Zonian

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Title:
Zonian
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Serial
Language:
English
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St. Petersburg Printing Co.
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St. Petersburg, FL
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Yearbook
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serial   ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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UF00093678:00072


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- RACING


sMWLA Nw


TO THE FINISH LiIY E


THE ZOYIAY 1989
VOLUME 80
BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL
BALBOA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA


Title Page 1















TO THE



FINISH LINE

-acing to the Finish Line.
The 1989 Zonian staff found
this theme to accurately
convey our life styles in Panama.
Several new aspects in Balboa
High School during the 1988-1989
school year led to the use of this
theme.
The decline in student popula-
tion decreased the number of bo-
dies rushing to get to class.
.l Girls' sports were added, causing
more athletic competition.
S. Inter-class competitions added
S to the school spirit race and moti-
ovation of the student body.
S'~ ',/*''e Balboa High School raced to its
S . finish line.


V i




S- .tion Building hill.









Closing 2

















































































Holding on for dear lifel Mark
Anthony Perez takes on a Zonian
tradition by sliding down the Ad-
ministration Building hill.


Opening/3


















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries












http://www.archive.org/details/zonian1989balb

























S


RACING INTO SPIRIT


Life is a banquet, and
some poor suckers
are starving to
death!" Well, we don't have
anyone "starving" to death
at Balboa High School.
Student life starts from
the first day of school and
lasts till the last day of
school. It includes social
meetings in the hallways,
dances, pep-rally's, spirit
days, dating, parties, lunch,
New Year's, PCC students,
Carnival, Early graduates,
and of course, you the peo-
ple.
This year the "Student
Life" section included a
new addition called "Mini-
mag". Mini-mag includes


all the events that influ-
enced the student body at
BHS. Some examples are:
The presidential elections,
the seventy-fifth anniversa-
ry of the Panama Canal, the
superstars of the 1988-89
school year, and polls from
BHS students.
"Student Life" contains a
pictorial of events that stu-
dents have been involved
in. We hope that when you
look back upon the pages
you will smile.
This section is dedicated
to all the students at BHS.
This is for you. Many stu-
dents will be gone after this
year whether because of
graduation or because their


family is with the military.
We hope that you will take
with you the memories of
Jamboree, Homecoming,
Christmas Formal, Cama-
valitos, and all the wonder-
ful memories that are gath-
ered from BHS.
We hope that when you
are old and grey, you will
remember the night you
and your buddies decided
to go carousing before the
school dance, or when you
had a chance to steal the
Bulldog from the 100's,
later to abandon it in the
girls' bathroom. We hope
you will look back on BHS
years from now and remem-
ber how good life was.


The essence of Student Life. Mark
Home and Mark Caffrey show off
their spirit before school in the
200's.


q


Student Life e


Introduction/5








WARMING UP FOR THE START


any people do not realize the activity that goes
on before the first day of school nor do they
remember those who did the work. The mem-
bers of the Student Association spent most of their
summer preparing for the new school year. They were
busy making arrangements to use the auditorium for
orientation, having programs made, asking groups to
speak at the assembly, and finding students who were
willing to be guides for the new students.
The S.A. also relocated the school store from the
main office area to room 100. "The moving was relative-
ly easy, but we soon found out that we needed to have
the air conditioning fixed and electrical outlets in-


S.A. Secretary, Carl Dragseth, devoted his lunchtime to sell S.A. cards
and candy.

Student Life P 6


stalled," commented Michelle Montgomery, S.A. Presi-
dent.
The class officers also worked hard to make the first
day of school memorable for their classes.
The senior class officers made dozens of miniature
blue graduation caps and hung them in the 100's. They
also hung a banner in front of the school that said,
"Welcome Seniors!"
The juniors and sophomores also hung posters.


Students check the list in the 100's hallway to find their homeroom
number.


Seniors Brian Cochran and Mike Cribbs go to Mrs. White to get advice
on course selections.








PARENTS

ENTERING THE RACE


hatter filled the air as parents flooded the halls of
BHS. "How does Joey find his way around this
place?" and "Look there are Mr. and Mrs.
Smith!" Comments as these flooded the air. It ap-
peared to be a twentieth high school reunion, but was
"Back to School Night."
"Back to School Night" was held on September 14 at
7:00 p.m. Parents filled the halls, carrying their sons or
daughter's class schedules and maps of the school.
When asked what she learned about BHS from "Back to
School Night," Mrs. Kirby replied, "I discovered the
teachers to be very amiable and cooperative and the
facilities greatly improved."
Eighteen members of the National Honor Society
were present to serve as guides.


Parents of students in Mr. Young's class get a view of their children's
artwork.


Mr. and Mrs. Deslondes find


During the break between 4th and 5th periods, parents flood the halls
to get doughnuts and coffee.


w J


Back To School/7


Examining their daughter's schedule,
their way around BHS.





- SPECTATORS IN THE RACE


2=Ti
*Adyl


V L~


and Jeff Knappen-


the introduction of their team by commentator Joyce.


'I
Pc'^


The pep rally held on Sept. 2 was organized by the Student Association. Officers prepared
for the pep rally as the students entered the stadium.


k


"Y-U-K-1, It's great to be a senior", screamed
Eileen Bradley while she danced with Edwin
Diaz and Janet McCormack on the field.


FIRST KICK-OFF
OF THE SEASON

kay, this event is sponsored
by oreoo cookies' and straw-
berry flavored 'koolaid',"
said Steven Joyce, the commenta-
tator of the pep rally, at the begin-
ning of the event while he waited
for students to get out to the
bleachers.
As the students hurried out onto
the field, the classes let their spirit
go by laughing, screaming, and
yelling. Steven played his "mini-
legacy" through the sound system
to arouse spirit. He then asked the
classes who really ruled BNS.
There were two types of spirit
contests. Each individual class was
to decorate a hallway, and bleach-
ers were to be filled with banners,
spirit signs, and different posters.
The seniors won in both events.
The sophomores placed second
and the juniors finished third.


The Student Association added
five new events to the pep rally:
"The Wave", performance by the
dance team, and three individual
dance contests among the classes.
While the students waited for the
announcement of the football
teams, and performances by the
dance team and cheerleaders, S.A.
sponsor, Mr. Waugh started "The
Wave." "The wave" really worked
well with the kids. I think we'll con-
tinue to use it," said Mr. Waugh.
The football teams were then
called out onto the field. Green
Devils, Cougars, Red Machine, and
Bulldogs in order of cheerleader
performance. The dance team
made their first debut, and the sen-
iors ended the race by going out to
the field and showing their spirit by
dancing to "Push-It" by Salt-n-
Pepa. The other classes could not
dance due to the lack of time. "The
pep rally was a lot of fun and was a
great way to start off the school
year," said Stephanie Russelberg.


"Ahh Push-it." Jennifer Rodgers, Todd Un-
derwood. Ken Crowley and Tanya Pratt danced
with classmates of senior class.


Student Life




























After being asked who really rules BHS by
commentator Joyce, the sophomores follow
their leader, Valerie Forster, by chanting,
"Sophomores are number one!"


4


"Do not enter, no underclassmen allowed,"
was the sentiment of seniors as they
cheered for their class at the first pep rally.


rf *


After the pep rally, Carrie Copier took a break
to brace herself for the bus ride to Cristobal
Jamboree.


The beginning of the daily race was antici-
pated by Sherdina Finney, Shonda Williams,
Kristin Schafer, and Vannette Warner.
"Open wide and scream for senior pride."
Charles Rogers and Luis Almendral show
their enthusiasm in the senior bleachers at
the pep rally.


Pep Rail) 9





A SPECIAjREAK

FROM THE RACE


friends old and new are
unique people with their own
special talents. Some as-
sume the role of coaches in the
race of life, but somehow, we all
unify to struggle through it togeth-
er.
From the beginning of the school
year until the end, friends are
there. You share fear and frustra-
tion, as well as the joy and mo-
ments in the race, Annabelle Velez
and Robbie Thrift responded, "No
matter how hard things get, we al-

Gathered outside the S.A. store, students
Steven Torres, Edwin Diaz, Tanya Uhora-
chak, Robbie Thrift, Katya Holdsworth, and
Michelle Alonso exchanged latest gossip.


ways stock together through thick
and thin."
Do you remember when you were
running to the finish line and
thought you'd never make it
through that last lap? You did it,
with the help of those special
friends.
Special moments and special
people are two good reasons to
take a break from the race, and re-
alize how important friends are.
Treasure the memories, and al-
ways remember WE MADE IT!


Time Out. Grace Brown, and Palas Burke
stopped to catch action between classes.


I


As these students raced to the BHS football
field for the first pep rally, Janet Cazabon
said, "Ana Lampas is always at my side."
"10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5. 4 3, 2, 1 Everyday
April Williams, Roberto Seeley, Jeanette An-
tongiorgi. Karla Johnson, Sona White, and
Dana Gorden made their final countdowns
to go home, as they await their buses.







Student Life e 10


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II 'a;


TRICKY,




TRICKY. !


Gouls and goblins.
Jack-o'-lantems and
black cats. Candy
corn and red hots. The spir-
it of Halloween was brewing
at BHS.
Friday, October 28, was
declared Halloween Spirit
Day by the Students Associ-
ation. Students and faculty
were encouraged to show
off their creativity by enter-
ing in the costume competi-
tion during lunch.
Jennifer Rouse won first
place for the female cate-
gory dressed up as a Q-tip,
and David Vasquez won for


the males dressed as a PCC
Green Devil cheerleader. "I
was really going for origi-
nality. I think one day of
embarrassment was worth
$25.00," said Jennifer.
The faculty competition
was stiff. Mrs. George won
first place. "I had no idea
'New Coke' could win!" said
a surprised Mrs. George.
Mrs. Macmillan, who was
substituting, won second
place for dressing up as a
Hershey Kiss. Third place
was won by Mr. Waugh with
this depiction of the last
DODDS teacher in 1999.


Disguised as Snow White and Dopey, Rachel Frey and Maria Capps take
their bows for their fabulous costume designs.


When asked where she go the idea
for dressing up as a Hershey Kiss.
Mrs. Macmillan replied, "I was al-
ready chocolate, all I needed was a
kiss."
Members of Mrs. Sosa's Political
Geography course, Michael
Cribbs, Marcos Gonzalez, and Bri-
an Cochran pose as OPEC minis-
ters.


.51F


1halio ',enl 11


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lack, brown, and or-
ange spiders swayed
creepily from webs
clinging to the ceiling. Or-
ange and black paper cov-
ered the walls and lights
lent a seasonal festivity to
"the GAP". After two weeks
of planning and labor, it
was ready for the first dance
of the school year.
The tickets allowed for
entrance to the dance and
to the JROTC haunted
house, held in the Balboa
gym.
LEGACY kept the music
spinning from 8:00 p.m. till
the bewitching hour of mid-
night.
The chaperones (Mrs. Py-
lant, Mrs. Hansen, Mrs. Lew-
is, and Mr. Waugh) kept an
eye on the students to
make sure they were on
their best behavior when
Mr. Holland came to
"check-out" the scene.
"Even though it was lame
the first few minutes, it got
better," commented Ben
Bean.


Mrs. Lewis stated that the
decorations were great and
that the students were well
behaved and having fun.
Sammie Thompson ad-
ded, "It really kicked off the
school year," and Carlos
Hattabaugh said, "At the
beginning it was very lame,
but as the night progressed
it got a lot better. The deco-
rations were pretty good,
but you could only see
them when the lights were
on, and they weren't on
very much."
No one even batted an
eye when the air condition-
er gasped its last breath.
Students stayed to dance
the night away. Even when
the music "gave up the
ghost" there were some
who called out for the party
to continue.
Many students stayed
afterwards to help tear
down decorations. Some
were found snatching spi-
ders for souvenirs while
others sat in the front room
for a breath of cool air.


MONSTER


MASH


Dressed as the vampires from The Lost Boys, Tiffany Sullivan and Pat
Sitarz demonstrate their stuff.

F. ..




., .: .. ... ____
An ~
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A shy pumpkin, Heidi Mendenhall, gets ready to read an article on drugs
to the fellow students in her psychology class.
Maria Black shows herself as a bag ofjellybeans before her third period
class. Meanwhile, Mrs. Macmillan tries to maintain discipline in her class-
room.


'4


a


Student Life


WNW


AlIlb












JAMBOREE CEREMONIES


imagine that you were the Mad
flatter from Alice in Wonder-
land. You had a very important
place to go and little time to pre-
pare for it. When asked about pre-
paring for the Jamboree, Bulldog
Princess Lisa Deslondes respond-
ed, "Rush, rush, rush, primp and
blush. After getting ready to parade
around the field in seven minutes, I
had ineffable feelings. I felt like an
Olympian." Other princesses wer-
en't worried about the race. Jackie
Brogie, Red Machine princess said,
"I felt proud to know that my favor-
ite group of guys (Red Machine)
chose me." Amy Vowell, Cougar
princess felt honored as well.
There was a total of seven buses.


Three were used for individual
classes (Sophomores, Juniors, and
Seniors), and four others for the
football teams.
The Jamboree is a Cristobal High
School tradition. It is held annually
on the Atlantic side. The purpose of
the Jamboree is to introduce the
new football players and cheer-
leaders. Each year, the football
teams choose one princess to re-
present the squad. They are escort-
ed by two captains of the team. The
cheerleaders and dance team per-
formed at half time.
Refreshments were sold through-
out the evening, along with pen-
dants, buttons and tee-shirts.


A moment in time-Red Machine Jamboree Princess.
Jackie Brogie gave us her "honored" smile as she
entered the field.


Senior illuminated symptoms of"senioritis" at After receiving the flowers for coronation as
pep rally. Molly Dreckman and Luis Almendral Cougar Princes, Amy Vowell waited to join
got psyched up for the race to the Atlantic side. the ceremonies for Jamboree.


Into the ring stepped Bulldog Princess Des-
londes, by parading around the CMS field.


J.Imhoree/13






KICKING OFF HOMECOMING SPIRIT


ho? What? When?
\\ helc ? How? Why?
The five W's and
one N are six familiar ques-
tions we ask in many situa-
tions. However, when
Homecoming approaches,
students have been known
to make up their own six
Homecoming questions.
Who am I going to ask?
What will I wear? When will I
ask him/her? Where will we
go for dinner? How will I get
the money to afford this?
WHY AM I DOING THIS?
The Student Association
provided students with an
array of activities to try to
beat the "Homecoming
Blues." We decided to have
five different things going
on at once to keep the audi-
ence entertained. We have
learned that students don't
like to sit and watch one
thing. "Their attention span


I* t '


is very short," said S.A.
President, Michelle Mont-
gomery.
There were five S.A. spon-
sored spirit raising events
students could participate
in. They consisted of hall-
way decorating, dress-up
days, float decorating, pep
rally activities, and the
Homecoming Dance.
Hallway and dress up
themes varied from class to
class. Sophomores used
"Heaven and Hell," Juniors
used "My Name is Pana-
ma," and Seniors used
"Wild, Wild West." the
dance, held at Curundu Ju-
nior High School from 8:00
p.m. to 12:00 a.m., followed
the theme of "Las Vegas
Nights."
Share and share alike. After throw-
ing a cream pie at Mrs. Short's face
during one of the Homecoming
festivities, Nesa Helm had to laugh
as she saw the backlash hurting
tnwarrlc hPr frP


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Fresh Catch of the Day. Falling into the spring waters of the
rdunkinq booth. Jose "Tuna" Tunon was canned during Pep

14 Student Life
14 Student Life


Gracefully showcasing a Panamanian "Pollera", Spanish Club Queen Gilda Berman
stood proud on the Homecoming Float for the crowd. "I felt so honored to be chosen
to represent the club, like Cinderella stepping out."


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Frustrated fans, April King and
Mei-Ling Lavecchia, expressed
looks of disapproval as they
watched the teachers defeat sen-
iors in volleyball.


Tricycle Racer, Lisa Moffitt, ped-
dles her way to victory for the sen-
ior class at the Homecoming Pep
Rally.

Making a back-breaking return,
Steven Torres scored one extra
point to lessen the gap between
seniors and faculty on the field.


"The lights must go on," said S.A.
secretary Jo Carlise, as she and
Patrick Michaelis worked on con-
structing "Las Vegas Night" for the
Homecoming Dance.


Nomecoming/15


M







The Jingle Bell Rock is demonstrated by J.J. and Kevin in a line of
Souplt s, at the Winter Formnal. That's the Jingle Bell Rock." said J.J. as
she jammed.



Reigning at the top of the Ice Castle are Winter Formal King and Queen.
Jeri Wheeler and Jason Sweency. The event was sponsored by the Senior
class.


I


A TIME FOR GIVING


I


.i ", \

"HO, HO, HO1" said Jenn Rodgers
and Mrs. Schramm as they greeted
couples.





Student Life I 16


(Please sing to the melody
of "Jingle Bells.")
Dashing through the
halls, Christmas
spirit way; O'er to
class we go, Complaining
all the way (Ugh, Ugh,
Ugh); Bells about to ring,
Making teachers cry; "Oh
when will we get out of
here?, vacation starts to-
night!"
(Chorus)
Oh! Peas and Corn,
Squash and Beans,
Canned Goods all the way;


Limo rides and candy raf-
fles, decorations made; To
fulfill our Christmas spirit,
giving everyday; A time for
giving, sharing too, on
Baby Jesus's day.
Mr. Waugh sings, "Bah,
hum-bug" all the day, Mrs.
Piper rings, "Wise Invest-
ments pay;" "A Christmas
Wish", and ''Midas
Touch" were honored that
day, singing grams by ju-
nior class embarrassed
their prey.
(Chorus)
Oh! Peas and Corn,


Squash and beans,
Canned Goods all the way;
Limo rides and candy raf-
fles, Decorations made;
To fulfill our Christmas
spirit giving everyday; A
time for giving, sharing
too, on Baby Jesus's day.
Candy grams were sold,
"Genuine" Thespian
made; College fairs were
staged, for College bound
students' aid.
Never forget, the signifi-
cance of this day; A time
for giving and sharing, for
the loving holiday!


I








"Aren't we gorgeous?" said Tracy Hun-
saker and Louis Martinez as they float on
an Ice Castle cloud of love.


Helium balloons bobbed from
the ceiling, an ice castle glit-
tered from across the room,
and couples swayed together to the
rhythm of the music.
Winter Formal, sponsored by the
senior class, was held at Amador Offi-
cer's Club from 8:00 p.m. to 12 a.m.
Music was by Legacy.
"The night was memorable be-
cause I was able to share it with some-
one very special," said a radiating Su-
san Martinez.


The Zonian staff also tried to add to
the memories of Winter Formal by raf-
fling a limousine to use for four hours.
Stephanie Helin won the raffle and
"did up the town".
"The most fun part of the dance
was when everyone decided to let
loose and do the locomotion!" com-
mented Jo Carlisle.
Todd Underwood added, "The mu-
sic and the simplicity of the decora-
tions made it a great night."


Plotting the theft of the Helium
balloons on the ceiling of the
dance are Sonya Latta and Ivan
Levy.
Dressing up. Coronating of the
Court, and picture taking are just a
few of the formalities of being cho-
sen member of a Winter Formal
Court. After the ceremonies, Wen-
dy Forster. Rob Thrift, Jeri Wheel-
er, Jason Sweeney, Carl Dragseth,
Maria Capps. Brian Lieberman,
and Stephanie Russelberg took
their last picture.


Winter r rrmil '17


ICE CASTLES










ARSENIC AND OLD LACE


Imagine if the two spinsters next door
were responsible for the murders of a
few lonely old men who boarded with
them. This was the plot for BHS's fall pre-
sentation of Arsenic and Old Lace by Jo-
seph Kesselring.
This comedy was presented on October
28-29 and November 4-5..
The cast and crew spent months prepar- v
ing. Their Saturdays were spent creating
the Brewster's living room and their week-
days were consumed by rehearsals that A
lasted until late in the evening.
Ironically, late this November, a Califor- jt
nian landlady was accused of poisoning
her tenants for their social security checks. 1
Police unearthed 7 shallow graves in her
back yard.


.ist_ Lr; bb. and1 Mar Jha Brc.ster hank
Elaine lor Iqoin, to the theatre 1ithi Mro
t(nir rhei are happ\ thai ii Molrtimlr has
it (40J I tlhi ih( thcair at a31 he is in ime
:(Tparn\ o .N minitlher djuolhtcer


Front Rot N H %oodrow R fre, \ Forster
5 Lo\ h Putnam A Fries L lzbir'hl h
C.jHre Bark hon\ Mr J Johnston C hel
son Ro\o J Fiere T Maisit R L ainres
B L.ichtrmnn 4 Ibckrhi C DragsCth I
Mltr D Henderson C Uniderwood R Sani
udl. C BErrcan '\ forster P Mirchcls Mrs.
I) Nelson



THE CAST


Abby Brewster
Rew. Dr. Harper
Teddy Brewster
Officer Brophy
Officer Klein
Martha Brewster
Elaine Harper
Mortimer Brewster
Mr. Gibbs
Jonathan Bre% ster
Dr. Einstein
Officer O'Hara
Lieutenant Rooney
Mr. Witherspoon
Mr. Hoskins


Jan Pierce
Rolando Linares
Derek Henderson
Brian Lieberman
Carl Dragseth
Tina Maisto
Catherine Nelson
Mark Boiwer
Alex Ro\o
Tom Myer
Aaron Izbicki
Ra mond Samuels
Wend) Fries
Chris Berrean
Valerie Forster


Twenty minutes before show-time, Mark Bower. Tina
Maisto, and Jan Pierce demonstrate the special make-
up that transforms them into their characters.


"Gee, I hope Idon't hit my finger!" said Alex
Royo while hammering in a wood support
for the Brewsters dining room. Set construc-
tion was one of the most time consuming
and difficult aspects of creating the play.


Student Life











A NEW


BEGINNING


Friends Angeline Rowland, Karen Kirby, Kara Twohy,
Michelle Berry, Karen Stromberg, and Jennifer
Sweeney resolve to get to the cafeteria early so they
won't have to wait.

Hopeful smiles for a prosperous New Year are dis-
played on the faces of Robert McDonald and Carl
Nesbitt.




g m-
1SI ^ -


Nancy Tiblier
Amy Vowell
Ashley Falcon
Yvonne Fishbough
Iliana Rodriquez
Yo Koitani
Takakiro Nakasu
Din Wei-Chung
Jennifer Rodgers
Doug waning
Craig Meyer
Mike Brazelton
Ismael Rios
Stephanie 1elin
Yessenia Rogers
Carrie Copier
Celeste Brown
Melissa Bowman
Leanne Thrift
Aida Angel
Shirley Krapfl
Mark Caffrey
Tiffany Sullivan
Patricia Sitarz
Shanaz Awan
Mari Anglada
Robert McDonald
Melinda Griffin


To get over Will this year.
To be a good little girl.
To sue my real father.
To stay faithful to Matt.
Try to get along with everyone.
Improving my grades.
To have many friends.
Have a nice year for everyone.
To be good to everyone.
To stop cursing.
For the utmost to win the cayuco race.
To not make and New Year's resolutions.
To stop looking at girls' behinds in the halls.
Stop hitting Eric.
Stop talking in Mr. Jaen's class.
To get better grades.
To be more friendly, and go out more.
To lose five pounds.
To stay out of trouble.
To settle down.
To eat more fish to lower my cholesterol.
To get home before my curfew.
To pass Algebra II.
Graduate and party from there in.
To get an A+.
Stay out of trouble.
To win a basketball game.
To stay with my boyfriend.


-4


"TROUBLEI I wish I could stay out of it," said Mar
Anglada as she sat with Belita Cargill, Ivette Thom-
son.


Resolutions/19








RUNNING THE RACE

TOGETHER


H holding hands. Side
glances S% eat.
palms. Nervous
twitches. These are all s3 mp-
toms of dating.
The places in the zone
most frequented b BHS Cou-
pies while dating are: Anth-
ony's Pizza Place Hoard or
Clayton movie theaters the
Yacht Club and occasionallN
the Club House.
A. ,When asked ,where the.
.usually go on a date Kim
Thompson replied. It usual-
ly doesn t matter as long as
Kristin Schafer and Fred Gomoll spend their lunch together in the 400's
hallway.


we re together. Us For-
eter!
A few adventurous BMS
couples could be found
downtown at 7--Ele.en
buying slurpies. dancing at
Magic dancing at the Mar-
riott. watching the band Cri-
sis at M) Place. or dancing
the night away at Bacchus.
Couples could also be
found at sports events such
as football games basket-
ball games and tennis
matches.


Always together, juniors Tradene Smith and Axel Atongiorgi pose for a
snapshot.


Kim Thompson and Torrey Gragg rendezvous after sixth period to dis-
cuss plans for Friday night.


^N


Chris WilIharn',ana 4rnna Mj,cr stop a Itheir locker 1o0 a quick c na beItet'll
classes.


Student Life



















































SPEEDING UP THE RACE


During the first few
days of school at Pa-
nama Canal Col-
lege, alumni walked the
halls dreading to bump into
one of "them". Some of
"them" had been spotted
in the biology lab, philos-
ophy class, and the photog-
raphy darkroom. "They"
had even invaded the
lounge. "They" were BHS
students attending PCC un-
der the concurrent enroll-
ment plan.
The concurrent enroll-


ment plan was started dur-
ing the 1987-88 school year
for seniors. There were two
program plans seniors
could enter; one was a tu-
ition waived plan, and the
other was a tuition paid
plan.
Tuition waived students
needed a 3.0 GPA, a letter
of request from their par-
ents, approval from the
principal, and permission
from the Dean of PCC. They
also had to enroll at BHS for
a minimum of one class.


