He will
also get one for this year. I am gettjj|ig along fine
here. I will be graduated in May, 1925.

Next year I have the honor of being the captain
of the baseball team. I am playing center field.
I'm afraid Alpha and I are more pro-baseball
than anything else. I wish he could have come



up here, but they do not have to pay the athletes

to come to California. They come of their own

accord.

Alson Sears.

Al Doyle is working hard at the The Panama
Canal Press getting ready to send little Miss
Eva Jeanne to college when she has been gradu-
ated from her daddy's and mother's alma mater
in '39 or '40.

R. F. D. 4, Coudersport, Pa.
I'm just writing a few lines to wish you success
and plenty of it. Also, I want, through you, to
greet all my old friends and wish them health and
happiness.

Whatever else you may do, don't forget to put
my name on your mailing list. I wouldn't miss
my copy of The Caribbean for anything.

Kenneth Greene.

The last time that we heard from Lindale
Davies he was residing in Boston, Mass.

1921.

Mount St. Vincent-on-the-Hudson.
I am working hard for a B. S. degree and find
college life agreeable, both socially and intellec-
tually. I am very glad to see so much school
spirit in this year's class, and am sure its Annual
will be better than ever.

Alice Hunter.

Carl Duey is working in New York City.

344 East 120 Street,

New York City.

You'll find that there is a much harder life than
that of going to high school. The way they hand
it to you here at Columbia makes you feel that the
Three Wise Men are at the head of the faculty
supervising the handing out of work and know-
ledge, as no one else could think of as much to have
you do. So you see I have been quite busy and
still am and shall be until school closes. Then
for the glorious June when Paul and I see a good
place and school again. Not saying we'll see
some good students again, for I think that with
the graduation of the class of '21 there were no
more good ones to be had at Cristobal High
School. Do you agree with me?

Good luck and best wishes to you and The
Caribbean.

Frank Raymond.



20



THE Caribbean;



Kirby Ferguson is residing on Colon Beach
with her parents.

Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.
I sincerely hope that this year's Annual will be
a great success. .Although I shall soon be in the
States I shall always have a warm spot in my heart
for Cristobal High School and its faculty.

Eleanor Zimmerman.

Charles Henter is a radio man on an aeroplane
at Hampton Roads, Va.

1922.

New York. Citv.
I have been receiving news on the sly about a
few of the doings of our school which leaeis both
Frank and me to believe that each year the stu-
dents get better. Be sure to save a place for us
to root for Cristobal High School at commence-
ment. Frank says he knows more than I do.
Of course he does he knows me, and 1 know him!

Paul Dovle.

Gatun, Can.4l Zone.

Thanks to the training I received at Cristobal
High School, I was able to be graduated from the
New York State Ranger School, a branch of the
Syracuse University. Since then I have been
working for the Panamanian Government as a
junior surveyor.

I have kept in touch, as much as possible, with
the Class of '24, and know that outside of being
the largest class to be graduated from Cristobal
High School they also hold the honor of being the
most wide-awake and ready to work of any class.
With them as the leaders, backed by sturdy work-
ers of Cristobal High School, this year's Annual
will be a record, hard to surpass.

Wesley Townsend.

1 22 1 Marshall Lane,

Austin, Texas.
My good wishes to The Caribbean and its
staff for 1924 may this issue be the best ever.
I am very intent on securing my B. S. degree anil
am in love with work and Texas University. My
warmest regards to those who still remember
Marv (JLENN Fields.

Mildred Stafford is living in Providence, R. I.
I^Roy Magnus(jn, \uj College Avenue, Clare-
mont, Calif., is a student in Pomona College.



CuHECo Fraternity,

State College, Pa.
I am taking an electrical engineering course in
Penn State College, Penn State, Pa. I have a
position in view in New "^'ork City for this
summer.

See that my mother gets an Annual for me. I
hope things are going along fine and old Cristobal
High School is still the best in the land. Give
my regards to the faculty. Best wishes for the
success of the graduates. And here is hoping the
Annual is the best ever.

George Cartwright.

Gatun, Canal Zone.
Best wishes for the class of 1924 and for the
success of the .Annual.

Emma Townsend.

118 Maple Avenue,
Tacoma Park, Md.
I'm having a glorious time. I love normal even
if we do have to work hard. Best wishes for this
year's annual and the faculty.

Marjorie D. Ball.

Syracuse, N. Y.
I am at present a student in the New York
State College of Forestry at Syracuse University.
The Caribbean has my best wishes for a suc-
cessful year.

Jordan Zimmerman.

Ilia Brown (Mrs. A\ Doyle), wishes every suc-
cess for The Caribbean of 1924.

1923.

Tampa, Fla.
My very best wishes for the brainchild of Cris-
tobal High School our Annual. You'll be scan-
dalously proud of it I get so puffed up when I
show mine to people up here. I showed it to one
man here whose daughter had been graduated
from Hillsboro High, the big school of Tampa,
and I told him, rather emphatically, that I
wuuUi put my Antuial beside that of Hillsboro
and bet on it ten to one. He said meekly "We
won't argue about it. Miss Mattie."

Mattison Pullig.



THE CARIBBEAN.



21



Well, howdy, friends of C. H. S.,

I wonder how you feel!
My hope is that you're at your best.

So you can listen to me spiel.

How time has flown 'tis but a year
Since I had many things to learn

In C. H. S., that school so dear,

For which I'll never cease to yearn.

My precious paper in my hand,
On graduation night last June,

Gave me a feeling that was grand,

.'\nd meant that I'd be working soon.

I tried my hand at managing

A soda fountain at the Base,
But far from home I could not cling.

So came o'er to another place.

At Jackson's Laundry ev'ry day,

Eight hours' hard work do I put in,

So that when I receive my pay,

'Twill not be with that guilty grin.

My future plans are not quite made,
.'^nd tho I chose the auto line,

I really wish I might have staid.
In C. H. S. a longer time.

Quite like the rest, I must pass o'er
But raise to you three hearty cheers,

.^nd hope your Book of '24

May prove the best of all the years'.

GeraU D. Bliss, Jr.

Ernst Euphrat, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Oiiio, is attending dental
college. He is making his home with Doctor and
Mrs. Morris.

Emogene Nash is residing with her parents in
Balboa. She sends her best regards to her friends
and wishes for the success of the 1924 Caribbeant.



297 Highland Avenue,

Arlington, N J.
Hello Cristobal High! I am awaiting the pub-
lication of the 1924 Annual with the greatest of
expectations. 1 know it will be the best yet.
Good luck to the staff and the school. My life
will always be filled with memories of Cristobal
High the best school on the map.

Henry Moore.

Philadelphia General Hospital.

Believe me, I have Cristobal High School, Miss
Dodds, you kids, our school teams in short
Cristobal High School spirit to thank for a num-
ber of things. Do you know it's instilled some-
thing fine in us, something we graduates can never
lose. Sometimes, do you know, the thought of
you all back home working, plugging, wishing
for the best to those of us who have gone on,
keeps me going when T get discouraged. If there
is anything I don't like to do, I picture it's a
basket ball game and phew! The whistle blows,
I pitch in, and before I know it the game is over
and there's another thing I don't mind doing
again!

I am sending my best wishes to The Carib-
bean, may it be the best, no I don't mean "may
it be" but make it be the best ever, make it truly
represent what all the classes ahead of you have
tried to have it do.

Louise Henter.

Gatun, Canal Zone.
Kindly carry to the school and faculty my very
best wishes for a successful year, a more successful
play, and a most successful Annual.

Edward May.




Cattle grazing on Panama Canal Pastures.



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



23




r^'!? {>



^~N>





Wirtz''



Florence Albert, '24.



TEN PRECEPTS OF ENGLISH.

Gladys B. Lowande, '24.
(Based on Professor Palmer's Self-Cultivation in English.)

I am English thy language, who brought thee out of the
land ot poorly expressed ideas, out of the house of tedium.
I. Thou shalt place no other study before me.
II. Thou shalt not make unto thee any likeness of anything
that is not a tool ot eftective speech, or that is not
exact in impression, or that is not equivalent to what
thou shalt mean: thou shalt not bow down thyself
unto limitations in the expression of thoughts, nor
serve such limitations, for I, English, thy language,
am a jealous language, visiting the limitations of the
fathers upon the children, unto the third and fourth
generations of them that do not properly use me;
and showing loving kindness unto the thousands of
them that love me and keep my precepts.

III. Thou shalt not take the possession of English, thy

language, in vain, for English will not hold him guilt-
less who taketh such a possession in vain.

IV. Nine months shalt thou labor, and do all thy other

studies; bur all months are labor unto English, thy
language; in all of them thou shalt work, thou, thy
teacher, thy chum, thy classmates, and even thv



family that is within thy gates: for in all months
English made wondrous nouns, exquisite adjectives,
and appropriate adverbs, and all that with them is,
and rested not in any month, wherefore English bless-
eth all months and claimeth them.
V. Honor thy hearer and thy subject, that thy influence
may be great with the power which English, thy lan-
guage, giveth thee.

VT.;Thou shalt not kill thy opportunities for advancement
in general serviceableness and in consequent delight
through a lassitude in thy daily advancement in
English study.
VII. Thou shalt not be slovenly in speech.
VIII. Thou shalt not commit the vagrancy of reporting a
vague and undetermined meaning or general emo-
tion and thou shalt not be afraid to send thy words
wherever they may follow best their purpose.
IX. Thou shalt not bear false witness against any word in
thy Webster's Dictionary.

X. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's strange, technical,
or inflated expressions, nor his poverty of expression
through provinciality, nor his personal command of
just a few approved resources of speech, nor his lack
of unity, nor his inability to construct one thing out
of many, nor anything that is the limited possession
of thv neighbor.




View of Washington Kotel.



<14



THE CARIBBEAN.




BEYOND THE CHAGRES

Caldwell B. Foos, '2J.




I.

Beyond the Chagres River

Are paths that lead to death.
To the fever's deadly breezes,

To malaria's poisoned breath!

II.

Beyond the tropic foliage

Where the alligator waits.
Are the mansions of the devil

His original estates!

III.

Beyond the Chagres River

Are paths fore'er unknown.
With a spider 'neath each pebble,

And a scorpion 'neath each stone.

Gilkrt.

"I tell you, its true! I've seen it! You might
think I'm crazy, but it's God's own truth. I'll
swear it on a stack of Bibles a mile high!" The
man's voice broke sharply. He was a wreck, phy-
sically and mentally. The men lowered him
tenderly to the hospital bed. With an ecstatic
sigh, he sank back, babbling happily.

"Lord, how I've dreamed about it!" he said.
"White sheets, white people, and the clean white
smell of things." He lay back and rested.

Came the doctor from the other side, who had
been summoneil hurriedly. The interne spoke to
him in a low tone "Extraoniinary case came
down the Chagres in what appeared to be a glass
boat, with no visible means of propulsion. Seems
half out of his head almost starving when we
picked him up raving about some queer people
or some queer place he has been in can't make
him out at all."

"Glass boat, you said?" asked the doctor in-
credulously.

"It appears to be it came down the Chagres
at a thirty-mile clip, and it has no screws, sails,
or oars. Another thing when we bumped against



the wharf, the thing got slammed hard, and it
didn't break, only rang like a gong, with a pecul-
iar quivering sound."

"Hm m! I'll speak to him." He approached
the bed. The man roused himself.

"Hello, Doc!" he said eagerly. "Listen, Doc,
I've made a wonderful discovery, and these fools
won't believe me. You'll believe me, won't you.
Doc?"

"Sure!" the doctor returned calmly. "Tell me
all about it."

"I've discovered a new people. Doc, and opened
up the greatest field for scientific investigation
that the world has ever known. Me, Doc, me!
I'm the only one left. There were five of us, there
were, all fearing neither God nor man, and all after
one thing gold! There was 'Chinese' M'Gee, the
wickedest little death-dealing bunch of humanity
I've ever seen little and consumptive, but sure
death with either hand at anything under two
hundred yards. Then there were Big John, a
giant Slav, dumb but strong, and willing to do
what he was told, and Sir Harry, an English
crook wanted for murder, but soft-spoken and
gentle as a child, and myself, to say nothing
of Philadelphia Charley, the head of the party.
Brains! It was due to him that we had all
escaped that time back in the States, when they
almost caught us in New York. His brains were
what killed him, too. He was chief all right.
Even Chink obeyed him. Well, we had to lie low,
and so we went across the Chagres and down
trails that no human foot had trod, cutting our
way, lording and swimming alligator-infested
streams. It was hard, bitter hard, and sometimes
we woulii meet a native who woukl warn us back
*Malo, muy malo!' but we kept on. Our compass
was broken, and we didn't know where we were
going, but we kept on and then Chink got sick.
Poor devil, he was the weakest of the party, and
when we traveled through a swamp for two days,
the malaria got him. We iliil everything we
could for him, which wasn't much, but he got
steadily worse until one day a native came to our
camp. He was the first human being we'd seen



THE CARIBBEAN.



25



for weeks, and we thought it might cheer poor
Chink up, so we brought him over. The native
was sorry tor Chink, and he took out a little idol
and rubbed it on Chink's forehead. Just then
Charley gave a yell and grabbed the idol out oi
the scared nigger's hand. We thought the heat
had gotten Charley too, but he scraped the idol.
It was shaped from an ingot of" pure gold. Gold!!
We passed it abound, every hanti eagerly grasping
it, the fever in our blood more deadly than that in
Chink's. We passed it to him, too, and he fondled
it and crooned to it as if it were a baby; then he
switched those icy eyes of his on the nigger and
asked him where he had gotten it. The native
was scared blue, but he said the idol was very
good magic and that it had come, long, long ago
from -a place where there were many statues like
it, only much, much, bigger, and that this city
was underground, and that the people used this
metal that the idol was made of for pots and pans,
and that the temples had roofs of it. He said it
was sure death to go any nearer to it than we were
then, and showed us the general tlirection of it.
We tried to make him guide us, but he said he
didn't know just where it was and that he would
die if he tried to go there; so we let him go.

"Chink died that night. He was calm and col-
lected to the last, and we could see him fighting
down the delirium. He had a will that was almost
stronger than death itself. He left his guns to me,
because he said I was the only friend he had ever
had. We buried him that night. Charley gave the
burial service (where he learned it God only
knows), and though we were all hard men, there
wasn't a dry eye in the bunch, and I was crying like
a baby.

"But the gold fever had us fast, and next morn-
ing we set out in search of the city. We made slow
time, hacking and slashing at the thick growth.
Then, for a time, we followed a rock outcrop. For
seven days we followed it, as it seemed to lead in
the direction that we wanted to go, and we traveled
far. We couldn't tell where we were, but we kept
on and on.

"Then came the great day. We left the rock
outcrop where it went below the surface again,
and plunged anew into the jungle. Of a sudden we
came to a small river, perhaps fifty feet wide, and
followed it a little distance. Then we stopped,
amazed. The river dipped sharply and smoothly
underground, flowing swiftly through an almost



perfect arch. But what struck us still with staring
tear was the thing that stood beside the arch. It
was shaped geometrically in the form of a man a
cylinder for a head; a truncated cone, slightly wider
at the top than at the bottom, for a bod>-; and
four long, flexible cylinders, with triangular prisms
at their extremities, tor arms and legs. The creature
saw us at the same time that we saw him, and
started for us with a curious sliding gait that was
extremely fast. Big John and Harry did not wait
for him to get to them, but whipped out their
45's and opened up. Charley and I saw him falter
slightly as the bullets struck him, and heard the
clear, ringing sound with which they ricocheted
off him into the water, throwing up fountains of
spray. It sounded like fine china being struck with
silver, or like glasses clinking together. Then
he was on them. With two terrific blows of the
prisms on the ends of his upper cylinders, he crushed
their skulls. Then Charley went down, but I saw
the thing perceptibly slacken his swing, and I
knew Charley was not killed. The thing swung
toward me; then everything went black.

"When I came to, I was being lifted into a glass
boat. That is, it looked like glass. I looked at my
captor. He was handling me as if I were a feather.
He must have been seven feet high. He was either
made of, or covered with armor of a substance that
looked like cream-like lenses. It reminded me of
looking into the top of a periscope that feeling of
something within looking out at you. I got an
impression of a great intelligence and an alert will.
He put me into the boat with Charley, who wasstill
unconscious, and then he himself got in. Taking
the sides of the boat in his prisms, he impelled it
out into the center of the stream and toward the
arch. Dipping with the river, we shot down into
darkness.

"It was pitch dark at first, and we could see
the creature glowing phosphorescently in the
gloom. The boat, if left to itself, must have
traveled at frightful speed, because the water was
rushing around the stern and past the bow, as if
we were standing still and the water rushing past
us and downward. The thing seemed to be holding
it back by sheer will-power, so that it descended
slowly. We did not see how this could happen and
we stared struck with awe at the thing's lenses.

"Suddenly a green haze began to grow around
us, evidently coming from some place in front of us.
Our captor stopped the boat, and examined a



26



THE CARIBBEAN.



white protective covering that was applied to him
like a coat of paint. He seemed to view the haze
with something very like tear. Then he looked at
us, and we read his thoughts! We didn't hear them,
we didn't see them, we didn't make them mit in
English words, but we "got" as plainly as it he had
spoken, this idea: 'If No. 6780.486 theorized and
experimented correctly, these creatures will he
unaffected by the death rays. It is a wondertul
opportunity to prove or disprove his work.'

"Death rays! But we were helpless, held to
the bottom of the boat by some invisible force.
The green light grew brighter. The creature seem-
ed to be obsessed with the desire to get past it as
quickly as possible. It grew dazzling, blinding, and
we were forced to hide our eyes. Slowly it sub-
sided, and we uncovered our aching eyes. We
were rapidly driving into the darkness again, and
were conscious of our captor's relief. He examined
us minutely, but without moving, seeming to
look through flesh and bone. We got the impres-
sion: 'Evidently unharmed. Curious, but I am
unable to receive their mind impressions.' This at
least, was comforting. We were unharmed, and he
could not read our thoughts.

"Then quietly, smoothly, so that we were
scarcely aware ot the change, we were turned into
a diversion a diversion that evidently flowed
uphill instead ot sharply down. We followed this
for perhaps fifteen minutes somehow we could
ne\'er keep track of time down there; then we
arrived.

"It was one great glow a clear, glorious blue
exhilarating and yet marvelously resttul the most
wontlerful light I have ever seen. By its reflection
we could make out the outlines of an immense cave.
It was of tremendous size, with a root to which one
slender beam ot blue light extended, striking out
golden sparks. The beam was perhaps a half mile
long. The floor was studded with ten-foot squares,
of a dark red color. The creature tlrovc us betore
him directly to one of the sc|uarcs, which, as wc
apptfjached it, opened bctorc us. L'nder it was a
platform the size of the square and, on an imperi-
ous motion from the thing, we stood on it. He
steppeti on it with us, and it ilescendeii under us
like an elevator, until it came to a stop in a large,
blue-walled room.

"Motioning us to follow him, he led us into the
next room. It was fiure white, startlingly so after
the clear blue of the rest of the city.



"A small passageway communicated with this
room, and through it he led the way, with us at the
rear. The corridor opened into what appeared to
be a great audience chamber, with innumerable
small passageways leading into it as did ours. It
was tilling rapidly with creatures like ours, and
more were piling into it every moment. Every-
thing was done in perfect order.

"Our captor lifted us both to a raised platform
at one end ot the hall. There was one other crea-
ture on the plattorm, who seemed to act as a sort
of chairman of the meeting, and as soon as we
arrived in sight ot the crowd, he began to send
thought waves at tension, just as a speaker raises
his voice to address an assembly. His discourse, in
effect, was this: 'Brother scientists, number 1 198.-
658 has returned, as you can see. He has, by
means of his perfected protection against the green
death rays, penetrated by the River Deathladen
to the outer world, of whose existence we have been
aware, but of which we have known nothing. The
formula for this protection is as yet the secret of
Brother 1198, but as soon as he has made it
absolutely safe for all, he will make it known.
Brother 1 198 will now address the assembly.'

"1 198 gave a brief account ot his journey to the
outer world, his discovery ot these strange beings
(he referred to us), and the curious ray-hurlers that
they carried, that struck with such terrific in-
tensity that he was staggered by their impact;
ot how the light up above seemed a mixture of all
colors, ani.1 contained a large proportion of infra-
reil and ultra-violet ra)'s; ot how there seemed to
Ik- IK) limit to the roof, that it was so far distant
that the e>'e was unable to perceive it; of how this
outer workl was overrun by immense plants, the
stems ot which sometimes approached the height
of a man in width; ot how it was lighted by a great
flaming ball hung high up in the roof; and of how,
w hen he hatl perfected his ray coating, he intended
to leail a large ]iarty to explore turther the country
anil bring back more specimens of its inhabitants
tor experimentation. \\'hen he was through, a
committee inspected us carefully, and reported
that I was a splendiil jihysical specimen, but far
below my companion in intelligence; thev were
right, hut how tlie\' found it out I can't untier-
stand, because we were evidently the first human
beings they had seen. The>- kept us a while Itjnger;
then I 198 took us back to his quarters.



THE CARIBBEAN.



27



"This time he took us into a new room, where
there was a queer chair-like contrivance, with three
polished switches on its arm. In front of it was a
thing that reminded me oi a searchlight, only it
was bigger than the ordinary light, and shining all
over. This room also was white, and bare ot all
furnishing except this chair, i 198 seated himself,
and pulled over one of the shining levers. In-
stantly he was flooded by a brilliant yellow glow
from the light in front of him. He basked in it for
a while, then shut it off, and switched on a deep
red. When he tired of this, he pressed the third
stop and blue light wavered around him. He played
with it awhile, varying the shades and producing
exquisite colors and tones; then switched on a
deep marine blue, and sank into a sort of torpor.
As he slipped down in his seat, his arm brushed the
yellow light control, and a pale, sickly green
resulted. He sat bolt upright with tear and pain,
and switched on the full force of the red. He lay
in it tor a while, recovering from his narrow escape;
then switched on the light blue and apparently
dozed.

"Charley grasped my arm. 'Dave, old boy,
we're saved!' he whispered tensely. 'I've got it
worked out now!'

"I knew Charley, so I wasn't surprised, because
he had brains enough to think out anything.
And his brains were what killed him, as you'll see.

"I have it all fixed except how we'll get rid of that
thing. I had begun to think he was invulnerable,
and there's not a possibility of getting away with
/tim watching. But as soon as we get a good
opportunity he's not deep enough asleep now to
take a chance we'll switch the yellow and blue
lights on him, and he'll croak! There's something
about green light that gets through their glass suits
and kills the nerves within, and he'll croak sure as
God made little green apples!

" 'Yes, and then we'll get tortured to death!
We'll never be able to get out of this place. Besides
how are you certain that green light will kill him ?'

" 'I know! That thing that examined us in the
auditorium was thinking about the physiology of
his own bunch when he was going over me, and I
got it all! There is a central nervous system all
cased up in flexible glass that's bullet-proof, jimmy-
proof, and proof against everything else except
light! And no other light affects them except green,
and that kills them! It's the straight dope! And
about getting out, I'm wise to how they run their



boats! You grab ahold of the sides near the stern
and think hard 'Move forward!' and she moves
sweet! See! I watched old 11 -something coming
down, and it'll work the same for anybody! .And
as for being tortured when we're caught, why, they
intend to cut us up and torture us anyway to see
how we react! I'm tellin' you, our best bet is to
cop old Rounds' and beat it!

"I grasped his hand. 'I'm with you, Charley,
old kid!' I exclaimed. 'Tell me some more about it!'

"Just then we were aware of a strange humming
that suddenly filleti the room. 1198 roused him-
self from his chair and appeared to listen. He
started over toward us, and the humming stopped
as suddenly as it had begun. Picking up Charley
and carrying him under his arm like a sack, he
started out into the passageway. I tried to follow
them, hut the creature hurled me back into a
corner, and I lay there for how long I can not
tell until he came back. He looked over toward
me, and I read his thoughts.

" 'Very interesting,' he was thinking. 'The
creature evidently had a reasoning intelligence.
Too bad he dieil so quickh'. However, we dissect
this one next, and he promises to have more
vitality than the first.'

"So Charle>- was right! Cut up like a guinea pig
in a research laboratory! And I was next! I
shivered all over with fright.

"i 198 sat down in the light chair, and enveloped
himself with a purplish glow. He seemed to be
asleep.

I could hear Charlc\''s last words ringing in my
ears. Now or never! I stealthily crept over to the
chair. I came closer, closer. I could see the levers
on the chair arm. The red and blue controls were
part way over, and the yellow control was closed.
I reached over toward them; then jerked back in
an ecstasy of tear. 1 198 had moved!

"But he sank back again. It was evidently only
an uneasiness in his sleep or rest. Gathering all
my courage, I again approached the chair, and with
one motion shoved back the red lever and switched
on the full force of the blue and yellow. A glaring
green leaped out of the cylinder, and 1 198 jumped
up from his seat, and then fell back, sprawling
awkwardly, still in that unearthly green light.
Charley was right!

"I spent an agonized fifteen minutes trying to
find the way out of that place, and finally came to
the room with the elevator in it. I stepped on it.



28



THE CARIBBEAN.



and it immediately shot up to the big cave floor.
It was just as I had seen it last, utterly deserted,
with the solitary blue beam extending to the tar-
away roof. I went down to the whart, wasting
more precious time hunting tor it, and took one ot
the many boats. As I put out into midstream, the
blue beam swept over me. I looked back; the
armored men were pouring trom every square.
The blue beam was sweeping everywhere. Sud-
denly it focused on my craft. Then I plunged
into the tunnel, and escaped the searchlight.

