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THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. III.



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1920



No. 1



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL



CARIBBEAN BOARD



Editor-in-Chief



Assistant Editor
Business Manager
Assistant Business Manager
Circulation Manager, Exchange Editor



Frank A. Raymond

Etha J. Bevixgtox

Harrv L. Ferguson

Kenneth Greene



Albert A. Dovle
Assistant Circulation Manager
School \otes Editor.
Athletic Editor, Joke Editor
Athletic Chairman



Kathryn M. Burgoon

Lillian M. Cotton

John B. Fields

. Alson W. Sears



CONTENTS



Caribbean' Buard
Albert A. Doyle
Caribbean Board



Frontispiece
Dedication
The Staff
EditoriaL
The Faculty
Faculty Notes.
Graduates

Class Will Albert .A. Doyle

Class Prophecy Fiha J. Bevington

.A Trigonometric Love Song Kenneth Greene

Class Song . Kenneth Greene

Seniors As You Were in 1916

The Man Who Came Back Harlan W. Holmwood
The NLan Who Did Nut Come



Back

Class of 1921

Juacas

Old Panama

Class of 1922.

A Shoe String Adventure

Margarita

A Knight's Adventure

The Process of Coffee Raising



Kenneth Greene



Alson W. Sears
Harlan W. Holmwood



Kenneth Greene

C. LiXDALE DaVIEs

William F. Marv
. Alson W. Sears



The National Drink of Panama, C. Lindale Davie.s
The Call of Panama Harlan W. Holmwood

Class of 1925

Country Lails Wise, City Lads

Wiser. Pai'l C. Dovle

Ramon in Colon Eulalie Arthur

Long-haired Stuff. Kenneth Greene

Night .
The I'all of Fort San Lorenzo ....



Page.



4

5
6

7
8

13

1?
16

17
18
19



-J
^4

25
26
26

28
29
-9



y-

."!4
M
,34



Long-haired Stuff Continued:

Farewell

Names and Greetings

.A Parting Toast.

The Tropic Night.

My Trip to New York via Haiti,

Etha J. Bevington.
.A Shark! ,A Shark! Harold Cloke

Resources and Industries of Panama,

-Alice M. Stilson
BlackorWhite Marjorie D. Ball

In and About Colon Albert .A, Doyle

I Wonder. Kenneth Greene

Almost Chester Taylor

A Little Excitement John B. Fields.

The Fate of the Marne Lillian M. Cotton

A Quiet Evening Kathryn M. Burgoon,

The Land of Beginning Again, . Eulalie Arthur.

A Lost Treasure Found Kirby Ferguson.

That Green Tulle Dress Lillian M, Cotton.

The Resurrection Flower .Alice M. Stilson

The F.xperiences of a Wayward Youth,

E,MILIO SoLO.MON

Mary's Little Cold

School Notes Lillian M. Cotton

.\thletics .John B. Fields

Exchanges Kenneth Greene

The FacultN Paul C. Doyle
.Alumni Lillian M. Cotton

School Days Etha J. Bevington

Jokes John B. Fields

Exchange Humor John B. Fields



Page.

35
35
35
35

36



38
39

40

47
48
49
50
51
52
54
54
55

';^-

56

57

62

64

''5
66
66
67
68



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.




As commencement da)- approaches, the dawn
ot a new period in the lives of our Senior Class
breaks.

L'nlike the shadows which accompany the birth
ot a new day, a mere 24 hours, which bring, de-
spite all human efforts to prevent, eitherapleasant
sun-shining, happy morning or a gloomy, spirit-
depressing storm to high and low alike, the birth of
this new and broader period in our lives is univer-
sally ushered in with emotions of joyous gladness
that our grade studies are ended; sincere thanks-
giving for the patience and willing sacrifices
made by our devoted faculty whose training and
guidance is their ineffaceable monument; stead-
fast hope for securely filling a deserving station
in the scheme of life, as well as unswerving con-
fidence in successfully achieving whatever under-
taken.

None of us may count on perpetual smooth sail-
ing, for uncharted and hidden rocks of carelessness
lie in our fairway, dangerous shoals of idleness
tempt the mariner-graduate who heeds not their
lure, and the treacherous reefs of constant pleas-
ure-seeking, abounding in the pathway of our
barque on its voyage to maturity, can strand high
and dry and destroy the finest ship of character
afloat.

Still, with all these expected obstacles, health
permitting, there is no reason why careful sea-



manship, instilled in us by parent and teacher,
will not bring the vessel of our future welfare into
the calmer and more numerous seas, found sooner
or later in the safe harbor of industrious citizen-
ship.

Some of us may encounter rough seas, but let it
be said of us, the Class of '20, we did our best to
save our ship. Let us, when wc take the helm
of life, steer the only safe course, plowing through
the waters of enthusiasm, whether it be work,
study, or play; working hard, studying hard, and
playing hard, for the saying that "What is worth
doing at all is worth doing well" still stands and
always will stand unrefuted.

If we are to become eminent mariners on the
sea of life, let us avoid the rashness of inex-
perienced youth and adopt the wise teachings
of our older seaman, who everywhere caution us
to be temperate temperate in thought, in action,
in language; to be punctual and faithful in our
tasks; to be industrious, thrifty, courteous,
honest, to be truthful, clean, loyal; to be rever-
ential. The class, whether it be '20 or '25, who
charts out such a course on the map of life will
safely anchor the ship of duty intrusted in its
hands in a harbor where the world will welcome
them with open arms.

.Albert A. Doyle, '20, Editor.



THE CARIBBEAN.




= '-J

:: <



THE CARIBBEAN.



Prof. A. R. Lang,
Superintendent.

A. B.. Nebraska Wesleyan University.
A. M.. University of Nebraska.

Few of us realize how much the Senior Class is really indebted
to Mr. Lang. For how quick was he to lend us the helping hand
in the difficulties and problems of our last year! When, on
commencement evening, you shake the hand of each member
of the Classof 1920, Mr. Lang, you will find in each grasp sincere
gratitude for your kind assistance and a firm wish for your
continued success.

Prof. Harry T. Drill, B. .\., Principal.

Cjlitornia.

University of California.

University of Michigan.

University of Oregon.

Physics, malhematirs.

'Mr. Drill." What other words command more respect and
admiration from the students of Cristobal High School?
From the Freshman, "Cheese it, Mr. Drill!" to the Senior,
"We'll ask Mr. Drill," there is a deep feeling of respect on one
hand and of implicit confidence on the other. "I hate to see
a thing done by halves; it it be right, do it boldly; if it be
wrong, leave it undone." From these words can be gleaned
his outstanding characteristic, h firm friend ot the Senior
Class, helping them along, advising them, he is in no small
measure responsible for the output ot The Caribbean. For
he was the power behind and the booster of all endeavors for
the raising of proceeds for the annual. "Neither rhyme nor
reason can express how much" the Class of 19:0 appreciates
the splendid work he did. Moreover, it is a delight to study
under him and fortunate we call the school over which Mr.
Drill will in future preside.

Marie E. Hollowav, R. S.
New York.

Vassar College.
Columbia University,
New York University.

English, Latin.
Having taught us for ; years. Miss Holloway is re.idily
familiar with Cristobal High School. Maintaining a firm
interest in all things connected with the school, she never
fails to be there with a generous share ot help when some end is
to be attained. Miss Holloway worked tirelessly on this and
the last edition of The Caribbean and it would be useless
to try and thank her for the advice and kindly criticism be-
stowed on us and which made this edition of The Caribbean
a credit to our school.

Clara B. Walton, A. B., M. .A.

Kentucky.

Transylvania College.

Chicago University.

Columbia University.

Mathematics, history.

The mere fact that Miss Walton has been with us but a year

does not mean that she is mildly interested in the school doings.

She "is strong" tor everything connected with the school,

even the Freshman Class who would be less than what they

arc now, or nothing, it it were not lor Miss Walton's interest



in them. No one has ever been seen lagging in her classes, for,
although her lesson assignments are not excessively light, she
has the ability to make those classes interesting and even
entertaining by clever management and her own pleasing
personality.

AvA G. Garner, B. S.
Michigan.

Michigan State College.

Home Economics.

Miss Garner came to Cristobal High School in November,
taking the place of the former teacher of domestic science.
Miss Gugenhan, who was transferred to Balboa. .After
several months of hard tasks Miss Garner has succeeded in
making competent cooks and dressmakers of most of the
Senior, Sophomore, and Freshman girls, which is saying a
lot in the latter case.

RiCARDO V'illafran'ca.
Costa Rica.

Leceo de Costa Rica.

\'irginia Polytechnic Institute.

Universidad de Barcelona.

Spanish.

"Seiior," as he is familiarly called by us, represents the
ideal teacher in the opinion ot the greater part of the high
school students. His lesson assignments, although they can
not be complained of, are extensive enough to keep us busy.
He is severe when necessary, yet has that fine sense of humor
which all successful teachers possess and which makes it a
pleisure to attend his clas.ies.

D. Nicholas.
Ohio.

Northwestern University.

Music.

This we say of him: A more efficient music teacher we have
never had. What do you think, folks, of a^music teacher who is
able to sk'p from soprano to bass, including alto and tenor, help-
ing each out in his turn in a four-part song and in the interim
keeping time by tapping violently on a desk and not batting an
eye when on one occasion he missed the desk and gave himself a
sharp rap on the knee efficiency? .Ask the Seniors. He is well-
liked by ihe whole school, which is saying fome"hing.

Hexkv G. Bacon.

Columbia University, New York.
Pratt Institute. New York.

Industrial Training.

.Although with us for only the last halt of the year, having
taken the place of Mr. Lee, whose picture is presentedherewith
in the group, it did not take us long to see that there was noth-
ing unusual to find out about Mr. Bacon. For in our first
relations we found that he was straightforward and business-
like, and there is something about him which "takes" the
boys and so they work willingly under his guidance.



THE CARIBBEAN.




"Kat."

"She is a woman; therefore may be wooed.
She is a woman; therefore may be won."

4. .'\ssistant Circulation Editor; Captain Girl*
Basketball; Athletic Council.

That which she naturall>- vociferates "Run

from here."

That which claims most of her time Basketball

That of her which stands out .- Frankness

That to which her heart goes out Dancing

L'ppermost in her mind. To marry riches.



"Lin."

"The very pineapple of politeness."

3. Quartette; Track; Basketball; Baseball; Or-

chestra.

4. Quartette; Track; Baseball; Secretary Athletic

Council.

That which he naturally vociferates "Jolly fine."

That which claims most of his time Music.

That of him which stands out Credulity.

That to which his heart goes out .Automobiles.

L'ppermost in his mind ..To own a "Marmon."




THE CARIBBEAN.




'Een.

"For Nature made her what she is.
And never made anitlier."

2. Glee Club.

4 Editor, School Notes .Tiid .Alumni; President
Senior Social Clul>.

I hat which she naturally vociferates ...."Oh, Good-
night!"

That which claimsmost of her time ...Dates.

That of her which stands out Friendliness.

That to which her heart goes out Letters.

L pperinost in her mind .Business career.



%a^/? jd:^^^:^






"Jack.'



"He's tough, ma'am, tough, is J, R.
Tough and devilish sly(?}"

3. Quartette; Swimming.

4. Quartette; Swimming; Joke t.ditor; .Athletic

Editor; Secretary and Treasurer ot Class.

That which he naturally vociferates "Razzberries."

That which claims most of his time Umpiring

ball games.

That of him which stands out Good nature.

That to which his heart goes out .A good feed.

Ippermost in his mmd That M. E. degree.




10



THE CARIBBEAN.




^iL I




"CurK."

"Reserve with frankness, art with truth alHed,
Courage with softness, modesty with pride."

:. Glee Club.

_;. Circulation Manager The Caribbean.

J. Business Manager The Caribbean'.

That which she naturally vociferates "By Jove."

That which claims most of her time__ Music

'I'hat of her which stands out Sincerity.

That to which her heart goes out Someone.

I'pperniostin her mind.._ To marry a millionaire.



.4^iLj^



wr



"Vet leaving here a name. I trust
That shall not perish in the dust."

2. .-Assistant Business Manager The Caribbean;
Basketball; Swimming; Track Teams; Class
Representative.

j. Joke Editor The Caribbean; Basketball; Swim-
ming; Track Teams; Class Representative.

4. Editor-in-Chiet The Caribbean; Basketball;
Swirr.ming; Track; Baseball.

That which he naturally vociferates "You're right!"
'I'hat which claims most of his time .Aertmautical

art.
That of him which stands out Jollity.

Thar to which his heart goes our Something new.

Uppermost in his mind 1o become an aviator.




',/''y!^


#.



THE CARIBBEAN.



11




Dimples."

"That we may braR we hae a lass
There's nane again sae bonnic."

4. Secretary Senior Social Club.

That which she narurally vociferates .._ "Oh,

Hea\eiis!"
That which claims most ot her time ...Worrying.

That ot her which stands out Sweetness.

That to which her heart goes out A 'phone call.

Uppermost in her mind A spinster's life (?)



.-'^^'T'Tv^K



"Handsome."

"Lord ot liimself. though not of land.
-And having nothing, yet hatli all."

2. Circulation Editor The C-\ribbeax.
.3. Assistant Editor The C.4RIbbe.4\.
4. Class President; Basketball.

That which he narurally vociferates "Sweet Cookiel"
That which claims most of his time Day-dreaining.

That of him which stands out Seriousness.

That to which his heart goes out. ..A certain girl.

Uppermost in his mind -...To be President of

the U. S.




12



THE CARIBBEAN.




"Al."

\\'hose armor is his honest tliought
Ami simple truth his utmost skill."

2. Baseball; Basketball; Swimming; Track.

J. Baseball; Basketball; Swimming; Track; Coach
Girls' Basketball; .Assistant Business Manager.

4. Baseball; Basketball; Swimming; Track; Chair-
man .-Xthletic Council.

That which he naturally vociferates .."My Gawd."

Tliat which claims most of his time. .Athletics.

That of him which stands out Independence.

That to which his heart goes out .... Girls.

Uppermost in his mind To be a "Big Leaguer."



'^''^^Z^^^^^g^



"Ken.'



Of him the great Nestor cried.
School spirit personified.

Basketball; Swimming; Track.
Basketball; Swimming; Track; Boys' Quartette.
Circulation Manager The Caribbean; Class
\'ice President; Track.



That which he naturally vociferates .. "Pipe down."
That which claims most of his time... Photography.

That of him which stands out "To do the best I

know how."
That to which his heart goes out... Call Balboa 603.
Uppermost in his mind... ..That electrical engineer-
ing ambition.




M



THE CARIBBEAN.



13



m




CLASS WILL.

.ilberl A. Doyle, '20.




We, the Class of 1920, the largest and most
important group of Seniors to be graduated
from Cristobal High School, after four long years
of arduous work and labor, have reached the first
rung on the ladder of our ambitious pursuits.
Knowing that we are about to piass away we feel
it our duty, being of strong mind, active body, and
of a generous nature, to recognize that respect
and consideration which we have received from
certain of the underclassmen, by bequeathing to
them, under our last will and testament, all
privileges, rights, and so forth, which we ourselves
h.ive enjoyed. We are ot the firm opinion that all
succeeding graduating classes are deeply indebted
to the Class of 1 920 for struggling for, establishing,
and maintaining the valuable rights and privi-
leges which are about to pass into their possession.
It is our fervent wish, therefore, that these
acquirements be guanled closely. It is our desire
also that they be bequeathed as follows;

Firstly: To the Junior Class, who are about to
step into the place which we held for the past
year, we leave the satisfaction of gazing non-
chalanth' back, at the lower classmen as, when,
conditions permitting, they steal awed and ad-
miring glances at the sagacious Seniors. To the
Juniors also, we leave the ability to accomplish
difficult tasks in a thorough and systematic
manner, and hope that they will handle the
intricate situations as methodically as did we.
We bequeath to them also the manifest right of
occupying the library at all times and ousting
all others with that deep feeling of superiority
which we so gloried in. We believe, of course,
that the above-mentioned Juniors are not entirely
capable of filling the places vacated by us mag-
nanimous Seniors, but, however, we have noticed
several signs of intelligence on their part during
the past year and believe that with a great deal
of advice correcting arrested development, they
might do. We have this piece of advice to give
them therefore: You have noticed how the Class
of 1920 has commanded the envy, respect, and



admiration of all those who have had the good
luck to converse or privilege of conversing with
any member of it. If so, it would be well for you
injudicious Juniors to emulate this Senior Class
in all respects so that when you shall have bidden
farewell to the old familiar corridor and glass-
knobbed doors of Cristobal High, you will leave
behind as many disconsolate mourners as we.

Secondly: We must deal with the Sophomores.
It is such a pleasure to do so, for, teachers and
students, are they not the most studious, stately,
sedate, sensible, susceptible, and submissive set
of beings you ever held discourse with? Incon-
testably so, say we. Some feeble-minded one had
the boldness to declare that the Sophomores were
a perverse and officious set. Ignore that person,
sound Sophomores. We, the Class of 1920, have
great faith in you, and can conceive in your con-
summate system of student policy a bright future
and are sure that if you hold true to your present
ideals you shall emerge from the ordeal as
gloriously as we.

Thirdly: Theinferiorit)- of the flimsy Freshman
Class has not left us devoid of all pity for that
impotent part of the High School organization.
In fact, we have a slight desire to better their
condition, providing, however, that in so doing it
would not lower the higher standard of the Senior
Class. It would indeed profit these rudimentary
beings to attain the quietness, modesty, and re-
serve that so clearly characterize the Class of
1920. We bequeath to these Freshmen all the
rights and privileges accorded a Senior and they
are to come by these rights at the end of three
more years, if, in the interim, they have acquired
and held the above-mentioned qualities which so
distinctly mark this Senior Class.

Fourthly: Etha Bevington takes great pleasure
in ie.iving to William Ashton her curly and wavy
hair with the wish that he will not treat it as he
did his late growth. To Edward Johnson she
leaves her bright sunny nature, and to those of
the underclassmen who may eniov it as much



14



THE CARIBBEAN.



as she has, she leaves the piivilege ot wandering
about the corridors.

Fifthly: Kathryn Burgoon wills her gentle
disposition and good looks to Emilio Solomon to
render him fitful aid during his school career. To
Emogene Nash she leaves her abili ty to speak Span-
ish with fluent ease. To Esther Witt she wills her
art of combing hair and her plans for a high school
hair-dressing parlor. To Mattie Pulligshe leaves
her over-developed formula for remaining thin.

Sixthly: Lillian Cotton leaves to Charles
Henter her ability to use the tongue with the
hope that it will be used freely in endeavoring
to obtain material from the lower-classmen for
next year's Caribbean'. Her busy offices of Presi-
dent of Senior Social Club, Chairman of Refresh-
ment Committee and Society Editor of The
Caribbean, she leaves to Dorothy Abendroth,
Elsie Johnson, and Ruby Reid, respectively.

Seventhly: Lindale Davies, to Roger Powelson,
gladly bequeaths his exquisite bass voice.
"Breezy" has the only real bass voice of the
school and thinks it fitting that it be left to a
talented successor. To Wesley Townsend he
leaves the knack ot keeping time on the desk
during music period. To Harold Cloke he leaves
his crop of auburn hair and to Claud Strowbridge
his winning way with the fair sex.

Eighthly: Al Doyle wills to Frank Raymond his
seat in the back of the assembly room with the
request that it be bequeathed, upon the expiration
of Frank's school term, to his brother, Paul Doyle.
It was left to Al by a former Senior, a brother of
Frank, so why not keep the antique in the family?
To Edward May he leaves the privilege of running
to the window whenever he hears an aeroplane.
To Carl Duey his ability as a physicist.

Ninthly: Jack Fields, with characteristic gen-
erosity, leaves to Harry Ferguson his secret of
gaining large proportions antl hopes that Harry
will share it generously with William Harrison.
He bequeaths to Leroy Magnuson his fine art ot
bluffing and to William Mary his ability to look
so cute during the first period rit the morning.

Tenthly: Harlan Holmwood, with ver\' good
judgment, wills to .Alice Hunter his knowledge
of mathematics, tor during next year .Alice will
not have our handsome Harlan to consult with
upon matters of this nature. I'o Kirby Ferguson
he leaves the right to occup>', during Spanish
period, the chair most adjacent to the tloor trom
which mav be obtained a fine view of the corridor



and English classroom when the door of the
latter is unwisely left ajar. To Lawton Patten
he bequeaths his modest silk shirt and plain
cravat to match.

Eleventhly: Kenneth Greene wills his unsur-
passed tenor voice to Theodore Foster with the
wish that "Teddy" will not neglect its develop-
ment by failing to run through the scales each
morning. His poetic genius, with that indis-
pensable requisite, the poet's hair growth, he
relinquishes to Walter Zimmerman, for Walter is
considered the next best in this line and Kenneth
is a firm believer in the fact that men of great
literary standing should hold together. His
school spirit he leaves to the Sophomore Class to
be equally divided among its silly members.

Twelfthly : Alice Stilson, after long and
serious thought, leaves to Doris Oliver her dimples.
To Alexander Linczer she wills her quiet and
reserved nature. "Alex" doesn't need this
very badly but as much as any other Freshman,
at least. The manner in which she fixes her hair
she leaves to Mattie Pullig. (xAlice fixes her hair
in the style of airplane wings and hopes that
Mattie, being ot sounder physical construction,
is capable of obtaining the speed necessary for a
"take-off".) Her bright eyes she leaves to
Chester Taylor.

Thirteenthly: Alson Sears after much delibera-
tion bequeaths to Glenora Edwards his privilege
of coming to school after 9.30 and getting away
with it. To George Cartwright he wills his inde-
pendence, to Majorie Ball his importance; to all
members of the Junior Class his manners of a
genteel nature; to Albert Quinto his athletic abil-
ity, including the art of moving pianos.

Lastly, we wish to extend our heartfelt thanks
to the faculty for keep-
ing the underclassmen
at a minimum state ot
quietness during the first
half-hour period ot the
morning during which
we labored so intensely
on our textbooks.

Has'ingdisposed ot the
above in regular order,
this bleak month of June,
1920, we pronounce it
legal and valid.

(Signed)

The Senior Cl.A5,s. the end




Jgfg;i



THIS third edition of The Caribbean is gratefully and affection-
ately dedicated to Mrs. H. Dingier, the former principal and teacher
of English for the first 2 years ot high school learning for the Class of
1920. "Miss Davis," as she is more readily known by us, had watched the
1920 class come up slowly through the grades at the old Cristobal school
and with charac-
teristic interest
in the other fel-
low's welfare
had "taken us
under her wing"
as soon as we
entered high
school and
coached us effi-
ciently in all
matters of high-
school life. She
is responsible for
the great literary
success of the
first edition of
The Caribbean.

We recall with a great deal of pride that "Miss Davis'
class of 1920 "her own.




"\Iiss Davis"



D


E


D


I


c


A


T


I





N

1



called the
Having given out so much of all she knew
to that class "Miss Davis" is at present taking another course of learning
at Columbia University and it is needless to speak of all the luck and
good wishes which attend her from "her own class."



THE CARIBBEAN.



15




CLASS PROPHECY

Ethd Bevinpon, '20.




-m



On the afternoon of May 30, 1930, I was seated
in the library of my home in Pasadena, Cai. I
was surrounded by books which I had thrown down
in disgust. I had been looking all afternoon tor
something interesting but had finally given it up
in despair and abandoned myself to my despond-
ency and ennui. Just as I was wondering whether
to take up fancy dancing or parlor Bolshevism,
my husband drove up to the door. He is always
interrupting my plans and breaking in at the
moments when I am most busy, but I forgave him
this time for he gave me a handful of mail. Prob-
ably the answers to my dance invitations, I
thought, but when I saw the postmark on the first
letter I tore it open hastily and read the following:

BkCNEI, HoRXtO,

.-Ipril ;, fcjjj.
Dear Fkie.sd:

I think it must be a long time since I wrote to you, hut it
seems to me that it would be most pleasant if we might have a
reunion of our high school class. I have thought ot those days
many times in the past years. I am now in command ot an
aviation post here in Brunei and have a large corps of natives
in training under me. They are all interested in their work and
make very good pupils. But 1 will tell you of my work later
and if anything is dehnitcly decided about a reunion please
notify me.

Sincerely,

Al Doyle.

Imagine my surprise after reading the above
letter. I broke open the others and found them
running along the same strain.

HONOLLl.f, H.-iWAII,

.-Ipiil /(), H/JO.

Dear Etha:

I am writing to all uur classmates in regard to a reunion.
I think wemightmeet on the Canal Zone on the 25th of June.
That seems to be the most central point for our scattered
members. Kindly let me know if this is convenient forycu.

M present I am commanding the Marine forces here in
Hawaii. 1 have just received a 3 months' furlough and expect
to en iov it to the utmost.



1 am sending you the letters which 1 have received from
two of the other class members.
Write soon.

Harlan.

Bluefields, Nicaragua,

.-Ipril 12, /Qjo.
De.ar Harl.an;

I received your letter concerning the class reunion and I
am glad to say that I think I may be able to leave my work
long enough to attend it. The time and place are very
satisfactory to me.

During the last J years I have been in charge of the govern-
ment hospital here in Bluefields. I like my work and find my
knowledge of Spanish very useful. I am so glad that 1 was so
interested in learning it. Until the reunion, then.

.'\s ever,

Kalhrv.s Blrgoo.s.

Ukalak.leet, .Alaska,

Jpri/ 6, IQJO.
Dear Cl.assmaie:

1 received your last letter and rtnil the date and place tor
the reunion entirely satisfactory. I have been thinking that I
needed a change ot climate anyway. I have been here in
Alaska 2 years now, coaching an Eskimo baseball team. They
learn quickly and I get along very well with them. I have
many interesting things to tell the class and am looking for-
ward to the reunion.

Sincerely,

.\l Sears.

BfLLFROG, NeV.AD-A,

May ?, IQJO.
.\Iv Dear Class.viate;

.After due consideration I have decided to break my word
never to return to Panama. .At the urgent request of the
Canal Government I have decided to return and, with Jack
Fields as associate, to erect the new high school at Cristobal.
Fields and I have conferred and are confident that we can
accomplish the work in the record time of ;? months.

\\ e shall attend the class reunion and after we have com-
pleted our work we shall proceed to Siberia where we have
accepted a contract to build a railroad from Siberia to the
L'nited States by way of .Alaska.

Your classmate,

Ke.vneth Greene.



Ifl



THE CARIBBEAN'.



ViEDMA, Argentina,

April /8. ro^o.
Friend Etha:

I have just received a letter from Harlan Holmwood regard-
in" a class reunion. I shall surely be glad to meet all the old
classmates again. I think I shall bring with me my Jaz? Band
for the entertainment of the class. This band is composed of
native Patagonians whom I have trained myself and they are
very good, even ifl do say it. They exhibit rare musical talent
and I think I shall tour the world with them.

Sincerely,

LiNDALE D.WIES.

RocKPORT, Tex.,

May I, 1930.
Dear Etha:

I received your letter yesterday and I was so glad to hear
from you. I hope I may see you before we leave for Central
America. You know my husband is connected with an oil
company now and his business will take him to Central Amer-
ica for a while, so I shall go with him.



You could never guess whom I saw yesterday. As I stepped
out of a store 1 bumped into a young woman and made her
drop her packages. I stopped to help her pick them up and
when I looked at her I saw it was Alice Stilson. You could
have knocked me down with a straw, I never expected to see
her here. 1 went home with her to tea and met her husband,
the most delightful man in the world, except my husband, of
course. Her husband is in the grain business and they are
visiting here. I told her about the reunion and she said she
would surely be there. I suppose I shall see you there, so until
then, goodbye.

Sincerely,

Lillian Cotton.

This was the last letter and I laid it down a little
sadly. It seemed so good to hear from them all
again. It seemed as if I were with them. Any-
way, I thought, most of their careers had turned
out as thev had wished them to be.



A TRIGONOMETRIC LOVE SONG.



Kenneth Greene, '20.



I love to hear the roar of the waves
At night by the sounding sea
And the rush of the cool night wind
Through the top of an old palm tree.

1 love to sit by the shore at night
Close by a maiden's side
And whisper talcs of love to her
From the ebb till the flow of the tide.

1 love to hold a maiden's hand
'Neath the light of a tropic moon
And murmur low of love to her
Or sing some old love tune.



I love to feel a maiden's cheek
Soft on my shoulder strong
And whisper low as the breezes blow
That oft repeated song.

I love to sit by the sounding sea
And hear a maiden say
Those beautiful words as old as time
"I'll love but you for aye."

I love to sit by the shore at night

With a maiden's hand in mine

And feel in the touch of the tropic breeze

The tang of the salt sea brine.



I love to hear a maiden sing
Softly of love to me
But best of all I love to work
On my trigonometry. (?)



THE CARIBBEAN.



17









^r-^P/TS'^o.



CLrASSSONG



^



(Tune "I'm Forever Elowin? Bubbles."")
Kcnnelh Greene, '20.



We're leaving school.

It's an old rule,

Seniors must come and go.

We'll ne'er return.

Others will learn,

And 'twill be ever so,

For as October brings school days

Seniors must pass onward always.

Chorus.

We're forever passing onward,
Passing onward, upward too.
We'll scale the heights.
We'll face the glaring lights.
We'll be the victors in life's fights.
We'll be e'er successful.
Ever win renown.
We're forever passing onward,
Always upward, never down.



Friend must leave friend,

.As our steps bend.

Toward the heights of success.

But it's a bet,

We'll ne'er forget,

.And these school days we will bless,

.And when these bright days we recall

Mem'ry will let a few tears fall. Chorus.



.3-



We'll say goud-by,

Time on will fly.

But we will ne'er return.

We'll break the ties,

We'll upward rise,

.As we more knowledge learn.

-And when we gain fame and fortune

Our thanks to this school we'll return. Chori



Class Motto ''Jucundi acti labores."
Class Flower The Passion Flower.
Class Colors Purple and green.



MR 72634-



IS



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



19




THE MAN WHO CAME BACK.

Harlan If. Ilohmcood, '20.



With the first signs of da\-light, Bud was
awake, true to custom, but instead of a-ising he
lay in his "Q. M. bunk" and heaved a sigh of
contentment. This was the last chance he would
have to lie in the old bunk he thought to h m-
self; for this was the great day when he would
leave the Zone forever. He had looked forward
to this day for a long time, he refected, and he
was at last gong- home.

He turned over and t'-ied to go back to sleep,
but it was no use, he coukl not help thinking of
the States and what he would do when he got
there. He wondc-ed where he would be two
weeks from now.

At last Bud arose and washed and dressed him-
self leisurely. Then he went over to the restaurant
to get some breakfast. Everywhere he saw
familiar faces and many of the fellow; bade him
goodby and good luck.

"We'll see you back here in six months," said
one; "they all come back."

"Not on your life." said Bud "I'v^e got all 1
want of Panama."

"I'd like to bet on it," returned the other,
and Bud only laughed. They didn't know him.

After breakfast he walked over to the clubhouse
and sat down, but he was restless and could hardly
sit still. He wondered how he was going to wait
until the 11 o'clock train that wou'd take him to
Cristobal. He got up and walked back to his
quarters. He looked over the room to see that he
had packed everything but the clothes he would
wear. Was there nothing he could do to pass
away the time? Would 11 o'clock n;ver come?
He tried to read but found it impossible to become
interested in the story. Finally, at 10 o'c'ock, he



changed his clothes and a quarter to eleven found
him at the station with fifteen minutes to spare.

-After what seemed an interminable two hours
he was in Colon. After eating a hasty lunch, he
went to the docks, the first passenger to reach
the ship He bade goodby to a crowd of fellows
who were over to see the boat ofl^ and now at the
last minute he hated, in a way, to leave the old
bunch. However, he put that idea away; he
would soon forget about them after he got in the
States.

The boat pulled out one hour late, according to
custom, and at last Bud was on the way to the
States. He pictured himself back in the o!d town
with all his school chums.

On the seventh morning they sighted the Jersey
coa t and when they passed the Statue of Lib-
erty Bud ran from one side of the ship to the
other, afraid that he might miss something. She
seemed to be welcoming him.

Six hours later, in the afternoon. Bud stepped
down from the railroad coach to the station
platform. The old town still looked the same,
there had been few changes. The usual number of
loafers we;e at the station to meet the train
but Bud saw no familiar faces. It seemed queer
to walk down the street and not see any one to
whom he might speak familiarly Down on the
Zone he used to speak to almost anyone he met.
He checked himself suddenly Here he was think-
ing about Panama already. That wouldn't do at all.

He surprised the folks at home, they hadn't
expected him until the next day. It was great
to be with them again. After supper, when they
were all seated on the porch, his father said to him,
"Well, Bud, what will you do now? Work is



20



THE CARIBBEAN.



scarce, but jNIr. Walters needs a mechanic and will
give you a job."

"Oh, I don't know, Dad," returned Bud, "I
hardly think I want to settle here again. I guess
I've got the wandering spirit now."

The next morning Bud walked around town and
only once or twice did he see a face that looked at
all familiar. He finally went into the drug store
to get some ice cream and at last he found some
one to talk to. It was Henry Wood, an old school
friend, who was now the soda clerk.

"Hello, Henry, how are you?" said Bud, "Do
you remember mer"

"Why, yes, you must be Bud Stevens," returned
the other, "where have you been all the time?"

"Down in Panama," answered Bud.

"Panama oh, yes, of course," said the other,
failing to show any interest.

"Well, I'll see you again."

What was the matter with these people, thought
Bud. "Didn't they know where Panama was?"
Well, he'd soon show them that it was no place to
laugh at.

At dinner that day Bud said, "Ma, I'm going
away again. I can't stand this place any more.
The people won't speak to you on the street and
they're too narrow-minded to suit me."

"Are you going back to Panama so soon. Bud?"
asked his mother.

"No, not right away, at least," said Bud, "I
guess I'll go to New York."

So the next day Bud left again. He had no trouble
getting work in New York, but it was far from



what he was used to. He had to work ten hours
instead of eight and he couldn't see what became
of his money. Then came the winter. Bud hadn t
seen any snow for five years and he enjoyeci it at
first but when the real cold came he wondered
if he felt it any worse than the other people.
There were times when he could hardly hold his
tools and then it was that he thought of Panama
and the warm weather. He laughed at his own
weakness. They expected him back there in six
months, did they ? Well, he'd show them that here
was one at least who could stay away.

Then one cold night in January Bud had to work
overtime. It rained and he got soaked so that his
clothes froze. The next morning he could not
get out of bed and for two weeks he never left
his room. When he finally could go out, he went
tiown to his shop.

"Mr. Hardin," he said to his foreman, "I'm
handing in my resignation, I'm going away."

One week later Bud was on a boat sailing out of
New York. It was a little boat which he had
always before avoided but now he was glad to be
on it.

.At the end of another week the ship was sailing
in between two breakwaters and Bud as close to
to the bow as he could get, straining his eyes for
familiar places on shore. When he walked down
the gangplank a little later he could not suppress a
feeling of elation. Everything looked familiar
and it was great to feel warm once more. At last
he was where he belonged, he was back in Panama.



THE MAN WHO DID NOT COME BACK.

Kennet/i Gre



All the "old timers," that is, those who were
here before nineteen seven or eight, knew Jack
Peters. "Happy Jack" he was called by all.
"Happy" certainly deserved his nickname. His
happy smile and cheery greeting were known from
one end of the Isthmus to the other. Even as
late as nineteen seventeen half the people on the
Zone knew him and the other half knew of him.
He knew everybody.

In January, nineteen seventeen, "Happy"
astonished his friends by deciding that he had had
enough of the Zone. He set the date for some
time early in March He figured it would take him



reene, 20.

that long to say goodby to all his intimate friends.
So it happened that he was ready to sail on the
United Fruit ship Cm//o, on the 3d of March.
The evening of the 1st of March, "Happy" and
I 5 of his very intimate friends were gathered on
the pirch of their quarters discussing old times
and old timers in general. Of course, the subject
of "Happy's" coming departure was brought up
for its share of discussion.

Case after case of old timers who had left the
Zone for "good" and then returned after a year
or so, was cited as proof of the Isthmian proverb
"They all come back." Many were the prophe-



THE CARIBBEAN.



21



cies thrown at "Happy." Such statements as
"You'll be back in six months." "You won't
stayawayover a year at most," were rife. Finally,
"Happy" spoke: "Fellows," he said, "You may
think I am not in earnest, but I am not coming
back. During the time I have been on the Zone,
I hav'e saved some six thousand dollars. I'll bet
you each tour hundred bucks that I will not be
back in less than three years." His bet was
immediately taken, for not one of them doubted
''Happy's" inability to remain away from the
Zone tor three whole years.

Finally the 3d arrived. The dock was thronged
with the largest crowd ever known to see one
ship off. Amidst a great amount of cheering and
waving of hats and handkerchiefs, the Carrillo
"shoved off." Seven days later she docked and
"Happy" was gone.

April, 'seventeen, long to be remembered in his-
tory, came, bringing with it war with Germany.

Many Isthmians thronged to the colors. In
November, one of the fellows who had not joined
the ranks received a letter from one who had, stat-
ing that he had seen "Happy" Jack on a troop
train passing through the training camp, pre-
sumably on his way to France. "Happy" was a
corporal of engineers, and had been married since
May.

Nineteen eighteen arrived. United States troops
had been landed in France, but had not yet been
in action. March, 'eighteen. Would our men
never get in to show the Hun what we could do?

.At last came the test, .April, nineteen eighteen.
Great news. Three hundred and seventy-five
.American engineers, armed only with picks and
shovels, held back ten times their number of Ger-
mans until the Canadians could come to their aid
and thus turned the tide at Paschendel Ridge
in favor of the Allies. Their glory shall live
forever.



Back in Cristobal people waited anxiously for
news of what was happening on the battlefields
in France. At last Frank Bell received a letter
from his personal friend in France, Jim Weyman.
The fellows crowded around to hear what the
letter would say.

"Dear Frank," it began, "Of course, you have
heard of our first meeting with the Hun. Believe
me, that was some scrap. I don't suppose the
'Star and' told you anything about 'Happy'
Jack Peters. He was my sergeant. He was right
beside me when the thing happened. He stood
up and fought those Huns with that same old
Canal Zone smile of his on his face. You can
bet your last cart wheel that that is the spirit
that will beat these curs and give them whole-
some respect for Americans. But I was going
to tell you what happened. About ten of
us, including 'Happy' and myself, got separ-
ated from the main crowd. Of course, it all hap-
pened in a few seconds. Suddenly, while I was
engaged with one strapping brute, another lunged
at me with his bayonet. I thought my last mo-
ment had come. Before I could do anything, and
before the Hun could touch me, 'Happy' threw
himself between us and was run through. He was
mortally wounded. You can be sure that cursed
Hun paid the full penalty at my hands. Just
at this time we were rescued, and I was free to
listen to 'Happy's' dying words. 'Jim, old pal,' he
said, 'send my things to my wife. Tell the boys
in Cristobal J have won my bet, for I'll never go
back. Tell them to pay to my wife. Tell them
goodby for me. Jim, old man, I'm glad it was
I instead of you.' "Man," you can't imagine my
feelings. I would a thousand times it had been
the other way round. At least 'Happy' will live
in the annals of old timers on the Zone, as the
man who did not come back. Yours, as ever,
Jim Weyman."



22



THE CARIBBEAN.



U




THE CARIBBEAN.



23



m



=s




JUACAS.

Alson tV. Sears, '20.




Juacas are the gravesot anancient tribe of Cen-
tral American Indians. These Indians were the
"Chiriqui" Indians by name. They are quite ex-
tinct now. It is estimated that they probably
lived about five hundred years ago. Their graves
are found in the mountains of the Province of
Chiriqui in the Republic of Panama; the prov-
ince having been named after the tribe. Chiriqui
is about three hundred miles north of Panama
City and the mountains are located approximately
thirty miles from the coast.

The graves are of great interest to us because
of the ancient pottery and curious trinkets worked
in gold and silver, which were, by a peculiar custom
of the Indians, buried with the dead. These
trinkets and these potteries are not of any special
financial interest to us but are of value as articles
of historical interest and above all are precious
to us because they are few and we always like
something that our neighbor has not.

The process of digging these graves is very
complicated. There is also an example of Pana-
manian red tape to go through before one may
begin operations.

If one wishes to obtain a piece ot this curious
pottery for himself, he must do as the writer relates
that he and his friends did. We went to the
.'Alcalde of Boquete and literally begged that
official for a scrap of paper without which, the
guide, who was employed by the government, will
be deaf, dumb, blind, and paralyzed.

This all-important little letter states that the
beareragrees to share "fifty-fifty" with the Alcalde
if he happens to find any pottery or gold. "Fifty-
sixty" if it be gold.

We then tramped for a couple of miles and
hired our guide for"un peso oro," a sleepy individ-
ual who I should judge was a direct decendant
of the oldest of the Chiriquis.

He mildly gave us the "once over," shouldered
his crowbar, shovel, and bolo and we fell in behind
the old warrior, who, by the way, had the business



ends of a dagger and six-shooter peeping from
beneath his coat tail. We all decided on the spot
not to anger our dear friend, the guide.

He led us silently up hill and down dale, through
the most attractive scenery I ever laid eyes on.
We passed many little ranch houses along the
trail, the inmates never failing to crowd to the
door and window to stare stupidly at our silent
procession.

At last we descended the last hill into a val-
ley of exquisite beauty. A sparkling mountain
stream tumbled noisily between banks covered
with a riotous growth of green and bright colored
things. Farther up the valley sat a little cottage
nearly hidden from view by rambling vines. In
front, on either side of the path leading from the
cottage, grew banana plants, bending under the
weight of their golden burdens. Under the trees
the farmyard fowl noisily swarmed around the
mistress of the "hacienda" who was idly scatter-
ing corn among them. To the extreme left of the
valley, a forbidding cliff rose perpendicular as
though for no other purpose than to shut off this
beautiful and homelike scene from the ovitside
world.

Just at our feet stretched a level bit of ground
which had holes dug in it here and there, and slabs
of rock lay about these holes. This our guide
made us understand was one of the burial grounds
of his honorable ancestors.

We all descended our little hill eagerly and after
talking the owner of the land into allowing us to
dig, we commenced or rather our guide did.

First he selected a crowbar from the various
tools of his kit, and after much deep thinking,
decided to test a flat bit of terra firma nearby.
By way of testing he drove his bar into the
ground about two feet where it struck something
with a hollow clang. Then, nodding his greasy
locks wisely, he proceeded to excavate. After
much waiting and craning of necks, we discovered
that the object from which the sound came was



24



THE CARIBBEAN.



not the treasure chest but a slab of rock that had
apparently been used as a protection to the
corpse. This was thrown aside and, looking into
the hole, instead of s>;eing the expected bones, we
saw nothing more than common black earth. This
our guide threw out to a depth of three feet or
more. He then discarded his sh jvel in favor of a
small stick, with which he carefully loosened the dirt
and threw it out with his hands. After digging
and scooping for some time, we heard him register
a grunt and instantly our lagging interests were
alive once more. Slowly and carefully he dug
about a round object. As hi dug, it developed
into the mouth of an ancient piece of pottery,
which perhaps had last seen daylight at a funeral
ceremony some centuries before. Later the
curved neck came into view. Then the bulging



body with its painted designs in red. Then last
of all, the legs, three in number, with the images
of animals carved on them.

After digging all the dirt carefully from inside
so as to be sure there were no valuables therein,
that we might take first choice of, he handed it
to us for inspection. It was very nicely done
in red clay, and the tiny images showed the touch
of a real artist.

Our guide dug the rest of the grave but failed
to uncover any more for us, probably intending
to come back for the rest after we had gone.

So we set out for home with our precious bur-
den proudly displayed to the country except when
we passed the "Alcalde's casa." Take my advice
and always be honest with the Panamanian offi-
cials.



OLD PANAMA.

Harlan IV. Holmwood, '20.



Just a heap of dust and boulders,
On a lonely stretch of shore,
Just the marks of walls and castles.
Traces of a power no more.
Signs of what was once a city,
Jewel of fair Pacific's st and,
Now an ugly pile of ruins.
Disappearing in the sand.



And the yellow glistening moonbeams,
Lighting up the country round,
Make each tree a sombre shadow.
Throw vague pictures on the ground
Once again I see the city
As it was in years gone by,
Its walls and buildings throbbing.
With its power and majesty.



