Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
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Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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--/'


VOL. IV.


CRISTOBAL, CANAL


ZONE, 1921


PUBLISHED


BY THE


CRISTOBAL HIGH


SCHOOL)I


Assistant Editor PAUL DOYLE


Business


Manager .


. GEORGE


Assistant Manager
Circulation Manager


Assistant


Circulation Ma


. CARL DUEY,
CARTTRIGHT,


EDWVARD MAY,


nager


Athletics (Boys')


Athletics


ALEX.


ANCZER,


HAROLD CLOKE,
KIRBY FERGUSON,


(Girls')


Art Editor


Editor


School


Notops


HAARLES
MARV
CHEITER,


Joke Editur


Literary


Editor


Alumni Editor


Excha


Editor


IEN I .K,
[I'l IDS,
TAVIOR,.


MARJORIE BALL,
DORIS OLIVER,
MILDRED STAFFORD,


We, the ftubents of Criftobal
bebicate this fourth bolume


our


tigbt dbool, affectionately
of "'1fe Caribbean" to


parents


Who,


bp tieir countless sacrifitces,


their tireless bebotion,


anb tieir bounbletS faitb in us anb our ultimate
maSterp .o oourselbt% anb our problems, batbe maybe our
ebutation anb, therefore, tHis book a poSSibilityp.


22.'


22.-








THE CARIBBEAN.


SCHOOL


Frank


SPIRIT.


What is s-hool spirit?


Most of us use the ex-


knew that their duty lav here.


They were willing


pression very freely and frequently, but do we use


it with full


understanding?


mean studying and pondering


Does school spirit
; at books during


to sacrifice their desired pleasure for the greatest
victory, the conquering of self, for the good of
their school.


every


vacant


moment


in and


out of school?


A drive for school songs and


yells met with


Is school spirit shown by neglect of school work
for practice and support of athletics? Is he who is
perfect, and credited with excellent work the only


one to evidence school spirit ?


It is true that school


instant approval from the student body.


result many songs and
number of which were
adopted by the school.


As a


yells were composed, a
so good that they were
These were readily mem-


spirit may be shown by a proper interest in one's
studies, by practice and support of athletics and
by producing excellent work. ______
But our idea of school spirit
is the combination and proper


mingling of


these,


which


comes only when a student
is willing to sacrifice his own
pleasure for the good of the


school.
means


In fact, school spirit


harmony


in every-


thing pertaining to the school


be:'ause the


individuals fkel


themselves part of the whole.
Are we at Cristobal High


orized and have been used to great advantage,
The greatest event of the year was the school


Cristobal High School.


school revealing this


an a 3


carnival.


There


efforts were made b


one in every
the work, not


way.


earnest
y every
It was


of a few, but


of the school as a whole.


spirit with which this project


was undertaken


factor in


was the


its great


success.


It is this


same


which has prompted


attitude
us to-


ward the standard of making


:mnbly


period as quiet


without


a teacher


harmony which


answer


is the


that there


true school


is no doubt


spirit?


w: are;


as with one.
a few classes


It has even enabledus to carryon


in the absence


of the teachers.


and we may prove this by a few incidents of the


In fact, during the absence of Sefior Villafranca,


school year.


On the morning of the arrival of


the Spanish


classes w2.'e


successfully conducted


President-elect Harding the desks in the assembly
hall were occupied by their respective owners even


bv students until a substitute was secured.


If the old adage


aws show which way the


Raymond,


I
1


..








THE CARIBBEAN.


But let us not be satisfied


with these


leve-


therefore,


we must


become


ments. There are other ways i:
show and create school spirit.
our classes? If not, let us start :
lovaltv within us. How can we (
classes have meetings we may giv
and sincere interest, be ready
for enlarging the class efficiency
ready to carry out those suggest
Material has to be handed in t
annual. It is your book. It b
much as to any one on the sta
Show your spirit. Be more thai
annual; be a maker of it.
Are vou a member of an ath
your utmost to gain a position o
not despair because others bett
trying. Work out at all the pract
vour athletic ability until you a
school's nine or five. Play, not a
a gamn of the team. Play for
not the winning of the game tha
tory but the exhibiting of the cl
man's spirit. If not a player, at
games and cheer your team to v
Is school life an enjoyment toi


hool work may seen


own making.


jich we m
we loyal
and stir th
? When oc
r attendant
suggestion


:v, and
ions.
each yea


then be

ir for this


elongs to you as
f. Do not idle.
n a reader of the


[letic team


t
:i


i a grin


ind enjoyment in


Sone or all. Do
r than you are
ces and improve
e chosen on the
star's game, but
eamwork. It is
t is the best vic-
an, good, sport-
east witness the
ctorv.
s? It should be.
ut this is of our


everything we


work
beco
rally
Th
work
by w\\
But
pend
in in'
W
scho
and
the s
insti
Ther
T"
Striv
prep
teris
mak
we a
Le
scho
us.
Tou


by taking more interest in it. \\e
me deeply interestedrc in what we do.
this will increase sch ool spirit.
ie teachers must do thecr part. Tc
dulls one. They must make arran
chich the students may enter into a
we must n:ot forget that school spir
ent chiefly on us. The teachers arec
creasing it without our co-operation.
hv should we endeavor so much t<
ol spirit? W\\hat is the school to i
our friends comp:ose the school. \\We
ame aims and principles. \We are pa
tuition which makes it as dear to us as
before, we should support it as we do
ie good within us is increased by re;
ing to enlarge school spirit is no mJor
aration for strengthening those >od)
tics which we possess. In truth, sch
es us ready for school citizenship; tl
re prepared for our country s citizen
t's start now and assist in the adva
ol spirit. Incite and arouse the ard;
Light the fuse of enthusiasm we
ch it to the powder of energy and


it with a bang that will fioodJ the atmnosph
real spirit.


need to
Natu-

K) much
gements
'tivities.


it is d
h el ple


rt
a
a
fl

C
*e
c


create
? \YWe
11 have
of this
friend.
friend.
spirit.
than a
harac-


iol spirit
therefore,
ship.
icing of
r" within
embody.
explode
ere with


our











4 THE CARIBBEAN.


MR. A. R. LANG, A. B., A. M.,
Lincoln, Nebr.


Superintendent


MABEL BEECHING, A. B.
Hutchinson, Kans.
Kansas State Normal School.


Schools.


Geometry,


Nebraska Wesleyan University.


General


Science,


Physics, Algebra.


University


of Nebraska.


F. X. KARRER,

Assistant
Wilson's Modern


Washington


A.B.. M.A


., M. Pd.,


I AURA


M. PIEDA


Bozeman, Mont.


to Superintendent.


Business


State Normal


College,


Seattle.


School, Ellensburg.


University of
Household


F Montana.
Science.


University of Washington.
Columbia University.
New York University.


RICARDO


San Jose,


J. ISABELLA DODDS, B. A.


LAFRANCA.
C.R.


Liceo de Costa Rica.


Virginia
University


Polytechnic Institute.
:y of Barcelona, Spain.


Claremont, Minn.
Macalester College.


English,


Latin


, History.


EDITH McCARTHY,


HATTIE L


EE HORNBEA
Waxahachie,


K, B. A., M. A.


New York,


N. Y.,


Tex. Normal and Model


School.


Trinity


University.


Trenton. N.


Columbia
English,


University.
History.


History.


HENRY


G. BA


MABEL JEAN BARNH


HOUSE,


'S ~T t


Jfaculty.


Principal.


A.B.


ix7^^- ... :11 r',.1











THE CARIBBEAN.


About 1492, Isabella, Queen of Spain, pa


wned her jewels for


a mig
for byr
world
now, i
gent.c
is folko
outdoi
cessful
pawnil


hty purpose. Her faith in man
this means a new continent
will always pay undying tribu
n 1920-1921, another Isabella,
haracter-stamped countenance
'wing in the footsteps of her il
ng the enterprising spouse of F
ly developing real men and
ng, mind you, but gi:ing--her ch
ectionate understanding, univ


distance, s
targes in deI


rling counsel,
old Cristohal 1
I 1 i


I wa
.. M


kind was
was disc
te to her
the ont
gleanms


lustr
erdin
wonm
choice
ersal
tchfi
l5ss I)


IOU
ian


en


and
in1


well rewarded,
covered and the
r memory; and
Whose intelli-
from this page,
s namesake and
1, for she is suc-
by giving-not
Precious jewels
terest, untiring


l guidance to her
)odds has been with
i i


us one term only, uit In a sor t t rime our resourceful ani]
amiable principal has attained a place in our hearts bordering
on worship. Thus, like Isabella of old, is Miss Dodds reaping
her harvest, for, with the able assistance of a loyal faculty,
never was school spirit so high and never did student body
respond to trying task more willingly than under the able
leadership of queenly Miss J. Isabella Dodds.


Mr. Bacon doesn't know he teaches di'
subjects, but he does, because we learn
in that daily perfect "swan." Mr. Bac
long hikes are commonplace to him. \
in healthy pastimes. We admire the b
which Mr. Bacon conducts his classes.
second year with Cristobal High.


g besides his school
watching his form
is a great athlete;
follow his footsteps
nesslike manner in
his is Mr. Bacon's


If size were determined by the way a teacher is loved by her
pupils, Miss Hornbeak would be a giantess, for this dainty
teacher makes her literature classes so interesting, so snappy,
and so plain, that she is a close second to our helpful principal
in popularity. Such a world of knowledge has Miss Horn-
beak that we have been unable to find a literary question that
she can't answer. This is Miss Hornheak's first year with us
and we sincerely hope it is not her last. If one wants to get a
Freshman angry enough to chew raw meat, just tell "It" that
you "know a nicer teacher than Miss Hornbeak."


affe









THE CARIBBEAN.


Miss Piedalue


has been on the Cristobal High School faculty


list for one-half year, which is entirely too short a time for such
a skiUlful teacher of domestic science to be here. We leave it to
the girls to sing her praises as a cooking and sewing teacher.
Why! Mother is learning rapidly from daughter, and father is
actually growing cheerful when the dinner bell tinkles. Miss
Piedalue has not been enjoying good health but her ailment
is always hidden by a pleasant countenance.


Senior


Villafranca has been with us for three years and each


year his class and popularity improve.


If you need an inter-


preter, ask for one of Sefior's pupils, for one and all, under his
earnest tutelage, speak the Spanish language with fluency and


grace
tell yc


(in our opinion, but Sefior may have a different story to
u). El Sefior bade us adios during the dispute between


Panama and Costa Rica and has accepted a position with the


Costa Rican Government.


His classes were taken over by


Miss Barnhouse, a very competent and talented teacher of
Spanish, whose path will be less thorny as a result of Sefior
Villafranca's excellent groundwork.











Miss Beeching's good friendship has been shared with all her


pupils.


Her spare time is spent in helping any of us with


work. Seemingly


our


impossible problems are simplified and drilled


into our noble cavities in an enduring, patient manner. Miss
Beeching has not been with us a full school year but it is
unanimously wished that she be here to see the present and
later editions of Freshies on Commencement night awaiting
their hard-earned diplomas.







THE


am


CARIBBEAN.


Sdtooltbop.


Frank Raymond,' 21.

am the Schoolboy.
ach morning I leave home with my lessons learned;
return early in the evening with a well-earned knowledge;


am not overworked, nor not worked
am as fresh in the evening as I was
am always alert.


enough;
in the morning.


I
E
P
T
T


am constantly watched;
very move I make is criticized.
people believe me never to be serious.
hey do not comprehend mv true feeling;


hey


heave a hopeless sigh as they gaze at me


And mutter, "Is that the future Amer
But, though I may seem indifferent,
Frivolous, and careless,
This is just the outward appearance
Like the gay-colored covers of a book.


ica


I am the builder of my country.
Upon me the future of this nation depends.
If it were not for me
The America of the future
Would be a second Russia.
Bolshevism will spread
And revolutions will prevail
If I do not learn the spirit with which to fight
And the right propaganda and slogans to use.
A democratic government is what I believe
And am taught to preach.
I am the future America.
I am the Schoolboy.










THE CARIBBEAN.


ALICE Hu


NTER,


New York.


"I have no other but a


I think him


so because


woman s reason;
I think him so."


-Two Gentlemen


Basketball,


1-2-3;


swimming,


of Verona.


1-2.


FRANK


NTHONY


ALMOND,


New Y

"He sits


the people's hearts.


-Julius


Basketball


, 1-2-3-4;


1-2-3-4; S nimmlng,
Representative, 1-2-3


ant Edito


baseball,
1-2-3; t


Caesar.


1-2-3-4;


ennis,


Class President, 4;


track


Class
Assist-


Editor-in-Chief, 4.


MILDRED IRENE


STAFFORD.


Maine.


"A light heart


lives lo


-Love's Labour Lost.


Basketball, 4


bowling, 4; Class Secretary, 4;:


Exchange Editor, 4.









TH F


CARIBBEAN


KATHERINE


KIRBY


ERGEIt)N,


Mississippi


"I am a woman, when I think


Basketball,


Girls'


I -2 3-4; bAscbali, 4;


Athle


must speak.


Editor


CHARLES HENTE


New York.

"Men of few words arc the best men.


- Kins


Basketball,
Editor, 4.


1-2>3


baseball,


ienryv


1 -2 3 4


CARL \WIL


LIAM I)


T ennessee.


"The force


of his


own merit makes his


- Ki


Baseball


, 3-4; t


tennis, 4; Business



ELEANOR FrPANCES /1MMERMANN,
New York.

"In thy face I sec
The map of honour, truth, an


- King


2-3-4;


basketball,


alagitr,


oya ti.
Henry


.As on Like


swimn


Hienrv


way.
7II.


F/







THE CARIBBEAN.


PROPHECY


One night the Seniors were having a party and,


CLASS OF '21.


Kirby raised such a row that we all said "Let


a short


time,


the inevitable


happened.


have two new operators,


so Mildred and Charlie


Some one said "Let's have the ouila.


Immediately
Fine!" etc.


there


was a chorus


"Sure!


After the board was brought to light, we were
in a quandary as to what we could ask it. We


could think of no new questions.


All of a sudden


Kirby spoke.
"Suppose we let it prophesy the future of the
Class of '21, and save Carl and me the trouble."
The bunch agreed to that and gathered around the


board, as two of our number sat down


to wrestle


with the weird instrument of communicating with


the supernatural. Prett'
to waltz around and al
record of what it said.


"Frank will be a doctor.


ran around


the room.


y soon the pointer began
1 of those present kept


" A gasp of surprise


That


was what


Frank


wanted to be.


arose and Frank and Eleanor took their places.
The board started to move and said that it was
only joking as Kirby was destined to be married
to the commandant of the Island of Guam.
The pointer stopped and then started to proph-
esy for Alice. "Alice will be the women's national


tennis champion


ten years from now, and also


secretary to the President of the United States."
The board did not stop but just went in circles


for a
die- -


:ouple of


minutes and then


I turned around to


hand, said "Adios," while t
heartfelt sympathy. The
we saw the pointer move to


Mud,"


"Henter will


shook his


he bunch extended their
n, on facing the board,


"t" and continue


he is forty in order to keep thin.


"after


He will be vice-


president of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation.


This relieved "Mud"


very much, but we had


not much time to congratulate him on his escape
because the board went on and said that Eleanor


Then Charles asked "What kind of a doctor?"


Zimmermann


was going to


be a stenographer,


"Doctor for the pane of a


window.


" Frank


world famous as the only one known who does not


immediately accused the two operators of pushing


gum.


The ouija seemed


tired after this,


the board,


which they very strenuously denied.


Then Frank asked,


"Is that true?"


Ouija replied, "No, but you will really become a


famous


surgeon.


Then the boar
be president--


d spelled out, Kirby is going to
The board hesitated and Alice


asked Kirby if sh could come and visit her at th


White House, then the board continued


s wife.


Kirby remarked that that was just as good as
being president.
Then Carl, who was feeling meddlesome, asked
the board what Kirby's husband was going to be
president of.


The board replied:


"Colon Humane Society.


because it would not work for fully five minutes.
Finally it started "Mildred is going to be in a
large dress"--(Eleanor broke in with "Say, Mil-
dred's going to be fat!")--"making establish-
ment of which she will eventually become pro-


prietor.


Then the laugh was on Eleanor.


The board executed a few loops and side slips


,, and, ending up with a tail spin, started to spell


out Duey s future.


g neer- -
gineer---


Carl is going to be an en-


Carl s thoughts turned


to famous


feats in engineering and work in the devastated
regions of Europe, then the board went on, "on


a ten-mile


railroad


between


Oskawassee


Humbuguss in Florida.
We went home!


e













THE CARIBBEAN


Jun


IIJ- -








I
/



x x
x( x x









- .


or Class



20-19 21


K


.'.


'*
* :
xx *
\ .' : ". .


^*.. :


1I


. .
**



7 xx
x" 2 x
x ,th xxxx 7
1, ,







THE CARIBBEAN.


ANTHOLOGY OF THE JUNIOR CLASS.


Georgie


pepper 23.


MARJORIE BALL-


just a moment!


We most humbly beg his pardon.


A "golden-haired maiden
fully at the windows of the


wno gazes
Assembly


Smourn-
Hall and


wishes that she were a Senior, so that she could
look out of them whenever she wants to.


He has worn one occasionally, but doubtless only
when he was despairing of ever attaining the right
to wear long hair and an artist's smock.


GEORGE CARTWRIGHT-


MARY FIELDS-
"Charley says


An extremely


" that Mary is such a demure,


blond


young man who rejoices


in the endearing (?) name of "Cockroach"


and is


puritanical, little maid that she might well be a


n )ted fjr his fondness for Freshmen.


Although a


of Priscilla.


Only if Mary were Priscilla


she'd
land's
"Whyv


probably
sake!"
don't


say "For
instead of
you speak


for yourself, John?"

GLENORA MAE EDWARDS-


It required
of sleuthing
that name. (


quite


a bit


to uncover


wouldd you


think of Jane as


ever


"Glenora


Mae?"

EMMA TOWNSENxD--
This is rather a weighty
subject for one so inexperi-


enced as


I shall not try.


to handle,


Discretion


is the better part of valor,
anyway.

I)DORIs OLIVER--
Some day we're going to


hear that


Doris


Junior,


has been


is extremely


ignorant, doesn't even know


the difference
iron and a fl


between


atlron.


a Freshman


student could tell him.

PAUL DOYLE-
"Paco" has contributed


to science a


wonderful in-


vention, a compass which,


according


to him, simply


cant go wrong.


me that


Seems to


it is more


orn2-


mental than useful, partic-


ularly as a guide.
also discovered a
conserve stamps.


He has


way to
Rather


late for conservation, isn't
it?

HERBERT McCLAIN-


You may


want


to abo


talk all
ut the


work of the missionaries


shot. Why?
who has the


Well, anyone


nerve


to possess


"darkest


a natural wave


Herbert's work is harder yet.


Africa" but


He has been trying


these days ought never to


be allowed to live


That would be too much.


to get Miss Hornbeak to come to Sunday School,
but the best that he's been able to do so far is to
get her to come to a Sunday School class banquet.


WILLIAM MARY-
1^


' -U 11 I i


rv Tnir,.,crvn


reincarnation









THE CARIBBEAN.


the ouija board on


subjects so


varied as which


shirt to wear to school and the state of his lady-


love's affections.


It is rumored (this is stricvtly


stomach.


" Furthermore


he is quite


will


his heart to be found as often as possible
that just like a man?


ing for
. Isn't


confidential, of course)


that he was quite over-


come by the answer to the latter question.


this be
When voc


a lesson


to all lovelorn


young


men.
'our


JORDAN Zi


How can


IMERMANN- "


write about


a boy when


I don't


own ouija board.


know anything about him


ambiti()n is to be a


exce


ntleman


pt that his main
bum all his life?


HAROLD CLOKE-


heard


"tripped
v along"
never
of a boy


who did it until
1 met Harold.
He does it most
success fully
though, trip-


everyone
the most


dignified Fresh-


m a n1 d o w n


tie greenest
Senior. Not
only that, but
he trips him-


sel f
d O n


*;. .wv- *^- -\. ".. aliyei wa y
. V - -
Te w

Inc New ('ristobal HWireless Staiio,.


ing remark at Marv's party was.


LEROY MAGNUSON-


The saving goes that "vou can't
man down." Neither can you keep


HARRIS CHEAL--


Although


he has only been


time, Harris is already casting tender glances
all the "femmes" from the eighth grade up


the Seniors.


You might


tleman Cleopatra.


CHARLES SEELEY


ease


pardon


find prose inadequate:

Since the beginning of the world
There has reigned supreme
In the world of silence


One figure-the Sphinx,
Her supremacy unquestioned,
Her riddle unanswered.
But at last there has risen


A rival-Charles


t believe
ask him


what his


Who has dared to usurp
Her throne.


part-


keep a good
I.erov quiet,


Perhaps


agree with me when I say that if the


digging of the Panama Canal was the Thi-te :nth
Labor of Hercules, suppressing Leroy is the Four-
teenth.


TAYLOR-


Chester is a thorough believer in the old saving


heart is through his


want a thing well done-push


always


of girls


daintil
but I
heard


with us a short


almost call


him a


this burst Into free


verse, but


Seeley,
-


particularly i
Hornbeak will


n the last period.


CHESTER


"the way to a man's


A Native Hut.


-- .


*


vOU










THE CARIBBEAN.


SOPHOMORES.


V V


mm


l i















THE CARIBBEAN.




SOPHOMORES.


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* *: **.









THE CARIBBEAN.


SOPHOMORE MUSIC.


Mattie


Pu!lig,


The following program of musical numbers was
rendered with much feeling by the members of
the class of'23 of Cristobal High School:


.Gerald Bliss


"Wandering".
"Tired of Me"


"Down by the Ohio, I'
Little 0 My 0!"...
"Tell Me Why" ,.....
"I Love the Ladies". .


ve Got the


... Edward May


Sweetest


... .Ernst Euphrat
.....Leo Eberenz
. .. .Alex. Linczer


"Drifting" ..
"Bright Eyes"
"Freckles"...


"O h!'. . . . . . . .
"You'd be Surprised!".
"Vamp".............
"El Capitan".. .. .. .


. .Lillian Colberg
... Elsie Johnson
..... Esther Witt
. Mildred Morgan
.....Jessie Weir
... Louise Henter
.. Georgie Pepper


"When You Get What You Want You


Don't Want It Any More


.. Catherine Pepper


"Oh, Mother, I'm Wild"


A. AlQuinto


"O, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning


.. .Mattie Pullig


THE


FRESHMEN.


Mabel Quinto,


There is not the


slightest doubt, in the minds of


Edna Campbell and Gladys Lowande,scoredmany


the Freshmen at least, that this class has far ex-
ceeded any first-year class of the preceding years.
There have been several interesting exhibits of


classroom


work.


The members of the Ancient


History class took part in an Olympian Council,
which not only displayed their knowledge of the
ancient peoples and their customs, but brought to
light some very good dramatic ability.
This same ability was shown to be even more


points for Cristobal in


Balboa,


and have


track meet held at


distinguished


themselves on


the basketball, baseball, and bowling teams.
Besides doing their share in the two big social
events of the year, the carnival and the dance, the
Freshmen gave a class picnic at Fort Sherman,


inviting the teachers.


bathing,


singing,


exploring
playing


After a delightful day spent
the neighboring jungle,


games,


we came


home,


extensive,


when


the members of th


English class gave several very
original monologues and dialogues,


e Freshman
interesting
in costume.


In athletics, the Freshmen have no reason to be


sunburned but happy.
In fact, in every line of school activities and
interests, the Freshmen have done their part and
have been willing to do more.


ashamed


their record.


our girls,


"$
--% .4i 'J^...- -










THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


CLASS WILL.


In order that it may not b: said of us, the class
of 1921, that we passed from this school intestate,
because we feel a certain responsibility toendeavor
to help those poor inefficient souls reach the goal
which we have already attained, and because we


To Mary Fields, the exclusive right to keep up
the Senior dignity.
To Jordan Zimmermann, the privilege of over-
coming tho3e shy looks which he uses to deceive
the girls.


possess


those


qualities


which


most


To Chester


Taylor, the privilege of talking to


dearly wish to acquire;


we, on this bleak day of


Leroy without permission.


June, issue this last will and testament.
To the irrational Freshmen-we leave the right
of exercising the tonsorial feat of paring the hair


To Emma


Townsend, a patent giggle muffler


which she may use to suppress those giggles of
hers.


the dormant


and noble


domes


forth-


To Wesley


Townsend,


the privilege of using


coming victims.
To the unconscious Soph-


omores-we
defatigable


leave


our in-


perseverance


and ability in athletics.


To the


Junior Class


leave the following:


To Harold


Cloke a box


for his feet in order that he
may not continue to annoy
his neighbors by putting his
feet in the aisle.


his power of narration.
To Marjorie Ball, the
privilege of lookingoutofthe
window during the periods.
To Doris Oliver, a map to
:, direct her to the Fountain of


Youth


which


will aid her


in the fulfillment


Officers Quarters, Fort de


Lesseps.


wish for eternal youth.


William


best wishes


the good looks


Mary, our
for retaining


voted him


To George Cartwright, the right to continue


in the contest.


explaining


mathematics,


without


interruption


from his ignorant classmates.
To Paul Doyle, a pair of twelve-ounce boxing
gloves so that he may pursue his pugilistic in-
clinations without serious injury to his unfortu-
nate victims.
To Leroy Magnuson, the San Lorenzo cliff, to
strengthen his bluff with Miss Hornbeak.
To Jane Edwards, a year to grow in, so that she


may


look more dignified


when she


becomes a


Senior.


To Charles Seeley, a lot on the Sahara desert
near the Sphinx.


To Herbert McClain,


permission to continue


being sarcastic.
To the faculty, we leave the truthful execution
of this will and the Cristobal High School with
all that it contains.
We, having disposed of the above in regular
order, this dismal month of June, 1921, now pro-
nounce it legal and valid.
(Signed) The Senior Class.







THE


CARIBBEAN.


as ALUMNI NOTES.


Doris O/izer,


Although


Cristobal


School


boasts only


course and is


expected to return


June for a


twenty graduates in the three


years of Its


exist-


vacation.


ence, a


more loval and


ambitious alumni group


can not be found.
Notwithstanding the fact that they


are scat-


tered to the four corners of our country, we have
recently received from most of them expressions
of good will and best wishes for the success of our


yearbook and our school.


Most of them are at-


Anna Dorothy Montanve (neXVeir) has recently
entered the realms of matrimony, and is residing
in Gatun, C. Z.
James Gerard Raymond is at present working
at the Cristobal docks, but expects to return next


year to complete
versity, New York.


his course at


Columbia


tending college or are working, showing the am-
bition and ability which they acquired or at least
developed in Cristobal High School.
An Alumni Association has been proposed and
the first meeting suggested for June, immediately


Kenneth Maurice Edward


s has been studying


as an apprentice electrician, and is fast climbing
the ladder to success.


I920.


after


Commencement.


We wish


that such


meeting and


organization may


be realized and


trust that all the Alumni will join in memory of
their years spent in Cristobal High School.
It will be of interest to all to know that:

1918.
Lula Mae Coman (ne Pullig) is still residing
in Cristobal using to advantage her knowledge of
domestic science acquired in Cristobal High School.
Susie Inloes Harrison has returned from college
in Maryland, and is now working in the establish-
ment of J. D. Maxwell.


Catherine


versity of C


Teese Waid is studying in the Uni-
alifornia, Berkeley, Cal. Catherine


writes that she is still working hard for the Golden
Bear of that institution.
George Minot Cotton is still with us, and is
working at the Cristobal dry dock. He expects to
leave for school in the States soon.


Fields,


engineering


is studying


Rice Institute,


He writes that he is returning in


mechanical


Houston,


June for a va-


cation to be spent with his parents at
Lesseps.


Katherine


Burgoon


became


Mrs. Stewart on


av 8. She now lives in Pedro Miguel.
Lindale D)avies is taking a course in dental sur-


gery at


Tufts College, Boston, Mass.


Lillian Cotton is a clerk a


station.


the Cristobal coaling


She is leaving shortly for the States and


upon her return will be married to Mr. Robert
Van Wagner.
Etha Bevington expects to move to California


soon.


We all wish her good luck in her new home.


Albert Doyle is in a preparatory school, and
expects to enter the Naval Academy at Annapolis
in September.


Leland Bourke Welsh i
rado School of Mines.


s studying in the Colo-


Alice Stilson is residing
Colon.


her parents


Mary Elizabeth Verner is studying in the Uni-
versity of North Carolina. She writes that college
is simply great and that no one should miss a
chance to go.


1919.


Alson W. Searsand Harlan Holmwood are studv-


ing in the University


of California,


where


several of our graduates have gone.
Kenneth Greene is teaching school in Brookville,
Pa. He writes that his father is going to buy a









THE CARIBBEAN.


THE


GHOST OF THE "BERKSHIRE.


Georgie Pepper, '23.


It was during


the steamship Berk


the last of March


left San


, I believe, that
Francisco for


there were neitherislands, reefs,rocks, hidden banks
nor any menace of that kind on the Berkshire's


Manila, at which port she was due


weeks.


in about four


She had been built originally as a freight


route.
fore she


She had been overhauled by experts be-


had left


'Frisco,


so that


any danger


and passenger boat, but, as no regular pa


ssengers


from poor machinery or insufficient fuel was out


booked for this trip, the owners


allowed the wife and four-year old son of the cap-
tain, the wife and two children of the engineer,
and the wives of various other members of the


of the question.
appearance? B


Tracers
daily.


Then, why hadn't she put in an
iut to that there was no answer.


were put on her an
She had been seen by


id reports


came


this boat at such


ship's crew to go along.


A bit irregular it was, as


and such a place.


She had been seen


by that


the shipping officer admitted, but it would do no


harm


to the pocket-books of the owners, and a


boat at another place hundreds of miles further
west, and each one reported her as seeming in


little indulgence now and then only strengthened


the loyalty


to the company for which


its em-


fairly


condition


on at her usual speed.


and apparently steaming
A glance over the wireless


ployees were noted.


Also, it was a fine chance


for the women to enjoy a trip with their husbands


and to see a bit of


the world


As I remarked before, the Berkshire sailed dur-


records of ships passing through the same vicinity
as the Berkshire showed no S. O. S. calls from her
and so, having exhausted every possible source,
the investigation ended with only these facts for


ing the last part of March with a thirty-day


voy-


an explanation of her disappearance:


She had


age before her and prospects of exceptionally fine


left San Francisco in perfect condition for a long


weather during the whole trip.


But the day on


ocean trip;


she had sent out no S. O.


S. calls;


which she was due in Manila arrived, and passed,
and seven more besides, and still the Berkshire


she had neither run ashore nor been foundered in


a storm;


and she had been last seen considerably


failed to put in an appearance.


When the second


farther than halfway


across


the Pacific.


Now,


week passed and they had heard nothing from her,
the authorities started a thorough investigation.
They cabled to every port where she might have


where was the Berkshire ?
, About two months later a wireless was sent in


by H. M.


S. S. Lancaster stating that she had


stopped,


but received


no news of her.


Then,


thinking that she might have been caught in a


sighted the Berkshire, coming straight toward her,
full speed ahead, that she had changed her course


had been


Hi il I m m m I m IIIIIIIIIIIIIIwm lm lm lm lm il o a m I *M l aaiig s a g n a g o lm n a l m m I i III Ii
in M







THE CARIBBEAN.


Furthermore


it had b


een a deliberate attempt,


next da


y when they would be given a decent buria


and not an accide
caster, an intimate
the Berkshire, ha
bells signaling the
to change his cour
passengers aboard
week later, the sa
time to the U. S. A
tried hard to hus
because he had als
Winters of the Ber
telegrams began t
Berkshire, judging
Pacific with the r
night she would tr
Pacific, the next sh
Islands, then again
Strait, or down ne
coincidence she v
whose commander
time, but after ab
would wire for he
were being attack
on until no boat w
which would corn
nowhere at any m
in sight. Eventua
out to look for he
such a menace. T
of her case: either
become insane or
pirate. Until the 1
dangerous for any
Then one day t


along past t
Berkshire m
discovery.
a number o
about on th
aboard bv t
tain the bo
children evi
of the boai
Lying face
water-soake


port
t fre
arge
eopli
urfa
Wat
s of


dently
t were
down o


tnt, as the captain of the Lan-
e friend of the commander of
t tried to believe, because the
quartermaster of the Berkshire
se had been distinctly heard by
the Lancaster. Then, nearly a
me thing happened again, this
. T. Thomas, whose commander
sh it up as much as possible,
o been an old friend of Captain
kshire. And then the wireless
o come in thick and fast. The
by these, was darting over the
apidity of a ray of light. One
y to ram a boat in the southern
'e would appear off the Hawaiian
In she would appear in Bering
ar Australia. By some curious
vas at first seen only by ships
-s had known Winters for some
out a month of this, strangers
IDp, excitedly vowing that they
ed by the Berkshire. This kept
as safe from the strange steamer
ie sailing up apparently from
minute and attack the first boat
lly destroyers had to be ordered
r in order to relieve the sea of
here were only two explanation
Captain Winters had suddenly
else the entire crew had turned


boat was ca
boat to cro
ie steamship


Lught


Pacific was


ss.


ip W/


hA


ion of the Paci
quently appear
lifeboat, appar
e, was found dr
ce of the water
erwitch and wa
a small group
starved to death
the words "S.
n the floor of


d diary mai


rked


aterwit


ch, sailin


fic in which the
ed, made a sad
entlycontaining
ifting aimlessly
. It was taken
s found to con-
of women and
th. On the bow
S. Berkshire."
the boat was a


name of


Molly Winters, wife of the captain of the Berkshire.
The bodies, which were little more than skele-


That night the captain of the J'aterwitch asked
the passengers to remain in the saloon after dinner
if they wished to hear a remarkable story and its
still more remarkable ending. Needless to state,


they all remained. When evervoni
captain rose and began t.o talk quie


"Doubtless you h
ance of the steamshi
ago," he said, "at
weather was as perfe
to insure a peaceful
appearances in vari
most of you saw th
on board the Water
boat was all that is


your
clear
The
ofth


o


ve all heard of
SBerkshire near
* time when e'
:t as could have
oyage, and of h
us parts of the


e piti
witch
left


permission I shall
s mv friend Winters
complete explanati'


e


Berkshire


was toun


on the floor of the lifebr
"As you all know,
Berkshire, besides the c


bers of the families of s
women were all enjoving
one had been seasick, anm
the boat to reach Manila.
voyage was passed.
And then, one morning
thing happening which p
opened before in all the h
baffled the keenest mind
parts of the ship were ur
Indeed, the men could
iron deck plates with their
was the first to discover
iron bolt and felt it give
fingers, just as if it were b
so soft that holes could ha
with files if it hadn't been
were also as soft as cheese
situation was the same.
more dangerous every r
wood was beginning to
drowned to pieces and I


I r -
touched
footprin
"By


* .. 1


1


deck
it ha
after


,, which
d been
*noon


h
m
it
It


quiet, the


e disappear-
two months
rv detail of


v


beel
er si
Pac


oat which
afternoon
he cBerkshi
you a st


of any attempt
iun of the disa
.t in Molly Win


n expected
subsequent
ific. Also,
was taken
. In that
're. WVith
mry which
at piracy.
appearance
tears' diary


there were on board the
rew, the wives and mem-


of the


crew.


These


the trip immensely, no
I they all were eager for
So the first part of the


ig they


Sawoke to find a


probably has ne
istorv of the w
s on board. T
ideniably grow
gouge pieces ou
ir fingers. iThe
it when he pick
in to the press
butter. The boi
ve been punched
for the fact thai
e. All over the
It became mI
minute. By n
rot, while th
)roke into dust
by now register
lade on it.
became plain


ver h


orrl
he
ing
t o
eng
ed i
re c
lers


1.


lin tl
t the
boat
lore
()oon
ie r


as they
ed every

that a


**


(









THE CARIBBEAN.


peculiar quality in the metal on board, as that had
been attacked first, and, even if it could have been
escaped now, the boat had been already ruined
and was helpless.
"Captain Winters had found that there was a


the Berkshire, steady and true again and steaming


straight toward them.


On she came, nearer the


little boat with every beat of her engines, until in
a few moments she must needs pass over them or


do some remarkable turning.


Mrs. Winters per-


small boat fastened to the stern of the


Berkshire


which had not only escaped the light ray, but was
large enough to hold the women and children who


were


aboard.


These were


called


together and


ceived the danger first and screamed aloud to the
crew to take care lest they run the little boat down.
But there was no sound to indicate that the crew
had heard, for the huge boat came on as swiftly


summarily placed in the boat.


The last to go


was


as before.


At the last moment the frightened


the captain's wife, who objected strenuously to


leaving


her husband.


as she


was finally


women hid their eyes that they might not see
the boat, as she passed over the frail cockleshell


persuaded


to climb down


the rope and indeed


in which they crouched.


But the minutes passed


was starting, the rope broke andti let her fall into


and still there was no sound save that of the en-


water


which


she was rescued


gines of the Berkshire.


And when they dared to


difficulty by the other women.


But the mischief


look up again, the stern of ti e Berkshire was just


was done.


All means of communication between


clearing the small boat.


The steamship had gone


the two boats, except by voice or sight was cut off,
and the two speedily drifted so far apart that it
was impossible to throw food or water casks into
the smaller boat from the larger.
"You may imagine the horror of the women,
a few minutes later, when they saw the Berkshire
collapse before their eyes, and become nothing


but a loathsome scum upon the water.


man cleared


the wreckage.


In fact there


Not a


was


nothing to indicate that there was a man under
the wreckage.
"They drifted for days and finally began, one


completely over them without leaving a trace!
"After that they gave up hope completely, and
in less than four days the last pitifully thin sur-
vivor was dead."
Here the captain stopped, turned abruptly and


left the room.


The passengers remained a while


talking over the strange story of the Berkshire,
but no one could offer any explanation of the
mysterious fate of the boat.
After the bodies of the women and children had
been buried in the sea, the captain sent the entire


story in


by wireless to the authorities in San


by one, to give up hope of rescue.


Then one night


Francisco where it was received with much sur-


they heard the welcome sound of engines throb-
bing near them and, behold, there was a tall ship


prise and, I am sorry to say,


incredulity.


from that day to this there has been no explana-


approaching them.


Nearer she came and nearer,


tion of the light ray that wrecked


the Berkshire,


until they suddenly awoke to the fact that it


was


THOUGHTS OF

Miltred


nor has the phantom ship ever appeared again.




A FRESHMAN.


The Seniors


The Sophomores all laugh at us,
And toss their he ids and say,
"Ltr's hope the little innocents
Will have more sense some day.


are so studious,


They wouldn't care, I know,
If we, by some mistake, should find
Ourselves in Jericho.







THE CARIBBEAN.


23


THE


MYSTERY


OF LA MONTANA.


Marjorie Ball, '22.


n th
litth
Moi
hal
there
e of
he p
:v tr


ficult fo
heavy j


e island of
e village,
ntafia". A
f hidden b
e crosses
Morgan's
ath up the


ail, steep


r climbing
ungle grc


trunks half bur
Late in the a
stopped to rest
This was walled
ical growth, an
leafy branches.
like gray veils f
go trees and, fro
there shone for
the Lady of the
blood-red passic
the sensitive le
step. In the
three rude cross
in height and t
been told by a n
the grave of a
and that the oti
Long ago at
tale, there ha
hoarding count
buried deep ben
roof hut. The t
his priceless tr
dead of night, d
him from his hu


Taboga,
stands w
Lt the top
y the lux
marking
men.
mountain


and narro
g. It winei
wth and ,
d under tU
ternoon I
n a little c
n by a den
roofed b
ertlrnnnc i


looming
hat the
of this ju
uriant t
the lone


high behind
natives call
ngle-covered
mdergrowth,
ly graves of


foi
on
CO
no
hu


is little more than a


making
in and o
)und old
k vegeta
mbed th
aring of
tangle of
the inter
Saninsh


very dif-
through
tllen tree


e trail and
the jungle.
'rank trop-
'twining of
mnoq hnna


rom decayed branches of old man-
m the dense shadows of the jungle,
. i r < r"


th an oc
Night
)n flowe
aves of
middle
es, the
:he other
native tl
"Gran
hiers ma
the en
d lived
less tre
ieath th
hree pir


casional waxen blossom of


orchid.
r flamed a
the mim
of the cl


en
rs
at
e*
ke
o


measure in
during a ter
t and murd


with greed for the gold,
themselves until all had b
buried them, later on, at
The spot has since been
the natives, who firmly


Here and


there a


ong the trail
sa shrunk at
aring stood


ter one about thr
a trifle shorter.
the tallest cross m
e, that is, a big
td the graves of hi.
)f the trail, so go
miserly old Spa
ires of gold and j
[irt floor of his tha
ts had learned of hi
the village and,
rible storm, had dr
tered him. Then,
they had fought
een killed. Nativ
the place of the m
religiously avoid
believe that on s


ee fee
I ha:
arkec
chief
s men
es th
niard


The dav wa
reboding sti
ly by the
ugh of some
t a breath o
ng low over


s hot and oppressive
illness hung over the
crackling of a twig
jungle creature far in
f wind was stirring anr
the mountain top.


a sort of
t, broken
te hoarse
distance;
rk clouds


Fascinated by the spot, I was oblivious of
foreboding storm. I pictured Morgan's raid
as they crept utip the trail with their flashing kni
and greedy, cruel faces. I seemed to see the
miser struggling with them, his withered face p
fully distorted with fear and terror.


A sudden sharp ci
ness. I started toc
storm was upon m
darkening in the s
knew that I could
trail until after the
the thicket, I prepay
It was terrible! V
followed by crashes
enough to wake the
the dead! Do the d
The next flash of
place with a ghastly
stant, I saw a sight
horror. Standing
three men with red


e
2


F,
t
e

I


ewels,
tched-
m and
in the
agged
crazed
among
es had
urder.
ed by
tormvy


and,


brown an


ing in


rack of thunder broke the still-


my feet, realizing
s-
e. The clearing w;
hort tropical twilig
never find my way
storm. So, finding
tred to wait until it
ivid flashes of light
of thunder that se
' dead. Loud enough
lead ever wake? I s
lightning illumined
y greenish light. I
which curdled my "
at the end of the
I sashes and gleami
their grasp, was an


that the
as already
;ht, and I
down the
shelter in
was over.
ning were
emed loud
;h to wake
huddered.
the whole
n that in-
)lood with
trail were
ing knives
old man,


withered with age.


One startling second a
A deafening crash of thumb
very mountain top. Then
of the trail came a weird t
myself from the thicket
the mountain side, stumb
and fallen trees.
What had I seen? Was
the scraping and groaning
wind ? Could it have been


the flash was
seemed to cra
ence. From tl
arthlv wail. I
[ raced madly-
e over twisted


t


over.
:k the
e end
flung
down
vines


it my imagination
of the branches in
hat I had fallen aslh


F










THE CARIBBEAN.


A TRIP THROUGH THE PANAMA CANAL.


HWji!iam


Mary,


As the


S. S. O/ockson


lay at


ready to leave, the harsh voice
could be heard calling to the m
to cast off the bow and stern lin


Pier T, Cristobal,


of the captain
en on the dock
es. and in a few


minutes we were slowly moving toward the en-


probably after insects or being chased by a larger
fish. Overhead a lone buzzard floated lazily,
while pale blue cranes silently skimmed along the
water.
Branching from the Canal like a little tributary


trance of the


Panama Canal.


the old French


Canal, its calm waters un-


IA I
N IU


__Meat _5ea Level __ _ __ __ Jifler L ___ i ___
- - -- -


A IfP MA5 J4UST


LEFT THE UPPER LCM., FA5$h4C INTO GAITUJN LAIt N At FC $ Mt: 4


Upmr oc
Upper 100^


5RAC- IN MODOLC AND LOWER PCOL hI' 'CCEN OQUALZtED. RAtSNG SlMIP


Lr Acormch Wall


Lower Lock
SMtIP MAS MOVED rOCWA2D TO MCi~DE CHAMBEC PREPARATORY


4 2


Upper Lotc


Cs
U U
I\ 0


Lcwe^grj'pc*ro"c WaH n.. LW #


sUmrAct IN UPPtr AND MIODLC OCOLS HAt &E-N


CQJA&iZED, AND SIP 1AS MOVED INTO UPPER CrIAMBLR.


NEXT IFT WILL fAl! Mte TO LLVLL Of LAXC As IN TOP )AGCAM


.iETHOD OF RAISING OR LOWERING VESSELS IN ALL CANAL LOCKS.


Upon entering the narrow channel of the Canal
I could see tall grass growing down into the water


ruffled, except for the occasional dip of the paddle
of a native, lazily drifting along in his slim cayuco.


and miles


of tropical


jungle


along


its banks.


Along its


banks, half hidden


the luxuriant


On the banks lay large crocodiles basking in the


early morning sun


evidently


content with


foliage, lay pieces of rusting machinery, pathetic
reminders of the failure of the French.


24


atua l ke Lev. UPer Apo -omh fil i
*.







THE CARIBBEAN.


As we neared the approach wall, I noticed


small electric locomotives which would help pull
the ship through the locks.
With a thud a small leather sack full of lead hit


the deck;


this was attached by a small rope to a


The pilot on l)oard yelled to the operators to let
go of the aft lines, and soon we were steaming


into Gatun ILake.


The lake lay smooth and clear,


reflecting the white clouds which lazily
across the blue sky.


floated


large steel cable which was on a coil fastened to


Beyond a turn in the lake, marked off by


one of the locomotives.


cable on board a


After the men pulled the


fastened it to the large iron


spar buoys,


the dead jungle, a forest of stark


trees rearing trom


the bosom of the lake


cleats, the locomotive proceeded to pu


their leafless boughs like gaunt arms.


On one


along until


three other locomotives


tow, two forward and


took us


two att.


tree were orchids, whose gay colored flowers made


a striking contrast against the


gray branches.


The gates
being open-


we


reached


en there
first


e ship
d the
chainm-


her until
reached
middle. 1
gates th
closed sl(


after


the
Fhe
en
ow-
us,


and sudden-


t from
S)ttomr


the chamber
came thun-
dering noise.
I. ooki n


down


saw


the water be-


swviled
t like


slight


bend


in the Canal,
I got my first
glimpse of
Gaillard
Cut. On
both sides of


the Canal


were
small
create
houses
lights
which


used as range
lights at
night. Slow-


iy pass
through
Cut,


a miniature
maelstrom.
Inch by inch
the ship was
raised, until
a bell clang-
ed from one


(CATl N L.a K, SHOWING 1ltn TaRECe


.VNIN (HAMBES, WITH
SI'A LE EL,


cATIN IaKE IN Til DI$ TX N'E Sn"


Thee looIks are 1-1 5 miles long. an, within thiir wall are housed mnst of lthe mtrieant and wonderful
marhievrv whient peIs ansid %Is> at e Ie al n ;n eontrlis bte water uiisT i niild ts whirh raise or lower
thei water in e;h of ib thre. 111 )-f )I twf t e'Er n s,


of the locomotives, and the ship proceeded into


second


chamber


After


s a e


ceedings, we entered the third and last chamber


of the locks.


After the ship was raised


to the


bustling Culebra of construction da
On both sides of the Canal lav


could


one side
sleepy li
town


Culebra in
striking con-
trast to the


rolling hills,


on the sides of which rose small concrete sheds
used during the construction days for the purpose


level of Gatun Lake, a beautiful scene lay before
us. On one side of the locks lay a large grassy
field like a green velvet carpet. This is the Gatun
/-/ i -


of storing dynamite.
pictures of desolation


are veritable


and decay, covered


moss, and topped by verdant foliage of some


Lake.


25








THE CARIBBEAN.


shining in the tropical sun.


We gaily exchanged


greetings with its passengers as we passed.
At this juncture we were called to lunch, after
which we explored the mysteries of the engine


blue smoke.


Orders were being given with the


rapidity of a machine gun and obeyed as quickly.
Then we were lowered one step into Miraflores


Lake;


from here we could see lpw rolling


Later we took pictures of the Cut, and


enjoyed an interesting talk with the captain and
first mate, who told us many thrilling sea stories.
At the entrance of the Cut proper stood Gold


dotted with grazing cattle.
Coming close to the spillway, we could see its
massive steel gates which were holding back the


waters of Miraflores


Lake.


After passing the


Hill and Contractor's


great


threatening


spillway,


we entered the Miraflores Locks


masses looming like Scylla and Charybdis of old,
on either side of the ships which thread the Canal.
On the canal side of Contractor's Hill were large
hydraulic graders which were used to lower the
hills and prevent slides.
Slowly passing out of Gaillard Cut, we cou'd
see PedroM guel Lock, and farther on, the Mira-


were slowly lowered two steps into the sea level


part of the Canal.


From this point, we could see


the red tiled roofs of Fort Clayton and above them
Old Glory flying proudly in the breeze.
In the distance rose Ancon Hill, dotted with
the homes of Canal employees, and, nestled at its


foot, lay Balboa.


Ahead of us in the Canal was a


flores
Lake.


Locks,


the two separated


Miranores


At this part of the Canal, sturdy little tugs


large suction dredge keeping the Canal clear of the


dangerous sand fill.


After passing a turn in the


were tied up ready to tow through the Canal any


disabled ship.


Tied up alongside the bank were


Canal, we could see the long cement docks where
boats of many lands were receiving and discharg-


two large cranes, the Ajax and


Hercules, their


ing cargo.


Soon we were tied up to the dock and,


mighty steel arms towering toward the sky.


after saying farewell to my friends aboard, I left


As we entered Pedro Miguel Lock,


we saw in


the ship greatly


impressed


the wonder


the chamber opposite one
stroyers sending up from


of Uncle Sam's
its funnels clouds


this remarkable engineering feat which has divided
two great continents.


room.







THE


CARIBBEAN.








THE CARIBBEAN.


WEE-WEE-GENTLEMAN.


@C


Mildred


Gill, '24.


He was only a little


"mite of the


night,


" with


sheltered roof garden to


see if everyone was safe


large brown eyes


that could see in the dark, and


thick brown fur, with a yellow breast, but he had


all the qualities essential to a gentleman.


Though


he was little larger than the marmosets, his nature


Though he had absolutely no way of defending
himself, there was never a more courageous little
thing than my Wee-Wee, as the following short
narrative will prove:


was as different from theirs


as can be


imagined.


The young son of the family


had been given


From


"Wee-Wee


baby,


time


was


weighing


a tiny
exactly


four ounces, he showed cer-
tain inborn traits.


never,


when he was


one time


whe


was caught
satchel, he


never cried
injured, and
n his finger
in a steel
nlyv jumped


up and down and made
faces, but not a sound did


he make
of his


but when


family


went


Colombia for two weeks, he
had no heart for play, and
cried himself sick.


He
little


one in his
thought we
to him-let


sick,
steal


a sympathetic


any-


family-he


belonged


anyone


and Wee-Wee


tidbits


kitchen


from


would
the


a toy snake and, like most


little boys,


left it


on the


floor when he had finished


playing


Wee-


Wee's sharp eyes discover-


ed it there,


and he com-


menced to bark like a dog,


a sure sign


thing


was wrong.


some-
(We


found later that he had an


instinctive


though
jungle


fear of snakes,
had left the


before


was a


month old, and had never


seen


a snake


had been v
did he runi
Wee-Wee!


round


since


1 away? Not
He circled


that snake,


crossing its


head,


took it away.


wards,
Wee-Wee


never


until we


Ever after-


to stay


wanted
away,


we displayed the snake.


Mostly Sophomores.


carry


through the house until he reached the


room of the


chance invalid, when he would drop them on the


bed and


>ounce up and down like a rubber ball,


with sheer pride.
If it rained-and


Little Wee-Wee died a few months ago, after
living for two years, during which he was as happy
a little animal as could be found, but his family


have lost


he hated


water-he would


rush all over the house, and even across the un-


a loving little friend and playfellow.


He has done his duty here, however, for he has
opened to them the whole world of dumb animals.


I_









THE CARIBBEAN.


WASHINGTON


ONNET
13 Y
SENIOR


SWIMMING


POOL..


Frank Ra vnmond.


MOTHER.

Kirbt FIergnHso.


e sweetes


Each day
This pool,
By repress
Who come
F'or weeks
There wee


t word of all the English tongue


tis filled
in which
:ntatives
in ships
enchant
flik, lid


with water from the bavy
is sought sweet joy divine
from every clime
from every port, and stay
ed by its tropic sway.
folk, young folk in their pi


,d always given to one who's loved and cared
ft only for the child no longer young
ad gay, but also for the one whose share
life is highly praised and widely sung-
is word of mother's said in such an air
fills one's heart with joy as sweet shrub 'mong
epe myrtle fills the place with fragrance rare.
e's loved us best, she's sacrificed the most;
nd, though to others we may seem to fail,
e always has a word in which to boast


Sh
Ar
Sh


The child who through the cour
But after all, for thanks she'd l1


ave us cnme


and sayx


life must sail.
his best-


"I've done my best.



LORENZO.


Carl Duev.


The ruined San I.orenzo stands on guard
High on a cliff by famous Chigre,.' mouth
Her ramparts all by time and powde: mai red.
Her rusted cannon and their b,.Ils to rout
Are put by verdant jungle, never b ured
Since Morgan's men last charged with battic shout,
And took the Spanish soldiers fighting hard
To keep the plund'ring English pirates out.


A Ruin.

This ransacked fort now slunb'lring peacefully
Beneath the tropic sky, awakes in me
A ,mri n it-v, f r t-hP fri rL- i-h it r( t liy *.hnv"t/i


Swimming


Pool Slide.


I)o bask a
Forgetful
The tourism
To vi'it it
And e'en <
Respond,
in its pro


-ill evening time
1 ray.
he Zone, are sure
y short,
its lure
any sport.
find


Good health, good sport, and peacefulness ol mind.



TROPIC TWILIGHT.

EAIeanUr Zm.'neirmann.


even n


And children


z when the


p


)laying


Will e in peaceful sil
And little twittering
The sky which late in
Now dons such gorge
To the paint box of a
Methinks a master ar
Soon the two sunsets
The latter now more


sun sin


ks in th


e west,


happy all day long
amber land ere long,
birds will go to rest.
sober colors dressed
ouis hues as must belong


1 l i t


t, huge an
at his bes
e sky and
tiful and
* tr f\t f1il-ln-


id strong-
t.
sea,
bright,


29









THE CARIBBEAN.


MY HOME TOWN.


Charges


Center, Jr.


As I do sit and think of days


gone by,


Of places I have seen in long past time,
I always dream of that old town of mine
Where all mv boyhood recollections lie.
As these old memories come before the eye
They slowly form a picture crystalline
In clearness-fit for memory's inmost shrine-
A picture which brings forth both smile and
sigh.


There stands the town. It looks
lake-
The lake where many happy days I


across


spent;


The locks through which great ships their way
still take,
The spillway, dear to those on fishing bent-
These pleasant scenes to all make their appeal;


Then how much


Gatan Students.


THE


more must I their beauty


ETERNAL STARS.


Mildred


Stafford.


The twilight


seems


to come to me unknown,


l1K' -a x-*^x-li


Hotel Washington, Swept


": ^ */ "' .* A,
..** * .' SQ ../
* -/ .** *. -.^ *
.- ^ .< ^ "V
p << <


Ocean Breezes.


THE WAVES.


licee Hunter.


I sit upon the old wall by the sea
And count the tiny wavelets near the shore;


Then farth


er out the larger waves I see;


Continuously toward me their wealth they pour.
They seem like captives longing to be free,
And beat and tear the rocks with sullen roar;
I wonder, as they all roll in toward me,
Where they will go and where they've been before.
At evening still you'll find me sitting there;
The winds have died and distant waves grown calm,
A luring call they seem to bear to me
From far-off lands; they sing to me a psalm
Of dreams; I feel a longing and desire
To travel with the waves until I tire.


And tiny


stars begi


n to come to view;


They shine like diamonds againstt the sky


so blue;


And then the wan, white, moon of tropic zone
Comes creeping out from clouds by soft winds blown
Across a sky that's now of darker hue,
And filled with stars which were at first so few,


Whose radiance lights the earth n


ow quiet grown.


The brighest shines out Venus-evening star,
Which casts a shadow with its yellow light;
Huge Betelgeuse it doth outshine by far,
And even the Southern Cross, that symbol bright.


But all this beauty comes not first to me
The men who shaped the Sphinx the same did


see.


Christ Church, Colon.








THE CARIBBEAN.


A HERO UNAWARES.


Paul DI)ov/,


Dan Johnston,


observer in


Aviation Corps, France Field,.
balcony of the Strangers' Clu
Limon Bay. A beautiful sce:
Through the entrance of the b
ly ship of the Great White Flee
the bay. A San Bias cayuco,it
etted against the jungle-covere
site bank,scarcelyseemed to mo
As Dan contemplated this
fond it hard to realize that bey
quil ocean there were the scream
thunder of cannon.
He was aroused from his reve
slap on the back and, on turn:
a man he had met the preced
plane factory in College Point,
"What luck to find you here
"Well, Bill Price," greeted D
grasping his hand, "I'm surely
but what in the world are you
The question was ignored, f
on the drawn face of his friend.
"I heard you had an accid
about it, will you?" he asked.
"It's all like a nightmare t
the young observer. "Several
assigned to our respective planes
theAtlanticFleetlastmonth. I
"A soloist," broke in Dan
singing got to do with aviation
"Ha-ha!" laughed Dan,
stand; 'Solo' is derived fror
means 'alone'--in other words
accompanied. I arrived at the
planes on the appointed morn
over the prospect of meeting
planes were out on the run
snappy commands and direct
above the humofthe motors tha


" i


umped into mv


plane;


C.Z
b look
ne lay
reakw
t glide
:swhit
d hills


ve-so ca
peaceful
'ond this s


. S. Army
sat on the


out
fire
ra s
lowl*
ilssi
the
im it
seen
scen
ame


over
him.
tate-
Sinto
lhou-
)ppo-
was.
e, he
tran-


tin of shell and the

rie by a resounding
ing, saw Bill Price,
ing year at an air-
, New York.
, old chap!"
an, enthusiastically
y glad to see you;


doing here?
or Bill's eC

ent, Dan;

:o me now,
of us fello
to welcome
n'masoloist
's friend,
i"


You
n th


s, I
Shan
-ning,
thef
way
ons c
atwe
it wa


"1
'es were

tell me

sighed
ws were
apartof
and--"
'What's


don't under-
e Spanish; it
had to fly un-
gar of the sea-
highly elated
fleet. Already
'gassing up';
wouldd be heard
rewarmingup.
.s out into the


deep blue waters, leaving in its wake showers of


white s
it refus
gun,' bu
"I pa
seeing s
turned
passeng
The pla
of my p
ing a f
shipmate
zoom;
hitting
him. I
coming
I could
"The
upward
then fel


pray.
ed to
it to m
ssed cl
.tation.
to waY
er in t
ne was
asseng'
lying
:e was
I nose
the lea


bat, making
hundred feet.
vertically upw1
the widespread
the plane turn
but fell to the
"When I ca
badly shaken
story was told
witnessed the
"My passed
spector of plan
at College Poi
Bill's face, fa
"Old Boy; y
turn in ridding
to follow this
Department n
work that our
detailed anoth
tions. He in


I nosed it up several
take off.' I was going
v relief it finally left the
ose to the Hotel Washii
. Imagine my surprise
ve to the sightseers the
he rear cockpit. I was
hard to handle, due to
er and sand, but I fell in
boat, wondering who
* The boat started c
d my seaplane down al
der, for I was entirely
nore speed than his bo
. Now I was but a few
-n. I was too low. We
boat, after being hit on
ist speed until it reached
silv on its back like an
a splash that rose int
The seaplane took a
ard, but its heavy nose sl
d wings around the p
ied with all the grace o
water in a crumpled hea
me to, I was in the Coli
upI. but uninsured. The


L

di

e

11
ar
o
g
S
0
r
ie


SU
to me bv mv
disaster from th
ger was killed
s who was so
it factory. Y
- from showing
u've done vo
it of this fellow
ame man; I'rr
w. He conder
suspicions we
r inspector toc
turn became


mechanic
e water's


He w


0
:r
U
u

I

n

r
s


critical
u reme
egret,
r count
. I w:
in the
ned so I
e arou;
examine
usicio1


times^
to 'c
water
ngton
when
re, I
speec
overb<
line ft
my st
town
so to
too cli
at an


s, but
it the

sight-
, as I
saw a
lesss.
balance
ollow-
range
for a
avoid
ose to
d was


feet away


hit.
its tail,
i its hei
ugly g
) the a
great sv
owly pu
voted
>f a seal
Lp.
m Hosp
rest of
c, who
edge.


shot
ght,
iant
ir a
veep
killed
tail;
gull,


ital,
Sthe
had


vas that in-
of our work
mber him."
was radiant.
try a good
as sent here
Intelligence
much of our
sed and we
[e his rejec-
us and dis-


-

NC


4,








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE


EYES


Esther


OF A LADY.

HWitt, '25


His college days were over.


Dan Howard was


just beginning to realize the full significance of
this. It not only meant that he must go out into
the world and fend for himself, but that he would


be parted from Jean Davis.


)During the last few


weeks thev had been thrown together a great deal
in the rehearsals of the Senior play, Shakespeare's
"As You Like It." She had been Rosalind and
he, Orlando, and it was during those weeks of


constant companionship
mean so much to him.


that she had


come


"Just because a fellow hasn't as much money


the gayest
knew that


when


of the gay, and not e
her gaiety was feign


a letter came from


ven her best friend
ed. So it was that


an aunt in


Panama,


inviting Jean to spend several months with her,
she gladly accepted, thinking that perhaps new
scenes and experiences would help her to forget
D)an.
Jean was wandering along the beach at Fort
San Lorenzo, a crumbling mass of vine-covered
ruins at the mouth of the Chagres River, Panama.
She had come with a party of young people to
spend the day there, and the peaceful beauty of the


as the next one, it doesn't


mean


that he isn't


place had strangely calmed her.


She had picked


worth as much,


" he reflected bitterly.


her war around the base of a cliff that she might


money, money, and money, and
no amount of strength or courage


seems


to count.


haven't asked


can I


offer hex
chance;
and he


strength.
"I 'll


when I


Of course I


her vet, but how
have nothing to


Oh, if I only had a


but I'll use what I have,
thankful for health and


work, and


when


feathered my nest I'll--"
The rest was left unsaid, but as
a result of this determination Dan


found
board


himself a
a southboui


week later on
nd steamer,


going-not even his best
knew where.


watch


sunset


alone,


seated upon a rock, shegave her-
self up to the enjoyment of the
scene before her.


All was still.


Even Nature


seemed to be holding her breath,
awed bythe wonderofitall. The
quiet sea reflected the soft rosy


tints of the sky, and


the sun, a


fiery, blood-red ball, sank slowly
out of sight below the horizon,


leaving only
silhouetted


"the flowerpot,"
against the west.


Jean sprang to her feet with a


start.


Nature's Flowerpot.


friend


dismay


In watching the sunsetshe


had forgotten time, and to


when


she reached


the cliff, she


found


All through the summer after graduation Jean


watched


but none came. N
had become of him;


some


message


Dan--


o one seemed to know what


it was as if the earth


that the
past. Bu
when she


tide had risen and


it Jean
found


she could not get


was a practical sort of girl, and
that she could not return the


way she had come, she decided to find another.


opened


and swallowed


At first


After a few minutes


search she discovered a


would not acknowledge even to herself that she
cared for I)an, but as time wore on and no news
came, she awoke to the realization that she did


ears on, care wry m .


f rt n


to realize


trail leading into the jungle, and she started down


it, supposing,


of course, that it led


around


After walking quite a long time she began


ht at instead


nearrnc


e ht be ach


it) I t~CL1n l l /fU. LAL 1110 aLLfttc. iJJ &ai^,t t


r?


ft^-m .- t


-t~~~ __ ..... __ l .-.


I ," iwq I







THE CARIBBEAN.


she could not find the beach.


At last she was


He took aim and shot just in time.


forced to acknowledge that she was lost, in a dense
tropical jungle, alone, and with night descending


age beast turned and leaped blindly at him, but
Dan sprang back in the nick of time, and the


upon her.


This was too much for her to stand,


jaguar fell heavily on the ground.


But he was


and, unable to restrain herself any longer, she


up in a moment, ready to spring again.


This time


threw


herself


on the ground and sobbed


Dan could not dodge, but dealt the jaguar a blow


sheer exhaustion.


his hunting knife.


The knife sank


deep,


The twilight deepened.


neighboring tree.


An owl hooted from a


Jean shivered, and crawled into


but the jaguar, maddened by the pain, lunged
forward again, and this time his teeth closed on


the dense underbrush beside the trail, where she


Dan's left arm.


He felt the bone crunch between


crouched, her ears straining


sound


approaching danger, and her eyes big with fright


and wet with unrestrained


tears.


rustle in the underbrush beside her;


A suspicious
an unearthly


the jaguar's powerful jaws and, sick with pain,
he swayed as if he would fall, but a look at the
girl for whose life he was fighting sustained him,
and he stabbed the jaguar again and again with


shriek from far in


awful stillness;


the jungle,


followed


the patter of padded feet as some


his free hand.
the jaguar's


At last, weak from loss of blood,


on his


arm relaxed


and he


night prowler slunk


her hiding place;


was all too much for Jean's overwrought nerves;


rolled over with an awful groan and lay motionless.
Dan staggered to his feet, and turned to the


she sprang up and dashed


wildly


out into the


place where


Jean had been lying, but she had


darkness,


Crash!


whither


She tripped


she did


over


not know


or care.


a fallen log and


regained consciousness and was at his side in a


moment.


After a few startled exclamations they


motionless on the ground beside it.


explained to each other how they happened to be


there.


While they were talking, Jean's eyes fell


Dan Howard, foreman of a large lumber camp
in the Panamanian jungle, strode down the trail
toward the camp after a day's hard work prospect-


ing for valuable trees.


It was already dark, he


was both tired and hungry, and he looked forward
to a good supper and a long night's rest.


Suddenly


attention


was arrested


shadowy formslinking down the trail ahead of him.
Taking his gun from his shoulder, he placed in it


the only cartridge he had left.


The shadow was


on Dan's arm.
"Oh, Dan!"


she cried,


your arm!"


Quickly she tore a strip from her petticoat and
set about binding up the wound.
"Dan, do you remember that we did this same


thing in our play


last year?


it a queer


coincidence that it has become a reality?


it grieves me,
sling.


" 'It is my


Orlando,


arm,


to see thy heart


How
in a


'" Dan returned.


lost to view around a bend of the trail;


followed.


the man


What he saw made him start violently,


"'I thought thy heart had been wounded by
the claws of a lion.' "


for before him crouched a huge jaguar just ready


And Dan answered softly,


" 'Wounded it is-


to spring upon his unconscious


prey, a


young


but with the eyes ofa lady.


' Dovou know whose?"


girl, whom Dan recognized in the dim light of the
rising moon as Jean Davis.


And the moon came out from behind the clouds
and bestowed upon them her benediction.


MR 77375---3


sav-







34 THE CARIBBEAN.


"WHEN


WE REACH


GENOA."


A TRUE STORY.


Emilio Solomon,


"Emilio!


Here, boy;


as we are nearing port,


Although


apprehensive of


danger,


became


we must ascertain the contents of the ice box.
Go down and check carefully all the provisions,
so that when we reach Genoa, we may know what


supplies we should take in.


Be snappy, my boy!"


for the moment indifferent to consequences and


boldly said,


"No, I shall not be a party to any


villainy; do your worst."
A revolver flashed in the dim light, and the


These words were addressed to me by the chief
steward of the good ship Navahoe, three days out
from Genoa.
Off I went to execute the order, turning over in
my mind the strange events of this voyage. I
was a boy of 18, very impressionable, longing as


all boys do for strange adventures.


How gladly


first voice snarled,


"No fooling!


mean busi-


ness.
I realized that it would do no good to resist.


My voice sounded weak and far off,
what do you want me to do?"


"That's a sensible boy,
the arm he had so lately g


"All right,


" he said, now patting
ripped. Your part will


had I seized this opportunity as cabin boy on board
the steamship Navahoe, a merchant marine bound


for Genoa.


My heart, elated over the prospect


of this great adventure, had sunk, however, after


I had seen my fellow shipmates.


A veritable band


of pirates they seemed, with their sinister, seamed


be an easy one, but you will get your share of the


spoils as a reward when we reach Genoa.


We are


robbing the cargo; you are to hold the torch while
we operate. We'll lie low now for a day or so, but
will leave a note in your cabin telling you when
we want you-you understand, boy?"


faces.


The refuse of society they were-dregs


I muttered


"Yes,


" and they left me, to take


from the four corners of the world.


consciously incurred


the displeasure


I had un-
of several


members of this crew since we had shipped, and
this had caused me muchdiscomforton the voyage.
As I entered the ice box, I saw that the lights


were turned off.


turning to


ascertain


cause, I imagined I heard low voices, but attribut-
ing it to my nervousness, I began to whistle a gay
tune to keep up my courage. The tune died on my
lips, however, as a rough hand closed over my arm
and a rough voice startled me with these words:
"Now, we have got you; you are the very one
we are looking for."
I felt a queer sensation come over me which I
can hardly describe, and, before I could utter a


sound, a flashlight flared in my eyes.
this that my assailant was masked.


stammer,


I saw by
I could only


"What is it?"


The harsh voice answered,


Young man, you


my inventory, like some dazed creature.
A day or so later I found the dreaded note in


my cabin.


Fearfully I unfolded it and the follow-


ing words blurred before my eyes:
"Emilio, recuerdese de nuestros arreglos, esta


noche entire las horas una o dos le


esperando a


' la entrada de la bodega.


bondad de cumplir con este adviso."
I was in a miserable state of mind.


estaremos
Tenga la

All day at


work I evolved means of escape, only to come back


to the threat on the slip of paper.
thought flashed in my mind; I w


captain,


Finally this
would go to the


who had befriended me on more than


one occasion, and make a clean breast of the
whole affair.
I rushed to the captain's office, fearing I would
change my mind if I stopped to reflect. As I
reached the door, my heart failed me, but Provi-
dence must have been with me, for at that mo-


are in our hands.


find it to your Interest.