"I rushed along through that tunnel at top
speed, because I knew I was being followed. Then
suddenly it opened into a chamber with six other




Coconut palms along the Caribbean.

tunnels running from it. I groaned, but there was
no time to lose, I chose one near the center and
plunged into it. I followed it for a while, and
then it ended at a black wall, with water bubbling
up from below.

"Nothing to do but turn arounil ami come back.
Almost at the entrance to the chamber I stopped
the boat suddenly, and lay back in the three-
quarter darkness of the tunnel. The armored
men were streaming back out of the extreme right-
hand opening, their boats following each other at
regular intervals. There was one thought com-
monly expressed: 'If we could only have caught
him before he got past the green light!' It evi-
dently never occurred to them that I hat! taken
the wrongopening. I waited until the last one had
long since disappeared; then slipped t)ut, anil into



the right entrance. I greeted the green light with
joy, got through it with many bumps, as it was so
blinding that I could not see, and finally came out
into the outer world.

"I grounded the boat and fell on the ground,
laughing and crying hysterically. It looked
amazingly good; it was wonderful to see the old
world again with its hot sun overhead, and its
birds and trees and plants. Even the lizards looked
beautiful. Then I saw the skeletons of Big John
and Harry. They were clean and whitened. And
I thought I had been in the underworld only about
twenty-four hours! How long had I been in there,
anyway? I buried their bones; then took the boat
and tollowed the river upstream. It came from a
lake of springs, and I followed another river that
emptied out of it until I got to the sea. I followed
the coast in an easterly direction for three days,
and on the morning of the fourth day I sighted
San Lorenzo. I was weak from hunger; so I put into
the mouth of the Chagres to get something to
eat. Then these gentlemen from the hospital
found me. That's all, Doc. You believe me, don't
you? I'm going to get well, Doc, and show the
world this place. I will get well. I will!"

"Sure you will," said the doctor soothingly.
"Just lie back and get some sleep. That'll help
you."

"Sleep? I need it, God knows. Well, good-
night, Doc."

"Good-night." The doctor turned to theinterne:
"Wasn't there an exploring party from the
National Geographic Society on the boat yester-
day?" he asked.

"Yes, sir," the interne answered. "They're
at the Washington now."

"Well,lethim sleep. I'll be back in the morning.
I'm going over to see those explorers."

"Then you il(jn't believe he's crazy?" asked the
interne in surprise.

"I'll stake any reputation that I may have as
an alienist that the man's absolutely sane," said
the iloctor emphatically.

"Well, \{ yoH say so, sir," replied the interne,
"he must be."

"'I'here'U be some heaiilines in the papers pretty
scjon, anyway," the doctor stated. "Wonder what
they'll say?"

"I wonder!" repeated the interne thoughtfully.



THE CARIBBEAN.



29



^P=to=tl)e=illinute Bramasi.



SHADES OF THE GREAT.

George Oakes, '24.

Scene. Ghosts of Napoleon, Alexander the
Great, Charlemagne, Hannibal, Richard the Lion
Hearted, John Paul Jones, and George Washing-
ton gather in the War Club to discuss the marvel-
ous inventions and improvements of the twentieth
century. They regret not having them in their
time an i olfer many it's and why's as to what
they could have done.

Alexander (Stroking his beardless chin). To
think. I died so young! Why if I had had a modern
doctor, I should have lived to conquer the remain-
ing world and other planets.

Hannibal (Busy shining his helmet). Yes, and to
think I had Rome almost under my power. If
only I could have telegraphed to Carthage to send
more men and supplies, instead of waiting years!

Charlemagne (His strong head weighted with
the iron crown). If I had had motor busses to
carry my soldiers from France to Spain, Roland
and my great army would have never been des-
troyed by the Saracens.

Napoleon (Walking up and down with his right
hand tucked in his military coat). Good gracious!
Charles! If I had had steam trains to carry my
men and transport supplies, I should never have
lost my grand army in Russia.

Kichard (Perspiring in his huge armored suit).
To think I wasted my time in the Holy Land
while England was being wrecked by brother
John. Oh! If I had had a good airplane that
would have taken me to England in a day instead
of my having to travel for months on my war horse!

John Paul Jones (Deciding to say something
about the sea). Yes I'll admit I was right when I
said, "We have not yet begun to fight."' Look at the
Navy to-day with submarines and huge warships.

Geo?-ge IVashington (Straightening the bow on
his white wig). To think I gave my farewell ad-
dress without having a radio audience.

Napoleon (Still walking up and down). Just
think if I had the method of map making that
they had during the World War, I should never
have lost the Battle of Waterloo and been exiled
to St. Helena.

Mars (Entering with his armor clattering). Hel-
lo, friends, I have a grand surprise for you. I'll
bet you can't guess! No, I have not started an-
other war, although you can expect one soon.
Everyone give up? Well, David is going to give



a recital with his harp at the opera house to-night.
Nero, being a friend of mine, gave me compli-
mentary tickets for the crowd.

(Exeunt Mars and ghosts laughingand joking.)

Curtain.

WHO KNOWS NOAH'S TROUBLES?

Josc .irosemena, '24.

Characters. Mr. Noah.
Mrs. Noah.
A Salesman.

Place. Entrance to the Ark.

Time. Afternoon.

Noah. Two elephants check; two sardines
check; two whales check; two mosquitoes
check

Salesman. Afternoon, Mr. Noah. I see that
you're getting your old tub ready. I have come
to see it I can interest you in some insect powder
guaranteed to kill all the bugs around the place.
You'll need it inside the .Ark.

Noah. Two fleas check; two iguanas

Salesman. Now, this powder will work wonders.
All you have to do is pick up the bug with your
fingers, tickle him in the ribs, and, when he laughs,
throw a pinch ot powder down his throat. Five
seconds later he will be dead.

Noah (Impatiently). Can't you see that I'm
very busy ? I have yet to check one thousand nine
hundred and thirty-seven pairs of animals. (Enter
Mrs. Noah.)

Mrs. Noah. Noah, come inside. Quick! The
cats are chasing the rats, the fox is trying to kill
a chicken, and everything is in an uproar.

Noah. Can't you leave a fellow alone for a
while? Let the cats eat the rats, and the fox kill
the chickens. I'll get another set of them. (Exit
Mrs. Noah.)

Salesman. May I interest you in some wire
cages? You can put the rats in them, and don't
have to worry about them any more.

Noah. Get away! Let's see. Where was I?
Here it is. Two horses check; two monkeys
check; two camels

Salesman. Oh, do you smoke Camels? I'm the
agent for them. But I think that you won't have
enough with two. May I place your order for a
dozen cartons? A dollar a carton, but in orders
of twelve or more they may be reduced to ninety-
eight cents each.



30



THE CARIBBEAN.



Noah (Picking up a dinosaur egg). Beat it, or
I'll crack your bean.

(Exit Salesman.)

Noah. At last I got rid of this fool. Now I can
continue with my work.

(Enter Mrs. Noah.)

Mrs. Noah. Noah, somebotly has called and
said that he won't be able to deliver the sea lions
until day after to-morrow.

Noah. Impossible! The great flood will come
off to-morrow. I can't wait any longer. I'll go
and send him a radio message. (Exeunt.)



AS IT NE\'ER WAS.

Chester L. Pike, '24.
Characters :

Queen of Sheba. The Gracchi.

Cleopatra. Smith Brothers.

Lady Astor. Saint Peter.

Mrs. Carrie C. Catt. Shylock.

Nero. Doctor Cook.

Gabriel.
Place. Indianapolis Speedway.
Time. July afternoon in 1924.

(The curtain rises disclosing the speedway at
Indianapolis. The grandstand and bleachers are
crowded. Everywhere are seen bright colors and
the reflection ot the sun on the bright helmets and
shields of ancient gladiators and on the armor of
knights. Straw hats bob here and there among
the flowing robes of the Greeks and Romans.
.Along the side of the speedway are lined automo-
biles, surreys, victorias, buckboards, and chariots.
Robin Hood and his men have tied their horses
beside those of Bill Hart and his broncho busters.)

The Gracchi (Going about the grandstand). Ice
cold Coca Cola.

Doctor Cook (Following the (Jracchi wherever
they go). Eskimo Pies. I'Vesh trom the pole.

A'^fro (Strumming on his violin). Won't they ever
begin? There was never such dela\ during my reign.

(The entrants for the feature race of the day are
lining up. Number one, near the post, is Ben Hur
in a red, white, and blue chariot on whose wheels
are Goodrich ballfjon tires and which is drawn by
Man-o'-War, M(jrvich, and Zev. Number two is
Paul Revere astride his famous liorse. Number
three is Ralph de Palma in his Kord roadster.
Number four is Charlie PatUiock in a new, laven-
der Annette Kclierman bathing suit. It is to be
a two-mile race with no rules whatsoever.)

Gabriel (On the starting line). Everybody ready?
(Gabriel blows his horn and they are ofl^.)



(Rudolph Valentino enters, takes a seat near
Queen of Sheba and Cleopatra. Lady Astor
nudges Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt.)

Lady .istor. Watch those ancient flappers vamp

Mr. Valentino.

Mrs. Catt (Exceedingly shocked. Shows it).
Aren't they terrible? The very idea of their com-
ing here like that! Why, they have hardly any
clothes on!

Cleopatra (Whispering in Queen of Sheba's ear).
Isn't he perfectly grand. Just look at his hair.
Smoother and more glossy than Tony ever had his!

^uecn of Sheba (Rolling eyes and straightening
hair). He sure is some sheik. Solomon had noth-
ing on him.

Nero (To Caesar, pointing to Valentino). Ye
Gods! Such a poor excuse for a man! A regular
woman!

(By this time the race is growing exciting.)

^iieen of Sheba (Jumps up. Waves fan). Look
at Ben Hur! Gee. He almost lost a tire when he
passed De Palma that time.

Cleopatra (Places hand on Rudolph's arm, but
seeing Queen ot Sheba doing same, quickly with-
draws it), (jt) on woman. What's the matter with
your eyes? He tlidn't pass De Palma; De Palma
passed him.

Rudolph (Tapping Queen of Sheba's arm). Par-
don me, madam, but do you see Paddock anywhere ?

^iteen of Sheba (Pretending scarcely to notice
Valentino). Of course not. What chance has he
against Ben Hur?

(By this time the crowd has shouted until they
are hoarse. Enter Smith Brothers with cough
drops). Here you are! Just what you need for
your sore throats! (They proceed to distribute
cough drops.)

(The race is almost over, De Palma leading,
with Revere a close second and Ben Hur tar be-
hind. De Palma at a hundred yarils trom finish,
runs car through fence. Paddock, who has been
riding on the rear of Palma's car, jumps oft' and
wins the race by runniiig the remaining one hun-
dretl yards in 9 ,?|5 seconds.)

(The crowd then leaves for the Colosseum where
Tar/.an of the Apes anil Robin Hood are putting
on a trapeze performance.)

Shylock (Rubbing his hands antl ailvancing to
Saint Peter, who is holding his usual ]iosition at
the gate). Vot you take in to-tlay?

Saint Peter (Leaning over and whispering con-
fidentially into Shylock's ear). Almost enough to
bribe a politician to sell me some Naval oil stocks.
j^uick curtain.



THE CARIBBEAN.




32



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE TRIP IN GENERAL.

Chester Pike, '34.

The morning of Saturday, March 22, dawned
bright and sunny. Fickle old Jupiter Pluvius was
absent. Evidently he did not care to accompany
the economics class of Cristobal High School on its
jaunt to the various institutions on the Pacific side.

Upon boarding the train we found the rest of
our-party sitting in small groups. We took vacant
seats as near them as possible, and made ourselves
comfortable for the hour's ride to Gamboa.

The view which flew past the windows was re-
freshing. The dark, dense jungles, the thatched
native huts, and the artificial beauty of the Canal
were all basking in the rays of the early morning
sun. Everything seemed to be at ease and at
peace with the world. Before we were aware of it,
the train stopped in front of a low, flat building
with a large yard surrounded by a high wire fence
over whose gate was the sign,

"C.^NAL ZONE PENITENTIARY."

Contrar\- to all expectations, Gamboa Peniten-
tiary is not a large place. .At the present time it
houses about eighty-seven prisoners.

The building is a long, low, wooden structure,
well ventilated and lighted, with a large enclosed
space surrounding it. Inside, the floors are of ce-
ment, and to clean them all that needs to be done
is to attach a hose to a faucet and let the water
run through.

There are sixteen cells, two of which accommo-
date nine prisoners each, all the others, six. In
each cell are shelves for the prisoners' personal
belongings. There are also two punishment cells,
ventilated from above. On the walls of these are
injn rings to which the prisoner is manacled, forc-
ing him to stand up. However, he sufters no
other discomfort, for he can not be kept in that
position more than a certain number of hours.

The dining room, which is impeccably clean, is
also used for a movie hall. Movies are shown once
a week. The kitchen is like the kitchen in any
other lar^e institution, but a note of cheeriness



was struck by a large gray cat, which was lazily
sunning itself.

It took us a little over five minutes to inspect
the prison but we found the visit both instructive
and enjoyable, thanks to Captain Walston.

Floroice Albert, '.?/.

Outside we found waiting the two fine big
Studebaker automobiles, Mr. Hopkins had very
kindly placed at our disposal tor the day. The
party divided, half to each car, and we started
on the next lap of our trip. The curving road was
smooth and inviting, the day exhilarating, and
the scenery inspiring, and the cars glided along
so gently that we feared this part of our excursion
would too soon be over. .A few miles from the
penitentiary we passed two gangs of its prisoners
working on the road. There were all types of
criminals here, some even wearing a ball and chain.
.At the end of about a half hour's ride we drove
into the yard of the

CANAL ZONE HOME FOR THE INSANE.

I had always thought of insane people as being
of an entirely different world from the world as
I knew it. What impressed me most in looking
over the patients in Corozal, was their human
quality and their close resemblance to other hu-
man beings. Then I wondered if, after all, maybe
there weren't just as many "crazy" people outside
the asylum as in it; if maybe it wasn't the location
that made the difference.

The inmates who are violently insane, or likely
at any moment to go off in a tantrum of rage, or
the like, are kept sequestered in cell-like rooms.
They are treated sympathetically, as far as lies
in the power of the nurses, in order to have them
as quiet and as peaceful as possible.

On entering the women's barracks, I was as-
tonished at the docility and apparent meekness
of the inmates. Evidently, there were more
morons and idiots maintained than radically in-
sane folks. And our guide tokl us that though
they were people admittedly below normal intel-
ligence, nevertheless, they were no queerer than
many others, until something wouUl set them off.



THE CARIBBEAN.



33



This "something" differed in different individuals.
The sight of a very small child would start one old,
chin-whiskered woman off on a wild search for her
baby. Usually the mention or remembrance of
even a very small thing would turn a woman vio-
lently crazy for a moment or two; then she would
be herself until another occurrence.

Not every inmate of the asylum is crazy.
Among others present, traveling about in wheeled
chairs, we noticed two colored men whose both
legs were severed. Upon inquiry, we learned that
they had both, at one time, been brakemen on
Panama Railroad freight trains; in a moment of
carelessness in their line of duty, their legs had
been amputated by the train, and the Govern-
ment, having no other place to keep its pensioners,
placed them here. They did not seem to mind the
queerness of their companions, but cheerfully en-
gaged in childish repartee with any or all of them.

Of course, among others, there was the preacher,
which every asylum possesses. This one, al-
though we did not see him, held our attention be-
cause of his extraordinarily vociferous eloquence.

There was a Chinaman who had quite a garden,
of all kinds of weeds, under the highest of the
barracks.

An old turbaned native of India was, in his
mind, a Buddha worshipper. He sat all day, with
arms folded, before a post that supported a wind-
mill made by a carpenter of the kingdom.

A little skinny Panamanian, with a black derby
balanced precariously on his small head, walked,
or rather tiptoed, around the grounds with a slim
finger across his lips, "Sh, Sh!" Our guide said
she didn't know what was his reason for being
there but he surely was as amusing a specimen as
any of them.

On the whole, in looking them over, we came to
the conclusion that they weren't what we had ex-
pected to find.

Leaving the grounds, we confided to each other
that we were beginning to doubt everyone. If
those folks were "insane," what could some of
the queer people outside be called?

THE OCCUPATION WARD, COROZAL.

Unfortunately we arrived at the occupation
rooms too late to see the morning workers and too
early to see those of the afternoon. Nevertheless,
it was a most surprising and interesting place
such a multitude of things are made there!



The building that is used for this ward is a
cottage surrounded by green grass and shade
trees. Although the cottage appears very small
from the outside, we found that it contains three
large rooms, and a very small one where finished
articles are kept.

The room that we entered first was the largest.
My first impression of it was one of emptiness
but this did not last. On the walls were hung
dyed henequen of vivid colors purple, red,
green bright baskets, gay bags and I can't
seem to remember the many other things, but
there were scores of them. In each of two corners
there was an old-fashioned loom where equally
old-fashioned rag rugs were made. In one there
was a half-finished rug. A nurse told us that they
were able to utilize almost all the old clothes and
linen in this manner.

The next room would delight the heart of any
child. In it were toys of every kind, size, and
description, and in every stage of the making.
There were tiny chairs, tables, pianos, doll houses
some filled with miniature furniture auto-
mobiles of many colors, boats, house-boats and
almost every sort of toy. The place seemed fairly
alive with toys two side walls were hung with
them as well as the ceiling. There were about five
long tables and benches in this room where many
of the inmates worked making these articles.
The floor here was unbelievably clean for a work
room only a few shavings and blocks of wood
b^ing strewn about.

The third room was the one in which the brooms
are made and very good brooms they are. In
tact, they are sold wholesale to the commissaries,
and supply the housewives of the Isthmus. They
are made by some colored men who lost both legs
during the construction days, and who are given
employment here by the Government. All there
was to see here was straw, brooms, and more
straw.

After I had seen the broom room, I went to the
small room where the finished articles are put
away. It is almost impossible to describe it. It
was very small, and I seemed hemmed in by the
prettiest of baskets done in contrasting colors,
more bags in brilliant colors and fantastic designs,
bright matting and other articles made of hemp,
not to mention the stacks of gayly painted toys,
and small pieces of furniture.



34



THE CARIBBEAN.



Then, we assembled in the first room we had
visited; here we heaped question atter question
on the two nurses who had so kindly explained
things for us as we went along. They had still
another surprise for us, and when they unrolled
two beautiful rugs made of soft silk one in three
shades of brown, and the other in old rose and two
shades of luxurious blue our ejaculations began
anew that people with sick minds could make
such useful, and at the same time attractive
really exquisite articles. Our respect tor the
insane was growing. Rtiih Hopkins, '2j.

Again we boarded our trusty Studebakers and
set out, this time to satisfy another part of our
body than our eyes and mind, for our next stop
was at the Ancon Restaurant. When we had ap-
peased our hunger, we held a council to find out
how many were going to Palo Seco. Fiv-e of the
girls decided that, for various reasons, they would
rather not go to the island, so they stayed in
Panama. The rest of our party then went to the
piers to get our boat for

THE TRIP TO PALO SECO LEPER COLONY.
Caldwell B. Foos, '2J.

We got out of the car and walked over to the
end of the pier and, looking down the runway,
saw the police launch that was to take us to Palo
Seco. It was a trim craft with lines that hinted
at its speed. Its engine was already running, and
we started as soon as we had piled aboard. We
went out of the pier enclosure, and started across
the bay to Palo Seco. It was about a half-hour's
trip and the ride was certainly idyllic the engine
throbbing regularly, the waves rushing past the
bow with a soft swishing sound, and everything
calm, peaceful and sunbathed, with soft breezes
blowing gently all the while. Now and then a
long string of heron would fly overhead, perhaps
forty in a group, proceeding in perfect formation.
Near-by the Fortified Islands could be seen, and,
in the distance, Taboga. The islands were the
direct antithesis of what a tropical island is usually
thought to be. The tropic island of romance and
ballads, and in fact, usually seen, is a low, sandy
islet with a foundation of coral and a crown of
palm trees. These were of solid rock, and had a
heavy vegetation, not unlike that found in the
States.



But soon we came in sight of Palo Seco itself.
It is an island apart from any other. As there is
no landing place, the boat stopped about a hun-
dred yards from the beach, and a small rowboat
came out to meet us. The womenfolk of the
party went over in the first boatload, and left
Guy, Chester and me until the next trip. We sat
in the launch and yarned away, as has been the
fashion ot males from time without measure, and
watched the boat slowly approach the beach. It
finally grounded about fi\e teet from the shore,
and a big black carried the girls ashore, one at a
time. "Lucky coon," remarked we in unison.

Then the boat came back for us, and we climbed
in and settled ciown, wondering rather uneasily if
a leper had sat there recently. As we were rowed
toward the beach, we could see a tew buildings and
a sign "Palo Seco Leper Colony. Entrance
prohibited." I, personally, telt qualms, and be-
gan, far down within me, to have a slight wish
that I had stayed back with the girls who had not
come with us. No, not quite that bad, but I
began to see their viewpoint. Still I was deter-
mined to go through with it, and I knew the rest
felt the same way. The boat grounded and I
made a standing broad jump onto the beach,
followed by Guy and Chester.

We went up the hill, and halfway up met the
girls antl Doctor Tucker, the superintendent of the
colony, just coming out of the dining hall. Miss
Dodds introduced us to Doctor Tucker, and said
that this building was the first place they had
visited, that it looked like an army mess hall
inside, and that it served as an auditorium and
movie hall besides, movies being shown there
once a week.

THE DISEASE.

After we were introduced to Doctor Tucker, he
kindly consented to show us around the colony.
On leaving his office, we walked up a little flower-
bordered path where we met our first patient, a
well-built black, who stopped and talked quite
cheerfully to the doctor. Had I met him on the
street, I should have noticed nothing unusual
in his appearance other than some bumps on his
face and a queer growth on his nose. I began to
think that if all the patients were like this one,
theirs was not such a bad lot after all.

After he passed on. Doctor Tucker explaineil tf) us
that there are three kinds of leprosy; nodular



THE CARIBBEAN.



35



such as had this patient, nervous, and mixed, or a
combination of these two. The outward mani-
festations of the noduhar type are little brown
bumps or nodules, and small scars resembling
those left by smallpox. Doctor Tucker assured us
that those afflicted with this type suffer no pain.

We turned from this little path into a broad,
concrete walk, which seemed to be the main street
of the village. At the end of the street is the hos-
pital where the patients periodically receive their
treatment of chaulmoolgra oil, the salvation of the
lepers, as well as treatment for any minor ailments,
for, as Doctor Tucker reminded us, they are human
and have their stubbed toes, and their tummy
aches, and toothaches, too.

In the hospital we found a patient afflicted with
the mixed type. His face and arms were covered
with little patches of nodules; his hands, which
were distorted, were minus one or two fingers,
while his body was drawn up awkwardly. He
was in bed because of an infected foot, but suffered
no pain from his disease.

As we proceeded. Doctor Tucker explained to us
that in the nervous type the nerves and muscles
become paralyzed and contract, while the nails
become hard and horny, and often entire fingers
and toes fall off. To illustrate he showed us a
man who had been cured of the nervous type, but
who had returned to the colony to be treated for
a slight infection. His left hand was twisted and
several joints were missing from his fingers. He
still bore a few scars, but they had the appearance
of healed wounds where the dead skin had dropped
off, leaving the new skin rosy and clean.

All these patients were very cheerful; in fact
I was strongly impressed with the remarkable
fortitude with which they bear their infirmity.

The whole colony seemed more like a summer
resort to me. When one sees the patients con-
tentedly reading magazines under the picturesque
mango trees and watches the faces of all light up
as Doctor Tucker comes near, one wishes that every
leper might have such comfortable surroundings
and be under as wise and sympathetic care.

Guy Stewai't, '2^.

I disagree with Guy's statement that it seemed
like a summer resort. It may have to them, but
I was in constant fear of touching anything.
I kept my arms folded so did everyone for that
matter. It must have looked queer to an outsider



to see us walking along behind Doctor Tucker,
being very, very careful not to touch anything, not
even the door knobs.

THE CURE.

Long ago in the days of Christ, leprosy was a
loathsome disease, for which there was no cure
save the Divine. Lepers were regarded as unclean
spirits and were called "the accursed of God."
No care was given them; they were driven from
their homes and were stoned if they came too
near the city walls, as they often did, to get food.
They made their new homes in the wilderness and
in the abandoned tombs on the hills. The rites
of the temple and the synagogue were forbidden
them. The law demanded that they cry, "Un-
clean! L'nclean!" if, perchance, anyone came near
them. According to "Ben Hur" the cry was "a
slow, tremulous wail, exceedingly sorrowful like
the voice of a spirit vanishing from Paradise and
looking back the while." They were afraid to die,
but had no hope except in death.

But, now! How different it is! Scientists have
recently experimented with an oil that will check
the disease. The thoughts of the afflicted are
turned from death to the joy of living. Although
it has barely gone beyond the experimental stage
in our country, the Asians (the Burmese, especial-
ly) claim by their legends of pre-Buddha times to
have known the value of this oil and to have used
it for centuries.