Tuition paid students
were not required to hold a
3.0 GPA; however, they had
to pay their own tuition and
meet the same require-
ments that applied to tu-
ition waived students.
Many concurrent enroll-
ment students found that
there were some advan-
tages to belonging to the
program.
"I liked the fact that they
weren't concerned whether
you were tardy or absent.
They left it up to the stu-


dent," said a content Mark
Caffrey.
"I liked being able to see
friends from previous years
that I would have missed at
BHS this year," commented
Jean Gramlich.
There were, however,
some drawbacks. Many pro-
fessors did not give make-
up tests, and a few were
known to lock out tardy pu-
pils.


Concurrent Enrollment/21












Carnavalito" (oth-
ernise known as
Little Carnival),
was created by
the Spanish Club with
the purpose of celebrat-
ing Hispanic heritage.
This year the event was
held at Ft. Amador Offi-
cers' Club. There, the


members of the club
showcased beautiful
decorations, typical
dancers, Panamanian
food, and all night danc-
ing with their friends and
family.
"I was proud of the
success," said Gilda Ber-
man, Carnaval Queen.


Elaborately costumed Spanish Club Princesses. Michelle Toledano, Aida
Angel, and Aurora Salazar admire the performance given by other mem-
bers of the court.


FIESTA!


"To Jump, or not to jump?." That
was the question Mike Monson
asked himself as he hung from the
Cocoli bridge.
Lost in love is Laurie Mangum as
she sits with boyfriend Brian Coch-
ran on steps at lunchtime.


Beauty, tradition, family, friends, honor, parties, 'Toldos." "Mojaderas," balloons, floats, festive costumes.
salsa music, "Damas." "Caballeros," and alegria are only a few of the elements that make up the Spanish
Club's annual Carnavalito/Comparsa.


*.. -.r. 7 A-. ,

"Thumbs up for the Class of 89.
and a boo for school." said Tracy
Hlusaker, Steph Russelberg, and
Michelle Toledano as they stood in
front of the Cocoli Bridge on Sen-
ior Skip Day.


STUPID CUPID


Solve, February has
often been de-
clared "The Month
of Love," but this year at
BHS, February was full of
a smorgasborg of events
which were dedicated to
love.
The Computer Club
held two events: a Valen-
tine's Dance, and "Com-


puter Dating Survey
(which served as a list of
compatibles).
The Spanish Club cele-
brated their annual Car-
navalito/Comparsa in
honor of Hispanic histo-
ry.
Two guest speakers.
Gary Davis and Col. Bu-
ford, came to give stu-


dents assemblies on
their topics: Christianity,
and the importance of
Black history. Later, the
Wild, Wild Seniors
showed their love of the
Class of '89 by skipping
school on traditional
skip day for seniors.


Student Life 22


February/23


"We're just GOOD friends." said
Jo Carlisle as she tickled her friend
Pat during lunchtime.
"Gracias." said Gllda Berman, as
she received her coronation flow-
ers.


LC -_ ~h-


i *;;
i 1.























Hungry for lunch, Randy Garmon and Edward McDonald inspect the empanadas and pizzas of a
local vendor.
Standing at their usual hangout during lunch. Derrick Townsend, Julissa Brown, Junior Fallin
and Terrel Lewis listen to their walkman's.


TIME OUT
FOR LUNCH


It was 11:45. The halls became flooded
with hungry teenagers. Popcorn started
to pop in room 100; lines started to
form in the cafeteria, and students started
to cluster around the S.A. store.
For those who chose not to eat in the
cafeteria, JROTC sold hot dogs and a vari-
ety of sodas. Empanadas, cookies and
"mystery meat on stick" were sold on the
street corner behind the 400's.
Many students just saved time by buying
two or three candy bars from the S.A. store
so they had time to mill around the 100's
and socialize.
Students could be found anywhere: from
sitting on the front steps of the school to
McDonald's in the center of Panama City.


I1 9


(0)


.tIlr racing to McDonald s RKan Coon indulges on
Biq Mdcs jnd milkshhak's


Student Life







THEIR OWN PLACE IN THE RACE


Cautiously, Chris Matson works on illustra-
tions.

A thin man with a big appetite, Mark McConnell
enjoys ROTC food after a vigorous workout.


Deep thinking "steel." Carey Goehle, concen-
trates on a drafting project.

Everything has its funn side, shows Anyas
Nolte during a tennis practice.

Cooperative work is better work prove Alex
Chaniotis and Chris Toshok as they study U.S.
government.



Student Life/25










GETTING A HEAD START


Primus gradum acade-
micum. If you are unfa-
miliar with these
words, then you probably
aren't aware of the Early Gra-
duate Program offered at
BHS.
The Early Graduate Pro-
gram was offered to students
who had completed the nec-
essary 20 credits.
The following 14 students,
who graduated in January,
did so for many different rea-
sons. When asked the ques-
tion," Why did you decide to
graduate early?," students
replied: to start college,
work, leave Panama, and
some responded to get out of
high school!"


"High school was begin-
ning to get boring, and I want-
ed to get on to bigger and
better things College,"
said Stacy Wilson.
So, if you are a junior in
high school, and haven't
planned your senior year;
early graduation might be for
you!

The following students were
BHS Early Graduates:
Yessica, Alexander
Amy Blackford
Montserrat Bojalil
Adam Coon
Sarah Forbes
Katya Holdsworth
Heidi Mendenhall
Jeannie Marohl


Antonio Pereira
Patricia Sitarz
Tanya Uhorchak
Stacy Wilson
Mary Minor
Young Soo Kim

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR
THE FUTURE?

Patricia-I would like to be an
artist.

Sarah-I want to major in Art
History.

Tanya-I'd like to work in com-
mercial marketing/communi-
cations.

Stacy-I'm going to Lousiana


Tech to become an engineer.

Jeannie-l'm going to Califor-
nia to start my career in Cos-
metology

Amy-I'd like become the own-
er of a chain of Lingerie Bou-
tiques.

GOODBYE-
"I would like to say a special
thank you to Mrs. Othon for
her friendship, which I will
cherish forever."
-Jeannie

"CONGRATULATIONS TO
ALL!"


Happily standing at the Balboa head, and at the end of their high school
years are Sarah Forbes and Amy Blackford.


S4- .


Bursting out with joy from the main hall doors of BNS are Tanya Uhor-
chak, Pat Sitarz, Ileidi Mendenhall, Amy Blackford. Adam Coon, and
Sarita Forbes. The beginning of the second semester often means more
work, but to these early graduates, the party is just beginning.


C


&03


"tudent Life


7-7-7 V
po
'"'*^ ^ ^e-h:- f ) '--.^ / P
,9~ti _^''


it








AWN-/M4MIJYE


STUDENTS'
FREEDOM
OF PRESS


by Wendy Forster
he Supreme Court
ruled on Jan. 13
that censorship of
a student newspaper by
public officials was not
unconstitutional as long
as it was "reasonably re-
lated to legitimate pedi-
logical concerns" and
had a "valid educational
:purpose."
. Justice Byron R. White,
said school officials, act-
ing in their "capacity as
publisher of a school
newspaper or producer
of a school play," had
authority to bar "speech
that is, for example, un-
grammatical, poorly writ-
ten, inadequately re-
searched, biased or pre-
judiced, vulgar or pro-
fane, or unsuitable for
immature audiences."
In dissent, Justice
Brennan said school offi-
cials acting in such a
manner "violated the
First Amendment's pro-
hibitions against censor-
ship of any student ex-
pression that neither dis-
rupts classwork nor in-
vades the rights of oth-
ers, and against any cen-
sorship that is not nar-
rowly tailored to serve its
purpose."
The case, Hazelwood


School District v. Kuhl-
meier, involved a Missou-
ri high school principal
who barred publication
by the school newspaper
of several articles on
teenage pregnancy and
the impact of divorce on
certain students.
The principal, Robert
Reynolds, said the arti-
cles were inappropriate
in that they might reveal
the identities of the preg-
nant students, who were
not named in the article,
and reference to sexual
activity and birth control
were improper for youn-
ger students who would
read the newspaper.
Also, Reynolds said,
one article contained a
sharp criticism by a
daughter of her father.
who was not allowed the
right to respond.
The censorship was
challenged by the stu-
dent members of the
newspaper staff as viola-
tion by a government, or
public, official of their
First Amendment rights
of free speech.
In the Hazelwood case,
White also cited the high
court's 1986 ruling that,
"First Amendment rights
of students in public
schools are not auto-
matically coextensive
with the rights of adults
in other settings" and
"must be applied in light
of the special character-
istics of the school envi-
ronment."
A key issue was wheth-


NEWS


SCIENCE/

MEDICINE


SPORTS




er the school newspaper
was a forum for public
expression or a part of fuse to sF
the school's curriculum, speech ti
The student newspaper, sonably b
written and edited by the advocate
school's Journalism II abuse, irr
class, clearly was part of or conduct
the school s curriculum, consiste
White concealed. shared va
Officials "must be able ized socia
to take into account the He addE
emotional maturity of could cen;
the intended audience in might "
determining whether to school wil
disseminate student other thar
speech or potentially on matte
sensitive topics." controver
"A school must re-
tain the authority to re-


30



33


34


onsor student
iat night rea-
e perceived to
drug or alcohol
responsible sex
t otherwise in-
nt with the
lues of a civil-
I order."
'd that schools
sor speech that
associate the
th any position
1 neutralization
rs of political
sy."A


Mini Mag,'27


MINI MAGAZINE


TALe O COUNT


STDJRENs TE1S
OF PSFREEDO
,SS


__


If









ENTERTAINMENT


'-


1


BOOMBA- HEY


BOOMBA-HEY
BALBOA
by Catherine Nelson
If you like high school
students, they love you
back!" Mark Sharen-
broich proved his point
as students laughed and ap-
plauded his anecdotes on
January 18.
Sharenbroich has been
speaking on a professional
level for ten years. His job,
which he considers a hob-
by, has taken him to over
800 high schools. "I'm
away from my family about
two nights per week," said
Sharenbroich. "It's always
hard to leave home. It's al-
ways wonderful to return."
During the hour long as-
semblies, one of Sharen-
broich's goals was to help
students to see their own in-


dividuality and value. "I
love to teach and try to help
high school students see
what the high school years
can be."
"I love being with teen-
agers. I see so much hope
and despair, excitement
and boredom, the best of
times and the worst of
times. It is such a time of
growth, when a person real-
ly begins to sense individ-
uality, direction, and inde-
pendence."
Sharenbroich's main goal
is to "choose life over exis-
tence. Celebrate who you
are, where you are cele-
brate life!" His story of a
small child, kissing its re-
flection in a mirror, de-
scribed this goal.
"High school if a time of
change and growth," said
Schrenbroich. "To grow,
one has to participate. Give
instead of just taking. Base
your participation on a
sense of self worth. When I
liee, respect, and value who
I am; I tend to like respect,
and value others. As I value
myself and others, I partici-
pate in positive growth
ways."
It's okay to compete in or-
der to be the best of who
you are, but avoid compar-
ing yourself to others with '1
wish lists' I wish I was
like that person instead of
like this Sharenbroich
advised. "You are no better
than anyone else. And no
one in this world is better
than you." A


"I absolutely loved my trip to Panama. Partly
because it's like walking through National
Geographic; partly because it is a significant part of
history in the making; mostly because the people are
so giving. The wonderful people I met are such
loving, giving people. It's so very easy to feel so
close to so many in such a short period of time. My
Panama friends truly have a special place in my
heart. Wishing my Balboa friends a life touched with
laughter, love, and tears ofjoy!"


Iherry






E ric Cherry on
the mo\'e! In-
\olled. Intense
creatikel) infectious. In-
spiring and thoughtful
Sa fe\ of the de-
scriptions audiences
have stated about Eric
Cherry. a talented musi-
cian. who is rising in rec-
ognition in the Christian
musical arena.
He has gained the
reputation of being de-
pendable. Christ-cen-
tered has become popu-
lar with the teens and
young adults he relates
to.
The mrraid of exper-
ience he draws from en-
rich his self-assured de-
liver) and aid in his em-
pathetic counseling.
He worked at a Chris-
tian camp where his
musical skills and down
right crazyman person-
ality were tested honed
and well utilized.
Eric s love for youth
and music came appar-
ent to his audience at
B.H.S. He was enjoyed by
the students and his sin-
cerity humor, and spiritu-
al challenge of his spiri-
tual message enhanced
his audience on March 7,
1989 at Balboa High
School. A


GARY DAVIS
bN Brian Lieberman


singer. songwriter,
and producer, all
in one, Gary Davis.
A description of Christian
Contempory music man.
During a two-week visit
to the Republic of Pana-
ma, Datis stopped in at
Balboa High School to
host two assemblies.
After a short Junior
ROTC demonstration,
Davis entertained his au-
dience with 'music with
a Message.


Using anecdotes frohr
his life, the 30-year old:,
Da\is. tried to relate his-.
teenage experiences to'
those of his audience.
The assemblies were-
designed to stir interest?
for a fullblown, but free:'
concert on Saturday,
February) 4, 1989. Thi4
concert was attended by
Balboa High School stu
dents and the public.
His message con-.
cerned his belief in God'
and Christian religion.
Dalis, visits high
school throughout the
country spreading his be-
lief in Jesus Christ. A


I


Mini Mag










MOVIES

BEST OF SCREEN

The Accidental Tourist
Dangerous Liaisons
A Fish Called Wanda
The Last Temptation of
SChrist
Little Dorvit
The Manchurian
Candidate
Mississippi Burning
Rainman
Who Framed Roger
Rabbit
Women on the Verge of
a Nervous Breakdown






WORST OF SCREEN

Another Woman
Aithur 2 on the Rocks
Betrayed
Cocktail
Colors
Far North
Frantic
Rambo III
Running on Empty
Young Guns


1. Anthrax
2. Metallica
3. Slayer
4. Megadeth
5. Motorhead
6. Scorpions
7. Loudness
8. Guns N' Roses
9. AC/DC
10. Cinderella


II
I I
I I
I
1111
I I
111
111
111
-II

I
I
I
I


--




- I




I
=-_-
m
m
m
I'
m,
-_ _
wI
mI
m
mm
mm
II
mm
mm


INS AND OUTS OF 1989


IN
Maine potatoes
Love Beads
Shooting quail
Cher
Bee-stung lips
Big U.S. cars
i1Cash
iPat Sajak
i!vn-1
INostalgia
Michelle Shocked
,Orange
iHelping the homeless
Madonna
Motorcycle fashion
Stews


OUT
California raisins
Crystals
Bashing Quayle
Liz
Liposuction
Small imports
Credit Cards
Vanna White
MTV
Futurism
U2
Pink
Wall Street greed
Tiffany
Bicycle fashion
Raw anything


IN
Over-40 rockers
Faxing
Blue suits
Laser disc
Toto
Batman
Regional Berrs
Brazilian pop
Cleavage
Keith Richards
Anne Rice
Cloth coats
Liquid protein diets
Ninetendo
Touring the USA
Candice Bergen


OUT
Under-20 posters
Phoning
Brown suits
DAT
Aliens
Mickey Mouse
Imported beers
African pop
Legs
Mick Jagger
Stephen King
Fur coats
Counting calories
Pictionary
International travel
Cybill Shepherd


Mini Mag/29


TRENDY IS OUT


by Jeri Wheeler


As the showrooms
unveiled the '89
fashions this fall.
there were crowds but
sales were low. Since mid
1987 womenswear sales
have been dismal. To-
day, most women work
and spend 3/4 of their
clothing budget on busi-
ness outfits.
Women have learned
to say no, and did so to
the X-rated mini and the
"walking shorts and jack-
et for the office."
Rising prices are being
met with lower quality.
Women complain that
salespeople never seem
to know about their mer-
chandise.
Contrary to this mens-
wear sales are booming. A


Information gathered
from NEWSWEEK De-
cember 5, 1988.


he Panama Canal,
a waterway that
links the Atlantic
and Pacific Oceans, cele-
brated its seventy-fifth
anniversary in 1989.
In 1903, a treaty be-
tween the United States
and Panama gave the
United States the right to
build a canal. On August
15, 1914. the first ship
transited.
In 1971, negotiations
designed to replace the
1903 pact began, and in
1971 two treaties were
signed. One treaty gave
Panama control of much
of the zone area begin-
ning October 1, 1978.
The other provided for
Panama to take full con-
trol of the canal on De-
cember 31, 1999. A


THE
PANAMA
CANAL







909~^19_4 4939
-' .r.:.'. 9'-l .r: a, -L.. C'.3 *- *.*-'!


I,
II
II
II
,,


I








-- NEWS


he 20th century
has been fraught
with change and
challenge. During the
last forty years a deco-
lonized world has been
dominated by two rival
superpowers, the United
States and the Soviet
Union, seeking military
and ideological suprem-
acy. Enter Mikhail Gorba-
chev, newest Soviet
President, with a sweep-
ing vision of a "new
world order" for the 21st
century. In his vision
there won't be a reliance
on military power or ide-
ology for dominance
among nations.
Gorbachev spoke of
his vision to the United
Nations in December,
1988. During his speech



Gorbachev's
vision
for a
new
world
order .



he included some entic-
ing initiatives: emigra-
tion, human rights, arms
control, and troop with-
drawal from Afghanistan
and Eastern Europe. His
new policies of openness
and economic growth in
the Soviet Union lend
themselves to support
this "new world order."
Gorbachev's gambit


does hale dangers for
the U.S. and Western Eur-
ope. Although these
ideas have been repack-
aged they seem new
when spoken of b a self-
assured Soviet leader
who has displayed a kind
of seductive charm the
world is not accustomed
to. His new thinking is
a significant shift, but the
U.S. remains warN of this
man whose timing and
magnetic personality
gihe him a most com-
manding presence on
the world stage. Skepti-
cism of course. is prob-
ably warranted and cer-
tainly prudent, however
the question is not
whether Gorbachev is
sincere but can he suc-
ceed?
The most immediate
challenge to the U.S. is to
preserve the unit) of the
North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization (NATO). and
then prepare for the
long-term economic bat-
tie for Europe. Gorba-
che% s initiates create a
grand opportunity for
George Bush and his new
team. He must redefine
America s role in the
world with a boldness
that could quickly bring
Bush out of the shadows
of both Gorbachev and
Reagan. Bush should
emphasize the common
ideals of free markets,
free trade and free peo-
ple. He should also lay
out a vision that tran-
scends Western goals in
what has been called the
cold war struggle. A
Infcimjlon .[ln'r.r cl rIIor TlriF Fjre
cerrit.ir 1-' i ,M The ic.-.rt,3rnl C Ch31
lenqc


PEACE AND
THE PLO

b) Jeri Wheeler

The PLO was per-
suaded to turn
from terrorism to
negotiation when the
American Jews accepted
the U.S. position, and for
once did not endorse Is-
raeli defiance. The Swed-
ish government also
served as an interme-
diar).
President Bush was
said to understand that
the best way to persuade
the PLO to take risk in
the peace process is to
reduce the security
threat, and one way is to
make Arafat keep his
word.
The peace talks began
to roll when U.S. Ambas-
sador Robert Pelletreau
met with four PLO offi-
cials in Carthage. He
commented that serious
discussion of how Israel
might trade land for
peace now seemed pos-
sible. Terms were set for
these negotiations by a
1975 promise by Kis-
singer which stated that
1) The U.S. will not deal
with the PLO until it ac-
knowledges Israel's right
to exist. 2) All countries


THE CHALLENGE
by Carie Morris


Mini Mag % 30


have the right to live in
peace with recognized
boundaries. And Reagan
added that 3) The PLO
renounce terrorism.
Arafat accepted Isra-
el s right to exist and was
reads to negotiate a set-
tlement to renounce ter-
rorism.
Two negotiations be-
gan in Stockholm on
Dec. 6, 1988. Palestin-
ians believe that these
talks should lead to an
international peace con-
ference. All discussion
will cease if the PLO is
found to still engage in
terrorism. A
The IloIluin rnlormalon was garnered
dlerCLI Ironrr Dcalinfy -lh r'3iai 18
NhEWSHWE December -6 1988


ARMENIA
b) Heather Lumpkin

picture a small, qui-
et soviet country
suddenly jolted by'
two earthquakes leaving
40 000 people dead and'
500,000 others home-
less. At 11:41 a.m. the|
first quake, registered atf
6.9 on the Richter scale,
shook Leninakan. Arme-:
nia's second largest city.,
A second quake followed.
shortly after, causing al-.
most as much damage-
as the first.
Eighty percent of Len
inakan was destroyedi
and almost as muc
damage was done to Kir
ovakan and Stepanavan
two smaller cities to the
east. Another city ol
16.000 people, Spitak,
was completely wiped
out from the intensity o
the tremors.
Reporters and eyewit-
nesses described th







area as complete chaos.
They also recollected
rescuers working around
the dock using what little
machinery was available.
but mostly clearing the
rubble with their bare
hands.
Although this was a
time of grief and shock, it
showed the growing
bonds between the su-
perpowers and other na-
tions. For the first time
since WWII, Soviets ac-
cepted help from the U.S.
and other Western coun-
tries.
Vartan Gregorian,
President of New York
Public Library and Brown
University, said, "Arme-
nians are like swallows,
they keep returning to
their home and rebuild-
ing because there is
nothing else to do." A
Ifrmation gaUthred rom NEWSWEEK

-THE CRISIS
by Care Morris
n Wednesday, De-
cember 14th,
1988, U.S. Am-
ssador to Panama, Ar-
ur Davis, spoke to the
merican Chamber of
commerce. This was
nly his second public
statement on Panama-
ian politics since his ar-
val nearly three years
go.
Mr. Davis spoke princi-
ally of the deteriorated
tte of the Panamanian
onomy, human rights,
stice and the rule of
w. Specifically, he reit-
ted that the economic
ss was brought on by
political crisis, not
S. sanctions. Mr. Davis
dressed his concern
ethe reports by the
anamanian Human
is Committee that
Izens were being held
hout due process of


law. The same commit-
tee has called repeatedly
for detainees to be al-
lowed to see their law-
yers and exercise their
right to a speedy trial.
The ambassador ex-
pressed his concern for a
free and democratic elec-
tion on May 7th, 1989.
should the current crisis
continue with no signifi-
cant change in leader-
ship. He indicated his de-
sire to be here for the
elections to see how it
turns out. However, he
followed the protocol of
submitting his resigna-
tion to President-elect
Bush's decision, the Am-
bassador plans to be in
Panama well into 1989.
He closed with the as-
surance that the United
States will meet its obli-
gations under the Pana-
ma Canal Treaty in what
he fervently hopes will be
a democratic Panama. Fi-
nally, he expressed soli-
darity and support for the
Panamanian people in
their continued aspira-
tions to restore democra-
cy, human rights and free
enterprise in Panama in
the year ahead. Informa-
tion gathered from the
Tropic Times December
16, 1988. a

THE
PERSIAN
GULF
by Thomas Myer

he ninety-five
month old Iran-
Iraq War came to
an end on August 20,
1988.
The war erupted, as
many others have, over a
border dispute.
The Shalt al-Arab river,
the junction of the Tigris
and Euphrates rivers
which flows down into


the Persian Gulf has
been repeatedly shifted
since World War Two.
The frontier question
nearly caused war in
1963 and 1968, but in
1975 the two nations
came to an agreement.
In 1979, the Islamic
Revolution exploded
through Iran, and Pres.
Hussein of Iraq felt that it
would threaten Iraqi sov-
ereignty.
He severed diplomatic
ties with Iran on Septem-
ber 17, 1980.
On September 22,
1980, Iraqi tanks surged
towards the Shatt al-Arab
on a 300 mile-wide front.
After heavy fighting
through October, the Ira-
qis took Abadan and
Khorramshar, both Key
Iranian cities in the oil-
rich Khuzistan province
of Iran. However, by June
of 1982, Iran had re-
pelled the invaders.
During the summer of
1982, Hussein made
many vain attempts to
procure a cease-fire
agreement.
From 1983 to 1988,
there occurred a slow
progression by both
sides towards total war.
Iran relied on human-
wave tactics: command-
ers would rush waves of
unarmed or poorly
armed men at Iraqi posi-
tions to wear down the
enemy: worse, conscripts
were rushed across min-
efields to clear them.
This disregard for hu-
man life caused over
500,000 men of draft age
to flee Iran for Turkey be-
tween 1983 and 1988.
In 1984, Iraq first used
the chemical agents Ta-
bun and Mustard Gas,
both supplied by the
West Germans.
Tabun, a nerve gas first
produced by the Nazis in
1936, causes nausea, di-


arrhea and convulsions
before death. Mustard
Gas, heavily used in
World War One, causes
bums, blindness and suf-
focation.
In April of 1984 Iraq be-
gan bombing Iranian oil
tankers; Iran retaliated
by attacking any vessel in
an Iraqi or Kuwaiti port-
of-call. This eventually
escalated into the "War
of the tankers."
The final step towards
total war was taken in the
summer of 1984: the
bombing of civilian
masses by both sides.
In early 1985, the fight-
ing for Basra began. Bas-
ra, Iraq's sole port on the
Persian Gulf, was nearly
invested by the Iranians,
but its defenders stood-
to and managed to push
the enemy back to the
border by February of
1986.
Basra proved to be the
turning point in the war
for Iran: she suffered
over 200,000 causalities
in the pitched battle for
the port.
A period of long build-
up ensued. On June 13,
1988, the stalemate was
shattered as Iran went on
the offensive. They were
being bottled up and dri-
ven back within only 19
hours.
On July 18, a war-wea-
ry Iran proposed a cease-
fire. Iraq answered with a
new offensive on July 22.
Tom by this final offen-
sive, Iran made a last bid
for peace on July 26, and
Iraq, under U.N. pres-
sure, accepted.
The cease-fire went
into affect on August 20.
A
Inormnnaon loomn NWSWEEl


Mini Mag/31













ELECTION 88


BN Carter cirliln
The IUJ88 American
Presidential Cani-
paign began eten
before Ronald Reagan
%ias elected for a second
term in 1984.
B\ 1988 (Jan Hallt and
Jesse Jackson had sc.
cured a significant edge
ocer their other Demo
cratic rivals During the
spring of 1988 8 Demo
cratic candidates ieree in
the running- Bruce Bab.
bitt Joe Biden Michael
Dukakis Richard Ge.
phardt Al Gore Garn
Mart Jesse Jackson and
Paul Simon
On the same token 6
Republicans placed a bid
for the president).
George Bush Bob Dole
Al Haig Jack Kemnp Fete
Du Pont and Pat Robert-
son
Late in the summer of
the same \car Demo-
crats and Republicans
chose their parts candi-
dates The DemocraLs In
Atlanta selected Massa-
chussets Governor Duka-
kis as their nominee,
%,ho in turn cho-.c It' ,a
Senator Llosd Benisin
as his running Iniat- The
Republicans in Ne\, Or-
leans chose Vice-Presi
dent George Bush and In
diana Senator Dan
Quayle as their presiden-
tial and \ice-presidential
picks respecti\ell.
In the heated months
between the Republican
contention and the elec
tion Dukakis and Bush
fought for %%hat has been
called the most powerful
elected olfice in the
world.
Presidential debates


%%ere hl d in lWinston Sa-
eIm North Carolina and
Los Angeles California
Most analIsts lelt that
Dukakis \%on the first de-
bate and Bush \,on the
second.
A \ice-presidential de
bate %\as held in Omaha
Nebraska. which h Bentsen
%as said to hate hon.
Until the final itceks of
the campaign Michael
Dukakis had trouble re.
\ealinq himscll and de.
fining his candidacy)
Man\ people \ietecd him
as a Carterst)le liber
al and technocrat wtho
wouldd destroy man\ of
the gains made b\ Ron.
aid Reagan in the past 8
\ears.
George Bush on the
other hand %%as otten
seetn as a tcak prixi-
leged aristocrat %,ho had
trouble ith his grammnal
and diction. In the final
wLceks 01 the campaign
Dukak'i campaigned on
a more progress\ e lib.
eral theme BN then he
had 1inall\ declined his
own ( anipaign s direc-
tion- thlCe ieeks before
clctlinn night
[i'spit>. the last minilute
surge in the polls b M Du.
kakis that put a score in
the Bush Campaign
Ameticans oierhellr
ingl\ Loted Gcoige Bush
as the 41st President of
the United States with a
54"'.-461., margin in the
popular xote and a 426
112 difference in the
electoral college A

Information gathered
fiom Newsweek Not. 21
1988 and TIME, 21
1988


George Bush


G eorqe Herbert
Walker Bush \was
born in Milton
Massachusetts on June
12 1924 tie graduated
from Phillips Acadenm in
Andolcr Mass. in June
1942 and received his
wings and commission in
the U 5 NaIy at age 18
the youngest pilot at that
time Me entered and
graduated from Yale Uni-
\ersity artei Woild War II
when he became an oil
businessman in Te\as
from 1948-1966
Bush then began his
political career \when
elected to the U.S. House
of Representatives and
%ias re-elected in 1968.