Be sensible; join us and you will


If you don't join us-well


ment the captain


nearly


overcame


appeared.
se: I made


nervousness


an attempt


" A orrrintr ln2iah finished the sentence.


urn ac u e


rantamn, on nerceivinn mv


*t b k ^//


h~ it thU









THE CARIBBEAN. 35


"Oh, yes! Captain,


" I answered,


something of


There stood the captain and before him the crew.


a very strange nature.
"Come into my cabin," he said.
I followed him in and took the chair to which he
motioned me. Then I began to relate my experi-
ence with the masked man. I told him that,
although I had promised to be one of this band,
my conscience would not allow me to depart from
the good teachings I had had from my mother and
teachers. I had come to the conclusion that the
best course I could pursue was to inform him of
this attempted piracy. The captain became
interested in the story as I went on, listening with
the greatest attention and anxiety. In a grave
voice, he said, "Emilio, do you mean to say, I
have such rascally cutthroats on board my ship?
I can't believe it; I can't believe it." After
sitting, lost in thought for a few moments,he con-
tinued,"Do you think vou can identify your man?"
"It will be difficult, Captain, for he was
masked, as were the others whom I saw, but I
may venture a guess, as I observed his build and
his hands." That hand had held a revolver to my
face; never would that memory be erased.
"You have nothing to fear. I shall protect you.
We'll soon have these fellows. When I need you,
I shall let you know. Go quietly about your
business in the meantime."
I went back to work with the terrible load lifted
from my conscience, secure in my faith in the
captain. An hour later, as I was leaving the ice
box, whither I had gone on an errand for the chief
steward, I stumbled against the man whom I
believed to be the masked man.
"Look at me," he said. "Do you know me?"
"Yes," I answered.
"Did you get the message?" he whispered.
I nodded my head.
"You are with us?"
Again I nodded.
"Good," he said. "to-morrow at 2.


"'1Tb


1 r


roint out your man and any one or t
whom you may recognize as one of thi
hand," he said, turning to me.
My knees trembled; I longed to flee bac
refuge of my cabin, away from the smi
hate in the eves of the men before me. I
speak, but the words refused to come.
sured, however, by the captain's hand u
shoulder, I pointed out my friend of the r
With a low snarl of rage, he made as if to 1I
me, but was restrained by the first mate
steward, who led him away. As he passed
gave me a terrible look which I shall never
for it burned itself upon my soul.
"Emilio," continued the captain, "
point out another?"
On my telling him that I could not,
**-
missed me, saying that this fellow would
Immediately after supper I was summ
the bridge and was indeed amazed to see t


her of
captain.


desperate


wretches


"These men," he sai'
their own confession."


I said nothing, but
before the malice in th
"Now, Emilio," c
commend you for no
promises of reward 1
villains. I commend )
pies of honor and intei
while. You need fear
wretches. They will
when we reach Genoa.
He dismissed me anm
For hours I tossed on
events of the past fev


into a drea
morrow to
in the bri


I
less sleep,
see through
ght morning


cowering


he crew
s rascal


k to the


lering
led to
Reas-
min my
olver.
ige at
id the


i me,


r forget,


:an you


he dis-
do.
[oned to
he nunm-


before


"stand condemned by


instinctively shrank back


eir evil
continue
t being
Ield ou
mou for I
grity.
nothing
received


d
4


eves.
d the captain, "I
susceptible to the
t to you bv these
following the princi-
That alone is worth
g further from these
their just reward


I went to myv
mv bunk, liv
days, but a
from which I
my tiny wind
g sunshine,


cabin to rest.
ing again the
it last I sank
awoke on the
ow, glittering
the spires of


After dinner I


was summoned to the


deck.


Genoa.


-r a e.. -


44 < ,%

auiflS5'1jwi


I


i







THE CARIBBEAN.


AN UNUSUAL CHRISTMAS.


GATUN, C. Z.,
January 20, 1921.

DEAR HARRY:
I have just come in from a ten-day camp and I


want to tell you about it
ambition to write a letter.


Our whole


family


before I lose all mv


and another


Miguel went out to rough it in
Christmas vacation.


Pedro


Chorrera during


decided that our good judgment had failed us when
we met a native who showed us another trail that
led almost directly back the way we had come.
Along with the right trail we acquired, in Chorrera
Spanish (which I soon found to be quite different
from that which I learned in Cristobal HighSchool),
a lot of advice, etc., on how to get there.
Of course there was a fork in this trail too, and
again we took the wrong one but it ended up in an


orange grove, so we didn't mind.


While we were


Mrs. Lackjer, an American lady who lives in
Chorrera, treated us very kindly during our stay


there.


She knew all of the surrounding country


well and saw to it that we visited the


places of interest.
While we were out


tne grown-ups
of the cooking


day they
horseback
or seven r
I was left
ing and m


did
but
weni


to a plac


niles
to do
ind t


away


there
most
one
t on
e six
and


principal


the cook-


camp.


was busier


one-eyed


a three-


in the grove, we saw and killed several big black


tarantulas.


Also the place was full of ticks and,


incidentally, it was not long before we were, too.
As I had always thought that the big spiders lived
entirely upon the ground you can imagine my sur-


when


orange


at o


whanged
ne to


him run up an orange tree.


I shot


down


with


a small rifle.


We
fork


went
where


we took


other trail and it


long


before


at the falls.


was not


we arrived


rested


ring circus.


watching


What with


that none


Chorrera Falls.


of the


grub burned, taking care of the kids, and seeing


sending you one.


there awhile and also took
some pictures of which I am
I nearly broke my neck get-


that none of the little natives that were


hanging


ting it.


I had to


cross a


wide stretch of water


around


the camp let their fingers stray, I surely


which, though fairly shallow, was might


swift.


had my hands full.


I was lucky though,


because


I had to carry the camera in my teeth and use


the lima beans didn't burn, the young ones didn't
do anything worse than heave potatoes at one
another, and nothing was lost, strayed, or stolen.
A day or two before Christmas about six of us
took a trip to el chorro or in plain English "the
falls." Mrs. Lackjer could not go with us that day
but she gave us the directions and said that it was
only about two miles away.
We set out confidently for el chorro. Pretty
soon we came to a fork in the trail and, as we had


mv hands and feet.


Even so, I thought several


times that I was gone.
When I returned we went back to camp, for it
was getting near chow time.
We all came back from the trip safe and sound
and fully convinced that we had spent as merry
a Christmas as we could possibly have had.
I hope you had as good a time as I had this
Christmas and are in good health.


I







THE CARIBBEAN.


SA MODERN HAMLET.
(AS THE SUBJECT APPEALED TO TWO SEIOl

N--


-- -- ,.__--
I I


Alice Hunter,


Thomas Baldwin, son of old Senator Baldwin,


had been accused of embezzlement


; but, owing


to his father's influence, he was let out on bail.


where's


do you suppose has


What


become


as she glanced around at th


of him?"
e end of th


the world
cried Marie,


e act.


was very


popular


and had


many


faithful


friends, chief among them his old college chum,
Rod Evans.
It was on the opening night of the new play


"Cornered,"


starring Madge Kennedy, that Rod


secured a box and telephoned his friends t


the play with him.


o see


He had no idea as to the plot of


the play; he was merely out for a pleasant evening.
The dinner had been good, the wine better than


"Why, isn't Tommie here


play ?"


Doesn't he like the


cried another.


"Oh, keep
vou out. He


still,"


cried Evans,


'11 be back shortly,


"before they put
he probably went


out to have a smoke.


The show ended, but Tom had been forgotten


long before.


He met them at the door.


"Folks, that play was too much for me, and I


usual, so the


"bunch"


was in a happy state when


just couldn't hold up any longer.


Do you remenm-


they reached the theater. Soon afterseating them-
selves and chatting with friends in a neighboring
box, they quieted down to see the curtain rise


on the first act.


Tom enjoyed the first act-at


ber how,


Hamlet,


Hamlet


discovered


uncle s guilt by writing a play to suit the situation
and how he said, 'The play's the thing in which


we'll catch the conscience of the king.


' WXell, that


least the glimpses of it that he was able to catch
through Marie's carved shell comb.
The action grew more tense and the situation


more thrilling during the second act.


The girl was


coming nearer and nearer to an exposure of her
theft.


showed them what the old king really was and this


little drama has done the same thing to me.


look at me like that, Rod, I


bring me
deny any


here to catch my


know


Don't


you didn't


conscience but I can't


longer that I'm a thief."


Carl Due', 21.


"Hm, that gas is pretty low.
for a good landing.


I'll have to look


thoughts aloud.


pop-and


roaring


a sudden-pop,


motor


became


pop,
quiet.


"I wonder where we are, anyhow?
"Say old buss, it looks bad for us."
Thus Lieutenant Whosis, as he buzzed through


and no landing


enough


in sight!


his thoughts were not so much


danger as on the play


"Hamlet,


Strangely


on his


" which he had


space,


was talking


to himself


and his airplane.


beenreadingthenight before.


Down, down, down,


He had been sent out from France Field on an
observation flight and had encountered a severe
storm which had carried him far out of his course


and had injured his compass.


He had turned on


in huge spirals went the plane,


the wind


whistling shrilly through the guy wires.-Crash.
Lieutenant Whosis awoke to find himself lying
in the middle of a jungle trail, and his machine a


the emergency gas tank some time before. The
gauge showed that it was nearly empty, and he
did not know where he was.


short distance


to one side, a total


wreck,


sur-


rounded by an excited group of Indians. These he
readily recognized as San Blas Indians by their






THE CARIBBEAN.


found out where he was and what they intended
to do with him.
A little Indian with a very large head and a


small hat,


who seemed


to have the most


authority, was talking, and among his words the
lieutenant made out "El debe quedar en nuestro
pais. No estara bien permitirle partir."
These remarks and a few more like them set the


lieutenant
"Hamlet"


to thinking.


Once


again


the play


came to his mind, and, knowing that


most Indians think a crazy person touched by the
hand of God, he decided to imitate the hero of the
play and act crazy.
After a while the little brown men turned their


"From where do you come?"


one finally asked


With a blank look and a silly chuckle the reply
came, "I come from the place where I was before
I came he-e."
"What is your business?"


This time it was with


speaks
replied,


the empty


mind"


"I sweep the clouds.


"the loud laugh that
that the lieutenant


The Indians asked many more questions but
received such foolish answers that they finally
gave up.
The lieutenant was allowed to come and go as
he pleased, but was always watched. The Indians


attention


the plane and, seeing that


plied him


with questions the first


two or three


lieutenant was awake and unhurt, told him to get
up and go with them.
After a half day's march they arrived at a small
village where the captive, for such the lieutenant


was led before a council


which, after due


deliberation, informed him that because he had
landed so far in the interior of their land they
were going to keep him there. This did not sur-
prise Lieutenant Whosis as he had surmised as


much


the talk he had heard


while


Indians were gathered around the airplane.

MUMBLINGS 01
Gladys Lowa

Alas, alas, still I lie in this hideous old museum


weeks but he answered and acted so queerly that
he was soon considered as crazy and no more


attention was paid to him.


Indeed he was thought


so harmless that he was no longer guarded.
Then one day he disappeared. The Indians
hunted high and low for him, but could not find
him so they finally came to the conclusion that he
had lost himself and had starved to death.
One month later Lieutenant Whosis came out
on the coast where, after a half day of watching,
he caught a small schooner bound for Colon.

F A MUMMY.
nde, '24.


river?


I remember how each year, with the com-


where these mercenary


me.


Americans have brought


My only companions in this secluded corner


ing of the rains, it would, of its own accord, come
up and water my lands, causing them to yield


are a corroded old bathtub unearthed in the ruins


abundantly.


All day I would sit under the olive


of Pompeii, and


mastodon


brought


a large ghastly


skeleton


the European


n of a
plains.


The only relic of my past grandeur is the hand-
carved case in which I was placed by my subjects


four thousand long years ago,


prior to my


trees in my gardens of rarest flowers and gloat
over my fields. I still see the faithful slaves
sowing the seed, the swine treading it down and,
at the end of the grain season, my great store-
houses filled to the eaves with the golden sheen


tombment in the lofty pyramid, the building of
which I directed-for we great Egyptians builded
our own mausoleums before our death.
Oh, but was not that a massive piece of hand-
wrought work, eight hundred feet long and eight


hundred feet wide?


Yes, every stone was at least


thirty feet wide and was dragged from the far-
away quarries in the Arabian mountains, by my
captives.
How fitting it was to lie in state in that tomb


of wheat.


What
doors ?
as they


do I hear? Is the caretaker opening the
Oh, I hear the creaking bolts and hinges
rasp slowly back to admit the daily


throng of curious people who come to gape at me.
"Why, Mrs. Smith, look, a Chinese mummy!
Isn't it marvelous to think of a body's being pre-
served for such a long time!"


the idea, a


Chinese mummy!


She has


degraded me, a noble of the wonderful Pyramid


A


^






THE CARIBBEAN.


teacher with her class of giggling pupils.


Oh, woe


unto me, woe un--


Kemp,


why did the Egyptians make


statues of their people?"
"He isn't a statue, Alice.


"Look here, old chap, at this bally mummy.
Rather touching, eh?"
An Englishman-their accent is not to be for-


gotten, and to think they even rule my


Indeed no, for once he


Egypt to-day!


beloved


Evil times have come upon our


lived, walked, talked, ate, drank, and slept just


as we do now.


When he died, his people preserved


great race.
"Robert,


an old yellow


shriveled-up


mummy.


but it's ghastly


looking!


"Is he as dead as a doornail?"


hurry on, I don't like it.


"Why, most certainly he is, child."
"And was he always as thin as that, and did he
always have that awful big nose?"


Like me, indeed!


should like


to rsee


An old shriveled-up mummy!


her complexion


thousand years:


"Oh, he gives me the creeps,
dainty little girl.


"-thi


s from one


The crowd is thinning out-only a few stragglers


are left.


are gone.


The caretaker


"Come, come, children, there are many other
interesting things I want you to see."


limps from window to window, making them all


fast for the night.


At last the door clangs.


Thank heaven, they're


tered and giggled
touch me.


gone.


How they chat-


and one even wanted to


I am alone.


a shaft of moon


see again


The shadows deepen; it is night;
light falls across my casket and I


n the moonlight on my beloved river.


"I" AND "MYSELF."


h


Carl Duey,


I have recently


discovered that there are two


me-"'I" and "Myself," but the discovery is not
entirely my own as it was more or less forced upon
me by an assignment in English literature.
Upon investigating my discovery I have found
i *-


that my two selves differ very greatly.


"I"


he gives
myself."


savs


us the point,


"Uh, huh,


serves 11
cheatin


"I"' looks


over


sorrowfully


and we miss,


' shows." And


result is, either way, no more peace of mind during
that game.


We both want to make friends.


always wanting to lend a helping hand but


self"


says,


"God


helps


who help


them-


1 says,
"Myself"


"Let s make friends with that


says,


"Aw, he won't benefit us any.


selves!-Let's go.


"But maybe we'll benefit him.


"Myself"
proaches "m


generally wins out and then


itself" the rest of


the day, making


both of us feel pretty cheap.
We both like sports, and tennis strikes


being an especially good game. We s
and our opponent puts over a fast,
that we miss altogether.


1 says,
"Myself"
" 'ts i n.
',ts in.


>
ts
says,
'


" 'ts out."


us as


tart to play


serve


We argue about it.


martyr.


If "myself"


If IT


we feel like


wins we feel mean.


It is true, though,that after we have approached
a fellow and made him our friend we both enioy


him thoroughly.


Our main argument
getting out of bed.


I says,
"Myself"


" 'ts out.
And so on.


is every


morning about


"Let's get up and start something."
says, "Be sensible. Turn over and


o to sleep."
There is always a long argument and while we


Finally we both say


"I don't know what that


are still at it,


"Mamma


says,


"Carl, if you don't


"Miss







THE CARIBBEAN.


EVERYLAD.-AN ALLEGORY.


Emma Townsend,


Father Experience stood at the gate, talking to
his son, Everylad.


Harold F.


reached


Coke, '22.


the end of that path, that he realized


how pale and neglected Hard Study and Con-


"You


are about to enter


upon


the path


science looked.


As they stood together on


Knowledge, my son.


It leads in a square about


bank of the final river a dark man, Cheat, offered


the great field of Wisdom and so, after going


Everylad a small


boat to ride in.


Conscience


around


this field, you will return


to your own


home. Always be prepared, and keep Conscience,
your chief friend, happy, cheerful, and spotless.
Good luck to you, my boy. Bring back as many
golden apples as you can."
Everylad started on his way, with the least bit
of fear in his heart. As he approached the en-
trance to the path he heard a loud noise and, on
passing through the gate, he saw the ferocious


urged him not to accept it, but he brushed his
weakened friend aside and jumped into the boat,


pushing it far into the river.


As the craft ap-


preached the middle, it capsized and left Every-


lad in the water to drown.


He fought his way


across and climbed up the opposite bank with sev-
eral goose eggs mixed with his golden apples.
Helped by Hard Study and Conscience he made
up, on the Junior side of the square, what he had


dragon, Hazing, rushing toward him.


cessfully


defeated


He suc-


the monster by receiving his


attacks in meekness and silence.
He soon found himself neck deep in the marsh


of Mathematics.


Only by the earnest efforts of a


lost before.


Everylad met Cheat several times


later, but each time expressed his scorn and drove
him away in anger.
We now see Everylad starting on the last por-
tion of his journey with twelve golden apples in


new acquaintance, Hard Study,


was he able to


his bag.


After going through the valley of Trig-


reach the smooth green fields of English.


Mean-


while, another stranger had appeared, a queer,


onometry, he started climbing the Final hill of
Languages, but fell down the bank of Careless-


foreign-looking man called Language.


Everylad


ness,


which ran along the side of the hill.


found this fellow most puzzling and really not much
help in solving the problems of this first side of the


managed to climb out safely, however.


He kept


thinking now, of the largest and most treacherous


His traveling was growing harder all the


time for he was in the rocky mountains of Geology.
All this time his friend Conscience, was happy and
cheerful, and was fully satisfied with the progress
made.
On trying to jump the first ditch of Semester
Tests, Everylad fell hard and crawled out crest-
fallen, resolving to jump safely across next time.


He successfully


traversed


the remaining


ditches by the help of Hard Study and Conscience.
Everylad was now becoming troubled, for there
loomed ahead, the deep and swift river of Exam-


river
crossed


of Examinations


I.


which


was yet


to be


All this time his friend, Conscience, was


happy and cheery, yet had a few dark spots on
his white mantle to remind Everylad of his former
neglect.
At last the great body of water appeared. As
he stood on the edge, contemplating his plunge
he saw on the other side of the river his old home
with his father standing patiently at the gate. His
friend, Conscience, cheered him greatly, and with


one final


river


breath, Everylad leaped far into the


of final


Examinations.


Currents caught


nations.


Finally he stood pausing on the brink


him and sucked him down but he finally crawled


with his friends, Conscience and Hard Study, who


were encouraging him.


He plunged bravely into


the river, to emerge on the other side with four
1 ---.t . -I... 1L.-. K 1 :.kIA.1 '... 1'-. L .-- J


up on


the opposite


bank,


breathless,


but with


sixteen golden apples held triumphantly in his bag.
He slowly approached his father, and held out
L -. .....--.- -c L L-. -


square.






THE CARIBBEAN.


FOREWORD.


outclassed all


through


the games and Cristobal


Needless to say, athletics, on


the whole, are


was not in danger once, to the satisfaction of the
whole school.


very beneficial to everyone, morally and physically.
Morally, they teach a person to play the game


fair, either


ife or sport.


Physically, they build


up the body and prepare one for the


of life.


hardships


Athletics are indulged in more, perhaps,


on the Canal Zone, than in any other part of the
world. This is accounted for by the fact that the
people here realize the necessity of physical exer-
cise, and take it as part of their daily work, as


well as pleasure.


Owing to the fact that there are


comparatively few pupils in Cristobal High School,
almost all have taken part in some form of ath-
letics, mainly basketball, swimming, and baseball.

BASKETBALL.

This year's basketball season was a very success-


ful one for


Cristobal


School.


Our first


practice game was played on October 8, with the


Gatun lightweights on their own floor.


It was a


fast and exciting game and we won to the tune of
18 to 10.


The following


Tuesday we defeated the same


Through
and Navy Y
on their flo


the courtesy of the Cristobal Army
. M. C. A., the first game was played


or.


We beat


whelming score of 37 to 7.


Balboa


the over-


Center was the star


all through the game, and made most of the bas-
kets. Good playing on the part of Raymond and


Doyle helped, and credit is due to


the guards,


Townsend, Duey, and Cloke, who prevented or
opponents from making many


a basket.


The whole school


turned out and many


rooters exhibited


of the


a profound


knowledge of the game.


On November 6,


we iour-


neved to Balboa and defeated


to 12.


no brilliant


There
plays on


either side and the game was


marked


v steady


playing
p 1 a


from beginning to end. Bal-
boahad all their fans out but
it was of no avail.


Balboa's Goat.


team in a close and well-played game, by a score


The third and final game was played on Novem-


This was a fine showing for the open-


ing of the season, and our hopes rose high.
We then arranged a series of five games with
Balboa High School, in which that team was to be
considered victorious which should win threeofthe


/-V 1 /'.


ber 13, at the Army and Navy


seemed


to be the unlucky


they were defeated.


managed


Balboa


to keep the lead


Y. M. C.A. It
for Balboa for


was desperate and


up to


the time the


whistle blew for the ending of the first half. But
A.-, i i I 9


of 22 to 21.


hI









THE CARRIBEAN.


r


*I


r -
p -


-as-


~4q*~ sq1,
t


'* I


Jr






THE CARIBBEAN.


murder in their eyes and went back with the score
25 to I I, in favor of Cristobal, in their minds.
Three of the prominent members of our usual


basketball lineup are Seniors.


on the team but his weight is no hindrance to his


fast playing.


Duev is


"there


when the guards


have to be depended upon.


All are fine players


and we shall be very sorry to lose them on account


TENNIS.


of their spectacular teamwork.


All positions were


A short


series


was arranged


for the double


well represented by Raymond at forward, Henter
at center, and Duey at guard.
The playing of Raymond, our captain and left
forward, is characterized by steadiness and surety.
Whenever the ball was to be had, he was on the


championship of Cristobal High School.


Frank


Raymond and Harold Cloke were the defenders
and they received theirfirst challenge from William


Harrison


and Paul


Doyle.


They


succe


defended their title by winning two sets in


ssfully


succes-


Frank was always ready for a


scrimmage, and generally came out in possession
of the ball. We look forward to the time when
some college team will be benefited by Raymond's
speed.
Center, our center, poetically speaking, is one
of the fastest and best-shooting players on our


sion, 6-4, 9-7.


Then the


"champs


split forces


and the Juniors, represented by Paul Doyle and
Harold Cloke, issued a challenge to all classes.
Frank Raymond and Carl Duey accepted for the
Seniors and the game was played off on the Colon


Beach


court,


February


The Juniors


were


victorious, by winning two out of three sets, 6-3,


team.


In every one of our games, he made his


regular number (and generally the majority) of


the baskets.


He outjumped his opponent almost


every time and when he had his hands on the
ball it was a sure basket.
Paul Doyle, the trickiest and fastest right for-
. ward on any school team on the Isthmus, is a fine


opposite for Raymond.


In Paul s case, size does


not count, for he slips right through the fingers


of his opponents.


Raymond, Doyle, and Henter


make a fast and fine triofor Cristobal's basketball
team and have shown their worth mn every game.
Wesley Townsend, who hails from Gatun, is one


of our steadiest


and most dependable


guards.


His position is right guard and he held it royally.
Many a time a shout went up from our opponents
when their best player got away with the ball, but
they were doomed to disappointment when Town-
send sent it sailing back to the other end of the


floor.


Truly, he is a guard to be thankful for.


The newest member of our team is Cloke. His
playing is surprisingly good considering the little
experience he has had as a left guard. He is always
after his man and proves himself a great hindrance
to his-opponents when they attempt to make a
basket. He is full of action and of fighting perse-


verance.


His pass work is accurate and snappy.


The third classmen, to settle the class champion-


ship, played


the Sophomores,


Gerald


B


Alex Linczer, at Fort de Lesseps, April 9.


liss and
Doyle


and Cloke easily won their sets by 6-4, 6-i.


The Juniors and Seni


on April


ors then traveled to Balboa


23, to decide the singles and doubles


championship of the two rival classes. Cristobal


was victorious and did not lose one set.


Doyle


and Cloke defeated their men, Sargent and W.


Banton, by 6-2, 6-i.


Doyle's smashing drives


and the steady serving of Cloke, easily won the


day for the Juniors.


Doyle then played W. Ban-
1


ton and defeated him in a good set of 6-3.


Cloke,


to make it a winning day for the Juniors, admin-
istered defeat to his man, Sargent, in a one-sided
set of 6-1.
The Balboa Sophomores, M. Banton and Clark,


played


the Cristobal


mond, and were defeated.


one and at the


Seniors,


Duev


and Ray-


The first set was a fast


beginning it looked


as though


Balboa was going to be victorious, but the upper
classmen rallied and finished the set 6-4. The
Seniors seemed to have found their pace, for they


won their next set 6-1.


DI)uey then played M.


Banton and Raymond played Clark.
no trouble in winning his set 6-1 bu


had a harder time.


Duey had
t Raymond


There was fast playing all


We all like him for his coolness and clean playing
of the game.


during the set, but Raymond finally won it 6-3,
due to fast and steady playing.
'"-tI W-^ ** 4 C' 4- I A "1


spot to get it.







44 THE CARIBBEAN.


disappointed and defeated.


The first set on the


program was between Raymond and Duey and


M. Banton and Verril.


set 6-0


The Seniors easily


STANDING BROAD JUMP.


I. James Miller (Balboa),


won


and also the following one,


8 feet, I1 inches.


2. F. Raymond (Cristobal).
3. H. Bissell (Balboa).


The Cristobal Ju
not so fortunate,


iniors,


Cloke and Doyle,


for they


lost their first


6-4, but came back in the second and defeated
Sargent and W. Banton by 6-4. In the last set
Balboa had Cristobal 5-1, but our Juniors played


were


RUNNING HOP, STEP, AND JUMP.

1. F. Raymond (Cristobal), 35 feet, 2
2. G. Morton (Balboa).
3. L. Landers (Balboa).


inches.


hard and made a
straight games. T


wonderful rally,


winning six


his resulted in the score of


12-POUND SHOT PUT.


saving the day for the


Juniors and keeping the


championship in Cristobal High School.

TRACK.


One of the fastest and most interesting track
meets between Balboa and Cristobal High Schools


was held on April 2,
both participated in


at Balboa.
the events a


Boys and girls
nd the points


i. L. Landers (Balboa),


35 feet,


2. C. Duey (Cristobal).
3. F. Raymond (Cristobal).


100-YARD DASH.

x. F. Raymond (Cristobal).
2. C. Miles (Balboa).
3. H. Bissell (Balboa).


were counted together.


The meet was not decided


220-YARD DASH.


until the last event, in which Balboa took the lead
and won by nine points. Our team had practically
no training and did surprisingly well under the
circumstances.
Raymond was the star for the Cristobal boys,
and he won a place in every event that he entered.
The majority of his places were firsts and he has


set a record to be proud of.


The total number of


Raymond's points was 27, more than two-thirds
of the total number scored by the boys.
Edna Campbell was the girls' star and her name
appeared for a place on the score card in everything


in which she took part.


This is Edna's Freshman


year, and she will be with us for three more years
to help us win our future track meets.


CANAL ZONE HIGH SCHOOL
TRACK MEET.

BOYS.
RUNNING HIGH JUMP.
1. Harry Bissell (Balboa), 4 feet, 9 inches.
2. Frank Raymond (Cristobal).
3. Carl Duey (Cristobal).


x. F. Raymond (Cristobal).
2. C. Miles (Balboa).
3. L. Landers (Balboa).


RELAY


RACE.


1. Balboa.
2. Cristobal.


Balboa.


GIRLS.

50-YARD DASH.
1. E. Campbell (Cristobal).
2. G. Lowande (Cristobal).
3. E. Getman (Balboa).

BASEBALL THROW.


1. E. Campbell (Cristobal), 133 feet, 64 inches.
2. Marie McMahon (Balboa).
3. L. Henter (Cristobal).


RUNNING BROAD JUMP


1. Lona Rathbone (Balboa),
2. E. Campbell (Cristobal).
3. Ethel Getman (Balboa).


12 feet.


STANDING BROAD JUP.


RUNNING BROAD JUMP.


i. F. Raymond (Cristobal), ig feet, 1o inches.


I. Lona Rathbone (Balboa), 6 feet, 7 inches.


I inch.







THE CARIBBEAN. ____ 45


RUNNING HIGH JUMP.


1. Ethel Getman (Balboa), 4 feet,
2. Loretta Rush (Cristobal).
3. E. Campbell (Cristobal).


A series of games was arranged to decide the
baseball championship between the high schools of


2 inches.


Cristobal and Balboa.


The first game was played


on our rivals' grounds, but we won by the score of


4to 3.


75-YARD DASH.
1. Ethel Getman (Balboa).
2. E. Campbell (Cristobal).
s. Marie McMahon (Balboa).


BASKETBALL


THROW


I. Florinette Matter (Balboa),
2. E. Campbell (Cristobal).
". C. Van Hardevelt (Balboa).


RELAY


RACE.


60 feet, 4 inches.


Raymond pitched a good game and, helped


by the fine support of the whole team, held Balboa


down to three runs.


One of the main features of


the game was a double play made by Cristobal.
One of the Balboa runners was perched on first and
a hot liner was hit to Doyle at third base. He
fielded it in fine style and shot it to Solomon at
second, who completed the play to Henter putting


the runner out at first.


One of the longest hits


of the game was made by Solomon, who lined out


I. Cristobal.
2. Balboa.


POINTS SCORED.


Points.


Balboa boys...
Balboa girls,...


a 3-bagger in the sixth inning.


Although Balboa


changed pitchers, it was of no avail for Cristobal
left the field victorious.


Balboa then crossed


the Isthmus to our side


the following week, determined to win-and they


Cristobal


seemed


to lack


pep and, as


Balboa High S<
Cristobal boys.
Cristobal girls.


result, Balboa doubled our score.


34 The final


and deciding game


Balboa after another week


was played


had elapsed.


Cristobal High School


BASEBALL.


tobal was ahead all through the game but in the
eighth inning our opponents rallied and, helped
by a downpour, made 5 runs, bringing the score
up to 8 to 7 in favor of Cristobal. One of the


We started th


e seas


on with a bang, by winning


longest drives of the series was made by Ra


vmond


a fast game and tying one other.


The first game


in this game.


Two men and himself crossed home


was a 5-inning


battle


the Lincoln


bachelors, on the New Cristobal diamond.


House
When


plate on the hit. Neither team scored in the ninth
and Cristobal left the field with the championship.


darkness settled, the score was 4 to 4.


It was a


s were


fast and snappy game and the two team
evenly matched.


Our second game was played with the grammar


school at the Mount Hope stadium.


Our team


We crossed


boat No.,
March 17.


bats with


the sailors from Eagle


on the Cristobal twilight diamond on
Raymond pitched his usual good game


made a fine showing and carried away the game


and we had no trouble in administering


defeat to


scoring


of the grammar school.


the sailors.


The final


score was 10 to


GIRLS'


ATHLETICS.


Due to the fact that the athletics
are under the auspices of the Club


grounds of


the different


town


on the Zone
s and Play-


we have


rather handicapped in that our athletics, with the
exception of track, have been necessarily divided


between Cristobal and Gatun, as many


of our


mirls live in Gatun.


to Cristobal High,even though they had their own
teams in basketball, baseball, etc.
During the games that the Cristobal girls of
the Cristobal High School have played the Gatun


girls of the


Cristobal


High School,


there


naturally been a stirring spirit of rivalry between







THE CARIBBEAN.


The Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds arranged
leagues in basketball, indoor baseball,and bowling.
The basketball season came first and on No-
vember 9, the Cristobal High School girls met and


elected


as captain,


Kirby


had their first practice.


Ferguson,


and also


Although only five were


present that day we played the grammar school
girls on November II, winning from them by a
score of 19 to 10.
As this was the first game of the season there
was no brilliant playing done, but the girls all
held their own very well.
After this game the girls turned out to practice
more often and more girls attended.


Alice Hunter, side center, played exceedingly well
in this game.


Our old rival again-Balboa.


This time we


suffered a terrible defeat, but let me say that even
after that we hold no hard feelings toward them.
The score was 42 to II.
The next week we again made up for the week
before by defeating Pedro Miguel on their floor
by a score of 28 to 25.


game


ended


basketball


season.


We had won four league games and lost four, but
wait-here is indoor baseball.


INDOOR BASEBALL.


On Saturday,


November


first league game, meeting the


we played
Gatun girls


Little can be said about the indoor baseball,


the Cristobal floor.


ended


in a


victory


The playing was fast and


for Gatun.


Good


sports-


manship was shown throughout by both teams.


The tune which they


carried


was


"Met


tobal on the Cristobal floor and won from them,
19 to II being the score."
The week following this game we had some very
good practice and on Saturday played the Ancon


team on our floor.


The game was fast and snappy,


Ida Brown and Kirby Ferguson never failing, when
the ball got to their end of the floor, to drop it


into the basket.
girls answered


Sad but yet hopeful, the Ancon


questions


to the score


but still


there is so much


that should be said.


Cristobal High School did not have an opponent


who could


call forth


our best


playing.


Edna


Campbell was our able captain and through her
earnest efforts in conjunction with our very able
and splendid physical instructress, Miss Blaisdell
(now Mrs. Lockett), and all the players, we won
the 100o per cent championship, never losing a
game.
Our team was Edna Campbell, left field; Jane


Edwards,


catcher;


Mary Fields, first base;


Kirby


Ferguson,


pitcher;


Ida Brown, second base;


Gladys Lowande, third base.


saying, "Cristobal, 31; Ancon, i6."
Our next game was with Pedro Miguel, at Cris-
tobal. In spite of the fact that their team was
much heavier than ours we never failed at any
time to prove that it is not quantity but quality


that counts, and sent them home crying,
tobal beat us 35 to 5-"


"Cris-


Next came our old rival, Balboa. We thought
we had the advantage play ng on our own floor,
but-well, let's say luck was against us. Although


we suffered
Campbell,


the great defeat of


center,


must


be high


44 to 8, Edna
ly commended


for her good judgment in passing the ball; also
Jane Edwards and Gladys Lowande, our guards,
who were greatly outweighed.
Gatun's return game was the next played and


BOWLING.


The month of May started the bowling league.
After a brief time of regular practice we formed a
team and elected Mary Fields as our captain.
On Saturday, May 14, our friendly rivals from
Gatun were our opponents at the Cristobal club-


house.


We bowled


three games and


won one.


The first game Gatun won by twelve pins, the
second we won by forty-two, and they won the


third by eight pins.


match.
ending.


This was our first bowling


We hope a poor beginning means a strong


TENNIS.


on their floor.


Again they were victorious, de-


Tennis


has had its place


among our sports,


fearing us by 20 points.


The score was 26 to 6.


too, the girls having a class


-every


morning for


In t-he


reetrnn


anme with An'nn.


niaverl


I 1I


nne hr ir


Next vear we hnne ton ee tennis tonlrnR-


Cris-
















THE CARIBBEAN. 47








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-- m *- 1 -. .







THE CARIBBEAN.


THE CARNIVAL.


AS A


WHOLE.


fees for an hour.


The people were not afraid of a


Frank Raymond, 'r.


good time and made it truly an
frolic, and festival."


evening of fun,


"School


carnival


to be given


at 7.30 p.


Thursday, December 16,"


was thoroughly adver-


THE ASSEMBLY-ROOM PROGRAMS.


tised throughout the Atlantic side.


But to our dis-


Charles Henter,


may and misfortune, the time of opening had to be


postponed.


We had


been making preparations


all day for the looked-for feature.


At 6.30


were still working enthusiastically on some minor


things.


When we were on the verge of completing


these details, the lights of all the town went out.
We were forced to stop our work and a pitiful
groan was echoed throughout the building as some-
one hit his finger with a hammer, another slipped


from the chair on which


he was standing, and


others
stairs.
were i


hours.


tripped up the
It seemed as if we


darkness


The lights never


would come on.


people were gathered out-
side waiting eagerly to


enter.
and


Seven-thirtypassed


our


completed and
were still out.
quarters of an


wasted, the


'ne best looking.
ra
and outside the building.


complete our


task but the


was not


the lights
After three-


Hour


lights


ere on and a great cheer
ng out, from both inside
We rushed wildly ro


demand


The assembly room was filled and refilled dur-
ing the evening by the audiences which listened
to the series of pro-
grams that had been
prepared.
The first program,


given
school,


y the grade
consisted of


songs, dances, and a
recitation ofStevenson's


"My Shadow,
Theo Simon.


The
high
with a


"by little


followed


school program
SJapanese flirta-


tion dance
Fields an
Pepper, a
Edna Ca


by Mary
d Georgie
ballet by
mpbell, a


The most pular.


ukulele-accompanied duet by Marjorie Ball and
Virginia Tucker, recitations by Mildred Gill and
Miss Dodds, and a piano solo by Doris Oliver.


The third


program, which


was given


by the


stringed orchestra, was well rendered, and proved


a success,


winning the applause of the audience


as each selection came to a close.


public to enter was too great to sustain.


THE POPULARITY


CONTEST.


Th, rnnrtc rnnanorlsA onA rh.ro uve a m1A raneh


Mary Fields, '22.







THE CARIBBEAN.


carnival.
was in ch


"Eddie May,


our popular Sophomore,


arge.


NATURE S GREATEST MISTAKE.


George Cartwright,


, and William Mary,


voted the best-looking girl and boy.
Doris Oliver and Harold Cloke, both


were


voted


22, were

Juniors,
e most


popular.
Frank Raymond,


and Edna


were


voted


"Nature's greatest mistake,


SZenura, the crea-


ture with 26 eyes, was also a great success, although


creature,


Louise Henter, did have twenty-


four needles pinned on her dress.


The room where


she was exhibited was never wanting for spectators.


Campbell,


JAPANESE TEA ROOM.


the best all-


Georgie


around boy andti girl.


I he great
the students
friends in th


interest


and their
is contest is


indicated bv the fact that,


although


votes


were


only 5 cents a piece, the
contest brought in $60.


Pepper,


You would hardly expect to find in the midst
of the turmoil of a high school carnival, a trans-
planted bit of Japan, but that such a thing is pos-


was proved


The bookcases


school


room


and ba


were


the Japanese
ire walls of


concealed


Stea room.
an ordinary
salm leaves,


massed together to form an effective background,


The best all-around.


happiest


thing


while


drawings


of odd


Japanese


landscapes


about it was th


e good spirit


turned


the blackboards


into


paneled


screens.


which the students showed toward the con
and the lack of jealousy among the con
themselves.


testants
testants


KANGAROO COURT.


Needless to say, many people slipped in to be
served tea beneath the swinging lanterns by the
quaint, Japanese maidens who gave the last, but
not least, attractive touch to the tea room.


Car Duev,


One of the


most unique booths in


the whole


carnival was the Kangaroo Court over which Mr.
Gerald D. Bliss, Sr., as judge, presided most ably.
He was assisted in his distribution of justice by
our police force, Emilio Solomon.


Emilio could be
halls for culprits.


seen


at anv time sleuthing the


He pinched them for smoking,


for not smoking, for not spending their money
fast enough, and for other similar crimes too


numerous to mention.
Once arrested, the guilty one


was led to the


court room in the lower hall where our most hon-
orable judge fined him or her, whatever amount it
looked as if the purse of the defendant could stand.
KINGS OF THE SAWDUST.


Weslevy


Tcwnsend,


CANDY, ICE CREAM, AND FLOWER BOOTHS.


Kirby Ferguson,


The candy and ice cream booths, which were
at opposite ends of the hall, were like two magnets,


drawing
Emma


crowds


Townsend


Lillian Colberg, in charge
of the candy booth, had
worked hard to make this
spot attractiveand surely
they had not worked in


vain.


The pretty little


booth was decorated with


effective


tropical


palms, crepe paper, and
coral vine.
The red-and-white ice


irresistible


toward


them.


One of the features that helped to make the


cream


booth, as always,


carnival


a huge


success


was the famous


demanded rush


service,


Posters and their makers.


"Kings of the Sawdust," Eberenz and Townsend,


recently
Show.


of Ringling


Brothers


WV orld-Famous


They were only to be obtained through the


which was very ably sup-
plied by Gerald Bliss and William Mary.
As for the flower booth, Jane Hall and Loretta


influence of our Advance Manager. Miss I. Isa-


Rush had so daintily decorated this


"garden of


louise Henter,


f








THE CARIBBEAN.


some trip from


THE BAZAAR.
.wiice Hunter, '2t.


One of the outstanding feature


was the bazaar.


s of the carnival


The room in which it was held


looked very attractive indeed with the palm leaves
entwined with coral vine, and with its pretty col-


"Ringling Brothers


" had reduced


her weight, she managed her part well and never
failed to draw a crowd.


Bill Harrison surely


brella


and George


his ladder and the


did manipulate that urnm-


Ball knew


how to


use


reducer.


ored lights.


This made a


very effective setting


for the lovely things we had for sale.


TRIPLY


Evervthin


was sold from the lacy handmade articles


to tin


KATE.


soldiers.


The profits were 50o.


THE FRENCH CAFE.


We were very fortunate in bein


evening


wonder from


Tri ply


the far-off island of Yan


able to


three-l
gaga.


secure


egged
This


Mildred Stafford,


young woman has baffled the minds of the greatest


The delicious


aroma a


of hot coffee


and crisp


surgeons of both hemispheres.


One of them of-


doughnuts


enticed


merrymakers int3


fered to amputate her third leg and experiment


French cafe, a most attractive


bower


of palms


and coral vines where chic French maidens pre-
sided over the dainty rose-shaded tables.


as to the cause of its growth, but sh
him that it had b:en with her so I
was very closely attached to it.


e calmly told


that she


BLUE BEARD S


WIVES.


CHAMBER OF HORRORS.


Herbert .AlcC/ain,


One of the most terrifying scenes of the carnival
was the dimly lighted chamber containing Blu
Beard's Wives.


The heads of three of his wives, which,


it is said,


were recently unearthed in one of the destroyed
chauteaux of France, were hanging by their few
remaining hairs.


They


were wonderfully preserved and presented


spectacle.


a most ghastly


HUMAN PINCUSHION.


Marjorie Ball,


Our mystical department was an enormous suc-


cess.


sent a gan


of roughnecks into the phy-
sics labc-
tZ|ratoryv


m o v ing


Iaroun


few tables
and hang-
ing a few
blankets


over


Before a door labeled,


youth


loudly


advertised


"Human Pincushion


his show.


More Carnival posters, door, they
pro u d l y


From


crowd about the door and the expressions on the


announce


our unbeli


evming


faces of those coming out,


we judged


that the


"Chamber of Horrors


was completed.


"Human Pincushion


tically
tainlv


and financially.


was human,


was a success, both artis-


"Pincushion


vet she smilingly


cer-


this outfit and


an unbelievable


luck, we managed to mak


supp


e the unheard of


of good
sum of


1I.84


agony that must have been caused by the great
variety of needles, pins, hat pins, and safety pins
that were thrust into her generously proportioned
figure.


FLABBY


FATIMA.


FORTUNE TELLER.


LotiseC


I/enter,


A charming gipsy fortune teller, strangely re-
sembling Miss Faulkner, wandered into the school


( ,tnrl C t r -


building the night of the carnival and was kept


5I


Lerov Malgnuson, 22.


cars








52 THE CARIBBEAN.


SOBER


SUE-


SHE NEVER SMILES.


STRATAGINI.


Leroy Magnuson,


Jane Edwards, '2a2.


The old adage,


"Laugh and the world laughs


" has been disproved


maiden.


this stoical


All efforts to bring a smile to her face


failed and no one earned the six tickets which had


been promised for that feat.


It must be admitted,


however, that the sight of her brought man


smile to the faces


of the spectators.


Chester


Taylor (alias Stratagini), the greatest


living magician in the Western Hemisphere to-day,
baffled the most brilliant minds of Cristobal and


Colon
change!


his impenetrable


magic.


Presto


And any attempt on our part to solve


the mystery was futile.


We left his den appalled


at the power of the great Stratagini.


to state that his


It is needless


department was one of the most


THE COUNTRY STORE.


popular.


THE MUSEUM.


Esther Witt,


One place at the Cristobal High School carni-
val where you could get your money's worth (in
fact the only place) was the country store.
Here was a counter over which bottles of soda


were sold for IO cents or three for 2g cents.


Behind


it were shelves lined with neatly wrapped parcels
containing everything from buttons to elephants,


for 5, 10, I5, 20, and 25 cents.


Every parcel con-


trained its full marked value, but not always did
it so appear to the person who purchased it.
Just the same, every parcel and bottle of soda
was sold a half-hour before the carnival closed,
and still other treasure seekers came, and, sad to
say, went away with drooping heads-and money
in their pockets!


Museums are always remarkable, but this one


was more so
teapot used


Where else have you ever seen the
at the Boston tea party, a piece of


the ice on which Washington crossed the Delaware,
and the real Plymouth Rock? It was worth seeing.


ENDING.


Everything ran smoothly and the people were
more than pleased with the features shown. The
halls both upstairs and downstairs were crowded.
At II o'clock the crowd began to thin out as a


few left for home.


We closed


the doors at 12


and went cheerfully home, because of our great


success financially and


socially.


SCHOOL ATMOSPHERE.


Ferguson,


When Miss Dodds


is feeling


But when her face
Just chartered o'er


She gives us all a smile.
It's like a whiff from a flowered wood
And makes our life worth while.
It rather gets beneath our skins
And helps us to dig in,
'Cause everything is sunshine,
When Miss Dodds begins to grin.


is like


a map


with care,


A dismal hush broods o'er the place,
There's microbes in the air.
We don't follow our orders right,
Nor keep our marks from falling down,
But we just mope and lag around
When Miss Dodds begins to frown.


It is curious how the atmosphere
Gets in a fellow's work;
How smiles will raise the spirits high
And frowns produce a shirk.
It's not the mark that we may get


Harold Boyd,







THE CARIBBEAN. ________ 53



A MUSIC STORE ROMANCE.


ley Townsend, '22. Jordan Zimmermann, '22.


Margie was
at the End of


"Fair
Here?"


"I Don't
4y Way, "


Drifting


Perfect


, cried he,


Know


Whe


down the Beau


Day when she ran into


Along ot
"Where


re I'm G


tiful Ohio


n Moonlight Bay.
Do We Go From


going,


Im On


she replied.


So they


paddled


to My


Isle of


Golden


on the Swanee.


"You'll
My Wild


ANever


I'm Loving


Tired


never


Irish Rose


Knew


" she replied,


of Me,


will you?


" he asked.


Love
Sweet


Anybody
SandLow.
and Low.


"After
Budding
"Dear
Fall, I'll


You've Gone,


Rose,
Little


was his
Boy of


I'llI Think


on, iMy


answer.


Mine,


be in the Garden


WJhen


the Shadows
Waiting for


When


In the Gloaming.
"You'd be Su


about her.
a Clear Sky,


L


return


ed, Freckles


was standing


He said,


rprised if I
Ised to Call


The Vamp gave


told you all I know
Her Baby, but Out of


me back myv


Rings


The follow


ng Evening


Fashioned Garden 'nea


met In


th the Alabama


a Stra


Love's


an Old


and Said Good-Bve Forever.


away


That


m Not Jealous,
in his car.


same


evening


" jerry


replied,


went


as he drove


to the Story


"Bright Eyes,
ton Blues."


your


Smiles


me the


Prohibi-


Book Ball


"Buddy,
azz."


and danced


" she said,


"Take


Naughty


Waltz.


Me to That


Land


"Your


Have


Me So,


" she replied,


Whispering.


"Girl


"I'll go to the End of the World z
ILove the Sunshine of Your Smile,


was his


Because
answer.


you go
West ?


Dreams," her


me to AMy


Little Gra


replied,
y Home


" ill
in the


LH.
and eat
"We'


she. exclaimed,
Chinese Rice an
11 take the Lovt


"We'll


d


in Old


Turkestan."


the Gyps}


ask Moth
STrail, '


erif I may
she said,


go Wandering down
as she picked the


Hindustan


Sir, his


want a Love


Carolina


Down


where the Hawaiian Lullabvs


"0, Promise


When


Roses


Me, Girl


Again


Sunshine


responded,


by the Saskatchewan
may reaches.


f Mine, I
in Miami,


n Springtime
You 'll Think


Last Rose of Summer and


gave it


to him, as he left


for Home, Sweet


Home.


In return for this rose


"I L


" she replied, before entering her


gave
WIhen


her Sweet K
Night Falls


isses.


again, he


was


Humming


Castle


Arms and


Dreams.
Kiss M


"Please


Ho/d


M1e in


re Good-bve.


Mandy beneath her window


"Wlhen


Preacher


Makes


Mine


"I Hear You Cal
she appeared in her


"Let'


Out in


ling Me," she


answered.


Alice Blue Gown.


Mv Old Town


Canoe, he


Sunday


Shack


Morning,


to That


Tumble


Some
Down


the JJor/d


tested, as they strolled beneath the Silvery Moon.


Thus ended the Music Store Romance.


H es


rry who was Sailing


Dreams


Could


of Roses,


Sipping
Old Sweet


Cider
Song.


Moon. After


Manila


Bloom


our


Athlone and Let the ReK
his words At Parting.


-- --.. -N


"ANo,








THE CARIBBEAN.


I've seen the toads in
And the bugs in Buch


Texas,
arest.


I raised
I struck


mit, with anger smith;
h firm decision;


The mosquitoes down in Cuba
I'll admit are quite a pest;
The scorpion and the centipedes
Are dangerous as can be,
But the thing that I fear most of all
Is the Panamanian flea.


But with one jump he cleared my bunk


And laughed in wild


derision.


'Twas then that I became enraged,
Began to slam and knock,


And through the wee small
We battled on my cot.


hours


While the midnight


On my shingle


summer


raindrops fell


roof o'erhead,


With mighty fist I crushed them;


One by


one they dropped away,


furiously


Up and down my white beJspread.
At first they came out one by one,
And formed a single line,
Then came a whole battalion


And as the dawn was breaking,
I rested from the fray.
With throbbing head, I wiped the dead


From off the blood-smeared


sheet


fearing reinforcements,


Taking up the double time.


I beat


a swift


retreat.


"Company square" and


section


Around my bunk they flew;


made


Then, running hard, they
And war began to brew.


I watched the pesty little freaks,
While doping by my bed,
Then one great flea rushed straight
And we grappled on the spread.


a charge


And thus the battle ended;
All honor to the dead,
Who lost their life in dubious strife


On my


t at me


WITHOUT


little white bedspread.


Oh, the scorpions and the centipedes,
Are dangerous as can be,
But I hope I'll never meet again
A Panamanian flea.





A THOUGHT.


Leo Eberenz,


Although I take my pen in hand,


tried to write about the sea


I know not what to


I've tried and


but all


write;


in vaf


forth no light.


With all its beauties rare,
As on the beach it comes anrd goes
Beneath the sun's bright gla


My theme is due by this forenoon,
And vet I have no thought.


morning


long without result,


I try to write about the sky,
About the forts, both new
But everything I try to write


and old,


A subject I have sought.


Has been by others better told.


I give up in desp


THE TERROR OF THE TROPICS.

Al. Quinto, '23.


A war was raging


of night,


air,








THE CARIBBEAN.


tITHE SOII.OQUY OF A W\VASTF.IKBASKET.
Edna UCanpb/l, ",.
It ..


"How


basket,
the jani
heavy b
on me;
for the
children


"But


branch
all'-
peare
class
quite
teach
had t


e <


sighec


it leaned
r will hu
den. Th
ev do tin
d war t
id to save
is mornij
t), I suff


My! My!
. I heard
read that
literary.
er whom


H


1


he children


against
rry up
ose boys
e me out
times to
, and 1 v
ng (I co
ered 'the
ere I am


the children
to-day--I
Vell, to get
had consi
file past r


the desk
aind relic'
and girls
so. I loi
return,
ias not so
uld cry a
most unl
quoting
n in the
really a
back to
dered mn
ne and tl


weary wastL-


. "I do h)pe
ve mne of myv
have no pity
ng s lmetiml
for then th:
load:d down.
t the reniem-
kindest cut ot


from Shak
Julius Cat
mI become
my story,
y best fri
row a sti


es U

inz
the
end
ckvy


gray substance (gum, they called it) at me. I
was very indignant, but I avenged myself on
her, for I read her sweetheart's letter, which she
threw at me-not thinking that I could read.
Hark! I hear a merry whistle; I believe it is the
janitor coming to help me. Thank heaven!
"How much lighter I feel now, but I can't forget
the indignities I've suffered to-day, and to add to
it all, that long-legged, red-headed Fred came and
stumbled over me, spilling the papers all over the


a large dent in m


"Th
is whe
and br
"())]1
has th
hurts!
show t
floor.


him t<
"W
footst
can bet
and t
I am
Do mi
telling


1"
I
he
I


) W
ell,
ep5
e ht
he
St+
\,


e goes the tin
they will th
d crusts at m
()h, dear! M
iwn somiethin
t mlist le thi
m something,
t is n:) use, t.:
'rap them in
, at last sch'
s of the last chl
tard in the ro:
scratching \
) drowsy-v-I
ears deceive


the teacher


new waste
dreams
"A rest!


Here I


y side-as if it were


kle of the lunch bell, anm
row their old orange

v e.es hat wretch
[v eves! That wretch,:


my fault!


SlbOv


m. O(hi! tw
cil shavings.
them all over t
ie teacher telli
I put them htbac
an.I the echoi
ied out. Nothi
* tick of the ch
: weary teach
11 sleep. \Vh
lie janitor rea
e discarded anm


hat I


)ut 1

've b


now that it has come,


n


my place


een honging ti:r
'm sad --I shall


a res


t and
them


all-even fat little Tom who never missed a
chance to kick me. Then Mary, John (the
little rascal), Ned-all of them, but-worst of all
I shall miss the old clock-confidant of all my joys


floor.


Then the horrid thing kicked me,


leaving


and sorrows.


LATIN.
Apoloisr toII Stevenson.
Esther 1'iin, '2?.


When I went to Cristobal Hig
A Latin book they gave to me
To dig into its lore.
My head was empty as a cup,
I strove and toiled to fill it up
Until my hair I tore.


But iall in vain; I mike imistakec
until I'm sure my teacher aches
I1") poke me with a pin.
Too thick and hard is my por ha.,
As thick as mud and hard as lactd,
And I.atin won't soak in.


There once was a Roman named C"sar,
Who fought like a Mexican greaser,
Ir-I -'^rr i'.andi,'i Ii ( .1111i


t


or is it all a







THE CARIBBEAN.


Scenario by F. RAYMOND.
Spelling corrected by P. C. DOYLE.
Photographer, CHESTER TAYLOR.
Art Director, EMIHO SOLOMON's little brother Jo:ixvY.


ROUND


less Threebase


, she likes the pretty things which


Mendezez s money will buy.


The only money


Happy receives is the few dollars he earns
selling cartons of cigarettes given to him for 3


hits at the ball games.


from
-base


(End of Round I.)


Betty Confetti, a beautiful 16-year maiden of


Italian descent,


whose father and mother were


drowned
Sea when


Caribbean


Reliance


ROUND II.


Three months have elapsed and this beautiful


and windy


unday morning Betty is seated in her


sank, is left alone, an orphan,


the only


occupant


of a big


type-14 house, standing next
door to the Strangers Club


in Colon.


She is a


favorite


comfortable porch swing strumming a sacred song
on her ukelele to drown the strains of the Victrola,
which some lighthearted soul is playing in the
adjoining Strangers Club. She eats but little, not
only on account of grief, but because her funds are


1. Profile photo of Men-
dezez taken just before
forming habit of nose
poking.


of the Strangers


Club,


Washington Cotillion Club,
the Wanderers' Club, and the


now down to but 56,


and the


district quarter-


master has notified her that in a few days she will


be homeless.


Her head tells her that she should


Colon Baseball Club, whose members have chipped


in to raise a liberal amount to keep her from


star-


not marry the handsome and penniless ballplayer,
and her heart insists that she must not marry the


the district quartermaster


vation, while


has generously agreed to let her stay in
the Commission quarters until the earned
leave of her loving father expires.
A wealthy member of the Washington


Cotillion


Club,


William


and stingy banker.


engaged, a


vendor


While she
of lottery


tickets enters and induces Betty to inm-


vest $5


of her remaining six in a ticket,


the number of which happens to be 9089.
The drawing is to be drawn within one


H. Mendezez,


who is president of the Continental Bank-
ing and Trust Company, and the good-


natured Happy


Threebase, star player of


the Colon Baseball Club, are suitors for


2. 1L11U
Srtheadr
to other


ring how nose
stikinx it in-
)plIs affiir$s


hour, and she decides


her luck.
ing hour


to stake all upon


The suspense of the remain-
s maddening, for Betty knows


that at the end of that


time she will


Betty's heart


and hand.


WXhat Happy lacks in


eitherhave but Si to her name or will have $20,000ooo


money he makes up in good looks, and what Men-
dezez lacks in good looks is shameful to mention,


forthe bankerisafilicted with an
which mars his beauty no little.


nose, called "flat


apartment


nose,


apartment


" by lower classmen, is caused by


silver and


Threebase.


sewer!


freedom to marry the handsome Harry


If she fails?
pins the


tenderly in the empty


box which


Well, there is always the
ticket
cracker


has furnished


poking it


so much into other people's business


that it becomes as wide andi flat as a mushroom,
and if it ever falls inside of the face nothing can


scanty


breakfast.


the floor to and


her hands


She paces
, wringing


in desperation, and


ever get it back on


stingy with


his money


the outside.


Mendezez is


and plans to wait until


tearing her hair out by the roots,


until she


hears


welcome


l I I "t I I t 1 1


3. t., ,,f the villain
,L..I-.... ;-r-ik,* ,rA "Tl^. .-


ISTHMIAN MOVIE TRAVESTY ENTITLED
"THE LUCKY PIN."
F. Rayvmond, '21. P. C. Djvle, '2.







THE CARIBBEAN.


tear-stained


cheeks she


frantically


rushes


to a


Grabbing the pin from its cruel hidin


place, he


lottery vendor's p
her board shows ti
Utter despair is
with heavy footsti
home, throws her
VgTo ...

ill NEV
A MAN
IN 0ROW







A *

//




chair. Hastily p
ing cushion, she
be nothing more
cracker box, which
table to the chairs
the pin or wheth
seeing the worthle
so much of her sc
but with a pardon
box and its conte
it out of the open
follows, and Bett
throws herself, 1
flat on her face (


only to
winning
own on
she rett
heavily


ullingthestinge


much
anger
the w
Wheth
it is d
lottery
[tv fun
ble shr
s from
window.
Confe
t this
a han


Sreliev
)us thai
mind has
ter it is
lisappoi
y,'ticket'
ids is no
iek she
Usher, th
SA tor
tti with
time
dv cou(


and consider herunhappy fate.


(I


That the slip on
nber to be 6806.
beautiful face as
to her unhappy
aninvitingchair,
only to jump
- up, clutch-
Sing the back
of her thi n
Stress while
uttering
piercing
Screams, for
she has been
terribly
stung by
something,
probably a
dreaded
scorpion hid-
den in the
seat of the
from its unwill-
ed to find it to
n the pin in the
blown from the
pain in removing
ntment in again
which hascosther
t for us to judge,
hurls the cracker
ie wind whisking
rental downpour
Dejected spirits
more cautiously,
ch to brood over
EndofRound II.)


notices f
paper at
ticket.
he rushe
carrying
riage an
"Betty,
change y
"Happ
number
to marr)
ticket 6i
have thr
He lea


des


th

pa
nu
pa
sil
St.

to
ba
po


first time thai


tached to it
With a glai
s over to
the ticket
d offers h
darling, if
our name
y," she rn
on the tick
* William
o806 had n
own that
ves her be


)air, unco
he offers
er enemy.
girl he lo1
es in the
gaining ha
ut to ma
1


iou
ot
U)


Which turn
nce of scorn
the home


with
er th,
this 9c
from
eplies,
et, "I
H.M
ot W(
piece
autifu
sly ta
)jectio
is now


I
V


es


Ai
r1


ireeoase, 1
e shrieks of
at it is time
Happy stro
sses the lott
rmber after
per which h4
ver to him.
0,000 gold, r
hear his be
nker, "No,
verty I will


man with an


*nt(
Vt:
s S
ve
de:
to


o pa
1 press


ki
n

it


anker's ear,
rs on the he
rv and you
or Mendeze:
Betty all
to press his
lls down Fi
ery office, n
all is 9089
e crushes in
He cashes
ushes again
loved's swei
Willie, I am
never cons


ingrowing


t it has
Is out to
i at his
of his
He pr(
terry tic
Sins to-d
etti to
hdie glai
practice;
zez, ant
'-day, I
per awa
;ence wi


s
ng the
to the
crossingg
ates for
"Harm
ad of t
will an
z. who


a piece of
be a lottery
hated rival,
sweetheart,
;Xposes mar-
ket, saying
lay you can
Threebase."
nces at the
ally decided
1 besides, if
would not
'I
ty.
ith a sigh of


ticket wi
entrance
the dooi
* a nmornm
one of
he girl
swer to
has list


morning, now
suit.
front Street and


notices
and ti
his han
s the
to Bett
et voi(
sorry,
ent to


nose:


th him,
e of his
step of
ent and
the few
you are
Happy
ened to
realizes

. as he


t the winning
the piece of
leans $20,000ooo
.et and with
home in time
saying to the
t with all mvy
the wife of a


Adios


termore


(End of Round III.)


ROUND


It takes but


2 minutes


IV.
for Happy to convince


ROUND III.


Happy


knows
bends
piece
pointe
force
worn
bank


Threebase


tnat t
)ver t
f pa
i pin,
ands
nost
, pas


there
:o un.
iper,
flies
just
from
ses j
*- l <


will be n
lace his
carrying;
in the
where
sliding
ust as t
0 n I 4.~ 1


the Strangers


o gam
spiked
g a ci
window
his ba
bases.
his ha
11. ,s alt, Is


e to-day an
shoes, a pit
ruel and s
w and with
seball pat
Mendeze
ppens and
;. ,L1 A r I ;


d
1-
ih


Club,
as he
laden
arply
great
:s are
z, the
Harryv
Sl I K


Betty tha
when she
and again
failed to i
sidedown.
overhead
dialogue.
now, darli
ty, we are
r," "XT


Sshe has been twice mistaken; once
said that she would marry Mendezez
when in her haste and anguish, she
otice that the number she saw was up-
After the ceremony a passing stranger
this
"And HVtw Wet' ,
g Bet- PINNED
:led for %sr Ihe- \
~,


v^'~


f









THE CARIBBEAN.


THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD


Popular Passenger Vessels Transit the Canal.

Three sister ships, the J.Isabella Dodds, theCatherine I. Davis, and the
Jessie Daniels, all of equal capacity, heavily laden with cargoes of
school spirits and general knowledge, filling all holds and every unoccu-
pied inch of deck space, cleared from this port during the present week.
Sailing with any of these ships is not only a genuine pleasure, but means
comfort and confidence in the highest degree, and safe arrival at desti-
nation.


Official Circulars.

Appointment.
THE PANAMA CANAL.
EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z., July 1, 1930.
HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS:
During my absence on leave Mr. Carl Duey will
be Acting Governor of The Panama Canal and
Mr. Harold Cloke will be Acting President of the
Panama Railroad. and, as such, they will be ac-
countable for all nonexpendable property in the
possession of the Cristobal Corral and the Mindi
Hog Farm.
FRANK RAYMOND,
GC'ernor. The Panama Canal.
President, Panama Railroad.
Approved:
ALICE HUNTER.
Auditress.
Transportation.
PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY,
PANAMA RAILROAD STEAMSHIP LINE.
OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT,
BALBOA HEIcGHT. C. Z., July 2, 1930.,
To all concerned-Effective at once, and until
further notice, collectors and conductors are
directed to pass, free of charge, all students of
Cristobal grade and high schools to all points on
the main line tracks in either direction. Viola-
tions of this order will meet with instant dismissal.
CHARLIE CENTER.
Superintendent, Panama Railroad.


Approved:
HAROLD
Acting


CLOKE,
President, Panama Railroad.


Removal.
THE PANAMA CANAL,
EXECUTIVE OFFICE.
BALBOA HEIGHTS. C. Z., July 3. 1930.
HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS:
In conjunction with the removal of the Ad-
ministration to the Atlantic Side, the Panama
Railroad offices will also be located there and will
occupy the historic railroad roundhouse on ac-
count of its scenic effect on passing tourists.
KIRBY FERGUSON,
Mistress of Transportation.
Authorized:
LEO EBERENZ.
Chief Health Officer.
Extension of Privileges.
THE PANAMA CANAL,
EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
BALBOA HEIGHTS, C. Z.. July 4. 1930.
To all concerned-As all male students of the
C'ristobal High School have been added to the
police and detective force of the Isthmus, heads
of departments and divisions are instructed to
turn over their trucks and Ford cars to them upon
demand. Instant dismissal will follow the slight-
est disobedience to any demand made by one of
these students.


Guy
Chief, Division of


JOHANNES,
Police and Fire.


Sale of Material.
Sealed bids will be opened by the Chief Quartet-
master for the sale of the following-described
equipment, Friday. July 6. Intending bidders
must address envelope in perfectly legible hand-
writing, free from misspelled words or gram-
matical errors, with Commissary bottled ink
meeting Government requirements; bidders must
be white, unmarried, between the ages of 16 and
21, if female, and between Z1 and 89 years of age.
if otherwise. All bids will be accompanied by a


clearance paper, metal c
Commissary coupons. T
accept any or all bids: Oi
storehouse, formerly use
Atlantic side weather; 1
cold storage plant, in good
needed on account of the ci
ture prevailing from the
umbrellas, Cristobal corn


that end
dry dock,


of the Canal
Old French,


ow
Mo


heck.
he rig
ne rain
d in l
ice-m
condit
ontinu
Caribi
missar
ing to
unt H


and 5 yards of
ht is reserved to
i gauge, obsolete
ying about the
taking machine.
ion but no longer
ed cold tempera-
bean; 189 rusty
y. unsalable at
lack of rain: 1
ope. suitable for


a small rowboat-repairing town but totally inade-
quate for the requirements of Cristobal
GEORGIE PEPPER.
General Manageress, Commissary Division.


HEADS
The
Playgr
Record
swim
inadvi
enjoy
press c
Africa.


B
O


ALBOA H]
)F DEPAR


Restriction.
THE PANAMA CANAL,
EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
EIGHTS, C. Z., June 30. 1930.
TMENTS AND DIVISIONS:


request of the Chief, Bureau of Clubs and
ounds, that the columns of The Canal
be thrown open to the activities of the
ing director is denied as it is thought
sable to extend the already wide field now
d by this Mexican athlete in the daily
)f the United States, Europe, Asia, and
MILDRED STAFFORD.
Executive Secretary.


Correction.


An article appearing on page 562 in the Oc-
tober issue was in error in stating that "all school
championships in basketball, baseball, tennis and
swimming are held by students of the Pacific
side," as Cristobal High has earned all champion-
ships in these events this year.


Prevention of Contagious Disease.


THE PANAMA
DIVISION OF


BALBOA HEIGHTS,


CANAL,
SCHOOLS,


C. Z., July 7, 1930.


To all concerned-By direction of the Chief
Health Officer, Mr. Leo Eberenz, all principals
are required to provide the following health
requisites for students during the school exercises:
Monday, ice cream cones; Tuesday, pie, cake.
and cookies; Wednesday, fudge; Thursday,
banana splits; Friday, apples, oranges, and raisins.
No departure from this program will be tolerated
unless student is ill, when he or she may be ex-
cused, without injury to class standing, with order
on Commissary for whatever fruit he desires.
A. R. LANG,
Superintendent of Schools.


COMMISSARY NOTE.

Sale.
There will be a special sale at all retail commissaries beginning Monday to close
out a lot of overstocked commissary coupon books. Fifteen-dollar books will be







THE CARIBBEAN. 59


CRISTI'OBAL HIGH SCI


Chester Tavn'r, 22.


Dor


1O0l, IN 2021O .

i O// er, '2.


After giving the morning paper the once over,
and finding that a bill had been passed prohibiting


"All right, Chester, I am going to have you write
a one-page theme in your own handwriting." 1


children under
any kind of a
to mother wit
wouldn't get hI
tinkering aroi
them just as
source of wortr
way to school
"Not such


r si
n a
th a
[is n
und
he
v fo


xteen years of age from driving
ir machine, I handed the paper


h of relief.


My kid


brother


eck broken now. He was always
one of the machines and usinm
liked. This had always been
)r mother, too. Soon I was on mn


a bad


landing that


timne,


" I said


to Herbert, as I climbed out of my aero-limousine
in front of the Cristobal High School hangar,


h was
surely


tuated on the roof of the building.


ve to go down these moving


don't you, Chester?"
the stairs.
"Yes, they're grea
"Hello, Chester,"'
automatic shoe shin
when I looped and lo
"Yes that was I
caught your helmet
but I didn't want to
helmet?"
"No. I didn't lookl


Alice asked me,


t," I answered.
said L.eroy, as
er, was that
st mv helmet?'
and I believe
if I hadn't ha
scare her. Did


for


I noti


stairs,


as we met on


we met at the
you under me

I could have
d Doris along,
you find your

ced that it fell


swore in
Ding,


wardlv.
dong,


Upon entering


the victrola and
ter's Explanatioi
Very well c
Beeching, as th
For the next
motored bus bou
to Spain for our
the air about tel


load of


panish


in English.


sounded


the gong


the algebra room


put on
n of Prol
:xplaine
2 victrol
class we
nd for B
Spanish
ni minute
kids con


t
b
.1
Ct


classes.


ceded to


he record called "Ches-
lem No. '
*
Chester," said Miss
Ceased.


all boar
arcelona.


ded
\x


We h
ve pa
to ta
forw
r alw
its d


V
r


]e
eS

hin


We always looked


Spanish class, because the teacher
us delicious wines and sweet biscu


As soon as we return
the lunch room.
"I hope they have
and some more of th
you ?" I asked.
"Yes, and do you
how it must have b
bother about paying
answered.


a big four-


. we
tad
isse
ake
ard
aavs
uri


re going
been in
d a bus
a lesson
to our
Served
nf class.


ed, ILeroy and I started for

some more chicken to-day
iat pistachio parfait, don't


know, I was just thinking
een when a fellow had to
for his own lunch," Lerov


in Mount Hope


cemetery


so why not let


it rest in


Coming out of the lunch room


we saw many


peace? I don't mind the helmet so much, but I
do hate to comb my hair over on this automatic
hair comber. It puts too much perfume on my
dome."


Soon the


hall. I h
the light
flashing.
pecting toc
Miss Hor
"Come
Stepping
up at her
"Wher


a


sliding boards had me in the assembly


id just seated mys
on my individual
I quickly clamped
hear some girl call
I i


elf, when I noticed
wireless telephone
on the phones, ex-
ng me, only to hear


nteak s voice.
up to the desk at once, Chester."
ig onto the moving carpet, I was soon
desk.
e were you the last half of the period


of the
ran out
Once o
feet in
the bot
colored
seemed
several
and ha
colored
and spi


student
to see
outside
fierce
toms o
school
to kn
planes
t wavi
school
ral do


alight but Shel
fellow turned t,
The next cl


ts running outside. Lerc
what the commotion was a
we saw two planes up about
combat. I knew by the ins
f the planes that one was
l and one was from ours.
ow who was in our plane,
from our school were up. W
ng we watched the plane
I turn and flee and our pl
wn to the ground. But wh


v White!


No wonder the


y and I
ill about.
It 15,000
ignia on
from the
No one
because
ith veils
from the
ane loop
o should


black


s was History. This class we


I ,







THE CARIBBEAN.


before us.
motored


Afterwards we all piled into a big four-


machine and


flew to Gettysburg and


Chattanooga and carefully looked over the old


New York had been busy in there all day,so natur-
ally we were crazy to have a peep, but the door
was shut fast, so we would have to curb our curi-


battlefields.


Just as if I ever gave a doggone for


osity until night.


This was to be the best dance


those old battlefields, anyway!


of the year.


Music was to be furnished by the


As soon


as we


got back


tiresome


Boston


Symphony


Orchestra,


and, during


trip, we all had a race to the natatorium, which


was situated


in the center


rooms in the basement.


of the gymnasium


Here we watched Paul


intermission, special dances were to be rendered
by the ballet of the Metropolitan Opera Company.
I began to call different girls for dances and


Doyle


and Frank


Raymond


battle


for three


quarters of an hour over a game of water tennis.
Paul, in the end, was victorious.
The next period was a study period for me.
I put my next day's English record on my indi-
vidual phonograph twice, but I knew no more


after the second time than before I


began.


soon my program was full.


This done, I decided


that I had better call Doris and warn her to be


ready at 7.30,
was always late.


when


would call for her-she


As I was trying to get her, some-


one broke in with---


"Chester, you had better get up.
you'll be late for school, I'm afraid.


It's 7.30 and


couldn't get my mind on my work, so I decided to
fill my program for the Junior dance which was to
be given that night in the Louis XVI ball room
in the south wing. Caterers and decorators from


"What ? Wi
Aw, mother, I


hy, where's Doris ?


Who are--


was just having a swell dream


about Cristobal High School in


2021.


I wishit


were true now.


THE


HABITS OF


OUR


ANCESTORS


1921.


NOTES FROM A LECTURE GIVEN IN 2021, BY A PROMINENT HISTORIAN.


Wesley


Townsend,


Eleanor Zimmermann,


It has been my privilege recently to take up
some original research work concerning life in the
public schools of the Canal Zone in 1921.
I have found through my investigation that:
The pupils in the school were forced to sit in
straight-backed seats in plain rooms, in strange
contrast to the luxurious upholstered chairs, in
comfortable rooms with frescoed walls and full
length windows, of our school.
The favorite game of the boys seems to have


basketball,


which,


however,


was far dif-


ferent from the game our boys play under the same


name.


The boys were exceedingly rough in their


game, knocking, shoving,
opponents against the walls,


and holding their
while our boys step


politely aside with an


Excuse me


and let the


other team take the ball.
As for the dress, this was the most astonishing.
The girls arranged their hair in a queer manner,
covering up their dainty ears which nature had


meant to be shown.


To accomplish this, some


even wore on each side contrivances which o16oked
like fuzzy balls glued to their heads.
They had no idea of grace and line and wore


their skirts very short and scant.


They used the


very richest material for their everyday dress.
Although there was not much change in the
boys' dress, some of the boys had come to our
sensible way of wearing loose collars, while others
still adhered to the ancient custom of wearing the
high stiff collar.


YOU KNOW!


Ferguson,


When Miss Dodds calls you to her office,


Though wit and wisdom flow


from her,


C C C -








THE


NAMELESS

Hlerbert


CARIBBEAN.


1BUT NAIMEIUI..


McC/lain,


I hopped into my


I)odds roadster and


left old


inside.


When he had fund his daughte-, I started


Stafford


Halls with


never a


pang of


re get.


to go home but fund that Strobridge had broken


entered the highway and stepped on the gas. It
was May, and Bovd by a Mary heart I sped along,


down


so I left the car and walked.


home I met a b)v leading a Ca


Not far from


npbell a


nd feeding


watching for a squirrel or


Kuhn as it crossed the


it some little


red BalLs.


I askel him what they


Ducy
Rush.


Fields.


rounded


a sharp


curve


Just ahead of me rode a Miller in a cart.


were.


He said,


"Peppers.


hit him with a bump that threw me out and


turned the Cartwright over.


hit the road and


I thought I knew th2 b:)y and asked himn,
you John Morton's bHv?"


tore my new Tailor


made


Cloke


the back.


He smiled and an


swered "I'm not


7ohnson


Mv victim stood up and, h/ite as he was about


Peterson.


" I passed on and came to the lake where


the Gills,
driving.


he gave me his Frank opinion of mv


I got into the car to


Parker o


outside the


mv brother Oliver was


the shore.


Beeching Edward' s boaa t on


He showed me a queer fish he had


Townsend and he got in beside me


to hunt
Hunter.
Solomon


his daughter.


offered


He couldn't find her in
sad he went to the Morgan


to go to town
to help him
the town. so


looked-


while


caught
sharp


that had See/lv


Hornbeak.


flappers


for fins and


We walked on together and I


thought of


homn e


decided to loaf hereafter and leave it to dad to


I staved outd


oors,


knowing what


a Colberg it


was


)ring home the Bacon and apo


ogize


for this Witt


IN PLANE
Esther IJitt, '


GEOMETRY


and Louise


CLASS.


Ilenter,


what's


the matter with


you boys?


Well, what's the matter with


You don't


need to make so much


noise.


Al, I ijst wish you were up


a steeple,


Now you quit bangin' those chairs around.
Why can't you let 'em stay on the ground?
Well, Eddie, so you're getting' it too?


Then you wouldn't be craning your neck
\V itching the airplanes on their wa'.


Oh, pshaw, haven't you g it any


brains?


It must be catching'


as the "flu.


" You absolutely give me a p:tain.


I thought you'd let the girls alone;
You'd better get a private phone
And do your chatting after school
When you won't be breaking any rule.
Now, Emma Townsend, quit those giggles,
And Jessie, have you got the wiggles?


Herbert, please go to


the board.


Now, Bill Mary, don't you crab,
I've t all your marks on tab,


AnJ they're not so


goid that you cin't improve


S ) take the hint and get on the move.
Well, this class must have the willies,


You act just like


al >t of sillis.


You'll make me real mad some dayv


soon,


You're noisy enough to be a Ford.


And I'll chuck


the while lunch


out of the


room.


SENI()RS SOLILO(QU


lildred


Stafford,


(Chairs


Hlanter,


To rise


or not to


rise--that is the question,


Oh, that this
Explode, and


too, too solid geometry


w )ui melt,


Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to rise
S. 1 . .. .1 .. . ...... 11: -- _.. .. .... k .T


now,


resolve itself into a smoke,


you pe ple?


F1- .... L ... ..._..L . L I . r.. I








THE CARIBBEAN.


We
year
issue.


regret


the small number


and hope to have b


However


exchanges that


of excha


better success in


, we certainly


were


the next


appreciate


sent us.


The Eltrurian.


is too


advertisements


School,


Haverhill,


Mass.


ood a book with the


in front and on the covers.


We have


nothing more to say except that we would like to hear
your views of us.


The W~hisp.


ilmnington


School,


WIihnmington,


We congratulate you on the development of so


The Pioneer.


Reading


High School,


Reading,


We are interested in your well-developed stories.


good a book.


Your jokes are clever and interesting.


'Neath Caribbean Skies"


is typical of our surround-


The cuts are appropriate. However, your book may
be improved by increasing your literary department
and keeping all your advertisements in the back.


The Ahdawagam. Lint
This is the only


coin


High School,


Wisconsin Rapids, Ifis.


annual we received as an exchange.


Your book is worthy of praise.
from beginning to end. We h


It is well planned
ave obtained many


suggestions from your arrangement. We hope you
will have an exchange department in the forthcoming


issue.


We were surprised to see a story


"A Trip


ings but
mistake.


in reading it over we found quite a serious
In the March number you said that Colon


had been given the American name "Cristobal."
Cristobal and Colon are two separate towns although
there is only a railroad separating them.


The Gleaner.
Your


Pawtucket High School,


book is very


meant is very interesting.


vou on
-


Your "Tattler


Pawtucket,


R.I.


" depart-


We wish to congratulate


the good arrangement of your doctors', law-


vers' and dentists' "ads"


in the front of the book.


through the Panama Canal,


Canal Zone

The Comment.


We enjoyed


" by one of our former


students, Prudence Martin,


Cretin High School, St.


your Christmas number.


Paul, Minn.


The Christ-


mas stories are in great contrast with ours and we


feel homesick after reading them.


will brighten your book.


A few snapshots


Your comments are origi-


nal. The paper and print of your book make it very
pleasing to read.


Revista La Salle.


Su libro es muy bueno.
fotografias.


The Hyde Park Weekly


Colegio de La Salle,


Panama.


Usted debe tener mas de


High School, Chicago,


The fact that your book is published


reason enough


weekly


for your not having cuts in your book.


Cuts and better paper would add a great deal to your
book.


The Curtis


Monthly.


Curtis


High School,


Staten Island,


N. Y.


The Magpie.


St. Margaret's School,


WiVaterbury, Conn.


There is a good variety of material in your contents.


Your literary department is well-handled.


jokes will add spice to your book.
improve its appearance.


A few


Cuts would


The Thrasher.


Rice Institute, Houston,


Your paper gives very good accounts of athletics.


The 7unta.


Indiana


High School,


Your cover designs are appropriate.


change in the Easter number is cleverly written. Why


not add more cuts to your book?


"Cannibal Lee


The Academy Journal.


Norwich Free Academy, Norwich, Conn.


Your magazine is unusually
pearance and content.


In the author of


we see a budding F. P. A.


The Record.


Your magazine is


Marshal
very good


attractive


High School,


both in ap-


Richmond,


throughout but there


The Florida Flambeau.


Florida


Your paper is very newsy.


State College for


Women.


"Nufsed.


are still ways of improvement, by adding a few cuts
and a joke department.


Haverhill High
bad to cheapen so g


Mass.


Indiana, Penn.
Your ex-


&
rf







THE CARIBBEAN.


OCTOBER,.


further by assuring him that things grow well in


the tropics.


The girls, except the few who were


When the doorsofCristobal High School were


again


opened,


we found


the assembly


creased twice the size of the year before.


hall in-
Many


afraid


of their


hazing


and staved


awayv


school was in session, didn't lose their curly locks


but had them braided


"a /a Sis Hopkins.


new faces were seen-among them one new Senior,


22. Mrs. Fields gave a party for her dau


one new Junior, and several
besides a large Freshman class.


new Sophomores,
Only two of the


MIary.
the ones


The threatening downpour did not faze


were


invited.


The evening was


faculty


year


before


remained,


enjoyed by all-especially the refreshments;


Bacon and Seior Villafranca.


As Mr. Drill was


Harold?


The house


was decorated to suit the


in the States, Mr. Bacon acted as principal.


coming occasion, Halloween.


6. This day


the seating of the student body,


excepting the proud Seniors, was changed.


2'. The faculty enjoyed a trip up the coast to


Porto Bello.


Among the many souvenirs brought


insulting it was to the


Juniors


to have Fresh-


men sitting farther back in the room than they


back was a most beautiful sunburn.
2 Our usual interest in aeroplan


es was some-


were!


How queer it was to see


six-foot Willie


what divided;


we watched the grammar school


sitting in a front seat and obstructing


the view of


children move into the annex.


room.


among


Quietly


four privilege


and innocent
ed, enjoying,


Lerov


corn fortable


Freshies.
ii. At 7-not sharp-a group of boys repre-
senting a picked basketball team, met at pier 7.


They waited until
Dodds, and Miss


Mr. Wilson, the coach, Miss


Hornbeak arrived.


Together


they left in the launch Margarita for Gatun (via


the Panama


Canal).


For results oi


f the game


refer to the athletic department.


26. Our


meetmin


was held.


Alex.


linczer was chosen as cheer leader and proved


himself qu


ite capable.


Do&dds we had
Miss Dodds.


With the


some clever veils.


The first game of th


able help of Miss
Rah, Rah, Rah,


e basketball series with


Ballboa High School was played on Cristobal floor


The school turned out and we were there


stron


with our new vells.


12. Much


to our surprise


and delight


Howard, whom we remembered as Miss Healey,


NOVEMBER.


came from


Balboa


to teach


a permanent


teacher could be secured.


S. Mliss


teach


Piedalue


the D)omestic


arrived
Science


Montana


classes


formerly in


Dodds


was appointed


principal.


of Mlrs.


Strong.


proved herself very capable and became a favor-
ite among the students.


15. Oh, poor


Freshies!


This day


their curly


io. Physical


examination


bv the doctors of


Colon Hospital.
16. The first general staff meeting at the home


locks were shorn from their heads by the upper-


rln -ccn~-,n anelfl hnir-i~r' fr^' iir'c r'h nra-uil


AQ 1


of Kirby


Ferzuson.


t.\.i11,. I


A--. ft 1


s


b - m . IL-L^ I .**. **-


' I







THE CARIBBEAN.


was held at the Hotel Washington.


Miss Dodds


15. The girls went to Ancon to play a basketball


acted as toastmistress and a school pin was pre-


sented to Mr. Wilson.


game.


The dinner was marred bv


the absence of Henter and Townsend; however,
it was an enjoyable evening.
18. Work was begun on the Junior play to be


FEBRUARY.


2. Mrs.


Holland gave a most interesting talk


Thanksgiving program.


23. The most important and enjoyable event
of the year was the welcoming of Senator and Mrs.
Harding, upon whom our nation had bestowed its


about India where she has been a missionary for
many years.
5. The girls played basketball with the Balboa
High School girls.


greatest honor.


We were given a half holiday, in


honor of the occasion.


8. School was dismissed at


the students


2 o'clock to enable


see the Panamanian


carnival


To celebrate the


program was held.


Thanksgiving holidays a


Many poems and stories were


parade.
i1. Girl Reserves


party at the Gilbert House.


read. The main number on the program was a
play given by four members of the Junior class,
Kirby Ferguson, Mary Fields, Herbert McClain,
and Harold Cloke. The plot of the play was the
revelation of the Puritan Age to a modern boy


19.
Gatun


First indoor baseball of the season


This was our first victory


but by no


means the last.


Miss Blaisdell became Mrs. Lockett.


28. Gerald Bliss


returned from South America


and girl as they


looked up at their ancestors


after a vacation of three weeks.


picture.


to 29.


Turkey, trips, and thankfulness.


MARCH.


DECEMBER.


i. Mrs.


Algebra


Howard left.
class and Miss


Mr. Bacon
Porter th


Le Modern


History class.
5. The Colon and Fort Davis baseball teams
played a benefit game for the high school annual.
The proceeds were indeed a great help and every
body interested in THE CARIBBEAN was thankful
to the teams, Mr. J. B. Fields, Colonel Cloke, and
all those who helped the cause.
8. Many sad faces were seen as the report cards
for the first quarter were given.


14-15. Everybody bus
carnival.
16. THE CARNIVAL.


17 (6-30 a. m.).
before.


20. Christmas vacation.


preparing


3. Much credit is due to the Ancient History
class for the presentation of their play, a Mock
Olympian Council. But, one can readily under-
stand the perfection of the entire play when we
say that Miss Dodds is the teacher of the class,
for she has the ability of bringing out all that is
best in a pupil.
4. Hostilities between Costa Rica and Panama
resulted in the sudden departure of Sefilor Villa-
franca.


10. Mis
take the


s


Barnhouse came


Panama


Spanish classes formerly in charge of


Senior Villafranca.


were


Cleaning day after the night


The faculty enjoyed


a trip to the San Bias Islands.


Freshman
chaperoned


Beeching,


picnic
by


at Devil'


s Hole.


Hornbeak,


Piedalue,


Lockett,


They
Miss
and


Mr. Bacon.
15. The Freshman classes of former years have
played little part in the school compared to the


activities and ability shown by the


'24 class, but


with Miss


JANUARY.


Hornbeak as


English


why shouldn't they be that way?


teacher


They gave a


3. Miss Beeching arrived from


the S


states to


most enjoyable entertainment composed of dia-


teach Geometry, Physics, and General Science.
r, 4c -c - -. -_


logues and monologues.


We sincerely hope that


* .. .... . _Ix . .. l 1---


given at the


*








THE CAR IBBEAN.


18-28.


Faster


vacation.


The boys


wen t


MA ,V.


different camping trips, among them
water and up the Chagres.


sweet


Elcv MlcCausev


, who has spent three


Freshman algebra


examinatIon.


,ears


in China, talk


to us ab )ut the custo ms


APRIL.


andl cotlnditions


IntjreCStinii


C(uinI trv.


I
U--


6.
for t


Track meet. A Pvrrhian victo
We had our first practice with


he


songs at the


Co1mmenceme


25. The Sophomore class
"Silas Marner."


28. The members


gave


- the Staff


presidents met to discuss the dance
the 6th of May.


rv for Balbla.


Nliss Currier
nt exercises.


a d dramatization


and the class


to be)


given


6. The


Ver


Scho(


lance at the


W\ashinmtz4n.


happy.


io. Mllss Reichel talk
class on her experiencelS
: 2. Mrs. )rehcr, Ith


Consul


talked


spent almost


Friday


to tus on


to the


Ancient History


talian cities.


of the


"Tahiti


Am 1 1ican


where


Y ears.


). Mrs. ILockett awards


the athl


o30. The last games


of the in


door baseball games


letters to


were played at


Balboa and


Cristobal High School girls


Pedro
winning


Miguel, the
both. which


SR. Iast material


for iTHE CARIBExx


press.


gave them the


100oo per cent championship.


APE OWE 'EM.


"WHO'S


TO BLAME


Exchange.
When fur stews can this sill leer I'm
Toot rye tomb ache theme e'en ink leer,


E. Miller


Four nights


to the movies


Youth inked wood butt bee weigh


thyme;


And a basketball


g.zme,


Use eh, "Its imp lean


on scents,


shear!"


m mv schtfl work


And wh%


Gnome attar; Anna lies align!


tn blame?


Can it be v my teachers?


Nation mice lender


verse says k


It surely isn


Fork rip tick poet real Ike mine,
How Aaron weal, demesnes allot.


I wonder,


I woln k&I


W\\ho can it be?


MORE


TRUTH


THAN


POETRY.


What


.lightning


is to Sp eed;


\\ hat Snap


is to "Fforv;


G(as is to the M\otor


W\\hat Butter


is to


Yea! Yea! and more


.u1st;


"e1 s!


\hat Ten cents is to a Freshm an;


What


Ft>od is


What Sleep


to a Sophlmore:
to a Junior;


\Vhat Commencement


is to a Semor,


a light idea of


What our Faculty


to all of


MR 77375--5


t Ime.


not--







THE CARIBBEAN.


Wesley
fairies?"


Townsend.-"Duey, do you believe in


The Junior class had been


taking


hi







references


"Source Book of American History,


"Sure, I crossed the Hudson River in


written


Hart.


When


the class w


called,


one.


After the ancient history class had compared


the characteristics


positions


of Caesar,


Hornbeak


asked:


"Have you your Harts, class?"
Everyone reached to his left side and nodded.


Crassus, and Pompey, Miss Dodds asked:


"Kenneth, which
have been?"


one of these


would vou rather


Paul (to his father).
ever grow any more?"


Mr. Doyle.-


"Pop, do you think I'll


"Why, sure, son, why not?"


Kenneth.-"Caesar.


Miss
Kenn

Irene


Dodds.-


eth.


Paul.-"I don't.


My head's in the


way.


"Why?"


"Because he lived the


McCourt.-"We h


ave a


ongest.


white


Harold Cloke (in the old Washington Hotel).-
"Waiter, is there any soup on the bill-of-fare?"


parrot at


Waiter.-
fr C -.


"There was, but I wiped it off."


home.


Miss
Irene.
Miss


Hornbeak.-"Does it talk?"
-"Oh, awfully."
H.-"Who taught him, Irene?"


Miss Dodds (at a staff meeting of THE CARIB-


BEAN).-


"How about some of you boys making


some things in wood work for our bazaar?"


Eddie


May.-


guess


that wood work.


A TRUE JOKE, BUT NOT FOR THE NATIVE.


was when


registers


were


first intro-


duced in Latin-American countries, that a store-
keeper in a small town away up in the interior,
bought one.
A few days later a native entered the store with


a bill to be changed.


Into the strange monster


of a cash register went the bill and
"No Sale."


up jumped


A Senior (after three and one-half years in high
school). I think I'll go down and look over the
night school some day."


Miss Beeching (teaching botany in general
science class).-"What kind of rose is common to


the Isthmus?"
Freshman.-"Neg-roes.


D, Sefior,
'No Sale.


Seijor,


screamed the nati


"him


' It won't come out.


ROLL CALL IN SPANISH


CLASS.


Mr. Villafranca.- "George!"


The Junior class was


discussing ci


topic turned to forms of governments.


George


(very loud).


Mr. Villafranca.-


"Are you here?"


"Chester, what was the form of
before the flood?"


Trying to think, he answered,
seem to remember."


government


"Why, I can't


"Slim
Gatun
baskets


to Wesley


" Zimmermann, the new guard


on the


basketball team was practicing shooting
. Just as he made a nice long shot, he said


was


standing


nearby,


"Gee,


Raymond


(at the dinner given to the basketball


every time I open my mouth it seems to fall in.


team


Mr. Wilson).


"Why is a schoolroom


hi .*.. COMNO-ATft


3oh es.


uey.-


"9


mOMNOTATTONT.


t








THE CARIBBEAN.


picture that may come into your


mind,"


OVERHEARD AT THE BALL GAME.


Hornbeak assigned to the Freshman English class.


"I can't do that,"
blank look.


"Certainly


you can,


spoke up Shelby,


said Miss


with a


Hornbeak.


"Now just tell me what picture comes into your


while you are looking at the


leaves of a


tropical palm tree."
He glanced at one just outside the school win-


dow, then calmly said,


"It looks to me like Harold


trying to raise a pompadour.


"Let me pitch;


I can give


balls as that boob can!"
"Cold drinks-s-s-s I"
"What wonderful control!


as many bases on


That pitcher can hit


a batsman's bat with the ball anytime he wants
to.'
"Hot peanuts-s s-s !"


"All that pitcher's got


Hey, you;
standing and


In
sit down in
no action.


s a glove.


front!"
"Hev!


Several are


You with


"Look here, Harold, why


did you tell Gladys


dirty neck!


Sit down!"


All obey the command.


Ford that you were
World War?"


over in France


during the


"Chunegum, cigarette


es-s-s-s


"What da


yer mean I told her such a whopper?


OVERHEARD


AT THE


SILVER COMMISSARY.


I told her the truth, but she ran away before I
finished saying France Field."


"Is you got any powder?


"Yes, what kind do


you want, tooth or face


Teacher


eighth


grade


pupil).-


"What


"Ah don


want nee


der; ah wants bug powder.


man "


Pupil.


'Live dust.


Julius


(making an impression).-


"Frankie Ray-


IIhEARD IN
Mirs. MlcCarthy.-


MODERN


HISTORY.


"Would you rather be burned


mond and I struck out 260 batsmen this season."
Julius was right, too, for the record shows that
Frankie struck out 259 and Julius struck out i.


at the stake or guillotined ?"


Bright


pupil.--


"Burned at the stake.


Mrs. McCarthy.-'-"Why ?"


Willie Harrison, now an apprentice machinist,
is said to have answered one of his examination


Bright


pupil--


"I'd rather have


a hot steak


questions


"A fishing line has a worm at one end


any day, than a cold chop.


and a nut at the other.



r
I


f//4I/I


F







THE CARIBBEAN.


OUR years ago the editorial staff of
expressed the wish that the fort


our yearbook


-r mg issue.
iscouragements,


us who


have


might


grow


That annual,


served


followed.


h


better


bravely


as an insp
r book has


We realize them and regret them. But w(
reflected a little of the true Cristobal Hig
i__ ^ o j h i. h, h fi l- b* d~ tj -j.^ jt***- **! 1^/^/*


the first CARIBBEAN
coming volumes of
with each succeed-
issued in spite of
ration to those of
s its imperfections.
e hope that we have
gh School spirit and


kept fait wt t at rst annua oar .
We can't thank personally all those who, behind the sc


(and


screens) have made this book a possibility, but we


assure them


behalf.


their untiring interest and enthusiasm, have


and
debt


we have appreciated all their efforts in


the staff


of The


Panama


Canal


mechanics of
of gratitude.


the book what they are,


Press,


who


made the print
we feel a sp


And now we leave it to our readers to thank another g


of helpers-the advertisers-by giving


them


their patron


enes
here
our
, by
ting
ecial

roup
iage,
^F-J M'" ^sf 'st^ii^^^ []iw"r
f^^af^^ ~i J^IH -^4 W *] *
I1Tl ~ j *r/ J f~ []1 ^L
[][][]2[][]2


and mentioning


THE


SLONDON STORE

s 55 FRONT S
[ SUITS MADE TO ORDER
iEnglish Woolen Suitings, Pongee Silk, P


to them


CARIBBEAN,


Modern Tailoring

STREET, COLON, R. P.
MATERIAL FURNISHED
aim Beach, and Tweeds of various shades to select from


1


1


I


I







THE


CARI11EAN.


FRANK RAYMOND,
"BUSTER" FIELDS,


'21, Governor-General
Office Bovy


Crsttobal 5igtib


PAUL C. DOYLE,


'22, General-Governor


HAROLD CLOKE, Chief


School


flbbertising


Penwiper


M


Let this
will read it


Agency write a sample
just to find our spelling


advertisement for you.


errors.


one adve


highest merit. This Agency unqualifiedly guarantees I
means the same as "Paramount" on moving pictures.
can expect for such high quality ad-writing in these days
and, if you like it and your goods measure up to the high


tisement for you next year.


You will be surprised how many teachers, scholars, and their parents
rtisement written each year, and that one concerning the article of


the merit of t


ie goods


it writes


about.


Its stamp on an advertisement


We just have got to eat, but our prices for this service are as low as you
of high wages and rising costs. Read this sample advertisement through
standard of the concern mentioned in it, our Agency will write an adver-


FRANK RAYMOND, Gavernor-General.
by "BUSTER" BURGOON, Executive


Secretary.


Advertisement


OW, you


chesty and


swell-headed


Seniors, you brainy


and
dum


enterprising Juniors, you w


b


innocent Freshies,


advertisement written


teak and pitiful Sophs,
just glance at the first


this Agency.


Most advertise-


ments tell about what a dealer has to sell, but this one will


quite


AMERICA


different, for


every


THEATER is


homelike amusement place


one


le biggest
in Colon;


us knows
, coolest,
we know


and most


orchestra alone is worth the price charged for admission, for
its sweet music is simply wonderful; we know that its seats


are wide, inviting, and comfortable,


and its pictures are the


best that money can buy; we know that when we are tired


and brain-weary and need a good, healthy laugh or an hour's
excitement in refreshing mental relaxation that a few min-


utes' walk in the cooling


us face to face with smiling


all of


the nicest


people


eezes
and


of


the evening will


bring


courteous attendants and


the Atlantic


Side;


so we


not going to use these reasons for urging your patronage at
the AMERICA. Rather, we are going to ask you to attend
their shows because the management gives us more than we


can get min the


States for the same money, and besides, they


have always supported our school annual


"The Caribbean."


PAUL C. DOYLE, General-Governor.
by HAROLD CLOKE, Chief Penwiper.


FOX.__


A IKrTllTflT A


a tnTTin A friln T.


GOLDW


'N


rlaencp


Sample


are


nvi'~r-TT\ ATiT't-'T-^ i- J


am i wa i


FACTORY: COLON BEACH, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA


br






THE CARIBBEAN.


UNITED


Regular Sailings
from


[]


to
New York,
New Orleans,
Cuba,
Colombia,
Jamaica, and
Costa Rica,


For further particulars,


apply:
M. C. O'HEARN,


General


FRU]


Agent, Cristobal, C. Z.


Panama Hats

H THE HAT OF THE TROPICS [





I J. B. GOMEZ
Q The Only Exclusive Hat Store in
COLON
gg44 FRONT STREET [
^~ !


MORAN &FORD

I] Colon's
gLeading
Jewelers


| For Choice Selection of Jewelry, [
ISilver and Cut Glass

@COLON STORE PANAMA STORE
x xth St.. On. Commissary 8th St. and Central Ave.


Cristobal


-iri ij i Mi~ E^J i>* ~><>~1""i U'''r i J~'iJI>" < "JM |i i "i *-'"JI>""i ^1 "J 'i'U ~ '^ ~iJ T ~i' ~'-r'l ~ij T j|1 -jll" j M"i\ ~ jM""J "iW"*
-^ 9_ ^-JfKT~Kf^ -klTJ f^IJ^AJ^ ^Xf~lJ-J -j -i7j^ >^ b^ -^Bf^Sj^ ^--f^ ~di M- ~A ^ .f--j- ^XX^ IJBj^ ^AJ^


T COMPANY













T. A. JACOME, Agent, Panama City
[]Z


A*T f'TA'HA^P *^ '^X^M BMEMMEM ft^^x3i x'^^^ liAS^A^^A^^A'







THE


CARIBBEAN.


ITHE FRENC
PANAMA AND

HLarge and Up-to-date

Headquarters for Pa


Stores


H


COLON


Department


hrisian Novelties


are appreciated by all careful


buyers who want a host of opportunities


min purchases


who prefer to


served


personally


a


and merit of their


is well
purch


as min the value
cases. .


[ H
SPANAMA


:EURTEMATTE


CO.,


Inc.


COLON


STasff)ngton
COLON BEACH


P. O. Address,


European


Plan


ioo Rooms
Rates


New, modern, and luxr
cuisine. Large private gi
sea front, and fine concr


Cool Days.


Cool Nig


CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


Facing


the Atlantic


xoo Baths
from $3.00oo up
urious in appointments. Excellent
rounds with promenade along the
ete sea-water swimming pool.
hts. Excellent Winter Resort.


ANDREW


JOHNSTON,


Manager.


WASHINGTON


MOTOR


SERVICE


CO.,


COLON, R. P.


UNDER


AMERICAN


MANAGEMENT


- -a -


lid.



7;;'


BAZAAR


Stores


I
[]l fl nl'

[]^i^^ *^^^^^t^^^^L

[]I ^^^^H


Jtotel


Li






TIHE


CARIBBEAN.


BO-WDRY
^" ^American Millinery and Dress Parlors
S/' Nos. 1-3 Avenida 4 de Julio
-, C BPANAMA

Z Colon Branch: roth Street, near Front Street


*A Phone,
American colon 98
Beauty
Parlor |

i SHAMPOOING
HAIR DRESSING
MANICURING
|FACE MASSAGE
~! SCALP TREATMENT

.. HAIR WORK OF ALL KINDS .'.


I Opposite P.R. R. Station "Upstairs" .
t I- []] []] []


[] INVESTIGATE
SThreaded Rubber
[] INSULATION









SMALLWOOD BROTHERS
Sole Distributors
PANAMA COLON


ITHOMPSON & DALEY

|Real Estate





THE CARIBBEAN.


M S C
I ^CLASS 0F 1921 s

EI have raised you from '-
T infancy, watched over you s
|T through your A-B-C's, and
v will continue to keep you
--^ sound of body and healthy of
]i1 mind.
S .gB s t.CH AR Les
ISt. Charles Milk



T AM'S GARAGE Broadway, between I4thand
tl^.JL. 0 GARAGEr I5th Streets, COLON, R. P. ||

|For your 5 and 7 passenger touring cars
Day and Night Service Call Phone 33 Competent Chauffeurs


Telephone 354 NIGHT SERVICE P. O. Box 2o4

Drs. Wm. and Vernon Crosbie
[ SURGEON DENTISTS
crn.nw iT p






THE CARIBBEAN.


RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO
H 23 Front Street, Colon, R. P,
Just at 7th Street.
SP. 0. Box 523, Cristobal, C. Z. Phone Corp. No. 9


[ Portraits, Groups, Enlargements, Views,
SCommercial Work and Photo Supplies

[] We do the highest quality of Portraiture in Our success in this direction is the result
Sour Studio, with that degree of artistic rendering, of good training in a Photographic Institute, and
[ so much sought after, and so rarely found here experience gained in some of the best Studios
[ on the Isthmus. in the United States.

H ART STUDIES OF INFANTS AND LADIES OUR SPECIALTY




IBargain Sale in Panama Hats

Prices 50 per cent below cost
I. L. MADURO, JR.
CATHEDRAL PLAZA NEXT CENTRAL HOTEL



FIRST CLASS SERVICE
Go to Cristobal Clubhouse Barber Shop
Come and Get the Unrivaled Shoe Shine





THE CARIBBEAN.


THE NEW

Gowns
Blouses
Undergarments

S...DRES

SFront Street, near Sli


YORK


SHOP


Millinery
Shoes
Hosiery


MAKING


fer


Park


COLON


Colon Electric
0 AND
Ice SuppyIo.u
'& --176 Bolivar Street
Colon, R. P.


Satisfied Servants
are always found in -
S ~~~ ~ ~~~~ -, ,^" -'^iv ^--w -


EMEMEMEME@@@@MMUMM


MEM


I







n
@
[]
[2


,MB[


EMEM@i


i@@






THE CARIBBEAN.


ITHE PAN-A

Botica Pan-Americana
S5o FRONT STREET
182 BOLIVAR
Phones: 336-166


Cable Addre


SColon Import
JOBBERS AN
MAN
^ DEALERS IN
HGeneral Merch

S.COLON,



Branch R
COLON BOCAS DEL TORO PLA


MERICAN


9


3 Stores


STREET


s "IMPCO."


and


ENGLISH


A. B.C.,


DRUG STORE

N. SALAZAR, Prop.
56 BOLIVAR STREET
[ DRUG STORE
COLON, R. P.
[]


and Lieber


Export


Co.


D COMMISSION MERCHANTS


UFACTURERS'


andise


and


AGENTS


Native


Pr


REPUBLIC OF PANAMA


P. O. Box 107


Stores


YA DAMA


and Trading


Stations:


SANTA ISABEL


ESCRIBA


, Ltd.




oduce







NO MANDINGA
=^ = = s
[][[]][[]][


Everything in the line of Plumbing

Ef

Estimates cheerfully given
r, n-^ r^ x ,- n n na -- ,^ a - a_ nff


EMEMEMEMEMEMEMEMEMEREMEMEMEMEMEMEMMMM






THE CARI BBEAN.


I FRENCH LINE OF STEAMERS

|| Regular Sailings from Cristobal, Canal Zone, to France
SMonthly Sailings from France to South America . .


Via the Panama Canal (Ecuador, Peru, and Chile)
KFor all particulars apply to

FRENCH LINE AGENCY
P. 0. BOX 128, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. Phone No. 185


IAmerican Trade
Developing
|Company
Complete Line of
S American, French, and
English


IGroceries

FREE DELIVERY IN ANCON AND BALBOA
We Invite Your Patronage
?- Central Avenue Panama City


French


Drug


V. DELGADO


Store


& SON


Main Store:


26 Front


Street,


opposite Cable Office


A large as ortment of
Ztmertuan, Jfrencj, anb


iwrltsbf


PERFUMERY
KODAKS


4^oobs.


TOILET ARTICLES


FILMS


CAMERAS


ETC., ETC.


Prescription Department under the


of United


supervision


States Pharmacists


BABIES' PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
'- >>-






THE CARIBBEAN.


I Be particular about the chocolates you eat!
SInsist upon the best-it can be had by specifying








Large assortments on sale at all Clubhouses and Commissaries

The Walter M. Lowney Company, Boston, Mass.
J. D. MAXWELL, Representative, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


i FAO IDE JI.Mawel

6- tRepresentative

CANAL ZONE
SA dainty candy-coated AND
chewing gum. REPUBLIC OF

*,d PANAMA

[] N / ADAMS [
| Th Pure Chewing Gum P. o. Box 5s026
BJk" Adams Adams Cristobal, C. Z.
"Black Jack California Fruit
i Adams ChIcletc Adams Sen Sen
A ** ... F JTel.D3. x Colon
r^4 w'Lv -.^IBrB.^^ TAk~ l






THE


DIERS


CARIBBEAN.


ULLRICH


and


Retail


Merchants


AGENTS


FOR


White Rock Mineral Water and Ginger Ale


Park


Tilford's


Candy


Anheuser-Busch Malt Nut


Front


Street


Phone IoI


COLO


IRATHBU]
GENERAL HARI
[ Dealers in PAINTS, 01LS, AND B

[ P. 0. BOX 140


STILSON


)WARE AND


BUILDERS'


LUMBER


CO


MERCHANTS


MATERIAL


Picture Framing


a Specialty
COLON, R. of P.


[ THE TRANS-CARIBBEAN COMPANY
H] AGENTS FOR
PAGE MILLING CO. BISHOP & CO.
TOPEKA, KANS. Three-in-One Oil LOS ANGELES, CAL.
SHard Wheat Flour High Grade Candy
[]i []


Wholesale


N \Sy-
[]


N,








THE CARIBBEAN:
M 4


R5 4 9* -




-4 .


4


p--- --_ --



4. mm
--I fl .l -- -
4- t=- l S ---= -




-
H+ .






H. _




Walinis ruy pleasure with













@ You will appreciate the flexi ity T%^ ^| &^R 1hey are universal in their ad-
Wthat leaves your feet so diet tr ntyes and use; they are for
Q after a long walk with N olin hJ\ i^ it 1 ealthygoaity, long wear, and c
A []

















Soles. T ,refineet
[] HEOLIN. SOLES ARE AS PLE LE AS THE FOOT ITSELF R;
a / 'T TH WT #




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THE CARIBBEAN ",;.o,:.. ...;I V __________ ...:. C HISTOH A L CA;\'AI. ZO:\ L'" H}:!I '\0, I PUBLI SHED BY THE C R I S TOBA L HI G H SC H OO L /'IuiSlanl Editor P Al'l. D0Y1.E, '21. .-1,., F,d/lor BIISilll!u JlItUlfIga CARl. D u t:", ''2[. F.,bl;roj SC//Ool Noft's C :iARLF.'" HI'\"rER. '2[, 1\I AII.\ 10'1.;1. 0<;, '22. A;sisfflnl.l/a11ager GEORGE C-\RrI\FUGHr, '12. 70JuEdifu r Circulation Ilimag.-,. FO',\'ARD ;\IAY, '23 L/II',.,I,...', Elill(U AuiJlfWf Cirat/aJioll l\!n1/agl'r Au:.,;. L IS'C'ZEJI. '23. ,-{llIl1In; Ediior dIMe/to CBo.vs') HAROLD CLOKE, '22. E:o:rlllmgi' Editor ,-Ilh/eli(! (Girb') KUC.8\ FEltGl"SO\, ''21. CHE,>n.R TA\"J.OR. '22. :\IARJOJOE IhLl-. '.!.!. DORI OU\'ER, ':2. ,\ltJ.D.u:D SrAffORD '21. We, tbr slubmls of
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2 THE CARIBBEAN. SC H OO L SPIRI T F rank Ra)'m ol/d, '21. \Vhat i s s h o') l s pirit? M os t o f LIS lise the express i o n v ery (;eel)' and f req u ently, but d o w e lise i t wit h full understanding? D oes sc hool spirit I'llean stud yin g and p o n de rin g at book s during ever\' v a cant m o m e n t in and o u t o f sc hool ? I s spirit s h o wn by n eg lect o f sc hool work f o r p r a c ti ce and support o f athle ti cs? I s h e wh o i s p erfec t and credited with e x cellent w ork t h e only o n e to eviden ce sc hool s pi r it? I t i s true that sc hool s p i r i t may b e s h o wn b y a pro per inte r es t in olle's studies, b y p racti ce a nd s u:)p ort o f athl etics an d kn e w t hat the ir d llt y lay here. They w e r e willing to s a c rifi ce the ir d es i red p l e a sure f o r the greatest vic t ory, the conque rin g o f self, f o r the good o f the ir sc hool. :\ d riv e f o r sc hool son gs and yells m e t with in stant appro val from the student b ody. A s a r esult so ng s and ydls w e r e composed, a numbe r o f w h i c h w e r e so good that the y w e r e adopte d b y the sc h ool. These w e r e r eadil y m emo rized and have b ee n u se d to g r eat a dvantage The great es t e v ent o f the y car wa s the s c h o o l carnival. The r e earnest eR'orts w e r e made by every o n e in every way. I twas the work, n o t o f a few, but o f the sc ho o l a s a whole The spirit with whi c h this pro j ect wa s undertake n was the main factor in its gre a t s uc ces s. b y produ c in g excellent w ork. Bu t our idea o f sc hool s pi r i t i s th e combinatio n :llld proper min g lin g o f these, whic h co m es only w h e n a s tuden t i s w illin g to s acrifice h is own p leasu re for t h e go')d o f t h e sc hool. I n fact, sc hool spi r i t mean s harmo n y in ever ything pertainin g to the sc hool b.:.:all se th e in d i viduals f.:e l themsd ves par t o f t h e wh o l e CtLStoltal lt.i gb&:boo!. "I t i s this same attitude w hich has prompted u s towa r d t h e standarJ of m a kin g Are we at Cris t o bal H i g h S c h o:; 1 revealin g thi3 h a rmony whic h is t h e tru e sc hool s p ir it? \\'e answer t hat t h ert: is no doubt t hat Wo! a re ; and we may prove this b y a f ew i ncidents of t h e sc h ool year. O n t h e morn i n g o f t h e arri v al o f P resident-e lect I l a rdi n g t h e desks i n t h e ass:!rnbl h al l we r e occ u p i ed b y t heir r es p ective ow ners e v e; l t hough it was t h e desire o f every on;,; of Ollr go oJ American students to witness t h e l a n d in g o f Hardi ng s party. Why ? B ocallse our studen ts a:1 a s quie t with out a teacher as wi t h o n e I t has e v e n enable d us t o carryon a f e w cla sses in the abse n ce of the teachers I n fact, during the abs=l1ce o f Seno r Villafranca, the S panis h classes s u c c essfull y condu cted b y students until a sub.ititll t e was se c u r e d. I f the o l d adage "Straws s h o w whi c h wa), the winJ bl o w s," i s true, may n o t t h ese incid ents indi cat e the direc ti o n in which the Cristobal H ig h S c hool spirit is t ending?

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THE CARIBBEA:'<. 3 But let u s not be satisfied with these a c hievements. There are other in which we l1ur s h ow and create sc h ool spirit. Are w e t.l our classes? I f n ot) let LIS start now anJ stir th:n loyalty wit hin u s How can we do it? \\'hen OUf classes have meetings we may give Ollf attendance and sincere interest, be ready with suggestions for enlarging the class efficiencr) 3n I b e r ead)' to carry Ollt those s u ggestio n s i\Iaterial has to be handed in each year for this annual. I [ is your bo o k I t b e l o ng s to you as much as to anyone on rhe s taff. D o not die. Show your spirit. B e more than a ft!a...ier of the annual; be a maker erit. A re you a membe r of an athle ti c t eam? D o your utmost to gain a p os iti o n on one or all. ))Q not despair because others better than you are \Vork out at all the prac ti:::es and improve your athletic ability until you arc c h ose n all tho; sc hool' s nine o r five. Play, not:1 star's game, but a gam! of team. Play for teamwork. I t i s not the winning of the game that is the best victory but the ex hibiting of the clean, good, sportman's spirit. I f not a player, at least witness the gam es and c h ee r your tcam to victory. I s school life an enjoyment to u s? I t s h ould b e School work may seem a grind but this i s o f our own making. \\' e finJ enjoyment in everything w e like; therefore, w e must becom e f o nd of our work taking more interest in it. "'e need ro become intert.'steJ in wh :1.[ w e lb. Xatuthi s will sc h))1 spirit. The teachers must li) their p.ut. Too Illu c h work dulls one. They Illust make arrangements whi c h the stuJcnts enter into activities. Bu t w e mus t n o t f org:::t that sc h oo l spirit is dep e ndent on u s T h e teach e rs are hdpless in in c reasing it without our c)-operation. \\' hy s hould w e en.iea\'or so muc h to create sc hool spirit? 'hat is sc ho:>1 to liS: \\'e and our fri enJs comp;)se the sc h ool. 'c all ha\'e the sam:;! aims anJ prin..-ipl es. \ \'e are part o f this institutio n which makes it a-; dear to liS a s a frienu. The r e fore, w e s h o uld supp ort it as w e do a fri enu. The good \\ithin liS is increa'leJ by real spirir. Stri\'lng to enlarge s::h):)1 spirit i s In m o r e than :l preparatio n for strengthening those: g.):).J characteristics which We poso:;css, i n truth, sc h on l spirit makes liS f o r sc ho.>1 citi/e n ship; therefore, w e are prepared f o r O llr cit ize n s hip. L et's start n o w an.J in the a.hancing of sc h ool spi rir. I n cite and the anhr \\ithin LIS Light the fuse of e nr-hu s iasm w e t.:mbod y. T o u c h it t o the P O\\ del' o f an.! explode it with a bang that will firm"! the atm:)sphere with real spirit. Itoyal PIlIrIU ill Cotll.

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THE CARIBBEAN. i\IIL A. R. A. B., A. i\1., L incoln, Nebr. Sltferilll""dmi oj S{hools. \\'e5Icya n l 'llinf'
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T H E : \bout I sabella, Q ueen of Spain, pawned her jewels for :I mighty purpose. Her fait h in mankmd was well rewarded, for by mean); a new (ominent was discovered and t h e world w,1l ah\ap pay undying tribute to her memory: and no\\, in 1C}!0-19!1, another I sabella, the one whose intellIgent. Ch:lf.lcter_sramped countenance g:le:lIlls (rom t his page, is fol lowing III the footsteps of her illu<;tnolls namesake and outdoing the enterprising spouse of Ferdinand, (or s h e is suc cess(ully developing real men and women by giving-not pawning mind yOll, but gitjug-her c h oice and precio u s jewel s of affect i oll;l{c understanding, universal interest untiring counsel, and watchful guidance to her charges in dear old Cristobal H igh. Dodds h as been with us one terlll only, but in that short time Ollr resourceful and amiahle principal hao;; attained a pLlce in our bordering on woro;;hip_ Thus, like Isabella of old, is ... s Dodds reaping her h an'e!>t, for, wit h the able aso;ista n cc of a loyal (ando', ne \'er was ... c h ool spirit so h igh :1Ilt! never did student body respond to trying t a sk more willingly t han under t h e able leadership o( queenl y 1 \ 1 iss .I. Isabel la Dodds. r Bacon doesn't know he teaches di\,ing besides his school subjects, but he does, because we learn watching h is form in dut d.lily perfecr "sw.II1." B acon i s a great athlete; long hikes arc commonplace to him, W e follow his footstep<; in healthy pastimes_ W e admire the businesslike manner in which :\ I r. B acon conducts his classes. T his is ;\ 1 r. Bacon's second year \\ Ith Cristobal H igh 1 f <;ize were determined by the way a tcacher is loved by her pupils, Hornbeak would be ;1 giantc<;s, for this daint)' teacher her literature classes so interesting, so snappy, and sO plain, that she is a close second to our helpful principal in popularity. Such a world o( knowledge has H o r nbeak that we ha\'e been unable to find a literary question that she can't am,wer. T his is ;\ l iss Hornbeak's first rear with us and we sincereh hope it is not her bst. I (one wants to get a Freshman enollgh tachew raw meat,just tell I t that \-ou "kno\\ a nicer Icac her than .\ Ii:;s Ilornbeak."

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6 THE C\RIBBEA :\,. P ieda l ue has beenon the Cristobal H ighSchool faculty li<;t for one.half year, w hich isentirelr too short a time for such .1 skillful teacher of domestic science to be he r e. W e leave it to the girl!l to sing her praises as a coo k ing and sew i ng teacher. \\'hy! i\lother;s lea r ning rapidly frolll daugh ter, and fat her i .. a ctu:,lIy growing c h eerful when the dinner bell tinkles. 1 \' l is5 P iedalue has not been enjoying good health but he r ai lment is alway\ hidden by a pleasant countenance. Senor \'illafranca has been with us for t hr ee rears and eac h year his cJa::.s and popularity improve. I f you need an inte r preter, ask for onC of Senor s pupi ls, for onc and all, under h is earnest tutelage, speak the Spanish language wit h fluency a n d grace (in our opinion, but Senor mar have a different stOr r to tell rou). El Senor bade us adios during the dispute be t wee n Panama and Costa R ica and has accep ted a positio n wit h t h e Co<;ta Rican Go,ernment. His classes wer e taken o \'er by ;'I.l iss Barnhouse, a "ery competent and talented teacher of Spanish, whose rath will be l ess thorny as a r esu l t of Senor \'illafranca's excellent groundwork. B eeching's good f rien ds h ip h as been s h ared with all h e r pupi l s. Her spare time is spent in helping anr of us wit h our work. imposs i ble p roblems aresimpl ined and drilled into Ollr noble cavities in an enduring, patient manner. M iss B ceching has not been wit h us a ful l school rear but it is unanimollslr wis h ed t hat s h e be here to see the present and later editions of F reshies on Commencement night awaiting their hard.earned diplomas.

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T H E CAR I BBEAN. 3l a m tue Frallk Rfl .\'mQu d, '21. I am t h e Sc h ool b o \ E a c h m o rning I le;1Vc home w i t h m\' l esso n s learn ed; J r eturn earl)' i n t h e evenin g with a well-earned knowledge; I a m not overwor:,ed, nor no t worked enough; I am as f r es h in t h e evenin g a s [ wa s in the morning. 1 a m a l way s a l e rt. am constan t l y watch ed ; Every move I m a k e i s criticized. P eop' l e b e l ieve m e n e v e r to b e se r i o u s T h e)' do not compr e h e nd m )' true f ee ling; T h e)' h eave a hopeless s ig h a s t h e v gaze at m e An d mutter, I s t hat t h e f uture Amer ica But, t h o u g h j m a)' seem i ndiffe r ent, Friv o lous, a n d carel ess, T h i s i s j u s t t h e o utward appearance Like t h e gay-col o r ed cove r s o f a book. I a m t h e buikk r of !1l\' countn Upon m e t h e future ot' t h i s nati o n depends. I f i t w e r e not for m e The Americ a o f t h e futur e Woul d b e a seco nd R u ss i a B ols h e vism wil l s p r ead An d r e volut ions will prevail ]( I do not l earn t h e spirit with w h i c h to tight An d t h e rig h t p ropaganda and s lo gans to l!'e A d e mocrati c governmen t i s w hat I believe ; \ nd am tau g h t to preach r a m t h e f uture America. L a m t h e Sc hoolbo\"

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THE CARIRRFAN. AI.ICE HUNTER, :"Jew Y ork. I h :we n o other but a woman's r easo n; I think h im so because I think h im so." -Tii/oGmtlemm oj I 'eru lln. Basketball, 1 2-3; sw imm ing, 1 -2. FRA'" t;. .>\:-:TIIO"Y :\'ew York, "rie sit:; h igh in all the people's hearts." -7uliuJ B a ... kt.[ball, I ':-]-4; haseball, I "2 J 4; t r ack, I "2 3 4; "'\ imming, I 2-3; tennis, 4; Clas s Repre ... ent;tti.-e, I 2 J: Class President,4; As"i 5tant I:-.ditor,]; blitor-in-Chicf,4' ;\I II .DRED IRENE STAI F'ORD. i\l:iine. "A. light heart lives l a n g L '"Jt,t J Ulbollr L os'. B.lsketb.111, 4 ; 4: Clas s Secretary, 4: Ex c h ange Ed i t o r, 4

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KATHER1:-;F. KIRBY F'ERGL"SO', iIol l :,si:,slppi. THE CARIBBEAN. I .1111 .1 wom.lIl, when I think I mu<,t . 1s VOII II. Basketball, I 2 3 4; 4; swimming, I 2; : \ thlctic Editor, 4, CHARLE<,I-IE:-;n.R,JR., New York. "\\11.:11 of few words arc the best mell." -A'lllg "f, R a:,kcd},\ll, I 2 J-4; b,''Ie!ull, I 1 J 4; -\rt blitor,4 CARl. \\"TI,LIAM Tennessee. "The force of hi" own merit makes W;IY. -King 1'/11. l3aseb;lll, J 4; tr,lek, :2 3-4; basketball, .1.;.; tennis,4; B usiness i\lanager, 4. EI.EANOR FrANCES 7IM\IR\U' .... New York. I n thy face I set: The map of honour, truth, anJ loyalt\". -"'lllg Hem)' 1'1. Baseball, 4; bowling, 4. 9

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1 0 THE PR O PH l oCY, C L A SS OF '01. ce; z One n ig h t t h e S e nior s wer e having a part)' and, after a s hort t im e t h e in evitab l e happe n ed. S om e o n e sai d L et's h av e t h e o uija." ] mm ediately t h e r e wa s a c h o ru s o f "Sure F i ne!" etc. After t h e b oard wa s bro u g h t to l i ght, w e w e r e i n a quandary a s to w hat w e could a s k it. \\'e coul d think o f 110 n e w q uesti o n s All o f a sudden K ir b y s p o k e "Suppose w e l e t it p r o p h es y t h e future o f th e Class o f ''21, and s a ve Carl and m e t h e tro ubl e The b u nc h agre ed to t hat a n d gath e r ed ar o un d th e boa r d, a s two o f our numbe r sat down to wr estle w i t h t h e w e i r d in s t r u m ent of cOlllmuni cating wit h t h e supe rnatural. P r etty soo n t h e poin t e r b ega n to waltz a rollnd and all of t h ose present k ept r ec o r d of w hat it s aid. Frank will b e a d oc t or." ; \ g a s p o f surprise ran around the room. That wa s w hat Frank wa n t e d to b e The n C h arles a s keJ "\\'hat kind o i a doct o r'" .. D oc t o r f o r the pane o f a w indow. Frank imme d iately a ccllsed t h e two o p e rator s o f p u s hin g t h e b oard w h i c h t h ey stre nu o u s l y denied. The n Frank a s k ed, I s t hat true?" O uija r e p l i ed, but yo u will b eco m e a fa m o u s surgeon." T h e n t h e b oard s p elled o u t "-irby i s go in g to b e p res id ent--" The b oard h esitate d and .Alice asked Kirby if s h e co ul d co m e and v i sit h e r at t h e 'hite H Ollse, t h e n t h e board continued 's wife K irby r e m arked t hat that wa s J U S t a s good a s be in g presid ent. The n Carl, w h o wa s f ee lin g meddl eso m e, a s k ed t h e board w h a t Kirby s h u sband w a s goin g to b e p r es ident of. The board replied : C o l o n H um a n e Society." Kirby r a isel..l s u c h a r o w t hat w e all said L et's have t w o n e w o p erators so !\lildre d and Charlie arose and Frank a n d El eano r too k t h e i r p la c es T h e b oard started to move and said t hat i t was joking a s f..:.irbr wa s d estine d to b e m a rri ed to t h e commandant o f t h e I sland of G uam. T h e p o inter s t oppe d and t h e n starte d to proph esy f o r A l i ce Alice will b e t h e wom en's nation a l tenn is c hampio n t e n years fr o m n o w, and a lso sec r e t ary to the P r es id ent o f t h e Uni t e d States." T h e b oard d id not stop but jus t w ent in c ir cle s for a co u p l e o f minutes a n d t h e n H e nter will die-" I turned around to "l\lud) s h o o k h is h a nd, s ai d "Adi os," w h i l e t h e bunc h exten d e d t h e ir h eartfelt sympath y. Theil) o n f a cing t h e board, \Vesaw the p ointe r move t o "t" and contin u e "after h e i s in order to keep t h in. H e w ill b e vicep resident o i t h e B e t h l e h e m Steel C orporati on This reli e ved "l\l u d v e r y m u c h but w e had n o t muc h time to congratulate h im on h i s e scap e b ecause t h e b oard w ent o n and s a i d t hat E leanor Zimmermann wa s going to b e a stenograph e r w orld fam o u s a s t h e o n l y o n e known w h o doe s n O t c h e w gum. T h e ouija seem e d tire d aft e r this, b :!ca u se it w ould n o t w o r k for fully fiv e m in u t e s Finall y i t started "l\1ildre d i s g oing to b e in a large d r ess "--(El e an o r bro k e in lVith "Say l V l i l d r ed s go in g t o b e iat''')--''ma k ing establis h m e n t o f w h i c h s h e will eventually b ecome p r o prietor." T h e n t h e l a u g h wa s o n El eano r The b oard e x ecute d a f e w l o o p s and s id e sl i ps and, e n d in g up with a tail spin, starte d to s p ell out (uture "Carl i s g o i n g to b e an e n g in ee r .. Carl's t h o u g h t s turn e d to fa m o u s f eats in e n g in eering and w ork in t h e d evastat e d regi o n s o f E u r ope) t h e n rh e b oard w ent 011, "on a t e n m i l e rai l r o a d b etwee n O skaw3ssee a n d H Ulllbu g u ss in F l orida." \\'e went

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THE CARIBB EAN. Junior Closs rQ20rQ 21 Il

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1 2 THE C.'\RIBBFA"'. .'1;\'TH OI.OC Y O F THE )L':-II O R C L.'1SS. !,I ARJORI E BALL-A "go lden haired maiden" w h o gazes m o u r n fully at t h e window s o f the Assembly I-Iall and wis h es t hat s h e w e r e a S en i o r, so t hat s h e cou l d l o ok o u t o f t h e m w h e never s h e wa n t s r D i\l.-\RY FIE L DS-"Charl e y s a ys t hat is such a demure p urita ni cal, littl e mai d that s h e m ig:lt well b e a r e in carnation o f P ri sc illa. Onl y if i\lary w e r e P riscilla s h e'd pr obabh s a y F o r lan d s s ake!" i n s r e:ld o f \ \ h y don't Y Oli s peak f o r your sel f J o h n 1 GLENORA j\l1 \ E E D WARDS-I t r e q u i r ed quite a bit o f s l e u t hing to uncover t h a t name C ould YUli ever t h ink o f .I a n e a s "Cle n or" E{\I{\I A TOWNSE:\D -This is rath e r a w e i g h t y s ubj ec t for o n e so inex p eri e n ced a s I to h a n d l e so 1 s hall not try Discretio n i s t h e bette r part o f v alor, a nyway. DORI!) OU\-ER-Some day we're going to hear t hat Dori s h as bee n s hot. \Vhy? \\'ell, anyone who h as t h e nerve to possess a natu ra l wa ve t h ese days o u g h t never to be allowed to l ive a hllg l ife. That wou l d be too m u c h .\JARY Better known as B ill". \\'e suspect him of a secret leaning toward B o hemianism and Gree n wich Village, for h e n eve r wea r s a collar. And-j ust a m o m ent! \Y e Illost humbly b::-g h i s pardon. H e has w o rn o n e but doubtless o n l y w h e n h e w a s desp airing o f ever attaining t h e r i g h t to wear l o n g h a ir a n d 3n artist's s m oc k. GEORGE C ART\\'R I GHT-.-\11 extr e mely blo n d man w h o r e j o ices i n t h e e ndea ring (?) namt: o f C ockro a c h and i s n ned f Jr hi s f,: m...lness f o r F r es h m e n .Alth o u g h a J unior h e is extre m e l y ignor ant, doesn't even kn o w th e dift"er e n ce b etwee n an i r o n a n d a flatiro n. i\l a y b e a F reshman 1-1 .'I. s tu dent could t ell h im. PACL DOYI.E-" P aco" has contributed to sc i e n ce a w o nderful in \ 'e n tio n a compass w h i c h, accor di n g to h im ca n' t go wro n g S ee m s to m e that i t i s m o r e o rn 2m e ntal than u se ful parti c ularl y as a guide H e ha s al so d i scove r e d a wa y to co n se r ve s t amps Rath e r late f o r c o nservatio n i sn't it? HERBERT l\IcCLA IN-Y o u talk all yo u wan t t o about t h e hard w ork o f th e missi o naries in darkes t Africa" b u t H erbert's w o rk i s harder ye t H e has b ee n trying to get i\J i ss H ornbeak to-co m e to S u n d a y c h oo l b u t t h e b es t that he's b ee n abl e t o do so f a r i s to get h e r to co m e to a Sund a y S c h oo l cla ss banq u e t. \\'ESLEY TOWNSEXD-Y o u'd n eve r b elie v e to l oo k at h im t hat h e i s a spiritualist, wou l d yo u ? \\' h y h e e ven c o n sults

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THE CARIBBEAN. 1 3 t h e o uija board 011 subjects so vari e d a s w h ic h s hirt to wear to sch ool and t h e state of h i s ladylove' s affections. I t i s rumored ( t h i s i s stri ctly confidential, of course) t hat h e wa s quite o v e r come by t h e ans w e r to t h e latter q uesti o n. L e t t h is b e a l esson to all l ovelorn young m en. \\' h e n want a t h ing w ell done-pus h OWI1 ouija board. H A RO L D CLOKE-I have always h eard of girls w h o "tripped daintil y a l ong" b 1I t i n e e r h ea rd of a w h o did it until I Illet H arold. H e does it m os t sliccess flilly though } tripping eve ryon e from the IllOSt dignified F r es h Illall down to the g reenest S enior. ;\'"o t onl)' that, but h e trips hil11s elf. If dOIl'r belic\'c it, a s k hi III w hat his parti n g r e m a r k at party was LEROY l\ JAGNUSON-The saying goes that can't keep a good man down. can y o u k ee p L e roy quiet, i n t h e last peri od P erhaps i\l iss Hornbeak will agree with m e wh e n I say that if the digging of t h e Panama Canal was the Labo r of H ercul es, suppressing Leroy i s the Fourteen t h. CHESTER T.'\\'LOR-C hester is a tho ro u g h believer in the old that th e wa), to a man's heart i s through hi s stomac h." Furth e r more h e i s quite w illin g for h i s h eart to b e fOllnd as often as poss i b l e. Isn't that just lik e a man? JORDAN ZJ,\I ,\IERMANN-I l o w can I write about a boy w h e n I don't know anything abou t h im except t hat hi s main amhitio n i s to b e a gentleman bum all hi s l i f e? H \RRIS CHEAL-l \lthough h e h a s only b ee n w i t h u s a s hort time, Harris i s already casting t e nder gla n ces a t all the "femmes" f rom t h e e i g h t h g rade lip to the S e niors. Y o u m ig h t almos t c all h im a "gentleman C l eopatra." CHARLES SEEL E Y -P l e ase pardo n t h i s burs t into free \'erse, b u t find prose inadequate : Since the beginning of t he world There has reigned sup r eme I n th e world of silence One figure t h e Sphinx, Her sapremacy un questio n ed Her r iddl e un answered But at List there ha s risen : \ ri\ al Charlcs Seeley. \\'ho has dared t o usurp Her t hr one. A Native H ut.

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THE CARIBBEA=". SOPHOMORES. Top Eupbr:u, Jesoie \\eir, Emilio SoilJIDon. Peppel, Edw.U'd Mar, GeorgiePepper, Dottom-ulMr Witt, AI. Quinto, Bertha frank.

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THE CARIBBEA=". 1 5 S OPHO M ORES Pulhg \ Pre.,ident l. Gr/BllI &u"s, H ente r Mpllt'lblUt tCllWl..\d'i"orl, .4.I...x.Liuczcr, :'hlJrrd Mo rssl1. Bottom-Lillia.n Colberg, Leo Eberen:, E1::,e Johnsoll {Not Ford :and John Letlch.)

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T H E CA R I BB E A N ------MUSI C. J [nllie Pu!lig, 23. The f ollowin g p r og rarn o f m u s i c al n umbe r s wa s r e nder ed w i t h mu c h f ee lin g b y t h e 1llt;:l11be r s o f t h e c la ss o f 3 o f Cris t o bal H i g h S c hool: W anderi ng" G e ra l d Bliss T ired o f t\le" E d w;ml i\lay D own by t h e Oh io, I 've Cor th e S w eetest Little 0 i\1 \' O! Ern<;[ E uphrat Tell Why" I. eo F.bcre n 4 '" Love f he 1.:l dic..;" "Oh, :\I(1lher, I 'm \\, ild" Alc'X, L incze r _""Quinto D r iftin g " B rig ht E yes " F r eckles" Oh Y o u' d b e Surpr i sed !" "Vam p "El C a pit a n" "When Y Oll Get What Y o u \\'ant Y OLI L illian C o l b e r g El s i e J o hn s on E s t h e r Witt i\l i l d r e d i\ l o r gan J ess i e W e ir ... L ouise I I ente r ..... G eo r g i e Pepper Don't W a n t I t Any i\lon'" Cat h eri n e P eppe r "0, I low I H ,lte to Get Up in the i\!anie P ulli g T H E . \1flbtl !!!..uin1o, '2-/. The r e i s n o t t h e s l i g h t es t doubt in t h e mi nd s o f t h e F res h m e n at l e a s t, t hat this c l a ss h a s far e x cee d e d a n y fir s t y e a r c la ss o f t h e p rece di n g y e a r s The r e havt! b ee n se ve r a l int e r esting e xhibits of c l a ss r oo m w o r k. T h e m e m b e r s o f t h e A n c i e n t H istor y c l a ss t oo k part in an O l ympi a n C o u n cil, w h i c h n o t o n l y di s p l a y e d t h e i r kno w l edge o f t h e anc i ent pe o p l es a n d t h e ir c u s t o m s b u t b r o u ght t o lig h t som e good dramati c Thi s same wa s s h o wn to b e even rno r e exte n s i ve w h e n t h e m embe r s o f t h e F r es hman Englis h cla ss gave se v eral v e ry in t e r es tin g origina l m o n o l og u es and dial og u es in cos tume I n a thl e ti cs, t h e F r eshme n h a ve n o r e a s o n to b e asharn cd o f t h e ir r eco rd. T w o o f our girl s E d n a Campb ell a n d G ladys L o wa n d e ,scor e d m a n y p oints f o r C r i stobal i n th e tra c k m ee t h e l d a t B al b o a and have d i s t in guis h e d t h e m se l v es o n t h e bas k e t ball baseball, a n d b o w l ing t eams. B es id es doi n g t h e i r s h a r e in t h e two big soc i a l e v e n t s o f th e y ear, t h e carnival a n d t h e dance, t h e F res h m e n g a v e a cla ss p i cnic at fort S h erma n inv iti n g t h e t e ac h e r s A fte r a delig h tful day spent in bathin g, e x plorin g t h e n e i g h bo rin g j un g le, sing ing, and p l ayi n g games w e ca m e h o me, s unburne d b u t happ y. I n fac t in e ve r y lin e o f sc h oo l activiti es and inte r ests, the freshme n have don e their part a n d h a \ 'e b ee n w illing t o do m o r e Cill u n H yd r oelectricStlit i o n

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TH E CARIBBE.,\N. 1 7 Fr-eshies I Campbell. S helby White. I rene ) l eCourL H arold Boyd. Quinto (Cl ass I'r l,!;ident). Tom Grier. Edwlml Gladys L owandc. 8311 Middle.-M ildred Gtll. Lloyd P eterson, Ethel Sonncllllmn, Kenneth Parker. Thelma raughan. Paul Kuhn Inll!. Markham O'Connell, J ane Il:l.U. Olga M endes. {h:wald M endes, Eunice M endes. Richard H all, .. \ nna Colberg, Claude Str ob r idge Loretta Ru sh, John M orton, Charlotte Hou.:;cl. (Not shown-Ralph Cona w ay, Gir don Rudd A.ndrew Smitb.) MR7737S-l

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THE CARIBBEA". I C LASS \\' 1 LL. I y; I n Dreier that i t may not said o f LIS t h e cla ss o f 19'21 that we passe d frol11 this sc h oo l intestate, because we f eel a ce r t ain r es pon s ibilit y t oc n dea vo r t o h elp t hOe poor in efficient souls reach the goal which w e have a lr eady atta ined, and because w e possess those good qualitie s whi c h they m os t dearly wis h to acquire ; we, on this b l eak day of June, issu e this last w ill and t estament. T o t h e irratio nal Fres h m e n w e l eave th e rig h t o f exe r c i s ing the tonsori a l f eat o f paring the hair from t h e dormant and nob l e domes of f orth-coming victim s. T o the unco n sc i o u s S oph o m o r es w e leave our in defatigabl e p e rseverance and abilit y in athleti cs T o t h e ] ulli o r Class we l e ave th e f ollo\\ ing: T o Harol d Cl o k e a b ox f o r hi s feet in o rder that h e may not co ntinu e t o annoy his n eighbo r s by putting his T o Fi e lds, the excl u s iv e r i g h t t o k ee p lip t h e S enio r d i gnity T o J o rdan Zimmermann, t h e privilege o f overco m i n g tho;e s h y look s whi c h h e uses to decei ve th e g irl s T o Ches t e r Tayl o r, the privilege o f talking to L e roy w i t h out permission. T o Emma T o w nse nd, a patent giggle muffl e r whi c h s h e may u se to suppress those giggles o f h e r s T o \\'es ley T o wn send, the privil ege of u sing hi s p ower o f n arration. T o Ball, the privilegeoflooking o u tof the wind ow during th e p e riods. T o D o ri s Oli ve r a map to d irect h e r to t h e F ountain o f Youth w hi c h will ai d h e r in t h e fulfillment of h e r \\ i s h f o r e t ernal youth feet in t h e aisl e Officcrs' Quarters. Fort de Le5seps T o W illiam our b es t wis hes f o r r etaining t h e good looks v oted him T o George Cartwright, the right t o continue in the contest. explaining mathe mati cs, with out interruptio n T o Charles Seeley, a l o t o n the Sahara desert fr o m hi s i g n orant classmates. n ear the Sphinx. T o P au l Doyle, a pair o f twel ve-oullce b ox ing T o H erbert I\icCl ain, permissio n to continue g loves so that h e may purs u e his pugilisti c in b e ing sarcas ti c. clinations without se ri o u s injury to his unfortuT o the faculty, we leave the truthful executio n nate victim s. o f thi s will and the Cristobal H igh S c hool with T o L e roy i V lagnusoll, the San Lorenzo cliR', to all that it contains. strengthen his bluff with Miss Hornbeak. We, having disposed of the above in regular To Jane E:lwards, a year to grow in, so tha t s h e order, this dismal month o f June, 1 921, now promay look more dignified w h e n s h e b eco m es a nounce it legal and valid. Senior. (Signed) T he Senior Class.