The oil is obtained from the seeds of the chaul-
moolgra tree, whence its name is derived. It is
found principally in Burma, India, the country
of its origin. As the demand is far greater than
the supply, Hawaii has begun a chaulmoolgra
plantation, but, as the tree bears no fruit until
it has grown eight years, little or no oil has
been produced. The leaves are about the size of
those of an almond tree; the fruit, from which the
seeds are extracted and distilled into oil, is about
the size of an apple. The oil checks the disease,
but does not remove the scars; those must be car-
ried through life, a constant reminder of that
dreadful affliction that even the joy of living can
not fully wipe out.

Doctor Tucker, who has been in charge of the
leper colony at Palo Seco since 1909, told us that
at one time the oil was very thick and nauseating,
disturbing digestion. "It was," he said, "very



36



THE CARIBBEAN.



hard to get people to take it, and those who were
willing were often unable to do so."

The amount of one dose, which is about one-
half teaspoonful, is now administered by injection.
The Asians probably used this in a primitive way,
both internally and externally. The oil as it
appears to-day has the consistency of sugar and
water, and is of a clear, amber color. It is received
from the laboratories in small five-inch vials tap-
ering to a point at one end.

Doctor Tucker also told us a story concerning
a land where this tree grows near the water. In
July when the fruit ripens, it falls into the water
below. The fish, eating the fruit, are poisoned.
On this account fishing in this land is not allowed
at this time of the year. He also told us that there
had been twenty-nine patients discharged from
Palo Seco.

As the price of the oil is very high, the scientists,
fearing that a scarcity might ensue in the Orient,
bought a quantity of seeds from the Mawlaikians
and sent them to California to be grown. Accord-
ing to reports, the transplanted plants are flour-
ishing.

Although the oil is used to a great extent in
Palo Seco, there are no trees on the island. How-
ever, there are some young plants in the hospital
grounds at both Ancon and Corozal, and these in
time, it is thought, will supply the demand on the

Isthmus. Katherine Fischer, '23.

Doctor Tucker then took us to

THE CHAPEL.

The little chapel hatl stepped back out of the
path as if to let us pass, but we decided to enter,
attracted by the twin signs standing at the sides
of the door, announcing to this little world the
following: on the left in English, "Services Wed-
nesday, Catholic; Monday, Episcopalian," and
on the right in Spanish, "Servicios: Los lunes;
Episcopal; los miercoles, Catolico Romano. Bien
venida."

On stepping in, we visitors saw several rows of
rude wooden pews and a small white altar upon
which rested a large brass crucifix, two stiff
bunches of bright artificial flowers, and a book
rest concerning which an interesting story was re-
lated by Doctor Tucker. Several years ago a travel-
er told the people of this colony of the poverty preva-



lent in a certain leper colony in Japan. Moved by
this story they collected ten dollars and gave it
to the traveler to send to the Orient. Several
months later, while Bishop Morris was in the
States, he received a sum of money from the Jap-
anese, in appreciation of what their brother lepers
had done for them, and knowing of no better use
to which to put the money, he purchased this
book rest and sent it to the chapel at Palo Seco.

On a little shelf beside the altar stood two small
glass candlesticks, their white candles bowed over
by the unscrupulous heat, .^t one end of the altar
rail was a door which may be said to lead from one
religion to another, as it is the front of the confes-
sional for the priest, when opened so that he may
sit behind it, but becomes a panel on the wall when
pushed back against it for the services of other sects.

In one corner stood a battered little organ,
scratched and paint-worn from the many dustings
it has received, while in the opposite corner stood
a neat stack of hymn books dog-eared and be-
thumbed by who knows how many disfigured
hands.

As we turned to leave, we saw through the open
door the calm blue of the Pacific and the purple
islands, while above all floated a mist of carefree
clouds. Passing through the bougainvillea-cov-
ered porch we descended the steps and walked
up the path toward the dispensary.

JraHam Cousins, '2j.

When we left the dispensary. Doctor Tucker took
us to his ofBce. It was a typical doctor's office,
with a bookcase of books on skin and tropical dis-
seases, a map of Panama on the wall, and the
executive touch showing in the desks, safe, and
filing cabinets. He went to the safe and took out
a box of the money, evolved by himself, and used
in the Colony. It was of aluminum or brass, the
size of American coins, with a round or square hole
in the center, and stamped with the name of the
colony. According to Doctor Tucker, it serves a
double purpose: First, the money of the outer
world is not infected with germs of leprosy, and
second, this money can not be used anywhere else
i)ut in the colony. He gave an interesting side
light as to this last. He said that in the old days,
whenever one of the inhabitants had accumulated
some money, he wouki go to a secluded corner of
the beach, hail a native fishing craft and give the
owner a few dollars to run him in to Panama.



THE CARIBBEAN.



37



There he would get gloriously drunk, and when
his money was all gone, give himself up. "Now,"
as Doctor Tucker smilingly remarked, "he could
offer a native a bushel of money and he wouldn't
even slow down." It was certainly a good demon-
stration of money as a means rather than an end.

Doctor Tucker and Doctor and Mrs. Erb,
who were also visiting the Colony, came back
with us, and after two more trips in the row-
boat, we started. We had a last fading view of
the beach at Palo Seco the hill, the wooden
buildings,andfIoatingover it all the American flag.

A general feeling of relief came over us all as
the beach faded from sight a sort of relaxation.
Doctor Tucker told us that many people who
came to Palo Seco on legitimate business would
suddenly become intensely interested in sea
shells, collect a few on the beach, and leave hur-
riedly without going up the hill.

We had a ride back that will linger long in my
memory; then we docked and, amid the eager
questionings of the stay-at-homes or rather, stay-
at-docks we left for Ch'iriqu'i. ~Ca/ihvf// B. Foos, '^5.

We drove past the church with the golden altar
and the historic flat arch, and down the narrow



streets between two- and three-story buildings
overflowing with dusky humanity. Our cars drew
up in front of Chiriqui Prison. While permission
to visit the place was being sought, we walked over
to the Plaza Frances to see the impressive monu-
ment erected to the French Canal diggers. When
summoned, we retraced our steps to the prison
where we were very cordially received and taken
into the courtyard. The prisoners stood about
idly in small groups and looked at us. Some had
small trinkets which they tried to sell us. Our
guide explained everything to us, and, as we left,
invited us to visit the new prison (which the
Panaman Government is erecting), as soon as it
is completed.

From here we drove to Las Sabanas. We went
along the beaches, past the bull ring, and around
the new Santo Tomas Hospital a hospital under
construction on an extremely beautiful spot near
the seashore.

We then returned to town and, after another
brief visit to the restaurant, boarded the train
for home. We were a tired bunch that returned to
the .\tlantic side that night, but all agreed that
the day had been well spent.--C/;cj/- Pike, '24.



THE CORAL TREE SHARK A LEGEND.

Morris Marchosky '2^.



He had guarded for years and years, as had his
fathers and forefathers, that precious, invaluable
coral tree with its majestic outspread branches.
Now he is dead. Mayhap some other of those
ferocious man-eating sharks will take his place
but he is gone.

The shark of Morro Isle was known to all na-
tives, and to any tourist who had stayed even one
day at Taboga, Panama's Palm Beach. Natives
had circulated weird tales about him. They told
of his size a great hulk, longer than any cayuco
they had seen, floating lazily on the waters ; of
his head formed like a sharp bullet; of his gleam-
ing teeth, keener than any razor; and of his fer-
ocity shown in the hurried death of any whom he
might attack.

The shark hated everyone, but there was one
whom he hated most of all. This was a slim
graceful lad who had escaped him one day, even
trying to use the sharp steel bolo, which every



swimmer in those parts always wore tucked in
his belt. The guardian of the coral tree had never
forgotten it.

One day the shark discovered someone with a
slim, graceful, brown body near the tree. It was
his hated adversary. He was sure he had come
to rob him of the coral tree, the dear heirloom
which rightly belonged to him. He must set out to
destroy him for the sacrilege which he had come to
commit. There was a swish of the waters, the
shark turned over, the white of his abdomen show-
ing like a white streak below the surface of water.
But where was the boy? He had disappeared as
if he had not been there. Then the shark felt a
sudden stabbing pain through his back. The bolo
was his Nemesis, for it had struck true and deep
into the heart of the sentinel.

Still the natives avoid the coral tree, believing
that the ghost of the dead shark haunts the place,
guarding in death what he had guarded in life.



THE CARIBBEAN.



^ Jf eU) Centers of Canal Hone ^ctibitp.

THE CONTROL HOUSE OF GATUN LOCKS.



Dorothea Tufis, '26,
See illustration on page 39.

People from every land come to see the Gatiin
Locks, which are the largest in the world. .Ar-
rived there, they immediately go to the control
house in which the control and operation of all
lock machinery is centralized, and from which they
can get not only a better view of the Canal but
also a better idea of the control and operation of
the lock machinery.

The lock machinery consistsof : the signal arrows,
one at each end of approach or center wall tor
signalling to ships; the eight chain fenders,
which fend ships from hitting gates when ap-
proaching; the forty gates, which separate and
divide the chambers into sections; the fifty-eight
rising stem valves, which control the flow of water
down stream from lake to chamber, from chamber
to chamber, and from chamber to sea; the sixty
cylindrical valves, which control the water across
stream, or from the chamber on one side to the
chamber on the other side.

In the center of the control house is a long
table, or control board on which are slabs of gray
marble representing water in the locks. L^pon
this table are the miniature machines, gates,
chains and arrows, which correspond to the actual
machinery in the locks, and the levers which oper-
ate all said machines. The most prominent indi-
cators on the control board are the tall thermom-
eter-like towers which indicate the water eleva-
tion throughout the locks. The chain fenders,
gates, and stem valves all have intlicators which
operate simultaneously with the machines and
show the exact position of each machine at all
times. The cylindrical valves have indicators
which consist of red and green lights and indicate
the opened and closed position of the valves only.
There are various additional indicators showing
the operation of signal arrows, and elevations of
water at the sea end of locks, in the chambers, and
at the lake end. .All exterior lighting on the locks
is controlled from the control house, as are the
range lights for guiding shi]\s through the break-
water on entering Colon harbor; and the range
lights for conducting ships to the locks from
Gatun Lake.

To realize the complicateil nature of Canal
Zone achievement, one has only to visit the con-



trol house anel witness the process of "locking a
ship through."

A COAST DEFENSE GARRISON.

George Oakes, '24.

The .Atlantic side of the Canal is defended by
various service organizations. Forts Randolph,
Sherman, and De Lesseps, composing the coast
artillery garrisons, border the entrance to the
Canal. Forts Davis and Gatun, lying near Gatun
Locks, have garrisons of infantry and field artil-
lery. The remaining posts, France Field and
Coco Solo, lie near Fort Randolph. These posts,
garrisoned with air service and naval troops, can
defend the Canal in the air and on the water.

Situated on the edge of Colon and bordered by
Limon Bay lies the smallest army post on the
Isthmus. Fort De Lesseps, the headquarters of the
Coast Defenses of Cristobal has a garrison of one
special duty company and the Sixteenth Coast
Artillery Band.

Lying next to the bay is a battery of two six-
inch guns that guard the entrance to the break-
water. Adjacent to the battery is the post theater
where both soldiers and townspeople enjoy the
cool breezes as they watch the entertainment ac-
companied by music by the orchestra. Next
come the five sets of officers' quarters surrounded
by tropical palms and flowers, a very pretty sight
when viewed from the bay. Near the officers'
quarters stand large cement barracks. Here at
one end are the offices of the post, headquarters,
commissary department, quartermaster depart-
ment, 'and ordnance. .At the other end are the
company quarters, banti quarters, library, and
mess hall. Behind this building and facing Colon
are the noncommissioned staff officers' c^uarters
three sets with four apartments in each. Across
from the entrance to hcatlquarters is a small wood-
en building that houses the hospital and post ex-
change. The jiost exchange, known as the can-
teen, is located on the lower fluor. It tloes much
business with the sokliers, who have children's
appetites for candy and ice cream. The rest of
the buikling is taken up In' the hospital. Here
any soltlier feeling sick is supposed to report at
sick call. Near the railroatl tracks, practically in
Colon, is a small Iniililing a terror for all good
sokliers. This is the M. P. guartihouse where all
disorderly deeds come to an end.



THE CARIBBEAN.



39




40



THE CARIBBEAN.



THROUGH THE CANAL.

Irene McCourt, '24.

A ship coming from New York, and bound for
San Francisco through the Panama Canal enters
the Canal in Limon Bay, where it takes on board
a pilot and several colored employees. From the
time the pilot gets aboard he is responsible for
the handling of the ship, and the lock operators
must assist him in every way possible. Then,
under its own power, the ship proceeds to Gatun,
where the locks are seen rising like great concrete
steps, leading to Gatun Lake.

.\s the ship nears the Atlantic approach wall, it
waits, if other ships occupy the chambers. If not,
the ship may advance as soon as the large red
arrow at the entrance has been placed in position.
This arrow is moved by the operator in the con-
trol house to designate whether the ship is to go
into the east or the west chamber.

Cables from the towing locomotives are now
let out by one-hundred-eighty-foot-per-minute
coils from the locomotives (commonly called
mules). Colored employees in a small boat fasten
a hand line, which is let down from the bow of the
ship by other colored employees, to the cable rope
which they carry with them from the approach
wall. The cable, drawn aboard the ship by the
hand line, is fastened to iron bits. The gates are
opened and the guard chain is dropped. The
pilot then signals to the locomotive operators and
the ship moves on, towed by four locomotives.
Two locomotives are fastened ahead pulling, and
two behind exerting back pull, in order to keep
the ship steady while it moves through the locks.
More mules are used in some cases according to
the size of the ship being towed. They tow at the
rate of two miles an hour.

These towing locomotives weight forty-five
tons, are thirty feet long, and have two 75-horse-
power, 220-volt motors. There is a cabin on each
end so that the operators can run them towing and
returning without the mules' being completely
turned around.

The ship makes its ascent in three levels, each
lifting it twenty-eight and one-third feet the
total being eighty-five feet, representing the dif-
ference between sea level and the lake level.
After the ship has entered one of the chambers,
the gates are shut behind. Then water is let in
from a system of culverts under the locks until
the ship has been raised another twenty-eight
and one-third feet, and so put on a level with the



next chamber. Thus, when the gates open from
the third chamber, the ship is at the lake level,
eighty-five feet above the sea-level channel. Here
the plan of the locks can be seen best. The Atlan-
tic entrance, the locks, the lake, and the channel,
the famed golf course, and the town of Gatun
(Lock City), all lie before the eye of the tourist.

The cables are then taken in by the rapid coils
and the ship starts on its own power. Thence
it proceeds up the channel, through the great di-
vide (theGaillard Cut), until it reaches the Pedro
Miguel locks, where the descent into the Pacific
begins. The locks at Pedro Miguel consist of a
single flight or step of twin locks, by which a drop
of thirty feet from Culebra Cut to Miraflores Lake
is accomplished. From the Miraflores Lake the
ship passes into the Miraflores locks. Here there
are two steps of twin locks, each step representing
a lowering of twenty-seven and one-half feet, a
total drop of fifty-five feet.

Now the ship is in the sea-level channel, with
Ancon Hill ahead in the distance. She turns a
bend in the channel and steams into Panama Bay,
ready, after dropping the pilot, to glide into the
Pacific.

ABOUT THE CANAL.

See illustration on page 39.

On board S. S. Sul/jioictiva,

Gatun Lake,
Transiting the Panama Canal.
Dear Evelyn:

At last I have the desired information for you.
I was fortunate enough to find the captain in a
talkative mood last night antl, taking advantage
of this unusual state, plied him with questions as
to the material advantage of transiting the Canal
rather than circling the Horn.

If we had used the route around Cape Horn, it
would have been necessary to travel ten thousand
five hundred miles from Cristobal on the Atlantic
side, to reach Balboa on the Pacific side. By using
the Canal we are retiucing that distance to forty-
four miles, and shall make the trip in less than ten
hours.

The cost of operating the ship is approximately
four hundred ami forty dollars per day. If he
had usctl the old route, it would have cost him
sixteen tlKJusanil, sixty dollars to go from Cristobal
to Balboa, but by transiting the Canal, though he
pays seven thousand five hundred dollars in tolls, he
saves eight thousand five hundred antl sixty dollars.



THE CARIBBEAN.



41



As well as I can remember, you especially wanted
to know how the water is operated in the locks
during the lockage of a ship. I shall try to explain
this process to you, but the complexity of it still
staggers my nontechnical mind.

I was playing cards below and didn't realize
we had reached the locks until I looked out of
the porthole and beheld towering concrete walls.
Throwing down my hand, I rushed up on deck
followed by the rest of the players.

I found out that we were in the lower chamber,
which is one thousand feet long, one hundred and
ten feet wide, with a depth of seventy-eight feet.
I asked the captain for permission to go ashore
and look over this wonderful piece of engineering.
A gang plank was pulled aboard and I went ashore.
Fortunately I metone of the employees whoshowed
and explained to me the operation of the locks.

We went below into the tunnel which runs prac-
tically the full length ot the locks. Here is lo-
cated the machinery which operates the guard
chain, gates, valves, etc. Each machine in the
tunnel is numbered and has a corresponding num-
ber in the control house from which it is operated.
The guard chain, which I have mentioned above,
weighs about ninety pounds to the link. I learned
that this chain is lowered and raised by hydraulic
pressure and is used tor the protection ot the
gates. In case a ship hits this chain, it is pro-
tected by a small valve which will release at
three hundred pounds per square inch, and allow
the chain to pay out gradualh'. \Vhen this chain
is lowered, it fits into a recess in the sides and bot-
tom of the locks.

The next machine was one which operates one
of the gates. There are twenty sets or forty
halves of these gates, each being sixty-five feet
long, seventy-eight feet high, eight feet thick, and
each weighing three hundred and fifty tons. The
bottoms of these gates have air-tight compart-
ments which give them a buoyancy. The gates
are opened and closed by a strut-arm which is
connected to the gate and to the bull wheel in the
tunnel, which is geared half-way around and is
driven by an electric motor.

Next was the operation of the water. It is
handled by gravity. It comes from Gatun Lake,
a fresh-water lake which is eighty-five feet above
sea level. There is a nineteen-foot culvert about
seventy-five feet under each wall, and through
these culverts the water flows to feed the locks.
Here the water is controlled by a system of valves
known as rising-stem valves. When a ship enters



the lower chamber trom the sea, the gates and
valves at the lower end of this chamber are closed.
The valves at the lower end of the middle chamber
are opened, allowing the water from the middle
level to pass into the lower chamber. As the
water in the lower chamber rises, the water in the
middle chamber lowers until they are equalized.
The valves are closed, the gates are opened, and
the ship then passes into the middle chamber.
The gates are closed and the valves are opened in
this chamber as in the lower chamber.

After the ship is raised in this chamber, it
passes into the upper chamber, where it is raised
to the level of the lake. It takes approximately
three and a half million cubic feet of water for
each lockage. After the fresh water passes trom
the upper level into the middle level, it becomes
mixed with salt water.

iAs soon as the ship had been raised in the upper
chamber, a gang plank was put aboard for me to
get back onto the ship.

We are now steaming along on Gatun Lake, and
expect to arrive at Balboa sometime this after-
noon. From there we go out to sea, and then shall
continue our journey to San Francisco. As soon
as we arrive there, I shall have another letter
ready to mail to you, telling about the rest ot the
trip. Sincerely yours,

Delilah.



CRISTOBAL COALING STATION.

Mildred Alorgan, '2^.

Cristobal Coaling Plant is located on Mindi
Island, west of Cristobal-Colon, and separated
from the American vicinity by the old French
Canal. Mindi Island runs south of Cristobal to
the inter-section of the old French Canal and the
new American Canal.

The construction work on the coaling plant be-
gan about 1 9 14, and was finished in 1916. The
first step was to sink the large caissons at the
north end of Mindi Island, preparatory to build-
ing a pier fronting on the waters of the bay on
the north, east, and west sides. After the dock-
construction work was finished, the work of con-
tractors was begun in erecting the machinery for
unloading and delivering purposes. The plant in
its entirety cost about three million dollars. The
unloading side of the plant, which is on the east
side, consists of four unloading towers, each indl-
pendent of the other and each having a two-and-
one-half ton capacity clamshell bucket that runs
out over a collier by means of a carriage and steel



42



THE CARIBBEAN,



line, the carriage being operated on a boom with
track. When the collier comes to the plant tor
unloading, these booms are lowered down to the
ship after it is tied up. All the unloading towers
are operated by steam, and are the only partot the
plant that is not operated by electricity. Each
one of the unloading towers has an unloading
capacity of two hundred and fifty tons per hour
when the digging is not interrupted. It takes
from twenty to thirty hours to unload a twelve
thousand-ton collier, depending upon other work
being done at the plant at the same time. The
last part of unloading a collier is considerably
slowed down on account of getting near the bot-
tom, where there is shoveling work necessary to
bring the coal toward the center ot the hatch.
These unloading towers are handled by one oper-
ator and one engineer, with a colored crew of six
or seven.

The delivering side of the plant consists of four
reloading towers (operated by electricity), that
have a capacity of five hundred to one thousand
tons per hour, depending upon the speed with
which a ship can receive coal. These reloaders are
independent of each other, and also constructed
so that they can be moved along the reloading
dock along similar lines to those of the unloading
towers. Each of these is operated by one operator
and a crew of three or four negroes. The reload-
ing towers are located on the west side of the plant.
There is also a reloading machine at the north end
of the plant, commonly referred to as the "wharf
bunker." This machine is stationary, and is pro-
vided with two conveyor booms operating on
swinging circles that have a radius of forty feet
each. This machine is capable of delivering a
little more than one of the reloading towers, and
requires an operator for each of two conveyor-
booms if they are operated simultaneously, with
a colored crew of the same number for each oper-
ator as is needed for reloading towers.

The elevated railroail, commonly called the via-
duct, is located between the unloailing and re-
loading sides of the plant, and serves both of them.

Across the plant and connecting with east and
west sides of it, arc built two large bridges. On
each of these bridges arc two five-ton capacity re-
claiming buckets, which arc used for iligging coal
from the pile and loading it into cars through a
hopper, built within the bridge. These digging
buckets are mtjvablc across the bridge by means
of trucks on tracks. The two hoppers within each



bridge are also mo\'able, there being one hopper
for each reclaiming bucket. These bridges are
built on trucks and run on tracks, in a north and
south direction on the plant. These buckets have
a capacity of five hundred tons per hour each.
A track runs through each bridge and connects
with either side of the elevated railroad by means
of a sliding switch, the latter being so constructed
that it fits over the track on the elevated railroad
and slides along said track when the bridge is set.

In addition to the main plant machinery, the
Cristobal plant has a fleet of three barges, equip-
ped with coal conveyors on elevators, that are
used for delivering coal to ships away from the
plant, or for delivering coal to vessels at the coaling
plant, when it is necessary to coal such vessels from
both sides at the same time. This is done by using
a reloading tower from the dock side and a con-
veyor barge from the opposite side. These barges
are equipped with generator sets, operated by
steam, for making electricity with which to run
the motors in each conveyor. These conveyors
are constructed along the lines of the old-fashioned
cistern pump, with cups or small buckets on a re-
volving chain. The conveyors are from forty to
fifty-five feet high. The coal is fed to them from
the bottom of the barge and carried up to the top
by this chain of buckets, and from there emptied
into large, round, telescoping shoots that are con-
nected to the coaling holes or openings in the ship
being coaled.

The coaling plant was built for supplying with
bunker coal, commercial vessels calling at the
Isthmus or transiting the Canal; for supplying
the Panama Canal, Panama Railroad, Army and
Navy, and individuals on the Isthmus with coal;
for providing the Navy Department with a coal-
ing station for all Navy vessels. The storage pile
of this plant is divided into two areas, one a wet
storage basin for storing coal under water for the
Navy, for an indefinite time as a reserve supply;
and a dry storage area for commercial and other
juirposes. The wet storage area occupies about
one-third (if the storage basin, and the dry about
two-thirtls.

The Cristobal plant is reputed to be the most
efficient coaling station in the world, and is thor-
oughly moiiern in every respect. LInloading or
delivering operations are begun as soon as the
ships have been securely tietl up to the dock; and
the coaling station has a worKl-wide reputation
for dispatching a ship in a short time. One of



THE CARIBBEAN.



43



the best records made was the delivery of one
thousand and two tons of bunker coal in an hour
and ten minutes.

"RALPHO, THOU DOST PREVARICATE."

Butler.

Florence Albert, '24.

"Let's see who can tell the biggest lie," proposed
Ruth, for the want of better inspiration.

"All right," chorused the rest of us. "Let's.
You start."

There were four of us, of whom Ruth, eleven or
twelve, was the oldest. We had been playing tag
and, tired and hot, had sat down to rest. We had
to do something, so suggestions as to what to play
were called for. Telling stories, playing colors,
playing house, were suggested and rejected scorn-
fully. Then came Ruth's idea something en-
tirely new!

"Well" she started, "I was on one of my uncle's
farms last year during vacation. He has an awful
lot of farms, twelve or maybe fifteen!"

We listened wide eyed. This ivas something
different. W'e fairly hung on her words.

"He has lots of grape arbors, too, and let me eat
all the grapes I wanted to. I used to eat them all
the time and he just used to laugh because I ate
so many, and he never said a word! Just told me
to bust myself."

O oh, just imagine having somebody around
who didn't keep telling you not to eat between
meals, because if you did, you wouldn't eat any
supper and would maybe get sick!

"So one day when I was eating some, I ate a
big spider. I saw it and ate it!"