From 1971-1973 he
seized diligently as U.S.
Ambassador to the Unit.
ed Nations, and as Chair-
man of the Republican
National Committee
from 1973-1974, when
he then became the
Chief ol the U.S. Liaison
Office in the People s Re-
public of China. During
the period of 1976-1980
he served as Director of
the Central Intelligence
Agency .
Ronald Reagan chose
Bush as his running mate
in the 1980 Republican
convention- he was elect-
ed as ,ice-President on
November 4, and shorn
in on January 20. 1981
as the 43rd Vice-Presi-
dent of the U.S. and
served with Reagan until
earl\ 1989
Bush was nominated
b\ the Republicans to
run in the 1988 election
and became a trium-
phant 41st President of
the U.S. on January 20
1989.
President Bush and
our First Lad) Barbara
Bush along with Vice-
President Quayle and his
wife %will lead us from
1989 through 1992. A


OUTLOOK '89


MNo new [ta\(
Balarncc the federal budget
SMllintiinl dfclens
Continue Reagaqnoiics
Remaiin actitk in foiclqn policy
Create 30 million nc\\ jot)s


'i M








: SCIENCE


SPACE
SHUTTLE
DISCOVERY
by Heather Lumpkin

T he world held its
breath and waited
as the final sec-
onds were counted
down. 3, 2, 1, blast
off. The Space Shuttle
Discovery had a predawn
launch on October 6,
1988. It had been three
years since the Challeng-'
er's explosion. Dirig--
those three.-yeias, engi-
neers wortted vigorously
to red n e shuttle,
and p A ae1lrTi
space. '
The shuttle was
launched from Kennedy
Space Center into crystal
blue skies. However, a
change in weather
threatened the shuttle's
wings, posing a minor
setback.


Once in space, an ice-
clogged duct presented a
problem. The astronauts
had to increase the heat
in order to melt the ice.
When a special commu-
nications antenna ex-
tended into space from
the cargo bay doors, it
failed to rotate properly
and was rendered use-
less for the rest of the
fight.
The astirnauts were
able to perform success-
ful routine duties without
any .:najr complica-

Although' .JASA and
-the United' States were
" satisfied with a -success-
- fu-Jaunch, many critics
remain dubious. NASA's
associate administrator.
Richard Truly, comment-
ed "Somewhere in the fu-
ture of our country I think
we are going to have an-
other accident." A
Information gathered from PEWSIWECE.
October 10 1988. tiRofl Litoff p22-27.


TWO GRAY WHALES

"The human persistence and determination
by so many individuals on behalf of the whales
shows mankind s concern for the environment.
It has been an inspiring endeavor said Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan after two gray whales es-
caped entrapment from the arctic ice on Octo-
ber 28. 1988.
Due to the efforts of a team of Eskimos. scien-
tists, environmentalists. oil workers and two
Soviet ice-breaking cargo ships, they then made
their way through a 220-mile long channel to
open sea.
The rescue was time consuming because of
bitter cold and shifting ice, but after three weeks
of delay, word came from circling helicopters
that the whales had made it through the chan-
nel safely.

by Stephanie Russellburg and Brian Lieberman


WHO'S
RIGHT?
by Rebecca Wetzstein

We have kids be-
ing born who are
going blind with-
out this research," Ron-
ald Boothe at Emory Uni-
versity's Yerkes Center
said. "By me doing this
research, we can prevent
them from going blind.
Most people, given that
choice, will think it isjus-
tified." That is the way
some people feel about
the highly controversial
and moral issue of using
animals for research.
There is also another
view to the issue. Roger
Caras, a naturalist, sums
up this view, "I believe
that animals have the
right not to suffer pain or
fear of physical depriva-
tion inflicted upon them
by us."
In one year alone, 17-
20 million animals were
used to conduct labora-
tory experiments.
Here at Balboa High
School, animals are used
for education. Frogs and
cats are two of the most
commonly used animals,
and it is a question that
is not easily put to rest
due to the two-faceness
of the whole issue. There
are benefits for humans
and pain for animals.
Who has the right to a
happier life? A
Information gathered from hrEWSWEEIL
October 10. 198& December 26. 19B8.
* Of Pain and Progress


AIDS

by Carie Morris

he Acquired Im-
mune Deficiency
Syndrome, other-
wise known as AIDS, is
and has been attacking
the United States and
many other nations.
Thousands of people
across the country are
testing positive to the
AIDS virus. Since June
1981, a total of 72,766
cases of the virus have
been reported in the
U.S., according to the
Centers for Disease Con-
trol. In 1988, eleven
states had -i increase of
100 perceitore report-
ed cases. d
The virus. spreading
with n kn i-cure, but
advance% Dthl in the
knowledge of AIDS_ ve
been m* _et- tly
their as een ssi-
ble.0, iM between
th. bact organism
Treporun~aM pallidum,
theIb.ig that causes
syphilis, a the AIDS
virus.
Wheth er not there is
a link between AIDS and
syphilis is a problem
arising in the U.S. that
may be well precedent in
history. Only time will
give the answer to the
question of what AIDS
really is. But can the na-
tion just sit and wait
while the number of
cases sky-rocket? A
Information gathered from rmpik times
January 1989


Mini Mag/33









SPORTS


OLYMPICS

he 1988 Olympic
Summer Games were
held in Seoul, South
Korea, "Land of the Morn-
ing Calm." The games, last-
ing only 16 days, were sev-
en years in the making.
They began with the color-
ful pageantry expected from
the Orient.
They were the first Olym-
pics in 16 years free from a
major boycott, and to pit
the U.S. versus the U.S.S.R.
East met West in the most
memorable competition
ever. Although scarred by
the biggest drug scandal in
Olympic history, the ath-
letes shone through with
majestic displays of sports-
manship and spirit.
Everyone was awed when
Greg Louganis almost met
disaster when he smashed
his head on the spring-
board, but bounced back
and won gold, winning a
second straight Olympics.
Both male and female So-
viet gymnastic teams domi-
nated the competition. All
gymnasts were schooled by
Sushinova, Romania, who
took 3 of 4 golds. The U.S.
female team was denied a
medal. During Kelly Garri-
son's event, teammate
Rhonda Fane removed the
springboard and stayed on
the platform. A wary East
German judge cited a rarely
used rule and accused Fane
of coaching Garrison. They
were penalized half of a
point and E. Germany's
team was able to win the
bronze; foul play, maybe.
Many records were
broken and history made in
swimming. Anthony Nesty
won Surinam's first Olympic
medal. Costa Rica also won
their first medal in the
Olympic competition. Matt
Biondi, U.S., won 5 golds
and set a world record for


the fastest swimmer. Janet
Evans U.S. Look home a
gold for each of her 3 races.
Kristen Otto, E. Germany.
showed who was the best
female swimmer by gliding
to 6 golds.
The U.S. sent its strongest
volleyball team to Seoul.


FOUL

PLAY...

MAYBE?


QBed by John Stork, who
led them to the medal
round. Karch hiral,. consid-
ered the best in the world,
and Steve Timmons with
his patented spike helped
conquer the Soviets and
capture the gold.
In basketball we wit-
nessed the U.S. fall from
glor). For the first time. the
U.S. team played for less
than gold setting for bronze.
Coach Thompson team lost
to the Soviets in their first
meeting since 1972. The
Soviets beat ugoslavia for
the gold. Oscar Schmidt.
Brazil set an Olympic re-
cord by scoring 55 points in
one game. The U.S. women
weren t challenged in their
quest for gold.
Tennis, one of the original
Olympic eents at Athens in
1896. was reintroduced to
the Olympics after 64 years.
The whole U.S. had more
than its share of controler-
sy in boxing. When Cuba
boycotted on behalf of N.


Korea the U.S. was picked
to sweep the golds. The U.S.
found opponents and
judges had other ideas. Ray
Jones dominated in boxing
throughout the Olympics
but was robbed of his gold
after fighting Korean Park Si
Hun. Tood Foster was or-
dered to refight Korean
Chung because Chung was
confused by a bell from an-
other ring. Foster beat
Chung again. The U.S. did
win 3 golds. 3 silvers and 2
bronzes howe er.
In the race to find the fas-
test man. Ben Johnson blew
away the pack and the
clock. Later he was dis-
qualified for using steroids
and Carl Lewis received a
belated gold. Lewis also
won gold for a second time
in the Long Jump a record.
Kenya swept the 800m to
10 000m races. The fasted
woman was Florence Grif-
fith-Joyner, who took 3
golds. Jackie Joyner-Ker-
se). U.S. won gold in the
Neptathalon and Louise Rit-
ter. U.S.. won the High
Jump for the first time in 20
years.
The 132 pound pocket-
Hercules Naim Silevman-
oglu, who defected from
Bulgaria to Turkey proved
to be the biggest little man
in the sport of weightlifting.
In wrestling. Kenny Mon-
day U S.. won gold against
the defending Soxiet
champ. Ironically, Monday
had just learned how to
wrestle 6 months earlier.
The marathon which
ends the Oympics. was won
by an Italian. Gelinda Bor-
din. It was the first time an
Italian has had a shot in 80
years. History again was
made in the momentous
Games of 88.

by Marc Ferguson


STEROIDS


by Mark Caffrey.


he 1988 Summer
Olympics, in Seoul
Korea, were an
historical event. Many
countries won their first
medals ever and several
world records were shat-
tered. The Olympics,
however, will be infa-
mous because of ster-
oids.
Steroids surfaced twice
in the Olympics. First,
two Bulgarian weight-
lifters were disqualified
and stripped of their gold
medals, which led to the
entire Bulgarian weight-i
lifting team leaving
Seoul. The second and:
most noted time steroids
appeared was in the 100-
meter dash. Canadian
sprinter Ben Johnson:
shattered his own world
record and breezed to
the gold medal. Howev-i
er, he failed his urinaly-1
sis, which was found to:
have traces of large
amounts of steroids, and:
was stripped of his world
record and gold medal.1
Ben Johnson left SeouL
in a scandal and upon re-
turning home to Canada,
he was banned from
competing on the Cana-
dian National team for,
life.
This tragic display of
doing anything to win"'
brought media attention
to the enormous prob-
lem of steroid abuse.
Steroids are a deriva-
tive of the male hormone
testosterone, which
builds muscle size and
strength. Athletes take


Mini Mag q







:his drug to increase
heir athletic ability and
performance In recent
rears, however, steroids
surfaced outside of
sports. Bodybuilders to
>olicemen have been
mown to take the drug,
>ut until the Olympic
scandal, nothing was
lone about it.
After the Ben Johnson
disqualification, society
md the sporting world
>egan to take action. The
national Football League
where steroid use is esti-
nated highest) imple-
nented a steroid testing
ilan that will begin next
,ear. Several states have
passed strict steroid dis-
ribution laws in an ap-
parent commencement
if action against ster-
oids. Until steroids are
moved from society
hey will continue to
blemish all aspects of
ports in America. A






THE
IRISH
RISE TO
PROMINENCE




by Erik Staffeldt

It was a perfect after-
noon for football, the
last seconds ticked
off the clock. The score-
board yelled the final
score of 51-30.


On this October after-
noon, many people felt
that the National Cham-
pionship was over. The
blue and gold team of
Notre Dame marched out
victoriously as the Miami
Hurricanes staggered out
behind.
With two and one-half
months left in the sea-
son, experts predicted an
Irish National Champion-
ship.
The Irish reached their
pinnacle on January 2
with a 34-21 victory over
the previously undefeat-
ed West Virginia. This vic-
tory closed a perfect (12-
0) season for the Irish,
giving them an unprec-
edented eighth National
Championship.
The Hurricanes re-
bounded admirably,
from their one loss, to
finish the season (11-1).
Florida State Semi-
noles' one set back was
against the Hurricanes in
the first game of the sea-
son. The Seminoles
fought back for a third
place ranking.
In a look back at indi-
vidual accomplishments
Barry Sanders cannot go
unnoticed. The 5'9" run-
ning b~.k_ Broke or tied
more than 30 NCAA col-
lege football records.
Barry Sanders exploded
onto the college football
scene to capture the
Heisman Trophy. This
season will be, without a
doubt, the most remem-
bered Irish rise to promi-
nence. A


FINAL
"TOP 20"
IN COLLEGE
FOOTBALL



1. NOTRE DAME (12-
0)
2. MIAMI (11-1)

3. FLORIDA ST. (11-
1)

4. MICHIGAN 19-2-1)

5. AUBURN (10-2)

6. CLEMSON (10-2)

7. USC (10-2)

8. UCLA (10-2)

9. W. VIRGINIA (11-
1)

10. NEBRASKA (11-2)

11. OKLAHOMA (9-3)

12. OKLAHOMA ST.
(10-2)

13. ARKANSAS (10-2)

14. WASHINGTON ST.
19-3)

15. SYRACUSE (10-2)

16. GEORGIA (9-3)

17. INDIANA (8-3-1)

18. ALABAMA (9-3)

19. n.N.C. STATE (8-
3-1)

20. SO. MISSISSIPPI
(10-2)


THE
WORLD SERIES

by Enrique Marquez


The 1988 World Se-
ries was a great
surprise. The Oak-
land Athletics versus the
Los Angeles Dodgers.
The Athletics were fa-
vored in the beginning of
the Series. Experts pre-
dicted that they would
win all four games in a
row. Their team was
packed with potential.
Jose Canseco was the
most talked about, and
the first Major League
player to hit more than
40 homeruns and steal
40 bases. He led a team
of stalwarts that included
two consecutive "Rookie
of the Year" selections:
Mark McGwuire and Walt
Weiss. The athletics had
power packed pitching
with R.H. starter Dave
Stewart and R.H. reliever
Dennis Eckersley.
Facts and statistics
showed that Dodgers
were the "underdog" in
the game to be played
against the Athletics. De-
spite the figures and the
potential they held for
their success, the Dodg-
ers played to the best of
their capability.
In the first game of the
series, the Dodgers' in-
jured M.V.P., Kirk Gib-
son, smashed a game
winning homerun in the
bottom of the ninth with
a runner on second base.
The homerun came with
a full count and two outs
off of Dennis Eckersley,
one of baseball's finest
relief pitchers.
The Dodgers won the
game is said to be one of
the finest games ever
played in the history of
the Series. A


Mini Mag/35

































OUR OWN PACE


he time was here.
The officials had
been chosen and the
white chalk separated the
rivals.
The 1988 Football Jam-
boree kicked off what prom-
ised to be an exciting athle-
tic season. Football tradi-
tionally marks the begin-
ning of sports at BHS. Foot-
ball begins with Jamboree
and ends with Homecom-
ing.
Shortly after, the girls'
sports season jumped to a
start with basketball sea-
son. Boys basketball, boys
tennis, and track and field
followed the end of these
seasons.
Swimming, girls tennis
and baseball brought the


last stretch of the sports
season to a finish.
Towards the end of the
school year, the athletes
competed in several differ-
ent sports ranging from vol-
leyball to soccer.
All the sporting activities
were well attended. "Turn
out at our sporting activi-
ties are quite good here at
BHS for the reason that the
teams are well balanced
and provide competitive
and entertaining action,"
commented Reyna Royo.
For most of the sporting
activities at BHS, the ath-
letes were chosen by a draft
system. Each athlete tried
out, showcasing their tal-
ents. They were then placed
on Balboa High School


Bulldogs, Balboa High
School Red Machine, Cur-
undu Junior High School
Cougars, and the Panama
Canal College Green Devils.
These teams practiced long
hours preparing them-
selves for each sport.
The four teams and the
Cristobal Junior-Senior
High School Tigers compet-
ed against one another sev-
eral times throughout the
different sports seasons.
"To do our best, we had
to set our own pace to
make sure we wouldn't
bum out before the sports
season ended," said Mark
Home to summarize the
sports season.


Interception "It's something that
is routine for Carlos Welch," said
fellow teammate Justin Winters.
Welch skillfully snatched the pass
intended for Daryl Moore of the
Cougars.


-1


Sports I 36


Introduction/37







Cutting up field, Cougar Serglo McKenzie's
first down set things up for a TD.


ss2 rA/T q



T#9 Pie?1?2


a yellow penalty flag. "Balboa
Red Machine must be playing
the Balboa Bulldogs." The Red Ma-
chine Booster Club yelled and rat-
tled their "Big Red" cans at the offi-
cials from the stands.
Football was a well attended
sport for various reasons. One of
the reasons was the great number
of students involved In the sport.
Four cheerleading squads of eight
members each, and four teams of
forty players, including managers
were seen on the field. The band,
the dance team, and JROTC mem-
bers also participated in the many
Friday night games. In the stands,
friends and family alike cheered
their favorite team on.
"The competition between the
teams was a lot closer this year.
Because of that and the cheer-
leaders, the crowds were encour-
aged to participate more by cheer-
ing their favorite teams onto victo-
ry," said Lisa Moffltt, cheerleader of
the Curundu Junior High School
Cougars.
A former S.A. bookkeeper noted

Beads ofsweat trickled down their faces as
anxiety overwhelmed the players. Red and
Devils prepared for a head-on collision Sep-
tember 23.


that football generated more funds
than all of the other sports com-
bined.
Mr. Holland, Principal of Balboa
High School, stated, "Football has
taken over as the American sport
and therefore is the number one
spectator sport in the United
States." He went on to add, "Stu-
dents show much more enthusi-
asm and spirit at the beginning of
the year than the rest of the year."


With a minute left, Bulldog Ken Jenkins up-
set the Devils by scoring the only TD.









11


L ., "
Hardwork and team companionship paid off
for these peppy Bulldog cheerleaders.
Sherri Anderson and Karen Kirby led their
team in a chant.

"You have to keep concentrating on the
game, so when it's your time to go on the
field, you perform," said Javier Velez of the
Curundu Cougars.


Sports I 38


Football/39












JAMBOREE U


OFF


he BHS Chiva raced to Cris-
tobal for the Jamboree. The
football player was anxious
to hurry up and get off the bumpy
bus. As he gazed out the window,
he concentrated on the plays. Only
a few hours remained until the
competition began.
Early in the evening, it was diffi-
cult to tell which team would finish
first. The champions from last year,
Red Machine, recaptured their pre-
vious title. The only obstacle in


their trek to glory was the Curundu
Cougars, but Red came away from
that game with a tie.
By 10:30 the Balboa Red Machine
was awarded the Jamboree trophy
for the second year.
However, the team and most of
the fans missed this great moment
of victory. Micheal Joseph of Red
said he was, "taking a HOT show-
er," while the trophy was being pre-
sented.


Weary-eyed Jason Sweeny takes a well de-
served break at Jamboree '88.


"Our quick reacting linebackers and our fast
defensive backs make the defense the best
part of our game," stated Marc Ferguson of
the Cougars. Jermaine Puryear, #53, is a
prime example of the Cougars tenacious de-
fense.
Running through the heart and soul of the
Red Machine Defense, Edward Winkler of the
Balboa Bulldogs finds out it's not an easy
thing to do.


The job of a quarterback is not to win
games, but to make the right decisions.
Dennis Cowles shows he's got what it takes.


Sports


























Blocked Terry Hunter of the Devils, with his
out-stretched arms, bats down Randy Jone's
pass.

Without wasting any time. Red Celebrated a
victorious homecoming. The final game of
the season was held on November 10th. Red
defeated the Bulldogs 14-9.


End of the Line


Homecoming

% 1 we've waited a long
time for this one, and
W it feels great to beat
the Bulldogs! exclaimed Stephanie
Helin, veteran Red cheerleader,
after winning the Homecoming
game.
"Even though we didn't have the
personnel that we've had in the
past, it's hard to believe we lost,"
lamented Lisa Deslondes, Bulldog


cheerleader.
It had been at least five years
since Red had beaten the Bulldogs
and the victory was welcomed by
Red fans.
"Both teams tried extremely
hard and fought for victory, but it
was obvious that the Red Machine
was the better of the two teams due
to hard work and good coaching,"
said Ray Underwood, president of
the Red Machine Booster Club.
The Homecoming game on No-
vember tenth marked the end of
the football season.


Reach for the skyl Red cheerleaders kept
their team inspired throughout the cham-
pionship game.


Concenlrationi Daryl Fishbough sets his aim
on the quarterback during Ihe homecoming
Same.


Red Machine/41









* Es AJ7ACH/A6F


Stephanie telln, Reyna Royo. Kara Twohy,
Dawn McArthur. Katie Goodwin, Lisa Palm,
Kim Thompson, Andrea Ruddock


Being a football coach
Is a tough challenge.
The Job requires dis-
cipline, dedication, and en-
thusiasm for the game. The
coach really needs to enjoy
football as a sport In order
to pass along winning quall-
ties to the team. A football
coach tries to Instill sports-
manship, pride, and com-


mltment Into the players.
Most Importantly, the
coach teaches the team
that winning means per-
forming to the best of their
ability, playing fair, and en-
joying the game. Win or
lose, a team will always
come out ahead if It accom-
plishes those three things.
As a coach, I feel successful
when the players on my
team have enjoyed the sea-
son, learned something
about the game of football,
and have become more
confident In their own abili-
ties. Go Redl


RJ4 Dsoki1A


"The guys depend on us to get everyone
motivated and focused on the football
game," stated Dawn McArthur. Red cheer-
leader.


Front Row Derek Smith. Mike Joseph, Pat
Fahy, Warren Stephens. Dennis Cowles. Da-
vid Daniel, Leonardo Brooks, Darrio Dennis,
Luis Cantu, Carlos Welch Middle Row -
Leann McConaughey, Kara Twohy, Katie
Goodwin, Reggie Davis. Ted Joyce. Rick Az-
carate, Gerald Gordon, Francisco Leone,
Ronaldo Olton. Robert Vose, David Lipman,
Torrey Gragg, John Haning. Cliff Ayo, Erich
Scheman. James Myers. Andrea Ruddock,


One can put the opposition in a hole if you
have a good punter. Torrey Gragg. punter
for Red. pinned the Bulldogs deep in their
own territory.


RED MACHINE SCOREBOX

RED MACHINE OPPONENTS
25 CMS 0
7 PCC 0
21 CJHS 6
7 WHITE 7
34 CMS 0
10 PCC 6
13 CJHS 6
14 WHITE 9


Kim Thompson, Zenia Neely Back Row -
Coach Erhart, Jackie Brogle, Reyna Royo,
Dawn McArthur. Nesa Helm, Reynaldo Royo,
Kevin Barnes, Blair Bates. George Williams,
Gary Grosidler. Justin Winters. Todd Under-
wood, Harlen Crouch, Darren Chastain,
Robert Flumach, Dean Wilkinson, Ivan Levy,
Fred Chauvin, Gary Crowder, Stephanie Me-
lin. Lisa Palm. Marcos Gonzalez, Lisa Good-
win. Coach Dahlstrom


Sports R 42


Noted for their outstanding support, these
Red Machine fans shook their homemade
rattles and waved their "Number-One
Hands" at every Red football game. With
their resounding spirit they cheered their
team on to unanimous victory.




Sweeping around the comer, Dario Dennis
of Red keeps his team's scoring drive alive
by gaining a key first down.


Red Machine/43









^BUZD O6S\


HIGH ANXIETY


he way I see it, football is my
time to vent frustration. I fi-
gure, the angrier I am, the
better I play just play the whis-
tle. Going to the game a little
peeved gets my adrenaline
flowing.
Things start poppin' as I step into
the locker room. The place smells
worse than it did yesterday yes-
terday I had sworn it reeked like the
inside of sweaty topsiders. I climb
over the mess: helmets, pads, bo-
dies. I reach for my locker-"gag!" I
forget to take my clothes home
from last practice. My raw nerves
start to sizzle.


People all around me are argu-
ing, pushing, shoving all ego
bruising actions. Tension builds,
and I get defensive. "Hey! Will
someone help me tape my ankle!"
No response.
Everyone is busy doing some-,
thing that resembles nothing. Then
Coach walks in and yells, "Backs
and receivers, meeting in the
health room, MOW!" My pads are
only half on. I hobble off to the
briefing; I know better than to keep
Coach waiting.
Who knows why they called the
meeting anyhow? They said the
same old stuff they say in practice.


Anxiety mounts. The repetition lets
my mind wander. "Calm down
nerves!" ten minutes til warm-up.
Self-doubt creeps into my mind.
"What if I really blow it?"
Warm-up begins. It's great to be
doing something finally! I'm at
my peak! Talk about pressure! I
stretch out yelling the counts. Sort
of helps to relax, and at least I have
something to do.
It's time, and I'm ready to give it
my all. We say our team prayer, and
I pray that they get the ball first so
we can nail them.


Julie Wilson. Adriane Rowley, Angle Garcia.
Sherri Anderson. Karen Kirby, Lisa Des-
Londes. Judith Clarke. Bulldog Mascot.
Brandy Huff


First Downi Running up the middle, Carl
Nesbitt picks up a first down for his team.


110 11111


BULLDOGS SCOREBOX

BULLDOGS OPPONENTS

7 PCC 0
35 CJHS 0
19 CHS 0
7 RED 7
0 PCC 0
14 CJHS 6
28 CHS 0
9 RED 14


U


A


High Spiritsl The Bulldog cheerleaders kept
their team's spirit high throughout the sea-
son.


Intense Pressurel Robert Thrift of the Bull-
dogs delivers a short pass before paying the
price.


Bulldogs/45


Front Row- Angle Garcia. Sherri Anderson, Lampas. Back Row- Shannon Winters, Jason
Julie Wilson, Karen Kirby. Lisa Deslondes. Henry. Fernando Vasquez, Jurrien Van Den
Brandy Huff, Judith Clarke, Adriane Rowley. Akker. Christian Charris, Joseph Clark, Nan-
Second Row- Eric Holland, Ralph Furlong, cy Tiblier.
Daryl Fishbough, Eric Hajduk, Robert Thrift.
Lawrence Groom. Third Row- Andre Goss.
Enrique Marquez, Jeff Knappenburger. Ted
Alvarado. Carl Nesbitt, Robert Nieves, Steve
Torres. Linda Reilly. Fourth Row- Coach
Howe, Alan Matheney. Louis Mitchner. Jay
Stevens, Roger Taylor. Mike Calapini, Alex
Stirling, Jennifer Ender. Fifth Row- Coach
Martinez, Kirby Kaufman, Casey Morris, Bull-
dog Mascot. Ken Jenkins, Doug Coffey, Ana

All Smilesi Managers. Ana Lampas and Linda Reilly, celebrate after a Bulldog victory.









GCRFFVN DEVILS


Up the middle, David Wall takes an "Adam
Coon hand-off" for 3 hard earned yards.










When all else falls go fshng

"When all else fails go fshingl :f


Top to bottom: Tanya Cuellar, Teresa Mon-
son, Tanya Parr, Monique Serrano, Tanya
Navarro, Elizabeth Costa. Behind: Kathy
Harrington, and Kristine Stromberg.


MANIC MANAGING


et our water now! Dry the foot-
balls! Hustle! Hustle! Whew! It
often seems that the managers
do more running and respond-
ing to orders than the football players
do.
Football managers are part of the
team. They go through muddy initi-
ations and participate in sloppy games.
They are there to give support and en-
couragement; to dry the footballs dur-


ing rainy games: to run water to thirsty
players: to provide minimal medical
care; and even to ride the hot, smelly,
sweaty buses.
A Green Devil manager said that
managing helped her make friends and
feel like an important part of the team.
"It got me into football spirit. It was fun
to be on the sidelines, rather than in
the stands."


Running balls and taking stats were Just a
fewjobs done by managers Denise Alberga
and Ashley Anderson during games.


Front Row: David Lamer. Benny Telesca,
James Dickerson, Sergio Gomez, Julian
Waldron, Ricky Larkin. John Haines, David
Wall, John Shaffer, Joe Daigle. Edward
Woodward. Middle Row: Robert Meyers, Mi-
cheal Banaslck. Roberto Nieves. Adam
Coon. John Hutt, Fred Davis. Chris Findley.


Ken Crowley. Robert Kimbrough, Dave Vas-
quez, Ben Keethler, Jose Gallardo. Back
Row: Eddylynn Corrigan. April King. Denise
AlIt,:r.i Doug Hanning. Russell Stromberg,
Rick ( nicr Kevin Steil. Steve Novan, Roddy
Mokillo, Jason Sweeney, Robert Petrosky,
Terry Hunter, Charles Thomas. Tim Denly.


GREEN DEVILS SCOREBOX

GREEN DEVILS OPPONENTS
O WHITE 7
0 RED 7
24 CM5 6
6 CJM5 16
0 WHITE 0
6 RED 10
19 CNH 6
8 CJHS 12


linebackerr Blitzl Ted Joyce of the Red Machine
forced Adam Coon, quarterback, to throw an
complete pass,
Unable to advance, the Tigers were stopped
old by a hot Devil defense.


Green Devils/47


E~I~F~


Sports










cobnRS1


It's a thankless job, but managers Tracy
Perez and Erin Hatchett are able to sweat it
out.


Tamara Simmons, Becca Wetzstein, Leanne
Thrift, Linda Lee. NIchole Stames, Rachel
Berger, Yvonne Fishbough, Lisa Moffitt


On the prowl, the Cougar defense stops
Devil running back, David Vasquez, cold be-
fore he could get to the outside.


V-I-C-T-O-R-Y I


Friday night games are not what cheer-
leading Is all about. Its a weekly commit-
ment, and other after school activities take
second priority. Finding time to do home-
work is a real chore. All cheerleaders need
to be at practice to make it worthwhile and
productive. Execution of stunts and cheers
are made possible only If everyone puts In
one hundred percent.
Monday seem to start off slowly. We have
to force ourselves to go to practice. We talk
about the successes and errors made on
Friday night.
Tuesday's practice Is a little more struc-
tured. and more is accomplished. New Ideas
start flowing In the creative minds of each
cheerleader.
Wednesday Arghl It s mid-week and
posters still need to be made. "Wait, we still
have Thursday to do them before the pep
rally."
Oh yeah, the pep rally. Each cheerleader
needs to be reminded that she must bake
goodies. Games need to be planned out,
cheers must be chosen and practiced, so
that the guys will be proud of their cheer-
leadin.i squad.
Tnurs, id. We walk the halls in a daze,
speaking only when spoken to. We have ab-
solul ,i n I nf J, .Dl l UI i, rvnci ls >.,
IL'ra Push rus|n lur ll -- i si uc i" 1 Ir fi is %1 h
the posters iin i ,uui iirionrll li Ic cheers
arid l r.anli quirkl, UiclIllc Ill e DCP sall. The
cheerleaders do one or two spectacular
cheers to boost team spirit and pride. Time
to snack, what an experience Players every-
where demanding goodies. Afterward the
cheerleaders take on the duty of cleaning up




Sports | 48


the mess.
Friday This is the day we show our
team colors at school by wearing our "day
outfits." After school we finally get to go
home and rest before the game. Getting to
the game about 45 minutes early gives us
enough time to set up the posters and then
warm-up.
The game begins and somehow we make
it through the night that is full of excitement,
Joy, and stress. All energy is generated to
cheering our team to victory.




COUGARS SCOREBOX

COUGARS OPPONENTS

0 WHITE 35
31 CHS 6
6 RED 21
16 PCC 6
6 WHITE 14
20 CM5 6
6 RED 13
12 PCC 8




People don't realize the importance of the
punter until it costs them the game or a
touchdown. Ryan Coon, punter for the Cur-
undu Cougars.


Front row Kevin Damon. Roberto Sealey,
Rick Szymanski. Edward McDonald. Frank
Digiovanni, Jim McGinnis, Kedar Mason, Jer-
maine Jermott, Henry Curry, Martin Tremb-
lay, and Lydia Garrido. Second row Angel
Brito, Raymond Hunter, Mark Perez, Che Bu-
t l N1 .i. o M 'h ,:nz.i rick Threat, Juan Bar-
rr le5 ic,.hn Pjnji,;.. David Larkin. Darnel
Gardner, and Jennifer Carr. Third row Ja-
vier Tosado, Manuel Love, Ryan Coon, Car-
los McKenzie, Jermaine Puryear, Shado


Beardeaux, Rene Acuna, Charles Taggart,
Danny Magee, David Calapini, and Erin Hat-
chett. Fourth row John Burnett, Marc Fer-
guson. Jason Gragg. Steven Wheeler, James
Naum, Randy Jones, Tony Moreno, Tracy
Perez, and Amy Vowell. Back row Coach
Bales, and Coach McGann.


Cougars/49


~F~e~




Up for Grabsl Lori Merrill, of the
Cougars tipped away Jeri Wheel-
er's hopes for a Red fast break.


Jump Start


he jump ball pops
up; one team takes
possession. A quick
pass, a little dribble, and
then a shot. Time slows as
the ball floats through the
air toward the hoop. The
fans hold their breath,
teammates whisper their
thoughts aloud, all eyes are
are gazing SWISHI The
first two points are on the
board.
So began the 1988 Girls'



^^RED

MACHINE


Basketball season re-
plete with a lot of action -
an air ball or a "brick" off
the backboard, whatever
the case, the fans still
cheered and the team-
mates hoped. Afterward
"Oh well, it was just one
game. We'll try harder next
time," said Shannon Lord
of the Bulldogs. These
thoughts might have filled
the minds of many players,
because no team went un-


defeated.
Individual preparation
proved to be as essential as
team work. If one player
had a bad game, the whole
team suffered. If the team
leader was off, it might have
meant disaster. "I looked
up to both Jeri Wheeler and
Valina Scottland. They have
both been playing for a long
time," stated Michelle Hay-
den of the Red Machine.


Jeanette Antongiorgi, Laurie Man-
gum, Vanette Warner, Libby Rid-
der, Janet Cazabon, Terrel Lewis,
Katie Schneringer, Nina Ford,
Coach Freund, Lori Merrill, Yira
Theoktisto, Nilca Thomas, Donna
McOill. Liz Reyes, Mary Nelson. Not
pictured-Melissa Harvey.









Tradene Smith, Misty Renfro, Uva
Anckle, Aliesha Ave-Lallemant,
Lorena Teran, Margot Tremblay,
Maria Len-Rios, Coach Moffit, Kyra
Robinson. Eileen Marquez, Tisha
Price, Gladys nattabaugh, Susan
Nelson, Ann Mathews, Sally Oak-
ley. Not pictured-Justina Jackson
and Joy Hauser.


Liz Thompson, Vallna Scottland,
Itzel Manning, Nicole Caffrey, Lavl
Sheppard, Anna Pace. Coach
Thaxton, Ashley Falcon, Allyson
Stelner, Michelle Hayden. Jessica
Holder, Jerl Wheeler, Renee
Ibarra,




BULLDOS


Jennifer Rouse, Marcia Scott, Kim
Leckey, Maria Ascana, Coach Oil.
ver. Jennifer Rodgers, Shannon
Lord. Christy Oliver. Melody Oli-
ver. Jennifer Nelms. Not pictured-
Deneira Serrano. Lisa Loy. and
Maria Black.


Our record this ,1r1

utcr l I JllJC -iill- iirr,
ill. 1 ,,u F r i'- l u n ]
r,->''uri i ,n F .,-,"r-


"I try to keep my mind off the
game before it starts, by staying up
and about-but calm-so when I go
out I do my best," stated Kyra Rob-
inson of the Devils.


Back in the Racel Red teammates rejoice after a crucial bucket was
made.


let by a strong Red defense, Kim
Secky of White is forced to seek help.


Sports i 50


COUGARS


Girls Basketball/51


















Scouting the competition, Bull-
dogs' Coach Oliver, raids an op-
posing game.


Meet you at the hoop. Shannon Lord, Bulldogs. drives to the net for two.


Hands to Heaven? Uva Anckle, Devils: and Valina Scotland. Red: antici-
pated the rebound.


With a half-court press, Joy Hauser of the Green Devils, is capable of
blocking Jeanette Antongiorgi from Devil territory.


On the fast break. Ana Pace
sprints past a determined Aliesha
Ave-Lallemant. driving deep into
Devil territory.





Make them county During a pep
talk. Coach Thaxton of Red, pre-
pares her team for second half ac-
tion.


From the outside. Bulldogs' Melody Oliver, takes a clear shot for three
points.


"What do you mean technical?
Coach Moffitt of Devils questions
an official's call during a game
against Red.


Sports i


Girls Basketball/53









AUT TEI mLlE


he whistle cut through the
action, and all heads pivoted
from the floor to the ref. He
indicated a personal foul had oc-
curred, and number fifteen would
be awarded two free-throws.
The player accepted the ball and
tried to calm his frantic breathing.
He dribbled to gain time and to
help relax his frayed nerves. A
quick glance at the time clock veri-
fied what he already knew fifteen
seconds to go, and one point be-
hind.
The boy took control of the ball
and crouched. His actions seemed
automatic as he sprung, directing
the ball toward its mark. The ball
hit the backboard, hesitated on the
rim, and then swished through the
hoop, sending the fans into frantic
ecstasy.
Several minutes passed before
the crowd quieted and the ref hand-








"No fouls, no foulsl" Instructed Coach
Reyes. Ryan Coon, Randy Oarmon. Alex
Reyes, Omar Morales. Juan Barrowes. Kirby
Kaufman, and Greg Schneringer takes a
breather during a time out.


ed the ball to the young player. The
strangled silence broke only when
the ball hit the floor's hard surface.
Time and breathing stopped as
eyes followed the ball's flight from
the boy's hands toward the hoop. It
missed the mark and did not re-
bound from the backboard, but in-
stead tipped over the edge and
through the net.
The '88-'89 Boys' Basketball sea-
son was also rife with tense mo-
ments. The Curundu Cougars
swept a 7-1 record for the cham-
pionship, but they got off to a shaky
start by losing their first game to
the Green Devils. The Devils
proved to be a strong match. They
tied for second place with the Cris-
tobal Tigers (5-3). Finishing third
was the Bulldogs with a (3-5) re-
cord, and Red came in fourth with
no wins.


"The reason for our
success this year was the
fact that we had an un-
selfish team. They
worked hard and were
equally as satisfied when
they got an assist as
when they scored the
basket." Cougars
coach, Ramon Reyes.


Pulling up for the jump shot, Pedro Silva of
Cougars scores against White.


Running the Green Devil offense, Robert
Morales leads his team down court.


Over the topl Matt Schneringer hurls the
ball over a Cristobal player for a tricky two
points.


"Despite a wide range of abilities in the
teams, the '89 season was a building of
character for some and leadership and unity
for others." Mark Home. Red Machine.


Off the backboard. Raymond Hunter and Briar
Wood come up with a key offensive rebound
against Red.


n a battle for possession, Alex Home-slice"
eyes from Cougars, out jumps Dave Winn
1' 'o .i. I he Cougars first chance to score.


Boys' Basketball/55


Sports | 54



































BULLDOGS Back: Coach Quinn, Enrique Jones, Terry Tevis, Kevin Hunter, John Riley.
Front: Fernando Williams, Fernando Vasquez, Tito Cotto-Perez. Brian Cochran, Tradene
Smith, Ivette Thomson.


GREEN DEVILS Ricky Larkin, Casey Morris, Brian Wood, Everette Wafford. Edwin Herrera,
Rody Mokillo, Raymond Hunter, Carlos Arana, Coach Capablo, Eric Fisher, Chad Collier,
Daryl Moore, Jermaine Jemmott, Adriano Diaz, Chris Creen, Robert Morales.


RED MACHINE Back: Coach Alvarez, Terrel Lewis, Pat Faye, Ricardo Gonzalez, Dave Winn.
Ken Jenkins. Paul Joyce, Mark Home, Craig Wood. Ken Crowley, Robert Castillo. Joseph
Cassidy. Front: Tanya Garcia. Chris White. Albert Fallin. Edwin Daiz. Darrell Moore, Bert
Maldonado. Fernando Dickson. Lamar Youngs, Dixie O'Brien.


COUGARS Back: Tammie Matheney, Matt Schneringer, Randy Garmon, Tony Herrera, Kirby
Kaufman, Alex Reyes, Coach Reyes, James Keller. Ryan Coon, Walter Amadee. Abdiel
Davidson, Greg Schneringer, Leanne Thrift. Front: Adrienne Oliver. Byron Schneringer,
Omar Morales. Juan Barrowes. Pedro Silva. Matt Ferguson. Dinah Eastham.


Dr. J up for the slam. James Keller, first year
player for Cougars, was awarded MVP.


Sports y 56


I


Boys' Basketball/57






















RED MACHINE Back: Chris Skora, Michael Hoffman, Paul De la
Guardia, Brian Sweniv. Roger Sanchez, Roberto Chevalier, Coach
Moffltt. Front: Johnn lanese. Dana Brown, Michael Bleichwehl, Dar-
ren Chastain, David Vasquez, Michael Benitez, Carlos Quintero.


-










BALBOA BULLDOGS Back: Michael Stump, Erik Staffeldt, Shawn
Allen, Jeff Naum. Front: Chris Barber, Scott J. Throndson. Mike Bra-
zelton, Coach Oliver. Not pictured: Juan Arias, Chris Berrean, Herb
Harmond, Ben Bean, Chris Spears.


PCC GREEN DEVILS Back: Frank Delima, Antonio Pereira, Coach
Tucker. Louis Cordero, Chris Narotta. Front: Juan Houradou, Ro-
berto Chan, Peter Liehr. Not Pictured: Manuel Troncoso. Erie
Holland, Daishi Yoshimoto, Scott Wood, William Ridder.


CURUNDU COUGARS Back: Jose Carbonell, Jason Wilson, Mike
Bolt. Richard Samson, Coach Schulte. Front: Young Soo Kim, Alex
Garcia, Keita Sakon, Carlos Ruiz, Saku Sakon. Not Pictured: Mike
Kelly, Robbie Garcia, Matt Chee.


Potential Energyl Ready to spring
at anything, Ernie Holland of DRc
ils, awaits the serve.


"There's no way White is going to
beat Red. Their own coach can't
keep his shoes tied, imagine the
team Coach Moffitt, Red.


In a heated exchange, Jason Wilson of Cougars, places the ball out of his
opponent's reach with a strong backhand.






Sports 58


With quick reflexes, Red Ma-
hine's Dave Vasquez, dives for
he ball for a perfect put-away.


MET AT THE NET

ob-sters in season! "The stiff competition chine was forced to settle
The back-hands and among the teams made this with a 3rd place finish. The
fore-hands were tennis season fun and excit- Green Devils won the cham-
poised ready and waiting. ing," commented Jason pionship in the last game,
A close race, with just two Wilson. "All the games with a convincing victory
games separating the top were close and action- over St. Mary's.
three teams, provided for packed."
an exciting tennis season. The tennis season culmi-
The Green Devils, boosted nated with a "come from
by strong draft choices, behind" victory for Bull-
captured the title with a 9-1 dogs, 5 games to 4, over
record. The Bulldogs and Red Machine. This gave the
Red Machine followed Bulldogs sole possession of
closely behind. 2nd place, and Red Ma-

Imitating Andre Agassi's serve,
Scott J. Throndson of Bulldogs,
uses his "Aries K" power to lob
the ball deep into his opponent's
4, court.













Boys' Tennis/59


/,l l


-r





No Guts- No Gloryl Ael 4nion-
giorgi clears hi; darng \auh


"When I run, everything Is blocked
out, and my mind is set on the fin-
ish line," commented Bulldogs'
hurdler Virgil Wilson.



"Arghl" Like a shot from a cannon
Todd Underwood (White) puts it
away. His put of 414" was good
enough for All-lsthmlan. -




RIINNNG6 WILD


"Just take It and run!" exclaimed Kathie Harrington, Red relay runner,


hin splints, torn qua-
driceps, pulled liga-
ments, lack of carti-
lidge in knee Joints due to
overwork, and exhausted
limbs from long runs.
All these ailments were
suffered by the Jr. Varsity
and Varsity Track team
members.
The Bulldogs boys' varsi-
ty squad and four members
of the Red girls' varsity
squad were underdogs in
their respective divisions,
yet they beat their larger
opponents. It was close in
each feat, though.
The secret of their suc-














"Runners take your mark
Jennifer Sweeney of Red waits
while adrenaline builds, ready to
explode at the instant the gun
sounds.


Sports R 60


cess? Coach Waugh, of
Red, and Coach Dahlstrom,
of White, ran their squads
through a comprehensive
series of conditioning exer-
cises that lasted the whole
season, instead of the first
few weeks. Most important-
ly, they taught their small
track squads a great variety
of events long Jumpers
did hurdles, long distance
runners sprinted, high
Jumpers did shot put, and
discus throwers did long
distance running.
Not only did this ensure
that a track participant
could score his maximum


possible points and partici-
pate fully in each meet, it
brought more points in for
the team in general.
Boys' Bulldogs won their
division, they took a major-
ity of All-lsthmians. Red Ma-
chine girls duplicated the
feat in their category. Both
boys's Bulldogs and Red
girls will have to be com-
pletely rebuilt next year
since most of them were
seniors this year, and will
be moving onto bigger and
better things.


--


Track and Field Back: Coach
Dahlstrom. Willie Watson, Axel An-
tongiorgi, Kristine Stromberg, Col-
leen Ellis, Shandra Elliot. Nathan-
iel Welsh. Eric Green. Derek
George. Mark Mclntire. Third Row:
Ann McConnell, Kathie A. Marring-
ton, Carlos Nattabaugh. Micheal
Joseph, Sergio McKenzie, Richard
Reborio, Tom Myer, Joe Erickson.


Jll---
.,~~ ^ T




able to leap capital "T" in a sin
gle bound. It s its John Wil
liams. JV high jumper for White.


Second Row: Jennifer Ritchie, Ni-
chole Stames, Jennifer Sweeney.
John Williams, Jennifer Rouse.
Mike Snyder, Fred Chauvin. Ryan
Stouffer. Front: Coach Waugh.
Leann McConnaghy, Todd Under-
wood. Jennifer Rodgers, Marcos
Gonzalez, Brian Lieberman. Dana
Gordon.



"A close encounter" at the end of
the 100 yd. dash. Robert Thrift of
White and Ralph Furlong of PCC
give it their all,

Special thanks to photographer
Bob Weedin.


"Can she really heave the shot put
or is it for show?" commented
Coach Waugh about Sherri Ander-
son, JV Shot putter.


Track/61

















BLAZING



TRAILS


Gallup-ing into the
sports season, girls'
soccer made its de-
but to the answer of an in-
terest poll concerning girls'
varsity sports. Girls' soccer
was introduced this year on
a trial basis. If enough inter-
est was shown, then it
would be considered for
varsity status.
A 4-1-1 season was good


enough for first place by the
Red Machine. The teams
consisted of the Balboa Red
Machine, Balboa Bulldogs,
Curundu Cougars, and the
PCC Devils.
"Although we were out
there to win we were also
out there to have fun,"
commented Libby Ridder of
Red. "Winning made it all
worth while."


, f -
**- a
r;


e&~b.


.34

., o,
***Mfr '
*~s ke '


-4. *


- *


J.*


Using her elbow to restrain Melody
Oliver (White), Eileen Marquez of
Devils, stays in control. She suc-
cessfully moved the ball away from
her opponent.


-- I





g~ ,stev .'

Giving it all she's got. Christie Oliver of Red positions herself to wallop
the ball to the center.


In the beginning there was a "THUD"! and so beqan the qame na
Cooksey, center for Bulldogs, stretches her leg in order to position the ball
62 downfield.


Sports


i ~sai"~r~




















































Busting OutI Out-maneuvering a tough Bulldog defense, Kelly Mallory
(Red Machine) kicks the ball into play.


Red Machine Back: Christy Oliver, Itzel Manning, Libby Ridder, Yolette
Walcott Dana Gordon, Coach Vicki Wagner, Elizabeth Costa, Kim
Leckey, Kelly Mallory, Ana Lampas, Kristine Stromberg. Front: Elisa
Merriweather, Mary Nelson, Jennifer Sweeney, Linda Lee, Tijuana Flow-
ers, Leti Higley, Zuleyka Cunningham, Tisha Price, Yaira Huc, Wilma
Diaz. Not pictured: Dorinda Codrington, Jessica Alexander, (Asst. Coach)
Benny Telesca.


Bulldogs Back: Coach Cowley, Soo Chung Kim, Angela Springstead,
Jennifer Toshok, Justina Jackson, Tina Donovant, Ana Cooksey, Marisol
Zamora, Ann Matthews, Claudette Welch, (Asst. Coach) Marcos Gon-
zales. Front: Kimberly Hughes (Mgr.), Katia Henriquez, Marisol Anglada.
Susan Nelson, Melody Oliver, Nilda Carrasquillo. Veronica Contreras,
Andrea Ruddock, Diane Merriweather.


Girls' Soccer/63




















14

f^ "


With a 5' wing span, the albatross, John Wil-
liams, soars over the water.


A perfect pike executed by Melanie Lawlor,
BMS diver.


FT STO


irv:111L~tl" Ta. i


'.. IU ,.- 1 .46'


SWIM AND DIVE TEAM Back: Jerome
Floyd, Carlos Nieves, Sergio Gomez, Hari
Singh, Eric Green, Mark Mclntire, James Rit-
chie, John D. Williams, Scott Loy, David Ble-
vins, Maria Len-Rios. Third Row: John Sulli-
van, Robin Goehle, Gengo Kinugasa, Mar-
cos Gonzalez, Richard Adams, Juan Urriola,
Teo Alvarado, Jennifer Galang, Noelle


'I


0

-A -1

.Al ..- '"


Woodrow, Jennifer Lively, Coach Sweeney.
Second Row: Ruben Gomez (Coach), April
Oliver (Coach), Jennifer Rouse, Aida Angel,
Kathryn Ann Harrington, Tracy Munsaker,
Mayra Diaz, Wilma Diaz, Kimberly Hughes,
Jessica Enriquez, Coach Beech. Front: Sean
Currey, Lauren Buchheister, Michael P. Mon-
son, Gina D'Anello, Naoki Watanabe.


"In a hurry, Currey?" Sean Currey, BMS
swimmer, zips through the water, back-
stroke style.







Sports | 64


I'4


<'7 :...3.;


4bit
ii,























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i~(ffU(


I


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eFjl:
--ran\~
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~-~~?~Ei~*~l""?F~"
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r
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;r


"Hey Sullivani What can you tell me about
the pool shark rumors?" Robin Goehle and
John Sullivan chat during swim practice.


From the very start. Mark Mclntire is off to a
quick lead.

Soaring into the season, Aimee Vierra prac-
tices a few required dives before her first
meet.


Swimming/65


**

kr- '*''


..~

~7~1~7JSL


AD--f:





From the suelch Darrell Moore oi Cougars
delivers ihe pitch


SEVENTH INNING


BULLDOGS Back: Kirby Kaufman, Charles Naum, Ricky Larkin, Rick Cofer, Luis Oakley,
Rogers, Greg Schneringer, Enrique Marquez, Jaime Oakley, Corey Finch. Front: Mathew
Jose Ruffer. Ronald Olton, Brian Wood, Wen- Schneringer, Rafael George, Byron Schner-
dy Forster, Lisa Moffitt. Middle: James inger, Sergio McKenzie.


With Itchy feet, Charles Rogers of White,
carefully edges off first.


n~i ^
On a close play at home. Hurb Harmond of
Green, slides under Steven Wheeler's (Red)
tag.



We're sorry we were unable to feature
a Cougar team picture: no time was
convenient for Coach Martinez to
have his team photographed.


On an inside pitch, Mathew Schneringer
drills the ball to right field.


"Airborne." Erik Staffeldt, shortstop and
key player for Devils, attempts to pull off a
tough double play.


Sports 66


RED MACHINE Back: Coach Quinn. Tito
Cotto-Perez, Brian Cochran, Marc Ferguson,
Reynaldo Royo, Satbir Singh, Steve Hovan,
Mike Banasick, Wesley Major, Jermaine
Jemmott. Mike Major, Reggie Davis, Lewis


Mitchner, Robert Thrift, Coach Bales. front:
Janet Cazabon, Jennifer Toshok. Danny Ve-
lez, Chris Hovan, John Haines, Santos Cava-
sos, Juan Haradou, Hari Ken Singh, Steve
Wheeler. Dario Dennis.


: .1i
4


iV


DEVILS Back: Coach Stromberg, Kevin Reyes. Front: Abdiel Davidson, Robert Mo-
Barnes. Rody Mokillo, Ray francis, John rates, Raul Reyes. Dennis Cowles, Erik Staf-
Banasick, Justin Winter, Hurb Harmond, feldt, Craig Fishbough, Alfonso Ellis. Jeff
Keith Krapfl, Ryan Coon, Kevin Branden- Naum, Tim Denly. Sitting: Michelle Berry,
burg, Eric Holland, John Neidzeleck, Coach Suzanne Stames.
Baseball 67


'I'


~acu~


CL-
::*~a


L,












Intense involvement from the gal-
ler\. New Coaches Ms. Coleman
and Mr. Howe. observe closely
their teams potential at a pre-sea-
son tournament held on February
11. 1989 in Cristobal.


I lr 1

P'^t ^ TO'\'


''C)


Double Troublel Mei-Ling Lavecchia and Adrienne Oliver of the Bulldogs
are a vexatious twosome. Through cooperation. Adrienne Oliver backs
up Mei-Ling as she effectively volleys at the net.

She's on the ball! Tammie Matheney of Devils, hustles backward to save
the ball.


a-t



,,..1 ,,p-t *---- -


-I-4 - 4--- 4 ---V+*" r--t t rY
r- o ^ *^ t - t ^ iL^ j"

- -* r T .*
4- 4 '


*. I . A' I
4t''

44*4 ~.4 '.2


Bulldogs: Shannon Smith, Karen Hernandez, Heather Lumpkim, Ve-
ronica Bleau, Coach Schulte, Mei-Ling Lavecchia, Jennifer Schulte,
Phaedra Ave-Lallemant, Susan Martinez. Not pictured: April Leihr.


Sports


Red Machine: Valerie Haeusser, Susan Nelson, Anne McConnel, Ana
Lampas, Jennifer Brewer, Coach Howe, Melody Oliver, Melissa Bow-
man, Christie Oliver, Bridgette Kelly, and Lisa Goodwin.


*'
i











FOR THE "LOVE OF IT!"


i ,, ... ^. ,* *. .. .. ** -" ,.'
)v Aor


Half a scoop of please! Lisa Goodwin and
Machine, dish out good returns.


Baseline bomber With good form
ball cross court


Valerie Haeusser of Red


Monica Rios ol Cougars sleeps the


Curundu Cougars: Melissa Hation. Michelle Toledano, Vanessa Uhor-
chak. Tammy Mix. Nicky Nassiff. Coach Higley. Monica Rios. Leti
Higley. Kristine Stromberg, Jenny Sweeney, and Katie Goodwin. Not
pictured: Paulette Nassiff, Eileen DePena.


.- .:-


PCC Devils: Erika Tsugane. Tammie Matheney. Coach Coleman Ni.
cole Caflrey. Donna McGill. Karen Williams. and Aliesha Ave-Lalle
manr. Not Pictured: Lynn Chan. and Jenilee Szymanski


Girls Tennis/69


The sports section would like to thank Greg Meyer for his help
with our photography.


---


S N ..... ... .. ..." .:'; .
:... I:.lr::'.: I: "i "EEE:il : '.:-i!iij !#... ... ":.
...... :i ..;; I.i i ..;

..... : .,.,:: .. ... i .......i~ ,































0N TlE SIDELINES


weat dripped off the
flushed faces of the
runners as they came
around the bend in the
track. They all struggled to
fill their lungs and stay with
the pack. Then the cheers
of the crowd reached their
ears, and the runners,
knowing they had the sup-
port of the fans, pursued
their goal with a second
wind.
Like the fans who offer
encouragement to competi-
tors, the clubs and organi-
zations at Balboa High
School support the educa-
tional system.
"Clubs are a great way to
get involved and to feel part
of your school," said Noelle
Woodrow, Vice President of

I


the Drama Club and Thes-
pians.
Students could choose to
participate in twenty-five ex-
citing COSAS (clubs, orga-
nizations, and student ac-
tivities). They could ex-
press themselves through
art, dance, drama, and pho-
tography, and were reward-
ed for over-all academic ex-
cellence and high achieve-
ment in biology, Spanish,
drama, and athletics.
Besides the international
language of love, students
in Panama practiced the
foreign languages of
French, Spanish, and com-
puters.
Students also glimpsed
at potential careers by get-
ting involved with JROTC,


Model United Nations, Of-
fice Administration Associ-
ation, The Parakeet, and
The Zonian.
Pupils who applied and
were chosen for Close-Up
learned about politics and
government issues; then
they travelled to Washing-
ton D.C. Students also got
involved with government
by being Student Associ-
ation officers.
Beta lota Kappa, the Bal-
boa Involvement Club, was
started in order to get stu-
dents involved in extracurri-
cular activities.
Clubs allowed the stu-
dents to get off the main
track and explore their in-
terests on the sidelines.


Protruding tongues, wrinkled
brows, and bulging biceps display
the exertion that Carlos Welch and
Gerald Drumgoole are putting
forth. Charlie Co. tugged their way
to victory in this match against
Echo Co. at the October JROTC
Organization Day.


Clubs 5


Introduction/71




Sitting pretty, S.A. President Michelle Montgomery spares us a smile.


j
I,


SENIORS Front Row: Eduardo Diaz, T-anya Uhorchak, Michelle
Toledano, Jennifer Rodgers, Mayra Diaz. Back Row: Paul Mitchell,
Ana-Maria Romero, Marc Ferguson.


'~-- r ~
ls~E;6 (


Li


~fl(


~P n
41r Bt!1
'P
II


i


w






A.


JUNIORS Front Row: Lisa Goodwin, Kim Thompson, Juan Bar-
rowes. Back Row: David Kemp, Tisha Price, Alex Royo, Canute
Underwood, Aimee Vierra, Margot Howell.
















SOPHOMORES Front Row: Cathy Loveless, Lea lzbicki, Jennifer
Galang, Jeanne Denham, Christine Ledezma. Back Row: Mary Nel-
son, Kathleen Kelly, Paul Hurst, Jennifer Rouse, Michael Maduro,
Elizabeth Ridder, Jennifer Lively.


S.A. Vice President Aurora Salazar
sells an S.A. card to Judie Beasley,
Senior. Over three hundred cards
were sold this year.


Student Life


If


a
a
ew
a


c

8





THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION:
RACING FOR YOUR NMOEY


he S.A. is the head of
the Balboa High
School government.
It is a non-profit organiza-
tion created to provide a
better school year for the
students here," Michelle
Montgomery, S. A. Presi-
dent said.
The Student Association
was larger and more.cohe-
sive during the 1988-89
school year than in pre-
vious years. It acted as a
referee during Homecom-
ing festivities and various
other events throughout
the year. Even though the
class officers did most of
the organizing and decorat-
ing of hallways and floats


for Homecoming. The Stu-
dent Association was re-
sponsible for keeping or-
der. This was all geared to-
ward the BHS students.
"We try to make sure ev-
ery student has a good time
at BHS. We sell food, class
shades, and S.A. cards to
them in our store. Our goal
is to spend money and to
be a service," said Carl
Dragseth, an S.A. secretary.
Representatives and their
alternates, chosen in the
second week of school by
first period classes, attend-
ed meetings to discuss mat-
ters in quorum. The next
day they reported to their
first period classes.


The economic theory of the Bull Market is here demonstrated by Carter
Griffin, S.A. Secretary. The S.A. Store was very successful this year.


S.A. Secretaries for the 1988-89
school year were: Jo Carlisle, Ro-
lando Linares, Catherine Nelson,
Carl Dragseth, and Carter Griffin
(Not pictured: Maria Len-Rios.)


Virtually, Mr. Waugh and the S.A. are interested in parting students with
their money.


Student Association/73


F\


- '~F~L






National Honor Society


A tribute to our


finest


ill I trip in front of ev-
eryone as I walk out?"
the thought bounced
around in her dead as she
fixed her hair at the last min-
ute.
The young man beside her
about to be initiated puts his
face close to hers and whis-
pered mischievously, "Let's
run and get this thing over
with.'
However, instead of running,
the well-behaved students
passed in front of beaming par-
ents, their heads held high, as
the initiation ceremony began.
This ceremony was the Na-
tional Honor Society Initiation


held on November 16 in the
BHS Library.
NHS President Jeri Wheeler
presided. "It was a great feel-
ing to initiate the deserving
new NHS members. They have
worked hard in their communi-
ty and school to create a better
atmosphere for all," she said.
Guest speaker Mr. John
Maisto, Deputy U.S. Ambassa-
dor to the Republic of Panama,
spoke to those gathered,
about his initiation into the
NHS. Mr. Ernest Holland, prin-
cipal of Balboa High, conclud-
ed the ceremony by swearing
in the initiates.


OLD MEMBERS Front Row: Eduardo Ponce, Karen Schnack, Mi-
chelle Colbert, Alex Chaniotis. Back Row: Eduardo Diaz, Mark
Dawson, Keli Gomez, Ana Maria Romero, Jason Wilson, Jean
Gramlich, Erik Staffeldt, Rebecca Wetzstein, Carl Dragseth. Tracy
Hunsaker, Wendy Forster, Theresa Hamisch, Eileen Bradley, Erin
Connolly.


t1
I I
*- -0


I


S-


INITIATES: Juan Barrowes, Jackie Brogie, Carlos Arana, Carter
Griffin, Timothy Huff, Carrie Morris (not pictured, Sheridina Fin-
ney).





National Honor Society initiations
include the ritual holding of the
candle by all initiates. Here, Maria
Len-Rios gives Juan Barrowes his
for the ceremony.
The guest speaker of the night was
Mr. John Maisto, Deputy U.S. Am-
bassador to the Republic of Pana-
ma, and member of the National
Honor Society.
The National Honor Society is a
society that holds high the values
of community service, academic
accomplishment, leadership abili-
ties, and an active extra-curricular
life. The officers this year were:
President Jeri Wheeler, Vice-Presi-
dent Anayansi English, Secretary
Adrienne Oliver, and Treasurer
Jacqueline Lavallee.


Clubs ,























INITIATES. Aimee Vierra, Pauletle Nassiff Jackie Brogie Margol
Howell. Melody Oliver, Juan Barrowes. 2nd Row. Ben Burge. Jeff
Zomes, Susan Nelson. Mel Lavecchia, Kim Putnam. Lisa Goodwin.
Sharon Cobham, Louanne Pearson. Marisol Zamora. Sherdina Fin-
ney. Kimberly Hughes. James Dickerson, Wilfredo Sanchez. Sean
Carson, Timothy Huff Lenard Sollami. Paul Rickells. 3rd row: Alex
Reyes, Jill Stahlman. Ana Cooksey. Carlos Arana. Susan Martinez.
Erin Connolly. Noelle Woodrow. Bryant Ramirez. 4th Row: Jose
Ruffer, Veronica Bleau. Yolette Walcott, Tisha Price. Aida Angel.
Burton Barrager. 5th Row: Mike Calaplni. Sandra Muggier. Alex
Chaniotis. Alex Royo. Mike Hoffman.


Nata, the oldest, regularly attend-
ed church in the Americas, was vis-
ited by the BHS on their field trip.


BIOLOGICAL HONOR SOCIETY


TAKES A HIKE!


OLD MEMBERS. Front Row: Jean Gramlich. Rachel Frey. Tracy
Hunsaker, Gilda Berman. Back Row: Johanna Leffler Eduardo
Diaz, Rebecca Wetzslein. Karen Schnack. Uva Anckle Rebecca
Joseph. Carrie Copier, Keli Gomez, Carlos Flores, Jacqueline La-
vallee, Mark Dawson.


I Norte bore down on
the hapless expedi-
tion members. Its
driving rain and wild wind
drove them from their
quest through endless jun-
gle expanses, back to the
warmth of their hotel
rooms.
The members of this ex-
pedition were from the Bio-
logical Honor Society, and
they were on their annual
field trip.
They set off at 7:30 a.m.
on December 17, from the
BHS JROTC area. The
eventful trip included a stop
at Aguadulce to see the
shrimp farms, and being
stopped at Santiago be-
cause they were travelling
in a commercial bus.
They arrived at Hotel Fun-
dadores in Boquete at 8
p.m., just in time to rise at
dawn to visit the empty


Leading the Biological Honor So-
ciety on jungle expeditions and
wilderness hikes were: Lavi Shep-
pard, Eduardo Ponce, Peter Liehr,
and Anayansi English, this year's
BHS officers.


trout farms in nearby Bam-
bito.
El Norte's cold winds and
rains kept the BHS from
reaching the top of El Baru,
over 11,000 feet above sea
level.
According to Mrs. Reeves,
sponsor, the BHS sched-
uled a nine mile hike from
Boquete to Cerro Punta,
shopping in Costa Rica, and
a visit to the hydroelectric
plant near Boquete.
The BHS members had to
cope with thin oxygen and
chill winds, not to mention
the freezing showers.
"I think what they
learned is that not everyone
has a hot water heater,"
said Mrs. Reeves.
The group returned on
December 21, after visiting
Nata, the oldest, regularly
attended, church in the
Americas.


--- B-S7


BMS/75




















Front Row: Jeri Wheeler, Tracy Hunsaker, Susan Martinez, Jason
Wilson. Back Row: Tina Maisto, Karen Schnack, Anayansi English,
Eduardo Diaz, Keli Gomez, Eduardo Ponce, Mr. Figueroa.


Front Row: Edilma Carr, Shaleen White, Sandra Muggier, Katia
Henriquez, Gilda Berman, Michelle Toledano, Alex Royo, Maria
Capps, David Kemp. 2nd Row: Lenard Sollami, Keli Gomez, Becca
Joseph, Adrienne Oliver, Tamara Matheney, Loida Cooper,
Eduardo Ponce. 3rd Row: Paul De La Guardia, Carlos Arana, Elsa
Washburn, Anays Nolte, Alicia Lewis, Sharmila Nandwani, Alex
Chaniotis.


Front Row: Sharmila Nandwani, Thomas Myer. 2nd Row: Ana
Cooksey, Tisha Price, Uva Anckle, Monica Rios, Sandra Muggier,
Katia Henriquez, Maria Capps. 3rd Row: Jo Carlisle, Kathryn Har-
rington, Lynn Chan, Juan Barrowes, Loida Cooper. 4th Row: Car-
los Arana, Elsa Washburn, Lavi Sheppard, Tanya Siraa, Alicia Lew-
is.

( lubs bi[ 76


Spanish Club members enjoy good fellowship at their (ookout ami-
gas, yes?


1.


Ed Ponce, a man of many talents.
shows his skill as an outdoor chef.


~D~W


L
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Fi


Zul


Ij






FRENCH AND SPANISH STUDENTS


CROSS THE CULTURAL LINE


Both the Spanish Club
and the French Club
were quite active at
the very start of the school
year, sponsoring a cookout
and a field trip, respective-
ly.
The Spanish Club sold 64
tickets for their cookout on
September 10, but rain kept
attendance down to 29 at
the Albrook Bohios.
Nonetheless, the cook-
out lasted from 1:00 p.m. to
4:00 p.m., the originally
scheduled hours, and the
majority of the hamburgers
and hot dogs were con-
sumed, leaving little to
waste.
As a respite, the rain
ceased to fall at 2:30 p.m.,
so the day ended in sunny
weather.

SALUD! Jenn Lively and Spanish
Club members enjoy drinks at the
cookout.


The French Club had
their first field trip of the
year on September 27. Over
60 French and selected
Spanish students congre-
gated at the Alliance Fran-
caise and at the Ferdinand
DeLesseps restaurant
downtown.
At the Alliance, students
met "Monsieur Pierre", the
director of the Alliance
Francaise in Panama,
watched a film on French
culture, and toured the fa-
cilities and classrooms de-
voted to teaching citizens of
Panama about French cul-
ture.
The tour was followed by
a French dinner at the Fer-
dinand DeLesseps restau-
rant in downtown Panama
City.


Both Born in Panama, Mr. Vaz and
Mrs. Cigarruista share the duties of
sponsoring the Spanish Club,
along with teaching Spanish at
BuS.


French And Spanish/77


It I
7"r, o1ow







A CLASS

ALL THEIR OWNI


Photography is fun,
but it is so frustrating.
Sometimes you look
at a scene and take a pic-
ture of it, and when you de-
velop your film, it comes
out totally wrong." said
Mrs. White, Photography
Club sponsor.
The 15 to 30 members of
the Photography Club took
that lesson to heart. Assign-
ments given by Mrs. White
were due each Wednesday.
Sometimes there was suc-
cess, other times frustra-
tion.
Part of the solution was
good instruction. Mrs.
White lectured to novice
photographers as much as
she could.
But just as a picture is
worth a thousand words, a
thousand words cannot


produce a good picture.
"You learn about photogra-
phy by doing it yourself,"
White added.
The club had no officers
this year, just four or five
seasoned photographers
and darkroom aficionados
who helped Mrs. White on
Tuesday and Thursdays in
the photo lab.
The Photography Club
did not stress perfection. Its
main goal was to teach peo-
ple how to observe their en-
vironment.


At first, photography can be one of
the most frustrating ordeals. Mrs.
White knows that, being a long-
time photographer herself.


"Imp
K i. Li^]p


Front Row: Mark Bower, Maria Capps. Back Row: Thomas Myer,
John Sullivan, Carey Goehle, Tina Maisto, Paulette Nassiff, Anto-
nio Portela, Katia Henriquez, Carmen Ortiz, Becca Wetzstein, Uva
Anckle, Melody Oliver, Lisa Moffitt, Mrs. White.


To take a GOOD picture, one must
do more than meets the eye. Here,
Michael Monson, photographer-at-
large, zooms in on his next victim.


Clubs P


1'











- --


Thanks to the dedication of the Lettermen's Club Officers, the Lettermen
actually were represented this year. President Lisa Deslondes, Vice Presi-
dent Mark Ferguson, Treasurer Tracy Hunsaker, and Secretary Maria
Capps all donated great amounts of their time to make the Lettermen's
Club a success at Balboa High. The Lettermen were able to send for
jackets, keep accurate records of fellow lettermen, and raise money to
send one club member to college with a sports scholarship.



Being a letterman involved a lot of pride in accomplishments. The pro-
cess of initiation into the ranks was long and strenuous, but those who
make it can be assured satisfaction that they are a true sportsman
among other athletes. Richard Reborio, track & field pole vaulter and
long distance runner, shows off what years of conditioning and discipline
brought him.






LOOK OUT
BHS LETTERMEN ARE IN THE RUNNING!


Front Row: Ana Velez. Lisa Deslondes Maria Capps. Tracy Hun-
saker. Mark Home 2nd Row: Eileen Bradley. Jennifer Toshok.
Charles Rogers. Javier Velez. Steven Torres, Earl Dame, Robert
Thrift, JeffKnappenberger, Edwin Diaz, Mark Caffrey. John Bemetl.
David Daniel, Harry Singh, Sergio Mckenzie.


according to Lisa Des-
londes, president of
the re-born Letter-
men's Club, the BuS letter-
men are up to something
good.
Besides keeping track of
lettermen and supplying
Lettermen Club members
with Lettermen jackets, the
club planned to raise
enough money to send one


of their own departing Sen-
iors to college with a siz-
able sports scholarship.
The winner of that was
announced at the Letter-
men Banquet near the end
of the year, along with the
winners of other awards
and trophies. All varsity let-
termen were honored for
their achievements.


Lettermen/79


1. i -.









THE

TWIK I]E CONNECTION


OFFICERS: Sponsor, Mrs. Howe; Secretary, Allyson Steiner; President.
Richard Durazzo; Treasurer, Carlos Flores; Vice-President, Bryan Wom-
ble.




n n aF es


wi ns and comput-
ers ot many people
wo d be able to con-
nect thesC two words; but,
the con4uter club has
manage to keep a rela-
tionship'etween them for
several years.
Not only do they give out
Twinkies for becoming a
member, but they sell them
at lunch time for twenty-five
cents. Twinkies have be-
come a fun "tradition" for
the computer club. Pres.
Richard Durazzo said, "The
Twinkies are a fun part of
the computer club that get
people to join."
The computer club has
also continued other tradi-
tions this year. They have
been in charge of organiz-
ing the annual dance for


Valentine's Day. In prepara-
tion for the "romantic" oc-
casion, the club offered the
dating service.
The dating service was a
computer program de-
signed to match up the
"perfect" couples of the
school. It was made up of a
series of questions about
the person's interests and
desires for his/her
"friend."
From Twinkies to ro-
mance, the computer club
was full of fun.


Experimenting with making com-
puter banners, Mayat Martinez and
Eileen Da Pena find out computers
are fun.
Life with a computer is the only
way to live for Allyson Steiner,
mmngltor rl,, f ---th y m


m -' ^<-

i3- l


COMPUTER CLUB: Front row: James Sager 2nd Row: Sean Carson,
James Sawyer, Back row: Cole Rawden, Robert Morris.


r Is.


80


Clubs


if. y


,s


r'




-_-L-


~



























Her sparkling smile is not all Mrs.
Corbett gives to the Zephyrus as
co-sponsor.


I


THE WRITE

DECISION


ZEPHYRUS STAFF: Front row- Jacqueline Lavallee. Eduardo Diaz.
Carter Griffin. 2nd row- Monica Rios. Wendy Fries, Tina Maisto. Roli
Linares. Rachel Frey, Back row- Annie English, Erika King. Chris Mat-
son. Paul Mitchell. Myra Diaz, Raymond Samuels. Roberto Smith.


xtra! Extra! Read all
about it! The Stu-
dent/Faculty literary
magazine returns to Bal-
boa." With a growing inter-
est in writing, Tom Myer and
Mark Bower decided it was
time to let the students and
faculty show their talent.
The literary magazine,
"Zephyrus" faded from the
high school in 1985. The re-
turn of it brought back ex-
citement. and a staff of
twenty-two students was or-
ganized within a few days.
The staff, headed by Tom


and Mark, was made up of
interested and qualified stu-
dents on the yearbook staff
and in the A.P. English
Class.
The chief editors and sec-
tion editors decided the
magazine would consist of
poetry, short stories, one-
act plays, and student art-
work.
Mark said, "We brought
back a way for students and
faculty to express their cre-
ativity. That's all we want-
ed."


Zephyrus/81


Being Librarian and Zeph)rus
sponsor keeps Mrs. Hanson work-
ing all the time.
In their "office", co-editors Mark
Bower and Tom Myer review stu-
dent's entries.














Once upon a time, in
a little high school
named Balboa,
there was an Afro-American
club. One day, it vanished.
Well, in 1987, the Afro-
American club returned to
BHS as the Youth Black In-
volvement club. It was re-
organized in order to, "Get
people together and out of
trouble," said president
Uva Anckle.


The name was changed
to the Balboa Involvement
club to sound more "excit-
ing." This new name sum-
marized the club's goal, but
was not very eye-catching.
It needed to have some-
thing more.
The group decided to use
the Greek letters Beta, lota,
Kappa, to represent the ini-
tial of the club's name.
They wanted their name to


be different to get people
to join. The name change
may not have fulfilled its
original goal, but it did raise
a few questions.

Mrs. William-Sanchez, B.I.K. spon-
sor, gives her ideas for the activi-
ties planned for the year.
President Uva Anckle and Sargent-
at-Arms Yadira Tomlinson, plan
the upcoming events at a Beta Iota
Kappa meeting.


lick, click clickity,
click, click." Those
familiar sounds of
the typewriter in the Parra-
keet room were heard be-
fore each deadline.
Students rushed to get
their stories typed and
ready to print. That part of
the story didn't change, but
"Parrakeet" readers were
surprised at some of the
changes in the paper.


Co. editors Melanie
Lawler and Stephanie Rus-
selburg spent one week at a
journalism workshop at In-
diana University during the
summer. Changes in "the
Parrakeet" were made us-
ing ideas and knowledge
gained from the workshop.
Graphic skills were en-
hanced, which enabled the
newspaper to be more in-
teresting and attractive.


Changes in the organiza-
tion of the staff were made,
as well as the changes in
the body of the newspaper.
To assist the co. editors,
section editors, and an edi-
torial board were added.
This allowed more people
to make decisions.
These changes were
made to satisfy the readers
and to improve "the Parra-
keet."


BETA IOTA KAPPA Front row.
Yadira Tomlinson 1Sargental
Arms) Mrs Sanchez sponsor)
LUa Anckle IPresidentr 2nd
row. Diana Telesca. Erlka Harrl.
son. Mercedes Nero Analansl
English. Jennifer Allen David
Daniels Jessica holder Der-
rick Daniels Raquel Gonzalez.
AnalioskaCooksey Trade Nes-
bill. Karima Clark Back row:
Diie O'Bnen. Jason Giliens
John Caton. Sheridina rinney










Clubs 82


NIicole Caffrey gets her story checked by co. editor Stephanie Russelburg. as Johanna Leffler
waits her turn.

Parrakeet Staff" Front row: Co.
editor Melanie Lawlor. Assis-
tant editor Steve Moore co edi-
tor Slephanie Russelburg 2nd
Sr row Sandra Muggier Maria
Capps Rachel rrey. Ratia Hen-
riquez 3rd row. Christine Len.
mark. Cathenne Nelson. Shell
Fonken. Valerie laeuser Kathy
Escalera. Jeanle Denham Back
row. Tom Myers. Amee Vierra.
Brian Cochran Tim Huff. Rob-
ert Smith. Paul Ricketts. David
Kuwanoe


Melanie Lawlor works overtime.


A NEW NAME


A DIFFERENT SQUEAK


f


5:
sJ


Parrakeet/83













C 1 ome and take
Sour chances
to win a rag
doll, radio, and/or a 35 mm
camera." You may have
heard something of this
sort as you walked the halls
of B.H.S. during lunch, be-
htween classes, or after
school. These were the
voices of the members of
Close-Up.
SClose-Up had a lot of
work to do in order to get
ready for their trip to Wash-
j ington D.C. They kicked off




-


the year by holding a series
of raffles, including: dolls,
radios, cameras, and even
Mr. Holland's beach house.
Although raffles were a
large part of the fund rais-
ing, the group held car
washes and rented out the
Ancon Theater Guild's
show, Nunsence. Ticket
prices were raised and all
the proceeds went towards
the D.C. trip.
Raising money was an im-
portant part of Close-Up,
but they needed more than


just money to go to D.C.
The fifteen members of
Close-Up were politically in-
formed.
Once a week, there was a
class held after school. The
class, led by Mr. Waugh and
Mrs. Alvarado, discussed
U.S. and foreign events and
brushed up on their govern-
ment studies. The group
also met with speakers to


learn more about current
political topics.
After seven months of
hard work and study, the
members of Close-Up were
ready to take on Washing-
ton D.C. for seven days.
D.C. would never be the
same.


Gathering for their weekly meetings, Carter Griffin, Jeri Wheeler, Eileen
Bradley, Jason Wilson. Lavi Sheppard, and Erik Staffeldt await further
instructions.
"Diet or regular?" asks Eileen Bradley selling sodas for the Close-Up trip
to Washington D.C.


Using creative selling techniques.
Jason Wilson convinces Peter
Liehr to purchase a ticket to Nun-
sense.


Close Up members. Jeri Wheeler.
Eileen Bradley, and Theresa Har-
nisch ask questions about U.S. Pa-
nama relations during a seminar.


Students learn about U.S. involvement in Central America during a mini-
seminar at Quarry Heights.


Clubs


THE CAPITAL RACE


Close Up/85








. DI.CPLIE . HEART
A DISCIPLINED HEART


Mark time, march and
ready, front!"
You probably heard
these words shouted loud
and clear after school. No,
*it wasn't JROTC. It was the
found of Heart Beat, better
known as the Dance Team.
Heart Beat wasn't all fun
and games. These seven
*young ladies were under a
V very strict code of conduct,
.constitution, and demerit
y system. There was no fool-
F ing around when it became
to being ladies. Walking
down the halls with their
hands behind their backs
was all part of their code of


conduct. Their practices
even consisted of drills
similar to those of the
JROTC cadets. The team
choreographed and
learned one new dance
each week. Practicing two
hours every day, plus indi-
vidual work, they were
ready to show their stuff at
the Friday night football
games.
The team, started by Don-
na Tores in 1987, learned
well over twenty routines.
Donna Tores, director and
coach; Rosie West, captain;
Maria Arenas co-captain;
and dancer Elsa Arenas, at-


tended "Super Star" train-
ing camps in Texas and
Florida over the summer.
The girls brought new
knowledge and skills to the
team.
Captain Rosie West has
learned, "If you love to
dance and are ready for
some hard work with no
complaints, if you got it,
(then) jam it!"



Wendy Fries (dance team man-
ager) watches the girls jam at the
Friday night football games.


DANCE TEAM 'Heart Beal' Front row: Elsa Arenas; Rosie West
captain- Maria Arenas co-captain Back row: Wendy r es, man-
ager: Jennifer Diaz: Lu2 flores: Vanessa Clarke; Donna Tonez,
manager.


ART CLUB front row. Shahnar Awan. Mike La Caze 2nd row.
Sherdina flnney, Sheila Fonken. Melanie Lawlor. Tiffany Sullivan.
Susan Maninez. Erich Scheman. Mr. Young Back row: John
Banasick Paincia 5tarz. John Williams. Robert Smith, Erika king.


Elsa Arenas, Rosie West, Maria
Arenas. Jennifer Diaz, Luz Flores.
Vanessa Clarke. "Heart Beat"
show their stuff at the Jamboree.


Art & Dance/87


Clubs N


Li,,'%










THE ER


Thespian Troupe 314 Back Row: Kim Putnam, Rolando Linares,
Lisa P. Moffitt, Wendy Forster, Tina Maisto, Raymond Samuels, Tim
Huff. Back to Front: Canute Underwood, Mark Bower, Valerie For-
ster, Rebecca Wetzstein, and Noelle Woodrow. Many of these peo-
ple were in charge of, or involved in the student play, The Princess
Bride.


Drama Club Members Top to bottom: Brian Lieberman, Jenni-
fer Ewan, Heather Lumpkin, Lea lzbicki, Carrie Copier, Maria
Capps, Tammy Mix, Rochelle Casperson, Carter Griffin, Sherdina
Finney, Libby Ridder, Jennifer Schulte, Angie Moffitt, Jennifer
Rouse, and Jessica Enriquez.










Drama n I 88


_ -rllraa~





Comedy, satire, and musicals to-
night tragedy tomorrow. Mr. J.
directed Arsenic and Old Lace and
The Wizard of Oz, leaving the trag-
ic plays for another year.


Climbing to new heights, the dra-
ma officers: Mark Bower, Noelle
Woodrow, Rachel Frey, and Kim
Putnam, produced the student
production of The Princess Bride.


& "1


-=Racing=-


to Muncy


"Not only Santa can stuff your
shocking' Rachel Frey advertised
and worked on the Thespian
stocking grams with Mark Bower
and Rolando Linares.


"You seem a decent fellow. I hate
to kill you," says Inigo. "You seem
a decent fellow. I hate to die," says
Westley. Brian Lieberman, West-
ley; and Raymond Samuels, Inigo
Monto)a rehearse a fight scene
from The Princess Bride.


To go, or not to go?
That was the ques-
tion. Many Thespians
struggled with the decision
of attending the annual
Thespian conference in
Muncy, Indiana. This con-
ference gives a chance for
young people to experience
theater and drama work-
shops.
Those who were interest-
ed in attending the confer-
ence joined the race to
Muncy early in the year. The
drama officers planned


bake sales, pizza sales, and
sold stocking grams for
Christmas. The biggest
fund raiser for the year was
the student production of
The Princess Bride. Making
use of the techniques he
learned in Theater Arts,
Mark Bower directed this
play with Rolando Linares'
assistance. At this writing,
plans were in the works for
the Muncy trip, and several
Thespians were planning to
attend.


Thespians/89





Guns in the sky Kelvin Andrews
for Alpha Co Mike Snider for Bra-
vo Co Juan Calliano for Echo Co
Joe Clark for Charlie Co.. and
John Burett for Delta Co. began
the mile relay.


Bottom Row J. Ralcnie J Quintero L Pearson C Nieres 5. Inne%
A Everitl. L. Reyes. h Lalnear- Row Two M. Season C. Taganr 5.
Moore. M. Lowe. L Gonzalez. W. Bartley R Vasquez J Shalegr Row
Three 5. Helin J Zomes D CGordon o Perez. ,. Gueiara E
Merriteather. M. Morales E. Noguiera, G. Gordon. Top Row 4 Scot
tino. A. Falling. A. Finn. P Ricketts I Reyes J FLo)d K Andrews


J, h


Bottom Roa. \. *ilson L. Garndo M rermanoez J Sager .1 Camp
bell. D Merriweather L Barrera L Oakle) D Knappenoergei Row
Two D. Daniel. R Seale) J Jackson T Decamp A Anionglorgi A
Thomas A. White D Hanirg Row Three 5 Gomer 5 Ho\an E
Grayson T 5aunders C. Ladue V La)ne T Mohlna M 5nider Top
kRow: M. Caner H. Launder P ClarK C Riggs T ftlzgibbons C
Welch D. Moore


Clubs 90


wful, awful Alpha.
Chicken, chicken
Charlie. Dumb,
dumb Delta. Icky, icky
Echo!" Bravo Company
sang thisjody at the JROTC
Organization Day held Oc-
tober third in the stadium.
Alpha, Bravo, Charlie,
and Delta Companies from
Balboa High School com-
peted against one another
and against Cristobal's
Echo Company in a series
of events. These events
ranged from basketball to
bottle-sucking.
Before the competition
began, the companies met
in the gym to raise spirit.
Alpha won the 880-relay.
Bravo won the basketball
tournament with a total of
two wins. Charlie won the


enter front P Micnaelis Ron Two. K. Kno% J Heath P. Mitchell.
ow Three T Emigh L Amat M Calon A Matthews G Drumgoole
Campbell M Allene O. Gulllen L. Alba J Dickerson M McCon.
ell Row Four W Harper .. Warner. J. Castro B Cargill K Barnes
Vela K Josephs H Webster Cj Villarreal H. Largas Ro, Fie. F.
ilhiams J Borrnas Sawer A Poneia B. Brown M. BAnasick D
ones R Gonzalez. R Petrosk R Hancock


tug of war contest, even
though they were short one
man. Delta, being the only
team that was not disquali-
fied, won the mile relay.
They won the racquetball
contest and made the most
"pushdowns" in push ball.
Echo sucked the best in the
bottle-sucking contest, and
they took the lead in the sit-
up/push-up contest.
At one o'clock there was
a break for lunch, and the
exhausted competitors ate
barbecued hamburgers
and hot dogs.
Echo proved to be the
overall winner of the eight
hour Organization Day. Del-
ta placed second, Charlie
third, Bravo fourth, and Al-
pha fifth.


Center Front J Bumelt. Row Two. E Connolly, J. McCormack. L.
Sollami; Row Three. R George. F. Bustamante. J. iltens. D. Willis, W.
Mena M. Howell- Row Four- B. Livingston. L. Huyghue D. O'Brien. T.
Atkinson. F. DIglovannl. J Reyes. T. Walker: Row Five: 0. Yates. Y.
Dlsla. M Weinnch 5. Betty. E. Moore. R. 5aymanski. C. Welch. F.
Chauvin, Row Six: 5. Carson. J. Caton. H. Smgh. E. Subia.


JROTC/91


r r




r











































Performing for the crowd at half-
time, the Male Drill Team reaches
the apex of their routine with Wil-
liam Spooner, Erik Nogueira, and
Stephen Stone kneeling in front.
and Virgil Wilson being surround-
ed by the remaining cadets.


.. V- .** '


Confidence and balance are neces-
sary for Sergio McKenzie to climb
up a staircase of rifles during this
daring routine.


Service with a smile Hutch Var-
gas, Fernando Williams, and
James heath help to run the
JROTC Hot Dog Stand.


Catch me if you can! Three flying
guns are being eyed carefully by
Mark McConnell, Hari Singh, and
John Burnett. as they practiced
the triangle toss.


- */ :" ,' .


bI1""1


Clubs 92












UNDERCOVER


Often times unrea-
lized, a group of ver-
satile young adults
play a major role in every-
day school life.
The JROTC provided peo-
ple to run the ticket booth
and hot dog stand at every
football game and track
meet. JROTC's drill team
took part in half-time enter-
tainment, and JROTC pre-
sented the colors year-
round at various activities.
They provided lunch for
many students everyday,
and made an average of 65-
75 dollars a day.
Not only were they in-


volved in things from which
the whole student body
benefited, they also had a
leadership school and a
camp during summer vaca-
tion. They participated in an
Organization Day; a Batal-
lion Review; Airborne, Wa-
terborne, and Helicopter
orientations; and the annu-
al "pig roast."
It is a highly disciplined
program which teaches stu-
dents to be organized and
to serve. It also allows stu-
dents to be leaders and to
lead their fellow students
on to success.


The Female Drill Team is made up of the following: Front Center
D. Knappenberger. Drill Team Commander: Row Two: G. Villarreal.
M. Caton: Row Three: K. Knox. L. Barrera. W. Mena; Standing: L.
Pearson. J. Jackson. T. Decamp. D. Gordon. and J. Quintero.


The Male Drill Team is made up of the following: Kneeling M.
McConnell. J. Sager. V. Wilson. B. Campbell E. Nogueira: Row
Two: A. Finn. P. Mitchell. S. McKenzie-Drill Team Commander, J.
Heath. E. Subia: Row Three: J. McCormack. S. Carson. H. Singh. M.
Snider


Just for kids? No way! Being on the
Drill Team involves many hours of
practice; but, both Drill Teams re-
ceived recognition for their efforts
on December 6, when they were
interviewed by SCN for "Just For
Kids."


JROTC 93







IeS.yAi


Behind closed doors a
transformation took
place. Every day
after school an elite group
of students met and trans-
formed a classroom into a
shooting range.
The cadets interested in
being on the Rifle Team
started practicing during
the last weeks of Novem-
ber, and they practiced
each afternoon to improve
their aim. Their first goal
was to survive the cuts and
make it on to the Rifle
Team. The members of the


III


team not only competed
against one another, but
they also sent their target
sheets to Cristobal High
School and to high schools
in the States to get an idea
of how they ranked.
At the beginning of the
season Enrique Subia won
a turkey and a ham; Frank
Kuwanoe won a turkey and
a bottle of wine; and Tony
Portela won a turkey when
they showed their skill at
the Turkey Shoot held on
November 19.


Aiming for a bull's eye. Tony Portela steadies his rifle and concentrates
on controlling his breathing. He scored an 84 on this round.


The faculty of the JROTC Junior Resene Olficers Training Corps
are. src Puryear. 55C webster CPT Norice and Src Cooper SSG
Webster commented that he enjoys workingg with the cadets because
he likes to see 5oung adults' succeed.


The cream of rme crop these sludenrL- make up [nie lrudent StLi of
the JROTC program at Balboa nigrn School Franh Kuhanoe Jersica
Holder Janet McCorrrach 51epnen Stone Sergio lMclKnzie ScoT'
LOI Carlos Miguel ieles Braale) Douglas iKein Damon ana John
Barnsichk not plcLuredl


This ;s an optical Illu-ion What )ou are seeing is just 3 small part of
ith whole for there is no established Color Guard ior evere eeeni
CadeLs who .olunteer lake the job ior one eent and the% can be
either a RIght or Left Guard or a flag Bearer This Color Guard is
made up or Sherdina Finney James Sager Doug Naning and Jerome
rlo1 .


The Rifle Team gets a chance to aim at their first live largest the
photographer. front Row* K Damon. T Portela. 5. Betty. E. Subia. Y.
Disla P. Mitchell. Row Two* J Sawyer. J. Zomes, O Yales. H Vargas.
M Weinrich- Row Tnree: src Pur)ear. L. Veliz. M. Torres. L Alba. R.
Hancock


Clubs u 94


JROTC/95





Sain t t ain


S o! No Monday can
not be a holiday)
blurted Tom Mler
'that giles us less timenl
The stress of meeting dead-
kL lines became a reality) for
members of the Zonian
staff As the year unraveled
and the pace of the rat race
The satisfaction of having pictures tum out is clearly evident on quickened the dedicated
the faces of Jerl Wheeler and Wend) Forster. Senior Section suffers n t p pictures dote
staffers took pictures t,.Tote


,Working on he rinal Ionian sponsor MS Shon discusses corrections kiln
editor in chief Calherne relson


captions and stories- made
layouts- and as Lisa Des
londes put it tried to re
create the highpoints of the
school year.




Gotta get II righll Thi /.,ri.ji S lll
uiln.entii r-i.-nt'ej a :rL l .It I
ordjCr 10 *I' t 1It, lr.1>:[1 _ira il


This is the fllel Maria Len*Rios and Michelle Montgomery are
pleased to nave finished another page of the Student Life section.


Regressing back to his Junior )eat. Brian Lieberman a Senior
gives ideas to and works with Lisa Desiondes on the Junior Sec
don


Calling her co-worker back to the world of yearbooks and Sopho
more Sections. Heather Lumpkin asks for Cathy Bal)eat s opinion


Teamwork. the key to a winning game and to a great Sports
Section. Erik Staffeldl Toad Underwood and Adrienne Oliver col
laborale


a I-1


This club was not all pla, Tom M Er Rebecca tetzstein and Mark
Bower put a plethora of hours of sork into the Clubs Se-i.or,


u a
a





ma-









1 ..1











The photographers. Roll Llnares and Tina Maislo. developed
many pictures and a close friendship omer developer fixer. and
stop


Polishing her final story. Tracq Hunsaker works diligently on the
Academics section


Brainstorming Ideas rain over the editors of the Faculty section.
Rachel Fre) and Carie Morris


Dedication from the Ads and finance section. Maria Capps. Bonnie
Hanson. Judith Potwell. and Katia Henriquez paid off


Zonian/97


Clubs


























PREPARING


FOR TIHE rFURE


est? What test?" If
you have been
known to say these
words during the first few
minutes of class, then obvi-
ously you weren't prepared.
To do well in Academics,
you should not only be pre-
pared, but you should be
ready and willing to learn.
Preparation was a must
for some of the most chal-
lenging classes such as
Physics, AP English, and
Calculus. The overwhelm-
ing work load was very diffi-
cult to manage coupled
with assignments from oth-
er classes. Jason Wilson
said, "Being in Calculus,
Physics, and AP English is a
lot of work. You have home-
work every night and lots of
tests. If you pay attention
*


and study a little, the
classes are pretty easy."
Shaleen White thought
French was her most fun
and interesting class this
year. "This was my third
year of French and I've en-
joyed it despite disappoint-
ments like the waiters not
speaking French on our res-
taurant field trip. I think my
knowledge of the language
will help me when 1 study
French in college."
School can be compared
to a marathon; without Aca-
demics, there would be no
school, and without run-
ners there would be no
marathon.
To do well in Academics
you need certain skills like
paying attention, being pre-
pared for class, and follow-


ing directions. In a race you
need agility, endurance,
and speed. You can't do
well on a test if you don't
study, and you can't win a
race if you do not train right
and work out.
There will be times when
you feel overloaded with
homework and you're not
going to make it through
the week. It's the same feel-
ing of dehydration in a race
and wishing the finish line
was right in front of you.
Although the road to Aca-
demics and learning is nev-
er really over, high school
Academics end at gradu-
ation. Hopefully, by this
time in your life, you will
have learned what it takes
to do well in the future and
be prepared.


In the library, Karen Schnack often
studied for her classes. Advanced
Placement English, Calculus,
Physics, and Analysis kept her
busy throughout her senior year.


Introduction/99


Academics


i'I


M






JOURNEY FROM THE PAST TO
CREATE A BETTER TOMORROW


One of the peer helping training techniques was for the old helpers to
instruct the new ones. Sarah Van Steenburg listens to Anita Nolte about
what she would do in a certain case.
Training the second generation of peer helpers is well worth Mr. Ander-
son's time and effort.


1------
1


L~ Y*


imagine traveling to
Europe, South Amer-
ica. China, and the
Middle East. Imagine
meeting George Wash-
ington. Abe Lincoln. Na-
polean, and the Emperor
of Japan. Imagine going
back in time and learning
abut new. different, and
exciting cultures.
Imagine a carpeted
classroom with thirty
desks and map covered
walls. You can go to all of
these exotic places.
meet all these famous
people. and study these
interesting cultures in so-
cial studies classes
To graduate. you need
three credits of social
studies: World geogra-
ph). U.S history, and
U 5. government are the
three most popular
classes to take.
There are reasons for
these classes to be re-
quired Mrs. 5osa said,
Social studies is like
solving a puzzle- the past
and present interlock to


Realizing that the Civil War really did affect his life. Christopher Marotta Thanks to Mr. Sweeney s U.S. his-
peruses his textbook, tory class. Steven Moore now
knows where the United States' ca-
pitol is,


Academics 4 100


Taking lecture notes is essential for Annie English to pass
economics.
During a peer helping session, Gilda Berman listens closely
to Mr. Anderson's instructions.


Social Studies101


form a picture of the fu-
ture. The challenge.isLto
make the most of the in-
formation in order to en-
rich your life."
This year, there is a
new way to get a social
studies credit called Peer
Helping. It is a program
of twenty-one students
who are trained to help
their peers by talking
with them about their
thoughts. feelings, and
problems.
Mr. Anderson. the
coordinator of the pro-
gram said, "Teenagers
are more likely to accept
feedback from peers on
how they come across as
persons. Peer Helpers
have another perspec-
live on alternatives in de-
cision making as well as
preparation for deci-
sions."
Whatever a person says
to a peer helper is kept
strictly confidential. This
may be important if you
need an ear to listen or a
shoulder to cry on.


*B r-

-1t-r -








With the help of a socket wrench, Luis Cantu and Dixie O'Brien change
the water pump in a car.
Lightbulbs, switches, wires, and a lot of concentration are what it takes
for Nathaniel Welsh to complete his work.


-"I,


-9
~


" lnirr
n 5i 3 ;

uk


Rulers, pencils, and lines are a major necessity in Ronaldo Olton's me-
chanical drawing class.
With the flick of a switch, Peter Pedersen finishes his housewiring assign-
ment.


A ademics


r
I-

























4tr1
\ -,


HAVINGi CAR TROUBLE? Calley Wharry, Erich Sheman, and Robert Nieves can help. They have taken auto mechanics.


HANDS ON


Working Lith electricity and wiring
has given Nodial Sanchez a special
skill.


Click, clank, zap,
buzz, whirr
These are all the
sounds you may hear
coming from the
screened-in building
which houses the indus-
trial arts classes. The
courses offered are split
between drawing classes
and classes where stu-
dents work with me-
chanical devices.
The drawing classes,
taught by Mr. Wil-
loughby, are mechanical
drawing, machine draw-
ing, and architectural
drawing. These courses
are highly recommended
for future interior decora-


tors and architects.
Reynaldo Royo said, "I
know the drawing exper-
ience I've gained in me-
chanical drawing will
help me if I become a
mechanical engineer. I
have learned many inter-
esting things, such as:
which kind of pencil to
use for certain lines, and
how to draw machine
parts."
The machine classes
include: electricity and
electronics, small engine
repair, and auto mechan-
ics. These courses are
taught by Mr. Chenn,
who said, "All of my
classes are basically de-


signed to give students a
general knowledge of
electricity, engine repair,
and basic car mainten-
ance."
He recommends his
classes for students
wishing to pursue a ca-
reer in the field of elec-
tronics, engineering, or
mechanics.
Unfortunately, there is
not significant equip-
ment or facilities enough
to do any major projects
(such as building an en-
gine). Nevertheless, all
industrial arts graduates
should be better able to
recognize potential prob-
lems.


Industrial Arts/103








Mixing colors is a shady business,
demonstrates Chris Williams at
the paint table.


Demonstrating how to
airbrush, Mr. Young
shows Shaleen White
how to do the back
ground on her Art IV
acrylics project.
A steady hand, a good
eye, and lots of patience
produce quality art. Rob-
ert Kimbrough combines
those traits as he fin-
ishes his commercial art
project.























Academics 104


NIC
^ *


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~9,1 1


+a,
:~c.l------


5








Cautious planning and precise measurement help Jack Hanna complete
his Art IV project.


~iLL


Cutting and measuring. Ken Crowley and Theresa Marmsch place differ-
ent styles of lettering for the Senior class shirt logo


Carefully deciding which colors to use, Patricia Sitarz works intently on
her Art II project, an illustration.


NEW DIMENSIONS


rt gave me an out-
let that other
classes just did
not give me. I could not
have survived high
school without it," com-
mented Theresa Har-
nisch on her experience
in art. Part of her exper-


iences include her year
in Art with Mr. Young.
Mr. Young introduced
Theresa and the rest of
the Art 111 and IV class to
his knowledge of art after
a year of studies in the
states. "New art" is the
concept he taught his


students to prepare them
for a career in art. Not
only were the students
taught "new art" tech-
niques, they learned art
vocabulary that would
serve as an asset to
those trying to survive in
the art Held.


Commercial art, in-
cluding graphics and
computer art, were part
of the 'new art" con-
cepts that returned with
Mr. Young. Student art
was displayed through-
out the year.


Art/105






Advanced reading, writing, and in-
terpreting skills were all necessary
for Raquel Gonzalez to do well in
world literature.


Reading has become a part of oral communications now that Jill Stahl-
man must study her rules of speech giving.


SPEAK UP


Listening to Carrie Copier's expla-
nation helps Karen lemandez bet-
ter understand the World Litera-
ture assignment.
Pointing out different techniques
of delivery, Mrs. Corbett gives a
helping finger to Jan Pierce.


I-
*I*' iwll...
~in,'-'


t-.i


I


urveys show that
the greatest fear of
any teenager is
making a speech or
standing up in front of a
classroom. Mrs. Corbett
said. If you take my
class, then you won't
have a problem." Oral
Communications is of-
fered to those who want
to improve their public
speaking abilities.
Oral Communications
focuses on the basics of
making a speech. Voice
clarity and quality. cor
rect grammar the speak.
er s character and ex-
pression and audience
appeal are all speech ba-
sics.
World Literature and
Research Writing a class
for avid readers pro
tides a new perspective
about life in different cul-


r


A -- i


lures. This class requires
advanced reading skills,
as well as writing and In-
terpreting skills.
The many types of
world literature chal-
lenge students and help
them build a larger vo-
cabulary. Research, in-
volving interpretation of
works, is a supplement
to the reading Students
are also expected to
make speeches and pre-
sentations on their re-
searched literature.
Mans foreign authors
are great geniuses and
they teach aspects from
around the world to their
readers. Mr. Howell stat-
ed that literature offers,
a good sense of com-
parison. All understand-
ing of life is compari-
son '


IE
With a look of frustration. Erin
Connolly attempts to answer
Christina Yanes's difficult ques-
tion.

















Academics 106


Interpreting literary works is a big part of Eddie Ponce's. Mike Cribbs and
Manuel Landron's weekly homework.
Body language and exciting facial expressions assist in capturing Col-
leen Ellis' audience.


Speech And World Lit/107


1\


1 ,

I Lf *
.eS









Memorizing vocabulary words. Sarah Forbes makes herself comfortable
on her bed.

Cramming before class, Kristine Stromberg and Teresa Monson attempt
to soak chapters of information into their brains.


CRAM IT!


WHAT ARE TYPICAL STUDYING CONDITIONS FOR YOU?


A.C., music, and a drink
Music to motivate
Videos, my dog, and lots of food
Just Pink Floyd on the stereo
Nothing, quiet
Studying?
I usually stare at my books a lot
the night before.
Inspect my ceiling
My radio with a Cure tape in it
Stereo blaring, while wondering
why I stay up so late
Quiet atmosphere
The rush during the first five
minutes of class.
I just keep putting it off.
Cramming the night before a test
I don't do it because I can't
miss my after school cartoons.
My bedroom, radio on low, good
lights, comfortable chair and
desk.
Sprawled on the living room rug
with the phone an arm's length
away, in the midst of my brother
and sister's squabbles.
Silence and a snack
The 45 minutes before school.




Academics ? 108


Lavi Sheppard
Jennifer Allen
Derreck Townsend
Jose Tufon
Court Little
Sarah Forbes
Andria Ruddock

Molly Dreckman
Tiffany Sullivan
Eddie Ponce

Stephanie Russelburg
Marc Ferguson

Sandra Muggier
Michelle Toledano
Ben Bean

Carlos Arana


Annie English



Carrie Copier
Erin Connolly


Preparing for the semester exam, Amy Blackford quickly reviews her
class notes.





Looking for a job?


Sure, we've all heard
of working part-time
during high school
-(with pay, of course),
but, how about getting
valuable work experience
and credits for high
school at the same time?
And during school hours
at that!
This was all made possi-
ble by Cooperative Work
Experience. CWE is a work
study program in which
students are introduced to
the world of work, and are
provided on-the-job train-
ing in particular career
fields.
During the 1988-89
school year, 125 out of
850 students participated
in CWE. These students
were matched with jobs of


their choices which
ranged from teaching to
hospital work.
Not only was the stu-
dents benefited by the
CWE program, the school
and community were as
well. They gained a well
educated, experienced
student in the working
field, and in the school
classroom, the student's
work experience aided in
life skills.
However, students that
participated in CWE ob-
tained the most from the
program. According to Ms.
Coleman and Ms. Man-
chester, CWE coordina-
tors, "Cooperative Work
Experience is the best
teacher for the job in your
future."


"Good morning, may I help you?
As a CWE employee at Gorgas Hos-
pital, Robin Jennings performs one
of her many tasks.
As a lifeguard at Los Rios Pool,
Jose Tunon is never distracted
from his post.


IT 1^1 L


Creativity and enthusiasm help Johanna Leffler to do a layout for The
Tropic Times.


At Gorgas Hospital, Linda Alba
gently rocks a new bor baby to
sleep.





















CWE/109





NEED A LIFT?


A riddle: What were
the two non-credit
classes taught by
a dynamic lady with
glasses? Each took two
hours each week, but
both were worth the ef-
fort. If you were thinking
Drivers' Ed and the SAT
Prep class, you were cor-
rect. Ms. Pylant taught
each class as an extra-
curricular duty.
The drivers' education
class taught skills that
prepared young drivers
for the perils of highway
and city driving. These
safety skills were taught
through lectures, films,
visuals and textbook
tests. Students learned:


how to operate a vehicle,
the laws of the road, ba-
sic mechanics and main-
tenance, and the basics
about how to buy and in-
sure a car.
The SAT Prep course
was a brain goal for all
prospective Scholastic
Aptitude Test takers. It
taught test strategies and
techniques that includ-
ed: learned to think like
SAT test-writers, taking
advantage of the limited
time allowed, finding the
answers to questions you
don't understand by in-
telligent guessing, and
using possible traps to
your advantage.


With a look of determination, Mrs. Pylant vowed to teach her students
how to drive.


Whether at home, school, or play
practice, Al oyo always found
time to stud r his SAT.
As lecturer the day, Mike Major
reviewed thr les of driving in ad-
verse conditis to his class.







Academics





Aadenics I 110


SAT prep books came in handy for
Cathleen Duygo.


























Using the magnetic board in Dri-
ver's Education class helped Mike
Calapini describe a car accident.
Lampas investigates possibilities
for college.




..... .. :
*1* *r
-n y j

ICt


Driver's Education/11l


































THE HUMAN RACE


by Lisa Deslondes


and study in an
environment
with various and nu-
merous cultures. Pana-
ma brings so many lan-
guages, customs and
experiences into peo-
ple's lives that aren't
found elsewhere in the
world.
A majority of BHS
students were born in
Panama or other Latin
American countries.
Those who remain


come from military
families, and other
parts of the world.
The diversity at BHS
enhances student
originality and creativ-
ity.
To some students,
Panama is home, and
to others, only a new
time and place that be-
comes a little part of
their lives. To others,
Panama is beyond
their imaginations.
Even in its primitive
ways, Panama has so
much to offer.
First to come to


many people's minds
are its numerous
beaches. Panama's
primitivism restores its
beauty, and life is good
in Panama. To exper-
ience Panama for all its
worth, you must get
out and enjoy it. One of
the set backs is that
the many conve-
niences US residents
are accustomed to
cannot be found in Pa-
nama. For BHS stu-
dents, Panama is an
opportunity of a life-
time.


.44


not We didn't plan this Shahnaz
Awan and Tiffany Sullivan are two
of the many talented students who
attended Balboa during the 1989
school year.


People 112


Introduction/113







Tricycle ridi,.g 101S. Interclass competition
was an important part of the school year.
The Homecoming tricycle race was just one
of many spirit builders. Renee Ibarra pilots
the senior trike to the end.


II I'


r P'I1


* J.


II 1


A pitcher is in the making. Ken Crowley
gives his best to the dunking booth during
the Homecoming pep rally. Unfortunately it
was "Ball four, take your base."


I' I


The Homecoming hall decorating contest
transformed the 300's into the Wild, Wild West.
David Wall and Gilda Berman paper this pas-
sageway to form the beginnings of cowboy
country.


I T-


I'


Seniors (







As I reminisce to the beginning of the class of 1989's junior year, as
your sponsor. I recall a class determined to be the most auspicious
class at Balboa High School This closely knit class welcomed all old
and new Department of Defense students to participate in a joint
venture toward unity
This class of 1989 through its endeavors, has reached the pedestal
of excellence and has far surpassed prior classes that I have spon-
Isored. You ha\e wrought cohesion by washing cars, popping corn,
organizing, decorating and selling everything for the class of '89.
These years of arduous toil and solidarity have been profitable, and
you have emerged as a positive entity between your classmates and
the faculty at Balboa High School.
As classes go. all must end, and yours will be in June. But it will be a
sad and happy ending. knowing that you have made these years, for
you and your classmates, the best they could be. I thank you for all
your hard work and dedication, class of 1989, and I wish you much
happiness and success in the life after graduation.
Thank you for the beautiful years, and good luck in your new
beginning.


TO THE


CLASS


OF


1989


I
The Class of 1989 is that unique mixture known only to DoDDS
schools worldwide. Although many memories have been life-long
friends and classmates, students entering BHS are welcomed and
encouraged by everyone, in the positive attitude which radiates from
the class.
Anyone who attended the Senior Reception in September has to
remember the sense of excitement, unity, and camaraderie which was
much in evidence. Most impressive was the fact that the 200 class-
mates obviously enjoyed being a part of this group, showing pride
and respect for the talents and accomplishments of each other.
My congratulations are to you, The Class of '89, individually and
collectively, for the many successes you have enjoyed. I share in your
excitement for the life which will soon begin.
There's reason why the graduation ceremony is called commence-
ment
Happy Life! I


n


Class Sponsors/115


c~"ta~-~







AlbaI Linda
Albcrga, Denisc
Alexander, Ycsica













Almendral, Luis
Anckle, Uva
Antongiorgi, Jeanette













Awan, Shahnaz
Banasick, John
Barriga, Tammy





1-







Bean, Benedict
Beasley, Judy
Bell, Jessica

















Seniors 116







THE INSIDE TRACK


Officers: President. Tracy Hunsaker Vice President,
Stephanie Russellburg Secretary, Maria Capps Spon-
sors: Truly Schramm, Marty Kober


I
Being a class officer takes a great deal of
time and effort to create spectacular mo-
ments that will make the year memorable.
With good leadership, anything can be
achieved.
"I hope everyone has had a year full of
fun and spirit, that's what being a senior is
all about!" said Tracy Hunsaker, President.
"I'm honored to have been given the op-
portunity to take part in creating the most
memorable moments of our high school
years. But remember, the class officers
didn't do it alone- the Class of '89 did it!"
says Stephanie Russellburg.
"Good luck to the Seniors of the Class of
'89 in their future endeavors," says Maria
Capps.
Class sponsors, Ms. Kober and Ms.
Schramm have kept seniors in line by guid-
ing them in the direction towards gradu-
ation.
Together, the Class of '89, the officers
and sponsors, have worked together and
made the final stretch eventful.


Berman, Gilda
Betty, Sean
Black, Marla











-Blackford, Amy
Boatwright, Joyce
Bolt, Michael


Class Officer '117





I

Bower, Richard Mark
Bradley, Eileen
Brassfield, Yessika












Bridges, Jeffery
Briggs, Eric
Brown, Julissa












Brown, Nicki
Bundick, Kurt
Burge, Benjamin












Burnett, John
Caffrey, Mark
Calapini. Michael















Seniors 118







Capps, Maria
Carlisle, Jo
Carpenter, Henry Jr.













Carter, Michael
Casperson, Roshelle
Castleton, Samuel












Cazabon, Janet
Chaniotis, Alex
Chastain, Christopher












Clarke, Vanessa
Cochran, Brian
Colbert, Michelle


Seniors/119






*o 1J TsE t W"o*


8tLI NH JacHU IrbrffmW







Connolly, Erin
Coon, Adam
Copier, Caroline
4










Corrigan, Cassie
Cotto-Perez, Tito
'C.Ebs. Michael












Crowley, Kenneth
Cunningham, Zuleyka
D'Anello, Gina Giselle












Dabral, Shalini
Daigle, Joseph
Daniel, David















Seniors 122




Full Text

PAGE 2

-. I... .. '" .', , .. ...... ..

PAGE 3

, TABLB OF CONTBNTS TITLE PAOE .......... ......... 1 OPENINO ....................... 2 STUDENT LIFE .................. 4 MINI MAO ...................... 27 SPORTS ....................... .36 CLUBS ......................... 70 ACADEMICS .................... 98 SENIORS ..................... 114 JUNIORS ...................... 145 SOPHOMORES ................ 157 FACULTY ...................... 169 ADS ......................... 179 CLOSINO ..................... 192 INDEX ... ..................... 194 ..

PAGE 5

CINQ TO TlfE FINISlf LINE TlfE ZONIAN 1989 VOLUME 80 BALBOA ffIOff SCffOOL BALBOA" RBPUBLIC OF PAl'fAMA Title Page 1

PAGE 6

Clos i n g 2 TO TilE FINISII LINE acing to the Fini s h Lin e. The 1989 Zonian s t aff found R this th e m e to accuratel y convey our life s t y l es in Panama. Se v era l new aspects in Balboa High Sc hool during th e 1988-1989 school yea r l e d to th e u se of this th e m e. Th e d ecline in student population decreased th e numbe r of bodies rush ing to get to c l ass. Girl s sports were add e d causing more athle ti c competition. Inte r-clas s competitions adde d to th e school spirit race and motivation of th e student body. Balboa High S chool ra ce d to its fini s h line, Joining in o n th e run I'aul J oyce gra bb e d hi s ca rdboar d and s lid dO\vT1 t h e Admin i s t r atio n Building hill.

PAGE 7

Holding o n for dear lifel r-1ark Anthony Perez takes on a Zonian tradition by s liding down the Administration Building hill. Opening/oJ

PAGE 8

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/zonian 1989balb

PAGE 9

Life i s a banquet. and some poor s u c kers are starving to death'" Well. we don' t h ave a nyone starvi n g to death at Balboa Nigh School. Student life starts from t h e first da y of school and lasts till th e last day of sc hool. It includes socia l meetings in the h allways dances peprally's. spirit days dating. parti es lunch. New Year's PCC students. Camival. Early graduates a nd of course. you th e p eo ple. This year the Student Life section in cluded a new addition called Mini ma g Mini-mag includes I(lItlNG INTO SPII(IT all th e events that innu e n ced the student body a t BNS. Some examples are: The presidential e l ections the seventy -fifth anniversa ry of the Panama Canal. th e su p ersta r s of the 1988-89 school year. and polls from BNS students. Student Life contains a pi ctorial of eve n ts that stu d ents have been invol ved in W e hope that when you loo k ba c k upon the pages you will smile. This section is dedicated to all the students a t BNS. This i s for you Man y stu d ents will be gone after this year whether because of graduation or because their family is with the military. We hope that you will take with you the memories of Jamboree. Nomecoming. Christmas Fomnal Camavalitos and all the wonderful m e mories that are gathered from BNS We hope that when you are old and grey you will remember the night you and your buddies decided to go carousing before the school dance. or when you h ad a chance to stea l the Bulldog from the 100 s later to a b andon it in the girls bathroom. We hope you will look ba c k on BNS years from now and rememb e r how good life was The esse n c e of Student Life Mark Horn e and M ark Caffrey s h ow off their spirit before s ch ool in the 200' 5 I ____________________________________ ; ________________________________ S t u d e nt Lif e Introdu c t io n / 5

PAGE 10

WARMINO UP FOR TffB STAR T Many peopl e do not rea li ze t h e activity that goes on before th e first day o f school n o r do they r e member those who did t h e work. Th e mem b e r s of the St udent A ss o ciation s p ent most of th e i r summe r preparin g for the new school year. They w e r e busy m aking arrange m ents to u se the auditorium for orientation. having progra m s made, asking groups to s p ea k at th e assembl y and finding students who were willing to be guides for th e n e w students. The S.A. a lso r e located th e school store fr o m th e main o ffice area to room 100. "The movi n g was re lative l y easy but we soon f ound out that w e n ee d e d t o have th e a i r conditioning fixed and e lectri ca l outlets in-S A. Secretaty, Carl Drag s et h d evoted h i s l u n c htim e to sel l S A cards a nd c a nd y Student Ufe 6 stalled commente d Mi c h e ll e Montgomery, S.A Pres i dent. The c lass office rs a lso worke d h a rd to make th e first day o f school m e m o rabl e for the i r c l asses. T h e se nior c l ass offi ce r s made doze n s of min i ature b l u e gradu a ti o n ca p s and hung the m in the 100s. They a lso hung a banner in front of th e school that sa i d W e lcom e S enio rs!" The juniors and sophomores a lso hung posters. Students c h e c k the lis t in t h e -IDa' s h a l l\ \lay t o find t h e i r homeroom numbe r Seniors [Jria n Co c h ran and Mik e C ribb s go t o Mr s Whit e t o ge t advice all course s e lectio ns.

PAGE 11

PARBNTS t:NTt:RINO TNt: RAet: Chatter fill ed the air as parents flooded the h a ll s of BHS. "How does Joey find his way around this place?"" and "Look there are Mr. and Mrs. Smith Comments as th ese flooded th e a ir. I t ap p eared to b e a twentieth high school r eunio n but was "Bac k to School N i ght." Back to School Night" was h e l d on September 14 a t 7:00 p .m Parents fill ed th e h alls carryin g their so n s or daughter's class schedules and maps of the school. When asked wh a t s h e l ea rn ed about BHS from Back to School Night, Mr s. Kirby r eplied, I discovered the teachers to be very amiabl e and coop e rati ve and the facilities greatly improved. Eighteen m embers of the National Honor Society were present to serve as guides. .J' t ... 1 P a r e nts o f students in Mr. Y o un g s c l ass get a view o r the i r c hil d r e n s artwork Examinin g (heir daughter' S s c h e dul e Mr a nd Mrs. D es l ondes fin d th e i r way a r ound B1"I5 Durin g th e b rea k b e tw ee n 4th a n d 5 th periods parenLS nood th e h a ll s t o get d o u ghnuts a n d c o ffee. B ac k T o S c h o ol / ?

PAGE 12

SPECTATORS IN THE RACE bulldog spec t a t ors Er i c "to l land E nri q u e f'1 arQuez Sleve n Torres, and Jeff Knappe n b e r ge r awaited the introduction o f their tea m by COlll m e nt a t o r J oyce T h e pep ra ll y h e l d on Sepl. 2 was organized b y the S tudent Associatio n Office r s pr e pa red (or th e p e p rally a s th e stu d e nts e ntered the s tadium. FIRST KICK-OFF OF THE SEASON Okay, this eve n t i s sponsore d b y 'oreo cookies and str aw berry navor e d 'koolaid' ," said S t eve n Joyce, the commentatator of t h e p e p rally, at the beginning o f th e event while h e waited for students t o get out to th e bleach e r s A s the students hurrie d out onto th e field, th e classes l e t th e i r spirit go by l a u ghing. scr eaming, and yelling. S teven played his m i n i legacy" through th e sound sys t e m t o arouse spirit. H e th e n asked th e classes who r eally rule d BHS T here w e r e two types of spirit contests. Eac h i n d ividu a l c l ass wa s t o decorate a h allway, and bleach ers w e re to be fi lled with bann ers, spirit sign s a n d diffe r ent poste rs The seniors won in both events T h e soph o m o r es placed second and th e juniors fini s h e d third. Student Life 8 T h e Student Association added fiv e new e v ents to th e p e p rally : "The Wave". performance by the dance t ea m and three individual dance contests a m o n g the classes. Whi l e th e students waited for the announcem ent of the football t ea m s and p erforma n ces b y the dan ce t ea m and c heerl ea d ers, S A sponsor, Mr. W a u g h started "The W ave. "The wave" r ea ll y worked w ell with the kids I think we 'll con tinue t o u se it, said Mr. W a u g h The fo otball t ea m s w e r e the n ca ll e d out onto th e fi eld. Green Devils, Cou ga rs, R ed Mach i n e, and Bu lldogs in order of c h eerlea d e r performa n ce. The d a nce t ea m made th eir firs t d ebut, and the se n iors e nded the race b y going out to th e fi eld and s howing their spirit b y d a n cing to "Pus h I t b y Sal t-n P e pa Th e o ther classes could not dan ce due to t h e lack of time. "The p e p r ally was a lot o f fun and was a great way to s tart off the school yea r," said S t ephanie Russelberg. ...f= -. Y U K I I t's grea t to be a senior ", screamed Eilee n Bradle y w hil e s h e d a n ce d with Edwin Dia z a nd Ja n e t McCormac k o n th e lie ld AMI Pus h it." J ennife r R odge r s Todd U n d erwoo d K e n C r ow l ey a n d Ta nya Pratt d a n ce d w ith c l assm a tes of senior c lass.

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After the pep rally, Carrie CopIer took a break to brace herself for the bus ride to Cristobal Jamboree. After being asked who really rules BtlS b y commentator Joyce, the sophomores fOllOW their leader, Valerie Forster, by chanting, "Sophomores are number one!" "Do not ente r no unde r classme n allowed," was the sentiment of seniors as they cheered for their c lass at the first pep rally. The beginning of the daily ra ce was antici pated by Sherdina Finney, honda Williams. Kristin Schafer, and vannette Warner. "Open wide and scream for senior pride." Charles Rogers and Luis Almendral show their enthus iasm in the senior bleachers at th e pep rally. Pep Rally/ 9

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A j3REA FROM THE RACE Fri ends o l d and new are unique peopl e with th eir own special ta l e n ts. So m e as s ume th e rol e of coach es in th e race of life, but som ehow w e a ll unify to struggl e through ittogether. From the beginning o f the school yea r until th e end, fri ends are th e r e Y o u s h a r e f ea r and frustr a ti o n as we ll as th e joy and m o m ents in th e race, Annabe ll e V e l ez and Robbie -fhrifi r es p onde d "No malle r how h a rd things gel. w e a i -Gat h e red o u tside the s.A. sto r e. s tud e nts S t eve n Torres Edwin Di az Ta nya U h o r ac hak, Robb i e Thrift Kat ya H o ld swor t h a nd Mic h elle Alon so exc h a n ge d l a t es t goss ip A s tllese student s ra c e d to t h e BI"IS footb all fie ld ( o r th e fir s t p e p rally. Ja n et Cazabon said, A n a L a m pas i s a l way s at Ill y side " 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 .3, 2 1 Everyday April Willi a ms, Roberto See l ey Jeane lt e Anton gio r gi, Kar l a J o hn s o n San a W hit e and Dan a Gord e n made t h e i r final c ountdown s to go h o m e as they await the ir b uses. S t ud e n t L i f e 1 0 ways s tock togeth e r throug h thic k and thin." Do you remembe r w h e n yo u were running to th e fini s h line and thought you d never make it through tha t last l a p ? You did it, with th e h e l p of those s p ecia l fri ends. S p ec i a l moments and speci a l people a r e two good reason s to t a k e a brea k from th e race, and r e a lize how important fri ends a re. Treasure the m emor i es, a nd a l ways r e m embe r WE MADE IT! Time O ut. Grace Brow n a nd ra j as Burk E S lopped Lo catc h a ctio n b e t wee n cla sses.

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D i sg u ised as Snow W h ite a n d Dopey Rac hel Frey and l"1 aria Capps take the ir bows for thei r fabulo u s costume designs Whe n as ked w h ere s h e go the i dea for dressin g u p as a H e r s h ey Kiss. l"lrs. M acmill a n repli ed 1 was al ready c h oco l ate a li i n eeded was a k iss." Me m bers of Mrs Sosa s P olitica l Geograph y course, f'lic hael C ribbs, M arcos Go nzal ez and Bri an Coc hran pose as OPEC min is t ers. ;; TRICKY, TRICKY. I G oul s and goblins. Jack-o' -lanterns and b lack cats. Candy corn and red h ots, The spirit of H a ll oween was brewing at 5 HS. Fr iday, October 25, was declar ed H alloween Sp irit Day by t h e St udents Associati o n Studen ts a n d facul ty were e ncou raged to s how off their c r ea ti v i ty by e nter in g in t h e costume competi tio n during lunc h Jennife r R o u se won first place for t h e femal e category dressed up as a Q-ti p and Davi d Vasquez won for the males dresse d as a PCC Green Devil c h ee rl eader. I was r ea ll y going for originality, I th ink one day of embarrassment was worth $25.00, said Jennifer. The faculty competition was stiff. Mrs George won first p l ace I had no idea New Coke' coul d win! said a surprised Mrs George. Mrs. Mac m i llan, who was s ubstituting, won se c o n d pl ace for dressin g up as a H ers h ey Kiss. Third place was won by Mr. Waug h with this depiction of t h e last DODDS teac h e r 1999, HaI1O\ .. ee n /ll

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MONSTER MASH Black brown, and orange spiders swayed creepily from webs clinging t o the ceiling. Orange and b l a c k paper c overed th e walls and lights l ent a seasonal festivity to t h e GAP After two weeks of planning a n d labor, it was ready for th e first dan ce of t h e school year. Th e ti c k ets a llowed for entrance to the dance and to the JROTC haunted h o u se held in t h e Balboa gym. LEGACY kept th e music spinning from 8:00 p m ti ll the bewitching hour of midnight. The chaperones (Mrs. Pylant, Mrs H a nsen, Mrs. L ew i s a n d Mr. Waugh) kept an eye on the students to make sure they were o n their best behavior w h e n Mr. Holland came to c h ec k -out" the scene. Eve n t h o u g h it was l a m e the first few minutes it got better," commented Ben Bean Mrs. Lewi s s tated th a t th e decorat i o n s were g r eat a nd that the students were well behaved and having fun. Sammie Thompson added, I t really kicked ofTthe school year," and Carlos Hattabau g h said, "At th e beginning it was very lame, but as the n ight prog r esse d it got a l o t better. Th e decorations were pretty good, but you could only see them when the lights were o n and th ey weren' t on very muc h No one even batted an eye when th e a i r conditione r gasped its last brea th. Students s tayed t o dance the night away. Eve n when the music "gave up th e ghost" there were some who ca lled out for the party to co ntinu e Many students stayed afterwards to h elp tear down decorations. Some were found snatching s p i d e r s for souvenirs while others sat in the front room for a breath of cool a ir. A s h y pumpkin, I r eid; I""lendenhall gets r eady to r ead a n arti c l e on drugs to the f e llo\\! s tudents in her p syc h o l ogy c lass l'1arla Bla c k s hOlti S herse l f as a bag of jell ybea n s befor e her third period c l ass f"l eanwhile 1"1r5. Macmillan trie s to maintain discip lin e in h e r c lass room r Student Lif e 1 2 Dressed as t il e vamp i res from T h e Lost Boys Tiffan y S ulli van a nd Pat S il a r z d emonstrate th e ir s tuff / --

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JAMBORBBCBRBMONIBS Imagin e tha t you were t h e Mad H a tter from Ali ce in Wo nderl and. Y o u h a d a very i mportant place t o go and little time to pre p a r e f o r it. Whe n ask e d a b out p re p aring f o r th e Jambo r ee Bulldog Prin cess Li sa D es l ondes r es p o n d e d "Rus h rush, ru s h primp a n d blus h Aft e r getting rea d y t o parade around the field in seve n minutes, I h a d ineffable f eelings. I f e l t li k e a n Olympia n Othe r p r in cesses wer e n t w o rri e d a b o u t th e r ace Jac ki e Brog i e R e d Machine princess said, I f elt proud to know th a t m y favor ite g r o u p o f g u ys ( R ed M a chine ) c hose m e : Amy Vowell, Cougar princess f elt h o n o r ed as we ll. The r e was a total o f seve n b u ses S cnior illuminated sympto m s o,"senioritis a l p e p r ally M o ll y Dre ckma n a n d Lui s Alme n dra l got p syc h e d up f o r th e rac e t o th e Atla n t i c sid e T h r ee w e r e us e d for indi vidua l classe s (Sophomore s Juniors and Se niors) and fo u r oth e rs f o r the football teams. T h e Jamboree i s a Cristobal H i g h Sc hool t r ad iti o n It i s h e l d annually o n the Atl antic s ide. Th e p urpose of th e Jambor e e i s to introduc e t h e n e w football playe r s and c h ee r leaders. Eac h year, t h e football tea m s c hoose one princ ess to r e prese n t t h e sq uad. Th e y are es c ort ed by two c a p ta in s of t h e tea m T h e c h ee rleaders a n d da n ce tea m p er fo r m ed a t h alf time Refr eshments we r e sol d t hrou g h out t h e evening a l o n g wi th p e n dan ts b utton s and tee shirts. Afte r r c cc i l in g th e flo w ers for cor o n atio n as C o u ga r Prin ces A m y V o w e l l w a il e d t o join t h e cere m o n ies for Jamboree A m o ment i n timeRed I"' a c hin e J ambo ree: Prin cess J a c k i e Brogi: gave u s h e r h o n o red' s m i l e as s h e e ntered th e fie l d Into tile ri n g S l e pp e d Bulldog P rinc ess Des l a ndes, by parading aroun d th e e n s field ./,:ul1boree 1.:5

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KICKING Off HOMECOMING SPIRIT Wh o? What? Whe n ? Where ? H ow? Why? The fiv e W s and o n e H are si x ramiliar qu es lio n s we ask in many s ilu a Lio n s. 11owever, when Homecoming approac h es. s tud e nt s ha ve b ee n known to make up the ir ow n six I lomecoming questions. Who a m I going to ask? What will I w ea r ? When will I ask him/ h er? Whe r e w ill we go for dinne r ? How w ill I get the money to afford this? WHY AM I DOING THIS ? The Student Association provided students with a n array o f acti vitie s to try to b ea t the "Iiomecoming Blues. We decided to have five different things goin g on at once to keep th e audi e n ce entertained W e have l earned that students don t like to sit and watc h one th in g "Their attention span Fres h Ca t c h o f the Day. I a llin g into t h e s pring \\lat e r s o f th e du nkin q booth Jos e T u na T un o n was ca nn e d durin g "cp Kally. 1 4 S tud e nt Lif e i s very s hort. sa id S A Pr esident. Mi c h e ll e Montgom ery. The r e were five S.A. sponsored spirit raising events students coul d participate in They consiste d of hall way d ecorating. dress-up days. noat decorating. p e p ra l l y act ivities. and th e Dance. H allway and dress u p th e m es vari e d fro m c l ass to c l ass. Sophomores used Heaven and lie l!. Juniors used My Name i s Pana rna." and Seniors use d W il d Wild West." the dance. held a t Curundu Junior liigh School from 8:00 p m to 12:00 a.m" fo llowed th e theme of Las Vegas Nights. Share and share a like. After throwing a c r ea m pie at Mrs. S h ort' s r ace during o n e o f the Homeco ming festivities Nesa H e l m h a d to lau g h a s s h e sa w the back la s h hurtin g toward s her (ace. ,. :: : ... t / ,. .. .'. ,. Gracefully showcasing a P anamania n "Pol l era", Spanis h C lub Queen Gi lda Berman stood proud on th e 110mcc 0ll1 in g neal for th e c rowd I f e ll so honored to be c h ose n t o r e pr ese nt the club, lik e C ind er e ll a s t e ppin g oul."

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. Tile ligllts must go on." sa id S A sec r e tary Jo Car li se as s h e and Patri c k /"lichae1is worked on con structing Las Vegas Night" f o r th e H o m ecoming Dan ce t Frustrate d fans. April King a nd M el Li n g Lavecchia expresse d looks of disapprova l as they wat c h ed t h e t eac h ers defeat seniors in voll eyba l l. Tricyc l e Racer, Lisa I'-l offi tt ped d l es her way t o victory for th e se n ior c l ass a t th e Homec oming Pep Rall y /"1aking a bac k -breaking retum Steven Torres score d o n e extra point to l essen t h e gap between seniors and facully on the field l'Io m ecomingj15 \

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, I The Jingl e Bell Ro c k is d emons tratcd b) J J and Kevin in a l i n e o f co uplcs. at the Winter Formal. Thai s IheJingl e B e ll R oc k," said J J as shc jammed H eign ing a t th e top of the I ce Castle arc Winter r onna l King and Queen, Jeri Whc e ler and Jason S\\lcency The event \ ... as spo n sorc d by th e Senior c l as A TIME fOR GIVING \ H O H O H O I said J e nn ROdge r s a n d M rs. Sch r amm as thc y g reet e d co up l es Stude nt L i f e 1 6 (P l ease s in g t o th e m e l o d y of J in g l e B e lls." ) Dashing throu g h th e h alls Christmas s pi rit way; O 'er t o c l ass w e go, Complaining a ll t h e way (Ug h Ug h Ug h ); Bells a b out to rin g, Making teach e r s cry; "Oh w h e n will we get out of h e r e?, va c a ti o n s t arts t onig hl!" (C horu s) O h Peas a n d Corn, Squash a n d Bean s Canned Goods a ll t h e way; Limo rid es and candy r a f n es, decorations m a d e; T o fulfill our Christmas spirit, g i ving e v e ryday; A time for g i ving s h a rin g too, o n Baby Jesu s s d ay. Mr. W a u g h sings B a h hum-b u g a ll th e d ay Mrs. Pip e r rings "Wise Inves t m ents pay;" A Christmas Wis h", and "Midas T o u c h w e r e honore d th a t d ay sing in g g r a m s b y junio r c lass embarrassed th eir prey. (C horus) O h Peas and Corn, Squash and b eans, Canne d Goods a ll th e way ; Limo rid es and candy raf fl es D ecorations m a d e; To fulfill our Christmas spirit giving e v eryday; A time for giving, sharing too, on B a b y Jesus' s day_ Candy g r a m s w e r e sold, G enuine Thespian m a d e; C o ll ege f a irs w e r e s t a g e d f o r Coll ege bound students a id Ne v e r f o r get, t h e si gnifi ca n ce of this day; A time f o r g i ving and s h a rin g for th e l o vin g h oliday!

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" Ar e n t we gor geo us?" said Tracy Hun sak e r and Loui s l'l artinez as they O oa t on a n I ce Castle cloud of l ove ICE CASTLES Helium balloons bobbe d from the cei ling. an i ce cas tl e glit tered from across the room. a n d cou p l es swayed toge ther to th e rhyth m of t h e m usi c. Winter Form a l sponsored by the se ni o r class. was h e l d at Amador Offi ce r' s Club from 8:00 p. m to 12 a.m. Mu s i c was by Legacy T h e ni ght was memorabl e beca u se I was abl e to s hare i t w i t h someo n e very speci a l. said a rad iating Susan Martinez. The Zonian staff a lso tried to add to the m emori es of Wint e r Form a l by rafning a limous in e to u se for four hours. Stephanie H elin won the r a m e and d i d up the lown" "The most fun part of th e dance was when everyo n e decided to let loose and do th e locomotion!" co m m ente d Jo Carlisle. Todd Underwood added. "The mu si c and th e simplicity of th e decorations made it a g r ea t night" P l otting the theft o f the H e lium bal l oons on the ce iling of the dan c e are Sonya Latta and I van Levy Dress ing up Coronating of the Co urt. and pi c ture taking arejust a f e w of the fonnalilies of being cho sen m ember of a Wint er fonnal Court After the ce remonies. Wen dy forst e r Rob Thrift Jeri Wheel er Jason \ yeeney Carl Dragseth l'laria Capps Brian Lieberman and Stephanie RU5seiber g took their last picture Winter f o rmal /17

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ARSENIC AND OLD LACE Im agine if the two spins ters n ex t door w e r e r esponsi b l e f o r the murders o f a f e w l o n e l y o l d m e n w h o boarde d w i t h t h e m This was the p lot for B H S s fa ll presentation o f Arsenic and O l d Lace b y Joseph K essel r in g. This comedy was presen t ed on O ctobe r 28-29 and Novembe r 4-5. The cast and c r e w s p ent month s prepar ing. Their Saturdays were s p e n t c r e ating the Bre w s ter' s li ving room and their we e k days were con sume d b y r e h earsals tha t last e d until late in the evening. Ironi c a ll y late this Novembe r a California n l andlady was accused o f poisoning her t e n a n ts for their soc i a l security c hecks. Poli ce unearthed 7 shallow g raves in her ba c k yard Twenty minutes befor e show-t i m:, Mark Bower, Ti n a Mai sla, and Jan P i e rce d e mons t rate t h e special makeu p thaI transforms t h e m into their charac t e r s Student Ufe 1 8 Sisters Abby and 1"1artha Brewster thank E l a i n e for going to t h e theatre with M o r timer. Th ey are h a ppy t hat, if Mortime r has to go t o t h e t h eatre, at least h e i s in the compan y o f a mini s ter's d a u ghte r { "Oee. I 'lOpe Idon' t hilmy ringer r sai d Alex Rayo w h il e hammering in a \yood s upport for the B rc\vsters dining room. Sct con s truction wa s o n: o f the mos t time c o n suming and difficult a spec t s o f c r eating t h e play Front Row : N Woodrow. R Frey, V Forster, S Loy K Putnam. W Fri es L I z b i cki. N Ca ffrey. Ba c k Row: Mr. J Johnston. C. Ne l son A Royo J P i e rce. T Maisto. R Linares. B Lie b erma n A I zbic ki. C. Dragseth T Myer D t1ende rson C. Unde n vood. R Sam u e l s, C. B errea n W Fors t e r P M i c h e li s Mrs. D Nelson. THE CAST Abby Brews ter Rew Dr. Harper Tedd y Brewster O fficer Brophy O ffi c e r Kl ei n Marth a Brewster E l aine Harpe r Mortime r Brews t e r M r G ibbs Jon at h a n Brewster Dr. E i n s t ein O fficer O '11a r a Li eutenant Rooney Mr. Withe rspoon Mr. Hoskins Jan Pierce Rolando Lin a r es Derek H enderson Brian Lieberman Carl Dragseth Ti n a /,,1 a i slo Cath e rine Ne lson M ark Bower A l ex Royo Tom Myer Aaron I zbicki Ray mond Samu e l s Wend y Fries Ch ri s B e lTean Valeri e Forster

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A NEW BEGINNING Nancy Tiblier Amy Vowell Ash l ey Falcon Yvonne Fishbaugh lIiana Rodriquez Yo Koitani Takakiro Nakasu Din Wei-Chung Jennifer Rodgers Doug Haning Craig Meyer Mike Brazelton Ismael Rios Stephanie Helin Yessenia Rogers Carri e Copier Ce leste Brown Melissa Bowman Leanne Thrift Aida Angel Shirley Krapn Mark Caffrey Tiffany Sullivan Patricia Sitarz Shanaz Awan Mari Anglada Robert M cDonald Melinda Griffin TO get over Will this year. To be a good little girl. To sue my real father. To stay faithful to Matt. Try to get a long with everyone. I mprovill9 my grades. To have many friends. Have a nice year for everyone. To be good to everyone. To stop cursing. For the utmost to win the cayuco race To not make and New Year' s resolutions. To stop looking at g irl s behinds in the halls. Stop hitting Eric. Stop talking in Mr. Jaen' s c l ass. To get better grades. To be more friendly. and go out more. To lose five pounds. To stay out of trouble. To settl e down. To eat more fish to lower my cholesterol. To get home before m y curfew. To pass Algebra II. Graduate and palty from there in. To get an A+. Stay out of trouble. To \ \lin a basketball game. To stay with my boyfriend. friends Angeline Rowland. Karen Kirby Kara T\y'ohy f"lich e ll e Berry, Karen Stromberg. a n d Jennifer S wee ney resolve to get to the ca feteria earl y so they won t have t o \ vai t. Hopeful smiles for a prosperous New Year are dis p layed on the f aces o f Robert McDonald and Carl Nesbitt. / "TROUBLEI I \yjsh I could stay out or it." said Marl Anglada as s h e sa t \yjlh B elita Cargill. Ivette Thomson. Reso lulionSj19

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Kn s tin SChafer a nd fred Gomoll s p end thei r lun c h to gether in the 400 5 h a ll way Always t oge ther, juniors Tradene Smith and Axe l Alon giorg i po se for a s nap s hot Kim TfJOmpson and T o rrey G r agg rende z vou s after s ixth p eriod to dis c uss plan s for Friday nig ht. v \ St uden t Lif e 20 RUNNING THt: RACt: TOGt:THt:R Ho l ding hands. Side g lances. Sweaty palms. N ervous twitc h es. These are a ll symp toms o f d ating. The p laces in the zone most frequented by BHS cou p l es while dating a r e: Anthony' s Pizza P l ace, Howard or Clayton movi e theaters, the Ya cht Club and occasiona ll y th e C lub H o u se. When asked where they usually go o n a date, Kim T hompson replied, "It usual l y doesn t matter as l o n g as we r e toge th er. Us For-ever! A few adventurou s BHS couples could be found downtown at 7 .. E leven buying slurpies dancing a t Magic, dancing a t the Marriott. watching the band Cri s i s at My P l ace, or d ancing the night away a t Bacchus. Couples could also b e found at sports events such as football ga m es, b as k e tball games, and t ennis match es. C h ris lVilliam s and Anna 1"1 ay ers s top a t the ir l o c k e r for a Quic k c h at beh"ee n c l asses

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Balboa Hi g h S chool's c on cur rent enrollment students gath er togeth e r during lunch Pictured : Carie Morris Eileen Bradley Jeri Wheeler Steph ani e Russelburg Brian lieberman Adrienne Oliver Melod y Oliver Tamara Matheney Jo hanna Leffler TingWei Lin. and Maria Len-Rios. Not Pictured : Denise Alberga Amy Blackford Joyce Boatwright Mark Caffrey Ken Crow ley. Omayra De Je sus Molly Dreckman Wendy Forster Jean Gramlich Katia Henriquez Kirby Kaufman En rique Marquez. Anays Nolte Raymond Samuels. Jason Sweeney Scott Throndson. Shaleen White and Dean Wil kinson. The concurrent enroll ment program is a great oppor tunity for young people to earn college credits." stated BHS counselor Mrs White Kirby Kaufman added I enjoy being able to schedule my classes so I can s l eep in the afternoons or in the mornings." SPBBDING UP TIfB RACB During the first few days of school at Panama Canal Col lege alumni wa lked the halls dreading to bump into one of "them" Some of "them" had been spotted in the biology lab, philosophy c lass, and the photography darkroom. T h ey had even invaded the lounge. "They" were BHS students attending PCC under the con current enroll m ent plan. The con current enroll-ment plan was started during the 1987-88 school year for seniors. There were two program p lans senio r s could ente r ; one was a tu ition waived plan, and the other was a tuition paid plan. Tuition waived students needed a 3 0 GPA a letter of r equest from their par ents, approval from the principal. and permission from the Dean of PCe. They a lso had to enroll at BHS for a minimum of one c l ass. Tuition paid students were not required to hold a 3.0 GPA; however, they had to pay their own tuition and meet the same requirements that appli ed to tu ition waived students. Many concurrent enrollment students found that there were some advantages to belonging to the program. 1 liked the fact that they weren t concerned whether you were tardy or abse nt. They left it up to the stu-dent:' sa i d a content Mark Caffrey. 1 liked bein g able to see friends from previous years that I would have missed at BHS this year," commented Jean Gramlich. There wer e. however. some drawbacks. Many pro fessors did not gi v e makeup tests and a f e w w e r e known to lock out tardy pu pilS Concurrent Enrollment /21

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iFIESTA! C arnavalito (o then'/ise known as Little Carnival). \\las created by the Spanish Club \ vith th e purpose of ce l ebrat ing Hispanic heritage. This year the event was h eld al flo Amador om ce r s Club Th ere the members of the club showcased beautiful decorations. t ypical dancers. Panamanian food, and all night danc' in g with their friends and famil y I was proud of the s u ccess said Gilda B e r man, Carnava l Queen. flaborately costumed Spanis h Club Prin c esses Michell e Toledano. Aida Angel. and Aurora Sal azar admire the performance given by other members of th e court. W e re just 0000 friendS said Jo Carli s l e as she tickled her friend Pat during lunchtime. Gracias." said Gi lda Berman as she received her coronation nowers B eau t y tradition. family fri ends honor, parties Toldos f"'loJade ra s balloo n s noats. festive costume s sal s a music 'Damas,'" aballeros," and al eg ria are only a f e w o f the e l e m ents that make up the Spani s h Club' s annual Carnavalito/Compars a S tudent Life 22 j "To jump, o r not to jump?" That was the question Mike Monson asked himself as he hung from the Cocoli bridge. Lost in l ove is Laurie Mangum as she sits with boyfriend 6rian Coch ran on steps at lunchtime. "Thumbs up for the Class of 8 9 and a boo for s chool." said Tracy Steph Russelberg, and f"'1ichelle Toledano as they stood in front of the Cocoli Bridge on Sen ior Skip Day STUPID CUPID Love, february has puter Dating S urvey" dents assemblies on often been de (whic h served as a list of th eir topics: Christianity, c i a red "Tl1e 1"10nth compatibles). and tl1e importance of of Love," but this year at The Spanish C lub c e l e Bla c k history. Later. the BHS February was fu ll of brated tl1e i r annual Car IV i I d IV i I d Seniors a smorgasborg of events navalito/Comparsa in sho\\' ed th eir love of the \vhi c h were dedicated to honor of Hispanic histo Class of 89 by skipping love. ry school on traditional The Computer Club Thl O guest speakers, skip day for seniors. h e l d l\vO events: a Valen Gary Davis and Col. Bu t in e s Dance and "Com' ford. carne to g i ve stu F cbruaT) '23

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Hungry for lun c h Randy Gannon and Edward M c Donald inspec t Ih e empa nada s and pizzas or a l o c a l vendor S t anding at their usual h a n go u t during lun c h Derri c k Townsend Ju li ssa Brown Junior Fallin and Terrel Lewis li sten to t h e i r wal kman s S tud e nt Lir e 2 4 TIME OUT FOR LUNCH It wa s 11:45. T h e h aJJs b eca m e Oood ed with hungry teenagers. Popcorn started to pop in room 100; lines started to form in th e ca f eteria. and students started to cl uster around th e S.A. stor e. For those who c hose not to eat in th e ca f e t e ri a JROT C sol d h o t dogs and a va ri ety of sodas. Empa nadas, cookies a nd mystery m ea t on sti c k were sol d on th e street corner b ehind the 400' s. Man y students just saved time by buyin g two or three candy bars from the S A store so th ey had time to mill around the 100' s and socialize. Students could b e found a n yw h ere: from sitting on the front steps of the school to M cDonald' s in t h e ce n te r of Panama City Afler ra cing t o 1'1 c D o n ald' s R ya n Coo n ind ul ges o n Big Macs and mi lk s h akes.

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THEIR OWN PLACE IN THE RACE ., Cautiou s l y Chris Matson works o n illustr a ti o n s A thi n m an with a big appeti te Mark McConne ll e njoys ROTC food a ft e r a v igorou s work o ut. D e e p thinking "steel;' Carey Goehle concen trates o n a d rafting p roject. Ev erything has its funn s i d e s hows Anyas N olte during a t ennis pract ice Cooperative work i s better wor k prove Alex Chanioti s a n d Chris Toshok as th e y s tudy U S gove mm erll. Student Life /25

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GETTING A HEAD START Primus gradull1 academicul11. trjOll are unfamiliar with these words. then YOLI probabl y aren t a\vare o f tile Early Gra duate Program offered at BIIS. The Earl y Graduate I }rog ram was orre red to students who had comple t e d ttle n ecessary 20 c r edits. Th e following 1 4 students. \vh o graduated in Janu a r y, d i d so for m a n y different reason s. Whe n asked the queslion, Wh y did you decide to graduate earl y? students replie d : to start college, work, leave Pan a m a and som e responded to gCI o u t of hig h schoo!!" Hi g h sc hool was beginning to gel boring, and I wanted to get on to b igger and better things -College," said Sta cy Wilsoll. So. if you are a junior in hi g h selloo!. and I laven pl anned your senior year; earl y g r aduation might b e for you! The follmving students were B I IS Early Gradu a t es: Yessica A l exander Amy Blackrord Montserrat Bojalil Adam Coon Sarah Forbes Katya Holdsworth H eidi Mendenha ll Jeannie Marohl Happily standing a t t h e h eac l and at t h e e n c l oftileir hig h sc hool yea r s are Sara h forbes and Amy B lackford. Bursting out with joy from t h e main h a ll doors o f BI I S :Ir e Ta n ya U h o r c hak, Pal S itar7 Ile idi f'l cndcnhal l A m y B lackfo rd Adam Coon and Sari ta rorbes. The beginning of th e second semes t e r often means more work, but to t h ese carl y graduates, th e party i s jus t beginning. 26 Antonio P ereira Patri c ia Sita r z Tany a U h o r c h a k Sta cy Wilson Mary Minor Young 500 Kim WtlAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR T I 1E FUTURE? Patr i c i a' woul d like t o b e a n artist. Sarah' want to major in Art Hi story. Tanya'l'd like to work in com m ercia l marke tin g /communi cations. