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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Dedication
 Faculty
 Front Matter
 Seniors
 Juniors
 Sophomores
 Freshmen
 Photography
 Activities
 Sports
 Advertising
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
DLOC PCANAL
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093678/00085
 Material Information
Title: Zonian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date: 1934
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: sobekcm - UF00093678_00085
System ID: UF00093678:00085

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Dedication
        Page 1
    Faculty
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Front Matter
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Seniors
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Juniors
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Sophomores
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Freshmen
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Photography
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Activities
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Sports
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Advertising
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Back Matter
        Back Matter 1
        Back Matter 2
        Back Matter 3
        Back Matter 4
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text







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ZONIAN


... ... ** ***..............................................




S DEDICATIOl



SE IEI)IIC.\TE THIS IN >: )K TO THE
GREAT MEN \\ II N. VISION
MADE POSSIBLE THE LINKING
OF THE TWO OC(E.AN FOR THE AD-
VANCEMENT OF .\N IN I MAY THF'I
TRIUMPH OVER OBSTACLES SERVE AS
AN INSPIR.\TION TO THE CLASSES OF
S[.\I.BO().A I1 .Ih SC0ll(1 TllRl' )L(,I-(di r
THE YEARS TO Co'lE


..* *
*.:. ***










ZONIAN


S


VIRGIL BARKER
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


BEN' Al. W'LLIAMS
SL'' FPiNT E ' ,jT i i t '- *


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ZONIAN


.4,~6~

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BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY
1933- 1934


HO A.\RD) SPA I.DI NG(
EM I.IE AMUNDSON
HELEN BAKER
FLOYD BUCKLEY
SIGURD ESSER
OLGA I-'R DT
BEATRICE (,.\HR INER
EDWARD HATCHETT
DOROTHY HAYWARD
CI..\LUDIUS IOl)IGFS
KATHERINE JESSUP
GUY JOY .
(;EOR(GE LEE
MARY NEWMAN
LICE PARSONS
ED\WARD PEASE
EI.INOR Rf 'VSO)N
RUBY SYRCI.E
GEORGE WARDLAW
R( \\'EN. WELLMAN
MYRTLE WHALEY
HAROLD ZIERTEN
CI..\LDI LS HODGES.


Principal
Commercial Subjects
... usic
Sciences
English
Languages
Art
Mathematics
Commercial Sli.,- t,
American Problems-History
English
Mechanical Drawing-Music
Sciences
Household Arts
English
Mathematics
Spanish
History
Mathematics-Languages
Commercial Subjects
Li bra ry-English
.Woodworking-Mechanical Drawing
A.merican Problems-History









ZONIAN


TO THE MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1934


The world rightly expects much of those upon whom the benefits of Mluiatinn, are
conferred. Through the generosity of your I L-rllnnlnLt and the devotion of ylur parentt
you have received such benefits in large measure. ,i\lv the education that y. u have re-
ceived in Balboa High School prove to be a serviceable instrument not only 1,I tlhe promo-
tion of your own happiness but for the service of others.
With sincere wishes for your continued success,
ia)OW'ARD G. SPALDING.
Principal, Balboa High Schtiol






ZONIAN


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ZON IAN


VIEWS


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ZONIAN


SENIORS


MOTTO
COLORS
MASCOT
VALEDICTORIAN
VALEDICTORIAN


ADELANTE, SIEMPRE ADELANTE!
ORANGE AND WHITE
MICKEY MOUSE
RUTH BROOKS
MARGARET BRADLEY


"0 wad some power the giftie gie us
To see oursels as others see us."









ZONIAN


C. B. HODGES
Adviser


ROBEiir LeK. D.v! II.'
Canal Zone
"Ted'led an/ never /aound ',ani ."
President
Parrakeet '32, '355 '34: Li ill Tlea-
ter '32, '33, '34: A Capella Choir-
1,. "The Three Gra, '" '35:
X, e.President '32, '33; "Mrs.
Bumpstead LeiSlh" '34; Secretarv
'31; Orchestra '33: Glee Club '32,
'33, '34; W\ater Polo '34. Press
Club '32: W'rie.,;' Cul:l '52: S.
I. S. Unit.


PITImrt NORM AN JI)IIS o)N
Canal Zone
"bLarIe is his, houni, and his ,,out
qntnc'et'e.
lTeasli'er
Class treasurer '33; Zoni.ni '34:
"The C' .1 ..- Chair" '33;
"The Three Grace" '"33; P;rrta-
keet '34; Fr .... Club "- '34:
La Fratermdad '32; II. R. S.
Unit '34.


FRANK EDWARD FITZPATRICK
New York
"But lo: I held them rpellbound."
Vice-President
,,;.,., .. Cl,., '32, '34; Zonian
..4 PI ,, I 1.1 '33. '34; Swimming
'33. '34; "Mrs. Bumpste:d Leigh"
'34.


TERE iSA ELIZA MICIHAELSEN
Canal Zone
"Her deep b'le e/e nailedd con-

Charm Club '32, '33, '34: Hispano
Amrt'ica '32,. '33. '34; S. I S. Unit
'33. '34; Glee Club '33; Parrakeet
'33; Tennis '31, '32; Volleyball
'34; Baseball '32; Bowling '31,
'32.











ZONIAN

JAIME ALFARO
Ecuador
Il, heart ir ar Iftrue ar rleel."


RUTH ELIZABETH BOHAN
Canal Zone
"She wax," made or happp tIhont<"
Supper Club '31, 32, "'. Decima
Legio '31, '33. Social Committee
'33;Charm Club'32, '33. '34; Biol-
ogy '32, '33, '34; Pep Squad '34.



MARGARET VIRGINIA AtiEy
Canal Zone
"1las: How difcull it i- not to
belarl one'x auid b4, one',f look(r."
Parrakeet '.1, '32, '33, '34; Rn;,,l
Clutb '34; Little Theater '.;2 ;,
'34: Literary Guild '32, '33: Art
Club '34.

THELMA MADORA BOTT
Philippine Islands
,F'. "A .rweel altractive kind oJ grace."
Charm Club '33, '34.


RODRIGO AROSEMIENA
I Pa rnm.,
real in .:! I. I.,, bul .rlature."
Hlispano America '31. '32. '33, '34;
(lee Club '33.

MARGARET MARY BRADLEY
Canal Zone
"Her action,r were modest and her
words dixcreel."
Supper Club '31, '32; La Fraterni-
dad '32; Little Theater '34; S. H.
U. '33, '34; Social Committee '34:
H. R. S. Unit '34.



JUcLIE ANN ASPARREN
Canal Zone
", rpular girl and the lbe rl o

I' .... ,i '31: Athletic Coun cil .1..
Parrakeet ',. Zonian '34.


BoYD IL,E BRANSON
South Dakota
"IN'hy lthould life all labor be?"
Little Theater '33, '34.









ZONIAN
ANGELA GnTIfEREZ BRn
Salvador
"The eye is the window o the soul."
Glee Club '30; "Riding Down the
'~1," '30; Hispano America '31,
'31, '34; Supper Club '30; Parra-
keet '34; S.H.U. '33, '34; Astm-
nomy Club '34.
SAMUElII. D)\VI BRI -S
Missouri
"Let us have wine andl women,
mirth and i,. I,.,."
Pro Con'33; Elcrys'33; "Mrs. Bump- '
stead Leigh"'34; Chemistry '33;
Parrakeet '33, '34. .

MARGAREr RUTH BROOKS
Canal Zone
l'irtue ix the beauty of the soul."
Science Club '32; Astronomy Club
'' Little Theater '32, '33, '34;
Parrakeet '32, '33. '34; Music
Club '34; Hispano Amhrica '34.
ANITA BEVER.LY CARLuTHI-:-S
Washington, D. C.
"She never wax heard to speak in
haste" her ioner were ever sweel."
Glee Club '33, '34; Little Theater
'34; Social Committee '33; His-
pano Amirica '33; Supper Club
'31, '32, '33; La Fraternidad 32;
Charm Club '32, '33, '34: Music
Club '34; Pep Squad '34.


ANNE BROWN
Georgia
"l.yA dail" pasx pleaantlt aOan/."



ESTER CASTEL
Colon
"Her voice was ever sroj, gentle and
low-an excellent thina in a woman."
Spanish Club '33, '",





JACK PEARSON BROWN
Canal Zone
'' .xound mind andt a sound bod."''
Athletic Council '32, '33, '34; Bas-
1,etball '32, '33,'34; Baseball '.'..
'34; Soccer '32, '33, '34; Engine-
r.ie Clulb.".4 B.,nd '53 tr5 lh .,,
1I -'; (_& e Chl, '31, '32, '33,
34: Track '31, '35 '34.

W ooDRO\W DE CASTRO
Panama
"Hi, xilcer longue and fruitful pen
gave cent to word" o fire.'"
Pro Con '33; Parrakeet '33. '34:
Zonian '34; Hispano Amhrica '34.










Z O(N T AN


WALTER G. CROucI
Canal Zone
Who, though defeated, would argue
.dill."
"Ridina Down the Skv" '31: Biology
Club '32. '33: Glee Club -.1;
Science Club '31.
MARc EIuTl,: L. DaRYiEN
Pennsylvania
"'l/es too deep to be blue, too ex-
prer.rive to be gray."
Basketball '32, '33, '34; Baseball
'32, '33, '34; Volleyball '32, '33,
'34; Nifty Fifty '32; Pro Con '33;
Athletic Council '34; *'Rlinll
Down the Sky" '31: Glee ChIl, .I1
ROmE T DONALD DANIE.LS
Canal Zone
"Pride ir the filing comrade oj
pro.rperditv.
"Ri;,h.] Down theSkv" '31; "The
flinI. Graces' '33; "Mrs. Bumps-
tead Leigh" '34; Little Theater '31,
'32. '33, '34; Parrakeet '32, '33,
Tennis '31; Hispano America '34;
La Fraternidad '32.
MARY Ru'rH DUNInA
Pennsylvania
"There ix, no wisdom like Jrankne.r.r"
Litte Theater '33, '34; EL r '3".
Glee Club '31, '33, '34 **'rlilig
Down the Skv" '31; La Fratern-
dad '31; Zonian '34; Pep Squad
'34; Supper Club '31, '32, '33;
"Mrs. Bumpstead Leigh" '34.
JOSEPIIINE RAYMOND DENNIS
"Lije i. not life at all without delight"
Canal Zone
Basketball '31, '32; Volley Ball '32,
'33; Tennis '32, '33; Supper Club;
Charm Club.Nifty Fifty; Spanish
Club; Glee Club; Pep Squad: Lit
tie Theater; Music Club; H. R.
S. U.
NORWOOD DEANE EPPLEY
Pennsylvania
"I ,.ee the riqht course and approve
the wrong I Jollow."
Science Club '31; Engineering Club
'32; Chemistry Club '33; "Three
Graces"'33; Social Committee
'33; Little Theater '34.

VIRGINIA DOROTHA DE YoUtNG
Canal Zone
"Her gentlene.r, her fojl manner:r,
all who rna admired."
Glee Club '31; Little Theater '34;
Charm Club '32, '33, '34; Supper
Club '31,'32, '33; "Ridli, Down
the S 'I.." '31.

Louis N. EVERSON
Canal Zone
"The world !Il.-., I to the eneirelic."
Glee Club 51. 32 Rilii. Down
the S!.," 31; S.H. S. U.'33, '34;
Zonian '34; Engineering Club '32.










ZONIAN


VIRGINIA M. FOSTER
Vermont
"Ge'niur mutn *,I Ihe price.
Press Club '32, .;. Little Theater
'32, '33, '34; Hispano America
'34: Para'. keet '32, '33; W'e Check
'32; Literary Guild '32.'33;'"Sl I-
in'" ".-' ",lMr.liumpstead .ei'"

MAnv El.iz>EIrII (GOl.!I:N
Canal Zone
"Shi/r iir !ia./ and .'I' ...
Charm Club '33, ",4 L. I- ,,..,.
dad '33; Hispano Am6rica '34:
Pep S .... '.-1 Volleyball '33;
Glee Cii., '33, '34; Swimming
'32, .3, Supper Club '32; Basket
ball '34.

WILAIAM ERv rTTrr FREvNCn
Canal Zone
"Ij he wa.r a finer fellow,. he an'uldln'/
he human.'"
Parrakeet '32. 33: Bioloy' '32: El-
crvs "'.; Glee Club '33, '34; Mu-
sic Club '34.

Brn.TH Gl R t(;(;
Texas
low ,rweel and araiji'f."
History Club '32. '33, '34; D)ebating
Club '32, '33.


MARnI Fiuil.is GALL.IVAN
Canal Zone
"The flower qf meekne,.rr .grou'. on
the ,dem / at, face."
Decima l.eyin '31; Supper Club '31,
'32.

Tf \rA)N SlUSANNI: HI.\ i DIAN
Canal Zone
"'B /lar I/t be jt pool i.r e.Ape'lriec'e."
Charm Club '32, ".',. 34; Supper
Club '31, '32. '34: Music Club
.-4: Baseball '31. '34; Volley ball
'31, '32, '33; ,,imnm i ,w '31, '32,
'33, '34: Glee LtI -,1 '32, '33;
Ri.lI;i Down the Sky" '31: Pep
Squad '34.

MII.I.REj A. GARLOW
Pennsylvania,
",-.rrai!hluular Ol Id.;! 1., "
La Fraternidad .52 F '~ S.
H. S. U. '33. '34: Hisiory Club
'34; Bulletin Board Committee
'34.
MARiORIE RTnT HALLETr
Canal Zone
"She will cure e he disea.re and kill
the patient."
"Riding Down the Sky" '31; Glee
Club '31. '32, '33, '34: Charm
Club '.', '33, '34: Spanish Club
'32; Little Theater '34: Mu'sic
Clulb '.4 q H. S. Unit '33. '34:
Supper Clhli '31. '.' '33.
13










ZONIAN
'. t- 7" 5:,7 .,'* '


ROBERT THOMAS HAZELDINR
New York
"Be briej if Ml/ he understood."
Orchestra '31: Science Club '31;
Engineering '32, '34.

OLIVE ROSE LUCILLE KOPIERSKI
Canal Zone
"Fie: What a spendthrift she ir oj
her ton que."
Charm Club '32, '33, '34; Supper
Club '32, '33; Hispano America
'33; Glee Club '33, '34; Pep Squad
'33. '34.

ROBERT MALWOOD HULL
Canal Zone
"And then he will talk. Good God:
How he will talk."
Little Theater '33, '34; Glee Club
'31, '32, '33, '34; Hispano Ambrica
'34; La Fraternidad '32.

THOMAS SANTEE KROMER
Canal Zone
"Good humor is the health oj the
.oiUl."
Class President '33; Science Club
'31: Engineering Club '32; Band
'31; Little Theater '34: "Mrs
P,u ,m p.fe ,el.L_.iil," '34 l:i.-,.. .. ,'
Clul. s.4 Fl:,- '33.