She stopped. We looked at each other rather
dismayed. Then Martha, Ruth's sister, spoke
up and said decidedly, "That's not true, Ruth
McCombs, and you know it. I'm going straight
home and tell mamma you were telling fibs."

"Aw, Martha, you know I said we'd see who could
tell the biggest lie. Don't be such a tattle-tale."

"I'm not a tattletale. I'm going home and
tell mamma you called me a name."

"Wait, Martha," I interposed, hastily, "I'll
tell my lie now, and then Elsie and you. Don't
break up the game."

I began, "You know I have a bear up in the
dark arch. He follows me everywhere I go, but
I don't bring him down here because I'm afraid
he'll chew you all up, and then they'd kill my bear.
And sometime when you get mad at me, I'll sic
him onto you, I will."



"Well, I like that, Florence Albert," all chimed
in at once.

"Well, wait a minute. I haven't finished. But
if you're nice to me, I'll take you up there and
make him do his tricks for you. Anyway, now
that I've got him up there, I'm not afraid to walk
through the dark arches because if anyone's there,
he'll tear him all to pieces. And when I go away,
I'm going to take him with me, so that you kids
can go in the dark arches without me."

This was too much!

"Florence Albert, Fll not speak to you again.
My mamma doesn't allow me to associate with
liars," declared Ruth, virtuously, jumping up and
starting to leave.

"Me, neither," echoed Martha. "And you know
that you haven't got a bear up there because the
boys are up there, and you are afraid because I
wanted you to go up and you wouldn't go."

"Well, I'm going with Martha and Ruth be-
cause I don't like you anyway," declared Elsie,
and all three stalked off the porch in righteous
indignation, leaving me to wonder at the perver-
sity of human beings.



FROM THE INTERIOR.

Dorothy Abendroth, '24.

It was on the Randolph road that I first saw him.

He was a shiny, ebony-colored man of absolute-
ly perfect proportions. On his round head re-
posed a monstrosity in the shape of a hat. Be-
neath the tattered brim, peered forth the blackest
and most innocent-looking eyes ever seen, except
in a cow. What must have been rather full lips,
finely chiseled, were completely hidden by a
shock of kinky hair which reached down over
where his necktie should have been. A ragged,
sleeveless shirt covered his back (literally speak-
ing; for there was no front in the thing). A filthy
pair of trousers, which, I feel sure, must have once
been white, fitted rather snugly and terminated
just below the knees.

With head held high and shoulders well back,
he walked briskly along swinging a pair of sinewy
arms in time to a tune whistled beneath his breath.

I pulled out my camera. "Say, John, how
about a picture?"

My answer came in an unexpected manner.
He picked up a pair of perfectly proportioned feet,
worn to watermelon pinkness in the soles, and
was far down the road before I could start the
car a swarthy .Adonis freeing in a manner not
at all becoming, nor worthy of his predecessor!



44



THE CARIBBEAN.




Situated on a. high bluff overlooking the Atlan-
tic Ocean stands the historic fort, San Lorenzo.
Once the stronghold of Spanish gallants, the
grand old fort now shelters the beasts of the
jungle. Where the haughty Spaniard once trod
now prowl the cat, tapir, and wild hog, making
their homes in the crumbling walls. Where once
the iron cannon rested, now roost the wild parrots
and turkeys, rousing the jungle with their strange
cries. This fort that defied all until captured by
the swarthy pirate Morgan, now lies in a state of
decay with tropical growth slowly but surely
hiding it from the world. Thus the strange battle
of the centuries goes on, with Nature always sure
of the conquest. Georgn Oakes, '24.



It was a typical balmy day of dry season. The
sea lay stretched out like a length of shiny satin
ribbon the color of melted sapphires. Blue,
blue, blue, it was that exotic shade of blue that
makes the heart ache. Motionless white craft
formed raised dots on its smooth, soft surface.
The breakwater made a silver border for the rib-
bon, and at the same time formed a definite divid-
ing line between the blue of the sea and the equally
startling blue of the cloudless sky.

Not a sound, not a motion, nothing but the
perfection of Nature manifested in the unmatch-
able blueness of sea and sky. Dorothy Abendroth, '24.



It is a beautiful tropical March afternoon with
the sun shining brilliantly. The pervading silence
is broken only by the faint noise of the little waves
as they run up on the shore and break on the
smooth, brown stones, which can be seen at irreg-
ular intervals along the beach.

The bay, a clear blue gray, is disturbed onls- by
the ripples made on its surface by the breeze.
Occasionally, a fish jumps, describes a flashing
silver arc as he goes through the air, and is gone.

In the distance the breakwater shows silver,
then changes, and is jewelled with lights and
shadows. Beyond, the horizon is clear of boats,
with not even a smudge of smoke to indicate one.



There the sea seems to merge with the white
sky, broken here and there by patches of blue.

Florence Albert, '24.



It is a hot sultry afternoon. Everything seems
exhausted even the Caribbean, that ocean of
ever-changing moods. How still it seems
motionless, save for a few ripples which, touched
by the idle breeze, wash lazily upon the aged, dull-
brown coral reef. Farther out the breakwater
stretches on aimlessly. The sun seems obscure;
the sky and water, a yellowish drab, seemingly
let the horizon unite them. This scene of monot-
ony is broken only by a lonely sea gull as it wends
its wav over the waters. Irene McCourt, '24.



The white-capped waves roared in between the
reefs which guarded the once quiet and peaceful
lagoon. The sky was as dark and menacing as
the threatening sea below. Clouds scurried across
it, hither and thither, as it seeking refuge from
the coming storm. The palm trees bent before
the lashing of the wind, which, shrieking like a
banshee, swept through their branches.

The sky grew darker, the waves rose higher and
tumbled faster and faster in between the sentinel
reefs; a faint mist rose from the spray and cov-
ered the water as if with a veil; faint rumbles of
thunder were heard at intervals. Suddenly a
hush! The sky grew more overcast and the
storm broke. Rain, falling in seemingly never-
ending torrents, hid the land from view.

Florence Albert, '24.

The sun, a gorgeous fire ball ot the melted,
tinted hues of a rainbow, is setting o'er the tran-
quil waters of Colon Harbor. An almost indis-
tinct gray smudge of smoke just appearing on the
horizon foretells the approach of a steamer. A
tiny sailboat flaunting its glistening white sail
before an impish sea breeze, slowly glides along
beside the silver breakwater. Only the faint chug-
ging of a motor boat as it wends its peaceful way
across Limon Bay disturbs the prevailing beauty

of silence. CUidys Lowantle, '24.



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



The bay is calm and quiet save for the lapping whispered in the gentle breeze, making soft mur-

of little waves against the sea wall. A few small muring noises, which seemed accompaniment to

sailboats are silhouetted against the beautiful the lapping of the waves on the beach. The

sky. Wonderful sunset tints of rose, blue, and water, turned golden by the rays ot the tropical

orange are reflected in the water, making it gleam moon, lured and invited, as enticing in its beauty

with as many varied and changing colors as a as those water nymphs of old, who drew to their

great, glowing opal. The strains of "The Star- destruction the unwary mariners. Florence Albert,' 24.

Spangled Banner" are heard fainth' across the

water as the flag comes down. A speck in the dis-
tant sky draws nearer and an aeroplane comes into Midnight, and everywhere the black blanket

view on its way to the field. The hum of its en- dotted with twinkling stars covers the silent ocean

gine gradually dies down until the plane lands. that touches the Caribbean shore. Scarcely a

Silence once again. The huge ball of fire has sound is heard except when an occasional ripple
dropped behind the horizon and only pale tinted washes against the sand. The water glows in
cloudy streaks are left in the sky. A few evening patches, with phosphorescence made by the gentle
stars peep out and are reflected in the calm bay waves passing over the reef. This casts a light
peaceful and quiet save for the lapping of little which shows the bottom of the reef covered with
waves against the sea wall. Edith Coulbown, '24. a mossy coating, with diamond eyes of some sea
inhabitant sparkling from its shelter. Border-

A glorious golden moon shone, shedding on the ing the shore, the murmurous mystery of the

water a pathway of subdued light. The palm jungle night only emphasizes the stillness of the

fronds, silvered in the moonlight, rustled and sea. George Oakes,' 24.

A CAPTURE.



Andrei!} D. Smith, '2^.

Until recently our acquaintance with the octo-
pus was confined to the one in ^'ictor Hugo's
"Toilers of the Sea," and to those in the Encyclo-
pedia Britannica, but we two now think we can
give Victor Hugo and the Encyclopedia Britannica
a few pointers since we captured, a tew days ago,
a specimen of the shallow-water type even if it
is not so large and ferocious as the deep-sea type
Octopoda.

The method we used was exceedingly simple.
As we proceeded along the coral reet, we searched
for a sandy, stone-and-shell-strewn spot directly
in front of a small opening. Creeping up behind
such an opening we would try to determine
whether or not the octopus was at home. If the hole
was occupied we would see, stretched across the
entrance, one of the tentacles barring intrusion.
We found a situation of this nature. Then we
proceeded to secure our prize with a small, sharp,
steel harpoon. After we harpooned the octopus,
we prodded a'ound in the back of the hole and
fastened a long-handled steel hook into its body.
Then came the work. It was necessary that a
steady strain be kept on the hook all the time. If
we had jerked or pulled too hard the body of the
octopus would have torn. After several minutes



Richard A. Fisher, '2j.

of this intense strain, the strength of the octopus
gave out, and he released his hold on the walls
of the niche. After being taken out of his hole
he squirted a stream of inky fluid, which is said
by the natives to be very blinding. This ink is
used as a smoke screen when the octopus wishes
to escape from an enemy.

After the octopus was placed on the coral reef,
we saw eight waving arms or tentacles at the base
of the sack-like body. Between the tentacles
was a web-like formation, which helps the crea-
ture to swim. The under side of the tentacles
was pink in color, and studded with two rows of
white suckers. The brain is below the stomach
and close to the base of the tentacles. The eyes
were black with white oblong irises. The lids
were of thick, elephant-like hide. The octopus
feeds on crabs and shellfish. He is able to change
color to some extent, but generally is a mold gray.

We caught several that evening, and from the
group we selected two specimens for the Cristobal
High School laboratory. One large one, with ten-
tacles about thirteen inches long, was slightly
torn. The other was a perfect specimen with
tentacles about four inches long. These two speci-
mens we preserved in formaldehyde.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.



K =



^




'Oh there are Voices of the Past,
Links of a broken Chain."
Clarice Steenierg, '26.



-Proctor.



m

One late atternoon I was curled up in a corner
of the sofa in my father's studio, drowsily attempt-
ing to read a romantic tale ot lite in the early nine-
teenth century. My eyes wandered to a large
portrait ot my great-great-grandmother, at eigh-
teen, which hangs in state over the large mahogany
desk. Pretty, sweet, little thing! I could see the
numerous young gallants she surely must have
had, ready to prostrate themselves at her feet.
In some respects, it must have been wonderful to
live at that time.

.\ creak of the door roused me from my mental
ramblings; probably one ot the girls running over
to ask which dress I would wear to the dance that
night. Without turning my head I called, "Come
on in!"

There was no answer, but I heard a seductive
little rustle as someone entered the room. I
looked around, and with a gasp of delight, I
beheld the daintiest little figure imaginable! I
gazed at her and then at the picture above the
desk. Yes, it was she! My great-great-grand-
mother, just as if she had stepped from the frame,
only so much more adorable, for she was alive,
breathing, even smiling at me.

She was arrayed in the daintiest of gowns, in
the style fashionable in her day. It had a tight
little blue satin bodice, with a wide, tlounced
hooped skirt, covered with net and creamy old
lace, with tiny pink rosebuds peeping from among
the ruffles. The neck, cut low enough to show her
lovely shoulders, was softened by a lace fichu fast-
ened at her breast with a cameo brcoch. Tiny
puffed sleeves came just above her elbows, where
they were fastened closely with dainty pink rose-
buds. Black lace mitts extended to her dimpled
elbows. Loose, short black curls peeped from
under the frilly blue poke bonnet, which made a
lovely setting for her pretty little face.

She proceeded with little mincing steps to come
toward me, and seated herself demurely beside me
on the sofa. I was conscious of a faint scent of
musk.

"Good afternoon, my dear," she said, giving me
a bewitching smile. "You have been sick, haven't
you, and had your lovely hair clipped!"




This awoke me with a jolt from my rapturous
contemplation ot her. She was referring to my
latest shingle bob, and I rose to defend it.

"Why indeed not!" I answered indignantly.
"This is the latest shingle bob! It's considered
quite the snake's eyebrow in my crowd. Your
hair is pretty, but it's really fixed awfully old-
tashioned, you know."

"Mine!" she exclaimed in consternation. "Why
I am not old-tashioned! I was considered the
most fashionably dressed belle of the town. I
still pride myself on the languishing glances I
received trom all the young gallants, as I rode
through the streets in my barouche behind my
lovely bays."

"Barouche! Bays!" I ejaculated, "Feature
that! My dear, they're awfully passee! Come on
out and I'll show you a real ride in my snappy
little red Hudson speedster. If that darned old
speed cop, that's always laying for me, isn't in
sight, I'll step on 'er and show you some speed,
perhaps up to seventy, with the cut-out at full
blast! Then, oh boy! Watch our dust!"

"Speedster! Speedcop! Seventy! What do
you mean?" she asked bewildered. "But, child,
I'll go with you as soon as you are dressed."

"Dressed!" I exclaimed. "Well, for crying out
loud! I am dressed."

She looked with wide eyes at my orange flannel
coat-dress, perfectly straight, as the mode re-
quires, fastened on the side with one large orange
buckle; then at my white chiffon stockings, with
large orange clocks, and the wide roomy fiat
Egyptian sandals, with crepe rubber soles stick-
ing out all around. With still greater wonder
she looked at the long dangling earrings that
reached nearly to my shoulder, at my clipped
hair with a stiff curl pasted across each cheek,
and the bangs that covered my forehead.

With a pitying glance at me and a self-satisfied
smile, she looked down at her ilainty dress, and
gently patted the ruffles and pink rosebuds with
her little lace-gloved hand. She crossed her little
feet in the tiny strapped slippers that surely
could not have been more than size one, and then
looked up at mc again.



THE CARIBBEAN.



47



"You don't mean to say you call that a dress,
do you ? Why it's just a straight piece of hideous
goods, and, child, where are the sleeves?"

"Oh," I answered condescendingly, "we don't
wear much sleeve nowadays, and this piece of
hideous goods happens to be the latest creation
from Giddings!"

"Really? Oh, but tell me, don't you ever
dance?"

"Dance? Sure!" I replied.

"You do? But how do you ever dance in that
narrow skirt?"

"Easily! You ought to see my latest cake-eater
and me do the double-shuffle or the camel walk.
That boy is some finale-hopper."

"Why, how interesting, granddaughter, dear.
Is it anything like the minuet?"

"Well, I should hope not!" I said with a superior
toss of my head, as I went over to the phonograph
and looked over the records.

"How would you like to hear 'She Wouldn't Do
What I asked Her to, so I Socked Her in the
Jaw?' I asked, picking up the latest favorite.

"What!" she gasped.

Quickly putting on the record, I performed the
snappy steps of the "camel-walk" once or twice
around the room.

"Oh, stop!" she cried. "How very immodest!
Shut oflF that awful noise box, and stop that
heathenish dance! I'll show you a minuet."

She arose from the sofa, and humming a little
tune to herself, she began to dance. A tiny little
foot in its strapped slipper, peeped out from under
the ruffled gown, pointed, and then drew in again.
Curtseying, smiling, swaying, bowing, she floated
about the room. The faint musk scent pervaded
the air. Her slippers seemed barely to touch the
floor, and her skirts rustled fascinatingly. She
made me think of a gracious fairy, and I closed
my eyes hardly daring to breathe, lest I break
the spell. But when I opened my eyes again, she
had vanished! Nothing remained, but the faint,
haunting scent of musk.



"LUCKS."

Caldiaell B. Foos, '2^.

As I sat and looked lonesomely out over the
parade ground, I thought of all my "Lucks."
They were many and varied.

The "Boojum," a happy little imp, my deity
of caged baskets, sat with his arms folded, his legs



crossed, and his face aflame with a joyous grin,
as he rocked back and forth on an opal basket
ball. He was very happy, because I had been
paying a lot of attention to him lately, and his
opal throne gleamed with a million varicolored
flames. I patted him fondly, and he grinned back
at me.

Then my "Wuff"ul Bold," the companion of my
horseback rides, posted merrily up and down on a
French officer's saddle, flapping his wings and
crowing lustily:

"Colon, Gatun, any place at all;
Fort San Lorenzo beats them all.
You may ride there fast, you may ride there slow;
But whichever way you take, it's a long way to go."

Next in line came my "Sping-Wow," proudly
bearing a shield in the form of a tennis racquet,
with two basket ball shoes sable sub three tennis
balls argent on a field verde, bearing the motto:
Vary your spin, vary your pace.
In every game and set;
Remember, the time to sock the ball.
Is when you charge the net!

Then, last in line, and sadly tarnished and bat-
tered from neglect, stood my "Brainy Boy," the
god of my school work, resting on a square erected
on a side of an equilateral triangle, bearing the
motto, "Intellego." I stood for a while, looking
penitently at him, when a magic sound penetrated
my consciousness. I rushed into the gym. Down
at one end three soldiers were engaging in basket
ball practice. One of them, with a welcoming
smile, hurled the ball far down the hall to me.
I caught it two dribbles and tossed it high in
the air. "Boojum!" I yelled. K-CHK!
It swished through. "Atta boy, Boojum!" I
applauded.



REST AFTER TOIL

From the upper end of Gatun Lake,
The natives, in their cayucos, glide

To the Gatun docks, where shippers take
Their wares, and then confide

To them the latest prices

Of animal furs and native rices.

The natives then to Colon go,

Where they spend the rest of the day

Going up and down amusement row
Visiting the low-type cabaret,

Till their money's gone for cheapest booze
."^nd they leave tor Sliter Park to snooze.

Chester Pike, '24.



48



THE CARIBBEAN.




SAX BLAS AS SEEN BY A SENIOR.

Inza Markliam, '24.
See illustration Page 49.

At daybreak we found ourselves working our
way out into the lower San Bias Bay. We had
arrived just at sunset the night before at San
Bias Point where we had paid our respects to the
Panamanian Governor ot San Bias. He it is
who issues the clearance papers which must be had
by all ships' captains who wish to travel in San
Bias waters. His is an unusual domain. Besides
the mainland territory, San Bias comprises three
hundred islands only fifty of which are, however,
inhabited. They reach from San Bias Point to
the Colombian border approximately one hun-
dred and fifty miles. All morning we traveled
past low coral reefs and small islands covered with
tall, waving palms. On the mainland rose the
mountains of the Continental Divide.

At noon we anchored off Nargana. Here we
bade good-bye to Captain Rowe, master of the
good ship Arabia^ and embarked in a native cayuco
for the village of Diablo. Arriving there we were
met by many Indians who had already been in-
formed of our coming. My father and I went
to visit the chief of police who treated us royally
and said he would lIo all in his power to make our
stay in San Bias a pleasant one. Our next move
was to Xargana, a few rods from Diablo. Upon
arriving there we inquired for Jake, a chief and
a friend of ours. "Jake," his brother told us "was
on his plantation to the wintiward," but he him-
self would take charge of us. He took a cayuco
and went to the Arabia for our baggage; and in
due time we were members of the family living
with his wife and childrL-n, and his three sisters
and their children. I stayed tw(_) weeks in San
Bias, visiting many islands, living with many
families, and learning the customs of this uniijue
people whose land had so long been closed to
white men. They had managed to live to them-
selves until 1916 when the Panama Government
established a school and opened the country.
Through our long friendship with Jake we were
able to stay at Devil's Key, an island inhabiteil



by a tribe of people who have not accepted civili-
zation and are practically the same as they were
generations ago. Through this same influence we
were able to win the confidence of the chief who
gave us an authentic story of his people. And
from close contact we were able to get first hand
information as regards daily life, customs in mar-
riage, sickness, and burial, and government.

The islands, covered with dense coconut
groves, rise only a few feet above the water but
are protected to the windward by a coral reef.

These Indians are small in stature, brown in
color, with straight, black hair, well-developed
shoulders and arms, and large head. x'\ll are good
swimmers in fact they learn to swim when they
are three years old. The Indians are descendants
from the mountain Indians. We suppose that a
band of Indians came down from the mountains
centuries ago to fish, and were perhaps compelled
to stay on one of the islands over night. Realiz-
ing what a lovely spot this would be in which to
live as these islands are free from snakes, mos-
quitoes, and all other insects, they have continued
to come out of the mountains to live on the islands.

Their government is one of the most just and
democratic existing. Suppose for instance one
island becomes overcrowded and part of the
people are compelled to move to another. When
they are settled on this island, a chief is appointed
by old Chief Coleman who lives to the windward.
Before this new chief can govern this island, a
meeting is called by all the people over whom he
is to rule. Every Indian has the right to the floor.
After an open iliscussion, if the majority accepts
this chief, all well and good he serves for life
unless he is removed for cause, which can be done
by calling a meeting ami voting him out. If he
is not accepted, they nominate and elect one to
their own liking. The chief wears no uniform
or insignia of any kind to denote his rank. He
enjoys no privilege that is not enjoyetl by any
other Indian. He receives no salary. But he is
perhajis more respected than any other govern-
ment official on earth. The chief of each islanti
receives his (;rilers from the head chief. He has



THE CARIBBEAN.



49







THE CARIBBEAN.



under him policemen who serve as messengers.
They wear no uniforms, and carry no club, badge,
or revolver. There are no prisons; in case one
of their unwritten laws is violated, the offender is
punished by being tied to a coconut tree and
flogged. The chief also has official musicians and
singers. They, like the police, receive no salary
but are supported by the house from wliich the)'
are appointed.

The home of the San Bias Indian is sand-floored,
and bamboo-walled, and has a palm roof sup-
ported by four hard-wood posts set iiito the
ground. There is a door at each end. There are
no partitions of any kind. The Indians sleep in
hammocks which they weave from the bark of a
tree twisted with cotton to form a thread.

Shoes and stockings are unknown among the
Indians. The clothing ot the men consists of a
pair of baggy trousers, a shirt which has neither
collar nor cuffs and which always hangs on the
outside (perhaps in order to display better the
fullness which is obtained by several rows of shir-
ring in the back and front), sometimes a gay-color-
ed necktie, and always "The Hat" sometimes
made by the women, sometimes a panama, some-
times a derby but always worn and always sev-
eral sizes too small. The women working on plan-
tations or around the house wear a waist and a
short skirt coming to the knees. When they are
dressed up, they wear a longer skirt, known as
the "smoke sail," which reaches the ground.
The waists are one-piece and consist of several
layers of bright-colored cloth cut and sewed so as
to form picture writing with the various colors.
The women have their ears pierced and wear large
brass earrings. When a child is about two weeks
old, its nose is pierced. Through this hole is run
a thread. Each day a larger thread is put in until
the hole is large enough to admit a ring an eighth
of an inch thick. Also from infancy their legs
are bound. There are yards and yards of colored
beads wound around their legs and arms. Every
few days these are tightened so that the flesh often
grows out over them. When wound correctly
these beads form the same patterns as are on the
dress. There are three of these bintlings on both
legs and arms. On the head is worn a bright
handkerchief, almost always red.

One of the most interesting customs of the San
Bias Indians concerns marriage. Neither the
bride nor groom has any "say" in the matter.



When the girl is about thirteen and the boy
eighteen, if the girl is a good cook and a good
worker, and has plenty of coconuts, and the
boy is a good hunter or fisher, the mothers get
together to arrange for the marriage. If the par-
ents wish to ]iut on style they have a feast. The
mother of the bride informs the chief, who gives
orders to his police to notify all the people of the
coming event. The Indians bring food such as
bananas, yams, yucca, and dried fish. From some
(.listant island comes the "Official Taster." The
drink is furnished by the parents, for it is the
most important part of the feast. It is made by
boiling the juice of sugar cane and corn together,
then covering it and allowing it to stand. Each
day tlie taster tastes it. Then comes the day
when he announces it just right. A group of men
now goes to the house of the ho)' and takes him
to the home of the girl. They are placed in a
hammock, their backs to each other. After
a while the boy is taken out to a small inclosure
and bathcLl. This is repeated four times. After
the last time they are considered married. Now
comes the big feast. The drink is passed around
in a gourd, the women, children, and men taking
a tlrink. It takes very little to make the Indian
drunk; so he soon becomes like a wild animal,
sometimes even killing his own wife and children.
The Indians lie around until they are sober; and
the performance is repeated. This lasts for three
days. At the end of the feast they bury their
dead, and the bride's father takes the groom to
the jungle where he compels him to cut so much
hardwood. The boy goes to live at the girl's
home they are never allowed to go and build a
home of their own. In one house in Tigre there
were one hundred and thirty people. After a
girl is married, she bobs her hair and so it re-
mains the rest of her life.

One night we attended a meeting which was
called because of a dispute over coconuts. The
house in which it was held had, as usual, no floor
but the sand. Down each side of the room were
long benches; at one end, a hammock. We were
the first to arrive and took much interest in those
who attentled. The chief came in dressed in a
pair of tiark trousers, white shirt worn on the
outside, anti a panama hat no shoes nor stock-
ings. He sat tiown in the hammock. Then in
came a man wearing short blue pants, and a shirt
tied around his neck. He sat down in the sand



THE CARIBBEAN.



