Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093680:00010


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VoL. VI.


CRISTOB4, CANAL ZONE, 1923.


No. i.


PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL


Porte Cochere, Hotel Washington-Entrance.


Porte Cochere, Washinoton Hotei-Exit.


CONTENTS


Advertising.................. ERNST EUPHRAr,
A lum n i. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appreciation ............... ... .... .. CLASS OrF
As You Like It . . . . .. .......


* 75
19
S 75
.-*


Athletics:


Boys'...... ....
Basketball,.
Foreword...
Swimming.
Tennis ...


Track .....
G irls'.. . .
Basketball -
Swimming.
Track., .


...... -CHESTER PIKE, '24.


59


. ... 6 1
..... 62
62


...... CHARLOTTEE HOUSE,


Caribbean Staff . .... ... ..............
D education ......... .. ... ......
Editorial.. ...... .......,H. EDWARD MAY,
E editorial Staff ........ .... . ........ . .
Exchanges ..................FLORENCE ALBERT,


Faculty, The..... . . .
Faculty Silhouettes. .. .
Freshman Class..........
Freshman Index........
Graduates............
Jokes................ .
Juniors............. ..


Liter


..... 6-7
... I7


...-. HELEN ABENDROTH,

.- M .MATTISON PULLIG,


ary...................... LOUISE H ENTER,
A Case of Mistaken Identity, GERALD BLISS, JR.,
Allegories of School Life-
Everyboy ...........H. EDWARD MAY,
Every Student's Ride. LOUISE HENTER,
The Harp........... .ERNST EUPHRAT,
A Shred of Yellow Paper, DOROTHY ABENDROTH,
A Soliloquy............. WILLIAM COUSINS,
Controlling my Temper..CALDWELL B. Foos,
Dramatic Attempts-
An Inferno-I Drama,... FRANCES GRAY,
Mr. Shakespeare Visits Gopher Prairie,
I.OUISE CENTER,
The Booklegger.......ERNST EUPHRAT,
Early Life in Panama-
A Cause for Thanksgiving,
1\4 A Itr' flt. 7 Din


Literary-Continued:
Glimpses of Colon-Continued:
A Furniture Store on Bolivar,
LOUISE CENTER,
Along Shore...,.. .MATTISON PULLIG,
A Window ....,....., HENRY MOORE,
Impressions While Strolling Down Bolivar
Street,......... DOROTHY ABENDROTH,
John's. ........GERALD BLIss, JR.
The Iceberg Snowball Shop, H. E. MAY,
The Native Market ... FRANCES GRAY,
Gum Chewing ..........MATTISON PULLIG,
Never Again .......L .....LOUISE RENTER,
Pup-p-pathetic......... ...ERNST EUPHRAT,
The Dungeon of Fort San Lorenzo,
WARNER F. BOWERS, '
The Iowa... ...... .EDITH COULBOURN,
Time ... .. .... FRANCES GRAY,
Tragedies-Large and Small-
Lost-One Dime... .MATTISON PUi.LLI,
The Home-Coming.. . .FRANCES GRAY, '
Two Trips Taken from Panama-
A Visit to the Chokois Indians,
INZA MARKHAM,
M is Vacaciones ......... .. .. ..... ... .
When Green Meets Green...Lourse HENTER, '
Poetry:
Alas and Alack ....... ... . HENRY MOORE,
A Tarpon. .............MATTISON PULLIG,
A Tribute ..... ..... .ERNST EUPHRAT,
Chinese Gardener ......... LOUISE HENTER,
Fantasy ...........GERALD BLISS, JR.,
Gatun ILake. ....... ......EMOGENE NASH,
Guess Where? ........H. EDWARD MAY,
My Father.. ........... FRANCES GRAY,
Revery. . . . . . . . INZA M ARKHAM, '


Sunset on the Caribbean,
SENIOR ENGLISH CLASS,


The Old Jungle Trail...... LOUISE HENTER,
The Piers.... ..........GERALD BLISS, JR.,
The Siege of San Lorenzo...H. EDWARD MAY,
The Tropic Moon......... ERNST EUPHRAT,
Tropic Rain ........ ......FRANCES GRAY,
W e Are Seven .. . . . . . . . . . . . ..


21 2
-'23. *_2
23.. 54
'23. 6
23.. 18
25. 58
12


Ii


'2-


. . .








THE CARIBBEAN.


Sunset on the Caribbean-A View Taken from the Foreground of the Home of THE CARIBBEAN.


The noises of the day have died; high, shrill,
Excited voices of the children, cries
Of parrakeets, and hum of planes are still.
The shadowed sea in somber sleep now lies
Which late did fret, and fume, and foam, and fill
The air with sounds monotonous. Low sighs
The rustling palm, and, from the distant hill,
The echoes of the sunset gun now rise.
The sun, low sinking in yon western sky,
Looks forth from clouds all touched and tinged with gold,-
His path, a carpet shimmering o'er the bay,
To meet the weary weathered rocks which lie-
Historians silent-waiting as of old
For sun, and wind, and wave of each new day.


SENIOR ENGLISH


CLASS,









THE CARIBBEAN.


Top, left to right.--Louise Henter, Literary Elit *r; Ernst Euphrat. Bu ine s Manaer: Gerald Bliss, Advertising Manager; Editor-
in-Chief, resigned; Henry Moore. Art E litor. Left side, reading down.-Florence Albert. Exchange Editor; Jarne3 Biuroon.
Assistant Business Manager; Warner Bowers, ex-Assistant Business Manager; Emomene Nash. Alumni E litor, Right side, reaJing
down.-Guy Stewart, Circul tion Manager; Chester Pike, Boys' Athletic Editor; Charlotte Housel, Girls' Athletic Editor; EJith
Coulbourn, Assistant C('ircuihtion Manager. Bottom, left to rizht. Mattie Pullig. Joke Editor; Gladys Lowande, Assistant
Editor-in-Chief; Frances Gray, School Notes Editor, Center.-Edward May, Editor-in-chief.


DEDICATION.


F. THE STUDENTS


OF CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, GRATEFULLY DEDICATE


\/BI 'S1r TI-IP ,TITI V1I I'nI (H T"F CARIRRFAN TO TI-IF TArFF OF THF








THE CARIBBEAN.


* - - -'. -m
a


*-.- B ^ ^
_/ *_h .7'"?


*:~'. \\ :.'
-Th
.~ I ZZ;.
C

>2 C ~
* .. . ~L
* .
.4 *. K .. ... ft
1'.-
.. .r -~
..--- o.1:
:'~ (: ~


"Our Eddie."


was Alexander Dumas in his


Monte Cris
teau d'If,


to,


"The Count of


" who gave importance to the Cha-


which is situated on a barren rocky


the arts, that Dant6s refused to leave him while
he lived. During the fourteenth year of Dant6s'
imprisonment, the Abb6 had his third attack of


island about two miles west of Marseilles and was
at that time used as a state prison by the French
government. As the story goes, Edmond Dantes,
a young man of about nineteen years, was unjustly
imprisoned there and forced to spend many years
of his life in a dark, dismal, dirty, and dank dun-


catalepsy,


which


was fatal


to him,


Dantes made a great effort to save his life.


although
Dant6s


then saw his opportunity for escape and taking
advantage of it, he substituted his body for that
of the Abb6, which had been wrapped for burial,
and was thrown in the sea, the cemetery of the


geon.


One evening as D)antes


ay on his cot in a


semi-conscious condition-for he had been trying
to starve himself to death-he heard a distant


tapping against stone.


Could it be the workmen


thereabout or a prisoner trying to make an es-


cape?


Dantes


was infused


strength came to him;


new


hope;


he got up and went to the


Chateau d'If.


After extricating himself, he swam


to the distant Isle of Tibouleu, where he was later
picked up by a sailing ship.
Thus, through patience, incessant, toil, and de-
termination, and by taking advantage of an oppor-
tunity, he was able to free himself from the bonds
of the Chateau d'If.


quarter whence the sound had come.


Knowing


that if it were a prisoner he would stop, but if it


were


a workman


he would


continue,


Dantes


tapped three times-and the noise ceased. Then,
with timorous patience he waited for seventy-two


days until the tapping again started.


At once he


resolved to gain something that he had coveted


for years-companionship.


After


breaking the


Each one of us has a life to live.


Are you going


to live yours in a chateau of IF or are you going
to dig to gain your liberty now? Are you going
to let the barriers of life's IF's retard your progress
or are you going to surmount them, as did Dant6s,
with patience, incessant labor, and determination.
"If I could have one more chance, how differ-


ently


I would do,-;


" "f only I were as clever


water jug in his cell he hid some of the larger
pieces and began immediately with one of them
to dig through the wall, whence the sound came.
He labored incessantly with every element of de-
termination for weeks and weeks, taking out per-


a handful of rock and


plaster


as he,-;


" "if I had only known before,-;


" "y


I could have the opportunities he has had,-;


"if only I were as lucky as she is,-;


his wealth,--;


" "if I had


" "f I had his perseverance,--;


"if myparents and teachers took more interest-."
We have heard these remarks time and time again.


Finally, he reached the tunnel that the other man
had made and, on meeting the prisoner, found him


We often make them ourselves.


Every person who


utters such a subjunctive clause is a prisoner in


to be I.


Abbe Faria, a priest who had been con-


the chateau of IF.


It is for us to make our own


fined there a few ears nrior to D)antes


sentence.


onnortunities and welcome them when thev an-


"9








THE CARIBBEAN.


Are you the master of what you undertake or
are you imprisoned by the trivial, yet significant
IF? When you are given a task to perform, do


"That person surely


forget that
hard work.


has been lucky.


ninety-eight


per cent of


That person has merely


" But we


genius is
gained his


you say,


"Yes I shall, if--"?


IF-that


is your


liberty from the chateau of IF.


He has chiseled


prison wall.


This very task that you are asked to


away a


t his chateau of IF until


only the dominant


perform may be your big opportunity in life;


remains.


you hesitate,


be lost.


Your


answer


should be,


"I must;


therefore I can.


"Nor in the clamour of th


e crow


street,


When


we encounter


a person,


who has


risen


Nor in the shouts and plaudits


of the throng,


higher than the average, we say without thought,


But in


ourselves, are triumph andi dcfca.t"


faculty.


MissBarnhouse. Mr. Bacon.


MissBeeching. Mis IDoddts.


fTe


Miss Hornbeak. Miss BakewelL









THE CARIBBEAN.


MR. W. W. ANDREW.,


MR. FRANK T.


WILSON,


Providence,


Rhode Island.


Seattle,
University


Superintendent of Schools.


Washington.
of Washington.


Assistant to Superintendent of Schools.


Who came to us from Minnesota


And often tells of "Brother


Ole"?


Who's travelled far and wide of late
And tales of travel does relate?


Who teaches


English,


coaches


And has


so much to claim her days?


Who talks of Caesar's wars in


as if she'd seen


Miss J. ISABELLA DODDS,


Claremont,


Minnesota.


Mlacalester College.


them all?


Who is it always lends a hand
And never fails to understand?
Who's loved by everyone in school,
With no exceptions to the rule?


English, Latin,


Social


Problems


and Economics.


MISS DODDS.


Caribbean


Adviser.


Senior Class


Adviser.


Who is


it changes


rapidly


When students answer vapidly,


From


smiling countenance to frown


And gives a proper calling


Who is it


down?


always can partake


In parties, and can surely make
Such pies and cakes and candy


As everyone


pronounces dandy?


Who is


"honestly thinks that


a real authority is the best,


Who has for outlines


an appetite,


But has a bark far worse than her bite?


West


Miss ADELA


Lansing,
Iowa State
University of


. BAKEWELL
Iowa.
College.
California.


MISS BAKEWELL.


Home Economics,


Ancient


History.


Junior Class Adviser.


Who is it hides behind


Upon her


the books


but o'er them looks


Through spectacles dark-rimmed and


Just when


round


she seems behind them drowned?


Who is


always


t


And tales of Texas loves


:he bell,
to tell ?


Who's anxious always for the mail?


Who dreads upon the


sea to sail?


. l ., p I









THE CARIBBEAN.


Who is it is a
But came to u


"native daughter'
is from o'er the water


From Bogota, where she did teach
And also probably did preach?

Who sings the praises of her brother


More frequently than


any other;


From Guatemala scarfs did bring
In colors fit to deck a king?


Who is it snaps her fingers hard,
But hates to decorate a card


With lurid


Who sympathizes


MABEL JEAN B


ARN N IS1,


Watsonville, California.


Even when she criticizes?


Leland


Stanf rd,


I niv(Sity.


MISS BARNHOUSE.


Spanish


Freshman Class


. d'iser.


Who is it always


stands


on guart


And looks so firm, and cold, and hard,
Or paces grimly up the ais!es-


And yet finds time for jokes and


W\'ho always


smiles?


looks the best in clothes


Such as he wears when er h


e goes


Upon a hike, with pack on back


To hold his


needments


and a snack?


Who is it makes


"bestest"


MR. HENRY G. BACON.,


gives us


lots of chance to judge?


Mauricetown,
Columbia I


New Jersey.


Who teaches our boys


to draw


And keeps the Science class in awe?


Manual Training,


AMechan


ical Drawin, General Sciem c.


MR. BACON.


Who is it sits


in a student


s seat


When in assembly she has her beat,


And pounces thence in


seeming


On him who looks up from his page?


Who is


it ejaculates,


"Oh rats!"


And has an antipathy for hats,


says,


"You


Seniors needn't think-"


And because they don t,


red ink?


Who likes to bat the tennis ball?


Who in her classwork kn


ows it all?


MNIts MABEL BEECHING,


W,\'hr\ hitL-c tho rnnntr\' ,.n ni A nun


rage,








8 THE CARIBBEAN.


MY FATHER.


Frances


Gray, '25.


castle wall,
the turret


A rush of feet upon the steep stone stair,
A clank of muskets on the courtyard flags,
The winding of the warning horn afar,
The rumble of the drawbridge as it drops,
The creaking of the gates as they swing wide,
The loud triumphant shout that welcomes home
The lord, the king, the idol of this band.
I fling aside my tapestry and run
With feet that scarcely seem to touch the marble floor,
So eager that my lips shall be the first
To give glad greeting to my dearest lord.
His breeches caught with silver at the knee,
A scarlet sash encircling his hips,


of his
s mig
rings
ack h


'wn throat,

,


I see him stand, surrounded by his men,
One hand upon the hilt of his great sword,
The other raised in greeting unto all.
He catches sight of me behind the men,
And, with a shout that echoes through the c
He thrusts aside the crowd that intervenes,
And stands and faces me with arms outstret
A breathless moment as I hesitate,
And then I rush into those sheltering arms.


I g
Goi
An


ourt,


And feel so tiny 'midst those great strong men;
I timidly shrink nearer, and he laughs
And lifts me to his shoulder, where I sit
And cling with one small arm about his neck.
I see all piled up high within the gates
Huge oaken chests with bands of copper bound,
And bales, and casks, and vats, and tubs, and sacks,
Fair bulging with their contents rich and rare.
I catch the words of cannon, battle, death,
A deep voice tells of storms upon'the sea,
Another speaks of raids, of close escapes,
Of silent marches through the tropic night,
Of bullion buried in a far-off cave,
Of unmarked graves, of faces that are gone;
And I wonder as I hear these words,
For I know naught of storms, or death, or graves.
My father holds me tight and passes on
Beneath the mighty arch into the hall,
Where wooden tables groan beneath their load
Of bread, and meat and wine-enough for all.


aze with won
ne are faces t
i new names
w here, now
niliar face, ti
t still the bar
* some who o


And then bethin


beating of his heart,
ainst my burning cheek,
of his calloused hands


Of "death'
The lights
The shout


der on the motley throng,
hat Jonce did know,
now re-echo through the hall.
there, I catch a sight of some
he sound of some known voice,
nd is changed. I look in vain
nce did feast within this hall,
ik myself of "storms at sea"
unmarked graves." I understand.
dim before my sleepy eyes.
ad the singing die away.


As he rumples up my short black curls.
He puts me down before him, and he stands
With hands on hips and gazes down on me;
I hardly reach the buckle on his sash


I hear a faint voice in the dis
"Morgan! The Pirate! The
I sleep.


tance cry
Raider!
*


Our King!"


heard upon the
of cannon from


The collar
To bare hi;
The heavy
His coal bl


linen shirt turned back
hty chest and strong bro
a-dangle from his ears,
air a-flying in the breeze


I feel the quicken
The touch of lips
The rough caressi














An Answer" to the Questlon.

WHtV-AT IS "THl-E IFUNC T"IOI'NT 00'i


' Y I II I 1


D1 A TAN 1 1 tN. 1 I.\ ^
EDUCATION?"


by Three (' ri ,tobal Iligh


T HE character of men, like th
i I l I .I .1 i


and, like the


stone,


and molded, and shaped
Education, like the tools


acter of mn
what? Of
Yes! It m
ledge of rig
sequences
individual
to uphold
that shape
A chain is
strong as i
to make th<
travel in a


strength


en. Educat
geography?


ieans all
!ht and
of right
response
this res]
man's c
as stroi
ts weaker


ItC)


of th


ATrong
and w
ability
ponsi:
harac
ng as
est bl(


weakest I
i everlas


h and the beauty


the ch


for its p<
that sh;
n mean
Of scien
ese, and
It me.
rong. I
of every*
'ility. .
ter. Al
its wea
)ck? It
k the str
cycle,
of the


Schoi G(;irlsj)


e substance of stone", varies


aractero


men must


)sition in thile tower
ape the rock, shape
s knowledge. K
ce? Of English?
more. It mean:
ans the knowledge
t means the realize
man. It means
Il tie e things a
i these things are
kest link. Is not
is the purpose oi
ongest, and this p
increasing, day 1


tower


of society.
-Frances


Ihe chiseled,
r of society.
'es the char-
nowledge of
Of Latin?
s the know-
e of the con-
dation of the
the strength
re the tools
Education.
a tower as


Educa
irpose n
y day,


Gray, 'a5.


EDUCATION-A
to learn material
to help other people
the business of life;
well as broaden it.
knowledge but by th
pounded to one's ass


h! not merely
1 things-fact
learn things;
teaching him
Education is
e knowledge
ociates.


the enabling an ind
, but teachinghim t
showing him his p
to brighten his cor
not measured by
nd happiness that
-Malttison Pullig,


ividual
he way
lace in
ner, as
selfish
are ex-
23.


ALL youth feels the intangible, stra
experiences nameless longings, and
dreams for the betterment of existing
boy at his plow in the fields, the busy f;


clerk weighing small
the shepherd boy ten
boys and girls in varn
dream. It is the p
dreams become reali
achievement, to lead
opment of individual


, exact amounts
ding his master's
ous conditions of
art of Education
ties, to furnish in
, guide, and direc
1 ideals, to take


urge of
amsvagu
editions.
ry boy, ti


of beans and
sheep, and al
life and in all
to make th
aspiration anm
t the mind in
outh out of


ambition,
shadowy
The farm
he grocery
potatoes,
I the other
countries,
ese vague
i tools for
the devel-
the rut of


on of wider spaces.


(As Given


e

I



{
Z


existence to a visi


-


own commonplace















THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


'19 20 East
'2E '22 High
Boys
"The
'22 '23 Class
Busin
High
Class


ERNST W. EUPHRAT.

Night School, Cincinnati, ()hio
School Chorus.
Glee Club.
Zone Police."'
Treasurer.
Less Manager, T[HE CARIBBEAN.
School Chorus.
Basketball.


"The I'rvsting Place.
"Grumpv."


HENRY J. M(OO)RE.


'19 '21 Curtis High School, St arten Island,
'21 '22 Exchange Editor, TH!.. CA RInE
I igh School Chorus.
Boys' Glee Club.
Basket hail.

I he Zone Police.
'22 '23 Art Editor, TIHE CARIBBEA N.
High School Chorus.
Basketball.
Baseball.
Swilnmming.
A t
'I rack.
I he rysting 'Place.
rump',


I.O1ISE E. HENTIER.


19-'20o High School Chorus.
20- 21 High School Chorus.
Basketball.
"EsmeralItia.
21-'22 Girls' Athletic Editor, THE
High School Chorus.
Girls' (lee Club.
Basketball.


CARIBBEAN.


Track.
"Mrs. Oakl
22 '23 Class Presi
Literary E>
High Schoo
Basketball.
Track.
LGrumpy.


ey's Telephone.
dent.
litor, THE CAR]


BBEAN.


Chorus


MATTISON G. PULLIG.

High School Chorus.
Class President.
General Assistant-"Esmeralda."
Art Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
Girls' Glee Club.
High School Chorus.
"Mrs. Oakley's Telephone."
General Assistant-"Clarence."
Class Secretary.
Joke Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
High School Chorus.
"The Trysting Place."
"Grumpy.
President, Girls' Supper Club.


EMOGENE J. NASH.


9'-'20 High School Chorus.
Basketball.
'2-'2i Oklahoma Baptist University.
21-'22 Class Secretary-Treasurer.
High School Chorus.
Girls' Glee Club.
"Mrs. Oakley's Telephone."
'22-'23 Alumni Editor, THE CARIIBE.


High S
"Grumr


AN.


school Chorus.
pY-


H. EDWARD MAY


GERALD D. BLISS, JR.


'20 High School Chorus.
'21 Class Secretary.
Circulation Manager, TH
Class Basketball.
Track.
"Esmeralda."
'22 Class President.
Assistant Editor-in-Chief,
High School Chorus.
Boys' Glee Club.
Class Basketball.
Track.
"The Zone Police."
'23 Editor-in-Chief, THE CAR


E CARIBBEAN.


THE CARIBBEAN.


I9- '20o Class President.
High School Chorus.
20- 21 Basketball.
21-'22 Class Vice-President.
Assistant Business Ma
High School Chorus.
Boys' Glee Club.
Basketball.
Baseball.
Swimming.
Tennis.
"The Zone Police."


22 23 Editor-in-Chief,


IBBEAN.,


Advertlsimn


nager


ITHE CARIBREAN.


resign


Manager


CARIBBEAN.


N. Y.


A.,


'21-'2 2




*22- '23


19-
'20-




21-





22-
'22-


.


)1









THE CARIBBEAN.


TU


WE ARE SEVEN.


I met an old Cristobal girl;


"And then


there was


the Henter girl,


"She swam,


played tennis with a vim,


was quite grown


up she said;


Her hair was thick but not a-curl-
For she wore it bobbed instead!


Whose first name was Louise;
She's won much literary fame .
Since taking her degrees.


Shone in society,
But best of all she liked it when


soared to


hit high C.


"Now


tell me of your school,


And classmates dear to you.
She settled down with a smile and said,
"There's nothing I'd rather do."


"In sports she ranked with an
Played basketball, and ran.,


Could jump, play tennis, throw


She's even caught


y one,


the shot-


a man!


"As 'Black Beauty' she scored


a hit-


In fact was made the queen,-
The prestige of Miss Liberty


to Edith C.


as queen."


"How many were there, first
"And what deeds did they


" I said,
do?


And what accomplishments are theirs
Since they with school are through ?"


"She always was just full of pep
And effervescent cheer;
To Ethel S. she left her gift


Of having for


classwork


"And what about yourself?" I asked;
"Of your renown I've heard;
Your influence on all was great;
All listened to your word.


no fear.


"There were not many


of us sir;


"And next


comes


Henry Edward May-


"In high school sport


you never j


We numbered only seven,
ad we are just as many now,


For none


has gone to Heaven.


He with the curly hair;
His slender fingers, long and firm,


Have made him a surgeon


But always lent your


cheers;


The memory of your pep and push
Has come down through the years.


rare.


"First Gerald, Jr., I'll discuss;
He's Bliss in deed and name;
As an advertising manager


He's made


his name and fame.


"He ran and jumped and sang
And thought and spoke with
And his report card also


Was always


and danced


ease;


full of E's!


"I understand you left to
Your popularity,
And that the class of '23
Left love and loyalty-


"He was an athlete every inch-
He swam, played basketball,


Was tennis champion, and


caught


At baseball, and did well in all;


"To raffle


was his chief delight;


(He has his bicycle still!)
He left to Chester Pike the right


in and


out at will.


"To things worth while


for everyone


He did devote his strength;
With Gladys L. and Charlotte H.
He did divide his length.

"The next I'll name was Henry Moore-
He came from Randolph post,-
As maker of the best cartoons
He's known from coast to coast.


"To our dear school? Of course we did!


And our great


dignity,


Our toothpick dear, and
With no malignity


"Unto the Junior class.


And wishes


Senior pen


Advice,


good and kind,


To Freshmen and to Sophomores
We sweetly left behind.


"Ernst


Euphrat is the


next in line,-


"Another athlete true


was he


"And to the faculty


we left


He is a Jr. too-
He still is practising dentistry
As he of old did do.


He hailed from


"Coitis"


As "Grumpy"' he achieved


Which is not like


Our thanks when from them riven:


a name


to die.


We're still the class of'


We're one


though


we are seven,


loved athletics much-


He found them rather tame-
But, when he started anything,


We always


found him


game.


"By nature pleasant, cheerful, yet
He liked his friendly spats;
To Florence Albert he did will
His pleasant noon-day chats.


"He took his time in what he did,
Was easy to amuse;
To Inza Markham he did leave


"Another girl


was Emogene-


Her name of yore was Nash-
By giving concerts everywhere


George


never




















THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN.


THE LAST JUNIOR GATHERING OF THE
CLASS OF '2A.


lovely chocolate layer cake?


used to make!


What?


Just like mother


You don't like chocolate


Gladyvs


Louande,


cake!'


Then she'd look up at the victim with those


mischievous eyes of hers and continue-


'But I'm


"Hey, kids, what about an informal gathering?


-the last one as Juniors, you know.


When we


sure you'll 1
ful icing.


ike this one. Just look at the wonder-
Why you couldn't possibly get any-


come back inOctober, it will be as the Senior Class.
Soundsgreat,doesn't it? Comeon, Miss Bakewell."
With Chet's words echoing in their ears, the
happy group strolled down to the domestic science
building, a building fairly haunted with memories


Junior


doings.


There


were-Chester


thing better-oh, you will take it.


I knew you


liked chocolate cake all the time, especially layer


cake.


One dollar-fifty please!' "


"So that's the way she did it, Bobbie.
in the world is that ice cream coming?
sure you sent for it, Chet?"


When
You're


Pike, good old Chet, the best class president ever;


Markham and Florence Albert,


known as Bol
Pythias of th
called "Oakes,


bie and Flossie,


e class;


otherwise


the Damon and


George Oakes, generally


wearing that same unbanishable


'Course I did.
as ever, Oakes. T
the track meet. Y
Bakewell? On the


There you are as impatient
'hat's just the way he was at
'ou saw him, didn't you, Miss
mark in the four-forty, there


he was, anxious to be off.


At the sound of the


smile with which he had entered school the latter


part of thi
Sonneman,


year;


Edith Coulbourn


Ed and Ethel,


maidens not heard from


very


and Ethel


th quiet, demure
cften, but, be it


sale or party, always willing to do their share


more;


Charlotte


Housel, a


wee little


gun he was of like lightning and talk about speed
and class-he surely has it."


"Cut out that talk, Chet.


What about basket-


ball? Never have seen anyone play a finer game
of guard, than you do-what's that Ethel?"
"Nothing, except that I am tired of hearing you


kept most busy with either playing the piano,
tennis, basket-ball or entertaining a certain senior


boys sing each other's praises.


girls?


Look,


Charlotte


What about the


and Pinky


lad; and last of all,GladysLowande, alias


"Pinky,


and Miss Bakewell,theirmuch loved class adviser.
"Well Chet, now that we are here, what's the
big idea?"
"Nothing exactly but-I just sent the janitor
down forsome ice cream thinking thatyou might-"
"Icecream! Leadmeto it! Sounds'most as good


as the eats at our Valentine party.


six salads that


Warner got away


Remember the


with,


to say


nothing of the cake?"


"Do we?


Well I'll say


By the way, Ches-


ter, have you heard from him lately?"


"Yes,
Brooklyn


I've had a couple of letters.


, New


glorious time.


He's in


York, now having one grand and
In the last letter I had, he said


made the representative school team.


Edith and


I have seen all the games and we know there isn't
a better forward on the Isthmus than Charlotte."
"Yes, and not only athletics but what about
Flossie's good work as toast-mistress at the Junior-
Senior banquet? You were great Flossie, but
how in the world do you do it?"
"That's nothing at all, Edith. But say, I'll
tell the rest of you that Ed, Bobbie, and Ethel
were certainly there when it came to decorating.
Didn't the room and those tables look gorgeous?
And talk about eats, well, Miss Bakewell, I think
we all agree that you know how to manage such


things. By the way, Chet, the nex
tell Warner about those chicken


t time you write,


timbales,


tuna


to tell you, Gladys, that he was glad to hear that


your prayer for another


answered.


Junior


had been


You know, Oakes, Gladys prayed for


you for about a month before you came."
"Oh, I did not, I just hoped we'd get another


salad, mashed potatoes, and string beans, and oh
yes-he was the one that used to talk about the way
Charlotte jazzed the piano-tell him we learned at
the banquet that she could regulate a victrola too."
"Don't you dare tell him any such thing, Chet.


to take


Warner's place.


But returning to


Look, here's the janitqr, thank goodness.


Come


the subject of the party, whenever I hear it men-


on Chet, dish the ice cream out quick, for I am













T'1K CARIBB1-AN.


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f11








THE CARIBBEAN.


"25"


We were surely well represented in athletics


that year.


Caldwell B. Foos,


Solid comfort.
and listen lazily


I lean back in my deck chair
to the swish-sh-sh of the great


Andy Smith shone min the four-forty-


and the mile relay, while two of our members-
"Peppy" Arosemena and William Cousins-made
the first team in basket ball, the former at forward


Army transport as it plows through the heaving


and the latter at guard.


And as for the chess


My soul is at rest, and I think with


a slight twinge of loneliness of all my friends back
in the Zone-expecially those of the Sophomore
class, at old Cristobal High. Dawg-gon, but I
had some good times with that bunch! And now
I am leaving them all on my way to the States.


No, not quite.


Down the deck the Deibert


child, with practised ease, is engaging her father
in a mock flirtation, and remarking in her inimi-


team, the Sophomores proved to have the best
material in the school, no member of another class


finding a place in the line-up.


At this point I


allow a satisfied smile to creep over my face. I
might not have been able to make any of the other
teams, but at least here was where I "shone with
unparalleled glory."
The ship's bell sends its clear notes over the


water.


I settle down and continue my interrupted


table manner,


"Ain't it cute?"-this time refer-


thoughts.


The Sophomore party.


I grin as I


ring to the moon, which beams down at her in
reply. I lean further back, and think of them all.
What immediately comes to my mind is the Soph-


recall how, with zeal and zip, I pushed a potato


across the hall,
and pushing the


wriggling along on my stomach
"spud" with my nose. I had


more dramatization of "Silas Marner.


The practices we used to have!


" Wow!


I was one of the


enjoyed that party-good nature, good entertain-
ment, good refreshments (I made sure of that,


"Silas Marners"-there were four, because of the
length of the play-Andy Smith, Jimmy Burgoon,


being on the refreshment committee).
party in every sense of the word.


A good


Arosemena,


and myself.


"Eppie"-


there were two, Hyacinth Eden and Helen Aben-
droth-had a naturally kidding nature, and what
we did to those supposedly serious rehearsals was


a sin and a shame.


even now.


Woof!


I get a kick out of it


But when the play came off, on visit-


And the ordinary school days were enjoyable
o. thanks to little incidents which broke the


periods of study


(does anybody remember the


genuinee Howouldja bag?") and made a day of
school something to be looked forward to with
pleasurable anticipation.


ors' day, we were all letter-perfect, and the acts


And then-the last day of school.


I found to


followed


one another smoothly


and without


a my joy I had passed all five subjects with high


hitch of any kind.


of "Silas


The only trouble was the lack


' shirts"-there were only two of them.


marks, and the class of '25, still the class of '25,
but now rejoicing in the honorable title of Junior,


got one and Andy Smith got the other.


I can


dispersed for the two months


vacation.


And-


still see Andy hurtling down the hall at his four-
forty-stride to give Jimmy Burgoon, who followed
him, the highly necessary shirt.


well, here I am.


I sit for awhile listening to the


sea; then stretch myself luxuriously and go down
to my stateroom.


Caribbean.













THE CARIBBEAN.


--' "?A -j


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r.t...v.; -.
.
4 .


C


F IRISHIMAN


-


('LASS,









THE CARIBBEAN.


FRESHMAN


INDEX.


13. Hopkins, Irene,-She's at her


best at a dance.


14. Kennedy,


Ion,-Demure as a Priscilla.


15. Kleefkens, Johanna,-"Johanna, please keep quiet!"


Helen,-Her only worry-that she
te to read.


2. Allwork, Winifred,-It took Winifred


won't


to hustle up the


"Better come back, Winifred; we need you."
Elsie,--"The Freshmen wish you all kinds


make a good


17. Mackey, Esther,-She has an unusual interest in the
eighth grade.
18. May, Delilah,-Delilah loves ancient history.
19. Morgan, Alpha,-"How do you enjoy science, Al?"


20. Mufoz,


Lola,-She's a strong


Mildred,-"Oh! more algebra?"


for bobbed hair.


luck in your business course,
4. Bliss, Manola,-Work


Elsie.
Elsie.


21. Neely,


doesn't bother her-She


doesn't


22. Oliver, Mildred,-"What's the answer to this problem?"


bother work.
5. Carson,


Betty,-"Beware of those


6. Campbell, James,-His


favorite


pared.
7. Coffey, Billy,-If size were a handicap,
wouldn't be able to dive.


e eyes!".
expression-"Not


we're afraid Billy


every


brings


a smile from Fort Sherman


morning.


24. Pike, Dorothy,-"Still
Dot?"


Domestic


Science


8. Coffey, Jack,-He's a


lazy but good-natured sort of per-


son.
9. Clinchard, William,-Girls don't bother him in the least.


27. Trowbridge, Charle
28. Tucker, Virginia,-
fine barber."


s,-"When do we eat?"
"Keep it up, Tucker,


o10. Eberenz,
our midst.


I I. Eggleston,
12. Eggleston,


Marcella,-This


Maurice,-"Oh


Zelda


gay butterfly has flitted from


dimples!"
good-looking


29. Vaughan,


Dorothy,-"Darn that eighth


metic.


30. Walsh, Charles,-"Say, Charley, we miss your jokes the


boy's sixth period; wish you'd join us


31. Wirtz,


Christian,-"How


many


posters


want?"


THE PIERS.


THE TROPIC MOON.


Ernst Euphrat,


standing


Where negroes sweat and toil the whole day
These piers above which airplanes stately fly


The dark of night is
The earth has taken


long-


turned to light of day,
on a silver sheen,


To meet each steamer,


as it comes along


Each object, large or small,


or drab or gray,


And docks, while busy foremen sharply cry,


"All hands at work, cut out your jib


Is all transfigured by the radiant ray.
The shadows only emphasize the gleam


and song.


The tourists leave the boat and pass on by


The anxious, weary, tired-of-waiting


Upon the palm leaves,


throng.


As if the world could


I


grasses, si
ne'er again


hirubs.


'Twould seem


be gray.


Boats bring the foreigners from far Japan;


From


East and West;


Across the sea is
Diminishing in b


Sweden and Italy;


cast a path of light,


rightness


They carry men of every hue and clan-
E'en those who hail from distant Araby.


In spots which sparkle in the ripples, bright
As phosphorescence-silvery flakes.


And, tho


they come from places far and near,


So large,


so grand,


the moon-so white, so


bright,


They always meet at a Canal


That e'en the stars for shame have dimmed their light.


A TRIBUTE.


Ernst Euphrat,


to the class of '


They will sustain reputations


of yore;


Helen Abendroth,


I. Abendroth,
have enough tim


Freshmen.
J. Bixby,


16. King, Oliver,-He'd


23. Ordway, John,-He


25. Pulgar, Carlos,-"Carlos! Leave the room.
26. Turner, Gay,-Her heart is in her work.


name


"What's that


u make


arith-


again."


Gerald Bliss,


mass of concrete buildings


For Luna fair has touched it with her beam.


till it breaks


Here's


actor.


booster









TH E


CARIBBEAN.


IFrom Jim ( omana, sn of Lula Mae, '18.


Another year has come and gone,


To Zimo, 22.


adding a new


Minor


Cotton


is residing


with Ihc ftjrmousi

Bro )kl n


group of alumni to those whom
School has sent out and of wh


Cristobal
om she fet


proud.
Each year increases our number and broadens
the activities of our members.
We know that in the near future the names of
some of our most famous men and women will be


' ork, aniu


is working in th


e main office of the


Western tnion Telegraph Company in
City.


Susie Harristn ivis visiting
does not expect to return to


Catherine
journalism


TIeese


Waid


at Columbia


New York


in D)elaware now and
the Canal Zone.


taking


University.


a course


She is


on our own roster.


Here is


junior this 'ear.


1919.


to the old


Here is to the new
Here is to the future


we all be true.


1918


LEM


VIRGINIA.


Kenneth Edwards is now residing on his father's
farm in Wellsboro, Pennsylvania.
I)orothv Anna Wier Montanve is now living in
Pittston, Pennsylvania.


ames Gerard


Raymond is now in Cristobal.


Congratulation


s and best wishes for the future


He is property clerk at the Cristobal Commissary.


and the class of


world for


ou r


and all


annual.


L.uL-A


success


i ever,
Pu .I; Co(


in the
BOS'ON, MASSACHtSETTS.
4I am brshing my course at Smmons College


1 Ai\N


DENVER, COLORADO.


I leave in ten days for Ten Sleep,


W\yoming, on


in June and I expect to have a position in Wash-
ington, DI). C., next year.


The very best wishes to the class of


and to


a piece of work that will keep me out there until


ARIBBEAN.


know from


all promises


next winter.


You know


am still


a tramp


annual is to be the b


est ever.


engineer.
I know that hard work will make a better an-


Sincerely,


ALICE ARLENE


BALL.


nual than good


wishes,;


still I


am offering m


1920.


Believe me there is


heart for old Cristobal High
Sincerely,


a warm spot in
School.


BURKE


HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA.
I am teaching the sixth grade in the Henderson-
ville City School, and I like mv work very much.


m v I
I


resent


Wordburyv
the City.


ANGELES,.


am taking a


CALIFORNIA.


busin


ess course


Business Collcee, one of the


I enjoy my work very


best in


much and I ex-


pect to graduate in October, when a good position


will be waitin


for me.


THE CARIBBEAN of COU
wishes, as it always does.


the high school.


rst


e has my very best
Give my regards to


It will be a long time,


if ever,


With best wishes for the class of ':
best of luck for Cristobal High School,
Sincerely,


, and the
remain


Vt'14 A H .*t 'iv rz rn


I forref- thei nalms and


fl t Yr n


on Coloin


k0 fC -


WELCH.


F1TH A


BEVINGTON


I117


oi e


w


I V I t








THE CARIBBEAN.


vear and I would like to haze some Canal Zone


freshmen before I leave.


I am working in the


real estate business with my father and so I am
real busy with that and my school work. One
has to study hard here to get anywhere and we
have few idle moments, but I have never enjoyed
life any more than I do right now, in California.
Best wishes to the student body and success to


THE CARIBBEAN.


I am at


Sincerely,
HARLAN W. HOLMWOOD.


BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA.
the University of California, the greatest


Though scattered we be to the four winds of Heaven,
Divided perhaps by the great seas seven,
Still we'll be bound by one great tie-
We are fellow alumni of Cristobal High.
As ever,
KENNETH GREENE.

Lindale Davies is residing in Boston, Massa-
chusetts.
1921.
Alice Hunter is taking a secretarial course at
Mount Saint Vincent on the Hudson. She ex-
pects to be with us this vacation.
Frank Raymond, Jr., is taking a medical course


in the country-not only in athletics either. I do
hope to welcome at least one Cristobal High School


at Columbia University.


"College is great and I


think that Cristobal High School is the place to


student this year.


As ever,


prepare one for it.


For look how it has urged me


ALSO SEARS.


to take as long a course as I am taking.


I surely


must


brought a


love for


education


Alice Stilson is living in Santurce Park with her
parents.
Lillian Cotton Van Wagner is now residing in
Brooklyn, New York.
Kathryn Burgoon Stewart is a cashier in the
Cristobal Clubhouse and resides in Cristobal. We
hope that some day little Virginia will go to Cris-
tobal High School.
J. B. Fields, Jr., is studying mechanical engi-
neering in the University of Texas.


CRISTO


DEAR CRISTOBAL HIGH:-


BAL, CANAL ZONE.
If the copy you have


sent in to our press so far is an indication of the
general style of the finished book, it is going to be
almost as good as the 1920 annual.
Congratulations and best wishes to the class of
23. As ever,
AL DOYLE.

COUDERSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA.
Aren't we getting classy, using letter-head sta-


tionery, embossed at that


bright idea?
CARIBBEAN ye
aspiration (to


Who evolved


I'm sure you will put out the best
t. You know that was the original
make each issue better than the


preceding) and I believe I can safely say that it


has been done so far.


You know you people just


Cristobal High School to take up more than a


four year course. I am doing nicely 1
question of how long I can keep it up.


but it is a
Send up


some Cristobal High School spirit."
Kirby Ferguson is now visiting in the States,
she expects to spend September with her brother
Harry as that is the time the Naval Cadets have


their leave.


She will be returning after the Army


and Navy game in October or November.
FORT RANDOLPH, CANAL ZONE.
It doesn't seem that I have been out of school
nearly two years, and there are times when I wish
I were back again with my old school mates.
I hope that this year s annual will be much big-


ger and more successful


than last year's and I


want to say that I certainly do enjoy reading the
stories that the students write for their annual.
I wish you all the best luck in the world for
this year's annual.
Sincerely,
ELEANOR ZIMMERMANN.
Charles Henter is a radio operator in the avia-
tion service, stationed at San Diego, California.
Carl Duey is working on a farm in Pennsyl-
vania, and expects to re-enter Penn State College
this year.
1922.


A1 ..* A1n.. ^-n krafnP^ eba- rb ;*a,., lllttLt.Ii


c+nro-


T Cfirtwrioht is


*nli rln ni








THE CARIBBEAN.


congratulations to the Seniors, and my sympathies


XWA S I N(TON,


I)ISTRICT


OF COLUMBIA.


for the Frosh.


Best wishes for the success of TiH E


I find Washington delightful,


between the


times


CARIBBEAN and "Grumpy."
GEORGE


Sincerely,
CARTWRI


am wishing I were back in Panama.


( VI'.


At present


I am studying in high school to keep from forget-
ting all that I learned at Cristu bal High Sch1ool,


DEAR CRISTOBAL HIGH


GATru N,
CHOOL:-


CANAL ZONE.


until next fall.


TIhen


expect to) Cllommence in


kindergarten training.


I am studying hard preparatory to entering the
Cincinnati Conservatory of Music.


Best wishes for


THE CARIBBEAN


and the class


I want to tell


you that


enijoved being a student


and am proud to be an alumnus of Cristobal iligh


School.


Best wishes to


school,


THE CARIB-


of '23.


EM MA


T OWNSENI).


AUSTIN,


BEAN, and the


I EXAS.


class of '23.
Sincercl\


MARJORIE


Greetings to Cristobal High School from Texas.
Texas University is a grand school but thev surely


know how to make one work.


I am taking a very


interesting course and am working for a degree in
home economics.


My best wishes to everyone,


hope that


sincerely


you will have a good CARIBBEAN this


As ever,


MIARY GLENN


PIROVIDENCE, RHOI)DE


At present


IELDS.


ISLAND.


am working hard trying to find


some way to spend my time, but, if they will let


me in, I intend to enter the Rhode


Island Normal


School in the fall to take up kindergarten training.
I didn't think I could miss the Canal Zone as I


have.
the fin


It gets you every time. Best wishes for
est CARIBBEAN ever, and also for the class
As ever,
MILDRED STAFFORD.


ANGELES,


CAI.IFORNIA.


I am now taking a post-graduate course at the
Los Angeles Polytechnic High School and am do-
ing well in all of my subjects. I expect to enter
Pomona College in September following and take


a mechanical engineering course.


there I


want to transfer to Stanf


After one year
ord University


to pursue my studies further.
I wish that I could spend a few more days of
happiness at dear old Cristobal High School with


the bunch.


I do not like the States very well,


altho California must be ideal as compared to the
eastern states.
Here's to the success of THE CARIBBEAN, 1923


The
pool ;
coach.


classroom


my best


I ORK,
have is


instructor


BALL.,


SORK.


the swilunhin


is the swimming


The swimming pool and the gymnasiums


of Columbia are hard to be beaten.


School is fine


and what I like best is that Columbia has
school spirit as Cristobal High has-the
spirit.
our friend,


1PAt'l. C.


FOR'T RA


ND)OI.PH,


ANAL


I wish Cristobal High School success
work on their annual.


At present, as you all know,


geometry


and Spanish.


e n t e r Syracuse
Unlverslty to


study


forestry.


Very truly yours,
JORDAN
ZIMMERRMANN.

Ida Brown has
been working in


American


Foreign Banking
Corporation, but


is now


States on


vaca-


tion.


Wesle v H.
Townsend is in


as goo
fighting


J)ov0IE.


ZONE.
in their


am taking


vear


solid


expect


a branch school I I




























"..*


;.** "'


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t hts-'


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.:. . -, t *



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i i i :. .L.. i..


V* .* ... .


r . i....


i,=."A-


-i a -m-


THE CARIBBEAN.


.* .at ^a


>. *
^s-
.. ..3


55 5


Ii


S. i !


W H








THE CARIBBEAN.


Louise Ienter,


THE DUNGEON OF FORT SAN IORENZO.


Warner F.


"Say, Sparks, tell us again what Mr. Duey said


about that dungeon,


said Chet, paddling


in the


Bowers,


"I don't believe that there is any such animal,
said Chet, looking a little discouraged.


"We don't want to forget anv of it.


"Don't start to worry now,
V


I said.


"We still


The three


in our bathing suits,


have another side.


" I didn't want him to know


loaded with picks, shovels, and one day's provi-
sions were at last making our long-planned excur-
sion.


"Well," I began,


"Mr. Duev said that he had


heard of a dungeon in the outer wall of Fort Lor-
enzo which was used by the old Spaniards as an
easy means of killing prisoners. The whole dun-
geon is flooded at high tide and so, any prisoners


that I felt disappointed too.
As we rounded the point, we came out into the
open bay and ran into the full force of the ground
swells that came rolling in from the calm sea, a
sea of that hue which makes it so difficult to dis-
tinguish the line where the sky touches the water.
"I'll bet our passageway is under that rock just


ahead,


said Wes.


chained inside would be drowned.


He said that


I'll bet so too,


cried Chet.


It has a mys-


the terrible odor of the place is the only thing
that has kept people from exploring it."


"Odor?" broke in


"Do you mean to tell


terious look.


"Well, we'll see when we get there,
conservatively.


" I answered


me that there is an odor after all


these


years ?


The rock referred to jutted out from the bank


Trying to kid us, aren't you?"
"Well, I'm just telling you what he said," I
answered indignantly. "I don't know any more


about eight or ten feet and was


grown
that we


with clinging vines


ea


so closely


and scrubby


couldn't tell whether it


over-


bushes


was natural or


about it than you do.


could find


the entrance;


He didn't say how we
so we'll have to look


man made.


We paddled up to it and parted


the bushes.


around.


There, sure enough, a black opening yawned before


After about two hours of paddling we came to
the mouth of the river and slipped out into the


A funny little


shiver ran up mv back as we


turned on our flash lights and pushed the canoe


little bay.


On a high bluff to our right stood the


into the opening.


What a sight met our eyes, as


ruins of the old fort, its walls and turrets over-
grown with a rank tropical vegetation that made
it difficult to determine the exact extent of the
ruins. We paddled up close to the steep bank and
pulled ourselves along from bush to bush, flashing


we flashed our lights upward!


The whole roof


was hung with snow-white stalactites which scin-
tillated in a hundred different colors as the bright


glare struck them.


Too much interested to speak,


we pushed on silently and beached the canoe on a








THE CARIBBEAN.


We had gone only a short distance when Ches-


ter broke out,


smell ?


"Don't


fellows


notice that


It's awful."


Wes didn't need to tell us though, for we saw
that as quickly as he did.
"What is to stop us from digging at it a while?"


"I had noticed it," I answered,
that I was just imagining it."
"I smell it, too." said Wes.


stronger all the time."
We passed on silently for a while.


"but I thought


suggested Chester.


"We have picks and shovels


and the rest of the day before us.


getting


The mel-


ancholy drip, drip, drip, of the limewater from the
roof made me so nervous that in my overwrought
imagination, the sound of every drop was magni-


What do you


say we take a crack at it?"
Without even stopping to answer I hurried back
to the canoe and got two picks and a shovel.
With Wes and Chester using the picks and me
the shovel, we soon had most of the wall down.
"We aren't much better off now, than we were


fled a thousandfold.


Then too, the odor was be-


coming unbearable.
"I'm going to settle this right now,


" I told the


at first,


" I remarked, as we came to a heavy iron


door which effectually shut off the passage.
I 1


-ihanK


goodness,


is rusty,


sai


d as I


other fellows as I


pulled out mv


handkerchief,


started


to batter


off the hinges


a pick.


soaked it in one of the limewater puddles, and
tied it around my head, covering my nose.


"If you fellows are wise,


you'll do the same


Working together, we at last got the door down
and found ourselves on the threshold of a room.
The walls were made of enormous blocks of sand-


thing now before we go any farther," I continued.
They both silently followed suit and we went on.
"I believe I can account for this smell," I man-


stone,


and the floor,


which


was comparatively


dry, was composed of huge flagstones laid in a sort


of rough pattern.


What most attracted our at-


aged to mumble through my handkerchief.


Their


eves asked the question which their handkerchiefs


tention was the skeleton of a man in a corselet
and helmet of steel, which was seated on the floor,


muffled;


so I went on,


''You


have probably no-


leaning against the wall.


The helmet, which had


that this floor


gradually


slopes


upward.


once been


burnished and shining,


was set at a


Well, I believe that the outside air keeps this foul
air pressed up in here, and since there is nothing
to create a draft, this is, in all probability, the
same air that was in here when the bodies of the
prisoners were first put here."
My theory sounded so reasonable that they did


jaunty angle over the grinning jaws and glaring,


empty eye sockets of the skull.


The steel coat


hung loosely on the wasted frame, and the sword,
still buckled around the bony waist, lay on the


floor by its side.


The remains of the silks and


velvets which no doubt had clothed him lay in


not stop to argue.
Just then Wes,


mouldering heaps on the floor.


who was in


the lead, gave a


sharp cry and ran forward, turning his flash light


on the wall.
and collars


There was a long line of rusty chains


hanging


the wall,


and still


Beside this grisly


sight stood an iron-bound chest with worm-eaten
sides ready to crumble at the lightest touch.


Say, isn't


Chet.


this a


cheerful


place!"


whispered


"Let's do something to shake offthe gloom.


farther on we found some gruesome skeletons-
one with the collar still around the ghastly verte-


brae, and another, an uncanny heap of


crushed


Suppose we open the chest and then explore the


room thoroughly."
"Suits me," I replied.


"We'll have to examine


bones as if of some victim of wheel, rack, or some
other devilish kind of torture.
"Oh boy, I'd like to get a chance at the fellows


the skeleton too.


It looks full of possibilities."


"You examine the old bones if you want to,


Spark.


You're welcome to my share,


" said Wes


that would do a thing like that,"


muttered Wes,


generously.


"The chest looks best to me.


through clenched teeth.


"Why couldn't they kill


pose you give it a few licks, Chet."


them like men instead of devils?"


What


might


not the chest


contain?


Gold,


Just a short distance ahead we came to a blank


W'ic rhuc rhk e-'nl ,,f


jewels, valuable documents?


Stories of the fabu-


1,,ic w^irhb^ nf i-heo \T0 Wort XXrl i nutrrtmic--








THE CARIBBEAN.


were


doomed


to disappointment


though.


Our friend Don Juan had a hard time of it, didn't


chest contained coins, right enough, but they were


We each found a


gold one as a souvenir and I picked up several
different ones of copper and brass for my collec-
tion, but the bulk of them we left as we had found


them.


I was better rewarded in my examination of the


skeleton, however.


Just as I was turning away,


"Say, where do you suppose this tunnel leads
to?" I asked as I pointed to a low archway in the
wall.


"Very likely that leads up to the fort,"


up Chet.
The p
length.


spoke


"Let s see.


assage


was only


about


twenty


feet in


Then we came to the bottom of a shaft


caught the bright gleam of something on one


cut straight


up through


the hill.


On one side


of the bony fingers.


I investigated and found it


iron brackets were set in the wall to form a rough


to be a large shiny ring with a beautiful blood
stone set, on which were carved the initials "J.
N. A."


"He left his


boys,


calling card,


"but he only left his


I called to the other
initials instead of his


ladder.


This, then, was the only means of reach-


ing the dungeon from the fort.
up; but the iron was so badly


\We tried to climb


rusted


that the


rungs broke off when any weight was put on them.
"The way we came seems to le about the only


name.


Look


around


for something


might identify him."
I had to repeat to them several tim


I had found the ring; tl
the chamber in earnest.


"Look


boys,
-


way of getting
continued, as a


es just how


we started to examine


called


what's


out,"


fellows,


thought struck me,


haven't much time left to


tide is in.


we surely


fool around before the


Mr. Dl)uey told me that the tide is high


at 1 1.30.
I looked at my watch and then showed it to


scratched on the wall?


Looks as if it might be


them.


t was 11i i.2.


the last will and testament of our friend J.


all right,"


said Chet.


"We have five


WVes knew more Spanish than either of us; so
we asked him to read the inscription and he halt-
ingly translated the following:
"These are the last words of Don Juan Nuez
de Alcorza, once commandant of Fort San Lor-


minutes to reach the opening."
"Yes, but Spark said that the tide would be


high at 11.30.


ing is.


Most likely


You know how narrow the open-


the opening is under water


" Wes remarked.


long before the tide is high,


enzo.


Slowly I am dying of starvation because of


Hardly daring to think of what we might find,


that pig, Sir Henry Morgan.


True, I have my


we dashed down the passage.


Step by step we


sword at hand but no one shall say that I, Don
Juan NuRez de Alcorza, was not man enough to


plunged deeper into the icy water, and the water
was no colder than the hand which seemed to grip


meet the death to which he was sentenced.


Like the


English pirate that he is, he crept upon us on the
night of a feast when all of my men were drinking.


Those men who were not


butchered in their drunk-


en stupor, escaped from the fort only to die of


starvation or fever in the swampy jungle.


deserted, the dogs!


They


Leaving me to fight the pirate


our hearts.


First to our ankles, then to our knees,


and before we reached the little beach the lapping


waters were about our hips.


Our canoe was float-


ing around, aimlessly bumping against the sides.
The thing that terrified us most was the sight of
the opening! It was nearly four feet under water.
"Well, boys," (Wes tried to be cheerful) "the


horde single-handed-me, their commander, spe-
cially commissioned by Her Highness, the Queen
of Spain!
"Oh! that I might feel that English throat be-
tween these fingers for but a few precious moments


before I die.


Then indeed might I die happy.


only thing to do is to dive for it.


about six feet thick.


The wall is only


Four feet down, six feet


through, four feet up, andti we are safe."
It didn't sound as easy as that to me by a long
shot, but it was our only hope.
As Weslev was the best swimmer, we decided


D)in. for a morel nf fnnd!


hrninm


thu- Cher wna t an firstr I wan tn fnllow antl then


practically all copper or brass.


N. A


. I


1 I ,


"That's








THE CARIBBEAN.


and then followed him.


As the green water closed


over my head, I felt an almost irresistible inclina-
tion to try to climb the ladder again or to do any-


"Do you fellows feel equal to the climb?"' asked


Chet as we were debating about it.


be the only uninjured


one of


"I seem to


the bunch,


I fought it down, though, and swam


Just as I was coming up,


I struck my head an awful blow on a projecting
rock. Luckily for me, Chet was watching and
pulled me out. Chet had come through all right
but I had a thumping headache as we waited for


Wes to appear.


At last he came up smiling.


know that if you can make it, I can."'
Since that was the only thing to be done, we
started up with the scorching sun beating down
on our heads, clinging to bushes, vines, .rocks, or
anything that offered a foothold.
"The only thing that worries me is the loss of


"Well, we're all safe,


" he spluttered.


But he


Wesley's canoe,


" I grunted as we toiled upward.


Just as we were about to pull him


out onto the rock, a long, black, vicious tentacle
reached out from the rocks and grasped him by
the ankle.


"Look out, Wes,


" I shouted.


"Good Heavens!


It s an octopus."
The slimy creature wrapped its eight snaky arms
around Wes and slowly pulled him down. He
managed to get his pocket-knife out and then the


struggle started in earnest.


A tentacle covered


with suckers which blister the skin wherever they
touch, pinned one of Wesley's arms to his side
leaving only one hand to battle against the seven


other arms of the devil fish.


Wes made a thrust


at the gleaming eye but a writhing arm prevented
the attempt and nearly wrenched the knife from
his hand. Wes recovered quickly and with a des-
perate slash, severed one of the arms, which sank


writhing in


the bloody


water.


The infuriated


creature was slowly creeping up to Wes's throat
when, with a lucky jab, he reached its eye. A


tremor passed


through


the body


of the awful


thing, and, as Wes stabbed it again and again, its


slowly


slackened.


At last,


a final


quiver, it lost its grip entirely and sank, an inert


mass.


Quickly we hauled Wes out, but not


too soon, for already other arms were reaching


out from the rocks.
of what we had


We shuddered as we thought


so narrowly


escaped, and


about to see that Wes was all right.


terribly
protested


He was


blistered about the arms and legs, but


t


that he felt fine.


The next question


"That doesn't worry me as much as the loss of


my lunch,


" Wes groaned cheerfully.


Often we came to patches of bare rock where
we had to cut hand and footholds in the soft sand-


stone with our knives.


Before we had gone half-


way, our hands were bleeding and torn, but we
had to keep on before exhaustion should overcome


Once


thought


deserted him. He v
far we had climbed,


that Chester's


vas looking down to see how


when


his foot slipped and


threw his entire weight on a little bush which


was holding with his hands.


The bush


sickeningly, gave a little, and then held.


remarked with a white


slipped
Chester


face that he had better


look up to see how much farther we had to go


instead of looking down
had done.


to see how much we


At last we reached the top and crept exhausted
into the restful shade of a mango tree to rest.
"Well, I guess we'll have to walk home; so the
sooner we start, the sooner we'll get there," said
Wes logically.
"I believe that we did an awfully foolish thing,"


I said


as we filed along the trail.


"Did you notice


that the floor of that room was not wet?


I be-


lieve that the iron door was water-tight and we
could have put it back up again, filled the cracks
with rocks, and stayed there until low tide."


"Say, I believe you are right,


said Wes.


didn't think of that."
"Well, for the love of Mike, don't tell anybody


was:


how to get off the rocks.


Swimming was


" pleaded


Chet.


"They


never


would


out of the question after what we had seen;
the only thing left was the cliff at our backs.


through kidding us.
That is why we have never told the story before.


thingbutthis.


through the opening.


was too sure.








THE CARIBBEAN.





(GI.IMPSES OF C()OLO)N.


IMPRESSIONS WHILE STROLLIN( I)()WN


A silly simple-looking Barbadian staring at


English


BOLl VAR STREET.
Dorothy .'Ibendroth, '..


A rainyv afternoon. Sheets of tropic
ing from a gray, cheerless-looking sky.


rush of muddy waters down
naked, brown pickaninnies. S
ment as they slip and splash.
A negro prize-fighter in a b
And spats-onion colored s
brown mud give them a wei
A great blob of color in the d
to be a group of darkies in a
reds, blues, and greens. \ai
stop, I guess. Vivid Chinese
purple, with night-marish fig
way across the waxed surface
Goody! Sun's out. Gaudy
es show themselves. Blue s
somber gray clouds. A hug
*^j- -
slouches along with an immen
head. Can't see what's in it-
I guess it's an assortment o
stately Martinique woman ir
ham. Naively pinned up to
ous sweep of embroidered pet
her head a red-snotted vello'


Poor color scheme.
laundryman--slant-e
out of place in con
out of place in con^


I.


.asti
long
AVonc
:om.
Sni
hat.
ickei


ng furtive gla
with a huge
ler why he d
Tote it on his
iff! Sniff! Srr
Pungent od
ning smell of


nc


But pictu
ved, lem
r ~ '
ventional
es at the


ditches


rain pour-
The angry
blocked b
lockedd by


;hrill cries of enjoy-


lack checkered suit.


pats. Splash
rd futuristic
distance. lu
confusing a
ting for the
parasols, pi


bures

blue-


shes
touc
rns o
rravy
rain
nk ail


winging their


-wheeled coach-


;ky peeps t,
;e slovenly
ise showcase
-but from ti
f rotting fr
i green plai
show the v
ticoat benea
w bandana
iresque! A
on-cheeked,
American
crowd as h


f laundry


hru the
negress
Son her
he smell
uit. A
id ging-
alumin-
th. ()n
turban.
Chinese
-sadly


on his back.


oesn t follow the negro s cus-
head.
Iell of frying fish. Cod-fish at
or of garlic mingled with the
spoiled native fruit. ULgh! A


tourist in tweed knickerbockers. And


green plaid stockings. Keep
you're only eight miles from the
H-is wife, a tall angular woman
looking green veils, strives to
pace. I hope he's not reducing
of luck. Two ragged sons of
argument. Their voices loud ar


the noises oi
the best of i
other foreign


Sound
town.
singers-
conspicu
pect, to
Signs of
-of
ticket ve
forth a
hunch.
My luck'
*
gorgeous
from Ma
Alps, Alg
I'll buy a
have a r


of
Cab
blot
)US
see
fresh


f the s
t. Mi
i langu
jazz.
'arets.
nd, fat
clothe
who ca
h pain


nder in a
bony han
To-dav's
Sday. I'll
gowns fr
deleine et
xiers, Veni
Smarblle p
nagnificen


street. W\
ght as well
age for all
Nearing
Cantinas
, painted,
s. Close c
an attract t
t. A tooth
faded drab
d, holding
Friday th
-
l buy-and
om Paquin
Mladeleine.
ce -city of
alazzo on t
t gondola


'-S


) T,
b,
I
th


walking old man,
G(atun golf links.
swathed in hot-


keep up x
g. She'll
Jamaica i
nd striden
der who's
e Sanskrit
can und(
[e lively


. T
bobbe
ompe
he mi
less s
wrap
a sev
e thi
if I w
's in
The
roma


he Ca
with


red-sashed gondolier instead of a cai
chauffeur. Oh! A Chilean sailor


into me. Too much
ity, I suspect.
The first sweet c1
church! Come to c
pulse," I guess l'll g


of the


"Atlantic's


nimes of evening.
church To "ohevY
0o.


THE NATIVE
Fnince's (ravy


ith hi
be oU
n a ho
abhov
getting
or an


stand.


three cabaret
d-haired. In
tuition, I sus-
ost attention.
kinny lottery
-
per, stretches
ven. A sure
rteenth, too.
in-clothes-
Paris. Hats
n travel- -the
nce. Maybe
nal (rande
a picturesque
r and liveried
bumps spank


hospital-

"Come to
that im-


MARKET.
, J>


Barbadian


charc
Nnw


oal b
~a 'z*


woman
razier.
g f"


is prn
She's


4 i


eparming supper over a
humming, "Margie."
\ft fi-i~re n c ('n nn \< r -t.-*


I think
is at about
nnt r1ah1pc


he be
6.30o
ir r n I


1 1 I


time to see the native market
Sthe morning when the stalls
I hmrh witrh frotnh rnt friit Inft


-'{ I


]


*


er


I
t


t


1


C"


t








THE CARIBBEAN.


trembling claw-like hands deal out to each cus-
tomer his exact portion of potatoes, dried beans,


green cho-cho, tiny sweet native tomatoes, long
black or yellow plantains, bunches of tiny luscious


or queer dried fruits that only the yellow


men


buy.
Next on the left are the long stone tables above
which the fresh-killed carcasses of beeves, hogs,
sheep, and an occasional conejo or deer are hung.
To me this is the only unsavory part of the market


apple
pears,


bananas,


green


or purple


"alligator


" round red oranges, Costa Rican oranges


that are nearly all juice, big green papaya, cocoa-
nuts, mangoes, mamey apples, and round trays
of pungent ginger root. The Chinese stalls are


perhaps


the most interesting.


All their


vege-


because I


see, as I go by, dirty, fleabitten, mangy


tables are tied in neat little bunches or piled in


dogs crouching under the table, watching hungrily
for a scrap of meat or bit of bone.


Boats beached at low tide in Panama City. To these come purchasers for the
cocoanuts, pineapple, etc., which they contain.
Beyond the meat stalls are the long tables bear-
ing their burden of fresh caught fish, and, if one
can stand the odor, these tables are not uninter-
esting. The table from which I usually buy is
ruled over by a husky negro woman who weighs
her gleaming wares in a rusty scale pan and flings


a continual


stream


of banter


at the


passing


neat little piles.


These stalls also have many


roots and bulbs that are peculiar to them. The
real characteristic of these stalls is, however, their


cleanliness.


All the stalls in the market are clean,


as a matter of fact, but these seem particularly


spotless
woman


neat.


There


is one old Chinese


who always wears the native costume,


consisting of loose


trousers and


a long jacket.


She is always extremely polite though never vol-
uble.
Another woman, a negress, is always adorned
with a pair of large gold hoop earrings and a long


necklace of coral,
about her fat neck.


which is wound many times
Each morning she regales me


with stories of her children and, though I have
not been able to find out the exact size of her
family, judging from the stories she tells, it must


be a large one.


She told me the other day that


her first husband had been struck by an automo-


bile and crippled;
band support him.


so she made her second hus-
I suppose that is one way of


overcoming a difficulty.
At a stall a little distance from my voluble
friend there sits an old white-headed negro who


throngs.
On toward the center of the market, beyond the
ancient Chinaman, sits an old Martinique woman


selling eggs. She never, s
out, speaks an unnecessa
table there is a sign, "Eggs,
if one should unwittingly
wares she merely points


o far as I have found


ry


word.


Above


6o cents per doz." and
ask the price of her


to the printed


words,


and waits, and waits, with an air of the greatest
unconcern, for you to buy or leave.
Taking up the greater part of the market are
the vegetable stalls, some presided over by ne-


groes, and some by the Chinese.


The long wooden


-1 I


ii


Pafllfltkd nrai ni inlIttfitt Ftr if- flflitt ry. nfl; ,InI trati ni?


can out-swear anyone
negress helps him sell


ever heard.


his wares, and


A young
the first


time I passed by and heard him giving her direc-
tions it took my breath away. The funny part
is that he is not ugly or malignant in his profanity


but speaks in a most pleasant tone.


As I have


never had the courage to buy anything from him,
I don't know whether he swears at his customers
or not, but his face and voice are so mild, one
really could not resent it if he did.
In a little group, surrounded by the vegetable
stalls, are tables and racks bearing goods, laces,
buttons, pins, shoes, stockings of many lurid hues,
nfl, rJ l~ n*|- ,- 0f rni I ^iij,/\ n "nn Ar.,-i rrrr.Aci*. eren l #1 ae^ E'n,.


- 1








THE CARIBBEAN.


cleanliness.


The wooden


vegetable


scrubbed until thev are white.


tables


The stone tables


bearing the meat and fish are spotless, and there


shelf, beside which is a bottle of Scott's Emulsion
and an old alarm clock, Joe takes a drinking cup
and allows the cake of flavored shaved ice to fall


isn't a flv or a hug to be seen.


I think one usually


into it.


associates dirt and filth with a native market
a tropic town, but this one is an exception.


THE


ICEBERG


SNOW'BAI. SHOP.


I .<.. May,


"Hey, Joe!


As soon as he has repeated the operation, Joe
hands the boy both snowballs, for which the cus-
tomer lavs one nickel on the counter.
Joe watches the boy as he turns the corner up
the street and notices that he has already finished
one and is rapidly indulging in the other.


Gimme a couple snowballs." The


rush order is given by one of Joe's regular cus-
tomers, who is most likely a high school student
who has just scornfully refused some delicacy on
his mother's lunch table.
Joe is the sole proprietor, chief mixer, and only
employee of the Iceberg Snowball Company,
which is situated in a part of a small, dirty room


ALONG SHORE.


Mattic l'ui/,


The afternoon sun


t )ltrabl v


parched shore
tiredC-looking


beams
water


balefully
lazily la


. The miniature harbor is full


much


bedraggled


sail-boats,


on Holivar Street.


I say part of a room, because


their sails furled like the wings of weary


birds.


the whole is a three-min-one affair.


Besides Joe's


Their owners must think it too warm to fish.


manufactory there is a fruit and vegetable counter


skeleton-like


frames


of half-constructed


bIoats


and a supposed-to-be bakery counter.


No doubt


loom up in several places.


Beneath the sides of


Joe's eating, sleeping, and living quarters are in
the same room behind the screen which can be


one especially large one, is the tiniest of houses,
very little larger than a good-sized packing box.


seen just to the rear ol


f the retail sections.


In fact this little home


built from boxes for,


I say dirty, because I am sure that no part of the
room has ever felt the charms of a little soap and


adorning one side is the slogan,
it do your work."


"Gold Dust-Let


water.


Stretched to dry, on poles at the left are huge


Joe, who has been sitting in his chair on the side-
walk in front of his place of business lazily absorb-
ing all the rays of the sunlight that came his way,
now assumes an air of business and quickly gets
behind the counter, which is nothing more than a
high box over which is nailed an old piece of sheet


well-worn


fish-nets, stiff


water-and-sun-bleached wooden


water,


"sinkers


" gleam-


ing in the glare.
In the little shade cast bv a bamboo tree sit
some negroes-two very drowsily playing check-
ers, and a group of others more drowsily watching.


iron that he has picked up somewhere.


He opens


the door of a very aged ice-box, that sits in the
corner, and takes out a rather large piece of ice.


He then


takes his ice shaver and sets to work


shaving some ice off the chunk.


After he has the


right amount, he opens the top of the shaver and
lets the shaved ice fall into an old tin cup, which
bears as many service marks as does the ice-box.


In a very


soda-jerky


way he fingers the bottles


of flavoring, some of which are small and some
large, some of which are old vinegar bottles and
some, ancient whiskey bottles, while he asks the


A Fishermen's Rendezvous.--


A Corner of Limon Bay in the Caribbean.


hnv wht" rn rrr hn rhAiroec


Th mentnrnmr tollc


On a concrete block cutting out into the water








THE CARIBBEAN.


To the right of this fishers


rendezvous is the


concrete foundation of a ruined house, over-grown
with weeds and crimson dotted hybiscus bushes.
Everything is very dry and warm, and my eyes
are tired, so I look afar out at the glimmering
blue water, and wish for a stray breeze to come
and blow away the little heat waves that rise


from everything.


and some colorless sacred pictures.
store is covered with several inches of
cial brand of Panamanian dust.


The entire
ts own spe-


A COBBLER'S SHOP.


Ernst Euphrat,


On the outside above the door, hangs a small,


A FURNITURE STORE ON


BOLIVAR.


poorly-printed
calsado."


sign proclaiming,


compone


Louise HInter, '23.


Within, a ten-foot room embraces the cobbler's


living quarters and


The store has no sign by which the owner pro-
claims his trade to his own little Bolivar world.
Perhaps he thinks the old, rusty bed-spring hang-
ing on the post in front, which looks as if it had
spent a long, wandering life traveling from one
dwelling place to another, is a sufficient adver-


tisement.


The store has two entrances, between


which is a low, cement step on which repose a
mangy, skinny, yellow and white cat, industri-
ously and vainly attempting to clean itself, and


several chairs minus necessary parts.


At the left


entrance a huge platform, set about six feet above
the floor, piled high with legless chairs, chairless
legs, old trunks, a water-cooler of uncertain hue,
drawerless bureaus, bureauless drawers, and vari-
ous other indescribable odds and ends of furniture,
threatens to fall on some unfortunate at the slight-


business establishment.


is divided into two parts by a flimsy partition


with a doorway at one end.


The floor of the shop


is littered with bits of leather and broken tacks.
The walls are covered with paper, yellow with
age. The long brown stains proclaim the incom-
petency of the walls to keep out the hard rains.
The cobbler sits near the door before a battered
table about three feet high, on which lie a sharp


knife,


a little larger than a good-sized pocket-


knife, a box of tacks, a spool of thread, and a
litter of other small miscellaneous objects. With
sharp, staccato raps he tacks a red leather sole
on a shoe gripped tightly between his knees.

JOHN'S.


Gerald Bliss, Jr.,


est provocation.


Tacked to the platform, on a


blue board in straggling, uncertain, irregular let-
ters is the motto,
"We do what we say.


And mean what we do.


At the back is


an opening, small


and 1


Just behind the school house and not more than


four hundred yards away, is the


where most of


the children get


"Chink"


shop,


their appetite-


spoilers, in the form of gum-drops, candy balls, or
some other kind of edible sweet.
From the outside it resembles a cottage of olden


through which a weary ray of light, lost in the
maze of furniture, pierces the dark interior and
lights up with startling distinctness several white


days, set squarely upon the ground.


Old wooden


boards, poorly painted, make up the framework,
while tin roofing provides the protection from the


bedposts and a rusty tin tub.


To the left is a


sun and rain.


A sign outside just over the door


carpenter's bench equipped with all manner of


written in Chinese, bears the name of the propri-


tools.


Two negroes oblivious to all outside in-


etor, although to us it means nothing.


Inside we


fluence, playing an interminable game of checkers
on a dirty checker board, occupy the only cleared


space.
At the


right entrance, a high green fence with


find counters which extend halfway around,


while


the other half of the store is taken up with barrels
and other surplus which can not be put in the


sleeping quarters,


that are


in the


rear of the


a once white top bearing the sign


"Oficina,


en-


shack.


Upon the shelves are to be found as cos-


*

1 ..


T ->S -








THE CARIBBEAN.


among these are threads of various colors, buttons


of as many h
chet hooks,
ticles of no se


Somewh
"Chink,"
John. He
that we ta
for. Fart,


joyous
the age
eightee
member
eight k
the gen
whenJ
ter, or


family
s of ei
n, anm
rs of t


ues, tops,
rubber bal
*eming imp
in the vic
om all of
er has his
nothing th
inside, wi
Consisting
ght and te
i a wife.
he family


cigarette
Is, and s
ortance.
inity, we
us have
watchful
at has no
e hear th


;oft
n, al
Besi
there


wo c
arge
des
are


s,
un


thimbles, cro-
dry other ar-


usually see
learned to
eye open tE
t been duly
ie sounds of
children bet
r boy of per
these immec
a cat and s


the
call
see
paid
f his
veen
haps
diate
ix or


ittens, and a canary. All of them help in
eral running of the store, either as salesmen
ohn is not there, or by playing on the coun-
singing in twittering tones.


A FRUIT STAND.
Emogene Nash, '23.


were many oh


used to
back wal
for the hi
pictures
New Yo
just how
There
I could s
termed. I
I turned
a pile of
of cockrn
As I c
prietor l
tors of s
engaged
rag of v!
didn't ca
to the bo


wrap
I Wa
ghly
which
rk j
far


papers and magazines which


the fr
is dark
Scoloret
h most
unk sh
back th


uit for
colored
I picture
likely
op -on
e room


the customers.
Sand had it not
es hung on the w
came from some
e couldn't have
extended.


were
The
been
'all
little
told


were no windows and the only door that
ee was the wide one by which I had en-


must me;
to leave t
overripe,
aches wa


ame
ooki
uch
in


wiping


nation here that it was
hat I spied under the
rotten fruit on which
,s greedily feasting.
of the door I noticed
one would expect the
establishment to look.
Sand polishing his fru


Ii


ery questionable hue.
re for any fruit, and con
)at.


I decide
tinued o


not until
fruit bins
a family


the pro-
: proprie-
He was
it with a
ed that I
n my way


was strolling through


Colon


on one of


A WINDOW.


those
the d
fruit
to its
Th
ment


r
V
Y
ta
sli
re
ol


pmeapp
imagine
before.
many n
yellow li
brown
reddish-
native
as pear
even a 1
side and
shaped
are alw
ing abo
lengths'
the atte
Hang
many b
were hi


are ba
season
nd.
ightes
was
f fruit
les wh
, had
At t
ative
mes, b
illigat
yellow
water
s, apj
few pe
behir
papay
avs in
ve tht
on wh
nationn
ing rt
unche
unlf m


lam
n,
Its


evenings


my attenti
whole mal
*


which


on was
keup---


come during


attrac
from i


d by a
owner


t detail-was very picturesque.
dumped on the sidewalk an assort-
s, such as bananas, papayas, and
which were very green and which, I
just been delivered a little while
he front in the numerous bins were
fruits, including oranges, greenish-
brownish-green pineapples, purplish-
or pears, banana-colored plantains,
v mangoes, and round, light-green
melons, also American fruits, such
ples, oranges, lemons, grapes, and
caches and plums. On the floor be-
ud the fruit bins could be seen melon-
as and fat brown cocoanuts which
season. Suspended from the ceil-
e bins were strings and cords of all
ich dangled "States" fruits to attract
of Americans who might pass.
ather low on the side walls were
s of overripe bananas. Above these
nanv bird caies. baskets. and nic-


heads
hangii
colors
some
modes
Orien
small


Such a litter of things--silk shirts, cuff buttons


ins, me
from a
d style,
cient,
below
md Pai
window


arrangement


dallio
bove,
s, som
other
', Egy
nama
with


ns, and trinkets
kimonos and s
e expensive, and
s antique, and
tptian vases, sil
hats-all crowd


any seemri


of all
hawls
some
still
ks fro
ed in'
I idea


Sorts:
of all
cheap,
others
m the
to one
as to


:--such is the window of the Hindu


shop.


CHINESE GARI)DENER.


Loauise


tlenter, '2.


Each morning sees him patter up the street,
His tiny figure, shriveled, old, bowed down
By weight of two huge baskets, too replete
With vegetables-lettuce, parsley, kale.

A huge, round, battered Chinese hat protects
His head. He wears a ragged, blue-gray shirt,
And baggy khaki pants adorned with flecks
Of dry red clay. His bare feet show much dirt.


Henry Moore,


h
'
i
i


L3


ut


3








THE CARIBBEAN.


EARLY


LIFE


IN PANAMA.


(Purely Imaginative Stories based on Early Incidents.)


A CAUSE FOR THANKSGIVING.


The man next to him on the flat car had died be-


Matie Puilig,


fore they reached the hospital.
his cries still.


He could hear


pobrecita,


pobrecita"-Sefora


Cortez


"Ah si, pobre Juan, pobre Carmencita.


placed a fat comforting arm about Carmencita's
quivering shoulders.


"Madre de


Dios!


wild cries rent the air.
many, many hours alre;


Mi Juan.


" Carmencita's


She had been sobbing for
idy. Her poor eyes were


Carmencita


couldn't


hadn't the money;


return


to Spain;


the best she could do was to


remain in Gorgona, in her little house out on the
banks of the river. Juan had industriously made
a small garden, so Carmencita didn't suffer for


swollen from weeping.
Her Juan had been brought home on a blood-


want of food.


The neighbors were kind, but the


little widow grew paler and paler, thinner and


stained


stretcher-broken,


mangled-the


warm


thinner.


Her eyes grew dull, her hands trembled,


life crushed out of him.


When she had ceased


and she was most absent-minded. Sefiora Cortez


laughing and crying, they explained.


There had


came in one day and found her holding


"Chichi"


been more trouble with Cucuracha (the name was
painfully familiar in those days, especially to the


upside-down.


The poor baby was crying feebly


and when Sefiora Cortez took the child she found


great snow-haired engineer).


The great pressure


it burning with fever.


All that night the doctor


on the side of the Cut had forced much mud and
dirt up in the middle of the Canal, tracks were
torn up, and steam shovels, engines and rock cars


from Bas Obispo sat beside the still feverish little
baby while Carmencita looked dazedly on and
watched "Chichi" draw a last faint breath and die.


had been overturned.


Yes, it had all happened


They placed "Chichi"


n a small white box and


so quickly, they had seen great clods of red-gold
dirt roll and tumble-and then had come the up-
heaval.


Ah yes, Carmencita had seen Gold Hi


hadn't


put her beside her father on the hill, close to the
military burying ground.
Carmencita shed no tears, she only grew more
dazed, her hands trembled more, and she seldom


she? Yes, she had seen it when she and Juan
and the baby had gone to Panama to last year's


spoke.


Ah! how she longed to die!


she live on, and on, and on, to suffer?


Why must
If she only


The train had gone around the curve


about sunset and the hill had looked like a great
lump of pure gold!
What? Oh! A steam shovel had ended Juan's
life.
With this excited explanation the men trooped


out.


When they reached the door-step one began


to whistle,


"O Sole Mio.


" It was sad, but death


dared to take matters into her own hands, and
end it all, so she might be placed to rest beside


the two loves of her heart!


But Carmencita was


a staunch Catholic, and the fear of losing God's


love was strong in her heart.


She wanted to die,


but to take one's own life was a great sin; so she
must wait.
This little Spanish widow thought herself be-


was no new thing to these hard-working, sun-


burned men.
or killed in


Every day some one was crushed


some way.


Sometimes


were


yond any greater grief.


She believed she was


numb to any greater pain, but on learning that
she must leave her home, her only possession, she


taken on flat cars to the hospital or morgue-and


often


the flat cars were


well-loaded


found that she was mistaken.
through her nearest neighbor.


The news came
While Carmencita


.. 1 1- .. - c ...k : .-*, *.-* **** 1-* n. J anti nn J fr2 1 q'kJ h- Irr a 1 n. A-I


carnival.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Lake to be unleashed, and all the houses on the
banks would be covered.
Several days after the rumor, a circular letter
was placed on the bulletin board in front of the
Commissary, stating that all the people must
move at once.


Carmenci
had not the
she would v
Sefiora C
over the den
that they r
warm heart
a tent far fr
Finally ca
the dike.
cause the ex
with Washi
the button
This thing


ta now saw her way clear. True, she
courage vet, but she could wait, yes,


ait.
ortez had k
ented wido
nust move,
and begged
om the path
tme the day
'he electric
cplosion wer
ngton and it
that caused
that was to


ept a protecting "
v, so when the news


she took h<
her to stay
of the water
set for the
wires that
e in some w
was in the
the explosion
happen see


wing
caume


er to her big
with them, in
rs.
destroying of
were used to
ay connected
Capital that
n was placed.
med the sign


his mouth before his foot dish.
The rock crashed the short
Sefior Cortez and Carmencita
heavy blow on the head. She w
less, and, much to the horror of
the rest of the way down the
reached her at last, it seemed


breathed
the place
bed, and
that was
could ha
and, had
Sefiora
to ask ir
had been


. They*
, and lai
a few mi
called
ve been
she live
Cortez.


took her to
d her tired bo
minutes later sh
in said there
done; her s
t, she would h;
amid much w


)dged
distant
and si
as kno
her fri
hill.
that


a big
ce be
truck
cked
ends,
WVhern
she I


avc been ai
copingg, f(


wonder why Carmencita
"(;racias a D[)ios.


rock.
tween
her a
sense-
sc list>
rolled
thev
ardhy


house in
ttle white
'he doctor
thing that
fractureI
in invalid.
unid time


s last words


AN INCIDENT.
II. F. .1av, '27.,


of completion, for the water was
for the first time.
There were crowds of people,


Zone
graph
there
finally)
they
climb
From
house
watch
her th


employees,
ers-almost
to witness
y persuaded
reached G;
the hill by
there she c
, but she
ing the wal
ie needed co


women
everybo


d


it. Cam
her to go
amboa, sh
the tracks
would see h
didn't fee]
ter close in
urage to ei


The time for the e
about fifteen minutes
engines and steam sh
a great clamor of w
warning to the work
Suddenly there was
all eyes were turned
dirt, rocks, and water
into the air and the
opening. Carmencit
gray house where the 1
reached, and covered
thought Carmencita.
As the party star


xplosi
s before
novels
whistless


nen o
i a gr
towan
rose
wate
a's efr


to be turned in


tou rists


Canal


and children, p
y on the Zone
-encita's friends
with them, and
e insisted that
to gain a better


er deserted little gray
l any pain-perhaps
About it would give
id it all.
)n had been set, and
"e that time all the


within a mile
and bells,


n the
eat ru
d the
almo
r swi
"es w


dike.
mblit
dike.
st a h
rled t
ere c


ong fingers of w
it. "Ah, mana

ted down the


set up
to give


g roar
The
indrec
irougl
t the
er rea


, and
mud,
Sfeet
h the
little
ched,


na, maliana,


hill, SeRora


"Hello, Jim, aren't you
ohn Carter as he joined
or the morning stroll dow
'hence the labor train de
ditch diggers," who were
t Culebra.
"No, Carter, I was up
premature charge let go a


bit.
to "Il
"I
one e
"'T'


ledge on
them off
to the le
heard on
to happe
I didn't
whole hil
time thai
of rock w
that's wl
the poor
Kemper
I guess
any moren


working today?" asked
his friend, Jim Martin,
n to the railroad track,
parted with its load of
employed up in the cut


on the hill when that
md I got bunged up a


arm is pretty badly injured so I'll have
ff" for a couple of weeks."
n't hear anything about it. Was an-


hurt?" queried
put some dot
the hill vester
at lunch time.
ft of the ledge.
e of the caps and
n, I jumped into
get into it any
1 must have co
n I could think
vent four and fi
hat got me, the
niggers were ho
and I were the


George is all ri


Carter.
ible charges


dav a
I was
AL


nd inte
working


under


g


led
on
*


About eleven o
knowing what wa!
the bucket ofmy m
too soon, for I thi
me down past me
of it. Some of the
ve hundred yards
flying stones. S
)rriblv mangled. I
only white men ir
ght now. I don't


to set
77 just
clock I
s about
shovel.
nk the
in less
pieces
away;
ome of
Gceorge
injured;
t want


Calls like that; it was my tenth experi-


t
)


va








THE CARIBBEAN.


that you know this is my last day.


Believe me,


won't I be glad to see Mary and my two little


girls?


I sail day after to-morrow afternoon.


"I didn't know that and I'm certainly sorry to


hear it,"


said Jim, rather surprised.


"When did


yvou decide to return to the States?"
"I get so homesick for them that I can hardly


Mary, Frances, and Jane, would be waiting at the
front gate for him on the day of his expected ar-
rival and how he would come up, throw his bag-
gage down, and take each one into his arms and
give her the loving of her life.
A sudden lurch of the train announced its ar-


rival at the bottom of Gold Hill.


As Carter went


stand it.


And what's the use of my being down


to his machine, he sang, for happiness was his.


here alone when I have one of the coziest little


As he sat on


his shovel


that afternoon-the


homes in the world back in Indiana?


I wouldn't


afternoon which was to mark the end of his canal


bring the family down on account of the bad living
conditions. My living here with the malaria and
yellow fever bugs is bad enough without making
the family undergo it."
"It is a rotten place to bring women folk. I
hardly see how some of the men stand it as well


service-he


noticed


that everything seemed


assume an unusually cheerful appearance.


From


behind a few fleecy clouds the sun shone on Gold
Hill, making it appear like a huge nugget with
countless numbers of seemingly miniature men
struggling apparently in vain to level its mighty


as they seem to.


I know that I wouldn't bring


bulk.


It had rained in the morning and the grass


any family of mine down here, that is, if I had
one," laughed Jim, as the two approached the
labor train, which was on the side track awaiting
its usual load,-a load which was often decreased
by such accidents as had occurred the day before.
But it seemed that there were always more to fill


the places of the absent ones.


There had to be,


for such an undertaking as the Panama


Canal


was of the brightest green while to the left in the
patch of level country beside the hill stood Car-


ter's favorite ponciana tree, its leaves


a burning


hue. From his towering post on the hill just op-
posite Gold Hill he could see the men hurrying
about to fulfill whatever task might be theirs. At
frequent intervals a train pulled out with its load
of dirt for the fill and the loaders rushed to another


could not be hindered by a single accident.
Carter's friendship with Jim had been very in-


timate and he rather hated to say,


"Well, I sup-


quarter to help fill another.


There were many


white men to boss the colored workmen and occa-
sional small groups of engineers who were over-


pose that I had better say goodbye, because I may


seeing the work.


Somehow he hated to think of


not get a chance to see you again.


I hope your


leaving because he had become so accustomed to


arm comes along all right and that you are even
luckier in the future than you have been in the


it; he seemed almost a part of it.


thought,


But then he


"Only two more weeks, old man, and


you'll be the happiest person on earth.


"I think I'll be down on the job about quitting


time, so I'll be sure to look you up,
Carter climbed aboard the train.


said Jim as


Just ten minutes before quitting time Jim Mar-


tin got off the tramin from Gorgona.


Over to the


The bouncing and jogging of the car in which
Carter rode did not disturb him, because he was
thinking of the cozy little Indiana home and all
its comforts, his wife, Mary, and her loving ways,
and the two little girls, Frances, seven years old


and Jane, five years of age.


He pictured the home-


coming and how he would take them in his arms


and love them all.


He said


to himself,


two more weeks and I shall see them.


seems


possible." He


thought of


"Only
S


It hardly


the big


yard, with all the mammoth shade trees, where


right he saw the men at the tool supply houses
checking in the tools that had been used farther


up the cut during the day.


When he turned to


the left, he saw the men hurrying about, most of
them coming from the tool sheds with picks and
shovels and going toward the hill across from Gold
Hill. Wondering what it all meant, he approached
a small group of men and asked what was wrong.
One of them spoke up hurriedly, "That ledge
above 426 came down and took the whole works
with it!"


yT .








THE CARIBBEAN.


Martin spoke with difficulty,


get me
a few i
up and
think o
front g
will ne1
those v
The
take thi
out so


terday
utes be
had to
te little
in a co
come.
gave
rk could


place of h
uddenlv.


inste
fore
go.
girls
'uple
' Bu
their
d no
lim w
The


dl of Car


11;
Vi


s time
hat will
lat will
Weeks,
Carter


a


t
1
<
[


, "Why di
ter to-day?
would havy
his poor w
be waiting
for a daddy
was onlyI


dn't it
()nly


lives for a worth v cause
t stop; another came
hose life had been crush
men there soon forgot


though the little family in Indiana never forgot.

EXTRACTS FROM A DI)IARY.
Gerald Bliss, 7r., 'j.

April to, 19o6.-The Co/on docked at pier 2


this afternoon after
down the Atlantic.
structed wooden at
noon sun did not g
Colon. A short w
Front Street to be
shacks built on the
In every door, we ,
scrawny ill-fed chic]
be a dingy affair.
shelter from the hot
which, we are told,
time of the year.
The trip across w
fing, noisy, and dirt

of propulsion to ou
the train were too m
and yelled the whol
ceases; and so after
we arrived at Pedro
four still incomplete
a station, and a Ch
the town, while in i
of nearly as many ra
their art of doing no
I am one of six w
Bud is the only bat
The Canal, which is
feet long, ten feet w
itant, an alligator of


a somewhat tranquil voyage
But the dock -a poorly con-
Fair-and the hotness of the


ive a favor
'alk to the
composed
edge of a
saw pigs, b
kens. The
It was not
sun and th


bible impression of
station revealed
of many wooden
rut-infested road.
rown children, or
station proved to
thing more than a
e drenching rains,


make their debut about this


'as unexciting.
y engine served a
r destination. I


~uc.
ew
ev


hite
Vo


h for Bud;
vav over.
vo hours of
guel. Wha
uses, a rutt
se shop. 1
ie lazily ma


s
B


ed
'hi;
in \


A slow, puf-
LS our means
he noises of
he screamed
t everything
is treatment,
place it is-
road or two,
s constitutes
Individuals


, resting, or else practising
ng.
women in the town, and
and but ten months old.