WA!LTER E. JUDSON
Massachusetts
"I' ,. to be happy Ihan awise."
Class President '31, -.- \I.,im rClub
'32; Baseball '31, '32, '33, '34;
Engineers' '"2 C I.emntrv Club32;
Social Committee '33; "The
Three Graces" '33; "Mrs. Bump-
stead-Leigh."
PAUL KUNKEL
Canal Zone
"To know how to hide one's abilihj
is great skill."
Soccer '32, '33; Baseball '33.





JUSTUS M. KLEMMER
Canal Zone
"I love jool's experinenr,; I am
always making lhem."



EDWARD CHARLES LAWSON
'District of Columbia
"A smile is a morsel of injerliou,
happiness."
Secretary '32; Album Club '32, "i.
'34; Engineers' Club '32; Bowling
'32.










ZO NIA N

ArLiEr.. M'RI ENS I t. BREN
Michigan
"She ir youna, wise, fair- in
there to nature rhe',r innmediale heir. '
Supper Club '31. '32; Bowling '32;
Little Theater '34.

MAR.Y MAcGILLIVARY
Canal Zone
"To be oJ ,rerlvice rather than to be

I ItIle Theater '33, '34; I -i ,
Club '34; La Fraternidad J5,
Parrakeet '33, '34.




jOIN BERNARD LE)FORS
Oregon
'I. 1 tiour gentleman and a gentle
student ."
Band '33, '34; Engineers' Club '34;
Hispano AmBrica '34.

Hf ,RmsoN Mac GRIo;(M
Georgia A
-ta" jolth a, the da.y ix tng."'
Engineers' Club '34.




IEN.\UD 0. LEON
Panama
nature e herell mnak-e,r the wise
1matn rich."
Hi ,T..n, America '33; Album



ESTHiER RUTH D. MADl)RO
Panama
"Constant laughter itndiatex a
health xouel."
Hispano AmErica '34.

JIoIN HERB'RT LLOYD, JR.
Canal Zone
"lrhal srpiritr were his, what wit
and what whim.'"
Glee Club '31., 32; S. H. S. U. '32;
H.,I,-z Down the Sky" '31; His-
pno Am&rica '33, '34; Social
committee '33; A Capella Choir
'34; Music Club '34; Pep Squad
'33, '34.
DOROTHY JOAN MAESSEN
Canal Zone
"1 mnaiden'xr crown of joy is her
,ilken, rippling hair."
Glee Club '31. '32, '33, '34; Hispano
Am&rica '33; Charm Club '33,
'34; PIV Squad '34: Music Club
'34; "R;.i;: Down the Sky" '31;
A C.,,Jl Choir '34.











ZONIAN
amb2ifi i r .4J-hbu.A-j -,


BERTHA MARINE
Panama
"II in,. worrL over Irifles?"
Elcrvs '32, H-,p.w, America
'31, '52, '3 '34.


LAMIA JEAN MORGAN
Canal Zone
"ler peerles.~ eature.f pro'e her fil
Jor none but a /,5,,,"
Glee Club '31, l: tH .,,,. Am6rica
'31. '32: "The Three Graces" '31;
Little Theater '31. '32, '33, '34;
Charm Club '32. '33, '34; Swim-
ming '31, '32, '33. '34.



Luz AM.I.IA M ENI)IZ
Panama
",1 demure anid studiou, girl."
Astronomy Club '34.



LAURA HELENA NEAl.
Maine
"GracefdJ and ueful in all rhe does."



DoROTHY MBSSER
Canal Zone
"Beller to have red hair than one."
La Fraternidad '32; Supper Club
'31. '32, '33; Glee Club '31, '32,
'33; "Riding Down the Skl." '31.

EDWARD HE'RY N.:x 11Ii
Canal Zone
"I 'here ir thy learning? Hath thy
toll o'er books consumed the midniqt
nil?"
Baseball '33, '34.

A'IAE:, ANTHONY MORALE:;
Canal Zone
"No one can speak well unler he
thoroughlhi understands his subject."
Parrakeet '33, '34; H. R. S. U. '33;
S. H. S. U. '33, '34; Tennis '31,
'32, '.5 Glee Club '31, '32, '33;
Science Club '31; Biology Club
'32; Pro Con '33; Cliem,'t, '32;
Little Theater '33; Album 'Club
'33; Hispano America '33; Engi-
neering Club '32.
MARGARET MARY NErVILLS
Canal Zone
"l'riend, hip above all ties dolh bind
the heart
lnd faith in jriendrhip is the noblest
part."
Decima Legio '31; Charm Club '32,
'33, '34; Little Theater '33, '34.









ZONIAN

DAVID R. OLL FI
Canal Zone
"It ixr not position but mind thal
I want I."
Soccer '34.

ANNIE E.LinAzAln III n lR
Virginia
"lier look.r do ant:ie heri replete
with m,,.: .i, "
Glee C.I., '.1 '32, '33, '34; Orches-
tra '32, '33; "Riding Down the
Skv" '31; Charm Club '32. '33,
'34; Parrakeet '32, '33, '34; Sup- .
per Club '31; Music Club '34: .
Dccima Legio '31; A Capella .-
Choir '34. .4 "


los1-'' R. () .
Canal Zone
"I (will n0o meel the ladie,."
Glee Club '31; Biology Club '32,
'33, '34: Parrakeet '32.


Roy V. PmIi.IILs
Panamala
"'fith a1ll !aood lrace to grace a
gentleman.."
Engineers' Club '32.




ost: GARCIA ulI: PARDII)S
Panama
/ i t.....'.i ir mtiqhlier than slrenkth
of the hand."
Parrakeet '33; Zonian '33: Hispano
Am&rica '31, '32; Engineers' Club
'32.

GEOlRGE WALKER
Canal Zone
"Cnltent to let the wVorld dva l on a.r
it will."
Soccer '31, '32, '33, '34: Athletic
Association '31; Track '34.

JUl.IETTA PATT.ERSON
Panama
"The liht that lier in a wvoan'.,
ever andl lie.r and lie and liew."
Hispano Am&rica '31, '32, '33, '34;
Astronomy Club '34; Basketball
'32, '33, '34; Tennis '33. '34: Sup-
per Club '31.

RICIIA.n Ru~ssEI.. Pori'rllI-
New Jersey
"He ha.r merit, good natre and
integrity."
Social Committee '34; Science Club
'31 E.nginc in.g Club '32, '34; La
Jr tIr.li,,l '"32.

17











ZONIAN


HITDA C. QUINTERO
Panama
"Laugh if you are wire."
Hispano America '30, '34; Astrono-
my Club '34.
GENEVIEVE CATHERINE Rose
Canal Zone
"' 1,, life ir like a stroll along the
beach."
Glee Club '31, '32, '33, '34; Charm
Club '32, '33, '34; Music Club
'34; Supper Club '31, '32; S. H. S.
Unit '34; Parrakeet '34; 'Rilini
Down the Sky" '31; A Capella
Choir '34.
MARGARET MARY REINING
Canal Zone
"Reproof on her lips, but a smile
in her eyes."
Little Theater '31, '32, '33, '34; El-
cry '33; La Fraternidad '32; His-
pano Ambrica '34; Supper Com-
mittee '34;"Mrs. Bumpdte.il-
Leigh" '34; S. H. S. LUnil '3. 34.
EDITH JESSII Row:I
Canal Zone
"Her waiVr are ,i. of pleasannes,,
and all her paths, oj peace.
Class President '31; Charm Club
'32, '3;' S. H. S. Unit '33
'34; Hispano Amirica '33;
Social Committee '33; Little
Theater '34; Club Service Unit
'33.
NARCISSA P. REEDER
Hawaiian Islands
"Speak to her of Jacob's ladder and
she would ask the number of .rep.r."
Zonian '34; Literary Guild '32, '33.
GLADYS SALTERIO
Salvador
"Be safe and silent, deedr not words
make the man."
Hispano America '31,'32, '33, '4-
Charm Club '33, '34; Volleyball
'32, '33, '34: Baseball '32, '3).
'34; Tennis '33; Bowlil p '32. '3".
'34; Basketball '34; (Gl.e CI,,.i
'32, '33.
GEORGIA REYNOLDS
Canal Zone
"llHellrig, wie, good natured and
good looking."
Parrakeet '3' '33; Science Club 'L'2.
Album 'ChuI '33, '34; Astronomy
Club 32.
EUGENE O. SAPHIR
New York
"He adorned whatever he wrote or
spoke upon with the most ii nr uiheal
eloquence."
We Check Club '32: "Mrs. Bump-
stcad-Leigh" '34; GleeClub '31,
'.5. '5. '534. Parrakeet '52. '"3,
'34 Fngineel-' Club '32, '3-4.
"RulIr. Do, n the Sky" '31; Zo-
mian '.3: The Three Graces"
'33; I.ttle Theater '34.










ZONIAN

GEORGIA SEABURG
Canal Zone
"There is more lo me than thou
undertandeth."



CAROL. f. SnE EP
District of Columbia
"Her aim wax never to offend md
.. creature wa.x her Jfriend."
I Title Theater '34; S. H. S. 1U.nit
'33..





ROBERT AYES SCIIEILIN(;
Virginia
"I tackle Ihingr a1 thley ,o,,me."
Engineers' Club '34.



DoRnoTiY CATHE'RINE Sl/rI "
California
"Simpliciih of all the ix 1e
hard c t p,
Charm CIhl '3.. '33, '34; S. I S.
Unit ',-,, '34.


TiiELMA SEELEY .'
Pennsylvania
"For I ,wax bori to ren~ and thou,
to adore.'
Charm Club '33, '34; Glee Club '34;
Little Theater '34; Pep Squad '34:
Supper Club '33; Hispano Ambri-
ca '33; La Fraternidad '33.

H.\RRY C. STEVENSON
Panama
"One who never ltrned hi back
but marche / ever formanrd."
Hispano Amnrica '31, '32; Track
'31, '33, '34; Soccer '33; Engineer-
ing Club '32.



W ILLIAn CHARL.ES SiiHE11 AN -
Canal Zone
"Mlian i,, not made to qi,'tion, bul
to adore."
Science Club '31; La Flraternlidad
'32.

RITA LOUISE SITRAUss
Canal Zone
"fier irrepre.iblMe ,ayelv ix the
cause of hei o0rl. "..
Glee Club "' '52. '34; Charm
Club '32, '33, '34; La Fraternidad
32 Pethe Squad '34; 1 "R. l
Down the Slk% '31.











ZONIAN
ff___


MARY JANE ALICE SUTIERLAND
Michigan
"Golden hair, like sunlhtl .rtreaminil"
Bowling '31; Volleyball '32; Basket-
ball '33; Supper Club '33.


BONA MARIE UNGAR
Canal Zone
"Of soledt mannaerr, ... if .. I/ mind,
lower of peace and .I '-,,.l ,,t man-
kind".
Hispano America '34; La Fraterni-
dad '32; nBilo. Club '32, '33. '34;
Charm Clua, 33.




GEORGE OLIVER TAR! LINGER
Canal Zone
"Thou wart a hero on many a field."
Baseball '34; Track '34.


JUAN RAMON VALLARINO ARIAS
Panama
"Nature create, meril and forline
brinas it into playl."
Hispano America '31, '32, '33; Glee
Club '33; S. H. S. Unit '33, '34.




HAMPTON FREDERICK TEDDER
Florida
"A little bit goes a long nway."
Science Club '31; La Fraternidad
'32; Engineering Club '32.


JOlIN EDWARD WAINIO
Canal Zone
"Hle, the mildest mannered man."
We Check Club '32; Parrakeet '34;
La Fraternidad '33.



HOWARD EAR. TURNER
Florida
"Knowledqe ir power."
H. R. S. Unit '34; La Fraternidad
'32; Engineering Club '34.


ROBERT HERMAN WEMPE
Canal Zone
"A man jof ',.r, manl virhteS."
"The Three Graces" '33: Social
Committee '33; Biology Club '31,
'32; Chemistry Club '33; Swim-
ming '33, '34; Album Club '34;
Track '33; Soccer '34.
20










ZONIAN


RUnII ANTOINETTE W EstMAN
Canal Zone
"She i nmolt jair and there unto
Her hlie doe" riq/hlyv harmonize."
?. -,,,.., Down the Sl, ." '31: "The
Three Graces" '33; Secretary '33:
Supper Club '33; Little Theater
'34.

EDwanRD B rENtON WOOD)
"In the water I'm, i.. "
Canal /b...o
Swimming '31, '32, '33, '34; Basket-
ball '33; Pro Con '33; Engineering
Club '34.



MIR Lv. AUS'IN WirrsiVETT r
Canal Zone
J la.rl we have perpetual motion,
ince.r.ant eneiyl.t/."
Sketch Club '33, '34: Little Theater
'34; l.a FraternidadI '33; Ilispalno
Am6rica '34.

JE .tiL: M. YOuNG
New Jersey
".Ind the bet of me ix dih*eT"e" n"
G(lee Club '31, '32, '33, '34; Hispano
Am-rica '34; Biology Club '34;
Album Club 33, '34; "Riding
Dow,, the Sky" '31; Glee Clubl, .
'31, '54 .



ARGARKTI:Y NVIHGGIN
Massachusetts
"Here we htwe MIi.i Prudence
Primm."
S. II. S. Unit '34; NWe Checl '34.




"Gril had/ he, a xlicker to the 'eq:V

Bisaeb,,ll '3]. '32, '33, '34.





wAI lY JliskCC(.e w'lth YIAM.S
Vi".1 r', inia ae';
aOkn haind pained."
"S1. ;1. I;.." '32; "The Three Graces" 1 9 3
'.. lI. S. Unit '32, '33: Debat-
ing Club '32; Little Theater '33,
'34; Dramatic Club '32.










ZONIAN
RAYMOND MONROE BENNETT OSVALDO PINEDO S.
Massachusetts Colombia
"He lives at peace with all mankind." "Reas.on is not measured by size
Orchestra '34; Band '34; Hispano or bi heiqht, but by principle."
America '34.

VICTOR OSE 1)1': LA GUARDIA SieRMAN GRGORY SQUIRES
Panama S TIERMAN GREGORY SrUIRES
Panama Friend, a ,,, .,.. hatl more "He is a nman. lake him all in all '
pan Ae ica '34. Track '33; Album Club '34.
MARION R. WATSON
SUE FEASTER Pennsylvania
Missouri "It is our aclual work which de-
"Ifhat i.r woman ifj rhe il not a lermines mor ralue."
T, JAMES PRENDERGAST Zonian '34.
.I. 11 33. Canal Zone
"'For Jools rush in where angel rjear
to tread."
"Mrs. Bumpstead Leigh" '34;
Orchestra '31, '32; Engineers' '32;
S. H. S. Unit '33; Chemistry Club.