51



by the chief. Next came six men, three of whom
sat down on the chief's right and three on his left.
The women, children, and other Indians occupied
the benches. When all were gathered, an Indian,
wearing short blue trousers, white shirt, red neck-
tie, and brown derby hat, came in carrying a clay
pipe. He was the expert canoe man or runner.
He gave the pipe to the chief, who took a puff and
handed it back to the runner, who handed it in
turn to each of the men around the chief. When
all had puffed it, he put it in his mouth and went
out. The chief now arose, spoke a few words, and
sat down in his hammock. An Indian in the au-
dience rose and spoke then another. At last
the chief got up, spoke a few minutes, and lay
down in his hammock. Now every one got up all
talked at once. This went on for nearly a half an
hour, when the chief rose, said a few words, and
went out. The meeting was over.

While visiting one of the chiefs I took the chance
to ask about their religion. He said, ".All people
in heaven San Bias no white men plenty fish,
deer, coconuts no Indian use more than one
arrow to kill deer. But in hell nothing, Indian
walk around blind, nothing to eat." Then he told
me the story of Nelly, the San Bias Indian, the
cleverest and best of them all. Around Nargana
were great whirlpools over which no man could
pass. Several Indians had been swallowed up
cayuco and all. Then one day Nelly went down
in the whirlpool in his cayuco. For three days
he had been gone, then he had come back. "Oh
yes, the great-great-grandfather of the chief had
seen Nelly."

Then I asked about some carved sticks which
people had told me were their gods. He said they
meant nothing and were used only in time of sick-
ness. When an Indian is sick, they gather herbs
and boil them together under the sick man's
hammock. The odor of these herbs is supposed
to chase out the little devils. Sometimes weird
songs are chanted. On the whole, however, we
found little sickness among the Indians.

A few days later we visited the cemetery. When
an Indian dies, they dig a hole and at each end
drive a peg. Then the Indian is put in his ham-
mock with his bows, arrows, and other belong-
ings. The hammock is hung to the pegs and the
hole filled in with dirt. Over the top is built a
thatched roof to keep off the rain. Every few
days a gourd or coconut of water is put on the



grave for the spirit in the next world. I asked our
guide if the spirit drank much. He said, "'Some-
times yes, sometimes no."

In 1910 a Catholic school was established but
with little success. Four years later Charles
Robinson, an Indian who had been to the States,
asked the Panama Government to found a school
of its own; but it was not until 1916 that schools
were established with success. The older people
do not like the schools nor anything connected
with them, but the younger generation like them.
They have a baseball diamond and never tire of
telling of the time they beat the crew of some ship.
There is a dance hall where the young people go
and enjo\- themselves. Through the influence and
training of teachers from Panama the Indians are
gradually being induced to discard their arm and
leg bands.

.All too soon came the day when an Indian re-
turned in his cayuco and tokl us that the Arabia
had been sighted to the windward. We took a
cayuco to the island where our belongings were,
to pack up our baggage already increased by the
many gifts of bows and arrows, dresses and spears.
That evening we were on our way toward Colon
and home, with a real feeling of friendliness for
those we had iust left.



CATIVA.

Juan B. Papi, '26.



Cativ'a es una pequeiia poblacion, muy cercana
a Colon. El pueblito es como de unos ochenta a
noventa metros cuadrados. Los habitantes su-
man a unos trecientas personas, aunque hay mu-
chas viviendas retiradas en los montes y fuera de la
poblacion. El pueblo esta habitado por diferentes
razas, las cuales trabajan laboriosamente sus pe-
queiios montes.

Traen sus productos a la cercana cuidad, con
grandes trabajos y dificultades, por no tener
caminos que les permitan acarrearlos por medios
mas faciles, mas que el de traerlos al hombro 6
en bestias.

Cativa esta habitado por personac muy diver-
tidas, las cuales estan dispuestas a sacrificar
muchas de sus necesidades, para divertirse durante
los tres dfas de la fiesta del Dios Momo.

Yo presencie los trabajos de esas pobres gentes,
las tareas y dificultades que tenian, para poder



52



THE CARIBBEAN.



guardar en forma de ahorro, algo de dinero para
los muy esperados dias del carnaval.

Esos dias tan deseados se iban acercando, v
mas iban creciendo los deseos y el entusiasmo.
Per fin llego ese sabado, el dia de principiar las
fiestas y los divertimientos. Sin tardanza se re-
unieron un grupo de los mas ilustrados y, forman-
do una especie de comite, decidieron romper las
silenciosas horas de la noche con aiegres sonidos
de tambores y sonoras voces de aiegria. Igual-
mente continuaron el domingo y el lunes, pero el
martes, en el dia de mas divertimiento, el dia de
la despedida de la bien acogida fiesta del carnaval,
en ese dia las fiestas y los bailes principiaron muy
temprano y no se vinieron a terminar hasta el
miercoles de ceniza.

Lo mas bonito y economico era el espacioso v
artistico salon de baile. Para arreglar ese salon se
reunieron un grupo de hombres y cortaron una
cantidad de hojas de palmas, las cuales las tijeron
en forma de trenzas, y las clavaron alrededor de
una barraca o sea el esqueleto de una chosa, en
tal forma de adorno, que hacian recordar los
ranches usados en la epoca de piedra. Lo mas
bello y atractivo de todo era el piso del amplio
salon de baile que tenia una superficie tan a nivel
como la cara ondulada de un mar tempestuoso.
Cuando la orquesta toco su melodioso y harmon-
ioso pic, pac, pic, boom-boom, salieron las parejas
a bailar el bello baile nativo "Tamborito" que
con tan gran compas y elegancia lo bailan. Esa
orquesta era compuesta de cuatro instrumentos,
tres tambores y un rayo.

Los tres tambores son de formas y sonidos muy
diferentes y dos de elios, o sean los mas pequeiios,
son tocados por medio de continuosos golpes con
las manos, mientras el bombo, o sea el mas grande,
es tocado por medio de dos palitos.

Tan pronto como tocaron los tambores, los alii
presentes se entregaron de toda gana a! diverti-
miento, demostraron su aiegria, por los brincos,
saltos y gritos de "Viva el Tamborito" y el que
mas se divertia era uno por el apodo de "Avia-
dor," porque bailaba y brincaba mas que los
demas.

Principiaron las fiestas de despedida como a la
una de la tarde, y en medio de la mas acaiurosa
aiegria, se dejo ver en el vasto firmamento una
espeza y negra nube, que furiosa dejo caer sobre
la gente sus gruesas y seguidas gotas de agua.
Esto parecio no molestar en lo mas minimo a los



valientes cooperadores del divertimiento, v esa
pobre iracunda nube, para no verse humiiiada,
prefirio mejor dejarse lievar por la suave hriza
veraiiera a! lejano oasis.



ESCOVAL.

Dorothy Abendroth, '24.

Escoval is a native village, picturesquely perched
high on the bank of Gatun Lake. .'\s the only
means of approach is by water, a flimsy wooden
pier projects sullenly out from the steep incline
that allows the visitor to wheeze up to the village
proper. If he survives the muddy climb, he is
rewarded by the sight of a village so primitive
as to remind him of the stories of the days when
Morgan was the dread of every small boy.

The main street, merely a rutted, winding path-
way, wide enough for a single wooden-wheeled
cart to wend its rumbling way, is lined on either
side with thatched huts balanced precariously on
high, skinny stilts. Underneath each of these
small, one-room structures, are the stable and the
kitchen, saved from being one room only by a
shaky partition of woven reeds stretched from
side to side.

Here in these twenty-foot squares all the busi-
ness of life is carried on. Sometimes as many as
ten people live in one of these huts and, appar-
ently, suffer no discomforts from congestion, never
having known other homes.

At the farther end of this monotonous thorough-
fare stands, or rather, trembles for the slightest
breeze causes it to sway dangerously on its wabbly
legs the village store. Swinging squeakily on the
rusty nails is a crude red sign to the effect that
"S\OB.AL.S" are for sale therein.

Branching off from the main street, numerous
corduroy lanes, overgrown with the most luxur-
iant green grass imaginable, treacherously lead
one to nowhere. They start out lustily, but
they never get anywhere. And that seems to be
the habit of everything and everyone in the vil-
lage. They start out bravely, but they never
arrive. However, the exception proves the riilc.
One of these winding pathways leads to the public
bakeshop. h large wooden building squats on the
other side of a shallow bog over which a skinny
plank stretches from the end of the path to the
narrow door. Insiile this unsanitary, one-roomed
shack yawn great brick-lineti ovens, into which



THE CARIBBEAN.



S3



huge lumps of dough are jammed by a long, flat
board. At the conclusion of the ten-minute bak-
ing, they are pulled out with a rake-like afi^air
and delivered to the owner.

If the visitor survives the closeness and heat, he
will emerge only slightly wilted and will be re-
warded by the sight of a native lazily pounding
corn in a pilon. This is a hollowed log standing
on end in which the corn is spread. Then a smaller
but solid log, held in both hands, is brought down
on the corn, flattening the kernels. This is the
initial preparation of the corn for the corn bread
baked in the bakeshop.

There is no sign of a school, unless a scene by the
side of a small lake would indicate a school of
some sort. Around two stout negresses, whose
grimy skirts are tied up around lumpy waistlines,
and whose skinny feet are bare of covering, daily
gathers a group of very young girls similarly un-
attired. Here they absorbedly watch the opera-
tions of the two women, who wash clothes by plac-
ing them on flat rocks and beating them with
smooth stones, until, besides being creditably
clean, they are nearly threadbare. Then, spread-



ing these poor, maltreated remnants on the grassy
banks, they leave them to dry in the scorching
sun. These silent watchers have evidently gath-
ered to learn the technicalities of a washer-
woman's business.

If the visitor is fortunate enough to be pres-
ent on the burial day of one of Escoval's citizens,
he will see the lake being put to another use be-
sides that of a washtub. Bearing on sinewy should-
ers a heavy metal coffin, the black-garbed pall-
bearers wend their silent way down to the lake's
edge where they gruntingly lower their burden and
drop it into the muddy lake where it quickly sinks
from sight.

The beauty ot Escoval lies in its vegetation.
Immense trees, mango, guava, palm, and lignum-
vitae, form a dense fringe around the edge of the
settlement. Beautiful tropical ferns wave grace-
fully in the front yards; velvety green grass covers
the slopes of the surrounding hills; languid trop-
ical flowers seem to spring up magically in the
most unusual places, making the whole place,
omitting only the squalor introduced by the hum-
an element, a vivid scene of natural beauty.



ffi=



=S




CHARCOAL.

Ciin'os Piilgar, '26.



m=



-s



See illustration on page 49.



Early one morning, I started for a hike to the
jungles. I soon came to what you might call the
entrance to that particular jungle into which I
was going. It was like the entrance to a tunnel
all fenced on both sides and on top by Mother
Nature. This tunnel wasn't so long perhaps a
hundred yards and I came quickly to the end, for
I made it my business to hurry, as I never had
been there before and was afraid of wildcats or
snakes.

Coming to the end I entered a clearing where
a man was burning something that looked to me
to be a wigwam covered with dirt. On inquiry
I found out the following: The wigwam was a
charcoal bin. The bin is more or less in the shape
of a fat cone. Inflammable material, such as chips
and dry twigs, is placed in a hollow. Around this,



small sticks are arranged, covered up with larger
ones, forming a mound.

This, in turn, is covered with green grass and
dirt. A small tunnel is left where the fire can be
put in, so as to reach the hollow in the middle.
The material in the hollow is now ignited by burn-
ing waste, which is pushed through the tunnel on
a stick or wire.

The outer layer of grass and dirt prevents the
wood from burning, but allows the heat to circu-
late thoroughly through the wood and so remove
all the gases without burning. When the outer
layer is removed, the mound collapses. The char-
coal burner collects the charcoal in a sack, shoul-
ders it, and starts out for town, where his product is
soon put to use, frying fish in the charcoal braziers
ot Bolivar and Broadwav.



5^



THE CARIBBEAN.




AT JUAN FR.'\NCO.

Jose Arosemena, '24.

Juan Franco race track is already crowded when
we reach it. On first view we get the impression
of a large mass of humanity, but soon we are able
to distinguish that the crowd is divided into small
groups. What a cosmopolitan crowd is assembled
here!^ North American tourists, American Army
officers, native Panamanians, South Americans,
Chinese and Hindu merchants, and a thousand
different shades of West Indians.

What strikingly different persons are seen con-
versing together. An American .Army captain is
talking in confidential tones with a small black
bov. In a corner three Chinamen are doing their
best to understand what an old Jamaican is tell-
ing them, while near to them a group of tourists
are trying out their high school Spanish on a
patient but bewildered Spaniard.

k tall, fat man is endeavoring to squeeze his
way through the crowd, while in his wake follows
a murmur of protests which he answers with an
occasional "excuse me" or "pardon me." I
wonder on how many feet he has stepped or will
step before the day is ended.

A bit of a man about five feet three with a beard
and moustache in the style of Napoleon III seems
to be greatly excited. He gesticulates wildly and
talks at the rate of sixty miles an hour.

A bell rings and everything else is forgotten in
the mad scramble for seats in the balcony. The
horses come out of the paddock and march to their
position at the post. A hush prevails in the
stands while the starter gives his directions. The
riders do some clever bits of jockeying in their

desire to get the start on their rivals, and

"They're off."



SHIPWARD BOUND.

Andrevj Smith, '2^.

The shades of night were falling fast on the
native dock, the landing dock for the American
sailors on shore leave.



Evidently every battleship, destroyer, and sub-
chaser was to be supplied with mascots. Here a
red monkey was perched on a fat shoulder. There
a tall gob was dragging a stubborn goat. Yonder
a tiny, wise-looking marmoset was comfortably
seated in the calloused hand of a fireman. Nearby
a red-headed Irish lad was gingerly carrying a
land crab, and grinning at the anticipation of fun
caused by placing it in somebody's bunk. That
tall, blond-headed chap with the merry, twinkling
blue eyes must have been a naturalist by inclina-
tion, for he had a stuffed iguana and two cases of
Panaman butterflies.

Hadn't the Colon merchants grown tired of
selling scarfs, silk, cotton, blue, green, pink, scar-
let, purple, striped, checked, of every shape and
size and a few extra kinds thrown in for good
measure? They served as bandanas, sashes a la
Valentino, neckties, and knee bandages. And
jewelry! Fingers were embellished with King Tut
luck rings, and necks with ivory pendants shaped
like Buddhas, roses, elephants, and hearts.

The fruit venders must have had to replace their
stock, for look at the supply here: Pineapples, soft
and mushy, mangoes, marmol, nisperros, and
coconuts. A tall, black negro, his face covered
with beads of perspiration, was lugging two
bunches of green bananas. That little shock-
headed fellow's eyes must have been larger than
his stomach; he was carrying two sour saps and
four pineapples in one arm, and in the other a
bunch of bananas. Here came a young fellow,
who had evidently read "Swiss F'amily Robinson,"
for he had six large, yellowish green breadfruit
clutched in his arms.

And the sailors! Tall, lanky, short, fat, clean,
dirty sailors were standing, sitting, lounging, lying
flat, laughing, talking, singing, swearing, and even
sleeping. A shore patrolman was just dragging a
struggling sailor to his launch. Someone must
have seen an interesting fight, for the gob's eyes
were black and swollen shut, and the S. P.'s nose
was bloody, and one eye, black. Squawk! squawk!
A jovial bay-windowed sailor was gracefully carry-
ing a noisy parrot on his outstretched finger. A



THE CARIBBEAN.



55



rum-befuddled old chap deliriously called out,
"Feed the poUy," and offered his spongy white fore-
finger to the bird. Excited Mr. Parrot, however,
mistaking his purpose, took a bite.

The liquor-soused sailor let out a blood-curdling
shriek, follo.ved by an amazingly long stream ot
profanity, and then swore to do every thing from
punching the owner in the nose to killing the
parrot. A shore patrolman gently lead him to a
launch bearing the name "Texas." Into the boats
they piled, some crowding, some lagging, some
quarreling, some singing the classic, "Hail, Hail,
the gang's all here."

The docks were cleared as it some master hand
had been there and swept them clean of their
human burden. Dong, dong; ding, ding; then
chugg,chugg, fainter, fainter, and fainter still. The
motor boats have left "the world to darkness and
to me."



CARNAVAL! !

Dorothy Jbendroth, '24.

Mi pollera! Mi pollera! Blah! Blah! Wheee!
Zip! Carnival is here!

A clear tropic night! Spacious park! Wonder-
ful combination!

Reds! Blues! Greens! Yellows! And a seeth-
ing surging mass of multi-colored humanity. Lots
of fun elbowing my way through the noisy crowd.
A big, fat negro in a sheik costume. With silver
slippers silver turban. Ah, he smiles in real
sheik fashion at a skinny Chinese girl in tar-
nished gold-cloth ballet dress. Hm! Not such a
bad-looking Syrian in his native dress. Arm-in-
arm with a bathing-beauty. Ye gods! She's an
American. A ghastly looking skeleton approaches.
Muttering to a group dressed as Is it possible?
grave robbers. Ghouls! Carrying a miniature
coffin. Probably a bottle inside!

La Paloma! The band's playing. Ah! here
comes the queen. Viva! Viva! La reina! Que
linda! Que Hilda! La reina popular!

What a clever get-up! Tall skinny man in a
red satin, tight-fitting suit. With a long tail. I'd
hate to die if that's a devil.

Wow! That perfume smarts. 000! My eves.
Part of the fun though! Here boy, gimme pair a
goggles. Glad I wore a hat. That confetti's aw-
fully hard to comb out of your hair. I wonder how
they get it out of their kinky locks.



What's he disguised as? Guess he donned a
clean shirt. Disguise enough!

Boom! Boom! Native tom-toms! I wish
they'd dance the "Tamborita." My wish is
granted. "V'iva! Santiago!" The MAN must
be "Santiago." Now they start. Clap! Clap!
That's a good-looking pollera. She dances well,
too. Swirls around. No stockings! Big feet!
Can it be yes, it is a man dressed up. Pretty
good! Others notice the discrepancy. Clapping
gets weaker. All over.

What a fascinating noise from another corner
of the park. Sounds like a nutmeg grater. A
group of negroes. Black grease paint on their per-
spiring faces. All dressed in short, green trousers
and black tuxedos. Goociy! They're going to
sing. "Lejos de ti, no soy feliz, mi amor." How
romantic. Splendid harmony, though. They
pass around the derby. That reminds me! Saw
a funny-looking affair a minute ago. There he is!
A fat Chinaman in a swallow-tail coat. A black
derby, with a hole cut in the crown, upside down
on his greasy head. Silly idea!

More music from the bandstand. "Cielito
Lindo." My favorite Spanish piece! "I told

him and, "He said to her Gosh! Why

don't they go home to talk scandal? Guess I'll
move on.

Band disperses to a bar for liquid refreshments.
.A. sudden hush falls on the crowd. The queen's

going to speak. "Amigos mios More soft

stuff! Phew! It's getting close in this jam. Wil-
liam's talcum powder! Lilac, I think it is! An-
other brand! More perfume! Gee! It surely
feels cold when it strikes the back of your neck!
Too much local color. Guess I'll trot along.



PANAMA LOTTERY OFFICE.

Gladys Lowande, '2^.

Sunday morning! The time for the drawing of
the Panamanian lottery is fast approaching. The
office is packed and the street outside thronged
with a multitude of people, most of whom clasp
one or several tickets on this week's drawing.
Perhaps the three Fates have ordained that some
one of them shall hold the winning number.

The Jamaican and Barbadian negro population
seems to have turned out en masse. Some are at-
tired in their Sunday best, a best which is probably
better than most of us can afford: Straw hats



56



THE CARIBBEAN.



that iauntily balance over one eye, striped shirts
that fairly screech, flaming ties, suits oi the ni )st
modern cut, and highly polished pointed oxtords;
or white silk hats heavily laden with kaleido-
scopic wreaths of flowers, gorgeous satin dresses,
and dangerously high French-heeled shoes.

In sharp contrast to this xiolent array arc those
poor creatures who have just returned from work.
Dirtv, ragged clothes and all, it makes no difl-'er-
ence. for they shutfle their lazy way through the
crowd, barely managing to keep on their old,
dilapidated shoes.

Scattered here and there, are groups of pictur-
esque Panamanian characters who, dressed in
somber attire, keep up incessant conversations
in Spanish. They somehow impress one with the
fact that they are the descendants of old aristo-
cratic Castilian families.

Several San Bias Indians have also been attract-
ed by this wheel of fortune. As is their custom,
they are lined up in a row, one directly behind the
other. How do they manage to keep their bare
brown feet from under the crushing heels of the
populace? How queer they are in their ill-fitting
gingham trousers, loose hanging shirts, and funny
hats that seem to perch upon their huge heads!
If theirs be the luck to win, what an assortment of
gaudy cheap beads and bright dress goods will be
carried back to the families in San Bias!

Then there are sailors, not only a few straggling
American boys in their white middies, but a couple
of old sea dogs from the French battleship that is
at anchor in the harbor.

Look! Two Martinique women each with a
kerchief on her head and another about her neck,
caught gracefully at the throat. Their flowing
skirts are held loosely over their arms in such a
manner as to display very stiffly starched, white
lace underskirts.

On the outskirts of this jibbering, jabbering,
motley mass is a fringe of late comers who, as
the possession of prayer books would seem to indi-
cate, have just returned from church services
where, perhaps, they have ofl^ered pious prayers
that they may be favored this Sunday morning.

Hark! The first whir of the lottery cage is
heard. A sudden silence falls. .All eyes are turned
anxiously toward that whirling contrivance which
holds within its wire bars their hopes and per-
haps their fortunes.



THE ICE CREAM VENDER.



C.h:ster Pike



-V-



"Eskimo! Eskimos!! Come get )'o' Eskimo
pies befo' yo' dies. Eat Eskimo pies an' yo' nevah
dies." In such a manner the arrival of the ice
cream vender is announced. Soon I hear the
rumbling of the hand truck on which he wheels
his ice cream barrel. I grab our commissary book
and run down stairs, where he greets me with,
"What yo' need, sah?"

Whenever I hear him say this word "need"
when he means "want," I have a hard time to
keep myself from saying, "I don't 'need' anything,
you old fool, but I would 'like' to get some ice
cream."

I ask him what flavors he has, and he answers
me, "Cherry, cherry make you merrie," or "Van-
illa to-day, sah. The best vanilla you evah saw."

It is only after I have made my purchase that
I notice what a peculiar person he is a short,
jolly, old Jamaican with a light brown hat cover-
ing his short, black, curly hair. He wears a large
white butcher's apron over a faded blue shirt and
a pair of old khaki pants, thus giving himself a
semi-sanitary appearance.

Then, remembering that I am holding the ice
cream, and fearing that it will melt if I stay there
much longer, I go upstairs. When I reach the
top step, I hear him again, as he continues his
rounds, calling, "Ice cream. Makes yo' dream.
Eat Eskimo pies and yo' nevah dies."



TROPICAL SNOWBALLS.

Jose Jrosemena, '24.

Snowballs, frescos, fruits of all kinds.
They'll take all the troubles away from your minds.
I know where they sell all these good things to eat.
In the snowball shop right in Bolivar Street.

Strawberry, Pineapple, Lemon, and Peach!
My favorite flavors! I'll take one of each.
Orange, Banana, Cherry, and Lime,
Which one shall I take? All I have is a dime!

"Now, be a sport, you surely know me!
I'm a kid from the school. Don't you see?
Won't you trust me the price of a few?"
"Get away from here. I don't know you!"



THE CARIBBEAN.



57



PITCAIRN "MYSTIC ISLE OF THE SOUTH

SEAS".

(Written by Mnnola Bliss '26, from authentic information
direct from the ishinJ).

Pitcairn Island,
August 20, 1 92 1.
Dear Manola:

Just two weeks have passed since that happy
day when we heard the cry of "Say Lo," anci ran
breathlessly down to the beach to see the Rni-
alaka tlrop anchor about a mile out. It would
be hard for you to realize just what an event in
our quiet lives the arrival of a steamer is, or how
exciting; it is to see our men, who have gone out in



cook stove, brought by the Youngs from Tahiti
several years ago, cost them sixty-four dollars.
Mother says she is a much happier woman since
she has the stove, as cooking on it is such an im-
provement over the old method of the open hre
and the stone oven. .'\11 of the women on the
island have been making good use of it for their
baking; so, as there are forty families, it has been
kept very busy.

To-morrow we go down to the beach to make
our yearly supply of salt. As the process takes
many days, we set up camp. We boil the sea water
in huge caldrons over open fires until we have
about twenty-five pounds of salt, which is a



little boats, clamber up the ropes carrying articles year's supply for one family. To procure this
to sell or exchange for jelly, sugar, soap, flour, amount about forty-six bucketsful of water are
cloth, overalls, and even perfume. The articles necessary. As our entire population is Seventh
used by us for bar-
ter are fresh and
dried fruits, such
as bananas and
pineapples, done
up in layers of dried
banana leaves;
strings of beads
made from dyed
shells or bright-
colored beans; and
baskets and fans
finely woven by
the women from
dried grasses, split




Day .'\dventist,we
go back to the vil-
lage on Friday for
our Sabbath,
which is your Sat-
urday. Friday is
always the busiest
day of the week,
for on this day we
prepare all the
meals for the mor-
row.

