Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
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Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093680:00009


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Full Text

~29


VOL. V. CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1922 No. I

PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL


ATLANTIC ENTRANCE TO CANAL AND GATUN IMCKS,
Showing sea level and the lake. 164 square miles in area. 85f et Iabove sea level.


MIRAF RES


LAKE ON THE PACIC SIDE


OF THE CANAL.


Another articial like, 1.6 square mile in area. 51t feet above sea level.


CONTENTS


Added Tonnage..
Alumni..........


Literary-Continued:


. .. . ..M


Appreciation.... .
Athletics:
Boys' . . . .
Baseball...-


ARJORTE


BALL. '22.


Gatun to Cristobal by Bus,


WILLIAM Co


Joseph's Reflections on


EORGE


CART


WRIGHT


Masks and Crabs,


Class


USINS,


of '23 . .


. GEORGE CARTW


RIGHT,


My First and Last Attempt at Diving,


Basket Ball.
Swimming.
Tennis.....
Track......


BEa-ry FITZ-WILLIAM,


Stop, Look, and Listen Jordan Zimmermann'22
Sunset at the Chagres .. EMMA FOWNSEND, 22
The Derelict's Story. ... KENNETH PARKER, 24


(;iris . . . . . .


.OL iSE


HENTER


The Prodigal Brother


Basket Ball.
Swimming.
Tennis. . -


IDA BROWN,


The Sea from Our School,
GEORGE CARTWRIGHT,


Class Play, "Clarence


Class


Will..


Dedication . .. ., ..
Editorial............. .
Editorial Staff.... ., .. .. .
Exchanges.................
Faculty-Senior Get-together.


The Secret


The Village Sleuth
Up the Pilcomayo


.PAUL


C. DOYLE


When


Sorrows


MARJORIE BALL,
,GIRDON RuoDD,
S\V. F. BOWERS.


onome--


? ALEX LiN


CZER,


Music


HENRY


MOORE


Our Faculty


Poetry:


Freshmen-Alphabetically Speaking
G graduates ............ .. . .. .


A Mishap.
A Telephone..


. . . ALEX


N


.GEORGE CARTWR


CZER,
IGHT,


Jokes.................W


ESLEY H. TO


WNSEND


J u n iors................. ... .... . .... ... ......
Literary:
A Musical Evening ....... GEORGE BALL, 24.
A Promising Young Man..PAUL C. DOYLE, 22.
A Risumd of the Country Fair.. ....... ..
A Scene at the Colon Station,
FRANCES POOLE, '2,


A Younger Br
Bobbed Hair.


Eyes...... .. ..
Gatun.........
H aiti ....... .
In Panama. .. .
Old Panama ..
Seasons ..... .


other


..... MARJORIE BALL,
......... IDA BROWN,
JORDAN ZIMMERMANN,
GEORGE CARTWRIGHT,
...... MARY FIELDS,
... MARJORIE BALL,
.Louise HENTER,


SJORDAN ZIMMERMANN,







THE


CARIBBEAN.


Beneath the palms on Caribbean's shore,
Scarce nine degrees from the equator's line,
Where trade winds blow, and tropic sun doth shine
With sultry heat, and where, in the days of yore,
Adventurous Spanish gallants did explore
And fall a prey to Morgan's bold design,
Where now the Stars and Stripes wave as the sign
That we have oped to Orient ports the door,
There stands a spacious building which doth hold
A band of people who do strive to learn
That which will lead them upward in life's way.
Desire-that we the best may e'er uphold,
That we may live and learn as well as earn
CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
Teaches day by day.


-1922.








THE CARIBBEAN.


EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE


Circulation


Assistant
.thletics,
Athletic, s.


Art Editor
School Notes


CARIBBEAN.


PAUL C. DOLE
EDWARD MAY


LERoV B.


manager


MAG N'SON


GERALD BLISS


Man a


Circulation


Manager


ALEX IINCZER (14),


JORDAN ZIMMERMANN
GEORGE CARTWRIGHT


LOIUISE CENTER
SMIATTIE PULLIG


Editor


EMMA TOWNSEND (is),
WEiSLEY H. TOWNsENDx (1i2).


Literary Editor
Alumni Editor
Exchange Editor


MARY FIELDS


MARJORIE BALL (9),
. HENaRY MOORE (o10).


DEDICATION.


Not because, as our


Principal,


she has done


so much


make our


Nor because
pleasant;
Not because,
make this


school


more


she has made


as our


interesting


our


and worth


so much


while;


more


so hard


yearbook a success;


Nor because she


so willingly


devoted


own time


and strength


to its production;


But because


she is


our "loved,"


our "honored,


mnuch-


respected Friend,"


the students


Cristobal High


School,


affectionately


dedicate


this fifth volume of


The Caribbean to


MISS


ISABELLA DODDS.


Editor-in-Chief
assistantt Editor
Business Manager
Jssislant Business


Editor


social life


Advisor, she


has worked


ab








THE CARIBBEAN.


Paul C. Doyle, '22.


paragraphs, flashed through his mind, he set aside
his basket-ball dream and finished his assignment
in time to assure himself of an excellent report.
As Jimmie tripped into the first freshman class
of the year, tardy, he drew a laugh from his fellow


Suppose we begin our sermon with a few i
tratlons for which the following slogan will
ply our text:
Bite off more than you can chew;
Then chew it.
Plan for more than you can do:
Then do it.
Hitch your wagon to a star;
Keep your seat, and there you are.
The turmoil of passing classes subsided.


students.


This inspired him to act the clown the


rest of his high school career.


It is true he had


passing marks, but he lacked the beneficial learn-
ing he should have gained from his four years' work.
His diploma without the foundation of knowledge
was almost worthless in seeking employment.
Henry had a clear voice but his debates were


uninteresting because he read them.


The cap-


tain of the debating team was absent and Henry


was the one chosen to speak in his place.


He tried


the classes, recitations began.


All were quiet in


at first to resign.


His doubt turned into deter-


the assembly room excepting Willie who shuffled
to the sharpener, sharpened his pencil, and tested


the point several times.


He settled in his seat,


but was up on the thought of an announcement


he should write on the blackboard.


He wasted


time putting unnecessary artistic touches to his


almost unreadable fancy letters.


He was about


to sit down and get busy when he found a Literary
Digest, in which he scanned the pictures and read


many


advertisements.


He laid the


magazine


aside to prepare his necessary class report, but
a shudder ran through him when he found he had
but three minutes to get his material from the en-
cyclopedia from which it takes so long to bring out


information in proper form.


As a result,


Willie


felt ashamed for having delayed his whole class.
The next day he came to school determined to
stick by a slogan he had read the previous eve-
ning. The first period classes had passed as usual
and Willie was in the assembly room taking notes
4 4 **


mination when he finished reading the same slogan
which we have already quoted, and he was soon
busy gathering material for his side of the sub-
ject. On the day of the debate he was nervous
but gritted his teeth, took his place before the
assembly, and delivered a talk which convinced
even his opponents that his stand on the subject
was the correct one.
Every fellow on the basket-ball team feels better
over a hard-fought defeat than an easily-won vic-
tory, when they have done what they felt was


more than


could do.


When


the boys of


C.H. S. basket-ball team accepted the challenge
of the U. S. S. Denver heavies, they planned for
more than they thought they could do, they did
it, and as a result, brought another victory to
their school.
In activities held at the school during the year,
many who at first remained silent and unknown


seized


their opportunity to chew a little more


.I 4 4 4 4 4 4 -









THE CARIBBEAN.


their lessons-all of which


go to make up true


successful they would have said the same thing.


school spirit.


This type of student has hitched


It is not fair to one


s self, and I may say it is


cow-


his wagon to a star and rides


of school with


over


the hard knocks


ease.


hardly, to hold one's self down and not plan for
more than one thinks one can do, and then do it.


Boys and girls, in


these days of accomplish-


In school or elsewhere wake up


our enthusiasm.


ment, look to the things that have already ad-


You are as good


as the best if


you want to


vanced civilization.


boat, railr
wireless is
say. "Ther


oad


train


They


see the modern steam-


, and airplane.


Now since


so keenly perfected, they sit back and
-e's nothing left to be done."


Plan for more than you can do;
Then do it.
You will reap the benefit for whatever you do.


If these same people had lived before Whitney,
Bell, or the Wright brothers made their inventions


Hitch


your


wagon


your seat,


a star;


and there


IN PANAMA.
Marjorie Ball, '22.


Low sighs


whispering palm


In Panama.
Cool trade winds blow.


Dank;
Over all, quiet reigns
Save for gentle lapping


of waves


upon the sands.


The tropic moon
Large,
Luminous.


Now, a boat with oars dipping,


Soft strumming of


Voices


guitar,


singing;


Lights dark rippling waters.
In the distance-


The boat passes.


Silence


again


In Panama.


The jungle
Dense.


OLD PANAMA.


Louise


Henter, '23.


A ruined church t
Flecks of sunlight


ower


standing lonely by the


on gray,


mouldering


Slowly the
At ringing


sun sinks,


dyeing the bay with


crimson.


of vesper bells,


Rusty piles of cannon,
Dim traces of a highway,
A decaying, weed-covered
Relics of former glory-
Old Panama.


Courtiers, cavaliers,


The faithful


bridge-


adventurers,


pray;


Tremulous prayer of the old priest
Dies softly away.
Evening breezes croon in the palms;
Night mounts her throne.
Old Panama.


Id-seekers-


Pioneers to the crossroads of the wo
Balboa, Cortez, Pizarro-


Seeking


fabled riches.


Treasure-laden Spanish galleons riding at anchor in the bay.
Flower of Spanish chivalry,
Graceful, languid sefioritas,
Flash of dark eyes behind lace mantillas,
Sounds of soft laughter,
Tinkle of guitars,
Old Panama.


Flashes of musket-fire cut the blackness of the night.
Cries of wounded fill the air,
Death rides abroad;
The sky burns crimson as the flames leap upward.


Madre de Dios!


Salvanos!


Morgan has come!
Old Panama.


are.






6 THE CARIBBEAN.


attei,@eehorteabi sak efa foaDa 'I' Z.Wabeleecfi


9 y .ake/j.aS house'i 'eory Sacor I, yfdA 5%)ef










THE CARIBBEAN.


MR. A. R. LANG, A. B., A. M.,
Lincoln, Nebr.
Superintendent of Schools.
Nebraska Wesleyan University.
University of Nebraska.


F. X. KARRER,


Assistant to


A. B., M.


A., M. Pd.,


Superintendent.


Wilson's Modern Business College. Seattle.
Washington State Normal School. Ellensburg.
University of Washington.
Columbia University.
New York University.


J. ISABELLA


MABEL


A. B.


Hutchinson. Kans.


Kansas State


Normal


School.


English, Latin,


Social Problems.


(;eometrvy,


Physics,


.igebra.


Joy, it


is, indeed, to know her


Maybe she doesn't know all


In school and out, for she is such a
Sociable, friendly sort of person. We
Admire her greatly for there seems to
Be nothing she can not do. We
Enjoy her classes for, with her as teac
Latin seems


Less dull and tedious.


Algebra and Physics
But she has kept it from


Enjoying


Laugh with us and at us.


even


Being fond


Her readings are


of ot tdoor


Exercise, she plays tennis


Another of her accomplishments and a source of


Every


morning.


Then too, she


Delight


to us.


Much of h


Can swim, and often goes


er spare time is given


Hiking.


Taki


Over to THE CARIBBEAN and otherschool activities


if we could go on


Daily word of cheer and


She is


the mainstay


without her


No one can say


encouragement, tor


Good sport.


Her brains,
Affected by
Though she


n iversit y.
University.


MABEL JEAN


History.


Watsonville, Cal.


Stanford.,


Spanish.


is very


Tiny, she seems to have an
Infinite amount of knowledge.
Education has been


Many are the friends of this kindyiv and


Agreeable person who


Boast


as our Spanish


m we
teacher.


M. A.


Largely developed by her,
Especially in
English and United States


Even tho' she


specializes


Likes


Bible teaching


History.


She has the abili


An interesting speaker with a


Only to teach, but also to make her
Recitations interesting by the
Narration of personal experiences and


Rather friendly,
Never loses


pleasing


Her patience


ODDS,


B. A.


Principal.


Claremont, Mminn.


Macalester


College.


BEECH


about


a joke, she isn't


us if she


doesn't


afraid to


Doubt


and support of Cristobal High.


HATTIE LEE HORNBEA


she isn't a


K, B. A.,


Waxahachie, Tex.


Trinity I
Columbia

English,


Le land
we find, are not
her size, for,


BARNHOUSE, A.


Jr., University.


in Spanish she also


She is


voice.









THE CARIBBEAN.


ADELA F. BAKEWELL,
Lansing, Iowa.


Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa, B. S. in Home Economics,
University of California.


HENRY G. BACON, B.
Mauricetown, N. J.

Columbia University.


Home Economics


and Modern History.


Manual Training, Mechanical Drawing,


General Science.


Appropriate, indeed, is the name of our new
Domestic Science teacher, for no one can


He is an


Excel her in this art.


We all


Like her very well
And that is not only because she can


Enthusiastic tennis player;
Nor does he regret when he can take a
Ride on shank's mare, and
Yet he's a good cook too.


Bakewell, but also because she is so
Amiable and pleasant. She
Knows just how to make parties interesting


General


Science


is his class.


He also teaches


Exciting, as we learned from our


experience


With the Sophs on St. Patrick's day.


She is


the idol of


Every Sophomore, and we hope that she has
Learned to


us we


l1 enough to


come


back next year.


Boys to square
A block of wood, making
Condition that the block shall not resemble an
Omelet when completed.
Nor does he fail to give his pupils a square deal.


FACULTY-SENIOR


GET TOGETHER


One of the mo


st enjo


able events of the school


Throughout the entire meal a buzz-buzz of de-


year took place on th
our principal, Miss J


e even


ing of June 1, when


Isabella


Dodds,


gave


lightful conversation took


to which only


Seniors


place
i their


upon
store


subjects
full of


dinner in honor of the Seniors of '22, having also


knowledge


could


possibly


justice-gradua-


as her guests the faculty.


The dining room


tion, college,


THE CARIBBEAN, and various bits


the Household Arts Department rang as in previ-
ous times with laughter and merriment. Promptly
__ at6.30 o'clock


dinner


was


announced
and the happy
crowd march-


of importance.


Dodds,


Seniors,


Toastmistress of the evening was


who delivered a toast to the


who responded showing their apprecia-


tion to Miss Dodds and the faculty.


Thus pa
nings do.
Dodds one


ssec


t


the evening as all tropical eve-


As the guests departed they rated Miss
Sof the best and most entertaining


principals Cristobal High School has ever had.


groupedthem-
selves about a
wonderfully


MENU


CHICKEN A LA EMMA


A MI.Y


Papa dons his hard hat and States' raiment while decorated ta-
Mamma puts on her shining tomato can bracelet, zebra
skirt, and best smile whenever the camera man induces ble. A color
J. Isabella. Hattie Lee, and E. Mabel, the rest of the
happy family, to pose. Now doesn't "Poor Lo" look SCh e me o f
just like a lion in a cage of Daniels. green and gold
(the Senior colors) was used and was carried out
even to the dainty little nut cups and clever com-
bination place and menu cards.


soon


proved


discovered


every


that the dinner


as delicious


itself


it sounded,


a real credit to the domestic science classes who


n ..r A^ nfl .4 i nn-w ,,, .. nn A* f


en^ / iu;' l~ 'ir~


MARY POTATOES FROM THE FIELD
MAGGIE STRING BEANS
BROWN BUNS


JELLY, PICKLES, AND BUTTER
FROM
CART(W)RIGHT TO TABLE

PACO SALAD SALTED WAFERS


WESLEY'S TOWN SENDS ICE CREAM FOR
MARJORIES GOLD CAKE


SAN DLAS INDIAN









THE CARIBBEAN.


II


SENIORS.
INTRODUCED IN STYLE OF CHAUCER.


FORE WORDE.


Fair hair has he that waves


upon h


is head.


In basketball he


Of clothes he
His thoughts


Where the canalle from the Gatun lokkes
Meets Limon Bay neer the Chrystoball dokkes,
Stand cities two, Chrystoball and Colonn;
From these and from Gatun our school is drawn.


surely


has good


is not dead.


taste and dresses well;


are clear, his voice


like a bell.


He dances fairly; good is his approach


To folk; by many he's


v cleped "Roach",


Of alle


its fame there is not tyme to tel,


Nor on its plezhures nedeth now to dwel;
We turn from tales of al the other classes


To Senvor


folkes-five lads and


eek five I


But this i
In future


s not t
years;


he name that will reach height


that name is George


-Jordan


asses.


Cartwright.


Ztmmermann.


Biffi that in Oktober onn a dave.


MARY FIELDS.


Inn Englissh


clas, they turned from work to played


At vers in Chaucer's styl; they thought
By imitation of his waiz in speech


to teech,


And thought, to others and themselves what they
Must lerne about this man of ancient day.
Al worked together-using wel the text
To "do" the two outside the clas-and next
Ech chose a clasmait whom he would describe;
And then, with many a joke and jest and gibe-
And groans a few-, was this new task begunne,
Which follows now as 'twaz when done.


Class Se-retarv, '22.
School Notes Editor,


She is


Basket Ball. '20.


a tall and dark complexioned girl;


Brown eyes she has, and hair of kinky curl.
From northern trip returned she in September,


And northern days she joyeth to
On Caribbean staff she ranks ful


And all her school


remember.
hye;


work's done without a sye.


She likes to play at tennis, dance and bowl,
And in all these she can high honors hold.
She loves to go to see a baseball game,


PAUL C. DOYLE


Class President, '21, '22.
Editir-in-Chief. '22.
President Athletic Organization, '22.
Assistant Editor. '21.
Baseball, '20, '21. '22.


Basket Ball, '23.
Swimming. '20,
Tennis, '21,' 22.
Track, '20, '21.


And with her rooting always brings


And to
She's al


, '22. captain.
'22.
'.4,
.'-*


us fame.


our class of


ways loval, faithful, good


trew.


There i
Who is


s a Senior


boy y cleped Doyle,


quite right according to friend Hoyle.


His sandy hair, that careless doth hang down,


MARJORIE BALL.


Clss Treiurer,
Literary Editor,


Editor, '22.
Ball, '23.


Doth partly


cover


even of milde brown.


Though he is very wee as all can see,


From dawn till night he's


busy as a bee.


There is in school,


a


Quite short and slim,


bright
whose


young
golden


Senior
locks


girl,
do curl


In all this life no taske does he shirk,
And faith, is well known for his worthy work.
And eek in sports also you'll see his name,
Through these he has well earned honor and fame.
Long will he be remembered by the class-


In soft, sweet waves about her oval face;
Her eyes are somewhat gray, and somewhat
Although she is not jealous, neither mean.


Of this


maid's


green


disposition we will say


She lively is, and merry all the day;


Of '22-that


will so shortly pass.


She dances givly,


for she loves this well;


-J'esley


Townsend.


And of her other sports, her friends will tell
That in the morning, when that it is early,


GEORGE CARTWRIGHT.


Assistant Business Manager, '21.
Class Vice President, '22.


Athletic E litor, '22.
Basket Ball, '22.


To swim, and tennis play,


she loveth dearly.


And of her manner let me tell you this,
Her voice and actions sweet, are ne'er amiss.
This maid, who has been cleped Marjorie,
lXaiI-! i1lraA- \--i -ill -- tko q-anraI-^tf c~ t I o ra ; eta.


-Ida Brown.











o10 THE CARIBBEAN.








A lliilIIII^^^^^r~tr ^rr-a^||||ri~|||,||,,h,|rr^^^.^.-- ----- **-*-*IIIIIL~^ll^^^--~ii|||u~i ___,............... _______









THE CARIBBEAN.


LEROY MAGNUSON.


Business Manager, '22. Baseball, '22.,
Basket Ball. '22. Swimming. '22.
Ther iz a tal and slender Senior boy
Whom some clep Baldy, others name Leroy.
His hair is brown; it hides hise eyen greye
Carefree he is and happy night and daye;
He loves to sing, and also to beat time.
By buying chewing gum with every dime,
He keeps supplied with that which breaks the riwle
So firmly maad by teachers of the school.
"The Chandler" hight his faithful auto steed
In which he loves to "birn the road" with speed.
He dances wel with proud high stepping gate,
In school athletics he is upp to date.
On studying is not set ful moche his leste,
But of trew loyall friends he is the best.
-1922.


His face is red, and bright, and rather plump;
For sports we find him always on the jump,
In height tho he can reach but to the average
Full military, straight is hise carriage.
No pleasure finds he in the dance's whirl-
Methinks perhaps the reason is a girl!
Fall well he likes to ride a gentle horse,
But never walks he-eek a small golf course.
Quiet is he when it is time to be-
But talking all the other time is he.
He scolds himself in language goodly strong;
Neer will he lead to start of any wrong.
But sum him up and take him as a whole,
A warm place in our hearts sure he doth hold.
-Paul C. Doyle.

JORDAN ZIMMERMANN.


Assistant
Baseball,


Circulation Manager, '22.
'21. '22.


Basket Ball, '21, '22.
Swimming, '22.


EMMA TOWNSEND.
Basket Ball, '21, '22.


A girl their is and that a jolly one;
She merry is and always ful of fun.
Tho somdel plump, she is extremely fair,
With even blue and light and curly hair.
She cares not much for daunce or fancy ball;


All outdoor sports she l
In basket ball and swir
We know in every gam
To keep Cristobal Higi
She's always ready whe
She seweth well and als
A goodly wif, I trowe,
An all round sport this
We call her Emma, for


loveth most of all.
mining she delights;
e she always fights
SSchool in the lead.


n their


is the need.


A good fellow there is i
A better lad I trowe cai
His eyes are brown; foi
Where e'er he's needed
He plays at basket ball
The part of center, and
A-passing, dribbling, sh
And always makes the
Not o' word speaks he
Of dances, frolics, and
A better built boy I trc


We find this


o cooketh too.
she'd make for you.
girl is found to be.


so named


is she.


n C. H. S.;
n not be guessed.
rsooth they match his hair.


always he'll be there.
, because he's tall,
covers all the hall,
ooting as he goes,
basket for which he throws.
more than there is need;
such he takes no heed.


hwe,


there's nowhere


none.


is cleped Zimmerman.


-George Cartwright.


MILDRED STAFFORD.


-Marjorie Ball.


Exchange Editor,


Basket Ball, '21.


IDA BROWN.
Basket Ball, '20. '21, '22.
Dramatics.


A girl there is full small and very fair
With eyes of blue and very curly hair;
In basketball and swimming she shows might,
And dancing finds she to her heart's delight.
The same sweet girl at school and in the home,
Full well she talks of times that she did roam.
For two long years she traveled every morn
To Balboa school, but now she does adjourne
To C. H. S. and we are glad to have
A Senior lass so true. You may her know
As Ida Brown, she's "Snibs" to us I trow.
-Mary Fields.


Among the Senior class, there is a girl,
Whose locks of gold are bobbed thikke, and curl
About her face; forsoothe it is petite.
Altho that she is languid, she is sweet
Of manner. Mail arrivals find her gay
If letters come from him so far away.
I trowe she loveth daintee clothes to ware
That suit her wel and make her look ful fayre.
For dancing and for bowling has she knack:,
But as for basketball she seems to lacke
In pep. Not moch she specks when in a party
But what she says receives a welcome hearty.
In fact she's liked by all both far and near;
She's cleped Myllred by those who know her here.
-1922.


AFTER WORDE.


WESLEY TOWNSEND.


School Notes Editor, '22.








THE CARIBBEAN.


CLASS WILL.


Hear Ye!


All persons having
able Court will atten
will and testament of
High School.
To all whom it may
to the inscrutable mn
the Class of 1922, of
must within the nex
sacred precincts of t
having accumulated
happiness, and many
in memory's vault,
to leave a share of
others less fortunate
sanely and legally,


testament:
1. To Ge
windows, no
partake of o
be provided
of raffle tick
satisfied sti
upon riding
2. A priv
typewriter
telephones,
Eberenz, w
title of man
Leo will ma
story over b
3. To J


Hear Ye!


business before this Honor-
d to the reading of the last
the Class of '22 of Cristobal


concern


, Greetings.-Bowing


rch of time, decreeing that
the Cristobal High School,


t thirty days depart
heir beloved domici
a wealthy store of kni
other good things t
following tradition,
their worldly posses


in things


material,


from the
le, they,
owledge,
reasured
desiring
ssions to
hereby,


make this. their last will and


raid D. Bliss is given the key to all
t only that he may freely and deeply
ur purest air, but that a handy place


for rapidly dis
ets in case a larn
ude it body
his bicycle.
ate office, carr
with two att
is bestowed up(
ith which goe
ager, in the hop
nage to tell the
>oth phones.
uline Granger


George's algebra formula,
to Show Correct Answers t
Beeching." To protect fr
sun, we also leave to
covered swimming pool wh
not interfere with a red
but will prevent those hor
4. The library door is


posing
ge and
insists


ying a
tached
on Leo
s our
e that
Same

goes


"Ho
o Mi
1


31
OI
h
ic
a;
ri
t(


m the
ler a
h will
nd pre
.d and
) be p


THE NEST.
These birds, prob-
ably buzzards, if locks
mount for anything, are
famous for their re-
markable appetites,
and have climbed this
cOfoot tree in search
Stheir favorite picnic
food, thecoconut. The
widely extended arms
of our editor-in-chief
are indicating his pre-
ferred ice cream cone
size.
tty complexion
painful blisters.
laced under the


as well


with
5.
hope
send
blyr
their
as E
6.
gran
site
miss
tend
off c
7-
ness
ness
8.
for
"CL
unc


, we impart Emma's cleverness in smiling


her eyes.
Since Edward May was I
ful Juniors, we confer upon hi
's aptitude for wandering ar
oom and his rosy and vigorous
, we leave to him a capacity
's look too Ez on Senior card
To Henry Moore, the Juni
t Leroy's dexterity in suppi
side of the question. Also,
ion to use Zim's Ford-Arrow
I staff meetings that are not
orner, Fort Randolph.
Emogene Nash is to have I
and health. To her is left
in getting the thing (?) she'
To Alex Linczer we present
reaching the height of six fe
arence's" glasses for studying
comfortable that we surrender


of honor wit
i 1


during c
9. As
with a
experien
we best'
dancing
,,
ence's"
tO. M
our besi
health,
fulness.


lass rec
a help
scrap"
ces. T
3W upo


?resident of the
m Wesley Town-
ound the assem-
is health. Fur-
:y for a few G's,


Is.
or
orti
he


politician, we
ing the oppo-
has our per-


that he may at-
held in that far-


Mary's youthful-
also Ida's clever-
s after.
t Jordan's recipe
et, together with
it. Alex looks so
r to him the seat


cushions and a special easy


stations.
to Eddie Solom
book in which
hat his footwork
,n him Lerov's


ability. T
liver.
[attie Pulli


t wishes
happine
ability,


requires to
. We endo
time so t
time, sot


I'o his enem

2 is cut off


for she
, cheers
friends,
make he
Ernst
it he m


chair


on, we furnish him
he may record his
k may be enlivened
light and graceful


ies we give


"Clar-


with nothing but


is already possessed of
fulness, kindliness, help-
and everything that a
r sought after.
Euphrat with Magnu-
ay attend social gather-


1 I


ings, practice his piano piece, and cure tooth-
aches.
It may not be polite to grant any one person
the honors that are due the Senior class as a whole


Hear Ye!


I


1








THE CARIBBEAN.


is marked by the seating arrangement; the bright-


est sit in the back seats.


edge,


Being of superior knowl-


we vacate our back seats to the less intel-


may sit a few seats farther back so that the shining
heads of the incoming babies will not hurt their eyes.
Last, we leave to the faculty our best wishes


ligent Juniors hoping they may acquire almost as


much brains as the present Senior class did.


the Juniors may


feel a little


under-class men we leave to them
our phantom privileges.
To theSophomore class we give
the power to hold their members
until they sit on the platform for


diplomas.


We also give


them permission to keep on with
their usual pep.


Freshmen


have our per


mission to keep on going. We
also leave to them theart of trim-


ming them close.


We give them


superior


That


to their


that they


out from C. H.


S. other


Senior classes almost as bright as ourselves. We
leave thanks to themfor keeping the silly underclass
_men quiet that we might study in


.anw.a.tflfl


M'KINLEYT


peace.


We express our apprecia-


tion for the patient way in which


they dealt


with us,


using their


spare time in helping us.


Having


justice


to the


faculty and all who follow us,


to express our sorrow


leaving them.


HOUSE.


A roomy happy home provided for Cristobal school
teachers, nestling near tae wind-swept seaside midst
stately sheltering palms.


free use of the shower bath that they may reduce


We have all been


good chums and we hope that the


C& H.


as it has been in th


S. spirit may continue as
e past. We leave our best


the high spirit of the


"first day


" freshie.


They


wishes in C. H.


S. for all its members.


THE LAUNCHING OF OUR SHIP.
George Cartwright, '22.


With the


help of a noted engineer and ten good


workmen, the keel


Organization


which
Exams


of the good ship


was laid early in October, 1921.


Many


were


erected a foremast


Mid-


and an aft mast of Final Exams, the


successful climbing of which denoted the ability


large trees were cut, but few were sound enough


of the sailors.


A large funnel through which the


to use for the ribs, Privileges.


securely


fastened


spikes


After these were


of Good


Advice,


they were covered with many firm boards called
Rules, which, when finished, made a good water-


refuse, Bad Work, Laziness, and Carelessness soon
found way of escape, was also erected on the deck.
And last, a beautiful bridge of Honor was built,


a little to the rear of


the foremast.


After the


proof hull of Discipline.


Next, a good ten-cylinder


installation of a Dodds rudder, and a splendid


engine, Energy, was put in place and arranged to


painting depicting


Social


Activities, the good ship


drive a large propeller of three blades, Good


Cooperation,
covered wit


and School


h a


Spirit.


well-laid deck of


The hull
School I


Work,


was
Work,


Senior left the docks of Vacation and started on
a nine months' tour, the first stop to be Graduation
Harbor.


Senior,


ItlP
<&ll












THE CARIBBEAN.


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


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THE CARIBBEAN.


Outer star, upper left-Edward May (President). Upper right.-Miss Hornbeak (Advisor). Center left-Gerald Bliss, (Vice President). Center right.-Alex Linezer.
Lower lefl.-Juline Granger. Lower right.-Louise Henter. Inner star, upper center.-Emogene Nash (Secretary). Upper left.-Henry Moore. Upper
right.-Ernst Euphrat. Lower left.-Emilio Solomon. Lower right.-Leo Eberenz. Bottom center--Mattie Pullig.








THE CARIBBEAN.


making his usual round on Saturday


morning, had cor
* 1


me


bent wearily over to
the desks, and found
and a big red "E.'
Junior children ham
dis way, fe every t
dey ave a gret big bu
hi haint wishin' to d
"Hevery time hi p:
de name Heddie M;
ha big whred "hE" I
children hin him cl


to the


(


Junior section.
a paper under
name, Edward
.ck mon! Des
to mess hup d
:omes hin dis


He
one of
May,
here
e floor
place,


nch ah paper hon de floo, han
o dis ting hatal.
ick hup ha piece ho paper wid
ay hon hit, hit always ave
han hit. Hevery whun of de
iss like him plenty well fob


de President, hand he
s fe running.


"Han you know dis boy,
ride a bike hall de time? M
his complaining' bout dis bo
to come to class when hit
always making' mischief wi
Joseph's monologue wa
the falling of a book from
he stooped to pick it up, h
Henry Moore, him never k
hat al. Hevery time hi co
ham falling' hout him desk
noise, han sometin' mor' fe
Enery ham just come to d
they make he de exchange
Staf' and wid dis title, hin
de time, fe every time hi t
for me to run to the post off
"Hand dis boy Hernest
boy make hi so surprised,
into de hassemblv hal' h;
boy ham playing' "Darktow
de piano so well. Dis boy


has whone


plenty


Bud Bliss, dat always


Barnhou


,. I


se


y, ite him neve:
ham de time.
d hall de teac
s interrupted
a crowded d
e grumbled, "
keeps him desk
ime hin here,
hand making'
hi to pic' hup.
is school dis y
editor hof de
i keeps hi jum
urn around h
ice wid more n
SHeufhrat!
fe whone da' h
after school, I
n Strutters' B
hallways stay


halwavs
r wishin'
He ham
hers."
here by
esk. As
Dis boy,
straight
ha book
ha lotta
Mistah
ear, and
Caribein
ping hal
e wishin'
nail.
Well, dis
i walked
hand dis
all" hon
late an'


best one in d


pitcher fe
"Emilio
hof de sch


de
Sol
ool.


e play. She h
annual.
omon ham de
Habout two


iam collection


' hal de


big knock-hout king
months ago he was,


hear she singin
ha singer.


1


a blood
ha long
wreallv

lead for


some-


going to
d rather

ys come
He cut
Sde floo'
Dis boy
:hi put
round
le know

ihe goin'
hear she
hear she
s heeder
cian.
e other
oom hen
hi come
dat she
e Gatun


gowming catch ha big fight, but him catch
poisinin' in him han; so him can't fight fe
time. Dis ham really sad, cause hi ham
wishin' to see him fight.
"Dis heah Leo, he am have ha big I
business when it come to fixin' fe a play
thin' like dat, but when hit comes to
classes he haint like dis hatal; he would
run ha errand fe the teacher heny da.
"Alex ham de barber when all de bo
from de height grade to be freshmen.
hoff all de boys' hair, den he leave hit hon
an dis make plenty mo' work for me.
ham use hup hall de colored chalk dat
around, cause him always circulation
making' signs on de board to make peop
dat him his de circulation' manager.
"Dat Miss Juline, hi haint know what s
be when she grows up fe de other da' hi
practisin' in the Junior play, an den hi
playing' de piana, hen hi ham sure she i
goin' be ha gret hactres hor ha gret music
"And dat Miss Lula, Lawd, me son, d
da' hi hear some talking' hin de school rn
hi really tink it was ha Dutch lady, but
hin an' fin' dat it was Miss Lula. I hear
sho' du make a good jump center on th
basket ball team too.
"Miss Emogene sho' ham ha good tenn
fe every morning' when hi his goin' dow
mail hi see she hout Dlavin. han de othi


' han hi ham sure she am goin'


study, hand hi really tink him's going be ha
dentist like him brudder-in-law.
"Dat Mattie ham de Hulu Hulu girl, han when
3 C'r~ LI c i- -- Jil". .........C 1...i


"Hevery whun of dem Junior girls haf ha good
learning ; in fac' dis ham ha good class fe true,"
muttered Joseph as he picked up his brooms and
i 1 1 <" ,I


17


JOSEPH'S REFLECTIONS OF CLASS OF '23.


Joseph,


c


is player
vn fe de
er da' hi


or


r


,













r8 THE CARIBBEAN.
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*u. ~ - ~Ra. SEA ut 0 .1 -. H~ s~ .'**..r -








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE SOPHOMORES.
hAnna Colberg, '24.


Kin
in his
trainii
start
much
throui
mer,
king,
made
ing pl
some
unive
in thi


g Lecc
great
ng fiel
ed by
the
gh the
came
and p
a terr
anets,
unkno
rse. A
s direc


The rumbli
the king and
they fled far 1
the shock whe
crashed on t
stood dazed
courage, they
object. Gre;
before them
the following
scribed upon
While rum
huge leather-i
Class of 192,
many days af
ing conclusion
thus to the ki
"Your maj
of some orgai
ruined school
seem that the


to the firs


tof


oagauloi
armies,
d when
Sthreatt
thunder
Sheaves
flying c
ardon tl
ible dis.
the Wo
)wn han


sgallic of Mars,
was one day ins
he and his att
ening rumbling t
that so often
ns. Allegorniac
ver the field,
his intrusion, bi
cover. One of
rld, has been to
d and hurled t


Part of it is now rushing
tion.


ng increased and


his coU
from th
n the h
he trai
for a
stealth
at was
a large,
words


it,
ma
bou
4,'
ter.


"Cr
going
nd
wh
S


Is from t
ng:
esty, it
lization
building
v deve
which t


rt became so f
e spot. Mars
uge segment fj
ning field. 1
few minutes;
hily crept up
their astonis
, ruined white
, hardly distir
istobal School
;, Allegorniac
)ook lettered,
ich he studied


in


who
pecti
tenda
hat r
rev
, the
"TX "1


delighted
ng a new


Lnts


were


embled
berates
strono-
mighty


ut I have just
our neighbor-
rn asunder by
throughout the


comet-like


, upon looking up,


frightened that
trembled with
rom the World
The spectators
then. gainin
.~anln


J
the st
Lent t
>ilding


:range
:o see
With


nguishable,
came UO
came upo


I
'History of the
Diligently for


he drew up th


follow-


:his wonder book and reported


seen
that
gat t
loped
he na


is as if this is
must have be
his early date.
through sever
me Freshmen v


alstorvy
in this
would
stages,
Given.


amount of ability and school spirit.
very studious and always willing to h
of this building which they call 'High
High,' to which they seem to have
ingly loyal.


"From the first period
nated Sophomore, they rt
the supervision of an ab
well, and a group of clas,
"Then your honor, the
activities during this So


were


many and


zations,
athletics.


holiday


"Athletics


into the


s'


They were
elp that part
'-'Cristobal
been exceed-

econd, desig-


trained this spirit
e advisor-Miss
officers.
y next tell abou
phomore term.
ch as debates, dr


program, picnics,


been


n this the Sophomores
nd well, considering the
"After this, they go o
howed good sportsman
lass basket-ball games,
-uniors' chance of being
:ver that may mean.
"The girls too, must ha
)n this planet because
hey also showed good
nost of them played on
schooll teams.
"These Sophomores s
nroud of one of the gir


>retta
11 her.
"And
ars in
part
>phom


under
Bake-


t their
These
amati-


parties,


given special mention, for


played
ir lac
)n to
ship i
and ;


the


their
of ma
ay tha
the b
t least


part nobly
trial.
,t the boys
oys' inter-
spoiled the


'champions'-what-


ve taken part in athletics
the book says here that
'basket-ball spirit,' for
both the class and high


;eem to have been very
1 members of their class,


Rush-the star athlete of the school, they

king, there seem to have been two other
which this class was always ready to do
in anything that was to be done, but this
ore year stands out as one of the most


Even in this early stage they displayed an unusual


interesting.'


19


tal


J


)n

















20 THE CARTBBEAN.














S...



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THE


CARIBBEAN.


/^ FRESHMEN-ALPHABETICALLY I
az) SPEAKING& i


for Ashton who to Balboa did go;
And for Arcia and Abendroth who'll stay here we know.


for Negligent, Naughtry,
Surely quite inappropria


and Noise,
te to our girls and


B is for Bridges-then too for Burgoon;
Bv their Bright indications, they'll be


great


men soon.


C is for Coffey, Cousins, and Campbell,
And also for Collins who from us did ramble.


0 is for Oliver, the girl with the pep,
Who as basket ball captain has made us a rep.

P stands for Patten, Poole, Peterson, Pulgar,
All of whom find it easy "Espainol estudiar.


D's for our Duey with gold in her curls;
And for Dutiful Daughters-that's all of


Q is for Quizzes which none fully


us girls!


E is for Eden whom all of us know,
And also for marks which we're gladdest to show.

F is for Fisher, Fitz-William, and Fields,
And for marks which surely no card of ours yields.

G's for Gatun whose folks come on the bus;
And also for Gover who's gone far from us.

H is for Hopkins, our president dear,
Whose nature is full of sunshine and cheer.


for Interest which we all try to show,
For we know that, without it, our wisdom


won't grow.


enjoy,


And also for Questions which our minds do employ.

R's for Rainy season when umbrellas we carry.


And for Rain which


will catch us-as s


for Solomon, for Smith, and for Scott,
And for Stewart, and Stiles-Oh my!

for Trowbridge, Tufts, Tucker, and Tuley


Four basket-ball


girls-and


ure as we tarry.


What a lot!


all good ones-truly!


U's for Unanimous which we hope to remain,


And for that Inderstanding

V's for Vitality, Vigor, and Vim
Which the mabana fever will


we re striving


cause


to gain.


to grow slim.


J is for Jukes, our president who married;
We wish that among us she longer had tarried.


K is for Kiddishness which we know we'll


outgrow,


And also for Knockers whom we don't care to

L's for Layton and Lengel and Linczer and Lee;
The first two among us no longer we see.


know.


W's for Wirtz, and also for Wallace;
The latter has proved in our swimming a solace.

X stands for unknown as all good Freshmen know;
May we face it serenely whatever it show.


Y is for the Years which before us still lie;
And also for Youthful which we'll be till


we die.


M's for Marchosky and Mendes and May,
Who'll all be great people before they


for Zeal which we have now we know;
And also for Zest we hope always to show.


are gray.


'y u jj1w^^ ~ 1 -^az I


W. IG









THE CARIBBEAN.


Marjorie Ball, '22.


As the Alumni of Cristobal High School grad-
ually increase in number, they continue to show the
same pride and loyalty for their old school and


the same joy in remembering the past.


The old


days are summed up in a little poem written by
a member of the Class of 1920, Kenneth Green.
"One year and better," did you say?
Why, friend, 'twas only yesterday.
There's Minot in his place of yore,
Pete Clarity right beside the door.
There's Catherine, Susie, Lula, Bourke,
Al! engaged in yearbook work.
Dorothy, Jamfs, and Arlene Ball,
And Kenneth Edwards, good friends all.
There's Jack and Lindale, Kate and 'Een,
Alice, Etha, Al-old bean.
There's Alson Sears, and handsome Harl,
Kirby, Alice, Frank, and Carl,
Mud and Mildred, she is new,
Townsend, Roach, and LeRoy too.
There's Emma, Mary, Jane, and Paul,
Doris, Chester, and Marjorie Ball.
Good friends, I greet you all to-day
Just as I did yesterday.

1918.


CRISTOBAL


Being
Bemg


C. Z.


min the first class to be graduated from


Cristobal High, I can appreciate how much you
have advanced since the class of 'i8 passed out.
I admire your school spirit above everything. I
think your athletics and the effort you are making
to publish a magazine worthy of our school help


1 1 I I
..* j ~. -. &_> I. JlI^ 1j.. &b - J - *-k. r ... JL. L. k *- f I -. -


BERKELEY,


I am now a Junior at the University of Cali-


forma.


Next September I expect to enter Colum-


bia University to take up work in its College of


Journalism.


THE CARIBBEAN last year was great,


and I am sure this year's will be better.


I certainly


wish the editors and contributors all the success in
the world.


CATHERINE


TEESE


WAID.


DENVER, COLO.
I took a year and a half in the Colorado School
of Mines at Golden and dropped out in 1920. I
got hold of an old transit and went up into Wyo-
ming and, calling myself a civil engineer, started
locating homesteaders on their claims.
It was up in the Big Horn Mountain and at


times I was over 125 miles from a railroad.


There


were lots of deer, elk, antelope and such game.


is a great country!


Last fall I decided I had better


get back into school again, so I entered Denver


University.


am taking a course min chemical


engineering, and expect to finish at the Colorado
Mines after I get through here.
I want to tell you how good it made me feel to


name still


on the mailing list of THE


CARIBBEAN.


LELAND


BOURKE


WELCH.


CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


I'm glad to know that such progress is being


- --


I '. 1 I 1 1 I --.. "., -. 1 I. .








THE CARIBBEAN.


watched the book improve and with it the school


BERKELEY,


spirit.


As for myself,


I've maintained a


policy


of watchful waiting, you might say, but am leaving
for the States on the nineteenth of May and d


not expect to return.


I am still studying at the University of Cali-
fornia and expect to go into business when I cornm-


> plete


my studies.


BEAN than


MiNxoT CoTrox.


Best wishes for a better CARIH-


ever before.


HARLAN


\V. HOLMWOOD.


CHAPEL HILL


N. C.


CRISTOBAL,


C. Z.


I am teaching Spanish and French in a high
school in North Carolina. Hard work, but I like


Best wishes for


THE CARIBBIEAN.


MARY


ELIZABETH


Susie Harrison, after completing a


VERNER.


secretarial


course, returned to the Zone and is now living in
Cristobal.


1919.


As.an apprentice printer, I am very busy making


the 1922 issue of THE CARIBBEAN.


"printing


ug has cutaneously performed on me, and, while
entertain no thought of abandoning my desire to


answer the
1 i 1


Knowledge slowlY infused into my green-gray
matter by that Principal of Principals, Miss K. I.


"call of the air,


yet, with the aid of


Davis,


with the help of th: printers around me,


and by sedulous application, I will first try to make
myself a printer worthy of the name.


Los A


best wishes


NGELES


for the


annual


and three


rousing cheers for the class of 1920.


I am working for the


Vonder Khulen Electric


ALBERT


DOYLE.


Company,


which


one of the oldest


Angeles, and I like it very well.


I had in leaving the


bring


in Los
Regret


Zone was that I could not


it with me.


KENNETH


EDWARDS.


CO'DERSPORT, PA.
I am out on a farm in Pennsylvania about a


million
success


graduating


miles


from nowhere.


of the annual and


Best wishes for the
the happiness of the


class.


BosTO


Mass.


NETH


GREENE.


I am a junior in Simmons College where I am


Alice Stilson


is residing


her parents in


taking a


secretarial course.


wish you success


Colon.


with the annual.


ALICE ARLENE


BALL.


Alson Sears is still attendingBerkeley College in
California.


Dorothy Anna Montanve (nee Weir) is residin


BOSTON, MASS.


in Pittston, Pa. \1
Montanye, Jr., may


hope that some day


return to the Zone


to be


classmate of Jimmy Coman, Jr.

James Gerard Raymond is residing in Colon.


He is working on the


Advance.


1920.


Best wishes for the success of the class of 1922.
If there are any of its members who are thinking
of entering the dental profession, I advise serious


contemplation, because


All that glitters is not


gold." The course is now five years and it means
a steady grind from start to finish or those who
start will never finish.


As a greeting to my


classmates, I should like


am at present


Teachers


working


ANGEILE
for the


to mention that all morning we have been having
a big snow storm which causes Harlan Holmwood's


Americ-an


' Agency and find my work interesting,


but am contemplating entering the University of


California in the fall.


I am in love with California,


poem


"The Call


of Panama,


strong appeal to me.


to make


"Hello, Class


a very
of '20,


when do we eat '?"
I wish the editorial staF thi best success in every


1 *11 1 -


2-


1 1








THE


CARIBBEAN.


Katherine Burgoon, now Mrs. Stewart, is still


FORT RANDOLPH


C. Z.


with us in Colon. b
I have just recently moved to Randolph but


J. B. Fields, Jr., is studying mechanical engi-
neering in Rice Institute, Texas.

Lillian Cotton recently changed her name to
Van Wagner and is now living in New Cristobal.
1921.


like it very much.


a big


University and have so far been successful in my


I am pledged in the Gamma Eta Gamma


Fraternity, and am residing in their chapter house.
There is nothing like fraternity life or spirit.
I have heard of the fine school spirit this year
and I only hope that it will aid you in publishing


"A word


the best CARIBBEAN yet.
to the wise is unnecessary;
who need to be told."


FRANK RAYMOND.

STATE COLLEGE. PA.


I am taking a course in Mechanica


COLUMBIUS, Miss.

I am studying at the Mississippi State College


for women.


but get lonesome for my old Isthmian friends.


KIRBY FERGUSON.


it is only the foolish


Charles Henter has been staying at Hampton


Roads,


but is planning on


electrical course next year.


Engineering


I wish that this


CARIBBEAN may be bigger and better than ever.
CARL DUEY.


Alice Hunter has been filing in the American
Foreign Banking Corporation, but expects to leave
us next year to enter Simmons College in Boston.


GATUN.


George


Ships pass north and ships pass south
Through Gatun.
Few birds fly overhead,
Among them buzzards with outspread wings.
Lighthouses, scattered here and there,
Safely guide the ships from lake and ocean.
Lake, but not ocean, touches shores
In Gatun.


Thick jungle borders.
Coconut palms bedeck the


streets;


Cartwright,


Soldiers numerous, in suits of khaki-
Drilling, shooting practice, sports, their work-
Guard the Canal.


Crops, a few, the Chinese grow-
Lettuce, beans, spinach, such.
The soil is not fertile and therefore


not sown.


Swimming pool, well enjoyed,
Consists of float and raft and water.


we see.


Whistles of departing ships
Seem to mark the hours.
From ocean seven miles away


Comes the wind.


The wind


sways


It loosens fruits from their high nest.
palms,


Bends deep grass,
Is the feature of the dry


season,


Helps cayucos sail home.
The locks, an enrineerine feature.


In the center of our town
Stands the clubhouse.


Pool room, gym and movies,
Library, reading room, bowling too, are there,
And for our treat-refreshments.
Thus serves this only building of its kind
The public
Of Gatun.

The church bells ring


I want to say that the students


am taking a


of Cristobal High School were very kind to me
when I entered last year, a complete stranger.
I sincerely hope that this year's annual will be


SYRACUSE, N.


studies.


success.


pre-medic course in Syracuse


ELEANOR ZIMMERMANN.


Remember,


I am enjoying my work immensely


at Pennsylvania State College.


taking up


Royal palms as well








THE CARIBBEAN. 25


UP THE PIILCOMAYO.


WI. F. Bowers, '24.


Who knows what may follow
boyhood, pledge ourselves to


when we. in our


things,


which


"Will I go ?"


When do we start?


I fairly yelled.


"I will, you know.


Tell me the plans.


even at the time of greatest interest, seem im-
possible?
When I was in high school in the Canal Zone,


"Well, keep your shirt on, will you?


start
bunch


to-night!


The object is


of quebracho


trees.


You can't


to locate a new


The old


ones


my friend,
two things


Weslev


upon


marriage has


Townsend, and


which


we agreed:


the means of


discovered
First, that


ruining many


about used up.


The scientific guys expect to stay


until we have located the trees."
"What are quebracho trees, anyway ?"


I asked;


men;:


therefore


away trom any
that civilization,


enough on


the surface,


we determined
entanglements;


a ripe guava,


to stay
second,


looks


but inside is eaten


"I have been here two years and I never heard of


the things.


Are they good to eat?"


"That's just like you.


thing to eat.


Always wanting some-


Tannin is extracted from the trees


worms.


As a result of these bits of sophistry, we


and used in tanning leather,


" he explained.


declared our intention of spending our lives in
exploring far from human kind.
Little did we dream how nearly some of our


We sat and talked over our plans until quite


don't believe


Would that week never pass?


slept a bit that night.


Think of it!


Seven


plans would become reality.


years


ago I


whole davs!


Of course there was plenty to do.


was graduated


Johns


Hopkins College of


We had to lay in a stock of provisions, guns,


Medicine.


My interest in South America bein


munition and the like.


Most of this was done


strong, I settled in Buenos Aires and succeeded in
building up a good practice.
One night just as I returned from a professional
call, there was a loud rapping at the door. In
response to my call, who should rush in but Towns-
end. His greeting was characteristic.
"Why don't you live in a decent joint, Spark-


by the men of the Society, however.
At last the day arrived and we boarded a river


steamer bound for Formosa.


For hours we were


out of sight of land in a turbid muddy sea.


Then


we reached the river's mouth and started on our


four-day trip.


The next morning we made our


first stop at Rosario, the second largest city of


awowskv ?


I had an awful time to find this hole.


Argentina.


All during the following day, small


I got your address from your folks and


then I


floating islands drifted bv on the sluggish current.


nearly had to walk myself to death to find
shack."


your


These islands were seething with


the glistening


bodies of water snakes and occasionally we saw a


I managed to pacify him by sharing the good
dinner which my cook had prepared.


wild pig marooned.


the partially


civilize


The next morning we passed
ed territory of Chaco, and


After


dinner


he continued


hooked


reached


Formosa late in the evening


Formosa


.-. 1_ .. _t" 1 -i_ ..... fl li-_.- _- /_ 1 r__1


are


am-








THE CARIBBEAN.


ous-looking lot. Short, flat-nosed, with long,
snaky, black hair-in a word, they were typical


devotion of Jos6


treating him


rather than as a hired servant.


as an equal
HIe refused to


Indians of the Guarani blood.


I noticed, however,


accept


a rifle,


however,


preferring


native


that the guide held aloof from them. Then I saw
that he was of an entirely different type. He was
a pure Bolivian-tall, stalwart, and clean-cut.


machete, with which he was an adept.
Toward noon, we approached a sharp bend in


the river.


Here we paddled along with double


"'Here,


"I thought,


"is a fellow to depend on.


caution but it availed us nothing.


The river was


At last, with all our baggage stowed away, we
started on our voyage up the Pilcomayo, a long
uncharted river which for hundreds of miles forms


swarming


dugouts


manned


hideously .painted and tattooed.


Indians


Evidently their


sentinels had seen us the first night and had sent


the boundary


between


Argentina and


Bolivia.


a warning ahead.


"backed water


quickly


All day we paddled between thick jungles matted


"Ilhanas


and tree ferns.


Gaudy birds flew


and attempted to turn around but they were too
quick for us.


screaming from tree to tree, and lazy
basked in the sunshine.


alligators


"Well, if this isn't a nice mess!


us that we were explorers anyway?"


Who ever told


Townsend


Toward evening we paddled up a side stream
and made camp in a small clearing.
In the morning we sent out a small party to


look for quebracho trees.


When they returned


after being gone most of the morning, they re-


demanded, as the Indians started to tow us shore-
ward.
None of us was able to think of any brilliant
plan; so we let the Indians take us to shore. Here
we were roughly hauled from our canoe and put


ported that they


had found


several white que-


into a evil-smelling, vermin-infested hut.


These


bracho trees, which yield an important drug, and


inhabitants violently contested our right to share


some red ones.


They also reported that they had


discovered tracks, Indian tracks!


We immediately


their abode with


them.


hobbled in with several


Presently an old hag
well-filled calabashes of


broke camp and


proceeded


cautiously


because,


not long before, a garrison of soldiers near Formosa


baked yams, breadfruit, roast goatmeat, and milk.
She scrutinized us closely and then, going up to


has been massacred.


All day long our men grum-


bled among themselves and now and then I caught
them looking at us malignantly and whispering
together. Fearing an ambush, we did not stop
for lunch but pushed steadily on, eating some cold


roast pig as we went.
In the evening, however,


we were


forced


one of
times.


the scientists,


she pinched


him several


Nodding her head and muttering to her-


self, she took a large part of the food and placed
if before him, indicating by signs that he was to


eat all of it.
despair.
"Well, I'm


Townsend was the picture of


darned,


he exclaimed,


"here


stop for the night.


We selected a spot on a slight


rise of ground and after a cold supper, for we
dared not light a fire, we posted guards and turned


thought I would get a square meal for a change.
Then she comes along and gives most of it to the


other fellow.


I'd like to know the great idea.


What was our terror when in the morning we
found that all of our men, except the guide, had
deserted, taking with them everything that they
could carry. After taking inventory of our re-
maining stores, which consisted of one dugout,
three 30.30 rifles, two .45 caliber revolvers, and a


We were all greatly mystified, but our mystifica-
tion increased when we received a summons to


come before the chief.


We were led to a large hut


in the center of the village, through the low door,
and into a long room hung about with skins of
animals, human skulls, and native weapons. At
the far end was a raised platform upon which the


case of


canned goods,


we sat down


to hold a


chief sat on a throne of skulls.


At his side stood


council of war.


T here were six of us, Townsend,


a tall, stalwart, clean-cut fellow, who was a pure


Jos6, the guide, the three men of the Geographic


Bolivian.


It was Jos6, our guide.


We looked at


Society, and I.


Five of us were in favor of going


one another in surprise


What was he doing here?








THE CARIBBEAN.


fellow wearing only a


breech-clout, necklace of


How we tugged at our bonds!


But it was no use.


bones, and a feather headdress, was furious when


we refused to kneel to him.
terpreter, he boomed forth,


Using JosP as an in-
"What do the white


We realized that we should have to see it through
without assisting our associate.
With a wild shout, the brute whipped a dagger


dogs in the country of the Chacos?
know the penalty?"


Do you not


We stated our business as clearly and as calmly
as possible but it did not seem to allay his sus-


picions of us.


Calling a guard, he had us bound


and taken back to our hut.


As evening drew on,
number of cooking fires.


we were surprised at the
One was kindled before


each hut and a pot of water put on.


from
friend


his belt and drove it to


There


was a


the heart of our


rush of villagers


as each


drew his knife and strove to get some part of the


victim s anatomy.


It was sickening.


Men rushed


from the crowd spattered with blood and carrying


a piece of leg, arm, or other delicacy.


Then fol-


lowed a great feast of dog and human flesh,


gether with many kinds of vegetables.


The men


"Say, fellows,


would be willing to bet that


ate until their wives had to carry them home.


these devils are cannibals


" I affirmed.


Finally


when


a few old


men were


"Well,
grimly.


soon find out,


said Townsend


And it was not long before we did find


sleeping on the ground, we saw, by the fitful light


of the fire, J


ose creeping toward us with a knife


out!
As soon as it was dark we were dragged, still
bound, to an open space in the center of the village
where five posts had been set in the ground. Each
of us being bound to a post, we waited apprehen-


sivelv for the performance to begin.


The villagers


lost no chance to pelt us with stones or whatever
was at hand.
Shortly the tom-toms began to beat-throbbing


notes that made one's senses dull.


these


gleaming in his hand.
Had he come to finish ,


What was he up to now?


\Ve hoped so.


Any-


thing would be better than the torture we were


undergoing.


sat down


arms and legs.


But he quickly cut our bonds and


till the


numbness


had left our


Silently he motioned us to follow


At the water's


edge our own canoe


was


drawn up, loaded with our guns and provisions.
We took our places and silently slipped down the


sounds ceased as if by magic and the chief stalked
over to his raised seat, together with Jos6. At


a given signal, a


crowd and


huge brute stepped from


went over to the scientist


who had


stream.


When we had


gone


to us that he knew


some distance Jos6 explained
the Chaco dialect and he


thought that by posing as our enemy, he might


eaten our dinner.


He executed a wild dance to


help us to escape.


He finished with:


"The Sefiors


the music of the tom-toms and then, taking some
instrument from a pouch at his belt, he loosened


did not think me a traitor?
"Jose, old boy, you had me stumped for awhile,


one of the captive's arms and started


to work.


One by one he slowly ripped out the finger nails
of his helpless victim, who fainted twice but was


revived immediately.


Then when he had wearied


admitted


Townsend.


We all assured


we trusted him fully.


"Poor devil,"


murdered scientist.


said Townsend, referring to the


"The best we can do is to go


of plucking the beard from his face, hair by hair,


he tore off his shirt and drew a burning


brand


back there some day and avenge him."
Gloom hung over us like a pall as we thought


across the bare flesh.


The scientist was sagging


of our companion.


We shook it off, and by hard


loosely in his


bonds, his lusterless eyes glazed,


his mouth swinging open.


paddling, we reached Formosa in two days. Four
more davs and we reached Buenos Aires and home.


*









THE CARIBBEAN.


CRISTOBAL,


C. Z.,


fort glooms above the sparkling blue water like


April


20, 1922.


some sullen sentinel, its gray


walls


forming


DEAR MARY:
In this letter I have something really interesting


strange contrast to the pink and blue of the red-
roofed huts which flaunt themselves at the foot
of the jungle-covered mountains like those of a


to write about.


Last Sunday we took a most de-


toy village.


Nearby, a group of native boys were


lightful trip to Porto Bello (beautiful port), a little
town about 20 miles down the coast, in which are
the historic ruins of an old Spanish fort, cathedrals,


swimming about in


the cool water, diving and


splashing like young seals, their agile bronze bodies


glistening in the sun.


How oblivious they were


and other interesting buildings,


which were the


pride of the town before the pirate Morgan sacked
it, leaving little but ruins of what had been one
of the richest cities on the Caribbean.
As we left Cristobal behind us, the water was


gray; the sky, dark and sullen;


but later the sun


came out and shone so radiantly that we knew
we should have a beautiful day for our trip. My
spirits rose as we set out to sea against the cool


of the fact that fathoms beneath them lay the
bones, and perhaps a tarnished sword-all that
was left of the once dauntless old sea dog, Drake!


Finally,


much


maneuvering, under the


interested eyes of a group of ragged half-naked
natives, all of whom were offering advice (which
we could not understand), we tied up to a rickety
little wharf.
After having a delicious lunch on board the


wind.


The Ca-


Cara,


we simply


could not wait any longer to


ra, leaving
pathway


PORT BELLO TOWNSITE.


foam and spray,
cut swiftly
through the
clear blue wa-
ter. We passed
a couple of


There dynamite and giant crushers conquered the .
mountain side to furnish food that the wonderful Canal diminutive sail-
Locks might live. i n
l kd ru n in thieboats, reeling
like drunken men, their white sails glistening in


a start, our heads were so full of tales of pirates,


pieces of eight, and treasure trove.
difficult time getting into the little


jumping over


a small stream


We had a
town, first


then squeezing


in between two huts, before we finally stepped


onto a narrow, dirty, little old


cobbled street.


What a contrast to the busy prosperous city of
years ago is this squalid little town-nothing to
be seen on the streets but a few scrawny old hens


and a mangy dog worrying a clean bone!


As we


picked our way down the streets, natives peered


the sun.
a stretch


Along the coast we could see, beyond


of white beach, tiny


thatched


nestling under stately palm trees; behind these,
rose hazy purple mountains.
At last we arrived at Porto Bello, and it cer-
tainly was rightly named, for I lost any qualms of
seasickness that I had had, in contemplation of


the exquisite scenery.


The bay, which is almost


out curiously.
mansion. What
a magnificent
old pile it must
have been with


its gray


walls


rising majesti-
cally! As I en-


Finally we


came to the governor


landlocked, is really the most picturesque I have
.-... *1* j. .. / -- C.4hat L n j* n l C k .


tered
*


the old


1


PORTO BELLO.
A land-locked harbor as beautiful as the poet's dream.








THE CARIBBEAN.


dark eyes flashing under his swarthy brow; while


At last we came to the fort, which thrilled me


strolling beside him was a 1:
in sweeping Spanish broc
veiling her lustrous eyes
topped by a tall carved corn
story goes that the gover
his wife lost their lives x
building was burned. Wit
for these ill-fated ones, I rel
left the shadows of the pas
glaringsunshine of the press
Outside, we saw two ba
scantily dressed little girls
wild rice in a wooden cy
vessel, with long awkward
how primitive this seemed


anguid sl
ades, a
and sle
b. The
'nor and
vhen the
h a sigh
luctantly
st for the
lent.
relegged,
husking
lindrical
pestles;
in corn-


endei
lace
ek bl


prison with the modern method of I'"
preparing rice!
Half hidden by creeping jungle
vines lies the old cathedral, the
Spanish style of architecture still
evident in the tall spires, arches, and
"In t
ornate carving. The centuries rolled
away; the air was heavy with incense; a
notes of the deep-voiced organ rose the
monotone of the old priest, and the mI
responses of the kneeling Spaniards. Wi
I spanned the years to the present
aroused from mv reverie bv the incon
the grunting and rooting of scrawny razo
hogs where once Spanish chivalry and be
knelt in prayer. I felt a shudder of di
this sacrilege.


SSeiiora,
mantilla
ack hair


most of
bloody b
pirates,


A NATIVE SCENE.


the shade of the


above the
droning
urmured
th a leap
rudely
gruity of
r-backed
auty had
state at


young mango tree.


were


forced tc


had to h
cannon
did argu
ever, it
beautiful
glow ovw
village.
tired, b


fe


worth while.


all, for I
attles and of
their knivt
white
to th
into ti
the ho
the lig
wonde
prison
glimps
old ru:
and n(
are sti
nated


could conjure
swarthy, bearcn
es gleaming I
teeth, creepii
e fort. As
he dirty old d
me of slimy liz
ht fade away in
red for how
ers this had b
,e of the sun.
sty cannon, on
ow just a heap
11 lying around
by the quain


tun
ard
ito
mna
)eel
Si
wce


,red-sashed
ween their
up the hill
descended
geons (now
Is) and saw
darkness, I
nv suffering
n their last
ome of the
so powerful


)f useless iron,
I was fasci-
gray sentry


boxes overhanging the bay, and, as I
peered through the narrow slit, in my
imagination I experienced the awful
terror of that loneguardwhothrough
this same aperture had seen that
first strange English ship appear.
The sun became so hot that we
return to theCara. Of course daddy
souvenir; so he bought two big rusty
from an old native, and how they
[ haggle over the price! Finally, how-
iettled satisfactorily, and we left the
Behind us, the sun casting a mellow
. rippling water and the fast receding
arrived home at about seven o'clock,
eling that the trip has been well
Truly your friend, BETTY.


STOP, LOOK, AND LISTEN.
Jordan Zimmermann, '22.


"Beware of entrance to
Bear't that the opposed
In plain English these
not quarrel needlessly b
that your adversary kno


Some people ge
chance to start a
point. The only t
plishes is an unp
There is a natural
argues over nothi
who seemindvly ar


Sthro
.n arg
thing
leasan
tended
ng.


e a


I ''


a quarrel, but, being in
may beware of thee."*
words of Polonius mean do
ut, if forced to, make sure
ws that he has noeasy task.
ugh life watching for the
;ument over some trivial
this sort of person accom-
it reputation for himself.
ncy to shun a person who
Of course there are some
ravs in an argument but


A person who goes alon


ingly
mud
rels.
thor
who
sides
take
but
ware
their
spect


always


the sam


h more than
Why? Be
roughly and
quarrels mu
or there c,
s a long tim
when he is f
. The Doin


force
d and


5


e,qu
pers<
se he
see
lecess


n
o01u
ax
br


[ts h


. He overwhelms
versatility of his a


from day


to day seem-


let and reserved, obser
on who blusters and qu
can study a point m<
both sides; whereas <
sarily take one of the t
nothing to argue on.
ise a quiet man to acti
wakened it is time to 1
rings up are clinching


the blusterer by the
attack.


t

1


a


'


I







THE CARIBBEAN.


THE DERELICT'S STORY.


Kenneth Parker,


It was on a wind-swept coral isle of the South


Seas that I met Jack Hart.


He was a great hulk


of a man, gray, worn and dissipated; in a word,


ster, nor could he leave him in a private school,
as he had promised the dying mother that the
child should not be separated from him.


a typical derelict of the seas.


clothed


inm rags,


His huge frame,


bore evidence of having once


The captain


loved his sister's


moment that he set eyes on him.


boy from the
After a hard


possessed great strength;


his features were strong


struggle within himself he decided to give up his


and regular


though


half concealed


beneath


a command at the end of one more voyage.


He had


heavy, matted beard.


Hart was wont to sit on a


rock, for hours at a time, gazing seaward with
head erect and eyes flashing. He aroused mv


started to leave the child at a home for sailors'
children, but the piteous cries of the motherless
child beseeching him not to leave him alone were


interest greatly.


I wondered a good deal about


too much for Hart;


so he took Billy with him on


this lonely creature.
We were both in this out-of-the-way place for


the same reason


business-I


being engaged


that fated voyage.
The trip gave all indications of being a record
one. He easily secured a valuable cargo from which


my usual occupation of gathering a cargo of copra


for the


company s


vessel;


being occupied with the task of


eking o
nothing.
We


ut a livelihood,


ere


drawn


doing


together


finally because of loneliness and
the fact that we were the only
white men on the island. One
day when more or less under the


seductive


influence


of whisky


and soda, he waxed commumnica-


tive and told me


his story.


he expected rich premiums.
Borneo,


Then at Brunei, North


he obtained,


through


what he thought was luck,


enormous


orang-outang


and a


gigantic leopard, the largest he


had ever seen.
to America alive
mean a fortune
could buy a con


If he got them
. they would


for him.


afortable home


for Billy and himself within sight
and sound of his beloved sea.
Pulling out of Brunei Bay, the
MaryEvansran into a stiff breeze


can not tell the tale


in Hart's


own words, but the memory of


it all haunts me vet.


I can still


PICTURESQUE TABOGA.
Poems are made by fools like me;
Only God can make a tree.-Kilmcr.


off the coast.


The barometer


alarming


"All hands make


rapidity.


snug,"


was


hear his


voice,


now shaken


hoarse


now bitter as he railed against an unjust fate.
He was a son of a fisherman and thus came to


the order.
a storm


The hatches were


raised


arations made.


and all


In a moment


battened
emergency


down,
prep-


the typhoon was


know and love the sea.


In his youth he had run


upon them.


The waves beat against the vessel,


away from home to try the roving, adventurous


life of a sailor.
experiences. I


Wild and strange had been his
shudder now as I think of them.


their blows forcing her to tremble from stem to


stern.
of it.


The Mary Evans was making bad weather
For hours she wallowed and drifted, without


Through his own efforts, he had finally become


master
Evans,


a fine trading


plying


schooner,


between


the Mary
Indies and


America.


After spending many years on the deep, he had


steerage, rolling helplessly in the trough of the sea.
Hart, feverishly rushing about, was suddenly
frozen in his tracks by a desperate scream followed
a moment later by an awful, guttural cry which
curdled the blood in his veins.


suddenly


confronted


with a serious prob-


The skipper,


numb


horror at what he


lem-one which almost baffled the hard old cap-
.. -...- 1 1 . .. I -.. I .. -.. 1 1 .-


might find, made a rush for below, flung open the
i ' .I ?1 l ,i .. 1_ -


- A








THE CARIBBEAN.


ape made him leap for the door


The draft
not hope
In a m
lay on thet
tiger, drev
breast of
Hart raise
the most
and the sh
was at hin
oar from
The oran


;ti t
rash
r. A
dec
hich
: nex
he b
to a


tain s


had already slammed
to reach it before the
)ment he caught utip
Sdeck, vaulted utip in
v his revolver, and e.
the charging beast.
d the oar and smashed
er's head. The brute,
lots, fell back, turned
i again. The man flu
him, grasped his k
g-outang, not being
o leap up at him, beg
ing roar of the tiger
\ quick sickening rip-
k with his whole break
Shad struck through
et moment the ship si
bottom were being tor
reef! Duty stood for


. But too late!


lit shu
orang
i heavw
to the
emptied
It sti
d it to
dazed


; he could
outang.
oar which
age of the
it into the
Same on.
nieces over
v the blow


a somersaui
ng the now
nife-and
possessed
an clamber
vibrated t
-and the a;
st laid open
the bars.
hook and tr
n away. S
most in ti


lt, andi


Billy utip into his arms


lives thrn
With t
her bean
pressure,
slipped o
later, Ha
exhaust
north of
From


to Lii
dear;
years
work
stanc<
even
As


embled


Sh,
he
21(


e could not even wait to gather


with tr
somehow


eatened;
terrible sh
is groan
the M
ff the fat
rt, cling
)n, was f
the villa
that tim
He ha
)t a spa
w he had
only wh
begging
m the na
rt finish
cmbling
v recurred


for a last farewell.


he rushed to the up
unidders passing through
ing and snapping und'
tarv Evans in a few
eful reef and went dowr
ing to a spar and at the
finally washed ashore a
ge of Gaya.
e on, life had been a n
.1 lost everything that
rk of ambition remain
wandered from island
en he was forced to b'f
from chance white tra
tives.
ed the pitiful story, anc
fingers for the siphc
d to my mind a phrase o


which I had learned as a


pl
it

e

i.


Other
r deck.
er, and
heavy
minutes
Hours
point of


few miles


utmare
e held
For
island,
ircum-
rs and


t reached
rn-there
f Irving's


schoolboy:


"little minds are tamed and subdued by misfortune but
great minds rise above it."


THE SEA FROM OUR SCHOOL.
George Cartwright, '2.


within


the assembly


room,


against iton theoppositeside, they are torn to pieces


through a window
row by a house
distance, a line
earth's surface,
drawn. Man m
but though he
over, he would
apparent edge
intersection of t
otherwise know
Some smoke ap
one on an unset
his last hope fo
most immediate
on either side, t
tions, which wit
steadily until it
they are support
I distinguish it
ocean voyage.
the horizon, a k


'w and an allotted space made nar-
nl either side. I see in the farthest


aight and para
y geometrician


av disc
travel
never
of the
he sk'
n as tl
pears a
en isle
)r resc
ly, th
wo lai
:h the ,
is app
ed by
to be


>eemi
ig str


cover and mn
the world
reach this
world, the
v and sea,
he horizon.


u
er
rg


s if some-
had used
e, but al-
re appear
e proiec-


smok
)aren
astur
onlyV
ngly
etch


.e
t
d
a
a
o


,rise
that
y base
harm
short
f rocks


an may invent,


and rise in the form of chalk-w
higher than their oppressor,
there at intervals, the full lengi
The foreground of this scel
Father Neptune, to-day an a
stricken mon


TORO POINT.
"Never an artist cmli paint iT'I his skill tte
sunsets which bloom o'er my Iills.


9
I
11
S


time p
ship
stance
wown


asses,
on its
from
as the


here
hear
unse
as ca


over
trad
less
and
back
their


by a cool, sweet-smell
gently over this vast
blue-green water. T
have succeeded in


and


hit
app
th o
ne i
ingr
ster


there, in


tsot owners a
worthy ves
ilm and smo
hed mirror,
its surface
e winds, whi
objects fron
keep tall
and forth
force; the
ing sea breed
, widespread
hen as the
escaping t


oam many feet
aring here and


)f the great wall.
s the domain of
ry, raging, fury-
,tossingits waves
citing fear in the
nd pilots ofsmall
isels; to-morrow
oth as a highly
; now carrying
, wild ferocious
ichli scatter base-
place to place,
palms swaying
in response to
n again ruffled
-ze, which moves
d, body of dark,
little waves that
hat destructive


31


- i


ef
)e








THE CARIBBEAN.


A SCENE AT THE COLON
Frances Poole, '25.


STATION.


The blistering rays of the hot afternoon sun
stream mercilessly through the iron bars of the


station


on a motley


crowd


of people pressing


toward the afternoon train for the trip across the


An elegantly


and dark,
musical S
husband.


passes


banish
With


dressed


Panamanian


me, chatting


lady,


vivaciously in


to her dapper wax-mustached


them is a


dark-eyed


pensive


Isthmus.


All is bustle and confusion.


I stand apart, interested in the scene before me.


senorita,


whom I


she bears a striking


take to be their daughter, as
resemblance to both. Lagging


are directed


toward


the parlor


behind them, are the two small sons of the family,


entrance'wherea timid baggage man is striving
to convince ajargoning Jamaican woman that she


is not at the second


class entrance,


while


giggling over


the funny


sheet of


an American


newspaper.
Here and there is a sprinkling of Army and Navy


negress firmly stands her ground, refusing to be


officers in spotless


"whites,


" with


their fashion-


convinced.


A huge, overdressed woman, who has


been e
through


yemg t
a gold


affair


lorgnette,


adds her voice to the weaker
one of the baggage man, and


finally, c
combined


able wives, making their way toward the parlor
car entrance.
Through the second class entrance surge peo-
ple from all corners of the world. In addition to
the usual collection of Jamaicans and Martiniques,


are Chinese


convinced
effort,


gress retreats to her own en-
trance, muttering to herself.
As she takes her place in


line,
tinique
have


two stately
women,


Mar-
who


conversing


mTEPagNs-cmAcE-ASPINWALL the French of their
.tflSVUv I S S*


Dedicated to the builders of ISle,
the Panama Railroad-John L.
Stephens, Henry ChauneeyWil- their
iama H. Aspin wall-a grotesque -
but well-meaning architectural tne3
monstrosity.


scornfully


dressed


in American


clothes


devoid of queues, and swarthy East Indians of


small


stature,


their straight black hair covered


with small round fezes of black velvet embroidered
in gleaming gold threads.
I turn my attention to the first class entrance


where


a short, dark, old


Panamanian, his stiff


white beard contrasting with the swarthiness of his


native
4


draw aside


r voluminous skirts lest
Touch the faded drab
of the slouchy Jamaican.


skin, takes his place sedately in line.


Behind him


towers a sunburned pink-faced Englishman.
At the end of the line a proud mother is engaged
in the difficult task of keeping her flock of five


children near her.


She cranes her neck, anxiously


I am strongly


costume


these


impressed


Martiniques.


picturesque
The stiffly


watching to see that the train doesn't leave with-
out her; at this juncture one of her infants strays


starched skirts of their gay gingham dresses are


away and stands


beside the sedate gentleman.


held up


neatly


over one


petticoats equally as stiff.
kerchiefs are crossed ove


arm, revealing snowy
Bright three-cornered
.r their ample bosoms,


while quaintly tied turbans of vivid red and yellow
add the finishing touch to these unique costumes.


The child drops his lollypop and reaches out his


dirty,


sticky


hands


to the man's


white


trousers to balance himself, while picking it up.


"Caramba,


" the man mutters-but very softly,


for he is a Panamanian gentleman and doesn't


A group of


three tourists interests me;


rather pompous man in immaculate white duck


utter oaths in
American men.


the unrestrained manner of our


mother rescues her child


and pith


helmet (v


vhich


is no longer worn


just as he takes out his lime-flavored lollypop to
* S S








THE CARIBBEAN.


arm is a magazine bearing the


title, "Elite Styles.


at the


entrance of the station


and several sturdily


A red-
the lates


his arm
far bac
trouser
The
the ga
cap far
wipes
Just


',
k
s
lS
la


-faced A
t number
comes rn
on his
flapping
.st of th


teman
back
his for


then the


merican sailor


of the "Police Gaze
hing up, his white c
useled hair, the bhot
s he runs.
line passes through
is also conductor,
head and sighs aud
and starts toward t


sound of boyish voi


, proudly bearing


tte" under
ap pushed
tomrn of his


the
push
ibly,


Ii


: train.


ces is


heard


come flyvin


:nocking over a Jama
;he mumbles somethi
nd turns to her con
amaican fashion on
Some boys outside
bout bringing home
tc. All but two are


o answer, th


alre;


tramin start


steps and the train


rough the gates, nearly
-- of: pauts
woman's trayofpeanuts.
bout rude American boys,
-
nion to discourse in true
sub)iect of rude children.
he gates shout something
bacon, skinning Balboa,
adv on, and, as they turn
s,; the boys jump to the


is off.


A TALE OF


A TRAINING
Paul C. Doyle, '22.


TRACK.


February v's


June r
reassert
Cristol
Det
in his
but de
prepare
jockey
whom
built a
main e
Eac
in the
week.


races


aces began.
nbled at t
bal High Sc
termination,
last race wi
cided he w
ing Algebra
called Fun
he named
.nd had the
vent in Tun


h
tr
r


were over


All the


training


hool.
a jockey
th his st
would spe
for the n
entered t
Physics.
making
,


and training


ckey school


ourse


time G,


students


, namely,


seventeen, had lost
born steed Algebra,
a little extra time
t big race. Another
stable with a horse
[his horse was well
a first rater for the


day the horses were trained to take part


yout
Fo b


their horses
a semester's
Horses line
but a vacant
lessness was r
Cheat, witi
his way aroul
was heard, "
Determine


were
pass
from
ning


throwi
ed Fun,
all the
his hor


n


S
s


s, ca


become
had t
work,
dup
spac
mnarke
h his
nd th
Fhey'
tion t
g the
vho b
pecta
Back


ed quizzes, at
a first rater o
o make the re,
within a certa
at the start for
e was noted at
;d absent.
horse History,


e
re
ur


end of each
onor student
red distance,
time of "G."
: weekly quiz,
iockev Care-


was already on


track of test when the shout
off."
red on Algebra whose hoofs


dirt of temp
'y this time h
tors of fellow
:wards down


station asi
ad drawn
students
the trail o


. He
laugh
r run-
llawn.


with a better time,


Che
E.


on dancing Physics a


at
T
a s


already


crossed it


hen came Fun riding in
peed of F, far below the


required time.
Each day in preparation for the


Determination b
his daily workout
exercises by att
horse English in t
the matinee wit]
lad nicknamed Fi
give him notes or
always have a I
Physics perform,
of wrong lessons.


Only
exams,
track mn
become
the onc
with a j
immedi:
brushed
the trac


The dA
e only
had n'
Id the


month
n was


manager,
serious
oming r
olt and
ately, a
*~ '


rushed
ts. Ca
ending
he stab
h Care
sh to c
1 what


up AIl
relessn


rn
)le
les
le
he


ughing


tatinei
. Ch
sness
an his
Shad
group


running sidewa


before


lied to
icipal,
Ise he
This
decided ti
ugh it
and da


bra
s mis


es, so
eat of
and
horse
done.
to s


June races,


who


shone


sed his daily
leaving his
ten attended
would get a
History and
Fun would
ee his horse


into the fence


: June races of final
he office of the race
ho told Fun he must
would be barred from
interview struck Fun
become serious, and
was rather late, he
v galloped him down


>f study.
Before the final event came. It was
me that Carelessness grew aware that
prepared English for the big race to be
xt day. He went to the stables to give


f


e.


1.


e


h


]


)


*re








THE CARIBBEAN.


and he was enjoying a swim of recreation, while
Algebra refreshed himself in the pasture of rest.
Seriousness still worked over Physics even during
the night, which made Physics quite exhausted.
Cheat had only one worry, he had shod History


with unfair answers and


was worrying how he


could take a short cut through the field of con-
cealed outline.
The eventful day had come and all dampened
sponges of books were taken from the jockeys.
A questionnaire was handed each of them as they
lined up at the starting point.


Cheat as he was slowing down and slipping on the
wet home stretch of thought questions, due to
History's new shoes of unfair answers.
Physics and English came plugging along with
Physics somewhat in the lead. They both leaped
by Cheat on the home stretch, eager to reach the
finish line of qualification for advanced series of


new subjects.


Cheat was humiliated and as a


last resort took from his pocket sand of outlined


campaigns and dropped it on th
History to keep him from slipping.


ie track


before


But the track


manager Principal discovered the sand and im-


"They're off,"


came


the shout,


but already


mediately


disqualified


Cheat


Cheat had a leap of an unprepared answer. De-
termination got a bad start but was pulling away


questionnaire of examination papers.
Thundered shouts rose from the spectators as


from Seriousness and


Carelessness, but Algebra


Determination


finished


fair and


square


began to puff and slow up when he came to the


Algebra who leaped across the tape of advanced


first bend called simultaneous equations.


As he


standing with


a much faster time than was


saw Cheat far in the lead he reached to his jockey
cap where he had a damp sponge of type forms


required.


Quite a cheer was given Seriousness as


Physics galloped across the finish within the re-


worked


out.


He looked


to the


rear and


saw


quired time


Not very far behind him Care-


Seriousness and Carelessness plowing fairly around
the bend of formulas and Shakespeare's Hamlet.
He dropped his hand and urged Algebra on square-
ly. A quick refreshing shower of renewed memory
came and Determination began to pick up speed


and gain on Cheat.


History was beginning to fail


lessness finished, panting heavily.
the lowest possible passing, "P."


His time was


Cheat was theonly one who didn't finish,as he left


the race through the gate of shame.


Although all


others were given a chance for the next races of new
subjects Cheat was expelled from the course.


SUNSET


AT THE CHAGRES.


Emma Townsend, '22.


A long stretch of white beach,


winding along


rosy.


Even


the small


waves


are pink-tipped.


the roya'-tinted
catches the eve.


waters


in graceful


curves, first


The darkening jungle with its


deepening shadows, outlined by a row of rugged
coconut palms,
i quiet,save for
S* the slight rust-


ling o0
caused
a:ntle


f leaves,


No life is seen, except yon boatman in his skiff


disappearing around


gull seeking
flowerpot,"


the point and


his nest for the night.


the restless
"Nature's


to the west, stands out as a proud


sentinel guarding the entrance, and to the east,


Lorenzo,


on a high


rocky


outlined


against the sky, looking out across the sea, and


seeming to tell its story of pirates and "


blowing


of the cool eve-


seadogs,"


marks the boundaries of our quiet, peaceful
world.


little


LOWER CHAGRES RIVER,
Snjlik int verdantly dad banks, the river is not all
m' repose.


gently on the soft, sand


dav's work of


ning


breeze.


Small waves lap


beach, tired after their


pounding themselves


unceasingly upon the shore


noisily and


in towering,


white-


capped waves.


What a picture for an artist'


spot, tar re-
moved from the
noise of the
bustling cities,


calm,


c'tt 1 1)i~lf~ 1~ 11n II 1 1 1J I.


peaceful,


-. _ i - ..i -- ~ *_j _


s pen, this little


tore


I I ~ -I m- A1 U .L,









THE CARIBBEAN.


GATUN TO CRISTOBAL BY


BUS.


William Cousins, 'a5.


"Let'


go, Joe,


Eddie.


a quarter


after.


meet
load o


John, the Chinaman, struggling under his
ff vegetables. He greets us with his cheery


It is a bright Monday morning


with everyone


smile and drawls


"Hellogoomornin.


" Descending


present and cheerful.


We start


with a rattle and


the hill,


we come to High Street,


which is


the driver


toots


his horn


for Ben Turpin,


riddle of the ride as we all


wonder what


street sweeper, to move h


mousi


ne so our chariot
can pass. After
considerable
shimmying, we
make the top
of the hill, pass
on the left the


Maids


rendezvous


MOUNT HOPE FILTRATION PLANT, and s
Might well be called a laundry, for here our drinking offiil
water is warned, bleached, and-momentarily-hun; OfCial
out in the air. L.. .


e veral
houses;


right,


would


call a street if it were one to which vou


go up hill.
As we bump over the railroad at the bottom of


hill, we


see to the right


the distance, the
, Agua Clara fil-


tration
\VWith


plant.
the


keeper's home
above it on the
Lill overlooking
1.
the reservoir, it
reminds one of


the palatial residences


Sowley;


and again on


of Mr.
the left,


Bridges and Mr.
the fire station


OIL FARM.
Immense tanks of liquid gold.


a farm.


rectlv


in front


with the bombers shining the brass on the engine.
Then we stop at the Henter farm. As Lulu is
getting on we can look down into the fertile penin-


sula below.


This is called Mud Point, probably


of us, is the largest cleaning-up place in town, the
post laundry, and, directly behind it, is the place
where the Army mule skinners rein and reign in all
their glorvy-the Army stables.


named after Lulu's brother


"Mud."


several goats running about and


Here we see
wonder which


Entering Fort Davis,


Warner


we stop for


Juline and


. Passing the athletic field, we see the ball


Carlos says the small one is hers,


as it is easy to get.
As we coast down Aristocrat Avenue something


seems to be amiss.
vehicleand,up- -


inspection,


mud guard


the left side is
rubbing on the


tire.


Further


investigation
reveals the rea-


The driver stops our valiant


OIL-PFMPING STATION.
Controlling miles of pipes from farm to ship side.


team
track.


out practicing


drive outon the


Bolivar
way, w


High-
'e have


dense jungle on


either


hand in


strong contrast
to the modern
concrete build-
ings of the fort


which
rock


ru n n e rs


covering


OIL-HANDLIJG PLANt.
Valves to the right of us, valves to the left of us.
opening and closing, the oil rushes out.


we have just left.


walls which


remind


Passing between two


one of


Culebra


son-Mattie and Emma are


on the same


* r tkW* .j> -


we see a Jamaican walking to Colon and taking


one is Lulu's.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


sun might cause him to become freckled!


Charlie,


which


is supplied


various companies


however, would rather stand there as he hopes to


tanks on


the surrounding hills and from which


conductor when


gets big.


Warner is


the government distributes the oil to ships at so


intently watching the road for a skin, and every
time we run over a snake, he skins back to skin it.


The girls


are too busy


copying one


another's


algebra and Spanish to engage in any diversion.
We approach the Mindi dairy which belongs
to the Government and supplies the Atlantic side


with fresh milk.


Adjoining the dairy are large


pastures in which we see the Holstein and Guernsey
cows which the Government has imported from


much per barrel.


We pass Mount Hope filtration


plant and pumping station from which Cristobal
and Colon are supplied with pure water, and ap-
proach a place with a grave aspect-a place where
people are dying to go-Mount Hope Cemetery.
On the left is a large gasoline tank, which we
tell strangers is the pagoda of the Chinese consul.
Below it is the printing plant-made famous by
THE CARIEBEAN-which makes money-no! not


the States.


The road which passes through the


counterfeit, but commissary books.


Behind this,


farm connects the Bolivar Highway with the old
Gatun-Cristobal road which runs to the east of
the dairy.
As we cross the bridge over a small stream, we


see a Silver City jitney reposing in the
three wheels tired and the fourth


knocked


Passing


a two-


wheeled cart loadedwith charcoa


and bananas


small


native


bigger than
drowsing I


load,


and drawn


pony


a large d


3aian


not much
og, with a


topping


we see just ahead


cylindrical


object


a black


ditch with


which,


were on a ship, we should think a


mine,


but which,


on closer in-


are the Cristobal shops and the dry dock which


was made bv the


Americans.


French and enlarged by the


Here we see all kinds of craft.


joining this is the site of the old coaling plant
which is a mere shovelful in comparison with the
_________ present one which we see to the


TARPON CLUB,


left in the distance.


This is the


place which added to the fame of
the Atlantic side when a whale ran
aground on theflats near theplant.
On our right is the up-to-date cold
storageplant builtand maintained
from commissary profits. After
driving through Silver City which


Any one may hook a tarpon, but it takes a thorough- consists of quarters built by the


brel to land one.


government for its silver (colored)


section, proves to be only a boiler for melting tar
to fill the cracks in the concrete road.
Running beside the river, we see a dark knotty
object, slowly gliding through the water among
the bushes. Warner thinks it will be a fine skin
if he can only get it; so, asking the driver to stop,
he jumps off, but by this time our friend Monsieur
Snap Alligator has left for a more healthful place.
One of the familiar characters of this trip is the
negro, pushing his three-wheeled cart loaded with
grass, who stops to blow his whistle at every car
that passes him.
Traveling at the terrific speed of eighteen miles per
hour, we soon arrive at the crossing of the Bolivar
Highway, Margarita Road, and the old road be-
tween Gatun and Colon. Stopping the chariot


for the Hanson


Brazos


Brook


Cri ;t hb-l reservoir, we are again on our way with


employees


which


in Cristobal-Colon


is next to


the largest


we enter Colon,
city in Panama.


Here we see Chinese, Japanese, San Blas Indians,
French, and English negroes, and East Indians.
In the market, as we pass, we see this collection
buying fish and beef on which, with a little rice


and yams, they live.


building,


We pass the government


with its iron-railed balconies, in which


is one of the largest libraries in Colon.


We bump


over the street car tracks but see no cars as one
administration put in the tracks and another will


put in the cars.


On our left, as we leave Colon


(it only takes ten minutes with our terrific speed)
we see the Hotel Washington with its high walls


and palm


trees,


and, on the right, picturesque


Christ Church by-the-Sea.
We run along the beach and see the breakwater
in the distance, turn the corner by the hospital,


1









THE


CARIBBEAN.


A MI'SICAL EVENING.


B/a/, 1.


"All articles for THE CARIHIEAX


morrow
principal.


without


fail,"


muSt he in to-


DI)odds,


our


I squirmed-mine wasn't even started.


I had lived in the tropics long enough to b)ecom:


was studYinc. S
After much di


went on laboring with my hero.


going with nail


he managed to make his escape.
done this than the Edison next


s and case knives,
He had no sooner


started play-


infected with the manlana fever;


hnce myl miotto


in2 the aria from


"Boheme.


" It was a favorite


"Never do to-day what you can put off until


of minell;


so I decided to let my hero breathe the


to-morrow;


" but to-day was my last to-morrow;


tresh air while


listened.


so I would have to summon my muse that night.
After supper I tried to settle down to work, but
the wires must have been crossed, for the muse
which presides over music answered mv invoca-


settled


"I am sure that is Galli Curci,"


"No.
Then


Farrar,


said my mother.


said my sister.


entered


only by the


into a dispute


old player upstairs,


was


which


and I


found


myself inspired


to produce


drowned out, with the strains of the aged "Margie,


harmony rather than literature


. TIherefore I got


voices


of my mother and sister, as


out my newly acquired mandolin, tunetl it t} the
best of my ability, and started
to play the firstand only piece _B


of my repertoire


Home.


"Home, Sweet


" I had not made more


than two or three discords when
my sister rushed from her room


splutterin forth a


world


can I


"How in the


be expected


study such a hard subject as
physics with this awful racket


going on
minute!


M amma,


it this
make


of the famous singer (whoever she was).
The epidemic spread quicker
than measles. The people across
the street started playing the


"Wang Wang Blues


rattlv


Victrola.


on their


The battle


was fast and furious, but soon


"Mlargic
and the


"died a natural death,


\\ ang


Wang Blues


wanted on triumphantly for a


few measures.
was silence.


Finally there


I returned to my hero.


Georgie stop that noise!"
I was so busy hunting for A
flat that her outburst did not


move me.


After much fi


had had enough fresh air now;


Ain nil awl well-attmn led landmark prl wliinin the \oicv SO heWas read foursome excite-


in the w ilit'rne e


ring and fumbling, I


succeeded in finding it, only to lose it again, for my


mother


had been


and together thev


moved by


were


miy sister s


appeal


too much for me.


ment. He immediately met the


villain, and there followed a terrible struggle, from
which my attention was turned to another struggle
across the way, between little Mary Jones and her
new violin. First there were twenty minutes of


"Some


sweet home


' this is,


" I muttered, as I


put away my books and reached for my pad.
At the combination of musical and family v discord,


mv muse had faded away.


to business.


Now I would get down


I chewed my pencil for a while; then


the inspiration came.
thunder masterpiece.


I started in on a blood and


villain


locking my hero in a deep, dark cellar.


succeeded


As I was


revolving ways and means for his escape, my sister
suddenly either finished her lessons or abandoned


squeakin up and down the scale.


Then she brutally


and cruelly butchered "Humoresque.


" The last


notes were painfully dying away when, from offin the
distance, came the sounds of the fife and drum corps


of the Panamanian Boy Scouts.


When they had


passed out of hearing, I returned with renewed vigor
to help my hero, whom I had left fighting the burly


villain
rest.


They must be exhausted now;


so I let them


Neither the' nor 1 could rest long, for from


down the street came tile wailing notes of a


I'iC to r f. I.. t l .


saxo-


gn ",,rr ho- .n


was


* _-_-___ ___**______


Geor.e,


.*


"h.. i ~


1








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE VILLAGE SLEUTH.


Girdon Rudd,


My storv takes place in Slaterville, a


little one-


car driven


was a high-powered


McFarlan and


horse town situated in the lower part of Florida


had three occupants.


About three days after the


on the Caloosahatchee River.


Itisjustoneofthose


quiet little villages which boast of a main street


robbery, it was believed that the bandits must
still be in the vicinity of Slaterville, or had made


where all


located
about
itself.


the business


and where


to-dav


and let


houses of


town


to-morrow


the town are


don't


care


care of


the mountains surrounding the little


their escape into the


roads had


hills, as all roads and rail-


watched carefully, and no one


answering to their description had gotten through.


Si's heart leaped high;


his chance had come at


village, excellent trout fishing and hunting are to
be found, and often through the winter months
tired business men and statesmen pass through
on their way into the mountains for a few weeks
rest from the turmoil of business and politics.
One of the stock characters of the place was


Now he would show those scoffers!


Daily


he disappeared into the hills, returning late at


night.


One night he returned later than usual,


bespattered


serious


purpose.


mud, and
His father


wearing a
again ap


look of
preached


him on the subject of a job.


Blackburn,


known


around


town


as Silas,


"Si," he said,


"Mr. Samuel is still holding that


the sleuth.


wagon for Perkins


He had formerly driven the delivery


' General Store, always cherish-


position open for you, and you can go to work as
soon as you quit this darn--"


ing within his bosom, however, the ambition to


"Pap, I don't care nothing


' 'bout no job; I've


become a second Sherlock Holmes.


So, against


got something


real important up my sleeve, and


the wishes of his parents he quit his job and began
sending for literature on how to become a detec-


don't want to be bothered."


He really had something up his sleeve.


He had


tive.


He established his office in the back of his


father's grain store, and hung out his sign to let


found about three miles out of town on the edge
of a small lake near a seldom-used road, a Mc-


the public


know


that Slaterville


boasted


Farlan car covered with mud.


It answered to the


private detective.
Everybody had laughed at him, and his father


description of that given by the paymaster.


a little way off, he found a campers


' tent with


had told him


to quit


this foolishness,


as Mr.


Samuel needed a good clerk in his new hardware
store and here was Si's chance to get a good job.
But nothing could persuade Si from his present
occupation and, when jokingly asked how business


three


occupants,


making


these


coveries, he had made his way home, deciding to
wait until the next day to investigate more fully,
for one of the instructions of his literature was to


proceed slowly and cautiously.


Setting out next


was, he would often reply: "Y
show you all some day."
He didn't have long to wait.


ou just wait, I'll


About 3 miles


morning with his rifle and dog on the pretense of
hunting, he made his way in the direction of the


campers he had discovered the day before.


When


out of Slaterville in the near-by hills was a large


sulphur mine.


The paymaster of the mine had


he reached the spot, he made a careful detour of
the camp and approached it from the lake shore


been on his way there with the monthly pay roll,


to keep


the men


from suspecting that he had


when


three


armed


bandits


in a high-powered


trailed them.


Stealing close to the side of the


motor car had held him up and had made a clean
get-away with $Io,ooo of the company's money.


tent, he laid his ear against it.


Cold chills played


up and down his spine at what he heard.









THE CARIBBEAN.


"The fellows up in the city


fools coming way


down


thought we were


here, but just wait till


,,Where be ye going, Si, that
that was all Si heard.


job that


we get back and tell them our luck," Si heard a
third person say.
This was enough evidence to convince his de-
tective mind that he had at last landed the ban-


After a half hour's ride, they began to near the
bandit's hiding place.
"You had better have your posse surround the


tent,


while vou


and I


forward and demand


dits, and done It single handed at that.


spoken of a haul;


the loot with


They had


so he thought they must have


them.


The men


inside


tent


began to move around; so he carefully crept back


into the woods.


Making his way back to town with


all possible haste, he headed for the sheriff's


office.


A half hour later Si, covered with mud from


head to foot


is hat m


issing,


his hair


disheveled


their surrender,


said Si to the sl


1


determined to be in at the killing.
had stationed his men, he and Si
the entrance of t hec tent, Si fairly s


While the sheriff held


loudly


rapped


eriff, for he was
After the sheriff
started toward
swaggering.


his gun in readiness, Si


on the tent and


got you dead to rights


veiled,


\c ve


so you might just as well


come forward and give yourselves up.
A rather short individual stepped


came running into the sheriff's office.


the tent,


followed


two other


me n.


Afte:.


"Whv


all the hurry, Si?


What's the excite- g


laring around at the pc


sse, the sheriff flaunting


ment?"
"If I
bandits


exclaimed the sheriff.


you to the hiding place of


that robbed


the Harrington


those


Sulphur


Mine's pay roll, do I get the reward?" he burst
forth, after getting his breath.


"Why, of course you do, Si,


" grinned the sheriff,


badge,


"What s all


and Si,


the shor


this farce?


a quiet couple of weeks


dummy
for him?
ou---


sheriffs


ought


coming


to ha


Can't


fellow


demanded,


a fellow


spend


fishing without a lot (of
up here and spoiling it
ve the whole bunch of


for he thought it was some big joke.
"Well, then, get a large posse together, fr these


But that was as far as he got, for the sheriff,
as if awakening from a dream, loudly exclaimed,


men may


make a desperate


fight;


fellow


"My Gosh!


It's the Governor of the State and


e," he said to the astonished sheriff.
The sheriff, almost convinced by Si, hastened


his--


But that was all


Si heard, for in the next instant


to gather a posse, and soon they


the hills.


were headed for


This was Si's great moment as he gal-


he was on his horse bound for home


sheriff to explain matters.


Gallopin


leaving the
g into town


loped up the main street with the posse and the


sheriff behind him.


Well,
father


came out


Folks would laugh at him?


them.


grain


store,


on the


As he passed


that astonished gentleman


sidewalk and veiled after him


as fast as his horse's legs would carry him, he rode
straight for his father's store, and dismounting,
went inside. Walking up to his father, he said


soberly:
talking


"Pap, what about that new
about?"


you was


A YOUNGER


BROTHER.


BOBBEI)


HAIR.


Ida Brown, '22.


MarIjoie Ba/l,


With lordly mien and boldly blustering air,
He loudly boasts that he can never know
Of any fear, but still, 'tis strange, will shew
A bashful blushing face when maidens fair


Are near.


Oh! Here is to the girl who bobs her hair-
Her hair of brown, chestnut, or golden hue
Her curly, flying locks of fashion new
Have caught my wondering heart within her snare


So gay and


Such trifling things as unke:r pt hair


And dingy grimy hands are far too low
To trouble his more lofty mind, although
He dons his clothes precisely and with care


is far too plainly heard;


vet so


artless is her air


Enhanced by roguish eyes of brown or blue.
But, with it all, I know her heart is true
Though she with largess free her favors share.
Let's pledge a toast to her-the modern girl-


" but


His iov in life








THE CARIBBEAN.


40



i


Mr. Jones never knew how the book agent got
past the guard in his outer office, for he had given
strict orders that no salesmen were to be ushered


into his sanctum sanctorum.


Mr. Jones hated


salesmen, particularly that brand of wind blowers,


as he called them, the book agents.


them with all the hatred of a


He hated


Wall Street cynic;


"Matter," sp
the same book.


luttered Jones;


"I got stuck on


Blast the whole tribe of book


agents.
Just then Mrs. Jones looked out of the window
and whom should she see hurrying through the
fast-gathering dusk in the direction of the station
but the same book agent!


so it spoke worlds for the persuasive powers of
the book agent, that Jones found himself dazedly


staring at a highly
Pilgrim Fathers."


colored copy of the


"Early


It had all been done so quickly


"Look, John!


"Yes!


Quick!


Is that your man?"


Blast him!"


"Run and catch him and make him take one of


these old 'Pilgrim Fathers


' back.


and glibly


was handing


that the only


over $5.


thing he remembered


He now


looked at the


"But, I am not dressed, and my boots are off."
Just then Mr. Smith, a next doorneighbor, drove


book again and cursed feebly, not because of the
money spent, but because he had been bested.


By the time Mr.


Jones reached his suburban


home that evening, he had completely forgotten
the unpleasant episode with the book agent, in
the anticipation of a good dinner and a quiet
evening with his wife.
Two hours later, Jones, in slippers and comfort-
able smoking jacket, pulled his easy chair before
the fire and settled down with his newspaper and


his pipe.


He looked across at the pretty dark


head of his wife, bent over her sewing, and a great
feeling of peace and contentment came over him.


"Oh, John!" D
sewing, ran over


Jones's


chair.


Jones,


to perch


"I've


throwing aside her
on the arm of Mr.


got something


you-a book agent came to-day;


oh, he was the


past in a carriage.


Jones frantically pounded on


the window pane in such a manner that the startled
horses were brought up with a jerk.
"Hey, Smith, run down to the station, will you,
and catch that book agent you see standing there."
Mr. Smith reached the station just as the con-
ductor said "All aboard."
"Book Agent!" he veiled, just as the book agent


stepped on the train.


minute, Mr
"Jones?


"Book Agent! hold on a


Jones wants to see you.


Jones wants to see me?"


puzzled-looking book agent.
he wants. He wants to bt
but I'll miss my train if I


"Oh, if that's al
back to him. Ho'


"Seven dollars for the


repeated the


"Oh, I know what
xy one of my books,
go back to sell it to


1 he wants I'll buy it and take it
w much is it?"


'Early Pilgrim Fathers,


nicest, most courteous man,


he would h


ave con-


vinced even you-and I know how you hate book
agents-that you couldn't be without this book."
Mr. Jones stiffened perceptibly.
"Yes, it was only $6 and tells about the Pilgrim
Fathers, John; you know my ancestors came over
in the Mayflower and I almost cried when I read


about that first hard winter.


It will be a wonder-


said the book agent, as he reached for the money
and passed the book through the window.
Just then Mr. Jones arrived at the station puff-
ing and blowing, like a diminutive model of the


engine


just pulling out.


As he saw the


train


leaving, he was too full for utterance.


"Well, I got it
that's all."


for you,


said Smith,


"Just got


ful book to hand down to our children."


"Got what?"


WHEN SORROWS COME--
Alex Linczer, '23.


I








THE CARIBBEAN.


MASKS AND CRABS.


George


Cartwright, '22.


"Having a good time, John?"
"Oh! Glorious," replied John.


asked Harry.
"But have vou


'P' in Physics, and a


shirt;


and what did


'G' in English,


eat m


you think of that red 'F'


seen Minnie around here?
for her for the last half hour.


I have been looking
I have an idea that


she dolled up as the French Jane.


Algebra?"
"Well, a good thing for you to do would be to
work a little more, and get what you think you


"Your're right,


" said Harry, chucklin


guiltily.


deserve.


Why blame the teachers?"


"She has been looking for vou also.


"Say, who do you think you are?


You talk as


"Well, thanks for the info.,


I'll be O. K. for the


if you


thought you


were a


teacher.


suppose


rest of the evening.
home at a respectable
started for Minnie.


Have a good time, and go


So long,


and John


He had very little trouble in finding her for she


you got all 'E's,' didn't you?"
"No, I didn't get all 'E's,' but you don't hear
me grouching about what I did get, do you?"
"All these teachers have their pets around here,


had been sitting all evening in


the same place,


which was very uncommon for Minnie.
generally here, there, and everywhere.


"Hello, Min!
eves are sore.


She was


I've been looking for you till my
Harry just put me wise now."


and I'm one of them, but I'm the pet nut.


.all pick on me.


They


It's John, John, John, all day long.


One of these days I'm going to change my name.
That Miss Beeching thinks I'm an Algebra shark,
but somehow or other I can't bite and then I get


"Good evening, John,
good time?"


" she replied.


"Having a


blamed for it.


knowing


Miss Dodds bawls me out for not


that this too solid


would


Something happen?


been quieter than usual."
"No, I'm just taking life
like my new costume?"


"Fine and dandv.


easv.


You have


How do you


Nobody would know who


Just because her brain sopped up all this Shake-
speare stuff, she thinks mine is going to do the


same.


Then there is Miss Hornbeak,


who tries


to tell me all this junk about Columbus and the
other inventors, and because I don't know what


it was.
told me.


Why I was even fooled myself until Harry


I bumped into about ten


teachers while


trying to find you, and was just about to tell them
what I thought about them, when I discovered who


they were.
any place


They give me a pain; I've never been


where


the whole crowd.


weren t. I i
You ought


m disgusted
to see the


report they handed me this morning."
"I did happen to see it, and I don't see what
you expect. That is about as well as you do or ever
did."


happened
if Ba--;


a thousand


years ago, I get


" but here he stopped for he heard the


whistle of the floor manager.
"Ladies and gentlemen, we ask you all to un-
mask now and go into the next room for refresh-
ments.
John, obeying orders with the others, unmasked
at once, but he neglected following further direc-
tions, for upon turning to offer Minnie his arm,
he discovered that with the removal of her mask


she had revealed-Miss Hornbeak.


John, without


"Huh!


replied


I'm glad


John.


you think so,


sarcastically


"If I don't deserve more than a


even excusing himself, darted out of the door and
ran for home.


41


"Sure thing!








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE PRODIGAL BROTHER.


Ida Brown


S1.45: Oh, I
show but it was


'm tired;
so long.


"Lightnin


was a


I'm glad Harry did go to


No, mother, I don't


don't worry.


He'll be


see them yet, but please
coming soon.


the movies.


He'll get a few more hours sleep than


2.55:


Oh, dear!


what if has been run over!


we, anyway.
Goodnight, mother and dad.
call me early to go swimming.


There is so much traffic and he isn't used to it all.


Don't forget to


Oh, what if I never see him again!


Why was I so mean to him!


Last night I made


11.50:
Mother!


(Guess I'll go kiss Harry good night.)
Harry isn't home vet! No! Where


him take me to the movies, and this morning I
fussed with him because he wouldn't go to the


do you suppose he is?


(Mother's voice sounds


store for me, and


to-night I made him do the


rather shaky; I wonder if she is scared and is just
cheering me up.)
You think he went riding with Aunt Kate? Oh,
all right, good night.


dishes when I knew he had been fishing all day and
was tired, and--)


Oh, mother, please don't say that!
he'll come home soon.


Of course


11.55:


(H'm!


I wonder if he did


go riding.


Well, mother and dad don't seem to be worrying


over him.


2.30:


Guess I'll go to bed too.)


What's that, dad?


I'll be right down!


Harry isn't home


No, indeed, I


won't go


back to bed; I'll sit down here and talk to mother.
First you're going to the hospital to see if he has
been hurt? Oh, yes, and then you'd better go to
the police station and report him missing.
2.35: There, mother, don't worry. He's all


(Yes--I surely have treated him abominably.
He often does little favors for me, and to tell the
truth he is really a lot better than other girls'
brothers, and all the girls are always saying how
polite he is and what pretty hair he has and--)
Oh mother, here comes papa now and Harry is
with him!


3.00:


(throwing


Where


arms


been,


around


Honey, I'll never, never


you darling!


him and kissing him).
treat you mean again!


right.


There!


There!


Am I worried?


Oh, no!


Not very, anyway.
2.40: Yes, I'll call Aunt Kate to see if they did
take him for a ride.


Two three five, central.
Hello, Aunt Kate? Yes


Yes, please.
s, this is she.


seen anything of Harry this evening?


Have you


Well,


he isn't home yet, and we thought maybe he was


over at your house. Al
know when we find him.


1 right then, we'll let you
Good bye.


2.50: (Oh, my, what if he has been kidnapped!
es, I was just reading to-day about a little boy's


I was so scared.
naped or--?


What!


Were you lost or hurt or kid-


You were listening to the wireless con-


cert in the pavilion and fell asleep!


you lazy little pest!


Asleep!


Here we have been worrying


and losing sleep, and I was thinking how mean I
had treated you-and to think you were asleep
all the time.


You're sorry!


Well, what good does that do?


It doesn't make up for the sleep I lost.


Yes, and


to-morrow, young man, you'll help with the dishes
and go to the post office for me and take me to the
movies and--well I'll tell you the rest in the


being kidnapped.


Maybe they think we are rich


morning.


Good night, motherand dad, and--


and are holding him for ransom.)


good night, you--you rascal.








THE CARIBBEAN.


A SLIP


OF THE


FOOT


IS BETTER


SLIP OF THE TONGUE.
Louise Henter, '2..


THAN A
l_ 9


Everyone was cruel to him.


His sister wouldn't


silence which


remained


unbroken


until,


just as


return his library


book for him, and


20 cents due on it already;


there was


his English teacher


a huge speckled trout was about to make a meal
of Jack's bait and hook, the new boy whispered


had threatened that if he didn't soon hand in his
theme on one of Franklin's proverbs, she would
give him material enough to write a book on the


subject,


"Experience


keeps


a dear


school,


excitedly,


"I say, how jolly pretty!"


he threw a rock in


And when


"to see how it would swim,


Jack threw down his line.


"For --


" but he got


no further.


In his


fools will learn in no other;


and now his mother


anger he had stepped too near the bank and he


had made him


take the new minister's son


himself


going


down-down--


Suddenly


was straight from a school in England) fishing with
him when he had thought he would have a whole
day away from everyone-a day just to go wan-


something hit


him and he tried


to count some


bright, orange stars spinning around in a purple


sea.


Then he was


being pulled-- pulled--


during with no one but his dog.


He bet he


knew


W\Vhen he regained consciousness, he could not


where a pair of wild ducks had their nest and there
was a peach of a place where he could set a trap
for a possum and--


He hated


new boy-his


name,


Percival,


see.


Something was


wrapped


around


his eyes,


but he could hear someone that sounded like his
father telling a story about someone (he didn't get
the name) who had fallen in the creek and had


the way he combed his hair, parted carefully in


been saved by


a boy who looked as if he hadn't


the middle,


the way


his ribbed stockings


were


rolled at the top, and especially the way he talked.
His "right-o, old chap" made him sick.


the strength of a girl.
and, smiling a bit, he st


better


a slip


Suddenly he understood
aid, "'A slip of the foot is


of the


tongue,


' Franklin.-


They reached the creek at last,


while all the


Experience.


" And they put another


bag on his


maintained


a discreet


silence-a


supposedly delirious


head.


THE SECRET.


Marjorie Ball,


One Saturday morning when I was in the midst
of my baking, the door flew open and in rushed
one of my neighbors breathless with excitement.


My dear!"


most


she gasped.


interesting piece of


"I've just heard


news.


simply


"Yes, you


see that's


how it was


and Mrs.


Jones


never would forgive me if she found out I told
you. You must never mention it to anyone."
Just then the order man came in, and I had to
excuse myself for a moment, but it made no differ-


couldn't wait to tell you.


"Well,


what is it?" I


asked,


rather


annoyed


ence to her for she kept on talking steadily
I gave my order.


while


because she had disturbed me.


"Now, if I tell you, you must promise never to


beamed


looked


"Really, I don't know whether


yvou or not.


mysterious.
ought to tell


You see, Mrs. Smith told Mrs. Brown


and told her not to tell, but Mrs. Brown just can't


tsiand


Smith


because


e ht S m i t hs


I suppose I ought not to, Mrs.


just kill me.


was this


Well, I


way---


band coming now, and


dinner.


1 ^ I


will anyway.


Oh, dear!


Jones will
You see, it


There is my hus-


haven t even started his


I'll tell you to-morrow.


. 1


- 1 1


- 7


. . - --


. s . .- ...,e s ,., o








44 THE CARIBBEAN.


MY FIRST


AND LAST


ATTEMPT


DIVING.


Betty Fitz-Villiam,


"Oh, go on and do
"But I can't!"
"Yes, you can! Se<


I peered down,
saw the bottom.


it, Betty,


urged Mildred.


"Well


, what did you do that for?


going over beautifully.


it's not very deep.


down, down


before


Oh, how stony it was!


If I should get to the bottom and somehow
come up-oh, but it would be too terrible!
"Oh, I can't, Mildred."


finally


So deep!


never


were


I'm not going to stand


here any longer waiting for you to do what you
never will!"
"Oh, Mildred, I'm going to do it right away,
I asserted heroically.


"Now, lean far over and just fall in,
directions.


were my


"Yes, you can!
"Well-I'll try


Now, go on!"
" I'd show her that I


I bent far over, over, over.


could


going for sure.


I said my prayers.


Now I


was


Had I kissed


do it as well as she could!


leaned


myself slipping.
I felt like those


over,


farther-farther.


A cold shiver ran up m
Shair advertisements


spine.


going-


mother before leaving home?


And then it seemed


as if the water leaped right up and slapped me
in the face.


Down, down I went.


Should I never come up?


going-but not quite gone, for with one effort I


ears were


ringing.


But the next


thing


caught myself.
"Oh," I gasped in relief.
If I had dived in, I'd be


knew I was clinging to the ladder spouting water


like a young whale.


down in that cold


green water now.


groaned,
pancake.


"Never again,


Gasping between breaths I


" for I had hit flat


as a


COGITATIONS OF


A COCHERO.


Gladys Lowande, 24.


Hi, der, cap, y
to da 'otel, cap.
Run, me son,


a hain't wish ha coach?


Take ya


No, no coach!


Napoleon,


haroun


' dis corner


pass ya ha spiggoty nickel fe ha fi'
wen hi don't wish to take hit, 'im get
call ha policeman.


cent?


hangry han


quick fe hyar come da humane lady dat stop hus


dis morning.


Da humane sasciety h'am always


Hi done


guess


h'only one wat


dis hyar nigga hain't da


catch bad luck.


One huf


busybodyin' haroun'.


First one ham say,


"Coach


ladies dat hi done took to da bank dis morning


man, take dat pore tin hoss bak to da stable han


make


ave ha good feed."


ya hashame fe driving


Han den,


"Hain't


' ha hoss wid ha sore hon


ham say she jus' finish give
Colon Free Clinic han den 'e


loss ha bran


ten dollars


to da


r little boy go han


new commissary book han she no


'im bak?"


Han den da nex


one say,


"Hi hadn't


gwan ride wid ya hatall if ya ham beat dat hoss
dat way.4"


Hit ham hall very well
blong to da Protection ho
but dey haint hunderstan'


fe dese white folks to
f Cruelty to animals


losses hatall.


Ya jus


ave the money to get another.
My! Dose wimen hain't got no sense about da


way dey gwan talk about der friend's.


one ham say,


ham catching' hall
clothes." Han d


Tha nex


"Hi wonder where dis Missus Jones


money


fe buy


talk something


new


scandals


hafta beat dem hall da time when de his balky,


about Missus Desmond wants


husbandd went hup


eh, Napoleon?


Dis hoss ham tin han him ribs


wrkb honur hut dat hain't noting. cause


I'se tin


handlef'she.


Hi wonder where she husbandd go?


Get hup der. Napoleon.


Der other day








THE


CARIBBEAN.


A RESUME OF THE COUNTRY


FAIR.


Florence


Albert,


rge Ball, 't,-;
'24; Virginia


Warner
Tucker,


Bowers,


Time.-The week end after the Cristobal High S:hool
Country Fair.
Place.-A house party in Balboa.


Now that we ve


out on


the front


talk.-Mary,
d *
didn't you?


You


finished dinner, let s al


porch, ti
brought


irn on the


vour


chafini


dish,


All right then, you bring it down and


I'll ask mother to get the things ready fir us to


make some candv.-Excu
utes, folks.-Jimmie, you
the chafing dish for Mary.
"Hey, do you feel any


that turkey


n everything?


se me for a few mm-
go up and bring down


better after eating all
I think that if I eat


any more I'll croak.-Hey, you two up there, are


you ever coming down?


Well, hurry then.


Come


on out here and set the chafing dish on the table,


Jimmie.-Alice, you re going to mak


aren t you?


e the candy,


You re so good at it!"


"Oh! say, that s great!


things in.


now.


Mother s bringing the


Someone start a story or something


I know!


Cristobal


School


You folks that were at the


Country


Fair the other


night take turns at telling what you did and saw.
We'll go right around the circle.-Jimmie, you
were there, weren't you?"


"The voting contest was right across the hall
from that, so I managed to get in there two or
three times. They were voting for a high school
girl to ride on their float in the carnival in Colon.


Helen


Jukes and Virginia


Tucker left the other


candidates behind early in the evening and then you


should have seen the money fly!


I ached when I


thought what a lot of good it would have done if
only it could have been invested at the hot dog


counter.


Why the voters would ust p k down
\Why th'e voters would just plunk down


one bill after another-fives,


twenty.


tens,


even


Finally though, the chap that was sup-


porting Helen


Jukes


won out.


must


winner any way for they say he has already won
*'
his candidate.-Isn't the candy done?
"Well, then I went downstairs and the first door


I came to advertised the Siamese Twins.


I went


in with the crowd and they-or should I say she?-
gave us a dance, and a song with a ukulele accom-


pamniment.


Somehow the golden hair of this at-


traction reminded me of Marjorie Ball and Ruth
Duey.-Say, I'm done, somebody else can tell the


rest.


I'm going to keep my eve on that candy.


Tony, your tongue needs exercise.


"All right!


It's hard though


to tell


it as it


"Ye
time.
you all


., I was there, and certainly had a good
I saw so much that I don't think I can tell


that I did see.


The things that I remember


seemed.


I had just paid mv admission, bought


my quarter's worth of tickets from Mr. Ball, and
was rushing down the hall to find a place to go


most are the edible things since that is what I'm


when


Emilio Solomon, disguised as a ferocious


usually most interested i


-If you're very care-


ful, Alice, your fudge may turn out to be almost


sleuth, nabbed me and took me to the kangaroo
court where Mr. Aanstoos, the judge, fined me


as good as


some of the candv Ida Brown was sell-


ing at the country fair.
fact though folks; their


Ow! I'll be good.-'s a
r candv was certainly good


fifty cents for speeding.


hung around a while


and watched the victims coming in.


Mr. Linczer


seemed to be captain of the police force for he


and from the amount they had I'll say all their


ably supervised Emilio.


Justice surely isnot blind


friends


must


making


it for them!


There were all kinds and they went faster than


for they saw many crimes that I didn't.
"After escaping the court, I went upstairs, and


hot cakes.


the sign,


'Grinless Gladys,' met my eye.


I finally


"Speaking of hot things, did y
those hot dogs from Leo Eberenz?


ou get any ot
I spent most


of my time and money at that counter until they


were all gone-the hot dogs were I mean.


I sup-


gained admittance to this show and, upon paying
my nickel ticket, was told that I might have it
back with five others if I could make her smile.
After cracking some wise jokes that would have


Alex Linczer,


v








THE CARIBBEAN.


"Just as I


was leaving


think it should have been


'Grinless


Gladys'--I


'Giggleless George'--I


heard a clarion voice announcing that the next


well and made a big hit with the crowd. Right
after them came the boys' glee club and judging
by their encores I'd say that they and Miss Cur-


program was ready in the assembly room.


Some-


rier were fully appreciated.


After that came the


where I heard a whisper,


'Hula Hu--


' That


movie,


Stage-struck


Floradora.'


With


Leroy


I jostled and pushed through the


crowd and finally managed to get standing space
in the back of the room. All at once Alex Linczer
stepped from behind the curtains which had been


stretched


across


the front


Sf the room and announced


that Morris
grade child,


Luce,
would


selection on thepiano


a fifth
play a
'. That


boy will be a second Pader-


ewski


or Beethoven


some


day if he keeps on.


"I turned


to say


some-


thing to my neighbor about
how well the boy had done,


and when


turned to the


front again, lo and behold!


The
drawn


curtains


aside


scene in Hawaii.


was


called,


The act
'Under-


neath Hawaiian Skies.'
There sure was some Hula-


hulaing


singming.


ginia Tucker, Edna Camp-
bell, Juline Granger, Mattie
Pullig, and Charlotte Hous-
el were the Hula girls while


Gerald Bliss,


Henry Moore,


and Alex Linczer were the
Hula men.


These,
and Jordan
as tourists,
the house.


ith Emogene
Zimmermann
brought down
Next some of


Miss Faulkner's pupils sang
some two-part songs and sa
"Next thing we knew, Ale


Magnuson as the irate papa, Louise Henter as the
fond mamma, Buster Fields as the irrepressible


young


brother, and Ernst Euphrat as a movie


manager, Helen Jukes in the title r61e had backing
___, enough for any star. We


thought
Miller's
dance


Velvia
pretty


Elizabeth
glowworm


vas to be the last


number but there were some


jolly Scotch
from some b


insisted


on


codgers there
oat and they
Edna Camp-


bell's dancing the Highland
fling. She did it, and did it
well too, though I'll bet it
was the first time a High-
land fling was danced in a


Hul


What
Ah!
movin
pan.


H u 1 a costume.-


about
Almost
g over
Your t


the candy?
cold! I'm
nearer that


urn


next,


Jane.
"As soon as I got through
that enormous crowd, jam-
med both inside and outside


the door,


went


to the


5-and-Io-cent store to get


a bottle of soda.


Harold


Boyd also sold me a couple
of alligator eggs which I
didn't want. After quench-


ing my thirst,


stairs


MISS HELEN JUKES-Q1EEN OF THE CARNIVAL.
Beauty may be only skin deep, but here's siaty-three inches of
regal beauty fit for a sculptor's masterpiece.


y! They were good!
x serenely announced


that this program was over and the next would
begin in a few minutes with an entire change. I


waited


(at a charge


of fifteen


cents)


Peterson


where


and H


Sent up-
saw Lloyd
ubert Lee


dispensing ice cream as fast


as they could dig it out. I bought a whopping big
ice cream cone for ten cents. Wandering away
from that booth with my ice cream cone in one
hand and the alligator's eggs in the other, I stood
in the middle of the hall, undecided as to where I


started again.


TI he first number this time was


hsould


go.-Give


me a piece


of that


candy.


- - ----- -- I. - S


was sufficient.








THE CARIBBEAN.


down
leaving
eggs I
and 't
"Be


: hall,
e count
gone o
fell to
rather


bumped
:ing the
ne way
earth, I
dazed


around and saw an or
in there and recuper
found myself in the J
I had heard so much.


)enl
ate.
apa
T


into nme,


and ran


stars while the alli
and the cone all(
knew not where.'
by the blow, I l
door; so I decided
I stepped inside
inese tea room of
'he room was lit by*


took to be


gator
their ,

)oked
to go
Sand
which
Jap-


adveri
guesse
helper
zer, A
EFden,
the cr
places


:isinug
*d a;
s, Ina
nna


Norwegian, were placarded on the walls
the wares of this 1oath-nr so I


way.
Mark
Ilberg,
;ept b
their
'm tir


E'mm a
',il Ill a
hi, (l
ouise
y serv
Um. I
and


Besides,


ownsen


advs F
Henter
ing col

I'll let


want


"d, Olga
and Hya
e and ca
to a few
omebodx
some me


anese lanterns ar
ed so dim and re:
decided to stave
and so ordered a
tea and sat down
of the numerous
ions. Tea and
were served I
dainty maidens
the manner of J
geisha girls. I m
of my friends
booth, for Irer
Court was in ch


id look-


stful.
: whi
Scup
on c


mnd,
Eun
-ty Fi
a Arec
presic


pot anm
to they
Now,
about
candyv
expect
perienc
fair or
Give I
piec <


Tha
you
sure
candy
"I
hall
Scan
table
for c


a couple of
i:-m--m.


t s good. I'll give I
credit, Alice, you
can make good t
lv.
left the tea room and as


agai
idina
es ai
)ur c


n I met Mar
ivian booth.
nd looked ab
offee. Even


THE CARNIVAL QUEEN AND HER ATTRACTIVE COURT.
Solomon, in all his glory.v was not arrayed as one of these. Left
o right: Misses Mihlred Stiles, Betty FitzX\ iliam. Helen Jukes,.
Queenl, O :a Linezer, utfl Duev.


started down the


v who enticed me into the
\Ve sat down at one of the
ut while we were waiting
n this warm country to go


senator.


Even his friend


I was one of the many
former nimbly walk a
across the floor.
"I saw Wesley, one of


that good c
"There's
yourself.
vou, Harrv
"Well, di


see the
I saw
some
and so
liver,
away.
that P
could I
They
of mo
"I
talking
teller,
She d
corner
tea r
thing
that I
Spanis
the ne


andv."
the dish, help
What about
?" any of you
id any of you


Labyrinth? A
Napoleon's te
congealed blo
mebodv-or-oth
I made my
I didn't k
Jlattie and E
be so bloodthir
made quite a
nev at it anvw
heard every
about the fort
so I hunted her
o m i n a t e d
of the Japan


:)O!
shi
d
h
txt


Barn hou
tune tell
painfully
"Say!
Tight Ro
a scream
good sho
stage as
s failed tc
who wa
rope sti


Tl,
m.
e t
idn
ass
d
se i
er,
fri
Ti
pe
!


after
eth,
)od,
her's
get-
n0 w
thel
sty.
bit
,*av.'
ody
une


The first
old me was
't have my
ignment for
av. Miss
s a good for-
but she is
ank.
sh Anna, the
Walker, was
Buster Bur-


ulmid go o
a female i
Recognized
tched this
retched t


n the
mper-
Shim.
s per-
ightily


the dignified Seniors, red


I

(


tell ab:)ut th








THE CARIBBEAN.


lar with the men.
candy to satisfy mv


managed t
wants.-Oh,


:o win enough
that reminds


me, is our candy all gone?"
"Good night, I never saw such a hungry bunch.


Go slow on that candy.
Mary, what did you do?"


"What about


see her?


Matchless


I haven't had any yet.


Medusa?


Well, that was clever.


If y


minute I'll tell you what she was like.


Andy Smith!


'ou wait a
She was


He had a couple of sheets over an


umbrella and, surmounting it, a false face sur-


rounded bv a sun bonnet.


ulation


According to the manip-


of the umbrella, she would be real fat


Girdon Rudd, rave about it though, you'd think
that you were sure to see nothing less than Bar-
num and Bailey's at the end of the trip.
"Eddie Solomon had some apparatus for testing
strength and ability to blow hard. I guess he
didn't find anyone to beat him at either one though.
I'd sure hate to have that boy hit me.
"There was another strong man too-that per-


fectly huge little Christian


get out!


Christian


Wirtz.


Works.


Who ever


heard of anyone named Christian Works?"


"I didn't


say--


one minute, and as thin as a toothpick the next.


"The three-ring circus was funny.


You had to


climb under tables and overchairs, and walkrails-
and then the three-ring circus was three dough-


nuts hanging on the wall.


To hear the manager,


"Cut it out, you folks, just look what time it
is. Almost one o'clock and we have to get up at
six o'clock in the morning and go for a swim. The


last one up gets thrown min the pool,
Goodnight everybody."


bed and all.


ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS.


Ida Brown


In his own opinion Henry was the best swim-
mer, the most graceful runner, and the bravest


the class, said that she wc
the woods and wanted


)uld like to walk through
to know who would go


He had boasted many times about
the night his
father's barn
had caught fire,
and but for him


PINEAPPLE PLANT.
He who has never tasted a Panama pineapple
knows not the taste of this lusiouA fruit.


the horses
would have
burned to
death. He had
told many thril-


stories
his ad-


ling
about


ventures and experiences in the jungles with wild
and ferocious animals.


with her.


Henry volunteered, saying he was fond


of walking also.


They were strolling along when


suddenly Helen let out one loud cry.
"Oh! Henry, lo-look at the b-bear!"
Henry took one look and then ran for all he was


worth.


He reached


the picnic grounds panting


and out of breath and, when asked where Helen


was, he said,


"Oh, I was racing with her.


be coming soon."
A few minutes later Helen returned.


straight over to Henry she said,


She'll


Going


"Oh! Henry, it


is too bad you ran so fast because on taking a
second look I found it to be only a-a cow!"


course many


questions,


exclamations, and


One day


the Senior Class went on a


picnic.


After lunch Helen, one of the cleverest girls of


shouts arose from the crowd but Henry, for once,
was silent.


A TELEPHONE.


George


Cartwright, '22.


A mouthpiece, covered wires,
And batteries-bhow simple, y


receiver, bell,
yet how great-


A world-wide instrument in little weight-
The workl nf Alerander Graham Hell


And thus the telephone, of world renown,
Stands on my desk and, if its summons come,
I answer, knowing not if foe or friend
Manv anil from near-hv home or far-off rnwn


boy in school.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


CLARENCE.


After


much scurrying


boiled shirts, evening dres


about


for dress


suits,


ses, tailored suits, win-


Too much can not be said of the admirable act-
ing of Paul Doyle as Bobby Wheeler, the budding


ter coats, etc.,


and after much sawing, hammer-


adolescent fired from his third school for


rolling


ing, painting of


scenery,


borrowing of Persian


the bones.


" Paul is so typical that we all recog-


rugs, gay silk pillows, and shaded lamps, in the
effort to convert a dingy stage into a luxurious


suburban
comedy,


home,


Booth


"Clarence,


ica Theatre on May


School


Seniors


under


Tarkington


four-act


is produced at the Amer-


26 bv


the Cristobal High


the able supervision


Miss Dodds.


LeRovy


Magnuson


is excellent in


nize some Bobby Wheeler, who has just waked up
to the fact that he ought to wash his neck and not


go around looking like a scarecrow


any more.


His anxiety over having kissed DI)ella, the house-


maid, in the presence of "her young man,


is so
))
IS SO


that we feel with him a sense of relief when


the ro1e of he hears her call Clarence


an angel"


and realize


Clarence, the young entomologist, who, after his
discharge from the Army, seeks employment in
New York, and, because of his ability to drive
mules without swearing, is given a position as a


that after using


she can't


endearmalents


on another man,


dogmatize him any more.


earnest in his love for Violet,


all the most spirichul things


which


He is


"brings out


" in him, that we are


sort of high


handv


man in the Wheeler


really moved by his last little tribute,


"Vi'let--


home.


He repairs the hot water system, he tunes


piano


the chauffeur's


tools,


and he


I'll go help--carry out your baggage."
Not unlike the original Cora, Helen Hayes,


tutors Bobby in math., at which he is a


iVIZ.


He is approached for advice on the straightening


out of domestic tangles, because he has


the Army and all that,


been in


and he performs acrobat-


ics on the saxophone, which proves most success-
ful in restoring harmony, when a domestic crash


seems imminent.


him from


We are intensely interested in


the minute he enters


office, a sallow soldier,
cause of his liver, until,


Mr. Wheeler's


who sags to one side be-
with his reappointment


as chief entomologist in the Sturtevant Biological
Laboratories, he triumphantly departs with Violet,
his bride-to-be, leaving peace and contentment


in the hearts of all but little Cora,


"hates


engaged men.
Marjorie Ball as the youthful and attractive
governess, Violet Pinney, who is employed to look


personal ap-
pearance, Ida
Brown proves
an adorable
Cora. As the
sweet, self-
willed little
flapper, who
fights and
quarrels with
Bobby, who


AGE-HOARY CHeRCH AT TABOGA.
"And in the holy twilight the church bells echo clear.


meets with parental interference in her affair with
the grass widower, Hubert Stem, and who finally
adores Clarence, she charms us from the minute
she enters her father's office to be disciplined until
she sinks on the steps after Clarence's departure


with a pathetic


"Oh! Clarence,


" for of course she


Wheeler,


this role, and,


is especially


in her difficult


charming


position


in the


Wheeler household, arouses our sympathy.
The nnrr nf Mrc Whheeler rh clnermritil in;E_


will never love again.
Emma Townsend shows much versatility as an
actress in the able way in which she portrays the


Ainmifod Mrc T Mrrvn_ Mr.


Wheeler's cnfidien-








THE CARIBBEAN.


Dinwiddie, the austere butler, who forgets his
dignity only once, and then because entranced by


the magic strains of Clarence's saxophone,
done by Jordan Zimmermann."


George


Cartwright, as Mr. Wheeler,


business


family,


and head


is splendid.


an unhap1


is well


"head of a
py rowing


He shows remarkable his-


trioni: ability in that he completely submerges
his own personality into that of the unfortunate
gentleman.


Despite the splendid work done by the Seniors
in the play, it would have been almost impossible
to produce it, had it not been for the hearty sup-
port given by the friends of the Cristobal High


School.


The Seniors are especially indebted to


Mr. J. B. Fields, Mr. W.
Hutchings for the artistic


W. Johns,
scenery; 1


and Mr. Al
to the Colon


Electric Light Company for the loan of a hand-


some shade;


and to the


Bureau


of Clubs


W esley


Townsend shows just how excellent an


ounds for the


loan of furniture.


actor he is by his praiseworthy portrayal of the


odious'Mr.


tern.


NM


TABOGA.


Emma Townsend.


A TA30GA


BEACH SCENE.


Sparkling white sand, laved by dancing
crystal transparency.


HILLS OF


waters of


SALUBRIOUS TABOGA.


"A little bit of heaven dropped from out the sky one
day, and it nestled in the ocean in a clime far, far away.


Surrounded by deep crystal


waters-


Tumble-down shacks full of children,


An isle of pirates bold, relics,


romances,


Line cobblesto ie


streets.


Sweet


memories, and old Spanish


dances-


Men and


women,


Is Taboga.
Old paths, trodden by bare feet,


Shaded by tropica
Wind lazily alo g


Tired,
Slowly,
Work at their dail


i evergreens,
a fringe of beach


Washed clean by gentle lapping of the
At Taboga.


whispering


waves,


Rough tails climb determinedly
Up deep-jungled mountains of historic fame;


Beds of odorous pineapple


Swaying palms hail


weary


entice tired
wanderers;


tourists;


tasks


In Taboga.
At th vesper hour,
Men light fresh cigarillos,
Women don mantillas,
And all make their way to the age-old cathedral,
To bow in reverent worship.


Yon cross, on


sloping hill telling of worthy


Low-dipping pelicans,
In quest of flying fish,


Of some old faithful priest,
Touched by the sun, low sinking in the


c,------


west,


. - 1 . .









THE


CARIBBEAN.


____ SI


SEASONS.


Jordan


Zimmermann,


New life is seen


In New York.
Sweet perfume


in Spring when snows melt


When Autumn
Gather in their
In New York.


fills the air


comes,
crops


the farmers


As trees and flowers blossom into


brilliant


colors


School children straggle


to unwelcome


In New York.
Lovers stray along quiet


The trees have taken gorgeous
The nights are turning cold.


roads;


New vigor fills old bodies;


All the


children are rejoicing.


Baseball,


tennis,


and golf claim the


active


The reason ?


Autumn means


In New York.


That snow will soon be on the ground
In New York.


The beaches are gaily colored
By the holiday crowds


Of New


York.


The Summer sun has driven man


To leave the city's heat.
Coney Island and Rockaway Beach
Draw their multitudes by their glitter.
The unfortunates who stay are stifled.
The paint on tenement houses blisters and
The subway with its damp air


Offers a
Of New


refuge
York.


from the


withering heat


The holiday


In New
Throngs


is in the air


York.


gather in th


e cities


To obtain remembrances for friends.
Children dance before the windows
At the miracles unfolded before them


In New York.


And as the eventful day
A great peace settles
Over New York.


dawns


HAITI.


Fields


The hot sun


shines


over the filthy


streets


noisy


clatter!


In Haiti.


A queer


contraption


passes.


Naked and gibbering
Sail in tiny boats


negroes


What a street car!
It bumps slowly al


Around the ships at anchor,
Yelling to the passengers


To throw them mone
Their shiny, bronze b
As they dive into the


odies glisten


street.


The old cathedral,


Quaint and fascinating,


in the sun


water


To retrieve the coins flung down

In the open market,
With its sickening smells,
Ugly and wrinkled old women


Squat neathh awnings
Their fruit and food


to them.


Overlooks the throngs min the market place.


Inside, still and peaceful,


Several people kneel


in prayer.


The President's palace


Of white, blinding


of burlap-


concrete


Stands


Surrounded by barren


Lying on the ground beside
Swarming with flies.


grounds.


High up on the hill


Women
In red ar
Wearing


td yellow dresses,
large hats,


dangle


Their shoes seeming to
Ride on small donkeys


To market.


Other women
Sit in the streets
Sorting coffee,
nT : cl^: .R i* in hf


,,mA nrf I


The Mountain House
Is encircled by large and


Through whose


toes,


Sweet strains
How restful,


Compared


boughs blow


of music


to the glaring


shady trees


cool and


restful breezes.


issue forth;


streets


and docks!


The sun aoes down:






THE


CARIBBEAN.


Cao
O

-c

0

0
-c
g

0

-c
*-S


52








THE


CARIBBEAN.


MUSIC.


Last year
as far as mu
have made u
increase in
gentle husba
rectress.
Miss Curri


Cristobal High Sc
sic was concerned
p for that fallow
enthusiasm and
ndry of Miss Hel


er came to th


ool was neglec
but this year
eriod by a goo
.bilitv under
1V Currier, our


e Zone from Minnesota,


the climate or her nature is evidently
of energy for we understand that she
to have high school work this year.


one is so muc
few good poir
ones that we a
of working wi
Only about
school have n
of those enroll
have left scho
the year has 1i
"The Legend
The Girls'
considering t]
many of the h


of a lady, so appreciative of our
;, and so kindly blind to our bad
glad to have had the opportunity


her.
dozei
been
i only
) has
en de'
Naci
lee C
fact


have never appeared
foundation for better
splendid Girls' Glee
The Boys' Glee Cl


at the country fair.


practices,
work.
Emma
was fully
Currier's
This ye
our school
no end of
students
ments, an
Currier, t
They mac
country f


all too short, and did some very good

Townsend's remarkable piano playing
appreciated and helped to make Miss


work
ar, for
1, an
troub
were
id un
hey 1;
ie the
air.


easier.
Sthe second time


orchestra
, some o
rsuaded
r the a
nched o


was 01O
f the le
to bri
ble lea.
)n their


in the h


anize
bash
; the
:rship
nusic


history of


d. After
ful of the
ir instru-
of Miss
al career.


ir first public appearance at the


The personnel of the orchestra is as follows:


n of the students in the high


and
who
st of
[tata


nent
vhen
They
the
nd a


enrolled in the chorus
one (aside from those
dropped out.. The las
voted to work on a can
jochee."
lub had a goodly enroll
that practice came
ool girls were in class.
in public but have laid
chorus work this year a
Club next year.
ub sang only once in pub


But they did have some jolly


VIOLINS.
James Brustmeyer, 7th grade.
Virginia Coy, 8th grade.
Morris Marchosky, 9th grade.
Mildred Oliver, 8th grade.


Grace Dowell,


7th grade.


CORNET.
Richard Hall, loth grade.
MANDOLIN.
Warner Bowers, loth grade.


PIANO.


Mildred Stiles, 9th grade.


EYES.


fJordan Zimmermnann,


Of many h


Some
A smi
In sot
Clear
Upon
That
These
All th
I like


uties are eyes, some


brown, some
ling joy; in
ne few eyes,
s utip all storn
each face;
history has
same kind
ese and man
to look into


blue, some gray,


green; in many there is shown
ome, a clear soft tone.


a light of
ms and pu
of such as
been mad
eyes have
iv more I
an eve s


f breaking day
its a smiling ray
these 'tis known
e. When taps is blown
filled and not been gay.
want to meet.
clear


C
. .... .. .. ..___ I r


o








THE


CARIBBEAN.


George Cartwright, '22.


FOREWORD.


up with the others.


But we must take our hats


Things have taken place this year in the athletics
of Cristobal High School that have never been


off to our brother Sophs, who showed their pep,
class spirit, and sportsmanship, and finally managed
to beat the Juniors one game. The Seniors, after


before.


Athletics have


backed


many


a hard


fought,


hair-raising game,


came


boosted to the sky.
been formed with


An athletic association has


president,


secretary,


council composed of one member from each class.
The benefits of such an organization have already
been shown, and it will be safe to say, I believe,
that in the future, the athletics of Cristobal High
School will rival those of any high school in exist-


ence.


The organization is striving to broaden


class competition, make athletic schedules, give
honor letters for athletic work, and promote in-


through with the high honors of 1000 per cent.
The competing teams and their line ups were:


SENIORS.,
Doyle, F. (Capt.)
Cartwright, F.
Zimmermann, C.
Townsend, G.
Magnuson, G.


JUNIORS.
May, F.
Bliss, F. (Capt.)
Linczer, F.
Solomon, C.
Moore, G.
Eberenz, G.


terest in athletics.


We hope that the students


SOPHOMORES.


FRESHMEN.


of coming years will regard this organization as
a necessity for proper athletic work, and will strive


to improve upon
students of 1922.


the foundation


made


Rudd, F.
Parker, F.
Ashton, C. (Capt.)
Hall, G.
Peterson, G.


Burgoon, F.
Solomon, F. (Capt.)
Walsh, C.
Cousins, G.
Pulgar, G.


BASKET BALL.


RESULTS OF INTER-CLASS SERIES.


Basket ball has always topped the "Athletic
Activities" ladder of Cristobal High School, and
this year it has successfully climbed higher by two
steps, one in the form of "Inter-class Series," the


other,


"All Star Series.


Team.


Played.


Seniors ........
Juniors .......
Freshmen......
Sophmores.....


Per cent.
I.ooo00
.666
*333
.i66


Shortly


series


school


was arranged,


opened,


which


proved


an inter-class


to be


very


exciting and well worth the efforts of our coach,


Nothing more was done in the line of basket ball
until some underclassman happened to realize that
the Seniors claimed the championship, and, hoping


ts*- I r t. .i i









THE


CARIBBEAN.


Seniors had just as strongly resolved to keep their


suffered defeat to the tune of 21 to 16.


This left


gain higher honors,


and so only 2 of the 3 games were played, for the
Seniors proved superior and took both games.


SENIORS, 20--23.
Doyle, F.
Cartwright, IF.
Zimmermann, C.
Townsend, G.
Magnuson, G.
A terrible mishap took
place in the second gamc
of this series when Mag-
nuson, oneof the Seniors'


star guards,


caged


first basket of his basket-


ball career.


were so
this feat


The All Stars


stupefied


over


that the excel-


lent guarding of Solomon
had little effect.
Instead of playing the
third game of this series,
the Seniors challenged


the Lincoln


Five,


from them suffered their


first ani only


ALL STARS, 4--9.
Walsh, G.
Eberenz, G.
Solomon, C.
Bliss, F.


oore,


the series standing with I game apiece, as it still
stands, for, through no fault of ours, the deciding
game has never been played.
Another game played by our team was that of
C. H. S. vs. Co. F. of Fort Davis, in which the high
school managed to exhibit their usual speed and
good pass work and to defeat their opponents by


the score of 14 to 13.
was that with the sail


and although our


The last game of the year
ors of the U. S. cruiser Denver,


team


defeat


looked like pigmies up
against these heavy-set,
broad-shouldered giants,
they proved that size is
not everything in life, for
they played one of the
fastest games of the year
and came out once more


laurels,


score of 21 to 16.

CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
T .AM.


Doyle, F.
Solomon, F.
Cartwright.
Moore G.


Zi.nmermann, C.
Bliss, G.
Magnuson, G.
Eberenz, G.


Townsend, G. Walsh, G.


The game was


fast and well played, but
there were a number of
fouls on each side, which


marred


the fast, snappy


pass work of each team.


CRISTO3AL


BALL TEAM-.


s-0-s, S-O-S,
Balboa's in
"An iaiful mess.'


Top row-Julius Solomon, Charles Walsh, Jordan Zimmermann. Henry Moore,
LeRoy Magnuson; center row: Ale< Linezer (cheer leader), Leo Eberenz, George
Cartwright, Robert P_ Hughes (coach); bottom row: Gerald Bliss. Paul Doyle
(captain), Wesley Townsend.


found


that thev


TENNIS.


Tennis


activities


nat start until late in the
year, but when they did


Cristobal


some


School


coming champions.


SENIORS,
P. Doyle, F.
Cartwright, F.I
Zimmermann, C.


Townsend, G.
Magnuson, G.


On Saturday


LINCOLN FIVE,


Raymond, G.
Eberenz, G.
Greening, C.
A. Doyle, F.
Bliss, F.


February


the Balboa


School came over and played the first game


annual high school


series.


High
of the


There were to heads


held high when the first whistle blew, but when the
last was blown the 5 belonging to Balboa began
to droop, for Cristobal had inflicted a defeat upon


The season opened Thursday, December I, when
the Juniors challenged and defeated the faculty
by the scores of (6-2) (6-o) (5-7).


jUNIORS.


Alex Linczer,
Gerald Bliss.


FACULTY.


Miss Beeching.
Mr. Bacon.


Nothing more was done until April when Balboa


accepted our challenge and
the ability of our champs.
took the doubles by the


came over to experience
Cristobal High School


scores of


(6-o).


There was only one round of doubles played, the
i


throne and at the same time


the year.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


Balboa managed to capture I round of singles,


in making a firm foundation for the other branches.


when Sergeant defeated


Doyle, by the score of


We shall leave this opportunity to coming


years.


(6-3) (4-6) (7-5). However, this was their only
victory of the day. Bliss of Cristobal High School
defeated M. Banton of Balboa High School by the
score of (6-o) (6-1). Linczer of Cristobal defeated
McBride of Balboa by the score of (5-7) (6-2)
(7-5), and to complete this triumphant day, Rudd
of Cristobal defeated W. Banton by the score of


(6-3)


(6-2).


Soon after these matches, the Juniors stepped
into limelight and issued challenges to all the other


Good luck to you!
SWIMMING.
On April 2, an inter-class swimming meet was
held, and here's where the high school took off


their hats to the Freshies.


The score was well


nigh tied for the first three events, but after this
the Freshies took the lead for the remainder of the
meet, and won, with the Sophs second, the Seniors
third, and the Juniors fourth.


classes.
defeat at


Every class accepted and in turn suffered


the hands of Bliss


and Linczer,


INTER-CLASS SWIMMING MEET.
(Boys.)


Junior victors.


They first tackled the innocent


6o-yard Dash.


Freshmen


(6-o)


(6-0).


and defeated


them


score


Then came the Sophs and they like-


wise were defeated by the score of (6-2)


(6-2)


(6-3) and last the Seniors were taken to the field
and defeated bv the score of (6-2) (6-1). Next


they thought they might


as well make a clean job


I Paul Doyle (Class '22).
2 Alan Wallace (Class '25).
3 Jack Coffey (Class '25).
go-yard Dash.


I Paul Doyle (Class
2 Jack Coffey (Class
2 Alan Wallace (Clas


HOTEL WASHINGTON SWIMMING POOL.


Cristobal school pupils-high,


every known stroke are taught by competent


physic


grammar,
al directors


and grade-for a plunge or brush in the cooling and buoyant salt water. Fancy dives and
. All children, boys and girls, swim, and many are highly proficient.


of it while they were at it and played the All-Stars
of the school, but they were no better than the


other
scores


common herd and


were


defeated


of (6-1) (6-i).


24o-yard Relay.
Won by Freshmen.
Team-Fields, Fisher, Wallace, and Coffev.


Plunge.


Seniors .. .
Juniors
Sophomores
Freshmen
All-Stars


TEAMS.


..... Doyle and Magnuson
.... .. .. Linczer and Bliss


Rudd and Parker
Fisher and Fields
. Doyle and Rudd


I Jack Coffey (Class '25)
2 Paul Doyle (Class '22).
3 Gerald Bliss (Class '23)


Fancy Diving.


1 Gerald Bliss (Class '23).
2 Paul Doyle (Class '22).
3 Wesley Townsend (Class


TRACK.


POINTS SCORED.


r~~~* .- L--


Daily, here gather


COMPETING


t








THE CARIBBEAN.


____________57





r% 4
11
xx

a .-:: e-d


-A
L


V
-$s*sP. ,


Girl's


icTam


Si








THE


CARIBBEAN.


Although many ofourstudents have participated
and won many events in outside meets, we have
not had the chance this year to show our ability
as a high school team, with other teams on the


Zone.
Balboa


Although


High


we have issued


School


boys, and


I challenges
the Naval


and the boys and girls from old Cristobal


won


the 50-yard dash for boys under 15, the special
boys' relay and the fancy diving contest, while a


grammar school girl, 1\
won the 5o-yard ladies


ladies


Adelaide


Lambert,


' championship and the


' back stroke races.


Station, they have not as yet been accepted, and
as there is no pleasure in beating ourselves, further
progress in swimming activities was abandoned.
Alan Wallace, another freshie, earned third
place in the 50-yard back stroke race for seniors.
In this race he competed against champions. He


holds


junior


championship


record


Isthmus for 60 yards, time, 37 seconds.


passed


beyond


8W1MMIN3 CEA- blrtt$l.S,
Colon Beach products of the one
health-giving pastime possible every
day in our Isthimian year.


Frank


Fields


of the
He has


a junior and retires
from that class unde-


feated.


was a


member of the A.


W. S. C. relay


team


who on this day de-


heated
Canal


the champion


A


athletic
team.
strong


Association
Alan is also a


link in the
relay tear
on the A. S
and C. H.
polo team.


is the fastest


C. H.


m.


He is


. W. S. C.,


water


swimmer


stroke), and has the prettiest form of any boy on


the Isthmus under 14


years.


We are proud to


-. .."


FANCY DIVING.
Practically every known dive is excellently executed by
graceful and accomplished divers, Cristobal High holding Isth-
mian championship honors in this spectacular branch of
water sports.


John Coffey, a fresh
style race for juniors.
mer on the Isthmus unr


ie, won the 5o-yard free-
John is the fastest swim-


16 years.


His pret-


ty form in the crawl stroke displays the ease
with which he swims. We look to see Coffey a
world's champion some day. John is anchor man
on the Junior relay team that has never been de-


feated in its long list of races.


He is the fast lead-


off man for the C. H. S. relay team.


Coffey is


also a fast forward on the water polo team.

BASEBALL.

Baseball has not been as prominent a sport this
year as might have been expected, other activi-
ties crowding it out, but we did put a team in the


have him in our school.


He is a member of the


winning junior relay team of the A. S. W. S. C.
Gerald Bliss will benefit this school next year
with his good form in fancy diving.
Paul Doyle, one of our Seniors, and all around


athlete,


holds


the Isthmian


championship


fancy diving, and held first place in the Memorial


Day meet.


He is a member of the A.


S. W.. .C.


relay, medley relay (side stroke), and water polo


team,


and captain of the C. H.


S. swimming
S. swimming


team which claims some of the best swimmers in


Panama.


The school


boasts


a fast water polo


and relay team.
James Burgoon has shown some hidden swim-
ming talent, but we discovered it and we will
I A4 1 I i .1.


A QUIET SECTION OF THE POOL.
The water depth at this point varies from 8 inches to 3 feet on a
gentle slope. Here groups of tots joyously mingle only to desert for the
deeper parts of the pool, able to swim after a few lessons.
field with Jordan Zimmermann as captain, win-
ning 3 of the 5 games played.
The first game of the season was played against
our Isthmian rivals, B. H. S., on the Mount Hope
J .. ... -- ...-- ,- -.. L_ -^ .-. .. A .^:* . ... f. *^ I ^ k I









THE


CARIBBEAN.


managed to keep the score within


I run of the


though a couple of double plays were made by


Balboa High boys.
C. H. S.. 1.


The sco


Captain Zimmermann
practice and, after a w


re ended B. H.


took his


team out for


eek of it, journeyed 47


miles across the Isthmus to the stadium at Balboa
(within sight of the Balboa High School) and took
his place on the mound determined to wipe out


us, our opponents took home the big


end of the


score, 4-2.
On Saturday, February 25, Manager Reach of
the American Legion came forth with a strong
nine eager for a victory, but left the field a sadly
disappointed man, as we won, 2-1.
During the week we crossed bats with the sol-


the last defeat which was given


B. H.


The B. H. S. boys seemed


to his nine byv


to lose all


diers from Fort De Lesseps, and, with
pitching, we administered a defeat to them.


Doyle


their pep in their practice before the game, while
C. H. S. boys showed unusual liveliness at all times.


ing this game Magnuson drove in two runs with
his 3-bagger to left field.


Zim, our southpaw pitcher, deserve


s all kinds of


Many


of our players were attached


to local


credit for his steady pitching, as does his support.


teams


during


season,


and all appeared


The game ended C. H.


B. H.


series stood tie and the last game was never played
due to the fact that some of Balboa's best men
left their line-up.


On Saturday,


February


we met defeat at


the hands of an Army team on the Mount Hope


diamond.


Both teams played good ball, but the


soldiers proved to be the heavier hitters and, al-


rank high in baseball skill.


LINE-UP


J. Zimmermann, pitcher (capt.)
G. Bliss, catcher.
J. Solomon, Ist base.
Moore, 2d base.
Magnuson, 2d base.
E. Solomon, 2d base.
P. Doyle, shortstop.


Eberenz, 3d base.
Mendez, right field.
Walsh, center field.
Townsend, left field.
Alex Linczer, left field.
Girden Rudd. left field.


A 90-YARD DASH,.
Close and exciting position of all contestants at the 40-yard mark,
The 90-yard was covered in 54 seconds.

GIRLS'


THE MILE-A-MINUTE SLIDE,
Popular with young and old, not to mention bathing suit manufacturers.


ATHLETICS.


Louise Henter, '23.


FOREWORD.


and basketball.


At last, however, in February, a


regular physical training directress, Miss Lindsay,


Girls' activities have been badly crippled this
year, and it has only been by very faithful work
and a loyal spirit on the part of a few girls that


anything at all has been done.


It is hoped that


next year, with a more favorable beginning, the
girls will at once undertake to start their athletic
work, and to carry it throughout the whole year
with true Cristobal High School spirit.


arrived and began work in earnest.


The work of


the Gatun girls was superintended by Mr. Baker,
physical director at Gatun.
In order to overcome some of the difficulties
concerning athletics there was formed, on October


1921,


an athletic


association


Louise


Hen teras president and Gladys Lowande, secretary.


At this


time


a schedule


of activities


totaling


Until late in


there


1" r rI 1 .. i i


1


was no regular
I?1 .r


90 points for one-half credit was submitted by the
1nL* C l' l I .... I V- ------- -- - -- -.....








THE


CARIBBEAN.


either the Junior or Senior class to make a team,


ability to climb ladders.


The score was finally


these two classes were combined.


Afterwards the


different classes met and elected captains.


conceded to be 1 1-10O in favor of the girls.


Homer


Baker, physical director at Gatun, is


Freshmen....
Sophomores .


Senior-Junior .........


...................... ..Ruth D uey
. . . . . .. . . . ..Loretta R ush


(later filled by Charlotte Housel)
....... .. .Emma Townsend


planning to take a team of girls to the States. To
obtain money for this, a series of basket-ball games
between the Atlantic and Pacific sides has been


arranged.


Cristobal and Gatun girls have cornm-


BASKET BALL.


bined to make an Atlantic side team.


The first and last inter-class game was played in


February at the Y.


as referee.


W. C. A., Miss Floyd acting


Owing to the absence of one of the


girls on whom the Sophomores were depending,


a Freshman


The Freshmen


was chosen


to play


presumably


in her stead.
the champion-


ay 19..


Where played.


Score.


. Gatun.... .
Balboa ....
Pedro Miguel.
Camp at Gatun
Fort Clayton.


. ..... ...... 1-0
. .......... 0--0
. .. .. .... 9-3
.. ..... ... 7-4


Fort Davis.... .


- 5-3


Winner.
Atlantic
Pacific
Tie
Pacific
Atlantic
Atlantic


ship, for they won this one and only game, and
neither of the other two class teams has tried to
dispute thb title.


Loretta


Rush,


our star


States on April 7, 1922.


athlete,


left for the


Before moving to Cris-


tobal she was one of the best players on the Gatun


TENNIS.

Tennis hold an important place in sports this
year with practice every Wednesday at either the


Cristobal


playshed


Radio


court.


basket ball team.


Since then, her time had been


taken up with swimming, in which she has been


successful.


Before


leaving,


however,


series of championship games between Balboa and


Cristobal High School was arranged.


was played on April 29.


The first


Olga Linczer played Anita


wished to try her hand at basket ball again;


2 games were played in her honor.


In the first,


a rollicking rough-and-tumble, at Gatun on April
i, Gatun was victorious with a score of II to I
and in the second, on April 6, at the Army and


NavyY


at Cristobal, Gatun was again victorious


with the score 17 to 4.
On April 17, the Gatun girls' basket-ball team


played their


"Daddies.


" The game was scheduled


Sergeant winning one love set and a second set


(6-3).


Helen Abendroth lost to Marion Lockart


in a game which was a decided credit to Helen in


Edna


Campbell played Olena Hutching, Edna winning
one love set and a second set (7-6).
On May 6, a return set of doubles was played
at Balboa. Olga Linczer and Edna Campbell
represented Cristobal and lost to Dorothy Brooks


her good


judgment in


placing


the ball.


to begin at 7 o'clock but the expectant crowd was
kept waiting for almost three-quarters of an hour.


and Ellen
games must


Roberts


(8-io).


more


be played.


Finally the


"Daddies


made a triumphant entry,


each one being introduced to the spectators. One
glance at their industrious jaws sufficed to answer
the question as to the why the Y had run out of


gum that night.


Many of the men berated them-


selves on not having noticed before how striking
an appearance a lace ruffle can give a pair of khaki
trousers and what an effective basket-ball uniform
maybecreatedwith cretonnebloomersandshort full


skirt.


After the uproar had somewhat died down,


the referee finally pried the whistle to his mouth,
through the long white hair that flowed in un-
f r I 1 1 I .I


HIKING.


A hike of


points.


16 miles was required to gain four


For this reason


2 hikes were made


one


to Gatun, a distance of 9 miles and other to Mindi
Farm.


SWIMMING.

Swimming has always been important in our
school athletics and we are proud to be able to
.... .* 1 L .... .. -^_E,-. -^^L L .---* ..-.. -- . . J,-k,^b A & -1, A ; 4-









THE


CARIBBEAN.


The first meet of the school


the Washington Pool on
the Atlantic side alone.


year


was held at


Thanksgiving D)ay, for
For hi gh school gi :ls the


alone, held on Easter, was the most amusing meet


of the year.


The management of this meet was


handed over almost


entirely to the high school


following


places


were


made:


OUR CHAMPION LADIES RELAY TEAM.
Three high and one grammar school
girl make up this fast-swimming quar-
tette, decisively lowering the colors of
Balboa's star swimmers. Miss Adelaide
Lambert (third in line), the grammar
school member. is the fastest girl swim-
mer on the Isthmus The others, all
high, from left to right are the Misses
Loretta Rush, Gladys Lowande. and
Edna Campbell.


.0-VARD DASH.


members of the Water Sports Club and they
tainlv didl well.


O()n March


I. Edna Camp-bell.
2 Loretta Rush.


Ruth Duev.


hC-VA RD DASH.


r. Loretta Rush.
2. Edna Campbell.
t. Ruth Duev.


in an all-Isthmian


Cristobal relay team won first place


a pool
minute


record


for ladies in


the fast


3,5 seconds, and Loretta


third place in the 60-yard dash.
The inter-class meet, on April


most


school
classes


Interesting


year.


important


cer-


meet


establishing
time of i
Rush made


was one of the


events


Only the Freshmen and Sophomore


were repres


ented by


iris in this


meet


January


two third


places, in fancy Living
and the 6o-vard dash
were made by Loretta


Rush.


60-YAR


i. Loretta Rush.


2. Edna


Ruth D


On the Washington's Birthday Isthmian meet
although the girls worked hard, only a few points
were made:


oret


2. Edna


Campbel


D DASH.

(Sophomore.
l. (Freshman.)


uey. (Freshman.)

3O-YARD DASH.


ta Rush.
Campbell.


(Sophomore.)
(Freshman.)


meet.


Loretta Rush,


6C-VARD


Ruth D


DASH.-LADIE S.


2. Loretta Rush.
3. Edna Campbell.


The most exciting event was
the Atlantic Side Water Sports


the relay won by


Club.


mers were Loretta Rush, Edna Campbell,
Lowande, and Adelaide Lambert.


variety


a swimming


meet


e swim-
Gladys


was held


uey. (Freshman.)


PLUNGE.


I. Loretta Rush.
2. Edna Campbell.
3. Gladys Lowand,


i. Sophomores.


at 2. Freshman.


(Sophomore.)
(Freshman.)
e. (Sophomore.)


WATER SPORTS.
Two grammar school
medal winners. Billy
Caffey. fancy di ver,
and Miss Adelaide
Lambert, holder of
Isthmus of Panama
women's championship
30-yard. 50-yard, and
60-vard records, com-
ing world's champion
girl swimmer.


120-YARD RELAY.
(Loretta Rush-Gladys Lowande.)
(Edna Campbell-Ruth Duey.)


Gatun on Ma


rch 7, in which LIoretta Rush made


DIVING.


second plac


e in the so-yard dash


special.


i. Ruth D


uey. (Freshman.)


The Junior aquatic meet for the


Atlantic side


2. Loretta Rush.


(Sophomore.)


A MISHAP.


.tlex Linczer,


A foolish frog, one sunny day,
While splashing around in a playful way,


Observed a man
With a red tin can,
And manners most suspicious,
"I think I know," remarked t


Thus far the foolish


was wise,


But, had he better used his eyes,


He would have


seen,


Close by, a lean
Old 'gator-his nose just showing.
Kersplash-the 'gator took one bite.


he frog,


60-YARD DASH.-GIRLS UNDER I6.







62 THE CARIBBEAN.





*
b












1 o
e lo Loa9
-. 2",a

5.2


Trainenq for the Meet










THEt


CARIBBEAN.


Henry Moore,


The Exchan


should be, and is,


ge Department


exceptional


of THE CARIBBEAN
y' interesting to the


The Mirror.


WYe liked the


Norwood


story entitled,


High School,


"The Quarterback.


student body of Cristobal High School.
The pupils of this school come from many dif-


ferent parts of the United States and


are always


Your poets


add much


The "Kick Department
much amusement.


interest


with their


clever lines.


was read and re-read


glad to find out what the schools from which they


TheEltrurian.


Haverhill


High School,


Haverhill


Mass.


came


are doing.


year, however, our


changes have not cooperated with us


Through yo


as we hoped


ur ver


infer that you have


y snappy and
a lively school.


newsy DOOK,
Great credit


they would.


We miss many of our old friends.


due the author of "Yellow Bill Barrett." Your


review


was well


written.


But surel


v your


The stor
number
came in
on THE '


ONE GATE OPEN AT GATL'N SPILLWAY.


enough


ir


of their school


to occupy


department.


Reading High
is brimful of


y entitled "To Horse
was very nteresting.


Reading,


news and humor.


in the February


"Who's


for no small bit of interest.


BBEAN


was gratefully


Who" also


Your comment


accepted


Mighty buffers


mounds,
over-taxe


secures
Niagarn
spectace


seething


turn back. in


tons of


lake. Overhead,


the dazzling sun.
a deadens other so
le fashioned entirely


towering


on-rushin g


ealdron-like


water from the


a rainbow-hued mist ob-
The roar of a miniature
uiods. An awe-inspiring
by the hand of man.


The Record.

In the


John Marshall


Record


rerestling magazine.


we found a


High School,


very


attractive


The headings for the


Richmond,


and in-


various de-


The Zonian.


Somehow


Balboa


High School,


we missed vou last year.


apartments


Balboa


was ver


That's too bad,


are fine.


y good.


be enlarged.


"Confessions


Your


exchange


Why not keep the


fa Bean Eater


department could
advertisements off


isn't it, when there


are only two of us on the Canal


covers


as they tend to ch


eapen


your


erwise


Zone?
1920-21


Anyway,


we received


issue and extend our hearty


your well-arranged


fine book?


congratulation.


Your athletics are especially interesting


to us because


The Stadium.


Townsend


Harris


Hall High School,


we are friendly rivals in this line.


Your full-page


pictures


add much.


them ourselves.


In fact we


were tempted


The glowing accounts that


Rumor has brought us of the excellence of


rial for vour 1


921-22


issue


spurred


to try
Dame


The exchange
the Stadium. Ii
aged to produce


your mate-
d us on to


ma n V


endeavor.


department
n spite of this
a weekly th


was found


missi


you have man-


at would put


to rout


monthlies.


Norwood, Ohio.


back


graduates think e
nve space in their

The Round- Up.

The Round- Up


Mass.


N. Y


I


greater









THE


CARIBBEAN.


it came.
business


Your school must abound in


manager


poets.,


The Quill.


is to be complimented on the


goodly amount of advertising
were well written.


The Trinitonian.

The Trinitonian
see your monthly


is a goo
or ann


matter.


Trinity

d paper.


The exchanges


U., /'axahachie,

We should like to


Staten Island Academy, Staten Island,


Taking all in all the


bigger exchange


The Torch.


The Torch is
and headings,


guil


a good


department would helj


magazine. A
p a good deal.


Boston Normal School, Boston,


very compact


however,


would be


neat.


A few


cuts


an improvement.


The Gleaner.


Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque,
N. Mex.


Your book
"The Wooing


Pawtucket


High School,


is both humorous and


of Hazeline


" is just the thing.


There is surely no space wasted in


your paper.


failed to find a single advertisement, dl of which goes


about b
are well


orrowing
written;


the fire department?


"The Tattler


came


The locals


in for a good


to show that the student body


backs its school paper.


bit of comment.


The Curtis


Monthly.


Curtis High School,


Staten


Island, N.


Revista La Salle.


Colegio


Panama


The Monthly
March number
mystery story,
April number


arrange


abounds
we became
"Masks."


in good
e greatly
and the


vas all that we could


your ads neatly


material.


In the


excited over the


conclusi


on in the


ask. Why not


in the back of the book


El placer que nos de la


en gran parte


topicos vivos, como


"Costumbres


"Ecos Mundiales


nos divierten
buen exito!


tectura de su publicaci6n se


a los articulos
"La Fiebre Mal


de los Indios de


excelentes


aria en


Panam4


Veraguas."


son tambien buenos.


much.


tengan


Los chistes


Ustedes


siempre


GATES CLOSED AT G
But for the musical drone
tion, all is as quiet and serene


Your


exceedingly


A


TUN SPILLWAY.
of the hydroelectric sta-


e as a Sabbath morn.


Nazareth


cuts and sketches


attractive.


with other schools why


apartment and let


others


APRON OF SPILLWAY DAM,


Kentucky


are fine and the cover is


Seeing that
not have an
know what


you exchange
exchange de-
you think of


Forming


headwaters


a playground for schools


RevistaEscolar de


Tenemos


SPuerto Rico
un solo ejem


Los artrculos son


of the lower Chagres River,
of "Silver King" tarpon.

San Juan, Porto Rico.


plar


su Revista


Mensual.


muy practices e interesantes.


them? The academy journal.
The Academy Journal.


Norwich Free Academy, Norwich,


Conn.


The Cambridge


Review,


Can: bridge H.


S., Cambridge, Mass.


The cover of the Journal is


the beginning of a go


The editorials


your other


stories


in the


material.


Review
Would


and poems and forming


meant separate


your


are well


not


written


as is


collecting your


a literary depart-


book.
inside


a decided


your-


from the other departments make


story as


book more satisfactory?


your artists torge
A few cartoons
advantage. "Is


" school that would


Babies


et that there was an
and headings would
there a little Fairy in


inspire


so Imaginative


in Cabbages?"


The Herald.


The stories


Holyoke


in the


Herald


High School,

were good,


Holyoke,


THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS.


Mass.


but alas for


CARIELEAN


has traveled


Owners


rest of
! We


your


book!


were readir
i i


You mixed it up so with the


your exchange


notes


I I I t I


have carried it to Maine, to Florida,


-
FOTI11a.


t I has been


sent


and to Cali-


as a ift or souvenir to
as a gift or souvenir to


The Albuquerque Record.


N.Y


Mass.


Pawtucket, 1
interesting.


Amaranth.


Academy,


*


, *


t I










THE


CARIBBEAN.


every


issue


annual wa
men who
York last


the best possible.


is found in a


were
year.


in Curtis
Thev v


York subwa


High School
rote us a goo


two


of New


better


CARIBBI AN.


You publish an immensely


I The article on the Canal


You htr


was ve


interesting magazine.
rv instructive. Thank


vour comment.


about it-but their address,


alas! is


THE CARIBBIEAN.


THE CARIBBEAN.


One of our best
splendid magazine.


exchanges.
The article


THE CARIBIIEAN
s o" local interest


especially good andti the school notes are well


stories


Zonites


paper,


and snapshots


we are certal


are excellent.


ud of


IBBEAN


IS a


fold of exchanges.
of good stories and


arranged,
As lival


our


of cuts
notes


sister


ARIBBEAN


The Zonian.


A Gld to wel come


You certainly


jokes, and


Share what make
and editorials a


you into our


are fine!


a wonderful abundance


you so interesting.


re well


written.


pictures we judge there are no more
in the whole school. It certainly


such a few


can get


outlett


From


than about


is wonderful that


a g'od paper


as yours.


Do not forget


us when


vour next issue comes


Cur 'tis


Monthyv.


IBBEAN.


(The author of this


imagined


that in her


ibut unwise friend ha


clever and


nal


abhen:e from her r
s gone through all


exch
oomTl


article has


an enthus iastic


her exchange


CHRISTMAS MORN
All bundled up in


AT


our winter elutthes.


taking
leaving


she considered the best in each


a note of comment
We feel flattered that


on what had
all that was


magazine


seemed


especia


left to identify us


THE CARIBN was a bit of
ITHE CARIBBEAN.


cover.)


The annual
and the editors


department


issue ot your


deserve


is especially


much credit.


is well planned


The athletic


terestming.


I happened


nized it at
C.Z. Th


to see a


piece of purple cover and recog-


once as "THE CARIBBEAN,
e note was quite lengthy.


from Cristobal,
"I think these


The Mirror.


pictures of the Canal and locks, pictures


are wonderful.,


CARIBBEAN.


I often wondered what the


f the town
Canal and


The cuts


and comments


of the


vrIu-US


classes


are Zone


were like. didn'


most interesting.


Your literary department


is ex-


The 'Junta.


cellent.
Canal."


WVe enjoyed "A
Your athletics


Trip Through the Panama


seem to be


We wel


tip-top
"tip-top


come


these


comments,


the only ones we


spite of the


size ot


your


school, receive


ed, and


only regret that we have not had


The Round-


A PROMISING


more.




YOUNG MAN.


Paul C.


"How many want music books?"


asked Mliss


will. I


," volunteered Johnny.


Dodds


of the assembly


"they


cost S


I, Th


e time came


for the report to be made but


"I do, I do!"


grin.
Books
distribute
slowly.


were


ed


exclainmed Johnny,


sent for.


but the


mioneyv


with an


They arrived and


for them


Finally, among the last


eager


were


came


f them to pay


John had failed to prepare it.
"Has some one a book entitled


ost, that he could bring to


, 'Shakespeare's


school ?"


asked the


English teacher.


"I have, I have,


answered Johnny


eagerly


The E!trarian,.


out.


65


"I HE


t Vou?"


-A 4 I


.... T --L -.....


copy of our


paper


of


*" >-?-T











66 THE CARIBBEAN.









i



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....





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.C









THE


CARIBBEAN.


Emma Townsend, '2.


1921.


to carry news of C. H.


S. to his own land.


O-O-


oooh!!


Ghosts!


Seniors


goblins capture under-


OCTOI BER.


Back to old


C. H.


S. where we


classmen at their Hallowe'en party.

fn taNOVEMBER.
find that


Joseph must have spent the summer cleaning
of r us. Larger enrollment than last year in


g up
spite


- -- --- --- ---------.._q,- _^ - --- J.* f--.-. I - tl. -,
of the absence of many old schoolmates. Miss
Bakewell present to fill the only faculty vacancy,


that of Modern History and Domestic


5- Everybody goes
morning, so as to
get books and as- -
signmentsfor half-


period


classes


the afternoon.
12. Hazing to-
day. The fresh-
men boys do not
seem to appreciate
the tcnsorial abil-
ity of the upper
classn-ren, for they


make


for barber


shops immediately
after school. The


parade


Science.


to half-period classes in the


them,


I. After two years min
joins our Senior class.


2. C. H.


S. Girls'


Balboa High School, Ida


W elcom


e back, Ida.


Athletic Club organized.


9. First meeting of above-mentioned association.
o10. About sixty of us subscribe for the Literary
Digest.
17. Membersof
.. .. ,-- ,, --- the Junior Class
SI are wearing blue


of girls,


with dresses re-


"When fond recollections present it to view, how


versed and hair carefully braided, seems to give


the rest of us more pleasure then it does
but they are all good sports.


26. Why are the Seniors wearing green and gold


dear to my heart


classes.


"The First


is this scene
In the a


arm


bands.


MissNeef,


welfare worker of
the Metropolitan


insurance


Company,
the Social
lems class


gives
Prob-
an in-


formal talk on her
work.
18. First annual


visiting
C. H. S.


of my childhood


assembly period the


Thanksgiving Dinner


a dramatization


I"Does An Education Pay ?


day in
Parents


and friends attend


Juniors


' play


" is followed by


by the Seniors on the subject


Program closes with


eyeshades?


Because the light coming from the


I 1 t I 1 1 r -


a piano duet by Charlotte Housel and Ruth Duey.
4 I *" iI i








THE


CARIBBEAN.


First game of boys' inter-class series in


basket


"Our Flag.


" For the Sophomores Edna Camp-


bell, Florence Albert, and Jane Hall give an origi-


21. Scene from
the assembly:


"Les Miserables


"acted before


nal play,


"The


History


of the Flag."


Each


Freshman gives one fact about the history of the


Jean Val Jean. .
The Bishop..,


The Bishop
Policeman


s sister


.Dr. Hubbard.
. .Mrs. Hearne.
.. MissDodds.


. .. .... Mrs. Marcuse.


flag and the whol
burg Address."


e class recites Lincoln's" Gettys-


14. Better Language day.


several selections


about speec


Miss Dodds reads
h. Each student


School


contributes
$3.50 to the
Belleau Wood
Memorial.
Sophomore
Class poverty


party.


Fearful


and wonderful


PARK.


Here inviting benches rest the representatives of are tr
perhaps every land at annual carnival or semiweekly
band concert-a happy, democratic throng, tUmeS.!


COS-


writes a creed concerning the use of the English
language.
Juniors are hosts to the high school students and
faculty at a unique affair min the form of a beach


party
forget


and marshmallow roast.


those


stunts?-the


Emilio as the dainty little


as the dashing


stalwart


ever


Junior tragedy with


Cinderella
prince; th


dramatization of Mother Goose rhymes;


and Alex
e Seniors'


several


songs, accompanied by ukeleles, sung by members


of the Sophomore class.
closed with the selection


The program is fittingly
by Mr. Bacon and his


DECEMBER.


Freshmen, in their silent Jazz orchestra.


Marsh-


2. Literary Digest Club formed in U.
class:


President.
Secretary.


Final


league.


game of boys


. George


S. History


Cartwright.


. Wesley Townsend.


inter-class basket-ball


Seniors finished with oo1000 per cent.


mallows,


yells,


Hurrah for the Juniors!
15. Naturalization day.


Jordan


Zimmermann


games, jokes,


and jollity!


In an original play,
a judge, explains the


ideals of America to an immigrant, Alex Linczer,
whose character is later vouched for by George
Cartwright and Gerald Bliss.


6. Pep meeting-a soap box and some noise.


16. Last


"Better


America


week.


Are the Seniors


really


anxious


to recite?


Wesley Townsend and Ida Brown debate against


No, they just want to show their new class rings.
Red Cross Society organized.
10. C. H. S. Girls' Supper
Club organized.
-^ 1* *. .
Mary Fields, President. "
Louise Henter, Vice President,.


Ruth Hopkins,


Secretary


Emma Townsend, Treasurer


12. Opening


America


week.


of "Better
Mr. Fisher


gives a very impressive talk
on "American Ideals."
13. All-high-school patri-


otic prograrr
niors, Emm
reads Lane's


i. For the Se-
na Townsend
"Makers of the


yr n t. C


STATE OF CRISTOBAL COLON.
An historic snapshot. The
building, headr uartersa of Count
Ferdinand de Lesseas like the


Henry


migration.


Moore and


Emma


Townsend,


on "Im-


" Following this, Emilio Solomon, as


an immigrant, with the help of an able interpreter,
Alex Linczer, and a judge, Edward May, gathers
information on how to become naturalized. Miss


Hornbeak reads


"The Lie,


23. Assembly period st


" to the assembly.
unts. Seniors give an


original sketch in child dialect and dress.


Juniors


are represented


in a negro


sketch


Henry Moore, Leo Eberenz, Emilio Solomon, and


Alex Linczer.


For the Sophomores, Edna Camp-


bell and LIoretta Rush dance. Some of the Sopho-
mores act out O. Henry's story, "The Gift of the


Magi."


Ruth Duey plays a piano solo for the


Freshmen.
School closes for the Christmas vacation.
C - I .. L T- I n n ...- 1 T-I. A.


COLON S MUNICIPAL


.. .. .
.. .
-








THE


CARIBBEAN.


trip there.


Santa Claus comes.


Barnhouse excepted, goes to Co


The faculty, Miss
sta Rica.


1922.


ments best.


The evening is somewhat marred for


the Juniors by the fact that they have forgotten
their toothpick.


Barnhouse


to the Economics


JANUARY.


class on the salmon industry in Washington.


9. School opens.
much in evidence.


Numerous new


gold pencils


(erald is anxious to tell


e -very-


one the time.


16. Mrs.
the subject,


Churchill addresses the assembly on


"The


t, ce.
01Cce.


" She


illustrates with


29. Seniors
mates, Mildred


idt gMood-by to one of their class


Stafford.


Good


to yOU,


Mildred!
Doctor Guild speaks to the assembly
Aim in Life."


"Our


APRIL.


several recitations.


21. The Freshmen entertain us.


Even the fact


i. G(atun girls defeat


Cristobal girls in


basket


that the chicken dinner turns out to be a dinner


for chickens, rather than of chic


our go


movies;
partial.


time.


all funnv.


Game


But Santa


kens, does not


Mutt
Claus


and Jeff,
is a bit


Mr. Alexander


"Standards in Life."
Miss Currier lecture
6. C. H. S. defeats


addresses


the assembly


s on "The Symphony.'
"F" Co. of Fort Davis


M e -


SEA PROMENADE, HOTEL


WASHINGTON.


bers ofC. H. S.


present


Mock


Dis-


armament
Conference at


Parent-


Teacher's
meeting. Geo.


Greenest verdure, cooling sea breezes, happy st-ul-
lers, and peaceful quiet here meet and blend in perfe t C ar t W r i g h t,
harmony.
as Secretary
Hughes, does creditable work, as do all the others.


21.
it a su
26.


C.H.
access?


basket ball.


/
friend


One of C.H.
ds sails for


S. 's best students, athletes, and


the States.


Loretta.


S7-7.


Easter vacation.


vocational conference
merit, and sunburn.


L o a ds


of fun at Ga-
tun. Girlsplay


tion


aives its annual country fair.


Ask any of those


C. H. S. defeats B. H.


27. Queen


Mildred


Stiles,


ielen
Ruth


who were present.
S. in basketball.


attended


Duey, Olga


Betty Fitz-William, represents


her
Lincze


C.


maids,
r, and
on its


float in the Colon carnival parade.


daddies
exhibi-
game of


basket ball.
21. The Se-
niors ofC. H.
S. are guests
at the Balboa


Seniors


' play


C. H.


at Balboa.


Don't forget us,


S. girls attend
Fun, merri-
Fun, merrl-


A CO NTRaYSDE


> l \wvi ae aup suh colmnie manage happnmes.
wi noun r en a glimpse of marble halls, motion pictures
or mentor ears.


"Ihe


Black


Feather.


A worthy


play given worthily.


28. Turn about is fair play.


B. H.


S. defeats


MAY.


C.H.


S. in basketball.


7. George Cartwright


best essay on


rize for the


"The Church and the Community.


From the time


we found the daintily written


invitations on our desks, our expectations for the
Sophomore party have been high and we are not


disappointed.


They meet us at the door, promptly


9. Chaplain Stull keeps us laughing


talks to us on


"Your


Purpose min the


when he
World"


but we remember all he says.
l o. Mr. Judd gives an interesting and instructive


at eikht, and after leading us blindly to kiss the


talk to the Economics class on


"Roads in Panama.


- -. ^-^4.*^ 1


FEHRUARV.


MARCH.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


2i. Papers of Marjorie Ball, Edward May, and
Emma Townsend sent to Balboa to compete in


2. Last of the material for THE CARIBBEAN goes
to the printers.


"Good Roads"


"Clarence


contest.
" plays at the America Theatre.


Gatun clubhouse shows


"Clarence.


31. News comes of Esther Witt's winning in


"Good


Esther.


School on havi


Roads"


contest.


congratulations


Congratulations,


to Balboa


High


ng won Esther at the beginning of


this year.


JUNE.


8. "Clarence


appears at the Balboa clubhouse.


12. The Junior-Senior Banquet is held at the
Hotel Washington.
16. Final meeting of Supper Club with Senior
girls as honor guests.


18. Baccalaureate


sermon


the Cristobal


Union Church.
21. Gatun parents are hosts to parent-teacher
association and guests, at final meeting of the


I. Miss


Seniors at
and gold


Dodds
a very


entertains the Faculty


delightful dinner.


decorations and favors


The green


were


original


and very attractive.


year.


24. The class of 1922 become Alumni.
30. End of the great and glorious school year,
'2I-'22.


ma


CocoNetr PaLM TREES.
As useful ai they are beautiful

TENNESSEE.


Wesley


She's the garden spot of the Union---
Is Tennessee.
Cut with wooded, rugged hills
Smothered with honeysuckle and arbutus;
Dotted with white monuments-
Memorials to the Blue and Gray


Townsend,


Here, fields of billowing corn;
There, plantations of wide-leafed tobacco;
Grapes in purple cluster;
Coming of apples and peaches
Heralded by the droning of the June bug;
Hnuses always onfen







TH E


CARIBBEAN.








THE CARIBBEAN.


44


a


Wesley


H. Townsed,


May.-"How many
Miss Hornbeak.-"Si
May.-"How's that?


senses


are there


Miss


X.


Beeching.-


you can see through


have five.


"A transparent object is one
gh. Name something that is


transparent.


Hornbeak.-"I know it.


The one lacking


"A doughnut.


is common sense.


Bliss.-"Ma, Miss Dodds gave me a three-day
vacation, for being the only one able to answer her
question."


His mother.-Well, I
what was the question?"


see about


that-but


Teacher.-"Frank, can
ceeded Edward VI."


Frank.-
Teacher
Girdon


me who


"Mary."
.-"Who followed Mary, Girdon?"
(absent-mindedly).-"Her little lar


suc-


mb.


Bliss.- "Who put the tack in Doyle's seat?"


In Physics class.
Miss Beeching.-


"The pressure of bodies at rest


Dodds.-"How is it, Gerald, that you are


always late?"


Bliss.-"It's like this. You keep telling me not
to watch the clock in classes, so now I'm in the
habit of not watching it at home."


is called force-give an example.
Baldy.-"The police force."


Zim.-"You know, Baldy is so lazy that he gets
up at 5 in the morning so that he has longer to
loaf."


Baldy,


to Miss


Dodds.


"May I go home?


don't feel well."


Miss


Dodds.-


"Yes, you may.


"Not so much noise, Alex."
"It's important, Miss Dodds.


Doyle.-
game too
game too.


"Wait for me outside; I wanna


see the


Remember, the machine that rattles the most


does not do the best work.
"Suppose it's a Ford?"


"Your father must have been an athlete.


"Why?"


Fields.-


"I hope this rain keeps up through the


"Because he raised a dumb-bell."


night.


Cousins.-


"What have we got for supper to-


Wallace.-"Why?
mallow roast."


It will spoil


the marsh-


night?"
Mother.-"What you haven't got."
Cousins.-"What is it, sardines?"


Fields.-


"No, it won't; if it keeps up it can't


come down.


Mother.-"No,


brains.


" Burgoon.-


"Dad, can you sign your name with


your eyes shut?"


S I I I


Zim.-


Miss


i ? .








THE CA


Car/os.- '"Please don't put my 's down in red.'"


-"W\hv?"


Because my


dad is like a bull.


RIBBEAN.


Miss Beeching, to Moore in Advanced Algebra
class.


Vtu]


would read over this


textlbook,


Vour


tS malt whenever he sees red.


lessons would


be half done.


"I know a boy w


ho takes up Spanish,


French, English, and German.
"How does he find time to


Italian,


"All right,


me two textbooks.


AT \I ,l.O\VIK 'EN


studv? ?


Brtid, es. -


"Oih, he doesn't study; he runs the elevator at
the lHotel Washington."
Rudd.--"How man" men are there in a quar-
tette ?''


"Hey,


P ARTY.


Doyle, d(o you want two pieces


of cake?"
l)ov/e.-"Sure."


Hridcss. -


"Well, cut your piece in half.


'Death still


loves a


shining mark,


Lee.-"Q(uartette
meaning quarter, so


comes from


there must be


the 1.atin


word


The New York newspapers do


say;


And print in letters large and dark,
"A champion bootblack died to-day.


Roach.


"Pass me


the ink.


Miss


Horn be


(reproachfully).--" If -what,


Do v/le (suspiciously,


in restaurant,


as waiter


George?"


Roac.H--

Mr. Hug


"If you

hes was


This particular lesson
"Now, Julius," said


can reach it.


giving instructions in diving.


was o


n the swallow dive.


Mr. Hughes,


you take a


turn.


brings
those


piece


of apple


pie).


"What state


apples come from


Salter.---


"You ought to know, you've been in


States.


Dcye.'-"But I didn't make the pies.
Jaiter.-"Well, I didn't make the apples.


Julius made a hopeless
alarming splash.


"That's not a swallow dive,


attempt and created an


said Mr. Hughes,


sympathetically.


"Ain't it?.


gurgled Julius.


"Why, I thought


AdMiss


D)odds


Assemblv).--


"John


Coffee,


settle!''


Hornbeak.-


'Don t stir.


Miss Barnhouse.-"Is that clear?'


I'd swallowed half the pool!"


line.-"Here's my first batch


of biscuit.


MAKING OUT PERIOD


SCHEDULE.


wait.


From


oven


Wirt z. "What


place


we put


down


whiscuit.


Mechanical Drawing?"
Miss Dodds.-"Put down M.


How poor Juline cried,
When Bliss cruelly replied,


T. Buildin


"You're right, only a bunch of dumb-


bells have their class there."

Miss Beeching, to Leo in Ph
"What is a vacuum, Leo?"


ot it in my


VS3CS.


head, but I can't


explain it.


"Let them


burn.


To eat them-


shouldn't riscuit.


Heard


come in
all day.


during


music


iod.-Basses,


NAMEFUL


A sad


Ql'ESTIONS.


one-


Is Fisher catcher?


Does George Ball?
No, but Edward May.


but Frank Fields.


Sunburn?


Is John Coffey colored?
v o In A RrW-m.i,


Whoa, Henry!
VWhy is Mattie Pullig Gladys Ford?


Why doesn't Kenneth Parker?


Teacher.
Car/os.


Wallace.-


on time, you've been behind the piano


please








THE


CARIBBEAN.


WHY NOT THIS WAY?


Inse.?
A man once in Me.
Had a terrible pe.
The doctors pronounced it rheumatics;
Now he gets down the le.


With the use of
And has had to


a ce,
give up acrobatics.


Fate is


Unkignd.


Poor Johnny did not see this sign,
"Please drive to the left of this lign,"
But he heard a great crash-
Saw his car go to smash!
Now he's working to pay off the fign.


-M. B.,


-7. Z.,


Heighty-teighty:
There was once


a man of great height


Tioux Trioux!


Who attempted to blow out the light;
But, alas! It was gas!


So he had to pas
To a realm that


His bones


is queight out


of eight.


a brave, an old Sioux,


case of the


flioux;


they did clatter,


His teeth they did chatter,
And a cure for it nobody knioux.


Did it Blr.?


There was once a spright'y


young


Who had a good-looking sr.;
One night in the dark,
They met in the park-
An awful mistake!-for he k


Mr. -Jr


Eau dear!


Jeau didn't have enough Deau!


A girl once


had a new beau


Who thought that she loved him,


seau


A ring


he bought her,


The Awful Huay.
There once sat a pair on a


And thought he'd caught her,
But when he proposed, she said, "Neau.


quay


And peacefully
But, when he "L
She said to him,
Now don't get fi


razed at th


e suay;


ip and kissed her,"
"Mister,
familiar with muavy"


--P. D.,


NOTICE

Additional copies of this School Annual, mailed to

any address in the United States, may be had by

addressing "Paul C. Doyle, The Caribbean, Cristobal,


Canal Zone," and inclosing the cost,


cents.


There once was
Who had a bad


.Z.. '22.


-E. T.,


--7.Zg.,







THE CARIBBEAN. 75


FOX ASSOCIATED
w REALART PRODUCERS&
gSELZNICK AMERICA THEATER FIRST NATIONAL
m GOLDWYN UNITED ARTISTS
PATHE HODKINSON


SHE management of the AMERICA THEATER and its staff
of employees extend heartiest congratulations to the grad-
|uating class of '22 of Cristobal High School. We also thank
mthe class, their schoolmates and parents for the generous
patronage which has helped enable the AMERICA THEATER
Sto maintain the highest standards in motion picture production
regardless of obstacles, distance, and cost.


ASSOCIATED FOX
S PRODUCERS REALART
FIRST NATIONALS AUTPD AT nAT ? SELZNICK g
SATL AMERICA THEATER S |=
HODKINSON PATHE




VISIT OUR PARLORS
,,MILLINERY
Sport and Dress Hats, Feathers, Ribbons, and Flowers.
DRESSES
ySport and Morning Togs. Afternoon Frocks. Ball Gowns.
|.. Mourning Goods.
UNDERGARMENTS
S/ /' Nightdresses, Petticoats, Knickers, Combinations, Corsets, and
Brassieres.
ART AND GIFTS
1 Umbrellas, Fans, Beaded Bags, French Novelties and Favors.



The Bowdry
Company, Ltd. D r sR s
SI |We wish to announce the new line of
oPANAMA \ Betty W&Ies Dresses now being shown
1 1-3 Fourth of July Avenue f, in our store. Come and see them today.






THE


CARIBBEAN.


i tasjingston Sftotor erbie Co., Jtb.
STHE ONLY ALL-AMERICAN GARAGE ON THE ATLANTIC SIDE

B"KALL-A-KAR"
TWO TELEPHONES - HOTEL WASHINGTON or COLON 204








COMPLIMENTS OF
SAmerican foreign 5ankting Corporation
SCRISTOBAL BRANCH
PCRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE










11 HERBERT A. DOTEN, D.D.S.






THE


CARIBBEAN.


=o~es



That Wer e

Bent bones t
that were bent
I@ by poirntad





Whether mnthe Zone

IJlor Back in the States
MM iT'T t Grew T'
iOI U '^' 'Healthy, strong feet are necessary in mental effort
Sand m phvs1cal prowess.
The members of the class of '22 may increase their Pf
St ratht life opp rtunities by conscientious care of the body.
6 rew straight The feet are most important units of the body.
Rin Educator
g^ Shoes For each and every member of th. family there is
one shoe that is made scientifically to "let the feet
gr()w as they should." That shoe is the Educator. {
^a IIt ha s room for all fve toe's, preventing corns, callouses, ^
fallen arches, and other foot-ills.
W^ ( ~Sold by l'
Panama Railroad Commissary
g8 Cristobal, Canal Zone
^^ ^ Made by
|RICE & HUTCHINSInc.
1111 sBOSTON U.S.A.
stamped like acCE & HUTCHINs $ .
^ this it is not an r I II A lFAR I






THE


CARIBBEAN.


"Ioretd nastigtongrn
S"COLON BEACH
P. O. Address, CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE
SEuropean Plan Facing the Atlantic
ioo Rooms ioo Baths
Rates from $3.oo up
Newmodern, and luxurious in appointment. Excellent
cuisine. Large private grounds with promenade along the
sea front, and fine concrete sea-water swimming pool.
CoolDays. Cool Nights. Excellent Winter Resort.
-' J. E. LEWIS, Manager.


"NOSTROLINE"

Truly the Best Catarrh Remedy g




tSimple! Safe! Sure!



British Pharmacy
165 BOLIVAR STREET


DIERS & ULLRICH
2 AGENTS FOR
White Park&
Rock Tilford's
SMineral Candy
mWater
SAnheuser-
Ginger Busch
SAle Malt Nut


g 48 FRONT STREET COLON
SPhone iox


COMPLIMENTS OF
| Dr. VERN PRIER
CRISTOBAL. C. Z.






THE CARIBBEAN.


UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

gRegular Sailings :.
~~from !
SCristobal, C Z
to ~I
New York,
~New Orleans,
|Cuba, |
DColombia, .
eeJamaica, and
Costa Rica.


For further particulars,
apply:
M. C. O'HEARN, General Agent, Cristobal, C. Z. T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panama City






Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd.
JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
DEALERS IN
General Merchandise and Native Produce

COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
P.P. .Box .o

Tsfti~~~ff ~D..nrl,~t Dfla nfl C+,n~rar, a..A Trn4n/ly/ C+^*m






THE


CARIBBEAN.


EVERYTHING IN THE LINE OF PLUMBING

|Central American

8Plumbing and Supply Company
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN
COLON, R. P. PANAMA, R. P.
I17o Bolivar Street 58 Central Avenue


TO ^* fw *d^ STORAGE df^ST

INVESTIGATE

|Threaded Rubber Insulation H










SMALLWOOD BROTHERS
Sole Distributors
PANAMA COLON


~The
V^r' 1rB *VI.

SNative Wood Shop
13 FRONT STREET COLON
nO THE MAJILTON
Floor Lamps.! Boudoir Lamps
Table Lan1 Desk Lamps
H Nut Bowls Powder Boxes
Smoking Sets Hair Receivers
Smoking Stands Tie Racks
Cigar Boxes Napkin Rings
Tobacco Boxes Toothpick Holders
T Tea Wagons Salt Trays
STablets Serving Trays
Trays Swagger Sticks
Coasters Police Clubs
Morris Chairs Paper Weights
H Picture Frames Canes, Etc.
ESPECIAL WORK TO ORDER
H LAMP SHADES AND FIXTURES TO ORDER
COLON Phone 498s CRISTOBAL


Compliments of


Dr.


URWILER


m tntiat








THE


CARIBBEAN.


17 black degees, 3 copying
Sor hold hey lines
Oa-5B.4B.3B
ror federal wring
ad sketching
Sf rov clean fine lines
2H-3HA4H.5H-
For delicate thin lines
SC//l? *7H.8H.9H
j The /arrest selling Quality Pencil in ie TWor/d. Plain Ends. per daoz.,-$o.o.
Rubber Ends, per Joz., 1.20
At stationers and storc:
throughout Wse world,
l When once you use these remarkable,
H ^Bhigh quality pencils, you will never
be satisfied with any' other. The
genuine and complete satisfaction given by
VENUS has made it the most famous
pencil in the world. None other so per-
fectly meets the requirements of ,
instructor and pupil alike.





VENUS
~ERASERS







"F the same superlative
the VENUS Pencil
famous; sofl, gray rubber
that erases elea: without
a smudge. Made in 12
sizes.
Sample on request.



American Lead Pencil Co.
-va rM~t4- A ~.n-. ATr-.vr..T.T h e






THE


CARIBBEAN.


COMPAGNIE GENERAL TRANSATLANTIQUE
FRENCH LINE OF STEAMERS
PASSENGER SERVICE
g_ Regular fortnightly sailings from Cristobal, Canal Zone, to France
H CARGO SERVICE ONLY
Monthly sailings from Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Havre, Bordeaux, and
g Cristobal, to South Pacific.
g. Monthly sailings from Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Havre, Bordeaux, and
ICristobal, to North Pacific.
Via the Panama Canal (Ecuador, Peru, and Chile)
SFor all particulars apply to
IFRENCH LINE AGENCY
P. O. Box 128, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. PANAMA, PLAZA DE FRANCIA
Phone No. x85 Phone No. 90o2


HMISTELI
| fThe 3fetueter
SPANAMA R.P.J



SILVERWARE CUT GLASS
Howard, Hamilton, Waltham, and Elgin Watches


D French Drug Store
SV. DELGADO & SON
K Main Store:
26 Front Street, opposite Cable Office

=A Large Assortment of
n American, French, and a
wEnglish Goods

PERFUMERY TOILET ARTICLES
HKODAKS FILMS CAMERAS
ETC., ETC.
SPrescription Department under the supervision
Iof United States Pharmacists
BABIES' PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
S. ?-. -.^^








THE,


CARIBBEAN.


V~y^ ^ k P^a
a-*- r'* -3i-


>





IBring Your Equipment Up to D


The "Caterpillar's"* "('ATERPILLAR" Tractors are used in
field Of usefuClnes tis corner of the globe for roanud making, mining,
b 1 iea n nsl^ liuiit'd gmng, farming, landl clearing, and overland tran
y nation of every kind. Throughout the entire
to road work. On "Caterpillar" Tractors were used exclusively b
farm and ranch, in United States and Allied armies. The same de
Sthe mining, oil, and able qualities which made the "Caterpillar'
twhereverroe successful and economical results in the han
Wliererer power and cvt sr
endurance are at a .,e -
rerni the 'Cater- Many "( caterpillars are used m the C anal.
Sp as well as min the United States, Mexico, Centra
pillar"* has no real -outh America, \Vest Indies, etc.
gComDpetitor. Upon request, we will gladly mail a copy c
illustrated booklet, "Caterpillar Performance,'
f copies of other catalogs relating to road buil
m logging, farming, and other industries.

'' *f* There is but one "Caterpillar"-HOLT builds it. The nar
originated and is owned exclusively by this company.
HOLT H O L THE HOLT MFG. CO., Inc., PEORIA,


ate

every
l, og-
spor-
War,
y the
)pend-
the
most
ds of

Zone,
l and R

f our
'also
ding,


me was


ILL.






THE CARIBBEAN.


Compliments of


Dr


MODRDTS


n a. a. 'I. tw '~~at
,Karl -LV O -*--j J b AJi,'In V J i, J
CI B entist
CRISTOBAL CANAL ZONE


H Buy Your Drugs, Patent Medicines,
IPerfumery, Toilet Articles, etc.
AT THE

H Pan-American Drug Store H
P 50 Front Street, Colon, R. P.
You Always Do Better at Salazar's

WE CARRY AN

Sp=to=bate $oba fountain
3 STORES
5o Front Street 56 Bolivar Street
182 Bolivar Street., English Drug Store


HAVE
YOUR
CLOTHES
M CLEANED
n CLEAN
M BY



SThe Royal
O Cleaners and Dyers
SCall Phone 250

SE. V. TROTT


RATHBUN, STILSON & CO.

General Hardware and Lumber Merchants
DEALERS IN
PAINTS. OILS. AND BUILDERS' MATERIALS. ETC.






THE CARIBBEAN.


IRICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO
I23 FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P.
Just at 7th Street ?
P. O. Box 523, Cristobal, C. Z. Phone Corp. No. 9

SIs the oldest establishment of Photography in
HColon, and our continued success is due to the
Fact that we have always pleased our patrons.
m"Richards" stamped on your photograph is
a guarantee of excellence. .


STUDIES OF LADIES AND INFANTS OUR SPECIALTY


Improved Equipment Modem Methods
Efficient Service

Jackson's Steam Laundry
HBROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER
House Delivery Service
|Wagon Will Call on Request
^ STEAMSHIP and HOTEL WORK
. A SPECIALTY .
Now Equipped to Handle all Classes of
cCleaning and Pressing
YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED
ggSpecial Rates for Soldiers' and Sailors' Work
as rm


@tlb Tifmer|
KNOW WHERE TO GET A
REAL HAIR CUT, SHAVE,
OR SHAMPOO .. .. .




SASK FOR

"FRANK"

|The Barber
rw AT THE HOTEL WASHINGTON






THE CARIBBEAN.


jRoyal Netherlands West India Mail
8E KONINKLYKE WEST-INDISCHE MAILDIENST
IJ COMPANIA REAL HOLANDESA DE VAPORES
|COLON LINE
SRegular fortnightly passenger and cargo service from Cristobal to Port
Limon, and from Cristobal to Puerto Colombia, Curacao, Puerto Cabello,
La Guaira, Trinidad, Barbados, Plymouth (for passengers and mail only)
Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg. Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe.
PACIFIC LINE
gRegular two- to three-weekly cargo service to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile,
g on the outward voyage, and to Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg home-
g ward. A limited number of passengers can be accepted.
gCargo accepted for all ports in Europe.
jFor further particulars apply to:
ROYAL NETHERLANDS WEST INDIA MAIL Messrs. SASSO, FUHRING & CO.
Telephone No. 21, Cristobal Telephone No. 682 Panama




Colon Electric
AND
H1_ Ice Supply Co. H
I -111 Market St.,
COLON, R. P.




Satisfied Servants /
S"av A^IAA i 'fn wn ;-A^S f / ^ ^: ^^'






THE


Haskins News Service
W AND
The Caribbean Publishing Co.,Ltd. j





3)nbtisfters

S5Itooh bers


Phone Cristobal 49 Phone Colon 37'
P. O. Box 28, Cristobal
DBMUM3UUMMUM i


CARIBBEAN.


Cristobal Clubhouse

Photo Department


H DEVELOPING AND PRINTING

ENLARGEMENTS
LANTERN SLIDES
M HOME PORTRAITURE and GROUPS
|PANORAMIC VIEWS
|AND GROUPS
SBest Work .:. Reasonable Prices
SPhones Cristobal 30 and 446


H APPRECIATION.
HEvery year THE CARIHBBEAN staff in- though we feel it to be, to carry its
|H| serts in its book a word of thanks to message of Cristobal High School and
|those who have made the book a pos- Cristobal High School spirit to friends
sibility. FEvery year this gratitude has far and near.
|Hbeen merited, but never, we feelsure, has To those friends we extend our thanks
Hlany staff owed greater debt to its friends for their interest in and support of our
than does this one of'21 '22. Moreover, activities-evidenced in so many ways.
Jwe are just as sure that no staff has felt Especially do we thank The Panama
^ more of a sense of responsibility to its Canal Press for a cooperation which has
HHfriends and sponsors-a responsibility far surpassed a mere business relation.
Which has been almost an obligation And now we ask the readers of our
^ to make good. book to help us to thank with their
HOur book is finished; what is done is business support some very necessary
||Hdone. We send it forth, imperfect financial backers-Our advertisers.







THE CARIBBEAN.


i I - - i- - -
- -- ---r^ A.T^
3. I xxf- kBi~^^ L xx xx J xx x.x^-0 x== "
P PURECHEWING GUM



|l" iFIJavors

You can In. ADAMS
Gum in any fIavor-
from licorice to pepper-
mint or tutti-frutti. .
Select 'our favorite-
then note the name
&ADAMSotinthe pack- ;--V -
flae4 it em absolute -
puritj and highest qual-.r
..

L Use it regularly. ,..


MAXWELL-KELSO


SALES


COMPANY


DISTRIBUTORS


xxxx
A^^"~




Full Text

CRISTOBRL



HiGH



f^- ^^



SCHOOL




^-^





i



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1922cris



f^-^y-/-5'3



THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. V.



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZO\E, 192a



No.



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL





Atlantic Entranpe to Canal and Gatun Locks.
Show ng sea level and the lake. 154 square miles in area, 85 fret above sea level.



MiRAFLbREs Lake on the Pacific Side of the Canal.
Another artiScial lake, 1.6 square miles in area, at feet above sea level.



CONTENTS



Added Tonnage

Alumni Marjorie Ball, '22.

Appreciation

Athletics:

Boys' George Cartwright, '22

Baseball

Basket Ball

Swimming

Tennis

Track

Girls' LolIse Henter, '21

Basket Ball

Swimming

Tennis

Class Play, "Clarence"

Class Will

Dedication

Editorial Paul C. Dovle, '22 .

Editorial Staff

Exchanges Henry Moore, '23

Faculty-Senior Get-together

Freshmen Alphabetically Speaking

Graduates

Jokes Wesley H. Townsend, '22.

Juniors

Literary;

A Musical Evening George Ball, '24

A Promising Young Man. Paul C. Doyle, '22

A Resume of the Country Fair

A Scene at the Colon Station,

Frances Poole, '25.

.A Slip of the Foot Louise Henter, '23

A Tale of a Training Track. Paul C. Doyle, '22.
Actions Speak Louder than Words,

Ida Brown, '22.
Cogitations of a Cochero. Gladys Lowande, '24.
Down the Coast to Porto Bello



15
22

74



54

58
54
56
55
56
59
60
60
60

49

13

3

4

J

63

8

21

9

72

16

37
65
45

32
43
33

48
44



Literary Continued:

Gatun to Cristobal by Bus,

William Cousins,

Joseph's Reflections on Class of '23

Masks and Crabs George Cartwright,
My First and Last .Attempt at Diving,

Betty Fitz-William,
Stop, Look, and Listen -Jordiin Zimmerm:inn'
Sunset at the Chagres. .Emma Townsend,
The Derelict's Story. . .Kenneth Parker,

The Prodigal Brother Ida Brown,

The Sea from Our School,

George Cartwright,

The Secret Marjorie Ball,

The Village Sleuth Girdon Rudd,

Up the Pilcomayo W. F. Bowers,

When Sorrows Come ?. Alex Linczer,

Music

Our Faculty

Poetry:

.A Mishap Alex Linczer,

A Telephone George Cartwright,

A Younger Brother Marjorie Ball,

Bobbed Hair Ida Brown,

Eyes Jordan Zimmermann,

Gatun George Cartwright,

Ha-ti Mary Fields,

In Panama Marjorie Ball,

Old Panama Louise Henter,

Seasons Jordan Zimmermann,

Taboga Emma Townsend,

Tennessee Wesley H. Townsend,

Why Not This Way Class of

School Notes Emma Townsend,

Sophomores Anna Colberg,

The Launchingof Our Ship. George Cartwright,



25



35
17
41

44
29

34
30
42

31

43
38
25
40
53
6

61

48
39
39
S3
24
51
5
5
51
50
70
74
67
19
14



THE CARIBBEAN.




Beneath the palms on Caribbean's shore,
Scarce nine degrees from the equator's line,
Where trade winds blow, and tropic sun doth shine
With sultry heat, and where, in the days of yore.
Adventurous Spanish gallants did explore
And fall a prey to Morgan's bold design,
Where now the Stars and Stripes wave as the sign
That we have oped to Orient ports the door,
There stands a spacious building which doth hold
A band of people who do strive to learn
That which will lead them upward in life's way.
Desire that we the best may e'er uphold,
That wc may live and learn as well as earn

CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL

Teaches day by day.



1()32.



THE CARIBBEAN.




mmmBmm






Edilor-in-Chief ...... Paul C. Dovle (7),

Assistant Editor ...... Edward May (8),

Business Manager .... LeRov B. Magnuson (6),

.Issislant Business Manager .... Gerald Bliss (5),

Circulation Manager ..... Alex Linczer (14),

.issislant Circulation Manager . Jordan Zimmermann (i),

.Ithlelics, Boys' ..... George Cartwright (3),

.ithlelics. Girls' ...... Louise Henter (4),

Art Editor ...... .Mattie Pullig (2),

School Notes Editor ..... Emma Townsend (13),

Joke Editor ..... Wesley H. Townsend (12),

Literary Editor ...... Mary Fields (ii),

.ilumni Editor ...... Marjorie Ball (9),

Exchange Editor ...... Henry Moore (10),



23



22
22
22
23



.sr^



J i!




DEDICATION.

Not because, as our Prineipal, she has done so miieh to
make our school life more interesting and worth while;

Nor because she has made our social life so much more
pleasant;

Not because, as our .Advisor, she has worked so hard to
make this yearbook a success;

Nor because she has so willingly devoted her own time
and strength to its production;

But because she is our "loved," our "honored, much-
respected Friend,

We, the students of Cristobal High School, affectionately
dedicate this fifth volume of The Caribbean to



MISS J. ISABELLA DODDS.



THE CARIBBEAN.




Suppose we begin our sermon with a few illus-
trations for which the following slogan will sup-
ply our text:

Bite ofF more than you can chew;

Then chew it.
Plan for more than you can do:

Then do it.
Hitch your wagon to a star;
Keep your seat, and there you are.

The turmoil of passing classes subsided. In
the classes, recitations began. All were quiet in
the assembly room excepting Willie who shuffled
to the sharpener, sharpened his pencil, and tested
the point several times. He settled in his seat,
but was up on the thought of an announcement
he should write on the blackboard. He wasted
time putting unnecessary artistic touches to his
almost unreadable fancy letters. He was about
to sit down and get busy when he found a. Literary
Digest, in which he scanned the pictures and read
many advertisements. He laid the magazine
aside to prepare his necessary class report, but
a shudder ran through him when he found he had
but three minutes to get his material from the en-
cyclopedia from which it takes so long to bring out
information in proper form. As a result, Willie
felt ashamed for having delayed his whole class.

The next day he came to school tietermined to
stick by a slogan he had read the previous eve-
ning. The first period classes had passed as usual
and Willie was in the assembly room taking notes
from an outside source, when suddenly he thought
of a basket-ball victory about which he should tell
Johnny, but, as theslogan, which ajipears in our first



Paul C. Doyle, '22.

paragraphs, flashed through his mind, he set aside
his basket-ball dream and finished his assignment
in time to assure himself of an excellent report.

As Jimmie tripped into the first freshman class
of the year, tardy, he drew a laugh from his fellow
students. This inspired him to act the clown the
rest ot his high school career. It is true he had
passing marks, but he lacked the beneficial learn-
ing he should have gained from his four years' work.
His diploma without the foundation of knowledge
was almost worthless in seeking employment.

Henry had a clear voice but his debates were
uninteresting because he read them. The cap-
ta'n of the debating team was absent and Henry
was the one chosen to speak in his place. He tried
at first to resign. His doubt turned into deter-
mination when he finished reading the same slogan
which we have already quoted, and he was soon
busy gathering material for his side of the sub-
ject. On the day of the debate he was nervous
but gritted his teeth, took his place before the
assembly, and delivered a talk which convinced
even his opponents that his stand on the subject
was the correct one.

Every fellow on the basket-ball team feels better
over a hard-fought defeat than an easily-won vic-
tory, when they have done what they felt was
more than they could do. When the boys of
C. H. S. basket-ball team accepted the challenge
of the U. S. S. Denver heavies, they planned for
more than they thought they could do, they did
it, and as a result, brought another victory to
their school.

In activities held at the school during the year,
many who at first remained silent and unknown
seized their opportunity to chew a little more
than their share in helping with assembly pro-
grams and parties, boosting athletic contests, co-
operation with the faculty, and faithfulness to



THE CARIBBEAN.



5



their lessons all of which go to make up true
school spirit. This type of student has hitched
his wagon to a star and rides over the hard knocks
of school with ease.

Boys and girls, in these days of accomplish-
ment, look to the things that have already ad-
vanced civilization. They see the modern steam-
boat, railroad train, and airplane. Now since
wireless is so keenly perfected, they sit back and
say, "There's nothing left to be done."

If these same people had lived before Whitney,
Bell, or the Wright brothers made their inventions



successful they would have said the same thing.
It is not fair to one's self, and I may say it is cow-
ardly, to hold one's self down and not plan for
more than one thinks one can do, and then do it.
In school or elsewhere wake up your enthusiasm.
You are as good as the best if you want to be.

Plan for more than you can do;
Then do it.

You will reap the benefit for whatever you do.
Hitch your wagon to a star;
Keep your seat, and there you are.



IN PANAMA.

Marjorie Ball, '23.



Low sighs the whispering palm

In Panama.

Cool trade winds blow.

The tropic moon

Large,

Luminous,

Lights dark rippling waters.

In the distance

The jungle

Dense.



Dank;

Over all, quiet reigns

Save for gentle lapping of waves upon the sands.
Now, a boat with oars dipping,
Soft strumming of guitar,
Voices singing;
The boat passes.
Silence again
In Panama.



OLD PANAMA.

Louise Renter, '23.



k ruined church tower standing lonely by the sea,
Flecks of sunlight on gray, mouldering walls,
Rusty piles of cannon.
Dim traces of a highway,
A decaying, weed-covered bridge
Relics of former glory
Old Panama.

Courtiers, cavaliers, adventurers, gold-seekers
Pioneers to the crossroads of the world.
Balboa, Cortez, Pizarro
Seeking fabled riches.

Treasure-laden Spanish galleons riding at anchor in the bay.
Flower of Spanish chivalry,
Graceful, languid seiioritas,
Flash of dark eyes behind lace mantillas,
Sounds of soft laughter.
Tinkle of guitars,
Old Panama.



Slowly the sun sinks, dyeing the bay with crimson.
At ringing of vesper bells,
The faithful pray;
Tremulous prayer of the old priest
Dies softly away.

Evening breezes croon in the palms;
Night mounts her throne.
Old Panama.

Flashes of musket-fire cut the blackness of the night.
Cries of wounded fill the air.
Death rides abroad;

The sky burns crimson .as the flames leap upward.
Madre de Dios! Salvanos!
Morgan has come!
Old Panama.



THE CARIBBEAN.




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THE CARIBBEAN.



Mr. a. R. Lang, A. B., A, M.

Lincoln, Nebr.

Superintendent of Schools.

Nebraska Wesleyan University.
University of Nebraska.



F. X. Karrer, A. B., M. A., M. Pd.,

Assistant to Superintendent.

Wilson's Modern Business College, Seattle.

Washington State Normal School. Ellensburg.

University of Washington.

Columbia University.

New York University.



J. Isabella Dodds, B. .A.

Principal.

Claremont, Minn.
Macalester College.

English, Latin, Social Problems.
Joy, it is, indeed, to know her

In school and out, tor she is such a

Sociable, friendly sort o( person. We

Admire her greatly for there seems to

Be nothing she can not do. We

Enjoy her classes for, with her as teacher, even

Latin seems

Less dull and tedious. Her readings are

Another of her accomplishments and a source of

Delight to us. Much ot her spare time is given

Over to The Caribbean and otherschool activities

Doubt if we could go on without her

Daily word of cheer and encouragement, for

She is the mainstay and support of Cristobal High.



We



Mabel Beeching, .\. B.
Hutchinson, Kans.

Kansas State Normal School.
Geometry, Physics, .llgebra.



about



Maybe she doesn't know all

Algebra and Physics

But she has kept it from us if she doesn't

Enjoying a joke, she isn't afraid to

Laugh with us and at us.

Being fond of outdoor
Exercise, she plays tennis
Every morning. Then too, she
Can swim, and often goes
Hiking. Taking all
In all,"

No one can say she isn't a
Good sport.



Hattie Lee Hornbeak, B. .\., W. \.
W'axahachie, Tex.



Trinity University.
Columbia University.



English, History.

Her brains, we find, are not
Affected by her size, for.
Though she is very
Tiny, she seems to have an
Infinite amount of knowledge. Our
Education has been

Largely developed by her.

Especially in

English and L^nited States

History. She has the ability, not

Only to teach, but also to make her

Recitations interesting by the

Narration of personal experiences and

By recounting the dramas and stories which she seems so

Easily to remember.

Attractive she is, and dainty.

Kinfolk and Texas are among her chief interests.



Mabel Jean Barnhouse, A. B.
Watsonville, Cal.

Leland Stanford. Jr., University.
Spanish.



Many are the friends of this kindly and

Agreeable person whom we

Boast as our Spanish teacher.

Even tho' she specializes in Spanish she also

Likes

Bible teaching She is

An interesting speaker with a

Rather friendly, pleasing voice. She

Never loses

Her patience

Over our mistakes, and is always willing to help

Us with our difficulties in

Spanish grammar, and

Even in other puzzling subjects.



THE CARIBBEAN.



Adela F. Bakeweli.,
Lansing, Iowa.

Iowa ?t3te College, Ames, Iowa. B. S. in Home Economics,
University of California.

Home Economics and Modern Historv.



Henry G. Bacon, B. S.
Mauricetown, \. J.

Columbia University.
Manna! Training, Mechanical Drawing, Genera/ Science.



Appropriate, indeed, is the name of our new

Domestic Science teacher, for no one can

Excel her in this art. We al!

Like her very well

And that is not only because she can

Bakeweli, but also because she is so

Amiable and pleasant. She

Knows just how to make parties interesting and

Exciting, as we learned from our experience

With the Sophs on St. Patrick's day. She is the idol of

Every Sophomore, and we hope that she has

Learned to

Like us well enough to come back next year.



He is an

Enthusiastic tennis player;

Nor does he regret when he can take a

Ride on shank's mare, and

Yet he's a good cook too.

General Science is his class. He also teaches

Boys to square

A block of wood, making

Condition that the block shall not resemble an

Omelet when completed.

Nor does he fail to give his pupils a square deal.



FACULTY SENIOR GET TOGETHER



One of the most enjoyable events of the school
year took place on the evening ot June i, when
our principal, Miss J. Isabella Dodds, gave a
dinner in honor of the Seniors of '22, having also
as her guests the faculty. The dining room of
the Household Arts Department rang as in previ-
ous times with laughter and merriment. Promptly

at 6.30 o'clock
lI i n n e r was
announced
and the happy
crowd march-
e d in and
groupedthem-
selves about a
won d e r f u 11 y

BAN BLAB INDUN FAMILY, ,

Papa HonB his hard hat and States' raiment while CleCOrateCl ta-

Mamma puts on her shining tomato can bracelet, zebra i i a p^l^p

skirt, and best smile whenever the camera man induces Die. c\ COIOl

J. IsalM^lla, Hattie Lee, and E. Mabel, the rest of the o r li p m p nf

happy family, to pose. Now doesn't "Poor Lo" look S C U C in e u I

just like a lion in a cage of Daniels. green and gold

(the Senior colors) was used and was carried out
even to the dainty little nut cups and clever com-
bination place and menu cards.

All soon discovered that the dinner itself
proved every bit as delicious as it sounded,
a real credit to the domestic science classes who
prepared and served it, and to Miss Bakeweli
under whose direction the work was done.




Throughout the entire meal a buzz-buzz of de-
lightful conversation took place upon subjects
to which only Seniors with their store full of
knowledge could possibly do justice gradua-
tion, college, The Caribbe.an, and various bits
of importance. Toastmistress of the evening was
Miss J. I. Dodds, who delivered a toast to the
Seniors, who responded showing their apprecia-
tion to Miss Dodds and the faculty.

Thus passed the evening as all tropical eve-
nings do. -As the guests departed they rated Miss
Dodds one of the best and most entertaining
principals Cristobal High School has ever had.

MENU

CHICKEN A LA EMMA



MARY POTATOES FROM THE FIELD

M.!GIE .STRING BEANS

BROWN BUNS



JELLY, PICKLES, AND BUTTER

FROM

CARTfWjRIGHT TO TABLE



PACO SALAD SALTED WAFERS

WESLEY'S TOWN SENDS ICE CREAM FOR
MARJORIES GOLD CAKE



RIVER JORDAN COFFEE



MINTS



THE CARIBBEAN.



^=



m=




SENIORS.

Introduced in Style of Chaucer.




FORE WORDE.

Wher the canalle from the Gatun lokkes
Meets Limon Bay neer the Chrystoball dokkes,
.Stand cyties two, Chrystoball and Colonn;
From these and from Gatun our school is drawn.
Of alle its fame there is not tyme to tel,
Nor on its plezhures nedeth now to dwel;
We turn from tales of al the other classes
To Senvor folkes five lads and eek five lasses.



Fair hair has he that waves upon his head.
In basketball he surely is not dead.
Of clothes he has good taste and dresses well;
His thoughts are clear, his voice rings like a bell.
He dances fairly; good is his approach
To folk; by many he's y cleped "Roach",
But this is not the name that will reach height
In future years; that name is George Cartwright.

Jordan Zimmermann.



Biftl that in Oktober onn a daye

Inn Englissh clas, they turned from work to playe

At vers in Chaucer's styl; they thought to teech.

By imitation of his waiz in speech

And thought, to others and themselves what they

Must lerne about ihis man of ancient day.

.W worked together using wel the text

To "do" the two outside the clas and next

Ech chose a clasmait whom he would describe;

And then, with many a jake and jest and gibe

.\nd groans a few was this new task begunne,

Which follows now as 'twaz when done.

PAUL C. DOYLE



Class Prejident, '21. '22.

Editor-in-Chief. '22.

President Athl?tic Organization. '22.

.\ssi5tant Editor. '21.

Baseball, '20, '21, '22.



Basket Ball, '2D, '21, '22, captain.
Swimming. '20. '21. '22.
Tennis, '21. '22.
Track, '20, '21.



There is a Senior boy y cleped Doyle,

Who is quite right according to friend Hoyle.

His sandy hair, that careless doth hang down.

Doth partly cover eyen of milde brown.

Though he is very wee as all can see,

From dawn till night he's busy as a bee.

In all this life no taske does he shirk.

And faith, is well known for his worthy work.

And eek in sports also you'll see his name.

Through these he has well earned honor and tame.

Long will he be remembered by the class-

Of '22 that will .so shortly pass.

Wesley Tovonsend.

GEORGE CARTWRIGHT.



Assistant Business Manager, '21.
Class Vice President, '22.



Athletic E litor, '22.
Basket Ball, '22.



.\ boy there is; of Gatun town is he,

Ful semely s.raight and fair as men can see;

Ot seventeen year of age is he, I trow.

Of height he has some more, I gesse, to grow.



Class Recretarv, '22.
School Notes Editor, '21.



MARY FIELDS.

Basket Ball, '20.



She is a tall and dark complexioned girl;
Brown eyes she has, and hair of kinky curl.
From northern trip returned she in September,
And northern days she joyeth to remember.
On Caribbean staff she ranks ful hye;
.And all her school work's done without a sye.
She likes to play at tennis, dance and bowl,
.'\nd in all these she can high honors hold.
She loves to go to see a baseball game.
And with her rooting always brings us fame.
And to our class of 1922
She's always loyal, faithful, good and trew.



-Ida Brown.



MARJORIE BALL.



Chss Treisurer. '22.
Literary Editor, '21.



Alumni Editor. '22.
Basket Ball, '23.



There is in school, a bright young Senior girl.

Quite short and slim, whose golden locks do curl

In soft, sweet waves about her oval face;

Her eyes are somewhat gray, and somewhat green

Although she is not jealous, neither mean.

Of this maid's disposition we will say

She lively is, and merry all the day;

She dances giyly, for she loves this well;

And of her other sports, her friends will tell

That in the morning, when that it is early.

To swim, and tennis play, she loveth dearly.

And of her manner let me tell you this.

Her voice and actions sweet, are ne'er amiss.

This maid, who has been cleped Marjorie,

Well liked by all the teachers here, is she;

By them no more than by the Senior class

Who long have known this bright young Senior lass.

Emma Townsend.



lO



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



IT




12



THE CARIBBEAN.



Business Manager, '22.
Basket Ball. 22.



LEROY MAGNUSON.

Baseball. '22.
Swimming, '22.



Ther iz a tal and slender Senior boy

Whom some clep Baldy, others name Leroy.

His hair is brown; it hides hise eye.n greye

Carefree he is and happy nighte and daye;

He loves to sing, and also to beat time.

By buying chewing gum with every dime,

He keeps supplied with that which breaks the riwle

So firmly maad by teachers ot the school.

"The Chandler" hight his faithful auto steed

In which he loves to "birn the road" with speed.

He dances wel with proud high stepping gate,

In scool athletics he is upp to date.

On studying is not set ful moche his leste,

But of trew loyall friends he is the beste.

1^22.

EMMA TOWNSEND.

School .Votes Editor,'22. Basket Ball, '21. '22.

A girl ther is and that a jolly one;
She merry is and always ful of fun.
Tho somdel plump, she is extremely fair,
With eyen blue and light and curly hair.
She cares not much for daunce or fancy ball;
All outdoor sports she loveth most ot all.
In basket ball and swimming she delights;
We know in every game she always fights
To keep Cristobal High School in the lead.
She's always ready when ther is the need.
She seweth well and also cocketh too.
.A goodly wif, I trowe, she'd make for you.
.An all round sport this girl is found to be.
We call her Emma, for so named is ihe.

Marjorie Ball.

IDA BROWN.

Basket Ball, '20. '21. '22.
Dramatics.

.A girl there is full small and very fair

With eyes of blue and very curly hair;

In ba.sketball and swimming she shows might.

And dancing finds she to her heart's delight.

The same sweet girl at school and in the home,

Full well she talks ot times that she did roam.

For two long years she traveled every morn

To Balboa school, but now she does adjourne

To C. H. S. and we are glad to have

A Senior lass so true. Vou may her know

As Ida Brown, she's "Snibs" to us I trow.

Mary Fields.



WESLEY TOWNSEND.

Baieljall. 21. '22.
Swimming. '20, '22.



I tell you of a worthy Senior boy.
The huskiest of this class so full of joy.



Joke Editor. '22.
Basket Ball, '21, '22.



His face is red, and bright, and rather plump;

For sports we find him always on the jump.

In height tho he can reach but to the average

Full military, straight is hise carriage.

No pleasure finds he in the dance's whirl

Methinks perhaps the reason is a girl!

FjU well he likes to ride a gentle horse.

But never walks he eek a small golf course.

Quiet is he when it is time to be

But talking all the other time is he.

He scolds himself in language goodly strong;

Neer will he lead to start of any wrong.

But sum him up and take him as a whole,

A warm pUace in our hearts sure he doth hold.



-Paul C. Doyle.



JORDAN ZIMMERMANN.



.Assistant Circulation Manager, '22.
Baseball. '21, '22.



Basket Ball. '21, '22.
Swimming, '22.



A good fellow there is in C. H. S.;

A better lad I trowe can not be guessed.

His eyes are brown; forsooth they match his hair.

Where e'er he's needed always he'll be there.

He plays at basket ball, because he's tall.

The part of center, and covers all the hall,

A-passing, dribbling, shooting as he goes,

.And always makes the basket for which he throws.

Not o' word speaks he more than there is need;

Of dances, frolics, and such he takes no haed.

A better built boy I trowe, there's nowhere none.

We find this lad is cleped Zimmerman.

George Cartwri%ht.
MILDRED STAFFORD.

E.\change Editor, '21. Basket Ball, '21.

Among the Senior class, there is a girl.

Whose locks of gold are bobbed thikke, and curl

About her tace; torsoothe it is petite.

Altho that she is languid, she is sweet

Ot manner. Mail arrivals find her gay

If letters come trom him so far away.

I trowe she loveth daintee clothes to ware

That suit her wel and make her look ful fayre.

For dancing and for bowling has she knacks.

But as for basketball she seems to lacke

In pep. Not moch she speeks when in a party

But what she says receives a welcome hearty.

In fact she's liked by all both tar and near;

She's cleped Myl.lred by those who know her here.



-1^22.



AFTER WORDE.

And now you know the class of '22,

Juste who they ar and what they thinke and do;

Though we hav written breefly and in haste

We hope you've found thees peeple to your taste.



THE CARIBBEAN.



13




Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

All persons having business before this Honor-
able Court will attend to the reading of the last
will and testament of the Class of '22 of Cristobal
High School.

To all whom it may concern. Greetings. Bowing
to the inscrutable march of time, decreeing that
the Class of 1922, of the Cristobal High School,
must within the next thirty days depart from the
sacred precincts of their beloved domicile, they,
having accumulated a wealthy store of knowledge,
happiness, and many other good things treasured
in memory's vault, following tradition, desiring
to leave a share of their worldly possessions to
others less fortunate in things material, hereby,
sanely and legally, make this, their last will and
testament:

1. To Gerald D. Bliss is given the key to all
windows, not only that he may freely and deeply
partake of our purest air, but that a handv place
be provided for rapidly disposing
of rafHe tickets in case a large and
satisfied studeit body insists
upon riding his bicycle.

2. A private office, carrying a
typewriter with two attached
telephones, is bestowed upon Leo
Eberenz, with which goes our
title of manager, in the hope that
Leo will manage to tell the same

bl I These birds, prob-

Oth phones. ably buzzards, if looks

r*^ T 1" r^ (ount for anything, are

3. lo Juline Cjranger goes famous for" their rc-
r^ 1 1 r I tTT markable appetites,

George s algebra tormuia, How ^nd have climbed this

01 r^ ^ \ ^A/T" '^O-foot tree in search

to bhow Correct Answers to Miss ^{ theirfavorite picnic

Bl > --p ^ ^ L .^U fond, thecoconut. The

eechmg. 1 O protect from the widely extended arms

11 .. u of our editor-in-chief

sun, we also leave to her a ^re indicating his pre-

1 1 u U ; 11 ferred ice cream cone

covered swimming pool which will she.

not interfere with a red and pretty complexion

but will prevent those horrid and painful blisters.

4. The library door is to be placed under the
exclusive control of Louise Henter that she may
hold private conversations in the Senior sanctuary
without being disturbed by the faculty. To her,




THE NEST.



as well, we impart Emma's cleverness in smiling
with her eyes.

5. Since Edward May was President of the
hopeful Juniors, we confer upon him Wesley Town-
send's aptitude tor wandering around the assem-
bly room and his rosy and vigorous health. Fur-
ther, we leave to him a capacity for a few G's,
as E's look too Ez on Senior cards.

6. To Henry Moore, the Junior politician, we
grant Leroy's dexterity in supporting the oppo-
site side of the question. Also, he has our per-
mission to use Zim's Ford-Arrow that he may at-
tend staff meetings that are not held in that far-
off corner, Fort Randolph.

7. Emogene Nash is to have Mary's youthful-
ness and health. To her is left also Ida's clever-
ness in getting the thing (.'') she's after.

8. To Alex Linczer we present Jordan's recipe
for reaching the height ot six feet, together with
"Clarence's" glasses tor studying it. .Alex looks so
uncomfortable that we surrender to him the seat
of honor with cushions and a special easy chair
during class recitations.

9. As a help to Eddie Solomon, we furnish him
with a "scrap" book in which he may record his
experiences. That his footwork may be enlivened
we bestow upon him Leroy's light and graceful
dancing ability. To his enemies we give "Clar-
ence's" liver.

10. Mattie Pullig is cut off with nothing but
our best wishes, for she is already possessed of
health, happiness, cheerfulness, kindliness, help-
fulness, ability, friends, and everything that a
girls requires to make her sought after.

11. We endow Ernst Euphrat with Magnu-
son's time, so that he may attend social gather-
ings, practice his piano piece, and cure tooth-
aches.

It may not be polite to grant any one person
the honors that are due the Senior class as a whole
so we now dispense to the Junior class the Senior
pen owned by no one but used by all the Seniors.
The higher degree of intelligence in high school



14



THE CARIBBEAN.



is marked by the seating arrangement; the bright- may sit a few seats farther back so that the shining

estsitin the back seats. Being of superior knowl- headsof theincomingbabieswiii not hurt theireyes.

edge, we vacate our back seats to the less intei- Last, we leave to the faculty our best wishes

ligent Juniors hoping they may acquire almost as that they may send out from C. H. S. other

much brains as the present Senior class did. That Senior classes almost as bright as ourselves. We

the Juniors may feel a little superior to their leave thanks to them for keeping the silly underclass



under-class men we leave to them
our phantom privileges.

To the Sophomore class we give
the power to hold their members
until they sit on the platform for
their diplomas. We also give
them permission to keep on with
their usual pep.

The Freshmen have our per-
mission to keep on going. We
also leave to them the art of trim-



men quiet that we might study in
peace. We express our apprecia-
tion for the patient way in which
they dealt with us, using their
spare time in helping us.

Having done justice to the
faculty and all who follow us, we
wish to express our sorrow for
leaving them. We have all been

.V roomy happy home provided for Cristobal school ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^j ^^ j^^p^ ^J^^j ^^^

C. H. S. spirit may continue as




M KINLEY HOUSE,



teachers, nestling near t.ie wind-swept seasi
stately sheltering i)alms.



ming them close. We give them

free use of the shower bath that they may reduce high as it has been in the past. We leave our best

the high spirit of the "first day" freshie. They wishes in C. H. S. for all its members.



S=




THE LAUNCHING OF OUR SHIP.

George Caiinsrighl, '22.




=ffi



With the help of a noted engineer and ten good
workmen, the keel Organization of the good ship
Senior, was laid early in October, 1921. Many
large trees were cut, but few were sound enough
to use for the ribs. Privileges. After these were
securely fastened with spikes of Good Adviee,
thev were covered with many firm boards called
Rules, which, when finished, made a good water-
proof hull of Discipline. Next, a good ten-cylinder
e.n%\nc. Energy, was put in place and arrangetl to
drive a large propeller of three blades, Gooc/ //^orA',
Cooperation, and School Spirit. The hull was
covered with a well-laid deck of School Work,



upon which were erected a foremast of Mid-
Year Exams and an aft mast oi Final Exams, the
successful climbing of which denoted the ability
of the sailors. A large funnel through which the
refuse. Bad IVork, Laziness, and Carelessness soon
found way of escape, was also erected on the deck.
And last, a beautiful bridge of Honor was built,
a little to the rear of the foremast. After the
installation of a Dodds rudder, and a splendid
painting depicting Social Activities, the good ship
Senior left the docks of Vacation and started on
a nine months' tour, the first stop to hsGraduation
Harbor.



THE CARIBBEAN.



15



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i6



THE CARIBBEAN.




Outer star upper left Edward May (Presidcntl. Upper risht Miss Hornbeak (Advisor). Center left Gerald Bliss, (Vice President). Center right. Alex Linczer.
Lower left Julinc Graumr. Lower risht Louise Henter. Inner star, upper center Emogcne Nash (Secretary). Upper left. Henr./ Moore. Upper
right. Ernst Euphrat. Lower left. Emilio Solomon. Lower right. Leo Eberenz. Bottom center. Mattie PuUig.



THE CARIBBEAN.



17




Joseph, making his usual round on Saturday
morning, had come to the Junior section. He
bent wearily over to pick up a paper under one of
the desks, and found on it the name, Edward May,
and a big red "E." "Chuck mon! Des here
Junior children ham too big to mess hup de floo
dis way, fe hevery time hi comes hin dis place,
dey ave a gret big bunch ah paper hon de floo, han
hi haint wishin' to do dis ting hatal.

"Hevery time hi pick hup ha piece ho paper wid
de name Heddie May hon hit, hit halways ave
ha big whred "hE" han hit. Hevery whun of de
children hin him class like him plenty well foh
he is de President, hand he has whone plenty
medals fe running.

"Han you know dis boy. Bud Bliss, dat halways
ride a bike hall de time.' Miss Barnhouse halways
his complainin' bout dis boy, fe him never wishin'
to come to class when hit ham de time. He ham
always makin' mischiet wid hall de teachers."

Joseph's monologue was interrupted here by
the falling of a book from a crowded desk. As
he stooped to pick it up, he grumbled, "Dis boy,
Henry Moore, him never keeps him desk straight
hat al. Hevery time hi come hin here, ha book
ham fallin' hout him desk hand makin' ha lotta
noise, han sometin' mor' fe hi to pic' hup. Mistah
Enery ham just come to dis school dis year, and
they make he de exchange heditor hof de Caribein
Staf and wid dis title, him keeps hi jumping hal
de time, fe hevery time hi turn haround he wishin'
for me to run to the post office wid more mail.

"Hand dis boy Hernest Heufhrat! Well, dis
boy make hi so surprised, fe whone da' hi walked
into de hassembly hal' hafter school, hand dis
boy ham playin' "Darktown Strutters' Ball" hon
de piano so well. Dis boy hallways stay late an'
study, hand hi wreally tink him's going be ha
dentist like him brudder-in-law.

"Dat Mattie ham de Hulu Hulu girl, han when
de C. H. S. have dair country fair, she am de



best one in de play. She ham collectin' hal de
pitcher fe de hannual.

"Emilio Solomon ham de big knock-hout king
hof de school. Habout two months ago he was,
gowing catch ha big fight, but him catch a blood
poisinin' in him han; so him can't fight fe ha long
time. Dis ham wreally sad, cause hi ham wreallv
wishin' to see him fight.

"Dis heah Leo, he am have ha big head for
business when it come to fixin' fe a play or some-
thin' like dat, but when hit comes to going to
classes he haint like dis hatal; he would rather
run ha errand fe the teacher heny da.

"Alex ham de barber when all de boys come
from de height grade to be freshmen. He cut
hoff all de boys' hair, den he leave hit hon de floo'
an dis make plenty mo' work for me. Dis boy
ham use hup hall de colored chalk dat hi put
around, cause him halways circulatin' round
makin' signs on de board to make people know
dat him his de circulatin' manager.

"Dat Miss Juline, hi haint know what she goin'
be when she grows up fe de other da' hi hear she
practisin' in the Junior play, an den hi hear she
playin' de plana, hen hi ham sure she is heeder
goin' be ha gret hactres hor ha gret musician.

"And dat Miss Lula, Lawd, me son, de hother
da' hi hear some talkin' hin de school room hen
hi really tink it was ha Dutch lady, but hi come
hin an' fin' dat it was Miss Lula. I hear dat she
sho' du make a good jump center on the Gatun
basket ball team too.

"Miss Emogene sho' ham ha good tennis player
te every mornin' when hi his goin' down fe de
mail hi see she hout playin', han de other da' hi
hear she singin' han hi ham sure she am goin' be
ha singer.

"Hevery whun of dem Junior girls haf ha good
learnin'; in fac' dis ham ha good class fe true,"
muttered Joseph as he picked up his brooms and
slouched out of the room.



MR 81010-



r8



THE CARIBBEAN.




Upper M;nU;r Kr*.up.--<':irdf'n Rud'J. ClidvJ Ford. Kthel Sonnemiii, Upper Itift.Hichard Hali, Fbrence Albert, EJna Campbell. Upper right, George Ball.

Inza Markham. Til (Viie President), Jane Hall. Lower right. Harold Boyd, Eunice Mendw, Charhttc Houicl. Bottom. .Misj Bal^cwell (Advisor), Lorctta Rush, Irene McCourt.



THE CARIBBEAN.



19



-ffi




THE SOPHOMORES.

Anna Colberg, '24.




King Lecoagauloisgallic of Mars, who delighted
in his great armies, was one day inspecting a n';w
training field when he and his attendants were
startled by a threatening rumbling that resembled
much the thunder that so often reverberates
through the heavens. Allegorniac, the astrono-
mer, came flying over the field, "Hail, mighty
king, and pardon this intrusion, but I have just
made a terrible discovery. One ot our neighbor-
ing planets, the World, has been torn asunder by
some unknown hand and hurled throughout the
universe. A part of it is now rushing comet-like
in this direction."

The rumbling increased and, upon looking up,
the king and his court became so frightened that
they fled far from the spot. Mars trembled with
the shock when the huge segment from the World
crashed on the training field. The spectators
stood dazed for a few minutes; then, gaining
courage, they stealthily crept up to the strange
object. Great was their astonishment to see
before them a large, ruined white building with
the following words, hardly distinguishable, in-
scribed upon it, "Cristobal School."

While rummaging, Allegorniac came upon a
huge leather-bound book lettered, "History of the
Class of 1924," which he studied diligently for
many days after. Finally, he drew up the follow-
ing conclusions from this wonder book and reported
thus to the king:

"Your majesty, it seems as if this is a history
of some organization that must have been in this
ruined school building at this early date. It would
seem that they developed through several stages,
to the first of which the name Freshmen was given.
Even in this early stage they displayed an unusual



=^



amount of ability and school spirit. They were
very studious and always willing to help that part
of this building which they call 'High' 'Cristobal
High,' to which they seem to have been exceed-
ingly loyal.

"From the first period into the second, desig-
nated Sophomore, they retained this spirit under
the supervision of an able advisor Miss Bake-
well, and a group of class officers.

"Then your honor, they next tell about their
activities during this Sophomore term. These
were many and varied; such as debates, dramati-
zations, holiday program, picnics, parties, and
athletics.

"Athletics has been given special mention, for
in this the Sophomores played their part nobly
and well, considering their lack of material.

"After this, they go on to say that the boys
showed good sportsmanship in the boys' inter-
class basket-ball games, and at least spoiled the
Juniors' chance of being the 'champions' what-
ever that may mean.

"The girls too, must have taken part in athletics
on this planet because the book says here that
they also showed good 'basket-ball spirit,' for
most of them played on both the class and high
school teams.

"These Sophomores seem to have been very
proud of one of the girl members of their class,
Loretta Rush the star athlete of the school, they
call her.

".\nd king, there seem to have been two other
years in which this class was always ready to do
its part in anything that was to be done, but this
Sophomore year stands out as one of the most
interesting."



20



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



i:




FRESHMEN ALPHABETICALLY
SPEAKING.




s=



A is for Ashton who to Balboa did go;

And for Arcia and Abendroth wlio'll stay here we know.

B is for Bridges then too for Biirgoon;

By their Bright indications, they'll be great men soon.

C is for Coffey, Cousins, and Campbell,

.\nd also for Collins who from us did ramble.

D's for our Duey with gold in her curls;

.'^nd for Dutiful Daughters that's all of us girls!

E is for Eden whom all of us know.

And also for marks which we're gladdest to show.

F is for Fisher, Fitz-VVilliam, and Fields,

.^nd for marks which surely no card of ours yields.

G's for Gatun whose folks come on the bus;

And also for Cover who's gone far from us.

H is for Hopkins, our president dear.

Whose nature is full of sunshine and cheer.

I is for Interest which we all try to show,

For we know that, without it, our wisdom won't grow.

J is for Jukes, our president who married;

We wish that among us she longer had tarried.

K is for Kiddishness w'aich we know we'll outgrow,

And also for Knockers whom we don't care to know.

L's for Layton and Lengel and Linczer and Lee;
The first two among us no longer we see.

M's for Marchosky and Mendes and May,

Who'll all be great people before they are gray.



N is for Negligent, Naughty, and Noise,

Surely quite inappropriate to our girls and boys.

O is for Oliver, the girl with the pep,

Who as basket ball captain has made us a rep.

P stands for Patten, Poole, Peterson, Pulgar,

All ot whom find it easy "Espaiiol estudiar."

Q is for Quizzes which none fully enjoy.

And also for Questions which our minds do employ.

R's for Rainy season when umbrellas we carry,

.'\nd for Ram which will catch us as sure as we tarry.

S is for Solomon, for Smith, and for Scott,

And for Stewart, and Stiles Oh my! What a lot!

T is for Trowbridge, Tufts, Tucker, and Tuley,

Four basket-ball girls and all good ones truly!

U's for Unanimous which we hope to remain.

And for that Understanding we're striving to gain.

V's for Vitality, Vigor, and Vim

Which the ma'.ana fever will cause to grow slim.

Ws for Wirtz, and also for Wallace;

The latter has proved in our swimming a solace.

X stands for unknown as all good Freshmen know;
May we face it serenely whatever it show.

Y is for the Years which before us still lie;

And also for Youthful which we'll be till we die.

Z is for Zeal which we have now we know;

And also for Zest we hope always to show.




CRAMMING FOR ELXAMS



22



THE CARIBBEAN.




Marjorie Bali, '22.



As the Alumni of Cristobal High School grad-
ually increase in number, they continue to show the
same pride and lo)'alty for their old school and
the same joy in remembering the past. The old
days are summed up in a little poem written by
a member of the Class of 1920, Kenneth Green.

"One year and better," did you say.'
Why, friend, 'twas only yesterday.
There's Minot in his place of yore,
Pete Clarity right beside the door.
There's Catherine, Susie, Lula, Bourke,
.All engaged in yearbook work.
Dorothy, J.imcs, and Arlene Ball,
-And Kenneth Edwards, good friends all.
There's Jack and Lindale, Kate and 'Een,
Alice, Etha, M old bean.
There's .Alson Sears, and handsome Harl,
Kirby, .Alice, Frank, and Carl,
Mud and Mildred, she is new,
Townsend, Roach, and LeRoy too.
There's Emma, Mary, Jane, and Paul,
Doris, Chester, and Marjorie Ball.
Good friends, I greet you all to-day
Just as I did yesterday.

1918.

Cristoual, C. Z.
Being in the first class to be gratluated from
Cristobal High, I can appreciate how much you
have advanced since the class of '18 passed out.
I admire your school spirit above everything. I
think your athletics and the effort you are making
to publish a magazine worthy of our school help
greatly in keeping up the enthusiasm. So, accept
my best wishes for Thi-; C.\rii bka.n, Cristobal High
School, and the class of '22.

Lula Mae Coman {nee Pullig).



Berkeley, C.^l.

I am now a Junior at the University of Cali-
fornia. Next September I expect to enter Colum-
bia University to take up work in its College of
Journalism. The Caribbe.^.v last year was great,
and I am sure this year's will be better. I certainly
wish the editors and contributors all the success in
the world.

Catherine Teese Waid.

Demver, Colo.

I took a year and a half in the Colorado School
of Mines at Golden and dropped out in 1920. I
got hold of an old transit and went up into Wyo-
ming and, calling myself a civil engineer, started
locating homesteaders on their claims.

It was up in the Big Horn Mountain and at
times I was over 1 25 miles from a railroad. There
were lots of deer, elk, antelope and such game. It
is a great country! Last fall I decided I had better
get back into school again, so I entered Denver
University. I am taking a course in chemical
engineering, and expect to finish at the Colorado
Mines after I get through here.

I want to tell you how good it made me feel to
find my name still on the mailing list of The
Caribbean.

Leland Bourke Welch.

Cristobal, C. Z.
I'm glad to know that such progress is being
made with the school annual. It is getting better
every year and I'm so glad of that, because the
first annual was put out when my class was the
senior class, back in '18. Since that year I've



THE CARIBBEAN.



2.3-



watched the book improve and with it the school
spirit. As for myself, Eve maintained a policy
of watchful waiting, you might say, but am leaving
for the States on the nineteenth of May and d >
not expect to return.

MiNor Cotton.

Ch.apel Hii.i., N. C.

I am teaching Spanish and Erench in a high
school in North Carolina. Hard vvtjrk, but I like
it. Best wishes for The Caribbean'.

Marv Elizabeth Verner.

Susie Harrison, after completing a secretarial
course, returned to the Zone and is now living in
Cristobal.

1919.

Los Angeles, Cal.

I am working for the Yonder Khulen Electric
Company, which is one of the oldest in Los
Angeles, and I like it very well. The only regret
I had in leaving the Zone was that I could not
bring it with me.

Kenneth Edwards.

Boston, Mass.

I am a junior in Simmons College where I am
taking a secretarial course. I wish you success
with the annual.

.'\lice Arlene Ball.

Doroth)-.Anna Montanye [in-e Weir) is residing
in Pittston, Pa. We hope that some day John
Montanye, Jr., may return to the Zone to be a
classmate of Jimmy Coman, Jr.

James Gerard Raymond is residing in Colon.
He is working on the .-Idvajue.

1920.

Los Angeles, Cal.

I am at present working for the American
Teachers' Agency and find my work interesting,
but am contemplating entering the LTniversity of
California in the fall. I am in love with California,
but still have a warm spot in my heart for dear old
Cristobal High.

Etha Be\"ington.



Berkeley, Cal.
I am still studying at the University of Cali-
fornia and expect to go into business when I com-
plete my studies. Best wishes for a better Carib-
bean than ever before.

Harlan W. Holmwood.

Cristobal, C. Z.

.As. an apprentice printer, I am very busy making
the' 1922 issue of The Caribbean. The "printing
bug" has cutaneously performed on me, and, while
I entertain no thought of abandoning my desire to
answer the "call of the air," yet, with the aid of
knowledge slowly infused into my green-gray
matter by that Principal of Principals, Miss K. L
Davis, with the help of th.^ printers around me,
and by sedulous application, I will first trv to make
myself a printer worthy of the name.

With best wishes for the annual and three
rousing cheers for the class of 1920.

.Albert Doyle.

Col'DERSPORT, Pa.

I am out on a farm in Pennsylvania about a
million miles from nowhere. Best wishes for the
success of the annual and the happiness of the
graduating class.

Kenneth Greene.

-Alice Stilson is residing with her p.irents in
Colon.

Alson Sears is still attendingBerkeley College in
California.

Boston, Mass.

Best wishes for the success of the class of 1922.
If there are any of its members who are thinking
of entering the tlental profession, I advise serious
contemplation, because ".All that glitters is not
gold." The course is now five years and it means
a steady grind from start to finish or those who
start will never finish.

.As a greeting to my classmates, I should like
to mention that all morning we have been having
a big snow storm which causes Harlan Holmwood's
poem "The Call of Panama," to make a very
strong appeal to me. .Also "Hello, Class of '20,
when do we eat?"

I wish the editorial staff the best success in every
line. I should like also to hear from all my old
friends on the Canal Zone.

Lindale D.avies.



24



THE CARIBBEAN.



Katherine Burgoon, now Mrs. Stewart, is still
with us in Colon.

J. B. Fields, Jr., is studying mechanical engi-
neering in Rice Institute, Texas.

Lillian Cotton recently changed her name to
Van Wagner and is now living in New Cristobal.
1921.

SVRACVSE, N. Y.

I am taking a pre-medic course in Syracuse
University and have so far been successful in my
studies. I am pledged in the Ga?)!?nu E/a Gamma
Fraternity, and am residing in their chapter house.
There is nothing like fraternity life or spirit.

I have heard of the fine school spirit this year
and I only hope that it will aid you in publishing
the best Caribbean yet. Remember, "A word
to the wise is unnecessary; it is only the foolish
who need to be told."

Frank Raymond.

State College, Pa.
I am taking a course in Mechanical Engineering
at Pennsylvania State College. I wish that this
Caribbean may be bigger and better than ever.

Carl Duey.



Fort Randolph, C. Z.

I have just recently moved to Randolph but
like it very much. I want to say that the students
of Cristobal High School were very kind to me
when I entered last year, a complete stranger.

I sincerely hope that this year's annual will be
a big success.

Eleanor Zimmermann.



Columbus, Miss.

I am studying at the Mississippi State College
for women. I am enjoying my work immensely,
but get lonesome for my old Isthmian friends.

KiRBY Ferguson.



Charles Henter has been staying at Hampton
Roads, Va., but is planning on taking up an
electrical course next year.

Alice Hunter has been filing in the American
Foreign Banking Corporation, but expects to leave
us next year to enter Simmons College in Boston.



GATUN.

George Carlwrigfit, '22.



Ships pass north and ships pass south

Through Gatun.

Few birds fly overhead,

Among them buzzards with outspread wings.

Lighthouses, scattered here and there,

Safely guide the ships from lake and ocean.

Lake, but not ocean, touches shores

In Gatun.

Thick jungle borders.

Coconut palms bedeck the streets;

Royal palms as well we see.

Whistles of departing ships

.Seem to mark the hours.

From ocean seven miles away

Comes the wind. It loosens fruits from their high nest.

The wind sways palms,

Bends deep grass,

Is the feature of the dry season,

Helps cayucos sail home.

The locks, an engineering feature,
Join the separated Americas,
Ixjwer ships to sea level,
Mix waters salt and fresh.
And make the town important.



Soldiers numerous, in suits of khaki
Drilling, shooting practice, sports, their work
Guard the Canal.

Crops, a few, the Chinese grow

Lettuce, beans, spinach, such.

The soil is not fertile and therefore is not sown.

Swimming pool, well enjoyed,
Consists of float and raft and water.

In the center of our town

Stands the clubhouse.

Pool room, gym and movies,

Library, reading room, bowling too, are there.

And for our treat refreshments.

Thus serves this only building of its kind

The public

Of Gatun.

The church bells ring

But few obey them,

Sunday is pictured as a day of rest.

In Gatun.

In Gatun.



THE CARIBBEAN.



25




JCiterarg




UP THE PIL.COMAYO.

IV. F. Bowers, '24.



Wno knows what may follow, when we, in our
boyhood, pledge ourselves to do things, which
even at the time of greatest interest, seem im-
possible?

When I was in high school in the Canal Zone,
my friend, Wesley Townsend, and I discovered
two things upon which we agreed: First, that
marriage has been the means of ruining many
good men; therefore we determined to stay
away from any such entanglements; second,
that civilization, like a ripe guava, looks fair
enough on the surface, but inside is eaten by
worms. As a result of these bits of sophistry, we
declared our intention of spending our lives in
exploring far from human kind.

Little did we dream how nearly some of our
plans would become reality. Two years ago I
was graduated from Johns Hopkins College ot
Medicine. My interest in South America being
strong, I settled in Buenos Aires and succeeded in
building up a good practice.

One night just as I returned from a professional
call, there was a loud rapping at the door. In
response to my call, who should rush in but Towns-
end. His greeting was characteristic.

"Why don't you live in a decent joint, Spark-
awowsky? I had an awful time to find this hole.
I got your address from your folks and then I
nearly had to walk myself to death to find your
shack."

I managed to pacify him by sharing the good
dinner which my cook had prepared.

After dinner he continued "I'm hooked up
with a bunch of butterfly-chasing old fossils from
the National Geographic Society. They want
to go to the Chaco and interview the Indians.
We need a doctor. How about it? Will you go?"



"Will I go?" I fairly yelled. "I will, you know.
When do we start? Tell me the plans."

"Well, keep your shirt on, will you? You can't
start to-night! The object is to locate a new
bunch of quebracho trees. The old ones are
about used up. The scienrific guys expect to stay
until we have located the trees."

"What are quebracho trees, anyway?" I asked;
"I have been here two years and I never heard of
the things. Are they good to eat?"

"That's just like you. Always wanting some-
thing to eat. Tannin is extracted from the trees
and used in tanning leather," he explained.

We sat and talked over our plans until quite
late. I don't believe I slept a bit that night.
Would that week never pass? Think of it! Seven
whole days! Of course there was plenty to do.
We had to lay in a stock of provisions, guns, am-
munidon and the like. Most of this was done
by the men of the Society, however.

At last the day arrived and we boarded a river
steamer bound for Formosa. For hours we were
out of sight of land in a turbid muddy sea. Then
we reached the river's mouth and started on our
four-day trip. The next morning we made our
first stop at Rosario, the second largest city ot
Argentina. All during the following day, small
floating islands drifted by on the sluggish current.
These islands were seething with the glistening
bodies of water snakes and occasionally we saw a
wild pig marooned. The next morning we passed
the partially civilized territory of Chaco, and
reached Formosa late in the evening. Formosa
is a typical old Spanish town with a population
of about three thousand.

We spent two days in hiring dugouts and
Indians to paddle them. The crew was a villain-



26



THE CARIBBEAN.



ous-looking lot. Short, flat-nosed, with long,
snaky, black hair in a word, they were typical
Indians ot the Guarani blood. I noticed, however,
that the guide held aloof from them. Then I saw-
that he was of an entirely difi^erent type. He was
a pure Bolivian tall, stalwart, and clean-cut.

"Here," I thought, "is a fellow to depend on."

At last, with all our baggage stowed away, we
started on our voyage up the Pilcomayo, a long
uncharted river which tor hundreds of miles forms
the boundary between .Argentina and Bolivia.
All day we paddled between thick jungles matted
with "llianas" and tree ferns. Gaudy birds flew
screaming from tree to tree, and lazy alligators
basked in the sunshine.

Toward evening we paddled up a side stream
and made camp in a small clearing.

In the morning we sent out a small party to
look for quebracho trees. When they returned
after being gone most of the morning, they re-
ported that they had found several white que-
bracho trees, which yield an important drug, and
some red ones. They also reported that they had
discovered tracks, Indian tracks! We immediately
broke camp and proceeded cautiously because,
not long before, a garrison of soldiers near Formosa
has been massacred. All day long our men grum-
bled among themselves and now and then I caught
them looking at us malignantly and whispering
together. Fearing an ambush, we did not stop
for lunch but pushed steadily on, eating some cold
roast pig as we went.

In the evening, however, we were forced to
stop for the night. We selected a spot on a slight
rise of ground and after a cold supper, for we
dared not light a fire, we posted guards and turned
in.

What was our terror when in the morning we
found that all of our men, except the guide, had
deserted, taking with them everything that they
could carry. After taking inventory of our re-
maining stores, which consisted of one dugout,
three 30.30 rifles, two .45 caliber revolvers, and a
case of canned goods, we sat down to hold a
council of war. There were six of us, Townsend,
Jose, the guide, the three men of the Geographic
Society, and I. Five of us were in favor of going
on, while one man wanted to turn back. The
majority ruling, we divided up our firearms and
started on once more. We completely won the



devotion ot Jose by treating him as an equal
rather than as a hired servant. He refused to
accept a rifle, however, preferring his native
machete, with which he was an aiiept.

Toward noon, we approached a sharp bend in
the river. Here we paddled along with double
caution but it availed us nothing. The river was
swarming with dugouts manned by Indians
hideously -painted and tattooed. Evidently their
sentinels had seen us the first night and had sent
a warning ahead. We "backed water" quickly
and attempted to turn around but they were too
quick tor us.

"Well, if this isn't a nice mess! Who ever told
us that we were explorers anyway?" Townsend
demanded, as the Indians started to tow us shore-
ward.

None of us was able to think ot any brilliant
plan; so we let the Indians take us to shore. Here
we were roughly hauled from our canoe and put
into a evil-smelling, vermin-infested hut. These
inhabitants violently contested our right to share
their abode with them. Presently an old hag
hobbled in with several well-filled calabashes of
baked yams, breadfruit, roast goat meat, and milk.

She scrutinized us closely and then, going up to
one of the scientists, she pinched him several
times. Nodding her head and muttering to her-
self, she took a large part of the tood and placed
if before him, indicating by signs that he was to
eat all of it. Poor Townsend was the picture ot
despair.

"Well, I'm darned," he exclaimed, "here I
thought I would get a square meal tor a change.
Then she comes along and gives most of it to the
other fellow. I'd like to know the great idea."

We were all greatly mystified, but our mystifica-
tion increased when we received a summons to
come before the chief. We were led to a large hut
in the center of the village, through the low door,
and into a long room hung about with skins of
animals, human skulls, and native weapons. .At
the far end was a raised platform upon which the
chief sat on a throne of skulls. At his side stood
a tall, stalwart, clean-cut fellow, who was a pure
Bolivian. It was Jose, our guide. We looked at
one another in surprise! \N'hat was he doing here?
Hail he turned traitor?

We advanced up the long room to the toot ot the
dais and stopped. The chief, an evil-looking



THE CARIBBEAN.



ry



fellow wearing only a breech-clout, necklace of
bones, and a feather headdress, was furious when
we refused to kneel to him. Using Jose as an in-
terpreter, he boomed forth, "What do the white
dogs in the country of the Chacos? Do you not
know the penalty?"

We stated our business as clearly and as calmly
as possible but it did not seem to allay his sus-
picions of us. Calling a guard, he had us bound
and taken back to our hut.

As evening drew on, we were surprised at the
number of cooking fires. One was kindled before
each hut and a pot of water put on.

"Say, fellows, I would be willing to bet that
these devils are cannibals," I affirmed.

"Well, we'll soon find out," said Townsend
grimly. And it was not long before we did find
out!

As soon as it was dark we were dragged, still
bound, to an open space in the center of the village
where five posts had been set in the ground. Each
of us being bound to a post, we waited apprehen-
sively for the performance to begin. The villagers
lost no chance to pelt us with stones or whatever
was at hand.

Shortly the tom-toms began to beat throbbing
notes that made one's senses dull. Soon these
sounds ceased as if by magic and the chief stalked
over to his raised seat, together with Jose. At
a given signal, a huge brute stepped from the
crowd and went over to the scientist who had
eaten our dinner. He executed a wild dance to
the music of the tom-toms and then, taking some
instrument from a pouch at his belt, he loosened
one of the captive's arms and started to work.
One by one he slowly ripped out the finger nails
of his helpless victim, who fainted twice but was
revived immediately. Then when he had wearied
of plucking the beard from his face, hair by hair,
he tore off his shirt and drew a burning brand
acro.ss the bare flesh. The scientist was sagging
loosely in his bonds, his lusterless eyes glazed,
his mouth swinging open.



How we tugged at our bonds! But it was no use.
We realized that we should have to see it through
without assisting our associate.

With a wild shout, the brute whipped a dagger
from his belt and drove it to the heart of our
friend. There was a rush of villagers as each
drew his knife and strove to get some part of the
victim's anatomy. It was sickening. Men rushed
from the crowd spattered with blood and carrying
a piece of leg, arm, or other delicacy. Then fol-
lowed a great feast of dog and human flesh, to-
gether with many kinds of vegetables. The men
ate until their wives had to carry them home.

Finalh' when only a tew old men were left
sleeping on the ground, we saw, by the fitful light
of the fire, Jose creeping toward us with a knife
gleaming in his hand. What was he up to now.-"
Had he come to finish us? We hoped so. .Any-
thing would be better than the torture we were
undergoing. But he quickly cut our bonds and
then sat down till the numbness had left our
arms and legs. Silently he motioned us to follow
him. .At the water's edge our own canoe was
drawn up, loaded with our guns and provisions.
We took our places and silently slipped down the
stream..

When we had gone some distance Jose explained
to us that he knew the Chaco dialect and he
thought that by posing as our enemy, he might
help us to escape. He finished with: "The Seiiors
did not think me a traitor?"

"Jose, old boy, you had me stumped for awhile,"
admitted Townsend. We all assured Jose that
we trusted him fully.

"Poor devil," said Townsend, referring to the
murdered scientist. "The best we can do is to go
back there some day and avenge him."

Gloom hung over us like a pall as we thought
of our companion. We shook it off, and by hard
paddling, we reached Formosa in two days. Four
more davs and we reached Buenos Aires and home.



28



THE CARIBBEAN.



:
i


DOWN THE COAST TO PORTO BELLO.


^



Cristobal, C. Z.,

Jpril 20, ig22.

Dear Mary:

In this letter I have something really interesting
to write about. Last Sunday we took a most de-
lightful trip to Porto Bello (beautiful port), a little
town about 2o miles down the coast, in which are
the historic ruins of an old Spanish fort, cathedrals,
and other interesting buildings, which were the
pride of the town before the pirate Morgan sacked
it, leaving little but ruins of what had been one
of the richest cities on the Caribbean.

As we left Cristobal behind us, the water was
gray; the sky, dark and sullen; but later the sun
came out and shone so radiantly that we knew
we should have a beautiful day for our trip. My
spirits rose as we set out to sea against the cool

wind. The Ca-
va, leaving a
pathway of
foam and spray,
cut swiftly
through the
clear blue wa-
ter. We passed
a couple of

There dynamite and KJant crushers conquered the . .

mountain side to furnish food that the wonderful Cana! dimmutlVC Sall-
Locks micht live. .

boats, reeling
like drunken men, their white sails glistening in
the sun. Along the coast we could see, beyond
a stretch of white beach, tiny thatched huts
nestling under stately palm trees; behind these,
rose hazy purple mountains.

At last we arrived at Porto Bello, and it cer-
tainly was rightly named, for I lost any qualms of
seasickness that I had had, in contemplation of
the exquisite scenery. The bay, which is almost
landlocked, is really the most picturesque I have
ever seen, and, in fact, has the reputation of being
the most beautiful natural harbor on the Carib-
bean. On the left side lie the crumbling ruins
of an old fortification, while on the right the main




POKTO BELLO TOWNSITE.



fort glooms above the sparkling blue water like
some sullen sentinel, its gray walls forming a
strange contrast to the pink and blue of the red-
roofed huts which flaunt themselves at the foot
of the jungle-covered mountains like those of a
toy village. Nearby, a group of native boys were
swimming about in the cool water, diving and
splashing like young seals, their agile bronze bodies
glistening in the sun. How oblivious they were
of the fact that fathoms beneath them lay the
bones, and perhaps a tarnished sword all that
was left of the once dauntless old sea dog, Drake!

Finally, after much maneuvering, under the
interested eyes of a group of ragged half-naked
natives, all of whom were offering advice (which
we could not understand), we tied up to a rickety
little wharf.

x^fter having a delicious lunch on board the
Cava, we simply could not wait any longer to
start, our heads were so full of tales of pirates,
pieces of eight, and treasure trove. We had a
difficult time getting into the little town, first
jumping over a small stream then squeezing
in between two huts, before we finally stepped
onto a narrow, dirty, little old cobbled street.
What a contrast to the busy prosperous city of
years ago is this squalid little town nothing to
be seen on the streets but a few scrawny old hens
and a mangy dog worrying a clean bone! As we
picked our way djwn the streets, natives peered
out curiously. Finally we came to the governor's
mansion. What
a magnificent
old pile it must
have been with
its gray walls
rising majesti-
cally! As I en-
tered the old
ruin, I could
almost imagine that before me, in the cool shad-
ows, strode a proud and haughty Don, clad in
rich velvets, his sword clanking at his side, his




PORTO BELLO.

A huid-locked harbor as beautiful as the poet's dream.



THE CARIBBEAN.



29



dark eyes flashing under his swarthy brow; while At last we came to the fort, which thrilled me

strolling beside him was a languid slender Seiiora, most of all, for I could conjure up scenes of

in sweeping Spanish brocades, a lace mantilla bloody battles and of swarthy, bearded, red-sashed

veiling her lustrous eyes and sleek black hair pirates, their knives gleaming between their




A NATIVE SCENE.

'In the shade of the young mango tree.'



white teeth, creeping up the hill
to the fort. As we descended
into the dirty old dungeons (now
the home of slimy lizards) and saw
the light fade away into darkness, I
wondered for how many suffering
prisoners this had been their last
glimpse ot the sun. Some of the
old rusty cannon, once so powerful
and now just a heap of useless iron,
are still lying around. I was fasci-
nated by the quaint, gray sentry
boxes overhanging the bay, and, as I
peered through the narrow slit, in my
imagination I experienced the awful
terror of that lone guard who through
this same aperture had seen that
first strange English ship appear.
The sun became so hot that we



topped by a tall carved comb. The
story goes that the governor antl
his wife lost their lives when the
building was burned. With a sigh
for these ill-fated ones, I reluctantly
left the shadows of the past for the
glaringsunshine of the present.

Outside, we saw two barelegged,
scantily dressed little girls husking
wild rice in a wooden cylindrical
vessel, with long awkward pestles;
how primitive this seemed in com-
parison with the modern method ot
preparing rice!

Half hidden by creeping jungle
vines lies the old cathedral, the
Spanish style of architecture still
evident in the tall spires, arches, and
ornate carving. The centuries rolled
away; the air was heavy with incense; above the were forced to return to the Cra. Ofcoursedaddy
notes of the deep-voiced organ rose the droning had to have a souvenir; so he bought two big rusty
monotone of the old priest, and the murmured cannon balls from an old native, and how they
responses of the kneeling Spaniards. With a leap did argue and haggle over the price! Finally, how-
I spanned the years to the present, rudely ever, it was settled satisfactorily, and we left the
aroused from my reverie by the incongruity of beautiful bay behind us, the sun casting a mellow
the grunting and rooting of scrawny razor-backed glow over the rippling water and the fast receding
hogs where once Spanish chivalry and beauty had village. We arrived home at about seven o'clock,
knelt in prayer. I felt a shudder of distaste at tired, but feeling that the trip has been well
this sacrilege. worth while. Truly your friend, Betty.

STOP, LOOK, AND LISTEN.

Jordan Zimmermann, '22.

"Beware of entrance to a quarrel, but, being in A person who goes along from day to day seem-

Bear't that the opposed may beware of thee." ingjy always the same, quiet and reserved, observes

In plain English these words of Polonius mean do much more than the person who blusters and quar-

not quarrel needlessly but, if forced to, make sure rels. Why? Because he can study a point more

that your adversary knows that he has noeasy task, thoroughly and can see both sides; whereas one

Some people go through life watching for the who quarrels must necessarily take one of the two
chance to start an argument over some trivial sides or there can be nothing to argue on. It
point. The only thing this sort of person accom- takes a long time to arouse a quiet man to action
plishes is an unpleasant reputation for himself. but when he is finally awakened it is time to be-
There is a natural tendency to shun a person who ware. The points he brings up are clinching in
argues over nothing. Of course there are some their force. He overwhelms the blusterer by the
who seemingly are always in an argument but speed and versatility of his attack,
they soon reveal the fact that they are only doing So far I have presented points for verbal quar-
it as a joke. The one I am talking about is the rels. But if the argument should turn to fisti-
chronic quarreler. He is not satisfied about cuffs, here also the quiet man will hold the advan-
school life, social life, industrial life, government, tage. He will be cool and conserve his strength
Nothing is done right. He never stops to consider while the other will be hot-headed and impetuous,
the opposite side of a question. wanting to be victorious in a short time.



3



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE DERELICT'S STORY.

Kenneth Parker, 24.

It was on a wind-swept coral isle of the South ster, nor could he leave him in a private school.



Seas that I met Jack Hart. He was a great hulk
of a man, gray, worn and dissipated; in a word,
a typical derelict of the seas. His huge frame,
clothed in rags, bore evidence ot having once
possessed great strength; his features were strong
and regular though half concealed beneath a
heavy, matted beard. Hart was wont to sit on a



as he had promised the dying mother that the
child should not be separated from him.

The captain loved his sister's boy from the
moment that he set eyes on him. .After a hard
struggle within himself he decided to give up his
command at the end of one more voyage. He had
started to leave the child at a home for sailors'



rock, for hours at a time, gazing seaward with children, but the piteous cries of the motherless

head erect and eyes flashing. He aroused my child beseeching him not to leave him alone were

interest greatly. I wondered a good deal about too much for Hart; so he took Billy with him on

this lonely creature. that fated voyage.

We were both in this out-of-the-way place for The trip gave all indications of being a record

the same reason, business I being engaged in one. Heeasily secured a valuable cargo from which

my usual occupation of gathering a cargo of copra he expected rich premiums. Then at Brunei, North



for the company's vessel; he
being occupied with the task ol [.
eking out a livelihood, doing
nothing.

^^"e were drawn together
finally because of loneliness and
the fact that we were the only
white men on the island. One
day when more or less under the
seductive influence of whisky
and soda, he waxed communica-
tive and told me his stor\-. I
can not tell the tale in Hart's
own words, but the memory of
it all haunts me yet. I can still
hear his voice, now shaken with hoarse sobs,
now bitter as he railed against an unjust fate.

He was a son of a fisherman and thus came to
know and love the sea. In his youth he had run
away from home to try the roving, adventurous
life of a sailor. Wild and strange had been his
experiences. I shudder now as I think of them.
Through his own efforts, he had finally become
master of a fine trading schooner, the Mary
Evans, plying between the East Indies and
.America.

.After spending many years on the deep, he had
suddenly been confronted with a serious prob-
lem one which almost baffled the hard old cap-
tain. His widowed sister, dying, had implored him
to take her 10 year-old son. What should he do
with him? He couldn't take him to sea with him,
for a trading schooner is no place to rear a young-




PlCTURESQl'E TABOGA.

Poems are made by fools like me:
Only God can make a tree. Kilmer.



Borneo, he obtained, through
what he thought was luck, an
enormous orang-outang and a
gigantic leopard, the largest he
had ever seen. If he got them
to -America alive, they would
mean a fortune for him. He
could buy a comfortable home
for Billy and himself within sight
and sound of his beloved sea.

Pullingout of Brunei Bay, the
Mary Eva>is ran into a stiff^breeze
off the coast. The barometer
fell with alarming rapidity.
".AH hands make snug," was
the order. The hatches were battened down,
a storm sail raised and all emergency prep-
arations made. In a moment the typhoon was
upon them. The waves beat against the vessel,
their blows forcing her to tremble from stem to
stern. The Mary Evans was making bad weather
of it. For hou.'s she wallowed and drifted, without
steerage, rolling helplessh' in the trough of the sea.
Hart, feverishly rushing about, was suddenly
frozen in his tracks by a desperate scream followed
a moment later by an awful, guttural cry which
curdled the blood in his veins.

The skipper, numb with horror at what he
might find, made a rush for below, flung open the
door of the sail room and saw there on the floor
before him, crumpled up in a pitiful little heap,
his boy, literally torn to pieces! He knelt beside



h



then a snarl and the booming grumble of the



THE CARIBBEAN.



31



ape made him leap tor the door. But too late! Billy up into his arms for a last farewell. Other

The draft had already slammed it shut; he could lives threatened; he rushed to the upper deck,

not hope to reach it before the orang-outang. With terrible shudders passing through her, and

In a moment he caught up a heavy oar which her beams groaning and snapping under heavy

lay on the deck, vaulted up into the cage of the pressure, the Mary Evans in a few minutes

tiger, drew his revolver, and emptied it into the slipped off the fateful reef and went down. Hours

breast of the charging beast. It still came on. later. Hart, clinging to a spar an^l at the point of

Hart raised the oar and smashed it to pieces over exhaustion, was finally washed ashore a few miles

the monster's heatl. The brute, dazed by the blow north of the village of Gaya.

and the shots, fell back, turned a somersault, and From that time on, life had been a nightmare

was at him again. The man flung the now useless to him. He had lost everything that he held

oar from him, grasped his knife and waited. dear; not a spark of ambition remained. For

The orang-outang, not being possessed of the years now he had wandereil from island to island,

strength to leap up at him, began clambering up. working only when he was fjrced to by circum-

The crashing roar of the tiger vibrated through stances, begging from chance white traders and

the air. A quick sickening rip and the ape sank even from the natives.

to the deck with his whole breast laid open by the As Hart finished the pitiful story, and reached

cat, which had struck through the bars. with trembling fingers for the siphon there

The next moment the ship shook and trembled somehow recurred to my mind a phi'ase of Irving's

as if the bottom were being torn away. She had which I had learned as a schoolboy:

run into a reef! Duty stood foremost in the cap- .., j^,^ ,;,,, ^^^e tamed and subdued by misfortune but

tain's mind. He could not even wait to gather great minds rise above it."

THE SEA FROM OUR SCHOOL.

George Carticrighl, '22.

As I peer from within the assembly room, againstitontheoppositeside,theyare torn to pieces

through a window and an allotted space made nar- and rise in the form of chalk-white foam many feet

row h\ a house on either side, I see in the farthest higher than their oppressor, appearing here and

distance, a line as straight and parallel to the there at intervals, the full length of the great wall,

earth's surface, as any geometrician has ever The foreground of this scene is the domain of

drawn. Man may discover and man may invent. Father \eptune, to-day an angry, raging, fury-



but though he travel the world
over, he would never reach this
apparent edge of the world, the
intersection of the sky and sea,
otherwise known as the horizon.
Some smoke appears as if some-
one on an unseen isle had used
his last hope for rescue, but al-
most immediately, there appear
on either side, two large projec-
tions, which with the smoke, rise
steadily until it is apparent that




'"Never an artist could pairt wit'i his skill t!ie
sunsets which bloom o'er my hilh."



Stricken monster, tossing its waves
here and there, inciting fear in the
heartsofowners and pilots of small
unseaworthy \'essels; to-morrow
as calm and smooth as a highly
polished mirror; now carrying
over its surface, wild ferocious
trade winds, which scatter base-
I'.-ss objects from place to place,
and keep tall palms swaying
back and forth in response to
their force; then again rufHed



they are supported by a sturdy base; as time passes, by a cool, sweet-smelling sea breeze, which moves

I distinguish it to be only a harml.-ss ship on its gently over this vast, widespread, bodv of dark,

ocean voyage. Seemingly a short distance from blue-green water. Then as the little waves that

the horizon, a long stretch of rocks, known as the have succeeded in escaping that destructive

breakwater, projects boldly out of the water. prodigy, the breakwater, roll determinedly up the

Although it is an ugly structure, at times when the rough nature-carved beach, each trying to outdo

sea is angry, and billows toss madly, it presents the last, they die, only to be followed by numerous

a beautiful sight; for when these waves dash companions.



32



THE CARIBBEAN.




A SCENE AT THE COLON STATION.

Frances Poole, '^5.




The blistering rays of the hot afternoon sun
stream mercilessly through the iron bars of the
station on a motley crowd of people pressing
toward the afternoon train for the trip across the
Isthmus. All is bustle and confusion.

I stand apart, interested in the scene before me.
My eyes are directed toward the parlor car
entrance where, a timid baggage man is striving
to convince a jargoning Jamaican woman that she
is not at the second class entrance, while the
negress firmly stands her ground, refusing to be
convinced. .'\ huge, overdressed woman, who has
been eyeing the affair
through a gold lorgnette,
adds her voice to the weaker
one of the baggage man, and
finally, convinced by this
combined effort, the ne-
gress retreats to her own en-
trance, muttering to herself.
.As she takes her place in
line, two stately Mar-
tinique women, who
have been conversing in
8TEPHE.VS ciuiNCEi-AspiNWALi. thc Ftcnch of thcl T natlve
Dedicated to the builders of "sle, scomfully draw aside

the Panama Kailroad John L. fU; ,,1, ,,;,, c Ql-ii-fc Ucf
Stephens. Henry Chaunccy.Wil- their VOluminouS SkirtS leSt

liam H. .^spinwaU a grotesque fL,, riirK t-lip (nAf,^ AriU
bat well-meaning architectural tne\ tOUCH tne raUeQUtaD

monstrosity. ^^^^ ^f ^f^^ slouchy Jamaican.

I am strongly impressed by the picturesque
costume of these Martiniques. The stiffly
starched skirts of their gay gingham dresses are
held up neatly over one arm, revealing snowy
petticoats equally as stiff. Bright three-cornered
kerchiefs are crossed over their ample bosoms,
while quaintly tied turbans of vivid red and yellow
add the finishing touch to these unique costumes.

A group of three tourists interests me; the
rather pompous man in immaculate white liuck
and pith helmet (which is no longer worn by
resident Americans, as they have become ac-
customed to the heat) is vigorously mopping his
dripping brow; the women in gay sport clothes
which smack of I'ifth .Avenue shops are dili-
gently fanning themselves as they view their
surroundings with amused interest.




.An elegantly dressed Panamanian lady, tall
and dark, passes me, chatting vivaciously in
musical Spanish to her dapper wax-mustached
husband. With them is a dark-eyed pensive
seiiorita, whom I take to be their daughter, as
she bears a striking resemblance to both. Lagging
behind them, are the two small sons of the family,
giggling over the funny sheet of an .American
newspaper.

Here and there is a sprinkling of Army and Navy
officers in spotless "whites," with their fashion-
able wives, making their way toward the parlor
car entrance.

Through the second class entrance surge peo-
ple from all corners of the world. In addition to
the usual collection of Jamaicans and Martiniques,
are Chinese dressed in .American clothes and
devoid of queues, and swarthy East Indians of
small stature, their straight black hair covered
with small round fezes of black velvet embroidered
in gleaming gold threads.

I turn my attention to the first class entrance
where a short, dark, old Panamanian, his stiff
white beard contrasting with the swarthiness of his
skin, takes his place sedately in line. Behind him
towers a sunburned pink-faced Englishman.

.At the end of the line a proud mother is engaged
in the difficult task of keeping her flock of five
chiklren near her. She cranes her neck, anxiously
watching to see that the train doesn't leave with-
out her; at this juncture one of her infants strays
away and stands beside the sedate gentleman.
The child drops his lollypop and reaches out his
dirty, sticky little hands to the man's white
trousers to balance himself, while picking it up.

"Caramba," the man mutters but very softly,
for he is a Panamanian gentleman and doesn't
utter oaths in the unrestrained manner of our
American men. The mother rescues her child
just as he takes out his lime-flavored lollypop to
stick out a very green tongue at his enemy.

.As the line thins through the gate, an American
girl comes hurrying along. With a whiff of heavy
perfume, she sallies by me. Her too fluffy yellow
hair is crowned with an organdie hat which
matches her beruffled pink dress. L'nder her



THE CARIBBEAN.



3.3



arm is a magazine bearing the title, "Elite Styles."
A red-taced American sailor, proudly bearing
the latest number of the "Police Gazette" under
his arm, comes rushing up, his white cap pushed
far back on his touseled hair, the bottom of his
trousers flapping as he runs.

The last of the line passes through the gate;

the gateman, who is also conductor, pushes his

cap far back on his head and sighs audibly, as he

wipes his forehead and starts toward th: train.

Just then the sound of boyish voices is heard



at the entrance of the station, and several sturdilv
built lads come flying through the gates, nearly
knocking over a Jamaican woman's tray of peanuts.
Shemumblessomethingaboutrude American boys,
and turns to her companion to discourse in true
Jamaican fashion on the subject of rude children.
Some boys outside of the gates shout something
about bringing home the bacon, skinning Balboa,
etc. .AH but two are already on, and, as they turn
to answer, the train starts; the boys jump to the
steps and the train is off.



m-




A TALE OF A TRAINING TRACK.

Paul C. Doyle, '22.



-=:.^




^=



February's races were over and training for
June races began. All th: jockey school students
reassembled at the training course, namely,
Cristobal High School.

Determination, a jockey of seventeen, had lost
in his last race with his stubborn steed Algebra,
but decided he would spend a little extra time
preparing Algebra for the next big race. Another
jockey called Fun entered the stable with a horse
whom he named Physics. This horse was well
built and had the making of a first rater for the
main event in June.

Each day the horses were trained to take part
in the tryouts, called quizzes, at the end of each
week. To become a first rater or honor student
their horses had to make the required distance,
a semester's work, within a certain time of "G."

Horses lined up at the start for the weekly quiz,
but a vacant space was noted and jockey Care-
lessness was marked absent.

Cheat, with his horse History, was already on
his way around the track of test when the shout
was heard, "They're off."

Determination urged on Algebra whose hoofs
were throwing the dirt of temptation aside. He
passed Fun, who by this time had drawn a laugh
from all the spectators of fellow students by run-
ning his horse backwards down the trail of clown.
The tryout neared the end with Cheat still in the
lead. Although Determination urged Algebra
still more and crossed the finish line within the

MR 81010 ,f



required time G, Cheat had already crossed it
with a better time, E. Then came Fun riding in
on dancing Physics at a speed of F, far below the
required time.

Each day in preparation for the June races,
Determination brushed up x'\lgebra who shone in
his daily workouts. Carelessness missed his daily
exercises by attending matinees, so leaving his
horse English in the stable. Cheat often attended
the matinee with Carelessness and would get a
lad nicknamed Fish to clean his horse History and
give him notes on what he had done. Fun would
always have a laughing group to see his horse
Physics perform, running sideways into the fence
of wrong lessons.

Only a month before the June races of final
exams. Fun was called to the office of the race
track manager, Principal, who told Fun he must
become serious or else, he would be barred from
the oncoming races. This interview struck Fun
with a jolt and he decided to become serious, and
immediately, although it was rather late, he
brushed up Physics and daily galloped him down
the track of study.

The day before the final event came. It was
the only time that Carelessness grew aware that
he had not prepared English for the big race to be
held the next d:iy. He went to the stables to give
English a thorough rubbing down of cramming-up
liniment. Determination had kept .Algebra fit
all through the training season called last semester



.u



THE CARIBBEAN.



and he was enjoying a swim of recreation, while Cheat as he was slowing down and slipping on the

Algebra refreshed himself in the pasture of rest. wet home stretch of thought questions, due to

Seriousness still worked over Physics even during History's new shoes of unfair answers.

the night, which made Physics quite exhausted. Physics and English came plugging along with

Cheat had only one worry, he had shod History Physics somewhat in the lead. They both leaped

with unfair answers and was worrying how he by Cheat on the home stretch, eager to reach the

could take a short cut through the field of con- finish line of qualification for advanced series of

cealed outline. new subjects. Cheat was humiliated and as a

The eventful day had come and all dampened last resort took from his pocket sand of outlined

sponges of books were taken from the jockeys. campaigns and dropped it on the track before

A questionnaire was handed each ot them as they History to keep him from slipping. But the track

lined up at the starting point. manager Principal discovered the sand and im-

"They're oflF," came ths shout, but already mediately disqualified Cheat and tore up his



Cheat had a leap of an unprepared answer. De-
termination got a bad start but was pulling away
f.-om Seriousness and Carelessness, but Algeb"a
began to puff and slow up when he came to the



questionnaire of examination papers.

Thundered shouts rose from the spectators as
Determination finished fair and square with
Algebra who leaped across the tape of advanced



first bend called simultaneous equations. As he standing with "E," a much faster time than was
saw Cheat far in the lead he reached to his jockey required. Quite a cheer was given Seriousness as
cap where he had a damp sponge of type forms Physics galloped across the finish within the re-
worked out. He looked to the rear and saw quired time "P." Not very far behind him Care-
Seriousness and Carelessness plowing fairly around lessness finished, panting heavily. His time was
the bend of formulas and Shakespeare's Hamlet, the lowest possible passing, "P."
He dropped his hand and urged Algebra on square- Cheat was theonlyone who didn't finish, as he left
ly. A quick refreshing shower of renewed memory the race through the gate of shame. .\1 though all
came and Determination began to pick up speed others were given a chance for the next races of new
and gain on Cheat. History was beginning to fail subjects Cheat was expelled from the cou.-se.

SUNSET AT THE CHAGRES.

Emma Townsend, '22.

A long stretch of white beach, winding along rosy. Even the small waves are pink-tipped.

the roya'-tinted waters in graceful curves, first No life is seen, except yon boatman in his skiff

catches the eye. The darkening jungle with its disappearing around the point and the restless

deepening shaiows, outlined by a row of rugged gull seeking his nest for the night. "Nature's

coconut palms, flowerpot," to the west, stands out as a proud

is quiet, save for sentinel guarding the entrance, and to the east,

t've slight rust- Fort Lorenzo, on a high rocky cliff, outlined

liig of leaves, against the sky, looking out across the sea, and

caused by the seeming to tell its story of pirates and "seadogs,"

a^jntle blowing marks the boundaries of our quiet, peaceful little

of the cool eve- world,
ning breeze. What a picture for an artist's pen, this

cai repose. Small waves lap spot, far re-

gently on the soft, santiy beach, tired after their moved from the

day's work of pounding themselves noisily and noise of the

unceasingly upon the shore in towering, white- bustling cities,

capped waves. calm, peaceful,

The sun, a glowing reil ball, sinks slowly into secluded, giving

the gold-rimmed horizon. The sky, a beautiful time for rest

background of reds, pinks, deepening lavenders, and thought,

golds dyed beyond artist's skill, gives the neces- quiet and con- a bend in the umm rR*oRE.'!.

sary color to nature's picture. Everything is tentment. ijJl^ ruut"p"rraa arel;^^^^^^^




LOWER CHAGRES BIVER.

Tnlike it? verdantly riad hanks, the river is not ;ill



itth




THE CARIBBEAN.



35



s=



=ffi




GATUN TO CRISTOBAL BY BUS.

William Cousins, '^J.



ffi-




=m




"Let's go, Joe," says Eddie. "It's a quarter
after."

It is a bright Monday morning with everyone
present and cheerful. We start with a rattle and
the driver toots his horn for B;n Turpin, the
st-eet sweeper, to move his limousine so our chariot

can pass. After
considerable
shimmying, we
make the top
of the hill, pass
on the left the
Old Maids'
rendezvous
Mot'Nr HOPB FILTRATION PLANT. and s e v e T a 1

Misht well be called a laundry, for here our drinking ^^C^JoI KrMicf^c-
water is wasneJ, bleacheJ, and momcntarilv hun^ Omciai nOUSCS,

"''""^"''- on the right,

the palatial residences of Mr. Bridges and Mr.
Sowley; and again on the left, the fire station
with the bomberos shining the brass on the engine.

Then we stop at the Henter farm. .As Lulu is
getting on we can look down into the fertile penin-
sula below. This is called Mud Point, probably
named after Lulu's brother "Mud." Here we see
several goats running about and wonder which
one is Lulu's. Carlos says the small one is hers,
as it is easy to get.

As we coast down Aristocrat .Avenue something
seems to be amiss. The driver stops our valiant
vehicle and, up-
on inspection,
finds the rear
mud guard on
the left side i
rubbing on the
tire. Further
investigation
reveals the rea-
son Mattie and Emma are both on the same
side; Mattie shifts, and we are again on our way.

Coming into New Gatun, we see the famous
cubist castle designed by Boob McNutt. .As we
top the hill which we have been ascending, we




OIL-PUMPING STATION,

Controlling miles of pipes from farm to ship side.



meet John, the Chinaman, struggling under his
load of vegetables. He greets us with his cheery
smile and drawls "Hellogoomornin." Descending
the hill, we come to High Street, which is the
riddle of the ride as we all wonder what they
would call a street if it were one to which you
go up hill.

.As we bump over the railroad at the bottom of
the hill, we see to the right, in the distance, the

.Agua Clara fil-
fation plant.
With the
keeper's home
above it on the
hill overlooking
the reservoir, it
reminds one of
a farm. Di-
recth' in front
of us, is the largest cleaning-up place in town, the
post laundry, and, directly behind it, is the place
where the .Army mule skinners rein and reign in all
their glory the Army stables.

Entering Fort Davis, we stop for Juline and
Warner. Passing the athletic field, we see the ball
team out practicing and runners covering the
track. -As we




OIL FARM.

Immense tanks of liquid gold.




drive out on the
Bolivar High-
way, we have
dense jungle on
either hand in
strong contrast
to the modern

1 -1 J (IIL-HANUI .t; PLwr

concrete build- Valves to the right of us, valves to the left of us,
inPS of the fort "P'"!? ^"'' ''"''"S. the oil rushes out.

which we hav^e just left. Passing between two
rock walls which remind one of Culebra Cut,
we see a Jamaican walking to Colon and taking
his breakfast en route, in the form of a stick of
sugar cane.

Wesley, who has been riding on the step, now
changes places with George, as a longer stay in the



36



THE CARIBBEAN.



sun might cause him to become freckled! Charlie, which is supplied from the various companies'
however, would rather stand there as he hopes to tanks on the surrounding hills and from which
be a conductor when he gets big. Warner is the government distributes the oil to ships at so
intently watching the road for a skin, and every much per barrel. We pass Mount Hope filtration
time we run over a snake, he skins back to skin it. plant and pumping station from which Cristobal
The girls are too busy copying one another's and Colon are supplied with pure water, and ap-
algebra and Spanish to engage in any diversion. proach a place with a grave aspect a place where

We approach the Mindi dairy which belongs people are d)ing to go Mount Hope Cemetery,
to the Government and supplies the .Atlantic side On the left is a large gasoline tank, which we

with fresh milk. .Adjoining the dairy are large tell strangers is the pagoda of the Chinese consul,
pastures in which we see the Holstein and Guernsey Below it is the printing plant made famous by
cows which the Government has imported from The C.ariebean which makes money no! not
the States. The road which passes through the counterfeit, but commissary books. Behind this,
farm connects the Bolivar Highway with the old are the Cristobal shops and the dry dock which
Gatun-Cristobal road which runs to the east of was made by the French and enlarged by the
the dairy.

-As we cross the bridge over a small stream, we
see a Silver City jitney reposing in the dit-'h with
three wheels tired and the fourth
knocked off. Passing a two-
wheeled cart loadedwith charcoa'
and bananas and drawn by ;;
small native pony not much
bigger than a large dog, with r.
drowsing Bajan topping the
load, we see just ahead a black
cvlindrical object which, it we




.Americans. Here we see all kinds of craft. .Ad-
ioining this is the site of the old coaling plant
which is a mere shovelful in comparison with the
"iresent one which we see to the
left in the distance. This is the
place which added to the fame of
the .Atlantic side when a whale ran
aground on theflatsnear theplant.
On our right is the up-to-date cold
storageplant builtand maintained
from commissary profits. .After
driving through Silver City which



TARPON CUB.

were on a ship, we should think a .A.n.v one may hook a tarpon, but it takes a thorough- consists of quarters built by the

, 1 1 1 bred to land one. ., ,'

mine, but which, on closer in- government for its silver (colored)

spection, proves to be only a boiler for melting tar employees in Cristobal-Colon we enter Colon,

to fill the cracks in the concrete road. which is next to the largest city in Panama.

Running beside the river, we see a dark knotty Here we see Chinese, Japanese, San Bias Indians,

obiect, slowly gliding through the water among French, and English negroes, and East Indians,
the bushes. Warner thinks it will be a fine skin In the market, as we pass, we see this collection

if he can only get it; so, asking the driver to stop, buying fish and beef on which, with a little rice

he jumps off, but by this time our friend Monsieur and yams, they live. We pass the government

Snap Alligator has left for a mtjre healthful place. building, with its iron-railed balconies, in which

One of the familiar characters of this trip is the is one of the largest libraries in Colon. We bump

negro, pushing his three-wheeled cart loaded with over the street car tracks but see no cars as one

grass, who stops to blow his whistle at every car administration put in the tracks and another will

that passes him. put in the cars. On our left, as we leave Colon



(it only takes ten minutes with our terrific speed)
we see the Hotel Washington with its high walls
and palm trees, and, on the right, picturesque



Traveling at the terrificspeed of eighteen miles per
hour, we soon arrive at the crossing of the B jlivar
Highway, Margarita Road, and the old road be-
tween Gatun and Colon. Stopping the chariot Christ Church by-the-Sea.
for the Hanson boys from Brazos Brook, the
Cri",t'jbal reservoir, we are again on our way with
the comfort of a Pullman and the speed of a
hearse. Then we pass Governor .Arcia's farm
which supplies Cohjn with milk. We sec also
on the left the government oil-pumping station,



We run along the beach ami see the breakwater
in the distance, turn the corner by the hospital,
antl climb from the chariot, up the steps of knowl-
edge, and into our seats, to spend another happy
day as pupils of Cristobal High School,



THE CARIBBEAN.



37



A MUSICAL EVENIXG.

George Ball, '24.

"All articles for The Cariubean must be in to- was studying. So I went on laboring with my hero,

morrow without fail," said Miss Dodds, our After much digging with nails and case knives,

principal. I squirmed mine wasn't even started. he managed to make his escape. He had no sooner
I had lived in the tropics long enough to become



infected with the maiiana fever; h'^nce my motto
was "Never do to-day what you can put off until
to-morrow;" but to-day was my last to-morrow;
so I would have to summon my muse that night.
After supper I tried to settle down to work, but
the wires must have been crossed, for the muse
which presides over music answered my invoca-



done this than the Edison next door started play-
ing the aria from "Boheme." It was a favorite
of mine; so I decided to let my hero breathe the
fresh air while I listened.

"I am sure that is Galii Curci," said my mother.

"No, Farrar," said my sister.

Then they entered into a dispute that was
settled only by the old player upstairs, which



tion, and I found myself inspired to produce drowned out, with the strains of the aged "Margie,"
harmony rather than literature. Therefore I got the voices of my mother and sister, as well as
out my newly acquired mandolin, tuned it to the that of the famous singer (whoever she was).

best of my ability, and started -^.^ The epidemic spread quicker

to play the firstand only piece QKv thanmeasles. Thepeopleacross

ofmy repertoire, "Home, Sweet ^^ ^ the street started playing the

Home." I had not made more -^jfe^ __^ "Wang Wang Blues" on their

than two or three discords when ^B^ '' ^ Wr rattly \'ictrola. The battle

my sister rushed from her room ^^^L l\\ was fast and furious, but soon

spluttering forth a "How in the ^^V^^k -'M? / 1^ "Margie" died a natural death,

world can I be expected to ^^''^^B^.^ l^Bmi l'I%i^' ^"'^ ^^^'^ "Wang Wang Blues"
study such a hard subject as ^fl .\'''^^^^^7&VHk, 1 IIKJ^*^ wanged on triumphantly for a
physics with this awful racket ^^^Hjl ilfif f vSL IiSEkB- *''^^ measures. Finally there
going on? You stop it this IBHHB}T'*Brr) ^^^^ _____^,_ was silence.

minute! Mamma, make r jj^'^'^gil I returned to my hero. He

Georgie stop that noise!" had had enough fresh air now;

^ ^ CHRIST CHURCH BT-TKE-SEA. ^

I was so busy hunting for A An old and well-attcnded landmark proclaiming the Voice SO he WaS ready torsome eXcitC-
^ , ... in the wilderness, tt t 1 i

flat that her outburst did not ment. He immediately met the

move me. After much fingering and fumbling, I villain, and there followed a terrible struggle, from

succeeded in finding it, only to lose it again, for my which my attention was turned to another struggle

mother had been moved by my sister's appeal across the way, between little Mary Jones and her

and together they were too much for me. new violin. First there were twenty minutes of

"Some 'sweet home' this is," I muttered, as I squeakingupanddownthescale. Then she brutally

put away my books and reached for my pad. and cruelly butchered "Humoresque." The last

At the combination of musical andfamily discord, notes werepainfullydyingaway when, from offin the



my muse had faded away. Now I would get down
to business. I chewed my pencil for a while; then
the inspiration came. I started in on a blood and
thunder masterpiece. My villain succeeded in
locking my hero in a deep, dark cellar. As I was



distance, came the sounds of the fife and drum corps
of the Panamanian Boy Scouts. When they had
passed out of hearing, I returned with renewed vigor
tohelpmy hero, whom I had left fighting the burly
villain. They must be exhausted now; so I let them
rest. Neither they nor I could rest long, for from



revolving ways and means for his escape, my sister j^^, ^,^^ ^^^^^^ ^^.^^ ^^e wailing notes of a saxo-

suddenly either finished her lessons or abandoned phone. It was Clarence, the leading actor in the

them, for she began banging "Dardenella" on the Seniorplay,doingacrobaticsonhissaxophone while

piano. Much to my relief, she was immediately practicing his role. I immediately killed both

suppressed by my mother, who reminded her that I my hero and villain and went to bed in despair.



38



THE CARIBBEAN.







=ss




THE VILLAGE SLEUTH.

Girdon Rudd, '24.




=^



My story takes place in Slaterville, a little one-
horse town situated in the lower part of Florida
on the Caioosahatchee River. It is just one of those
quiet little villages which boast of a main street
where all the business houses of the town are
located, and where the town folks don't care
about to-day and let to-morrow take care ot
itself. In the mountains surrounding the little
village, excellent trout fishing and hunting are to
be found, and often through the winter months
tired business men and statesmen pass through
on their way into the mountains for a tew weeks
rest from the turmoil of business and politics.

One of the stock characters of the place was
Silas Blackburn, known around town as Silas,
the sleuth. He had formerly driven the delivery
wagon for Perkins' General Store, always cherish-
ing within his bosom, however, the ambition to
become a second Sherlock Holmes. So, against
the wishes of his parents he quit his job and began
sending for literature on how to become a detec-
tive. He established his office in the back of his
father's grain store, and hung out his sign to let
the public know that Slaterville boasted of a
private detective.

Everybody had laughed at him, and his father
had told him to quit this foolishness, as Mr.
Samuel needed a good clerk in his new hardware
store and here was Si's chance to get a good job.
But nothing could persuade Si from his present
occupation and, when jokingly asked how business
was, he would often reply: "You just wait, I'll
show you all some day."

He didn't have long to wait. About 3 miles
out of Slaterville in t'le near-by hills was a large
sulphur mine. The paymaster of the mine had
been on his way there with the monthly pay roll,
when three armed bandits in a high-powered
motor car had held him up and had made a clean
get-away with 3io,ooo of the company's money.
Telephones were got to working and all roads
that lead out of Slaterville were watched. A
large reward was offered by the company for the
capture of the bandits. 'I"he paymaster hail been
so dazed that all he could remember was that the



car driven was a high-powered McFarlan and
had three occupants, .^bout three days after the
robbery, it was believed that the bandits must
still be in the vicinity of Slaterville, or had made
their escape into the hills, as all roads and rail-
roads had been watched carefully, and no one
answering to their description had gotten through.

Si's heart leaped high; his chance had come at
last. Now he would show those scoffers! Daily
he disappeared into the hills, returning late at
night. One night he returned later than usual,
bespattered with mud, and wearing a look of
serious purpose. His father again approached
him on the subject of a job.

"Si," he said, "Mr. Samuel is still holding that
position open for you, and you can go to work as
soon as you quit this darn

"Pap, I don't care nothin' 'bout no job; I've
got somethin' real important up my sleeve, and
don't want to be bothered."

He really had something up his sleeve. He had
found about three miles out of town on the edge
of a small lake near a seldom-used road, a Mc-
Farlan car covered with mud. It answered to the
description of that given by the paymaster. Also,
a little way off, he found a campers' tent with
three occupants, and, after making these dis-
coveries, he had made his way home, deciding to
wait until the next day to investigate more fully,
for one of the instructions of his literature was to
proceed slowly and cautiously. Setting out next
morning with his rifle and dog on the pretense of
hunting, he made his way in the direction of the
campers he had discovered the day before. When
he reached the spot, he made a careful detour of
the camp and approached it from the lake shore
to keep the men from suspecting that he had
trailed them. Stealing close to the side of the
tent, he laid his ear against it. Cold chills played
up and tlown his spine at what he heard.

"Well, that was a pretty good haul we made,"
saitl one.

"It sure was," said another. "And we ought to
make two or three more like it before we go back
to the city."



THE CARIBBEAN.



39



"The fellows up in the eiry thought we were
fools coining way down here, hut just wait till
we get back and tell them (jur luck," Si heard a
third person say.

This was enough evidence to convince his de-
tective mind that he had at last landetl the ban-
dits, and done it single handed at that. They had
spoken of a haul; so he thought they must have
the loot with them. The men inside the tent
began to move around; so he carefully crept back
into the woods. Making his way back to town with
all possible haste, he headed tor the sheriff's office.

A half hour later Si, covered with mud from
head to foot, his hat missing, his hair disheveled,
came running mto the sheriff's office.

"Why all the hurry, Si? What's the excite-
ment?" exclaimed the sheriff.

"If I take you to the hiding place ot those
bandits that robbed the Harrington Sulphur
Mine's pay roll, do I get the reward?" he burst
forth, after getting his breath.

"Why, of course you do, Si," grinned the sheriff,
for he thought it was some big joke.

"Well, then, get a large posse together, tjr these
men may make a desperate fight; then follow
me," he said to the astonished sheriff.

The sheriff, almost convinced by Si, hastened
to gather a posse, and soon they were headed for
the hills. This was Si's great moment as he gal-
loped up the main street with the posse and the
sheriff behind him. Folks would laugh at him?
Well, he'd just show them. As he passed his
father's grain store, that astonished gentleman
came out on the sidewalk and veiled after him,



,, Where be ye going. Si, that job that ," but

that was all Si heard.

.After a half hour's ride, they began to near the
bandit's hiding place.

"You had better have your posse surround the
tent, while you and I go forward and demand
their surrender," said Si to the sheriff, for he was
determined to be in at the killing. After the sheriff
had stationed his men, he and Si started toward
the entrance of the tent. Si fairly swaggering.

While the sheriff held his gun in readiness, Si
loudly rapped on the tent and yelled, "We've
got you dead to rights; so you might just as well
come forward and give yourselves up."

A rather short individual stepped forth from
the tent, followed by two other men. After
glaring around at the pcsse, the sheriff' flaunting
his badge, and Si, the short fellow demanded,
"What's all this farce? Can't a fellow spend
a quiet couple of weeks fishing without a lot of
dummy sheriffs coming up here and spoiling it
for him? I ought to have the whole bunch ot
you

But that was as far as he got, tor the sheriff,
as if awakening from a dream, loudly exclaimed,
"My Gosh! It's the Governor of the State and
his

But that was all Si heard, for in the next instant
he was on his horse bound for home leaving the
sheriff to explain matters. Galloping into town
as fast as his horse's legs would carry him, he rode
straight for his father's store, and dismounting,
went inside. Walking up to his father, he said
soberly: "Pap, what about that new job you was
talking about?"



A YOUNGER BROTHER.

Marjorie Ball, '22.

With lordly mien and boldly blustering air,
He loudly boasts that he can never know
Of any fear, but still, 'tis strange, will show
A bashful blushing face when maidens fair
Are near. Such trifling things as unkeirpt hair
.^nd dingy grimy hands are far too low
To trouble his more lofty mind, although
He dons his clothes precisely and with care.
His joy in life is far too plainly heard;
And appetite by far too plainly seen;
But 'neath all this, is helpfulness to mother,
With friendly thoughts behind his careless word.
-And, after all, who is there who could mean
The same to vou as does your little brother?



BOBBED HAIR.

Ida Brown, '22.

Oh! Here is to the girl who bobs her hair
Her hair of brown, chestnut, or golden hue'
Her curly, flying locks of fashion new-
Have caught my wondering heart within her snare
So gay and yet so artless is her air
Enhanced by roguish eyes of brown or blue.
But, with it all, I know her heart is true
Though she with largess free her favors share.

Let's pledge a toast to her the modern girl
That she may keep her happiness and joy.
That beauties like iweet petals may unfurl
From heart now light as that of barefoot boy,
Until she blooms into perfected life
Emerging capable, a staid good wife.



40



THE CARIBBEAN.



=m




\\HEN SORROWS COME-

.i/ex Liriczer, 'sj.




M =



^



Mr. Jones never knew how the book agent got
past the guard in his outer office, far he had given
strict orders that no salesmen were to be ushered
into his sanctum sanctorum. Mr. Jones hated
salesmen, particularly that brand of wind blowers,
as he called them, the book agents. He hated
them with all the hatred of a Wall Street cynic;
so it spoke worlds for the persuasive powers of
the book agent, that Jones fjund himself dazedly
staring at a highly colored copy of the "Early
Pilgrim Fathers." It had all been done so quickly
and glibly that the only thing he remembered
was handing over S5. He now looked at the
book again and cursed feebly, not because of the
money spent, but because he had been bested.

Bv the time Mr. Jones reached his suburban
home that evening, he had completely forgotten
the unpleasant episode with the book agent, in
the anticipation of a good dinner and a quiet
evening with his wife.

Two hours later, Jones, in slippers and comfort-
able smoking jacket, pulled his easy chair before
the fire and settled down with his newspaper and
his pipe. He looked across at the pretty dark
head of his wife, bent over her sewing, and a great
feeling of peace and contentment came over him.

"Oh, John!" Mrs. Jones, throwing aside her
sewing, ran over to perch on the arm of Mr.
Jones's chair. "I've got something to tell
you a book agent came to-day; oh, he was the
nicest, most courteous man, he would have con-
vinced even you and I know how you hate bjok
agents that you couldn't be without this bojk."

Mr. Jones stiffened perceptibly.

"Yes, it was only $6 ami tells about the Pilgrim
Fathers, John; you know my ancestors came over
in the Mayflower and 1 almost cried when I read
about that first hard winter. Ir will be a wonder-
ful book to hand down to our children."

"Ancestors and Mayflower be hanged!" growled
Jones.

"Why,John, what's the matter, you're positively
cross; it's really quite an educational



"Matter," spluttered Jones; "I got stuck on
the same book. Blast the whole tribe of book
agents."

Just then Mrs. Jones looked out of the window
and whom should she see hurrying through the
fast-gathering dusk in the direction of the station
but the same book agent!

"Look, John! Quick! Is that your man?"

"Yes! Blast him!"

"Run and catch him and make him take one of
these old 'Pilgrim Fathers' back."

"But, I am not dressed, and my boots are off."

Just then Mr. Smith, a next door neighbor, drove
past in a carriage. Jones frantically pounded on
the window pane in such a manner that the startled
horses were brought up with a jerk.

"Hey, Smith, run down to the station, will you,
and catch that book agent you see standing there."

Mr. Smith reached the station just as the con-
ductor said ".All aboard."

"Book .Agent!" he yelled, just as the book agent
stepped on the train. "Book Agent! hold on a
minute, Mr. Jones wants to see you."

"Jones? Jones wants to see me?" repeated the
puzzled-looking book agent. "Oh, I know what
he wants. He wants to buy one of my books,
but I'll miss my train it I go back to sell it to
him."

"Oh, if that's all he wants I'll buy it and take it
back to him. How much is it?"

"Seven dollars for the 'Early Pilgrim Fathers,'"
said the book agent, as he reached for the money
and passed the book through the window.

Just then Mr. Jones arrived at the station puff-
ing and blowing, like a diminutive model of the
engine just pulling out. As he saw the train
leaving, he was too full tor utterance.

"Well, I got it for you," said Smith, "Just got
it; that's all."

"Got what?"

"Got the book 'Early Pilgrim Fathers' and
paid

"Bv the great horn spoon," muttered Mr. Jones,
as he fainted right in the middle of the street.



THE CARIBBEAN.



41



^'




MASKS AND CRABS.

George Cartwright, '22.




'^



"Having a good time, John?" asked Harry.

"Oh! Glorious," replied John. "But have you
seen Minnie around here? I have been looking
for her for the last half hour. I have an idea that
she dolled up as the French Jane."

"Your're right," said Harry, chuckling guiltily.
"She has been looking fjr you also."

"Well, thanks for the info., I'll be O. K. for the
rest ot the evening. Have a good time, and go
home at a respectable hour. So long," and John
started for Minnie.

He had very little trouble in finding her tor she
had been sitting all evening in the same place,
which was very uncommon tor Minnie. She was
generally here, there, and everywhere.

"Hello, Min! I've been looking for you till my
eyes are sore. Harry just put me wise now."

"Good evening, John," she replied. "Having a
good time?"

"Sure thing! Something happen? You have
been quieter than usual."

"No, I'm just taking life easy. How do you
like my new costume?"

"Fine and dandy. Nobody would know who
it was. Why I was even fooled myself until Harry
told me. I bumped into about ten teachers while
trying to find you, and was just about to tell them
what I thought about them, when I discovered who
they were. They give me a pain; I've never been
any place where they weren't. I'm disgusted
with the whole crowd. You ought to see the
report they handed me this morning."

"I did happen to see it, and I don't see what
you expect. That is about as well as you do or ever
did."

"Huh! I'm glad you think so," sarcastically
replied John. "It I don't deserve more than a



'P' in Physics, and a 'G' in English, I'll eat my
shirt; and what did you think of that red 'F' in
Algebra?"

"Well, a good thing for you to do would be to
work a little more, and get what you think you
deserve. Why blame the teachers?"

"Say, who do you think you are? You talk as
if you thought you were a teacher. I suppose
you got all 'E's,' didn't you ?"

"No, I didn't get all 'E's,' but you don't hear
me grouching about what I did get, do you?"

".^11 these teachers have their pets around here,
and I'm one of them, but I'm the pet nut. They
all pick on me. It's John, John, John, all day long.
One of these days I'm going to change my name.
That Miss Beeching thinks I'm an .Algebra shark,
but somehow or other I can't bite and then I get
blamed for it. Miss Dodds bawls me out for not
knowing that this too solid tlesh would melt.
Just because her brain sopped up all this Shake-
speare stutf, she thinks mine is going to do the
same. Then there is Miss Hornbeak, who tries
to tell me all this junk about Columbus and the
other inventors, and because I don't know what
happened a thousand years ago, I get 'P,' and

if Ba ;" but here he stopped for he heard the

whistle of the floor manager.

"Ladies and gentlemen, we ask you all to un-
mask now and go into the next room for refresh-
ments."

John, obeying orders with the others, unmasked
at once, but he neglected following further direc-
tions, for upon turning to otfer Minnie his arm,
he discovered that with the removal of her mask
she had revealed Miss Hornbeak. John, without
even excusing himself, darted out ot the door and
ran for home.



42



THE CARIBBEAN.



s=



m




THE PRODIGAL BROTHER.

Ida Brown, '22.



'^



1 1. 41;: Oh, I'm tired; "Lightnin' was a good
show but it was so long. I'm glad Harry did go to
the movies. He'll get a few more hours sleep than
we, anyway.

Goodnight, mother and dad. Don't torget to
call me early to go swimming.

11.50: (Guess I'll go kiss Harry good night.)
Mother! Harry isn't home yet! No! Where
do you suppose he is? (Mother's voice sounds
rather shaky; I wonder it she is scared and is just
cheering me up.)

You think he went riding with Aunt Kate? Oh,
all right, good night.

11.55: (H'm! I wonder if he did go riding.
Well, mother and dad don't seem to be worrying
over him. Guess I'll go to bed too.)

2.30: What's that, dad? Harry isn't home
yet! I'll be right down! No, indeed, I won't go
back to bed; I'll sit down here and talk to mother.
First you're going to the hospital to see if he has
been hurt? Oh, yes, and then you'd better go to
the police station and report him missing.

2.35: There, mother, don't worry. He's all
right. There! There! Am I worried? Oh, no!
Not very, anyway.

2.40: Yes, I'll call .Aunt Kate to see if they did
take him for a ride.

Two three five, central. Yes, please.

Hello, .Aunt Kate? Yes, this is she. Have you
seen anything of Harry this evening? No? Well,
he isn't home yet, and we thought maybe he was
over at your house. All right then, we'll let you
know when we find him. Good bye.

2.50: (Oh, my, what if he has been kidnaped!
Yes, I was just reading to-day about a little boy's
being kidnaped. Maybe they think we are rich
and are holding him for ransom. J



No, mother, I don't see them yet, but please
don't worry. He'll be coming soon.

2.55: Oh, dear! what if has been run over!
There is so much traffic and he isn't used to it all.
Oh, what if I never see him again!

Why was I so mean to him! Last night I made
him take me to the movies, and this morning I
fussed with him because he wouldn't go to the
store tor me, and to-night I made him do the
dishes when I knew he had been tishing all day and
was tired, and )

Oh, mother, please don't say that! Of course
he'll come home soon.

(Yes 1 surely have treated him abominably

He often does little favors tor me, and to tell the
truth he is really a lot better than other girls'
brothers, and all the girls are always saying how
polite he is and what pretty hair he has and )

Oh mother, here comes papa now and Harry is
with him!

3.00: Where have you been, you darling!
(throwing arms around him and kissing him).
Hone\', I'll never, never treat you mean again!
I was so scared. Were you lost or hurt or kid-
naped or ?

What! You were listening to the wireless con-
cert in the pavilion and fell asleep! .Asleep! Oh,
you lazy little pest! Here we have been worrying
and losing sleep, and I was thinking how mean I
had treated you and to think you were asleep
all the time.

You're sorry! Well, what good does that do?
It doesn't make up for the sleep I lost. Yes, and
to-morrow, young man, you'll help with the dishes
and go to the post office for me and take me to the

movies and well I'll tell you the rest in the

morning. Good night, mother ami dad. and

good night, you you rascal.



THE CARIBBEAN.



43



ii^




A SLIP OF THE FOOT IS BETTER THAN A




^




(^^


SLIP OF THE TONGUE.


^^




H=




Louise Heater, '2j.




SS



Everyone was cruel to him. His sister wouldn't
return his library book for him, and there was
20 cents due on it already; his English teacher
had threatened that if he didn't soon hand in his
theme on one of Franklin's proverbs, she would
give him material enough to write a book on the
subject, "Experience keeps a dear school, but
fools will learn in no other;" and now his mother
had made him take the new minister's son (he
was straight from a school in England) fishing with
him when he had thought he would have a whole
day away from everyone a day just to go wan-
dering with no one but his dog. He bet he knew
where a pair of wild ducks had their nest and there
was a peach of a place where he could set a trap
for a possum and

He hated the new boy his name, Percival,
the way he combed his hair, parted carefully in
the middle, the way his ribbed stockings were
rolled at the top, and especially the way he talked.
His "right-o, old chap" made him sick.

They reached the creek at last, while all the
time Jack maintained a discreet silence a



silence which remained unbroken until, just as
a huge speckled trout was about to make a meal
of Jack's bait and hook, the new boy whispered
excitedly, "I say, how jolly pretty!" And when
he threw a rock in "to see how it would swim,"
Jack threw down his line.

"For ," but he got no further. In his

anger he had stepped too near the bank and he
felt himself going down down Suddenly
something hit him and he tried to count some
bright, orange stars spinning around in a purple
sea. Then he was being pulled pulled

When he regained consciousness, he could not
see. Something was wrapped around his eyes,
but he could hear someone that sounded like his
father telling a story about someone (he didn't get
the name) who had fallen in the creek and had
been saved by a boy who looked as it he hadn't
the strength of a girl. Suddenly he understood
and, smiling a bit, he said, 'A slip of the foot is
better than a slip of the tongue,' Franklin.
Experience." .'^nd they put another ice bag on his
supposedly delirious head.



THE SECRET.



Mtiijorie

One Saturday morning when I was in the midst
of my baking, the door flew open and in rushed
one of my neighbors breathless with excitement.

"Oh! My dear!" she gasped. "I've just heard
the most interesting piece of news. I simply
couldn't wait to tell you."

"Well, what is it?" I asked, rather annoyed
because she had disturbed me.

She beamed and then looked mysterious.
"Really, I don't know whether I ought to tell
you or not. You see, Mrs. Smith told Mrs. Brown
and told her not to tell, but Mrs. Brown just can't
stand Mrs. Smith because the Smiths have a
Cadillac and Mr. Brown only has a Ford, so she
told Mrs. Jones just for spite, and Mrs. Jones
told me."

"How interesting!" I murmured absently.



"Yes, you see that's how it was and Mrs. Jones
never would forgive me if she found out I told
you. You must never mention it to anyone."

Just then the order man came in, and I had to
excuse myself for a moment, but it made no differ-
ence to her for she kept on talkmg steadily while
I gave my order.

"Now, if I tell you, you must promise never to
tell. I suppose I ought not to, Mrs. Jones will
just kill me. Well, I will anyway. You see, it
was this way Oh, dear! There is my hus-
band coming now, and I haven't even started his
dinner. I'll tell you to-morrow."

With that she tore out through the door as
suddenly as she had come in. So she never told
me her secret, but I have always had a very strong
suspicion that I knew it for I was the one who had
told Mrs. Smith.



44



THE CARIBBEAN.




MY FIRST AND LAST ATTEMPT AT
DIVING.

Betly Fitz-JI'illiam, '2J.




K



"Oh, go on and do it, Bitty," urged Mildred.

"But 1 can't!"

"Yes, you can! See, it's not very deep."

I peered down, down, down before I finally
saw the bottom. Oh, how stony it was! So deep!
If I should get to the bottom and somehow never
come up oh, but it would be too terrible!

"Oh, I can't, Mildred."

"Yes, you can! Now, go on!"



"Well, what did you do that for? You were
going over beautifully. I'm not going to stand
here any longer waiting for you to do what you
never will!"

"Oh, Mildred, I'm going to do it right away,"
I asserted heroically.

"Now, lean far over and just fall in," were my
directions.

I bent far over, over, over. Oh! Now I was



"Well I'll try." I'd show her that I could going for sure. I said my prayers. Had I kissed



do it as well as she could!

I leaned far over, farther farther. I felt
myself slipping. A cold shiver ran up my spine.
I felt like those hair advertisements going
going but not quite gone, for with one effort I
caught myself.

"Oh," I gasped in relief.



mother before leaving home? .^nd then it seemed
as if the water leaped right up and slapped me
in the face.

Down, down I went. Should I never come up?
My ears were ringing. But the next thing I
knew I was clinging to the ladder spouting water
like a young whale. Gasping between breaths I



If I had dived in, I'd be down in that cold groaned, "Never again," for I had hit flat as a

green water now. pancake.

COGITATIONS OF A COCHERO.

Gladys Lowande, '24.

Hi, der, cap, ya hain't wish ha coach? Take ya pass ya ha spiggoty nickel fe ha fi' cent? Han

to da 'otel, cap. No, no coach! wen hi don't wish to take hit, 'im get hangry han

Run, me son. Napoleon, haroun' dis corner call ha pliceman.

quick fe hyar come da humane lady dat stop hus Hi done guess dat dis hyar nigg.i hain't da

dis mornin'. Da humane sasciety h'am halways h'only one wat catch bad luck. One huf dem

busybodyin' haroun'. First one ham say, "Coach ladies dat hi done took to da bank dis mornin'

man, take dat pore tin hoss bak to da stable han ham say she jus' finish give ten dollars to da

make 'im 'ave ha good feed." Han den, "Hain't Colon Free Clinic han den 'er little boy go han

ya hashame fe drivin' ha hoss wid ha sore hon loss ha bran' new commissary book han she no

'im bak?" Han den da nex' one say, "Hi hain't 'ave the money to get hanother.

gwan ride wid ya hatall if ya ham beat dat hoss My! Dose wimen hain't got no sense habjut da



dat way.

Hit ham hall very well fe dese white folks to
blong to da Protection hof Cruelty to hanimals
but dey haint hunderstan' bosses hatall. Ya jus'
hafta beat dem hall da time when de his balky,
eh. Napoleon? Dis hoss ham tin han him ribs
stick hout but dat hain't noting, cause I'se tin
ma-sef. Lawd, Sa, no one wishin' to ride wen
hit ham drv season so how she tink hi gwan catch



way dey gwan talk habout der frien's. Tha nex'
one ham say, "Hi wonder where dis Missus Jones
ham catchin' hall da money fe buy she new
clothes." Han dey talk somethin' scandalas
habout Missus Desmond wats 'usband went hup
hand lef'she. Hi wonder where she 'usband go?

Get hup der. Napoleon. Der bother day ha
gal wat hi drove to da pool ham tell 'er frien',
"Hi hain't gwan dance wid Fred no more 'cause



money to buy food fe ma hoss? But rainy season 'im h'always dance wid dis hyar Catherine hall da

comin' soon han heverybody wish ha ride han time han hi hain't care hatall."

den hi get lots ha money fe da feed fe you, Na- Wat's dat hi 'ear, ha whistle? Hi, Napoleon,

poleon. make hit fas to da dock, I'se gwan catch ha

Han, me son, wat ya gwan do wen ha man passenger from da Panama Railroad boat.



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



A RESUME OF THE COUNTRY FAIR.

.ilex Linczer, 'jj; George Ball, '2^; li'arner Bowers, '24;
Florence Albert, '24; Virginia Tucker, '2^.



Time. Th; wee'-; end atter the Cristobal High S;hool
Country Fair.

Place. .\ house party in Balboa.

"Now that we've finished dinner, let's all go
out on the front porch, turn on the Km, and
talk. Mary, you brought your chafing dish,
didn't you? .All right then, you bring it down and
I'll ask mother to get the things ready fjr us to
make some candy- Excuse me for a tew min-
utes, folks. Jimmie, you go up and bring down
the chafing dish for Mary."

"Hey, do you feel any better after eating all
that turkey 'n everything? I think that if I eat
any more I'll croak. Hey, you two up there, are
you ever coming down? Well, hurry then. Come
on out here and set the chafing dish on the table,
Jimmie. Alice, you're going to make the candy,
aren't you? You're so good at it!"

"Oh! say, that's great! Mother's bringing the
things in. Someone start a story or something
now. Oh! I know! You folks that were at the
Cristobal High School Country Fair the other
night take turns at telling what you did and saw.
We'll go right around the circle. Jimmie, you
were there, weren't you?"

"Yes, I was there, and certainly had a good
time. I saw so much that I don't think I can tell
you all that I did see. The things that I remember
most are the edible things since that is what I'm
usually most interested in. If you're very care-
ful, Alice, your fudge may turn out to be almost
as good as some of the candy Ida Brown was sell-
ing at the country fair. Ow! I'll be good. 's a
fact though folks; their candy was certainly good
and from the amount they had I'll say all their
friends must have been making it for them!
There were all kinds and they went faster than
hot cakes.

"Speaking of hot things, did you get any of
those hot dogs from Leo Eberenz? I spent most
of my time and money at that counter until they
were all gone the hot dogs were I mean. I sup-
pose I ate most of them good fat, hot frankfur-
ters, coated with mustard and folded in a roll.
Boy! they were good.



"The voting contest was right across the hall
from that, so I managed to get in there two or
three times. They were voting for a high school
girl to ride on their float in the carnival in Colon.
Helen Jukes and Virginia Tucker left the other
candidates behind early in the evening and then you
should have seen the money fly! I ached when I
thought what a lot of good it would have done if
only it could have been invested at the hot dog
counter. Why the voters would just plunk down
one bill after another fives, tens, and even a
twenty. Finally though, the chap that was sup-
porting Helen Jukes won out. He must be a
winner any way for they say he has already won
his candidate. Isn't the candy done?

"Well, then I went downstairs and the first door
I came to advertised the Siamese Twins. I went
in with the crowd and they or should I say she?
gave us a dance, antl a song with a ukulele accom-
paniment. Somehow the golden hair of this at-
traction reminded me of Marjorie Ball and Ruth
Duey. Say, I'm done, somebody else can tell the
rest. I'm going to keep my eye on that candy.
Tony, your tongue needs exercise."

".All right! It's hard though to tell it as it
seemed. I had just paid my admission, bought
my quarter's worth of tickets from Mr. Ball, and
was rushing down the hall to find a place to go
when Emilio Solomon, disguised as a ferocious
sleuth, nabbed me and took me to the kangaroo
court where Mr. Aanstoos, the judge, fined me
fiftv cents for speeding. I hung around a while
and watched the victims coming in. Mr. Linczer
seemed to be captain of the police force for he
ably supervised Emilio. Justice surely is not blind
for they saw many crimes that I didn't.

".After escaping the court, I went upstairs, and
the sign, 'Grinless Gladys,' met my eye. I finally
gained admittance to this show and, upon paying
my nickel ticket, was told that I might have it
back with five others if I could make her smile.
After cracking some wise jokes that would have
made the sphinx laugh, I subsided. She hadn't
laughed, but I caught a masculine twinkle in
that blue eve.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.