- '
but i"
XI in
tie, an
unkno


its embrv(o,
d has as its onm
)Wn age.


is thirty
lv inhab-


stores-with


hined
but lii
tables
in Col
road.
range
haul v


getting sha
into a nmud
larger than
wise, many
night alwa\


while
left
dishes
F,
took
offi ce
On tle
cinat
This
many*
could
poor
But
article
ML
chine
health
like
With
of th
year.
they
takes
never


tt
in
[s1
b7/


Ie ne:
the
or ot
ar'y I


bar and provision


provide us with
else. For thin
is necessary to
are streets whi
hey are alleys
I roughness. T
about, hut it is


ken up


counter


a few fresh
gs other than
go to Pan amn
ch disgrace eve
in width, and
here are a few
worse riding ii
Sit is to wall
few feet. As


has more stores
and "cantinas.
latter filled wit


than


hole every


rs
he


if their
Id, the
sehold
.-Las


it upon themse
rs and so gained
having they said
e those who need
morning about
Sof the houses
get their hands
that we didn't ha
several of the
es. Next time v
ay .', /9o7.-ITh
in this whole t
h officer, and, as
ise quite lenient
out it, Bud woul
e much-needed c
The health co
ought to be. Ev
a victim for M
- know when our


each night tha
ANe'w Years.


about


Fourteen
our teen


down Porto
storm that
excellent as
the same th
the ships.
Christmas t
New Year's


Bu


lves


ve an
other
ye wil
icre i
-own.
he i
abou
d ha\
lothe


ndit
werv


e
,o


is still a 1
womenfol


conm-


vegetables,
these vege-
[. Here, as
n the name
mountain
coaches to
n them and
k andi step
Panama is
, and like-
SPay-day
Ih labl title money
Invest in


requisites.
t week, two Spaniards
to become quarantine
trance to the houses.
d be back later to vac-
l They came all right!
o'clock, they entered
stole everything they
Luckily, we were so
thing worth stealing.
s lost some valuable
I be more careful.
s but one sewing ma-


owned I
ongenial
, people
without
s vacation


S
t
ve
s


ions are still not
train headed for


onkey H


tu


Cemetery


y' the
, he is
use it.
Smanyv
n this
what
Colon
. \We


rn will come, but we pray


t it stays off fori
/9go8.-The dai
ships left Colori
11o way to find sh
s then raging,
protection, and
g if I had been
t. alas, one of t



urkev on it, and
instead of Chris


ver.
before
Harbor
Iter fro
Aolon H
would
captai
lose shi
we had


Christmas,
r and went
m thegreat
arbor isn't
have done
n of one of
ps had our
turkey for


tmas.


1








THE CARIBBEAN.


of the patients, and their disease is not contagious;
so I don't think we will have to join them by com-


pulsion.


They surely are fond of Grandma, and


CONVINCED.


Henry Moore,


often give her little presents, which are usually the


things


that they


learned


to make


while


they have been confined there.


When the United States bought theCanal Zone,
it was with the understanding that they would
reimburse all the native land owners for the land


Apri/ ,


19o8.-There was a big rain last week;


used.


Now it so happened that on the ground


and so we haven't had any cold storage from Colon
since then on account of the track's having sunk
out of sight somewhere along the line; so we have


where the Government wished


to make Gatun


Lake there lived many natives who had small


gardens or


banana


groves.


All these


natives,


had to resort to the


"Chink"


shops again.


Word


except one, agreed to clear out, when they were


has just been received that the track is repaired,
so we are in hopes of having a decent dinner, to-


offered a good price for their lands.
fellow-lived apart from the rest.


This one old
His hair was


morrow.


gray and his face wizened, and he walked with a


September


29g, 9go9.-The first Chinese baby to


stoop.


How old he was nobody knew.


be born in Pedro Miguel was born to-day. As
Aunt Gladys helped quite considerably, the baby


was named Gladvs in her honor.


is Leon.


Her last name


They held quite a celebration in


Chinese colony in honor of the birth of the first
child in this section.


24, 191.


-Another of


those all-night


rains has completely covered a steam shovel and
a train with dirt that slid down from the edge of


the Canal.


Lucky


for the people down


that it was after quitting time,
have been a few casualties. Ev


below


or there might
erything will be


all right early to-morrow, though, for now that
we have the facilities to combat slides, it takes
very little time to overcome the damage done by
them.
October Io, I/3.-The Canal opened to-day,
and I must say that it was quite a spectacle. The
dike at Gamboa was blown up at three o'clock by
President Woodrow Wilson in his office at Wash-


mgton.


It was one grand blast, and threw dirt


The agent for the Government increased the
price offered, thinking that old Juan, as the native
was called, was holding out for more money, but


still the native refused.


The Governor then sent


an interpreter with the agent so that they might
be sure that the native understood what they were
offering him, but the native still refused, saying,
"No quiero vender, no quiero vender."
The interpreter then asked him his reason for
not selling and old Juan replied in a long stream
of guttural Spanish, all to the effect that his father
and grandfather had lived there before him, he
had lived there all his life and intended to die
there, also, that he did not have to sell if he did


not wish.


Here was a stumbling block indeed,


for everything was ready and the day had been
set when the water was to be turned into the ral-
ley, and now one man was likely to hold back the


work.


The agent and the interpreter tried every


means imaginable min order to get the native to


sell his land, but old Juan still refused.


Finally,


two days before the water was to be let in, the
agent took some gold coins and offered them to


in every direction.


The Canal


is now


a thou-


the old native,


thinking that the sight of gold


sand feet wide, more or less, and about sixty-five
feet deep, compared to its thirty-foot length and
ten-foot width of 1906 at Pedro Miguel.
February 15, 1922.-The Chinese, as is usual


every year, have held their Carnival.


do you know!


And what


Gladys Leon, the first Chinese girl


born in Pedro Miguel was their Queen.


This old


might influence him, but to no avail, for the na-
tive shrugged his shoulders and mumbled the
words which had come to be hated by the agent,
"No quiero vender!"
The agent now lost his temper for the first time
in all those trying days, and in a rage at the stub-


bornness of the old man stormed,-


"Don't sell,


hannr vnn n.fl in I-wn Asvc vnn n4/I A;p hra, ITnt


March


36








THE CARl BBEIAN.


Taken back by the
he agent went back
ito conference with
'hey decided that ev
one to make the nat
roceed.
When the time can


u) an
ties,
rouni
feat,-
on hi
ened
miles
fright
end.
looke
earth
water
forth,
to ris
great


id the w
officials
ling hilL:
-that is,
s doors
by a gre
about.
:, think
Then h


c




.t


North
smoke
, spark
slowly
e on ei
astonis


coolness of the old native,
to the ofiee and there went
the rest of the officials.
erything possible had been
ive sell; so the work would


ie for the dam to Ibe blown


after to be clet in, the workme
, and sight-seers stood mon th
s to watch the great engin
all but old Juan. He, as usu
ep dozing. Suiddenly he was
at shock which shook the ear
He jumped to his feet in a


ng
ea


wa
, a
lin
fill
the
hm


tha
ring
rd a.
nd r(
g in
ing
r ba
ent,


nearer and nearer:


the world had


great cli
there,
k, he sa
le sunli
e basin
. Old1
Sthe w.


then the wore


come l


n, naI
Le sur
C Sl1F>
uerin2
aI, sat
awak-
th for
great
to an


he turned and
tst a shower of
;ilver stream of
leap and rush
then beginning
Watched with
gradually came
Is of the agent


came showly back to him.


takin


Which w as craW lin
hand to his head he
no CS verdad: nL


thought to hx
water was sl(
up the bank;
It seemed th
giaze from th
nearer it camn'
hut not convir
and higher rn
six inches, fr(
water met his
and rose abo'
there dazed.
his knees the
This was e
born man, and
old Juan ma


In its!
I)ios!


m
a),
Iv
(


tated without


b urst
o eCs I
possihl
killing
)ld Ju


at he
e appr
e and s
iced.
>se the
m his
feet, t
vc his
To th
water
nouzh


was
oachi
;till
Stub
wa
feet
hen


IFo

*eves f
,rd him
forth,
posible.
e had
the bi


an wat
unable
ing wa
old Juai
bhornlv I
ter; teo
-and
his ankle


roim the
, then, pu
"Nom bre
" But
happened
asin and


new I
hitting
de 1I
what
, for
crc(cI


iched spelibho
to withdraw
ter. Nearer
n watched, d;
he waite,; hit
i feet; five t
vet it rose.


e


s; it passe


lnd.
his
and
ized
gher
eet;
The


d him


door-step, and still he stood
e calf of his legs and then to
crept.
to convince the most stub-


1 coming suddenly back to his
de for the hills with great


bling to himself, "Dios!
Fs verdad; FI mundo


)ios!
al reeves.


lenses,
haste,


Nombre de
"1


*


*
I


I


S







38 ,_____THE CARIBBEAN.







THE CARIBBEAN.


TWO


TRIPS TAKEN


FROM


PANAMA.


DOS VIAJES DE PANAMA.


A VISIT TO


THE CHOKOIS INDIANS.


squawking of the parrots and the


chatterin


of the


Inza Markham,


It was


night, and the tropic moon rose slowly


over the fortified
entrance to the
tugfusta Victoria,
the deep, dark w
It was a perfect
A million stars li
lay like a huge
our party sat on
the time, others
lay on the hatch
play on the water,
would bring ford
ward to this trip
now on our way!
of Indians known
Chico river, a br
is one of the large
into the Turyra.
foot in this count
thrilled and excit
Next morning
were now in the
found to be full o
ed reefs. There,
rocky island inh;
who, when a sh
black cloud into
entered Darien
station on one si
Palma on the ott
released two carn
thought of Capta
ton, eight pairs
along. These wei
ing the trip and
these first two.


island,
Canal,
sturdil
aters.
night


Which guard the Pacific
as our tiny craft, the
y pushed her nose through

to start on our adventure.


ghted the h
mirror all a
the deck, s
singing the
iway watch
, and wonder
h. For wee
to the Darie
There we
as the Cho
anch of the
st rivers in


No white


leavens.


le


round us. M
ome dreaming
latest songs,
ing the moon
ing what the m
ks I had looke


n cou
were
kois,
Chu
Pana
worn


ocean
ost of
away
but I
beams
borrow
d for-


antry. We were
Sto visit a tribe
who live up the
cunaque, which
ma and empties
an had ever set


:ry; so was it any wonder I felt
ed?
we were up bright and early. We


bay
f trea
also,
abitedc
ot Wa
the
harbo
de anr
her.


of Sa
cherou
was a
Sby tl
is fire


ier pigeon
ain Baird,
of these bi
re released
all reach
One of th


ed
es


n Miguel, which we
s rocks and unchart-
lonely, barren, grey,
thousands of pelicans
1, rose like a great
\t eleven o'clock we
. the U. S. wireless
native village of La
ours up the river we
Through the fore-
). M. C., Fort Clay-
is had been brought
t different times dur-
SFort Clayton save
se was discovered in


mon
issip
sand
it w
eyes
where
whet
steg(
vita<
Al


keys. This river m
pi with its tree stun
bars, and thick o
as very narrow, w
, peer into the da
re nature had hek
re live and flourish
imnyia. Here and
e tree towered above
after a long and tires


f^
village of Yavi
the shore to m
lages, consists o
and a school.
an old Spanisi


hundred
Indians.
In the


sa where


wy be likened to the Miss-
ps, mud banks, lowlands,


verhanging vines.
e could, by strain
rk and forbidding
Solitary sway to
the deadly anophe
there a flowering
e the jungle.


ome
all


eet us. Yavi
)fthatched-ro
But here we
i stronghold,


years ago,


day
the
sa, I
ofed
four
bul


protection


Where
ng our
jungle
r ages,
les andti
lignum


arrived at the
ives flocked to
all native vii-
uses, a church,
he remains of
perhaps three


against


early hours of the next morning


fore the su
), we were
hucunaque
ver cavucos
mahogany
at they hav


n had begun to think
n native cayucos bein
river; then, up the
are made by hollowi.
tree, and differ from
e no keel and are flat-


A heavy fog hung over


the trees in
were given


to
a


the over-hang
startled bv a
the cool, slim
water. From
piercing cry
awakening bi
trilling. Hou
river, sometin
torn out in a
at the village
Two days b
of civilization


tal


grey


shower bat
ing foliage
swish, swis
y mud bat
the depth
of a wild c


rds w
rs an
nes al
recent
of th
before,
and


ere c
d ho
most
flood
e Cho
I hadc
sanit


g, long


about getting
g poled up the
Chico. These
ng out a cedar
the sailboat in
bottomed.


* the jungle, transform
ghosts. Occasionally
:h as we brushed again
. Several times we w
h, as a 'gator slid fr
nk into the dirty vell
s of the jungle came
rat. High overhead
heerfully twittering a
urs we traveled up
blocked by great tr
t, until at last we armi


)
I


kois.
left the Zo;
ition, with


ne,
its


ing
we
nst
ere
om
ow
the
the
nd
the
ees
ved


the height
hospitals,








THE CARIBBEAN.


same to-day as it was in the days of the first of


their race.


Upon seeing us, they ran in all direc-


on their faces and, upon questioning our inter-
preter, we learned that they gather poisonous ants


tions like frightened deer.


But our interpreter was


and crush them.


This paste,


when put on the


at last able to persuade them to come out by tell-
ing them that the great white doctor had come.
My father had earned this title by carrying with
him bandages, castor oil, pills, quinine, and potas-


sium to kill the


"little devils,


as they termed the


sores and fever which we found to be prevalent.
As, one by one, they came from their hiding places,
they were greatly attracted by my dress, for I


face, kills the roots of the hair and so prevents
its growth.
Their houses are made by driving four posts
into the ground and making a floor about ten feet
high. The floor is reached by means of a ladder
made by chopping notches in a small tree. One
corner of the floor is taken up by the stove. This
is made of a layer of clay about six inches thick and


wore far more than


their whole wardrobe con-


three feet square.


In the middle is a hole in which


tained.


The women wore a strip of bright-colored


stones are put, and it is on these stones that the


cloth tied around the waist and reaching to the


fire is built.


After it has died down, the meal,


knees,


while the men wore still less.


Both the


which consists of bananas, yams, or wild game,


men and women were short and dark with long,
heavy, straight black hair.
Through our interpreter we learned many of
their strange customs.
When an Indian is courting, he wears a gorgeous
head band made of tiny beads, a gay metallic


is put on to cook.
cf palm leaves.


The roof of the house is made


neckband, and


enormous earrings.


These ear-


rings are huge affairs, the front button being about


the size of a fifty-cent piece.


From it hang tiny


drops, making the whole about four inches long.
The button is fastened to a stick about an inch


long and the size of a pencil.


r .V
..


This is run through


the ear and held there by means of a string tied
behind the head.


The native mode of burden carrying.


\\hen an


Indian goes to see the lady of his


The jungles around their homes are alive with


choice, he takes with him a handful of kernels of


panthers,


wildcats,


wild hogs, lance heads, and


corn.


These he carefully flings at her one by one.


boa constrictors.


For killing these, they use the


If she objects, he must seek another;


but if she


does not, he may go on with his wooing.
When a baby is born, it is rubbed all over with


the juice of a berry.


As this dries, it turns black


so that before the child is many days old he is


coal black.


This, they say, is to prevent sunburn,


a custom which seems queer to us, since they are
already so dark.
If they wish to give the baby a bath, they take
it out, pour water over it, and then shake it as
one would shake a rug.
They have a novel way of carrying their chil-


dren.


The child is put on its mother's back to


which it clings like a


young monkey.


Several


yards of bright cloth are then wrapped around the


spear and the bow and arrow.
A part of their land is forbidden to all but the
Chokois Indians.
It was in the middle of the afternoon when we
embarked in our cayucos and started for Yavisa
under a sun so blistering hot that we were forced
to use banana leaves for sunshades, and it was at
sunset that we rounded the bend and came in
sight of our tiny craft.
Next morning we shoved off and started down
the river toward home.


Our first stop was Real de St. Maria.


Here we


left the mail and waited until noon to get the
high tide at La Palma. At six o'clock the skipper
showed the clearance papers to the alcalde of La








THE CARIBBEAN.


like the


rest of


native


houses, a school, and the r
church. We were in San N
we started out on the last
While passing between
schools of thousands of
sardines. The sardines a


villages-thatched


s of a once wond
uel until noon.
) of our journey.
Islands, we ran
.ckerel feeding
driven near the


erful
ithen

into


upon
sutir-


water


, gets


remains of the poor sardine.


Then we ran across schools of porpoise. In both
cases we found that the pelican works with the
larger fish.
That evening at five, we pulled in at the Marine
landing-a tired but happy crowd, glad to get
back to civilization.


face where the pelican


who flies low


over


MIS VACACIONES.


Como habia pensado ya hace tiempo, me decidi


Dl)espu&s de


unos


minlutos


de decanso sal


ir el verano pasadc
vecina rep6blica de
Al comienzo del
en el vapor Ulua
muelle de Cristoba
la ciudad de Col6n
En la bahia todo
pues de salir del ror
poco mAs agitado 2


dando m
Despu
manana
mas imp
laintico.
cionados


enos perso;
es de bast
siguiente 1I
ortante pt
Mientras
con la ad


C
I
f


a pasar mis vacaciones en la
Costa Rica.
mes de agosto me embarqu6
de la compafia frutera de un
. Que bella vista presentaba
uando me alej6 de sus playas!
u6 perfect calma pero des-


mpeolas, ya se not6 el mar
y por consiguiente fueron q
nas sobre cubierta.
tante horas de buen viaje,
legamos al Puerto Limon,
ierto de Costa Rica en el
arreglaban los asuntos re
uana, visit su bela parqu


un
ue-


otras cosas que pueden lamar la atencion en ese
lugar.
Alas nueve y media tom6 el tren que nos llev6
a Cartago, lugar hacia el cual me dirigia. Durante


larga
do el
,1 tren
ar, ca
, y pc


travesia, pude
Rio Reventazon
, y las pintores
icao y caf6 que
)r las que este p


das. La llegada a c
comprar dulces, frut
ofrecian los numerous
llegada del tren, y a
pr6pios de cada lugar.
A media que el tre
el frio que produce I
tante de tarde llegul
me parecia muy agrad
en ese lugar, de que
caballeros tienden ir
surprendi6, pero no r


:ada
as y
)S v
ver


n
a
I
a
ta
a
m


entretenerme con
, que corre casi
cas fincas de nara
se encuentran p(
ais tiene muchas e
estaci6n me per
otras cosas quet
endedores atentos


item-


pa
nj
or
nt
mi
a


v costumbres


fu6 subie
.s alturas
al simp
ble la cos
antos las
recibir
e dei6 d


mnd


o. full


sintiendo


. Siendo ya bas-
Atico Cartago, y
tumbre que tienen
damas como los
el tren. Esto me


zrada


L ou


rccorrer el
pude admi
dad de los
que es mu
venes cAle
muchos air


sitio. Primero f
rar la riqueza de
habitantes. De
y concurrido a e
giales. De ahi f
macenes. Duran


estuve en esa, visited a las
Angeles es la mas notable,
tiguamente una virgen se ap
se apareci6 ahora han cons
lesia. Cerca de aqui tambi
groso en el cual, si uno se
mizas, se curaran. Tambie
tar los alredelores, los cua
vos en la agriculture. Por 6
el famoso volcin de Costa I
tante al lugar debe de ir.
causo un gran terremoto qt
de Cartago, de tal manera q
de electricidad, los tubos
fueron tumbados y destrui
personas fueron heridas y n
Una vez que conoci baste
fui a visitar a otros luga
Heredia y Guadalupe. F
merece especial atenci6n la
ser el lugar mais poblado y
ficios. Entre Fstos esti el
de los mejores de America,
que son llamados "las dos loc
sias, quien fu6 un preside


mucd
patri
agrac
fuero
De


r tan


10 por el
a. Mi p
able por
in prodiga
,sou6s de


adelante vy
ermanencia
las much
idas.
tres meses


iul al mercado,
1 suelo y la lal



ahN segui al
stis horas po
ful a andorre
te los demAis
iglesias. La
porque dicen
areci6 y que e
truido esa fat
6n hay un po
lava las part
n ful a caball
les son muy
Iltimo ful a M
lica, al cual t(
Este volcain
ie destruy6 la
ue todos los a
de agua v l


donde
borosie-


parque,
r las j6-
ar a los
dias que
de Los
que an-
n donde
nosa ig-
zo mila-
s enfer-
o a visi-
progresi-
t. Irazu,
odo visi-
en 1911
Sciudad
lambres
as casas


tambien mhchas


nul
tar
re;
)e
ca
el
Te
y
ur
nt


ertas.
ite esta pobalad
s, como San J
todos estos si
pital, San Jose,
de mis bellos
eatro National,
el Asilo de Cha
as" de Rafael I
e que se preoc


ci6n
ose,
'tios
por
edi-
uno
pui,
gle-
upo6


embellezimiento de su
en la capital fu6 muy
s atenciones que me

de tan feliz Daseo. re-


41


e al







THE CARIBBEAN.


TIME.
Frances Gray,


thing else.


When you try to slip in three weeks


where there ought to be only one day, there are


The other day I heard some talking about


eter-


usually complications.


It is like trying to build


nity, but he didn't seem to have a very clear idea


of what eternity is.


I didn't say anything, but


a twelve-by-eight-inch-puzzle on


inch-table.


I know.


I've tried bo


a six-by-four-
th. There are


I thought to myself that I had a pretty good con-


ception of eternity.


I think it can be quite ac-


curately compared with the period between nine


school, and golf, and tennis, and swimming, and
basket ball, and-oh, I could go on naming in-
numerable things that ought to be done every


a. m. and four p. m. on any


Monday between


day, if time weren't in such a hurry.


The other


October and June, when you have spent the wak-
ing hours of the previous night reading the thrill-


day a teacher said to me,


"You know, you would


get really good marks if you would only put a little


t


ming adventures or
"Pilgrim's Progress.
don-chu-know.)


Jesse


James,


or Bunyan's


" (One so often does that,


more time on your work,"


and a man said that I'd


"play a corking good game of tennis" if I'd"


put in a little more time practicing,


But to get down to our real subject, which is time.


You know, time is a funny thing.
enhauer says that time is the


dimension.


You knowSchop-
only unchanging


Now I have a great deal of respect for


Schopenhauer, but I can't bring myself to believe
everything that he says, and this statement about


and some one


else prophesied that I'd be a coming golf champion
if I'd only work at my driving-"just take a little
time off every day and work up a good drive." If
time would only slow up at the right moment, for
a while, (and if I were fool enough to believe every
thing I hear), I'd be the forty-eleventh wonder of


time is one of the things I don't believe.
to me that time is just about one of


It seems
the most


changeable dimensions that there is.
You always see time pictured as an old man,
but along about one and five-eighths minutes of


nine when I am leaving home to tread the


seven


or eleven blocks between me and the scene of my


the world.


Alas!


It is a terrible thing for a bud-


ding genius tobe so handicapped, but "Time waits
for no man," so at least I don't need to feel that
I am being particularly ill-treated.
But you know, when you come right down to
brass tacks, there is no use contending with Time.
I have had several years' experience now, and I've


labors, namely,


Cristobal High School, I


see a


vision of a winged Mercury fleeting past me with


come to that conclusion.
Time. You can't beat


There is no use rushing
him and you can't get


a scythe over his shoulder and I
"What fools men are!"


to myself,


around him.
a-hold as he ru


The only thing to do is to grab
dishes by and hang on. Time isn't


But that impression doesn't last long, because
along about the first quarter of the first period in
the morning I am forced to change my mind about


Mr. Time all over again.


I go to class all primed


for a brilliant recitation, but after I have held my
seat for about ten minutes, I discover that what
I don't know holds about a three-fourths majority
so I slide away down on the back of my neck,
hoping that I'll be missed in the rush, and count
the young eternities as they flutter by.
One place that time always makes me angry,
though, is in social problems class, when I think
of a great many things to say, and so does every-


one else, and the first thing I know


Mr. Time


has stepped on the accelerator and gone speeding
by before we are half through.


going to go your pace, so you'll have to go his,
and let me tell you (confidentially, this is), you've
got to have a pretty good grip when he gets going
and you've got to have pretty good brakes when
he decides that it is time to slow up.


A TARPON.


Mattison


Pullig,


The smooth clear water flows so swiftly by-
A solid shadowed sheet made dark by mat


Of moss beneath.


Then on the rocks which lie


Below, it falls with rumbling roar.


At that,


It rests awhile, a mirror for the sky.
In it I stand and patiently combat
The heat of sun, and weariness. I ply
The rod and try to lure the autocrat.
S t S .. *t t-S


g.











THE CARIBBEAN


"a
* ***


.E.A4E ILLW.M -

SEIGHt6FESCP8I
4' 1U1ULLJ.YlI5TTI


.:..DRO-EI.CTRIC STATION
* aE *I'
*. . '.". I* r
.: 'S "*". 3 f V


- -a La..


0 ^- .*


~t IL


S


dI .
M*:


-t%.., .


.1 ^ *
iLtf..t **.


- 7- -


is,


m


* MaN^


FE-r








44 THE CARIBBEAN.


-K


DRAMATIC


ATTEMPTS.


AN INFERNO-L DRAMA.


Uncle


Remus.


Mah-mah name


is Uncle Re-


Frances Gray,


mus suh, but-but-ah reckon ah must a dropped
into de wrong place.


The devil.


Cleopatra.
Julius Caesar.
Lucrezia Borgia.
Uncle Remus.


Caesar.


Wrong place, go to!


1


place into which thou canst drop;


'his is the only
so be assured.


Come, let me present thee to the ladies. This is
Queen Cleopatra, fairest and most beautiful of all
women. (Cleopatra languidly raises one white
hand which Uncle Remus gingerly touches and


Scene:


Hades.


A shady corner of the Brim-


stone Country Club, overlooking the Styx.


Cleo-


patra reclines languidly on the sizzling surface of


a cast-iron divan,


while Caesar lounges against


the electrified barbed-wire rail, sipping with relish


a tall glass of molten lead.


Lucrezia stands with


a phial of her favorite hemlock in her hand while
she watches with interest the passage of Charon
as he ferries a newcomer across the river.


drops like a hot pancake.)


famed Lucrezia


Borgia,


And this is the far-


whose deadly


hemlock


has gnawed the vitals of more than one unfaith-


ful love.


(Lucrezia nods her head with a sar-


donic smile, and Uncle Remus chokes and swal-
lows but utters not a word.)


Cleopatra.


But sit thee here beside me, and tell


me of the things upon the earth.


struggling


mortals,


who climb


I envy not those
and crawl and


grovel in the dirt, all for a few paltry coins or


Caesar.


What see'st thou fair I.ucrezia?


Surely


the favor of


the fickle goddess


Fame.


Come!


there is naught of interest at this hour.
Lucrezia. What mean'st thou, Caesar, naught


of interest?


A gentleman of color doth approach.


Cleopatra. A gentleman of color, say'st thou?
Lucrezia. But surely, one of your own country,


perhaps some close of kin.
ively.)


(She laughs deris-


Speak, man.
Uncle Remus. (Sitting gingerly on a glowing
chair.) Lawd, Missus, it's hard times on de earf
right now. Dey aint enuf coal to keep the pore
folks warm, and deys all mighty nigh to freezing


to death.
a blight


De cotton crop don fail las


come along and


away


year, an


cawn.


Caesar.


No, no, sweet Lucrezia.


Thou know'st


our fair companion has naught of color to her.


Atween de freezin
much laughing' an


an' de starving


' a nigger caint


' dey aint been


no whar


Caesar.


naught but the jealousy that doth possess her.
If'twere not fhr the circumstances, I should prob-
ably have felt the biting of her hemlock ere now.


(A commotion


is heard


outside,


and presently


widout laughing .
Cleopatra. Why it reminds one of the locusts
in Egypt. I had thought the modern civilization
had overcome such things.


Uncle


Remus.


Lawd, Honey, modern civiliza-


around


the corner of


the porch


appears


Uncle


tion aint overcome nothing .


It's just made more


Remus.)
Uncle Remus. (Gazing wide-eyed on the ancient
and somewhat scanty costumes of the two women


things what needs to be overcome. (Turning to
Caesar.) But tell me, man, who is you, and how
comes you here?


and Caesar.)
Where is I at?


De Lawd hab mercy on mah soul!


Caesar.


(Pompously


and with


Why, man, I am Julius Caesar.


much


chest.)


You see before


Characters:


Cleopatra. Heed








THE


CARIBBEAN.


Uncle


Remus.


You refused a crown, you say?


Lawd, if dat don't put me in mine' oh de time
'at Brer Lion got tired ob his crown an' 'fuse to


wear it.
ob folks


Shucks though, there's always plenty


ats willing


' to wear it even second han'.


Brer Rabbit he step right up an' offered to do de
kingin' for a-while an' Brer lion han' it ober to


him an


man had


went off fishing'


. Dem was de days


gun to do tie kingin


'. but man done


gone along jes de same as de animals used to.
I reckon dev paint so berry much difference ater
all.


Lucrezia.


You know, mv lord Caesar


methi nks


we have a second Socrates among us.


Cleopatra.


But true, fair Lucrezia.


"'1


most amusing to hear the two discourse


"would be
together.


THE BOOKI.EGGER


Ernst Euphra, 2'.


Sr efle:


The office of one of our generals of in-


ustrv.


Characters


Mr. Jon


es, said general.


Tony, an agent.


Tony (Entering office with bulging hip pocket).


Good morning.


I'm Tony Hotstuff.


I was speak-


ing to you over the phone this morning.
Jones. Oh ves! Glad to see you. Sit down.


Toer,
weather,


(Looking
ain't it


sumpin Nice


Brown was savin


cautiously
Everybod


about).


place you got here.


Rotten


a cold


\Vell, ahem,


you was interested in some good


Caesar
be--


. But so! We
What in Hades


If thou canst excuse me
retire from the scene.


Cleopatra.


must arrange a meeting


is this?


The devil!


methinks


Nay Caesar, it is that we all must


stuff. He buys everything he gets from me.
Jones. Yes, he spoke to me about it and showed
me some stuff he got from you.


I've got an


awful good


line just


now.


Just got it in day before yesterday.


be excused, for I have no more stomach for this
company than thou hast.


Jones.
Tony.


\\'hat have you got?


W\Vell, I have sumpin


' direct from Arthur


Lucrezia.
Cleopatra
thee-well!


Nor I.


Fare-thee-well


and Caesar.
(Exit Caesar,


I'ncle Remus.


(Ironically). Aye, fare-
Cleopatra, and Lucre-


Uncle Remus stands dumbfounded staring


Schnitzler.


Jones.


much of it.


Ton y.


I've tried his stuff and I


That's funny.


didn't think


It was supposed


to be


after them.


Devil. Ho!
comer methinks
Uncle Rem


Enter the devil behind).


Ho! What have we here?
:s. Speak, shade. Who
us. Ah's Uncle Remus,


who may you be?


Devil.


Who may


I be?


A new-


art thou ?


real genuine stuff.
Jones. Must of been diluted.


Tony.


help it, Mr.


don't handle nuthin


' diluted if


can


Jones, but of course it's hard to tell


what is real stuff and what ain't.


a sample of some stuff I just


Now here's


Sherwood Ander-


son-came over the Canadian border.


I'm the lord and master of thi


s kingdom.


Jones


the Devil.


onV.


(gleefully). Sherwood Anderson!
Regular stuff too. I've sold a lot andti


Uncle
whar is


Remus.


De devil


' horns


you is!


' tail?


ain t


man,
neber


ain't had no complaints.


Jones.


How much?


see a devil


wifout horns an


' tail.


Tony. Sh, I can let you have a case for $18o0.


Devil.


trash!


(With a snort). Horns


and tail!


That is nonsense to frighten the


What


children.


Jones.
Ton v.


That's pretty steep.


Got anything else?


Well, I got some Ben Hecht, and some


But come, have you dined?


Uncle Remus. Dine?


How you talk


"dine '


DI). H. Lawrence-it's all
hut plenty of kick in it.


young stuff


though-


Devil. Dined, eaten, partaken of food.


Uncle Remus. 1
Devil. Precisely!


ou mean has I et?
Has you et?


Jones.
Tony.


any more.


Tones.


Got any Balzac or Ibsen or-


Naw!


Nobody can get any of that stuff


It ain't made no more.


Well. I don't think I'll order anything








THE CARIBBEAN.


MR. SHAKESPEARE VISITS GOPHER-


my books, for instance-Have you ever met Carol


PRAIRIE.
Louise Henter, '23.


Characters. Mr. William Shakespeare
Mr. Sinclair Lewis.
Carol Kennicott.


Place.
Time.


Kennicott?


She's--


Shakespeare (Still hunting for glasses).


"When


the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees--


Lewis (Exasperated).


rest.


Doctor Kennicott.
Mrs. Bogart.
Gopher Prairie.
Night.


(Imitating Shakespeare's


We know the


tone)


Mike


farm hand, methinks came a-sparking at Matilda


Ann's.
Mrs. K
woman.


(Enthusiastically)


.ennicott.
Carol!


She's
Carol!


must meet


a real character,


(The rise of the curtain discloses Main Street.
Most of its filth and sordidness is hidden by the


darkness.
blank, v
stretched


A stiff, dirty-white, dead cat, with its


acuous t
directly


toward


the audience,


above the footlights.


Enter


Mr. Shakespeare followed by Sinclair Lewis.)
Lewis. This town represents any small town in
this country.
Shakespeare. (Hunting hurriedly for his glasses.)


"How


sweet


the moonlight


sleeps


upon


bank--


Lewis. Moonlight?
It's the light from


Bank?


You're mistaken.


the lamp in Mrs.


Bogart


kitchen shining on the ash pile in the yard!


Shakespeare (Who is slightly deaf).


"Here


will sit--
Lewis (Holding him back and kicking aside a


rotten


overripe


banana


which


across


stage and stops, propped tipsily against the side
of the cat). Not much we won't, Willie! Not


on boxes
Grocery.


coming


Howland


and Gould s


I made them and I know what they are.


Why man, they're simply alive with-
(At this point a huge cockroach emerges from


the box on


about


which Mr.


to sit, and slowly


William Shakespeare is


waving


his whiskers,


walks sedately across the stage and disappears
behind the wings.)
Shakespeare (Hunting frantically for his glasses).


And let the sound of music creep min our


ears.


Lewis (Wiping his face with a dirty, stained


pocket handkerchief).


Oh, no we don't.


thing does any creeping it'll be I.


man.


I'm sick of hearing


grinding out


"You-You


some


tellem"


If any-


Let's go, old
phonograph


or "Mr.


(Enter


(Doctor


Carol,


resignedly,


dressed


in silver


sheath, carrying a dirty gray dishrag in one hand,
in the other a treatise on village improvement.
She is followed by a mangy, fleabitten, skinny dog
that scratches industriously throughout the en-
tire scene.)


Carol.


Just another of those sordid, common-


place people he makes me meet.


peare at that.


If he only were


Called Shakes-
the Shakespeare.


He d have understood me.


Shakespeare.


Lewis.


She's true to life.


grandmother.


(Mrs.


Bogart,


Ah-Ah- -


Bogart!


You'd


Why, she might even be your


Mrs. Bogart!!


who has been


tiently for him to call, oozes in.


waiting impa-
She sees Mr.


Shakespeare and is oblivious to all else.
as fast as possible toward him and t
damp, pudgy arms about his neck. She
Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Shakespeare! M:


Shakespeare ?
called that.


wonderful


She runs
hrows fat,
snickers.)
r. William


should


He wrote beautiful sermons.


He-


Carol Such vulgar demonstrations.


Lewis. I-I-say.


like that.


You aren t supposed


to act


I didn't make-


Shakespeare (Searching madly for his gl
I have a --


Mrs. Bogart. I love you!


are red!


I love you


asses).


Roses


Violets--


I have a wife, whom, I


(Faints.)


Kennicott enters and drags her out,


assisted by Sinclair Lewis, who realizes you don't


know a woman even if you've created her.


Carol


lagher


"Stum-


trails disgustedly after.


The gray dishrag swings


01 I-..- .... flAIL L.Mc-- L L..M. l. f .... .-..


Shakespeare (Shouts).
protest, I love."
Mrs. Bogart. O-h-h-h


MV/T ghulr~n rpat finallv finri hie 1orlac








THE CARIBBEAN.


A SHRED OF YELLOW


PAPER.


Cristobal


Commissary


met a Cristobal


Dorothy Abendroth, '25.


Chong, quaint-eyed,
orthodox raiment, shuffle
of the dawning city. H
t' I i I


or paper, crumpled
I pick it up. Un
light, sprawling, gro
me. Whatdothevm
Perhaps they fo
written where the
cense to the Prince
squalid room abovc
haps this is what t,
"O Lotus Lady,
the willow trees, C
of the moon and si
tern of your beauty
thousand years, w.
-
dead with love, stir
silk and of copper.
"0 Lotus Lady,
the shallows are s
an alien land whei


gold, where their
where the stars arn
great glazed candles
"0 Lotus Lady,
mountains, across t
pan of dreams draw
comes to greet you
Is this the poen
sprawling character
faded, yellow pape
mean: "Six collar


lemon-cheeked, bizarre in
es through the gray silence
e drops something, a piece
yellow.
the bilious flare of the arc-
utie, Chinese letters confront


can-these fantasticcharacters.
rm a poem which Chong has
little purple dreams rise as in-


:ss o
*e Lo
S.o
hey
light
hong
tars
y. a


f the Poppy


grocer'


Mie's
mean:
: of the
Salute


flic
\ll


in the
V store.


secret,
Per-


bamboo hut among
s you. The candles


ker pale before the lan-
the great empresses of a


ho have made men drunk and
r enviously in their swathing of


rd
re


your willows


I
wo
ar
ten
>ur
wif


he width


droopin


toward


am sadder. He
men are marble
e ice, not fire,
led from the sk
Chong, am so lo
de deserts, across
of the sea on a


n by jade dragons, y
I ,'^r


*

-s
*r
s,


our Chong


that Chong has written in
upon the crumpled sheet of
Or do the letters merely
three shirts, four handker-


chiefs, and one pair of trousers?


A SOLILOQUY.
Iilliam (Cousins, '25.


I am short


Senior class
Senior class
though the
prepared.
allegories,
that the Sei
N1,7 mf-,-


.

V
I
an
ni
F"r


slender


TI
but


his
I


and black


hs m
hail i


come for me
have written
id themes;
ors never ha
; 10b.-r Ifly^


, the pride


of the


second year with tie
never be graduated, al-
when lessons are to be
n sonnets, descriptions,
vet the teachers think
ve others do their work.
117'o 1i/^btTn inI -i*ltisacT! 0


Freshman
ty he took
here that
do their S
i not knov
bra either,
attempt t


have angered n
left on his desk
Several days
with an Englis
large freckles,
me and before
by the neck an
into the Senior


St(
Se
af
Se


as


jy
, a
lai
h
an
I
d c
sa


who mnv
me to schl
"ay, sever
;panish-t


v the fi
as I S(
o solve
friend,
nd I ni
ter as I
theme,
d red
could
ragged
nctuar


ory for the Annual.
nior.) This boy al
ter this and I did
niors for the rest of
This year the Senio
did the ones of last


an
tas
e2vei
wa
a
hai
evet
1 m
y \w
(Th


ited me home. The
ool with him. While
al ignorant Freshmen
his was my Waterloo,
thing about Spanish,
found out when they
equation. This must
that afternoon I was
r saw him again.
s resting after a tussle
boy with a red nose,
r sneaked up behind


n
e
rh
is


wavs


no work


dodge
out of
ere I l
is ho
ept m


for anv


ched me
oom and
> write a
ecame a
his desk
one but


the year.
*
rs do not prize me as dearly
year, and I am sorry to say


I am sometimes forced to do Junior work-which
is far below the dignity of a Senior Pen.

G(ATI'N I AKE.
EmoIgene Aash/i, '?.
Oh wondrous work of mighty men--
Real men of brawn and brain,
Who your deep jungle did not fear,
Nor fever, nor tropic rain.


Upon your bosom passes now
The commerce of all nations;
Where once the untamed Chagres raced,
Work men in close relations;
Where now majestic ships hold sway
On rippling waters' face,
There once roamed fierce wild animals
Who here found hiding place;


And now, like hoary monarchs
Your dead trees ghnit-like st
Their greAt, grim trunks, sole r
(f tropic jun le lan LI


47


SWilsMMEWdlZWCH W


I


1
)








THE CARIBBEAN.


TRAGEDIES-LARGE


THE HOME-COMING.
Frances Gray, '25.


AND SMALL.


old man who had sent his dreams crashing into
oblivion, and, with a snarl in his throat, he lunged


The dingy local pulled into the little station


and discharged
army locker. 1


one passenger


and a battered


he passenger wore a faded khaki


uniform, one leg of which
sewed at the knee. He lea


was turned


up and


ned dispiritedly upon


his crutches and surveyed the empty platform.
He was a young chap, hardly more than a boy,
but suffering and hardship had lined his face and
turned to white the hair above his sunken temples.


His eyes,


that had


been alight with a strange


eagerness as he stepped off the train, now were
dull, and his wasted body sagged between his


crutches.


Slowly


he swung himself


across


platform and stood in the doorway of the tiny
office where an old, bald-headed man sat before


a battered wooden desk.


There was no light of


recognition in the old man's face as he looked up, and
the boy's lips began to tremble, while the bitter
tears gathered in his eyes. "Don't you remember
me, Jim?" he asked in a slightly husky voice.
The old man stared at him a minute and then


his jaw dropped.
Willie Hunter!


"My Gosh, if it ain't little


Why boy,


we heard these two


forward, his hands outstretched.


But his crutches


slipped from under him, and he fell in a heap upon


the floor.


For a moment he did not move, and


then, throwing his head back, he burst into peals


ghastly,


choking


laughter-laughter


brought the bloody foam to his lips, and sent the
salty tears coursing down the hollow cheeks. He
laughed until exhaustion overcame him, and then,
as he slipped further down beside the battered
desk, his dull eyes softly closed, and an expression


of quiet peace stole over his twisted face.


As his


sunken chest rose in the last breath of life his


blood-flecked lips formed


I'm coming.


the prayer,


"Mother,


Don't fail me this time.


LOST-ONE DIME.


Mattie Pul'ig,


It was a glorious shiny new dime.


Dimes


were very scarce in Bobby's young life, for his
mother worked all day over a tub of warm soap-
suds, to support the five small Murphys and the
one big Murphy, and any dime, new or old, was


always needed.


But this was an unusual occur-


years back as how you was mission


died of the grief.


twas


well she sold the ol'


an your Maw


Yor Paw done died sence then-


lonesomeness-an


place an


Aunt,


went to Canady.


rence. Mrs. Curtis, that lived in the big white house
on the hill, had given Mrs. Murphy two extradollars,
for laundering some especially dainty dresses.
Bobby's brown, bare feet beat a merry tattoo


The boy did not speak, but as he listened to the


on the old board walk.


He was going to buy a


old man his face turned a ghastly white.


Mother


and Dad gone, the old place sold, and he a cripple!
This, after four years of a German prison camp.
Gone were the dreams of the glad home-coming,


top-a beautiful red and green top, a gorgeous
top, the one that he had watched and longed for


for a month.
Horrors!


Now he was going to get it!
That new dime had slipped from his


that mother


made," the


long quiet


little, damp, dirty hand!


It rolled and rolled and


evenings by the hearth-no sound but the crackle
of Dad's paper and the creak of Mother's rocker
as she darned or mended-the dreams of quiet


and rest, the dreams of peace.


Gone were these


rolled.


Bobby prayed,


into that big crack.


"Oh Lord don't let it roll


" But evidently that dime


was possessed, for-plink!-it rolled sickeningly
into the crack. Gone were his dime, his top, his


1 I


-1


I


..1 a *-.^*- I .it n rt f a.1 tn I4 1 a ttI'% '*-a *.t.tlrt Nf I 11 flE V


"


p-_*


1


*








T"IH! CARIBBEIAN. 4,


FAITH.
Loutise f'nter, '-,.


Many peop
-


or a sma
attempt
become
people,
is, have
ke things
own lut
ulties it
d Mike,
,1 nine-y
, and sk
>tOll to


terry
still
have
Wise
fat he
to ta
their
diffic
Ku
Gang
fight
exelXe


had eve
he knev
and Big
and asI
can, in
means


hip, a
hen he
tuch ex
No on
0 one
iv loft
ghting
wav-wi


e attempt


Snoy s mi;
g though
the sinmali
:specially
Given up the
as they co
e to pull
' arise.
christened


ear-ol
tiled i
the Re


r attempt
v, he had n
Pat Malio
i-covered,
a moment
of underst


r
v
a]
eC


-emnant o
W-s emplo
ted positi(
had ever


ed to
attend
small


solve
iptcd,
hb.i\ s
f nin,
and s
dl hav<
iI to I


them through


"Ijar


d veterans
I "ditchiiung
neral rule
to ulnderst;
:er had ani
:, vwho hai
it of an 0
)f soblriety
ling, a l1
f the glor
yed in the
n of garba
sympathiz


had ever even Stuspec
ier or softer sentiment
and an anything-is-ri
th-it feeling,-that i


Marsh, old and motherly
had come down to F6u
some delicacies for a forn
arrived just in time to
rather precipitately from


canm
rteent
icr co
meet
the


whatever

d Boilted


if numerous street
"the cop, was no


thogi hi


atnd him.
y father <
1 picked h
\vernowin
, used, a
'ng, blacl
*y of for
very su;
ge wagon
ed with
ted him
its than
ght-if-yo
s, not u
e into his
:h Street
ok of her


K
lo(


id Mli
)r, aid


impetus given him by the square toe of
huge and much worn shoe.
There was something compelling al


Marsh


o whi


sentful, finally succt
times after this and
the lookout for her tr
destination. Finally
secret desire of Kid
own-to fight with h
care what kind just


walk on at
looked like
A t A


I


Kid Mike,


sullk


*d. She can
time Kid Mi
)rt her to ant
came to kno
e's life--a do
nd for him.
it had enou*


aggle oh yes


r
li

g
S
k4
"I1


A


ii
m

h
r
uC


no on:
119) Of)l.
s far as
another ,
, grinmy
,arbagec
is only
awhide
r days


perior and
Kid Mike.
>of having
a love of
u-can-get-
ntil .Mrs.
life. She
, bringing
s, and had
ke issuing
ed by the
Big Pat's

)ut)t Mirs.
in and re-
ve several
ke was on
1 from her
w the bi)g,
g -all his


He
dh


didn't
egs to


lust so it


nothinu t heer tnr Bit Pat;
dit* step of th c
thi story t the
modern I'liristmi;
Christi nias trees


Mike I
sO N1


\v md an extra
. Marsh satr (Hn


crowdedl t
first Chris
is, with its
andl prcsci


at Santa Claus sh<,uld I
I but he must ihave faitr


Claus, andt m)t of all in ( ud,
w.si a1 o.f l' -" ki
I\V) iix Uty IlttF\Cerj1rCkitl


kn i1Stmail
then nizhi
next dayi i
leng tiwne
I Ic didn't
many d sat
ed st:7c.' r
eredl wha
thu>d? "l'h<


I anI
t waro
i into
k1\ I


d st
th
Sni
ill(
at~i
th
use
Ch
* h,


l cam) i
till n< k


e

it
,1
I i
ri
td


all thini s


S suspenise


u>;,n
I Mrs.
1 I


eve rni
Mlars]


s1m1, anul thle nexlt.
lis and still she didn't
hers hadl been Just on
I)h reckless diving onl
stillas m()rnin Het
said. Faith? In h
i failed him. Fairh?


AnSl so>, without faith
set (out (in tlie Iroad of


A CASE


She was hi
hurry when
pared biKfo:1
meat was I
reached the
lizng aroma
the table.


the stove when
staccato.
t lurricdlv. she


clean a
ever it
in his
was th
past fe
she in
plainly
him as


,pron, ;
might
hand,
e book
w days

,ited h
that
som a


himself, she
g'ood-f or-noth
whatsoever\ r.
i *


]e.
andg
age


OF()1 MISTAKEN


Lirrylingi as ra pidl
she is trying to


S"men folks
nini nicely, th
: where thex La\
I every t ing was
Was in the act (
the drbell ga

w\iped her face


went
Ag
So
nt th
Ii ai hI


im in
she \\
s p<>s-
s l /ss
hurst
ng?
ing I
Come
Si
I )UIS


to
\as


*to> wel
ance ai
the cot
at had
asty, h
the hot
quite
e. As
rth wi
uppose
k that
ime, hua
i


( kVCt


gi and
h. ITh u
WeeVks
t collie.
e of the
crn}wd-

remem-
eir? In
T''he re
in (h;d
I.ifc.


i1)I NTN 1'T,


as anv womIlan does


c dinner pro
home. The
potatoes had
dt" that tanta-
iturit reati for
aking it from
forthl a short


on her nl)ne-to()-


Collme t
t him re
lclusior
Cbeen in
alf-coui
IS, 1)111
wnimLne


1
s '


* caller, who-
caled a boo k


I \was tI
I tovwn fI
rteous m
'tC(/IS Ill
sho\wcd
to zct

he had s
ell, wiha
ou have
ec no us
C vl)n't a
Ilavcnl t3


1 IfI1, -


heated
t will
so>me
e tor
I day,
11"


tail to wV
oR.
1


wh> made


1


lolrmni


l


1







5Ko THE CARIBBEAN.


A few


more


short


snappy


remarks


Who's the team that's going to win?


made, and then, without a word of warning, left
for the kitchen from which considerable smoke


I was interrupted by the referee's whistle.


"Who's that?


What's the whistle for?"


was pouring forth.


A few minutes later she ap-


"He is the referee,


" I explained.


"The referee


peared in the sitting room again, and said as she


moved in a stern but not stately manner,


"Well,


now that everything is burned, I suppose--
But she got no further, for the book agent had
flown, much to her surprise, as well as delight.
So she went back to the kitchen to make out of
the remains whatever might be possible.
The next day at church, she met the new pastor.
And the people wondered why she fainted.


referees and when he referees he blows the whistle
when fouls are--"
"What's fouls?" I missed one of Moore's light-


ning baskets by explaining.


She cut me short,


however.
"Why do those men both stand in the circle?
Why is it that when that man blows the whistle


and says


'Ball out


someone always throws it in


again?" I explained, that is, I started to explain,


but she broke in,


NEVER AGAIN!


"Oh! Don't you think that tall


center of Balboa's is the swellest-looking thing
iTl _.n7 -" 1


you ever saw?


Louise Henter,


Mary had just come to town.


On hearing that


our most popular game was basket ball, she im-
mediately became desirous of understanding the


game so


that she


might


games she intended to see.


appreciate tne many
So I, only too over-


joyed at the prospect of explaining the intricacies
of my favorite sport to this less fortunate, though
certainly most attractive member of the weaker
sex, took her to the clubhouse on the night of the
game between Cristobal and Balboa High School.
As soon as we were seated she began:
"Oh! What are those things?"


Whats his name?


boy with the pretty eyes?"
"No I don't," I said in answer


question.


to her first


"I never did think Norfleet was hand-


some, and I don't think anyone else does either!
But he's--"
"Who is that boy that just looked this way?


Who's that
When--


What's this?


Why did he fall down?


" A faint glimmer of light came to me.


I didn't even attempt to answer.


ticed.


I got up.


She never no-


Still she didn't notice.


I left.


She had forgotten all about me.

PUP-P-PATHETIC.


"Those things," I
kets and --"


explained,


are called bas-


"Why do they run around in circles under those
jiggers?"
"They run around like that under the baskets


Ernst Euphrat,


Good gracious!


It was right over him-a great


black thing with long crooked claws.


nearer, it got bigger and bigger!


As it came


Closer!


Closer!


to get warmed up.
"Warmed up?


It closed


What's that?


Over what?"


around


heart thumped;


him! He shut his eyes; his
he shook from the edge of his


She had the cutest way of putting her finger


to her mouth when she giggled.


answering


questions


But while I was
and explaining


little pink nose to the tip of his tail.
had him by the back of the neck!


Well!


There!


It was only the shadow of his mistress's


what the lines meant on the floor, she was off
on another subject.


"Oh!
suits?
better


hand as she came to take him for a walk!


Doesn't the Balboa team have pretty


Don't they look darling?


looking than


Cristobal


They're much


boys!"


even though it was she who said it, I was up in
arms.
"Why we've got the best school on the Zone!


*t w" p I I I-"


Cris--


t?








THE CARl BBEAN.


THE IOWA.
Edith Cou/bour,, 'a;,
(Sv. illustrati,'t p1.g 22


Into the harbor
Panama Canal stea


huge
trim


super-dreadn
submarines.


of Colon anti
med the Atlan
oughts, grim
It was indeed


on throu
tic fleet w
destroyer
I an imp


sight, for the white uniforms of the men
dazzling contrast with the somn bre gray. T1
maneuvers were to be held in the Pacific,
coast of Panama, and the ships were on th
to take part in them.
Among them was the U. S. S. Iowa maki
farewell voyage from the eastern shore
United States, and her first and final
through the Panama Canal to the Pacific
she was to render her last bit for her coun
she was to be used as a target for the guns
Atlantic and Pacific fleets during the mant


11gh the
ith her
s, and
ressi ve
nade a
he fleetr
off the
eir way


ng her
of the
voyage
where
try, as
of the
euvers.


she returned to her homeland as the victor, flying


the Re
given
The
Iowa
her ow
newer
nmandec
of the
larger
called
the t.
The
siderec
sion bI


, Xhit
r her a
came
ew sm;
, for sh
lips cot
by sor


Navy.


and mn1)r


, and Blue. Cheer after checi
nd her nodle crew.
larger and finer battleships.
all I)by comparison. Still she
e hiad a glorious past of which]
uild not boast. She had been
me of the most proIninent cap
Fven though the newer ships
e formidable, the' had never


m to detIe
S. Iowa.
)rld War
i obsolete
assigned t


r was

The
held
h the
corn-
tains
were
been


their country's flag as had


came. The Iowa, being con-
type, was placed in commis-
o duty in home waters. She


was used in connection with the training of men
newly enlisted in the naval service, and in this
manner contributed her part in no small way, by
furnishing trained men for the newer battleships,


Cristobal Coaling Station where Ships of the World Touch


Trim and neat as 1i
she went on her wa
for the last time, an
she had served so


And as
under hc
old days
In the
pleted a
sylvania


-w
most
comm
Iowa
Roble
Bob."


the Iowa
er own st
when she
year of oi
t Cramp's
--the large


p
e;
h
ei

;e.


immediately
mission, war w
was at that
y D. Evans,
Under his c


n days gone by, she looked as


y, her crew walking her d
id the flag of the country wl
faithfully flying from her
)roceeded on this, her last
am, the thought came of
ad been the pride of our N:
- Lord 1897, she had been c
Shipyard, Philadelphia, P
st battleship of that time.
after she had been place
as declared with Spain.
time commanded by Cap
better known as "Figh
commandd the Iowa proved
f. ---_ **


ecks
which
gaff.
trip
the
ivy.-
om-
enn-
Al-
d in
The
tain
ting
her


destroyers, ant
guards for the
lantic carrying
The Peace (
Disarmament
States agreed t
had to be redu
The Iowa was
fitted out for u
tests of radio c
on the Atlantic
to be used as
winter mnaneuv
Here she wa
following the


i submarines


met
troop
Conf
Coni
o scr
ced;


se in
ontr
coa
a t
ers
s, br
exam


rchant ships c
ps and cargo.
erence came-
ference, in wh
ap so many sh
so the oldest
n selected as
connection w
ol. After sevw
st the Iowa w;
arget in conn
)f the U'nited
'avely proceed
ple of her no
A *


as well as armed


crossingg the At-

-and finally the


rich


the United


tips. Our Navy
Ships must go.
the ship to be
ith experimental
aral experiments
as ordered south
section with the
States fleet.
ing on her way,
)ble officers and


nE


1


1 *







THE CARIBBEAN.


On Monday, March 19, 1923,


got under


way, the Iowa accompanying them, controlled by


radio


through


Secretary Denby ordered the National Anthem
to be played on board the U. S. S. Maryland, and
as the strains floated out across the water, every


seemed a phantom ship, for there was not a soul
on board, yet her engines were running and her
boilers filled as if she were fully manned by her


visitor, officer, and man on


the ships stood at


attention, head bared, as in the presence of death.
Tears rose in many eyes as they looked their last


crew.


The Stars and Stripes were proudly flying


upon that noble


The national


salute of


from her gaff and she seemed to derive a con-
scious dignity from the fact that she had defended
the honor of that flag and carried it to victory;
that she had always done her duty faithfully to
her country; and that now she was still serving it,
even though it was her last service.
They proceeded to the open sea and arrived at
the spot where the Iowa was to be sunk on Tuesday,


March 20.


twenty-one guns was given as the Iowa went to
her last resting place in the Pacific.
As soon as she had gone down, the ships steamed


over to where she had last been seen.


A rust-


colored scum lay like a veil over the water. It
was the only visible trace left of the U. S. S. Iowa,
but the memory of that ship will live in the hearts
of the American people for many years to come.


The sea, blue and placid under the


afternoon sun, seemed a fitting grave for suchaship.


When


the Iowa


was nine


Mississippi started firing on her.


miles


away,


After a fewsalvos


from the huge guns of the super-dreadnought the
Iowa lay an immovable, defenseless target.


"The ships that roam o'er the ocean's foam
May hear, in ghostly tones,
The lowa's bell, as she tolls her knell
In the locker of Davy Jones."


ALLEGORIES OF SCHOOL LIFE.


EVERY STUDENT'S


at


garments of Good Intentions, and, as he heard the
school bus Ambition blowing the horn of Oppor-


RIDE.


(Based on the morning run of the Gatun Bus.)


Louise Henter, '23.


tunity,
grabbed


e ate a hasty
his ill-packed


breakfast


lunch


of Patience,


of Perseverance,


Every Student was to begin a new period of
preparation for his journey toward Success. For
a long time he had stayed in the bed Vacation


called


for the


new girl,


Novelty,


carrying


books of Enjoyment, and waited for the bus Am-


bition.


Every Student found that several others


although the
awakened him
But Every Si


alarm


clock


Watchfulness


from his sleep Ease quite early.


student


sighed,


and groaned,


were already there-Pleasure, the prettiest girl,.
Bluff, the bully boy, Courage and Self-Respect,
both clear-eyed and ready for any emergency, and


threw the clock Watchfulness under the bureau
Carelessness where it stopped running, except for


a sudden jerk or knock at long intervals.


Student's dog,


Conscience,


F


his best friend


avery
and


the twins, Cheat and I-Should-Worry.


The driver


Faculty started Ambition with the crank of Ideals
and after a moment of confused rumblings and
groanings Ambition began its slow progress along


faithful follower, was much disturbed by the noise.
Conscience tried vainly to get under Carelessness
but it was too big a proposition for him; so finally
he turned to Every Student and scratched him


High School Road.


four parts.
was later c


This road was divided into


The first part was hard traveling but
imposed chiefly of long hills down


which Ambition coasted swiftly.


Pleasure tried


the U. S. S. Mississippi.









THE CARIBBEAN.


push Novelty into a deserted corner, appropriat-


ing her seat


his lun
She im
right o
tention
show
Study,
Facul t
Exami:
for the


Ready
on the
ev imn
sure, a
To sho
Study
Facul t
Hard
helped
Pleasu
all jun
stopped
noises,
tended


ch of
1


next to Every Student,


Perscver
1 i


immediate\ tega
ver Every Stui
is, he sought th
Off before her
although repeat
y, and, on goini
nation Bump, h
ready aid of Bl
Fort Industry
Money got on
second hal of
iediatelv devot
nd Every Studc
w he didn't car
again but this
Vy on the hard a
Study, where


*
him vei
re, Blufl
nped of]
d many
but the
to vby I


V mniuc
Sand C
at Bli
times
mvstel
.iculty,


I
k


.
O C t h e t h lft1 Stop Ambition was


ance, making
in to exercise
dent and, to e
e company of
he stood on
tedly scolded
g around RevIt
ie would have
uff and Cheat.
, Efficiency,
board to acc(
.
their journey.
-
ed all his attei
nt became ver
e, he stood on
time he was f
itnd uncoinforr
System and
i. Readv MoIo
?heat to go wit
nd Alley Rivt
with severe it
rious ailment \
and, by the ti


I S I . C
easily.
At the third stop there were three roads -Easy


Work Road,
leading down
ulng onward.
and Assuranc
Road throug-
stopped where


leading back
hill; and H
Ambition,
e, kept on its
rh the townr
e the zreat s


of Experience washes the


ward
igh S
after
s wa\
Sof
ea of


; No
school
pick
alone
Achi
life


shore of


THE HARP.
Ernst EnhI'rat, ,, '.


The beautiful human harp is ready.


stout frame of former hi
stretched the wires of st
bass wires, the Seniors,
each selection. The Juni


nish an acc
Each instri
s~. ...- _--


nim(
prii


ent
cks


an s<
fZll S(
tude,
form
ors a
for t
out


\orry Road,
Road contm-
ig up D)ignity
.- s '
SHigh School
vement, and
with its ships


l)ependence.


FIr many of the wires the strain is great


he1h1
prince
instru
day 's
tions,
sports


to sau:.
pal, wh<
ment ino
practice
comes t
. Amnd


lose are c
tightens
armonlv.
these ex
recrcati
routh it


led to I
up an
en, aft
Sstubl1
the p<
runs 1th


and they


"uncr,
's the
harl
iposi-
atni- of
adin g


tnd sitting on
it rather flat.
a proprietary
scape her atr
Pleasure. To
thle step No-
)by the driver
cw Curve and
fallen off but

System, and
>m-pany them
"
Ready Mon-
itlon to) Plea-
y despondent.
Sthe step No-
r'cibhlIv set by
able bench of
Self-Respect
icy persuaded
h him so thevy
r. Ambition
trks and loud
'as always at-
me they came
!oinE forward



I'1CrVl ")V, after
schol, acco )mpanie
scho ),"it Illt pAnict*
who is I1u()lnted (1 On
to find the twin c


has been
his fiCien
from the
a cloak C


advise
Kno\\
halls (
SChar,


d :
lcd
Af


act


his gra1du
by his firm


the ste
cities Su
nany ti
Ige, so
Preparai


cd E
icces
mes
whe
-tion
tlOee


action
friend
xperiet
s and
on th
n the

. Ever


from i1
K now-led
ice, Sets (
2 amne.
e matter
tWo Set <
VbIo)v We


er, hat of Determination, and


shoes of Perseverance, he rides a steed, Sys
and carries a firearm, Courage.
As they ride along, Everyboy notices
there are many more engaged in the search. S
of them have no amounts, others are monte
steeds of Laziness, and still others are moul
but wear no cloaks, and carry no firearms.
feels proud that hlie has such an unusual start,
Knowledge warns him that only the test of
will tell his future.
Knowledge has hardly finished this warn


when Ever
Bad Luck.
such as Mis
lbov also n
river Carel
station, Va
Beyond the


vbov see5
\' *
In this
fortune,
$


otl
.ess
3SS
oill
2 ri


tells him is th-


SUpn the


school reputation are
ithood. The heavy
the background of
nd Sophomores fur-
he Freshmen's tune.
his tune: English,
- j tulle:-. ,n 1 ..


either made o
if Everyvbov c
and the city,
Fortune, whi
Success and
As they en
boy sees the
- -- - J j ^ .-*


ces that


that
No)lme
d on
ited,
He
, but
time


n thie distance the swamp
vamp dwell many enemies,
sgrace, and Shame. Every-
this swamp is fed by the


ness, wherein
lation, [nstc
ver he sees a
ie city of Ad\
r broken. K


I
are the d,
tadiness,
city, whi
ersity, \\
knowledge


an get through the swx:
he will come out upon
ch leads directive to ti


Fame.
1


ti
e


er tne swamp ot
enemies creeping
... .


f Ba
ar Cu
i- .- *-


as, Temp-
Failure.
nowledge
a man is
says that
the river,


e goo


d road,


he twin cities,


Id Luck,
mningly
.i c ,. .


Every-
rVcnrv-
around
,- i .h 4-*-


theme of school spirit.


EVERY BOY.

II. 1. liar, ''


ning,


t


- ,- -- *L-


..-,








THE CARIBBEAN.


Everyvbov


Knowledge


hurry


ness.


As soon as Everyboy is sufficiently rested


swamp and,


ledge instructs


crossing it.


as they come upon the river, Know-


Evervbov


as to the manner of


Evervbov listens with


eager


ears and


upon reaching the bank he spurs his mount on,


into the


water.


The demons


are upon


to resume the hard journey, the two set out for
the city of Adversity.
As they approach the city gates, there is no
fear in the heart of Everyboy, for he knows that
with his cloak of Character and his firearm of


Temptation pulls at his cloak of Character, Vacil-
lation at his cap of Determination, Unsteadiness


Courage, Adversity can not harm him. He


gates


strikes


to the ground with a single blow from


at his shoes


of Perseverance,


while Failure, the


his firearm of Courage.


Much to his surprise he


strongest of the demons, tries to force the steed
System down and to wrench the weapon from his


is not attacked


as he makes the transit of the


city, but he meets many strange persons.


Among


hand.


Soon they get an advantage over him, but


never-failing Knowledge rushes in and saves him


by overpowering Failure.


chance to


Evervboy then gets a


use his weapon and he kills all the de-


them he sees Pride and Relentlessness, who are
the parents of Ignorance, and Conceit and Haugh-
tiness, the parents of Overconfidence.
From the city he exits to the plain of Happi-


mons.


ness,


through


which


sees the road


Fortune


Knowledge then takes Everyboy to the inn of
Confidence, where he is given a room of valor and
fruits from the trees of Earnestness and Eager-


running up


to the twin cities,


Success


and Fame.


He soon reaches them and settles down in the
estate of Bliss.


*


Ruined Bridge


REVERY.


at Old Panama.


THE OLD JUNGLE TRAIL.


Inza Markham,


Louise


Henter,


twilight. By


a ruined bridge


A crumbling bridge, vine-clad and


stand--


years-


The new trail ends.
And step into green


We leave the glare of day
twilight, mystic, still.


Above a muddy stream.


I dream-A band


The festooned jungle and the rugged


Of faithful


go to evening prayer.


ears


Are peopled by dark shadows.


On the hill,


Are filled with sound of vesper bells.


The land


Cringing beneath the haughty Spaniard's


sway,


Is calmed with peace.


The chant of nuns.


From


It dies.


convent


walls one hears


And then a hand


Crushed down by loads of jewels, beaten 'til
The blood dripped down-red rubies on the gray


a guitar strums forth a song that cheers.


Smooth path, the servile slaves, their


savage


Then on the


ie horne the rramn of honfk


Broken beneath the la.h annnear.


RBriht hbars


breeze








THE CARIBBEAN.


CONTROLLING MY TEMPER.


Ca/dweI B.


Friday, April


27, 1923,


a. m.


With


good-by to them and my father, who was driving
them, and sat down to my breakfast. I finished
it, rose, and went into my bathro ml, gayly carol-
ing a mournful ballad concerning the lncvcr-im-


sleepy murmur I rolled out of bet


and landed on


pending demlise of ancient warriors,


to wir:


all fours on the carpet.
permeated my being,


and ambled


A general dazed amiability
and I rose from the floor


into the bathroom.


shower, and five minutes later I
A I 1 lt I1 C. '


,, 1


"Ol sold iers never die,
Never-r-r die,
Never-r-r die,
Old soldiers never-r die


An ice cold


strode


through


tne door, clad in an ol1 pair or gym shoes and
an old suit of overalls, fairly bubbling over with


an excess


of animal spirits.


Only FA-A-A-AI)DE a-\VA-A-Y


--upon which I scrubbed my teeth v


vilm..


Then


I ! !

ith vigor and


went out to wait for the bus.


"Oh the bear went over the mountain,
The bear went over the mountain,
The bear went over the mountain
To see what he could see."


watched with pleased interest the awkward


cruitles


Being drilled by a weary sergeant.


pretty soon the waiting grew tiresome, and the


splendid


feeling


departed-where,


where?


"Shut up, Caldwell.
rad baby."


You'll wake up the Con-


Don't ask me -mavbe one of the


but from the


recruities" had


look on their faces I hardiv think


"Awright, Pop, old dear, anything you say"-
and out of the house and down the road to the


garage at the other end of the Post.


I unlocked the


doors and fastened them apart; then stepped in
and opened the door of the snappy sedan which
stood within.


After a while the bus came, and I climbed over
various seats and things to my place, to the ac-
companiment of a carping voice truculently de-


declaring that I was stepping on his lunch,
didn't get off- etc., etc.


and if I


"Chg-a-chg arrrmmm!


Rm-m-m-m-


" With a


Slow,


mournful


funeral


music.


was five


steady cadence that did mv heart good the engine


o'clock, and the bus crawled back into Fort I)Davis,


settled down to work.


With a noiseless shifting of


where it stopped


a moment while


>t off.


gears we rolled out of the garage, into second and
then high before we (the car and I) were off the
short stretch of dirt road in front of the garage.
Then, as we hit the concrete road, I "stepped on
it." The cool engine gave a protesting spit or
so, and then accelerated with a powerful driving
hum-twenty, twenty-five, thirty, and still climb-


climbed off
homeward.


with a


growl, and


started


growled again


walking


recalled


events of the day.
I reached home, climbed wearily up the steps


down which I had vaulted
ing, and opened the door.


What


was this?


My pu


so lightly in the morn-
I stopped in horror.
ttees! My beautiful,


We shot past Deiberts


braked suddenly


and Walker's, then


and went past the Colonel's at


gleaming, classy puttees, which I had so carefully
and lovingly polished preparatory to my trip to


a sedate and proper twelve miles an hour, as per


San loArenzo on the coming Sunday


clav-stained


Post regulations.


As we topped the hill, I switch-


and scratched, a doleful sight.


I gazed on them


ed off the ignition and slipped the gear-shift lever
into neutral, and we coasted down the hill, to


and opened my mouth;


then shut it and swal-


lowed, and went on without a word.


ounr steps


come to a silent stop in front
Check.


of our quarters.


on, and


stopped again.


My distinctive,


My riding breeches!


well-cut, perfectly fitting riding


I climbed out, feeling as if I were the exclusive
owner of this terrestial sphere, and went into the


breeches!


Rumpled,


red clay-stains


tossed


everywhere


Inmto a


corner


evident.


gazed


house.


I met mv kid sisters with a cheerful and


silently at them, taking in every


horrible detail.


slighting greeting, as is my custom. They replied
in kind, to the effect that I was a double dumb-


Then my mother came through the door.


"Oh, your riding breeches,


" she said.


"I lent








THE CARIBBEAN.


blazing, sizzling, blue streak.


Everything I had


very few repetitions, and with all the fervor of long


silently absorbed


in seven l


years


experience at


various army posts I now made use of. No easy,
mild "cusses" like a complicated Chinese cuss, but
real, man-sized horrible curses that fairly ripped


their way


through


the startled atmosphere.


cursed steadily on for almost five minutes, with

GUM C


pent-up emoti
door a slam


ons.


Then I went out, giving the


that almost broke it, leaving my


mother horror struck.


Such a thing had never


happened before.
That's how I controlled my temper on April
27, 1923.


HEWING.


Mattie Pullig,


Why is it that the picture of a tousle-headed
stenographer chewing gum always provokes a
laugh? Probably because of the peculiar expres-


sion on her face.


She looks so blank.


It seems


tion," and create an atmosphere utterly lacking
in dignity.
Take for instance a minister,-no matter how
distinguished looking-put a piece of "Wrigley's"


as if this comical expression always appears when
one is engaged in the gum-chewing pastime.


There


are ways


and ways of


chewing gum.


Some people chew it slowly and deliberately in a


bovine manner, others go about it in


a serious


business-like way, while still others chew it very,
very fast, working their jaws like a threshing ma-
chine, and making almost as much noise. Per-
haps the last is most annoying to other people


"juicy Fruit"


"Black


Jack"


and see how quickly his dignity is 1


does not impress you.


old man!


You think,


in his mouth
ost. His talk
"What a silly


I know he has that gum sticking in the


roof of his mouth."
European people think that our chief "indoor-


sport,


is gum-chewing.


reputation is it not?


Rather an undignified


So on your trip to Europe,


but all give


the appearance of


"perpetual mo-


at least, leave out the chewing gum.


The Old Fliat Arch in Panama City-An Architectural Curiosity.


THE SIEGE OF SAN LORENZO.


II. Edward May,


High on a beetling battlement beside


SThe brn


:C Sfntcl SIn Lorenzo.


To seize the stronghold from the ocean side.
A lookout tave the signal that the land


'V a Itj1


-6


v








THE CARIBBEAN.


WHEN


G REEN MEET IS GREEN.
Louise liener, '2.


ill luck and humor, combined, proved too much
for the authorities, and he left, by invitation.


The thunder rolled and the lightning


flash


The Fates were having another family quar
Jove, from his mighty seat, viewed the coni
and mopped his anguished brow with a large,
bandana handkerchief while praying for a m
supreme power than even his to bring peace
tranquillity once more to the heavens. Long
he had learned not to interfere when the 1;
fought. The quarrel had begun because Atroi
in a fit of anger, had cut short the life of the
ters favorite plaything. Any form of arm
ment is rare in the heavens and the three Fa
old and pettish as they were, derived their o
amusement from the antics through which t
put the people on earth. For Atropos to ki
person just as his car and a railroad train me
a crossing was an unforgivable offense, especi
as he might have been good for all sorts of am
ing situations, although an arm or a leg w
missing. However, the battle terminated
swiftly as it had begun and, when the dust sett
the three sisters were seen sitting side by s
conferring earnestly with each other. Fin
they chuckled unpleasantly,-they hardly e
smiled. Clotho drew a new cord from her dist
and the life of Patrick Michael O'Connell- beg
Mrs. O'Connelly looked into the ugly, little
face and prayed that life would treat him kin
more kindly than his looks might at first im
She caught a tiny twinkle in the wide, blue e
"Ye've the Oirish sinse of humor, Pat, me
but mav the good saints give ye luck," and,
though she said it last, luck held a place of
importance in her estimation.
Pat grew up. Humor, well, humor was P
biggest asset-a ready laugh in return for
hard, unfriendly kicks of the world, a joke
the jibes of his associates, for Pat was unlun
Unlucky hardly fits Pat's case, he was absolu
unfortunate. When he was a few days old
mother changed her earthly habitation for
more ethereal, aided somewhat by the w
placed kicks of her husband, who, filled with p
and -- something else besides, had just


t,, ma,1 (rn,,,rv <'la'


k|,t-, t-; r rt-h


:3


i n'I


rel.
lict
red
lore
and
ago
ites
)Os,
SIS-
sis-
.se-
tes,
nlvy
hev
11 a
t at
all
us-
ere
as
led,
ide,
ally
'ver
:aff,
gan.
red
dly,
ply.
yves.
lad,
al-
first


the
for
:ky.
tely
his
one
'ell-
ride
re-


nt ,,C Pnr! \,,t-


His ill-luck persisted. When he got a
is when an employer was able to ov


looks, something
burnt down, the b
.*
railroad train jumr
was wrecked and (
was that person.
soup, 'd be out


came up smiling.
about. You cat
who gets sore."
()ne night, the
the cashier in"
ant," to marry I
mnoneyv-and no
wharves to thin
considered life.
things happened
then something
head and he fell


always


happened.


nt into )
: track.
; person
)wn wor
fork."
es knew


1t have any
i*


night
him'ss S


him, a;


He awoke with th


He stared straight i
thing on which he
way, then the other
turned a bit; the tc
He sat utip stiffly and
of a small schooner,
where but where he
see nothing but sea


finitely.


aie


job, that
erlook his
The store
uptcy, the
street car
injured, he
f it rained
he always
: they were


fun with a person


he asked Peggy Malone,
erve-You-Quick Restaur-


d had been rel
' he went do'
;s over. Sittin
le were funny.
least expected
ected came do


fused, "No
wn to the
g there he
, the way


w
wr


ng way into darkness
e hot sun shining in
nto an unclouded sk
lay rolled slightly,
. He must have di
p of a mast came in
saw that he was on
very evidently goir
did not know, for
-blue sea stretching
I! He had heard of


had never happened to him be
life was funny.
After a week of sailing the


land-Panama.
and sighed ecsta
romance to him,
more heavily, "4
picked him up, al
on extra duty, to
his falling in. As
the ship.
Everything wa
testing. Real pal
A carromata ho
i rn't- f~ id cBrki


Pat leaned
tically. Pai
a land of i


fore.


He la


y came into


heavily o
nama was
promise [


p
Oh gee- !" The s
most drowned, and he v
account for the delay
a result he was the la


.s
m
Irs
*Is
.r


new to him
trees! He
e, frankly b
hfr ubhi~


, ever
stopped
)ored,
t# 1-1


as-
i on
s.
his f
-y.
first
ed.


to
thl
lg
he
So
it
ugi


view.
e deck
some-
could
ut in-
but it
ied,-


sight of
the rail
land of
* leaned
all boat
s placed
used by


st to leave


:thing inter-
d to admire.
chewed the
tnr mm tnr








THE CARIBBEAN.


wildly, clutched at a bunch of green papers held
in the lax hand of a wrinkled old negress, sur-
rounded by baskets of fruit, coconuts, and parrot


cages.


One of the cages was overturned and the


tered street car he arrived at Panama City.


left the car and


about ten o'clock was attracted


by a huge crowd.
Anticipating a fight he pushed his way forward.


occupant screeched, "Caramba!


Caramba!" The


He was disappointed.


On a platform twirling a


owner now fully aroused also screeched but much


wire cage about a foot and a half in diameter,


less intelligibly-a rush


of words,


Spanish


stood a child.


The cage stopped and the child


English, not understandable but plainly not com-
plimentary.
Pat seated perilously on a basket of coconuts


thrust his hand through a small opening and pulled


out a small ball.


the ball


A man on the platform opened


and looking


inside


shouted,


"Dos!"


was bewildered, dazed.


He hadn't done any harm.


Immediately afterward the number 2 appeared


The farther away he was from that small negro


on the signboard behind him.


The child twirled


volcano the better he'd feel.


tempted
more in


to leave,


tense.


But when he at-


the excitement only


She clutched


became


at his hand


the cage again and drew forth another ball and
again the man shouted. Pat was interested.
This must be the lottery the fellows spoke about


gesticulated wildly.


Oh yes, he saw what was the


matter, he had a sheet of the numbered, green


paper


she had


wanted it.


holding;


He thrust it at her.


evidently she
She shook her


on the boat.
thousand! G
much money!


How much did the winner get? Ten


how would it feel


to have so


But his contemplations were in-


terrupted; the man shouted again and the number


head violently. N
want him to leave?


No! Then why didn't she
She wanted it and she didn't


268 stood on the board behind him.


This hap-


opened again and now the numbers stood out clear,


want it!


He was more bewildered than ever.


2683.


They looked familiar to Pat.


Where had


crowd had gathered and
him more excited. Sudde


their jibes only made
nly a firm hand grasped


his arm and a kindly voice said,


"Pay her five


dollars and everything will be all right."


heart sank.


Five dollars was all he had.


Pat's
How-


he seen them before?


to him.


Suddenly recognition came


His hand went to his pocket and drew


forth a crumpled sheet of paper.
The Fates had smiled.


ever, anything to get away.


He paid


the five


dollars and again offered her the sheet of paper.


She didn't want it?


Well!


He crumpled


the paper carelessly, thrust it into his pocket, and
wandered, disconsolate, back to the ship.
Next day the ship went through the canal, and
the next, being Sunday, the crew was given shore


leave


for the entire day.


Pat was undecided


whether to go ashore or not but at last curiosity


overcame


reluctance


and he


set out.


plored Balboa, admired the Prado,


traction


Building,


the Clubhouse,


the Admirns-
the Stadium,


the Mosque, and finally


after getting into a bat-


Lottery Drawing in Panama City.


TROPIC RAIN.


Frances


Drip, drip; drip, drip; drip, drip; on vale and hill;
The- irw mnrntnnrv qllo nil the nir


Sharp whistle pierces through the rain-drenched air.
The wh;crnr nf rh whnrl nmnna the lna.vp.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Chester Pike, '24 and Charlotte Ilousel, '4.


SCHOOlI


SPORTS.


Athletics


is an


essential


school life.


been given up, or real sacrifices


made because the


In no other
spirit of a sc
the team tha
square game,
which these


every <
Athl
team
and ev
letics
"We li1
One


forn


n of school
1 reflected a
ays the clea
d you have
als are tau
.inary school
great unifi


activities is the true
s in athletics. Find
n game, the fair and
found the school in


ght
Slife.
er.


and applied


basketball


y play Balboa, for instance, and win,
the person who has no interest in ath-
atsoever, in speaking about it will say,
ed them."'


deal that athletics develops


the ideal of


school was depending on one to do his or her part
in the basketball game, the swimming meet, or
the tennis match?
Athletics brings the members of a school into a


closer
fact t
forms
selves
which
Throu


understanding of one anoti
hat gives athletics its real
a bond not only between th
but between the students
cannot be obtained in
igh understanding we have


through cooperation our


that we


desire it to b


excelli


her, and


importance
e students
and the f;
any other
cooperatio
may becoi


it is this


e. It
them-
acuity
wav.
n and
me all


all others in spirit,


unselfishness.


How many parties and shows have


, and accomplishments.


--Louise


lender,


BOYS'


ATHLETICS.


FOREWORD.


taking fourth place in


220 vard run, in the


Cristobal High School has


1 .1


going when rnei
letic line of scho
exception. We
of the scores as
years, but the bi
to the public th
School are still
losers as well a
boys went they
ing and good sp
good athletes w
and twenty-thrn
good material 1l
ing year are bri
Our school sl
graduates, who


a


ol act
did n
often
oys di
at thi
full o:
s goo
were
ortsm


s anvth
.. .
:ivities.
ot corn
as we
id their
e memi


f pe;
d wi
pra
ansh


hen the c
ee is grad


always


Th
e ou
have
leve
ers


) and t
winners.
ised for
tip. W1
lass of
uated. I


been up and


is year
t on th
done i
1 best a
of Crist
iat the
Every
their c
e shall 1
ninetee
but the


n the ath-
proved no
e long end
n previous
nd proved
:obal High
vy are good
'where the
lean play-
ose several
n hundred
re is much


eft, and the prospects for the com-
ghter than ever.
iould be, and is, very proud of its
are making good in athletics, as


inter-class track
Wesley Town
22, who is now
Ranger School,
h
is catching on t
one of the best nr


tet at
d, a r
tendir
ranch
school
Son th


lumbia
mber o
the Ne
Svracu
*
baseballl
Sswimm


Unive
f the
w Yor
se Uni
team,
ring te;


rsity.
class of
k State
versity,
and is
am. He


is also the champion middle-weight boxer of the
school.
Another member of the class of '22, who is doing
well in athletics, is Paul Doyle. Paul is now at-
tending Columbia University, where he has made
the class water-polo team besides being on the
relay swimming team, and the fancy-diving squad.

BASKETBALL.

Basketball, the most popular sport on the Isth-
mus, again took the leading place in Cristobal


re w









THE CARIBBEAN.


ed from the ranks of both the Freshman and the
Sophomore classes, and challenged the Juniors
and Seniors to a three-game series of basketball.
The Juniors and Seniors readily accepted. The
first game of this series was played Thursday,


December 15, at the Army and Navy


Both


teams were evenly matched and it was a hard-


B. H. s., 39.
Shuber, F.
Clements, F.
Norfleet, C.
Engelke, G.
Pena, G.
Clark, G.
Cross, F.


C. H. S., 9.
Oakes, F.
Arosemena, F.
Moore, C.
Bliss, G.
Pike, G.


fought game all the way through.


The Junior-


Seniors came out the victors by the score


22-28.


The next game


Post team.


was with the Fort De Lesseps


This was played on the Army and


JUNIORS-SENIORS,


Bliss, F.
Moore, F.
May, C.
Euphrat, G.
Pike, G.


FRESHMEN-SOPHOMORES,


Arosemena, F.
Eggleston, F.
Walsh, C.
Cousins, G.
Burgoon, G.


Navy


"Y" floor on April 3.


The score was close


all through the game, but our forwards had trouble


"finding the


basket."


We lost to the tune of


18-I2.


DE LESSEPS,


C. H. S.,


The second game of the series was played on
the Army and Navy "Y" floor, Friday, January
19. This was an exceedingly fast game, and there


very few fouls called.


It was anybody's


game from the time the whistle first blew until
the last few seconds of play. At the end of the
first half the Freshman-Sophomore team was one


point ahead of the opponents, but the
Senior team finally won by the very close
19-18.


JUNIOR-SENIOR, 19.
Bliss, F.
Eggleston, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Moore, G.
Pike, G.


Junior-


score


FRESHM N-SOPHOMORE, I 8.


Pulgar, F.
Arosemena,
Walsh, C.
Cousins, G.


Samson, F.
Jacox, F.
Bruchie, C.
Naibuer, G.
Lanfield, G.


Oakes, F.
Moore, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Bliss, G.
Pike, G.


Lyons, F.
Goldstein, F.

Our second game with Balboa High School was
played April 7, at the Cristobal Army and Navy


'Y.


Both teams started with the determination


to pile up a big score on the other team, and the
result was that the first two quarters were excep-


tionally fast.
basketball ti


Cristobal boys played much better


when


played


Balboa


first time, but were not able to put the long end of
the score in their favor.


Early in March,
the school team.


Mr. Bogda, our coach, picked
Our first game was with "F"


Co. of Fort Davis, on Wednesday, March 20, at


the Army and


Navy


passed this team by the


We outplayed and out-
arge margin of 34-9.


B. H. S., I t7.
Shuber, F.
Cross, F.
Norfleet, C.
Pena, G.
Clark, G.
Clements, F.


C. H. S.,


Moore, F.
Bliss, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Oakes, G.


CO., 9.


Tedball, F.
Boone, F.
Cose, C.
Beard, G.
Williams, G.


c. H. s., 34.
Oakes, F.
Arosemena, F.
Moore, C.
Bliss, G.
Pike, G.


On Monday, April 9,


Combers.


we defeated the Beach


We had good pass-work and had little


difficulty in defeating our opponents.


The game


was fast and interesting, but at no time were our
boys in danger, and the game ended 26-18 in
our favor.


On Friday, March


we went over to Balboa


BEACH COMBERS,
Rflrimnin P"


C. H. S.,


tn nlbv lh fircr ramn+,, nd fh nn ,-,oIl Unrl 0 I. Mnne.








THE CARIBBEAN.


The third game with Balboa proved to be the


A series of five games was arranged between


most exciting game of the season.
at Gatun on Friday, April 13. Oi


It was played
ir bovs played a


C. H. S. and "C" Co.,


D)avis.


The first


game was played Thursday, May 10, at the Army


wonderful game but Balboa got the breaks of the


and Navy


This was a hard fast game with


game and won by one lonely basket.


At the end


of the first quarter they had us Iby one point


and at ti
one poin
quarter
2--28.


I0-9,


end of the half they were still ahead bv


we were


Then at the end of the third


in the lead by three


In the last quarter


points,


Balboa caught up


with us and then, with but a few seconds left to


play, one


of Balboa's men made a long shot from


good passing on the part of both teams.


was the score b


CO., I 2.


Bloomhcrg, IF.
\VIlson, F.
Healy, C.
Fuelling, G.
D)ixton, (.
Smith, sub-C.


18-12


which C. H. S. took the game.


C. H. S., I8.


Arosemena, F.
Cousins, F.
Zimmcrman, C.
Oakes, G.
Campbell, G,


near


the center of the floor and won the game.


This was Balb la


game,


SWIMMING.


31-29.


mmimgng


B. H. S., 31,
Sullivan, F.
Clements, F.
Norfleet, C.
Pena, G.


Clark, G.


C. H. S., 2.
Bliss, F.
Moore, F.
Zimmerman,
Oakes, G.
Pike, G.
Cousins, G.


place in C.


has taken


H. S. athletic activities


a prominent
s. We have


some wonderful swimmers in our school, some of
whom have broken certain Isthmian school rec-


words, this year.


When Balboa H.


came over


to swim us the first time, two of our best swimmers
were unable to compete and we lost the meet by


Several days


"H" Company of Fort Davis


arranged to play us at the Army and Navv "Y,"
and won the game by the close score of 14-13.
We had several points on them at the end of the


half and so, deciding


to get some practice,


13 points.
Events:


Balboa took


33 points to our 20.


YARD SWIM.


I R. Norfl


2 B. Engelke, B. H. S.
3 Trowbridge, C. H. S.


passed the ball around instead of shooting for the


YARD


SWIM,


basket.
the game


We saw our mistake,-too late to win


The following week we played


Company at Gatun where we


*


easily won to the


I B. Engelke, B. H.
2 Shuber9 B. H. S.
SB. Cofley, C. H. S


tune of 19-13.
The line-up for the game at Gatun was:


co., 1 3.


220 YARD SWIM.


i J. Coffey, C. H.
2 Shuber, B. H. S.


c. H. s., I<. 3 R. Norfleet, B. H.


Garriger, F.
Williams, F.
Higgens, C.
Moore, G.
Pertony, G.


Arosemena, F
Moore, F.
Zimmerman, (
Oakes, G.
Pike, G.
Cousins, G.


We again travelled to the town of Gatun


play basketball.
was to play the (
point, 1-7-16.


GATUN,


This time, Frida


Gjatun boys.


PLUNGE.


i J. Coffey, C. H. S.
2 D. Engelke, B. H.
3 Allen, B. H. S.


DIVING.


SB. Coffey, C. H.
2 Allen, B. H. S.
3 Hutchins, B. H.


y, May


we lost


C. H. S., 16.


Kent, F.
r- i


RELAY.


1 Balboa High School.
Allen.)
2 Cristobal High School.


(B. Engelke, R. Norfeet, Shuber,


(B. Coffey, Moore, Trowbridge,


5. Coffev.)


Arosemena, F.








THE CARIBBEAN.


the meet from B. H. S. by the big margin of


to 13.


We took all the first places and in the


yard dash, Alan


Wallace, our husky swimming


champ, broke the Isthmian school record by fin-
ishing the 90 yards in 57 Ik5 seconds. James Bur-
goon took first place in both the 30 and the 60
vard swims, and also swam anchor man on our


relay team.


The two Coffey brothers also made


fine showings on Saturday.


Jack Coffey won one


RUNNING HOP SKIP AND JUMP.


1. Newhard, B. H.
2. May, C. H. S.
3. Clark, B. H. S.
4. Norfleet, B. H. ;


S., 38 feet, 84


inches.


220 YARD DASH.


1. May,


C. H. S.


2. Newhard, B. H.
3. Clark, B. H. S.
4. Duran, B. H. S.


MILE RELAY,


second and three third places, and, in the diving


tied for second with


Norfleet of Balboa.


1. B. H.
2. C. H.


B.H.


Coffey easily won the diving.
Events:


(Shuber, Engelke, F. Newhard, Duran.)
(Smith, Moore, Oakes, May.)


(Clark, Pena,


C. Newhard, Norfleet.)


TENNIS.


30 YARD SWIM.-TIME 15


SECONDS.


I. James Burgoon, C. H.
2. Robert Norfleet, B. H.


3. Jack Coffey,


C. H. S.


60 YARD SWIM.--TIME 36


SECONDS.


i. James Burgoon, C. H. !
2. Robert Norfleet, B. H.


3. Jack Coffey,


C. H. S.


90 YARD SWIM.-TIME


i. Alan Wallace,


57 I 5 SECONDS.


C. H. S.


2. Robert Norfleet, B. H.


j. Jack Coffey,


C. H. S.


220 YARD SWIM.-TIME 2 MINUTES,


r. Alan Wallace,
2. Jack Coffey, (


The first in the line of tennis activities took
place on Thursday, January 27, when the under-
classmen, Wirtz and Eggleston, answered the
challenge of the upperclassmen, Bliss and Pike.
The upperclassmen easily won by the score, (6-i),
(6-0).
On Saturday, January 27, Mr. Robertson, Bal-
boa's athletic coach, brought four men over to


play tennis against us.


We had only time to play


the doubles. Balboa took the first set (6-3) and
we took the next (6-3), but as they had to hurry
to catch the 12.15 train, we played the best two
out of three games for the third set, and as they
took the first two games they won the match.


SECONDS.


C. H. S.
. H. S.


3. Robert Norfleet, B. H.


120 YARD RELAY.-TIME I MINUTE,


I. C. H. S. (Andrew Smith, J
James Burgoon.)


8 SECONDS.


ack Coffey, Alan Wallace,


We did not play


B. H. S. again until June 2,


when they again came over to the Atlantic side.
Bliss ofCristobal won from Shuber of Balboa after
three, hard-fought sets, by the score (6-4), (4-6),


2. B. H.


(Robert Norfleet, Leo White, Wayne


Banton,


(6-3).


Then Pike of Cristobal won from Clem-


and Jack Van Puttman.)


ents of Balboa in two straight sets (6-i), (6-2).


FANCY DIVING.


Balboa forfeited the doubles to us,


which corn-


i. Billy Coffey,


C. H. S.


2. Tie between Jack Coffey


H. S. and Norfleet of


B.H.


TRACK.


On Saturday, Apri


14, the Canal


Zone High


and Grammar School Athletic Meet for boys, was


held at the Balboa
points to our 22.


Stadium.


DISCUS


B. H. S. made


THROW.


pleted


our victory,


taking


two rounds


singles and the doubles.
On Tuesday, May 29, the seniors, Louise Henter
and Gerald Bliss, played the juniors, Gladys Low-
ande and Chester Pike, in mixed doubles. This
was a close exciting match but the seniors won
by the score (6-3), (6-j3).
There has been an inter-class doubles tourna-
ment arranged, and one of the matches has al-


1. Moore,


C.H. S.


98 feet, 1o inches.


ready


been played.


The seniors won from


2. Shuber, B. H. S.
i. Zimmerman, C. H.


4. May,


freshmen in two exciting sets to the tune of(6-2),


(6-4).


C. H. S.


None of the other matches have been


played, but will be soon.








THE CARIBBEAN.


GIRLS'


ATHLETIC CS.


TRACK.


Although girls' athletics were late in starting this
year, they made up for their delinquency in the few


months that followed.


We owe most of our success


to Miss Lindsay, the girls' physical directress.
BASKETBALL.
Basketball always was and still is our most pop-


ular and favorite sport.


A series


of five games was


arranged between the girls' basketball teams of the
two high schools, Cristobal and Balboa, in which
Balboa won by a score of 3 games to I game.
The first game was played at the Balboa play-


An inter-Isthmian track meet was arranged by
the bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds, in which
a number of our high school girls competed. For


days our girls were kept


training for the


meet, but, due to the superior excellence of some
of the Balboa High School girls competing, and
to the inability of several of our girls to partici-
pate, the final reckoning left much to be desired


for Cristobal.


was Louise


The highest point scorer for Cris-


Center.


The records of


events are as follows:


on March,


game ended


twenty-third.


Although


with a defeat for Cristobal


to the


tune of 12-6, it did not dampen our spirits and
we came home more determined than ever that
the series would end with Cristobal in the lead.
The second game was played at Gatun Club-
house, neutral territory, on April thirteenth, and
a huge crowd of Cristobal High School rooters
witnessed thedefeatof Balboa in the scoreof 22-10.
Never before was such team work shown by our
team, as was displayed that night, and although
Balboa worked hard, they were unable to over-
come the number of points scored the first quarter.
The third game of the series was played on the
slippery floor of Balboa playshed, on the afternoon


of April twenty-seventh.


The game,


inm which we


must admit they outplayed us, ended with


a score


Balboa as victor.


8-P'OUND SHOT PUT.


-DISTANCE


1. Lona Rathbone, Balboa.
2. Louise Henter, Crisrobal.


22 FEET,


INCHES.


3. Ruth Duey, Cristobal.


Arlie Green,


Balboa.


RUNNING HIGH JUMP.--HEIGHT 4 FEET.


I. Esther Green, Balboa.


3. Ida Ruth Hammer, Balboa.


2. Louise Henter, Cristobal. 4. Lona Rathbone, Balboa.


RUNNING BROAD JUMP.-DISTANCE 12 FEET, 9


1. Thelma Babbit, Balboa.
2. LIona Rathbone, Balboa.
o100 YARD DASH.-TIM
i. Esther Green, Balboa. 3.


INCHES.


3. Esther Green, Balboa.
4. Louise Henter, Cristobal.
IF. 13 2 5 SECONDS.
Mary McConnoughey, Balboa.


2. Ruth Duey, Cristobal. 4. D)orothy Deibert, Cristobal.
440 YARD RELAY.-TIME I.062 5.


1. Esther Green, Arlie


Greene,


Florence Murtaugh, Mary


McConnoughey, Balboa.
3. Louise Henter, Gladys Lowande, Dorothv Deibert, Ruth
Duey, Cristobal.


4. Helen Huber,
bone.


Ida Hammer, Mabel Glidewell, Lona Rath-


During the Girls' Conference held at the Y. XW.
C. A. in Cristobal, a basketball game was played


as one of the events of the afternoon.


was won by the team


girls at
game.


is game


of Cristobal High School


the Conference, and
The score was 11-2.


SEASON'S


BALBOA


TEAM.


was not a


league


GAMES.


CRISTOBAL TEAM.


SWIMMING


Swimmmn


has always


a close


basketball in popularity, but this year it has been
neglected and has fallen to a position of minor


importance.


However, Frances Gray, Sophomore,


managed to take second place in a novelty race
held at Balboa pool, February 22, against some


Arlie Greene, F. (Captain)
Florence Murtagh, F.
Helen Huber, C.
Lona Rathbone, S. C.
Thelma Babbitt, G.
Esther Greene, G.


Louise Henter, G. (Captain)
Gladys Lowande, G., S. C.
Alice Oliver, C.
Ruth Duey, G.
Frances Gray, S. C.
Dorothea Tufts, F.
Charlotte Housel, F.


of the best swimmers of the Isthmus.


We hear


with pride of aquatic success of Loretta Rush, a
former student of Cristobal High School, who has
attracted the notice of the public in some of our
biggest cities, on account of her swimming and


The fourth and


last game of basketball


was


diving ability.


We hope that Adelaide Lambert


played at the Cristobal Army and


May twenty-sixth.


Navy


Both teams put up a hard


fight, and the score at the first quarter was o


too.


of the eighth grade, who has been a record breaker
in swimming, will return to the Isthmus to join us
in October to revive us and aid us in regaining our


of 22-3,











THE CARIBBEAN.


Vy.
*W -r .:T
'2& 4



fl ,l i' t


T-


-.- -.- m,


LIN, V.'


'.
.
a ,
; ! ,a


.: .
a ~ ~ ~ i wa *-'''8? ''^


-n -


* ,








THE CARIBBEAN.


4faa^. n^- /(-t


Frances


1922.


!o. The first staff meeting of the school


OCTOBER.


vear


was


held at Henry


Moore's


this evening.


5. School opened


today.


Howard


took command until Miss Dodds should return
from Europe.
Oct. 6. More pupils arrived and the program
fight continued.
Oct. 12. Miss Dodds and Miss Hornbeak re-


turned amid great rejoicing.


Miss Dodds gave a


brief account of her wanderings.


Oct. 13.


Today being Friday the thirteenth and


ominous in itself, the Freshmen "got
the usual hair cutting and make up.


theirs


" with


Oct. 27. Today marked the first meeting of the
Cristobal High School Girls' Supper Club for this


year.


Eleven new members were admitted with a


very impressive ceremony. The new officers
elected as follows:
President.-Miss Mattison Pullig.
Vice President.-Miss Ruth Hopkins.
Secretary.-Miss Hyacinth Eden.
Treasurer.-Miss Frances Gray.


The supper that followed the business meeting
was well befitting the occasion.
Oct. 28. Chaplain Rentz of Coco Solo gave a
brief talk today on the Navy, it being Navy Day.
NOVEMBER.


were


After the business of the meeting was transacted


More served


delicious refreshments, and


we spent a half hour or so dancing, and listening
to Miss Dodds giving one of her readings.


Today


was a red


letter


William Jennings Bryan came and spoke to us on


the subject of education.


He was the first speaker


of real national importance that we had had the


pleasure of hearing, and
kindness.


Nov. 23.
sian folk st


we all appreciated


A performance of the dramatized Rus-
A performance of the dramatized Rus-


:ory,


"The Princess and the


given in the assembly hall today
the effect upon the audience the


cess.


The cast was as


The King Father
The Queen Mother
The B-e-a-utiful Princess
The Sage .. .....


The Tutor ....
Ladies-in-waiti
Nov. 24.
was held at


Sage,


was


Judging from
play was a suc-


follows


Alpha .Morgan.
Frances Gray.
Charlotte Housel.
Richard Hall.
Warner Bowers.


ng .. Gladys Lowande, and Ruth )Ducy.
The second CARIBBEAN staff meeting


the


qua:-ters of Frances Gray,


freshments and recreation followed the business.

DECEMBER.


Nov. 2.


First class meetings were held and new


4. Following


resig


nation


of Gerald


officers and class advisers were elected.


Elections


Bliss,


Edward May was elected Editor-in-Chief of


for the Annual staff also took place.
Nov. 8. Colonel Newton, retired from the U. S.
A i-nv,'r on/- nrsll lrnnniiin kpt-arov nn tbo 7nnc.i nn'raQ n


THE CARIBBEAN.


Dec. 8. Emogene Nash and Mattie Pullig en-
rr-.rroin~Ar th,^ S-rnFf '-a A-i nt-ier alri*n nti- irh. V XX\


65








THE CARIBBEAN.


Dec. 15. Today was annual visiting day.
a number of the parents attended the classes.


Quite
The


afternoon classes were shortened, and Miss Horn-
beak's Sophomore English class presented some


scenes


"Silas Marner.


" A Parent-Teachers


meeting followed, and refreshments were served
by Miss Bakewell's domestic science class.
In the evening the Junior-Senior boys played
basketball against the Freshman-Sophomore boys
and defeated them with a score of twenty-two to
eighteen.


Dec.
school.


20. A staff meeting was held


today


We all brought our suppers but most of


the time was taken up with work.
Dec. 22. The first party of the year took place
tonight, with the Seniors as hosts and hostesses.
Everyone was dressed as a kid, and some of the


othy Pike,. Georgia Bixby and Dorothy Wertz),
with Maurice Eggleston at the door;
Nigger Babies managed by Guy Stewart and
Andrew Smith;
The Chink Shop run by Gerald Bliss and Wal-
lace Johnson;
The Boneless Wonders (Alpha Morgan and Jack
Klunk) under the direction of William Clinchard;
Belinda-the-Beautiful-but-Bored (Warner Bow-
ers in a beautiful white wig);


Marvelous


Mauritzky


performing under the
Coffey and Oliver King.
Then there were:


(Morris


Marchoskey)


management of William


The Chinese team room in which fragrant tea


was served by Edith
ande, Irene McCourt


Trowbridge, Gladys Low-
:, Irene Hopkins, and Mil-


costumes were a great


success.


After we had


played games for about an hour, refreshments,
consisting of ice-cream men, cake, and lolly-pops,


dred Oliver, in costume;
The Dutch coffee room where Mrs. Kleefkens
was chief coffee maker, and the attractive Dutch


were served.


Santa Claus, disguised


as Mr. Eu-


girls, Johanna Kleefkens, Gay


Turner,


Winifred


phrat, distributed presents from the tree in the


Allwork, Florence Albert, Inza Markham, Louise


assembly


party


broke


at about


eleven thirty after an extremely jolly evening.
Dec. 29. A staff meeting to plan the carnival
was held this evening at the home of Edith Coul-
bourn, and a supper which was most enjoyable was
served after the meeting.


Center,
served;


Ruth


Duey,


and Dorothy


Abendroth,


Hot4ogs sold by Charles Trowbridge and Louis
Snedecker;
The candy booth in the charge of Mildred Mor-
gan, Charlotte Housel, and Edith Coulbourn;


JANUARY,


Jan. 14.


The third annual high school carnival.


Ice-cream


John Coffey


and Robert All-


d"
geier to dispense it.
The assembly hall program consisted of a series


Fun, frolic, and finance.
tions were open to all:


The following attrac-


of drawings by Mr. Blackwell, of Coco Solo;


Gypsy Idyll"


"The


with a cast of high school students,


An art gallery, with Holmes Kingsbury at the
door and Dorothy Deibert in charge;
Miss Terious, the beautiful balancing tight rope
walker (James Burgoon) with Laurence Callaway
in charge of the door;
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Thumb (Lewis Barnett and


assisted by Mr. Booz, leading man; several dances
by the pupils of Mrs. Sexton and Mrs. Dyer; a
piano solo by Marian Lowande, and one by Morris


Luce; and songs by


three of Mrs. McCarthy


pupils.
The popularity contest was under


the direc-


Mabel


Jean Bliss) under the charge of Manola


tion of William


Cousins


was assisted


Bliss, with Henry Stevens at the door;
The Kangaroo Court, of which Mr. Stetler was
judge and Jordan Zimmerman the cop;
The Crazy House under the direction of Mil-


Neely


and Dorothy


Vaughn,


Surse


Taylor as doorman;
The Mary-go-round consisting of Mary Cath-


Charles Walsh and Miss Beeching.


The results


were as follows:
Best all round boy and girl.-Gerald Bliss and
Frances Gray.
Most popular boy and girl.-Guy Stewart and
Mattie Pullig.
Best looking boy and girl.-Alpha Morgan and








THE CARIBBEAN.


Jan. I


Mr. William A. Peterson, of Chicago,


who had stopped here on his way to South Amer-
ica, gave, today, one of the most interesting talks


dogs
have a


Manarc


were


roasted,


and everyone seemed


delightful time.
"h i7. The Sophomore class celebrated St.


that we have had


physical,


mental,


this year.


and spiritual


He spoke of
development


our


Patrick's day by giving a party at the high school.


The green and white


table dec rati )ns and


relation to what we owe the future generations,
and, in the general opinion of the school, he was


one of the most interesting visitors we


have ever


pipe and snake favors were


the Irish games


March


were elnterec


20. The C.


IH. S.


very effective


while


into with zest.
boys defeated


lt. l)avis


We also held an auction sale of all the articles


at basketball


score of thirtv-four to nine.


not sold in the Country Store.


Dodds was


M arch


e B. t.


S. hovs


ct'atcd the C'.


auctioneer, and competition ran high.


H. S. bo1vs


at hasketabll with a


score

Junior-Senior


' basketball


to nine.


team


defeated


Freshman-Sophomore


team


A PR iL.


with a score of nineteen to eighteen.


Jan. 26.


Mrs. Needham of Pedro Miguel and


Mrs. Phillips and Mrs. Keenan of


Balboa


came


boys today


I'ort die Iesseps defeated ouir basketball
with a score of eighteen to twelve.


over today and gave a


very interesting musical


April 6. A Staff meeting was held at the home


program in the assembly hall.


of Charlotte Housel


sandwiches


FEBRUARY.


this evening,


were


served


and delicious


the usual


Business meeting.


Staff meeting was


Gladys


Lowande's.


held tonight at


After the business was put


April 7.
and C. H.


Boys' basketball game between B. H. S.
S. Score seventeen to eight in favor


away


l owande


served


refreshments,


of B. H.


Marian, Gladys's younger sister,
talented pianist, played for us.


Juniors


who is quite a


entertained


the high


April 13.


boa girls
(;atun.


The Cristobal girls defeated the Bal-


at basketball, the game being pla:
The score was twenty-two to ten.


school at a St.


Valentine party which was a real


April 20.


An entertainment celebrating the


success.


The red and white


decorations


were


ond birthday of the


Y. W\. C. A. on the Zone was


most appropriate and the refreshments were de-
licious.


The seventh meeting of THE CARIB-


held this evening at the Y. W\V. C. A. building, and
the high school contributed to the program, first,


one of Booth


Tarkington's plays


"The Trf.i"g
Ilie r rvStni


BEAN staff was held at Edward Mav's.


The en-


Place


" with the cast as follows:


tainment following the meeting was quite unique.
There being only a small part of the staff present
we turned to more serious things, and spent per-
haps half an hour in feats involving mental telep-


Launcelot
Mrs. Briw


Briggs, in love with Mrs. Curtis


mother of lunceclor


Jessie, sister of Launcelor
Mrs. Curtis, a youna widow


. .. .. M attie Pulln
G(Ildys Iow\nic
Frances (Graix


athy.


MARCH.


Mr. Inolsl


), in love with Mrs. Bri gs


Ernst Euphrat


The Staff was entertained this even-


ing by Ernst Euphrat at the home of his sister
Mrs. Ray Morris, where the business meeting
was followed by a delicious chop suey supper.


Rupert Smith, in love with Jessie .
T'he Voice, eng aged to Mrs. Curtis


second,


"Gypsy


sisting of Marian


Idvll,"


Burgess,


Henry Moore
-Edward MIav

with a chorus con-


MuItrRz,


March


16. Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, the well


Hopkins,


Virginia


tucker, Olga Arcia, Charlotte


known suffragist leader, honored the high school


with a short talk today.


She is the second person


of national importance that we have had the good
fortune to have speak in our school, and her pres-


House, Jose Arosemena, Ernst Euphrat, Edward
May, Carlos Pulgar, and Frances (ray, and Mr.
Melville Booz.


April 21.


(Girls minterschool track meet held in


see-


March 9.


Comt any


,trail Bliss








THE CARIBBEAN.


MAY.


white, the Junior colors. The dinner was pre-
pared by Miss Bakewell's domestic science classes,


May 4-6.


The Annual Y


W. C. A.


Vocational


Conference was held this weekend, and girls from
both Balboa and Cristobal took part.
May 9. A Staff meeting was held tonight at the
home of Louise Henter in Gatun, and a most appe-
tizing supper was served after the meeting.


and served by the eighth grade girls.
was as follows:


The menu


Fruit Cup

Chicken Timbales


May io.


C. H. S. boys played basketball with


Potatoes,


Virginia Style


Buttered String Beans


"C" Company from Ft. Davis, and defeated them
with a score of twenty-four to eighteen.


Parker House Rolls


Tuna Salad


Cheese
Pickles


Olives


Straws


Mint Sherbert


Junior Cake


Coffee


Florence


SAlbert


Tropic Cream
Mints


was toastmistress,


and the


toasts were given by Louise Henter representing


CARIBBEAN;


Ernst


Euphrat,


the Youth's


bireet Scene ii roiubaL.


May 11. A party was given this evening by the
Freshmen under the direction of Miss Barnhouse.
The red and white decorations were most effec-
tive, and the tables were arranged in the form of


Companio
Opinion;


n;


Miss J. Isabella Dodds, the Current


Gladys Lowande, the Good Housekeep-


Edward


May,


the World's


Barnhouse, the Modern Priscilla;


Work;


Henry Moore,


the Pathfinder, and Mattie Pullig, Life.
May 23. The Senior rings and pins came today,
and the Senior chests and left hands are much in
evidence.
June 7. Last of Annual material went to press.


June 8.


The class of 1923 presented


"Grumpy"


an F.


"An enjoyable time was had by all.


at the America Theater.


May 12. One of the biggest events of the school
year, the Junior-Senior banquet, was held in the


June 9.


The class of 1923 presented "Grumpy"


at the Gatun Clubhouse.


household arts rooms tonight.


The twenty-two


June 22.


The class of 1923 presented "Grumpy


guests, consisting of the Junior and Senior classes
and all the teachers, were seated at four tables
which were decorated with the Junior class flower,
the purple bougainvillea, and the rooms were made
exceedingly attractive by decorations of green and


at the Balboa Clubhouse.
June 24. Baccalaureate sermon at the Cristobal


Union Chui
June 27.


rch.


Chaplain Deibert, speaker.


Commencement exercises at the Wash-


ington Hotel.









THE CARIBBEAN.


Frorence


.Albert,


EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT.


The Scribbler.


IFrank


Evans


ool, Spartanburg,


The '
tlions.
on in th


change Department


has many func-


It keeps us in touch with what is going


eS


states.


gives


us a chance to


see what


others are doingalong the line of their periodicals;
and so shows us what we can do to make our an-
nual better.
We have been fortunate indeed in the quality
of our exchanges but we have been disappointed
this year in not hearing from some of the high
schools to whom we have sent our annual. We
should like to hear from everybody that we can
but especially from those high schools which put


out year books.
The Gleaner.


We always welcome new friends.


Pawtucket, R.


YoU h
stories oi


ave a
which


arge inerary section
you may well be proud


your other departments


The Review.


C central


We sehlom have the


fine book.
frontispiece
This book
because tw
Jorie Ball,
The Epitome.


We received
school. The a


T'he cuts
e "Christmas
is rendered a


could be imp


School,


privilege


with splendid


roved
Ii'ashi


however,
a little.


nglon,


of readi


ire especially


reetings


l the


I and the


most attractive.


more interesting


to us


o of our former students, George and Mar-
are now attending this school.


Hig~4 School for Boys, Reading, J
both the annual and monthly from this


annual i


s a corn


carefully edited that there


pact and neat book


is no fault which stands


out so much that it must he criticised.
however, leaves much to be desired.


The monthly,
The advertise-


Your literary department is very good.


The "Tat-


ments


are mixed min with the School


Notes


is amusing,


not have


some


original,


interesting.


cuts at the head of each department?


eral other departments.
would be a good book.


If this


were remedied, it


The Spectator.


You have an interesting book.


Johnston,


The Curtis


Don't you think


Monthly.
a strange


Curtis


High School,


Staten


coincidence the exchange editors of


that if the advertisements were arranged at the back


THE CARIBBEAN for the veirs


1922 and 1923 have


of the book, it would make it


more attractive?


been ex-pupils of Curlis High School.


So this


maga-


The Record.


There


seems


John Marshal


to be


High School,


Richmond, Va.


a good deal of school spirit in your


school as reflected bv the magazine.


Corner


and "Who's Who


"The Library


were commented upon


zine has had
editors. We
testing book,
The Quill.


more interest for them than for former


Think that it
but a few mo


Staten


is a well arranged, inter-


re jokes


Island Acade


would add to


my, Staten Island,


It.
N.Y.


as being original.


We like your book,


Every department


is well


The Student.


Holmes


High School, Covington, Ky.


developed and equally balanced.


"Exchan


department


is the largest you


The Juntna.


Indiana


High School,


Indiana,


We should suggest that you


try to make your


You have a splendid joke department but where,


other departments
of the Irish" was
much pleasure. W


as large.


The story "The Luck


very diverting.


read it with


were surprised to find an article


oh where,
The Cambridge


in one of your numbers written by a former student
of Cristobal High, William Bridges.


the exchange


Review.


A very


Issue.


section?


Cambridge


We have


HIigh and Latin
Cambridge,


very few


find with the general make up of your book.


The Apokeepsian.


Poughkeepsie


High School, P


oughkeepsic,
N. Y.


The Academy Journal.


Norwich Free Academy,


N orwich, Conn.


Your joke department is large,


enlivening, and hu-


well edited book


with an


especially well


morous.


The literary section is also very interesting,


though small.


written athletic department.


TAhe Alnitnr.


I, l i,


. ev v c an e er ty. a.ew


S. C.


Pawtucket High School,


Johnston High School,


sev-


have.


School,
Mass.
:s to


faul


Irlled


frei


JJ* 7 -r AL s- h- i- *!f- n;


A r.-


"E


===









THE CARIBBEAN.


The Herald.


Holyoke


High School,


Holyoke,


Mass.


THE CARIBBEAN.


We should suggest a


few more cuts.


have a larger Exchange Department?


Why not
Aside from


that we like vour book and are always glad to hear


The CARIBBEAN is one of the most complete papers


we have seen.


Your swimming records are to be


envied.


The Gleaner.


THE CARIBBEAN.


The Torch.


(Vest Philadelphia


High Schoolfor Girls,
Philadelphia, Pa.


We enioved very much the story "Ye Gods and


Your annual is wonderful.


The stories, of which


you have a great number, were fine and the snap-
shots distributed among them made them all the


" It was very clever and original.


Yours is a fine book and surpasses many that we have


seen.


Jokes taken from another book are usually


indicated.


more interesting.


The Apokeepsian.


THE CARIBBEAN.


A fine magazine.


You are to be congratulated


The Squeedunk.


Monroe


City High School,


Monroe


your Alumni Department.


The fact that so many


Through the courtesy of Miss Octave Schulze, we


have a copy of your most excellent book.


After re-


viewing it we do not wonder that it won a prize. V
should like to have you on our list of exchanges.


Balboa


We have heard that you are not putting out a


issue.


Reista La


That is too bad, because your book is very


Salle.


Colegio


de la Salle,


Republique


Ustedes tienen articulos muv


Panama,


Panama.


buenos 6 interesantes,


pero 2porqu6 no tienen mis locales, tambien mais


fotograffas.?


Sus adivinanzas son muy originales


y hemos encontrado much placer en solverlas.

A LITTLE ENCOURAGEMENT.

This part of the exchange department is right


named because out of all


the exchanges which


alumni write back to the magazine is a compliment


to their Alma Mater.


The numerous pictures add


a great deal to the general appearance of the paper,
The Torch.

THE CARIBBEAN.
You publish an exceptionally interesting and at-
tractive paper with every department well cared for.
We feel that we should like to visit Cristobal both
because of your school and because of the place itself
of which you gave us such a clear idea by pictures and
descriptive writing.
The Herald.

THE CARIBBEAN.
Your paper is one of the most interesting on our
list. It seems so strange to think of people so far
away as having the same interests as we and yet as
we examine your paper, we find that we might be
reading of any American high school, except when


we came to the picture
by palm tree.


of your school surrounded


The Cambridge Review.


have commented on THE CARIBBEAN, not one has


criticised it adversely.


We received a fine letter


THE CARIBBEAN.


from the manager of the Grolier Society, compli-


mentmng our magazine.


much that


We appreciate


we feel constrained to print parts from


says:


"First and foremost, I wish to congratulate you and your
fellow students upon putting out one of the finest annuals


that has ever been my pleasure to examine. Y
thing to be extremely proud of."
He also adds that he has for sixteen


ou have some-


A wonderful book-full of excellent cuts, more ex-
cellent news, and most excellent stories-a magazine
of which any school might well be proud.
The Scribbler.


THE CARIBBEAN.
We were delighted to hear from our far away Pan-
ama friend THE CARIBBEAN with its splendid stories


of life in Panama.


"Added Tonnage for the Amer-


ican Merchant Marine" gave interesting glimpses of


years


in close touch with school and educational work,


and in that sixteen years he has yet to


school annual the equal of our 1922


see a high


issue.


We thank our friends for all the compliments


the individual members of the graduating


class.


The poetry, especially "Old Panama", is splendid.
In fact, the magazine is one of the best that has come


to us.


The Spectator.


they have given us and


we hope that


we shall con-


THE CARIBBEAN.


tlnii- t n merit thim


Your magazine is one of the best we have received


,1


Little Shades.


TheZonian.


High School, Balboa, C. Z.









THE


CARI BBEAN.


,ait'tn; Pu/ i .


From the Star and fI'al/d.


"Hundreds of


(;'lKSS \vI IERII.


dren dressed in costumes and with decorated re-
hicles will form for the line

band of the I'.
"Mrs.
11 S V c _
I'l~ ib


S. S. Mlar/!and.


Iboys, it


entertalinled at tea for a numlll-


her of people including (enerals -..-
--, who recently arrived on tilhe


- antd
isthmus


Siv s MIr. Baco


"i',l (I0


is thrm or
is It" timet for


wo ( r
work-


n, hurriedly,


g()<,id work vonu must not shirk,


BIur settle down


interestejlv.


in a pollera. .ilce for wi prevails;
A silence tor ;i while prevails;


Extracts from exanmlnation papers of the graIm-


T he teacher wonders wh.t


IHU -oon a Sound t


somewhere


is wrong.
( tirt -iI 14


mar grades:
.lu's.-How


would


yOUi go


a olI ut


checking a


i.-I- 'd,
- fS. I U


from house to house and count the


'Tis C.l I well I'oos, who n)ow does spe
"l.,rt D)avis has thle lcrt re im here


And W\illhie a.liost hts


to shriek,


wins the nflag


ues.-Vhv did the colonists settle along rivers?
.-I.ns.- Because they had to have some place t)
throw their garbage.


Bud Bliss bawls out fro:n down the line,
"I low's th it, Stewart?"' ( Su soon does whip
H1is chair anImn I, and in a whine


A\ snile from liud


and "lip.


Q'es.-Name ten kinds of foods and tell where
they come from.
Jus.- Meat-cows and pigs.
Butter-milk.


"Old Floos thinks he's


Sivs Kin",
ay [ingl,


SI1
in icalous


If he can lick a postage


And ritht a


wAvI goes


a tennis chiamnp,


tone,


staml p.
up a shout.


Tomatocs-seed.


Cabbage-cabbage plant.
Eggs-chickens.
Milk-cows.


i.es.-\Why does


All right there, boys, you get to work,


Says .
'And, itf


lr. Bacon, airi'lv,
vou don t come here


You d better leave quite


a society need a chairman?


t the chairs together.


to wor


rapidly


Eddie


HJnrxv M


(With a hurt expression).-In our Man-


oore, 2'e


ual Training exam., MIr. Bacon asked about pieces


Mondi morning a:ind time for work to


of wood that we never


saw


or heard of before.


Spanish composition!


And map hook no:


Mi ss


)Dotds.--O,


he expected you to get it out


of Your heads.


No thnime for dances and social activity,
No time to develop athletic proclivitv!


cold?


c astes.


SThe absence of the


stn n


\ e tl.


\\ hatt.


I doubt


ALAS ANI) ALACK!


'l )
' )w,


" ou wate!h who








THE CARIBBEAN.


Frances


sophomore


meeting,


while


planning for a party).-Guy, what are you
Guy.-Me? I'm refreshment.


Louise (Who hasn't been to the U.


S. for some


time).-Well, what'll I do if I get seasick?


Charlotte (Who knows


experience).--O


(In solid geometry).-What are
. Chester?


Chester.-Noth i ng.
Miss B.-Well you're making a lot of racket
about it.


don't worry, you'll do it.

Miss Currier. (In music period).-Gerald, put
your finger where you're singing.


Gerald


promptly puts


his finger in


mouth.


Emogene


mons?


(In senior English).-What are cinna-


(And


we re


supposed to know that she


means synonvms.)


MissBeeching.-I'm eating ice to make me thin.
Mattie.-O, I didn't know ice made you thin.
Miss. B.-Well it makes me shrink.


AS YOU


LIKE


Two men loqk out through the selfsame bars,


One sees the


mud, the


FANTASY.
Gerald Bliss, Jr., '


other the stars.


Fussv


Approachable
Cheerful
Unbiased
Lenient


Tireless


Youth trainers.


Seven


Eminent


Near-perfect
Indispensable
Original
Real
Seniors.


Unique
Nonchalnt
Important
Open-minded
Rollicking
Somebodies.


Sagacious
Orderly
Perfect
Helpful
Optimistic
Model
Oracular


Arrogant
Contradictory
Ugly
Lazy
Temperamental
Yammerers.


Seven


Egotistical
Nervy
Ignorant
Obstinate
Rioting
Seniors.


Jealous


Uninteresting
Noisy
Impudent
Obnoxious
Rambunctious


Simps.


Shallow
Ossified


Priggish
Hopeless
Opinionated
Maudlin


A bull was in the barnyard,
He saw me with delight,
But I grabbed hold of his south end,
And threw him with all my might.
Next, I met the crocodile
A-swimming in the pool,
I knew that if I jumped in,
Twould help to keep me cool.
While floating in there lazily,
I saw a whale or two,
But I cared nothing for them-
I killed them both off too.
The wood upon the other side,
They say, was full of bear;
But, as I had no thought of fear,
I didn't begin to care.
And though I met a dozen or so,
They seemed to be quite tame;
The reason was, I later found,
They, all of them, were lame.
Just then I felt a pair of arms
Begin to encircle me.
I didn't know from whence they came,
Nor did I want to see.
First, I thought it took a bite,
Then I thought it spoke.
Alas! 'Twas mother rousing me,


Saying it


Obtuse
Rabid


was time I awoke.


Exceptional
Sharks.

Fascinating
Refined


Exasperating
Sharpers.

Frivolous
Ridiculous


Miss Beeching
you trying to sa'








73


THE CARIBBEAN.


- --- -











74 THE CARIBBEAN.






*J




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Ii





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-..- -


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THE CARIBBEAN. 75



SAADVERTISING.
Ernst Euhrat, '.

Advertising is of several classes. There is, as a source of their income that the purchser
for instance, the circular, concerning whose of the periodical receives much greater value
advisability expert advertisers are doubtful, for his money than he could expect if there
suggesting that it be sent only to people who were no advertising matter.
g are particularly interested in the product or Within the last twenty years the prepara-
- ~article whose virtues it sets forth, tion of advertisements for the press has be-
Again we find poster and sign advertising come so important that talented writers and
| ~which is very generally regarded as a public artists, especially the latter, are paid gener-
| ~nuisance. Many object to the large glaring ously by the advertising companies. Mate-
signboards as they would to any man who rial of real educational value is referred to,
would step up behind them and bawl into and even discussed, famous works of sculp-v
" ~their ears a recommendation of some wonder- during andti painting are often reproduced-
ful panacea, material which many of the readers of the
| But there is some really constructive and periodicals might never hear ofor see through
H beneficial advertising. In this class we may any other source. A section of this type of
includethehighstandardworkwhichappears advertising is certainly interesting and per-
S in our periodicals, haps even more instructive than the articles
- ~ The business of periodical advertising is of the magazine proper. ]
" of very recent origin if it be regarded with Like many other publications of merit, THE
- other forms of commercial activity. It has CARIBBEAX depends largely on the financial
H grown and improved with the periodicals support of its advertisers. In soliciting
" until, at the present time, estimates of the advertisements for our annual, we have con-
- ~amount spent annually on advertising in the sidered only those whose material would be
I LUnited States are as high as $500,000,000oo. constructive and reliable. We are proud to
The daily, weekly, and monthly publications call the reader's attention to our advertising -
of to-day look to advertisements so largely section. Patronize our advertisers!




^ APPRECIATION.
c "A friend in need is a friend indeed" runs the old proverb. THE CARIBBEAN staff
1 ~has felt the need-and always it has found the friends-in YOL'. Was it cookies for the
I ~carnival? Some one sent them in, with a cake in addition. Was it an old party dress
H for the Senior play? Some one lent us her very best new Parisian frock. W\as it money
S from a play? Some one sold fifty or sixty tickets before we knew it. Was it some place
- ~to eat when we were getting ready for a play? Somebody invited us into the home and
HH served us a lunch fit for royalty. Was it a lamp shade or a beautiful rug or an automobile _
i ~ride? There was always some one to do more than we had expected. And so it has been,
1 ~your kindnesses have been registered, where every day we've turned the page to read S
H ~them". We can't mention you singly but we want you to know that our dear old Cris-
- ~tobal High School appreciates whatever efforts you have made in our behalf. We are





THE CARIBBEAN.


* HOTEL WASHINGTON
i COLON BEACH
5 P. 0. Address
| JCISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE
B European Plan
5 Facing the Atlantic
I zoo Rooms xoo Baths
5 Rates from $4.oo up.
New, modern, and lux- -
urious in appointment.
| Excellent cuisine. Large
s private grounds with
B promenade along the sea
5 front, and fine concrete
~ sea-water swimming pool.
Cool days. Cool nights.
Excellent Winter Resort.
B J. E. LEWIS, Manager.



Uladfjington *otor herbtce to., Jtb.
B THE ONLY ALL-AMERICAN GARAGE ON THE ATLANTIC SIDE

BSpecial Service to Hotel Washington
5 TWO TELEPHONES HOTEL WASHINGTON, Cristobal 733, and Colon 204
MBMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MM

rMMEEAMMAMr4NMa _RERN







THE CARIBBEAN.


MMAMM NNNERMS M HNENNRNMERNAMENUME
Cedlia Ebeatre America Ebeatre


MARION
THOMAS


DAVIES
MEIGHAN


GLORIA SWANSON


MARY MILES
WALLACE RE
WALLACE RE
RUDOLPH VA


MINTED
ID
ID
LENTIN


Coming
in
in
in
in
R in
in
in
O in


Attractions


%4551b4V 1114


^'9mI4v IMr &


"When Knighthood Was In Flower"


"The Ne'er-Do-


Well"


"Prodigal Daughter


"The Trail of the Lonesome Pine"


"Mr.


Billings Spends


His Dime"


"Clarence"


"The


Young


Rajah"


"OVER


THE


HILL"


All-Star


Cast


RUDOLPH VALENTINO


"Blood and Sand"


Cectilia
PANAM2


Sfeatre


BEST


COMING


FOR


YOUR


ENTERTAINMENT


America


COLON'S BEST


; .: STRAND THEATRE
COLON, R. P.

WHAT IS
THE Flame o Life ?"
^, .... v,';. When this title was selected for Priscilla Dean's latest
-r BK iB ,..H? great screen production the producer had in mind some
e wonderful quality in the picture which was best expressed
,Z' Bby the phrase, "The Flame of Life." What is that
quality ? What is the FLAME of life ?
~?????????

- COMING SOON -

The management of this Theatre takes this opportunity
___ ,, ^ :~ in extending to the graduating class oJ '23 of Cristobal
'ar a te^t^t .....^^ Hiph School, heartiest congratulations, and wishes to a


T theatre


EMMMMEMMMMERE


MMMEMMMMSMMEMMMMEMMERMM






THE CARIBBEAN.


W jfNotde Thtot s-
ANCON PANAMA

gA HOMELIKE HOTEL WITH a
^ AA CHEERFUL ATMOSPHERE,
EUROPEAN PLAN

Ideally located in the coolest and
_i most beautiful part of Ancon, r
OVERLOOKING THE SEA

gNoted for its -
CLEANLINESS and COMFORT and the GENERAL EXCELLENCE of the SERVICE and CUISINE.

I ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS COOL and COMMODIOUS PRIVATE BATHS
Completely Refurnished and Redecorated 4. 4- Reasonable Rates
ANDREW JOHNSTON. MANAGER
CONTROLLED AND SUPERVISED BY THE SUPPLY DEPARTMENT OF THE PANAMA CANAL







mNew York Canal Zone Panama


Sailings every ten days, on the 9th, 19th and 29th of
ft each month, for New York via Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
Steamers sail at 3.00 P. M. from Pier 7, Cristobal,
m Canal Zone; docking at Pier 67, North River, Foot of
H West 27th., Street, New York.


RATES OF PASSAGE






THE CARIBBEAN.


gGOETHALS, WILFORD & BOYD, INC.
11SOLE AGENTS and WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS for
IS Procter & Gamble Distributing Corporation i
V. Vivaudou, Inc.
IH. Welch Grape Juice Company
III Cluett, Peabody & Co., Inc.
11 Interwoven Stocking Company
C. Kenyon Company
= Standard Supply and Equipment Company

(Goethals, Wilford & Boyd, Inc.
MAIN OFFICE: 11th and Broadway
261 South 15th Street, Philadelphia Colon, R. P.






m BONDED WAREHOUSES
j ~Merchandise of all description stored in bond,
S ~without payment of Panama Customs Duties S

I Agents: AMERICAN EXPRESS CO.
&Travellers Checks Drafts Money Orders
g EXPRESS SERVICE TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD
s Agents and Distributors:
g CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA and CANAL ZONE
Star Motors, Inc. Durant Motors, Inc.
C^-'-X J^IPl. tn nfl rT rrnnT> nT^ T-if *t A W-M r t% t T AN.f - -1 --^ .~c ^ Tn T^ k ?~






THE CARIBBEAN


11WHEN IN PANAMA -
KM

K- Visit -




g CENTRAL AVENUE


M Finest Motion Picture
|Theatre in the City.



|TRUTE BROS.
^ WHOLESALE
IMPORT EXPORT
MANUFACTURER'S AGENTS


EXCLUSIVE SELLING AGENTS FOR
SC"J VENTRTAL MINERAL L
(d
S(Table and Medicinal Water) VSS
jss
K Theatreooo in otheeccccof Ciy


K S
M CRISTOBAL
RESTAURANT
K NEVER CLOSED



SCafeteria and A
ls la Carte Service



Special Dinners
SUNDAY NIGHTS
K St








E Compliments of
|Dr.Wm. J. LymaYoung
K SURGEON DENTIST g






THE CARIBBEAN.


- w^%5%i 'iv5


I TELEPHONE 1031 PANAMA ITE'LEPIIONE 28
1-3 Fourth July Ave. 4 4 7,089 Front
SPANAMA .' COLO!
Opposite Ancon P.. 0.| Opposite P. R. R




HATS- HATS
DRESSES DRESS



BOWDRY
LADIES OUTFITTERS FEATURING AMERICAN
k- SELLING AT STATES PRICES
E~ SELN TSTTSPIE


Street
N
t. Station




I- -

SES




STYLES
a''a


---'p


SArmy AND Navy I
I Y.M C AI
0 .
STHE SERVICE MEN'S HOME

A MOVIES
^ EDUCATIONAL CLASSES
^ BASKET BALL
ENTERTAINMENTS

SSocials - Fellowship Meetings H


SUGGESTIONS FOR


rabuation


m Waterman Ideal Fountain Pens
- Eversharp Gold Plated Pencils
s Dunn Fountain Pens
^ Panama Patchwork
H Panama Canal Stone Jewelry "
Victrola Records


S!Srir1~ a7W.a.% t s aaJ 3


il


, COLON


<(Nttg






THE CARIBBEAN.


SGOODYEAR TIRES and BUICK CARS

gPanazone Garage

PANAMA, Phone 335 COLON, Phone 5
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMSEMMMMMMMMM M


B'iisl '


I10.115 BOLIVAR ST. COLON, R. P.
THE SERVICE STORE

g NOSTROLINE
ISThe Nasal Specific
g TRI-MUR-TI PEPPERMINT
CREAM for Constipation
MUSTARD OIL CREAM U
^ For all Kinds of Pains
H LAC-A-FLY
Kills Flies and Bed Bugs


I THE MULLER CO.
IISuccessors
ONE PRICE DEPARTMENT STORE

11 Best Quality Merchandise
1 from all parts of the World

SDry Goods for Ladies, Gentlemen,
Sand Children. . .
S~~~fg *^f1
s Household Furnishings
I, Travelling Requisites.

-:- VISIT US -:-
SM_ U ENE AUMM-MM


COMPLIMENTS OF

CRS TOBAto c.Z z-
SCRISTOBAL. C. Z. U






THE CARIBBEAN.


L. C. Leighton Photographs

FLASHLIGHT GROUPS A SPECIALTY
[i 7x17 Doubleweight Sepia Views of Canal Zone
BOX 1452 CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



^ Cable Address "IMPCO." A. B. C., 5th, and 6th, Bentley's


Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd.
JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
g- MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
H| DEALERS IN
BGeneral Merchandise and Native Produce

COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
1&P. O. Box 342

|Branch Retail Stores and Trading Stations:
COLON PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL ESCRIBANO MANDINGA





9 a. rtit er
I 2B~entist t
&s t






THE CARIBBEAN.


IFOR ANYTHING YOU NEED ALWAYS CALL FIRST AT

ITHE FRENCH BAZAAR
SThe Largest Department Store on the Isthmus
PPANAMA and COLON




|Royal Netherlands West India Mail
HIKONINKLYKE WEST-INDISCHE MAILDIENST
SCOMPANIA REAL HOLANDESA DE VAPORES
COLON LINE
Regular fortnightly passenger and cargo service from Cristobal to Port
|gLimon, and from Cristobal to Puerto Colombia, Curacao, Puerto Cabello,
I La Guaira, Trinidad, Barbados, Plymouth (for passengers and mail only),
ilHavre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg. Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe. '
PACIFIC LINE
Regular two-to three-weekly cargo service to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile,
on the outward voyage, and to Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg, home-
gward. A limited number of passengers can be accepted.
ICargo accepted for all ports in Europe.
For further particulars apply to:
ROYAL NETHERLANDS WEST INDIA MAIL Messrs. SASSO, FUHRING & CO.
STelephone No. z2, Cristobal Telephone No. 682 Panama -


S EVERYTHING IN THE LINE OF PLUMBING

Central American
gPlumbing and Supply Company
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN








THE CARIBBEAN.


"The Book of Knowledge"


|STHE CHILDREN'S ENCYCLOPAEDIA

~The Book of Knowledge is a complete work in twenty volumes, covering every field.
* % It is written for children especially from the ages of three to one hundred years. The


volumes consist of more than 350 colored plates and 9,000 pictures in over 6,oo000 p


ages.


With each set there


a "Parent and Teachers' Guid


e" which aids very materially in the


studying and enjoying of these books.


WHAT TWO CANAL ZONITES THINK OF "THE BOOK


OF KNOWLEDGE"


FROM AN EX-TEACHER
"I have a kindergarten class at home every day,
and it is almost impossible to keep the children


away from
They even


your books


come


back a


during their spare time.
ifter class and stay for


ours, looking thru them.
"I believe that all of the schools will soon have


these books in their
help immensely in g<
of the world."


courses.


They would surely


lining an idea of the workings


MRS.


C. P. IIOFFMAN


"The


rainy season


children, for they


lost in


conicme


ca usc s


inside


"The Book of Knowledge.


never


realized


that i


many different subjects
could be brought to chili
language."


t was possible to find so
upon which information


dren


minds in


MRS.


so simple


t. D. BLISS


WHAT


"THE BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE"


THINKS OF


"THE CARIBBEAN."


First and foremost, I
the finest Annuals that it has


wish to congratulate you
ever been my pleasure to


with 1,600 pupils, which I imagine is four or five times


and your fellow students upon putting out one of


examine.
as large


We have


a High School here in Atlanta


as your school, and their Annual is abso-


lutely nothing in comnpatison with your own.


You have


something to be extremely proud of.


" I am enclosing you our check and wish to place our company in your hands.


it if you will act


as our advertising man in this


just one suggestion that I


would like


case and insert whatever


to make, and that


seemsS


is, that you put some


I would appreciate


best to yourself.
clause in that a


There


hvert lse-


ment expressing


for the past


the opinion of a man who has been in close touch with School and Educational work


sixteen


years.


In that sixteen


years


time,


he has vet to


see a


High School Annual the


1922 issue.


I mean this


from the bottom of my heart,


as you


would well


believe if


of the Annuals issued by the High Schools


of this Country.


THE G

"The
)1A Pa~rhtron Rliilxflna


ROLIER


Book o


a a


212 Paorlhtron .Strnot


FROM A MOTHER OF SEVEN


no hardships to
Sand are immed


vour


sonme


could


SOCIETY


Knowledge"





THE CARIBBEAN.


K ~COMPLIMENTS OF
S Dr a. I, Uke U

COLON, R. P.



for Easy
~HOME SEWING
HWIColon Electric
"K, AND
Ice Supply Co.
"-g +111 Market St.,
S /COLON, R. P.




*Phone Hos. N, g



m HE CRIBBEANPRESS
~H. A. ARCHER, Proprietor






THE CARIBBEAN.


COMPLIMENTS OF

SH. W. MITTEN, D. D. S.
SBALBOA, C. Z.

MEMMMEMMM( MERMRMMMEME


-u ____EMNEM


PRINCIPAL
Dr. A. C. Da(


DRUG


STORE


COSTA GOME;


We carry a large stock of chei
ical products, patent medicine


and


perfumery from


American and European firn


Wholesale and retail


Prescri


tions accurately compound


COURTESY AND LOW PRICE!
OUR MOTTO.


9th and Bolivar Str
Corp. Phone No.


- Colon, R. o


E b
Z 3


m-
Les
est
s.

Lp-
-


fP.
4. '


222, P. O. Box, No. 8'


I DIERS & U
AGENTS FC

White I
Rock
Mineral (
SWater
^~Ai
Ginger Bi
Ale M


S48 FRONT STREET
Phone ioa
s-c~~r ___ ;?i?? ?^ ~^ 'f ???1 ?i^
5^~~ _u S ? a~"u'"t -(^p^pt1>'(i^t


LLRICB
)R


[


Park


rilford'
sandy


nheuser-
isch
alt Nut


- COLON


IRATHBUN, STILSON & CO.

tHardware, Lumber, Paints, and Oils


MM


MEN


555555


5^S^f NEW W


b<






ThE CARIBBEAIN.


gPhones: Balboa 667, Panama 934 Box 382, Ancon, C. Z. Cable Address: "Puseg"
ITHOMAS R. LOMBARD

S
JJ V PANAMA CITY, R. P.




SRICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO
5 23 FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P. 68 HARBOUR STREET,
Phone Colon No. 9 KINGSTON, JAMAICA
|P. O. Box 523, Cristobal, C. Z.

SIs the oldest establishment of Photography in
SColon, and our continued success is due to the
Fact that we have always pleased our patrons.
"Richards" stamped on your photograph is
S a guarantee of excellence. . .

5 STUDIES OF LADIES AND INFANTS OUR SPECIALTY



1 *COMPLIMENTS S
IDr. DONALD R. YOUNG
* SURGEON DENTIST
an4' O wai AW li-A a ah-aa rf T !*.S*






THE CARIBBEAN.


MENEM REMMMERMMMER1MERM 5 w


Compliments of


Dr.


MORRIS


Sentist


CRISTOBAL


CANAL ZONE


^^^^^* __^ ^^ t^^^^ ^ ^^ ^fp^^ 1 ^ P^ ^^ ^^^^^^


LE


LINE


PASSENGER


S


Regular fortnightly sailings from Cri


and France


, calling at Colombia


CARGO


Monthly sailings from Antwerp,
to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile.


SEI


Le


Monthly sailings from Antwerp, Le
to Mexico. San Francisco. and Vancouv


For all particulars


LINI


P. O. Box 128, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
Phone No. 185


F STEAMERS

SERVICE
stobal, Canal Zone, to England
Ln and Venezuelan ports.
VICE
Havre, Bordeaux, and Cristobal,
Havre, Bordeaux, and Cristobal,
er.

apply to
AGENCY
PANAMA, Calle 8a No. x z
P. O. Box 303 Phone No 759 g
_ _ _.t ~ N


IBORDEN'S GARAGI

g Latest Model Cars
SFOR BUSINESS AND FOR PLEASURE


FRENCH


FRENCH


wsw


v.'-S
^33
*^-.*"E ^
^x
f--rf.,<*


ER


IEGE


CO


0]





THE CAIlBBEAI.


COMPLIMENTS OF
| W. ANDREWS & CO.
SSTEAMSHIP AGENTS


N N






m hospital be Sanama
Q panama
KN










PHONE 395 COLON PHONE 395 COLON
m MOR GA N'SGARAGE
~The Only Reliable Garage on the Atlantic Side
DEPENDABLE SERVICE






THE CARIBBEAN. 91


IlCOMPLIMENTS OF
SSAMARITAN HOSPITAL
||COLON


IHThe finest in optical |
IIprescription work..

^ NEWEST STYLES
^ STATES PRICES -



SScadron Optical Co.
PANAMA COLON
pi 23 Central Ave. 44 Front St.


M Buy Your Drugs, Patent Medicines,
s^ Perfumery, Toilet Articles, etc.
AT THE

g Pan-American Drug Store
E 50 Front Street, Colon, R. P.
SYou Always Do Better at Salazar's
|||WE CARRY AN |

Ul p-tozbate oba JFountain
3 STORES
o 50 Front Street 56 Bolivar Street .
i x182 Bolivar Street


I The Panama Coca-ColaBottling Co.
|gMANUFACTURERS OF

I HIGH GRADE SOFT DRINKS





THE CARIBBEAN.


IMPROVED EQUIPMENT MODERN METHODS

EFFICIENT SERVICE


JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY
gBROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER


NI
g "LET US DO THE DIRTY WORK"

II We solicit the Patronage of Canal Employees.



Weekly Collections and Deliveries of Laundry Work.
^ Charge Account if Desired.



CLEANING, PRESSING, and DYEING
gA SPECIALTY






TIHE CARI BBEAN.


Jt is generally recognized that
Sthe Best Formula for Infant
Feeding down in these Tropical
^ Countries is the Ancon Doctors'
SFormula:

1-Part Nestle's Condensed Milk
S3-Parts St. Charles Cream
12-Parts Boiled Water.
It changes with the age of the child:
' Ask your doctor.


FOR USE IN COFFEE AND OTHER
PURPOSES 1

INestles' & St. Charles'
-Are the most economical because
they go FARTHEST.


BOYS-Tell your mothers to give
you Nestle's and St. Charles' and
- exchange the Labels for Toys, Story
Books, Chocolate, etc.
? iAT THE -

I Nestle's Milk Company


LOOK Y


e You ar

WA A
~BEA

SSANITA]






Phone 2(
SFront St


OUR BEST


e cordially invited to visit i

LMERICAN
UTY PARLOR

RY and UP-TO-DATE q





8 Colon 3
reet, Opposite P. R. R. Station
a--a


UNIVERSAL
^ ELECTRIC
APPLIANCES







No. e,
E9166
N f-'
9^/>rJ<-






THE CARIBBEAN.


*QUALITY IS EVERYTHING
* Naturally, having spent many years in the making of portraits, we
*have very positive ideas on that subject. To our mind a quality
Portrait should have distinction of pose. Day and night photography.
STUDEBAKR ARAGE SCRANTON PHOTO STUDIO ", ctz.
Central Ave. Panama City Panama City, R. of P.



|UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
5 Regular Sailings
*from
5 Cristobal, C. Z.
to
mNew York,
New Orleans, .
Cuba, N""
*1 Colombia,
S Jamaica, and .
5Costa Rica.


5For further particulars,
apply:
5 M. C. O'HEARN, General Agent, Cristobal, C. Z. T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panama City 3



| R. LINCE & CO.

FINE PANAMA HATS




Full Text

PAGE 2

\W

PAGE 7

THE CARIBBEAN VOl . VI. No. I. Pl' BI.I S H E D BY THE CRIS T O B A l. HI G H SCI-IOOL ---__ H otel Entrance P ortl' rocherI', Uot!'1 __ CO :-lTENT S Advertising A l u:lHli f \ppr eciatio n f \ s Y ou I. ike I t : \ t h letics: Bors Foreword Swimming T ennis T rack Girls' B asketb:tll T rack Caribbean Staff D e,lication E ditorial Editorial Staff E xch:tnges F.lcultr. The F aculty Silhouettes CI.ASS or ''2.1 I -I. EOW,\RD i\I A\', '2.1 FLORENCE ALBERT, '24 ,, s 10"-1 1 F reshman Class F res hman In dex Gradu:Hcc; J okes i\ \ATTISON PU1.I.IC, '2] 7 1 l uniors Literary, ... ,. . .. LOUISE HESTER, '2'2 A Identiq'. GERAI.D Buss, ) R .. '23 Allegories of School Life-..... H EDWARD 'z.J E very Student's R ide I.OIISE HENTER, ''23 The Harp. ... ERNS t EUI'HRAT, ''23 A Shred of Y ellow Paper, DOROT!! \ ABENDROTH, '25 A Soliloquy . '\'ILLI A\! COU S INS, '25 Controlling m}' Temper CALOWEI,L B. Foos, ''25 Dramatic Attempts-,;\n InfernoI Drama FRAN"CES GRAY, : n i\ 1 r. Shakespeare \ 'isit<; Gopher Prairie, The Booklegger . Early L ife in Panama1.0UISE HENTER, '2J ERN>;T EUPHRAT, '23 A Cause for Thanksgiving, 1\IA'rT1S0N P L 'LL IG, '2.1 An Incident H F.DwARD i\ I A\', '2.1 COI1\inced .. H ENR\ i\ tOORE, '23 Extracts From a Diarv, GF.RAI.I) BLISS JR., '23 Faith .. LOUISE HENTER, ''23 G limpses of Colon: ,;\ Cobbler's S hop A Fruit Stan d ERNST EUPHRAT, '23 EMOGEN"E NA SH, ''23 3 2J +9 53 5' 5.1 4 7 +7 55 H J 2 33 J6 J5 +9 30 J Literary-Continued: Glimpses of Colon-Continued: A Furniture Store on Bolivar, H ENTER, ''23 Along Shore 1\IATTISON P ULLIG, ''23 \\'indow HE:>;RY 1\IOORE, ''23 Impressions While Strolling Down Bolivar Street, DOROTHY ABENDROTH, ''25 J ohn'" GERAI.I) 13I.IS<;, JR., '23 The Iceberg Snuwball Shop, H E. MA\', ''23 The Nati\'e FRANCES GRAY, '25 Gum Chewing MATThON P Gl.LIG, ''23 :'\ever Again L otl.!tE HEInER, '23 Pup p-p:tthetic. ER ''>T F,GPHRAT, '2 3 The D u ngeon of Fort San Lorenzo, \ \'ARNER F. BOWERS '::q T he Iowa EDITH COU I,BOURN, ''24 Time FRANCES GRAY, '25 T r:lgelies-I,arge and Small-Lost-One Dime. i\IATTISON" P U I.I.IG, ''2 3 The Horne-Coming FRANCES GRA\', '25 T wo Trips Taken from Panama-} \ \'isit to the Chokois Indians, b u '24 Vacacione s When Green i\ lcds Green HENTER, ':23 Poe:rv: "1.tS and Alack A T.trpon A Tribute Chinese Gardener Fantasy Gatun '.ake Guess Where? i\ l y F.tther H ENR\' i\ 100RE, ''23 PULLIG, '2.] ERNST E U I 'HRAT '23 LOUISE H ENTER, '2] GERALD BI.lS .. JR., '2 3 EMOGENE NASH, ''23 H EDWARD 1\IA\", ''23 Rever)". .. FRANCES GRAY, ':25 I:o/ZA i\ I AR"HAM, ':24 Sunset on the Caribbean, SENIOR ENGLISH CLA .... ':2:2-':23 The Old Jungle T r.til L OIII"E HENTER, '23 The Piers. GERALD BLISS, JR., '23 The Siege of San Lorenzo .1-1. EowAROi\IAY, ':23 The Tropic 1\loon ERNST EUPHRAT, ':23 Tropic Rain FRANCES GRAY, '25 We J\re Seven School Life. ..... School :-':otes FRANCES GRAY, ':25 Sophomore Cbss ... .. The Last Junior Gathering of t h e Cbss of 24, GLADYS LOWANDE, ''2-+ T\\enty-five" . CALDWEl.L B. Foos, ''25. \\'hat is the Function of Education? FRANC'ES GRAY, 2 5 i\ IATTISON PULLIG, ''23. LOU ISE H ENTER, '23 30 29 3 J9 +' 57 7 +2 8 3 72 +7 7 8 H

PAGE 8

T H E C\RIBBEA:-I Sunset on the Caribbean A "jew Taken from the F o r eg r ound o f the I l ome o f T ilE CARII3BEAN. The of the dar h a \ 'c died; hig h, s hrill. Ex cited voices of the c hil d r en, c r ies Cf p .. rrakc::ers and hum of planes a re still. The :.h adowed sea in somber slee p now lie s Which late d i d fret. and fume and foam, and fill T he air with sounds monotonous. Low sig h s The rustling palm, :lnd, from the distant hill, The ec h oes of the sunset gun n o w risco T he sun, l ow si nkin g in yon western s k y L ooks (onh fro m clouds all touc h ed and tinged with gold,His path, a ca rpet s himmering o'er the bay, T o meet the w ea r y weathered r oc ks which lieJ-li storians s ilent-waiting as of old For sun, and wind, and wave of eac h new day. SENI OR ENGL..I S H CL.\SS, '22 "23

PAGE 9

THE CA R I BBEA N. Top. left t') ri;ht.-Louise. Henter Literar r EJit o r : Ernst B u,inclS Gerald BIi,s,. Ad\'crtisinlt Editor-Ill-Chid, resigucd: Henr y Moore, Art ElitoT Left s ide. reading dOl'ln.-Florcllcc Albert. Jarn('.l J3ur,:oon. A.'ISi tant Business Warner Bo..-erl, ex-Assistant Rig ht side.realinR d own.-GI.IY Stewart. Circuhtlon l\lanaget; Chester Pike. B oys' AthlNIC Edil o Girls' Athletic Editor: EJith Coulbour n .Jr,ssi stant Circuhtion Boltorn. l e ft to Joke, Editor; Glad)'s Lowandc, Editor-in-Chicf; Frances G ray, School NOles Edito r CCllt C t.-Erlw lml "'3)', Editi)tlu-cbLCf. DEDICATI ON. WF, THE S T U D EN T S Or. CR I S T OBA L HI G H SCHOOL GRATEFULLY DEDICAT E THIS, THE S IXT. H Or. THE T O THE STAFF OF THE PRESS-II'EOSE PAS T PRESENT H ."E EI' ER OUR INTERESTS THEI R S, THE IR AND E:-.1ER G Y OU R S I N THE PRODUCTION O F THE BOO(.;. 3

PAGE 10

T H E CARIBBEAN. "O ur E ddie I t was Alexander Dumas in hi s "The C ount o f ;\lonre Cristo," who g a ve i rnportance to th e Chateau d' l f whi c h i s situa ted o n a barre n r ocky is l a n d about two m i les w es t o f 1\larse ill es and wa s at that ti m e u sed as a state pri so n b y the Fre n c h go \ 'ernment. :\5 th e stor y goes, E d m o n d Dantes a young man o f about nine t ee n r ears, was unjustly i mpri so n ed th e r e a n d f o r ced to s p e nd mall)' y ears o f h is l i f e in a dark, d i smal dirty, and dank dungeon. One eve ning a s Dantes lay 011 his cot in a se mi -co n sc i o u s co nditi o n f o r h e had b e e n trying to s r a n c him self to deathh e h e ard a di stant ta p pin g agains t stolle C ould it b e r h e workme n th e r ea b out o r a priso n e r try ing to mak e an escape? D a n tes was infu sed with n e w hop e ; stren gth came to him; h e go t up and w ent t o t h e quarter wh e n ce the sound had com e K n owing that i f it were a prison e r h e wo ul d stop, but if it were a workman h e w o ul d cOlHinu e Dantes tapped three t imes a n d t h e n o ise ce a seJ. The n, with timorous patience h e w aited f o r se v enty-two days until the tappin g again starte d. f\t o n ce h e reso ked to gain so mc:thi ng that h e had cov e t e d f o r years-comp a n io n s hip. Afte r breaking t h e water j u g ill his cell h e hi d som e o f the large r pieces and bega n im med i a t ely with o n e of t h e m [0 d i g thro u g h t h e wall, w h e n ce the sound c arn e lie labored i ncessantl y w ith e v e r y e l e m ent of determination for weeks a n d wee k s taking out p e r haps a handf u l o f roc k a n d plast e r each day J "inally, he reac hed t h e tunne l that the oth e r man had made and, on meeting t h e pri so n e r f ound him to be J : o.\hbe '-aria, a prit:st \\ho had bee n COI1-finc:J there: a few years prior to Dantes' sente n ce T he A hhe was subject to catalepsy and kne w that it Wol\ for h im to escap e, but h e baJe Danres go"n ",ith his p lan of escape. The was kind to him and taugh t him so muc h o f the arts t hat Dantes refused to leave him w h ile he liv e d. During the fourteenth year o f Dantes' imprisonment, the Abbe had hi s third attack o f catale p s y, w h ic h was fatal to him, a l t h ough Dantes made a great effort to save hi s l ife D antes the n saw hi s opportunity f o r escape and taking advantage of it, h e substituted hi s body for that of the Abbe which had b ee n wrapped for burial, and was t h rown in t h e sea, the ce metery o f the C hateau d'i f. After extricatin g himself, h e swam to t h e distant I s l e ofTiboul eu, w h e r e h e was late r picked lip by a sailing s hi p Thus, through patience, in cessant toi l a n d det ermination, and by taking advantage of an opp o rtunity, h e was able to fr ee himself fr o m the bo nds o f the C hateau d'i f. Eac h o ne of us h as a life to live Are yo u go in g t o liv e yours in a c hateau of I [< or are you going t o dig to gain your libert), now? Are you goi ng to l e t the barriers oflife's I F 's retard your progress o r are you g oing to surmount the m as did D antes, with patie n c e, incessant labor, and determination. "1/ I could have one more c hance, how diffe r e ntl y I would dO,-j" "if o nl y I w ere as clever a s h e -j" "ij I had only known b e fore, -j" "ij I co ul d ha ve the opportunities h e h as had,-j" "if on l y I wer e as lucky as s h e i s,-;" "if l had his wealth,-;" "if I had his pe rseverance,-j" "ijmyparents and teachers took m o r e interest-." \\'e have h eard t h e s e remarks t ime and tim e again. \\'c o ft e n make t h e m ourselves. Every person w h o utte r s stic h a subjunctive clause is a prisoner ill the c hatt:au of I F. J t is for us to make our own opportunities and w e lcome them when they app ear, o r w e s hall dwell a lways in t h e chateau o f I F H enlt:)' in hi s Invictus" says: I a m th e ca ptain o f m y soul, I : un th e ma s t e r o f m y fatc."

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THE ARIBBEA:-i. Are yo u th e master of what YOLI un d ertake o r are YOll impriso ned by t h e trivial yet s ignifi cant IF? \Vhcn you are g i ven a tas k to p erforrl1) do yo u s a y Y es I s hall iJ--"? I F t hat i s your prison wall. This very ta s k tha t Y Oll arc a s k e d t o p erform may b e your big opportunity i n life ; if you h esitate, all may be l os t. Y our ans w e r s h ould be, I must; there for e I can." \Vh e n w e e ncounte r a perSOIl, wh o h a s rise n high e r than th e a ve ra ge, wit hout tho u ght, "That p e r so n s urel y ha s b ee n luc k y Bu t w e f o r ge t t hat "nine t y-e i g h t p e r cent o f ge niu s i s hard w o rk. That p erso n has m ere l y gained his libert) (r o m the c hateau o ( I F H e ha s chis eled away at his chateau o f I F until on l y t h e dominant I r emains ";\01 in t h e clamour of t h e crowJcd ... treet, Not in t h e and p l a udits of the throng, B m i n our"clves, nre t r i u mp h and defeat

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6 THE C \.RIBBE.'\.N. ;\IR. \Y \Y A"'OREW, Pro,idence Rhode Is land. of Schoo/;. l\hss .1. I SABELLA OOI)I)S, Claremont, l\l inne so ta. Macal ester College. English, Ullin, Social Prohlems and Economics. Caribbrall S l ajJ AdrJiur. Senior ClaJS .,;Jduiur. Who is it c hanges rapidly When students answer vapidly, From smiling countenance to frown And gives a proper caili n g down ? Who is i t always can partak e I n p:trties and c:tn surely make Such pies and cakes and candy A s ever} 'one pro n ounces dandy? Who is it "honestly thinks that West As a real authorit), i s the best," Who ba s fo r outlines an appetite. Bu t ha s a b:trk far wors e than her bite? ""SS BAKEWELL. IIA'ITTF. 1. HORNBEAK, \\ axahachle, Texas. T,i1it>' I'nin:rl,ll'. C',lumbia tnh ... r':t v. Eng li sh, Amtrlcan lIu l o ry Imd Civics. SophtJmort Class Adv iser l\1R.. F RANK T. WIl.SON, Seattle. W:lsh ington. l1ni\'crsio' of \Vashington. AJIiJUml fo Super;ulendml of SchoolI. \ Vho carne to u s from Minnesota And often tells of Brother Ole"? Who's t r :welled far a n d wide o f late : \nd tale s of tr:l\'el does relate? Who te:lc hes Engl i s h, coaches plays, And has so mu c h to claim her d:l) 's ? Wh o talks of C aesar's war s i n Gaul A s w ell as if she'd seell them all ? Who is it always lends a hand And never fail s to u nder stand? Wh o's l oved b r everyone in sch ool, Wilh no exceptions to th e ru le? DODDS. MISS ADELA F BAKEWEll., Lansing, Iowa. l o w.J State Coll e ge. Univer sit}' of California. H o m e (ollom;(s. nnci(llt H iSiory. ,]lInior Class Aduiser. Who is it hides behind t h e books Upon her desk, but o'er them look s Throu g h s pectacle s < \;Irk -rimmed and round J ust when s h e see m s b ehind t hem d r owned? Who is it alwa} 's bangs t h e bell, And tales o f Texa s loves t o tell? Who s anxious a h va)'s for the mail ? Who dreads u pon t h e se a to sail? Who Ius a memory w onderful Whi c h makes u s f ee l quite "blunderful"? Who talks o f S hakes pe : l re, Poco o r r-.l orc As if s he'd lived to them ne x t door? M ISS H O llNBEAK.

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T H E CA R I B B EAN. W h o is it is:l "native daughter" But came t o u s fr o m o'er the waler F r om Bogota, where s h e did teach And also prob: lbl}' did prc;lch ? W h o si n gs the praises of her brother J\l ore frequently than an y other; F rom Guate m ala scarfs did brin g I n co lors fit 10 deck :t kin g? W h o is it s n aps her finger s hard B ut h:nes to decor:lfe a card W it h lurid F's? W h o sympathizes Even when s h e criticizes? 1111 55 B A R N H OUSE. i\IR. HNH G. B A CON. !\lauricetown, N e w Columbia L'niversitr. 1\I(llIlIfllTrflillillg, il feclumiw/ Dmw;n '(,GnumISc;"wre. Wh o i s it sits in a student's sea t W hen in a ssemblr s h e ha s h er b e:n. An d po un ces thence in see min g rage. On h im who looks up from h is page ? W h o is it ej I c u[ate s "Oh rats!" And h as an antipathy for hats And says, Y ou Seniors nee dn't t hink-" And be ca u se t h cy don't, s lin gs on red ink? W h o l ikes to b.1t t h e tennis ball? W h o i n her cbsswork know s it all? \\,ho h ikes the cOllntry up and down, And sco rns the re s t : lUrants of t ow n ? B EEC H I NG. i\l! ss i\IABEL J F.AI' B,\R:-.'1I0USI:;, \ V:uso!1viJ1c, Cal ifo r nia. Leland S tanford. Jr., {lnin'r.;il} Splwisll. FrtJlmltl1l CI(lH .1dr:iur. Wh o is it always stands on g u ard An d looks so firm, and co ld, and hard, Or paces g riml)' up the And yet find s time for jokes and smiles? Wh o always l ooks t h e best in clothes Suc h as he wears when 'c r h c goes Upon :t h ike, with p:tck on b:tck T o h old his needments and a sn:tck? \\'ho is it makes the "bestest" fudge And gives us lots of c h a n ce to judge? Who teaches ollr boys to draw, An d ke e ps the Science class in :lwe? R B .-ICON. 1\1[<;s i\L\8El. BEECH[NG, I l utc h inson, Kanas 5t:!.!, Nor:n:ll f'c h: oJ. GeomeI1J', Ph .'si.:s, /lgebr.l.

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THE CAR 1BBEAN. i\ I Y FATHER :\ cry is heard upon the castle W;1.II. :\. sound of cannon from t he turret high. A rush of feet upon the s teep stone stair. A clank of muskets on the courtya r d R ags The winding of the warnin g horn afar. The rumble of the d r::lwbr idge as it drops, The creaking of the gates as they swing wide. The loud triumphant s hout that welcomes h ome The lord, the king, the idol of thi s band. I fling :\side mr tapestry nnd run With feet that sca rce!), seem to touch the marble A oor, So eager that my lip s s h all be the fir s t T o give glad greeting [Q my dearest l ord. His breeches caught with sih'e r at the kn ee A scarlet sas h encircling his hip s T he co llar of his l i nen shirt turned ba c k T o bare his mighty c hest and strong brown thrCl The heav\ rin gs a-dangle from his ears, H is coa l black hair a.Rying in t h e breeze 1 see him stand, surrounded by hi s men, One hand upon the h ilt of his g reat s word, The other r aised in greeting untO all. He catches sight o f me behind the men, And, with a shout that ec h oes through t h e court, H e thrusts aside t h e c r owd that intervenes, And stands a nd faces me with arms outstretched; A breathless moment as J hesitate, An d then J rus h into those s heltering arms. J feel the quickened beating of his heart, The touch of lips ag:linst m y burning c h eek, The r oug h caressing of his calloused hands A s he rumples up m)' s h ort blac k curls. H e puts me down before him, and h e stands W ith hands on hips a n d gaze s down on me; I hardl)" re ac h the buckle on hi s sas h And feel so tinr 'mi ds t th ose great strong men; I timidly shrink and h e l a u g h s A nd lifts me to his s h oulder. where I sit And cling wit h one s mall arm about his neck. J see all piled up hi g h within the gates Huge oak en chests with bands of copper bound, And bales, and cask s and vats, and tubs and sacks, rair bul gi n g with their content s ric h and rare. I catch the words of cannon, battle death, A deep voice t ells of storm s upon the sea Anoth e r speak s of raid s of clo se escapes Of si l ent marc h es through t h e t ropi c night, Of bullion bu r ied in a far. o ff cave, Of unmarked graves of faces that a r e gone ; An d I wonder as I he a r the se words, For I kn o w nau g h t of storm s o r death, o r g raves. fath e r h olds me tight and o n Beneath the might} a r c h into t h e hall, Where wooden tables g roan beneath their load Of bread. and meat and wine-enough for a ll. I gaze with wonder on t h e motley throng, G one are face-:: tllM J once did know, An d new n ames n ow r e.ec h o through t he h a ll. Now h ere n o w there. I catch a sight of some Familiar face, the sound of so me kn ow n voice, Bu t still t h e b a n d is c h a n ged. I look in vain F o r some who once did f e:l.st within thi s h all, A.nd t h en bethink myself o f "storms at se:l." Of ;'death" of "unmarked graves. I understand. The lights gro w dim b efo r e m y s leep y eyes. The shouting and the si ngin g die away. I he a r a faint voi ce in the distance c r)' The P irate! The R :l.idcr! Our King!" I s leep.

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An Answer to the Question: "WHAT I S T H E FUNCT ION O F ED CATION?" (.\5 Given Three Cristobal Hil:h School Girls.) THE characte r o( men, like the substance o( stone:;, varies and, l ike the SlOne, the charactero( men must be chiseled, and molded, and shaped (or its position in [he tower o( societ),. Education, like the tools that shape the rock, shapes the char_ acter o( men. Education means knowledge. Knowledge o( what? Of geography? O( science? O( English? Of L atin? Y es! It me:tns all of these, and more. I t means the know_ ledge of right and wrong. I t means the knowledge of the con sequences of right and wrong. I t means the rcaliLation of the individual responsibilitr of e\'ery man. I t means the strength to uphold this responsibility. .4.ll e things are the tools that shape man's character .. '\11 thes:e things are Education. A chain is as strong as its weakest link. I s not a tower as strong as its weakest block? lt is the purpose o( Education to make the weakest block the strongest, and this purpose must travel in an everlasting cycle increasing, dar by da}', the strength and t h e be:tuty o( the tower of society. -Fl"flllctsCI"fl;V, '25. E DUCA T ION-.'\h! not merely the enabling an individual to learn material things-facts, but teaching him the way to help other people learn things; showing him his place in the business o( life; te3ching him to brighten his corner, as well as broaden it. Education is not measured by selfish knowledge but by the knowledge and happiness that are expounded to one's associates -J[allison Pullig, '2). A L L youth feels the intangible, strange urge o( ambition, experiences nameless longing!', and dreams "agueshadowr dre: l ms (or the betterment of existing conditions. T he farm boy at his plow in t h e fields, the bus)' factory bar, the grocef}' clerk weighing small, exact amounts of beans and potatoes, the shepherd boy tending his m:l.ste r 's sheep, and all the other boys and girls in \ 'arious conditions o( life and in all countries, dream. I t is the part of Education to make these vague dreams become realities to inspiration and tools (or achievement, to lead, guide, and direct the mind in the development of individual ideals, to take Youth out of the rut of his own commonplace existence to a vision of wider spaces. Louiu lftnltr, '2J.

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10 THE C :\RIBBE .'1:-J.

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T H E 11". H I PHRAT '19 ''20 Ea .. t Xi(,dH School. Cincinnati, Ohio. '21 '22 School Chorus. Bo\.!; Glee Club. "The Zone Police." '2J Cbss Treasurer. Bu:.incs<; i\bnager, Tllf: CARlaoEA' I-I,,!;h School Choru<:. Cl;ss B asketb;lll. "The Pbcc." "Grump\"." -1If.:'IRY J. '19 '21 CurtI' lIigh School, St.llen [",Iand.' Y '21 '22 Editor, Tltf: CARIBIH.:,,, I h gh School Choru .... Bop,' Glee Club. lull. R a ... chall. "The 7...one Police," 'n ',2.1 t\n E ditor, THE c'''RISUf:A .. I IH!;h School Choru .... Ba"kclball. B.lse!> II. Swimming. Trad:. The Tn <,tinl{ Pla ce." "GrUnllw." -I. OU ISE F HF."HR. "9 '20 H igh Chorus. '20-'21 School Chorus. .. ketb:tlJ. .. Esmeralda. '22 Girls' Athletic Editor, THE CARIOBE"", H igh School Chorus. Girls' Glee Club. Basketball. Track. "i'I rs. Oakley's Telephone." '12 '23 Class President. Liter,ln E.ditor, TH E CARIUSE"l". School Chorus. Basketball. Track. "Grump\." G. PULLI G. 19-'20 H igh School Chorus. '20-'21 Class President. General Assistant-"Esmeralda." ':U-'12 Art Editor, THE CARIBBEA:'. Girls' Glee Club. High Sch oo l Chorus. "i\lrs. Oakle)"s Telephone." Gener.11 Assistant-'Cl arence." ':22-'23 Class Secretary. Joke Editor, TH E CARIBBE ... School Chorus. Trrsring Place." "Grumpr" President, Girls' Supper Club. H EDWARD Y. 19-'20 H igh School Chorus. '20-''21 Class Secretarv. Circulation THE Class Basketball. J '19-'10 H igh School Chorus. Basketball. '20-'21 Oklahoma Baptist Cni\'ersuy. '21-'22 Class Secretary-Treasurer. H igh School Chorus. Girls' Gl ee Club. ",\I rs. Oakley's Telephone." '12-'23 -\Iumni Editor, TilE C"RISBEA:'. Hie:h School Chorus. "Grumpr" D BLISS. JR. '19-'20 Class President. H igh School Chorus. '10-'21 Ba sketb:lli. '21-''21 Class \'ice.President. II Track. "Esmeralda." Assili:tant Bu siness l\lanager, THE CARIBBE"'. H igh School Choruli:. '2(-'22 Class President. -\ssistant THE CARIBHE"'. H igh School Chorus. B o}'s' Glee Club. Class Basketball. Track. "The Zone Police." '22-'23 Editor-in-Chief. THE C"RISBEAl". H igh School C horus. Class basketball. Track. Tennis. "Th e Trysting Place." "Grumpy." Bo\s' Glee Club Basketball. B a"eball. Swimming. Tennis. The Zone Police." '23 Editor-in-Chief, resigned. A dverrisine; i\lanager. THE C"'RIBBEA'. Basketball. B a!:ehall. Tennis. "The Tr\"
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lZ THE CARIBBEA:\,. 'YE A R E SE V EN. I met an old Cristobal girl; She was quite grown up s h e said: Her hair was thick but not a-curlFor she wore it bobbed insteJ.d! ":-':ow tell me of you r school," I said, And classmates dear to you." She seuled down with a smile and said, "There's nothing I 'd r ather do." H ow rnan\' were there, first," I said, .. \nd wh'at deeds did ther do? And what accomplishments are t he irs Since the)" with sch oo l a re through?" "There were not man}' of us sir ; \\'e numbered only seve n, And we a r e just as many now, F o r none has gone t o H eaven. "First Ge r ald. Jr . \'11 discuss; H e's Bliss in deed and name; As an advertising manager H e's made his name and fame. H e was an athlete eve r r inc h H e swam, played basketball, W as tennis champion, and caug ht At baseball, and did well in all; "To raffle was his chief delight; (I-Ie has his bicycle still!) H e left to Chester P ike the rig h t T o go in and out at will. "Ernst Eurhrat is the next in line,H e is a Jr. too-lie still is practising dentistry -\s he of old did do. H e never loved athletics muchH e found them rather tame-But, when he started anphing, We always found him game. "He look hi!> lIme in whal he d i d, \Vas eas)' 10 amuse; To Inla ;\ larkham he did leave The right to pia)' t h e "Blues." "And th en there wa s the H ente r girl, Wh ose first name was Louise; She's won much literary fame Since taking her deg re es. I n spo r ts s h e ranked with anr one, Pl ayed basketball, and ran C ou l d jump, pia}' tennis, throw the shotShe's even caught a m an! "She always was just full o f pep And effe r vescent cheer; T o Ethel S. s h e left her gift Of ha\ ing for classwork no fear. "And next comes H enry Edward H e with the c urty h air; His s lender fingers, long and firm, Have mad e him a s ur geo n rare. H e ran and jumped and sang and danced And thought and spoke with ease ; And his report ca rd also W as always full of E's "To things worth while f o r eve r yone H e did devote his s tren g th; \\'ith Gla dys L. and Charlotte H H e did div ide his length. "The next J 'II name wa s H enry H e ca m e fro m R andolph post,-A s maker of the best cartoo n s H e's known from coast to co aSt. "Another athlete true w as h e H e hail ed f rom "Coitis Hig h; : \ s "Grump)''' h e achieved a name Whi c h is not lik e to die "B)' nature pleasant, c h ee rful, yet H e lik ed his f r iend l y spa t s; T o Flo r ence .<\Ibert h e did will His plea":tnt Jloo1l4d:IY c hat s "Another girl was Em oge neH e r name of )'ore wa s Nas h By givi n g concerts everywhere She ea rn s a milli o n-cash "She swam, played tennis with a vim, Shone in society, But be s t of all s he liked it when She soared to hit high C. "As 'Black Beaut)" s he sco red a hit I n fact was made the queen,-The prestige of l'.liss L iberty Gave to E dit h C. a s queen." "And what about ),ourself?" r asked; "Of )'o m ren own I 've heard; Y ou r influence o n all was great; All listened to your word. "In high sc hool sport you never joined, But alwa)'s lent rour cheers; The memory of you r pep and pus h Has come dow n throug h th e rear s, I un de r sta n d rou left to Geor ge Y our popularitr, And that t h e class of ''23 L eft love and l oya lty-" "To our dear sc h oo l ? Of cour se we did! And ou r gre : u dignity, Our toot hpi ck dear, a n d Senior pen W ith no m:tli gnit}, "Unto the Junio r cla ss. Advi ce, And wis hes good and kind, T o Fr es hm en :tncl to Sophomores We s weet l y l eft b e hind. "And to the faculty we l eft Our thanks when from them riven: We're s till t he cla ss of ''23; \Ve're one though w e are seven."

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T H E CARIBBEAN. Rch/ls ... r Vic.fl.-i8-Glad'fs Lowande Ch.a.Tlo\\e House\ 1 3

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T H E C.-\RIBBF.AN. -----THE L.-\ST Jl'=--I O R G.HH ERI;\JG OF T H E CL.-\SS OF Glmi.,s Lou'Il1ulr, '21. Hey, kids, what about an informal gathering? -rhe laSt one as Juniors you know. \\'h e n we come back inOcrober, it will be as the S e nior Class. Qundsgrear,doesn 'r it? Come on, :\I iss Bak ewell. ,. \\'jtll -eher's words ec h oing in their ears, th e happy group strolled down to the domestic sc i e nc e building, a bui lding fairly haunted with m e mori es of past Junior doings There w e r Chester Pike, good old Cher, the best class president everj Inza ;\Iarkham and Florence Albert, otherwi se known as Bobbie and Fl oss i e, the Damo n and Pythias of the classj George Oakes, called "Oakes," wearing that same unbanis hable smil e with which h e ha d entered sc hool the latter part of the rear; E dith C oulbourn and Ethe l onneman, Ed O!nd Ethel, both quiet, demure maidens not heard from very but, b e it sale or party, always willing to do the ir share and more; Charlotte H ousel, a wee litde girl kept most busy with eith e r playing the piano, tcnnis, basket-ball or en t er tainin g a certain se nior lad;and last of all, Gladys Lowan.::1e, alia s "Pinky, and .\l iss Bakewell, their much l ove.:! class advi se r. "'\'ell Chet, n ow that we are h e r e, what's t h e big idea?" ":\'othing exactly but-I just sent the janitor down forsome icecream thinking [harroll might" )cecream! Leadmcroit! S O lillds'mostasgood as t h e catsar our \'a l c ntill c party. R e m embe r t h e six salads that \ "arner got away wit h t o say nothing of the cake?" D o we? \\" ell I 'll sar so. B r the war, Chester, ha\'c YOli heard from him lately?" Yt!s, I've had a coupl e o f letters. H e s in Brooklyn, :\'ew York now ha v in g o n e grand and glorious time. I n the la s t lett e r I had, h e s aid ro tdl you, Gladys, that h e was glad to h ear t hat your prayer for another Junior boy had been an<;wcred. Y ou know, Oakes, Gladys prayed f o r you for about a month before you came." "Oh, I did not, I just hoped we'd get another boy w take \\'arner's place. Bu t returning to tht! subject of the part)', w henever I hear it m e n t1(JOt!d, that is-by somt! one of the feminine sexthere is SUr(:: to bt! some raving about ),our wonderful interpretation of tht! sheik, Chet." mind, Chet, yo u haven't a thing on Charlotte. Let me give you an impersonation of her at the cake sale. 'Sa)" won't ),o u buy this love l y c hocolate layer cak e? J U St like mother used to make! \\' hat? Y o u don't like c hocolate cake!' Then she'd look u p at the victim with t h ose misc hievous eyes of hers and continue-'But I'm sure you'll like t h is o ne. Just look at t h e wo nder ful i ci ng. Why you cou ldn't pos sibly get a n ything bette r-oh, you will take it. I knew you liked chocolate cake all the time, especially layer cake. One dollar-fifty p lease!' "So t hat's the way she d i d it, Bobbie. \ \ h e n in t h e world i s that i ce cream coming? You're sure you sent f o r it, C het?" .. 'Course I did. There y o u are as impatient a s ever, Oakes. That' s just t h e way h e was at track meet. Y ou saw him, didn't you, i\l i ss Bakewe ll? On t!l e mark in t h e fou r -forty, the r e h e was, an"iolls t o b e ofF. At t h e sound o f the gun h e wa s lig htning and talk abou t speed and c l ass he s urel y h a s it." "Cut out that talk, Chet. \\"hat abou t basketball? ;'\ Tevcr have seen anyo n e playa fin e r game of guard, than you do-what's t hat Ethel?" except that J am tire d o f hearin g you boys sing each oth er's praises \\'hat abou t the girls? L oo k, C harlotte and Pinky have both made the representari ve sc hool team Edith a n d I have see n all t h e games and we know t here isn't a b etter f orwar d o n t h e Isth m u s t han C h arlotte." Y es, and not only athletics b u t w hat about Fl oss i e s good work a s toast-rnistr ess at t h e J u n iorSeni o r banquet? You wer e great Flossie, bu t how i n the worl d do yo u do it?" "That's n o thing at al l Edith But sa)" I 'll tell the r es t o f you t hat Ed, Bobbie, a n d E t h el were certainly the r e w hen it came to decoratin g. Didn' t the ro o m and those tables look gorgeous? A .nd talk about eat s well, l\ l i ss Bakewell, I think we all agree t hat y o u k now how to manage s u c h t h i n gs. B y t h e way, C het, t h e next t i me yo u write, tell \\'arne r about t hose c h icken t imba l es, tuna salad, mas hed potatoes a n d stri ng b eans, a n d o h yes h e wa s the o n e t hat lIse d to tal k about t h e way Charlotte jazzed the piano-t ell h im we lea rned at the banque t t hat s h e could regulate a victrol a too. " D on't YOll dare t ell hi m any s u c h t h i ng, C het. Look, h e r e s t h e janitQf, t hank good n ess. Com e o n Chet, di s h t h e i ce c ream out quick, f o r J a m n e arl y fami s hed. How in t h e world did you ever happe n to think of som e t h in g so n ice, anyhow?" I didn't. Now f o r the surprise This isn't my treat but i\I i ss Bakewell's. 0 b e fore we start on the cream, l et's give her three r ousing good c heers. One, two, three, go."-"R a h r a h r a h B a k ew ell.

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w Z d w ::> t-:> c.r) w :::J I-z: <;4 l!':) N CD z :::> CI) Till" C:\RIBBF: \ -o N '5 g

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THE CARIBBEAN. 25. Caidtl:rll B F oos, '25. So l id c omfort. I l ean ba c k in my dec k c h a ir a n d listen to t h e s w i s h -s h -s h o f the g rea t Army trans p ort a s it plows th ro u g h t h e h e a v in g C aribbe an. 1\l y s o u l is at rest, and I thi nk with a slight twinge o f l o n elin es s o f all m y f r i e nds b ac k i n the Z o ne-expec i ally t h os e of the S opho m Q r e class, at o l d Cris tobal H igh O a w g-go n but I had so m e g oo d t im es with t h a t bunch! And n o w I am l eavi ng t h e m all on m y wa y t o the States . t\ll ? i'J"0, n O t q u ite. D o wn t h e dec k th e D e ib ert c hild, wit h prac ti sed ease is engaging h e r f a t h e r in a m oc k flir tati o n a n d r e markin g in h e r inimi tabl e manne r Ain' t it cu t e ?" thi s t i m e r e f e r ring t o t h e moo n w hich beams down a t h e r in r e p l y I l e a n furth e r ba ck, a n d t hink o f t h e m all. \\'hat immediately co m es to my min d i s th e S opho m o r e dramatization o f "Sila s i V f a rn er." \ V ow! The prac t i ce s we u sed t o have! 1 wa s o n e o f t h e "Sila s wer e f o u r, b ecause o f t h e l ength o f the play-Andy S mith J imm y Burgoo n J ose Arose m ena, and m y s e lf. 1\l y H E p pie" th e r e w e r e tw o Hyacint h Eden a n d H ele n Ab e n d r othha d a naturally kiddin g nature, a n d w hat w e d i d to those supp o s ed l y se riou s r e h ea r s a l s wa s a sin and a s h am e \\' oof! I g e t a kic k o u t o f it eve n n o w But w h e n th e pla y c a me off, o n v i sit o r s' day w e wer e all l ette r p erfe c t, a n d th e a c t s f ollo wed o n e ano t h e r s m oo thl y and with o u t a hitc h o f any kind. The only troubl e was the l ac k o f "Silas' s h irts"-t h e re we r e only two o f t h e m. I go t o n e and Andy Smith go t th e oth e r. I c a n still see Andy hurtli ng down t h e hall at his f our f orty-s trid e to g ive Jimmy Burgoo n, w h o f ollo w e d him th e high l y n e ce ssary s hirt. \ V e w ere sure l y w ell r eprese n t e d i n athletics t hat ye ar. Andy Smi t h s h o n e in th e f our-forty a n d the mil e r e la y, whi l e two o f our m embe rs Peppy" A rose m ena a n d \Villiam C o u sins-made t h e fir s t t e am in bas k e t ball, t h e f ormer at f orward and th e l atte r at guard And a s f o r the c h ess t eam, the Soph o m o res prove d t o have the b es t mate rial in the sc h oo l 110 m ember o f ano t h e r cla ss find ing a pla ce in the line-up. At this p oint I allo w a s ati sfied s mil e t o c ree p o v e r m y fac e I mi ght n o t ha ve b ee n abl e to make any o f the o t h e r t eams but a t l e a s t h e r e wa s w h e r e 1 "shone with unparalle l ed g l o r y." The ship's b ell se n ds its clear n o t es ov e r t h e water. 1 se ttl e down and continue m y interrupted t h o u ghts The S o ph o m o r e party I grin as I r ec all how, wit h ze al and z ip I pu s h e d a p otato a c r oss t h e h all, wrigg ling alo n g o n my s t o mac h and pu s hin g t h e "spud" wit h m y n ose I had enjoyed t hat party good nature, g oo d entertainm ent, g ood r efres h m ents ( 1 made sure of t hat, b eing o n the refres h m ent committee ) A g ood party in eve r y se n se o f t h e w o r d And t h e o r dina r y sc h oo l days w e r e e nj oyabl e t oo, t hanks to littl e inc i dents whic h bro k e the p eriods o f s tudy ( does a n y b o d y r e m embe r the ge nuwin e H o w ouldj a bag ?" ) and made a day o f sc h oo l so m e t h ing to b e l oo k e d f orward to wit h p l e a s u rabl e antic i p ati on. And the n th e l as t day o f sc h ool. I f ound to m y j oy I h a d p asse d all five s ubj ec t s w i t h hig h m a r ks, a n d th e c l ass o f '25, s till t h e c l a ss o f 2 5, bu t n ow r ejo i cing in t h e h o n o rabl e title of J u n i o r, d i s p e r sed f o r the two m onths v a catio n. And w ell, h e r e I a m. 1 sit f o r awhile lis t ening t o the sea ; t h e n stre t c h m yself luxuri o u s l y and g o down t o m y state r oo m

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THF. C ARIBBEA N 7 19 26 _________________________________________________ ____ CLASS. J'el!ils-Be:;.innilll! at t op, rendine; clotkwise-Coutoidcl--G:IY Turner. Treasurer: Christian W irtz, Cha rles Tro w b ri dge. M :l.TloJIl Bliss, Dor othea EI:;ic Bixb)', M ildred Oliver, W illiam ('liuchfl r d, Carlos Delilah May, J ohanna Klecf kens, M aurice Egg ll'llton, \\"illinrn CQlfey. (lusidcl-\\ 'inifrcd Allwork, ex-rice-President: Dorothy Pike. Secretary; M ild r ed Neely, A l pbn M o r gan. M iss Barnhouse, .-\dvbcr: Oliver Kiug. \'irginia Tucker, \"ice-Pre3idcnt: H elen A bendroth, Zelda Eggleston. Lola M u n Dt, Iren\l H opkins, Esther Dor othy Vaughn, Center-John Coffey, Pre;idenl.