There are sixty-
six children on the
island between the
ages of one and



A Chinese junk at anchor in Colon harbor.

palm or banana leaves, and artistically embroidered seventeen, all of whom are healthy and robust;

or painted in gay colors. forty-six of these attend the school, which is

Imagine our delight when, after several bags of taught by the great grandson of the Captain

mail had been thrown into the boats, a large crate of the Bounty. All the children are required

was carefully lowered into one. We were breath- to attend school, the fee for which is a barrel

less with the anticipation that it might be mother's of potatoes, one barrel representing twelve shil-

long-desired stove, and so it proved to be. This lings making school fee one shilling per month,

was set up with great ceremony in our house. We have few books; so our teacher puts the

which is in the center of the village, and was con- lessons on the blackboard. All of us have

sequently visited by all the islanders. slates, but not long ago the pencils dwindled down

I can't find words to express our gratitude to to half a dozen stubs; these had to be passed
your father and mother for procuring the stove around to each in turn in order that he might
for us. For several years we have been carefully write his lesson; however, a large package of pen-
saving the money gotten from the sale of fruits cils and crayons soon came to Daddy by a passing
and curios to passing steamers; but we feared ship, and you can't imagine how delighted we were
the twenty-five dollars would not be enough, since to get them.
the only other stove on the island, a two-griddle You asked me some questions about our island.



58



THE CARIBBEAN.



so I'll begin with the history. Two ships left
England in the summer of 1762 for the purpose of
exploring the Pacific ocean. The Dolphin found
the island of Tahiti, where Doctor Dreher of
Cristobal has been consul from the United States
(Aunt Edith was their maid while they lived there).
The Swallow, while looking for "Easter Island,"
sighted a rock one morning in 1767. In honor of
the midshipman who discovered it, the captain
named it "Pitcairn's Island." On April 28,
1790, the mutineers of the English ship, The
Bounty, landed at Pitcairn with some of the
people they had picked up at Tahiti. There were
twelve women and fifteen men, nine of whom were
Englishmen. They took all the fittings and things
they could use off the boat and afterwards burned
it. Then the Englishmen divided the land into
nine parts and made the others their slaves.

Our climate is very similar to that of Florida
(according to the tourists who visit us). We raise
guavas, yams, bananas, oranges, pineapples, limes,
plantains, breadfruit, coconuts, sweet potatoes,
sugarcane, and even peaches, for we have quite
a few trees grown from a few peach stones gotten
from a passing ship a few years ago.

The oldest inhabitant on the island is my grand-
father, Mr. James Russel McCoy, who is seventy-
six. He has been a missionar\' among the islands
near Pitcairn. He has also been to Brisbane,
England, and California, and hopes to go to New
York and Sydney before he dies. My father is the
government secretary and is considered to be the
best educated person on the island. I have two
brothers, Warren and Baby Ivan. Warren and
I go to school.

There are one hundred and seventy-four people
on the island, two of whom are Americans from
Los .Angeles, a father and son by the name of
Clarke, who married on coming to the islantl, and
have IIvclI here for ten years. The language
spoken on our island is English. You were inter-
ested to know what we looked like. Some are
fair-skinned, (jthers swarthy, but most of us are
light brown; our features are regular and gentle
(at least people say so).

Our houses are thatched-roofed, wooden struc-
tures, usually twostories high, with a ladder leading
to the upper story, where beds (similar to the



berths on board a ship) are built along the walls.
Each house has a large garden, and pens for the
pigs, chickens, sheep, goats, or dogs, and in a few
cases shelters for cattle. Our furniture is very
simple, being made by the men from yellow
tefano wood.

The government is carried on by a chief magis-
trate, assisted by several assessors and an internal
committee. These officials are chosen by the
people, men and women alike voting. This elec-
tion takes place on Christmas Day. Our laws
are made as the need arises. One law which will
seem peculiar to you, although it is quite import-
ant here, is the law regarding cats. There is a
heavy fine for the killing of a cat, because they
keep the island free of rats, but sometimes they
kill the fowls and in that case the cat must be
sacrificed.

I believe you asked me in your letters about
our celebration of Christmas; it is very simple
in comparison with yours. Instead of turkey and
the innumerable good things which you mentioned,
we have roasted goat and baked sweet potatoes.
After dinner is over, all of us go up to the church,
where there are two trees loaded with gifts. And
do you know what our gifts are? Bananas, pine-
apples, coconuts, hats, baskets, beads, brooms,
and fans, each carefully labeled with the name of
the person for whom it is intended and the name
of the donor. After we have received our gifts,
we go down to the beach to see the boat races in
which the men partake. Since many of them are
very skillful, this is an exciting pastime. At the
close of the day we return home and are soon lost
in sleep, for on the morrow we must be about our
usual tasks, as we celebrate only the one day.
The sun is our alarm clock, and we follow closely
the old saying, "Early to bed and early to rise."

I hope you will answer soon tor I do enjoy
hearing about your family, school, and pleasures.
I am mailing this on the next boat, which will
reach you about Christmas time.

Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy
New Year, 1 remain

Your friend,

Hilda Christian.



THE CARIBBEAN.



59



m


"AND THINGS ARE NOT WHAT THEY SEEM."

Longfellow.


= gi



ONLY A BABY.

Dorothy Jbendrolh, '24.

I lounged on the porch of the Hotel Washing-
ton, hoping to see some of the latest styles on the
numerous tourists who thronged the place.

Not being immediately thrilled by any espe-
cially striking costume, I must have dozed off.
The tap, tap of very high heels accompanied by
the strong odor of "Jasmin" brought me out of
my stupor all too suddenly.

The tapping I had heard was caused by a very
beautiful pair of suede slippers on the dainty feet
of a wonderfully garbed woman, who walked, or
rather slunk, gracefully over to a seat across from
me, and sank tiredly into its comfortable depths.
She leaned back and closed her eyes, giving me a
splendid opportunity to "look her over."

Feet first! The black suede slippers were set
off by enormous silver buckles, which the silver
stockings matched so well as to seem only a con-
tinuation of their shiny surface. The black silk-
crepe dress was very chic, being all-over beaded in
silver translucent beads, and having no sleeves
and a very low neckline, which allowed her throat
to rise like a marble column from its blackness.
Her face was very striking, shaped as it was in
that fashion commonly called Oriental. The slant-
ing almond eyes were protected by long, silky
eyelashes. Her long, thin-lipped mouth was the
color of a ripe strawberry and was beautifully vivi-
fied by the black mole which grew near the lower
left side of her dimpled chin.

She evidently became weary of the chair, for
she got up, approached my haven, and sank her
lithesome slimness into a chair near my elbow.
Leaning back, she closed her eyes, and once more
I gazed upon her beauty.

But "distance lends enchantment!"

Her enviable whiteness was the result of patient,
repeated applications of liquid powder. The rosy
lips were not of Nature's coloring, nor even of the
size which Nature intended. The long, silky eye-
lashes simply were not, that's all. She opened
her tinted eye lids to gaze upon the glassy sea,



and fastened her restless eyes upon a bit of white-
ness in the bay; thinking. As I watched, she
narrowed them slightly, and I perceived a coldly
calculating look in their gray depths. She was
thinking!

Then a dapper young fellow drew up a chair
and began a conversation. They were evidently
old acquaintances, for I caught some very remark-
able scraps of a "line" which she "slung" in a
very coarse voice, accompanied by wise shrugs and
knowing winks.

"Evidently a very coarse person. Maybe she's
one ot the new cabaret girls," were some of the
thoughts that floated through my now thoroughly
aroused brain.

As their voices became louder and their words
more indiscreet, the object of my curiosity re-
moved her black satin turban and ran slim white
fingers through the fluffy blondness of her bobbed
hair. This called forth some remarks from
"Monty" to the effect that her locks were not
exactly the same shade he remembered their
having been in Honolulu. Her only response
was a low chuckle and a phrase reminding him
of the fickle preferences of man in regard to the
color of hair.

This word-throwing contest (for it could hardly
be called a conversation) continued for some time,
and I was about to meander along, when out of
the hotel came a nurse carrying a small babv.
She directed herself straight toward my compan-
ions. I thought it was a case of mistaken identity,
as she came smiling toward these queer folks, un-
til I saw my "painted lady" jump up, and with
queer little mincing steps, run to the stiffly
starched English nurse and bend over the tiny
pink bundle in the capable arms. The entire
expression on the enameled face underwent a
miraculous transformation. The hard, coldly cal-
culating look became one of glorified mother-love.
Even her thick voice assumed new tones. It no
longer reminded me of the caw of the crow; it
was the soft murmur of a contented brook, as she
cooed to the smiling infant.



6o



THE CARIBBEAN.



Even "Monty" was conceded a higher place in
my opinion, as he smoothed a satiny hand ot the
child, and remarked, "Quite a rummy little chap,
what?"

Now that I had had a glimpse of their better
natures, my spirits rose, and as I sauntered non-
chalantly by the happy group, I bravely whistled,
"The End of a Perfect Dav."



in it. My heart went out to the old fellow. How
could I ever have thought him a criminal?



THE DOG WROUGHT THE CHANGE.

Edith Couliourn, '24.

He sat beside me at the station waiting for a
train. I could imagine all sorts of things about
him. A great red face he had with a heavy dark
moustache. .A big old felt hat pulled tightly down
over his ears partly shaded his staring red-rimmed
eyes which rolled apprehensively now here, now
there. His dark suit was dirty and shiny and was
much too large, for it hung on him like the rags
on a scarecrow.

He pulled out a huge red bandana and wiped
his sweaty face and uncouth-looking hands, then
dusted his large, clumsy shoes. He shook the
bandana furtively and put it away in his grimy
pocket, then could find no place for those large
ugly hands. First he folded them in his lap,
then put them in his pockets, and finally picked
up a big paper bundle and held on to that.

I was sure he was nervous and fidgety because
the police were looking for him. In my mind I
pictured this man doing all conceivable crimes.

Into the station there came a dirty little dog.
On his side was a large sore which he stopped to
lick every few minutes. As he came down the
aisle past where I was sitting I drew back with
loathing from such a creature. Soon he crawled
to the feet of that repulsive looking individual
my criminal. Almost instantly the man leaned
over and tenderly picked up the little cur. "Poor
fellow," he said, "you have gotten some of the
world's hard knocks, haven't you? So have I.
Let's chum it together." He pulled out his red
bandana and carefully wiped the dog's side. His
eyes grew tender looking. His hands had found
work at last.

As I looked at him I couldn't help my eyes'
filling up, and my throat's getting a huge lump



DO YOU REMEMBER?

Florence Albert, '2^.

Do you remember the time when mother made
some cookies just the kind you liked the best,
big crumbly brown ones full of fat raisins, and
told you not to touch them until she came home,
when she would give you one? She put them in
on the pantry shelf; so you resolved that you
would be good and not go near them. You went
out to play but it wasn't interesting. Midge
wasn't out and you didn't like to play with Jane
Page and the others. You went back into the
house and roamed aimlessly around. Then you
wandered into the kitchen and looked at the
pantry door. No! You would be good and do as
mother told you. You went and got your favorite
doll, the baby doll with real hair, but somehow you
didn't feel like playing with it just then.

Then you had an idea! It wouldn't do any
harm just to peek at the cookies. At first the
door resisted all your efforts to open it. You were
despairing ot carrying out your plan, when sud-
denly you gave the right twist to the knob and
the door swung open. But the cookies were up
too high for you to reach, and you had to get a
chair. You got up on it and took the cover off
the jar. They looked so good. But you reluc-
tantly and slowly put the lid back on, for you had
told yourself that you would just look at them.
You took another peek. Just one wouldn't make
any difference among so many. But alas! "Just
one" led to another and another and another until
you had eaten so many you felt as if you would
burst. You looked into the jar. You never im-
agined that you had taken so many! You looked
around for a place to hide but there wasn't any.
You decided to meet her at the door and tell her;
but when the time came, you couldn't say a word.
Anil when mother went to the pantry to get the
cookie she hatl promised you, you trembled.
When she saw how many cookies were gone, she
just turned and looked at you. You felt so
ashamed and sorry that you cried; but mother
diiln't take you in her arms and pet you as she
Lisuall)' ilitl. You had to cry all by yourself, and
between sobs you vowed that you woulil never do
it again. Do you remember?



THE CARIBBEAN.



6i



AVERAGE BOY.

^osc Arnsemena^ ^ ~4-

Average Boy brought out his team on the high
school basket-bail floor, ^^'ith the aid of Deter-
mination, Industry, Enthusiasm, and Good Foun-
dation, he hoped to conquer the team of Sec-
ondary Education. The referee. Faculty, blew
the whistle, and the teams took their position on
the floor. English, Mathematics, Language, His-
tory, and Industrial Arts, made up the strong
Secondary Education team.

As Mathematics had come preceded by great
fame. Average Boy took special care to guard him,
leaving English practically unattencied. .'\fter
some minutes of play, Laziness ami Apathy took
the places of Industry and Determination, but the
rest of the team was not used to playing with
these new substitutes; therefore the team work
suffered badly. Near tbe end of the quarter,
another player, Cramminess, was put in, but to
no avail. The end of the period found Average
Boy two points behind.

In the second period, a new player. Bluff, came
in. Bluff was good for a while, but he tired badly
and had to be put out. Average Boy was bewil-
dered. He was unable to catch up with the other
team. He despaired of winning the game. The
whistle sounded for the end ot the quarter with
Average Boy two more points behind.

Between the second and third periods, the
coach, Common Sense, gave the team a talk, and
when the refe"ee called for the third quarter, .Aver-
age Boy's team was strengthened by Hope. Dur-
ing this period they played much better than before,
and were able to regain two of the lost points.

For the fourth quarter. Average Boy brought
out his strongest team: Industry, Determination,
Enthusiasm, and Good Foundation, the last one
having recuperated greatly during the previous
quarter. With this team and the coaching of
Common Sense from the side lines, Average Boy
was able to win the game handily; thus securing
possession of the cup called Graduation.

GOLF.

Chester Pike, '24.

After completing his course in golf, his school
education, College-Graduate started on his round
of life golf. He set his ball. Ambition, on the pixy
of a splendid physique, took up his club. Confidence,
and teed off. .'\mbition landed far from the first
hole, in front of a high knoll, called Pleasure.
By taking three more shots, this time using his



club, Self-Denial, he made the first hole, Perma-
nent position.

Again teeing off with his club Confidence, he
landed Ambition near the next hole, which was
Higher position. Here he took the wrong club, Over-
confidence, and drove too far. In two more shots,
usinghisclub Efficiency, hereachedHigherposition.

With the use of his clubs, Efficiency and Confi-
dence, he made the next four holes, the first of
which was Employer's confidence, and the next
three, increases in salary.

Driving for the seventh hole, he landed so deeply
in the high grass of Society, that, for several shots,
he made no advancement toward the Assistant
Managership of the firm. This he afterwards
acquired by using a new club, Ingenuity, which
placed him far ahead of the field of competitors.

The ground between the seventh hole and the
eighth (General Managership) was fairly level
with no difficult obstacles, and he made hole eight
easily by using his two best clubs. Efficiency and
Ingenuity.

From the eighth hole till the last there was one
hindrance after the other. There were the bunk-
ers. Suspicion and Jealousy-of-fellow-employees,
and the slough. Board of Directors, as well as
several minor traps. With the use of his trusty
clubs, Efficiency and Confidence, he finally saw
with satisfaction his ball settle comfortably in
the last hole, the Presidency of the firm.



ON THE ROAD TO CATIVA

Charlotte Housel, '24.

A crude woven basket sat helplessly on the top
of a turban that wound itself carelessly around a
kinky growth of hair. Two narrow, deep-set,
haggard-looking eyes peered out from overshadow-
ing, unkempt eyebrows A nose that looked as if
it had been forced to change its course before it
had finished growing, flattened itself out over a
considerable space. Now and then, as she puffed
at a thin cigar that hung loosely out of her
mouth, her thick lips revealed a few isolated teeth,
or remnants of teeth.

A ruffled collar and vestee made a pitiful attempt
to make attractive her coarse woven-fabric gar-
ment. Her long sleeves hung loosely around her
bony wrists, as if endeavoring to hide the ragged,
sh'ny, shriveled hands.

Two bare feet peeped out from under the ill-
hanging dress. Flat, broad, and scarred, they
seemed to belong, as did she, to the surrounding
entanglement of swampy vegetation,



62



THE CARIBBEAN.



S=



=S




SPORTS



Girls Ruth Diiey, 'sj;.



Boyi Guy Slt'tturt, 'j^.




S=



STEW

ART SAYS^

During my long and diversified career
as journalist, man-about-school, and soda-
water guzzler in general, I have come to
many conclusions. One of these con-
cerns the utter uselessness of human be-
ings. After listening awhile to Mac, the
anarchist, this becomes even more evi-
dent. Why not a world without human
beings? .A Utopia totally devoid ot these
incredibly stupid creatures! No hen-
pecked husbands or sourfaced wives, no
dumb school children or grinning, tooth-
less hags; no need for census reports,
read now only by proof readers; no
worries about the Mellon plan or oil
stock or

And gentle reader, pause and think
how much better it would be for the ani-
mals and insects and little fishes! Such
a wonderful opportunity for them to exer-
cise their lurid individualities, untram-
meled by conventions! But after all.



don't you think they would act the same
way we do? Suppose we take an instru-
ment for seeing into the future, recently
invented by Mr. Foos, B. S. J. C. H. S.
Mr. Foos claims that his instrument can
show us anything we want to see in the
future, or anything we want to see any-
way.

We would see a fat cootie, living on the
back of an ape, reading to his esteemed
spouse the latest news from the Bug-
house Gazette.

"I see where this bird Grease Bug has
broken into print again with his famous
troupe of Red, Blue, and Black juveniles,
that perfect bunch of performing potato
bugs, ."^nd look, our friend J. K. Bee is
slamming Gerald Doodle Bug because he
has the sense to uphold the Atlantic
Side."

Of course, you see, this could be con-
tinued indefinitely, but since I'm paid for
a column only I'll go home and sleep off
my last night's movie show, Baby Peggy,
"The Darling of New York."

G. K. S.



C. H. S. ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
FORMED.

October lo, iglj. To-day the .Athletic
.Association representing Cristobal High
School was formed. The attendance was
one hundred per cent, and a sincere co-
operation was promised to the teams.

The meeting was called to order by
Miss Dodds, who, after a brief talk, an-
nounced that nominations were in order
for the presidency of the .Association.
George Oakes, '24, was chosen President,
William Cousins, '25, Secretary and
Treasurer, and Guy Stewart, '15, Man-
ager. President Oakes said that in the
very near future our athletics would open,
beginning with some scheduled swimming
matches to be swum against Balboa.
The meeting was adjourned with every
one confident that our athletics will be of
the best this vear.



BALBOA HUMBLED ON HOME
GROUNDS.

January 26,

i';24. It seems that
every time Cris-
tobal beats Balboa
^^ it is on the Bal-

(^^^ ~A boa's homeground.

^"^^V I Cristobal to-day

"f i^,t^ succeeded in tack-

jrf^vX^^'^XjQ Balboa's hard-
'^ earned three, in an




exciting nine-inning game. The crack of
ash on horsehide was continuously heard,
but the fielding was perfect on both teams.
We had a new man pitching, Richard
Fisher, who has a nice curve, and he ably
showed his stuff. Juan Papi played a
perfect game on short, and pitched a
little in the seventh inning to relieve
Fisher. Then we had Jose Arosemena,
who made his debut on the second sack.
George Oakes and John Solomon played



first and third very well while Leo Eber-
enz covered the keystone sack well. The
pitchers did little work but should be
commended on their good batting. On
the whole the game was as perfect as pos-
sible and notwithstanding the ability of
the Balboa team our boys were unbeat-
able. Cristobal was always in the lead
and never in danger of losing. The action
was fast and peppy all the way through.
The line-ups were:



ORGANIZATION OF GIRLS"

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.

On the twenty-eighth of October, the
high school girls met to organize the
Athletic .Association. The officers chosen
were;

President Charlotte Housel.

Fice President Gladys Lowande.

Secretary and Trensurer Dorothy Dei-
bert.

The first few months we spent on gym
work, which was successfully carried out
only by the able leadership of Miss
Mathee. It is through her that we were
able to have our fun and gain our victory
in basket ball.



Engelke, p.
Stanziola, c.
Foster, lb.
Morris, ib.
Burgoon, ss.
Crofs, 3b.
Clements, If.
Hutchins, cf.
Whitlock, rf.



CRISTOBAL.

Fisher, p.
F.herenz, c.
Oakes, lb.
.Arosemena, 2b.
Papi, ss.
Solomon, 3b.
Marchosky, If.
Brown, cf.
Lowande, rf.



DISASTER.

February 2, 1924. It is with a feeling
akin to sorrow that we write of this game.
Our boys, buoyed up by last Saturday's
victory over Balboa, through some psy-
chological twist, are plunged into depths
of despondency, and Balboa walks all over
them. The game, considered as a game,
was a poor excuse. Balboa played well
we agree, but Cristobal lost because of
her absolutely faulty teamwork. The
day was depressing, someone was late,
and there was an undercurrent of unrest
throughout. Several players deliberately



THE CARIBBEAN.



63



fell down on the job, and everywhere
there was crabbing. Probably some
learned psychologist will be able to ex-
plain this; we can't. Of course Balboa
saw its opportunity and waded through
us, the score being i J-4. We really must
give credit to Balboa. They won, and
Buster Burgoon, old time Cristobalite,
helped them do it. This boy is certainly
good. (Observe he used to live in Cris-
tobal.) His curves are perfect and his
battmg consistent.
The line-ups were:



Burgoon, p.
Clements, c.
Foster, lb.
Crofs, 2b.
Engeike, .3b.
Morris, ss.
Hutchins, If
Newhardt, ct.
Elias, rf



CRISTOBAL.

Fisher, p.
Eberenz, c.
Oakes, ib.
Arosemena, ih.
Papi, jb.
Solomon, ss.
Brown, It.
Marchosky, cf
Lowande, rt.
Johnson, rf.



GIRLS' BASEBALL.

Partly for fun and partly for credits,
we finished out our athletic year with
baseball. We had about two weeks'
practice before our first game. The team
was composed of:

Charlotte Housel, p.
Helen .'\bendroth, c.
Rae Fischer, ib.
Ruth Duey, ib.
Dorothy Deibert, jb.
Grace Dowell, jb.
Gladys Lowande, ss.
Marion Barrett, rt.
Dorothy Staulfer, If.
Wilhelmina Stute, cf.

April 19 we journeyed to Balboa to try
our mettle. During the first two innings
the score was neck and neck. Then a
few wild throws allowed Balboa's girls to
bring in several runs, and we were not
able to rally sufficiently to win; so the
game ended 15-10 in favor of Balboa.

Everyone enjoyed this first game so
thoroughly that it was decided we play
another. Accordingly, on May 3 our
second game took place. Some ot our
team were not there so our subs were
used. The playing of both teams was
not as good as before, but the excitement
was just as great. We seemed unable to
check the opposite team and the resulting
score was 8-16 in their favor.



CRISTOBAL LOSES IN BASEBALL
TO BALBOA.

January 19, 1924. The first game of the
season was played at Mount Hope to-day,
with Balboa taking back with her a very
hard-earned victory. Owing to the Balboa
team's having to return to Balboa on the
four o'clock train, the game w.is called
I in the sixth inning.

When the Cristobal boys went out on
the field they were all discouraged and
didn't think they had a chance with Bal-
boa, which was a veteran of many games.
It was the first game the boys had played
together and there was very faulty team-
work. Then too, everyone was grouchy
and was reluctant about playing.

Nevertheless the Cristobal boys held
Balboa down in the first innings until, in
a final burst, Balboa succeeded in wading
through us. It seems that now the boys
woke up, but too late. The prospect
brightened for us and we succeeded in
bringing in one run. We tightened up,
but were chagrined when the Balboa boys
had to leave. The game finally ended in
the 6th inning, 5-1. I

To win, our boys should practice all
next week, and travel to Balboa confident
in themselves because we see that Balboa
is really not invincible. Practice and
more team work and we'll surely beat
Balboa next Saturday.

Juan Papi, a new man, pitched for
Cristobal and very ably showed his stuff.
His underhand is spectacular. He suc-
ceeded in securing several strikeouts.
Then our friend Johnny Solomon played
a consistent, errorless game at the initial
sack. Also George Oakes played second
1 base very well, and Harry Brown held
down third ably. Then we have Leo
Eberenz as shortstop, who can play a
j better game and should tighten up. We
I are very much indebted to Jack Klunk,
j who held down the keystone sack. The
j line-ups were as follows:



CRISTOB,\L HIGH .SCHOOL

SURPRISES SUBURBANITES

IN TR.\CK.



February 2j, 1924. Generally, Balboa,
suburb of ."^ncon, has everything its own
way. This time // got fooled to the tune
of 31-28. To-day our space annihilators
carved a niche in the Hall of Fame! Re-
joice, all ye brethren! The highest point
scorers were both men from Cristobal, and
senior laddies at that. Jose Arosemena
and George Oakes tied for a good nine
points each. Like Grape Nuts, "There's
a Reason!"

A SUR-^PPV BATTLE.

The century, goal of all speed kings,
was first on the program. The boys may
not have been Paddocks, but still they
made pretty good time. Oakes ably
ankled his way to victory, closely followed




Stanziola, c.

Whitlock, p.

Barton, ib.

Burgoon, 2b.

Morris, ss.

Engeike, 3b. (Capt.) Brown, jb.

Clements, It. l^ing. It.