"Just as I was leaving 'Grinless Gladys' I well and made a big hit with the crowd. Right
think it should have been 'Giggleless George' I after them came the boys' glee club and judging
heard a clarion voice announcing that the n;xt by their encores I'd say that they and Miss Cur-
program was ready in the assembly room. Some- rier were fully appreciated. After that came the

where I heard a whisper, 'Hula Hu .' That movie, 'Stage-struck Floradora.' With Leroy

was sufficient. I iostled and pushed through the Magnuson as the irate papa, Louise Henteras the

crowd and finally managed to get standing space fond mamma. Buster Fields as the irrepressible

in the back of the room. All at once Alex Linczer young brother, and Ernst Euphrat as a movie

stepped from behind the curtains which had been manager, Helen Jukes in the title role had backing
stretched across the front
rf the room and announced



that Morris Luce, a fifth
grade child, would play a
selection on the piano. That
boy will be a second Pader-
ewski or Beethoven some
day if he keeps on.

"I turned to say some-
thing to my neighbor about
how well the boy had done,
and when I turned to the
front again, lo and behold!
The curtains had been
drawn aside to show a
scene in Hawaii. The act
was called, L' n d e r
neath Hawaiian Skies.'
There sure was some Hula-
hulaing and singing. Vir-
ginia Tucker, Edna Camp-
bell, Juline Granger, Mattie
Pullig, and Charlotte Hous-
el were the Hula girls while
Gerald Bliss, Henry Moore,
and .'\lex Linczer were t!ie
Hula men.

These, with Emogene
and Jordan Zimmermann
as tourists, brought down
the house. Next some of




enough for any star. We
thought Velvia Elizabeth
Miller's pretty glowworm
dance was to be the last
number but there were some
jolly Scotch codgers there
from some boat and they
insisted on Edna Camp-
bell's dancing the Highland
fling. She did it, and did it
well too, though I'll bet it
was the first time a High-
land fling was danced in a
Hula Hula costume.
What about the candy?
Ah! Almost cold! I'm
moving over nearer that
pan. Your turn next,
Jane."

".\s soon as I got through
that enormous crowd, jam-
med both inside and outside
the door, I went to the
5-and-io-cent store to get
a bottle of soda. Harold
Boyd also sold me a couple
of alligator eggs which I
didn't want. .After quench-
ing my thirst, I went up-
stairs where I saw Lloyd
Peterson and Hubert Lee
dispensing ice cream as fast



MIBS HELEN JCKES QVEEN OF THE CARNIVAL.

Beauty may be only skin deep, but here's siay-threc inches of
Miss Faulkner's pupils sang regal beauty fit for a sculptors masterpiece.

some two-part songs and say! They were good! as they could dig it out. I bought a whoppmg big

"Next thing we knew, Alex serenely announced ice cream cone for ten cents. Wandering away

that this program was over and the njxt wjuld from that booth with my ice cream cone in one

begin in a few minutes with an entire change. I hand and the alligator's eggs in the other, I stood

waited (at a charge of fifteen cents) until it in the middle of the hall, undecided as to where I

start3d again. The first number this time was should go. Give me a piece of that candy.

some music by the high school orchestra under Needn't think you're going to get away with it

the direction of Miss Currier. It was announced all. Let's see, where was I? Oh, yes, I re-

that this was their first public appearance but I member I was in the middle of the hall well, as

could hardly believe that, for they certainly played I was standing there, somebody came running



THE CARIBBEAN.



47



down the hall, hiimiicd into nie, and ran f)n, ro[)k to be Norwegian, were placarded on the walls

leaving me counting the stars while the alligator advertising the wares of this booth or so I

eggs had gone one way and the cone another, guessed anyway. Emma Townsend and her

and 'they fell to earth, I knew not where.' helpers, Inza Markham, Gladys Ford, Olga IJnc-

"Being rather dazeii by the blow, I looked zer, .^nna Colberg, Eouise Henter, and Hyacinth

around and saw an open door; so I tiecided to go Eden, were kept busy serving coffee and cake to

in there and recuperate. I stepped inside and the crowd in their room. I weni: into a few more

found myself in the Japanese tea room of which places but Em tired and Ell let somebody else

I had heard so much. The roon was lit b>- Jap- t;ll about thir,;. Besides, I want some more of



anese lanterns and look-
ed so dim and restful. I
decided to stay a while;
and so ordered a cup ot
tea and sat down on one
of the numerous cush-
ions. Tea and crackers
were served here by
dainty maidens clad in
the manner of Japanese
geisha girls. I met some
of my friends in this
booth, tor Irene Mc-
Court was in charge cf
it and, as helpers, she
had Eunice M e n d e s
Betty Fitz-William, and
Olga .Arcia. Tilda How-
ard presided over the tea-
pot and gave out the tea
to the willing servitors.
Now, look here, I get
about one piece of that
candy a month, do you
expect me to tell my ex-
periences at the country
fair on that little bit:
Give me a couple of
pieces. U m m.
That's good. Ell give
you credit, .Alice, you
sure can make good
candy.

"I left the tea room and as I started down the
hall again I met Mary who enticed me into the
Scandinavian booth. We sat down at one of the
tables and looked about while we were waiting
for our coffee. Even in this warm country to go
into that booth made one chilly. There were ever-
green trees and mountains painted on the wall;




THE CARNIVAL QCEEN AND HER ATTRACTH'E COURT,

Solomon, in all his glory, was not arrayed as one of these. Left
to right: Misses Mildred Stiles, Betty FitzWiUiam, Helen Jukes,
(Queen I, Ol^a Linczer. Ruth Duey.



that good candy."

"There's the dish, help
yourself. What about
\()u, Harrv?"

"Well, did any of you
see the Labyrinth.' .After
I saw Napoleon's teeth,
some congealed blood,
and somebody-or-other's
liver, I made my get-
away. I didn't know
that Mattie and Ethel
could be so bloodthirsty.
They made quite a bit
ot money at it anyway.
"I heard everybody
talking about the fortune
teller, so I hunted her up.
She ti o m i n a t e d one
corner ot the Japanese
tea room. The first
thing she told me was
that I didn't have my
Spanish assignment for
the next day. Miss
Barn house is a good for-
tune teller, but she is
painfully frank.

"Say! Tish .Anna, the
' Tight Rope Walker, was
a scream! Buster Bur-
good should go on the
stage as a female imper-
sonator. Even his friends tailed to recognize him.
I was one ot the many who watched this per-
former nimbly walk a rope stretched tightly
across the floor.

"I saw Wesley, one of the digniiied Seniors, red
in the face from much vocal exertion, standing in



tront ot the nigger baby booth, so I went in there
snow was also there. Mysterious words, which I to try my skill. Wesley's booth was very popu-



4



THE CARIBBEAN.



lar with the men. I managed to win enough
caniy to satisfy my wants. Oh, that reminds
me, is our candy all gone?"

"Good night, I never saw such a hungry bunch.
Go slow on that candy. I haven't had any yet.
Mary, what did you do?"

"What about Matchless Medusa? Did you
see her? Well, that was clever. If you wait a
minute I'll tell you what she was like. She was
.Andy Smith! He had a couple of sheets over an
umbrella and, surmounting it, a false face sur-
rounded by a sun bonnet. According to the manip-
ulation of the umbrella, she would be real tat
one minute, and as thin as a toothpick the next.

"The three-ring circus was funny. You had to
climb under tables and overchairs, and walk rails
and then the three-ring circus was three dough-
nuts hanging on the wall. To hear the manager.



Girdon Rudd, rave about it though, you'd think
that you v/ere sure to see nothing less than Bar-
num and Bailey's at the end of the trip.

"Eddie Solomon had some apparatus for testing
strength and ability to blow hard. I guess he
didn't find anyone to beat him at either one though.
I'd sure hate to have that boy hit me."

"There was another strong man too that per-
fectly huge little Christian Wirtz."

"Aw get out! Christian Works. Who ever
heard of anyone named Christian Works?"

"I didn't say

"Cut it out, you folks, just look what time it
is. Almost one o'clock and we have to get up at
six o'clock in the morning and go for a swim. The
last one up gets thrown in the pool, bed and all.
Goodnight everybody."



ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS.

Ida Brown, '22.



In his own opinion Henry was the best swim-
mer, the most graceful runner, and the bravest
boy in school. He had boasted many times about

the night his
lather's barn
hadcaugiit fire,
and but for him
the horses
would have
burned to
death. He had
told many thril-
ling stories
about his ad-
ventures and experiences in the jungles with wild
and ferocious animals.

One day the Senior Class went on a picnic.
.-\fter lunch Helen, one of the cleverest girls of




PINEAPPLE PLANT.

He who has never tasted a Panama pineapple
knows not the taste of this luscioui fruit.



the class, said that she would like to walk through
the woods and wanted to know who would go
with her. Henry volunteered, saying he was fond
of walking also. They were strolling along when
suddenly Helen let out one loud cry.

"Oh! Henry, lo-look at the b-bear!"

Henry took one look and then ran for all he was
worth. He reached the picnic grounds panting
and out of breath and, when asked where Helen
was, he said, "Oh, I was racing with her. She'll
be coming soon."

A few minutes later Helen returned. Going
straight over to Henry she said, "Oh! Henry, it
is too bad you ran so fast because on taking a
second look I found it to be only a-a cow!"

Of course many questions, exclamations, and
shouts arose from the crowd but Henry, tor once,
was silent.



A TELEPHONE.



George Cartwright, '22.



A mouthpiece, covered wires, receiver, bell,
.And batteries how simple, yet how great
A world-wide instrument in little weight
The work of Alexander Graham Bell,
Whose genius the world will ever tell.
With far-stretched wires, it carries unseen freight,
And to the world doth constantly relate
News of import to great, and small as well.



And thus the telephone, of world renown,
Stands on my desk and, if its summons come
I answer, knowing not if foe or friend
May call from near-by home or far-otf town,
Or if it brings me sorrow great, or some
Good news. Its urgeful call I must attend.



THE CARIBBEAN.



49




After much scurrying about tor dress suits,
boiled shirts, evening dresses, tailored suits, win-
ter coats, etc., and after much sawing, hammer-
ing, painting of scenery, borrowing of Persian
rugs, gay silk pillows, and shaded lamps, in the
efFort to convert a dingy stage into a luxurious
suburban home. Booth Tarkington's four-act
comedy, "Clarence," is produced at the ."^mer-
ica Theatre on May 26 by the Cristobal High
School Seniors under the able supervision of
Miss Dodds.

LeRoy Magnuson is excellent in the role of
Clarence, the young entomologist, who, after his
discharge from the Army, seeks employment in
New York, and, because of his ability to drive
mules without swearing, is given a position as a
sort of high class hanciy man in the Wheeler
home. He repairs the hot water system, he tunes
the piano with the chauffeur's tools, and he
tutors Bobby in math., at which he is a "wiz."
He is approached for advice on the straightening
out of domestic tangles, because he has been in
the .Army and all that," and he performs acrobat-
ics on the saxophone, which proves most success-
ful in restoring harmony, when a domestic crash
seems imminent. We are intensely interested in
him from the minute he enters Mr. Wheeler's
office, a sallow soldier, who sags to one side be-
cause of his liver, until, with his reappointment
as chief entomologist in the Sturtevant Biological
Laboratories, he triumphantly departs with \'iolet,
his bride-to-be, leaving peace and contentment
in the hearts of all but little Cora, who "hates
engaged men."

Marjorie Ball as the youthful and attractive
governess, Violet Pinney, who is employed to look
after Cora Wheeler, is especially charming in
this role, and, in her difficult position in the
Wheeler household, arouses our sympathy.

The part of Mrs. Wheeler, the superficial, inef-
ficient stepmother, jealous of the governess and
suspicious of the necessary conferences held with
Mr. Wheeler to discuss the children's welfare, is
ably portrayed by Mary Fields.

MR 81010 4



Too much can not be said of the admirable act-
ing of Paul Doyle as Bobby Wheeler, the budding
adolescent fired from his third school for "rolling
the bones." Paul is so typical that we all recog-
nize some Bobby Wheeler, who has just waked up
to the fact that he ought to wash his neck and not
"go around looking like a scarecrow" any more.
His anxiety over having kissed Delia, the house-
maid, in the presence of "her young man," is so
real that we feel with him a sense of relief when
he hears her call Clarence "an angel" and realize
that after using "endearmalents" on another man,
she can't "dogmatize" him any more. He is so
earnest in his love for Violet, which "brings out
all the most spirichul things" in him, that we are

reallv moved by his last little tribute, "\'i'let

I'll go help carry out your baggage."

Not unlike the original Cora, Helen Hayes, in
personal ap-
pearance, Ida
Brown proves
an adorable
Cora. As the
sweet, self-
willed little
flapper, who
fights and
quarrels with
Bobby, who
meets with parental interference in her affair with
the grass widower, Hubert Stem, and who finally
adores Clarence, she charms us from the minute
she enters her father's office to be disciplined until
she sinks on the steps after Clarence's departure
with a pathetic "Oh! Clarence," for of course she
will never love again.

Emma Townsend shows much versatility as an
actress in the able way in which she portrays the
dignified Mrs. Martyn, Mr. Wheeler's confiden-
tial secretary, as well as the role of Delia, the Irish
housemaid, whose smile is so intriguing we can't
blame Bobby or anybody else for wanting to kiss
her.




AGE-HUARY CHTRCH AT TABOGA.

",\nd in the holy twilight the church belli echo dear."



so



THE CARIBBEAN.



Dinwiddie, the austere butler, who forgets his
dignity only once, and then because entranced by
the magic strains of Clarence's saxophone, is well
done by Jordan Zimmermann."

George Cartwright, as Mr. Wheeler, "head of a
big business and head of an unhappy rowing
family," is splendid. He shows remarkable his-
trionic ability in that he completely submerges
his own personality into that of the unfortunate
gentleman.

Wesley Townsend shows just how excellent an
actor he is by his praiseworthy portrayal of the
odious'Mr. Stem.



Despite the splendid work done by the Seniors
in the play, it would have been almost impossible
to produce it, had it not been for the hearty sup-
port given by the friends of the Cristobal High
School. The Seniors are especially indebted to
Mr. J. B. Fields, Mr. W. W. Johns, and Mr. Al
Hutchings for the artistic scenery; to the Colon
Electric Light Company for the loan of a hand-
some shade; and to the Bureau of Clubs and
Playgrounds for the loan ot furniture.



?=



-S




br.=



TABOGA.

Emma Townsend, '22.









A TA30GA BKACH SCENE.

Sparkling white sand. laved by dancing waters of
crystal transparency.




HILLS OP SALUBRIOUS TABOGA.

"A little bit of heaven dropped from out the sky one
day. and it nestled in the ocean in a clime far, far away.



Surrounded by deep cryst.il waters
An isle of pirates bold, relics, romances.
Sweet memories, and old Spanish dances-
Is Taboga.

Old paths, trodden by bare feet,
Shaded by tropical evergreens.
Wind lazily alo'g a fringe of beach

Washed clean by gentle lapping of the whispering waves,
At Taboga.

Rough trails climb determinedly
Up deep-Jungled mountains of historic fame;
Beds of odorous pineapple entice tired tourists;
Swaying palms hail weary wanderers;
I^w-dipping pel cans,
In quest of flying fish.
Startle listless boatmen,
At Taboga.

Roses pink, red, creamy,
Send out their fragrance, sweet and rare;



Tumble-down shacks full of children.

Line cobblesto le streets.

Men and wo.men,

Tired,

Slowly,

Work at their daily tasks

In Taboga.

At rh; vesper hour.

Men light fresh cigariilos.

Women don mantillas.

And all make their way to the age-old cathedral,

To bow in reverent worship.

Yon cross, on sloping hill telling of worthy life

Of some old faithful priest.

Touched by the sun, low sinking in the west.

Seems to pronounce its quiet benedi tion

On calm, peaceful,

Taboga.



THE CARIBBEAN.



51



SEASONS.

Jordan Zimmermann, '22.



New life is seen in Spring when snows melt

In New York.

Sweet perfume fills the air

As trees and flowers blossom into briHi.-int colors

In New York.

Lovers stray along quiet roads;

New vigor fills old bodies;

Baseball, tennis, and golf claim the active

In New York.

The beaches are gaily colored

By the holiday crowds

Of New York.

The Summer sun has driven many

To leave the city's heat.

Coney Island and Rockaway Beach

Draw their multitudes by their glitter.

The unfortunates who stay are stifled.

The paint on tenement houses blisters and peels.

The subway with its damp air

Ofl^ers a refuge from the withering heat

Of New York.



When Autumn comes, the farmers

Gather in their crops

In New York.

School children straggle to unwelcome tasks;

The trees have taken gorgeous hues.

The nights are turning cold.

.^11 the children are rejoicing.

The reason? Autumn means

That snow will soon be on the ground

In New York.

The holiday spirit is in the air

In New York.

Throngs gather in the cities

To obtain remembrances for friends.

Children dance before the windows

At the miracles unfolded before them

In New York.

And as the eventful day dawns

A great peace settles

Over New York.



HAITI.

Mary Fields, '22.



The hot sun shines over the filthy streets

In Haiti.

Naked and gibbering negroes

Sail in tiny boats

Around the ships at anchor,

Yelling to the passengers

To throw them money.

Their shiny, bronze bodies glisten in the sun

As they dive into the water

To retrieve the coins flung down to them.

In the open market,

With its sickening smells,

Ugly and wrinkled old women

Squat 'neath awnings of burlap

Their fruit and food

Lying on the ground beside them,

Swarming with flies.

Women

In red and yellow dresses,

Wearing large hats,

Their shoes seeming to dangle on their toes,

Ride on small donkeys

To market.

Other women

Sit in the streets

Sorting coffee.

Their feet in the midst ot it.

The stores
Display their goods

By hanging them on lines suspended o'er the sidewalks-
Baskets, gay calicoes, patchwork dresses,
And more baskets.



A noisy clatter!

A queer contraption passes.

What a street car!

It bumps slowly along the street.

The old cathedral,

Quaint and fascinating.

Overlooks the throngs in the market place.

Inside, still and peaceful.

Several people kneel in prayer.

The President's palace

Of white, blinding concrete

Stands alone.

Surrounded by barren grounds.

High up on the hill

The Mountain House

Is encircled by large and shady trees

Through whose boughs blow cool and restful breezes.

Sweet strains of music issue forth;

How restful,

Compared to the glaring streets and docks!

The sun goes down;

The sky alight with crimson and gold

Glorifies the peaceful harbor.

Cool breezes blow,

Everything is quiet,

Haiti is at rest.



S'i



THE CARIBBEAN.




JQ

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THE CARIBBEAN.



51




Last year Cristobal High School was neglected
as far as music was concerned, but this year we
have made up for that fallow period by a goodly
increase in enthusiasm and ability under the
gentle husbandry of Miss Helen Currier, our di-
rectress.

Miss Currier came to the Zone from Minnesota,
and either the climate or her nature is evidently
productive of energy for we understand that she
even asked to have high school work this year.
She is so much of a lady, so appreciative of our
few good points, and so kindly blind to our bad
ones that we are glad to have had the opportunity
of working with her.

Only about a dozen ot the students in the high
school have not been enrolled in the chorus and
of those enrolled only one (aside from those who
have left school)^ has dropped out. The last of
the year has been devoted to work on a cantata
"The Legend of Nacoochee."

The Girls' Glee Club had a goodly enrollment
considering the fact that practice came when
many of the high school girls were in class. They
have never appeared in public but have laid the
foundation for better chorus work this year and a
splendid Girls' Glee Club next year.

The Boys' Glee Club sangonly once in public
at the country fair. But thev did have some jolly



practices, all too short, and did some very good
work.

Emma Townsend's remarkable piano playing
was fully appreciated and helped to make Miss
Currier's work easier.

This year, for the second time in the history of
our school, an orchestra was organized, .^fter
no end of trouble, some of the less bashful of the
students were persuaded to bring their instru-
ments, and under the able leadership of Miss
Currier, they launched on their musical career.
They made their first public appearance at the
country fair.

The personnel of the orchestra is as follows:



James Brustmeyer, 7th grade.
Virginia Coy, 8th grade.
Morris Marchosliy, 9th grade.
Mildred Oliver, Sth grade.
Grace Dowell, 7th grade.

CORNtT.

Richard Hall, loth grade.

MANDOLIN.

Warner Bowers, loth grade.

PIA.VO.

Mildred Stiles, 9th grade.



EYES.

Jordan Zimmermann, '22.

Of many hues are eyes, some blue, some gray,
Some brown, some green; in many there is shown
k smiling joy; in some, a clear soft tone.
In some few eyes, a light of breaking day
Clears up all storms and puts a smiling ray
Upon each tace; of such as these 'tis known
That history has been made. When taps is blown
These same kind eyes have filled and not been gay.
.Ml these and many more I want to meet.
I like to look into an eye so clear
That character is imaged there. The quest
Goes on; each man seeks for the one to greet
Some day the thought of which is always near.
Please answer this, Which do you think the best?



54



THE CARIBBEAN.





I




ATHLETICS




I




George Cartwright, 22.



FOREWORD.



Things have taken place this year in the athletics
of Cristobal High School that have never been
tried before. Athletics have been backed and
boosted to the sky. An athletic association has
been formed with president, secretary, and a
council composed of one member from each class.
The benefits of such an organization have already
been shown, and it will be safe to say, I believe,
that in the future, the athletics of Cristobal High
School will rival those of any high school in exist- Zimmermann, C,
ence. The organization is striving to broaden lownsend, O.
class competition, make athletic schedules, give
honor letters for athletic work, and promote in-
terest in athletics. We hope that the students
of coming years will regard this organization as Rudd, F.
a necessity for proper athletic work, and will strive Parker, F.
to improve upon the foundation made by the Ashton, C. (Cipt.)

, c Hall.G.

students of 1922. Peterson, G.



up with the others. But we must take our hats
off to our brother Sophs, who showed their pep,
class spiri t, and sportsmanship, and finally managed
to beat the Juniors one game. The Seniors, after
many a hard fought, hair-raising game, came
through with the high honors of 1000 per cent.
The competing teams and their line ups were:



Doyle, F. (Capt.)
Cartwright, F.



Magnuson, G.



SOrHOMORES.



JUNIORS.

May, F.

Bliss, F. (Capt.)
Linczer, F.
Solomon, C.
Moore, G.
Eberenz, G.

FRESHMEN.

Burgoon, F.
Solomon, F. (Capt.)
Walsh, C.
Cousins, G.
Pulgar, G.



BASKET BALL.

Basket ball has always topped the "Athletic
.'\ctivities" ladder of Cristobal High School, and
this year it has successfully climbed higher by two
steps, one in the form of "Inter-class Series," the
other, "All Star Series."

Shortly after school opened, an inter-class
series was arranged, which proved to be very
exciting and well worth the efforts of our coach,
Mr. Hughes. Class spirit, friendly rivalry, and a
good sportsmanlike spirit were aroused. The
teams were evenly matched, except for the Sopho-
mores, who for lack of boys found it hard to keep



RESULTS OF INTER-CLASS SERIES.



Team.



Seniors

Juniors

Freshmen.
Sophmores



Played.
6
6
6
6



Won.
6
4



Lost,
o

4

5



Per cent.
1. 000
.666

333
.166



Nothing more was done in the line of basket ball
until some untlerclassman happened to realize that
the Seniors claimed the championship, and, hoping
to dethrone them, spread his sentiment, and it
was not long before a series of three games was
arranged between the All Stars of the school and
the Seniors. But their efforts were in vain for the



THE CARIBBEAN.



55.



Seniors had just as strongly resolved to keep their suffered defeat to the tune of 21 to 16. This left
throne and at the same time gain higher honors,
anil so only 2 of the 3 games were played, for the
Seniors proved superior and took, both games.



ALL STARS, 4 9.

Walsh, G.
Eberenz, G.
Solomon, C.
Bliss, F.
Moore, F.



SENIORS, 20 23.

Doyle, F.
Cartwright, F.
Zimmermann, C.
Townsend, G.
Magnuson, G.

A terrible mishap took
place in the second gamt
of this series when Mag-
nuson, one of the Seniors'
star guards, caged the
first basket of his basket-
ball career. The All Stars
were so stupefied over
this feat that the excel-
lent guarding ot Solomon
had little effect.

Instead of playing the
third game of this series,
the Seniors challenged
the Lincoln Five, and
from them suffered their
first ani only defeat of
the year. The game was
fast and well played, but
there were a number of
fouls on each side, which , ., , ,v ,i m ,.

LeRoy Maiinuson: center row: Alei Linczer (cheer leader). Leo Lherenz. (-jeorge , ,.

marred the fast, snappy CartwrlKht. Robert p. Hushes (coach); bottom row: Gerala BIIss. Paul Doyle year, DUt When tneyuld
' (captain). Wesley Townsend. r^ ^ L 1 U' u c u I

Cristobal High School




the series standing with i game apiece, as it still
stands, for, through no fault of ours, the deciding
game has never been played.

Another game played by our team was that of
C. H. S. vs. Co. F. of Fort Davis, in which the high
school managed to exhibit their usual speed and
good pass work and to defeat their opponents by
the score of 14 to 13. The last game of the year
was that with the sailors of the U. S. cruiser Denver,
and alth'jugh our team looked like pigmies up

against these heavy-set,
broad-shouldered giants,
they proved that size is
not everything in life, for
they played one of the
fastest games of the year
and came out once more
with laurels, with the
score of 21 to 16.

Cr.ISTOBAI. HIGH SCHOOL
TiAM.

Doyle, F. Ziinmermann, C.
Solomon, F. Bliss, G.
Cartwright. M.agnuson, G.
Moore, G. Eberenz, G.
Townsend, G.Walsh, G.



CRISTOBAL HIGH COSSET BALL TE.VS1.

"S-O-S. s-o-s,

Ball)Oa's in
"An awful mess."
Toprow Julius Solomon. Charles Walsh, Jordan Zimmermann. Henry Moore, not Start Until late in the



TENNIS.

Tennis activities did



pass work of each team.



SENIORS 18.



P. Doyl;, F.
Cariwri^ht, F.
Zimmermann, C.
Townsend, G.
Magnuson, G.



LINCOLN FIVE, IJ.

Raymond, G.
Eberenz, G.
Greening, C.
.\. Doyle, F.
Bliss, F.



found that they had some coming champions.
The season opened Thursday, December i, when
the Juniors challenged and defeated the faculty
by the scores of (6-2) (6-0) (5-7).



On Saturday, February 18, the Balboa High
School came over and played the first game of the
annual high school series. There were 10 heads
held high when the first whistle blew, but when the



JUNIORS.

.'\lex Linczer.
Gerald Bliss.



FACULTY.

Miss Beeching.
Mr. Bacon.



Nothing more was done until April when Balboa
accepted our challenge and came over to experience
the ability of our champs. Cristobal High School



last was blown the 5 belonging to Balboa began took the doubles by the scores of (6^) (6-0).

to droop, for Cristobal had inflicted a defeat upon There was only one round of doubles played, the

them, by the tight score of 23 to 22. contestants being:

On the following Saturday, we returned the cristobal high school. balboa high school.

compliment and journeyed to the silver side to play \ i.inczer. M. Banton.

Balboa, the second game of the series. Here we G. Bliss. W. Sergeant.



56



THE CARIBBEAN.



Balboa managed to capture i round of singles,
when Sergeant defeated Doyle, by the score of
(6-3) (4-6) (7-5). However, this was theii' only
victory of the day. Bliss of Cristobal High School
defeated M. Banton ot Balboa High School by the
score of (6-0) (6-1). Linczer of Cristobal defeated
McBride of Balboa by the score of (5-7) (6-2)
(7-5), and to complet; this triumphant day, Rudd
of Cristobal defeated W. Banton bv the score of
(6-3) (6-2).

Soon after these matches, the Juniors stepped
into limelight and issued challenges to all the other
classes. Every class accepted and in turn suffered
defeat at the hands of Bliss and Linczer, the
Junior victors. They first tackled the innocent
Freshmen and defeated them by the score of
(6-0) (6-0). Then came the Sophs and they like-
wise were defeated by the score of (6-2) (6-2)
(6-3) and last the Seniors were taken to the field
and defeated by the score of (6-2) (6-1). Next
they thought they might as well make a clean job



in making a firm foundation for the other branches.
We shall leave this opportunity to coming years.
Good luck to you!

SWIMMING.

On .April 2, an inter-class swimming meet was
held, and here's where the high school took off
their hats to the Freshies. The score was well
nigh tied for the first three events, but after this
the Freshies took the lead for the remainder of the
meet, and won, with the Sophs second, the Seniors
third, and the Juniors fourth.

INTER-CLASS SWIMMING MEET.

(Boys.)
60-yard Dash.

1 Paul Doyle (Class '22).

2 .^lan Wallace (Class '25).
J Jack Coffey (Class '25).

QO-yard Dash.

1 Paul Doyle (Class '22).

2 Jack Coffey (Class '25).

3 Alan Wallace (Class '25).




of it while they were at it and played the All-Stars
of the school, but they were no better than the
other common herd and were defeated by the
scores of (6-1) (6-1).



COMPETING TEAMS.



HOTEL WASHINGTON SWIMMING POOL.

Daily, here gather Cristobal school pupils high, grammar, and grade for a plunge or brush in the cooling and buoyant salt water. Fancy dives and
every known stroke are taught by competent physical directors. All children, boys and girls, swim, and many are highly proficient.

340-yard Relay.

Won by Freshmen.

Team Fields, Fisher, Wallace, and Coffev

Plunge.

1 Jack Coffey (Class '25).

2 Paul Doyle (Class '22).
J Gerald Bliss (Class '23).

Fancy Diving.

1 Gerald Bliss (Class '23).

2 Paul Doyle (Class '22).
J Wesley Townsend (Class '22).

POINTS SCORED.

Freshmen 34

Sophomores 24

Seniors 17

Juniors 6



Seniors

Juniors
Sophomores
Freshmen
All-Stars



Doyle and Magnuson

.Linczer and Bliss

Rudd and Parker

Fisher and Fields

Dovie and Rudd



TRACK.

The great opportunity of developing this branch
of athletics has slipped by this year because of no
reason except that most of our time has been spent



THE CARIBBEAN.



57




\{uri//"i'iA.]K.



fboy's H^lay Team



58



THE CARIBBEAN.



Although many of our students have participated
and won many events in outside meets, we have
not had the chance this year to show our ability
as a high school team, with other teams on the
Zone. Although we have issued challenges to
Balboa High School boys, and the Naval Air
Station, they have not as yet been accepted, and
as there is no pleasure in beating ourselves, further
progress in swimming activities was abandoned.

Alan Wallace, another freshie, earned third
place in the 50-yard back stroke race for seniors.
In this race he competed against champions. He
holds the junior championship record of the
Isthmus for 60 yards, time, 37 seconds. He has
passed bevond the age of a junior and retires

from that class unde-
feated. He was a
member of the A. S.
W. S. C. relay team
who on this day de-
feated the champion
Canal Zone Athletic
Association team.
Alan is also a strong
link in the C. H. S.
relay team. He is
on the A. S. W. S. C,
and C. H. S. water
polo team.

Frank Fields is the fastest swimmer (any
stroke), and has the prettiest form of any boy on
the Isthmus under 14 years. We are proud to
have him in our school. He is a member of the
winning junior relay team of the A. S. W. S. C.
Gerald Bliss will benefit this school next year
with his good form in fancy diving.

Paul Doyle, one of our Seniors, and all around
athlete, holds the Isthmian championship in
fancy diving, and held first place in the Memorial
Day meet. He is a member of the A. S. W. S. C.
relay, medley relay (side stroke), and water polo
team, and captain of the C. H. S. swimming
team which claims some of the best swimmers in
Panama. The school boasts a fast water polo
and relay team.

James Burgoon has shown some hidden swim-
ming talent, but we discovered it and we will
watch for some junior records to be broken.

On Memorial Day the Atlantic Side Water
Sports Club, which numbers many of our high
school students as members, journeyed to Balboa




Colon Beach products of the one
health-giving pastime possible every
day in our Isthmian year.



and the boys and girls from old Cristobal won
the 50-yard dash for boys under 15, the special
boys' relay and the fancy diving contest, while a
grammar school girl, Miss Adelaide Lambert,
won the 50-yard ladies' championship and the
ladies' back stroke races.




1-\N1Y IiIVIM:

Practically every known dive is excellently executed by
graceful and accomplished divers, Cristobal Hit^h holding Isth-
mian championship honors in this spectacular branch of
water sports.

John Cofl^ey, a freshie, won the 50-yard free-
style race for juniors. John is the fastest swim-
mer on the Isthmus under 16 years. His pret-
ty form in the crawl stroke displays the ease
with which he swims. We look to see Coffey a
world's champion some day. John is anchor man
on the Junior relay team that has never been de-
feated in its long list of races. He is the fast lead-
off man for the C. H. S. relay team. Coffey is
also a fast forward on the water polo team.

BASEBALL.

Baseball has not been as prominent a sport this
year as might have been expected, other activi-
ties crowding it out, but we did put a team in the




A Ql'IET SECTION OF THE POOL.

The water depth at this point varies from 8 inches to 3 feet on a
gentle slope. Here groups of tots joyously mingle only to desert for the
deeper parts of the pool, able to swim after a few lessons.

field with Jordan Zimmermann as captain, win-
ning 3 of the 5 games played.

The first game of the season was played against
our Isthmian rivals, B. H. S., on the Mount Hope
diamond, with short notice, during our basket-ball
series. Zim's arm was working well in the game
but, due to lack of practice, many unpardonable
errors were made by teammates. However, we



THE CARIBBEAN.



59



managed to keep the score within i run of the
Balboa Hiaih boss. The score endeel H. H. S., 4;
C. H. S., 3.

Captain Zimniermann took his team out for
practice and, after a week of it, journeyed 47
miles across the Isthmus to the stadium at Balboa
(within sight of the Halboa High School) and took
his place on the mound determined to wipe out
the last defeat which was given to his nine by

B. H. S. The B. H. S. boys seemed to lose all
their pep in their practice before the game, while

C. H. S. boys showed unusual liveliness at all times.
Zim, our southpaw pitcher, deserves all kinds of
credit for his steady pitching, as does his support.
The game ended C. H. S., 8; B. H. S., 5. The
series stood tie and the last game was never played
due to the fact that some of Balboa's best men
left their line-up.

On Saturday, February 11, we met defeat at
the hands of an Army team on the Mount Hope
tiiamond. Both teams played good ball, but the
soldiers proved to be the heavier hitters and, al-



though a couple of double plays were made by
us, our opponents took home the big end of the
score, 4-2.

On Saturday, February 25, Manager Reach of
the American Legion came forth with a strong
nine eager for a victory, but left the field a sadly
disappointed man, as we won, 2~i.

During the week we crossed bats with the sol-
diers from Fort De Lesseps, and, with Doyle
pitching, we administered a defeat to them. Dur-
ing this game Magnuson drove in two runs with
his 3-bagger to left field.

Many of our players were attached to local
teams during the season, and all appeared to
rank high in baseball skill.

LINE-UP.

J. Zimmermann, pitcher (capt.) Eberenz, 3d base.

G. Bliss, catcher. Mendez, right field.

J. Solomon, 1st base. Walsh, center field.

Moore, 2d base. Townsend, left field.

Magnuson, 2d base. Alex Linczer, left field.

E. Solomon, 2d base. Girden Rudd, left fi^ld.
P. Doyle, shortstop.




k 90-YARD DASH.

Close and exciting position of all contestants at the 40-yard mark.
The 90-yard was covered in 54 seconds.




THE UILE-A-MI.NLTE SLIDE.

Popular with young and old, not to mention bathing suit manufacturers.



GIRLS' ATHLETICS.

Louise Henter, '2j.



FOREWORD.



Girls' activities have been badly crippled this
year, and it has only been by very faithful work
and a loyal spirit on the part of a few girls that
anything at all has been done. It is hoped that
next year, with a more favorable beginning, the
girls will at once undertake to start their athletic
work, and to carry it throughout the whole year
with true Cristobal High School spirit.

Until late in the year there was no regular
directress for Cristobal girls' work. For the first
8 weeks Mrs. Baxter coached the girls in swim-
ming. Later Miss Floyd, physical directress at
the Y. W. C. A., took the girls for gymnastics



and basketball. At last, however, in February, a
regular physical training directress. Miss Lindsay,
arrived and began work in earnest. The work of
the Gatun girls was superintended by Mr. Baker,
physical director at Gatun.

In order to overcome some of the difficulties
concerning athletics there was formed, on October
26, 1921, an athletic association with Louise
Henter as president and Gladys Lowande, secretary.
At this time a schedule of activities totaling
90 points for one-half credit was submitted by the
Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds. Seven Gatun
girls and 12 Cristobal girls began work for this
credit. It was decided to organize class basket-
ball teams but, as there were not enough girls in



6o



THE CARIBBEAN.



either the Junior or Senior class to make a team,
these two classes were combined. Afterwards the
different classes met and elected captains.

Freshmen Ruth Duey

Sophomores Loretta Rush

(later filled by Charlotte Housel)
Senior-Junior Emma Townsend

BASKET BALL.

The first and last inter-class game was played in
February at the Y. W. C. A., Miss Floyd acting
as referee. Owing to the absence of one of the
girls on whom the Sophomores were depending,
a Freshman was chosen to play in her stead.
The Freshmen presumably hold the champion-
ship, for they won this one and only game, and
neither of the other two class teams has tried to
dispute the title.

Loretta Rush, our star athlete, left for the
States on April 7, 1922. Before moving to Cris-
tobal she was one of the best players on the Gatun
basket ball team. Since then, her time had been
taken up with swimming, in which she has been
very successful. Before leaving, however, she
wished to try her hand at basket ball again; so
2 games were played in her honor. In the first,
a rollicking rough-and-tumble, at Gatun on April
I, Gatun was victorious with a score of 1 1 to i
and in the second, on .'Vpril 6, at the Army and
Navy Y at Cristobal, Gatun was again victorious
with the score 17 to 4.

On April 17, the Gatun girls' basket-ball team
played their "Daddies." The game was scheduled
to begin at 7 o'clock but the expectant crowd was
kept waiting for almost three-quarters of an hour.
Finally the "Daddies" made a triumphant entry,
each one being introduced to the spectators. One
glance at their industrious jaws sufficed to answer
the question as to the why the Y had run out of
gum that night. Many of the men berated them-
selves on not having noticed bsfore how striking
an appearance a lace ruffle can give a pair of khaki
trousers and what an effective basket-ball uniform
may be created wi th cretonne bloomers and short full
skirt. After the uproar had somewhat died down,
the referee finally pried the whistle to his mouth,
through the long white hair that flowed in un-
natural waves from under a boudoir cap, and the
game began. Credit should certainly be given to
the forwards of the "Daddies" team for their



ability to climb ladders. The score was finally
conceded to be i i-io in favor of the girls.

Homer Baker, physical director at Gatun, is
planning to take a team of girls to the States. To
obtain money for this, a series of basket-ball games
between the Atlantic and Pacific sides has been
arranged. Cristobal and Gatun girls have com-
bined to make an Atlantic side team.



Date. H'here plawed. Score.

May 5 Gatun ii-j

May 6 Balboa i-o

May 12. Pedro Miguel o-o

May 13. Camp at Gatun 9-3

May 19. Fort Clayton 7-4

May 20., . Fort Davis 5-3

TENNIS.



IVinner.

Atlantic

Pacific

Tie

Pacific

Atlantic

Atlantic



Tennis hold an important place in sports this
year with practice every Wednesday at either the
New Cristobal playshed or Radio court. A
series of championship games between Balboa and
Cristobal High School was arranged. The first
was played on April 29. OlgaLinczer played Anita
Sergeant winning one love set and a second set
(6-3). Helen Abendroth lost to Marion Lockart
in a game which was a decided credit to Helen in
her good judgment in placing the ball. Edna
Campbell played Olena Hutching, Edna winning
one love set and a second set (7-6).

On May 6, a return set of doubles was played
at Balboa. Olga Linczer and Edna Campbell
represented Cristobal and lost to Dorothy Brooks
and Ellen Roberts (5-7) (8-10). Two more
games must be played.

HIKING.

A hike of 16 miles was required to gain four
points. For this reason 2 hikes were made, one
to Gatun, a distance of 9 miles and other to Mindi
Farm.

SWIMMING.

Swimming has always been important in our
school athletics and we are proud to be able to
say that many ofthe best swimmers on the Atlantic
side, and indeed on the Zone, are members of
Cristobal High School.



THE CARIBBEAN.



6i



The first meet ot the school year was held at
the Washington Pool on Thanksgiving Day, for
the Atlanti; side alone. For high school gi Is the
following places were made:

,^0-VARD DAiH.

I. Edn.i C.inipbell,
2 Loretta Rush.
3. Ruth Duey.

fiC-VARD DA.SH.

1. Lorett.i Rush.

2. Edna Campbell.
.^ Ruth Duey.

In the meet on
January 2, two third
places, in fancy diving
and the 60-yard dash
were made by Loretta
Rush.

thday Isthmian meet
ard, only a few points




OL'B CH.\MPIU.\ LADIES RELAY TEA.M.

Three high and one grammar school
girl make up this fast-swimming quar-
tette. de?i>ively lowering the colors of
Balboa's star swimmers. Miss .\delaide
Lambert (third in line), the grammar
school member, is the fastest girl swim-
mer on the Isthmus. The others, all
high, from left to right are the Misses
Loretta Rush, Gladys Lowande. and
Edna Campbell.

On the Washington's Bir
although the girls worked h
were made:



60-VARD DASH. GIRLS UNDER l6.

3. Loretta Rush.

6c- YARD DASH. LADIES.

2. Loretta Rush.

3. Edna Campbell.

The most exciting event was the relay won by
the Atlantic Side Water Sports Club. The swim-
mers were Loretta Rush, Edna Campbell, Gladys
Lowande, and .'Vdelaide Lambert.

For variety a swimming meet was held at
Gatun on March 7, in which Loretta Rush made
second place in the 50-yard dash special.

The Junior aquatic meet for the .Atlantic side



alone, held on Easter, was the most amusing meet
of the year. The management of this meet was
handed over almost entirely to the high school
members of the Water Sports Club and they cer-
tainly dui well.

On March 12, in an all-Isthmian meet the
Cristobal relay team won first place establishing
a pool record for ladies in the fast time of i
minute iS 35 seconds, and Loretta Rush made
third place in the 60-yard dash.

The inter-class meet, on .April 3, was one of the
most interesting and important events of the
school year. Only the Freshmen and Sophomore
classes were represented by girls in this meet.



60-VARD DASH.

1. Loretta Rush. (Sophomore.)

2. Edna Campbell. (Freshman.)

3. Ruth Duey. (Freshman.)

30-YARD DASH.

1. Loretta Rush. (Sophomore.)

2. Edna Campbell. (Freshman.)

3. Ruth Duey. (Freshinan.)



1. Loretta Rush. (Sophomore. I

2. Edna Campbell. (Freshman.)

3. Gladys Lowande. (Sophomore.)

120-VARD RELAY.

1. Sophomores. (Loretta Rush-Glady

2. Freshman. (Edna Campbell-Ruth

DIVING.

1. Ruth Duey. (Freshman.)

2. Loretta Rush. (Sophomore.)




WATER SPORTS,

Two grammar .school
medal winners. Billy
Coffey, fancy diver,
and .Miss .Adelaide
Lambert, holder of
Isthmus of Pa n a m a
women's championship
.30-,vard. 50-.vard. and
60-vard records, com-
ing world's champion
girl swimmer.



s Lowande.)
Duey.)



A MISHAP.

.Ilex Linczei 'jj.



A foolish frog, one sunny day,

While splashing around in a playful way,

Observed a man

With a red tin can.
And manners most suspicious,
'I think I know," remarked the frog,
'\\ safer place than on this log,

"For when a man
Comes with a can.
His object is malicious."



Thus tar the foolish frog was wise.
But, had he better used his eyes.

He would have seen,

Close by, a lean
Old 'gator his nose just showing.
Kersplash the 'gator took one bite.
The moral I need scarce recite:

Before you leap

Just take a peep,
.And see where you are going.



62



THE CARIBBEAN.




The,6oph^ Love 3dsK^-6b&.ff









1



9



Z



Training for the Maet ^-^^



c \



' >



3^TtK POLO KNlGHrg




THE CARIBBEAN.



f>3




The Exchange Department of The Caribbean
should be, and is, exceptionally interesting to the
student body of Cristobal High School.

The pupils of this school come from many dif-
ferent parts of the United States and are always
glad to find out what the schools from which they
came are doing. This year, however, our ex-
changes have not cooperated with us as we hoped
they would. We miss many of our old friends.



Henry Mnore, '2J.

The Mimr. Norivoori High School^ Norwood, Ohio.

We liked the story entitled, "The Quarterback."
Your poets add much interest with their clever lines.
The "Kick Department" was read and re-read with
much amusement.




ONE GATE OPEN AT GATUN SPILLWAY.

Mighty buffers turn back, in towering cal'iron-Iike
mounds, seething tons of on-rushing water from the
over-taxed lake. Overhead, a rainbow-hued mist ob-
scures the dazzling sun. The roar of a miniature
Niagara deadens other sounds. ,\n awe-inspiring
spectacle fashioned entirely by the hand of man.



The Zoniati. Balboa High School, Balboa, C. Z.

Somehow we missed you last year. That's too bad,
isn't it, when there are only two of us on the Canal
Zone? Anyway, we received your well-arranged
1920-21 issue and extend our hearty congratulations.
Your athletics are especially interesting to us because
we are friendly rivals in this line. Your full-page
pictures add much. In fact we were tempted to try
them ourselves. The glowing accounts that Dame
Rumor has brought us of the excellence of your mate-
rial for your 1921-22 issue have spurred us on to
greater endeavor.

The Junta. Indiana High School, Indiana, Pa.

The jokes, stories, and editorials in the Junta are
tine. The athletic department was full of pep, and
interesting to us.



TheEltrurian. Haverhill High School, Haverhill, Mais.

Through your very snappy and newsy book, we
infer that you have a lively school. Great credit is
due the author of "Yellow Bill Barrett." Your
bock review was well written. But surely your
graduates think enough of their school to occupy
nicie space in their department.

The Round- Up. ReadingHigh School, Reading, Mass.

The Round- Up is brimful of news and humor.
The story entitled "To Horse" in the February 23
number was very nteresting. "Who's Who" also
came in for no small bit of interest. Your comment
on The Caribbean was gratefully accepted.

The Record. John Marshall High School, Richmond, I 'a.

In the Record we found a very attractive and in-
teresting magazine. The headings tor the various de-
partments are tine. "Confessions of a Bean Eater"
was very good. Your exchange department could
be enlarged. Why not keep the advertisements off
the covers as they tend to cheapen your otherwise
fine bock?

The Stadium. Townsend Harris Hall High School, C. C,

New York, N. Y.

The exchange department was found missing in
the Stadium. In spite of this fault, you have man-
aged to produce a weekK' that would put to rout
many monthlies.

The Spectator. Johnstown High School, Johnstown, Pa.

The Spectator is an exceptionally g jod-looking book.
But why not tell us the name of your school ? We had
to scour the whole book before we found from whence



64



THE CARIBBEAN.



it came. Your school must abound in poets. Your
business manager is to be complimented on the
goodly amount of advertising matter. Theexchanges
were well written.



The Trinitonian.



Trinity U., H'axahachie, Tex.



The Trinitonian is a good paper. We should like to
see your monthly or annual.

The Albuquerque Record. Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque,

N. Mex.

There is surely no space wasted in your paper. We
failed to find a single advertisement, r 11 of which goes
to show that the student body backs its school paper.



The Siuill. Staten Island .icademy, Staten Island, N. Y

Taking all in all the Sliiilt is a good magazine. \
bigger exchange department would help a good deal.

The Torch. Boston Normal School, Boston, Mass.

The Torch is very compact and neat. A few cuts
and headings, however, would be an improvement.

The Gleaner. Pawtucket High School, Pawtucket, R. I.

Your book is both humorous and interesting.
"The Wooing of Hazeline" is just the thing. How
about borrowing the fire department? The locals
are well written; "The Tattler" came in for a good
bit of comment.



The Curtis .Monthly. Curtis High School, Staten Island, X. Y. RevistaLa Salle.



The .Monthly abounds in good material. In the
March number we became greatly excited over the
mystery story, "Masks," and the conclusion in the
,^pril number was all that we could ask. Why not
arrange your ads neatly in the back of the book only?




GATES CLOSED AT GATUN SPILLWAY.

But for the musical drone of the hydroelectric sta-
tion, all is as quiet and serene as a Sabbath morn.



Amaranth.



Nazareth .-Icademy, Kentucky.



Your cuts and sketches are fine and the cover is
exceedingly attractive. Seeing that you exchange
with other schools why not have an exchange de-
partment and let others know what you think of
them?

The Cambridge Review, Can bridge H.ii L. S., Cambridge, Mass.

The editorials in the Review are well written as is
your other material. Would not collecting your
stories and poems and forming a literary depart-
ment separate from the other departments make
your book more satisfactory?



The Herald.



Holyoke High School, Holyoke, Mass.



The stories in the Herald were good, but alas for
the rest of your book! You mixed it up so with the
ads! We were reading your exchange notes when
we suddenly became entangled with bath robes,
kimonos, shirtwaists, petticoats, furs, etc. A better
arrangement of the advertisements would go a long
way in making your book what it should be.



Colegio de la Salle, Panama R. de P.

El placer que nos de la tectura de su publicacion se
debe en gran parte a los artxulos excelentes sobre
topicos vivos, como "La Fiebre Malaria en Panama"
y "Costumbres de los Indios de Vera-uas." Los
"Ecos Mundiales" son tambien buenos. Los chistes
nos divierten mucho. Que tengan Ustedes siempre
buen exito!




APRON OF SPILLWAY DAM.



Forming headwaters of the lower Cha^res River,
a playground for schools of "Silver King" tarpon.



RevistaEscolarde Puerto Rico.



San Juan, Porto Rico.



Tenemos un solo ejemplar de su Revista Mensual.
Los art'culos son muy practices e interesantes.

The Academy Journal. Norwich Free .Icademy, Norwich, Conn.

The cover ot the Journal is the beginning of a good
book. Did your artists forget that there was an
inside to it? .A few cartoons and headings would
be a decided advantage. "Is there a little Fairy in
your school that would inspire so imaginative a
story as "Why Babies Sleep in Cabbages?"

THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS.

The CARir;i,EAN has traveled far. Owners
have carried it to Maine, to Florida, and to Cali-
fornia. It has been sent as a gift or souvenir to
Washington, Kansas, and Texas. Personal com-
ments have been numerous and so kindly in their
nature that we have been encouraireJ to make



THE CARIBBE.'^.



6S



every issue the best possible. One copy of our
annual was foinul in a New York subway by two
men who were in Curtis High School of New
York last year. They wrote us a good letter
about it but their address, alas! is lost.

The Caribbean.

One of our best exchanges. The Caribbean' is a
splendid magazine. The articles of local interest are
especially good and the school notes are well arranged.
The stones and snapshots are excellent. As loyal
"Zonites" we are certainty proud of our "sister
paper," The Caribbean.

The Zoriinn.




CHRISTMAS MORN AT NEW CRISTOBAL.

.\I1 bundled up in our winter clotlies.

The Caribbean.

The annual issue of your p.iper is well planned
and the editors deserve much credit. The athletic
department is especially interesting.

The Mirror.

The Caribbean.

The cuts and comments of the various classes are
most interesting. Your literary department is ex-
cellent. We enjoyed "\ Trip Through the Panama
Canal." Your athletics seem to be "tip-top" in
spite of the size of your school.

The Round- Up.



The Caribbean.

You publish an immensely interesting magazine.
The article on the Canal was very instructive. Thank
you tor your comment.

The Eltruriaii.

The Caribbean.

Hello, Caribbean! Glad to welcome you into our
fold of exchanges. You certainly are fine! Plenty
of good stories and jokes, and a wonderful abund.ince
of cuts are what make you so interesting. All your
notes and editorials are well written. From your
pictures we judge there are no more than about sixty
in the whole school. It certainly is wonderful that
such a few can get out such a good paper as yours.
Do not forget us when your next issue comes out.

Curtis Monthly.

The Caribbean.

(The author of this clever and original exchange article has
imagined that in her absence trom her room an enthusiastic
but unwise friend has gone through all her exchange heap,
taking what she considered the best in each magazine and
leaving a note of comment on what had seemed especially
good. We feel flattered that all that was left to identify us
was a bit ot cover.)

I happened to see a piece ot purple cover and recog-
nized it at once as "The Caribbean, from Cristobal,
C. Z. The note was quite lengthy. "I think these
pictures of the Canal and locks, pictures of the town
are wonderful. I often wondered what the Canal and
Zone were like, didn't you?"

The Junta.

We welcome these comments, the only ones we
received, and only regret that we have not had
more.



A PROMISING YOUNG MAN.

Paul C. Doy.'e, '22.



"How many want music books?" asked Miss
Dodds of the assembly, "they cost Si.o6."

"I do, I do!" exclaiin;J Johnny, with an eager
grin.

Books were sent for. They arrived and were
distributed, but the money tor them came in
slowly. Finally, among the last of them to pay
was Johnny.

"Will someone volunteer to make the report on
'wages' for to-morrow?" asked the economics
teacher.



"I will, I will," volunteered Johnny.

The time came for the report to be made but
John had failed to prepare it.

"Has some one a book entitled, 'Shakespeare's
Lost,' that he could bring to school?" asked the
English teacher.

"I have, I have," answered Johnny eagerly.

The teacher glanced about the class, then
looking straight through Johnny, inquired, "Has
anyone else a copy?"



MR 81010-



66



THE CARIBBEAN.







38



>



THE CARIBBEAN.



67




f^;-^.. .- -



Emma To'xusend, '-'_.

1921. to carry news of C. H. S. to his own land. 0-0-

oooh!! Ghosts! Seniors goblins capture under-
OCTOBER. classmen at their Hallowe'en party.

NO\EMBER.

1. After two years in Balboa High School, Ida
joins our Senior class. Welcome back, Ida.

2. C. H. S. Girls' .Athletic Club organized.

9. First meeting of above-mentioned association.

10. About sixty of us subscribe for t\\ Digest.

17. Members of
the Junior Class
are wearing blue
and g o 1 d a r m
bands. MissXeef,
welfare worker of
the Metropolitan
Life Insurance
Company, gives
the Social Prob-
lems class an in-
formal talk on her
work.

18. First annual
visiting day in

CRISTOBAL HIGH SfHODL C. H. S. PatCntS

When fond recollections present it to view, how dear to my heart is //(is scene of my childhood.'" j r* J ^^ j

and friends attend





ii^iJSiiri



4. Back to old C. H. S. where we find that
Joseph must have spent the summer cleaning up
for us. Larger enrollment than last year, in spite
of the absence of many old schoolmates. Miss
Bakewell present to fill the only faculty vacancy,
that of Modern History and Domestic Science.

5. Everybody goes to half-period classes in the
morning, so as to
get books and as-
signments for half-
period classes i n
the afternoon.

12. Hazing to-
day. The fresh-
men boys do not
seem to appreciate
the tcnsorial abil-
ity of the upper
classrren, for the>'
make for barber
shops immediately
after school. The
parade of girls,
with dresses re-
versed and hair carefully braided, seems to give classes. In the assembly period the Juniors' play
the rest of us more pleasure then it does them, "The First Thanksgiving Dinner" is followed by
but they are all good sports. a dramatization by the Seniors on the subject

26. Why are the Seniors wearing green and gold "Does An Education Pay?" Program closes with
eyeshades? Because the light coming from the a piano duet by Charlotte Housel and Ruth Duey.
bald-headed row is too strong for their eyes. At 3.30 a meeting of parents and teachers leads to

31. C. H. S. entertains distinguished visitors the formation of a Cristobal High School Parent-
from the Land of the Rising Sun. One of them Teacher Association. After this, the Domestic
voices the greetings of his country and promises Science class serves light refreshments.



UJMMM*^




68



THE CARIBBEAN.



First game of boys' inter-class series in basket
ball.

21. Scene from "Les Miserables" acted before
the assembly:

Jean Val Jean Dr. Hubbard.

The Bishop Mrs. Hearne.

The Bishop's sister MissDodds.

Policeman Mrs. Marcuse.

23. School
contributes
53.50 to the
Belleau Wood
Memorial.

Sophomore
Class poverty
party. Fearkil
and wonderful

tuLu:. ^ MtNKlPAL l-Alii.,

Here inviting benches rest the representatives of are trie COS-
perhaps every land at annual carnival or semiweckly |

band concert a happy, democratic throng. iripQ

DECEMBER.




tumes;



2. Literary Digest Club formed in U. S. History
class:

President George Cartwright.

Secretary Wesley Townsend.

3. Final game of boys' inter-class basket-ball
league. Seniors finished with looo per cent.

6. Pep meeting a soap box and some noise.

7. Are the Seniors really anxious to recite?
No, they just want to show their new class rings.
Red Cross Society organized.

10. C. H. S. Girls' Supper
Club organized.

Mary Fields, President.
Louise Henter, V'ice President.
Ruth Hopkins, Secretary
Emma Townsend, Treasurer

12. Opening of "Better
America" week. Mr. Fisher
gives a very impressive talk
on ".American Ideals."

13. All-high-school patri-
otic program. For the Se-
niors, Emma Townsend stahe op "cbistobal colon.

, f ^*^* I c ^l^ An historic snapshot. The

reads Lane s Makers or the buiUinB, headquarters of Count

1-1, >, 1 l_ c Ferdinand de Lesscps. like the

Hag, and each Senior gives trees, has been raied to make

^L ^' .... room for terminal facilities, and

one point as to the etiquette the statue of the famous discov-

ft rt ¥- .,.1 T erer now reposes, facing the

thenag. hor the Juniors, carii.bean.in the beautiful

Edward May reads Drake's K^t "' "' """'' '''"'"







^K^

E




m


'^>7iidHH



"Our Flag." F"or the Sophomores Edna Camp-
bell, Florence .Albert, and Jane Hall give an origi-
nal play, "The History of the Flag." Each
Freshman gives one fact about the history of the
flag and the whole class recites Lincoln's" Gettys-
burg Address."

14. Better Language day. Miss Dodds reads
several selections about speech. Each student
writes a creed concerning the use of the English
language.

Juniors are hosts to the high school students and
faculty at a unique afl^air in the form of a beach
party and marshmallow roast. Can you ever
forget those stunts? the Junior tragedy with
Emilio as the dainty little Cinderella and .Alex
as the dashing stalwart prince; the Seniors'
dramatization of Mother Goose rhymes; several
songs, accompanied by ukeleles, sung by members
of the Sophomore class. The program is fittingly
closed with the selection by Mr. Bacon and his
Freshmen, in their silent Jazz orchestra. Marsh-
mallows, pop, yells, games, jokes, and jollity!
Hurrah for the Juniors!

15. Naturalization day. In an original play,
Jordan Zimmermann as a judge, explains the
ideals of America to an immigrant, Alex Linczer,
whose character is later vouched for by George
Cartwright and Gerald Bliss.

16. Last day of "Better .America" week.
Wesley Townsend and Ida Brown debate against
Henry Moore and Emma Townsend, on "Im-
migration." Following this, Emilio Solomon, as
an immigrant, with the help of an able interpreter,
.Alex Linczer, and a judge, Edward May, gathers
information on how to become naturalized. Miss
Hornbeak reads "The Lie," to the assembly.

23. .Assembly period stunts. Seniors give an
(jriginal sk-jtcli in child dialect and dress. The
Juniors are represented in a negro sketch by
Henry Moore, Leo Eberenz, Emilio Solomon, and
.Alex Linczer. F.jr the Sophomores, Edna Camp-
bell and Loretta Rush dance. Some of the Sopho-
mores act out O. Henry's story, "The Gift of the
Magi." Ruth ])iic> pla\s a piano solo tor the
Freshmen.

School closes for the Christmas vacation.

From December 23 to January 9. Jordan moves.
.As usual people go swimming on Christmas day.
Because of an epidemic of smallpox in Boquete
the Boy Scouts arc prevented from taking their



THE CARIBBEAN.



69



trip there. Santa Claus comes. The hieultx Mis
Barnhouse excepted, goes to Costa Rica.



1922.



JAM AR\'.




SEA PROMENADE, HOTEL WASHINGTON.



9. School opens. Numerous new gold pencils
much in evidence. GeraKI is anxious to tell every-
one the time.

16. Mrs. Churchill addresses the assembly on
the subject, "The Voice." She illustrates with
several recitations.

21. The Freshmen entertain us. Even the fact
that the chicken dinner turns out to be a dinner
for chickens, rather than of chickens, does not
spoil our good time. Games, Mutt and Jeff,
movies; all funny. But Santa Claus is a bit
partial.

20. M e m
bersofC.H.S.
present a
Mock Dis-
armament
Conference at
the Parent-
Teacher's
meeting. Geo.

Greenest verdure, cooling sea breezes, happy stroi- ^

lers, and peaceful quiet here meet and blend in perfect V^artwrignt,
harmony. n

as Secretary
Hughes, does creditable work, as do all the others.

FEHRl'ARV.

21. C. H. S. gives its annual country fair. Was
it a success? Ask any of those who were present.

26. C. H. S. defeats B. H. S. in basketball.

27. Queen Helen attended by her maids,
Mildred Stiles, Ruth Duey, Olga Linczer, and
Betty Fitz-William, represents C. H. S. on its
float in the Colon carnival parade.

28. Turn about is fair play. B. H. S. defeats
C. H. S. in basketball.

MARCH.

1 7. From the time we found the daintily written
invitations on our desks, our expectations for the
Sophomore party have been high and we are not
disappointed. They meet us at the door, promptly
at eight, and after leading us blindly to kiss the
blarney stone, they set us free to enjoy the even-
ing, and we do. The games are good, the decora-
tions better, and those green and white refresh-



ments best. The evening is somewhat marred for
the Juniors by the fact that they have forgotten
their toothpick.

27. Miss Barnhouse talks to the Economics
class on the salmon industry in Washington.

29. Seniors bid good-by to one of their class
mates, Mildretl Stafford. Good luck to you,
Mildred!

Doctor (iuild sjicaks to the assembly on "Our
.Aim in Lite."

APRIL.

I. Gatun girls defeat Cristobal girls in basket
ball.

4. Mr. .Alexander addresses the assembly on
"Standards in Life."

Miss Currier lectures on "The Symphony."

6. C. H. S. defeats "F" Co. of Fort Davis in
basket ball.

7. One of C. H. S. 's best students, athletes, and
friends sails for the States. Don't forget us,
Loretta.

7-17. Easter vacation. C. H. S. girls attend
vocational conference at Balboa. Fun, merri-
ment, and sunburn.

17. Loads
of fun at Ga-
tun. Girls play
their daddies
an "exhibi-
tion" game of
basket ball.

21. The Se-
niors of C. H.

SSouh who make up such colonies manage happiness.
. are guests withoutevenaglimpseofmarblehalis. motion pictures
. .1, D II or motor cars.

at the Balboa

Seniors' play "The Black Feather." A worthy

play given worthily.

MAV.

7. George Cartwright wins the prize for the
best essay on "The Church and the Community."

9. Chaplain Stull keeps us laughing when he
talks to us on "Your Purpose in the World"
but we remember all he says.

10. Mr. Judd gives an interesting and instructive
talk to the Economics class on "Roads in Panama."

16. Junior class of C. H. S. presents "The Zone
Police" and "Mrs. Oakley's Telephone" at Fort
De Lesseps, Well given and well liked.




A COUNTRVsmE NATIVE VILLAGE.



70



THE CARIBBEAN.



21. Papers of Marjorie Ball, Edward May, and
Emma Townsend sent to Balboa to compete in
"Good Roads" contest.

26. "Clarence" plays at the America Theatre.

29. Gatun clubhouse shows "Clarence."

31. News comes of Esther Witt's winning in
the "Good Roads" contest. Congratulations,
Esther. Also, congratulations to Balboa High
School on having won Esther at the beginning of
this year.

JUNE.

I. Miss Dodds entertains the Faculty and
Seniors at a very delightful dinner. The green
and gold decorations and favors were original
and very attractive.



2. Last of the material for The Caribbean goes
to the printers.

8. "Clarence" appears at the Balboa clubhouse.

12. The Junior-Senior Banquet is held at the
Hotel Washington.

16. Final meeting of Supper Club with Senior
girls as honor guests.

iS. Baccalaureate sermon at the Cristobal
Union Church.

21. Gatun parents are hosts to parent-teacher
association and guests, at final meeting of the
year.

24. The class of 1922 become Alumni.

30. End of the great and glorious school year,

'2I-'22.




CucoNiT Pai.m Tree?.
As ui^ful ai they arc Ix'aujful.



TENNESSEE.

Wesley Townsend, '22.



She's the garden spot of the Union

Is Tennessee.

Cut with wooded, rugged hills

Smothered with honeysuckle and arbutus;

Dotted with white monuments

Memorials to the Blue and (iray

Who fought for honor and right

In Tennessee.

Oh! The wide sluggish rivers,

Where plies the old "side wheeler";



Here, fields of billowing corn;

There, plantations of wide-leafed tobacco;

Grapes in purple cluster;

Coming of apples and peaches

Heralded by the droning of the June bug;

Houses always open;

Friend or enemy,

Here's our hand

In Tennessee.



THE CARIBBEAN.



71







5^5



2



"5^






11



&- S3

Q.

o oS



72



THE CARIBBEAN.







Wesley H. Townsed, '22.

May. "How many senses are there?"
Miss Hornbeak. "Six."
May. "How's that? I only have fiv-e."
Miss Hornbeak. "I know it. The one lacking
is common sense."



^^^^



Miss Beechiug. "A transparent object is one
you can see through. Name something that is
transparent."

Zim. "A doughnut."



Bliss. "Ma, Miss Dodds gave me a three-day
vacation, for being the only one able to answer her
question."

His mother. Well, I'll see about that but
what was the question?"

Bliss. "Who put the tack in Doyle's seat?"



Teacher. "Frank, can you tell me who suc-
ceeded Edward \'I."
Frank. "Mary."

Teacher. "Who followed Mary, Girdon?"
Girdon (absent-mindedlv). "Her little lamb."



In Physics class.
Miss Seeching. "The pressure of bodies at rest
Miss Dodds. "How is it, Gerald, that you are is called force give an example."
always late?" Baldy. "The police force."

Bliss. "It's like this. You keep telling me not
to watch the clock in classes, so now I'm in the Zim. "You know, Baldy is so lazy that he gets



habit of not watching it at home.'

Baldy, to Miss Dodds. "May I go home? I
don't feel well.

Miss Dodds. "Yes, you may."

Doyle. "Wait for me outside; I wanna see the
game too."

"Your father must have been an athlete."

"Why?"

"Because he raised a dumb-bell."

Cousins. "What have we got for supper to-
night?"

Mother. "What you haven't got."
Cousins. "What is it, sardines?"
Mother. "No, brains."

Miss Dodds. "Wesley, what is a budget?"
Wesley. "Well, it's a method of worrying before
you spend instead of after."



up at ? in the morning so that he has longer to
loaf."'

"Not so much noise, Alex."
"It's important, Miss Dodds."
"Remember, the machine that rattles the most
does not do the best work."
"Suppose it's a Ford?"

Fields. "I hope this rain keeps up through the
night."

Wallace. "Why? It will spoil the marsh-
mallow roast."

Fields. "No, it won't; if it keeps up it can't
come down."

Burgoon. "Dad, can you sign \'our name with
your eyes shut?"

Father. "Sure, nothing easier."

Burgoon. "Well, please close \our eyes and
sign my report card,"



THE CARIBBEAN.



73



Carlos. "Please don't put m\ F's down in red."
Teacher. -"Why?"

Carlo.':.- -"Because my dad is like a hull. He
gets mad whenever he sees red."

"1 kn-jw a boy who takes u)i .Spanish, Italian,

French, English, antl Cierman."

"How does he find time to study.'"

"Oh, he doesn't study; he runs the elex'ator at

the Hotel Washington."

Rndd. "How many men are there in a quar-
tette?"

Lee. "Quartette comes from the Latin word
meaning quarter, so there must be 25."

Roach. "Pass me the ink."
Miss Hornbeak (reproachtullyj. "It what,
George?"

Roach. "If you can reach it."

Mr. Hughes was giving instructions in diving.
This particular lesson was on the swallow dive.

"Now, Julius," said Mr. Hughes, "you take a
turn."

Julius made a hopeless attempt and created an
alarming splash.

"That's not a swallow dive," said Mr. Hughes,
sympathetically.

"Ain't it?" gurgled Julius. "Why, I thought
I'd swallowed half the pool!"

MAKING OUT PERIOD SCHEDULE.

Wirtz. "What place shall we put down tor
Mechanical Drawing?"

Miss Dodds. "Put down M. T. Building."
IVallace. "You're right, only a bunch ot dumb-
bells have their class there."

Miss Beeching, to Leo in Physics.

"What is a vacuum, Leo?"

"I've got it in my head, but I can't explain it."



Miss Beeching, to Moore in .\dvanced Algebra
class.

"If \()u vsouUl reaii over this textbook, your
lessons would be half done."

"All right, give me two textbooks."

.\T ii.\i.i.o\vi;'i-;n i'ari^.
Bridges. "Hey, Doyle, do you want two pieces
ot cake?"

Doyle. "Sure."

Bridges. "Well, cut \our piece in halt."

"Death still loves :i shining mark,"

The New York newspapers do say;

And print in letters large and dark,

".\ champion bootblack died to-day."

Doyle (suspiciously, in restaurant, as waiter
brings piece of apple pie). "What state did
those apples come trom ?

IVaiter. "You ought to know, you've been in
the States.

Doyle. "But I didn't make the pies.

Waiter. "Well, I didn't make the apples.

Miss Dodds (in Assembly). "John Coffey,
settle!"

Miss Hornbeak. "Don't stir."
Miss Barnhouse. "Is that clear?"

Said Jtdine. "Here's my first batch of biscuit.
Just wait. From the oven I'll

whiscuit."
How poor Juline cried.
When Bliss cruelly replied,
"Let them burn. To eat them

well! I shouldn't riscuit."

Heard during music period. Basses, please
come in on time, you've been behind the piano
all dav.



NAMEFl'L QUESTIONS.



A sad one

Does George Ball?

No, but Edward May.
Sunburn?

Is John Coffey colored?

Yes, and Ida Brown.
Where ignorance is ?

Has Gerald Bliss?

Yes, but Henry Moor?,



Sports

Is Fisher catcher?

No, but Frank Fields.
Whoa, Henry!

Why is Mattie PuUig Gladys Ford:

Why doesn't Kenneth Parker?
Culinary department.

Does .-^dela Bakewell?

Yes, and I've seen Henry Bacon-



THE CARIBBEAN.



WHY NOT THIS WAY?



A man once in Me.

Had a terrible pe.

The doctors pronounced it rheumatics;

Now he gets down the le.

With the use of a ce,

And has had to give up acrobatics.

Heigh ty-teighty!

There was once a man of great height

Who attempted to blow out the leight;

But, alas! It was gas!

So he had to pass

To a realm that is queight out of seight.

Didit Blr.?

There was once a sjirightly )'Oung Mr.

Who had a good-looking sr.;

One night in the darl<,

They met in the park

.An awful mistake! for he kr.

The .Awful Huay.

There once sat a pair on a quay
And peacefully gazed at the suay;
But, when he "up and kissed her,"
She said to him, "Mister,
Now don't get familiar with muay!'



-7.Z.,



-7. Z., '22.



-J. Z., '22.



Fate is Unkignd.

Poor Johnny did not see this sign,

"Please drive to the left of this lign,"

But he heard a great crash

Saw his car go to smash!

Now he's working to pay off the fign.



M. B., '22.



Tioux Trioux!

There once was a brave, an old Sioux,

Who had a bad case of the flioux;

His bones they did clatter,

His teeth they did chatter,

.And a cure for it nobody knioux.



>V. T., '22



Eau dear! Jeau didn't have enough Deau!
A girl once had a new beau
Who thought that she loved him, seau
A ring he bought her.
And thought he'd caught her.
But when he proposed, she said, "Neau."



-E. T., '22.



~P. D., '22.



NOTICE

Additional copies of this School Annual, mailed to
any address in the United States, may be had by
addressing "Paul C. Doyle, The Caribbean, Cristobal,
Canal Zone," and inclosing the cost, 75 cents.



THE CARIBBEAN.



75



FOX

REALART

SELZNICK

GOLDWYN

PATHE



AMERICA THEATER



ASSOCIATED

PRODUCERS
FIRST NATIONALS
UNITED ARTISTS
HODKINSON



rpUE management of the AMERICA THEATER and its staff
of employees extend heartiest congratulations to the grad-
uating class of '22 of Cristobal High School. We also thank
the class, their schoolmates and parents for the generous
patronage which has helped enable the AMERICA THEATER
to maintain the highest standards in motion picture production
regardless of obstacles, distance, and cost.



ASSOCIATED

PRODUCERS
FIRST NATIONALS
UNITED ARTISTS
HODKINSON



AMERICA THEATER



FOX

REALART

SELZNICK

GOLDWYN

PATHE




The Bowdry
Company, Ltd.

PANAMA
1-3 Fourth of July Avenue

Opposite Aacon Post Office

COLON

Masonic Temple



VISIT OUR PARLORS

MILLINERY

Sport and Dress Hats, Feathers, Ribbons, and Flowers.

DRESSES

sport and Morning Togs. Afternoon Frocks. Ball Gowns.
Mourning Goods.

UNDERGARMENTS

Nightdresses, Petticoats, Knickers, Combinations, Corsets, and
Brassieres.

ART AND GIFTS

Umbrellas, Fans, Beaded Bags, French Novelties and Favors.




(BetdDOu&A



Dresses

We wish to announce the new line of
Betty Wi";es Dresses now being shown
in our store. Come and see them today.



76



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE ONLY ALL-AMERICAN GARAGE ON THE ATLANTIC SIDE



u



KALL-A-KAR



5 J



TWO TELEPHONES



HOTEL WASHINGTON or COLON 204



COMPLIMENTS OF

i^imerican Jforeign J^ankins Corporation

CRISTOBAL BRANCH

CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



m'^



HERBERT A. DOTEN, D.D.S.



Opposite Royal Mail Building



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



THE CARIBBEAN.



77




Bern uonos

that were bent

by point. "d

shoes




Straight
u Dones

:i|T:iit Grev

^ .'^lipht in




Straight

Bones that

grew straight

in Educator

Shoes




Unless

stamped like

this it is not an

Educator




Whether in the Zone
or Back in the States

Healthy, strong feet are necessary in mental effort
and in physical prowess.

The members of the class of '22 may increase their
life opportunities by conscientious care of the body.
The feet are most important units of the body.

For each and every member of thj family there is
one shoe that is made scientifically to "let the feet
grow as they should." That shoe is the Educator.
It has room for all five toes, preventing corns, callouses,
fallen arches, and other foot-ills.

.Sold by

Panama Railroad Commissary

Cristobal, Canal Zone

Made by

Rice & Hutchins, inc.

BOSTON .c.., U.S.A.

Educatoiv



78



THE CARIBBEAN.




ilotel Magfjinston

COLON BEACH

P. O. Address, CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE

European Plan Facing the Atlantic

100 Rooms 100 Baths

Rates from $3.00 up

New, modern, and luxurious in appointment. Excellent
cuisine. Large private grounds with promenade along the
sea front, and fine concrete sea-water swimming pool.



Cool Days.



Cool Nights.



Excellent Winter Resort.
J. E. LEWIS, Manager.



((



NOSTROLINE"



Truly the Best Catarrh Remedy



Simple Safe Sure I



DiERs & Ullrich



AGENTS FOR



White
Rock
Mineral
Water

Ginger
Ale



Park&

Tilford^s

Candy

Anheuser-
Busch
Malt Nut



British Pharmacy

165 BOLIVAR STREET



48 FRONT STREET COLON



Phone 101




Dr. VERN PRIER

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



THE CARIBBEAN.



79



UNITED FRUIT COMPANY



Regular Sailings
from

Cristobal, C. Z.

to
New York,
New Orleans,
Cuba,
Colombia,
Jamaica, and
Costa Rica.



For further particulars,
apply:



M. C. O'HEARN, General Agent, Cristobal, C. Z.




T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panair.a City



Cable Address "IMPCO." A. B. C, 5th, and Lieber



Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS

DEALERS IN

General Merchandise and Native Produce



COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

p. O. Box 107



Branch Retail Stores and Trading Stations:
COLON BOCAS DEL TORO PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL ESCRIBANO MANDINGA



8o



THE CARIBBEAN.



EVERYTfflNG IN THE LINE OF PLUMBING

Central American
Plumbing and Supply Company



ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN



COLON, R.P.

170 Bolivar Street



PANAMA, R. P.

58 Central Avenue




INVESTIGATE

Threaded Rubber Insulation




SMALLWOOD BROTHERS



Sole Distributors



The



Native Wood Shop



13 FRONT STREET



COLON



THE MAJILTON
Floor Lamps Boudoir Lamps

Table Lamps Desk Lamps



Nut Bowls
Smoking Sets
Smoking Stands
Cigar Boxes
Tobacco Boxes
Tea Wagons
Tablets
Trays
Coasters
Morris Chairs
Picture Frames



Powder Boxes
Hair Receivers
Tie Racks
Napkin Rings
Toothpick Holders
Salt Trays
Serving Trays
Swagger Sticks
Police Clubs
Paper Weights
Canes, Etc.



PANAMA



COLON



SPECIAL WORK TO ORDER
LAMP SHADES AND FIXTURES TO ORDER

COLON Phone 498 CRISTOBAL



Compliments of

Dr. E. A. URWILER



COLON



AND



GATUN



THE CARIBBEAN.



8i



VTNUS
PENCILS

77?^ largest selling Quality Pencil in the J] 'oriel.




When once you use these remarkable,
high quaHty pencils, you will nc\'cr
be satisfied with any other. The
genuine and complete satisfaction given by
\'ENUS has made it the most famous
pencil in the world. None other so per-
fectly meets the requirements of
instructor and pupil alike.




American Lead Pencil Co.

220 Fifth Avenue, New York



Makers of a Complete Line of Pencils, Penholders, Erastrs. and Rubber Bands.



MR 81010 (i



8a



THE CARIBBEAN.



COMPAGNIEGENERALETRANSATLANTIQUE

FRENCH LINE OF STEAMERS

PASSENGER SERVICE

Regular fortnightly sailings from Cristobal, Canal Zone, to France

CARGO SERVICE ONLY

- Monthly sailings from Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Havre, Bordeaux, and
Cristobal, to South Pacific.

Monthly sailings from Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Havre, Bordeaux, and
Cristobal, to North Pacific.

Via the Panama Canal (Ecuador, Peru, and Chile)

For all particulars apply to

FRENCH LINE AGENCY



m



p. O. Box 128, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.

Phone No. 185



PANAMA, PLAZA DE FRANCIA
Phone No. 902



MISTELI

tKfje feeder



PANAMA



R. P.



French Drug Store

V. DELGADO & SON

Main Store:

26 Front Street, opposite Cable Office



A Large Assortment of

American, French, and
English Goods



SILVERWARE CUT GLASS



Howard, Hamilton, Waltham, and Elgin Watches



PERFUMERY TOILET ARTICLES

KODAKS FILMS CAMERAS

ETC., ETC.

Prescription Department under the supervision
of United States Pharmacists

BABIES' PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY



PEARLS AND DIAMONDS



COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA



THE CARIBBEAN.



83




Bring Your Equipment Up to Date



The Caterpillar' s"*
field of usefulness is
by no means limited
to road work. On
farm and ran eh, in
the mining, oil, and
lumber industries
wherever power and
end u ranee are at a
premium, the ''Cater-
pillar"* has no real
competitor.



HOLT

PEORIA, ILL.
STOCKTON, CALIF.



"CATERPILLAR" Tractors are ust-d in every
corner of the globe for road making, mining, log-
ging, farming, land clearing, and overland transpor-
tation of every kind. Throughout the entire War,
"Caterpillar" Tractors were used exclusively by the
United States and Allied armies. The same depend-
able qualities which made the "Caterpillar" the
choice of these Governments, insure the most
successful and economical results in the hands of
e\er>' user.

Manv "Caterpillars" are used in the Canal Zone,
as well as in the United States, Mexico, Central and
South America, West Indies, etc.

Upon request, we will gladly mail a copy of our
illustrated booklet, "Caterpillar Performance," also
copies of other catalogs relating to road building,
logging, farming, and other industries.



There is but one Caterpillar" HOLT builds it. The name was

orginated and is owned exciusiveiy by this company.

Infringements will be prosecuted.

THE HOLT MFG. CO., Inc., PEORIA, ILL.

Branches and service stations aU over the world

Export Division: 50 Church St., New York



^ll^^asi



84



THE CARIBBEAN.



CRISTOBAL



Compliments of



Dr. R. S. MORRIS



CANAL ZONE



Buy Your Drugs, Patent Medicines,

Perfumery, Toilet Articles, etc.

AT THE

Pan-American Drug Store

50 Front Street, Colon, R. P.
You Always Do Better at Salazar's

WE CARRY AN

Mp=to=tiate ^oba ifountain

3 STORES

50 Front Street 56 Bolivar Street

182 Bolivar Street., English Drug Store



4



HAVE

YOUR

CLOTHES

CLEANED

CLEAN

BY



b



The Royal
Cleaners and Dyers



Call Phone 250



i0



E. V. TROTT



RATHBUN, STILSON & CO.

General Hardware and Lumber Merchants

DEALERS IN
PAINTS, OILS, AND BUILDERS' MATERIALS, ETC.



Picture Framing a Specialty



P. O. Box 140, COLON, R. P.



THE CARIBBEAN.



85



^g^glglgJi



RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO

23 FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P.

Just at 7th Street
P. O. Box 523, Cristobal, C. Z. Phone Corp. No. 9



Is the oldest establishment of Photography in
Colon, and our continued success is due to the
fact that we have always pleased our patrons.
** Richards" stamped on your photograph is
. a guarantee of excellence.



STUDIES OF LADIES AND INFANTS OUR SPECIALTY



Improved Equipment



Modem Methods



Efficient Service



Jackson's Steam Laundry

BROADWAY, near FOLKS RIVER

House Delivery Service
Wagon Will Call on Request



STEAMSHIP and HOTEL WORK

A SPECIALTY .

Now Equipped to Handle all Classes of
Cleaning and Pressing

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED
Special Rates for Soldiers' and Sailors' Work



0lh Wimtv^



KNOW WHERE TO GET A
REAL HAIR CUT, SHAVE,
OR SHAMPOO .-. .-. .-.



^



ASK FOR



ii



Phone Colon 21



P. 0. Sox 1131, Cristobal. C. 2.



FRANK

The Barber



AT THE HOTEL WASHINGTON

AND YOU WILL RECEIVE

SATISFACTION



86



THE CARIBBEAN.



Royal Netherlands West India Mail

KONINKLYKE WEST-INDISCHE MAILDIENST
COMPANIA REAL HOLANDESA DE VAPORES

COLON LINE

Regular fortnightly passenger and cargo service from Cristobal to Port
Limon, and from Cristobal to Puerto Colombia, Curacao, Puerto Cabello,
La Guaira, Trinidad, Barbados, Plymouth (for passengers and mail only)
Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg. Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe.

PACIFIC LINE

Regular two- to three-weekly cargo service to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile,
on the outward voyage, and to Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg home-
ward. A limited number of passengers can be accepted.

Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe.

For further particulars apply to:
ROYAL NETHERLANDS WEST INDIA MAIL Messrs. SASSO, FUHRING & CO.



Telephone No. 21, Cristobal



Telephone No. 682 Panama




I Colon Electric



AND



Ice Supply Co.

Ill Market St.,
COLON, R. P.



Satisfied Servants ^|^'^.^-\';

ar alwaijs found in ,^-S^^i^'



Gloctrified Homes



;^^ \



Phone Nos. 150, 196, 92



THE CARIBBEAN.



87



Haskiiis News Service | | Cristobal Clubhouse



AND



The Caribbean Publishing Co., Ltd.



a^ ^M K)



printers
^ufalis^fjcrs;
Poofe pinbers^



Phone Cristobal 49 Phone Colon 371
P. O. Box 28, Cristobal



Photo Department



DEVELOPING AND PRINTING

ENLARGEMENTS

LANTERN SLIDES

HOME PORTRAITURE and GROUPS

PANORAMIC VIEWS
AND GROUPS



Best Work



Reasonable Prices



Phones Cristobal 30 and 446



APPRECIATION.



Every year The Caribbean staff in-
serts in its book a word of thanks to
those who have made the book a pos-
sibility. Every year this gratitude has
been merited, but never, we feel sure, has
any staff owed greater debt to its friends
than does this one ot '2i-'22. Moreover,
we are Just as sure that no staff lias felt
more ot a sense of responsibility to its
friends and sponsors a responsibility
which has been almost an obligation
to make good.

Our book is finished; what is done is
done. We send it forth, imperfect



though we feel it to be, to carrv its
message of Cristobal High School and
Cristobal High School spirit to friends
far and near.

To those friends we extend our thanks
for their interest in and support of our
activities evidenced in so many ways.

Especially do we thank The Panama
Canal Press for a cooperation which has
tar surpassed a mere business relation.

And now we ask the readers of our
book to help us to thank with their
business support some very necessary
financial backers Our advertisers.



THE CARIBBEAN. ;



ADAMS

PURE CHEWING GUM



One Quality
All Flavors

You can hfv ADAMS
Gum in any flavor
from licorice to pepper-
mint or tutti-frutti.
Select your favorite
then note the narhe
Adams on the pack-
age: it means absolute
purity and highest qual-
ity. Use it regularly.

Everywhere



5




MAXWELL-KELSO SALES COMPANY
DISTRIBUTORS

Canal Zone and Republic of Panama Masonic Temple, Cristobal, C. Z,






PAGE 1

1922 --==-------_ _ _ --_ -_ ---------_ ... "" ...

PAGE 2

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive .org/detai Is/caribbean 1922cris

PAGE 3

THE CARIBBEAN VOL. V CRI STOBA L CANA L ZO'iE, '9" No. I P UB LI SHED BY THE CRI S T O BAL HI GH SC HOOL An.ANTIC TO CO"'L \SD GATt" !.OCII:S. :'how If,4"QU.lrt' mil('Sinart'3 ... r t'( abo\'t' '>I.>a I,,\'el Lu:& os THC PACI'IC SlllC 0' THE .\IHltl,,,t lli>KplUe mill!.l in 3"e:l. 51 fe.'t allon sea CO :'>TF.:"T S Added T onnage Alumni Appreciation Athleti cs : B oys B aseball Basket B all. Swimming T ennis T rack Girl s' Basket B all Swimming T ennis Class Play, "Clarence" Class \\'ill D edication Editorial E.ditoria l Staff ;'>.lARjOR1E BALI., ':!2 LQo.iSE HEyrEk, '21 PACL C. DOYLE, ':!2 Exchanges HENRY .\!OORE, 'lJ F aculty Senior Get-together Freshmen Alphabetically Spea k ing Gra duates J okt:s WESLEY H TOWNSENI), ''1'1 Juniors Li tc rary: A j\l usical Evening GEORGE BALI., '24 \ Promising Young Man PAUl. C. O O\'I.E, '22 .1\ o f t h e Country F ai r A Scene at t h e Colon Station, FR.ANCES POOLE, '25 .-\ Slip of the Foot LOUI S E HESTER, '23 .-\ T ale of a Training T rack PAUL C. DOYLE, '22 A ,Clio!\!. Spea k Louder than Wcrds, IDA BROWN, Cogitation s o f a Co c hero.GI.AD\S LOWANOE, ''24 Down the Coast to Porto B e llo .. 15 I.iter.lry-Continued: 54 58 54-56 55 ;6 60 fo 60 4 3 63 8 37 65 H 3' 43 33 Gatun to Cristobal by Bus, \\'1I.1.1Al'oI COUSIN', '25 joseph's R eflections on Cla ss of '23. :\I asks and Crabs GEORGE CARTWRIGHT, ':22 :\1r F irst and I. :\st ATtempt at D iving, BETTY Flrl-WlI .L1AM, '25 Stop, Look, and L isten Jordln Zimmerm an n '1: Sunset at the Chagres E.M:'IA '22 The D erelict's Storr The P rodigal Brother IDA BROWN, ''2.1 Tht:: Sea from Our School, The Secret The Village Sleuth Up the Pikomayo GEORGE CAR1'WRILHT, '11 When Sorrows Come-? :\lARJORIE BALI. '22 GIRDOI\ IhOD, '24-\\'. F. BOWERS, '14-ALEX LINC2ER, ''23 :o.luSlc Our F.tcultr Poetry: : \ Mi shap .'\ Telephone A Y o un ger B rother B obbed H air I .. yes Gatun I -hti I n Panam Old Panama ALEX LINC2.ER, ''23 GEORGE CARTWRIGHT, ''2'2 MA'tjORI E BALL, ''2'2 IDA BROWN, n JORDAN ZIMMERMANN, '2'2 GEORGE CARTWRIGHT, ''21 t\IAR\' FIELDS, '2'2 MARJORIE BALL, ':2'2 LOIJI!>E HESTER, '13 Seasons JORDAN ZIMMERMANN, '22 T aboga EMMA TOWNSEND, ',:'2 T ennessee \\'ESI.E\' I -I. TOWNSE:"O, '21 Wh y Not T his Way CLASS Of '"2"2 Sc hool Notes. EMMA TOWNSEND, ''22 So ph omo r es _. AS"NA COLBERG, '1 4 The L :LUnc hingofOur Ship GEORG E CARTWRIGHT, ''1'2 35 7 4' H '9 34 30 4' 6 4 8 39 39 53 '4 5 5 50 70

PAGE 4

THE CARIBBEAN. Beneath the palms on Caribbean's s h ore, Scarce nine degrees from the equator's lin e, Where trade winds blow, and tropic sun doth s hine Wi t h sultry heat, and where, in the days of yore, Adventurous Sp ani s h gallants did exp l o re And fall a prey to r.lorgan's b o l d design, Where now the Star s and Stripes wav e as the s i g n That we have o p ed to Orient p orts the doo r, T h e r e stands a spacio u s building whi c h doth hold A band of peop l e who do strive to l ea rn That which will lead t h em upward in life's war. D es ire-that we the best may e'er upho ld, That we may l ive and !carll as well as earn C RI S TOBA L HI G H SC H OO L T eaches day by cia)'

PAGE 5

T H E CARIBBEA"'. EDITO RI Al. S TAFF OF THE CARIBBEAN. Edll or.ill-CIJi4 1Jsisll11llEdilo r B1U;'USJ .is;iJltU/1 BltJUUJJ .\!mmgrr Cirru/alioll ,lfallagrr .1$Shlnnl Cirultu;o1l ,\lanager 7/h/rlres, BO,\'J' ."',/drlifs, Gir ls' .11"1 Edilor Srhool No/{'s &lIlor Jok,,d;lor Lit e I'm) Editor 1ltolllliEdit o r E.wJuwgr Editor PAL'1. C. DonE (7), ''21 EDWARD (8), 'z J L E Roy B (6), '1: GERAt.D B LISS (5), '23 ALEX L 'l\C'Z E R ( 14), 2 J JORDAN Z IMMER)l A",""," ( I), 'Zl G EORGE CARTWRIGHT (3), ''12 LonSE H E!';SEND ( 1'2), '2'2 f\IARY FIELDS ( II ) 'n i\IARJoRIE B ALI. (9), "22 HENRY t\IOORE (10) ''l J D E D ICATION Y o l bectluse, as our Principal, sire !tas done so muc h 10 make our sc/lOollijt' more interesting and worth while ; I V a I" bec/luse she luzs mad,: Ollr socia l life so muc h more ple asanl; Val bt?Causc, as our / / d viso r s lJC lias work e d so hard to make this yearbook (l s ucceSSi i Vo,. because she has so willingly devot ed her own lime and slr e ngth 10 ilJ prod u ction; But becaus e she is o u r H loued ou r "honor ed, mUc!lrespecl ed Fri e nd," W e III< .'Illdenis oj Crislobal H ig l l School, aileeliollalely dedical e II,is fiJ l h uolllll/e oj T he Caribbean 10 Jlf 1 SS ]. 1 S/iBELL/I D ODDS .1

PAGE 6

4 THE CARIBBEAN. Suppose we begin ou r sermon with a few illustrations for wh i c h the following s l oga n will supply OUf text: Bite off more t h an you can chew; Then chew it. Plan for more than yo u can do: Then do it. H itc h yo ur wagon to a star; K eep your seat, and there you atc. The turmoil of passing classes su b s ided. 1 n t h e classes, recitations b eg an All w e re quiet in the assembl y room exceptin g \ Villi,:: who s huffled to the s harpener, s harpened his penci l and tested the point several times. H e settl e d in his seat, but was up on t h e t hought of an an n ounce m e n t he s h o uld write o n t h e blackboard. H e wasted time putting unnecessary artistic to u c h es to his almost unreadabl e fancy letters H e was about to sit down and get busy when h e fOllnei a Lite rary Diges/, in whic h h e scanned t h e pictures and read many advertisements. H e laid the magazine aside to prepare his necessary c l ass re port, but a shudder ran t h rough him when h e found h e had but three minutes to get his material from t h e e n cyclopedia from which it takes so long to bring out information in proper form A s a resu lt, \iVillie felt ashamed for having de layed his w h o l e class. The next day h e ca m e to sc h oo l determined to s tick by a s l ogan h e had read the previ o u s evening. The first period c la sses had passed as u s ual and \Villie was in t h e assembly room takin g notes from an outside source, when suddt:n l y h e t hough t of a basket-ball victory about which h e s h ou ld tell Johnny, but, as the slogan, whic h appear s in our fir s t PllId C. Doyle, '22. parag raph s, Aas h ed through his mind, h e set a s i de his basket-ball dream and fini s h ed his ass ignment in t im e to assure him self of an excellent report. As Jimmie tripped into t h e first fr eshman cla ss o f t h e year, tardy, h e d r e w a laugh from his fellow students. This inspired him to act the clown t h e rest of his hig h sc h oo l career. 1t i s true h e had passing marks, but h e la c k ed the beneficial l earn ing h e s h ould have gained fr o m his four years' work Hi s d ipl oma without the f o undation of kn ow l edge wa s almost worthless in seeking e mpl oy m e nt. H enry had a clear voice but his debates w e r e uninterestin g b eca u se h e read them. The captain of the debating team wa s absent and H enry was t h e o n e c h osen t o speak in his place. H e tri ed at first to resign Hi s doubt turned into determinat ion when h e fini s h ed reading the same s l oga n which we have already q uoted, and h e wa s soo n busy gatherin g material for his s ide of t h e s ubject. On the day o f the debate h e was nervous but gritted his teeth took his place b e f ore the assembl y, and delivered a talk whic h co nvin ced even his opponen ts that his stan d on the subjec t was th e co rrect o n e. Every f ello w o n t h e basketball team f ee l s better over a hardf o u ght defeat than all easily-w o n vic to r y, when th ey ha ve done what t h ey f elt was more than they co ul d do. Whe n the boys o f C. H S. basket-ball t eam a ccepted the c h alle ng e of t h e U. S S. Denver heavi es, they planned f o r more t h a n they t h o u ght t hey could do, they did i t, and as a result, brought anoth e r victor y t o their sc h ool. j n activities h e l d at the sc h oo l during th e yea r, many w h o at firs t remained silent and unknow n se i zed t h e i r opportunity to c h e w a little more t h a n the ir s hare in helping with a ssembly programs and parties, boosting a thleti c contests, co o peration with t h e fa culty, a n d faithfulness to

PAGE 7

THE CARIBBEA;-':. th e i r l e sso ns-all o f whic h g o to mak e up [rue sc h o o l spirit. This t y p e o f stude n t ha s hitc h ed his w agon to a Star an d r id es ove r r h e h a r d kn o ck s of sc h oo l wit h ea se B o y s an d gir l s in t h ese days o f a cco mpli s h ment, l oo k to t h e t h i n g s t hat have already aelvallC e d c iviliz ation. The y see t h e m ode rn s t eamboat, rai l r o a d t r ain, a n d airplan e N o w since wir e l ess i s so k eenly p erfect e d t hey sit back and s a y "The r e's n o t hing l e ft to b e don e." I f t h es e same p eo p l e ha d lived b e f o re W hitney, B ell, o r t h e \ V rig h t bro t h e r s made t h e ir in ve nti o n s s u ccess ful t hey wo u l d have sai d t h e same t h ing. I t i s not f a ir to o ne's se lf. a n d l may say i t is coward l y, to h o l d o n e s self d o w n an u not pl a n for more t han o n e thinks o n e can do. a n d t h e n do it. I n sc h oo l or el se wh e r e wak e u p your enthus iasm. Y o u are a s good a s the best if YOll want to b e Pbn for more t han )"ou can d o ; Then do it. Y o u will reap t h e b e n efit f o r w h atever yo u do. Ilitch your wagon to a star ; K ee p your seat, a n d there you .Ire. l N PA NA M A B all, 2:1. L o w s ig h s th e whi spe rin g p a lm I n Panama Cool trade winds b l ow T h e tr opic moo n Large L um i n o u s Ligh ts dark rippl i n g water s I n th e dis t a nce-T h e jung l e D e n se Dank; O ve r all, q uiet r eigns Save for gentle lapping of waves upon t h e sa nds. Now, a boat wit h oars dipping, Soft strumming of guitar \ 'oices singing; T he boat passes Silence agai n I n P a nama, O LD umiu '2). :\ rui ned c hu rc h to w e r standing lonely by t h e sea. F lec k s o f sunlig h t on gr.lr, moulder ing walls R usty p i l es of ca n no n D i m tra ce s o f a highway, A decari ng, w e e d-cove red bridgeRelics o f former g l orr-Old Panama. C ourtie r s, cavalier s, adve nturers, go l d-seeke rsP ionee r s t o th e c r ossroads o f t h e world. B a lb oa, C o rt ez, Pizarro-See k i n g fabled ric h es Treasure l aden Spanish galleo n s riding a t a nc hor in t h e b ay, Fl o w e r o f Spanish c h ival r y Grace f u l, l a n guid seno rit as, Fl as h o f dark e yes behin d b ee mantillas, So unds of sof t laug h te r Tinkle o f guitar s Old P a nama. S l owly the s u n sinks, dyeing t h e bar w it h crimson : \ t ringing of vesper bells T h e fait h f u l pray; T remulo u s pr.tyer of t h e old priest D ies softly away. E vening breezes c r oon in t h e palms; Nigh t mounts h e r throne. O ld Pana m a F las h es o f m usket_fire cut the blackness of the nig h t C r ies of wounded fill t h e air, Death r ides abroad; The sky burns c r imson as t h e flames leap u pwa r d de Dios! Salvanos! l\l o rgan has come! Ol d Pana m a

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6 THE CARIBBEAN. I QlJR

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T H F C.-\RlBBE: \:\, A. R LANG, A B., A. l\I., L incoln, Nebr. SlIperjll/em/mt oj Schools. \\'e .. L'nh'ersit)", l "nivef"il)' of .. ka. j ISABEI I .A J).)oos, B : \ Prillcip.Jl. Claremont, ;\Iinn. l\1 .. College. Eng/isll utili, Socirll Problems. Joy. it is, indeed, to kilOW her I n school and out, for she: is such :t friendly son of person. W e Admire her greally for there seems to B e nothing she Can not do. W e E njoy her classes for, with her :IS te3cher, e\'t"n L atin seems L ess dull and tedi o u s Her reading s are Another of her accomplishments and a source of D elig h t to us. i\l uch of her spare time is given Over to THE CARIIIBEAN and other schoo l W e Doubt if we could go o n without her D aily word of c heer and encouragement, for S he is the mainstay and support of H igh. H ATT I E LEE HOR"8!:AK, B A ., i\1. \ Waxahachie, Tt=x. l'ni\"l'rsitr. ColumbiJ. English /lis/or)'. Her brains, we find, are not A ffected by her size, fJr, T hough she is ver y T iny, she seems to have a n I nfinite amount of kn.)wll;!dge. Our Education h as b ee n Largelr developed by h e r, E specially in E nglish and United States Historr. She has the aoi lity, not O nly to teach, but also to make her R eciw.tions interesting by the Narration o f perso n a l experiences and B y rec 'ountin g the dram as and stories which s he seems so E asi l y to remember. Attra cti"e she is, and dainty. K infol k a n d T exas are among her chief intcrC!its. ---------. -F X KARRER, A. 8., A., Pd., Auis/anl /0 Superill/utdm/. \\'il!OOn's \lodern Bu"iness College. Seattle. \\'ashington SI.tte :-':ormal School. Ellensburg. l'ni\er .. ity of \\a"bington. Columbh Lnher--it}. :-.:".W \'ork llniv('r .. il}. BEECHI1'.'G, .' \ B. Hutchinson, Kans. J..:.InSlS State :-':Orlllal School. Maybe she doesn't know all about A lgebr.t :lnd P hysics But s he kept it from u s if she dUt'",,,'t Enjoying a joke, she isn't afraid to L ,lUgh \\ uh Wi anti .H II", B eing fond of outdoor E xercise, she plays tennis morning. T hen tOO s he C all swim, and oftcn goes H iking. Taking all I n all, N o one can shl' isn't a Good spOrt. J F.AN" BARN"HOUSE, : \ B. Watsonville, C ;d. u-1J.nd Stanford. Jr .. I]nivcr_it}'. Spanish. M ,m), arc the friends of this kindly and A.greea ble person whom we Boast as our Spanish reacher. E vcn tho' she specializes i n Sp:mish she also L ikes B ible tcaching She is A n interesting speaker with a Rather friendly, pleasing voice. She Ne\'er loses Her patience O ver our mistakes, and is a lways willing to help U s with our difficulties in Spanish grammar, and E ven in other punling subjects.

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THE CARIBBEAN. ADELA F. BAh.EWEL1., Lallsing, Iowa. 10""3 ('ol\e!l'. Arne!'. loW!). B. S. in Home }o;eonomics. l'nh'enlil), ofCahrornia. Erollomi(S and J / od(rn In.flory. Appropriate, indeed, is the n ame of our !le\\ Domestic Science teacher, for no one can E.xcel her in this art. W e a l l L ike her very well And that is not only because $he can B akewell, but also because she is so Amiable and pleasant. She K nows just how to make parties interesting a n d E xciting, as we learned from our experience With the Saphs on 51. Patrick' s day. S h e is t h e idol of Every Sop homor e, a n d we h o p e t hat s h e ha s Learned to L ike us w ell enou gh to co m e bac k n ex t ye ar. HENRY C. B ACON B. S. ;"lauricetown N .f. Columbia Uni v e rsity. .\ltll//{ol A-techlm; rol Dmwiu,{, G mend Sc;m u H e is an E n t husiasti c tenni s p la ye r ; Nor does h e regret when h e ca n take a R ide on s h an k 's m a r e, a n d Yet h e s a good coo k too General Science is h is class H e a l so teach es Boys to sq uare A bloc k o f wood, making C o n d i t i o n that th e bloc k s hall n o t r ese mbl e an Omelet wh e n co m p leted. N o r doe s he f ail t o gi ve his pupil s a square deal. FACULTYSEN I O R GET TOGETHER One of t h e most e n jova ble even ts o f the sc h oo l year took place o n til e evenin g o f J un e J wh e n our principal Mi ss J. I sa b e lla Dodds, g a ve a dinner in h o nor of t h e Senio r s o f ''2'2, having also as her g uests th e faculty The dining r oo m o f t h e H o u se h old A r ts Department rang a s in previous t i m es w i t h l a u g hter a nd merrim ent. Promptly a t 6 30 o'cloc k dinne r was annollnced and the happ)' c r o w d marc h ed in and g r o uped the m se l ves about a w o nderfully Papa dOM raiment while decora ted t abl e, A c o l o r s c h e m e 0 f /u-t like a hon in a eagc of Daniels. g r ee n andgol d (the Senior co l ors) was u sed a n d was carried Ollt even to t h e dainty little nu t cups an d cle v e r combination place and me n u cards, All soo n discovered t hat t h e d inn e r itself proved every bit as delicious as i t so unded, a real credit to t h e domestic sc i e n ce cla sses wh o prepared and served it, a n d t o Mi ss Bake w ell under whose directi o n t h e w o rk wa s d o n e Thr o u g h o u t th e entire m eal a bu zzbuzz o f delig h tful too k p la ce upo n s ubj ec t s to whic h only Senio r s with t h e ir s t o r e full o f kn ow l edge could p oss ibl y do justice-graduatio n, colle g e THE CARIBBEA N an d various bits o f importance T o a s tmi stress o f th e evening wa s Mi ss ]. I. Dodd s wh o d e liv e r e d a t oast to the Senio r s wh o r es p o nded s h o wing the ir apprec ia ti o n to Mi ss Dodds and th e fac u.lt y Thus pa ssed the e v ening a s all tropical evenin gs do. A s the g u es t s departed they rate d I V l i ss D od d s on e o f the b es t and mo s t entertaining prin c ipal s Cristo bal Hi g h S c h oo l h a s e v e r h ad. MENU ('H I C K EN .0\. L A EMMA M ARY POTAT O E S fo'Hm,1 TU E FH;LD MI\ G GI E STJUNG BEANS B H O W N JELLY, J ) J CKLES, AN D B UT T E R FROM CAIl T ( W ) H I GHT T O T ABU: PACO SAL A D SALTE D W A F E R S W ESLEYS T O W N SENDS ICE CRE A M m R MAnJ Ql UES GOLD CAK E I1I VEIt J OIWAN con'EE M INTS

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TH E CAR IBB EAN. 9 I SEN IORS. INTRODUCED IN STYLE OF CHAUCER. lr-in-Chirf. '22, Pre'ident Atbbtic Org:miz:ltiou, '22_ \ ssi lanl F.dilor, '21. B:lSeooll, '20, '21. '22 c:lphin, Track, '20, '21. T here is a Senior boy y cleped Doric, Who is quite right according to friend H oyle, His sa n dy hair, that careless doth hang down, Doth partir cove r eyen of mildc brown Tho u gh he is ,'err wee as all can see, F 'rom dawn ti l l night he's bus)' as a bee. 1 n all thi s life no taske does he shirk, And faith, is well known for his worth\' work, And e:,k in sports also you'll sec his n;me, Through these he has well earned honor ;Ir\d f,lme, L o n g will he be remembered by the class Of ''2'2-that will so shortl y pass. -If/es/q To w lIsend, GEORGE CAR T WRIGHT. A-'Bist:lntBU'inessl\lanagcr, '21. Class \,ire President, '22 Athletic Elilor, '22, B:lSkttB:lII, '22. A boy there is; of Gatun town is he, Ful semel}' s :raight and fair as men can see; Of seventeen year of age is he, I trow, Of h eight h e h as some more, J gesse, to grow, Fair hair has he that waves upon his head, I n basketball he surely is not dead, Of clothes he ha s good taste and dresses well; His thoughts are clear, his voice rings like a bell. H e dances fairly; good is his approach T o folk; by man} he's y c1eped Roach", But this is not the name that will reach height I n future years; that n:lme is George Cartwright. -1ordtl1l Zimmrrmtlll1l. '2!, School Notel Edit!)!', '21. MA R Y F I ELDS. Ibskel B:lII.'20, She is a tall and dark complexioned gir l; Bro wn eyes she has, and hair of kinky c url. From northern trip returned s he in September, And northern days s h e ,ioyeth to remember. On Caribbean staR' she ranks ful hye; And all her sc h ool work's done without a s}'e. She likes to play at tennis, dance and bowl, And in all these she Can high honors h old, She loves to go to a baseball game, And with her rooting always brings us fame, And lO Ollr cla ss of 19'2'2 She's alwal's loyal, f:lithful. good and trew. Tre:n urc-, '22, EJLt or, '21. BALL. :\Jumn i Editor, '22. Ball, '23. -Jdtl Broum, There is in school, a bright YOllng Senio r girl, QlIite s hort and slim, whose golden loc ks do curl I n soft, sweet waves about her oval face; Her eyes arc somewhat gray, and somewhat green Although she is not jealous) neither mean. Of this maid's dispositio n we will sa}' She lively i s, and merry all the day; She dances glyly, for she loves this well; And of her other sportS, her friends will tell That in t he morning, when that it is earl),. T o swim, and tennis play, she loverh dearly. And of her manner let me tell }'OU this, Her ,'oice and actions sweet, arc ne'er amiss. This maid, who has been cleped Well liked by all the teachers h e r e, is s h e; B y them no more than by the Senior class Who long have known this bright young Senio r lass, -Emma TOWlISflJd,

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10 THE C :\R1 BBEAN.

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TI-II:: CARIBBEAN. If

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10 TH E CAR I B R EAN. -------------------------------------------BIlliDe'll '!'J BashtBalI. 'JJ LER O Y S-wlmming, '22. Ther iz a tal and slender Senior bO' \\' hom some c1ep o th ers L eroy. His hair is brown; it h ides hise e}'en greye Carefree he is and happy nighte and dare; H e lo\'es to sing, and also to beat time. B r buying chewi n g gum with every dime, H e keeps supplied with t hat which breaks the riwle So firmlr maad by teachers of the school. "The Chandler" hight his faithful auto steed I n which he l o v es to "birn the road" with speed. I I e dances wei with proud high stepping gate, I n scool at hletics he is upp to date. On studyi n g is not set ful moc h e his le s te, But of n e w larall friends he is the beste, D. $t-bool S o telEdilor,':?2 B asket Ball, '2 1 '22. A girl ther is and that a jolly one ; She mer r r is and always ful of fun Tho somdel plum p, she i s extremely fair, \\'ith eyen blue and light and curly hair. She ca r es not much f o r daunce or fancy ball ; All outdoo r sportS s h e l ovet h m ost of all. I n basket ball and s wimmin g s he delights; We kn o w in evcry g ame s h e alway s fights T o k eep Cri stob al Hi g h School in the l ead She's always ready when ther is the need, She seweth well and also cocketh too -\ good l y wif, I trowe, s he'd make for )'OU. An all r o un d spo rt this girl is found t o be. \\' e call her Emm a, for so named i s :.he. -1922. Ba/l. IDA BROW1\. B all, '2D. '21. '22. Draaulit'1 A girl th ere is fuJI s mall and very fair W ith eyes of blu e and very curly hair; I n basketball and s wimming s h e s h ows migh t, And dancing finds s h e to h e r heart's de light. The S:lme swee t girl :It sch oo l and in the h o me, Full well s he talks of times that s h e did roam, P o r two long years s he trave l ed eve r y morn T o B albo:l sc h ool, but n ow s h e d oes adjourne T o C, H S. and we a r e glad to h ave A Senior lass so tr:.Je. Y ou may h e r kn o w As Ida Br own, s h e's "Snibs" to u s I tr o w -Mary FiddJ. \\,E S L E Y TO\\'NSEND. '2 1 '22 ""IQuning, '2'0, '22 I tell you of a worth) Senior 00) The huskiest of this class so full of j oy His face i s r ed, and bright and r :tt her plump; ;'o r Sp::lrts we find him always on the jump, I n height tho h e can rea c h but to the a\'erage Pull military, s traight i s hise carriage. :OVo ple a s ure finds h e in the dance's whlrl M e think s perhaps the reason is a girl! P .. II w ell h e like s to ride a gentle h orse. But never walk s he-eek a small golf course. Quiet is he when it i s tim e to be--B ut talkin g all the other tim e is he, H e sco l ds h imself in lan guage goodl)' str o n g; Neer will h e lead to Start of any wr ong B ut Stllll him up and take him as a who l e, A warm place in o u r h earts s ur e h e doth h o l d. -Paul C Cireubtiop '2'2. B aseba ll '2 1 '22 Basket Ball '21. '22. Swimming,'22. A good fellow the r e i s in C. H. S.; A better lad I trowe can not b e g uessed. His eyes are brown; f orsoot h they matc h his hair Wh ere e'er he's needed always h e 'll b e there. H e plays at ba s ket ball becau se h e's tall, The part o f cente r, and covers all the h a ll, A .passing, dribbling, s h ooti n g as h e goes A nd :llwa) 's makes the basket f o r which h e throws. Not 0' w o rd speaks he m o re t h an there i s n eed; Of dances, frolics and sllc h h e ta k e s n o A better built boy I trowe, therc's n owhere n OIlC. W e find this lad i s clep ed Zimmerman -C:eorge Cflrlwri,{lII WLDRED S TAFFORD. Exeb:t.ngeEJitM, '21. Bask e Ball '21. A'll ong the Seni o r class, th ere is a girl, W h ose locks of gold are b ob b ed thikke and curl .'\ bout her face; fors oo the i t is petite. Alth o that s h e is languid, she i s sweet Of manner, ;\lail arri\' als find h er ga), If letter s come from him so far away, I tro w e s h e l ove th daintee clot h es to war e That s uit h er w e i and make h e r l oo k ful fayre, P o r dancing and for b o wlin J h a s s h e But a s f o r ba s ketball she see m s t o lacke I n p ep, Not m ac h s h e s peeks whe n in a party B ut what s h e s ay s receive s a w
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THE CARIBB EAN. 13 H ear Y e H ear Y e H ear ''( e All p e r s on s having bu s in ess b e f o r e thi s H o n o r abl e C o urt will attend t o the r e a d in g o f r h e la s t will and t estame n t o f the Class o f ''22 o f Cristob a l H i g h S c hool. T o a ll WllOlII it may COl/Cirri, Greel ings B o win g to the in scrutable m a r c h o f time decr ee in g that th e Class of 1 922, o f t h e Cri s tobal H i g h S c hool must within the n ext thirty d a ys depart frol11 the s a c r e d prec in c t s o f the ir b e l o v e d domicile they, having a ccumulate d a w ealthy store o f knowle d ge happiness, and many othe r good things tre a sured in m e m ory's vault, f ollo win g trad iti o n desi r in g t o l eave a share o f the ir w orld l y p ossess i o n s to othe r s l ess f ortunate in things materi a l, h e r e b y, sane l y and legall y, make this, the i r la s t will and testament: I. T o G e ral d D. Bliss i s give n th e k ey to all window s n o t o nl y that h e may f ree l y and deepl y partake o f our purest a i r but that a handy place b e pr ovided f o r r a pidl y disposing o f raffl e ti c kets in case a l a r ge a n d satisfied stude It bo d y in s i s t s upo n riding hi s bi c ycle 2 A private offi ce carrying a t y p ewrite r wit h two attac hed t e l e p h o n es i s b es t o w e d upo n Leo Ebe r ellz with whi c h goes our title o f manage r in the h o p e tha t Leo will manage t o t ell the same story over b oth pho nes. 3 To J ulin e Grange r goes G eorge's algebra formula, How t o Sh o w Correc t An s w e r s to Mis s B eeching." To pro t ect fr o m the sun, w e al so l e a ve t o h e r a :e cov e r e d swimming pool whi c h will let cream tone n o t interfe r e with a red and pretty complexio n but will prevent those h o rri d and painful bli s ters. 4-The libr ary do o r i s to b e pla ced un de r t h e exclusiv e contro l o f L o ui se H ente r t hat s h e may h o ld private conve r satio n s in the S e ni o r sanctuary withou t being di sturbe d by the fa culty. T o h e r, a s w e ll, w e impart Emma's c levern ess in s milin g with h e r eyes. 5 Sin ce Edward N l a y wa s Presid ent of the h o p e ful J uni o r s w e confe r upo n him \\'esley T o wn se n d s aptitude f o r w a nderin g around the assem bl y room a nd hi s rosy and v i go r o u s h e al t h. Furthe r w e l e a ve t o him a capac ity f o r a f e w G's, a s E 's l oo too E z o n S e ni o r cards. 6 T o H enry J\ioor e the Junio r p o liti cian, w e grant L e r oy s d exterity in supporting the opposite s i de o f the ques ti on. A lso, h e has our p e r mi ss i o n to u se Zim's F ord-Arro w that h e may atten d staff m ee tin gs that are n O t h e l d in that far off corn e r F o r t R a ndolph. 7 Em oge n e Nas h i s t o hav e Mary s yo uthful n ess and h e alth. T o h e r i s l e ft also I da's cle v e r n ess in g etting the thing (?) s h e s after. 8 o r o A l e x L in cze r w e present J o r dan's r ec ip e f o r r e a c hin g the h e i ght o f s i x feet, toget h e r wit h "Clare nce's" g l asses f o r studying i t. Alex look s so uncomfortabl e t h a t w e surre nder to him the seat o f h o n o r with c u s hi o n s and a s p ec ial e asy c h a ir during cla ss r ec i t a t i o n s 9 A s a help to E d di e S o l ol11o n, w e furni s h him with a scrap" b oo k in whi c h h e may r eco rd his experie n ces That his f ootwo rk Illa y b e e nli ve ned w e b es t o w upon hilll L e roy' s lig h t and grace ful dan c in g T o hi s e n e mies we g i ve "Clar_ e n ce s l ive r. 1 0 j\t attie Pulli g i s cut o R with n othing but our best wis hes, f o r s h e i s a lr e ady possesse d of h ealth, happiness, c h eerfulness, kin d lin ess, help fuln ess ability fri ends and e v e r ything that a girl s r equires to make h e r so u ght afte r. II. \V e endo w Erns t Euphrat with J\1agnuson's t im e so that h e may atte n d soc i a l gathe r in gs, prac ti ce hi s piano piece, and cure t ootha c h es It may n o t b e p olite t o grant anyon e perso n the h o n o r s that are d u e the S e ni o r cl ass a s a whol e so w e n o w d i s p e nse to the Junior cla ss the S e ni o r pe n o wn ed b y n o o n e but used b y all the S e ni o r s The high e r degree o f inte lli ge n ce in hig h sch oo l

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T H E C.'\RIBI3F.'\:-<. ----------------------------------is marked the seating arrangement; rhe brightest sit in the back seats. B eing of superior kn ow l edge, we vacate our back seats to the l ess intel lig en t Juniors hoping they may acquire almost as much brains as the present Senior class tliJ. That the .I uniors may fed a littl e superior t o their unde r -class men w e leave to them our phantom privil eges T o th e Sophomore class w e give the powe r to hold thei r mcm b e r s until they s it on the platform f o r their diplomas. \\'e also give them permission to k eep on with their u s ual pep. Illay sit a f ew seats farthe r back so that th e s hilling heads of theincorning babies will nor hurt th e ireyes. Last, we l eave to the faculty our best wishes that rhey may send out from C. H S. oth e r Senior classes almost as bright as ourselves. \\"e l ea \Ie thanks to them f o r keeping the s illy underc la ss m e n quiet that we might study in p eace \\'e express our apprecia tion for t h e patient way in w h ich t hey dealt with u s, usin g their spare time in h e l ping u s. H aving done justice to the faculty and all who f ollo w u s, we wish to express Ollr sorrow for The Fres hm e n hav e OUf p e r miss i o n to k ee p on going. \\'e also leave to th e m theanor trim-lIKISI..r.y HOLlIr. leaving them. \\'e have all been good chums and we h ope th:tt r h e ming th e m close \\'e give them 5tateiy fre e us e of th e shower bath that they may reduce the high spirit of the "first day"' freshie They 11;-C. H S. spirit ma y co ntinu e as hig h as it ha s b ee n in the past. \\'e l e ave our b es t wishe s in C. H S. for all its mernbers T H E L AUNC H ING OF OUR SHIP. GeQrgl! Ctlrt:vr; ght, '22. \\"i th the help of a n o ted engineer and ten good w o rkm e n the k ee l Orgnni':.ntion of the good s hip Senior, was lai d early in October, 19'21. large trees were cut, but f e w were sound enough to u se for th e rib s, Privileges j \ .fter thes e were secure h fasten ed with spikes o f G ood Advia, they covered with many firm boards called Rules, which, when finished, mad e a good wate r proof hull of Discipline Next, a good ten -c ylinder e ngin e, Ene r g)' was put in place and arranged to drive a large propeller of three blades, Good Work, Coop e ratioll, and School Spirit. T h e hull was covered with a well-laid deck of School Work, upon whi c h were erected a foremast of lllid Year Exams and an aft mast of Finnl Exams, the s u ccessful climbing o f which denoted the ability o f rhe sailors. A larg e funnel through which the refuse, Bnd II/a rk, L aziness, and Car e lessness soon f O llnd way o f esca p e, was also erected on t h e deck. / \11<1 last, a b eau tiful bridge of H OllOI' was bui l t a little to th e r ea r o f t h e foremast. After t h e installati on of a Dodds rudde r and a splendid painting depicti n g Social Activities, t h e good s h ip Senior l e ft t h e docks of f/acnt;on and started on a nine months' to u r t h e first stop to be Graduatioll Harb or.

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ADDED TONNAGE FOR AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE The followin g vessds, transitin g the High Sc hool canal, a l C ristobal, Canal Zone. during the ftsca; year 1921-1 922. h ave passed II most successful examination by the Board o f Locai Ins pector s a n d h ave rece I ved commissions quall.fylng them 10 navlgau o n any ocea n Name of \'C!8e1. ( Pupil.) Paule. Doyle' M aryGlcnn Leltoy B Magnu so n Ida Bro o' J o rdan Zimmermann' W el!ley T own'leud' Marj orie BalJ Emma T own!Jend' Goorl;e('artwright' i\lildred I. Stu.ffon" 'Sail. 0111'111'111 (Partlll,,) A. P Kuud El'aM J B and Gertrude Charles and Emily U:myandldn H erman and Ellen Frank II. aud C'e iJeJ GCOTgl"and Ahce Frank II :Iud J Mllry Per ey F and \ I ildr e d Nationalit\ ( Plf)l'tofl)lflll) Washinl:t()n, 1) ,(' SUllCrior, \\' i 8 OranIl;C,}/ J Fe Adam n I Chatt:uloo;ta, T enn Washin:tUn,l)(' CIIiUtanoogll, Terlll Pal c rae r Ii. It was unabL' to l-xtrie,u c Two 160-pound werl' dropped from of it self and r eJll;lined th(,rt" with the top of hC
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16 THE CARIBBEA Outer !W, upper M ay fl'resitlcntl, l'III>e( ,"tht-Miss Ilo mbeak C Adl'lor). Center left-Gerald Cente rri 6ht-Alc1 Linclcr. Lower left J ulme CrnlllCer !..ower rillht.-Loui-e lIelite r I nner SI:lr, UllPer :nter.-Emol(t'ne (Seer left -.!':Jenr / MI)re. Upper right.-Erll!>t Euphrt l Lower left Emilio Solomon. Lo .... e r rirhl.-Leo E ller",", B o t to m cente r ;\Iattlc PulJiR;.

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THE CARIBBEA 7 ------------------" e JOSEeH'S REre""'ONS 0' C<.ASS 0' '", $"l J osep h makin g his u sual r ound o n Saturday m o rnin g, h ad com e to the Junior s ec tion. H e b e n t weari l y ov e r to pick up a paper unde r one o f t ht: des k s ) and f O llnd on it the name Edward May, and a big r e d "E. "Chu c k mon! D es h e r e Junio r c hildre n ham t o o bi g to m ess hup d e floo di s wa y f e h e v e r y time h i com es hin di s p la ce d e y ave a gre t big bunc h ah pape r h o n d e A oo, han hi haillt wi shin' t o d o d i s ting hatal. "I-Ie v e r y time hi pi c k hup ha pi ece h o pape r wi d de name H ed di e May h o n hit, hit halways ave ha big wh re d "hE" han hit. Hever y whun of d e childre n hin him cla ss lik e hi m pl enty w ell f o h h e i s de Pn:sielcl1t, hand h e has who n e p lenty meda l s f e funning. "Han YOLI kn o w di s b o y, B ud Bli ss, dat halw. l ),s rid e a bik e h all d e time ? Miss Barnhouse halways hi s complainin' b out di s boy, f e h im n e v e r wi shin' to come to cla ss wh e n hit ham d e time. H e ham always makin' mi sc hi e f w i d hall d e t e a c hers." J oseph's m o n o logu e wa s interrupte d h e r e b y the fallin g o f a book fr o m a c r o wded d e s k. .-\s h e s toop e d to pi c k it up, h e grumbled, Di s boy, H enry Moor e, him never keep s him d es k s t r ai ght hat al. H e v ery time hi com e hin h e r e ha book ham fallin' h out him desk hand makin' ha l atta n o i se han som etin' m a r f e hi t o pi c hup. Mistah Ene r y ham jus t com e to d i s sc hool d i s year, and t hey m a k e h e d e exchange heditor h o f d e Caribe in S tar' and wid d i s tirl e him keep s hi jumping hal de time, f c h e v e r y time hi t urn haround h e wishin' f o r m e to run to the post office wid more mail. "Hand dis boy H ernes t H eufhrat! ''''e ll, dis boy make hi s o surprised, f e wh o n e da' hi walke d into d e hasse mbl y hal' hafte r school hand dis boy ham playin' Darkto wn Strutte r s Ball" h a n de piano so w e ll. Di s boy hallways stay late an' study hand hi wre ally tink him's goin g b e ha d entis t l ik e hirll brudder in Iaw. "Dat i\lattie ham d e Hulu Hulu girl, han wh e n d e C H S have dair country fair, s h e am d e 8 1 0 10 2 b es t one in de play. S h e ham c ollec tin' h a l d e pitc h e r f e d e h annual. "Emilio S o lo m o n ham de b ig knockh o u t kin g hof d e sc h o o l. Habo u t two months a g o h e was gowi ng catch h a big fight, but h im catc h a b lood p o i s illill' in him han; so him can't fight f e h a lo ng timt:. Di s ham wre all y s a d caUS e hi h a m wreally wi s hin to see him fight. ., D i s h eah Leo, he am have ha bi g h e a d f o r bu s iness wh e n it com e t o fixin' f e a play o r somethin' lik e dat, bu t whe n hit comes to g oing t o classes h e haint lik e di s hatal; h e w ould rathe r run ha errand f e the t e a c h e r h e n y da. Al e x h a m de barbe r w h e n all de boys come f ro m d e h e i ght grade to b e fresh m e n. H e cut h o ff all de boys' hair, d e n h e leave hit h o n d e Roo' an dis make pl enty m o work f o r m e Dis boy ham use hu p hall d e colore d c halk dat hi put around, c ali se him haJwa ys c ir culatin' round nuk in s i g n s o n de b oaru t o m a k e peop le kno w (b t him his ue c ir c ul a t in' m anager "Dat i\' l i ss Julin e hi haint kn o w what s h e g ain' bt: wh e n s h e gro w s up f e de oth e r da' hi h ear s h e prac ti sin' in the J uni o r play an d e n hi h ear s h e playin' d e piana, h e n hi ham sure s h e i s heed e r g ain' b e ha gre t hactres h o r ha g r e t mus ic ian, "And dat j \1i ss Lula, Lawd, m e son, d e h othe r da' hi h ear som e talkin' hin de sc h o ol room h e n hi r e all y tink it wa s ha Dutc h lad)', but hi com e hin an' fin' dat it wa s Miss Lula. I h ear dat s h e s h o d u make a g o o d jump cente r o n the Gatun bas k e t ball t eam too. Mi ss Emo g e n e s h o ham ha goo d t e nni s p la ye r f e e v e r y m ornin' wh e n hi hi s goin' d own f e d e mail h i see s h e h Ollt p layin', han de othe r da' hi h ear s h e s in gin' han hi ham sure s h e am g ain' b e ha s inger, HevCl'), whun o f clem Junio r girl s haf ha good learnin'; in fa c d i s ham ha good class f c true," muttered J oseph as h e pi c ked up hi s broom s and s l o u c hed out o f the room

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THE CARlBBEA'\'.

PAGE 21

THF. CARIBB EAN. 1 H E . 1mlfl Colberg, K ing Lecoagaul o i sg alli c of f\Iars, who deligh ted in his great armies, was o n e day inspecting a training fie l d wh e n h e and his attendants were startl ed by a threate nin g rumbling that resembled mu c h the thunder t hat so often reverberat es through t h e heaven s. .-\lIegorniac, the astronomer, cam e fly in g o\'er the field, H ail, mighty king, and pardon t hi s intrusion, but I have just made a t e rribl e d iscovery. One of o u r n eighbor in g planets, the \\'arld, ha s b ee n torn a s under by some unknown hand
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2 0 THE CARlBREAN. J! 1 '" a .. e s: d: 1 I H I Ii ii"g I .!f e:; 1 E-0'-., 1 Jj '" i :.3 1 g 1 3 0 .:j .; li ,,: .
PAGE 23

TH E CARIBB EAN. 11 I I e EN ALPH,.\BE T ICALL)' S PEAK I:'-.'G. !o;,------------A is for A shton who to Balboa did go; And for Arcia and Abendroth w h o'll stay he r e we know. B i s for Bridges-then too for Bu rgoon; By their Bright indications, they'll be great men soon. e is for Coffey, COlls in s and Campbell, And also for Collins who from l i S did ramble. D 's f o r our O uey with go ld in her curls : AmI for D utiful 0 IUghters-th:I.t's all of us girls! E is for Eden w h om all of li S k n ow, And a lso for marks which we're gladdest to s how. F is for F i s he r F itz-William, and F ields, And for marks whi c h JlIrely no card of ours yields G's for Gatun w hose folks COille on I h e b u s; And a lso for Gover who s gone far from liS. H is for H opkins, our president dear, W ho se nature i s full of sunsh ine ami cheer. I is for Interest w h ich we all try to s h ow, For we know t hat, with out it, our wisdom won't grow. J is for J ukes, our w h o married; W e wish that among u s she longer had tarried. K is for Kid(hhness w : li c h we kn o w we'll outgrow, And also for K nockers who m we don't care to know, L 's for Layton and L enge l and I. in cze r and L ee; T he first tWO :lIllong u s no longer we see. M 's for 1I.I:trchosk\ and ;\l endes ami r<.lar, W ho'll all be people before they are gray. N is for and :\'oise, Surely quite inappropriatc to our gir l s and bars. o i s for Olivcr, the girl with the pep, Who as ba..,ket ball captain has made us a rep, P stands for Patten, Poole, Peterson, P ulgar, All of whom find it c a s)' "Espanol Q is for Quines which none fully e njoy, An d also for Questions which our minds do employ. R s for Ra i n y season when umbre lla s w e carry And for Rain which will catch lis-a s sure a s w e tarr}'. S is for Solomon, for Smith, and for SCOtt, An d for Stewart, and Stiles-Oh my! What a lot! T is for Tro\\bridge, Tufts, T ucker, and T uley, F o u r lu<,ket-ball girls -and all good ones-tru l) U 's for Un animous which we hope to remain, And for that Underst:tnding we're striving to gain. V s f o r \'igor, and Vim Whi c h the rna :ana fever wi[1 cause to grow s lim W 's for Wi rt7, also for Walla ce; The I.lttcr ha s in our s wimming a sobce. X .!itand s for unknown as all good Freshmen know; r<.lay we face it se renely whatever it s how Y is for the Y e Irs which before us still lie; And al so for Youthful which we'll be till we die. Z is for Zt!al willch we have now w e kn o w; And also f o r Zest we hope alwa)'s to show. CRAMMI NG FOR

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THE Cil R1BB EAN. M arjorie Ball, '22. As [he .'>'Ilimni of Cristobal H igh School gradually increase in numbe r, rhey continue to s how the same pride and loyalty for their o l d sc h oo l and t h e sam e joy in remembering rhe past. The old days are summed up in a little p oe m written a membe r o f the Class of 1920, K e nneth Green. "One and better," did you say? Whr. friend, 'twas o nly There's in his place of yore, Pete Clarit y right beside the doo r There's Catherine, Susie L ula, B o urke, All engaged in yea rb oo k work. Dorothy, and A rlene B a ll, And Kenneth Edwards, good friends all. There's J ack and L inda l e, Kate and 'Een : \ Iice, Etha, AI-old bean. There's Alson Scars, and h andsome H arl, K irby. Alice, Frank, and Carl, i\l ud and i\li ldred, s he is new, T ownsend, R oac h, and L e R oy too. T here's Emma, Mary, J ane, and P au l D oris, Chester, and il.larjorie B all. Good friends, I greet rou all to-day JUSt as I did yesterday. 1 9 1 8 CRI STOBAL, C. Z. Being in the fir s t cla ss to b e g raduated from Cristobal Hi g h I ca n appreciat e how muc h yo u have advanced s in ce the class of 1 8 passed out. I admire your schoo l spirit above everythin g. I think your athletics and the effort you are making to publish a magazine worth y o f our sc h o I h elp greatly in keeping up the enthusiasm. So, accept my best wis h es for TilE C i \IHr l H::AX, Cristobal H igh School, and the class of '22. L ULA IVIAE COMAN (nee PULlIO). BERKELEY, C AL. I am n'Jw a Junior at [h e Uni ve r sity of Calif.Jrnia. Next September J ex p ec t to enter Columbia University to tak e up work in its Coll e g e of J ournalis m. TH E C ARIBBEAN la s t year was great, and 1 am sure thi s year's will b e better. 1 certainly wis h the ediwrs and contribu w r s all t h e in the world. CATHERINE TEESE \ V AID. DE N\'ER, COLO. I took a yea r and a half in the C o l orado Sch ool of i\l ines at G o ld e n and dropped out in 19'10. I got h o l d o f a n o l d transit and w ent up into \ Vyo ming and, callin g myse l f a civi l e ngin ee r started locatin g h o m esteade r s on the ir claims, It was up in the Big Horn l\l lountain and at times I was over 125 mil es from a rai lroad. The r e w e re lots o f deer, e lk, an [ e l o pe and s uch game I [ i s a great cOLIn try! Last fall 1 decided I had better get back into sc h oo l again, so I entered D e n ve r Unive r sity I am taking a course in c h e mical e ngin eer ing and ex p ec t w fini s h at the C olorado J\lin es after 1 ge t through h e r e. I want to tell YOll h o w good it made m e f ee l t o find m y name s till o n t h e mailing list of TH E CARIBBEAN. LELAND BOURKE CRI STOfjAL, C. Z. I'm g la d to know that s u c h progress i s b eing made with the sc hool annual. I t i s gettin g b etter every year and I'm so g lad o f t hat, becau se the first annual was put o u t wh e n m y c la ss wa s the seni o r cla ss, bac k in 18. Since that year I've

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THF. CAR l BHEAN. watch ed t h e book improve :lnd with it the sc h oo l spirit. A s for myse lf, I've maintained a of watc hful waiting, you mi ght but am l e a \'ing for t h e Sta t es o n t h e nin e te enth of and u) Ilot expect [Q rewrIl. i\11:-,'oT CH}\PEL HILL, :"\T C. I am t e ac h ing Spani s h an d F r e n c h in a hig h sc hool in North Caro l in:l. I-I:trd w ork) but I lik e it. B es t wis h es for TilE ELIZABETH rER:..'ER. Sus ie I larriso n, afte r compl e tin g a secretarial course returne d t o t h e Z o n e and is n o w livin g in Cristobal. 1919. L o s C AL. I a m wor king for t h e r ontier K h u t e n Electric Company, w h i c h i s olle o f the o ldest in L a'; Angel es and I lik e it well. The only regret I h ad in l eaving r h e Zon e was that I could not bring it with m e KENNETH F..DW :\RDS BOSTON, am a junior in Simmo n s C ollege where I am taking a secretar ial course. I wis h YOli s u ccess with t h e annual. ALICE A .RLENE BALL. D o r othy: \nna i\lolltanye (nl'e \\'e ir ) is re siding in Pittston, P a. \\'e hope t hat so me:;: day J o hn !\ l ol1tanye, J 1'., may retu rn to t h e Z o n e to b e a cla ssmate o f Jimmy C oman, .I r. James G erard Raymond i s residing in C o lo:1_ H e is working o n t h e 1920 Los ANGELES, C.-\I,. I am at present w orking for the American T e ac h ers' Age ncy and fin d my work interesting, but am contemplating entering the University o f California in the fall. J am in O\'e with Califvrnia, but s till ha ve a warm s pot in my heart for d ear oU Cristobal High E T HA BE\ INGTON. BERKELEY, CAl.. I am still studying a t the L 'niversity o f Calif v rni:t and expect to g,') into business when I com plete my studies Best wishes (or a better CARIBUE.\N than ever before. HARI.AN \Y CRISTOOAL, C. Z. :\san apprentice primer, I am ve r y bu sy making the' 1912 issue o f rilE CARIIJBEAN. T h e "printing bu g ha s C lital l':OllS ly performed o n m e and, whil e I entertain n o thou ght o( ahandoning my desir e t o answer the ;'call o( the air," with the aid of knowledge s lowl y infu sed into m y green-gray matter b y that P rincipal o f P rin c ipal s !\l i ss K I. Davis, wirh tht: h e l p o f printers arollnd m e, :lnd by sedulous application, I will first try to make myself a printer worthy o f the name \\"ith b es t wishes f o r the annual and three r Olls ing c h ee r s for the cla ss o f 19'2 0 ALBERT Don.E. COL' DERSPORT, PA. I am out 011 a f.lrm in Pennsyl vania about a mi llio n mil es from n o w h ere B es t wis hes f o r t h e s u ccess o f the annual and t:'e happiness o f t h e gra duati n g class. I--::ENNETH GREENE. Alire Stilso n i s residing with h e r pJ.rents III Co l ol1. .'\lsol1 S e ar s i s stil l attel1dil1g B e rk e l e y C ollege ill Califvrnia. BOSTo:;..', i\ I Ass. B es t for t h e s:.lCcess o f the cla ss o f 192'2. I f there are any o f its m embe r s w h o are t hinking o f entering the dental profession, I advise serio u s cOlltemp la t i o n, becau se .'-\1\ that glitters is not gC)ld." The course is 11::)\V five and it m ea n s a g;-in d frolll start to fini s h o r those wh o start will never fini s h. A s a greetin g to m)' c la ssmates, I s h ould lik e to m e nti on that all m orning we have b ee n having a big s now storm which ca uses Harlan H olmwood's poem "The Call o f P an:1ma," to make a very strong a;1peal to Ille. :-\I so H ello, Class of '20, do w e eat?" I wis h the e...lito.i:d staff b es t s u ccess in every l ine. I s h ould l ike a lso to h ear from all o l d friends on the Can:d Zone. L 1NliALE D.'\\IES

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THE CAR1BB EAN. Katherine Burg oon, l1ow,\lr5. Stewart, is s till with us in C o lon. J B F ields Jr.) i s studying m ec hani ca l e ngi n ee ring in R ice Institute, T exas Lillian Cotton r ecently changed h e r name to \ "3n \\"ag n e r a nd i s n o w l iv in g in New Cristobal. 1921. SYRACUSE, N. Y. 1 am taking a pre-medic course in Syracuse L lniversity and have so far b ee n sliccess ful in m y studies. 1 am pl edged in the Gamma Eta Gamma Fraternity, and am residing in th e ir c hapter h ouse. There is nothing lik e fraternity l ife or spirit. I have h ea rd of th e fine sc h oo l spirit this year and J on l y hope that it will aid yo u in publi s hin g the b es t CARIBBEAN ye t. R e m ember, "A word t o the wise is unnecessary; i t i s on l y t h e f oolis h who ne ed to be told." FRANK RAYMOND. STATE COLLEGE, P A I a m taking a cou r se in M ec h anical Enginee rin g at Pennsylvania State College. I wis h that this C ARIRBEAN may b e bigg e r and better than ever. C ARL DUEY. FORT RANDOLPH, C. Z. ha ve just r ece ntl y moved to Randolph but lik e it very much. I want to say that th e students of Cristobal Hig h Sc h oo l were very kind to me whe n I ente r ed last yea r, a complete stranger. I since rel y hope that thi s year's a nnu al will b e a big s uc cess ELEANOR Z IMMER l\ lANN. COLUMBUS,MISS. 1 am studying at the Mississ ippi State C ollege for women. I am enjoyin g my w o rk imm e n se l y, but get l o n eso m e for myoid Isthmian frie nd s. KIRBY C harl es HelH e r has b ee n stayin g at Hampton Roads, Va., but i s planning o n taking up an e l ec tri ca l course n ex t yea r Alice Hunter h as b ee n filing in the Americ an Fore i g n Banking Corporation, but expects t o leave u s n ex t year to ente r S imm o n s Colleg e in Boston. GAT UN. Geo rge Car/wright, '22. Ships pass north and s hip s pass sou th Thr.:)ugh G a tun. Few bird s B y overhead, Among them buzza rd s with o ut sp r ead wings. Lighth ouses, scattered h ere and there, Safely guide the sh ip s f r om lake and ocean. L ake, but n ot ocean, touc hes s h ores In Catun. Thick jungle b o rd e r s Coconut palms bedeck the s treets; R oyal palms as well we see Whi stles o f departing s h ips Seem to mark the hours. From ocea n seven mile s away Comes the wind. I t l oose n s fruit s f r o m t heir high nest The wind sways palms, B ends deep grass, I s the feature of t h e d r y season, H elps cay u cos sail home. The locks, an engineering f eatu r e, Join the sepa rated America s Lower ships to sea l evel, Mix wate r s sa l t and fre s h And make the t own important. Soldiers numer ous, in s uits of khaki-Drilling s ho oting practice, s p o rts their w orkGuard the Canal. Crops, a few, the C h ine se grow L ettuce, b ea n s, s pinac h s u c h. The soil i s n ot f ertile and theref ore i s n o t sown. Swimming pool well enjoyed, Cons i sts o f float and raft and water. I n t h e cente r of our t own Stands t h e clubhou se. Pool room, gym and movie s Library, re adi n g room, bowling too, are there, And f or our treatrefre s hment s Thus s e rv es thi s on l y building of it s kin d The public Of Gat un. T h e c hur c h bells ring But few obey th em, Sunday is pictur ed :'IS a day of re s t I n Gatun. In Gatlin.

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THE CAR IBR EAN. ----U P T HF. PILCO MAYO fr. F. BowerJ, '2-/. \Vho knows what may foll o w, wh e n we, in Ollf boyhood p ledge ou rselves to do things, w h ic h even at r h e tim e of greatest inte rest, seem im possible? \Vhe n l was in hi g h sc h oo l in the Canal Zone, my friend, V es ley T o wn send, and 1 d iscover e d two t hin gs upo n whi c h we agreed: Firs t t hat marriage has b ee n the m eans o f ru ining many good me n ; the r e f ore w e determin e d to stay away fr o m any s u c h entangle m e nts; second, that civilization lik e a ripe guava, l oo k s fair enough o n the surface but inside i s eate n b y worm s. A s a re sult of t h ese bits of sophistry, we declared o u r inten tion o f spending our l ives in exploring far (rarn human kind. Little di d w e d r ea m how n carly so m e o f our p l a n s w ould b eco m e reality. T wo years ago I was graduatc d from J o h ns Hopkin s College o f Medi c ine. J\1y inte rest in SOllt h America b ei ng s t ro ng, 1 settled in Buenos A i res and s ucceeded ill building up a good practice One night jus t as I returned from a professio nal call, there was a l oud rapping at t h e door. I n re s pon se to m y call, w h o s h o u l d rll s h in but T o wn s end. H i s gree tin g was characteristic. "\\' h y don't yo u live in a decent joint, parkawo w s k y ? 1 had a n awful time to find thi s h ole I got your address f r o m you r fol ks and then J n e arl y ha d to walk m yse l f to death to find yo u r s h ac k. I managed to pacify him b y sharing the good di nn e r whic h m y cook had prepare d. Aftc r di nn e r h e continued I m hooked up with a bunch of b utte rfly-c h a s i n g old f ossils from the National G eograph i c S ociety. They want t o go to t h e C haco and inte r v i e w t h e Indians W e n ee d a doctor. How a b o u t it? Will yo u go ?" "WillI go?" 1 fairly yelle d I will, YOll know. 'Vhe n do we start ? T ell m e the p lans. " V e il, k ee p your s hirt o n will you? Y o u can't start to-nigh t! The object i s to locate a new bunc h o f quebrac h o trees The o ld ones are about lIsed up. The sci e ntifi c g u ys expect to stay until w e have located the trees. " Vha t are quebrac h o trees, anyway?" ] asked; H J have b ee n here two years and 1 never h eard o f the things Are they good to eat?" "That's j u s t lik e you. Always w anti n g so m e t hin g to eat. Tannin i s extrac ted fr o m the trees and lIsed in tannin g l eather, h e explained. '-\'e sat and talked over our plans until q uite late. I don't b e l ieve I s l ept a bit that ni ght. \ V o uld that w ee k n ever pass? Think of it! Seven wh o l e days! Of course t h e r e was p l enty t o do. \\'e had to la y in a stock of provi s i o n s guns, ammunition and the lik e Most of thi s wa s don e by the m e n o f the Society, h o wever. At la s t the day arrived and w e b oarded a river steame r b ound for F ormos a. F o r h o u rs we were out of s i g h t of land in a turbid muddy sea. Then w e r e a c h e d the riv e r's m outh a n d s tarted 011 o u r four-day trip. The next mornin g we made our first stop at R os ari o, the second largest city o f Argentina. All durin g t h e f ollo win g day, small floating is lands drifted by on the s l uggish current. T h ese i s l ands w e r e seething with the glistenin g bodies o f water s nakes and occasionally we saw a wild pig marooned. The n ex t m orning we passed the partially c ivilized territory o f Chaco, and reached F o rmosa late in t h e evenin g. Form os a i s a t y pi ca l o l d Spanis h town w i t h a population o f about three t h o usand. '-\'e spent two days in h irin g dugouts and Indians t o paddl e them. The c r e w was a villain-

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THE C.'\RIBBEAN. ous-Iooking lot. Short, Aat n osed, with l o ng, snaky, black hair-in a word, were typic al J ndians of the Guarani blood. I noticed, however, that the guide h eld aloof from t h e m. The n 1 saw that he was of an entirely d iff e r ent type H e wa s a pure B olivian-t all, stalwart, and clem-cut. Here," I thought, "is a f ellow to depend on," A t last, with all OUf baggage stowed w e started on OUf \'Orage up the P ilcomayo, a l o n g uncharted river whic h f o r hundreds o f mil es form s the b oundary betw ee n Argentina and B o livia. All day we paddled between thic k j un g l es matted with lIianas" and [fCe f e rn s birds Aew screaming fr o m tree to tree, a n d alligators basked in th e suns hin e Toward evenin g we paddled Lip a s id e strea m and made camp in a s mall c l earing, J n the m orning we sent out a s mall party to l ook for quebrach o trees \\' h e n they returned after being gone most o f t h e morning, they r eported that t hey had found several white quebrach o trees, whic h y i e l d an important drug, and so m e r ed o n es They also reporte d t ha t t h ey ha d discovered tracks, J ndian tracks! \V e imm ediate ly bro k e camp a n d proc eeded ca u tio u s l y b ec a u se not l o ng b e fore, a garrison of so l diers n ea r F or mosa ha s be e n massac red. All d a y long our m e n grum bled amon g th e m se l ves and n o w and t h e n I ca u g h t th e m l ooking at tiS malignantly and w h isp ering togeth e r. F earing an ambus h w e d i d not stop f o r lun c h but pus h e d s teadi l y all, eating som e co ld roast pi g a s we went. I n th e evening, h o wever, w e wer e f o rc ed to stop for the night. \V e se lected a spot o n a s l ig h t rise of ground and a fter a co l d suppe r, for w e dar ed not light a fire w e posted guards and turn e d In. \\' hat was ou r terror wh e n in th e mornin g w e f ou n d that all o f ou r men, except t h e gui de ha d deserted, taking wit h t h e m everythin g t hat t h ey co uld carr y Afte r takin g in ventory o f o u r r emaining stor es, whi c h co n sis ted of o n e d ug o ut, three 30.30 ri A es two .45 ca lib e r r e vo l vers, an d a case o f canned goods, w e sat down to h o l d a council of war. w e rt: s i x of tiS, T ow n se nd J ose, the gu ide, the three m e n o f the.::: G eographic Society, and I F ive of u s were in favor of go in g on, while o n t mall wantc.:::d to tll rn back. 'The majority ruling, we d ivided up our firearms and started all ollce m ore. \\'e co mpletel y w o n the devotio n of J ose b y treating him as an equal rathe r than as a hir e d servant. H e r efused to accept a riAe, h o wev e r, pre f erring his native mac hete, with w h i c h h e wa s an adept. Toward noon w e appro a c h e d a sharp b e n d in th e riv er. Here we paddled along with doubl e cau t i o n but i t availed us n othing. The river was swarming wit h d ug outs manned br Indians hid eo u slr painted and tattooed E v id ently th e ir sentine l s h ad see n u s th e firs t night and ha d se n t a warning ah e ad. \\'e "backed water" quickly and attempted to turn around but t h e)' wer e too qui ck f o r u s "\\'e ll, if thi s i sn't a nice m ess \Vh o e ver t o ld u s t ha t w e wer e e xpl o r e rs an y wa y? Townsend demanded, a s the 1 ndians started to tow us s h o r eward N o n e o f u s was abl e to t hin k of any brilliant plan; so w e let the Indian s take u s to s h o r e H e r e we were r o ughl y haul ed f ro m our can oe and put in to a e vil-sm e llin g, ver min -infes t ed hut. These inhabitants v i olently contested our ri ght to share the ir abode with th e m. Prese ntl y an o ld hag h o bbl ed in with se veral w ell-filled calabas h es o f baked ya m s breadfruit,roast goat Illear, and milk. She scrutinized tiS clos e l y and then, going up to o n e of t h e sc i e ntists, s h e pinch ed him several t im es Noddin g her h e a d and muttering to h e r se lf, s h e took a large part o f t h e f ood and placed if b e fore him in dicating by s i g n s that h e wa s to eat all of it. P oo r T o wn se nd wa s th e picture of despai r "\Vell, I'm darned," h e exclaimed, "he r e I thought I wou l d get a square m eal f o r a change The n s h e co m es a l o n g and g iv es most o f it to t h e oth e r fell ow. I'd lik e to kn o w t h e great i dea." \V e w e r e all gr eatlr but o u r mystificati o n in c r e a sed wh e n w e r ece ived a summo n s to corne b e f o r e the chief. \\'e wer e l e d to a lar ge hu t in t h e ce nter of t h e villa ge, t hr o u g h t h e l ow doo r and into a long roo m hun g abo u t with s kin s o f a nim als, human s kull s, and native weapon s A t the far e n d wa s a rai sed platform upon w hich t h e chie f sat o n a throne of s kulls i!\t his s ide s t ood a tall, stalwart, clean-cut f ellow, w h o was a pure B oliv i an I t wa s J ose, our g uid e \\'e l oo k ed at o n e anoth e r in surprise! \\'hat wa s h e doi n g h e r e? H ad h e turne d traito r ? \Ve ad vanced up t h e l o ng ro o m to th e foot of t h e dais and stopped The chief, an evill oo kin g

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T H E 17 fellow wearing a breec h-clout, necklace o f bones, and a feath e r headdress, was furio u s when w e refused to kneel to h im. LTsin g Jose as an int erpreter, h e boom ed fort h "\\' ha t do t h e w h ite dogs in the country of rhe Chacas? D o you not know the p enalty?" \\'e stated our bu s in ess a s clearly and as calml y as possible but it did not seem to his s u s pi c ions o f liS Calling a guard, h e had u s :lnd taken bac k t o our hu t. A s e \"ellillg drew 011, we were s urprised at the number o f coo kin g fir es. One wa s kindled befure each hu t an d a pot o f water put on fellows, I would h e willing to bet that these devils are c:lIlnib:t l s I affirmed. "\\'ell, w e 'll soon find out, said Townsen d griml y. : \ nd it was nor long before w e did find o u t! i\ s SOOI1 a s it was dark we were dragged, still bound, to an open space in the center o f t h e village where fiv e posts had been set in the g r ound. Each of u s being b ound [Q a pOSt we waited appreh enf o r the perforrnance to begin. The \ 'illagers lost no c hance to pelt u s with stones or whatever was at hanc l. Shortly the tOI11-tOI11S began to beat-throbbing notes that made one' s senses dull. Soon these sounds ceased as if magic and the c hief stalked o \'er to his raised seat, together with J ose. :\t a given signal, a huge hrute stepped frorn the crowd and went over to t h e scientist w h o had eaten our di nn e r. H e execut ed a wild dance t o the mus ic of the tom-toms and then, taking some instrument from a pouch at his belt, h e ... 1 olle of t h e captive's arrllS and started to work. On e o n e h e slowly ripped out the finger nails of hi s helpless v ictim, wh o fainted twice but was r e \'ived immediately. Then when h e had wearied of plucking t h e beard from his face, hair hair, h e tore ofr hi s shirt and drew a burning brand across the bare A es h. The sc ientist was sagging looselyin his bonds, hi s lusterless eyes glazed, his m outh swinging open. H o w we tugged at our b o nds! Bu t it was n o use. \\'c reali.led that we s h o uld have to see it through without assisting our associate. \\'ith a wild s hout, t h e brute whipped a dagger from hi s belt and drove it to the heart of our friend. The re \\as a rush of villagers a s each drew his knife and stro\ e to get some part of the victim's anatomy. I t was sickening. rushed from the crowd spattered with blood and carry ing a piece o f leg, arm, o r other delicacy. The n f01-lowed a great feast of dog and human flesh, together with many kinds of vegetables. Th e m e n ate until their wi\'es had to carry t h e m h o m e. Finally when only a few o l d m e n were left s leeping on the ground, we saw, by the fitful light of the fire, .Jose creeping toward us with a knife gleaming in hi s hand. \\'hat was h e lip to now? Had h e com e to fini s h us? \\'e hoped so. Anything wou l d be better than t h e torture we were undergoing. But h e quickly c u t our bonds a n d the n sat down till the numbness had left o u r arms and legs Silently h e motioned u s to f ollow him. A.t t h e water's edge our own canoe wa s drawn liP, loaded with our guns and prQ\ i sio n s \\'e took our places a n d silently slipped down the stream. \\' h e n we had gon e som e distance J ose expla ined to LIS that h e knew the Chaco dialect and h e thought t hat by posing a s our e n emy, h e might help us to escape, H e finis hed with : "The Senors did not think m e a traitor?" J ose, old boy, yo u had m e stumped for awhil e," admitted Townsend. \ \ 'e all assured J ose t hat we trusted him fully. ,. Poor devil," said Townsend, r eferring to the murdered sc ientist "The best we can do is to go hack there some and a\'enge him. Gloom hung over u s lik e a pall as we thought o f O llr companio n. \\'e s hook it oR, and by hard paddling, we reached F ormosa in two days. Four more days and we reached Buenos A i res and home.

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THE CARIBBEA N D O W N TH E COA ST T O POR TO BELLO. CRISTOBA L C Z., /lpriI20, 1 922 DEAR MARY: I n this letter I have so methin g really inter esting to write about. Last S unday w e too k a most delig h tful trip to P o rto B ello (beau t iful p ort), a littl e town about '20 mi l es down t h e co a s t in w hi c h a r e the historic r u ins of an o l d Spanish f ort, c a t h ed r a l s, and other i nterestin g b uil d in gs whi c h we r e t h e pride o f t h e town b e fore the p ir a t e M o r gan sacked it leavin g lit tl e but r u in s o f wh a t h a d bee n o n e of t h e ric hest c i ties on th e Caribbean. As we left C ristobal be hin d u s, the wate r w as gray; the sky, dark an d s ullen; but later t h e s u n came out and s hone so radiantl y that we knew we should have a b ea u ti ful d a y f o r our trip. M y spirits rose as we se t out to sea against t h e coo l PORTO BELLO TO"'l'I81lT.. TIlcrc dynamite and cn.JlIhers C(lllquered thc mouut:ainllide to furnish food thM the lI"ondcrful Caual Lockll wilo:ht Ihe. wind. The Ca-rll, leaving a p a t h w a y of f oa m a ndspra y, cut swiftl y thro u g h the clear blu e wa ter. passed a coupl e of d im inutivesail b oats, reel ing like drunken men t h e ir white sails glis t e nin g i n the sun. Along t h e coast we cou ld see, beyond a stretc h of w hite beac h t iny t hatch ed huts nestling under stately palm trees; b e h i n d these, rose hazy purple mountains. At la s t we arrived at Porto B ello, an d i t certainly was rightly named, for I lost any qual ms o f seasickness that I had had, in co ntemplation of the exquisite scenery. T h e bay, whic h is a lmost landlocked, is really t h e most picturesque 1 have ever see n, and, in fact, has t h e reputati on of bein g the most beautiful natural h a r bo r o n t h e Carib bean. On the left s ide lie the crum b lin g ruins of an old fortification, w h i l e o n t h e r ig h t t h e m a in for t g l oo m s a bove the sparkling blu e w a t e r lik e so m e s ull e n se n t in e l its g ray walls f orming a stran ge contras t to t h e pink an d blu e o f the redroofed hu ts whi c h H aunt t h e m se lv es at t h e f oo t o f the j u ng l e-cove r ed m o untain s lik e t h ose o f a toy v ill age. Nea r b y, a g r oup o f n a ti ve boys w e r e swimming a b o u t in th e coo l wate r d i v i n g an d spla s hin g lik e yo un g seal s, t h e ir a gile bro n ze b od i es glistenin g i n the SUllo H o w o bli v i o u s t hey w e r e of t h e fact t hat fath o m s b e neat h t h e m lay t h e b o n es, a n d pe rhaps a tarn i s h ed s w o rd-all t hat was left of t h e o n ce dauntless o l d sea dog, Drake Finally a fter muc h mane u ve rin g under t h e inte rested eyes o f a g r oup o f ragged half-nake d nat i ves, all o f wh o m w e r e of F ering adv i ce (w h i c h w e co u l d not understand), w e ti e d up to a ri c k e t y littl e wh a rf. A fter havin g a d eli c i o u s lun c h o n b oard t h e Cara, we si m p l y co ul d not wait a n y l o n ge r t o start, our heads w e r e so full o f t a l es o f pirates, pi eces o f e i ght, a n d t r e a sure trove. V e had a diffic u l t time gettin g into t h e little t ow n fir s t jump in g over a s mall stream the n sq u eez in g in betw ee n t w o huts, b e f o r e w e finally s t e p p e d onto a n a rr o w, dirty, littl e o l d cobbl e d str ee t \ ,Vhat a contras t to t h e busy p r os p ero u s c ity o f yea r s a go i s t h i s sq uali d l i ttle town-noth in g t o b e see n o n the stree t s bu t a f ew scrawny o l d h e n s a n d a mangy dog w orry in g a clean b o ne! A s w e p i cked our way d:>wn th e street s, nati ves p ee red o u t c u r i o u s ly. F i n ally w e came to t h e govern or's m a n s i o n. \ ,Vhat a magn ificent o l d p i le i t must have been wit h its gray walls ris in g majesti cally! As 1 e n tered t h e o l d PORTO BI.I,(I, r Ulll, J could A lalldlocked barbo r:\8 beauti rlll :\lithe IJOet'S dr eam. a lmost imag in e t h a t b efo r e me, in t h e coo l s h adows, strode a p ro u d an d h a u g h t y D Oll, cla d in r i c h ve lvets, his s w ord cla n kin g a t his s id e h i s

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THE CARIBBEAN. dark ey es fla s h ing u nd e r his swarthy brow; whil e strolling b es id e him wa s a lan guid s l e nder S e n o ra, in s w e eping Spani s h bro cades a la ce mantilla v e iling h e r lu stro u s eyes and s leek bla c k hair toppe d b y a tall carve d comb. The stor y goes that t h e gove rn o r and hi s wife lo s t the ir liv es wh e n the building was burne d. \ Vith a s i g h for these ill fate d on es I r e lu ctantly l e f t th e s hado w s o f t h e pas t f o r th e g iarings ull s h in e o f t h e p rese nt. O u t s ide, w e s aw tw o b a r e l egged, scantily dressed lit tl e girl s hu sking wild rice in a wooden cylindrical v esse l, with l o ng a wkw a r d p es tl es ; how primitive thi s see m ed in co m paris on with th e modern m e th o d o f preparing ri c e At l a s t w e came t o t h e f ort, whi c h thrill ed m e m os t o f all, for I c oul d conjure up scen es o f bloody battles and of swarthy, b earded, r e d -s a s h e d pirates the ir kni ves g l eaming b e tween their whit e teeth, c r ee pin g up the hill to th e f ort. A s w e descende d into th e di r t y o l d dungeo n s (now t h e h o m e o f slim y lizards) and s aw th e light fade away into darkness 1 w o ndered f o r h o w many sufferin g pri so n e r s thi s had b ee n t h e ir la s t glimpse o f the s un S o m e o f t h e o l d ru s t y canno n, o n ce so p o w e rful a n d n o w jus t a h eap o f u seless ir o n, are s till l y in g a r o un d I wa s fascinated b y th e quaint, g ra y sentry b o x es o v erhanging th e bay and, a s I peered thro u g h the narro w slit in m y imagin ation I experie n ced th e awful t erro r o f that l o n e guard wh o thro u g h thi s same a pe r ture had see n that Half hidde n b y c r ee pin g jlll1g l e vine s lies th e old cathed ra l th e Spanish s t y l e of architecture s till e vid ent in th e t all s pir es arc h es, an d ornate carv ing The centuries r olle d .1 0 th e shad: fir s t strange Englis h ship appe ar. The s un b ecame so hot that w e away ; th e air wa s h e avy with in ce n se ; above the n o t es o f t h e dee p v o i ced o r g an r ose t h e d r o nin g m o n o t o n e o f t h e o ld pri es t and t h e mu rmured r es p o n ses o f th e kn ee ling Spania r ds \\' i t h a l eap j spanne d th e rears to t h e prese n t rudel y arouse d f ro m m y b y th e incongruity o f the grunting an d rootin g o f scrawn y razor-ba c k ed h o g s wh e re o n ce Spanis h chivalry and b e auty had kn elt in pray er. J f e l t a s hudder o f d istast e at thi s s a c ril e g e w e r e f o rced t o r eturn t o th e C a r n Of course d a ddy had to ha ve a so u venir; so h e b ought t w o big rus t y canno n ball s fro m an o l d nat i ve, and h o w t hey d i d a r g u e an d haggl e over th e pri ce Finall y h o w ever i t w a s settle d satisfactoril y and w e l e ft th e beautiful ba y b e hin d u s the s un c a sting a m ello w g l o w over th e ri p p l ing w a t e r an d th e fas t receding v illag e \V e arrived hom e at about seve n o 'cl oc k t ired, but f ee l in g that th e trip h as b ee n w ell w orth whil e Truly your frien d B ETTY. STO P L OOK, AND Ll S T EN. J o rdan Zimmenl1(lIl1l, '22. "Be w a r e o f en tr a n ce to a quarr e l but, being in B ea r't t hat t h e opposed may beware of thee." I n plain Engli s h th ese w o rds o f P o l o lliu s m ean d o not quarrel ne e dl ess l y b ut, if f o r ced to, make sure t hat your adve r sary know s that h e has noeas)' t a s k. Som e peo pl e g o thro u g h lif e watc h i n g f o r th e chance t o start an argument over so m e t ri v ia l p o i n t The on l y thing thi s SOrt o f p e r so n acco m plis h es is an unple a sant r eputatio n f o r him self. The r e i s a natural t e nd e ncy t o shun a pe r so n wh o argues o v e r n othing. Of course there are so m e w h o see mingl y are always in an argument but t hey soo n reveal the fac t that they are only doing it a s a j o k e The o n e I am talking abo u t i s t h e c h roni c quarre l e r. H e i s n o t sati sfied a b out sc h oo l lif e soc ia l life, in d ustrial lif e, governme n t. Nothing i s d on e right. H e never stops to co n s ider t h e opposite side o f a ques ti o n. A p e r so n wh o g oes al o n g (r ol11 d a y to d a y seemingl y a lwa ys th e same, qui e t and r ese r ved o bser ves muc h m o r e than th e p e r so n wh o blu s t e r s and quar r e l s \\'hy? B ec all se he can s tudy a p oint more tho r o u ghly an d can see b o t h s id es; w h e r e a s o n e wh o quarre l s mus t n ecess aril y take o n e o f the two sides o r th e r e can b e n othing to argue all. It tak es a l o n g time t o a ro u se a quie t m a n to acti o n bu t wh e n h e i s finall y awake n ed i t i s time to b e ware. The p oints h e brings up are clin c hin g in th e ir f o r ce H e overwh e lm s th e blu s t e r e r b y the s p ee d and ve r satility o f his attack. S o far r ha ve prese nted p o in ts for verba l q u a r r e l s B u t if the argume n t s h o ul d turn to fis ti cuffs, h e r e al so the qui e t man will h o l d t h e advantage. H e will b e coo l and co n se r ve h is str e ngth w h i l e the othe r will b e h o t-headed a n d im petuo u s, wanting t o b e v i c t o ri o u s in a s h ort time.

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30 THE C\RIBBE.-\N. T H E DERELICT'S STO RY. Ketlnnll Parker, 2; h was on a wind-swept coral i s l e o f the South ster, nor could h e l eave him in a private schoo l Seas that J met J ack Hart. H e was a great hulk as h e had promised the dying m other that t h e of a man, worn and dissipated; in a word, chil d s h o u l d not b e separate d from him. a typical derelict of th e seas His hug e fram e The captain l oved his s i s t er's b o y from the cloth ed in rags, b o re evide n ce o f having once moment that h e set eyes on him. After a h ard pos sessed g reat strength; his features were stron g struggl e within him self h e decided to give u p his and regular though half concea l ed a command at th e e n d of one mor e voyage. H e had matted beard. Hart wa s wont to sit on a started t o l e ave th e chi l d at a h o m e for sa i l o rs' r oc k f o r h ours at a time, gazing seaward with children, but th e piteous cries of the motherless h ead erec t and eyes flashing. H e arou sed my child him not to l eave him alon e wer e inte rest greatly. I wondered a good deal about t oo m u ch f or Hart; so h e took B illy w ith h im on thi s l o nely creatur e. that fated voyage. \\'e were b o th in this out-o f -the-way place for T h e trip gave all indi cations of b e ing a record the same reason, business-I being e n g a ged in o ne. Heea sily secured a valuable cargo from whic h my u s ual occupation of gathering a cargo of copra h e ex pected ric h pre mium s The n at B r u nei, North for the company's v esse l; h e "",..,.-___________ "" B o rn eo he obtained, t h roug h being occ upi e d with the task of what h e thought was luc k, an e king out a livelih ood, doing enormous orang-outang and a nothing. gigantic l eopard, t h e larg es t h e \\'e were drawn together had ever seen. I f h e got them finally b eca u se of l o neliness and to Am eric a alive, th e y would the fact that w e were th e o nly m ea n a f ortune for him. H e white m e n on the i s land. One co u ld bu)' a comfortable h o m e day when m ore or l ess tinder the for Billy and him self wit hin sight seductive influence of whisky and sound of h i s b e l oved sea. and sod a, h e waxed communi caPullingollt of B r u nei Bay, t h e tiv e and t old m e his stor y ] AIm)' E V flnJran into a stiff breeze can not tell the tale in Hart's PICTUR.;SQl'E TAHQG.\. off the coast. The baromete r own words, but the m e m o r y of fell wit h alarming rapidity. it all haunts me yet. I ca n s till "All hands make snug," was h ea r his voice, n o w shake n with h oarse sob s, n o w bitter a s h e rail ed again s t an unjust fate. H e wa s a so n o f a fis herman and thus ca m e to know and love the sea I n his yo u t h h e had run away fro m hom e to try th e roving, adventurolls lif e or a sailo r. \l'il d and strange ha d b ee n his experiences I s hudder n ow as I think o f the m. Throug h his OWI1 efforts, h e h ad finally b eco m e master o f a fine trad ing sc h oo n e r, th e AIm)' EvanJ, plying between the Eas t I ndi es an d America. Aft'!r spending many yea r s on th e deep, h e had sudJenly been confronted with a serio u s problem-onc which almost baffl ed th e hard old ca p tain. His widowed sister, d y ing, ha d implored him to take h e r 10 yea ro l d son. \l'hat s h o uld h e do wit h him? H e cou l d n't take him to se a with h im, for a trading sc h ooner is n o place to r car a yOlln g-the order. T h e hatch es w e r e battened down, a storm sail rai sed an d all e m e rg e ncy pre parations made I n a m oment the typhoon was upon t h e m. The waves b eat agains t the vesse l their blow s forcing h e r to tremble from stem to s t ern T h e A4ar.y E t 'flllJ wa s making bad weath e r of it. For hou rs s h e wall o w e d and drift ed without s t ee ra ge, rollin g h e l p l ess ly in th e tro ugh o f the se a. Hart, f everis hly ru s hing abo llt, wa s sudde nly frozen in his tracks by a desperate screa m f o llowed a mom ent later by an awfu l guttural cry whic h c urdl ed t h e blood in his veins. T he skippe r, numb with horror at what h e might find, made a ru s h for bel ow, flung open t h e doo r of the sai l 1'00111 and saw there on the floor b e for e him crumpl ed up in a pitiful little h ea p, his boy, lit e rall y torn to pieces H e kn e lt b eside him j th e n a Slllri and th e bo o ming grumble of the

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T H E C.'IR IBBF. .... ;\'. J I ape rna de him l eap f o r th e d oo r. But t oo la te T h e draft had already slammed it s inH; h e co uld n o t hop e t o r e a c h it her o r e rhe o ran g-oura n g I n a m o m ent h e caught lip a h eavy oar whi c h b\' o n the deck, vaulte d lip into the c age o f the tige r, dre w his r c \'oi vcr, and emptied it into the b re a s t of the c h :lrging b e a s t. I t s till came o n. Hart rai s ed the oar and smas h e d it to pieces over the m o n s t er's h ead. T h e brute, daze d by the blo w and t h e s hots fell ba ck, turne d a som e r sault, and wa s at h im a gain. T h e Illan flung the now u seless oar from him, gras p e d hi s knife-and waited. T h e orang-ollrang, n o t b e ing po ssesse d o f th e stre n gth to l eap up at him, began clambe rin g lip. The cras hin g r oar o f the tiger vibrated thro u g h the air. A quic k s ic k ening rip-and the a;")t..: sank to d ec k wi th his wh o le bre a s t laid o p e n b y the cat, whi c h h;ld struc k through the bars The n ext m o m ent the ship s hook and tre mblt:d a s if the b ottOI'll w e r e b e in g torn away. She had run into a re ef! Duty s tood f o r emos t in the captain's mind. H e c o ul d n o t e v e n wait to gathe r B illy up into his arms f o r a la s t farew ell. Other ii\'es threate ned; h e ru s h e d to the upper deck \rith t errible s hudder s pass in g thro u g h h e r and her h eams g r oaning and s n apping under h e avy preSSHre the 1\/111)' EL'aJlJ in a f e w minutes slippe d o R -t h e fate ful reef and we n t down. I l ours later, I Ian, cl in ging to a spar :ln d at the p oint o f exhausti on, wa s finally wa s hed a s h o r e a f e w mil es n o rth o f th e v illa ge o f Gay". F r o m that time 011, had been a nightmare t o I i m H e had l 'Js t everything that h e h e l d de:H ; n o t a spark o f ambitio n r emained. F o r yea r s n o w h e had wandered fr olll i s la n d to i sland workin g only wh e n h e wa s f J rccd t o b l' c ir culTI s t:ln ces, Ix:ggin g frol11 c h a nce w hi te trader s a n d even fr o m the natives :\s H art fini s hed the pi t iful s t ory, and reached with t rembling finger s f o r the s i p h o n -there som e how r ecurred t o my mind a ph r a sc o f [ r v in g s wh ic h I had Itarncd a s a sc hoolb oy: Little minds a re tamed and s u bd u ed by misf o r t un e bu t grea t m inds r ise a b ove it." TH E S E A O l l R SCHOOl.. George Cm t/;riglrt '22. A s I peer from within the a ssemhly room, through a window and an all o n e d space made nar row hy a h o u se on eithe r s ide, I see in the farthes t di stance, a lin e a s straight and paralle l to thl! earth's surface a s any geom e tri cian has ever drawn. i\lan may discover and man m a y ilwcllt, agains t iton t heoppositesid e, the r are t o rn to pi eces and rise in the form of chalk-white f oam many feet hi g h e r than the ir oppressor, appcaring h e r e and there a t intervals, t h e fulllc n g th o f t ht: g r e a t wall. The f o regr o un d o f this sce nt: i s the d omain o f Fathe r ;'\Teptune t o-day an a n g r y rag in g fury s tri c k e n m o n s t er, toss in g its waves h e r e and the r e in citing f ear in the h eartsof o wn e r s and pil o t s o f small unscaworthy vessel s j tom orro w a s calm and s mooth as a hi ghly p olis hed mirro r; n o w carrying over its surface, wild f e r oc io u s trade winds, whi c h scatte r base ll!sS o bject s frolll place t o placc, but though h e t r :lv e i the w orld ove r h e w o ul d n e v e r r e a c h this apparent edge o f t h e w o rld the inte r sec ti o n o f the sky and sea, othe rwi se kno wn a s the h orizon. S o m e s m o k e appears a s if som eone o n an lJnSee n i s le had u sed hi s la s t h o p e f o r r esc u e but al m os t immcJi a t cly, the r e appear 011 eith e r s id e twO large projec ti o n s whi::h with the s m o k e rise steadily un til it i s apparent that and keep tall palms swaying skill b ac k and f orth in resp o n sc to are supported by a sturdy base ; a s time passes I di sting ui s h it to b e only a ship o n its o cean Seemingly a s h ort di stance f ro m the h orizol1, a l o ng stre t c h o f ro c k s kno wn a s the breakwater, pro j ects b o l d l y out o f the water Althoug h it i s an u g ly structure, at times wh e n the s.: a i s angry, and bill o w s toss mad ly it presents a b eautiful s i ghtj f o r whe n these wa ves dash the ir f o r ce ; the n again ruffl e d h y a cool s weet -s m e lling se a breeze, whi c h moves ovcr this v a st, wid es pread, body o f dark, blue-green wate r. T h e n as the little waves that h:1ve s ucceeded in esc a p ing that destructive prodigy, the breakwate r r oll d e t erminedl y up the ro u g h nature-c arved beach, each tryin g to outdo the la s t t hey d ic, only to b e f ollo wed b y nume r o u s companio n s

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THE CARIBBEA !Ii $ A SCENE AT THE COLON STATION. I Frances Poole, 25. The blistering rays of the hot afte rnoon stln stream mercilessly through the iron bars of th e station on a motley c r owd of peop l e pressing toward the afternoon train for the trip a c r oss the Isthmus. All is bustle and confusion. I stand apart, interested in the sce n e b e f ore m e f\I y eyes are directed toward the parlor ca r entrance where a timid baggag e man is striving to convince ajargonin g Jamaican woman that s h e is not at the second class entrance while the negress firmly stands h er ground, r efusing to b e convinced. A huge, overdressed woman, who has b ee n eyei ng the a ff air through a gold lorgnette, adds h e r voice to the wea ker one of the baggag e man, and finally, convinced by t hi s combined e ff o r t, t h e n e gress retreats [Q h e r own e n trance, muttering [Q h erself. A s s h e takes h e r place in lin e, two stately Martinique women, who have b ee n co n versing in ITEPHJ:S8ClUt;NCEr-A SI'ISWAt.t. the f.'rench of thei r native o f isl e, sco rnfully draw aside the ir voluminous skirts lest they [Quch the fad e d drab mOlllltr():jlly. one o f the slouchy Jamaican. J am strongly impressed by the picturesque costume o f these Martiniques T h e s tiffly starc h ed skirts o f their gay gingham d resses are h eld up neatly over one arm, r eve aling s n owy petticoats eq uall y a s s tiff. Bright three-cornere d k e r chie f s are c r ossed over the ir ampl e b oso m s while quaintly tied turbans o f vivid red and yello w add the fini s hing t o u c h to these unique costumes. A group of three t ouris ts inte r es ts m e ; th e rathe r p ompo u s man in immaculate white duck and pith h e lmet (whic h i s n o l o ng e r worn b y resident Am e r icans, a s th ey have become accustomed to the h eat) i s vigorou s l y mopping his dripping brow; th e women in gay sport clothes whi c h smack o f Fif th Avenue s h ops are diligently fanning the m selves a s they view their burrounding s wit h am u sed interes t. An elegan tly dressed Panamanian lady, tall and dark, passes me, chatting vivacious l y in mu s i ca l Spanish to her dapper wax -mustached hu sband. \Yith them i s a dark-eye d pensive senorita, whom I take to be their daughter, a s s h e b ea r s a striking res emblance to b o th. Lagg in g behind them, are th e two s mall sons of the family, giggling over t h e funny s heet of an American newspape r. H e r e and there i s a sprinkling of Army and Navy officers in s p otless '(whites, wit h their fas hion able wive s making their way toward the parlor car entrance. Throug h the seco nd class entrance surge people fro m all corners of th e world. T n addition to the u s ual collection of Jamaicans and Martiniques, are Chin ese dressed in American clothes and devoid of qu e u es, and swarth y East Indians of s mall stature the ir straight black hair covered with small r ound fezes of bla c k vel vet embroidered in gleaming gold threads. I turn m y attention to th e firs t cla ss entrance where a s h ort, dark, o ld Panamanian, his stiff white b eard cOl1trasti n g with the s warthille ss of his ski n, takes his place sedately in line. B e hind him towers a sunburned pink-faced Engli shman. At th e end of the lin e a proud mother is engaged in th e diffi cult task of keeping h e r flock of five c hildr en n ear h e r. Sh e cranes h e r n eck, anxiously watching to see that the train doesn't leav e with out her; at thi s j uncture o n e o f h e r infants away and stand s b es ide t h e sedate ge ntleman. The c hil d drops his lollypop and rea c h es out his dirty, stic ky littl e hands to th e man's white tro u se r s t o balance him self, whil e pic king it up. "Caramba," the man mutte rs-but v e ry softly, f o r h e i s a Panamanian gentlerllan and doesn't utte r oa th s in the unres train ed manne r of our Am erica n men. The mothe r r esc u es h e r child jus t as h e takes out his lirn e-Aavored l ollypop t o sti c k out a very gree n tongu e at his e n e my. A s th e line thins through th e gate, an Am erican girl comes hurrying along. \ Yith a whiff of h eavy perfum e, s h e s alli es b y me. H e r too fluff y yellow hair is c r owned with an organdie hat which matc h es h e r b e ruffi ed pink dress. nd e r h er

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THE CARIBB EAN. arm is a magaz in e b earing the titl e, "Elite Styles." A red-faced America n sa ilor, proudly b : arillg the latest /lumbe r of the "Po l ice Gazette" unde r his arm, comes ru shing up, his white cap pu<)hed far back on his rouseled hair, th e bottom o f his trouse r s Rappin g as h e runs. The last of t h e line p:lss es throug h the gate ; th e garcm:lll, who is also con ductor, pu s h>;:; his cap far back 011 his h ead and sicihs as h e wip es hi s fo:'e h ead anJ starts t.:>ward [r.lin. .r list then the sOlin...! of boyi s h v o i ces is h eard at the entrance o f th e station, and seve ral srunJih, built lad s co m e flying through the gates, nearl;' knockingO\ 'e r a J amai c :ln woman's tray ofpeanurs. She mumbles so mcthingabout rude :\merican boys) and turns to h e r compani o n to discourse in true Jamaican fas hi o n o n the subject of rude c hildren. S o rne boys outside o f the gates s h out something about bringing home the bacon, skinning Balboa, etc. All but twu are already all, anu, a s t hey turn to ans w e r, the train starts; the boys jump to the Heps and the train is off'. _____________________________________________ .-\ T.-\LE OF .-\ TR .-\I:--'I:--'G TR,-\Cf(. Februant 's races were O\'er and training f o r June races' began. A .II th:: jo:::key sc h ool students r easse mbled at the training course, namely, Cristobal H ig h School. Determination, a jockey of seventeen, ha d lost in his last ra ce with hi s stubborn steed Alg ebra, but decided h e would spend a little extra time preparing Algebra for the next big race. Another jockey called Fun entered the stable with a horse w h o m he named Physics This horse was well built and had the making of a first rater for the main event ill June. Eac h day the horses were trained to take part in the tryouts, called quizzes, at the end of each week. T o become a first rater or honor student their h o r ses had to make the required distance, a se mester 's work, within a certain time of "C." H orses lined up at the start for the weekly qui!., but a vacant space was noted and jockey Care l ess n ess wa s mar ked absent. Cheat, with hi s h orse History, wa s already on hi s way around the track of test when the shout wa s heard, "They're off." Determinatio n urged on Algebra whos e hoo f s were throwing the dirt of temptation aside. H e passed Fun, who by this tirne had drawn a laugh from all the spectators o f fellow students by rUI14 ning hi s horse backwards down the trail of cbwn. The tryout neared the end with Cheat still in the lead. Although Determination urged .-\Igebra still more and crossed the fini s h line within thl" MR8101 0-J r equied time G, Cheat had alread\' crossed it with :I bercer ti:n e, E. Then came Fun riding in all dancing Ph ysics at a speed of F far below the required time. Each day in preparation for the J line races, Determination brushed up Algebra who s hone in his daily workouts. Carelessness mi ssed hi s daily exercises by attending matinees, so leaving his horse English in the stable. Cheat ohen attended the matinee with Carelessness and would get a lad nicknameu Fi sh to clean his horse History and give him n otes on what he had done. Fun would have a laughin g group to see his horse Phys ic s perform, running sideways into the fence of wrong lessons. Only a month b e fore the .Tune races of final exams, run was called to the office of the race track manager, Principal, who told Fun h e must b eco me serious or else. h e would be barred from the oncoming races. This interview struck FUll with a jolt and h e decided to become seriolls, and immediately, although it was rather late, h e bru'ihed lip P h), sics and daily galloped him down the track of study. The day the final event came. It was the only time that Carelessness grew aware that h e had nOt prqared English for the big race to be h eL...! the d.ty. H e went to the stables to give English a thorough rubbing down of cramming-up linim ent. Determination had kept Algebra fit all through the trainins season called last semestyr

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3.: T H E and h e was e nj oyi ng a sw im of r ecreation, while A .. lgebra refreshed him self in the pasture of rest .. S eriousness still worked over Ph ysics e ven during the night, which made Phys ics quite exhausted. Cheat ha d one worry, h e ha d s h od H i s t orr with unfair an s w ers and was worrying h ow h e could take a s h ort cut through the fie l d of con cea l ed ou tlin e. The eve ntful day had come and all dampened sponges o f b oo ks were take n from the j oc k e y s --\. ques ti onnaire was hande.::1 each of th e m as th ey lin ed up at th e startin g point. "They're oft"," C3m'! th:! shout, but Cheat had a l eap o f an unprepared ans w er D.::t erminatio n got a bad start but wa s pullin g away f:om and Carel ess n e ss, b :.H Aige b a to p uff anJ s l o w u p h e cam,:: t o fi,st called simultaneo us eq u3.ti o n s. A s h e S3W far in th e l e a.! h e rea c h e d to his jocke y cap where h e had a damp s p o ng e o f type f o rm s wor k ed Ollt. H e to the r ear and saw S er i o u sness and Care l ess n ess plowing f a irly around the b e n d of f ormulas and Shakes p eare's Hamlet. H e dropped his han....! ami u rged Alg ebra on squarely. : \ quic k r e f res hin g s h o w e r of r e n e w ed m e m o ry came and D e t ermination b e g an to pick up speed and gain o n Cheat. H istor y wa s b eg inning to fail Cheat a s h e was s l o wing down and slipping on t h e wet home stre t c h of thought ques tions, due to H i s t o ry's n e w s h oes of unfair answers. P hy sics and Engli s h ca m e plugging along w i t h P hysics somewhat in the l e ad T h ey both l e ap ed b y Ch eat on t h e h o m e stre tc h eager to re ac h t h e fini s h lin e o f qualificati o n f o r advan ced seri es of n e w s ubjects. C h eat wa s humiliate d and a s a last resort took from his p oc k e t sand of outlined ca mpaigns and dropped it on th e trac k b e f ore H i story t:) k ee p him fro m s l ipping. But th e trac k manager P rinc i pa l discovered the sa nd an d im m e diate l y disqualified Cheat and tore up his q u es ti onnaire o f ex am i nation pape rs. Thundered s h outs ro se f rom t h e s pectator s a s D e terminatio n finis h ed fair and s q uare with :\'l gebra who l eaped acros s t h e tape of advanced standing with "E," a mu c h faster time t h an wa s r e q u ir ed Quite a c h ee r was g i ven S e riou s nes s a s P h ysics galloped across t h e finis h within t h e r equired tim e 1'." Not very far b e hind him Care l ess n ess fini s h ed panting h e avi ly. H i s tim e was th e l o west p oss ibl e pass ing, "P." C h eat wa s theonlyolle who di d n t finish,as h e l e ft the ra ce through the gate of s h am e Altho ugh all oth e rs w e re given a c hance f o r the next ra ces of n e w s ubjects Cheat wa s ex p elled f ro m th e SU:-ISET A T THE C HAGRES. Emili a T ownJl'lld, '2 2 A l o n g stre tch o f white b each, winding alo ng the r oyal-tinted in graceful curves, first catch es th e ey.::. The darkening jung l e with its outlin::.i b y a r ow o f rLI,3:geJ coconut pal m s i s quiet,save f o r t'l e slight ru s tli. l g of l e av es ca u sed b y the g.::ntl e b l o win g o f t h e coo l eve-'olik ... 11< river is oot:111 n i n g breeze. till'll Small w
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THE CARIBBEAN. 35 GATUN T O CRIS T O B A L BY BU S. If/illiam COllsillJ, '25. 1 L et's go Joe," says Eddi e ".It's a quarter after," J t is a brigh t m orning with everyone present an d c h eerful. \Ve starr with a rattle and t h e driver toot s h is horn for B : n Turpin, t h e s t"eet sweeper to move his l imousine so our c hariot can pass. :\fter considerabl e shimmyi n g we make the top of the hill, pass o n t h e l e ft the Ol d 1\1 a ids' rendezvous and s eve r a I offic ial houses; out in the ait. o n t h e rig h t, t h e palati a l r es id e n ces o f Mr. B ridges and i\1r. Sow l e)'; and agai n on the l e ft, the fire stati o n with the b omberos s hinin g t h e brass 011 t h e e n gi n e. Then we stop at t h e Henter farm. As L ulu is getti n g on we can l ook down into t h e f ertile penins ula b e low This i s calJed i V luu Point, probabl y named after L ulu 's broth e r "Mud." H e r e we see seve ral goats run ning abo u t and wonJer whic h o n e i s Lulu's. Carl os says the small one is h e r s a s it i s easy t o get. A s w e coast down Aristocrat A ve nu e so methin g see m s to b e amiss The driver sto;:>s our valiant ve h icle and up o n inspection fin;:is t h e rear rnu J guar d on the l e f t s ide i s rubbing on t h e tire Furthe r investigation reveal s t h e rea-OIL-Pll"PI"O ST.\TIOl
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THF CAR1BBE .-\:-<. s un mi g h t cau se him to b eco m e fr eckled Charlie whic h i s supplied from th e various compaflles ho-.\'e \'er, w ou l d rath e r stan:l t h ere a s h e h o p es t o t a nk s on t h e surrounding hill s and fr o m whic h be a co nductor wh e n h e ge t s big. \Varne r i s rh e g overnme n t di stribute s t h e oil to ships at so i nten tly wa t c hin g the r o a d f o r a s kin, an d every mu c h p e r barrel. \\' e pas s l\fount H o p e filtration time we run o v e r a s n a k e h e s kin s bac k to s kin it. plant and pumping station from whic h Cristobal The girls are t OO co pyin g o n e another's and C o l o n are s uppli e d with pure water, and apa l geb r a a n d S pani s h t o e n g:lge in an y di ve r s i on. pro a c h a pla ce wit h a grave aspecta pla ce w h ere 'Ye appro a c h rh e i\l in d i whi c h b e l o n gs p eo pl e are t o go-M ollnt Hope Cemetery. to t h e G overnment and s uppli es the Atlantic s i de On th e i s a large gaso lin e tank, whic h we w it h f res h m i lk. A d j o inin g the are large tell strange r s i s th e pag oda of t h e Chinese co n s ul. pastures in whi c h w e see th e H o l s t e in and B elo w it i s th e printing p lant-made fam o us b y cows w hich th e G overnment h a s importe d fr o m THE make s moneyno! n o t th e Stat es The r o a d whi c h pa sses thro u g h th e co unterfeit, but commissary b o oks B e h ind this, farm co nnects th e B olivar Highway with th e old a re the Cris t o bal s h o ps and t h e dry dock whi c h Gat un -Cris t o bal road whi c h runs t o eas t o f w as made b y th e Fre n c h an d enlarge d b y t h e th e dairy Americans H e r e w e s ee all kinds o f craft. AdA s w e c r oss th e b r i d g e o ve r a small s t ream, w e j o inin g th i s i s th e site o f t h e o l d coa lin g plant see a Sil ve r City jitne y r e p os ing in t i l e ditr h w i t h whi c h i s a m e r e s hovelfu l in comparis on wit h t h e three wh ee l s tired and th e f ourth ;Jre sent o n e w h ich w e s e e to t h e k noc k ed off. P a ss in g a two-in th e d istan c e This is t h e whe<;!l ed car t l o adedwith charco a' place whic h added to t h e fam e o f and bananas an d drawn b y ;1 r h e Atlantic s ide wh e n a wha l e ran s m a l l n ative p o ny n o t aground on th e flat s near t h e plant. big ge r than a large d o g, with c. On our rig h t is the up-to-date co ld drows in g Bajan topping the storageplant b uil t and mainta in ed l o ad, w e see jus t ah e a d a bla c k fro m commissary profits. Afte r cyl i n d ri cal o bj ec t whi c h, if w e driving t hrough Silver City wh i c h w e r e o n a s hip, w e s h o ul d think a Anyonem ay hook:ltllrpon.butllt:lke3:lt h o r o uo;h. consists o f quarters built b y t h e m i n e, b u t whi c h, o n close r il1-b T U to l and one. government for its silver ( co l ore d ) s p ec t io n, proves to b e onl y a b oile r f o r m<;!lting tar e mpl o y ees in Cristobal-Colon we enter C o lon, t o fill the c rack s in th e co n c r e t e r o a d w h i c h i s n e xt to th e largest c ity in P anama. Running b es ide the riv e r, w e see a dark kn otty H e r e w e see Chinese Japane se San Bias T ndians, object, s l ow l y gli d ing t h ro ugh th e wate r amo ng F r e n c h and English n egro es, and East] n dians th e bu s h es \\'arne r th i nk s it will b e a fine s kin t n t h e marke t a s w e pa ss, w e see t h is collectio n if h e can on l y ge t it; so a s kin g t h e dri ve r to stop, bu y ing fis h and b e e f o n whic h with a little ri ce hejumps o ff but b y this time O llr fri e nd i\f o n s i eur an d yams t h ey liv e \Ve pass th e government Snap Alligator has l e ft f o r a m o r e h ealt hful p l a ce buil d ing, with it s i ron railed b alcon i e s, in whi c h One o f th e familiar charac t e r s o f thi s trip i s th e i s o n e o f the larges t librari es in Colon. \V e bump negro, p us h i n g h is threewh eeled cart l oaded wit h o v e r t h e stree t car trac k s but s e e no cars as one grass) w h o stop s to blow his whi stle at ever y car a d mini stratio n put in t h e trac k s and another will that h i m. put in the cars On our l e ft, as w e l eave Colon T ravel ingatth e terrific speed o f e i g h tee n mil es p e r (it o n l y takes t e n minutes with our terrific speed) hour, we SOOI1 arrive at t h e c r oss in g of th e B olivar w e see t h e H o tel \\'as hington with its hig h walls Highway, ;\Iargarita Road, and t h e o l d road b e-and palm trees and, o n t h e r i g ht, p ictures q u e tw..:'.:n Gatu n a n d C o l on. StOp p i n g t h e chario t C hris t C hurc h b yth eS e a. for tht: H anson boys from B razos B roo k t h e \\'e run al o n g th e b e a c h and see t h e b r eakwater Cri t )lnl we arc again 011 our w ay wit h in th e di s t a n ce turn t h e corn e r by t h e h ospital, the cClmffJrt of a P u llm a n and t h e speed o f a and climb fr o m th e c hariot, tip t h e steps o f kn owlhearse. Then we pass G ove rn o r Arc i a s f arm t.:cige and into our seats to s p e nd another happy which supplits Colo n with milk. lI'e sec al so da y a s pupil s o f Cris t o bal HiSh Sc h ool. on tho;: lef t t h e governm ent oil-pumping statio n

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THE C AR I BBE:\:-J. A E\'I::'\I :'\G. ":\11 articles for THE CARIBFlEAX must be in tomorrow without fail," said .\ J iss Dodds, our principal. I sq uirmcti.-mine wasn't even started. I ha d l ived in t h e tropic s l ong e n o ugh to b ecolll': infected with t h e manana fe\'er; my motto was "Never do to-day what you can put oil until to-morrow;" but to-day was last to-morro\\'; so I would have! to summon 111\" muse that night. After supper I tried to settle "down to work,llU[ the wires must ha vc been crossed, for rhe which pres id es ova music answered 111\" il1\toca[ion, and I found myself inspired to' product harmony rather than literature. Therefore I got out my newly acquired mandolin, it t) the best of my ability, and started to play the firstand only piece ofmr repertoire, Home,Sweet Home. I had not made mort: t han two or three discords when sister r u s h ed frol11 her room spluttering forth a How in the world can I b e expected to study s u c h a hard subject as physics with this a\\ ftll racket going on? Y o u stop it this minute! 1\lal11ma, make Georgie stop that noise!" was studying. S,) I went on laboring with my hero. A.fter mllch digging with nails and case knives, he manageJ to make hi s escape. H e had no sooner done this th:tn the Edison next door starteu playing the :tria from Boheme." I t was a favorite of mine; S0 I decideu to le t m y hero breathe the fresh air while I listened. I am sure that is Galli Curci," said my mother. Farrar," said my s ister. T hen they entered into a dispute that was settled onl y by the old player upstairs, which drowned out, \\ ith the strains of the aged ,. t argie," the uf mother and sister, as well as that of famo!Js singer (w h oe \'er she was). The epidemic spread quicker than measles. Thepeopleacross the street started playing the "\Yang \Yang Blues" on their rattly rictrola. The battle was fast and furious, but soon "!\Iargit" died a natural death and the "\\'ang \\'ang Blues" wanged on triumphantly for a few measures. Finally there was si lence. I was so busy hunting for :\ Rat t hat her outburst did nOt .-\n olJ an.1 wdl-..Itl-n It I l,wdlll3rk IlmrLumin' \-oitt in Ibe.qlkrll( I returned to my hero. H e had had enough fresh air so h e was ready for some excitement. H e immediately met the mo\'e m e. :\'fter much fingering :lIld fumbling, I succeeded in finding it, to lose it again, for my mothe r had been moved by my sister's appeal and togeth e r they were too much for me. "Some 'sweet home' this is," I muttered, as I put away my books and reach ed for mr pad. A t the com bination o f musical and familydiscord, rny muse had faded away. :-..row I would get down to business. I c hewed pencil for a while; then the inspiration came. I started in on a blood and thunder masterpi ece. '\ I r villain succeeded in lockin g my hero in a deep. dark cellar. : \ 5 I was revolving ways and means for hisescapc, s uddenl y either fini shed her lessons or ab:mJoned them, for s h e began banging" Dardenella" on the piano. i\tuch to relief, s h e was immediately suppressed by my mother, who reminded her that I \-illain, and thac followed a terrible struggle, from which attention was tllrned to another struggle across the way, between little Jones and her new \'iolin. First there were twenty minutes of s4ucaking up and down the scal e. T hen she brurally and cruelly butchered Humoresque," The last nores were painfully dyingaway when, from offin the distance. came the sou nels of the fife and drum corps of the P .1I1am:mian Boy Scouts. \\' hen they had pass;::...! out of hearing, I returned with renewed vigor to help my hero, whom I had left fighting the \illain. mUSt beexhausteJ now; so Ilet them rest. :\Teither nor I could rest long. for from down the street came the wailing notes of a saxophone. I t was Clarence. the leading actor in the Senior play ,doing acrobatics on his saxophone while practicing his role. 1 immediately killed both my hero anJ \"illain and went to bed in despair.

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J T H E CARIBB EAN T H E V IL LAGE S L EU TH GirdOll Rudd, '2-/ story takes place in S later ville a lit tl e o n e h o r se [Own situated in t h e l owe r par t of Flo r ida o n th e Cal oo sa hatch e e R i ver. J t i s jus r o n e o f t h ose quie t littl e villag e s which boast o f a m a in stree t wh e r e all t h e b u s iness h o u se s of the t o wn are l ocate d and w h e r e t h e tow n f o lk s don't care about to-da y and let tom o rr o w tak e ca r e o f itse lf. ] 11 r h e m o untain s surro u n d in g t h e little villag e, e xc elle n t trOllt fis hin g and hun ting a re to b e f o un d and ofte n t hr o u g h t h e w i n t e r m O l1t h s tired b u s i n e ss m en a n d state s m e n p ass t h r o u g h 011 t h e ir way in to t h e m Ollntains f o r a f e w w ee k s r es t from t h e turmo i l o f b usine ss an d p o liti cs. One o f t h e s toc k character s o f the pla ce wa s Silas B la ckbu rn, know n a r o un d town as Sil a s t h e s l e u t h. H e had for m erly driven t h e de liv e r y wa go n f o r P e r kin s G e n e r a l Stor e, alwa ys c h e r i s h ing w i t hin h i s b os o m h oweve r th e ambiti o n to b ec om e a seco nd S h erlo c k H o lm es So, again s t t h e wis h es o f h i s pare n t s h e quit his j o b an d b eg an se nding f o r lit e ratu re all h o w to b eco m e a det ec t i ve H e es tabl i s h e d h i s offic e in t h e bac k o f h i s fath e r 's g rai n s t o r e a n d h u n g out his s i g n to l e t th e p u b l i c kn o w t hat S l a terville boast ed o f a pri vate d e t ec tiv e E ve r y b o d y h ad l aug h ed at him a n d his father had told h i m t o q u it this f oo l i s hn ess as Mr. S a mu e l n eede d a g oo d cle r k i n h i s n ew h a r dware store an d h e r e wa s S i s c hanc e to g e t a good j ob. But nothin g co ul d p e r s uade S i f r o m h i s pre s e n t occupati o n an d w h e n j o k ing l y a s k e d h ow bu siness wa s h e w o uld o ft e n r e p l y : Y o u j u s t wait, 1 '11 s h ow yo u all so m e d a y He;: d i d n' t h a ve l o n g to wa i t. Ab o u t 3 mil es out o f S later v ille in t l e n e a rb y h ills wa s a large sulp hu r m i n e The pay ma s t e r o f t h e min e h ad b e e n on his way t h e r e w i t h t h e m o n thly pa y r oll, w h e n three a rm ed ba n d i t s in a high p o w e r ed moto r c a r had h e l d h im lip and h ad made a cle an g et-away w i t h $10,000 o f t h e cornpany s m o n ey Tele p h on es we re go t to w o rk i ng and all r oads t hat l e ad out o f S late r v ille w e r e wa t c h e d A la rge r e wa r d w a s of f ered b y t h e compan y f o r th e capture of t h e ba n d i t s The paym as t e r had b ee n so daze d t hat all h e c o u l d r e m embe r wa s th a t t h e car drive n wa s a high p ower e d f\1 c Farian a n d had t h r ee occ u pants Ab o u t thr ee days a ft e r t h e r obbe r y, it w as b elie v ed that t h e ba n d i t s mu s t s t ill b e in t h e vicinity o f S late rville o r had made t h e ir escape i nto t h e h ills, a s all r oads and rail r o a ds had b ee n watc h ed carefully a n d n o o n e an s w er i ng to t h e i r descripti o n had gotte n t hr o u g h S i 's h eart l eape d h i g h ; his c hance had c o m e at l a s t. N o w h e w o u ld s h o w t h ose scoffe r s l D ai l y h e d i sappea r e d into t h e h ills r etur ning la t e at n i g h t One nig h t h e r eturn e d late r t h an u s u al, b espatte r ed wit h mud, and w e ari n g a l oo k o f serio u s purpose H i s fath e r aga i n a ppro a c h ed h im o n t h e s ubj ec t o f a job. "Si," h e said, "Mr. Samu e l i s s t ill h o lding t hat p os iti o n o p e n f o r yo u a n d yo u c a n go t o work a s soo n a s yo u q uit this darn--" Pap, I don't care 110 t h in' 'bo u t 110 j o b j I' ve go t so methin' r e al impo r tant up m y s l ee v e, a n d don t w a n t to b e b o t h e r ed." H e r e all)' h a d so meth i n g up h i s s leeve. H e had f o u n d abo u t three m i l es out o f town o n t h e edge o f a s m all lak e n ear a se ldom u se d r oad, a M c F a rlan car cove re d wit h mud. I t ans w e re d to t h e descripti o n o f t hat g i ve n b y t h e pa y m a s t er. Als o a lit tl e way off, h e f o u n d a campers' t e n t with t h r ee o c cupants and, afte r r!lak i n g t h ese d i s coveri e s h e ha d ma d e h i s wa y h o m e, dec i ding t o wait un til t h e next d a y to i n ves t i gate m o re f ully f o r o n e o f t h e i n struc ti o n s o f h i s lite r ature wa s to proce e d s l ow l y and c a u ti o u s l y S etting o u t n ext m o rnin g w i t h h i s rifle a n d dog o n t h e pre t e n se o f hunting, h e made his wa y in t h e di rectio n of th e campe r s h e h a d d i s cove r ed t h e d a y b e f o re \ V h e n h e r e a c h e d the s pot, h e nude a care f u l de t our o f th e c am p an d appr oa c h ed it f ro m t h e lak e s h o r e t o k ee p th e m e n f r o m s u s p ec tin g t hat h e had trai l ed t h e m Stealin g close to t h e s ide o f t h e t ent, h e l a i d his ea r a g ainst i t. C o ld c h ills p l a ye d tip an d d o w n his s pine at w hat h e h e ard. \\'c ll, t h a t w as a pre t t y good h aul w e ma de s a i d on e '" t s ur e w a s said an o t h e r "And w e o u ght to m a k e t w o o r t h r e e m o r e l i k e it b e f o re w e go ba c k to t h e c it y.

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THE CA R I BBEAN. 39 ;' The fellow s lip in the city thought we were fools coming way down here, but just wait till we get back and tell them our luck," Si heard a t hird person S :1)'. T his was enough evid e nce to convince his detective mind that h e had at last landed the handits, and done it si ngl e handed at that. T hey had spoken of a haul; so h e thought they must have t h e loot with t hem. The men inside the tent began to move around; so h e carefull y crept back into the woods. J \ laking hi s way back to town with all poss ibl e haste, h e headed for the s heriff's office. }\. half hour later Si, covered with mud frol11 head (0 foo t, h is hat mi ss ing, hi s hair disheveled, came running into the s heriff's office. "\\'hy all the hurry, Si? \\'hat's the excitem ent?" exclaimed the s h e riff. I f I take you to t h e hiding place of those bandits t hat robbed the Harrington Sulphur i\line's pay roll, do I get the reward?" h e burst forth, after getting his breath. "\\'hy, o f course YOll do, Si," grinned t h e sheriff, f o r h e tho u g h t it wa s some big joke. "\\'ell, t h e n, get a large p osse together, L)r these may make a fightj then fJllow me," h e said to the astonished s h eriff. The s h eriff, almost convinced by Si, hastened to gather a posse, and soon they were heaJed fJr t h e h ill s TJlis wa s Si's great moment as h e galloped up the main street with the posse and the s herifF behind him. F o lk s would laug h at him? \\'e ll, h e'd just s how them. : \ s h e passed his father's grain store, that astonished gentleman came out 011 t h e sidewalk and yelled after him, A Y OC:-\CE R BROTH ER. W it h lordly mien and boldly blustering air, H e l oudly boasts that he can never kno\\ Of an)' fear, but still, 'tis strange, will shc\\ A bashful blushing face when fair Ar e nt;:ar. Such trifling things as unke ;qlt hair And dingy grimy h :l.Ild .. are far too 10\\ T o trouble his more lofty mind, althoug h H e dons his clothes precisely and with carc. His joy in life is far 100 pl:tinly heard; : \ml appetite by far roo plainly seen; But 'neath all this, is helpfulness 10 mother, W ith friendly thoughts behind his ca reless word. And, aftl:r all, who is there who could mean The same 10 you as doc, litde brother? ,, \\'he r e be ye going, Si, t hat job t hat--," hut th;1 t was all i hC;1rd. A.tter a half h our's ride, they began to ncar the bandit's hiding place. Y o u had b t:tter have your posse surround the tent, while YOll and I go forward and demand their surrender," said Si to the sheriff, for he was determined to be in at the killing. After the !:iheriff had stationed his men, h e and Si started toward the entrance of t h e tent, Si fairly swaggering. \\' hil e the s heritf h e l d his gun in r eadincs!:i, Si l o udly rapped on the tent and yelled, "\\'c \'c got you dead to rights; so you might just as well comc f0rward and g ive yourselves up." A rather s hort individual stepped forth from the tent, follow e d two other men. Afce' g lari n g around at the pesse, the sheriff flaunting his badge, and Si, the s hort fellow demanded, "\\'hat's all this farce? Can't a fcllow spend a quiet co upl e o f weeks fishing without a lot o f dummy s herifFs coming up here and spoilin g it Lx him; J ought to the whole bunch of you--" But that was a s far a s h e got, (or the s h erifl", as if awake nin g from a dream, lo udly cxcbimed, ";\I y Gosh! It's the Governor of the Stat!.! and his--" But that was all Si h eard, for in the next instant ht: was on hi s h o rse bound for h o m e le;l\ ing the sheriff to explain matte:-s. Galloping into town as fast as his horse's legs would him, he rode strai ght for his father's store, and dismounting, went inside. \\'alking up to his father, h e said sob e rl y : "Pap, what about that new job was talking about?" BOBBED H A l R Ida BrotL'1I, Z2. Oh! Here is to the girl who bob .. hcr hair Iler hair of brown, chestnut, or golden hue Her curly, flying locks of fashion ne\\ I lave Illy wondering heart within her sn,ue So gay anti yet so ,Irtless is her air E nhanced by roguish eyes of bro\\ n or blue. Hut, with it all, I know her heart is true Though she w ith largess free ht!r fa\'ors share Let's pJed(!e a toast to her the modern girlThat she mar keep her happll1c!>s and joy. That beautIes like petals may unfurl Fr om heart 110\\ light as that of barefoot L ntil she blooms into perfect.:!d lifeEmerging capable, a staid good wife.

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THE C. -\RI BBEAN. SORRO W S COME-? J ones ne\'e r knew how the book agent got past the guard in his outer office, fJr h e ha d given strict orders that no salesmen were to be us hered intO his sanctum sal1ctorUI11. i' lr. J o n es hated salesmen, particularly rh3.t brand of winJ blowers, as he called them, the bO:Jk age nts. H e hated them with all the hatred of a \\'0111 Stree t cynic; so it spoke workls fvr th.: perslI:1.s ive powers of rhe book agent, that JO!1"::3 f.):'I:ld himself dazedl y staring at a highly colo;eJ copy of tho" Early Pilgrim Fathers. I t haj all be e n done so quickly and glibly thilt the thing h e remembered was handing over 55. H e n o w IO'Jkeci at the book aglin and cursej f.!ebly, 1l.J[ b eca use of money spent, but h e had b ee n bested. B y the tim e l\lr. J ones reached his home that evenin g, h e ha d completely forgotten the unpleasant episode w i t h t h e book agent, in the anticipation of a good dinner and a quiet evening with his wife. Two hours later, J ones, in slippers and com f or t able smoking jacket, pulled his easy c h air before the fire and down with his n e wspa pe r and his pipe. H e looked across at the pretty dark head of his wif e, b ent over her sewi n g, and a grea t f ee ling of peace and contentm ent came over h im. "Oh, John!" l\l rs. J ones, throwing aside h e r sewing, ran over to perc h on the arm of 1\lr. J ones's chair. I 'ye got somethin g to tell you a book agent came to-day; o h h e was the nicest, most courteous man, h e would h ave con vinced eve n you -and I know h ow you hate b::>ok agents-that you cou ldn't b e with' Jut this b ook." ,\Ir. J ones stiffen ed paceptiblr Y es, it was on l y 56 and teils ab')ut the P ilgrim Fathers, J ohn; you kn o w my an ces tors ca m e over in the A4a.yjlower and I almost cried when I read about that firs t hard winter. I t wiil a w orLie r ful book to hand down t o our children," .... \ncesrors and A-lo}:/1owt!r b e hanged!" grow l ed J ones "\\' hy J o hn what's the matte r, you 'n: p ositively cross; it's r eally quite an educational--" l\l atter," splutte r ed Jones; 1 got s tu ck o n th e sam e b ook Bla s t t h e whol e tribe o f b oo k agents. Just then J o n es l ooked out of the window and whom s h ould s h e see hurrying through the f.lst-gatherin g dusk in th e direction o f the station but the same b oo k agent! L ook, J o hn! Qui ck! I s that vour man?" Y es! Blast him'" Run anJ catc h him a n d make him take o n e o f th ese o l d P i l grim Fathers' bac k." But, I am n o t dressed, a nd m y bo o ts are off." J USt then I\lr. Smith a n ex t door n eig hb o r, drove past in a carriage. J ones fianti cally pounded o n the window pan e in suc h a manner t hat the startl ed h orses were brought up wit h a jerk Hey, Smith, r un down to t h e s t a ti o n, will you, and c a tc h that b.)ok agent YOll see standing t h e r e. Mr. Smith reac h ed the stati o n J U S t as the co nductor sa id "All aboard." B ook A gent'" h e yelled, just as the book agent stepped o n the train. B oo k A ge n t! h o l d on a minute, l\1r. J ones wantS to see you." .. J o n es? J o n es wan ts t o see me?" repea t e d the puzzledlooking b oo k ag ent. "Oh I kn ow what h e wants. H e wants to bu y o n e o f m)' b oo k s but I ll mi ss m y t rain if I go back to sell i t to him." "Oh, if that's all h e wants I 'll buy it and take it back to him. H o w mu c h i s it?" "Seve n dollar s for the Earl), P ilgrim Fathe rs,'" sa i d th e b ook agent, as h e r e a c h ed for th e m a n e), an d pa sse d the b oo k throug h t h e window. J ust tht!11 Mr. J o n es arrived at t h e statio n puR-ing and blo wing, lik e a diminuti ve m od el o f th e just pulling out. A s h e sa w the train l e aving, h e was too f ull for utterance. "\\'e ll, I gOt it for you," sa id Smith, Just got it; that's all." Got w hat?" Got th e b oo k -'Early P ilgrim Fathe rs' and paid--" "By the g reat h o rn s p oo n muttered I\l r. J o n es, as h e faint ed right in the middl e o f the street.

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THE CARIBBEAN. MAS K S .'\ND CRABS. Car/ wrigh t '22. Having a good rim e, J o hn ?" a s ked H a rry. "Oh Glori o u s, r eplied J ohn. "But have you seen Minnie arollnd here? I have b ee n l ooking f o r h e r for the la s t h alf h o ur. I have an idea t h : H s h e dolled up a s th e Fre n c h Jane." "Your're right," sai...l HrTY, chuc kling g uiltily. "She has b ee n l ooking fJT you al so." "We ll, thanks for the info., I 'll b e O. K fur the r es t of th e even ing. Have a g oo ... t time, and go h o me at a respectabl e h our. S o l o ng," and J o hn started f or i\l inni e H e had very little trvubl e in fin ding her (or s h e had b ee n sitting all evening in the sa m e pla ce which wa s very uncommo n f o r i\ l inni e S h e wa s generally h ere there, a n d everywh e r e H ello, i\lin! I 've b ee n l oo king for YOli till m y eyes are so r e I larry jus t put m e wise n ow." "Good evenin g John, s h e repli ed Having a g oo d time? "Sure thing! S o mehing happe n ? Y o u have b ee n quieter than u sual." "No, I'm JUSt taking lif e easy. H o w d o yo u lik e my n ew costume?" "Fine and dandy. lo body would kn o w wh o it wa s \\' h y I wa s even fool ed myself until old m e. I bUfnp ed into about t e n teachers whil e trying to fillJ yo u, and wa s jus t about to tell them what ( th ought about th e m when I discovered wh o they w e r e. They giv e me a pain; ('ve never b ee n any plac e wh e r e they w eren't. I'm d isgusted with the wh o l e c r o wd. Y ou ought t o see th e report th ey handed m e t h i s m orning. " ( did happe n to see it, and I don't see what YOll ex pect. That i s about as well as you door ever did." H uh! I 'm g lad yo u t h ink so," r eplied J o hn I f I d on't deserve m o r e than a P in Ph ys i cs, and a 'G' in Engli s h I 'll eat m y shirt; and what did yo u think of that r ed 'F' in Algebra?" W ell, a good thing for you t o do w o u l d b e to w o rk a little m ore, and get what yo u think yo u deser ve, \Vh y blafn e th e teachers?" "Say) w h o do you think you are? You talk a s if you th o ugh t you w e r e a teacher. I suppose yo u got all' E's, d idn't you?" "No, I didn't get all 'E's but you don't hear m e grouchin g about what J did get, do you?" "All these t eac h ers have their pets around h e r e and I'm o n e o f them, but I'm th e p e t nut. The y all pi c k on m e. It's J o hn ] ohn,J ohn, all day l o n g. One of th ese days I'm going to change m y name. That M i ss B eec hin g thinks I'm an Alg ebra s hark, but so m e h ow o r oth e r I can't bite ancl then I get blamed f o r it. Mi ss Dodds baw l s m e out f or n o t kn owing t hat this too solid fles h w o uld m elt. J ust b ecause h e r brain sopped up all this Shakes p eare stuA-', s h e thinks min e i s going [Q do tht same. The n there i s Mi ss H ornbeak, who tri es to t ell m e all this junk about Columbus and th e oth e r inventor s, and b ec all se I don't kn ow what happened a tho u sand yea r s ago, ( get 'P,' and if Ba--;" but h e r e h e s topp ed for h e hear d th e whi s tl e of th e A oo r manage r. Ladies and gentlemen, w e ask you all to un mas k n o w and go into th e n ext r oo m f o r refresh m ents J o hn obeyin g orders with th e oth ers, unmasked at o n ce but h e negle c t ed f ollow in g furthe r direc t ions, f o r upo n turning to ofl'er l\l innie his arm, h e d i scove r ed that with th e r e moval o f h e r mas k s h e ha d reveal ed l\li ss H ornbe ak J o h n, without even exc u s in g him self, darted out o f the doo r and ran f o r h o m e

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THE CARIBBEAN. Ida Brow". '22. 11.45: Oh, 1'111 tired; "Lightnin'" was a good show but it was so long. ] '111 glad did go [0 the movies He'll get a few more h o urs sleep than we, anyway. Goodnight, mother and dad. Don't f orget to call m e e arl y to go swimming. 11.50 : (Guess ( 'II go kiss Harry good night.) i\ lother! Harry i sn't h o m e yet! No! \ V h e r e do yo u suppose h e i s? (i\lother's voice sounds rather shaky; I wonder if she i s scared and i s jus t c heering me up.) Y Oti think h e went riding wit h Aunt Kate? Oh, all right, good nig h t 11.55: ( H 'm! 1 w o nd e r if h e did go riding. 'ell, moth er and dad don't see m to b e worrying over him. Guess I 'll go to b ed too.) '2.30: \\'hat's that, dad? Harry isn't h o m e yet! 1'1J be right down! N o, indeed, .I w on't go back to bed; t'll s it down h e r e and talk ro mother. Firs t yo u r e going ro t h e h ospital ro see if h e has been hurt? Oh, yes, and then you'd better go ro the police stati on and r e port him missing. '1.35: The r e, moth e r, don't w o rry. He's all right. There! The r e! Am r worried? Oh, n o :\lot very, anyway. 1.40: Y es, ( 'II call Aunt Kate to see if they did take him for a ride. Two three five, central. Y es please. H ello, Aunt Kate? Y es, this is s h e I -]ave you seen anything of Harry this evening ? No? \ V e ll, he isn't home yet, and we thought maybe h e wa s over at your h ouse All right then, we'll l e t yo u know w h en we find h im Good bye_ 1.50 : (Oh, my, what if h e ha s been kidnaped! Y e s J was jus t reading ro-day about a littl e b oy s b e ing kidnaped. J v Jaybe they think we are ric h and are holding h im for ranso m.) No, moth e r I don't see t h e m yet, b u t pl ease don't worry H e 'll b e coming soo n 2.55: O h dear! w hat i f has bee n r un over! T here i s so much traffic a n d h e is n't used ro it a ll. Oh, what if 1 never see h im agai n \\"h y wa s ] so mean ro h im! Last n ig h t I made h im take m e ro th e movies, an d t his morning T fussed with h im b ec a u se h e wo uldn't go t o th e sror e (or m e, and to-nig h t I made him do t h e dis h es wh e n I kn e w h e h ad b ee n fish ing all day a n d wa s tired, and--) Oh, moth e r please don't say t h at! Of co u rse he'\1 come home soo n ( Y es--l surely have treated him a b o min a bl y H e often does littl e favors (or me, and ro tell t h e truth h e i s r e ally a lot better t h an other g i rls' brothe r s, and all t h e girls are a lways sayi ng how polite h e i s an d what pretty hair h e h as and--) Oh mother, h e r e comes papa now and Harr y is with h im! 3 .00: \\' h ere have you b ee n, you darling! (th r o win g arms around h im and kiss i ng h im ) Honey, ('II never, never trea t you mean again! I was so scared \\' e r e you lost or hurt or kidnaped 01'--1 \\'hat! Y o u w e re listening ro t h e wireless COI1-cert in t h e pavilion and f ell asleep Asleep! O h you lazy littl e p est! Here w e have b ee n worryi n g and l os ing s leep, and I was thinking h ow m e an I h a d treated you -and t o t h ink yo u w e re as l ee p all t h e tim e Y o u r e sorry! \\'e l l, w hat good d oes t hat do? I t doesn't make up (or t h e s l ee p I lo s t. Y es, a nd to-morrow, yOllng man, you'll h e l p wit h t h e dis h es an d go to th e post office (or m e and take me to t h e movi es and--w ell I '\I t ell you t h e rest in t h e m o rnin g Good nig ht, m o t h e r and dad. andgood nig h t, YOU--YOLI rascal..

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THE CARIBBEAN. 43 -----------------------@); , A SLIP OF THE r.OOT I S BETTER A SLIP Or. THE L O II;S( 'Z3. Eve r yo n e was cru e l to him. H is sister woutdn '[ return his libr a r y b ook f o r him, and there wa s '20 cents due o n it already; his Engli s h t eacher had t h r eate n ed t ha t if h e didn't soon hand in his the m e o n one o f Franklin's proverbs s h e wou l d give him mate rial e nough to wri t e a book on th e s ubj ec t "Experience keeps a dea r schoo l but fool s will learn in no o th e r;" and now his mothe r had made him take the n e w minister's SOil ( h e wa s straight from a sc h oo l in England ) fishing with him w h e n h e ha d t h o u ght h e would have a w h o l e day away from everyon e a day just to g o wandering with n o o n e but his dog. H e b e t h e kn e w wh e r e a pair o f wild d u c k s ha d t heir ne s t and th e re wa s a peach o f a place w here h e couLl se t a trap f o r a p ossum alld--. H e hated t h e n e w boy-h is name, Percival the way h e combed his hair, parted carefully in the middl e th e way h is rib bed stockin gs wer e r olled at t h e top, and especially th e war h e t :dked. H is "right-o, o l d c hap" made him sick. They reached the c reek at last, whil e all th e time J ack maintained a discreet sile nce-a s i l e n ce w hich r emained unbroke n until jus t a s a hu ge s p eckle d trout wa s abollt to make a m eal o f Jilck's bait and hook, t h e new bo y w h i s p e r e d e x citedly, I say, h ow j olly pretty!" And wh e n h e thre w a ro c k in "to see h o w it w o uld s w im," J ack t h r e w down his line. p a r -," but h e got n o furthe r. I n his ange r h e had s t eppe d too n ear the bank and h e f elt him self g o ing downJ o wn Sudde n l y som ething hit him and h e tri e d to COUllt som e bright, orange star s spinning around in a purpl e sea. The n h e wa s being pull e d--pull e d \\' h e n h e r egaine d consc i o u s n ess h e c ould n o t see S o m e t h ing wa s wrappe d around h i s e y es but h e c o u ld h ear someone that sounde d lik e his fat h e r t e llin g a story about s o m eo n e ( h e didn't g e t t h e name) wh o h ad f all e n in th e cre e k and had b e en save d by a b o y w h o lo o k e d a s if h e h a dn't t h e strcngth of a girl. Sudde nly h e un d e rstood and, s miling a bit, h e said, {I (;\ slip of th e f oo t i s b etter than a s lip o f t h e tongue,' Franklin.Experie n ce," A.nd they put an o th e r i ce ba g o n his supposedly deliri o u s h e ad. THE SECRET. B IIII ':n. One Saturday morning when I was in the mid s t o f m y baking the door flew open and in ru s h e d o n e o f m y n eig hb ors breathless with excite m ent. "Oh M y dear!" s h e gasped. I 've jus t h eard t h e most inte resting piece o f n ews I simply couldn't wait to tell you." \ V ell, what i s it ?" I a s k ed ra t h e r ,:u1I10 y e d b ecause s h e ha d disturbed m e S h e b eamed a n d t h e n looked my s teri o u s R eally I don't kn o w w heth e r I ought to t ell yo u o r not. Y o u see, Smith to l d B rown and told h e r not to tell, but i\Irs. B rown jus t can't stan d i\.Jrs. Smith because the Smiths have a Cad illa c and Mr. Brown only has a Ford, s o s h e told l\irs. J o n es just for spite, and i\i r s J o n es tol d me," H ow inte resting!" I murmured absently. Y es y o u see that's how it wa s and i\lrs J o n es n e v e r w o ulll f o rgiv e m e if s h e f ound out I tol d y o u. Y o u mu s t n e v e r m entio n it t o anyo n e." J u s t the n th e o rd e r mal1 came in an d I ha d t o e x c u se myse lf f o r a m o m ent, but i t made n o diffe r e n ce to h e r f o r s h e k ept on talking s t e a dily whil e I gave my order. ";..Jaw, if I t ell Y O ll, y o u mllst promise n e v e r to t e ll. I suppose I ought n o t t o J\i rs J o n es will jus t kill m e \\'e ll, I will an y way. Y o u s e e it wa s thi s way--Oh, dear! The r e i s m y hu sband coming n ow, an d I haven't e \"cn s tart ed his dinner. I 'll tdl y o u tom orrow." \\"ith that s h e to r e out thro u g h th e door a s s u ... ld enly a s s h e ha d co m e in. S o s h e n e v c r t o l d m e h e r sec r e t but I havc always ha d a v c r)' stro n g s..1s pi c i o n that I kn e w it f o r I was the o n e wh o had told Smith.

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+4 THE C.-\R I RBEA:--r. -------------------i\IY F IRST AND UST ATTEi\IPT AT D I V ING. Bt'II} Fitz.Willitlm, '25. "Oh, go on and do it, urged i\l ildred. "But I can't!" -'Yes, you can! See, it's not very d e ep." J peered down, down, down befo r e I fin: t!ly saw the b ottom. Oh, h ow stollY it was! S o deep! If 1 should g e t to the bott o m and some h ow come up-oh, but it would b e too terrible! "Oh, I ca n't, MildreJ.' Ye s you can! Now, go on!" "\\'ell-I'II try." I 'd show h e r that could do it as w ell as she could! I leaned far over, fanhe:farth er. I f e lt myself slippi ng. :\ co l d s hiv e r ran lip m}' spin e. I felt lik e those h air advertisements goinggoing -but not quite g o n e, for with effort I caught m yself. "Oh," I gasped in r elief. If I had dived in, I'd b e down in t hat co l d green water now. "'Ve il, what did you do that for? Y ou w e re going over b ea utifully. J'm Ilot going to stand h ere any longer waiting for you to do w hat you never will!" "Oh, i\, l ildreci, I'm going to do it right away," 1 asserted h eroically "Now, l ea n far over and just fall in," were my di rections. I b e nr far over, over, over. Oh! Now I was going f o r sure. 1 said my prayers. Had I kissed fllo th e r befo re l eavi ng h ome? And then it seemed as if the water leaped right up and slapped m e in t h e face. D o wn, down 1 went. Shou l d I nev e r come up? I\l y ears wer e ringing. But the next thing I kn ew J wa s clinging to the ladder spouting water lik e a you ng w h a l e. Gasping b.::tween breath s I groaned, "Never again," for I ha d hit flat as a pancake. COGITATIO:--rS OF A COCH E R O. Gladys '24. Hi der, cap,),a hain'twish hacoac h ? Take)'a to da 'otel, cap. No, no co a ch! Run, me SOil, l apoleon, harou n' dis co rner quick f e hyar come cia humane lady dat stop hu s dis mornin'. D a humane sasc i e t y h'am h always bus)'bodyin'haroun'. Firstonchamsay, "Coach man, take dat pore rin h oss bak to da stable han make 'im 'ave ha good feed." Han den, Hain'r ya hashame f e drivin' ha h oss wid h a so r e h o n 'im bak?" H an clen cia n ex one say, H i hain'r gwan rid e wid y a hatall if ya ham b eat dat h oss dar way Hi t ham hall very well f e dese whit e f o lk s t:, blong to da Pr o t ecrio n hof Crue lry r o h a nimal s but dey hairH huncl e r stall' h osses hatall. Y a jus hafta b eat dem hall da tim e whe n de his ba l ky, e h, apolt:on? Di s h oss ham rin han him rib s srick h out bur dar hain'r n o ring, cause I se tin ma-s e L Lawd, Sa, n o o n e wishin' to rid e w e n hit h am dry seaso n so how s h e tink hi gwan catc h money to buy f ood f e rna h oss? But rain y se as o n comin' soo n han h eve r y body wis h ha rid e han den hi get lots ha m o n ey f e da f eed f e you, :>Ia p o l eo n Han, me so n wat ya gwan do wen ha man pass ya ha spiggoty nickel fe '" fi' cent? Han wen hi d on'r wis h to hit, 'illl get han gr)' han call ha pli ce m :1I1. H i done guess dat dis hyar nigg.l hain't da h' onlyone wat catch bad luc k. One huf dem lad i es dat hi done took to da bank d i s m orn in' ham say s h e jus' finis h give t e n dollars to da C o lon Free Clini c han d e n 'er lirtle b::>y go han l oss h3 b:-an' n e w commissary b::>ok h3n she no 'ave th e m o n ey to get han other I\ly! D ose wim e n hain't g o t n o se n se habout da way d e y gwan talk habour der frien's. T ha n ex' one h3m s a y H i wonder whe r e dis i\l issu s J o nes 113m ca t chin' hall cia m o n ey f e buy s h e n ew cloth e s." H an d ey talk somethin' scanualas habout Mi ss lls D es mo n d wars usband went hu p han d l e f' s h e. H i wonder wher e s h e 'usband go? G e t hup der, :>Iapole o n. D
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THE CARIBBEAY 4 5 A OF THE COL';\,TRY FAIR . -1hx LmrJr, '2); .. Bal!, ',z.;; 1I/(lrIII'T Bowty;, '2./; .flbn-I, '2-1; I 'irx,mta T uc/ur, '25. T i m l',-'I wee', e n d after the Cristo bal H Igh C ountry Fttir. Plaa.A hO'Jse party in B alboa. "No w that w e've fini s h e d dinne r, l e t's all go out on the fro llt p o r c h, turn o n th e LII1, an l talk.-i\1ary y o u br o u ght y our di s h didn't you ? All right the n, y ou brin g it d o wn and I'll a s k m o th e r t o ge t th e things r e a d y f ) r u s to make so m e cand y Ex clise m e f o r a f e w minutes, f o lk s J imrni e yo u go up and brin g down th e c hafin g d i s h f o r i\l ary." uo r Oll f ee l any b ette r after eati ng all that w r key '11 e v erything ? I think that if I eat an y m o r e "II c r o ak. HeYl yo u tw o up th ere are y o u e v e r cO:1ling down ? \Ye ll, hurry th e n C o m e o n out here an d se t th e c hafing d i s h o n th e t a bl e, Jimmie -Alic e, you're g o ing t o make the c andy, aren't y ou ? Y ou're so g ood at itt" "Oh! sar, that's gre at! M o t h er's bringing t h e things in. S omeo n e start a story or some t h ing now Oh! I kn ow! Y o u f o lk s that wer e at th e Cristo bal H i g h S c hool C ountry Fair the othe r night take turns at t e llin g what y o u did and s aw \V e 'll go right aro un d th e YOli wer e th e r e, w e r en't you?" "Yes, I wa s th e r e and certainly had a good time I s aw so mu c h that I d on't think I can t ell y o u all that I did see The things that I r e m embe r m os t are th e ed ibl e things s in ce th a t i s what I 'm u s uall y m os t inte r es t ed in. I f tou' r e v err care ful, A .lic e, y our fudg e may turn to b e almos t a s g ood a s som e of th e cand v lda Bro wn wa s seil in g at the country fair. I 'll b e g oo d. s a fac t t h ough f o l k s ; th e ir candy wa s certainly good and frol11 th e amount t h e \' had 1"11 s a y all th e ir frie nd s mu s t have b ee n 'making it for th e m! The r e w e r e all kinds an d the r w e n t faster than hot cakes "Spe akin g o f h o t things d id y o u ge t an y o f th ose h o t dog s fr o m L eo Ebe r e nz ? 1 s p ent m os t o f m )' time an d m o n e y at that c ounte r until th e \ w e re all g o n e th e h o t d o g s wer e I m ean. I supp ose I ate m os t o f them-good fat, h o t frankfurters, coated with mu stard and f o lded in a r o ll. B o)' r they were good T h e votin g contes t wa s right a c r oss th e hall fro m th a t, so I managed to ge t in th e r e two o r th ree times They w e r e votin g f o r a hig h sc hool g i r l t o ride o n the ir A o a t in th e carniv a l in C o l o n. H e l e n Jukes and Virg inia Tuc k e r l e ft the othe r c an d i d a tes b e hind early in theevcnin g and the n yo u s h ould ha ve see n th e m o n ey A y I a c h e d wh e n I t h o u ght what a l o t o f good it w ould have don e if only it could have in veste d at th e h o t d o g co unter. \\' h y voters w oulJ j u s t plunk d o wn o n e bill after an o ther-fives t e n s an d e v e n a t w enty Fin ally th o u g h the c ha p that wa s sup p orting H e l e n J uk es w o n a lit H e mu S t b e a winn e r an y wa y f o r th e y s a y h e ha s already w o n his ca n d idate. I sn't the candy don e? \\e ll, th e n I w e n t d'Jwllstai rs aId the firs t d oo r I came to ad ve rti sed (h e Siamese T win s I went in with t h e c r o wd an d t hey-or s hould I s a y s h e ? g a ve liS a dance and a song w i t h a ukule l e accompaniment. S o meh o w t h e g o ld e n ha ir of this attrac tion r eminde d m e of I V l arj orie B all and Ruth Du e r -Say, I'm don e so m e b ody else c an t ell the r es t. 1'111 go ing to k ee p m y eye o n that candy. T OllY, your t o ngu e n ee d s e x e rci se .' "All ri g ht! I t's hard tho u g h t o t ell it a s it see m ed I had jus t pai d m y admiss i o n, b ought my quarte r 's w orth of ti c k e t s fro m Ball, and wa s ru s hin g down the hall t o find a place to g o wh e n Emili o S o l o m ol1, disgui se d a s a f e r oc i o u s s l euth, nabbe d m e and to o k m e t o th e kangaroo c ourt wh e r e i V I r. Aans to os th e judge fine d m e fift y cents f o r s p eeding. ] hung around a whi l e and watc h ed th e victims c o min g in l\1 r. Lin cze r see m e d to b e captain o f th e p olice f o r ce for h e abl y supe rvi se d Emili o J u stice sure l y i s n o t blind f o r th ey sa w many c rim es that I d i dn't. "Afte r escaping th e court, I w ent u pstairs and th e s i g n 'Grinless Gladys,' m e t m y eye. I finally g ain ed admittance t o this s h o w and, upo n pay ing Ill)' nickel ti c k e t w as to l d that 1 might have it blck wit h five othe r s if I could make h e r s mil e. Afte r c ra c kin g so m e wise j o k es that w o ul d have made the sphinx laugh, I s u bs ided, She hadn't l a u g h ed but I caught a masc ulin e twinkle in that blue e ye.

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THE C -\RI "Jus t as I was lea\ r ing 'Grinless Gladys'-l think it should h,,'e been 'Gigglel ess George'-I heard a clarion voice announcing t hat rh e program was ready in the assembly room. Somewhe re I h eard a whisper, H ula H u--.' That was suffic ient. I jostled and pushed t hrough the crowd and finally managed to get standing space in the back of the room. All at o n ce Alex L illczer stepped from behind t h e curtains w hich had been stretched across rh e frollt ( f the room and announced that t\Iorris Luce, a fif t h gcade child, w ould p laya selection on the piano. That boy will h e a second Paderewski or B eethoven sorne day if h e k eeps o n. '" turned to say something to my n eighbo r about h o w w ell the boy had done, and when I turne d to the frollt again, 1 0 and b e h old! The curtains had b ee n drawn a s ide to show a scene in H awaii. T he act wa s c a II ed, 'U n de rneath H a wa i ian Skies .' The re sure was some Hulahulaing and singing. V irginia Tucker, Edna Campbell, Juline Granger, Pull ig, and Charlotte H ous e l Wefe the Hula girls while G erald Bli ss H enry Moore, and A l ex I.inczer were the Hull m e n. well and made a big hit with the crowd. Right after them came the boys' g l ee club and judging by their e ncores I'd s a y that they and Miss Currier w e r e fully appreciated. After that came the J'llovi e, 'Stage-struc k Fl oradora.' \Vith L e ro y Magn u son as the irate papa, L o uise H e r n e r a s t h e fond mamma, Bu s ter Fi e lds as the irrepressibl e young brother, and Ernst Euphrat as a movi e manJ.ger, H e l e n Jukes in the title rol e had backing enou g h for any star. \ V e tho u ght V e l v ia Eli za b eth Mill e r 's pretty g l owworm dan ce was to b e the la s t numbe r but there were som e jolly Scotch codgers there from so m e b oat and they in sisted o n Edna Campbell's dancin g the Hi gh l and flin g, She did i t and did it well too, t hough I'll bet it was the fir s t time a Hi g h land flin g was dan ced in a H u I a H u I a costume.\\'ha t aboll t the candy? Ah! Almos t cold! I'm moving over nearer that pan. Y our [tIrn n ext, Jane." These wi th Emoge n e and J ordan Zimmermann as t ouris t s brought down th, hl')Use. :\ex t som e of .llU18 HELeN JUKf..8-Qt!EEN o r THr. NIt''!\'AL. "As soon as I got t:1ro u g h that enormOliS c rowd, jam med both inside and outs id e the door, I went to rh e s-and-I o ce n t store to get a bottl e o f sod a. Harold Boyd a l so so l d m e a coupl e o f alligator eggs whi c h I didn' t want. f\fre r quenching my thirst, j went upstairs where I saw Lloyd Peter so n and Hubert L ee lle3uly ilia)' be only !kin deep but 8 i Iy-three inch es o r :\1is Faulkner's purils sang Te;l:al beauty fit fot II liCulptor 's ma1 orchestra un..l e r Needn't think you're going to get awa y with it the direction o f t\t i ss Currier. I t wa s annoll'1ce i al1.L et's see where was I ? Oh, yes, I re-that this was their fir s t public appearance but I m ember I was in the middle o f the hall-well, a s could hardly believe that, for they certainly played I was standing there, so m e body cam e running

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THE d o wn th e hall, bumped in to m e an d ran 011, l eaving m e counting the stars whil e th e alli ga tor eggs had go n e o n e and t h e cone a noth e r, and 'the y f ell t o earth, I kn ew n o t where.' .. B e in g ratha daze d b y th e blow, I l oo k ed aro llnd and saw an o p e n d oo r; so I d ec i ded to go in there and r ec llp erate. I stepp ed in s ide a nd found myself in th e .I apanese t e a r oo m o f whi c h I ha d h e ard s o much. The r o'Y;, w a s lit b y .Ia)1an ese lante rn s and l oo k e d s o dim and r es tfu1. d ec id e d to stay a whi l e ; and s o orde r e d :l Clip o f t e a and sat d o wn o n aile o f the nume r o u s c u s h i o n s T e a and c ra c k e r s \V c reserved h e r e by dainty maide n s cla d in th e manne r o f .I :tpanese ge i s ha girl s I m e t som e o f m y f r i e n ds in thi s b ooth, f o r I r e n e i\l c C ourt wa s in charge (" f it and, a s h e lp e r s s h e ha d Ellni ce i\l e ndes, Betty F it z-\\' illiam, and Olg a Ar c ia. Tilda H o w ard pres ided Q\'c r th e t e a P O t an d gave a lit th e t e a to the willin g se n itors. look here, I ge t about o n e pi ece o f that cand y a !"'nollth, do Y Oll e xp ect m e to t ell my ex p e ri e n ces at the fair on that little bit ? Give m e a call pi e o f pie c e s U m m. That's goo d. I 'll g i v e took to h e ;\o rw eg ian wer e placarded o n th e w all s a d \'erti s in g th c wares o f t h is b'xJt h lr s') I g u essed an y wa y Emma T ow n sc n J a n,1 her help e r s, I n l.a ;\I a rkham, Gladys Ford, O lg a L inc ze r Anna C o lb e r g, L ouise H e nter, :lI1d Ily a t inth E de ll, wer e k ept bu s)' servin g co ff ee an d cakc to t h e c r ow d in t h e ir room. I intv a f;.:w m a r c places but I'm tir e d and I ll l e t som e body else e ll abJur th )3':. B es id es 1 want so m e m a r c o f that goo d c anti y." "The r e s th e d i s h h e l p yourself. \\'hat about you, Harry? " \," e ll, d id any o f yo u sec the Labyrinth? ft c r I s aw ;\apol eol1's t ceth, so m e co n ge al ed blood an d so m e body-or-oth er's liv e r I made m y ge t away I didn't kn o w that an d Ethe l co uld b e so bloo d thirs t),. They made quite a bit o f m o n e y at it an y way. I h eard ever y b o d y talking abo u t t h e f ortune t elle r, so I hunted h e r up. Sh e d 0 min ate don e co rn e r o f th e Japanest: t e a r oo m. The firs t thing s h e to l d m e wa s that I d i dn't have m y Spanis h a ss i g nm ent f o r th e next d ay, ;\ 1 iss Barn h o u se i s a good f o r tune t elle r, bu t s h e i s painfull y frank. yo u credit, Alice T H E CAUl'iIHL Qn:El>' A l'iD In:u ATTICH'Tllt: (,O l'RT. "Say! T i s h Anna t h e Ti ght R o p e \Yalker was a sc r ea m B uster l3ur good s h ould go o n th e stage as a f e mal e impc r s u r e c an ma k e goo d to candy, (QUCf!nl.ObLinczer. Hut'lDuey. I l e ft t h e t e a ro o m and a s 1 s t arte d down t h e h all again I m e t ;\Iary wh o c nti ce d m e into th e S candinavian b oo th, \\'e sat down at o n e o f th e tables an d l oo k e d abollt whil e w e w e r e w a it ing f o r Ollr co ff ee E\'en in chis w arm cou ntry to into that b oo th made o n e c hilly. The r e w ere ever g r e en trees and m ountains painted o n t h e w a ll; s n o w wa s also th e r e w o rds, whi c h 1 SQna tor, Even his frie n ds f ai l ed to h i m. I wa s o n e o f th e w h o watch ed this perf ormer n i mbl y wa lk a ro p e str e t c h ed t i ghtly a cross t h e floo r. I saw \\"esley, o n e of t h e d ignified S enio r s, r ed i n t h e f ace from mu c h \'ocal exertion, standing i n front of t h e nigger baby booth, so I went in t h e r e t o tr), Ill)' s kill. \\'es ler's b oot h was ver)' po pu-

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T H E CARIBBEAN. lar with the men. I managed to win e n o u g h cardy to satisfy my wants.-Oh that r eminds me i s our candy all gone ?" "Good night, I never saw suc h a bunch. G o s l o w o n that candy. I haven't ha d any yet. i\.lary, what d i d you do?" "\\'hat about Matchless Medusa? Did yo u see h er? \Ye ll, that was clever. I f yo u wait a minute 1'1\ tell you what s h e was like. She wa s Andy Smith! H e h.:d a co u p l e o f s heet s over 3n and, sunn)unting it, a fal se face sur rounded a sun b o nnet. A ccordi n g t o th e manipulation of th e umbrella s h e would b e real fat one minute, and as t hin as a t o:)t hpi c k th e n ex t. "The t h ree-ring circus wa s funn y Y o u had to climb unde r tables and overch a ir s and walk rails anj then t h e threering circu s was three dough nuts hanging o n t h e wall. T o hear t h e m anager, Girdo n R udd, rave about it t h o ugh, you'd t hink t hat yo u were su r e t o see n o t h i n g l ess t han B a rnum and Bailey's at the e nd o( t h e tri p. "Eddie Sol o m o n had SJ m e apparat u s ( o r testing strength and ability to blo w hard. I guess h e d idn't find anyone t o beat h im at eithe r one t h o ug h [ 'd sure hate to ha ve t hat b oy hit m e." "The r e wa s an"Jth e r str o n g man to'J-t hat p e r f ectly huge littl e Christian Wirtz." "Aw get Ollt! Christi a n \\'orks \ h o e v e r h eard o ( name d Christian \ V orks?" I d i dn't say--" "Cut it out, yo u (.)I ks, j u s t look what time it i s Almost o n e o 'cl oc k an d we have t o get up at six o'cloc k in t h e m orning and g o (,Jr a s wim. T h e last one up g e t s thrown in t h e p oo l b e d and a ll. Goodni g h t ever y body." ACTIONS S P EA K LOUD E R THAN W ORDS. Ida Brown, '22. I n his ow n o pini o n H enry wa s th e b es t swim m er, the m os t graceful runne r, and th e braves t boy in sc h oo!. H e had b o asted many times about the nig h t his (ather' s bar n had caught fire a n d but f o r h im t h e horses would have burned t o == == == == ==== death H e h ad PINEUPU; pu.:'"T. 1ft who h as never t as t ed a Panamapineappie kno .. -a not th e l aste of this luscio u J fruit to l d many t h ril lin g stories about his ad-ventu res and expe ri e n ces in th e jungles wit h wild and f eroc i o u s animal s. One day th e Senio r Class w ent o n a pi cnic. After lun c h Hel e n, one of the c lever es t girls o f t h e clas s said t hat s h e wou l d like to wal k through t h e wood s and wa n ted to know w h o wou l d go wit h h er. Henry v olunteer ed saying h e was (ond o ( walki n g also T h ey w e r e strolling alo n g w hen suddenly H e l e n l e t out one l oud c ry. O h H enry, l o look at t h e b b ear!" Henry took o n e look and then ran ( o r all h e was worth H e r e a c h ed t h e picni c grounds panti ng and out o ( breath and, wh e n a s k ed w here H elen wa s, h e said, "Oh I wa s racing with h e r. S h e 'll b e comi n g soon." A f e w minutes later H e l e n retu rn ed Going straigh t over to H e n r y s h e said, "Oh H e n r y, i t i s too bad yo u ran so (as t b eca u se o n taking a seco nd l oo k I (oun d it to b e only a a co w!" O ( course many questio n s exclamati o n s, a n d s h outs arose (r o m t h e c r o w d but H enry, f o r o nce was sil ent. A TELEPHONE. George Carlwrigl ll, '22. A mouthpi ece, cove red wire s, receiver, bell, And batteries-how s imple yet how greatA world-wide inst rum e nt in little weight The work o f Alexander Graham B ell, Wh ose genius the world will ever tell. With far-str etc hed wires, it carries un see n f r eig ht, And to t h e w o rld doth constantly relate New s of import to g reat, and small as well. And th u s th e te l ephone, of w o rld renown, Stands o n m y desk and, if it s s ummon s come, I answer, kn o wing not if foe or friend M ay call from near -by h orne or far-oR" town, Or if it brin gs me so rrow great, o r some G ood news Its ur geful call I mu st attend.

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THE CARI BBEAN. 1 C L A RENCE. " ;----------------------------------------------------------s Afte r m u c h scurrying about f o r dress suits b oi l ed shirts ev e ning dresses tai l o red suits t e r coats e tc., an d afte r m llc h s awing hamme r in g, painting of sce n e ry b o rr o win g o f P e r s ian r u gs, gay s i l k p illow s a n d s h aded lamps in th e effort to co nv ert a d ing y s tag e into a lux u r i o u s s u burban h o me B oo t h T arki ngton 's f o u ra c t co medy, dCla r Cllce, i s pro d uced at t h e A m e r ica Theatre o n 1 6 b y the C r istob a l H i g h S c h o o l S enio r s under t h e abl e s u pe rvi s i o n o f I i ss D odds L e Roy l\l a g nu so n i s e x cellent in th e rol e o f Clare n c e, t h e yo un g e n t o m o l o gi st, w h o a f t e r h i s di sc h a r g e fro m t h e Army, see k s employm ent in Tew Y ork, a n d b ec au se o f h i s ability to d riv e mul e s with o u t s w e a ri n g, i s g i v e n a p os iti o n a s a sort o f h ig h cla ss handy m an in t h e \\'hee l e r h o m e. H e r epairs th e h o t w a t e r s ys t em, h e tunes t h e pi a n o with th e c h aufle ur's too l s a nd h e tu t o r s B obby i n math_, at w h i c h h e i s a "wiz H e i s a ppro a c h e d f o r ad v i ce o n t h e stra i g h t e nin g o u t o f d o me s ti c tang l es b e ca u se h e h a s b ee n in the A r m y and all t hat," and h e p erforms a c r obat i cs o n t h e s a x o p h o n e, w h i c h pro v es m os t s u ccess ful in r estoring harmony, w h e n a d o m estic c ra s h seems imminent. \ \ 'e are inte n se ,," inte r es t ed in h im fr o m th e minute h e ente r s \ \ h ee l er's office a s all o w so l d i e r, w h o sags to o n e s id e b ecause o f his liv e r u n ti l w i t h h i s r eappointment as c h i e f ento m o l o g i s t in t h e Sturtevan t Bio l o gi c al Labo ratories h e tri u m p hantly departs wit h r i o l e t h i s bride-tob e l eavin g p e ace an d c o n t entment in t h e h eart s of all but little Cor a w h o hates engage d m e n M a rj o r i e Ball a s t h e youth ful and attrac ti ve g o v e r n ess Vio l e t P inn e y,. w h o i s e m p l o y ed t o l oo k after C o r a \\'he e l e r i s es pe c i all y charming in thi s r o l e, a n d in h e r difficu l t p os iti o n i;, the \\' h eel e r h o u se h o l d a r o u ses ou r sympat hy. The part o f Whe eler, t h e s uperfi c ial, in e f ficie n t s t epmoth e r, jeal o u s of t h e g o v e rn ess and s uspi c i o u s of th e n ecessary con f e re n ce s h e l d wit h \\'h ee l e r to d i s c u ss t h e c hil d ren s w e lfar e, i s abl y portrared b y Fi e l d s Too mu c h can n o t b e s:1id o f th e a dmira bl e a c t in g o f Paul Doyl e a s B obby Whee l e r, t h e b uddi n g :1dol esce n t fir e d f r o m h i s t h ird sc h oo l f o r r ollin g t h e b Q n:!s." P aul i s so t y p ical t hat w e all r ecog n ize so m e B obby \\,hee ler, w h o has j u s t wak e d u p to t h e fact t hat h e o u ght to was h his n ec k and n o t go around l oo kin g lik e a scarec r o w an y rnore. H i s anxiety o v e r having kissed D ella t h e h o u se m ai d in th e prese n ce o f h e r yo un g l11:1n," i s so r e a l that w e f ee l wit h h im a se n se o f r e l i e f w h e n h e h ears h e r c all C l a re n ce "an an ge l a n d r e a l i ze t hat afte r u s ing e n d earmal ents" o n ano t h e r man, s h e can't d ogmatize" h im an)" m o r e H e i s so e a rn es t i n his l o v e f o r r i o l et, w h i c h "brin gs out all t h e m o s t s p iric hu l thing s i n him t hat w e are r e all y m o v e d b y his l a s t little tribu t e V i' l e t-I 'll g o h e l p--ca r r y out ),o u r bagga ge N o t un l ik e t h e o rigina l C o ra H e l e n H a yes, i n p e rsonal ap p earance I d a B r o wn prov es an adorabl e C o ra. A s t h e s weet self will ed littl e Rapp e r, w h o fig h t s and q uarre l s with AOE-1I0ARl CHl'KCH tT TUO( H B obby, w h o "Andm tbe boly tl\ iligl.t the cburchbell3echoclc3r .. m ee t s wit h parental i n t erfe r e n ce in h e r affair w i t h t h e g ra ss w id o w e r Hubert Ste m an d w h o fin ally ador es Cbre n ce, s h e charms u s f rom t h e minute s h e e n ters her fath er's office to be d i sc i p lin ed u n til s h e s i nk s o n t h e s t e p s afte r Clare n ce s departur e w i t h a patheti c O h Clare nce," f o r o f co u rse s h e will n eve r l o v e a gain. Emma T owl1<;end s h o w s muc h versatility as an actr ess in th e abl e wa y in whi c h s h e p ortrays the d i g nifi ed Mr. Wheeler's co nfi de n tial sec r e t a r y a s w ell as the r o l e o f D e lla th e I ri s h h o u se m a i d w h ose s mil e i s so intriguin g w e can t b lame B obby o r a nybody el se f o r wanting t o kiss h er.

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50 THE CARIBBE .-\.N. Dinwiddie, the au s t e r e butle r wh o forg e t s his d ignity only o n ce, and the n b ecause C :1tranced by the mag i c strains o f C lare n ce s s axoph Ql1e i s w ell done b y J o r dan Zimmermann." Geo rge Cartwright, a s Mr. \\' h e e ler, "head o f a big bus in e ss an d h e a d o f an unhappy r o wing i s s pl e n d i d H e s h o w s r emarkable h i stri oni: a bili t y in that h e completel y subme rg e s his ow n perso n ality into t hat o f the unfortunate g e ntl e m an. \\'es l e y T o wn se nd s h o w s j u s t h ow exc ellent an actor h e i s b y h i s praise w orth y p ortray al o f the od i olls:Mr. Stem. D espite t h e spl endid work don e b y the Seni o rs in th e p lay, it would have b e e n a l mo s t im pos s ibl e to produce it, had it not b ee n for the h earty support gi v e n b y t h e rri ends o r t h e Cristobal Hi g h S c ho ol. The Sen i ors are e s pe c i ally indebte d t o Mr. J. B. Fi e l d s, Mr. W. W. J o hn s a n d Mr. Al Hut c hing s f o r the artis t i c sce n e r y ; to t h e C o l o n Elec t r i c Light C ompany f or th e loan of a han d so m e s h ade; a n d to t h e Bure au o f Cl u b s f o r the loan o f furniture TABOGA Emma Towl/u nd, '22. A TAJOG. I nr..le l! SCENr. S pa rkli n g whit e I:n' ed by dan.:iu g w a t er s o f I":r ys tai ttlln $ parcu cy. Sur r o u n d ed b y de e p crysta l w ate rs-A n i s l e o ( pirate s b o ld, r elic s r oman c e s Sweet memorie s an d o l d Spani s h dan c esI s T aboga. Old path s tro d den b y bare (eet S h aded b y tropi c a l eve r gree n s Win d lazi l y a lo-g a (ringe o ( b eac h Wa s hed clean b y gentle l apping o( t h e w hispering w a ves, At T aboga R o ugh trail s climb de t ermined l y Up d ee p -jung J ed m o u n tain s o( h i s t o r i c (arn e ; R eds o ( odo r o u s pineapple enti c e tired touri s ts; S waying p a l m s hail wear)' w:ln de r e r s; L o w_dippin g pel cans I n q uest o ( fly ing fis h, S t a rtl e listless b oa tm en, At T a boga. Roses-pink, red, c r eamy &:nd out t heir (ragran ce s w ee t a n d rar e ; HIL LS or S AI.UlIIU OUS T .IBOOA "Aliul e b i t ofhea v cndroPllcufromoutlhesk y on e da y, and it n est led in t hcoc eanin a c l i m c far .faraw ay." T limble_down s ha c k s (ull o( chil d r en, L i n e cobbl esto Ie s treet s M e n and WO:ll en, Tired W o rk at th e ir dail y ta s k s I n Tabo,';l::l. At t h ves per h o ur, M e n l i g h t (re s h c i g arill os W o m e n d o n mantilla s And all m ake th e ir way t o the a ge-o l d c:tth ed ral, T o b o w in r e v e rent w o r s h ip. 'Yo n c r oss, o n s l o pin g hill tellin g o f w o rth y li( e Of so m e o l d ( a ith(ul priest, T o u c h ed b)' th e s un, l o w s inkin g in th e w e,;t Seem s t o p r o n o unce its qui e t b ened i tio n On calm, p e ace(ul, T a b o ga.

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T H E CARIBBEAN. SEASONS. Jordan '22. ew l ife i s see n in Spring when s n o ws melt I n New Y o rk. Sweet perfume fills the ai r As tree s and Rower s b l osso m into brilliant colors I n New York. Lovers Stray along quiet road s ; New vigor fills o ld bodies; Baseball, tennis, and golf claim the a cti\'C: I n New York. The beaches afC gaily colored B y the h o lida y cr owds Of New Y or k. The Summer sun ha s driven many T o leave the city's heat. C o ne y I sland and Rockawa y Be ac h Draw their multitudes b y their glitter. The unfo rtunates w h o S[;lY afe s tifle d The paint on tenement hou ses bli sters and The s ubway with its damp air Offer s a refuge from the withering heat Of New Y ork When Autumn comes, the farmer s Gather in their crop s In ew Y o rk. Schoo l c hildren s traggle to unwelcome t:lSks ; The trees have rakcn go rg eous hu es The nights are turning co l d. All the c hildren are rejoi c ing. The reason? Autumn mc : tn s That s n o w will soon b e on the ground In New York. The h oliday spirit is in the air In New York. Throngs gather in the cities To obtain remembrances for friends. Children dance before the window s At the miracles unfolded before them In New York. f\nd a s the eventful day dawns A great peace settles Over New Y o rk H A I TI. l\;far)' Fields, '22. The hot s un s hine s o ver the filth} streets I n H aiti. Naked and gibbering negroes Sail in tiny boats Around the s h ips at anchor, Y elling to the passengers T o throw them mane}. Their s h i n y bronze bodies glisten i n s un A s t hev dive into the water T o ret;ieve the coins flung down to them. I n the ope n market, With its sickening smells, Ugly and wrinkled o ld women Squat 'neath awnings o f burlap-Their fruit a nd food L ying on the ground beside them, Swarming with flies. Women I n red and yellow d r esses, Wearing large hats Their s hoes see ming to dangle on their toes, R ide on s m all donkeys T o market. Other women Sit in the streets Sorting co ffee, Thei r feet in the midst o f i t. The stores Di sp la y their goods B y hanging them on lines suspended o'er thc sidewalksBaskcts, gay calicoes, patchwork dresses, And more baskets. A n oisy clatter! A queer contraption passes. What a Street car! I t bumps s lowly along the street. The o ld cathedral, Quaint and fascinating, Overlooks t h e throngs in the m arket place In side, s till and peaceful, Seve ral people kneel in prayer The Pre sident's palace Of white, blinding conc rete Stands alone, Surrounded by barren grounds. Hi gh up on the hill The Mountain H o u se I s encircled b y large and s h ad}' trees Through whose boughs blo w cool and restful breezes. Sweet strains o f music issue forth; H o w restful, Compared t o the glaring streets and docks! The sun goes down; The sky alight w it h c rim son and gold Glorifies the peaceful h3rbor. Cool breezes blow, Everything is quict, Haiti is at rest. 51

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,,03 ) ",. -" High Schoo l Ch or-u s Gir-ls' Glee Club u, ., >--I :r: r', ()

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THE CARIBB EAN 53 L a s t rear Cri s t o bal H i g h S c h oo l wa s n eg lected a s far a s mu s i c wa s co n ce rned, bu t this we have made up f o r that (all o w p eriod by a good l y incre a se in enthus ia s m and ability under t h e g entle h u sbandry o f l\I i ss H e l e n Curr i e r our d i r ectress l\l i ss Currie r came to the Z o n e fro m i\liIlI1 CSOt
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54 THE CARIBBEAN. ATHLElI[5 Cnrlwrighl, '22. FOREWORD. Thi n gs have take n place thi s year in the athle ti cs of Cristobal Hi g h Sc h oo l that have never b een tried before. Athl e ti cs have be e n bac ked and boosted to the sky An athleti c associatio n h as be e n formed wit h president, secretary, and a council composed of o n e m e mb er from eac h class The benefits of such an organization have a lready b ee n s h own, and it will b e s afe to say, I b elieve, that in the future, the athletics o f Cristobal Hi g h Sc h oo l will r ival those of any hig h sc h oo l in existence. The o r ganization i s strivin g to broaden clas s competition, make ath l e tic sc hedul es, give honor letter s f or athle ti c work, and promote in te rest in athleti cs. We hope that the students of comi n g years will r ega r d t hi s organizati on as a ne cessity for proper athletic work, and will s tri ve to improve upon th e foundation made by the students of 1922. BASKET B ALL. Bask e t ball h a s a lways topped t h e "Athle ti c A c tiviti es ladder o f Cristobal Hi g h Sc h oo l a n d thi s year it has s ucce ss full y climbed high er b y two s teps, one in the f o rm o f In t e rclass Series," the oth e r, All Star S e rie s." Shortly afte r sc h oo l open ed, an inte r-class series wa s arranged, whi c h proved to b e ve r y exc i ting and w ell w orth the efforts o f ou r coac h Mr. H ug h es Class spirit, frie n d l y riva l ry, and a good sportsmanlike spirit w e r e arou se d The teams were e venl y matc hed, except f o r th e Sop h o m o re s who f o r la c k o f boys found it hard to k eep u p with t h e othe r s But we must take our hats off to our brother Soph s, who s h owed their p e p, cla ss spirit, and sportsmanship, and finall y managed to b ea t the J un i o r s o n e game. The Se n iors, a ft e r many a h a r d f ought, h a i r rai s in g gam e, ca m e through w i t h the high h o n ors o f 1000 per ce nt. The competin g teams and their lin e ups were: D oy l e, F ( Capt. ) Cartwri g h t, F. Zimmermann, C. Townsend, G Magnu son, G. Ru dd, F P arke r, F. Asht o n C. (Capt.) H all,G. Peter so n G. JUNlOR$. May, F. Bliss, F. (Capt.) Lin cze r, F. So l o m on, C. Moore, G. Eberenz, G. FRESHMEN. Burgo o n, F. So l o mon, F. (Capt,) Wal s h,C. Co usins, G. Pulgar, G. RESULT S Of" INTER-CLASS SERIES. Ttam. Plflytd. 11/011. L o; l. P er unt. Scnior$ J uni o r s .. Fre s hmt:n Sop hm o r e s .666 .JJJ t66 Noth ing m ore was don e in the lin e o f basket b all until so m e under classma n happen ed to realize t hat t h e Seniors claim ed th e c hampionship, a nd, h opin g to d ethro n e them, spread his sentiment, a n d it wa s n o t long b e f ore a series o f three games was a rrange d betw ee n t h e All Star s of t h e sc h oo l and the Sen i ors Bu t the i r efforts we r e in vain for t h e

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T H E CAR I BBEAN. 55 Seni o r s had jus t as strong ly r eso l ved to k ee p the ir thro n e and at the same tim e gain hig her honors, and so only '2 of the 3 games were played, for the Seniors proved superior and took both games. SENIORS. '20-:23. D oy l e, F. Cartwright, F. Zirnmcrrnann, C. T ownsend, G. i\lagnllson, C. A t e rribl e mi shap took place in the seco nd game of this series when J \ l agnUSOll, one o f the Seniors' star guards, caged the fir s t bas ket o f hi s basketball career. The All Stars were so stupefied over this f eat that the exce l lent guarding o f Solomon had little effect ALL STARS, 4---<). W alsh, G EberCl12, G. Solomon, C. Bliss, F F. suffered defeat to the tune of 2 1 to 16. This l e f t the series standing with I game apiece, as it still stanus, for, through n o fault of ours, the deciding game h as never been played. Anoth e r game played by our team was that of C. H S. us. Co. F. of Fort Davis, in whic h the hi g h school managed to exhibit the ir u s ual speed anu goou pass work and to defeat the ir oppon en t s b y the score o f 14 to I J The last game o f the year was that with the sailors o f the U S. c ruiser Denoer, :lI1J alth::)Ugh our team looked like pigmies up against these heavy-set, broad-shouldered giants, they proved that size i s not everything in life, for they played one o f the fastest games o f the year and came out once more with laurels, with the score of '1 I to 16. CR.I S T O BAL HIGH SCHOOL TAM. D oyle, F Zi.nmcrmann, C. S o lon;on, P. Blis:>, C. Cartwright. r..lagnuson, C. f\lo::.re, G. Eberenz, G. Townsend,G. W alsh. G. l nstead of p l:l y ing the third gfllllC o f this seri es the Seni.Jrs c h :dlc n ged t h e L incoln Five, and fr o m the m s ufr ereu their first :1.11 I only of the year. The g31l1C was fast anJ well playe..J, but there were a number o f on each s iJe, whi:h marred t h e f
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56 THE CARIBBEAN. Balboa managed to capture I r o u nd of sin g l es when Sergeant defeated D oy l e, by t h e score of (6-]) (4-6) (7-5) However, t hi s was t h ei, o nl y victory of the day. B liss of Cristobal Hi g h Sc h ool defeated l\l. Banton of Balboa H ig h Sc h oo l b y the score of (6-0) (6-1 ). Linczer of Cristobal defeated l\Ic B ride of Balboa by t h e score o f (5-7) (6-2) ( --5), and to complete this triumph a n t day, Rudd of Cristobal defeated \\'. Banton by t h e score of (6-3) (6-2). Soon after th ese matches, t h e J uni ors s tepp ed into limel ig h t and issued c hallenges to all t h e other classes. Every class accepted a n d in turn s u ffere:l defeat at t h e hands of B l i ss and L i n cze r, t h e J unior victors They first tack l ed t h e in n ocent Freshmen and defeated t h e m b y t h e sco r e o f (6-0) (6-0) Then came t h e Soph s a n d t hey likewise were defeated by t h e sco r e o f (6-2) (6-2) (6-3) and last t h e Seniors we r e tak en to t h e field and defeated bv the score of (6-2) (6-1 ) Next they t h oug h t they m i g h t as well m ake a clea n job in makin g a firm f oundatio n f o r the othe r branc hes. \ V e s h all l e a ve thi s opportunity to co min g years G oo d luc k to you! SWIMMING. On April '2, an inter -class swimming m ee t wa s h eld a n d h e re's where the hi g h sc h oo l took o ff the ir hats to th e Freshies. The sco r e w as w ell n i g h t ied f or th e fir s t three events but a ft e r thi s t h e F reshies took the l ead f o r th e r e main de r o f the meet an d WO:1, wit h t h e Sop h s seco n d the S enio r s thid, a n d t h e J uni o r s f ourth. S WI M MI NG MEET. ( Bo)",) 6o-)'ard Dash. I P aul D oyle ( Class '22). '2 Alan W allace (Clas!> '25). 3 J ack Coffey ( C l ass '25) 9D-p/.rd D ash. I P aul Doyl e ( C lass n ) '2 J ack Coffey ( C l ass '25 ). 3 Alan W:t1lace (Cbss '25). IIOIT.L W.'SHlNGT'ON SWBlllING rOOL. Daily. here gattle r Cristobal schoo l pupilg-high. grammar. and grade-for a p l unge or brush in the cooling and buoyant salt w ater. F ancy diVe!! Bnd e\'e r y known stroke are taught by competent ph)' s i cal directors. All children. and girts, swim. and man), arc h ighl y proficient of it w h ile they were at it and p layed the All-Star s of th e school, but t h ey were n o better t h an t h e other commo n h e r d and were de f ea t ed b y the scores of (6-1 ) ( 6 1 ) Seniors Juniors Sophomores Fr eshmen .. 'II-Stars COMPETING TEAMS. TRACK and i\1agnuson L inczcr and B liss R udd and P arker Fi s her and Fiel ds D oyle and R udd The great oppor tuni t y o f developing t hi s branch of athletics has slipped by t hi s year b ecause o f n o r ea son e x cep t th a t m os t o f o ur tim e ha s b ee n s p ent 2-10-.\'ard Relay. W o n b) F reshmen. Team-F ields, F ishe r W allace, and Coffe y Plullge. I J ack Coff!::}' (Cbss '25). "l P aul Do}'l e ( Clnss '22) 3 Gera l d B liss ( Clnss '23 ) Fancy Diving. I Gerald B liss ( Class '"23). '2 P aul D oy l e (Class '"2"2). 3 W esler T ownsend ( C l ass ''2"2). F res hmen Sophomo res Seniors Juni o r s POINTS SCORED, 3 1 7 6

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THE CARIBB E .4.N. 57

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58 THE CARIBBEAN. .-\Ithough many o f our students ha ve participated a n d won many events in outside meets, w e have n o t had the chance this yea r to show our ability as a high sc h oo l t ea m, with oth e r t ea ms o n the Zo n e . -\lth ough we have i ss u ed challenges to B alboa H igh Schoo l boys and th e Naval Air Station, they have not as yet been accepted and as there is n o p l e a s ure in beating ourselve s further progress in swimming activities was abandoned. Alan \ Valla ce anoth e r freshie, earned third place in the 50-ya rd bac k stroke race for se n iors. In this race h e compe ted against c hampions. H e h olds the j uni o r champion s hip r eco rd of the Isthmus f o r 60 ya r ds time, 37 seco n ds. H e h a s passed bevond the age o f a juni o r and retires fro m that class undefeate d. H e was a member o f the A. S. IV. S. C. relay t ea m who on this day de f ea ted the c hampion Canal Zone Athleti c Association team. A lan is also a s t ro n g link in t h e C. H S r eJay team. H e i s o n t h e A. S. W S c., 1I"'.,UII!iJ CI:: .: .... ,"..." Co l o n !:Ieaeh proouctJ of the one and C H. S. water ht:3ll h-gh'ing P3Stime poss i b le el'ery d3y in our I sthmia n )'e:l.f p o l o t eam. Frank Fi e ld s i s th e fastest swimmer (any st;-oke), and has th e pre tti es t form o f any bo y on the Isthmu s under 14 years. \ V e are pro u d to have him in our sc h ool. H e i s a m embe r of the winning junior r e l ay t e am o f the A. S. W S. C. Gerald B liss will b e n e fit thi s sc h oo l next year with his good f o rm in f a n cy d i v ing. P aul D oy l e o n e o f our Sen i o r s and all around athlete, h o l ds the Isthmi an c h ampi o n s h ip in fancy diving, and h e l d first place in t h e Memo ria l D ay m eet. H e i s a m e m be r of t h e A. S W. S C. r elay, m ed ley r e lay (s id e stroke) and water polo team, and captain of the C. H S. s wimm i ng t e am whic h cla im s som e o f th e b es t swimmers i n P a nama. The sc h oo l boasts a fa s t water pol o and r e la y tea m James Burgoo n h as s h ow n som e hidden s wimming talent, but we d i scovered it and w e will watch f o r some junior records to b e broke n. On M emo rial Day th e Atlanti c Side Wate r Sports C lub, whi c h numbers many of our hig h sc h oo l students as m embe r s journeye d to B a lb oa a nd the boy s and g irl s fro m old Cristobal won the 50-ya rd dash f or b oys under 1 5, t h e spec ia l b o ys' relay and th e fancy d ivin g contest, w hil e a grammar sc h oo l gir l J\lI iss Ad e laid e Lambert, won t h e 50-ya rd l adies' c hampi ons hip and t h e l ad i es back stroke races. rANC Y DII'ING. l'rac t ieaJly el'c ry kllown dh'C is excellentl y executed by g r accful and !lceom plishcd dil ers.Cristobal High h o ldin g Istbmian cb!lmpiollllbip b ono rs in this spectacu lar branc h of wat cr spo rt;!!. J o hn Coffey, a freshie, won the 50-ya rd freestyl e ra ce for juniors. J oh n is the fastest sw im mer o n t h e Isthmus under 1 6 yea r s Hi s prett y form in the crawl strok e displays the ease wit h whi c h h e s wim s \ V e l ook to see C offey a world's champio n some day J o hn i s anchor man o n t h e Junior relay team that h as never b ee n def ea re d in i ts l o ng lis t o f rac es H e i s th e fa s t leadoff man f or the C. H. S. r e lay t e am. Coffey I S al so a f lst f orward on t h e wate r po l o t eam. BASEBALL. B a s eball has n o t b ee n a s prominent a S pOrt thi s year a s migh t have b ee n expec t ed, oth e r activities c rowding i t out, but we did put a t e a m in the A Q UU:T SECTI ON o r TilE PO() L The watcr d ep th at thi s I Klint varies from 8 in ches to 3 f ee t all :I gc ntl e s lOlle. H e r e g r oups o f toU! joyou s l y min g l e only to desert f o r the deeper j):lrl -softhc pool .:ableto 8 wim afte r 3 f e w leSllOll8. field w i t h J ordan Zimmermann a s captain, winning 3 o f the 5 ga m es pla yed. The first game of th e seaso n wa s p layed agains t our I sthmian riva l s B. H. 5., o n the M o unt H o p e diamond, wit h s h ort noti ce, during our bas k e t ball series Zim's arm was w o rk i ng w ell in the g am e but, du e to lack o f practi ce, many unpardonabl e errors were made b y teammates. H oweve r w e

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THE CARIBBEAN. 59 managed to k ee p th e sco r e wit hin I run o f t h e Balbo a H i g h bo)'s The scor e e nded B. H S. +; C. H. S., 3 Captain Zimme rm a nn too k his t eam out f o r practice and, afte r a w ee k o f it j ourneyed 4 7 mi l es a c r oss t h e Isthmus t o the sta dium at Balbo a (within s ig h t o f the B a lb o a H i g h Sch oo l ) and took his place o n the m O lln d det ermined t o wip e out t h e la s t d e f eat whi c h wa s g i ve n to his nin e b y B. H S. The B. H S b o)'s see med to l ose all t h e ir p e p in the ir prac ti ce b e f o r e the game, whi l e C H S b o y s s h o w e d ulllI s lial l iveiill ess at all times Zim, our s o uthpaw p i tc h e r dese r ves all kin ds o f c redit f o r h i s s t eady pitc hing, as does hi s support. The game e nded C. H S S ; B. H S., 5 The s e ries stood ti e and the l a s t game wa s never pla yed d u e to the fact t hat so m e o f Balb o a 's b es t m e n left their lin e-up. On Saturday, F e bru a r y II, we m e t d e f eat at th e h a n d s of an Arm y t eam o n the H o p e diamond. B oth t eams playe d goo d ball but the s o l diers proved t o b e the h e avie;-hitte r s and, al -.I.90-T.\IIDDASII. C l ose and eJ[eit i u g poI:!iti o n o f all COlltest:mts a t the 4 o.-yard mark. The90-yard W:I!ICOl ered in 5 4 seeollds. t h o u g h a coupl e o f doubl e plays w e r e made bY' u s, o ur op p o n ents too k h o m e the big e nd o f the sco r e 4 -2. On F e bru a r y '25, Manage r R e a c h o f th e A m erican L eg i o n came f orth with a stro n g nin e e a ge r f o r a v ictory, but l e ft th e field a sa dl y dis a p p ointed man, a s w e w o n, '21 Durin g t h e wee k w e c r ossed ba ts wit h th e sol d i e r s ( ro m Fort D e L esse p s, and w i t h D oy l e pitc hin g, w e a d mini s t e red a d e f e a t t o th e m. During thi s g am e Mag nuson d rove in tw o runs wit h hi s 3-bagger t o l e ft fie l d. M a n y o ( our player s w e r e attac h ed to l oc al t e am s d urin g th e se a so n, and all appeared to rank hi g h in base ball s kill. J Zinunc r mal1ll, pit c her (ca p t.) G B l iss, catcher. J Solo mon, 1St b ase f..loo r e '2d b ase f..1 ag nu so n '2d b ase. E Solo m o n '2d base. P D oy l e s hortstop E be rem;, 3d b as e f..l e n dez right fie l d. W a l s h ce n te r fie l d T owns en d l eft field Alex Lincz er, left field G i r de n Ru dd left field. TH 1IILE-.hIlI NUTE: S LIDE. P o p u lar with yo un g a nd old, uot t o lIle o tio u batbi o g lJUit GIRLS ATHLETICS. L ouise H W ler, '23 FOREWORD. Girls' acti v iti es have b ee n badl y c rippl e d thi s ye ar, and it h as onl y b ee n b y ve r y fait hful w o rk an d a l oyal spirit o n t h e part o f a f e w g irl s that anything at all h a s been d o n e It i s h o ped that next year, with a m o r e fav o rabl e b e ginnin g, th e girls will at on c e undertake t o start th e ir a thle ti c work, and to carry i t t h r o ugh out th e who l e year with true Cristobal H ig h S c h oo l spirit. Until late in th e year t h e r e wa s n o r egular directr ess f o r Cristo ba l girls w o rk. F o r the fir s t 8 weeks Mrs Baxte r co a c h e d the gir l s in s wim ming. Lat e r iVl iss Floyd, ph ys i c a l directress at the Y. W. C. 1\. t ook the girl s f o r g ymnastics and bas k e tball. At la s t h ow e v e r, in February, a r egular ph ys i c al training directress Lindsay, arrive d and b e gan work in earnes t The work o f t h e Gat un g irl s wa s superinte nd e d by i\1r. Baker phys i c al director at Gatun. I n order to over co m e so m e o f the diffi c ulti e s co n ce rnin g athle ti cs the r e wa s f ormed, on O ctober '26, 1 9'21, an athletic ass o ciatio n with L o ui se H e n te r a s pres ident and Gladys L owande s ecretary. l \ t thi s tim e a sc h ed ul e of activities t otalin g 90 p o in ts f o r on e-half c r ed it wa s submitte d b y t h e B u rea u o f Clubs and Pla ygrounds. S e v e n Gatun girl s an::! 1'2 Cristoba l girl s b e g a n w':)fk for t hi s cr edit. ] t wa s d ecide d t o organi ze class basketball t eams but, a s the re w e re n o t enough girls in

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60 THE CARIBBE.-\N. either the J uni o r o r S enio r cla ss [ 0 make a t eam, these twO cla sses w e re combine d Afterwards the d iff e r ent cla sses met and e le c t ed captains F res hm en Soph omores Senior-Junio r Rut h Duel' L o retta Ru s h (later filled by Ch a rlotte H o u sel ) Ernm 3 T o wn se n d BASKET BALL. The fir s t and la s t inte r cla ss g am e wa s pla yed in F ebruary at th e Y. \V. C A., iVliss Flo y d a : tin g a s r e f e ree Owin g to the abse n ce of oll e of girl s o n who m the S o ph o m o res w e r e d e p e n ding a Freshman wa s c h ose n t o pla y in h er s t e ad. The Fres hm e n presumably h o ld the champio n s hip, f o r the y w o n thi s o n e and only game and n eithe r o f the othe r twO cla ss t e am s has tri e d t o d i spute the titl e L o r etta Ru s h o ur star athle t e l e ft (or the State.s o n \ pril 7 1922. B e f o r e m o ving to Criswbal s h e was one o f t h e b est playe r s on t h e Gatun bas k e t ball t eam. Sin ce t h e n, h e r tim e had b ee n take n up with s wimmin g in whi c h s h e has v e r y s u ccess ful. B e f o re l e a ving, h o w e v e r, s h e wis hed to try h e r hand at ba s k e t ball again; so 'l g am es w e re played in h e r h o n or. I n t h e firs t a r oUic king r o ugh -andturnbl e, at Gatun o n April I, Gatun wa s victoriou s w i th a sco r e of II t o I a n d in the seco nd, o n April 6 at t h e Army and Navy Y at Cri s t o bal, Gatun wa s a g ain v i c tori o u s with the sco r e 1 7 to 4-On Apri l 1 7 the Gatun g irls' ba s k e t ball t eam pla yed t h e ir Daddi es." The game wa s sc h eduled to b egin at 7 o 'cl oc k but th e ex p ectant c r o w d wa s k ept waiting f o r alm os t t h r ee-quarte r s o f an h o ur. Finall y the "Daddies made a triumphant entry e a c h o n e b e i n g introduced t o th e s p ectators One g l a n ce at th e ir indu s t r i o u s jaws suffi:::e d t o a n s w e r the questio n a s to the why the Y h ad run o u t o f gum th a t nig h t Many o f t h e m e n b erate d t h e m se l ves o n n o t having noti ce d b e f o r e h o w s t r iki n g a n appea ran ce a l ace rume ca n gi ve a pair o f kh aki tro u se r s and w hat a n effective bas ket-ball un if o rm may be c reated wit h cretonn e bloo mc:rsandsh ort full s k i r t. Afte r the uproa r had so m ew h a t di e d d o wn, the r efe r ee finally pri e d t h e whistle t o his m outh, thro u g h the l o n g white hair that flo w ed in un natural wa ves fro m unde r a b o u do i r cap, and t h e game b egan. Credit s h o u l d certainly b e give n to the forwards of the "Daddies" t e am for t heir abilit y to climb ladde rs. The score wa s finally c o n ce d e d to b e 11 1 0 in favor o f t h e g irls. H o m e r Bake r, p h y s ical d irecto r at Gatun, i s planning t o take a t e am of gir l s to t h e States. T o obtain m o n e y f o r this, a series of baske t-ball game s b e twe e n t h e Adantic and P acific sid e s ha s b ee n arrange d. Cri s tobal and Gatun g irls have c om bin e d to make an Atlantic sid e team. D .lIe p l/I)'l' d Score. lI'inner. Mays G a tlltl [ I-J Adanti c M ay 6 . B a lb oa P a cific M : l)" 1"2. Pedr o i\l i gud T i e M ay I J. C a m p a t Gatun 9-3 P a cific i\la y 1 9 F ort Cbr t o n 7-4 Atl a nti c M ay "20. F ort D avis 5-3 Atl a nti c TENNI S T e nnis h old an important pla c e in sports this year wit h prac ti ce every \ Vedn esday at e i t her the New Cristobal playsh ed or Radio co u rt. A series of champio n ship game s b e tw ee n B al b oa and Cri s tobal H ig h S c h o o l wa s arranged. The fir s t wa s pla yed on April 2 9 Olga Linczerplay ed Anita S e rg eant winning o n e lov e se t and a sec o n d s e t ( 6 3) H e l e n Abendroth l os t to Marion L ockart i n a g am e whic h wa s a d e c i d e d c r edit to H e l e n in h e r g ood jud gm ent in pla c ing th e ball. Edna Campbell pla ye d Ol ena Hut c h ing Edna w inning o n e l o v e se t and a se c o nd se t (7-6). On May 6 a r eturn se t o f d o ubl es wa s played at Balbo a. Ol g a Linc z e r and Edna Campbell r epresente d Cri s t o bal and l os t to D orothy Br ook s and Ell e n R o b erts ( 5-7) (8-10) Two more garn es m u s t b e playe d. HIK I NG. A hik e of 1 6 mile s wa s r equire d to gai n f ou r p oints F o r thi s r e a so n '2 hikes wer e made, o n e to Gatun, a di stance o f 9 mil es and oth e r t o I V Iin di Farm. SWIMMING. Swimming h a s a lways b ee n important in our sch oo l athletics and w e a re pro ud to b e abl e to say that manyofthe b es t swimm ers on the Adantic s i de, and indeed on the Zo n e, are members o f Cristobal H igh Sc h ool.

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T H E CAR lBBEAN. T h e first meet o f the sc hool year was h e l d at the \\'as h ingtol1 P oo l o n Thanksgiving Day, f o r rh e r \t\anti: s ide alone. For hig h sc h oo l g i I s t h e f ollowing phces were made: Ot:R CllAlIPION 1..\015 RELA TEl'\!, Three high and one gt:lmmar schoo l mak e up thi s fast.s\\-imming quattette, l o\\'cnng the oolor s o f Balbo:l: s Slar swimmcT'll. Miss Adcbidc Lambert (third in line ) the I!:rIl.mmat school member, the fastest gitl s ,,-imm e r on the I sthmu3. Th e others. all hil!:h. from left to right arc the t-hsscs Loretta Rush. Gl:l.dys Lowaude. :md Edna Campbell. 30-YARD DA:'H. ] Edna Campbell. Loretta R ush. J. Ru th Duey. 6c.YARD DAS:-I. I L orett:! R u s h 2. Edna Campbell. 3. Ruth Olley. I n the meet o n J <1llllary '2, two third p laces, in fancy t:ivillg and the 60\ar d d a s h were made by Loretta Rush. On the \\'ashingtoll's Birthday Isthmian m ee t although t h e g irl s worked hard, o nly a few p oints w e r e made: 60.YARD OASH .-CIRLS UNDER 16. 3. Loretta R ush. DASH.-LAOIES. Loretta R ush. 3. Edna C ampbell. T h e most exci tin g event wa s t h e r elay w on the Atlantic S i de \\'ater Sports Club. The swim mers w e r e L o r etta Rush, Edna Campbell, Gladys L owande, and A.de laide Lambert. For variety a swimming meet was h e l J at Gatlin o n i\larch 7, in whi c h Loretta Rush made second p l ace in t h e 50-yard dash special. The Junior aquatic meet for t h e Atlantic side alone, h e l d o n Easter, wa s the m os t amusing meet o f the year. The management o f thi s meet was handed over almost entire l y to t h e h ig h sc h oo l m embers o f t h e \\'ater Sports Club and t hey ce r tainly did well. On r.larch 12, in an allI sthmian m ee t t h e Cristobal relay tea m wo n fir s t p l ace establ i s hin g a poo l record fClr la dies in t h e fast time o f 1 minute 1 8 J 5 seco nd s, and Loretta R u s h made thi r d place in t h e 6o-yard dash The inte r cla ss meet, o n April J, wa s o neofthe m os t inte r esting and importan t events o f t h e sc h oo l year. Onl y the Freshme n a n d Soph o more classes were represented by girls i n this meet. I. l.oretta R ush. (So phomore.) 1. Edna Campbell. ( F reshman.) 3. R uth Duer. ( F res h man. ) 3C-YARD D A S H I. Loretta R ush. (So p h omore. ) 1. E dna Campbell. ( F reshman. ) 3. R uth Du ey. (Fresh man. ) PLUNCE, I. L oretta R ush. (So p h o m ore.) Edna Campbell. (Fres h man. ) 3. Gladys L owande. (Sophomore.) 1"2C-YARD RELAY. W ATER 9I'QRTI! Tw o gr ammar achool medal ,,I oners.. Coffey. raRC}' dl \ 'er. anJMissAdelaide Lambert. holder o r Istbmusor Panama 3Q..yard .5Q..ya r d.and 6O-vard comiog world' champion girl swimmer. I. Sophomores. ( Loretta R us h Gl adys L o w ande.) F reshman. ( E d n a CampbellRuth Du ey.) DI\' ING. 1. R uth Duer. {Freshman. } 1. Loretta Rush (So ph o m ore.) : \ A foolish frog, one sunny day. \\'hile splashing around in a plarful wa)", Observed a man W i th a red tin can, 4.nd manners most suspicious, I think I know remarked the frog "A safer place t h an on this l og, "For when a man "Comes with a can, His object is malicious -Ile:.: Lillczer, J. Thus far the fool ish frog was wise, But, had he better used his eyes, H e would have seen Close by, a lean Old 'gator-his nose just showing Kersplash-th e 'gator took one bite The moral I neeJ scarce recite: B efore you leap J ust take a peep. And see where you are going.

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THE CARIBBEAN.

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THI:: CARl Bi3;::AN. 6.1 The Exchange Department ofTI-IE CARIIlBEAN 3 h ou l d b e, and is, excepti o nall y interestin g to the studen t body o f Cristobal H igh The pupi l s o f this sc h oo l come from many diff e r ent parts o f t h e United States and are always g lad to find out what the sc h oo l s from w hi c h they cam e are doing This year, h oweve r our ex c han ges h ave not cooperated \vith u s as we h oped they w o ul d. \ V e miss m a n y of o u r o ld f riends. ONE G.l.Tt: O P EN .\T GNl'UN SJ'ILI.\\'AY Migh t y bulfcN turn back. in towermg cald r,)u-l ike SC(!thing tOILS of on-rushing W:lter fr om t ile l:ike. Ol'crhcad. n raiub;lw-huoo mbt obs<:ures th e daulingsull. T he roar ora miniMure Niag:lra o th e r sounds. \11 3we-inspi rin g !:'pect!lclef;t;!hioued entir e l y by the h a nd orman. ThtZonitlll. Balboa H iglt Scltool Ba lboa, C. z. Somehow we missed vou laS t \"ear. That's toO bad, isn't it, when there only of u s o n the C anal Zone? Anpvay, we received y o ur well_arran ged 19'20-'21 issue and extend our hearty congratulations.. Y o ur athleti cs are especi:llly inte resting to us becau se we are frien dly rival s in thi s lin e. Your full -p:tge pictures add mu c h I n fact we were tempted t o tn them ourselves. T he glowing a ccountS that D:tIlH: Rumor ha s brought us of the excellence o f your m:tte ri:t l for your 19'21-'22 i ss u e have spurred u s on f O greater endeavor. Tlte Jllllla. fllrii{l1UI Higlt School, Indiana, Pa, The j o ke s storie s and editori als in the JU1IIa are fine. The athletic department was full of pep, and interesting to us 'flu l l1irror. N o r wood H iglt Sc hool, Norwoo d, Ohio. W e lik ed t ht: entitled, "The Quarterback." Y o ur p oets add much intere s t with their clever line s T he K ick Department" w as read and re -read with mu c h amusement. TheEllrurian. Har;Jerhill High School, H averhill, Mass. Thro ug h yo ur very s nappy and n ewsy bo o k, we infer t hat rou h ave a l ive l y sc h ool. Great cred it i s due t he author of "Yellow Bill Barrett." Y o ur h oc k review was well written. But s urel y yo ur graduates think eneugh of their sc h oo l to occupr m('!e sp.tce in their dep:lrtmen!. "file ROIll:d_lip. Re.ldin gHigh School, Reading, 1Ia JJ. T he Round_ Up i s brimful of news an d hum o r. The story e ntitl ed "To H orse" in the February '23 number was very n t e:esting. "\\'ho s Who" al so came in for no small bit of intere s t. Your comment on THE CARIB8EAN was gratefully accepted. Tlu Rec o rd. Joll11 Mars /ullI Hig h Sc h ool, Richmo1ld, Va. In the R ecord we f ound a ver}' attractive and in tt:resti ng m agaz ine. The heading s f o r the varions departments :Ire nne. "Confess i o n s o f a Bean Eater" was verr good. Y o ur exc h ange department could be enlarged. Why not keep the advertisements off the covers a s they tend to c heapen rour otherwi se nne b oc k The S ladiuni. TO{IJIIJwd Harri J Ha lliligl! School C. c., New York, N. Y. Tht: e:xch'lIlgc departmem was found missing in the S ladium. In spite o f this f a ult, you h a \ 'e man aged 10 prod uce a weekl y that \\ould put to rout m a n y m o nthlie s. T/, e Speclalor. )OhIlJ IOWIl lIigll Scllool, JolillJloum, Pa. The Spec / flIoris an except i onally g )od-Iooking book. But why not tell u s t he name o f your sc h oo l ? \V e h ad to scour t h e whole book before we foun d frorn whence

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THE CARIBBEAN. it came. Your school must abound in poets. Your business manager is to be complimented on the goodly amount of matter. The exchanges were well written. Trinit0 1ljan. The TrinifQnian is a good paper. \Yeshould like to see your monthly o r annual. Allmqlurqtu Ruord. Albuquerqlu HighSchool, .4lbuquerqlu, N.[ Hex, There is surely no space wasted in your paper. We failed to nnd a single advertisement, [II of which goes to show that t h e student b od)' backs its sc hool paper. Th e fl.uill. Sla ten IJland hcndem)', S tatUI lsla,zd, N. Y T :tking all in all t h e Q.uill is a good magazine. A bigger exc h ange department would h elp a good deal. The Torch. BOJ/on NO""1al School, BaSion, /l1alJ. The T orch is ver} compact a n d neal. A f ew cuts and h eadings, h owever, would be an improveme nt The Gleaner. Pawtucket High School, Pawtucket, R. I Y our b oo k is bot h humorous and interesting. "The W ooing of H aze line" is just the thing. H ow abo u t b o r rowing the fire department? T he locals are well written; "Th e Tattler" came in f or a good bit of comment. The Curtis M onthl),. Curli s H igh School, St alell Island, N. Y. Revisla La Salle. Colegio de la Salle, Panama R. de p, The M onthl), abounds in good material. In the l'.l a r c h number ..... e became greatly excited over the my st ery st0f}', "l'.iask s, and the concl u sion in the April number was all t hat we co uld ask. Why not arrange your ads neatly in the ba c k o f the b oo k Amaranth. GATI':SCI.08&DATG.\Tl'!'iSPILL\\AJ. But f o r the mus i ca l drone o f the hydroeloctricsu tlo n all ia a s quiet and serene 3.lI a &abbath morn Nazareth Academy, Kentll ck)' Y ou r cuts and s ket c he s are fine and the cover i s exceedingly attractive. Seeing that )'OU exc han ge with other sc ho o l s why not have an exc h ange de. partment and let oth ers kn o w what you t h ink o f them? Tlu Camoridge Review Can oridge H. & L. S., Cmr.6r idge. MaJS. The editorials in the Re view are well written a s i s your other material. W ould not collecting you r stor ies and poem s and f o rming a literary depart. ment sepa ra te from the other departments make your book m o re satisfactory? The Herald H olyoke Hig h School, H olyoke, Mass. The storie s in the H eral d were good, but al as f o r the rest o f yo ur book! Y ou mixed it up so with the ads! We were re ading yo ur exc h ange note s when we s uddenl), be came entangled with bath robes, kimono s s hirtwaists, petticoats, fur s etc. A better arrangement of the advertisements would So a I ons wa y in makin g you r book what it s hould be. EI placer que n os de la tect ura de s u publica c i o n se debe en g ra n parte a l os art!culos excelentes sabre (opi cos vivos, como "La F ieb r e l\l alaria en P a n a ma" }' "Costumbres de l os I ndios de L os "Ecos Mundiales" so n tambien buen os. L os c h istes nos divicrten muc ho. Que tengan Ustedes sie mpre b u en exito! APRON O F SPILLWAY OA) I F o r ming headwaters of th e l ower River a playground for schoo l s of S ilver King" tllrpon Rev i s/a Escolm' de Puerto Rico. Sail Juan, Porto Rico, T enemos un solo ejemp l a r de s u R evista M ensual. L os art:cu l os son mu}' practi cos e interesantes. The Academ)' Journal. Norwich Fret ."eadem)', Norwich, Conn, The cover of the JOIII"llal is t h e begi n ning o f a good book. Did your artists forget that there was 3n inside to it? i \ few cartoons and headings w ould b e a decided advantage. I s there a littl e Fairy in yo ur sch oe l that w ould ins pire so imaginative a star)' a s "Why B .. bies Sleep in Cabbages?" THROUGH THE LOOKI NG GLASS. THE CAR1CCEAN h as trave l ed far. Owners have carried it to M aine to Florida, and to C.11ifomia. I t h as b ee n sent as a g ift or souve nir to \ ; Vashillgton, Kan sas a n d T exas P e r so nal co m ments ha ve b ee n num e rou s a nd so kin d l y i n their nature that we have b ee n enco u raged t o make

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THE CARIBBE.'\.J'J. 65 ---every i ss u e t h e best possib l e One copy o f Ollr annual wa s found in a York subway by two m e n wh o were in Cllrtis H igh S c h ool of Y ork last year. T h ey wr o t e u s a good l etter abollt itbut t h e ir address) a l as! i s lost. THE CARIIJOEAX'. On e o f our best exchanges. THE C.4.R1UBEAN is a splendid maga zine. T h e :lrticles of local interest ar e especially good and the sc h ool notes arc well arranged. The storie s and sllaps hots arc C;!xcellent. : \ 5 l oyal "Zonites" w e arc certainl), proud of our "sister paper," T H E CARIBBEAX. C HRISTlI.\ S MOil:> AT SE"" CR 1STOIHL. AlibundledupiuoUf wjntcreiotllCS THE CARIBBEAN. Tlu'ZOllinfi. T he :lllllll: ti issue of your p.lper is well pbrulcd and the editors deserve mll c h credit. The athletic department is especially interesting. Tlu .Ilirror. THI; CARIBBEAN. T h e cutS and comments of the v;lrio u s art: most intere sti n g. Y our literary department is ex c ellent W e enjoyed : \ T rip T hrough the P an:lma Canal." Your athletics seem to b e "tip-top" in spite of the size of your sc h ool. Tlu ROl/ndUp. THE CARlllllEAN. Y ou publis h an inunt:nsd} interesting tn.lgal.ine. Tht: article on t h e Canal was very instructive. Thank vou for your comment. E llmrillll. THE CARlnnEAS". H ello, CARInSEA:';! Glad to welcome you into our fold of exc han ges. Y o u certainly are fine! Plenty of good stories and jokes) and:l wonderful abundance: o f cutS are what make you so interesting. All your n Otes and editorials are w ell written. From your pictures wejuJge t herearcnornore than about "ixtv in the wholl: sc h ool. I t certainl y is wonderful that stic h a few can get out such a g')od paper as yours. D o not forget u s when your next issue comes out. THE CARISHEAN. (The author of t his clever :lnd original exc h ange article ha s imagined that ill h e r a b sen t e from her r o o m an enthu s i:tst i c but unwi s e friend has g o ne through all her cxchange help, t . king what s h e co n s i dered the b est in each magazine a nd l eaving a nOte o f comment o n what h ad seemed especially good. \\'e feel Ratt ered that all that was left to identify us wa s a bit of co ver.) I happened to see a piece of purple co ver and recog niz ed it at once as "THE (ARlnoEA:>.' from Cristo b al, C Z. T he notc was quite length y J think the se pictures of the Canal and l oc k s pictures o f the town are wonderful. I o ften w o ndered what the Canal and Z o n e were like, didn't you?" Th e 7unto. \ \'e w e lcom e th ese the only ones we r ece iv ed, an d regr e t that we h ave not h ad mor e .'\ PR O W S I "IG YOU:\G Paul C. D oyle, 'n. d H o w many wall( mu sic bo o k s? a s k ed i\l iss Dodds o ( t h e assembly, "ther cos t 51.06." L do) I do!" txclaim:::J J o hnn y, with an eage r gr in. B ooks w ere sent (or. T he}' arrived and W ere di stributed, but th e m o n e y ( o r th e m came in slowl),. am o ng the la s t o ( t h e m to was J o h n n y "\\'ill so m eone volunteer to make the report o n 'wag es' (or to-lllorrow?" asked t h e eco n o m ics teach e r. )IR 8 1010--5 I will. I will voluntee r ed J o h nny. The tim e came ( o r the r e p ort to b e made bu t J o hn ha d failed to prepare it. H as so m e one a b oo k e ntitl ed, 'Shakes p eare's L ost,' that ht: co u l d bring to sc h ool?" asked the Englis h teacher. "1 h a\'t:, I have," an s w e r ed J ohnny eagerly, The t e a c h e r glanced about the cla ss, then looking straight thro u g h J o hnn y, inquired, H as e l se a copy?

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66 THE CARIBBEAN. "I 1 i. .. 8 .' J ,,-.: H g9 :g 0 ;: :;:; >-2ii J -:::'$ '0. i .. 5j ] il 8 -Jj

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THE CAR1BBEA:\,. Emma '/'OWIISt'llll, '22. 1921. OCTOfiER. 4. B ack to old C. H S. wh e r e w e find that Joseph must have spent th e summe r cle anin g lip for liS. Larger enro llm ent than la s t y ear, in spite o f the absence of many old sc ho:>lmates l\l iss B akewell present to fill t h e onl y faculty VaC31lCY, that of j V [ ode rn History an...! D o m e sti c S c i e n ce 5 Everybody go es t o h alf-p e ri o d clas ses in th 1110rn i ng so as to ge t books and as sig nmentsfor halfperiod classes in the afternoon. to carry n e w s o f C. H S. to his OW/1 land. 0 0 oouh!! Ghosts! S eniors g o blin s capture ulld e r at H all owe e n party. =,O \ DIBER. I. Afte r two years in Balbo a H i g h S c h ool, Ida j oi n s OUf S enio r cla ss \\'e lcom e ba c k Ida. o C. II. S. Girls' Club organized. 9. Fir s t m ee tin g of abovem entio n ed a ssoc iati o n. 1 0 About s i xty o f u S subscribe for t:l e Lit erm:" D ig,s! 17. M embe rs o f th e J uni o r Class are w earing blue and g old arm bands i\l i ss ;': eef, w e lfa re w o rk e r o f the Life I n surance C ompany gi yes th e S oc ial Pro b l e m s cla ss an in f o rmal talk o n h e r w o rk. J 8 Fir s t annual vi siting day in C. H S Parents 12. H a z ing today. The fr es h men boy s do not se e m to appreciate the t c nsorial ability of the upper classlTen, for they make for barber s h o p s immediately afte r sc hool. The parade of girls, wit h dresses re"Wh e n f ond reeolleetLOJlS prCSl!llt I t t o i e w h o w d ear to Ill)' heart thi. l!eeue o f m)' childhood." an d frie nd s atte nd cla sses I n th e a ssembly p e riod th e J lIni o rs' play "The Firs t Thanksg ivin g Dinn er" i s f ollo w e d b y a dramati.latiol1 b y the S e ni o r s o n the subjec t D.:>es An E d u catio n Pay?" Program closes with a piano Uue t b y Charlotte H o u se l and Ruth Du e y A t 3.30 a o f parents anti. teach e r s l e ads to the f ormatio n o f a Cri s t o bal H i g h S c hool Parent T e a c h e r A ssoc iati o n. :\Jte r thi s, the D o m es ti c S cie n ce cla ss serves light r e fr es hm ents versed and hair care f ully braided, see m s to giv e the rest o f u s more pl easure the n it d oes th e m, but they are all good sports 26. \\'hy are t h e S enio r s w earing gree n and gol d eyeshades ? Because the light coming fro m th e bald-headed row is too stro ng f o r the ir e y es 31. C. H S entertains di s tingui s h e d vis itor s from the Land of th e R i s ing Sun. One o f th e m voices the greetings of his country and promises

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THE C\RIBBEAN. First game of boys' inter-class series in basket ball. 2.1. Scen e from "Les i\li serables" acted before the ass e m J ean \'al.lean The Bis hop The" Bis hop'ssister P oliceman Or. Hubbard. Mrs. He :trne I\l iss D odds I\l rs. i\larcuse. 23. School contributes 53.50 to the B ellea u \\' ood i\l e m o rial. Sophomore Cla ss povert), party. F e arful OOl.O!'i'S !'IRK and wonde rful Bere iO\'iting bcnchC! .. e30f are the C05-[umes! DECEfo.IBER. 2. Literarr Digest Club form ed ill U S. History class: Pre sident Secretary Ge o rge Cartw!"ight. We sley Town send J. Final game of boys' inter-class basket-ball league. S enio r s fini s hed with 1000 p e r cent. 6. Pep meeting-a soap box and some nois e 7 Are the Seniors really anxious to r ecite? No, th ey just want to s h ow th e ir n e w class rings R ed Cross Society organized 1 0 C. H. S. Girls' Suppe r Club organi zed Field s, Pr esident. L ouise H t:ntt:r, \ 'ice P residt!nt Ruth H opkins, Secretar} Emm a T ownse nd, Treasura 12. Opening of Bl!tte r Ame ri c a week. i\lr. gives a impress iv e talk on "American Ideal s. I J .All-hig h -sc h oo l patri o ti c program. F o r the S e ni o rs, Emma Townsend 8T\1rr.O,CRI8TOIHLCOLON. reads Lane' s I akers of th e F lag," and eac h e nior gives one point as to th e etiqu ette o f the Aag. For th e Junior Edward j\lay reads Drake's of th e H o tel Wash-"Our Flag," For the Sophomores Edna Campb e ll, Florence Albert, and Jane H all give an origi nal play. "The History of the Flag." Each Freshman gives one fact about the history of th e flag and the who l e class recites L inc o ln's Gettysburg Address." q. B etter Language d a y Dodds reads several selections about speech. Each student writes a creed concerning the use of t h e English language. J ul1iors are hosts t o the high sc h oo l students a n d faculty at a unique affair in the form of a b e ac h party and marshmallow roast. Can ever f o rget t h ose stunts?-th e J unior tragedy wit h Emilio a s the dainty little Cinderella and Alex as the dashin g stalwart prince; th e S eniors' dramatization of i\10the r Goose rhymes ; several songs, accompanied by ukel e l es, sung b y members of the Soph o m ore class The program is fittingl y closed with th e selection by i\1r. Bacon and h is Fres hm e n, in th e ir silent J azz orc hestra. i\1arsh mallow s, pop, ) 7 e1ls, games jokes, and jolli ty! Hurrah for the Juniors! [5. Naturalization day. I n a n original p l ay) Jordan Zimmermann as a judge, explains t h e id eals o f America to an immigrant, Alex Lin czer, whos e character is later vouched for by George Cartwright and Gerald Bli ss 16. Last day of B etter America" wee k \ V es ley Townsend and Ida Brown debate against Henry rvr oo re and Emma Townsend, on l' lm_ migration." F ollowing this, Emilio Solomon, as an immigrant, with t h e help o f an able interpre t e r, Alex L in cze r, and a judge, Edward i\IIay, gathers information on h ow to b ecome natu ralized. Mi ss Hornbe ak r eads "The L ie," to the assembly. 23. As sembly p e riod stunts. Seniors g i ve an original sk e tch in c hil d dialect and dress. The Juniors are r epresented in a n egro sketch by H enry i\) oore, I.':!o Ebe r e nz, Emilio Sol o m on, and :-\Ie x I ,incz er. F o r th e S ophomo r es, Edna Campb ell and L o r etta Ru s h dance. S o m e of t h e Soph o m o res act out O. H enry's story, "The Gift of t h e Ruth Dut.:)' plays a piano solo for t h e F res hm e n. Sch oo l closes f o r t h e Christmas vacati o n. From D ecembe r 23 to January 9 Jordan moves. A s usual p eo pl e go swimming o n C hristmas day. B ec au se o f an epidemic of smallpox in Boquete the Boy Scouts are prevented from taking their

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THE CARI BB E A:-J. trip t h ere Sa n ta Claus co m es T h e (ac u ity, i\l i ss Barnhouse excepted, goes ro Costa R i ca 1 922. JANUARY. 9 Sc h oo l open s Nume r olls n e w gold pencils muc h i n eviden ce. G erald i s anxi o u s to t ell everyo n e th e t i me. 1 6. i\lrs. C h urchill addresses t h e o n t h e s ubject, "The ,"cice," S h e illustrates with seve r a l r eci ta t i ons. 2 1. The Fres h m e n entertain liS Eve n the fac t t h a t t h e c hick e n dinne r turns out to b e a dinner f o r c h ickens, rath e r t h an of ch i c k e n s does n o t s p oil Q llr good time. Games, J\lutt and J eft', movies; all funny. But Santa Clau s i s a bit partial. 2 0 1\1 e m bersofe.H.S. present a Dis-
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T H E CARIBBEAN. I. P a p e r s o f B all, E dward May and E mma T ownse n d sent to Balb o a to compe t e in G ood Roads" co n tes t '26. "Cla r e nce" p l ays at the : \ m eric a Theatre '29 Gatun clubho u se s h o w s "Clare n ce J I N ews co m es o f E s th e r \\'itt's winnin g in the "Good R o ads" contes t. C ongratulatio n s Esth e r. Also, co n gratulatio n s to Balbo a H i g h S c h oo l a ll havin g w o n E sthe r at the b eginning o f this ye ar. JUNE. I. i\l i ss Dodds entertains th e Fa culty and S en i o r s at a very delightful d inn er. The g r ee n a n d g o l d deco r a ti o n s a n d fav o r s w e r e ori g inal and very attrac ti ve '2. L ast o f the mate rial f orTI-IE goes to the printe r s 8 "Clarence" appears at the Balbo a club h o llse. 12. The J uni o r-S enio r Banqu e t is held at the H o t e l \\' a s hin g t o n. 1 6 F inal m ee ting of Supper Club with Senior g irl s a s h Ol1or g u es t s 1 8 B a cc a laureate se rmon at the Cristobal Uni o n Churc h. 2 1. Gatun parents are h o s t s to parent-teac h e r a ssoc iati o n and gu es t s at final meeting of the year. 24-. The cla ss o f 1 9 '22 b ec om e Alumni. 30. End o f th e great and glori o us s c h oo l year, '21 -'2'2. PUM TIIEI:'. She's the ga r den spot of th e UnionI <; T ennessee. Cut with wo
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T H E CARIBBEAN. --------------------

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THE C.-\RIBBE.-\:-I l\lo) How many senses are M iss Homb,ak.-"Six." j\!tl)' .-"H:)w's that? I only have fiv e t\/iss H ornbtak .-'" know it. The o ne lacking i s common se nse." i\l i ss Dodds gave m e a vacatio n, for b e ing th e o nly one abl e to answe r h e r qu est i o n ... H is mOllur.-\\,e11, ('II see abou t that-but what was the q u estion?" Bliss.-"\\'ho put the tack in D oy le's seat?" i\lfiS J Dodds. H ow i s it, Gerald, t hat you are always late?" Bli ss .-"It's lik e this. Y ou ke e p telling m e not to watch th e clock in classes, so now J'm in th e habit of not watching it at home." Bald)" 1 0 Nli ss Dodds.-"May 1 go home' don't f ee l welL" Miss Dodds .-"Y es, r o u mar" Do),le.-"\Yait f o r me ou t side; I \Vanna see the game t oo," "'Your father must have been an athlete." Why?" B eca u se he rais ed a dumbb e ll." CousiJlJ ,-"\Vhat have we got f or s lipp er to-night?" A1o/Jur.-"\\'hat yo u haven't got. COllsiIlS.-"\\'hat i s it, sa rdin es? Mo/},er .-"";:\o, brains." Min Dodds.-"Wesley, what i s a budget?" Wes/e)'.-"Well, it's a method o f worr y ing b e f o re yo u spen d instead of after. -? A/iss Beeching. A transparent one you ca n see t h r o ugh. so mething t hat i s transparent. doughnut." T endle r. -"Frank, can you tell m e who s u c-ceeded Edward \ '1." Frnnk. "i\ Iary." T encher.-"\\' h o followed Girdon?" Gird oll (absent-mindedly) H er littl e lamb." I n Ph ),sics c la ss J \ fi ss Beeching 'The pressure of bodi es at rest is called force -give an exa m ple. Baldy. "The poli ce force." Zim.-f'Y o u k n ow, Baldy i s so lazy that he gets up at 5 in the morning so that h e has longer to l oaf." :'\ot so much n o i se Alex "It' s important, i\T i ss Dodds." Remember, the ma c h ine t hat rattles the most does not do t h e best work." "Suppose it's a F ord?" Fi, lds. 1 hope t his rain k eeps up t hr o ugh the night." lVallace. "\\' hy' I t "ill s p o i l t h e mars h mallow roast," Fields,-"No, it won't; if it k ee p s up it can't come down," Bllrgooll,-"D ad, ca n you s ign your name wit h your eyes shut?" Fn/}, e r ,-"Sure nothing eas i er." Burgoon ,--"\\'ell, please close your eyes and sign m y report c ard."

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T H E CAR I BBE ":'\'. 73 Car/OJ. "P l e af;e d o n 'r put my F s down in red." Tt'n e lla. "\\'hy? Car/o.r. ,; Because 111y dad i s lik e a hull. H e g e t s ma d h e sees r ed." I kn'Jw a h o y \\ h o takes up Spanis h I t alia n, Fre n c h, En glis h, and G erman." H e w d oes h e find time t o study?" "OIl, h e does n t study; h e funs the d e \ :1to r at t h e J lote l \\' a shingto n !?/{dd. H ow m e n are the r e in a quart ette?" I t'l,. -"Quanc u c co m es fro m the Latin w o r d m eaning quarte r, so the r e Illlls t h e 2 5." R OllcIJ." P ass m e the ink." 1 \ l is.r H o rnbt a k ( reproa c hfully ) f what, George?" R O(lclt. I f can r e a c h it. ;\ I r. Hughes wa s giving in struc ti o n s In di ,in g This particular lesso n was 011 th e s wallow d iv e "Now, J ulius," s aid 1\Jr. H ughes, tak e a turn .Juliu s made a hope l ess attempt and create d an alarming s pla s h That's not a s wallow d i ve," said M r. H u g h es sympath e tically. "Ain't it?" gurgl e d J uliu s I th ought I 'd swallowed half the pool!" :'
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7 4 I nse.? .-\, man o n ce in 1\l e Ha d a terrible pc, The docto r s pronounced it rheumatics; ow he gets down t he Ie. W ith the use of :1 ce, And has h ad to give up acr obatics. H eig ht r-teighty: There was once a man of great h eight Wh o attempted to blowout the l e i ght; But, alas! I t was gas! So he had to P:1 SS To a realm that is queight out of seight. Did it There was once a spright'y youn g 1\lr. Who h ad a good-looki n g s r.; One n ight in th e dark, Ther met in the park -f\n awfu l mis take! -for h e kr. The Awful Huar. THE CARIBBEAN. WHY NOT THIS WAY ? -J.Z., '22. -7.Z., .22. -].2., '22. F ate i s Unkig n d P oor Johnn y did n ot see thi s sign, "Please drive t o the left of th is l ign," Bu t h e h eard a g r ea t crash-Saw his ca r go t o smas h Now h e's worki n g to payoff the fign. Ti oux Tri o ux! T h e r e once W:1S a brave, a n old Sioux, Wh o had a bad case of the A iouxj His bones they did clatter, H i s teeth they did chatter, .And a cure for it nobody kni oux. Eau dear! J eau didn't h ave e n oug h Deau! .J\ girl once h ad a new beau Wh o th oug ht t hat s h e lov ed him, sea u A ring h e boug ht h er, And th o ught h e'd ca ught h er -AI. B.) '22. -IP. T., '22 There once sat a pair on a quay And peacefully gued at the s ua y; B ut, when he "up and kissed h er," S h e said t o him "i\ l i stcr, Bu t wFien he proposed, s h e said, "Neau," !"ow don't get familiar with mu ay : -p,n.,'n. NOTICE Additional copie s of this School Annual, mailed to any address in the United States, may be had by addressing "Paul C. Doyle, The Caribbean, Cristobal, Canal Zone," and inclo s ing the cost, 75 cents -E. T., '22.

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THE CARlB=.BE= A:..:.N,---,--, __________ --'-'75<-ml SELZN I CK AMERICA THEATER FIRS T NATIONALS ml GOLDWYN UNIum ARTIS T S PATElE HODKJNSON ml -----!m ml !m ml THE management of the AMERICA THEATER and its staff !m a of empl oyees extend heartiest congratulations to the grad-ml uating class of '22 of Cristobal High School. We also thank !m w:l the class, their schoolmates and parents for the generous ml !m patronage which has helped enable the AMERICA THEATER ml ml to maintain the highest standards in motion picture production !m a regardless of obstacles, distance, and cost, I ml a ------I I AMERICA THEATER I The Bowdry Company, Ltd. PANAMA 1-3 Fourth of July Avenue Opposite An,on Post Offic.e COLON Ma sonic Temple VISIT OUR PARLORS fltl Sport and Dress Hat s, F ea ther s, Ribbons, and Flower s. DRESSES ro:l MILLINERY Sport and Morn i n g Tog s Afternoon Frocks Ball Gowns. M ou rning Goods. AA UNDERGARMENTS ml Nightdresses, Petticoats, Knick e r s, Comb : nation s Corsets, and ART Beaded Bags, French Novelties and Favors I Vie wish to announce the new lin e o f Belty Wtt.:I!S D resses now being shown in ourstore. Co m e and see them today

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THE C i\RIBBEAN. W IDl i .motor (!Co., JLtb. H ID3 THE ONLY ALL-AMERICAN GARAGE ON T H E ATLANT I C SIDE rol IDl IDl i "KALL-A-KAR" i IDl IDl i TWO TELEPHONES HOTEL WAS HINGTON or COLON 204 i i i i i I co.,".,"',., I I jfoteign 11ianking (tCorporation I e\I'i CRISTOBAL BRANCH i!>J CRI S TOBAL CANAL ZONE i I i I i IDl ;: HERBERT A. DOTEN, D D.S. :: i i 1m Opposite Royal Mail Building CRISTO B A L C ANAL ZONE i

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THE CAR I BBEAN, 77 I 0 1m 1m o I 1m M 1m M 1m M M Ben tlOO S wc.r ., bent M by 1m 1m 1m 1m 1m B I I Whether in the Zone I I or Back in the States 1m 1m Heal t h y stro n g feet a r C n ecessary in m enta l effort I o r '21 m a\' inc rease their I fm lif e o P P3rtunities b y con scientio u s ca r e o f the b ody. The fee t a r e important units of the b o d y. S h o e s F o r each a n d c \"cr y m e ml-)cr o f th...: f a mil y tht:r e i s M o n e s h oe tha t i s m a d e sc i entificallv L a l e t the feel g r o w as t h,:,)" s h o uld." Tha t s h oe' i s the Educa t o r I t h a ... r oulll f o r all n 'c t oes, p rc\'enlingcorn s. callo u ses. f alle n a r c hc_". and othe r f oo t ill s o B I Panam a Railroad Commi ssary 1m C ri stoba l Can al Zone 1m I I I RICE & HUTCHINS, Inc. B BOSTON ED U C'"A"'''T'''O 1\ U. s. A. i'rnlm M this It i s notan :ducator 1m H

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THE CARIBBEAN.

PAGE 81

THE CA RIBBEAN. 79 ID.l !ill a UNITED FR UIT COMPANY I ID.l ID.l I Regular Sailings I !ill !ill H C z. I M New York M a New Orleans !ill mI Cuba, H M Colombia M !ill Jamaica, and !ill I Costa Rica 6 I For furth e r p a rti c u la r s, a ID.l appl y: rul I M C O'HEARN, General Agen t, C r i stobal, C. Z. T H. JACOM E Agent, Panama C i t y a I C.bl Add"" IMPCO." A B C., slh, nd u .b" til ID.l a a I Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd. I JOBBERS AND COMMIS SION MERCHANT S IDl !ill MANU F ACTURERS A GENTS 1!l'l !ill a D E ALERS I N a 6 General Merchandise and Native Produce g a COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA I I P O B ox 107 I !ill !ill Branch Retail Sto res and Trading Stations: !ill COLON BOCAS DEL TORO PLAYA D AMA SANTA I SABEL ESCRIBANO MANDINGA !ill

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80 THE CAR I BBEAN. EVERYTffiNG IN THE LINE OF PLU MB IN G 1m 6 Central American g g PI um I a CO L O N R P PANAMA R P a g Willii=a g i Native Wood S hop I INVESTIGATE 1m [!l '3 FRON T STREET COLON i Threaded Rubber Insulation i H ,HE M A]ILTO N H ;!IS M W'J Fl oo r Lamp s B o udoir Lamps 1m H H T a bl e Desk L a m ps H Imlm Nut Bow l s --Powder Boxe s M Smoking Sets Hair Receiver s Smoking Stands Tie Racks Cigar Boxes Napkin Rings Tobacco Boxes Toothpick H o lder s M Trays Swagger Sticks M M Coasters Polic e Clubs [fl, 1m ID! [!l SPECIAL WORK TO ORDER 1m 1m S MAL LWO OD BROTHER S 1m 1m LAMP SHADES AND F I XTURES TO ORDER H PANAMA Sol Dj ,"ib""" COLON H a COLON Pho", 498 C RI S T O B A L H 1m g Compli m ents of I Dr. E. A. URWILER g ]!lentis t Ii !I!l COLON AND '. GATUN [!l

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THE CAR IBBEAN. ----------------------IDl I ENUS 6 eu9 ror hold line:! PENCILS IDlaIDl r o rde:an line 2 H.3HHH G H r o r delic::uelblnlinc;, o --IDl WI The largest selling Q1Iali(v Pmci! i,. tlt e World. IDl IDl e A I J l a/io ner! and Jlo rc: [JJ through out /lu ..... nor/d. IDl ' hen o n ce yo u u se t h ese r emarka bl e, IDl Ii '" hig h CJualit)' p e nci l s yo u \\'ill never a IDl be sati s fied with an)' othe r. The IDl 1m genuine and complete sati sfaction gi"e n by mI M \,El\US has made i t the most famous M IDl p e n cil in t h e worl d. None oth e r so pe r -IDl Ii fectl y meets the r equire m ents of Ii IDl instruc t o r and pupil a lik e IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl i Ii IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl IDl O F the same s uperlative M qualit y t h at has mad e fm th at erases d e n t without Made i n 12 g Ii IDl IDl U Ameri can Lead Pencil Co. a IDl 220 Fifth Avenue, New York IDl Ii J{ak ers of a Complete Lia, of Peacils. Peahold",. Em",s, aad Rabber Baad s. Ii

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THE CAR I BBEAN !m 6 COMPAGNIE GENERALE TRANSATLANTIQUE 9 H FRENCH LINE OF STEAMERS il !Ii PASSENGER SERVICE !Ii Regular fortnightly sai ling s from Cristobal, Canal Zone, to France Wl I CARGO SERVICE ONLY I !!.!'i M onthly sailings from Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Havre, B ordeaux, a nd M IDl Cristobal, to South Pacific. Wl mz M onthly sail ings from Hamburg, Antw erp, Le Havre, Bordeaux, and Wl ID:: Cristoba l to North Pacific Wl ; illS Via the Panama Canal ( Ecuador,Peru, and Chile ) M Wl Wl I I Wl MISTELI IDl Wl IDl Wl 3f eweler Wl 6 PANAMA R P. 6 H H H H i;!Jj S ILVERWARE CUT GLASS IDl i;!Jj 1m H owa rd Hami lton, Waltham, and Elg : n Wate:;; ii IDJ --!,rn 1m PEARLS AND DIAMONDS 1m Wl IDl H French Drug Store H IDl V. DELGAD O & SO N Main Store: D M 26 Front Street, oppos it e Cable Office !!.!'i IDl IDl a A Large A ssortment of G Wl American, French, and Wl !Ii English Goods H Wl m; I PERFUMERY TOILET ARTICLES a IDl KO DAK S FILMS CAMERAS Wl 1m ETC., E TC. Wl Pre s c r ipti o n D epartme n t un de r the supervisio n of United State s P h armaci s t s Wl BABIES' PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY IDl Wl IDl Wl COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA IDl

PAGE 85

T HF. 3 rul I I i Bring Your Equipment Up to Date i a i I'm The "Caterpili:lr's"* "CATERPILLAR" Trdctors a r c l"ed i n even rul field of IIsefullless i s C(,rner of the globe for rO, ld m a kin g minin g. lo g-I'm I . I ging. f arming. land clearing. a nd o \' erIand lran::,por rul 110 JlJeallS iJIIlIte( tation of c"ery kind Thro u g hout th e entire \\'ar, rul rul to r o n d 11" 0 r k_ 011 "Cate rpillar'" Tractors were u se d exelus i""l y by t h e rul rul f ar11l ilnd rallc h ill l 'niled Slalesand Alli ed a rmi es. T hesamede p encJ-1m I'm the mining, oil, [/lid abl e qua lili es whic h made the "Caterpillar"' th e !m III 111 h e r i11dustries cho i ce o f Go\'crnments, in s u re the m os t M and economica l in the hand s of rul wl!e r e l'er p o w e r f l1ld c"er y u ser. [!:j rul ell d II r a 11 ce a r e at a IIlany "Caterpilla rs' a r e u,ed in the Canal Zon e rul pre nJiUll1, lhe U C ; lt er-a swellasin the United States, M ex ico. Central a n d rul pillal-'" has 110 rea I ,outh, merica, \\'est I ndi es, etc. [fl rul competitur. Upon request, we will g ladl y mail a copy of our rul illustrated bookle t "Caterpillar P erformance," a lso copies of othe r catalogs r e lating to roa d building. I cml_plLla T h .. ,m, I o r j!i n :lle d and i s o\\n e d clclush'el y by Ihis COnlp: In )'. IDl H 0 L T In'd .. ,,. .. ,, "HI b .,o",," .. d rul rul THE HOLT MFG. CO., Inc P EO RIA ILL. 1m P E 0 R I A ILL. alltl i ce .... alio1J .., all O l e r tIJ e Horld STOCKTON, CALIF. Exp Orll)hlMon 5{)Churc hSt.NewYork

PAGE 86

THE CARIBBEAN. i Buv Your Drugs, Patent Medicines, i IDl Perfumery, Toilet Art i cles, etc. g AT THE I i PanAmerican Drug Store I a 50 Front Street, Colon, R. P. a You A l ways D o Better a t Salazar's H WE CARRY AN a I l!lp. t O '." I [fJ 3 S TORES 50 Front Street 56 Bolivar Street 1 82 Bolivar St r eet. Engli s h Dru g Store The Royal Cleaners and Dyers Call Phone 250 ." E. V. TROTT a RATHBUN, STILSON & CO. a a Gener al Hardware and Lumber Merchants a DEALERS IN ml a PAINTS, OILS, AND BUILDERS' MATERIA L S, ETC. a Picture Framing a Specialty P O. Box 1 4 0 COL O N R. P a

PAGE 87

THE CARIBBEAN. 85 ---I I 9 P O. Box 523, Cristobal, C Z. Ju s t a t 7th St
PAGE 88

6 THE CARIBBEA;-,t. i Royal Netherlands West India Mail g KONINKLYKE WEST-INDISCHE MAILDIENST ru:l COMPANIA REAL HOLANDESA DE VAPORES oo:l R"ol" fortn;,htly hom C,;,,,b.1,, Port IlIII Limon, and from Cristobal to Puerto Colombia, Curacao, Puerto Cabello, M La Guaira, Trinidad, Barbados, Plymouth ( for passengers and mail only ) Havre, Amsterdam, and Hamburg. Cargo accepted for a ll ports in Europe PACIFIC LINE a Regular two to three-weekly cargo service to Ecuador, Peru, and Chile, a on the outward voyage, aFnodr futrOthe H r paaVrtr;ceu',aArs mapSpt,yertod:am, and Hamburg home-!maim ward. A limited number of passengers can be accepted. M Cargo accepted for all ports in Europe. 1m ROYAL NETHERLANDS WEST INDIA MAIL Messrs. SASSO, FUHRING & CO. T elep h on e No. 11, Cri stobal T e l epho n e No. 68 l Panama e . Colon Electric I 1m AND ru:l im i Ice Supply Co. a a 111 Market St., a COLON, R. P ru:l 1.4 . U I I im Sorvants 1m 1m ar(> a1walls found in '-Lot;,'.-:J I '/ IDl 1m C} t fo d H II/. -' Phone Nos. ISO, 196,9' ru:l im i':-QC fl ';:j't-=' ru:l

PAGE 89

THE C AR IBBE A ;\' !m ml i Haskins News Service Ii AND m1 The Caribbean Publishing Co., Ltd. Wi Wi rul [r:j H 6 U 6 lSook 6 U Phone Cri stobal 49 Phone Colon 37' 9 Cristobal Clubhouse a Ii i flJ:l Photo Department g 9 DEVELOPING AND PRINTING IDl JJ' til ENLARGEMENTS R LANTERN SLIDES a HOME PORTRAITURE and GROUPS a PANORAMIC VIEWS Wi AND GROUPS Wi : Pho nes C r ;stohal 30 and 446 : -'lPPRE CI.HI OI\'. ; Eve ry year T H E CARIBBEA:-.' s t aff il1-t h o u g h w e f ee l it to b e, to carry its ; serrs in ir s b oo k a w o rd o f t h a nk s to m ess a ge o f Cri s tobal H igh S c h oo l and im th ose who ha ve made t h e b ook a p osCristobal H i g h S c h oo l spirit t o frie nd s fn', s ibilit y Eve r y yea r thi s g r atitude ha s far an d n e ar. b ee n m erited bu t n e v er we reel s ur e h as T o t h ose frie nds w e exte nd our thanks staR-o w ed greater deht t o its f rien ds f o r t heir inte r es t in an d support o f our trn t h an does thi s o ll e o f 2 r '22. ;\i ore(}\'e r. a ctiv iti es -evi de n ced in so many ways w e a r e ju s t a s sure t hat n o staR h a s f e l t I-<: s peciall y do w e thank The P a nam a a m o r e o i a se n se o f r es p o n s i bility to i ts Cana l P ress for a coo p eratio n which ha s frie n ds an d s p o n so r s a f a r surpassed a me r e bu siness relatio n. w h i c h h a s b ee n almost a n obliga tion A nd n o w we as k the r e a ders o f our to mak e good boo k ro h e l p u s ro th an k wit h t heir Our h oo k i s finis h ed ; what i s don e i s husin ess support so m e ver y n ecessarr d o n e \Ve se nd it f orth imperfect finan c ial ba c k e rs-Our a d v e r ti se r s

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88 THE CAR I BBEAN. ml ADAMS PURE CHEWING GUM One Quah'ty AllF1avor s Y o u can hi')' A DAMS C u m in any f lavor-from l ic o rice t o pepper-mint or t u t ( ;.fru tti. Se lect your Fav orite-t hen n o t e t h e n a m e ADAMS o n the pack a ge: i t m ea n s a b solute and 'hig hest qu a l -!!L.. U se i t regul arly. Everywhere 5 I i I MAXWELL-KELSO SALES COMPANY a DISTRIBUTORS H ml ml ml Cana l Z o n e and R ep ubli c o f Panama Masonic Temple, Cristobal, C, Z, IDl ml.... IDl