Then comes a scene of warfare,
A battle hard and long,
The clash of sword and armor,
The soldier's batde song.
.A fire and sure destruction
Fear reigns on every hand.
And now a pile of ruins.
Disappearing in the sand.



THE CARIBBEAN.



25




26



THE CARIBBEAN.



S=




A SHOE STRING ADVENTURE.

Ke line III Greene. '20.




'V



Five of my companions and I were camping on
the Boqueron River, in the interior of Panama.
We had been in camp a week and had encountered
nothing more exciting than the nightly battle
with mosquitoes. I must say that the carnage
in these battles was sickening. In fact several
of us had had slight attacks of malaria as a
result of these encounters. So it was that Mon-
day morning I started out to seek adventure.

I had been hiking all day and had encountered
nothing more thrilling than a swarm of angry
bees which I had unwittingly disturbed It was
getting late and I had to hurry along the bank
of the stream, in order to get to camp in time for
supper. As I hiked along, I came to a place
where, for 20 or 30 yards the bank was in danger
of sliding into the stream. Being in a hurry, I
did not care to make a detour, so I started to run.
Halfway over this danger zone, something caught
and down I went, flat on my face. My rifle and
kodak, in full accord with Newton's laws of mo-
tion, landed about 10 feet in front of me. I
arose and hurriedly began to disentangle my shoe
string; from the small bush in which it had caught.



As I did so I teit the bank giving way. Frantic-
ally I tried to loosen myself. The refractory shoe
string became more badly entangled than before.
Suddenly with a rush, the bank gave way, and
slid precipitately into the stream now swollen by
the rains. Downlwentinto the water. I caught
a breath just in time. Under I went, the weight
of the earth to which I was attached pulling me
down. For many seconds I remained under. It
seemed like as many minutes to me. My lungs
were bursting. My head throbbed. My ears
pounded like steam hammers.

.'\t last I was about to give up all hope, and to
breathe in the obliviating waters. Without warn-
ing, something gave way, and I rose gasping to
the surface. Safely ashore I discovered that the
water softening the earth had caused the bush to
pull out by the roots.

After resting a few moments to regain my poise
I proceeded campward. There I became the hero
of the day, for sitting around the camp fire, I
took great pleasure in relating and exaggerating
my adventure to my comrades. I had had the
most hair-raising experience yet encountered.



MARGARITA.

C. Lindale Davies, '20.



One night from a typical mud hut of a small
native village in the interior, a ragged shadow was
seen to steal forth into the pale moonlight.
After pausing to overcome fear, it was seen to
glide up to a rose bush that grew beside the door,
and greedily pluck one of the tiny roses. Even in
the failing light an expression composed of love,
happiness, and satisfaction was seen for a minute
to usurp the one of fear and weariness as the ragged
pilgrim hungrily yet tenderly held the tiny rose
against her heart. Brought back to reality by
the sudden bounding of a conejo across the vil-
lage prado the rose was hastily tucked within her
bosom and the ragged shadow glided back to the



door as silently as it had come, and was swallowed
up in the unbroken darkness. Compelled to look
by this mysterious midnight sally, the shadow
could be faintly discerned burying a box so care-
fully that it would lead one to believe it contained
the family jewels.

The ragged shadow was Margarita; an orphan
who had to work harder than a slave for her daily
bread. No one had a kind word for her, but instead
a curse or blow on the slightest excuse. On this
particular night Margarita had made her nightly
pilgrimage to a rose bush that Spanish peasants
are so fond of having before the door. This
bush contained the only balm for her wounded



THE CARIBBEAN.



27



soul, a rose. Her love for this flower was so great
that as a small superstitious child she was willing
to venture forth into the night filled with its
mysterious noises, also risking the chance of being
caught and literally flayed alive by her foster
parents. The small box that she had so carefully
buried did contain jewels, because Margarita
loved the art of nature above all other worldly
things.

In later years, when questioned, she confessed
that it was only the anticipation of visiting the



rose bush at night that gave her hope and strength
to sustain the tortures of day.

To-day Margarita is a typical poor native
mother, and with her age has also grown her love
for flowers. If, in her wanderings, she espies a
rose she never overcomes the temptation of
stealing it. No matter how hard or dirty is her
duty Margarita always finds time and a place for
the symbol of love, a rose, in her unkempt hair.



A KNIGHT'S ADVENTURE.

William F. Mar\, '22.



-At the gates of the Castle Bon Barey stopped
a young knight dressed in black armor and wearing
on his shield the emblem of lightning. After his
coming was told by his heralds he was admitted
into the castle. After he was shown his bed he
sat in the dining room of Baron de Lenus chatting
with the knights about his strange experiences
on his way to the castle.

They "-old him of a tournament which was to be
held on the morrow at noon. The knight, hearing
this, decided to overstay his visit 'til the morrow
eve to partake in the games.

The knight arose as the castle cock sounded his
peculiar reveille. Everything was a hustle and
bustle all through the morning preparing for the
tournament. Bold knights were beiiecking them-
selves with their most costly armor. Their heralds
were dressed in silk and satin-colored suits, with
their trumpets polished and their banners gleam-
ing like gold.

When all the knights rode abreast on their proud-
est steeds it was a spectacular sight. After being
viewed by the crowds, the trumpeters sounded
their horns for the first contest, which was archery.
Sir Lightning, as we shall call our hero, entered
this with 9 other contestants. After 8 had finished
shooting, none had hit the center of the bul!s'-eye,
the ninth contestant shot his shaft right in the
middle of the bull's-eye. Seeing this. Sir Light-
ning drew himself to his full height, took his
straightest arrow, aimed it carefully and let it go.
It whizzed through the air and when it hit, it



split the ninth contestant's arrow through the
middle and Sir Lightning was given a silver arrow
inlaid with jewels.

In the next j contests he was an easy victor
on account ot his broad shoulders and muscular
frame. Next was the tilting contest. Two sides
were chosen and at a command rushed toward each
other; many were thrown from their horses and
blood-stained armor littered the field. At last
only one man remained on each side to decide the
victory. Sir Lightning and Sir Groudion, whose
shield bore the talons of a lion. With jilt sticks in
place they both came toward each other at terrific
speed. At last they met, both reared at the shock;
Sir Groudion's saddle strap broke and, trying to
regain his mount, was knocked down by Sir
Lightning and forced to surrender.

i^fter receiving honors from the king he set
on his way toward his destination. On his way he
had many encounters with robbers and outlaws
and at last arrived where he received much wel-
come. When he went to the king he was asked
many questions and Sir Lightning told him of the
victories he had won.

The king tlien said: "Sir knight, if thou boast
of thy knighthood and fearlessness, take my
daughter away from a certain knight undefeated
in contest who lives about 150 miles trom here
and she shall be your bride."

The next day the knight set out along a little-
traversed highwav. About halfway his advance



28



THE CARIBBEAN.



was disputed by 2 men on horseback. They both
made a rush and the knight then raised his sword
and spoke:

"Men, it is cowardly and unknightly to fight
unevenly, but I will take you one at a time. What
is your answer?"

The men then began to talk very quietly to each
other and in 5 minutes the bigger of the two said
he would fight him first and, drawing his sword,
charged. The knight rained heavy blows when-
ever the robber left a place unguarded, otherwise
did little fighting and more guarding, so as to
save himself for the other robber. The knight,
seeing his chance, gave the robber a heavy blow
on the head and sent him sprawling on the ground.
The knight then dismounted and, drawing a small
dirk, ended the robber's misery.

Mounting, he met his other foe. This one, who
was enraged at the death of his comrade, struck
the knight a few glancing blows on the breast-
piece, but not heavy enough to do much damage.
Soon the robber reeled in his saddle and fell
to the ground, breathing his last.

Sir Lightning then proceeded on his journey.
In an hour he came to a small stream, where he
bathed his wounds and, giving his horse a drink,
he again started.



It was about 10 o'clock on the morning of the
second day that the towers of the castle were
visible. At noon he came upon the knight who
held as captive the king's daughter.

As Sir Lightning looked upon him, his noble
blood reddened and his fighting spirit began to
burn within him and with a cry "You dog!"
rushed upon him with leveled spear. The other
knight's horse reared, but stood the shock; the
other knight soon gained his bilance and was
upon Sir Lightning who received him with little
effort. Once the spearhead just grazed his left
shoulder and once it made a deep flesh wound on
his side, but he kept right on fighting.

The fight was witnessed by the king's daughter
who silently prayed that the stranger be victorious.
Seeing his chance, Sir Lightning rushed atthe other
knight, knocked him off his hors;, and was soon
upon him with raised sword. The other knight
begged for his life but the cold steel had found the
warm heart and he breathed no more.

Then Sir Lightning took the king's daughter
and told her what her father said. He then secured
a mount and started home with his bride-to-be.



THE PROCESS OF COFFEE RAISING.

J!so>i II'. Sears, '20.



Although it would seem that the climate ol
Panama is not suitable for the raising ot coffee,
it is really quite the opposite. A very fine grade of
coffee is raised among the mountains in the
Province of Chiriqui.

While visiting this part of the country, not long
ago, the owner of a very fine cafetal explained
the whole process of coffee raising to me.

When the owner of a cafetal wishes to plant more
trees he does not plant a seed but merely trans-
plants the "suckers" or young trees that shoot
up around the older trees. They are transplanted
when they are about 3 feet high and are placed
about 10 feet apart. Then after about 2 years'
growth they are of age and the white blossoms
may be seen for miles around; from a great dis-
tance a cafetal could be mistaken for a great
expanse of soft white snow. As the days pass the
blossoms drop off and small green berries appear.



They grow close together and very close to the
limb of the tree, appearing to be part of it at first
glance. In due time the berry is ripe, when it is
bright red and somewhat resembles a cherry. At
this stage they are picked by natives who will work
all day for less than 75 cents. The berries are
then spread out in the sun on sheets of tin to
be dried. In this way the miel or honey is
absorbed by the two small brown beans inside
the shell, thus giving your coffee its mellow taste.
.After the beans are thoroughly dried they are
poured into the stump of a tree which has been
gouged out in a conical shape. They are then
punched with heavy clubs to separate the kernel
from the shell, much the same as common table
beans or rice is threshed. The chaff is separated
from the kernel in a novel manner. The whole
mass is scooped out in a large platter of wood.
Then a native girl stands with the platter in her



THE CARIBBEAN.



29



hands by a corner of the shed so that when she
throws the contents into the air the light chafF is
blown avvav by the wind and the coffee beans
return to the pLitter.

Now the beans must be placed in a dry place
for a few davs so they will dry thoroughly. After



which they are put in bags and sent to market
where they are roasted and ground. Thence
to the home, perhaps back to Chiriqui to be drunk
bv a native or mav be to grace the table of a king.



THE NATIONAL DRINK OF PANAMA.

C. Lindale Davies, '20.

At this time, when so many substitutes for the becomes very soft. It is then sweetened to taste

forbidden beverages are being sought for, it might with heads of crude sugar which in Spanish are

be interestino- to know about the native drink called "rapadura."

called "Chicha de Maiz." The liquid is strained, and the corn thrown to

Corn is placed between dampened leaves and the poultry. The beverage is sometimes taken

set in some dark recess to ferment. After a few hot, but is much more refreshing when cool and

days when the corn has sprouted, it is removed mixed with ice. When cool, it is bottled and

and thrown into a very large mortar. The mor- put aside tor future use.

tar is usually about 4 fee^t high, and is made Along the streets of the Republic may often be

from the trunk of some large tree. Two women seen crowds drinking "Chicha" which is very

directing two huge pestels, pound the corn until it refreshing under the rays of a noonday sun.

is thoroughlv cracked. From there the corn enters If the bottles are left standing any length of

an enormous pot of water that has been previously time, the fermentation becomes so strong that it

put over a roaring fire to boil. .\ continual is impossible to keep a cork in the bottle,
stirring is kept up for 5 or 6 hours when the corn



THE CALL OF PANAMA.

Harlan W. Holmwood, '20.



Seated before tlie fireplace,

Heavy hearted and sore,
While I listen to the pattering rain,

And wind outside my door.
.\s it whistles through the tree tops,

AnA whirls the glistening snow,
What thoughts I have, what visions come,

Of davs of long ago.



Of a little tropic country,

Where the sun forever glows.
Where the palms wave in the soothing trades,

And the moon full yellow shows.
Where the stars gleam o'er a glistening bay

Whose soft w.aves wash the shore.
Oh! take me back to Panama

And let me roam no more.



Take me back to where it's warm,

.And let me sweat again.
Let me see the jungle thick

Where Nature has full reign.
So give me back that easy life,

I'm tirei of bustle and roar,
For Panama is calling me,

She is knocking at mv door.



30



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



31



feni


COUNTRY LADS WISE, CITY LADS WISER.


m


B


Paul C. Doyle, '23.


"



I was visiting my uncle's farm tor tlie first
time; in fact it was tfie first time I was ever
away from the city.

Rosy-checked, husis.y, and cheerful lads, all
about my age welcomed me to their games and
pastimes and the usual debates and loud and wordy
arguments which boys indulge in when a new-
comer invades their ranks were shared with the
recital of amusing boy pranks of city and country
life.

I was surprised at the origiilality of some of the
tricks they played on each other, for up to this
time it was my fixed opinion that the country
lad could not compete with the city boy in using
his brain. Of course, now that I have chummed
with the country boy, I'll freely admit that my
opinion has been decidedly changed.

One of their schemes for initiating a visiting
boy was to play a game called "Deliver the black
pudding." To play this game a prisoner and a
judge were chosen. The rest were policemen. To
make things sound right they'd give the judicial
power to the newcomer. He was told when the
prisoner was brought before his majesty he should
give orders to "deliver the black pudding," and
the prisoner, having a ripe tomato and eggs
thrown at him, wouldn't get funny any more.
The boys were gone 4 minutes when they brought
the half-laughing prisoner in. He was placed before
the judge, "What shall we do with him?" would
be the question.

"Deliver the blac ," but just then the

prisoner ducked. When the judge cleared the
tomatoes from Kis ears and egg from his eyes he
awakened to find his chums had disappeared, and
the joke on him. The prisoner has a hard time
convincing the judge that a mistake has been
made, but good fighters never quit until every-
body, through one way or another, are warm
friends again.

I then related how we had tun with my cousin
.Albert who recently visited my home. Albert was
a good swimmer but not nearly as good as many



of our boy friends. After telling my cousin that
we were all learning to swim, he obligingly offered
to teach any of the boys who cared to take lessons.

Two of the fastest swimmers accepted his kind
offer, and kept poor .'Albert working for a half
hour in shallow water, explaining how to kick,
when to take a stroke, where to keep the head,
and how to breathe. It was very funny to watch
them pretending to learn and all the spectators
enjoyed the fun.

At the end of one hour my cousin was stupefied
at their progress, tor both beat him in a race by 40
feet in a length of but 90 feet. The usual state-
ment "Ah, go on, you knew how to swim all the
time," came from Albert.

I now know my mistake in telling them my part
in this prank, and I will now tell you how they
made me a victim to one of their own and why I
changed my opinion about country boys not being
as wide-awake as city boys.

I had never been in the country and I was as
green as grass about everything in it. The only
time I have ever seen a cow outside of pictures,
was when a nice thick juicy slice of one was sizzling
in hot butter on the dinner table. So it was easy
for me to fall into their trap.

My uncle had given me 10 cents and I had in-
vested the whole sum in peanuts and was enjoying
eating them the next day, when I was met by 3
ot the boys who said they were going squirrel
hunting and would let me go if I would share my
peanuts equally with them. .After a long argu-
ment in which I was allowed to keep 10 peanuts,
beside my share, we came to an agreement.

I counted out 10 peanuts and put them in my
trousers pocket, then handed one to Bill, one to
Teddy, and one to "Red" and continued this
until each ot us had the same amount. There were
two left over and these we decided after a long
argument to bury at the foot of a monument
located at the top of a high and steep hill in the
center of the town. This we did and swore that
we hoped to die if any of us would return for the



32



THE CARIBBEAN.



buried treasure before we caught a squirrel. We
started for the woods which were at the foot of the
other side of the hill. Each of the boys carried lo
empty potato sacks which they said were used to
catch squirrels by putting a piece of carrot in the
sack and holding it against a squirrel tree. All
you had to do was to shut your eyes and keep per-
fectly still and the squirrel thinking you were
asleep, would sneak into the bag to steal the carrot,
and he was your captive.

We walked at least 5 miles through a pretty and
shady forest and as I was not used to walking I
became very tired. Besides, so that they could
locate the squirrel trees more quickly, I had to
carry the whole 30 bags, sol was mighty glad when
we came to the finest squirrel tree in the country.
We drew straws for this tree. Luckily, I drew the
shortest straw, thereby winning the privilege to
use the best hunting ground.

While the other boys walked away in search of
other squirrel trees I began my hunt for squirrels.
Following instructions in holding my carrot-baited
bag against the tree trunk, keeping my eyes shut
most of the time, I waited still as a mouse for 15
minutes and, growing tired of the sport, I decided
to look for a boy at some other squirrel tree,
leaving my sack at the deserted hunting place.

I must have walked for an hour without finding
any of the boys, and I turned to go back when I



discovered that I was lost. Remembering my
scout rules I climbed one of the tallest trees and
when I reached the branches what a disappointing
surprise met my gaze! Not half a mile away lay
the hill with its monument where the peanuts were
buried, and there before my eyes were three wild
eagles (the squirrel hunters who had tricked me)
digging for the treasure. I'll say they were wild,
for by this time I could see that they had found
the 2 empty shells which I had substituted for
real peanuts while climbing the hill.

The entire forest I now could see was not over a
mile in area and those country "hicks" had led
me around in a circle until I thought it was endless.

Slipping down the tree I quickly made for the
point where the hill was located and on my way
I stopped to pick up my sack and, finding some-
thing moving in it, I peeped inside and what do
you think? There were 2 tiny frightened rabbits
in it. I took them with me. I met the grinning
boys near the hill; they asked to see my squirrels.
I let one of them see through a little space in the
top, but the others had to supply my appetite
with some nice, large, red apples before they
saw my treasure. I took the rabbits to my uncle's
house, where they raised a large and interesting
family, and I then finished eating my 10 peanuts
in peace.



RAMON IN COLON.

Eiilai'te Arthur, '22.



Until he was 15 years old, Ramon had lived in
the interior. He had never seen anyone except
his own family and the neighbors. He knew
nothing at all about the outer world, in fact, he
was hardly civilized.

He knew that every week when his father
left the farm, if it could be called a farm, that he
went to a place called Colon and, in exchange for
his fruits and vegetables, brought back sugar and
salt and other things that he himself could not
raise.

Soon after his 15th birthday his father decided
that he was old enough to be taught how to sell
fruits and vegetables.

And so the following week, Ram6n, dressed in
an old suit of his father's that was several sizes



too large for him, accompanied his father to that
place of mystery, Colon.

They left home very early in the morning and,
as the mule that pulled the rickety wagon was so
old that probably Noah would have recognized
him as one of those that he had driven into the
ark, it was dusk before they arrived at the out-
skirts of Colon.

He spent the night there with a friend of his
father's, and at 4 o'clock the next morning they
were driving into the city.

It was iust 5 o'clock when they arrived at the
market.

Ramon was tokl that he might go for a walk
about the cit\- but to be sure to be back by
6.30.



THE CARIBBEAN.



33



As Ramon was walking down Front Street,
not on the sidewalk, but in the very middle of the
street, he heard a queer noise and turning beheld
a great black monster, as he thought, but a tew
yards away and rapidly approaching, and all the
time making that horrible noise.

He didn't wait for a second look but started at
full speed down the street.

The chauffeur of the car seeing the figure of a
boy with coat tails flying in the wind and who paid
no attention to the warning horn, running with all
speed, thought something must be wrong, and
followed.

Ramon ran for a couple ot blocks and turned his
head to see if the monster was still coming.

He wondered what he had ever done that he
should have to die at the hands of such a terrible
thing. And he asked all of the saints that he had
ever heard of to have mercy on his soul.

But at last the chauffeur came to the corner
where he turned and with a last blare of the horn
that almost stopped the beating of poor Ramon's
heart, vanished.

Ramon's heart was still jumpmg when "toot!
toot!" He saw another monster many, many
times larger than the one he had just escaped which,
dragging more monsters behind, was running
down the opposite side of the street.

Ramon couldn't have moved an inch just then,
for he was paralyzed with fright.



He could only hope, as he watched the thing
that shot forth great clouds of smoke from its
head, that death would come quickly.

He closed his eyes and stood there for an inter-
minable time and then, as nothing happened, he
opened them and saw that the thing, an early
freight train, just pulling out of the station, had
disappeared.

Ramon decided that he had seen quite enough of
Colon and walked in the direction of the market.

On the way he passed a fruit store that had been
open but a few minutes and among the familiar
oranges and bananas he saw round red things,
and small purple ones, also round, that were in
bunches like bananas.

Ramon was hungry and he began to help him-
self liberally to the fruit, when the proprietor, com-
ing from the rear of the store, saw him filling both
pockets with the small purple things, grapes, and
crying "thief," summoned a near-by policeman
and placed Ramon in his kind hands.

Ramon was taken to a place with iron bars
across the window and door, and here his frantic
father found him that night.

He told Ramon that he had had to pay <;
perfectly good dollars to get him out of jail
and to wait until he got him home! But Ram in
was too happy at the thought of leaving this town
of monsters and devils to mind his father's
threat.

-And thus ended Ramon's first visit to Colon.



MR 7263+



34



THE CARIBBEAN.



LONG HAIRED




Kenneth CiREEXE, '20.

Poel Liiureate.



NIGHT.



Aloft in the azure depths there lies
Serene in the dark caerulean sl A silvery moon, an orb of white,
Throwing its light on the clouds around.
Tracing vague shadows on the ground.
Setting a spell with its mystic light.
From lofty mount to broad sea strand.
O'er every people and every land,
That slumbers now in the arms of night.
The broad lake shimmers in its beams
And each little ripple glimmers and gleams.
Making a beautiful, wonderful sight.
The trees their giant branches toss.
The moonbeams stream on beds ot moss.



On the cool night air there floats a song
Sung by some lover to his love.
And still that mystic disk above
Floats with its silvery light along.
\o lamb in the silent pasture plays,
No huntsman in the forest strays.
But mnonbeams play the trees among,
.^nd all rests calm in the moon's white light.
Till breaking the silence of the night.
We hear the town clock's solemn gong,
Tolling the hour, and all too soon
Breaking the mystic spell of the mcon.



THE FALL OF FORT SAN LORENZO.



High on a beetling cliff
O'erlooking the Spanish Main,
High on a lofty crag
The frowning fortress stood.
Turreted, towered, embattled.
There by the Chagres' mouth,
High o'er the foaming flood.
Guarding its treasure.
Hither the treasure seekers
Bearing their bags of gold,
Came to the golden city,
The city of gold of the west.
Then o'er the bounding main,
Morgan the buccaneer,
Morgan the pirate came.
Morgan the terror of Spain,
Morgan the ruthless came.
Seeking what spoils he might,
Came he toward the height
Of Fort San Lorenzo.
Volleying shot and shell.
Storming the rocky height,
Morgan the pirate fought.



The carnage was awful.
Twice he attacked the fortress.
Twice he stormed it in vain,
Twice beaten back dismayed,
Twice he returned again,
Testing the fortress's power.
When the third time he came,
The hidden passage revealed.
Up to the fortress streamed
Morgan's merciless men
Killing or torturing all.
Ruthless and merciless they,
Dealing but bloodshed and slaughter.
Caring for naught but the gold.
Bravely the fortress resisted,
F,ach man knowing his fate
Despairingly wielded his sword.
Selling his life blood dear.
Thus was Fort San Lorenzo
Put to the ultimate test.
Thus fell Fort San Lorenzo,
The city of gokl of the west.



THE CARIBBEAN.



35



FAREWELL.



"Where conies the climax o\ this play?"
The teacher's voice was far away.
For I was dreaming of that day
When to this high school I should say,
"Farewell."



"Translate, 'siibiloqiie fragore.'
.Again my thoughts were far away
For still was I thinking of that day
When to this high school I should say,
"Farewell."



"What is the law of sines, I pray?"
Dimly I heard the principal say
For all my thoughts were tar away
On thatda>' oftlayswhen I should say,
"Farewell."



"Out of this building, young man, stray.'
1 heard the principal solemnly say.

"For if you can't attention pay
Within this school you need not stay."
"Farewell!"



NAMES AND GREETINGS.



Sure me name is Paddy Laughlin
.\nd Oi come tiom Erin's Oisle
.And all Oi've got to greet yez wid
Is me carefree Oirish smoile.



My name is H.iiik Bohunkus
And New Vork is my stall
And all I've got to greet you with
Is mv lanky ^'ankee drawl.



.Ach ma name is Tarn McDuft'y
.An' ah coome Irae auld Scootland
An' all ah've got to greet ye with
Is me hearty Scoottish hand.



Oh, my name is Manuel Calvo,
.And I come from Panama,
.And all I've got to greet you with
Is a lazv como esld.



A PARTING TOAST.



I sit by the sea in the moonlight,
.And my thoughts are far away.

Washing up like the eddying wavelets
On the shore of some tuture dav.



Then my thoughts turn ag lin to the present,
.And my eye fills up with a tear,

.As I think of the sure separation

From my friends at the end of the year.



I forget the trials that are over.

And the toils that have long passed awax
.As I think of the unfailing promise

Ot some future succes.s-bringing day.



But when my sorrow and sadness
.About me hang like a shroud.

The moon shining out in its whiteness
Shows a ray of hope through the cloud.



T hen hurlmg tar from me m>' sorrow
I raise my voice up to the sky,

In a toast to the golden to-morrow
.And a toast to dear Cristobal High.



THE TROPIC NIGHT.



The day is done, and the burning sun,

has set in golden splendor,
The big white moon, mounting up tuU soon,

shines through the palm trees slender.
Thestars shine bright, with their twinkling light,

on a world not yet in slumber.
.And lovers sigh, as they vainly try,

to give each star a number.
The night bird's call, from the palm tree tall,

with its weird haunting shrillness.



.Adds by its sound, as I have found,

to the night's cool soothing stillness.
\ow the moon's gone down, and in the town,

the mortals all are sleeping,
.As up trom the East, like a stealthy beast,

the sun is slowly creeping.
.As I toss about, on a sharp lookout,

for words to end my story.
Here's a parting cup, as the sun comes up

in a gold-red blaze of glory.



36



THE CARIBBEAN.



-%




MY TRIP TO NEW YORK VIA HAITI.

E//ia J. Beviyigtou, '20.




1^



=g



The steamship Colon left Cristobal on May 31,
1919, with a passenger list of 196. For the first 2
days out no one could ask for more perfect
weather. The Atlantic was as calm as one would
want it, and the heavens were a beautitLiI blue
whose color was reflected on the ocean. On the
evening of June 2 we sighted Haiti, and were told
that we would dock the next morning. Just before
dark we entered the bay of Haiti. This bay is a
wonderful piece of nature's work, being one of the
largest natural bays in the world, having a length
of 90 miles.

When I awakened the next morning, I could not
understand why the boat was not in motion.
Soon I heard sharp commands and again the
noise of negroes; then I realized we were in the city
of Port-au-Prince. After breakfast all passengers
were allowed to go ashore, but were to return by
3 that afternoon. There were 8 in our party that
went ashore to explore the city. It seemed to me
I have never known the sun to be so hot as it was
on that day, it was even worse than Panama sun.
Port-au-Prince is much like Colon and Panama,
only much dirtier.

The first place we visited was the post office, a
dirty wooden building and full of beggars. Such
beggars! I never saw so many, with nothing but
rags to cover their bodies. The chief password of
Haiti is "Gimme 5 cents, mister." W'e did give a
few of them some change, but before we knew it
we had a flock of beggars around us. The best
thing to do, we decided, was not to give them any
more money ifwe were to escape from them. How
those beggars did stick, one little lad said he would
show us the town, but we told him we didn't need
his assistance. Once more we were on our way,
some straying off from the party.

Although Port-au-Prince is a thousand times
dirtier than Colon or Panama, the streets are
much better. The sidewalks are made of rough
stones and built in steps which is very trying on
one who is not accustomed to them. The stores
are even with the pavement, with merchandise.



baskets, and hats strung overhead. While my
friend and I (we having lost the rest of the party)
were taking in the sights, a negro boy asked us if
we did not want to buy a parrot. He wanted Sg
gold for it, so we told him no. Later we found out
that the parrot could be bought for 46 cents.
Just as we turned to go on our way we noticed
our little guide was still with us. We told him to
go away, but he didn't take the hint, so, to get
rid of him, we hired a coach for an hour. It seemed
good to sit down even if the coach did not have
tires like the ones on the Zone.

There was really not much difference in the
sights from those of Colon to arouse much interest.
We passed the prison, a large stone building, and
we saw a number of negro convicts, in striped
suits, looking through the bars. One thing of
interest was an open-air market, which covered
a large amount of ground. All articles were laying
on the ground, and the sellers were sitting with a
piece of burlap propped on sticks which covered
their heads to protect them from the sun. There
were thousands of people there, colored, of course,
buying and selling. Many of the products were
brought in from the country by native women on
mules.

We saw a few Americans now and then, who
were mostly sailors and Marines. We wanted to
see the American settlement which we heard
was very beautiful, but as our hour was up and it
was nearing 3 o'clock, we had to go back to the
boat.

When we went aboard ship again we were loaded
down with hats, baskets, and alligator pears, as
likewise were the other passengers. I am sure
the people in New York must have thought we
were from the country when we docked with our
arms full of souvenirs from Haiti. I was glad to
be back on the boat once more, as I had a bursting
headache from the sun, and what I wanted most
was a drink of cold water.

We did not leave Haiti until 6 that evening, as
we took on more cargo than was expected. Every



THE CARIBBEAN.



37



one became impatient as they waited for the boat
to pull out. I watched the negro workmen put
the cargo aboard, and it seemed that all of them
were bossing the job, but no one really knew much
about it at all. Ninety more passengers were
taken aboard at Haiti, many Marine officers and
their families, also a number of Haitians. Just
at twilight we pulled away from the dock, and
we were all greatly relieved.

Nothing unusual happened the next 5 days;
than ever happens on board a Panama Railroad
steamer en route to New York. Each day it grew
colder, and all of us had to "bundle up" to keep
warm, although, the crisp air made us feel good.
The night before we docked a heavy fog came up
and anyone who has been in a fog before knows
what it is to hear the foghorn. All night I had
to sleep between the blasts which were every
minute, so I got very little sleep that night.



I had a hard time getting up the next morning,
as it was so cold first I put out one foot and then
the other, but each time I crawled back in my
berth. After several attempts at this I succeeded
in getting dressed. Most all passengers were on
deck and they looked frozen. I felt the same in
spite of heavier clothing. There was still a slight
fog, and we could just distinguish the sights of
New York harbor. When I went out on deck I
just shook, I was so cold. The wind cut like a
knife. But I had to see the Statue of Liberty once
more, in spite of the cold. After the usual red
tape of inspectors and doctors, we finally docked.
I was very glad when we were safely on a warm
Pullman on our way to Cleveland, Ohio. A feeling
of contentment came over me, when I had the
satisfaction of knowing I was once more in the
good old U. S. A.



A SHARK! A SHARKl

Harold Chke, '22.



"Boom!" went the minute gun with its loud
roar, waking from peaceful sleep the Dutch farmer
whose house overlooketl the ba)-.

He sprang from his bed, and, throwing open the
window, could just make out the lines of a small
brig, over which large waves were breaking, hiding
the ship from time to time.

"Boom!" once again across the water came the
loud roar, so plainly appealing for help. This
time the gun woke the wife, who instantly knew
what it meant. Sitting up, she said: "Ship in
distress, Hans?"

The man nodded he hatl no time for words.
He quickly drew on his sea clothes, while his wife
busily prepared her home for a number of ship-
wrecked sailors. Many a time had a half-
drowned sailor found refuge at that seaside home.

Hans lost no time in making his way to the
stable, and having slipped a halter over his horse's
neck, he mounted him and quickly rode off to the
scene of the wreck.

In another minute the doomed ship lay before
his eyes, not a couple of hundred yards from the
shore. But that space was of large foaming break-
ers and full of sharks.



Already Hans could make out the bobbing heads
of the strongest swimmers, who were vainly trying
to reach shore.

Hans grasped the situation, and at once rode his
horse mto the ocean, calling at the top of his
voice: "Make for the horse, men! Swim to him,
and catch hold of his tail. It's your only chance!"

The men were not slow to follow his advice, and
soon 3 of them caught hold of the horse's tail, and
were soon on land.

Everywhere men were throwing ropes to the
unfortunate sailors, but Hans and his horse saved
the most lives.

The sailors who had until now stuck to the ship
at last realized that she was breakingup and hastily
climbing down the rigging, they swung themselves
over the side and caught hold of anything until
Hans came with his horse to tow them to shore.

The journey was almost over when one of the
men gave an awful shriek, which could be plainly
heard above the roar of the waves.

"A shark! a shark! It's got hold of my leg!
Oh, save me!"

"Kick out! Keep kicking!" shouted Hans. "We
will save you," and, urging his horse to greater



38



THE CARIBBEAN.



efforts, he made for the land, where brave men
rushed into the surf with knives, to kill the dreaded
animal.

All of a sudden a roar of laughter went up from
the crowd, for on dragging the man to shore, no
shark was found, hut a poor little cabin boy, who
had hung onto the first thing he grasped, and was
still clinging to the man's ankle with a clasp ot
despair.

"Here's your shark, mate!" called out a man.
"What shall I do with it.?"



"Give me the boy," said Hans. "I will take him
to my wife. She will take good care of him."

Before long the shipwrecked sailors were seated
around Hans's kitchen fire, drinking hot coffee
and enjoying large hunks ot bread and cheese.

The cabin boy was fast asleep in bed and seemed
none the worse for his adventure, while the men
would from time to time break out into peals of
laughter as they recalled their mate's escape from
"a shark!"



RESOURCES AND INDUSTRIES OF PANAMA.

Alice M- Stitson, '20.



From the location of the Isthmus of Panama
one would expect it to be a very flourishing
republic and it is the opinion of many that it may
be so in the years to come. The Isthmus is
endowed by nature with many resources, such as
agricultural, mineral, and forestvai, but its indus-
tries are very few. However, its resources are
not sought after as they should be, nor are any of
the industries highly developed as they are in
other countries. The people here lack energy and
interest but they are not entirely responsible for
this, for they need some help from the government
to back them up.

Most of these resources lie in the interior ot
Panama, but the interior is difficult to reach as
there are very few roads. Very few means are
provided for the development of these resources,
therefore, it is cheaper and easier to import the
necessary things.

In the past, large quantities of gold were dug
out by the Indians and Spaniards from the
mountains near Chiriqui. Silver, iron, and other
metals were also discovered, but at present very
little is derived as no serious attempts are made
to find these minerals.

The land all through the interior is especially
adapted to grazing and farming, but hardly any
means are provided for the bringing in of the
produce.

Some of the trees, which grow on the Isthmus,
are the India rubber tree, the cocoa tree, the Cot-



tonwood tree which grows to a very great size, and
the bamboo. The bamboo is used very much by
the natives for building their little huts as a e
also the b-anches fro;n palm or coconut trees.

One of the m ist important industries of Pan-
ama, alth-jugh njt highly developed, is the culti-
vation of fruits. In and around Colon bananas
grow quite abiinJantly, although they are not
really the bsst. They say that the best bananas
a -e grown in B c\s tiel Toro. The boats on their
way to New York usually stop there in order to
get a cargo of bananas. Another truit, commonly
seen on the Isthmus, is the coconut and it is one
of the chief exports. The coconuts are chiefly
brought from t!ie islands of San Bias and St.
Andxw and then shipped to the States.

BesiJis t'lese there are other fruits cultivated,
such as pineapples, lemons, oranges, sugar cane,
and the papaya. The island of Taboga is noted
for the pineapples which are grown there

Some of the vegetables grown on the Isthmus
are the yucca, coco, and yam. Yam is used by
the natives just as much as the potato is useci by
the Americans, in fact, it is the native potato. .All
these grow with very little care on account ot the
very fertile soil.

An industr)- which is neglecteci in Panama is
manufacturing. Neither in Colon nor in Panama
are there any factories of great importance. Nearly
all manufactured goods are imported. Perhaps
some day this industry will be developed.



THE CARIBBEAN.



39




BLACK OR WHITE?

Alurjorie D. Ball. '22.



"Tommy, have you forgotten to bring in tiie
coal and chop the wood? Yes, and I want you to
go to the commissary, too," called Tommy's
busy mother.

"Oh, dear! Well, I'll come in a minute,"
Tommy groaned in answer. Then to himself,
"I wish I wuz one of those little niggers in Colon.
They never have to work. It's too hot to work,
anyway. I believe I'll run away. Then she'll
have to chop her ole wood herself."

Midafternoon found Tommy hot and weary
in a coconut grove on the edge of the jungle.
He was too tired to go any farther, so he sat down
and rested his head wearily against the trunk
of a palm.

Far overhead the tropical sun sent off rays of
intense heat. .\ trail of ants crawled slowly by the
little boy's head and a centipede stretched itself
lazily at his feet. .\r\ iguana, basking on a near-by
rock, eyed him sleepily through half-closed lids.
'Way up in the top of the palm a little monkey
peered curiously down at the boy, evidently try-
ing to classify this strange creature.

Suddenly Tommy sat up. "Where am I r
What am I doing here? Gee, I'm hungrv! Guess
I'll go home an' see if Ma won't gimme somethin'
to eat."

In his mother's kitchen he found it difficult to
get past the maid, who seemed determined not to
let him in. .Sho\'ing the maid aside he burst into
the middle ot an afternoon tea, demanding some-
thing to eat.

His mother looked up in surprise. "Why, vou
little black rascal, what are you doing in here?
Mary, come put this child out."

Outside the door he realized that his wish had
come true. No more chopping of wood, no more
carrying of coal or trips to the commissary! He
was a little negro and could enjoy life.

He found the boys with whom he usually
played but when he tried to get into their games
they chased him away and threw stones at him.



=^



"Well, I don't care if they won't play with me,"
he said, "they have to chop wood and I don't,"
and he marched off with his nose in the air

In a field near-by some little colored boys were
flying a kite. He received a welcome from them
and soon was fully enjoying himself.

Then one little fellow cried, "Say, kids, let's
get somethin' to eat." With the approval of all
they started for New Cristobal.

At the first house all the boys crept underneath
the porch except the smallest, who happened to
be Tommy.

He rapped on the door. "Please, mistress, a
piece of bread," he mumbled according to in-
structions. The door slammed in his face.

Joining the rest, he found that they had dis-
covered some dry bread in a garbage can. To his
own surprise he accepted some and crunched it
gratefully.

Bedtime found Tommy with no place to sleep.
Then one little boy asked him to come to his
home, a small room in Bottle Alley. Tommy was
given a section of floor in the corner of the room
for his bed. It appeared that a family of 9 slept,
ate, and lived for the most part in one small room.
Soon the family retired and the doors and win-
dows were barred. The air was ht)t and stifling
and Tommy could hear a distant roll of thunder
predicting a storm. He became more uncomfort-
able as the storm grew worse and wondered if he
would live 'til morning.

Suddenly a terrific crash of thunder brought
him to his feet with his hands at his head. The
iguana scuttled off the rock, the centipede slid
off through the grass and the little monkev up
among the coconut leaves chattered with glee
over the havoc his coconut bomb had wrought.

.\ sadder yet wiser Tommy wearily wended
his way home and carried in the coal without
complaint.



40



THE CARIBBEAN.




IN AND ABOUT COLON.

Jlberl A. Dovie, '20.




J^



.\ slight lurch of our steamer told us that the
tue, which was "kicking" us into our berth, had
finished its job. Fred and I looked down from the
deck onto the dock to which we were made fast
and saw a picture of laziness. .About 200 West
Indian laborers sat or stood by their hand trucks
gaping at the arrival of the "Steeuts buot."
Conditions rapidly changed, however, when an
.American of average stature, tanned a deep brown
and clad in a blue open-throated shirt, khaki
trousers, and straw hat, appeared on the scene
sharply directing the laborers, who then showed
extraordinary agility in getting about. For
the first few minutes after disembarking there
seemed to reign the greatestconfusion, accentuated
by the many noises. But, after looking more
closely at things, I found that confusion was ap-
parent rather than real, for intleed a very exact
system of management was taking place that
long trail of hand trucks was unloading mail
bringing tidings from loved ones to anxious rela-
tives and friends in distant lands, and this nois\-
crowd of laborers were skillfully sorting out the
trunks and baggage of the passengers in system-
atic, orderly, and easily identified rows, and that
still more noisy gang were preparing the nets and
slings and hoisting gear with which they would take
the valuable cargo from ofl'our ship.




I'lcTo It and S.



Fred and 1 were soon clear ot all customs in-
spection, so we made our way out of the dock and
onto the street that led to the pier's entrance.




This street, ot concrete construction, was built on
an artificial mole which extends out in a westerly
direction from Old Cristobal. The 4 adjoining
docks are said to be the finest in the world, being
built at wide regular intervals at right angles to
the mole.

Walking eastward, we came to the land end ot
the mole where the .Atlantic Terminal Building,
a handsome substantial 3-story structure, is
situated. We had to enter this building, as our
business neces-
sitated a visit
to the Registra-
tion, Port Cap-
tain's and Pan-
ama Railroad
offices, ail lo-
cated in it.

F"rom the tall .\tlantic Terminal Building.

flagstaff in front of the building floated "Old
Glory." Fred and I had done a lot of traveling
and had seen the Stars and Stripes unfurl itself
to the breezes in many lands, but we had not
yet seen such a satisfying picture as it then
made, surrounded by tropical palms.

The Terminal Building contains all the branches
of the steamship-handling business forming a part
of the government of The Panama Canal and there-
fore takes official care of all shipping at Cristobal,
the -Atlantic port. .A ship transiting the Canal
southward must take on a pilot whose headquar-
ters is in the Terminal Building. It must, if it
has not an agency on the Isthmus, make a rec]uest
for its coal or supplies or repairs to the Port
Captain there. It must transact its business with
the quarantine, customS; admeasurer, and collector
all in the same building. The collector receives
the tolls for the ship's passage and the payments
for its repairs or .supplies. From the third floor of
this building we obtained a good view of the new
steamship line offices grouped in the neighbor-
hood. A low 2-story building to the left we found
was the Hamburg-American Line office, completed



THE CARIBBEAN.



41



just after the starting of the late war and tor this
reason, being a German company, was never
occupied by it.




Hamburg-American and Italian l^leamsiiip Lines Buildings.

When "we" entered the war, the United States
Government confiscated it as alien enemy prop-
erty,and used it as headquarters for the Fifteenth
Naval District. Just opposite the building in
question stood the new Italian Steamship Line
office, made prominent by its stately tower, an
uncommon piece of architecture around Cristobal
or Colon.

Coming down into the street again, Fred and I
passed by the base of the flagstaff. We learned
that this white pole, besides flying "Old Glory,"
had also flown 3 Liberty Loan honor flags,
showing that Cristobal had Jed all other Canal
Zone communities in three of the five Liberty
Loan drives launched during the World War.
At thebase of the flagpole were propped 2 huge,
rusty iron anchors with 14-toot shanks. We
learned that they were the famous "Anchors of
Cruces." Morgan and his band of buccaneers

are said to have
left the anchors
in Cruces, a
small native
village near
Fort San Lor-
enzo, during his
dark days of
p i r a c > over

Anchors uE Cruces and German Mine. ^00 \'ears affO

.A striking comparison was offered between these
ancient anchors and a modern missile of war
which stood just near them a German mine.

This queer-shaped object was presented to the
Port Captain of Cristobal by the master of the



5


frrotg^ "T


I'


15


I


llg


1


1




U. S. S. Mehille, a mine layer and sweeper. We
also learned that this ship, when on her way to
Cristobal and about 500 miles out, had on board a
disastrous explosion resulting in the death of 5
of Uncle Sam's sailors.

This depressing information saddened both Fred
and myself, so, wishing to change the scene and
thought, we hailed one of those tumble-down
ticket}' local coaches with its disreputable under-
sized and bony horses which mar the otherwise
clean and business-like surroundings, and directed
the "cochero" to drive us to the Hotel Wash-
ington. Dashing more or less madly up the wide
and clean concrete street at a speed of at least
,3 miles an hour, which, by the way is satisfactory
when one considers the advanced age and pitiable

physical con-
dition of the
un for tu n a t e
animals gener-
ally engaged in
vehicle trans-
portation here,
we were brought
to a halt by a

Cristobal Fire ,^'tation,

passing train,
equal, in every particular, to any we had met
in our travels, at what we learned was the busiest
spot on the Atlantic or "Gold" side of the
Canal.

.^s our steed came very willingly to a stop, we
saw on our left the Cristobal fire station.

Peering within we saw the very latest ap-
paratus in fire-fighting equipment. Here, as
before, the Stars and Stripes were borne proudly
on a flagstaff'. Across the railroad tracks to the
right, was a long 2-story building which throngs
of busy people were constantly entering and
leaving. This, v/e learned from our dusky
driver, who
spoke a not
easily under-
stood brand of
the English
language pecu-
liar to the West
Indies, was in
reality a big

modern depart- Panama Railroad Building.

ment store, known as the "Commissary," having
practically every commodity required, and from
whicli employees of The Panama Canal and the




42



THE CARIBBEAN.



Panama Railroad Company purchased their
supplies, paying for them with yards and yards
and vards ot narrow strips of paper called com-
missary coupons. Whether the employees made
their own coupons or not we were unable to learn.

The train ha\'ing passeij, there followed the
greatest clamor ot coach bells, truck horns, and
general warning signals imaginable, as the two
lines of vehicles coming in opposite directions
passed over the railroad crossing through the
scurrying crowd ot pedestrians who tlodged their
winding ways in and out among the slowly moving
vehicles, all, without a single exception, complain-
ing about the high cost of living.

Our driver had no difficulty in restraining the
horse from rushing through here at excessi\'e
speed, thus giving us ample tune to carefully
observe the first buildin^j which greets the e\'e in



By simply turning our heads we could see the
"Ba>'," dotted with numerous ships, some waiting
for Canal transit, others coal, fuel oil, or supplies,
and others their clearance papers. It was interest-
mg to note the ilifFerent classesof ships that passed
through the "Big Ditch," for out there lay at
anchor small yachts and sailing schooners, little
coastwise steamers and great bulky troopships,
tugs, lighters, and immense colliers, as well as
freight and passenger-carrying steamers from all
parts of the globe. We learned that a picture of the
bay was incomplete without a naval ship of some
government in it. Airplanes and hydroplanes,
banking in graceful spirals, flitted about, swallow-
like, in the air, while pelicans in exact military
wedge-shapeil formation and the high-soaring
buzzarLis hovered almost motionless above, making
the V, hole an extremely lively spectacle.




Hotel Washiiifzton-



Colon proper which w; were tuld is the city
iust across the railroad tracks from Cristobal
a j-story cement structure, the lower floor of
which was occupied by modern and well-filled
stores and shops with attractive window displays.
Turning down to the left which incidentally
appears to be the rule for traffic driving in Colon
on Front Street, one of the main thoroughfares of
Colon, we passed store after store apparently
displaying every article of merchandise obtainable
in the civilized world, separated here and there
by spotlessly clean alleyways and now and then
by another clean, wide and well-paved street,
similar in its industry and enterprise, to the one
on which we were traveling.



.\s we rode along in our conveyance ample
opportunity was afforded to observe the sub-
stantially constructed concrete buildings which
lined the thoroughfare for several squares, followed
by other squares containing unsightly wooden
buildings in most unfavorable contrast, giving
to this section the appearance of pioneer mining
towns which we had traversed in the western
I'nited States. This condition we learned was due
to a disastrous fire occurring about 5 years ago,
consuming 22 squares in the city of Colon, threat-
ening all of that city and beautiful Cristobal as
well. The wooden buildings, dried to tinder by
the merciless tropical sun, furnished a fuel which
swept forward until a generous use of dynamite



THE CARIBBEAN.



43



razed unconsunied buildings tor a considerable
area in the path ot the conflagation. From this
ruin arose the handsome buildings which greeted
our eyes, causing Fred to comment "In my private
opinion, the tire was a blessing in disguise," in
which I most emphatically joined.

Rounding the end of Front Street, we came m
sight of a little park with an abuntlance ot flowers,
shrubs and other tropical growths presenting to
my sense of proportion an overcrowded and there-
tore unpleasant appearance. We turned down a
narrow car-tracked street running parallel with



One conilitioii, had wobbled so continuously, Fred
who was nearly seasick as a result and I who
again felt the rolling sensation experienced on our
rough but otherwise pleasant sea voyage were
delighted to see the beautiful Hotel Washington
loom into sight, thus realizing, though in mmor
measure, the jox' and happiness ot Columbus when
he sighted the island of San Salvador now called
Watling's Island, as we learned on our way
down. Just like the famous navigator, our journey
was near its end. The unposmg hotel meant the




Manzaiiillo Bay, Cristobal. Old French ("anal. Coaling Plant, Canal Approach, and .Mainland, \iewed from the .Air,

end ot our hot anci uncomtortable coach ride,



the park and wondered what purpose these tracks
served, and even, as I write, we have been unable to
hndanyoneelse who knows. The deep sweet aroma
from the beautiful buds and flowers that so pro-
fusely bloomed in the park contrastetl favorably
with odors ot stewing dried cotlHsh which now
assailed our nostrils trom passing alleyways in
which swarmed kinky-haired, tropically clad and



an inviting dinner, and a comfortable bed with
the high waving palm tromis, which could be
plainly seen rapping the windows, beckoning us to
peacetul ani.! well-earned slumber, as the roar of the
receding waters ot the Caribbean Sea, now dis-
tinctly discernible, sing their song of lullaby.
Once past the hotel entrance gate, there lay



noisy but happy children. Not a fly was seen since spread betore us the front lawn, level as a billiard

we stepped trcMii the gangplank ot our steamer, table and as green, sprinkled with bright flowers

and we later learned that neither flies nor snow- and rose bushes, all inclosed with a well-trimmed

storms are to be found here. and red-flowered hibiscus-like hedge. On the



44



THE CARIBBEAN.



sides of the circular driveway stately royal palms,
majestic in their symmetry and grace, threw a
cooling shade over the pathway, while on the
extreme opposite side a grove of young coconut
trees swayed and toyed with the brisk breezes
which were wafted landward from the near-by sea.
Other older, but none the less beautiful, coconut
trees, all heavily laden with clusters of green
coconuts, raised their lofty heads to shelter par-
rots, parrakeets, and other birds of feathery
radiance, which from time to time flittered lightly
and gaily through the air.

Driving under the portico and alighting, each
handed the driver locents in Panaman currency



because. of the possibility of losing a brand new
perfectly spendable S5-gold piece for a ride in a
broken-down, lop-sided, and extremely disreputable
coach. Personally, I am slow to anger, but I am
too truthful to even imply that my fortitude would
remain normal in the face of handing over even
the smallest known gold piece for such an unsatis-
factory carriage ride.

Fortunately, at this juncture, an old and tried
comrade, Bob Knapp, to whom whatever reputa-
tion for skill in aviation I owe everything, unex-
pectedly appeared upon the scene and after em-
bracing as only men can, who, long separated, meet
again after having shared the cockpits of a



-^-Siil




Beautiful New Cristobal.

in accordance with the tariff card attached to our De Havilanc



vehicle, in payment for our coach tare. Our coach-
man indignantly refused the offering and loudh'
demanded that he be paid in "gold." The situa-
tion was most embarrassing, as I was using trav-



4 midst bursting shell and tracer
bullet in foreign clime. After a few quiet but
cheery words to the coachman, he started the
excited West Indian on his way smiling, explaining
to us that Panama silver currency is valued at just



eler's checks entirely and had no gold coin upon one-half of L'nited .States currency, and to dis-
my person and Fred, who was unlucks' enough to tinguish one from the other all United States



have a single 55-gold piece in his well-filled purse,
permitted his excitement to rise to a pitch border-
ing upon actual hostilit}-, nor ccjuld I hnd the
heart to blame my companion when I considered
the offensive shouting of the driver, his outrageous



money, whether paper, silver, nickel, or even a
copper penn>', is known here as "Gold." Fred's
face broke out into a cheerful smile at last and I
could not resist recalling our narrow escape from
arrest by attempting to pay but 5 cents gold for



attempt to overcharge us, but perhaps principally our ride when by all that is just we should have



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



paid 20 cents silver, as I now realized the enormity
of our offense and could not treat the matter as
lightly as he did. Fred protested strongly that
he viewed the matter as seriously as I did, but was
forced to smile for an entirely different reason, and,
when I pressed him for an explanation, he slyly
drew his right hand from his pocket and showed
me, quietly huing; there, one ot the prettiest ^5
gold pieces I have ever seen in all my travels.



water lying east of Colon, the small neck of land
which connects Colon with the Isthmus of Panama,
the calm waters of Limon Bay, and a section of the
dark thick jungles of the Republic farther away
toward the horizon. Another, taken at a low
altitude showed the town of New Cristobal
transformed in 4 years from a swamp to a
beautiful community very prettily laid out, the
concrete streets curving gracefully around and




Colon Beach to tbt lefi of Hotel Washington in the foreground; .Statue of Columbus in center; Swimming Pool and Battery Beach to right; Colon in background.

Possibly it was the uniform of a Lieutenant through it, with excellent quarters for the accom-

Colonel of Aviation in which Bob was clad that so modation of Canal and Railroad employees,
quickly quieted our enraged driver, but perhaps it We strolled through the hotel lobby and were

was after all the same pleasing personality which agreeably surprised to find all of its appointments

Bobdisplaysgenerally,butparticularly inhis warm to be everything that could be desired in modern

and sinceregreeting to Fred and me, which sent the convenience. Shady and wind-swept porches,

coachman and his fiery charger away satisfied. from which could be obtained an excellent view

Telling us of his daring capture of enemy air- of the quiet and deep blue Caribbean Sea, the

men of unknown nationality with their picture- harbor with its life and bustle, the two immense

taking apparatus and prohibited Colon air views, breakwaters, behind one of which a sunset, in-

he presented me with j of the more harmless, one describable in its beauty of coloring, burst into

of which shows Manzanillo Bay, a small body of splendor making a picture long to be remembered.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.



Here we saw the apparent phenomena oi the
sun sinking in the Atlantic Ocean. Bob explained
to us that owing to the formation ot the Isthmus,
making the Pacific Ocean lie east ot the .Atlantic
Ocean in this part ot the world, the sun actually
rises in the Pacific Ocean and sets in the .Atlantic
Ocean.

In front of us lay a level, well-trimmed lawn,
flanked by winding paths, in the exact center ot
which an artistic bronze statue of Christopher



and engaging in other water sports. \\'e learned
that swimming is popular every day throughout
the year here, and that practically everybody,
even tots 3 years old, swim and dive, some of them
becommg verv proficient in aquatics. Among
the bathing costumes worn by the ladies were
noted some which might be classed in my native
city of Brookline as unconventional.

Appetizing odors wafting from the hotel ban-
ished all present desire tor sightseeing, so Bob,




Colon, Repuhlif

Columbus and a crouching Indian maiden is
located. Bob advanced the interesting informa-
tion that the famous discoverer's name is pro-
nounced and spelled "Cristobal Colon" in the
Spanish language, and that the two .Atlantic
ports are named in his honor.

On the extreme edge of the grounds, facing a
small but modern battery, was found an excellent
salt-water swimming pool where a large and happy
throng disported themselves, swimming, diving,



ol Panama.

Fred, and I repaired to the dining section to find a
well-appointed central room, refined in ornamenta-
tion, with many tables outside on a wide, screen-
enclosed porch. The tables were dressed with
snowv white linen, cut glass, and excellent china-
ware and silver. The dinner was all that could be
wished and, as we sipped our coffee, all agreed
that the tropical traveler could hardly be blamed
for wanting to prolong his sta>- in this delightful
spot.



THE CARIBBEAN.



47




I WOXDER.

Kenneth Greene, '20.




You may think 1 am crazy,
Perhaps I am a nut.
But I wonder it small Jert
Will ever grow as tall as Mutt.

II a tramp went through a forest

On a mountain, after dark,

I wonder, yes, I wonder

just how loud the dog-wood bark.

'Tis a well-known fact that men
Slip upon banana skins.
But I wonder if a bull-dog
Ever, ever barked his shins.



I wonder why when .Adam

And Eve only wore a smile,

Why they didn't cut the cost of clothes

By making it the st> le.

I know the revolution
Put a load upon our backs,
But 1 wonder it a Pilgrim
Ever paid an income tax.

In the da\'s when you were little
It was taught to \'0u in school,
But I wonder, yes I wonder
It you know the Golden Rule.



Of course I know that tea is made

By boiling leaves of tea.

But I very often wonder

Whv the shore's so near the sea.



We all acknowledge without doubt
That the best horse wins the race.
But I wonder what another
Would have done in Wilson's place.



You may think I'm an awful dunce,
.\nd maybe it is true
But I wonder, really wonder
Don't vou wonder these things too?



48



THE CARIBBEAN.





ALMOST!

Chester Tavlor, '22.



I had asked Mr. Drill if I might not get off for
the last period in the afternoon. This was a
study period for me. Mr. Drill had asked, of
course, the reason for my wanting to go. I told
him that around the hour of 3 in the afte-noon,
T was usually very restless.

"You will soon get used to that. No, I think
you had better stay this time," he answered.

"I do all my studying at home," I told him, as
a last resort.

"No; I think not this time."

During the whole period I sat pondering a way
to get off the following afternoon. Charlie was
going to take me for a ride in his sailboat and I
had to get off.

Beginning the next day at noon my history
class was not so bad, but I thought I would never
live through the next class of F.nglish. Each min-
ute seemed like five to me.

Charlie was going to leave at J sharp with or
without me.

At last English was over. Hurrying to my seat
in the assembly room, I hastily packed my books
in my school bag. After the classes had been dis-
missed and the room was empty I mean minus a
teacher I bravely picked up my bag and started

out the door. Had Charlie One step out the

door and 5 feet away stood Mr. Drill talking to
Miss HoUoway, with his side toward me.

Silently and rather quickly I crept back to my
seat and sat there nervously chewing and sucking



my thumb nail. Five minutes passed. Surelv,
now was the time. Once more I left m\ seat.
This time I looked, with great caution, up and
down the hall.

Ah, our principal was not in sight! Gliding
down the hall, hardly daring to breathe, I reached
the steps. There at the turn stood Mr, Drill
talking to a Spanish pupil. That was all I saw.

In another second I was back in my seat.

Ten minutes passed and no teacher came into
the assembly room. It was now 10 minutes to 3.
The third time had always been a charm to me.
Surely, I would make it this time.

Stepping into the upper hall, I saw the coast was
clear. This time I headed tor the opposite stairs
and going down, to my joy, I saw the lower hall
was clear. Quickly I walked toward the room
in which I kept my bicycle. Just a turn around

th; corner and I would have my There

stood Mr. Drill talking to the janitor. This time
h; saw me; this time I could not go back. As I
started to open the door into the bicycle room,
Mr. Drill spoke:

"Where are you going, Chester?"

"A-a-a 1 was going home, sir."

"But didn't I tell you yesterday you couldn't
go?"

"Yes, sir."

".AH right. You stay here with me this eve-
ning until 4.30."

I did.



THE CARIBBEAN.



49




A LITTLE EXCITEMENT.

John B. Fields, '20.




K=



The L'nited States had entered the war. The
main question on the Zone was, Would the Ger-
mans attack the Canal? Many thought they
would, just as many said no. The United States
was prepared tor them, however. Many sub-
chasers were sent down from the States to guard
the entrances, mine fields were laid, nets swung
between the breakwaters.

Three months had passed and no attempts to
attack had been made. The careful vigil that
had been kept was growing slack.

One night in October, I was on watch from 8 to
1 1 on S. C. fSj on outside patrol. As it was get-
ting near midnight I was climbing down from the
crow's nest to the bridge to write out the log ot
my watch. .'\s I was looking for a pencil (it was
dark, as no lights were allowed above decks) my
hand hit the blinker key. .'\s it flashed it was
answered by a flash from sea. As I was standing
there thinking about this, the captain came up
on the bridge.

He looked at his watch, then out to sea and
said "Fields, you may go below, I will stand by
until your relief comes."

I thought this was peculiar because he was very
strict about the watches and besides this, he and
I were not friendly at all. .As he was the skipper,
however, I went down on deck but as I was turn-
ing to go below the light that I had seen was
blinking again, but closer in. I thought that
maybe some naval vessel was coming in. As I was
sleepy I didn't pay much attention but went
below and turned in. I must have been asleep
about 2 hours, when someone shook me.

"Fields, come here quick," he said.

I jumped up and followed him into the next
compartment. The mate was sitting down with
the listening tube receivers on his ears. The
whole crew was standing around, hard by, breath-
ing. .As I entered the lieutenant took off the
receivers and handed them to me. I put them on
and listened. There was that throbbing sound
that a submarine makes, running on the surface.



I listened again. No, it was not a submarine it
was two of them. I took off the receivers and
told the lieutenant what I thought.

"Boys," he said, his face deadly pale, "some-
thing is wrong, no L^ S. subs are in these waters,
yet there are 2 subs coming this wa>'. Fields, you
come with me, the rest ot you stand bv x-our
posts."

He then stepped over and unlocked a locker,
and took out 2 automatics and handing me one,
started up on deck. There was the captain stand-
ing on the bridge smoking a cigar. Smoking
was strictly prohibited at night on the boat and
the captain had never been seen smoking before.
The lieutenant held out his hand to stop me. He
pulled off his shoes and started up to the bridge.
Soon a dull crunch was heard, followed by a sound
as though somebody had fallen on the deck.

"Fields, come on up," the lieutenant said, stick-
ing his head out ot the house.

I went up to the bridge. The captain was lying
on the deck, his face all bloody, a big gash on one
side of his head.

"Take the wheel, and steer for the mine field,"
he ordered, switching on the stern light. "Our
boat is light enough to go over without touching
them but those baby killers will be blown to where
their Kaiser is going."

Ringing for half speed ahead I headed for the
mine field. Brown soon came up and went up to
the searchlights; the lieutenant and 5 men were
pulling the cover over the forward 4-inch gun.
From the noise astern I gathered that ash cans
were being put on the racks, and the Y"gun loaded.

"Fields, Brown will relieve you at the wheel, you
take command of the after gun. When you see
the light flash, open fire on the second one in line.

Everyone was tense with anxiety, the 1 83 was
to see action I Could we get the three of them?
If not, we could at least show them how to fight.

Out into the dark shot a finger of light; it
settled on the two leading subs. "Fire!" I shouted.

Immediately two roars burst simultaneouslv
out ot the stillness.



MR 72634-



50



THE CARIBBEAN.



"A direct hit for number 2;" sang out the look-
out, "the sub is going down by the stern."

We had put one out of commission with the first
shot! Number i gun was spitting away as fast
as the men could handle it.

"Direct hit for number!; shot hit in amidships;
sub number 3 submerging."

The lieutenant ran up to the bridge. "Get
your ash cans ready, boys, we've got to get them."

I thought that I would like to get one more
shot in before the sub went under.

"Fire."

The smoke blew in my face so that I couldn't
see but I could tell by the yells that something
had happened.

Above the noise I heard three bells (lull speed
astern), then one bell (stop). We were standing
still, about 25 yards from the sub. Our last shot
had shot away the stern. She was standing nose
down, trying to sink but could not.



"Lieutenant," I yelled, "may I finish her, she
has not struck her colors?"

"Carry on, Fields."

"Aye, aye, sir! Give it to her, boys." The sub
sank from sight.

Someone was working up by the crow's nest.
Shining a flashlight up we saw the ship's painter
putting 3 gold stars on her. We had done our bit.

The fight had lasted but 25 minutes. By this
time many other boats were coming out to join us.
Getting one of the other boats to stand by for us,
we went in. The next day the captain was
sentenced to death. Before he was shot he con-
fessed that he was a German naval officer and
was guiding the subs in through the mine field
so that they might blow up Gatun Locks.

The next day the crew received a cable from
President Wilson, thanking us for our services and
promoting every one of us. The lieutenant was
made skipper on our boat, much to our joy.



THE FATE OF THE "MARNE."

Lillian M. Cotloii, 'zo.



On the afternoon ot January 24 an explosion
occurred in one of the holds of the steamship
MrK^, immediately followed by a fire. This ship,
owned by the United States Shipping Board,
was tied up at Dock 1 1 at the time of the ex-
plosion. There had been some telegraph trouble
on the way down and it had tied up to find the
trouble and have it fixed before going on to
Melbourne, where she was bound. She was loaded
with benzine, gasoline, and fuel oil. Immediately
following the discovery of the fire, she was towed
away from the pier and was sunk in more shallow
water by shots from the Navy submarines.

At night it was a beautiful sight, the oil burn-
ing on the water for about half a mile. The sky
was illuminated with the bright coloring from the
fire. Nearly all of Colon and Cristobal lined the
walls of the Washington Hotel and Colon Beach
to witness the sight.

The fire burned for about two weeks and a half,
but was confined to the hold in which the explosion
occurred. She was raised in the record-breaking
time of 23 days, men sometimes working below the
water for 10 hours at a straight stretch putting
temporary wooden patches in the holes caused by
the shells used to sink the ship.



The work on the salvaging of the Marne was
very dangerous, as the odors from the benzine
and gasoline which covered everything were very
disagreeable, and many of the men were overcome.
The stern of the vessel was raised first and a few
hours later the bow lifted. The vessel was raised
a little higher each day until all the water had been
pumped out.

The ship, or what was left of it, was towed to
Dock 6 on March i. It seemed almost impossible
to ever make anything out of her, she was such a
wreck. Very little of the cargo was discharged
and in the early morning of March 6, another
explosion, a very heavy one, occurred, followed
by a fire. The funnel blew off and into the air,
coming down and knocking two large holes in the
roof of the dock. The glass windows were smashed
and the steel doors were blown out of shape. The
ship was again towed out and sunk off the mole in
40 feet of water. This time the entire boat did not
sink and the water is being pumped out of the for-
warti holds as it leaks in. She had been raised the
second time and efforts are being made to dis-
charge her cargo, but the fumes are still so strong
it is almost impossible for the men to work around
the ship, and the discharging of the cargo is very



THE CARIBBEAN.



51



slow. A representative of the company, to which off Cape Mahi, in the Pacific Ocean, and was

she belongs, is coming to determine whether or not towed, while burning continually, to and was sunk

she is worth repairing. at Balboa. A salvaging party is at work and the

The Olocksoii, the sister ship of the Adartie, same plan is being used as is being used on the

loaded with the same sort of a cargo, caught fire Marne to discharge the cargo.

A QUIET EVENING.

Kalhryn M. Btirgoon^ '20.



Mrs. Brown stood in the doorway, drawing on
her gloves. Her eyes rested on her husband, with
a look of amusement, as he sat in an easy chair.

"John, I thought you were going to the theater
with me this evening."

"I'm so sorry, dear, but I have a great deal
of work to do this evening, so I am going to
spend it quietly at home. Ask Mrs. Cook to go
along with you."

"Well, I suppose I'll have to, and ^Oh,

John!"

"Yes."

"The dressmaker said that she might bring my
new gown this evening, and it she should, please
settle with her. And, John, if Mrs. Smith calls
me up on the phone, tell her that I won't be able
to give that talk at the club to-morrow. Now
you won't forget, will you?"

"I'll try not to; goodby, dear, I hope you enjoy
the play." After he had heard the door close
Mr. Brown settled comfortably in his chair. Five
minutes later the telephone rang.

"Hello. Yes, this is Mr. Brown. What? Is
Mrs. Brown here? Why, no, she just left tor the
theater. Oh, all right, good night."

He had just become very interested in his
papers when, "jingle, jingle," the doorbell rang.
Mr. Brown put his papers carefully aside and
went to answer it.

"Oh, Mr. Brown, I called to inquire how Fan-
fan is." (Fan-fan being Mrs. Brown's small
poodle.)

"She is very much better, thank you, Mrs. Carr.
I'm so sorry Mrs. Brown is not at home, but I'll
tell her you called. Good night."

As he went back to his work he wondered if
he were to be interrupted like this all evening.
But he had barely picked up his pen when the
back doorbell rang. At first he was tempted



not to answer, and then he thought it might be
the dressmaker. So Mr. Brown went very un-
willingly to the door.

"I brought the package of matches Mrs. Brown
ordered this afternoon, sir," said the small boy
at the door. "We were rushed or I would have
delivered it sooner."

Mr. Brown took the matches and as he closed
the door, he muttered a few uncomplimentary
remarks about grocers in general and this grocer in
particular. Again he returned to his interrupted

task; when Oh, that awful telephone! Why

wasn't his wife here to answer it?

"Hello, this the police station?" "No, it isn't,
you have the wrong number."

"I wonder what it will be next, the insane
asylum, I suppose." Mr. Brown, feeling very
much as it he would be ready for that last-men-
tioned place if this kept up, went back to his
work. This time it was the doorbell. Whoever
invented a doorbell, anyway?

"Pardon me, sir, for troubling you at such a
late hour, but I knew that this would be the only
time I would find you at home."

"Yes," said Mr. Brown.

"I am selling a very beautiful tombstone and

I thought maybe ," but Mr. Brown didn't

wait for him to finish. With his head in his
hands he ran tor the living room.

There he leaned weakly against the table. \
tombstone good heavens, he wasn't dead yet.

When lie had sufficiently recovered from the
shock he looked at the clock. ?\. quarter after
nine; well, dressmaker or no dressmaker, he was
going to bed.

.\bout eleven o'clock when Mrs. Brown tiptoed
very gently into the bedroom, she looked at her
husbantl. He lay in bed with a terror-stricken
look on his face, evidenth' dreammg about some
man trying to sell him his own tombstone.



THE CARIBBEAN.





THE


LAND OF BEGINNING AGAIN.

Enlalie Arthur, '22.


"



K=



=IR



"You are a failure, John Ferris, that's what you
are! You have been going steadily down hill
ever since your mother's death. And you ask me
to marry you, a failure! Go and make something
of yourself and when you have proven your man-
hood, come back and ask me that question again
and perhaps I shall say 'yes.'

Louise Hudson uttered these words with flashing
eyes and scornful voice, although toward the last
her gra\- eyes softened and her voice trembled.

John Ferris stood with bowed head and droop-
ing shoulders until she had finished. Someone
has said that the truth hurts, and he knew deep
down in his heart that every word she had spoken
was the unvarnished truth.

"A failure!" Well, wasn't he.' "Going down
hill;" he thought with a pang of the many nights
he had wasted in useless pleasure instead of improv-
ing his mind. No wonder Roger Stevens had been
promoted to assistant manager, when by all rights
he should have had the place.

Slowly he raised his head and looked at Louise.
But there was no sign of relenting in those gra\'
eyes. Without a word he pickeil up his hat and
left the house.

It was still early in the evening, but John Ferris
went straight to his room; and there, with his
head buried in his hands went carefully over the
last few months of his life.

Again and again Louise's words came to his
mind. "A failure!" and even this morning the
president (jf the firm had told him that he "must
either make good or get out." All that night
John wrestled with his problem.

The eastern sky was streaked with the first
faint rays of a new day when John finally made up
his mind.

"No, 1 haven't any work for you to do and
can't give meals to every tramp that conies along,"
said a woman's sharp voice to the man in the rag-
ged suit standing at the back door.



It is just a year after my story opens, but no one
who had known John Ferris would have recognized,
in this ragged hobo, the well-groomed man of the
city that John Ferris had been.

He had gone south the morning after Louise's
fiery speech, thinking that he could retrieve his
mistakes there but he had been unable to obtain
work and gradually things had gone from bad to
worse, until he was compelled to depend upon the
kindness of housewives for his meals. This had
been the second time to-day that he had been
refused and he was too tired to try again.

Not many j'^ards away from the house was the
railroad, with a string of freight cars almost ready
to pull out. John made his dejected way toward
them, hoping that he might find the door oi one
open. Perhaps his luck had changed, for he found
a car with one of the doors slightly ajar.

It took him but a very few minutes to make the
opening larger, and to make himself as comfortable
as possible in a corner of the car. All that night
and half of the next day the train sped toward its
destination. About noon of the second day the
train stopped at the seaport, Galveston.

John slowlystood up and stretched his cramped
muscles. Peering cautiously through the door
he saw that no one was in sight. He dropped
to the ground and made his way from the rail-
road yard. Fate led him in the direction of the
docks. As he was strolling aimlessly among the
immense bales of cotton he heard a man say:
"We sail early to-morrow morning."

Hardly stopping to think, he stepped up to the
man and asked "Coukl you use an extra hand?
I'll do anything."

The man looked at him for a minute and then
said shorth'; "^^'e could use another man, and
1 sjuess you will do as well as another."

John had never been on the sea before and for
the first ^tw days he was dreadfully ill. But gradu-
allv he was able to move arounil and do his share
of the work.



THE CARIBBEAN.



53



On the seventh day they sighted land and that
night John caught his first glimpse of palm-
studded shores.

"What place is it," he asked, tor the first time
showing anv interest in the port thev were hound
for.

"^^hy, man, don't you know? Panama, of
course."

Just at that moment the captain approached



"1 am sorry, terris, but I won't neeii \-ou any
more, so you needn't come hack after vou tjo
ashore to-morrow."

And John, with very little mone>- in his pockets,
went ashore at Colon. All that day he walked the
streets of Colon but found no work, and that night
he spent out under the stars, for he was hoarding
the few dollars that he had.

The next morning he sought work again, but
without success, and that afternoon found him
near Mount Hope, tired in both body and mind.
He entered the printing plant and asked his old
question.

The man at the desk looked into the eyes of
John Ferris and he met them without flinchin les, you may come to work to-morrow morn-
ing."

Within the next few weeks John began to look
a little like his former self. The work that he had



to do was very nearly the same as he had done
in the States, so that he was promoted rapidly.

Perhaps the proudest day of his life came when
he was made assistant general foreman.

When he heard the news his thoughts flew to
Louise and he wondered if she had forgotten him.

"John, old man, I want you to come home to
dinner with me to-night," said a friendof his a few
days later.

John consented and that night found him at his
friend's house. Mrs. Davis greeted him cordiallv
and then turned to introduce him to the girl at
her sitie.

"Louise, may I introduce Mr. FeVrisr" "Mr.
Ferris, Miss Hudson." John started and raised
his eyes to encounter those of the girl he had
dreamed about for the last 2 years. The gray
eyes were tender now and her lips were parted in
a faint smile.

"I believe I have met Mr. Ferris before," she
saiii.

Just then dinner was announced and John found
himself seated beside Louise.

"I am so glad that you have made good, John,"
she said.

Toward the end of the dinner John raised his
glass and, with his eyes on the girl he loved,
proposed a toast "To Panama, the land of begin-
ning again."




GIRLS B.ASKET-B.ALL TEAM.



54



THE CARIBBEAN.



-m




A LOST TREASURE FOUND.

Kirhy Ferguson, '23.




S=



='JS



"Oh, dear!" sighed Grandma Whitmore, as she
picked up her crocheting and sat down to finish
the centerpiece she had started, "I thought I left
my glasses right here with my work so when I
picked up my work I would not have to look all
over the house for them but I suppose I must have
needed them for something else and come back
and gotten them."

"Now, let me see, when I stopped crocheting,
what did I do? Why, I went over to Nellie's to
help her bake cakes for her party this afternoon.
I wonder if I left them over there. I will telephone
and ask her."

Grandma left the 'phone quite discouraged, for
she had not left them at Nellie's, and she thought
she had searched the house for them and had failed
to find them.



Now Grandma was getting to be quite old
and wasquite helpless without her glasses. There-
fore many hours were spent in looking for them,
and when her grandson came in to see her that
night he found his grandmother sitting in a large
rocker in front of the brightly blazing log fire
with her face buried in her hands.

After his grandmother had told him why she
was so sad he began laughing and said, "Why,
grandmother, did you never think to look to see
if you hadn't pushed them up in your hair."

Grandmother then put her hand up to her
head, and there she found her treasure which she
thought she should never see again.



THAT GREEN TULLE DRESS.



Lillian M. Cotton- '20.



"Mother, I simply must have a new dress tor
dances, and that is all there is to it," sighed
pretty June Morris.

"Well, June, I wish you could have one, but
it seems rather useless to me when your gradua-
tion is soon coming, and you will need so many
dresses then, and besides, we have our income tax
to pay this month. Please try and be satisfied
and wear your pink tatfeta a few more times."

June said no more, but gathered up her books
and went to school. She was quite heavy-hearted
though, because she had been invited to a recep-
tion on board the battleship Pennsylvania, due
to arrive that day. She decided that with a tew
little touches she could try and make the pink
taffeta look a little different before Saturday.

"Oh, June, almost all the boys are working to-day
driving trucks on account ot all the colored men
going on strike, and lots of the women are working
in the hotel. I wish we could work for a couple of
days and earn a little pin money, don't you?"
excitedly questioned one of June's classmates.



That morning there was very little work done
in school, because many of the boys and several ot
the girls were out. The strike was the main topic
of conversation. That noon there were fewer still
who showed up and, after a lot of high-pitched
talking, the flock of girls left, decided to go to the
"Y" for work. June was more excited than the
rest, because she loved to work anyway. She
and three or four others received employment,
serving ice cream and other light refreshments.
Gleams of a green tulle dress rose before her eyes,
but she dared not hope. She knew she couldn't
make enough money to buy one and it was too
late to have one made. She didn't even know
tor sure whether she was going to be paid. On
and on she worked for 3 days without even trying
to fix up the pink dress.

Saturday afternoon she went home at j o'clock
as usual, expecting to see her pink taffeta all
pressed lying on the bed. She went into the house,
spoke in a natural tone to her mother, and went
to her room. Her eves must be deceiving her.



THE CARIBBEAN.



55



On the bed instead of pink taffeta was a beautiful
green tulle dress, all puffs and frills. Beside it was
the most beautiful pair of silver slippers, and
beside them a green tulle hat.

"Mother, where on earth did these come
from and how did you know I wanted these
particular treasures.' I think they are beautiful,"
and June hugged and kissed her mother until
she had to scream for breath.

"I wanted you to look nice, June, so I wentinto
your room one night to look at your pink taffeta,



and heard you talking about green tulle, so I
decided to make you one. I'm so glad you like it,
dear. Now hurry up and get ready or you will be
late."

June was as happ)- as a lark all the rest of the
afternoon. She even forgot her aching feet in the
beautiful silver slippers. One thing will always
have a soft spot in June's heart, and that will be a
green tulle dress. With the money she earned
at the "Y," June decided to buy her mother some-
thing pretty.



THE RESURRECTION FLOWER.

Alice M. Stilson, '20.



One of the tropical flowers known as the Resur-
rection flower has derived its name from its pe-
culiar growth. This beautiful flower, so symbolic
of its name, blooms only around Easter time.

The Resurrection plant somewhat resembles the
lily in its growth, only the leaves are broader
and more numerous than that of the lily plant.
During the year these moss-green leaves grow to a
height of about 3 feet, but when Easter draws



near at hand, the leaves begin to die, which reminds
one of the death of Christ.

In about a week's time nothing can be seen of the
plant, only the bare ground from whence grew the
leaves. Then later we see little purple flowers,
about the size of an orchid, springing up from the
ground, during Easter time, signifying the Resur-
rection, and from these peculiarities the flower
received its name.



THE EXPERIENCE OF A WAYWARD YOUTH.

Emiiio Solomon, '2j.



Having been led away by a very strong desire
to see the outer world and to revel in the pleasures
and sunshine of my own fancy and its prodigal
illusions, I abruptly left this institution (Cristobal
High School) and all parental restraints for a free
and untramelled life abroad. New York, having
been the choice of my destination, I booked my-
self for that wonderful city.

At noon on Sunday, July 8, 1917, I awoke to
find myself in the great metropolis of the East,
with its weird sky scrapers overshadowing spacious
streets on which traffic of every kind was engaged
and on whose sidewalks busy pedestrians jostled
one another in eager endeavor to move along. I
often clashed with busy traffickers while I unresist-
ingly raised my eyes to the wonderful heights of
these strange buildings on either side of the streets.

The crowded condition of these streets and the
business carried on there can better be imagined
than described. After a few days sight-seeing



and the enjoying of everything enjoyable in this
gay city, my purse gave me a significant reminder,
that the open sesame had lost its magic power,
and the scriptural injunction, "By thesweat of thy
brow shall thou eat bread," forcibly intruded
itself on my mind.

I then immediately began to exert myself, and
the effort was crowned with success. I obtained
employment at the national post office, where I
worked for 7 months at §18 a week. At the end
of that period I was forced by the severity of the
winter to seek fresh fields and pastures new to
earn a livelihood. I found employment on board
a ship bound for Europe.

It was a terrible venture at that time as the
European war was at its most dangerous stage.
The Germans were exasperated to the point of
madness at what they considered the most dogged
obstinacy by the Allies' persistency anci pertinacious
determination to carrv the war to its bitterest end.



56



THE CARIBBEAN,



They, in their turn, were goaded on to revenge in
employing every means with their submarine in
hurJing every allied ship afloat to the bottom
of the deep.

My position as second steward did not exempt
me from doing anything the exigency of war time
demanded. I found myself then placed in the most



a boisterous sea, will better convey an idea of the
misery undergone by letting it remain unwritten.
To make short work of a long stor)- we spied a
ship and in order to save ourselves from being fired
upon one of the men's coats was placed on the
point of an oar and hoisted as high as we could,
as a signal of distress. A merciful providence



unenviable position in which the most unpleasant 'paused that signal to be a successful means of
food for thou-ht was presented. Unfavorable savmg our lives; for, as we subsequently learned,
weather unexpectedly set in. Everyone had to be we had been mistaken for a submarine, and had

we not been prompt in signaling we would have
been fired upon. The ship turned out to be
.A,merican,and we were picked up and taken to the



on the alert and to be up and doing. I, a novice,
unaccustomed to such an encounter and to walk-
ing the deck of a rolling ship on the bosom of an ^ , t-l

r T 1 ^,.;l^ t ,,,.,0 port ot Genoa where we spent 4 davs. 1 hen we

angry sea, felt such as 1 can never describe. 1 was ^ ^ ^ i\.-

called upon to act as Captain's attendant at one
moment, then as fireman the next, now as a coal



the next destination ot our



shoveler and the next moment as a sailor.
In fine I had to do anything I was called upon to
do. The most painful ot it all was that I was
compelled to sleep in company with the most
obiectionable bedfellows. No description, however
well drawn, can give an adequate idea ot the suf-
ferings and the attendant regrets I underwent as
a justretributionfor my waywardness. Experience



went to France,
rescue ship.

Having revelled in the gaieties and pleasures of
La Belle France for a few days and enjoyed the
ready hospitality of the liberal and light-hearted
French people, we eventually sailed back to New
York. During the trip we had to exercise the
greatest vigilance, adopting a zigzag course so as to
elude the venomous hate of the irresistible German
underwater wolves. An ever-watchful Providence
guided us to the haven of safety. I was once more



alone can convey to one's mind a picture of what -^ ^.^^ y^^,.^ ^^^ mysterious city. I then thought

I mean to impress. ^f home and my waywardness. I buried every

Somethinginfinitely worse, however, than all the feelingofprideandhaughtiness,and began to think

preceding horrors was yet to come. I allude to the soberly. I resolved to change my course. The

torpedoing of the boat in which I was, by one ot jjga ^f obtaining a profession forcibly impressed

these unmerciful German avengers, the submarine. ,^^y ^^jn^^i^ i .,aje ^ determination to return home

Two days off the shores of Genoa this occurence ^^id devote myself to study and, in order to do so,

took place. The boat went down. As many as I saw the necessity of returning to school and to

could possibly get entrance into lifeboats availed put forth all efl^ort to gain that end. I wrote to

themselves thereof. I was one of the fortunate my home intimating my desire to return. My

ones who managed to get into one of these boats. father concurred and procured me the means of



Untold miseries were experienced. Hunger and
thirst threatened the absolute destruction of our
numbers. It is even now a nauseating idea to
think how the cup was snatched from one another's
lips as one tried to sip a drop of the refreshing
liquid. The inconvenience experienced, cramped
up, so manv in a small boat tor many hours upon



traveling homeward.

Since my arrival, my resolution was strengthened
by readmg the intellectual prowesses ot my fellow
students. I theretore intimated to my tather my
desire ot returning to my studies in this institution.
He most paternally granted my desire, and here
I am in Cristobal Hiah School.



Mary had a little cold

That started in her head

.And everywhere that Mary went
That cold was sure to spread.



.MARY'S LITTLE COLD.

[I 'ilUani F. Mary, '22.

It followed her to school one ilay

There wasn't any rule
It made the children cough and sneeze

To have the cold in school.



The teacher tried to drive it out

She tried hard but "ke.'-choo,"

It didn't do a bit of" good,

For teacher caught it too.



THE CARIBBEAN.



57




"m IB B.^ SH ET r




LHIiiiu M. Co'.ton, '20.



At the beginning ot the school year the Seniors
organized a club, called the "Senior Social Club,"
of which Lillian Cotton was elected President, and
Alice Stilson, Secretary and Treasurer. The object
of the club was "A good time."

The first party given by the Senior Social Club
was held in the latter part of October at the Gilbert
House. Each Senior invited one other person,
and the club extended an invitation to the faculty
and the mothers of the Seniors. The evenuig was
pleasantly spent in character readings, singing,
dancing, and game playing. Delicious refresh-
ments ot ice cream, cake, and candy were served.
Mr. ^'illafranca, the Spanish professor, presented
each Senior girl with a red rose.

The seating capacity of the assembly room was
overtaxed as soon as school was taken up this
year, and it was found necessary to put in several
extra desks.

Miss Walton was kept busy on the roll-call book,
for this year was marked by the coming and gomg
of many members of the school.

Early in the school year Mr. Nicholas, our
efficient music teacher, thought it would be well
to get acquainted with the high school bod>', and
so arranged a little gathering one evening on the
beach at New Cristobal. Although but about
one-half of the student body attended, a real get-
together little gathering was enjoyed by those who
were there. Marshmallow toasting, over a bright
camp fire, was the chief sport of the evening, but
was almost overshadowed by the tun obtained
from the character reading by Mr. Nicholas. Some
were real pleased at the flattering remarks tendered



them and others were deeply chagrined on finding
out many disagreeable things about themselves
that they had not known before. The party was
charmingly chaperoned by Miss Walton.

During the first semester one of our most im-
portant Seniors left us, in the person of John B.
Verner. John had been on the Isthmus 12 years
previous to his sailing and had gone through the
whole Isthmian grade school and would have
completed his high school course here had he
remained. He was popular enough with the boys,
but was not a special favorite of the girls or of the
faculty. He left with the intention of entering
Columbia University.

During the first semester, Prof. A. R. Lang,
Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools, visited
Cristobal High and granted the Seniors a hearing,
during which we ex-
plained to him the part
which we wished to have
in this year's commence-
ment exercises on the
Pacific side. He prom-
ised us a very favorable
share in the affair, and
we'll get it, for Professor
Lang is our friend, you
know.

The school playground
was used slightly this
year, if at all. .A 7-foot
wire fence was constructed
around the grounds to





11


fV


If'-





Useful us well as uriiameutal.



58



THE CARIBBEAN.



keep out undesirables. It hardly sufficed, how- surprise awaited the class in the form of a most
ever, in keeping Freshmen or Sophomores from daintily served repast. Miss May Smith, also
climbina; over or crawling under when the gates formerly of Cristobal High as an efficient teacher



were locked.

The fine flag presented to us 2 years ago by
thoughtful members of the community has been
decidedly decreased in size by the brisk northeast-
erly trades which gracefully bend the beautiful
coconut palms shading our school.

Hostilities between our own boys and those of

the male Panaman school across the way proved memorable and enjoyable entertainment for the

ofslight consequence this year. There was but one Class of 1920, 2 male Seniors sat together when

stone battle of any moment, during which a one of them extracted from his pocket a round

number of our boys repelled a far superior force object of a white and crisp brown color.



of Latin and mathematics, was present and added
considerably to the enjoyment of the occasion by
the interesting games which she suggested. A
splendid time was had by everyone on this happy
occasion which, it is sate to say, will not be for-
gotten. Thank you, "Miss Davis."