Hutchins, cf. Fisher, cf.

Sullivan, rf. Jones, rf.



CRISTOBAL.

Klunk, c.
Papi, p. (Capt.)
Solomon, ib.
Oakes, 2b.
Eberenz, ss.



by .\rosemena with .^ndy Whitlock of
Balboa, third. The track was very slow
and in poor condition.

The sixteen-pound shot-put was copped
by Kid Coffey, the demon swimmer, who
flipped the marble thirty-two feet, with
Richard Fisher second and George Oakes
third, all these from Cristobal.

We dropped the relay to Balboa. Here
a funny thing happened. Runner number
two, new at the game, ran about ten
yards the wrong way before he was stop-
ped. .'\s it was, the Cristobal fourth man
was not very far behind his Balboa man.

An orange shirt and a pair of legs and
you have a portrait of Ralph Clements,
Balboa's lofty jumper, who, literally
speaking, rose to greater heights than
any man. He took first place easily in
the high jump, but Chester Pike and
Maurice Eggleston won second and third
places, respectively.

The running broad jump was easily
won by Jose .'\rosemena, with George
Oakes second and our friend Clements
third.

The 440-yard dash was won by Balboa
men in first and second places, Elias and



64



THE CARIBBEAN.



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THE CARIBBEAN.



65



Duran showing pretty form. Willie
Cousins showed good mettle when, after
a discouraging start, he pluckily came in
third.

Then the 220-yard dash was barely
taken by VVhitlock and Duran of Balbo.i,
who in a spectacular finish took first
places from Arosemena. Arosemena had
a good lead in the first hundred and fitty
yards but his ankles grew wabbly and he
finished a very close third.

Juan Papi, Henry Stevens, and Guy
Stewart also ran for Cristobal.

In coming years, if Cristobal takes a
good interest in track we can but succeed,
for we have excellent material, and inade-
quate equipment is our greatest handicap.
Mr. Bogda please notice.



CRISTOBAL LOSES TO BALBOA
IN HAND BALL.

December 14, 1923. For the first time
in the history of the school, Cristobal
rounded up a hand ball team and traveled
to Balboa; after some long, rather scrap-
py games, we lost to Balboa.

Leo Eberenz, school champ, represent-
ed us in the singles and gloriously we
say gloriously because it was a splendid
fight lost to Bobby Engelke of Balboa.
Engelkeis to be given credit for his superb
playing, and we predict for him a great
future. If Eberenz would improve his
defensive, he could be counted on to give
a hard game any day. The final scores
were 21-6, ai-8.

It was surely a queer, almost pathetic
sight to see the two freshman midgets,
Charles Will and Harry Brown, playing
against Ralph Clements (over six feet)
and Fred Brady, also of great height.
Unfortunately our boys lost, but as the
odds were greatly against them, they
should be given credit for their plucky
fight. It may be said to their credit and
to the credit of Cristobal High School,
that our men never fall down on a job.
As it was, the games were spectacular
and fast. The final score was aa-il,
21-14.



BALBOA FORFEITS ALL

SWIMMING TO CRISTOBAL.

Balboa and Cristobal were scheduled to
swim three swimming meets, and in each
one of these, after our boys had trained
faithfully, Balboa failed to show up,
thereby giving us the meets. We regret



wipe Balboa off the map as far as swim-
ming was concerned. It may be remem-
bered that in the championship swim-
ming meet, held on the Fourth of July,
a Cristobal High School team consisting
of Jack Cofl^ey, .^lan Wallace, James
Burgoon, and Alpha Morgan, carried off
the Senior 220-yard relay championship
of the Canal Zone.

The boys from Cristobal who came out
for swimming and trained faithfully tor
over a month under the leadership ot
Al Morgan were: Jack Cofl^ey, (capt.),
Andrew Smith, Foster Tufts, Richard
Fisher, Oliver King, Billy Cofl^ey, Chris-
tian Wirtz, Surse Taylor, and George
Cakes.

We may add that Cristobal expects to
retain the championship next Fourth of
July.







GIRLS' SWIMMING.

November 24, 192J. On this date a
preliminary swimming meet against Bal-
boa took place at the Washington f>ool.
This was to prepare us for finals, but due
to the fact that we haven't had a swim-
ming instructor for any length of time,
the final meet was never held. It was
only through the courtesy of Miss Reed
that we were able to obtain a few satis-
factory practices. Balboa defeated us in
points, which was as it should be.



TENNIS OPENS WITH A RACKET.

'^OVEMBER 14,
1923. To-day the
first round of the
eliminations for
tennis champion-
ship of the school
was arranged.




confident of victory, and some fine games
are promised. We note with satisfaction
the names of several newcomers in tennis.
The use of courts all over the Atlantic
side has been secured, and the players
may be assured a good gallery.

SONNEMAN VICTORIOUS.

November 28, 1923. John Ordway,
Oliver King, and Maurice Eggleston
were the semi-finalists in the tennis
matches for championship of the school;
but Fred Sonneman, stellar attraction,
who had not played in the first part of the
tournament due to doctor's orders, easily
defeated them all, leaving Eggleston as
runner-up.



this sincerely because we knew we could I There are twelve candidates, each one



CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA TIE
IN TENNIS.

December 14, 1923. To-day our
tennis stars went over to Balboa and
played Balboa some fine games resulting
in a tie, Cristobal boys winning two out
of four series played.

Fred Sonneman was pitted against a
worthy opponent, Horace Foster, who
was forced to put up a brilliant game of
defense, though at times he showed him-
self well in the offensive. Nevertheless
Sonneman won the first set, 7-5.

The second set was any man's set until
Foster, through sheer weight and very
clever fighting, was able to beat Fred. 9-7.

Sonneman soon recuperated and show-
ed his wonderful form in the third set,
where he easily slashed his way to victory,
winning 6-3.

Maurice Eggleston dropped his sets to
Robert Engelke after a plucky up-hill
fight, the score being 6-4, 6-5.

Caldwell Foos and John Ordway lost
to Ralph Clements and Gerrans after a
strenuous fight in which victory seemed
right in their hand several times, when
the superior weight and length (?) of
their opponents told on them and Balboa
won, 6-4, 7-9, 97.

John Ordway, the sophomore slasher,
played a game different from his usual
one, playing cautiously with an eye more
toward accuracy than speed. He easily
outwitted his opponent, Jimmie Driscoll,
and strode to victory to the tune of 6-3,
6-2.

A return match scheduled for May 3,
is to be played at Cristobal.



66



THE CARIBBEAN.



GIRLS' TENNIS.

More tennis tans and players have ap-
peared this year than ever before. The
first preliminary match was played at
Balboa, December 15.
Ruth Duey Mary Joe Lowe

Helen .Abendroth Gladys Blakely

We easily defeated them, tor they had
not had as many practices as we.

During the month ot March the girls'
tennis elimination was taking place. A
great deal of fun was derived from these
sets, for everybody tried even those
who hadn't played tor several years. The
final four girls winning were to pl.ay
singles and doubles against Balboa's best

.\pril 19 we held our singles at Balboa.
Much interest was shown in the games by
the supporters who were looking on.

Charlotte Housel defeated Mary Joe
Lowe, 6-j, 6-3.

Gladys Lowande defeated Belle Mar-
tin,'^6-2, 6-2.



UPPER CLASSMEN COP CROWN.

December 3, 1923. .Again the Senior-
Junior boys played the Sophomore-
Freshies and proved that a ripe old age
is no disqualification by beating them to
the score of 28-16. ."^gain we saw won-
derful playing as both teams ran off some
excellent plays. It's rather hard to pick
a star player, but we think that -Arose-
mena for the older boys and "Rusty"
Jones for the youngsters are pretty good.
-A still larger crowd was in evidence, and
we even had some organized cheering
by the freshman girls, led by Dot Wertz,
which surely raised the roof. Of course
the Senior-Junior young ladies the
others are mere girls retaliated and we
think they won. Mr. Schneppmueller
attended this game and commented upon
the good points of the teams, and pointed
out some faults which should be remedied.
The players were:




SENIOR- JUNIORS WIN FROM
SOPHOMORE-FRESHMEN.

'OVKMBF.R 20,
1923. Last night at
the old .Army and
Navy "Y," the
Senior-Junior boys,
after a very hard,
fast game beat the
Sophomore-Freshmen with a score of
17-13. This was the first basketball
game of the year and all the players
were keyed up and full of pep. Some very
promising material was viewed, and every-
one is confident that we will give Balboa
a run for their money.

During the second quarter, while a
pretty play was going on, the lights were
snapped off for a second, and when they
were turned on again, referee Gerald
Bliss had disappeared. The .Army came
to our rescue sounds poetic and an
enlisted man very ably refereed the re-
mainder of the game. The spectators
were a very .sportsmanlike bunch, and
heavy cheering was heard continuously.
The line-ups were as follows:

UPPER CLASS.MEN. LOWER CI-ASSMEN.

Arosemena, f.fcapt.) Jones, f.
Pulgar, f.

.Solomon, c. (capt.)
Grider, g.
F.ggleston, g.
Brown, sub.
Lowande, sub.



Eberenz, f.
Cakes, c.
Pike, g.
Cousins, g.
Fisher, sub.
Foos, sub.
Stewart, sub.



GRAV-BEARDS.

Arosemena, f.

(capt.)
Eberenz, f.
Cakes, c.
Pike, g.
Cousins, g.
Fisher, sub.
Foos, sub.
Stewart, sub.



Jones, f.
Pulgar, f.

Solomon, c. (capt.)
Grider, g.
Eggleston, g.
Brown, sub.
Lowande, sub.



STOP! LOOK! READ!

Cristobal High School again plays extra
quarter with Lincoln Five! April 12,
1923. Recipe for Nervous Prostration,
or Cne Exciting Game."

Ingredients.

Five School Boys.

Five Big Men.

Cne Scorer with .Automatic Adding
Machine.

One Referee.

Cne Basket Ball.

Cne Time Keeper.

Place basket ball in center of large
floor. Put boys and men in and mix
for five quarters sprinkle liberally with
flashy plays. Inject a little bit of referee
when friction becomes too great or when
too strenuous mix-ups occur. Stir con-
tinuously, stopping only to place ball in
center. Have timekeeper in perfect con-
dition, to wit, equipped with strong voice
to be heard above din, and one sharp



e.agle-eyed vision; and one scorekeeper
plentifully supplied with sharpened pen-
cils. -A series of superhuman plays inter-
mixed with incredible feats of valor.
Hoarse voices. Give boys due honor and
compliment.

This gives a game which we guarantee
to cure the most despondent cases, as
well as to exhilarate mentally. Observe:
This game can not be served to men on a
silver platter because it is apt to burn
their fingers.

Such was last night's game.

For details, use imagination freely.

OUR BOVS.

.Arosemena, f.
Jones, f.
Cakes, c.
Solomon, g.

K^ing, g-
By the way, the score was 30-26, and
the Lincoln Five won.



EXTRA! THRILLING ELEC-
TRIFYING GAME! EXTRA!
LINCOLN FIVE FORCED TO
PLAY TWO EXTRA QUARTERS.

January 4, 1924. In one of those cata-
clysmic games that fans pray for and
rarely ever get, the Cristobal High School
boys suffered a glorious, exalted defeat
from the Lincoln Five, the score being
23-22. Here is a case where defeat is
victory, for the game was won by one
point, and two extra quarters, six in all
were played! Wow! Talk about excite-
ment! Fast! Thrilling! Talk about
noise! We believe the "Y" is still re-
ceiving complaints about the racket
raised that night. There was a good gal-
lery, and believe us, they were lucky!
The Lincoln Five, invincible and uncon
quered! Veterans of a thousand and one
hard-earned victories! Forced by a mere
handful of boys to play two extra quar-
ters!

Cur mind is still in a whirl and all we
can think of is legs and ball and arms,
and arms and legs and ball! Occasionally
we see little "Rusty" Jones being flung
halfway across the floor by a big Marine!
Then we see Cakes sink a perfect basket,
quickly followed up by Al Doyle's superb
shooting in the opposite basket. But
then Arosemena and Cousins and Pike
quickly get the ball in play, and acting
like well-oiled mannikins snap the ball
back and lo another basket. Point after



THE CARIBBEAN.



67



point piles up on either side. Speed!
Thrills! Excitement! Say, if all the
thrills were raindrops, the Army and
Navy "Y" would have floated.

Gentle reader, pause and reflect. Let
your imagination run freely! Then rise
up and in a burst of enthusiasm, rend the
air with three lofty cheers, for Cristobal
has arrived!

The battle-scarred heroes were:



the game was good and fast with some
good plays throughout.
The line-ups were:



CRISTOBAL.



Jones, f.

Arosemena, f.

Oakes, c.

Cousins, g.

Pulgar, g.

Pike, g.

Referee. Tom Collins



LINCOLN FIVE.

Jones, f.
Al Doyle, f.
Hawkins, c.
Bliss, g.
Eherenz, g.



BALBOA CAPTURES FIRST

BASKET BALL GAME.

April 4, 1924. With a team consider-
ably weakened, our boys traveled to Bal-
boa and lost the first basket ball game of
the season to Balboa, the score being
42-16. As a team Balboa is invincible,
and the players are all stars. Cristobal
has excellent material but it can't work-
together. Why? Lack of practice and
lack of training. The game was played
at the Balboa playshed, and that might
have been why we lost so decisively.
Then it was plainly seen that Balboa had
some well-thought-up organized plays.
That's something we need. Nevertheless



Clements, f.
Elias, f.
Sullivan, c.
Burgoon, g.
Engelke, g.
Knabenshue,



iub.



CRISTOBAL.

Jones, f.
Arosemena, f.
King, c.
Solomon, g.
Cousins, g.
Pulgar, sub.




GIRLS TAKE SEASON'S SERIES.

LJR foremost sport,
naturally, is basket
ball. A series of
five games was ar-
ranged between
Balboa and Cris-
J tobal, though only
four games were played.

So many girls took an interest in basket
ball that it was difficult to select a team,
but at a special meeting the following
were selected:

Charlotte Housel, f. (Capt.)
Dorothy Deibert, f.
Dorothy Stauffer, c.
Rae Rscher, sc.
Irene Hopkins, sc.
Gladys Lowande, g.
Ruth Duey, g.

The first game of the season, on Feb-
ruary 2, was played at Balboa playshed.
Many remarks were heard on the splen-
did passwork of the teains, but the thing



that made the game worth while was the
friendly spirit of rivalry which existed
between the two sides. The end came
quickly with the close score of 9-1 1 in our
favor.

On February 16, Balboa met us at Cris-
tobal playshed, determined to send us to
ignominious defeat, but their eflxirts were
in vain. Our rooters witnessed a hard
struggle to the last second. When the
quarter was up, there was only two point's
difl^erence with Cristobal on the safe side,
9-7.

We were so confident of the third game,
February 23, that the speed of the Balboa
girls took us by surprise. They forged
ahead in the first quarter and kept us
busy trying to catch up with them. It
took us the whole game to realize that
they were in the lead. At the end we
resolved never to let the score (5-6 in
their favor) happen again.

March i, the final game was held on
our floor. Naturally it was the hardest
game, for both teams were ready to fight
to the finish. Balboa's team was some-
what dampened in spirit on account of
some of the girls' being ill, but the game
progressed smoothly in spite of this diffi-
culty. Much credit is due Florence Mur-
taugh, captain of Balboa's team, for
through her ready optimism in the face
of odds, the score was brought up to our
very heels. Then time intervened and
left us victorious with the same score as
the beginning game, 9-1 1.



THE WASHINGTON POOL.



Rainy days, sunny days, hot days, cool;

In all kinds of weather there are people at the pool.

Long women, short ones, skinny ones, plump
Everything's in swimming from a mermaid to a frump.

That tourist swims so funny he holds his head up high.
And uselessly he works his feet, just like a gum-stuck fly.

A little Panamanian lad in a bathing suit too large.
Leaves behind a trail of foam like a Hudson River barge.

A tiny miss American dives gracefully below.

And comes up smiling with a stone for her little friend to throw.



A lanky man in English tweed comes loping down the stairs,
And stops to speak to a pair of twins with huge brown teddy-
bears.

On the benches all around, loll people of all kinds
Who laugh and talk and smile and stare, with nothing on their
minds.

.^nd I sit laughing, talking, too; hiding my stares with smiles.
For I am there to gather hints upon the latest styles.

For, rainy days, sunny days, hot days, cool.

In all kinds of weather there are women at the pool.



A man in swimming with his son a baby of one year.
Keeps splashing him with salty spray, despite his cries of fear.



Dorothy Ahcyidroth, '24.



68



THE CARIBBEAN.




Ethel Sonneman, '2^



OCTOBER.



Oct. 30. The high school gives a rising vote of
appreciation to Mr. S. J. Shreves, father of James
Shreves of the Sophomore class, who, through
tireless effort as a diver, has been able to help
raise a sunken submarine and so save the lives
of two men imprisoned therein.

NOVEMBER.

Nov. I. Wallace Johnson presents to C. H. S.
a joke box which he has made.

Nov. 2. The first staff meeting ot the school
are organized, and a very brief meeting of the year is held during lunch hour. Lunch and busi-
Supper Club is held after school. ness occupy the whole hour.

Oct. 17. The Boys' and Girls' .Athletic .'\sso- Nov. 3. The Seniors give the high school a

ciations hold their first meeting this afternoon and unuiue Hallowe'en party, "A Trip Around the

elect their officers. World," and serve delicious refreshments. Re-

Oct. 18. \ Supper Club meeting is held at the member the Peninsula of Death? And the stunts?

Y.W.C.A. The following new officers are elected: Did the Senior patient have can sir or two more?



Oct. 5. Cristobal High School reopens her doors
with so large an attendance that the Seniors are
relegated to the library. We welcome one new
teacher, Mr. Schneppmueller. Mrs. Noble is sub-
stituting until the arrival of our mathematics
teacher.

Oct. II. The Freshmen are initiated.

Oct. 12. A bald-heatled row is in evidence.

Oct. 15. The Caribbean staff is elected, classes



President. Ruth Hopkins.

Vice President. Mildred Morgan.

Treasurer. Teresa Gallagher.

Secretary. Irene Hopkins.

The old members are hostesses at a real iollifi-



Nov. 9. A Supper Club meeting is held at the
y. W. C. A. The new members are initiated.
Miss Hornbeak gives an interesting talk on
"Books" and the Senior girls serve supper.

Nov. 10. A staff meeting is held this evening at



cation and again Miss Dodds delights us with a Gladys Lowande's home. After the business



few readings.

Oct. 19. Mr. Schneppmueller's pleasing bari-
tone is heard in two solos in assembly period,
"The Song of Hubrias, the Cretan," and "Little
Mother of Mine."



meeting is over, Mrs. Lowande serves an enjoy-
able repast and we spend the remainder of the
evening in playing games and singing songs.

Nov. 12. Chaplain R. C. Deibert gives us a
very interesting talk on "Youth, its .'Vdvantages



Oct. 22-24. 1 he skies fairly burst open on these and Dreams." School medical examinations are



days:

Oct. 22. From midnight to midnight the rain-
fall was 9.02 inches.

Oct. 2.3. From midnight to miilnight the rain-
fall was 4.23 inches.

Oct. 24. I'Vom midnight to midnight the rain-
fall was 10.03 inches.

The Gatun bus is held up at Fort Davis on ac-
count of the rain.

Oct. 25. Miss C)'Connell, our new mathematics
teacher arrives and pays us a short visit.

Oct. 25. Mrs. Noble leaves us to teach the
eighth grade and Miss O'Connell takes up her
duties.



held to-day also.

Nov. 14. The Upsilon Gamma Gamma Club is
organized by the Junior-Senior boys. The first
steps are taken toward drawing up a charter
and the following officers are elected:

Oracle. Chester Pike.

Scribe. Richard Fisher.

Adviser. Miss DoiKis.

Nov. 19. The first interscholastic basket ball
game, in vviiich the Junior-Senior boys defeat the
l-reshman-Sophomore boys, is played and opens
the boys' athletic season.

Nov. 23. A staff meeting is held at George
Oakes' home this evening. After our business



THE CARIBBEAN.



69



meeting, a supper which we all enjoy very much
is served by Mrs. Oakes.

Nov. 26. Thanksgiving vacation begins.

DECEMBER.

Dec. 7. A staff meeting is held after school.
Strictly business. Junior Girls are hostesses at
regular Supper Club meeting. Miss Bakewell
gives an instructive talk on" The Girls' Budget,"
and an interesting playlet, "The Budget Ghost,"
is given by the program committee.

Dec. 18. The Seniors acquire new brilliancy.
Shiny new rings and pins are donned.

Dec. 19. Miss Corbett, member of the National
Board of the Y. W. C. A., pays C. H. S. a very
brief visit.

Dec. 21. The Juniors give a delightful Christ-
mas party at the Y. W. C. A. Especialh- appre-
ciated was the mock faculty meeting with

Katherine Fischer as Miss Dodds,

Mildred Morgan as Miss O'Connell,

Ruth Duey as Miss Barnhouse,

Olga Arcia as Miss Bakewell,

Dorothy Deibert as Miss Hornbeak,

Richard Fisher as Mr. Schneppmueller.
Christmas vacation begins.

JANUARY.

Jan. 7. School reopens and many new resolu-
tions are made.

Jan. II. A delightful supper is served by the
Sophomore girls at the Supper Club meeting.

Jan. 14. We begin the new school hours. Eight
o'clock seems at least three hours earlier than
nine.

Jan. 16. Mr. Schneppmueller sings three selec-
tions. We enjoy them, and then laugh long, while
he tells us about Cousin Olga and something good
to eat.

Jan. 1 8. A stafl" meeting is held during lunch
houv.

Jan. 22. The faculty and students of the high
school and the eighth grade visit the U. S. S.
California through the courtesy of Chaplains G. S.
Rentz and B. R. Patrick.

Jan. 25. The Upsilon Gamma Gamma Club
gives a beach party at New Cristobal in honor
of the faculty and some girl friends. Games,
wieners, and a good sing contribute to a satis-
fying good time.

FEBRUARY.

Feb. I. The Senior Class invade Richards'
studio for the annual picture-taking event.

Feb- 8. Mrs. Dennis presents to the high school



a picture of the Colosseum, doubly welcome be-
cause it is our first piece of real art. The Supper
Club girls vote the Freshman girls' refreshments
of wieners and sauerkraut both different and de-
licious.

Feb. 1 1-15. O days of midnight oil and fear.
The first semester tests are here!

Feb. 15. The efficiency of this staff business
meeting at the home of Guy Stewart is rivalled
only by the excellence of those tiny sandwiches.
Fll never tell how many you ate! And who ever
expected ice cream?

Feb. 16. Advance sales ticket contest closes.
Delilah May's side, losing, has sold 132; George
Oakes' side, winning, 142.

Feb. 20. Emily Bledsoe, '27, having sold 13
tickets, is presented prize of a two-and-one-half
dollar gold piece awarded by Edward May, '23,
for the girl selling the most tickets in the recent
contest, while Surse Taylor, '27, having sold 30,
wins an award of the same amount given by Mr.
V. H. May of Gatun for the boy selling the most.
Charlotte Housel, '24, selling 12, and Charles
Will, '27, selling 25, run them close seconds.

Lady Thais, of Czechoslovakia, delightfully en-
tertains us with three violin solos, Monti's
"Czardas," Mozart's "Minuet" and Dvorak's
"Humoresque." Her performance is rendered even
more effective by the sympathetic piano accom-
paniment given by Mrs. L. A. Schandler.

Feb. 20, 21, 24. Mr. Schneppmueller's mechan-
ical and architectural drawing classes have open
house. Only too few visitors see the interesting
exhibit.

Feb. 29. Another noonday staff meeting.

MARCH.

March 7. Senior girls are hostesses for the last
time at the Supper Club. Miss O'Connell gives
an instructive talk on "Stars." After a delicious
supper the meeting is adjourned early on account
of the Sophomore party.

The Sophomore Class gives a Leap Year party.
Charlotte Housel as the vamp, and the month
stunts with Caldwell B. Foos' impersonation will
long be remembered.

March 8. Feminine members of the faculty and
of the Senior Class plan a hike to Cativa. Only
four, and two guests, are able to go. On their
return, tales of snowballs, horseback rides, and a
"cross year" are heard.

March 13. Miss O'Connell takes Physics class
to the Mount Hope cold storage plant. Mr. Jones



70



THE CARIBBEAN.



makes their two hours interesting as well as in-
structive.

March 14-16. Twenty-five C. H. S. girls attend
Y. W. C. A. conference at Balboa. "Wasn't that
stunt funny at the frolic luncheon?" "Weren't
the Balboa girls good to us?" "Did Miss Pell
have to speak to you about going to sleep?"
"Aren't you glad our 'Gipsy Idyll' won in the song
contest?" "We had the grandest ride Sunday
p. m."

March ;i. Through the favor of Mr. P. R.
Joyce, the Tarpon Club at Gatun is placed at the
disposal of Cristobal High School for the party
which Delilah and her losing side give for George
and his winning side. They did not lose out in
choosing a place for the party!

March 22. The social problems class visit Gam-
boa penitentiary, Corozal Hospital, Palo Seco Leper
Home, and Chiriqui Prison. This is made possible
only by Mr. Hopkins' two cars, the passes fur-
nished by Mr. Andrew, and Captain Phillips'
loan of the police launch.

APRIL.