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THE CARIBBE.-\N. I:'\OEX. I. :\bendr oth, I-felen,-Her onl)' worry-that she won't ha\e enough time to rel.d. 2. Allwork, \\'ini(red -it took Win ifred to husrle up the Freshmen. "Better come back, Win ifred; we need rou." J. B ixby, Elsie,-"The Freshmen wish you all kinds o ( luck in your business course, Elsie." 4. Bliss, ;\Ianola.-\\'ork doesn t b ot her her-Sh e doesn't bother work. Carson, Bettr,-"Bewa r e o( those eres!" 6. Campbell J ames H is (avorite prepared." -. Coffey, Billr,-I ( size \\ere a h a n dicap we're afraid Billy \\ouldn't be ab l e to dive. S. Coffer, J :lck -I-Ie's a l azy but goodn :tt ur ed so rt of son. 9. Clinchard William,-G irls don't bother him in t h e least 10. E berenz, i\larcella,-This ga), butterfly ha s Ritted (rom our midst. II. Eg gleston. i\l a urice,-"Oh those d impl es!" 12. E ggleston, Zelda,-"\\' h :tt's that good-looking bor's name?" THE P I E RS. G(raid B IiH, Jr., :U. A mass o( co n crete buildings standing high Wh e r e negroes swea t and toil the whole day long These piers above whic h airplanes statel y fly T o meet e:tch ste am er, as it comes a l ong And docks, whil e bus)' (oremen s harpl y c r y "A.II h ands at work, cut a lit your jib and song. The tourists leave the boa t and pass on by The anxious, wea r r t i r ed-a ( -wa iting throng. B oats bring the (or eig ner s (r o m (:lr J apan; F rom East and W est: Sweden and I tal r ; Thc) Carr)' men o ( eve r y hu e and elan-E'en those who hail (r om dist:lnt Araby. And, tho they come (rom places (ar and ncar, The)' always meet :It a Cana l Zone pier. 13. H opkins, I rene, She's at her best at a dance. q. K ennedy, 1 0ll,Demure as a Pr iscilla. 1 5. Kleefkens, Johanna,-"J ohanna, please k eep quiet!" 16. K ing Oliver, H e'd make a good actor. 17. i\la c key, E s th er,S h e ha s an unu s ual inte r est in the eighth grade. IS. i\lar, Delil: lh, D elilah l oves ancient h isto ry. 1 9 i\l organ, Alp ha,-"How do you enjoy sc ien ce, AI?" 20, \I unoz, Lola, She's a str ong booster (or bobbed h air. 2 1 Neely, i\l ildred. "Oh! more a lgebra?" 2'2. Oliver, i\lildred -"What's the answer to this problem?" '23. Ordwar. J o hn.-H e bring s a s mile (rom F 'o r t Shcrman ever)" morning. '24. P ike, D oro rh y .-"Still doing D omestic Scien ce w o rk, Dot?" '25. Pulg a r Carlos "Carlos! L eave the room." '26. T urner Ga}",-H e r heart i s ill h er w ork. '27. T rowbridge, C h arles. "When do we eat?" '28. T ucker, \ 'i rginia,-"Keep it up, Tuc ker. you make a fine b a rber." '29. V a u g h an D orot h y,-"Darn that eight h grade a r ith-metic 30. W als h, Charles,-"Sar, Charl ey, we miss your joke s the s i xt h period; wish yo u' d join u s agai n." 3 'Wirt'Z, Christian ,-"How man y posters do rou want?" THE TROP I C The da rk o( night is turn ed to lig ht o( day. The earth h as taken o n a silver s heen, F o r Luna (ai r ha s t ouc hed it wit h h er beam. Ea c h object, l arge or small, o r dmb or gm)' I s all tran s figured b y t h e r adiant ray. T h e s h adows ani), emphasize the glea m Upon the p:llm l eaves grasses. s hrubs. 'Tw ould see m A s if the w orld could n e'e r again be gray. A c ross t h e sea i s cast a path o( l ight, Dimini s h ing in hrightness till it break s I n spo t s which s park l e in t h e rippl es, bri g h t A s pho s phoresc e nce-silvery R akes, So large. so gr and. t h e moon-so whit e so b right That e'en th e star s ( o r s hame hav e dim m ed t h eir l ight. A TRI B UTE. rnSI Euphrtll, '2J' ffere's t o the class o ( ''24; Thcy w ill sustain r ep utati o n s o( yore: Thcy will sponso r the sch oo l keep her nam e (:lir and brig h t, And achieve (or themselves n:lm cs with h o n o r bedight; W i th a (ond (arewell to their Alm a 1\'I:Iter, They will pass to the world, e: l c h o n e a firs t -rater,

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THE CA R I BIl I-:.'\:-\. 9 .A.nother year has com e and gone, adding a group o f alumni to those whom Cristobal H igh Sc h oo l ha s sent out and of whom s h e feels so proud. Each ycar incre ases our number and the activities of our m embers. \\'e know that in rh e n caf future the names o f some of our IllOSt fam o u s men and women will be on QlIf own roster. H ere is to the old Ilere is to the new Ilere is to the future 1\la) t we all be true 1 9 1 8 "IRG INI \. Congratulations and best wi s hes for the future and th e class o f '23, and all th e s u ccess in the world for "our" annu al. :\5 ever, Ll."LA Put-L1G DENVER, COLORADO. I l eave in te n days for T e n Sleep, \\"raming, 011 a piece of work t hat will keep me out there until next winte r. You know I am still a tramp civi l engineer. I kno w that ha rd work will make a better annual than good wis h es j still I am off e rin g m)' b es t. B e liev e m e t here i s a warm spot in m)' heart for olJ Cristobal H i g h Sc h ool. Sincere l y, Bl:RKE \\'ELCH. ;.JORTH CAROLINA. 1 am teachin g t h e sixth grade in t h e H ende r so n ville City Sch ool, and I lik e my work verr much. TH E CARIBIJEAN o f course has my very best wishes, as it a lways does. Give regards to t h e hi g h sc hool. I t will be a long time, if ever, before L forget the palms and waves on C o lon Beach. \\'ith best wishes for the class of '23. Faithfully, i\lARY E. \ERNER. To ZIIII, with tl1O' Forti i\linot Cotron is residing in B rook l yn York, and is working in the main office of the \\'estern L l nion Telegraph Company in :'\ew York Cit). Susie Ilarrison is visiting in Delaware now and doc.:s nOl expect to return to the Canal Zone. Catherine Teese \\'aid is taking a course In journalism at CollHnbia L Tniversit),. She is a junior this year. 1 9 1 9. Kenneth Edwards i s now residing o n his father's farm in \\'ellsboro, P enllsyhania. Doroth y Anna \\'ier i\lontanye is now living in Pittston, P e nnsyl vania. James Gerard Raymond i s now in Cristobal. H e i s p roperty clerk at the Cristobal Commissary. BOSTON, i\1 .\sSACHl'SETTS I am finishing m)' course at Simmons College in J un e and I expect to have a position in \\'as h ington, D C" next year. The very best wishes to the c la ss of '23 and to the '2J C-\RIBBE \N. I know from all promises that the annual i s to be the best ever, Sincerely, ALICE 1 920. Los ANGEI.ES, C \LJ fORNl.\. At present I am taking a business courSe at \ Vordbury Bu siness C ollege, one o f the best in the City, I enjoy work very much and I expect to graduate in October, when a good position will he waiting for me. \\,ith best wishes for t h e class of '23, and the hest of lu ck for Cristobal H ig h School, I remain ETH,-\ B E\'ISGTON, BERKELEY, C.\LlrORXI-\. I wis h that more of the Canal Zone students would come up h ere to college; I know that ther cou ldn't make a better choice. I ha\'c one more

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00 THE CARIBBEAN. 'ear anli would like to haze some Canal Zone t"reshmen before I leave. I am working in the real eS[are business with m)' father a n d so I a m real busy with that and my sc hool work. One has to study hard here to get anywhere a n d we ha\'c few idle moments, but I have never enjoyed life any more than I do right n ow, in California. Best wis hes to the student body and sliccess to THE CARIBBEAN. Sincerely, HARLAN 'V. H O Ll\lWOOD. BERKELEY, C .. \LlrORNI A I am at rhe University ofCaiif o rllia the greatest in the country-not only in athle ti cs eidl cr. J do hope to welcome at least o n e Cristobal H ig h Sc hool student thi s year. A s ever, ALSON SEARS. Ali ce Stilson is living in Santurce Park wit h h e r parents. L illian Cotton Van \\'agllcr i s n ow resiuing in Brooklyn, New Y o rk. Kathryn Burgoon Stewart i s a cashier in t h e Cristobal Clubhouse and r es ides in Cristobal. W e hope that so m e day little Virginia will go to Cristobal H igh Sc hool. J B. Field s, J r., i s studying mechanic al e n gi neering in the University o f T exas. CRI STOBAL, CANAL ZONE. DEAR CRISTOIlAL HIGH:-I f t h e copy you have sent in to our press so far is an ind i cation o f the general st), le o f the fini s h ed book, it i s going to b e almost as good as t h e J 9'20 annual. Congratulations and b es t wis h es to t h e cla ss of ''23. A s ever, AL DOYLE. COUDERSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA. Aren't we getting c la ssy, u s i ng letter-head stationt:ry, embossed at that? \\'ho e v o l ved that hright idt::a? I'm sure you will put o u t th e best C.-\RIBBEAN yet. l'ou know that was the o rigina l aspiration (to make eac h issue better t h a n the preceding) and I believe I can sa f e l), say that it has been done so far. You know you people just don't dart: to break the chain. I'm getting to be a regular R e uben T. H ayseed out h e re in th e backwoods of t h e mos t uncivil ized, des"late, and f"rsaken bit of wildern ess in t h e L:nit ed States. Yet Though scaner ed we be ( 0 (he f our winds of H ea ven, D ivided perhaps by the g r eat seas seven, Still we'll be bound by one g reat lie-W e are f ellow :dumni of Cristoba l High. A s ever, KENNETH GREENE. Lindal e D avies i s res iding in B os t o n Mass ac husetts. 1 92!. Alice Hunter i s taking a secretarial course at l\l ount Saint Vin cent on t h e Hudson. She expects to b e with u s this vacation Frank Raymond, Jr., i s taking a m edica l course at C olumbia Unive r sity "College i s g r eat and I t hin k that Cris t o bal H i g h Schoo l i s th e p l a ce to prepare o n e for it, For look h ow it h as urged m e to take as l o n g a course as I am taking, I sure l y Illust have brought a love f o r ed u c ati o n fr o m Cristobal H i g h S c h oo l to take lip m o r e than a f our yea r course. I am doing nicely but it i s a question of h o w l o n g I can k ee p it up. S e nd up some Cristobal H ig h Sc h oo l spirit. Kirby F e r g u so n i s n o w visiting in t h e States, s h e expects to s p e n d Septembe r with h e r brother Harr y as that i s th e time th e Naval Cade t s h av e t heir l e a ve. S h e will b e returning after the Army and Navy game in Octo b e r o r Novembe r. FORT RANDOLPH, CANAL ZONE. J t doesn t see m that] h a ve b ee n out o f sc h oo l nearly tw o years, an d there are times w h e n I w i s h I were ba ck again w ith myoi d sc hool mates I hope that this year's annual will b e mu c h bigger and m o r e s u ccessful than la s t year's and J want to say t ha t I certainly do enjoy r e adin g t h e stori es t hat t h e stu dents write f o r the ir annual. I wis h you all the b es t lu c k in the world for t h is year's annu al. Sin cere l y, E LEANOR Z I M MERMANN. Charles H enter is a ra d i o operato r in the avia tion se r vice, stationed at San Di ego, Califo rni a. Carl Du ey i s worki ng o n a farm in P e nn sy l vania and expec t s to r e-ente r P e n n State College thi s ye ar, 1 922. George ] Cartwrigh t i s takin g an electrical engin ee ring course at t h e U ni versi t y o f P e nnsyl v ani a ) lik e m y work ve r y mu c h and al so th e sc hool. The r e see m s to be a C"istobal H igh S c hool spirit prevalent. M y best wis h es to th e Faculty;

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THE CAR IBB EAN, c ongratulatio n s t o t h e S e ni o r s and m y syJTIP:nhies f o r t h e Frosh. B es t wis h es ( o r the s u ccess of TH E CAR IBBEAN and H GruITIP Y incerely, G E ORGE J. CART WRIGHT. G A TUN, CANAL ZONE. DEA R CRI STOBA L H I G H S C H OOL:-I am studying hard preparato r y to e ntcring the Cincinnati C o nser v ator y o f Best wis h es f o r THE C A R II1BEAN and the c l ass o f ''13 'fOWNSEND. AUSTI N ) TEXAS. Greetings to Cris t o bal H i g h S c h oo l from T ex a s r e xa s Univer s ity i s a grand sc h oo l bur t h ey s lif e l y kno w h o w to make o n e w o rk. I am taking a vc r y inte r esting course and am w o rking for it degree in h o me eco n omics b es t wis h es t o eve r yo n e, an d I sincere l y h o p e that y o u will have a good C ARlIl llEAN thi s ye ar. GLENN FIEI.DS. PRO ViDENCE, RHODE I S tAND At pn;sent I am w orking hard t r y in g to fin d so m e way to s p e n d my time, bu t if they will tet m e in, ] intend t o enter the R hode I sland N ormal S c h ool in the fall to take up kinde r garte n training I didn't think I could mi ss the Canal Z o n e a s I have ] t g e t s yo u e v ery time Best wi$ h es ( o r the fin es t C ARIIlIlEAN ever, and al so f o r the c la ss o ( ''23 A s e v e r I'VIILDRED ST AFFORD L o s ANGELES, C ALIFORN I A -' am now taking a p os t -graduate course at the L os Angel es P o l y t ec hni c H i g h Sc h oo l and am doing w ell in all o f l11y subjec t s I expec t to e nter P omona C ollege i n S epte m b e r ( allo win g and take a me c hani cal e n g in ee rin g Afte r o n e year the r e I want to trans f e r to Stanford Uni ve r s ity t o pursue Iny stud i es furthe r. -' wis h that I coul d s p e n d a ( e w m o r e d a ys o ( happiness at dear o l d Cristobal H i g h S c h oo l wit h the bunc h ] do n o t lik e the States ve r y w ell, alth o Califo rni a mus t b e ideal a s com pared to the e a s t e rn states. H e r e s t o the s u ccess o f T H E C ARIH UEAN, 19'23 and e v e r afte r. "Day b y day in ever y way," TH E C ARIIH1EAN' S g etting bigg e r and b e tter. As ever, B. : M AGNUSO N \\'ASHINGTON, DISTRICT or COJ.UMBIA. I fin d \\' a s h i ngtoll delightful bt:tween t h e times I am wishin g I were back in Panarna. A.t present I am studyin g in h ig h sc hool to keep (rom forgetting all t ha t I lear ned at Cristobal H ig h Sch oo l until n ex t fall. The n I expect to commence in kinde rgarte n t r aining I want to tell you t hat I enjoyed bt:ing a studt!IH and a m proud to b e a n alumnus of Cristobal H igh Sch ool. Best wish es to the sc h oo l THE C t )RIIJBEAN, and the c l ass of '2J. S i nce r e l y, MARJO R I E BALL ''22. NEW YORK, NEW YORK. The b es t cl ass r oo m I have is t h e swi rnming p oo l a n d m y best i nstructor i s t h e swimming co a ch. The swimming p oo l and t h e gymn asiums o r C o lumb i a are hard to b e beaten Sch oo l is fine and what I lik e b es t i!) tha t C olumbia h as as good sc h oo l s pi rit a s Cris t o b a l H i g h h as t h e lig hting spirit. Y o u r fri e n d p U L C. DOYLE, FORT R,\NDOLPH, CANAl. ZONE. I wis h Cris t o bal H ig h S c hool s u ccess in the i r w o rk o n the ir annual. At present, a s you all kn o w, I am tak ing solid geo m etry and Spanish. Next year I expect to e n t e r S yrac u se Unive r sity to study f o restr y r e r y truly yours, J O R DAN I cia Brown has b ee n w orking in the American F o r e i g n Banking C orpo r atio n, but i s n o w in the States o n v a cat i o n. \\'esley H Town se n d i s in a b ranch sc h oo l o ( Syr a c u se U n i versity in the n o r t h e rn part o r N e w Y ork.

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THE

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THE CAR IBBEA:-<. 23 ry Louiu 'Z2. THE DU:-
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THE C\RIBBE. '\:,{. \Ye had gone only a s hort distance wh en Chest er broke out, Don't f ellows notice that smell' It's awful." I had noticed it," I answered, "but I thought that I was just imagining it. " I smell it, too," said \Yes. 'It's gettin g stronger all rhe time." 'Ye passed on silently f o r a while. The melancholy drip, drip, drip, of the limewater fro m the roof made me so nervou s that in my overwrought imagination, th e sound o f every drop was magnified a thousandfold. The n too, the odor was becoming unbearable. " m goi ng to settle this rig h t now," I told t h e other fellows as 1 pulled out handkerchief, soaked it in one o f t h e lim ewater puddles, and tied it around head, covering my n ose '" f rot! fellows are wise, rou'li do the same thing n o w before w e go any farther," I cOl1tinued. They bo th silen tl y f ollo w ed suit and w e went all. ".I believe I can account for t h is s m ell," I managed to mumble thro u g h my hand k erchier. The i r eves a s ked t h e q uesti o n whi c h th eir handkerchie f s so I went on, Y o u have probably no ticed that this floor gradu ally s l o p es upward. \\'ell, I believe that t h e o utside air ke e p s t h is foul air pressed up in h ere, and s in ce th e r e i s nothin g to create a draft, this i s in all probability, th e same air that wa s in h e r e wh e n th e b od i es o f t h e prisoners were first put h e r e." th eo r y sounded so rea so nabl e t hat the)' d i d not S t O P to argue. Just t h en \Y es w h o was in th e lead, gave a sharp cry and ran forward, turning h is Aas h light o n the wall. The r e wa s a l o n g lin e of rusty c h ains and co llar s hanging fro m th e wall, and still farther on we found som e gru eso m e s keletollsone with the co llar s till around th e g hastly vertebrae, and anoth e r, an uncann y h eap or crush ed bones as if or some victim o f w h eel, rack, o r some other devilis h kind of torture. "Oh boy I'd like to ge t a c hance at t h e fellows that would do a thing like that," mutte r ed \\'es, through clenc h ed teeth "\\'h)" could n t they kill them like men instead o f devils?" JUSt a short distance a head we came to a b lank wall hlocking the passage. Il'as thi s t h e end of the dungC(JIl? I t evidently was, but if so, where was the connection with the fort? "Boys, I guess means the end of it, unlt:ss wc can get t hrough this wall." \Y es didn't n eed t o tell u s though, f or w e s aw that a s quickl y as h e did. "\\'hat i s to Stop LIS fro m d igging at it a w hile?" s u ggested C hester. "\\'e have pi c k s and s hovels and the rest of th e day h e fore us \Yhat do YOLI say we take a crack at it?" \\'ithout e en s topping to answer I hurried ba c k to the can oe an d go t two picks and a s hovel. \ Yith \Y es and Chester lIsi n g th e picks and m e the s h ovel, we soon had most o f th e wall dowll. "\Ye aren't much hetter oAn ow, than w e were at first," I remarked, a s we came to a h e av), i ron door which eA--ectually shut oR-th e passage. "Thank goodness, it i s r usty," I said as I started to batter oft" the hin ges with a pi ck \\'orkin g together, we at last got th e u oo r down a n d f ound oursel ves all t h e thresh o l d o f a room. The walls were made of e norm o u s bloc k s o f sa n dstone, and the floor, whic h wa s comparativel y d r y, was CO:l1posed o f hu ge Aags t o n es laiLl in a sort of rough pattern. \Yhat most attrac ted our attention was the skeleton of a man in a co r se l e t and h e lmet o f steel whi c h was seate d all th e floor, leaning agai nst t h e wall. The h e l m et, whic h ha d once been burnished and shining, was se t at a jaunty angl e ove r the grinnin g jaws and g laring, empty e),e soc kets of th e s kull. The s t ee l coat hu ng l oosel), o n the wa s t ed fram e and th e s w o r d, still bu ck l ed aroun d t h e b on)' wai s t la y o n th e Aoor by its side The r emains of t h e silk s and ve l ve t s whic h n o doubt had c loth e d him Jay in mouldering h eaps all t h e Aoor. B es i de this gri s l y s i g h t stood an ir o n b o un d c hest with worm -eate n sides ready to crumbl e at th e lightes t tou ch_ "Say, isn't thi s ;:1 c h ee rful p la ce!" whi spered Cht:t. Let's do so m ething t o shake of F th e g l oo m. Suppose we open t h e chest and th e n ex plor e the room th o r o u ghly." "Suits me, I replied "\\\:'11 have t o examin e t h e ske leton too I t l ooks full of poss ibilities." Y o u exam in e th e o l d b o n es if yo u want to, Spark. Y ou're welcome to m)' share, said \V es generou sly "The c hest look s best to m e up p ose you g i ve it a few licks, C het." \\' hat might not t h e c hest contain? G o ld jcwds, va luabl e documents? Stories o f t h e fabu lOllS wealth of t h e :,\Tcw \\'or l d rose i n our mindssto:ics of the gold o f th e I n cas and t h e tre a sures wrested from t h e I ntiia n s b y Cortez ) a n d oth e r s. o f t h e treaSure of I .ore n zo ha d ever hecn found! :-':0 wonder our h o p es rail high. \V e

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THE CARIBBEAN. w e r e doom e d to di s a p p ointment tho u gh. The ch es t contained coin s right e n o u g h, but they w e r e practic all y all coppe r o r brass \\'e e a c h f ound a g o l d o n e a s a sou venir and 1 pi c k e d up several diffe r ent o n es o f coppe r and brass f o r m y collecti o n, but th e bulk o f th e m w e l e f t a s w e ha d foun d them. 1 wa s b ette r r e war ded in m y t:xamina tiol1 o f th e s kel e t o n h o wever. J lis t a s I wa s tur nin g a way, I caught the bri ght g l ea m o f som ething o n o n e o f the bo n y finger s 1 il1\' cs ti gated and f ound i t to b e a lar ge s hin)' rin g with a be:l.lItiful blood ston e se t, o n whi c h w e r e canTed t h e initia l s J N. H e l e ft his c allin g card," I c alled to t h e oth e r b oys "but h e only l e ft his init ial s inste a d o f his full name. Look around f o r somethin g that might i dentify him. I had t o r e p eat t o the m several tim es jus t h o w I had f o un d t ht: rin g ; the n w e started to examine the chambe r in earnest. Look h e r e boys," called \\'es, "what s thi s scratc hed o n the wall ? Look s a s if it mi ght b e the la s t will and testament o f ou r fri e n d ] N .'\ \\'es kne w m o r e Spanis h than eithe r o f u s ; so w e as ked him t o r c a d t h e in scriptio n and h e halt in g l y translate d the f ollo win g : "These are the la s t w ords o f D o n Juan Nunez d e AIcOl-la, o n ce commandant o f r ort San L o r e nzo. Slowly J am dyin g o f starvatio n b ecause o f that pig, Sir H enry j V l organ. True I ha ve m )' s w ord at hand but n o o n e s hall say that I D o n Juan Nune z de Alc o rza, wa s n o t man e n o ugh t o m ee t the death t o whi c h h e wa s sente n ce d. L ik e the Englis h pirate that h e i s h e c r ept upo n u s o n the ni ght o f a f e a s t wh e n all o f m y m e n w e r e drinking Thos e m e n wh o w e r e n o t butc h e red in the ir drunk e n stupo r, escape d fro m the f o r t o nl y to d i e o f starvatio n o r f e v e r in the swampy jung l e They d eserted, the dogs! L eaving m e to fight the pira t e h o rde s ingl e-handed-m e the ir commander s p e c iall y commiss i o n ed b y H e r H ighn ess the Quee n o f Spain! "Oh! that I might f ee l that Engli s h throat b etwee n these fing e r s f o r but a f e w prec i o u s m o m e ntS b e f o r e I d i e T h e n indeed mi ght J d i e ha p p y "Pa r Dios f o r a m o r s el o f f ood! 1 \1 )' brain r ee l s m y e y es g r o w d im H a sta luego. A d i os "Peopl e always tho u ght that the commandant was the o n e who d eserte d said \ \ Ies, "but we'll have a d iff e r ent s t o r y t o t ell when w e g e t bac k Our fri e n d D o n Juan had a h a r d tim e o f it, di d n t h e ?" H n y wh e r e do yo u suppose thi s runnel l e ads t o? I a s ked a s I p ointed t o a l o w archway in the w a ll. V e r y lik e l y that l eads up t o the f ort," s p o k e up Che t. L et's see." The passage was o n l y about twenty feet in l e n gth. The n w e came t o the botto m o f a shaft Cllt straight up thro ugh the hill. On o n e s id e ir o n brac kets w e r e set in t h e wall t o f orm a r o u g h ladder. This the n, wa s the only m eans o f r e a c h ing t h e dungeon f ro m the f o r t. \\'e tri e d to climb up; but the ir o n w as so bad l), ru s t e d that t h e rungs b ro k e oft wh e n a n y w e i g h t wa s pu t o n the m "The wa), w e came see m s to b e about the only wa y o f g etting out," I said. "Say fdlo w s," I con t inued, a s a tho u ght struc k m e w e sure l y ha ven't muc h time l e ft t o fool around b e f o r e the tide i s in. Mr. Duey t o ld m e that the tid e i s hig h a t r r .30." 1 l oo ked a t m)" wa tc h and the n s h o w e d it to the m. I twas r r .'25 "That's all right, said ehe t. \ V e have five minutes t o r e a c h the o p e nin g." "'Yes but Spark s ai d that the t ide w o uld b e high at r 1.30. Y o u kno w h o w narrow t h e ope n ing i s. i\l os t lik e l y the o p ening i s unde r wate r l o n g b e f o r e the t ide i s hi gh," \
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26 THE CARIBBEAN. and then followed him. As the green water closed O\'er my head,l felt an almost irresistible inclina tion to try to climb the ladder again or to do anyrhingbut this. I fought itdowll, though, anclswam through the ope ning. Just as 1 was coming up, 1 struck my head an awful blow on a projecting rock. Luckily for me, Chet was watching and pulled me out. Chet had come through all right but] had a thumping headach e as we waited for \res to appear. At last h e came lip smi ling. \Y ell, we're all safe," he spluttered. But he was too sure. Just as we were about to pull him out onto the r oc k, a long, black, vicious tentacle reached out from the rocks a n d grasped him by the ankle. L oo k Ollt, \\'es," I shouted. "Good H eavens! It's an octopus." The slimy creature wrapped its eight s naky arms around \\'es and slowly pulled him down. H e managed to get his pocket-knife out and then the struggle started in ea rnest. A tentacle covered with suckers which blister t h e skin wherever they touch, pinned one of lesley's arms to h is s ide l eavi ng only one hand to battle against the seve n other arms of the devi l fish. \V es made a thrust at the gleaming eye but a writhing arm prevented the attempt and nearly wrenched the knife from his hand. \Ves recovered quickl y and with a desperate s la s h severed one of the arms, whic h sa nk wri[hing in [ h e bloody wa[er. The infuria[ed c reature was s lowly creeping u p to \ Ves's [hroat when, with a lucky jab, h e reached its eye. A tremor passed through the bod)' of t h e awfu l [hing, and, as \V es stabbed it again a nd again, its hold s l owl), s lackened. At last, wit h a final quiver, it los[ its grip e lHir e l y and sank, an inert mass, Quickly we hauled \Ves out, but no[ any too soon, for already other arms were reach ing out from the r oc k s. \Ve s huddered as we [hought o f wha[ we had so narrowly escaped, and set abou[ to see tha[ \\'es was all righ[. H e was terribly blistered about the arms and l egs, bu[ pro[ested that he felt nne, The n ex t questi o n was: how to ge[ off the rocks. Swi rllming was out of the question after what we had see n; so the onl y thing left was the cliff at our backs. D o yo u fellows feel eq ual to the climb?" a s k e d Chet as we were deb:uing about it. u l see m to be t h e only uninjured o n e of the bunch, so T know t hat if YOli can make it, I can." Since t hat was the on l y t hin g to be done, w e staned up with [he sco r c h ing sun b eating down o n our h eads., clinging to bu s h es, v i nes, rocks, or anythin g that offered a footh o ld. "The on l y thing t hat worries m e i s th e lo ss o f \,"esley's canoe," 1 grUlHed as we toi l ed upward. "That doesn't worry me as muc h as the lo ss o f my lunch," \Ves groaned c h ee rfull y Often we came to patches o f bare r oc k where we had to cut hand and foot h o ld s in th e soft sa nd stone with our knives B e f ore we had gon e halfway, our hands wer e bleedi ng and t o rn but we had to keep o n b efo r e ex haustion s h o ul d overcome us. Once I thought that C hester's luck had deserted him H e was l ooki n g down t o see h o w far we had climbed, wh e n his f oo t s lipp ed a n d threw his entir e weight on a littl e bu s h which h e was h o l d in g with his hands. The b u s h s lipped s i c keningl y, gave a littl e, an d t h e n h e ld. C hester remarked with a white face that h e had b etter l oo k up to see h ow muc h farth e r we had t o go instead o f l oo kin g down to see h ow muc h w e had don e At last we reached t h e top and crept ex hausted into the restful s hade o f a mango tree to rest. \Vell, I guess we'll h ave to wa lk home; so t h e soone r we start, th e sooner we'll get there," s aid W es l og ically I believe that we d i d an awfully foo l is h thing," I sa id as we nled alo n g th e trail. Di d yo u noti ce t hat t h e floor o f t hat room was Ilot wet? I b elieve t hat the i ron door was water-tigh t and w e could h ave put it back up again, nlled the cracks with rocks, and stayed t here until l ow tide." "Say, I believe you are rig ht," said \ V es. I d idn't think of that. " W ell, f o r t h e love of Mike, don't tell an)' bod)' else," p leaded C het. "They never wou l d get through kid d in g us." That i s why we have n ever to l d th e story before.

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THE !;--E \\,HILE STROLLING DO\\,N B OLlI' A R STREE T Doro/h)' Abmdrolh '25. A rainy afternoon. Shee t s o f tropic rain p ouring from a gray, c h eerlessl oo king s k y The an g r y ru s h of Illuddy wate r s d own ditc hes bloc ked b y naked, bro wn pi ckaninnies. Shrill cries o f e njoym ent a s th e y s lip and splas h. A n egro prize-fighter in a bla c k c h ec k e r e d s ui t And spats-onion c o l o r e d spats Splas h es o f brown mud give th e m a w e ird futuristic touch. A great blo b of co l o r in the distance Turns out to b e a group of darkies in a co nfu sing array o f reds, blu es and gree n s \\' airing f o r th e rain t o stop, 1 gu ess \ ivid Chinese parasol s, pink and purple, with night-maris h figures winging the ir way across t h e wax e d s urfa ce G oody' Sun's out. Gaudy b l u e-whee l e d co a c h es s how th e ms e lve s Blue s k y p ee p s thru the somber gray clouds A huge s loven l y n egress s louches along with an imm e n se s h o w c a s e o n h e r h ead. Can't s e e what's in it-but fro m the s m ell ] guess it's an a ssortment of rotting fruit. A statel y i\iartinique woman in gre en plaid ging h am Na' l vely pinn e d up to s h o w th e valumin ou s sweep o f embro ider e d p e tti coat b e n eath. On h er head a r e d -spotted y ello w bandana turban. P o o r c o l o r s ch e m e But pi cturesque A C hinese laundrymans lant-eyed, l e m o n -c h ee ked,-sa d l y out of place in conventio nal Ameri can clo th es Casting furtiv e glances at th e c r owd a s h e s link s along wit h a huge bag of laundry o n his ba c k. \Vonde r why h e d o e sn't f ollo w th e n egro's c u s tom. Tote it o n his h e ad. Snif!"' Snifr' Smell o f frying fis h. Cod-fis h at thar. Pu ng ent odor o f garli c mingl ed with th e sic kening s m ell of s p oile d native frui t U g h :\ Barbadian woman i s preparing suppe r o v e r a c harcoal bra Z I er. Sh e s humming, "i\larg i e." Now a s eries of ind e finabl e od o r s a s C o l o n pre pares t h e e v e ning m e al. Earrings And m o r e earrings L o ng o n es an d short on es I lIs ed to think n egro babies w e r e b o rn with earrings i\laybe the y are F A silly s impl el oo kin g Barbad ian starin g at a fat En g l i h touri s t in tw ee d kni c k e rb oc k ers. An d g ree n plaid stockin gs K ee p walkin g old man, you're o nly e i ght mil es fro m the Gatun g olf l i nk s H i s wif e a t all angular w oman s wath ed in h o t l oo kin g g ree n v eils strives t o k ee p up with his pace I h o p e he's n o t r ed u cing Sh e'll b e o u t o f luc k. Two ra gge d so n s o f Jamaic a in a h o t argume nt. The ir v o i ces l o ud and strident above th e n o i ses o f th e stree t. \Vo nd e r who's getting th e b es t o f it. a s w ell b e San skrit o r an)' o th e r f o re ign lan guage f o r all I can under stand S ound of jazz. N earing th e liv e ly part of tOWIl. Cabare t s Cantinas Thr ee cabare t s inge rs-b l o nd, fat, painted b obbe d -haire d. 1 n co n spic u o u s clothes Cl ose competitio n, I s u s p ec t, t o see who c an attrac t t h e mos t atte nti o n. Sig n s o f fres h paint. A t oo thl ess skinny l otte r y ti c k e t v e nd e r in a fa de d drab wrappe r stre t c h es f orth a b o n y hand, h o ldin g a se v e n. A s ur e hunc h. T o-d a y s Fri d a y th e thirteenth, too luckv da),. I 'll buy-and if I win -c1o thesg o r geo u s gowns fro m Paquin's in P ari s Hats fro m i\ladel eine e t i\lade l eine The n trave l th e Alp s Alg i e r s, V enice city o f r omance f\r a y b e I 'II a marble palazzo o n the Canal Grande ha ve a magnifi cent go ndola with a picturesq u e r ed-s a s h ed go n dolie r ins t ead o f a car an d liverie d chauffe ur. Oh! A Chil ean sailo r bumps s p a nk into m e T oo mu c h o f th e "Atlantic 's" h ospital it y, I stls p ec t. The fir s t s weet c him es o f eve nin g "Co m e to church! C o m e to church!" T o "obey that im pul se, I g u ess I 'll go T H E 1\i\TI\' E Fmllcu Gra)', '25. t h ink th e b es t tim e t o see the nati\'e marke t i s at about 6 .30 in the m o rnin g wh e n the stalls and tabl es are pil e d hig h with fres h C tlt fruits an d ve getabl es an d the s till dripping b eeves a r e fir s t hung upo n th e ir h oo ks. On the right o f th e B olivar Stree t entrance i s a s tall kept by a wrinkl ed o l d Chinaman w h ose

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THE CARIBBEAN. trembling claw-like hands deal out to each customer his exact portion of potatoes, dried beans, or queer dried fruits that only the yellow men bur on the left are the long stolle tabl es abo\"c which the fresh-killed carcasses of beeves, hogs, sheep, and an occasional coneja o r dee r are hung. To me this is the only unsavory part o f the market because I see, as I go by, di r t)', fleabitten, mangr dogs crouching under the table, watching hungrily f or a scrap of meat or bit of bone. Uoau allow lide ill l'iln:l.m3 City. T o these. come purchscu for the coeoanut3.piuealmICJ,ctc ..... bichthc)'cont.:lin. Beyond t h e meat stalls are t h e long tables bearing their burden of fresh cau ght fish, and, if olle can stand the odor, these tabl es are not uninteresting. The table from w hi c h 1 usually bu)' is ruled over by a husky negro woman w h o weighs her gleaming wares in a rusty scale pan and fling s a continual stream of banter at the passing throngs. On toward t h e center of t h e market, beyond t h e ancient Chinaman, sits an o l d i\ lartiniquc woman selling eggs. S h e never, so far as I have found out, speaks an unnecessa ry word. A.bove her tabl e there is a sign, "Eggs, 60 ce n ts pe r doz." and i f one should unwittingly ask the price o f her wares she mere l y poi n ts to the pri n ted words, and waits, and waits, with an air of t h e g reatest unconcern, (or you to buy or leave. Taking up the greater part of the market are the vegetable stalls, some presided over by negroes, and some b)' the Chinese. The long wooden tablts are piled high with their golden )'e llow melons, thin bunches of native beans, tied with bits of dried grass, their crisp native lettllcC which is so much sweeter than the head lettuce fr o m t h e States, the gnarled brown yams, the pri c k I y green c ha-cha, tiny sweet native tomatoes l ong b lack or yello\\ plantains, bunches of tiny lu scio u s apple bananas, big green or purple "alligato r pears," round red oranges, Costa Rican oranges t ha t are nearly all j ui ce big g reen papaya, coco a nuts, mangoes, mamey apples, <;lnd r ound trays of pungent ginger root. The Chinese s tall s are perhaps the most inte restin g All the ir vegetables are tied in neat little bunches o r piled in ncat little piles. These stalls al so have many roots and bulbs that are p eculiar to the m. The real characteristic o f these s tall s is, however, the ir cl e anliness. All the stalls in the market are clean, as a matter o f fact, but t h ese see m particularly spotl ess a n d neat. There is one o l d Chinese woman w h o always wears the native costume, consisting o f l oose trousers and a long jacket. S h e is a lways extremely polite t hough never voluble. Another woman, a n egress, is always adorned w i t h a pair o f large go l d hoop earrings and a long necklace o f coral w hi c h i s wound many times about her fat neck. Eac h morning s h e regale s m e with stories of h e r childre n and, tho u g h I ha ve n o t bee n able to find out the ex a c t s i ze o f her family, j udging fro m the stori es s h e tells, it must be a large one. She told m e the other day that her first hu sband had been stru c k by an automobil e and crippled; so s h e made h e r secon d hu s band support h im. J suppose that i s o n e way o f overcoming a difficu lty. At a stall a little distan ce from m y volubl e friend there sits an o l d white-headed ncgro who can out-swear I cver heard. A young ncgress h e lp s him sell hi s wares, and the first tim e I passed by and hear d h im givin g h e r directio ns it took my breath away. The funny part i s that h e i s not ugl y or malignant in hi s profanity bllt speaks in a m os t pleasant ton e As I have never had t h e courage to buy anythin g from hirn I don't know wheth e r h e swear s at hi s c u s t o m e rs or not, but hi s face and voi ce are so mild, one r cally could not resent it if h e d i d I n a little group, s urrounded by t h e vegetable stalls a r e tables and racks bea-ing goods, la ces, buttons, pins, shoe stockings of many lurid hues, and other miscellaneous dry goods drticles F o r a touch o f local "color" o n e need l ook no farther than thest' few s talls. There i s one thing about thi s market that always surprises n ew com e rs, and t hat i s i ts

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T H E CAR I BBEAN. cle anlin ess The wood e n v egctable tables a re scrubbed until rh e)' arc white The s t o n e tabks b earing the m eat and fis h are s p o tl ess an d lhere i sn't a flr or a bug to b e see n. I think o n e lIsllally a s so ciates dirt and fil th with a native rnarkt: t in a tropic t a wil, but thi s o n e i s an excepti o n T H E I CE B E R G SNOWBALl. S H O P II E .lIa),. '2J. I l ey, Joe! Gilllll1C a c oupl e s nowball s." The ru s h o rd e r i s g iven by o n e o f J oe s r egular c u stome r s wh o i s m os t lik e ly a high sc hool s tu dent who ha s jus t sco rnfull y refu se d so m e deli c acy o n h i s m o th e r' s l un c h tabl e J o e i s the so l e pro prietor, chie f mix e r, and only employee o f th e Ic eberg Sn o wball C ompany, whi c h i s situated in a part o f a s mall, dirt)' room o n H o livar Stree t I s a y part o f a rOOln, b ec au se the wh o l e i s a threein-on e affair. B es id es .Joe's manufactory th e r e i s a fruit and v ege tabl e co unter and a supposed-to-b e bake r y counte r. N o doubt J o e 's eating, s l eeping, and l iving q uarte r s are in t h e same room b ehind th e sc r ee n whic h can b e see n JUS t to th e r ear o f th e r e tail sec ti o n s AnJ I say dirty, b ecause 1 am sun:: that n o part o f th e r oo m ha s ever f elt th e charms o f a littl e soa p an d wate r. J o e, wh o ha s b ee n sitting in his chair 011 th e s id e walk in frollt o f his p l a ce o f bu s in ess la zily absorb ing all t h e rays o f the s unli ght that came his wa y now a ssumes an air o f bu s in ess and quickly g e t s behind the counte r, whi c h i s n othing m o r e than a high b o x o v e r whi c h i s nail e d an o l d pi ec e o f s h ee t i ro n that h e ha s pi c k ed up som e wh e r e H e o p e n s the doo r o f a ve r y age d i ceb o x that sits in the c o rn e r, and takes out a rathe r large pi ece o f i ce H e th e n takes his i ce shave r and se t s to w o rk shaving so m e i ce off' th e chunk. Afte r h e ha s the right amount, h e o p e n s th e to p o f th e s ha ve r and l e t s th e s ha ve d i ce fall into an o l d tin cup, whi c h b ears a s man)' se r v i ce marks a s does th e i cebox. I n a ver y way h e finge r s th e b ottles of fla vo rin g so m e o f whi c h are s mall an d so m e large, som e o f whi c h are o ld vin egar b ottles and som e anci ent whi s k e y bottles, w hile h e a s k s th e boy what fla vor h e d es ir es The c u s tom e r t ells h im and al so reminds J oe to be sure to giv e him h i s money's worth. J o e th e n takes the right b ottle from th e s h e l f and p ours in th e prescribe d amount of Aavor. F rom the b o x of drinking cups on the ------shelf, b es id e whi c h i s a b ottle o f Scott's Emuls i o n ami an o l d alarm cloc k, J oe takes a drinking cup and all ows th e cake o f fla vo r e d shaved i ce to fall in ro it. A s soon a s h e h as r e p eate d the o p eratio n J oe h a n ds th e boy b oth s n o wball s f o r whi c h th e c u stom e r la ys o n e nic k e l o n th e co unter. J oe wa tc h es the boy a s h e tlJrn s th e corne r up t h e str ee t a n d n o ti ces that h e ha s already fini s h e d one and i s rapid l y indulg in g in th e o th e r. .I\LONG S H ORE. The afte rn oo n s un b eams ba l e full y ; it i s in t ) I.:rabl )' h o t. The wate r l a zily laps laps a parch e d s h o r e The miniature harbo r i s rull o f ti re d l oo kin g l11uc h b edrag gl ed s ail b oats with the ir s ai l s furl ed lik e t h e win gs o f w eary bird s The ir o wn e r s mu s t t h ink it too warm t o fis h The s k e l etonlik e fram es of haIr-co n struc t e d b oats 100111 up in several places B e n eath the s id es of on e es p ec iall y large o n e i s th e tini es t of h o u s e s v e r y little lar ge r than a good -s i ze d packing box. I n fa c t thi s little h o m e i s built frol11 b o x es f o r, adorning o n e s i de is the s l ogan, "Go ld Du s t L e t it d o your w ork." Stre t c h e d t o dry, on p o l es at the l e ft are h ug e w ellworn fis h n e t s s tiff' with salt water, the ir wate r -and-sunbl e a c h ed wood e n sinkers g leaming in th e glare I n t h e little s h ade c a s t b y a bambo o tree sit so m e n egroes-two v e r y dro w s ily play ing c heck e r s and a g r oup o f others m o r c dro w sily watching. .4. UcndeJ\ous.A Corner or Limon B ay i n the Ca r ibbean. On a co n crete bl oc k jutting out into the water sits a c o l o r ed w orkman indus tri o u s ly wa shing his f eet. B e n eath the s id e of a n e wly painte d b oat, a son o f Jamaic a, stre t c h e d full l ength, is taking a warm, but seemingly enjoyable s i esta.

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JO THF. CA Rl BBEAN. To the right of this fishers' rendezvous is the conc rete foundati on of a ruined house, over-grown with weeds and crimson doned h ybiscus bushes. E\erything is e ry dry and warm, and my eyes are tired, so I l oo k afar out at the glimmering blue water, and wish for a stray breeze to come and blow away th e little heat waves that rise from e\erything : \ Fl'RNTTVRE STOR E O;\' BOLl \ AR. LOlliS( Hmtrr, 2J, The store has no sig n by which th e owner pro claims his tracle to his own littl e B o l ivar wor l d. Perhaps he thinks the o ld rusty bed-spring h ang ing on the post in front, whic h l oo k s as if it ha d spent a l o ng, wandering lif e traveling fro m one dwelling place to another, is a suffic i e n t adver tisement. The store has twO entrances, between which is a low, cement step on which repose a mangy, skinny, yellow and w hit e cat, industri ously and vainly anempting to clean itse lf, and several chairs minus necessary parts. At the l e ft entran ce a huge platform, set about six feet ahO\e the floo r, piled high with legless c hair s, c h airless legs, o ld trunks, a water-cooler of uncertain hu e drawerless bureaus, bureau l ess drawers, a n d var i o us other indescribable odds and e nd s o f f u rniture, threatens to fall o n so m e unfortunate at the slightest provocation. Tacked to th e pladbrm, on a blue board in straggling uncertain, ir regular letter s is the motto, "\\'e do what we say, And mean what we do." At the ba c k is a n open ing, srnall and low, thro ugh which a w eary ray o f light, lost in the maze o f furniture, pie r ces the dark interior and light s up with startling di s tin c tness severa l white bedposts and a rusty tin tub. T o t h e l e ft i s a carpenter's bench equipped with all mann e r of tools Two negroes obl i vio u s to all outsi de inAue n ce playing an interminable game o f c h ec k e r s o n a dirty checker board, occ up y th e only cleared space. At the right entrance a high green fence with a once white top bearing th e s i gn "Oficina," en closes what is evidently the "Oficina," co ntaining an ancient roll-top desk o n whic h ar e so m e equally ancient eggs and a telephone. On the floor rests the overflow o f the platfo rm. On t h e walls h a n g some dull-g ilt pic ture frames, and so m e colorless sacred pictures The entir e store i s cove r ed wit h seve ral inc hes of its own spe cia l brand of Panamanian d ust. \ COBBLER'S S H O P EmSI Ellphrat, '2J On the o u tside above the doo r, h a n gs a sma ll, poorly-printed sign proclaiming, "Se comp one calsado \Yithin, a ten-foot r oom embraces t h e co bbl e r 's living quarters and busin ess establi s hm e nt. It i s div i ded into two parts by a Aimsy partition w i t h a doorway at o n e e nd. The floo r o f t h e s hop is littered wit h bit s o f l ea ther and broken tacks The walls are cove r ed with pa p er, yellow wit h age. The l o n g brow n s tain s proclai m the incolll petency of th e walls to keep out th e hard rains. The cobb l er s it s n e ar the doo r b e fore a batte r ed tabl e about t h ree f ee t hig h all which lie a s har p knife, a littl e larg e r t han a good-sized p oc k e t knife, a box o f tacks, a spool of thread, and a litter of other s mall miscellaneous objects, \Vit h s harp staccato raps h e tacks a r ed leath e r sa l e on a s h oe gripp ed tightl y between his kn ees J O HN'S. Geml d Bliss, Jr., '2J. Just b e hind t h e sc h oo l h ouse an d n o t m o r e t h an four hundred yards away, is t h e "Chink" s h op w h ere m os t o f the c hil dren get th e ir appetite spoilers, in th e f o rm o f gUilldrops, ca nd y ball s, o r sor n e oth e r kind of ed ib l e sweet Fro m t h e ou ts i de it rese m b l es a cottage o f o l den days, set sq u are l y up o n t h e grou n d Old woode n board s, poor l y painted, mak e up th e fram e w o rk while tin roofing p r ovides t h e protection from t h e s un a n d rain. A sig n o u tside JUSt over t h e door written i n C hin ese, b e ar s th e nam e o f t h e proprietor, a l t h oug h to u s it m e an s nothing. Inside w e find counte r s whi c h exte nd halfw ay around, w h i l e t h e oth e r hal f o f t h e store i s taken u p wit h ba rr e l s and o th e r surplus whic h c an not be put in t h e s l eep ing q u arters, t hat are ill the r ear o f t h e s h ack. Upon th e s helve s ar e to b e found as cos mop olitan a mixture a s i s to b e found in a pawn s h op. But th e wares h e r e are almost all in the lin e o f foods of o ne kind o r another, except ( o r a few o ( t h e ne ce sary utilitie s w ithout which n o co l ored famil), tries to get a l o n g Princ ip a l

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THE CAR I BBEAN 31 among these are threads o f varioliS co l o r s, butto n s o f as many hu es, topS, ciga r c n cs, thimbles, croc het h oo ks, rubber ball s, and S Ulldry oth e r ar ticle of 110 seem ing importance. Somewhere in the vicinity, we lI swll1y see the "Chink," whom all o f u s have learned to call J ohn. H e cvt::r has hi s watchful eye o p e n to see that we take nothin g that ha s not b ee n dul y paid f or. Farthe r inside we hear th e sounds of his joyous family consisting of two c hildren betwee n the ages of eight and ten, a lar ger boy of perhap s eighteen, and a wife. Besides these immediate rnembc r s of the family there are a cat and six or eight kincns, and a canary. All o f them h elp in the general funning of the store, eithe r a s salesmen \vhe n J ohn is not there, o r by playing on the COUIlter, or singing in twittering tones. A FRU I T S T AND. Emogult Nash, 23 A s ] was strolling through Colon o n o n e of those rare balmy evenin gs which come during the dry season my attention was attracted by a fruit stand. I ts whole make-upfr o m its owner to its slightest detail-was very picturesque. The r e was dumped on the sidewalk an assortment o f fruits, s u c h as bananas, papayas, and pineapples which were very green and which, J imagine, had jus t been delivered a little whil e before. At the front in the numerous bins were many native fruits, including oranges) greenishyellow lime s, brownish-green pineapples, purplis h brown alligator pears, banana-colored plantains, reddish-yellow mangoes, and round, light-gree n native watermelons, also American fruits Stich as pears, apples, oran ges, lemons, grapes, and even a few peach es and plums On the Roar beside and b ehind the fruit bins coul d b e see n melon shaped papayas and fat brown cocoanuts which are a lways in season. Suspended from the cei l ing above the bins were strings and cords of all length s o n which dangled "States" fruits to attract the attention of Americans who might pass. Hanging rather Iowan the s ide walls were man)' bunches of overripe bananas. Abo ve these were hung many bird cages) baskets, and pictures o f every size, share, and color imaginable. .In the center back were two tables which didn't l oo k as if they had ever b een used to se r ve anything. On tables on the fjoor <;I ose b)' w e r e many o l d papers and magazi nes which we r e u se d t o wrap the fruit for the c u s t o m e r s. The bac k wall was dark colored and had it not been f o r the highly co l o red pictures hung o n t ht: wall pictures which most lik ely cam e fr o m som e little New Y o rk junk s hop-on c coul dn't have told jus t h o w far bac k the r oo m extended. The r e w e r e n o windows and the only door that I co uld see wa s the wid e onc by which I had e n tered. I must m ention here! that it was not until I turned to leave that l spied unde r the fruit bins a pile o f overripe, rott e n fruit o n whi c h a famil y o f cockroac h es wa s greedily feasting. A s I came o u t of the d oo r I noti ce d t h e proprietor l ooking a s one would expect the proprietors of s uch an es tabli shment t o look. H e was engaged in wiping and p olishing hi s fruit with a ra g o f very ques tionabl e hue I d ecided that I didn't care for any fruit, and continued on m y way to the boat. A 11'1 N DOli'. lIenry .\loore, '23. Suc h a litte r of things-silk shirts, cuff buttons, beads pins, medalli o n s and trinkets of all sorts: hanging from above, kim onos and s hawl s of all colors and styl es, so me expensive, and som e c heap, so m e ancient, oth e r s antique, and s till oth e r s modern: below, Egyptian vases, s ilk s frorn the Orient, and Panama hatsall crowded into one s mall window without any seeming idea as t o arrangemcllt:-su c h is the windo w of the Hindu s h op. CHINESE GARDENER L ouise IIwler, '23. E ac h m orning sees h i m patter up the street, His tiny figur e s hr i \ eled old, bowed down B y weight of two hu ge baskets. too reple te With veget:tbles Iettuce, p a r sley kale. A huge, r o un d b attered Chinese hat p r otects His head H e w ears a r agged, blue.gray s hin, And baggy khaki pants ado rne d with Reeks Of
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THE CARIBBEA ___ __ ______________ E A R L Y __ Ll F E __ __________ ___ ___ '@' (P,,,ly Im,,'.";V' S
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T H E CAR IBBEAN. J.l Lake (0 be unleashed, and all the houses 011 the banks woult! b e covered. Several ti;ws after the rumor, a circ ular lette; waS placed o"n the bulletin board in (ront of the COl"'nn1issary, statin g that all the people Illwa mOve at once. Carrnenc ira now saw her way clear. Truc, s h e had not the courage yet, but s h e could wait, yes, s h e would wait. Senora CortCI. had kept a protecting "wing" over the dt:ll1cl1tcd widow, so when the news call1l; that they must m ove s h e took her to her big warlll heart and begged h e r to stay with them, in a tent far fro m the path of the ,\ aters. carne the day set for the ing of the dike. The electric wires that were used to cause the explosion were in some \\'a) connl.'ctcd with \\'ashingto n :lnd it was in the Capital that the button that caused the explosion was placed. T hi s thing that wa s to happen seemed the sign of cornpletion, f o r the water was to he turneu in for the first time. There we r e crowds of peopl e, tourists, Canal Zone employees, women and children, photographers-almost everybody on the Zon e was t here to witness it. Carmencita's friends had finally p ersuaded her to go with them, and when they reached Gamboa, she insisted that the\' the hill br the tracks to gain a better vie\\;. From there she could see h e r deserted little grar house, but s h e didn't feel any pain-perhaps watching the water close in about it would gi\'e her the needed courage to end it all. The time f o r the explosion had been set, and about fifteen minutes before that time all the engines and steam shovels within a mile set up a great clamo r of w h i s tl es and b ells, to g ive warning to rhe workmen on rhe dike. Suddenly there was a great rumbling roar, and all eyes were turned toward the dike. The Illud, dirt, rocks, and water rose a lmost a hundred feet into the air and the water swirled through the opening. Carme n cita's eyes were all the little gray house where the long fing e rs of water reached, reached, and covered it. "Ah, manana, manana," thought Carmencita. : \ s the party started down the hill, Senora Cortez was fir st, with Carmencita f ollowing, then Senor Cortez and the res t of the people. :\s they reached a particularly steep rocky part of the hill, Senor Cortez's warning was hardly out of his mouth before hi s foot dislodged a big ro c k. Tht: rock crashed the short distHncc b ctween Scnor Cortez and Carmcncita and struck her a blm\ on the head. She was knocked Sense l ess, and, much to the horror of her friend", rolled the rest of the way down the hill. \Yh cn thc)' reached her at last, it seemed that she breathcd. Thcy took her to tht: onl y house in the place, and laid her tired bod)' on a little white bcd, and a fc\\ I'llinllt es latt:r s h e dicd. The doctor that was callc,l in said there was nothing that could have hecn done; her skull was fractureJ and, had s h c livcd, s h e woulll ha\-e heen an in\-ali.1. Senora Cortc/, amid flluch wecping, found timc to ask in wonder why Carmencita's last words had heen, "Cracias aDios." A:-.I I:-.ICI DE:-.IT. H ello, Jim, aren't you working today?" asked John Carter as h e joined his friend, J im l\Iartin, for the morning stroll down to the railroad track, whence the labor train departed with its load of "ditch diggers," who were employed up in the Cut at Cul e bra. Carter, I wa s up on the hill when that premature charge let go and J got bunged up a bit. arm i s pretty badly injured so I 'll h,,'e to "Ia)' oR"" ror a co upl e or weeks." '" didn't hear anything about it. \\'ao;; all.\ one e lse hurt?" queried Carter. "They put some double charges under that ledge all the hill yesterday and intendeti to set them of f at lunc h time. r was working on 7-: just to the lert or the l edge. About eleven o 'cl ock I h eard o n e of the caps and knowing what was ahou t to happe n, I jumped into the bucket o f my s hovel. I didn't get into it any too SOOI1, for think the w h o le hill must have come down past me in less time than I could think of it. Some of rhe pieces of rock went four and five hundred yards that's what got m e, the flyin g stones. Some of the poor niggers were horribl y mangled. George Kemper and I were the only white men injured; I g u ess George i s all right now. I don't want an)' more calls lik e that; it was tenth experience with premacures." "\\'c ll, in my little sojourn of three years down here neither the malaria bugs nor the premature5 han: got me," said John, c heerfully. I suppose

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T H E CAR1BBEAN. that you know this is Illy last B e l ieve me, won't 1 be glad to see i\[ary and my two little girls? I sail day after to-morrow afternoon " J didn't know that and I m to hear it," said J im, rather su rpri sed. \\'hen d i d you decide to return to the States?" 1 get so homesick for them t hat I can hard l y stand it. And what's t h e lise of my being down here alone when I have o ne of the coziest littl e homes in the world back in Indiana? I wouldn't bring the family down o n account o f t h e bad livi n g conditions. i\J y living h e re with th e malaria and yellow fever bugs i s bad enou g h w i t h out making the family undergo it." "It is a rotten pla ce to bring w o m e n folk. hard l y see h ow some of the m en stan d it as w ell as they see m to. I know t hat 1 wou l d n't bring any family of mine down h e r e, t hat i s, if had one," laughed J im as the two approached t h e labor train, which was o n the s ide trac k awaiting its usual load,-a load w h ich was o ft e n decreased by such acc idents as had occurred the day befo r e. But it seemed that there were always m o r e t o fill the places of t h e absent o nes. The r e had to b e, for such an undertaking as the Panama Canal could not be hindered by a si ngl e acciden [. Carter 's fri endship with J im had been very in timate and h e rath e r hated to s a y, \ V ell, suppose t hat I had better say good b ye, becau se I may nOt get a chance to see yo u again. I hope your arm comes alo n g all rig h t and that you are even lu ckier in t h e future t h a n you have b ee n in t h e past." I think I'll be down o n t h e job abou t quitting time, so ] 'II b e su r e to look you up," said Jim as Carter climbed aboard t h e train. The bouncing and jogging of t h e car in whic h Carte r rode did not disturb him, beca use h e was thinking o f t h e cozy little Indiana h o m e and all its comforts, hi s wife, Mary, and her loving ways, and the twO little girls, Frances, seven years o l d and] ane, fi ve years of age. H e p ictured t h e h o m ecoming and how h e wou l d take thern in his arms and love them all. H e said to hi m se lf, "Onl y two more weeks and I s h all see t h e m. I t hardly seems possible." H e t h e n t hough t of t h e big yard, with all the mammoth s hade t r ees, w h e r e he used to romp with Frances and Jane An d t h e food that Mary cooked cam e into hi s mind and he made a silent reso lu tion never t o l eave again once he s h ou ld get home. H e cou l d p icture how i \ lary, [<'ranees and Jane, wou l d b e waiting at t h e front gate f o r him all t h e day o f hi s expected arrival and how h e would co m e up, t h row hi s baggage down, and take each one into h i s a rm s a n d g ive h e r t h e lovin g o f h e r l ife. A s udden lurc h o f t h e train announce d its arrival at the bottom o f Gold Hill. As Carter went t o his mac hin e, h e sang, f o r happin ess was hi s As h e sat o n hi s s hovel that afternoont h e afte rnoon whic h was to mark t h e end of hi s canal se r v ice-h e noticed t hat e v e r y t hing seemed to a ssume an unusually c h eerful appearance Fro m be hin d a f e w fleecy clouds t h e su n s h o n e on Gold H ill, making it appear like a huge nugget with countless numbe r s o f seemingly miniature m e n struggling a pparentl y in vain to l eve l its mighty bu l k. [ t had rained in t h e m orning and t h e grass was o f t h e bri ghtest g r ee n w hil e to t h e l e ft in t h e patc h o f l eve l country besi de t h e hill stood Car t e r 's favorite ponciana tree its leaves a burning hue. Fro m h i s towerin g pos t o n t h e hill just o p posite Gol d H ill h e coul d see t h e m e n hurry in g about to fulfill whate ve r tas k mi g h t b e the ir s At fr eq u ent intervals a t r a i n pulled out with its load o f dirt for t h e fil l and the loader s r u s hed to a noth e r q uarte r to h elp fill anothe r. The r e w e r e many white m e n to boss t h e colored workmen and occas ional small g r oups of enginee r s w h o w e r e oversee ing t h e w o rk. S o m e how h e hated to think o f leavin g b ecause h e had b eco m e so a cc ustomed to it; h e see med al m os t a part of it. But the n h e t h o u ght, "Onty two more w ee k s, o ld man, and you'll b e the happiest p e r so n o n earth." Jus t ten minutes b e for e quitti ng time Jim 1\I1 a r ti n got o ff t h e t r a in from Gorgona. Over to the right h e saw t h e m e n at t h e tool supply h o u ses c h ecking in t h e tool s t hat had bee n used farthe r up the cut d u ring the day \"'h e n h e turne d to t h e left, h e saw t h e m e n hurrying abollt, m os t of t h e m coming fr o m t h e tool s heds with pi c k s and s hovel s and go in g toward t h e hill a c r oss from Gol d Hill. \ I V o nderin g what it all m eant, h e appl"Oac hed a small g r oup o f men a n d a s ked w hat wa s w r o n g One of t h e m s poke up hu rri edly, "That l edge above .p6 ca mt: down and took t h e w h o l e works with it!" "Good L o r d don't tell m e t hat wa s Cart e r s s hovel," h e answer e d with a n x iety "Yes Carter w as cru s hed to death ; t hey go t him. They'r e d igging (or t h e r es t n ow."

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THE CARIBBEAN. 35 -----------.-----------------------f\lartin spok e with diffic ult y I<\\' h)' didn't it g e t me y es t erday in s t ead o f Carte r to-da y? Only a f e w minutes b e f o r e his tim e w ould have b ee n lip and he had t o g o \"hat will hi s poor wife do; think of th e littl e girl s that will bt;: waitin g a t th e front gate in a c o upl e o f w ee k s, f o r a daddy wh o will n e v e r c om e But Carte r wa s only o n e o r those who gave t h e ir lives f o r 11 w orthy cause The work c o ul d n o t stop; anothl:1" came to take th e pla c e o f him whose lif e had b ee n c ru s hed O u t s o sudde nly. 'rhe m e n the r e soo n ( o rgotthough t he little family in I n d iana f o r got. EXTRACTS A D I ARY. G l'mld Bliu, Jr., '2J. //pri/ 1 0 '906. -The CO/Oil clock e d at pi e r 2 this afternoo n afte r a so m ewhat tranquil voyage down the Atlantic Bu t the d oc k a p oo rly co n structed wood e n aR"air-and the h otness o f the noon sun did not giv e a fav o rabl e impress i o n o f Colon. .4. s h ort walk t o the sta ti o n reveale d Front Street to b e compose d o f many wooden s hacks built on t h e edge o f a rut-infes t e d r oad. I n every door, w e saw pig s bro wn c hil d r e n, or s crawny ill f e d chickens The statio n proved t o b e a dingy afl"air. I t wa s n othing m o r e than a s h elter from the hot sun and t h e dre n c hin g rain s whi c h, w e are told, make the ir d ebut about thi s time of the y e ar. 'The trip a c ro ss wa s une x citing. A. s l o w, puf fing, noisy, and dirty engine serve d a s our m eans o f propuls ion t o our destination. The n o i ses of the train w e r e too muc h f o r Rud; so h e scr eame d and yell e d the wh o l e way ove r. But everything ceases; and so afte r two h ours o f thi s treatment, w e arrived at P edro \Yhat a pla ce it isf ou r s till incompl e t e h o u ses a rutte d r oad o r two a statio n and a Chinese s h o p. Thi s c on stitutes t h e town, w hil e in it lie la z ily many indi\iduals of nearly a s many races resting, o r e l se prac t i sing the ir art o f d oing n othing. I am o n e o f six white w o m e n in the t o wn a nd Bu d i s the only baby, and but t e n m onths o ld. The Canal, whi c h i s but in its embryo, i s thirtr f ee t long t e n f ee t wide, and has a s its only inhabitant, an alli gato r o f unkno wn age. June 25, 1906. Living h e r e i s quite diffe r ent from living in the States T h e r e i s 110 co l d stor age at all. Butte r co m es in tin s a s d o the m eats and other foods o f that nature The Chinese stor es -with b a r and prov i s i o n cou nter COI11-bined provide u s wit h a f e w fr es h vegetables, but little e lse. F o r t hin gs oth e r tha n these vege t ables, i t i s n t'cessa r y to go to P a nama. H e r e, as in C o l o n, are streets whi c h disgra ce eve n t h e name ro a d T hey are alleys in wid t h and moullta in r a n ges in r o u ghness The r e are a f ew coach es to haul rou about, bu t i t i s w o rse riding in t h e m a n d getting shake n lip than i t i s to w alk a n d step into a mud h o l e ever y f e w feet. A s Panama is l a rger than C o l o n it ha s m o r e s t o r es, and lik ewise, man)' m o r e bars and cantinas Par-day night always finds the latte r filled with l a b o r e r s whil e t h e next day, i f the r e i s s till a little m o ney l e ft in t h e h o u s dlOl d the w o m enfo lk invest in d i s h es, o r othe r h o u se h o ld r eq ui sites J-evntfl})' II, 1 90 7. La s t w ee k, t w O Spaniards took it llpon the m se l ves t o b eco m e quarant in e office r s and so g ained entrance t o t h e h o uses. On l e a v in g, they said they'd be ba c k later t o v a c cinate those wh o n ee d e d it. They came all right! Thi s m orning about two o 'clock, they e ntered man)' o f the h o u ses and s t o l e e v e r ything t hey could ge t the ir hands o n. L u c kil y, w e w e r e so poor that w e di dll't have anything w orth s t e alin g B u t se v e ral o f t h e othe r s l os t so m e valuable artic les. N ext time we will b e m o r e care ful. l\-fa)' 23, 1 907.-The r e i s but o n e sewing ma c h in e in thi s whol e town. i t i s o wn e d b y the h ealth office r, and, a s h e i s v e r y conge nial h e i s lik e \\ise quite l e ni ent about l etting peopl e u se it. \\"ithout it, Bud w ould have g o n e witho u t m a n y o f the muc h n ee d e d clothes f o r hi s va c a t i o n thi s y e ar. The h ealth conditio n s are s till not what they ought to b e E very train h eade d f o r C o l o n takes a victim f o r H ill C e m e t e r y \\'e n e v e r kno w \vh e n our turn will com e, but w e pray e a c h night t hat it stays oR" for e v e r. A Tew Y e ar s 1 908 -The day be f o r e Christmas, about f ourtee n ships l e ft C o l o n Harbo r and w e n t d o wn P orto B ello way to find s h elter fr o m the g reat storm that wa s the n raging. C o l o n Harb o r i s n t excellent a s a pro tecti o n and r woul d have don e [h e same t hin g if I had b ee n a c aptain o f o n e o f the s hips. But, alas, o n e o f those ships had ou r Christmas turkey o n i t and so w e ha d f o r Y ear's in s t e a d o f Christmas. J\lardl .1, 1 905. -The l e p e r col o n), a t i\lira flo r es i s quite a r elig i o u s g r o u p :\nd so G rand m a goes d o wn the r e every Sund a y to l ead the s in gi n g and r eading o f the Bibl e The r e are about tWl:nty

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THE C:\ R l of the patients, and their disease is n o t contagious; so I don't think \\ e will h:n-e rojoin them compulsion. They surel y are f o nd of Grandma, and oft en gi\'e her linle presents, which are usually the things that they ha\-e learn e __ 1 t o make while rhey been confined there .ipri/j, 1905.-There wa s a big rain last week; anti so we haven't had :lny co l d srorage from Colon since then 011 a ccount o f the track's havin g sun k out of s ight some where al ol1g the lin e ; so ''ve ha\'e had to resort r,l the "Chink" s h o;Js again. \ Yord has just hCCI1 rccci\-c ... i that the track i s repaired, so w e are in o f ha\ing a decent dit1l1er, t.)morro\\. St!pltmbt>r 2(}, The fir s t Chinese baby to be born in Pedro ;'\Iiguel was b')ill to-day. :-\5 Aunt Gladys h e lred quite considerabl y, th e was named Gladys in h e r hon o r. H e r last name is L eon. They held quite a ce lebrati o n in tht: Chinese co l o ny in h o n o r o f the birrh o f th e first child in thi s sec ti on. J1 m 'c!1 2.J, 1 9 11. -.--\nother o f those all-ni ght rains has co mpletely covered a s t ea m s hove l and a train \\ ith dirt that s lid down from the edge of the Canal. Lu c ky f o r the people down bel o w that it was after quitting time, or t h ere might have been a f e w casualties Everything will b e all right early to-morrow, though, f o r n o w that we have the facilities to combat s lid es, it takes very little tim e to o 'e rcome the damage done by them. Ooc/obe,-10, 191.1. -The Canal open ed to-day, and I must say that it was quite a spectacle. T he dike at Gamboa was blown up at three o'clo c k by President \\'ood row \\'ilso n in his office at \Ya s h ingta n. I t was one grand blast, and thre w dirt in ever} direction. The Canal i s now a t h o u sand feet w ide, more o r l ess, and about s ixty-five feet dee p, compare d to its thirtyfoot l e n g th and ten-foot width of 1906 at P ed r o Febrttar.y 15, 1922. The Chinese as is u s ual every yea r, have hc:ld the ir Carni,ral. A.nd what do yo u know! Gladys I .eon, the firs t Chinese g irl born in P ed r o '\I igucl wa s th e ir Qu ee n. This old world s urel y does mcwc:! T o think that blH a few years ago s h e was a littl e in swaddling clothes, you n ger th a n m)' bah) w h e n I brought him dow n here! IImry '2j. \\' h e n the L 'niteJ States bought theCanal Zo ne, it was with th e understanding that t h ey would reimburse al\ the native land owners for t h e land used. N o w it so happened t hat 011 t h e groun d where th e G overnment wished to make Gatun I .ake the re lived many natives w h o had s m all gardens o r banana groves. ,'-\Ii t h ese nati ves except o n e agreed to clear Ollt, when t her were off e r ed a good pri ce f o r thei r lands. This one o l d fellow lived apart from the res t His h a i r was gray and his face wize ned, and h e walked wit h a s t oop. Howald he was nobody knew. The agent f o r the Government increased t h e pri ce off'ered, thinking t hat old Juan, a s the native was called, was h o l d ing out for morc mane)" but s till th e native r efused The G ove rn o r t h en se n t all interpreter wit h t h e agent so that t h ey mig h t be sure t hat t h e native understood w hat they were ofl'c ring h im, but t h e native still refused, sayi ng .. TO quie ro v ender, no quiero vcnder." T h e interpreter t h en asked him his rea so n for not s elling and old J uall replied i n a long s t re a m of guttural Spanish all to t h e ef Fect tha t his fath er and grandfath er had lived t h ere b e fore h i m h e had lived t h ere all his life and intended to d i e th e r e al so, that h e did not have to sell i f h e d i d not wis h H ere wa s a stumbl ing b l oc k i n deed, f o r c \ 'errthing was ready and t h e day had bee n se t whe n the water was to be turne d into t h e val l ey, and now one mall was like l y to h o l d back the w o rk. The agent and the interpreter tried eve r y m ea ns imaginable in o rder to get t h e native to sell his land, but old Juan still refused. Fin ally, tw o days befo r e the water was to be let in, t h e agent took so m e go l d coins a n d o f Fered t h e m to the o l d native, t h inking t hat t h e s i g h t o r go l d mig h t infl u ence h im, but to n o avai l for th e n a tiv e s h rugg e d his s houlders a n d m u m b l ed t h e words whi c h had come to be hated by t h e age n t, N o quiero vender!" The agent n ow l os t his temper for t h e first time in all those trying days, and in a rage at t h e stu b bornness o f the old man stormed," D o n't sell, han g you, and in tw o days ),Olt w ill d i e h ere, I n sidc o f forty-eight h o urs t h e water will be h ere and the n if yo u can't s wim, you'll b e drowncd," Old J uan wa s not easily aroll se d 0 h e agai n said .. N o 1 0 creo; n o es verdad; noqui ero ve nder,"

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THE C.'\RIBBEA:". 37 Taken back b y rh e coolnt.::ss o f the old native, the agent Wt:I1[ bac k t o the oRin: and there went into confe r e n ce ,\ ith the rest of the officia l s. They decitlt:d that ever) thing po ss ible had b ccll done to rnakc.:: the native sell; so t h e work w ou l d proceed. \\' h en the time cam e for the dam to b e blown u;) and the water to be let in, the workmen, n:1 rives officia l s and sight-see r s stood on th e S lIl"r ounding hill s to watch the great enginct.:rin 6 r eiH,-that is, all but old .Juan. H e a s u s ual, s a t o n his doorstep dozing. h e wa s awakened by a great s hock whi c h s h ook rh e earth {vI" mile s ab ollt. H e jumpe d to his feet in a g r eat fright, thinking that the worl d had co m e t o :1n encl. Then hearing a great cheer, h e turned an i l ooked northward and the;e amids t a s hower of earth smoke, and r oc k, h e saw a s ilver stream o f water, sparklin g in the sunlight, leap and rus h forth slo wly fillin g the bas in (111...1 the n b eginnin,3: to ri se 011 either bank. OIJ Juan watc hed with great a s t o ni shment, as the wate r gradually came nearer and n earer; t hen the words o f the agent came s lowl ) back to him. For a while h e meditated without taking his t:yes rr om the nc\\ lak e \\ h ich \\as crawling toward him t hen, putting hi s hand to his h ead h e burst rorth, "r'\om hre de D ios; no es "crdad; n o cs rosiblt:." Bu t what h e thought t o b e impossible had happelled, r o r the watcr was 5 1 0\\ I )' fillin g the basin and creepin g up the banks. Old.J uan watched spellbound. I t seemed that h e was unable to withdraw hi s gal.c rrom t h e approaching watcr. :":earer and nearer it came and s till o ld .Juan watched, dal.l:d l)ln not cOn\' in ccd Stuhbornl), h e waiteJ; hi g her and hi g hc.::r rose the water; ten reet; five ret.:t; six inches, fro m hi s f ee t-an d yet it rose. The water met hi s rect, the n hi s ankles; it passed him and r ose above his door-step, and s till h e stood th e r e dazed. T o the calf of his l egs and then to hi s knees the water crept. This wa s enough to convince the most stubb o rn man, and corning suddenly back t o hi s se nses, old J lIall maJe for the hill s with great has t e, l11umblin g t o himselr, D i os! Dios! de D i os! E s verdad; E1 1111111cio a l reves."

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THE

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THE CARIBBEA7\'. 39 T\\,O TR I P 'l"A" 1::-1 DOS \ I :\j ES DE '. A \ I S I T T O THE CI-IO O I S I N D I A}\; I t was night, and the tropic moon rOSt;! slowl) over the f )rtificd is lands whic h guard the P acific entrance to th e anal, as our tin)' craft, the ,-Iugus/a I "ie/GI"ia, sturdily pushed her nose through the deep, dark waters I t was a perfect nig h t to start o n OUf adventure. A million stars lighted the heavens. The ocean lar like a huge mirror all around liS. i\ lost of our party sat o n the deck, some dreaming away the time, others si n gi ng the latest songs, but I lay 011 rhe hatchway watching the moonbeams play on the water, and wondering what rhe Illorrow wo ul d bri n g forth. For weeks 1 had looked forward to t h is trip to the Darien country. 'Ye WCfe n ow on our way! There we were to visit a tribe o f Indians known a s t h e C h okois, who liv e up the Chico rive r, a branch of the Chucunaque, which is one of the largest rivers in Panama and empties into the furrra. N o white woman had e\'er set foot in this countr),; so was it any wonder I felt thrilled and excited? morning we were up bright and \\'e were now in the bar of San J\l iguel, which we found to be full of treacherous rocks and uncharted reefs. There, also, was a lonely, barren, grey, rocky island inhabited by thousands of pelicans who, w hen a shot was fired, rose lik e a great black cloud into the air. At eleven o'clock we entered Darien harbor with the U S. wire l ess station on o n e s ide and t h e native village of L a Palma o n t h e other. T wo h ours up the river we released twO carrier pigeo n s. Through the fore t hought of Captain Baird, Q. c., Fort Clayton, eight pairs of these birds had been brought along. These were released at different times during the trip and all reached Fort Clayton save these first two. One of these was discovered in the "illage of Chipegana; the oth e r was no doubt disturbed by the hawks which infest the jungles. On and o n we traveled up the Turyra river, nothing breaking the summer silence save the !Ii squawking of the parrots and the chattering of tht: monke),s. This river rna)' be likened to the I\l iss issippi with its stumps, mud hanks, lowlands, sand hars, and thick overhanging vines. \\'here it was ver), narrow, we coul d, b)' straining our peer into the dark and forbidding jungle where nature had h e l d solitary sway for ages, \\ hen: live and Aourish the deadly anopheles and stegomyia. Here and there a Rowering lignum \-itae tree towered above the jungle. .;\(ter a long and tiresome da)' we arri\'ed at the village of Yavisa where all the natives Rocked to the shore to meet tis. Yavisa, like all native vil lag es, consists of thatched-roofed h ouses a church and a sc hool. But here we found the :emains of an old Spanish strongh o ld, built, perhaps three hundred years ago, for protecrion against the Indians. I n the early h ours o f the next morning, long before the sun ha d begun to think about getting up, we were in native cayucos being poled up the Chucunaqut: river; then, up the Chico. These river cayucos are made by hollowing out a cedar or mahogany tree, and differ from the sailboat in that they have no keel and are Rat-bottomed. A heavy fog hung o\'er the jungle, transforming the trees into tall grey ghosts. Occasionallr we were gl\'en a shower bath as we brushed the over-hanging foliage. Several times we were startled by a swis h, swis h, as a 'gator slid from the cool, s lim y mud bank into the dirt)' yellow water. Fro m the depth s of the jungle came the piercing cry of a wild cat. H igh overhead the awakening birds were c heerfully twittering and trilling. H ours and hours we traveled lip the ri\Tcr, sometimes almost blocked by great trees torn out in a recent R ood, until at last we arrived at the village of the Chokois. Two days before, I had left the Zone, the height of ci\' iliz3tion and sanitation, with its hospitals, its airplanes, its forts, its warships, and all the facilities for safetr and convenience. To-day 1 stood before people who had never before gazed upon a white woman. Their civilization is the

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THE CARlI3BEAN. same as it was in the days of th e first o f their race. L "poll seeing LIS, they ran in all directions like frightened deer. But Ollf interpreter was at last able to persuade th em to come o u t by tell ing them that the great white doctor h ad come '\ly father had earned this title by carrying with him bandages, caStor oil, pills quinine, and potaSsiulll to kill the "little devils," as r hey t ermed t h e sores and fe\"er which we f ound to be preval ent. :\s, one by one, came frOIll t h eir hiding plac es, rhey were greatly attracted by my dress, f or I WOfe far more than their w h o l e wardrobe contained. The women wore a strip of bright -co l ored cloth tied around t h e waist and reachin g to the knees, whi l e the men wore still l ess Both the men and women were s hort and dark with long, heavy, straight black hair. Through our interpreter we learned many of the ir strange customs. \,"h e n an In d ian is courting, h e w ears a gorgeous head band made of tiny beads, a g a y metallic n eck band, and enormous earrings. These earrings are h uge affairs, t h e front butto n bei n g about the size o f a fifty-cent piece. Frorn it h a n g tin y drops, making the w h o l e ahout four inches l o ng. The button i s fastened to a stick abo u t an in c h long anei the si7e o f a pencil. This i s run through the ear and h e l d t h ere by m eans of a string tied behind the head. hen an "I ndian goes to see t h e lady o f hi s choice, h e takes with him a handful o f k e rn e l s of corn. These h e carefull y flin gs at h e r o n e b y o n e I f s h e objects, h e must see k a noth e r ; but if s h e does not, h e may go on with his wooing. \\" hen a baby is born, it i s rubbed all over with the jui ce of a berry. A s this dri es, it turns black so that before the c hil d is many days o ld h e i s coal black. This, t hey say, i s to p revent sunburn, a CUStom which seems queer tv us, s inc e t hey are already so dark. 1 f they wis h to give the baby a bath, t h ey take it out, pour water over it, and t h e n shake i t a s one would s hake a rug. They have a nove l way o f carryi ng t h e ir c h ildren. 'The child i s put on its moth e r 's back to which it clings like a young monkey. Several yards of bright cloth are then wrapped around t h e mother and child, and t ied into a knot. Thus t h e mother may go on with her work, always be in g able to keep track of her c h i l d. \\'e; noticed that the male I ndians had n o ha ir on their faces and, upo n questi oning our inter p r eter, we l earned that they gather poisonous ants and c ru s h them. This paste, when put o n the face, kill s the roots of the hair and so prevents its growth. Thei r h o u ses are made b y driving f our p os t s into the ground and making a floor about ten feet high. The Roar i s r eached by mean s o f a ladder made by c h opping notch es in a small tree. One co rn e r o f t h e floor i s taken up b y the s t o v e i s made o f a la ye r of clay aboutsix inc h es t h i c k and three f ee t square. I n the middl e i s a hol e in w h i c h ston es are put, and it i s o n these ston es that the fire i s built. Afte r it h a s died down, t h e m eal, which co n s ists o f bananas, yams, or wild game, i s put on t o cook. The roof of t h e house is made o f palm l e aves. Th e nati\'c modcor burden carrying. The jungles arou n d their homes are alive with panthers, wildcats wil d h ogs, lance h eads, and b o a con s trictor s F o r killing t h ese, t her use the s pear and the bow and arrow. A part of their land i s f orbidden to all btl t t h e Chokois I ndians. I t was in t h e middle o f the afte rn oo n w h e n we embarke d in our cayu cos and started f o r Yavisa under a su n so blistering h o t that w e w e r e force d to u se banana l eaves for sunshades, and it was at sunset that w e r ounded t h e b end and came in sight of our tiny craft. Next m orning we shoved off' and started down t h e riv e r towar d h o m e Ollr fir s t stop wa s R ea l de St. i\1aria. Here w e l e ft the mail and waited until noon to get t h e hi g h tide at L a Palma. At s i x o'clock t h e skippe r s h o wed the c l earance pape r s to the alcalde o f L a Palma and w e proceeded o u t to sea. \\'he n w e wok e up the n ex t m o rn i ng, we were anchored in t h e bay o f San Mig u el. At dayli g h t w e w ent a s h o r e to look around, San Mig u e l i s

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THE CARl BBEAN lik e the rest of the native villa ges -thatched h o u ses, a sc h oo l, and the ruin s of a o n ce wondedul c hur c h \ \' e w cre in Sail Miguel until noon. T hen w e started Ollt on the last lap of our journey \\'hile passing between the i s land s, we fan into sc h oo l s of t hOLISilnds o f mackerel feeding upon sa rdin es. The sardines are driven n ear t h e sur(ace where the p elican, who flies low over the wate r, gets what r emains o f the poor sa rdin e. The n we ran across sc hool s of porpoise. I n both cases w e (mJlld that th e pelican work with the l arger fish. That evening at fivc, w e pulled in at t h e f\t arine landinga tir ed but happy crowd, glad to get hac k to civiliz ation. I'ACACIO;\lF.S. Com o habia p c n sado ya ha ee riempo, m e decidi ir el verano pas ado a pasar mis vacaciones en la vecina r epll blica de Costa R ica. Al comienzo del mes de agosto me embarque en el vapor Ulua de la compaiHa frutera de un muelle de Cristobal. Que bell. vista presentab. I ciudad de Col6n cuando m e aleje de sus play.s! En la bah ia todo fue perfecta ralma pero despues de salir del rompeoias, ya sc n ote e l mar u n poco mas agitado y por consiguiente fuero n quedando menos personas sobre cubierta. Despues de bastante horas de bucll viaje, la manana s i guiente lIegamos al Puerto Lim o n, el mas importante puerto de Costa R ica en e l .t\ t lantico. i\lientras arreglaban los asuntos rela cion ados can la aduana, visite su parque )' otras casas que pueden Hamar la atencion en esc lugar. A la s Ilueve y media tome e l tren que n os llevo a Cartago, lugar h acia e l cualme dirigla. Durante esta larga t r avesia, pude entretenerm e contemplando el R io R eventazoll, que carre casi para l e i a l tren, y l as pinwrescas lincas de na!anjas, azucar, cacao y cafe que se encuelltran por su paso, y por la s que este pai s tiene mu c h as entradas. L a lJegada a cad a estaci6 n me permitio comprar dulces, frutas y otras casas que me orredan l os numerosos vendedores atentos a la Ilegada del erell, y a ver l os tipos y costumbres propios de cad a lugar. A medida que el tren (ue subiendo, (ul s intiendo el (ri o que proclu cen las alturas. Siendo ya bastante de tarde Ileg u e al simpatico Cartago, y m e pareda muy agradabl e l a costumbre que tienen en ese lugar, de que tantos las damas como los caballeros tiellden ir a recibir e l tren. Esto me surpre ndio pero no me dejc de agraclar se r tan amablemente recibida A carta distancia v i e l H otel Frances" muy concurrido par los visitantes del lugar, al cual me dirigl y en que (UI muy bien atendida. d e un os mintltos de decanso s ail a r ecorre r e l s itio. Primero (ut al m e r cado, donde pude admirar la riqueza del s uel o y la labo r os i edad de los habitantes D e ahi segu r a l parque, que es muy co ncurrido a esta. s horas por l as jovenes c)l eg ial es De ah! fu! a andorrear a l os muc h os almacenes. Durante lo s demas dias que estuve en esa, visite a la s iglesias. La de L os Ange l es es la mas notable, porque dicen que anriguamente una virgen se aparecio y que en donde se aparecio ahara han construid o esa (amasa i g lesia. Cerca de aqui tambien hay un pozo mila groso e n e l cual s i un o se lava las partes en (ermizas, se curaran. Tambie n (ul a caballo a visitar lo s alrecle.:iore s los cllales SOil muy progres i vos en la agriclilrura. Par {litimo (UI a J \ 1 (. Irazu, e l famoso volean de Costa Rica, al c ual todo visi tante al lugar debe de ir. Este volean en '9' I causo un gran terremoto que destruyo la ciudad de Cartago, de tal manera que wdos l os alambres de e l ec tri c ida d, l os tubas de agua y la s casas rue ron tumbados y destruidos, tam bien mllchas personas (lieiOn heridas y muertas. Una vez que conod bastante es[a pobalac ion (UI a visitar a otros lugares, COIllO San J ose, Heredia y Guadalupe. D e wdos esws sitios merece especia l atencioll la capital, San J ose, par ser e l lugar mas p o blado y e l de mas bellos edific ios Entre estos esta el Teatre un o de l os mejores de America, y e l Asilo de Chapui, que son lIamados ((l as dos locuras" de R a(ael .Igle sias, quien (ue un presidente que se preocupo mucho par el adelante y embellezimiento de su patria. r'\li permanencia en la capital rue muy agradable par la s much as atenciones que me (uero n prodigadas. Despues de tres meses de tan (eliz paseo, re grese a Colon completamente satis(echa can mis buenos recuerdos de ese pais y con mas entusiasmo y energia para cOlltinuar mis tare as escolares.

