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PCANAL










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1945


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Dedication


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To former students and faculty, our service stars of the
Forces, we gratefully dedicate the 1945 Annual Caribbean







Foreword

"Freedom is a bright and singing thing . Freedom is not only something to read of in
textbooks . Freedom is our heritage and our life. When we think of those who
fight for freedom on the world's greatest battlefields, let us remember our birthright, and
take it, and hold it high in our hands-our brightest heritage-Freedom."


Three











1Faculty




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MR. T. F HOTZ
Principol


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Faculty


Counselor
MR. P. L. BECK
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MR. PALUMBO
Physical Education


MR. HALLECK MISS McLIMANS
Physical Education Household Arts


MR. ANDERSON
Woodwork


MISS BEAVERS
Mathematics


MR. GIBSON
Mechanical Drawing


MISS RUOFF
Secretary










u r k iirn eC
CLASA s o 19345
4OR WOK BEI NS K H

OUR WORK BEGINS HERE


The Final curtain falls after the fourth and last act of the production "The Class of
Forty-five." The actors came on the set as bit players in the first act, but under the in-
valuable guidance of stage managers and directors, they have advanced and are now
making their curtain calls.
We, the members of the cast, began our careers by learning to play a great
variety of minor roles. During our third year, we took more important parts. In this,
our last year, with the help of our class president and his staff, we have taken the leads.
We have all earned rings or pins, and some of us have received various other awards.
The main characters have been Max Weich, President; Roy Atwood, Vice President;
Leona Sanders, Secretary; Roy Knoop, Treasurer. The Senior class representatives
are Joy Randall and Malcolm DelValle. We hope that you will remember with
pleasure our production as we go out to take part in many others, for "All the world's
a stage.


Seven
















WITH OUR GRADUATION


ETHEL K. COULTER
Flushing, New York
Caribbean Staff,3, 4. Trade Wind
Staff, 3, 4. La P. A. S. 1, 2, 3. Glee
Club 1, 4. Victory Corps 1, 2.
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.
''A pleasing countenance is no slight
advantage."






CHARLES ARNOLD
Louisville, Kentucky
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Victory Corps
3. Music Appreciation 3. Operetta
1,2.
"Ready, willing, and able to work,
In his studies he never did shirk."





MARGARET BAGGOTT
Pleasantville, New Jersey
Acting Secretary 3. La P. A. S. 2, 3,
4. Cipos 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Basketball 2, 3,
4. Junior-Senior Banquet Committee
3, 4. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
"Peggy's jokes and her flaming hair,
Make us forget our trouble and
care.





ORELIA AUSTIN
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Victory Corps 2, 3. Softball 2, 3.
All-Star 3. Swimming 1, 2, 3. Vol-
leyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
"Unselfish in every thought and care,
She enjoys a happiness that's rare."


* ROY ATWOOD
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Victory Corps 4. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
All-Star 1, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1, 3.
.' Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Track 1, 2, 3, 4.
All-Star 1, 2, 3, 4. Swimming 2, 3.
.': Water Polo. Class Officer, Vice Pres-
S ident 2. Acting President 4.
S"Not too studious, not too gay,
He trod the even, middle way.


GLORIA ASKOFF
New York City, New York
Trade Wind Staff 4. La P. A. S. 3.
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4. President
4. Thespian 2, 3, 4. Vice President
4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Victory
Corps 1, 2, 3. Operetta 2. Junior-
Senior Banquet Committee 3. Volley
ball 1.
"Sentences fail when one word is
complete,
Descriptive of Gloria is one word:
sweet.



THEODORE BROWN
Chiriqui, Panama
Glee Club 2. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Operetta 2. Orchestra 1, 2. Band 1,
2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2,
3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball
1, 2, 3, 4.
"A free heart won by the sea.
Never imprisoned to earn a degree.





MARLIN CULPEPPER
Venice, Florida
Dramatic Club 4. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Music Appreciation 3. Orchestra 3.
Band 1, 2. Football 1, 4. Baseball 1,
4. Softball 1, 4. Basketball 1, 4.
Model Airplane Club 2.
"It is hard for the happy to under-
stand misery."


;yrlYI
















WE LOOK TO NEW FIELDS


WILLIAM FISHER
Gatun, Canal Zone
Student Association President 4.
Class Officer 3. Honor Society 3, 4.
La P. A. S. 2, 3, 4. Dramatic Club 3.
Glee Club 1, 2,3, 4. Victory Corps
2, 3. Operetta 1, 2. Orchestra 1, 2,
3. Band 1, 2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
Baseball 1, 2, 3. Softball 1, 2, 3.
Basketball 1, 2, 3. Track 1, 2, 3.
"He is all that's good and great,
He is the ruler of his fate."





KATHERYNE GATES
Barranca-Bermeja, Colombia.

La P. A. S. 3. Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3,
4. Victory Corps 1, 2, 3. Operetta
1, 2. Swimming 1, 2, 3. Archery 1.
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.
"At last we have perpetual motion
Incessant energy."




DONALD DIDRICKSON
Seattle, Washington

Class Representative 1. Victory
Corps 2. Orchestra 1, 2. Football
1, 2, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 4. Baseball
1, 2, 4. Softball 1, 2, 4. Soccer 1,
2, 4. Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4. Water
Polo 1, 2. Model Airplane Club 2.
"Politeness is the chief sign of
culture."




SUSIE FAHNESTOCK
Gulfport, Mississippi

Thespian 3, 4. Honor Society 3, 4.
President 4. La P. A. S. 3, 4. Presi-
dent 4. Victory Corps 2, 3. Oper-
etta 2. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Librar-
ian 2. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
mitee Toastmistress 3. Cabinet Mem-
ber 4.
"Always there to lend a hand,
When the situation may demand."


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Nine


JOAN ELLIS
Dallas, Texas
Trade Wind Staff 4. La 1. A. S. 3.
Dramatic Club 3. Thespian 3, 4.
Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Librarian 2.
Softball 1. Basketball All-Star 3.
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.
Volleyball 3.
"Oh, thou art fairer than the evening
air
Clad in the beauty of a thousand
stars."


MALCOLM DELVALLE
New York City, New York

Caribbean Staff, Art Editor 4. La
P. A. S. 3. Dramatic Club 3, 4. Thes-
pian 3, 4. Victory Corps 3, 4. Foot-
ball 4. Baseball 3. Softball 3.
Swimming 4. Tennis 4. Junior-
Senior Banquet 3. Cabinet Member
4. Class Representative 3.
"He'll be successful in any land,
For he holds his future well in hand."





MORAIMA FREIRE
Habana, Cuba

Softball 1, 2. All Star 1. Basketball
1, 2. All-Star 1. Tennis 1. Archery
1, 2. Volleyball 1, 2. All-Star 1.
"A gentle heart is tied with an easy
string."








BERNARD:DE LONG
Flint, Michigan

Victory Corps 2, 3. Operetta 1.
Football 4. Track 1.
"Good things are twice as good
when they are short."


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SOME TO HIGHER EDUCATION


LOIS KRIDLE
Latrobe, Pa.
La P. A. S. 3. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Operetta 2.
Volleyball 2, 4.
"O winsome smile, laughing brown
eyes,
Makes this girl above others rise."





ROY KNOOP
Ancon, Canal Zone
Class Officer, Treasurer 4. Carib-
bean Staff 4. Trade Wind Staff 4.
Glee Club 2, 3. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Operetta 2.
"Very quiet and unassuming,
Weighty plans his mind is brewing."




MELIDA HOWARD
Colon, R. P.
Class Representative 3. Dramatic
Club 1. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1 2, 3. Cheering Squad
1, 2, 3. Music Appreciation 2.
Operetta 1, 2. Softball 1, 2. Basket-
ball 1, 2. Swimming 1. Tennis 1, 2.
Archery 1, 2. Junior-Senior Ban-
quet Committee 3. Cabinet Member
4.
"Hang sorrow, care will kill a cat,
Therefore let's be merry."



EUGENE GREGG
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Band 1. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All-
Star 1, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soft-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3.
Track 1. Swimming 1, 2, 4. Water
Polo 1, 2.
"He is a man of sense who doesn't
grieve for what he has not,
But rejoices in what he has."


Air


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HUGH HALE
Ancon, Canal Zone
Caribbean, Staff, Photographer 4.
Trade Wind Staff, Photographer 4.
Dramatic Club 4. Victory Corps 3.
Orchestra 2, 3. Band 1. Football 1,
2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
3. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soccer 1, Bas-
ketball 2.
"A bold and gallant knight is he,
His manner laden with chivalry."





CHARLEEN HELLUMS
St. Joseph, Missouri
Trade Wind Staff 3, 4. La P. A. S. 3.
Glee Club, 1 2, 3. Softball 1, 2.
Soccer 1, 2. Basketball 1, 2. Volley-
ball 1.
"Conscientious and dependable,
A classmate indispensable."






PATRICK GORMELY
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Caribbean Staff 4. Trade Wind Staff
3, 4, Co-Editor 4. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Band 1, 2.
"He is great who never reminds us
of others."







MILDRED GILL
Pinnsauken, New Jersey
Glee Club 1, 2. Victory Corps 1, 2.
"A peppy little piece of humanity."


/_d.-
















OTHERS TO THEIR LIFE WORK


JOAN MILLSPAUGH
Newbergh, New York
La P. A. S. 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 4.
Victory Crops 2, 3. Cheer Leaders
4. Operetta 1, 2. Basketball 2.
"Her laughter and giggles are heard
all day,
For she believes in the smiling way."





BENNY KULLER
Balboa, Canal Zone
Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Victory Corps 2,
3. Operetta 1, 2. Football All-
Star 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball All-Star
1, 2, 3, 4. Softball All-Star 1, 2, 3, 4.
Soccer 1. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-
Star 2. Track 3, 4.
"I am wealthy in my friends."




GARVYN MOUMBLOW
Gatun, Canal Zone
Class Officer, President 3. Class Rep-
resentative 4. Caribbean Staff
Photographer 3. Glee Club 2. Vic-
tory Corps 2, 3. Cheer Leaders 4.
Operetta 2. Orchestra 2. Band 1,
2. Junior-Senior Banquet Committee
3.
"There could be no great ones
if there were no small ones.




JEAN O'HAYER
Baltimore, Maryland
La P. A. S. 3. Dramatic Club 3. Vic-
tory Corps 2, 3. Librarian 1. Softball
1, 2, 3. All-Star 3. Basketball 3.
Archery 1,2. All-Star 2. Volleyball
1, 2, 3. All-Star 3.
"From the top of her head to the tip
of her toes,
Her example of neatness and love-
liness grows."


L 7


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Eleven


JACK REILLY
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Dramatic Club 3, 4. Glee Club 3.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Operetta 2.
Orchestra 1, 2, 3. Band 1, 2. Foot-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1. Baseball
1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1, 2, 3. Softball
1, 2, 3, 4. B-All-Star 1, 2, 3. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. B-All Star 2, 3.
Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4. Water Polo 1,
2. Model Airplane Club 3.
"Laughter shall dimple the cheek,
and not furrow the brow with
ruggedness."



ANGELICA LIM
Bocas del Toro, R. P.
La P. A. S. 4. Glee Club 1, 2. Var-
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1. Bas-
ketball 1, 2, 3. Track 3. Model Air-
plane Club 3. Volleyball 1, 2, 3.
"To those who know thee not,
No words can paint."




ADAIR PASSAILAIGUE
Colon, R. P.
Class Officer, Secretary 1, 2. Dra-
matic Club 1, 2. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Operetta 1. Baseball 2, 3. Softball
1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2.
"She is gay and gladsome."

JOY RANDALL
Ancon, Canal Zone
Class Representative 2, 4. Class Offi-
cer, Secretary-Treasurer 3. Honor
Society 3, 4. Treasurer 4. La P.AS.
S2, 3, 4. Cipo 3, 4. Dramatic Club
1 3, 4, Vice President and Treas-
Surer 4. Thespian Club 3, 4, Sec.-
Treas. 4. Biology Club 2. Glee Club
1, 2, 3, 4. Victory Corps 2, 3. Var-
Ssity Club 2. Operetta 1, 2. Librarian
S 1, 2, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
1, 3. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
1. Swimming 1,2, 3, All-Star 1 2, 3.
Tennis 1. Archery 1, 2, 4. A/I-Star
2. Junior-Senior Banquet Committee
3. Cabinet Member 4. Volleyball
1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1, 2.
"Not bold, nor shy, nor short, nor
tall,
A pleasant mingling of them all."














BUT ALL OF US STRIVE


RITA SHOAF
Lexington, North Carolina
Class Representative 1. Caribbean
Staff 4. Trade Wind Staff 4. Honor
Society 4. La P. A. S. 4. Varsity Club
4. Orchestra 2, 3. 4. Band 2, 3, 4.
Softball 3, 4. All-Star 3. Basketball
3, 4. All-Star 3. Cabinet Member 4.
Volleyball 4.
"Right brisk is she and full of spirit."


DANKWART SANDERS
Shanghai, China
La P. A. S. 2. Biology Club, President
2. Victory Corps 2, 3. Football 1, 2,
3, 4. All-Star 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2. 3
4. All-Star 3. Track 1, 2, 3, 4. All-
Star 1, 2, 3. Water Polo 1, 2.
Swimming 2, 3. Junior-Senior Ban-
quet Committee 3.
"Self-respect, that cornerstone of all
virtues.



CAROL RUOFF
Los Angeles, Calif.
Class Representative 3. Dramatic
Club 2, 3. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Vic-
tory Corps 2, 3. Varsity Club 2, 3.
Operetta 1. Volleyball All-Star 4.
"She is full of grace, force, and fas-
cination."




LEONA SANDERS
Barranca-Bermeja, Colombia
Class Officer, Secretary 4. Carib-
bean Staff, Co-Editor 4. Trade Wind
Staff 4. Honor Society, Secretary 4.
La P. A. S. 4. Dramatic Club 4,
Thespian 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
President 4. Swimming 2. Tennis 2.
"I would rather be remembered by a
song
Than by a victory."


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ALFRED SIMONSSON
Colon, R. P.
Victory Corps 2, 3. La P. A. S. 3.
Band 1. Football 1, 3, 4. All-Star
S1, 3, 4. Soccer 1.
I "Virtue is never left to stand,
He who has it will have neighbors"


NORRINE TERRY
Breadalbia, New York
Victory Corps 2, 3.
"Do but look on her hair; it is as love's
star when it riseth."




LUCIEN R. SKEELS
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Water Polo 1, 2. Basketball 1. Vic-
torp Corps 1, 2. Track 1, 2. Journa-
lism 2. Glee Club, 1, 2, 4. Archery
2. Baseball 2, Swimming 1, 2, 3.
Photo Club 1. Inter-Amer. Discussion
Club 1.
"The world was taken in his stride;
Nor turned he back for time nor
tide."


LOIS STAPF
Ancon, Canal Zone
Caribbean Staff, Co-Editor 4. Trade
Wind Staff 3, 4. Co-Editor 4. La
P. A. S. 2, 3, 4. Cipo 3, 4. Dramatic
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Photo Club 1, 2,
Treasurer. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Vic-
tory Corps 3. Varsity Club 2, 3, 4.,
President 4. Operetta 1, 2. Softball
All-Star 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2,
3, 4. All-Star 2, 3, 4. Tennis 1, 2, 3.
4. Girls' Championship 1, 2, 3,
Archery 3. Junior-Senior Banquet
Committee 3. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
All-Star 2, 3, 4.
"Her sunny locks hang on her temples
like golden fleece."


Twelve















TOWARD HAPPINESS AND SUCCESS


MARY WHITE
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Class Officer, Secretary 2, 3. Glee
Club 1, 2. Victory Corps 3. Oper-
etta 2. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
mittee 3. Volleyball 2.
"A girl with beauties very rare,
Bewitching eyes and raven hair."


MARTIN KENDZIOREK
Colon, R. P.
La P. A. S. 2, 3, 4. Cipo 3. Victory
Corps 1, 2, 3. Model Airplane Club
1. Dolphins Club 2. Swimming 1, 2,
3. Football 1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2.
Softball 1, 2. Water Polo 1, 2. Track
2. Orchestra 2, 3.
"His nimble brain is hid by levity,
Merry, but no fool is he."


ALVIN LIM
Cristobal, Canal Zone
Class Officer, Vice President 3.
Campaign Manager 3. La P. A. S.
2, 3. Cipo 2, 3. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.
Model Airplane Club 1, 2. Football
1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1. Baseball 1, 2,
3. Basketball 1, 2, 3. Softball 1, 2,
3. All-Star 2.
"A cheerful smile, a pleasant word,
Mirth over sadness, he preferred."


FE
I


MAX L. WEICH
Gatun, Canal Zone
Class Officer, President 4. La P. A.
S. 4. Biology Club 2. Glee Club 1,
2, 3. Victory Corps 2, 3. Operetta
1, 2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
1, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3. All-Star 1,
3. Softball 1, 2, 3. All-Star 1, 2, 3.
Basketball 1, 2, 3. All-Star 1, 2, 3.
Track, All-Star 1, 2, 3. Swimming 1,
2. Water Polo, All Star 1, 2. Junior-
Senior Banquet Committee 3. Cab-
inet Member 4.
"There is more in me than you under-
stand."


GRACE YOHROS
Brooklyn, New York
La P. A. S. 2, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Softball 1, 2.
Basketball 1.
"Smiling lips, twinkling eyes,
And a beauty that never dies!"





EDMOND WACHTEL
Colon, R. P.
La P. A. S. 2. Cipo 2. Victory Corps
2, 3. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
mittee 3. Class Officer, Vice Presi-
dent 2. Biology Club 2. Football 3.
Basketball 3. Glee Club 2, 3.
"From quiet, unexpected sources,
Often spring the world's great
forces!"


GENE STONE
Cristobal, Canal Zone



ROBERT WOOD
Gatun, Canal Zone


Thirteen


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The members of the class of Forty-six have risen from bit to feature players, and the
next step is stardom. Last year and the year before they gave plays in assembly, and
this year their biggest production was a most successful banquet for the Seniors. This
class has also been outstanding in sports, scholarship, and service.
Their leaders are: President, Thelma Pucci; Vice President, Gus Rosania; Secretary,
Eleanor Williams; Treasurer, Noel Gibson; Class Representatives: Helen Stade and
Charles Thomas.
The curtain falls and when it rises again .


Fourteen





JUNIORS


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Fifteen





JUNIORS


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ALFRED MALE


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Sixteen


HELEN STADE


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JUNIORS


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Seventeen


GERALD TROOP


MARY LEACH


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cnr Iinnik n r c
C L A 5 0 C /SK 47
4JUYTIUVIUKTL


SOPH CLASS OFFICERS
The second act! The players, still in minor roles, are improving. When the curtain
rises again, they will be upper-classmen. The lead role in this act is played by Gloria
BorneFeld. Other characters are Oscar Flores, vice president, Judy Havas, Secretary,
James Roe, Treasurer. Muriel Tatelman and George Schultze are the Class Represen-
tatives. The Sophomores are completing their second year here, and in both they have
been very successful.


Eighteen























Row 2-
J. Buckley; H. Bingham; R. Osorio; T. London

Row 1-
A. Benthal; L. Brown; J. Andrews; G. Bornefield;
H. Keenan

















Row 2-
B. Wadley; J. Roe; R. Pincus, R. Scheiddegg;
M. Tctelman

Row 1-
G. Schulte; J. McNair; F. Rosales; P. Wilkes;
B. Webster














Row 3-
T. McGinn; J. Dorsey; O. Flores; J. Rowe;
H. Wentworth

Row 2-
E. Tompkins; F. Howard; J. Havas; M. Chong;
Z. Campbell

Row 1-
P. Mcllvaine; M. Harrington


Nineteen





















Row 2-
M. Hupp; J. Malcolm; H. Diaz; N. Keller; J. Pescod

Row 1-
H. Kellman; A. Lincoln; T. Gregg; G. Schuite


Row 2-
G. Cadava; H. Leignadier; R. Nilto

Row 1-
R. Tracy; B. Watts; B. Reeves; R. Muckle


Row 3-
S. Blackburn; T. Dorgan; B. Dixon; D. Chambers

Row 2-
P. Benny; A. Cottrell; H. Culpepper; R. Knoop

Row 1-
H. Hanna; R. DeCastro; J. Hanshaw


Twenty


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FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS
The curtain rises on the first act, and we present the class of 1948. Don't turn away-
watch them!
The principal characters are David Aycock, President; Bill McGinn, Vice President;
Johnny Engelke, Secretary-Treasurer. Representatives are David Stade and Evelyn
Frankel.
The freshmen are the future stars; the leaders were once led. Good luck!


Twenty one
























Row 2
D. Wong; M. Simons; N. Dyer; R. Williams

Row 1-
H. Taylor; E. Corbett; T. Melancon; D. Serko
















Row 3-
R. Mcllvaine; H. Schulte; K. Millard; J. Stringer;
R. Halwanny

Row 2-
D. Lindstrom; N. Owens; P. Leach; H. Miller

Row 1-
E. Manrique; A. Parcell















Row 2-
W. McGinn; P. Sanders; D. Stade; E. Johnston;
D. Sether

Row 1-
G. DeLong; P. Nieves; M. Styles; N. Quigley;
S. Nichols; L. Lamis


Twenty two



















k.:..-. 3-
T D[i..:r. ,'. clla' C Harr.:r. E Prr..O
SFerr.andez



T t rcht ..:-ld '.' beli:rani o . HeerTr,. r, Er. le-
:.r. :hl .'. fI.-L,: u.3 hlnr

P.:-. 1
E Franrel e Prc -.rn r.1 r 'lel.s


. ".


P.R- -
N Na11l .'...ller.Ir n I Ho,,,.:.d G Eaolti

Ro. 12-
M Fure.,, '.. r rflr.:r.g E K.,ller .I .,ll

MP.. 1-
'' .,3nd.r' '_. i'-_oulier E Prell, CD Heur.


.-. 3j-
C t.i.adison .. .'.'illoug.qhb, CD. .-c k

FP.. .2-
I Ta,-l,.r Braiorn .1. Bennry

P.-... 1-
I En.oelle I HeII,.,,T,: B. Hc..d.:lesi N. "Azpuro
S. Freier


Twenty three


































- I


Twenty four


.. .r



Y~ 5:






ACTIVITIES








*"
~"*


II







s














T



C THE STUDENT COUNCIL
O This year's election of the Student Council was marked by one of the most interesting
and exciting presidential elections in the history of C. H. S. Susie Fahnestock, Malcolm
DelValle, and Bill Fisher campaigned vigorously up to the very last moment in attempts
T7 T to sway public opinion. After election day, when the smoke of battle had cleared, it
was discovered that Bill Fisher had been elected to be the twelfth president of the Cris-
tobal High School Student Association.
N' The Student Association is governed according to Parliamentary Procedure through
a governing body known as the Student Council. Two representatives are elected from
each of the various classes. These, in addition to the president, vice president, secre-
tary, and treasurer, comprise the Student Council. Through this system students of C. H. S.
are exposed to representative democracy, similar to that which they may Find as citizens
J in adult life.
Representative student government in C. H. S. has been particularly successful this
year. One of this year's goals was to make the Student Council more representative of
L the various homerooms through closer homeroom cooperation. The Student Council has
been responsible for the highly successful Student Study Hall, which has been run en-
tirely by the students. Also the Council has been very busy at the task of revising the
Student Association Constitution, which has for some time, been outmoded.


Twenty six






Thanks to the Student Association, C. H. S. has again enjoyed its usual student
activities. The "Trade Wind," "Caribbean," atheltic events, musical programs, drama-
tic productions, class picnics and dances, sports awards, magazine drives, talent assem-
blies, and the Junior-Senior Banquet, have all been sponsored by the Student Association.
A great deal of the Student Association's success may be traced directly to the effi-
cient guidance of the Sponsor, Mr. Clifford Hauberg. Giving a great deal of his time
to Student Council affairs, he has helped and inspired the Council in its numerous
activities. T
A cabinet of six members was chosen this year to assist the president in his duties.
Although cabinets of previous years have also been successful, the consensus of opinion
seems to be that this year's cabinet has been even more so..
Those composing the President's Cabinet are: Joy Randall, Director of Budget and
Finance Malcolm DelValle, Director of Public Relations; Rita Shoaf, Chairman of the E
Constitutional Revision Committee; Susie Fahnestock, Director of Citizenship Activities;
Max Weich, Miscellaneous; and Melida Howard, Miscellaneous.


C


A4


B


Twenty seven







i NATIONAL HONOR




SENIORS








The first high school honor society was Founded in 1903. It came into being soon
after the great increase in enrollment in the secondary schools showed the need for such
an organization. Social and athletic activities became increasingly important but the
necessary stimulation for scholarship was lacking, and something needed to be done about
it.
On the last day of the school year, in 1903, five girls of high scholastic standing,
under the direction of Dr. William B. Owen, who was then principal of the old South Side
Academy of Chicago, formed the first honor society, Pi Beta Sigma. Its primary aim was
the encouragement of scholarship. The next year, the Academy became a part of Chicago
University but the society continued and still exists as an independent organization. Its
rules and regulations are much the same as those of the National Honor Society.
The idea for encouraging good high school citizenship and scholarship spread and
soon societies emulating the activities and accomplishments of Phi Beta Kappa in Uni-
versities were organized in widely separated parts of the U. S. Many of these consoli-
dated, because schools lying in the same district were able to agree upon requirements
for membership and standards of scholarship.
In 1919 the operation of these honor societies had been so successful that the ques-
tion was taken up at a meeting of the National Association of Secondary School Prin-
cipals. They approved of the plan and the American Torch Society was formed. This
was later changed to the National Honor Society.
In order to be eligible to the National Honor Society a student must have an A or
B average. IF a pupil is normal or above average in other traits and excels in scholarship,
he is one who is primarily intended to be honored. The pupils are ranked in numerical
order, according to their grades during the First seven semesters, or in the case of the
Juniors, the first five semesters.


Twenty eight


It -i~crar








SOCIETY





JUNIORS


Other qualities that are analysed are leadership, service, and character. At a
-! meeting of all the teachers with whom these pupils have come into contact, they are
rated.
The aim of the National Honor Society is to make good citizenship in high schools
a matter of distinction. Its members must have the outstanding qualities of character,
service, leadership, and scholarship. These qualities developed in school should make
,I- a better citizen of the graduate and he, in turn, will contribute more to his country.
The Caribbean Chapter is only three years old, but already its influence is being
felt. It is hoped that with the passing years this chapter's contribution to the Americas
will be very great.
Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore is the Sponsor of the Caribbean Chapter of the National
Honor Society. Miss Moore, Miss Liter, and Mr. Jorstad form the governing board of
this chapter.
Near the end of each school year a luncheon or dinner party is given by the prin-
cipal or one of the advisors in honor of the members of the Caribbean Chapter. This
S year a lovely dinner at the Washington Hotel was given by Miss Moore and our school
principal, Mr. Theodore Hotz, and his wife.
The Honor Society does not have special social activities but its members are obli-
gated to work quietly for the betterment of scholarship in the school.


Twenty nine








LA PAS


The Cipos are the inner circle of the
La P.A.S. Club and to become a mem-
ber of this organization a student must
be outstanding in his Spanish classes
and must be ready and willing to do
his part in any activities, large or small,
sponsored by the Spanish Club.
During the La P.A.S. Initiations, the
Cipos take the duties of officers of the
club and they arrange all social func-
tions given for the La P.A.S. Club.


i ,


mr~


The purpose of the La P. A. S. Club
is to promote a greater interest in Span-
ish and a better relationship between
the United States and the Republic of
Panama.
Mrs. Phyllis Spencer, the sponsor and
organizer of the La P. A. S. Club, has
done much in carrying out the purpose
of the club. Last year was presented
the second annual Inter-American Un-
derstanding Award, which is awarded
to the Isthmian resident who has done


Thirty


CLUB


most in fostering understanding between
the peoples of the Americas. Mrs.
Spencer was chosen because of her
many years as teacher of Spanish at
Cristobal High School, organizing of
Spanish and English clubs, and her
translations and those of Spanish 12
classes of the works of noted Latin-
American poets.
One of the social events of the year
for the La P. A. S. Club members was
a masquerade party in the ballroom of
theMargarita clubhouse. Everyonecame
gaily dressed, and this proved worth-
while for prizes were given to the
most beautifully dressed boy or girl,
the most ingenious and the funniest.


The evening was highly successful, and
the members were repaid for their
good work in Spanish.
The final activity of the La P. A. S.
Club was a formal luncheon at the
Washington Hotel on May 20. A de-
lightful lunch was served and the pro-
gram, all in Spanish, consisted of speech-
es made by the different Cipos.
Membership in this club is strictly
honorary, and it is open only to those
students attaining an average of B or
better in Spanish. The club now has
about 65 members and is growing as
the pupils take keener interest in Span-
ish.


Thirty one


C~c~'ii~~


1 V-:


Sf'~L~


- . *







Quill/


and


Scroll


Ardith, Patrick, Lois


"Quill and Scroll," which was organized in 1926 by a group of high school advi-
sors, has grown until today it includes nearly 2,000 chapters in the United States and
foreign countries all over the world.
Its purpose is to raise the standards of high school journalism and to stimulate interest
in journalistic endeavor. It is the honor society for the field of journalism and its affiliated
activities, such as art and literature, and provides a goal of achievement.
The Caribbean Chapter was organized this year and includes 12 charter members.
From time to time, other initiations will be held to admit those who meet the necessary
qualifications.
The charter members are Lois Stapf, Rita Shoaf, Leona Sanders, Ethel Coulter, Dorit
Berger, Rosita Czernik, Lois Householder, Ardith Boyle, Joan Ellis, Malcolm Delvalle,
who is not in the picture, Pat Gormely, and Miss Bess Liter, sponsor. The officers are:
President, Pat Gormely, Vice President, Lois Householder, and Secretary, Ardith Boyle.


FIRST ROW: Patrick, Leona, Joan
SECOND ROW: Rita, Ardith, Miss Liter, Rosita, Lois
THIRD ROW: Lois, Dorit, Ethel


Thirty two


1fNII UNA IONAL


u







VARSITY


CLUB


MRS. O'BRIEN


FIRST ROW: Rita, Lois, Arline
SECOND ROW: Lois, Helen, Marilyn, Harriet
THIRD ROW: Nancy, Eleanor, Jean, Thelma, Alice



The purpose of the Girls' Varsity Club is to interest more girls in athletics, and to
belong to this exclusive club a girl must make two All-Star teams in the same year, or be
one of the 10 highest in the point system.
At the end of this school year 16 members who had fulfilled these qualifications and
were initiated were: Betty Jamesson, Jacqueline Carlin, Pat Leach, Eleanor Kuller,
Roberta Williams, Gladys Schulte, Ardith Boyle, Barbara Brown, Betty Kuhrt, Majorie
Styles, Helen Culpepper, Mary Aleguas, Norma Hall, Andre Whitlock, and Peggy Mc-
Ilvaine.
The Club this year was led by Lois Stapf, President; Jean Kuller, Vice President,
and Thelma Pucci Secretary-Treasurer.
A St. Valentine Dance, given in February, was the girls' biggest success of the year.
Thirty three


09.





TORRID ZONE WIZARDS


F~ '


hA"


The Torrid Zone Wizard Club, or-
ganized in 1942 and affiliated with
the Science Clubs of America, has
grown from a small insignificant group
to one containing the full quota of 25
members chosen from all the Science
Classes on the basis of scholarship
and active interest.
The activities of the club vary with
the times and were not the same this
year as last.


: J


The regular Field trips to Barro
. Colorado were postponed during
this year because of the inconven-
ience involved. However, the group
was active in other fields in which
they were just as interested. One
trip was taken along the trails of
Puerto Pilon.
Their sponsor, Mr. Maedl, assisted
the officers, Lois Householder, Pres-
ident; Patsy Benny, Vice President;
Barbara De Schmidt, Secretary; and
Rosity Czernik, Librarian, in running
the club through periods of tribula-
tion and its parties.
The club has held as its highest aim
the pledge of service to the ideals
of Science. These are: 1) To increase
their knowledge of science; 2) to
learn to perfect their skills in science;
3) to give service to their community
and nation; 4) to understand the im-
portance of science in their lives; and
5) to carry out the program of science
club's of America.

SCE CE F



BK


Mr. MAEDL, Sponsor


Thirty four





"T_







7iu

.5sC


AA.- *~' 4~*~ ~* jfq,


'I- y' oV'.


6bi
'1~" e;r'
'I;k~

k3


B~F ~ILUh
r\LV(R~5
.r~EpL.L-L. --L


"JUNIOR MISS"
AS PRESENTED 4T
CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
DECEMBER 1944


A---


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ERf MA' N '. k F
frTI15f


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A


FATHERS PIPE /S
NNG HIM SICK "


I; ,


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~.- .. ,'' ._, I', ..-.,',. r, !/ .*4' SA.Lt I-.L:
'>- Ga mInr./,D .......V "


Thirty five


-, I I


t ;








National


Thespian


Society


The National Thespian Soclet. .'.,as
organized in the spring of 1928 b/ a
group of teachers .'.ho felt that a
greater impetus could be gi .en to the
study of educational dramatics b,' an
association of directors, teachers and
students actively interested in high
school dramatics. While the ne.v or-


I.Ir Beck ord Nahiioral Thespians


kas^..V


Joy, Bitsy, Gloria


gan:ialion .-.as established along
the same lines I,pical of honor so-
cielie. in general, its founders r.ere
specific in their demand that it be
an acti.e progressive and for.*.ard-
loc ling .ocilet/ in ts field It '.vas
made clear that the honor of member-
ship t.as to be conferred upon High
School students not so much for the
reason that Ihe,, met the eligibility
requirements, but more for wvhal these
students promised, under oath, to
achieve in dramatics after they be-
came members.


Thirty six










DRAMATIC


CLUB -- j





Mr. P. L. BECK, Sponsor



To become a member of the Cristobal
Dramatic Club all one needs to do is ex-
press a sincere interest in dramatics.
During the past year the Cristobal
Dramatic Club has held Four very inter-
esting meetings. The officers For the
year were elected at the First meeting.
At the second, a one-act play "The
ow ., Cue He Knew," was enacted by vari-
ous members and a review of the Little
Theater's Play, "Golden Boy," was
Given. The Sponsor gave a talk on
types in plays and the Professional The-
ater, and later, refreshments were
served. During the third meeting the
"Florist Shop," a one-act play, was
presented and the Sponsor talked on



characterization and another play re-
view of the Little Theater's "Three
Men On a Horse" was given.
The aim and ambition of every mem-
ber of the Dramatic Club is to achieve
membership in the Thespian Society.
There are no special talents or require-
ments to be a member of the Dramatic l
Club, whereas, on the other hand, to be
a Thespian a pupil is required to partic-
ipate in a meritorious manner in the .
production of plays. It is necessary to .
have either a major role in a three-act
play or a minor role in two or more
plays. A pupil may be eligible also for .
outstanding work in the production
staff of the play. -


Thirty seven




~= r~
-d 1 .:I


BEST DRESSED
Hugh Hale Rita Shoaf


BEST GIRL ATHLETE
Lois Stapf


a.


WITTIEST
Hugh Hale Joan Ellis












Thirty eight


MOST STUDIOUS
Roy Knoop Joy Randall










FRIENDLIEST
Malcolm DelValle Charleen Hellums


OUEEN OF THE CHINESE CLUB


(N.


Thirty nine


,es ,






































ft
fI I


ALMA PMAER


Forty


iffRIt- M-At P;-OR i ^












pp


>.IN
/00,w


z


/ ^/


/, /


- i -


ii


DEPAiT1IENI


-I


k'
crSI /


J


~-_I-










MUSIC


"AMusic is well said to be the speech of angels"
Even though the glee club and orchestra may not pro-
duce angelic music at all times, their activities under Mr.
Jorstad are truly outstanding.
The Music department is one of the most important in
C.H.S. Many times during the year, the orchestra is called
on to play for assemblies, plays and other special occasions.
The glee club is very popular, also, in school and at outside
programs.
Among the outstanding events of the year were the
Annual Christmas Festival, the Easter Concert, and the
Spring Music Festival. At all of these, the choir and
orchestra persented beautiful programs for the general
public. In addition, music was furnished for over Fifteen
school assemblies.
Several talented musicians have appeared in solos or


Ct i,$TW AAt
.,. sa~~s~r .


PAT SUSIE BILL


HI H SC NO L
.-. '


DEPARTMENT


small groups. Leona Sanders has appeared many times
in assembly as vocal soloist, and her lovely voice is Familiar
to most of the Atlantic siders, as she is also on the local
radio. Every year, the Christmas program is opened by a
brass quartet playing a traditional carol. This year it was
composed of Gay Thomas and Jimmy Rowe, trumpets, and
Noel Gibson, Jr., and Johnny Engelke, trombones.
The accompanists for the glee club are Susie Fahnestock
and Bill Fisher, and the orchestra is accompanied by Pat
Gormely.
The orchestra is composed of thirty-five members, and the
glee club has seventy singers. This is a very high percent-
age out of a total student body of two hundred twenty-
eight.
As more students arrive from the States in the near
future, the future of the music groups will appear even
brighter.


Forty three


Forty two













The Library



One of the outstanding and most useful departments of
Cristobal High School is a well equipped library, Filled with
the latest magazines and books ranging from Fiction to the best
reference material.
Placed in the upper story of the high school building, MISS JEANNE BROWN
overlooking the beautiful Limon Bay, its atmosphere and conditions are most excellent For
deep thought and study. Balmy breezes frisk through the spacious library, continually
refreshing one's mind and body. Large tables and comfortable chairs are conveniently
placed to gain the best advantage of the lighting facilities.
Miss Jeanne Brown, our well trained librarian does an admirable job of managing
both the business end of the library and the library itself, besides teaching several English
classes on the side.


Forty four



































Assisting her at the task of caring for such a large library are the student librarians:
Beverly Reeves, Alice Cain, Beulah Simons, Eola Pretto, Marilyn Metzger, Mary Leach,
Merle Simons, Kenneth Millard, Dick Chambers, Joy Randall, and Dorit Archbold.
These students, besides learning the fundamentals of library work, begin to appre-
ciate books, the care of them, to love them, and to acquire a surprising amount of gen-
eral knowledge.
The library is a popular place. Classes often go there when some phase of their
work needs the help of the excellent reference books. An average of sixteen pupils
are present every period to broaden their minds or catch up on passing events, and
approximately forty books are checked out every day.
Naturally, the most popular literature is the fiction, but history, social science, travel,
literature, and biography are high on the list because of the compulsory reading required
by school classes.
The library is open seven periods every school day so that whosoever desires knowl-
edge may have the opportunity in our own excellent library.


Forty five


: li.A *Vd~BX 0d

%IML














SISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL,

S/ THE


MAIL BAG


Class Makes Plans
For Charter In
Quill And Scroll
he first tme in the
paper, definite
de to ob-
-fj M .^rshi s .


been W S
years, bu'to
other a chapter or-i
al society was never 4
When the charter is grant-
ed, the adviser of the journalism
S mes a
: Scroll.
; ty can
ugh a
mem-
are'


urper
must
)rk in
sm ur
must
advis-
'n7Wf


a


on ... !
movie, a --
production. He .
merely because you -
enjoy a play is no sign
it Is not a good one. No one'
has the right to say, "That
movie was rotten," but, rath-
er, "I didn't like that movie."
After Mr. Beck's falk Charles
Madison gave a resume of the
Cristobal Little Theatre play
"Hayfever." The east of the
play, "The Cue e Knew" then
took over the entertainment
for the evening. The play was
h-r


-IH. S.
CRISTOBAL, C. Z. C ciii
Augusta Wong, C.H.S. '42,U ln I R
'at Mills College, has recent- NIOR
ty been honored by having one 10-
bf her poems, '-On an Imagina- 1"6
ve Child", selected for the ,
nvual Anthology of College
SiPoetry for 1944. This antholoev
cA *Is p compilation of tl
-'1k_:ometry written by coll


Claude Camnpblll, C.I
now in the V-12 at-St
College, Enmettburg, MI
J lucky Maryland las
'.seemingly: found great 1
Caaude's ui..qtptr
le line Carlin. a M ard
8er Marilyn Metzger, ad P
Bchrlftgeisser a i

o- -*^l electoral c e s


ular IEN IE
nounced Boo f
. This s a very -
project which will ac
practical politics a h e
constitution really n
many page's of rea g e-
rial and much
structors.
A similar election Id
in 1940 to choose betwe
velt and Wilkie. Roo a
elected -wth 24 wh
Wilkie got only 51 vos.


National Edt


Mariner %MA

Scouts.. attetind
meeting- of the
on Tuesday, J0SO
7:00, in the.Ul*
During her. I"
e glr ito





obtu.'
allow ther-"
craft 'when.St
Cross W6rkerT.ni_;
comes over to .i
art of sailing.'
The doriated 4
the Army is.-t
yellow by' .t.h.


ucation W
uS 11


lay Nov. 7 -
eday Nov. -
rdty Nov. 910- I
Bday Nov. 11 -
y Nov. II 6 f


... .- 1.
.r^ ?J BD


7


Sand
Tuew
Wedn
satm
Thur
Friday


Forty six


MFl~









THE


CARIBBEAR


k*~Fbl. 1:


I#U
ii 4K


^CI POS'&V
.ATED
py. December. 10,
Vw4 jeld at; Uie 1i
[iiti4 lve. Dnew *nieE
i os 'Ta
i .eer*tV


Buys Boys' S-.r
OA-4iRa1, BilU Pretto, Hi.-.
;. !. ,~: ,-.-:,~~. Tln ~
[*- V ea .ure
DBDo Nall, Leona Sanders,
Bouseholder .. 'Ardi
Itn-Co, utr, :,- g.: j
~tide1 Coulter, Peggy B
: t~i B


I- r


Forty seven


"
;iyg;,Bai~
n. ^ptCia





r -,- % 77"r'TEl


il-
r~ nn~


r 1- ?-P
;'F~ ~


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~: PI~Lc













CafCtera .. .

Two hundred and sixty boys and girls
hurry into the Cristobal High School Cafe-
teria daily for their lunch. The cafeteria
isn't large enough to hold this number of
students all at the same time, but fortu-
nately, the Grammar School and various
study halls are dismissed early in order that
their members may eat and leave the room
before the regular noon-hour rush.


There are eight girls who belong to the
class in cafeteria. They receive two full
credits as they would in household arts.
These girls have various duties such as tak-
ing charge of the making of salads and sand-
wiches and serving. They also act as cashiers
occasionally and help take care of finan-
cial reports. These jobs are rotated every
week so that each girl may learn the duties
of each job.
Miss McLimans has charge of the cafeteria
work and of its Finances and she has done a
remarkable job of serving adequate and


(**a


wholesome lunches in spite of the shortage
of certain foods and staff members. At the
present time she operates this with one cook,
a cook's helper, and one maid.
Miss Hallie Beavers has served most effi-
ciently as the cashier for several years, and
this popular math teacher is most adept at
keeping track of funds.


Forty eight


' --- *'-~r-*C13Ylll~-~~ll*~ir*~--~*l~-


iC


i











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.,,. dC~i dC-: Lw


-Y All
113








A & B FOOTBALL


I i

I-

Coach Palumbo

SUnder the able direction of Coach
Luke Palumbo, the Cristobal High
School Grid Squad annexed the Isth-
mian football championship by virtue
of a last-play victory over a powerful
Junior College Eleven and a score-
less tie battle with the strong Balboa
High gridsters.
"A" League All-Stars Noel Gibson became the star of
Zone Champions the Junior College tilt when, on the
last play of the game, he faded back to the Junior College 45-yard line, and threw a
long desperation pass to Benny Kuller, who snatched it out of the air in the College end
zone for a touchdown and victory. Max Weich, who had previously kicked a field goal,
converted the extra point and Cristobal won 10-7.
The Cristobal-Balboa tilt was a hard bruising battle with the linemen dominating
the individual play.
Cristobal came the closest to scoring, driving all the way to the Balboa 13-yard
line in the fourth quarter before an attempted field goal by Max Weich was blocked
on fourth down to end the march.
Coach Paul Halleck's able "B" League stalwarts outplayed a much heavier Balboa
team in nearly every department of
the game as they triumphed over the
big Balboa Eleven by a score of 8-0.
Pedro Nieves began the scoring
when he broke through the Balboa
line in the second period to tag a Red
and White back in his own end zone
for two points.
George Egolf scored the game's
only touchdown when he raced 40
yards around end in the final quarter
for a touchdown.


"B" League All-Stars


Fifty two







SOFTBALL


The Cristobal High School softballers climaxed the season with a 4-3 victory over a
strong Balboa Ten. Cristobal had previously lost to the Junior College by a score of 6-2.
Johnny Hower of Balboa and Jim Fernandez and Denis Venning of Cristobal pitched
brilliantly, giving up but three hits between them. Hower's downfall came in the first
two innings when all four of Cristobal's markers crossed the plate, the result of two walks,
two stolen bases, and four costly errors.
The Junior College game was another matter, however, with Ed Kunkel's speedy
delivery proving just too much for the local lads. The Collegians quickly picked up a big
six-run lead which they held until the last inning when Cristobal scored twice, because
of the several errors by the College infield.
Behind the two-hit pitching of Jim Rowe, the "B" League boys trounced a hapless
Balboa Ten by the unheard score of 19-0.
The game had to be called in the 6th inning as Balboa simply could not get the local
boys out.


Fifty three







BASKETBALL


The Cristobal "A" League All-Star basketball team went down to defeat at the
hands of the Junior College 25-23.
Stempel, Flashy center for the Pacific siders, was a one-man team, sending six baskets
and three fouls through the hoop.
The Cristobal offense could not penetrate the tricky zone defense of the College
five, scoring most of their points on long set shots and rebounds off the College back-
board.
The "B" League basketeers were heavily favored to take the measure of the Balboa
quintet and achieve the record of having beaten Balboa in every sport.
Jimmy Rowe, high scorer in last year's game, was expected to head a squad com-
prised of such talented stars as Oscar Flores, Jack Pescod, Fred Hill, and many others.


Fifty four








TRACK





Balboa Wins Over
Cristobal 50-451


Al Maale
Tosses the Discus


"Mac" McPheters
Puts the Shot


The Cristobal High trackmen
were narrowly edged out, 50 to
45, by Balboa High School in
the annual triangular track meet
held in Balboa. The Junior
College Finished a weak third
with 28 points.
The Cristobal high scorers
were Noel Gibson, with nine
points, and Herbert Robinson,
with eight points, including a
spectacular Finish in the 880-
yard run.


The "B" League boys partly
made up for the "A" League
loss by easily defeating the
Balboa team.
Oscar Flores, with 15 points,
was the individual star for the
smaller lads. Flores shattered
the 50-yard dash record when
he raced the distance in six
seconds and tied the 100-yard
record as he sped to victory in
11 seconds flat.


Dick Nitto Going
Over the Top (top)
Jack Pescod Leaps
the Bar (bottom)


Hotz Starts
Them Off


Fifty five


Off in the
Two-Hundred


~5~6~






BASEBALL





The Cristobal "A" League All-Star baseball team was defeated by a strong Balboa
nine by a 4-1 score.
Bill Pretto matched his pitching talents with Charlie Lebrun of Balboa and save for a
three-run Balboa rally in the seventh inning, held the rivals in check all the way.
Cristobal scored its only run in the top half of the seventh inning to tie the score, but
the three-run Balboa rally, in the latter half of the frame, dispelled any hope of victory.
The Cristobal "B" League baseball team defeated the Balboa "B" League nine
by a 5-0 score in a game played in Balboa.
Cristobal pitcher, Fred Hill, had complete control over the Balboa nine all the way,
giving up only a few hits.
Pitcher Hill, Jerry Stringer, and Ed Corbett each contributed a home-run to the
winning cause.


Fifty six






Gil's Sports



Girl's sports this year were highly successful, not only because
of the large number of victories over Balboa, but because of the
large percentage of girls who participated in each sport.
The sports are planned for all the girls, not for just a select few,
and nothing is more gratifying to a coach than to see a good per-
centage of the girls come out. The larger the group is, the better
chance there is of developing a good all-star team. This was
proved over and over again when the "big games" came along.
The "A" league record is exceptional: out of seven games or
sports our girls won four, lost two and tied one. The record of
the "B" girls could not possibly be bettered: they defeated Balboa
in every sport, volleyball, basketball, softball, and archery.
But despite these good records the other big thing the girls
were striving for was good sportsmanship. It means just as much
or more to a girl to be known as a square dealer as to be known
as a good "athlete." To know how to play a game fairly, with
endurance and teamwork is what the girls learned from volley-
ball, basketball, softball, and the other sports.

"To set the cause above renown,
To love the game beyond the prize,
To honor while you strike him down,
The foe that come with fearless eyes.




*


Fifty seven












A TLA N T/C


5/DE


DEF/-A T5

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PACIF/C


5/DE


LO/5 HOUSE EHOL DER
436
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NOUSEHOLODER CA/N


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A/-fN3V ON


ROBEq T7
WIL L /iMS


FRED
I/IL L


HIL TON
MSPHETERS


CA/IN


J/C K
A UA'K FIL


RE/LEY


I
clj,


\








"A" LEAGUE VOLLEYBALL
This year volleyball started off with a
S bang; more girls came out For this sport
J than any other activity during the whole
l 'X year. The "A" All-Stars bowed down
reluctantly to two strong Balboa teams.
4' ,The Jnnior College girls were victor-
ious over Cristobal by the score of 21-17
1 and 21-12, while the Balboa High
School team also triumphed over our
girls, 21-19 and 21-14. The teamwork
and cooperation of our girls were ex-
f 1 I .,cellent, while the serving and passing
of the Balboa teams were superior, and
were instrumental in their victories over
A /VZLL, 416/LDz-R, 3 ROw/, J.C9Al/,// L. 7PF i Cristobal.





VOLLEYBALL

STAW^W6- EU:KIS, G.cfar#,4L4LA ,B.'DLEIL// ;2'-L/ -,WLL P.L C B. f/P'CC / /TA P/.uLLER

"B" LEAGUE VOLLEYBALL
The "B" League girls began their
sports season even more successfully
than the "A" Leaguers by winning two
well-played games against the Balboa '
High School "B" League. Their smooth "
coordination and teamwork were the
decisive factors in their victory over
their opponents. The scores were also
decisive: 21-10 and 21-13. 'A i


Fifty nine






r


I Ue





-!IT
EL LIE 9 BATTY



.r BETTY


JEA N


6ARBY


CRIS TOBAL
MARGE BALBOA -


-18
6


JACKIE


IC


015
9 o/N
L /


CRI5TOBAL -15
UR. COLLEGE 15


ARD/ TH


A


GEORG/A


NANCY


k~A


MAR/LYN N


BASKELTB


LL


Jo.
1,









/

/


Our players practiced hard and faithfully and their efforts were well rewarded when
they brought the basketball season to a successful close.
Mrs. Eileen O'Brien worked very hard and patiently with the girls on both teams,
bettering their passing and team cooperation, improving their guarding and basket
technique, and in general, organizing them into two Fast-moving and quick-thinking
All-Star teams. She is deserving of much credit, and the school is justly proud of the
records made by these basketball teams.


Sixfy one


)GIRLS "B" BASKETBALL





The "B" League basketball team of Cristobal High School Finished the season by
playing and winning an excellent and fast game against Balboa, and the Final score was
17-5. Roberta Williams starred For our "B" League with a total of nine points to her
credit. Our star guards, Jeannie Kuller and Alice Cain, kept the Balboa players on the
run throughout the whole game. Passing kept the ball at top speed, and the thrilling shots
both long and short made the game one of the most interesting and exciting of the year.




"A" and "B"
SOFTBALL
0:1.oL.A


Sixty two











SOFTBALL TEAMS

Both the "A" and "B" League Softball teams were in top form
this year. The "A" intra-murals consisted of three teams, while
the "B" League had two. If the girls were less adept than their
male schoolmates, they made up for it with a multitude of runs.
And, when the time rolled around for the All-Star games both
teams did themselves proud.
The "A" Leaguers traveled to Balboa and trounced the Junior
College girls, 2 I-6. When the Balboa High School girls invaded
our territory, the "A" 's garnered another victory when they hit
in eleven runs, while their opponents could only account for four
runs. The unbeaten "B" girls likewise downed their opponents
by the score of 8-4.
Eleanor Williams and Alice Cain were the starring pitchers of
the two teams.
The "A" All-Stars were: Lois Stapf, captain, Eleanor Williams,
Lee Brown, Betty Jamesson, Jacqueline Carlin, Ardith Boyle,
Betty Kuhrt, Nancy Gilder, Marilyn Metzger, Helen Culpepper,
Barbara Lawson, and Barbara Brown.
These girls comprised the "B" League team: Jean Kuller,
captain, Alice Cain, Roberta Williams, Pat Leach, Norma Nall,
Thelma Pucci, Andre Whitlock, Harriet Keenan, Gladys Schulte,
Peggy Mcllvaine, Vilma Bejarano, and Eleanor Kuller.



*


Sixty three













Once again the staff of Publications have given you a "Caribbean." Once again,
the book is not complete and is "as full of faults as an old shoe." For that we are sorry,
but we do not apologize. C'est la guerre! You will notice the lack of evidence of
classroom activities, and the absence of pictures of the work of several departments.
All of that is not as planned, but as ordained by whatever gods there be who control
camera supplies. Our school photographers are not professionals and when many of
their efforts at showing the school in action failed, they found to their dismay that there
were no refills for their cameras! So-another page was dropped from the book.
Lois Stapf and Andree Whitlock are student photographers, and Foto Andre and
Foto Wolf furnished the professional pictures. We are especially indebted to Mr. Rene
Wolf for his help.
To offset some of our disappointments-and yours, maybe- we call attention to the
work of our Art Editor, Malcolm DelValle, who gave us his unusual talent in designing
the cover, the emblems, and the division pages. Hilton McPheters did expert work in
lettering and improved the appearance of many pages.
The planning of the "Caribbean" was done largely by the co-editors, Leona San-
ders and Lois StapF, and they were assisted in writing for the book by Dorit Berger, Pat
Gormely, Roy Knoop, Rita Shoaf, and Lois Householder.
This "Caribbean" would never have been a reality without the excellent work done
by the Advertising Staff. Rosita Czernik was business manager and directed the campaign
for funds. Dorit Berger and Betty Jamesson deserve much credit for the many ads which
they sold. Robert Rosania also showed outstanding business ability in collections.
Most of the cuts were made by Jahn and Oilier, of Chicago, with a few by the
Star & Herald Engraving Company.
We are much indebted to our friends of the Panama Canal Press not only for putting
the book together, but for bearing with our inexperience and delays.
May the Peace bring us bigger and better year-books.
THE STAFF


Sixty four













SENIOR BOYS' CLASS WILL

CHARLES ARNOLD-Leaves his boisterous ways to Lolly Collins.
ROY ATWOOD-Leaves his ability to go steady to any needy Junior.
TEDDY BROWN-Wills his wolfish eye to Gus Rosania.
MARLIN CULPEPPER-Leaves his Fighting ability to Robert Toledano.
BERNARD DELONG-Leaves his long hair-cuts to Alfred Maale.
MALCOM DELVALLE-Leaves his smooth dancing to Bob Snelling.
DONALD DIDRICKSON-Leaves his polite ways with the opposite sex to Donald Nail
BILL FISHER-Leaves his ability to get by to Fred Hill.
EUGENE GREGG-Leaves his "line" to Steve Gracie.
PAT GORMELY-Leaves his proof-reading of the "Trade Wind" to whoever will take it!
HUGH HALE-Leaves his witty (?) lokes to Billy Casswell.
ROY KNOOP-Leaves his ability to study to Starford Churchill.
BEN KULLER-Leaves his brilliant repartee to be equally distributed among the Junior Boys.
GARVYN MOUMBLOW-Leaves his 6'2" stature to Noel Gibson.
JACK REILLY-Leaves his excess weight to Chuck Thomas.
DANK SANDER-Would leave English 12 to someone, but doesn't dislike anyone enough.
ALFRED SIMONSON-Leaves his good nature to anybody who needs it.
MAX WEICH-Leaves his "long wind" to the palm trees.
ROBERT WOOD-Leaves his Banana Plantation to Gerald Stroop.








MR g- Sixty ive




MR 9919-9 Sixty five













SENIOR GIRLS' CLASS WILL

GLORIA ASKOFF-Wills those bedroom-blue eyes to the Maybelline Mascara Company.

ORIE AUSTIN-Leaves her giggles to Barbara Millard.

PEGGY BAGGOTT-Leaves her "shiny apple" to Eleanor Williams.

ETHEL COULTER-Leaves her absence record to Lois Householder.

JOAN ELLIS-Leaves her satin-soooth Pond's complexion to Miss Patterson.

SUSIE FAHNESTOCK-Leaves her "vacant" periods to Helene Marsh.

MORAIMA FREIRE-Leaves her shorthand periods to just anybody at all.

BITSY GATES-Leaves the armed forces in the capable hands (?) of Pauline Schriftgiesser.

CHARLEEN HELLUMS-Wills all Future Atwood Jrs. to C. H. S.

MELIDA HOWARD-Leaves her "perpetual energy" to Miss Liter.

LOIS KRIDLE-Leaves Balboa to just any Junior who's crazy enough to want it!

ANGELICA LIM-Leaves her competence in Business Training to the Business Training Class of '46

JOAN MILLSPAUGH-Leaves her red hair to Marilyn Metzger.

JEAN O'HAYER-Leaves her silver skates to Ardith Boyle.

JOY RANDALL-Leaves her "million-dollar smile" to the highest bidding toothpaste company.

CAROL RUOFF-Leaves her chewing gum to Helen Stade.

LEONA SANDERS-Leaves her voice to Anita Berley.

RITA SHOAF-Leaves her Southern accent to Mac McPheters.

LOIS STAPF-Leaves her tennis racket to Mr. Hotz.

GENE STONE-Leaves her sophistication to Betty Kuhrt.

NORRINE TERRY-Leaves her sweet disposition to any Junior who feels in need of it.

MARY WHITE-Leaves her good looks to be evenly distributed among the Junior girls.

GRACE YOHROS-Leaves her "straight" hair to anyone who can manage it.


O


Sixty six

























































































Sixty seven










COMPLIMENTS OF


THE HERFF-JOInES


CO


MPAnY


Manufacturers of


Class Rings


Commencement Invitations
Medals and Trophies


E. A. LEWIS, Representative


Box 3792


Ancon, Canal Zone


Sixty eight











COMPLIMENTS OF


SMART


High Qualities and Exclusive Models

of the Latest Styles


Bolivar 7087


PANAMA


COMPLIMENTS OF


HODAK, PAnAmA, LTD.



Central Ave. Arboix Building


COLON


PANAMA CITY


Sixty nine


COLON


No. 98,


MR 9919-10


re


-

B














-A


S
E
V


55 Front Street
Colon, Panama


Remember that SEVILLA
stands for Distinction


Compliments of

THE
SWISS JEWELRY STORE
CHARLES PERRET


Opposite the
Commissary


Colon


Compliments
of




W. W. GOULD

Insurance


Second Floor, Masonic Temple
Phone 3-1456
Box 2098 Cristobal, C. Z.


Congratulations
Class of '45


BAZAR


PANAMA CITY


ESPANOL


.:. PANAMA


Seventy


I









VICTORY
BUY
VNITSD
STATUS
TAND
Isrlp


Recreation in the modern manner,
convenient Facilities, and reasonable prices


VISIT THE NEW
THEATERS
CRISTOBAL THEATERS
GOLD THEATER RESTAURANTS


SODA


FOUNTAINS


BOWLING LANES


Panama


Canal


Clubhouses


"Your Community Center


Seventy one


* COMFORT SEATS
SAIR VENTILATING
SYSTEM
* BEAUTIFULLY
DECORATED


Panama Canal
CLUBHOUSES
_________________











Compliments
of


7I

aO


WONG CHANG, S.
General Hardware

We Specialize in Glass for
Windshields, Doors, etc.,
For any Make of Car


Panama
Phone 303


A.


Colon
Phone 1193


Looking For

A GIFT
Visit


THE NATIVE ART AND
GIFT SHOP

Mrs. H. Shaw, Proprietor


45 Front Street
Phone 113 Colon


Yet
bXo


Duty-Free-Store


Come and see us at our new store on Bolivar Street,
next door to the Chase National Bank


PANAMA


CASA

FRSTLICH


Seventy two


COLON









No. 33


P. JHANGIMAL

Wholesale and Retail

Perfumes, Panama Hats, Silbs
and Oriental
Novelties

Front Street
-Phone 613-J, Colon


Compliments of ,.L





GARAGE ATLANTICO


15th Street
Phone 923


and Melendez


Avenue
Colon


HOTEL WUSHinGTON
Unequalled for Location and Comfort


A hotel in keeping with the dignity, spirit, and comfort of
THE PANAMA CANAL


Golf Swimming Water Sports

Tarpon Fishing


Seventy three











COMPLIMENTS OF


We have the 4
same quality here
as in Panama





COLON Opposite the
Commissary


Seventy four














Go To

COLON JEWELRY

COMPANY

For

Watches and Jewelry

11th and Front Streets, Colon


ESQUIRE

30 Front Street
Tele 1064 Colon


Office Supplies
Stationery
Kodak Films
Parker 51 Pens
Greeting Cards
Baby Clothes
Toys


Compliments
of




Sears and Roebuck

and Company

Represented on the Isthmus
by
AGENCIA SEARS
Tivoli Avenue, opposite Ancon Post Office


Margarita Florist


Shaw & Williams


Masonic Temple
Phone 3-1916


Seventy five
















Compliments of

The French Bazaar
JUAN PALOMERAS


Front Street.
Colon


National Mattress

Factory


Melendez Avenue
Between 10th and 11th Streets
Colon


UnITED FRUIT COmPAnY


GREAT WHITE FLEET
SERVES THE AMERICAS



OFFICES


United Fruit Co. Building
CRISTOBAL


Century Club
PANAMA CITY


Phone 2121


Panama 523
524


Seventy six












Compliments of


THE ROBERT WILCOX


COMPANY


Carlton Drug Store

Clean, Modern, Up-to-Date
Drugs, Patent Medicines, and
Toilet Articles


Ice Cream, Sodas, etc.


10th Street and Federico Boyd Avenue
Phone 255 Colon


Paramount Store


Gentlemen s Wear
Children's Wear


11th St. and Balboa Ave., Colon


JOHN SURANY

Agents for
Remington-Rand, Inc.
W. A. Shaeffer Pen Co.
Magazines, Books, Office and
Photo Supplies, Games,
Novelties, Sporting Goods,
Greeting Cards


Colon


Front
Street


Seventy seven


,
~-fr5:
I
~s












FACTORY


P. GORIN, Manager, "CHS" '40
6071 Bolivar Avenue
See Gorin's for the
"BEST IN REST"





Manufacturers of the highest
grade of bedding


Compliments


The American Bazaar

"Haberdashers and Tailors to
Men of Good Taste"


Panama


Colon


Now More


Agents for Panama

TAGAROPULOS

S. A.




Colon, Rep. de Panama


Seventy eight


GORIN'S


MATTRESS


4















Compliments of


Colon Motors, Inc.

Distributors for
Dodge Passenger Cars and Trucks
DeSoto Passenger Cars


Phone 492


Colon


C. CASULLO

Watchmaker and Jeweler
45a Front Street, Colon

"MIDO" MULTIFORT
SUPER
AUTOMATIC WATCH

An Ideal Gift for Graduation


Compliments
of


Novedades Ventura


Front Street


Colon


Special Attention
Given to y
Linen Suits EA



YOUR VALET

Ph EXCELSIO R 226
Federico Boyd Ave. between 14 & 15 Sts.

DRY CLEANERS


Office 10th Street


Colon Theater Bldg.


Seventy nine


. .














Compliments of


BOMBAY


BAZAAR


Colon


ALMACEN
ELECTRIC
Jose Jaen J. y Cia., Ltda.
Electrical Appliances
Refrigerators
Hardware


Phone 33


Colon


P. O. Box 33


"The label that signifies
Quality"


PANAMA


M


0


TTA'S


COLON


Eighty










a\>


THE BESTFIT


CO.


Manufacturers of


MEN'S and YOUNG MEN'S


CLOTHES


Opposite the Commissary


Compliments


THE DARIEN DRUG STORE


COLON


Julio A. Salds


Distributor
Philips Radios


Phone 537


Decca Records


5.006 Front Street
P. O. Box 1104
Colon


JARDIN


"EL


CLAVEL"


We specialize in all kinds of
Floral Work


Colon I Phone 715


Colon


J. MIZRACHI


Jeweler, Watchmaker, and
Expert Diamond Setter


Satisfaction Guaranteed


Front Street


Phone 345


Colon


Eighty one

















Compliments
of


1. L. mRDURO, Jr., S. A.

Colon


-53-

ISTHMIAN

CURIO SHOP
Kresz and Jessany


Perfumes
Panama Hats
Movelties
Silver


Phone 359


Colon


Congratulations, Class of '45




FOTO ELITE


10th Street


COLON


Eighty two










Congratulations,
Class of '45

FRENCH BAZAAR
Huertematte & Co.


Central Avenue


Panama


Best Wishes to the
Class of '45


PINOCHO

Panama, R. de P.


Compliments /M
of



CASA CENTRAL


Bolivar Avenue


Phone 623


Colon


Front Street


58
NOVEDADES ATLANTICO

Large Assortment of
Perfumes, Silk Stockings, Watches,
Alligator Bags, Jewelry, Panama Hats



sp


Eighty three


C'










o

M
P
L IL

E
N
T
S OF

MADURITOS

Ladies Wear
Silk Stockings
Sports Wear
Perfumes
Phone 888 Colon


Good Luch To The
Class of '45


Central

Plumbing


American

Company


COLON


RADIO CENTER

Distributors of

(M) RCA Victor Products
(v) General Electric Products
(v) Stationery, Office Supplies,
Books

Congratulations, Class of '45


Compliments
of


SALAZAR DRUG STORE


COLON


Eighty four
















Central Avenue
Central Avenue


Colon

ARMY AND NAVY
Specialize in all Kinds of
Uniforms

English Cloth of the Best Quality
Initial Payments Accepted


Congratulations,


Class of '45




Dr. VERN PRIER



Masonic Temple


Compliments of



THE

REX
AND

BOLIVAR
THEATRES

COLON


C
0
O
M
P
L


PARIS


BAZAAR


Colon


Eighty five


CALIFORNIA
TAILOR SHOP

131

Phone 2976-L


~I~~I






















Americana


Central Avenue, Panama


Congratulations,

Class of '45


Navarreti & Martinez
CIA., LTDA.


Front Street


Colon


OUR '
STUDENTr
COUNCIL

of the

STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION
OF CRISTOBAL HIGH
SCHOOL

Wishes
"SUCCESS TO OUR SUCCESSORS"
in the coming year


N
T
S


International


Panama, R. de P.


Eighty six


La fToda


of


Store


I























































COMFORTABLE LOCKHEED 14'S>
"Flights to Mexico and Cuba with connections to the United States"


I



i
''
..
I~


44..


S "


Eighty seven


I-.3


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~.rE,-v ~K


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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1945cris




One




Dedication to an Idea/



To former students and faculty, our service stars of the
forces, we gratefully dedicate the 1945 Annual Caribbean



Two



Foreword



"Freedom is a bright and singing thing . Freedom is not only something to read of in
textbooks . Freedom is our heritage and our life. When we think of those who
fight for freedom on the world's greatest battlefields, let us remember our birthright, and
take it, and hold it high in our hands our brightest heritage Freedom.''




Thr







?^>\



^ S CowW e



!>/* J i^oi> c



Fgur




Five




MR. HALLECK
Physical Education





MISS McLIMANS
Household Arts



MR. PALUMBO
Physical Education




MISS RUOFF
Secretary




MR. ANDERSON
Woodwork




MISS BEAVERS
Mathematics




MR. GIBSON
Mechanical Drawing



Six




r r k nnrvc

CLAv5v5 Or )945

OUR WORK BEGINS HERE




The final curtain falls after the fourth and last act of the production "The Class of
Forty-five." The actors came on the set as bit players in the first act, but under the in-
valuable guidance of stage managers and directors, they have advanced and are now
making their curtain calls.

We, the members of the cast, began our careers by learning to play a great
variety of minor roles. During our third year, we took more important parts. In this,
our last year, with the help of our class president and his staff, we have taken the leads.
We have all earned rings or pins, and some of us have received various other awards.
The main characters have been Max Weich, President,- Roy Atwood, Vice President,-
Leona Sanders, Secretary,- Roy Knoop, Treasurer. The Senior class representatives
are Joy Randall and Malcolm DelValle. We hope that you will remember with
pleasure our production as we go out to take part in many others, for "All the world's
a stage."



Seven




WITH OUR GRADUATION



ETHEL K. COULTER
Flushing, New York

Caribbean Staff, 3, 4. Trade Wind
Staff, 3, 4. La P. A. S. 1, 2, 3. Glee
Club 1, 4. Victory Corps 1, 2.
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.

''A pleasing countenance is no slight
advantage."



CHARLES ARNOLD
Louisville, Kentucky

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Victory Corps
3. Music Appreciation 3. Operetta
1,2.

"Ready, willing, and able to work,
In his studies he never did shirk."



MARGARET BAGGOTT
Pleasantville, New Jersey

Acting Secretary 3. La P. A. S. 2, 3,
4. Cipos 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Basketball 2, 3,
4. Junior-Senior Banquet Committee
3, 4. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.

"Peggy's jokes and her flaming hair,
Make us forget our trouble and
care."



ORELIA AUSTIN
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Victory Corps 2, 3. Softball 2, 3.
All-Star 3. Swimming 1, 2, 3. Vol-
leyball 1, 2, 3, 4.

"Unselfish in every thought and care,
She enjoys a happiness that's rare."




ROY ATWOOD
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Victory Corps 4. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
All-Star 1, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1, 3.
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Track 1, 2, 3, 4.
All-Star 1, 2, 3, 4. Swimming 2, 3.
Water Polo. Class Officer, Vice Pres-
ident 2. Acting President 4.

"Not too studious, not too gay,
He trod the even, middle way."



GLORIA ASKOFF

New York City, New York

Trade Wind Staff 4. La P. A. S. 3.
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4. President
4. Thespian 2, 3, 4. Vice President
4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Victory
Corps 1, 2, 3. Operetta 2. Junior-
Senior Banquet Committee 3. Volley
ball 1.

"Sentences fail when one word is
complete,
Descriptive of Gloria is one word:
sweet."



THEODORE BROWN
Chinqui, Panama

Glee Club 2. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Operetta 2. Orchestra 1, 2. Band 1,

2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2,

3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball
1, 2, 3, 4.

"A free heart won by the sea.
Never imprisoned to earn a degree.



MARLIN CULPEPPER
Venice, Florida

Dramatic Club 4. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Music Appreciation 3. Orchestra 3.
Band 1,2. Football 1, 4. Baseball 1,
4. Softball 1, 4. Basketball 1, 4.
Model Airplane Club 2.

"It is hard for the happy to under-
stand misery."



Eight




WE LOOK TO NEW FIELDS



WILLIAM FISHER
Gatun, Canal Zone

Student Association President 4.
Class Officer 3. Honor Society 3, 4.
La P. A. S. 2, 3, 4. Dramatic Club 3.
Glee Club 1, 2,3, 4. Victory Corps
2,3. Operetta 1,2. Orchestra 1, 2,
3. Band 1, 2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
Baseball 1, 2, 3. Softball 1, 2, 3.
Basketball 1, 2, 3. Track 1, 2, 3.

"He is all that's good and great,
He is the ruler of his fate."



KATHERYNE GATES
Barranca-Bermeja, Colombia.

La P. A. S. 3. Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3,
4. Victory Corps 1, 2, 3. Operetta
1, 2. Swimming 1, 2, 3. Archery 1.
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.

"At last we have perpetual motion
Incessant energy."



DONALD DIDRICKSON
Seattle, Washington

Class Representative 1. Victory
Corps 2. Orchestra 1, 2. Football
1, 2, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 4. Baseball

1, 2, 4. Softball 1, 2, 4. Soccer 1,

2, 4. Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4. Water
Polo 1, 2. Model Airplane Club 2.

"Politeness is the chief sign of
culture."



SUSIE FAHNESTOCK
Gulfport, Mississippi

Thespian 3, 4. Honor Society 3, 4.
President 4. La P. A. S. 3, 4. Presi-
dent 4. Victory Corps 2, 3. Oper-
etta 2. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Librar-
ian 2. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
mitee Toastmistress 3. Cabinet Mem-
ber 4.

"Always there to lend a hand,
When the situation may demand."




JOAN ELLIS
Dallas, Texas

Trade Wind Staff 4. La P. A. S. 3.
Dramatic Club 3. Thespian 3, 4.
Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Librarian 2.
Softball 1. Basketball All-Star 3.
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.
Volleyball 3.

"Oh, thou art fairer than the evening
air,
Clad in the beauty of a thousand
stars."



MALCOLM DELVALLE
New York City, New York

Caribbean Staff, Art Editor 4. La
P. A. S. 3. Dramatic Club 3, 4. Thes-
pian 3, 4. Victory Corps 3, 4. Foot-
ball 4. Baseball 3. Softball 3.
Swimming 4. Tennis 4. Junior-
Senior Banquet 3. Cabinet Member
4. Class Representative 3.

"He'll be successful in any land,
For he holds his future well in hand."



MORAIMA FREIRE
Habana, Cuba

Softball 1, 2. All Star 1. Basketball
1,2. All-Star 1. Tennis 1. Archery
1, 2. Volleyball 1, 2. All-Star 1.

"A gentle heart is tied with an easy
string."



BERNARD DE LONG
Flint, Michigan

Victory Corps 2, 3. Operetta 1.
Football 4. Track 1.

"Good things are twice as good
when they are short."



Nine




SOME TO HIGHER EDUCATION






LOIS KRIDLE
Latrobe, Pa.

La P. A. S. 3. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Operetta 2.
Volleyball 2, 4.

"O winsome smile, laughing brown
eyes,
Makes this girl above others rise."



ROY KNOOP
Ancon, Canal Zone

Class Officer, Treasurer 4. Carib-
bean Staff 4. Trade Wind Staff 4.
Glee Club 2, 3. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Operetta 2.

"Very quiet and unassuming,
Weighty plans his mind is brewing.



MELIDA HOWARD
Colon, R. P.

Class Representative 3. Dramatic
Club 1. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2, 3. Cheering Squad
1, 2, 3. Music Appreciation 2.
Operetta 1, 2. Softball 1, 2. Basket-
ball 1, 2. Swimming 1. Tennis 1, 2.
Archery 1, 2. Junior-Senior Ban-
quet Committee 3. Cabinet Member
4.

"Hang sorrow, care will kill a cat,
Therefore let's be merry."



EUGENE GREGG
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Band 1. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All-
Star 1, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soft-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3.
Track 1. Swimming 1, 2, 4. Water
Polo 1, 2.

"He is a man of sense who doesn't
grieve for what he has not,
But rejoices in what he has."




HUGH HALE
Ancon, Canal Zone

Caribbean, Staff, Photographer 4.
Trade Wind Staff, Photographer 4.
Dramatic Club 4. Victory Corps 3.
Orchestra 2, 3. Bandl. Football 1,

2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star

3. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soccer 1, Bas-
ketball 2.

"A bold and gallant knight is he,
His manner laden with chivalry."



CHARLEEN HELLUMS
St. Joseph, Missouri

Trade Wind Staff 3, 4. La P. A. S. 3.
Glee Club, 1 2, 3. Softball 1, 2.
Soccer 1, 2. Basketball 1, 2. Volley-
ball 1.

"Conscientious and dependable,
A classmate indispensible."



PATRICK GORMELY
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Caribbean Staff 4. Trade Wind Staff
3, 4, Co-Editor 4. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Band 1, 2.

"He is great who never reminds us
of others."



MILDRED GILL
Pinnsauken, New Jersey

Glee Club 1,2. Victory Corps 1, 2.
"A peppy little piece of humanity."



Ten




OTHERS TO THEIR LIFE WORK



JOAN MILLSPAUGH
Newbergh, New York

La P. A. S. 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 4.
Victory Crops 2, 3. Cheer Leaders
4. Operetta 1, 2. Basketball 2.

"Her laughter and giggles are heard
all day,
For she believes in the smiling way.



BENNY KULLER
Balboa, Canal Zone

Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Victory Corps 2,
3. Operetta 1, 2. Football All-
Star 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball All-Star
1, 2, 3, 4. Softball All-Star 1, 2, 3, 4.
Soccer 1. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-
Star 2. Track 3, 4.

I am wealthy in my friends.'



GARVYN MOUMBLOW
Gatun, Canal Zone

Class Officer, President 3. Class Rep-
resentative 4. Caribbean Staff
Photographer 3. Glee Club 2. Vic-
tory Corps 2, 3. Cheer Leaders 4.
Operetta 2. Orchestra 2. Band 1,
2. Junior-Senior Banquet Committee
3.

There could be no great ones
if there were no small ones."



JEAN O'HAYER
Baltimore, Maryland

La P. A. S. 3. Dramatic Club 3. Vic-
tory Corps 2, 3. Librarian 1. Softball
1, 2, 3. All-Star 3. Basketball 3.
Archery 1,2. All-Star 2. Volleyball
1, 2, 3. All-Star 3.

"From the top of her head to the tip
of her toes,
Her example of neatness and love-
liness grows."




JACK REILLY
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Dramatic Club 3, 4. Glee Club 3.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Operetta 2.
Orchestra 1, 2, 3. Band 1, 2. Foot-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1. Baseball

1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1, 2, 3. Softball
1,2,3,4. B-AII-Star1,2, 3. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. B-AII Star 2, 3.
Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4. Water Polo 1

2. Model Airplane Club 3.

"Laughter shall dimple the cheek,
and not furrow the brow with
ruggedness."



ANGELICA LIM
Bocas del Toro, R. P.

La P. A. S. 4. Glee Club 1,2. Var-
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1. Bas-
ketball 1, 2, 3. Track 3. Model Air-
plane Club 3. Volleyball 1, 2, 3.

To those who know thee not,
No words can paint."



ADAIR PASSAILAIGUE
Colon, R. P.

Class Officer, Secretary 1, 2. Dra-
matic Club 1, 2. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Operetta 1. Baseball 2, 3. Softball
1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2.

"She is gay and gladsome."



JOY RANDALL
Ancon, Canal Zone

Class Representative 2, 4. Class Offi-
cer, Secretary-Treasurer 3. Honor
Society 3, 4. Treasurer 4. La P. AS.

2, 3, 4. Cipo 3, 4. Dramatic Club

3, 4, Vice President and Treas-
urer 4. Thespian Club 3, 4, Sec-
Treas. 4. Biology Club 2. Glee Club
1, 2, 3, 4. Victory Corps 2, 3. Var-
sity Club 2. Operetta 1,2. Librarian
1, 2, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
1, 3. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star

1. Swimming 1,2, 3, All-Star 1, 2, 3.
Tennis 1. Archery 1, 2, 4. All-Star

2. Junior-Senior Banquet Committee

3. Cabinet Member 4. Volleyball
1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star 1, 2.

"Not bold, nor shy, nor short, nor
tall,
A pleasant mingling of them all."



Eleven




BUT ALL OF US STRIVE



RITA SHOAF
Lexington, North Carolina

Class Representative 1. Caribbean
Staff 4. Trade Wind Staff 4. Honor
Society 4. La P. A. S. 4. Varsity Club
4. Orchestra 2, 3. 4. Band 2, 3, 4.
Softball 3, 4. All-Star 3. Basketball
3, 4. All-Star 3. Cabinet Member 4.
Volleyball 4.
"Right brisk is she and full of spirit."



DANKWART SANDERS
Shanghai, China

La P. A. S. 2. Biology Club, President
2 Victory Corps 2, 3. Football 1, 2,
3, 4 All-Star 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2. 3
4 All-Star 3. Track 1, 2, 3, 4. All-
Star 1, 2, 3. Water Polo 1, 2.
Swimming 2, 3. Junior-Senior Ban-
quet Committee 3.

"Self-respect, that cornerstone of all
virtues.




ALFRED SIMONSSON
Colon, R. P.

Victory Corps 2, 3. La P. A. S. 3.
Band 1. Football 1, 3, 4. All-Star
1, 3, 4. Soccer 1.

"Virtue is never left to stand,
He who has it will have neighbors"



NORRINE TERRY
Breadalbia, New York

Victory Corps 2, 3.

"Do but look on her hair; it is as love's
star when it riseth."



CAROL RUOFF
Los Angeles, Calif.

Class Representative 3. Dramatic
Club 2, 3. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Vic-
tory Corps 2, 3. Varsity Club 2, 3.
Operetta 1. Volleyball All-Star 4.

"She is full of grace, force, and fas-
cination."



LEONA SANDERS

Barranca-Bermeja, Colombia

Class Officer, Secretary 4. Carib-
bean Staff, Co-Editor 4. Trade Wind
Staff 4. Honor Society, Secretary 4.
La P A. S. 4. Dramatic Club 4,
Thespian 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
President 4. Swimming 2. Tennis 2.

"I would rather be remembered by a
song
Than by a victory."




LUCIEN R. SKEELS
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Water Polo 1, 2. Basketball 1. Vic-
torp Corps 1, 2. Track 1, 2. Journa-
lism 2. Glee Club, 1, 2, 4. Archery
2. Baseball 2, Swimming 1, 2, 3.
Photo Club 1. Inter-Amer. Discussion
Club 1.

"The world was taken in his stride,
Nor turned he back for time nor
tide."



LOIS STAPF
Ancon, Canal Zone

Caribbean Staff, Co-Editor 4. Trade
Wind Staff 3, 4. Co-Editor 4. La
P A S 2, 3, 4. Cipo 3, 4. Dramatic
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Photo Club 1, 2,
Treasurer. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Vic-
tory Corps 3. Varsity Club 2, 3, 4
President 4. Operetta 1, 2. Softball
All-Star 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2,
3,4. All-Star 2, 3, 4. Tennis 1,2, 3.
4. Girls' Championship 1, 2, 3,
Archery 3. Junior-Senior Banquet
Committee 3. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
All-Star 2, 3, 4.

"Her sunny locks hang on her temples
like golden fleece."



Twelve




TOWARD HAPPINESS AND SUCCESS



MARY WHITE
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Class Officer, Secretary 2, 3. Glee
Club 1, 2. Victory Corps 3. Oper-
etta 2. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
mittee 3. Volleyball 2.

"A girl with beauties very rare,
Bewitching eyes and raven hair."




MAX L. WEICH
Gatun, Canal Zone

Class Officer, President 4. La P. A.
S. 4. Biology Club 2. Glee Club 1,

2, 3. Victory Corps 2, 3. Operetta
1, 2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star

1, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3. All-Star 1,

3. Softball 1, 2, 3. All-Star 1, 2, 3.
Basketball 1, 2, 3. All-Star 1, 2, 3.
Track, All-Star 1, 2, 3. Swimming 1,

2. Water Polo, All Star 1, 2. Junior-
Senior Banquet Committee 3. Cab-
inet Member 4.

"There is more in me than you under-
stand."



MARTIN KENDZIOREK
Colon, R. P.

La P. A. S. 2, 3, 4. Opo 3. Victory
Corps 1, 2, 3. Model Airplane Club

1. Dolphins Club 2. Swimming 1, 2,
3. Football 1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2.
Softball 1, 2. Water Polo 1, 2. Track

2. Orchestra 2, 3.

"His nimble brain is hid by levity,
Merry, but no fool is he."



ALVIN LIM
Cristobal, Canal Zone

Class Officer, Vice President 3.
Campaign Manager 3. La P. A. S.

2, 3. Cipo 2, 3. Victory Corps 2, 3.
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.
Model Airplane Club 1, 2. Football
1,2,3,4. All-Star 1. Baseball 1, 2,

3. Basketball 1, 2, 3. Softball 1, 2,
3. All-Star 2.

"A cheerful smile, a pleasant word,
Mirth over sadness, he preferred."








GRACE YOHROS
Brooklyn, New York

La P. A. S. 2, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Softball 1, 2.
Basketball 1.

"Smiling lips, twinkling eyes,
And a beauty that never dies!"




JIHHH



EDMOND WACHTEL
Colon, R. P.

La P. A. S. 2. Cipo 2. Victory Corps
2, 3. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
mittee 3. Class Officer, Vice Presi-
dent 2. Biology Club 2. Football 3.
Basketball 3. Glee Club 2, 3.

"From quiet, unexpected sources,
Often spring the world's great
forces!"



GENE STONE
Cristobal, Canal Zone



ROBERT WOOD
Gatun, Canal Zone



Thirteen




ii ikimrvr

vJUINIUKJ




The members of the class of Forty-six have risen from bit to feature players, and the
next step is stardom. Last year and the year before they gave plays in assembly, and
this year their biggest production was a most successful banquet for the Seniors. This
class has also been outstanding in sports, scholarship, and service.

Their leaders are: President, Thelma Pucci,- Vice President, Gus Rosania,- Secretary,
Eleanor Williams,- Treasurer, Noel Gibson,- Class Representatives: Helen Stade and
Charles Thomas.

The curtain falls and when it rises again .



Fourteen



JUNIORS









Ed/th SuA/fre Thomas Styles Adda Lynaj A/all f/fAA/ff D/£-/?s Mar/c Afi/cn M ARC/A Vanatta





o







W/ll/am Wall Ros/ta Czeknik H/ltoa/ M-Phetea'S Dokothy Engler Gus Rosania Thelma Thomas



V"





'HOMAS U>AA>SARA



Lawsom Luc/lle Hamilton Stea'A'sa' Gf?/ic;£ PhKll/5 Piff/Kr/f Robeat Posaa/m



Fifteen



JUNIORS










A i W l 1

Helea/ Staue Deaisv/s Vea/ahrg Marilyn Metzger Alice Gain Normal Olade Arditr Boyle

t i
Kenneth Campbell Barbara Primmer Fred H/ll Ue~aa/ Holler Robert SHELL>/VGrAiJLiA/t-5o/ft/ET6E/55Efi

Alfred Ma ale (Jacqi/el/we Carlin Noel Gibson Lois UouseRolder Helene Marsh Frank He/te






Charles Thomas Oorit B>E RGE?t \



Sixteen



JUNIORS



t^






V J


1




\3LRALD StROOP


Mary Leach











f^



Robert Toleoano




t

Kenneth Lowe







UETTr (Jam



WMESSO/V




Anita Berley

Seventeen




cni\nnkjni\r c

C L A vS 5 OF- /34 7

JUKHUHUKX.J




SOPH CLASS OFFICERS

The second act! The players, still in minor roles, are improving. When the curtain
rises again, they will be upper-classmen. The lead role in this act is played by Gloria
Bornefeld. Other characters are Oscar Flores, vice president, Judy Havas, Secretary,
James Roe, Treasurer. Muriel Tatelman and George Schultze are the Class Represen-
tatives. The Sophomores are completing their second year here, and in both they have
been very successful.



Eighteen








-M


V 9 | K *i| ^b


mum k



Row 2

J. Buckley; H. Bingham, R. Osorio; T. London

Row 1

A. Benthal; L. Brown,- J. Andrews, G. Bornefield,

H. Keenun



Row ?

B. Wadley, J. Roe, P. Pincus, R. Scheiddegg;

M. Tatelman

Row 1

G. Schulte, J. McNair, F. Rosales,- P. Wilkes;

B. Webster




Row 3

T. McGinn,- J. Dorsey,- O. Flores,- J. Rowe,-

H. Wentworlh

Row 2

E. Tompkins,- F. Howard; J. Havas,- M. Chong;
Z. Campbell

Row 1

P. Mcllvaine,- M. Harrington



Nineteen




Row 2

M. Hupp, J. Malcolm; H. Diaz, N. Keller, J. Pescod

Row 1

H. Kellman,- A. Lincoln, T. Gregg, G. Schulte



* IF





Row 2

G. Cadava, H. Leignadier; R. Nilto

Row 1

R. Tracy; B. Watts, B. Reeves, R. Muckle



y



Row 3

S. Blackburn; T. Dorgan,- B. Dixon; D. Chambers

Row 2

P. Benny,- A. Cottrell, H. Culpepper, R. Knoop

Row 1

H. Hanna, R. DeCastro, J. Hanshaw




Twenty




r\r c i ik At* m




#



1 "-iigi't,




/



k ..



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS

The curtain rises on the first act, and we present the class of 1948. Don t turn away
watch them!

The principal characters are David Aycock, President,- Bill McGinn, Vice President,-
Johnny Engelke, Secretary-Treasurer. Representatives are David Stade and Evelyn
Frankel.

The freshmen are the future stars,- the leaders were once led. Good luck!



Twenty one





Row 2

D. Wong; M. Simons,- N. Dyer, R. Williams

Row 1

H. Taylor,- E. Corbett, T. Melancon; D. Serko



Row 3

R. Mcllvame; H. Schulte, K. Millard, J. Stringer,-

R. Halwanny

Row 2
M D. Lindslrom; N. Owens,- P. Leach,- H. Miller

Row 1

E. Manrique,- A. Parcell



Row 2

W. McGinn, P. Sanders,- D. Stade,- E. Johnston;

D. Sether

Row 1

G. DeLong, P. Nieves,- M. Styles; N. Quigley,-

S. Nichols,- L. Lamis



Twenty two




Row 3

T. Dixon, G. Sollas; C. Harrison; E. BringaS;

J. Fernandez

Row 2

T. Archbold; V. Bejarano; M. Heerman; B. Engle-

bright, W. McLaughlin

Row 1

E. Frankel; B. Brown; M. Aleguas





Row 3

C. Madison; W. Willoughby; D. Aycock

Row 2

J. Taylor,- A. Braylon; M Benny

Row 1

J. Engelke, J. Heliums, B. Hodges, N. Aizpuria,-

S. Freier



Row 3

N. Nail; B. Wolfenstein; J. Haywood; G. Egol

Row 2

M. Furey,- A. Armstrong,- E. Kuller, J. Gill

Row 1

D. Sanders; G. Coulter; E. Pretto; D. Heun




Twenty three









Twenty four



CTIVITIES




r



T

U
D
E

N
T

C
O

U

N

C
I
L





THE STUDENT COUNCIL

This year's election of the Student Council was marked by one of the most interesting
and exciting presidential elections in the history of C. H. S. Susie Fahnestock, Malcolm
DelValle, and Bill Fisher campaigned vigorously up to the very last moment in attempts
to sway public opinion. After election day, when the smoke of battle had cleared, it
was discovered that Bill Fisher had been elected to be the twelfth president of the Cris-
tobal High School Student Association.

The Student Association is governed according to Parliamentary Procedure through
a governing body known as the Student Council. Two representatives are elected from
each of the various classes. These, in addition to the president, vice president, secre-
tary, and treasurer, comprise the Student Council. Through this system students of C. H. S.
are exposed to representative democracy, similar to that which they may find as citizens
in adult life.

Representative student government in C. H. S. has been particularly successful this
year. One of this year's goals was to make the Student Council more representative of
the various homerooms through closer homeroom cooperation. The Student Council has
been responsible for the highly successful Student Study Hall, which has been run en-
tirely by the students. Also the Council has been very busy at the task of revising the
Student Association Constitution, which has for some time, been outmoded.



Twenty six



Thanks to the Student Association, C. H. S. has again enjoyed its usual student
activities. The "Trade Wind," "Caribbean," atheltic events, musical programs, drama-
tic productions, class picnics and dances, sports awards, magazine drives, talent assem-
blies, and the Junior-Senior Banquet, have all been sponsored by the Student Association.

A great deal of the Student Association's success may be traced directly to the effi-
cient guidance of the Sponsor, Mr. Clifford Hauberg. Giving a great deal of his time
to Student Council affairs, he has helped and inspired the Council in its numerous
activities.

A cabinet of six members was chosen this year to assist the president in his duties.
Although cabinets of previous years have also been successful, the concensus of opinion
seems to be that this year's cabinet has been even more so.

Those composing the President's Cabinet are: Joy Randall, Director of Budget and
Finance,- Malcolm DelValle, Director of Public Relations,- Rita Shoaf, Chairman of the
Constitutional Revision Committee,- Susie Fahnestock, Director of Citizenship Activities,-
Max Weich, Miscellaneous,- and Melida Howard, Miscellaneous.



T
H
E




C
A

B
I

N
E

r



Twenty seven



NATIONAL
HONOR SOCIETY



NATIONAL HONOR




SENIORS



The first high school honor society was founded in 1903. It came into being soon
after the great increase in enrollment in the secondary schools showed the need for such
an organization. Social and athletic activities became increasingly important but the
necessary stimulation for scolarship was lacking, and something needed to be done about
it.

On the last day of the school year, in 1903, five girls of high scholastic standing,
under the direction of Dr. William B. Owen, who was then principal of the old South Side
Academy of Chicago, formed the first honor society, Pi Beta Sigma. Its primary aim was
the encouragement of scholarship. The next year, the Academy became a part of Chicago
University but the society continued and still exists as an independent organization. Its
rules and regulations are much the same as those of the National Honor Society.

The idea for encouraging good high school citizenship and scholarship spread and
soon societies emulating the activities and accomplishments of Phi Beta Kappa in Uni-
versities were organized in widely separated parts of the U. S. Many of these consoli-
dated, because schools lying in the same district were able to agree upon requirements
for membership and standards of scholarship.

In 1919 the operation of these honor societies had been so successful that the ques-
tion was taken up at a meeting of the National Association of Secondary School Prin-
cipals. They approved of the plan and the American Torch Society was formed. This
was later changed to the National Honor Society.

In order to be eligible to the National Honor Society a student must have an A or
B average. If a pupil is normal or above average in other traits and excels in scholarship,
he is one who is primarily intended to be honored. The pupils are ranked in numerical
order, according to their grades during the first seven semesters, or in the case of the
Juniors, the first five semesters.




WILLIAM T/5HER





*\, *5



Twenty eight



SOCIETY



JUNIORS




.GAY TH0MA6




* il



wwtr.wma



Other qualities that are analysed are leadership/ service, and character. At a
meeting of all the teachers with whom these pupils have come into contact, they are



ra



ted.



The aim of the National Honor Society is to make good citizenship in high schools
a matter of distinction. Its members must have the outstanding qualities of character,
service, leadership, and scholarship. These qualities developed in school should make
a better citizen of the graduate and he, in turn, will contribute more to his country.

The Caribbean Chapter is only three years old, but already its influence is being
felt. It is hoped that with the passing years this chapter's contribution to the Americas
will be very great.

Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore is the Sponsor of the Caribbean Chapter of the National
Honor Society. Miss Moore, Miss Liter, and Mr. Jorstad form the governing board of
this chapter.

Near the end of each school year a luncheon or dinner party is given by the prin-
cipal or one of the advisors in honor of the members of the Caribbean Chapter. This
year a lovely dinner at the Washington Hotel was given by Miss Moore and our school
principal, Mr. Theodore Hotz, and his wife.

The Honor Society does not have special social activities but its members are obli-
gated to work quietly for the betterment of scholarship in the school.



Twenty nine




LA PAS



The Cipos are the inner circle of the
La P.A.S. Club and to become a mem-
ber of this organization a student mus'
be ouststanding in his Spanish classes
and must be ready and willing to do
his part in any activities, large or small
sponsored by the Spanish Club.

During the La P.A.S. Initiations, the
Cipos take the duties of officers of the
club and they arrange all social func-
tions given for the La P.A.S. Club.





C< (












c* e L%N



n =,o^'6 oS



\o






^ e o



(0



The purpose of the La P. A. S. Club
is to promote a greater interest in Span-
ish and a better relaticnship between
the United States and the Republic of
Panama.

Mrs. Phyllis Spencer, the sponsor and
organizer of the La P. A. S. Club, has
done much in carrying out the purpose
of the club. Last year was presented
the second annual Inter-American Ur-
derstanding Award, which is awarded
to the Isthmian resident who has dene



Thirty



CLUB





Jv. J

f^llikiitj\








most in fostering understanding between
the peoples of the Americas. Mrs.
Spencer was chosen because of her
many years as teacher of Spanish at
Cristobal High School, organizing of
Spanish and English clubs, and her
translations and those of Spanish 12
classes of the works of noted Latin-
American poets.

One of the social events of the year
for the La P. A. S. Club members was
a masquerade party in the ballroom of
theMargarita clubhouse. Everyonecame
gaily dressed, and this proved worth-
while for prizes were given to the
most beautifully dressed boy or girl,
the most ingenious and the funniest.



The evening was highly successful, and
the members were repaid for their
good work in Spanish.

The final activity of the La P. A. S.
Club was a formal luncheon at the
Washington Hotel on May 20. A de-
lightful lunch was served and the pro-
gram, all in Spanish, consisted of speech-
es made by the different Cipos.

Membership in this club is strictly
honorary, and it is open only to those
students attaining an average of B or
better in Spanish. The club now has
about 65 members and is growing as
the pupils take keener interest in Span-
ish.



Thirty one



Qui// and Scro//



iMimNAIIHNAI.



QUILL



SCROLL



"AT




Ardith, Patrick, Lois



"Quill and Scroll," which was organized in 1926 by a group of high school advi-
sors, has grown until today it includes nearly 2,000 chapters in the United States and
foreign countries all over the world.

Its purpose is to raise the standards of high school journalism and to stimulate interest
in journalistic endeavor. It is the honor society for the field of journalism and its affiliated
activities, such as art and literature, and provides a goal of achievement.

The Caribbean Chapter was organized this year and includes 12 charter members.
From time to time, other initiations will be held to admit those who meet the necessary
qualifications.

The charter members are Lois Stapf, Rita Shoaf, Leona Sanders, Ethel Coulter, Dorit
Berger, Rosita Czernik, Lois Householder, Ardith Boyle, Joan Ellis, Malcolm Delvalle,
who is not in the picture, Pat Gormely, and Miss Bess Liter, sponsor. The officers are:
President, Pat Gormely, Vice President, Lois Householder, and Secretary, Ardith Boyle.




FIRST ROW: Patrick, Leona, Joan

SECOND ROW: Rita, Ardith, Miss Liter, Rosita, Lois

THIRD ROW: Lois, Dorit, Ethel



Thirty two



1 1




VARSITY
CLUB



MRS. O'BRIEN




FIRST ROW: Rita, Lois, Arline

SECOND ROW: Lois, Helen, Marilyn, Harriet

THIRD ROW: Nancy, Eleanor, Jean, Thelma, Alice



The purpose of the Girls' Varsity Club is to interest more girls in athletics, and to
belong to this exclusive club a girl must make two All-Star teams in the same year, or be
one of the 10 highest in the point system.

At the end of this school year 16 members who had fulfilled these qualifications and
were initiated were: Betty Jamesson, Jacqueline Carlin, Pat Leach, Eleanor Kuller,
Roberta Williams, Gladys Schulte, Ardith Boyle, Barbara Brown, Betty Kuhrt, Majorie
Styles, Helen Culpepper, Mary Aleguas, Norma Hall, Andre Whitlock, and Peggy Mc-
llvaine.

The Club this year was led by Lois Stapf, President,- Jean Kuller, Vice President,
and Thelma Pucci Secretary-Treasurer.

A St. Valentine Dance, given in February, was the girls' biggest success of the year.

Thirty three



TORRID ZONE WIZARDS




The Torrid Zone Wizard Club, or-
ganized in 1942 and affiliated with
the Science Clubs of America, has
grown from a small insignificant group
to one containing the full quota of 25
members chosen from all the Science
Classes on the basis of scholarship
and active interest.

The activities of the club vary with
the times and were not the same this
year as last.








i







Mr. MAEDL, Sponsor
Thirty four



Wfi^



^



The regular field trips to Barro
Colorado were postponed during
this year because of the inconven-
ience involved. However, the group
was active in other fields in which
they were |ust as interested. One
trip was taken along the trails of
Puerto Pilon.

Their sponsor, Mr. Maedl, assisted
the officers, Lois Householder, Pres-
ident,- Patsy Benny, Vice President;
Barbara De Schmidt, Secretary,- and
Rosity Czernik, Librarian, in running
the club through periods of tribula-
tion and its parties.

The club has held as its highest aim
the pledge of service to the ideals
of Science. These are: 1) To increase
their knowledge of science,- 2) to
learn to perfect their skills in science,-
3) to give service to their community
and nation,- 4) to understand the im-
portance of science in their lives,- and
5) to carry out the program of science
club's of America.



ui





I 1



^ H,V0*





-ilM.-*i



c&



"JUNIOR MISS

AS PRESENTED AT

CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM

DECEMBER 1944






t



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'0 ^ ** Mahinb Hto Sick"



Tvr Make-Up Crew: Miss Arcocx, Susie Fahnestock "hifii^^
Paou^t ScHp/Fre/essen h'Hfi

Br/iur/rr

>>iARO




j A Person Can't Get Ant 5n BrAur/rrwr- 3/rsr GArrs,GioRiA AsKorr, Ieona Zanders r Ud /j



*""*/>.



Thirty five




National



Thespian



Society



The National Thespian Society was
organized in the spring of 1928 by a
group of teachers who felt that a
greater impetus could be given to the
study of educational dramatics by an
association of directors, teachers, and
students actively interested in high
school dramatics. While the new or"




Joy, Bitsy, Gloria



Mr. Beck and National Thespians



ganization was established along
the same lines typical of honor so-
cieties in general, its founders were
specific in their demand that if be
an active, progressive, and forward-
looking society in its field. It was
made clear that the honor of member-
ship was to be conferred upon High
School students not so much for the
reason that they met the eligibility
requirements, but more for what these
students promised, under oath, to
achieve in dramatics after they be-
came members.



Thirty :



DRAMATIC

CLUB







Mr. P. L. BECK, Sponsor



snm





*




To become a member of the Cristobal
Dramatic Club all one needs to do is ex-
press a sincere interest in dramatics.

During the past year the Cristobal
Dramatic Club has held four very inter-
esting meetings. The officers for the
year were elected at the first meeting.
At the second, a one-act play "The
Cue He Knew," was enacted by vari-
ous members and a review of the Little
Theater's Play, "Golden Boy," was
given. The Sponsor gave a talk on
types in plays and the Professional The-
ater, and later, refreshments were
served. During the third meeting the
"Florist Shop," a one-act play, was
presented and the Sponsor talked on



characterization and another play re-
view of the Little Theater's "Three
Men On a Horse" was given.

The aim and ambition of every mem-
ber of the Dramatic Club is to achieve
membership in the Thespian Society.
There are no special talents or require-
ments to be a member of the Dramatic
Club, whereas, on the other hand, to be
a Thespian a pupil is required to partic-
ipate in a meritorious manner in the
production of plays. It is necessary to
have either a ma|or role in a three-act
play or a minor role in two or more
plays. A pupil may be eligible also for
outstanding work in the production
staff of the play.




Thirty seven



:M



(***''




Thirty eight



FRIENDLIEST
Malcolm DelValle Charleen Heliums




\



Denia Wong
QUEEN OF THE CHINESE CLUE




**t



V




%






+<



Dorothy Engler
QUEEN OF THE SIMON BOLIVAR CLUB



'%A>






Thirty nine



v$>













Hurts M/itEiA.




ACMA WACEH





c loc,i



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**,



Forty




MUSIC



"Music is well said to be the speech of angels' 1

Even though the glee club and orchestra may not pro-
duce angelic music at all times, their activities under Mr.
Jorstad are truly outstanding.

The Music department is one of the most important in
C.H.S. Many times during the year, the orchestra is called
on to play for assemblies, plays and other special occasions.
The glee club is very popular, also, in school and at outside
programs.

Among the outstanding events of the year were the
Annual Christmas Festival, the Easter Concert, and the
Spring Music Festival. At all of these, the choir and
orchestra persented beautiful programs for the general
public. In addition, music was furnished for over fifteen
school assemblies.

Several talented musicians have appeared in solos or




PAT SUSIE BILL



R1STOBAL HIGH








^>*r?s?ywJ&ll




Fcrly two



DEPARTMENT





small groups. Leona Sanders has appeared many times
in assembly as vocal soloist, and her lovely voice is familiar
to most of the Atlantic siders, as she is also on the local
radio. Every year, the Christmas program is opened by a
brass quartet playing a traditional carol. This year it was
composed of Gay Thomas and Jimmy Rowe, trumpets, and
Noel Gibson, Jr., and Johnny Engelke, trombones.

The accompanists for the glee club are Susie Fahnestock
and Bill Fisher, and the orchestra is accompanied by Pat
Gormely.

The orchestra is composed of thirty-five members, and the
glee club has seventy singers. This is a very high percent-
age out of a total student body of two hundred twenty-
eight.

As more students arrive from the States in the near
future, the future of the music groups will appear even
brighter.




Fort/ three




The Library




MISS JEANNE BROWN



One of the outstanding and most useful departments of
Cristobal High School is a well equipped library, filled with
the latest magazines and books ranging from fiction to the best
reference material.

Placed in the upper story of the high school building,
overlooking the beautiful Limon Eay, its atmosphere and conditions are most excellent for
deep thought and study. Balmy breezes frisk through the spacious library, continually
refreshing one s mind and body. Large tables and comfortable chairs are conveniently
placed to gain the best advantage of the lighting facilities.

Miss Jeanne Brown, our well trained librarian does an admirable job of managing
both the business end of the library and the library itself, besides teaching several English
classes on the side.




Forty four





Assisting her at the task of caring for such a large library are the student librarians:
Beverly Reeves, Alice Cain, Beulah Simons, Eola Prelto, Marilyn Metzger, Mary Leach,
Merle Simons, Kenneth Millard, Dick Chambers, Joy Randall, and Dorit Archbold.

These students, besides learning the fundamentals of library work, begin to appre-
ciate books, the care of them, to love them, and to acquire a surprising amount of gen-
eral knowledge.

The library is a popular place. Classes often go there when some phase of their
work needs the help of the excellent reference books. An average of sixteen pupils
are present every period to broaden their minds or catch up on passing events, and
approximately forty books are checked out every day.

Naturally, the most popular literature is the fiction, but history, social science, travel,
literature, and biography are high on the list because of the compulsory reading reauired
by school classes.

The library is open seven periods every school day so that whosoever desires knowl-
edge may have the opportunity in our own excellent library.



Forty Five




ISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



i?*



THE

MAIL BAG



Class Makes Plans
For Charter In
Quill And Scroll




Augusta Wong, C.H.S. '42
[at Mills College, has recent-'
ly been hpnored by having one
of her poems, '0n an Imagina-
tive Child", selected lor the
Annual Anthology of College
Poetry for 1844. This antholoav
is a compilation of tl
poetry written by coll



C. H. S. DE
JUNIOR CC
10-6



S *UIAiI




the first time in the

paper, definite

to ob-

ershlp




i Claude Campbell, C.H

now in the V-12 at St

College, Emmetsburg, Mi

jA lucky Maryland las

5. (seemingly found great 1

8- 'Claude's .e^es^

le line Carlln. Barbara

er Marilyn Metisger, land



85s-

been

years, but~tu.

other a chapter oT^

al society was never IrW

When the charter Is grant-
_ecL thejidviser of the journalism on

;mes a movie, ana >.
Scroll, production. He po
ty can merely because
I ugh a enjoy a play Is no sign W
It Is not a good one. No one
mera has the right to say, "That ular ai
are: movie was rotten," but, rath- nounced soo
seniors, er ..j didn't like that movie." This Is a

upper A f ter Mr. Beck's talk Charles project which will *a
f'must Madison gave a resume of the practical politics an.
ork In cris tobal Little Theatre play constitution really i
ism or "Hayfever" The cast of the "^^ P a 8 es * read:
must p Iay "The cue He Knew" then ria l and much taUcl:
"Ms* took' over the entertainment str 4 uct ^.\, ^ WH
r the evening. The play w as to A l9 JSSoSSbSU

'" velt and Wllkie. Rods.
,ro elected with 245 vl
e Wllkie got only 51 vo








Scout Head
Mariner M<

Miss Davis, 3
Scouts, attendee
meeting of the
on Tuesday, Oci
7:00, in the Mai
During her v
e girts to
t



e

,n obta

- allow tht

n- craft when Mr

Cross Worker on

Id comes over to t

- art of sailing. %

The donated 1

the Army is t

yellow by the



National Education W



Ec?



Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Saturday

Thursday

Friday



(



- 11



Nov. 7
Nov. 8
Nov. 9
Nov. 1
Nov. 11




i .




Forty six




TH CRRIBB^nn






CKIST0B.1L high school, cristobai



EiS" DEFEAT
GREEN WAVES"

y, October 9, at Strode
te Bears led by Captain
ters defeated AI Maale's



I)




DECEMBER 22,



IT TO BE HEII



singe!

Zone on >. "^ glj
also present ^*^
the wrapping.

Each of these pac*
tains such things as: y.
cards, chewine gum. a can

attends



Hilton McPheters



Hilton McPhei
known as "Mar"
athlete to arrlv



#1



NEW CIPOS
INITIATED



ting



tbonds. Thespians Receive

making National Recognition

\nvest~

8d of Girl James Gilder and Edv

the last Aanstoos have received nat

iriners held / al recognition "lor :
>er 24th. at _ -n-nrir in rh-a marics and
er House,
t she urg-
iuy Mariner

they will
occasion.

las been




com m0 n,y r Comment

the newest 'MA SNOOP
t CristobaU, perchance, noticed
ea up knee of our lit-

<*al, Rita Shoaf? On Sunday, December 10,

sh e got, t.h e meeting was held at the nor

ie of Mrs. Phyllis Spencer In o

der to Initiate five new mer

- of the Cipos. The Clp

inner circle, or t:

of the honora

PAS. T

di



Co-Editors .

iture from Lois Bi, W .e Barbara Lawson

be painted Bo ys Sports Re poi ters Nickname "Barb"

[ariners. Gus F.osania, Bill Pretto, Hilton McPheters Address 173-B Roosevelt Ave,



ek



John Buckley

Feature Writers
Don Nail, Leona Sanders, Rita Shoa
Reporters
Lois Householder Ardith Boyle

Doret Berger





Forty seven
















Cafeteria



Two hundred and sixty boys and girls
hurry into the Cristobal High School Cafe-
teria daily for their lunch. The cafeteria
isn t large enough to hold this number of
students all at the same time, but fortu-
nately, the Grammar School and various
study halls are dismissed early in order that
their members may eat and leave the room
before the regular noon-hour rush.



There are eight girls who belong to the
class in cafeteria. They receive two full
credits as they would in household arts.
These girls have various duties such as tak-
ing charge of the making of salads and sand-
wiches and serving. They also act as cashiers
occasionally and help take care of finan-
cial reports. These jobs are rotated every
week so that each girl may learn the duties
of each job.

Miss McLimans has charge of the cafeteria
work and of its finances and she has done a
remarkable job of serving adequate and





wholesome lunches in spite of the shortage
of certain foods and staff members. At the
present time she operates this with one cook,
a cook's helper, and one maid.

Miss Hallie Beavers has served most effi-
ciently as the cashier for several years, and
this popular math teacher is most adept at
keeping track of funds.



Forty eight




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MS BUS



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£H*



A & B FOOTBALL





'A" League All-Stars
Zone Champions



Coach Palumbo

Under the able direction of Coach
Luke Palumbo, the Cristobal High
School Grid Squad annexed the Isth-
mian football championship by virtue
of a last-play victory over a powerful
Junior College Eleven and a score-
less tie battle with the strong Balboa
High gridsters.

Noel Gibson became the star of
the Junior College tilt when, on the
last play of the game, he faded back to the Junior College 45-yard line, and threw a
long desperation pass to Benny Kuller, who snatched it out of the air in the College end
zone for a touchdown and victory. Max Weich, who had previously kicked a field goal,
converted the extra point and Cristobal won 10-7.

The Cristobal-Balboa tilt was a hard bruising battle with the linemen dominating
the individual play.

Cristobal came the closest to scoring, driving all the way to the Balboa 13-yard
line in the fourth quarter before an attempted field goal by Max Weich was blocked
on fourth down to end the march.

League stalwarts outplayed a much heavier Balboa
_____ team in nearly every department of

the game cs they triumphed over the
big Balboa Eleven by a score of 8-0.
Pedro Nieves began the scoring
when he broke through the Balboa
line in the second period to tag a Red
and White back in his own end zone
for two points.

George Egolf scored the game s
only touchdown when he raced 40
yards around end in the final quarter
for a touchdown.



Coach Paul Halleck's able "B'




'B" League All-Stars



Fifty two



SOFTBALL




The Cristobal High School softballers climaxed the season with a 4-3 victory over a
strong Balboa Ten. Cristobal had previously lost to the Junior College by a score of 6-2.

Johnny Hower of Balboa and Jim Fernandez and Denis Venning of Cristobal pitched
brilliantly, giving up but three hits between them. Hower's downfall came in the first
two innings when all four of Cristobal's markers crossed the plate, the result of two walks,
two stolen bases, and four costly errors.

The Junior College game was another matter, however, with Ed Kunkel's speedy
delivery proving just too much for the local lads. The Collegians quickly picked up a big
six-run lead which they held until the last inning when Cristobal scored twice, because
of the several errors by the College infield.

Behind the two-hit pitching of Jim Rowe, the "B" League boys trounced a hapless
Balboa Ten by the unheard score of 19-0.

The game had to be called in the 6th inning as Balboa simply could not get the local
boys out.




Fifty three



BASKETBALL




The Cristobal "A" League Ail-Star basketball team went down to defeat at the
hands of the Junior College 25-23.

Stempel, flashy center for the Pacific siders, was a one-man team, sending six baskets
and three fouls through the hoop.

The Cristobal offense could not penetrate the tricky zone defense of the College
five, scoring most of their points on long set shots and rebounds off the College back-
board.

The "B" League basketeers were heavily favored to take the measure of the Balboa
quintet and achieve the record of having beaten Balboa in every sport.

Jimmy Rowe, high scorer in last year's game, was expected to head a squad com-
prised of such talented stars as Oscar Flores, Jack Pescod, Fred Hill, and many others.




Fifty four



TRACK




Al Made
Tosses the Discus



The Cristobal High trackmen
were narrowly edged out, 50 to
45^, by Balboa High School in
the annual triangular track meet
held in Balboa. The Junior
College finished a week third
with 28tj points.

The Cristobal high scorers
were Noel Gibson, with nine
points, and Herbert Robinson,
with eight points, including a
spectacular finish in the 880-
yard run.




Balboa Wins Over



Cristobal



5"+5^



Dick Nitto Going
Over the Top (top)

Jack Pescod Leaps
the Bar (bottom)






'Mac" McPheters
Puts the Shot



The "B" League boys partly
made up for the "A" League
loss by easily defeating the
Balboa team.

Oscar Flores, with 15 points,
was the individual star for the
smaller lads. Flores shattered
the 50-yard dash record when
he raced the distance in six
seconds and tied the 100-yard
record as he sped to victory in
11 seconds flat.




Hotz Starts
Them Oft



Off in the

Two-Hundred



Fifty five



BASEBALL



The Cristobal "A" League All-Star baseball team was defeated by a strong Balboa
nine by a 4-1 score.

Bill Pretto matched his pitching talents with Charlie Lebrun of Balboa and save for a
three-run Balboa rally in the seventh inning, held the rivals in check all the way.

Cristobal scored its only run in the top half of the seventh inning to tie the score, but
the three-run Balboa rally, in the latter half of the frame, dispelled any hope of victory.

The Cristobal "B" League baseball team defeated the Balboa "B" League nine
by a 5-0 score in a game played in Balboa.

Cristobal pitcher, Fred Hill, had complete control over the Balboa nine all the way,
giving up only a few hits.

Pitcher Hill, Jerry Stringer, and Ed Corbetf each contributed a home-run to the
winning cause.




Fifty six



Girts Sports



Girl's sports this year were highly successful, not only because
of the large number of victories over Balboa, but because of the
large percentage of girls who participated in each sport.

The sports are planned for all the girls, not for just a select few,
and nothing is more gratifying to a coach than to see a good per-
centage of the girls come out. The larger the group is, the better
chance there is of developing a good all-star team. This was
proved over and over again when the "big games" came along.

The "A" league record is exceptional: out of seven games or
sports our girls won four, lost two and tied one. The record of
the "B" girls could not possibly be bettered: thev defeated Balboa
in every sport, volleyball, basketball, softball, and archery.

But despite these good records the other big thing the girls
were striving for was good sportsmanship. It means just as much
or more to a girl to be known as a square dealer as to be known
as a good "athlete." To know how to play a game fairly, with
endurance and teamwork is what the girls learned from volley-
ball, basketball, softball, and the other sports.



'To set the cause above renown,
To love the game beyond the prize,
To honor while you strike him down,
The foe that come with fearless eyes.'



Fifty seven




ATLANTIC 5/Df DEF£AT5 PAC/F/C S/DE






v



c











fkUCE



£//



LO/5 HOUSEHOLDER

436




LO/S AL/CC BARBARA ROBERTA

HOUSEROIDER CA/N HANSON WILLIAMS



FRED HILTON J/?C K JACK

R/LL MSPHCTERS KUA/KEL. RE/LEY







"A" LEAGUE VOLLEYBALL

This year volleyball started off with a
bang,- more girls came out for this sport
than any other activity during the whole
year. The "A" All-Stars bowed down
reluctantly to two strong Balboa teams.
The Jnnior College girls were victor-
ious over Cristobal by the score of 21 -1 7
and 21-12, while the Balboa High
School team also triumphed over our
girls, 21-19 and 21-14. The teamwork
and cooperation of our girls were ex-
cellent, while the serving and passing
of the Balboa teams were superior, and
were instrumental in their victories over
Cristobal.



VOLLEYBALL



5im^6-M./L^QMjMfc/mr£-,MuMl^/^E);J^ii£j?J£M

KmuwRWlLU/IMS, PLe/TC//, TP(/CC/ 7 M.ft££/MA{ P/G/LLER



"B" LEAGUE VOLLEYBALL

The "B" League girls began their
sports season even more successfully
than the "A" Leaguers by winning two
well-played games against the Balboa
High School B" League. Their smooth
coordination and teamwork were the
decisive factors in their victory over
their opponents. The scores were also
decisive: 21-10 and 21-13.




HP^^^BKVBi



Fifty nine






I






GEORGIA






u



i



1*s



HELEi\l





1/





t



ti



NANCY





\



JACKIE.



EL LIE





i

BAT TV




BETTY




\








'



MARGIE



MARILYN



\



i

JEAN



3ARBY



ri



;



l



CRI5T0BAL -18
BALBOA S



£OA5



CRISTOBAL -15
JR. COLLEGE- 15




ARDITH



Sixty




\



GIRLS "B" BASKETBALL



The "B" League basketball team of Cristobal High School finished the season by
playing and winning an excellent and fast game against Balboa, and the final score was
17-5. Roberta Williams starred for our "B" League with a total of nine points to her
credit. Our star guards, Jeannie Kuller and Alice Cain, kept the Balboa players on the
run throughout the whole game. Passing kept the ball at top speed, and the thrilling shots
both long and short made the game one of the most interesting and exciting of the year.



l^_*J£.




Our players practiced hard and faithfully and their efforts were well rewarded when
they brought the basketball season to a successful close.

Mrs. Eileen O'Brien worked very hard and patiently with the girls on both teams,
bettering their passing and team cooperation, improving their guarding and basket
technique, and in general, organizing them into two fast-moving and quick-thinking
All-Star teams. She is deserving of much credit, and the school is justly proud of the
records made by these basketball teams.



Sixty one



"A" and T







Sixty two




SOFTBALL TEAMS

Both the "A" and "B" League Softball teams were in top form
this year. The "A" intra-murals consisted of three teams, while
the "B" League had two. If the girls were less adept than their
male schoolmates, they made up for it with a multitude of runs.
And, when the time rolled around for the All-Star games both
teams did themselves proud.

The "A" Leaguers traveled to Balboa and trounced the Junior
College girls, 21-6. When the Balboa High School girls invaded
our territory, the "A" 's garnered another victory when thev hit
in eleven runs, while their opponents could only account for four
runs. The unbeaten "B" girls likewise downed their opponents
by the score of 8-4..

Eleanor Williams and Alice Cain were the starring pitchers of
the two teams.

The "A" All-Stars were: Lois Stapf, captain, Eleanor Williams,
Lee Brown, Bettv famesson, Jacqueline Carlin, Ardith Boyle,
Bettv Kuhrt, Nancy Gilder, Marilyn Metzger, Helen Culpepper,
Barbara Lawson, and Barbara Brown.

These girls comprised the "B" League team: Jean Kuller,
captain, Alice Cain, Roberta Williams, Pat Leach, Norma Nail,
Thelma Pucci, Andre Whitlock, Harriet Keenan, Gladys Schulte,
Peggy Mcllvaine, Vilma Bejarano, and Eleanor Kuller.



Sixty three




Once again the staff of Publications have given you a Caribbean. Once again,
the book is not complete and is "as full of faults as an old shoe. For that we are sorry,
but we do not apologize. C'est la guerre! You will notice the lack of evidence of
classroom activities, and the absence of pictures of the work of several departments.
All of that is not as planned, but as ordained by whatever gods there be who control
camera supplies. Our school photographers are not professionals and when many of
their efforts at showing the school in action failed, they found to their dismay that there
were no refills for their cameras! So another page was dropped from the book.

Lois Stapf and Andree Whitlock are student photographers, and Foto Andre and
Foto Wolf furnished the professional pictures. We are especially indebted to Mr. Rene
Wolf for his help.

To offset some of our disappointments and yours, maybe we call attention to the
work of our Art Editor, Malcolm DelValle, who gave us his unusual talent in designing
the cover, the emblems, and the division pages. Hilton McPheters did expert work in
lettering and improved the appearance of many pages.

The planning of the "Caribbean" was done largely by the co-editors, Leona San-
ders and Lois Stapf, and they were assisted in writing for the book by Dorit Berger, Pa f
Gormely, Roy Knoop, Rita Shoaf, and Lois Householder.

This "Caribbean" would never have been a reality without the excellent work done
by the Advertising Staff. Rosita Czernik was business manager and directed the campaign
for funds. Dorit Berger and Betty Jamesson deserve much credit for the many ads which
they sold. Robert Rosania also showed oustanding business ability in collections.

Most of the cuts were made by Jahn and Oilier, of Chicago, with a few by the
Star & Herald Engraving Company.

We are much indebted to our friends of the Panama Canal Press not only for putting
the book together, but for bearing with our inexperience and delays.

May the Peace bring us bigger and better year-books.

THE STAFF



Sixty fojr




SENIOR BOYS' CLASS WILL

CHARLES ARNOLD Leaves his boisterous ways to Lolly Collins.

ROY ATWOOD Leaves his ability to go steady to any needy Junior.

TEDDY BROWN Wills his wolfish eye to Gus Rosama.

MARLIN CULPEPPER Leaves his fighting ability to Robert Toledano.

BERNARD DELONG Leaves his long hair-cuts to Alfred Maale.

MALCOM DELVALLE Leaves his smooth dancing to Bob Snelling.

DONALD DIDRICKSON Leaves his polite ways with the opposite sex to Donald Nail ! !

BILL FISHER Leaves his ability to get by to Fred Hill.

EUGENE GREGG Leaves his "line" to Steve Gracie.

PAT GORMELY Leaves his proof-reading of the "Trade Wind" to whoever will take it!

HUGH HALE Leaves his witty (?) jokes to Billy Casswell.

ROY KNOOP Leaves his ability to study to Starford Churchill.

BEN KULLER Leaves his brilliant repartee to be equally distributed among the Junior Boys.

GARVYN MOUMBLOW Leaves his 6"2" stature to Noel Gibson.

JACK REILLY Leaves his excess weight to Chuck Thomas.

DANK SANDER Would leave English 12 to someone, but doesn't dislike anyone enough.

ALFRED SIMONSON Leaves his good nature to anybody who needs it.

MAX WEICH Leaves his "long wind" to the palm trees.

ROBERT WOOD Leaves his Banana Plantation to Gerald Stroop.



MR 9919-9 Sixty Five




SENIOR GIRLS* CLASS WILL

GLORIA ASKOFF Wills those bedroom-blue eyes to the Maybelline Mascara Company.

ORIE AUSTIN Leaves her giggles to Barbara Millard.

PEGGY BAGGOTT Leaves her "shiny apple" to Eleanor Williams.

ETHEL COULTER Leaves her absence record to Lois Householder.

JOAN ELLIS Leaves her satm-soooth Pond's complexion to Mss Patterson.

SUSIE FAHNESTOCK Leaves her "vacant" periods to Helene Marsh.

MORAIMA FREIRE Leaves her shorthand periods to just anybody at all.

BITSY GATES Leaves the armed forces in the capable hands (?) of Pauline Schriftgiesser.

CHARLEEN HELLUMS Wills all future Atwood Jrs. to C. H. S.

MELIDA HOWARD Leaves her "perpetual energy" to Miss Liter.

LOIS KRIDLE Leaves Balboa to just any Junior who's crazy enough to want it!

ANGELICA LIM Leaves her competence in Business Training to the Business Training Class of 46

JOAN MILLSPAUGH Leaves her red hair to Marilyn Metzger.

JEAN O'HAYER Leaves her silver skates to Araith Boyle.

JOY RANDALL Leaves her "million-dollar smile" to the highest bidding toothpaste company.

CAROL RUOFF Leaves her chewing gum to Helen Stade.

LEONA SANDERS Leaves her voice to Anita Berley.

RITA SHOAF Leaves her Southern accent to Mac McPheters.

LOIS STAPF Leaves her tennis racket to Mr. Hotz.

GENE STONE Leaves her sophistication to Betty Kuhrt.

NORRINE TERRY Leaves her sweet disposition to any Junior who feels in need of it.

MARY WHITE Leaves her good looks to be evenly distributed among the Junior girls.

GRACE YOHROS Leaves her "straight" hair to anyone who can manage it.



o



Sixty six




Sixty se\en




COMPLIMENTS OF



thg HRFfjon


Manufacturers of



Class Rings



Commencement Invitations

Medals and Trophies



E. A. LEWIS, Representative



Box 3792



Ancon, Canal Zone




Sixty eight



COMPLIMENTS OF



SfTlflRT




let



I



Wl



High Qualities and Exclusive Models
of the Latest Styles



COLON



Bolivar 7087



PANAMA



dM




5CJ



COMPLIMENTS OF



kodak, pflnnnnfl, ltd.



No. 98, Central Ave.
PANAMA CITY



Arboix Building

COLON



MR 9919-10



Sixty nine




V



L



L



A



55 Front Street
Colon, Panama



Remember that SEVILLA
stands for Distinction




Compliments of

THE
SWISS JEWELRY STORE

CHARLES PERRET



Opposite the
Commissary



c



olon



Compliments
of




W. W. GOULD



Insurance



Second Floor, Masonic Temple

Phone 3-1456

Box 2098 Cristobal, C Z.




Congratulations
Class of '45



BAZAR ESPANOL



PANAMA CITY



PANAMA



Seventy




VICTORY



BUY

UNITED
STATES

WAR

BONDS




Recreation in the modern manner,

convenient facilities, and reasonable prices



VISIT THE NEW

CRISTOBAL

GOLD THEATER

COMFORT SEATS

*AIR VENTILATING
SYSTEM

BEAUTIFULLY
DECORATED



THEATERS



RESTAURANTS
SODA FOUNTAINS



BOWLING LANES



Panama Canal Clubhouses



Your Community Center



//



Seventy one




Compliments
of



Wong Chang, S. A.

General Hardware

We Specialize in Glass for

Windshields, Doors, etc.,

For any Make of Car



Panama
Phone 303



Colon
Phone 1193



Looking for

A GIFT




Visit



THE NRTIVE ART AND
GIFT SHOP

Mrs. H. Shaw, Proprietor



45 Front Street
Phone 113 Colon




**



£5*



CASA

fflSTLICH

Duty-Free-Store



Come and see us at our new store on Bolivar Street,
next door to the Chase National Bank




5<



yv



PANAMA



COLON



Seventy two



No. 33



P. JHANGIMAL



Wholesale and Retai



Perfumes, Panama Hats, Silbs
and Oriental
Novelties







Front Street
Phone 613-J, Colon



Compliments of




GARAGE ATLANTICO



15th Street and Melendez Avenue
Phone 923 Colon



HOTO. UUASHiriGTON

Unequalled for Location and Comfort
A hotel in keeping with the dignity, spirit, and comfort of

THE PANAMA CANAL

Golf Swimming Water Sports
Tarpon Fishing



Seventy three



COMPLIMENTS OF



a



,/




*k)k





We have the
same quality here



as in Kanama




COLON



Opposite the
Commissary



Seventy four



O 'Vr^^ 3


(g \


^ SQUIR


Go To


30 Front Street
Tele 1064 Colon


COLON JEWELRY




Office Supplies


COMPANY




Stationery
Kodak Films


For




Parker 51 Pens
Greeting Cards


Watches and Jewelry




Baby Clothes
Toys


11th and Front Streets, Colon







Compliments
of




Sears and Roebuck
and Company

Represented on the Isthmus

by

AGENCIA SEARS

Tivoli Avenue, opposite Ancon Post Office




Margarita Florist



Shaw & Williams



Masonic Temple
Phone 3-1916



Seventy f.ve




?







Compliments of

The French Bazaar

JUAN PALOMERAS



Front Street
Colon



National Mattress
Factory



Melendez Avenue

Between 10th and 11th Streets
Colon



*W





2*V*




uniTD fruit compflny

GREAT WHITE FLEET

SERVES THE AMERICAS



OFFICES



United Fruit Co. Building

CRISTOBAL
Phone 2121



Century Club
PANAMA CITY

Panama 523
524



Seventy six



Compliments of

The Robert Wilcox
Company





Paramount Store



Gentlemen s Wear
Children s Wear



11th St. and Balboa Ave., Colon




Carlton Drug Store

Clean, Modern, Up-to-Date

Drugs, Patent Medicines, and

Toilet Articles



Ice Cream, Sodas, etc.



10th Street and Fedenco Boyd Avenue
Phone 255 Colon



JOHN SURANY

Agents for

Remington-Rand, Inc.
W. A. Shaeffer Pen Co.

Magazines, Books, Office and

Photo Supplies, Games,

Novelties, Sporting Goods,

Greeting Cards



Front
Street




Cc



Seventy seven



GORIN'S
Mattress Factory

P. GORIN, Manager, "CHS" '40
6071 Bolivar Avenue

See Gorin's for the

"BEST IN REST"




Manufacturers of the highest
grade of bedding



Now More




in new
bigger
bottles



Orange-
CrUSh

' ^^^^ t h nco u' w o*r

CARBONATED BEVERAGE






Compliments
of




The American Bazaar

Haberdashers and Tailors to
Men of Good Taste"



'anama



Colon



Agents for Panama

TAGAROPULOS

S. A.



Colcn, Rep. de Panama



Seventy eight




Compliments of

Colon Motors, Inc.

Distributors for

Dodge Passenger Cars and Trucks

DeSoto Passenger Cars



Phone 492



Colon






Compliments
of



Novedddes Ventura



Front Street



Colon




C CASULLO

Watchmaker and Jeweler
45a Front Street, Colon

"MIDO" MULTIFORT

SUPER

AUTOMATIC WATCH

An Ideal Gift for Graduation



Special Attention
Given to
Linen Suits




YOUR VALET

%7 EXCELSIOR'S"

Fedenco Boyd Ave. between 14 & 15 Sts.

DRY CLEANERS



Office 10th Street Colon Theater Bldg



Seventy nine




3






Compliments of




BOMBAY BAZAAR



Colon




ALMACEN

ELECTRICO

Jose Jaen j. y Cia., Ltda.

Electrical Appliances

Refrigerators

Hardware



Phone 33



P. O. Box 33



Colon




MOTTA'S



"The label that signifies
Quality"



PANAMA



COLON




Eighty



' > J^ftV




THE BESTFIT CO.



Manufacturers of



MEN'S and YOUNG MEN'S

CLOTHES



Opposite the Commissary



Colon



Compliments
of



lflgfr







THE DAREN DRUG STORE



COLON



[RECOUPS |



Julio A. Sdlas B




Distributor

Philips Radios Decca Records

5.006 Front Street

Phone 537 P.O. Box 1104

Colon



JARDIN
CLAVEL" it

We specialize in all kinds of
Floral Work
Phone 71 5 Cc Ion








_ J.MIZRACHI



Jeweler, Watchmaker, and
Expert Diamond Setter

Satisfaction Guaranteed



Front Street Phone 345

Colon



Eighty one




Compliments
of



L.mfiDURO,Jr.,S.A.



Colon



-53-

ISTHMIAN
CURIO SHOP

Kresz and Jessany



Perfumes
Panama Hats
Movelties
Silver



Phone 359




C



olon



Congratulations, Class of 45




FOTO GLIT




10th Street



COLON



Eighty two



Congratulations,
Class of '45

FRENCH BAZAAR

Huertematte & Co.



Central Avenue



'anama




"Or



Us



Omj




Best Wishes to the
Class of '45

PINOCHO

Panama, R. de P.



Compliments
of




CASA CENTRAL



Bolivar Avenue



Phone 623



C



Front Street



olon



58
NOVEDADES ATLANNCO

Large Assortment of

Perfumes, Silk Stockings, Watches,

Alligator Bags, Jewelry, Panama Hats




Eighty three



c



o



M




M



N



S OF



MADURITOS

Ladies Wear

Silk Stockings

Sports Wear



Phone 888



Perfumes
Colon






Good Luck To The
Class of '45

Central American
Plumbing Company

COLON



RADIO CENTER

Distributors of

O) RCA Victor Products
(y) General Electric Products
(vO Stationery, Office Supplies,
Books

Congratulations, Class of '45





Compliments
of

SALAZAR DRUG STORE

COLON



Eighty four



CALIFORNIA
TAILOR SHOP

131




^ U J



Phone 2976-L Central Avenue

Colon

ARMY AND NAVY

Specialize in all Kinds of
Uniforms

English Cloth of the Best Quality
Initial Payments Accepted




Congratulations,
Class of '45



Dr. VERN PRIER



Masonic Temple




Compliments of



THE

REX

AND

BOLIVAR

THEATRES

COLON



C



O
M



M



N




OF



PARIS BAZAAR



Col



on



Eighty five



Vf '>l c




o



M



M



N



OF



La fTlodd Americana



Central Avenue, Panama



OUR

STUDENT'

COUNCIL




of the

STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION

OF CRISTOBAL HIGH

SCHOOL

Wishes
"SUCCESS TO OUR SUCCESSORS"

in the coming year




Congratulations,
Class of '45

Navarreti & Martinez

CIA., LTDA.



Front Street



Colon



c



o



M






M



N



nternational Store



Panama, R. de P.



Eighty six




TRAVEL VIA TACA IN THE LUXURIOUS AND
COMFORTABLE LOCKHEED 14'S

"Flights to Mexico and Cuba with connections to the United States"



Eighty seven



:



. -4$'f<



: ' '. %]':







'



: '};:-:



-



.



...



:



:










STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00002
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1945
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00002

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Dedication
        Page 2
    Foreword
        Page 3
    Faculty
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Seniors
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Juniors
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Sophomores
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Freshmen
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Activities
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Departments
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Sports
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Yearbook staff
        Page 64
    Senior boys' class will
        Page 65
    Senior girls' class will
        Page 66
    Advertising
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Back Matter
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Back Cover
        Page 91
        Page 92
Full Text








rin

94


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Inas
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- *a/ JPC -*_ & j_
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^jOOJBBB"^^ J _^^H Be * _* jjf -
JBfi'Wwe^&88Enx'4ff


, ,,..


Dedication


to


dan


deal


former


students


faculty,


service


stars


fnrrpc wAP nrntnriiv ntlkrnf tha 1Q4r Annn (Cnrikhknn


i,*^


' ..i,,, I, l li







Foreword


"Freedom is a bright and singing thing


Freedom is not only something to read of in


textbooks


Freedom is our heritage and our life.


When we think of those who


fight for freedom on the world's greatest battlefields, let us remember our birthright, and
take it, and hold it high in our hands-our brightest heritage-Freedom."

















Faculty


MR. T. F. HOTZ
Principal


A


**
- -


t.


-r nrC9.
r~


w-J


.
-.





































S.-e







\t~o



4,4

2uX


L --


N H


Faculty


Counselor
MR. P. L. BECK


... "


. -











.>> t
', : > -
- *^>j **
""-( -^

"C LU
dw


MR. HALLECK
Physical Education


MISS McLIMANS
Household Arts


MR. PALUMBO
Physical Education


MISS RUOFF
Secretary


/ I Ir~l|


C-V
















OUR


OCLARK
WORK


OF"r


1345


BEGINS


HERE


The Final curtain falls after the fourth and last act of the production


Forty-five.


The actors came on the set as bit pla


in


valuable guidance of stage managers and directors, they
making their curtain calls.


"The Class of


the First act, but under the in-
have advanced and are now


'e, the members of the cast, began our


careers


by learning to play a great


variety of minor roles.


During our third year, we took more important


our last year, with the help of our class president and his staff,


Wi


have all earned rings or pins, and some of us have received


parts.


n this,


e have taken the leads.
various other awards.


TI a S mt-i; n rknr~r^ /t/-+o~re r ni/ kosQn h\/n'.\ \A\/oi rk D/rc~r;a Dr't'^n, A/^ Zt\rtrA Dr -4^-/
















WITH


OUR


GRADUA


TION


ROY ATWOOD


ETHEL K. COULTER
Flushing, New York


Caribbean Stc
Staff, 3, 4. La
Club 1, 4.
lunior-Senior


'A pleasing count


"ff,3, 4. Trade
P. A. S. 1, 2, 3.
Victory Corps
Banquet Committ


enhance


is no slight


advantage.


Cristobal, Canal


Zone


Victory Corps 4. Football 1, 2,
All-Star 1, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2,
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Track 1, 2,
All-Star 1, 2, 3, 4. Swimming
Water Polo. Class Officer, Vice
ident 2. Acting President 4.
"Not too studious, not too gay,


He trod the


even,


middle


GLORIA ASKOFF
New York City, New


CHARLES


ARNOLD


Louisville, Kentucky
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. \
3. Music Appreciation
1,2.


Trade Wind Staff 4. La P.
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4. P
4. Thespian 2, 3, 4. Vice P
4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Corps 1, 2, 3. Operetta 2.
Senior Banquet Committee 3.


ball 1.


one


victoryy
3. Op


"Ready, willing, and able to work,
In his studies he never did shirk."


"Sentences fail when
complete,
Descriptive of Gloria
sweet.


'".%A


MARGARET BAGGOTT


Pleasantville, New


Jersey


A. S. 3.
resident
resident
Victory
Junior-
Volley

word is


one word:


THEODORE BROWN
Chiriqui, Panama


Acting Secretary 3. La P. A. S. 2, 3,
4. Cipos 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Victory Corps 2, 3. Basketball 2, 3,
4. Junior-Senior Banquet Committee
3, 4. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.


"Peggy's jokes a
Make us forget
care.


nd her flaming hair,
our trouble and


Glee Club
Operetta 2.


Vic


Orn


2. Football 1, 2,
3, 4. Softball 1,


che
3,
2,


.tory Corps 2, 3.
stra 1, 2. Band 1,
4. Baseball 1, 2,
3, 4. Basketball


"A free heart won by the


Never


sea.


imprisoned to earn a degree.


ORELIA
Cristobal


AUSTIN
, Canal Zone


MARLIN CULPEPPER
Venice, Florida


leyball 1,


rps 2, 3. Softball
Swimming 1, 2, 3.


2, 3, 4.


Dramatic Cl
Music App
Bond 1, 2.
4. Softbal
kA I l A *


ub 4. Victory Corps 2, 3.
reciation 3. Orchestra 3.
Football 1, 4. Baseball 1,
l 1, 4. Basketball 1, 4.
- 1r- I."t.L n


York


> I


tr
















WE


LOOK


TO


NEW


FIELDS


WILLIAM FISHER


JOAN ELLIS


Dallas,


Gatun, Canal Zone
Student Association President 4.
Class Officer 3. Honor Society 3, 4.
La P. A. S. 2, 3, 4. Dramatic Club 3.
Glee Club 1, 2,3, 4. Victory Corps
2, 3. Operetta 1, 2. Orchestra 1, 2,
3. Band 1, 2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
Baseball 1, 2, 3. Softball 1, 2, 3.
Basketball 1, 2, 3. Track 1, 2, 3.


all that's good and !
the ruler of his fate.


Texas


Trade Wind
Dramatic Cl


La P. A. S.


espian


Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Librarian
Softball 1. Basketball All-Star
Junior-Senior Banquet Committee
Volleyball 3.


'Oh, thou art fairer than th


air,
Clad in the


stars.


beauty of


e even


a tho


MALCOLM DELVALLE


KATHERYNE GA
Barranca-Bermeja,


A. S. 3.


"At I


TES


Colombia.


Dramatic (
rps 1, 2,


ub 1, 2,
Opere


New York
Caribbean
P. A. S. 3.
pian 3, 4.
ball 4.
Swimming


Senior


Swimming 1, 2, 3. Archery 1.
-Senior Banquet Committee 3.
ast we have perpetual motion
1


Incessant


energy.


New York


Art Editor 4. La


Dramatic Club
Victory Corps
Baseball 3.


Banquet


4. Thes-
4. Foot-
ftball 3.


Tennis 4. Junior-
3. Cabinet Member


Representative


"He'll be successful in any land,
For he holds his future well in hand.


DONALD DIDRICKSON
Seattle, Washington


MORAIMA


FREIRE


Representative


Corps 2. Orchestr
1, 2, 4. Basketball
1, 2, 4. Softball 1,
2, 4. Swimming 1,
Polo 1, 2. Model


a 1
S2.


2, 3, 4.
Airplane


Habana, Cuba


Victory
Football
Baseball
Soccer 1,


"Politeness is the chief sign of
culture."


ir~> F
-

4~


softball 1, 2. All Star 1
, 2. All-Star 1. Tennis
, 2. Volleyball 1, 2.


tie heart


. Basketball
s 1. Archery
All-Star 1.


is tied with an easy
11


string.


SUSIE FAHNESTOCK
Gulfport, Mississippi


Thespian 3,
President 4.


dent 4.


k. Honor
La P. A.


Victory


Society
S. 3, 4.
: 2, 3.


BERNARD DE LONG
Flint, Michigan
Victory Corps 2, 3.
Football 4. Track 1.


things


are twice


r 3, 4.
Presi-
Oper-


etto 2. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Librar-
ian 2. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
__ -- . i &


"Good


Operetta


as aood,


Class


-
















SOME


TO


HIGHER


EDUCA


TION


LOIS KRIDLE
Latrobe, Pa.

La P. A. S. 3.
Victory Corp
Volleyball 2,


winsome


eyes,
Makes this


Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Operetta 2.

laughing brown


above


HUGH HALE
Ancon, Canal Zone
Caribbean, Staff, Photographer 4.
Trade Wind Staff, Photographer 4.
Dramatic Club 4. Victory Corps 3.
Orchestra 2, 3. Band 1. Football 1,
2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
3. SoFtball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soccer 1, Bas-
ketball 2.
"A bold and gallant knight is he,
His manner laden with chivalry."


others


ROY KNOOP
Ancon, Canal Zone


CHARLEEN HELLUMS
St. Joseph, Missouri


Class Officer, Treasurer 4.
bean Staff 4. Trade Wind
Glee Club 2, 3. Victory Cc0
Operetta 2.


Carib-
I Staff 4.


Trade Wind Staff
Glee Club, 1 2,
Soccer 1, 2. Basic
ball 1.


Very quiet and unassuming,
Weighty plans his mind is brewing.


ke


3,4. La P. A. S. 3.
3. Softball 1, 2.
tball 1, 2. Volley-


"Conscientious and dependable,
A classmate indispensable."


MELIDA HOWARD
Colon, R. P.


PATRICK
Cristobal,


Class Representative 3. Dramatic
Club 1. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1 2, 3. Cheering Squad
1, 2, 3. Music Appreciation 2.
Operetta 1, 2. Softball 1, 2. Basket-
ball 1, 2. Swimming 1. Tennis 1, 2.
Archery 1, 2. Junior-Senior Ban-
quet Committee 3. Cabinet Member


"Hang sorrow, care will k
Therefore let's be merry."


GORMELY


al Zone


Caribbean Staff 4. T
3, 4, Co-Editor 4. Vi
Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4.


reat who
V


ctory
Bar


Wind St
Corps 2,
d 1, 2.


never reminds us


ot others.


a cat


EUGENE GREGG
Cristobol, Canal Zone


Band 1.
Star 1, 4
ball 1, !
Track 1.
3% I --


MILDRED


Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All-
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soft-
3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3.
Swimming 1, 2, 4. Water


Pinnsauken, New


Club 1,


Jersey


Victory Corps 1,


. A i,,I I


aff
3.















OTHERS


TO


THEIR


LIFE


WORK


JACK REILLY


Cristobal,


Cana


JOAN MILLSPAUGH
Newbergh, New York


La P. A. S. 3,
Victory Crops
4. Operetta 1


4. Glee Club 1, 2, 4.
2, 3. Cheer Leaders
, 2. Basketball 2.


Dramatic Club 3, 4. Gi
Victory Corps 2, 3. C


Orchestra
ball 1, 2,


1, 2, 3,
1, 2, 3,
ball 1,
Swimmi


"Her laughter and giggles are heard
all day,
For she believes in the smiling way."


2. Model Airplane Club


ee Club
>peretta


1, 2, 3. Band 1, 2. Foot-
3, 4. All-Star 1. Baseball
All-Star 1, 2, 3. Softball
B-All-Star 1, 2, 3. Basket-
3, 4. B-All Star 2, 3.
1, 2, 3, 4. Water Polo 1.


Laughter shall dimple the cheek,
and not furrow the brow wil
ruggedness.


BENNY KULLER
Balboa, Canal Zone


ANGELICA LIM
Bocas del Toro, R. P.


Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Victory Corps 2,
3. Operetta 1, 2. Football All-
Star 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball All-Star
1, 2, 3, 4. Softball All-Star 1, 2, 3, 4.
Soccer 1. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-
Star 2. Track 3, 4.
"I am wealthy in my friends."


La P. A. S. 4. Glee Club 1, 2. Var-
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1. Bas-
ketball 1, 2, 3. Track 3. Model Air-
plane Club 3. Volleyball 1, 2, 3.


"To those who know thee
No words can paint."


GARVYN MOUMBLOW


Gatun,


Canal Zone


t I
*an inil


Class Officer, President 3. Class Rep-
resentative 4. Caribbean Staff
Photographer 3. Glee Club 2. Vic-
tory Corps 2, 3. Cheer Leaders 4.
Operetta 2. Orchestra 2. Band 1,
2. Junior-Senior Banquet Committee
3.
"There could be no great ones
if there were no small ones.


ADAIR PASSAILAIGUE
Colon, R. P.
Class Officer, Secretary 1,
matic Club 1, 2. Glee Club 1
Operetta 1. Baseball 2, 3.
1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2.


gay and gladsome.


y ** I
-


*
JEAN O'HAYER
Baltimore, Maryland
La P. A. S. 3. Dramatic Club 3. Vic-
tory Corps 2, 3. Librarian 1. Softball
1, 2, 3. All-Star 3. Basketball 3.
Archery 1,2. All-Star 2. Volleyball
1, 2, 3. All-Star 3.


JOY RANDALL
Ancon, Canal Zone
Class Representative 2, 4. Class Offi-
cer, Secretary-Treasurer 3. Honor
Society 3, 4. Treasurer 4. La P.AS.
2. 3, 4. Cipo 3, 4. Dramatic Club
3, 4, Vice President and Treas-


urer 4. Thespion Clu
Treas. 4. Biology Club
1, 2, 3, 4. Victory Coi
sity Club 2. Operetta 1


b 3, 4, Sec.-
2. Glee Club
rps 2, 3. Var-
, 2. Librarian


1, 2, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
1, 3. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All-Star
1. Swimming 1,2, 3, All-Star 1, 2, 3.
Tennis 1. Archery 1, 2, 4. All-Star
0 f.,ni irr..Con inr P~nnn. IQ ~mi Cnmt~fi~


ngo
















BUT


ALL


OF


US


STRIVE


-


RITA SHOAF
Lexington, North Carolina


ALFRED SIMONSSON


Class Representative 1. Caribbean
Staff 4. Trade Wind Staff 4. Honor
Society 4. La P. A. S. 4. Varsity Club
4. Orchestra 2, 3. 4. Band 2, 3, 4.
Softball 3, 4. All-Star 3. Basketball
3, 4. All-Star 3. Cabinet Member 4.
Volleyball 4.


Colon,
Victory
Band 1.
I 1, 3, 4.
I. "Virtue


Corps 2, 3.
Football 1
Soccer 1.


nev


He who has


La P. A. S. 3.
, 3, 4. All-Star


'er left to stand,
it will have neighbors


"Right brisk


is she and full


DANKWART SANDERS
Shanghai, China


La P. A. S. 2. B
2. Victory Cor
3, 4. AII-Star 4
Softball 1, 2, 3,
4. All-Star 3.
Star 1, 2, 3.
Swimming 2, 3


biology Club, President
ps2, 3. Football 1, 2,
. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.
4. Basketball 1, 2.3
Track 1, 2, 3,4. All-
Water Polo 1, 2.


Junior-Senior


NORRINE TERRY
Breadalbia, New


Victo


ry Corps 2, 3.


"Do but look


quet Committee


on her hair; it is as love
i -. i i


star when


it riseth.


Self-respect,


that cornerstone
virtues.


LUCIEN R. SKEELS


CAROL RUOFF


Los Angeles,


Calif.


Class Representative 3.
Club 2, 3. Glee Club 1,
tory Corps 2, 3. Varsity
Operetta 1. Volleyball


Dramatic
3. Vic-


and fas-


Cristobal,
Water Pol
torp Corp
lism 2. Gl
2. Basebc
Photo Clul
Club 1.
"The world
Nor turn


tt-.


Canal Zone
lo 1, 2. Basketball 1. Vic-
s 1, 2. Track 1, 2. Journa-
ee Club, 1, 2, 4. Archery
all 2, Swimming 1, 2, 3.
b 1. Inter-Amer. Discussion

d was taken in his stride;
ed he back for time nor


LOIS STAPF


LEONA SANDERS
Barranca-Bermela, Colombia


OFFicer


bean Staff, Co-
Staff 4. Honor
La P. A. S. 4
Thespian 4. G
President 4. S\


Secretanry


Editor 4.


lee
vimi


Carib-


Trade Wind


:iety, Secretary
Dramatic Club
Club 1, 2, 3,
mina 2. Tennis


Ancon,


Canal


Caribbean St
Wind Staff 3
P. A. S. 2, 3,
Club 1, 2, 3
Treasurer. G
tory Corps 3.
President 4.


Zone


aff, Co-Editor 4. Trade
, 4. Co-Editor 4. La
4. Cipo 3, 4. Dramatic
, 4. Photo Club 1, 2,
lee Club 1, 2, 3. Vic-
Varsity Club 2, 3, 4.,


)peretta 1, 2. Sc


;


C


' r


..


.


,\-^ I
















TOW


ARD


HAPPINESS


AND


SUCCESS


MAX L. WELCH


Gatun, Canal


MARY WHITE


Cristobal,


Canal


Class Officer, Secretary 2, 3. Glee
Club 1, 2. Victory Corps 3. Oper-
etta 2. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
mittee 3. Volleyball 2.


"A girl with beauties
Bewitching eyes an


very rare,
d raven hc


Class Officer,
S. 4. Biology
2, 3. Victory 1
1, 2. Football
1, 3, 4. Baseba
3. Softball 1,
Basketball 1, 2
Track, All-Star
2. Water Polo.


Senior


Banquet


inet Member 4.


"There


Zone


President 4. La P. A.
Club 2. Glee Club 1,
Corps 2, 3. Operetta


I 1,
ll 1
2. 3


2, 3, 4. All-Star
,2, 3. All-Star 1,
. All-Star 1, 2, 3.
All-Star 1, 2, 3.


, 2, 3. Swimming 1,
\ll Star 1, 2. Junior-
Committee 3. Cab-


is more in me than
stand."


u under-


MARTIN KENDZIOREK
Colon, R. P.
La P. A. S. 2, 3, 4. Cipo 3. Victory
Corps 1, 2, 3. Model Airplane Club
1. Dolphins Club 2. Swimming 1, 2,
3. Football 1, 2, 3. Basketball 1, 2.
Softball 1, 2. Water Polo 1, 2. Track
2. Orchestra 2, 3.


GRACE


YOHROS


Brooklyn, New York


La P. A. S. 2,
Victory Corr
Basketball 1.


"Smiling lips, twinklin
And a beauty that


lee Club 1, 2, 3,
3. Softball 1.


g eyes
never


dies!"


"His nimble brain is hid by
Merry, but no fool is he."


ALVIN LIM


Cristobal, Canal


Class Officer, Vice
Campaign Manager 3.
2, 3. Cipo 2, 3. Victo
Junior-Senior Banquet
Model Airplane Club 1
1,2, 3, 4. All-Star 1.
3. Basketball 1, 2, 3.
3. AII-Star 2.


EDMOND


President 3.
La P. A. S.
ry Corps 2, 3.
Committee 3.
1, 2. Football
Baseball 1, 2,
Softball 1, 2,


WACHTEL


Colon, R. P.
La P. A. S. 2. Cipo 2. Victory Corps
2, 3. Junior-Senior Banquet Com-
mittee 3. Class Officer, Vice Presi-
dent 2. Biology Club 2. Football 3.
Basketball 3. Glee Club 2, 3.
"From quiet, unexpected sources,
Often spring the world's great
forces!"'


"A cheerful smile, a pleasant word,
Mirth over sadness, he preferred."


GENE STONE


Cristobal,


Canal


Zone














LA53


OF"


46


The members of the class of Fort


have


sen from bit to feature players, and the


next step is stardom.


Last year and the


ear befo


re th


ey gave


plays


in assembly


this year their biggest production
class has also been outstanding in


was


sports,


a most successful banquet for the Seniors.


scholarship, and


service.


Their leaders are:


Eleanor


harles


William
Thomas.


President,


Thelma Pucci;


Treasurer


ice President, Gus
s Representatives:


Rosania;
Helen


secretary,
Stade and


curtain falls and


when it rises again








JUNIORS


V
^^*UlHHI^MJP^UlHJMlM|||||t~rlM!L~ttU>!MfPP^~lP^ ^^ ^ Krf 1 Sl1 v ^ B^: WJIA.K^T y v ^f. 1111^11.+Hh KK < K? rf'yT'v Av ^avK


war


Engr/v


S#mPE


TOMAS


Tyrn s


Ao


&AWK


DBarS


MA -


cMAf C/A


VArA7TA


q *
?/ .: x x







"


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i-ary


WALL


/?ozsA CzenW N/LTQA


M&/ TCA


Domrn Y


GL: C


GUs RSAH /A


T i/CMA


THOMAs


.- 1
-. I
KuHf T Dor ?^>;.

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ai


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frrETTa




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.ggmIM. hs ;uxx^ x x x /

BETTY


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JUNIORS


Nf'L N


STAVE-


Dew/


VNN/Nw MALwm rMCTZGAw


Azucr GAIN


NoRMAN


Anwr- Bo


A i


--
'.1 fly '<*


Ktwnrn


GaMmQ


BARPAR4 PR/MMER


MfLL


ULLER


Po0rnT


I>A/U S A/L/A'I Ilw f


*vx/ e xk wa ++ *m+ l4 :4:+:+7:+:+::


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NANCY GILOER


94R SARA


ALo A r C. T R..

/ MRDA ROBERT


U


<4.l


-to" -* *,*"*
iy-< '^/s *
^ '*^ *l' ^^^*';/
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JUNIORS


xxA-x


GERALD


TROOP


L xxx xxxx x xx


MARY


&NNETH/


Lowe


SCTT7 Kw(4sMw


LEACH


xx '. W .


xx KKK K
sx '
fK Kx


!















/34


m.d "


SOPH


CLASS


OFFICERS


The second act!


The players, still


in minor ro es, are improving.


When the curtain


rises again,
Bornefeld.


they will be upper-classmen.


Other characters


are Oscar


The lead role in this act is played by Gloria


Flores,


vice


president, Judy


Havas, Secretary,


James Roe, Treasurer.


Muriel Tatelman and


George


Schultze are the


Class Represen-


tatives.


The Sophomores are completing their second year here, and in both they have


- a


,5 5
























Row 2--


J. Buckley; H. Bingham; R.


Osorio;


T. London


Row 1-
A. Benthal; L. Brown; J. Andrews,


* * *


G. Bornefield;


H. Keenan


















Row2-
B. Wadley; J. Roe; R. Pincus; R. Scheiddegg;
M. Tatelman

Row 1-
G. Schulhe; J. McNair; F. Rosales; P. Wilkes;
B. Webster


T. McGinn; J. Dorsey;


O. Flores; J.


Rowe;


H. Wentworth

Row 2-
E. Tompkins; F. Howard; J. Havas; M. Chong;
-7 C I 11






















Row 2-


M. Hupp; J. Malcolm; H. Diaz; N. Keller;


J. Pescod


Row 1-


H. Kellman;


A. Lincoln; T.


Gregg; G. Schu!te


Row 2-
G. Cada


va; H. Leignadier; R. Nilto


Row 1-


R. Tracy; B. Watts; B.


Reeves;


R. Muckle


S. Blackburn; T


P. Benny;


. Dorgan; B. Dixon; D. Chambers


A. Cottrell; H. Culpepper; R. Knoop


















C L


OF


a p


C


-"


iti~.. L


I'


FRESHMAN


CLASS


OFFICERS


The curtain rises on the first act, and


we present the class of 1948. Don't turn away-


watch them!


The principal characters are David
Johnny Engelke, Secretary-Treasurer.
Frankel.
The freshmen are the future stars;


ycock, Presiden


McGinn,


Vice


President;


Representatives are David Stade and Evelyn


the leaders


were


once led.


Good luck!


5 6


























Row 2


D. Wong;


M. Simons;


N. Dyer; R. Williams


Row 1-
H. Taylor; E. Corbett; T. Melancon; D. Serko


R. Mcllvaine; H. Schulte; K. Millard; J. Stringer;
R. Halwanny


D. Lindstrom; N.


Owens;


P. Leach, H. Miller


Row 1-


E. Manrique;


A. Parcel


Row 2-
W. McGinn; P. Sanders; D. Stade; E. Johnston;
D. Sether


m 'm


















T. Dixon;


G. Sollas;


J. Fernandez

Row 2-
T. Archbold;


C. Harrison; E. Bringas;


V. Beiarano; M.


Heerman; B. Engle-


bright;


W. McLaughlin


E. Frankel; B. Brown; M. Aleguas


OW 3-


N. Nail; B.


Wolfenstein


; J. Haywood;


G. Egolf


Row 2-
M. Furey;


A. Armstrong; E. Kuller; J. Gill


Row 1-


D. Sanders;


G. Coulter; E. Pretto; D. Heun


C. Madison;


Row 2-
J. Taylor


. ,iiioughb9 C'


Sco.L


A. Era, ,r. M Bennr,


- -tat.






































































































































































































































































A .. . ^ .


T Ti
F
1
1-
1





e.
am


.7.





t
v.













4.














0"



W<:
ve-







.,,,s -L..


TF




























































F


A































THE


STUDENT


COUNCIL


This year's election of the Student Council was marked by one of the most interesting


and exciting presidential elections in the history of C. H. S.


Susie Fahnestock, Mal


DelValle, and Bill Fisher campaigned vigorously up to the very last moment in attempts


to sway public opinion.


After election day, when the smoke of battle had cleared,


was discovered that Bill Fisher had been elected to be the twelfth president of the


Cris-


obal High School Student Association.

The Student Association is governed according to Parliamentary Procedure through


a governing body known as the Student Council.


representatives are elected from


each of the various classes.


These, in addition to the president, vice president,


secre-


tary, and treasurer, comprise the Student Council.


Through this system students of C. H. S.


are exposed to representative democracy, similar to that which they may find as citizens
in adult life.


Representative student government in


year.


has been particularly successful


One of this year's goals was to make the Student Council more representative


the various homerooms through closer homeroom cooperation.


Lnon rocrnnnci kl Fnr


I I I -


The Student Council has
which hns been run en-


imnhlv :,,\rr^f\i Std(nt Stundv Hnll.







Thanks to the Student Association,


activities.


"Trade Wind," "Caribbean,


H. S. has again enjoyed its usual student
" atheltic events, musical programs, drama-


tic productions, class picnics and dances, sports awards, magazine drives,


alent assem-


blies, and the Junior-Senior Banquet, have all been sponsored by the Student Association.


A great deal of the Student Association


cient guidance of the


to Studen
activities.


success


Sponsor, Mr. Clifford Hauberg.


Council affairs, he has helped and inspi


A cabinet of six


may be traced directly to the eFfi-
Giving a great deal of his time
red the Council in its numerous


members was chosen this year to assist the


president in his duties.


Although cabinets of previous years have also been successful, the
seems to be that this year's cabinet has been even more so.


consensus of opinion


Those composing


he President's Cabinet are:


Joy Randall, Director of Budget and


Finance; Malcolm DelValle, Director of Public Relations; Rita Shoalf, Chairman of the


Constitutional Revision Committee;


usie Fahnestock, Director of Citizenship Activities;


Max Weich, Miscellaneous; and Melida Howard, Miscellaneous.







NA


TIONAL


HONOR


SENIORS


The first high school honor society was founded in 1903.


It came into being soon


after the great increase in enrollment in the secondary schools showed the need for such


an organization.


Social and athletic activities became increasingly important but the


necessary stimulation for scholarship was lacking, and something needed to be done about


he last day of the school year, in


1903, five girls of high scholastic standing,


under the direction of Dr. William B. Owen, who was then principal of the
Academy of Chicago, formed the first honor society, Pi Beta Sigma. Its p


the encouragement of scholarship.


old South Side
primary aim was


The next year, the Academy became a part of Chicago


University but the society continued and still exists as an independent organization. Its
rules and regulations are much the same as those of the National Honor Society.
The idea for encouraging good high school citizenship and scholarship spread and
soon societies emulating the activities and accomplishments of Phi Beta Kappa in Uni-


versities were organized in widely separated parts of the U. S.


Many of these consoli-


dated, because schools lying in the same district were able to agree upon requirements
for membership and standards of scholarship.
In 1919 the operation of these honor societies had been so successful that the ques-
tion was taken up at a meeting of the National Association of Secondary School Prin-


cipals.


They approved of the plan and the American Torch Society was formed.


was later changed to the National Honor Society.
In order to be eligible to the National Honor Society a student must have an A or
B average. If a pupil is normal or above average in other traits and excels in scholarship,


he is one who is primarily intended to be honored.


order, a


The pupils are ranked in numerical


according to their grades during the first seven semesters, or in the case of the


Juniors, the first five semesters.


ktl


!








SOCIETY





JUNIORS


Other qualities that are analysed are leadership,


service,


and character.


At a


meeting of all the teachers with whom these pupils have come into contact,
rated.


The aim of the Natic
a matter of distinction.


hey are


Honor Society is to make good citizenship in high schools


Its members must have


he outstanding qualities of


character,


service,


leadership, and scholarship.


These qualities developed in school should make


a better citizen of the graduate and he, in
The Caribbean Chapter is only three


urn, will contribute more to his country.


ears old


, but already its influ


ence


is being


It is hoped that with the passing years this chapter's contribution to the Americas


will be very great.


Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore is the Sponsor of th


Honor Society.
this chapter.


Miss M


oore, Miss Liter, and Mr.


e Caribbean Chapter of the National
Jorstad form the governing board of


Near the end of each school year a luncheon or dinner party is given b


the prin-


cipal or one of the advisors in honor of the members of the Caribbean Chapter. This
year a lovely dinner at the Washington Hotel was given by Miss Moore and our school
principal, Mr. Theodore Hotz, and his wife.


The Honor Society does not have special social activities bu


its members are obli-


gated to work quietly for the betterment of scholarship in the school.








A


AS


The Cipos are the inner circle of the
La P.A.S. Club and to become a mem-
ber of this organization a student must
be outstanding in his Spanish classes
and must be ready and willing to do
his part in any activities, large or small
sponsored by the Spanish Club.
During the La P.A.S. Initiations, the


Cipos take the duties of


officers of the


club and they arrange all social func-


tions given for the La P.A


Club.


The purpose of the La P. A. S. Club
is to promote a greater interest in Span-
ish and a better relationship between
the United States and the Republic of
Panama.
Mrs. Phyllis Spencer, the sponsor and


organizer of the La P.


A. S.


Club, has


done much in carrying out the purpose


of the club.


Last year was presented


the second annual Inter-American Un-
derstanding Award, which is awarded
to the Isthmian resident who has done


liS k 5 MW









CLUB


most in fostering und
the peoples of th,


erstanding between


Americas.


The evening
the members


was highly successful


were


repaid


their


Spencer


was


chosen


because


good work in Spanish.


many


years


as teacher


Spanish


The fina


activity of the La P.


Cristobal
Spanish


High
and E


translations


School,


english
d those


organizing


clubs, and
of Spanish


Club


was


a formal


uncheon


at the


Washington Hotel on May 20.


lightfu


lunch was served and the pro-


works


American poets.
One of the social
for the La P. A. S.


noted


events of the


Latin-


year


Club members was


a masquerade party in the ballroom of
theMargarita clubhouse. Everyonecame


I.1


gram, all in Spanish, consisted of speech-
es made by the different Cipos.


Membership i
honorary, and it


is open only


students attaining an average


better
I


in Spanish.


strictly
o those
of B or


The club now


.1 I I I .1 L


classes


I I


I


* *







ull'


and


Scroll


Ardith, Patrick, Lois


"Quill and Scroll,"


which was organized in 1926 by a group of high school advi-


sors, has grown until today it includes nearly 2,000 chapters in th
foreign countries all over the world.


e United States and


Its purpose is to raise the standards of high school journalism and to stimulate interest
in journalistic endeavor. It is the honor society for the Field of journalism and its affiliated
activities, such as art and literature, and provides a goal of achievement.
The Caribbean Chapter was organized this year and includes 12 charter members.
From time to time, other initiations will be held to admit those who meet the necessary
qualifications.
The charter members are Lois StapF, Rita ShoaF, Leona Sanders, Ethel Coulter, Dorit
Berger, Rosita Czernik, Lois Householder, Ardith Boyle, Joan Ellis, Malcolm Delvalle,
who is not in the picture, Pat Gormely, and Miss Bess Liter, sponsor. The officers are:
President, Pat Gormely, Vice President, Lois Householder, and Secretary, Ardith Boyle.


Sv S......................................... k' -t... -j^^H







ARS


CLI


ITY


lB


O'BRIEN


FIRST ROW: Rita, Lois, Arline
SECOND ROW: Lois, Helen, Marilyn, Harriet
THIRD ROW: Nancy, Eleanor, Jean, Thelma, Alice


The purpose of the
belong to this exclusive


arsity


club a girl must make


to interest more girls in athletics, and to
yo AII-Star teams in the same year, or be


one of the 10 highest in the point system.
At the end of this school year 16 members who


had fulfilled these qualifications and


were initiated


were:


Betty


Jamesson, Jacqueline Carlin,


Pat Leach, Eleanor Kuller,


Roberta Williams, Gladys


Schulte,


rdith Boyle, Barbara Brown, Betty Kuhrt, Maiorie


- I I I B a A i k I I I II A I \ A /l ..I I I P A A .






TORRID


ZONE


WIZARDS


Zone


zed in


ence


1942 and affiliated with


Clubs


grown from a small In
to one containing the


members chosen from al


Classes


on the


basis


/-merica, nas
gnifcant group
ull quota of 25


he Science
scholarship


Color
this y
ience
was
they
trip '


regular


ado
ear


were
because


postpone


however


active
were


was


in othe


lust
taken


r fields


as interested.


to Barro
d during
inconven-


group
which
One


and active


interest.


Puerto


Pilon.


e activities


times


and w


of the
ere no


ub vary


Their sponsor,


same


Mr. Maedl


he officers, Lois Hous


year as


ident


; Patsy


Barbara


Benny,


De Schmidt,


Vice
Sec


eholder


listed
Pres-


President


retary;


Rosity Czernik,


Librarian


he club through p
ion and its parties.


riods


, in running


ribula-


club has


Id as its highest aim


of Sc
their


pledge
ience.


service


These


knowledge


to the


1)To increase


science;


learn to perfect th


to give


service


eir skills
to their


in science;
community


and nation1 4) to understand the


portance of science
5) to carry out the p


n their


programm o


lives;


science


merica.


p


C


I m


M ,] .L I


v .
r











N


Avo Hw Anr )WMMs


4


JUNIOR


i V*


M/SS"


AS PRESENTED AT


CR/STOBAL HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM


DECEMBER 1944


ry


potG JA
Soler#


S0 5 O-01t M v^.c HIM 5,. *.


>^-^


- --- a-. *~. -


4
4 1
A> ~> t 4

~ w;iittj
ft <2


F W B e


r^


,


*v^e


1









Nati onal


Thespian


Society


The National Thespian Society was


organized in the


spring of 1928 by a


group of teachers who felt that a
greater impetus could be given to the
study of educational dramatics by an
association of directors, teachers, and


students actively interested


n high


school dramatics.


While the


new


Mr. Beck and National Thespians


ganization
the same


was
nes


established


along


typical of honor


dieties in general,


specific


its founders were


n their demand that it be


an active, prog


ressive, and forward-


looking society in its Field.


it was


made clear that the honor of member-
ship was to be conferred upon High


School students not


so much for the


reason that they met the eligibility
requirements, but more for what these


Bitsy, Gloria


students


promised,


I I under


oath,


. r t..


t


under








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,< i :. .. **:*** : ..*
> **** *


DRAMATIC


CLUB


- ,. 4$> "
'*" '><


^hjj'


Mr. P. L. BECK, Sponsor




To become a member of the Cristobal
Dramatic Club all one needs to do is ex-
press a sincere interest in dramatics.
During the past year the Cristobal
Dramatic Club has held four very inter-


testing meetings.


The officers for the


year were elected at the first meeting.


At the second, a one-act play


"The


Cue He Knew,


was enacted by vari-


ous members and a review of the Little


Theater


given.


s Play,


"Go


The Sponsor


gave a


, was
talk on


types in plays and the Professional The-


after, c
served.
"Florist


later


refreshments


were


During the third meeting the


bhop,


presented and


a one-act
he Sponsor


play, was
talked on


characterization and another play re-


view


Little


Theater's


'"Three


Men On a Horse


was given.


The aim and ambition of every mem-
ber of the Dramatic Club is to achieve


membership


in the


Thespian


Society.


There are no special talents or require-
ments to be a member of the Dramatic
Club, whereas, on the other hand, to be
a Thespian a pupil is required to partic-
I


/


/"*'







BEST DRESSED
Hugh Hale Rita Shoaf


BEST GIRL ATHLETE
Lois Stapf


A 0 S eJ\\f
r^ee


*


9m


WITTIEST
Hugh Hale Joan Ellis


A t


MOST STUDIOUS


Roy Knoop


Joy Randall































































Een.r. HI'. NS EnLq
,UEEN OF THE CHINESE CLUB


Dorothy Engler
QUEEN OF THE SIMON BOLIVAR CLUB





















St


ro


4R 9


MAtt


SA,


ALMA M AZE"%
AI-K^ m A~ e


S


m



















Lm

a
a
a


---'C


~
4%


a-*


/


A-


-a


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7


-A


A


f


f


J


SFmI\mnmum"
mmmnmm












MUSIC


"Music


is well said to


the speech of


angels"


Even though the glee


club and


orchestra may not pro-


duce ange
Jorstad are
The Mus
C.H.S. M
on to play f
The g ee cl


lic


II


music at


times,


truly outstanding.
ic department is one


any times during the
iany times during the


or ass


emblies


is very


ir activitiE

the most


under


important


year, the orchestra is call


, plays and


popular


other special


occasions.


ool and at outside


programs
Amonc
Annual


pring


orchestra
public.


I asse
era I


outstanding


Christmas Fest
Ausic Festival.
persented b


n addition


mblies.
talented


ival,


eau


music


events or the
the Easter C
all of these,


was


musicians


year


concert
the


programs
furnished


have


appeared


were


choir


le general
wver Fifteen "_"

in solos or PAT


STOB
9//y:/ \ K


AA


SCHOOL


& ti. V'"/,.'.. !*
V/ ^<.*.


SUSIE


RI


V
t ^^


g


h









DEP


ARTMENT


small groups.
in assembly as vc


Leona Sanders has appeared many times
cal soloist, and her lovely voice is familiar


to most of the Atlantic siders, as she is also on the local


radio.


Every year, the Christmas program is opened by a


brass quartet playing a traditional carol. This year it was
composed of Gay Thomas and Jimmy Rowe, trumpets, and
Noel Gibson, Jr., and Johnny Engelke, trombones.
The accompanists for the glee club are Susie Fahnestock
and Bill Fisher, and the orchestra is accompanied by Pat
Gormely.
The orchestra is composed of thirty-Five members, and the


glee club has seventy singers.


age out of a total student body of
eight.


This is a very high percent-


wo hundred twenty-


As more students arrive


from the States


in the near


future, the future of the music groups
brighter.


will appear even














The


One


Library




outstanding and most useful departments of


Cristobal High


School is a


the latest magazines and b


well equipped library, filled with
ooks ranging from fiction to the best


reference material.


Placed in the upper


story


of th


high school building,


MISS JEANNE BROWN


overlooking the


beautiful


Limon Bay, its atmosphere and conditions are most excellent for


deep thought and study.


Balm


ezes


frisk through the spacious


library


, continually


refreshing one's mind and body.
placed to gain the best advantage


Miss


Large tables and comfortable chairs are conveniently


of the lighting facilities.


Jeanne Brown, our well trained librarian does an admirable job of managing


both the business end of the library and the library itself, besides teaching


several English


classes on the side.


















0


Assisting her at the task of caring for such a large library are the student librarians:
Beverly Reeves, Alice Cain, Beulah Simons, Eola Pretto, Marilyn Metzger, Mary Leach,
Merle Simons, Kenneth Millard, Dick Chambers, Joy Randall, and Dorit Archbold.
These students, besides learning the fundamentals of library work, begin to appre-


ciate books, the care of them, to love


them, and to acquire a surprising amount of gen-


eral knowledge.


The library is a popular place.


Classes often go there when some phase


their


work needs the help of the


excellent reference books.


An average of


sixteen pupils


are present


every period to broaden their minds or catch up on passing


event


approximately forty books are checked out every day.
Naturally, the most popular literature is the fiction, but history,


al science, travel,


literature, and biography are high on the


ist because


of the compulsory reading required


by school classes.


The library is open seven periods every school day


so that whosoever desires knowl-


mm m






* :. /

V ^


* 'I .


* .1
4s'.

,.
1 1


IST2M4Afltfl SI8lO1 (R ISTOBRt. iC. Z.
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4%


ass


';: / "^ /^"iS "^


>< r-


Augusta Won

frt~tiporcc
of hE j-"U--
live 'hu4 si
An-nual Antholc
Poetry for 104-4.
_s p.^ c o^T'^"^ */^^'mp ^*^.T *^ JJ ^l. a.tJ't U Io


C. H. S. lYE
g. C.HS., .JJTNINfD c
e. ha.s recent-UNIOR CI
Sby having one 104g '
On an Imagina- U-.
elected for the -.- ,, '
gy of Coellee ,S
This anthology S ,.
n of ut- "4"


",. poetry written by coll
Clan Makes rlans.d''
For xarterl
^^ ,'X.A \ ^^~^.1: \ ^* ', C^\ ^*i^^ t f ^& i i^I^ H^




" r i Imt" / f Claude Campbellu. C..HU
& e: >, ie, definite now min the V-12 at SL t
de t o olege, Emmnietburg. Mi
"she.. -. lucky Maryland las
S. -- 45 seemingly found great 1
9 C -aude's e .+ .
tn Carn. Ba aa Scouta
been e Marilyn Metger, and P ulin naY
w ye ars, oiur t- SthrltelmaerarMaim r M

.hen the chre la gran ed wl th l tu Sou ts,
ed. the adviser ot the journs~almontemein of o

mero rood t A t t imee of te





Oer6*t --"'a^^ ^^B^ ^d^;,^| |-^ ^lWoco~ ewlL^-atofl Tuesayl^ Op
tY cRn merely bease /
ujh a eoyaplaS &snMsa kesie
it is nOt oone
mem" ~has the rtig>h are moiewas rotten but MrahL> t vnoAcd o
'X nio'l at "m + ~ +w- e- 0
saeniors* r, "I didn't. Eke that morte." ThIs Ls a very b
.upper After Mr. Bec talk Charles )roJect which will
m ust Maionwa a esm or ~the raetlca] politics a h e,
ork in Cristbal tfl Teatt. play constitution really r n obt -
m r ''HayfeverY Tbest of must lay "The -ue 1 Knw- thnra and much talk Craft When
R.cas M too over the enterttructors. Cross W.lgr
tor OW? elit hfl4 ay A similar election Id comes over
po~tfra.fo ti entlw bi 1940 to choose betwe ii art of aaillht..
felt and Wilkie. Rooa The donated
elected WIth 45 v s. wh the Army 1s:t
r Wiflkie got only 51 va a. yellow by -
the ..


V.


l |QNatipnal Educoa




. .on ay. ,
Swtaln w T ea


.- '.

tion t.i
....~~~~ ~ ?.$. -l w ^*i*rf iti~if
J1 i


i


i


I















Cafeteria


hundred and


sixty boys and girls


hurry into the Cristobal High School Cafe-


teria daily for their lunch.


isn't large enough


The cafeteria


to hold this number of


students
nately,


all at the same time,
the Grammar School c


fortu-


various


study halls are dismissed early in
their members may eat and leave


order that
the room


before


he regular n


oon-hour rush.


There are eight
class in cafeteria.


girls who belong to the
They receive two full


credits as


would


in household arts.


These girls have various duties such as tak-
ing charge of the making of salads and sand-
wiches and serving. They also act as cashiers


occasionally
cial reports.


and help


ake care of Finan-


These jobs are rotated every


week so that each girl may learn the duties
of each iob.
Miss McLimans has charge of the cafeteria


work and
remarkable


its finances


iob o


serv


and she has done a
ing adequate and


wholesome


unches


in spite


the shortage


of certain foods and staff members.


At the


present time she operates this with one cook,
a cook's helper, and one maid.
Miss Hallie Beavers has served most effi-
ciently as the cashier for several years, and
this popular math teacher is most adept at
I. .. :- L.- I 1 1 ...- I^


m

























7 -^


/ *
21




J4











L







- - - -


FOOTBALL


Coach Palumbo


Under the able direction of Coach


Luke Palumbo,


the Cristobal


High


"A" League All-Stars
Zone Champions
last play of the game, he faded back to the
long desperation pass to Benny Kuller, who s


School Grid Squad annexed the Isth-
mian football championship by virtue
of a last-play victory over a powerful
Junior College Eleven and a score-
M less tie battle with the strong Balboa
High gridsters.
Noel Gibson became the star of
the Junior College tilt when, on the
Junior College 45-yard line, and threw a
snatched it out of the air in the College end


zone for a touchdown and victory. Max Weich, who had previously kicked a field goal,
converted the extra point and Cristobal won 10-7.
The Cristobal-Balboa tilt was a hard bruising battle with the linemen dominating
the individual play.


Cristobal came the closest to scoring, driving all the way to the Balboa


in the


on fourth d


13-yard


fourth quarter before an attempted field goal by Max Weich was blocked
own to end the march.


Coach Paul Halleck's able


"B" League stalwarts outplayed a much heavier Balboa


team in nearly


every


department of


the game as they triumphed over the
big Balboa Eleven by a score of 8-0.
Pedro Nieves began the scoring


when he broke through the


Balboa


line in the second period to tag a Red
and White back in his own end zone
for two points.


George Egol


, -


scored the game's


,nlv tnrkc-nrlnwn wh.en he raced 40


! !







SOFTBALL


The Cristobal High School softballers climaxed the season with a 4-3 victory over a
strong Balboa Ten. Cristobal had previously lost to the Junior College by a score of 6-2.
Johnny Hower of Balboa and Jim Fernandez and Denis Venning of Cristobal pitched
brilliantly, giving up but three hits between them. Hower's downfall came in the first
two innings when all four of Cristobal's markers crossed the plate, the result of two walks,
two stolen bases, and four costly errors.
The Junior College game was another matter, however, with Ed Kunkel's speedy
delivery proving just too much for the local lads. The Collegians quickly picked up a big


six-run lead which they held until the last inning when Cristobal scored twice, because
of the several errors by the College infield.
Behind the two-hit pitching of Jim Rowe, the "B" League boys trounced a hapless
Balboa Ten by the unheard score of 19-0.
The game had to be called in the 6th inning as Balboa simply could not get the local
boys out.







BASKETBALL


The Cristobal


League All-Star basketball team went down to defeat at the


hands of the Junior College 25-23.
Stempel, Flashy center for the Pacific siders, was a one-man team, sending six baskets
and three fouls through the hoop.
The Cristobal offense could not penetrate the tricky zone defense of the College
five, scoring most of their points on long set shots and rebounds off the College back-
board.
The "B" League basketeers were heavily favored to take the measure of the Balboa
quintet and achieve the record of having beaten Balboa in every sport.
Jimmy Rowe, high scorer in last year's game, was expected to head a squad com-
prised of such talented stars as Oscar Flores, Jack Pescod, Fred Hill, and many others.









TRACK


Balboa Wins

Cristobal c


Over
-45-


"Mac" McPheters


Tosses the Discus


The Cristobal
were narrowly
45k, by Balboa


the annua


College


High


wec


rackmen


made


edged out, 50 to
High School in


I triangular
Balboa. T1
finishedd a '


rack meet


easily


Balboa team.
Oscar Flore


Junior


was


League boys


partly


"A" League


defeating


15 point


individual star


for the


points.


smaller


Flores


shattered


The
were
points
with


Cristobal


Noel
, and
eight


soectacular


high


Gibson,
Herbert
points, i


Finish


scorers


nine


the 50-yard dash


raced


record


distance


seconds and tied the


Robinson,
including a


880-


record as h


seconds


when
in six


100-yard


e sped to victory in
Flat.


yard run.


Dick Nitto Going
Over the Top (top)
Jack Pescod Leaps
the Bar (bottom)


.,- S I


Al Maale


Puts the Shot


i mI


m






BASEBALL


The Cristobal


League All-Star baseball team


was


defeated by a strong Balboa


nine by a 4-1


score.


Bill Pretto matched his pitching talents


with Charl


Lebrun of Balboa and save for a


three-run Balboa rally in the


seven


th inning, held the rivals in check all the way.


Cristobal scored its onl


y run in the top half of the


seven


th inning to tie the


score,


the three-run Balboa rally, in the latter half of the frame, dispelled any hope of victory.


The Cristobal


"B" League baseball team defeated the Balboa


"B" League nine


by a 5-0 score in a game played in Balboa.
Cristobal pitcher, Fred Hill, had complete control over the Balboa nine all the way,
giving up only a few hits.
Pitcher Hill, Jerry Stringer, and Ed Corbett each contributed a home-run to the
winning cause.






Gi'


Spo s


Girl's sports


this year
C


were highly successful, not only


because


of the large number


of victories over


Balboa, but because of


large percentage of girls who participated in each sport.
The sports are planned for all the girls, not for just a select few,


and nothing is more gratifying to a coach than


centage of the girls come out.


to see a good per-


The larger the group is, the better


chance


there


developing


good


all-star


team.


This


was


proved over and over again


when


the "big games


came along.


The "A" league


sports


our girls won


record


four,


is exceptional:


lost


two and


out of


tied


one.


seven games or
The record of


the "B"


girls could not possibly


be bettered:


they defeated Balboa


min every sport,


volleyball, basketball, softball, and archery.


But


despite


these


good


records


other


thing


girls


were striving for was good sportsmanship.


It means just as much


or more to a girl to be known as a square dealer as to


be known


as a good "athlete.


know


how


to play


game fairly,


with


endurance


and


teamwork


what the girls learned


from


volley-


ball, basketball, softball, and the other sports.


"To set the cause above renown,
To love the game beyond the prize,
To honor while you strike him down,
The foe that come with fearless eyes.















A TLANT/G


5/DE


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AL/OCE
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CA/IN


LO/s


HOU5EHOLDER
436


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"A" LEAGUE


This year vol


VOLLEYBALL
ll started off with a


I
7'!

4.


year.


All-Stars bowed down


reluctantly to two strong Balboa teams.


Jnnior College girls


were


victor-


ious over Cristobal by the score of 21-17


21-12,


while


Balboa


School team also triumphed
girls, 21-19 and 21-14. The
and cooperation of our girls


cellen


over


High
our


teamwork


were


, while the serving and passing


of the Balboa teams were superior, and


were instrumental in their victories


i/f' DD .. i/.. -. ... ~, / %'.


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IdwwrEws, S L4IYSC A:4%4'C55W#%KL L4[IkZ 1. /W I


over


Cristobal


Srnewrs-M4.KCQWS.&~w //c/zr, .gg.BWI&LcriJ/$24C/U'.j
IA ^ .*LM L C1,7P/C .K /u /


LEAGUE


"B"
The
sports
than thE


VOLLEYBALL


"B" League girls began their


season
e "A"


even


more


successful


Leaguers by winning two


well-played games against the Balboa


High School "B" League. TI
coordination and teamwork


decisive


factors


heir smooth


were


their victory


the
over


their opponents.


The scores were also


bang; more girls came out for this sport
than any other activity during the whole


I










<4<


ii -
ImE.


NANCY


GEORG/IA


L"


EL LIE


BATTY


. + *


BETTY


JEAN


BARBY


MA RGI


GPRITOBAL


BALBOA


-h8


-6


LO/S


HELEN


JACK/E


L____


: .'./ ^


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LS


BASKETBALL


"B" League basketball team of Cristoba


High School Finished the


playing and winning an excellent and fast game against Balboa, and the final


season
score


was


17-5. Roberta Williams starred for our


"B" League with a tota


of nine points to her


credit.


Our star guards, Jeannie Kuller and Alice Cain, kept the Balboa players on the


run throughout the whole game. Passing kept the ball at top speed, and the thrilling


shots


both long and short made the game one of the most interesting and exciting of the year.








II

J..*









Our players practiced hard and faithfully and their efforts were well rewarded when
they brought the basketball season to a successful close.
h1 r /I';k-iI n\/-kr- (T1'P r i/nn\\ ^^.nrI/-/" i/nAv t r \ r-, kr/rr ,, n\ # r^rt^ r f /\l^+II \AJitI^ +C n /\/inefI ^ r^n kri k 4-1 ft mr r-


"B"













SOFTBALL


TEAMS


Both the "A


and "B" League Softball teams were in


top storm


this year.
the "B"


The


"A"


ntra-murals


League had two.


consisted


If the girls were


three


teams,


less adept than


while
their


male schoolmates,


they made up for it with


a multitude of runs.


And,


when


time


rolled


around


the All-Star games


both


teams did themselves proud.


The "A"


Leaguers traveled to


Balboa and trounced the Junior


College girls,


2 I-6.


When


Balboa


High School girls invaded


our territory, the "A'


garnered another victory when


they
S


in eleven runs,


while their opponents could only account for four


runs.


The


unbeaten "B"


girls


likewise


downed


their


opponents


by the score of 8-4.


Eleanor


Williams and


Alice Cain


were the starring pitchers of


the two teams.


The "A


All-Stars were: Lois Stapf, captain, Eleanor


Williams,


Lee


Brown,


Betty
4,


Jamesson,


Jacqueline


Carlin,


Ardith


Boyle,


Betty


Kuhrt, Nancy Gilder, Marilyn Metzger, Helen


Culpepper,


Barbara


Lawson, and Barbara Brown.


These


girls


captain, Alice


comprised the
Cain, Roberta


Thelma Pucci, Andre


"B"


League


Williams, Pat


team:
Leach


Jean


Norma


Ku miller,


Nail,


Whitlock, Harriet Keenan, Gladvs Schulte,


Peggy


Mcllvaine,


Vilma


Bejarano, and Eleanor


Kuller.













Once again the staff of Publications have given you a


the book is not complete and is
but we do not apologize. C'


"Caribbean.


as full of faults as an old shoe.


est la guerre!


Once again,


" For that we are sorry,


You will notice the lack of evidence of


classroom activity


es, and the absence of pictures of the work of several departments.


All of that is not as planned, but as ordained by whatever gods there be who control


camera supplies.


Our school photographers are not professionals and when many of


their efforts at showing the school in action failed, they found to their dismay that there


were no refills for their cameras!


o-another page was dropped from the book.


Lois Stapf and Andree Whitlock are student photographers, and Foto Andre and


Foto Wolf furnished the professional pictures.


We are especially indebted to Mr. Rene


for his help.


To offset some of our disappointments-and yours, maybe- we


call attention to the


work of our Art Editor, Malcolm DelVall


who gave


us his unusual talent in designing


cover, the emblems, and the division pages.


lettering and improved the appearance


Hilton McPheters did expert work in


of many pages.


The planning of the


"Caribbean


was done largely by the co-editors, Leona San-


ders and Lois Stapf, and they were assisted in writing for the book by Dorit Berger, Pal
Gormely, Roy Knoop, Rita Shoal, and Lois Householder.


"Caribbean


would never have been a reality without the excellent work done


by the Advertising Staff. Rosita Czernik was business manager and directed the campaign


for funds.
they sold.


Dorit Berger and Betty Jamesson deserve much credit for the many ads which


Robert Rosania also sh


owed outstanding business ability in co elections.


Most of the cuts were made by Jahn and Oilier, of Chicago, with a few by the


& Herald Engraving Company


We are much indebted to our friends of the Panama Canal Press not only for putting
the book together, but for bearing with our inexperience and delays.
May the Peace bring us bigger and better year-books.


THE STAFF














SENIOR


BOYS'


CLASS


WILL


ARLES ARNOLD-Leaves


his boisterous ways to Lolly


Collins.


ATWOOD-Leaves


TEDDY


his ability to go


BROWN-Wills his wo


eye


steady to any needy


to Gus


Junior.


Rosania.


MARLIN CULPEPPER-Leaves his fighting ability


to Rob


ert To


edano.


BERNARD DELONG-Leaves his


ong hair-cuts to Alfred Maale.


MALCOM DELVALLE-Leaves his smooth dancing to Bob Snelling.


DONALD DIDRICKSON-Le


aves


his polite


ways


with the opposite


sex to Donald Nail


I I I


BILL FISHER-Leaves his ability


y to get by to Fred Hill.


EUGENE GREGG-Leaves his


to Steve


Gracie.


PAT GO


RMELY-Leaves his pro


of-reading of the


"Trade


Wind"


to whoever will take it!


HUGH HALE-Leaves his

ROY KNOOP-Leaves his


BEN KULLER-Leaves


witt


y (?) jokes to Billy


ability to study


asswe


to Starford Chu


brilliant repartee to be equally distributed among the


Junior Boys.


GARVYN MOUMBL


OW


Leaves his 6'2"


stature


to No


ibson.


ACK REILLY-Leav


s excess we


ight to


Chuck Thomas.


ANK


ANDER-Would


eave


English


to someone


but doesn't dis


ke anyone enough.


ALFRED SIMONSON-Leaves


is good nature to anybody


who needs it.


MAX


WEICH-Leaves his


"long wind"


to the palm trees.


ROBERT WOOD-Leaves his Banana Plantation to Gerald Stroop.














SENIOR


GIRLS'


CLASS


WILL


GLORIA ASKOFF-Wills those


bedroom-blue eyes


to the Maybelline Mascara Company.


ORIE AUSTIN-Leave


s her giggles


to Barbara Mi


Hard.


PEGGY BAGGOTT-Leaves her


"shiny apple


to Eleanor W


illams.


ETHEL


COULTER-Leaves her absence


record


to Lois Hou


seholder.


AN ELLIS-Leaves her satin


-sooo


th Pond'


s comply


exion


to M ss Pa


tterson.


SUSIE FAHNESTOCK-Leaves


vacant


periods


to Helene


Marsh.


MORAIMA FREIRE-Leaves her shor


hand periods to


just anybody at a


BITSY


GATES-Leaves th


e arme


orces


the capab


hands (?) of Pauline Schriftgiesser.


CHARLEEN

MELIDA H(


HELLUMS-Wi


DWARD-Leaves h


all future At

er perpetua


wood


Jrs. to


energy


H. S.

ss Liter.


KRIDLE


-Leaves


Balboa to lust any Junior


who's


crazy


enough


to want it


ANGELICA


LIM-Le


aves


her compete


ce in Business


Training to


Business Training Class of '46


AN MILLSPAUGH-Leaves her red hair to Marilyn Metzger.


JEAN


HAYER-Leaves her


silver skates


to Ardith Boyle.


RANDALL-Leaves her


"million-dollar smile


to the highest bidding toothpaste company.


CAROL RU'


FF-Leaves her


chewing gum to Helen


LEONA SANDERS-Leaves


er voice


to Anita Berl


AF-Leaves her Southern accen


IS STAPF-Leaves her tennis racket to Mr.


GENE STONE-Leaves her


t to Mac McPheters,


Hotz.


sophistication to Betty Kuhr


NORRINE TERRY-Leaves her


sweet disp


position to any Junior who feels in need of it.


MARY WHITE-Leaves her good looks


to be


even


ly distributed among the Junior girls.


A Cffrir lt'. nn\/snn \A/, r",-rIn mmnini r' t


rcpArc vnupn<^ I -- ke,


e*rt i.ik





































-e
a


a


mnnml


n










COMPLIMENTS OF


THE


HERFF


JONEs


COMPfNY


Manufacturers of


Class kings


Commencement Invitations
Medals and Trophies


E. A.


LEWIS, Representative


ncon, Canal Zone


3792










COMPLIMENTS OF


m


High Qualities and Exclusive Models
of the Latest Styles

Bolivar 7087


COLON


PANAMA


COMPLIMENTS OF


HODDH,


Central


Ave.


PRRNMA,


LTD


Arboix Building


I





















55 Front Street
Colon, Panama


Remember that SE'
stands for Distinct


Compliments of

THE


SWISS JEWELRY


STORE


CHARLES PERRET


Opposite the


Colon


Compliments


LJj~


GOULD


Insurance


Second Floor, Masonic Temple
Phone 3-1456


2098


Cristobal,


C.Z.


Congratulations
Class of '45


BA


AR


DANIAKAA ,A" TV


ESPANOL


DANIAKAA















Recreation in te modern manner,
convenient facilities, and reason e prices


THEATERS

RESTAURANTS


SODA


FOUNTAINS


BOWLING LANES


Panama


Canal


Clubhouses


VISIT THE NEW
CRISTOBAL
GOLD THEATER


MFORT SEATS


*AIR VENTILATING
SYSTEM
* BEAUTIFULLY
DECORATED











Compliments


WONG


CHANG,


nera


I Hard


ware


ialize


Windshi


or any


Panama


Phone


oors


Make


Colon


Phone


Looking for


THE


NATIVE


GIFT


ART
HOP


AND


Mrs. H. Shaw, Proprietor


45 Front


Street


Phone


Colon


CASA


CH


Duty


-Fr


- Stor


Come and


see us at


our new


store on Bolivar Street,


next door


to th


e National Bank


FFSTTL









No.


P. JHANGIMAL

Wholesale and Retail

Perfumes, Panama Hats, Sils
and Oriental
NNovelties


Compliments of




GARAGE


ATLANTICO


15th Street and Melendez Avenue


Street


Phone 613-J, Colon


Phone


Colon


HOTTL


WASHINGGTON


Unequalled for Location and Comfort


hotel in keeping


with the


dignity,


spirit, and comfort of


THE


PANAMA


CANAL


Golf


Swimming


aWter


Sports


T -a ir- !" r















COMPLIMENTS OF


We have the


same quality here


as in Panama


COLON


Opposite the
Cnmmissorv


. ,
-
.














Go

COLON


To

JEWELRY


COMPANY

For

Watches and Jewelry


11th and Front


Streets,


Colon


ESQUIRE

30 Front Street


1064


Colon


Office Supplies
Stationery
Kodak Films
Parker 51 Pens
Greeting Cards
Baby Clothes


Compliments
of




Sears ar

and(


Ro buck


Company


Represented on the Isthmus
by
A C"N"I A cr A nI


Margaritda


Florist


Shaw & Williams

Masonic Temple


id














Compliments of


The
J


French


Bazaar


UAN PALOMERAS


Front Street


National


Mattress


Factory


Melendez Avenue


Between


10th and 11th Streets


Colon


UflTED


FRUIT


GREAT


WHI


COMPANY

FE FLEET


ES THE AMERI


OFFICES


United Fruit


Building


Century Club
PANAMA CI1


CRISTOBAL


Phone 9191


Panama 523











Compliments of


THE ROBERT WILCOX

COMPANY


Carlton Drug Store

Clean, Modern, Up-to-Date
Drugs, Patent Medicines, and
Toilet Articles

Ice Cream, Sodas, etc.

10th Street and Federico Boyd Avenue
Phone 255 Colon


Paramount Store



Gentlemen s Wear
Children s Wear


JOHN


Agents for


Remington-Rand, Inc.
W. A. Shaeffer Pen


Magazines, Books, Office and
Photo Supplies, Games,
Novelties, Sporting Goods,


Greeting Cards


Front


Street


SURANY


Colon










GORIN'S


MATTRES


P. GORIN, Manager,


6071 Bolivar


FACTORY


"CHS" '40


Avenue


Gorin's for the


"BEST


Manufacturers


REST"


of the highest


grade of bedding


Compliments


The


Bazaar


"Haberdashers and Tailors to


Men of Good Taste


Panama


Agents for Panama


TAGAROPULOS


Colon, Rep. de Panama


American


Colon


i


ore
















Compliments of


Colon


Motors,


Distributors for


Dodge Passenger Cars and Trucks


DeSoto


Passenger Cars


CASULLO


Watchmaker and Jeweler
45a Front Street, Colon


"MIDO


MULTIFORT


UPER


AUTOMATIC


WATCH


Phone 492


Colon


An Ideal Girt for Graduation


Compliments


2-
I


Novedades


Ventura


Front Street


Colon


Special,
Give
Linen


attention


YOUR


Phone


VALET


EXCELS


Federico Boyd


DRY


OR


Phone


between 14


CLEANERS














ALMACEN


Compliments of


BOMBAY


BA


AAR


Colon


ELECTRIC
Jose Jaen J. y Cia., Ltda.
Electrical Appliances


Refrigerator
Hardware


Phone 33


Colon


MO


TT


A


"The


abel that signifies


Quality


* I I



















THE


BESTFIT


CO.


Manufacturers of

MEN'S and YOUNG MEN'S

CLOTHES


Opposite the Commissary


Colon


Compliments
of


THE


DARIEN


DRUG


STORE


mril (hKI


iREttoaOS


Julio A. SaldS

Distributor
Philips Radios


Decca Records


5.006 Front Street


Phone


P.O.


Box 1104


Colon


JARDIN
"EL
CLAVEL"


388
-~


We specialize in all kinds of
Floral Work


Phone 715


a9-


Cc lon


MI


RACHI


fl-a


Jeweler,


Watchmaker, and


Expert Diamond Setter


Satisfaction Guaranteed


Front Street


Phone 345


irin


s^















Compliments


Perfumes 't --
Panama Hats ,
Movelties g
Silver 3

Phone 359 Colon


. L CDURO, Jrlon, S. .
Colon


53


STHMIAN


CUR


Kresz and J


SHOP


essany


Congratulations,


FO


Class


0


'45


EL


10th Street


COLON











Congratulations,


Class of '4


FRENCH BAu
Huertematte &


Central


Aven


Best


ishes


CadSS of


7,
_AAR
Co.

Panama


to the
'45


NOCHO


Compliments
of



CASA (



Bolivar


Phone 623


CENTRAL



Avenue


Street


Colon

58


NOVEDADES


ATL


NTIC


Large Assortment of
Perfumes, Silk Stockings, W


igator Bags, Je


t -


Panama Hats




















MADUR


OF

TOS


Ladies Wear
Silk Stockings
Sports Wear
Perfumes


Phone 888


Good Luchk
Class of


Centra


Plumbing


Colon


The


American

Company


RAD


CENTER


Distributors of


RCA


Genera


ictor Products
I Electric Products


Stationery, Office


Supplies,


Books


Congratulations,


Class


Compliments
of


ALA


DRUG


STORE


II












CALIF(
TAILOR


2976-L


DRNIA


HOP


Centra


venue


Colon


RMY


Spec


Kinds


Uniforms


the Best


initial Pavm


Oua


accepted


ratulat


ions


VERN


mpliments


THE
REX


A

BOL


THEATRE


COLON


C
0
M
P
L


PAR


BA


AAR


AR














~M

E Congratulations,
N
T Class o5 '45
OF

Rmericana N avarreti & Martinez
CIA., LIDA.

Central Avenue, Panama Front Street Colon





STUDENT'] 0 ^^


of the M^t.^-

STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION N
OF CRISTOBAL HIGH S of
SCHOOL
International Store
Wishes
"S

















P. ;


11~
I
~ '
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IH


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