April 1 2. The Easter bazaar is held and voted
a great success. "How the old laboratory did
blossom into a beautiful flower-and-fancy-work
booth." "Oh! the delicious Easter bunnies and
candies." "Will you ever forget the Tea Room
or the Blue Grotto?"

April 21. Tales of moonlight nights, beautiful
seas, and sailing boats are heard from the Easter
vacationists.

.April 29. Mr. Schneppmueller is compelled to
give up teaching on account of ill health, andsails
for the States, carrying a heavy load of our good
wishes. Mr. Betterly takes up his duties as
mechanical drawing teacher.

MAY.

May 2. Most of The C.-^ribbe.an work goes to
the printers. The freshman party is a great
success. "Will you ever forget Butter Scotch or
Lt. Pinkin's quaint, sad love affair?" "Can't
you see Emily Bledsoe as the stout lady, Henry
Stevens as the beautiful vampire, and Fred
Sonneman as Jack be Nimble?"

May 5. Mrs. R. Wilson takes up the duties of
Mr. Schneppmueller in the teaching of the plane
geometry class.

May 7. Mr. Silcock lielights us by singing three
songs. We certainly hope he will pay us another
visit and entertain us again. A staff meeting is



held at Jose Arosemena's home. Business occu-
pies most of the time, but we find time to eat a
delicious supper, after which the boys prove their
ability to play a piano (player variety).

May 31. The Junior-Senior Banquet is held at
the Washington Hotel. Cheerful conversation,
impromptu toasts, good things to eat, and dancing
keeps us royally entertained for the evening.

JUNE.

June 6. The senior play, "The Charm School,"
is gi\en at the Gatun Clubhouse and draws a large
crowd.

June 7. "The Charm School" is given again
at the America Theater.

June II. '\gain "The Charm School" is pre-
sented at Coco Solo. "Thanks folks, for your
generous applause."

June 14. Again we give our play this time at
the National Theater to a Pacific side audience.

June 17. Miss Dodds entertains in honor of the
seniors at a dinner at the Old Washington Hotel
with the faculty as guests.

June 22. Baccalaureate services are held at the
Union Church.

June 23-21;. Final examinations.

June 25. Graduation exercises in the Hotel
Washington auditorium.

June 30. Cristobal High School closes her doors.



The Junior Class had quite an eventful time
and certainly did a full share in the school activi-
ties. Starting out with the Senior party in which
each class had to give a skit, we pulled off a very
good Ku Klux Klan initiation in which the whole
class acted. Of course this skit was the best one
presented. Then we held several candy sales and
collected enough money to hold our party. We
started out with an entirely different kind of a
party, for we gave it at the Y. W. C. A. and the
crowd danced to the music furnished by a loud
speaker. Here we shone again, for our class gave
two little playlets, "The Bogus Count" and "A
Faculty Meeting" in which the whole class co-
operated. Then came the Easter Bazaar and here
again the Juniors did their best. The Junior
Class gave two luncheons at the domestic science
building for the purpose of collecting funds for
the Junior-Senior Banquet. In the Senior play,
"The Charm School," the Junior Class was repre-
sented by several members. And last but not
least, we gave at the Hotel Washington a Senior
Bamiuct which everyone enjoyed.



THE CARIBBEAN.



71




Helen Abendroth, '2^.



REFLECTIONS.

Isolated as we are from so many high schools,
our exchanges mean much more to us than do the
exchanges of most schools. They are like voices
from afar telling of the activities of other students;
of their athletic scores, of the plays they have
given, ot their clubs and parties. An exchange
gives us an insight into a school's literary stand-
ards and ability, and into its ideals.

We have been very fortunate in receiving this
year many new monthlies and annuals, but we
regret to say that we have not heard from some
of our old friends. Where are the ^uill and the
"Junta, the Apokeepsian and the Herald? We've
missed them.

We welcome all new exchanges, and are eager
to add to our list any worthy school publications.

We are sorry to say that Balboa, our friendly
rival, published only a pamphlet last year instead
of her usual worthy annual. However her maga-
zine, though small, showed that she is still alive,
and it is with pleasure that we learn she is again
to put out a year book. We hope that we may
soon have it upon our exchange list.

OUR REFLEXES to others.

The RedandBlack. Reading High School for Boys, Reading, Pa.
Your literary department contains unusually good
material. You seem to excel in athletics.

The Netop. Turners Falls High School, Greenfield, Mass.

You have a clever little magazine. However we

looked in vain for your exchange department. We

should suggest that a table of contents and a few

cartoons and cuts would greatly improve your book.

The Mirror. Punxalawney High School, Punxatawney, Pa.

We enjoyed your poetry immensely. Your jokes
are original, and your literary department is excellent.
Our assistant editor hails from your town.



The Cambridge Review. Cambridge High and Latin School,

Cambridge, Mass.
Your cartoons are great. We enjoyed your "Notas
Espanolas" very much. Your magazine is well ar-
ranged.

The Gleaner. Pawtucket High School, Pawtiicket, R. I.

Your headings are original and clever. The
"Tattler" is unique.

TheCurtis Monthly. Curtis High School, Staten Island, N. Y.
"The Post Office" is a unique idea, and your "Cur-
tis Blast" brought forth many a laugh. Your de-
partment headings are also very attractive.

T/ie Student. Holmes High School, Covington, Ky.

.\ very good magazine. Your department head-
ings are original. Your athletic records are great.

The Exhaust. South Euclid High School, South Euclid, Ohio.

We should suggest that you have a table of con-
tents and arrange the different departments under
their various heads. We were obliged to look all
through the book before we found your exchange
list in the corner of a page.

The Reflector. Middletown Township High School,

Leonardo, N. J.
You have an excellent exchange department.
Your ads are to be envied. We were delighted with
your comment on our magazine. You have an en-
thusiastic booster in our circulation manager.

The Scribbler. Frank Evans High School, Spartanburg, S. C.

You have a wonderful literary department. Your
exchange list is very good, and your list of advertisers
is a delight to the eye.

The Spectator. Johnstown High School, Johnstown, Pa.

You have an excellent literary department. We en-
joyed very much your page entitled "Just a Mom-
ent." But why not add a few cuts to your book?

The Tradesman. High School oj Commerce, Boston, Mass.

\ delightful paper. Your cartoons are great.
We especially liked your parody entitled, "Who
Killed School Spirit.'"



72



THE CARIBBEAN.



The TrUent. Neptune Township High School,

Ocean Grove, X. J.
Your athletic department is good. Your cover de-
sign is always attractive and your ads are very well
arranged.

The Echo. Xorwalk High School, Norwalk, Conn.

.\ very good paper devoted to school activities.
.A few more cartoons would greatly improve it how-
ever.

The Epitome. Re.iding High School for Boys, Reading, Pa.
.\ well-arr.inged magazine. Your cuts are extreme-
ly good and your athletic records are to be envied.



The SqueeJiink. Monroe City High School, Monroe City, La.
Through the courtesy of Miss Octave Schulze we
again received a copy of your worthy annual. It is,
beyond doubt, the best high school book we have ever
been fortunate enough to receive. We should ap-
preci.ite being on your exchange list.

La Riata. Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque, N. M.

Your annual is the second best we have received
this year. Your dramatic department is especially
goo.l The cuts and cartoons are excellent. On look-
ing over the magazine we wondered how such a good
big annual could be published without advertise-
ments.



^uoddy Light. Lubec High School, Lubec, Me.

Your cuts are splendid. Your magazine is full of
school news and one ot which to be proud. We con-
gratulate you.

The Retina. M. R. IVaite Hi^h School, Toledo, Ohio.

We like the fine quality ot paper on which this
book is printed. Your cover designs are always good.
Your headings and cartoons are excellent. "Gos-
sip" is clever and well written.

The t'oice of South High. Youngslown,Ohio.

.\ superior magazine. .\ heading for each depart-
ment would greatly improve it, however.

ne Torch. H'est Philadelphia High School forGirls,

Philadelphia, Pa.
You have a wonderfully well-developed exchange
department. Your drawings and cover designs are
always distinctive. We enjoyeil the story "I Would
If I Could, But I Can't," by Dorothy Pizor, which
appeared in the March number, as swimming is one
of the principal sports here.

The Monitor. Il'ellesley High School, H'ellesley Hills, Mass.
.\ few more stories and cuts would greatly improve
your paper. Why not tell where it is published too?

Reflector. H'oburn High School, H'oburn, Mass.

Your heidings are good, but a more systematic
arrangement of the contents woald add greatly to the
attractiveness of your publication.



The Pai. Tamalpais Union High School, Sausalilo, Calif.

Through the courtesy of Elinor Harrold, we re-
ceived this worthy exchange. The departments are
well arranged. The pictures and cartoons are excel-
lent. The cover design is unique and attractive.
What more can we say.'

The Miniir. La Grande High School, La Grande, Oreg.

This far-west exchange came as a pleasant surprise
to us. We like it from the front of its very attractive
cover to the very end. Your account of school
activities indicates that you are very much alive.

The Pinion. McKinley High School, Honolulu, Hawaii.

We were especially pleased to receive this f.ir-away
exchange. In one of the early issues we saw thatOlga
Linczer, a former classmate ot ours, was on one of
your athletic teams. Your paper is full of local color,
and receives our heiirry applause.

The Oracle. Englewood High School, Engleviood, N.J.

Your headings are clever. The poet's corner is in-
deed a novel idea.

Pebbles. Marshalllown High School, Marshalltown, Iowa.

.\ splendid paper, with good athletic records. A
bigger literary department would improve it, how-
ever.

The Round- Up. Reading High School, Reading, Mass.

For so small a paper, >'ou tieserve praise. \'our
literary dcp.irtment is excellent.



The Breccia. Peering High School, Portland, Me.

"Pebbles" is a uniijue heailing for your clever jokes.
.\ few more stories would help a good deal. We are
very grateful for your comment on our magazine.

The Academy Journal. Norwichh'ree Academy, Norwich, Conn.
Your cover design is always attractive. "Day by
Day" is clever. A few cuts woulil help.

The Record. John Marshall High School, Richmond, Va.

You have a wonderful alumni department. The
stories, as many as there are, are very good. Why
not have some more? Y'our headings arc clever and
original.



Searchlight. Bound lirook High School, Buuiui Bruok, N.J.
.\ well-arr.inged little paper, tilled with school
news. A few more stories would improve it. Our
editor-in-chict attended school in Bound Brook at
one time.

The If 'est port Crier. IVestporl High School, Kansas City, Mo.
Your paper is fully devoted to school interests.
What greater praise is there.'

Red and Black. Hillsborough Hig,h School, Tampa, Fla.

Your paper is ilevoted to school activities. We
always look forwaril to "Billv Stitf." Congratula-
tions!



THE CARIBBEAN.



73



as we are reflected.

The Caribbean.

Your magazine is extremely attractive. You have
many original ideas and your large number of photo-
graphs makes your magazine attractive.

The Torch.
The Caribbean.

(The exchange list ot this magazine, was written up
in the form of poetry.)

The first on our list is The Caribbean,
From Cristobal, Panama!
'Tis like a trip to a foreign zone,
And is the best received by far.

§jioddy Light.
The Caribbean.

Your magazine is one of the best among our list
of exchanges. It is well balanced and proves itself
to be the result of much hard work and student in-
terest. The pictures add greatly to the attractiveness
of the issue.

The Monitor.
The Caribbean.

We welcome anything that comes such a long jour-
ney. Distance lends enchantment. Your annual is
well drawn up. Some ot the poems were wonderful.

The Record.
The Caribbean.

We were delighted with our far-away friend, The
Caribbean, with its splendid stories of life in the
tropics. Your cuts are very clever and your alumni
department is well developed. Yours certainly is a
splendid paper.

The Spectator.



The Caribbean.

Your publication is excellent.



The Echo.



The Caribbean.

We consider ourselves very fortunate to exchange
with you. Your magazine is splendid. To a boy or
girl in the States the photographs and well-written
stories of The Caribbean are ot special interest. We
were delighted to hear about George Oakes, a former
classmate of ours.

The Reflector.

The Caribbean.

The Caribbean is the best yet. It has so many
fine pictures and such interesting news. All the de-
partments are well gotten up.

The Scribbler.

The Caribbean.

We wish to give special mention to "The Dungeon
of Fort San Lorenzo," by Warner Bowers. Your
magazine gives a good idea of the country in which
you live.

The Mirror.

The Caribbea.v.

We find that this magazine is complete in every de-
partment. They have numerous pictures of Panama
and views around the Canal Zone. It is an interest-
ing, helpful magazine. We are glad to exchange with
you, Caribbean.

The Trident.



AN ORAL REPORT IN ENGLISH CL.ASS.

(With apologies to "Casey.")

John Ordway, '26.



Ten thousand eyes are on me as I get up from my seat;
Ten thousand giggles greet me as I trip up on my feet;
And when, bewildered by the laughs, the words I quickly pour,
No stranger in the class can doubt I wish the thing were o'er.



."^nd there I stand before the class a gasping idiot there
.^nd they look on with laughs and smiles, enjoying the atFair;
And when the words refuse to come and I can not even speak.
And when again the whole class laughs, "Sit down!" says Miss
Hornbeak.



Ml



[MMMMMI



^



THE seventh annual issue of The Caribbean is completed. We of the staff have worked hard, for we were
loath to have it fall below the standards set for us by any of our predecessors, and we were anxious
that students ot future years might look upon our annual as worthy of their emulation. We say it is
completed. It will never be complete. No one knows that better than we. We see its errors, its
shortcomings. But in spite of them we are unashamed. We feel that we have put into it that which we most desired
It to have a bit of the real Cristobal High School spirit. What we have done however could never have been
accomplished without the aid of those of you who read this. You have surprised us, accustomed though we are to
your kindnesses, by your generosity and interest. People of the .-Atlantic side, ever loyal in their support, have sur-
passed themselves this year. Even people on the Pacific side have given material evidence of their interest.

Personal thanks areout of the question. Consider this is written toyou. We of Cristobal High School thank you.
We can not close, however, without a special word of gratitude to our tried and true friends of the Panama Canal
Press, who have indubitably proved, in ways which we can not mention, and for which we can never sufficiently
thank them, their loyalty to and friendship for our high school.

And now, just one last request. Tell our advertisers that you have seen their advertisements in The Caribbean.
Let them feel that they have been wise as well as liberal in giving us their patronage.

The Business Managers, The Caribbean, 1924.



u



THE CARIBBEAN.



WB



Ch.violte Ho:!sel, '24.

SIMPLY SUGGESTIONS.

Charlotte Housel, '24.

We Students of Cristobal High School realize
that unless some necessary improvements are car-
ried out within a short time, so as to produce a
reaction in studies and lessen the physical action,
the high school as a whole will continue to suifer.
Speaking not as a critic or cynic but as a person
who is very much interested in the welfare of the
school, I suggest that individual telephones be
installed in the desks of certain individuals, so
that they may converse with one another the
entire study period, as some desire, without dis-
turbing the whole assembly.

Comfortable cots are desirable for those tired
exhausted human beings who study so hard and
wonder why they receive only a scarlet "F" or
a timid "P."

A sounding board in front of the assembly room
to throw the teacher's voice, so that she can im-
press upon the hard-of-hearing pupil what she
wants and expects, would prove a success pro-
vided nothing else were thrown except the voice.

An inexhaustable supply of paper is imperative
so that the paper in some people's desks won't
prove a magnet to the nails on the fingers of the
less fortunate or forehanded.

A giggle-muffler to silence those who find a joke
in everything and common sense in nothing
would not prove unacceptable.

And last but not least, a niachine to utilize the
lost motion caused by indivitiuals who love to
explore unknown parts of the assembly room
would perhaps store the needed energy for the
poor tired individuals who, wlicn a basket ball
game comes, are too weary to come out to cheer.



WHAT IF SOMEONE ELSE HAD SAID IT:

Miss Dodds (to Richard Fisher who had just
come from the luncheon given by the Juniors).
How was the luncheon to-day?

Richard Fisher. As good as you could expect
from beans.

WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF-EVIDENT.

Miss 0' Council (outside the room). Miss
Hornbeak?

Miss Hornheak (inside the room). Yes.
Miss 0' Council (still outside). Are you gone?

Three o'clock in the morning old Ancon Club-
house after a basket ball game.

Z. P. You fellows open the door now. I've
been up here three times and I'm going to settle
this.

John S. (anxious to help out). We're all sleep-
ing, sir. J

OF COURSE HE didn't KNOW SHE MEANT KIPLINg's
VOLUME.

Miss Hornbeak (in front of room). I am very
anxious to find "Mine Own People."

Jose (surprised in back ot room). Why, I
thought they were in Texas.

AND THIS IS WORD PLAv!

Guy (talking of giving a play to get money for
expenses for the annual staff). How would the
"Three Musketeers" do for a staff play?

Chester. Oh no, that's all sword play, isn't it?

HEARD IN Sl'ANISH CI.AS.S.



Freshman Girl. .Ain't I pretty?

Oliver. Even a sign is pretty when it's painted



Surse Taylor (in an exercise of original sentences
to illustrate use oi de and para). I,a cerveza de
Balboa es muy buena.

Miss Baruhouse (to pupils). Don't ask me for
proof.



THE CARIBBEAN.



75




76



THE CARIBBEAN.



mM.um.'U.VAU^^imMmmMMmmMmMUMmmMmmMMm '^^



Cecilia Theatre

PANAMA



America Theatre

COLON



E\)t ^ijrines of JBljoto dramatic ^rt



Exhibitors of -

PARAMOUNT, REALART, UNITED ARTISTS, FIRST NATIONAL,
FOX, SELZNICK, HODKINSON, VOGEL, GOLDWYN, ASSOCIATED
PRODUCERS and PATHE PRODUCTIONS



fgra^ irWmW




I



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UNITED FRUIT COMPANY



I



Regular Sailings
from

Cristobal, C. Z.
to
New York,
New Orleans,
Cuba,
Colombia,
Jamaica, and
Costa Rica.



For further particulars,
apply:







M. C. O'HEARN, General Agent, Cristobal, C. Z.



T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panama City



4W\m\\rnKmmmMim£iKmi!lmmmiM



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i

I
I



QUALITY IS EVERYTHING



Naturally, having spent many years in the making of portraits, we
have very positive ideas on that subject. To our mind a quality
portrait should have distinction of pose. Day and night photography.



Ifpslair.s the
STUDEBAKKR (;ARAf;t';
^ Central Ave. Panama City



SCRANTON PHOTO STUDIO



BOX 476

Ancon, C. Z.

Panama City, R. of P.



i



^mmmmwimwimwgWimwmfWfm^^



THE CARIBBEAN.



77



HOTEL TIVOLI



PANAMA'S



ANCON, C. Z.

DISTINCTIVE



HOTEL





l#il^^




^^K




^ At^L^i^Sifc'jWBB^BBBi^^Bi^^?^



Where comfort and refinement combined with
moderate charges are at your convenience



Overlooking the City of Panama and
the Pacific Ocean



EUROPEAN PLAN

Room without bath, one person per day $2.50 and up

Room with bath, one person per day 4.00 and up

Room without bath, two persons per day 6.00 and up

Room with bath, two persons per day 7.00 and up

Andrew Johnston, Manager



i;



78 THE CARIBBEAN.



^^



/>>.v/>Vi./



5

i IMPROVED EQUIPMENT MODERN METHODS

I



i

i

i






EFFICIENT SERVICE



i JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

I

i BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER

I
g

I

We Solicit the Patronag^e of Canal Employees.

i
I

I

5 Weekly Collections and Deliveries of Laundry Work.

I Charge Account if Desired,

I
I
I
I

i
I



CLEANING, PRESSING, and DYEING
I A SPECIALTY




Phone Colon 21 P. O. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z



THE CARIBBEAN.



79




MMMMMMMMmMMMMiiMMMMM2



BORDEN'S GARAGE

Latest Model Automobiles

COMPETENT CHAUFFEURS AND RELIABLE CARS



12th & Bolivar Streets



Telephone 355 Colon, R. P.



§



Bay Your Drugs, Patent Medi ines,

Perfumery, Toilet Articles, etc.

AT THE

Pan-American Drug Store

50 Front Street, Colon, R. P.
You Always Do Better at Salazar's

WE CARRY AN

Mp=t0=batE ^oba iFountain

3 STORES

50 Front Street 56 Bol-var Street

182 Bolivar Street



COMPLIMENTS OF

SCn abmirer

of

(Eristofaal Cfigfj ^^rfjool



[MMMMSKMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMSSMMMiMilSP



RATHBUN, STILSON & CO.

Hardware, Lumber, Paints, and Oils

p. O. Box 140, COLON, R. p.



8o



THE CARIBBEAN.




X the discerning,
X Xomelike hospitality, coupled with
H/agemess to serve

VV ill spell hotel comfort,
x\.nd efficiency.

l^uch are conditions at the

Hotel Washington.

Xt is indeed fortunate in its setting one of
J.^ atural beauty enhanced by man's artifice;



Airplane View of Hotel Washington.



Vjrounds bordering on the blue Caribbean;

Trees stately palms, and starry perfumed
f rangapani ;

V^rchids, roses, and cheery periwinkles;

tatory privileges
salt-water pool



I^Tatatory privileges afforded in a splendid




X Xere in a beautiful concrete building in
V^ld Spanish style



T



here are conveniences for visitors
from near and far; and



T7^ nding the joyous day, comfort
T ulled to sleep by the sound of



able beds where one is

ed to sleep by the so

the waves on the sea wall.



Entrance to Hotel Washington.



THE CARIBBEAN.



i



1



[iSMMMMllMMMlSMiSiSiSMMMMMMMP

I

i



ARBOIZ HERMANOS

FANS, COMBS, SHAWLS and other FANCY ARTICLES

Stores in both
PANAMA - anJ - COLON



palding's Athletic Goois



TRACK
BASEBALL
BASKET BALL

GOLF

TENNIS

BOXING

SWIMMING

GYMNASIUM
and Accessories

Sole Agents

The Maduro Company

21 Central Ave., Panama

p. O. Box 1078

immmmmmmmmmn




Frencii Diug M

FRONT and BOLIVAR STS.

Pure Drugs and Chemicals

French Perfumery

Goerz Cameras

Films and other Photographic
Supplies

Army and Navy

BINOCULARS



of the Best Quality



fmmm^



MP



L. C. Leighton



Photographs



FLASHLIGHT GROUPS A SPECIALTY
7x17 Doubleweight Sepia Views of Canal Zone



BOX 1452



CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



mMWMMMMMMM^



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82



THE CARIBBEAN.



m^ ^ff^MmmmfMJM tMmmmj



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3



Jlerliert ^. IBotm, B. IB. ^,



I CRISTOBAL,

1



CANAL ZONE



Mmmmmm ^MMMMMMMMMM5fATAlhTAl^Al^ATATATATATA^IfW\TATATATAli^




S C'PTTT^Th^'R A 1^"R^"T? is the second largest automobile manu-
^ O 1 U 1^J2/-D21.A.J2/I\. facturer in the world, and the largest
§ builder of quality cars in the world, Studebaker's lowest-priced car has
more Timkin bearings throughout than any other car selling within $1500
^ of their price.



I J^ J^^ HOPKINS Sole Dealer for Canal Zone and Republic of Panama

I THIS IS ANOTHER STUDEBAKER YEAR |




MMMMMmi



Eotarp Clul) of Cris;tobal=Colon



MEETINGS EACH MONDAY AT NOON
AT THE STRANGERS CLUB :



.IDisfiting ?^otaiiang UDclconif.



M^m^m^mmmmmmmm^^mw^^tmwmmwmswMmmwmwmmwm



THE CARIBBEAN.



83



syamyayjaiMmm a^ui^i^y^i^



FAST
COMFORTABLE



i LAUNCHES
I EVERY DAY



l^fje ^sipinlnaU ^otel swimming

^ ^ ^^ HIKING

MOONLIGHT p
DANCING



TABOGA

"Typical Tropical Isle"



Tourists Don t Miss It



Residents Yoii Cmi" t Forget It



ASEPTIC DENTAL PARLOR

Pr. Wxa. %. Upma loung

SURGEON DENTIST



8.099 Bolivar Street, between 8th and 9th Streets

P. O. Box 115 Phone Colon 331

Colon, R. de P.



^mmMMJMmmmmMMMMm;m[k



The American Beauty Parlor



1(51



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PROPRIETOR



37 Front Street
Phone Corp. 298 Colon, R. P.



iJMJMMWS



SMMMMSEMMMMMMMMMMMliM



I
I



Bentisit



COLON



AND



GATUN



"^m^^^^^^^^^f^^^i^^^^i^i^^^t



84



THE CARIBBEAN.



II TIP TO





It is generally recognized that
the Best Formula for Infant
Feeding down in these Tropical
Countries is the Ancon Doctors'
Formula:

1-Part Nestle's Condensed Milk
3-Parts St. Charles Cream
12-Parts Boiled Water.

It changes with the ageof thechild :
Ask your doctor.



FOR USE IN COFFEE AND OTHER
PURPOSES

Nestle's & St. Charles'

Are the most economical because
they go FARTHEST.



BOYS Tell your mothers to give
you Nestle's and St. Charles' and
exchange the Labels for Toys, Story
Books, Chocolate, etc.

AT THE .



^ Nestle's Milk Company



Colon or Panama



g^^i^iMWiWiWiWiWfWdmwiWiWi^^m



LA MASCOTA



BUY




SHOE



The Packard Shoe

BEST ON THE ISTHMUS
Sole Agent

C. W. MULLER

CENT