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"P T H E CARIBBEAN The other day I heard some talking about eter nity, but he didn't seem to have a clear idea of what eternity is. I did n t say but I thought to myself that I haj a prett)" good con ceptio n o f eternity. I think it ca n be quite ac curately compared with the period between nin e a. m. and four p. m. on an y J\l o nday b e tween October and J un e, when you have s?el1t the wak ing h ours o f the previous night reading th e thrill ing adventures o f J esse Ja1 1 es, o r Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress. ( On e so ofte n does that, don-c hu kn ow ) But roget down to our r ea l subject, which is time. Y ou kn o w ) tim e is a funn y thing. Y o u kn ow S c h op en hau e r says that time is th e onl y un c hanging dimensio n I hav e a g r ea t deal of r espec t ( o r Schopenhauer, but I can't bring myself to believe everything that h e says) and thi s state m en t about time is o n e o f th e things I don't believe It see m s to me that time is just about one of th e IllOSt changeabl e dimensions that there is. Y o u always see tim e pictured as an old man, but alo ng about o n e and five-eigh th s minutes of nine when 1 am leaving h ome to tre ad the se v e n or e l eve n blocks between m e and th e sce n e o f m y labor s, nam e l y, Cristobal H i g h School, I see a vision of a winged l\l e r cury fleeting past m e with a scyth e ove r his s h ou lder and I say t::> m yself, "What f oo l s men are!" But that impression doesn't las t l ong, because along about the first quarter of th e first in the morning I am f o r ced to c hang e m y about i\l r. Time all ove r again. I go to class all primed f o r a brilliant recitation, but after] have h e l d In)' seat for about t en minutes, I discover that what I don't know h o l ds about a three-fourths maj ority so I slide away dow n o n th e ba c k o f m y n ec k, h oping that I'll be mi ssed in the ru s h and count the young e t ern i t i es as they flutt e r b y One place that time a l ways makes m e angry, though, i s in socia l problems class, when I think of a great many things to say, and so does eve ry one else, and the first thing J know i\lr. Time has stepped on th e accele ra tor and gone speedi ng by before we are half through. And did you eve r get a geometr), proposition that did not hav e any so lution? That always makes me mad. \\'e ll, I usually get ra s h and c hal leng e Time, and believe mc, it is so m e ra cc. The worst thing to try to do t h ough, is to c r owd Time. J think he resents that mJre than any-thing else \Vhe n you t ry to s l ip in t h ree weeks where th e re ought to b e onlr one dar, there are u s uall y co mpli ca ti o n s I t is like trying to build a twelve-by-eight-inch-puzzle on a six-by-four in c h table. I kn ow. I 've tri e d both. T h ere are school, and golf, an d t e nn i s, and swimming, and ba s k e t ball, and-oh, I could go on n aming i n num e rab l e t h ings that oug h t to b e don e every day, if tim e w eren't in s u c h a h urry. The oth e r day a teac h er said to m e Y o u k n ow, you wou l d get r eally good mark s if yo u would only put a l ittle mor e time on your w ork," and a man said t hat I'd "playa corking go od game of tennis" if I 'd "only put in a littl e m ore tim e practicing," and some one e l se proph es i ed that I 'd be a coming golf c h ampio n if I'd o nly work at my driving-"just take a little tim e off' ever)' day and work up a good drive." If tim e w ould only s l ow up at th e rig h t m o ment, for a while, (a nd if I were f oo l enough to b elie ve eve ry thing I h e ar ), I 'd be t h e fort y-eleventh wond e r of the world. Ala s I t is a terrible thing f o r a bud ding genius to b e so h an d icapped, but Ti m e waits for no man," so at least I do n't ne e d to feel t hat I am b e ing parti cu l arly illtreated. Bu t you k now, w h en you come rig h t dow n to bra ss tacks, t h ere i s no use contending wit h T ime. I h av e h ad seve ra l years' experience now, and I ve come to t hat conclusion. The r e i s no u se rus h ing Time. You can't b ea t him and you can't get aroun d him. T h e only t h ing to do is to g rab a-hold as h e rushes by and h ang on T i me isn't going to go your pace so you'll have to go h is, and l e t me tell you (co nfidentially, th i s i s) you've got to have a pretty good grip when h e gets going and you've got to have pretty good brakes w h en he decides t hat it is time t o s l ow up. TARP ON. N/nltiSOIl pumg, '23. The smoot h clear water flows so s wiftl y byA so lid s ha dowed s heet made dark by mat O( moss beneath. Then o n the r oc k s whi c h lie D elow it (ails with rumbling r oa r. At that, I t r ests aw h ile, a mi r ror (or the skr. I n it I stand and patiently combat The heat o( s un, and weariness. I ply The rod and try to lure the a u toc rat. I wait, and wait, and wait, and still I wait. Aht Now a thrill, a tig h tening o( thc line! A tarpon l eaps, a.sparkling in the s un ; I pla y him-in and out-a "reel" debate; H e struggles, gills wide.sprc:ad. Tho victory mine, I 'm sad: the silv e r king with l i(e is don e. See illUJtl11tioliOll l108it.e

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TH E CARTBBE .. N. __________

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++ THE C._\RIBBE:I.Y !I;--G c e j!l; .-\:-; I:"\FER:>IO L F ranas Gra)', '25. CI,ara(/Crs ; The devil. Cle op." . Juliu s Caesar Lucrezia B o rgia C nde R emus. Sce ne; Hades. ._\ shady corner o f the B rim s tone C ountry Club overloo king the Styx. Cleopatra r eclines langui d ly o n the sizzling su rface of a cast-iron d ivan, whil e Caesa r l ounges against the electrified barbed -wire rail, s ipring with relish a tall gla ss o f molten l ead. Lu c r ez ia stands with a phia l of h er favorite h em lock in h er hand whil e s h e watc h es with inte r es t rh e passage of Charon as h e ferries a newc o m e r acros s the river. Caesar \"hat see'st thO ll fair Lu crezia? Surely the re i s naught o f interes t at this h ') ur. Lucrezia \\' hat m e all' s r thou, Ca es ar, naught o f interest? i\ gentleman o f co lor doth approach. Cleopatra A gentleman o f co l or, say's t thou? Lucr ezia. Bu t surely, o ne o f your own country, perhaps som e cl03e o f kin ( She laugh s deris ively.) Cae.ra,.. no, s w ee t Lu c r ez ia. Tho u know'st ou r fair companion h as naught o f co l o r to h e r. Cleopatra. H eed h e r n o t, my Caes ar. 'Tis naught hut the jealousy that doth p ossess h er. I f 'twer e not f Jr de c ir cumstances, I s h o uld probably hav e f e l t the biting o f h e r h emloc k e r e n ow. commo ti o n i s h ea rd outs ide, and prese ntl y around th e corner o f th e porc h appears Uncle R em u s.) Ullele R enJ/tJ. (Gazi ng wid e-eyed o n the ancient and somewhat scant)' costumes o f th e two w o m e n and Caesar.) D e L awd hab m e r cy on mah soul! Whe r e is I at' CarJar. (Advanc ing ) W elcome to o ur c it y and our club. What name didst thou b e ar up o n the earth? Come, speak up, man! Stand not so, and gape like some raw lad Uncle Remus i\lah-mah name is Uncle R emus suh, butbut-ah reck on ah must a dropped into de wr o ng pla ce Caesar. ',"rang place, go to! This is th e o nly place into whi c h thou ca nst drop; so b e assured. C o m e, l e t m e present thee to the ladi es This is Quee n Cle opatra, fair es t and m os t beautiful of all w omen. (Cleopatra languidly raises one w h ite hand which Uncle R emus gingerly touches and drops like a hot pancake. ) And this is the far famed Lu crezia B orgia, whose deadly heml oc k has gnawed the vital s of more than o n e unfaithful love. ( Lu c r ez ia n ods h e r h ead with a sar d onic s mil e, and Uncle Remus c h okes and swal l ows but utters n o t a word. ) Cleopatra. But sit thee h e r e b eside me, and tell me o f the thin gs upon the earth. I envy not those struggling m ortals, w h o climb and crawl and grove l in th e dirt, all for a f e w paltry coins or the f.vor o f th e fickle goddess Fam e Came' Speak, man. Uncle R e mus. (Sitting gingerl)' on a glowi n g chair. } Lawd, f V l i ss us, it's hard times on de earf right n ow. Dey aint enuf coal to keep the pore f o lk s wann, and d c)'s all mi ghty nig h t o freez ing to d eath. D e cotton crop don fail las' year, an' a blight com c al o ng a n d tuk away de cawn. Atwcen d e freezin' an' d e starvin' dey aint been much laughin' an' a nigger caint git n o whar wdout laughin'. Cleopatra. \\'hy it reminds one o f th e l oc u s t s in Egypt. I had tho ught the m ode rn civilization had overcome Stic h things Uucl e R emits Lawd, H oney, modern c i viliz a tion aint overco m e n othin'. It's just made m o re things what n e eds to be ove r co m e. (Turning to Caesar.) But tell m e, man, w h o i s you, and h ow co m es yo u h e re? CaeJar. ( P ompo u s l y and wit h mu c h c h es t. ) \\'hy, mall, I am Julius Caesa r Y o u see b e f o re you the R uins of the noblest man that eve r liv ed in th e tide o f times". Afte r thrice r efus in g a c r ow n in th e mighty city of R o me, I ca me here t o escape the t oils o f t h e selfis h world.

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T H E CARIB BEAN, Uncle N.ell/us. Y OLI refused a crown, YOli say? Lawd, if dar don'r put me in mine' ob de time 'at Br e r Lio n got tired ob his crow n an' '(u sc to w ear it. hucks though, there's always plenty ou f o lk s ',us willin' [0 wear it even second han'. B r e r R abbit he.:: step right up an' offered to do de kingin' for a whil e an' Br er Lio n han' it abef to him an' went of F fis hill'. Dcm was de days 'fore man had 'gull to do de kingin', but man done gone alo ng jes de.:: same a s de animal s lIsed to. I reck o n dc)' aillt so b erry muc h difFerence atcr a ll. Lucrt'Zia. You know, m y lo rd Caesar, mcthinks w e have a seco nd Socrates among us Cleopatra But true, (air Lucrezia. 'Twould b e most amusing to hear the two discourse together. Cat'sar. But so! \\'c must arrange a meeting be-\I'hat in Hades is this? Oh! The de,il! I f tholl canst exc use mc, laJies, rnethinks I will retire fro m the sce n e. Cleopalrn. ;'\Tay Caes ar, it i s that w e all mu s t be excused, for I have no more stomach f o r this company than th oll hast. /....uC1y::.itJ. j\Tor I Fare-thee-well, L'ncle R emus. CI ,'opnll'n nnd Cnesnl', ( I ronically), Ayc, farethee-well! (Exit Caesar, Cleopatra, and L u c rczia. Uncle Remus stands dumbfounded staring after them, Ente r the devil b ehind) Devil. Ho! H a! \"hat have we h ere? A newcomer methinks. Speak, shade. \\" h o art thou? Uncl e R em us. Ah's Uncl e R emus, suh, an' who may you b e? DeDil, \\'ho may I be? Ho! Ho' Ho' \I'hy I'm t h e lord and master of this kingdom. I'm t h e Devil. Vnclt! R emus. D e devil you is! \\'hy rnan whar is )'0' horns an' )'0' tail? r ain't n e b e r bero' see a devil wifout horns an' tail. DeDil, (\\,ith a snort), Horns and tail! \I' hat t rash That is nonse ns e to frighte n the children. But corne, have you dined? Uude Remus. D ine? How rou talk "dine"? D evil Dined, eaten, partaken of food. R emus. You mean has let? D evil Precisely! Has you et? R emus. \\'ell no, suh, I ain't. Devil. Come then with me. ] would h ear the news o f earth, but not on an empty s t omac h. (Exit Uncle Remus and the devil.) SCt'llt': T H E BOOKLEGGER EmSI ElIplmll, '2J. The office of one of our general s of industry. Cllfl1'n(/fl's: i\I r. Jones, said general. T ony, an agent. T Oil)' (Entering office with bulging hip pocket), Jood morning. I 'rn Tony Hotstufr. I wa s speaking to you over the phone this morning. JOUt's. Oh yes! Glad to see you. it down. 1'011), ( Looking cautio u s l y about) Rotten weather, ain't it? Everybody's got a cold or sumplll. place you got here. \\'e ll, ahern, Brown was sayin' you was interested in some good stufr. H e bu ),s everything h e gets from me, J01It'S. Y es, h e spok e to m e about it and s howed m e some stuff h e got from you. TOllY. I've got an awful good line just now. J ust got it in da), b e fore yesterday, JOlles, \I'hat have )'ou got? T on)'. \V e ll I have sumpin' direct from Arthur Schnitzler. JOlles, I've tried hi s stuff and I didn't think much of it. T ony. That's funny. I t was supposed t o b e real genuine stuff. JOlles, o f been diluted, T Oil)" I don't hand le nuthin' diluted if I can help it, J o n es but of course it's hard to tell what i s real stuff' and what ain't. here's a sample of some stufl' l just got, Sherwood Anderson-carne over the Canadian border. JOlles (gleefull )') Sherwood Ande rson! T on)' R egular stuff too. I've sold a lot nnd ain't had no complaints. Jones. How much? T ou)'. Sh, I can you have a case for ::;180. Jones. That's pretty steep. Got anything e lse? TOil)'. \\'e ll, I got some Ben H echt, and some D. H. I.awre nce-it's all roung stuR' though but plent), of ki c k in it, Jones Got an)' Balzac o r I bsen or--TOll)'. Naw! Nobody can get any of that stuff any m o r e I t ain't made no more. JOlles, \\'ell, I don't think I 'll o rd e r anything to-day, I 'll call rou up late r, T on),. All right, but you'd better put in your order in a coupla days, It's gettin' harder and harde r to get good stuff through. Cur/nino

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THE CARIBBEAN. :l1R. SH ."'KESPE. -\.RE \'I ITS GOPHER PR. -\.IRIE UJltiu Z3. Characters. \\'illiam hak espeare 1\l r. Sinclair L e wis Caro l K ennicott. Doctor K ennicott. B og art. Plare. Gopher Prairi e Time l i ght. (The rise of the curtain discloses 1\fa in Street. of its filth and sordidness is hidd e n bv the darkn ess. A s tiff, dirty-white, dead cat, wi-th its blank, vacuous fac e toward th e a u die n ce, lies stretch ed direc tl y above t h e footlights. Enter I r. Shakespeare followed by Sinclair L ewis ) Lewis. This town repr esents any small town in this country. Shakespeare. ( Hunting h urriedl), f or his g l asses. ) H ow swee t the moonlight s l eeps upo n t his bank--" Le w i s Bank? Y ou're mistaken. I t's the light from the lamp in B ogart's kitchen shini n g on the as h pile in th e ya rd! SI/akespem'e ( Wh o is slightly deaf) H e r e we willsit-" L ew i s ( H o l ding hi m back and kicking aside a r otten overrip e banana whic h r olls across t h e stage and stopS, propped tipsi l y agai nst t h e s i de o f the cat) Not muc h we won't, \Villie! Not o n b oxes coming fr om H ow land and Gould's Groce ry. I made them and I know what they are \\"h)" man, they're simp l y alive with--(At this p oint a hug e cockroac h e m erges fro m the b o x on whi c h 1r. Will iam S h akespeare i s about to sit, and s l ow l y waving his whiskers, walk s se datel y across the stage and di sappears b e hind the wing s ) S hakesp e ar e (Hunting frantical l y for his g l asses ) "And l e t the sound o f mu s i c creep i n our ears." Lewis (\\' iping his face with a dirty, stained rocket handkerchie f ) Oh, n o w e don't. If anything does any c r eeping it'll b e I. L e t 's go, o ld man. I 'm s i c k of h e arin g so m e phonograp h grinding out "Yo u Y o u tellern" or "l\1r Gal lagher" or "Stum-" Sllokespeare (\\'ho ca n not h ea r but b elieves in being pleasant). '" stic h a night as thi s Lew is. Oh man Quit the s pouting. No olle ever bothl.!rs about yo u an y more. \Ve'r e inte r est ed in realism, materiali sm. You s h o u l d read my b oo ks, for illstallce--H ave rou ever met Caro l K e llnicott? Sh e 's--. Shakrs peare ( Still hunting for glasses ) When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees--" L ewis ( Exasperated ) Yes! Yes! W e kn ow th e rest. ( Imitating S h akespeare's to ne) t h e farm hand, methinks came a -s parking at i'1atilda Ann's. ( Enthusiastically) But you must meet l\l rs. K e nnicott. S h e's a real c ha racter, that woman. Car ol! Carol! (Ente r Carol, resignedly, dressed in silve r car r ying a dirt)' gra), d i s hra g in one hand, 111 t h e o th e r a treatise on village improvement. S h e is followed b y a mang y fleabitte n, sk inn y dog that scratc hes industrio u s l y throug h o u t t h e e n tire sce n e.) Cnrol. Jus t another of t h ose sord id co mm o n p l ace peop l e h e makes m e meet. Called Shakes p e are at t hat. 1 f h e on l y w e r e Ihe S hak espeare. H e'd h ave un ders t ood me. Shakes pear e Ah Ah---L ewis. And B ogart! Y ou'd lik e h er. S h e's true to life \\'hy s h e might eve n be your g r a n d moth er. Mrs. B oga rt!! ( Mrs. B ogart, w h o h as bee n waiting impa ti e ntl y for him to call, oozes in. S h e sees Mr. S h akespeare and is oblivious to all e l se. S h e runs a s fast as pos s ible toward him and t h rows fat damp, pu dgy arm s abou t his n eck. S h e s nick ers .) Nln. B og art. Mr. S ha kespeare! Mr. Willi am S h akespeare? H ow wonderful you s h ou l d be called that. H e wrote beautifu l se rmons. He-Car ol Suc h v ulgar demonstrations. L ew is. I I say You aren't sup p osed t o act like that. 1 d idn't make--" S hakesp eare madly for his glasses ) I ha ve a--Mrs. Bo g art. I l ove you! I l ove you! R oses are red! Vio lets--Shakespeare ( S h o u ts ) '" h ave a wife who m, I protest, I l ove AIrs. B ogar t. O h h -h' '! (Faints.) ( Doctor Kennicott ente rs and drags h e r out, assi s t ed by Sinclair L e wis, w h o realizes yo u do n' t kn o w a woman even if you've created h er. Ca r o l trail s d i sg u s t ed l y after. The gray d i s h rag swings stiffly. S hak espe ar e finall y finds his gla sses H e l ooks around, sees th e a s h pile, th e rott e n banana, t h e d e ad cat, andMain Str eet.) S llIIkespetl!"t' ( I. eavi n g h a s tily ) "A gentl e r iddance-Draw th e cunai ns Go! ( H e d i sappears.)

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T H E CARI BBEAN. 4 7 A SHRED OF YELLOW PAPER. D o r ollty Abeudroth, '25. Cho ng, quaint-cyed l e m o n -c h ee ked, bizarre in orrho d o x raim ent, s huffl es thro u g h the g ra y sile n ce of the dawning c it)'. H e dro p s so m ething, a piece of pape r, crumple d and yellow. I pi c k it up. Under th e bili olls A a r e o f t h e arc light, sprawling, gr o t es qll c, Chinese l e tter s confront m e \ \ 'hatdo th ey m e an -these fan tasticcharac t e r s? Perhaps th e y f O fm a p oe m whi c h Cho n g ha s writte n wh e r e the litrl e purple d r eams rise a s in ce n se to the Princess o f the P oppy in the sec r e t squalid r oo m abo v e L o J\l ie's groce r y s t o r e P e r haps thi s i s what they m ean: H O L otus Lady, light o f the bamboo hut amo n g the willow trees Chong YOll! The candles o f the 11100n and stars Ric k e r pal e b e f o r e the lantern o f your b eauty All the great empresses o f a thousand y ears, who have made m e n drunk and d ead with l o v e, stir envio u s l y in the ir swathing o f s ilk and of coppe r. "0 Lotus Lady, your will o w s d r ooping toward the shall o w s are s a d but I am sadder. I ( e r e in an ali e n land wh e r e the w o m e n are marble n O t gold, wh e r e the ir h earts are i ce, not fir e h e r e where the stars are frighte n e d fr o m the s k y b y great glaze d candl es 1 y our Cho ng am so lon e l y H O L otus Lady a c r oss wid e d eserts ) a c ro ss tall m ountains a c r oss the width o f the se a o n a sampan o f dreams drawn b y jade drago n s y our Chong comes t o gree t Y O ll!" I s this the poem that Cho n g has writte n in sprawling characte rs upon the crumpled s h ee t o f faded, yell o w pape r? Or do the l ette r s m e r e ly m ean: "Six collars three shirts f our handke r chi e f s and one pair o( trouser s ?" A SOLI LOQUY. '"il/iam COllsi m '25. 1 am s hort, s l e nder and bla c k, t h e pri de o ( t h e S enio r cla ss This i s m)" second y car wit h the Seni o r class bu t ] s hall never be gradu a ted, although the y c o m e ( o r m e wh e n l esso n s are to be prepare d. I ha ve writte n sonne t s, descriptions, all ego ries, and the m es ; ye t the teachers think that the S enio r s n e v e r ha ve othe r s do t h ei r work. i\l y history i s short. I wa s b orn in .lanesville, \\' i sco n s in. in 1 915 and fr ol11 t here -' went to N e w Y ork, arriving in 1 9'1O A l t hough only five y ears o l d I wa s (ull gro wn . left Xew York on the Adv ance ( o r the Canal Zone, reac h ing the Isthmus in January 1 921. One d a y wh i l e i n t h e Cri s t o bal C o m m issar y 1 m e t a C r i s t o b a l Hig h S c h oo l Freshma n w h o in v ited m e h o m e. The n ex t day h e roo k m e to school w i t h him. \\'hile I wa s the r e that d a y ) sever a l i g n o r ant Freshme n had m e do the ir S panis h thi s w a s m y aterloo, a s I d i d n o t kno w the first t hin g about Spanis h o r algebra eithe r, a s soon f ound out wh e n they had m e attempt to so l ve an equati o n. This mus t ha ve angered m y fri e nd, a s that a fternoon 1 was l e ft o n his desk, and I never saw him a g ain Sev e ral days late r a s wa s restin g a ft e r II tuss l e wit h an En glis h the m e, a b o)' with a red nose, large frec kl es and r e d hair s n eake d lip b ehind m e and be f o r e c oul d even dodg e, clutc h e d m e b y t h e n ec k and dragge d m e out o f the r oo m and into the c ni o r sanctuary wh e r e I had t o write a stor y f o r the Annual. (This i s h o w I b ecame a S e ni o r. ) This boy always k ept m e o n hi s desk afte r thi s and I d id n o w o rk ( o r anyon e but S enio r s ( o r t h e rest o ( the ye ar. This year the S e ni o r s do n o t prize m e a s d e arl y a s di d the o nes o f la s t year, and f am sorry t o say I am so m e tim es forced to do Junio r workwhi c h i s far b e l o w the d i gnity o f a Senio r P e n. GATL' N I A KE. Emogene JV(/sh. J. O h wond r o u s w ork of migh t), men R ea l me n of bra w n a n d br a in. Who your deep jung l e did not f ear, N o r fe\'er, nor tropic rain U po n rour boso m pa sses n o w The com m e r ce of all n atio n s ; Wh e r e once t h e un tamed C hagr es r aced \\'o r k men in close r elations; \\'here now majestic s h ips h old s w a)' On rippling waters' face. T here once roamed fierce wild animals \\, ho here found hiding place; A nd now, like hO:lry gr.l)' Y our dt:ad gho"c-like st:lndT heir greH, grim trunks, sole relics or tropic jungle !.tne!. Glltun Lake-The Dying Jungle.

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THE C AR IBBEAN. 8 n'CED
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THE CA R IBBEAN. 49 F A ITH. LQI/iu IImla, '23. l'v lany people have.;: attempted to sol ve the myst e r y o f a sm:111 boy's mind, attcrnpted, and are s till attempting though the small h o y s o f ( o u r have b eco m e the s mall I n)"s of nincty f ) ur. \\,i se p eo p l e, es p ec i cdly m others an d so me fc.:w fathers, have given lip t h e search alld have Icarn e.! to take things a s they com e, trusting to God and the ir o wn l u c k to pull the m t hrough \\hate\'a difficulties may ari se. Kid c hriste n ed (0)' th e I brd B o iled Gang," nine-rear-o ld veteran s o f numerOliS s treet fig hts, and s killed in "ditching the cop, ",a'5 n o exce pti on to t h e ge n e ral rtl I !::, alt h o ugh IlQ o n.:: had e v e r attempted to undersr:tnJ him. A.s far ali h e knew, h e had never had any (:tt her or mother, and B ig Pat i\laho n c)' who had pi cked him grim)' and ash-covered, out of an overflowing garbage can, in a m o m ent o f sobri ety, used, a s hi s onl y m eans of understand ing, a lo ng, black ra\\hidc w hip, a r emnant of t h e gl ory of f orme r days wh e n h e wa s employed in the very superi o r and mu c h exalted positi o n of garbage wagon driver. No o n e had ever sympath ized with l\:iLl i\l ike. :"] 0 o n e had ever even s u s p ected him of ha\'i n g any loftier o r softer sentiments than a love of fighting and an atl),th ing-is -right-if-you-can-getaway-with -it f ee ling,-that is, n o t until .;\I rs. i\lars h o l d and m otherly, came into hi s lif e S h e had come down to FOurteenth Street, bringing some delic a c ies for a former cook o f hers, and had arrived just in time to meet K id i ssuing rathe r precipitate l y from t h e door, aided by the impetus given h im by the square toe o f Big Pat's huge and muc h w o rn s h oe The r e was som ething compellin g abollt l\l rs. l\lars h to whi c h e \ 'c n K i d i\l ik e, s ull e n and r e sentful, finally s uccumbed. She came se\'eral times afte r this and each t im e Kid wa s on the lo o k out for her to escort her to and from her destinatio n. Finally s h e came to kl1O\\ the big, secret desire o r Kid lire-a dog-all his own-to fight with h im and f o r him. H e didn't care what kind jus t so's it had e n ough leg s t o walk 011 and a tail to waggle-oh yes-jus t so it l oo k ed like a dog. J\I r s i\lars h unde rstood. She though t of Spots at h o me. ;:.Jo o n e really wanted him or needed him n o w that the boys were grown. Christmas was only two days oA-. But Christmas m eant n othing to K id heyond an extra quart o f fo" Big Pat; so \Irs, j \ larsh sat on the cold, stt:il of the crowded tenement and tol d h im tht: story of the first Christmas and then or our ny>dern Chri stm<1'i, with its fat jolly Santa Claus, Christmas trees and prt:st:nts. Sht: promised to St:c that Santa C lalls s hould bring him what h e \\ :lI1tc.J but he;: must faith in hLT and Santa and mO.':'it of all in God, who made all things P()sSI'll;.:. Two days of n t:rve-racking suspense f )lIowed, morning came nooll -en;ning -allJ rht:n night and still no kind \ J rs. ;\ Iars h. The day it wa s the samc..:. and the next. \\"ecks It:ngtht:IH.:d into months and still s h e didn't come. H e di.Jn 't know that hers had been just onc of the many d.:'arhs cau'ied b } reckless driving o n crowded st:c..:ts o n a Christma'i morning. H e rCITIt:I11-b eret! what s h e had said. Faith? I n her? I n G od? Ther had hoth (ailed h im. F aith? T h ere wa s n o s u c h thing. ; \nd so, without faith in God or mall, K id ;\ Iikc set out on the road o f I. ife. A CASE OF IDE"TlTY, GuaM B.'iSJ. Jr., .13. S h e was ing a s as any woman does hurry "ht:n s h e i s trying to get the dinner prepare .. 1 b:.:fore t h e m e n folks" get home. T h e meat wa s bro\\/ling nicely, the potatoes had reached the stage where they gave oR-" that rantalil-ing aroma, and everythin g was about ready for the table. She was in t h e act of taking it fr o m the sto\'e when the doorbell ga forth a short staccato. Hurriedly, s h e \\ip ed her face on h e r none-tooclean apron, and wt:nt to welcome the caller, whoe \ 'e r it might b e :\ glan ce at hirn re\'ealed a book in hi s h:1.l1d and so the conclu s ion wa s that h e was the book agent that had b een in town for the pas t few days . I n a hast)', half-courteous manner s h e il1\it ed him inra the h o u se, but s howed \'cry plainly that s h e wa s quitt:: \\ illing to get rid o f h im as soon as possible. ;-\s soon as h e had seated himself, s h e burst forth with, \\" ell, \\ hat will you b.! wanting? I suppose that you have some good-for-nothing book that I ha\'e no use For \\hatsoe\e r. Come, com e hurry! I haven'tallday, a s my dinner i s about ready to burn now. Let's hear w hat have to say and gd it done quickly." \\' hil e s h e was sayin g all of this, the book agent wa s gasping for breath and staring in surprise.

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50 THE CARIBBEAN. A few more short and snappy rema rk s s h e made, and then, \\ ithout a word of warning, l e ft f o r the kitchen from \\ hich co n side rabl e smoke was pouring forth. : \ few minutes late r s h e appeared in the sitting r oom again, and said as s h e mo\'eJ in a Stern but not stately manner, "\Ye ll, now that e\'erything is burned, I suppose--" Bu t she got no further, f o r the book agen t had. flo wn, much to her s urpri se, as w ell a s delight. o she went back to the kitch e n to make o u t o f the remains whate\ 'e r might b e possible The next day at c hur c h, s h e met th e new pastor. : \ nd the people wondered wh)' s h e fainted. ?\,HER \ GA IN! Louise Hmw', '23. i\l ary ha d just co me to t own. On h ea ring that ou r most popular game was basket ball, s h e irll mediately became desiro u s of understanding th e game so that she might apprec iate t h e man)' games s h e intenued to see So I o n l y too overjoyed at the prospect of exp laining th e intricacies of my fa\'orire SpOrt t o thi s l ess fortunate, t h o ugh certainly most attracrive mem b e r of t h e weaker sex, took h er to t h e club h o u se 011 th e night o f t h e game between C r istobal and B a lboa H igh Sc h ool. A s soon as w e were seated s h e began: "Oh' \\' hat are t h ose things?" "Those things," I ex pl ained, "are c all ed ba skets and --" "\\' h y do t hey run around in c ir cles un de r t h ose jiggers?" "They run around lik e that unde r the ba skets to gt!t warmed up." "\\' armed up? \\' hat's t hat? O ve r w hat?" S h e h ad the cutest way of plJtting h er finge r to her mouth w h e n s h e g i gg l ed But w hile [ wa s busy answe rin g h er questions and ex plainin g what the lin es meant o n t h e floo r, s h e wa s of f o n another subject. "Oh! Doesn't the B alboa team h ave pretty suits ? D o n't they l ook darling? They' r e mu c h better l ooki ng than th e Cristobal boys!" But even thOlJgh it was s h e w h o sa i d itJ I was up in arms. "\\' h y wt:'vt: got t h e best sc h oo l o n t h e Zone! \\'e're second to none! I f YOll don't b elieve i t, ask l\l iss Dodds' She's over there. We've got the pep and the r ep! Balboa's got a snappy tea m but we aren't afraid of them! No; n o t a bit! \\' ho's the t e am that's going to win? Cris--" I wa s interrupted by t h e r e f e r ee s whi s tl e "\\' h o's that? \\'hat's the whistl e f o r? " H e i s th e referee," I ex plain e d. Th e r e f e r ee ref e r ees and wh e n h e r e f e r ees h e blows the w h i s tl e wh e n fouls are-" What's f ouls?" I missed o n e o f M oo r e's l ight nin g baskets by exp l a inin g S h e c u t m e s h ortJ h owever "\\'hy do those m e n b oth stand in the c ircle? \\' h y i s it t hat whe n t hat m a n blo w s t h e whi s tl e and says 'Ball out' so m eo ne a l ways thro w s it in again?" I ex plain ed, t hat i s I started t o exp l ain but s h e brok e in, Oh! D o n t you think that tall cente r o f B a lb oa's i s the swellest-l oo kin g thing yo u eve r s aw? \ Vhat' s his name? \Vho's t hat b oy w ith the pretty eyes?" "No I don't," I sai d in a n s wer t o h e r fir s t question I n e ver d i d think Norfleet wa s handsome, and 1 don't t hin k an yo n e e l se does e ith er! But h e 's--" Wh o i s that b oy t hat j u s t l oo k ed this way? Who's that? What's thi s? Wh y did h e fall down? \ \,h e n--" A faint g limmer o f light came t o m e I didn't eve n attempt to answer. S h e n eve r n o t i ced I got up. Still s h e d i dn't n o ti ce. I l e ft S h e h ad f o rgotten all abou t m e P U P P PATH ETIC. E1'I/J/ Eltphrtll, '23. G ood graci o u s I t wa s rig h t ove r him a g r ea t bla c k thing with l o ng c r ooked claw s As it ca m e neare r ) it got bigg e r and bigger! C l oser! Clo ser! I t closed around h im! H e s hut his eyes ; his h eart t humped; h e s h oo k fro m th e edge o f hi s littl e p ink n ose to t h e tip of his tail. The r e It ha d h i m b y t h e ba c k o f the n eck! \Vell! I t was only the s h ad o w o f his mistress's hand as s h e came t o take him f or a walk

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T H E Ct\ R II313EA:-I. 5 TilE 1 0\\'A. Adifll CQII/bollrn, 'ZI il1thlr,ltiln, p.).: l! 1 Into t h e harbo r of Col o n and o n throu g h P a nama Canal steamed t h e Atlantic flel!t with h e r huge super-dreadnoughts, g rim e r s and trim s u bmarin es. I t was ind eed an sight, for the w hite uniforms of the m e n made a dazlling Contrast with the sombre..: T h e flee t maneuvers were to h e h eld in the P a cific, o ff the coast o f Panama, and the ships \\ce o n their to take part in t h em. A m ong t h e m was the U. S S I OUNI making her farewell voyage fr o m the e a S t e rn s h o r e of the L'nited States, and h e r first anJ final voyage t hrough t h e Panama Canal to the P a cific \\ h e r e s h e was to rende r h e r la s t bit f o r h e r COlllHr)" as she was to be lIse d a s a targe t f o r the gUlls of t h e Atlantic and P a cific Aeets during t h e maneuve r s s h e r eturned to h e r homeland as the victor, A ying the R ed, \\'hire, and H im:. Cheer after c heer was g i\t.:n f o r h e r and hcr n oble crew. Then cam e larger and finc r battleships. The I owa grew small by comparison. Still s h e h e ld her own, for s h e had a g lorio u s past of which the newer ships could not boast. She had been commanded h y som\.! of the mOSt prominent captain s o f the ;\T;-tV). though the newer ships were larger and Ilv)re f ormidable, they had never been callcu llpOIl to Liden I their country's Aag as had the L S. S. I owa. T h e \\'orld \\'ar cam e The f own, b eing co n s id e red an obsolete t),p e, was placed in commis s io n but a ss igned to duty in h o m e wate r s She was used in conncctio n with the training o f m e n n c w l y e nli sted in the naval service, and in this manner contributed h e r part in n o small way by furni s hin g trained m e n f o r t h e l1l:wer battleships T rim a n d neat as i n days gone by, s h e looked a s s h e went o n her way, her c r e w walking her decks for t h e last time, and t h e Aag of the co untry whi c h s h e had served so faithfully flying from h e r gaff. A nd as t h e f owa procee d e d on t h is, h e r la s t trip u nder her own steam, t h e t h o u g h t came of t h e old days w hen s h e had been t h e pride o f our ?\ Tav)'. 1 n t h e year of our Lord J 897, s h e had been com pleted at Cramp's S hipyard, Philadelph ia, Pennsylvaniat h e larges t battlesh ip of t hat time. Al most immediatel y after s h e had been placed in comm issio n war was declared with Spain. The I owa was at t hat time commande d by Captain Robley D Evans, better known as "Fighting Bob. Under h is command the l own proved h e r worth at t h e battle of Santiago and played an im portant part as a fig hting unit of the United States Atlanti c Aeet w hen t h e Spanish fleet was dest royed. How prou d t h e nation was o f h e r w h e n destroyers, and submarines as w ell a s armed guards f o r t h e m erchant s hips crossing the Atlantic carrying troo p s and cargo. The Peace Confere nce came-and finally the D i sarmament Confe r e n ce, in whi c h t h e L1nite d States agreed to scrap so many ships. Our Navy had to b e reduced; so the o ld es t ships must go. The i owa was t h e n se lected a s the s h ip to b e fitted out for use in connectio n with experimental tests of radio control. Afte r several experiments on t h e Atlantic coa s t the I owa was ordered south to b e used a s a target in connection with the winter maneuve r s of the Cnited States Aeet. Here s h e wa s brave ly proceeding on h e r way, following t h e example o f her noble officer s and men who had not been afraid to dare. I n three week s afte r they reached Panama Bay t h e Aeet had carrie d out their prearranged maneuvers and proble m s.

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T H E CARIBBEA r ;\larch 1 9 1 923, got under w a y the Jou:n a ccompanying the m, controlled by radio th rough the C. S. S. M i ss i ssippi. S h e see med a phantom s h ip, for t h ere was not a s o ul o n b oard y e t h e r e ngines wer e fUlln i n g a nd h e r boilers filled a s if s he wer e ma n ned h e r ere\\. The Stars and Stripe s w e re prou d l y flying fro m h e r gaff and s h e seemed t o de r ive a COI1-sc i o u s d i gnity fro m t h e fact t hat s h e ha d defe n ded the h o n o r o f that flag and carrie d it to v ictor y ; that s h e had don e h e r d uty f a i t h f ull y t o h e r country; and that n o w s h e was still se r v in g i t e \ 'e n tho u g h it was h e r last serv ice. T h e y proceede d to t h e op e n sea a n d a rri ved a t the s p o t whe r e t h e [ oUi n was to b e s u n k o n 2 0 The se a, b l u e a nd p la c i d un de r the afte rn oo n SUIl, see m e d a fitti n g g r a ve for suc h a s hip. \\' h e n the I ow a wa s n i n e mil es a way, t h e \ / iss i ssip p i starte d firing o n h er. Afte r a f e w sal vas fro m the huge guns o f th e superd readn o u g h t the I owa lay an immovabl e, def e n se l ess target. !Ii S ec r etary D enby o r de r ed t h e Natio nal Anth e m to b e pla yed o n b oa r d th e U. S. S. M aryla n d and as t h e stra in s floated out a c r oss t h e wate r e v e r y vis itor office r and man o n t h e s h ip s s t oo d at a t t e n t i o n head b a red, a s in t h e p r ese n ce o f death Tears r ose in many eyes a s t h ey l oo k ed t h e i r l a s t u po n that n o b l e s h ip. T h e na t i o na l s a lute o f tw enty-o n e gUlls w as g i ve n a s t h e I owa w ent t o h e r la s t resting place in t h e P a cific A s soo n a s s h e h a d go n e dow n t h e s h ip s s t e am e d over to w h e r e s h e had la s t b ee n see n. A r u s t co l o r ed scum la y like a veil over t h e wate r. J t wa s t h e o n l y v i s ibl e trac e l e ft o f t h e U. S S. I ow a bu t t h e m e m o r y o f t hat s h ip will liv e i n t h e h earts o f t h e A meri can p eo p l e f o r many t o c o m e N ow, "The ships t hat roam o e r t h e ocean's f oam 1\lay h e ar, in g h os t l y t o n es The Iowa s b e ll, a s s h e t olls h e r kn ell I n th e lock e r o f D a vy J o n es." A LLEGOR I E S OF S C H O O L LIFE EV ERY STUDENT'S RIDE. (Bolscd on t h e m o r n i n!! r u n o f t he G atun Bus.) L Ollise !lel/ler '2). Eve ry Student wa s to b eg in a n e w p e r i od o f preparat i o n f o r his j ourne y towa r d Success F o r a l o n g tim e h e h a d s ta y ed in t h e b e d V a c a t i o n altho ugh the alarm c l oc k Watc hfuln ess had a wak e n ed him fro m h i s s l ee p Eas e q u i t e e arl y But Eve r y t uclent s i g h ed, and groa n ed, a n d t hr ew the cloc k \\'a t c hful n ess under th e b u rea u C a reless n ess w h ere it s top pe d ru n n i ng e x c e p t f o r a s udden jerk o r kn oc k at l o n g inte rval s Every Student' s dog, C o n sc i e n ce his b es t fri e n d and faithf u l f ollower, w as muc h d i sturbe d b y t h e n o i se. Con sc i e n ce tri ed v ain l y to ge t unde r Care l ess n ess b u t i t was t oo big a pro p os iti o n ( o r him j so fin ally h e t u rned to E v e r y Student and scrarc h e d h il11 with th e cla w D i scomfort, waki n g h im from his s l eep E ase t o a r e ali z ati o n o f t h e situati o n L 'nder th e s h o w e r P e p, E v e r y Stude n t l os t t h e f ee l i ng o f L az in ess H e dresse d him self in t h e g arm ents o(Gooci Inte nti o n s, an d a s h e h eard t h e sc h oo l bus Ambiri o n blo wing t h e h o rn o f Opp o r tunity, h e ate a hasty bre akfast o f Pati e n ce grabbed h i s ill-pac k ed lun c h o f P e r se veranc e called f o r t h e n e w g ir l N o v e l t y carry ing h e r b oo k s o f Enj oy m ent, a n d waited for t h e bu s .1\,111-biti oll. E ve r y Student f ound t hat se v e ra l o th ers w ere a lready t h ere Pl e a s ur e, t h e pretties t g irl Bluff t h e bul l y b oy C ourage and S e l f R es p ec t, b o t h clear-eyed an d r e ady f o r a n y e m e r ge n cy and t h e t wins, C h e a t and I -S h o uld -\Vorry The dri vel' F aculty started Ambi t i o n wit h t h e c ra nk o ( Ideals a n d a f t e r a m ome n t o f co nfu s e d rumbli n gs and gro anin gs A mbit i o n b eg an i ts s l o w prog r ess a l o ng H i g h Sc h oo l R oad. Thi s road wa s d i v i d ed into f o u r p a r t s The first part wa s hard trave ling but wa s later compos e d c h i efly o f l o n g hill s down whic h Ambi t i o n c o a s ted s wiftly P l e a sure tri ed vainly to g e t E ve r y Student t o sit wit h h e r b u t Nove lty ha d all h i s atte nti on. T h e firs t s t op wa s made f o r a v e r y h o m e l y g ir l 1 \ l o noton),. T h e firs t t hing M o n o t o n y d i d wa s to

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THE CARIBB EAN. 53 push Novelty into a deserted corner, appropriating h e r seat next ro Every Student, :lnd sitting all his lun c h of P erseve ran ce, making it rather flat. She immediately began to exercise a right o\'cr E\'cry [udellt and, to escape her att entions, h e sought the company of Pl casurt:. T o s how off before ha h e stood 011 the step tudy, although repeatedl)' scokled by the dri\'er Faculty, anti, 011 going around R c\icw Curve and Examination B ump, h e would hil\'C fallen ofF but for the ready aid o f Bluff and Cheat. At Fort Industry, Efficiency, ystel11, and Readyi\loncy got on board to accompany them on the second half of their journey. Ready ;\ 1 011-ey immediately dC\'oted all his attention to Pleasure, and E\'ery Student became \'ery despondent. T o s how h e didn't care, he stood on step :\0-again but this time he was forcibly set by Faculty on the hard and uncomfortable bench of Hard Study, \\ h ere System and SelfRespecr h e l ped him very much. Ready ;\ioney persuaded Pleasure, BlufF, and Cheat to go with him so they all jumped olr at Blin d All ey R i,'er. stopped times with se\'ere jerks and loud noises, but the mysterious ailment was al\\'ays attended [Q Facu lty) and, the time they came to the third stop, A.mbition was going forward easily. A t the third stop there were three roads-Easy Work Road, leading backward; :\0 Worn Road, leading down hill; and H igh chool Road continuing onward. Ambition, after picking up Dignity and kept on its along H igh School Road through the town of .-\chie\'ement, and stopped where the great sea of Life with its ships of Experience washes the shore of Dependence. THE HARP. Ernst Enrhral, ; 23. The beautiful human harp is ready. L'pol1 the stout frame of former high sc h ool reputation are stretched the wires of studenth ood. The heav\' bass wires, the Seniors, form the background each selection The Juniors and Sophomores fur nish an accompanirnent for the Fres hmen's tune. Each instructor pricks out his tune: English, from sonorous strains of grand opera traged)' to li"ely light lyrics; the heavy cantatas of algebra and physics; the dreary chants of Latin; the patri o ti c airs of history;-all are practiced from day to dar in preparation for the quarterly recitals. par many of the wires the strain is great, and the)' begin to sag. T hese arc attenJed to hy the tuner, principal, who tightens them up and keeps the instrument in harmony. Then, after the hard day's practice of these exalted, stubborn composirions, comes the n:creation of the popular air of sports. An d through it all runs the pcn'ading theme of school spirit. 1.n RYBOy. after his graduation from high school, accompanied by his firm fricntl KnO\\ ledge, who is mounted on the steed Experience, sets out to find the [\\ in cities Success and F ame. H e has been ad\' ised many times on the matter by his friend Kn owledge, so when the two set out from the halls of Preparation, Everyboy wears a cloak of Character, hat of Determination, and s h oes of Perseverance, h e rides a steed, System, and carries a firearm, Courage. A s they ride along, Everyboy notices that there are many more engaged in the search. Some of them ha\'e no mounts, oth ers are mounted all steeds of L aziness, and still oth ers are mounted, but wear no cloaks, and carry no firearms. H e feels proud that he has such an unusual start, but t...::now\edge warns him that only the test of time will teli his future. Kn owledge has hardly finished this warning, when E\'erybo)' sees in the distance the swamp Bad I .uck. I n this swamp dwell many enemies, such as .\ iisfortune, D isgrace, and Shame. Everyboy also notices that this swamp is fed by the river Carelessness, \\ herein are the demons, Temptation, racillation, L'nsteadiness, and Failure. Beyond the river he sees a cit)', which Kn owledge tells him is the city of .-\d"ersity, where a man is either made or broken. Knowledge also says that if Everybo)' can get through the swamp, the ri,'er, and the city, h e will come out upon the good road, portune, which leads directly to the twin cities, Success and Fame. As they enter the swamp of Ba d Luck, E\'eryboy sees the enemies creeping cunningly around in order to try to render his steed System unfit, so that they can capture E\'eryboy and make him join their ranks. Simultaneously they strike, but Everyboy is on the alert and wirh the help of his fine weapon) Courage, he wards them off.

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T H E C \RIBBE A N and Knowledge hurry frolll t h e swamp and, as they come upon the river, K now ledge instructs Evcryboy as to the manner of crossing it. E\'eryboy listens with eager ears and upon reaching rhe bank he spurs his mount on, into the water. The demons are upon him; Temptation pulls at his cloak of Character, \ acillation at his cap of Determination, L 'nsteadincss at his shoes of Perseverance, while F ailure, t h e strongest of the demons, tries to force t h e steed System down and to wr c n c h the weapon from his hand. So on get an advantage over h im, b u t nC\'er-failing Knowledge rush es in and saves h im by overpowering Failure. Everyboy th en gets a chance to use his weapon and he kills all t h e demons. K nowledge then takes E\'erybo)' to t h e i nn of Confidence, where he is given a room of valor and fruits from the trees of Earnestn ess and Eagerness. A s soon as Everyboy is suffic i e ntl y rested to resume t h e hard journey, t h e two set o u t for t h e city of Adversity. ; \ s t h ey app roac h t h e city g a tes, t h ere i s n o fear in t h e heart of Everyboy, (or h e k nows t hat wit h h is cloak o( C haracter and his fir ea rm of Co u rage, Adversity ca n not harm him. H e s trik es t h e gates to t h e groun d wit h a si n g l e blow from his firearm o( Cou rage. l\l u c h to his surprise h e i s not attacked as h e m a k es t h e t ra n s i t o f the city, b u t h e rneets man y strange pe r so n s Am o n g t h e m h e sees P ride and R e l e n tless n ess, w h o a r e t h e p are n ts o( Ignorance, a n d Con ceit a n d Haugh tiness, t h e parents o f Overconfidence. F ro m t h e cit)' h e exits to t h e p l ai n o f Happi ness, t h ro u g h whic h h e sees t h e r o a d Fortune runni ng u p to t h e twi n cities, S u ccess a n d Fame H e soon reac h es t h e m a n d settl es dow n in t h e estate of B l i ss. Ruined Bridge at Old P(1I1ama. REVEIlY [nUl \larlchllm, '2';. 'Tis twilight. B y a ruined bridge J stand-.. \ crumbling bridge, vine-clad and grey with yea rsAbove a mudd)' stream. 1 dream-A band Of faithful go to eveni n g pra}'er. j\lyears Are filled with sound o f vesper bells. T h e bnd 15 calmed with peace. Fr om convent walls one hear s The chant of nuns. It dies. ,\nel then a hand On a guitar strums forth a song that c h eers. Then on the breeze i!; borne the tramp of hoofs. Again J picture \ 1 0rgan with his hordes. The)' steal upon that slumbering town. The roofs, HIgh blazing, turn the to <;carlet. Swords In darkne!;!; clash. I rou<,c. "'at me from sight lias kindl)' hid the of that night. THE OL D J UNG L E T RAiL. Louise Nellf(r, '2). The new trail ends. W e leave the glare of day And step i n to green twilight, mystic, still. T he festooned jungle and the rugged way Are peopled by dark s h adows. On the h ill, Cringin g beneat h the haughty Spania r d's sway Cru s hed down br loads of jewe ls, beaten 'ti l The blo od dripped down-red rubies on { h e g r ay Smooth path, {he servile s laves, thei r savage will Bro ken b e neath the las h, appear. B right bars Of yellow gold gleam on bent backs. The low Soft hum of voices tinkling of guitars-A parrot laughs. The stones lie b r oken row On row The gold is now the sunlight's dower; The blood, the petal s of a pa ssio n flower

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THE CAR IBBF.AN. 55 CO:- J e detail. Then mother came through the door. "Oh1 your riding breeches," s h e said. '" lent t h e m to Rut h to go exploring in. I'm sorr), s h e gOt the m dirty." I exploded. I n one long, terrible crashing burst I nullified years of good b ehavio r. I cursed a

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,6 THE CARTBBE.-\:--r. blazing, sizzling, blue streak. thing I had absorbed in se \ 'e n years' ex p e rience at \"arious I now made lise of. Xoeasy, mild "cusses" like a co mplicated Chin ese cuss, but real, man-sized h orrihle curses that fairly ripped their through the startled atmosp h e r e I cursed steadily o n f o r almost h"e minutes, with very f ew repetitions, and with all th e fervor of long pent-up emoti ons The n I went out, giving t h e doo r a s lam that almost broke it, leaving my mother horror s tru c k. Suc h a t hin g had never happe n ed before That's h ow I controlled 111)' temper o n April 2""',19'23 C H E m :--rG. \\"hy is it that the picture o f a tousle-headed stenographer c h e\\ ing g um alway s pro\'ok es a laugh? Probably b eca u se o f the p ec uliar expres sion on h e r face She looks so blank. I t see ms a s if this comica l expression always appears when one is in the g um-ch e win g pa s time. There are ways and s of c h e\\ ing gum. Some people c h ew it and deliberately in a bO\'ine manner, oth ers go about it in a serio u s business-like way, \\hile s till oth ers c h e w it '"cry fast, working th e ir jaws lik e a t hr es hin g mac hin e, and making almost as much n o ise. P e r haps the last is mOst annoying to oth er p eo pl e but all gi,"e the appearance of "pt'rpetual mo-tion," and create an atmosphere utte rly l ac king in dignity. Take f or instan ce a rninister, n o matter h ow di s tinguished loo king -put a pie ce of "'rigley's" or Juicy Fruit" o r "Bla c k Jack" in his m outh and see h ow quickly his dignity is l os t. His talk does not impress )'o u. Y ou think, "\\' ha t a s ill y o l d man! I kn o w h e h as t ha t g um s ti c kin g in t h e ro o f of his mouth." Europea n people t hink t hat our chie f "ind oo r sport," i s g Uill-ch e wing. Rath er an undignified reputation is it not? So on your trip to Europe, at least, l e av e out the c h e wing gum. Th(: OM fi.ll Arch ill Panama Cit)' \u Architectllral CuriO!lily. Till 5 1 loGE O F SAt\' LOREt\ZO. II. Edu:a/"d \/(/.\', '23. I hl{h on a bcetlinll hattlement beside brin\" !.e:l. S.ln L orenl.(). 'ight reiune,1. \len\ minds lUrne I nut to lil!,ht, h,r, from yon loukout the sentry cried, "One hell and all i., welL" lie had nOf ..,pil:" 'I he ruthle '\irJncan, near the h;Htle ... ite, \\ h(1'>e men ",ere (.ding up the dill)" height T o sci Ie the s tron g hold rroll) the ocean side. r\ l ooko llt ga,t: the .. ignal that the land Sidt: wa.., hesieged: t h e drunk defenders rlls ht:d T o 111.111 the guns. Those h idden hord es were o n Their backs. The batdc rilged; the)' made :t stand, Theil fell. Ilis siege well done, rhe noise wa s hu s hed, And M orga n stood s upreme at break or daw n.

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T H E CARIBREA:--I. 57 \\"Hb _:\ GREE:--I G REE:\. /.otliu IItll/tr, '2J The thunder rolled and the lightning Rashed. The Fates wer e h,l\'ing another family quarrel. J ove, fro m his mighty sear, \-jewell rhl.! conflict and mopped hi s anguished brow \\ ith a large, rcd bandana handkerchief while praying for a more supreme power than C\'cn his to bring peace and tranquillity once more to t h e heaven s. Long ago h e had learn ed not to interfere when the Fates fought. The quarrel had begun because Atro p os, in a tit o f anger, had cut short the life of the sis rer s fa\'orirc plaything. : \11)' fOfm of amusement is rare in rhe and the three old and petti s h as they were, their only amusement from the antics through which rhe) put the people on earth. For -\rfop05 [0 kill a person just as his car and a railroad train met at a cross ing wa s an offense, especially a s he might han;: been good for all sorts of amusing situations, although an arm or a leg were missing. However, the battle terminated as swiftly a s i t had begun and, when t h e dust settled, the t h ree s isters wcr e see n sittin g s id e hy side, confr.::rring earn es tl y with each other. Finally the)' chuckled unpleasantly,-they hard ly C\'er smiled. C loth o drew a new cord from her distaff, and the life o f Patrick began. O'Con n e lly looked into the ugh", little rd fac e and prared that lif e would treat him more than his looks might at first imply. She caugh t a tiny twinkle in the wide, blue eyes l"e've the Oirish sinse o f humor, Pat, me lad, but may the good saints gin: luck," and, although s h e said it last, luck hel d a place of fir>t importance in her estimation. Pat grew up. Humor, well, humo r was Pat's bi gges t asset-a r eady laugh ill rewrn (or the hard, unfri e ndly kicks of th e world, a joke for th e jibes of h is a ssociates, for Pat was un lucky. Unlu cky hardly fits Pat's case, h e was absolutely unfortunate. \\' h en h e was a (ew days o l d his m o th e r changed h e r earthly habitation for o n e m ore ethereal, aided somewhat by the wellplaced ki c k s of her husband, \\'ho, filled \I ith pride and ---something else besides, had just returned fr o m celebrating the ach'ent of Par. l o ng after, Pat, aided by the same medium, c hanged his habitation-for the gutter, from which h e was fis h ed by a humane pus,!l cart proprietor and transported to the city orphanage. There his ill luck and hurnor, combined, prm"ed too much for the! authorities, :lnd he Ie!ft, by in\"itation. Ilis ill-luck persisted. W hen he got a job, that is when an employer was abl e to b\"er look his looks, something alwa)"s happened. The Store hurnt down, the bank went into bankruptcy, the railroad train jumpeu the track. I f a street car was wrecked and ani), one person was injured, h e was that person. I n his own words, I f it rained soup, I 'd b e out with a fork Bu t h e a lways came IIp s miling. The fates knew what they were ahout. Y ou can't have an)" (un with a person who gets "sore." One night, the night h e asked P eggy the cashier in Tim's erve-Y o u Qui ck Restaurant," to marry him, and had been refuseu, and 110 luck," h e went down to the \\ han'es to thillk things o\'cr. Sitting there h e considered life. Peopl e were t h e way things happened when least expectcu was-and then somethin g unexpected came down on his head and h e fell a long way into darkness. H e awoke \\ it h the hot s un s hini ng in his fac e H e stared straight into an uncl o ud ed sky. The thing on w h ich h e lay rolled slightly, first one way, t h en thc other. H e must have died. H e turned a hit; the top of a mast came into view. H e sat up :lnd sa\\ that h e was on the deck of a small schooner, very ev idently going somewhere hut where he diJ not know, for h e cou ld see nothing but sea-blue sea stretchin g out infinitely Shanghaied' H e hau heard of it but it had ne\"er happencJ to him before H e laughed,life was After a week of sai lin g they came into sight o f land-Panama. Pat leaned hea\ ily on the rail and sighed ecstatically. Panama \\as a land o f romance to him a land of promise. H e leaned more "Oh gee--!" The s mall boat picked him u p, almost drowned, and h e was placed on extra d uty, to account for the delay ca u sed by his falling in. : \ s a result h e was the last to leave the ship. Everything was new to him, interesting. R eal palm H e stopped to admire. :\. carromata h orse, frankly bored, c hewed the back o f his straw hat while waiting for him to Chinese and H indu stores, Kelly's, a \"ariet)" store, a glimpse of something small and black in a window! \\'hat was it? :\ doll's head? H e turneu quick.ly, slipped, and one hand, flying

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58 THE CAR IBB EAN. wildly, clutched at a bunch of green papers h eld in the lax hand of a wrinkled old negress, surrounded by baskets of fruit, coconuts, and parrot cages. One of the cages was overturned and the occupant screeched, "Caramba! Caralllba!" The owner n o w fully aroused also sc r eec h ed but much l ess intelligib1r-a rus h of words, Spanis h a n d Engli s h not understandable but plain l y n o t co mplimentary. Pat seated perilousl), o n a ba sket o f cocon u ts was bewildered, dazed. H e hadn't done any har m. The farther away h e was from that small negro volcano the better he'd feel. But when h e attempted to leave, the excitement only became m o r e intense. She clutched at his hand and ge sticulated wildly. O h yes, h e saw what was the matter, h e had a s h ee t of the numbered, g reen paper s h e had been h olding; ev i dently s h e wanted it. H e thrust it at h er. She s h oo k her head vio l e ntl y. No! No! The n w h y d idn't s h e want him to leave? She wanted it a n d s h e d idn't want it! H e was more bewi ldered than ever. A c r o wd had gath e red and the ir jibes anI), made him more excited. Suddenly a finn hand grasped his arm and a kindl), voi ce said, Pay h e r five dollars and everyth ing will b e all rig ht." P a t 's heart sank. Five dollars was all h e had. H owever, anything to get away. H e paid th e five dollars and again off e r ed her th e s heet of paper. No? She didn't want it? \V ell! H e crumpled the paper carel ess l y, thrust it into his pocket, and wande r ed di sco n solate, back to t h e s hip. N ex t day the ship went t hrough t h e canal and the n ex t, b eing Sunday t h e crew was g i ven s hore leave for t h e entire da),. Pat was undec ided whethe r to go as hore or l:"Iot but at last cu riosity over came relu ctance a n d h e set alit. H e explore d Balboa, admired t h e Prado, th e Admini stration Buil di ng the C lubh o u se t h e Stadium, the M osq u e and finally after g ettin g into a bat-tered street car h e arrived at Pa'nama Cit)'. H e l e ft the car and about ten o'cl oc k wa s attrac ted b y a hu ge c rowd. Anticipatin g a fig h t h e pus h ed his way f orward. H e was disappointed. On a platform twirling a wire cage a bout a foot and a half in diameter, stood a c hil d The cage stopped and t h e c hil d thrust h is hand thro u g h a small openin g and pulled o u t a s m all ball. A man o n the platform opened the ball and l oo kin g i nside s h outed, Dos!" Immediatel y afterward th e numbe r 2 appeared o n the s i gnboard behi n d him. The c h i l d twirled the cage again a nd drew forth another ball and again t h e man s h o uted. Pat was interested. This must be t h e lottery the f ellows s poke about o n the b oa t. H ow muc h did t h e winner get? Ten t h o u sa nd! G ee, h ow would it f ee l t o have so muc h mane)' But his co n templati o n s were in terrupted; the man s houted again and t h e numbe r 268 stood o n t h e board b ehind him. This happ e n ed again and n ow th e numbers stood out clear, 2683. They looked f amiliar to Pat. W h ere had h e seen th e m befo r e? Suddenly recognition cam e to him. H is hand w ent to h i s pocket a n d drew forth a crum p l ed s heet of paper. The Fates hact smiled. l .oue r y Dmwillg in Panama City. TR O PI C RA I N. Frnl/us Grny, '25. Drip, drip; drip, d rip; drip, drip; on vale and hill; The low monOtony fills all the air. The chatter of the monkeys now is s till. The jaguar s l inks away into his l air. T he water fills t h e stagnan t p oo l s until They overRow. The palm fronds b end with their Rich weight of crysta l drops. The torpia l' s s hrill S h arp whistle pierces through the rain.drenc h ed air. T h e whi s p e r of the wind among t h e leav es The timid c h irp of some close hid den bir d T he patter of a cat as h e achieve s A place of s afety-onl) t he se a rc heard: No marc. Dr ip, d r ip; drip, drip; at ni ght, at daw n The tropi c r:lin falls o n and o n and on.

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THE CA R IBBEAN. 59 Chesler Pike, '!-II/lid C/I(lr/Olll' /lOIISel. ',N. C HOOI. SPORTS. thletics is an essentia l part of sc h oo l lif e. I n n o other form of sc h ool activities is t h e true spirit of It sc h ool reflected as in athletics. Fin d the ream that plays the clean game, the fair and square game, and rOll ha ve fOllnd t h e sc h oo l in which these ideals are taught and applied to ever), day of ordinary sc h ool life Athletics is a g reat unifier. The basketball t eam ma)' play Balboa, for instan ce, and win, and C\'CI1 the person who ha s 110 interest in ath leti cs whatsoever, in speaking about it will sa)" "\\'1,; licked them." One i dea l t ha t athlt:ti cs develops i s t h e i deal of un selfishness. H ow many parties and s h ows hay!;: h een give n lip or real sacrifices made because the sc hool was depending o n o n e to do his or her part in the basketball game, the swimming meet, or the tennis m:Hch? Athletics brings the m embers of a sc h ool into a closer 1I11uerstanding o f one another, and it is thi s fact that gives athletics its real importance. I t r Hns a bond not on l y between the students themse l ves but between the stu dents anu the faculty which cannot be obtain ed in any other way. Through understanding we have cooperation and through cooperatio n our sc hool may b eco m e all t hat we desire it to be, exce lling all oth e r s in spirit, aim s, and accomplishments. -Lolliu IIenla, '23. B O YS' ATHLFTI CS. F O R E\\"oR D. Cristobal H igh School has alwa,'s been up and going when there was anything doing in the athl e ti c lin e o f sc h oo l acti\ ities. This year proved n o excepti o n. \\'e did not come out on the long end of th e scores as o ft en as we ha\'e done in previous rears, but the boys d id their le\'el best and pro\'eu to the publi c that t h e members of Cristobal H igh Sc h oo l are still full of pep and that they are good lo se r s as well as good winners. Everywh e r e the boys we n t they were prai sed f o r t h eir c l ean playing and good sportsman s hip. W e s hall l ose several good athletes wh e n the class of nineteen hundred and twentr-th ree i s graduated, but there is much good matcria l l e ft and the prospects for the coming year are brighter than ever. Ollr sc h oo l s h ou ld be, and is, very proud o f its graduates, who are making goou in athletics, as well as sc h olars hip, at the sc h oo l s ther are now attending. Frank Raymond, who was graduated from C. H S. in 1921, WOIl the 100 yard dash as well as taking fourth place in the '220 yard run, in the inter-class track meet at Columbia niversity. \\'esler Townsend, a member of the class of '22, who is now attending t h e :\few York State Ranger Sc h ool, a branch of yritcuse L 'niversity, is catchin g on the sc h oo l baseball team, and is onc of the best men 011 their swimming team. H e is also the champion middle-weig h t boxer o f the sch ool. Another member of the class o f '2'2, who is doing well in athletics, i s Paul Doyl e. P au l is now attending Columbia niversity, where h e ha s made the class water-polo team besides being on the relay swimmin g team, and the fancy-diving squad. BASKETBALL. Basketball, the most popular sport on the Isthmus, again took the leading place in Cristobal H igh School athletic activities. the middle of December, the lower classmen, knowing that they had several good basketball players in their midst, formed a team recruit-

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60 THE CARIBBEAN. ed from the ranks of both the Freshman and the ophomore classes, and challenged the Juniors and eniors to a three-game series of basketball. The Juniors and Senior readily accepted. The first game of this series was plared Thursday, D ecember IS, at the Army and :,\Tavy "1'." B oth teams were eve nly matc hed an d it was a hardfought game all the way thro u g h. The Junio r S eniors came out the victors by the score 22-28. jt.SIORS-SESIORS, Z2. B liss, F. F. Mar. C. Euphr:u. G. Pike. G. rRESHMES-SOPHOMORES, 18. Ar osemena, F Eggleston, F W a l sh, C. C ousins, G. Bur goon, G. The second game o f the series wa s played o n the :\rmy and Y R oar, Friday, January 19. This w as an exceed ingl y fas t game, and the r e were very f ew f o ul s called. It wa s allybody's game fr o m the time the whi s tle fir s t blew until the la s t few seconds o f play. At the end o f the fir s t half th e Freshman-Sophomore t e am was o n e point ahead o f the oppo n ents, but the J uni o r Senior t ea m finall y w o n by the very clo se score of jt.'SIOR-SESIOR, 19. Bli ss, F F Zimmerm:an, C. G Pike. G. \S-SOPHO .\lORE, 1 8 Pu tga r, F Aro semena, F W alsh. C. Cousins. G. K ing, G. Early in Mr. B ogda, our coa c h picked the sc h oo l team. Our first ga m e was with "F" C o o f Fort D avis, o n \\'ed nesday, l\l arch 20, at the Army and i\avy "Y." \\'eoutpJa yed and o u t passed this t e am by the larg e margin of 3 4-9. "r" co., 9. Tedb,lI. F B oone. F Cose. C. Beard, G. \\' illi:ams, G. C. H. s., 34. Oakes, F Aroseme na, F C. Bliss,G. P ike, C. On Friday, l\l arch 23, we went over to B a lb o a to play the first game of t h e an nu a l high sc h ool series. Ilere we met ou r first defeat. B a lb o a out pla)'ed us in ever)' way, but the boys s h o w ed their sportsmanship in fighting until the ve r y la s t a nd then taking the defcat in the prope r spirit. B. H. 5., 39. Shuber. F Clements. F NorAeet. C. Engelke G. Pena, G. Clark. G. Cross, F. C. H. S., 9. Oakes, F. Ar osemena, F C. Bliss, C. Pik e. C. The next game was with the Fort D e L esseps Post team. This was played on t h e Arm)' and Navy "Y" R oar o n April 3 The score was close all t hr o ugh the game, but our f o rwards ha d troubl e "finding the basket." W e lo s t t o the tune of 18-12. DE LESSEPS, 18. Samson F J acox, F. Br uchie, C. Naibuer, C. L anfield, G. L },ons, F G oldstein, F. C. H. S., 12. Oakes, F. F Zimmerman, C Bliss C. P ike. C. Our seco n d game with B alboa H igh School was pla )'ed April 7, at the Cristobal Arm y and lavy HY." Both t e ams started with the determination t o pil e up a big sco r e on the oth e r t eam, and th e r esult was that th e fir s t two quarte r s w e r e exce p tio nally fast Cristoba l b oys pla)'ed mll c h b ette r basketball than wh e n they pla yed Balb o a the first tim e, but were not abl e to put th e l o ng end of the score in the ir fav o r B H. S., 17. Shui>er, F. Cross. F. N o rAeel, C. P ena, C. Clark. C. Clemenls, F. C. H. S., 8 F Bli ss, F Zim me rm an, C. Oakes, G. Pike, G. On M o nday, Apri l 9, w e d e f eate d t h e B eac h C o mb e r s W e ha d good pa sswork and had littl e difficu lt y in defeating our opponents. The gam e was fast and interesting, but at no tim e w e re our b oys in danger, and the game e nd e d 261 8 in our favor. B EAC H CO\lBERS, 18. Bur goon, F E ggles-ton, F Kent, C. Snedeckcr. G. Solomon, G. Trowbrid!;c, C. C. H. s., '26. F Cousin s F Zimmerman, C. O akes C. Pik e C.

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THE CAR1BBEAl The third game with Balboa proved to b e the mos t t:xciting g ame of th e I t waS played at Gatlin on F 'riday, pril 3 Ollr boys played a wonderful game but Balboa got the breaks of the game and won by one lon e ly basket. At the end of the fir s t quarte r they had liS by ont point 10-9, and at the end of the half the)' w e r e still ahead by one point, [8-1 7 Then at th e ent..! of t he third quarta we were in the lead by three p oints, 2S2R. I n the las t quarter Balboa caugh t lip with LIS and rhen, with but a f e w seco nd s l eft to play, one o f Balboa's m e n made a long shot from n ear the center of th e Aoor and won rh e game. This W.:I S Balb)a's gamc, 3 1 29. 8. H S., 31. Sullivan, F. Clements, F. C. r ena, G Clark, G. C, H. s., 29. Bliss, F. i\l oore F. Zimmerman, C. Oakes, G. P ike, C. C ousi n s C. Several days later H Company of Fort Davis arranged to play u s at the Army and avy Y, and won the game by the close scor e of 1 + 1 3. \\'e had several points on them at the end of the half and so, deciding to get some practice, we passed the ball around instead of s hooting for the basket. \Y e saw our mistake,-too late to win the game. The following week we played H Company at Gatun where we easily won to t h e tune of 19-13. The line-up for the game at Gatun was: "H" co., 13. Garriger, F. W illiams, F. H iggens C. i\ l oore G. Penon}" G. e. H. s. It.'. Ar osemena, F. i\ i oo re, F. Zimmerman, C Oakes, G. P ike, G. C ousins, C. \\'e again travelled to the town of Gatlin to play basketball. This time, Friday, i\lay .h it was to play the Gatun boys. Here w e lo s t br one point, 17-1 6 CATIJX, I i Kent, F. P ulgar, F. Pertony, C. i\i yers, G. King, G. C. H. s., 1 6 Ar osemena, F. i\l oore, F. Z immerman, C. Oakes, G. Pike, G. Cousins, G' A series o f fi vc games wa s arranged b e tween C. H. S. and "C" Co., Fort Davis. The fir s t game wa s played Thursday, l\tay 1 0 at the Army and fav)' "Y." This wa s a hard fa s t game with good pass ing on t h e part o f b oth teams 18-1 '2 was dle scor e by whi c h C. H. took the game. "e" co., 12. B loomberg F. Wli son, F H ealy, C. Fuclli ng, G. O ixton G. Smith, sub-C. C. H. S., 1 8 Arosemena, F. Cousins, F Zimm erma n, C O a kes G. Campbell, G. SIVIMMI 'G. T his year swimming has taken a prominent place in C. H S athletic a ctivities. \Ve have some wonderful swimmers in our school some of whom ha ve broken certain Isthmian sc h oo l records, this year. Whe n Balboa H S. came over to s wim LIS the first time, two of our best swimme r s were unabl e to compete and we lost the meet by 13 points. Balboa took 33 points to our '20 Events: 60 \'ARO S\\'I.\1. I R N orReet, B H S. '2 B Engelke, B H S .3 Trowbridge, C. H S. 90 YARD SWI.\I. 1 B Engelke, B H. S. '2 Shuber,. B H S. 3 B. CoRer. C. H. S. '2'20 YARD SWIM. j Coffer. C. H. S. '2 Shuber, B. H f. 3 R Norfleet, B H S. j Coffer C. H. S. '2 O. Engelke. B H 5. 3 .-Illen, B H S. I B C offey C. H. S. Allen. B H S. .3 Hu tchins. B H S. PLLXGE. I B alboa H igh School. (B. En gel ke, R. Shubert Allen. ) 1 Cristoba l H igh School. (8. C off e y, Trowb r idge, j Coffer) Our second swimming meet this year against our Isthmian rivals, B. H S., took place Saturday, i\ lay 26, at the Washington Hotel pool. This time we had all Qyr with us and took

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THE CARIBBEAN. the meet from B. H. S. by the big margi n o f 39 co 13. \\" e took all the first places and in t h e 90 yard dash, A lan \rallace, our hu s ky swi mmin g champ, broke the Isthm ia n sc h oo l record by fin ishing the 90 yards in 5-1,5 seconds. James B ur goon cook first place in both the 30 and the 60 yard swims, a n d also s wam anch o r man o n our relay team. The tw o C af r e), bro th e r s also made fine s h owi n gs o n Saturday .lac k C offey w o n olle second and three third places) and, in th e diving tied for seco nd wit h N orAeet o f B a l boa. Bill y Coffer e a sily w o n th e diving. Events: 30 YARD SWIM.--TIME 1 5 315 SECONDS. I. J ames Bur goon, C. H S. _. R obe r t :\orReet. B H S. J. J ack Coirer. C H S. 60 YARD SWIM.-TIME 36 SECONDS. I. J ames Bur goon, C. H S. '2. R obert :\orReet. B H J. J ack Co ife), C. H S. 90 YARD SWi\I.-TIME 5-: 115 SECONDS. I. ,.\\an W allace, C. H S. 2. Roben Norfleet B H S. J. J ack Coife)" C. H S. :l'lO YAltO :1. MINUTES, 59 SECONDS. I. .00Jan W allace, C. H S. ,. J ock Coife)" C. II. S. 3. R obe r t ;o.:orReet, B H S. 110 \'ARD RELAY.-TIME I M INurE, 8 SECONDS. J. C. H S. ( Andrew Smit h, J ack Coffer, Alan W allace, an d j ames B urgoon.) 1. B. H S. ( R obe r t Norfleet, L eo Wh ite, W ayne B anto n and j ack \ an Puuman.) fANCY I. Billy Coffey. C. H S. 1 Tie between j ack Coffey o( C. H S. and Norfleet of B H S. TRACK. On Saturday, April 14, t h e Callal ZOlle Hi g h and Grammar Sc h oo l Athletic (Vl ee t ( o r hays, wa s hold at the B a lb oa radiu m. B H S. made 32 points to ou r 22. T HROW. J. C. II .,98 (eet, 10 inc h es. Shu be" B H S. 3. Zimm e rman, C. 1-1. S. \la)" C. II. S. Rl ....... HIGH )t:MI'. I. Clemenu., B II S., 4 (eet, 1 0 inches. 2. "orReee. B J J. S. 3. \tay, C. II S. 4 :'I.1 00re, C. H S. Rl'NNINC HOP SKI P AND J UMP. I i\'e\\ h ard, B H S., 38 (eet, 8.'2 inc h es. 1. C. II. S. J. Cla
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THE CAR1BBEAN. G IRLS' ATHLETICS. Altho u g h girls' athle tic s w e r e late in starring this year t hey made up f o r the ir d e linque n c)' in t h e few 1110 l1th s that f ollo wed. \\'e o w e most of our s u ccess [0 Miss Lin d s a y t h e girls' phys ic al d irectr ess. BASKETBALL. Ba s k etball always wa s and still i s our mOst popular and fa varite s p o rr. A series o f five games wa s arrange d b etwee n th e girls' ba s k etball tcams o f t h e tw o hig h school s Cristob a l a n d Balboa, in whic h B alboa w o n b y a sco r e o f J games to I game. The fir s t gam e wa s played at the Balbo a play s hed o n twenty-third. Altho u g h the game e nded with a defeat for Cri s tobal to th e [tin e o f 12-6, it did not dampe n Qur spirits and w e ca m e h o m e more d etermined than eve r that the series w o uld end with Cristobal in the lead. The seco nd game was pla yed at Gatun Club h ouse, n eutral t e rritory, o n April t hirteenth, and a huge crow d of Cris t o bal Hig h School rooters witn essed t h e de feat o f B alb o a in t h e sco reof '2 '21 0 Nevel' b e f o r e wa s s u c h t eam work s h own by ou r t eam, as wa s d ispla yed t hat night, and alth o ugh Balbo a work ed hard, th ey w e r e unable to over co m e the numbe r of p oints scored th e firs t quarter. The third g am e of the series was played o n t h e slippe r )' floor o f Balboa plays hed, on the afternoon o f April twenty-seventh. The ga m e in whi c h w e must admit t h ey outplayed u s, ended with a score o f '2'2-3, Balboa as victor. During the Girls' Confe rence h e l d at t h e Y. \Y. e. A. in Cristobal, a basketball gam e was played a s one o f t h e events o f th e afte rn oon This gam e was w o n b y th e t e am o f Cristobal High Sc h oo l gir l s at the C onfe r e n ce and wa s n o t a l e agu e game. The score wa s 1 1 '2. SEASON'S BALBOA TEAM. Arlie Gre ene, F. ( Captain ) Flo rence l\ l lirtagh F H e l en H uber, C. L o n a R at hb one, S. C Thelma B abbitt, G. Esth er Gree n e G. CR I S'roBAL TEAM L ouise H e In er, G. ( Captain ) Gla dys L owande, G . S. C. Alice Oliver, C. R ut h D uey. G. F rances Gr ay, S. C. D orothea T ufts. F Charlotte H ousel, F The fourth and last game of bas k etball was pla yed at th e Cri s t o bal Army an d Navy H y," l\l a y twenty-s ixth. Both t eams put up a h a r d fight, and th e score at the first quarter wa s 0 to o Altho u g h we worked hard, w e w e r e not abl e to overcome the number of p oints sco r ed by our opponents during the n ex t three quarte r s, and the game e nded 9 to 3 with Balbo a as victor. TRACK. An inte r Isthmian trac k meet was arranged by t h e burea u o f Cl u bs and Playgrounds, in whic h a numbe r o f ou r hig h sc h oo l girls competed. For days o ur girls w ere kept busy training for the m ee t, but, d u e to t h e superior excelle n ce of some o f the Balbo a Hig h c hool g irl s competing, and t t h e inability of several o f o u r girls to parti c i pate, the final reckoning l e ft muc h to be desired for Cristobal. The h ig hest p oint scorer for Cristobal wa s L ouise H el1ter. The r eco rds o f the events a re as ( ollows : 8rOU/l.'D SHOT l'UT. -DlSTANCE '2'2 rEET, 3 I/I.'CHES. I. Lona R a th bone, B alboa. J. Ruth Due)" Crislobal. '2. Louise H ellier, Cristobal. 4 Arlie Green, B a l boa. RUNNI NG HIGH jUMI'.-HEIGHT 4 rEET. I. E s th er Green, Ba lboa. 3. I da Ruth I-Iammer, B alboa. Loui se H ellier, Cristobal. 4 Lona R athbone, Balboa. RUNNING BROAD JUMI' .-D1STANCE 1'2 rEET, 9 INCHES. I. Thelma B abbit, B alboa. 3. Esther Green, B alboa. '2. L ona R athbone B a l boa. + L ouise I-Iente r Cristobal. 100 YARD DASII.-TIME 13 '215 SECOND S. I. Esth er Green, Balb oa. 3. rvla r)' i\lcConnougher, B alboa. '2. Ruth Due)" Cristobal. 4 Dorothy D eibert, Cristobal. .H o YARD RELAY.-TIMF. 1.06'215. I. Esther Gre en Arlie Greene, Florence i\l urtaugh, i\t cConnollg he}', B alboa. 3. L ouise H enter, Gladys Lowande, D orot h y D eibe rt, R uth D uey, Cri stobal. 4 H elen H uber, I da H ammer, l\1abel Glidewell, Lona R :nhbone I I G Swimming h a s alwa ys b ee n a clo se riva l to ba s ketball in popularity, but thi s year it h as b ee n n e g l ec t ed and h as fall e n to a po s ition o f min o r importan ce H oweve r, Frances Gray Soph o m ore manage d t o take seco n d plac e in a novel t y ra ce hel d at Bal b o a p oo l F ebruary '2'2, agai n s t so m e o ( t h e b es t swimmers of th e Isthmus \\'e h ea r with pride of aquatic s u ccess of Loretta Rus h, a former student of Cristobal H i g h S c hool who has attrac t ed the noti c e o f the publi c in so m e o f our biggest c iti es o n account o f h e r s wimmin g and d iving abilit y. W e hope t hat Adelaide Lambert o f th e eighth grade, w h o has b ee n a record brea k e r in swimming, will return to th e Isthmus to join u s in O c t o b e r to revi ve u s and aid u s in rega i ning our laure l s. Practically e very student plays o r attempts to play t e nni s but it i s surpris ing how f ew have backed it as a sc hool s p ort.

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THE CARIBBEAN.

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THE CARTBBEAN. 65 Fra11a s Gra) 25. 1 922. OCTOBER. Oct. 5. S c hool open ed today. Howard took command until i\1iss Dodds s h ou ld return from Euro p e O c t. 6. i\1o r e pupils a rrived and the program fight continued. Oct. 12. Mi ss Dodds and Miss H ornbeak re turned amid great r e j o i c in g. Miss Dodds gave a bri e f account o f h e r wanderi ngs. Oct. 1 3 Today b e ing Friday the thirteenth and ominous in itse l C the Freshme n "gOt the irs" with the usual hair cutting a n d make up. Oct. '7. Toda y marked the first m eeti n g o f the Cristobal High Schoo l Girl s Suppe r C lub f o r t h is year. El e ven new membe r s were admitted with a very impress iv e ce r e mony. The n e w officers were elected as f ollo ws : PreJide11l.-Miss Mattison Pulli g. Vice Presi d el1l,-i\1iss Ruth Hopkins. H y a cinth Eden. TreaJurer -l\r liss Frances Gray. The supper that f ollo wed th e business meetin g wa s well befitti ng the occasion. O c t. 2 8 Chaplain R entz o f Coco So l o ga ve a bri e f talk today on th e Navy it b e ing Navy D a y NOVEMBER. Nov. 2. First cla ss mee tin gs w e r e h e l d and new officers and class advisers we r e elected. Electi o ns f o r the Annual staff als o t oo k place. Nov, 8, Colon e l N ewton, r etire d fr o m the U. S. Army, and well known here o n the Zone, gave a talk o n the captur e of Aguinaldo The fac t that C o l o n e l Newton took part in thi s capture made h i s stor y doubl y inte re s tin g, and it was al so very en lighteni ng to many o f us Nov. 1 0 The fir s t staR' m eeting o f th e sc hool year was h e l d at H enry J\f oo re's this eveni ng. After t h e bu si n ess o f th e meeting wa s transacted i\Irs J\l o.) r e se r ved delic i o u s r e f res hm ents, and w e spent a half h ou r or so dancing, and lis t e ning to DodJs giving one of h e r readings Nov. [ 7 Today wa s a r ed l etter dav. i' lr. \\' iltiam J ennings Bryan came and s p o ke u s on t h e subject o f education. H e was t h e first speaker of real natio nal importance that we had had the ple a su r e of heari ng, and w e all appreciated his kin d n ess Nov 23. A p ::rformance o f the cira matizeJ R u s s ian f o lk stor y "The P rin cess and the Sage," was given in th e as sembly hall today. J udging f rorn th e efFect upo n the audie n ce t h e play wa s a s u c cess. The c a St was as f ollows: The K ing Father The Queen i\loth er The B-e-autiful P rin cess The Sage The T utor L adies-in-waiting Alpha :"I organ. Frances Gray Ch arlotte H ousel. R ichard H all. \Varne r B owers. Gla dys L ow;lnde, and R uth O lley. Nov. 2 + The second CARI SIlEAN staR' meeting was h eld at th e quat ers of Frances Gray, and re fr es hm ents and recreati o n f ollo w ed t h e bu si n ess. DECHIBER. D ec 4. F ollow in g t h e r esignatio n of Geral d Bliss Edward i\Iay wa s e l ec t ed Editorin Chief of THE C AR1I3IlEAN. D ec. 8 Emogene Nash and Pull ig e n tertained the Staff at a d inner given at the Y \\T C . A. Needless to sar the di nn e r wa s delicious, an d th e tabl e most attracti\'e. The members of th e Staff also evol ved seve ral n e w rul es o f table eti q uette. (Ther have n o t yet be e n printed.)

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66 THE CARIBBEAN. Dec. 15. Today was annual visiting day. Quite a number of the parents attended the classes. The afternoon classes were s h ortened, and i\liss H or n beak's S op homore English class presented so m e scenes from" ilas t\I arne r .-\ P arent-Teachers' meeting followed, and refreshments were se n 'e d B akewell"s domestic scie n ce class ]11 th e evening the J unior-Senior boys played basketball against the Fr es hman-Sophomor e boys and defeated them with a scor e o f tw enty-two to eighteen. Dec. 2 0 :\ staR meeting wa s held raja)" at school. W e all brought our suppers but most of the time was taken up with worJ.-. D ec. 22. The first party o f the yea r took p l ace tonight, with the Seniors as h os t s and h ostesses E\'e ryone was dressed as a kid, and som e of the COStumes were a great success . I\ft e r we h ad played games for about an h o ur, refr es h m e nts, consisting o f ice-cream m e n cake, and loll yp o ps, wer e served, Santa Clau s disguised a s i\Ir. E u phrat, dis tributed presents from th e tree in the assemb l y hall. The part)' br o k e up at ab out eleven thirty after an extremely jolly evening. D ec. 29. :\ stafF mee ting to plan t h e carniva l was held this eveni ng at the h o m e o f Edith C o u l b o urn, and a suppe r which was most e njo yable wa s se r ved after the meeting. JANUARY, 1923. J an. q. The third annual high sc hool carni v al. Fun, frolic, and finan ce. T h e f ollowing attra c tion s wer e open to all: } \ n art gallery, with H olmes King s bur y at t h e door and D orot h y D e ibert in c harge; T erious t h e beautiful balan cing tight r o p e walke r (James Burgoon ) with L aurence Callawa y in charge of t h e door; an d T om Thumb ( L ew i s Barnett an d Jean Bliss) unde r the charge of B liss, with H en ry Steven s at the door; The K angaroo C ou rt, of which i\1r. Stetle r was judge and J ordan Zimm e rma n the cop; The Crazy HOll se und e r the direction o f Mil dred and D o r o thy raug hn, with Surse Ta)"l or a s doormanj The co n s i s ting of Catherine Rentz and Pool e, directed by Em oge n e :-;ash; Blu e B ea rd's hambe r, in whi c h Delilah exhibited the murdered wives of Blu e Beard ( D o r othy P ik e, Ge o rg i a B ixby and Doroth y Wertz) with i\l aurice Egg l eston at t h e door; Nigge r B ab ies managed b y Guy Stewart and .'\ndr e w Smith; T h e Chink Sh op run by Gera l d Bliss a n d \ \ a l lace J o hnson; T h e B oneless \\'onders (.-\Iph a a n d J ack K lunk ) und e r t h e direction of \Y illiam Clinc h ard; B e linda -the-Beautifu l-but-B o r ed ( Warner B owers in a b e autifu l white wig ) j M arc h oskey) performing und e r the management of \\' illiam Coff ey and Oliver I\:ing. T h e n there wer e : T h e Chin ese t e am ro o m i n w h ic h fragrant tea was se rv ed by Edith T r o wbridg e, Gladys L owande, I r e n e i\ [ cCourt, I re n e H o p k i ns, a n d M il dred Oliver, in costume; The Dutc h coR'ee room w h ere i\I r s. wa s c h i e f coRee mak er, a n d the attracti ve Du tc h girls, Johanna Kleefke ns, Gay Turne r \\'inifr ed Allwork, Fl o r e nce Al b e rt I n z a l\ l ark ham, L o u ise H enter, Ruth Duey, and D o roth y A be n drot h se rvedj H o t dogs so ld by C h arl es T rowb r idge and L o uis Snedecker ; The candy b oo t h in t h e c h arge o f Mi ldred Mor gan Charlotte Housel and Edith Coulbo u rn; T ce-cream wit h J o h n Cofrey and R obe r t Allgeier t o d ispense it. T h e a ssembly h all program co n s i sted o r a series of drawings by Mr. B lackw ell, o f Coco So l o; "The Gypsy Idyll" with a c a s t o f high sc h ool s tude n ts, a ss i s t ed b y i\l r. 800z, l eading m a n ; severa l da nces by t h e pupi l s o f M r s S e xton and M rs D ye r ; a piano solo by i\l arian Lowande, and one by M orris L u ce; and songs b y three of M r s pupil s T h e popu larity contest wa s und e r t h e directio n o f \\' illiam Cou sins w h o was assiste d by Charles \\'als h and B eec h ing. The r esults w e r e as f ollo w s : Besl nil roulld boy nlld g irl. G e r ald B l iss a n d F ran ces Gra y MOSI papillar boy alld gi rl. -Guy Stewart and P ulli g. Besl lookillg boy nlld girl -Alph a M organ and R u t h Hopkin s f\lr. K lunk took c h arg e o f t h e door down and handl ed t h e tickets in a mann e r most efficie n t and sati s f actory.

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THE CARl 13 13 EA:'\'. Jan. 5 j\ 1 r. W illiam :\. Peterson of Chicago, wh o ha d stopped h e r e on hi s way to South Arncriea, gave, today, O ll e of t h e most interesting talks that w e ha ve had thi s year. H e spoke of Ollf physical mcntal, and spiritual development in relation t o what w e owe rhe future generations, :llltl, in the general opini o n of t h e school h e wa s olle of th e IllOSt inte r esting \ i sitors we eVer had. \\'c also h eld all auction sale of all the articles not sold in the Countr), Store. i\l iss Dodds was auctioneer, and competition ran high. Jan. '9 The JuniorSenior boys' basketball team defeated the Freshman-Sophomore tcam with a score of nineteen to eighteen .Ian. 26. i\l r s :'\ eed ham of Pedro Iigud and I\lr5. Ph illips and I\i rs K eenan of Balboa caml;! over and gave a very interesting musical program in the assembly hall. FEBRUARY. F eb. 9. A Stafl' m eeting was h e l d tonight at Gladys Lowande's. A fte r the business was put away i\l rs. Lowande served refreshments and i\larian, Gladys's younger sister, who is quite a tal ented pianist, played for us. F eb. q. The .Juniors entertained the h ig h sc h oo l at a St. \'al entinc part)' w h ic h was a real s u ccess. The red and white decorations were mos t appropriate and t h e r e fre shments were delicious. F eb. ,6. T h e se,'enth meeting of THE C","BEAN stafr wa s h eld at Edward The entainment following the meeting wa s quite unique There being on l y a small part of the staR' present we turned to more serious things, a n d spent perha ps half an hour in feats involving m ental telep-ath\,. j\'!arch 9. The Stafr was entertained this even in g by Ernst Euphrat at the home of hi s sister i\lrs. Ray i\lorris, where the business meeting was f ollowed by a delicious c hop suey supper. l\ larch 1 6 i\i rs Carrie C hapman Catt, the well known s uR'ragist lead e r, honored the h igh sc hool with a s hort talk today. She is t h e second person of national importance that we ha\'e had the good fortune to ha\'e speak in our school, and h e r presence was greatly appreciated. The "Cristobal H igh School Girls' upper Club" gave a hot-dog roast for the high school bo)"s A big fir e "as built o n the b e a c h at Cristobal where the "dogs" were roasted, and C\'cryonc seemed to have a delightful time. "bre h '-. T he Sophomore class celebrated St. Patrick's day hy gi\ing a party at the high school. The green and white table decorations and rhe pipe and snakc fa\'ors were etfectin:, while the I rish games were elltert:d into with lest. larch 20. The C. H S bo)'s defeated F Company from F t. Davis at basket hall with a scorc of thirty-four to nine. 23. The B I -I. S. boys defeated the C. II S. boys at hasketabll \\ i th tl score of th irty -n i ne to nine. APRil .. : \priI3. Fort de I.esseps defeated our baskethall b o y s roday with a scorc of tightccn to t\\eh'c. 6. :\ Staff mceting was h eld at the home of Charlotte Iio u sel this en:!ning, and delicious club sand\\ i c h es were sen'ed after the usual bu siness mcetin g. April". basketball game between B H S alld C. H S. Score sc\'enteen to eight in favor o f B 1-1. S April 3 The Cristobal girls defeated the B a l boa girls at bas k etball, the game being played at Gatun. The score was twenty-two to ten A pri l 20. A n entertainment celebrating the st:cand birthday of the Y \\' C. :\. on the Zonl:! was held this c\'ening at the Y \\'. C .. ..\,. building, and the high sc h oo l contributed to the program, first, one of Booth Tarkington's "The Trysting P lace" with the cast as follows: Launcelot in love with \ lr:-.. Curtis Gerald Bliss ;\Irs. mother of L auncelot \Llttle PulJig J essie, sister of L auncelot ... J.owande ;\Irs. Curtis, a young \\Ido\\ Fr.tnces l\l r. I ngoldsby. in love with ;\I rs. hn ... 1 Euphr:lt Rupert Smith, in \O\'e with J essie J Jenr\' ,\J oore T he oiee, engaged to i\l rs. Curtis J .dward ,\lay seconu, the "Gyps}' Idyll," with a c horu s con s isting of ;\Iarian Burgess, L ola :\ Iuno/, Ruth H opkins, \ 'i r gin ia Tucker, Olga :\rcia, Charlotte H ousel, .lose :\rosemen3, Ernst Euphrat, Ed\\ art! ;\lar, arlos Pulgar, and Frances and :\ I r Bool. A pril 21. Girls' interschool track meet held in B311>0a today. A pril :2-. The girls' basketball team \\as again defeated Balboa. The score was to three.

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6 T H E C :\RIBBE .-\:-l. M.-\\". The .-\nnual Y 'Y. C. A. "ocational C onference was held this weekend, and girls fro m both Balboa and Cristobal took part. 9 .. -\ Stall' meeting was hel d t onight at the h ome of L ouise H ente r in Gatun, and a m os t appe tizing supper was served after th e me e ting. 10. C. H S. boys played bask e tball with "C from Ft. Da vis and defeated t h e m with a score o f twentr-four to e i g ht een. II. A party was g iv en thi s even ing the Fr eshme n under the direction o f :\I iss B arnho u se. T he red and white deco rati o n s were m os t e ffec tive, and the tables were arranged in the f orm of an F. An enjoyable time was ha d by all." l\\ a y 12. One of the bigge s t eve ntS o f the sc h oo l year, th e J uni o r -enio r banqu e t, was h eld in the h ouse h old arts room s tonig ht. The twenty-two guests, cons i s ting of t h e Jun ior and Se n ior cla sses and all the teac h ers w e r e se ated at ( our tab l es whi c h w e r e decora t ed wit h th e J unior cla ss flower, th e purple b o ugainvillea and the r ooms w e r e ma de exceedingly attra c tive by deco rati o n s o f green and white, the J unior colors The d inn e r was pre pared by i\l iss B a k ewell's domestic science classes, and se n ed the eighth grade g irls. The menu was as follows: Fruit Cup Chi cke n Ti mbales P otatoes, \"irginia Style Butt ered Stri n g B eans P arker H ouse R olls Tun a Salad Olives J unior Cake Coffee i\l int Sherbert Chee se Straws P ick l es T ropic Cre:1m i\lints Flo rence : \I bert was toastmi s tre ss, and th e t o a s t s were gi\ en by L ouise H en t e r representi n g THE CARIBBEAN; Ernst Euphrat, th e Youth'J C o npall i o n; l\l iss j. Isabella Dodds, th e Current Opinioll; Gla dys L owa n de the Good H ousekeep ing; Edward Mal', the World s Work; Miss Barnh ouse the AI/odt!nl Priscilla.. H e nry iVI.oore, the Pathfinder, and Mattie Pullig, L ife l\\ a y 23. The S en i o r ring s a n d pins ca m e today, and the Seni o r c h ests and l e ft han ds ar e mu c h in e vid e n ce June 7. L ast of .-\nnual mat erial went t o press june 8 The class of 1 923 presented "Grumpy at the Am erica The ater. j un e 9 The class o f 1 923 presented "Grumpy" at t h e Gatun Clubho use J un e 22. Th e class of 1923 prese nt ed "Gr ump y" at t h e B alboa Clubhou se June 2 + Ba cc alaur e at e ser m on at t h e Cristoba l Unio n Church. Chaplain D e ib e rt, speaker. June 27. Comm e n ce m e nt exercises at t h e \ 'Vas h ingt o n H otel.

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TH E CARIBB EAN. --------------------------EXC H ANGE D E PARTMENT The "Exch a n ge Department" h a s mall)' ( unctio n s. I t k eeps LIS in touc h with w hat i s going on i n t h e tates.1 t gives u s a chance to see what oth e r s are d o ing al o n g t h e lin e of t h e ir p eriod i c a l s ; and so s h ows LIS w hat we c a n do t o mak e our an nua l b euer. \\' e have been f o r tunate i nd ee d i n t h e q uality of our exc h ange s but w e have b ee n di sappointed this year i n not h earing f rom some of the hig h sc h ools to w h om w e have sent Ollr annual. \\'e s h ould l ike to hear from ev erybody t hat we can but espec i ally f r om t h ose hig h sc hool s w hich put out year b oo ks. \\'e always welcome n ew frie n ds PawlllcJul High School P{lWJflCkrl, R. I Y ou r literar y depa rtment is very good. T he "Tattl er" is a mu sing, origin al. a n d interesting. Wh) n O t have so me c ut s at th e h ead of each department? TIle S,riob/rr. F rank EDam Ihgh School SparlrmourK. S. C. h a\'c a 1.1rge l itera r y section with s plendid s'oriec; o f w hich )'011 may well be proud. Il owevcr, your mher departments could be improveJ a little. Cmfr.ll lIigll Scllool "'lIshiIlK IOll, D. C. W e c;eldom h ave the privilege o( readin g :>uch a fine book. The cuts are espec ially good and the (ronti<;plece Chri<;trn:ls Greetings" mo st :ttt ra Clive This book is render ed all the more tnteresting to us bec:1U \e two o( our (or mer students. George and jorie B all, are now attending this sc hool. Tllr Epitome. lIigll $chool Jor B o)s, Rrndillg, Po. W e received both the an nu a l and monthly (rom this sc h ool. The annual is a co:npact and neat book so carefully crli ted that there is no Ltuh whi c h stands out so much t hat it must b e criticised. The monthly, h oweve r leaves much to bc desi r ed. T h e advertise_ men ts are mixed in with the Sc h ool Notes and sev er.t! other depa r tments. I f this were remedied, it w ould b e a good book. The Specta lor. Johns l M High School JO"'11101l, Pa. The Curli; '\/o lllh(v. Curtis High School, SMUll Islalld, N. Y. Y ou have an interesting book. D on't you think th at if the advertisements were a r r a n ged at the back o f the book, it woul d make i t more attr active? The Ruord. Joh" M arshal High School, Richmond, f/a. There seems t o be a good deal o f sc h oo l spirit in you r sc h oo l as reRec ted b)' the magazine. "The Library Corn e r and "Who's Who" were commented upon as bein g original. The S tud ent. H olmes High School, CODington, 1\)'. The "Exchange" department i s the largest you have. \\'e s h ould suggest th : u you try to make yO:'Jr other departments as lar ge. T he sto r y "The Luc k o f the Iris h was very divertin g. \\'e read it with mu c h plea s ure \\'e wer e s urpr ised to find an a r ticle in o n e o ( your numbe r s written br a ( ormer st u de n t of Cristobal H igh, William Bri dges. The .. 1poluepsian. P OIIghku psie High School, Poughkups;c, N. j . Y our joke depa rtment is l a r ge enli\'ening, and hu morous. The literary section is a l so verr interesting, th o u g h s mall Refleclor. Iro/lllm High School lI"ollllrlt, .\lass. Wh y not h ave a Lit e r ary De partment and place you r advertisements m ore to the back o( the book? Art headin gs would also improve your magazine, B y a st r ange coincidence t h e exchange editors o( THE CARIBBEA" for the reus 1 922 and 1 923 ha\'e been ex-pupi l s of Cur'is High School. So this maga_ zine h as h ad more interest (or them than (or former edito r s. W e t h ink that it is a well arr anged, inter esting book, but a few m ore jokes would add to It. The f!..uW. Stalen Island Academ)' Slaten I sland, N. }', W e like your book. Every department is well developed and equally balanced. Tlu JUllt(}. I ndi(}flfl Higll School, Indiana, Pa. Y ou h ave a splendid joke depa rtment but where, o h where, is th e exc han ge section? Tlu C(}morid'l,e Re v iew, Camoridge High and Latin School CflIlloridgt, ,\lass. A vcr)' good issue. \\'e h a \ 'e ver)' (ew faults to find with the genera l make up o( ),our book. Tlu .1mdemy Journal. NorwichFru .1 cadem)', Norwich, Conn. A very well edited book with an especially well \\rllten athletic department. The .\lolli lor. II /ellesley High School, We/lesle_y. ,\lass W e looked all ove r the book to find out where you came (rom and at laSt (ound it in one o( the advertisements. Your book is good but a (ew morc cutS would bette r it,

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THE CA RIBBEAN. High S(hool, f/o/;'oJu, JfaSJ. We should suggest :\ few more cuts. Wh r not h;l\"e :\ I:trger Exch:mge Department? A side f r om [h:n we like your book and are always glad to h ea r from TOr(h. /I'nl High SchooljorG irlI Pa We enjoyed much the story d Y e G ods and Little Shades." I twas verr clever and original. Y ours is a fine book and surpasses many t hat we h ave seen. .lakes taken from another book are us u ally indicated. Squudunk. J /onroe Cit), HiXh School, .I/Ol/roe Cit)', La T hroug h the courtesy of i\l iss Octave Sc hul ze, w e ha\'e a copy of your most exceltent book A fte r r e viewing it we do not wonder that it won a p r ize W e should like to have you on our list of exc h anges Balbon fligh School B nlbon, C. Z. \\'e have heard that are not putting o u t a 192] issue. That is too bad, beca u se your book is ve r y good. Re::iJ/a La S"I/e. Colegio de In Stll/e, Pnlltlmn Repubiiqlle de P tlflnmn Ustedes tiene n artfc u los muy buenos c! interesa n tes pero no tienen 1ll1s l oca l es tambien m as fotografbs.? Sus adivi n anzas so n Il1UY o r ig in ales )' hemos encontr:tdo llluc h o pl:tcer en so l verlas. A LITTLE ENCOURAGEMENT This pa r t o f t h e exc hang e d epartment i s righ tl y named beca u se out o f all th e e x c han ges whi c h h ave co mm e n ted o n THE C ARIBBEAN, n o t o n e h a s criticised i t adver se l y \Ve r ece iv ed a fine l ette r f rom t h e man age r o f t h e Grolie r Soci ety, co mpli menting our m ag azin e \ V e appreciate thi s so muc h t hat we f ee l co n s trai ne d t o print parts from it. H e says : "First and foremost I wish to congratulate rou and your fellow students upon putting o u t one of t h e finest a n n u a l s that has ever been my pleasure to examine. Y ou h ave so m cthing to be extremely proud of." H e also adds t hat h e h as f o r s i x t ee n ye ar s b ee n in close touc h wit h sc h oo l an d ed u c ati o na l w o rk and in t hat s i xteen ye ar s h e ha s yet to see a hig h school annu a l t h e equal o f o ur 922 issue. \\'e t h a n k Ollr fri e n ds for all t h e co mplim ents they have given u s and we h ope t hat w e s hall co n tinue to mer i t t h em THE You certainly have a great paper. It is parti c u larly well set up. Your jokes :tre excellenc T he At/oni/ or. THE e," RISBEAN. The C ARIBBEAN i s o ne o f th e m os t co mplet e papers w e h a ve s e e n ''( o ur s wimmin g r eco r ds :tr e t o b e e n vied. The Cletluer THE CARIBBEAN. Your annu a l i s w o n d erful. T h e s t ories, o f whi c h yo u ha vc a g reat numbe r, w e r e fine an d th e s nap_ s hots dist r ibuted am ong the m made them all the m o r e i n teresti ng The Apo k eepJit lll. THE A fine mag:l7.ine Y o u are to be c o ngratulate d on your Alumni D e p a r t m ent. T he fac t that so many alumni writ e b ack to the ma gaz ine i s a c o mplim ent t o t heir Alm a i\ l a t er. The numero u s pictures ad d a g reat de al t o th e ge n e ral appearance o f th e p a p e r, T he T orell. THE CARIBBEAN. Y o u p ubli s h an exceptio nall} interes tin g an d at t ractive paper wit h eve r y d e p artment well c are d f o r. W e feel th a t w e s h o uld l i k e t o visit Cri s t o bal b o th becau se o f you r sc h oo l a n d b eca u s e o f the pla ce it self of whic h yo u gave u s s u c h a clear i de a b y pi ctures an d desc r i ptive writing. Tilt Hr:rald. THE C \RIBBEAN. )'our p a p e r is o n e of th e most interes tin g o n o ur l ist. I t see m s so str:tnge t o think of p eo pl e s o far a wa}' a s h avi ng t h e s am e inte r es t s a s w e an d ret a s w e exa min c yo ur p a p e r, w e find that we might be r e:lding o f an}' Am eric an hig h sc h ool, except when w e came to t h e picture o f }'our sc h oo l s urr o und e d b y p a l m Tilt C a m b ri dge RelJi ew CARIBBEAN. A w o nd e r ful b oo k full o f excc llent cuts m o r e exce!1cn t n e w s a n d m os t excellen t s t ories-a m agazine of w hich an)" sc h oo l migh t well b e p r o u d T Il( Scribbler THE CARIBBEAN. W e w e r e delighted t o h ea r fro m o ur far awa y P an a m a frien d THE CARIBBEAN with its s pl e ndi d s t ories of l ife i n P a n a ma. "Added T o nna ge for the Ame r i c an i\l arin e g:tve inte r es tin g g limp ses o f t h e i nd i v i d llal m em b e r s o f the g ra d uatin g cla ss The poet r)" especi all y "Old Panama i s sple n d i d I n fact, the m agazi n e is o n e o f the b es t that ha s com e to u s. Tile Spec /%r. THE CARIUBEAN, YOllr mag azin e is o n e of th e b es t w e ha ve r ece iv ed a n d we are glad to exc han ge w i th o ur s i s t e r sc h ool." "Y's a n d O t h e r Y' s i s indee d uniqu e. Y our cuts are fin e. Y o u i n deed h ave sc h oo l s pirit. What g r eater praise i s t h e r e? TheZollinll.

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T H E CAR IBBEAN 71 .l l alfiJon Pul/ig. '2). F r o m the Slnr and lIertlld "l-Iull dreds o r c hil d r e n d r essed in costumes a n d w it h decorated vchicles will f orm ( o r th e line of mar c h br.:hin d t h e ban d o f th e U. S. S. "l\l r 5 ente rtaincd at tea (or a !lUI11-b el' o f peop l e in cl u ding G e neral s a n d ----, wh o r ecently arrived o n the i sthmus in a p olle ra. E.xtra c t s fr ol11 examinat i o n p a p e r s o f t h e grammar grades: w o ul d YOli go about c hecking a co l d ? AUJ.-I ttl go f ro m h Ollse [0 h o u se a n d co un t the c a ses Q.ues. -\\'hy did t h e co l onis t s settle al o n g / hJS. B ecalise ther ha d to ha\'c so m e pla ce to thro w th e ir garbage t ell kinds of foods and tell where th e y co m e fr o m. /Ins -1\ l ear-cow s an d pigs Butter-milk. T o rnatoes-seed. Cabbage-cabbage plan t. Eggs-chic ke n s Plues. -\\' h r does a soc iety n eed a chairman? / !Jl J T o ge t th e c hair s toge th er. E dd i e (\\'ith a hurt exp ress i o n ) Ill our I\ lal1-lIai Training exam., B a co n a s k ed abo u t pi eces o f w oo d that w e never saw or h eard o f b e f o re. } \ fiss D odds O h e ex p ec t ed Y Oll to ge t it o u t o f y our h e a ds W illialll C. (I n G e ne ral S c i e n ce) G ee B a c on, w e ha d a har d l e sso n toda y Ca/dwell Y ea, it was about rocks. G L FSS WHERE. II E. \/tl). 'zJ. "'\'ow, it is lhe lime (or work," Sa\"s 1 \ l r. B acon, hurriedlv, T o do goo.1 work vall must not shirk But settle down intereste.!ly." A silence for a w h ile prevail,,; T he teac her wonders W h:H is wrong. But soon a sound somewhere cUfuiis T he absence of [he lIsual song. Tis Callwell F oos, who now doc<; spc:lk, "port D avis Ius the best tcun here;" A nd W illie a lmost has to shriek, You watch who win<; the Rag this yea r." Bu d B liss b awls out from down the line "110\\ '<; thlt. Stew.1rt?" G uy soon does whip His c h :ur arounl. and in a whine A sks, Whar?" \ smile from B ud anti ZIp." "Old F oos th inks h e s a tennis champ," Says K ing, in jealous tone, 1 doubt If he ca n lick a postage stamp," A nd rig h t away goes u p a shout, ":\11 right t h ere boys, rou get to work," Says :\I r. B acon, angrilr, A nd if you don't corne here to work You'd better le,we quite rapidly." ,\I..-IS .-IL A C K lIem)' Hoo,.e, '23. i\1 0nd.lY morning and time for work to begin! Spanish composition! A nd map hook not :-:0 time for dances and social activity, time to de\"elop athletic proclivity! Ten problems in physics,-no\\ isn't that a fright! R eciting all day and studYlIlg all night! ! J\l iss Dodds wants book reports, poems, and themes,A high sc hool education is not what it seems! !

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THE CARIBBEAN. Franas (I n sophomore class mee t ing, w hil e planning for a what are you? GU.'.-'\ le? I'm refreshment. \liss Bt'ulling (I n so lid ge ometry). -\\' hat are you trying to say, Chester? Chn/n'. ';\ orhing. JfjS.f B.-\\'ell y ou're making a lot o f racke t about it. Emogtl1f ( I n senior English ) \Yhat a r e cinnamons? ( And w e're supposed to know t hat s h e means sy n ony m s.) A S r oc LI KElT. .. Two Olen loqk out through the selfsame b::.rs, One the mud. the other the stars." F ai r F ussr Appro3cn .lble Arr ogant C heerful C ontradictor)" l nhiased L'gl) Lenient Laz.y T ireless Temperamental Youth trainers. Y ammerers. S even S even Eminent Egotistical Ke;;.r-rerfect !,,'crv)' Indispensable I gnorant O riginal O b s tinate R eal R ioting Senior s. J ollr Jealo u s Unique Uninteresti ng l\ onchaL nt Noisy Important Impuden( Open-minded O bnoxious R ollicking Rambunctious Somebodies. Simps. Sagacious S hallow O rderl y O:.sified Perfect P riggi s h H elpful I l opeless Optimistic Opinionated M odel Maudlin Oracular Obtuse R a r e Rabid I'.xcept onal Sharks. Fascinating F rivolous R efined R 1diculous Cnlertaininl. F.mptr-headed Subtle S upcrRuous Hearty llarping MIghty M o notonous Energetic Eccentri c Kobility. l'\onentitics. LOllise (Who ha s n t been to the U. S. f o r some time } W e ll, what 'II I do if I get seas i c k ? Cllflr/Ollr (Who knows f ro m exper i e nce}.--G d o n t w orry, you'll do it J\liss Cur,.ier. ( I n musi c p eriod) -Gerald, put your finger wher e you're sin ging. A nd Gerald promptly puts his fing e r in his mouth. A1isJ Bt?eclJing 1 'm eating ice to make m e thin. Alallie.-O, I d idn't kn o w i ce made yo u thin. M iss B. W ell it mak es m e s h rink. FANTASY. B liss 7r .. '2J A bull wa s in t h e barn),ard, H e saw me wi( h delig ht, But I grabbed h o l d o f his south end, And threw him with all m y might. Next, I met the c r ocod ile A -s wimmin g in the pool, I kne w that if I jumped in, 'Two ul d help (0 keep me cool. While Roating in ther e lazily, I saw a whal e or twO, Bu t I ca r ed noth ing for th emI k illed them both o ff too. The wood upon the other side They say, w as full o f bear ; But, as I had no thought o f fea r, J didn't begin to care. And though I met a dozen o r so They seemed to be quite tame; The reason w as, I late r f ound, They, all of them, wer e lame. Just t hen I f e lt a pair o f arms B egin to encircle m e. I didn't kn o w from when ce t hey ca me, Nor did I want to see. Firs t, I t hought it took a bite, Then I thought it spoke. A las! 'Twas moth e r rous ing me, Saying it was time 1 awoke.

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THE CAR IBBEA . 73

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T H E CA R l BBEA;-<. -'-----------------------------.,' l

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THE CA R I BBEA:-<. 75 ADVERTI S ING. E rnst Euphraf, '23. Advertis in g is o f se v e ral classes The r e i s, f o r in stance the circ ular, con cerning wh ose advisability expert advertise r s are doubtful, suggesting that it b e sent o nl y to peopl e wh o are particularly i n t e r es t e d in the product o r arti c l e whose virtues it se t s f orth. a s a source o f the ir incom e t hat t h e purc h se r o f the p eriod i c al r eceives mll c h great e r va lu e f o r hi s m o ney than h e coul d ex pect j f t here w e r e n o adver t i s in g matte r A g ain w e find p os t e r and s ign advertis in g w hi c h i s v ery gene rall y r egarded a s a public nui sance [\lany o bj ec t to the large glaring signboards a s they wou l d t o any man wh o w ould s t e p lip behind the m and bawl into their ears a recommendatio n o f so m e w o nder ful panace a. But the r e i s so m e r eally con structive and b e n efic ial adverti s ing I n thi s class w e may include the hi g h standard w o rk whi c h appears in o u r p erio di c al s The bus in ess o f p erio di c al adve rti s in g i s of v ery r ecent o rigin if it b e r egarded wit h othe r f orms o f comme r c ial a c ti vitr I t ha s gro wn and improved with the p eriod i c al s until at the present time e stimates o f the amount s p ent annually o n adve rti sing in the United States are a s hi g h a s SSCX>,c:xx::l,ooo. Thedaily w ee ki }', and m onthly publi catio n s o f to-day look t o advertise m ents so large l y \\'ithin the la s t twenty ycar s t h e p r e para-tio n o f adverti se m ents f o r the press h as b e-com e so impo r tant tha t t a l e nted writer s and artis t s, es p ec iall y t h e l atte r a re pai d gener-olls l y b y the advertis in g companies i\late-rial o f r e a l educa ti o nal v alu e i s r e ferred to, and even di sc ussed, f a m o u s w orks o f scu l p-turing and paint in g are o ft e n r eproduced-mate rial whi c h many o f the r eacle r s of the p eriod i c al s mi ght never h ear o f o r see thro u g h any othe r source A sec t io n o f thi s type o f adve rti s in g i s certa inl y interestin g and p e r -haps even m o r e in struc ti ve tha n the a r t i cles o f the mag a z in e proper. L ik e many othe r publicati o n s o f meri t, T H E CARIBBEAN d e p e nds l a r ge l y o n the finan c i a l s u p p o r t o f its adver tise r s I n soliciting advertisem ents f o r our annua l we have cons idered o nl y those wh ose material wo ul d b e con struc t ive and r elia bl e '\'e are p roud to c all the r e ader's atte n t i on t o our adver t i si n g secti on. Patro n ize our ad, ertisers APPRECIATlO:-<. "A fri end in need i s a fri e n d indeed" runs t h e o l d proverb. THE CARIBBEAN staff h a s f elt t h e n e ed-and always it ha s f ound the fri e nds-in Y OU \\'a s it coo kies for the carnival? S o m e o n e sent the m in, with a cake in additi o n \\' a s it a n o l d party d r ess for the S e ni o r p lay? S ome o n e l ent li S h e r v e r y best n e w P ari s ian fr oc k. \\'as i t m o ney fr o m a p l a y ? S o m e o n e sold fifty o r sixty ti c k e t s b e f o r e we knew it, \\'as it som e pl ace to eat w h e n we w e r e g etting r e a d y f o r a play? S o m e body in vited u s into t h e h o m e and serve d u s a lunc h fit f o r r oyalty \\'as it a lamp s hade o r a b eauti ful ru g or an autom obile ride ? T h ere was always so m e o ne t o do m o r e than w e had expected. An d so i t h as been, your kindnesses have b ee n regi s t e red, wh e r e ever y day we've turned t h e page t o read them". e can' t m entio n y o u s in g l y bllt w e want yo u to kno w that our dear o l d Cristobal H igh S c h oo l appreciates whatever e ff orts you have made in our beh a lf. Y e are proud of our schoo l and our annual. They are n o t p erfec t but w e are strivi n g t o make the m b etter and are sincere ly grate ful t o all wh o have sympathized and aided.

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THE C. ... RIBB E .... N. HOTEL WASHINGTON P. O. Address CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE European Plan Fa cing the Atlan tic 100 R ooms 100 Baths Rates from $4.00 up. -1-New, modem, and luxurious in appointment. Excellent cuisine Large privat e grounds with promenade along the sea front, and fine concrete sea-wa ter swimming pool. Cool days. Cool night s Excellent Winter Resort. COLON BEACH J E. LEWIS, Manager. OOlasbington ,fflotor 1[tb. THE ONLY ALL-AMERICAN GARAGE ON THE ATLANTIC SIDE Special Service to Hotel Washington TWO TELEPHONES HOTEL WASIDNGTON Cristobal 733, and Colon 204 :moten, :m. :m. CR I S TOBAL CANAL ZONE

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THE CAR IBBEA;-.l. 77
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7 8 T!,)otel miboli ANCON PANAMA A HOMELIKE IIQ,.J<: L W ITH A C HEERfUL ATMOSPHERE E ROPEAl .... PLAN Ideally located in t h e coolest and most beau tiful part of Ancon, OVERLOOKING T H E SEA Noted f o r irs --THE CARIBBEAN. CLEA.t'lLINESS and COMFORT and t h e CI-: NERAL EXCELLENCE o f the SERVICE and CUISINE. Completel y Refurnis hed and Redecorated Reason able Rates ANDREW JOHNSTON. MANAGER CONTROLLED AND SUPER V ISED BY T H E SUPPLY DEPARTMENT OF THE PANAMA CANAL PDlOmD HOILHODD STEOmSHIP LINE Canal Zone P a nam a Sailings e very ten days, on the 9th, 19th and 29th of each month, for New York via Port-all-Prince, Haiti. Steame r s sail at 3.00 P. M. from Pier 7, Cristobal Can a l Zone; docking at Pier 67, North River, Foot of West 27th., Street, New York. RATES OF PASSAGE

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TH E CARIBB EAN. 7 9 GOETHALS, WILFORD & BOYD, INC. I SOLE AGENTS and WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS for IWi Procter & Gamble Corporation \ ji} V. Vivaudou, Inc. Welch Grape .Juic e Company Cluett, Peabody & Co., Inc. Interwoven Company C. Kenyon Company Standard Supply and Equipment Company Goethals, Wilford & Boyd, Inc. MA I N OFFI C E : Illh and Broadway 261 Soulh 1 5 1h Street, l 'hiludcl phl:1 Col o n R I', I STUMUDHD IMTEHHUTIOHDL COHPOHUTIOH I BONDED WAREHOUSES Merchandise of a ll description stor ed in bond, without payment of Panama C ustoms Duties AMERICAN EXPRESS CO. Travellers Checks Drafts -Money Orders EXPRESS SERVICE TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD Agents and Distributors: CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA and CANAL ZONE MID M I tar otors, nco urant otors, nco STANDARD INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION 26 1 South IS Street. } 'hilude lphiu. Pu. IIlh and Broadway, Colon, R P W. Y. BOYD President.

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80 T H E C.-\RIBB EAN. WHEN IN PANAMA Visit TIle Cecilia Theatre CENTRAL AVENUE Finest Motion Picture Theatre in the City. TRUTE BROS. WHOLESALE IMPORT EXPORT MAN U FACTURER'S AGENTS EXCLUSIVE SE LLI NG AGEN T S FOR "JUVENT A" MINE RAL WATER ( T able and Medi cinal W a t e r )
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TIIF. C A RIBBF.AN. TELEPHONE 103 1 PANAMA 13 Fourth July Ave. PANAMA OPllOSilC Ancon P 0 HATS-DRESSES HATS-DRESSES BOWDRY LADlES OUTFITTERS FEATURING AMER ICA STYLES SELLI N G AT STATES PRI C E S Army AND Navy Y.M.C.A. THE SERVICE MEN S HOME MOVIES E D UCAT IO NAL CLASSES B ASKET BALL E I T E RTAI NMENTS Socials --Fellowship ALL THE COJJFORTS OF JlOJJE SUGGESTI ONS FOR Waterman Id e a l Fountain P e n s Evers harp Go ld Plated Pencils Dunn Fountain Pens Panama Patchwork Panama Canal Stone Jewelry Vict rol a Records m;be Jjieuerboubt FRONT STREE T COLO:,(

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THE CARIBBEA GOODYEAR TIRES and BUICK CARS P G 0 anazone ara5e PANAMA, Phone 335 COLON, Phone 5 Britisn Pharmacg 10.115 BOLIVAR ST. COLON, R. P. THE SERVICE STORE Best Quality Merchandise from all parts of the World TOSTROLINE Th e Nasa l Specific TRI-MUR-TI PEPPERMINT CREAM for Constipation MUSTARD OIL CREAM For a ll Kinds of Pains LAC-A-FLY Kill s Flies and Bed Bugs COMPLIMENTS OF Household Furnishings Travelling Requisites. VISIT US 1!\r. l}ern larier CRISTOBAL, C. Z. -: -

PAGE 89

THE CARIBBEA 83 L. C. Leighton Photographs FLASHLIGHT GROUPS A SPECIALTY 7x17 Doubleweight Sepia Views of Canal Zone BOX 1452 CRISTOBAL, c. Z Cable Address "IMPCO." A 8 C. sth, and 6th B entley s Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd. JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS DEALERS IN General Merchandise and Native Produce COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA P o Box 34'1 Branch R e t ail Sto r es and Trading Station s: COL ON PLAYA DAM A SANTA I SABEL ESCRIBANO MANDINGA COLON 119r. WrltJiler 11genti.st AND GATUN

PAGE 90

THE CAR I BBEAN. -------FOR ANYTHI G YOU NEED ALWAYS CALL FIRST AT THE FRENCH BAZAAR The Largest Department Store on the Isthmus PANA;\IA and COLON Royal Netherlands West India Mail KONINKLYKE WEST-INDISCHE MAILDIENST COMPANIA REAL HOLANDESA DE VAPORES COLON LINE Regular fortnightly passenger and cargo service from Cristobal to Port Limon, and from Cristobal to Puerto Colombia, Curacao, Puerto Cabello, La Guaira, Trinidad, Barbados, Plymouth (for passengers and mail only), Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg. Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe. PACIFIC LINE Regular twoto three-weekly cargo service to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile, on the outward voyage, and to Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg, homeward. A limited number of passengers can be accepted. Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe. For further particulars apply to: ROYAL NETHERLANDS WEST INDIA MAIL Messrs. SASSO, FUHRING & CO. Teleph o n e N o. 21, C riSl o b a l T e l epho n e N o. 6 82 P a n a ma EVERYTHING IN THE LINE OF PLUMBING Central American Plumbing and Supply Company E S TIMATES CHEERFOLLY GIVEN COLON R. P. PANAMA, R. P. !:liil 1 70 B oliva r Str eet 58 Central Avenue

PAGE 91

T H E CARIBBEA;\' "The Book of Knowledge" THE CHILDRE 'S ENC Y C LOPAEDI A The Boo k o f Know l e dge i s a com pl ete work in twenty vol umes, cov e r i n g every field It i s w ritten f o r chi ldren e s pecially f r o m the age s of three to on e hundre d yea r s The v o lumes c o n s i s t of m o r e tha n 3 5 0 col or e d pl ates a n d 9 ,00 0 pictures in ov e r 6,000 p age s. W it h each set t here i s a P a rent and Teach e r s Guid e w h i ch aid s very m a t e ri ally in the study in g and enjoyin g of thes e book s. W H A T TWO C ANA L ZONITES TIDNK OF "THE BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE" FROM A N EXTEACHER '" have <1 k i nd e r garte n c b ss a t h o m e e v e ry day, :l.Ild i t i s a lm os t im poss ib l e t o k ee p the c h i ldre n ;)\\,. l y fr o m your h oo k s d u r in g the i r s p a r e tim e They even co m e bac k a flc r cla!;s a nd s tay f o r h Ollrs l ooki n g thru t h e m .. b el i c \'( ; thJ.t all o f the .:'ch ooh; will s oon have thc.;c h ooks in {h(;ir courtiCs. They w o uld h e lp imm e n se l y in gaining a n id ea o f t h e w o rkin gs o f the worl d." i\l R S C. P. HOFFi\IAN F ROM A MOTHER OF S EVEN "The ring the opini o n o f a Jlla n who has b ee n in close t ouc h wit h Sc h oo l a n d Educati o n a l work f u r the past sixtee n years. I n tha t s i x t ee n yea r s l im e h e has yet to:.ee a lIigh Sc h oo l Annua l the equal o f yOllr 1922 itisu c. I m ca n thi s from the b otto m o f m y heart, as you w o uld w ell b e l i e'"c i f you could sec so m e o f the -\nnu a ls b y the H i g h Sc h oo l s o f this C ountry." THE GROLIER SOCIETY "The Book of Know]edge" 2 1 0 Peachtree ATLANTA, G E OR G I A

PAGE 92

THE C A R IBBEAN. COMPLIMENTS OF 1!\r. jf. 1L. DedI for Easy HON E SEWING COLON, R. P Colon Electric AND Ice Supply Co. III Market St. COLON, R. P THE CARIBBEAN PRESS H A. AR C HER, Proprietor QUALITY PRINTERS B ox 1 32 9, Cristobal Pho n e 4 9 C ri s t obal ( Offlc e In Nonh End I R R SIMl o n C o l o n )

PAGE 93

t H E CARlBBEAN C OMPLIMENTS OF H. W. MITTEN, D. D. S. BALBOA, C. Z. PRINCIPAL DRUG STORE Dr. A. C DaCOSTA GOMEZ We carry a large stock of chemical products, patent medicines and perfumery from the bes t American and European firms Wholesale and retail. Prescriptions accurately compounded. COURTESY AND LOW PRICES OUR MOTTO. 9th and B oli"3 r S treets Co l o n R o f P Co rp. Phone No 222, P O B ox. No. 8 4 DIERS & ULLRICH AGENTS FOR White Rock Mineral Water Ginger Ale Park & Tilford's Candy Anheuser Busch Malt Nut 48 FRONT STREET COLON P h one 101 RATHBUN, STILSON & CO. Hardware, Lumber, Paints, and Oils P. O. Box 140 COLON, R P

PAGE 94

sa THE CARiBBEAN Phones: Ba lboa 667, P anama 93 4 Box 382, Ancon, C Z. Cable Addr ess: "Pusee," THOMAS R. LOMBARD "l)) ublic <$aragl''' jl ,: If.IJ/J PANAMA CITY, R P RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO 23 FRONT STREET, COLON, R P Phone Colon NO.9 P O. Box 523, Cristobal, C. Z 68 HARBOUR STREET, KINGSTON, JAMAICA Is the oldest establishment of Photography in Colon, and our continued success is due to the fact that we have always pleased our patrons. "Richards" stamped on your photograph is a guarantee of excellence. STUDIES OF LADIES AND INFANTS OUR SPECIALTY COMPLIM ENTS Dr. DONALD R. YOUNG SURGEON DENTIST Panama City

PAGE 95

THE CARTBBEAN. COMPAGNIE GENERALE TRANSATlANTIQUE FRENCH LINE OF STEAMERS PASSENGER SERVICE Regular fortn ight l y sailings fr o m Cristobal, Canal Zon e, to England and France, calling at Colombian and Ven ezuelan ports. CARGO SERVICE Monthly sailings from An twe rp, L e H avre, Bord ea ux, and Cristobal, to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile. Monthly sailings from Antwerp Le Havre, Bordeaux, and Cristobal, to Mexico, San Francisco, a n d Vancou ver. F o r all particulars apply to FRENCH LINE AGENCY P O. Box 128, CRISTOBAL C. Z Phone No. 185 BORDEN'S PANAMA, Calle 8a No. 12 P O. Box 303 Phone No 759 GARAGE Latest Model Cars FOR BUSI ESS A D FOR PLEASURE Wilcox Building, 9th & Broadway Telephone 353, Co lon. R. of P.

PAGE 96

tHE CARIBBEAN. COMPLIMENT S O F W. ANDREWS & CO. STEAMSHIP AGENTS be Wanamll PHONE 395 COLON PHO N E 395 CO L O N MORGAN'S GARAGE The Only Reliable Garage on the Atlantic Side D E PENDABLE S ERVICE CALL A C AR A ND B E CONVINCED T L MORGAN, Prop

PAGE 97

T H E CARIBBEAN. COMPLIMENTS OF SAMARITAN HOSPITAL snVE YOUR EYES The finest in optical prescription work. ff NEWEST STYLES COLON STATES PRICES liltj liltj ================liltj Scadron Optical Co. PAN A M A COLON 23 Centra l A ,'e. 4 4 F r o n t St. liltj Buy Y ou r Drugs Patent Medicine s P e rfum e ry, T oilet Articles etc. AT THE Pan-American Drug Store 50 Front Street Col o n R. P. Y o u Alwa ys D o Better at S a la za r's WE CARRY AN J STORES SO F ront Street 56 B oliva r Street 182 Bo livar Street The Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Co. M ANU FA C T URERS O F HIGH GRADE SOFT DRINKS PANAMA, Phone 65 COLON, Phone 84

PAGE 98

T H E CARIBBE: \N. L\lPROY E D E Q U I P M E I T MODERN METHODS EFFICIENT SERVI C E Ilki JACKSON'S STEAM LAU N D R Y I BROA D W A Y, EAR FOLKS RIV E R I "LET US DO THE DIRTY WORK" W e solicit the P atro n a e of Can a l Employees Ilki b Wee kl y Co ll ections and D e li veries of Laundry Work. Charge Ac count if D esire d m CLEANING, PRESSING, and DYEING I A SPECIALTY Phon e Colon 2 1 P. O. ll ox 1131. Cris toba l C Z .

PAGE 99

TilE C.-\RI BBFA '\'. k i YOUR mOTHERS I ) t is generall y recognized that the Best Formula for Infant Feeding down in these Tropical Countries i s the Ancon Doctors' Fornulla: I-Part Nestle's Condensed Milk 3Parts St. Charles Cream 12'Parts Boiled Water. fS:"$ i Itchangeswiththeageofthechild: Ask your doctor. FOR USE I N COFFEE \ ND OTIIER P RPOSES Nestles' & St. Charles' Are the m os t economical because they go F.\RT HEST. BOYS Tell your mothers t o give yo u Nestle's and St. Charles' and exc h a nge the Label s for Toys, Story B ooks, Chocolate, etc. AT THE Nestle's Milk Company Colon or Panama LOOK YOUR BEST You are cordially invited to visit AMERICAN Phone 298 UNIVER SAL ELECTRIC APPLIA CES CADOZE & LINDO PANAMA 93

PAGE 100

9+ THE CARIBB EAN. QUALITY IS EVERYTHIN G Naturall y, s p ent m any yea r s in the of portraits, we h ave very p ositive ideas o n that subject. To our mind a q uality portraitsh ould h ave distinction o f p ose D a y and Upstair s (he STUDEBAKER GARAGE Central ",'e. Panama City Regular Sailing s from Cri stobal, C. Z t o N ew Y ork, N e w Orlean s, Cub a C o l ombia J a m aic a and Costa Rica. For further particulars, apply: S CRANTON PHOTO STUDIO BOX 476 Ancon C. z. P a n a m a C ity, R o f P M C O'HEARN, General Agent, Cristobal, C. Z. T. H JACOME, Agen t, P a na ma C ity R LINCE & CO. FINE PANAM A HATS 83 CEN TRAL AVE NUE PANAMA R. P

PAGE 101

THE CAR I BBEAN. -----FREDERICK Automobile and Motor Boat Repair Service 2nd and BOLIVAR STREET COLON, R. P. The rainy season i s on; protect yourself INFLUE ZA and COLD b y The Sures t and Safest R e m e d y KAL-MOL EUSTACE LEE, So l e Agent Colon. R. P. On Sal e at all Drug Stores. PANAMA AGENCIES CO. Grace Line STEMISIIIP AGENTS Sailings to New York SPECIAL RATES TO C INAL ZO,YE EMPLO}'EES PERK I NS RI NTS E RF EGT IGTURES CRISTOBAL CLUBHOUSE PHOTO FINISHING DEPT. Developing and Printing, Enlargements, Lantern Slides, Home Portraiture and Groups. WORK CUARA.VTEED SEE S FIRST Phones 30 and 446 95

PAGE 102

T I -IE CARIB BEAN. This store bas the 25-Year Pen Come and see the super pen cre ated by Geo. S. Parker, invent:" of the l eakp roof "Lucky Curve. I t took him 30 years to perfect it, bet it h a s t a k e n only a fe weeks f e r the clas s ic J uo !old to b e come our l eading s eller. Come and see th e of its Chine s e-red barr e l with smar t black.,ipped ends and n e u' gold pock clip. Grasp it! Get th e bu s iness-like feel of i ts fit, w ei:;ht a n d b a !::!1c::: in yo'..!r hand. Note how mu c h 1!lO!'"(! ia..'< irs o ver barrel holds! The n write with Native Iridium point. as s mooth and life-enduring as a h a rd i e w e l bearing, and gu a ranteed 25 y ears for w ear and t:'!c-;h':':licJ. perfec tion CcIIl e in and get one for 3 0 days'trial ---Smaller sizes can be had at lower prices. Also a large variety of hand -painted designs, together with the Parker "Lucky Lock" Pencil in gold or si!ver. Every student needs these two items of int imate per-sona! ment. equip-FOR SALE AT LEADING STO RES Maxwell-Ke lso Sales Co. DISTRIBUTORS Cristobal




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THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. VI.



CRISTOBAL, C'\N'\L ZONE, 1923.



No.



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL





Porte Cochere, Hotel Washington Entrance.



Porte Cochere. Washinttton Hotel Exit.



CONTENTS



2.-?.



24



Advertising Ernst Euphiiat, '23

.'\lu.Tini

Appreciation Class of

.\s You Like It

.Athletics:

Boys' Chester Pike, '24

Basketb.ill

Foreword

Swimming

Tennis

Track

Girls' Charlotte Housel

Basketball

Swimming

Track, .?

Caribbean Staff

Dedication

Editorial H. Edward May, '23

Editorial Staff

Exchanges Florence Albert, '24

Faculty, The

Faculty Silhouettes

Freshman Class

Freshman Index Helen Abendroth, '26

Graduates i

.lokes Mattison Pullig, '23

Juniors

Literary Louise Henter, '22

A Case of Mistaken Identity, Gerald Bliss, Jr.
Allegories of School Life

Everyboy H. Edward Mav

Every Student's Ride. .Louise Henter,

The Harp Ernst Euphrat.

.A Shred ot Yellow Paper, Dorothy Abendroth, '15

.A Soliloquy William Cousins, '25

Controlling my Temper. .Caldwell B. Foos,
Dramatic .Attempts

.An Interno-I Drama Frances Gray,

Mr. .Shakespeare Visits Gopher Prairie,

Louise Henter,

The Booklegger Ernst Euphrat,

Early Lite in Panama

A Cause for Thanksgiving,

MAmsON Pullig,

An Incident H. Edward May,

Convinced Henry Moore,

Extracts From a Diary, Gerald Bliss, Jr.,

Faith Louise Henter,

Glimpses of Colon:

A Cobbler's Shop Ernst Euphrat,



23

'23
'^3



25.
'21;.

'23-



23



A Fruit Stand Emogene Nash, '23



75
19
75
7-

59

59

59

61

62

62

63

^3

63

63

3

3

4

3

69

5
6-7
17
18
o-i I
71
13
23
49

53
52
53
47
47
55

44

46
45



32
33
36
35
49

30
31



Literary Continued:

Glimpses of Colon Continued;
.A Furniture Store on Bolivar,

LouisF. Henter,

.Along Shore Mattison Pullig,

.A Window Henry Moore,

Impressions While Strolling Down Boliva:

Street, Dorothy Abendroth,

John's Gerald Bliss, Jr.,

The Iceberg Snowball Shop, H. E. May,

The Native Market Frances Gray,

Gum Chewing Mattison Pullig,

Never .Again Louise Henter,

Pup-p-pathetic. Ernst Euphrat,

The Dungeon of Fort San Lorenzo,

Warner F. Bowers,

The Iowa Edith Coulbourn,

Time Frances Gray,

Tragedies Large and Small

Lost One Dime Mattison Pullig,

The Home-Coming Frances Gray,

Two Trips Taken from Panam.a
A \'isit to the Chokois Indians,

Inza Markham,

Mis Vacaciones

When Green Meets Green .Louise Henter,
Poetry:

-Alas and Alack Henry Moore,

.A Tarpon Mattison Pullig,

.A Tribute Ernst Euphrat,

Chinese Gardener Louise Henter,

Fantasy Gerald Bliss, Jr.,

Gatun Lake Emogene Nash,

Guess Where? H. Edward May,

My Father Frances Gray,

Revery Inza Markham,

Sunset on the Caribbean,

Senior English Class, '22-

The Old Jungle Trail Louise Henter,

The Piers Gerald Bliss, Jr.,

The Siege of San Lorenzo. .H. Edward May,

The Tropic Moon Ernst Euphrat,

Tropic Rain Frances Gray,

We .Are Seven

School Li fe

School Notes Frances Gray,

Sophomore Class

The Last Junior Gathering of the Class of '24,

Gladys Lowande,

"Twenty-five" Caldwell B. Foos,

What is the Function of Education.' Frances Gray,
Mattison Pullig, '23, Louise Henter,



23-
23
23

25^
23-
23-

25-
23-

23

23-
24-

24-
25-

23.
25-



24-



23-

23

23-

23
23-

23-
23-

25-
24-

23-
23-
23'
23-
23-

25-



25-



24-

'25-

25.

'23-



30
29
31

27
30
29

27

56

50
5

23
51
42



48



39

41

57

71
42
18

31

72

47

7>
8

54



54
18

56
18
58
12
64
65
15



14
16



THE CARIBBEAN.




Sunset on the Caribbean A \ iew Taken fiuni the Foreground of the Home of TuE Caridbean.



The nolces of the d:iy have died; high, shrill,

Excited voices of the children, cries

C( pr.rrakeets, and hum of planes are still.

The shadowed sea in somber sleep now lies

Which late did fret, and fume, and foam, and fill

The air with sounds monotonous. Low .sighs

The rustling palm, and, from the distant hill,

The echoes of the sunset gun now rise.

The sun, low sinking in yon western sky.

Looks forth from clouds all touched and tinged with gold,-

His path, a carpet shimmering o'er the bay.

To meet the weary weathered rocks which lie

Historians silent waiting as of old

For sun, and wind, and wave of each new day.



SE.VIOR E.NGLISH CLASS. 22-'23



THE CARIBBEAN.




Top, left t-i ri,^ht. Louise Ht'iittr, I.Hcrarv Llit .r. Lra.>i Laplir^i. liu -luc -.-> .\Liii.;j:or. llfr.ii.J Hli>.>, Advertising Manager; Editor-
in-Chief, resigned; Henry Moure. Art EJitor. Left side, reading down. Florence Albert. E.\change Editor; JameJ Bur^ioon.
Assi:tant Business Manager: Warner Bowers, ex-Assistant Business Manager; Emogene Nash. Alumni Eiitor. Rightside, reaJing
down. Guy Stewart. Circulation Manager; Chester Pike. Boys' Athletic Editor; Charlotte Housel. Girls' Athletic Editor; EJith
Coulbourn, Assistant Circuhtion Manager. Bottom, left to right. Mattie Pullig, Joke Editor; Gladys Lowande, Assistant
Editor-in-Chief; Frances Gray. School Notes Editor. Center. Edward May, Editor-in-chief.



DEDICATION.



WF, THE STUDENTS OF CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, GRATEFULLY DEDICATE
THIS, THE SIXTH VOLUME OF THE CARIBBEAN, TO THE STAFF OF THE
PANAMA CANAL PRESS WHOSE MEMBERS, PAST AND PRESENT, HAVE
EVER MADE OUR INTERESTS THEIRS, AND THEIR TIME AND ENERGY OURS
IN THE PRODUCTION OF THE BOOK.



THE CARIBBEAN.




"Our Eddif,"



It was Alexander Dumas in his "The Count of
Monte Cristo," who gave importance to the Cha-
teau d'lf, which is situated on a barren rocky
island about two miles west of Marseilles and was
at that time used as a state prison by the French
government. As the story goes, Edmond Dantes,
a young man ot about nineteen years, was unjustly
imprisoned there and forced to spend many years
of his life in a dark, dismal, dirty, and dank dun-
geon. One evening as Dantes lay on his cot in a
semi-conscious condition for he had been trying
to starve himself to death he heard a distant
tapping against stone. Could it be the workmen
thereabout or a prisoner trying to make an es-
cape? Dantes was infused with new hope;
strength came to him; he got up and went to the
quarter whence the sound had come. Knowing
that if it were a prisoner he would stop, but if it
were a workman he would continue, Dantes
tapped three times and the noise ceased. Then,
with timorous patience he waited for seventy-two
days until the tapping again startcti. At once he
resolved to gain something that he had coveted
for years companionship. After breaking the
water jug in his cell he hid some of the larger
pieces and began immediately with one of them
to dig through the wall, whence the sound came.
He labored incessantly with every element of de-
termination for weeks and weeks, taking out per-
haps a handful of rock and plaster each day.
Finally, he reached the tunnel that the other man
had made and, on meeting the prisoner, found him
to be L' .Abbe P'aria, a jiriest who had been con-
fined there a few years prior to Dantes' sentence.
The Abbe was subject to catalepsy and knew that
it was impossible for him to escafie, but he bade
Dantes go on with his plan of escape. The Ablie
was so kind to him and taucht him so much of



the arts, that Dantes refused to leave him while
he lived. During the fourteenth year of Dantes'
imprisonment, the Abbe had his third attack of
catalepsy, which was fatal to him, although
Dantes made a great effort to save his life. Dantes
then saw his opportunity for escape and taking
advantage of it, he substituted his body for that
of the Abbe, which had been wrapped for burial,
and was thrown in the sea, the cemetery of the
Chateau d'lf. After extricating himself, he swam
to the distant Isle of Tibouleu, where he was later
picked up by a sailing ship.

Thus, through patience, incessant toil, and de-
termination, and by taking advantage of an oppor-
tunity, he was able to free himself from the bonds
of the Chateau d'lf.

Each one of us has a life to live. Are you going
to live yours in a chateau of IF or are you going
to dig to gain your liberty now.'' Are you going
to let the barriers of life's I F's retard your progress
or are you going to surmount them, as did Dantes,
with patience, incessant labor, and determination.

"// I could have one more chance, how differ-
ently I would do, ;" "// only I were as clever
as he, ;" "// I had only known before, ;" "//"
I could have the opportunities he has had, ;"
"//only I were as lucky as she is, ;" "z/ I had
his wealth, ;" "// I had his perseverance, ;"
"z/my parents and teachers took more interest ."
We have heard these remarks time and time again.
We often make them ourselves. Every person who
utters such a subjunctive clause is a prisoner in
the chateau of IF. It is for us to make our own
opportunities and welcome them when they ap-
]iear, or we shall dwell always in the chateau of IF.

Henle\' in his "Invictus" says:

"I ;im the captain of my .soul,
I ,im the master of mv fate."



THE CARIBBEAN.



Are you the master of what you undertake or
are you imprisoned by the trivial, yet significant
IF? When you are given a task to perform, do

you say, "Yes I shall, ;/ "? IK that is your

prison wall. This very task that you are asked to
perform may be your big opportunity in life; //
you hesitate, all may be lost. "^'our answer
should be, "I must; therefore I can."

When we encounter a person, who has risen
higher than the average, we say without thought.



'"riiat person surel\- has been lucky." But we
forget that "ninety-eight per cent of genius is
hani work." That person has merely gained his
liberty from the chateau of IF. He has chi.seled
away at his chateau of IF until only the dominant
"I" remains.

"Not in the clamour of the crowded street,
Not in the shouts .ind phiudits of the throng,
But in ourselves, are triumph and defeat."



Cfje Jfacultp.




Miss Horn beak.



MissBakewell.



Mis3 Barnhouse.



Mr. Bacon.



Miss Beeching. Miss Dodds.



THE CARIBBEAN.



Mr. W. \V. .Andrew,
Providence, Rhode Island.

Superinlendenl of Schools.




Miss J. Isabella Dodds,

Claremont, Minnesota.

Macalester College.

English, Latin, Social Problems and Economics.
Caribbean Staff Adviser. Senior Class Adviser.



Who is it changes rapidly
When students answer vapidly,
From smiling countenance to frown
.And gives a proper calling down?

Who is it always can partake
In parties, and can surely make
Such pies and cakes and candy
.As everyone pronounces dandy?

Who is it "honestly thinks that West
As a real authority is the best,"
Who has for outlines an appetite.
But has a bark far worse than her bite?

MISS B.AKEWELL.



Mr. Frank T. Wilson,

Seattle, Washington.
University of Washington.

.-Issistant to Superintendent of Schools.



Who came to us from Minnesota
And often tells of "Brother Ole"?
Who's travelled far and wide of late
.And tales of travel does relate?

Who teaches English, coaches plays,
And has so much to claim her days?
Who talks o( Caesar's wars in Gaul,
-As well as it she'd seen them all?

Who is it always lends a hand
And never fails to understand?
Who's loved by everyone in school,
With no exceptions to the rule?

MISS DODDS.




Miss Adela F. Bakewell,

Lansing, Iowa.

Iowa State College.

University of California.

Home Economics, .-Incient History.

Junior Class Adviser.




.Miss Hahie I.ee Hornbeak,

Waxahachie, Texas.

Tiinity Univerjity.
Columbia L'niversltv.

English, American History and Civics.
Sophomore Class Adviser.



Who is it hides behind the books
Upon her desk, but o'er them looks
Through spectacles dark-rimmed and round
Just when she seems behind them drowned?

Who is it always bangs the bell,
And tales of Texas loves to tell?
Who's anxious always for the mail?
Who dreads upon the .sea to sail?

Who has a memory wonderful
Which makes us feel quite "blunderful"?
Who talks of Shakespeare, Poe, or More
As if she'll lived to them next door?

MISS HORNBEAK.



THE CARIBBEAN.



Who is it is a "native daughter"
But came to us trom o'er the water
From Bogota, where she did teach
And also pr
Who sings the praises of her brother
More frequently than any other;
From Guatemala scarfs did bring
In colors fit to deck a king?

Who is it snaps her fingers hard.
But hates to decorate a card
With lurid F's? Who sympathizes
Even when she criticizes?

MISS BARNHOUSE.




Miss Mabel Jkan Barnhouse,

Watsonville, California.

Leiand Stanft)rd. Jr.. U[iiversity.



Spanish.



Freshmati Class .-Idviser.




Mr. Henrv G. Bacon,

Mauricetown, New Jersey.

Columbia University.



Manual Training, Mechanical Drawing, General Science.



Who is it always stands on guard
.^nd looks so firm, and cokl, and hard.
Or paces grimly up the aisles
.And yet finds time for jokes and smiles?

Who always looks the best in clothes
Such as he wears when'er he goes
Upon a hike, with pack on back
To hold his needments and a snack?

Who is it makes the "bestest" fudge
.\nd gives us lots of chance to judge?
Who teaches our boys to draw,
.'\nd keeps the Science cla,ss in awe?

MR. BACON.



Who is it sits in a student's seat
When in assembly she has her beat.
And pounces thence in seeming rage.
On him who looks up trom his page?

Who is it ej-iculates, "Oh rats!"

.And has an antipathy tor hats.

And says, "You Seniors needn't think

And because they don't, slings on red ink?

Who likes to bat the tennis ball?
Who in her classwork knows it all?
Who hikes the country up and down.
And scorns the restaurants of town?




Miss Mabel Beeching,

Hutchinson, Kansas.
Kan-,as State Normal Sch:ol.



MISS BEECHING.



Geometry, Physics, .Algebra.



THE CARIBBEAN.



MY FATHER.

Frances Gray, '2^.



.\ cry is heard upon the castle wall,

A sound of cannon from the turret high,

A rush of feet upon the steep stone stair,

A clank of muskets on the courtyard flags.

The winding of the warning horn afar,

The rumble ot the drawbridge as it drops,

The creaking of the gates as they swing wide.

The loud triumphant shout that welcomes home

The lord, the king, the idol of this band.

I fling aside my tapestry and run

\Mth feet that scarcely seem to touch the marble floor,

So eager that my lips shall be the first

To give glad greeting to my dearest lord.

His breeches caught with silver at the knee,

A scarlet sash encircling his hips.

The collar of his linen shirt turned back

To bare his mighty chest and strong brown thro:it.

The heavy rings a-dangle from his ears.

His coal black hair a-flying in the breeze,

I see him stand, surrounded by his men.

One hand upon the hilt of his great sword.

The other raised in greeting unto all.

He catches sight of me behind the men.

And, with a shout that echoes through the court,

He thrusts aside the crowd that intervenes,

And stands and faces me with arms outstretched;

A breathless moment as I hesitate.

And then I rush into those sheltering arms.

I feel the quickened beating of his heart,

The touch of lips against my burning cheek,

The rough caressing of his calloused hands

As he rumples up my short black curls.

He puts me down before him, and he stands

With hands on hips and gazes down on me;

I hardly reach the buckle on his sash



.And feel so tiny 'midst those great strong men;
I timidly shrink nearer, and he laughs
And lifts me to his shoulder, where I sit
And cling with one small arm about his neck.
I see all piled up high within the gates
Huge oaken chests with bands of copper bound,
And bales, and casks, and vats, and tubs, and sacks,
Fair bulging with their contents rich and rare.
I catch the words of cannon, battle, death,
A deep voice tells of storms upon the sea.
Another speaks of raids, of close escapes,
Of silent marches through the tropic night,
Ot bullion buried in a far-off cave,
Ot unmarked graves, of faces that are gone;
."^nd I wonder as I hear these words.
For I know naught of storms, or death, or graves.
My father holds me tight and passes on
Beneath the mighty arch into the hall.
Where wooden tables groan beneath their load
Ot bread, and meat and wine enough for all.
I gaze with wonder on the motley throng,
Gone are faces that I once did know,
And new names now re-echo through the hall.
Now here, now there, I catch a sight of some
Familiar face, the sound of some known voice,
But still the band is changed. I look in vain
For some who once did feast within this hall,
.f^nd then bethink myself of "storms at sea"
Of "death" ol "unmarked graves." I understand.
The lights grow dim before my sleepy eyes.
The shouting and the singing die away.
I hear a faint voice in the distance cry
"Morgan! The Pirate! The Raider! Our King!"
I sleep.




An Answer to the Question:

"WHAT IS THE FUNCTION OF
EDUCATION?"

(AsGiven by Throe Cristobal High School Girls.)



' I ''HE character of men, like the substance of stones, varies
and, like the stone, the characterof men must be chiseled,
and molded, and shaped for its position in the tower of society.
Education, like the tools that shape the rock, shapes the char-
acter of men. Education means knowledge. Knowledge of
what? Of geography? Of science? Of English? Of Latin?
Yes! It me.ms all of these, and more. It means the know-
ledge of right and wrong. It means the knowledge of the con-
sequences ot right and wrong. It means the realization of the
individual responsibility of every man. It means the strength
to uphold this responsibility. All the e things are the tools
that shape man's character. All these things are Education.
A chain is as strong as its weakest link. Is not a tower as
strong as its weakest block? It is the purpose of Education
to make the weakest block the strongest, and this purpose must
travel in an everlasting cycle, increasing, day by day, the
strength and the beauty of the tower of society.

Frances Gray, '^j.



t* DUC.'^TION .'^h! not merely the enabling an individual
to learn material things facts, but teaching him the way
to help other people learn things; showing him his place in
the business of life; teaching him to brighten his corner, as
well as broaden it. Education is not measured by selfish
knowledge but by the knowledge and happiness that are ex-
pounded to one's associates. Mattison Pullig, '2j.



A I-L youth teels the intangible, strange urge of ambition,
experiences nameless longing.'--, and dreams vague shadowy
dreams for the betterment of existing conditions. The farm
boy at his plow in the fields, the busy factory boy, the grocery
clerk weighing small, exact amounts of beans and potatoes,
the shepherd boy tending his master's sheep, and all the other
boys and girls in various conditions of life and in all countries,
dream. It is the part of Education to make these vague
dreams become realities, to furnish inspiration and tools for
achievement, to lead, guide, and direct the mind in the devel-
opment of individual ideals, to take Youth out of the rut of
his own commonplace existence to a vision of wider spaces.

Louise Henter, '23.



lO



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



II



ERNST \V. F.UPHRAT.

'l9-'20 East Night School, Cincinnati, Ohio.
'l\-'22 High School Chorus.

Boys' Glee Club.

"The Zone Police."
'22-' 2 i Class Treasurer.

Business Manager, The CARiBnEAN.

High .School Chorus.

Class Basketball.

"The Trysting Place."

"Grumpy."



HENRY J. MOORE.

'i9-'2l Curtis High School, Sraten Island, N. Y.
'2i-'22 Exchange Editor, The Caribbean-.

High School Chorus.

Bovs' Glee Club.

B,asketball.

Baseball.

"I'he Zone Police."
'22-'23 .Art Editor, The Caribbean.

Hiuh School Chorus.

Basketball.

Baseball.

Swimming.

Track.

"The Trysting Place."

"Grumpy."



LOUISE E. HFXTKR.

'i9-'20 High School Chorus.
'20-'2i High School Chorus.

Basketball.

"Esmeralda."
'2i-'22 Girls' Athletic Editor, The Caribbea.v.

High School Chorus.

Girls' Glee Club.

Basketball.

Track.

"Mrs. Oakley's Telephone."
'22 '2j Class President.

Literary Editor, The Caribbean.

High School Chorus.

Basketball.

Track.

"Grumpy."



M.ATTISOX G. PULLIG.

'i9-'20 High School Chorus.
'2o-'2i Class President.

General .Assistant "Esmeralda."
'2i-'22 An Editor, The Caribbea.v.

Girls' Glee Club.

High School Chorus.

"Mrs. Oakley's Telephone."

General .Assistant "Clarence."
'22-'23 Class Secretary.

Joke Editor, The Caribbean.

High School Chorus.

"The Trysting Place."

"Grumpy."

President, Girls' Supper Club.



EMOGENE J. NASH.

'i9-'20 High School Chorus.

Basketball.
'20-'2i Oklahoma Baptist L^niversity.
'2i-'22 Class Secretary-Treasurer.

High School Chorus.

Girls' Glee Club.

"Mrs. Oakley's Telephone."
'22-'23 .Alumni Editor, The Caribbean.

High School Chorus.

"Grumpy.



H. EDWARD MAY.

'l9-'20 High School Chorus.
'20-'2i Class Secretary.

Circulation Manager, The Caribbean.

Class B.asketball.

Track.

"Esmeralda."

'2i-'22 Class President.

.Assistant Editor-in-Chief, The Caribbean

High School Chorus.

Boys' Glee Club.

Class B.asketball.

Track.

"The Zone Police."
'22-'23 Editor-in-Chief, The Caribbean.

High School Chorus.

Class basketball.

Track.

Tennis.

"The Trysting Place."

"Grumpy."



GERALD D. BLISS, JR.

'i9-'2o Class President.

High School Chorus.
'20-'2i Basketball.
'2i-'22 Class Vice-President.

.Assistant Business Manager, The Caribbean.

High School Chorus.

Bovs' Glee Club.

Basketball.

Baseball.

Swimming.

Tennis.

"The Zone Police."
'22-'2j Editor-in-Chief, resigned.

.Advertising Manager, The Caribbean.

B,asketball.

Baseball.

Tennis.

"The Trysting Place."

"Grumpy."



12



THE CARIBBEAN.




WE ARE SEVEN.




I met an old Cristobal girl;

She was quite grown up she said;
Her hair was thick but not a-curl

For she wore it bobbed instead!



"And then there was the Henter girl,
Whose first name was Louise;

She's won much literary tame
Since taking her degrees.



"Now tell me of your school," I said, "In sports she ranked with any one.

And classmates dear to you." Played basketball, and ran.

She settled down with a smile and said. Could jump, play tennis, throw the shot-

"There's nothing I'd rather do." She's even caught a man!



"How many were there, first," I said,
".And what deeds did they do?

.And what accomplishments are theirs
Since they with school are through?"

"There were not many of us sir;

We numbered only seven,
.And we are just as many now,

For none has gone to Heaven.

"First Gerald, Jr., I'll discuss;

He's Bliss in deed and name;
.As an advertising manager

He's made his name and fame.

"He was an athlete every inch
He swam, played basketball.

Was tennis champion, and caught
At baseball, and did well in all;

"To raffle was his chief delight;

(He has his bicycle still!)
He left to Chester Pike the right

To go in and out at will.

"Ernst Euphrat is the next in line,

He is a Jr. too
He still is practising dentistry

As he of old did do.

"He never loved athletics much
He found them rather tame

But, when he started anything.
We always found him game.



"He took his time in what he did.

Was easy to amuse;
To Inza .Vlarkham he did leave

The right to play the "Blues."



"She always was just full of pep

.And effervescent cheer;
To Ethel S. she left her gift

Ot having for classwork no fear.

"And next comes Henry Edward May

He with the curly hair;
His slender fingers, long and firm.

Have made him a surgeon rare.



"She swam, played tennis with a vim.

Shone in society.
But best of all she liked it when

She soared to hit high C.

".As 'Black Beauty' she scored a hit
In fact was made the queen,

The prestige of Miss Liberty
Gave to Edith C. as queen."

".And what about yourself?" I .asked;

"Ot your renown I've heard;
Your influence on all was great;

All listened to your word.

"In high school sport you never joined.
But always lent your cheers;

The memory of your pep and push
Has come down through the years.



"He ran and jumped and sang and danced "I understand vou left to George
And thought and spoke with ease; Your popularity.

And that the class of '23
Left love and loyalty



And his report card also
Was always full of E's!



"To things worth while for everyone
He did devote his strength;

With Gladys L. and Charlotte H.
He did divide his length.

"The next I'll name was Henry Moore-
He came from Randolph post,

As maker of the best cartoons
He's known from coast to coast.

".Another athlete true was he
He hailed fom "Coitis" High;

As "Grumpy" he achieved a name
Which is not like to die.

"By nature pleasant, cheerful, yet

He liked his friendly spats;
To Florence .Albert he did will

His pleasant noon-day chats.

"Another girl was F.niogene
Her name of yore was Nash

By giving concerts everywhere
She earns a million cash.



"To our dear school? Of course we did!

.And our great dignity,
Our toothpick dear, and Senior pen

With no malignity

"Unto the Junior class. .Advice,

And wishes good and kind.
To Freshmen and to Sophomores

We sweetly left behind.

".And to the faculty we left

Our thanks when trom them riven:
We're still the class of 'ij;

We're one though we are seven."




THE CARIBBEAN.



13




cJ-IiiasBah.wcU-. fldviscv-
(UI-RorCAC G. /Albert- Vice- Prcs.
M- Gladys Lov>ra.ndc

Q-CKar\o\\c Ho\jLsa\
- E.the,\ 5 oTvTv cYTv arv.
^- Inza MaLrKKaYrv
S~Edx^KCo\x"l'bo'u.rrv,- Sac.T>-a. ^"CKaslcr P\V<.a-- President

^-WaY-ner- Bovx/(Z.Y-s-Cx.5<2.c.tTrai.



14



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE LAST JUNIOR GATHERING OF THE
CLASS OF ^=-4.

Gladys Loivaniie, '24.

"Hey, kids, what about an informal gathering?
the last one as Juniors, you know. When we
come back in October, it will be as the Senior Class.
Sounds great,doesn't it? Come on. Miss Bakewell."

With Chet's words echoing in their ears, the
happy group strolled down to the domestic science
building, a building fairly haunted with memories
of" past Junior doings. There were Chester
Pike, good old Chet, the best class president ever;
Inza Markham and Florence Albert, otherwise
known as Bobbie and Flossie, tlie Damon and
Pythias of the class; George Oakes, generally
called "Oakes," wearing that same unbanishable
smile with which he had entered school the latter
part of the year; Edith Coulbourn and Ethel
Sonneman, Ed and Ethel, both quiet, demure
maidens not heard from very cfren, but, be it
sale or party, always willing to do their share
and more; Charlotte Housel, a wee little girl
kept most busy with either playing the piano,
tennis, basket-ball or entertaining a certain senior
lad; and last of all, Gladys Lowande, alias "Pinky,"
and Miss Bakewell, their much loved class adviser.

"Well Chet, now that we are here, what's the
big idea?"

"Nothing exactly but I just sent the janitor
down forsome ice cream thinking that you might

"Icecream! Leadmetoit! Sounds 'most as good
as the eats at our \'alentine party. Remember the
six salads that Warner got away with, to say
nothing of the cake?"

"Do we? Well I'll say so. By the way, Ches-
ter, have you heard from him latel\?"

"Yes, I've had a couple of letters. He's in
Brooklyn, New York, now having one grand and
glorious time. In the last letter I had, he said
to tell you, Gladys, that he was glad to hear that
your prayer for another Junior boy had been
answered. You know, Oakes, Gladys prayed for
you for about a month before you came."

"Oh, I did not, I just hoped we'd get another
boy to take Warner's place. But returning to
the subject of the party, whenever I hear it men-
tioned, that is by some one of the feminine sex
there is sure to be some raving about your wond-
erful interpretation of the sheik, Chet."

"Never mind, Chet, you haven't a thing on
Charlotte. Let me give you an impersonation of
her at the cake sale. 'Say, won't you buy this



lovely chocolate layer cake? Just like mother
used to make! What? You don't like chocolate
cake!' Then she'd look up at the victim with those
mischievous eyes of hers and continue 'But I'm
sure you'll like this one. Just look at the wonder-
ful icing. Why you couldn't possibly get any-
thing better oh, you will take it. I knew vou
liked chocolate cake all the time, especially layer
cake. One dollar-fifty please!'

"So that's the way she did it, Bobbie. When
in the world is that ice cream coming? You're
sure you sent for it, Chet?"

'Course I did. There you are as impatient
as ever, Oakes. That's just the way he was at
the track meet, "^'ou saw him, didn't you. Miss
Bakewell? On tlie mark in the four-forty, there
he was, anxinus to be off. At the sound of the
gun he was o.Tlike lightning and talk about speed
and class he surely has it."

"Cut out that talk, Chet. What about basket-
ball? Never have seen anyone play a finer game
of guard, than you do what's that Ethel?"

"Nothing, except that I am tired of hearing you
boys sing each other's praises. \\'hat about the
girls? Look, Charlotte and Pinky have both
made the representative school team. Edith and
I have seen all the games and we know there isn't
a better forward on the Isthmus than Charlotte."

"Yes, and not only athletics but what about
Flossie's good work as toast-mistress at the Junior-
Senior banquet? You were great Flossie, but
how in the world do you do it?"

"That's nothing at all, Edith. But say, I'll
tell the rest of you that Ed, Bobbie, and Ethel
were certainly there when it came to decorating.
Didn't the room and those tables look gorgeous?
And talk about eats, well. Miss Bakewell, I think
we all agree that you know how to manage such
things. By the way, Chet, the next time you write,
tell Warner about those chicken timbales, tuna
salad, mashed potatoes, and string beans, and oh
yes he was the one that used to talk about the way
Charlotte jazzed the piano tell him we learned at
the banquet that she could regulate a victrola too."

"F^on't you dare tell him any such thing, Chet.
Look, here's the janitqr, thank goodness. Come
on Chet, dish the ice cream out quick, for I am
nearly famished. How in the world did you ever
happen to think of something so nice, anyhow?"

"I didn't. Now for the surprise. This isn't my
treat but Miss Bakewell's. So before we start on
the cream, let's give her three rousing good cheers.
One, two, three, go." "Rah, rah, rah, Bakewell."



THE CARIBBEAN.



15



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i6



THE CARIBBEAN.



"25."
Caldvcell B. Foos, '-'5.

Solid comfort. I lean hack in my deck chair
and listen lazily to the swish-.sh-sh ot the great
.Army transport as it plows through the heaving
Caribbean. My soul is at rest, and I think with
a slight twinge of loneliness of all my friends back
in the Zone expecially those of the Sophomore
class, at old Cristobal High. Dawg-gon, but I
had some good times with that bunch! .And now
I am leaving them all on my way to the States.
All? No, not quite. Down the deck the Deibert
child, with practised ease, is engaging her father
in a mock flirtation, and remarking in her inimi-
table manner, "Ain't it cute?" this time refer-
ring to the moon, which beams down at her in
reply. I lean further back, and think of them all.
What immediately comes to my mind is the Soph-
omore dramatization of "Silas Marner." Wow!
The practices we used to have! I was one of the
"Silas Marners" there were four, because of the
length of the play Andy Smith, Jimmy Burgoon,
Jose Arosemena, and myself. My "Eppie"
there were two, Hyacinth Eden and Helen Aben-
droth had a naturally kidding nature, and what
we did to those supposedly serious rehearsals was
a sin and a shame. Woof! I get a kick out of it
even now. But when the play came off, on visit-
ors' day, we were all letter-perfect, and the acts
followed one another smoothly and without a
hitch of any kind. The only trouble was the lack
ot "Silas' shirts" there were only two of them.
I got one and Andy Smith got the other. I can
still see .Andy hurtling down the hall at his four-
forty-stride to give Jimmy Burgoon, who followed
him, the highly necessary shirt.



We were surely well represented in athletics
that year. Andy Smith shone in the four-forty-
and the mile relay, while two of our members
"Peppy" .Arosemena and William Cousins made
the first team in basket ball, the former at forward
and the latter at guard. .And as for the chess
team, the Sophomores proved to have the best
material in the school, no member of another class
finding a place in the line-up. .At this point I
allow a satisfied smile to creep over my face. I
might not have been able to make any of the other
teams, but at least here was where I "shone with
unparalleled glory."

The ship's bell sends its clear notes over the
water. I settle down and continue my interrupted
thoughts. The Sophomore party. I grin as I
recall how, with zeal and zip, I pushed a potato
across the hall, wriggling along on my stomach
and pushing the "spud" with my nose. I had
enjoyed that party good nature, good entertain-
ment, good refreshments (I made sure of that,
being on the refreshment committee). A good
party in every sense of the word.

And the ordinary school days were enjoyable
too, thanks to little incidents which broke the
periods of study (does anybody remember the
"genuwine Howouldja bag?") and made a day of
school something to be looked forward to with
pleasurable anticipation.

And then the last day of school. I found to
my joy I had passed all five subjects with high
marks, and the class of '25, still the class of '25,
but now rejoicing in the honorable title of Junior,
dispersed for the two months' vacation. .And
well, here I am. I sit for awhile listening to the
sea; then stretch myself luxuriously and go down
to my stateroom.



THE CARIBBEAN.



17




FRESHMAN CLA.S.S.

Petals Be'innini! at top. reading clockwise (outside) Gav Turner. Treasurer: Christian Wirtz. Charles Trowbridge. Manola Bliss,
Dorothea Tutt<. EUie Bixbv. Mildred Oliver. William Clinchard. Carlos Puljar. Delilah May, Johanna Kleefkens, Maurice Egelcs-
ton, William Coffev. (Inside) Winifred AUwork. ex- Vice-President: Dorothy Pike, Secretary; Mildred Neely. Alpha Morgan,
Miss Barnhouse, Adviser; Oliver King, Virginia Tucker, Vice-President; Helen Abendroth. Zelda Eggleston, Lola Munoz, Iren?
Hopkins, Esther Mackey, Dorothy Vaughn. Center John Coffey, President.



I9



THE CARIBBEAN.



FRESHMAN INDEX.

Helen .-iiendroth, '26.

I. .^bendroth, Helen, Her only worry that she won't
have enough time to re.id.

I. .Allwork, Winifred, It took Winifred to hustle up the
Freshmen. "Better come back, Winifred; we need you."

3. Bixby, Elsie, "The Freshmen wish you all kinds of
luck in your business course, Elsie."

4. Bliss, Manola, Work doesn't bother her She doesn't
bother work.

5. Carson, Betty, "Beware of those eyes!"

6. Campbell, James, His favorite expression "Not pre-
pared."

7. Coffey, Billy, It size were a handicap, we're afraid Billy
wouldn't be able to dive.

8. Coffey, Jack, He's a lazy but good-natured sort of per-
son.

9. Clinchard, William, Girls don't bother him in the least.

10. Eberenz, Marcella, This gay butterfly has flitted from
our midst.

II. Eggleston, Maurice, "Oh those dimples!"

12. Eggleston, Zelda, "What's that good-looking boy's
name?"



ij. Hopkins, Irene, She's at her best at a dance.

14. Kennedy, Ion, Demure as a Priscilla.

15. Kleetkcns, Johanna, "Johanna, please keep quiet!"

16. King, Oliver, He'd make a good actor.

17. Mackey, Esther, She has an unusual interest in the
eighth grade.

iS. May, Delilah, Delilah loves ancient history.

19. Morgan, Alpha, "How do you enjoy science, .'^1?"

20. Muiioz, Lola, She's a strong booster for bobbed hair.

21. Neely, Mildred, "Oh! more algebra?"

22. Oliver, Mildred, "What's the answer to this problem?"

23. Ordway, John, He brings a smile from Fort Sherman
every morning.

24. Pike, Dorothv, "Still doing Domestic Science work,
Dot?"

25. Pulgar, Carlos, "Carlos! Leave the room."

26. Turner, Gay, Her heart is in her work.

27. Trowbridge, Charles, "When do we eat?"

28. Tucker, Virginia, "Keep it up, Tucker, you make a
fine barber."

29. V'aughan, Dorothy, "Darn that eighth grade arith-
metic."

30. Walsh, Charles, "Say, Charley, we miss your jokes the
sixth period; wish you'd join us again."

31. Wirtz, Christian, "How many posters do you want?"



THE PIERS.



THE TROPIC MOON.



Gerald Bliss, Jr., 'jj.

A mass of concrete buildings standing high
Where negroes sweat and toil the whole day long-
These piers above which airplanes stately fly
To meet each steamer, as it comes along
And docks, while busy foremen sharply cry,
".All hands at work, cut out your jib and song."
The tourists leave the boat anil pass on by
The anxious, weary, tired-of-waiting throng.
Boats bring the foreigners from far Japan;
From East and West; Sweden and Italy;
They carry men of every hue and clan
E'en those who hail from distant Araby.
.And, tho they come from places far and near,
They always meet at a Canal Zone pier.



Ernst Euphrat, '2j.

The dark o( night is turned to light of day,

The earth has taken on a silver sheen,

For Luna fair has touched it with her beam.

Each object, large or small, or drab or gray,

Is all transfigured by the radiant ray.

The shadows only emphasize the gleam

L'pon the palm leaves, grasses, shrubs. 'Twould seem

.As it the world could ne'er .igain be gray.

Across the sea is cast a path of light,

Diminishing in brightness till it breaks

In spots which sparkle in the ripples, bright

As phosphorescence silvery flakes.

So large, so grand, the moon so white, so bright.

That e'en the stars for shame have dimmed their light.



A TRIBUTE.

Ernst Euphrat, '2j.

Here's to the class of '24;

They will sustain reputations of yore;

They will sponsor the school, keep her name fair and bright,

And achieve for themselves names with honor bedlght;

With a fond farewell to their Alma Mater,

They will pass to the world, each one a first-rater.



THE CARIHHKAN.



19




From Jim Coman.s: n of Lula Mac. '18.

Another year has come and gone, adding a new
group of alumni to those whom Cristobal High
School has sent out and of whom she teels so
proud.

Each year increases our number and broadens
the activities of our members.

We know that in the near future the names of
some of our most famous men and women will be
on our own roster.

Here is to the old

Here is to the new
Here is to the future

Ma\' we all be true.
1918

S.'M.EM, VlRCINI.A.

Congratulations and best wishes for the future
and the class of '2j, and all the success in the
world for "our" annual. As ever,

LuLA Pullk; Coman.

Denver, Colqr.40o.

I leave in ten days for Ten Sleep, Wyoming, on
a piece of work that will keep me out there until
next winter. You know I am still a tramp civil
engineer.

I know that hard work will make a better an-
nual than good wishes; still I am offering my
best. Believe me there is a warm spot in my
heart for old Cristobal High School.

Sincere!)', Birre Welch.

Hendersonville, North Carolina.
I am teaching the sixth grade in the Henderson-
ville City School, and I like my work very much.
The Caribbean of course has my very best
wishes, as it always does. Give my regards to
the high school. It will be a long time, if ever,
before I forget the palms and W'a\'es on Colon
Beach.

With best wishes for the class of '2j.
Faithfully,

Marv E. Verner.



To Zim, *22, with the famoufl Ford.

Minot Cotton is residing in Brooklyn, New
^'ork, and is working in the main office of the
NVestern I'nion Telegraph Comjiany in New York
City.

.Susie Harrison is visiting in Delaware now ami
d
Catherine Teese Waid is taking a course in
journalism at Cokunbia University. She is a
junior this \'ear.

Kenneth Edwards is now residing on his father's
farm in Wellsboro, Pennsylvania.

l)nroth\' Anna Wier Montanye is now living in
Pittston, Pennsylvania.

James (lerartl Raymond is now in Cristobal.
He is property clerk at the Cristobal Commissary.

Boston, Massachusetts.
I am finishing my course at Simmons College
in June anil I expect to have a position in Wash-
ington, D. C, next year.

The very best wishes to the class of '23 and to
the '23 Caribbean. I know from all promises
that the annual is to be the best ever.
Sincerely,

.Alice Arlene Ball.
l'20.

Los Angeles, California.
.At present I am taking a business course at
Wordbury Business College, one of the best in
the City. I enjoy my work very much and I ex-
pect to graduate in October, when a good position
will be waiting for me.

With best wishes for the class of '23, and the
best of luck for Cristobal High School, I remain
Sincerely,

Etha Bevington.
Berkelev, California.
I wish that more of the Canal Zone students
would come up here to college; I know that they
couldn't make a better choice. I have one more



20



THE CARIBBEAN.



vear and I would like to haze some Canal Zone
freshmen before I leave. I am working in the
real estate business with my father and so I am
real busy with that and my school work. One
has to study hard here to get anywhere and we
have few idle moments, but I have never enjoyed
life anv more than I do right now, in California.
Best wishes to the student body and success to
The Caribbean. Sincerely,

Harlan W. Holmwood.

Berkeley, California.
1 am at the University of California, the greatest
in the country not only in athletics either. I do
hope to welcome at least one Cristobal High School
student this year. As ever,

Alson Sears.

Alice Stilson is living in Santurce Park with her
parents.

Lillian Cotton Van Wagner is now residing in
Brooklyn, New York.

Kathryn Burgoon Stewart is a cashier in the
Cristobal Clubhouse and resides in Cristobal. We
hope that some day little Virginia will go to Cris-
tobal High School.

J. B. Fields, Jr., is studying mechanical engi-
neering in the University of Texas.

Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Dear Cristobal High:- If the copy you have
sent in to our press so far is an indication of the
general style of the finished book, it is going to be
almost as good as the 1920 annual.

Congratulations and best wishes to the class ot
'23. As ever,

Al Doyle.

Coudersport, Pennsylvania.

Aren't we getting classy, using letter-head sta-
tionery, embossed at that? Who evolved that
bright idea? I'm sure you will put out the best
Caribbean yet. You know that was the original
a.spiration (to make each issue better than the
preceding) and I believe I can safely say that it
has been done so far. You know you people just
don't dare to break the chain.

I'm getting to be a regular Reuben T. Hayseed
out here in the backwoods of the m(t uncivili/.eti,
desolate, and forsaken bit of wilderness in the
United States. Yet



Though scattered we be to the tour winds of Heaven,
Divided perhaps by the great seas seven,
Still we'll be bound by one great tie
We are fellow alumni ot Cristobal High.

As ever,

Kenneth Greene.

Lindale Davies is residing in Boston, Massa-
chusetts.

1921.

Alice Hunter is taking a secretarial course at
Mount Saint \'incent on the Hudson. She ex-
pects to be with us this vacation.

Frank Raymond, Jr., is taking a medical course
at Columbia University. "College is great and I
think that Cristobal High School is the place to
prepare one tor it. For look how it has urged me
to take as long a course as I am taking. I surely
must have brought a love tor education from
Cristobal High School to take up more than a
four year course. I am doing nicely but it is a
question ot how long I can keep it up. Send up
some Cristobal High School spirit."

Kirby Ferguson is now visiting in the States,
she expects to spend September with her brother
Harry as that is the time the Naval Cadets have
their leave. She will be returning after the Army
and Navy game in October or November.

Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.
It doesn't seem that I have been out ot school
nearly two years, and there are times when I wish
I were back again with my old school mates.

I hope that this year's annual will be much big-
ger and more successful than last year's and I
want to sa)' that I certainly do enjoy reading the
stories that the students write for their annual.

I wish you ail the best luck in the world for
this year's annual.

Sincerely,

Eleanor Zimmermann.

Charles Henter is a radio operator in the avia-
tion service, stationed at San Diego, California.

Carl Duey is working on a farm in Pennsyl-
vania, ami expects to re-enter Penn State College

this vear.

1922.

George J. Cartwright is taking an electrical

engineering course at the University of Pennsyl-
vania. "1 like my work very much and also the
school. There seems to be a Cristobal High School
spirit jirevalent. My best wishes to the Faculty;



THE CARIBBEAN.



21



congratulations to the Seniors, ami my s^mpatliies
for the Frosh. Best wishes for the success of Thk
Caribbean and "Grumpy." Sincerely,

George J. CARrwRUinr.

Gatun, Canal Zone.
Dear CRisroisAi. High School:-

I am studying hard preparatory to entering the
Cincinnati Conservatory of Music.

Best wishes for The Caribbean and the class
of '23. Emma Townsend.

.\rsTiN, Texas.

Greetings to Cristobal High .School from Texas.
Texas University is a grand school bur they surely
know how to make one work. I am taking a very
interesting course and am working for a degree in
home economics.

My best wishes to everyone, and I sincerely
hope that you will have a good Caribbean this
year. As ever,

Marv (ji.enn Fields.

PRoviDENCE, Rhode Island.
At present I am working hard trying to find
some way to spend my time, but, if they will let
me in, I intend to enter the Rhotie Island Normal
School in the tall to take up kindergarten training.
I didn't think I coukl miss the Canal Zone as I
ha\'e. It gets you every time. Best wishes for
the finest Caribbean ever, and also for the class
of '2j. As ever,

Mildred Stafford.

Los Angeles, California.

I am now taking a post-graduate course at the
Los Angeles Polytechnic High School and am do-
ing well in all of my subjects. I expect to enter
Pomona College in September following and take
a mechanical engineering pourse. After one year
there I want to transfer to Stanford University
to pursue my studies further.

I wish that I could spend a few more days of
happiness at dear old Cristobal High School with
the bunch. I do not like the States very well,
altho California must be idea! as compared to the
eastern states.

Here's to the success of The Caribbean, 1923
and ever after.

"Day by day, in every way," The Caribbean's
getting bigger and better.

As ever, Lerov B. Magnuson.



Washingion, District of Columbia.
I find ^^'ashington tielightful, between the times
I am wishmg I were back in Panama. .At present
i am studying in high school to keep from forget-
ting all that I learned at Cristobal High School,
until next fall. Then I expect to commence in
kindergarten training.

I want to tell \ou that i enjoyeii being a student
and am proud to be an alumnus of Cristobal High
School. Best wishes to the school, 'I'he Carib-
bean, and the class of '23.
Sincerely,

Marjorie Ball, '22.

New ^'ork.. New '\'ork.
The best classroom I have is the swinuning
pool and my best instructor is the swimming
coach. The swimming pool and the gymnasiums
of Columbia are hard to be beaten. School is fine
and what I like best is that Columbia has as good
school spirit as Cristobal High has the fighting
spirit.

"^"our friend,

P\ii, C. DoVLE.

Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.

I wish Cristobal High School success in their
work on their annual.

.At present, as you all know, I am taking solid
geometry and Spanish. Next year I expect to
enter Syracuse
Lhi i V e r s i t y to
study forestry.
\'ery truly yours,

Jordan
Zimmermann.

Ida Brown has
been working in
the American
Foreign Banking
Corporation, but
is now in the
States on vaca-
tion.

Wesley H.
Townsend is in
a branch school
of Syracuse Uni-
versity in the i>.u-i)" a.ii 'ruANKii:.'

1 .- Paul DoyleaiiJ Frank Rav.ii in J. I'Mit )rs-in-Chief,

nortnern part or 1922anill921.nowin('olumbiaUniver3ity.

New York.




0.1



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



23




Louise Henler, '22.



THE DUNGEON OF FORT SAN LORENZO.

Warner F. Bowers, '24.



"Say, Sparks, tell us again what Mr. Duey said
about that dungeon," said Chet, paddling in the
bow. "We don't want to forget any of it."

The three of us, clad in our bathing suits,
loaded with picks, shovels, and one day's provi-
sions were at last making our long-planned excur-
sion.

"Well," I began, "Mr. Duey said that he had
heard of a dungeon in the outer wall of Fort Lor-
enzo which was used by the old Spaniards as an
easy means of killing prisoners. The whole dun-
geon is flooded at high tide and so, any prisoners
chained inside would be drowned. He said that
the terrible odor of the place is the only thing
that has kept people from exploring it."

"Odor?" broke in Wes, "Do you mean to tell
me that there is an odor after all these years?
Trying to kid us, aren't you?"

"Well, Fm just telling you what he said," I
answered indignantly. "I don't know any more
about it than you do. He didn't say how we
could find the entrance; so we'll have to look
around."

Alter about two hours of paddling we came to
the mouth ot the river and slipped out into the
little bay. On a high bluff to our right stood the
ruins of the old fort, its walls and turrets over-
grown with a rank tropical vegetation that made
it difficult to determine the exact extent of the
ruins. We paddled up close to the steep bank and
pulled ourselves along from bush to bush, flashing
our torches in at all the openings between the
rocks. In this manner we worked our way along
one entire side without finding the opening for
which we were looking.



"I don't believe that there is any such animal,"
said Chet, looking a little discouraged.

"Don't start to worry now," I said. "We still
have another sitle." I didn't want hiin to know
that I felt disappointed too.

.\s we rounded the point, we came out into the
open bay and ran into the full force ot the ground
swells that came rolling in from the calm sea, a
sea of that hue which makes it so difficult to dis-
tinguish the line where the sky touches the water.

"I'll bet our passageway is under that rock just
ahead," said Wes.

"I'll bet so too," cried Chet. "It has a mys-
terious look."

"Well, we'll see when we get there," I answered
conservatively.

The rock referred to jutted out t.'om the bank
about eight or ten feet and was so closely over-
grown with clinging vines and scrubby bushes
that we couldn't tell whether it was natural or
man made.

We paddled up to it and parted the bushes.
There, sure enough, a black opening yawned before
us. .A funny little shiver ran up my back as we
turned on our flash lights and pushed the canoe
into the opening. What a sight met our eyes, as
we flashed our lights upward! The whole roof
was hung with snow-white stalactites which scin-
tillated in a hundred different colors as the bright
glare struck them. Too much interested to speak,
we pushed on silently and beached the canoe on a
little strip of sand which had washed up around the
beginning of the tunnel proper. The slimy floor
was slightly up hill we noticed as we started up the
passage, bent over to avoid the extremely low roof.



24



THE CARIBBEAN.



We had gone only a short distance when Ches-
ter broke out, "Don't you fellows notice that
smell? It's awful."

"I had noticed it," I answered, "hut I thought
that I was just imagining it."

"I smell it, too," said Wes. "It's getting
stronger all the time."

We passed on silently for a while. The mel-
ancholy drip, drip, drip, of the limewater from the
roof made me so nervous that in my overwrought
imagination, the sound of every drop was magni-
fied a thousandfold. Then too, the odor was be-
coming unbearable.

"I'm going to settle this right now," I told the
other fellows as I pulled out my handkerchief,
soaked it in one of the limewater puddles, and
tied it around my head, covering my nose.

"If you fellows are wise, you'll do the same
thing now before we go any farther," I continued.
They both silently followed suit and we went on.
"I believe I can account for this smell," I man-
aged to mumble through my handkerchief. Their
eyes asked the question which their handkerchiefs
muffled; so I went on, "You have probably no-
ticed that this floor gradually slopes upward.
Well, I believe that the outside air keeps this foul
air pressed up in here, and since there is nothing
to create a draft, this is, in all probabilit)-, the
same air that was in here when the bodies of the
prisoners were first put here."

My theory sounded so reasonable that they did
not stop to argue.

Just then Wes, who was in the lead, gave a
sharp cry and ran forward, turning his Hash light
on the wall. There was a long line of rusty chains
and collars hanging from the wall, and still
farther on we found some gruesome skeletons
one with the collar still arounti the ghastly verte-
brae, and another, an uncanny heap of crushed
bones as if of some victim of wheel, rack, cjr some
other devilish kind of torture.

"Oh boy, I'd like to get a chance at the fellows
that would do a thing like that," muttered Wes,
through clenched teeth. "Why couldn't the)- kill
them like men instead of devils?"

Just a short distance ahead we came to a blank
wall blocking the passage. Was this the enti of
the dungeon? It evidently was, but if so, where
was the connection with the fort?

"Boys, I guess this means the end of it, unless
we can get through this wall."



Wes didn't need to tell us though, for we saw
that as quickly as he did.

"What is to stop us from digging at it a while?"
suggested Chester, "^^'e have picks anti shovels
and the rest of the day before us. \\'hat do you
say we take a crack at it?"

\^'ithout even stopping to answer I hurrieti back
to the canoe and got two picks and a shovel.
With Wes and Chester using the picks and me
the shovel, we soon had most of the wall down.

"We aren't much better off now, than we were
at first," I remarked, as we came to a heavy iron
door which effectually shut off the passage.