SENIOR CLASS HISTORY
I gazed, fascinated, into the large crystal ball before me. Its clear depths revealed
secrets galore.
1931-when we were lowly freshmen! How short a time it seems! Within the ball
was a scene that made me chuckle. Our freshman meetings-the girls and boys meeting
in separate rooms, with their respective advisers, Miss \\'h:aly and Mr. G. R. Lee. The
class officers! Walter Judson, president of the boys; James Morales, vice-president; Robert
Dwelle, secretary; and George Walker, treasurer. To lead the girls, Edith Ro,,e %\as
elected president; Mildred \\'alters, vice-president; Teresa Michelsen, secr-tary. and
Julie Asparren, treasurer.
The scene shifted. I looked closer. Ah, yes! It was the freshman party at the Y. \V.
C. A. It was not until this event that the upper-classmen were aware of the fact that %e,
too, were students in Balboa High School. We were proud to be the first freshman class
to have nerve, and money enough to give a party. The girls-not initiated into society--
wore their best Sunday dresses. In order not to be out-done, each boy wore his best pair
of LONG trousers! There was no question about it- the party was a success. Bunco %%as
played until ten o'clock, and refreshments then aere served. Horrified by tht late hour of
eleven- -the little freshmen hurried home.
From then on we were treated with respect. To think that such little bits of humanity.
as we were regarded, had dared to have a party and stay up until almost midnight. com-
manded the attention of even the seniors.
After a quiet vacation, the class of '34 met in Mr. Carson's room to choose officers
Again Walter Judson was elected president. Robert D).elle was promoted to the chair of
vice-president. Fd Lawson was chosen secretary and Margaret Woodland, treasurer.
There were one hundred fifteen sophomores no. diordtirg the halls, and %% hat sopho-
mores! We were dignified enough to be envied by the freshmen, and lowly enough to he
scorned by the seniors.
This year marked the awakening of the "Sleeping Beauties." Committees ter. elected
for the social affairs and the class was launched on its second year.
Nobody took us seriously and anything that we did provided comedy for the rest
of the school. The most important events of the year were the collecting of class dues, or
the attempt to collect them, and the sophomore dance.
Class meetings galore were held, and nothing was accomplished, but it was a fin:- time
to sleep. What consolation! It is recalled that at one meeting, President Jud-,on timidly








Z ON I A N


introduced the selection of class colors. This brought about a stir of excitement and the
voting began. An argument arose as to whether green and white, or blue and white, should
be the appropriate colors. Unable to come to an agreement, a "dark horse" was entered.
Two girls in the front row were enchanted by the color of President Judson's tie; conse-
quently, the colors were at last chosen. Orange and White!
Amidst sleeping and arguing, the rest of the year slipped 1by. and we found ourselves
once more promoted. 'Twas great to be a junior!
Once again we trooped back to school; and we were received with the exclamation,
"Mr. Gronde is our class adviser!"
It was during this year that w.e blossomed forth. We started it off with "the shot
heard 'round the school."
Again the question of elections arose, and this time Tom Kromer was proclaimed
president. Bob D.velle retained his position of vic:-pl:.-ideint: Billy Westman was made
secretary; and Peter Johnson, treasurer.
From the bte[inning, things kept right on Ii.ipp'nin, A social committee was elected
and under its supervision the "Derby" and the never-to-be-forgotten "German" were
made successes.
"Tex" Gronde brought many ideas from his state, which were carried out by the class
of '34, to his immense satisfaction. One of the plans put forth was that of having class
teams arrayed in uniforms of class colors. The season started off with orange shorts and
white shirts. We were the only class to have teams fully uniformed.
The girls had a great deal to do with the successful standing of our class. Not only
did they excel in all sports, but they succeeded in wresting the scholarship cup from the
class of '33.
Many important events were successfully established: competition bet.veen upper
classes in the ticket sales for plays, Mr. Gronde's homeroom plan, his police force based
on the plans of the Wecheck Club.
The crowning feature of a very successful year was the Junior-Senior Banquet. The
menu, consisting of leather meat, tough potatoes, chocolate desert, and poinciana bud
salad, agreed with each and every one. It was at this honorable feast that the future base-
ball pitchers did their practising an open mouth was a sufficient target for an almond.
rose bud, and numerous other articles. Another chapter in our book of schooldays com-
pleted.
At last we were seniors! With a sigh, the old timers, who had spent years and years
in getting to the top, put down their burdens and took a rest. During one of these periods,
Bob Dwelle was chosen to lead the class through its trials and tribulations. Frank Fitz-
patrick was unanimously elected vice-president; Teresa Michealsen, secretary; and Peter
Johnson, treasurer.
Elections for the editor of our annual and paper were also held during the first weeks
of relaxation. Louis Everson, that tired looking student one saw begging his fellow class-
mates for pictures, was chosen editor of the Zonian: Margaret Alley,
that sturdy little piece of girlish sweetness, was proclaimed editor of the Parrakeet. It isn't
the paper she's worried about, it's the fear that somebody will steal her little sign, "Editor-
in-Chief."
The worries of the class in its infancy, 1933, were too much for Mr. Gronde, so he
returned to his native state in order to recuperate. The responsibility of the burden fell
upon the broad shoulders of Mr. C. B. Hodges.
Scenes were shifting so rapidly that the crystal ball grew almost hazy. The Junior-
Senior Dance at the Yacht Club--the Senior Luncheon--the Senior Play, "Mrs. Bump-
stead Leigh." The latter provoked a little mirth. \Vhat would have happened hadn't there
been a prompter! More dances and social events! Seniors sporting pictures around early
in February! New additions to our faculty-picnics-plans for graduation-another
fight over caps and gowns-seniors receive graduation announcements-long faces fellow.
It is realized that no longer are we to adorn the halls of B. H. S. The Junior-Senior Banquet
marks the beginning of the end, with Baccalaureate close on its heels; and finally, June
15-Commencement! The crystal ball is misty. Alas! How sad it seems. Dear old Balboa
Hi. Good-bye! Good-bye!









ZONIAN


AFTERTHOUGHT
If seniors in their learned ways
Reflect upon the bygone days,
They will find if they explore
Their sayings have been said before.
Their prankish deeds so up-to-date,
Their grandfathers planned upon a slate.
And Shakespeare made a big ado
About the things they think are new.
Their numerous wisdom recipes
Were told before by Socrates.
Their style and dress and other such
Have been outranked by old King Tut.
Rules that guide the high and low
Were put in vogue by Cicero.
It's true there's nothing anymore
That hasn't been said or done before.
.Ilargaret 3/lley


CLASS WILL
CLASS WILL


We, the senior class of 1934, being as sane of mind as we can hope to be on the
completion of a four year sentence, do grant, bequeath, and convey our property as follow s:
Article 1. To our over-worked, but efficient faculty, we leave our sincerest thanks
for their noble efforts in raising us from the status of lowly freshmen to our present high
state of wisdom.
Article 2. To the janitors, we bequeath the good news that never again are we to
throw papers on the assembly flocr.
Article 3. Having become liable as a body, we do now dispose of our personal be-
longings:


MARGARET ALLEY


JULIE ASPARREN
RODRIGO AROSEMENA
RAYMOND BENNET
&
JESSIE YOUNG
BETTY BOHAN

THELMA BOTT

MARGARET BRADLEY

BOYD BRANSON

ANGEI.A BRAY

RUTH BROOKS

ANNE BROWN

JACK BROWN


bequeaths her ability to go to Panama City "ON PAR-
RAKEET BUSINESS" during school hours to the
next editor of the famed publication.
leaves to Joyce Rance, her Mae West figure.
bequeaths his small stature to Frank McGahhey.

bequeath their CORNER on the steps to Claudi;
Hcwell and Jimmy Johnson.
leaves to Wanda Doyle her slim figure and L()\'E
for tuna fish.
bequeathes her capability of doing ALL of her home-
work EVERY night, to Beverly Boggs.
doth 2rudginriyv bequeath Kent Lambert unto Ruth
Richmond.
leaves to William Gormely, HIS SLUPERB disposition
and wit.
leaves her ability to write a Spanish column INCO)G-
NITO to Reba Colberg.
bequeathes her love for dear old Ballboa Hi, and all that
goes with it to Harlan Crouch.
bequeathes her ability to CHEW gum in the library
to Eleanor Hcbson.
leaves to the FUTURE president of the Athletic
Council his SEAT.
24










SAM BURKS
BEVERLY C.\RRL'IERS
ESTER CASTEL
WALTER CROUCH

ROBERT DANIELS
WOODROW DE CASTRO

JOSE DE PAREKIES

JOSEPHINE DENNIS

VIRGINIA DE YOUNG

MARNY DRYIDEN


MARY RUTH DUNHAM
BOB DWELLE

DEANE EPPLEY

LOUIS EVERS;'N

VI RG INIA FIS 1 E.
BILLY FRENCH!
MARIE GALLIVAN

MILDRED GARLOW

BETTY GOLDEN
BERTHA GREGG

THA I\RO)N HALDEMAN,
OLIVE KO )PE1RSK I
&
BILLEE \WST.M \N
MARJORIE HIALLETT
&
ANNIE PEARRE
BOB HAZELDINE

BOB HULL
PETE JOHNSu N

"DINEY" JUDSON

JUSTUS K ILE. ,\MFR

TOM KROMER

PAUL KUNKEL


ZO N IA N
wills his Beer Garden pass to Maurice Brown.
bequeathes to Betty Nolan her joyous joy rides in junks.
leaves her low, soft voice to Lucille Ta fiiricr.
bequeathes his ability to throw erasers and get away
with it to Harry Raphael.
leaves his SOCIAL ASPIRATIONS to Thomas Pimento.
wills his SILVER TONGUED orations to Gordon
Graham.
bequeathes his ability to wander through the halls with
that blissful unconscious look to Jean Steele.
wills Sammy and the Buick to Jean 1 1.111 on the condition
that she take a-. J care of both.
leaves her ability to be a "ONE BOY GIRL" to anyone
who can do it.
bequeathes to Elaine Bohan, her H)EART-RENDING
sneeze during tests. She adds that it takes a lot of
practice to get the right tcne.
leaves to Jean Scott her CYNICAL aspects.
bequeathes his ability to portray butlers in the class
plays to Willrc'd Toepser.
by special request, bequeathes his Good Iooks to the
highest bidder.
leaves to Tom Ma.kibblin, his exact replica of Robert
Woolsey.
leaves her methods of REDUCING to Frances Welch.
bequeathes his BABY FACE to William Reinig.
humbly bequeathes her r.(iriri disposition to Isabel de
Arenzana.
leaves the Bulletin Boards to anyone who wants a hard
job.
bequeathes her FRIENDLY NATURE to Regina Quinn.
leaves her ability to compose class songs to Bobby
Peterson.

leave their membership in the "JABBER CLUB" to
Peggy Perry, Muriel Waters, and Margaret McElhone.
leave their aptness for getting "KICKED OUT" of as-
rimnlliics and the library to Burneast Eastburn and
Frances Maguire.
bequeaths his pile of mystery stories and "HIS
BLOND" unto John Maguire.
leaves his GENTLE MANNEIRS to Tom Blanton.
bequeathes his ability to "SCRAPE KUSH" from
Scotchmen to the future treasurer of the senior class.
bequeathes his ability to tell double meaning jokes to
Jack Kromer.
leaves his many rebukes for "being silly," when in dead
earnest, to Billy Jones.
wills to George Haldeman his MARATHON running
record on the dance floor.
leaves to anyone who may need it, his pamphlet en-
titled, "Il hl to go through High School in Five Years,
in Ten Lessons."









ZONIAN


AL.BRTA LE BRL'N

JOHN LEDFORS

RENAUD LEON

JOHNNY LLOYD

MARY MAC GILLIVARY

HARRISON M.% G(RE'(;OR

ESTHER MADURO

DOROTHY MAESSEN
BERTHA. MARINE

AMALIA MENDEZ

DOROTHY MESSER
MARY JANE SUTHERLAND
GEORGE TARFLINGER

HOWARD TURNER

BONA UNGAR

JUAN VALLARINO

JOHN WAINIO
GEORGE WALKER

MARIAN WATSON

ROBERT WEM,PE

MIMI WHITSETT
EDDIE WOOD

MARGARET WIGGIN

REREKCCA WILLIAMS
MR. C. B. HODGES

TERESA MICHA EI.SEN

JAMES MORALES

LAURA MORGAN

NED NEVILLE


bequeathes her FULL WARDROBE to Anna Mae
Quinn, and hopes that she will add to it.
wills the gift of maintaining silence on all occasions to
Marjorie Bullock.
leaves his collection of SILK SHIRTS to Sherman De
Vore.
bequeathes to Graham Brotherson, his ability to make
a girl think she's "THE ONE."
leaves her ability to get on the Honor Roll every term,
to Bobby Calvit.
bequeathes his slow, but sure SMILE to Culbert Shed-
lock.
leaves her ability to be everywhere, but unheard, to
Ralph Morales.
leaves her golden tresses to Barbara Evans.
leaves her ability to pass speed tests in shorthand to
Mary Netta Orr.
bequeathes her ability to be Mr. Carson's PET to Anna
Ramirez.
leaves her line of BABY TALK to Virginia Preston.
bequeathes her dalliance to Sarah Robertson.
leaves his power over the senior 1 ()iMEFROOM to
Elwood Tonneson.
bequeaths his imaginative qualities to his brother,
Eugene.
leaves her ability to turn from a worm into a butte FlF
in three years, to someone who can do the same thing.
bequeathes his ability to SETTLE DISPUTEIS in
Modern Literature to LOUIS NOLI.
leaves his "A's" to Walter Kunkel.
the somnambulist, leaves that divine state of being to
Gene Clinchard.
leaves her talent in drawing to Roderic MacDonald
and suggests that he use it in decorating the desks at
school as she did.
bequeathes to Raymond Welch, his name "Tarzan," and
hopes that he can improve his yell.
leaves her MAE WEST walk to Katheryn Laurie.
leaves to Bill Flemming, his white B. V. D. ,i;mlming
shorts with the red strings.
gives to Blanche Cheney her membership in the Study
Hall Unit.
leaves her trusty steed to Juan Franco.
bequeathes to Mr. Pease his COLLEGIATE air and
hopes that he will take care of it.
leaves her little book, "How to be the Most Popular
Girl in Your Class" to the future president of the
\\ECHECK Club.
bequeathes his ability to go "ON AND ON" in .\me-
rican Problems class to one just as bashful as he
bequeathes her "Wings" aviation pin and also her
receive for "Shepherds' Pie" to those girls who are
TIRED OF LIFE.
leaves his place in the DETENTIO()N HALL to Hoby
Gibson.








ZONIAN


DAVID OLLER

JOE ORR

JULIETTA PATTERSON
ROY PHILLIPS

RICHARD POTTER

JAMES PRENDERGAST

NARDIE REEDER

ROBERT REIBER

MARGARET REINIG

GEORGIA REYNOLDS
GENEV'IE\'E ROSE

EDITH ROWE
&
PEGGY NEVILLE
GLADYS SALTERIO
EUGENE SAPHIR

BOB SHELLING
THIELM\.\ SEELEY

BILLY SHEEHAN

CAROL SHEEP
DOROTHY SMITH

"SQUEEKIE" SQUIRES

DICK STOUDNER

HARRY STEVENSON

RITA STRAUSS

FRANK FITZPATRICK


bequeathes his ability to get on all the CLASS TEAMS
to Winter Collins.
leaves his ability to come in to every class fifteen min-
utes late and still get "B's," (WE WONI)IER HOW?)
to John Bruland.
bequeathes to Anita Morales, her DEMURENESS.
leaves his DIGNIFIED EXPRESSION to Dennis
Gilbert.
...ills to Bob Payne, his ability to save his shoe leather
by DANCING ON his partner's feet.
leaves his ability to rush GIRLS off their feet in his
caveman fashion to George Dingee.
with grave misgivings, leaves to Jean Burdge the "U.
S. S. Richmond."
bequeathes all his BUGS, including his fine collection
of fleas, to Wilma Wickens.
leaves to Gladys Shelton her ability to make herself
comfortable and others miserable, by TAKING OFF
HER SHOES in shorthand class.
wills her DIMPLES to Ruth Horter.
leaves to Donald Brayton "The Iron Woman" and hopes
that he will always take good care of her.

will their LONG FRIENDSHIP to the next such pair
of chums to enter the halls of B. H. S.
leaves her enviable athletic record to Phyllis Buechele.
leaves the aptitude of earning thirty-two credits in three
years and then staying in school "just for fun," to
Howard Clarke.
wills his TIMIDITY to Albert Burkett.
bequeathes to her sister, Mildred, her aptness for HOLD-
ING HER MAN.
bequeathes to Margaret Haw, his ability to have others
DO HIS HOMEWORK.
leaves her height to Eugene Hamlin.
bequeathes to Pat Key her ability to make a good im-
pression on a new teacher by keeping quiet.
leaves his ability to get in and out of mischief to Ernest
Erickson.
doth bequeath to Sid Randolph, his true LOVE for a
certain member of the fairer sex.
leaves his ability to get on the Soccer team without
practice to Arthur Michaelsen.
bequeathes her dexterity to fall in and out of LOVE
every week, to Juanita Jensen.
leaves his SPORT SHORTS to Mr. Buckley.


FITZPATRICK
ALLEY
REINIG
EVERSON
WIGGINS
EPPLEY
LE BRUN
LLOYD









Z ON I A N


I SO.METI.XIES TELL LIES

The door opened and my wife entered all excited, "Louis Everson," she said breath-
lessly, "has phoned from the bank that our account is overdrawn and that he has stopped
payment on all our checks. I told him that Miriam Whitsett was on her way to the bank to
cash a check that I had just given her for painting my portrait and that the check just
must be cashed. Then he was so hateful and gruff that-" And she started to cry.
I had been writing steadily all morning, trying to get my book ready for publication
and this was the third interruption. I replied sharply, "Well, my dear, Everson is treasurer
of the bank because he tends to business and you should not expect the bank to be exactly
a social club. It is really up to you to keep your account balanced and when you
do not, you can expect-" But I got no further.
She retorted quickly, "Yes, and it is up to you then to furnish enough money so there
will always be that balance after the bills are paid." Then she went out closing the door
in a manner very jarring to my nerves.
I was sorry that I had not asked how much our account was overdrawn, but what was
the use? I took out my wallet and counted exactly $20.98; this would just have to do us
until my book was published. I turned again to my typewriter and had just written a few
lines when my wife reappeared. She tossed the morning's paper into my lap saying, "Here
is something I have been looking forward to for months."
I picked up the paper and read on the front page in big headlines, Rebecca Williams
and Sam Burks star in hit of Broadway, "FOIBLES AND FANCIES OF 1942." "Gosh."
I groaned, "I wanted to see that show myself, but honest honey, I don't see-" But I
never finished as my wife had again left the room shutting the door, as before, in a most
determined fashion.
I was down in the dumps. Here it was 1942; I was four years out of college, and what
had I accomplished; every month the money went out faster than I could bring it in. I
was hot and tired. The telephone was ringing and drowsily I got up to answer it. Ed
Lawson, chief pilot for the United Fly Wings Corporation of America, was on the line shout-
ing for help. In an hour he was to hop off on a goodwill tour of the South American coun-
tries and Mary MacGillivary was to have gone along to write up the trip. However, at
the very last minute, she had received a promising offer from the Westinghouse people as
designer and stylist in connection with their electrical reducing appliances and she had, of
course, accepted. Now, Ed was asking if I would consider the position with a salary and
all expenses paid. I told him how hard I was working trying to finish my book; he argued
that a change was just what I needed, as I was getting stale; and he mentioned that the
plane was going to stop at Panama. After that I needed no further inducement. Ever since
I had graduated from high school I had planned to go back sometime and visit the Canal
Zone and now was my chance. I told Ed I would be at the field inside of an hour.
From experience I knew better than to discuss the trip with my wife so I sat down and
wrote her a note, pinning my last $20.00 to it. I then called up the brokerage firm of Kromer
and Turner, and finally succeeded in getting Turner on the wire. I told him of the trip I
was taking and instructed him to sell my U. S. Steel common, at the market price, and to
turn the proceeds over to my wife. He remonstrated, saying U. S. Steel would double itself
in two months, but I was firm; he had been telling me that since November, 1929.
When I arrived the air field was crowded; one would think that Colonel Lindbergh
himself was taking off. As I paid the taxi driver out of my remaining 98 cents, I saw Vir-
ginia Foster, feature writer for the New York Times, coming towards me. I kne% the
reputation she had earned, in the field of journalism, for always getting what she went
after; so, I prepared to tell her my life's secrets. Then Lawson came running up saying that
David Oller, photographer for the Pathe News, wanted all who were going on the trip to
line up so he could take their picture. Finally Oller got us arranged to his satisfaction % ith
Ed Lawson, chief pilot first; James Prendergast, co-pilot; George Walker, chief mechanic;
Eugene Saphir, wireless operator; Jackie Brown, passenger and myself last. lack was
now coach of the Balboa University football team. He was wearing a gray felt hat and I








ZO N I AN
wondered if it was the same one he wore when he was a senior catching for the Balboa
High baseball team. When the picture was taken, I was careful not to look too happy for I
knew my wife would see it in the paper the next morning. It would never do for me to
look cheerful.
There was lots of excitement; everyone was talking at once. Marion Watson was trying
to get Ed. Lawson to endorse an ad for Yardley's Enrlish Lavender Complexion Soap.
Narcissa Reeder, senator for Ne% York State, who was larcl.y responsible for the good-
will trip, was tiilinL me about a political school which Georgia Reynolds and Dorothy
\lac'ssen had established in New York for the purpose of making good Republicans. She
was certain that this school would be instrumental in selecting our next president.
Joseph Orr was there proudly exhibiting a medal which he had just received for being
the World's Champion Pole Sitter. Jimmie Allit,. on official business in New York, was
atl i~ing everyone not to get married, s-:yinI that two could not live ascheapiy as one;
especially, if there was a French bazar handy. Sherman Squires, promoter of grey hound
racing in Firidi. was di-.pl, min.l on a leash a few of his blue ribbon hounds. Gecirila Sea-
burg, demonstrator for the Underwood Typewriter Company, was explaining how con-
veniently and satisfactorily a portable machine would work under all conditions. Betty
Golden, Commissioner of the Girl Scouts of Amer ica. handed me a bouquet of flowers and
.Margar't Alley'- latest book, entitled, "Husbands and Their Fallacies." Juan Vallarino,
Panamanian .1 ni.'ie-r to the United States, was shaking hands with everyone and sending
messages to his friends in Panama. Dick Stoudner, short stop for the Pittsburgh Pirates,
with his wife, Thelma Seeley, gave us a box of nicely .-ufitgraphed, baseballs to be dis-
tributed to the baseball fans on the Canal Zone; and even Tom Kromer had left Wall Street
long enough to see us off.
Just as the plane was ready to take off, Richard Potter came running up with Dr.
Renaud Leon. Potter was the general manager of the New York office of the Son's Life
Insurance Company and after he had talked to me for five minutes, 1 wondered why they
did not make him president. He so thoroughly convinced me that I owed it to
my wife to take out an insurance policy that I asked him why he did not
bring with him John Wainio, of the Wainiin Casket Company of America. I had
always thought that I would like to be buried in one of Wainio's Grecian Model Cask-
ets. I also felt that a few words of blessing from the Reverend Robert Daniels, world
renowned Evangelist, would not be amiss at such a time. Potter finally won his point and
in a jifty Dr. Leon had examined me and pronounced me sound phy.sic.-llv\ and I had in-
structed Kromer to pay my first yearly premium from the sale of U. S. Steel. Kromer
looked sour about this, but that was to be e.\xpctrdl: Wall Street "Bulls and Bears" have
no time for anylhin'- pcrl..iingn to security and protection.
Our first stop was Brownsville, Texas, and an immense crowd led by Congressman, the
Honorable Frank Fitzpatrick, was on hand to greet us. Fitz had earned a reputation for
being a silver tnn.'ui.d orator; and in his welcoming address he proceeded to give us an ex-
cellent demonstration of his abilities. However, I was in no mood to appreciate I nm' speeches
for, due to Lawson's unasked for exhibition of how a plane could ride up-side down and
play hide and seek with the clouds, my stomach had become misplaced. I watched my
chance and the first time Fitz turned his head the other way, I was off and down Main
Street. I walked along until I saw a sign reading "Ye Old Fashioned Tavern," which reminded
me of the tavern and pretty bar maids I had read about in Noye's "M1-rmdid Tavern". I
entered in good spirits, picked up the menu, and was surprised to read that Margaret
Reinig, Dorothy .-s-sr and Teresa Michaelsen were the proprietors. As soon as I made
myself known, it was like an old fashioned home-week; everyone was talking at once.
Mlargaret Reinig told me that the tavern was really only a tea room and they sold nothing
stronger than tea. I was disappointed and started to lecture her on fraud and for misleading
the public,but my stomach began to feel badly again so I begged for a cup of coffee instead.
Dorothy Messer suggested that I try "Elexitone," a new beverage just perfected and put
on the market by the noted chemist, Betty Bohan. The drink had the reputation for being
invigorating andl s-iniiil.tin_: and after I had drunk two glasses, I was a changed man. I
felt as if I were ,.alkin..' n the air. Teresa .Mich:ielsen, who had just returned from a business
trip to HolAfi ,lyood told me that Ed. Wood and Margaret Dryden were almost movie stars.









ZONIAN
She said they were doubling for the real stars in all their dangerous s imming and stunt
acts. Alberta Lebrun and Mary Jane Sutherland were also in Hollywood where they were
the successful proprietors of a Beauty Salon; they had so perfected the art of Lrowing
hair on bald spots that they had customers from Europe and the far East. This reminded
me of Tarflinger's Shppe. and I told them how George, and James lMorales. with
Mildred Garlow as nurse, had a very successful chiropodist establishment in New York
City and were considered experts in the amputation of corns and bunions.
We were interrupted by the arrival of a party of noisy motorists, and the tea room was
soon in a turmoil with everyone greeting each other. It was the Sunshine Exploration
Company celebrating before they started on their trip to the Treasure Islands.
Robert Schelling, scientist, was in charge of the party, which included Hampton Tedder,
mining engineer: Robert Wempe, taxidermist; Laura organa, nurse and dietition; Carol
Sheep, astrologist; Ruth Books, author; and little Marie Gallivan, secretary. Marie stated
she only hoped she would find some treasure; if she did not, she supposed she would go
back and marry Roy Phillips, as he had made millions in the oil fields. Carol Sheep ga ve us
a lecture on the plndrts- she believed that due to atmospheric conditions at the Treasure
Islands, she would be able to find out why Venus and Neptune were situated so far apart in
the heavens. While they were arguing, Laura Morgan asked to have the radio turned on
as she wanted to hear Billv Sheehan, the popular "Lullabyist," whose golden voice, between
the hours of one and two, assisted mothers in prevailing upon their children to take at ter-
noon naps. After listening to Bill, we heard a very interesting lecture by Rita Strauss on
"How to Grow Old Gracefully." The radio announcer cut in once to say that Ed. Neville
and Beverly Caruthers were still leading in the marathon dancing contest. Howe\ er, it
was thought that the contest would soon be over as Neville's feet were dragging; and for
the past hour, Beverly had been holding him up.
Just as I was taking another drink of "Elexitone," my airplane companions arrixedi. led
by Billy French. Then there were some more greetings. Finally Billy suggested that %e
visit Eppley's and Johnson's Dude Ranch, which was about three miles out of town. We
all piled into Billy's driveless and gasless Radiomobile and were on our way. Bill said
that the car was run entirely by radio waves and that he had so many orders for the model
that his factories were working day and night.
The Dude Ranch was a sight worth seeing. On the long veranda which extended the
length of the ranchhouse was a line of rocking chairs with air-cushion seats. Johnso n said
that these chairs were installed for guests, who after horseback riding, were more or less
incapacitated. This improvement, it seems, had been suggested by Sue Feaster and her
husband who had spent their honeymoon at the ranch. Due to their horsemanship, they
were never able to find a seat soft enough. Eppley could talk about nothing but horses
Eppley and Johnson both begged 1hat when we arrived in Panama we would get in touch
with Harry Stevenson and John Lloyd, owners of the Juan Franco race track.
Saphir thought we should get back to our ship as most of our journey was beih-re
us, so we all said "goodbye" and were on our way. I finally prevailed upon Lawson to let
Prendergast pilot the plane to Panama; for somehow or other I could not get my ife out
my mind and this, together with Lawson's driving, made me somewhat fidgety. At the
plane we met Edith Rowe with Count Plopalot whom she introduced as her fiance. Edith
said she was teaching school in Dallas and just had to come over and say "hello" and "bon
voyage." Then we were off for Panama.
The first person to shake hands with us at the landing field was the Honorable Robert
Hull, American Minister to Panama. Hull was known in the diplomatic world as the Latin-
American Pacifist, having earned this title by the unique manner in which he had settled
numerous disputes. With him were numerous Panamanian officials and Hilda Quintero.
official translator. Hilda and I shook hands and she said something two minutes long to
me in Spanish. All I could remember of my Spanish was "Buenodias sefiorita," which I said
about five times in succession. When Hilda laughed, I hastily said, "Si, si," and she
replied, "Mei.r, mejor." Virginia Booth, nee Virginia DeYoung, came up with Iimmy
and gave me a handful of cables. I looked them over hurriedly, feeling sure there %\ would be
at least one from my wife, but there wasn't; and I was disappointed and upset. Gee. what
30








ZONIAN
if Turner had not sold the stock and she had no money? I felt that I must hear from her
immediately. Through the courtesy of Jimmy, I sent her a message direct from the field
and asked for an immediate reply.
Chief Justus Klemmer, with his squad of secret service men, made a passage way for
us through the crowd to a sightseeing bus owned by Woodrow de Castro. Woodrow told us
that since the road across the Isthmus had been constructed his Blue Eagle Line had a
monopoly on the tourist trade. It was an elaborate bus with electrical, red plush rocking
chairs and pink, velvet shades which could be drawn shut by a couple desiring privacy.
Our first stop was "The Presidencia" where we were met by Victor de la Guardia, Panama's
.Mlinister of Foreign Affairs, who introduced us to the President and showed us around the
Palace.
\Ve then rode out to Old Panama to see Panama's most up-to-date hotel. It was owned
by Rodrigo Arosemena with Amalia Mendez as hostess. The name of the hotel was "TLe
Pirates Retreat". As we were leaving, we met Olive Koperski in the lobby; she was
enroute to join her husband, manager of the Chille Copper Comlpa. n in Peru. Olive told
us confidentially, that judging by the prices charged at the hotel, she believed that RI lri' :
and Amalia were direct descendants of pirate Morgan himself.
W\ next visited Panama's new Municipal City Hall, a magnificent concrete building
facing Panama Bay. At the entrance of the building was a life-like statue of General Vasco
de Balboa with the word "welcome" iengranedl in large letters on the base. The Honorable
Hull told us that the statue was the work of Jos6 Paredes, Panama's clever sculptor and
that the Municipal huildlile was designed by Robert Hazeldine, prosperous architect with
offices in Panama and South American countries. It had been erected by the contractors,
Ledfors and .\Iac(Gregor, whose motto was "We do good work as we never bite off more
than we can chew."
At the right, as you entered, was an information desk with Ester Castel in charge.
Ester was busy giving tourist information so she could talk to us only a few minutes.
She told us that a few doors down we would find the office of Bertha Marine, who was a
public stenographer: and then I had an idea. I wanted to write to my wife, but my
letters were always so formal and business-like that I was afraid I would only make matters
worse. I knew that Bertha could write just the kind of beseeching and endearing letter
my wife would enjoy, and down the hall I went to see her. Something must be the matter,
for surely by this time I should have had a cable from home.
On the second floor of the building were the offices of Esther .lidauri,. Director of
Education. She had such splendid ideas for improving the schools of Panama and ended
every other sentence with the national cry, "If I only had more money to work with."
On the same floor was the health office where Gladys Salterio was empinlyvc as public
nurse and, as I had recalled a little more of my Spanish by now, I wa s .,ii t,' say more
than "Buenos dias" to G-ldv .%. An gela Bray was in charge of the Employment Bureau and
was having all sorts of dIliult:ie.le
We took the elevator to the third floor where Josephine Dennis and Billee Westman
owned a Fashion Salon. Josephine Dennis was the designicr for the establishment while
Billie Westman acted as a model, displavini; the creations. I sat down on one of the easy
chairs and while watching Billie Westman display the correct vcenint dress for milady,
I forgot my troubles for a few minutes.
An art gallery, library and museum occupied the entire fourth floor; and we were told
that Raymond Bennett, who was travclline for the National Geographic Society.
was responsible for the museum. He had given many of the animals and thousands
of dollars to this project.
As our time was limited, we hurried on to the Canal Zone. On our way to call on the
Governor, we stopped at Gorgas Hospital as we heard that G. O. Lee was now chief
bacteriologist there. We found M1r. Lee with his snakes and toads on the second floor.
I asked about Mr. Hatchett, the mathematics instructor, who was never too busy to give
a student extra help; and Mr. Lee said we would find him at the junior college where he
was now an instructor. Mr. Lee fold us that Mr. Hatchett was still unable to catch a soft
ball, but that he had just discovered the reason why.










ZONIAN


I had not heard from my wife yet and I was irritable. When Hull suggested that we
drive around to the front of the Administration building which meant we would have to
climb that long flight of steps, I protested loudly; afterwards I was sorry I was so hasty.
At regular intervals terraces had been cut in the hill on each side of the long steps leadinL
to the building. On the terraces were chaise lounges and tables over which were placed
large umbrellas for shade. Under the umbrellas were electric fans and attached to the arm
of each chair was a miniature ice cooler. Beds of beautiful and brightly colored flowers
were scattered here and there in the most artistic fashion. The idea of having these com-
fortable and inviting resting places for the employees of the administration builline. who
had to climb the long flight of steps each day, originated with M!,jrie Hallet, Directress
of the Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds. The credit for designing and putting the idea
into effect went to Robert Dwelle, landscape gardener, who had recently returned from
France.
When we arrived at the Balboa High School, Mr. Hodges, the new principal, was out
to greet us. He told us of the many new additions to the school and boasted proudly of its
newest invention. It was a machine called the "995" and was invented by Professor Walter
Crouch. Mr. Hodges explained its mechanism: a teacher upon sending a student from the
room would write on an electric pad attached to one of these machines, the student's name
and a brief history of his misbehavior; this information would immediately show up on
the machine in Mr. Hodges' office, preparing him for the student when he arrived. Gee,
I thought, what an efficient device to be invented by Crouch, who, when a senior led the
class in collecting "995's." Mr. Hodges showed us an article in the morning's paper which
stated that such clever women lecturers as Peggy Nevile and Bona Unga were now cam-
paigning in the States in behalf of the Republicans. He was greatly depressed as he feared
our next President would be a Republican, and then the country .,IIwuid surely go to ruin.
I turned to the society page thinking I might find something of interest to my wife and
read a detailed account of the wedding of Dorothy Smith to a prominent army officer. A
little further down, I also saw an article concerning Margaret Wiggins, chief of the New
York Branch of the Salvation Army, who was expected to visit the Isthmus shortly.
I was getting a crook in my neck watching for a messenger from the cable office.
I was so worried I almost wished I had not made the trip. At the top of the high school
we got into small Panama Railroad electric cars which took us over a bridge connue-ting the
high school with Balboa University. Mr. Spalding did not seem to have chiancgdl much,
altho he had gotten somewhat stouter and had lost some of his curly black hair. We
congratulated him upon his success with the University, which now ranked as high as any in
the United States, and also upon his appointment as its first President. He was proud of
the school and its graduates and mentioned a few who had won distinction: Thelma Bott,
who was now teaching a new branch of study, "Culture and Good Manners" in New York
University; Julie Asparren, an instructor in women's physical education in China; Mar-
garet Bradley, a scenario writer in Hollywood; Tharon Haldeman,who was now com petting
for the International Golf Championship in Europe; Laura Neal,who was writing tor the
local newspaper, giving advice on "Family Relationships and Marital Differences;" and
Julieta Patterson, who had won the Nobel Prize this year for inventing a device which
allowed one to hear himself talk or even sleep while his neighbors played their radios.
He also showed us a book of poems written by Bertha Greggi entitled "\\'ith Age comes
Wisdom", and I told him I was just finding that out.
He asked about Annie Pearre; and I told him just before I left New York I attended
a piano concert given for her by the society leaders, Ruth Dunham and Genevieve Rose.
Miss Jessup, Dean of Women at Radlil ffe College, attended the concert; and I ai.- met
and talked with Jessie Young, now a fashionable interior decorator. ~\i. Sp:ildin: asked
us if we had visited Paul Kunkle who recently had purchased the Lewis Periodical Shp?
He said Paul was a hard boiled business man. Spalding laughed as he told us that one day not
long ago when he was to pay for some magazines he wished to purchase, he found he had
left his wallet at home; Kunkel had refused to trust him saying his terms were strictly cash
and he could not make an exception.









ZONIAN


Mr. Spalding asked us-but just then I saw a messenger coming from the Cable
Company and I rushed to meet him. I tore open the cable and read aloud: "Your wife has
employed me as her lawyer to file suit for divorce; favorable verdict assured; prepare to
pay alimony"-signed Boyd Branson.
When I could get my breath, I shouted wildly, "What is the quickest way I can get back
to New York?"
Lawson said, "Whai is the matter, you can always get another wife; you have said
so yourself many times; you just can't walk out on us like this."
I tried to explain to him that this was different; my wife was divorcing me; that
Branson never lost a case; that Ann Brown was the judge of the court in which my case
would he tried; and she was known as a man hater; that in New York one went to
jail when he did not pay his alimony; but Ed. would not listen. He grabbed me but I
pushed him aside Just then I heard a scream and awoke to find my wife leaning up against
the book-case cr.in;. "You hit me," she moaned. "I am going to get a divorce."
What a relief! I laughed as I told her, "Honey, I was dreaming that someone was
trying to keep me away from you."
But she refused to listen, saving "I was only trying to wake you to say that you had
forgotten our wedding anniversary- I am going home to mother's."
"Listen! listen!" I yelled,as I took the $20.00 out of my wallet, but what was the use?
For the third time that day she had walked out while I was Calklin-. closing the door after
her in a manner most jarring to my nerves.




:": -""* ".i'"."* "".****N.f -S
.**** . . .......*....* ****







SMILES ......
Smiles there are,
True! so many kinds of smiles--
Believe it or not
It's a fact-
Smiles can talk.
There is the smile of satisfaction,
And the smile of uInl. r..nlinl
And the deep, grim smile ot vengeance,
I'm not trifling--
Smiles can talk.
Lovers' stolen glances
Smiles of love and dreams and hopes.
Dying men have smiled contentedly-
Their full share have they done on earth, so-
Smiling they depart.
Smiles--
I am positive they talk!
Blessed be thy name-oh God!
For i: in. to us on earth,
These yving, talking things
Called
Sm iles........
By Anna Ramirez











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THE HALL OF FAME


Most Popular Girl
Most Popular Boy

Best Girl Dancer.
Best Boy Dancer.

Most Studious Girl
Most Studious Boy


TERESA MiICHAELSEN
ROBERT DWELLE


BETTY BOHAN
SAM BURKS


MARY MAcGiI.LAvRY
PETER JOHNSON

TULIE ASPARREN
GEORGE TARFLINGER


Best Girl Athlete
Best Boy Athlete

Girl Most Likely To Succeed
Bov Most Likely To Succeed


EDlTH ROWE
Louis EVERSON


I)Done Most For Class


FRANK FITZPATRICK




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':W~PE"mumma"YT~~rt


OFFICERS


Adviser..............
Pre-ideWlf
I ,Ie Pre i,,el./
Trea I.uer
Secreelj,


........... ED. PEASE
PETEH CoRRiG;.;N
I ;MEI JiHNO(')N
D,\ E BOLG-.
JrFN Srr E.











ZONIAN
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Girls

ADAMS, AILEENE
\r it;. I. THELMA
A,\ E /IZABETH
AROSEMENA, MARY
\-mIi.. .. GLORIA
U\lI 0 FDITH
BOGGS, BEVERLEY
BOHAN. ELAINE
BREWERTON. MIATHILDE
BULLOCK, MARJORIE
CItRi T1t VIVIAN
Ci %'l. N :i.'. Y
C.-rl. LUCILLE
CORNWELL, MARTHA
DE LA MATER, LOIS
DE LA GUARDIA, MARGARITA
DE ARANZANA, ISABEL
DIDDLEBOCK, MARY
DO..'-, i \ RY
),,.. 1M ,,',"
EDWARDS. SHIRLEY
EVANS, BARBARA
F i-t.i,. DAISY
I 1I \'i, ELAINE
HOWELL, CLiAUDIS
HUGHES, VIRGINIA
JOHANNES. ROBERTA
JOYNER. MARY
N. ** r. BETTY LOUISE
ORR, MARY
LAURIE, KATHRYN
LAURIE, ROSA.MOND
M %. I- ill_. MARY
MALSBURY, JACQUELINE
MAURER, MURIEL
MI Fl I* rN i. MARGARET
.l1. K ri FI IZABETHI
PERRY, MARGARET
PIONTIKE, ROBERTA
QUINN, ANNA MA
RAMIREZ, ANNA
RANCE, JOYCE
RIEBER, JOSEPHINE
ROBERTSON, SARA
SEALY MARGARET
SHELTON, GLADYS
SMITH, AILEENE
STEELE, JEAN
STILLWELL, JEAN
TARFLINGER, LOUISE
TORBERT, TIHELMA
TRUE, MILDRED
VILLANUEVA, JULIA
WALTERS, MURIEL
WALBRIDGE, BARBARA
WICKINS, WILMA
Woon, ROSE
Boys
ALFARO, HORACIO. JR.
ANDRADE, HIRAM
ANGER, JULIUS
ARZE, CARLOS
BERQUIDO, GUILLERMO
BOGGS, DALE
BOYD, ALBERT
BOYD, AUGUSTO
BRULAND, JOHN


JUNIORS


CASTRELLON, JUVENAL
CHAFFIN, GODFREY
CORBIN, PAUL
CORRIGAN. PETER
COYLE, EDWARDS
DANIELS. EDWARD
DELVALLE, MANUEL
DOMBROWSKY, TED
DRAKE, HENRY
DURFEE, JEROME
ERICKSON, ERNEST
EVER, HENRY
FABREGA, OCTAVIO
GIBSON, HOLBROOK
GORMELY, WILLIAM
GRAHAM, GORDON
HALnsEMAN, GEORGE
Hi 11 .\l. THOMAS
HAMLIN, EUGENE
HENDRICKSON, FRED
HENNEBERGER, BAKER
HERRING, GEORGE
HUNTER, WILLIAM
JOIINSON, JAMES
JONES, WILI.AM
JOYNER, JOE
KOPERSKI, RICIARD
L.OPEZ, ROBERT
NOLI, LOUIS
NOVEY, RICHARD
OLLER, ROBERT
PARDINI, JUAN
PARKER, HARVEY
PARMELEE, JACK
PERCY, DAVID
PETERSON, ROBERT
PFEIL, ROBERT
PIERCE, FRANKLIN
POOL, WILLIAM
QUINTERO, RUBELIO
RATHGABER, JACK
REINIG, WILLIAM
ROTI, THOMAS
SANGER, VERNER
SIMIDT, Louis
SHREEGAS, FRANCIS
SOLANO, CELSO
SQUIRES, WILLIAM
SUTHERLAND, JACK
rOEPSER, WILFRED
TONNESON, ELWOOD
LOCKWOOD. SAM
MADURO, OSWALD
MAKIBBIN, THOMAS
MARTINELLI, RICARDO
MOFFAT, LOUIS
MOORE, WI LIAM
McCoNAGHY. JOHN
McCoNAGIY, GEORGE
VALLARINO, LUIS
VFNGnrCHFA. JULIO
\V1 %. ,..,. R,,t
WELCH, RAYMOND
WHITE, HUGH
WILLIAMS, DONoLD
WRIGHT, JAMES
YOUNG, JAMES
YATES, JAMES


"Look forward triumphantly"









ZON AN


THE CLASS OF '35


The year of 1934 has been a very successful year for the junior class. Our activities
included three dances, a luncheon, food sale, class play and banquet.
At the first class meeting Peter Corrigan was elected president; James Johnson, \ice-
president: Jean'Steel, secretary, and Dale Boggs, treasurer. Mr. G. R. Lee was class
adviser--later to be followed by Mr. Pease who helped our class a great deal and to whom
great praise is due.
The first social event of the year was the Junior-Senior dance held at the Yacht Club.
The Corozal orchestra furnished the music for the occasion, which was proclaimed a huge
success.
Next was the Junior Prom which was said to be the best dance of the year. This
dance also was held at the Yacht Club which was attractively decorated in a unique
manner. The prizes, which were donated by the outstanding stores in Panama. added
much to the affair.
The remaining social affairs included a barn dance, class play, and the annual Junior-
Senior Banquet.
Aside from these activities, the juniors ranked second in the school athletics. The
boys came in second in soccer; and the girls, second in volleyball. Although both lost first
place, the teams put up a good hard fight. Claudis Howell and Jack Sutherland were chosen
as representatives for the Athletic Council and proved worthy of their posts.
Throughout the year the juniors strove hard to win the scholarship cup. Twice the
junior boys from Mr. Joy's room won this honor.























TI;










ZONIAN


THE SOPHOMORES
OFFICERS


. Li."i. I

I I., I're.ite,il
Pr..,-i /k',!
1 1", P, e'-,i.,,e

Se. ,'el, i, i'
T'ir *rti'i


G. O I. L
I.AL K HukIt R

PTF. -.,. H ,..RT
TiU'I %<. H'.-rt










ZONIAN
1


SOPHOMORES


ALAN ADAMS
ROBERT ANDERSON
MACLIN BENAGIH
PAUL BERGH
TOM BLANTON
FRANCISCO BRAY
MAURICE BROWN
TOM BROWN
GEORGE CAMBELL
GENE CLINCHARD
KEITH CONLEY
JOE CORRIGAN
HENRY COURVILLE
DAVID DE LA PENA
SHERMAN DE VORE
RICHARD DONOVAN
MANUEL DOYLE
ROBERT DUVALL
JACK EWING
WILLIAM FAIRCHILD
DONALD FERO
GEORGE FITZGERALD
WILLIAM FLEMING
TOM FOLEY
RIGGS FOREST
WALTER FRIDAY
MARIANO GASTEAZORO
DENNIS GILBERT
PHILLIP HALE
JAMES HALL
CLIFTON HALLETT
ARTHUR HAMMOND
THOMAS HUFF
BERNARD KEEGAN
DAN KILEY
JACK KROMER
CARL LIEBERMANN
EDGAR LINDO
LOUIS LIPZINSKI
RAYMOND LLOYD
Luis LUSHMAN
RODRIC MACDONELL
EMMETT MADIGAN
DAN MCCARTNEY
JOHN McGUIRE
CHARLES MACMURRAY


HELEN ALLEN
MARTHA ANDRADE
MERCEDES ARRIETA
CATHERINE ATKINSON
ALICE BLANTON
CAROL BOGGS
PHYLLIS BUECHELE
JEANNE BURDGE
CLELIA CALBOUN
SARITA CASTEL
BLANCHE CHENEY
REBA COLBERG
MARGARET COINS
BETTY COMLEY
ELEANOR DARNEI.L
FRANCES DIXON
THELMA DOWELL
WANDA DOYLE
LUCILIE DUGAN
DORTHY DUGAS
BURNEAST EASTBURN
MARY FOIrEY
BARBARA GRUBER
JEAN HALL
MARGARET HAW
PEGGY HORTER
RUTH HORTER
JANE HUGHES
DORIS HUTCHISON
MARY HYDE
JUANITA JENSEN
ESTER JOHNSON
BETTY JONES
MARY KIERULFF
FRANCES LAMBERT
BETTY LEWIS
FRANCES McGUIRE
JEAN MITCIHE I
MURIEL MOORE
JEAN MORGAN
LoIS NASH
BETTY PHII LIPS
EULA MAE PLATH
MARY ELLEN PRATT
MANUEL MENDEZ
OCTAVIO MENDEZ


ARTHUR MICIIAEI.EN
FRED MIDDILETON
RAIPI MORAI.ES
GEORGE MULLINS
SIDNEY RANDOI.PH
ROBERT RATHGABER
ROBERT RIDGE
JOHN ROSE
C LI i t u SHEDLOCK
ALBERT SIMKA
WALTER SIMS
IRA SOLENBERGER
EWALD STEINER
DONALD STILSON
RAYMOND WATSON
WILLIAM VIOLETTE
ALBERT WEMPE
MARTIN WEMPE
HARRY WERTZ
STANLEY WHALER
GEORGE WILLIAMS
WILLIAM WIGG
BURRITT WRIGHT
ROSARIO SPINELLA
VIRGINIA PRESTON
VERNA PRICE
MARIA QUIJANO
BETTY RATH
VIRGINIA RICHMOND
ELSA ROMAN
LOIS SAsso
ISABEL SCHLOMING
JEAN SCOTT
SOPHIE SEABURG
MILDRED SEELEY
ROSARIO SHELTON
LILLIAN STOCKWELL
FAY SUTHERLAND
ALMA SYMONDS
PEARL TUTTLE
HELEN VAN CLIEF
BIENVENIDA VILLA
DOROTIY WALSTON
MARJORIE WEIGOLD
FRANCES WELCH


Laugh and live, then learn.









ZONIAN


THE CLASS OF '36


September 22, 1932 some 132 pupils registered in Balboa High School as Ireshmen.
That was the big day of our lives, as the boys with their bald heads and the girls v. ith their
pigtails wandered bewilderedly through the halls.
Our class was divided into two sections, one for boys and one for girls. Each
division elected its own officers.
The boys elected Jack Kromer, president; Walter Friday, vice-president; Tom Huff,
secretary; and Donald Fero, treasurer.
The girls chose Jean Mitchell, president; Peggy Horter, vice-president; Lois Nash,
secretary; and Margaret Haw, treasurer.
During the first year the class was hazed. We attempted to give a party, and caused
much trouble. In fact, it was a most unusual FREHSMAN class. By June, it had learned
what high school life was, and had decided that it was most exciting and enjoyable.
Oh-here is that extraordinary class again! Just as extraordinary as ever. Almost
the same group with just a few losses and some additions. We were getting used to each
other, getting to know which of us were the real students, which the musicians, and which
the athletes. We soon found that we could be represented in every school activity. This vear
we gave a beach party and a sophomore.get-together. Both parties were a success. fah!
Another unusual feat by an unusual class.
The success of our class as sophomores was due greatly to Mr. George 0. Lee, our
adviser.
Jack Kromer was re-elected president; George Fitzgerald, Lois Nash, and Ruth
Horter, were elected to be vice-president, secretary and treasurer respectively. A dem-
ocratic form of government was organized. A senate committee was set up which %\as
composed of officers and ex-officers of the class. The committee was composed of the
following students: Jack Kromer, George Fitzgerald, Lois Nash, Ruth Horter. Clelia
Calhoun, Sidney Randolph, Thomas Huff, and our class athletic officer, Arthur Michaelson.
In the world of sports, the boys, in 1933, captured first place in baseball; second, in
basketball; third, in track and lost in soccer. This year the boys carried away the soccer
crown, and won third position in track and baseball. Eight boys made five of the varsity
sports in their first year, and fifteen boys made three of these sports in their second year.




1


4 4


j









ZONIAN


S.. . ..- ..A.
Kf "- .-rAV-%Wirt i' "f' 2'-* *-


THE FRESHMEN

OFFICERS


....E. W. HATCHET
.CHARLES GORNELL
...RUTH RICHMOND
...LEO FERGUSON
......LILLIA BOOTH


Advier..........
PresidenL.......
Vice President.
Treasurer ........
Secretary.. .......










ZONIAN
- -- -- -- .-


ALFARO, OLMEDA
.Xi.. i \. r
.\1.1 T r1 ., ',,
.\ b r i< i 1 1 ,* 1 .
,\n 1II', tI I I i. i
ARZE, ALEJANDRO
ATKINSON, FRED
AZCARAGA, RAQUEL
Bk1 iwl r RICHARD
Rl -I i CHARLOTTE
Bt. 1 .. PATSY
BRAYTON, DONALD
B 'II ,I ( N. Ci t IHAM
Bl .i '. H i
BHii .' ".. R I i

BURLIN, ROBERT
BYRD, ROBERT
CALVIT, ROBERT
Ci'ik. ANNABELL
Cl \1.. PATRICIA
CLARKE, HOWARD
COLLINS, WINTER
C Iir. BARBARA
Ci 0 i-., EDWIN
CORR, GLORIA
CRADDOCK, JAMES
CROUCH, HARLAN
CROUCH, JEAN
CULLEN, JAMES
DAVENPORT, HERBERT
DEENEY, ETHEL
DENNIS, JEAN
DINGEE, GEORGE
DOCKERY, HARRY
DODSON, DEAN
DRAUGHAN, WOODWORTH
DURFEE, JULIA
DU VALL, DOROTIY
DWELLE, EDWARD
EDWARDS, LELAND
ENRIGHT, JANE
ERICKSON, ROBERT
El i.-, WENDELL.
FENTON, GEORGE
FERGUSON, JOHN
FERGUSON, GEORGE
FERNANDEZ, JULIA
FITZPATRICK, JOHN
FITZPATaICK, MARY
FOOTE, ALICE
F. .i aj, PAULETA
FREEMAN, BLANCHE


GIBSON, BETTY
GCI .... PATRICIA
ut( I I *I ., VIRGINIA
GORNELL, CHARLES
CG. .. MARIE
GREGG, HOWARD
GRIER, ROBERT
GRITZ, JUDIrH
HACK, BERTA
HALE, PHtILLIS
HALr.LE, BUDDY
HALLIDAY, ROBERT
HALMAN, GLADYS
HERRINGTON, THELMA
HOLSTON, DOROTHY
HUNTER, JAMES
IDE, GEORGIA
JACKSON, MARY
JOHNSON, HELEN
JOYNER, DOROTHY
JUDD, DOROTHY
KEY, PATRICK
KINDERMAN, FRANKLIN
KNOWER, MI LDRED
K'-I:r-i WALTER
L R. ,. ROBERT
LAURIE, RITA
LEVY, HARRY
LEWIS, PHYLLIS
LIPZINSKI, TODD
I I. i' i| ,GINIA
,\.I u. I HENRY
MALONE, DOUGLAS
MANN, LOUISE
MARTIN, GEORGE
MATHENEY, ROBERT
M ..CI..* I. l R 1. Ir, RD
,., .C .,r, -1 R r .I o l
.1" [) ,.1 .1 1 .1, '1?. J,
McEl.HINE, HARRY
MrFAI-IHFN'. GEORGE
.1I. N r .-, \\'rLLIAM
. i-i. BURTON
1i Ii. -. JAMIES
MELCHIER, TIII LMA
M I-. I I k I i II *.


MOORn~ GEORGE
.M' .. \ i ANITA
NAVARRO, NORBERT
NEWTON, AI.I.EN


NEWMAN, ClHARLES
ORR, MATTERS
PACUII.LI, EvYLYN
PALACIO, NELVAA
PEARSON, HARRY
PESCOD, LIlY
PlGG, MILTON
PRATT, ROBERT
PRICE, WILLIAM
QUINN, REGINA
RANce, PAGcT
RICE, THOMtAS
RICHMOND, RLTH
RIDGE, LAWRENCE
RIDGE, VINCENT
ROBB, JANICE
ROBINSON, EARLE
R. 'I- .. '.-, M ICHEI
ROSE, JULIAN
ROSE, LAWRENCE
Ross, BETSY
ROTH, JAMES
RUDDEI., MARY
RUSSON, DOLORES
SALTERIO, GRACE
SCHAFI, ALFRED
SEELEY, NORMA
SIMKA, ESTrER
SIMMs, VIRGINIA
SPIER, WOODROW
STEMIPEI., LIONEL
STII.LWELL, NORMA
1.1, I* lI. JAN E
T 1 1 ... ANN
TROWE'R, JAIMES
TURNER, EUGENE
VILLA, OLGA
VIOLETTE, FRANCES
WAnHL, BUDDY
WAINio, ALICE
WANKE, CARl
WEEKS, GEOFFREY
\\ i i i: KENNETHl
WELCH, PAUL
\VIHELMAN, MARY
WHITE, EUGEiNIA
WHITSETT, JAMES
WILSON, JULIA BELI.IE
WOODRUlF, MAIRY JANI
YOUNG, LOUISE:
ZIRKILE, IOIN


"Let not ambition mock their useful toil

Their homely joys, and destiny obscure:"


-- --- --


FRESHMF1EN








ZONIAN


THE CLASS OF '37


The class of '37 started its career in Balboa High School by taking the Scholarship Cup
for the first six weeks period.
For the first time only one set of officers was elected. Charles Gornell was elected
president; Ruth Richmond, vice-president; Lilia Booth, secretary; and Leo Ferguson,
treasurer. With these officers and Mr. Hatchett, class adviser, the FRESHMEN have
passed through a successful year. A number of athletic tickets were sold to the class
due to the efforts of Bob Matheney and Lily Pescod, the athletic representatives.
It was decided at one of the class meet ings to have a dance in preference to a beach
party. Three dancing classes were held in order that those who were inexperienced might
learn.





ZONIAN


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ZONIAN


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ZONIAN


SCIENTIFIC:

If you don't know what's wrong with your innar
But you seldom or never feel fine,
Don't waste any money on doctors-
Try betaimenazolylethylamine.
When all those around you are sneezing.
And flu takes its annual toll,
Rest easy, no bad germ can get you-
Use methylenedicododignoiacol.
If pneumonia is snooping about you
And you fear lest you're taken a chill
There's only one thing which can save yon -
It's benyzldidenedibenzyldiethyl.




"A RH.APS()IY IN BLACK'
I i,-',,'r de la Guardia


Through the inky blackness of the night strugl:t. that lonely figure. climbing up the
broken slope of the iaggcd mountain side. A flashing streak of light reveals him sloualy
strIuggling up his tortuous way, then plunges him in darkness more intense. Blindly he
gropes his way, stumbling again and again upon the treacherous earth. Th- booming
thunder rolls through the St.iglan night and the vivid, rapier thrusts of light -trike out to
bar his way. On he plods, undaunted by the unleashed wrath of the night.
Detached, I watch that weary body surging upward. It is I! As from a cloud, in
peace and calm, I watch myself sketched by a glowing streak against the velvet sky.
At last, the crest is reached! The grotesque figure, arms wildly tossing, runs falteringly
over the rocky, wind-swept mountain top. A blinding glare makes day of night, Ireeal-
ing the yau ning chasm at his feet. Too late! Dovn he plunge, and terror's icy fingers
grip my heart, for it is I. Down into the black depths I plunge, my body falling. falling
falling......










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ZONIAN
BELIEVE IT OR NOT

Place: The patio of the Balboa High School.
Time: One dark midnight at the end of the school year 1933 -'34.
Chamrader.: The shades of the past graduating classes of th- school and representatives
of present school organizations.
Keeper ,I the Rec.,rd-' We. the classes of yore,
Reassemble once more
To evaluate, as we hear,
The accomplishments of this year.
W'e %ill call first of all
On a club formed this fall.
tJosephine Dennis, president of the Music Club. is ushered before the throne
of the Keeper of Recordsj.
Jo.i.ephiiner The Music Club. sponsored by AIrs. Baker, is as you have said. O Wor-
thy Keeper of the Records. a net club tc- the school this year. The purpose of the club is
to promote the further study of music in the school and to assist in the musical part of
programs. The members of the club have helped make it successful by taking turns in
preparing bulletin boards and by taking charge of meetings.
Alav it please your honor to accept this photo of the members of this club.
Keeper ot lhe RecordJ.: To make this subject complete
Let all musicians compete!
