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T H E C.'\ R IBBE.\ i\'. 9 ;-..rOTES. DO IUO/z; .. 't'l. '.?Z. Although Cris t o bal H igh S c h oo l b o a s t s onll' twenty grauuatt:s in the three y ears o f its ex i s t e n ce a more loyal and ambitious alumni g ro u p can not be foulld. Notwithstanding t h e fac t that t h e r art: SC:ltt o the f Ollr c orn e r s o f Ollr country, w e have n :cc lltl y r ece i ve d from mos t o f th e m express i o n s o f good will anti best wis hes f o r the s u ccess o f Ollr yearboo k and our sc h ool. i\l o s t o f th e m are att ending c ollege o r are w orking, s h o wing the ambitio n and whi c h the y a cquire d o r at l e a s t devel o p e d in Cris t o bal H igh School. An :\lulllni A ssociatio n has b ee n pro posed and the fir s t meeting sugges t e d for June immediately afte r COlllm e nc e m ent. \\'e wis h that slIc h a m eeting and organizatio n may b e r e alized and trus t that all t h e Alumni will j o in in m emory of the ir s p ent in Cris t obal H ig h S c h o ol. I t will be of interes t to all t o know that: 191 8 Lula Coman ( ll ie Pullig) i s s till residing in Cris t o bal u sing t o advantage h e r knowle dge o f dom es ti c sc i e n ce a cquire d in Cristobal High S c hool. Sll s i e I nloes Harrison has returne d fr o m colle g e in J\laryland, and i s n o w w orking in the establis h m ent o f J D. Catherine Teese \\'aid i s studying in the Uni v e r sity o f California, Cal. Catherine writes that s h e i s s till w orking hard f o r the G O/dl' lI B enr o f that in stitutio n. Georg e fldinot C otton is still with u s and is w orking at the Cristobal dry dock. H e expects to leave for sc hool in the States soon. L eland B ourke W el s h i s studying in the C o lorado School o f i\l in cs i\1ary Eli zabeth \'erne r i s studying in the L n i v e r s it), o f Carolina. She writes that college i s simply great and that n o aile s h ould miSS a chance t o go. '9' 9 Ali c e Arl e ne Ball i s a s opho m o r e in Simmo n s College, Boston, She is taking a secretarial course
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20 THF. CAR IBBEAN. c;:;; ., THE G HOST O F THE "BERKSHIRE Georgie '23. I t was during t h e last o f I b e lieve, t h a t t h e steamship BO'kshil't, l e f t San F r an c i sco f o r at \\ hich port s h e was clu e i n a b o u t f o u r weeks. had b ee n b uilt ori g i nr dly as a f re i g h t a n d passe nge r boat, b u t as n o regula r passengers had h ee n b oo k ed for this t rip, t h e owners had allowed d:c wife a n d f O llr-year o l d so n o f t h e c aptain, t h e wife and two c h ildre n o f t h e engineer and t h e \\ ives of variou s oth e r m e m be r s of t h e ship's crew to go along. A bit irreg ular it w as, a s t h e shippi n g office r admitted but i t would do n o h a l m to t h e pocket-books of t h e owners, a n d a little indulgence 110W and then onl), strengthened t h e loyalty t o t h e c(,mpan y for w h ic h its e m ployees were noted. A l so it was a fine chance for t h e \\(,l11en t o e njoy a trip w i th t h e ir hu sbands and to see a b i t o f t h e worl d :\s I remarked be fore, t h e Berkshire saile:.! d u r ing the la s t part of i\larc h with a t hirty-day voyage b e fore her and prospects of exceptio n ally fine weather durin g t h e w h o l e trip, But t h e day o n whi c h s h e was due in l\I a n ila arrived, and passed, and seven more b esides a n d still t h e BerkS/lire failed to I ut in an appearance. \\ h e n t h e second week passed and had h e a r d noth i n g from h e r the authorities started a t h o r o u gh i nvestigation They c abl ed to every P Ort wh e re s h e migh t have stopped, but received no n ews of h er. Then, thinking that s h e might have been ca u g h t i n a storm and foundered, t hey sent a committee to look oVt:r the weather repor ts for t h e past t w o months, but to their s llrpri se, ther e had bee n n o storms o f any kind; and t o their certain knowledge, the r e w e r e !le i theri s lands, r ee f s,roc k s h idd e n banks n o r any m e n ace o f th a t kin d 011 the B e r kshire s r Otlte. S h e had been overha tll ed b y ex p erts b e f o r e s h e had l e ft Frisco, so tha t a n y dange r fr o m poor mach i nery o r in s uffi c i ent fuel wa s Ollt of the question. The n why hadn't s h e put in an appearance? But to tha t the r e wa s n o ans w e r. Tracer s w e r e put 011 h e r a n d re p orts ca m e in daily She had boen seen b y this b oat at stic h a n d stic h a place. She had b ee n seen b y tha t boat a t anothe r place hund r e d s o f mi l es furthe r w est, a n d e a c h o n e r e p orted h e r a s seeming in f ai rl y good co n d iti o n a n d apparentl y s t eaming o n at h e r lIs lIal speed. A glance o v e r t h e wireless records o f ships pass in g t h r o u g h the same vicinity a s t h e B e r kshi r e s h o wed n o S. O. S c alls fr o m h e r and so, havi ng exhaustc,;:d ever y p oss ibl e source, t h e investi g ation e nded wit h ani), these fa c t s f o r an expl a n a tion o f h e r d i sappearance : She h a d l e f t San Francisco in perfect co n d iti o n f o r a l o ng ocean t rip; s h e had sent o u t n o S, O. S c alls ; s h e had n e i t h e r run as h o r e n o r b ee n f o under e d in a
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THE CARIBBEA"" 1 1 Furthermo r e it had b ee n a deli b e rate attempt, and flot an acci d e nt, a s the captain of t h e LaJl((Isler, an in ti ma te fri e n d o f the cOlllmande r o f the B erkshirr, had tri ed to b elieve, becau se the b ells s ignalin g the quartermas t e r o f the B erkslt irl' t o change his course had been distin c t l y h eard by pa sse n gers aboard th e Lfwcflsler. Then, n carly a week late r the same thing happened again, thi s time to t h e U. S. A . T T h o ma s wh ose co mJ'nandcr tri ed hard to h u s h it lip a s muc h a s p oss i bl e, because h e had also been a n o ld friend o f Captain \\'inters o f t h e Berk s hire. And t h ell t h e wire l ess t e l egrams b egan to co m e ill thic k and fas t. The B erkshire judg in g b y these was dartin g over t h e P acific wit h t h e rapidity o f a ray of lig h t One nig h t s h e would try to ram a boat in t h e south-=rn P a cific, t h e n ex t s h e would appearoff the H a waiian I slands, th e n again s h e w,)uld appear in H e rin g Strait, or down n e a r Austral ia. som e c u r iou s coi n c id e n ce s h e wa s at fir s t seen b y ships w h ost: cornmande r s had kn ow n \ \ 'inte r s f o r time, but afte r about a m onth of thi s, strang:!rs would wire ( o r h elp, exciteJly vowin g t h:1t they w e re b e in g attacked by t h e I3c'rkshire This k ept o n un ti l n o b oat wa s sa f e from t h e strange s t eamer whic h would co m e sailin g up apparently frol11 n o wh e re at any m inure and attac k t h e fir s t b::>at in s i ght. E\'entually d estroyers ha d to b e orde red out to look f o r h e r in orde r to r elieve t h e se a of s u c h a m enace There w e r e only twoexp lanariol11 of h e r case: eirhe r Captain \\'inters ha d becom e insane o r e l se the entire c rew had turne d pirate Until th e boat was caug ht, t h e P a c ific wa s dangerous for any b oat to c r oss. The n o n e day t h e steam ship fl"n ll'rwilch sailing a long past the p ortio n o f th e Pacific in whi c h tht: most fr eq u ently appeared, made a sad d iscovery. A large life boat,app:ue n t lycontainin g a numbe r of peopl e was f ound drifting aimless l y about on t h e surface o f t h e wate r J t was take n aboar d by th e fValnwilell a n d wa s f ound t o co n tain t h e bodies o f a s mall g roup o f wom e n and c hildren e \ idently starved to death On t h e b o w o ( the boat w e r e t h e words "S. S. B e rkS/lir e." Lying fa ce down on the Aoor o f the boat was a wate r -soaked diary marked with the name o f l olly Winters, wife o f the captain o f the B erkslzi r ", T h e bodies, which were little more t han skelet o ns covered over wi th skin, were taken out o f their dismal coffin and placed b etween decks until the n ext day w h e n they wou l d b e g i ve n a decen t burial That nig h t t h e captain o f the I Valcrwilch asked t h e passe n ge r s to remain in the saloon afte r dinner if wis h ed t o h ea r a r ellurkable story and its s till more r emarkable e n.Jin g ;\Ie';!.JIt.:ss to state, t hey all remained \\' h e n evcryo n;:: wa s quiet, t h e captain r ose and toJ talk q uietiy. D oubtless you h a I'e all h eard o f the di sappearance of t h e steams hip I3t'rkshi r e n early twO m onths ago," h e said, "at a time w h e n every d e tai l of weathe r wa s a s p erfec t a s cUlII...! ha ve h ee n expect e u to in s u r e a p e a ce ful voyage, and of h e r subse q u ent appearances in varioliS parts o f the P a c ific Also, m os t o f r o u saw t h e pitiful b oa t w h i c h was take n o n board the fVale r w ilch t h i s afternoon. I n t hat b o a t wa s all t hat is l e ft of t h e n t'rkshirt' 'ith your p e rmi ss i o n I s hall r :1I you a s tory whic h c lears l11y frie n d \\inte r s of a n y atte mpt at The complete explanatio n of t h e di'iappe3ran ce o f the Bt'r ksltirt' was f ourd in \\"intecs' diar y o n t h e Aoor o f t h e lif e b oat. ";\ s yo u all kn ow, there were o n board tht: l3t!rkshin' b es id es t h e cre w, th e wive s m e m b e r s o f r h e famili es o f sam e o f the c r cw. These wom e n wer e all enjoying t h e trip imme nsely, 110 one had se a sick, and the y all \\'ere eager f o r th e boar to r e a c h l\lanila. So t h e fir s t part of the voyage wa s passed. An d t h e n, one mornin g th e y aw o k e to find a t hing happe nin g whi c h prohably has ne\'er happ e n e d b e for e in :111 th e history o f t h e w o rld. I t baffl e d th e keenest minds o n b oard. T h e metal parts o f th e s hip were undeniably growin g so fr. I ndeed, t h e m e n co uld gouge pi eces out o f t h e ir o n J ec k p lates with their fing e r s T h e e ngin ee r wa s t h e first to discover it w h e n h e picked up an iro n b olt a n d felt i t give in to t h e pressure of hi s fing e rs, j u s t a s ifit w e r e butte r. The b oile r s wer e so soft t hat h o l es co ul d have been punc h ed in t h e m with files ifit hadnt b ee n for t h e fac t that th e fil es w e r e also as soft a s c heese. All over the boat the situatio n wa s the sa m e. I t be came more and m o r e dan gerolls e \'ery minute B y noon t h e wood was b eginning to rot, whi l e t h e r o p es d r opped to pieces and bro k e into dust as t hey tou c hed t h e deck, whi c h by now r egistered every footprint t hat had been made o n it. B y mid-afternoon it became plain that a mys terious light ray o f som e kin d was playing on the s hip, It was doubtless attracted br some

PAGE 22

'1 '1 THE CARIBBEAN. p ec uliar quali t y in th e m e tal o n b oard a s that had b ee n attac k e d firs t, and, eve n if it cou l d h av e b ee n escape d n ow, th e b oat had b ee n alre ad y ruin e d an d wa s h e lpl ess "Captain \\'inte r s had f o und that th e r e wa s a s mall b oat fas t e n ed t o t h e s t e rn o f t h e whi c h had n o t only esca p ed th e lig h t ra y, but wa s large e n o ugh to h o l d t h e wom e n a n d c hil d r e n who w e r e a b oard. These w e r e c all e d tog e t h e rand summarily pla ce d in th e b oat, The la s t to g o wa s t h e captain's wif e, w h o o bj ec te.d strenuo u s l y t o l e avin g h e r h u sband. J U S t a s s h e wa s finally pe r suaded to climb d own th e r o p e and ind ee d w as starting, t h e ro p e br o k e an d let h e r fall into t h e wate r fro m w h i c h s h e wa s r esc u e d with difficulty th e oth e r wom en. Hut th e misc h i e f wa s don e All m e a n s o f c ommunic ati o n b e tw ee n t h e tw o b oats except by v o i ce o r s i ght was cut off', a n d t h e tw o s p ee di l r d rift e d so far apart t hat it wa s impo ss ib l e to thro w f oo d o r wate r c a s k s i n to t h e s malle r boat fro m t h e larg er. Y o u ma y imag in e t h e h o rr o r o f th e wom e n a f e w minutes late r, whe n t h e y s aw t h e B rrkshire co lla pse b e f o r e th e ir eyes and b eco m e noth in g but a l oathso m e scum upo n the wate r. N o t a man cleare d th e I n fac t t h e r e was n o thin g t o in d i cate t hat t h e r e was a man un de r th e wr eckage "They drifted f o r da)"s an d b e g a n, o n e b y o n e, to gi ve u p h o p e o f r esc u e The n o n e nig h t th ey h eard t h e w elco m e so u nd o f e ngin es t h r o b bin g n c ar t h e m an d b e h old, t h e r e was a tall s h ip approac hing th e m. N e ar e r s h e c a m e a n d n eare r, un til th ey a w o k e to t h e fac t t hat it was th e B e rk S /lir e s t eady and t ru e again and steamin g straigh t toward t h e m. On s h e c a m e, nearer the littl e b oat wit h e v e ry beat of h e r e n g ines, until i n a f e w m o m entS s h e mu s t n ee d s pass ove r th e m or d o so m e r e markabl e turning. i\1 r s \ \'in t e r s p e r c e iv ed t h e d a n g e r firs t a n d scre am e d aloud to th e c r e w to take care l es t th ey run t h e littl e b oat d o w n But t h e r e wa s n o so un d to indi cate t hat t h e c r e w h a d h eard, f o r hu g e b oat c am=: o n as a s b e f o r e At t h e la s t m o m ent t h e frighte n ed w o m e n hid t h eir eyes t hat th e y might n o t see t h e b oar, a s s h e passed ove r th e frail cockles h ell in w h i c h t h e y c r o u c h e d. But t h e minutes pa ssed and s till t h e r e wa s n o so un d s a ve t hat o f th e e n gin es o f t h e B erkS /lir e A n d whe n t h ey dared to l oo k u p again t h e s t e rn o f tl e B e r kshire wa s jus t clearing t h e s mall b oat. The s t e am s hip ha d g o n e co mpl e tel y ove r t h e m without l eaving a trace "Afte r t hat t h e y gave u p h o p e compl e t e l y and in l ess than f our days t h e la s t pitifull y thin survivo r wa s d ead." H e r e t h e captain stopp ed turne d abruptly an d l e f t th e r oo m. The pa sse ng e r s r e main ed a whil e talk ing ove r rh e strange s t o r y o f th e B e rkS/lire but n o o n e co uld o R'er any exp lanatio n o f th e fat e o f t h e b oat. A ft e r t h e b od i es o f t h e w o m e n and c h i ldre n had b ee n b uri e d in t h e se a, t h e captain se n t th e entire in b y wir e l ess to th e auth o r i ti es i n San Franc i sco w h e r e it wa s r ece i ve d wit h much sur pri se an d I am so rr y to say, in c r edulity But from that day t.) this t h e r e h a s b ee n n o explana ti o n o f t h e l ig h t ra y that wr ec k ed t h e B e rkS/ li r e n o r h a s th e phanro m s h ip eve r appe ar ed a g ain. THO U GHTS O F .'\ The Sophomore .. all 1 :'HI;,lh at u s, And toSS their helds anJ say, L-t's hope the litde innoct'rlts \ \ 'ill have more sen se som e dar. TheJ uniors eye us haugh ti l y, \\ ith noses in the airT he} try to make us humble With ;\ proud, di s dainrul stare. .\IIIire.! Gil, ':--/. T h e Sen i ors a r e so stud i o u s, They w o uldn't ca n;:, I kno w, I i wc, b y SOIllC misr ak<", s h ould find Ourse l ves in J er i c h o Blit never m i nd-th ose re:U $ wh e n w e Are Soph o m o r es, a n d ;111, \Ve'li tak e o u r c h a n ce t o have o ur R ing; W e'll th ose Freshies slll311.

PAGE 23

T H E CARI BB EAN. '23 THF. TERY O F L \ e -o. J !lIrjorie Ball, '22. On t h e i s lan d o f Taboga, l oo min g hig h b ehind the little villa g e s t a n d s what t h e natives c all L a i\ l ontaiia". .1\ t t he to p of this j lin g l e-c ov e r e d hill h a l f h idd e n by t h e lux uri a n t un d e r gr o wt h arc thr ee crosses m arking t h e l o n e l y graves o f three o f i\l o rgan's men. The path lip t h e mountain i s little 111::>re t han a r ocky trail, s t ee p and narro w mak in g i t v ery di f ficult f o r cli mbing I t wind s i n and Ollt th r o u g h h eavy jung l e growth and aro llnd o l d f alle n trun k s h a l f burie d u n d e r t h i c k v e g etat i o n. I.ate i n t h e afternoon I clim b e d t h e trail and stoppe d t o r es t in a lit tl e clearin g o f t h e jun g l e Thi s was walle d in b y a d e n se tangl e o f rank t r o p i c a l g r owth :ln d r o o fed by t h e in t e r twini n g o f l eafy bran c h es F estoons o f Spani s h m oss hung l i k e g ray vei l s fro m decayed b ranc h es o f o l d m a n go trees and frorn t h e den se s hado w s o f t h e jun g l e t h e rt: s h o n e f orth a n o cc a s i o n a l wax e n b l ossom of t h e Lady o f t h e N i g h t o rchid H e r e a n d t h e r e a b l o o d r e d pass i o n R o w e r Rame d a l o ng t h e trail and t h e se n siti ve l eave s o f t h e m imosa s h r u nk at s t e p. I n t h e mid d l e of t h e c l e arin g stood t h e three rude c r osses t h e cente r o n e abo u t t h re'! in h e ig h t and t h e o t h e r s a triR e s h orte r. I haJ b ee n t o l d b y a native t hat t h e talles t cross marked t h e grave o f a "Gran J e f e," t hat i s a bi g c h i ef, a n d t hat t h e o t hers mar k e d t h e graves o f h i s m e n. L o n g ago at t h e e nd o f r h e rrai l, so goes the tal e t h e r e had liv e d a m i se rly o l d S paniard. h oardin g c o un tl ess t r e a sures o f g o l d and j e w e l s burie d d ee p b e n eath t h e d irt R oar o f h i s t1ntc hedroof hu t. The t h ree pirates had l e a r n e d o f h i m a n J h i s pri ce l ess tre a s u r e in t h e village a nd, in t h e d ead o f n ig ht, d uri n g a t erribl e storm, h a d d ragge d h i m f r o m his hu t a n d murdere d him. T h e n c razed w i th gree d for t h e g o ld, t h e y had f o u g h t amo n g t h e m se l v e s until all had b ee n kill e d 'ati ves h a d burie d th em, late r o n, at t h e p l ace o f t h e murde r. The s pot h a s sin c e been r elig i o u s l y avo id e d by the nati v es w h o fir ml), b e l i e ve that o n stormy nig h t s the sc r eam of t h e murd ered man e c h oes t h ro u g h the jung l e I t was a gru eso m e s t ory, a n d I s hudde r e d to think tha t this was rh e v ery s c e n e o f t h a t dark an d bloody strugg l e. T h e cla y wa s h o t and oppress i v e and a sort o f fore b o di n g s t illn ess hung o v e r t h e s p o t, bro k e n onl y by t h e crackli n g o f a twig 01' t h e h oa r se c o u g h o f SOm e jun g l e c r eatur e f a r in t h e di stan ce ; n o t a b r eath o f w in d w a s s ti rring and dark clouds hung l o w over th e m o untain t o p F a scinate d b y t h e s p ot, I was o b l i v i o u s o f t h e f o r e b oding s t o r m I pi cture d J\l o r gan's raide r s, a s t h e r c r ept u p t h e t r ail wir h t h e ir flashing knives and greedy, crue l faces I seemed t o see t h e o l d mi se r strugglin g with th em, his with e r e d face piti f ully d i storte d with fea r and t erro r. A sudde n s harp crac k of thund e r b r o k e t h e s till n ess I star t e d t o m y feet r e aliz in g t hat r h e s t orm wa s u p o n m e The clearin g wa s a l r eady dark e ning i n t h e s h o r t t r o pi c a l twi l i g ht, a nd I kn e w t hat I co ul d neve r find Ill\' wav down t h e trail un til a f t e r t h e storm. So, fin di n'g s h e l t e r i n t h e thic k et. I p r e p a r e d to wa i t until it wa s o ve r I t wa s t erribl e Viv id R a s h es o f l i g h t nin g w e r e f ollo w e d by c r a s h es o f t h llnder t hat sec m eu I Olld e n o u g h [Q wa k e t h e dea d L o ud e n o u g h t o wake t h e d ead! D o t h e dea d e \'er w a k e? I s h udder ed The n ext R a s h o f l i ghtnin g illumine d rh e wh o l e place with a ghas tl y greenis h l ig h t I n t hat i n stant, I saw a s i g h t whic h c u r d led mv blood with h orror. Standi ng at t h e e nd o f t h 'e trail w e r e t h r ee m e n with r e d s a s h es and g l eaming knives and, struggl ing in t h e i r grasp, wa s a n o l d man, bro wn and w i r h e r ed with a ge O n e startl i n g secon d a n d t h e fla s h wa s over. A d eafe n in g c r a s h o f t hunde r seem ed t o c ra c k r h e ve r y m o untai n t o p. The n sile n ce. Fro m t h e e n d o f t h e trail came a w eird unearth l y wail. I Run g m yse l f fr o m t h e t h i c k e t and raced n n d h d o wn t h e m ountain s ide, stumbl in g o v e r v i n es and falle n trees \\' hat had T seen ? \\' a s it m y imaginatio n and the scraping a n d groaning o f t h e b ranc h es in th e w i nd ? C ould i t h a ve been t hat I h a d falle n a s l ee p ? Or had t h e p irates r e ally co m e bac k ? I d o n o t know, b u t t o t h i s day t h e m e m o r y 0 ; th a t night m akes m)' b lood run co l d

PAGE 24

THE CARIBBEAN. $ A TRIP THROUGH THE CANAL. z/ A s t h e S. S. Glorksoll lay at P ier ", Cristobal ready to l e a ve, t h e h ars h voic e o f the captain could b e h ea r d calling to t h e m e n o n th e dock to cast off the bow and stern lines, and in a few minutes w e were s lowl y moving toward t h e entrance o f the Panama Canal. probabl)' aft e r insec t s or b eing chased by a large r fis h Ove rh ead a l one buzzard floated l azily, w h i l e pale blue cran es sil ently skimmed a l ong the water. Branching from th e Canal lik e a little tributary lay t h e o l d Fre n c h Canal, its ca lm waters UI1-,\.1:;11101) UI' 1<.,\,..",(. Ok LOWERIl"(' ,'101 ..-\1..[. C":-;'AL L T pon entering the narrow channe l of rhe Canal J could see tall grass growi ng down into the water and miles of tropical j ungl e a long its banks. On the banks lay large c r ocodi les basking in the early morning sun evidently content with t h e world. A sudden splas h, breaking th e tropica l stillness and followed by many more, to l d me that some of the inhabitants of the laz)' waters of the Canal were jumping in and Out of the water, rullled, except for th e occasiona l dip of the paJdl e of a native, lazily d riftin g a lo n g in his slim caruco. Along its banks, half hidden b y the lu xuriant foliage, lay pieces of rusting ma c hinery, pathetic reminders o f the failur e o f the Frenc h ] was arollsed from m y co n templations of t h e beautiful tropical sce n e r), by the voice o f some o n e ca lling m)' attention to the Gatun L oc k s whic h rose in the distance like great stairs to Gatun

PAGE 25

THE C:\ R 1BBF.:\:-J, Lake A s w e n eare d t h e appro a c h w a ll, I noticed s m all e l ec t r i c l oco m o tiv es w hich w ould h e lp pull t h e ship th r o u g h t h e l oc k s \I' i t h a thud a Slllall leath e r s a c k (ull o(lead hit t h e d eck; t h i s was att a c h e d b y :l s m all ro p e to a large s teel cable whi c h was o n a coi l fastened to olle o f t h e l oco m o t i v es After t h e m e n pulled r h e cabl e o n b o a r d and fas t e n e d i t to t h e la rge iron cle a r s t h e locom ot;ve proceed ed to pull t h e ship a l o n g until three o t h c r l oco moti\cs ro o k LIS in tow, two forward and two aft. T h e p i l o t o n b oard yelled to t h e o p erato r s t o l e t go o f t h e a ft lin es and soon w e w e r e s t e aming into Gatun I .ake The lake la y smoo t h a n d c l e a r, r eflect ing t h l' w hite w h i c h la zily floate d across t h e hIm: s k r a turn in the lake marked ofF b y r e d spar Imoys, l ay the deaJ jung le, a ( o rest o f star k t r ees r earing (r o m t h e bosom o f t h e lake t h e i r l e a f h::ss b o u g h s l ik e gaunt arms O n o n e trce WL'rt.: o r chids) wh ose gar c o l o r e d flo w e r s m a d e a strikin g co ntrast against t h e gray b ranch es A s w e r e a c h e d a s lig h t b end in t h e Can a l I g o t my fir s t glimpse o f G a i liard Cut. O n b o t h s i des o f t h e Canal at t h e b end The gates b e ing ope n ed t h e s hip entered r h e firs t c h :ll1l ulltil i t r e a c h e d t h e m idd l e The gatt::s the n close d s l o \\'afte r liS and s uddell-frol11 t h e h o ttom o f t h e chambe r clInc a thulllkrillg n o i se Looking d own I s aw t h e w a t e r h ei n g s wirl e d about like a mi niature madstro m I n c h inc h t h e s hip wa s r ai se d u n til a h ell clanged from one (:ATl N 1..1 t...,. """m/se 1111. T .. T ./" U\\lB':r.S. \\ ITH G"TI's 1.\;;'1" /" TlH, D/.,Tt"C \.i nET \B,II': w e r e two small COIlc r e t e lig h t h Ollses, t h e ligh t s o f w h i c h w e r e u sed a s ra n ge li g h t s at nig h t, Slo w l y passi n g thro u g h t h e Cli t w e could sec o n olle s ide the s l ee p y I i ttl e tow n 0 f Culebra ill striking COIltras t to the I .... \LEI!:L 1'11<"',' lorb :lrt' I I .j mill'_ loul!. :11..1 Willull Ih"ir 11":111_ :It, hOIl_'.! m''''' Ilf 1111' iUlricatr au.! I'o'onde,ful ... r.l' whirh ;md r!""" III!' ,lIul rontrol I'oull'r IIIlakl' Mul ""lh'l-1 ",Iuth r:li'I' I>t IOI'oI.-r tlww . /tr m!'a'h.,rll< \!m (1)1)'("11111"111 O ( th e IOCOllloti,'L's, and the ship proCt.'('Li('d into t h e second c hamber. A f t('r t h t' sallle proc e edings we ente r e d t h e third. a n d last c h ambe r o f t h e locks .-\ft e r the s hip wa s rai sed to t h e l e ve l o f G atun Lake a b eaut iful scen e l a y before liS. On o n e s id e o f t h e l oc k s a large g rassy fie l d lik e a gree n v e l v e t carpe t, Thi s i s t h e Gatlin gol f course (the m os t expe n s i ve gol f course in the w o rld, for it i s l ocate d o n Gatun dam). Far beyo n d t h i s stre t c h o f g r ee n r ose ha z y pu r pl e m ountains t h e tops h i d d e n by s n o w), clo u d s hustl ing Cull'h ra of co nstruct ion days. O n hoth sides o f t h e C a n a l la\' r o lling h ills, 011 the sides of wh ic h rose s mall co n c r e t e s heds used d uring t h e construction d a ys f o r t h e purpose o f storing dynamite. :'\ o w t hey are v eritabl e p ictures of desol ilti o n and deca y, c o ve red with m oss, and toppe d by v erdan t f o liage o f som e j un g l e tree whi c h ha s sprung u p insid e a n d pus h e d t h roug h th e sagg i ng r oof, In th e distance, co m i n g fas t toward us, was a s m all wh i t e mowr launc h, its b rass trimmings

PAGE 26

26 THE CARlBBEAN. shining in the tro pi c al SUIl. \ \'e gaily exchange d gr ee t i ng s \\ith its pa sse ng e r s a s w e passe d. At this juncture w e w e r e c all e d to lunch, afte r which w e e xpl o r e d the mys t e ries o f the engine r oom. Late r w e too k pictures o f the Cut, and e nj o y e d an inte resting talk with the captain and fir s t mate, wh o t o ld u s many thrilling sea s t o ries. At th e entrance o f the Cut pro p e r s tood G o ld Hill and Contractor's H ill, great threatening maSSeS l aming lik e and Charvbdis o f old, o n either s;d e o f the ships whi c h thread the Canal. On the canal s ide o f C ontractor's H ill w e r e large h ydraulic grader s whi c h were used t o low e r the hill s anJ pre v ent s lides. Slowly pass in g out o f Gaillard Cut, w e c ou'd sec Pedro i\1 g u e i Lock, and farthe r all, the i\liraflo res Lock s the two separate d hy Lake At thi s part o f the Canal, sturdy little tugs were tie d up r ead)' to t o w t hrough the Cannl d i sable d ship. Tie d up a ongs id e the hank w e r e two large cranes, the and / /a(u/I>s, their s t e el arms t o w ering t oward the sky. .-\s w e ente r e d P edro I.o ck, w e saw in the chambe r opposite o n e of Un c le Sam's d e stro y e r s sending up fr o m its funne l s c l ouds o f blue s m o k e Orders were being give n with the rapidity o f a machine gun and obeyed a s quickly. Then w e w e r e low e r e d one step into MiraAores Lake; from h e r e we could see low rolling h ills dotte d with grazng cattle Corning close to the spillway) w e could see its massive s teel gates which w ere holding back the wate r s o f Lake. After passing the gpillw.1Y, w e entered t h e L ocks and w e r e s l o .vly l o w e r e d twO steps into the sea lev e l part o f the Canal. Fro m this p oint, w e c ould s e e the r e d til e d roof s of F ort Clayton and above them Old Gl ory Aying proudly in the breeze. I n the distance rose Ancon H ill, dotted with the homes o f Canal emplo y ees and, n estled at its foot, Balbo a AheaJ o f u s in the Canal wa s a large s u c ti o n dredge keeping the Canal cl ear of the dange r o u s sand fill. .-\fte r passing a tlirn in the Canal, W e could see the long cement doc k s where b oats o f many lands w e r e receiving and dischargin g cargo. 50011 w e w c r e ti e d up to the d ock and, afte r saying fare w ell t o fri e nds aboard, T l e ft the ship greatly imprcsseJ b,' the w onde r of this r emarkable engineering f eat \Vh eh has di vide j t\\"o great continents

PAGE 27

THE C:\RIBBE : \:,\. -. '0:; ij is ". U ii :;;1i !::; x J; -' -. >i.E Ii .., 1:

PAGE 28

THE CAR IBBEAY !Ii Gill, 'Z4. H e was onl y a little "mite of t h e nig ht," with large brown eyes t hat could see in th e dark, a n d thick brown fur, with a yellow bre ast, hut h e ha d all t h e qualities essen tial to a gentleman. Though h e was little larger than t h e manno,"ers, his nature was as diR'erent from theirs as can b e imagined. From t h e time t hat "\\'ee-\\'ee" was a tiny baby, weig hing exactly four ounces, h e s h owed certain inbo rn traits H e never, lIt'Vl'J" cried when h e was injured, and o n e time w hen his finger was ca u g h t in a steel satch e l, h e jumped lip and down and l11:ltle faces, hut not a sound did h e make; but when one o f hi s family went to Colombia f o r tw o \\ceks, h e had n o heart for play, and c r ied himsel f sick. H e wa s a sympat hetic little soul, and let one in his family h e though t we all be longed to himlet anyone he sick, and \\'ee-\\'ee wou l d steal tidbits from the s h eltered roo f garden to see if everyone was saf e Tho u g h h e had absolutely no way o f defen ding himself, t h e r e was never a more courageou s littl e t hin g than my \\'ee-\\'ee as th e following s hort narrative will prove: The you n g son o f t h e family had been g i ve n a toy snake a nd, lik e most littl e boys, left it o n the Aoor w h e n h e ha d fini s h e d p laying with it. \\'ee \ Vee's sharp eyes d iscover ed it th e r e and h e co m menced to bark lik e a dog, a sure sign that something was w ron g. (\\'e found late r that h e had an instinctive f ear o f snakes, t h o u g h h e had left t h e j ungle befor e h e was a m onth o ld, and had n ever seen a snake since h e had b ee n w ith u s ) But did h e run away? Not Wee-\\'ee! H e circ l e d ro un d th:n snake lIever rrossing ils head, ulltil w e took it away. Eve r after wards, if w e wanted \\'ee\ Vee to stay away, w e displayed t h e s n a k e. kitch e n a n d carr y t h e m through t h e house lJ n til h e reacheJ t h e rOOm of rh e L i ttle \ \'ee\ Vee d i ed a f e w m onths ago, after chance invalid, when h e wou l d drop t hem o n t h e livin g for twO rears, durin g whic h h e was as happy bed and bounce up and down lik e a rubbe r ball, a little anima l as could be found, but his family with sheer pride. have l os t a loving little friend a n d play fellow. I f it raineda n d h e hated waterh e w ould H e has done his here, however, for h e has rush all over the h o u se, and e ,'en across t h e un-opened to the m the whole world o f dumb animals.

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THE C A R IRBE .-\"'. SONNETS B y E N IOR Kirb.,' Ferguson. T h e sweetest word of all t h e E ngli:, h tongue A nd a lwny .... l-\ivcn t o o n e who':-loved and cared onl y for the child no longer young And g:ly. h u t also for the one who se I n lif e is highly prail:ied ami widely l:illngT his word of mnl/ur s said III an air A s fills one' heart with joy ;15 sweet s hrub 'mong Crepe myrtle Ihe pl.lcc;: with fragrance rare. She's loved l i S best, s he's .... tcrifi ced the mOl:it; nt!, though to others \\c m.L\ l:iCCIll to (nit, S h e a lwavs has a word in \\ hich to boast T he chilli throu!.!:h the coup.c of life must s.ul. B ut .lflcr .111, for .. he'd ]o\'C this best-T o h.t\ 'c 1I" \:llllC and sa \ I'vcJone Ill\' be::.!," 5.-\1\' 1.0 RF:--IZO. Ca,.1 Dut')'. T he r u ined San I. o renzo stanJ$ on g U ;lrd High on :1 ('lilT b y famous eh Igre_,' mouth Her all b y time and mal red H er r usted Clnnon a nd theit b . 11:. to r out Are put hv ve rdant never b l:-reJ Since men bst durgeJ \\ ith battle shout, And took the Spanish soldiers fighting h :lrJ T o kecp the p lund'ring E mdi s h pirates our. A Ruin T his f..lrt now Slu.llb'rll1g peacefully Beneath the tropi!.: sky, ,1\\ akes in me A wcd pit) f o r the trick that f.ne has s h own 'Tis like a dog that's sen'eJ so f.ut!lfull y, : \ nd no\\. bccause it is too old to be Of furth er u se unnoticed lies alone, \\'.-\ S I-II :'\ G T O:'\ POOL. Frill/X RfI)'lIIolld. Eac h day 'tiS filled \\ i th \\ ;tter from the ba } T hi ... pool, in \\ hi c h is sought s\\eetjor divme I h representativcs from C\'crr clim e \\' ho co me in ships from c"ery p or t, I nl! l ,'or week s enchanted by its tropic swar. T here w ee folk, old f o lk, young f olk in thclr primc f"nmming Pool Slide D o ba ... k and play from morn till c\cning timc F orl.{ctful of the sun's reAectl:d ra\'. T h ; tourists, passing through the Z onl:, are sure "\' \-i'l; I t time bt': n'n' ..,hort, \!H I e'en our P resident JI I l) Its bre R e ... pond, .lnt! foun d it be ... t of an\' "port. III It-. profundities we all may fin d G ood hcalth,good sport, and pe;\ce(ulne" ... of mimi. TROPI C T\\,I LI GJ-IT Etctwor Zimmermanl/. I' i ... \!\'eI1ll1g: w h en the s un in the west, And children playing happy all dar long \\"ill h:: in peaceflll land ere long, '\nd little twittering birds will go to rest. T he ... b which late in sober colors dres ... cd :'\'ow dons s uch hu e ... must belong T o the paint box of a giant, huge and strong \ Iethinks a master artist at his best. Soon the two s unsets in the sk\ and sea The latter no\\ more beautiful and bright, ... t gradually fade away from me I nto the splendor of t he Lethean night. But all these beauties are to me no loss. For I 'Ill with darknessal1ll the S outhern e ros!..

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JO TIlE C .'\RIB BEA:\. T()\\':\. Chll1.'u Hrllu,-, Jr . -\3 I do .. ,Ind tllInk of day::. gone Of pl.lces I hin c seen in long paSot time, I ah"II'!> dre.1m of th.lt old town of mine W here boyhood re:ollectiolls lit:. -\5 the .. !.' 01 I memories come before the eye T hey kl\v l y (orm :l picture I n clearness fit (or memory's inmost .,1 1I"1I1C :\ picture which brings forth both smile and There ... rands the [0\\11. I t looks :lcross the I.lke T he I.lke where m'lI1\ IllPP' d'I's I "pent; T he lock .. rhrough I I hich great "hip ... their II ,,[1111.11;.(', T he spiltw:!l, dear [fl those on fi"h1n!.! hentThese Illc;lsant to ;"1 make their appeal; T hen how much morc must I their be.tun feci. Hotd W:l.'!hilljttOIl, f> .... ept b} 0<:('311 Brccze>'. TI-I E \\".'1 \ 5. .-Ilia Hunler sit upon the old ";tU by the sea And count the !lilY w;lvclets ncar the s h ore; T hcn f.lrt h er out the larger waves I sec; Continuousl y towanl me t h eir wealth ther pour. T he), seem like captives longing to be free, And beat and tear the rocks wit h sullen roar; I wonder, as they all roll in toward me, \\'here they will go and where they've been before \t evemng stili rouI find me sitting there; The wind\ ha\c died ;Ind distant wa\'es grown c.llm, A call seem to bear to me From far-offlanth; they to me a psalm Of dream\; I feel a longing: and de!Jire To travel with thc waves until I tire_ T H E E T E R:\AL S T A R S .l/zldud S/ajfQrd. T hc twilight seems to come to me unknown. \ nd \tars begm (0 come to view; shine like di,lInonds 'g:tinst the sky so blue; -\nd then the \\.tn, w hite, moon of tropic l.one COllies creeping out frolll clouds by soft winds blown Aeros,> .1 ... k\, th.II'S now of darker hue, \ nd nlled with Stan; which were:tt first so few, \\'hose radi;lnce lights the e:trth now quiet g r own. The hriu:hest shines out \'enus-e\'ening star, Which ca ... ts a with its yello\\ light: Iluge Bctdgeu,>e it doth out;;hine by far, : \ntl e\'en the Southern Cross, that mbol bright, But all this beauty comes not first [0 me T he men who shaped the Sphinx t h e same did see. C'hri-lChlirch.Colou

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T H E CA R IBBEAN. 3 A H E R O UNA\\';\RFS. Dan Johns ton o b se rv e r in the L l S . Aviation Cor p s France Fidd, C. Z. } sat o n th e b:d cony of the Club l oo kin g Ollt over L.imon B ay .'\ b e autiful sce n e lay b e f J r c him. Through the entrance o f the bn.::a1,wate r a state ly s h ip o f th e Great White Flee t g lide d s l o wl\' into th e bay. ASan Bla scayuco,itswhitcsailssilh ollctte d a g ain s t the jung l e-co v e r e d hill s o n th e opposite bank,scarc cly sec m cd to move-so c alm it was A s ))an contemplated thi s p e a ce ful sce n e h e fO.lIlei it hard t o r e ali ze that b e y o nd thi s s am e tran quil ocean the r e wer e t h e scream o f s h ell and the thunde r of cannOI1. H e wa s arOll se d fr olll his r e v erie a r esound in g slap 011 t h e back and, o n turning saw Bill Price, a man he had Illet th e preceding y ear at an aIr plane factory in Coll ege P oint, N e w Y o rk. "What luc k to find ),ou h e r e old chap I" "\Vell, B ill Price," gree ted Dan, enth u s ia s ti c all y grasping his hand, I m sure ly gla d to see you: but what in the world are y ou d oing h e r e ?" The ques ti o n wa s i g n o r ed for B ill' s w e r e on th e drawn face of his frie nd. I h eard y o u had an a cc id ent, Dan; t ell m e about it, will y ou?" h e a s k e d. I t s all lik e a nightmare t o m e n o w, s igh e d the ),oung observ e r. "Se v e ral o f u s f ello w s w e r e a ss ign e d toour r es p ec tiv e planes t o w e l co m e a parto f t h eAtlanticFleetiastmonth. I'm a so l o i s t and" ";\ so l o i s t bro k e in Dan's friend, \\"hat's s inging got to do with aviatio n? " Ha-ha!" laughed Dan, "Yo u don't understand; 'Solo' is derive d from the Spanish; it means 'alone'in other w o rds, I had to fly unaccompanie d. J arrive d at the hangar of the se a planes on t h e appointe d m o rnin g hig hly elated ov e r t h e pros p ec t of m eeting the flee t. planes w e r e out on th e runway 'ga ss ing up' ; snapp), commands and d ir ec ti o n s co ul d b e h eard above t h e humof the motor s that w e r e warl11ingup I jumpe d into my plane ; it wa s put into t h e water. ] heade d it into the wind and gave it the 'gun'. The warme d moto r c hange d its g e ntl e hum to a clamorous roar, as the plane increased in speed and gracefully skimmed the surface of the deep blut: waters, It::avin g in its wake s h o w e r s o f white spray J n ost:d i t up several tim es, but i t r efuse d to 'take o fr.' I was goin6 t o cut the g un but to 111)' r elie f it finall y l e ft t h e watl.:". I passe d c l ose to the H o tel W as hington s i ght see in g statio n. I ma gine m y surprise whe n a s I turne d to wa ve t o th e s i ghtsee r s t h e re, I saw a passe n ge r in the r ear coc k pit. I wa s s p eechless The plane wa s hard t o handle due to o v erbalance of m)' passe n ge r and sand, but I f ell in lin e f ollo w ing a fly ing b oat, w o nderin g who 111)' strange shipmate wa s The b oat starte d d o wn f o r a z o om; I no se d m)' seaplane down also to a v oi d hitting t h e l e ader, f o r r wa s entire l y t oo c l ose to him. I had m o r e s p eed than his b oat and wa s coming n eare r. N o w 1 wa s but a f e w f ee t away I co uld n o t turn. 1 wa s too l ow. \Ye hit. "The fly ing b oat, afte r b e ing hito n it s tail, s hot upward and l os t s p e e d until it r e a c hed its h e i ght, the n f ell c lum sily o n its bac k lik e an ugl y giant bat, making a s pla s h that r ose into th e air a hundred f ee t. The seaplane t oo k a great s w ee p ve rti c all y upward, but its h e a v), n ose s l owly pull ed the widespre a d wing s aro un d t h e pivo t e d tailj the plane turned with all th e g ra ce o f a se a g ull but f ell to the wate r in a crumpled h eap. "\\' h e n J came to, .I wa s in the C o l o n H ospital, badlr shake n LIp, but uninjured The r es t o f th e story wa s tol d to m e b y m y m e chanic wh o had witn esse d the d i s a s t e r from th e water's ed g e "1\ 1 y passe n ge r was killed. H e was that in s p ec t o r o f planes wh o wa s so c riti c al o f our w ork at Coll e g e Point factory. You r e m embe r him." Bill s face, far fro m s h o win g r egre t, was radian t. Ol d Boy; you've don e y our cou n t r y a good turn in ridding it o f thi s f ellow. I W:1S sent h e r e to f ollo w thi s same man; I'm in t h e J n tellige n ce D epartment n ow. H e co ndemne d so mu c h o f our w o rk that our s u spic i o n s we r e aro u sed and w e detail ed a n o th e r inspect o r to examine his rejecti o n s H e in turn b ec am e s uspi c i o u s and d i sappeared. \\'e the n d iscovered him to b e a spy in t h e e mploy of the German Government. Why, wh e n m y rep ort i s made public yo u 'll b e hailed a s a h e ro."

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32 T H E C\RI BBE -\'I'. Yi--TilE EYES OF A I..-\I)Y i His college were over. Dan Howard wa s just beginning to n..:alizc t h e full s i gnificance of this I t not only meant that h e mus t go out into the world and fend f o r h im s elf, hut t hat h e w ould be parted from Jean During the last few weeks they had bcen thruwn together a great deal ill rh e rehears al s of t h e S enior play 1 .'\ s Y o u L ik e It." She had heen Rosal ind and h e, O rlando, and it wa s during t h ose weeks of co n stant cornpanio n ship that s h e had cOllle to m ean so mllc h to him. ".I list because a f e llow hasn't as muc h money as the next one, it d oesn't mean that h e i sn't worth a s much," h e refl ec t ed binerh-. ( t'c; m o ney, m o ney, and m o ney, and no amount of strength or courage seems to count. O f course 1 haven't asked h t:r yet, hut how call 1 when ] ha ve nothing to offer h e r? Oh, if I only had a chance; but j 'lI us e what I have, and b e thankful for health and stre n g t h ""II work, and wh e n 1 \'e f eathered m)' nest ('11--" the gayest of t h e and not C \"en h e r best friend knew t ha t her gaiety wa s f eig n e d. So it wa s t hat "hen a letter came from a n aUllt in P anama, in,-iting .lean to s pend several mOl1ths with h e r s h e gladly accepted, thinking that perhaps new scc.:ncs and e'pericnces \\oldd help her to f o rget Dan. Jean was wandering along the beach at F ort San I ,orcn,w, a crumbling mass o f 'ine-covered ruins at th e mouth of the Chagres Ri,rer Panama. She had come \\ith a of you n g people to spend the day there, and the p e a ce ful beauty o f the place had strangel, calm ed her. She had picke d ho:"r \\1\ around t h e base of a cliff' that s h e might warch the s un se t a lone, and, seated llpon a rock,s hegave h e r sel f up to the enjoyment o f t h e sce n e b e for e her. .-\11 wa s still. Eve n ::,\Tature seemed to be h o lding her breath) awed by the w o nd e r of it all. The quiet sea rdiected the soft ros), tints of the sky, and the SUIl, a fiery, blood-red hall, sank s lowl y o u t o f sight bel o w the horizon leaving only "the flowerpot," silhouetted against t h e west. Jean sprang to her feet with a start. I n watching the sunset s h e T h e r es t wa s left un said, bur as a re s ultof this determination Dan fou n d himself 11 w ee k late r on board a southbound steamer, going-not even his best fri e n d kn e w where Flowerpot had forgotten time, and to her All t h r o u g h t h e summe r afte r graduation J ean watched dail y for som e m es::;age from Dal1-hut n o n e came. \'0 o n e see m ed ro know \\ hat had become o f him; it was as if the earth had opened up and swallowed hirn. A t first s h e wou ld not acknowledge even to hersdf that s h e cared for Dan, hut a s time wore o n and n o newS came, s h e awoke to t h e realization that s h e did care, and cared ve r y mu c h. I n an eH'ort t o forget him s h e plunged mad ly into t h e \\ inter festivities of the little middle west [()\\n whL'rc s h e had li'ed since childhood. At all t h e parties, sleigh rides, and good times of the season, s h e was dismay wh e n s h e reach ed the clift') s h e f ound t hat t h e tide had ri se n a n d s h e eQu i d not get past. Bu t .lean wa s a practical sort o f girl and when s h e f ound that s h e could not return the s h e had co me, s h e decided to fin d another. .-\fter a few minutes' sear c h s h e d iscovered a rrailleading into the jungle, and s h e starte d down it, supposin g, o f course that it led around the clifF. A frer wa lkin g quite a l o n g time s h e began to rea l il.e that in stead o f nearing the beach s h e see m ed to be getting deeper and deeper into rhe jungl e This frightened h e r, and s h e began to retrace h e r step s, but alth o ugh s h e walked (111 til s h e co uld scar cely drag one foot after the oth e r,

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THE CARIBBEAN. 33 she could not find t h e beach. At last s h e was forced to acknowledge that s h e was lo s t, in a dense tropica l jungle, a l one, and with night descendi n g upo n h er This was too much for h er to stand, and, unable to restrain h ersel f an y longer, s h e threw her se lf o n th e ground a n d so bbed fro m s heer ex haustion. The twilight deepened. An owl hooted fro m a n e i g hb oring tr ee. J e an s h iver ed, and c rawl e d int o t h e dense underbrus h be s ide the trai l w h e r e s h e c r o u c hed, h er ca r s s training for any sound of approac h ing danger, and h e r eyes big with frig h t and wet with unrestrain ed tears A s u s pici o u s rustle in the underbru s h beside h er ; an un ea r thly s hriek fr o m far in t h e jungle, f ollowed b y a n awful sti lln ess ; the patter of padded feet a s so me night prowler slun k past h e r h iding pla ce; it was all too muc h (or J ean's overwroug ht n erves; s h e spran g up and dashed wildly out into th e da rkn ess, whither s h e did not kn ow o r care . Crash! She tripped over a fallen l og and la y motion less on t h e ground beside it D an Howard, foreman of a l arge lumbe r camp in t h e Panamanian jungle, strode down the trai l toward the camp after a day's h a r d w ork p rospecting for va luabl e trees. I t was a lready dark, h e was both tired and hungry, and h e looked f o rward to a good supper and a long nig h t's r es t. Suddenly his attention was arrested by a s hadowyformslinking down the trail ahead o f him. Taking his gu n from his s houlder, h e placed in it the only cartri dge h e ha d left. The s ha dow was lost to view around a bend of the trail; the man followed \\' h a t h e saw made him start violently, for before h im crouc h ed a huge jaguar j ust ready to sprin g upon hi s unconscious prey, a youn g gir l whom D a n recogni zed in the d im light o f t h e rising mOOI1 as J ea n Davi s. MR 77J75---3 H e too k aim a n d s h o t just in time. The savage beast turned and leaped b lindly at him but Dan sprang back in th e nic k of time, and the jaguar f ell h eavi l y o n th e grou n d. But he was up in a m orllellt, ready to spr in g again This time D a n could not d o dge, but deal t t h e jaguar a b low w ith hi s hunting knife. The knife sa nk deep, but th e jaguar, madde ned b y t h e pain, l unged f o rwar d again and t h is tim e his teeth c losed on Dan's l e ft arm H e felt th e bone c run c h between t h e jaguar's powerful jaws and, s i c k with pain, h e swayed as if h e wou l d fall but a l oo k at th e g irl f o r whose life h e wa s fighting s ustained him, and h e stabbed the jaguar again and again with his fr ee hand. At last, weak fro m l oss of blood, t h e jaguar's h o l d o n hi s arm relaxed and h e r olled over with an awful groan and lay motionless. Dan s taggered t o h is feet, and turn ed to the pla ce wh e r e Jean had b een l y in g but s h e h ad regained consciousness and was at his side in a m o m ent. Afte r a f e w s tartled exclamation s they exp l ain ed to eac h other h ow t h ey happened to be t h e r e Whil e th e y wer e talking, Jean's eyes f ell o n D an s arm. "Oh, D an s h e crie d "your a rm!" Qui c k l y s h e tor e a strip fro lll h er petticoat and set ab out bindi n g up th e w o unei. D a n do you remem ber t hat we did this same thing i n o ur p lay last year? I s n 't it a queer coinc id e nce that it h as becom e a reality? How it grieves m e Orlando, to see t h y heart in a s lin g." .. I t is m y a rm, D an returned. "., t h o u ght thy heart had been wounded by th e claws o f a lio n.' And Dan answered softly "'\\'ounded it is but w ith t h e eyes o f a lady.' Doyou know w h ose?" A n d t h e moon c am e out fro m behind t h e clouds and bestow e d upo n them h e r benediction.

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34 THE CARIBBEAN. !Ii !Ii WHEN WE REACH GENOA." -$ A TRUE STORY. Emilio Solo m on, '23. "Emilio! H e r e, boy; as we are nearing port, we must ascertain the contents o f t h e i ce b ox. Go dow n and c h ec k ca r e full y all the provi s i o ns, so t hat w h e n w e reac h Genoa, we mar know w hat s upplies we s h ould take in. B e snappy m y b oy! These words were addressed to m e b y t h e c hief s t eward o f the good s h ip NavallOe, three days out from Genoa. Off ] wen t t o exec u te t h e o rd er, turnin g over in my mind the strange events o f this voyage. I was a boy o f 1 8 very impressio nabl e, l ongi ng as all b oys do for strange adventures. H ow g ladly h ad I seized thi s opportunity as ca bin boy o n board the s t eams h ip l\lavahoe, a m erchant marine b ound for Genoa. \ \ll y heart, e lated over the prospect o f this great adventure ha d sunk, h oweve r after I h ad see n m y fellow ship mates. A veritable band of pirates t hey see med, with the ir sin ister seamed faces. The refuse o f soc i e t y t hey were -dregs fr om t h e f our cor n e r s o f the world. I had un consc iousl y in curred t h e displ easure o f seve ral m em b e r s of this c r ew s inc e we had shipped, a n d this had caused m e mu c h discomforton the voy ag e. As I e ntered the ic e b ox, I saw t hat t h e l ig h ts were turned off'. O n turning to ascertain t h e cause, J imagined] heard l ow voices, but attributi n g it t o m y n e r vo u s n ess, ] b ega n t o whi s tl e a gay tune to keep u p m y co u rage. The tune died o n m y lip s, h oweve r as a ro u g h hand closed over m y arm and a rough vo i ce startled me w i t h these words : "Now, we have got you; yo u are t h e very one we a r e looking for." ] f elt a queer se nsation com e over me whic h I can hardly describe, and, b e f o r e I co ul d utter a sound, a fla s hli ght flared in my eyes. ] saw b y this that my assailant was masked. I co uld only stamme r, \"'hat is it?" The harsh voice answered, Y oung man, you are in our hands. Besensibl e; join u s and yo u will find it t o your interest. If you don't join us -well --." A grating laugh finished the sentence. "Your life won't b e worth the snapping o f a fing er," anothe r rough voice !Ii Although apprehensive of dan ge r, 1 became for t h e moment indifferent to conseq u ences and bo ldly said, "No, I s h all n o t be a party to any v illainy; do your wo rst." A revol ve r flashed in t h e dim light, and t h e first voice s narled, "No fooling! 1 mean busi ness." I realized t hat it wou l d do no good to resist. M y voice sounded weak a n d far ofF, "All right, w hat do yo u want m e to do?" "That's a sen sible boy, h e said, n ow patting the arm h e h ad so lately gripped. Your part will be an easy o n e, but yo u will get you r share of t h e s p oils as a reward w hen we reac h Genoa. \\'e are robbing t h e cargo; yo u are to h o l d t h e torc h whi l e we operate. \Ve'lllie l ow now for a day or so, but will leave a note in your cabin telling you whe n we want you yo u understand, boy?" 1 mutter ed Yes," and t hey left me, t o take my i n vellwry, lik e some dazed creature. A day o r so later I f ou n d t h e dreaded note in m y cabi n. Fearfully I un folded it a n d the f ollowing words blurred b efo r e my eyes : "Emilio, r ec uerdese de Iluestros arregl os, esta n oc h e entre la s h o ra s una a dos I e estare m os esperando a' la entrada de l a bodega. Tenga la b o n clad de cumplir con este adviso." T was i n a mi se rabl e state o f mind. All day at work ] evol ved means of escape, on l y to come back t o the threa t o n the s lip of paper. Finally this t h o u g h t flas h ed in my mind; I would go to the captain, w h o h ad befriended m e on more t h an o n e occas i o n and make a clean breast of the whole affair 1 ru s h ed to the captain's office, fearing 1 would c h a n ge my min d if 1 stopped to reflect. As 1 r eac hed t h e door, my heart fail ed m e, but Provi dence Illust have bee n with m e, f o r at that mo ment the captain appeared. rvly nervousness nearly overcame m e; 1 made an attempt to turn back, but the captain, on p e r ceivi ng my embarrass m ent, sai d "Come on, Emilio, what is the matter? Have yo u something to say to n)e?"

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THE CARIB B EAN. 35 Oh yes Captain," T ans w e r ed, "somethin g o f it v e ry strange nature. "Com e into m y cabi n," h e s aid. T f ollowed him in and took th e c hair to whic h h e motio ned m e Then I began to r elate rny ex p erie n ce with the mas k e d n13l1. J told him that, although I had pro mised to b e o n e of this band, m y co n scie n ce w o uld n o t all o w m e to depart fro m the good t eachings I had had fro m l11y m othe r and t e a c h ers. 1 had co m e to t h e concl u s i o n that the b es t course I co ul d purs u e wa s t o info rm him o f thi s attempte d piracy The captain b ecame inte r es t e d in t h e story a s I w e n t all, l i s t ening with the greatest atte nti o n and anxiety. In a grave vo i ce, h e said, "Emili o d o yo u m e an to s a y, I have slic h ra scally cutthroats o n boar d m y ship? 1 can't beli eve it; I can't b elieve it," Afte r sitting, lo s t in thought for a f e w moments, h e co n tinued," D o y o u think yo u can id e n ti f y y our man? " I t will b e diffi cult, Captain, f o r h e wa s mas k ed, as wer e th e o th e r s w h o m I saw, but I may venture a guess, a s 1 o b se rv ed his build and his h a nds." That h a n d had h e ld a revol ve r t o m y face; never wou l d that m e m o r y b e era sed "Yo u have n othing to f ear. I s hall protect yo u. \ V e 'll soo n ha ve t h ese f ello w s \Vhe n I need YOll, 1 s hall let you kn ow G o qui etly about your b u s in ess in the m e: lI1time." 1 w e n t bac k to w o rk with th e terrible l oad lift e d fro m m y co n sc i e n ce, secure in faith in t h e captain. An h our later, a s I wa s leavin g the i ce bo x whithe r I had go n e o n an erran, j f o r t h e c hief s teward, I stumbled against the man w h olll I b elieved to b e the Ill:l s k ed man. L oo k at me," h e said. D o yo u kn o w m e? " Yes," l answered. ('Did yo u get the m ess age?" h e whispered. J n odded my h e ad. "Yo u a r e with u s? A g ain 1 n odded Good," h e said, t omorr o w at 2." After dinner I wa s summo ned ro the deck T h e r e s t ood t h e captain and b e f o r e him the crew. P oi n t ou t your m a n a n d anyon e o f the c r e w whorn yo u may r ecog n ize a s o n e o f thi s rasca l band, h e said, turning to m e I V I), kn ees tre mbl ed ; 1 l onged to Aee bac k to th e r efuge o f m y ca bin away fr o m t h e s m o ldering hate in t h e eyes o f t h e m e n b e f o r e m e. I tri ed t o speak, but th e w o rd s refu sed to com e. R e assured, however, b y the captain's hand upo n m y s h o ulder) l pointed out m y frie nd o f th e revol ver. \Vit h a l o w snarl of rage, h e made a s if t o lunge at m e but was restrained b y t h e first mate and t h e s t eward, w h o led him away A s h e passed m e, h e gave m e a te rribl e lo o k whic h I s hall never f o rget, f o r it burne d itself upo n m)' soul. "Emilio," continued th e captain, "can yo u p oint out anoth e r ? On m y t e lling him that 1 co u l d n o t h e dismissed m e, s a y ing t hat this f ello w would do. Immediate l y after suppe r I wa s summo n ed to th e bridge and wa s indeed amaze d to see t h e 1ll1111 -b e r o f desperate wretch es co w eri n g before t h e captain. "These m en," h e said, "stand co nd emnet1 b y the ir own confess i on." J said n othing, but instinctively shrank back b e f o r e t h e mali ce in their evil eyes "Now, Emilio," continued t h e captain,
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THE CAR IBBEAN. . .. -."':-1 Ul\lJSU.-\L CHRISHI AS GATUN, C. z., J anuar), 20, J 92 J decided that our good judgment had failed u s w h e n we !TIet a native w h o s h owed u s another trail that led a lmost directly back t h e wa)' we had come. DEAR HARRY: Alo n g with the right trail we acquired, in C h arre ra J have just co m e in frolll a ten-day camp and 1 Spanish (whic h I soo n found to be quite different want to tell ),o u about it before I l ose all my from that which I l ea rned in Cristobal H igh S c h oo l ) ambition to write a letter. a lot of advice, etc., on h ow to get there OUf whole famil y and another frolll Pedro Of cou r se there wa s a fork in this trail too, and l\ l iguel went Ollt to r o u g h it in C horrera during again we took the wrong o n e but it e nded up in an Christmas vacati o n o range gro\'e, so we didn't mind. \\' hil e we were i\i rs Lackjer, an Ame rican lady who lives in in the g r o \'c, we saw and killed several big black Chorrera, treated us very kindly durin g our stay tarantulas. Also the place was full of ticks and, there. She knew all of the surroundin g incidentally, it was not long before we were, t oo well and saw to it t hat we visited the principal A s I had always thought that the big spiders lived p l aces o f inte rest. entirely upon the ground you can imagine my sur-\\' hil e we were out the r e prise w h e n 1 w hanged an the grown-ups did most orange at o n e t o see of t h e cook i ng, bu t o n e him ru n up an orange tree. day they a ll went o n -' s hot him down with horseback to a place six a s mall riRe. or seven miles away and \ \ 'e went back to the 1 was left to do the cook-fork where we too k the ing and mind the carnp. oth e r trail and it was not Say, I was busier than a long before we arri ved one-eyed boy at a three-at the falls. \\'e rested ring circus. \ \ 'hat with there awhile and also took watching that none of the Chorren. hlU. some pictures o f which ] am grub burned, taking care of the k ids, and seeing sendin g you one. I nearl y broke my neck get-that none o f the little natives that w e re hanging ting it. I had to c r oss a wide stret c h o f water around the camp let their fingers stray, I surely which, though fairly s hall ow, was mighty sw ift. hali my hands full. I was lucky though, because I had to carry the camera in my teeth and u se the lima beans d i dn't burn, th e young onesdiJn't my hands and feet. E ven so, I t h o ught several do anythin g worse t han heave potatoes at one t im es that I was gone. anoth er, and nothing was lost, strayed, or stol en. \\' h en I returned we went back to camp, f o r it A day or two before Christmas about six of us was getting ncar c how time. took a trip to el chorro or in plain English "the \\'e all came back from the trip safe and sound falls." i\l rs. Lackjercouldnotgowithusthatday and fully convin ced that we had spent as merry but s he gave us the directions and said that it was a Christmas as we could have had only about twO miles away. I hope you had as good a time as I had this \\'c set out confidcntly for eI cllol"ro. Pretty Christmas and are in good h ealth. soon we came to a fork in the trail and, as we had forgotten the directions, used our good judgment. \\'e had walked two miles easi l y and h ad just Your friend, CARL DUEl'.

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THE CARIBBEAN. 37 : \ ( ."'" THE SU8jF.Cf AI'PEALE!) TO T wo SE,\IOR:'.) !Ii---.1lice Iftm/(r, '21. Thomas Baldwin, son of o l d Senator Baldwin, had be e n acclised of embezzlement; but, owing to his father's influence, h e was let out 011 bail. H e wa s vcry popular and had faithful fri ends chief among them hi s old college chum, R od Evans I twas 011 the o p ening night of th e new play "Cornered," srarring i\ladge Kennedy, that R od secured a box and telephoned his frie nd s to sec the pia)" with him. H ehadnoideaastotheplotof rh epi:1.y; hewas m e re!y out(ora pleasantevcning. The dinner had been good, the wine better than lIsual, so the "bunch" was in a happy state when they reached the theater. Soon afrerseating themsel ves and chatting with friends in a neighboring b ox they quieted down to see t h e curtain rise on the first act. Tom e njoyed t h e first act-at least the glimpses of it that h e was able to catch thro ugh I arie's ca rved s h ell comb. The action grew more tense and the situation more thrilling during th e seco n d act. T h e girl was coming n eare r and near e r t o an exposure o f her theft. \Yhy, where's T o m? \\'hat in the world do you suppose has b eco m e o f him?" cried l\larie, as s h e glanced around at the e n d o f the act. isn't Tommi e h ere? D oesn't h e lik e the play?" cried another. "Oh, keep still, cried Evans, "before the)' put you out. H e'll be back s h ortl)"; h e probably went out to have a smoke." The s how ended, but T o m had been forgotten long before H e met them at the door. "Folks, that was too Illu c h for mc, and [ just couldn't h o ld up any longer. D o you rememb';!r how, in Hamlet, Hamlet discovered hi s un c l e s guilt by writing a play to suit the situatio n and how h e said, T h e play's th e thing in which we'll catch the co n sc i e n ce o f the king,' \ V ell, that s h owed them what t h e o ld kin g really was and this little drama ha s done the sam e t hin g to me D Ol1't l oo k at me l ik e that, Rod, 1 know you didn't bring me h e r e to catch my co n science but I can't deny any longer that I'm a thief." Carl DIU.", '2 r H m, that gas i s pretty low. I 'll have to look for a good landing. '" w o nd e r whe r e w e arc) anyhow? "Say old buss, it looks bad for liS. T hu s Lieutenant \\' ho s is, as h e bu zzed through space, was talking to him se l f and hi s airplane. H e had b een sent out from France F ield 011 an observation flight and had encountered a sc \ ere storm which had c arricd him far out of his course and had injured hi s compass H e had turned all the emerg e ncy gas tank some time b efo r e. The gauge s h owed that it was nearly empty, and h e did nOt know where h e was. K eepi ng hi s eyes open f o r a suitable place to land, th e lieutenant continued t o speak hi s thoughts aloud. " of a sudden-pop, pop, pop-and the roaring 1110tor became quiet. ?'Jo gas, and 110 landing in sight! Strangely e n o u g h his thoughts were not so much o n hi s danger as on the play Hamlet," which h e had been reading the night before. Down, down, down, in hu ge spirals went the plane, with the wind whistling s hrilly through the guy wires .-Crash. Lieutenant \\' h osis awoke to find him sel f lying in the middl e of a jungl e trail, and his machine a s hort distance to one side, a total wreck, surrounded by an excited group of I ndians. These he readily recognized as San Bias Indians by their s hort stature, and, as a good bit of [heir talk was in Spanish, which h e understood, the lieutenant

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THE CARIBBEA f o und Ollt whe r e h e wa s and w h a t t hey inte n d e d to do with him. :\. lit tl e l n dian with a v e r y large h ead and a ve r y s mall hat, w h o see med t o have t h e rnos t a u t hority wa s talking and a m o n g his words t h e lieute na n t made o u t "EI d e b e q u e d a r e n n u estro p ai s N o estara bi e n p e r m iti rl e partir." T h ese r emarks and a m o r c l ik e t h e m se t t h e l i e utenant t o t hinki n g O n ce a g ai n t h e play "Ha ml e t cam e to his mind, and, kn o wing t hat m os t I ndians t h i n k a c r azy p e rson t Ollc h e d b y t h e h a n d o f God, h e deci d ed to imitate t h e h e r o of t h e play a n d a c t crazy. Afte r a w hil e t h e littl e bro w n m e n t urne d the i r attenti o n f r o m th e p l a n e a nd, see in g t hat t h e lie u t enant wa s awak e a nd unhurt, t o l d him t o g e t up and go with t h em. After a h al f da)"s marc h t h e )' arrive d at a small v ill a ge w h e r e t h e captive f o r slic h t h e l i eutenan t wa s wa s l e d b e f o r e a co u n c i l w h i c h aft e r d u e d e l i b e rati o n informe d him t hat b ecause h e h a d l a nded so f a r in t h e in t e r i o r o f t h ei r land t hey w e r e g o i n g t o keep h im t h e r e Thi s d i d n o t s u r pri se Li e u t e n a n t \Vhos i s a s h e h a d s u r mi se d a s m u c h fr o m the talk h e had h eard w hil e t h e Ind i a n s w e r e gath e red a r ound t h e airplane
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THE CA RIBB EAN. 39 teach e r with h e r cla ss o f g i gg ling pupil s Oh, woe unto m e woe UI1--. "Miss K emp, w h y did t h e Egyptians make statu es o f the ir peop le?" "He i sn't a statue, A.li ce I ncleed 110, for o n ce h e lived, wa lk ed talk ed ate, d ra n k, and s l ept j ust as w e do n ow. \Vhe n h e died, his people p r ese r ved him." I s h e a s dead as a doornail?" "\Vhy m os t certainly h e i s, c hil d "And wa s h e always as thin a s that, and did h e a lways have that awful bi g nose?" "Oh h e gives m e t h e c r ee ps,"-thi s ( ro m o n e d ainty little g irl. "Co me, co m e, c h i ldren, th e r e are many o ther inte restin g t h ing s I want YOll t o see." Thank h e a ve n, t hey're gon e. H o w they c hatt e r ed and g iggl ed Ugh and o n e e v e n wanted t o touch m e Look h e re, old chap, at this ball y mummy. Rath e r touchin g, e h ?" An Englis hmant h e ir a ccent is /lot t o b e forgotten and to t hink they even ru l e m y b e loved Egypt to-day! Evil times have co m e upo n o u r g reat ra ce. R o b ert, look! an o l d yellow s hriveled-up muml'n )' 1\1l y, but it's g hastly l oo kin g Let' s hurry o n, I d on't l ike it." Lik e m e indeed! An o ld s hriveled-u p mummy I s h ould l ik e t o rsee h e r co m p l ex i o n after f our tho u s a n d yea rs: The crow d i s t hinning o u t-on l y a f e w straggl e r s are l e f t. N ow t hey are gone. The caretaker limps fr o m w indow to window, makin g t h e m all fast f o r t h e nig ht. At l a s t t h e door clangs. I am a l one. The s hado w s deepen ; it i s nig ht; a s haft o f moon l i g h t falls a c r oss m y casket and I see again the moonli g h t o n m y beloved r i ver. T AND "MYSELF." Carl Due)" '21. 1 have r ecently d iscover e d that t h e r e a re two o f me-"I and ,Myse l f bu t th e discover y i s not entirely m y o wn as it was m o r e o r l ess forced upon m e by an a ssignment in Englis h literatur e Upon investigating my d iscovery 1 have f ound that m y two se l ves dif F e r ve r y g reatl y. I i s always wanting to l e n d a helping h a n d but "my_ self" s a ys, "God h e l ps t h e m wh o h elp the m selves L et's g o "l\r l yself" gen e r ally w in s out and the n I rep r o a c h es "myse lf" the rest o f the day, making both o f liS f eel pretty c heap. \\'e both l ik e s ports, and tenni s strik es u s as being an es p ec iall y good game. \\Ie start to play and our opponent puts over a fast, c lose se r ve that we mi ss altogeth e r. 1 says, 'ts in." says, t s alit." ,. 'ts in 'ts out." And so o n. Finally w e both say 1 don't know w h a t that was," knowing that our oppo n ent will either give u s the point o r se r ve it over. I f h e gives u s the p oint, I look s sorr owfully at m yse lf. I f h e serves it over and w e mi ss, I s a ys "Uh huh, c h eatin' s hows." And t h e resu l t i s, eithe r way, n o more peace o f m ind d uring t hat game \\'e both want t o make friends. I says, "Let's make friends with t hat guy." "Mysel f s a ys, HAw, h e won't benefit us any." "But maybe we'l! b e n efi t him. \\'e a r g u e about it. I f 1 win s w e f eelli:,:e a martyr. I f m yself" wins we feel mean. I t i s t rue, t h o u g h t hat after we have approac h ed a fello w and made h im our frie n d we both enjoy him t horou ghly. Our main argument i s ever y morning about getting alit o f bed. " sars, Let's getup a n d start something." "J\lyself says, B e sensibl e. Turn over and go to s leep. There i s a lways a long a r gume n t and whil e w e are still at it, "tvlamma" says, "Carl, if YOli don't ge t up I 'll throw a cup o f water on you." \\'e get out!

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THE CARIBBEAN. EVERYLAD. A N ALLEGORY. j Emma TOWllUlId, '22. Harold F. Cl o ke, '22. Fathe r Experie nce s tood at the gate, ta lk ing to his SO il Ever y lad. "Yo u ar e ab out to ente r upon t h e path of Kn owled g e my son. J t l e ad s in a s quare about t h e g r ea t fie l d o f Wi sdo m and s o afte r going a r ound thi s field you will r e turn t o y our own h o m e Alwa ys b e pre par e d, an d keep C o n scie nce, your chie f frie nd, happy, cheerful and s p otless G ood lu c k t o y ou, m y b oy Bring ba c k a s many go l de n appl es a s y ou c an. E ve r y l ad s tart e d o n his wa y with th e lea s t bit o f f ear in his h eart. A s h e appro a c h e d the entrance t o th e path h e h e ard a l o ud n o i s e and on pa ss ing thr o u g h th e gate h e s aw th e f eroc iou s dra go n Haz ing rus h ing t o ward h im. He success full y d e f eate d th e m o n s t e r by r e c e iving his a t t a c k s in m eekness and sile n ce. H e soo n f ound him se l f nec k de e p in th e mars h o f Mathe matic s Onl y b y t he earnes t e ff o rts of a n e w a cq uaintan ce Hard Study, wa s h e able to r eac h t h e s m oo th gree n fie l ds o f Engl i s h. M e anwhil e an o th e r s trang e r had app e ar ed, a queer, f o r e i g n l oo kin g man c all e d Languag e Eve r y l ad f o un d t h i s f ello w m os t pu zz ling and r e ally n o t much h e lp in so l v ing the pr oble m s o f this firs t s ideof t h e s quar e Hi s trave lin g wa s gr o wing h ard e r all the tim e f o r h e wa s in th e r oc k y m o untain s of G e olog y All thi s tim e his frie nd C o n sc i e n ce wa s h app y and c h ee rfu l an d wa s full y s ati sfie d with t he pr o gr ess rnade O n t r ying t o jump the firs t ditc h o f S e m es t e r T ests, Everyl ad f ell hard and c rawl e d out cr es tfalle n resolvin g t o jump s afel y a c r oss n e xt tim e H e success full y trave r sed th e r e maining f e w ditc hes by th e hel p o f H a r d Study and C o nsci e nc e Everyl ad w as n o w becomin g troub l ed, f o r th e r e l o o med a h e a d, th e d ee p and s wift rive r o f Exam inatio n s F i n ally h e s t oo d p au sing o n th e brink with his f rie n ds, C o n sc i e n ce an d Har d S tudy, wh o w e re encouraging him. H e p l un ged brav e ly into th e riv er, to e me r ge o n th e o th e r s ide with f our g o l de n appl es h e l d t i g h t l y in his han d On th e S o p h o m ore s i de o f th e fie l d Eve r y lad s p ent mu c h tim e wit h a n i n te r es ting c h a p c all e d Pl e a s ur e and b ec am e n eg l ectful o f his frie nd s, H a r d Study and Conscie n ce It wa s n o t until h e rea c he d th e e n d o f that path, that h e r e ali zed h o w pal e an d n eg l ec t ed Hard Study a n d C o n sc i e n ce l oo ked A s th ey stoo d t o gethe r o n th e bank o f th e fina l riv e r a dark man, Ch ea t offered Eve r y lad a s m all b oat t o ride in. C o n sc i e n ce urg e d him n o t t o accept it, but h e bru s hed his w e ak e n e d frie nd as i de an d j um ped into th e boat, pu s hing it far into th e riv e r A s th e c raft appr o a c h e d the midd l e, it ca p s i zed an d l e ft E ve r y l ad in t h e wate r t o d r o wn. H e f o ugh t his way acr oss a n d climb ed up th e o pp os i te bank with seve ral g oose e ggs mixed with his g o l de n appl es H e lp e d b y Hard Study and C o nsci e n ce he made up, o n the J uni o r s ide o f th e s quare, w h a t h e had l o s t b e f o r e E ve r y la d m e t Ch eat sever a l tim es lat e r but eac h tirne expressed his scorn a n d d rove him awa y in an ger. n o w see E ve r y l ad s tartin g o n th e l as t p o r tion o f his j o urney with tw e l ve gol de n a ppl es in his bag Afte r g o in g thro u g h the v all ey o f Trig o n o m e tr y he starte d climbin g th e Fi nal hill o f Languages, but f ell down th e bank o f Care l ess n ess whi c h ran alo n g the s i de o f th e hill. H e mana ge d t o c limb out safe l y h o wever. H e k e p t thinkin g n o w, o f th e lar ges t an d m os t tr e a c h e r o u s river of E x aminati o n s whi c h wa s yet t o b e cr osse d. All thi s tim e his frie nd, C o n sc i e n ce, wa s happy and ch ee r y, ye t ha d a f e w dark s p o t s o n his whit e mantl e t o r e min d E ve r y la d o f his f orme r n eglec t. At la s t the g r eat b ody o f w a t e r appeared A s h e s t ood o n th e edge, conte mplatin g his plunge h e s aw o n th e o th er s i de o f th e rive r his o l d h o m e with his f a th e r s tan d ing pati e ntl y at th e gate His frie nd, Con sc i e n ce, c heer ed him gr e atly, an d with o n e final bre a t h Everylad l e a p ed f ar into th e rive r o f final E xa minati o n s Curr e n ts c au ght him an d s u c k ed him do wn but h e finally c rawl ed up o n th e o pp os it e b ank, bre athl ess, but with s i x t ee n go l de n apples h e ld trium p hantl y in his ba g H e s l owly a p pr oac h e d his f a th er a n d held out th e contents o f his ba g M y son you have do n e we ll. C o m e," h e sa id, an d with his ann aro un d Ever y l ad s s h oulder he s l o w l y walk ed lip the w o rn path to th e welc o ming h o mestead

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THE CARIBBEAN. F O REWORD Needless to s ay, athletics, 011 the who l e, are very b eneficial to everyone, morally and physically. i\l o rall y, t h ey teac h a p erson to pla y th e game fair, eit her in lif e or s p ort Physi cally, they build u p th e body an d prepare o n e f or t h e h ardships o f lif e Athletics are indulged in more, per h aps, on t h e Canal Zone, than in any oth er pan of the world. This i s accounted for by the fact t h at t h e peopl e h ere r ealize the necessity of p h ysical exer cise, and tak e it as part of their da ily work, as well as pleas ure. Owing to t h e fact t hat t h ere are comparatively f ew pupils in Cristoball-li g h School, almost all have taken part in some form o f athl etics, mainly bas k etba ll, swimming, and baseball. BASKETBALL. This year's basketball season was a very slIccessful one f or Cristobal High School. Our first practi ce game wa s played on October S, with the Gatun light weights o n t h eir ow n floor. I t was a fast and exciting game and we won to t h e tune of I S to 1 0 The following Tuesday we defeated t h e same team i n a close and w ell-p lay ed game, by a score of 2'2 to 2 1. This was a fine s howing f o r the open ing o f the season, and our hope s rose high. \Ye then arrang ed a series of fiv e games with B alboa H igh Scho o l, in which that team was to be considered victorious whic h s h ould win threeofthe games Our team won three fast ones in s u cces sion and so cli n ched th e series Ba lboa was clearly outclassed all t h rough t h e games and Cristobal wa s not in danger once, to th e satisfaction of the whol e sc h ool. Throu gh the courtesy of the Cristobal Army a n d Navy Y. M. C. A ., the firs t game was plared on t h eir floor. \\'e beat B a l boa by t h e overwhe lmi ng score of 37 to 7. H e nt er was the s tar all through the game, and mad e most o f t h e ba s k ets G ood playing on th e part of R aymond and Dorle h elped, and credit is due to t h e g u ards, Townsend, Duey, and Cloke, who oreventen n llr opponents from makin g man y a basket. The whole sc h oo l turned out and mallY o f the rooters exhibited a profound knowledge of the game. On November 6, we jou r neyed to Balboa and defeated the m b y '18 to 1'1. The r e were no brilliant plays on e ith er side and the game was marked by steady playing from beginning to end Bal boahad all their fans out but it was of no avail. Goat. The third and final game was on ::'\tovem_ ber 3, at the Army and Navy Y. i\l. C A It seemed to be the unlu cky '3th for B alboa f o r they were defeated B alboa was desperate and manag ed to keep the lead up to the time the whi stle b l ew f or the ending o f the first half. But Cri s t oba l's blood was up and they carried away the game in the last half. Balboa came over with

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T H E CARRIB EAN. ,5 .3 il j (i

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THE CARIBBEAN. 4.1 murd e r in th eir eyes an d w e nt ba c k with the scor e 2 5 to I') in favor o f Cris t o bal, in their minds Three o f th e pro min ent m embe r s o f our lI slial bas k etball lin eup are S enio r s All are fine p l a ye r s an d w e s hall b e v e r y sorry t o lose th e m 011 a ccoullt o f th eir s p ectac ular t eamwo rk. All positi o n s w e r e w ell r epresented b y R a y m o nd at f o rwar d H ente r at center, and Ducy at g uar d The pla ying of Ray m ond, our c aptain and l e ft f o rward, is c ha ract erized b y s t e adin ess and s ur ety. \Vhe never th e ball was t o b e had, h e wa s o n th e s p o t t o get i t Frank was always r eady f o r a scrimmag e and g e n e rall y c am e Ollt in possessi o n of th e ba ll. \ V e look f o rward to t h e tim e w h e n som e coll e g e t eam will b e b e n e fit e d b y Ray m ond's s p eed. H erner, Ollf cente r poetic ally s p e akin g i s o n e o f the fas test an d best sh ooting pla ye r s o n o ur t e am 1 n e v e r y on e of o ur games, h e made his regular number (and ge n e rall y the majority) o f t h e ba s k e t s H e out jumpe d h i s o pp o n ent a l most e v e r y tim e and w h e n h e h ad h i s h and s o n th e ball it was a s ur e ba s k e t Paul D oyle the tri ckiest and fastest right f o r-. ward o n an y sch o o l t eam o n t h e l s t h mus, i s a fine opposite f o r Raymond. In Paul 's c ase, s ize does n o t count, for h e s l ip s right thro ugh t h e fing e r s o f his o pp onents Ray m o nd, Doy le, and H e n t e r make a fast and fin e tri o for Cristobal's bas k etball t eam and have sh o wn th eir w o rth in ever y g a m e \ \lesl e y T o wnsend, wh o hai l s fro m Gatun, i s o n e o f our s t e adi es t and m os t d e p e ndabl e guard s Hi s p os iti o n i s right g uard and h e h eld it royall y 1\1any a tim e a s h out w ent up from o ur o pp o n ents wh e n th eir best pla ye r g o t awa y wit h th e ball but t hey w e r e doom e d to di s app o intm e nt wh e n T o wn send sent it s ailing ba c k t o th e o th e r e nd o f th e Roor. Truly, h e i s a guard t o b e thankful f o r. The n e west m e mb e r o f our t e am i s Cl o k e Hi s pla y ing i s s urpri s ingl y good con side ring th e littl e e xp erie n ce h e h a s ha d a s a l e ft g uar d H e i s always afte r his man and proves him self a gr ea t hin d ran ce to his o pp o n ents wh e n they attempt to mak e a bas k e t H e i s full o f a c ti o n and o f fighting p e r sev e rance. H i s pass w ork i s a ccurate an d s napp y \ V e all lik e him f o r his coolness an d cl e an pla ying o f the game Duey, fro m Gatlin a s a g uar d proved himself w o rth y o f th e p os iti on. H e i s th e h e a v iest man o n the t e am but his w e i g h t i s n o hin d rance t o his fas t playing. Duey i s "the r e" wh e n the g uards have t o b e d e p e nded upo n. TENNI S. A s h o rt series w as a r ranged f o r th e doubl e champio n ship o f Cristobal Hi g h S c h ool. Frank Ray m o nd and Harold Cl o k e w e r e the def e nder s and they recei ve d t h eir firs t c h all e nge fro m \ Villiarll Harrison and Paul Doyl e. They s u ccess full y d e f e nd ed th eir titl e b y winnin g tw o set s in s uccess i on, 6 4 9 7 The n t h e champs" split f o r ces and th e Junio r s, repc ese nted b y Paul Doyl e and Haro ld Cl o k e i ss ued a c hall e nge t o all cla sses Frank Ray m o nd and Carl Olley accepted ( o r t h e S enio r s and th e game wa s pla yed off" o n th e C o l o n B e a c h court F e bruar y 9 The ] uni o r s w e r e victorio us, b y winnin g two out o f three set s 6 3 4 6 6-
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44 THE CAR IBBEAN. disappointed and de f eated. The firs t se t o n t h e progr am wa s b e tw ee n Ray m o nd and Duey and j\ ,I. Banton and V e rri!. T h e S eniors easily won their se t 6-0 and also the f ollo win g one 6 -2. The Cristoba l Junio r s, Cl o k e and D o), l e, w ere not so f ortunate f o r they l os t th e i r firs t set 6 4 but came ba c k in th e seco n d a nd de f ea ted Sargent and W. Banto n b)' 6 4 I n th e la s t se t Ba l boa h ad Cristoba l 5 -1, but our J uni o r s pla )'e d h a r d an d mad e a wonderfu l rall y, winning s i x strai ght games. This r es u l t ed in t h e sco r e of 7 5, sav ing the da)' f o r th e J uniors a n d k ee ping th e c h a mpi o ns h ip in Cri s t o bal Hi g h S c h ool. TRACK. O n e o f t h e fastest and most inte restin g track m ee t s b e tween Balb o a a n d Cristobal Hig h S c h oo l s was h e l d o n April 2, at Balboa. B o)'s and girl s both parti cipated in th e events a n d the p oints we r e co unt ed togeth er. The m ee t was n o t dec i ded u nti l the la s t e v ent, in whi c h B a lb o a t oo k the l e ad and wo n b y nin e p oints OUf team h ad practically n o training and did surpris ingly well under the circ um s tan ces. Ray m o nd wa s t h e s tar f o r t h e Cri s t o b a l boys, and h e won a pl ace in ever y event that h e ente r ed The majorit), o f his pla ces were firs t s and h e ha s se t a r eco rd t o be proud of. The total numbe r o f Raymond's p oints wa s 27, m o r e than two-thirds o f th e t o tal number sco r ed by th e b oys Edna Campbell wa s t h e girls' s tar and h e r name appeared f o r a p l ac e o n the scor e ca rel in ever y t hing in w h i c h s h e t oo k part. This i s Edna's Fres hman yea r and s h e will b e with u s f o r three m ore years t o help u s win our futur e tra c k meet s. CANAL ZONE H I GH SC H OO L TRAC K MEET. B O YS. RUNN ING HIGH JUMI'. I. Harry B i ss ell ( B alboa ) 4 feet, 9 inche s 2. Frank Ray m ond (Cris wbal) 3 Carl Du e)' (Cris t obal ) R U N NING BROAD J UMP. I. F. Ray m o nd (Cris toba l ) I S feet, 1 0 i n c h es. 2 M orrill ( Bal bo a ) 3 L. L a n ders ( B a lbo a) -----STANDING BROAD JUMI>, I. J ames Mill e r ( B alboa ) 8 feet, II i n c h e s 2. F. Ray m o n d ( Cristobal ) 3. H B ; ssell (Balboa ) RUNNING HOI', STEP AND J UMP. I. F. R aymo n d (Cris tobal ) 35 feet 7 inches. 2 G. l\lonon ( B alboa ) 3. L. L anders ( B a l boa) 12-POUND SHOT I'UT. I. L. L a n ders ( B a l boa ) 3 5 feet, I i n ch. 2 C. Due)' ( Cristobal ) 3 F R aymond ( Criswbai). 1000YARD DASH. I. r. R aymond ( Cris t o b a l ) 2. C M;les ( B a lb oa ) 3 H. Bissell ( Balb oa ) 220-\ 'ARD DAS H I. F. R aymond ( Cristobal). 2. C. l\l iles ( B a l boa ) 3. L. L anders ( B alboa ) RELA\' RACE. I. Balb oa. 2. Cristobal. 3. Bal boa GIRLS. 50-YARD DASH. I E Campbell (Cristo b a l ) C. L owande (Cris t oba l ) 3. E Getman ( B a l boa ) BA SEBALl. THROW. I. E Campbell (Crisw bal) 133 feet, inc h es M arie M c M a h on ( B a lboa ) 3 L. H e nter (Cris t obal) RUNNING BROAD j UMI'. I. Lena R at h bone ( B a l boa ) 12 feet. z. E. Campbell ( Cristobal ) 3 Ethe l Getman ( B alboa) STANDING BROAD JUI'. I. L ona R athbone ( B alboa ) 6 feet, 7 inc h es 2 M arie M c M ahon ( B alboa ) 3. L. H enter (C r istoba l )

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THE CAR1BBEAN. 4 5 RUNNI : C HIG H J UMI', I. Eth el G etman ( Balboa ) of fee t '2 inc he s 2 L oretta Ru s h ( C r i s t o bal). 3 E. C a mpbell ( Cri s t o ba l ) 75-\'ARD D ASH. I. Ethe l Getm a n ( B a l bo a ) 2. E. Campb ell { Cri s t o bal}. 3. (Balboa) BA SKETSA I !. THRO W I. Fl o rin ette ( Bal bo a ), 60 f ee t 4 inc h es . E. C a mpb ell ( Cri sto b al) 3 C. V a n H :mlev e lt ( 8 3 1 003 ) I Cr isto b al. '2. Bal bo a. REL A Y R A CE. O I N T S SCO R ED. Bal boa b oys B a l boa g irl s .. B a l boa High Sc h ool.. Crist o bal bo)"s .. Criswbal g irl s . Cri s t o ba l H i g h Sc h oo l BASEBALL. P oints. 3 S 38 3 4 33 \\'e started the se a so n with a bang b y winning a fas t game and tyin g o n e othe r. T h e fir s t game was a sinning battle with the Linco ln H Ollse ba c h e l o r s o n th e ;\le w Cri s t o bal diamo nd. he n darkness settl ed, t h e sco r e wa s 4 t o 4 I t wa s a fas t and snappy game a n d t h e tw o t eams w e re e v enly matc h e d. Our second game wa s p l ay e d with th e gramma r sc h oo l at the J\l ount H o p e s tadiu r n. Our t eam mad e a fine sh o wing and ca rri ed awa y the game b y s co ring 5 to 3 o f t h e grammar sc h ool. A serie s o f game s wa s arranged t o d ec i de the ba se ball c hampio n s h ip b etwee n the high sc h oo l s o f Cri s t o ba l and Balbo a. The fir s t game wa s playe d o n our rival s grounds but w e w o n b y the sco r e o f 4 to 3 Raymo n d pitc hed a good game and, h e lp ed by the fine support o f the wh o l e t eam, h e ld Balbo a d o wn t o three runs One o f the main f eatures o f t h e game wa s a d o ubl e play made b y Cri s t o bal. One o f t h e Balbo a runne r s wa s p e r c h e d o n fir s t and a h o t liner wa s hit to D oy l e at third ba se. H e fie lded it in fine s t y l e and s h o t it t o S o lom o n at s eco n d wh o co mpl e t e d the pla y t o H ente r putting t h e runne r out at fir s t One o f the l o ng es t hits o f the game wa s made b y S o l o m o n, wh o lin e d a lit a 3-bagg e r in the s ixth inning. Altho ugh Balb o a change d pitc h e r s it wa s o f n o a v ail for Cri s tobal l e ft t h e fie ld v i ctori o u s Balbo a t hen crosse d the I sthmus t o our side th e f ollo wing w ee k, d e t e rmin ed t o win -and they did! Cristoba l seemed t o l a c k p e p and a s a r esult, Balbo a d o ubled our sco r e The final an d d ec i d in g game wa s played at Balbo a afte r a n othe r w ee k had elapse d. Cri s t o ba l wa s a h e a d all t h r o u g h th e g am e but in the e i g h t h innin g our oppo n ents rallied an d h e lp e d b y a downpour, m a d e 5 runs brin g in g the sco r e u p to 8 t o 7 in favor o f Cristob al. One o f the l o n ges t drives o f the series w as made b y Ray m o n d in thi s game Two m e n an d him self c r ossed h o m e plate o n the hit. Neithe r t e am scored in the ninth and C r i s r oballe ft th e fie l d w i t h the champio n s hip. W e c r ossed bats wit h t h e s ail o r s frOlll] Ea g l e boat V O .JI o n th e Cristobal twili ght diamo n d o n Marc h 7 Ray m o n d pitc hed his u s u a l good ga m e a n d w e ha d n o tro ubl e in a d m inisterin g def eat to the s ail o r s The final sco r e wa s 1 0 to 5 G IRLS' ATHLETI CS. Due t o the fac t that t h e athle ti cs o n the Z o n e are under the au s pi ces o f the Clubs an d Pla y grounds o f the diR-e r ent tow n<::, w e have b ee n rathe r handi:apped in tha t our athle ti cs with t h e exceptio n o f trac k, have b ee n n ecess a rily divi de d b etwee n Cri s tobal and Gatllll, a s man y o f our girl s liv e in Gatun. Although thi s has be e n so, the Gatlin girl s have never fall e n d o wn o n e degree in the i r loyalty to Cristobal H i g h,even t h ollg h they had [h ei r ow n t eams in ba s k etball, ba se ball e t c. Dlirin g the ga m es th a t the Cris to b a l girls of th e Cristobal H i g h S c h o o l have p lared the Gatlin girl s o f t h e C r istob a l H i g h Sc h oo l, there h as naturally b ee n a s tirrin g sp iri t o f rivalry between the r e s i de n ts o f the t wo towns but that s p irit h as eve r b ee n m os t fri e n d l y

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THE CARIBBEAN. The Bureau o f Clubs and Pla yg r o un ds arrange d l eagues in bas k e tball indoo r base ball,ancl bowling The basketball se a so n carne fir s t and o n N o ve mb e r 9, the Cri s t o bal Hi g h S c h oo l g irl s m e t and elec ted as captai n Kirb y F e r guson, and also had th e ir firs t practice Although only five w e r e present t hat day we p layed th e grammar sc hool girls o n Nove mb e r II, winning from the m by a score o f 1 9 t o 1 0 A s thi s was the firs t ga m e o f the se a so n the r e was n o brilliant pla y ing clon e but the girls all h e l d th eir own ver y well. Aft er thi s game t h e girls turn ed out t o pra ctice m o r e o ft e n and m o r e girl s atte n ded. O n Satu rday, Novernber '20, we p l ayed o ur firs t l e agu e game, meeting the Gatun girls on th e Cristo bal A oor. The p l aying wa s fas t and ended in a v ictory f o r Gatun. Good s p o rtsI'llans hip was s h o wn thro u g h out b y b o th t e am s The tun e whic h they c arri ed wa s "!\ I e t Cri s t o bal o n th e Cristoba l floor an d wo n fro m th em, 1 9 to 1 1 b e i n g th e sco r e The week f ollowing thi s ga m e we ha d som e v e ry good pra ctice and o n Saturday played th e Ancon t e am o n our floor. The g am e wa s fas t and s nappy, I da Bro wn and Kirb y F e rguson never f a iling, w h e n th e ball got t o th e ir e nd of th e A oo r, to dro p it into t h e ba s k e t. Sad but ye t h ope ful, th e An co n girls a n s were d all qu es tion s as to th e scor e saying, "Cris t o bal, 31; Ancon, 16." Our n ex t ga m e wa s with P e dro !\1igu e l at Cris tobal. In sp it e o f th e fact that th eir team wa s mu c h heavi e r than o ur s w e never fail e d at an y tim e t o prove that it i s n o t quantity but quality t hat counts, and se n t th e m h o m e c r ying, "Crist o bal b eat u s 35 t o 5" N ex t ca m e our o l d rival, B a l boa. \V e th ought we ha d the advantage plaYing o n our own Roar, butwel l let's say l uck was against u s Alth o ugh we s uff e r ed the great defeat o f H to 8 Edna Campbell, ce nt er mu s t b e highly co mm e n ded for h er good judgment in pa ss ing th e ball; al so J ane Edwards and G ladys L o wande, o ur g uard s, w h o w e r e g r eatly outwe i g h ed Gatun's r e turn game was th e n ext played and on th eir Roar. A gain they were v i c tor i o u s, de feating u s by '20 poi nt s. The sco r e was '26 to 6 I n th e return game with An co n, p l ayed o n th e Ancon R Jor we made up f..)r what w e ha d lost to Gatun the week b e f ore b y winning 21 to 8 Alice Hunter, s id e cente r, pla yed exceed ingly well in thi s game. OUf old rival again-Balboa. This time we s uff ered a terr ibl e d e f ea t but let me say that e ven after that we h o l d n o hard f eel ing s toward th e m The scor e was 4'2 to I I. The next week w e again made up f o r th e week b e f o r e by de f eating P edro Mi g u e l o n their A oo r by a sco r e o f 2 8 to 25. This ga m e e nd ed th e ba s ke tball sea so n. \\'e h ad won f ouf l eag u e games and lost f o ur but wait h e r e i s indoor baseball. INDOOR BASEBALL Littl e c an b e sa i d a b out th e indoor ba se ball, but s till th e r e is so muc h t hat s h ould b e sa id. Cristobal High S c h oo l did n o t ha ve an opponent who could c all f orth our best p l ay in g Edna Campbell was our abl e captain and thro u g h he r earnes t e ff o rt s in conjun ctio n with our ve r y able and splendid p h ys i cal i n s tru c tr ess Mi ss Blaisd ell ( n o w !\l l r s L oc k e tt ) and all th e play e r s, w e w o n th e 100 p e r cent c hampi o n ship, n e v e r losing a ga m e Our t e am wa s Edna Campbe ll, l e ft fie ld; J ane Edward s catch er; Kirb y F e r g uson pitcher; !\1ar y Fie l ds, first ba se; I da Bro wn, second base; Glad ys L o wancl e third ba se BOWLING. The m o nth o f M ay started th e b o wling l eag u e After a bri e f tim e o f regular practi ce w e f ormed a t ea m and elected !\I ary Fie l ds a s our captai n On Saturda y J May I.h O llr frie ndl y rivals fro m Gatlin were ollr opp o n ents at th e Cri s t o bal c lub h o u se. \ V e b owled three ga m es a n d won one. The first ga m e Gatlin wo n b y tw e lv e pin s the secon d we won by f o rty two, and they w o n th e third b y e ight pin s This was O llr firs t bowling matc h \ V e h o p e a poor beginnin g m e an s a stro n g e ndin g. TENNIS. T e llni s ha s ha d it s pla ce am o ng our s p o rt s, too, th e girls having a c1ass"every m o rnin g f o r o n e h o ur. N ex t ye ar w e h o p e t o see t e nni s t o urna m e nt s writte n up in whi c h Cristobal will h ead th e lis t.

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THE CARIBB EAN. 4 7 ; \!. .e-o

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THE CARIBBEAN THE CAR N IVAL. AS A WHOL E Frank Ra)' m Olld, '2f. "Sch oo l ca rni va l to b e g i ven at 7.30 p m. } Thursday, D ecembe r 1 6," wa s t horoughly advertised througho u t t h e A tialltic side. Bu t to our di s may a n d mi s f ortune, the time of o p ening had to b e p ostponed. \ V e had b een making preparatio n s all day for the l oo ked-for f eature At 6.30 we wer e still w orking e n t hu s iastically o n some min o r t h ing s \Vh e n w e wer e o n t h e v e rg e of co mpleting these details, t h e lig h ts o f all t h e town w en t out. \\'e were f o r ced to stop our work an d a pitiful groa n was ec hoed through oll t t h e building as som eone hit hi s finger with a hammer, another slipped from the c h air on which h e was standing, a n d 'Ioe oe5t lOOKIng others tripped lip t h e stair s It see med as i f we were in darkness for h ours The lights never w ould come on. The people w e r e ga thered ou t side waiting eagerl y [0 enter. Seven-thirty passed and our work was not co mpleted and t h e lig h ts w e r e still out. Afte r t h reequarters o f an h our had b ee n wasted, the lights were on and a great c h ee r rang out) from both ins ide and outside the bui l d in g. \\'e ru s hed wildly (Q complete our tas k but t h e demand frol11 the public toenter wa s too great to sustain. The doors o p e ned and t h ere was a mad ru s h for entran ce, entrance c hecks, and s how tickets. A f e w o f u s were bu sily engaged collecti ng entrance f ees for an h o ur. The people were not afrai d of a good time and made i t trul y an "evening of fun, froli c, and festival." THE ASSEr-.'IBLY-ROOM PROG RAMS. Clwrles Hellier, '21. The assembl y r oom was filled and refilled durin g t h e evening by the audiences which listen ed to t h e series o f programs t hat had been prepare d. The first program, given by the grade sc h ool, consisted of songs, dances, and a r eci ta tion ofStevenson's S hadow," by littl e T h eo Simon. The n followed t h e high school program wi t h a Japanese flirta tion dance b y i\Iary Fields and Georgie Pepp e r a ballet by Edna Campbell, a ThemosLp.,lpular. ukule le-a ccompanied duet b y i\1arjorie B all anJ Virginia Tucke r recitations by i\l ildred Gill and Dodds, and a piano sol o b y D oris Olive r. The t h ird program, whi c h was given by the stringed orchestra, was well r endered, and proved a s u ccess, winning th e applause of th e audience as eac h se lecti o n came to a close. THE POPULARITY CONTEST. l\llll)' Field s '22. The popularity contest opened about two weeks b efore t h e carnival and closed t h e night of the

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TI-I CARIBB : \ N. 49 11R iiJiS--i

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50 THE CAR I BBEAN carni\'al. "Eddie i\lay," our popular Sophomore, was in charge. L ouise H enter} '2...)) and \\' illiam i\lary, ''12, w e re voted the best-looking girl and boy. Dori s Oliver and Haro ld Cloke, both .I uni ors, were voted rhe mos t ropular. r;'rallk Haymond, '21, and Edna Campbe ll, '2 .. h w e r e voted th e best allarollnd and girl. The great inte r es t o f the students and their friends in thi s contest i s indicated by th e (act that, al th o ugh r h e votes w e r e o nly 5 cents a piece, the contes t brought in $6 0 The happiest thing abo u t it was t h e good spirit which t h e stuJents s h )we .. 1 toward t h e contestants and the la c k of jealollsy among t h e cont estants themselves. KAN(. \ROO COURT. em} Du!!)', '21. One of the most unique booth s ill tht: who l e carni\-:d was the K :lI1garoo C o urt over which i\l r. Gc.!rald D. Bliss, Sr., asjudge, presided m os t ably. H e was assisted in his d istributio n o f justice by our p ol i ce force, E milio Solomon. Emili o cou l d b e seen at any time s l euthing t h e hall s for culprits. l i e p in c hed them f o r smoking, f o r not s m oking, f o r not spendin g t heir mone y fast enou g h and for other similar c rimes [00 Ilumerous [0 mention. Once arrested, the guilty o n e was led to t h e court room in the lower hall where our most h o n orahlejudge fined h im or her, whatever amo un t i t looked as if the purse of the def e n d all t could stand. I-.I N(,!-I 0 1 THE SAWD l !)T. /I'e.dt), Tcum u lId, '2 2 One of the features t hat helped to make t h e carnival a hu ge was t h e famous duo, "Kings of t h e Sawdust," EberenL and Town se nd, recently of R ingling Brothers \\'orld-Famo u s Show. They wac on l y to be obtained t hr o u g h th e influence of our Advance l\Ianager, l\li ss .J. Isabella D odds w h o made mud pies with the younger Ringling in h e r childhood days. NATURE'S GREATEST f\II STAKE. George C.trtwright, '22. "Nature's greatest mi stake," Zenura, the c r e a ture with 26 e ye s, w as also a g r ea t s u ccess, al though the "creature," L ouise H elHe r, did have twentyf our l1.ced l cs pinned o n h e r dress The room where s h e wa s ex hibi ted wa s n ever wanting f o r s p ectato r s JAPANESE TEA R OOl'\1. Georgie Pepper, J. Y o u would hard l y ex pect to find in th e mid s t of th e turmoil of a high sc h oo l carnival, a transplanted bit o f Japan, but that s u c h a thing i s pos s ibl e was proved by the Japanese tea r oom. The b oo kca ses and bare wall s of an ordinary sc h oo l r oo m w e r e co nc ealed b y palm l eaves) rnasst.;d rog'!ther to f o rm an effec tiv e background, whil e drawings o f odd J apallcse landscapes turned the bla ckboard s into paneled screens. to say, many peopl e slipped in to b e served tea b e n eath the swinging lanterns by the quaint, Japanese maidens wh o gave the la s t, but not least, attractive to u c h to the t e a r oo m. CANDY, ICE CREAM, AND fLOWER BOOTHS K ir")' FergllJolt. '21. The and i ce c r eam b ooths whi c h w e r e at opposite ends o f th e hall, w e r e lik e two magnets drawing t h e crowd s il r es i stibly toward them. Emma T o wn se n d and Lillian C o lb e rg, in charge o f the candy bo oth, had work e d ha rd to make thi s s pot attractive a n d sure ly they had n o t worked in va111. The pretty littl e booth wa s decorated with the e R'cctive tro pical palms, crepe pape r, and coral vinc. The red-and-white i ce crc arn b oo th a s demanded r u s h se r vice, I'Lsters and tbelr makers. whi c h wa s abl y supplied b y Gerald Bli ss and W illiam A s f o r the Aower b ooth, Jane H all and L o r etta R u s h ha d so daintily decorated this "garden o f roses" that one could not pass it b y without b ecoming the proud possessor of part of its beauty.

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T H E CARIBBEAN. 5 I THE BAZAAR. One of t h e outstanding f eatures o f th e carnival was the bazaar. T h e room in whi c h it wa s h e ld l oo ked very attractive indeed with th e palm leav es entwin e d with coral vine, and with its pretty co l ored lights This made a ver y effect i ve setting f o r th e l ovely thin gs w e ha d f o r sa l e. E verything wa s so ld fro m the lacy handmade articles to tin so ldi e r s. The pr ofits w e re S so THE FRENCH CAFE. J/ildred SI,I./lard, '21. The delic ious aroma of hot cofFee and c ri s p doughnuts enticed th e m errymakers int) the Fre n c h cafe, a most attractive b o w e r o f palms a n d co ral v in es wh e r e chic Fre n c h maide n s pres id ed over the dainty rose-shaded tables BL U E BEA RD'S WIVES One o f th e most terrifying sce n es o f th e carnival wa s the diml y lighted chambe r containing Blu e B eard's W i v es The h eads o f three of his wive s, whi c h it i s saiJ, wer e r ecently un earthed in o n e o f th e destroyed chauteaux o f France w e re hang ing by the ir f e w r emaining hairs They w e re wonderfull y preserved and a m:)st ghastly s p ec tacl e H tJf\IAN PI NCUSH ION J/mjarie Ball, '22. B efo r e a door labe led, Human Pincushio n a youth loudl y adve rtised his s h ow Fro m th e crowd abo u t the door and the express ion s on the faces of those coming out, we judged that th e Human Pincushion" was a s u ccess, both artis ti cally and financially. T h e "Pinc u shion" ce r tainly wa s human, yet s h e bore the agony that mu s t have b ee n ca u sed th e great vari ety o f needles, pins, hat pins, and sa f ety pin s that were thrus t into h e r generousl y pro portioned figur e fLABB)' FATIf\I A George Carlwright, '22. Anoth e r great attraction o f the evel1lng was "Flabby Fatima." Although that l o ng an a tir e-some trip fr o m R ing l ing Brothers" had reduced h e r weig ht, s h e managed h e r part well and never fail ed to draw a crowd. Bill Harrison sure l y did manipulate t hat umbre lla w e ll, and G eo r ge Ball knew h ow to u se his ladde r and t h e "reducer." TRIPLY KATE. L era)' ,1/tlgfllfSall, '22. \\'e w e r e very fortunate ill being to secure f o r th e e v ening T ri,}iy Kate, th e three-legged w o nd e r f rom t h e far-oR" i s land of Yangaga. This yo un g w oman has baffled th e minds o f the greates t surgeo n s o f b::>th h e misph eres. One o f them o f f ere.J to amputate her third and experim ent a s to th e ca u se of its growth but s h e calml y t o l d him that it ha d \\ ith her so l o n g t hat she was very close l y attac hed to it. C HAf\IBER O F /laberl ,llcC/nin, '22. Ollr mysti ca l department was all e normous s u c cess. \\'e sent a gang o f into t h e ph y s i cs labcratory. : \ r t c r III 0 V I n g around a f ew tables and hanging a few blankets over the door, they proudlr announced to our unbelievi n g ears that the "Chambe r of H orro r s was completed. \\,ith thi s outfit a n d an unbelievable of good lu c k, we managed to make t h e unheard of SUIll of SI.8S FORTUNE TELLER. I.aui$( flemer, '23. .-\ charming gipsy fortune teller, strangel y resembling i\l iss Faulkner, wandered into the sc hool building the night o f t h e carnival and was kept busy all evening b y aspiring people who w is h ed to b e w ell-versed in past, p resent, a n d future events.

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THE CARIBBEAN. SOBER SUE" SHE NEVER SMILES Leroy \ 1ngIlIlJOIl, '22. The o ld adage "Laugh and the w orld laughs with yo u ha s b ee n d i sproved by thi s s t o i c al mai de n. All efforts to bring a srnil e t o h e r face fail ed and no o n e earned the s i x ti c kets wh i c h had b ee n pro mised f o r that f eat. I t mu s t b e admitted, h o wever that the sight of h e r brought many a s mil e to the fa ces of the s p ec ta tors. THE COUNTRY STORE. H arold BO.rd, '2-/. One place at the Cri s tobal High S c h oo l carni val wh e r e yo u co u l d get your m o ney' s worth ( in fact t h e only place) wa s the country stor e H e r e wa s a counte r ove r whi c h b ottles o f soda w e r e so ld ( o r 1 0 cents or three f o r 25 cents B e hin d it w e r e s h e l ves l ined with n eatly wrapped parcel s containing ever ything f ro m buttons t o elephants, for 5 1 0, 15, '20, a n d '25 cents E ve r y parcel contained its full marked value but n o t a lways d id it so appear t o the person wh o purchased it. Just the sa m e ever y parce l and b ottle of soda was sol d a halfh our b e f o r e the carnival closed, and still othe r treasure seekers came, and, sad to say, w ent away with drooping h eads-and m o ney in the ir pockets STRATAG INi. Jane Edwards, '22. Ches t e r Tay l o r (al i as Stratagini) the greatest living magi c i an in the \ '''es tern Hemisphere to-day, baffled the m os t brilliant minds of Cristobal and Col o n with his impe n etrable magi c Presto c h ange! And any attempt o n our part to so lv e th e m ys t e ry wa s futile. W e l e ft his den appalled at th e powe r o f the great Stratagini. I t i s n ee d l ess t o state t hat his departmen t wa s o n e o f the mos t p opular. THE MUSEUM. EstherW;u, Museums are always r emarkable, but thi s o n e wa s m o r e so! \\' h ere e l se have yo u ever see n t h e teapot u sed at the B os t o n t e a party, a piece of the iceon whi c h \Vashington c ro ssed the D e laware, and the r e al Pl y m outh R oc k? I t wa s w orth seeing. ENDING. Everything ran s m oo thl y and the p eo pl e were m o r e than pleased with the features s h own. The h alls both upstairs and down stairs were c r owded. At 11 o 'cl oc k the c r o wd began t o t hin out a s a f e w l eft f o r h ome. W e closed the door s at 1 2 and w ent c h ee rfully home, b ecause of our great s u ccess finan c ially and socially SCHOOL ATMOSPHERE. Kirby FergUJQu, 21. When Miss D odds is feeling good) She gives us all a smile. Bm w h en her face is like a map J ust chartered o'er w it h ca r c, I ts like a whiff from a flowered wood And makes our life worth while. A disma l hu s h broods o er the place, The r e's mic robes in th e air. I t rather gets beneath our skins W e don't follow o ur o r ders right, And helps us co dig in, 'Cause everything is su n shine, When M iss D odds begins to grin. Nor keep o ur m arks from f alling down, Bu t we just mope a n d lag around Wh en l'vl iss D odds begins to frown. I t is curiou s h ow th e atmosphere Gets in :l fellow s work; H ow smiles will r aise t h e spi r its hig h And frowns p r oduce a s h irk It's not the mark that w e may get Which makes u s all sail in, Bu t the express i o n on her face Wh en !\'l iss D odds begins to grin

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THE CARIBBEAN. 53 I A MUSlC S T O R E ROMA NCE T ownulId, '22. Jordr/1/ ZimmtrllUlllll, '22 M argie was Dri(linJ( down t h e BeallliflllOhio a t t h e End of (l Perfecl Da)' wh e n s h e ran into Jen)' who was SailinJ( /llong on M oonl ighi Btl)'. "Fair One," cried he, "II/lur e Do I f/e Go From H e re?" "J Don', "'P1l0W f//Jlefe I'm Going, Bul I'm Oll M y Wa),," s h e replied. "/lJler YOII've G oni', ['/! Think oj YOII, M)' Budding Rose," was his an s wer. "Dear L illIe 130)' oj /vlille, When Ihe Shadows Fa/!, T/! be ill II" Garden of R oses, Wailing Jor You." The following E vening t h ey m e t III tin Old FllsizioncdGardeJl 'neath t h e Alabama \10011. After Sipping Cider IIII'll' a Straw, rhey sang Looe' s Old Sweet Song "BriglIl E)'cs, your Smiles give me the Prohibition Blues. "Your Eyes H ave Told J\1e So," s h e replied, IV/lisperillg. TIl go 10 tile End of Ihe I{'"orld willI You, Bannie I Lovc lire Sunsltine oj YOW" Smile," wa s his answer. "OM" s h e. exclaimed, "\I'e'li go to H indllslall and eat CIl1'nese Rire and Tell. "\\"e'li take t h e Loue Boal ill Old Mallila for Turkeslan 4"'11 go ask "Io/her if' may go lI 'andcring down the G)'PS)' Trail," s h e sa id as she picked th e Lasl R ose of Summer and ga\'e it to him, as h e left (or /-lome, Sweet H omt' J n r e turn for thi s rose h e gave h er SWft!/ A 'isSt's lI ; hen j V ig/ll Falls again, h e was back Humming ,\lfwd)' b e n eath h e r window. I H ear You Calling AIt1," s h e answered. Soon s h e appeared in h er Alice B lue Gown. Let's go QuI in AI/.\' Old Town Canoe," h e suggested, as t hey strolled b e neath the Silvt'1), N l oon, !Ii So t her paddl ed to JII)' lsle oj Goldm Drl'nllls 011 th e Swanfe. Y o u 'll never g row Tired of / l l f, will you? JII)" Wild Irish R ose" h e asked .. f Never "/lew J Could Love /l1I),bod), Like Fm l.oving You," s h e replied, SWetl and L ow. \\' h en t hey returned, Frecklfs was stan ding In/llcG/oaming. H e said, "You' d be Surprised if I t o l d rou all I know about h er. J Used 10 Ca/! H er Babv, but Oul oj a Clear Sky) Th e ramp gave m e back m y Riugs and Said Good-Bye Forever." "FIJI NOI Jealous," Je1'1J' replied, as h e drove away in his car. That sam e evenin g they w ent to th e SIO IJ' B ook Ba/! and danced T hai Naughl), Wallz. "Buddy," s h e sa id "Take M e 10 T hai Lall d of Ja::." "Girl oj JIIy Dreallls," her Hero replied, "\\,ill you go with m e to ;11)' Lillie Gray in the /VeS!?" IVO, Sir," his Carolina SUlls/H'ue responded, '" want a Lov(' lVes/ Down b)' tilt! Saskald,ewllll where the Hawaiian Lu//ab;'s may reach LIS." "0, Promise ;\le, Girl of Aline, In SprillKlime II//un R oses Bloom Again in A[iami, You'll T /,illk oj I I /e." "/ L ove You," s h e r e plied, befor e enterin g h e r Casile oj Drt'allls. "Please H old ,lIe ill Your /lnlls and J..iss JIIe Good-b)"e." "'Vhen ti,e Preac/Jt!r Jljakes YOll J l liUt' Some SUlldav ,\lorning, we'll go to T haI Tumble Down SIwek ill /lIMolI{ anti L ei Ihe Resl of Ihe "'orld Go By" were his words AI Parting. Thus e nded t h e Music S t o re R omance.

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5 4 THE CARIBBEAN TH E T ERRO R O F TH E TROPICS. AI. '2). I've st:en the toads in Texas, .. \1ll1 the bugs in T he m osquitoes down in Cuba I 'll admit afC quite a pest; T h e scor p io n and t h e centipedes Are dangerou<: as can b C1 Bu t the thing that I fe:lf most of a!l I s the Panaill a n i:m fie:!.. Whil e the midnight summer r.linJrop" (dl On m y s hingle ro')( o'erhead, A war wa s raging furiou!:>ly Up and down my white bejspread. : \ r first thc\' c:une out one by one, :\nd formed a s inq:le line, Then came a wh 01e baHalio n Taking up the double time. .squ:lre" and sec tion left Ar o un d my bunk they flew ; T h e n, running hard, they made a An d war began to I watche d the pe sty little freaks, W hil e doping br my bed, Then one gre:tt flea ru s hed straight at m e An d we grappled on th e spread, I raised my mit, with anger s mit; I struck with firm decision; B ut with o ne jump h e cleare d my bunk And lau g hed in w ild derision. T w:ls then that I became en raged, B egan to s lam and kn oc k J \ nd through the wee small h ours of night, \\'e battled on m y cot With mighty fist I crushe.! them: One by one t he y dropped A nd as t h e dawn wa s breaking, I rested from the frar. Wi t h thr.)bbin] he3d, I the dc:ad F r o m o ff t h e blood-smeared s h eet: Then, f e:tring rein f orce ments, I beat a swift retreat. An d thus the b:tltle e nded; All honor to the dead, W h o lo s t their life in d ubi o u s strife On m y liH l e w hite bedspread. Oh, the sco rpi o n s and the centipedes, Are dangerous as can be, But I h o pe I'll never meet again A Panamanian flea. \YITHOUT:\ THOUGHT. Altho ugh I take my pen in hand, I kn o w not what t o write; I've tried and tried, but all in vain; hr.lin gives forth n o light. 1 \ 1 )' theme is due by this forenoon, And yet' h:we no tho u ght. All morning long without rc:sult, A <,ubject I h:tve sou ght. UO Ebtrm:, 23 At laSt I give up in despair Without a single line, I've tricd to write about the sea With all its be:tuties rare, A s o n the be:tch it comes and goes Beneath the sun's bright glare. I try t o write ab:>ut the sky, About the f o rt s, both new :tne! o ld, But everything I try to write H as b ee n by others b e uer told. :\01, a s my cla ss is ne:trir due, I write this little rhyme.

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THE CARIBBE .. \:\. 55 THE SOLlLOQL.:Y O F .-'1 \\" .-'lS TEB.-'IS"ET \i) How tired I :1111," s i g hed the weary wat;t cbas ket, as it l ea ned against the desk. I d o h t h e janito r will hurry li p and r e lieve m e of hea\ r burde n. Those b oys and girls no pity o n me ; t her do tire m e out so I l Jllg f o r the old war times to n :turn, (Oi then th: c hildren had to sa ve, and I was not so o: td:d dowll. Bu t t hi s mornil1J ( I could cry at th.: remt!rllbra nee orit), I suffe red 'th e m os t unkindc3t cut at all' -i\ly! i\\y! H ere I am quoting (rom Shakesp eare. I h eard t h e c h ildren in t h e 71//il/ s Cal 'sa r c l ass read t ha t to-dayI r c ally am b ecoming quite literary. \\'ell, to get back to my story, the teacher whom I had con s idered my best fri end had the c hildren file past m e and t h row a sticky substan ce (gum, they c alled it) at m e I was indignant, but I avenged myself o n h e r for I read h e r sweetheart's l ette r, w hi c h s h e threw at me-not thinking that I could read. H a r k! I h ear a m e rr), w histle; I believe it i s the janitor coming to help rile Thank hea\'cn! How much lighte r I f ee l now, but I can't forget the indignities ['ve suffered to-day, and to add to it all, t hat long-legged, red-headed Fred allLi stumbled over me, spi lling t h e pape r s all o \"er the R oa r The n the horrid thing kicked me, lea\ring . a large d ent in my s ide as if it were my fault! T h e r e goes the tinkle of the lunc h h ell, and here is where they w ill throw their old orange p e d s and bread crusts at m e. "Oh! Oh, dear! j\l y That wretched ha s thro wn something into rh:l11. Oh! How it hurts! I t mus t h e thos:: fin.:: p.:n cil sha\ings I 'll s h o w the m something, anJ th-n.v th':fl1 all O\'cr the Aoor. I t i s n o u<;e, fvr I hear the te1cher telling him to wrap them ill a p:tp:r a :1.I put bac k, "\\'eli, at last sch ool i s out aId the ech oing foot s t eps of the la s t c hil d ha,..! died out. can be heard in tht! rO;)111 the tick o f the clock and t h e scratching p.:n of weary teacher. I am so dl"o\\'s)" I helie,e 1 s leep. \\"hat' D o ears deceive Ill:? I s t h e janitor reall\ t elling the t e a c her that I am to h e discarded and a new wastebasket put in place -or it all a dream? ".4. rest! I've h ee n longing fo r a rest and n o w that it has COI11,=, I'm sadI shall mi ss them all-even fat little Tom wh o n e ,'er missed a chance to kick m e Then J ohn (the little rascal) :-\ed-all ot" them, but-worst o f all I s hall miss the old clock-confidant o f all my joys and sorrows." UTI:-\. (.\poloJ,:ics t o Est/ltr II 'ill, Z3. When I went to Cristobal I-hg h : \ Latin hook they gave to Ille, T o dig into its l o re. head wa s empty as a cup, I strove : lI1d t oi led to fill it up L 'ntil m, hair I tore, Bur all in v:tin; I nuke mist.iI,e, L'ntil, I 'm sure In\' teacher at:he" T o poke me \\ nh ,I pill. Too thi(k an,1 hard IS my poor hea.!. A<; thick as Illud ami hard as lead. -\nd Latin won't sO:lk Ill. There once wa s a Roman named C ::esar, Who fought like a .\I exica n grea<;er, H e conquered all Gaul, W rote a book on It all: Wish he hadn't thi s old Roman Gee"er. C. H.-21.

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56 THE CARTBBEAN. 1 TR .. \YESTY E0iTTTLED 'jJJ "THE LCCl\: Y PI:\'. F. R 'i}'1JI1)1jd. ':n. P. C. D J .'-/':, '22. Scen:lri:> br F. R AntO"D. Spelling corrected by P C. DOYLE. Photographer, CHESTER TAYI.OIt. Art D irector, EMILIO SOI.O,:o,,' s l i t tle brother ROlJND I Betty Confetti, a beautiful 16-rear maide n of J talian d escent, who se fat her and mother were l ess Thre ebase, s h e lik es th e pretty things which :\l enJezez's money will bur. The only money Happy recei\'e s is the f e w dollars h e earn s fro m selling ca rtons of cigarettes given to him f or J-base hits at the ball games. (End o f R ound I. ) ROUND II. drowned in t h e Caribbean Three months ha\' e e lapsed and thi s beautiful Sea when th e tu g Reliance amI windy Sunday morning is seated in h e r sank i s left alone, an orphan, comfortable porch swi ng strumming a sacred song the only occupant of a big 011 h e r ukel e l e to drown t h e strains of t h e Y i ctrola, type-14 h o u se standing next which some lighthearted soul i s playing in t h e door to t h e Strangers Club adjoining Strangers Club. S h e eats but little, n o t in C o l on She is a favorite only on account of grief, but because h e r funds are of the Strangers Club, t h e now down to but 56, and t h e district quarte r -\\"ashington C otillion Club, master ha s notified h e r t hat in a f e w days s h e will habit of nose t h e \Yanderers' Club, and t h e be homeless. Her head tells h e r that s h e s h o ul d Col on Ba se ball Cill b, w hose mem bers ha \"echipped not marry the handsome and penniless ball p layer in t o rai se a liberal amount to keep her from star-and her heart ins ists t hat s h e muSt not marry t h e v ation, whil e the d istrict quartermaster h o mely and stingy banker. \\"h i l e s h e h a s generousl y agreed to let her staY;11 i s thus engaged, a \'endor o f lottery t h e Commission quarters until the earned tickets e nter s and i n duces Betty [Q in-leave o f her loving father expires. .1 vest 55 of her remainin g s ix in a ticket, A wealth y member of the \\'ashington the number of whi c h happens to b e 9, Cotillion Club, \\'illiam I -I. i\lendezez, The drawing is to be drawn with in o n e who i s president of the Continental Bank-hour, and she decides to stake all upon in g and Trust Company, and the good-her luck, The s uspen se of the remain-natured Happy Threebase, star playe r o f ing h our 's maddening, for Bettr knows the Colon Baseball Club, are suito r s f o r that at t h e end of that time s h e will Retty's heart and hand. \Yhat la c k s in eitherhave but 51 to her narneor will have 520 ,000 money he makes up in good look s and ,,-hat i\f e n-silver and fre edom to marry the handsome Harry dezez lacks in good looks i s shame ful to mention, Threebase. I f s h e fails? \\'ell, t here i s always the forthebankerisaffiicted\\ithan"apartmcnt"no s e s e wer! S h e pins the ticket w h ich mars h is beauty n o little An "apartment" in the empty cracker t) nose, called "Aat" by low e r cla ss mel1, is caus ed by box \\ hich h as furnished her 0-poking it so much into othe r pe ople's bu s in ess scanty breakfast. She paces 'l that it becomes as wide and Aat as a mus hroom, the Aoor to and fro, wringing and if it ever fall s inside of the fac e nothing can her hands in desperation, and -ever get it back on the outs ide. :\I enuc:zez is tearing her h ai rout by therootsJ 0 stingy with his and plans to wait until until s h e hears the welcome 3. ;'iy,.. .. f tile "ill .. l1l Betty is so poor that s h e will ha\t e to a ccept his toll of the bell in the Governor's H appy repulsive advances palace which tells h e r that Bett)' has a hard time deciding w hom she will it is now 1 1 o'clock and s h e can now learn. t h e accept, for, while she loves t h e carefree and penni-winning number. \\"ith d i s heveled h ai r and

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THE CARIBBEAN. 57 tear-stained c heeks s h e fra nti cally ru s h es to a l otte r y vendor's post onl y to find t hat the sl ip on h er board s h ows t h e winning numbe r to be 6806. Utter despai r i s s hown o n h e r b eautiful f ace a s with heavy footsteps s h e return s t o h er unhappy h o m e, t hrows h e r se l f h ea vii y intoan invi ti ngchair, Ir's NO U SE M(I,D El. t'll NEVf.\ l A MAN 'NITK AN INOROWING NOS E onlytojump up, clutch ing t h e bac k o f her thin dress whil e u t t e r in g piercing sc r ea m s f o r s h e has b ee n t err i b I y stung b y som e t h in g, probablv dreaded scorpi on hidden in the se a t o f the chai r. Hastily pulling the stinger from its unwill in g c u s h i o n, s h e i s muc h relieved to find i t to be nothin g more dangerous t han the pin in the cracker b ox, which the wi!ld has blown from t h e table to t h e chair. '''hether i t i s pain i n removing the pin o r whether it is disappoinunent in agai n see in g t h e worthless lottery ticket whi c h has cost h e r so mu c h o f her scanty funds is nOt f o r u s to judge, but wit h a pardonable s hri e k s h e hurls the cracker b ox and its contents from h e r t h e wind whisking it out o f the open window. A torrential downpour f ollows, a n d B etty Confetti with dejected spirits thro w s herself, but this time more cautiousl y, flat on her face on a handy couch to brood over and consider heru n happyfate. (End o f R ou nd Il.) ROUND lll. Happy Threebase, at t h e Strangers Club, knows that t here will be n o gam e to-day and as h e b e nds over t o unlace his spiked s h oes, a pin-laden piece o f paper, carrying a cruel a n d sharply pointed pin, flies in t h e window and with great f o r ce lands just w here h is baseball pants are worn mOSt from sliding bases. i\rendezez, the banker, passes just as this happens and Harry beli eves t hat h e h as purposely jabbed him with a poisoned dart. \\'ith a cry of rage Harry swings a terrific b l o w whi c h lands right on his hated rival's n ose, caus in g it to pop i n s id e of his face, so that h e ca n nev e r blow that n ose again. Grabbing t h e pin from its c ru e l hiding place, h e noti ces f o r t h e first time t hat it h as a piece o f pape r attached to it whic h turns out to be a lott e r y ticket. \Vith a glance of scorn at h is hated rival, h e ru s h es over to t h e home o f his sweetheart, carryin g t h e ticket wit h h im. H e proposes marr iage a n d offers h e r t h e lottery t i c ket, sayin g Betty, darling, if t his 9089 win s to-day yo u can c h a n ge your name from Confetti to Threebase." Happy," s h e replies, as s h e glances at th e number o n th e ti c ket, I have practically decided to m arry \Vill iam H i\Iendezez, and b es id es, if ticket 6806 had flot won to-day, l wou l d not have throw n t hat pie ce of paper away." H e leaves h e r beautiful presence wit h a s igh of despair, unco n scio u s l y taking t h e t i c k e t wit h him, and h e offers no o bjection to t h e e n trance of h is bitter e n emy, w h o i s now crossing t h e doorst e p of t h e g i r l h e loves. H e h esitates for a moment and hisses in t h e banker's ear, Harm o n e o f the few r e maining h ai r s on the h ead of the g irl yo u are about t o marry and you will answer t o Happy Threebase," f o r i\lendezez, who has listened to the s hri e k s of Bett y all morning, now r ealizes t hat it i s tirn e to press his suit. Happy strolls down Fron t Street and, as h e passes t h e lotter y office notices that t h e winning number afte r all i s and t hat th e piece of paper w h ic h h e cr u s h es in his hand m ea n s '20,000 s ilver to h im H e cash es the ticket and with :'10,000 go ld, rushes again to Betty's h o m e in time to hear his beloved's sweet voice saying to t h e banker, "No, 'Yillie, I a m sorry, but with all my poverty 1 will never consent to be the wife of a man with an ingrowing nose : Adios forevermore!" (End of R o un d IlL) ROUND l V. It takes but '25 minutes for Happy to convince Betty that s h e has been twice mistaken; once when s h e said that s h e would marry i\lendezez and again w hen in h e r haste and anguish, s h e failed to notice that the number she saw was upsidedown. After t h e ceremony a passing stranger overhead this dialogue. ";\nd now, darling Betty, we are tied for lif e "Not tied, Happy," was the strange rejoinder, "pinned. (End of R o u nd I V )

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58 THE CAR l THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD 9 8 9 Popular P asse ng e r V esse l s Transit the Canal Thr ee s ister s hi p s. the l.lsabella D odds th eCal h er;lIe T D at';s, a n d the J essie D allie/s, all o f equa l capacity. hea\ 'ily l a d e n wit h car goes o f sc hool s pirits a nd ge n e r a l kn o w l e d ge. fillin g all h o l d s a nd c \ 'c r y UIl OCC U pie d in c h o f cice k s p ace, clea r e d fr o m this p ort during the present w ee k S ailin g w ith a n y o f these ships i s n o t o nl y a genuine pl easure but mean s co m f ort a nd co nfid e n ce in th e hig h es t degr ee, a nd sa f e a rri \ 'a l a t d es tin a t i o n Official Circulars. Appointment. '1'111::: PANA.\I,\ C'AN_\L, B,\LBOA IIE1GIITS, C. Z.O I 1930. II DEP,\RT\IENT,,> 01\ '''lONS: my abscllce 011 Jean').] r. Carl will b;,> Governor of The Panama Canal and )' I r. Harold Cloke will be .\umg Prl"sidl'lll of the Panama Railroad. and. "uch. thl"Y will be accountable for all nonexJ)('l1dable PlOllerty ill the pos,;ession of the Corral and the :\lindi 1I0g Farm. FR.\-:t.:: R\y,m-:o. Grn'""or. Thr PanuPlwCuNul PrrHdnrl. Pa""",a RIIIZ,flad. .\ppro\'Nl: .\L1CE H t::-'"TER. .-IlIdllrrss. Tra nsportat io n PA".\.,\I.,\ R \ILRO\D CO'IP.\"Y. P\SA-'I A RAILROAD STE.\\I<.,IItP LI .... ". OFFICE SlP":RI"TESUEST. R AI.aO,\ C. Z .. July l. I IHO. To all lOllunud-Effl'Ctive at oncc. and until furthcl noticc, collectors an(\ conductors ale dIrected to pass. free of char,i:(' . 111 stlldcnt" of grarle and hiSh to all poin\.' 011 the main line tracks in either IOS!>: I n conjunction with the removal of the Ad ministration to the \tlantic Side. the Panama Railroad offict.'s will also be located there and will the historic railroad on account 01 its scenic effect on pa:>.;in\; tourists K1RRY FERGt'SOS. J/,slr(ss of Tr(JnIporl(Jtion, Authori:l.:ed LEO EBERESZ. Chl,'fllt'allh njficcr, Ext e n sio n of P ri vHeges. THK PA"A'I'" C"S\I EXKl.:t"TI\K OHltt:. B,\U10,\ II EIlOS<;: TIll' request of the Chief. Bureau of and P layground..;. that the columns of Tht' C
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THE C\RIB BE '\:'\. S9 CRISTO B :\L HI G H SC HOOL 1 :,\ 2 001. $ -r After giving the m orning pape r the o nce o \'er. anti finding that a hill had been passe d prohibiting c h ild r e n untler s i x t ee n y ears o f age frol11 driving any kind of an air mac h in e I hande d the pape r to mothe r with a s ig h of r e l i ef. i\l y kid brothe r wou ldn't ge t his neck bro k e n n ow. H e wa s tinke rin g arollnd o n e o f th e mac hines and lIs ing t h e m jus t a s h e lik ed. Thi s had always been a source o f worry f o r m othe r, too. Soon I wa s 011 my wa), t o sc hool. stic h a bad land in g that time r s ai d to l":l erbert,:ls T climbe d out o f m)" a e ro-limo u s in e in fr ont o f the Cri s t o bal H igh S c h oo l hangar, whi c h wa s situate d 011 the roof o f t h e buildin g I sure l y love to go down these moving stairs don't YOll, C hest e r ? :'-lice a s k e d m e a s w e m e t o n t h e stairs Y es, t h ey're great, I ans w e r e d H ello Ches t er," said L e r oy, a s w e m e t at the a utomatic s h oe s hin e r, wa s that y o u unde r m e wh e n J l oo p e d and l os t rny h e lm ed" Y es that wa s I and I b elie v e I c o ul d ha\'e caught r our h e lm e t if I ha d n t had D oris al o ng, but I didn't want to scare h e r. D id you find y our h e lm et?" "'No, T didn't lo o k f o r it. I n o ti ced that it f ell in lId ount H o p e c e m e t ery, so why n o t l e t it r es t in p e a ce ? J d o n t mind t h e h e lm e t so muc h, but L do hate to comb m y hair o V'er o n this automatic hair com h e r. I t puts too mu c h p erfume 011 m y dome." Soo n t h e sliding b oards had m e in the hall. I had jus t seate d myse lf, wh e n I n oticed t h e light o n my in d i vidual wirel ess t elepho n e Aas h in g I quic kl), clampeu o n the pho n es ex p ecting to h ear som e girl c allin g m e, only to h ear I\l i ss H ornbeak's \'oi ce "Co m e up to th e desk at o n ce Ches t er." Stepping onto th e moving carpet, I wa s soon up at h e r d es k. "\\' h e r e w e r e y o u the la s t half o f the period y es t erday?" s h e a s k e d 1 w ent t o St. Clair Fi eld t o see an air p o l o game between P edro and B alboa. " All right, Ches t e r, l am g o ing to ha ve yo u write a o n e-page t h e m e in ),our o wn handwriting I s w o r e inwardly. Di n g d o n g sounded th e go n g f o r classes. L l p o n entering th e algebra room, I proceed e d to th e \ i ctro la and put o n th e recor d c all ed "Ches t er's E xplanatio n o f P r o bl e m X o. J." \'ery w ell explained Ches t er," said i\l iss B eec hin g a s the v i ctro la cc a se d. F o r th e next class w e all b oarded a big f our motor e d bus b ound f o r Barce l o n<1. \\'e w e r e goin g to p<1in f o r our Spanis h lesson. \\'e had been in the air about t e n minutes wh e n w e passe d :l b u s l o a d o f Spanis h kid s co min g o v e r to take a lesson in E n glis h \\' e look e d f orwa r d to our Spanis h class, because the t eache r always se r ve d u s d elic i o u s win es and s w ee t biscuits during cla ss A s SOOI1 :1S w e r eturned L e roy and I st<1rteti for th e lu n c h 1'00111. I h o p e the y have so m e m o r e chic k e n and SOl11e 1110 r e o f that pi stachio parfait, don't I a s ked. "Yes, and do y o u kno w, I was just thinking h o w it mus t ha\'e been wh e n :l f ello w had t o b othe r about p aying f o r hi s o wn lunc h, L e r o y ans w e r ed C oming out o f t h e lunc h room w e saw many o f the students running outside. L e roy a n d I ran o u t to see what th e commoti o n wa s <111 about. Once outs ide w e saw t w o pl<1nes LIp abo u t 15,000 f ee t in fie rce combat I kne w b y t h e in s i gnia o n the bottom s o f t h e pl<1l1es that o n e W<1S fr o m the co l o r e d sc hool and o n e wa s fr o m ours o n e see m ed to kn o w wh o wa s in our pl a n e b ec ause several planes fr o m our sc hool w e r e up. \\' i t h y ells <111<.1 hat wa\ing w e w a t c hed t h e plane fr o m t h e co lored sc hool tur n a n d flee and our plane loop <1lld s piral down to the groun d But wh o s h o ul d ali g h t bu t Shelby \"h ite! wo nder t h e b lack f d l o w turned tail. The n ex t class wa s This class w e d readeu rnos t o f a ll, because w e ha d to s i t f o r t welH Y wh o l e minutes a n d watch the battl es o f G ettysburg and Chatta nooga run oft' o n the sc reen

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60 THE CARIBBEAN. b e f o r e u s Aft e rwards w e all pil ed into a big f ourm o t o r e d machine and flew to G ettys burg and Chattanoog a and car efully l oo k ed o v e r th e o ld battlefields J u s t a s if I e v er gav e a d o gg o n e f o r th ose o ld battlefie lds, anywa y A s soon a s w e g o t ba c k from thi s tiresom e trip, w e all h a d a race t o th e natato rium whi c h wa s situate d in th e c e nt e r o f the g y mna s ium rooms i n t h e basem e nt. H e r e w e watch e d P aul D o)' l e and Frank R aymond battle f o r t hr e e quart e r s o f an h our ove r a game of wate r t e nni s P aul, in t h e e nd, wa s vi c tori o u s The n ext p e riod wa s a s tudy p erio d f o r m e I put m y n ext day's Engli s h r eco r d o n m y in d i vidual ph o n o graph twi ce, but I kn e w n o m o r c afte r th e s eco nd tim e than b e f o r e I b e g a n I c o uldn t get m y min d o n my w ork, so I decided to fill m y pr og ram f o r the J uni o r dance whi c h was to b e given that night in th e L o ui s X \ J ball r oo m in th e south wing. Caterers an d decora to r s fro m N e w Y ork ha d b e en busy in th e r e all d a y ,so naturall y we w e r e craz y t o have a p ee p but the door wa s shut fas t, so w e w o ul d have t o c urb our c uri osity until night. This was to b e th e b es t dance o f th e year. was to b e furni s h ed b)' th e Boston S y mph o n y Or c hestra, and, d urin g the inte rmi ss i o n s p ec ial d ances w e r e to b e r e nd e r ed b)' th e balle t o f th e M etro p olitanOpe ra C o mpan y I b eg an t o call diff e r ent g irl s f o r d an ces an d soon m y pro gram wa s full. This d o n e I decid e d that J h ad b ette r c all D oris an d warn h e r t o b e r e a d)' at 7 30 whe n [ w ould c all f o r h e r-sh e wa s always late A s 1 wa s tr ying t o get h e r, som e o n e bro k e in with--" Ch es t e r ),ou ha d b ette r ge t u p It's 7 30 and )'o u 'll b e late f o r sc h ool, I m afrai d "What? Whr, whe r e's D oris ? Wh o are--, Aw, m o th e r .I wa s j u s t havin g it s w ell dr eam ab out Cri s t o b a l H igh S c h oo l i n 2021 1 wis h it w e r e tru e n o w. THE HABITS OF' OU R ANCESTOR S I N 921. NOTES fROM A LECTURE G I V E N I N 2 021, BY A PROMIN E N T H ISTORIAN. If/ esley T ownsend, '22. Eleanor Zimmermann, 21. It h a s been m)' privi l e g e r ece ntl)' to take up som e orig inal resear c h w ork con ce rning life in th e publi c sc h oo l s o f th e Canal Z o n e in 1 921. 1 ha ve f o und thr o ugh m y investiga ti o n t h a t: The pupil s in th e sc h oo l w e r e f orced t o s it i n s tr a ight-b ac k ed seat s in plain room s in s trange con tra s t to t h e lux uri o u s uph o l s t e r ed c h airs in comfo rtabl e room s with frescoed w alls an d full l e n g th w i ndow s o f our sc hool. The favorit e g am e of t h e boys seem s t o ha ve been ba s k e tball, w h i c h h o wever w as far dif f e r ent f ro m th e g am e our boys pla y under th e s am e n a m e The boys w e r e exceedingl y r o ugh in th ei r ga me, knocking, s hoving, and h o l d ing th eir opp onents agains t th e walls, w hil e o ur boys s t e p p o lit e l), a s i de with an Excu se me" an d let th e o th e r t e am take th e b all. A s f o r th e d r ess thi s wa s th e most astoni s hin g The girls arranged th eir hair in a qu ee r manne r coverin g up th eir dainty e ar s w hich n a tur e h ad m eant to b e s h o wn T o accompl is h this, som e even w o r e on eac h s i de contr iva n ces whic h look ed l i k e fuzzy b alls glued to th eir h eads. They h ad n o idea o f g race an d lin e an d w o r e th eir s kirt s ve r y s h o rt a n d scant. They u sed th e ve r y ric hest mate rial f o r th eir everyda y d r ess. Altho u g h th e r e wa s n o t much c hange in th e boys' d r ess som e of th e boys ha d com e to our se n s ibl e wa y o f wearing loose collar s whil e o th e r s s till a d h e r e d to th e an c i e nt c ustom o f w e aring th e high s tiff co llar. YOU K O W \\'hen D odds calls you to he r office, I n the h::tll o f C. H. S You know there's so m ething o n h e r m ind But you're boun d you w o n '[ con f ess. K irhy Ftrgtlsoll, '21. Th ough \\i[ and wisdom R ow from her, Y o u s i t t he r e sto nr. co l d; But whe n s h e l oo k s .:I.t yo u i n silence N e xt thin g yo u kno w is-)'ou 've to l d

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THE CARIBBEAN. BUT 1 hopped into 111)' Dodds roadster and l e f t o l d Stafford H alls with never a pang o f r eg,"ct. 1 e n tered t h e hig hw ay and stepp ed o n t h e gas It was Ala)", a n d Boyd b)' a Mill)' heart I speJ along, watc hin g for a sq uirrel or A"uh" as it crossed the Duey Fi elds '-rounded a s harp curve with a Rusk .I lis t ahead of me rod e :1. /\liller in a cart. I hit hi m with a bump t hat threw m e out and turned t h e Cnrlwr;g'JI DVe:. 1 hit rhe road and tor e n ew T ailor made Cloke up t h e back. J\1y v icti m stood up and, If/hile as h e wa s abo u t t h e Gills, h e gave me hi s Frank opinion of my dri ving. ] got into t h e ca r to Parker ollts id e th e Townsend and h e got in b eside m e to go to town to hunt hi s daughter. I off e red to h elp him H un/er. H e couldn't find her in t h e town, so Solomon sad h e went to th e AI/organ l ooked whil e 1 stayed outdoors, knowin g what a Colberg i t was -in s i ,je, \\'he n h e had L)LlIld hisdaughte-, I started to go h o m e but fJ""" that Strobridge had broke n dowl1 so I l e ft car and walked, Not far fro m I met a b'Jy leading a Ca oJ/p!;cll and feeding it so m e little r d B alls I a skeJ him what t hey w e r e. H e said, "Peppe rs I th:mgh t I kne w b3y a n d asked hil11, "Are you J o hn lv 1 0 rl on's b 'JY?" H e s miled and answe red I'm n o t 70h11son but Pderson." [passed o n and came to t h e lake w here m y brother Oliver was B eeelling Edward's boat on the s hore, H e s h o w e,j m e a queer fis h h e had caugh t t hat hact Seeley flappers f o r nns and a s harp H ornbeak. \\'e walked on together and I thoug h t o f t h e Bliss of m y happy home and decided to l oaf hereafte r a n d leave it to dad to bring h o m e t h e Bacon and apologize f o r t hi s / f/ill. I N PLANE CLASS. Estlur r ill, '23, Iwd Louis!! IIwler, '2J. Say now, what's the nutter with }'OU boys? Y ou don't need t o make so much noise Now rou quit bangin' those chairs around, \\'h)' can't yo u let 'em stay on the ground? W ell, Eddie, so you're geuin' it too? I t must be catch in as the 'Au." J thought you'd let the girls alone; You'd better get a private 'phone .And do your chatting after sc h oo l \\' h en rou won't b e breaking any rule, Now, Emma T ownsend, quit those.: giggles, And have you got the wig gles? H e rbert, please go to the board You're nois)' enough to be a I;'ord. W e ll, what's th e matter with rOll pe?ple? AI, I j'.lSt wis h rou were up a steepl e, T hen yo u w ouldn't be craning your n ec k all day. W Itchi n g the airplanes on their way, Oil, P3haw, haven't yOll g'Jt a,}, b;-ains? Y ou absolutely give m e a ll1in, N o w, BiUt\ l ary, don't ),ou c r ab, I've gn all your mark .. on tab, An,-I they're not so go::>d th.1t yo u c;tn't im pro\ 'C! S) take t h e hint and get on the move. \\'dl, thi s cb<;s must h :tve the willies aCt JUSt lik e a I)t o f sillie, Y o u'll make.: m e real mad some dar soon, AnJ I 'll c hu c k the wh')le bun ch out of the room, SE:--II O R S SOLILOQUIZE .IlildredSffljJonl, '21, T o rise or not to rise-that is t h e question, Whether 'tis n o bler in the mind to rise And carry b ooks unwillin:Jly to sch')::>1 Or by an extra nap avoid m y troubles; And in this s leep forget, and be conte.:nt T o ri se w h enever me the spirit moves Charla '2/, Oh, that thi s t oo, too solid geometr), w )ulJ mdt, Expl ode, and r esolve itself into a smoke, Or that th e sc h ool teachers had not fixed Their minds for to [c;Ich us ge;)mctry How weary, hard, dull and unw or kable Seem all the propositions of thi s book.

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62 T H E CARIBBEAN. ,lfildred &ajJorJ, '21. \\'e regret t h e s mall numbe r o f exchanges this year and hope to ha ve bett e r sliccess in t h e next i ss u e However, w e certainly apprec iate the e x c han ges that w e r e sent li S Tlu: If//iisp. Wilmington lIigh Sc/lOol, W ilmington, Del. \\'e co ngratulate you on the development of so good :l book. Your jokes are clc\'cr and interesting. The cuts arc appropriate. However, your book may be improved by increasing your literary department and keeping all rOUf advertisements in the back. T ile AhdtlWtlglllJl. Linco/n lIigh Sdwol, l Visconsill Rtlpids, This is the only annual w e received as all exchange. Your b o ok is worthy of praise I t is wdl planned from beginning to end \\' e h ave o b tained many suggestions from your :lrrangement, \\'e h o p e rOll w ill have an excha n gc department in tht: forthcoming: issue. \\'e were surpri<:ed to see a storr "A Trip t hr oug h t h e Panama Canal," by onc o f our former Canal Zone students, P rudence l\brtin, '10 Tile Comment. Crelin /figll Scll o ol, St. Palll, lJ ilill. \\'e enjoyed your Christmas Illllllber. T he Christmas stories are in great contrast with O UI 'S and we feel h omesick after reading them. A few will brighten your b ook. Your commentS are origi nal. The paper and print of your book make it very pleasing to read. The .\lagric, SI ,\Iarglll'et's Scllool, I!'aterbw)';Co1JII. '(our literarr department is well-handled. A few jokes will add spice to rour b ook. CutS would improve its appearance, TIle ]u1Jta. luditlllfl /figh School, Indianfl, 1'0111. Your cover designs are appropriate. Your ex_ c h ange in the numbe r is deverl)' written. \\'hy not add more cute; to your book? I n the author of "Cannibal Lee" we see a budding F. P A. TM FlorMa Flambeau. Florida Slale ColI,,!.e for ,romen. Your paper is very news)'. 'Nuf sed. The Ellrwiall. Haw/1iI1 H igll SclIool, /facerhi/l .\flUS. I t is tOO bad to c h eapen so good a book with the advertisements in front and on the cove r s. \\'e h ave nothing more to say except that we would like to hear your views of u s Tlte Piol/cer RCtlding H igh School. RCfldillg, \ltus. \\'e arc interested in rour well-developed stories 'Neath Caribbean Sk ies" is typical o( ou r surro un d ings but in reading it over we (ound qui t e a serio u s mistake. I n the ?ll arch number you said t hat C olon had been give n t h e i \ merican name "Cristobal." Cristobal :Ind Colon are two sepa rate towns alth oug h t h ere i s only a railroad separating them. Tile Gleaner Pawtucket Higll Scliool, Pawtucket, R. I Your b ook is ver)' good Your T:tttler" depanmeln is very interesting \\'e wish to congratulate )'OU on t h e good arrangement o f your :Iocto rs', l aw yers', and dentists' u ads in the (ron t of the book. RcviSIa I A SIll/e. Colegio de La Salle, Pa1/ama. Su libro es InU\' bueno. Usted debe t ene r mas de (otogra n as. Tile I("de Park Wukly. /f)'de Park Higlt School, Clli eago, !II. The fact that you r book is publis h ed weekly i s reason enoug h (or you r not having cu t S in your book. Cuts and better paper would add a great deal to your book. Tile Cllrlis Cllrlis High School. Slalen bland, N Y. T here is a good varietrof material in you r contentS, Tile Thmsllf:r. R ice Insli"'I (, HOlIJlon. Tc."(. Your paper gives very good accounts of athle tics. Tile ."cadem)' ]ounwl. l VorwicllFru ,{eadem)" J"orwich, COlin. Your magazine is attractive both in appearance and content. Tlte Record. ]01111 .lIars/wI Higll Scllool, Richmond. Vtl Your magazine is \'ery good t h roug hout but th e r e are still wars of improvement, b y adding a (ew cuts and a joke department.

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THE CARIBBE. ;-,'. LEND Fields, '.zo? OCTOBER. \\"he n t h e doors of Cristobal H ighSc h oo l were again opened, we found the assembly hall increased twice t h e size of t h e year b efore. i\lany n e w f aces w e re see n -among t h em one new Senior, o n e n e w .J lIllior, a n d sever al new Sophomores, besides a lar ge Freshman class. two of the {aell ltv from the year before remained, i\f r. and Senor \ 'illafranca. As i' l r Drill was i n the States, i\l r. Bacon acted as principal. 6. This day t h e seating of the student excepting t h e proud Seniors, was changed. H ow insulting it wa s to the J u n iors to have F res h men sitting farther bac k in t h e room than t h ey were! How queer it was to sec six-foo t \ \ 'illie sitting in a front seat and obstructing the view of t h e room. and innocendr Leroy sat among four privileged, cnjoring, comfortable Fres h ies II. : \ t 7-not s harpa group of boys representing a picked basketball team, met at pier ,. Thev waited until i\I r. \\' i lson, the coach ,1\ l iss D odds, and Hornbeak arrived. T oget her they left in t h e launc h Jlargarilfl for Gatun (via the Panama Canal). For results of th e game refer to the athletic department. 1'2. i\l u c h to our surprise and delight 1\l rs, Howard, whom w e remembered as i\l iss H ealey, came from B a lboa to teach until a permanent teacher could be secured. i\l iss Dodds was appointed principal. She proved hersel f very capable and became a favorite among t h e students. 15. Oh, poor Fres hi es! This da), their curly locks were s horn from their heads by the upperclassmen and n o barber fee was charged. .:\S a special concession half of H arold Boyd's luxuriant lock s wer e left and Miss D odds encouraged him further by a ssuring him that things grow well in the tropics, The g irl s except the few who were afraid of their hazing and stayed away until sc h ool was in session, didn't lo se their curly locks but had them braid ed "tI la Sis H opki ns." '22. l\l rs. F ie lds gave a party for h e r daughter The threatening downpour did not faze the ones who were invited. The evening wa s enjoyed by all-especially t h e refres hm ents ; e il, Harold? The h Ollse was decorated to suit the coming occasion, Halloween. '23. The faculty enjoyed a trip up th e coast to Porto B ello .-\mong the man)' souvenirs brought back was a most beautiful sunburn. '25. Our usual interest in a eroplanes wa s somewhat divided; we watched the grammar sc h ool chi ldren mO\'e into the annex. 26. Our first pep meeting wa s h eld. A.lex I inczer was c hosen as cheer l eade r and proved him sel f qui[e capahle. \ \ ith the abl e hell' of Dodds we had some clever yells. Rah, Rah, Rah, D odds. JO. The first game of the basketball series with B alboa H igh School was played 011 Cri s tobal Aoor, The sc hool turned out and we wer e the r e strong with our new yells. NOVE!\IBER. 8. i\ l iss Piedalue arri"ed from ;\l ontal1a to teach the Domestic S c i e nce cla sses form e rly in charge o f Strong. 10. P hy s ical examination by the doctors of Colon Hospi,"1. 16. The first general staff m eeting at the h o m e of Kirby F e rguson. : 7. \\'ilsol1 fulfilled his promi se to [he basketball team for their s u ccess in winning tht: series. A dinner that will always be remembered

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THE C A R I BB E A N. w as he l d at t h e H o t e l W a s hington Miss D odds a c t ed a s t o a s tmis tre ss a n d a sc h o o l p i n wa s presente d [0 iVlr. \\' ilson. The d i n n e r was m arre d b y t h e ab se nce o f H ente r and T o w n se nd; h o w e v er, it wa s a n e nj oy abl e e v e ning. 1 8 \ V a r k wa s b egun o n t h e Junio r p l a y to b e give n at t h e Thanks gi ving pr o gra m 2 3 The most important a n d e n joya b l e e v e n t orth e ye ar wa s t h e wel coming o f S e na to r a n d M r s H ar ding up o n w h o m o u r n ati o n h ad bestow e d i t s g r e a t es t h o n o r \\'e w e r e giv e n a h alf h'Jliday, i n h o nor o f t h e o cc a s i on. 2 4 T o ce lebrate t h e Than ks g i ving h o l ida ys a pr o gram wa s h e l d M a n y p oe m s and s tories w e r e r e ad. The main numbe r 011 t h e pr o gra m wa s a give n b y f o u r m e m b e r s o f t h e Junio r c lass, Kirby F e rg u so n Mary Fie l d s H e r b ert M c Clai n and H arold C l o k e The p l o t o f the p l a y wa s t h e revel ati o n of t h e P u r itan Age t o a mod e r n boy and girl a s t hey look e d u p at t h eir ancest o rs" p i c t u r e 2 5 to 2 9 T ur key, tr i p s and t hankfulness. DECEMBER. I M rs. H oward l e ft. Mr. B a co n too k t h e A l g e bra I cla ss a n d M i ss P orte r t he M o d e rn His tor y cla ss 5 The C o l o n and F ort D avi s ba se ball t e a m s p l a ye d a b e n e fit game f o r t h e hig h sc h oo l annu al. The p roceed s w e r e indeed a gr eat h e l p an d ever y b od y i n te rest ed in THE C ARIBBEAN wa s t h ankfu l to th e t e a m s, Mr. J B. Fie ld s C o l o ne l Clo k e and all t h ose who help ed t h e c au se. S Many s ad f aces w e r e seen a s t h e r e p o rt c ards f o r t h e fir s t quarte r w e r e g iven. q J 5 Eve r y body busy pre par i n g f o r th e c arni v al. 1 6 THE CA R N J VAL. 1 7 (6. 30 a. m.) C l e ani n g da y afte r t he nig h t b e f ore 20. Chri stmas v a c ati on. T h e f a culty enjoyed a trip to t he San Bias I s lan ds JANUAR Y 3 Mi ss B ee cilin g arri ved fro m the States t o teach Geom e try, P h ys i cs, a n d G e n e ral S c i e n ce 10. ta ff m eeti ng. B as ketball ga m e betw ee n Gatun an d Cristoba l High Sc h oo l girls. 1 5 The girl s wen t to A n co n t o playa b a s ketball ga m e. FEBRUAR\' 2 M r s H o llan d g a v e a m os t int e restin g ta l k a b out J n d ia w h e r e s h e h a s been a m issi o n ar y f o r m a n y year s 5 The girls p la ye d ba s ketbal l w i t h the B a l b o a High S c h oo l girls. S S c hool was d i s missed at 2 o c lock t o e nab l e th e s t u d e n t s t o see t h e Panamanian c arnival parad e 1 I Girl Reserves' part y at th e Gilb e r t H o use. 1 9 F i r s t indoor baseball o f t h e season w i t h Gatun. T h i s wa s our firs t victor y b u t b y n o m e a n s th e l a s t. 2 3 l i ss Bla i s d ell b ec ame M r s L oc k ett. 2 8 G e r a l d Bliss r e t u rn e d fro m S outh A m eric a afte r a va c ati o n o f t h ree week s M A R C H 3 l V l u c h c r edit i s du e t o t h e A n c i ent H istor y c l a s s f o r th e presen tati o n o f th e i r pla y a J\Jock Olympian C o un c il. But, o n e can r e adil y u n ders tan d t h e perfec t i o n o f t h e entire pl a y w h e n w e s a y t hat Mi ss Dodds i s t he t e a c h e r o f t h e cla ss, f o r s h e h a s t he ab i l ity o f brin g i n g out all t hat i s b es t i n a p u pil. 4. H ostil ities b etween C os ta R i c a an d Panama resu l t ed in th e s u dd e n d e partur e o f S e n o r Villa fran c a. 1 0 J\1iss B ar nh o use c am e fro m P a nama to take t he Spani s h cla sses f ormerly in c h arg e o f S e n o r Villafran c a. 1 2 Freshman p i c ni c at Devil's H o l e They. w e r e c hap e r o n ed b y N J i ss H o rnb e ak Miss Beech ing l Vliss Pi ed alue, Mr s Lock ett, and I V lr. B acon. 1 5 The F r es hm an cia sses o f f orme r y e ar s h a ve p l a y ed l ittle p art i n t h e school compar ed to th e a ctivities and ability s h own b y t h e '24 cla ss, but with Miss H o rnb e ak a s th eir Eng li s h t e a c h e r w h v s h ouldn't t hey b e that wa y ? They gave a m os t e njoyabl e ente rtainm ent comp osed o f d ia logues a n d m o n o l o gues. \ \' e s i n ce r e l y h o p e t h a t t h e n ext t i m e E l i z a makes h e r appe arance III publi c s h e will have h e r sock s darn ed 1 6 I S S e mest e r e xami n ati o n s

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THE C-\RIBBE:\:\. 1 8 28 Eas t e r vacation. The wellt on different camping trips, among dll'1ll to S\\l:l!twate r anu up th e Chagrcs '21. F reshman al gehra c'\tlmilliltioll. \PRJI.. 2. Track rnect. A Pyrrhian victory f o r Balboa. 6 \\'e ha d O U f firs t practic e ,\ irh ;\I iss Currier f o r the so n gs at t h e C Olllll1e nCCm CIH exe r c i ses 25. The Soph o more cla ss gave a dram
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66 THE CARIBBEAN. Jones. / If/esley TowlIselld D u e y, d o you b e l i e ve in fairies?" DueJI. -"Sure 1 crossed t h e Hud so n R i ve r in o n e A f t e r t h e an c i ent history cla ss ha d compared the c harac t eris ti cs and p os iti o n s o f Caesar, C r a ss u s and P ompey, [ V I i ss D odds a s ked: .. K enneth, whi c h o n e o f t hese w o ul d YOLI r athe r have been ? I\"e nn e /h, -"Caesar. Miss D od d s "Why?" A e nn e lh B eca use h e liv e d the l ongest." ire l1l J W c Co url. "'vVe hav e a white parro t a t h om e." Miss H o mbenk. -"Ooes it talk?" lrellc -"Oh, awfull y." Nbss H,C \ ;Vho t a u ght h im, I r e ne?" A TRU E JOKE, B U T NOT FOR THE NAT IVE. I t was w h e n ca s h regi s t e r s w e r e fir s t intro duce d in LatinAm erican countries t hat a s t o r ek ee p e r in a s mall town away up in the interio r, b ought o n e A f e w da ys 1 a t e r a na ti v e e n t e red the stor e wi t h a bill to b e c hange d. I nto t h e strange m o n s t e r o f a c a s h r egis t e r w ent t h e bill and up jumpe d "No Sal e." "0, S e n o r S e n or," sc r eame d th e native, h im s a y l Y o Sal e : ] t w o n't co m e out. The J uili o r cla ss wa s d i sc u ss in g c i v i cs The t o pi c turned to f o rm s o f governments "Ch es t e r what was t h e f o rm o f government b e f o r e the flood? Trying t o think, h e an s w e red, "\\'hy, "( can't see m to r e m embe r. Raymond (at the d inn e r g i ve n t o th e bas k e t b all t eam b y Mr. Wil so n ) "lI'hy i s a sc h oo lr ool11 lik e a F o rd?" Clokc. H Because t h e r e i s a crank in front." Miss D odds. "And a l o t o f nuts b e h in d The .J uni o r cla ss ha d b ee n taking r e f e r e n ces fro m the Source B oo k o f Am erican H istor y," wri tte n b y H a r t. \ "he n the cla ss was c alled, Mi ss H ornbeak a s k ed : H a ve yo u your Harts, c la ss? Ever yo n e r e a c h ed to his l e ft s id e an d n o d de d. Pnul (to his fat h e r ) P o p d o yo u think I 'll eve r g r o w a n y m o r e? AI r D o)'l e "\\'h y, sure so n, wh y n ot?" P a ul. I don t. M)' h ead's in t h e wa)'." H n r old Cloke (in the o l d W a shington H o t e l ) \Vaite r i s the r e an y soup o n t h e bill -o f far e ?" / Vailt r. "The r e w as, but 1 wip e d it o fr." JlIi H D o dds ( a t a staR-m ee tin g o f THE C ARIB B EAN) H ow about so m e o f yo u b oys making so m e things in w ood w ork f o r our ba zaar?" Eddi e M ny I g u ess that w ood w o rk. /I Senio r (afte r t hr ee an d o n e-half years in hig h sc h oo l ) J think J'II go down an d l oo k over t h e night sc h oo l so m e d a y." J\lliss B e ce/ling (tea c hing b otany in g e neral sc i e n ce c1ass) "\\'hat kind o f r ose i s c ommon to t h e I s t hm us?" r J esl!m(lJl. -"Neg r oes_' R O LL CA LL I N S P A:-;' l S H C LASS. NIl'. Villnfrallcn. G eorge George ( v e r y l o u d ) .-"Sir. i\lh Villajrnn(a "Are yo u h e r e? "Slim" Zimmermann, the n e w guard o n the Gatlin ba s k e tball t e am wa s prac ti c in g s h ooting ba s k e t s J u s t a s h e made a nice l o n g s h o t h e s ai d t o \"es ley w h o wa s standing n earby G ee e v e r y tim e ] o p e n m y m OLith it see m s to fall in." CONNOT ATION F o r tom o r ro w 1 want'yoll to describeanatural sce n e Y o u may desc rib e a tree lak e, o r an y othe r

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T H E CAR I BREAN. pi cture t hat may com e into your mind," J \ l iss H ornbeak a ss i g n e d t o the Freshman Englis h cl a ss 1 can't do t hat," s p o k e lip Sh e lb y, with a blank look IIC ertainly you can," s ai d i\l iss H ornbeak. "Now jus t tell m e what picture cOmes into your mind while y o u arc looking at the l eaves o f a tro pi c a l palm tree," H e glance d at o n e jus t olltside the school win d o w, the n calmly said, I t look s t o m e lik e Haro l d try ing to rai se a pompadour." Look h e r e Haro l d wh y did you t ell Gladys F ord that y o u w e r e over in France during the World War?" 4'\\'hat da' ref m e an I tol d h e r stic h a wh oppe r ? I tol d h e r the t ruth, but s h e fall away b e f o r e I fini s hed s a ying France Fi eld." T e a cher ( to e i ghth grade pupil) What i s man?" Pupil. L iv e dust." HEARl) Il\" IIISTOR\. Mrs McCar lhy, "\\'ould you rathe r b e burned at th e stak e o r g uill o tin ed? B r ighl pupi l Burn ed at th e stake." Mrs M cCar l hy \ \ h y? Briglll p/{pi l J 'el rathe r ha ve a h o t s t e ak an y d a y tha n a co l d c hop. OVERHEARD A T THE H A L L GAME. L e t m e pitch; I c an give a s mall)' ba ses all ball s a s tha t b oo b c an! " C o ld drinks s s s I" "\\'hat w onde rful contro l That pitc h e r c an hit a batsman's bat with the ball an y tim e h e wants t o " H o t p eanuts s s s " Al l that pitc h er's gOt s a g love," Hey, yo u; sit down in fro nd" S eve ral are standing an d n o a c ti o n ((H e)' Y o u with the dirt)' n eck! Sit d own!" All abe)' the command. "Chunegum, c i garettes s s s O V ERHEARD AT T H E SILVER COMMISSARY. I s ),o u go t an y p o wder ? " Y es what kind d o yo u wan t tooth o r f ace? " Ah d o n' want f1l-:eder j ah wants bug p o w der." Juliu s ( making:1n impr ess i o n ). "Frankie R a y m o n d an d I s t r u c k o u t '160 bats m e n thi s season. J uliu s w as rig h t, too, f o r th e recor d s h o w s that Frankie struc k out '159 an d J uliu s struc k o u t I. \ \,illi e H arri so n, n o w all appre nti ce m ac hini s t, i s s a id to have a n s w e r ed o n e of his examina t ioll ques t io n s .1\ fis hin g lin e ha s a w orm a t o n e e n d a n d a Ilut at the othe r. THE eND.

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68 THE CARIBBEAN. ----------------------@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @I1lil\ll1liJliRimJl'!l1Itl"l IlBf lilt 'illlJl'fm 'riJl'il' @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ @ FOUR ears ago t h e edito rial stafr o f t h e fir s t C A R IBBEA:-< @ I expresse d t h e wis h that t h e f orth c oming v o lumes o f our y e arbo o k might g row b ette r with each succeed-@ ing i ss u e That annua l, b rave ly is s u e d in spite o f @ di scourage m ents h a s se r v e d as an in s pi ration to thos e of u s w h o hav e followed. Our book h a s its imperfections. @ W e r e ali ze t h e m and r egret them. But we hope t hat we have @ I r eflecte d a little of the true Cristobal Hig h School spirit and k ept faith with t hat first annual board. @ W e can't t hank p e r sonally all those w h o behind t h e sce n e s @ @ (and scree n s ) have made thi s book a but w e h e r e @ I a ssure the m t hat w e have appr eciate d all their efforts in a liI' I b e half. T o t h e stafr of The Panama Canal Press, w h o I t h e i r untiring inte r es t a n d e n t hu s ia sm, hav e made t h e printin g and m echanics o f t h e bo o k w hat th e y are w e f ee l a s p e cia l d ebt o f gratitude. @ :\nd n o w w e l eave it to our r eade r s to thank anoth e r gro llp @ I o f h e lp e r s t h e ad ve rti se r s -b, giving th e m t h eir patronage I @ and m entioning to t h e m @ TH E C ARIBBEAN, '21. @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I LONDON STORE J!# Modern Tailoring I I 55 FRONT STREET, COLON, R P. I @ SUITS MADE TO ORDER MATERIAL FURNISHED @ @ Engli s h Woolen Suitin gs1 Pongee Silk, Palm B e ach, and Tweeds of va riou s s hades to select from @ @ WORKMANSHI P GUARANTEED FROCK COATS A SPECI ALTY @ @ ANTONIO ROSANIA & CO. Phone ,6 @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

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@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ FRANK RAYMOND '21, Governor-General PAUL C. DOYLE, '11, Gene.al-Governor @ "BUSTER" FIELDS, Office Boy HAROLD CLOKE, Chief Penwiper I
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70 THE CA R IBBEAN. @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I UNITED FRUIT COMPANY I @ I Regular Sailings I @ @ @ Cristobal, C. Z @ @ to @ @ New York, @ I New Orleans, I @ Cuba, @ @ Colombia, @ @ Jamaica, and @ @ Costa Rica @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ For furthe r particulars, @ @ @ I M. C. O'HEARN, General Age nt, Cri s tobal, C Z. T. A. JACOME, Agent, Panama City I @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ I Panama Hats I I MORAN &FORD I @ @ @ @ @ @ @ Colon's @ I THE HAT OF THE TROPICS I I Leading I @ @ @ @ @Gf@@ Jewelers@ @ -I @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ J. B. GOMEZ @ @ For Choice Selection of Jewelry, @ I The Only Exclu sive Hat Store in I I Silver and Cut Glass I @ COLON @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 44 FRONT STREET @ @ COLON STORE PANAMA STORE @ @ @ 11th St., Opp. Commissary 8tb St. and Central Av e @ @ T e l ephone 115 1I0nly One Price" @ @ Phone 209 P C. Phone 8S8 Corp. @ @ @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

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T I I E C\RIBBEA:-.'. 7 @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I THE FRENCH BAZAAR I I PAN A MA AND COLON I @ @ @ Large and Up-to-date Department Stores @ @ @ @ Headquarters for Parisian Novelties @ @ @ @ @ @ Our Stores are appreciated by all careful @ @ buyers who want a host o f opportunities @ @ in purc hases and who prefer to be well @ @ served pe r so n ally as we ll as in t h e va lu e @ @ and merit of their purchases. '. .. @ @ @ @ @ I HEURTEMATTE & CO., Inc. I @ PANAM A COL ON @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ I 6asbingt o n I @ COLON BEACH @ @ P O. Address, CruSTOBAL, C. Z. @ r.;:( Europ ea n Pl a n F acing the Atlantic 100 Rooms 100 Baths Rate s from S3.00 up @ New, modern, and luxurious in appointments. E:teellent @ @ I L:::e the @ @ Cool Days. Cool Nights. E:a-ceUent Winter Re s ort. @ @ ANDREW JOHNSTON, Ma nager @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I WASHINGTON MOTOR SERVICE CO., Ltd. I @ COLO N R. P @ @ @ @ UNDER AMERICAN MANAGEMENT @ @ @ I t o go Call a Car Telephone: Colon 204 I @ @

PAGE 72

r HE A Phone, merlCan Colon 298 Beauty Parlor SHAMPOOING HAIR DRESSI NG \5J! MANICURING \::ill FACE MASSAGE I SCALP TREATMEN T H A IR WORK OF ALL KINDS :. Opposite P R R. Stati o n "Upstai r s @ @ @ @ @ INV E STIG ATE @ Threaded Rubber @ IN S UL A T IO N @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ S MALLWOOD BROTHERS @ PANAMA Sol,o;",lbo"," COLON @@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ THOMPSON & DALEY @ Real Estate @ @ @ @ COMMISSION MERCHANTS COLON R P. @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

PAGE 73

T H E C A R 1 BREA :,\. @ @ @ p @ RO CLASS OF 1921 S u @ @ @ S C @ @ p c @ @ E I ha ve raised you from @ @ R E @ @ I infancy, watched over you s @ T through your A-B-C's, and s @ Y will continue to keep you @ @ sound of body and healthy of @ @ @ @ mind. @ @ IBu/{:wif @ @ @ @ @ W I St Charles Ml-lk I.w @ @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ LAM'S GARAGE Broa d way between 1 4th and 1 5t h Streets, C OL O N R. P @ @ @ @ For your 5 and 7 passenger touring cars @ @ @ Day and Ni ght Serv i c e Call Pho n e 33 Competent C h a uffeurs @ @ @@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@ @ @ @ T e l e ph o n e N I GHT SER V ICE P. O. BOlt 104 @ @ @ Drs. Wm. and V ernon Crosbie @ S URGEON D ENTISTS @ @ C OLON R P. @ OFFI CE H OU RS: 8 A M t o IZ Noo n I P M t o 6 P M Back of Inlerntllionai Bank @ @

PAGE 74

7 4 THE CA R I BBEAN. @ @ I RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO I I 23 Fro n t S t reet, C o l o n R P I P O B ox 523 Cr i s t obal, C. Z Jus t a t 7th Street Phone C o rp N o. 9 @ @ @ @ @ @ @ Portraits, Groups, Enlargements, Views, @ @ @ I Commercial Work and Photo Supplies I @ @ @ W e d o the hi g best q u a lit y o f P ortraiture in I OUf success in t his di rection is the result @ @ our S t u d i o w ith t h a t d eg ree of a rti s tic r e nderin g o f good tr ai n i n g in a P h otog raphic I n stitute, and @ so much sou g h t a ft e r I and so rare l y f o un d here expe ri e n ce gai n ed in som e o f the best Studios @ @ o n the I sthmus. i n t h e U nited States. @ @ @ I ART S TU DIES OF I NFANTS AND L ADIES O UR S P EC IALTY I @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ Bargain Sale in Panama Hats I @ @ Prices 50 per cent below cost I @ @ @ I. L MADUR O, JR. @ @ CAT H E DRAL PLAZA N E XT CENTRAL HOTEL @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I F I RST CLASS SERVICE I I G o t o Cris to bal Clubhouse Barber Shop I I Come and Get the Unrivaled Shoe Shine I @ @ I BOWLEY, Proprietor I

PAGE 75

T H E CARIBBEA". 75 @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I THE NEW YORK SHOP I @ @ @ @ Gowns Millinery I Blouses Shoes @ @ Undergarments Hosiery @ @ @ @ ... DRESSMAKING... @ @ @ @ @ @ @ Front Street, near Slifer Park COLON @ @ @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ Colon Electric AND Ice Supply Co. 176 B olivar Street C o l o n, R.P. alwaLJs found i n EIQctriiiQd HomQs

PAGE 76

THE C:\RIBBE .-\:-':. @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I THE PAN-AMERICAN DRUG STORE I @ @ @ Botica P a n-Americana 3 Stores N SALAZAR Prop. @ @ @ @ SO FRONT STREET 56 BOLIVAR STREET @ 182 BOLIVAR STREE T ENGLISH DRUG S TOR E Phones: 336166 COL ON, R. P. @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ @ Cab l e Address "IMPCO." A. B. C., 5th, and Lieber @ @ @ @ @ @ @ I Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd. I @ JOBBER S AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS @ I MANUFACTURERS' AGE NTS I @ DEALER S I N @ I General Merchandise and N ati v e Produce I @ @ I COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA I @ P. O. Box 107 @ @ @ @ @ @ Branch R etail Stores and Trading Stat i ons: @ MANDINGA @ COLON BOCAS DEL TORO PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISAB EL ESCRlBANO @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@.@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ @ Everything i n the line of Plumbing @ @ @ I Central Omerican Plumbing ann SO,DVlg Co. I @ Estimates cheerfull y give n @ @ C OLON R P. PANAMA, R P. @ @ 170 Bolivar Street 58 Centra l Avenue @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

PAGE 77

TilE C :\RI BBE .'\:-J. 77 @ I COmPAGNIE GENERALE I FRENCH LINE OF STEAMERS @ @ @ @ Regul a r Sailin gs fro m Cr i stob al, C a n a l Z o n e, t o France @ M on t hl y Sailin gs f ro m Fran ce to S o u t h Am e ric a @ @ @ @ @ Via the Panama C anal ( Ecuador, Peru, and Chile ) @ @ @ F or all par tic u la r s apply to @ FRENCH LINE AGENCY @ @ @ P O BO X I28, C RI STOBAL, C Z Pho ne No. I 8 S @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ Ameri can Trade De veloping Company @ @ @ Complet e L ine of @ @ American French and @ @ Engli s h @ @ @ @ G @ rOCerleS @ @ @ @ @ FREE DEL I VERY IN AN CO N A ND B ALBOA @ @ W e Invit e Y o u r P atro nage @ Centra l A venue -Panama City @ Telepbo nes, Nos. 5 88 and 7 4 1 @ @ @ .@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ French Drug Store @ V D E LGAD O & SO N @ @ M ain St ore: @ @ @ @ 26 Front S tre et, opposite Cab l e Office @ @ @ @ assortment of @ I I . PERFU MERY TO I LET ARTI CLES @ KODAKS F I LMS CAMERA S @ @ ETC., ETC. @ @ Pre s criptio n D e partm e n t u n de r the s u pe r v i s i o n @ @ o f Unit e d St ate s Ph armac i sts @ @ BABIES' PRESCRlPTIO NS A SPEC I ALTY @ @ @ @ C O LON, R EPUBLIC OF P A N A M A @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

PAGE 78

THE CARIBBEAN. @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I Be part icular about the chocolates you eat! I @ Insist u pon the best-it can be had by specifying @ @ @ @ @ @ @ I owners I I f'hocolates I @ @ I L arge assortments on sale at all Clubhouses and Commissaries I @ @ I The Walter M. Lowney Company, Boston, Mass. @ J. D M AXWELL, Representative, CRISTOBAL, C. z. @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ I 1. D. Maxwell I @ @ Represen tativ e f @ @ @ @ I I @ @ @ @ @ PANAMA @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ P O Box 5026 @ I Cristobal ,C. z. I @ @ @ T e l 329 Colon @ @ @ @

PAGE 79

l THE CARTBBEAN. 79 @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ @ @ I DIERS & ULLRICH I @ @ @ @ I Wholesale and Retail Merchants I @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ AGENTS FOR @ @ @ @ White Rock Mineral Water and Ginger Ale @ I Park & Tilford's Candy Anheuser-Busch Malt Nut I @ @ @ @ I 48 Front Street Phone 101 COLON I @ @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I RATHBUN, STILSON & CO. I @ GENERAL HARDWARE AND L MBER MERCHANTS @ @ @ @ Deale r s in PAINTS, OILS, AND BUilDERS' mATERIALS, ETC. @ @ @ @ Picture Prsl"ing a Specialty @ @ P. O. BOX 140 COLON R of P. @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ I THE TRANS-CARIBBEAN COMPANY I @ AGENTS FOR @ @ PAGE MILLING CO. BISHOP & CO. @ TOPEKA. KANS. Three-in-One Oil L OS A N GELES. CAL. @ Hard Wheat Fl our Higb Grade Candy @ @ COLON: Sth a nd B ottle Alley PANAMA : Call e 13 Oe s t e, No. 19 @ Pho n e JJ4 Phone 1079 @ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

PAGE 80

80 .. '-'-....... THE CAR IBB EAN . @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ You will appreci a t e th e flexiqiJit y SOL E S They are universal in their ad -that leave s your fee t s o differ ent vantages and usej they are for \.:!Ii long walk with N\91in long wear, and f' NEOLIN SOLES ARE AS FLEXIBLE AS THE FOOT ITSELF @ @ @ THE GOODYEAR TIRE AND RUBBER CO. @ OF SOUTH AMERICA @ B ONDE D WAREHOUSE IN COLON, R P @ @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@


^f^/i^^i-L-l^



THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. IV.



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1921



No. I



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL




Edilor-in-Chief, Frank Raymond,



Assistant Editor


Paul Doyle, '2:


Art Editor




. Charles Henter,


Business Manager


. Carl Duey, '21


Editjr nj School


Notes


. Mary Fields


Assistant Manager


. George Cartwright, '22


Joke Editor




. Chester Taylor


Circulation Manager


Edward May, '2j


Literary Editor




Marjorie Ball


Assistant Circulation


Manager Alex. Linczer, '23


Alumni Editor




Doris Oliver,


Athletics (Boys')


, Harold Cloke, '22


Exchange Editor




Mildred Stafford,


Athletics [Girls')


KiRBY Ferguson, '21









Wt, tf)e gtubentg of Cristobal il^tgij ^cfjool, afffctionatclp
ijebicatt ttis fourtl) Uolume of "Cfjc Caribbean" to

O^ur Parent£i

W^o, bp ti)Eir tountlesg sacrifices, tfjeir tireless ijebotion,
anb tljeirfaountilessfaitt in uS anb oui ultimate

maStcrp of ourSelbeS anb our problems, ftabe mabe our
ebucation anb, therefore, tl)is boob a poSSibilitp.



THE CARIBBEAN.



(^^




^^^^^^^>



SCHOOL SPIRIT.



Frank Raxmrjyui. '21.



Wiiat is s ho)! spirit? Most ot us use the ex-
pression very freely and frequently, but do we use
it with full understanding? Does school spirit
mean studying and pondering at books during
every vacant moment in and out of school?
Is school spirit shown by neglect of school work
for practice and support of athletics ? Is he who is
perfect, and credited with excellent work the only
one to evidence school spirit? It is true that school
spirit may be shown by a proper interest in one's
studies, by practice and support of athletics and
by producing excellent work.
But our idea of school spirit
is the combination and proper
mingling of these, which
comes only when a student
is willing to sacrifice his own
pleasure for the good of the
school. In fact, school spirit
means harmons' in every-
thing pertaining to the school
bjjause the individuals f.'el
themselves part of the whole.

Are we at Cristobal High School revealing this
harmony which is the true school spirit? We
answer that there is no doubt that w; are;
and we may prove this by a few incidents ot the
school year. On the morning of the arrival of
President-elect Harding the ilesks in the assembly
hall were occupied by their respective owners even
though it was the desire of every one of our good
American students to witness the landing of
Harding's party. Why? Because our students




Cristobal High titbuul.



knew that their tluty lay here. They were willing
to sacrifice their desired pleasure for the greatest
victory, the conquering of self, for the good of
their school.

A drive for school songs and yells met with
instant approval from the student body. \s a
result many songs and yells were composed, a
number of which were so good that they were
adopted by the school. These were readily mem-
orized and have been used to great advantage.
The greatest event of the year was the school
carni\al. There earnest
efforts were made by every
one in every way. It was
the work, not of a few, but
of the school as a whole. The
spirit with which this project
was undertaken was the
main factor in its great
success.

It is this same attitude
which has prompted us to-
ward the standard of making
an a33:.Tibly period as quiet without a teacher
as with one. It has even enabled us to carry on
a few classes in the absence of the teachers.
In fact, during the absence of Senor \'illafranca,
the Spanish classes wj.'e successfully conducted
by students until a substitute was secured.

If the old adage "Straws show which way the
wind blows," is true, may not these incidents indi-
cate the direction in which the Cristobal High
School spirit is tending?



\



THE CARIBBEAN.



But let us not be satisfied with these achieve-
ments. There are other ways in which we may
show and create school spirit. .Are we loyal t3
our classes? If not, let us start now an.I stir that
loyalty within us. How can we do it ? When our
classes have meetings we may give our attendance
and sincere interest, be ready with suggestions
for enlarging the class efficiency, and then be
ready to carry out those suggestions.

Material has to be handed in each year for this
annual. It is your book. It belongs to you as
much as to any one on the staff. Do not idle.
Show your spirit. Be more than a reader of the
annual; be a maker of it.

.Are vou a member of an athletic team? Do
your utmost to gain a position on one or all. Do
not despair because others better than you are
trying. Work out at all the practices and improve
your athletic ability until you are chosen on the
school's nine or five. Play, not a star's game, but
a gam; of the team. Play for teamwork. It is
not the winning of the game that is the best vic-
tory but the exhibiting of the clean, good, sport-
man's spirit. If not a player, at least witness the
games and cheer your team to victory.

Is school life an enjoyment to us? It should be.
School work may seem a grind but this is of our
own making. We find enjoyment in everything we



like; therefore, we must become fond of our
work by taking more interest in it. We need to
become deeply interested in what we do. Natu-
rallv this will increase school spirit.

The teachers must do their p.;rt. Too much
work dulls one. They must make arrangements
by which the students may enter into activities.
But we must not forget that school spirit is de-
pendent chiefly on us. The teachers are helpless
in increasing it without our co-operation.

Whv should we endeavor so much to create
school spirit? What is the school to us? We
and our friends compose the school. We all have
the same aims and principles. We are part of this
institution which makes it as dear to us as a friend.
Therefore, we should support it as we do a friend.

The good within us is increased by real spirit.
Striving to enlarge schrjol spirit is no more than a
preparation for strengthening those good charac-
teristics which we possess. In truth, school spirit
makes us ready for school citizenship; therefore,
we are prepared for our country's citizenship.

Let's start now and assist in the advancing of
school spirit. Incite and arouse the ardor within
us. Light the fuse of enthusiasm we embody.
Touch it to the powder of energy and explode
it with a bang that will flood the atmosphere with
real spirit.





I





Royal PalTUi in CoLn,



THE CARIBBEAN.




Mr. a. R. Lang, A. B., A. M.,
Lincoln, Nebr.

Superinte>idenl of Schools.

Nebraska Wesleyan University.
University of Nebraska.



Mabel Beeching, A. B.

Hutchinson, Kans.

Kansas State Normal School.

Geometry, General Science, Physics, Algebra.



F. X. Karrer, A. B., M. A., M. Pd.,

Assistant to Superintendent.

Wilson's Modern Business College, Seattle.

Washington State Normal School, Ellensburg.

University of Washington,

Columbia University.

New York University.



Laura M. Piedalue, B. S.

Bozeman, Mont.

University of Montana.

Household Science.



J. Isabella Dodds, B. -A.
Principal.

Claremont, Minn.

Macalester College.

English, Latin, History.



RiCARDO ViLLAFRANCA.

San Jose, C. R.

Liceo de Costa Rica.
\'irginia Polytechnic Institute.
University of Barcelona, Spain,

Spanish.



Hattie Lee Hornbeak., B. .\., W. .\.
Waxahachie, Tex.

Trinity University.
Columbia University.

English, History.



Mrs. Edith McCarthy,

New York, N. Y.,

Normal and Model School,
Trenton, N. J.

Historv.



Henrv G. Bacon, B. S.

Mauricetown, N, J,

Columbia University,

Manual Training, Mechanical Drawing, Algebra.



Mabel Jean Barnhouse, .A. B.

Watsonville, Cal.

Leland Stanford, Jr., University.

Spanish.



THE CARIBBEAN.




About 1492, Isabella, Queen of Spain, pawned her jewels for
a mighty purpose. Her faith in mankind was well rewarded,
for by this means a new continent was discovered and the
world will always pay undying tribute to her memory; and
now, in 1920-1921, another Isabella, the one whose intelli-
gent, character-stamped countenance gleams from this page,
is following in the footsteps of her illustrious namesake and
outdoing the enterprising spouse of Ferdinand, for she is suc-
cessfully developing real men and women by giving not
pawning, mind you, hut giving her choice and precious jewels
of affectionate understanding, universal interest, untiring
assistance, sterling counsel, and watchful guidance to her
charges in dear old Cristobal High. Miss Dodds has been with
us one term only, but in that short time our resourceful and
amiable principal has attained a place in our hearts bordering
on worship. Thus, like Isabella of old, is Miss Dodds reaping
her harvest, for, with the able assistance of a loyal faculty,
never was school spirit so high and never did student body
respond to trying task more willingly than under the able
leadership ot queenly Miss J. Isabella Dodds.



Mr. Bacon doesn't know he teaches diving besides his school
subjects, but he does, because we learn by watching his form
in that daily perfect "swan." Mr. Bacon is a great athlete;
long hikes are commonplace to him. We follow his footsteps
in healthy pastimes. We admire the businesslike manner in
which Mr. Bacon conducts his classes. This is Mr. Bacon's
second year with Cristobal High.



If size were determined by the way a teacher is loved by her
pupils, Miss Hornbeak would be a giantess, for this dainty
teacher makes her literature classes so interesting, so snappy,
and so plain, that she is a close second to our helpful principal
in popularity. Such a world of knowledge has Miss Horn-
beak that we have been unable to find a literary question that
she can't answer. This is Miss Hornbeak's first year with us
and we sincerely hope it is not her last. If one wants to get a
Freshman angry enough to chew raw meat, just tell "It" that
vou "know a nicer teacher than Miss Hornbeak."



THE CARIBBEAN.



FIWW




iiiiiriiiiiiiii.iii.iiiiiiiiipipiiiiiii




^



Miss Piedalue has been on the Cristobal High School faculty
list for one-half year, which isentirely too short a time tor such
a ski'hul teacher of domestic science to be here. We leave it to
the girls to sing her praises as a cooking and sewing teacher.
Why! Mother is learning rapidly from daughter, and father is
actunlly growing cheerful when the dinner bell tinkles. Miss
Piedalue has not been enjoying good health but her ailment
is always hidden by a pleasant countenance.



Sefior Villafranca has been with us for three years and each
year his class and popularity improve. If you need an inter-
preter, ask for one of Serior's pupils, for one and all, under his
earnest tutelage, speak the Spanish language with fluency and
grace (in our opinion, but Seiior may have a different story to
tell you). El Sefior bade us adios during the dispute between
Panama and Costa Rica and has accepted a position with the
Costa Rican Government. His classes were taken over by
Miss Barnhouse, a very competent and talented teacher of
Spanish, whose path will be less thorny as a result of Seiior
\'illatranca's excellent groundwork.



Miss Beeching's good friendship has been shared with all her
pupils. Her spare time is spent in helping any of us with our
work. Seemingly impossible problems are simplified and drilled
into our noble cavities in an enduring, patient manner. Miss
Beeching has not been with us a full school year but it is
unanimously wished that she be here to see the present and
later editions of Freshies on Commencement night awaiting
their hard-earned diplomas.



THE CARIBBEAN.



3 am tlje ^djooltjop.

Frank Raymond, '21.

I am the Schocilhoy.

Each morning I leave home with my lessons learned;

I return early in the evening with a well-earned knowledge;

I am not overworked, nor not worked enough;

I am as fresh in the evening as I was in the morning.

I am always alert.

I am constantly watched;

Every move I make is criticized.

People believe me never to be serious.

They do not comprehend my true feeling;

They heave a hopeless sigh as they gaze at me

And mutter, "Is that the future America?"

But, though I may seem indifferent,

Frivolous, and careless.

This is just the outward appearance

Like the gay-colored covers of a book.

I am the bui!d:r of mv country.

Upon me the future of this nation depends.

If it were not for me

The America of the future

Would be a second Russia.

Bolshevism will spread

And revolutions will prevail

If I do not learn the spirit with which to fight

And the right propaganda and slogans to use.

A democratic government is what I believe

And am taught to preach.

I am the future America.

I am the Schoolbov.



THE CARIRRFAN.




Alice Hunter,
New York.

"1 have no other but a woman's reason;
I think him so because I think him so."

Two Gentlemen of Verona.

Basketball, i-2-j; swimming, i-2.



Fr.4xk Anthony Raymond,
New York.

"He sits high in all the people's hearts."

Julius Caesar.

Basketball, 1-1-3-4; baseball, 1-2-3-4; track,
1-2-3-4; s'.vimming, 1-2-3; tennis, 4; Class
Representative, 1-2-3; Class President, 4; Assist-
ant Editor, 3; Editor-in-Chief, 4.





Mildred Irene Stafford.
Maine.

".\ light heart lives long."

Love's Labour Lost.

Basketb.dl,4; bowling, 4; Class Secretary, 4: Exchange Editor, 4.



THE CARIBBEAN.



K.ATHERINE KiRBV FeRCUSON,

Mississippi.

"I am a woman, when I tliink I must speak.
.y.f )'oi! Like It.

Basketball, 1-2-3-4; b.:seba!l, 4; swimming>
1-2; Girls' .Athletic Editor, 4.



m


^^^^^^^^^M


m




1% ^^^


4




*/






Charles Hen'ter,Jr.,
New York.

"Men ot few words are the best men."

King Henry I '/.

Basketball, 1-2-J-4; baseball, 1-2-3-4; Art
Editor, 4.



Carl William Diev,
Tennessee.

"The force ol his own merit makes his wav."
~Kin,z Henry nil.

Baseball, 3-4; track, 2-3-4; basketball, 3-4;
tennis, 4; Business Manager, 4.



Eleanor Fpances Zimmermann,
New York.

"In thy face I see

The map of honour, truth, and loyalty."

King Henry FI.

Baseball, 4; bowline, 4.




lO



THE CARIBBEAN.




One night the Seniors were having a part>- and,
after a short time, the inevitable happenetl.
Some one said "Let's have the ouija."

Immediately there was a chorus of "Sure!
Fine!" etc.

After the boarti was brought to light, we were
in a quandary as to what we could ask it. We
could think of no new questions. All of a sudden
Kirby spoke.

"Suppose we let it prophesy the future of the
Class of '21, and save Carl and me the trouble."
The bunch agreed to that and gathered around the
board, as two of our number sat down to wrestle
with the weird instrument of communicating with
the supernatural. Pretty soon the pointer began
to waltz around and all of those present kept
record of what it said.

"Frank will be a doctor." A gasp of surprise
ran around the room. That was what Frank
wanted to be.

Then Charles aske_l "\\'hat kind of a doctor?"

"Doctor for the pane ot a wmdow." Frank
immediately accused the two operators ot pushing
the board, which they very strenuously denied.

Then Frank asked, "Is that true?"

Ouiia replied, "No, but you will really become a
famous surgeon."

Then the board spelled out, "Kirby is going to

be president The board hesitated and Alice

asked Kirby if she could come and visit her at the
White House, then the board continued" 's wife."

Kirby remarked that that was just as good as
being president.

Then Carl, who was feeling meddlesome, asked
the board what Kirby's husband was going to be
president of.

The board replied: "Colon Humane SocietN."



Kirby raised such a row that we all said "Let's
have two new operators," so Mildred and Charlie
arose and Frank and Eleanor took their places.

The board started to move and said that it was
only joking as Kirby was destined to be married
to the commandant ot the Island ot Guam.

The pointer stopped and then started to proph-
esy tor .Alice. "Alice will be the women's national
tennis champion ten years from now, and also
secretary to the President of the L'nited States."

The board did not stop but just went in circles
tor a couple ot minutes and then "Henter will

die I turned around to "Mud," shook his

hand, said .idios" while the bunch extended their
heartfelt sympathy. Then, on tacing the board,
we saw the pointer move to "t" and continue "after
he is forty in order to keep thin. He will be vice-
president of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation."

This relieved "Mud" very much, but we had
not much time to congratulate him on his escape
because the board went on and said that Eleanor
Zimmermann was going to be a stenographer,
world tamous as the only one known who does not
chew gum. The ouija seemed tired atter this,
because it would not work for tully five minutes.
Finally it started "Mildred is going to be in a
large dress" (Eleanor broke in with "Say, Mil-
dred's going to be fat!") "making establish-
ment of which she will eventually become pro-
prietor." Then the laugh was on Fdeanor.

The board executed a tew loops and side slips
and, ending up with a tail spin, started to spell
out Duey's future. "Carl is going to be an en-
gineer Carl's thoughts turned to famous

feats in engineering antl work in the devastated
regions of Europe, then the board went on, "on
a ten-mile railroad between Oskawassee and
Humbuguss in Morida."

We went home!



THE CARIBBEAN.



II




^



Left groups. William Mary, Emma Townsend. \\'esley Townsend. Charles Seeley, Mary Fields, Herbert McClain. Middle. Paul Doyle (Class President),
Jane Edwards (Class Secretary). Right. Harold Cloke, Marjorie Ball, George Cartwright. Chester Taylor, Doris Oliver, Leroy Magnusgu. (Not
shown Harris Cheal, William Harrison, Jordan Zimmermaon.)



12



THE CARIBBEAN.




ANTHOLOGY OF THE JUNIOR CLASS.

Georxie Pepper, 'jj.




K=



Marjorie Ball

A "golden-haired maiden" who gazes mourn-
fully at the windows of the Assembly Hall and
wishes that she were a Senior, so that she could
look out ot them whenever she wants to.

Mary Fields

"Charley says" that Mary is such a demure,
puritanical, little maid that she miglit well tv a
reincarnation ot Priscilla.
Only if Mary were Priscilla
she'd probably say "For
land's sake!" instead of
"Why don't you speak
for yourself, John?"

Glenora Mae Edwards
It required quite a hit
of sleuthing to uncover
that name. Could you ever
think of Jane as "Glenora
Mae?"

Emma Townsend

This is rather a weighty
subject for one so inexperi-
enced as I to handle, so
I shall not try. Discretion
is the better part of valor,
anyway.

Doris Oliver

Some day we're going to
hear that Doris has been
shot. Why? Well, anyone

who has the nerve to possess a natural wave
these days ought never to be allowed to live a
bing life. That would be too much.

William Mary

Better known as "Bill". We suspect him of a
secret leaning toward Bohemianism and Green-
wich Village, for he never wears a collar. And




just a moment! We most humbly b;g his pardon.
He has worn one occasionally, but doubtless only
when he was despairing of ever attaining the right
to wear long hair and an artist's smock.

George Cartwright

An extremely blond \oung man who rejoices
in the endearing ( ?) name of "Cockroach" and is
n Jted f jr his fondness for Freshmen. Although a
Junior, he is extremely
ignorant, doesn't even know
the difference between an
ir(.)n and a flatiron. May
be a Freshman H. A.
student could tell him.

Pail Dovi.e

"Paco" has contributed
to science a wonderful in-
vention, a compass which,
according to him, simply
can't go wrong. Seems to
me that it is more orn?,-
mental than useful, partic-
ularly as a guide. He has
also discovered a way to
conserve stamps. Rather
late for conservation, isn't
it?

Herbert McClaix

You may talk all you
want to about the hard
work of the missionaries
in "darkest Africa" but
Herbert's work is harder yet. He has been trying
to get Miss Hornbeak to come to Sunday School,
but the best that he's been able to do so tar is to
get her to come to a Sunday School class banquet.

Wesley Town'sexd

You'd never believe to look at him that he is a
spiritualist, would you? Why he even consults



THE CARIBBEAN.



13



the ouija board on subjects so varied as which
shirt to wear to school and the state of his lady-
love's affections. It is rumored (this is strictly
confidential, of course) that he was quite over-
come by the answer to the latter question. Let
this be a lesson to all lovelorn young men.
When you want a thing well done push your
own ouiia board.



Harold Cloke

I have alwavs heard of gir




Tne New Cristobal Wirelfss vStatiuit,

ing remark at Mary's party w



Is who "tripped
daintily along"
hut I neve r
heard ot a boy
who did it until
I met Harolil.
He does it most
successfully
though trip-
ping ever\'one
from the most
dignified Fresh-
m an do w n to
the greenest
Senior. Not
onl\- that, but
hf trips him-
self. It \-ou
don't believe
it, ask him
what his part-
us.



Leroy Magnuson

The saying goes that "you can't keep a good
man down." Neither can you keep Leroy quiet,
particularly in the last period. Perhaps Miss
Hornbeak will agree with me when I say that if the
tligging ot the Panama Canal was the Thii-teinth
Labor ot Hercules, suppressing Leroy is the Four-
teenth.

Chester Taylor

Chester is a thorough believer in the old saving
that "the wav to a man's heart is through his



stomach." Furthermore he is quite willing for
his heart to be tounel as otten as possible. Isn't
that just like a man?

Jordan- Zimmermann

How can I write about a boy when I don't
know anything about him except that his main
ambition is to be a gentleman bum all his life?

Harris Cheal

.Although he has only been with us a short
time, Harris is already casting tender glances at
all the "femmes" trom the eighth grade up to
the Seniors. You might almost call him a "gen-
tleman Cleopatra."

Charles Seelev

Please pardon this burst into free verse, but
I find prose inadequate:

Since the beginning of the world
There has reigned supreme
In the world of silence
One figure the Sphinx,
Her supremacy unquestioned,
Her riddle unansweted.
But at last there has risen
A rival Charles Seelev,
Who has dared to usurp
Her throne.



I.'^ft,


M^JB|


fHMI'Hir'


M^ JP


W


HHHlBr^


fe3


pi


j^E


Im&j^ ^^J^^i^?J^^U


Fll?r


* iSr j^yNS'


."; ""-"'







A Native Hut.



14



THE CARIBBEAN.



SORHOMORES.



s^'j^s^vTTjr:





--^...^ a:,.---.-*-.



Top group Erust Euphrat, Jessie Weir, Emilio Solomon. Middle Catherine Pepper, Edw^dMay, Georgie Pepper,
Bottom Esther Witt, AI. Quinlo, Bertha Frank.



THE CARIBBEAN.



15



SOPHOMOREIS.




7'oppoup Mattie Pullig iPrfeidentl.Ge.ala bli, L.ui-. IKiitir Miduk Miss Piedalue (Class AdiiMir Al^x.Lunzer, MiliriM Morgan,
Bottom Lillian Colberg, Leo Ebcrcnz, Elsie Johnson. (Not shown Gladys Ford and John Leaeh.)



i6



THE CARIBBEAN.



SOPHOMORE MUSIC.



Mdttie Piil/ig,



The following program of musical numbers was
rendered with much feeling by the members of
the class of '23 of Cristobal High School:

"Wandering" Gerald Bliss

"Tired of Me" Edward May

"Down by the Ohio, I've Got the Sweetest

Little O Mv O!" Ernst Euphrat

"Tell Me Why" Leo Eberenz

"I Love the Ladies". , Alex. Linczer

"Oh, Mother, Lm Wild" AlQuinto



"Drifting" Lillian Colberg

"Bright Eyes" Elsie Johnson

"Freckles" Esther W'itt

"Oh!" Mildred Morgan

"You'd be Surprised!" Jessie Weir

"Vamp" Louise Hcnter

"El Capitan" Georgie Pepper

"When You Get What You Want You

Don't Want It Any More" Catherine Pepper

"O, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning". .Mattie PuUig



THE FRESHMEN.



Mabel i^i/itao, '24.



There is not the slightest doubt, in the minds of
the Freshmen at least, that this class has far ex-
ceeded any first-year class of the preceding years.

There have been several interesting exhibits of
classroom work. The members ot the Ancient
History class took, part in an Olympian Council,
which not only displayed their knowledge ot the
ancient peoples and their customs, but brought to
light some very good dramatic ability.

This same ability was shown to be even more
extensive, when the members ot the Freshman
English class gave several very interesting
original monologues and dialogues, in costume.

In athletics, the Freshmen have no reason to be
ashamed of their recoril. Two ot our girls,



Edna Campbell and (jlad>'s Lowande,scoredman}-
points for Cristobal in the track meet held at
Balboa, and have distinguished themselves on
the basketball, baseball, and bowling teams.

Besides doing their share in the two big social
events of the year, the carnival and the dance, the
Freshmen gave a class picnic at Fort Sherman,
inviting the teachers. After a delightful day spent
in bathing, exploring the neighboring jungle,
singing, and playing games, we came home,
sunburneti but happy.

In fact, in every line of school activities and
interests, the Freshmen have done their part and
have been willing to do more.




GatUQ Hydroelectric Station.



THE CARIBBEAN.



17



Fresh ies




Lefl 5'outis. Edna Campbell. Slicll)y Whiti.-. In-iic MfC.jurt. HurolJ BoyJ. MuIkI Quinto (Class Pruiident 1 Tom lJM.?r. Edward Miller. Gladys l.owaiide. c.u.or?c Ball.
Middle. Mildred Gill. Lloyd Peterson. Ethel Sonnemann. Kenneth Parker. Thelma \'au2han, Paul Kuhn. Inza Markham. Maurice O'Connell. Jane Hall. Right.
Olga Mendes, Oswald Mendts. Eunice Mendes. Richard Hal], Anna Colberg, Claude Strobridgc. Loretta Rush, John Morton, Charlotte Houscl. (Not shown Ralph
Conaway, Girdon Rudd, Andrew Smith.)

MR 77375 2



i8



THE CARIBBEAN.




In order that it may not b_" said of us, the class To Mary Fields, the exclusive right to keep up

of 1921, that we passed trom this school intestate, the Senior dignity.

because we feel a certain responsibility tjendeavor To Jordan Zimmermann, the privilege of over-

to help those poor inefficient souls reach the goal coming those shy looks which he uses to deceive

which we have already attained, and because we the girls.

possess those good qualities which they most To Chester Ta>lor, the privilege of talking to

dearly wish to acquire; we, on this bleak day of Leroy without permission.

June, issue this last will and testament. To Emma Townsend, a patent giggle muffler

To the irrational Freshmen we leave the right which she may use to suppress those giggles of

of exercising the tonsorial feat of paring the hair hers,

from the dormant and noble domes of forth- To Wesley Townsend, the privilege of using



commg victmis.

To the unconscious Soph-
omores we leave our in-
defatigable perseverance
and ability in athletics.

To the Junior Class we
leave the following:

To Harold Cloke a box
for his feet in order that he
may not continue to annoy
his neighbors by putting his
feet in the aisle.







his power of narration.

To Marjorie Ball, the
privilege of looking out of the
window during the periods.

To Doris Oliver, a map to
direct her to the Fountain of
Youth which will aid her
in the fulfillment of her
wish for eternal youth.

To William Mary, our
best wishes for retaining
the good looks voted him




Officers' Quarters, Fort de Lesseps.

To George Cartwright, the right to continue in the contest.

explaining mathematics, without interruption To Charles Seeley, a lot on the Sahara desert

from his ignorant classmates. near the Sphinx.

To Paul Doyle, a pair of twelve-ounce boxing To Herbert McClain, permission to continue

gloves so that he may pursue his pugilistic in- being sarcastic.

clinations without serious injury to his unfortu- To the faculty, we leave the truthful execution

nate victims. of this will and the Cristobal High School with

To Leroy Magnuson, the San Lorenzo cliff, to all that it contains,

strengthen his bluff with Miss Hornbeak. We, having disposed of the above in regular

To Jane Edwards, a year to grow in, so that she order, this dismal month of June, 1921, now pro-
may look more dignified when she becomes a nounce it legal and valid.
Senior. (Signed) T/ie Senior Class.



THE CARIBBEAN.



19



=^




ss=



ALUMNI NOTES.

Doris Other. '22.




=feri



Although Cristdhal High School boasts only
twenty graduates in the three years of its exist-
ence, a more loyal and ambitious alumni group
can not be found.

Notwithstanding the fact that they are scat-
tered to the four corners ot our country, we have
recently received from most of them expressions
of good will and best wishes for the success of our
yearbook and our school. Most of them are at-
tending college or are working, showing the am-
bition and ability which they acquired or at least
developed in Cristobal High School.

An Alumni Association has been proposed and
the first meeting suggested for June, immediately
after Commencement. We wish that such a
meeting and organization may be realizeti and
trust that all the .Alumni will join in memory of
their years spent in Cristobal High School.

It will be of interest to all to know that:

1918.

Lula Mae Coman (ncc Pullig) is still residing
in Cristobal using to advantage her knowledge of
domestic science acquireti in Cristobal High School.

Susie Inloes Harrison has returned from college
in Maryland, and is now working in the establish-
ment of J. D. Maxwell.

Catherine Teese Waid is studying in the I'ni-
versity of California, Berkeley, Cal. Catherine
writes that she is still working hard for the Golden
Bear of that institution.

George Minot Cotton is still with us, and is
working at the Cristobal dry dock. He expects to
leave for school in the States soon.

Leland Bourke Welsh is studying in the Colo-
rado School of Mines.

Mary Elizabeth \'erner is studying in the Uni-
versity of North Carolina. She writes that college
is simply great and that no one should miss a
chance to go.

1919.

.Alice Arlene Ball is a sophomore in Simmons
College, Boston, Mass. She is taking a secretarial



course anti is expected to return in June for a
vacation.

.Anna DorothyMontanye(t'V Weir) has recently
entered the realms of matrimon>', and is residing
in Gatun, C. Z.

James Gerard Raymond is at present working
at the Cristobal docks, but expects to return next
year to complete his course at Columbia Uni-
versity, New York.

Kenneth Maurice Edwards has been studying
as an apprentice electrician, and is fast climbing
the ladder to success.



1920.



John B. Fields, Jr., is studying mechanical
engineering in Rice Institute, Houston, Tex.
He writes that he is returning in June for a va-
cation to be spent with his parents at Fort De
Lesseps.

Katherine Burgoon became Mrs. Stewart on
May 8. She now lives in Pedro Miguel.

Lindale Davies is taking a course in dental sur-
gery at Tufts College, Boston, Mass.

Lillian Cotton is a clerk at the Cristobal coaling
station. She is leaving shortly for the States ami
upon her return will be marrietl to Mr. Robert
\'an Wagner.

Etha Bevington expects to move to California
soon. We all wish her good luck in her new home.

Albert Doyle is in a preparatory school, and
expects to enter the Naval Academy at Annapolis
in September.

.Alice Stilson is residing with her parents in
Colon.

Alson W. Searsand Harlan Holmwood are study-
ing in the I'niversity of California, Cal., where
several of our graduates have gone.

Kenneth Greene is teaching school in Brookville,
Pa. He writes that his father is going to buy a
farm and he will then transfer from school teach-
ing to farming.



70



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE GHOST OF THE "BERKSHIRE."

Georgie Fepper, '23.



It was during the last of March, I believe, that
the steamship Berkshire left San P'rancisco tor
Manila, at which port she was due in about tour
weeks. She had been built originally as a freight
and passenger boat, but, as no regular passengers
had been booked for this trip, the owners had
allowed the wife and tour-year old son of the cap-
tain, the wife and two chikircn ot the engineer,
and the wives of various other members of the
ship's crew to go along. A bit irregular it was, as
the shipp'ng cfTicer admitted, but it would do no
harm to the pocket-books ot the owners, and a
little indulgence now and then only strengthened
the loyalty to the ctmpany tor which its em-
ployees were noted. .Also, it was a fine chance
tor the wcmen to enjoy a trip with their husbands
and to see a bit of the world.

As I remarked before, the Berkshire sailed dur-
ing the last part of March with a thirty-day voy-
age before her and prospects of exceptionally fine
weather during the whole trip. But the day on
which she was due in Manila arrived, and passed,
and seven more besides, and still the Berkshire
failed to put in an appearance. When the second
week passed and they had heard nothing from her,
the authorities started a thorough investigation.
They cabled to every port where she might have
stopped, but received no news of her. Then,
thinking that she might have been caught in a
storm and foundered, they sent a committee to
look over the weather reports for the past two
months, but to their surprise, there had been no
stormsot any kind; and to their certain knowledge,



there were neither islands, reefs,rocks, hidden banks
nor any menace of that kind on the Berkshire's
route. She had been overhauled by experts be-
fore she had left 'Erisco, so that any danger
from poor machinery or insutficient fuel was out
of the question. Then, why hadn't she put in an
appearance? But to that there was no answer.
Tracers were put on her and reports came in
daily. She had b^en seen by this boat at such
and such a place. She had been seen by that
boat at another place hundreds of miles further
west, and each one reported her as seeming in
fairly good condition and apparently steaming
on at her usual speed. A glance over the wireless
records of ships passing through the same vicinity
as the Berkshire showed no S. O. S. calls from her
and so, having exhausted every possible source,
the investigation ended with only these facts for
an explanation of her disappearance: She had
left San Francisco in perfect condition for a long
ocean trip; she had sent out no S. O. S. calls;
she had neither run ashore nor been foundered in
a storm; and she had been last seen considerably
farther than halfway across the Paciiic. Now,
where was the Berkshif-e ?

.About two months later a wireless was sent in
by H. M. S. S. Lancaster stating that she had
sighted thtt Berkshire, coming straight toward her,
full speed ahead, that she had changed her course
in an effort to avoid being run down, and that
the Berkshire had also changed her course in an
attempt to ram the other boat, but had failed,
having missed the Lancaster by about ten feet.



THE CARIBBEAN.



21



Furthermore, it had been a deliberate attempt,
and not an accident, as the captain of the Lan-
caster, an intimate friend of the commander ot
the Bt'>-ks/iir,\ had tried to beheve, because the
bells signaling the quartermaster of the Berks hnf
to change his course had been distinctly heard by
passengers aboard the Lancaster. Then, nearly a
week, later, the same thing happened again, this
time to the U. S. A. T. Thomas, whose commander
tried hard to hush it up as much as possible,
because he had also been an old friend of Captain
Winters of the B^ry^j-^/rf. And then the wireless
telegrams began to come in thick and tast. The
Berks/lire, judging by these, was darting over the
Pacific with the rapidity of a ray of light. One
night she would try to ram a boat in the southern
Pacific, the next she wouldappearofftheHawaiian
Islands, then again she would appear in Bering
Strait, or down near Australia. By some curious
coincidence she was at first seen only by ships
whose commanders had known Winters for some
time, but after about a month of this, strangers
would wire for help, excitedly vowing that they
were being attacked by the Berkshire. This kept
on until no boat was safe from the strange steamer
which would come sailing up apparently from
nowhere at any minute and attack the first boat
in sight. Eventually destroyers had to be ordered
out to look for her in order to relieve the sea ot
such a menace. There were only two explanation ;
of her case: either Captain Winters had suddenly
become insane or else the entire crew had turned
pirate. Until the boat was caught, the Pacific was
dangerous for any boat to cross.

Then one day the steamship H'aterwitch, sailing
along past the portion of the Pacific in which the
Berkshire most frequently appeared, made a sad
discovery. A large lifeboat, apparently containing
a number of people, was found drifting aimlessly
about on the surface of the water. It was taken
aboard by the U'aterwitch and was found to con-
tain the bodies of a small group of women and
children evidently starved to death. On the bow
of the boat were the words "S. S. Berkshire."
Lying face down on the floor of the boat was a
water-soaked diary marked with the name of
Molly Winters, wife of the captain oitheBerkshire.
The bodies, which were little more than skele-
tons covered over with skin, were taken out ot their
dismal coffin and placed between decks until the



next dav when they would be given a decent burial
That night the captain of the ITaterivitch asked
the passengers to remain in the saloon after dinner
if thev wished to hear a remarkable story and its
still more remarkable ending. Needless to state,
they all remained. When everyone was quiet, the
captain rose and began t.i talk quietly.

"Doubtless you have all heard of the disappear-
ance of the ste^msyi\\> Berkshire nearly two months
ago," he said, "at a time when every detail of
weather was as perfect as could have been expected
to insure a peaceful voyage, and of her subsequent
appearances in various parts of the Pacific. Also,
most of you saw the pitiful boat which was taken
on board the Waterwitch this afternoon. In that
boat was all that is left of the Berkshire. With
your permission I shall tell you a story which
clears my friend Winters of any attempt at piracy.
The complete explanation of the disappearance
l.^{theBerkshire was found in Molly Winters' diary
on the floor of the lifeboat.

"As you all know, there were on board the
Berkshire, besides the crew, the wives and mem-
bers of the families of some of the crew. These
women were all enjoying the trip immensely, no
one had been seasick, and they all were eager for
the boat to reach Manila. So the first part of the
vovage was passed.

"And then, one morning they awoke to find a
thing happening which probably has never hap-
pened before in all the history of the world. It
bafHed the keenest minds on board. The metal
parts of the ship were undeniably growing soft.
Indeed, the men could gouge pieces out of the
iron deck plates with their fingers. The engineer
was the first to discover it when he picked up an
iron bolt and felt it give in to the pressure of his
fingers, just as if it were butter. The boilers were
so soft that holes could have been punched in them
with files if it hadn't been for the fact that the files
were also as soft as cheese. All over the boat the
situation was the same. It became more and
more dangerous every minute. By noon the
wood was beginning to rot, while the ropes
dropped to pieces and broke into dust as they
touched the deck, which by now registered every
footprint that had been made on it.

"By mid-afternoon it became plain that a
mysterious light ray of some kind was playing on
the ship. It was doubtless attracted by some



22



THE CARIBBEAN.



peculiar quality in the metal on board, as that had
been attacked first, and, even it it could have been
escaped now, the boat hail been aireatly ruined
and was helpless.

"Captain Winters had tounii that there was a
small boat fastened to the stern of the Berkshire'
which had not only escaped the light ray, but was
large enough to hold the women anil children who
were aboard. These were called together and
summarily placed m the boat. The last to go was
the captain's wife, who objected strenuously to
leaving her husband, just as she was finally
persuadeel to climb down the rope and indeetl
was starting, the rope broke and let her fall into
the water trom which she was rescued with
difficulty by the other women. But the mischief
was done. All means of communication between
the two boats, except by voice or sight was cut off,
and the two speeilily drifted so far apart that it
was impossible to thrijw food or water casks into
the smaller boat from the larger.

"You may imagine the horror of the women,
a few minutes later, when they saw the Berkshire
collapse before their eyes, and become nothing
but a loathsome scum upon the water. Not a
man cleared the wreckage'. In fact there was
nothing to indicate that there was a man under
the wreckage.

"They drifted for days and finally began, one
by one, to give up hope of rescue. Then one night
they heard the welcome sound of engines throb-
bing near them and, behold, there was a tall ship
approaching them. Nearer she came aiul nearer,
until thev suddenlv awoke to the fact that it was



the Berkshire, steady and true again and steaming
straight toward them. On she came, nearer the
little boat with every beat of her engines, until in
a few moments she must needs pass over them or
do some remarkable turning. Mrs. Winters per-
ceived the tlanger first and screamed aloud to the
crew to take care lest they run the little boat down.
But there was no sound to indicate that the crew
had heard, for th; huge boat cam; on as swiftly
as before. At the last moment the frightened
women hid their eyes that they might not see
the boat, as she passed over the frail cockleshell
in which they crouched. But the minutes passed
and still there was no sound save that of the en-
gines of the Berkshire. And when they dared to
look up again, the stern of tl e Berkshire was just
clearing the small boat. The steamship had gone
completely over them without lea\'ing a trace!

".After that they gave up hope completely, and
in less than four days the last pitifully thin sur-
vivor was dead."

Here the captain stopped, turned abruptly and
left the room. The passengers remained a while
talking over the strange story of the Berkshire,
but no one could offer any explanation of the
mysterious fate of the boat.

.After the bodies of the women and children had
been buried in the sea, the captain sent the entire
story in by wireless to the authorities in San
Francisco where it was received with much sur-
prise and, I am sorry to say, incredulity. But
from that day tj this there has been no explana-
tion of the light ray that wrecked the Berkshire,
nor has the phantom ship ever appeared again.



THOUGHTS OF A FRESHMAN.

Mi/Jre.i G.ll, --./



The .Soiihoniores :ill hui^h :it us,
.Ami toss their he ids an J say,

"L'?t's hope the little innocents

Will have more sense some dav.'



The Seniors are so studious.

They wouldn't care, I know,
It we, by some mistake, should find
Ourselves in Jericho.



The Juniors eye us haughtily,

With no.ses in the air
They try to make us humble

With a proud, disdainful stare.



But never mind those years when we

Are Sophomores, and all,
We'll take our chance to have our fling;

We'll show those Kreshies small.



THE CARIBBEAN.



23



m-




THE MYSTERY OF LA MONTANA.



Marjon'e Ball. '22.




=



'J

The day was hot and oppressive and a sort of
foreboding stillness hung over the spot, broken
only by the crackling of a twig or the hoarse
cough of some jungle creature far in the distance;
not a breath of wind was stirring and dark clouds
hung low over the mountain top.

Fascinated by the spot, I was oblivious of the
foreboding storm. I pictured Morgan's raiders,
as they crept up the trail with their flashing knives
and greedy, cruel faces. I seemed to see the old
miser struggling with them, his withered face piti-
fully distorted with fear and terror.

A sudden sharp crack of thunder broke the still-
ness. I started to my feet, realizing that the
storm was upon me. The clearing was already
darkening in the short tropical twilight, and I
knew that I could never find my way down the
trail until after the storm. So, finding shelter in
the thicket, I prepared to wait until it was over.
It was terrible! Vivid flashes of lightning were
followed by crashes of thunder that seemed loud
enough to wake the dead. Loud enough to wake
the dead! Do the dead ever wake? I shuddered.

The next flash of lightning illumined the whole
place with a ghastly greenish light. In that in-
stant, I saw a sight which curdled my blood with
horror. Standing at the end of the trail were
three men with red sashes and gleaming knives
and, struggling in their grasp, was an old man,
brown anti withered with age.

One startling second and the flash was over.
-A deafening crash of thunder seemed to crack the
very mountain top. Then silence. From the end
of the trail came a weird unearthly wail. I flung
myself from the thicket and raced madly down
the mountain side, stumbling over twisted vines
and fallen trees.

What had I seen? Was it my imagination and
the scraping and groaning of the branches in the
wind? Could it have been that I had fallen asleep?
Or had the pirates really come back? I do not
know, but to this day, the memory of that night
makes mv blood run coki.



On the island of Taboga, looming high behind
the little village, stands what the natives call
"La Montafia". ."^t the top of this jungle-covered
hill, half hidden by the luxuriant undergrowth,
are three crosses marking the lonely graves of
three of Morgan's men.

The path up the mountain is little more than a
rocky trail, steep and narrow, making it very dif-
ficult for climbing. It winds in and out through
heavv jungle growth and around old fallen tree
trunks half buried under thick vegetation.

Late in the afternoon I climbed the trail and
stopped to rest in a little clearing of the jungle.
This was walled in by a dense tangle of rank trop-
ical growth, and roofed by the intertwining of
leafy branches. Festoons of Spanish moss hung
like gray veils from decayed branches of old man-
go trees and, from the dense shadows of the jungle,
there shone forth an occasional waxen blossom of
the Lady of the Night orchid. Here and there a
blood-red passion flower flamed along the trail and
the sensitive leaves of the mimosa shrunk at my
step. In the middle of the clearing stood the
three rude crosses, the center one about three fe;t
in height and the others a trifle shorter. I had
been told by a native that the tallest cross marked
the grave of a "Gran Jefe," that is, a big chief,
and that the others marked the graves of his men.

Long ago at the end of the trail, so goes the
tale, there had lived a miserly old Spaniard,
hoarding countless treasures of gold and jewels,
buried deep beneath the dirt floor of his thatched-
roof hut. The three pirates had learned of him and
his priceless treasure in the village and, in the
dead of night, during a terrible storm, had dragged
him from his hut and murderetl him. Then, crazed
with greed for the gold, they had fought among
themselves until all had been killed. Natives had
buried them, later on, at the place of the murder.
The spot has since been religiously avoided by
the natives, who firmly believe that on stormy
nights the scream of the murdered man echoes
through the jungle. It was a gruesome story, and
I shuddered to think that this was the very scene
of that dark and bloody struggle.



24



THE CARIBBEAN.



s=




A TRIP THROUGH THE PANAMA CANAL.

IViU'uun Man, '22.




As the S. S. Olockson lay at Pier ", Cristcihal, prohahly after insects or being chased by a larger

ready to leave, the harsh voice of the captain fish. Overheaii a lone buzzard floated lazily,

could be heard calling to the men on the dock while pale blue cranes silently skimmed along the

to cast ofl^ the bow and stern lines, and in a few water.

minutes we were slowly moving toward the en- Branching from the Canal like a little tributary

trance of the Panama Canal. la-^- the old French Canal, its calm waters un-



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Upper Acpr otch Wall



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Upon entering the narrow channel of the Canal
I could see tall grass growing tlown into the water
and miles ot tropical jungle along its banks.
On the banks lay large crocodiles basking in the
early morning sun evidently content with the
world. A sudden splash, breaking the tropical
stillness and followed by many more, told me that
some of the inhabitants of the lazy waters of the
Canal were jumping in and out of the water,



ruffled, except for the occasional dip of the paddle
of a nati\'e, lazily drifting along in his slim cayuco.
Along its banks, half hidden by the luxuriant
foliage, lay pieces of rusting machinery, pathetic
reminders of the fadure of the French.

I was aroused from my contemplations of the
beautiful tropical scenery by the voice of some
one calling my attention to the Gatun Locks
which rose in the distance like great stairs toGatun



THE CARIBBEAN.



25



Lake. As we neared the approach wall, I noticed The pilot on hoard yelled to the operators to let

small electric locomotives which would help pull go of the aft lines, and soon we were steaming

the ship through the locks. into Gatun Lake. The lake lay smooth and clear,

With a thud a small leather sack full of lead hit reflecting the white c'ouds which lazily floated

the deck; this was attached by a small rope to a across the blue skN'.

large steel cable which was on a coil fastened to Beyonil a turn in the lake, marked off by red

one of the locomotives. After the men pulled the spar buo>s, lay the dead jungle, a forest of stark

cable on board and fastened it to the large iron gray trees rearing from the bosom of the lake

cleats, the locomotive proceeded to pull the ship their leafless boughs like gaunt arms. On one

along until three other locomotives took us in tree were orchids, whose gay colored flowers made

tow, two forward and two aft. a striking contrast against the gray branches.



The gates
being open-
' ed, the ship
entered the
first cham-
ber until it
reached the
middle. The
gates then
closed slow-
ly after us,
and sudilen-
ly from the
bottom of
the chamber
came a thun-
dering noise.
L o o k i n g
down I saw
the water be-
ing swirled
a bou t like
a miniature
maelstrom.
Inch by inch
the ship was
raised, until
a bell clang-
ed from one















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(lATLN Lucks, showing the TiiREE T.VIN CHAMBERS, WITH GaTIN LaSE IN THE DISTANCE So FEET ABOVE

SEA LEVEL.

These loeks are 1-15 miles lone, anfl within their walls are housed most of the intricate and wonderful
maehinery which opens and closes the gates and controls the water intakes and outlets which raise or lower
the water in each of its thre? l,0)3-f int twin c'lamb?-s.



As we

reached a
slight bend
in the Canal,
I got my first
glimpse of
G a i 1 1 a r d
Cut. On
both sides of
the Canal at
the bend
were two
small con-
crete light-
houses, the
lights of
which were
used as range
lights at
night. Slow-
ly passing
through the
Cut, we
could see on
one side the
sleepy little
town of
Culebra in
striking con-
trast to the



of the locomotives, and the ship proceeded into bustling Culebra of construction days.

the second chamber. .After the same pro- On both sides of the Canal lay rolling hills,

ceedings, we entered the third and last chamber on the sides of which rose small concrete sheds

of the locks. .After the ship was raised to the used during the construction days for the purpose

level of Gatun Lake, a beautiful scene lay before of storing dynamite. Now they are veritable

us. On one side of the locks lay a large grassy pictures of desolation and decay, covered with



field like a green velvet carpet. This is the Gatun
golf course (the most expensive golf course in the
world, for it is located on Gatun dam). Far
beyond this stretch of green, rose hazy purple



moss, and topped by verdant foliage of some
jungle tree which has sprung up inside and pushed
through the sagging roof.

In the distance, coming fast toward us, was a



mountains, the tops hidden by snowy clouds, small white motor launch, its brass trimmings



26



THE CARIBBEAN.



shining in the tropical sun. We gaily exchanged
greetings with its passengers as we passed.

.'\t this juncture we were called to lunch, after
which we explored the mysteries ot the engine
room. Later we took pictures of the Cut, and
enjoyed an interesting talk with the captain and
first mate, who told us many thrilling sea stories.

-At the entrance of the Cut proper stood Gold
Hill and Contractor's Hill, great threatening
masses Icoming like Scylla and Charybdis of old,
on either side of the ships which threatl the Canal.
On the canal sicfe ot Contractor's Hill were large
hydraulic graders which were used to lower the
hills and prevent slides.

Slowly passing out ot (laillard Cut, we cou'd
see Pedro M gusl Lock, anil farther on, the Mira-
flores Locks, the two separated by MiraHores
Lake. At this part ot the Canal, sturdy little tugs
were tied up reatiy to tow through the Canal any
disabled ship. Tied up a'ongside the bank were
two large cranes, the .ijax and Hercules, their
mighty steel arms towering toward the sky.

As we entered Pedro Miguel Lock, we saw in
the chamber opposite one ot I'ncle Sam's de-
stroyers sending up from its funnels clouds of



blue smoke. Orders were being given with the
rapidity of a machine gun and obeyed as quickly.
Then we were lowered one step into Miraflores
Lake; from here we could see low rolling hills
dotted with grazing cattle.

Coming close to the spillway, we could see its
massive steel gates which were holding back the
waters of Miraflores Lake. After passing the
spillway, we entered the Miraflores Locks and
were slovly lowered two steps into the sea level
part of the Canal. From this point, we could see
the red tiled roofs of Fort Clayton and above them
Old (ilory flying prouilly in the breeze.

In the distance rose .Ancon Hill, dotted with
the homes of Canal employees, and, nestled at its
foot, lay Balboa. Ahead of us in the Canal was a
large suction dredge keeping the Canal clear of the
dangerous sand All. After passing a turn in the
Canal, we could see the long cement docks where
boats of many lands were receiving and discharg-
ing cargo. Soon we were tied up to the dock and,
after saving farewell to my friends aboard, I left
the ship greatly impressed by the wonder of
this remarkable engineering feat wh'.ch has divided
two great continents.




THE CARIBBEAN.



27




s






3 nj



S It









28



THE CARIBBEAN.



=K




WEE- WEE GENTLEMAN.

Mildred Gill. '24.




He was only a little "mite of the night," with sheltered roof garden to see if everyone was safe

large brown eyes that could see in the dark, and Though he had absolutely no way of defending

thick brown fur, with a yellow breast, but he had himself, there was never a more courageous little

all the qualities essential to a gentleman. Though thing than my Wee-Wee, as the following short

he was little larger than the marmosets, his nature narrative will prove:

was as different from theirs as can be imagined. The young son ot

From the time that



"Wee-Wee" was a tin>'
baby, weighing exactly
four ounces, he showed cer-
tain inborn traits.

He never, iii'vcr cried
when he was injured, antl
one time when his finger
was caught in a steel
satchel, he only jumped
up and down and made
faces, but not a sound tlul
he make; but when one
of his family went to
Colombia for two weeks, he
had no heart for play, and
cried himseU sick.

He was a sympathetic
little soul, and let any-
one in his tamil\- he
thought we all belongetl
to him let anyone be
sick, and Wee-Wee would
steal tidbits from the
kitchen and carry them




the family had been given
a toy snake and, like most
little boys, left it on the
floor when he had finished
playing with it. Wee-
Wee's sharp eyes discover-
ed it there, and he com-
menced to bark like a dog,
a sure sign that some-
thing was wrong. (We
found later that he had an
instinctive fear of snakes,
though he hail left the
jungle before he was a
month old, and had never
seen a snake since he
had been with us.) But
did he run away? Not
^^ee-Wee! He circled
round that snake, never
crossing its head, until we
took it away. Ever after-
wards, if we wanted
\\'ee-Wee to stay away,
we displayed the snake.



Mostly .Sot-hinmr

through the house until he reached the room of the
chance invalid, when he would drop them on the
betl and bounce up and tlown like a rubber ball,
with sheer pride.

If it rained and he hated water he would



Little Wee-Wee died a few months ago, after
living for two years, during which he was as happy
a little animal as could be found, but his family
have lost a loving little friend and playfellow.
He has done his duty here, however, for he has
rush all over the house, and even across the un- opened to them the whole world of dumb animals.



THE CARIBBEAN.



29



SONNET 4^
EN lOR "^^ -^



WASHINGTON SWIMMING POOL



Frank Raymond.



MOTHER.

Kirby Ferguson.

The sweetest word of all the English tongue

And always given to one who's loved and cared

Not only for the child no longer young

And gay, but also for the one whose share

In life is highly praised and widely sung

This word oi mother s said in such an air

As fills one's heart with joy as sweet shrub 'niong

Crepe myrtle fills the place with fragrance rare.

She's loved us best, she's sacrificed the most;

And, though to others we may seem to fail.

She always has a word in which to boast

The child who through the course of lite must sail.

But after all, for thanks she'd love this best

To have us cnme and say "I've done my best."



SAN LORENZO.

Cart Duey.

The ruined San Lorenzo stands on guard

High on a cliff by famous Chagres' mouth

Her ramparts all by time and powde;- maired.

Her rusted cannon and their balls to rout

Are put by verdant jungle, never birred

Since Morj;an'smen last charged with battle shout.

And took the Spanish soldiers fighting hard

To keep the plund'ring English pirates out.



A




j^^gM




S





A Ruin.

This ransacked fort now slumb'ring peacetull
Beneath the tropic sky, awakes in me
.^wed pity for the trick that fate has shown.
'Tis like a dog that's served so faithfully,
.And now, because it is too old to be
Of further use, unnoticed lies alone.



Each day 'tis filled with water from the bay

This pool, in which is sought sweet joy divme

By representatives from every clime

Who come in ships from every port, and stay

For weeks enchanted by its tropic sway.

There wee folk, old folk, young folk in their prime




Swimminji Pool Slide.

Do bask and play from morn till evening time

Forgetful of the sun's reflected rav.

The tourists, passing through the Zone, are sure

To visit it though time be very short,

.\nd e'en our President di.l to its lure

Resviond, and found it best of any sport.

in its profundities we all may find

Good health, good sport, and peacetulness of mind.



TROPIC TWILIGHT.

Eleanor Zimmerynann.

'Tis evening when the sun sinks in the west,
.And children playing happy all day long
Will be in peaceful slumber land ere long,
.'^nd little twittering birds will go to rest.
The sky which late in sober colors dressed
Now dons such gorgeous hues as must belong
To the paint box of a giant, huge and strong
Methinks a master artist at his best.
Soon the two sunsets in the sky and sea.
The latter now more beautiful and bright.
Must gradually fade away from me
Into the splendor of the Lethean night.
But all these beauties are to me no loss.
For I'm wi th darkness and the Sou thern Cross.



3



THE CARIBBEAN.



MY HOME TOWN.

Chiir'es Hentet\ 'Jr.

As I do sit and think of days gone liy.

Of places I have seen in long past time,

I always dream ot that old town of mine

Where all my bo)'hood re:olIections lie.

As these old memories come before the eye

They slowly form a picture crystalline

In clearness fit for memory's inmost shrine

A picture which brings forth both smile and

sigh.
There stands the town. It looks across the

lake
The lake where many hipp\' days I spent;
The locks through which great ships their way

still take,
The spillway, dear to those on fishing bent
These pleasant scenes to all make their appeal;
Then how much more must I their beautv feel.




GataD Students.



THE ETERNAL STARS.



Mildred Slajford.




Hotel Washingtun. .Swept by OceaTi Breezes.

THE WAVES.

.iUce Hunter.



The twilight seems to come to me unknown.

And tiny stars begin to come to view;

They shine like diamonds 'gainst the sky so blue;

.And then the wan, white, moon of tropic zone

Comes creeping out from clouds by soft winds blown

.Across a sky that's now of darker hue,

And filled with stars which were at first so few,

Whose radiance lights the earth now quiet grown.

The brighest shines out Venus evening star.

Which casts a shadow with its yellow light;

Huge Betelgeuse it doth outshine by far,

.And even the Southern Cross, that symbol bright.

But all this beauty comes not first to me

The men who shaped the Sphinx the same did see.



I sit upon the old wall by the sea

.And count the tiny wavelets near the shore;

Then farther out the larger waves I see;

Continuously toward me their wealth they pour.

They seem like captives longing to be free,

And beat and tear the rocks with sullen roar;

I wonder, as they all roll in toward me,

Where they will go and where they've been before.

.At evening still you'll find me sitting there;

The winds have died and distant waves grown calm,

.\ luring call they seem to bear to me

From far-off lands; they sing to me a psalm

Of dreams; I feel a longing and desire

To travel with the waves until I tire.




Christ Church, Colon.



THE CARIBBEAN.



31



m=



=s




A HERO UNAWARES.

Pan/ Doyle, 'j2.




"S



Dan Johnston, oliser\er in tht U. S. .Ann>'
.Aviation Corps, France Field, C. Z., sat on the
balcony of the Strangers' Club looking out over
Linion Bay. \ beautiful scene lay before him.
Through the entrance of the brea'^Lwater a state-
ly ship of the Great White Fleet glided slowly into
the bay. .A San Bias cayuco, its white sails silhou-
etted against the jungle-covered hills on the oppo-
site bank, scarcely seemed to move so calm it was.

As Dan contemplated this peaceful scene, he
fo-ind it hard to realize that beyond this same tran-
quil ocean there were the scream of shell ami the
thunder of cannon.

He was aroused from his reverie by a resounding
slap on the back and, on turning, saw Bill Price,
a man he had met the preceding year at an air-
plane factory in College Point, New York.

"What luck to find you here, old chap!"

"Well, Bill Price," greeted Dan, enthusiasticalh-
grasping his hand, "Em surely glad to see you;
but what in the world are you doing here?"

The question was ignored, for Bill's eyes were
on the drawn face of his friend.

"I heard you had an accident, Dan; tell me
about it, will you?" he asked.

"It's all like a nightmare to me now," sighed
the young observer. "Several of us fellows were
assigned to our respective planes to welcome a part of
theAtlanticFleetlastmonth. I'masoloist and

"A soloist," broke in Dan's friend, "What's
singing got to do with aviation ?"

"Ha-ha!" laughed Dan, "You don't under-
stand; 'Solo' is derived from the Spanish; it
means 'alone' in other words, I had to fly un-
accompanied. I arrived at the hangar of the sea-
planes on the appointed morning, highly elated
over the prospect of meeting the fleet. Already
planes were out on the runway 'gassing up';
snappy commands and directions could be heard
above the humof the motors that werewarmingup.

"I jumped into my plane; it was put into the
water. I headed it into the wind and gave it the
'gun'. The warmed motor changed its gentle
hum to a clamorous roar, as the plane increased in
speed and gracefully skimmed the surface of the



deep blue waters, leaving in its wake showers of
white spray. I nosed it up several times, but
it refused to 'take off.' I was going to 'cut the
gun,' but to my relief it finally left the water.

"I passed close to the Hotel Washington sight-
seeing station. Imagine my sin-prise when, as I
turned to wave to the sightseers there, I saw a
passenger in the rear cockpit. I was speechless.
The plane was hard to handle, due to overbalance
of my passenger and sand, but I fell in line follow-
ing a flying boat, wondering who my strange
shipmate was. The boat started down for a
zoom; I nosed my seaplane down also to avoid
hitting the leader, for I was entirely too close to
him. I had more speed than his boat and was
coming nearer. Now I was but a few feet away.
I could not turn. I was too low. We hit.

"The flying boat, after being hit on its tail, shot
upward and lost speed until it reached its height,
then fell clumsily on its back like an ugly giant
bat, making a splash that rose into the air a
hundred feet. The seaplane took a great sweep
vertically upward, but its heavy nose slowly pulled
the widespread wings around the pivoted tail;
the plane turned with all the grace of a seagull,
but fell to the water in a crumpled heap.

"When I came to, I was in the Colon Hospital,
badly shaken up, but uninjured. The rest of the
story was told to me by my mechanic, who had
witnessed the disaster from the water's edge.

"My passenger was killed. He was that in-
spector of planes who was so critical of our work
at College Point factory. You remember him."

Bill's face, far from showing regret, was radiant.
"Old Boy; you've done your country a good
turn in ridding it of this fellow. I wns sent here
to follow this same man; I'm in the Intelligence
Department now. He condemned so much of our
work that our suspicions were aroused and we
detailed another inspector to examine his rejec-
tions. He in turn became suspicious and dis-
appeared. We then discovered him to be a spy
in the employ of the German Government.
Why, when my report is made public, you'll be
hailed as a hero."



32



THE CARIBBEAN.



m-




^



THE EYES OF A LADY.

Est/ier If^il/, 'i'j.




=m



His college days were over. Dan Howard was
just beginning to realize the full significance of
this. It not only meant that he must go out into
the world and fend for himself, but that he would
be parted from Jean Davis. During the last tew
weeks they had been thrown together a great deal
in the rehearsals of the Senior play, Shakespeare's
"As You Like It." She had been Rosalind and
he, Orlando, and it was during those weeks of
constant companionship that she had come to
mean so much to him.

"Just because a fellow hasn't as much money
as the next one, it doesn't mean that he isn't
worth as much," he reflected bitteHv. "It's nil
money, money, and money, and
no amount of strength or courage
seems to count. Ot course I
haven't asked her yet, but how
can I when I have nothing to
offer her? Oh, if I only had a
chance; but I'll use what I have,
and be thankful for health and
strength.

"I'll work, and when I've
feathered my nest I'll

The rest was left unsaid, but as
a result of this determination Dan
fountl himself a week later on
board a southbound steamer,
going not even his best friend
knew where.

.All through the summer after graduation Jean
watched daily for some message from Dan
but none came. No one seemed to know what
had become of him; it was as if the earth had
opened up and swallowed him. .At first she
would not acknowledge even to herself that she
cared for Dan, but as time wore on and no news
came, she awoke to the realization that she i^iii
care, and cared very much. In an effort to
forget him she plunged mailly into the winter
festivities of the little middle west town where she
had lived since childhood. -At all the parties,
sleigh rides, and good times of the season, she was



Nature's



the gayest of the gay, and not even her best friend
knew that her gaiety was feigned. So it was that
when a letter came from an aunt in Panama,
inviting Jean to spend several months with her,
she gladly accepted, thinking that perhaps new
scenes and experiences would help her to forget
Dan.

Jean was wandering along the beach at Fort
San Lorenzo, a crumbling mass of vine-covered
ruins at the mouth of the Chagres River, Panama.
She had come with a party of young people to
spend the day there, and the peaceful beauty of the
place had strangely calmed her. She had picked
h-^r wnv around the base of a cliff that she might
watch the sunset alone, and,
seated upon a rock, she gave her-
self up to the enjoyment of the
scene before her.

All was still. Even Natiu-e
seemed to be holding her breath,
awedby the wonderof itall. The
c]uiet sea reflected the soft rosy
tints of the sky, and the sun, a
fiery, blood-red ball, sank slowly
out of sight below the horizon,
leaving only "the flowerpot,"
silhouetted against the west.
Jean sprang to her feet with a
start. In watching the sunsetshe
""^'""- had forgotten time, and to her

dismay when she reached the cliff, she found
that the tide had risen and she could not get
past. But Jean was a practical sort of girl, and
when she found that she could not return the
way she had come, she decided to find another.

.After a few minutes' search she discovered a
trail leading into the jungle, and she started down
it, supposing, of course, that it led around the
cliff. .After walking quite a long time she began
to realize that instead of nearing the beach
she seemed to be getting deeper and deeper into
the jungle. This frightened her, and she began to
retrace her steps, but although she walked until
she could scarcelv drag one foot after the other.




THE CARIBBEAN.



33



she could not find the beach. At last she was
forced to acknowledge that she was lost, in a dense
tropical jungle, alone, and with night descending
upon her. This was too much for her to stand,
and, unable to restrain herself any longer, she
threw herself on the ground and sobbed from
sheer exhaustion.

The twilight deepened. -An owl hooted from a
neighboring tree. Jean shivered, and crawled into
the dense underbrush beside the trail, where she
crouched, her ears straining for any sound of
approaching danger, and her eyes big with fright
and wet with unrestrained tears. A suspicious
rustle in the underbrush beside her; an unearthly
shriek, from far in the jungle, followed by an
awful stillness; the patter of padded feet as some
night prowler slunk past her hiding place; it
was all too much for Jean's overwrought nerves;
she sprang up and dashed wildly out into the
darkness, whither she did not know or care.
Crash! She tripped over a fallen log and lay
motionless on the ground beside it.



Dan Howard, foreman of a large lumber camp
in the Panamanian jungle, strode down the trail
toward the camp after a day's hard work prospect-
ing for valuable trees. It was already dark, he
was both tired and hungry, and he looked forward
to a good supper and a long night's rest.

Suddenly his attention was arrested by a
shadowy form slinking down the trail ahead of him.
Taking his gun from his shoulder, he placed in it
the only cartridge he had left. The shadow was
lost to view around a bend of the trail; the man
followed. What he saw made him start violently,
for before him crouched a huge jaguar just ready
to spring upon his unconscious prey, a young
girl, whom Dan recognized in the dim light of the
rising moon as Jean Davis.



He took aim and shot just in time. The sav-
age beast turned and leaped blindly at him, but
Dan sprang back in the nick of time, and the
jaguar fell heavily on the ground. But he was
up in a moment, ready to spring again. This time
Dan could not dodge, but dealt the jaguar a blow
with his hunting knife. The knife sank deep,
but the jaguar, maddened by the pain, lunged
forward again, and this time his teeth closed on
Dan's left arm. He felt the bone crunch between
the jaguar's powerful jaws and, sick with pain,
he swayed as if he would fall, but a look at the
girl for whose life he was fighting sustained him,
and he stabbed the jaguar again and again with
his free hand. At last, weak from loss of blood,
the jaguar's hold on his arm relaxed and he
rolled over with an awful groan and lay motionless.

Dan staggered to his feet, and turned to the
place where Jean had been lying, but she had
regained consciousness and was at his side in a
moment. After a few startled exclamations they
explained to each other how they happened to be
there. While they were talking, Jean's eyes fell
on Dan's arm.

"Oh, Dan!" she cried, "your arm!"

Quickly she tore a strip from her petticoat and
set about binding up the wound.

"Dan, do you remember that we did this same
thing in our play last year? Isn't it a queer
coincidence that it has become a reality? 'How
it grieves me, Orlando, to see thy heart in a
sling.'

" 'It is my arm,' Dan returned.

" 'I thought thy heart had been wounded by
the claws of a lion.'

."^nd Dan answered softly, 'Wounded it is
but with the eyes of a lady.' Do you know whose?"

.\nd the moon came out from behind the clouds
and bestowed upon them her benediction.



MR 77375-



34



THE CARIBBEAN.



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m


"WHEN WE REACH GENOA."
A TRUE STORY.

Emilio Solomon, '23.


m


^i




a



"Emilio! Here, boy; as we are nearing port,
we must ascertain the contents of the ice box.
Go down and check carefully all the provisions,
so that when we reach Genoa, we may know what
supplies we should take in. Be snappy, my boy!"
These words were addressed to me by the chief
steward of the good ship Navahoe, three days out
from Genoa.

Off I went to execute the order, turning over in
my mind the strange events of this voyage. I
was a boy of i8, very impressionable, longing as
all boys do for strange adventures. How gladly
had I seized this opportunity as cabin boy on board
the steamship Navahoe, a merchant marine bound
for Genoa. My heart, elated over the prospect
of this great adventure, had sunk, however, after
1 had seen my fellow shipmates. A veritable band
of pirates they seemed, with their sinister, seamed
faces. The refuse of society they were dregs
from the four corners of the world. I had un-
consciously incurred the displeasure of several
members of this crew since we had shipped, and
this had caused me much discomfort on the voyage.
As I entered the ice box, I saw that the lights
were turned off. On turning to ascertain the
cause, 1 imagined I heard low voices, but attribut-
ing it to my nervousness, I began to whistle a gay
tune to keep up my courage. The tune died on my
lips, however, as a rough hand closed over my arm
and a rough voice startled me with these words:
"Now, we have got you; you are the very one
we are looking for."

I felt a queer sensation come over me which I
can hardly describe, and, before I could utter a
sound, a flashlight flared in my eyes. I saw by
this that my assailant was masked. I could only
stammer, "What is it ?"

The harsh voice answered, "Young man, you
are in our hands. Be sensible; join us and you will
find it to your interest. If you don't join us well

." A grating laugh finished the sentence.

"Your life won't be worth the snapping of a
finger," another rough voice said.



Although apprehensive of danger, I became
for the moment indifferent to consequences and
boldly said, "No, I shall not be a party to any
villainy; do your worst."

.\ revolver flashed in the dim light, and the
first voice snarled, "No fooling! I mean busi-
ness."

I realized that it would do no good to resist.
My voice sounded weak and far off, "All right,
what do you want me to do?"

"That's a sensible boy," he said, now patting
the arm he had so lately gripped. Your part will
be an easy one, but you will get your share of the
spoils as a reward when we reach Genoa. We are
robbing the cargo; you are to hold the torch while
we operate. We'll lie low now for a day or so, but
will leave a note in your cabin telling you when
we want you you understand, boy ?"

I muttered "Yes," and they left me, to take
my inventory, like some dazed creature.

A. day or so later I found the dreaded note in
my cabin. Fearfully I unfolded it and the follow-
ing words blurred before my eyes:

"Emilio, recuerdese de nuestros arreglos, esta
noche entre las horas una o dos le estaremos
esperando a' la entrada de la bodega. Tenga la
bondad de cumplir con este adviso."

I was in a miserable state of mind. .All day at
work I evolved means of escape, only to come back
to the threat on the slip of paper. Finally this
thought flashed in my mind; I would go to the
captain, who had befriended me on more than
one occasion, and make a clean breast of the
whole affair.

I rushed to the captain's office, fearing 1 would
change my mind it I stopped to reflect. As I
reached the door, my heart failed me, but Provi-
dence must have been with me, tor at that mo-
ment the captain appeared. My nervousness
nearly overcame me; I made an attempt to
turn back, but the captain, on perceiving my
embarrassment, said "Come on, Emilio, what is
the matter? Have you something to say to rne?"



THE CARIBBEAN.



35



"Oh, yes! Captain," I answered, "something of
a very strange nature."

"Come into my cabin," he said.

I followed him in and took the chair to which he
motioned me. Then I began to relate my experi-
ence with the masked man. I told him that,
although I had promised to be one of this band,
my conscience would not allow me to depart from
the good teachings I had had from my mother and
teachers. I had come to the conclusion that the
best course I could pursue was to inform him of
this attempted piracy. The captain became
interested in the story as I went on, listening with
the greatest attention and anxiety. In a grave
voice, he said, "Emilio, do you mean to say, I
have such rascally cutthroats on board my ship?
I can't believe it; I can't believe it." .After
sitting, lost in thought for a tew moments, he con-
tinued, "Do you thinkyoucan identify yourman ?"

"It will be difficult. Captain, for he was
masked, as were the others whom I saw, but I
may venture a guess, as I observed his build and
his hands." That hand had held a revolver to my
face; never would that memory be erased.

"You have nothing to fear. I shall protect you.
We'll soon have these fellows. When I need you,
I shall let you know. Go quietly about your
business in the meantime."

I went back to work with the terrible load lifted
from my conscience, secure in my faith in the
captain. An hour later, as I was leaving the ice
box, whither I had gone on an errand tor the chief
steward, I stumbled against the man whom I
believed to be the masked man.

"Look at me," he said. "Do you know me?"

"Yes," I answered.

"Did you get the message?" he whispered.

I nodded my head.

"You are with us?

Again I nodded.

"Good," he said, "to-morrow at 2."

Atter dinner I was summoned to the deck.



There stood the captain and before him the crew.

"Point out your man and any one of the crew
whom you may recognize as one of this rascal
banti," he said, turning to me.

My knees trembled; I longed to flee back to the
refuge of my cabin, away from the smoldering
hate in the eyes of the men before me. I tried to
speak, but the words refused to come. Reas-
sured, however, by the captain's hand upon my
shoulder, I pointed out my friend of the revolver.
With a low snarl of rage, he made as if to lunge at
me, but was restrained by the first mate and the
steward, who led him away. -As he passed me, he
gave me a terrible look which I shall never forget,
for it burned itself upon my soul.

"F^milio," continued the captain, "can you
point out another?"

On my telling him that I could not, he dis-
missed me, saying that this fellow would do.

Immediately after supper I was summoned to
the bridge and was indeed amazed to see the num-
ber of desperate wretches cowering before the
captain.

"These men," he said, "stand condemned by
their own confession."

I said nothing, but instinctively shrank back
before the malice in their evil eyes.

"Now, Emilio," continued the captain, "I
commend you for not being susceptible to the
promises of reward held out to you by these
villains. I commend you for following the princi-
ples of honor and integrity. That alone is worth
while. You need tear nothing further from these
wretches. They will receive their just reward
when we reach Genoa."

He dismissed me and I went to my cabin to rest.
For hours I tossed on my bunk, living again the
events of the past tew days, but at last I sank
into a dreamless sleep, from which I awoke on the
morrow to see through my tiny window, glittering
in the bright morning sunshine, the spires of
Genoa.



3(>



THE CARIBBEAN.




Gatun, C. Z.,
January 20, 1 921.

Dear Harrv:

I have just come in from a ten-day camp and I
want to tell you about it before I lose all my
ambition to write a letter.

Our whole family and another from Pedro
Miguel went out to rough it in Chorrera during
Christmas vacation.

Mrs. Lackjer, an .American lad>' who lives in
Chorrera, treated us very kindly during our stay
there. She knew all ot the surrounding country
well and saw to it that we visited the principal
places of interest.

While we were out there
the grown-ups did most
of the cooking, but one
day they ail went on
horseback to a place six
or seven miles away and
I was left to do the cook-
ing and mind the camp.
Say, I was busier than a
one-eyed boy at a three-
ring circus. What with
watching that none of the
grub burned, taking care of the kids, and seeing
that none of the little natives that were hanging
around the camp let their fingers stray, I surely
had my hands full. I was lucky though, because
the lima beans didn't burn, the young ones didn't
do anything worse than heave potatoes at one
another, and nothing was lost, strayed, or stolen.

A day or two before Christmas about six of us
took a trip to el chorro or in plain English "the
falls." Mrs. Lackjer could not go with us that day
but she gave us the directions and said that it was
only about two miles away.

We set out confidently for el chorro. Pretty
soon we came to a fork in the trail and, as we had
forgotten the directions, used our good judgment.
We had walked two miles easily and had just




chorrera Falb.



decided that our good judgment had failed us when
we met a native who showed us another trail that
led almost directly back the way we had come.
Along with the right trail we acquired, in Chorrera
Spanish (which I soon found to be quite different
from that which I learned in Cristobal High School),
a lot of advice, etc., on how to get there.

Of course there was a fork in this trail too, and
again we took the wrong one but it ended up in an
orange grove, so we didn't mind. While we were
in the grove, we saw and killed several big black
tarantulas. Also the place was full of ticks and,
incidentally, it was not long before we were, too.
.\s I had always thought that the big spiders lived
entirely upon the ground you can imagine my sur-
prise when I whanged an
orange at one to see
lirni run up an orange tree.
I shot him down with
a small rifie.

We went back to the
fork where we took the
other trail and it was not
long before we arrived
at the falls. We rested
there awhile and also took
some pictures of which I am
sending you one. I nearly broke my neck get-
ting it. I had to cross a wide stretch of water
which, though fairly shallow, was mighty swift.
I had to carry the camera in my teeth and use
my hands and feet. Even so, I thought several
times that I was gone.

When I returned we went back to camp, for it
was getting near chow time.

We all came back from the trip safe and sound
and fully convinced that we had spent as merry
a Christmas as we could possibly have had.

I hope you had as good a time as I had this
Christmas and are in good health.



Your friend.



C.4RL DuEY.



THE CARIBBEAN.



37




A MODERN HAMLET.

(As THE Subject Appealed to Two Seniors.)




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.i/ice Hunter, 2i.



Thomas Baldwin, son of old Senator Baklwin,
had been accused of embezzlement; but, owing
to his father's influence, he was let out on bail.
He was very popular and had many faithful
friends, chief among them his old college chum,
Rod Evans.

It was on the opening night of the new play
"Cornered," starring Madge Kennedy, that Rod
secured a box and telephoned his friends to see
the play with him. Hehadnoideaas to the plotof
the play; he was merely out for a pleasantevening.

The dinner had been good, the wine better than
usual, so the "bunch" was in a happy state when
they reached the theater. Soon afterseating them-
selves and chatting with friends in a neighboring
box, they quieted down to see the curtain rise
on the first act. Tom enjoyed the first act at
least the glimpses of it that he was able to catch
through Marie's carved shell comi).

The action grew more tense and the situation
more thrilling during the second act. The girl was
coming nearer and nearer to an exposure of her
theft.



"\^h\^ where's Tom? What in the world
do you suppose has become of him V cried Marie,
as she glanced around at the end of the act.

"Why, isn't Tommie here.' Doesn't he like the
play?" cried another.

"Oh, keep still," cried Evans, "before they put
you out. He'll be back shortly; he probably went
out to have a smoke."

The show ended, but Tom had been forgotten
long before. He met them at the door.

"Folks, that play was too much for me, and I
just couldn't hold up any longer. Do you remem-
ber how, in Hamlet, Hamlet discovered his
uncle's guilt by writing a play to suit the situation
and how he said, 'The play's the thing in which
we'll catch the conscience of the king.' Well, that
showed them what the old king really was and this
little drama has done the same thing to me. Don't
look at me like that. Rod, I know you didn't
bring me here to catch my conscience but I can't
deny any longer that I'm a thief."



CarlDiiey, 21.



"Hm, that gas is pretty low. I'll have to look
for a good landing.

"I wonder where we are, anyhow?

"Say old buss, it looks bad for us."

Thus Lieutenant Whosis, as he buzzed through
space, was talking to himself and his airplane.
He had been sent out from France Field on an
observation flight and had encountered a severe
storm which had carried him far out of his course
and had injured his compass. He had turned on
the emergency gas tank some time before. The
gauge showed that it was nearly empty, and he
did not know where he was.

Keeping his eyes open for a suitable place to
land, the lieutenant continued to speak his



thoughts aloud. .'\11 of a sudden pop, pop,
pop and the roaring motor became quiet.
No gas, and no landing in sight! Strangely
enough his thoughts were not so much on his
danger as on the play "Hamlet," which he had
been reading the night before. Down, down, down,
in huge spirals went the plane, with the wind
whistling shrilly through the guy wires. Crash.

Lieutenant Whosis awoke to find himself lying
in the middle of a jungle trail, and his machine a
short distance to one side, a total wreck, sur-
rounded by an excited group of Indians. These he
readily recognized as San Bias Indians by their
short stature, and, as a good bit of their talk was
in Spanish, which he uncierstood, the lieutenant



38



THE CARIBBEAN.



found out where he was and what they intended
to do with him.

A little Indian with a very large head and a
very small hat, who seemed to have the most
authority, was talking, and among his words the
lieutenant made out "El debe quedar en nuestro
pais. No estara bien permitirle partir."

These remarks and a few more like them set the
lieutenant to thinking. Once again the play
"Hamlet" came to his mind, and, knowing that
most Indians think a crazy person touched by the
hand of God, he decided to imitate the hero of the
play and act crazy.

After a while the little brown men turned their
attention from the plane and, seeing that the
lieutenant was awake and unhurt, told him to get
up and go with them.

.'\fter a half day's march they arrived at a small
village where the captive, for such the lieutenant
was, was led before a council which, after due
deliberation, informed him that because he had
landed so far in the interior of their land they
were going to keep him there. This did not sur-
prise Lieutenant Whosis as he had surmised as
much from the talk he had heard while the
Indians were gathered around the airplane.



"From where doyou come?" one finally asked
him.

With a blank look and a silly chuckle the reply
cam;, "I co'Tie from the place where I was before
I came he"e."

"What is your business?"

This time it was with "the loud laugh that
speaks the empty mind" that the lieutenant
replied, "I sweep the clouds."

The Indians asked many more questions but
received such foolish answers that they finally
gave up.

The lieutenant was allowed to come and go as
he pleased, but was always watched. The Indians
plied him with questions the first two or three
weeks but he answered and acted so queerly that
he was soon considered as crazy and no more
attention was paid to him. Indeed he was thought
so harmless that he was no longer guarded.

Then one day he disappeared. The Indians
hunted high and low for him, but could not find
him so they finally came to the conclusion that he
had lost himself and had starved to death.

One month later Lieutenant Whosis came out
on the coast where, after a half day of watching,
he caught a small schooner bound for Colon.



MUMBLINGS OF A MUMMY.

Gladys Lowande, '24.

Alas, alas, still I lie in this hideous old museum river? I remember how each year, with the com-
where these mercenary Americans have brought ing of the rains, it would, of its own accord, come
me. My only companions in this secluded corner up and water my lands, causing them to yield
are a corroded old bathtub unearthed in the ruins abundantly. All day I would sit under the olive
of Pompeii, and a large ghastly skeleton of a trees in my gardens of rarest flowers and gloat
mastodon brought from the European plains, over my fields. I still see the faithful slaves
The only relic of my past grandeur is the hand- sowing the seed, the swine treading it down and,
carved case in which I was placed by my subjects at the end of the grain season, my great store-
four thousand long years ago, prior to my en- houses filled to the eaves with the golden sheen
tombment in the lofty pyramid, the building of of wheat.

which I directed for we great Egyptians builded What do I hear? Is the caretaker opening the

our own mausoleums before our death. doors? Oh, I hear the creaking bolts and hinges

Oh, but was not that a massive piece of hand- as they rasp slowly back to admit the daily

wrought work, eight hundred feet long and eight throng of curious people who come to gape at me.
hunilrcd feet wide? Yes, every stone was at least "Why, Mrs. Smith, look, a Chinese mummy!

thirty feet wide and was dragged from the far- Isn't it marvelous to think of a body's being pre-

away quarries in the Arabian mountains, by my served for such a long time!"
captives. Bah! the idea, a Chinese mummy! She has

How fitting it was to lie in state in that tomb degraded me, a noble of the wonderful Pyramid

on the wonderful Nile, where I had spent all my Age of Egypt, who lived during the reign of

life! Did not my vast domains border that great Cheop, the cruel and evil one. Here comes a



THE CARIBBEAN.



39



teacher with her class of giggling pupils. Oh, woe
unto me, woe un

"Miss Kemp, why did the Egyptians make
statues of their people?"

"He isn't a statue, Alice. Indeed no, for once he
lived, walked, talked, ate, drank, and slept just
as we do now. When he tiietl, his people preserved
him."

"Is he as dead as a doornail?"

"\\ hy, most certainly he is, child."

"And was he always as thin as that, and tlid he
always have that awtul big nose?"

"Oh, he gives me the creeps," this from one
dainty little girl.

"Come, come, children, there are many other
interesting things I want you to see."

Thank heaven, they're gone. How they chat-
tered and giggled! Ugh! and one even wanted to
touch me.



"Look here, old chap, at this bally mummy.
Rather touching, eh?"

An Englishman their accent is not to be for-
gotten, antl to think they even rule my beloved
Egypt to-day! Evil times have come upon our
great race.

"Robert, look! an old yellow shriveled-up
mummy. My, but it's ghastly looking! Let's
hurry on, I don't like it."

Like me, indeed! An old shriveled-up mummy!
I should like tor see her complexion after four
thousand years.-

The crowd is thinning out only a few stragglers
are left. Now they are gone. The caretaker
limps from window to window, making them all
fast for the night. At last the door clangs.

I am alone. The shadows deepen; it is night;
a shaft of moonlight falls across my casket and I
see again the moonlight on my beloved river.



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"I" AND "MYSELF."

Ciir/ D:iey, '2/.



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=s



I have recently discovered that there are two of
me "I" and "Myself," but the discovery is not
entirely my own as it was more or less forced upon
me by an assignment in English literature.

Upon investigating my discovery I have found
that my two selves differ very greatly. "I" is
always wanting to lend a helping hand but "my-
self" says, "God helps them who help them-
selves! Let's go."

"Myself" generally wins out and then "I" re-
proaches "myself the rest of the day, making
both of us feel pretty cheap.

We both like sports, and tennis strikes us as
being an especially good game. We start to play
and our opponent puts over a fast, close serve
that we miss altogether.

"I" says, 'ts in."

"Myself" says, 'ts out."
'ts in."

" 'ts out."

And so on.

Finally we both say "I don't know what that
was," knowing that our opponent will either give
us the point or serve it over.



If he gives us the point, "I" looks sorrowfully
at "myself." If he serves it over and we miss,
"I" says "L^h, huh, cheatin' shows." And the
result is, either way, no more peace of mind during
that game.

We both want to make friends.

"I" says, "Let's make friends with that guy."

"Myself" says, "Aw, he won't benefit us any."

"But maybe we'll benefit him."

We argue about it. If "I" wins we feel li!ce a
martyr. If "myself" wins we feel mean.

It is true, though, that after we have approached
a fellow and made him our friend we both enjoy
him thoroughly.

Our main argument is every morning about
getting out of bed.

"I" says, "Let's get up and start something."

"Myself" says, "Be sensible. Turn over and
go to sleep."

There is always a long argument and while we
are still at it, "Mamma" says, "Carl, if you don't
get up I'll throw a cup of water on you."

We get out!



4



THE CARIBBEAN.



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EVERYLAD. AN ALLEGORY.

Emma Townsend, '33. Harold F. Cloke, '33.




Father Experience stood at the gate, talking to
his son, Everylad.

"You are about to enter upon the path of
Knowledge, my son. It leads in a square about
the great field of Wisdom and so, after going
around this field, you will return to your own
home. Always be prepared, and keep Conscience,
your chief friend, happy, cheerful, and spotless.
Good luck to you, my boy. Bring back as many
golden apples as you can."

Everylad started on his way, with the least bit
of fear in his heart. As he approached the en-
trance to the path he heard a loud noise and, on
passing through the gate, he saw the ferocious
dragon, Hazing, rushing toward him. He suc-
cessfully defeated the monster by receiving his
attacks in meekness and silence.

He soon found himself neck deep in the marsh
of Mathematics. Only by the earnest efforts of a
new acquaintance. Hard Study, was he able to
reach the smooth green fields of English. Mean-
while, another stranger had appeared, a queer,
foreign-looking man called Language. Everylad
found this fellowmost puzzling and really not much
help in solving the problems of this first side of the
square. His traveling was growing harder all the
time for he was in the rocky mountains of Geology.
All this time his friend Conscience, was happy and
cheerful, and was fully satisfied with the progress
made.

On trying to jump the first ditch of Semester
Tests, Everylad fell hard and crawled out crest-
fallen, resolving to jump safely across next time.
He successfully traversed the remaining few
ditches by the help of Hard Study and Conscience.

Everylad was now becoming troubled, for there
loomed ahead, the deep and swift river of Exam-
inations. Finally he stood pausing on the brink
with his friends. Conscience and Hard Study, who
were encouraging him. He plunged bravely into
the river, to emerge on the other side with four
golden apples held tightly in his hand.

On the Sophomore side of the field P^verylad
spent much time with an interesting chap called
Pleasure, and became neglectful of his friends,
Hard Study and Conscience. It was not until he



reached the end of that path, that he realized
how pale and neglected Hard Study and Con-
science looked. As they stood together on the
bank of the final river a dark man, Cheat, offered
Everylad a small boat to ride in. Conscience
urged him not to accept it, but he brushed his
weakened friend aside and jumped into the boat,
pushing it far into the river. As the craft ap-
proached the middle, it capsized and left Every-
lad in the water to drown. He fought his way
across and climbed up the opposite bank with sev-
eral goose eggs mixed with his golden apples.

Helped by Hard Study and Conscience he made
up, on the Junior side of the square, what he had
lost before. Everylad met Cheat several times
later, but each time expressed his scorn and drove
him away in anger.

We now see Everylad starting on the last por-
tion of his journey with twelve golden apples in
his bag. After going through the valley of Trig-
onometry, he started climbing the Final hill of
Languages, but fell down the bank of Careless-
ness, which ran along the side of the hill. He
managed to climb out safely, however. He kept
thinking now, of the largest and most treacherous
river of Examinations which was yet to be
crossed. All this time his friend. Conscience, was
happy and cheery, yet had a few dark spots on
his white mantle to remind Everylad of his former
neglect.

At last the great body of water appeared. As
he stood on the edge, contemplating his plunge
he saw on the other side of the river his old home
with his father standing patiently at the gate. His
friend. Conscience, cheered him greatly, and with
one final breath, Everylad leaped far into the
river of final Examinations. Currents caught
him and sucked him down but he finally crawled
up on the opposite bank, breathless, but with
sixteen golden apples held triumphantly in his bag.

He slowly approached his father, and held out
the contents of his bag.

"My son, you have done well. Come," he said,
and with his arm around Everylad's shoulder,
he slowly walked up the worn path to the wel-
coming homestead.



THE CARIBBEAN.



41




'xt^



FOREWORD.

Needless to say, athletics, on the whole, are
very beneficial to everyone, morally and physically.
Morally, they teach a person to play the game
fair, either in life or sport. Physically, they build
up the body and prepare one tor the hardships
of life. Athletics are indulged in more, perhaps,
on the Canal Zone, than in any other part ot the
world. This is accounted tor by the tact that the
people here realize the necessity ot physical exer-
cise, and take it as part of their daily work, as
well as pleasure. Owing to the fact that there are
comparatively tew pupils in Cristobal High School,
almost all have taken part in some form ot ath-
letics, mainly basketball, swimming, and baseball.

BASKETBALL.

This year's basketball season was a very success-
ful one tor Cristobal High School. Our first
practice game was played on October S, with the
Gatun lightweights on their own floor. It was a
fast and exciting game and we won to the tune of
18 to 10.

The tollowing Tuesday we defeated the same
team in a close and well-played game, by a score
of22to2i. This was a fine showing for the open-
ing of the season, and our hopes rose high.

We then arranged a series of five games with
Balboa High School, in which that team was to be
considered victorious which should win threeofthe
games. Our team won three fast ones in succes-
sion and so clinched the series. Balboa was clearlv



outclassed all through the games and Cristobal
was not in danger once, to the satisfaction of the
whole school.

Through the courtesy ot the Cristobal Army
and Navy Y. M. C. A., the first game was played
on their floor. We beat Balboa by the over-
whelming score of 37 to 7. Henter was the star
all through the game, and made most of the bas-
kets. Good playing on the part of Raymond and
Doyle helped, and credit is due to the guards,
Townsend, Duey, and Cloke, who prevented Tir
opponents from making many
a basket. The whole school
turned out and many of the
rooters exhibited a profound
knowledge of the game.

On November 6, we jour-
neyed to Balboa and defeated
them by 28 to 12. There
were no brilliant plays on
either side and the game was
marked by steady playing
from beginning to end. Bal-
boahad all their fans out but

it was ot no avail. Balboa's Goat.

The third and final game was played on Novem-
ber 13, at the Army and Navy Y. M. C. A. It
seemed to be the unlucky 13th for Balboa for
they were defeated. Balboa was desperate and
managed to keep the lead up to the time the
whistle blew for the ending ot the first half. But
Cristobal's blood was up and they carried away
the tjame in the last halt. Balboa came over with




42



THE CARRIBEAN.







W



THE CARIBBEAN.



4.1



murder in their eyes and went back with the score
25 to IT, in favor of Cristobal, in their minds.

Three of the prominent members ot our usual
basketball lineup are Seniors. All are fine players
and we shall be very sorry to lose them on account
ot their spectacular teamwork. All positions were
well represented by Ra\mond at forward, Henter
at center, and Duey at guard.

The playing of Raymond, our captain and left
forward, is characterized by steadiness and surety.
Whenever the ball was to be had, he was on the
spot to get it. Frank was always ready for a
scrimmage, and generally came out in possession
of the ball. We look forward to the time when
some college team will be benefited by Raymond's
speed.

Henter, our center, poetically speaking, is one
of the fastest and best-shooting players on our
team. In every one of our games, he matle his
regular number (and generally the majority) ot
the baskets. He outjumped his opponent almost
every time and when he had his hands on the
ball it was a sure basket.

Paul Doyle, the trickiest and fastest right for-
ward on any school team on the Isthmus, is a fine
opposite for Raymond. In Paul's case, size does
not count, for he slips right through the fingers
of his opponents. Raymond, Doyle, and Henter
make a fast and finetriofor Cristobal's basketball
team and have shown their worth in every game.

Wesley Townsend, who hails from Gatun, is one
of our steadiest and most dependable guards.
His position is right guard and he held it royally.
Many a time a shout went up from our opponents
when their best player got away with the ball, but
they were doomed to disappointment when Town-
send sent it sailing back to the other end of the
floor. Truly, he is a guard to be thankful for.

The newest member of our team is Cloke. His
playing is surprisingly good considering the little
experience he has had as a left guard. He is always
after his man and proves himself a great hindrance
to his opponents when they attempt to make a
basket. He is full of action and of fighting perse-
verance. His pass work is accurate and snappy.
We all like him for his coolness and clean playing
of the game.

Duey, from Gatun, as a guard, proved himself
worthy of the position. He is the heaviest man



on the team but his weight is no hindrance to his
fast playing. Duey is "there" when the guards
have to be depended upon.

TENNIS.

A short series was arranged for the double
championship of Cristobal High School. Frank
Raymond and Harold Cloke were the defenders
and they received theirfirst challenge from William
Harrison and Paul Doyle. They successfully
defended their title by winning two sets in succes-
sion, 6-4, 9-7. Then the "champs" split forces
and the Juniors, rep."esented by Paul Doyle and
Harold Cloke, issued a challenge to all classes.
Frank Raymond and Carl Duey accepted for the
Seniors and the game was played off on the Colon
Beach court, February 9. The Juniors were
victorious, by winning two out of three sets, 6-3,
4-6, 6-0.

The third classmen, to settle the class champion-
ship, played the Sophomores, Gerald Bliss and
Alex Linczer, at Fort de Lesseps, .\pril 9. Doyle
and Cloke easily won their sets by 6-4, 6-1.

The Juniors and Seniors then traveled to Balboa
on April 2j, to decide the singles and doubles
championship of the two rival classes. Cristobal
was victorious and did not lose one set. Doyle
and Cloke defeated their men, Sargent and W.
Banton, by 6-2, 6-1. Doyle's smashing drives
and the steady serving of Cloke, easily won the
day for the Juniors. Doyle then played W. Ban-
ton and defeated him in a good set of 6-3. Cloke,
to make it a winning day for the Juniors, admin-
istered defeat to his man, Sargent, in a one-sided
set of 6-1.

The Balboa Sophomores, M. Banton and Clark,
played the Cristobal Seniors, Duey and Ray-
mond, and were defeated. The first set was a fast
one and at the beginning it looked as though
Balboa was going to be victorious, but the upper
classmen rallied and finished the set 6-4. The
Seniors seemed to have found their pace, for they
won their next set 6-1. Duey then played M.
Banton and Raymond played Clark. Duey had
no trouble in winning his set 6-1 but Raymond
had a harder time. There was fast playing all
during the set, but Raymond finally won it 6-3,
due to fast and steady playing.

The Balboaites then came to Cristobal on April
30, to try their luck again, but they went home



44



THE CARIBBEAN.



disappointed and defeated. The first set on the
program was between Raymond and Duey and
M. Banton and Verril. The Seniors easily won
their set 6-0 and also the following one, 6-2.
The Cristobal Juniors, Cloke and Doyle, were
not so fortunate, for they lost their first set
6-4, but came back in the second and defeated
Sargent and W. Banton by 6-4. In the last set
Balboa had Cristobal 5-1, but our Juniors played
hard and made a wonderful rally, winning six
straight games. This resulted in the score of 7-5,
saving the day for the Juniors and keeping the
championship in Cristobal High School.

TRACK.

One of the fastest and most interesting track
meets between Balboa and Cristobal High Schools
was held on April 2, at Balboa. Boys and girls
both participated in the events and the points
were counted together. The meet was not decided
until the last event, in which Balboa took the lead
and won by nine points. Our team had practically
no training and did surprisingly well under the
circumstances.

Raymond was the star for the Cristobal boys,
and he won a place in every event that he entered.
The majority of his places were firsts and he has
set a record to be proud of. The total number of
Raymond's points was 27, more than two-thirds
of the total number scored by the boys.

Edna Campbell was the girls' star and her name
appeared for a place on the score card in everything
in which she took part. This is Edna's Freshman
year, and she will be with us for three more years
to help us win our future track meets.



STANDING BROAD JUMP.

1. James Miller (Balboa), 8 feet, 11 inches.

2. F. Raymoml (Cristobal).

3. H. Bissell (Balboa).

RUNNING HOP, STEP, AND JUMP.

1. F. Raymond (Cristobal), 35 feet, 7 inches.

2. G. Morton (Balboa).

3. L. Landers (Balboa).

12-POUND SHOT PUT.

1. I.. Landers (Balboa), 35 feet, i inch.

2. C. Duey (Cristobal).

3. F. Raymond (Cristobal).

lOO-VARD DASH.

1. F. Raymond (Cristobal).

2. C. Miles (Balboa).

3. H. Bissell (Balboa).

220-YARD DASH.

1. F. Raymond (Cristobal).

2. C. Miles (Balboa).

3. L. Landers (Balboa).

RELAY RACE.



1. Balboa.

2. Cristobal.

3. Balboa.



GIRLS.



50-YARD DASH.

1. E. Campbell (Cristobal).

2. G. Lowande (Cristobal).

3. E. Getman (Balboa).



CANAL ZONE HIGH SCHOOL
TRACK MEET.

BOYS.

RUNNING HIGH JUMP.

1. Harry Bissell (Balboa), 4 feet, 9 inches.

2. Frank Raymond (Cristobal).

3. Carl Duey (Cristobal).

RUNNING BROAD JUMP.

1. F. Raymond (Cristobal), 15 feet, 10 inches.

2. Morrill (Balboa).

3. L. Landers (Balboa).



BASEBALL THROW.

1. E. Campbell (Cristobal), 133 feet, 6^ inches.

2. Marie McMahon (Balboa).

3. L. Henter (Cristobal).

RUNNING BROAD JUMP.

1. Lona Rathbone (Balboa), 12 feet.

2. E. Campbell (Cristobal).

3. Ethel Getman (Balboa).

STANDING BROAD JUP.

1. Lona Rathbone (Balboa), 6 feet, 7 inches.

2. Marie McMahon (Balboa).

3. L. Henter (Cristobal).



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



RUNNING HIGH JUMP.

1. Ethel Getman (Balboa), 4 feet, 2 inches.

2. Lorettii Rush (Cristobal).

3. E.Campbell (Cristobal).

75-YARD DASH.

1. Ethel Getman (Balboa).

2. E. Campbell (Cristobal).

3. Marie McMahon (Balboa).

BASKETBALL THROW.

1. Florinette Matter (Balboa), 60 feet, 4 inches.

2. E. Campbell (Cristobal).

3. C. Van Hardevelt (Balboa).

RELAY RACE.

1 Cristobal.

2. Balboa.

POINTS SCORED.

Points.

Balboa boys 38

Balboa girls 38

Balboa High School 76

Cristobal boys 34

Cristobal girls 33

Cristobal High School 67

BASEBALL.

We started the season with a bang, by winning
a fast game and tying one other. The first game
was a 5-inning battle with the Lincoln House
bachelors, on the New Cristobal diamond. When
darkness settled, the score was 4 to 4. It was a
fast and snappy game and the two teams were
evenly matched.

Our second game was played with the grammar
school at the Mount Hope stadium. Our team
made a fine showing and carried away the game
by scoring 5 to 3 of the grammar school.



A series of games was arranged to decide the
baseball championship between the high schools of
Cristobal and Balboa. The first game was played
on our rivals' grounds, but we won by the score of
4 to 3. Raymond pitched a good game and, helped
by the fine support of the whole team, held Balboa
down to three runs. One ot the main features of
the game was a double play made by Cristobal.
One of the Balboa runners was perched on first and
a hot liner was hit to Doyle at third base. He
fielded it in fine style and shot it to Solomon at
second, who completed the play to Henter putting
the runner out at first. One of the longest hits
of the game was made by Solomon, who lined out
a 3-bagger in the sixth inning. .Although Balboa
changed pitchers, it was of no avail for Cristobal
left the field victorious.

Balboa then crossed the Isthmus to our side
the following week, determined to win and they
did! Cristobal seemed to lack pep and, as a
result, Balboa doubled our score.

The final and deciding game was played at
Balboa after another week had elapsed. Cris-
tobal was ahead all through the game but in the
eighth inning our opponents rallied and, helped
bv a downpour, made 5 runs, bringing the score
up to 8 to 7 in favor of Cristobal. One of the
longest drives of the series was made by Raymond
in this game. Two men and himself crossed home
plate on the hit. Neither team scored in the ninth
and Cristobal left the field with the championship.



We crossed bats with the sailors fro^i,^ Eagle
boat No. J/ on the Cristobal twilight diamond on
March 17. Raymond pitched his usual good game
and we had no trouble in administering defeat to
the sailors. The final score was 10 to 5.



GIRLS' ATHLETICS.



Due to the fact that the athletics on the Zone
are under the auspices of the Clubs and Play-
grounds of the different town, we have been
rather handicapped in that our athletics, with the
exception of track, have been necessarily divided
between Cristobal and Gatun, as many of our
girls live in Gatun.

Although this has been so, the Gatun girls
have never fallen down one degree in their loyalty



to Cristobal High, even though they had their own
teams in basketball, baseball, etc.

During the games that the Cristobal girls of
the Cristobal High School have played the Gatun
girls of the Cristobal High School, there has
naturally been a stirring spirit of rivalry between
the residents of the two towns, but that spirit has
ever been most friendly.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.



The Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds arranged
leagues in basketball, indoor baseball, and bowling.
The basketball season came first and on No-
vember 9, the Cristobal High School girls met and
elected as captain, Kirby Ferguson, and also
had their first practice. Although only five were
present that day we played the grammar school
girls on November ii, winning from them by a
score of 19 to I o.

.As this was the first game of the season there
was no brilliant playing done, but the girls all
held their own very well.

.After this game the girls turned out to practice
more often and more girls attended.

On Saturday, November 20, we plaved our
first league game, meeting the Gatun girls on
the Cristobal floor. The playing was fast and
ended in a victory for Gatun. Good sports-
manship was shown throughout by both teams.
The tune which they carried was "Met Cris-
tobal on the Cristobal floor and won from them,
19 to II being the score."

The week following this game we had some very
good practice and on Saturday played the .Ancon
team on our floor. The game was fast and snappy,
Ida Brown and Kirby Ferguson never failing, when
the ball got to their end of the floor, to drop it
into the basket. Sad but yet hopeful, the .Ancon
girls answered all questions as to the score
saying, "Cristobal, ji ; .Ancon, 16."

Our next game was with Pedro Miguel, at Cris-
tobal. In spite of the fact that their team was
much heavier than ours we never failed at any
time to prove that it is not quantity but quality
that counts, and sent them home crying, "Cris-
tobal beat us 35 to 5."

Next came our old rival, Balboa. We thought
we had the advantage playing on our own floor,
but well, let's say luck was against us. .Although
we sufl^ered the great defeat of 44 to 8, Edna
Campbell, center, must be highly commended
for her good judgment in passing the ball; also
Jane Edwards and Gladys Lowande, our guards,
who were greatly outweighed.

Gatun's return game was the next played and
on their floor. .Again they were victorious, de-
feating us by 20 points. The score was 26 to 6.
In the return game with Ancon, played on
the Ancon fl jor, we made up for what we had lost
to Gatun the week before by winning 21 to 8.



Alice Hunter, side center, played exceedingly well
in this game.

Our old rival again Balboa. This time we
sufl^ered a terrible defeat, but let me say that even
after that we hold no hard feelings toward them.
The score was 42 to 11.

The next week we again made up for the week
before by defeating Pedro Miguel on their floor
by a score of 28 to 25.

This game ended the basketball season.
We had won four league games and lost four, but
wait here is indoor baseball.

INDOOR BASEBALL.

Little can be said about the indoor baseball,
but still there is so much that should be said.
Cristobal High School did not have an opponent
who could call forth our best playing. Edna
Campbell was our able captain and through her
earnest efl^orts in conjunction with our very able
and splendid physical instructress. Miss Blaisdell
(now Mrs. Lockett), and all the players, we won
the 100 per cent championship, never losing a
game.

Our team was Edna Campbell, left field; Jane
Edwards, catcher; Kirby Ferguson, pitcher;
Mary Fields, first base; Ida Brown, second base;
Gladys Lowande, third base.

BOWLING.

The month of May started the bowling league.
-After a brief time of regular practice we formed a
team and elected Mary Fields as our captain.

On Saturday, May 14, our friendly rivals from
Gatun were our opponents at the Cristobal club-
house. We bowled three games and won one.
The first game Gatun won by twelve pins, the
second we won by forty-two, and they won the
third by eight pins. This was our first bowling
match. We hope a poor beginning means a strong
ending.

TENNIS.

Tennis has had its place among our sports,
too, the girls having a class'every morning for
one hour. Next year we hope to see tennis tourna-
ments written up in which Cristobal will head the
list.



THE CARIBBEAN.



47^




2 =



-48



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARNIVAL.



AS A WHOLE.
Frank Raymond, '21.

"School carnival to be given at 7.30 p. m.,
Thursday, December 16," was thoroughly adver-
tised throughout the Atlantic side. But to our dis-
may and misfortune, the time of opening had to be
postponed. We had been making preparations
all day for the looked-for feature. At 6.30 we
were still working enthusiastically on some minor
things. When we were on the verge of completing
these details, the lights of all the town went out.
We were forced to stop our work and a pitiful
groan was echoed throughout the building as some-
one hit his finger with a hammer, another slipped
from the chair on which he was standing, and
others tripped up the
stairs. It seemed as if we
were in darkness for
hours. The lights never
would come on. The
people were gathered out-
side waiting eagerly to
enter. Seven-thirty passed
and our work was not
completed and the lights
were stillout. Afterthree-
quarters of an hour had
been wasted, the lights
were on and a great cheer
rang out, from both inside
and outside the building. We rushed wildly to
complete our task but the demand from the
public to enter was too great to sustain.

The doors opened antl there was a mad rush
for entrance, entrance checks, and show tickets.
A few of us were busily engaged collecting entrance




'iue Dest looKlng.



fees for an hour. The people were not afraid of a
good time and made it truly an "evening of fun,
frolic, and festival."

THE ASSEMBLY-ROOM PROGRAMS.
Charles Henter, '21.

The assembly room was filled and refilled dur-
ing the evening by the audiences which listened
to the series of pro-
grams that had been
prepared.

The first program,
given by the grade
school, consisted of
songs, dances, and a
recitation of Stevenson's
"My Shadow," by little
Theo Simon.

Then followed the
high school program
with a Japanese flirta-
tion dance by Mary
Fields and Georgic
Pepper, a ballet by
Edna Campbell, a The most popular.

ukulele-accompanied duet by Marjorie Ball and
Virginia Tucker, recitations by Mildred Gill and
Miss Dodds, and a piano solo by Doris Oliver.

The third program, which was given by the
stringed orchestra, was well rendered, and proved
a success, winning the applause of the audience
as each selection came to a close.

THE POPULARITY CONTEST.
Mary Fielils, '22.

The popularity contest opened about two weeks
before the carnival and closed the night of the




THE CARIBBEAN.



49




^El



iiUJJ











-:^

.:..^



MR 77375 4



5



THE CARIBBEAN.




The beat all-around.



carnival. "Eddie May," our popular Sophomore,
was in charge.

Louise Henter, '23, and William Mary, '22, were
voted the best-looking girl and boy.

Doris Oliver and Harold Cloke, both Juniors,
were voted the most
popular.

Frank Raxmond, '21,
and Edna Campbell, '24,
were voted the best all-
around boy and girl.

The great interest of
the students and their
friends in this contest is
indicated by the tact that,
although the votes were
only ^i cents a piece, the
contest brought in S60.

The happiest thing

about it was the good spirit

which the students shewed toward the contestants

and the lack of jealousy among the contestants

themselves.

KANGAROO COURT.
Car/ Duay, '21

One of the most unique booths in the whole
carnival was the Kangaroo Court over which Mr.
Gerald D. Bliss, Sr., as judge, presided most ably.
He was assisted in his distribution of justice by
our police force, Emilio Solomon.

Emilio could be seen at any time sleuthing the
halls for culprits. He pinched them for smoking,
for not smoking, for not spending their money
fast enough, and for other similar crimes too
numerous to mention.

Once arrested, the guilty one was led to the
court room in the lower hall where our most hon-
orable iudge fined him or her, whatever amount it
looked as if the purse of the defendant could stand.

KINGS OF THE SAWDUST.
IVesley TcwHsend, '22.

One of the features that helped to make the
carnival a huge success was the famous duo,
"Kings of the Sawdust," Eberenz and Townsend,
recently of Ringling Brothers World-Famous
Show. They were only to be obtained through the
influence of our Advance Manager, Miss J. Isa-
bella Dodds, who made mud pies with the younger
Mr. Ringling in her childhood days.



NATURE S GREATEST MISTAKE.
George Carlivrighl, '22.

"Nature's greatest mistake," Zenura, the crea-
ture with 26 eyes, was alsoagreatsuccess, although
the "creature," Louise Henter, did have twenty-
four neeelles pinned on her dress. The room where
she was exhibited was never wanting for spectators.

JAPANESE TEA ROOM.
Georgic Pepper, '2j.

You would hardly expect to find in the midst
of the turmoil of a high school carnival, a trans-
planted bit of Japan, but that such a thing is pos-
sible was proved by the Japanese tea room.
The bookcases and bare walls of an ordinary
school room were concealed by palm leaves,
massed together to form an effective background,
while tlrawings of odd Japanese landscapes
turned the blackboards into paneled screens.
Needless to say, many people slipped in to be
served tea beneath the swinging lanterns by the
quaint, Japanese maidens who gave the last, but
not least, attractive touch to the tea room.

CANDV, ICE CREAM, .'iND FLOWER BOOTHS.
Kirhy Ferguson, '21.

The candy and ice cream booths, which were
at opposite ends of the hall, were like two magnets,
drawing the crowds irresistibly toward them.
Emma Townsend and
Lillian Colberg, in charge
of the candy booth, had
worked hard to make this
spot attractive and surely
they had not worked in
vain. The pretty little
booth was decorated with
the effective tropical
pal ins, crepe paper, and
coral vine.

The red-and-white ice
cream booth, as always,
demanded rush service,
which was very ably sup-
plied by Gerald Bliss and William Mary.

As for the flower booth, Jane Hall and Loretta
Rush had so daintily decorated this "garden of
roses" that one could not pass it by without be-
coming the proud possessor of part of its beauty.




Pesters and their makers.



THE CARIBBEAN.



51



THE BAZAAR.

Alice Hunter, '.?/.

One of the outstanding features of the carnival
was the bazaar. The room in which it was held
looked very attractive indeed with the palm leaves
entwined with coral vine, and with its pretty col-
ored lights. This made a very effective setting
for the lovely things we had for sale. Everything
was sold from the lacy handmade articles to tin
soldiers. The profits were ^50.

THE FRENCH CAFE.

Mildred Stafford, '21.

The delicious aroma ot hot coffee and crisp
doughnuts enticed the merrymakers intj the
French cate, a most attractive bower of palms
and coral vines where chic French maidens pre-
sicied over the daintv rose-shatled tables.



some trip from "Ringling Brothers" had reduced
her weight, she manageii her part well ami never
tailed to draw a crowd.

Bill Harrison surely did manipulate that um-
brella well, and George Ball knew how to use
his ladder and the "reducer."

TRIPLV KATE.
Leroy Magntison, '22.

^^'e were ver\- fortunate in being able to secure
tor the evening Triply Kate, the three-legged
wonder trom the tar-off island of Yangaga. This
young woman has balfled the minds of the greatest
surgeons of both hemispheres. One of them of-
fered to amputate her third leg and experiment
as to the cause of its growth, but she calmly told
him that it had bren with her so long that she
was verv closelv attached to it.



BLUE BEARD S WIVES.
Jessie Heir, 'jj.

One of the most terrifying scenes of the carnival
was the dimly lighted chamber containing Blue
Beard's Wives.

The heads of three of his wives, which, it is said,
were recently unearthed in one of the destroyed
chauteaux of France, were hanging by their few
remaining hairs.

The>' were wonderfully preserved and presented
a most ghastly spectacle.

HUMAN PINCUSHIO.N.
Mnrjorie Ball, '22.

Before a door labeled, "Human Pincushion" a
youth loudly advertised his show. From the
crowd about the door and the expressions on the
faces of those coming out, we judged that the
"Human Pincushion" was a success, both artis-
tically and financially. The "Pincushion" cer-
tainly was human, yet she smilingly bore the
agony that must have been caused by the great
variety of needles, pins, hat pins, and safety pins
that were thrust into her generously proportioned
figure.

FLABBY FATIMA.
George Cartzirighl, '22.

Another great attraction of the evening was
"Flabby Fatima," Although that long and tire-




CHAMBER OF HORRORS.
Herbert McClain, '22.

Our mystical department was an enormous suc-
cess. We sent a gang of roughnecks into the phy-
sics labc-
r a t o r \'
A f t e r
m o v i n g
around a
tew tables
and hang-
ing a few
blankets
over the
door, they
prou d ly

announced to our unbelieving ears that the
"Chamber of Horrors" was completed. \Mth
this outfit and an unbelievable supply of good
luck, we managed to make the unheard of sum of
Si. 85.

fortune teller.

Louise Henter, '2^}.

.\ charming gipsy fortune teller, strange!)' re-
sembling Miss Faulkner, wandered into the school
building the night of the carnival and was kept
busy all evening by aspiring people who wished
to be well-versed in past, present, and future
events.



More Carnival posters.



52



THE CARIBBEAN.



SOBER SUE SHE NEVER SMILES.

Leroy Magniison, '32.

The old adage, "Laugh and the world laughs
with you," has been disproved by this stoical
maiden. All efforts to bring a smile to her face
failed and no one earned the six tickets which had
been promised for that feat. It must be admitted,
however, that the sight of her brought many a
smile to the faces of the spectators.

THE COUNTRY STORE.
Harold Boyd, '24.

One place at the Cristobal High School carni-
val where you could get your money's worth (in
fact the only place) was the country store.

Here was a counter over which bottles of soda
were sold tor 10 cents or three for 25 cents. Behind
it were shelves lined with neatly wrapped parcels
containing everything from buttons to elephants,
for 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cents. Every parcel con-
tained its full marked value, but not always did
it so appear to the person who purchased it.

Just the same, every parcel and bottle of soda
was sold a half-hour before the carnival closed,
and still other treasure seekers came, and, sad to
say, went away with drooping heads and money
in their pockets!



STRATAGINI.
Jane Edwards, '22.

Chester Taylor {alias Stratagini), the greatest
living magician in the Western Hemisphere to-day,
baifled the most brilliant minds of Cristobal and
Colon with his impenetrable magic. Presto
change! And any attempt on our part to solve
the mystery was futile. We left his den appalled
at the power of the great Stratagini. It is needless
to state that his department was one of the most
popular.

THE MUSEUM.
Esther Witt, '2j.

Museums are always remarkable, but this one
was more so! Where else have you ever seen the
teapot used at the Boston tea party, a piece of
the ice on which Washington crossed the Delaware,
and the real Plymouth Rock? It was worth seeing.

ENDING.

Everything ran smoothly and the people were
more than pleased with the features shown. The
halls both upstairs and downstairs were crowded.
At 1 1 o'clock the crowd began to thin out as a
few left for home. We closed the doors at 12
and went cheerfully home, because of our great
success financially and socially.



SCHOOL ATMOSPHERE.



Kirby Ferguson, '21.



When Miss Dodds is feeling good,
She gives us all a smile.
It's like a whiff from a flowered wood
And makes our life worth while.
It rather gets beneath our skins
And helps us to dig in,
'Cause everything is sunshine,
When Miss Dodds begins to grin.



But when her tace is like a map

Just chartered o'er with care,

A dismal hush broods o'er the place,

There's microbes in the air.

We don't follow our orders right,

Nor keep our marks from falling down.

But we just mope and lag around

When Miss Dodds begins to trown.



It is curious how the atmosphere

Gets in a fellow's work;

How smiles will raise the spirits high

And frowns produce a shirk.

It's not the mark that we may get

Which makes us all sail in,

But the expression on her face

When Miss Dodds begins to grin.



THE CARIBBEAN.



53



^=



=ss



A MUSIC STORE ROMANCE.

Wesley Townsend, '22. Jordan Zimmermann, '22.




=a



Margie was Drifting down the Beautiful Ohio
at the End of a Perfect Day when she ran into
Jerry who was Sailing .Hong on Moonliglit Bay.

"Fair One," cried he, ''Where Do li'e Go From
Here?"

"I Don't Know Where Fin Going, But Fm On
My Way" she replied.

"After You've Gone, Fll Thinii of You, My
Budding Rose," was his answer.

"Dear Little Boy of Mine, When the Shadows
Fall, Fll be in the Garden of Roses, If'aiting for
X ou.

The following Evening they met In an Old
Fashioned Garden 'neath the Alabama Moon, .'\fter
Sipping Cider thru' a Straw, they sang Love's
Old Sweet Song.

"Bright Eyes, your Smiles give me the Prohibi-
tion Blues."

"Your Eyes Have Told Me So," she replied,
Whispering.

"I'll go to the End of the If'orld with You, Because
I Love the Sunshine of Your Smile," was his answer.

"Oh!" she. exclaimed, "We'll go to Hindustan
and eat Chinese Rice and Tea."

"We'll take the Love Boat in Old Manila for
Turkestan."

"I'll go ask Mother if I may go IVandering down
the Gypsy Trail," she said, as she picked the
Last Rose of Summer and gave it to him, as he left
for Home, Sweet Home. In return tor this rose
he gave her Sweet Kisses.

Jf'hen Night Falls again, he was back Humming
Mandy beneath her window.

"/ Hear You Calling Me," she answered. Soon
she appeared in her Alice BlueGown.

"Let's go Out in My Old Town Canoe" he sug-
gested, as they strolled beneath the Silvery Moon.



So they paddled to My Isle of Golden Dreams
on the Swanee.

"You'll never grow Tired of Me, will you?
My Jl'ild Irish Rose" he asked.

"/ Never Knew I Could Love Anybody Like
Fm Loving You," she replied. Sweet and Low.

When they returned. Freckles was standing
In the Gloaming. He said,

"You'd be Surprised if I told you all I know
about her. / Used to Call Her Baby, but Out of
a Clear Sky, The Vamp gave me back my Rings
and Said Good-Bye Forever."

"Fm Not Jealous," Jerry replied, as he drove
away in his car.

That same evening they went to the Stoiy
Book Ball and danced That Naughty Waltz.

"Buddy," she said, ^^Take Me to That Land of
Jazz.

"Girl of My Dreams," her Hero replied, "Will
you go with me to My Little Gray Home in the

WestV

"No, Sir," his Carolina Sunshine responded,
"I want a Love Nest Down by the Saskatchewan
where the Hawaiian Lullabys may reach us."

"0, Promise Me, Girl of Mine, In Springtime
fVhen Roses Bloom Again in Miami, You'll Think
of Me."

"I Love You," she replied, before entering her
Castle of Dreams. "Please Hold Me in Your

Arms and Kiss Me Good-bye."

"When the Preacher Makes You Mine Some
Sunday Morning, we'll go to That Tumble Down
Shack in Athlone and Let the Rest of the IVorld Go
By" were his words At Parting.

Thus ended the Music Store Romance.



54



THE CARIBBEAN.



ffi=



s=




THE TERROR OF THE TROPICS.



Jl. Si'iinlo, '23.




=S



IVe seen the toads in Texas,

And the bugs in Bucharest.

The mosquitoes down in Cuba

I'll admit are quite a pest;

The scorpion and the centipedes

.Are dangerous as can be,

But the thing that I fear most of all

Is the Panamanian flea.

While the midnight summer niindrons tell

On my shingle root o'erhead,

.A war was raging furiously

Up and down my white bedspread.

At first they came out one by one,

.And formed a single line,

Then came a whole battalion

Taking up the double time.

"Company square" and section lett

Around my bunk they flew;

Then, running hard, they made a charge

.And war began to brew.

I watched the pesty little freaks.

While doping by my bed.

Then one great flea rushed straight at me

And we grappled on the spread.



I raised my mit, with anger smit;

I struck with firm decision;

But with one jump he cleared my bunk

.And laughed in wild derision.

'Twas then that I became enraged,

Began to slam and knock,

.And through the wee small hours of night,

We battled on my cot.

With mighty fist I crushed them;
One by one they dropped away.
And as the dawn was breaking,
I rested from the fray.
With throbbing head, I wip;d the dead
From otf the blood-smeared sheet;
Then, tearing reinforcements,
I beat a swift retreat.

And thus the battle ended;

.All honor to the dead.

Who lost their life in dubious strife

On my little white bedspread.

Oh, the scorpions and the centipedes,

.Are dangerous as can be,

But I hope I'll never meet again

.A Panamanian flea.



WITHOUT A THOUGHT.

Leo Eherenz, '23.



.Although I take my pen in hand,
I know not what to write;

I've tried and tried, but all in vain;
Mv brain nives forth no light.



I've tried to write about the sea
With all its beauties rare,

-As on the beach it comes and goes
Beneath the sun's bright glare.



My theme is due by this forenoon,
.And yet I have no thought.

All morning long without result,
A subject I have sought.



I try to write about the sky,

.About the forts, both new and old.
But everything I try to write

Has been bv others better told.



At last I give up in despair.
Without a single line,

.AnJ, as my class is nearly due,
I write this little rhvme.



THE CARIBBEAN.



55




THE SOETEOOrV OF A WASTI-RASKFT.

Eiinn C.amphell, '24.




"How tired I am," sighed the weary waste-
basket, as it leaned against the desk. "I do hope
the ianitor will hurry up and relieve me of my
heavy burden. Those boys and girls have no pity
on me; they do tire me out so. I 1 jng sometimes
for the old war times to return, for then th;
children had to save, and I was not so loaded down.

"But this morning (I could cry at the remem-
brance of it), I suffered 'the most unkindest cut ot
air My! My! Here I am quoting from Shakes-
peare. I heard the children in the Julius Caesar
class read that to-day I really am becoming
quite literary. Well, to get back to my story, the
teacher whom 1 hatl considered my best friend
had the children file past me and throw a sticky
gray substance (gum, they called it) at me. I
was verv indignant, but I avenged myself on
her, for I read her sweetheart's letter, which she
threw at me not thinking that I could read.
Hark! I hear a merry whistle; I believe it is the
janitor coming to help me. Thank heaven!

"How much lighter I feel now, but 1 can't forget
the indignities I've suffered to-day, and to add to
it all, that long-legged, red-headed Fred came and
stumbled over me, spilling the papers all over the
floor. Then the horrid thing kicked me, leaving



=S



a large dent in my side as if it were my tault!

"There goes the tinkle of the lunch bell, and here
is where they will throw their old orange peels
and bread crusts at me.

"Oh! Oh, dear! My eyes! That wretched boy
has thrown something into them. Oh! How it
hurts! It must be those fine pencil shavings. I'll
show them something, and th-ow them all over the
floor. It is no use, for I hear the teacher telling
him to wrap them in a paper an.l put them back.

"Well, at last school is out and the echoing
footsteps of the last child have died out. Nothing
can be heard in the room save the tick of the clock
and the scratching pen of the weary teacher.
I am so drowsy I believe I'll sleep. What!
Do my ears deceive me? Is the janitor really
telling the teacher that I am to be discarded and a
new wastebasket put in my place or is it all a
dream?

"A rest! Here I've been longing for a rest and
now that it has come, I'm sad I shall miss them
all even fat little Tom who never missed a
chance to kick me. Then Mary, John (the
little rascal), Ned all of them, but worst of all
I shall miss the old clock confidant of all my joys
and sorrows."



Wlien I went to Cristob;il High,
.\ Latin book they gave to me,
To dig into its lore.
My head was empty as a cup,
I strove and toiled to fill it up
Until my hair 1 tore.



LATIN.

(Apologies to Stevenson.)
Esther JVitt, '.'?.



But all in vain; I make mistakes
Until, I'm sure my teacher aches
To poke me with a pin.
Too thick and hard is my poor head,
.'\s thick as mud and hard as lead,
.And Latin won't soak in.



There once was a Roman named Caesar,

Who fought like a Mexican greaser,

He conquered all Gaul,

Wrote a book on it all:

Wish he hadn't this old Roman Geeser.

C. H.'2r.



56



THE CARIBBEAN.




ISTHMIAN MOVIE TRAVESTY ENTITLED
"THE LUCKY PIN."



F. R,-y



ind. '21. P. C. Dn-Ie, '22.




Scenario by F. Ravmond.
Spelling corrected by P. C. Dovle.
Photographer, Chester Tavlor.
Art Director, Emilio Solomox's little brother Johxnv.

Round I.

Betty Confetti, a beautiful I'i-year maiden of
Italian descent, whose father and mother were
drowned in the Caribbean
Sea when the tua; Reliance




less Threeliase, she likes the pretty things which
Mendezez's money will buy. The only money
Happy receives is the few dollars he earns from
selling cartons of cigarettes given to him forj-base
hits at the ball games. (End of Round I.)

Round II.

Three months have elapsed and this beautiful
and wmdy Sunday morning Betty is seated in her



sank, is left alone, an orphan, comfortable porch swing strumming a sacred song

on her ukelele to drown the strains of the Mctrola,
which some lighthearted soul is playing in the
adjoining Strangers Club. She eats but little, not
only on account of grief, but because her funds are
now down to but S6, anil the district quarter-
master has notified her that in a few days she will
be homeless. Her head tells her that she should
Colon BaseballClub, whosemembershavechipped not marry the handsome and penniless ballplayer,
in to raise a liberal amount to keep her from star- and her heart insists that she must not marry the



the only occupant of a big
type-14 house, standing next
door to the Strangers Club
in Colon. She is a favorite
of the Strangers Club, the

1. Profile photo of Men- _,, X .,,. ,^,

dezez taken just before Washington CotllllOn Club,
forming habit of nose ^-st r^i 1 1 i

poking. the Wanderers Club, and the



vation, while the district quartermaster
has generously agreed to let her stay 'ii
the Commission quarters until the earned
leave of her loving father expires.

A wealthy member of the Washington
Cotillion Club, William H. Mendezez,
who is president of the Continental Bank-
ing and Trust Company, and the good-
natured Happy Threebase, star player of
the Colon Baseball Club, are suitors for




3. iliastraiing bow nose
spreads by sticking it in-
to other people's affairs.



homely and stingy banker. While she
is thus engaged, a vendor of lottery
tickets enters and induces Betty to in-
vest S5 of her remaining six in a ticket,
the number of which happens to be 9089.
The drawing is to be drawn within one
hour, and she decides to stake all upon
her luck. The suspense of the remain-
ing hour s maddening, for Betty knows
that at the end of that time she will



Bettv's heart and hand. What Happy lacks in eitherhave but Si to her nameor will have S20,ooo

moncN' he makes up in good looks, and what Men- silver and freedom to marry the handsome Harry

dezez lacks in good looks is shameful to mention, Threebase. If she fails? Well, there is always the

forthe bankerisafflicted\\ifhan"apartment"nose, sewer! She pins the ticket

which mars his beauty no little, .-^n "apartment" tenderly in the empty cracker

nose, called "flat" by lower classmen, is caused by box which has furnished her

poking it so much into other people's business scanty breakfast. She paces

that it becomes as wide and flat as a mushroom, the floor to and fro, wringing

and if it ever falls inside of the face nothing can her hands in desperation, and

ever get it back on the outside. Mendezez is tearing her hair out by the roots,

stingy with his money and plans to wait until until she hears the welcome

Betty is so poor that she will have to accept his toll of the bell in the Governor's af,e it'*^*" ^"*^ ^^'""'

repulsive advances. palace which tells her that

Betty has a hard time deciding whom she will it is now ii o'clock and she can now learn- the

accept, for, while she loves the carefree and penni- winning number. With disheveled hair and




t,f tile villain



THE CARIBBEAN.



57




cnair.



tear-stained cheeks she frantically rushes to a
lottery vendor's post only to find that the slip on
her board shows the winning number to be 6806.
Utter despair is shown on her beautiful face as
with heavy footsteps she returns to her unhappy
home, throws herself heavilyintoaninvitingchair,

only to jump
up, clutch-
ing the back
of her thin
dress while
uttering
p i e r c i n g
screams, for
she has been
terribly
stung by
some thing,
probably a
dreaded
scorpion hid-
den in the
seat of the
Hastily pulling the stinger from its unwill-
ing cushion, she is much relieved to find it to
be nothing more dangerous than the pin in the
cracker box, which the wind has blown from the
table to the chair. Whether it is pain in removing
the pin or whether it is disappointment in again
seeingtheworthlesslottery ticket which has cost her
so much at her scanty funds is not for us to judge,
but with a pardonable shriek she hurls the cracker
box and its contents from her, the wind whisking
it out of the open window. A torrential downpour
follows, and Betty Confetti with dejected spirits
throws herself, but this time more cautiously,
flat on her face on a handy couch to brood over
and consider herunhappy fate. (Endof Round 11.)

Round HI.

Happy Threebase, at the Strangers Club,
knows that there will be no game to-day and as he
bends over to unlace his spiked shoes, a pin-laden
piece of paper, carrying a cruel and sharply
pointed pin, flies in the window and with great
force lands just where his baseball pants are
worn most from sliding bases. Mendezez, the
banker, passes just as this happens and Harry
believes that he has purposely jabbed him with
a poisoned dart. With a cry of rage Harry
swings a terrific blow which lands right on his
hated rival's nose, causing it to pop inside of his
face, so that he can never blow that nose again.



Grabbing the pin from its cruel hiding place, he
notices tor the first time that it has a piece of
paper attached to it which turns out to be a lottery
ticket. With a glance of scorn at his hated rival,
he rushes over to the home of his sweetheart,
carrying the ticket with him. He proposes mar-
riage and offers her the lottery ticket, saying
"Betty, darling, if this 9089 wins to-day you can
change your name from Confetti to Threebase."

"Happy," she replies, as she glances at the
number on the ticket, "I have practically decided
to marry William H. Mendezez, and besides, if
ticket 6806 had not won to-day, I would not
have thrown that piece of paper away."

He leaves her beautiful presence with a sigh of
despair, unconsciously taking the ticket with him,
and he offers no objection to the entrance of his
bitter enemy, who is now crossing the doorstep of
the girl he loves. He hesitates for a moment and
hisses in the banker's ear, "Harm one of the few
remaining hairs on the head of the girl you are
about to marry and you will answer to Happy
Threebase," for Mendezez, who has listened to
the shrieks of Betty all morning, now realizes
that it is time to press his suit.

Happy strolls down Front Street and, as he
passes the lottery office, notices that the winning
number after all is 9089 and that the piece of
paper which he crushes in his hand means $20,000
si'.ver to him. He cashes the ticket and with
;? 1 0,000 gold, rushes again to Betty's home in time
to hear his beloved's sweet voice saying to the
banker, "No, Willie, I am sorry, but with all my
poverty I will never consent to be the wife of a
man with an ingrowing nose: Adios forevermore!"
(End of Round HI.)

Round IV.
It takes but 25 minutes for Happy to convince
Betty that she has been twice mistaken; once
when she said that she would marry Mendezez
and again when in her haste and anguish, she
failed to notice that the number she saw was up-
sidedown. After theceremonya passing stranger
overhead this
dialogue. "And
now, darling Bet-
ty, we are tied for
life." "Not tied,
Happy," was the
strange rejoinder,
"pinned." (End
of Round IV.)




58



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD



989



Popular Passenger Vessels Transit the Canal.

Three sister ships, the J. Isabella Dodds, thi^ Catherine I. Davis, and the
Jessie Daniels, ail of equal capacity, heavily laden with cargoes of
school spirits and general knowledge, filling all holds and every unoccu-
pied inch of deck space, cleared from this port during the present week.
Sailing with any of these ships is not only a genuine pleasure, but means
comfort and confidence in the highest degree, and safe arrival at desti-
nation.



Official Circulars.

Appointment.

Thk Panama Canal.
Executive Office.
Balboa Heights. C. Z.. July 1. 19.50.
Heads of Departments and Divisions:

During my absence on leave Mr. Carl Duey will
be Acting Governor of The Panama Canal and
Mr. Harold Cloke will be Acting President of the
Panama Railroad, and. as such, they will be ac-
countable for all nonexpendable property in the
possession of the Cristobal Corral and the Mindi
Hog Farm.

Frank Ra\'mond.
Gnrerrwr, The Panama Canal.
Presidfut. Pamima Railroad.
Approved :

Alice Hunter.
.Aiidilrc-^s.



Transportation.

Pan.aj^ia Railro.U) Company.
Panama R_\ilro.ad Steamship Line.

Office of Superintendent.
Balboa Heights. C. Z.. July 2. 1Q30.
To all concerned Effective at once, and until
furthei notice, collectors and conductors are
directed to pass, free of charge, all students of
Cristobal grade and high schools to all points on
the main line tracks in either direction. \'iola-
tions of this order will meet with instant dismissal.
Charlie Henter,
.Sxiperinlendent. Panama Railroad.
Approved:

Harold Cloke.

Acting President, Panama Railroad.



Sale of Material.

Sealed bids will be opened by the Chief Quarter-
master for the sale of the following-described
equipment, Friday. July 6. Intending bidders
must address envelope in perfectly legible hand-
writing, free from misspelled words or gram-
matical errors, with Commissary bottled ink
meeting Government requirements; bidders must
be white, unmarried, between the ages of 16 and
21. if female, and between 21 and 89 years of age.
If otherwise. All bids will be accompanied by a
clearance paper, metal check, and 5 yards of
Commissary coupons. The right is reserved to
accept any or all bids: One rain gauge, obsolete
storehouse, formerly used in lying about the
Atlantic side weather; 1 ice-making machine,
cold str>rage plant, in good condition but no longer
needed on account of the continued cold tempera-
ture prevailing from the Caribbean; 189 rusty
umbrellas. Cristobal commissary, unsalable at
that end of the Canal owing to lack of rain; 1
dry dock. Old French. Mount Hope, suitable for
a small rowboat-repairing town but totally inade-
quate for the requirements of Cristobal.

Georgie Pepper.
General Mana^eres'i, Commissary Division.



Removal.

The Panama Can'.a.l,
Executive Office.
Balboa Heights. C. Z., July 3. 1030.
He.abs of Departments and DrvisioNs:

In conjunction with the removal of the Ad-
ministration to the Atlantic Side, the Panama
Railroad offices will also be located there and will
occupy the historic railroad roundhouse on ac-
count ot its scenic effect on passing tourists.
KiRBv Ferguson,
Mistress of Transportation.
Authorized:

Leo Eberenz,

Chief Health Officer.



Restriction.

The Panama Canal.
Executive Office.
Balboa Heights. C. 2., June 30, 1Q30.
He.\ds of Departments and DrvisiONs:

The request of the Chief, Bureau of Clubs and
Playgrounds, that the columns of The Canal
Record be thrown open to the activities of the
swimming director Is denied as it is thought
inadvisable to extend the already wide field now
enjoyed by this Mexican athlete in the daily
press of the United States. Europe. Asia, and
Africa.

Mildred Stafford.
Executive Secretary.



Correction.

An article appearing on page 562 in the Oc-
tober issue was in error in stating that "all school
championships in basketball, baseball, tennis and
swimming are held by students of the Pacific
side," as Cristobal High has earned all champion-
ships in these events this yei.r.



Extension of Privileges.

The Panama (\\nal,
FxEci.'Ti\E Office,
Balboa Heights. C. Z.. July 4. 1930.
To all concerned As all male students of the
Cristobal High School have been added to the
police and detective force of the Isthmus, heads
of departments and divisions are instructed to
turn over their trucks and Ford cars to them upon
demand. Instant dismissal will follow the slight-
est disobedience to any demand made by one of
these students.

Guy Johannes,
Chief. Division of Police and Fire.



Prevention of Contagious Disease.

The Panama Canal,
Division of Schools,
Balboa Heights. C. Z., July 7. 1930.
To all concerned By direction of the Chief
Health Officer, Mr. Leo Eberenz, all principals
are required to pi o vide the following health
requisites for students during the school exercises:
Monday, ice cream cones; Tuesday, pie. cake.
and cookies; Wednesday, fudge; Thursday,
banana splits; Friday, apples, oranges, and raisins.
No departure from this program will be tolerated
unless student is ill. when he or she may be ex-
cused, without injury to class standing, with order
on Commissary for whatever fruit he desires.
A. R. Lang.
Superintendent of Schools.

COMMISSARY NOTE.



Sale.

There will be a special sale at all retail commissaries beginning Monday to close
out a lot of overstocked commissary coupon books. Fifteen-dollar books will be
marked down to SI. 98 and S5 books will sell at two for 17 cents. Many of them are
beautifully printed in Bolsheviki red and Barbadian black covers which may be used
in dyeing pocketbooks and handbags. For the not-too-fastidious consumer these
books should meet almost every requirement.



THE CARIBBEAN.



59




CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL IN 2021.

Chesler T,i\l'jr, '22. Unris Other, '22.




=S



After giving the morning paper tlie once over,
and finding that a bill had been passed prohibiting
children under sixteen years of age from driving
any kind of an air machine, I handed the paper
to mother with a sigh of relief. My kid brother
wouldn't get his neck broken now. He was always
tinkering around one of the machines and using
them just as he liked. This had always been a
source of worry for mother, too. Soon I was on my
way to school.

"Not such a bad landing that time," I said
to Herbert, as I climbed out of my aero-limousine
in front of the Cristobal High School hangar,
which was situated on the roof of the building.
"I surely love to go down these moving stairs,
don't you, Chester.?" Alice asked me, as we met on
the stairs.

"Yes, they're great," I answered.
"Hello, Chester," said Leroy, as we met at the
automatic shoe shiner, "was that you under me
when I looped and lost my helmet?"

"Yes, that was I and I believe I could have
caught your helmet if I hadn't had Doris along,
but I didn't want to scare her. Did you find your
helmet?"

"No, I didn't look for it. I noticed that it fell
in Mount Hope cemetery,so why not let it rest in
peace? I don't mind the helmet so much, but I
do hate to comb my hair over on this automatic
hair comber. It puts too much perfume on my
dome."

Soon the sliding boards had me in the assembly
hall. I had just seated myself, when I noticed
the light on my individual wireless telephone
flashing. I quickly clamped on the phones, ex-
pecting to hear some girl calling me, only to hear
Miss Hornbeak's voice.

"Come up to the desk at once, Chester."
Stepping onto the moving carpet, I was soon
up at her desk.

"Where were you the last halt of the period
yesterday?" she asked.

"I went to St. Clair Field to see an air polo game
between Pedro Miguel and Balboa."



"All right, Chester, I am going to have you write
a one-page theme in your own handwriting." I
swore inwardly.

Ding, dong, sounded the gong for classes.
Upon entering the algebra room, I proceeded to
the victrola and put on the record called "Ches-
ter's Explanation of Problem No. j."

"Very well explainetl, Chester," said Miss
Beeching, as the victrola ceased.

For the next class we all boartled a big four-
motored bus bound for Barcelona. We were going
to Spain for our Spanish lesson. We had been in
the air about ten minutes when we passed a bus
load of Spanish kids coming over to take a lesson
in English. We always looked forward to our
Spanish class, because the teacher always served
us delicious wines and sweet biscuits during class.
.As soon as we returned, Leroy and I started for
the lunch room.

"I hope they have some more chicken to-day
and some more of that pistachio parfait, don't
you?" I asked.

"Yes, and do you know, I was just thinking
how it must have been when a fellow had to
bother about paying for his own lunch," Leroy
answered.

Coming out of the lunch room, we saw manv
of the students running outside. Leroy and I
ran out to see what the commotion was all about.
Once outside we saw two planes up about 15,000
feet in fierce combat. I knew by the insignia on
the bottoms of the planes that one was from the
colored school and one was from ours. No one
seemed to know who was in our plane, because
several planes from our school were up. With veils
and hat waving we watched the plane from the
colored school turn and flee and our plane loop
and spiral down to the ground. But who should
alight but Shelby White! No wonder the black
fellow turned tail.

The next class was History. This class we
dreaded most of all, because we had to sit for
twenty whole minutes and watch the battles of
Gettvsburg and Chattanooga run off on the screen



6o



THE CARIBBEAN.



before us. Afterwards we all piled into a big tour-
motored machine and flew to Gettysburg and
Chattanooga and carefully looked over the old
battlefields. Just as if I ever gave a doggone for
those old battlefields, anyway!

As soon as we got back from this tiresome
trip, we all had a race to the natatorium, which
was situated in the center of the gymnasium
rooms in the basement. Here we watched Paul
Doyle and Frank Raymond battle for three
quarters of an hour over a game of water tennis.
Paul, in the end, was victorious.

The next period was a study period for me.
I put my next day's English record on my indi-
vidual phonograph twice, but I knew no more
after the second time than before I began. I
couldn't get my mind on my work, so I decided to
fill my program for the Junior dance which was to
be given that night in the Louis X\'I ball room
in the south wing. Caterers and decorators from



New York had been busy in there all day, so natur-
ally we were crazy to have a peep, but the door
was shut fast, so we would have to curb our curi-
osity until night. This was to be the best dance
of the year. Music was to be furnished by the
Boston Symphony Orchestra, and, during the
intermission, special dances were to be rendered
by the ballet of the MetropolitanOpera Company.

I began to call different girls for dances and
soon my program was full. This done, I decided
that I had better call Doris and warn her to be
ready at 7.30, when I would call for her she
was always late. As I was trying to get her, some-
one broke in with

"Chester, you had better get up. It's 7.30 and
you'll be late for school, I'm afraid."

"What? Why, where's Doris.'' Who are

.Aw, mother, I was just having a swell dream
about Cristobal High School in 2021. I wish it
were true now."



THE HABITS OF OUR ANCESTORS IN 1921.

NOTES FROM A LECTURE GIVEN IN 2021, BY A PROMINENT HISTORIAN.



Wesley Townsend, 22. Eleanor Zim/nermann, '21.



It has been my privilege recently to take up
some original research work concerning life in the
public schools of the Canal Zone in 1921.

I have found through my investigation that:

The pupils in the school were forced to sit in
straight-backed seats in plain rooms, in strange
contrast to the luxurious upholstered chairs, in
comfortable rooms with frescoed walls and full
length windows, of our school.

The favorite game of the boys seems to have
been basketball, which, however, was far dif-
ferent from the game our boys play under the same
name. The boys were exceedingly rough in their
game, knocking, shoving, and holding their
opponents against the walls, while our boys step



politely aside with an "Excuse me" and let the
other team take the ball.

.As for the dress, this was the most astonishing.
The girls arranged their hair in a queer manner,
covering up their dainty ears which nature had
meant to be shown. To accomplish this, some
even wore on each side contrivances which looked
like fuzzy balls glued to their heads.

They had no idea of grace and line and wore
their skirts very short and scant. They used the
very richest material for their everyday dress.

Although there was not much change in the
boys' dress, some of the boys had come to our
sensible way of wearing loose collars, while others
still adhered to the ancient custom of wearing the
high stiff collar.



YOU KNOW



Kirhy Ferguson, '2/.



When Miss Dodds calls you to her office,
In the h.illofC. H. S.
Vou know there's something on her mind
But you're hound you won't confess.



Though wit .ind wisdom flow from her,
You sit there stony, cold;
But when she looks at you in silence
Next thing you know is you've told.



THE CARIBBEAN.



Wr-



=^




NAMELESS BUT NAMEFUL.



Herherl McCliii'i, '22.




I hopped into my Dodds roadster and Ictr oKl
Stafford Halls with never a pang of reg.-et. I
enteretl the highway and stepped on the gas. It
was May, and Boyd by a Mary heart I sped along,
watching tor a se]uirrel or Kulvi as it crossed the
Duey Fields. I rounded a sharp curve with a
Rush. Just ahead t)f me rode a Miller in a cart.
I hit him with a bump that threw me out and
turned the Cartwright over. I hit the road and
tore my new Tailor made Cloke up the back.
My victim stood up and, Jf'hite as he was about
the G/7/.f, he gave me his Frank opinion of my
driving. I got into the car to Parker outside the
To'dsnscnd and he got in besicie me to go to town
to hunt his daughter. I offered to help him
Hunter. He couldn't find her in the town, so
Solomon sad he went to the Morgan looked while
I stayeil outdoors, knowing what a Colberg it was



inside. When he had f lund hisdaughte", I started
to go home but fraud that Strobridge had broken
down so I left the car and walked. Not far from
hom; I met a boy leading a Ca npbell antl feeding
it some little red Balls. I asked him what they
were.

He said, ^^ Peppers."

I thought I knew th; boy and asked him, "Are
you John Morton's boy?"

He smiled and answered "I'm not Johnson but
Peterson." I passed on anil came to the lake where
my brother Oliver was Beeching Eduiar.Ts boat on
the shore. He showed me a queer fish he had
caught that had Seeley flappers for fins and a
sharp Hornbeak. We walked on together and I
thought of the Bliss of my happy home anti
decided to loaf hereafter and leave it to dad to
bring home the Bacon and apologize for this IVitl



IN PLANE GEOMETRY CLASS.

Esltier H'ilt, 'sj, and Louise Henter, '2J.



Say now, what's the matter with you boys?
You don't need to make so much noise.
Now you quit bangin' those chairs around.
Why can't you let 'em stay on the ground?
Well, Eddie, so you're gettin' it too?
It must be catchin' as the "flu."
I thought you'd let the girls alone;
You'd better get a private 'phone
-And do your chatting after school
When you won't be breaking any rule.
Now, Emma Townsend, quit those giggles,
And Jessie, have you got the wiggles?
Herbert, please go to the board.
You're noisy enough to be a Ford.



Well, what's th; matter with you peiple?

Al, I just wish you were up a steeple,

Then you wouldn't be craning your neck all day,

W Itching the airplanes on their way.

Oh, pshaw, haven't you gat any b.-ains?

You absolutely give me a pain.

Now, Bill Mary, don't you crab,

I've g3t all your marks on tab,

And they're not so good that you can't improve

Sd take the hint and get on the move.

Well, this class must have the willies.

You act just like a lot of sillie;.

You'll make me real mad some day soon.

And I'll chuck the whole bunch out of the room.



SENIORS SOLILOQUIZE.



Mildred Staford, '2



Charles Hunter, '21.



To rise or not to rise that is the question,
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to rise
And carry books unwillingly to school
Or by an extra nap avoid my troubles;
.And in this sleep forget, and be content
To rise whenever me the spirit moves.



Oh, that this too, too solid geometry would melt.
Explode, and resolve itself into a smoke,
Or that the school teachers had not fixed
Their minds for to teach us geometry.
How weary, hard, dull and unworkable
Seem all the propositions of this book.



62



THE CARIBBEAN.




We regret the small number of exchanges this
year and hope to have better success in the next
issue. However, we certainly appreciate the
exchanges that were sent us.

The Whisp. Wilmington High Schonl, Wilmington, Del.

We congratulate you on the development of so
good a book. Your jokes are clever and interesting.
The cuts are appropriate. However, your book may
be improved by increasing your literary department
and keeping all your advertisements in the back.

The- Ahdaiacigiim. Lincoln High School, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis.
This is the only annual we received as an exchange.
Your book is worthy of praise. It is well planned
from beginning to end. We have obtained many
suggestions from your arrangement. We hope you
will have an exchange department in the forthcoming
issue. We were surprised to see a story "A Trip
through the Panama Canal," by one of our (ormer
Canal Zone students. Prudence Martin, ';o.

The Comment. Cretin High .S'chool, St. Paul, Minn.

We enjoyed your Christmas number. The Christ-
mas stories are in great contrast with ours and we
feel homesick after reading them. A few snapshots
will brighten your book. Your comments are origi-
nal. The paper and print of your book make it very
pleasing to read.

The Magpie. St. Margaret's School, Waterbury',Conn.

Your literary department is well-handled. A few
jokes will add spice to your book. Cuts would
improve its appearance.

The 'Junta. Indiana High School, Indiana, Penn.

Your cover designs are appropriate. Your ex-
change in the Easter number is cleverly written. Why
not add more cuts to your book? In the author of
"Cannibal Lee" we see a budding F. P. .\.

The Florida Flambeau. Florida Slate College for Women.

Your paper is very newsy. 'Nuf sed.



The Eltrurian. Haverhill High School, Haverhill, Mass.

It is too bad to cheapen so good a book with the
advertisements in front and on the covers. We have
nothing more to say except that we would like to hear
your views of us.

The Pioneer. Reading High School, Reading, Mass.

We are interested in your well-developed stories.
" 'Neath Caribbean Skies" is typical of our surround-
ings but in reading it over we found quite a serious
mistake. In the March number you said that Colon
had been given the .American name "Cristobal."
Cristobal and Colon are two separate towns although
there is only a railroad separating them.

The Gleaner. Pazslucket High School, Pawtucket, R. I.

Your book is very good. Your "Tattler" depart-
ment is very interesting. We wish to congratulate
you on the good arrangement of your doctors', law-
yers', and dentists' "ads'" in the front of the book.

Revisla La Salle. Colegio de La Salle, Panama.

Su libro es muy bueno. Usted debe tener mas de
fotografias.

The Hyde Park Weekly. Hyde Park High School, Chicago, 111.
The fact that your book is published weekly is
reason enough for your not having cuts in your book.
Cuts and better paper would add a great deal to your
book.

Tlie Curtis Monthly. Curtis High School, Staten Island, A\ Y.
There is a good variety of material in your contents.

The Thrasher. Rice Institute, Houston, Tex.

Your paper gives very good accounts of athletics.

The Jcademy Journal. NorwichFree Academy, A^orwich, Conn.
Your magazine is unusually attractive both in ap-
pearance and content.

The Record. John Marshal High School, Richmond, Va.

Your magazine is very good throughout but there
are still ways of improvement, by adding a few cuts
and a joke department.



THE CARIBBEAN.



63




OCTOBER.

4. When the doorsofCristobal HighSchool were
again opened, we found the assembly hall in-
creased twice the size of the year before. Many
new faces were seen among them one new Senior,
one new Junior, and several new Sophomores,
besides a large Freshman class. Only two of the
faculty from the year before remained, Mr.
Bacon and Senor Villafranca. As Mr. Drill was
in the States, Mr. Bacon acted as principal.

6. This day the seating of the student body,
excepting the proud Seniors, was changed. How
insulting it was to the Juniors to have Fresh-
men sitting farther back in the room than they
were! How queer it was to see six-foot Willie
sitting in a front seat and obstructing the view of
the room. Quietly and innocently Leroy sat
among four privileged, enjoying, comfortable
Freshies.

11. At 7 not sharp a group of boys repre-
senting a picked basketball team, met at pier 7.
They waited until Mr. Wilson, the coach. Miss
Dodds, and Miss Hornbeak arrived. Together
they left in the launch Margarita for Gatun (via
the Panama Canal). For results of the game
refer to the athletic department.

12. Much to our surprise and delight Mrs.
Howard, whom we remembered as Miss Healey,
came from Balboa to teach until a permanent
teacher could be secured.

Miss Dodds was appointed principal. She
proved herself very capable and became a favor-
ite among the students.

15. Oh, poor Freshies! This day their curly
locks were shorn from their heads by the upper-
classmen and no barber fee was charged. As a
special concession half of Harold Boyd's luxuriant
locks were left and Miss Dodds encouraged him



further by assuring him that things grow well in
the tropics. The girls, except the few who were
afraid of their hazing and stayeil awa\' until
school was in session, didn't lose their curly locks
but had them braided "a la Sis Hopkins."

22. Mrs. Fields gave a party for her daughter
Mary. The threatening downpour diil not faze
the ones who were invited. The evening was
enjoyed by all especially the refreshments; eh,
Harold? The house was decorated to SLiit the
coming occasion, Halloween.

2j. The faculty enjoyed a trip up the coast to
Porto Bello. .'\mong the man\' souvenirs brought
back was a most beautiful sunburn.

25. Our usual interest in aeroplanes was some-
what divided; we watched the grammar school
children move into the annex.

26. Our first pep meeting was held. .Alex.
Linczer was chosen as cheer leader and proved
himself quite capable. With the able help of Miss
Dodds we had some clever yells. Rah, Rah, Rah,
Miss Dodds.

30. The first game of the basketball series with
Balboa High School was played on Cristobal floor,
The school turned out and we were there strong
with our new yells.

NOVEMBER.

8. Miss Piedalue arrived from Montana to
teach the Domestic Science classes formerly in
charge of Mrs. Strong.

10. Physical examination by the doctors of
Colon Hospital.

16. The first general staff meeting at the home
of Kirby Ferguson.

'.-. Mr. Wilson fulfilled his promise to the
basketball team for their success in winning the
series. A dinner that will always be remembered



64



THE CARIBBEAN.



was held at the Hotel Washington. Miss Dodds
acted as toastmistress and a school pin was pre-
sented to Mr. Wilson. The dinner was marred by
the absence of Henter and Townsend; however,
it was an enjoyable evening.

1 8. Work was begun on the Junior play to be
given at the Thanksgiving program.

23. The most important and enjoyable event
of the year was the welcoming of Senator and Mrs.
Harding, upon whom our nation had bestowed its
greatest honor. We were given a half holiday, in
honor of the occasion.

24. To celebrate the Thanksgiving holidays a
program was held. Many poems and stories were
read. The main number on the program was a
play given by four members of the Junior class,
Kirby Ferguson, Mary Fields, Herbert McClain,
and Harold Cloke. The plot of the play was the
revelation of the Puritan Age to a modern boy
and girl as they looked up at their ancestors'
picture.

25 to 29. Turkey, trips, and thankfulness.



1 5. The girls went to .^ncon to play a basketball
game.

FEBRUARY.'

2. Mrs. Holland gave a most interesting talk
about India where she has been a missionary for
many years.

5. The girls playetl basketball with the Balboa
High School girls.

8. School was dismissed at 2 o'clock to enable
the students to see the Panamanian carnival
parade.

II. Girl Reserves' party at the Gilbert House.

19. First indoor baseball of the season with
Gatun. This was our first victory but by no
means the last.

23. Miss Blaisdell became Mrs. Lockett.

28. Gerald Bliss returned from South America
after a vacation of three weeks.

MARCH.



DECEMBER.

I. Mrs. Howard left. Mr. Bacon took the
Algebra I class and Miss Porter the Modern
History class.

5. The Colon and Fort Davis baseball teams
played a benefit game for the high school annual.
The proceeds were indeed a great help and every
body interested in The Caribbean was thankful
to the teams, Mr. J. B. Fields, Colonel Cloke, and
all those who helped the cause.

8. Many sad faces were seen as the report cards
for the first quarter were given.

14-15. Everybody busy preparing for the
carnival.

16. THE CARNIVAL.

17 (6.30 a. m.). Cleaning day after the night
before.

20. Christmas vacation. The faculty enjoyed
a trip to the San Bias Islands.

JANUARY.

3. Miss Beeching arrived from the States to
teach Geometry, Physics, and General Science.

10. Staff meeting.

Basketball game between Gatun and Cristobal
High Schoolgirls,



3. Much credit is due to the .Ancient History
class for the presentation of their play, a Mock
Olympian Council. But, one can readily under-
stand the perfection of the entire play when we
say that Miss Dodds is the teacher of the class,
for she has the ability of bringing out all that is
best in a pupil.

4. Hostilities between Costa Rica and Panama
resulted in the sudden departure of Senor Villa-
franca.

lo. Miss Barnhouse came from Panama to
take the Spanish classes formierly in charge of
Seiior Villafranca.

12. Freshman picnic at Devil's Hole. They
were chaperoned by Miss Hornbeak, Miss
Beeching, Miss Piedalue, Mrs. Lockett, and
Mr. Bacon.

15. The Freshman classes of former years have
played little part in the school compared to the
activities and ability shown by the '24 class, but
with Miss Hornbeak as their English teacher
why shouldn't they be that way."* They gave a
most enjoyable entertainment composed of dia-
logues and monologues. We sincerely hope that
the next time Eliza makes her appearance in
public she will have her socks darned.

16-18. Semester examinations.



THE CARIBBEAN.



?i<;



18-28. Easter vacation. The hoys went on
different camping trips, among them to Sweet-
water and up the Chagres.

21. Freshman algehra examination.

APRIi..

2. Track meet. A Pyrrhian v-ictory for Baihoa.

6. We had our first practice with Miss Currier
for the songs at the Commencement exercises.

25. The Sophomore class gave a dramatization
of "Silas Marner."

28. The members of the Staff and the cKiss
presitients met to discuss the dance to be given
the 6th of May.

30. The last games of the indoor baseball games
were played at Balboa and Pedro Miguel, the
Cristobal High School girls winning both, which
gave them the 100 per cent championship.



MAV.

5. Miss F.lcy McCausey, who has spent three
years in China, talked to us abiut the customs
and conditions in that interesting country.

6. The High School dance at the Washington..
F.\erybody happy.

10. Miss Reichel talked to the .Ancient History
class on her experiences in Italian cities.

12. Mrs. Dreher, the wife of the .American
Consul, talked to us on "Tahiti," wiiere she
spent almost tour years.

I J (Friday). Mrs. Lockett awarded the athletic
letters to the girls.

18. Fast material for The Caribbean goes to
press.



APE OWE 'EM.

Exchange.

When fur stews can this sill leer I'm
Toot rye tomb ache theme e'en ink leer,
Youth inked wood butt bee weigh sting thyme;
Use eh, "Its imp lean on scents, shear!"

Gnome attar; Anna lies align!
Nation mice lender verse says knot
Fork rip tick poet real Ike mine.
How .\aron weal, demesnes allot.



"W^HO'S TO BLAME?"

E. Miller, '24.

Four nights to the movies
And a basketball game,
"F" in my school work,
And who's to blame?
Can it be my teachers?
It surely isn't me.
I wonder, yes, I wonder
Who can it be?



MORE TRUTH THAN POETRY.

What Lightning is to Speed;

What Snap is to Effort;

What Gas is to the Motor Car;

What Butter is to Toast;

Yea! Yea! and more Yeas!

What Ten cents is to a Freshman;

What Food is to a Sophomore;

What Sleep is to a Junior;

What Commencement is to a Senior,

Gives but a light idea of

What our Facultv is to all of us.



MR 77J7S-



66



THE CARIBBEAN.




Wesley Townsend. "Duey, do you believe in
fairies?"

Duey. "Sure, I crossed the Hudson River in
one."

After the ancient history class had compared
the characteristics and positions ot Caesar,
Crassus, and Pompey, Miss Dodds asked:

"Kenneth, which one ot these would you rather
have been?"

Kenneth. "Caesar."

Miss Dodds. "Why?"

Kenneth. "Because he liveil the longest."

Irene McCoiirt. "We have a white parrot at
home."

Miss Hornbeak. "Does it talk?"

Irene. "Oh, awfully."

Miss H. "Who taught him, Irene?"

A TRUE JOKE, BUT NOT FOR THE NATIVE.

It was when cash registers were first intro-
duced in Latin-American countries, that a store-
keeper in a small town away up in the interior,
bought one.

A few days later a native entered the store with
a bill to be changed. Into the strange monster
of a cash register went the hill and up jumped
"No Sale."

"O, Seiior, Seiior," screamed the native, "him
say 'No Sale.' It won't come out."

The Junior class was discussing civics. The
topic turned to forms ot governments.

"Chester, what was the form of government
before the flood?"

Trying to think, he answered, "Why, I can't
seem to remember."

Raymond (at the tlinner given tothe basketball
team by Mr. W'ilson). "Why is a schoolroom
like a Ford?"

Cloke. "Because there is a crank in front."
Miss Dodds. "And a lot of nuts behintl."



The Junior class had been taking references
from the "Source Book ot American Histors-,"
written by Hart. When the class was called.
Miss Hornbeak asked:

"Have you your Harts, class?"

Everyone reached to his left side and nodded.

Paul (to his father). "Pop, do you think I'll
ever grow any more?"

Mr. Doyle. "Why, sure, son, why not?"
Paul. "I don't. My head's in the way."

Harold Cloke (in the old W^ashington Hotel).
"Waiter, is there any soup on the bill-of-fare?"
Waiter. "There was, but I wiped it oif."

Miss Dodds (at a staff meeting of The Carib-
bean). "How about some of you boys making
some things in wood work tor our bazaar?"

Eddie May. "I guess that wood work."

./ Senior (after three and one-half years in high
school). "I think I'll go down and look over the
night school some day."

Miss Beerhing (teaching botany in general
science class). "^^'hat kind of rose is common to
the Isthmus?"

Freshman. ^"Neg-roes."

ROLL call in SPANISH CLASS.

Mr. Villajranca. "George!"

George (very loud). "Sir."

Mr. J'illafranea. "Are you here?"

"Slim" Zimmermann, the new guard on the
Gatun basketball team was practicing shooting
baskets. Just as he made a nice long shot, he said
to Wesley who was standing nearby, "Gee,
every time I open my mouth it seems to tall in."

CONNOTATION.

"For to-morrow I want you to describe a natural
scene. You may describe a tree, lake, or any-other



THE CARIBBEAN.



67



picture that may come into your mind," Miss
Hornbealc assigned to the Freshman English class.

"I can't do that," spoice up Shelby, with a
blank look.

^^ "Certainly you can," said Miss Hornbeak.
"Now just tell me what picture comes into your
mind while you are looking at the leaves of a
tropical palm tree."

He glanced at one just outside the school win-
dow, then calmly said, "It looks to me like Harold
trying to raise a pompadour."

"Look here, Harold, why did you tell Gladys
Ford that you were over in France durinsj the
World War.?"

"What da' yer mean I told her such a whopper.?
I told her the truth, but she ran away before I
finished saying France Field."

Teacher (to eighth grade pupil). "What is
man?"



Pupil. "Live dust."

HE.ARI) IX MODERN HISTOR\

Mrs. McCarthy .~''\\\m\d you rather be burned
at the stake or guillotined?"

Bright /)/)//. "Burned at the stake."

Mrs. McCarthy. "\\\\yr'

Bright pHpil.~'Td rather have a hot steak
any day, than a cold chop."



OVERHEARD AT THE BAM, GAME.

"Let me pitch; I can give as many bases on
balls as that boob can!"

"Cold drinks-s-s-s !"

"What wonderful control! That pitcher can hit
a batsman's bat with the ball anytime he wants
to."

"Hot peanuts-s-s-s !"

".All that pitcher's got 's a glove."

"Hey, you; sit down in front!" Several are
standing and no action. "Hey! You with the
dirty neck! Sit down!" All obey the command.

"Chunegum, cigarettes-s-s-s !"

OVERHEARD AT THE SILVER COMMISSARV.

"Is you got any powder?"

"'^ es, what kind do you want, tooth or face?"

".\h don' want needer; ah wants bug powder."

Jiilins (making an impression). "Frankie Ray-
mond and I struck out 260 batsmen this season."

Julius was right, too, for the record shows that
Frankie struck out 259 and Julius struck out i

Willie Harrison, now an apprentice machinist,
is said to have answered one of his examination
questions "A fishing line has a worm at one end
and a nut at the other."




THE e:nd.



68



THE CARIBBEAN.



FOUR years ago the editorial staff of the first Caribbean
expressed the wish that the forthcoming volumes of
our yearbook might grow better with each succeed-
ing issue. That annual, bravely issued in spite of
discouragements, has served as an inspiration to those of
us who have followed. Our book has its imperfections.
We realize them and regret them. But we hope that we have
reflected a little of the true Cristobal High School spirit and
kept faith with that first annual board.

We can't thank personally all those who, behind the scenes
(and screens) have made this book a possibility, but we here
assure them that we have appreciated all their efforts in our
behalf. To the staff" of The Panama Canal Press, who, by
their untiring interest and enthusiasm, have made the printing
and mechanics of the book what they are, we feel a special
debt of gratitude.

And now we leave it to our readers to thank another group
of helpers the advertisers by giving them their patronage,
and mentioning to them

The Caribbean, '21.



LONDON STORE



^



Modern Tailoring



55 FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P.

SUITS MADE TO ORDER MATERIAL FURNISHED

English Woolen Suitings, Pongee Silk, Palm Beach, and Tweeds of various shades to select from
WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED FROCK COATS A SPECIALTY

ANTONIO ROSANIA & CO. Phone 16



THE CARIBBEAN.



69



FRANK RAYMOND, '21, Governor-General
"BUSTER" FIELDS, Office Boy



PAUL C. DOYLE, '22, Geneial-Governor
HAROLD CLOKE, Chief Penwiper



Crtgtotial jl^igl) ^cftool ilbbertisiing Igencg

FACTORY: COLON BEACH, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

Let this Agency write a sample advertisement for you. You will be surprised how many teachers, scholars, and their parenis
will read it just to find our spelling errors. Only one advertisement written each year, and that one concerning the article of
highest merit. This Agency unqualifiedly guarantees the merit of the goods it writes about. Its stamp on an advertisement
means the same as "Paramount" on moving pictures. We just have got to eat, but our prices for this service are as low as you
can expect for such high quality ad-writing in these days of high wages and rising costs. Read this sample advertisement through
and, if you like it and your goods measure up to the high standard of the concern mentioned in it, our Agency will write an adver-
tisement for you next year.

FRANK RAYiMOND, Governor-General.

by "BUSTER" BCRGOON, Executive Sec.-etary.



Sample Advertisement

"lyrOW, you chesty and swell-headed Seniors, you brainy
^" and enterprising Juniors, you weak and pitiful Sophs,
you dumb and innocent Freshies, just glance at the first
advertisement written by this Agency. Most advertise-
ments tell about what a dealer has to sell, but this one will
be quite different, for every one of us knows that the
AMERICA THEATER is the biggest, coolest, and most
homelike amusement place in Colon; we know that its
orchestra alone is worth the price charged for admission, for
its sweet music is simply wonderful; we know that its seats
are wide, inviting, and comfortable, and its pictures are the
best that money can buy; we know that when we are tired
and brain-weary and need a good, healthy laugh or an hour's
excitement in refreshing mental relaxation that a few min-
utes' walk in the cooling breezes of the evening will bring
us face to face with smiling and courteous attendants and
all of the nicest people of the Atlantic Side ; so we are
not going to use these reasons for urging your patronage at
the AMERICA. Rather, we are going to ask you to attend
their shows because the management gives us more than we
can get in the States for the same money, and besides, they
have always supported our school annual "The Caribbean."

PAUL C. DOYLE, General-Governor,
by HAROLD CLOKE, Chief Penwiper.



AMERICA THEATER



FOX

ARTCRAFT
PARAMOUNT
REALART



GOLDWYN
UNITED ARTISTS
SELECT
SELZNICK



7



THE CARIBBEAN.



UNITED FRUIT COMPANY



Regular Sailings




from




Cristobal, C. Z.




to


V'


New York,




New Orleans,


1


Cuba,


1


Colombia,


|;


Jamaica, and


^^j,


Costa Rica.


H^^^-K


For further particulars,
apply:


1




M. C. O'HEARN, General Agent, Cristobal, C Z.



T. A. JACOME, Agent, Panama City



Panama Hatsi IMORAN&ford



THE HAT OF THE TROPICS



Colon's
Leading
Jewelers



J. B. GOMEZ

The Only Exclusive Hat Store in
COLON



For Choice Selection of Jewelry,
Silver and Cut Glass



44 FRONT STREET
Telephone 115 "Only One Price"



COLON STORE PANAMA STORE

nth St., Opp. Commissary 8th St. and Central Ave.

Phone 209 P. C. Phone 858 Corp.



THE CARIBBEAN.



71



THE FRENCH BAZAAR



PANAMA AND COLON



Large and Up-to-date Department Stores
Headquarters for Parisian Novelties



PANAMA



Our Stores are appreciated by all careful
buyers who want a host of opportunities
in purchases and who prefer to be well
served personally as well as in the value
and merit of their purchases.



HEURTEMATTE & CO., Inc.



COLON




r'iiif ii'H" (
II l_llllfi



ftotel OTagfjiuston |

COLON BEACH gj

P. O. Address, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. 7=1

European Plan Facing the Atlantic rsfj

100 Rooms 100 Baths b^

Rates from S3. 00 up ySt

New, modern, and luxurious in appointments. Excellent VSt

cuisine. Large private grounds with promenade along the Jt^fl

sea front, and fine concrete sea-water swiirming pool. >2w[

Cool Nights. Excellent Winter Resort. ^j

ANDREW JOHNSTON, Manager. JSt



WASHINGTON MOTOR SERVICE CO., Ltd.



COLON, R. P.



UNDER AMERICAN MANAGEMENT



When you want to go
somewhere



a



Call a Car"



Telephone: Colon 204



m^^



THE CARIBBEAN.



.^V ^^^^



BOWDRY

American Millinery and Dress Parlors




^mq w



Nos. 1-3 Avenida 4 de Julio

PANAMA

Colon Branch: loth Street, near Front Street



American

Beauty

Parlor



Phone,

Colon 298



^



SHAMPOOING
HAIR DRESSING
MANICURING
FACE MASSAGE
SCALP TREATMENT



.-. HAIR WORK OF ALL KINDS .-.



Opposite P.R.R. Station "Upstairs"



INVESTIGATE

Threaded Rubber



INSULATION




SMALLWOOD BROTHERS

Sole Distributors



PANAMA



COLON



THOMPSON & DALEY
Real Estate



igS COMMISSION MERCHANTS



COLON, R. P.



THE CARIBBEAN.



73



P

R
O

S
P
E
R

I



T
V



ST.CHARl.es

Crated Mft"



CLASS OF 1921



I have raised you from
infancy, watched over you
through your A-B-C's, and
will continue to keep you
sound of body and healthy of
mind.



St. Charles Milk




ST. CHARLES

mo MO*!




T A "l\/r'Q r^ A "O A r^T? Broadway, between 14th and g

J-'Xl.lfl O VJxl.i\.Xi.\JJlr 15th Streets, COLON, R. P. g

For your 5 and 7 passenger touring cars g

Day and Night Service Call Phone 33 Competent Chauffeurs ^



Telephone 354



NIGHT SERVICE



P. O. Box 204



Drs. Wm. and Vernon Crosbie

SURGEON DENTISTS



COLON, R. P.



OFFICE HOURS: 8 A. M. to 12 Noon.
I P. M. to 6 P. M.



Back of International Bank



mi



74 THE CARIBBEAN.



RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO

23 Front Street, Colon, R. P,

Just at 7th Street.
P. O. Box 523, Cristobal, C. Z. Phone Corp. No. 9



Portraits, Groups, Enlargements, Views,
Commercial Work and Photo Supplies

We do the highest quality of Portraiture in Our success in this direction is the result



our Studio, with that degree of artistic rendering,
so much sought after, and so rarely found here
on the Isthmus.



of good training in a Photographic Institute, and
experience gained in some of the best Studios
in the United States.



ART STUDIES OF INFANTS AND LADIES OUR SPECIALTY



im^i-i



Bargain Sale in Panama Hats

Prices 50 per cent below cost

I. L. MADURO, JR.

CATHEDRAL PLAZA NEXT CENTRAL HOTEL



FIRST CLASS SERVICE

Go to Cristobal Clubhouse Barber Shop

Come and Get the Unrivaled Shoe Shine



BOWLEY, Proprietor



im



THE CARIBBEAN.



75



THE NEW YORK SHOP



Gowns
Blouses
Undergarments



Millinery
Shoes
Hosiery



...DRESSMAKING...



Front Street, near Slifer Park



COLON




76



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE PAN-AMERICAN DRUG STORE



Botica Pan-Americana



50 FRONT STREET



3 Stores



N. SALAZAR, Prop.

56 BOLIVAR STREET



182 BOLIVAR STREET, ENGLISH DRUG STORE
Phones: 336-166 COLON, R. P.



Cable Address "IMPCO." A. B.C., 5th, and Lieber



Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS



DEALERS IN



General Merchandise and Native Produce

COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

p. O. Box 107



Branch Retail Stores and Trading Stations:
COLON BOCAS DEL TORO PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL ESCRIBANO MANDINGA



Everything in the Hne of Plumbing



m^m




Estimates cheerfully given



COLON, R. P.
170 Bolivar Street



PANAMA, R. P.
58 Central Avenue



.THE CARIBBEAN. 77




IE 6EIEIIIILE TRimmilllTIQUE

FRENCH LINE OF STEAMERS



Regular Sailings from Cristobal, Canal Zone, to France
Monthly Sailings from France to South America .



Via the Panama Canal (Ecuador, Peru, and Chile)

For all particulars apply to

FRENCH LINE AGENCY

p. 0. BOX 128, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. Phone No. 185



American Trade | | French Drug Store
Developing | |



Company



V. DELGADO & SON

Main Store:

26 Front Street, opposite Cable Office



Complete Line of i i .^ iiiV^t aSfSiOrtmeitt Of

American, French, and W W rv ^

English i m. American, Jfrencij,anb

^

^ PERFUMERY TOILET ARTICLES

^ ^ KODAKS FILMS CAMERAS

^ ^ ETC., ETC.

FREE DELIVERY IN ANCON AND BALBOA j^ ^ Prescription Department under the supervision

We Invite Your Patronage i^ ^ ^ United States Pharmacists

^ ^ BABIES' PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY

Central Avenue Panama City ^ ^

Telephones, Nos. 588 and 741 ^ ^ COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA



Groceries



78



THE CARIBBEAN.



Be particular about the chocolates you eat!
Insist upon the best it can be had by specifying



G'



oxvneus

oco/aies



Large assortments on sale at all Clubhouses and Commissaries



The Walter M. Lowney Company, Boston, Mass.

J. D. MAXWELL, Representative, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



m




MT LADY'S
FAVORITE



ADAMS



htctets



A dainty candy-coated
chewing: gum.



/\eallyiDeli^k'6ful



I.D.Maxwell i



Representative




ADAMS

Pure Chewing Gum

Adams Adams

DIack J3ck California Fruit
Adams Chiclet': Adams Sen Se




CANAL ZONE

AND

REPUBLIC OF

PANAMA



P. O. Box 5026
Cristobal, C. Z.

Tel. 329 Colon



m



THE CARIBBEAN. 79



DIERS & ULLRICH

Wholesale and Retail Merchants



AGENTS FOR



White Rock Mineral Water and Ginger Ale
Park & Tilford's Candy Anheuser-Busch Malt Nut



48 Front Street Phone loi COLON



RATHBUN, STILSON & CO.

GENERAL HARDWARE AND LUMBER MERCHANTS

Dealers in PAINTS, OILS, AND BUILDERS' A\ATERIALS, ETC.

Picture Praming a Specialty

P. O. BOX 140 COLON, R. of P.



THE TRANS-CARIBBEAN COMPANY

AGENTS FOR

PAGE MILLING CO. BISHOP & CO.

TOPEKA, KANs. Thiee-in-One Oil ^s angeles. cal.

Hard Wheat Flour High Grade Candy

COLON: sth and Bottle Alley PANAMA: Calle 13 Oeste, No. 19

P'^'"^ "4 Phone 1079



Bq



THE CARIBBEAN:



*.



in

f




Walking is truly §? pleasure with




You will appreciate the flexibility
that leaves your feet so different
after a long walk with N^lin
Soles.



SOLES



They are universal in their ad-
vantages and use; they are for
health, quality, long wear, and
refinement.



NEOLIN SOLES ARE AS FLEXIBLE AS THE FOOT ITSELF



THE GOODYEAR TIRE AND RUBBER CO.

OF SOUTH AMERICA
BONDED WAREHOUSE IN COLON, R. P.