"Thank goodness, it is rusty," I said as I
started to batter off the hinges with a pick.
Working together, we at last got the door down
and found ourselves on the threshold of a room.
The walls were made of enormous blocks of sand-
stone, and the floor, which was comparatively
dry, was co.mposed of huge flagstones laid in a sort
of rough pattern. What most attracted our at-
tention was the skeleton of a man in a corselet
and helmet of steel, which was seated on the floor,
leaning against the wall. The helmet, which had
once been burnished and shining, was set at a
jaunty angle over the grinning jaws and glaring,
empty eye sockets of the skull. The steel coat
hung loosely on the wasted frame, and the sword,
still buckled around the bony waist, lay on the
floor by its side. The remains of the silks and
velvets which no doubt had clothed him lay in
mouldering heaps on the floor. Beside this grisly
sight stood an iron-bound chest with worm-eaten
sides ready to crumble at the lightest touch.

"Say, isn't this a cheerful place!" whispered
Chet. "Let's do something to shake oflthe gloom.
Suppose we open the chest and then explore the
room thoroughly."

"Suits me," I replied. "We'll have to examine
the skeleton too. It looks full of possibilities."

"'i'ou examine the old bones if >ou want to,
Spark, ^'ou're welcome to my share," said Wes
generously. I'he chest looks best to me. Sup-
pose vou give if a few licks, Chet."

What might not the chest contain? Gold,
iewels, valuable documents? Stories of the fabu-
lous wealth (if the \ew World rose in our niinils
stories of the gold of the Incas anti the treasures
wrested from the Fnilians by i'lzarro, Cortez, and
others. None of the treasure of I-orenzo had ever
been fountl! No wonder our hopes ran high. We



THE CARIBBEAN.



25



were doomed to disappointment thoLigii. The
chest contained coins, right enough, but they were
practically all copper or brass. We each found a
gold one as a souvenir and I [kicked up several
different ones of copper and brass for my collec-
tion, but the bulk of them we left as we had found
them.

I was better rewarded in my examination of the
skeleton, however. Just as I was turning away,
I caught the bright gleam of something on one
of the bony fingers. 1 investigated and found it
to be a large shiny ring with a beautiful blood
stone set, on which were carved the initials "J.
N. A."

"He left his calling card," I called to the other
boys, "but he only left his initials instead of his
full name. Look around for something that
might identify him."

I had to repeat to them several times just how
I had found the ring; then we started to examine
the chamber in earnest.

"Look here, boys," called Wes, "what's this
scratched on the wall? Looks as if it might be
the last will and testament of our friend J. N. A."

Wes knew more Spanish than either of us; so
we asked him to read the inscription and he halt-
ingly translated the following:

"These are the last words of Don Juan Nuiiez
de Alcorza, once commandant of Fort San Lor-
enzo. Slowly I am dying of starvation because of
that pig, Sir Henry Morgan. True, I have my
sword at hand but no one shall say that I, Don
Juan Nuiiez de Alcorza, was not man enough to
meet the death to which he was sentenced. Like the
English pirate that he is, he crept upon us on the
night of a feast when all of my men were drinking.
Those men who were not butchered in their drunk-
en stupor, escaped from the fort onl}- to die of
starvation or fever in the swampy jungle. They
deserted, the dogs! Leaving me to fight the pirate
horde single-handed me, their commander, spe-
cially commissioned by Her Highness, the Queen
of Spain!

"Oh! that I might feel that English throat be-
tween these fingers for but a few precious moments
before I die. Then indeed might I (.lie happy.

"Por Dios, for a morsel of food! My brain

reels, my eyes grow dim Hasta luego. Adios."

"People always thought that the commandant

was the one who deserted," said Wes, "but we'll

have a different story to tell when we get back.



Our friend Don Juan had a hard time of it, didn't
he?"

"Say, where do you suppose this tunnel leads
to?" I asked as I pointed to a low archway in the
wall.

"Very likely that leads up to the fort," spoke
up Chet. "Let's see."

The passage was only about twenty feet in
length. Then we came to the bottom of a shaft
cut straight up through the hill. On one side
iron brackets were set in the wall to form a rough
latlder. This, then, was the only means of reach-
ing the dungeon from the fort. We trietl to climb
up; but the iron was so badly rusted that the
rungs broke off when any weight was put on them.

"The way we came seems to be about the only
way of getting out," I said. "Say fellows," I
continued, as a thought struck me, "wc surely
haven't much time left to fool around before the
tiile is in. Mr. Duey told me that the tide is high
at I I.JO."

I looked at m\- watch and then showed it to
them. It was 1 1.25.

"That's all right," said Chet. "We have five
minutes to reach the opening."

"Yes, but Spark said that the tide would be
high at 11.30. You know how narrow the open-
ing is. Most likely the opening is under water
long before the tide is high," Wes remarked.

Hardly daring to think of what we might find,
we dashed down the passage. Step by step we
plunged deeper into the icy water, and the water
was no colder than the hand which seemed to grip
our hearts. First to our ankles, then to our knees,
and before we reached the little beach the lapping
waters were about our hips. Our canoe was float-
ing around, aimlessly bumping against the sides.
The thing that terrified us most was the sight of
the opening! It was nearly four feet under water.

"Well, boys," (Wes tried to be cheerful) "the
only thing to do is to dive for it. The wall is only
about six feet thick. Four feet down, six feet
through, four feet up, and we are safe."

It didn't sound as easy as that to me by a long
shot, but it was our only hope.

As Wesley was the best swimmer, we decided
that Chet was to go first, I was to follow, and then
Wes would come last. We wished Chet good luck,
and then watched him expel the air from his lungs
and slowly sink from sight as we clung to the rocks
waiting for our turn. I waited about five minutes



26



THE CARIBBEAN.



and then followed him. As the green water closed
over my head, I felt an almost irresistible inclina-
tion to try to climb the ladder again or to do any-
thing but this. I fought it down, though, and swam
through the opening. Just as I was coming up,
I struck my head an awful blow on a projecting
rock. Luckily for me, Chet was watching and
pulled me out. Chet had come through all right
but I had a thumping headache as we waited tor
\Yes to appear. At last he came up smiling.

"Well, we're all safe," he spluttered. But he
was too sure. Just as we were about to pull him
out onto the rock, a long, black, vicious tentacle
reached out from the rocks and grasped him by
the ankle.

"Look out, Wes," I shouted. "Good Heavens!
It's an octopus."

The slimy creature wrapped its eight snaky arms
around Wes and slowly pulled him down. He
managed to get his pocket-knife out and then the
struggle started in earnest. A tentacle covered
with suckers which blister the skin wherever they
touch, pinned one of Wesley's arms to his side
leaving only one hand to battle against the seven
other arms of the devil fish. Wes made a thrust
at the gleaming eye but a writhing arm prevented
the attempt and nearly wrenched the knife from
his hand. Wes recovered quickly and with a des-
perate slash, severed one of the arms, which sank
writhing in the bloody water. The infuriated
creature was slowly creeping up to Wes's throat
when, with a lucky jab, he reached its eye. A
tremor passed through the body of the awful
thing, and, as Wes stabbed it again and again, its
hold slowly slackened. -At last, with a final
quiver, it lost its grip entirely and sank, an inert
mass. Quickly we hauled Wes out, but not any
too soon, for already other arms were reaching
out from the rocks. We shuddered as we thought
of what we had so narrowly escaped, and set
abtjut to see that Wes was all right. He was
terribly blistered about the arms and legs, but
protested that he felt fine. The next question
was: how to get off the rocks. Swimming was
out of the question after what we had seen; so
the only thing left was the cliff at our backs.



"Do you fellows feel equal to the climb?" asked
Chet as we were debating about it. "I seem to
be the only uninjured one of the bunch, so I
know that if you can make it, I can."

Since that was the only thing to be done, we
started up with the scorching sun beating down
on our heads, clinging to bushes, vines, rocks, or
anything that offered a foothold.

"The only thing that worries me is the loss of
Wesley's canoe," I grunted as we toiled upward.

"That doesn't worry me as much as the loss of
my lunch," Wes groaned cheerfully.

Often we came to patches of bare rock where
we had to cut hand and footholds in the soft sand-
stone with our knives. Before we had gone half-
wa)', our hands were bleeding and torn, but we
had to keep on before exhaustion should overcome
us. Once I thought that Chester's luck had
deserted him. He was looking down to see how
far we had climbed, when his foot slipped and
threw his entire weight on a little bush which he
was holding with his hands. The bush slipped
sickeningly, gave a little, and then held. Chester
remarked with a white face that he had better
look up to see how much farther we had to go
instead of looking down to see how much we
had done.

At last we reacheti the top and crept exhausted
into the restful shade of a mango tree to rest.

"Well, I guess we'll have to walk home; so the
sooner we start, the sooner we'll get there," said
Wes logically.

"I believe that we did an awfully foolish thing,"
I said as we filed along the trail. "Did you notice
that the floor of that room was not wet? I be-
lieve that the iron door was water-tight and we
could have put it back up again, filled the cracks
with rocks, and stayed there until low tide."

"Say, I believe you are right," said Wes. "I
didn't think of that."

"Well, for the love of Mike, don't tell anybody'
else," pleaded Chet. "They never would get
through kidding us."

That is why we have never tohi the story before.



THE CARIBBEAN.



27




IMPRF.SSTOXS WHII.F, STROT.I,T\G DOWN'
B()I.1\AR SIRKKT.

Dorothy /Ibendrolh, '2^.

A rainy afternoon. Sheets ot tropic rain pour-
ing from a gray, cheerless-looking sky. The angry
rush of nuuidy waters down tiitches blocked In-
naked, brown pickaninnies. Shrill cries of enjejy-
ment as they slip antl splash.

A negro prize-fighter in a black checkered suit.
And spats onion colored spats. Splashes ot
brown mud give them a weirtl futuristic touch.
A great blob of color in the distance. Turns out
to be a group ot tlarkies in a contusing array ot
reds, blues, and greens. Waiting for the rain to
stop, I guess. Vivici Chinese parasols, pink and
purple, with night-marish figures winging their
way across the waxed surface.

Goody! Sun's out. Gaudy blue-wheeled coach-
es show themselves. Blue sky peeps thru the
somber gray clouds. .\ huge slovenly negress
slouches along with an immense showcase on her
head. Can't see what's in it but from the smell
I guess it's an assortment ot rotting truit. .A
stately Martinique woman in green plaid ging-
ham. Naively pinned up to show the valumin-
ous sweep of embroidered petticoat beneath. On
her head a red-spotted yellow bandana turban.
Poor color scheme. But picturesque! A Chinese
laundry man slant-eyed, lemon-cheeked, sadly
out ot place in conventional American clothes.
Casting turtive glances at the crowd as he slinks
along with a huge bag of laundry on his back.
Wonder why he doesn't follow the negro's cus-
tom. Tote it on his head.

Sniff! Sniff! Smell of frying fish. Cod-fish at
that. Pungent odor ot garlic mingled with the
sickening smell of spoiled native fruit. I'gh! A
Barbadian woman is preparing supper over a
charcoal braz'ier. She's humming, "Margie."
Now a series of indefinable odors as Colon pre-
pares the evening meal.

Earrings. And more earrings. Long ones and
short ones. I used to think negro babies were
born with earrings. Maybe they are!



A silly simple-looking Barbadian staring at a fat
English tourist in tweetl knickerbockers. .And
green plaid stockings. Keep walking old man,
you're only eight miles from the (Jatun golf links.
His wife, a tall angular woman swathed in hot-
looking green veils,, strives to keep up with his
pace. I hope he's not reducing. She'll be out
ot luck. Two ragged sons of Jamaica in a hot
argument. Their voices loud and strident above
the noises of the street. Wonder who's getting
the best of it. Might as well be Sanskrit or any
other foreign language for all I can understand.

Sound ot jazz. Nearing the lively part of
town. Cabarets. Cantinas. Three cabaret
singers blond, fat, painted, bobbed-haired. In
conspicuous clothes. Close competition, I sus-
pect, to see who can attract the most attention.
Signs of fresh paint. .A toothless skinny lottery
ticket vender in a faded drab wrapper, stretches
forth a bony hand, holding a seven. \ sure
hunch. To-day's Friday the thirteenth, too.
My lucky day. I'll buy and it I win clothes
gorgeous gowns from Paquin's in Paris. Hats
from Madeleine et Madeleine. Then travel the
Alps, Algiers, Venice city of romance. Maybe
I'll buy a marble palazzo on the Canal Grande
have a magnificent gondola with a picturesque
red-sashetl gondolier instead of a car and liveried
chauffeur. Oh! .A Chilean sailor bumps spank
into me. Too much of the ".Atlantic's" hospital-
ity, I suspect.

The first sweet chimes of evening. "Come to
church! Come to church!" To "obey that im-
pulse," i guess I'll go.

THE NATIVE MARKET.

Frances Gray, '2^.

I think the best time to see the native market
is at about 6.30 in the morning when the stalls
and tables are piled high with fresh cut fruits and
vegetables, and the still dripping beeves are first
hung upon their hooks.

On the right of the Bolivar Street entrance is a
stall kept by a wrinkled old Chinaman whose



28



THE CARIBBEAN.



trembling claw-like hands deal out to each cus-
tomer his exact portion of potatoes, dried beans,
or queer dried fruits that only the yellow men
buy.

Next on the left are the long stone tables above
which the tresh-killed carcasses of beeves, hogs,
sheep, and an occasional conejo or deer are hung.
To me this is the only unsavory part of the market
because I see, as I go by, dirty, fieabitten, mangy
dogs crouching under the table, watching hungrily
for a scrap of meat or bit of bone.




IliiaLi beached at low tide id Panama City, To these come purchasers for the
cocoaDuts, pineapples, etc.. which they contain.

Beyond the meat stalls are the long tables bear-
ing their burden of fresh caught fish, and, if one
can stand the odor, these tables are not uninter-
esting. The table from which I usually buy is
ruled over by a husky negro woman who weighs
her gleaming wares in a rusty scale pan and flings
a continual stream of banter at the passing
throngs.

On toward the center of the market, beyond the
ancient Chinaman, sits an old Martinii]ue woman
selling eggs. She never, so far as 1 have found
out, speaks an unnecessary word. .Above her
table there is a sign, "Eggs, 60 cents per doz." and
if one should unwittingly ask the price of her
wares she merely points to the printed words,
and waits, and waits, with an air of the greatest
unconcern, for you to buy or leave.

Taking up the greater part of the market are
the vegetable stalls, some presiiied over by ne-
groes, and some by the Chinese. The long wooden
tables are piled high with their golden yellow
melons, thin bunches of native beans, tied with
bits of dried grass, their crisp native lettuce which
is so much sweeter than the head lettuce from the
States, the gnarled brown yams, the |irickly



green cho-cho, tiny sweet native tomatoes, long
black or yellow plantains, bunches of tiny luscious
apple bananas, big green or purple "alligator
pears," round red oranges, Costa Rican oranges
that are nearly all juice, big green papaya, cocoa-
nuts, mangoes, mamey apples, and round trays
of pungent ginger root. The Chinese stalls are
perhaps the most interesting. All their vege-
tables are tied in neat little bunches or piled in
neat little piles. These stalls also have many
roots and bulbs that are peculiar to them. The
real characteristic of these stalls is, however, their
cleanliness. All the stalls in the market are clean,
as a matter of fact, but these seem particularlv
spotless and neat. There is one old Chinese
woman who always wears the native costume,
consisting of loose trousers and a long jacket.
She is always extremely polite though never vol-
uble.

Another woman, a negress, is always adorned
with a pair of large gold hoop earrings and a long
necklace of coral, which is wound many times
about her fat neck. Each morning she regales me
with stories of her children and, though I have
not been able to find out the exact size of her
family, judging from the stories she tells, it must
be a large one. She told me the other day that
her first husband had been struck by an automo-
bile and crippled; so she made her second hus-
banii support him. I suppose that is one wav of
overcoming a difficulty.

At a stall a little distance from my voluble
friend there sits an old white-headed negro who
can out-swear anyone I ever heard. A young
negress helps him sell his wares, and the first
time I passed by and heard him giving her direc-
tions it took my breath away. The funny part
is that he is not ugly or malignant in his profanity
but speaks in a most pleasant tone. .As I have
never hail the courage to bu}- anything from him,
I don't know whether he swears at his customers
or not, but his face and voice are so mild, one
really could not resent it if he did.

In a lirrle group, surrountied by the vegetable
stalls, are tables aiui racks bearing gootls, laces,
buttons, pins, shoes, stockings of many lurid hues,
antl other miscellaneous dry goods articles. For
a touch of local "color" one need look no farther
than these few stalls.

There is one thing about this market that
always surprises new comers, ami that is its



THE CARIBBEAN.



29



cleanliness. The wooden vegetable tables are
scrubbed until they are white. The stone tables
bearing the meat anil fish are spotless, and there
isn't a fly or a bug to be seen. I think one usually
associates tlirt and filth with a native market in
a tropic town, but this one is an exception.

THE ICEBERG SNOWBALL SHOP.

//. /;. .1/rtv, '3j.

"Hey, Joe! (jiinme a couple snowballs." The
rush order is given by one of Joe's regular cus-
tomers, who is most likeK' a high school stutlent
who has just scorntulh' retusetl some delicac\' on
his mother's lunch table.

Joe is the sole proprietor, chief mixer, anil only
employee of the Iceberg Snowball Company,
which is situateii in a part of a small, dirty room
on Bolivar Street. I say part of a room, because
the whole is a three-in-one affair. Besides Joe's
manufactory there is a fruit and vegetable counter
and a supposed-to-be bakery counter. No lioubt
Joe's eating, sleeping, and li\ing quarters are in
the same room behind the screen which can be
seen just to the rear of the retail sections. And
I say dirty, because I am sure that no part of the
room has ever felt the charms of a little soap and
water.

Joe, who has been sitting in his chair on the side-
walk in front of his place of business lazily absorb-
ing all the rays of the sunlight that came his way,
now assumes an air of business and quickly gets
behind the counter, which is nothing more than a
high box over which is nailed an old piece of sheet
iron that he has picked up somewhere. He opens
the door of a very aged ice-box, that sits in the
corner, and takes out a rather large piece of ice.
He then takes his ice shaver and sets to work
shaving some ice off the chunk, .^.fter he has the
right amount, he opens the top of the shaver and
lets the sha\ed ice fall into an old tin cup, which
bears as many service marks as does the ice-box.
In a very "soda-jerky" way he fingers the bottles
of flavoring, some of which are small and some
large, some of which are old vinegar bottles and
some, ancient whiskey bottles, while he asks the
boy what flavor he desires. The customer tells
him and also reminds Joe to be sure to give him
his money's worth. Joe then takes the right bottle
from the shelf and pours in the prescribed amount
of flavor. From the box of drinking cups on the



shelf, beside uhich is a bottle of Scott's Emulsion
and an okl alarm clock, Joe takes a drinking cup
and allows the cake of flavored shaved ice to fall
into it.

.As soon as he has repeateil the operation, Joe
hands the boy both snowballs, for which the cus-
tomer lays one nickel on the counter.

Joe watches the boy as he turns the corner up
the street and notices that he has already finished
one and is rapidly indulging in the other.

ALONG SHORE.

Matlie Pullig, 'sj.

The afternoon sun beams balefully; it is in-
t )l.'rably hot. The water lazily laps, laps a
parched shore. The miniature harbor is full of
tired-looking much bedraggled sail-boats, with
their sails furled like the wings of weary birds.
Their owners must think it too warm to fish. The
skeleton-like frames of half-constructed boats
loom up in several places. Beneath the sides of
one especially large one, is the tiniest of houses,
very little larger than a good-sized packing box.
In fact this little home is built from boxes for,
adorning one side is the slogan, "Gold Dust Let
it elo your work."

Stretched to dry, on poles at the left are huge
well-worn fish-nets, stiff with salt water, their
water-and-sun-bleached wooden "sinkers" gleam-
ing in the glare.

In the little shade cast by a bamboo tree sit
some negroes two very drowsily playing check-
ers, and a group of others wore drowsily watching.




A Fishermen's Rendezvous. \ Corner of Limon Bay in the Caribbean.

On a concrete block jutting out into the water
sits a colored workman industriously washing his
feet. Beneath the side of a newly painted boat,
a son of Jamaica, stretched full length, is taking
a warm, but seemingly enjoyable siesta.



30



THE CARIBBEAN.



To the right of this fishers' rendezvous is the
concrete foundation of a ruined house, over-grown
with weeds and crimson dotted hybiscus bushes.
Everything is very dry and warm, and my eyes
are tired, so I look afar out at the glimmering
blue water, and wish for a stray breeze to come
and blow away the little heat waves that rise
from everything.

A FIRNTTURE STORE ON BOLI\AR.

Louise Holler, 'jj.

The store has no sign by which the owner pro-
claims his trade to his own little Bolivar world.
Perhaps he thinks the old, rusty bed-spring hang-
ing on the post in front, which looks as if it had
spent a long, wandering life traveling from one
dwelling place to another, is a sufficient adver-
tisement. The store has two entrances, between
which is a low, cement step on which repose a
mangy, skinny, yellow and white cat, industri-
ously and vainly attempting to clean itself, and
several chairs minus necessary parts. At the left
entrance a huge platform, set about six feet above
the floor, piled high with legless chairs, chairless
legs, old trunks, a water-cooler of uncertain hue,
drawerless bureaus, bureauless drawers, and vari-
ous other indescribable odds and ends of furniture,
threatens to fall on some unfortunate at the slight-
est provocation. Tacked to the platform, on a
blue board in straggling, uncertain, irregular let-
ters is the motto,

"We do what we say,
And mean what we do."

.At the back is an opening, small and low,
through which a weary ray of light, lost in the
maze of furniture, pierces the dark interior and
lights up with startling distinctness several white
bedposts and a rusty tin tub. To the left is a
carpenter's bench equipped with all manner of
tools. Two negroes oblivious to all outside in-
fluence, playing an interminable game of checkers
on a dirty checker board, occupy the only cleared
space.

At the right entrance, a high green fence with
a once white top bearing the sign "Oficina," en-
closes what is evidently the "Oficina," containing
an ancient rftll-top desk on which are some equally
ancient eggs and a telephone.

On the floor rests the overflow of the platform.
On the w^lls hang some dull-gilt picture frames,



and some colorless sacred pictures. The entire
store is covered with several inches of its own spe-
cial brand of Panamanian dust.

A COBBLER'S SHOP.

Erni/ Eiiphral, '2j.

On the outside abo\e the door, hangs a small,
poorly-printed sign proclaiming, "Se compone
calsado."

Within, a ten-foot room embraces the cobbler's
living quarters and business establishment. It
is divided into two parts by a flimsy partition
with a doorway at one end. The floor of the shop
is littered with bits of leather and broken tacks.
The walls are covered with paper, yellow with
age. The long brown stains proclaim the incom-
petency of the walls to keep out the hard rains.

The cobbler sits near the door before a battered
table about three feet high, on which lie a sharp
knife, a little larger than a good-sized pocket-
knife, a box of tacks, a spool of thread, and a
litter of other small miscellaneous objects. With
sharp, staccato raps he tacks a red leather sole
on a shoe gripped tightly between his knees.

JOHN'S.

Gerald Bliss, Jr., 'zj.

Just behind the school house and not more than
four hundred yards away, is the "Chink" shop,
where most of the children get their appetite-
spoilers, in the form of gum-drops, cand\' balls, or
some other kind of edible sweet.

From the outside it resembles a cottage of olden
days, set squarely upon the ground. Old wooden
boards, poorly painted, make up the framework,
while tin roofing provides the protection from the
sun and rain. A sign outside just over the door
written in Chinese, bears the name of the propri-
etor, although to us it means nothing. Inside we
find counters which extend halfway around, while
the other half of the store is taken up with barrels
and other surplus which can not be put in the
sleeping quarters, that are in the rear of the
shack. L'pon the shelves are to be found as cos-
mopolitan a mixture as is to be found in a pawn-
shop. But the wares here are almost all in the
line of foods of one kind or another, except for a
few of the necessary utilities without which no
colored family tries to get along. Principal



THE CARIBBEAN.



31



among these are threads ot various colors, buttons
of as many hues, tops, cigarettes, thimbles, cro-
chet hooks, rubber balls, and sundry other ar-
ticles of no seeming importance.

Somewhere in the vicinity, we usually see the
"Chink," whom all of us have learneti to call
John. Ik- ever has his watchful eye open to see
that we take nothing that has not been duly paid
for. Farther inside, we hear the sounds ot his
joyous family consisting of two children between
the ages of eight and ten, a larger boy of perhaps
eighteen, and a wife. Besides these immediate
members of the family there are a cat and six or
eight kittens, and a canary. All ot them help in
the general running ot the store, either as salesmen
when John is not there, or by playing on the coun-
ter, or singing in twittering tones.

A FRUIT STAND.

Emogene Nash, 'ij.

As I was strolling through Colon on one of
those rare balmy evenings which come during
the dry season, my attention was attracted by a
fruit stand. Its whole make-up from its owner
to its slightest detail was very picturesque.

There was dumped on the sidewalk an assort-
ment of fruits, such as bananas, papayas, and
pineapples which were very green and which, I
imagine, had just been delivered a little while
before. At the front in the numerous bins were
many native fruits, including oranges, greenish-
yellow limes, brownish-green pineapples, purplish-
brown alligator pears, banana-colored plantains,
reddish-yellow mangoes, and round, light-green
native watermelons, also American fruits, such
as pears, apples, oranges, lemons, grapes, and
even a few peaches and plums. On the floor be-
side and behind the fruit bins could be seen melon-
shaped papa\ as and fat brown cocoanuts which
are always in season. Suspended from the ceil-
ing above the bins were strings and cords of all
lengths on which dangled "States" fruits to attract
the attention of Americans who might pass.

Hanging rather low on the side walls were
many bunches of overripe bananas. Above these
were hung many bird cages, baskets, and pic-
tures of every size, shape, and color imaginable.

In the center back were two tables which tlidn't
look as if they had ever been used to serve any-
thing. On these tables and on th? floor close by



were many old papers and magazines which were
useil to wrap the fruit for the customers. The
back wall was dark colored and had it not been
for the highly colored pictures hung on the wall
pictures which most likely came from some little
New WivV. junk shop one couldn't have told
iust how tar back the room extended.

There were no windows and the only door that
I could see was the wide one by which I hail en-
tered. I must mention here that it was not until
I turned to leave that I spied under the fruit bins
a pile of overripe, rotten fruit on which a family
of cockroaches was greedily feasting.

As I came out of the door I noticed the pro-
prietor looking as one would expect the proprie-
tors of such an establishment to look. He was
engaged in wiping and polishing his fruit with a
rag of very questionable hue. I decided that I
didn't care for any fruit, and continued on my way
to the boat.

A WINDOW.

Henry Moore, '2j.

Such a litter of things silk shirts, cuff buttons,
beads, pins, medallions, and trinkets of all sorts:
hanging from above, kimonos and shawls of all
colors and styles, some expensive, and some cheap,
some ancient, others antique, and still others
modern: below, Egyptian vases, silks from the
Orient, and Panama hats all crowded into one
small window without any seeming idea as to
arrangement: such is the window of the Hindu
shop.



CHINESE GARDENER.

Louise Henler, '2j.

Each morning sees him patter up the street,
His tiny figure, sfiriveled, old, bowed down

By weight of two huge baskets, too replete
With vegetables lettuce, parsley, kale.

A huge, round, battered Chinese hat protects
His head. He wears a ragged, blue-gray shirt,

.And baggy khaki pants adorned with flecks

Of dry red clay. His bare feet show much dirt.

He stops outside. His merry whistle blows.

His cry is heard, "Cluclumbers, lady, clorn.
Kale, lettluce, clarrots, sling beans." On he goes;

When vou have borne enough, you buy. "Sank you.



32



THE CARIBBEAN.



s=



s




EARLY LIFE IN PANAMA.

(Purely Imaginative Stories based on Early Incidents.)




^



A CAUSE FOR THANKSGIVING.

Mallie Piil/ig, '2J.

".Ah, pobrecita, pobrecita" Seiiora Cortez
placed a fat comforting arm about Carmencita's
quivering shoulders.

"Madre de Dies! Mi Juan." Carmencita's
w ild cries rent the air. She had been sobbing for
many, many hours already. Her poor eyes were
swollen from weeping.

Her Juan had been brought home on a blood-
stained stretcher broken, mangled the warm
lite crushed out of him. When she had ceased
laughing and crying, they explained. There had
been more trouble with Cucuracha (the name was
painfully familiar in those days, especially to the
great snow-haired engineer). The great pressure
on the side of the Cut had forced much mud and
dirt up in the middle of the Canal, tracks were
torn up, and steam shovels, engines and rock cars
had been overturned. Yes, it had all happened
so quickly, they had seen great clods of red-gold
dirt roll and tumble and then had come the up-
heaval.

.\h. yes, Carmencita had seen Gold Hill, hadn't
she? Yes, she had seen it when she and Juan
and the baby had gone to Panama to last year's
carnival. The train had gone around the curve
about sunset and the hill had looked like a great
lump of pure gold!

What.'' Oh! .'^ steam shovel had entied [uan's
life.

With this excited explanation the men trooped
out. When they reached the door-step one began
to whistle, "O Sole Mio." It was sad, but death
was no new thing to these hard-working, sun-
burned men. Every day some one was crushed
or killed in some way. Sometimes they were
taken on flat cars to the hospital or morgue antl
very often the flat cars were well-loaded with
broken bodies. They remembered the time that,
by some mistake, one great deposit of dynamite
had gone ofl^ before the stated time, and so many
were killed. One of the men looked ruefully at
his empty sleeve Ah yes, he remembered well.



The man next to him on the flat car had died be-
fore they reached the hospital. He could hear
his cries still.

"Ah si, pobre Jtian, pobre Carmencita."

Carmencita couldn't return to Spain; she
hadn't the mone\-; the best she could do was to
remain in Gorgona, in her little house out on the
banks of the river. Juan hail industriuusly made
a small garden, so Carmencita didn't sufl'er for
want ot food. The neighbors were kind, but the
little widow grew paler and paler, thinner and
thinner. Her eyes grew dull, her hands trembled,
and she was most absent-minded. Senora Cortez
came in one day and fountl her holding "Chichi"
upside-down. The poor baby was crying feeblv
and when Seiiora Cortez took the child she found
it burning with fever. All that night the doctor
from Bas Obispo sat beside the still feverish little
baby while Carmencita looked dazedly on and
watched "Chichi" draw a last faint breath and die.
They placed "Chichi" in a small white box and
put her beside her father on the hill, close to the
military burying ground.

Carmencita shed no tears, she only grew more
dazed, her hands trembled more, antl she seldom
spoke. W\\ how she longed to die! Why must
she live on, and on, and on, to suffer? If she only
dared to take matters into her own hands, and
end it all, so she might be placed to rest beside
the two loves of her heart! But Carmencita was
a staunch Catholic, and the fear of losing Ciod's
love was strong in her heart. She wanted to tlie,
but to take one's own lite was a great sin; so she
must wait.

This little Spanish widow thought herself be-
yond any greater grief. She believed she was
numb to any greater pain, but on learning that
she must leave her home, her only possession, she
found that she was mistaken. 'F'he news came
through her nearest neighbor. While Carmencita
had been fighting insanity, the great engineer had
been fighting Cucuracha, and had finally, with
the help of many men, conquered it. In two weeks
the dike that held back the water of the Chagres
was to be dynamiteil, the water storetl in (Jatun



THE CARIBBEAN.



33



Lake to be unleashed, aiui all the houses on the
banks would be coveretl.

Several days after the rumoi-, a circular letter
was placed on the bulletin board in front of the
Commissary, stating that all the people must
move at once.

Carmencita now saw her way clear. True, she
had not the courage yet, but she could wait, yes,
she would wait.

Senora Cortez had kept a protecting "wing"
over the demented widow, so when the news came
that they must move, she took her to her big
warm heart and beggetl her to stay with them, in
a tent far from the path of the waters.

I<"inall\- came the day set tor the destro)ing ot
the tlike. I'he electric wires that were used to
cause the explosion were in some way connected
with Washington and it was in the Capital that
the button that caused the explosion was placed.
This thing that was to happen seemed the sign
of completion, for the water was to be turned in
for the first time.

There were crowds of people, tourists. Canal
Zone employees, women and children, photo-
graphers almost everybody on the Zone was
there to witness it. Carmencita's friends had
finally persuaded her to go with them, and when
they reached Gamboa, she insisted that they
climb the hill by the tracks to gain a better view.
From there she could see her deserted little gray
house, but she tlidn't feel any pain perhaps
watching the water close in about it would give
her the needed courage to end it all.

The time tor the explosion had been set, and
about fifteen minutes before that time all the
engines and steam shovels within a mile set up
a great clamor ot whistles and bells, tt) gi\e
warning to the workmen on the dike.

Sudtlenly there was a great rumbling roar, and
all e\es were turned toward the dike. The mud,
dirt, rocks, and water rose almost a hundred teet
into the air and the water swirled through the
opening. Carmencita's eyes were on the little
gray house where the long fingers ot water reached,
reached, and covered it. "Ah, maiiana, maiiana,"
thought Carmencita.

As the party started down the hill, Senora
Cortez was first, with Carmencita tollowing, then
Seiior Cortez antl the rest ot the people. .As they
reached a particularly steep rock\- part of the
hill, Seiior Cortez's warning was hardly out of



his mouth before his foot dislotlged a big rock.
The rock crashed the short distance between
Seiior Cortez and Carmencita and struck her a
heavy blow on the head. She was knocked sense-
less, and, much to the horror of her friends, rolled
the rest ot the way down the hill. When they
reached her at last, it seemed that she hardly
breathetl. They took her to the only house in
the place, and laid her tired body on a little white
bed, anil a tew minutes later she ilied. 'f'he doctor
that was called in said there was nothing that
could have been done; her skull was fractured
and, had she lived, she would have been an invalid.
Seiiora Cortez, amid much weeping, found time
to ask in wonder why Carmencita's last words
had been, "(iracias a Dios."

AN INCIDENT.

//. E. May, '2j.

"Hello, Jim, aren't you working toda\?" asked
John Carter as he joinetl his friend, Jim Martin,
for the morning stroll down to the railroad track,
whence the labor train departed with its load of
"ditch diggers," who were employed up in the cut
at Culebra.

"No, Carter, I was up on the hill when that
premature charge let go and I got bunged up a
bit. My arm is pretty badly injured so I'll have
to "lay off" tor a couple ot weeks."

"I ditln't hear anything about it. Was an/
one else hurt.'" queried Carter.

"They put some double charges under that
ledge on the hill yesterday and intended to set
them off at lunch time. I was working on 77 just
to the left ot the ledge. About eleven o'clock I
heard one ot the caps and knowing what was about
to happen, I jumped into the bucket of my shovel.
I didn't get into it any too soon, for I think the
whole hill must have come down past me in less
time than I could think of it. Some of the pieces
ot rock went four and five hundred yards away;
that's what got me, the flying stones. Some of
the poor niggers were horribly mangled. George
Kemper and I were the only white men injured;
I guess George is all right now. I don't want
any more calls like that; it was my tenth experi-
ence with prematures."

"Well, in my little sojourn of three years down
here neither the malaria bugs nor the prematures
have got me," said John, cheerfully. "I suppose



34



THE CARIBBEAN.



that you know this is my hist day. Believe me,
won't I he ghid to see Mary and my two little
girls.' I sail day after to-morrow afternoon."

"I didn't know that and I'm certainly sorry to
hear it," said Jim, rather surprised. "When did
you decide to return to the States.''"

"I get so homesick for them that I can hardh'
stand it. And what's the use of my being down
here alone when I have one of the coziest little
homes in the world back in Indiana? I wouldn't
bring the family down on account of the bad living
conditions. My living here with the malaria and
yellow fever bugs is bad enough without making
the family undergo it."

"It is a rotten place to bring women folk. I
hardly see how some of the men stand it as well
as they seem to. I know that I wouldn't bring
any family of mine down here, that is, if I had
one," laughed Jim, as the two approached the
labor train, which was on the side track awaiting
its usual load, a load which was often decreased
by such accidents as had occurred the day before.
But it seemed that there were always more to fill
the places of the absent ones. There had to be,
for such an undertaking as the Panama Canal
could not be hindered by a single accident.

Carter's friendship with Jim had been very in-
timate and he rather hated to say, "Well, I sup-
pose that I had better say goodbye, because I may
not get a chance to see you again. I hope your
arm comes along all right and that you are even
luckier in the future than you have been in the
past."

"I think I'll be down on the job about quitting
time, so I'll be sure to look you up," said Jim as
Carter climbed aboard the train.

The bouncing and jogging of the car in which
Carter rode did not disturb him, because he was
thinking of the cozy little Indiana home and all
its comforts, his wife, Mary, and her loving ways,
and the two little girls, Frances, seven years old
and Jane, five years of age. He pictured the home-
coming and how he would take them in his arms
and love them all. He said to himself, "Only
two more weeks and I shall see them. It hardly
seems possible." He then thought of the big
yard, with all the mammoth shade trees, where
he u.sed to romp with Frances and Jane. And the
food that Mary cooked came into his mind and
he made a silent resolution never to leave again
once he should get home. He could picture how



Mary, Frances, and Jane, would be waiting at the
front gate for him on the day of his expected ar-
rival and how he would come up, throw his bag-
gage tlown, and take each one into his arms and
give her the loving of her life.

A sudden lurch of the train announced its ar-
rival at the bottom of Gold Hill. As Carter went
to his machine, he sang, for happiness was his.

.As he sat on his shovel that afternoon the
afternoon which was to mark the end of his canal
service he noticed that everything seemed to
assume an unusually cheerful appearance. From
behind a few fleecy clouds the sun shone on Gold
Hill, making it appear like a huge nugget with
countless numbers of seemingly miniature men
struggling apparently in vain to level its mighty
bulk. It had rained in the morning and the grass
was of the brightest green while to the left in the
patch of level country beside the hill stood Car-
ter's favorite ponciana tree, its leaves a burning
hue. From his towering post on the hill just op-
posite Gold Hill he could see the men hurrying
about to fulfill whatever task might be theirs. At
frequent intervals a train pulled out with its load
of dirt for the fill and the loaders rushed to another
quarter to help fill another. There were many
white men to boss the colored workmen and occa-
sional small groups of engineers who were over-
seeing the work. Somehow he hated to think of
leaving because he had become so accustomed to
it; he seemed almost a part of it. But then he
thought, "Only two more weeks, old man, and
you'll be the happiest person on earth."



Just ten minutes before quitting time Jim Mar-
tin got off the train from Gorgona. Over to the
right he saw the men at the tool supply houses
checking in the tools that had been used farther
up the cut during the day. When he turned to
the left, he saw the men hurrying about, most of
them coming from the tool sheds with picks and
shovels and going toward the hill across from Gold
Hill. Wondering what it all meant, he approached
a small group of men and asked what was wrong.

One of them spoke up hurriedly, "That ledge
above 426 came down and took the whole works
with it!"

"Good Lord, don't tell me that was Carter's
shovel," he answered with anxiety.

"^'es. Carter was crushed to death; they got
him. They're digging for the rest now."



THE CARIBBEAN.



35



Martin sjicikc with difficult)-, "Wliy tiidn't it
get me j-esterday instead of Carter to-day? Only
a few minutes before his time vvouKl have been
up and he had to go. \\ hat will his poor wife do;
think of the little girls that will be waiting at the
front gate in a couple ot weeks, for a thukiy who
will ne\er come." But Carter was onl\' one of
those who gave their lives for a worth)' cause.

The work could not stop; another came to
take the place of him whose life had been crushetl
out so sudtlenls'. I'he men there soon forgot
though the little family in Iniliana never forgot.

KXTK.ACTS FROM A 1)1 A KV.

Cenihi Rlhs, Jr., '<,'.

April 10, H)o6. The Colufi docked at pier i
this afternoon after a somewhat tranc]uil voyage
down the .Atlantic. But the tlock a jioorly con-
structed wooden affair and the hotness of the
noon sun did not give a favorable impression of
Colon. A short walk to the station revealed
Front Street to be composed of many wooden
shacks built on the edge of a rut-infested road.
In every door, we saw pigs, brown children, or
scrawny ill-fed chickens. The station proved to
be a dingy affair. It was nothing more than a
shelter from the hot sun and the drenching rains,
which, we are told, make their tlebut about this
time of the year.

The trip across was unexciting. .A slow, puf-
fing, noisy, and dirty engine served as our means
of propulsion to our destination. The noises of
the train were too much for Bud; so he screameci
and yelled the whole way over. But everything
ceases; and so after two hours of this treatment,
we arrived at Pedro Miguel. What a place it is
four still incomplete houses, a rutted road or two,
a station, and a Chinese shop. This constitutes
the town, while in it lie lazily man\- individuals
of nearly as many races, resting, or else practising
their art of doing nothing.

I am one of six white women in the town, and
Bud is the only baby, and but ten months old.
The Canal, which is but in its embryo, is thirty
feet long, ten feet wide, and has as its only inhab-
itant, an alligator of unknown age.

June 2^, ii)o6. Living here is quite different
from living in the States. There is no cold stor-
age at all. Butter comes in tins, as do the meats
and other foods of that nature. The Chinese



stores with bar and provision counter com-
binedprovide us with a iitv^ fresh vegetables,
bur little else. For things other than these vege-
tables, it is iiecessar)' to go to Panama. Here, as
in Colon, are streets which ilisgrace even the name
roail. They are alleys in width, and mountain
ranges in roughness. There are a few coaches to
haul >()u about, but it is worse riding in them and
getting shaken up than it is to walk and step
into a mud hole ever\- few feet. .As Panama is
larger than Colon, it has more stores, and like-
wise, many more bars ami "cantinas." Pay-day
night always finds the latter filletl with laborers,
while the next day, if there is still a little money
left in the household, the womenfolk invest in
dishes, or other household requisites.

February / /, /goj. Last week, two Spanianis
took it upon themselves to become ijuarantine
officers antl so gained entrance to the houses.
On leaving, they said they'd be back later to vac-
cinate those who needed it. They came all right!
This morning about two o'clock, they entered
many of the houses and stole everything they
could get their hands on. Luckily, we were so
poor that we tiidn't have anything worth stealing.
But several of the others lost some valuable
articles. Next time we will be more careful.

May 2j, /go/. There is but one sewing ma-
chine in this whole town. It is owned by the
health officer, and, as he is very congenial, he is
likewise quite lenient about letting people use it.
\Mthout it, Bud would have gone without many
of the much-needeti clothes for his vacation this
year. The health conditions are still not what
they ought to be. Every train headed for Colon
takes a victim for Monkey Hill Cemetery. We
never know when our turn will come, but we pray
each night that it stays off forever.

New Years, igoS. The day before Christmas,
about fourteen ships left Colon Harbor and went
down Porto Bello way to find shelter from the great
storm that was then raging. Colon Harbor isn't
excellent as a protection, and I would have done
the same thing if I had been a captain of one of
the ships. But, alas, one of those ships had our
Christmas turkey on it, and so we had turkey for
New Year's instead of Christmas.

Mareh 4, fgoS. The leper colony at .\Iira-
flores is quite a religious group. And so Grandma
goes down there ev-ery Sunday to lead the singing
and reading of the Bible. There are about twenty



THE CARIBBEAN.



of the patients, and their disease is not contagious;
so I don't think we will have to join them by com-
pulsion. They surely are fond of Grandma, and
often give her little presents, which are usually the
things that they have learned to make while
they have been confined there.

April 5, igoS. There was a big rain last week;
and so we haven't had any cold storage from Colon
since then on account of the track's having sunk
out of sight somewhere along the line; so we have
had to resort to the "Chink" shops again. Word
has just been received that the track is repaired,
so we are in hopes of having a decent dinner, to-
morrow.

September 2g, rgog. The first Chinese baby to
be born in Pedro Miguel was born to-day. As
.Aunt Gladys helped quite considerably, the baby
was named Gladys in her honor. Her last name
is Leon. They held quite a celebration in the
Chinese colony in honor of the birth of the first
child in this section.

March 24, igii. Another of those all-night
rains has completely covered a steam shovel and
a train with dirt that slid down from the edge of
the Canal. Lucky for the people down below
that it was after quitting time, or there might
have been a few casualties. Everything will be
all right early to-morrow, though, for now that
we have the facilities to combat slides, it takes
very little time to overcome the damage done bv
them.

Ooctober /o, igijt. The Canal opened to-day,
and I must say that it was quite a spectacle. The
dike at Gamboa was blown up at three o'clock by
President Woodrow Wilson in his office at Wash-
ington. It was one grand blast, antl threw dirt
in every direction. The Canal is now a thou-
sand feet wide, more or less, and about sixty-five
feet deep, compareti to its thirty-fi)of length and
ten-foot width of 1906 at Pedro Miguel.

February 75, ig22. The Chinese, as is usual
every year, have helil their Carnival. .And what
do you know! Gladys Leon, the first Chinese girl
born in Pedro Miguel was their (^uecn. This old
world surely does move! To think that but a
few years ago she was a little baby in swaddling
clothes, younger than my baby when I brought
him down here!



CONVINCED.

Henry Moore, '2j.

\N'hen the United States bought the Canal Zone,
it was with the understanding that they would
reimburse all the native land owners for the land
used. Now it so happened that on the ground
where the Government wished to make Gatun
Lake there lived many natives who had small
gardens or banana groves. All these natives,
except one, agreed to clear out, when they were
offered a good price for their lands. This one old
fellow lived apart from the rest. His hair was
gray and his face wizened, and he walked with a
stoop. How old he was nobody knew.

The agent for the Government increased the
price offered, thinking that old Juan, as the native
was called, was holding out for more money, but
still the native refused. The Governor then sent
an interpreter with the agent so that they might
be sure that the native understood what they were
offering him, but the native still refused, saying,
"No quiero vender, no quiero vender."

The interpreter then asked him his reason for
not selling and old Juan replied in a long stream
of guttural Spanish, all to the effect that his father
and grandfather had lived there before him, he
had lived there all his life and intended to die
there, also, that he did not have to sell if he did
not wish. Here was a stumbling block indeed,
for everything was ready and the day had been
set when the water was to be turned into the val-
ley, and now one man was likely to hold back the
work. The agent and the interpreter tried every
means imaginable in order to get the native to
sell his land, but old Juan still refused. Finally,
two days before the water was to be let in, the
agent took some gold coins and offered them to
the old native, thinking that the sight of gold
might influence him, but to no avail, for the na-
ti\e shrugged his shoulders and mumbled the
words which had come to be hated by the agent,
"No quiero vender!"

'['he agent now lost his temper for the first time
in all those trying days, anti in a rage at the stub-
bornness of the old man stormed, "Don't sell,
hang >i)u, and in two da\'s_v6i will d\tt here. In-
side of forty-eight hours the water will be here
and then if you can't swim, you'll be drowned."

Old Juan was not easily aroused so he again
said, "No lo creo; no es vcrtlad; noquiero vender."



THE CARIBBF.AN.



37



Taken back hv the coolness of the oKl nati\e,
the agent went hack to the office and there went
into conference with the rest of the officials.
They decided that everything possible had been
done to make the native sell; so the work woidd
proceetl.

W hen the rime came tor the dam to be blown
u;i ami the water to be let in, the workmen, na-
tives, officials, ami sight-seers stood on the sur-
rounding hills to watch the great engineering
feat, that is, all but old Juan. He, as usual, sat
on his doorstep dozing. Sudtienh- he was awak-
ened by a great shock which slumk the earth for
miles about. He jumped to his feet in a great
fright, thinking that the world had come to an
end. Then hearing a great cheer, he turned and
looked northward and there, amidst a shower of
earth, smoke, and rock, he saw a silver stream of
water, sparkling in the sunlight, leap and rush
forth, slowly filling the basin and then beginnin ;;
to rise on either bank. Old Juan watched with
great astonishment, as the water gradually came
nearer and nearer; then the words of the agent



came slowK- back to him. For a while he medi-
tated without taking his eyes from the new lake
which was crawling towartl him, then, putting his
hanil to his heatl he burst forth, "N(jmbre de Dios;
no es verdad; no es posible." But what he
thought to be impossible had happened, for the
water was slowl\- filling the basin and creeping
up the banks. Old Juan watcheti s)iellbound.
It seemed that he was unable to withdraw his
gaze from the approaching water. Nearer and
nearer it came and still olti Juan watched, tlazed
but not convinced. Stubbornly he waited; higher
and higher rose the water; ten feet; five feet;
six inches, from his feet and yet it rose. The
water met his feet, then his ankles; it passed him
and rose above his door-step, and still he stood
there dazed. To the calf of his legs and then to
his knees the water crept.

This was enough to convince the most stub-
born man, and coming suddenly back to his senses,
old Juan made for the hills with great haste,
mumbling to himself, "Dios! Dios! Nombre de



Di



F,s verdad; h'.\ mundo al reves.'




Ju:i^le Scenery.



THE CARIBBEAX




THE CARIBBEAN.



39



ffi-




K-



IWO IRIPS lAKF.N FROM PANAMA.
DOS VIAJES DF. PANAM.A.




A VISrr TO THE CHOKOIS INDIANS.

hiza Mitrkliam, '.?/.

Ir was night, antl the tropic moon rose slowly
over the t:)rtified islands which guard the Pacific
entrance to the Canal, as our tiny craft, the
Augusta I'icloiia, sturdily pushed her nose through
the deep, dark waters.

It was a perfect night to start on our adventure.
\ million stars lighted the heavens. The ocean
lay like a huge mirror all around us. Most of
our party sat on the deck, some dreaming away
the time, others singing the latest songs, but I
lay on the hatchway watching the moonbeams
play on the water, and wondering what the morrow
would bring forth. For weeks I had looked for-
ward to this trip to the Darien country. We were
now on our way! There we were to visit a tribe
of Indians known as the Chokois, who live up the
Chico river, a branch of the Chucunaque, which
is one of the largest rivers in Panama and empties
into the Turyra. No white woman had ever set
foot in this country; so was it any wonder I felt
thrilled and excited?

Next morning we were up bright and earl\-. We
were now in the bay of San Miguel, which we
found to be full of treacherous rocks and unchart-
ed reefs. There, also, was a lonely, barren, grey,
rocky island inhabited by thousands ot pelicans
who, when a shot was fired, rose like a great
black cloud into the air. .At eleven o'clock we
entered Darien harbor with the U. S. wireless
station on one side and the native village of La
Palma on the other. Two hours up the river we
released two carrier pigeons. Through the fore-
thought of Captain Baird, Q. M. C, Fort Clay-
ton, eight pairs of these birds had been brought
along. These were released at different times dur-
ing the trip and all reached Fort Clayton save
these first two. One of these was discovered in
the village of Chipegana; the other was no doubt
disturbed by the hawks which infest the jungles.

On and on we traveled up the Tur^-ra river,
nothing breaking the summer silence save the



-Hi



squawking of the parrots anil the chattering of the
monkeys. This river may be likened to the Miss-
issippi with its tree stumps, mud banks, lowlands,
sanil bars, ami thick overhanging vines. Where
it was ver\- narrow, we coulii, by straining our
eyes, peer into the dark ami forbidding jungle
where nature had held solitary sway for ages,
where live and flourish the deadly anopheles and
stegomyia. Here and there a flowering lignum
vitae tree towered above the jungle.

After a long and tiresome day we arriveti at the
village of Yavisa where all the natives flocked to
the shore to meet us. Yavisa, like all native vil-
lages, consists of thatched-roofed houses, a church,
and a school. But here we found the remains of
an old Spanish stronghold, built, perhaps three
hundred years ago, for protection against the
Indians.

In the early hours of the next morning, long
before the sun had begun to think about getting
up, we were in native cayucos being poled up the
Chucunaque river; then, up the Chico. These
river cayucos are made b\- hollowing out a cedar
or mahogany tree, and differ from the sailboat in
that they have no keel and are flat-bottomed.

.\ heavy fog hung over the jungle, transforming
the trees into tall grey ghosts. Occasionally we
were given a shower bath as we brushed against
the over-hanging foliage. Several times we were
startled by a swish, swish, as a 'gator slit! from
the cool, slimy mud bank into the dirty vellow
water. From the depths of the jungle came the
piercing cry of a wild cat. High overhead the
awakening birds were cheerfully twittering and
trilling. Hours and hours we traveled up the
river, sometimes almost blocked by great trees
torn out in a recent flood, until at last we arrived
at the village of the Chokois.

Two days before, I hat! left the Zone, the height
of civilization and sanitation, with its hospitals,
its airplanes, its forts, its warships, and all the
facilities for safety and convenience. To-dav I
stood before people who had never before gazed
upon a white woman. Their civilization is the



40



THE CARIBBEAN.



same to-day as it was in the days ot the first of
their race. L'pon seeing us, they ran in ail direc-
tions like frightened deer. But our interpreter was
at last able to persuade them to come out by tell-
ing them that the great white doctor had come.
My father had earned this title by carrying with
him bandages, castor oil, pills, quinine, and potas-
sium to kill the "little devils," as they termed the
sores anci fever which we found to be prevalent.
.\s, one by one, they came from their hiding places,
they were greatly attracted by my tlress, for I
wore far more than their whole wardrobe con-
tained. The women wore a strip of bright-colored
cloth tied around the waist and reaching to the
knees, while the men wore still less. Both the
men and women were short and dark with long,
heavy, straight black hair.

Through our interpreter we learned many of
their strange customs.

When an Indian is courting, he wears a gorgeous
head band made of tiny beads, a gay metallic
neckband, and enormous earrings. These ear-
rings are huge affairs, the front button being about
the size of a fifty-cent piece. From it hang tiny
drops, making the whole about four inches long.
The button is fastened to a stick about an inch
long and the size of a pencil. This is run through
the ear and held there by means of a string tied
behind the head.

When an Indian goes to see the lady of his
choice, he takes with him a handful of kernels of
corn. These he carefully flings at her one by one.
If she objects, he must seek another; but if she
does not, he may go on with his wooing.

When a baby is born, it is rubbed all over with
the juice of a berry. As this dries, it turns black
so that before the child is many days old he is
coal black. This, they say, is to prevent sunburn,
a custom which seems queer to us, since they are
already so dark.

If they wish to give the baby a bath, they take
it out, pour water over it, and then shake it as
one would shake a rug.

They have a novel way of carrying their chil-
dren. The child is put on its mother's back to
which it clings like a young monkey. Several
yards of bright cloth arc then wrapped around the
mother and chikl, and tied into a knot. Thus the
mother may go on with her work, always being
able to keep track of her chikl.

We noticed that the male Indians hail no hair



on their faces and, upon questioning our inter-
preter, we learned that they gather poisonous ants
and crush them. This paste, when put on the
face, kills the roots of the hair and so prevents
its growth.

Their houses are made by dri\'ing four posts
into the ground and making a floor about ten feet
high. The floor is reached by means of a ladder
made by chopping notches in a small tree. One
corner of the floor is taken up by the stove. This
is made ot a layer of clay aboutsix inches thick and
three feet square. In the middle is a hole in which
stones are put, and it is on these stones that the
fire is built. After it has died down, the meal,
which consists of bananas, yams, or wild game,
is put on to cook. The roof of the house is made
cf palm leaves.




Tiip native



ode of burden carrying;.



The jungles around their homes are alive with
panthers, wildcats, wild hogs, lance heads, and
boa constrictors. For killing these, they use the
spear and the bow and arrow.

A part of their land is forbidden to all but the
Chokois Indians.

It was in the middle of the afternoon when we
embarked in our cayucos and started for Yavisa
under a sun so blistering hot that we were forced
to use banana leaves for sunshades, and it was at
sunset that we rounded the bend and came in
sight of our tiny craft.

Next morning we shoved off and started down
the river toward home.

Our first stop was Real de St. Maria. Here we
left the mail and waited until noon to get the
high tide at La Palma. At six o'clock the skipper
showed the clearance papers to the alcalde of La
Palma and we proceeded out to sea.

When we woke up the next morning, we were
anchored in the bay of San Miguel. At daylight
we went ashore to look around. San Miguel is



THE CARIBBEAN.



41



like the rest of the native villages thatched
houses, a school, and the ruins of a once wonticrful
church. We were in San Miguel until noon. Then
wc started out on the last lap of our journey.

While passing between the islands, we ran inttj
schools of thousands ot mackerel feeiiing upon
sardines. The sardines are ilriven near the sur-
face where the pelican, who flies low over the



water, gets what remains of the poor sardine.
Then we ran across schools of porpoise. In both
cases we found that the pelican works with the
larger fish.

That evening at five, we pulled in at the Marine
lantling a tired but happy crowd, glad to get
back to civilization.



Como habia pensado ya hace tiempo, me decidi
ir el verano pasado a pasar mis vacaciones en la
vecina repiiblica de Costa Rica.

Al comienzo del mes de agosto me em barque
en el vapor Ulua de la compariia frutera de un
muelle de Cristobal. Que bella vista presentaba
la ciudad de Colon cuando me aleje de sus playas!
En la bahia todo fue perfecta calma pero des-
pues de salir del rompeolas, ya se noto el mar un
poco mas agitado y por consiguiente fusron que-
dando menos personas sobre cubierta.

Despues de bastante horas de buen viaje, la
maiiana siguiente llegamos al Puerto Limon, el
mas importante puerto de Costa Rica en el At-
lantico. Mientras arreglaban los asuntos rela-
cionados con la aduana, visite su bello parque y
otras cosas que pueden llamar la atencion en ese
lugar.

A las nueve y media tome el tren que nos llevo
a Cartago, lugar hacia el cual me dirigia. Durante
esta larga travesia, pude entretenerme contem-
plando el Rio Reventazon, que corre casi para-
lel al tren, y las pintorescas fincas de naranjas,
azucar, cacao y cafe que se encuentran por su
paso, y por las que este pais tiene muchas entra-
das. La llegada a cada estacion me permitio
comprar dulces, frutas y otras cosas que me
ofrecian los numerosos vendedores atentos a la
llegada del tren, y a ver los tipos y costumbres
propios de cada lugar.

A medida que el tren fue subiendo, fui sintiendo
el frio que producen las alturas. Siendo ya bas-
tante de tarde llegue al simpatico Cartago, y
me parecia muy agradable la costumbre que tienen
en ese lugar, de que tantos las damas como los
caballeros tienden ir a recibir el tren. Esto me
surprendio, pero no me deje de agradar ser tan
amablemente recibida. A corta distancia vi el
"Hotel Frances" muy concurrido por los visi-
tantes del lugar, al cual me dirigi y en que fui
muv bien atendida.



MIS VACACIONES.

Despues de unos minutos de decanso sali a



recorrer el sitio. Primero fui al mercado, donde
pude admirar la riqueza del suelo y la laborosie-
dad de los habitantes. De ahi segui al parque,
que es muy concurrido a estas horas por las j6-
venes c:)legiales. De ahi fui a andorrear a los
muchos almacenes. Durante los demas dias que
estuve en esa, visite a las iglesias. La de Los
.\ngeles es la mas notable, porque dicen que an-
tiguamente una virgen se aparecio y que en donde
se aparecio ahora han construido esa famosa ig-
lesia. Cerca de aqui tambien hay un pozo mila-
groso en el cual, si uno se lava las partes enfer-
mizas, se curaran. Tambien fui a caballo a visi-
tar los alrededores, los cuales son muy progresi-
vos en la agricultura. Por ultimo fui a Mt. Irazii,
el famoso volcan de Costa Rica, al cual todo visi-
tante al lugar debe de ir. Este volcan en 191 1
causo un gran terremoto que destruyo la ciudad
de Cartago, de tal manera que todos los alambres
de electricidad, los tubos de agua y las casas
fueron tumbados y destruidos, tambien muchas
personas fueron heridas y muertas.

Una vez que conoci bastante esta pobalacion
fui a visitar a otros lugares, como San Jose,
Heredia y Guadalupe. De todos estos sitios
merece especial atencion la capital, San Jose, por
ser el lugar mas poblado y el de mas bellos edi-
ficios. Entre estos esta el Teatro National, uno
de los mejores de America, y el .Asilo de Chapui,
quesonllamados"las dos locuras" de Rafael Igle-
sias, quien fue un presidente que se preocupo
mucho por el adelante y embellezimiento de su
patria. Mi permanencia en la capital fue muy
agradable por las muchas atenciones que me
fueron prodigadas.

Despues de tres meses de tan feliz paseo, re-
grese a Colon completamente satisfecha con mis
buenos recuerdos de ese pais y con mas entusiasmo
y energia para continuar mis tareas escolares.



42



THE CARIBBEAN.



TIME.

Frances Gray, '2^.

The other day I heard some talking about eter-
nity, but he didn't seem to have a \ery clear idea
of what eternity is. I didn't say anything, but
I thought to myself that I had a pretty good con-
ception of eternity. I think it can be quite ac-
curately compared with the period between nine
a. m. and four p. m. on any Monday between
October and June, when you have spent the wak-
ing hours of the previous night reading the thrill-
ing adventures of Jesse Janes, or Bunvan's
"Pilgrim's Progress." (One so often does that,
don-chu-know.)

But toget down to our real subject, which is time.
You know, time is a funny thing. You know Schop-
enhauer says that time is the only unchanging
dimension. Now I have a great deal of respect for
Schopenhauer, but I can't bring myself to believe
everything that he says, and this statement about
time is one of the things I don't believe. It seems
to me that time is just about one of the most
changeable dimensions that there is.

You always see time pictured as an old man,
but along about one and five-eighths minutes of
nine when I am leaving home to tread the seven
or eleven blocks between me and the scene of my
labors, namely, Cristobal High School, I see a
vision of a winged Mercury fleeting past me with
a scythe over his shoulder and I say to myself,
"What fools men are!"

But that impression doesn't last long, because
along about the first quarter of the first peri'jd in
the morning I am forced to change my mind about
Mr. Time all over again. I go to class all primed
for a brilliant recitation, but after I have held my
seat for about ten minutes, I discover that what
I don't know holds about a three-fourths majority
so I slide away down on the back of my neck,
hoping that I'll be missed in the rush, and count
the young eternities as they flutter by.

One fiiace that time always makes me angry,
though, is in social problems class, when I think
of a great many things to say, and so does every-
one else, and the first thing I know Mr. Time
has stepped on the accelerator and gone speeding
by before we are half through.

.And did you ever get a geometry proposition
that did not have any solution? That always
makes me mad. Well, I usually get rash anil chal-
lenge Time, and believe me, it is some race.

The worst thing to try to do though, is to crowd
Time. I think he resents that m:>re than any-



thing else. When you try to slip in three weeks
where there ought to be only one day, there are
usually complications. It is like trying to build
a twelve-by-eight-inch-puzzle on a six-by-four-
inch-table. I know. I've tried both. There are
school, and golf, and tennis, and swimming, and
basket ball, and oh, I could go on naming in-
numerable things that ought to be done every
day, if time weren't in such a hurry. The other
day a teacher said to me, "You know, you would
get really good marks if you would only put a little
more time on your work," and a man said that I'd
"play a corking good game of tennis" if I'd "only
put in a little more time practicing," and some one
else prophesied that I'd be a coming golf champion
if I'd only work at my driving "just take a little
time ofl^ every day and work up a gooddrive." If
time would only slow up at the right moment, for
a while, (and it I were fool enough to believe every
thing I hear), I'd be the forty-eleventh wonder of
the world. Alas! It is a terrible thing for a bud-
ding genius tobe so handicapped, but "Time waits
for no man," so at least I don't need to feel that
I am being particularly ill-treated.

But you know, when you come right down to
brass tacks, there is no use contending with Time.
I have had several years' experience now, and I've
come to that conclusion. There is no use rushing
Time. You can't beat him and you can't get
around him. The only thing to do is to grab
a-hold as he rushes by and hang on. Time isn't
going to go your pace, so you'll have to go his,
and let me tell you (confidentialh-, this is), you've
got to have a pretty good grip when he gets going
and you've got to have pretty good brakes when
he decides that it is time to slow up.

A TARPON.

Mattison Piilli^, 'ij.

The smooth cle.ir water flows so swiftly by

.\ solid shadowed sheet made dark by mat

Of moss beneath. Then on the rocks which lie

Below, it falls with rumbling roar, hi that,

It rests awhile, a mirror for the sky.

In it I stand and patiently combat

The heat of sun, and weariness. I pK-

The rod and try to lure the autocrat.

I wait, and wait, anil wait, and still I wait.

Ah! Now a thrill, a tightenint; of the line!

.\ tarpon leaps, a-sparkling in the sun;

I play him in and out a "reel" debate;

He struggles, gills wide-spread. Tho victory mine,

I'm sad: the silver king with life is done.

See illuitratioti opposite



THE CARIBBEAN.



4J



^^sst




^



ABOVE- 'faOOO.OOO 60LF LINKSOATUN
LEFT-BRID6E ABOVE SPILLWAY
RIGHT- SPILLWAY EIGHT GATES OPEN
BELOW -HYDRO-ELECTRIC STATION





44



THE CARIBBEAN.



Si


nRA>rATlC ATTEMPTS.





AN INFERNO L DRAMA.

Frances Gray, '^j.

Characters: The devil.
Cleopatra.
Julius Caesar.
I.ucrezia Borgia.
Uncle Remus.

Scene: Hades. A shady corner of the Brim-
stone Country Club, overlooking the Styx. Cleo-
patra reclines languidly on the sizzling surface of
a cast-iron divan, while Caesar lounges against
the electrified barbed-wire rail, sipping with relish
a tall glass of molten lead. Lucrezia stands with
a phial of her favorite hemlock in her hand while
she watches with interest the passage of Charon
as he ferries a newcomer across the river.

Caesar. What see'st thou fair Lucrezia.? Surely
there is naught of interest at this hour.

Lucrezia. What mean'st thou, Caesar, naught
of interest? A gentleman of color doth approach.

C/eopa/?-a. A gentleman of color, say'st thou?

Lucrezia. But surely, one of your own country,
perhaps some close of kin. (She laughs deris-
ively.)

Caesar. No, no, sweet Lucrezia. Thou know'st
our fair companion has naught of color to her.

Cleopatra. Heed her not, my Caesar. 'Tis
naught but the jealousy that doth possess her.
If 'twere not far the circumstances, I should prob-
ably have felt the biting of her hemlock ere now.
(A commotion is heard outside, and presently
around the corner of the porch appears Uncle
Remus.)

Uncle Remus. (Gazing wide-eyeti on the ancient
and somewhat scanty costumes of the two women
and Caesar.) De Lawd hab mercy on mah soul!
Where is I at?

Caesar. (Advancing) Welcome to our city and
our club. What name didst thou bear upon the
earth? Come, speak up, man! Stand not so, and
gape like some raw lad,



Uncle Remus. Mah mah name is Uncle Re-
mus suh, but but ah reckon ah must a dropped
into de wrong place.

Caesar. Wrong place, go to! This is the only
place into which thou canst drop; so be assured.
Come, let me present thee to the ladies. This is
Queen Cleopatra, fairest and most beautiful of all
women. (Cleopatra languidly raises one white
hand which Uncle Remus gingerly touches and
drops like a hot pancake.) .And this is the far-
famed Lucrezia Borgia, whose deadly hemlock
has gnawed the vitals of more than one unfaith-
ful love. (Lucrezia nods her head with a sar-
donic smile, and l^ncle Remus chokes and swal-
lows but utters not a word.)

Cleopatra. But sit thee here beside me, and tell
me of the things upon the earth. I envy not those
struggling mortals, who climb and crawl and
grovel in the dirt, all for a few paltry coins or
the favor of the fickle goddess Fame. Come!
Speak, man.

Uncle Remus. (Sitting gingerly on a glowing
chair.) Lawd, Missus, it's hard times on de earf
right now. Dey aint enuf coal to keep the pore
folks warm, and deys all mighty nigh to freezing
to death. De cotton crop don fail las' year, an'
a blight come along and tuk away de cawn.
.\tween de freezin' an' de starvin' dey aint been
much laughin' an' a nigger caint git no whar
widout laughin'.

Cleopatra. Why it reminds one of the locusts
in Egypt. I had thought the modern civilization
had overcome such things.

Uncle Remus. Lawd, Honey, modern civiliza-
tion aint overcome nothin'. It's just made more
things what needs to be overcome. (Turning to
Caesar.) But tell me, man, who is you, and how
comes you here?

Caesar. (Pompously and with much chest.)
Why, man, I am Julius Caesar. You see before
you the "Ruins of the noblest man that ever
lived in the tide of times". After thrice refusing
a crown in the mighty city of Rome, I came here
to escape the toils of the selfish world,



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



Uncle Ri'iiius. ^'ou refused a crown, you say?
Lawti, it ilat don't jnit me in mine' oh de time
'at Hrcr I, ion got tireii oh his crown an' 'fuse to
wear it. Slnicks rhoiigh, there's always plenty
ob folks 'ats willin' to wear it even second han*.
Brer Rahhit he step right up an' offered to tlo de
kingin' for a-while an' Brer I. ion han' it oher to
him an' went off fishin'. I)em was de days 'fore
man hail 'gun to do de kingin', hut man tlone
gone along jes dc same as de animals uscil to.
I reckon dcN- aint so herrv much ilifference ater
all.

LucreZia. You know, my lord Caesar, niethinks
we have a second Socrates among us.

Cleopatra. But true, fair I.ucrezia. 'Twould he
most amusing to hear the two tliscourse together.

Caesar. But so! We must arrange a meeting

be What in Hades is this? Oh! The devil!

If thou canst excuse me, laiiies, methinks I will
retire from the scene.

Cleopatra. Nay Caesar, it is that we all must
be excused, for I have no more stomach for this
company than thou hast.

LucreZta. Nor I. Fare-thee-well, L'ncle Remus.

Cleopatra and Caesar. (Ironically). Aye, fare-
thee-well! (Exit Caesar, Cleopatra, and Lucre-
zia. Uncle Remus stands dumbfounded starmg
after them. Enter the de\il behind).

Devil. Ho! Ho! N\hat ha\e we here? A new-
comer methinks. Speak, shade. Who art thou?
Uncle Remus. Ah's Uncle Remus, suh, an'
who mav vou be?



Devil. Whc



I be? Ho! Ho! Ho! Whv



I'm the lord and master of this kingdom. I'm
the Devil.

Uncle Remus. De devil \ou is! Why man,
whar is yo' horns an' yo' tail? I ain't neber
befo' see a devil wifout horns an' tail.

Devil. (With a snort). Horns and tail! What
trash! That is nonsense to frighten the children.
But come, have you dined?

Uncle Remus. Dine? How you talk "dine" ?

Devil. Dined, eaten, partaken of food.

Uncle Remus. You mean has I et?

Devil. Precisely! Has you et?

Uncle Remus. Well no, suh, I ain't.

Devil. Come then with me. I would hear the
news of earth, but not on an empty stomach.
(Exit L'ncle Remus ami the devil.)



THE BOOKLEGGER

ErnsI Eitphral, 'ij.

Scene :

The office of one of our generals of in-
dustry.
Characters :

Mr. Jones, said general.
Tony, an agent.

Tony (Entering office with bulging hip pocket).
Good morning. I'm Tony Hotstuff. I was speak-
ing to you over the phone this morning.

Jones. Oh yes! Glad to see you. Sit down.

Tony (Looking cautiously about). Rotten
weather, ain't it? Everybody's got a cold or
sumpin'. Nice place you got here. Well, ahem,
Brown was sayin' you was interested in some good
stuff. He buys everything he gets from me.

Jones. Yes, he spoke to me about it and showed
me some stuff he got from you.

Tony. I've got an awful good line just now.
Just got it in day before yesterday.

Jones. What have you got?

Tony. Well, I have sumpin' direct from Arthur
Schnitzler.

Jones. I've tried his stuff and I didn't think
much of it.

Tony. That's funny. It was supposed to be
real genuine stuff.

Jones. Must of been diluted.

Tony. I don't handle nuthin' diluted if I can
help it, Mr. Jones, but of course it's hard to tell
what is real stuff and what ain't. Now here's
a sample of some stuff I just got, Sherwood .Ander-
son came over the Canadian border.

Jones (gleefully). Sherwood Anderson!

Tony. Regular stuff too. I've sold a lot and
ain't had no complaints.

Jones. How much ?

Tony. Sh, I can let you have a case for Si 80.

Jones. That's pretty steep. Got anything else?

Tony. Well, I got some Ben Hecht, and some
D. H. Lawrence it's all young stuff though
but plenty of kick in it.

Jones. Got any Balzac or Ibsen or

Tony. Naw! Nobody can get any of that stuff
any more. It ain't made no more.

Jones. Well, I don't think I'll order anything
to-day. I'll call you up later.

Tony. All right, but you'd better put in your
order in a coupla days. It's gettin' harder and
harder to get good stuff through. Curtain.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.



MR. SHAKESPEARE VISITS GOPHER
PRAIRIE.

Louise Hfnler, '2J.

Characters. Mr. William Shakespeare

Mr. Sinclair Lewis.

Carol Kennicott.

Doctor Kennicott.

Mrs. Bogart.
Place. Gopher Prairie.
Time. Night.

(The rise of the curtain discloses Main Street.
Most of its filth and sordidness is hidden by the
darkness. .A stiff, dirty-white, dead cat, with its
blank, vacuous face toward the audience, lies
stretched directly above the footlights. Enter
Mr. Shakespeare tollowed by Sinclair Lewis.)

Lewis. This town represents any small town in
this country.

Shakespeare. (Hunting hurriedly for his glasses.)
"How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this
bank

Lewis. Moonlight.' Bank? You're mistaken.
It's the light from the lamp in Mrs. Bogart's
kitchen shining on the ash pile in the yard!

Shakespeare (Who is slightly deaf). "Here we
will sit

Lewis (Holding him back and kicking aside a
rotten overripe banana which rolls across the
stage and stops, propped tipsily against the side
of the cat). Not much we won't, Willie! Not
on boxes coming from Howland and Gould's
Grocery. I made them and I know what they are.
Why man, they're simply alive with

(.At this point a huge cockroach emerges from
the box on which Mr. William Shakespeare is
about to sit, and slowly waving his whiskers,
walks sedately across the stage and disappears
behind the wings.)

Shakespeare (Hunting frantically for his glasses).
"And let the sound of music creep in our ears."

Lewis (Wiping his face with a dirty, stained
pocket handkerchief). Oh, no we don't. If any-
thing does any creeping it'll be I. Let's go, old
man. I'm sick of hearing some phonograph
grinding out "You You tellem" or "Mr. Gal-
lagher" or "Stum

Shakespeare (Who can not hear but believes in
being pleasant). "In such a night as this

Lewis. Oh man! Quit the spouting. No one
ever bothers about you any more. We're inter-
ested in realism, materialism, ^'ou should read



my books, for instance Have you ever met Carol
Kennicott? She's

Shakespeare (Still hunting for glasses). "When
the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees

Lewis (Exasperated). Yes! Yes! We know the
rest. (Imitating Shakespeare's tone) Mike the
farm hand, methinks came a-sparking at Matilda
.Ann's. (Enthusiastically) But you must meet
Mrs. Kennicott. She's a real character, that
woman. Carol! Carol!

(Enter Carol, resignedly, dressed in silver
sheath, carrying a dirty gray dishrag in one hand,
in the other a treatise on village improvement.
She is tollowed by a mangy, fleabitten, skinny dog
that scratches industriously throughout the en-
tire scene.)

Carol. Just another of those sordid, common-
place people he makes me meet. Called Shakes-
peare at that. If he only were the Shakespeare.
He'd have understood me.

Shakespeare. .Ah-.Ah

Lewis. And Mrs. Bogart! You'd like her.
She's true to life. Why, she might even be your
grandmother. Mrs. Bogart!!

(Mrs. Bogart, who has been waiting impa-
tiently for him to call, oozes in. She sees Mr.
Shakespeare and is oblivious to all else. She runs
as fast as possible toward him and throws fat,
damp, pudgy arms about his neck. She snickers.)

Mrs. Bogart. Mr. Shakespeare! Mr. William
Shakespeare? How wonderful you should be
called that. He wrote beautiful sermons. He

Carol. Such vulgar demonstrations.

Lewis. I-I-say. You aren't supposed to act
like that. I didn't make

Shakespeare (Searching madly for his glasses).
"I have a

Mrs. Bogart. I love you! I love you! Roses
are red! Violets

Shakespeare (Shouts). "I have a wife, whom, I
protest, I love."

Mrs. Bogart. O-h-h-h! ! (Faints.)

(Doctor Kennicott enters and drags her out,
assistetl by Sinclair Lewis, who realizes you don't
know a woman even if you've created her. Carol
trails disgustedly after. The gray dishrag swings
stiffly. Mr. Shakespeare finall\- finds his glasses.
He looks around, sees the ash pile, the rotten
banana, the dead cat, and Main Street.)

Shakes fieare (Leaving hastily). ".A gentle rid-
dance Draw the curtains. Cjo! (He ilisappears.)



THE CARIBBEAN.



47



A SHRED OF YELLOW PAPER.

Dorothy Abciulroth, '.'f.

Chong, quaint-eyed, lemon-cheeked, bizarre in
orthodox raiment, .shuffles through the gray silence
of the dawning city. He drops something, a piece
of paper, crumpled and yellow.

I pick it up. Under the bilious flare of the arc-
light, sprawling, grotesque, Chinese letters confront
me. What do they mean these fantastic characters.'

Perhaps they form a poem which Chong has
written where the little purple dreams rise as in-
cense to the Princess of the Poppy in the secret,
squalid room above Lo Mie's grocery store. Per-
haps this is what they mean:

"O Lotus Lady, light of the bamboo hut among
the willow trees, Chong salutes you! The candles
of the moon and stars flicker pale before the lan-
tern of your beauty. -All the great empresses of a
thousand years, who ha\e made men drunk and
ciead with love, stir enviousK- in their swathing of
silk and of copper.

"O Lotus Lady, your willows drooping toward
the shallows are sad, but I am sadder. Here in
an alien land where the women are marble, not
gold, where their hearts are ice, not fire, here
where the stars are frightened from the sky^ by
great glazed candles, I, your Chong, am so lonely!

"O Lotus Lady, across wide deserts, across tall
mountains, across the width of the sea on a sam-
pan of dreams drawn by jade dragons, your Chong
comes to greet you!"

Is this the poem that Chong has written in
sprawling characters upon the crumpled sheet of
faded, yellow paper? Or do the letters merely
mean: "Six collars, three shirts, four handker-
chiefs, and one pair of trousers?"

A SOLILOQUY.

William Cousins, 'i'5.

I am short, slender, and black, the pride of the
Senior class. This is my second year with the
Senior class, but I shall never be graduated, al-
though they come tor me when lessons are to be
prepared. I have written sonnets, descriptions,
allegories, and themes; yet the teachers think
that the Seniors never have others do their work.

My history is short. I was born in Janesville,
Wisconsin, in 1915 and from there I went to
New York, arriving in 1920. .Although only five
years old I was full grown. I left New York on
the Advance for the Canal Zone, reaching the
Isthmus in January, 1921. One day while in the



Cristobal Commissary I met a Cristobal High
School Freshman who invited me home. The
next day he took me to school with him. While
I was there that day, several ignorant Freshmen
had me do their Spanish this was my Waterloo,
as I did not know the first thing about Spanish,
or algebra either, as I soon fount! out when they
hatl me attempt to solve an ecjuation. This must
have angered my friend, as that afternejon I was
left on his desk, and I never saw him again.

Several da>s later as I was resting after a tussle
with an English theme, a boy with a red nose,
large freckles, and red hair sneaked up behind
n-.e and before I could even dodge, clutched me
In- the neck and dragged me out of the room and
into the Senior sanctuary where I hatl to write a
story for the .Annual. (This is how I became a
Senior.) This boy always kept me on his desk
after this and I did no work for any one but
Seniors for the rest of the year.

This year the Seniors do not prize me as dearly
as ditl the ones of last )ear, ami I am sorry to say
I am sometimes forced to do Junior work which
is far below the dignity of a Senior Pen.

GATUN LAKE.

Emogene Nash, '2j.

Oh wondrous work of mighty men

Real men of brawn and brain,
Who your deep jungle did not fear,

Nor fever, nor tropic rain.
Upon your bosom passes now

The commerce of all nations;
Where once the untamed Chagres raced,

Work men m close relations;
Where now m.ajestic ships hold sway

On rippling waters' face.
There once roamed fierce wild animals

Who here found hiding place;
And now, like hoary monarchs gray.

Your dead trees ghost-like stand
Their great, grim trunks, sole relics

Ot tropic jungle land.





i*w *jt V ^%^^ B^^BHil^ISi


K1I4. liBii



Gatuii Lake The Dying Junt^le.



48



THE CARIBBEAN.




TRAGEDIES LARGE AND SMALL.




THE HOME-COMING.

Fniriies Gni\\ '.?>.

The dingy local pulled into the little station
and discharged one passenger and a battered
army locker. The passenger wore a faded khaki
uniform, one leg of which was turned up and
sewed at the knee. He leaned dispiritedly upon
his crutches and surveyed the empty platform.
He was a young chap, hardly more than a boy,
but suffering and hardship had lined his face and
turned to white the hair above his sunken temples.
His eyes, that had been alight with a strange
eagerness as he stepped off the train, now were
dull, and his wasted body sagged between his
crutches. Slowly he swung himself across the
platform and stood in the doorway of the tiny
office where an old, bald-headed man sat before
a battered wooden desk. There was no light of
recognition in the old man's face as he looked up, and
the boy's lips began to tremble, while the bitter
tears gathered in his eyes. "Don't you remember
me, Jim ?" he asked in a slightly husky voice.

The old man stared at him a minute and then
his jaw dropped. "My Gosh, if it ain't little
Willie Hunter! Why boy, we heard these two
years back as how you was missin' an' your Maw
died of the grief. Yor Paw done died sence then
folks says 'twas lonesomeness an yor Aunt,
well she sold the ol' place an' went to Canady."
The boy did not speak, but as he listened to the
old man his face turned a ghastly white. Mother
and Dad gone, the old place sold, and he a cripple!
This, after four years of a German prison camp.
Gone were the dreams of the glad home-coming,
the "pies that mother made," the long quiet
evenings by the hearth no sound but the crackle
of Dad's paper and the creak of Mother's rocker
as she darned or mended the dreams of quiet
and rest, the dreams of peace. Gone were these
dreams, the dreams that had kept life in him for
ff>ur long harrowing years, swept aside by the
words of one little old man.

Suddenly a flame of blind, unreasoning hatred
flared up in the heart of the boy, hatred for this



old man who had sent his dreams crashing into
oblivion, and, with a snarl in his throat, he lunged
forward, his hands outstretched. But his crutches
slipped from under him, and he fell in a heap upon
the floor. For a moment he did not move, and
then, throwing his head back, he burst into peals
of ghastly, choking laughter laughter that
brought the bloody foam to his lips, and sent the
salty tears coursing down the hollow cheeks. He
laughed until exhaustion overcame him, and then,
as he slipped further down beside the battered
desk, his dull eyes softly closed, and an expression
of quiet peace stole over his twisted face. As his
sunken chest rose in the last breath of life his
blood-flecked lips formed the prayer, "Mother,
I'm coming. Don't fail me this time."

LOST ONE DIME.

Mattie PuHig, '3j

Gee! It was a glorious shiny new dime. Dimes
were very scarce in Bobby's young life, for his
mother worked all day over a tub of warm soap-
suds, to support the five small Murphys and the
one big Murphy, and any dime, new or old, was
always needed. But this was an unusual occur-
rence. Mrs. Curtis, that lived in the big white house
on the hill, had given Mrs. Murphy two extra dollars,
for laundering some especially dainty dresses.

Bobby's brown, bare feet beat a merry tattoo
on the old board walk. He was going to buy a
top a beautiful red and green top, a gorgeous
top, the one that he had watched and longed for
for a month. Now he was going to get it!

Horrors! That new dime had slipped from his
little, damp, dirty hand! It rolled and rolled and
rolled. Bobby prayed, "Oh Lord don't let it roll
into that big crack." But evidently that dime
was possessed, for plink! it rolled sickeningly
into the crack. Gone were his dime, his top, his
dreams. Tears made little white trails down
Bobby's cheeks, as he trudgetl a weary way home.
The sunshine was gone from the sky, the birtls
from the trees and his dime from his hantl.
The world was intlecd dark and dreary.



THK CARIHBKAN.



49



FAITH.

Louise Henler, 'sj.

Man\' pciiplc have attcinpteil to soK'e rhi.' mys-
tery of a small boy's iiiinci,^attempte(.i, aiitl are
still attempting though the small boys of four
have become the small bjys of ninety-four.
Wise people, especially mothers, and some few
fathers, have given up the search and have learned
to take things as they come, trusting to God and
their own luck to pidl rlicm through \\hare\er
difficulties ma)- arise.

Kid Mike, christeneil by the "Hard Boileil
(jang," nine->'ear-old veterans of numerous street
fights, and skilled in "ditching" the cop, was no
exception to the general rule, although no on^'
had ever attempted to understand him. .As far as
he knew, he had ne\'er had an}- father or mother,
and Big Pat Mahoney, who had picked him, grimy
and ash-covered, out of an overflowing garbage
can, in a moment of sobriety, used, as his only
means of understanding, a long, black rawhide
whip, a remnant of the glory of former days
when he was employed in the very superior ami
much exalted position of garbage wagon driver.

No one had ever sympathized with Kid Mike.
No one had ever even suspected him of having
any loftier or softer sentiments than a love of
fighting and an anything-is-right-if-you-can-get-
away-with-it feeling, that is, not until Mrs.
Marsh, old and motherly, came into his life. She
had come down to Fourteenth Street, bringing
some delicacies for a former cook of hers, and had
arrived just in time to meet Kid Mike issuing
rather precipitately from the door, aided by the
impetus given him by the square toe of Big Pat's
huge and much worn shoe.

There was something compelling about Mrs.
Marsh to which even Kid Mike, sullen and re-
sentful, finally succumbed. She came several
times after this and each time Kid Mike was on
the lookout for her to escort her to and from her
destination. Finally she came to know the big,
secret desire of Kid Mike's life a dog all his
own to fight with him and for him. He didn't
care what kind just so's it had enough legs to
walk on and a tail to waggle oh yes ^just so it
looked like a dog.

Mrs. Marsh understood. She thought of Spots
at home. No one really wanted him or needed
him now that the boys were grown. Christmas
was only two days off. But Christmas meant



nothing to Kid Mike beyond an extra quart of
beer for Big Pat; so Mrs. Marsh sat on the cold,
dirty step of the crowded tenement and told him
the story of the first Christmas and then of our
modern Christmas, with its fat jolly Santa Claus,
Christmas trees and presents. She promised to
see that Santa Claus should bring him what he
wanted but he must have faith in her and Santa
Claus, and most of all in God, who made all things
possible.

Two days of nerve-racking suspense followed.
Christmas morning came noon evening and
then night and still no kind Mrs. Marsh. The
next day it was the same, and the next. Weeks
lengthened into months and still she didn't come.
He didn't know that hers had been just one of the
many deaths caused by reckless driving on crowd-
ed streets on a Christmas morning. He remem-
bered what she had said. Faith? In her? In
God? They had both failed him. I-'aith? There
was no such thing. And so, without faith in God
or man, Kid Mike set out on the roatl of Fife.

A CASF OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY,

Gera'd Bliss, Jr., 'jj.

She was hurrying as rapidly as any woman does
hurry when she is trying to get the dinner pre-
pared before the "men folks" get home. The
meat was browning nicely, the potatoes had
reached the stage where they gave off that tanta-
lizing aroma, and everything was about ready for
the table. She was in the act of taking it from
the stove when the doorbell gave forth a short
staccato.

Hurriedly, she wiped her face on her none-too-
clean apron, and went to welcome the caller, who-
ever it might be. .A glance at him revealed a book
in his hand, and so the conclusion was that he
was the book agent that had been in town for the
past few days. In a hasty, half-courteous manner
she invited him into the house, but showed very
plainly that she was quite willing to get rid of
him as soon as possible. As soon as he had seated
himself, she burst forth with, "Well, what will
you be wanting? I suppose that you have some
good-for-nothing book that I have no use for
whatsoever. Come, come, hurry! I haven'tallday,
as my dinner is about ready to burn now. Let's
hear what you have to say and get it done quickly."
^^'hile she was saying all of this, the book agent
was gasping for breath and staring in surprise.



-lO



THE CARIBBEAN.



A few more short and snappy remarks she
made, and then, without a word of warning, left
for the kitchen from w hich considerable smoke
was pouring forth. .A few minutes later she ap-
peared in the sitting room again, and said as she
moved in a stern but not stately manner, "Well,
now that everything is burned, I suppose

But she got no further, for the book agent had
flown, much to her surprise, as well as delight.
So she went back to the kitchen to make out ot
the remains whatever might be possible.

The next day at church, she met the new pastor.
And the people wondered why she fainted.

NEVER AGAIN!

Louise Henler, 2S-

Mary had just come to town. On hearing that
our most popular game was basket ball, she im-
mediately became desirous of understanding the
game so that she might appreciate the many
games she intended to see. So I, only too over-
joyed at the prospect of explaining the intricacies
of my favorite sport to this less fortunate, though
certainly most attractive member of the weaker
sex, took her to the clubhouse on the night of the
game between Cristobal and Balboa High School.
As soon as we were seated she began:

"Oh! What are those things?"

"Those things," I explained, "are called bas-
kets and

"Why do the>' run around in circles under those
jiggers?"

"They run around like that under the baskets
to get warmed up."

"Warmed up? NVhat's that? Over what?"

She had the cutest way of putting her finger
to her mouth when she giggled. But while I was
busy answering her questions and explaining
what the lines meant on the floor, she was off
on another subject.

"Oh! Doesn't the Balboa team have pretty
suits? Don't they look darling? They're much
better looking than the Cristobal boys!" But
even though it was she who saiil it, I was up in
arms.

"Why we've got the best school on the Zone!
We're second to none! If you don't believe it,
ask Miss Dodds! She's over there. We've got
the pep and the rep! Balboa's got a snappy team
but we aren't afraid of them! No; not a bit!



Who's the team that's going to win? Cris

I was interrupted by the referee's whistle.

"Who's that? What's the whistle for?"

"He is the referee," I explained. "The referee
referees and when he referees he blows the whistle
when fouls are

"^^'hat's fouls?" I missed one of Moore's light-
ning baskets by explaining. She cut me short,
however.

"Why do those men both stand in the circle?
Why is it that when that man blows the whistle
and says 'Ball out' someone always throws it in
again?" I explained, that is, I started to explain,
but she broke in, "Oh! Don't you think that tall
center of Balboa's is the swellest-looking thing
you ever saw? What's his name? Who's that
boy with the pretty eyes?"

"No I don't," I said in answer to her first
question. "I never did think Norfleet was hand-
some, and I don't think anyone else does either!
But he's

"Who is that boy that just looked this way?
Who's that ? What's this ? Why did he fall down ?

When A faint glimmer of light came to me.

I didn't even attempt to answer. She never no-
ticed. I got up. Still she didn't notice. I left.
She had forgotten all about me.

PUP-P-PATHETIC.

Ernst Enphrut, '2j.

Good gracious! It was right over him a great
black thing with long crooked claws. As it came
nearer, it got bigger and bigger! Closer! Closer!
It closed around him! He shut his eyes; his
heart thumped; he shook from the edge of his
little pink nose to the tip of his tail. There! It
had him by the back of the neck!

Well! It was only the shadow of his mistress's
hand as she came to take him for a walk!




THK CARIBBKAN.



51



THE IOWA.

Edith Coiilhoitrii^ '2^.
(See illiistriition, p-.R- II )

Into rile liarlior of Colon anil on throiigh rlu-
Panama Canal stcameil the Atlantic- fleet with het
huge siiper-(.lieadnought.s, grim destroyers, and
trim submarines. It was indeed an impressi\e
sight, for the white uniforms of the men made a
(.iazzling contrast with the somhre gra\ I'he fleet
maneu\'ers were to he held in the FaciHe, off" the
coast of Panama, and the ships we"e on their \\a\'
to take part in them.

.Among them was the L'. S. S. loiia making her
farewell voyage from the eastern shore of the
I'nited States, and her first and final voyage
through the Panama Canal to the Pacific where
she was to render her last bit for her country, as
she was to be used as a target tor the guns of the
.Atlantic an^i Pacific fleets during the maneuvers.



she returned to her homeland as the victor, flying
the Ketl, White, anil Blue. Cheer after cheer was
given for her and her noble crew.