Call to the stand
The "maestro" of the band!
(Mr. Joy bravely takes the stand before the silent company'.
Mr. Joy: The High School Band, organized two years ago, has made a very cred-
itable showing. It has been active at many public events during the school year, such as
basket ball games at the playshed, the Commissary Christmas toy sale, the Boy Scout
program, the Junior Class Play at the Balboa Clubhouse, athletic contests, the Memorial









ZONIAN


Day parade, and the Shriner's Picnic at Farfan Beach on George Washington's birthday.
On this last occasion the band received a twenty-five dollar donation which made it possible
to open a treasury account. This picture, I offer for your ilp:ctinn. was taken of the band
at the picnic.









ZONIAN
The Hligh School Orchestra, also under my leIad-erlhip, is composed olf ftenty-seven
members. It is a confident and competent group. The musicians have supplemented their
regular class work with several public appearances. They played at the Balboa
Clubhouse for the High School and Junior College plays, at two Ar my and Navy Y.M.C.A.
public Sunday alternoon concerts. and at the Cecilia Theater in Panama City. Ours was
the final 'voice' in school activities this year %hen %\e played the 'recessional' for the
er.iduatine class on June the fifteenth. Such is our record.
Mrs. Baker couldn't come tonight so she asked me to present to you the accomplish-
ments of her String Quartet. To hear them is a musical treat. The quartet presented an
assembly program, consisting (-. mu'ements from several standard string quartets. and
solos bL\ the different instruments. The membership is as follows: lirst violin. Fred Ifend-
rickson,. second vit lin. Rosario Spinella; violin, lames lohnson; and cello. Charles Vincent.
()O.in& to the large number of pupils registered for the Glee Club. it has. for two
consecutive years. been necessary to divide it into three groups. T. ot elementary clubs
and ..ne advanced club -rrc, formed. About trenty-tive- pupils %ere in each section Mrs.
Baker has been in charge tf all the groups.
The evening Christmas program in the school patio %as their maior event. The girls
carried lighted candles. That they pleased "as sho'n by the compliments received from
the large audience that attended. In November, the Glee Clubs furnished music on Armis-
tice Day; in May. they planned a Spring Festival; and in lune, they sang at the graduation
exercises. In the .Adanced Glee Club a fe%, members have formed a Capella Choir for
the purp,)se of studying Capella Music. or unaccompanied singing. They believe
Capella Music to be necessary. for it tends to develop independence in the performer.
Keeper ,i/ the Recr.t.,: You have spoken %ell, 0 Master of Music, even as did the
great Theophilus %hen he said:
"Music's a great and never-tailing treasure
To those %%ho've learned and studied it in youth."








ZON I A N


How'er be not disheartened, my friends,
For tow'rds the blithesome the Art Club tends.
31uriel3 aurer (pr iesiden t of the Art Club): Our club meets every Wednesday under the
able leadership of Mlis CGa rdner, the art teacher of our school. This club, though mainly
interested in sketching the figure, also makes posters for any school event, many of which
were made this year for school plays. dances and luncheons. The assembly program given by
this club was enjoyed by all students. Lieutenant Judson Smith, of Fort Clayton spoke on
'Art as a Hobby, and its Development and he showed some of the art work he had done.
Keeper &,J the Record.: You have spoken!









ZONIAN
From the Service Units, I vow
We will learn where, when and hov.
(A shade ushers in tvvo teachers, who prove to be Miss Wardlaw, adviser of the
Home Room Service Unit, and i.... Robson, adviser of the StuId Hall
Service Unit).
,iie. Ward/law: The Home Roonm Service Unit has as its purpose the betterment of
Baliboa High Schn,,I The a.urk ,t the Billetin BIiari C'i'mmitt : hl.i- increaseJI the general
Ikn-.Iledge t.f the stilLde t I oh Ihr(gh 1th: tfcirts i t, th e Schlarl hip C,,mmnittee the
statitiics it the schila.stic rating it the hmme r, nims hie I l.in prcsentecd. The unit seeks
t- cr cIirage LIInd discipline I\v cLilti\ t tin.: in -.!l. th.: l-.s.ir- ti prcp r tfor th? .,Illi.ations
,if I ., ,Iu ciitier-,hi)p.


i,.1. \\',lrdl. p.litilv I0 .. aV M iss Rolls.,n ..t,.p up'i
.11,.. T/,.,',,,,. The Study Hall Ser I:. L'it ta 1 organized tI, prnmn '.A. t.'d.-r.-I ,. -
e.rnment in RBalboaI:i H)Ih Schii.' Thr. are i e t Ffiers in echl ;issmcnp' th2 pre ident.
Sice-president. secretai ry. p.iss-giu'.er anid t i, clerk,. .. li.. aii, ]i esponsii!li t,-r I tl!i.i-':v and
pi I L onduct in their respecli\c asswemlli. Tlihe-c ,'f iceis are ilectel in th..;r \;ri( us
..s..m liliLs Ih ;tud nTt .Allt.
I he \Vechick iorLianization. which is .iAls under my cntril, has a -irv dclhnit and
specilied routintc ; which it >alta \ l'lln.'.s Thi-. cn\ eniennt system tnab- lilie t'dernts ti go
directly Irom their L-crndtl pt-rinJ cl.issc- to a clul, mni\ in-_ i r to- th': librair '. ;liiiut having
to v.,it in their hunimcuiomn- tur the rIlls .i Ii checked \l. .\lthh t- i studintl-; oftenn cLioider
the \\'echeck. a libther. I lhelieve thev reali;,e hio much ,i1 A hlavie I'enefited :h-.' A.-hi,.
KIe,-p.-r / Ih' e,'. This reminds me il the Id Dutch Proe'crb: "'\ hn ;:rves
the puli!ic -cr'c- a lickle miwser









ZONIAN


,I










Keeper of the Records: The Albums last year met success
We'll see if this year they've met less.
(The ihsllv m.shL-WnLer enters with Mr. Pease, Album Club advis.r).
Jlr. Pearse. It is not entirely the fault of the members of the Album Club that it
67








ZONIAN


has not been as successful this year as it was last. It was unfortunate in having to change
advisers in the middle of the year; and the old trustworthy members, who knew the art
of photography resigned, leaving to the unexperienced underclassmen the job of making
the pictures for the school annual. But I feel, Mr. Keeper of the Records, that nextyear at
this time the club will have a very favorable report to put in your records.
Keeper of the Records: 'Tis with regret we hear
The Albums weakened this year.
The Biology Club will present
How its time has been spert.
Jcseph Orr: AHEM! As president of the Biology Club, it gives me the utmost
pleasure to inform this worthy assemblage concerning this most outstanding club. spon-
sored by Mr. G. O. Lee. EGAD!








ZONIAN
The membership of this club is limited to those who have taken bloily or who have
exhibited special talent in this field. The self-criticism which is a part ot every pri.-rr:m.
tends toward constant improvement; consequently, an individual seldom repeats the same
mistake. Inspiration and direction of purpose have been secured through the study of the
great biologists. HARR--UUIMIPII 1
Keeper of the Recordr: (Sternly) Let that suffice Shakespeare said, "He draweth
out the thread of his VERBOSITY finer than the staple of
his argument."

Methinks wouldd be meet
To examine a sheet
Of the Parrakeet.
(Margaret Alley, Editor in Chief of the Parrakeet, humbly brings forward the
following excerpt from an issue of the school paper).
Keeper of the RecordG: "Ah, ye knights of the pen! May honour be your shield, and
truth tip your lances! Be gentle to all gentle people. Be
modest to women. Be tender to children. And as for the
Ogre Humbug, out sword, and have at him."
When Thackeray said this, he was voicing my opinion as
well as his own.


MARCH 16 MARCH 16
BARN DANCE T H EJRLUNCHEON



PARRAKEETT


VOLUME V.- No. 9


March 9. 1934


STUDENTS TO ELECT
MOST WORTHY SENIOR
Contest To Close In Six Weeks
In an attempt to determine the
most worthy boy and girl of the
senior class, the Parrakeet will
sponsor a contest, which will be-
gin today and extend over a per-
iod of approximately six weeks.
The purpose of this contest i.
not to choose the most popular
members of the senior class, but
rather the most OUTSTAND-
ING senior boy and girl. In or-
der to do this, such qualifica-
tions as scholarship, dependability,


Remaining Issues
of Parrakeet
April 13
May 4
May 18
June 8

SENIORS MUST BE

DIGNIFIED-FRUGAL

Class Follows Precedent
The struggle of caps and gowns vs.
ordinary attire which almost amount
ted to a war last year, was set-


BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL
WELCOMES PARENTS

Charm Club To Have Charge
In order to afford parents an
opportunity to witness a normal
school day in session, Balboa
High School will hold its third
such event from one o'clock un-
til eight o'clock today.
The Charm Club girls who
are in charge of the affair are:
Edith Rowe (president); Riti
Strauss, Dorothy Messer, Thel-
ma Seeley, Betty Bohan, Peggy
Neville, Olive Koperski, Virgi-
nia De Young, Tharon H:'lde-


VOLUME V. -No. 9









ZONIA N


EDIT(_RIA.L AND R'SINESS SIAFF OF TiE PXRRAKEET








ZONIAN


Let the Little Theater speak
Be not boastful, be not meek.
Miss Jessup : As you no doubt know, Most Exalted Record Keeper, the Little
Theater, which was organized three \.;iar- ago for the purpose of encouraging dramatic
ability among the students of Balboa High, is composed of the Inner Circle and Outer
Circle. The club has inly one unfavorable thing to report; namely, the necessity for ch in--
ing officers during the school year. It has increased steadily in progress as well as in mem-
bership. The Little Theater started its fame with the production of the assembly play,
"The Valiant," st.arrin_ S.m Burks and Claudis fHowell. Its greatest dramatic successes
were the senior pl 3, "',Mr.. Bumpstead-Leigh," and the junior play, "A Murder Has Been
Arranged."
Only a few people had heard of the 'Sissapolla Indian ferb Remedies' and the 'Sayles
Favorite Stomach Elixir' before attending the senior play given at the Balboa Clubhouse
on. February sixteenth.
Virginia Foster, as Mr. Bumpstead-Leigh, was charming with her English accent
and lIirne'te. She had managed a n,a iria -, for herself into English aristocracy hiding the
fact that she was the daughter of Jim Sayles, vendor of patent medicines and stomach
elixirs. After a partial success in educating her mother to the ways of society, she tried
hard to marry her younger sister into an American family with a ., i.1. social background.
But, the sister, poor little Violet, pla. cd by Claudis Ho.vell just had to be truthful and
disclose the origin and early history of the De Salle name. Though she aroused the ire of
her sister and mother and lost her affianced husband, she won a true lover, and all ended
happily. Rebecca Williams, as Mrs. De Salle, the mother, often forgot her society manners
and acquired speech and produced some amusing sequences. The American family, the
Rawsons, consisted cf Justin Rawson, the father, played by James Prend-ilIra;t: Miss
Rawson, Justin's sister, played by Jean Strel: Anthony Rawson, elder son, played by
James Wright; and the y'rungcr son, Geoffery Rawson, pl1aived by Sam Burks.
The younger Rawson was considered the black sheep of the family because he pre-
ferred ranching and farming to business. However, the facts disclosed as the play progressed,
proved him to be the better of the sons and the only sincere one in the Rawson household
except Kitson, the butler. Sam Burks, in his rcle as Geoffery Rawson, was outstanding
as the sweetheart.
The servants in the Rawson home were Nin1. the maid, acted by Pauleta Foster,
and Kitson, the butler, acted by Robert Dwelle. Nina was an attractive girl and Kitson
thought it his duty to keep her on the 'right path.'
John .llhyd and Margaret Reinig took the parts of Mr. and Mrs. Leavitt, social lead-
ers and neighbors of the Raw-sons.
Walter Judson, as Peter Swallow, a former suitor of \Mr Bunip(icad-Lelgh. was
anxious to destroy the 'family tree' made by the latter. He used his business, that of
selling monuments, as a means of meeting people and then he bored them with his endless
speeches about himself and Indiana.
Those who assisted greatly in the production but who could not be seen by the au-
dience were Jack Dombrowsky, Robert Daniels, Frank Fit/patrick. and Mary Ruth
Dunham.
Music was furnished by the 11;gh School Orchestra under Mr. Joy's direction.

Keeper if the Reccrds: That you remember the words of Pope
I most sincerely hope.
"To wake the soul !\y tender strokes of art,
To raise the genius, and tc mend the heart"
To make mankind in conscious virtue bold,
Live o'er each scene, and be what they behold--
For this the tragic Muse, first trod the stage."








ZONIAN


LITTLE E THEATER


SENIOR PLAY CAST








ZONIAN
A MIL'RDER HAS BEEN ARRANGED

A murder was actually arranged for Balboa High. Oddly enough S. S. Van Dine had
no hand in it. Mr. Turbftil and others were responsible for the commission of the crime.
The assistants were: Beverly Boggs as Lady Beatrice Jasper, a lovely girl of eighteen; Dale
Boggs as Jimmy North, a romantic and handsome, young man; Dick Stoudner as Sir
Charles Jasper. middle-aged husband of Lady Beatrice; Isabel Schloming as Miss Graze,
the pretty, but hard secretary of Lord Jasper; Fred Hendricksen as the poker-playing
orchestra leader, Cavendish; Lucille Tarflinger as Mrs. Wragg, the middle-aged stage-
manager-cook; Marjorie Bullock as Beatrice's grasping mother; Elaine Bohan as "A Wom-
an," practice of black magic: and Manuel Devalle as the super-criminal and murderer,
Maurice Mullins. Together the group put on the Junior play "A Murder Has Been Ar-
ranged."
In the course of the play, the audience discovered that lMaurie Mullins was to inherit
two million dollars if Lord Jasper died before his fortieth birthday. According to a legend
concerning a certain theater, if anyone was murdered in this theater, a ghost was to walk
there soon after the murder. A man was found there-murdered! Lord Jasper gave a party
in the theater hoping that his guests would see the ghost walk. The lcyend further told that
if a murder was committed in this theater, a dumb woman would be found nearby. The
"woman" would meet her end in a super-natural manner.
It developed that the theater was not the scene of the original murder, but Maurice
Mullins kindly murdered Lord Jasper so that the ghost would walk. This unearthly being
took his stroll; the dumb woman appeared and died. In spite of the fact that he started all
the excitement, 1lullins went insane and lost his inheritance. All the characters were








ZONIAN


shu,,ked beyond \,:,rds; but the au.-lcn-ii %jis i-'t ;lth th e fe:in;2' that limmv and Lady
Jasper would recIter n,-ei\. A
Others who helped to produce the Junior play were Mary Ruth Dunham, prompler;
Bob Wempe, stage manager; Edward Covle, business manager; and .lr. Pease class
adviser.


--------------



Hispano America, the club of Espafiol.
How near have you come to reaching y',ur goal?
Rcdrtqc, Aro.emena: As president of the club, Hispano .Arnmrica. it plkas-: me to
announce that the club has completed another successful year under the spmns,.rship or
Mr. Carson. The membership of our club is divided equally between the Spinish and
English speaking students. Several intL-rLstin: programs have been given, one ot th: best,
at Christmas. Lectures by distinguished Panamanians were a club feature. The season
closed with a "tertulia." or Spanish fiesta. (\'ith a polite Spanish gesture) Alics!



-------I-------~



Let the charm Club relate
Ere we decide its fate.
(The president of the Charm Club, Edith Rowe, is ushered in).
Edith: The Charm Club has been. prominent in. Balboa High School for three
years. The members of the club acted as hostesses to the guests on Visitors' Day. They
also underto ik to teach the freshman dancing classes, and served at the freshman dance.
By this photograph you may better acquaint yourself with the members cf the charm
club.
Keeper cj the Recordr: Thank you, most charming young lady.









ZONIAN


Now the moment nears
To hear from the Engineers.
Howard Turner (president of the Engineers' Club): The Engineers' Club is the first
of its kind to be found in Balboa High School; its purpose being to stimulate a further
interest in engineering. Through the efforts of Mr. Hatchett, the adviser, several very
interesting lectures have been presented to the club about various factors and details of
engineerin;. Mr. Floh,-ir, and Mr. l c... u .it,!t are among' those who assisted at these
special meetings.
Keeper c/ the Recjrdf: Study well each plan
An engineer's a man.










ZONI AN

Please try not to laugh
At the Zonian Staff.

(Louis Everson, Editor in Chief of the Zonian, takes his place before the Shades.)
Loui.r: All I have to say is that with the aid of Mr. Esser, our adviser, the Zonian
Staff has worked long and hard to present the yearbook to the class of '34, and to the Balboa
High SchoIl. To you I will give the picture of the editorial and business staff of the hoolk.


Keeper of -ll- Recordr:


The book we will scan-
And blaspheme if we can.


ZONIAN ST.\I:l


S. E 1,
L. EP., .,
P. J '.. ,
R. P- 'r:,
T. N ,. v ,,
W. i. C n r,
N R ,. ..
L. C.
E. R... ,
M. \ % ..
J. B, . *-
L. RIL. I
M. DF IrH -i
J. Fi rezi %rii I.


/ I/i,i'e

A, .ie",' p l h11.m la,'



..i. nt I, le .a I~'ilor

. .ta,o 1, it. tie- I/.' t.r"

1, I l. ,or

Ile!oer
Ti, p1 *,
',,,, T, l'.i,,,








ZONIAN


We will call on the History Club last
For they study, such as it is-the past.
(Mary MacGillivary, History Club president, is escorted by a shade to the keeper).
Alary: As in the past, our purpose has been to perpetuate the glory of this great
nation of ours in the minds of the high school students. Early in the year our club (often
called the Elcrys, because it is the reverse of the name of our adviser, Miss Syrcik) held a
candy sale, the proceeds of which helped to purchase a frame for the picture the club T:. e
to t e school.


Keeper of the Records:


Keeper of the Recordsx:


Much have we learned from Gibbon
Who says, 7History is little more
Than the register of the crimes,
Follies and misfortunes of mankind."


Shades of the past. All work is finished. All records are
before you. Have the traditions of the past been upheld?
I await your voice.


(The whole assemblage of ghosts at a motion from the Keeper of the Records
arise and chant):
We, the past classes, find that all is well.
Lonu live Balboa High School!

(Mysteriously and silently the shades disappear as a faraway clock strikes one. The
representative, of the various organi;zatins gratefully wend their way homeward, knowing
they never dare to breathe a word of their recent adventure to a living soul).







ZONIAN


SCHOOL EVENTS


Soc cer


r& &Sr Dance


7a c k


1\








ZUNIAN


|0




BALBOA CAPTURES B JU
CHAMPIONSHIP. SCC


In the opening inning Cris-
tobal scored o runs. Alberga,
first man up singled to righ
field for two bases. He a
ed to third on Beard's
and came home on a v
left fie ~- -
imme
mto ,.,
hit;^:!wal^-A !iot '








ZONTAN


i,,,. ,,. _ef. l,,. I,., -- M. thi- Stitherlalnd. ZLerten, Bro,, n. M ichaelken
a,!it,i -Pe'cod. Van Cliel. Ho ell. Drdilen.


ATHLETIC COUNCIL

Starting with a bang and continuing with a bang, bang, the Athletic Council, under
the supervision of Mr. Zierten, rose from the graveyard of debts and succeeded in restoring
its long lost treasury.
Under the direction of Miss Amundson, an athletic-ticket drive got under ay during
the first semester. Marguerite Dryden, senior, was in charge of all sales. Although far from
being a financial success, the drive stimulated school spirit.
Jack Brown, president, and Marguerite Dryden represent the seniors.
Jack Sutherland and Claudis Howell, uphold the juniors. In the sophomore world, Arthur
Michaelsen and Helen Van-Clief are the official members; the freshmen members are
Bob Matheney and Lily Pescod.









Z N IAN


S.m,!'. Left to '.,I.: Stl, n-r-. Quintero. Novey, Brown, Tarflinger, Morales, Reiber, Kromer.
Lower:-Leivsy (C.. IF K[ iron-. r Chaffin, McCartney, Moore.


TRACK


Although Balboa was able to enter a well-balanced team, Cristobal ran away with
the track meet, 47-5.j. Five new school records were set in this meet.
The o(isfandlinL -tars of the meet were Paul Beard, of Cristobal, and George Tarflinger,
of Balboa. The lormner broke the 100 and 220 yard dashes in the remarkable time of 9.9
and 21.8 seconds respectively. "Tar" broke his own shot and discus records, previously
made when he represented Cristobal. Hollowell, of Cristobal, bettered the record for the
880 yard run previously held by Bill Burdge of Balboa.

PLACES IN INTERCLASS MEET
1. Seniors
2. Juniors
3. Sophomores
4. Freshmen
The senior track team: Stevenson, Morales, Tarflinger, Reiber, Kromer, Brown,
Wempe, Oiler and Squires completely dominated the interclass meet.








ZONIAN


4i


' : ... '.. Leji to Riahl:-Greiser (Coach), Tarflinger, Wood.
,)itin:- Johnson, \\'eri.-' I .i,.; i. I.. Dwelle.


W.A'ER POLO

The senior water polo team, led by Edward \'.I'd. c,;stabiishd a new recur:.] by
completing its schedule without tasting defeat. Fitzpatrick and WempE pr.vced
to be instrumental in adldin-; to the effectiveness of the group. The remaining fk-!o'3s:
Johnson, Dwelle, Crouch, Branson and Tarflinger also should receive special conmmenda-
tion for their good sportsmanship, and willingness to cooperate.
W L Pet.
Seniors 12 0 1.000
Sophomores 7 5 .583
Juniors 4 8 .333
Freshmen 1 11 .083
Bill Flemming, a sophomore, deserves credit for we:i.lina his team through the schedule
to take second place.
Makibbin, Haldeman and Comulada, are also to be remembered for their nl tenorthv
performances while playing under the junior banner.








ZONIAN


Back Row,:-Sutherland, Brown, Wempe, Morales.
Second Row,:-Reiber, Walker, Chaffin, Courville.
Front Row.:-Durfee, Gornell, Anger, Lipzinski, Navarro, Oiler.

SOCCER
The strong soccer squad, c ,nf-ifin; of the remnants from the previous year's team
plus energetic new-comers, proved to be one of the most powerful teams ever seen on the
field.
Captained by James Morales, who played well during the season, the team never
lacked aggressiveness, the essential factor to victory.
Walker, Stevenson and Gornell, classy forwards Brown and Durfee, backfield aces,
are players who will go down in history as having contributed much this year to the
success of our school team, in the soccer realm.
INTERCLASS
W L T PCT.
Sophomores 2 0 1 1.000
Freshmen 2 1 0 .666
Juniors 1 2 0 .333
Seniors 0 2 1 .000
IU'lpew n.-. all forecasts, the lower classmen stole all honors when the sophomores and
Ire~.ihmien to ~k first and second place respectiv1ely.








ZONIAN


SiaJi'lj -Zierien. Forre-t Sutherland, Tarflinger, Neville, Fridyv.
Keeli,:i.,:-Koperskie. Kunkel, Lipzinski, Parker, Hammond, Corrigan.


BASEBALL

By winning the first three games in a creditable manner, Balboa cinched the baseball
championship.
Although the team lacked uniforms and looked shabby on the field, the brand t' base-
ball played was surely characteristic of a highly spirited club.
With an infield composed of such stars as Parker, Judson, Brown, Stoudnor and
Sutherland, what more could a team long for?-Cristobal's idea, anyv.. a..

W L Pet.
Seniors 3 0 1.000
Juniors 2 1 .666
Sophomores 1 2 .333
Freshmen 0 3 .000
Determined to win the interclass championship the seniors: Stoudnor, Judson, Neville,
Fitzpatrick, Kromer, Brown, Potter, Tarflinger, Kunkel, Oiler and Wempe swept the series
and so avenged the defeat handed to them last year.








ZONIAN


Back Row:--Pratt, Tonneson, .lihn-,,n Zierten
Second Row:--Morales, Whaler Fle .mnn Chaffin. Michaelsen.
Kneeling:-Brown. P. Coorienn, Sutherland, Friday, I. Corrigan.





BASKETBALL


Balboa High School this year boasted one of the strongest teams it has ever had. After
a slow start, the team found itself, and went on to win the Isthmian High School Champion-
ship.
The outstanding work of J. Brown and J. Sutherland was a big factor in the team's
success. Coach Zierten should have a strong team again next year.

BASKETBALL RESULTS
Balboa Cristobal
16 21
34 21
23 25
23 10
34 29
23 27
31 26


eon&,,~









ZONIA N


/ .,,,,' ," i..hl i., \ i>,r;,.- H ... I
IC" Dri. 1,r:..


VOLLEYBALL

The Balboa Amazons decisively defeated their Cristobal opponents in all five contests
and thereby proved themselves north % of the title, Champions.
The excellent work of Captain Julie Asparren, and her co-worker, Marny Dryden
was an important factor in the team's success. It was their combination plays whichh
brought Balboa victory.
To the rest of the scquad- Michealken. Van Clief, HoAell, Golden and Salterio and
de la Guardia special mention is due, because of their untiring spirit displayed in all
encounters.
INTERCIASS
W L Pet.
Seniors 3 0 1.000
Sophomores 2 1 .666
Juniors 1 2 .333
Freshmen 0 3 .000
The girls of '34 overshadowed their rival contenders to such an extent, that they
won all three games played; consequently they swept series.








ZONIAN


Left to Riht:--Hanna (Coach), Asparren, Dryden, Golden, de hi Guardia, Van Clief.



BASKETBALL


Again the girls of the red and white took to the floor and completely ruled it. Having
kept their record free from .IL-!:ll. the BHiilli. girls e..,ilh obtained the basketball cham-
pionship by winning ,ui games pi 1.y.-d
Due to the scoring ability of Captain Jui .\-Ap.larcn. Julieta Patterson, and Helen
Van Clief, a higher number of! .ini- was accounted for this season than had been scored
in previous years.
The two centers, Marny ".lrt.inm. id" Dryden and Betty Golden, played their
positions like veterans, suciesSt!uu upsetting most plays attempted by their opponents.
It was in the B..lb,.i guards' area that Cristobal was defeated. Through the stub-
borness of Isabel de Arenzana, and Margarita de la Guardia, a lower percentage of baskets
was made by Balboa's foes than in the past. They were a great team.









ZONIA N


ANNUAL RECORD
BOYS
SoccER
Championship Won By
Balboa
Balboa 1 College 2
Balboa 2 College 1
Balboa 4 C. H. S. 0
Balboa 2 C. H. S. 0
Balboa 4 College 3
BASEBALL
Championship Won By
Balbca
Balboa 6 C. H. S. 3
Balboa 8 C. H. S. 6
Balboa 10 C. H. S. 4
Balboa 7 C. H. S. 5
Balboa 3 C. H. S. 10
TRACK
Championship Won By
Cristobal
47 35

GIRLS
VOLLEYBALL
Championship Won By
Balboa
Balboa 24 16, 25 17, 37 23
Balboa 24 16, 13 22, 21 19
Balboa 28 11, 18 12, 23 13
Balboa 16 12, 22 16, 24 16
Balboa 30 14, 18 17, 26 16
BASKETBALL
Championship Won By
Balboa
Balboa 17 C. H. S. 6
Balboa 23 C.H.S. 21
Balboa 19 C.H.S. 0
INTERCLASS SWIMMING
1. Seniors
2. Sophomores
3. Freshmen
4. Juniors
INDOOR BASEBALL
(Interclass)
W L Ptc.
Freshmen 3 0 1.000
Seniors 2 1 .666
Sophomores 1 2 .333
Juniors 0 3 .000









ZONIA N






ZONIAN
K=-


Light -

Telephones


Power


- Gas


Refrigeration



Our modern, efficient plants and buildings are open
at all times to inspection by students of Balboa
High School, Call Public Relations Dept., Panama
3000, and arrange for a personally conducted trip.


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ZONIAN
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OFF "J" ST.
Call Phone 453



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ZONIAN


MARINE STUDIO



The Judgment of

The Majority...

----~-


Usually Safe to Follow. That Our Photographs Are
Satisfactory in All Respects Seems to be the Unani-
mous Opinion of the B. H. S. Senior Class of 1934.

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ZONIAN


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also
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Cable Address
"TIRESUPPLY-PANAMA"
Code: Bentley's
P. O. Box 2019 ANCON, C. Z.
Apartado 930 PANAMA
No. 71-17 W. & "H" STREETS


GRADUATION FROCKS
AND GIFTS
-II

Felix B. Maduro
21 CENTRAL AVENUE,
PANAMA.


ARE YOU READY


for the vconing English Evanminations?

If you re iot, let ilt' help )you.

GEOR9IA KODADEK
PREPARE TORY SCHOOL

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lhlnt'lrtiollal Hotel

Phone 2-102 Panama.


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x


Compliments of


The Panama


Railroad Company

AND


Panama Railroad


Steamship Line


-w


Compliments of


JIMMY DEANS


ZONIAN

The
Ancon Greenhouse
Ancon, Canal Zone
Member
Florist Telegraph
Delivery
Association
---
CUT FLOWERS
Phone: Balboa 2390
Cable: "ANCOGRE"







ZONIAN
iT


Hotel Washington

UNEQUALED FOR SITUATION
AND COMFORT

A Hotel in Keeping with the Dignity, Spirit,
and Service of the Panama Canal

GOLF-SWIMMING-WATER SPORTS
TARPON FISHING
The Year Around
AMES E. LEWIS P. O. Address


Cristobal, Canal Zone


J
Manager


1


SAVE TWO DAYS OUT OF THREE
TRAVEL VIA

PAN-AMERICAN AIRWAYS
SYSTEM
~------
0-
Comfortable multi-motored air-
liners equipped with two
way radio
Rates to Government Employees
Century Club Building
PANAMA
Phone Panama 2400
CRISTOBAL
Phone Cristobal 1882
___________k________________ _^


COMPLIMENTS OF




PAUL JOE
CAFE
'25 i 27


23 YEARS OF STEADY
PROGRESS IS YOUR ASSURANCE
OF MERIT


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