While riding home on the train from that



of the enemy and forced
them to retreat to the
vicinity of their own
schoolhouse. The two
forces were dispersed by
the arrival of several
officers of the law and
Mr. Drill, the peer of
all law officials, in our
opinion. There neces-
sarily followed a treaty
and peace was signed,
ending hostilities for the
year. It was called "A
Peace of Bliss" in honor
of Gerald D. Bliss, jr.,
he being the only mem-
ber of our forces
wounded during the
combat.




What has come to be a part of our .school life. A squadron of planes over the
school, the delight of the student and the despair of the teacher.



"What's that ?" asked
the first.

"One of Mrs. Dingler's
biscuits," was the
answer.

"Oh, boy! Why didn't
I think of that; give me
a piece."

Early in February a
number of Japanese
midshipmen on their
training ship, Yakiimo,
visiting Canal waters,
paid us an enjoyable
visit. They wereshown
through the school by
Professor Drill and they
expressed no little de-
light and admiration in
our system of education.



The Friday morning half-hour entertainment Most ofthem spoke English "very well," as some
programs directed by Miss Holloway were of of our girls informed us later .^



unusual interest this year. Miss Holloway is to be
congratulated on the management displayed on
these occasions.

Probably the most impressive social school
event of the year was the delightful little luncheon
party given to the class of 1920 by Mrs. H.
Dingier, who is more affectionately remembered



Due to the management of Professor Drill, and,
in no small part, to the monitors of the respective
brakes, the brake service to and from Old and New
Cristobal during the noon hour was always kept on
schedule time and with few delays.

Several times during each week one or more of
the grammar grades would use the assembly hall
for their vocal training. The piano is located
and better results were obtained with the



as "Miss Davis," the former principal of Cristobal

High School. On the morning of December 29 there

the cla.ss entrained at the Colon railroad station help of it.

for Gatun and was met there by their hostess, who On the morning of March 30, Doctor V arrill,

accompanied them to her home. An appetizing on a tour of Central and South America, gave



THE CARIBBEAN.



59



an extremely interesting lecture on "Fish and
Their Habits" in the assembly room of the high
school. The seventh and eight grades of the
grammar school were invited and some of them
were surprised to find out there were existing so
many queer fish, as they expressed it, outside of
those contained in Cristobal High.

A few days later, Doctor Varrill, returning
upon request, delivered a second lecture. This
time his subject was "Nature's Game ot Hide
and Seek" and this was more interesting, it
possible, than the first lecture. The professor
drew numerous sketches on the board to illustrate
his talk and they proved to be very instructive.
One of the Sophomores expressed his satisfaction
by saying "The drawings were very artistic and
'clever.'

During the week's
strike of about 17,000
West Indian laborers in
the employ of The
Panama Canal and rail-
road, the high school
necessarily closed for the
full time, as most, if not
all, of its students went
out to help keep the "big
machinery" ot the Canal
moving. The girls helped
in the hotels and restau-
rants to teed the hungry
line of guests in the
former and bachelors in

, ^_.,, Strange bedfellow;?. Four

the latter. 1 he club-
houses, too, were not without their waitresses.
But where were the boys in the meanwhile? Hav-
ing the time of their lives I'll say driving
delivery trucks and motor cars for the quarter-
master's division. It was a sad bunch of high-
school boys that trooped back into the build-
ing on the morning following the closing of the
strike. And the best of it is that they were paid
for their work, too, and there is not one but would
have gladly done it tor nothing.

On April 7 great was the rejoicing among the
members of the Spanish classes, for upon this
memorable date Sefior Villafranca failed to present
himself, a very uncommon happening of this year's
school annals.




The Seniors sent for their class rings and pins
very early this year and after waiting several
months had them finally delivered to their
hands. The general opinion is that the design is
the best that any Senior class in Cristobal High
has had. The words "Cristobal" forms a semi-
circular top of a triangle of which "H" and "S"
are the legs. "20" is prettily engraved in the
center. The pins have the same attractive design.

The Class ot 1920 have completed the 4 years'
course together and the closest triendships have
developed among the members. Let us see what
they will do in the near future:

Etha Bevington, Harlan Holmwood, and .Alson
Sears all plan to enter Berkeley College in Cali-
fornia in the tall session. Kenneth Greene
expects to enter Pennsylvania State College at the

same time. Lillian Cot-
ton will return to Cris-
tobal High School to
take a post graduate's
course. Lindale Davies
plans to enter a college of
dentistryinthefall. Jack
Fields goes to Texas
.'Agricultural and Me-
chanical School in Sep-
tember. Duringthesame
month A\ Doyle pur-
poses to enter Columbia
University. Kathryn
Burgoon and Alice Stil-
son are as yet undecided
as to what they will do.
The fire drills this year were very frequent and
were carried out very rapidly and with the entire
absence of confusion.

Speaking of fire a slight blaze ot no great
danger took place in the physics laboratory in
March. The turn valve of a lighted gasoline blow
torch was turned too far and it dropped out,
allowing the blazing gasoline to flow over the tile
floor. -After the tew flames were extinguished no
damage was tound to hav^e been done and no one
outside of the laboratory occupants were the wiser
for what had happened.

Coincident with the visit of General Pershing
to the Isthmus was a happening of almost equal
prominence, for it was the day after the arrival



Sophs and one Senior.



60



THE CARIBBEAN.



of the "man of the hour" that the high school partook of the gay carnival life, for we know her

received its first half holiday of the year for having to be a p-.ipil of a quiet and reserved nature "as

40 half-days ot perfect attendance. most Freshmen are."

During the first semester \\e held the firstdance The Seniors were granted several rights and

at the Washington Hotel tor the purpose of raising privileges this year by Mr. Drill who is always

proceeds to defray expense of publishing this willing to do the right thing in the right way.

annual. The financial returns were as good as The most important of there privileges was the

was expected and even it we were not overcrowded use of the library as a Senior studv hall with the

with funds, the social benefits resulting were right to keep all others out.

immenselv pleasing to all attending. /-, m,. ,1, u 1 1 i-^,t r

t '^ & (.)n May J the scho(jl was excused a little earlier

.A few months later the second and last dance than usual, for May 3, together with a few days

was given by the high school at the Hotel Wash- before and after it, were memorable davs here

ington for the same beneficent purpose and this because of the visit of our own General Pershing.

was a success, both financially and socially. The Immediately after getting out, the students went to



events of the evening were made especially
attractive by the graceful dancing numbers ren-
dered bv several pupils ot Miss Helen Y. Rowe
to whom many thanks are due for her assistance
in the evening's program.
A great deal ot thanks is
also due Mrs. Charles
Cotton and Mrs. Elmer
-Stetler fo.- making and
serving punch and render-
ing much other valuable
assistance.

Little doubt there is that
the Senior Class lost their
best friend when Mrs. H.
Dingier left the Isthmus in
January on the steamship
Co/on for the States to take
a further historical and

rhetoric course at Columbia University. Most
of the Senior Class were excused to bid farewell
to her at the dock. "The rest" had to be content
with watching the Colon, from the school window,
poke her bow through the big swells which rolled
in between the great breakwaters, straining their
eyes to see the last of Mrs. Dingier.

Many poor marks resulted from the mid-year
examinations but this was due to the fact that
they took place during the days in which the year's
carnival festivities were held in Colon. Dancing,
late hours, and much studying equals whatr

The strain of the mid-year examinations claimed
a victim in the person of Ruth Xielson, a Fresh-
man, who succumbed to nervousness and fa'nted.
We ilo not mean to infer, however, that Ruth




Ui



Fort De Lesseps, "around the corner," which the
General was to inspect. Although he did not make
the looked-tor speech he proved extremely sociable
and shook hands with many lucky scholars who
were there en masse.

\\ hen the Prince of
Wales visited the Isthmus
many of the high school
students residing at Gatun
stayed at home on the day
ot his arrival to see him
pass through the locks on
the dreadnaught Renown.
.All of our students were
not so fortunate in viewing
the future King of Great
Britain.

The whole school is in-
debted to Doris Oliver for
her valuable and willing assistance at the piano
throughout the year. The rest ot the classes
should be thankful that Doris is but a Sopho-
more, for they will have her for 2 years more to
play for them during singing class, the noon hour,
and at social functions.

Balboa High School intended bringing their
annua! play to this side of the Isthmus but the
influenza epidemic postponed the plan indefinitely.
It was finally shown on April 24 at the .Army and
Navv Y. M. C. .A. at Cristobal and was attended
by several of our students who declared it excel-
lent. Our school was to help Balboa put their
plav on in Colon but conflicting amusements
necessitated a change of plan.



THE CARIBBEAN.



61



During March, 1 weeks ot school were lost due
to the restriction put on iiy the Isthmian sanitary
authorities, closing all schools, theaters, and places
where a crowd was apt to congregate, to prevent
the spread ot the influenza epidemic. During
this time most ot the boys and some ot the girls
worked. The Easter week vacation was omitted
this year to make up tor some of the time lost
resulting trom the strike anil the mfluenza epi-
demic.

We wish at this time to thank the officers and
members ot Cristobal Lodge No. 2, Independent
Order of Odd Fellows, for their financial assistance
in the publication of The Caribbean- and par-
ticular!)- Mr. Ernest Cotton, whose labor in con-
nection with its actual printing proves his loyalty
to his old alma mater. The Odd Fellows gave a
dance to the Seniors on the roof of the Masonic
Temple on the evening of April 10. The dance
was very well attended and the proceeds helped
us not a little in the publication of our annual.
Above all, however, it showed the spirit ot friend-
ship which the people ot the community have for
the school and also showed us that our efforts
to make this issue of The Caribbean- the "best
ever" was not being unnoticed.

The boys' quartette is formed ot almost the
same members as last year but not much was
accomplished, chiefly because ot the lack of time
and because a lot of extra time had to be put on
"The Rose Maicien," a very pretty opera which
Mr. Nicholas was teaching us.

Tuesday and Thursiiay mornings were always
looked forward to by the whole student body, tor
on these mornings we had our singing class.
We do not mean to imply that we enjoyed our own
singing, but we did like the selection ot musical
pieces Mr. Nicholas taught us. The faculty
was immensely pleased with the singing and often
commented on its worth. This class, however,
was lacking in altos, so several charming scholars
from the seventh grade with that quality voice,
were invited in and helped out greatly.

The "Office of The Caribbea.v" was almost
flooded with poetic work this year. We wish



that some ot our pj;ts had turned their pens in a
humorous direction for our joke department is
quite brief in this edition. On account of the lack
ot space many good poems have, of necessity, been
omitted, likewise numerous stories, among which
Harry Ferguson's ".A Narrow Escape" is particu-
larly good.

It is not very often that a Freshni.m receives
praise but in this caseLawton Patten is to be con-
gratulated on his artistic sketch work in this
number of the annual.

A silent but effective partner, is Mr. .A. P. E.
Doyle, whose aivice in the planning of this issue
of The Caribbean is thankfully acknowledged.
Now and then donating programs or tickets
to us, he alwa>-s prints them in an artistic
manner at the lowest possible cost to us. Mr.
George H. Ball of The Panama Canal Press read
all proofs on this Caribbean himself, freeing us
trom a great cost and he did the same unselfish act
last year and the year before. Really, folks, isn't
it great to have such unfaltering support? In
P'reshman language "I'll say we're lucky."

On the afternoon of May 8 a very successful
cake sale was held by the school at the Cristobal
clubhouse trom which the handsome sum of S60.35
was realized. This gave the financial resources
of The Caribbean a splendid boost. .All the kind
ladies who contributed cakes are to be deeply
thanked and the needed assistance of Mrs.
Bevington and Mrs. Cotton at the sale was par-
ticularly appreciated.

Give credit where credit is due is our motto.
Harry Ferguson and Frank Raymond, Juniors,
and Etha Bevington and Harlan Holmwooii,
Seniors, are responsible for the excellent batch
ot ads which adorn the last pages of this book
and are to be congratulated on their fine work.

Mr. Lee, teacher ot manual training, left us the
first halt ot the year tor Balboa and his place was
filled by Mr. Bacon, newly trom the States, an
efficient teacher, a favorite of the boys and a strong
booster ot The Caribbean.



62



THE CARIBBEAN.



=m




ATHLETICS.

Juck Fields, '20.




m



I



BASKETB.4LL.



We opened the season with our old rival Balboa.
Until the lasj^ quarter we had a good lead on them
but for some reason our team went "dead" and
allowed Balboa to score enough points to win the
game. We played them a return game at Balboa
and beat them by 7 points,
the same as they beat us. The
third and deciding game was
also won by Balboa, giving
them the series. A peculiar
incident with this series is that
all the scores were 7 points
different.

.'\fter the Balboa series we
played 2 games with an .'^rmy
team from Gatun. The team
they played for the first game
was the team that won the
Isthmian championship. We
played them, however, and
put up a hard fight even though completely
outclassed. In the second game we were more
successful than in the first, winning the game in
5 minutes' extra time.

Although we won but 2 games this year we had
a very good team, and should have won the
majority of our games.



Balboa.
Balboa.
Balboa
Gatun
Gatun



Pedro Miguel




28


C. H. S


21


'4


C. H. S


21


15


C H. S


8


40


C. H. S


21


12


C. H. -S


*u



Total 109

* Five minutes overtime.



lotal



On May 4, Physical Director Wilson took 8
members of the basketball team to Pedro Miguel
and on that evening played the Pedro Miguel gym
class a fast game. The team work of our boys was
excellent. Paul Doyle performed star work in the



first half, dropping basket after basket and the
work of Sears in the second half was of equal value.
Splendid guard work on the parts of Duey, Har-
rison, and Raymond and center work on the parts
of Henter and Ferguson, were outstanding features
of the game. Result, Cristobal High School 34;
17.

On the evening of the 24th
of May, the school basketball
team journeyed to Gatun in
motor cars and at the club-
house there, played two fast,
interesting games. The first
and closest game was played
with the Gatun lightweights,
several members of which are
students of Cristobal High.
Gatun played hard and our
team played hard and the
game was about even up to
the last part of the third
quarter when we pushed into
the lead and held it. The whistle blowing at the
finish found the score 20 to 18. The second victory
of the evening was gained from Company .\, 33d
Infantry, on the same floor by the score of 32 to
25. The soldier boys were there strong with the
opposition but clever teamwork by the school
boys in the last half made possible an easy vic-
tory. The first half of this game was played by
several substitute members of the school team but
in the second quarter the Company all but ran
away with the game necessitating the replacing
of the subs on the school team by the regular
players. This turned the tables, for the soldiers
were unable to enlarge their score while the
Cristobal High School boys attained and main-
tained a safe lead to the finish.

B.ASEBALL.

We had a very successful season in baseball this
year, losing but 2 of our games.

In our first game, which was with Balboa, the



THE CARIBBEAN.



63



infield showed up very poorly. Before the next
game the entire infield was rearranged and showed
a big improvement.

We played 2 games with Ancon this season and
won both of them. In the first game Sears pitched
a no-hit, no-run game, while our team hit the
opposing pitcher hard and scored 6 runs.

We started a ball game with the boys from
Gatun but before the game was half over the
game turned out to be a farce. After the ninth
inning when the score was finally added it was
found to be 1 9 to I

Teams from Gatun seemed to be our meat,
for after beating the boys, we played Headquar-
ters team. Although they were ahead for several
innings, we soon overcame their lead and won
the game.

A series of 2 games was played with the men
from New Cristobal. They won the first game
and we took the second. In the second game
Sears hit for the circuit with one man on base.
A third game is to be played at an early date.

Having nothing to do one Saturday we took
Fort de Lesseps out to Mount Hope ball diamond
and finished up the season with a win. In this
game Sears knocked one for a home run with none
on base. This made the second circuit clout for
Sears in 8 games.

On April 24 we again utilized the Mount Hope
diamond, this time with Fort De Lesseps as our
opponents. As in our first game with them we
had no difficulty in administering defeat, conse-
quently we romped home with a 9 to 2 victory.
One week later the De Lesseps boys came back for
more, this time with the determination of making



good for past defeats. Moreover, it looked as if
they were accomplishing their purpose up to the
ninth inning. The last half of the ninth found the
score J to 2 in De Lesseps' favor but on getting
up for a last crack at the sphere, due partly to an
error on their side and real baseball on ours (even
if we do say it), we squeezed in 2 big runs and
settled the argument.

SWIMMING.

The swimming meet held on May 22 between
Balboa and Cristobal high schools at Balboa,
ended in the defeat of Cristobal High. The score
by points stood 45 to 23. The limitation on the
issuing of passes prevented us from bringing to
Balboa any backers but we'll not put the blame
of our defeat on that. Another, or return meet,
was arranged to take place at Cristobal in June,
but this annual must go to press before that time
so we are unable to record the records we are
going to break and the splendid victories we are
going to achieve at that meet.

girls' basketball.

The girls formed a basketball team and played 3
games this season. All but two of the girls had
never played basketball before, so, taking this fact
into consideration, the girls played very well.
Although they lost all their games they showed
good material for a team for next year.

Gatun 6 C. H. S I

.Ancon 16 C. H. S 12

.Ancon 34 C. H. S 16



Basketball.
Sears, '10 (Captain)
Raymond, '21.
Doyle, A., '20.
Holtnwood, '20.
Ferguson, '21.
Greene, '20.
Doyle, P., '22.
Harrison, '22.
.'\shton, '23.
Solomon, '23.



TEAMS.

Baseball.
Raymond, '21 (Captain;
Sears, '20.
Doyle, A., '20.
Davies, '20.
Ferguson, '21.
Henter, '21.
Doyle, P., '22.
Harrison, '22.
Solomon, '23.
.Ash ton, '23.



Total 56

I



S'x'imntitig.
Sears, '20.
Greene, '20.
Fields, '20.
R.iymond, '20.
Doyle, A., '20.
Doyle, P., '22.
Bliss, 23.
Cloke, '22.
Patten, 21.
Townsend, 22.



Total 29



Track.
Sears, '20.
Raymond, '2
Davies, '20.
Greene, '20.
Doyle, .A.. '2
Harrison, '22
Doyle, P.. '2



Girls' Basketball.
Kathryn Burgeon, '20 (Captain)
Glenora Edwards, '22.
Emogene Nash, '23.
Kirby Ferguson, '22.



Alice Hunter, '22.
Ruth Nielson, '23
Mary Fields, '22.
Ida Brown, 22.



64



THE CARIBBEAN.




Realizing the profit derived from exchange we
have this year striven to enlarge and better this
department of The Caribbean. In this we have
been entirely successful. Although some to whom
we have mailed copies of The Caribbean have
not responded, others to whom we did not make
advances have more than filled their places. Our
success has therefore been marked, for is not our
fifteen of this year a vast improvement over the
two of last year?

We have made many new friends with whom we
hope to build up a long and pi'ofitable exchange.
Moreover, we have not >'et given up those who
have failed to respond to our advances. Owing to
the number of copies printed last year only a very
few were left for exchange. For this reason several
of those who have remitted to us have been
forced to wait for this edition. To these we
humbh' apologize and hope that this issue will
be full recompense for the long wait.

Here's to exchange. May it grow,
.^nd spread to three pages or more,

For its profits we know

Are unmeasured, and so
Here's a toast to exchange and its lore.

Last year we started to exchange, antl now we
have T/if Habit and have broken The Record
for rapid development. Having so many ex-
changes, we found it necessary to have an Index
in order to know where the various Academy
Journals were listed. You can be sure we just
devoured Magpie which we received, and turned
The Curtis Monthly from blue to reail. We also
received The IVhisp from a State upon which The
North (field) Star shines.



ROCKS AND ROSES.

The icademy Journal. Nomich Fj-ee Academy, NorJiich, Conn.
Your literary niaterial is good. You have a fine
editorial, good school notes, and a splendid cover
design. .\ few snapshots would improve the paper.

'I'he Curtis Monthly. Curtis High Schoot, Staten Island, N. Y.
November, i g, and January, '20 issues. You have
goodliterarymaterialand original ideas. "YeGoode
Olde Dayes" is splendid, ."^re there no cameras
among your students?

TheE.L. H.S.Oracle. Ednard Little High School,. iiibiirn. Me.
Your February number is very patriotic with the
Lincoln cover and article on Roosevelt. Your
stories are good and department headings original
and well-drawn.

The Hd',il. Ck.irles City High School, Charles City, lo'xa.
Your St. Patrick's edition is appropriate. Your
paper is full of interesting school news. More
literary material and a tew more cuts would improve
your already go.^d paper.

The Index. Oshkosh High School, Oskkosh, If is.

October, '19, January, 'zo. Commencement, and
Faster numbers. The only adverse criticism we
can offer is that your name and address are hard to
pronounce in a hurry. Try it. Where do you get so
man>' good jokes?

The yiagpie. St. Margaret' s School, ll'aterhury. Conn.

Your poems are great. They surpass your prose.
Kut have yju no artists or amateur photographers
in your school?

'The Sorthjield Star. Northfield Semi'iary, Xorthfield, Mass.
Your paper is well-gotten up. Your stones are
good. Your article on "Mr. Moody" is certainly a
gooil idea. .A tew more poems would greatly
enhance the v.ilue ot your paper.



THE CARIBBEAN.



65



The Purple and Gol.l. Cediir 'ale High School, Cedar Vale, Katu.
Your paper has what most lack plenty nf snap-
shots. In fact the cuts ov-erbalance the literary
material. How about an exchange department.' We
also acknowledge with thanks the receipt ot several
issues of the High School Outlook.

The Purple and Gold. \utr High School, Milton, S. H.

Your stories are good, but too short. .\ few illus-
trations would add greatly to the attractiveness ot
the paper.

The Record. John Marshall High School, Richmond, la.

Your stories are among the best we have read.
Your department headings are original anci well-
drawn. Why not more poems?

The ll'hiip. Il'ilmington High School, JVilviinglon, Del.

You have a fine editorial, good school notes, and
good stories, although short. Your class pages are
original, but would be favorably replaced by a good
joke depai tment. What's wrong with a few snap-
shots.



The Zonian. Balboa High School, Balboa, C. Z.

We are glad to have The Zonian among our ex-
changes this year. The general excellence of its
literary content is a re.ison for pride in which its
sister school, dear old Cristobal, shires. N'o exchange
among the many good ones received, with a far
larger "tudent body, excels it. It is an enduring
monument to the accomplishment ot its contribu-
tors and a silent tribute to the devotion and serJ
Oi its teacher of English, Miss Myrtis M. Gallup.

BOUQUKTS FROM OUR FRIENDS.

The Caribbean with its pictures ot palms and sunny
beaches torms a vivid contrast to our own shivery weather.
Evidently they are not bothered with coal strikes down there.
The Caribbean is an annual filled with stories, poems, jokes,
and articles on the Canal Zone. With only about 50 pupils in
the scliool an annual has been produced that any school might
be proud of. The Curtis Monthly.

The Caribbean. The snapshots give your paper "spice."
Keep it up. The Index.

The Caribbean. We find you most interesting and hope
that your Exchange Department will be a great success.
The Magpie.



THE FACULTY

Paul C. Dovle, '22.



Our principal is Mr. Drill,

Who works with us with a will.
But when we fool, he shows us his rule,

.And then we quiet down and be still.

Music is taught by Mr. Nicholas,

Whose four-part singing does tickle us,
But as a teacher, he makes a screecher

Sound like a bird in the forest.

Drawing is given by Mr. Bacon,

If he was to leave we'd be forsaken,
Tho' we treat him not as we ought, he proves himselt a
sport.

And we shall behave like a deacon.



For English we have Miss Holloway,

Who is sometimes happy and sometimes gay,

But when she is cross, it is at our loss
To talk will mean "F" without delay.

History is taught by Miss Walton,

Who can say "Myers's" book without haltin,'
If outlines tor her are not complete, a poor mark we're sure to

meet.
She'll say "It's your fault, then."

El ultimo pero no menos,

Es el Senor "Villafranca,"
Quien segun todos sabermos,

Nos ensefia a "Monsanto."



66



THE CARIBBEAN.





Lillian M. Cotton, '20.



The alumni is a new phase in the life of The
Caribbean. In the 2 years in which there has
been a complete high school course offered at Cris-
tobal, there have only been 10 graduates alto-
gether, but in the coming year, we hope to have a
long list ot "passers on" and sincerely trust that
we may always be able to hear from them.

Lula Mae Coman (isee Pullig) is residing in
Cristobal, C. Z., keeping house.

Susie Inloes Harrison is taking a business course
at Goldey College, Wilmington, Del., and expects
to return to the Isthmus some time this year.

Catherine Tesse Waid is having a wonderful
time at Berkeley College, Berkeley, Cal., learning
to be a journalist.

George Minot Cotton is still in Cristobal, but
expects to leave shortly to study architecture in
the United States.



Leland Bourke Welsh is working for the State
chemist, Trinidad, Colo. He expects to return
to the Colorado School of Mines in the fall, which
he left on account of ill health.

Mary Elizabeth Verner is studying at the
L'niversity of South Carolina.

.'^.lice Arlene Ball is at Simmons College, Bos-
ton, Mass. .\rlene is expected early in July to
spend her vacation with her parents on the Isth-
mus. She is taking a secretarial course.

.'^nna Dorothy Weir is living at Gatun, C. Z.,
at the present time.

James Gerard Raymond is studying electrical
engineering at Columbia University.

Kenneth Maurice Edwards is an apprentice
electrician and, after having completed his course,
he intends to study electrical engineering in col-
lege.



SCHOOL DAYS.

Etha J. Bevington, '20.



I sit in the buzzing schoolroom

Thinking of days that have passed,

Of four long years whose memories clear
Bring sweet recollections that last.

The year as a "Kreshie" was terrible,-
As a "Soph" I sought to amend.

When a Junior I wished my school days were over,
.And now I am fearing the end.

Ofttimes when English was hard

And a theme just couldn't he writ,

Or my "Trig" was worse than usual
'Twas then I wanted to quit.



These days will soon be over

For the end is drawing near.
No more will I seek the joys and sorrows

Of the schooldays that are dear.

I have often been told by my elders,

Who through these same years have passed.

That these days are the happiest

And to enjoy them while they last.

But now that 1 am nearing the end

Which am I, sorry or glad.'
For these have been years of sorrow andjoy.

Of good mixed with the bad.



THE CARIBBEAN.



67




lSl3



John B. Fields, '20.



Mr. Drill. "William, did you complete the
lessons that you missed?"

William H. "Yes, sir; T made them up?"
Mr. Drill. "It sounds like it."

Mr. Drill. "Mr. Bacon, how many p'reshmen
work at manual training?"

Mr. Bacon. "Oh, about one-halt of them."

Harlan Hohnwood. "In Europe fruit skins are
being used in shoes."

Al Doyle (as usual). "What do they use
banana skins tor?"



SEEN IN COLON.

J. Cumberbatch, Furniture.
We repair and translate French, Spanish, and
English.

P. Davies, Custom Tailor.
"We die on men and women's clothing."

G. Arthur.
"Furniture repairer, also talking machine

Banana Factory.

Coffee and Leather Shop on 9th St.
Harlan Hohnwood. "Oh, they are used as "CotTee ground to the sight of all buyers. We
slippers. welcome all and roast daily."

Miss Walton. "I gave you boys permission
to talk but not to speak."

He. -I'm not in favor of this phonetic spelling "Carpenters wanted immediately." Inside was a
^j gjj Freshman waiting tor a hair cut.

She. "Why not!"

//^. "Well, take 'p-a-r-l-o-u-r' for instance; ^'-^ G^m^-r. "Dorothy, how do you poach



SEEN IN .\ COLON EARLER SHOP.



having 'U' in it makes all the difference in the ^^^s



world."

Frank Raymond (to Harold Cloke, who is point-
ing a rifle at Doyle's head) "Look out there,
Cloke, don't you know that that gun shoots
through 3 feet ot wood.



Dorothy. "Put an egg in a pan of water and fry



HEARD IN ANCIENT HISTORY.



Patten. "Noah was the first man to use an

electric lamp."

Teacher. "Why do you say that?"

Patten. "Well, instead of using steel for the

ark, he used wood and made the ark light.



A demagogue is a Jewish church.
A mummy is an Egyptian idol.
.\ pedagogue is a Jewish hurch.



Irate mother to Mr. D. "So that is what those
high school students want the candy sales for!"
Mr. Drill. "Why, what do you mean?"
Mother. "Well, Dorothy told me the high
Miss Walton. "I want all those who are absent school was taking the money from the sales to
to say so." buy their rings and dresses for graduation.



68



THE CARIBBEAN.



Sears. "Gee, fellows, I was following a sweet Colon the lieutenant turned to Paul and said:
dame down Front Street, when a car came from "Gee, I bet 50 per cent of the people down

one of the side streets and hit her. I rushed over there expect us to crash to earth."

to pick her up but she was "Yes, and 50 per cent of

not to be seen. i 1 ^41^^ i. 1 I i j I 1 I j '^'^^ \->to\->\s up here think.

Do.v/t'. "What happened --4^^^BMg--l-i_ -^^ | | j the same thing," says Paul
to her?" T-l^^Hi^HteSyRi.-- -4-

Sears. "Well, the onlv Wlg/tj^m^^^^^^F:
solution I have is that the ^^^F^^^j'.- j( ^f

car-bur-et-or." H( ^.^^S^^ ^lfi4i "Sav, porter, how old

D.vA..-"No, I thmk the ^fy^^|B|fr ^L^^ ^^ ^hat lamp?"

plane and while sailing over ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Sl (.q^ young to smoke."

THE FIN.4L FOOTNOTE.



C. H. .S. student to porter
on the Panama train:



EXCHANGE HUMOR.



"Why do you paint," asked a violinist of his
daughter.

"For the same reason that \ou use resin,
papa."

"Why, how is that?"

"To help draw my beau," replietl the girl.

S. S. teacher. "Now we will each give a Bible
quotation. I will start with one showing re-
pentance. 'Judas went out and hanged himself.'

First pupil. "Go thou and do likewise."

"Say, dad, what keeps us from tailing off the
earth when we are upside down?"



"U hy, the law of gravitation, of course, son."
"Well, dad, what did people do before the law
was passed?"

In the parlor there were three,
He, the parlor lamp, and she,
Two is a company, no doubt,
So the little parlor lamp went out.

"Hey, Herman, see my new car."
"Gee, it's a peach, but where is the horn?"
"Why, I don't need one, don't you see that sign
on my radiator, 'Dodge Brothers.'




Central American
Plumbing and Supply Co.



Everything in the line of Phinihing



^ COLON, R. P.
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Estimates Cheerfully Given



PANAMA, R. P.
58 Central Avenue



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THE CARIBBEAN.



69



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iFaborite HSobie ^tars; of tlje
Class of 1920



LILLIAN COTTON




KATHRYN BURGOON




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ALSON SEARS



ETNA BEVINGTON



JACK FIELDS



KENNETH GREENE






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70



THE CARIBBEAN.



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DEALERS IN

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Picture Framing a Specialty



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23 FRONT STREET

Next to International Banking Corporation

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P. O. Box S23, Cristobal, C. Z.



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Uver American Bazaar
Phone Corp. 298 - Colon

K> fip 'ip 'if." 'yp 'i-p '^p '>p 'i'P 'A'P n*r 'i'r 0*^^ 'n*c o*? '^*f?^ o'c 'o*^' "S*? W 'Sc fltc W W W 'i'F Wi W 7t'? "F "l", "t" W W "t" '^I^



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72



THE CARIBBEAN.



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THE CARIBBEAN.



73



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Souvenirs of the Canal, Panama Hats, Etc



Agent for Eastman Kodak Co., Columbia Graphophones and Records
Novelties, Silks, Stationery, Etc.



CATHEDRAL SQUARE, PANAMA



(Next to Central Hotel)



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WEEKLY SERVICE BETWEEN



i CRISTOBAl C. L GUAYAQUIL mte^^iate PERUVIAN P((RTS

fi

f
i "UCAYALr' ''MAMARO" "URUBAMBA" "HUALLAGA"'



ALL OUTSIDE CABINS



MARCONI WIRELESS



Head Office on the Isthmus of Panama

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
Cable Address: "VAPORUANA"















FOR PARTICULARS APPLY TO



E. D. BEJARANO, General Agent



CRISTOBAL, C. Z.

Tel. 183



PANAMA, R. P.

Tel. 730



74



THE CARIBBEAN.



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GOETHALS,WILFORD&BOYD



INCORPORATED












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BONDED WAREHOUSE

COLON. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Main Office: 40 Wall Street, New York, U. S. A.

BRANCHES: NEW ORLEANS, HAVANA, SAN JUAN, CRISTOBAL, BALBOA



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STROPS SHAVES CLEANS
Without Removing Blades



Sold by the following dealers:



PANAMA
La Mascota
French Bazaar
Maduro & Co.
American Bazaar



COLON
American Bazaar
The MuUer Co.
Sterling Stores
Kvvong On Chan



ARROW COLLARS

ARROW SHIRTS

INTERWOVEN SOX

KENYON'S

PALM BEACH SUITS



All American Standards for Style
and Quality



Sold by the following dealers:



COLON

The Muller Co.
Sterling Stores
American Bazaar
Lum & Company
Kwong On Chan



PANAMA

Palais Royal
American Bazaar
Maduro & Co.
French Bazaar
La Mascota



THE NATIONAL DRINK



Welch's Grape Juice






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THE CARIBBEAN.



75



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William Piers

SUCCESSOR TO

KRANK ULLRICH

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MERCHANT



Agent for

WKite RocK Mineral Water and Ginger Ale

ParK f^ Tilford's Candy

AnKeuser-Busch Malt Nut



48 Front Street, phone loi Colon



m



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Cable Address "IMPCO" A. B. C, 5th, and Lieber



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Colon Import and Export Co., Ltd.



'M Dealers in



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JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS

General Merchandise and Native Produce



COLON, R. P.

p. O. Box 107



5?



Branch Retail Stores and Trading Stations:



COLON BOCAS DEL TORO PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL ESCRIBANO MANDINGA ^



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76



THE CARIBBEAN.



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M 50 FRONT STREET AND 56 BOLIVAR STREET, COLON, R. P. 1

mi A COMPLETE STOCK OF






KJ
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Patent

Medicines



Pure



Drugs



Toilet Articles,
Etc.



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N. SAI^AZAR, Proprietor



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Clarence Alberga






^ FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES ^



Furniture, Hardware,

Glassware, Crockery, etc.



em



Nos. 124-126 BOLIVAR STREET
Phone Corp. 105



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Wi BURGOON'S JEWELRY STORE

Mi 54 FRONT STREET, COLON






p. O. Box 82, Colon, R. P. ^



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Repairing a specialty



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m H. HENRIQUEZ i



Commission and
TrucKing' Agent






Stamped Paper
and Revenue Stamps



Cable Address:
JOTABE



1



^ P. O. Box 51

tm COLON, R. p.

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12P



Morgan's Garage



Between 2d and 3d Streets iMi



COLON, R. P.



For your 5 and 7 passenger touring cars

CALL PHONE 395

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE COMPETENT CHAUFFEURS

Repairs made. Orders promptly attended to. T. L. MORGAN, Proprietor.



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THE CARIBBEAN.



77



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LAM'S GARAGE



Between 14th and 15th Streets, Broadway



COLON, R. P.



GENERAL SERVICE-DAY AND NIGHT



m 5 AND? PASSENGER CARS



CAREFUL AND RELIABLE CHAUFFEURS ffl



PHONE CORPORATION No. 33, COLON



(K'SI KJS KX1 ^S'!
i R. BROUQH & COMPANY g



WHOLESALE AIND RETAIL

IMPORT MERCHANTS



FRONT STREET



COLON, R. of P,



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Young^s Garage



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^ iijth ANDBOLivAii



COLON



STREETS



RELIABLE CHAUFFEURS



DEPENDABLE CARS

Phone Corp. 204

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78



THE CARIBBEAN.



WM






AMERICAN COSMETIC PARLOR



1^



FACE MASSAGE



By Hand, Vibrator, or Violet Ray



SCALP TREATMENT



SHAMPOOING ELECTRICALLY DRIED HAIR DRESSING MANICURING

FANNY BRIGGS CARR and fvIARY FULLER
Face and Scalp Preparations Manicuring Articles Real Hair Nets "Cap"
Phone Corp. 298 OVER AMERICAN BAZAAR 8th and Front Sts., Colon



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COLON'S
Leading Jewelers






S&



For choice selection ol

JEWELRY, SILVER, AND
CUT GLASS



COLON STORE PANAMA STORE

llth St., Opp. Com'y. 8th St. and Central Ave
PHONE 209 P. C. PHONE 858 CORP.



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INVESTIGATE

Threaded Rubber



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SMALLWOODS'

Panama and Colon



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LINDO'S GARAGB

THE OLD RELIABLE

FIVE AND SEVEN PASSENGER CARS FOR HIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE ....






Comipetent and reliable Chauffeurs



THE CARIBBEAN.



79



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m




Long Wearing

Comfortable

Waterproof



Neolin Soles are obtainable in blaclc, wliite, and tan. Be sure you get
the genuine Neolin. Look for the name on the bottom of the sole.









I THE GOODYEAR TlUE
OF SOUTH AMEKK A

BOM>ED WAHKMOI SK IN COLON, TJ. V.




80



THE CARIBBEAN.



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PRODUCTION COSTS 1




APRIL


MAY


JUWE


JULY


AUG.


SEPT.


OCT.


NOV. 1 1


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Power by Wire Reduces Costs






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Manufacturers will secure maximum power, economy,
and minimum production costs by the use of central
station power.

Power from central station frees you from the boiler
and engine room help problem eliminates the wastage
of private plants in belts and shaftings ends costly
steam leakage and improper insulation of pipes.

You pay only for the power used when you tie up to
our lines. Individual motors at each machine allow
greater flexibility and speed.

Our engineeriivj service is available to you free of charge.



m



COLON ELECTRIC AND ICE SUPPLY CO.



Bolivar Street



Phone 150



COLON









^(!>


AFTERWORD.



We wish to express our thanKs and appre-
ciation for the assistance (s'iven us by many
friends, and to
recommend to
the public an
earnest perusal
of the adver-
tisements in-
serted in this
publication by
firms -whose in-
tegrity needs
no encomium.

Business
Manager.






STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00007
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1920
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00007

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Opening
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Faculty
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Seniors
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Section 8
        Section 9
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Literary
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Activities
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Sports
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Exchanges
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Alumni
        Page 66
    Jokes
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Advertising
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Back Cover
        Page 81
        Page 82
Full Text





















VOL. III.


CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1920


No. 1


PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL


CARIBBEAN BOARD


Editor-in-Chief


ALBERr A. DOYLE


Assistant Editor .
Business Manager .
Assistant Business Manager
Circulation Manager, Exchange Editor


FRANK A. RAYMOND
ETHA J. BEVINGTON
HARRY L. FERGUSON
KENNETH GREENE


Assistant Circulation MAanager
School Notes Editor.
Athletic Editor, Joke Editor
Ath!etc Chairman .


. KATHRYN M. BURGOON
LILLIAN M. Co-rroN
JOHN B. FIELDS
ALSO W. SEARS


CONTENTS


Frontispiece....
Dedication.....


SCARIBBEAN


BOARD


The Staff..


Editorial.. .
The Faculty ....
Faculty Notes.
Graduates ...


ALBERTT A.

. ARIBBEAN
~CARIBBEAN


DOYLE


BOARD


Class Will.......... ALBERT A. DOYLE.
Class Prophecy............. ErHA J. BEVINGwo ,
A Trigonometric Love Song ... KENNETH GREENE .
Class Song. . . .. ...... KENNETH GREENE.
Seniors As You Were- in 1916... ...... ....... ..
The Man Who Came Back, HARLAN W. HOLMWOODn


The Man Who Did Not Come


Back... .. .
Class of 1921 ......
Juacas .... .....


SKENNETH GREENE

,. ALSON W. SEARS


Old Panama ....... HARLAN W. HOLMWOOD.
Class of 1922 . .. .. .. . ..
A Shoe String Adventure. KENNETH GREENE
Margarita . ... ... C. LINDALE DAVIES,
A Knight'sAdventure .... WILLIAM F. MARY.
The Process of CoffeeRaising .... ALsoN W. SEARS
The National Drink of Panama .C. LINDALE DAVIES.
The Call of Panama ..... HARE LAN W. HOLMWOOD
C lassof 1923. ... .. .... .. .... ..
Country Lads Wise, City Lads


W iser... ... ..,.


..... PAUL C. DOYLE


Ram6n in Colon ...... .. .. EULALIE ARTHUR
T i fA .I. j *1


Page.
I Long-haired Stuff-Continued:
2 Farewell . .. . .. ..
4 Names and Greetings .........
5 A Parting Toast......... ...... ...
6 The Tropic Night ...... ....... ..
7 My Trip to New York via Haiti,
8 ETHA J. BEVINGTON.
13 A Shark! A Shark! ........ HAROLD CLOKE..
I < Resources and Industries of Panama.


ALICE M. STILSON.


Black or White........
In and About Colon .
I W onder...... .. ....
A lm ost ............ .. .
A Little Excitement ....
The Fate of the Marne


. MARJORIE D.BALL
... ALBERT A. DOYLE.
.. KENNETH GREENE.
CHESTER TAYLOR.
JOHN B. FIELDS.
LILLIANM. COTTON.


AQuietEvening ........ .KATHRYNM. BURGOON.
The Land of Beginning Again....EULALIE ARTHUR,
A Lost Treasure Found........ KIRBY FERGUSON.
That Green Tulle Dress..... LILLIAN M, COTTON
The Resurrection Flower ..... ALICE M. STILSON
The Experiences of a Wayward Youth,
EMILIO SOLOMON
Mary's Little Cold . . . .
School Notes .... ... .... LILLIAN M. CorroN.
Athletics ......... ..... JOHN B. FIELDS.
Exchanges......... .. .. KENNETH GREENE.
The Faculty. ... ....... PAUL C. DOYLE.
Alumni .. . . . . . LILLIAN M. COTTON .
t," t -. -


Page.













4 x
*~~~x x^ x^ ^ :

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xA x ** x xxx xxx


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x /







THE


CARIBBEAN.


EDITORIAL.


As commencement day approaches,


the dawn


of a new period in the lives of our Senior Class
breaks.
Unlike the shadows which accompany the birth
of a new day, a mere 24 hours, which bring, de-
spite all human efforts to prevent, either pleasant
sun-shining, happy morning or a gloomy, spirit-
depressing storm to high and low alike, the birthof
this new and broader period in our lives is univer-
sally ushered in with emotions of joyous gladness
that our grade studies are ended; sincere thanks-


manship, instilled in us by parent and teacher,
will not bring the vessel of our future welfare into
the calmer and more numerous seas, found sooner
or later in the safe harbor of industrious citizen-
ship.
Some of us may encounter rough seas, but let it
be said of us, the Class of '20, we did our best to


save our ship.


Let us, when we take the helm


of life, steer the only safe course, plowing through


the waters of enthusiasm,


study, or play;


whether it be work,


working hard, studying hard, and


giving


patience


willing


sacrifices


playing hard, for the saying that "What is worth


made by our devoted faculty whose training and
guidance is their ineffaceable monument; stead-
fast hope for securely filling a deserving station
in the scheme of life, as well as unswerving con-
fidence in successfully achieving whatever under-
taken.
None of us may count on perpetual smooth sail-
ing, for uncharted and hidden rocks of carelessness
lie in our fairway, dangerous shoals of idleness
tempt the mariner-graduate who heeds not their
lure, and the treacherous reefs of constant pleas-


ure-seeking, abounding in


the pathway


our


doing at all is worth doing well"


still stands and


always will stand unrefuted.
If we are to become eminent mariners on the


sea of


perienced


let us avoid


youth


of our older seaman,


the rashness of inex-


and adopt the wise


teachings


who everywhere caution us


to be temperate-temperate in thought, in action,


in language;


tasks;
honest
ential.


to be punctual and faithful in our


to be industrious,


thrifty,


, to be truthful, clean, loyal;
The class, whether it be 'c


courteous,
to be rever-


0 or 25,


charts out such a course on the map of life will


barque on its voyage to maturity, can strand high
and dry and destroy the finest ship of character
afloat.
Still, with all these expected obstacles, health
permitting, there is no reason why careful sea-


safely anchor


the ship of duty intrusted in its


hands min a harbor where the world will welcome
them with open arms.


ALBERT A. DOYLE,


Editor.


C
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CARIBE a N

T*l CARISEA


xx x x xx %.x


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THE CARIBBEAN:
ft I, P - .L -


Prof. A. R. LANo,
Superintendent.
A. B., Nebraska Wesleyan University.
A. M., University of Nebraska.
Few of us realize how much the Senior Class is really indebted
to Mr. Lang. For how quick was he to lend us the helping hand
in the difficulties and problems of our last year! When, on
commencement evening, you shake the hand of each member
of the Class of L9Zo0Mr. Lang, you will find in each grasp sincere
gratitude for your kind assistance and a firm wish for your
continued success,


Prof. HARRY T. DRILL, B. A., Principal.
California.
University of California.
University of Michigan.
University of Oregon.
Physics, mathematics.


Mr. DrilL" What other words command more respect and
admiration from the students of Cristobal High School?
From the. Freshman, "Cheese it, Mr. Drill!" to the Senior,
"We'll ask Mr. Drill," there is a deep feeling of respect on one
hand and of implicit confidence on the other. "I hate to see
a thing done by halves; if it be right, do it boldly; if it be
wrong, leave it undone." From these words can be gleaned
his outstanding characteristic. A firm friend of the Senior
Class, helping them along, advising them, he is in no small
measure responsible for the output of THE CARIBBEAN. For
he was the power behind and the booster of all endeavors for
the raising of proceeds for the annual. "Neither rhyme nor
reason can express how much" the Class of I920 appreciates
the splendid work he did. Moreover, it is a delight to study
under him and fortunate we call. the school over which Mr.
Drill will in future preside.

MARIE E. HOLLOWAY, B. S.
New York.
Vassar College.
Columbia University,
New York University.
English, Latin.
Having taught us for 2 years, Miss Holloway is readily
familiar with Cristobal High School. Maintaining a firm
Interest in all things connected with the school, she never
fails to be there with a generous share of help when some end is
to be attained. Miss Holloway worked tirelessly on this and
the last edition of THE CARIBBEAN and it would be useless
to try and thank her for the advice and kindly criticism be-
stowed on us and which made this edition of THE CARIBBEAN
a credit to our school.

CLARA B. WALTON, A. B., M. A.
Kentucky.
Transylvania College.
Chicago University.
Columbia University.
Mathematics, history.
The mere fact that Miss Walton has been with us but a year
does not mean that she is mildly interested in the school doings.


in them. No
although her
has the abili
entertaining
personality.


one has ever been seen lagging in her classes, for,
lesson assignments are not excessively light, she
ty to make those classes interesting and even
by clever management and her own pleasing


AVA G. GARNER, B. S.
Michigan.
Michigan State College.

Home Economics.


Miss Garner came to Cristobal High School in November,
taking the place of the former teacher of domestic science,
Miss Gugenhan, who was transferred to Balboa. After
several months of hard tasks Miss Garner has succeeded in
making competent cooks and dressmakers of most of the
Senior, Sophomore, and Freshman girls, which is saying a
lot in the latter case.


RICARDO VILLAFRANCA.
Costa Rica.

Leceo de Costa Rica.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute.
Universidad de Barcelona.

Spanish.

"Seifor," as he is familiarly called by us, represents the
ideal teacher in the opinion of the greater part of the high
school students. His lesson assignments, although they can
not be complained of, are extensive enough to keep us busy.
He is severe when necessary, yet has that fine sense of humor
which all successful teachers possess and which makes it a
pleasure to attend his classes.

D. NICHOLAS.
Ohio.
Northwestern University.
Music.

This we say of him: A more efficient music teacher we have
never had. What do you think, folks, of a-music teacher who is
able to sk p from soprano to bass, including alto and tenor, help-
ing each out min his turn in a four-part song and in the interim
keeping time by tapping violently on a desk and not batting an
eye when on one occasion he missed the desk and gave himself
sharp rap on the knee-efficiency? Ask the Seniors. He is well-
liked by the whole school, which is saying something.

HEXRY 0. BACON.
Columbia University. New York.
Pratt Institute. New York.

Industrial Training.

Although with us for only the last half of the year, having
taken theplace of Mr. Lee, whose picture is presentedherewith
in the group, it did not take us long to see that there was noth-
ing unusual to find out about Mr. Bacon. For in our first
I_ *- .. . .J -l L .. .. .. . L ,. .. ... A .. l ... .. ..




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THE


CARIBBEAN


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'*She :s a woman: therefore may be wooed
She is a woman, th,-rel'ore may be won "


4. Assistant


Circulation


Editor:;


Captain


Girl's


Basketrhalr; Athletic Council.


That which she n.aturallv vociferates


.. "'Run


from here.


That which claims most of her trime..
That of her which stands out .
That to which her heart goes. out
L;ppcrmniost in her mind To


.Basketball
Frankness
. .. ..Dancing
Smarry riches.


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S.^A


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"The very pineapple of politeness."


3. Quartette; Track;


Basketball;


Baseball;


chestra.
4. Quartette; Track; Baseball; Secretary Athletic
Council. ,

That which he naturally vociferates... 'Jolly fine."
That which claims most of his tim e............... Music.
That of him which stands out..............Credulity.
That to which his heart goes out........ Automobiles.
Uppermost in his mind..........To own a "Marmnon."


..*=.A ilPAA 91ill".Al







THE


CARIBBEAN.


rEenm

"For Nature made her what she is,


And never made


another.


2. Glee Club.


School


Senior


Social


Notes
Club.


and Alumn


i; President


which she naturally


That which claimsmost


vociferates


of her


)Oh. Good-


time...........Dates.


of her which


to which her heart


stands out ..........Friendliness.


goes out..... ......Letters.


Uppermost


in her mind ...-


.Business


career.


"Jack."

"He's tough, ma'am, tough, is J.
Tough and devilish sly(?)"


Swimming.
Swimming;


Editor; Secretary and Treasure

That which he naturally vociferates.
That which claims most of his time ..


That of him which stan
That to which his heart


Athletic


of Class.


"Razzberries.


Umpiring


call games.
ids out ..... Good nature.


goes


uut.......


,..A good feed.


Uppermost in his mind. ..


That M. E. degree.


I
/\


a


3. Quartette;
4. Quartette;









10 THE CARIBBEA t


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I


Curls.

"Reserve with Irankness art with truth allied.
Courage with Silness. modesty uith pride."

:. Glee Club.
j. Circulat on Manager THE CARIBBEAN.
4. Business Manager THE CARIBBEAN.


That which she naturally vocjferates ....."'By Jove."
rhat which claims most of her time..... ..Music
That of her which stands our...................Sincerity.
That to which her heart goes out ..... .- ....Someone.


I pperrrost in her mind


....To marry a millionaire.


"A I.

"Yet leaving here a name. I trust.
That shall not perish in the dust.2

2. Assistant Business Manager THE CARIsBEA;


Basketball; Swimming; Track


Teams; Class


Representative.
3. Joke Editor TnHE CARIBBEAN; Basketball; Swim-
ming; Track Teams; Class Representative.


4. Editor-in-Chief THE CARIBBEAN;


Basketball:


Swimming; Track; Baseball.


That which he naturally vociferates.."You're right!"
That which claims most of his time ...Aeronautical
art.
That of him which stands out .. .;, -... .Jolity.
That to which hisheart goes out.... Something new.
Uppermost in hismm ind......To become an aviator.


U




C


/







THE


CARIBBEAN


Dimples.


hat we may
here's nane


brag we
again sz


Share a lass
ae bonnie."


cretary


Senior


Social


which she naturally


That which claims


vociferates....


most of her


..... ..."Oh,
Heavens!"


time...... Worrying.


of her which


stands out .. ..... .... Sweetness.


That to which her heart goes out........A 'phone call.


Uppermost in her mind...............A spinster


's life (?)


"Handsome."
"Lord of himself, though not of land.
And having nothing, yet hath all.

2. Circulation Editor THE CARIBBEAN.


Assistant


4. Class


Editor THE CARIBBEAN.


President; Basketball


Thatwhich henaturally vociferates.


That which


"Sweet Cookie!"


claims most of his time Day-dreaming.


That of him which stan
That to which his heart


Uppermost


ds outr......... Seriousness.
goes outA certain girl.


in his mind........ To be President ot


the U. S.









THE CARITBBEAN,


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"Whose armor i is h.~ochrt thought
And simple truth his utmont ikd]


2. Baseball, Basketball: Swimming;


Track.


j. Baseball; Basketball; Swimming; Track; Coach
Girls' Basketball; Assistant Business Manager.
4. Baseball; Basketball: Swimming: Track; Chair-
man Athletic Council.


I h.a hich he naturally vociferates
" hat which claims most of his time.
"1 hat of him which stands our I


That to which his hear
Lippermost in his mind


goes out ..
To be .1


"My Gawd"
... Athletics.
independence.
..... G irls.


"Big Leaguer.


Of him the great Nestor cried,
School spirit personified.

2. Basketball; Swimming; Track.
3. Basketball; Swimming; Track; Boys' Quartette.


4. Circulation Manager


THE CARIBBEAN: ,Class


Vice President; Track.


That which he naturally vociferates... "Pipe down."
That which claims most of his time... Photography.
That of him which stands out ..... "To do the best I
know how."
That to which his heart goes out...Call Balboa 603.
Uppermost in his mind.., ....That electrical engineer-
ing ambition,


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


CLASS


Alberi


WILL.


4. Dove.


We, the Class of


1920, the largest


and most


important group of Seniors to be graduated
from Cristobal High School, after four long years
of arduous work andlabor, have reached the first


admiration of all those who have had the good
luck to converse or privilege of conversing with
any member of it. If so, it would be well for you


injudicious


Juniors to emulate this Senior Class
Juniors to emulate this Senior Class


rung on


the ladder of


our ambitious pursuits.


in all respects so that when you shall have bidden


Knowing that we are about to pass away we feel
it our duty, being ofstrong mind, active body, and


of a generous nature, to recognize


that respect


farewell to the old


familiar


corridor


and glass-


knobbed doors of Cristobal High, you will leave
behind as many disconsolate mourners as we.


and consideration which we have received from
certain of the underclassmen, by bequeathing to


them,


under


our last will and


testament,


Secondly:


We must deal with the Sophomores.


It is such a pleasure to do so, for, teachers and
students, are they not the most studious, stately,


privileges, rights, and so forth, which we ourselves


sedate, sensible,


susceptible, and submissive set


have enjoyed.


We are of the firm opinion that all


of beings you ever held discourse with?


Incon-


succeeding graduating classes are deeply indebted
to the Class of 1 920 for struggling for, establishing,
and maintaining the valuable rights and privi-
leges which are about to pass into their possession.


It is our fervent


wish,


therefore,


acquirements be guarded closely.


these


It is our desire


also that they be bequeathed as follows;


testably so, say we.


Some feeble-minded one had


the boldness to declare that the Sophomores were


a perverse and officious set.
sound Sophomores. We, th


Ignore that person,
e Class of I920, have


great faith in you, and can conceive in your con-
summate system of student policy a bright future
and are sure that if you hold true to your present


Firstly:


To the Junior Class, who are about to


ideals


emerge


the ordeal


step into the place which we held for the past
year, we leave the satisfaction of gazing non-
chalantly back at the lower classmen as, when,
conditions permitting, they steal awed and ad-


gloriously as we.


Thirdly:


The inferiority of the flimsy Freshman


Class has not left us devoid of all pity for that
impotent part of the High School organization.


miring glances at the sagacious Seniors.


To the


In fac


t, we have a slight desire to better their


Juniors also, we leave the ability to accomplish


difficult
manner,


tasks


in a thorough


and hope


that they


systematic


will handle


condition, providing, however, that in so doing it
would not lower the higher standard of the Senior


Class.


It would indeed profit these rudimentary


intricate situations as methodically


as did


beings to attain the quietness, modesty, and re-


We bequeath to them also the manifest right of


serve that so clearly


characterize


the Class


occupying the library at all


times and ousting


1920.


We bequeath to


these Freshmen all the


all others with that deep feeling of superiority


which


we so gloried in.


We believe, of


course,


that the above-mentioned Juniors are not entirely


capable of filling the places vacated by


us mag-


unanimous Seniors, but, however, we have noticed
several signs of intelligence on their part during
the past year and believe that with a great deal
of advice correcting arrested development, they


rights and privileges accorded a Senior and they
are to come by these rights at the end of three
more years, if, in the interim, they have acquired
and held the above-mentioned qualities which so
distinctly mark this Senior Class.


Fourthly:


Etha Bevington takes great pleasure


in leaving to William Ashton her curly and wavy
hair with the wish that he will not treat it as he


li
11
zI








THE CARIBBEAN


as she has, she leaves the privilege of wandering
about the corridors.


Kathryn


Burgoon


her gentle


and Engl
latter is
he beque


Lish classroom when the~ dor ofh
unwisely left ajar. To Lawtn Pte
aths his modest silk hrtadrl


disposition and good looks to Emilio Solomon to
reader him fitful aid duringhis schoolcareer. To
EmogeneNashshe leaves her ability to speak Span-


ishwith fluent ease.


To Esther Witt she wills "her


art of combing hair and herplansfor a high school


cravat to match.


Eleventhl/v


SKenneth


Greene wills his unsur-


passed tenor voice. to Theodsre e
Wtsh that Teddy will not neglect its develop-
ment by failing to run through the scales each


hair-dressing parlor.


To Mattie Pullig she leaves


her over-developed formula for remaining thin.


Sixthly:


Lillian


Cotton


leaves


to Charles


Henter her ability to use the tongue with the
hope that it will be used freely in endeavoring
to obtain material from the lower-classmen for


next year's CARIBBEAN.


Her busy offices ofPresi-


dent of Senior Social Club, Chairman of Refresh-


ment


Committee


CARIBBEAN, she


and Society


leaves


Editor


to Dorothy


of THE


Abendroth,


Johnson, and Ruby Reid, respectively.


Seventhly:


gladly
"Breezy


Lindale Davies, to Roger Powelson,


bequeaths


" has


the only


exquisite


voice.


real bass voice of the


morning.


His poetic


pensable requisite,


the poet


0< 0
s with that in s-
s hair growth, e


relinquishes to Walter Zimmerman oWalT
considered the next best in this line and Kenneth


is a firm believer in the fact
literary standing should ho
school spirit he leaves to the
be equally divided among its


Twelftkhy:


Alice


Stilson,


serious thought, leaves toDon
To Alexander Linczer she


reserved


nature.


that men ...gr.t
ld togae.H
Sophomore st
silly membe~<
s afterlrga
sOliverherd$imples
rills her quitand
I' '


Alex doesn't


ms


very badly but as much as any otiei r Wreshma,
at least, The manner min which she fixes"rjiahir


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school and thinks it fitting that it be left to


talented
leaves


successor.


To Wesley


Townsend


the knack of keeping time on


during music period.


the desk


To Harold Cloke he leaves


his crop of auburn hair and to Claud Strowbridge
his winning way with the fair sex.
Eighthly: Al Doyle wills to Frank Raymond his
seat in the back of the assembly room with the
request that it be bequeathed, upon the expiration
of Frank's school term, to his brother, Paul Doyle.
It was left to Al by a former Senior, a brother of
Frank, so why not keep the antique in the family?
To Edward May he leaves the privilege of running
to the window whenever he hears an aeroplane.
To Carl Duey his ability as a physicist.
Ninthly: Jack Fields, with characteristic gen-
erosity, leaves to Harry Ferguson his secret of
gaining large proportions and hopes that Harry


a she leaves to Mattie Pullig.


(Alice xes her hair


in the style of airplane wings and hopes tha Y
Mattie, being o( sounder physical construtttio,
is capable of obtaining the speed nsartoraa:V
"take-off".) Her bright eyes she leaves to
Cr- Tt tI -


t ieste Lr


a iyimr.


Thirteenthly: Alson Sears afi
tion bequeaths to Glenora. Edi
of coming to school after 9.30
with it. To George Cartwrigh
pendence, to Majorie Ball his


members


of the


Junior Class


genteel nature; to Albert Quint
ity, including the art of oi
Lastly, we wish to extend l
to the faculty for keep-
ins the underclassmen


at a minimum


:er much deliberia
wards his privilege
and getting away
the wills his" in -
importanzeto all
his manqnerso4 a

ig pianos. ,
r heartfeltf thanks :


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state


will share it generously with


William Harrison.


quietness drirng the first


He bequeaths to Leroy Magnuson his fine art of
bluffing and to William Mary his ability to look
so cute during the first period of the morning.


Harlan


Holmwood,


judgment, wills to Alice Hunte
iSf rMaEh ,iamen tir trlitnao nivt


with very good
r his knowledge


trar Alire^ will


half-hour period


morning


during


ot the
which


we labored so intensely
on our textbooks.
Havingdisposed of the


a hnve in


repiiar order.


I


Fifthly:


t l "


Tenthly


X. X XX X


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T920O


HIS third edition of THE CARIBBEAN is gratefully and affection-

ately dedicated to Mrs. H. Dingler, the former prinid ter

english for the first 2 years of high school learning for the Class of

. "Miss Davis," as she is more readily known by us, had watched the:


1920 class come up slowly through the grades at the old Cnristobal school

and with charac-


teristic


interest


in the other fel-


low's

had


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welfare


"taken


under her wing
under her wing


as soon
entered

school

coached

ciently


high


us effi-


matters of high-

school life. She

is responsible for

the great literary


success

first


edition


*lMAss DAVIs"


A

T

I

0

N


THE CARIBBEAN.


We recall


class of r92C

to that class


)


a great deal of pride


"her own.


"Miss


Davis


<0 .*.


called the


" Having given out so mptch of all shevknev


"Miss Davis" is at present taking another course fle
"Miss Davis is at present takng another course of ieaining


at Columbia University and it is needless to speak of all the


good wishes which attend her from


'"her own class.


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luck and










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v .. .-










THE


CARIBBEAN.


I


CLASS


PROPHECY


Etha Bevington, 20.


On the afternoon of May


30, 1930, I


was seated


min the library of my home in Pasadena, Cal. I
was surrounded by books which I had thrown down


in disgust.


I am sending


the letters which


I have received


two of the other class members.
Write soon.


HARLAN.


had been looking all afternoon for


something interesting but had finally given it up
in despair and abandoned myself to my despond-


ency and ennui.


Just as I was wondering whether


to take up fancy dancing or parlor Bolshevism,


my husband drove up to the door.


interrupting my


plans and


He is always


breaking in


at the


moments when I am most busy, but I forgave him


this time for he gave me a handful of mail.


answers


to mv dance


Prob-


invitations,


BLUEFIELDS, NICARAGUA,


Aprtl 12, 1Q0o.
DEAR HARLAN:
I received your letter concerning the class reunion and I
am glad to say that I think I may be able to leave my work
long enough to attend it. The time and place are very
satisfactory to me.
During the last 3 years I have been in charge of the govern-


ment hospital here in Bluefields.


knowledge of Spanish ve
interested in learning it,.


:rv useful.


I like my work and find my


I am so glad that I


was so


Until the reunion, then.


thought, but when I saw the postmark on the first


letter I tore it open hasti


ever,
KArHRYN BURGOON.


and read the following:


UNALAK


BRUNELE BORNEO,


7, 1I3y.


DEAR


FRIEND:


I think it must be a long nr
seems to me that rt would be m
reunion of our high school class.
many times in the past years.


ne since I wrote to you, but it
ost pleasant if we might have a
I have thought of those days
I am now in command or an


aviation post here in Brunes and have a large corp


s of natives


in training under me. They are ll interested in their work and
m training under me. They are all nter estedt m thero a


make very good pupils.


and if


But 1 will tell vou of my work later


ng is definitely decided about a reunion please


CLASSMATE:


I received your last
the reunion entirely s


letter and tind the date and place for
atisfactory. I have been thinking that 1


needed a change of climate anvwav.


I have been here in


Alaska 2 years now, coaching an Eskimo baseball team.


learn quickly and I


many interesting


thi


get along very well with them.
ngs to tell the class and am look


IThey
I have


ing for-


ward to the reunion.


Sincerely,


AL SEARS.


notify me.


Sincerely,


BUiLLFROG,


AL DOYLE.


NEVADA,


May 3, 193o.


Imagine my surprise after reading the above


letter.


I broke open the


others and found them


DEAR


After due
never to ret


CLASSMATE:


consideration


I have


urn to Panama.


decided to break my word


At the urgent request of the


running along the same strain.

HONOLULt, H


Canal Government I have decided to return and, with Jack
Fields as associate, to erect the new high school at Cristobal.
Fields and I have conferred and are confident that we can


AWAll,


, w3o.


accom


plsh the work in the record time of 3 months.


DEAR ETHA:


I am writing to all our


1 think


wemightmeet


classmates


in regard to a reunion.


on the Canal Zone on the 25th ofJune.


That seems to be the most central point for our scattered


members.


\Ve shall attend the class reunion and after we have com-
pleted our work we shall proceed to Siberia where we have


accepted a contract to build


United


States by


Kindly let me know if this is convenient foryou.


At present I am commanding the Marine forces here in


r 1,.,,. ;.....,-;,.;,,,.,it mn.nrh' finrlon'h and


a railroad from Siberia to the


way of Alaska.
Your classmate,
KENNETH GREENt.


expect


DEAR


.LEET, ALASKA,


- --, -


12 .....: ;






. .. KK K KK K K


[ilEOMA,


April IS, uwo.


FRIEND ETHA:
I have just received a letter from Harlan Holmwood regard-


ing a class reunion.


I shall surely be glad to meet all the old


THE CARIBBEAN.


ARGENTINA, Yotuunzbld nevertguess whom ) saw yesterday As I st4eppd
HT~~~~~~~~X K X!i KKK K. y K / ^ K KM f^K : K KKKKKKK^


outof a store I bumped into a young woman and made her
drop her packages I stopped to help her pick them up and
when I looked at her I saw it was Alice Stilson. You cold
have knocked me down with a straw, I never expected to see


classmates again. I think I shall bring with me my Jazz Band


for the entertainment of the class.


This band is composed of


native Patagonians whom I have trained myself and they are
very good, even ifI do say it. They exhibit rare musical talent
and I think I shall tour the world with them.
Sincerely,
LINDALE DAVIES.


her here.


I went home with her to tea and met her husband,


the most delightful man in the world, except my husband, of
course. Her husband ii in the grain business and they are
visiting .li^ "I todher albaout the reunion and shi said t
would snlry be Aere I suppose I shall see you thiEereto s
then, goodbye.


Sitteerdig


SLulntaCntbw.


RoeaPorr, Tsx.,
May I, 9p3o.
DEAR ETHA:
I received your letter yesterday and I was so glad to hear
from you. I hope I may see you before we leave for Central
America. You know my husband is connected with an oil
company now and his business will take him to Central, Amer-
ica for a while, so I shall go with him.


This
sadly.
again.


ras thelast letter and I laid it down
It seemed so good to hear from tl


It seemed as if I were with them


way, I thought, most of their careers had
out as they had wished them to be.


A TRIGONOMETRIC LOVE SONG.


Kenneth Greene,


I love to hear the roar of the waves
At night by the sounding sea
And the rush of the cool night wind
Through the top of an old palm tree.

I love to sit by the shore at night
Close by a maiden's side
And whisper tales of love to her
From the ebb till the flow of the tide.

I love to hold a maiden's hand
'Neath the light of a tropic moon
And murmur low of love to her
Or sing some old love tune.


I lore to feel a maiden's cheek
Soft on my shoulder strong
And whisper low as the breezes blw
That ft repeated song.

I love to sit by the sounding sea
And hear a maiden say
Those beautiful words as old as time
"I'll love bat you for aye.'

I lovetositbytheshoreat night
With a maiden's hand in mine
And feed in the touch of the tropic breeze


The tang of the salt sea brine.


0.
0
0 ^


I love to hear a maiden sing
Softly of love to me
But best of all I love to work


On my trigonometry.


a lit de
hem
. Any- :
turned



NA
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THE


CARIBBEAN.


- -~so


(Tune-" 1m


Forever Blowing


Bubbles.")


Kenneth


Greene,


We're leaving school.
It's an old rule,
Seniors must come ar


Friend must


leave friend,


ne er return.


As our


Others will learn,
And 'twill be ever so,
For as October brings school days
Seniors must pass onward always.


Toward the heights
But it's a bet,
We'll ne'er forget,


And these school days


of success.


we will bless,


And when these bright days we recall


Chorus,.


will let


tears falL.-Chorus.


We're forever


passing


onward


Passing onward, upward too.
We'll scale the heights.
We'll face the glaring lights.
We'll be the victors in life's fights.
We'll be e'er successful,
Ever win renown.
We're forever passing onward,
Always upward, never down.


We'll say good-by,
Time on will fly,
But we will ne'er return.
We'll break the ties,
We'll upward rise,
As we more knowledge learn.


And when we


in fame and fortune


Our thanks


to this school we'll return.-Chorus.


Class


Motto-


'Jucundi


acti labores."


Class


Flower-The Passion Flower.


Class Colors-Purple and green.


We'll


steps













CART BBEAN.

xh .

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THE


M|








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE MAN WHO CAME
Harlan WI. HIolmwood,


BACK.
'20.


With


the first


signs


of daylight,


was


awake, true to custom, but instead of arising he


lay in his


"Q. M. bunk"


and heaved


a sigh of


changed his clothes and a quarter to eleven found
him at the station with fifteen minutes to spare.
After what seemed an interminable two hours


contentment.


This wasthelast chance he would


he was in Colon.


After eating a hasty lunch, he


have to lie in the old bunk he thought to hm-
self; for this was the great dlay when he would


went to the docks, the first passenger to reach


the ship


He bade goodbye to a crowd of fellows


He had looked forwnvard


to this day for a long time, he reflected, and he
was at last go'ng-home.
He turned over and tried to go back to sleep,
but it was no use, he could not help thinking of


who were over to see the boat off and now at the
last minute he hated, in a way, to leave the old


bunch.


However,


would soon to


he put


that idea awa


rget about them after he got in the


States.


the States and what he would do when


there.


He wondered where he would


he got
be two


The b;at pulled out one hour late, accor


ding to


custom, and at last Bud was on the way to the


weeks from now.


At last Bud arose and washed and dressed him-


States.
with all


He pictured himself back in the old town
his school chums.


selfleisurely.


Then he went over to the restaurant


On the seventh morning they sighted the Jersey


to get some breakfast. Everywhere he saw
familiar faces and many of the fellows bade him
goodby and good luck.
"We'll see you back here in six months," said
one; "they all come back."


coat and when th
ertv Bud ran from


ey passed the Statue of Lib-


one side of


the ship to the


other, afraid that he might miss something. She
seemed to be welcoming him.
Six hours later, in the afternoon, Bud stepped


"Not on your life.,"
want of Panama."
"I'd like to bet on
and Bud only laughed.


said Bud.


"I've got all I


down


platform.


returned


the other,


They didn't know him.


the railroad


coach


to the


The old town still looked


there had been few changes.


loafers


we:e


at the


station


station


the same,


The usual number of


to meet


train


After breakfast he walked over to the clubhouse
and sat down, but he was restless and could hardly


but Bud saw no familiar faces.


It seemed queer


to walk down the street and not see any one to


sit still.


He wondered how he was going to wait


whom he might speak familiarly


Down on the


until the ii o'clock train that wou!d take him to


Zone he used to speak to almost anyone he met.


Cristobal.
quarters.


He got up and


walked back


to his


He looked over the room to see that he


He checked himself suddenly


ming about Panama already.


Here he was think-


That wouldn't do at all.


had packed everything but the clothes he would


He surprised


the folks at home, they


hadn't


B A .r
JLI-rlJ


leave the Zone forever.








THE CARI


scarce,;but Mr. Walters needs a mechanic and will


give you a job."
"Oh, I don't know, Dad,"


returned Bud,


hardly think I want to settle here again.


I guess


I've got the wandering spirit now."
The next morning Bud walked around town and
only once or twice did he see a face that looked at
all familiar. He finally went into the drug store
to get some ice cream and at last he found some
one to talk to. It was Henry Wood, an old school
friend, who was now the soda clerk.


"Hello, Henry, how are you?"


said Bud,


you remember me?"
"Why, yes, you must be Bud Stevens, returned
the other, "where have you been all the time?"
"Down in Panama," answered Bud.


"Panama-oh, yes, of course,


said the other,


failing to show any interest.
"Well, I'll see you again."
What was the matter with these people, thought
Bud. "Didn't they know where Panama was?"
Well, he'd soon show them that it was no place to
laugh at.


At dinner that day Bud said,


away again.


"Ma, I'm going


I can't stand this place any more.


The people won't speak to you on the street and
they're too narrow-minded to suit me.
"Are you going back to Panama so soon, Bud?"
asked his mother.


"No, not right away, at least,"


guess I'll go to New


said Bud,


York."


So the next day Bud left again. He had no trouble
getting work in New York, but it was far from



THE MAN WHO DID
Kenneth Gre


All the


"old timers,"


that is,


those who were


here before nineteen seven or eight, knew Jack


Peters.
"Happy"


"Happy


Jack"


certainly deserved his


he was called by all.


nickname.


happy smile and cheery greeting were known from


one end of the Isthmus to the other.


Even as


late as nineteen seventeen half the people on the
Zone knew him and the other half knew of him.
I .- -- ..--.. J .


[BBEAN.
V >

what he was used to. He had o work te4hour
instead of eight and he cou-ldn see what became*p


ofhismoney. Then came the winter, Budhadn't
seen any snow for five years and he enjoyed it
first but when the real. cold came he wcn.pered "; ?
if he felt it any wrse han the ot erpeop
^f fe j~. ^ Jk~l*u- ^ Jf~ iU^-4t+4t .*:t^t-^*^j J~'.U ^ J_ -i .^ .K :M^ ^. ^-.K. ::oth e r *:::< ** u ..J... ':l-'-:.* .. ::* ::::eo p 1 L. *'*:*'* KKK.ftKKK


There w
tools an
and the
weakness
months,
was onei


ere times when he couldJ hardly hold his,
d then it was that he thought ofPanm a
warm weather. He laughed. his o
They expected him back there jn siz
did they Well, he'd show them tha hete
ilt Ieasst who cn ld stavaway:


* ~- -W -. ---- -N---f -
Then onewold.nigh
overtime. It raied


clothes froze.


get out of bed and
his room. When he


- -. - - w r -
tinj anuarv Bud had to work
and he got soaked ohath
next morning he could
for two weeks he tever lef
finally could go out, hewnu
could j o.,-out


down to his shop.


ha


Ni
al


"Mr. Hardin ," he said to hisforeman< "tm
I i tIU 1 clU L lalU Il~i 1, ,
nding inm my resignation, I'm going away.
One week later Bud was on a boat sailing out o
ew York. It was a little boat which he hbd
ways before avoided buit now he was glad to be


on it.
At the end of another week the ship was sailing
in between two breakwaters and Bud as close to
to the bow as he could get, straining his eyes for


familiar places on shore.


When he walked down


the gangplank a little later hecouldnot suppresssa
feeling of elation. Everything looked familiar


and it was great to feel warm once more.


At last


he was where he belonged, he was back in Panrama.


4

NOT COME BACK.

tnt, '2o.
that long to say good by to all his intimate friends'.
So it happened that he was ready toi sa4l o the
United Fruit ship Carrillo, on the 3d of March.
The evening of the 1st of March, "Hapjpy and
15 of his very intizwte friends were gathered op
the plrch of their quartets discussing od times
and old timers in general. Of course, theenubect
Sof itHappyd coming departure was brought up
Uit
N ^ *.:^ .*..

tha long hts sery goiodbyto all hs werema :ijd.*


15 of his very int ttpl Uimateli^ friendsicto' werel a rit
thec p~jrchi ofi thiroi quarter dCJIOussmgoiit .y~c;'~yEJC
and o imr in general.^ Of cour-se,
of "appyV*coming departure was brougiatru


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


cies thrown at *Happy." Suci
"You'll be back in six months.
stayawayover a year at most," w


h statements


" "You


won't


ere rife. Finally,


"Happy" spoke: "Fellows," he said,
think I am not in earnest, but I am


back.


"You may
not coming


During the time I have been on the Zone,


Back in Cristobal people waited anxiously for
news of what was happening on the battlefields
in France. At last Frank Bell received a letter
from his personal friend in France, Jim Weyman.


The fellows crowded
letter would say.


around


to hear what the


I have saved some six


thousand dollars.


I'll bet


"Dear Frank,


it began,


"Of course, you have


you each four hundred bucks that I


will not be


heard of our first meeting with the Hun.


Believe


in less


three years."


His bet


was


immediately taken, for not one of them doubted


"'Happy's" inability to


Zone for three whole yea
Finally the 3d arrived.


remain


away from the


The dock was thronged


the largest crowd ever known


ship off.


to see one


Amidst a great amount of cheering and


me, that was some scrap.
'Star and' told you anyth


Jack Peters.


He was my ser


beside me when the thing h
up and fought those Huns


I don't suppose the
iing about 'Happy'
geant. He was right
happened. He stood
with that same old


Canal Zone smile of his on his face.
bet your last cart wheel that that is


You can
the spirit


waving of hats and handkerchiefs,


the Carrillo


that will beat these curs and give them whole-


"shoved off."


Seven days later she docked and


some respect for


Americans.


But I


was going


"Happy" was gone.
April, 'seventeen, long to be remembered in his-
tory, came, bringing with it war with Germany.


Many


Isthmians thronged


to the colors.


to tell


us, including


what ha
'Happy


ated from the main crowd.
opened in a few seconds.


happened.


About


and myself, got


ten or
separ-


Of course, it all hap-


Suddenly,


while I was


November, one of the fellows who had not joined
the ranks received a letter from one who had, stat-


that he had seen


"Happy" Jack on a


train passing through the trn
sumably on his way to France.


aminmg can
"Happy


Ip,
"


troop
, pre-
was a


engaged with one strapping brute, another lunged


at me with his bayonet.
ment had come. Before


before


the Hun could


I thought my last mo-
e I could do anything, and


touch me,


'Happy


himself between us and was run through.


' threw
He was


corporal of engineers, and had been married since


mortally wounded.


You can be sure that cursed


May.
Nineteen eighteen arrived.


the full penalty at my hands.


United States troops


at this time we were rescued, and I


was free to


had been landed in France, but had not yet been


in action.


March,


eighteen.


Would


our men


never get in to show the Hun what we could do?
At last came the test, April, nineteen eighteen.


listen to'Happy's'dying words. 'Jim, old pal,' he
said, 'send my things to my wife. Tell the boys
in Cristobal I have won my bet, for I'll never go


back.


Tell them to pay to my wife.


Tell them


Great news.


Three


hundred


and seventy-five


American engineers, armed only with picks and
shovels, held back ten times their number of Ger-
mans until the Canadians could come to their aid


and thus
in favor
forever.


turned


the tide


of the Allies.


at Paschendel


Ridge


Their glory


goodby for me.
I instead of you.


feelings.


Jim, old man, I'm glad it was


you can't imagine my


I would a thousand times it had been


the other way round.
in the annals of old


man


who did not come


At least 'Happy


will live


timers on the Zone, as the


back.


Yours, as ever,


Jim Weyman.


' "Man,




r x *x ** ***** *****x**x




x x --x
"x

xx x4


it
xx


xx0

xx. x


THE CARIBBEAN.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


JUACAS.


W. Sears,


Juacas are the graves of an ancient tribe of Cen-


ends of a dagger and six-shooter peeping from


tral American Indians.


These Indians were the


beneath his coat tail.


We all decided on the spot


"Chiriqui" Indians by name.


tinct now.


It is estimated


They are quite ex-
that they probably


not to anger our dear friend, the guide.
He led us silently up hill and down dale, through


lived about five hundred years ago.
are found in the mountains of th


Chiriqui in


Their graves
ie Province of


the Republic of Panama; the prov-


ince having been named after the tribe.


is about


three hundred


Chiriqui


miles north of Panama


the most attractive scenery I ever laid


on.


We passed many little ranch houses along the
trail, the inmates never failing to crowd to the
door and window to stare stupidly at our silent
procession.


City and the mountains are located approximately
thirty miles from the coast.
The graves are of great interest to us because
of the ancient pottery and curious trinkets worked
in gold and silver, which were, by a peculiar custom


of the Indians,


buried


the dead.


These


trinkets and these potteries are not of any special
financial interest to us but are of value as articles
of historical interest and above all are precious
to us because they are few and we always like
something that our neighbor has not.
The process of digging these graves is very
complicated. There is also an example of Pana-
manian red tape to go through before one may
begin operations.
If one wishes to obtain a piece of this curious
pottery for himself, hemustdoas thewriterrelates


that he and his friends did.


We went to


At last we descended
ley of exquisite beauty.


stream


tumbled


noisily


the last


hill into a val-


A sparkling mountain


between


banks covered


with a riotous growth of green and bright colored


things.
nearly hi


Farther up the valley sat a little cottage
dden from view by rambling vines. In


front, on either side of the path leading from the
cottage, grew banana plants, bending under the


weight of their golden burdens.


the farmyard
mistress of the


fowl noisily swarmed


"hacienda


ing corn among them.


valley,


Under the trees


around the


" who was idly scatter-


To the extreme left of the


a forbidding cliff rose


perpendicular as


though for no other purpose than to shut off this


beautiful and homelike scene


the outside


world.
Just at our feet stretched a level bit of ground
which had holes dug in it here and there, and slabs


Alcalde of Boquete and


literally


begged


of rock lay about these


holes.


This our guide


official for a scrap of paper without which, the
guide, who was employed by the government, will
be deaf, dumb, blind, and paralyzed.
This all-important little letter states that the


bearer agrees to share


"fifty-fifty" with the Alcalde


made us understand was one of the burial grounds
of his honorable ancestors.
We all descended our little hill eagerly and after
talking the owner of the land into allowing us to
dig, we commenced or rather our guide did.


if he happens to find any potteryor gold.
sixty if it be gold.


"Fifty-


First he selected a crowbar from


tools of his kit, and


after much deep


e various
thinking,


We then


tramped for a couple of miles and


decided to test


a flat bit of terra


firma nearby.


hired our guide for"un peso oro,


a sleepy individ-


By way


of testing he


drove


his bar into


ual who I should judge was a direct decendant
of the oldest of the Chiriquis.


ground about two feet where it struck something


with a hollow clang.


Then, nodding his greasy


Alson


S


n












THE CARIBBEAN.


* **** .B'- .
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not the treasure chest but a slab of rock that had
apparently been used as a protection to the
corpse. This was thrown aside and,lioking into
the hole, instead of seeing the expected bones, we
saw nothing more than common black earth. This
our guide threw out to a depth of three feet or
more. He then discarded his shovel in favor of a
small stick, with which he carefully loosened the dirt


and threw it out with his hands.


After digging


and scooping for some time, we heard him register
a grunt and instantly our lagging interests were


body with its painted designs in red.


Then last


of all, the legs, three in number, with the images
of animals carved o"n hem.n
After digging all the dirt carefully from inside

so as to be sure there were no valuables thei.
that we might take first choice of, he handed it


to us for inspection. I
in red clay, and the tiny

of a real artist.


t was very nicely done
images showed the touch
^SK ~ ~ 0 S0^ *"> 0 ^^KK. XX XXX^XXXXX ^K K S. SA
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Our guide dug the rest of the grave but failed
to uncerael any Idt ,s diong


alive once more, Sl
about a round object.


owly and carefully he dug


As he dug,


it developed


into the mouth of an ancient piece of pottery,
which perhaps had last seen daylight at a funeral


ceremony


some


curved neck came into view.


before.


Later


Then the bulging


OLD


to come back for the rest after
So te set ot" home witl
..s xa x thex
den proudly i d" to the c

we passed the 'Acalde's casa.
and.always be honest with th
cials.


PANAMA.


Harlan W F.Holmwoood, 'o.


Just a heap of dust and boulders,
On a lonely stretch of shore,
Just the marks of walls and castles,
Traces of a power no more.
Signs of what was once a city,
Jewel of fair Pacific's st and,
Now an ugly pile of ruins,
Disappearing in the sand.


we had gone.
1 out preciouis bur-
a~ntry exept wben

TaMkemy advice

e Panam nian offi-

0
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And the yellow glihening moonbeams,
Lighting up the country round,
Make each tree a somitbre -shsd
Throw vagtuepictures on the .igndS


Once aga in seec the city
As it was in years gone by,
Its walls and buildings throbbing,
With its power and majesty,


Then comes a scene of warfare,
A battle hard and long,
The clash of sword and armor)
The soldier's battle song.
A fire and sure destruction-
Fear reigns on every hand,
And now a pile of ruins,
Disappearing in the sand.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 25















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N A.

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THE


CARIBBEAN.


^ ."4. ^ ^ ..


HOE STRING ADVENTURE.


t ^^.


KIenneth Greene. '2o.


-A S







Five of my companions and I were
the Boqueron River, in the interior
We had been in camp a week and had
nothing more exciting than the ni
with mosquitoes. I must say that
in these battles was sickening. In


gwngway. F n ic-
The refractory shoe
tangled than before .
bank gave wayj and


camping on
of Panama.
encountered
ghtly battle
the carnage
fact several


As I did so I felt the bank
ally I tried to loosen myself.
string became more badly e
Suddenly with a rush, the


of us had had slight
result of these encount
day morning I started


I had been hiking all day and had encountered
nothing more thrilling than a swarm of angry
bees which I had unwittingly disturbed. It was
getting late and I had to hurry along the bank
of the stream, in order to get to camp in time for
supper. As I hiked along, I came to a place
where, for 20 or 30 yards the bank was in danger
of sliding into the stream. Being in a hurry, I
did not care to make a detour, so I started to run.
Halfway over this danger zone, something caught
and down I went, flat on my face. My rifle and
kodak, in full accord with Newton's laws of mo-
tion, landed about 1o feet in front of me. I
arose and hurriedly began to disentangle my shoe
string from the small bush in which it had caught.


At last I was
breathe in the o
ing, something


the
wat
pull
A


about to give up
bliviating waters.
gave way, and I


*MfI. *







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swollen by
. I caught
the weight
pulling me
under. It
My lungs
My ears


all hope, and to
Without warn-
rose gasping to


surface. Safely ashore I discovered that the
er softening the earth had caused the bush to
out by the roots.
after resting a few moments to regain my poise


I proceeded campward. There I became the hero
of the day, for sitting around the camp site, ,
took great pleasure in relating and exaggerating
my adventure to my comrades. I had ha4 the
most hair-raising experience yet encountered.


MARGARITA.
C. Lindale Davies, '0o.


One night from a typical mud hut of a small
native village in the interior, a ragged shadow was
seen to steal forth into the pale moonlight.
After pausing to overcome fear, it was seen to
glide up to a rose bush that grew beside the door,
and greedily pluck one of the tiny roses. Even in
the failing light an expression composed of love,
happiness, and satisfaction was seen for a minute
to usurp the one of fear and weariness as the ragged


door as silently as it had come,
up in the unbroken darkness.
by this mysterious midnight
could be faintly discerned bui
fully that it would lead one to
the family jewels.
The ragged shadow was Ma


and was swallowed
Compelled to look
sally, the shadow
trying a box so care-
believe it contained


rgarita;


an orphan


who had to work harder than a slave fbr her daily
bread. No one had a kind word for her, but instead


attacks of malaria as a
ers. So it was that Mon-
out to seek adventure.
4 4


slid precipitately into the stream now
the rains. Down I wentinto the water


a breath just mn time. Under I went,
of the earth to which I was attached
down. For many seconds I remained
seemed like as many minutes to me.
were bursting. My head throbbed.
pounded like steam hammers.







THE


CARIBBEAN.


soul, a rose. Her love for this flower was so great
that as a small superstitious child she was willing


rose bush at night that gave her hope and strength
to sustain the tortures of day.


to venture forth


into the night filled


with its


To-day


Margarita


is a typical


native


mysterious noises, also risking the chance of being


mother, and with her age has also grown her love


caught and literally flayed alive


parents.
buried


her foster


The small box that she had so carefully


contain


jewels,


because


Margarita


for flowers.
rose she n
stealing it.


If, in her wanderings, she espies a


lever


overcomes


temptation


No matter how hard or dirty is her


loved the art of nature above all other worldly
things.
In later years, when questioned, she confessed
that it was only the anticipation of visiting the


A KNIGHT'S


duty Margarita always finds time and a place for
the symbol of love, a rose, in her unkempt hair.


ADVENTURE.


William F. Mary,


At the gates of the Castle Bon Barey stopped
a young knight dressed in black armor and wearing


on his shield the emblem of lightning.


After his


coming was told by his heralds he was admitted


into the castle.


After he was shown his bed he


split the ninth


contestants arrow


through


middle and Sir Lightning was given a silver arrow
inlaid with jewels.
In the next 3 contests he was an easy victor
on account of his broad shoulders and muscular


sat in the dining room of Baron de Lenus chatting


frame.


Next was the tilting contest.


Two sides


his strange experiences


on his way to the castle.
They old him of a tournament which was to be


held on the morrow at noon.


The knight, hearing


this, decided to overstay his visit 'til the morrow
eve to partake in the games.
The knight arose as the castle cock sounded his


peculiar reveille.


Everything was a hustle and


bustle all through the morning preparing for the


tournament.


Bold knights were bedecking them-


selves with their most costly armor.


Their heralds


were dressed in silk and satin-colored suits, with
their trumpets polished and their banners gleam-
ing like gold.
When all the knights rode abreast on their proud-


est steeds it was a spectacular sight.


viewed by the crowds,


After being


the trumpeters sounded


their horns for the first contest, which was archery.
Sir Lightning, as we shall call our hero, entered


this with 9 other contestants.


After 8 had finished


shooting, none had hit the center of the bulls -eye,
the ninth contestant shot his shaft right in the


middle of the bull s-eye.


nng drew


himself


Seeing this, Sir Light-


to his full


height,


- 1 1~ Cl-, I 1l-*.c-


were chosen and at a command rushed toward each
other; many were thrown from their horses and


blood-stained armor littered


the field.


At last


only one man remained on each side to decide the


victory, Sir Lightning and Sir Groudion,


shield bore the talons of a lion.


whose


With jilt sticks in


place thev both came toward each other at terrific


speed.


At last they met, both reared at the shock;


Sir Groudion's saddle strap broke and, trying to


regain


mount,


was knocked


Lightning and forced to surrender.


down


After receiving honors from the king he set
on his way toward his destination. On his way he
had many encounters with robbers and outlaws
and at last arrived where he received much wel-


come.


When he went to the king he was asked


many questions and Sir Lightning told him of the
victories he had won.


The king then said:


of thy


knighthood


"Sir knight, if thou boast
and fearlessness, take my


daughter away from a certain knight undefeated
in contest who lives about i5o miles from here
and she shall be your bride."
T'Lrnr A *-,.* A^,^ l---" r,,rrbr- cct- /nut- alfnna n Hrt'fel..


the knights about







28 THE CARIBBEAN i.


n horseback. They both
ght then raised his sword


and unknighdy to fightr
you one at a time. What


was disputed by 2 men o
made a rush and the kni
and spoke:
"Men, it is cowardly
unevenly, but I will take
is your answer?"
The men then began t


other and in 5 minutes the bigger of the two said
he would fight him first and, drawing his sword,
charged. The knight rained heavy blows when-
ever the robber left a place unguarded, otherwise
did little fighting and more guarding, so as to
save himself for the other robber. The knight,
seeing his chance, gave the robber a heavy blow
on the head and sent him sprawling on the ground.
The knight then dismounted and, drawing a small
dirk, ended the robber's misery.
Mounting, he met his other foe. This one, who
was enraged at the death of his comrade, struck
the knight a few glancing blows on the breast-
piece, but not heavy enough to do much damage.
Soon the robber reeled in his saddle and fell
to the ground; breathing his last.
Sir Lightning then proceeded on his journey.
In an hour he came to a small stream, where he
bathed his wounds and, giving his horse a drink,
hE again started.


THE PROCESS OF


A/son W


It was about ro o'clock on the morning of the
second day that the towers of the castle were (
visible. At no e c ......up ......I.. ........
held as captive the king's daughter.
As Sir Lightning looked upon hi m his nofe
blood reddened and his fihing iitbeggnto>
burn within him and with a~ cry Youdog
rushed upon him with leveled sbear.
knight's horse reare, but stood the shockW; iie
other krdght soon gained his balance andwas
uon Sir Lightning who received him wit h lite
effort Once the spearhead just grazed his left
shoulder and once it made a deep flesh moun on
his side, but he kept right on fighting.
The fight was witnessed by the king's daughter
who silently prayed that the stranger be victorious.
Seeing his chance, Sir Lightning rushed at the other
knight, knocked him off his hours; and was soon
upon him with raised sword. The other knight
begged for his life but the cold steel had found the
warm heart and he breathed no more.
Then Sir Lightning took the king's dqugbter
and told her what her father said. He then secured
a mount and started home with his bride-to-be.





'COFFEE RAISING.
'. Sears$ '20.


Although it would seem th
Panama is not suitable for the
it is really quite the opposite. A
coffee is raised among the r
Province of Chiriqui.
While visiting this part of the
ago, the owner of a very fine


at the climate of
raising of coffee,
Very fine grade of
mountains in the

country, not long
cafetal explained


the whole process of coffee raising to me.
When the owner of a cafetal wishes to plant more
trees he does not plant a seed but merely trans-
plants the "suckers" or young trees that shoot
up around the older trees. They are transplanted


when
about
growth
may b


they are about
o10 feet apart.
i they are of a|
e seen for miles


3 feet high and are placed
Then after about 2 years'
ge and the white blossoms
around: from a 2reat dis-


They grow close together and very close to the
limb of the tree, appearing to be part of it at first


glance. In due time the
bright red and somewhat
this stage they are picked
all day for less than 75
then spread out in the
be dried. In this way
absorbed by the two sr
the shell, thus giving you
After the beans are th
poured into the stump ol
gouged out in a conical


punched with heavy
from the shell, much
beans or rice is thresj


clul
th(
hed.


berry is ripe, when it is
resembles a cherry. At
by natives who will work
cents. The berries are
sun on sheets of tin to
the mie or honey is
nall brown beans inside
r coffee its mellow taste,
roughly dried tey are
f a tree which has been
shape. They are ten
s to separate the .kernel
e same as common table
. The chaff is separated


) talk very quietly to each


Jr
0
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THE CARIBBEAN.


hands by a corner of the shed so that when she
throws the contents into the air the light chaff is


which they are put in bags and sent to market


where they


are roasted and ground.


Thence


blown


away by the wind and the coffee beans


return to the platter.
Now the beans must be placed in a dry place


to the home, perhaps back to Chiriqui to be drunk
by a native or may be to grace the table of a king.


for a few days


so they will dry thoroughly.


After


THE NATIONAL DRINK


C. Lindale


OF PANAMA.


Davies,


At this time, when


so many substitutes for the


becomes very soft.


It is then sweetened to taste


forbidden beverages are being


sought for, it might


with heads of crude sugar which in Spanish are


be interesting to know about the native drink
called "Chicha de Maiz."
Corn is placed between dampened leaves and


called


"rapadura.


The liquid is strained, and the corn thrown to


the poultry.


The beverage


is sometimes taken


set in some dark recess to ferment.


After a few


hot, but is much more refreshing when cool and


days when the corn has sprouted, it is removed


mixed


When


cool, it is bottled and


and thrown into a very large mortar.


tar is usually


about 4


feet high, and


The mor-
is made


put aside for future use.
Along the streets of the Republic may often be


from the trunk of some large tree.


Two women


seen crowds drinking


"Chicha


which is


directing two huge pestels, pound the corn until it


is thoroughly cracked.


From there the corn enters


an enormous pot of water that has been previously


refreshing under the rays of a noonday sun.
If the bottles are left standing any length of
time, the fermentation becomes so strong that it


over


a roaring


fire to boil.


continual


is impossible to keep a


cork in the bottle.


stirring is kept


up for


or 6 hours when the corn


THE CALL OF PANAMA.


Harlan W.


Seated before the fireplace,
Heavy hearted and sore,


While


I listen to the pattering rain,


And wind outside my door.
As it whistles through the tree tops,
And whirls the glistening snow,
What thoughts I have, what visions
Of days of long ago.


Holmwood,


Of a little tropic country,
Where the sun forever glows,
Where the palms wave in the soothing trades,
And the moon full yellow shows.


Where the stars gleam


o'er a glistening bay


Whose soft waves wash the shore,
Oh! take me back to Panama


come,


And let me roam no more.


Take me back


to where it's


warm.


And let me


sweat again,


Let me see the jungle thick
Where Nature has full reign.
So give me back that easy life,
I'm tiret of bustle and roar,
For Panama is calling me,
She is knocking at my door.





x H" A
xx xx DAx










30 THE CARIBBEAN.






m^
I 1

________________________ _______________ m________


hl







THE


CARIBBEAN.


COUNTRY LADS WISE, CITY LADS WISER.


Paul C. DoVle


was visiting my uncle's farm for the first


of our boy friends.


After telling my cousin that


in fact it was the first time I


was ever


away from the city.


we were all learning to swim, he obligingly offered
to teach any of the boys who cared to take lessons.


Rosy-checked,


husky, and


cheerful


Two of


the fastest swimmers accepted his kind


about my age welcomed me to their games and
pastimes and the usual debates and loud and wordy


arguments which boys indulge in


when a new-


offer, and kept poor


Albert working for a half


hour in shallow water, explaining how to kick,
when to take a stroke, where to keep the head,


comer invades their ranks were shared with the
recital of amusing boy pranks of city and country


I was surprised at the originality of some of the
tricks they played on each other, for up to this


and how to breathe.


It was very funny to watch


them pretending to learn and all the spectators
enjoyed the fun.
At the end of one hour my cousin was stupefied
at their progress, for both beat him in a race by 4o


time it was my fixed opinion that


the country


feet in a length of but 90 feet.


The usual state-


lad could not compete with the city boy in using


ment "Ah, go on, you knew how to swim all the


his brain.


Of course, now that I have chummed


time,


came from Albert.


with the country boy, I'll freely admit that my
opinion has been decidedly changed.
One of their schemes for initiating a visiting
boy was to play a game called "Deliver the black


pudding.


" To play this game a prisoner and a


I now know my mistake in telling them my part
in this prank, and I will now tell you how they
made me a victim to one of their own and why I
changed my opinion about country boys not being
as wide-awake as city boys.


judge were chosen. The rest were policemen. To
make things sound right they'd give the judicial


I had never been in the country and I
green as grass about everything in it. "I


was as
'he only


power to the newcomer.


He was told when the


prisoner was brought before his majesty he should


time I have ever seen a cow outside of pictures,
was when a nice thick juicy slice of one was sizzling


give orders to


prisoner,


thrown at him,


"deliver the black pudding,"


having


a ripe


tomato


wouldn't get funny


more.


The boys were gone 4 minutes when they brought
the half-laughingprisonerin. He was placed before


in hot butter on the dinner table.
for me to fall into their trap.


It was


My unele had given me o10 cents and I had in-
vested the whole sum in peanuts and was enjoying
eating them the next day, when I was met by 3


the judge, "What shall we do with him?"
be the question.


would


of the


who said


they were going squirrel


hunting and would let me go if I would share my


"Deliver


the blac--


prisoner ducked.


When


" but just


the judge


peanuts equally with them.


cleared


tomatoes from his ears and egg from his eyes he
awakened to find his chums had disappeared, and


the joke on him.


The prisoner has a hard time


After a long argu-


ment in which I was allowed to keep 10 peanuts,
beside my share, we came to an agreement.
I counted out o10 peanuts and put them in my
trousers pocket, then handed one to Bill, one to


convincing the judge


that a mistake has been


Teddy, and


one to "Red"


and continued


made, but good fighters never quit until every-


until each of us had the same amount.


There were


body,


through


one way


or another, are


warm


two left over and these


we decided after a long


friends again.
I ba rnlo i -claAl-j/ j~in t i. b-sA flnyiTM- mrn/Tnc~


argument to bury


at the foot of a monument


mmrofr-A a3" tho frm rT a hinAh ara r no hill in rho




- ..;A~ .A~ u~1w
iu~r~ru


32 THE CARIBBEAN.
IIIII III I I 111111111 I 111 1111111111 II x xx x

buried treasure before we caught a squirrel. We discovered' that I was lost. Remembering my
etrat d for the woods which were at the foot of the scou t rules I climbed one of the tallest trees and


sflA : S i --- -,- -------- -----------------


other side of the hill.


Each of the boys carried xo


empty potato sacks which they said were used to
catch squirrels by putting a piece of carrot in the
sack and holding it against a squirrel tree. All
you had to do was to shut your eyes and keep per-


fectly still and


the squirrel


thinking you were


asleep, would sneak into the bag to steal the carrot,
and he was your captive.
We walked at least 5 miles through a pretty and
shady forest and as I was not used to walking I


became very tired.


Besides, so that they could


locate the squirrel trees more quickly, I had to
carry the whole 30 bags, so I was mighty glad when
we came to the finest squirrel tree in the country.


We drew straws for this tree.


Luckily, I drew the


shortest straw, thereby winning the privilege to
use the best hunting ground.
While the other boys walked away in search of
other squirrel trees I began my hunt for squirrels.
Following instructions in holding my carrot-baited


bag against the tree trunk, keeping my


eyes shut


most of the time, I waited still as a mouse for i5
minutes and, growing tired of the sport, I decided
to look for a boy at some other squirrel tree,
leaving my sack at the deserted hunting place.
I must have walked for an hour without finding
any of the boys, and I turned to go back when I


RAMON IN


when I reached the branches what a disappointing
surprise met y gaze! Not af a mile y
the hill with its monument where the pea t# eaw
"-o1~t fo-ip esn-yil wie~r~'2'1xh ire 1l'Mfftre*^iA1^
buried, and there before my eyes were thee wid
eagles (the squirrel hunters who had tried mek
digging for the treasure. I'll say they W .e wiwd,
for by this time I could see that they d found


the 2 empty shells which,


T had substituted for


real peanuts while. limbing the hilL
The entire forest I now could see was not


mile in area and those countryy


"hick s h


me around in a circle until wI thought it was endless.
Slipping down the tree I quickly made for the
point where the hill was located and on my way
I stopped to pick up my sack and, finding srme-
thing moving in it, I peeped inside and what do


you think?


min it.


There were 2 tiny frightened rabbits


I took them with me.


I met the grinmning


boys near the hill; they asked to see my squirrels.
I let one of them see through a little space in the
top, but the others had to supply my appetite


with


some nice,


large, red apples before


saw my treasure. I took the rabbits to my under's
house, where they raised a large and interesting
family, and I then finished eating my to peanuts
in peace.


i










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COLON:


Eula/ie Arthur, 'a.


. :!^' t


Until he was 15 years old, Ram6n had lived in


the interior.


his own


He had never seen anyone except


family


and the neighbors.


He knew


nothing at all about the outer world, in fact, he
was hardly civilized.


He knew that every Wveek


when


his father


left the farm, if it could be called a farm, that he
went to a place called Colon and, in exchange for
his fruits and vegetables, brought back sugar and
salt and other things that he himself could not
raise,.
Soon after his isth birthday his father decided


too large for him, accompanied his fthtr to thit
place of mystery, Colon.
They left home very early in the morning ad,
as the mule that pulled the rickety wagon "as so
old that probably Noah would have recoged
him as one of those that he had driven into the
ark, it was dusk before they arrived at the ouat-
skirts of Colon.


He spent the night there with a fri


end of his


father's, and at 4 o'lock the next mqrnming they
*' :a


were driving into the eity.


It was just e o'lck when th ey arced at the


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


As Ram6n


was walking down


Front Street,


not on the sidewalk, but in the very middle of the
street, he heard a queernoise and turning beheld
a great black monster, as he thought, but a few
yards away and rapidly approaching, and all the
time making that horrible noise.
He didn't wait for a second look but started at
full speed down the street.
The chauffeur of the car seeing the figure of a
boy with coat tails flying in the wind and who paid
no attention to the warning horn, running with all


speed, thought


something


must


be wrong, and


followed.
Ram6n ran for a couple of blocks and turned his
head to see if the monster was still coming.
He wondered what he had ever done that he
should have to die at the hands of such a terrible


thing.


And he asked all of the saints that he had


ever heard of to have mercy on his soul.
But at last the chauffeur came to the corner
where he turned and with a last blare of the horn
that almost stopped the beating of poor Ram6n's
heart, vanished.


Ram6n s heart was still


toot!"


He saw


another


jumping when


monster


many,


"toot!
many


times larger than theonehe had just escaped which,


dragging


more


monsters


behind


was running


He could only hope, as he watched the thing
that shot forth great clouds of smoke from its
head, that death would come quickly.
He closed his eyes and stood there for an inter-
minable time and then, as nothing happened, he


opened


them and saw that the


thing, an early


freight train, just pulling out of the .station, had
disappeared.
Ram6n decided that he had seen quite enough of
Colon and walked in the direction of the market.
On the way he passed a fruit store that had been
open but a few minutes and among the familiar


oranges


and bananas


he saw round red things,


and small purple ones, also round, that were in


bunches like


bananas.


Ram6n was hungry and he began to help him-
self liberally to the fruit,when the proprietor, com-
ing from the rear of the store, saw him filling both
pockets with the small purple things, grapes, and
crying "thief," summoned a near-by policeman
and placed Ram6n in his kind hands.


Ram6n


was taken


to a


place with iron bars


across the window and door, and here his frantic
father found him that night.


He told Ram6n


perfectly


that he


dollars


to g


had had
et him c


and to wait until he got him home!


to pay 5
)ut of jail
Jut Ram6n


was too happy at the thought of leaving this town


down the opposite side of the street.


monsters


and devils


to mind


father's


Ram6n couldn't have moved an inch lust then,
for he was paralyzed with fright.


threat.
And thus ended Ram6n's first visit to Colon.





THE CARIBBEAN.


-C
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' ;11/3. 13 '; T
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' !M.. .**' ^***'
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KENNETH GREEN ,.O.
Poe Laureae.


NIGHT.


Aloft in the azure depths there lies
Serene in the dark carulean sky,
A silvery moon, an orb of white,
Throwing its light on the clouds around,
Tracing vague shadows on the ground,
Setting a spell with its mystic light,
From lofty mount to broad sea strand,
O'er every people and every land,
That slumbers now in the arms of night.
The broad lake shimmers in its beams
And each little ripple glimmers and gleams,
Making a beautiful, wonderful sight.
The trees their giant branches toss,
The moonbeams stream on beds of moss,


On the cool night air tbere floats a song
Sung by some lover to his love,
And still that mystic disk above
Floats with its silvery light along.
No lamb in the silent pasture plays,
No huntsman in the forest strays,
But moonbeams play the trees among,
And all rests calm in the moon's white light
Till breaking the silence of the nlgh r,
We hear the town clock's solemn gong,
Tolling the hour, and all too soon
Breaking the mystic spell of the moon.


THE FALL OF FORT SAN LORENZO.


High on a beetling cliff
Oerlooking the Spanish Main,
High on a lofty crag
The frowning fortress stood.
Turreted, towered, embattled,
There by the Chagres' mouth,
High o'er the foaming flood,
Guarding its treasure.
Hither the treasure seekers
Bearing their bags of gold,
Came to the golden city,
The city of gold of the west.
Then o'er the bounding main,
Morgan the buccaneer,
Morgan the pirate came.
Morgan the terror of Spain,
Morgan the ruthless came,
Seeking what spoils he might,


The carnage was awful.
Twice he attacked the fIortrest
Twice he stormed it n vani,
Twice beaten back di sm:i ed,
Twice he returned 2a.in,
Testing the for tre~s'h po er.
When the third time he came,
The hidden passage revealed.
Up to the fortress str3ame d
Morgan's mercile men
Killing or touring *L


Ruthless and merciless they,
Dealing but bloodshed and slaughter,
Caring for naught but the gold.
Bravely the fortress resisted,
Each man knowing his fate
Despairingly wielded his swords
Selling his tife blood dear.


S V^v^ ^ ^'^
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THE


CARIBBEAN.


FAREWELL.


"Where comes the climax of this play?"
The teacher's voice was far away.
For I was dreaming of that day


When to this high school
"Farewell."


would say,


"Translate,


'subitoque fragore.


Again my thoughts were far away
For still was I thinking of that day
When to this high school I should say,
"Farewell."


I should say,


"What is the law of sines, I pray?"
Dimly I heard the principal say
For all my thoughts were far away


On that day of days when
"Farewell."


NAMES


"Out of this building, young man, stray.
I heard the principal solemnly say.


"For if you can't attend
Within this school you


tion pay
need not


stay.


"Farewell!"


AND GREETINGS.


me name


Paddy Laughlin


My name is Hank Bohunkus


And Oi
And all


come


fiom Erin's


And New
And all I'v


Oi've got to greet yez wid


York is
'e got t(


Street you


Is me carefree Oirish


smoile.


Is my lanky


Yankee


drawl.


ma name


is Tam McDuffv


An' ah coome frae auld


name


Scootland


is Manuel


And I come from Panam


An' all ah've


Is me h


earty


got to greet ye
Scoottish hand.


And all I've got


Is a lazy


to greet


como estd.


A PARTING TOAST.


I sit by


sea in the


And my though


moon


ts are


Then mv


away,


thoughts


turn ag un


And my eye fills up w


ith a


to the present,
tear,


Washing


up like the eddying wavelets


As I think of the s


ure separation


On the shore of some future day.

I forget the trials that are over,
And the toils that have long passed


From my friends at the end of the year.

But when my sorrow and sadness
About me hang like a shroud,
The moon shining out in its whitene;s
Shows a ray of hope through the cloud.


away,


As I think of the unfailing promise
Of some future success-bringing day.


Then hurling
I raise my
In a toast to


a toas


far from
voice up


me my


sorrow


to the sky,


the golden to-morrow
t to dear Cristobal High.


THE TROPIC NIGHT.


The day is done, and the burning


has set in golden


sun,


splendor,


The big white moon, mounting up full soon,


shines through the palm


trees slender.


Thestars shine bright, with their twinkling light,


on a world not vet in slumber.


Adds by its sound, as I have found,
to the night's cool soothing stillness.
Now the moon's gone down, and in the town,
the mortals all are sleeping,
As up from the East, like a stealthy beast,


the sun is slowly creeoine.




44

~


THE


CARIBBEAN.


1


MY TRIP TO NEW YORK


7. Beitt.,nor,, "-1o


The steamship Colon left Cristobal on May 31,


baskets, and hats strung over


head. While miy.<


1919, with a passenger

out no one


could


ask for


For the first 2


more


perfect


friend and I twe having lost the rest of the party
were taking in the sights, a negro boy asked usif


weather.


The Atlantic was as calm as one would


we did not want to buy a parrot.


He wanted $o


want it, and the heavens were a beautiful blue


whose color was reflected on the ocean.


On the


evening of June 2 we sighted Haiti, and were told


that we would dock the next morning.
dark we entered the bay of Haiti.


Just before
Fhis bay is a


gold for it, so we toldhim nc Later we fond out
that the parrot could be bought for 46 cens.
Just as we turned to go on our way we 'noticed


our little guide was still with us.


We told him to


go away, but he didn't take the hint, so, to get


** S.!." !!

4:


wonderful piece of nature's work, being one of the
largest natural bays in the world, having a length
of 90 miles.
When I awakened the next morning, I could not


understand


why the


boat was not in


heard sharp commands


motion.


and again


noise of negroes; then I realized we were in the city
of Port-au-Prince. After breakfast all passengers
were allowed to go ashore, but were to return by
3 that afternoon. There were 8 in our party that
went ashore to explore the city. It seemed to me
I have never known the sun to be so hot as it was
on that day, it was even worse than Panama sun.
Port-au-Prince is much like Colon and Panama,
only much dirtier.
The first place we visited was the post office, a


dirty wooden building and full of beggars.


beggars!


Such


I never saw so many, with nothing but


rags to cover their bodies.
Haiti is "Gimme c cents,


m


The chief password of
ister." We did give a


few of them some change, but before we knew it


we had a flock of beggars around us.


The best


thing to do, we decided, was not to give them any
more money if we were to escape from them. How
those beggars did stick, one little lad said he would
show us the town, but we told him we didn't need


his assistance.


some straying off from the party.
Although Port-au-Prince is a thousand times


rid of him,we hired coach for an hour.


It seemed


good to sit down even if the coach did not have
tires like the ones on the Zone.
There was really not much difference in the
sights from those of Colon to arouse much interest
We passed the prison, a large stone building, and
we saw a number of negro convicts, in striped


suits, looking through


the bars.


One thing of


interest was an open-air market, which covered


a large amount of ground.


on the ground, dnd the sellers were sitting with a
piece of burlap propped on sticks whith cover 4
their heads to protect them from the sun. There
were thousands of people there, colored, of course,


buying and selling.


Many of the products were


brought in from the country by


native


mules.
We saw a few Americans now and
were mostly sailors and Marines. We
see the American settlement which


wm

the
wai
we


was very beautiful, but as our hour wasu
was nearing 3 o'clock, we had to go tack
boat w a


me. on
n io
nted to
ni Ia'w/*

heard

to thde
,, '/ *.*.
. : r .


Whe ent b hip "" w loaded
Down with hats, baskets, and alligator pears) as


likewise were the other passengers.


the people in New


i am sure


York nteist have thought we


were from the country when we docked with car


arms full of souvenirs from Haiti.


5
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I was glad to


dirtier than Colon or


Panama,


the streets are


be back on the boat once more, as I had a burssig


'IA HAITI.


All articles were laying


Once more we were on our way,


II a
-z
1







THE CARIBBEAN.


one became impatient as they waited for the boat


to pull out.


I watched the negro workmen put


I had a hard time getting up the next morning,
as it was so cold-first I put out one footand then


the cargo aboard, and it seemed that all of them
were bossing the job, but no one really knew much


the other, but each


berth.


time I crawled back in my


After several attempts at this I succeeded


about it at all.


Ninety


more passengers were


in getting dressed.


Most all passengers were on


taken aboard at Haiti, many Marine officers and
their families, also a number of Haitians. Just


deck and they looked frozen.


spite of heavier clothing.


I felt the same in


There was still a slight


at twilight we pulled away from
we were all greatly relieved.
Nothing unusual happened th


the dock, and


next


days;


fog, and
New Yo


we could just distinguish the sights of


rk harbor.


just shook, I


When I went out on deck I


was so cold.


The wind cut like a


than ever happens on board a Panama Railroad


knife.


But I had to see the Statue of Liberty once


steamer en route to New York.


Each day it grew


more, in spite of the cold.


After the usual red


"bundle up" to keep


warm, although, the crisp air made us feel good.
The night before we docked a heavy fog came up
and anyone who has been in a fog before knows


tape of inspectors and doctors, we finally docked.
I was very glad when we were safely on a warm


Pullman on our way to Cleveland, Ohio.


of contentment came over me


A feeling


when I had the


what it is to hear the foghorn.


to sleep
minute,


between


the blasts
very little


All night


which
e sleep


were every
that night.


satisfaction of knowing I
good old U. S. A.


was once more in the


A SHARK!
Harold


A SHARK!


"Boom!"


went the minute gun


with its loud


roar, waking from peaceful sleep the Dutch farmer
wh6se house overlooked the bay.
He sprang from his bed, and, throwing open the
window, could just make out the lines of a small
brig, over which large waves were breaking, hiding
the ship from time to time.


Already Hans could make out the bobbing heads
of the strongest swimmers, who were vainly trying
to reach shore.
Hans grasped the situation, and at once rode his


horse into the ocean, calling


voice:


at the top of his


"Make for the horse, men! Swim to him,


and catch hold of his tail.


It's your only chance!"


once again across the water came the


loud roar, so plainly appealing for help. This
time the gun woke the wife, who instantly knew


what it meant.


Sitting up, she said:


"Ship in


distress, Hans?"
The man nodded-he had no time for words.


He quickly drew on his sea


clothes, while his wife


busily prepared her home for a number of ship-


wrecked


sailors.


Many


a time


had a half-


drowned sailor found refuge at that seaside home.
Hans lost no time in making his way to the
stable, and having slipped a halter over his horse's
neck, he mounted him and quickly rode off to the
scene of the wreck.
In another minute the doomed ship lay before
his eyes, not a couple of hundred yards from the


The men were not slow to follow his advice, and
soon 3 of them caught hold of the horse's tail, and
were soon on land.
Everywhere men were throwing ropes to the
unfortunate sailors, but Hans and his horse saved
the most lives.
The sailors who had until now stuck to the ship
at last realized that she was breakingupandhastily
climbing down the rigging, they swung themselves
over the side and caught hold of anything until
Hans came with his horse to tow them to shore.
The journey was almost over when one of the
men gave an awful shriek, which could be plainly
heard above the roar of the waves.


"A shark! a shark!


It's got


hold of my leg!


Oh, save me!"


colder, and all of us had to


"Boom!"









3 8 T H E_ _._ __ ... .A _^_ .j.- ^^u ^^^jj^^ ij C AIBAN .^ K KK KK K K KK KKKKK K KKKKKK K:<$$^ KK KKKKK
ffe-k:^F orts he* m ade for the land^ w here braveK m eW-^FR nk G ivei m e^ .;* h bov."* said* H ans. :::*::*: ::* *:: KKK ::::*:::::*: KKKK::::**;::::::::::* "IK^"K^". w*.:::ll:. take him:;*


taV/* S)li, A1 A* ****


rushed into the surf with knives, to kill the dreaded
animal.
All of a sudden a roar of laughter went up from
the crowd, for on dragging the man to shore, no
shark was found, but a poor little cabin boy, who
had hung onto the first thing he grasped, and was
still clinging to the man's ankle with a clasp of
despair.


to my wife.


She will


take good care of him.


Before long the shipwrecked sailors were seated
around Hans's kitchen fire, drinking hot coffee
rang enjloyming large hunks of bread and cheese.
The cabin boy was fast asleep in bed and seemed
onoe the worse for his adventr tWe
would from time to time break out into peals oft
laughter as thne recalled their mate s escape crom


"Here's your shark, mate!"
"What shall I do with it?"


called out a man.


RESOURCES


AND


a sharks"


0~
<


INDUSTRIES OF PANAMA.


Aice M. Stilson, '20o.


From the location of the Isthmus of Panama


one would


expect it


to be


a very flourishing


republic and it is the opinion of many that it may


be so in the years to


come.


Isthmus


endowed by nature with many resources, such as
agricultural, mineral, and forestral, but its indus-


tries are very few.


However, its resources


tonwood tree which grows to a very great size, ad
the bamboo The bamboo is used very mch by
the natives for building their little huts a t e
also the branches from palm or coconut trees
h. du p*an'
One of the mnst important industries of Pan-
ama, although not highly developed is the cultit
vation of fruits. In and around Colon bananas


not sought after as they should be, nor are any of


the industries highly developed


other countries.


as they are in


The people here lack energy and


interest but they are not entirely responsible for
this, for they need some help from the government
to back them up.
Most of these resources lie in the interior of
Panama, but the interior is difficult to reach as


there are very few roads.


Very few means are


grow quite abundantly, although they are
really the best. They say that theIbest ban;
a-e grown in B s del Toro. The boats on t
a~e gown in B .fi'ex Tlo. h e~ft


not
anas
,heir


way to New York usually stop there in order to
get a cargo of bananas. Another fruit, commonly
seen on the Isthmus, is the coconut and it isone
of the chief exports. The coconuts are te
brought from the islands of San Bias and St


Andrew and then shipped to the States.


*< KKK v> <
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provided for the development of these resources,
therefore, it is cheaper and easier to import the
necessary things.
In the past, large quantities of gold were dag


Besid-s these there are other fruits cultivated,
such as pineapples, lemons, oranges; sugar cane
and the papaya. The island of Taboga, isnoted
for the pinpples which are gnon o e.
for the pmoppe ^ .^ :
at"ii ^ ._"'-___- ..* **


out by


the Indians


mountains near Chiriqui.


and Spaniards


Silver, iron, and other


metals were also discovered, but at present very
little is derived as no serious attempts are made
to find these minerals.
The land all through the interior is especially
adapted to grazing and farming, but hardly any
means are provided for the bringing in of the
produce.
Some of the trees, which grow on the Isthmus,
are the India rubber tree, the cocoa tree, the cot-


Some of the vegetables grown on the Isthmus
are the yucca, coco, and yaum. tya; w byt
the natives just as much as the potato is used by
the Americans, in fact, it is the natve potaTo. Afl
these grow with very little care on account of the
very fertile soil.
An industry whch is neglected in Panama is
An .h~ch XXX
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manufacturing. Neither in C
are there any factories of great
all manufactured goods are
some day this industry will b


*'I


n- -.--


onionn nor in ranama
i importance. Nearly
importepd. Perhaps:
~e developed.


.&~~ ~ ~ I :: .. --, : ^ -- -- -


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THE


CARIBBEAN.


BLACK


OR WHITE?


Mariorie D. Ball,


"Tommy, have you forgotten to bring in the


"Well, I don't care if they won't play with me,


coal and chop the wood?


Yes, and I want you to


he said,


"they have to chop wood and I don't,


to the


commissary,


called


Tommy's


busy mother.


"Oh,
Tommy


dear!


groaned


come


in answer.


in a minute,


Then


to himself,


and he marched off with his nose in the air
In a field near-by some little colored bo


flying a kite.


ys were


He received a welcome from them


and soon was fully enjoying himself.


"I wish I wuz one of those little niggers in Colon.


They never have to work.


anyway.


It's too hot to work,


believe I'll run away.


Then she'll


have to chop her ole wood herself."


Midafternoon found
in a coconut grove on


Tommy


hot and


the edge of the


weary
ungle.


He was too tired to go any farther, so he sat down


and rested his head


wearily


against


the trunk


of a palm.
Far overhead the tropical sun sent off rays of
intense heat. A trail of ants crawled slowly by the
little boy's head and a centipede stretched itself
lazily at his feet. An iguana, basking on a near-by
rock, eyed him sleepily through half-closed lids.
'Way up in the top of the palm a little monkey
peered curiously down at the boy, evidently try-
ing to classify this strange creature.


Suddenly


Tommy


What am I doing here?


"Where


Gee, I'm hungry


am 1?
Guess


I'll go home an' see if Ma won't gimme something
to eat."


In his mother's kitchen he found it difficult to
get past the maid, who seemed determined not to
let him in. Shoving the maid aside he burst into
the middle of-an afternoon tea, demanding some-


Then one little fellow cried,


get something


to eat.


"Say, kids, let's


With the approval of all


they started for New Cristobal.
At the first house all the boys crept underneath


the porch except the smallest,
be Tommy.


He rapped on the door.


piece" of bread,"


structions.


who happened to


"Please, mistress, a


he mumbled according


to in-


The door slammed in his face.


Joining the rest, he found


that thev had dis-


covered some dry bread in a garbage can.


To his


own surprise he accepted some and crunched it
gratefully.
Bedtime found Tommy with no place to sleep.
Then one little boy asked him to come to his
home, a small room in Bottle Alley. Tommy was
given a section of floor in the corner of the room


for his bed.


It appeared that a family of 9 slept,


' ate, and lived for the most part in one small room.
Soon the family retired and the doors and win-


dows were barred.


The air was hot and stifling


and Tommy could hear a distant roll of thunder


predicting a storm.


He became more uncomfort-


able as the storm grew worse and wondered if he


thing to eat.
His mother looked up in surprise.


little black rascal,


"Why, you


what are you doing in here?


would live
Suddenly
him to his


til morning.
a terrific crash of thunder brought
feet with his hands at his head. The


Mary, come put this child out.
Outside the door he realized that his wish had


iguana scuttled off the rock, the centipede slid
off through the grass and the little monkey up


come true.


No more chopping of wood, no more


among


the coconut


leaves chattered


with glee


carrying of coal or trips to the commissary!
was a little negro and could enjoy life.


He found


the boys


whom


he usually


played but when he tried to get into their games


over the havoc his coconut bomb had wYought.


A sadder y
his way home
complaint.


et wiser


Tommy


and carried


wearily


wended


in the coal without


N




-N-" -- "~- ~ ~Nfl~NWNW ~ -N1~

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THE


CARIBBEAN.
:" V
** :. ^ -M. .


IN AND ABOUT COLON.


d/ibet .1


DZrI


"kicking"' us into our berth, had
Fred and I looked down from the


deck onto the dock to which we were made fast


and saw a picture of laziness.


About 200 West


Indian laborers sat or stood by their hand tracks


gaping


at the arrival


of the "Steeuts buot.


Conditions rapidly changed, however,


when an


American of average stature tanned a deep brown


and clad in a


blue open-throated


sl


trousers, and straw hat, appeared on


hirt, khaki
the scene


This street, oFconcrete construct
an artificial mole which extends
direction from Old Castolbma


ion,
I~fl,
out I
The


docks are said to.. h Fiest in the
built at whde ret r inter als at r-ig
the m0le,
Walking eastwarid, we came to the

the mole where the Atlantic Termin
9m ~


a hands
situated.
business nh


me substantial 3-story .s
We had to enter this buitl
eces-


was .bui on 5 7
n a westerly



ht ianles to

land end of

al Bi~ding
trcture, iss C
ding, as onu
0^V ^XX X''XX- KK^


sharply directing the laborers, who then showed


extraordinary


agility


in getting


about.


the first few minutes after disembarking there
seemed to reign the greatest con fusion, accentuated


by the many noises.


But, after looking more


closely at things, I found that confusion was ap-
parent rather than real, for indeed a very exact
system of management was taking place-that


long trail of hand


trucks


was unloading


bringing tidings from loved ones to anxious rela-
tives and friends in distant lands, and this noisy
crowd of laborers were skillfully sorting out the
trunks and baggage of the passengers in system-
atic, orderly, and easily identified rows, and that
still more noisy gang were preparing the nets and
slings and hoisting gear with which they would take
the valuable cargo from off our ship.


stated


a visit


to theReaistra
tion, Port Cap
tain's and Pan


ara a
offices,
cated
From


Railroad
all lo-


the tall


flagstaff in


front


0/KK KK KKXK
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Atlanti lTeniirial BulddmL


of the


building


floated


"Old


Glory." Fred and I had done a lot of traveling
and had seen the Stars and Stripes
to the breezes in many lands, hur we a not


>0 WV:f'xyxxx~!
x> xxxxxxx
XXXXVX XXXv


yet seen such a sastiying pietate as e
made, surrounded by tral has
The Terminal Building contains all the branches
ofthesteaimnship-handling bus iness fornig ap
of the government of The Na i
fore takes uticial care of all shipping at Cristob al,
the Atlantic port. A ship transiting the Canal
southward must take on a pilot whose headquar-
ters is in the Terminal Building. It must, if it
has not an agency on the Isthmus, make a request
for its coal or supplies or repairs to the Vort
Captain there. It must transact its business with
the quarantine, customs. admeasurer, and collector


all in the same building.


The collectoa


XXX XXies 000


the tolls for the ship's passage and the payments
for its repairs or smplies. Fromn the this R


^**> ^^W0>A0.


tug, which was
finished its job.


A slight lurch of our steamer told us that the


StKKKK -KK


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*XXXXXXX~~~~ ~~~ ~ X. XXXX X XX XXX X X XX X X X XXXX X X X XX X
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X~~~yX~~y'!X~~ XX XX0XX X X X *X '.. X X 'X KKK K K K ^ .. X ^ X X ^ X ^ X X


-III







THE CARIBBEAN.


just after the starting of the late war and for this


U. S.


S. Melville, a mine layer and sweeper.


reason,


being


a German


company,


was never


occupied by it.


also learned that this ship, when on her way to
Cristobal and about 500 miles out, had on board a
disastrous explosion resulting in the death of 5
of Uncle Sam's sailors.
This depressing information saddened both Fred
and myself, so, wishing to change the scene and


thought,


we hailed


one of


those


tumble-down


rickety local coaches with its disreputable under-
sized and bony horses which mar the otherwise
clean and business-like surroundings, and directed


cochero


ington.


" to drive us to the


Hotel


Wash-


Dashing more or less madly up the wide


and clean concrete street at a speed of at least
3 miles an hour, which, by the way is satisfactory
when one considers the advanced age and pitiable


Hamburg-American and Italian teamnship Lines Buildings.


When "we" entered the war, the United States
Government confiscated it as alien enemy prop-
erty,and used it as headquarters for the Fifteenth


Naval


District.


question stood the new


opposite the building in
Italian Steamship Line


office, made prominent by its stately tower, an
uncommon piece of architecture around Cristobal
or Colon.
Coming down into the street again, Fred and I


Criatobal Fire Station,
equal, in every particular,


physical
edition


con-


un fortu n a t e


animals


gener-


ally engaged in
vehicle trans-
portation here,
we were brought
to a halt by a


passing
to any we


train,
had met


passed by the base of the flagstaff.
that this white pole, besides flying


We learned
"Old Glory,"


in our travels, at what we learned was the busiest


on the


Atlantic


"Gold"


side of the


flown


Liberty


honor


flags,


Canal.


showing that Cristobal had Jed all other Canal


Zone communities in


three of the five


Liberty


As our steed came very willingly to a stop,
saw on our left the Cristobal fire station.


Loan


drives


launched


during


the World


War.


At the-base-of the flagpole were propped 2 huge,
rusty iron anchors with 14-foot shanks. We


Peering


paratus


within


we saw the


fire-fighting


equipment.


latest ap-
Here, as


before, the Stars and Stripes were borne proudly


learned that thev were the famous


"Anchors of


on a flagstaff.


Across the railroad tracks to the


" Morgan and his band of buccaneers
are said to have


left the anchors
in Cruces, a
small native


village
Fort Si


near


an Lor-


enzo,during his


over


piracy,


right, was a long 2-story building which throngs


of busy
leaving.
driver,
spoke
easily


people
This,
who
a not
under-


were


constantly


we learned


entering and
Sour dusky


stood brand of
the English
language pecu-
liar to the West


Ancehors of Cruces and German Mine.


3oo years ago.


A striking comparison was offered between these


Indies,
reality


was in
a big


Cruces.


V




<~> > ~Th V
40> Th4A~ V


THE


CARIBBEAN.


Panama Railroad Company purchased their
supplies, paying for them with yards and yards
and yards of narrow strips of paper called cornm-


missary coupons.


Whether the employees made


their own coupons or not we were unable to learn.


The train having passed,


there followed


greatest clamor of coach bells, truck horns, and
general warning signals imaginable, as the two
lines of vehicles coming in opposite directions


passed


over


the railroad


crossing


through


scurrying crowd of pedestrians who dodged their
winding ways in and out among the slowly moving
vehicles, all, without a single exception, complain-
ing about the high cosf of living.
Our driver had no difficulty in restraining the


horse


rushing


through


at excessive


speed, thus giving us ample time to carefully
observe the first building which greets the eye in


By simply


turning our heads we could see the


"Bay, dotted with numerous ships, some waiting
or Canal transit others coaJ, fuel oilor suDlies
and others their clearance papers, It was interest-
ing to note the different classesoh
through the "Big
hrou sel Bg fs outo
anchor small yachts an saihing ~hcei&
2(1r/i ~'tf '*~ 1iyi** I ~ ~~f -s-~-*mrirpj'"^"~r r'^odo'^a--^^-..*""""


coastwise steamers and


great


bulky trrc


opships,


tugs, lighters, and immense colliers, as well as
freight and passenger-carrying steamers freo~ al
partsof the gl.be. We eard z tat actue o te
bay was incomplete without a naval shipos'm

government in it. Airplanes and4hdvoplanes,
banking in graceful spirals flitted abcoutwallow-
like, in the air, while pelicans i exact ta

wedge-shaped formation and the high-soariag
buzzards hovered almost motionless abtcm*kiog
1i I I. 1 '^ y *' -^ ^ -f *'-., **


the whole an extremely lively spectacilet
whole an extr x
X'X X^X "% X XXX .X X


i.


.
!M *.^M ^ *|i.
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NV
NP~<1
N*


Hotel %ra.bhirici-iri


Color
just


1


proper- which


we were told is


the city


across the railroad tracks from Cristobal-


a 3-story cement s
which was occupied


structure,


the lower floor bof


modern


and well-filled


stores and shops with attractive window displays.
Turning down to the left-which incidentally
appears to be the rule for traffic driving in Colon---
on Front Street, one of the main thoroughfares of
Colon, we passed store after store apparently
displaying every article of merchandise obtainable
in the civilized world, separated here and there


by spotlessly


clean alleyways and now and then
* S *5 -


we rode


opportunity
stantiallv


along
jr


) was a no
constructed


linedthe thorough
hy other squpares
buildings min most
to this section the
towns which we


in our conveyance ample


rded


conc


to observe the sub-
rete buntdings which


are for several squares, followed
contaxrning uasightswooe
unfavorable cont~a~st in
appearance o .p.io mng
had traversed in the westera n


United States. This condition we learned wasdue
to a disastrous fire occurring about 5 ea-ssia go
consuming 22 squares in the city of Colothe
ending all of that city and beautiful ritobal
al! beatifl Gr ba


KK /: .A K. >: 1J. KKKK .X


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*M^' .^^S^







THE


CARIBBEAN.


razed unconsumed


buildings


for a


area in the path of the conflagation.


considerable
From this


One of the wheels of our carriage, bent in a sad


condition, had


wobbled so continuously, Fred


ruin arose the handsome buildings which greeted
our eyes, causing Fred to comment "In my private
opinion, the fire was a blessing in disguise," in
which I most emphatically joined.
Rounding the end of Front Street, we came in
sight of a little park with an abundance of flowers,
shrubs and other tropical growths presenting to
my sense of proportion an overcrowded and there-


who was nearly seasick as a result-and I-who
again felt the rolling sensation experienced on our


rough but otherwise pleasant sea


voyage-were


delighted to see the beautiful Hotel Washington
loom into sight, thus realizing, though in minor
measure, the joy and happiness of Columbus when
he sighted the island of San Salvador-now called


Watling's


Island


as we learned


on our way


fore unpleasant appearance.


narrow car-tracked street running


We turned down a


parallel


down.


Just like the famous navigator,our journey


was near its end.


The imposing hotel meant the


Manzamnillo Bay, Cristobal, Old French Canal, Coaling Plant, ( anal Approach, and Mainland, Viewed from the Air.


the park and wondered what purpose these tracks
served, andeven, as I write, we have been unable to


end of


our hot and uncomfortable coach


an inviting dinner, and a comfortable bed with


find anyone else who knows.


The deep sweet aroma


the high


waving palm


fronds,


which


could


from the beautiful buds and flowers that so pro-
fuselyv bloomed in the park contrasted favorably


plainly seen tapping the windows, beckoning us to


peaceful an


well-earned slumber, as the roar of the


with odors of stewing dried


assailed


our nostrils from


codfish


which


now


passing alleyways in


receding waters of the Caribbean Sea, now dis-
tinctly discernible, sing their song of lullaby.


which swarmed kinky-haired, tropically clad and


Once past the hotel entrance


gate, there lay


,-.o n Inrp At lijfirt. 110 i rh tI ( ntl r In fin,, 10r,,l nif i i t l.1 1,l


K r t" -- 41 un c' ctn~n




44 THE CA

sides of the circular driveway stately royal palms,
majestic in their synimmetry and grace, threi a


cooling shade


over the pathway


while


on the


RIBBEAN.


because.of the possibility of losing a brand new
perfectly spendable $5-gold piece for a ride in a
broken-down,lop-sided, and extremely disreputable


extreme opposite side a grove of young coconut


coach.


Personal


I am slow to anger, but I am


trees swayed and toyed with the brisk


breezes


too truthful to even imply that my fortitude would


which were wafted landward from the near-by sea,
Other older, but none the less beautiful, coconut


trees,


all heavily


laden with clusters of green


coconuts, raised their lofty heads to shelter par-


parrakeets,


and other


birds


of feathery


radiance, which from time to time flattered lightly
and gaily through the air.
Driving under the portico and alighting, each
handed the driver locents in Panaman currency,


emain normal its the facr of h.aidit


the smallest known gold piece hor such an unsatis-
factory carriage ride. .
Fortunately, at this juncture, an old and tried
comrade, Bob Knapp, to whom whatever reputa-
tion for skill in aviation I owe everything, unex-


pectedly appeared upon the scene and aeffr


em-


bracing as onlymen can, who, long separated, meet
again after having shared the ct


Beauilul NEi Crigrbal.


in accordance with the tariff card attached to our
vehicle, in payment for our coach fare. Our coach-
man indignantly refused the offering and loudly


demanded that he be paid in


The situa-


tion was most embarrassing, as I was using trav-
eler's checks entirely and had no gold coin upon
my person and Fred, who was unlucky enough to
have a single $5-gold piece in his well-filled purse,
permitted his excitement to rise to a pitch border-
anrr nnnn nrnonl hkn0rliri nnr rnnlA T ainA rh.


De Havy


bullet i
cheery


and 4 midst


n


torein


clime.


bursting shell


tracer


After a few quiet


words to the coachman,


he started


exciteJ \Vest Indian on his way smiling, explaining
to us that Pnawa silTer earreny s


Th K 2


one-half of UTiled State curre cy, and


tinguish
money,


one romm


the other


whether paper, silver


copper penny, is known here as


f e bkrnvlrp r inn3rn a rhr-'&rtli


al1 United


States


nickel, or even a


"'Gold."


Fred's


t sal a n d I


I ll ItItI I IA I(J L UIlJ A


i ,, ....., %, ... ..m


cmi~L.
At


i:i .......


"gold."









THE


CARIBBEAN.


paid o20 cents silver, as I now realized the enormity
of our offense and could not treat the matter as


lightly as he did.


Fred protested strongly that


water lying east of Colon, the small neck of land
which connects Colon with the Isthmus of Panama,
the calm waters of Limon Bay, and a section of the


he viewed the matter as seriously as I did, but was
forced to smile for an entirelydifferent reason,and,
when I pressed him for an explanation, he slyly
drew his right hand from his pocket and showed
me, quietly laying there, one of the prettiest $a
gold pieces I have ever seen in all my travels.


dark thick jungles of the Republic farther


toward
altitude


the horizon.


showed


transformed


Another
town


in 4 years


from


taken


of New


away


at a low
Cristobal


a swamp


beautiful community very prettily laid out, the


concrete


streets


curving gracefully


around


* .-^- .
. *?;;>
*w^':
^^':- .*
Aff^


Colon Beach to the lef& of Hotel Washington in the foreground;


Statue of Columbus in center;


Swimming Pool and Battery Beach to right; Colon in background.


Possible


was


the uniform of a Lieutenant


Colonel of Aviation in which Bob was clad that so
quickly quieted our enraged driver, but perhaps it
was after all the same pleasing personality which
Bob displays generally, butparticularly in his warm
and sincere greeting to Fred and me, which sent the
coachman and his fiery charger away satisfied.
Telling us of his daring capture of enemy air-


-through it, with excellent quarters


modation


of Canal


and Railroad


ir the accom-
employees.


We strolled through the hotel lobby and were
agreeably surprised to find all of its appointments
to be everything that could be desired in modern


convenience.


Shadvy


and wind-swept


porches,


from which could be obtained an excellent view
of the quiet and deep blue Caribbean Sea, the
- ."




V
S
~
~t


~"vF A~EY~> Pt


THE


Here we saw the apparent phenomena of the
sun sinking in the Atlantic Ocean. Bob explained
to us that owing to the formation of the Isthmus,
making the Pacific Ocean lie east of the Atlantic
Ocean in this part of the world, the sun actually
rises in the Pacific Ocean and sets in the Atlantic


CARIBBEAN.


S ~
tmrtrrL~


and engaging in other waterr sports. \e learned
that swimming is popular every day throughout
the year here, and that practically everbody,
even tots 3 ars old s'im and dive, some of them


becoming very proficient, in pa tics,


the bathing costumes


worn


byhv the la


dies were


Ocean.


In front of us lay a level, well-trimmed lawn,
flanked by winding paths, in the exact center of


which an


artistic bronze statue of Christopher


noted some which might be classed in my native
city of Brooldine as unconventional. h.
Appetizing odors wafting fr omthe
ished' all present desire for sightseeingai, n M Bb,-...


m.s.





-




.I


Colon. Republic of Panama.


Columbus
located.


and a crouching


Indian


maiden


Bob advanced the interesting informa-


tion that the famous discoverer's name is pro-


nounced and spelled


Spanish


language,


"Cristobal


and that the


Colon


in the


two Atlantic


ports are named in his honor.
On the extreme edge of the grounds, facing a


Fred, and I repaired to the dining section to nd


well-appointed central room, refined in ornamenta-


tion, with many tables ou


enclosed


porch.


The tal


snowy white linen, cut gla
ware and silver. The dinn
wished and, as we sipped


tside on a wiMet, screen -
bies were dressed with
ss, and excellent c hna-
ter was all that could be
d our coffeeafl agreed
:~~~~~~~~~~~ L~;X _:. V?~e.I** W lfV.t^ r ^ ,^ s^ .*J|


NS


!M'


'
^









THE


CARIBBEAN.


I WONDER.
Kenneth Greene, '2ac


I wonder


You may think I am crazy,
Perhaps I am a nut,
But I wonder if small Jeff


Will ever grow as tall


And Eve only


when Adam
wore a smile,


Why they didn't cut the
By making it the style.


as Mutt.


cost of clothes


If a tramp went through a forest
On a mountain, after dark,
I wonder, yes, I wonder
Just how loud the dog-wood bark.

'Tis a well-known fact that men
Slip upon banana skins,
But I wonder if a bull-dog
Ever, ever barked his shins.

Of course I know that tea is made


By boiling


leaves of tea,


I know the revolution
Put a load upon our backs,
But I wonderif a Pilgrim
Ever paid an income tax.

In the days when you were little
It was taught to you in school,
But I wonder, yes I wonder
If you know the Golden Rule.

We all acknowledge without doubt
That the best horse wins the race.


But I very often wonder
Why the shore's so near the


But I wonder what another


Would have done in Wilson's place.


sea.


You m
And m


ay thin
aybe it


k I'm an
is true


awful dunce,


But I wonder, really wonder
Don't you wonder these things too?









TIlE CARIBBEAN.


* 1= __ ^_____


!Ii
4t
i


ALMOST'
L,%,n T / il-l'.r, ".


I had asked Mr. Drill if I might not get off for


the last period in t
study period for me.


he afternoon.


This was a


Mr. Drill had asked,


course, the reason for my wanting to go. I told
him that around the hour of 3 in the afternoon,


I was usually very restless.
"You will soon get used to that.


you had better stay this time,


No, I think


" he answered.


ei tlr 0


Five minutes


passed. u &YS A


owO "as the time. Once more I left rn .
This time Io.oked& with great cauri uh,' u^nc
down the hall.


Ah, our principal was not in sight! Gliding
down the hail, hardly dartin tn hredth, I reached
the steps. There at the tarn stood Mr, Dr1l
talking to a Spanish pupil. That was all I saw.


0M' *&* *.^ .
0^'.*'Ii i1
0 X X 0 X


"I do all my studying at home,


" I told him, as


a last resort.
"No; I think not this time."
During the whole period I sat pondering a way


to get off the following afternoon.


Charlie was


going to take me for a ride. in his sailboat and I
had to get off.
Beginning the next day at noon my history
class was not so bad, but I thought I would never
live through the next class of English. Each min-
ute seemed like five to me.
Charlie was going to leave at 3 sharp with or
without me.


At last English was over.


Hurrying to my seat


In another second I was back ib my seat.
Ten minutes passed and no teache came i


the assembly room.


It was now minuS'ftes ti


The third time had always been a charm to
Surely, I would make it this time.
Stepping into the upper haU, I saw the coast
Stppn intoJ aajf **


clear.


This time I headed for the opposite sty


and going down, to my joy, I saw the lower 1


was clear.


Quickly I


in which I kept my bic


the corner and I


walked toward the ro
ycle. Just a turn aroi


would have my--


stood Mr. Drill talking to the janitor.


he saw me


Th


TI


; this time I could not go back.


is t
A


started to open the door into the bicycle roc


into

o 2 .




air
hall "

-nd "" "
evre
NV





me
s I





min
UiaLAi ' *2is;.'!
/<0 V. ff
o a XX tINX*XX XXXXX





me

nf l,* 1f ^ll^^^^


in the assembly room, I hastily packed my books


in my school bag.


After the classes had been dis-


missed and the room was empty-I mean minus a
teacher-I bravely picked up my bag and started


out the door.


Had Charlie --


One step out the


door and 5 feet away stood Mr. Drill talking to
Miss Holloway, with his side toward me.
Silently and rather quickly I crept back to my
seat and sat there nervously chewing and sucking


Mr. Drill spoke:
"Where are you going,:Chester?"
"A-a-a I was going home, sir
a- a --..........-- w.^ jacs ^y Rfclfm etn nih c"


03 0 .


"But didn't I tell you yesterday you could
"0
S ^^^. ar ; < .


"Yes, sir."
"All right.
ning until 4.30
I did.


You stay here with me this ev
"in'
53 0 ;!'./


.It
'00'0 "0

KK
0
00' /s: *^^

*'' *!.V /
0'.**M :1

0< 0.:^ :

K^ K^ K KK0

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0:.^*|







THE


CARIBBEAN.


A LITTLE EXCITEMENT.
) John B. Fields, '0o.


The United States had entered the war.


main question on the Zone was,


Would the Ger-


I listened again.
was two of them.


No, it was not a submarine-it
I took off the receivers and


mans attack


the Canal?


Many


thought


told the lieutenant what I


thought.


would, just as many said no.


The United States


"Boys,


" he said, his face deadly pale,


some-


was prepared


for them, however.


Many


thing is wrong, no U. S. subs are in these waters,


chasers were sent down from the States to guard
the entrances, mine fields were laid, nets swung
between the breakwaters,
Three months had passed and no attempts to


attack had been made.


The careful vigil that


yet there are 2 subs coming this way.


come with me, the rest of you


stand


y your


posts.
He then stepped over and unlocked a locker,
and took out 2 automatics and handing me one,


had been kept was growing slack.
One night in October, I was on watch from 8 to


II on S. C. 8I3 on outside patrol.


As it was get-


ting near midnight I was climbing down from the
crow's nest to the bridge to write out the log of


my watch.


As I was looking for a pencil (it was


dark, as no lights were allowed above decks) my
hand hit the blinker key. As it flashed it was
answered by a flash from sea. As I was standing
there thinking about this, the captain came up
on the bridge.
He looked at his watch, then out to sea and
said "Fields, you may go below, I will stand by
until your relief comes."
I thought this was peculiar because he was very
strict about the watches and besides this, he and


I were not friendly at all.


As he was the skipper,


however, I went down on deck but as I was turn-
ing to go below the light that I had seen was
blinking again, but closer in. I thought that


maybe some naval vessel was coming in.


sleepy


didn't pay much


below and turned in.


attention


As I was


went


I must have been asleep


about 2 hours, when someone shook me.


started up on deck.


ming on


There was the captain stand-


the bridge smoking


a cigar.


Smoking


was strictly prohibited at night on the boat and
the captain had never been seen smoking before.
The lieutenant held out his hand to stop me. He
pulled off his shoes and started up to the bridge.
Soona dull crunch was heard, followed by a sound
as though somebody had fallen on the deck.


"Fields, come on up,


" the lieutenant said, stick-


ing his head out of the house.


I went up to the bridge.


The captain was


lying


on the deck, his face all bloody, a big gash on one
side of his head.
"Take the wheel, and steer for the mine field,"


he ordered, switching on the stern light.


"Our


boat is light enough to go over without touching
them but those baby killers will be blown to where
their Kaiser is going."
Ringing for half speed ahead I headed for the
mine field. Brown soon came up and went up to
the searchlights; the lieutenant and 5 men were
pulling the cover over the forward 4-inch gun.
From the noise astern I gathered that ash cans


were beingputon the racks, and the


Y gun loaded.


"Fields, Brown will relieve you at the wheel, you


"Fields, come here quick,


" he said.


take command of the after gun.


When you see


I jumped up and followed him into the next


compartment.
the listening


The mate was sitting down with


receivers


on his ears.


the light flash, open fire on the second one in line.
Everyone was tense with anxiety, the 183 was


to see action!


Could we get the three of them?


whole crew was standing around, hard by, breath-


If not, we could at least show them how to fight.


Fields, you







... .. !


THE CARIBBEAN.


"A direct hit for number 2;"


sang out the look-


out, "the sub is going down by the stern."
We had put one out of commission with the first


Number


away as fast


as the men could handle it.
"Direct hit for number 2; shot hit in amidships;
sub number 3 submerging."


The lieutenant ran up to the bridge.


"Get


your ash cans ready, boys, we'ye got to get them."
I thought that I would like to get one more
shot in before the sub went under.


"Fire.


"Lieutenant,


" I yelled, "may I fi


ntsh hI


has not struck her colors??"
"Carry on, Fields." .
"Aye, aye, sir! Give'it to her, boys.t 1
sank from sight,
Someone was working up by the crow


'era h


The sub
*/ ~"" * !!< -i | S


s nest.


Shining a flashlight uip we saw the ship's paiat
putting 3 gold stars on her. We had done our .


The fight had lasted but


minutes.


By this


time many other boats were coming out to join us
Getting one of the other boats to stand by for us,


we went


The smoke blew in my face so that I couldn't
see but I could tell by the yells that something
had happened.
Above the noise I heard three bells (full speed


then one bell (stop).


still, about 25 yards from the si


had shot away the stern.


We were standing
ab. Our last shot


She was standing nose


down, trying to sink but could not.

THE FATE OF T]
Lilian M. C

On the afternoon of January 24 an explosion
occurred in one of the holds of the steamship


Marne, immediately followed by a fire.


This ship,


The next day


sentenced to death.


Before he was shot he


fessed that he was a German naval officer
was guiding the subs in through the minte
so that they might blow up Gatun Loks.
The next day the crew received a ble
President Wilson, thanking us for our spices
promoting every one of us. The lieutenant
made skipper on our boat, much to our joy.


"MARNE."


'otton, '20.


*.' U 1 4 -- j >


was
con-
and
,field K


from~
alnd
was
.^ .. ..., *~j. jjC':KK K K-






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was *'^1
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The work on the salvaging of the Marne was
very dangerous, as the odors from the benzine
and gasoline which covered everything wereveryr
disagreeable, and many of the men were overcome.


00


was tied up at Dock I I at the time of the ex-
plosion. There had been some telegraph trouble
on the way down and it had tied up to find the


trouble and


it fixed


before


going


on to


Melbourne, where she was bound. She was loaded
with benzine, gasoline, and fuel oil. Immediately
following the discovery of the fire, she was towed
away from the pier and was sunk in more shallow
water by shots from the Navy submarines.
At night it was a beautiful sight, the oil burn-


ing on the water for about half a mile.


The sky


The stern of the vessel was raise
hours later the bow lifted. The


a little highereachdayuntil all t
pumped out.
The ship, or what was left ol
Dock 6 on March t. It seemed
to ever make anything out of h


wreck.


Very little of the car


and in the early morning of
explosion, a very heavy one, c


by a fire.


The funnel blew off


ed first and a few
vessel was raised
he water had'been
2V
f it, was towed to
almost impossible
er, she wassuch a
was d
March 6, anthd~er
nccurredd, folowed 4,
and into the air,


was illuminated with the bright coloring from the
fire. Nearly all of Colon and Cristobal lined the
walls of the Washington Hotel and Colon Beach
to witness the sight.
The fire burned for about two weeks and a half,
but was confined to the hold in which the explosion
occurred. She was raised in the record-breaking
4 AT 4. . 4 U U


coming down and knocking two large hales in the
roof of the dock. The glass windows were smashed
and the steel doors were blown oat of shape. The
ship was again towed out and sunk off the mole min
40ofeet of water. This time the entire boat did not
sink and the water is being pumped out of the for-
ward holds as it leak s in. She had been raised the
: q -* .


**" *< ..' :4
*0M/
0 ::i|
0 0l1
0; *


.shot!


I gun was spitting


astern),


A ^XXXX

'Jr%. !:


the captainf


owned


the United States Shipping Board,








THE


CARIBBEAN.


slow.


A representative of the company, to which


off Cape


Mala, in


the Pacific Ocean, and


she belongs, is coming to determine whether or not
she is worth repairing.


towed, while burning continually, to and was sunk


at Balboa.


A salvaging party is at work and the


The Olockson


the sister ship of the Marne,


loaded with the same sort of a cargo,


caught fire


same plan is being used as is being used on the
Marne to discharge the cargo.


A QUIET EVENING.


Kathrvn


M. Burgoon,


Mrs. Brown stood in the doorway, drawing on


her gloves.


Her eyes rested on her husband, with


not to answer,
the dressmaker.


and then he thought it might be
So Mr. Brown went very un-


a look of amusement, as he sat in an easy chair.
"John, I thought you were going to the theater
with me this evening."
"I'm so sorry, dear, but I have a great deal


of work to do
spend it quietly


along with you.
"Well, I suppose


this evening, so I am going to
at home. Ask Mrs. Cook to go


I'll have


to, and--Oh,


John!"
"Yes."
"The dressmaker said that she might bring my
new gown this evening, and if she should, please


settle with her.


And, John, if Mrs. Smith calls


me up on the phone, tell her that I won't be able
to give that talk at the club to-morrow. Now
you won't forget, will you?"
"I'll try not to; goodby, dear, I hope you enjoy


the play.


After he


had heard


the door close


Mr. Brown settled comfortably in his chair.
minutes later the telephone rang.


"Hello.


Yes, this is Mr. Brown.


Mrs. Brown here?


theater.
He hac


What?


Why, no, she just left for the


Oh, all right, good night.


papers when,
Mr. Brown pu


become


"jingle, jingle,


papers


interested in


" the doorbell rang.


carefully


aside


went to answer it.


"Oh, Mr. Brown, I called to inquire how


willingly to the door.
"I brought the package of matches Mrs. Brown
ordered this afternoon, sir," said the small boy


at the door.


"We were rushed or I would have


delivered it sooner.
Mr. Brown took the matches and as he closed


the door, he muttered a few


uncomplimentary


remarks about grocers in general and this grocer in


particular.
task; when


Again he returned to his interrupted


Oh, that awful telephone


wasn't his wife here to answer it?
"Hello, this the police station?"
you have the wrong number."


I wonder


asylum,


what it


suppose.


will be


Mr. Brown,


"No,


, the
feeling


it isn t,


insane
; very


much as if he would be ready for that last-men-


tioned place if this kept up,


work.


went back


This time it was the doorbell.


to his


Whoever


invented a doorbell, anyway?
"Pardon me, sir, for troubling you at such a
late hour, but I knew that this would be the only


time I


"Yes,


would find you at home.


said Mr. Brown.


"I am selling a very beautiful tombstone and


thought maybe--


wait for him


to finish.


" but Mr.
With his


Brown
head


didn't


hands he ran for the living room.
There he leaned weakly against the table.
tombstone--good heavens, he wasn't dead yet.


fan is.


" (Fan-fan being M


Brown


s small


When


he had sufficiently recovered from


poodle.)
"She is very much better, thank you, Mrs.Carr.
I'm so sorry Mrs. Brown is not at home, but I'll


tell her you called.


Good night."


As he went back to his work he wondered if
he were 1-n hr internintd likie this nil evening


shock he looked at the clock.


A quarter after


nine; well, dressmaker or no dressmaker, he was
going to bed.
About eleven o'clock when Mrs. Brown tiptoed
very gently into the bedroom, she looked at her


* ,% fl d ,i


L 1


4-rt t t 1


m an e ay n e w a error. n


was


1


-


i b d ith









52 THE CARIBBEAN.




THE LAND OF BEGINNING AGAIN

Eulalie Arthur, '2a.




"You are a failure, John Ferris, that's what you It is just a year after my story opens, but oon
are! You have been going steadily down hill who had known John Ferris would have reognaRized,
ever since your mother's death. And you ask ine in this ragged hobo, the well-groomed man of th
to marry you, a failure! Go and make something city that John Ferris had been,.
of yourself and when you have proven your man- He had gone south the morning after Louse's
hood, come back and ask me that question again fiery speech, thinking that he could retrieve his
and perhaps I shall say yes.' mistakes there but he had been unable to obtainr

Louise Hudson uttered these words with flashing work and gradually things had gone from bad to :
eyes and scornful voice, although toward the last worse, until he was compelled to depend upon the
her gray eyes softened and her voice trembled. kindness of housewives for his meals. Thi had
- ~been the second time to-day that he hadbe
John Ferris stood with bowed head and droop- been sco tm. t
- refused and he was too tired to try agan.
ing shoulders until she had finished. Someone refused and he s t to
Not many y-ards away fo h os a h
has said that the truth hurts, and he knew deep Not man d t houew
railroad, with a string of freight cars almost read-y" i
down in his heart that every word -she had spoken w. o amsad
.* ito pull out. John made his dejected way taowar :1
was the unvarnished truth. .
"i' "them hoping that he might find the door of oAn
"A failure" Well wan't he? "Going down d eha*' *i"," .*.
wasn t open. Perhaps his luck ha hnefrhe foud
hill;" he thought with a pang of the many nights r. a t f T.
0 a car with one of the doors sightly ajrar.
he hadwasted in uselesspleasure insteadofimprov- a d l y
It took him but a very few mAunutes.---. to m .--ake- thega: ...
ing his mind. No wonder Roger Stevens had been tkib an v me mint:. ess ntkcth "ai :
Sall rights opening larger, and to make himself as comfrtabe
promoted to assistant manager, when by possible in a corner ofthe car A rgathtgt
~as possible i-n ad corner .of d~ the ca /siAll that- ni-Mght ......Bf
he should have had the place t tiW -.. -'
he shoul havehaand half of the next day the train sped towardtds
Slowly he raised his head and looked at Louise. destination. About noon of the second day the
But there was no sign of relenting in those gray train stopped at the seaport, Galveston.
eyes. Without a word he picked up his hat and John slowly stood upan-dstretched his cramped
left the house. muscles. Peering cautiously through th d
__~~. 4 4 r ** - ''*..... ^ **. .. "i .! : ^l '. : .


It was still early in the evening, but John Ferris


went straight to his room;


and there,


with his


head buried in his hands went carefully over the
last few months of his life-
Again and again Louise's words came to his


mind.


"A failure!"


and even this morning the


president of the firm had told him that he


either make good or get out."
John wrestled with his problem.


must


All that night


The eastern sky was streaked with


the first


faint rays of a new day when John finally made up
his mind. ---
"No, I haven't any work for you to do and I
ton, 't rWP mIlc. 1-in Pt7Yv fra me tnher mmnme ainna '


he saw that no one was in sigh dropped
to the ground and made his war rom therall-
road yard. Fate led him in the d...ectio.n the
docks As he was stro lling :: amle4 n the
immense bales of cotton he heaid a tman say:
We sail early to-morrow morningg"
Hardly stopping to think, hestpped up to the
man and asked "Could you use an extra anld?
I'll do anything."
The man looked at him for a. minute id then
said shortly; "We could use another ma; and
I guess you will do as well as another. "
John had never been on the sea before and b
the first Few davs he was dreadfu1vt ill But Rradu-


*a **'**
Ii &, *
*^ M ^ ...

"/ .... .N :
y ' .t ,
N** '*'s.* *
* ^ .
N ,. : l
.
/< .
N N.
i
/ < .
. ., ^ *
.' ..: /
.. ,, ,,< *
N^ <' S'*:
....
: % ; *.ll
!M !:
,<* ..i
^' N- .
8,,








THE CA

On the seventh day they sighted land and that


night


caught


studded shores.
"What place is it,


his first glimpse


of palm-


asked, for the first time


showing any interest in the port they were bound


"Why,
course."


man,


don't


you know?


Panama,


Just at that moment the captain approached


RIBBEAN.


to do was very nearly the same as he had done
in the States, so that he was promoted rapidly.-
Perhaps the proudest day of his life came when
he was made assistant general foreman.
When he heard the news his thoughts flew to
Louise and he wondered if she had forgotten him.
"John, old man, I want you to come home to


dinner with me to-night,
days later.


" said a friend of his a few


John consented and that night found him at his


"I am sorry, Ferris,


but I won't need you any


friend's house.


Mrs. Davis greeted him cordially


more, so


needn't come


back after


you go


ashore to-morrow.


and then turned to introduce him to the girl at
her side.


And John, with very little money in his pockets,


"Louise, may I


introduce Mr.


Ferris?"


"MVr.


All that day he walked the


streets of Colon but found no work, and that night
he spent out under the stars, for he was hoarding
the few dollars that he had.
The next morning he sought work again, but


Ferris, Miss Hudson.
his eyes to encounter


" John started and raised


those of the


dreamed about for the last 2


ears.


eyes were tender now and her lips
a faint smile.


were


1 he had
The gray
parted in


without success


and that afternoon


found him


"I believe I have met Mr. Fetris before," she


near Mount Hope, tired in both body and mind.


He entered the printing plant and asked


question.
The man at


his old


the-desk looked into the eyes of


Just then dinner was announced and John found
himself seated beside Louise.


"I am


so glad that you have made good, John,


John Ferris and he met them without flinching.
"Yes, you may come to work to-morrow morn-


she said.


Toward the end of the dinner John


his eyes on


the girl


raised his
he loved,


Within the next few weeks John began to look


proposed a toast "To Panama, the land of begin-


a little like his former self.


The work that he had


nmg againm.


a -~lq


went ashore at Colon.







T H E C A R I B B E A N .X
A LOS TU FOUND
0 1 0oT 0 0
| A K IH ~ ^ *'* 00 0:' -i s
i~~~~~~~~~~0 0-ir 4/iA aJ-> A^r xl 0.^ ^r .Hi,. i| *.:
X X. X X XX .X XX X. X XX
0. o 0^ 0XX. ^.X V ^X^X
*/~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ 0 ^ X^ .........^ ^ y vv ^ ,.X
TH CA I BE N XX 0S XX0KX XX X

. y~ ^ T ^A^T R W WH **"'*!** aBto ^/ ^--fj0


Kirby Fergt


"Oh, dear!" sighed Grandma Whitmore, as she
picked up her crocheting and sat down to finish
the centerpiece she had started, "I thought I left
my glasses right here with my work so when I
picked up my work I would not have to look all
over the house for them but I suppose I must have
needed them for something else and come back
and gotten them."
"Now, let me see, when I stopped crocheting,
what did I do? Why, I went over to Nellie's to
help her bake cakes for her party this afternoon.
I wonder if I left them over there. I will telephone
and ask her."
Grandma left the 'phone quite discouraged, Tor
she had not left them at Nellie's, and she thought
she had searched the house for them and had failed
to find them.


"Mother, I simply r
dances, and that is a
pretty June Morris.
"Well, June, I wish
it seems rather useless


dresses then
to pay this
and wear yo
June said
and went to
though, bec;
tion on boa


, and be
month.
ur pink
no mor
school.
ause she


to arrive that
little touches
taffeta look a
"Oh, June, al
driving trucks
going on strike


tion is soon coming, and you will need so many


sides, we have our income tax
Please try and be satisfied
taffeta a few more times."
e, but gathered up her books
She was quite heavy-hearted
had been invited to a recep-
battleship Pennsylvania, due


day. She deci
she could try
little different
most all the boy
on account of
,and lots of the


before
s arew
all the
womei
A


Lson, 'ea
0



Now Grandma was getting to be quite oldk4
and wasquite helpless withouthergasses.
fore many hours were spent in looking for then
and when her grandson came in to see her th ~
night he found his grandmother sitting in a large
rocker in front of the brightly blazing bg fire
with her face buried in her hands.


After his grandmother had told him why she
was so sad he began laughing and said, ?Why,
grandmother, did you never thihik to look to see
if you hadn't pushed them up in yourohair"
Grandmother then put her hand up to her
head, and there she found her treasure which she
thought she should never see again.


4^


That morning there was very little work dne
in school, because many of the boys and several of
the girls were out. The strike was the main topic
of conversation. That noon there were fewer still
who showed up and, after a lot of high-pitched
talking, the flock of girls left, decided to go to the
"Y" for work. June was more excited than the
rest, because she loved to work anyway. She
and three or four others received employment,
serving ice cream and other light refreshments.
Gleams of a green tulle dress rose before her eyes,
but she dared not hope. She knew she couldn't
make enough money to buy one and it was toot
late to have one made. She didn't even know
for sure whether she was going to be paid. On


and on she worked for 3
to fix up the pink dress.
Saturday afternoon sh
as usual, expecting to
*0 a


*. *'**'** .... .
**- *1^
^.^
/. *: j^
/< '
:< *
/3 *
*3


'

0
N X
**: '/*0
* /
** <'*


^.../
*< .
.:**:
.. / *
:**


* '. **!M<


out even trying

me at 3 'clock

ink taffeta all
* ./ *


THAT GREEN TULLE DRESS.
Lillian M. Cotton 'so.


nust have a new dress for
dl there is to it," sighed

you could have one, but
to me when your gradua-


,rd


the


ied that with a few
and make the pink


Saturday.
working to-day
colored men
n are working


days with


ie went ho
see her p
nt


^

Sf
w .*
*!M


%.







THE


CARIBBEAN.


On the bed instead of pink taffeta was a beautiful


and heard


you talking about green


tulle, so


green tulle dress, all puffs and frills.


Beside it was


decided to make you one't


I'm so glad you like it,


the most beautiful


pair of


silver slippers, and


dear.


Now hurry up and get ready or you will be


beside them a green tulle hat.


where


and how did


on earth


know


these


wanted


come
these


June was as happy as a lark all the rest of the


afternoon.


She even forgot her aching feet in the


particular treasures?
and June hugged a


I think they are beautiful,"
mnd kissed her mother until


beautiful silver slippers.


One thing will always


have a soft spot in June's heart, and that will be a


she had to scream for breath.


green tulle dress.


With


the money she earned


"I wanted you to look nice, June, so I wentinto


at the


" June decided to buy her mother some-


your room one night


ook at your pink taffeta,


thing pretty.


THE RESURRECTION FLOWER.
Alice M. Stilson, '20o.


One of the tropical flowers known as the Resur-
rection flower has derived its name from its pe-


culiar growth.
of its name,


This beautiful flower, so symbolic


blooms only


around Easter


near at hand, the leaves begin to die, which reminds
one of the death of Christ.
In about a week's time nothing can be seen of the
plant, only the bare ground from whence grew the


The Resurrection plant somewhat resembles the


leaves.


Then later we see little purple flowers,


lily in its growth,


the leaves


are broader


and more numerous than that of the lily plant.
During the year these moss-green leaves grow to a


height of about


feet, but when Easter draws


about the size of an orchid, springing up from the
ground, during Easter time, signifying the Resur-


reaction, and from
received its name.


these peculiarities


the flower


THE EXPERIENCE OF


A WAYWARD


YOUTH.


Emilio


Solomon,


Having been led away by a very strong desire
to see the outer world and to revel in the pleasures
and sunshine of my own fancy and its prodigal
illusions, I abruptly left this institution (Cristobal
High School) and all parental restraints for a free


and the enjoying of


everything enjoyable in this


gay city, my purse gave me a significant reminder,
that the open sesame had lost its magic power,


and the scriptural injunction


eat bread,"


, "By the sweat of thy


forcibly


intruded


New York, having


been the choice of my destination, I booked my-
self for that wonderful city.
At noon on Sunday, July 8, 1917, I awoke to
find myself in the great metropolis of the East,
with its weird sky scrapers overshadowing spacious
streets on which traffic of every kind was engaged
and on whose sidewalks busy pedestrians jostled
one another in eager endeavor to move along. I
often clashed with busy traffickers while I unresist-
ingly raised my eyes to the wonderful heights of
these strange buildings on either sideof the streets.
ir .. 1 I1


itself on my mind.
I then immediately began to exert myself, and


the effort was crowned with


success.


I obtained


employment at the national post office, where I


worked for 7 months at $i


8 a week.


At the end


of that period I was forced by the severity of the
winter to seek fresh fields and pastures new to


earn a livelihood.


I found employment on board


aship bound for Europe.
It was a terrible venture at that time as the
European war was at its most dangerous stage.
The Germans were exasperated to the point of
.- ... .. .. A- 1#. _" -J - .3 I-. . - .... J


"Mother,


and untramelled life abroad.








THE CARIBBEAN,


They, in their turn, were goaded on to revenge in
employing every means with their submarine in


hurling every allied ship afloat to


the bottom


of the deep.
My position as second steward did not exempt
me from doing anything the exigency of war time
demanded. I found myself then placed in the most
unenviable position in which the most unpleasant


for thought


was presented.


weather unexpectedly set in.


Unfavorable


Everyone had to be


on the alert and to be up and doing.


I, a novice,


unaccustomed to such an encounter and to walk-
ing the deck of a rolling ship on the bosom of an


angry sea, felt such as I can never describe.


I was


called upon to act as Captain s attendant at one
moment, then as fireman the next, now as a coal


shoveler


and the


next


moment


as a sailor.


In fine I had to do anything I was called upon to
do. The most painful of it all was that I was


compelled


to sleep min


objectionable bedfellows,


company with


the most


No description, however


well drawn, can give an adequate idea of the suf-
ferings and the attendant regrets I underwent as
a just retribution for mywaywardness. Experience
alone can convey to one's mind a picture of what
I mean to impress.
Somethinginfinitely worse, however, than all the


preceding horrors was yet to come.


I allude to the


torpedoing of the boat in which I was, by one of
these unmerciful German avengers, the submarine.
Two days off the shores of Genoa this occurence


took place.


The boat went down.


As many as


could possibly get entrance into lifeboats availed


themselves thereof.


I was one of the fortunate


ones who managed to get into one of these boats.


Untold miseries were experienced.


Hunger and


thirst threatened the absolute destruction of our


numbers.


It is even now a nauseating idea to


a boisterous sea, will bet
misery undergone by let
To make s-hort worik o


incwvrattdefl
a
f along story te ped
shp a in o to save orvK fX bXn JiXeXX
X.XX XXX *SS"K KK X ,X XXX


ship and in order to saave ourselves frqnm being Jred
point f an oar aied men'oiscoed at s high as we oud,
point ot an oar and hoisted as high as we coizld.


a a signal of .dis tress:..
caused that signal to be a
saving our lives; for, as we
we had been mistaken for
we not been prompt in sig


fired upon.


The ship


kmer~c1i4u pwovWdenc
successful s
subsequently ge......
a submarine, and#a
naliflgwe would have 2


turned


out to be


American,and we werepked p and taken to


port of Genoa whe


went


to France,


/ e.


re we spent 4 days. TheW
the next destmii" on or
*n ~ ^ **


rescue ship.


'
Having -revelled in the gaieties and pesrro
La Belle France for a few days andi enjoyed ihe-
** f *
d h..,~ l-/- i^ f-/ 1h W -^-^l~-^kf t lb..^* l d0 li h*-^ h


er auy osbpita ty uo
French people, we e


York.


During the


greatest vigilance, ad
elude the venomous
underwater wolves.
guided us to the have
in New York, the my
of home and my w
feelingofpride andha
soberly. I resolved


.. .. *s-
'*
* I
XX X
r <
^.iM.


eventually sailed back to New
U.
tripiwe had to exercise the
Lopting a zigzag courseso as to
hate of the irresistible German
An ever-watchful Providenc
en of safety. I was once more
sterlous city. I then tho. t :
aywardness. I buried every
aughtiness, and began to think
to change my course. The
tol :W ^ .l*A ../ l-kl^ W~if ,^ i


idea of obtaining a profession forcibly impressed
my mind, I made a determination to return home
and devote myself to study and, in order to do so,
I saw the necessity of returning to school and to
put forth all effort to gain that end. I wrote to
my home intimating my desire to return. My
father concurred and procured me the xeans of
traveling homeward.
Since my arrival, my resolution was strengthened
by reading the intellectual prowesses of my fellow


think how the cup was snatched from one another's
lips as one tried to sip a drop of the refreshing
liquid, The inconvenience experienced, cramped
up, so many in a small boat for many hours upon


students.


I therefore intimated to my father my


desire of returning to my studies in this institution.
He most paternally granted my desire, and here
I am in Cristobal High School.


MARY'S LITTLE COLD,


w'illiam F. Mary,


It fnllrnneA her tn *rknn'hi nruert iir


Tke tpk tre rn.rhn tn.


-x








THE



I I


CARIBBEAN.


Li/lian M. Coiton, '20o.


At the beginning of the school


ar the Seniors


organized a club, called the "Senior Social Club,"
of which Lillian Cotton was elected President, and


them and others were deeply chagrined on finding
out many disagreeable things about themselves


that they had not known before.


The party was


Alice Stilson, Secretarv and Treasurer.


of the club was


The object


"A good time.


The first party given by the Senior Social Club
was held in the latter part of October at the Gilbert


House.


Each Senior invited one other person,


and the club extended an invitation to the faculty


and the mothers of the Seniors.


The evening was


pleasantly spent in character readings, singing,
dancing, and game playing. Delicious refresh-
ments of ice cream, cake, and candy were served.
Mr. Villafranca, the Spanish professor, presented
each Senior girl with a red rose.
The seating capacity of the assembly room was
overtaxed as soon as school was taken up this
year, and it was found necessary to put in several
extra desks.
Miss Walton was kept busy on the roll-call book,
for this year was marked by the coming and going
of many members of the school.


Earlv


in the


school


year Mr.


Nicholas,


our


efficient music teacher, thought it would be well
to get acquainted with the high school body, and
so arranged a little gathering one evening on the


beach at New Cristobal.


Although


but about


one-half of the student body attended, a real get-
together little gathering was enjoyed by those who


were there.


Marshmallow toasting, over a bright


charmingly chaperoned by Miss Walton.
During the first semester one of our most im-
portant Seniors left us, min the person of John B.


Verner.


John had been on the Isthmus 12 years


previous to his sailing and had gone through the


whole


Isthmian


completed


grade


school


his high school


and would


course


had he


remained. He was popular enough with the boys,
but was not a special favorite of the girls or of the


faculty.


He left with the


intention of entering


Columbia University.


During the first semester, Prof. A.


Superintendent


I


of Canal Zone Schools


R. Lang,
. visited


Cristobal High and granted the Seniors a hearing,


during


which


plained to him the part
which we wished to have
in this year s commence-


ment


exercises


Pacific side.


He prom-


ised us a very favorable


share in


the affair, and


we'll get it, for Professor


Lang is our


friend, vou


know.
The school playground


- .-n-,-. -




A j~A~ ir~v1r


T


keep out undesirables.
ever, in keeping Freshmi


It hardly suffie
en or Sophomo


'HE CARIBBEAN :
* N

ed, how- sarprine awaited the cass in theayrm omita aosot
res from daintily served repa~st. Miss May Smith, also


climbing over or crawling under when the gates
were locked.
The fine flag presented to us 2 years ago by
thoughtful members of the community has been
decidedly decreased in size by the brisk northeast-


early trades which gracefully


bend the beautiful


coconut palms shading our school.
Hostilities between our own boys and those of
the male Panaman school across the way proved
of slight consequence this year. There was but one


stone


battle of any moment,


during


which


a


formerly of Crstobal High as an efficient teacher


of Latin and mathematics, was present ana
considerably to the enjoyment olthe occ
the interesting games which she suggest
~interestin^~j^g suju Tm, i v^^a
splendid time was had by eeryoe on this
occasion which, it is safe to say, will not
*occas '*' oni


gotten.


Thank you, "Miss Di


While riding


home


4~ *


on their


train froi
S .


ak ied .. .


~happ
be for-
mta
W N
C>
aj "u t


memorable and enjoyable entertainment for the
Class of 1920, 2 male Seniors sat together when
one of them extracted from his pocket a roand


number of our boys repelled a far superior force


of the enemy and forced
them to retreat to the


vicinity


of their


schoolhouse.


own


The two


forces were dispersed by


the arrival


of several


officers of the law and


Mr. Drill,
all law office


opinion.


the peer of
:ials, in our


There neces-


sarily followed a treaty
and peace was signed,
ending hostilities for the


. year.


It was called "A


Peace of Bliss" in honor
of Gerald D. Bliss, Jr.,
he being the only mem-


ber of
wounded
combat.


our


forces


during


object of a white and crisp brown coblor.


What has come to be a part of our school life. A squadron of planes over the
school, the delight of the student and the despair of the teacher.


The Friday morning half-hour entertainment


programs


directed


unusual interest this year.


Holloway


were


Miss Holloway is to be


congratulated on the management displayed on
these occasions.


Probably


most


impressive


social


school


event of the year was the delightfullittle luncheon
party given to the class of 1920 by Mrs. H.
4Diqgler, who is more affectionately remembered
as "Miss Davis, the former principal of Cristobal
n
High School. On the morning of December 29
*hs eri~c entrained at the Colon railroad station


Most ofthem spoke English "
of our airls informed us later.


KK K KKK K 4 ". A*..13.:.M .i


"Wnat's that askedd
the first.
"OneofMrs.Dingler's


biscuits,


was


answer.
"Oh, boy! Whydidn't
I think of that; give me


a piece.


Early in


February a


number of Japanese
midshipmen on their
training ship, Y'akumo,


vsitin
paid
visit.


g


Canal


waters,


us an enjoyable
They wereshown


through the school by


Professor Dril
expressed no


and they
little de-


light and admiration in
our system ofeducatino


very well,"


as some


4** .'i.:' ^
!M< ' '!


Due to the management of Professor Drill, and,
in no small part, to the monitors of the respective
brakes, the brake service to and from Old and New
Cristobal during the noon hour was always kept a
schedule time and with few delays.
Several times during each week one or more of
the grammar grades would use the assembly h


for their vocal


tramnig.


^.y.
XX XX XX
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.The piano i la
The piano is Aloa to


there and better results were obtaed with the
help of it.


. *^13' :: *: ..^
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THE


CARIBBEAN.


an extremely interesting


lecture on


"Fish and


Their Habits" in the assembly room of the high
school. The seventh and eight grades of the
grammar school were invited and some of them
were surprised to find out there were existing so
many queer fish, as, they expressed it, outside of
those contained in Cristobal High.


A few


days later,


Doctor


Varrill,


re


upon request, delivered a second lecture.


his subject was


and Seek"


possible,


and this


"Nature's
was more


the first lecture.


turning
This


Game of Hide
interesting, if
The professor


drew numerous sketches on the board to illustrate
his talk and they proved to be very instructive.
One of the Sophomores expressed his satisfaction


by saying
'clever.' "
During
strike of


"The drawings were very artistic and


The Seniors sent for their class rings and pins


months


this year
i them


and after
finally de


waiting
livered


several
to their


hands. The general opinion is that the design is
the best that any Senior class in Cristobal High


has had.


The words


"Cristobal"


circular top of a triangle of which


are the legs.


center.


is prettily


forms a semi-


and "S"


engraved


in the


The pins have the same attractive design.


The Class of 1920 have completed the 4 years'
course together and the closest friendships have
developed among the members. Let us see what
they will do in the near future:
Etha Bevington, Harlan Holmwood, and Alson
Sears all plan to enter Berkeley College in Calh-


fornma


in the fall


session.


Kenneth


Greene


expects to enter Pennsylvania State College at the


a


the week's
bout 17,000


West Indian laborers in
the employ of The
Panama Canal and rail-


road,


the high


school


necessarily closed for the
full time, as most, if not
all, of its students went
out to help keep the "big
machinery" of the Canal
moving. The girls helped
in the hotels and restau-
rants to feed the hungry
line of guests in the


former and
the latter.


bachelors in
The club-


Strange


bedfellows.


Four Sophs and one Senior.


same time.


Lillian Cot-


ton will return to


tobal High


take a
course.


post


School


Cris-
)1 to


graduate's


Lindale Davies


plans to enter a college of


dentistry in the fall.


Fields


goes


Agricultural


to T
and


chanical School


Jack
exas
Me-


in Sep-


tember. Duringthesame


month


Doyle


poses to enter Columbia
University. Kathryn
Burgoon and Alice Stil-
son are as yet undecided
as to what they will do.


houses, too, were


not without their


waitresses.


But where were the boys in the meanwhile?


ming me
delivery
master's
school I


time


of their


lives-I'll


Hav-


say-driving


trucks and motor cars for the quarter-


Division.


It was a sad bunch of high-


that trooped back into


the build-


ing on the morning following the closing of the


The fire drills this year were very frequent and
were carried out very rapidly and with the entire
absence of confusion.


Speaking of


fire-a


danger took place in


March.
torch v


slight


blaze of


no great


the physics laboratory in


The turn valve of a lighted gasoline blow


vas turned


too far and


it dropped


And the best of it is that they were paid


for their work, too, and there is not one but would
have gladly done it for nothing.
On April 7 great was the rejoicing among the
members of the Spanish classes, for upon this
11 1 C'% TY^ P1y- t i


allowing the blazing
allowing the blazing


floor.


oline to flow over the tile


After the few flames were extinguished no


damage was found to have been done and no one
outside of the laboratory occupants were the wiser
for what had happened.
r. .1 I S *S^ T


strike.





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THE


of the


man of the hour"


that the high school


received its first half holiday of the year for having
40 half-days of perfect attendance.

During the first semester we held the firstdance
at the Washington Hotel for the purpose of raising


proceeds
annual.


to defray


expense of


publishing


The financial returns were as good as


was expected and even if we were not overcrowded


funds,


the social


benefits


resulting


were


CARIBBEAN.


partook of the gay carnival life, for we k..w her
to be a papuil of a quiet and reserved natuire- "as
most Freshmen are."


The Senjqrs were granted several rights and
privileges this year by Mr. Drill who is always
willing to do the right thing inm the.. right way.
The most important of the:e privileges was the
use of the library as a Senior study hatl with the


right to keep all others out.


immensely pleasing to all attending.

A few months later the second and last dance


was given by the high school at the Hotel


Wash-h


ington for the same beneficent purpose and this
was a success, both financially and socially. The


events


of the


evening


were


made


especially


th
I


*. .
On May 3 the school was excused a li title earlier
an usual, for May 3, together with a fe ays
-n a t -


before and after it, were memorable days ere
because of the visit of our own General Perahing.


Immediately after getting out, the students went to
Fort De Lesseps, "around the corner," which the


attractive by the graceful dancing numbers ren-
dered by several pupils of Miss Helen V. Rowe
to whom many thanks are due for her assistance
in the evening's program.


General was to inspect. Although he did nt make
the looked-for speech he proved extremitelysociabl
and shook hands with many lucky scholars who
were there en masse.


A great deal


of thanks is


also due Mrs. Charles


Cotton
Stetler


and Mrs. Elmer
for making and


serving punch and render-


ing much


other valuable


assistance.

Little doubt there is that
the Senior Class lost their
best friend when Mrs. H.
Dingler left the Isthmusin
January on the steamship
Colon for the States to take


a further


** s.


historical


When


Prince


z'


\ale s visited the Isthmus


many


of the high


school


students residing at Garun
stayed at homeon the day


of his arrival


see him


pass through the locks on
the dreadnought Renown.


All of


our students were


not so fortunate in viewing
the future King of Great
Britain.
The whole school is in-
debted to Doris Oliver for


rhetoric course at Columbia


University.


Most


of the Senior Class were excused to bid farewell


to her at the dock.


"The rest" had to be content


with watching the Colon, from the school window,
poke her bow through the big swells which rolled
in between the great breakwaters, straining their
eyes to see the last of Mrs. Dingier.
Many poor marks resulted from the mid-year


examinations


but this was due to the fact that


they took place during the days in which the year's


carnival festivities were held in Colon.


Dancing,


late hours, and much studying equals what?
The strain of the mid-vear examinations claimed


her valuable and willing assistance at the piano
throughout the year. The rest of the classes
should be thankful that Doris is but a Sopho-
more, for they will have her for 2 years morne to
play for them during singing class, the noon hour,


and at social functions.


Balboa High


School intended


bringing their


annual play to this side of the Isthmus


1L.^ fl-


out. the


influenza epidemic postponed the plan indefinitely.
It was finally shown on April i4 at the Army and
Navy Y. M. C. A. at Cristobal and was attended
by several of our students who declared it excel


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THE


During March, 2 weeks of school were lost due
to the restriction put on by the Isthmian sanitary
authorities, closing all schools, theaters, and places


CARIBBEAN.


that some of our poets had turned their pens in a
humorous direction for our joke department is


quite brief in this edition.


On account of the lack


where a crowd was apt to congregate,


the spread


tl


of the influenza epidemic.


o prevent
During


of space many good poems have, of necessity, been
omitted, likewise numerous stories, among which


this time most of the boys and some of the girls


worked.


The Easter week vacation was omitted


Harry Ferguson's
larly good.


"A Narrow Escape


" is particu-


this year to make up for some of the time lost
resulting from the strike and the influenza epi-
demic.
We wish at this time to thank the officers and
members of Cristobal Lodge No. 2, independent
Order of Odd Fellows, for their financial assistance


in the


publication of THE CARIBBEAN


and par-


ticularly Mr. Ernest Cotton, whose labor in con-
nection with its actual printing proves his loyalty
to his old alma mater. The Odd Fellows gave a
dance to the Seniors on the roof of the Masonic
Temple on the evening of April 10. The dance
was very well attended and the proceeds helped
us not a little in the publication of our annual.
Above all, however, it showed the spirit of friend-
ship which the people of the community have for


the school and


also showed us that


our efforts


It is not very often that a Freshman receives
praise but in this case Lawton Patten is to be con-


gratulated on


artistic


sketch


work


in this


number of the annual.


A silent but effective partner, is Mr. A. P. E.
Doyle, whose advice in the planning of this issue
of THE CARIBBEAN is thankfully acknowledged.


he always


donating
s prints


programs
them in


or tickets
an artistic


manner at the lowest possible cost to us. Mr.
George H. Ball of The Panama Canal Press read
all proofs on this CARIBBEAN himself, freeing us
from a great cost and he did the same unselfish act


last year and the year before.
it great to have such unfal
Freshman language "I'll say


Really, folks, isn't
tering support? In
we're lucky."


to make this issue of THE CARIBBEAN the


ever


"best


was not being unnoticed.


On the afternoon of May 8 a very successful


cake sale was


held by the school at the Cristobal


The boys


quartette is formed of


almost the


same members as last year but not much


was


accomplished, chiefly because of the lack of time
and because a lot of extra time had to be put on


"The Rose Maiden,


a very pretty


opera


which


Mr. Nicholas was teaching us.
Tuesday and Thursday mornings were always


clubhouse from which the handsome sum of $6o.35


was realized.


This gave


the financial resources


of THE CARIBBEAN a splendid boost.


ladies w
thanked


ho contributed


cakes


needed


All the kind


are to b


assistance


Bevington and Mrs. Cotton at the
ticularly appreciated.


e deeply
of Mrs.


sale was par-


looked forward to by the whol


on these


mornings


we had


e student body, for


our singing


class.


We do not mean to imply that we enjoyed our own
singing, but we did like the selection of musical


pieces


Nicholas


taught


The faculty


was immensely pleased with the singing and often
commented on its worth. This class, however,
was lacking in altos, so several charming scholars
from the seventh grade with that quality voice,
were invited in and helped out greatly.


The "Office of THE


CARIBBEAN"


was almost


Give credit where credit is


Harry
and E
Seniors


Ferguson


and Frank


tha Bevington
, are responsible


of ads which adorn


due is our motto.
Raymond, Juniors,


and Harlan
for the ex


Holmwood,


cellent


batch


the last pages of this book


and are to be congratulated on their fine work.
Mr. Lee, teacher of manual training, left us the
first half of the year for Balboa and his place was


filled bv


Mr. Bacon, newly from the States, an


efficient teacher, a favorite of the boys and a strong
booster of THE CARIBBEAN.


flooded


poetic


this year.


We wish




*.^4 :^-.

0 /


THE CARIBBEAN


ATHLETICS.

Jack FieMs, 'ao.


4/. *-^ :


BASKETBALL.


We opened the season with our old rival Balboa.
Until the lasp quarter we had a good lead on them
but for some reason our team went "dead" and
allowed Balboa to score enough points to win the
game. We played them a return game at Balboa


and beat them by 7 points,
the same as they beat us. The
third and deciding game was
also won by Balboa, giving
them the series. A peculiar
incident with this series is that


students


Gatun p
team pl
game w-
the last


completely


successful than in the first, winning the game in
5 minutes extra time.
Although we won but 2 games this year we had


- p S n It I^1-t<


won the


the lead and held


finish found the score 2i


opposition


players.
were ul


but clever teamwork


This turned the tables, for the soldiers


unable


to enlarge


their score


while


BASEBALL.


Cristobala


played hatd
ayed hard


r
0
t A>

tAt
~>< <~

A
0

4* '*"


ofHenter and Ferguson, were outstanding features
of the game. Result, Cristobal High School 34
Pedro Miguel x7.


Uigh.


and our
and the


as about even up to


of the


third


the school


all the


first half, dropping basket after basket and the
work f Sears iin the second half was of equal. vae.

Splendid guard work on the parts of Dy, Har-
rison, and Raymond 'and center work on the parts


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On the evening of the 24th
of May, the school basketb4a


team journeyed to Gatuni
motor cars and at the ub-


house there, played two fAst,
interesting games. T fist
and closest game was played
with the Gatun lightweights,

several members of which are


scores were


points


different.
After the Balboa series we
played 2 games with an Army


team from Gatun.


- -- -


The team


they played for the first game


was the


team


that won


Isthmian championship.


em,


played th
put up a
outclassed.


however,


hard fight even


though


In the second game we were more


a very


team,


majority of our games.


and should


quarter when we pushed into


The whistle blowing at the
o to i8. The second victory


of the evening was gained from Company A, 33d
Infantry, on the same floor by the score of 32 to
25. The soldier boys were there strong with the


S .-f* ..... .- -- .


BalboaR... ...... --.. ...-..
Balboa..--......- -
Balboa ...... --...... -
B ~
Gatun ..............
G atu rL.,....... ..... ....- ".. ..


28 C.H.


C H.


S.-


C H .S .... ... ...........


i2 C.H.


S a -. .-^ .


Total ....... ... 109
* Five minutes overtime.


boys in the last half made possible an easy vi-
tory. The first half of this game was played by
i several substitute members of the school team but
i in the second quarter the Company all but ran
8 away with the game necessitating the replacing
i of the subs on the school team by the regular


Otal .. .. -----... -.. -


On May


4, Physical Director


Wilson took 8


Cristobal High School boys attained and main-
tained a safe lead to the finish.


-K.KKSKS

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THE


CARIBBEAN.


infield showed up very poorly.


Before the next


good for past defeats.


Moreover, it looked as if


game the entire infield was rearranged and showed
a big improvement.
We played 2 games with Ancon this season and


they were accomplishing their purpose up to the


ninth inning.


The last half of the ninth found the


score 3 to 2 in De Lesseps


won both of them. In t
a no-hit, no-run game,


ie first game Sears pitched
while our team hit the


opposing pitcher hard and scored 6 runs.
We started a ball game with the boys from


up for a last crack at the sphere, due partly to an
error on their side and real baseball on ours (even


if ywe do say it), we squeezed in
settled the argument.


Gatun


but before


the game


was half over the


game turned out to be a farce. After the ninth
inning when the score was finally added it was
found to be 19 to I.
Teams from Gatun seemed to be our meat,
for after beating the boys, we played Headquar-


ters team.
*


innings,


Although they were ahead for several


we soon overcame their lead and


won


SWIMMING.


The swimming meet held on May


Balboa


and Cristobal


schools


22 between
at Balboa,
The score


ended in the defeat of Cristobal High.


by points stood 45 to 23.


issuing of passes prevented us from bringing to
Balboa any backers but we'll not put the blame


the game.
A series of 2 games was played with the men


from New Cristobal. T
and we took the second.
Sears hit for the circuit


hey won


the first game


In the second game
with one man on base.


A third game is to be played at an early date.


Having nothing to


GIRLS


Fort de Lesseps out to Mount Hope ball diamond


was arranged to take place at Cristobal in June,
but this annual must go to press before that time


so we are unable to record


going to break and the splendid victories we are
going to achieve at that meet.


and finished up the season with a win.


In this


game Sears knocked one for a home run with none


on base.


The girls formed a basketball team and played 3
games this season. All but two of the girls had
never played basketball before, so, taking this fact


Sears in 8-games.
On April 24 we again utilized the Mount Hope
diamond, this time with Fort De Lesseps as our


into consideration,


the girls


played


very well.


Although they lost all their games they showed
good material for a team for next year.


opponents.


As in our first game with them we


had no difficulty in administering defeat, conse-
quently we romped home with a 9 to 2 victory.
a One week later the De Lesseps boys came back for
more, this time with the determination of making


Gatun .... ...........
Ancon ... .... ........
A ncon.. ... .... -.-.. .... .


T otal ...... ................


S .. .. .....


S ....... _......


TEAMS.


Basketball.


Sears, '20 (Captain)
Raymond, '21.
Doyle, A., '20.
Holmwood, '20.
Ferguson, '21.
Greene, '20o.
Doyle, P., '22.
Harrison, '22.
Ashton, '23.
Solomon, '23.


Baseball.


Raymond,'21 (Captain)
Sears, '20.
Doyle, A., t20.
Davies, '20.
Ferguson, '21.
Center, '21.
Doyle, P., '22.
Harrison, '22.
Solomon, '23.
Ashton, '23.


Swimming.
Sears, '20.
Greene, '20.
Fields, '20.
Raymond, '20.
Doyle, A., '20o.
Doyle, P., '22.
Bliss, 23.
Cloke, '22.
Patten, 21I
Townsend, 22


Track.


Sears, '20.
Raymond,
Davies, '20.
Greene, '2o.
Doyle, A.. '
Harrison, '2
Doyle, P., '


'favor but on getting


2 big runs and


The limitation on the


of our defeat on that.


Another, or return meet,


do one Saturday we took


the records we are


This made the second circuit clout for


BASKETBALL.


6 C.H.
16 C.H.


C.H.


TotaL ............. .......












THE CARIBBEAN


Realizing the profit derived from exchange we
have this year striven to enlarge and better this
department of THE CARIBBEAN. In this we have
been entirely successful. Although some to whom
we have mailed copies of THE CARIBBEAN have
not responded, others to whom we did not make
advances have more than filled their places. Our
success has therefore been marked, for is not our
fifteen of this year a vast improvement over the
two of last year?
We have made many new friends with whom we
hope to build up a long and profitable exchange.
Moreover, we have not yet given up those who


have failed to respond to our advances.


Owing to


the number of copies printed last year only a very


ROCKS AND ROSES.


The Academy journal


Norwich FreeAcademy, Norwich Con


Your literary material is good. You have a fine
editorial, good school notes, and a splendid cover
design. A few snapshots would improve the paper.


The Curtis Monthlyv.
November, '19g
good literary mat


Olde Dayes" i


s


Curtis High School, Staten Island, N.
, and January, '2o issues. You hare
erialandorigmial ideas. YeGoode
splendid. Are there no cameras


~fr


among your students?

TheE .L. H.S.Oracle. EdwardLittle High School, Auburn, M.
Your February number is very patriotic with the


Lincoln cover


and article on Roosevelt.


stories are good and department headings original
and well-drawn.


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few were left for exchange.


of those
forced


to wa


For this reason several


Shave remitted toc
it for this edition.


Sus have i
To these


humbly apologize and hope that this


be full


issue will


recompense for the long wait.


The Habit.


Charles City High Schnol, Charles City, Iowa.


Your St. Patrick's edition is appropriate. Your
paper is full of interesting school news. More
literary material and a few more cuts would improve
your already good paper.


Here's to exchange.


May it grow,


And spread to three pages or more,
For its profits we know
Are unmeasured, and so
Here's a toast to exchange and its lore.


The Index.


October,


Easter numbers.


High School, Oshkosh, 9is.
'-o, Commencement, and


The only adverse criticism we


can offer is that your name and address are hard to


pronounce in a hurry.
many good jokes?


Try it.


Where do you get so


Last year we started to exchange, and now we


The Habit


and have


development.


broken


Having


The Record


so many


changes, we found it necessary to have an Index


n i order


to know


where


various


The Magpie.


St. Magxares School, M'aterbuy, Conn.


Your poems are great.


They surpass your prose,


But have you no artists or amateur photographers
in your school?


Academy


Kenneth Gne, 'a
Kenneth Green e, '2o.


Oshkosh


'19, January,


for rapid


*










THE


CARIBBEAN.


The Purple and Gold. Cedar Vale High School, Cedar Vale, Kans.
Your paper has what most lack-plenty of snap-


The Zonian.,


Balboa


High School,


Balboa,


are glad to have The Zonian among our ex-


shots.
material


changes


In fact the cuts overbalance the literary


How about an exchange department?


also acknowledge with thanks the receipt of several
issues of the High SchoolOutlook.


this year.


The general excellence


literary content is a reason for pride in which its


sister school, dear old
among the many g(
larger etudenr body,


Cristobal, shares.


ood ones
excels it.


received,


of its


No exchange
, with a far


It is an enduring


The Purple and Gold.
Your stories are
rations would add


Nute High School,


good, but too short.


N. II.


A few


tlv to the attractiveness ot


monument to the accomplishment of its contribu-
tors and a silent tribute to the devotion and ze:,
of its teacher of Eng!ish, Miss Myrtis M. Gallup.


the paper.


BOUQUETS FROM OUR FRIENDS.


The Record.


Marsha/ll


High School,


Your stories are among the best we h


Your department headings


drawn.


The Whisp.


Richmond,
ave read-.


are original and


Whv not more poems?


Itihmington


High School,


i!'ilmington,


THE CARIBBEAN with its pictures of palms and


sunny


beaches forms a vivid contrast to our own shivery weather.
Evidently they are not bothered with coal strikes down there.
THE CARIBBEAN is an annual filled with stories, poems, jokes,
and articles on the Canal Zone. With only about 5o pupils in
the school an annual has been produced that any school might


be proud of.-The Curtis


Mionthlv.


You have a fine editorial,


good stories,
original, but


joke dep
shots.


attir


good school notes, and


although short. Your class pag
would be favorably replaced by a
ent. What's wrong with a few


es are
good
snap-


THE CARIBBEAN.-The snapshots give
Keep it up.-The Index.


THE CARIBB
that your Exc
The Magpie.


your paper


spice.


EAN.-W\Ve find you most interesting and hope
change Department will be a great success.-


THE FACULTY.

Paul C. Dovie, '22.


Our principal


Mr. Drill,


Who works with us with


a will,


For English


we have Miss


Who is sometimes happy and


oway,
sometimes


But when we fool, he shows us his rule,
And then we quiet down and be still.


But when she is cross, it


To talk will mean


is at our


"F" without delay.


Music is taught by Mr. Nicholas,
Whose four-part singing does tickle i
But as a teacher, he makes a screecher
Sound like a bird in the forest.


Drawing is given bv


History is taught by Miss Walton,


Who can say


"Mvers's"


book without haltin,


If outlines for her are not complete, a poor mark


we're sure to


meet,
say "It's your fault, then.


Mr. Bacon,


If he was to leave we'd be forsaken,
Tho' we treat him not as we ought,
sport,
And we shall behave like a deacon.


El ultimo pero no menos,


hie proves


himself a


Sefior


"Villafranca,


Quien segun todos sabermos,


Nos ensefia a


"Monsanto.


*









THE


CARIBBEAN.


"r^.
* ** ' y.^&' **K!
: **.** vy: ^*^^^

/ S y'. I' .^.^ i




^*- ^ .^ <* i' ^"/^l^l1^






.. "*i^
*w
^ ^ *< ..
.' /< ':
./ :'
13'


Lillian M. Cotton, 'so.


The alumni is a new phase in the life of THE


Leland Bourke Welsh is working for the State


CARIBBEAN.


In the 2 years


in which there has


chemist,


Trinidad, Colo.


He expects to return


been a complete high school course offered at Cris-


tobal,


there have only been


io graduates alto-


to the Colorado School of Mines in the fall, which
he left on account of ill health


gether, but in the coming year, we hope to have a


Mary


Elizabeth


Verner


is studying


at the


long list of "passers on


and sincerely trust that


University of South Carolina.


we may always be able to hear from them.


- Alice Arlene


Ball is at Simmons College, Bos-


Mae Coman


Pullig)


is residing in


ton, Mass.


Arlene is expected early in


July to


keeping house.


Susie Inloes Harrison is taking a business course
at Goldey College, Wilmington, Del., and expects
to return to the Isthmus some time this year.


Catherine


Tesse


time at Berkeley Co
to be a journalist.


Waid is having a wonderful.
liege, Berkeley, Cal., learning


spend her vacation with her parents on the Isth-


mus.


She is taking a secretarial course.


Anna Dorothy Weir is living at Gatun, C. Z.,
at the present time.
James Gerard Raymond is studying electrical
engineering at Columbia University.


Kenneth


Maurice


Edwards is an


apprentice


George


Minot Cotton is still in Cristobal, but


expects to leave shortly to study architecture in
the United States.


electrician and, after having completed his course,
he intends to study electrical engineering in col-


SCHOOL DAYS.
Etha J. Bevington, '20o.


I sit in the buzzing schoolroom
Thinking ofdays thathave passed,
Of four long years whose memories clear
Bring sweet recollections that last.


The year


as a "Freshie"


was terrible,-


As a "Soph" I sought to amend,
When a Junior I wished my school days were
And now I am fearing the end.

Ofttimes when English was hard


These days will soon be over
For the end is drawing near,
No more will I seek the joys and sorrows
Of the school days that are dear.

I have often been told by my elders,
Who through these same years have passed,
That these days are the happiest
And to enjoy them while they last.

But now that I am nearing the:end


over,


Cristobal, C.








THE


CARIBBEAN.


John B. Fields,


Mr. Drill


"William,


you complete


SEEN IN


COLON.


lessons that you missed?"


William I
Mr. Drill.


H.- "Yes, sir;


I made them up?"


"It sounds like it.


J.
We repair


Cumberbatch,


Furniture.


and translate French,
English.


Spanish,


Mr. Drill.-"Mr. Bacon, how many Freshmen
work at manual training?"
work at manual trailing.


Mr. Bacon.- Oh, about on


e-half of them.


P. Davies, Custom Tailor.
"We die on men and women's clothing.


Holmwood.


being used in shoes.
Al Doyle (as usual).-
banana skins for?"


Holmwood.-"Oh,


"In Europe fruit skins


"What do they


use


are used


G. Arthur.


"Furniture repairer, also talking machine
Banana Factory.

Coffee and Leather Shop on 9th St.
"Coffee ground to the sight of all buyers.
welcome all and roast daily."


Miss


Walton.-"I


gave


to talk but not to speak.


you boys


permission


SEEN IN


A COLON EARLIER SHOP.


"I'm not in favor of this phonetic spelling


at all."


"Carpenters wanted immediately.


" Inside


was a


Freshman waiting for a hair cut.


She.-"Why not!"
He.-"Well, take


having
world."


p-a-r-1-o-u-r


' for instance;


'U' in it makes all the difference in the


Frank Raymond (to
ing a rifle at Doyle's
Cloke, don't you kr


Harold Cloke, who is point-


head)--


low


Look out


Garner.-


"Dorothy,


how do you


poach


eggs ?"
Dorothy.-"Put an egg in a pan of water and fry


HEARD


there,


that that gun shoots


A demagogue is


IN ANCIENT HISTORY.
Sa Jewish church.


through 3 feet of wood.


A mummy is an Egyptian idol.


Patten.-"Noah
electric lamp."


was the first man to use an


A pedagogue is a Jewish


Irate mother to


/'-ro++,l,, __ ,'lA ,t Ar ,-Tr,. nn+, .+*, n "


Mr. D.-


hurch.


"So that


is what those


Harlan


Harlan
slippers."


He.




Nu * i .i ll::' 0 : N:


THE


CARIBBEAN.


Sears.--"Gee,


fellows, I


was following a


sweet


Colon the lieutenant turned to Paul and said:


dame down Front Street, when a car came from


"Gee,


I bet


go per cent of the people


down


one :of the side


streets


and hit her.


I rushed


over


there expect us to crash to earth.


to pick her up but she
not to be seen.


Doyle.-
her?"
Sears.-'


was


"What happened


*Well,


solution I have
car-bur-et-or."


Doyle.-
radi-a-tor.'


Paul Doyle
his first ride


the only
is that the


"No. I think the


was taking
in an aero-


plane and while saili


ng over


"Yes, and


people up
same thin,.


C.H.
on the I
"Say,
is that
"She


"Well


Co per cent of


here think


savs


Paul.


S. student to porter


train:


2 ears old


itxdcwlA it


too young to smoke.


THE FINAL FOOTNOTE.


EXCHANGE


HUMOR.


"Why do
daughter.
"For the


you paint,


same


reason


" asked a violinist of his


you use resin,


"Why, the law of gravitation, of course, son"
"Well, dad, what did people do before the I


was passed?"


papa.
"Why, how is that?"
"To help draw my beau,

S. S. teacher.-"Now we


quotation.
pentance.


will start


" replied the girl.


will each give a Bible
vith one showing re-


0 "
'l / !^ .::M '
4 K^


In the parlor there were three,
He, the parlor lamp, and she,
Two is a company, no doubt,
So the little parlor lamp went out.


see my new car.


First

"Say,


il.- "Go


thou and do likewise.


"Gee,


it's a peach, but where is the horn


"Why, I don't need one, don't you


dad, what keeps us from falling off the


on my radiator,


earth when


we are upside down?"


SCentral American


U Plumbing and Supply Co.
SEverything in the line of Plumbing
* COLON, R. P. PANAMA, R. P. g


to


Pananma
, porter
lamp?
is 'bout


turn


: .: */i^ *0
0 4. *


"Judas went out and hanged himself.' "


"Hey, Herman,


'Dodge Brothers.


see that sign


xx






THE


CARIBBEAN.


U
S4aborite obbite tars of the
*
*
tlass of 1920

5g LILLIAN COTTON KATHRYN BURGOON LINDALE DAVIES








BALSON SEARS ETHA BEVINGTON JACK FIELDS KENNETH GREENE






is~siDoorOTY GIsH ---ay
S~~is TOM MOORE H
g ~HA1RLAN HOLMWCOODS
SALICE STILSON
AL DOYLE
USs __ ^ ff-j* __ __. T?\














swat TOM MEIGHAN ^
S

SEV JACK FIELDS KENNET H GEN

*? S
S
.:






THE


CARIBBEAN.


* RATHBUN, STILSON & C
* GENERAL HARDWARE AND LUMBER MERCHANTS
5 DEALERS IN
S. PAINTS, OILS, AND BUILDERS' MATERIALS, ETC. .
5 Picture Framing a Specialty
SP.O. Box 140 COLON,


0.


*.


II of P.


* U

SRICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO

* 23 FRONT STREET U
* Next to International Banking Corporation

U Cameras and General Photo Supplies S
* S
)M Sole Agents for
* Collins' and Globe Photo Mounts and Mountings The Central Dry Plates 5

U WE ARETHE ORIGINATORS OF THE RICHARDS, ART CRAFT PICTURES S
U A DISTINCT DEPARTURE FROM THE OLD STYLES OF PORTRAIT WORK
PH. ALEX. RICHARDS
]^Phone Corp. No. 9
S P. O. Box 523, Cristobal, C. Z.
S

*:



I THE ROYAL TAILORS
* CLEANERS AND DYERS 1 V. TROTT, Manager
S103-105 Avenida de Paez, Colon

SDry Cleaning, Steam Pressing, and Dyeing, Alterations and Repairs.
-M vs


*:l .: *
!MN
. '. N
KK K K K
* * !i .





THE


CARIBBEAN.


^CfPHG IE 6EElIBLE ll
iS

FRENCH LINE OF STE

* REGULAR SAILINGS FROM CRIS- MONTE
TOBAL, CANAL ZONE, TO FRANCE FRANC
-a

Via the Panama Canal (Ecuador
For all particulars apply to
FRENCH LINE AG
5 P. 0. BOX 128, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
MSMMSMMMM AM


AMERS


MeheMade 40tst*Matt*Setsheus^w*989490a^f~Phb
aya*gaga*gee had *^a*g*ga *U'Uappmpageypegag Wa'1^g'^at ^'


ILY


SAILING


FROM


E TO SOUTH AMERICA


.4 If. *'4. *; I lle ., *''^*^ig nzte *lt 4* *St*'-i *Ip tS


, Peru,


and


ENt


PHONE No. 185


S You are cordially invited to visit
* The American o
SCosmetic Parlor
5 MRS. HARVEY W. WRIGHT, Prop.
5 Over American Bazaar
S Phone Corp. 298 - Colon S


WHEN IN PANAMA


^SI U
* MISTELVI -
THE JEWELER
S - 29 Central Avenue -
* S


THE HOME OF .

" "WAJLK OVEFt SIOES"

PANAMA MF I.A NV 1A7AR COLON


SgTLfi


llIOU




K K KK xK
*THE CARIBBEAN.


Central American Printing Co.
*'^'f- *V^^W T^TB
* ., ,-,,.,,,,.,,.,,..,.,,,:,,..,. t'''''t'h''i'i'' 1KC
6TH STREET AND AVE. A PANAMA

-1 Ur~ ^*A \crxw ^
igh Quality engraved
Grade and a
Grade 3Promptness a
SPrinting I Embossed
Accuracy Effects


ADDRESS BOX 287, PANAMA, R. P. TELEPHONE CORPORATION 7T 5




SWH I PANAMA -

SDo not fail to call at

~HEADQUARTERS FOR






g The new electric starter Phone us for a caaog
g FORDisthe ideal Family or '1^ all^ M\ ^ and see the CAR f
Car for the Canal Zone
^- L ^p^J U'1 _- ^ ^ ^s ^







STHE UNIVERSAL CA-
. You should have one -






THE


CARIBBEAN.


*I. L. MADURO, Jr.


Souvenirs of the Canal, Panama Hats, Etc.


IAgent for Eastman Kodak Co., Columbia Graphophones and Records
SNovelties, Silks, Stationery, Etc.


S CATHEDRAL SQUARE, PANAMA
5 (Next to Central Hotel)





a PERUVIAN STEAMSHIP COMPANY
FAST MAIL EXPRESS STEAMERS
WEEKLY SERVICE BETWEEN
CRISTOBAl, C. Z., GUAYAQUIL inteeate PERUVIAN PORTS
U With the magnificent and new steamers
I CAYAL1" "MANTARO" "URUBAMBA" "HUALLAGA"|
ALL OUTSIDE CABINS -:- MARCONI WIRELESS
________-___________________ 4"262
SHead Office on the Isthmus of Panama
CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
1 Cable Address: "VAPORUANA"
|FOR PARTICULARS APPLY TO
E. D. BEJARANO, General Agent






THE CARIBBEAN.


SH S, WIRD & BCD
* INCORPORATED

I BONDED WAREHOUSE
* COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA 3
SMain Office: 40 Wall Street, New York, U. S. A.
BRANCHES: NEW ORLEANS, HAVANA, SAN JUAN, CRISTOBAL, BALBOA


* h "*ARROW COLLARS u
ARROW SHIRTS g
S SAFE'5 INTERWOVEN SOX

KENYON'S 5
* PALM BEACH SUITS
I S

B All American Standards for Style
S and Quality

S ^Sold by the following dealers:
5 COLON PANAMA
5 The Muller Co. Palais Royal
S STROPS SHAVES CLEANS sterling Stores American Bazaar
* American Bazaar Maduro & Co.
Without Removing Blades Lum & Company French Bazaar
Kwong On Chan La Mascota

* Sold by the following dealers: 5
PANAMA COLON THE NATIONAL DRINK
La Mascota American Bazaar
1 French Bazaar The Muller Co. TVT 1 f T 5 m


V<'






THE


CARIBBEAN.


IWilliam Diers

U SUCCESSOR TO
FRANK ULLRICH

* WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MERCHANT
-^^ ~ ~~~~~. weal. i ... ' 'i '*t i i. ,# 'g 41 9 U U" h *' t.*.' .U. s*t" mt g9 *5 U| tq tg''t t*'~ *'' *I. i *E t..n ' ** 1' t 5
SAgent for
|White RocK Mineral Water and Ginger Ale
* Park CO. Tilford's Candy
jAnheuser-Busch Malt Nut

* 48 Front Street, PHONE 101 Colon


U Cable Address "IMPCO" A. B. C., 5th, and Lieber


Colonlmport and Export o., Ltd.
5 JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
I MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
5 Dealers in
* General Merchandise and Native Produce

g COLON, R. P.
U P.O. Box 107

U Branch Retail Stores and Trading Stations:
if l ..-. -- -w a-* tr a a C, rTr a T A rc-rl .n~r a *rjlt~^' ^ /T T '^T" riTn^-T-


55
U
U
S
U
U
S
U
S
U
U
S
S
S
S
U
S
S
S




-K. s m


THE CARIBBEAN.


* rAN-AMERICAN DRUG STORE
S 50 FRONT STREET AND 56 BOLIVAR STREET, COLON, R.P.
u--______A COMPLETE STOCK OF_____
* Patent Pure Toilet Articles,
SMedicines Drugs Etc.

* N. SALAZAR, Proprietor
MAM MM @@ MMMM S MMMAAMSMp


x x x xxx
xx xx ^ ***


I Clarence Alberga

* FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES
SFurniture, Hardware,
U Glassware, Crockery, etc.
S ^ ffkf ift*rS S t flw* tJ r, It t f ^fhl tk* t .ute ^ A AktdS 't f~Ujj
* PhNos. 124-126 BOLIVAR STREET
Phone Corp. 105 P. 0. Box 82, Colon, R. P.


* BURGOON'S JEWELRY STORE

* 54 FRONT STREET, COLON

S Repairing speci 1


] ." "- .
Th>:
9 *:/


H. HENRIQUEZ-

5 Commission and Stamped Paper
STrucKing Agent and Revenue Stamps
UP. O. Box 51 Cable Address:
COLON, R. P. JOTABE

SAAAM8MMM88 M
Ammsmsmmumusumssmumsm MM


Morgans (
For your


da A H 5


garage


7 passengee
na Ha A -


-- '- - i M n ii


Between 2d and 3d Streets
COLON, R. P.
r touring cars
- nnth






THE


CARIBBEAN.


I LAM'S GARAGE
H Between 14th and 15th Streets, Broadway
& COLON, R. P.


5* GENERAL SERVICE-DAY AND NIGHT

S5 AND 7 PASSENGER CARS -:: CAREFUL AND RELIABLE CHAUFFEURS

I 'PHONE CORPORATION No. 33, COLON 5




SR. BROUGHT & COMPANY
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
1. IMPORT MERCHANTS .
* FRONT STREET COLON, R. of P,



S12ANDBO Young s Garage COLON
*DE PTENTS CARS 0 RLALE CHAUFFEUR
ST..,.. REET.S^.....,... y* ,.,,,,..p -,..,. ..*'. ,.....-

* DEPENDABLE CARS RELIABLE CHAUFFEURS S









THE CARIBBEAN:


* AMERICAN COSMETIC PARLOR '

FACE MASSAGE - SCALP TREATMENT
^g ....... w.,,,,'tf h,,#...... .. * **. By Hand, Vibrator, or Violet Ray ..,.,.,.f..,.M.>. .M.w
SSHAMPOOING ELECTRICALLY DRIED HAIR DRESSING MANICRING S
* FANNY BRIGGS CARR and MARY PULLERS
S Face and Scalp Preparations Manicuring Articles Real Hair Nets-"Cap"
* Phone Corp. 298 OVER AMERICAN BAZAAR 8th and Front Sts., Colon

*mmmmuuWmUUSUS MS t


* U
* U


i~ llllll 01 mi
gogan P^ ^*1 Fold *^ ***^




* COLON'S
L. Leading Jewelers



* For choice selection of
* S
JEWELRY, SILVER, AND
U CUT GLASS g
* U


U COLON STORE PANAMA STORE
S 11th St., Opp. Com'y. 8th St. and Central Ave p
S PRONE 9 P.. C. PONE 858 CORP.


. **: .
:1i: ^ ***

: !^ .. '"*^^
<
K. K K^K KK KKKKKK
KKKKK KK. KK KKKKKK
^X K' KKKK K KK KKK

K^ K^KKKKK K^

K^ K ^ I^SSS
. ^ ^ :\. :FC
^1 ^^''ll^^
^ ^ s ^^
K .KKKKl^KKK^ KK
: ^^ ^'^^
^' **"*':


C



* S


U INVESTIGATE

3Threaded Rubber

S* nrdtufSu~rxr
tSMALLWOODS'
* Panama and Colon





* U
* U^^^^s^^^^



3,i 3 l 'r 'r ^ "A


h

KKK K
KKK KKKK. K
* /<** :":
^. *" 4..'"
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U
I* INDO'S GOMeMARAGET


U THE OLD RELIABLE

* FIVE AND SEVEN PASSENGER CARS FOR HIRE
fll A AwTfl TrflflfI oWmaTflW






THE CARIBBEAN. 79










Song Wearig






1Comforta ble
W~aterproof

SNeolin Soles are obtainable in black, white, and tan. Be sure you get
|the genuine Neolin. Look for the name on the bottom of the sole.

|THE GOODYEAR TIRE A__ RUBBER COMPANYg
HI OF SOUTH AMEltI(A
j| *BONDED WAREHO)USE IN ('OLON, R. P.
IN
NI






80 ,I, E GARIBBEANC




PRODUCTION COSTS
APattIe ue MAY UN U UO, saP-sI ocT: NOI
X .
S







8OOf --' ReiCSO
8nf___ -l scr mu p e ATnoy











Power fro cetalaionrre s youfomtes bosts
S/
SN
*N









and engine room help problem-ellininates the wastage
~~of private plants in belts and shaftings--ends costly
~steam leakage and improper insulation of pipes.
You pay only for the power used whn o teupt
our lines. Indivwdual motors at each machine allow
greater flexibility and speed.
Our engineering service is available to you free of cha rge.


~COLON ELECTRIC AND |CE SUPPLY CO.
***J m s J& j*f ~ K u o i *** .*:*::::::::::::* .:: * * -
J*^ ^ *.f--*^ ^ ~ kfv .. ... KKyyy .v
--*.^ *- ^^ ^^ ^ X XW 7 T -^ ^^^^^^ -J^^ *^^^f -.W^ q T ^-
*J iA A:j L^T~J.J *..K..i*J>...l *. . ..*iM@ -:w *- *S

jtSSi M ~ fl~k. ^^ *ri L * *^^k ^^B ^*^*^L ^~fr iki' ^jiR e~u^ij ,. .. '* ^ &||
*2^*3 'Hi mW^f^ *^^ **r B~k- a^ ^ ^^ BI^ ':'-:^1|"
U^ _j ip''* jR *BK:.H J^,il- *._ILj f^ '':^L*:: '"*:::r' iS^'' ::'
SJA~ ~-. T ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ F ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ r^ ^ ^ ^ ^ F ^ f f^ ^ ^ ^ -- ^ ^ ^ u ^ ^ r ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ T ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ H *^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
U^h -^ ^K_'k ^ kT l ^ ^ B f df **^* *~f^^^T*ai^ ^^ .* *** ::::'4AA'*:** -*:i^
lEIJy~l: ^- *BB ^^ -"- ^^ ^ 'B"^' ---^'. ^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ .'^^^ "'^^^ ^^^ ^W ^^^ ^*-^ *! : ^ ifl :' '"^^*^ ^*0
U A R L '' '''1j ~ e U ,'*'y ^ .B ^ o T -N N ." --,^" i"f;






^g ^ -- -^^ ^ ^^^g'

^ I -^ Manufactu~xrer will/if/ seur maximum poer ec^/onomy r ,^-
anlld minimum prdcion cotsbrteas of L central s


a^E ~ ~ pivateiu pilants/ win beltsc andEiiui shafingsend costluyA ss
|isteamio loeakag an imroe inuato of pies

S ~~You pay only for the power used when you tie up to g" _. _^|s*
*| our lines. Individual motors at each machine allow -S"'
g greater flexibility and speed.
SOur engineering service is available to you free of charde,.'-
S OO LCRCADIESUPYC.I *.f'
*
* S
* COLON ELECTRIC AND ICE SUPPLY CO.




Oc9


Sc-?


AFTERWORD.

We wish to express our thanks and appre-


ciation for the assistance given


friends, and
recommend


public


earnest perusal


of the


adver


tisements


serted


in this


publication
firms whose


us by many


farC44. a S