Ihen came larger and finer battleshijis. The
liiiiui grew small b)- comparison. .Still she held
her own, tor she had a glorious jiast of which rhe
ncwer ships couki not boast. She hail i)een com-
manded by some of the mixst prominent captains
of the Navy. F.ven though the newer ships were
larger and more formidable, they hail never been
called upon to defend their country's flag as had
the I'. S. S. lovca.

The World War came. The loiva, being con-
siilered an obsolete type, was placed in commis-
sion but assigned to dut\- in home waters. She
was used in connection with the training of men
newK- enlisted in the naval service, and in this
manner contributeii her part in no small wa\-, by
fin'nishing trained men tor the newer battleships,



iKi#^j






ucK






Cristobal Coaling Stition wliere Ships of tht- World Touch,



Trim and neat as in days gone by, she looked as
she went on her way, her crew walking her decks
for the last time, and the flag of the country which
she had served so faithfully flying from her gaff.
And as the Iowa proceeded on this, her last trip
under her own steam, the thought came of the
old days when she had been the pride of our Navy.
In the year of our Lord 1897, she had been com-
pleteil at Cramp's Shipyard, Philadelphia, Penn-
sylvania the largest battleship of that time. Al-
most immediately after she had been placed in
commission, war was declared with Spain. The
Iowa was at that time commanded by Captain
Robley D. Evans, better known as "Fighting
Bob." Under his command the loiva proved her
worth at the battle of Santiago and played an im-
portant part as a fighting unit of the Uniteci States
Atlantic fleet when the Spanish fleet was des-
troyed. How proud the nation was of her when



destroyers, and submarines, as well as armed
guards for the merchant ships crossing the .At-
lantic carrying troops and cargo.

The Peace Conference came and finally the
Disarmament Conference, in which the United
States agreed to scrap so many ships. Our Navy
had to be reduced; so the oldest ships must go.
The Iowa was then selected as the ship to be
fitted out for use in connection with experimental
tests of radio control. After several experiments
on the .Atlantic coast the Iowa was ordered south
to be used as a target in connection with the
winter maneuvers of the United States fleet.

Here she was, bravely proceeding on her way,
following the example of her noble officers and
men who had not been afraid to dare.

In three weeks after they reached Panama Bay
the fleet had carried out their prearranged man-
euvers and problems.



THE CARIBBEAN.



On Monday, March 19, 1923, they got under
way, the loan accompanying them, controlled b\'
radio through the U. S. S. Mississippi. She
seemed a phantom ship, for there was not a soul
on board, yet her engines were running and her
boilers filled as if she were fully manned by her
crew. The Stars and Stripes were proudly flying
from her gaff and she seemed to derive a con-
scious dignity from the fact that she had defended
the honor of that flag and carried it to victory;
that she had always done her duty faithfully to
her country; and that now she was J//7/ serving it,
ev'en though it was her last service.

They proceeded to the open sea and arrived at
the spot where the Iowa was to be sunk on Tuesday,
March 20. The sea, blue and placid under the
afternoon sun,seemedafitting grave for sucha ship.

^Yhen the lona was nine miles away, the
Mww//)/'/ started firing on her. .'\fter a few salvos
from the huge guns of the super-dreadnought the
Iowa lay an immovable, defenseless target.



Secretary Denby ordered the National .'\nthem
to be played on board the 11. S. S. Maryland, and
as the strains floated out across the water, every
visitor, officer, and man on the ships stood at
attention, head bared, as in the presence of death.
Tears rose in many eyes as they looked their last
upon that noble ship. The national salute of
twenty-one guns was given as the Iowa went to
her hist resting place in the Pacific.

As soon as she had gone down, the ships steamed
over to where she had last been seen. A rust-
colored scum lay like a veil over the water. It
was the only visible trace left of the U. S. S. Iowa,
but the memory of that ship will live in the hearts
of the American people for many years to come.
Now,

"The ships that roam o'er the ocean's foam
May hear, in ghostly tones.
The Iowa's bell, as she tolls her knell
In the locker of Davy Jones."




EVERY STUDENT'S RIDE.

(Based on the morninij run of the Gatun Bus.)
Louise Henter, '2j.

Every Student was to begin a new period of
preparation for his journey toward Success. For
a long time he had stayed in the bed Vacation
although the alarm clock Watchfulness had
awakened him from his sleep Ease quite early.
But Every Student sighed, and groaned, and
threw the clock Watchfulness under the bureau
Carelessness where it stopped running, except for
a sudden jerk or knock at long intervals. Every
Student's dog. Conscience, his best frieml ami
faithful follower, was much disturbed by the noise.
Conscience tried vainly to get under Carelessness
but it was too big a proposition for him; so finally
he turned to Every Student and scratched him
with the claw Discomfort, waking him from his
sleep P.ase to a realization of the situation.

Under the shower Pep, Every Student lost the
feeling of Laziness. He dressed himself in the



garments of Good Intentions, and, as he heard the
school bus .'Ambition blowing the horn of Oppor-
tunit}-, he ate a hasty breakfast of Patience,
grabbed his ill-packed lunch of Perseverance,
called for the new girl, Novelty, carrying her
books of Enjoyment, and waited for the bus Am-
bition. Every Student found that several others
were already there Pleasure, the prettiest girl.
Bluff", the bully boy. Courage and Self-Respect,
both clear-eyed and read)' for any emergency, and
the twins. Cheat and I-Should-Worry. The driver
Faculty started .'\mbition with the crank of Itleals
and after a moment of confused rumblings and
groanings Andiirioii began its skjw progress along
High School Kuad. This road was divided into
four parts. The first part was harti traveling but
was later composetl chiefly of long hills ilown
which Ambition coastetl swifth'. Pleasure tried
vainly to get Every Stutlent to sit with her but
Novelty had all his attention.

The first stop was maile for a very homely girl.
Monotony. The first thing Monotony did was to



THE CARIBBEAN.



53



push Novelty into a ilcscrtctl corner, appropriat-
ing her seat next to Every Student, and sitting on
his lunch of Perseverance, making it rather flat.
She immediately began to exercise a proprietary
right over Every Stuiicnt and, to escape her at-
tentions, he sought the company of Pleasure. To
show off before her he stood on the step No-
Study, although repeatetily scolded by the dri\er
Facult>', and, on going around Review Curve and
Examination Bump, he would have fallen ot^ but
for the ready aid of Blufl^and Cheat.

At Fort Industry, Efficiency, System, and
Ready Money got on board to accompany them
on the second halt of their Journey. Ready Mon-
ey immediately devoted all his attention to Plea-
sure, and Every Student became very despondent.
To show he didn't care, he stood on the step No-
Study again but this time he was forcibly set by
Faculty on the hard and uncomfortable bench of
Hard Study, where System and Self-Respect
helped him very much. Ready Money persuaded
Pleasure, Bluff, and Cheat to go with him so they
all jumped off at Blind .Alley River. Ambition
stopped many times with severe jerks and loud
noises, but the mysterious ailment was always at-
tended to by Faculty, and, by the time they came
to the third stop, .Ambition was going forward
easily.

.At the third stop there were three roads Easy
Work Road, leading backward; No Worry Road,
leading down hill; and High School Road contin-
uing onward. Ambition, after picking up Dignity
and Assurance, kept on its way along High School
Road through the town of Achievement, and
stopped where the great sea of Life with its ships
of Experience washes the shore of Dependence.

THE HARP.

Ernst Eiiphrat, 2J.

The beautiful human harp is ready. Upon the
stout frame of former high school reputation are
stretched the wires of studenthood. The heavy
bass wires, the Seniors, form the background of
each selection. The Juniors and Sophomores fur-
nish an accompaniment for the Freshmen's tune.
Each instructor pricks out his tune: English,
from sonorous strains of grand opera tragedy to
lively light lyrics; the heavy cantatas of algebra
and physics; the dreary chants of Latin; the pa-
triotic airs of history; all are practiced from day
to day in preparation for the quarterly recitals.



For many of the wires the strain is great, and they
begin to sag. These are attended to by the tuner,
principal, who tightens them up anil keeps the
instrument in harmon)'. Then, after the hard
da\ 's practice of these exalted, stubborn composi-
tions, comes the recreation of the popular air of
sports. .And through it all runs the pervading
theme of school spirit.

EVERY BOY.

//. £. May, 'sj.

Everybo}-, after his graduation from high
school, accompanied by his firm friend Knowledge,
who is mounted on the steed Experience, sets out
to find the twin cities Success and Fame. He
has been advised many times on the matter by
his friend Knowledge, so when the two set out
from the halls of Preparation, Ex-eryboy wears
a cloak of Character, hat of Determination, and
shoes of Perseverance, he rides a steed. System,
and carries a firearm, Courage.

As they ride along, Everyboy notices that
there are many more engaged in the search. Some
of them have no mounts, others are mounted on
steeds of Laziness, and still others are mounted,
but wear no cloaks, and carry no firearms. He
feels proud that he has such an unusual start, but
Knowledge warns him that only the test of time
will tell his future.

Knowledge has hardly finished this warning,
when Everyboy sees in the distance the swamp
Bad Luck. In this swamp dwell many enemies,
such as Misfortune, Disgrace, and Shame. Every-
boy also notices that this swamp is fed b\' the
river Carelessness, wherein are the demons. Temp-
tation, ^'acillation, Unsteadiness, and Failure.
Beyond the river he sees a city, which Knowledge
tells him is the city of Adversity, where a man is
either made or broken. Knowledge also says that
if Everyboy can get through the swamp, the river,
and the city, he will come out upon the good road.
Fortune, which leads directly to the twin cities,
Success and Fame.

As they enter the swamp of Bad Luck, Every-
boy sees the enemies creeping cunningly around
in order to try to render his steed System unfit,
so that they can capture Everyboy and make
him join their ranks. Simultaneously they strike,
but Everyboy is on the alert and with the help of
his fine weapon. Courage, he wards them off.



54



THE CARIBBEAN.



Everyboy and Knowledge hurry from the
swamp and, as they come upon the river, Know-
ledge instructs Everyboy as to the manner of
crossing it. Everyboy listens with eager ears and
upon reaching the bank he spurs his mount on,
into the water. The demons are upon him;
Temptation pulls at his cloak of Character, ^'acil-
lation at his cap ot Determination, Unsteadiness
at his shoes of Perseverance, while Failure, the
strongest ot the demons, tries to force the steed
System down and to wrench the weapon from his
hand. Soon they get an advantage over him, but
never-failing Knowledge rushes in and saves him
by overpowering F'ailure. Everyboy then gets a
chance to use his weapon and he kills all the de-
mons.

Knowledge then takes Everyboy to the inn of
Confidence, where he is given a room of valor and
fruits from the trees of Earnestness and Eager-



ness. .As soon as Everyboy is sufficiently rested
to resume the hard journey, the two set out for
the city of .Adversity.

.As they approach the city gates, there is no
tear in the heart of Everyboy, for he knows that
with his cloak of Character and his firearm of
Courage, Adversity can not harm him. He strikes
the gates to the ground with a single blow from
his firearm of Courage. Much to his surprise he
is not attacked as he makes the transit of the
city, but he meets many strange persons. Among
them he sees Pride and Relentlessness, who are
the parents of Ignorance, and Conceit and Haugh-
tiness, the parents of Overconfidence.

From the city he exits to the plain of Happi-
ness, through which he sees the road Fortune
running up to the twin cities. Success and Fame.
He soon reaches them and settles down in the
estate ot Bliss.



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1



Ruined Bridge at Old Panama.



REVERY.
Inza Markham, '24.

'Tis twilight. By a ruined bridge I stand

A crumbling bridge, vine-clad and grey with years

Above a muddy stream. I dream k band

Of faithful go to evening prayer. My ears

.Are filled with sound of vesper bells. The land

Is calmed with peace. Krom convent walls one hears

The chant of nuns. It dies. .And then a hand

On a guitar strums forth a song that cheers.

Then on the breeze is borne the tramp of hoofs.

Again 1 picture Morgan with his hordes.

They steal upon that slumbering town. The roofs,

High blazing, turn the sky to scarlet. Swords

In darkness clash. I rouse. Nature from sight

Has kindly hid the horrors of that night.



THE OLD JUNGLE TRAIL.
Louise Henler, '2j.

The new trail ends. We leave the glare of day
And step into green twilight, mystic, still.
The festooned jungle anil the rugged way
.Are peopled by dark shadows. On the hill,
Cringing beneath the haughty Spaniard's sway,
Crushed down by loads o( jewels, beaten 'til
The blood dripped down red rubies on the gray
Smooth path, the servile slaves, their sav.ige will
Broken beneath the lash, appear. Bright bars
Of yellow gold gleam on bent backs. The low
Soft hum of voices, tinkling of guitars
A parrot laughs. The stones lie broken, row
On row. The gold is now the sunlight's dower;
The blood, the petals of a passion flower.



THE CARIBBEAN.



55



CONTROLLING MY TEMPER.

Caldwell B. Foos, '3$.

Friday, April 27, 192J, 6.30 a. m. With a
sleepy murmur I rolled out of bctl and landed on
all fours on the carpet. .*\ general ilazeil amiahilit\-
permeated my being, and 1 rose from the Hoor
and ambled into the bathroom. .An ice cold
shower, and five minutes later I strode through
the door, claii in an old pair of "gym" shoes and
an old suit of overalls, tairl\- bubbling o\er with
an excess of animal spirits.

"Oh the bear went over the mountain,
The bear went over the mountain.
The bear went over the mountain
To see what he could see."

"Shut up, Caldwell. You'll wake up the Con-
rad baby."

"Awright, Pop, old dear, anything you say"
and out of the house and down the road to the
garage at the other end of the Post. I unlocked the
doors and fastened them apart; then stepped in
and opened the door of the snappy setlan which
stood within.

"Chg-a-chg arrrmmm! Rm-m-m-ni U'ith a
steady cadence that did my heart gofiti the engine
settled down to work. \\\t\\ a noiseless shifting of
gears we rolled out of the garage, into second and
then high before we (the car and I) were off the
short stretch of dirt road in front of the garage.
Then, as we hit the concrete road, I "stepped on
it." The cofjl engine gave a protesting spit or
so, and then accelerated with a powerful driving
hum twenty, twenty-five, thirty, and still climb-
ing. We shot past Deiberts' and Walker's, then
braked suddenly and went past the Colonel's at
a sedate and proper twelve miles an hour, as per
Post regulations. As we topped the hill, I switch-
ed off the ignition and slipped the gear-shift lever
into neutral, and we coasted down the hill, to
come to a silent stop in front of our quarters.
Check.

I climbed out, feeling as if I were the exclusive
owner of this terrestial sphere, and went into the
house. I met my kid sisters with a cheerful and
slighting greeting, as is my custom. They replied
in kind, to the effect that I was a double dumb-
bell, with a cheerfulness equal to my own. Then
I went into my room and dressed for school.
When I came out, my kid sisters were just start-
ing on their way to Gatun in the car; so I waved



good-by to them and my father, who was driving
them, and sat down to my breakfast. I finished
it, rose, and went into my bathroom, gayly carol-
ing a mournful ballad concerning the never-im-
pentiing ilcmise of ancient warriors, to wit:

"Old soldiers never die,

Never-r-r die,

Never-r-r die,

Olil soldiers never-r die

Only KA-A-A-.^DF. a-\VA-A-Y I !"

upon which I scrubbeii my teeth with vigor and
vim. Then I went out to wait for the bus. I
watched with pleaseil interest the awkward "re-
cruities" being tlrilled by a weary sergeant. But
pretty soon the waiting grew tiresome, and the
splendid feeling departed where, oh where.^
Don't ask me maybe one of the "recruities" had
it; but frorn the look on their faces I hardly think
so.

After a while the bus came, and I climbed over
various seats and things to my place, to the ac-
companiment of a carping voice truculently de-
claring that I was stepping on his lunch, ami if I
didn't get off etc., etc.

Slow, mournful funeral music. It was five
o'clock, anil the bus crawled back into Fort Davis,
where it stopped a moment while I got off. I
climbed otf with a growl, and started walking
homeward. I growled again as I recalled the
events of the day.

I reached home, climbed wearily up the steps
down which I had vaulted so lightly in the morn-
ing, and opened the door. I stopped in horror.
What was this? M)- puttees! My beautiful,
gleaming, classy puttees, which I had so carefully
and lovingly polished preparatory to my trip to
San Lorenzo on the coming Sunday, clay-stained
and scratched, a doleful sight. I gazed on them
and opened my mouth; then shut it and swal-
lowed, and went on without a word. Four steps
on, and I stopped again. My riding breeches!
My distinctive, well-cut, perfectly fitting riding
breeches! Rumpled, tossed into a corner with
red clay-stains everywhere evident. I gazed
silently at them, taking in every horrible detail.
Then my mother came through the door.

"Oh, your riiling breeches," she said. "I lent
them to Ruth to go exploring in. I'm sorry she
got them dirty."

I exploded. In one long, terrible crashing burst
I nullified years of good behavior. I cursed a



56



THE CARIBBEAN.



blazing, sizzling, blue streak. Everything I had
silently absorbed in seven years' experience at
various army posts I now made use of. No easy,
mild "cusses" like a complicated Chinese cuss, but
real, man-sized horrible curses that fairly ripped
their way through the startled atmosphere. I
cursed steadily on for almost fi\e minutes, with



very few repetitions, and with all the fervor of long
pent-up emotions. Then I went out, giving the
door a slam that almost broke it, leaving my
mother horror struck. Such a thing had never
happened before.

I hat's how I controlled my temper on .April



GUM CHEWING.

Mattie Pullig, '2j).

Why is it that the picture of a tousle-headed tion," and create an atmosphere utterlv lacking

stenographer chewing gum always provokes a in dienity.

laugh.? Probably because of the peculiar expres- Take for instance a minister,-no matter how

s.on on her face She looks so blank. It seems distinguished lookins^-put a piece of "Wriglev's"

as ,f this comical expression always appears when ^, '.j^icv Fruit" or^ "Black Jack" in his mouth



one is engaged in the gum-chewing pastime.

There are ways and ways of chewing gum.
Some people chew it slowly and deliberately in a
bo\ine manner, others go about it in a serious
business-like way, while still others chew it verv,
very fast, working their jaws like a threshing ma-
chine, and making almost as much noise. Per-
haps the last is most annoying to other people



and see how quickly his dignity is lost. His talk
does not impress you. You think, "What a silly
old man! I know he has that gum sticking in the
roof of his mouth."

European people think that our chief "indoor-
sport," is gum-chewing. Rather an undignified
reputation is it not? So on your trip to Europe,



but all give the appearance of "perpetual mo- at least, leave out the chewing gum.




TtiL- OM l''l.it Aruli in Panama City -An .Vrchituctiiral Curiosity.



TIIK SIKGE OF S.AN LORENZO.
//. Edward May, '-'_?.



High on a beetling battlement beside

The briny sea .stood San I^renzo. Night

Of feasting reigned. Men's minds turned not to fight,

VoT, from yon lookout post, the sentry cried,

"One bell and all is well." He had not spied

The ruthless Morgan, near the battle site,

Whose men were scaling up the iliz/y height



To seize the stronghokl from the ocean side.

.A lookout gave the signal that the land

Side was besieged; the drunk defenders rushed

To man the guns. Tho.se hiilden hordes were on

Their backs. The battle raged; they made a stand,

Then fell. His siege well done, the noise was hushed,

And Morgan stooil supreme at break of dawn.



THE CARIBBEAN.



57



WHEN GREEN MEETS GREEN.

Louise Henler, 'zj.

The thiituier rolled and the lightning flashetl.
The I'ates were having another famii\- quarrel.
Jove, from his mighty seat, viewed the conflict
and mopped his anguished brow with a large, red
bandana handkerchief while praying for a more
supreme power than e\en his to bring peace and
tranquillity once more to the heavens. Long ago
he hail learned not to interfere when the l'"ates
fought. The quarrel had begun because .'\tropos,
in a fit of anger, had cut short the life of the sis-
ters' favcjrite plaything. .Any form of amuse-
ment is rare in the heavens and the three Fates,
old and pettish as they were, derivcil their only
amusement from the antics through which they
put the people on earth. For .Atropos to kill a
person just as his car and a railroad train met at
a crossing was an unforgi\eable offense, especially
as he might have been good for all sorts of amus-
ing situations, although an arm or a leg were
missing. However, the battle terminated as
swiftK' as it had begun and, when the dust settled,
the three sisters were seen sitting side by side,
conferring earnestly with each other. Finally
they chuckled unpleasantly, they hardly ever
smiled. Clotho tlrew a new cord from her distaff,
and the life of Patrick Michael O'Connelly began.

Mrs. O'Connelly looked into the ugly, little red
face and prayed that life woukl treat him kindly,
more kindly than his looks might at first imph'.
She caught a tin\' twinkle in the wide, blue eyes.
"Ye've the Oirish sinse of humor, Pat, me lad,
but may the good saints give ye luck," and, al-
though she said it last, luck held a place of first
importance in her estimation.

Pat grew up. Humor, well, humor was Pat's
biggest asset a ready laugh in return for the
hard, unfriendly kicks of the world, a joke for
the jibes of his associates, for Pat was unlucky.
Unlucky hardly fits Pat's case, he was absolutely
unfortunate. When he was a few days old his
mother changed her earthly habitation for one
more ethereal, aided somewhat by the well-
placed kicks of her husband, who, filled with pride
and something else besides, had just re-
turned from celebrating the advent of Pat. Not
long after, Pat, aided by the same medium,
changed his habitation for the gutter, from which
he was fished by a humane push cart proprietor
and transported to the city orphanage. There his



ill luck and humor, combined, proved too much
for the authorities, and he left, by invitation.
His ill-luck persistetl. When he got a job, that
is when an emjiloyer was able to overlook his
looks, something always happened. The store
burnt down, the bank went into bankruptcy, the
railroad train jumpeii the track. If a street car
was wrecked and only one person was injured, he
was that person. In his own words, "If it rained
soup, \\\ be out with a fork." Hut he always
came up smiling. The fates knew what they were
about. \ ou can't have any fun with a person
who gets "sore."

One night, the night he asked Peggy Malone,
the cashier in "'lim's Serve- You-Quick Restaur-
ant," to marry him, anil had been refused, "No
money and no luck," he went down to the
wharves to think things over. Sitting there he
considered lite. People were funny, the way
things happened when least expected was and
then something unexpected came down on his
head and he fell a long way into darkness.

He awoke with the hot sun shining in his face.
He stared straight into an unclouded sky. The
thing on which he lay rolled slightly, first one
way, then the other. He must have died. He
turned a bit; the top of a mast came into view.
He sat up stiffly and saw that he was on the deck
of a small schooner, very evidently going some-
where but where he did not know, for he could
see nothing but sea blue sea stretching out in-
finitely. Shanghaied! He had heard of it but it
had never happened to him before. He laughed,
life H'as funny.

.After a week of sailing they came into sight of
land Panama. Pat leaned heavily on the rail
and sighed ecstatically. Panama was a land of
romance to him, a land of promise. He leaned

more heavily, "Oh gee !" The small boat

picked him up, almost drowned, and he was placed
on extra duty, to account for the delay caused by
his falling in. .As a result he was the last to leave
the ship.

Everything was new to him, everything inter-
esting. Real palm trees! He stopped to admire.
.A carromata horse, frankly bored, chewed the
back of his straw hat whde waiting for him to
move. Chinese and Hindu stores, Kelly's, a
variety store, a glimpse of something small and
black in a window! What was it.' .A doll's head?
He turned quickly, slipped, and one hand, flying



58



THE CARIBBEAN.



wildly, clutched at a bunch of green papers held
in the lax hand of a wrinkled old negress, sur-
rounded by baskets of fruit, coconuts, and parrot
cages. One of the cages was overturned and the
occupant screeched, "Caramba! Caramba!" The
owner now fully aroused also screeched but much
less intelligibly a rush ot words, Spanish and
English, not understandable but plainly not com-
plimentary.

Pat seated perilously on a basket of coconuts
was bewildered, dazed. He hadn't done any harm.
The farther away he was from that small negro
volcano the better he'd feel. But when he at-
tempted to leave, the excitement only became
more intense. She clutched at his hand and
gesticulated wildly. Oh yes, he saw what was the
matter, he had a sheet ol the numbered, green
paper she had been holding; evidently she
wanted it. He thrust it at her. She shook her
head violently. No! No! Then why didn't she
want him to leave? She wanted it and she didn't
want it! He was more bewildered than ever. A
crowd had gathered and their jibes only made
him more excited. Suddenly a firm hand grasped
his arm and a kindly voice said, "Pay her five
dollars and everything will be all right." Pat's
heart sank. Five dollars was all he had. How-
ever, anything to get away. He paid the five
dollars and again offered her the sheet of paper.
No? She didn't want it? Well! He crumpled
the paper carelessly, thrust it into his pocket, and
wandered, disconsolate, back to the ship.

Next day the ship went through the canal, and
the next, being Sunday, the crew was given shore
leave for the entire day. Pat was undecided
whether to go ashore or not but at last curiosity
overcame reluctance and he set out. He ex-
plored Balboa, admired the Prado, the Adminis-
tration Building, the Clubhouse, the Stadium,
the Mosque, and finally after getting into a bat-



tered street car he arrived at Panama City. He
left the car and about ten o'clock was attracted
by a huge crowd.

Anticipating a fight he pushed his way forward.
He was disappointed. On a platform twirling a
wire cage about a foot and a half in diameter,
stood a child. The cage stopped and the child
thrust his hand through a small opening and pulled
out a small ball. A man on the platform opened
the ball ami looking inside shouted, "Dos!"
Immediately afterward the number 2 appeared
on the signboard behind him. The child twirled
the cage again and drew forth another ball and
again the man shouted. Pat was interested.
This must be the lottery the fellows spoke about
on the boat. How much did the winner get? Ten
thousand! Gee, how would it feel to have so
much money! But his contemplations were in-
terrupted; the man shouted again and the number
268 stood on the board behinel him. This hap-
pened again and now the numbers stood out clear,
268J. They looked familiar to Pat. Where had
he seen them before? Suddenly recognition came
to him. His hand went to his pocket and drew
forth a crumpled sheet of paper.

The Fates had smiled.




Lottery Drawing in Panama City.



TROPIC RAIN.

Frances Gray, '2';.



Drip, drip; drip, drip; drip, drip; on v.ile and hill;

The low monotony fills all the air.

The chatter of the monkeys now is still.

The jaguar slinks away into his lair.

rhc water fills the stagnant pools until

They overflow. The palm fronds hend with their

Rich weight of crystal drops. The torpial's shrill



Sharp whistle pierces through the rain-drenched air.

The whisper of the wind among the leaves,

The timid chirp of some close hidden bird.

The patter of a cat as he achieves

.'\ place of safety only these are heard:

No more. Drip, drip; drip, drip; at night, at dawn,

The tropic rain falls on and on antl on.



THE CARIBBEAN,



59




Chester Pike, '24 und Charlolte llousel, 'Z4.



SCHOOL SPOR'I'S.



Athletics is an essential part of school lite.
In no other form of school activities is the true
spirit of a school reflected as in athletics. Find
the team that plays the clean game, the fair antl
square game, and you have found the school in
which these ideals are taught and applied to
every day of ordinary school life.

Athletics is a great unifier. The basketball
team max- pla\- Balboa, for instance, and win,
and even the person who has no interest in ath-
letics whatsoever, in speaking about it will say,
"We licked them."

One ideal that athletics develops is the ideal of
unselfishness. How many parties and shows have



been given up, or real sacrifices made because the
school was depending on one to do his or her part
in the basketball game, the swimming meet, or
the tennis match?

Athletics brings the members of a school into a
closer understanding of one another, and it is this
fact that gives athletics its real importance. It
forms a bond not only between the students them-
selves but between the students and the faculty
which cannot be obtained in any other way.
Through understanding we have cooperation and
through cooperation our school may become all
that we desire it to be, excelling all others in spirit,
aims, and accomplishments. Louise Ileuter, '2j.



BOYS' ATHLETICS.



FOREWORD.



Cristobal High School has always been up anil
going when there was anything doing in the ath-
letic line ot school activities. This year proved nfi
exception. We did not come out on the long end
of the scores as often as we have done in previous
years, but the boys did their level best and proved
to the public that the members of Cristobal High
School are still full of pep and that they are good
losers as well as good winners. Everywhere the
boys went they were praised for their clean play-
ing and good sportsmanship. We shall lose several
good athletes when the class of nineteen hundred
and twenty-three is graduated, but there is much
good material left, and the prospects for the com-
ing year are brighter than ever.

Our school should be, and is, very proud of its
graduates, who are making good in athletics, as
well as scholarship, at the schools they are now
attending.

Frank Raymond, who was graduated from C.
H. S. in 1 92 1, won the 100 yard dash, as well as



taking fourth place in the 220 yard run, in the
inter-class track meet at Columbia Lhiiversity.

Wesley Townsend, a member of the class of
'22, who is now attending the New York State
Ranger School, a branch of Syracuse L^niversity,
is catching on the school baseball team, and is
one of the best men on their swimming team. He
is also the champion middle-weight boxer of the
school.

Another member of the class of '22, who is doing
well in athletics, is Paul Doyle. Paul is now at-
tending Columbia L'niversity, where he has made
the class water-polo team besides being on the
relay swimming team, and the fancy-diving squad.



BASKETBALL.

Basketball, the most popular sport on the Isth-
mus, again took the leading place in Cristobal
High School athletic activities.

Near the middle of December, the lower class-
men, knowing that they had several good basket-
ball players in their midst, formed a team recruit-



6o



THE CARIBBEAN.



ed from the ranks of both the Freshman and the
Sophomore classes, and challenged the Juniors
and Seniors to a three-game series of basketball.
The Juniors and Seniors readily accepted. The
first game of this series was played Thursday,
December 15, at the Army and Navy "Y." Both
teams were evenly matched and it was a hard-
tought game all the way through. The Junior-
Seniors came out the victors bv the score 22 28.



JINIORS-SESIORS,

Bliss, F.
Moore, F.
May, C.
Euphmt, G.
Pike, G.



FRESHMES-SOPHOMORES, I 8.

Arosemena, F.
Eggleston, F.
Walsh, C.
Cousins, G.
Burgoon, G.



The second game of the series was played on
the Army and Navy "Y" floor, Friday, January
19. This was an exceedingly fast game, and there
were very few fouls called. It was anybody's
game from the time the whistle first blew until
the last few seconds of play. At the end of the
first half the Freshman-Sophomore team was one
point ahead of the opponents, but the Junior-
Senior team finally won by the very close score of
1918.



JUNIOR-SENIOR,

Bliss, F.
Eggleston, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Moore, G.
Pike, G.



19. FRESHM'.N-SOPHOMORE,

Puigar, F.
Arosemena, F.
Walsh, C.
Cousins, G.
King, G.



Early in March, Mr. Bogda, our coach, picked
the school team. Our first game was with "F"
Co. of Fort Davis, on Wednesday, March 20, at
the .'\rmy and Navy "Y." We outplayed and out-
passed this team by the large margin of 34 9.



Tedball, F.
Boone, F.
Cose, C.
Beard, G.
Williams, G.



C. H. S., 34.

Oakes, F.
Arosemena, F.
Moore, C.
Bliss, G.
Pike, G.



On Friday, March 23, we went over to Balboa
to play the first game of the annual high school
series. Here we met our first defeat. Balboa out-
played us in every way, but the boys showeii their
sportsmanship, in fighting until the very last and
then taking the defeat in the projx-r sjiirit.



B. H. S.

Shuber, F.
Clements, F.
Norfleet, C.
Engelke, G.
Pena, G.
Clark, G.
Cross, F.



39-



C. H. S., 9.

Oakes, F.
Arosemena, F.
Moore, C.
Bliss, G.
Pike, G.



The next game was with the Fort De Lesseps
Post team. This was played on the Army and
Navy "Y" floor on April 3. The score was close
all through the game, but our forwards had trouble
"finding the basket." We lost to the tune of
1812.



DE LESSEPS,

Samson, F.
Jacox, F.
Bruchie, C.
Naibuer, G.
Lanfield, G.
Lyons, F.
Goldstein, F.



C. H. S., 12.

Oakes, F.
Moore, F.
Zimmerman,
Bliss, G.
Pike, G.



C.



Our second game with Balboa High School was
played April 7, at the Cristobal Army and Navy
"Y." Both teams started with the determination
to pile up a big score on the other team, and the
result was that the first two quarters were excep-
tionally fast. Cristobal boys played much better
basketball than when they played Balboa the
first time, but were not able to put the long end of
the score in their favor.



B. H. S., 17.

Shuber, F.
Cross, F.
Norfleet, C.
Pena, G.
Clark, G.
Clements, F.



c. H. s., S.
Moore, F.
Bliss, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Oakes, G.
Pike, G.



On Monday, April 9, we defeated the Beach
Combers. We had good pass-wcjrk and had little
difficulty in defeating our opponents. The game
was fast and interesting, but at no time were our
boys in danger, and the game ended 26 18 in
our favor.



BEACH COMBF.RS, 1 8.

Burgoon, F.
P'.ggleston, F.
Kent, C.
Snedecker, G.
Solomon, G.
Trowbridge, C.



c. H. s., 26.
Moore, F.
Cousins, F.
Zimmerman,
Oakes, G.
Pike, G.



C.



THE CARIBHKAN.



6i



The third game with Ballioa proved to be the
most exciting game of the seas :>n. It was played
at Gatun on Friday, April i,^. Our hoys playeil a
wonderful game but Balboa got the breaks of the
game and won by one lonely basket. At the end
of the first quarter they had us by one point lo 9,
and at the end of the half they were still ahead by
one point, 18 17. Then at the end of the thirti
quarter we were in the leail by three points,
25 28. In the last quarter Bal!)oa caught up
with us and then, with but a few seconds left to
play, one of Balboa's men made a long shot from
near the center of the floor and won the game.
This W.1S Balbja's game, ji 29.



B. H. s., 31.
Sullivan, F.
Clements, F.
Norfleet, C.
Pena, G.
Clark, G.



C. H. S., 20.

Bliss, F.
Moore, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Oakes, G.
Pike, G.
Cousins, G.



Several days later "H" Company of Fort Davis
arranged to play us at the Army and Navy "Y,"
and won the game by the close score of 14 13.
We had several points on them at the end of the
half and so, deciding to get some practice, we
passed the ball around instead of shooting for the
basket. We saw our mistake, too late to win
the game. The following week we played "H"
Company at Gatun where we easily won to the
tune of 19 13.

The line-up tor the game at Gatun was:



H CO., 13.

Garriger, F.
Williams, F.
Higgens, C.
Moore, G.
Pertony, G.



c. H. s., 19.

Arosemena, F.
Moore, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Oakes, G.
Pike, G.
Cousins, G.



We again travelled to the town of Gatun to
play basketball. This time, Friday, May 4, it
was to play the Gatun boys. Here we lost by one
point, 17 16.



GATUN, 17.

Kent, F.
Pulgar, F.
Pertony, C.
Myers, G.
King, G.



C. H. S., 16.

Arosemena, F.
Moore, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Oakes, G.
Pike, G.
Cousins, G'



A series of five games was arranged between
C. H. S. and "C" Co., Fort Davis. The first
game was played Thursday, May 10, at the Army
and Navy "Y." This was a hard fast game with
good passing on the part of both teams. 18 12
was the score by which C. H. S. took the game.



C CO., 1 2.
Bloomlicrg, F.
Wilson, F.
Healy, C.
I'uclling, G.
Dixton, G.
Smith, sub-C.



c. H. s., 18.
Arosemena, F.
Cousins, F.
Zimmerman, C.
Oakes, G.
Campbell, G.



SWIMMING.



This year swimming has taken a prominent
place in C. H. S. athletic activities. We have
some wonderful swimmers in our school, some of
whom have broken certain Isthmian school rec-
ords, this year. When Balboa H. S. came over
to swim us the first time, two of our best swimmers
were unable to compete and we lost the meet by
13 points. Balboa took ^j points to our 20.

Events:

60 YARD SWIM.

1 R. Norfleet, B. H. S.

2 B. Engelke, B. H. S.

3 Trowbridge, C. H. S.

90 VARD SWIM.

1 B. Engelke, B. H. S.

2 Shuber, B. H. S.

3 B. Cofley, C. H. S.

220 YARD SWIM.

1 J. Coffey, C. H. S.

2 Shuber, B. H. F.

3 R. Norfleet, B. H. S.

PLCNCE.

1 J. Coffey, C. H. S.

2 D. Engelke, B. H. S.

3 Allen, B. H. S.

DIVING.

1 B. Coffey, C. H. S.

2 Allen, B. H. S.

3 Hutchins, B. H. S.

RELAY.

1 Balboa High School. (B. Engelke, R. Norfleet, Shuber,
Allen.)

2 Cristobal High School. (B. Coffey, Moore, Trowbridge,
J. Coffey.)

Our second swimming meet this year against
our Isthmian rivals, B. H. S., took place Saturday,
May 26, at the Washington Hotel pool. This
time we had all our swimmers with us and took



6a



THE CARIBBEAN.



the meet from B. H. S. by the big margin of 39
to 13. We took ail the first places and in the 90
yard dash, Alan Wallace, our husky swimming
champ, broke the Isthmian school record by fin-
ishing the 90 yards in 57 1I5 seconds. James Bur-
goon took first place in both the 30 and the 60
yard swims, and also swam anchor man on our
relay team. The two Coffey brothers also made
fine showings on Saturday. Jack Coffey won one
second and three third places, and, in the diving
tied for second with Norfieet of Balboa. Billy
Coffey easily won the diving.
Events:

30 YARD SWIM. TIME I5 3I5 SECONDS.

I. James Burgoon, C. H. S.
:. Robert Norfleet, B. H. S.
3. Jack Coffey, C. H. S.

60 YARD SWIM. TIME 36 SECONDS.

I. James Burgoon, C. H. S.
;. Robert Xorfleet, B. H. S.
3. Jack Coffey, C. H. S.

90 YARD SWIM. TIME 57 l|5 SECONDS.

I. .Alan Wallace, C. H. S.
I. Robert Norfleet, B. H. S.
3. Jack Coffey, C. H. S.

220 YARD SWIM. TIME 2 MINUTES, 59 SECONDS.

1. .Alan Wallace, C. H. S.

2. Jack Coffey, C. H. S.

3. Robert Norfleet, B. H. S.

120 YARD RELAY. TIME I MINUTE, 8 SECONDS.

I. C. H. S. (.Andrew Smith, Jack Coffey, .Alan Wallace, and
James Burgoon.)

2. B. H. S. (Robert Norfleet, Leo White, Wayne Banton,
and Jack Van Puttman.)

FANCY DIVING.

1. Billy Coffey, C. H. S.

2. Tie between Jack Coffey of C. H. S. and Norfleet ot
B. H. S.

TRACK.
On Saturday, .April 14, the Canal Zone High
and Grammar School .Athletic Meet for boys, was
held at the Balboa Staiiium. B. H. S. made 32
points to our 22.

DISCUS THROW.

1. Moore, C. H. S., 98 feet, 10 inches.

2. Shuber, B. H. .S.

3. Zimmerman, C. H. S.

4. May, C. H. S.

RUNNING HIOH JUMP.

1. Clements, B. H. S,, 4 feet, 10 inches.

2. Norfleet, B. H. S.

3. May, C. H. S.

4. Moore, C. H. .S.



RUNNING HOP SKIP AND JUMP.

1. Newhard, B. H. S., jS feet, 8^ inches.

2. May, C. H. S.

3. Clark, B. H. S.

4. Norfleet, B. H. S.

220 YARD DASH.

1. May, C. H. S.

2. Newhard, B. H. S.

3. Clark, B. H. S.

4. Duran, B. H. S.

MILE RELAY.

1. B. H. S. (Shuber, Engelke, F. Newhard, Duran.)

2. C. H. S. (Smith, Moore, Oakes, May.)

3. B. H. S. (Clark, Pena, C. Newhard, Norfleet.)

TENNIS.

The first in the line of tennis activities took
place on Thursday, January 27, when the under-
classmen, Wirtz and Eggleston, answered the
challenge of the upperclassmen. Bliss and Pike.
The upperclassmen easily won bv the score, (6 i),
(6^).

On Saturday, January 27, Mr. Robertson, Bal-
boa's athletic coach, brought four men over to
play tennis against us. We had only time to play
the doubles. Balboa took the first set (6 3) and
we took the next (6 3), but as they had to hurry
to catch the 12. K train, we played the best two
out of three games for the third set, and as they
took the first two games they won the match.

We did not play B. H. S. again until June 2,
when they again came over to the .Atlantic side.
Bliss of Cristobal won from Shuber of Balboa after
three, hard-fought sets, by the score (6 4), (4 6),
(6 3). Then Pike of Cristobal won from Clem-
ents of Balboa in two straight sets (6 i), (6 2).
Balboa forfeited the doubles to us, which com-
pleted our victory, taking the two rounds of
singles and the doubles.

On Tuesday, May 29, the seniors, Louise Henter
and Gerald Bliss, played the juniors, Gladys Low-
ande and Chester Pike, in mixed doubles. This
was a close exciting match but the seniors won
by the score (63), (63).

There has been an inter-class doubles tourna-
ment arranged, and one of the matches has al-
ready been played. The seniors won from the
freshmen in two exciting sets to the tune of (6 2),
(6 4). None of the other matches have been
playeti, but will be soon.

COMPETING TEAMS.

Seniors Bliss and May.

Juniors Pike and Oakes.

Sophomores Arosemena and l-'oos.

Freshmen ; King, Fggleston and Wirtz.



THE CARIBBEAN.



63



CIRI.S' ATHLETICS.

Although girls' athletics were late in starting this
year, the\' niaile up for their tlelinquency in the tew
months that followed. We owe most of our success
to Miss Limlsay, the girls' physical directress.
B.ASKKTHAI.J..

Basketball always was and still is our most pop-
ular and favorite sport. A series of five games was
arranged between the girls' basketball teams of the
two high schools, Cristobal and Balboa, in which
Balboa won by a score of 3 games to 1 game.

The first game was played at the Balboa play-
shed on March, twenty-third. .'Although the
game ended with a defeat for Cristobal to the
tune of 12 6, it did not dampen our spirits and
we came home more determined than ever that
the series would end with Cristobal in the lead.

The second game was played at Gatun Club-
house, neutral territory, on .April thirteenth, and
a huge crowd of Cristobal High School rooters
witnessed the defeat of Balboa in the score of 2210.
Never before was such team work shown by our
team, as was displayed that night, and although
Balboa worked hard, they were unable to over-
come the number of points scored the first quarter.

The third game of the series was played on the
slippery floor of Balboa playshed, on the afternoon
of April twenty-seventh. The game, in which we
must admit they outplayed us, ended with a score
of 22 3, Balboa as victor.

During the Girls' Conference held at the Y. W.
C. A. in Cristobal, a basketball game was played
as one of the events of the afternoon. This game
was won by the team of Cristobal High School
girls at the Conference, and was not a league
game. The score was 11 2.

SE.ASON'S GAMES.

BALBOA TEAM. CRISTOBAL TEAM.

Arlie Greene, F. (Captain) Louise Renter, G. (Captain)

Florence Miirtagh, ¥. Glaiiys I.owande, G., .S. C.

Helen Huher, C. Alice Oliver, C.

Lena Rathbone, S. C. Ruth Duey, G.

Thelma Babbitt, G. Frances Gray, S. C.

Esther Greene, G. Dorothea Tutts, F.

Charlotte Housel, F.

The fourth antl last game of basketball was
played at the Cristobal .Army and Navy "Y,"
May twenty-sixth. Both teams put up a hard
fight, and the score at the first quarter was o to o.
.Although w^e worked hard, we were not able to
overcome the number of points scored by our op-
ponents during the next three quarters, and the
game ended 9 to 3 with Balboa as victor.



TRACK.

.An inter-Isthmian track meet was arranged by
the bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds, in which
a number of our high school girls competed. For
days our girls were kept busy training for the
meet, but, due to the superior excellence of some
of the Balboa High School girls competing, and
to the inability of several of our girls to partici-
pate, the final reckoning left much to be desired
for Cristobal. The highest point scorer for Cris-
tobal was Louise Henter. The recortis of the
events are as follows:

8-POUND SHOT PUT. DISTANCE 21 FEET, J, INCHES.

1. Lona Rathbone, Balboa. 3. Ruth Duey, Cristobal.

2. Louise Henter, Cristobal. 4 .Arlie Green, Balboa.

RUNNING HIGH JUMP. HEIGHT 4 FEET.

1. Esther Green, Balboa. 3. Ida Ruth Hammer, Balboa.

2. Louise Henter, Cristobal. 4. Lona Rathbone, Balboa.

RUNNING BROAD JUMP. DISTANCE 12 FEET, 9 INCHES.

1. Thelma Babbit, Balboa. 3. Esther Green, Balboa.

2. Lona Rathbone, Balboa. 4. Louise Henter, Cristobal.

too YARD DASH. TIME 1^ 2(5 SECONDS.

1. Esther Green, Balboa. 3. Mary McConnoughey, Balboa.

2. Ruth Duey, Cristobal. 4. Dorothy Delbert, Cristobal.

440 YARD RELAY. TIME I.062I5.

I. Esther Green, .Arlie Greene, Florence Murtaugh, Mary
McConnoughey, Balboa.

3. Louise Henter, Gladys Lowande, Dorothy Deibert, Ruth
Duey, Cristobal.

4. Helen Huber, Ida Hammer, .Mabel Glidewell, Lona Rath-
bone.

SWIMMING

Swimming has always been a close rival to
basketball in popularity, but this year it has been
neglected and has fallen to a position of minor
importance. However, PVances Gray, Sophomore,
managed to take second place in a novelty race
held at Balboa pool, February 22, against some
of the best swimmers ot the Isthmus. We hear
with pride of aquatic success of Loretta Rush, a
former student of Cristobal High School, who has
attracted the notice of the public in some of our
biggest cities, on account of her swimming and
diving ability. We hope that .Adelaide Lambert
of the eighth grade, who has been a record breaker
in swimming, will return to the Isthmus to join us
in October to revive us and aid us in regaining our
laurels.

Practically every student plays or attempts to
play tennis but it is surprising how few have
backed it as a school sport.



64



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



65



<^^c^





mr




Frances Gray



1922.



OCTOBER.



Oct. 5. School opened today. Mrs. Howard
took, command until Miss Dodds should return
from Europe.

Oct. 6. More pupils arrived and the program
fight continued.

Oct. 12. Miss Dodds and Miss Hornbeak re-
turned amid great rejoicing. Miss Dodds gave a
brief account ot her wanderings.

Oct. I J. Today being Friday the thirteenth and
ominous in itself, the Freshmen "got theirs" with
the usual hair cutting and make up.

Oct. 27. Today marked the first meeting of the
Cristobal High School Girls' Supper Club for this
year. Eleven new members were admitted with a
very impressive ceremony. The new officers were
elected as follows:

President. Miss Mattison Pullig.

Vice President. Miss Ruth Hopkins.

Secretary. Miss Hyacinth Eden.

Treasurer. Miss Frances Gray.

The supper that followed the business meeting
was well befitting the occasion.

Oct. 28. Chaplain Rentz of Coco Solo gave a
brief talk today on the Navy, it being Navy Day.

NOVEMBER.

Nov. 2. First class meetings were held and new
officers and class advisers were elected. Elections
for the Annual staff also took place.

Nov. 8. Colonel Newton, retired from the U. S.
Army, and well known here on the Zone, gave a
talk on the capture of .'\guinaldo. The fact that
Colonel Newton took part in this capture made
his story doubly interesting, and it was also very
enlightening to many of us.



Nov. 10. The first staff' meeting of the school
year was held at Henry Moore's this evening.
After the business of the meeting was transacted
Mrs. Mojre served delicious refreshments, and
we spent a half hour or so dancing, and listening
to Miss DodJs giving one of her readings.

Nov. 17. Today was a red letter day. Mr.
William Jennings Bryan came and spoke to us on
the subject of education. He was the first speaker
ot real national importance that we had had the
pleasure of hearing, and we all appreciated his
kindness.

Nov. 23. A performance of the dramatized Rus-
sian folk story, "The Princess and the Sage," was
given in the assembly hall today. Judging from
the effect upon the autlience the play was a suc-
cess. The cast was as follows:

The King Father Alpha Morgan.

The Queen Mother Frances Gray.

The B-e-a-utiful Princess Charlotte Housel.

The Sage Richard Hall.

The Tutor Warner Bowers.

Ladies-in-waiting Gladys Lowande, and Ruth Duey.

Nov. 24. The second Caribbean staff meeting
was held at the quarters of Frances Gray, and re-
freshments and recreation followed the business.

DECEMBER.

Dec. 4. Following the resignation of Gerald
Bliss, Edward May was elected Editor-in-Chief of
The Caribbean.

Dec. 8. Emogene Nash and Mattie Pullig en-
tertained the Staff at a dinner given at the ^'. W.
C. A. Needless to say the dinner was delicious,
and the table most attractive. The members of
the Staff also evolved several new rules of table
etiquette. (They have not yet been printed.)



66



THE CARIBBEAN.



Dec. Is. Today was annual visiting day. Quite
a number of the parents attended the classes. The
afternoon classes were shortened, and Miss Horn-
beak's Sophomore English class presented some
scenes from "Silas Marner." A Parent-Teachers'
meeting followed, and refreshments were served
by Miss Bakewell's domestic science class.

In the evening the Junior-Senior boys played
basketball against the Freshman-Sophomore boys
and defeated them with a score of twenty-two to
eighteen.

Dec. 20. .A staff meeting was held today at
school. We all brought our suppers but most of
the time was taken up with work.

Dec. 22. The first party of the year took place
tonight, with the Seniors as hosts and hostesses.
Everyone was dressed as a kid, and some of the
costumes were a great success. .After we had
played games tor about an hour, refreshments,
consisting of ice-cream men, cake, and lolly-pops,
were served. Santa Claus, disguised as Mr. Eu-
phrat, distributed presents from the tree in the
assembly hall. The party broke up at about
eleven thirty after an extremely jolly evening.

Dec. 29. A staff meeting to plan the carnival
was held this evening at the home of Edith Coul-
bourn, and a supper which was most enjoyable was
served after the meeting.

JA.VU.ARV, 1923.

Jan. 14. The third annual high school carnival.
Fun, frolic, and finance. The following attrac-
tions were open to all:

An art gallery, with Holmes Kingsbury at the
door and Dorothy Deibert in charge;

Miss Terious, the beautiful balancing tight rope
walker (James Burgoon) with Laurence Callaway
in charge of the door;

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Thumb (Lewis Barnett and
Mabel Jean Bliss) under the charge of Manola
Bliss, with Henry Stevens at the door;

The Kangaroo Court, of which Mr. Stetler was
judge and Jordan Zimmerman the cop;

The Crazy House under the direction of Mil-
dred Neely and Dorothy Vaughn, with Surse
Taylor as doorman;

The .Mary-go-round consisting of Mary Cath-
erine Rentz and .Vlarv Foole, directed bv Emogene
Nash;

Blue Beard's Chamber, in which Delilah May
exhibited the murdered wives of Blue Beard (Dor-



othy Pike, Georgia Bixby and Dorothy Wertz),
with Maurice Eggleston at the door;

Nigger Babies managed by Guy Stewart and
.Andrew Smith;

The Chink Shop run by Gerald Bliss and Wal-
lace Johnson;

The Boneless Wonders (.Alpha Morgan and Jack
Klunk) under the direction of William Clinchard;

Belinda-the-Beautiful-but-Bored (Warner Bow-
ers in a beautiful white wig);

Marvelous Mauritzk}- (Morris Marchoskey)
performing under the management of William
Coffey and Oliver King.

Then there were:

The Chinese team room in which fragrant tea
was served by Edith Trowbridge, Gladys Low-
ande, Irene McCourt, Irene Hopkins, and Mil-
dred Oliver, in costume;

The Dutch coffee room where Mrs. Kleefkens
was chief coffee maker, and the attractive Dutch
girls, Johanna Kleefkens, Gay Turner, Winifred
.AUwork, Florence .Albert, Inza Markham, Louise
Henter, Ruth Duey, and Dorothy .Abendroth,
served;

Hot dogs sold by Charles Trowbridge and Louis
Snedecker;

The candy booth in the charge of Mildred Mor-
gan, Charlotte Housel, and Edith Coulbourn;

Ice-cream with John Coffey and Robert .All-
geier to dispense it.

The assembly hall program consisted of a series
of drawings by Mr. Blackwell, of Coco Solo; "The
Gypsy Idyll" with a cast of high school students,
assisted by Mr. Booz, leading man; several dances
by the pupils of Mrs. Sexton and Mrs. Dyer; a
piano solo by Marian Lowande, and one by Morris
Luce; and songs by three of Mrs. McCarthy's
pupils.

The popularity contest was under the direc-
tion of William Cousins who was assisted by
Charles Walsh and Miss Beeching. The results
were as follows:

Bfs( all round boy and girl. Gerald Bliss and
PVances Gray.

Most popular boy and girl. Guy Stewart and
Mattie Pullig.

Bcsl looking boy and girl. .Alpha Morgan and
Ruth Hopkins.

Mr. Klunk took charge of the door down stairs
antl handled the tickets in a manner most efficient
and satisfactorv.



THE CARIBBEAN.



67



Jan. 15. Mr. William A. Peterson, of Chicago,
who had stopped here on his way to South Amer-
ica, gave, today, one of the most interesting talks
that we have had this year. He spoke of our
physical, mental, and spiritual ilevelopment in
relation to what we owe the future generations,
and, in the general opinion of the school, he was
one of the most interesting visitors we have ever
had.

We also held an auction sale of all the articles
not sold in the Country Store. Miss Dodds was
auctioneer, and competition ran high.

Jan. 19. The Junior-Senior boys' basketball
team defeated the Freshman-Sophomore team
with a score of nineteen to eighteen.

Jan. 26. Mrs. Needham of Pedro Miguel and
Mrs. Phillips and Mrs. Keenan of Balboa came
over today and gave a very interesting musical
program in the assembly hall.



FEBRUARV,



Feb. 9. A Staff meeting was held tonight at
Gladys Lowande's. After the business was put
away Mrs. Lowande served refreshments, and
Marian, Gladys's younger sister, who is cjuite a
talented pianist, played for us.

Feb. 14. The Juniors entertained the high
school at a St. Valentine party which was a real
success. The red and white decorations were
most appropriate and the refreshments were de-
licious.

Feb. 16. The seventh meeting of The C.arib-
BE.AN staff" was held at Edward May's. The en-
tainment following the meeting was quite unique.
There being only a small part of the staff present
we turned to more serious things, and spent per-
haps half an hour in feats involving mental telep-
athy. M.\RCH.

March 9. The Staff was entertained this even-
ing by Ernst Euphrat at the home of his sister
Mrs. Ray Morris, where the business meeting
was followed by a delicious chop suey supper.

March 16. Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, the well
known suffragist leader, honored the high school
with a short talk today. She is the second person
of national importance that we have haii the good
fortune to hav-e speak in our school, and her pres-
ence was greatly appreciated. The "Cristobal
High School Girls' Supper Club" gave a hot-dog
roast for the high school boys. A big fire was
built on the beach at New Cristobal where the



"dogs" were roasted, and everyone seemed to
have a delightful time.

March 17. The Sophomore class celebrated St.
Patrick's day by giving a party at the high school.
The green and white table decorations and the
pipe and snake favors were very effective, while
the Irish games were entered into with zest.

March 20. The C. H. S. boys defeated "F"
Company from Ft. Davis at basketball with a
score of thirty-four to nine.

March 23. The B. H. S. boys defeated the C.
H. S. boys at basketabll with a score of thirty-nine
to nine.

APRIL.

April ;. Fort de Lesseps defeated our basketball
boys totiay with a score of eighteen to twelve.

.April 6. A Staff meeting was helii at the home
of Charlotte Housel this evening, and delicious
club sandwiches were served after the usual
business meeting.

April 7. Boys' basketball game between B. H. S.
and C. H. S. Score seventeen to eight in favor
of B. H. S.

.April I J. The Cristobal girls defeated the Bal-
boa girls at basketball, the game being played at
(jatun. The score was twenty-two to ten.

April 20. An entertainment celebrating the sec-
ond birthday of the Y. W. C. A. on the Zone was
held this evening at the V. W. C. A. building, and
the high school contributed to the program, first,
one of Booth Tarkington's plays "The Trysting
Place" with the cast as follows:

I.auncelot Briggs, in love with Mrs. Curtis Gerald Bliss

Mrs. Briggs, mother of I.auncelot Mattie PuUig

Jessie, sister of Launcelot Gladys Lowande

Mrs. Curtis, a young widow Frances Gray

Mr. Ingoldsby, in love with Mrs. Briggs Ernst Euphrat

Rupert Smith, in love with Jessie Henry Moore

The Voice, engaged to Mrs. Curtis Edward May

second, the "Gypsy Idyll," with a chorus con-
sisting of Marian Burgess, Lola Muiioz, Ruth
Hopkins, \irginia Tucker, Olga .Arcia, Charlotte
Housel, Jose .Arosemena, Ernst Euphrat, Edward
May, Carlos Pulgar, and Frances Gra\-, and Mr.
Melville Booz.

.April 21. Girls' interschool track meet held in
Balboa today.

.April 27. The girls' basketball team was again
defeated by Balboa. The score was twenty-two
to three.



68



THE CARIBBEAN.



May 4-6. The Annual Y. W. C. A. Vocational
Conference was held this weekend, and girls from
both Balboa and Cristobal took part.

May 9. A Staff meeting was held tonight at the
home of Louise Henter in Gatun, and a most appe-
tizing supper was served after the meeting.

May 10. C. H. S. boys played basketball with
"C" Company from Ft. Davis, and defeated them
with a score of twent\'-four to eighteen.









May 1 1. A party was given this evening by the
Freshmen under the direction of Miss Barnhouse.
The red and white decorations were most effec-
tive, and the tables were arranged in the form of
an F. "An enjoyable time was had by all."

May 12. One of the biggest events of the school
year, the Junior-Senior banquet, was held in the
household arts rooms tonight. The twenty-two
guests, consisting of the Junior and Senior classes
and all the teachers, were seated at four tables
which were decorated with the Junior class flower,
the purple bougainvillea, and the rooms were made
exceedingly attractive by decorations of green antl



white, the Junior colors. The dinner was pre-
pared by Miss Bakewell's domestic science classes,
and served by the eighth grade girls. The menu
was as follows:

Fruit Cup



Chicken Timb.-iles




Potatoes, Virginia Style Buttered String Beans


Parker House Rolls




Tuna Salad

Olives


Cheese Straws
Pickles


Mint Sherbert
Junior Cake

Coffee


Tropic Cream
Mints



Florence Albert was toastmistress, and the
toasts were given by Louise Henter representing
The C.A.RiEBE.'iN; Ernst Euphrat, the Youth's
Companion; Miss J. Isabella Dodds, the Current
Opiniori; Gladys Lowande, the Good Housekeep-
ing; Edward May, the World's Work; Miss
Barnhouse, the Modern Priscilla; Henry Moore,
the Pathfinder, and Mattie Pullig, Life.

May 23. The Senior rings and pins came today,
and the Senior chests and left hands are much in
evidence.

June 7. Last of Annual material went to press.

June 8. The class of 1923 presented "Grumpy"
at the America Theater.

June 9. The class of 1923 presented "Grumpy"
at the Gatun Clubhouse.

June 22. The class of 1923 presented "Grumpy"
at the Balboa Clubhouse.

June 24. Baccalaureate sermon at the Cristobal
Union Church. Chaplain Deibert, speaker.

June 27. Commencement exercises at the Wash-
ington Hotel.



THE CARIBBEAN.



69




imm



Florence Albert, 31




EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT.



The "Exchange Department" lias man\- func-
tions. It keeps us in touch witli what is going
on in the States. It gives us a chance to see what
others are doing along the line of their periodicals;
and so shows us what we can do to make our an-
nual better.

We have been fortunate indeed in the quality
of our exchanges but we have been disappointe i
this year in not hearing from some of the high
schools to whom we have sent our annual. We
should like to hear from everybody that we can
but especially from those high schools which put
out year books. We always welcome new friends.

The Gleaner. Pawtiicket High School, Pawtucket, R. I.

Your literary department is very good. The "Tat-
tler" is amusing, original, and interesting. Why
not have some cuts at the head of each department?

The Spectator. Johnston High School, Johnston, Pa.

You have an interesting book. Don't you think
that it the advertisements were arranged at the back
ot the book, it would make it more attractive?

The Record. John Marshal High School, Richmond, Va.
There seems to be a good deal of school spirit in your
school as reflected by the magazine. "The Library
Corner" and "Who's Who" were commented upon
as being original.

The Student. Holmes High School, Covington, Ky.

The "Exchange" department is the largest you
have. We should suggest that you try to make your
other departments as large. The story "The Luck
of the Irish" was very diverting. We read it with
much pleasure. We were surprised to find an article
in one of your numbers written by a former student
of Cristobal High, William Bridges.

The .-Ipokeepsiiiri. Poughkeepsie High School, Poiighkeepsic,

N. Y.
Your joke department is large, enlivening, and hu-
morous. The literary section is also very interesting,
though small.

The Reflector. Wobiirn High School, IVobiirn, Mass.

Why not have a Literary Department and place
your advertisements more to the back of the book?
Art headings would also improve your magazine.



The Scribbler. Frank Ei-ans High School, Spartanburg, S. C.
\oj have a large literary section with splendid
sones of which you may well be proud. However,
your other departments could be improved a little.

The Review. Central High School, IVashington, D. C.

We seldom have the privilege of reading such a
hne book. The cuts are especially good and the
frontispiece "Christmas Greetings" most attractive.
I his book is rendereii all the more interesting to us
because two of our for.mer students, George and Mar-
jorie Ball, are now attending this school.

The Epitome. High .School /or Boys, Reading, Pa.

We received both the annual and monthly from this
school. The annual is a compact and neat book so
carefully edited that there is no fault which stands
out so much that it must be criticised. The monthly,
however, leaves much to be desired. The advertise-
ments are mixed in with the School Notes and sev-
eral other departments. If this were remedied, it
would be a good book.

The Curtis Monthly. Curtis High School, Staten Island, N. Y.
By a strange coincidence the exchange editors of
The Caribbean for the yeirs 1922 and 1923 have
been ex-pupils of Curris High School. So this maga-
zine has had more interest for them than for former
editors. We think that it is a well arranged, inter-
esting book, but a few more jokes would add to it.

The ^uill. Staten Island Academy, Staten Island, N. Y.
We like your book. Every department is well
developed and equally balanced.

The Junta. Indiana High School, Indiana, Pa.

You have a splendid joke department but where,
oh where, is the exchange section?

The Cambridge Review. Cambridge High and Latin School,

Cambridge, Mass.
A very good issue. We have very few faults to
find with the general make up of your book.

The .icademy Journal. NorwichFree Academy, Norwich, Conn.

.\ very well edited book with an especially well
written athletic department.

The Monitor. Il'ellesley High School, Wellesley, Mass.

We looked all over the book to find out where
you came trom and at last found it in one of the
advertisements. Your book is good but a few more
cuts would better it.



70



THE CARIBBEAN.



The Herald. Holyoke High School, Holyoke, Mass.

We should suggest' a few more cuts. Why not
h.nve a larger Exchange Department? .'^side from
that we like your book and are always glad to hear
from you.

The Torch. II' est Philadelphia High School Jor Girls,

Philadelphia, Pa.

We enjoyed very much the story "Ye Gods and
Little Shades." It was very clever and original.
Yours is a fine book and surpasses many that we have
seen. Jokes taken trom another book are usually
indicated.

The Sqiieedunk. Monroe City High School, Monroe City, La.

Through the courtesy of Miss Octave Schulze, we
have a copy of your most excellent book. After re-
viewing it we do not wonder that it won a prize. We
should like to have you on our list ot exchanges.

The Zonian. Balboa High School, Balboa, C. Z.

We have heard that you are not putting out a 1923
issue. That is too bad, because your book is very
good.

ReDista La Salle. Colegio de la Salle, Panama,

Repiihlique de Panama.

Ustedes tienen articulos muy buenos e interesantes,
pero iporque no tienen mas locales, tambien mas
fotograffas. ? Sus adivinanzas son muy originales
y hemes encontrado mucho placer en solverlas.

A LITTLE ENCOURAGEMENT.

This part of the exchange department is rightly
named because out of ail the exchanges which
have commented on The Caribbean, not one has
criticised it adversely. We received a fine letter
from the manager of the Grolier Society, compli-
menting our magazine. We appreciate this so
much that we feel constrained to print parts from
it. He says:

"First and foremost, I wish to congratulate you and your
fellow students upon putting out one of the finest annuals
that has ever been my pleasure to examine. You have some-
thing to be extremely proud of."

He also adils that he has for sixteen years been
in close touch with school ami educational work,
and in that sixteen years he has yet to see a high
school annual the equal of our 1922 issue.

We thank our friends fcjr all the compliments
they have given us and we hope that we shall con-
tinue to merit them.

The Caribbean.

You certainly have a great paper. It is particu-
larly well set up. Your jokes are excellent.

The Monitor.



The Caribbean.

The Caribbean is one of the most complete papers
we h.ive seen. Your swimming records are to be
envied.

The Gleaner.
The Caribbean.

Your annual is wonderful. The stories, ot which
you have a great number, were fine and the snap-
shots distributed among them made them all the
more interesting.

The .ipokeepsian.

The Caribbean.

A fine magazine. You are to be congratulated on
your .'\lumni Department. The fact that so many
alumni write back to the magazine is a compliment
to their .Alma Mater. The numerous pictures add
a great deal to the general appearance of the paper,

The Torch.

The Caribbean.

You publish an exceptionally interesting and at-
tractive paper with every department well cared for.
We feel that we should like to visit Cristobal both
because of your school and because of the place itself
of which you gave us such a clear idea by pictures and
descriptive writing.

The Herald.

The Caribbean.

Your paper is one of the most interesting on our
list. It seems so strange to think of people so far
away as having the same interests as we and yet as
we examine your paper, we find that we might be
reading of any American high school, except when
we came to the picture ot your school surrounded
by palm tree?.

The Cambridge Review.

The Caribbean.

.\ wonderful book-tull of excellent cuts, more ex-
cellent news, and most excellent stories a magazine
of which any school might well be proud.

The Scribbler.

The Caribbean.

We were delighted to hear from our far away Pan-
ama friend The Caribbean with its splendid stories
of life in Panama. "Added Tonnage for the Amer-
ican Merchant Marine" gave interesting glimpses of
the individual members of the graduating class.
The poetry, especially "Old Panama", is splendid.
In fact, the magazine is one of the best that has come
to us.

The Spectator.

The Caribbean.

Your m.agazine is one of the best we have received
and we are glad to exchange with our "sister school."
"Y's and Other Y's" is indeed unique. Your cuts
are fine. You indeed have school spirit. What great-
er praise is there.'

The Zonian.



THE CARIBBEAN.



71




Matlison Pii/h'g, 'sj.



From tlic Slay and //t7Vi/c/. -"Hviiulreds ot chil-
dren dressed in costumes and with decorated ve-
hicles will form for the line of march behind the
hand of the U. S. S. Maryland."

"Mrs. entertained at tea tor a num-
ber of people including CJenerals and

, who recently arrived on the isthmus



in a poUera.

Extracts from examination jiapers of the gram-
mar grades:

i^iifs. How would you go about checking a
cold?

.Jns. I'd go from house to house and count the
cases.

^ues. Why did the colonists settle along rivers?
y^ns. Because they had to have some place to
throw their garbage.

^ucs. Name ten kinds ot toods and tell where
they come from.
y^ns. Meat cows and pigs.

Butter milk.

Tomatoes seed.

Cabbage cabbage plant.

Eggs chickens.

Milk cows.

^ues. Why does a society need a chairman?
y-lns. To get the chairs together.

Eddie (With a hurt expression). In our Man-
ual Training exam., Mr. Bacon asked about pieces
of wood that we never saw or heard of before.

Miss Dodds. O, he expected you to get it out
of your heads.

IVilliani C. (In General Science). -Gee! Mr.
Bacon, we had a hard lesson today.
Caldwell. Yea, it was about rocks.



Gl'ESS WHERE.

//. E. May, '23.

"Now, Ijoys, it is tlie time for work,"

Says Mr. Bacon, tiurrieiily,
"To do good work you must not shirk,

But settle down interestedly."

A silence for a while prevails;

I he teacher wonders what is wrong.
But soon a sound somewhere curtails

The absence of the usual song.

'lis Caldwell Koos, who now does speak,
"Fort Davis has the hest teim here;"

And Willie almost has to shriek,

"\ ou watch who wins the flag this year."

Bud Bliss bawls out from down the line,

"How's that, Stewart?" Guy soon does whip

His chair around, and in a whine

Asks, "What?" A smile from Bud and "Zip."

"Old Koos thinks he's a tennis champ,"
Says King, in jealous tone, "I doubt

If he can lick a postage stamp."
-And right away goes up a shout.

"All right there, boys, you get to work,"-

Says Mr. Bacon, angrily,
".'\nd, if you don't come here to work,

You'd better leave quite rapidly."

ALAS AND ALACK!

Henry Moore, '2j.

Monday morning and time for work to begin!
Spanish composition! .And map book not in!
No time for dances and social activity.
No time to develop athletic proclivity!

Ten problems in physics, now isn't that a fright!
Reciting all day and studying all night! !
Miss Dodds wants book reports, poems, and themes,-
A high school education is not what it seems! !



72



THE CARIBBEAN.



Frances (In sophomore class meeting, while
planning for a party). Guy, what are you?
Guy. Me: I'm refreshment.

Miss Beeching (In solid geometry). What are
you trying to say, Chester?

Cheslrr. Nothing.

Miss B. Well you're making a lot of racket
about it.

Emogene (In senior English). What are cinna-
mons? (.And we're supposed to know that she
means svnonvnis.)



Louise (Who hasn't been to the U. S. for some
time). Well, what'll I do if I get seasick?

Charlotte (Who knows from experience). O
don't worry, you'll do it.

Miss Currier. (In music period). Gerald, put
your finger where you're singing.

And Gerald promptly puts his finger in his
mouth.

Miss Beeching. I'm eating ice to make me thin.
Mattie. O, I didn't know ice made you thin.
Miss. B. Well it makes me shrink.



AS YOU LIKE IT.

Two men logic out through the selfsame bars,
One sees the mud, the other the st.Trs."



Fair


Fussy


Approachable


Arrogant


Cheerful


Contradictory


In biased


tgly


Lenient


Lazy


Tireless


Temperamental


Youth trainers.


Yammerers.


Seven


Seven


Eminent


Egotistical


Ner,r-perfect


^'ervy


Indispensable


Ignorant


Original


Obstinate


Real


Rioting


Seniors.


Seniors.


Jolly


Jealous


Unique


Uninteresting


Nonchaknt


Noisy


Important


Impudent


Open-minded


Obnoxious


Rollicking


Rambunctious


Somebodies.


Simps.


Sagacious


Shallow


Orderly


Ossified


Perfect


Priggish


Helpful


Hopeless


Optimistic


Opinionated


Model


Maudlin


Oracular


Obtuse


Rare


Rabid


Exceptional


Exasperatin]!


Sharks.


Sharpers.


Fascinating


Frivolous


Refined


Ridiculous


Entertaining


Empty-headed


Subtle


Superfluous


Hearty


Harping


Mighty


Monotonous


Energetic


Eccentric


Nobility.


Nonentities.



FANTASY.

Gerald Bliss, Jr., 'jj.

.\ bull was in the barnyard,

He saw me with delight,
But I grabbed hold of his south end,

.\nd threw him with all my might.

Next, I met the crocodile

A-swimming in the pool,
I knew that if I jumped in,

'Twould help to keep me cool.

While floating in there lazily,

I saw a whale or two.
But I cared nothing for them

I killed them both off too.

The wood upon the other side.
They say, was full of bear;

But, as I had no thought of fear,
I didn't begin to care.

And though I met a dozen or so.
They seemed to be quite tame;

The reason was, I later found,
They, all of them, were lame.

Just then I felt a pair of arms

Begin to encircle me.
I didn't know from whence they came.

Nor did I want to see.

First, I thought it took a bite.

Then I thought it spoke.
Alas! Twas mother rousing me.

Saying it was time I awoke.




THE CARIBBEAN.



73




74



THE CARIBBEAN.








fl



4;;






j:^!






THE CARIBBEAN.



75




Advertising is of several classes. There is, as a source of their income that the purchser



i



for instance, the circular, concerning whose
atlvisability expert advertisers are douhttul,
suggesting that it he sent only to people who
are particularl\- interested in the protiuct or
article whose virtues it sets forth.



of the periodical receives much greater value
for his money than he could expect if there
were no advertising matter.

Within the last twenty years the prepara-
tion of advertisements for the press has be-



m
i

Vise






artists, especially the latter, are paitl gener-
ously by the advertising companies. Mate-
rial of real educational value is referred to,
and even discusseii, famous works of sculp-
turing and painting are often reproduced
material which manv of the readers of the



.Again we find poster and sign advertising come so important that talented writers and



^ which is very generalh' rcgariied as a public

^ nuisance. Many object to the large glaring

^ signboards as they would to any man who
would step up behind them and bawl into
their ears a recommendation of some wontier-
ful panacea.

But there is some really constructive and periodicals might never hear of or see through

beneficial advertising. In this class we may any other source. .A section of this type of

include the high standard work which appears advertising is certainly interesting and per-

in our periodicals. haps even more instructive than the articles

The business of periodical advertising is of the magazine proper.

^ of verv recent origin if it be regarded with Likemanyotherpublications of merit. The

^ other forms of commercial activit\-. It has Caribbean depends largely on the financial
grown and improved with the periodicals support of its advertisers. In soliciting
until, at the present time, estimates of the advertisements for our annual, we have con-
amount spent annually on advertising in the sidered only those whose material would be
L'niteil States are as high as $500,000,000. constructive and reliable. We are proud to
Thedailv, weekh-, and monthly publications call the reader's attention to our advertising

M of to-dav look to advertisements so largely section. Patronize our advertisers!



m







i






APPRECI.ATION.

"A friend in need is a friend indeed" runs the old proverb. The Caribbean staff
has felt the need and always it has found the friends in YOC Was it cookies for the
carnival? Some one sent them in, with a cake in addition. Was it an old party dress
for the Senior play? Some one lent us her very best new Parisian frock. W^as it money
from a play? Some one sold fifty or sixty tickets before we knew it. Was it some place
to eat when we were getting ready for a play? Somebody invited us into the home and
served us a lunch fit for royalty. Was it a lamp shade or a beautiful rug or an automobile
ride? There was always some one to do more than we had expected. And so it has been,
vour kindnesses have been registered, where every day we'v-e turned the page to read
them". We can't mention you singly but we want you to know that our dear old Cris-
tobal High School appreciates whatever efforts you have made in our behalf. We are
proud of our school and our annual. They are not perfect but we are striving to make
them better and are sincerely grateful to all who have sympathized and aided.









^^^^MM^^^M^^i



pBW&p&p&^^WBpBI



<^^m^mm^m



76



THE CARIBBEAN.




HOTEL WASHINGTON




I Masfjington ilotor ^crbice Co., Htb.

^ THE ONLY ALL-AMERICAN GARAGE ON THE ATLANTIC SIDE






I Special Service to Hotel Washington

^ TWO TELEPHONES - HOTEL WASHINGTON, Cristobal 733, and Colon 204 ^

I i^ertiert 1. Boten, . IB, ^, |



THE CARIBBEAN.






Cecilia ^fjeatre



Coming Attractions



!^merica ^f)eatre









MARION DAVIES
THOMAS MEIGHAN
GLORIA SW ANSON
MARY MILES MINTER
WALLACE REID
WALLACE REID
RUDOLPH VALENTINO
"OVER THE HILL"
RUDOLPH VALENTINO



in "When Knighthood Was In Flower"

in "The Ne'er-Do-Well"

in "Prodigal Daughters"

in "The Trail of the Lonesome Pine"

in "Mr. Billings Spends His Dime"

in "Clarence"

in "The Young Rajah"

- All-Star Cast

in "Blood and Sand"






Cecilia E\)tatvt

PANAMAS BEST



COMING FOR YOUR
ENTERTAINMENT



ilmerica ^ijeatre

COLON'S BEST






STRAND THEATRE i




COLON, R. P.






WHAT IS



a



THE Flame of Life ? '



When this title was selected for Priscilla Dean's latest
great screen production the producer had in mind some
wonderful quality in the picture which was best expressed
by the phrase, "The Flame of Life." What is that
quaUty ? What is the FLAME of life ?



- COMING SOON -



The management of this Theatre takes this opportunity
in extending to the graduating class oj '23 of Cristobal
High School, heartiest congratulations, and wishes to
amiounce that free matinees will be given all the children
from th: Cristobal High School who care to attend the
Theatre on Saturday afternoons.







^



78



THE CARIBBEAN.



^otel VtiMi



ifiSl



ANCON



A HOMELIKE HOTEL WITH
A CHEERFUL ATMOSPHERE



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Ideally located in the coolest and
most beautiful part of Ancon,

OVERLOOKING THE SEA



Noted for its -

CLEANLINESS and COMFORT and the GENERAL EXCELLENCE of the SERVICE and CUISINE.



ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS COOL and COMMODIOUS

Completely Refurnished and Redecorated ^ m^^



PRIVATE BATHS ^

m



Reasonable Rates

ANDREW JOHNSTON. MANAGER



^ CONTROLLED AND SUPERVISED BY THE SUPPLY DEPARTMENT OF THE PANAMA CANAL ^

I Piill WOOD STEmnSHIP Li I

Canal Zone Panama m



i New York



Sailings every ten days, on the 9th, 19th and 29th of
each month, for New York via Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Steamers sail at 3.00 P. M. from Pier 7, Cristobal,
Canal Zone; docking at Pier 67, North River, Foot of
West 27th., Street, New York,

RATES OF PASSAGE
CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK, $100; TO PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI,






THE CARIBBEAN.



I GOETHALS, WILFQRD & BOYD, INC. |

H SOLE AGENTS and WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS for M



Procter & Gamble Distributing Corporation

V. Vivaudou, Inc.

Welch Grape Juice Company

Cluett, Peabody & Co., Inc.

Interwoven Stocking Company

C. Kenyon Company

Standard Supply and Equipment Company



gg:



Goethals, Wilford & Boyd, Inc.




BONDED WAREHOUSES



Merchandise of all description stored in bond,
without payment of Panama Customs Duties






Agents: AMERICAN EXPRESS CO.

I Travellers Checks Drafts Money Orders 1



m






EXPRESS SERVICE TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD



i% Agents and Distributors:






CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA and CANAL ZONE

Star Motors, Inc. Durant Motors, Inc.



M STANDARD INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION

^6 261 South 15 Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 1 1th and Broadway, Colon, R. P.

m W. Y. BOYD, President.



8o



THE CARIBBEAN.




The Cecilia THeatre



CENTRAL AVENUE



Finest Motion Picture
Theatre in the City.



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Cafeteria and a
la Carte Service






Special Dinners

SUNDAY NIGHTS



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i"JUVENTA" T'^^'



Dr. Wm. J. LymaYoung

SURGEON DENTIST






(Table and Medicinal Water



WATER ^.






No. 7.108 BOLIVAR STREET
COLON, R. p.



^^
^
^



^ 127 Bolivar Street, between 8th and pth Streets ^
^ P. O. Box 115, Colon, R. P. ^^



THE CARIBBEAN.



8i




1-3 Fourth July Ave.
PANAMA

Opposite Ancon P. O.









HATS-
DRESSES




7,089 Front Street p

COLON m

Opposite I'. It. R. Station



HATS-
DRESSES






BOWDRY



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FEATURING AMERICAN STYLES M



SELLING AT STATES PRICES




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MOVIES

EDUCATIONAL CLASSES
BASKET BALL

ENTERTAINMENTS



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p Socials - Fellowship Meetings ^









rabuation (gifts



Waterman Ideal Fountain Pens
Eversharp Gold Plated Pencils
Dunn Fountain Pens
Panama Patchwork
Panama Canal Stone Jewelry
Victrola Records












ALL THE COMFORTS OF HOME M.



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FRONT STREET




COLON M



82



THE CARIBBEAN.







GOODYEAR TIRES and BUICK CARS



Panazone Garage







BiitisH PhariiiaGg



^ 10.115 BOLIVAR ST.



THE MULLER CO.

Successors
COLON. R. P. P P ONE PRICE DEPARTMENT STORE 1






THE SERVICE STORE



p NOSTROLINE

^ The Nasal Specific






Best Quality Merchandise m
from all parts of the World ^



^ TRI-MUR-TI PEPPERMINT 1
M CREAM for Constipation

B MUSTARD OIL CREAM
For all Kinds of Pains



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^ and Children.

^ Household Furnishings

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COMPLIMENTS OF

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



THF. CARIBBEAN.



83




FLASHLIGHT GROUPS A SPECIALTY
7x17 Doubleweight Sepia Views of Canal Zone



BOX 1452



CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



M'S






Xg^



Cable Address "IMPCO." A. B. C, 5th, and 6th, Bentley's



Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS



M=5



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DEALERS IN

General Merchandise and Native Produce



COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA




gg^gi^g^gi^g^iigsg^g^gi^gj^gi^gi^gi^g^g^g^g^^^g^^^^^l^^^^-^^^^^^^j






COLON



AND



GATUN









84



THE CARIBBEAN.



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M^MM^^^^P^^^^^^^^^^^^^M



FOR ANYTHING YOU NEED ALWAYS CALL FIRST AT



THE FRENCH BAZAAR

The Largest Department Store on the Isthmus



PANAMA



and







Royal Netherlands West India Mail



KONINKLYKE WEST-INDISCHE MAILDIENST
COMPANIA REAL HOLANDESA DE VAPORES

COLON LINE






m



^ Regular fortnightly passenger and cargo service from Cristobal to Port

^ Limon, and from Cristobal to Puerto Colombia, Curacao, Puerto Cabello, ^,

^ La Guaira, Trinidad, Barbados, Plymouth (for passengers and mail only), ^

'M Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg. Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe- ^

I PACIFIC LINE I

m Regular two- to three-weekly cargo service to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile, ^

^ on the outward voyage, and to Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg, home- fij

M ward. A limited number of passengers can be accepted. ^

Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe. M

For further particulars apply to : k

ROYAL NETHERLANDS WEST INDIA MAIL Messrs. SASSO, FUHRING & CO. m






Telephone No. 21, Cristobal



Telephone No. 682 Panama



WmMMMMMMMMMMMmB&MMMMMmiBimi^MmimiMMMMMMMMMM




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Plumbing and Supply Company



THE CARIBBEAN.



85




"The Book of Knowledge"



THE CHILDREN'S ENCYCLOPAEDIA









The Book of Knowledge is a complete work in twenty volumes, covering every field.
It is written for children especially from the ages of three to one hundred years. The
volumes consist of more than 350 colored plates and 9,000 pictures in over 6,000 pages.
With each set there is a Parent and Teachers' Guide" which aids very materially in the
studying and enjoying of these books.



WHAT TWO CANAL ZONITES THINK OF "THE BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE"



M



^

i'"



FROM AN EX-TEACHER

"I have a kindergarten class at home every day,
and it is almost impossible to keep the children
away from your books during their spare time.
They even come back after class and stay for
hours, looking thru them.

"I believe that all of the schools will soon have
the^c books in their courses. They would surely
help inuncnscU' in gaining an idea of the workings
of the world." -^j^^^ p^ p^ HOFFMAN-



FROM A MOTHER OF SEVEN

"The rainy season causes no hardships for my
children, for they come inside and are immediately
lost in "The Book of Knowledge."

"I never realized that it was possible to find so
many ditTerent subjects upon which information
could be brought to children's minds in so simple
language."

MRS. G. D. BLISS






^
^



WHAT "THE BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE" THINKS OF "THE CARIBBEAN."



Si^



5f






" First and foremost, I wish to congratulate you and your fellow students upon putting out one of
the finest .\nnuals that it has ever been my pleasure to examine. We have a High School here in .Atlanta
with 1,600 pupils, which I imagine is four or five times as large as your school, and their Annual is abso-
lutely nothing in compaiison with your own. You have something to be extremely proud of.

" I am enclosing you our check and wish to place our company in your hands. I would appreciate
it if you will act as our advertising man in this case and insert whatever seems best to yourself. There
is just one suggestion that I would like to make, and that is, that you put some clause in that advertise-
ment expressing the opinion of a man who has been in close touch with School and Educational work
for the past sixteen years. In that sixteen years time, he has yet to see a High School .\nnual the equal
of your 1922 issue. I mean this from the bottom of my heart, as you would well believe if you could see
some of the .Annuals issued by the High Schools of this Country."



THE GROLIER SOCIETY

"The Book of Knov^^ledge"



^ 210 Peachtree Building



218 Peachtree Street



isA?






m



ATLANTA, GEORGIA



THE dARlBfiEAN.




I Br. Jf. %, OTeeb

M COLON, R. P. ^

i f







THE CARIBBEAN PRESS

H. A. ARCHER, Proprietor






QUALITY PRINTERS

Box 1329, Cristobal



THE CARIBBEAN.




H. W. MITTEN, D. D. S



BALBOA, C. Z.



^^^M^M^^^^^^^^^^^M^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^







PRINCIPAL DRUG STORE






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Dr. A. C. DaCOSTA GOMEZ M ^ AGENTS FOR

1 White

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'^ Mineral






We carry a large stock of chem- ^
m. ical products, patent medicines ^^
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^ American and European firms. ^]






^ Wholesale and retail. Prescrip-
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Water
Ginger






COURTESY AND LOW PRICES
OUR MOTTO.






9th and Bolivar Streets Colon, R. of P. M
Corp. Phone No. 222. P. O. Box, No. 84. ^



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Park&

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Candy



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Busch
Malt Nut



I 48 FRONT STREET COLON

Phone 1 01




RATHBUN, STILSON & CO.

Hardware, Lumber, Paints, and Oils



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THE CARIBBEAN.




^ Phones: Balboa 667, Panama 934 Box 382, Ancon, C. Z. Cable Address: "Puseg" K



THOMAS R. LOMBARD

"Public ^erbi ce OBaragc"

PANAMA CITY, R. P.









RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO



^ 23 FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P.

^f Phone Colon No. g

M P. O. Box 523, Cristobal, C. Z.



68 HARBOUR STREET,

KINGSTON, JAMAICA



Is the oldest establishment of Photography in
Colon, and our continued success is due to the
fact that we have always pleased our patrons.
'^Richards" stamped on your photograph is
a guarantee of excellence









m




THE CARIBBEAN.



^9




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Compliments of

Dr. R. S. MORRIS

Bentisit







COMPAGNIEGENERALETRANSATLANIiaUE

FRENCH LINE OF STEAMERS



Mi






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PASSENGER SERVICE

Regular fortnightly sailings from Cristobal, Canal Zone, to England ^

and France, calling at Colombian and Venezuelan ports. ^

CARGO SERVICE S

W Monthly sailings from Antwerp, Le Havre, Bordeaux, and Cristobal, ^

^ to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile. ^

M Monthly sailings from Antwerp, Le Havre, Bordeaux, and Cristobal, m

m to Mexico, San Francisco, and Vancouver. ^

M d

^S For all particulars apply to ^

i FRENCH LINE AGENCY I



p. O. Box 128, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



PANAMA, Calle 8a No. 12 ^
P. O. Box 303 Phone No 759 ^




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THE CARIBBEAN.








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DEPENDABLE SERVICE
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THE CARIBBEAN.



91



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The finest in optical
prescription work.

NEWEST STYLES
STATES PRICES






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COLON

44 Front St.






AT THE






i






Pan-American Drug Store

50 Front Street, Colon, R. P.
I You Always Do Better at Salazar's ^

WE CARRY AN






.i.^

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?aji=to=t)ate j^oba iFountain

3 STORES



50 Front Street 56 Bolivar Street ^

182 Bolivar Street ^



I The Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Co.

^ MANUFACTURERS OF

HIGH GRADE SOFT DRINKS



m



92



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IMPROVED EQUIPMENT



MODERN METHODS ^



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EFFICIENT SERVICE



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER









"LET US DO THE DIRTY WORK"



We solicit the Patronage of Canal Employees.



Weekly Collections and Deliveries of Laundry Work.
Charge Account if Desired.



P






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^



1



CLEANING, PRESSING, and DYEING

A SPECIALTY



THE CARIBBEAN.



93




854






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fl TIP Til



i LOOK YOUR BEST





It is generally recognized that
the Best Formula for Infant
Feeding down in these Tropical
Countries is the Ancon Doctors'
Formula:

1-Part Nestle's Condensed Milk
3-Parts St. Charles Cream
12-Parts Boiled Water.



AM



^
^












5r



You are cordially invited to visit

AMERICAN
BEAUTY PARLOR



m



^ SANITARY and UP-TO-DATE ^



i



P Phone 298



Colon ^

Front Street, Opposite P. R. R. Station



It changes with the age of the child : m
Ask your doctor.




94



THE CARIBBEAN.




QUALITY IS EVERYTHING



^ Naturally, having spent many years In the making of portraits, we ^

^ have very positive ideas on that subject. To our mind a quality ^

M portrait should have distinction of pose. Day and night photography. js.?

BOX 476




FINE PANAMA HATS



83 CENTRAL AVENUE



PANAMA, R. P. m



mm^mmmmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmm



THE CARIBBEAN.



95




Automobile and Motor Boat Repair Service




The rainy season is coming on; protect yourself
against INFLUENZA and COLD, by using:



^ The Surest and
Safest Remedy



i"C3^



KAL-MOL



EUSTACE LEE, Sole Agent

Colon, R. P.



On Sale at all ^
Drug Stores. ^



1 PANAMA AGENCIES CO. I



Agents, Grace Line



m^ IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS



-:- -:- STEAMSHIP AGENTS ^

Fortnightly Sailings to New York ^

^

SPECIAL RATES TO CANAL ZONE EMPLOYEES ^







P



ERKINS
RINTS
ERFECT
ICTURES



CRISTOBAL CLUBHOUSE

PHOTO FINISHING DEPT,



Developing and Printing, Enlargements, Lantern ^

Slides, Home Portraiture and Groups. . ^

irCi7?A' GU ARAN TEED ^

B SEE us FIRST Phones 30 and 446 M



m
m



eiBW&m^m^m^f^^^^W3W^W§W3W3W3W&



^mi^mi^BimmmskMM^mMMmMMMM



96



THE CARIBBEAN.




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taSy DnoSold i^ J?








TMs stre has
tlie SS-Y@ar Fen

Come and see the super- pen cre-
ated by Geo. S. Parker, inventor
of the leakproof "Lucky Curve." It
took him 30 years to perfect it, but
it has taken only a few weeks for
the classic Duofold to become our
leading seller.

Come and see the lacquer-like besur/
of its Chinese-red barrel with smart
black-tipped ends and neat gold pocket-
clip.

Grasp it! Get the business-like feel
of its lit, weight and balance in your
hand.

Note how much more ink its over-
size barrel holds'.

Then write with this Native Iridium
point, as smooth and life-enduring as a
hard jewel bearing, and guaranteed 25
years for wear and raechanic.J perfec-
tion.

Ccme in and get one for 30 days' triaL




M



tSsgri t&'Si'a-n &*!*



Smaller sizes



FOR SALE AT LEAD-
ING STORES.



^^i^'B: et>jw w^&u






Maxwell-Kelso Sales Co.



^^
^



^
^






can be had at
lower prices.
Also a large
variety of
hand -painted
designs, to-
gether with
the Parker
"Lucky Lock"
Pencil in gold p



or silver,



M?
^



j^?

^
^



1^



Every student ^
needs these ^M



two items of ^:
intimate per-
sonal equip-
ment.






m
mm



DISTRIBUTORS



Masonic Temple



Cristobal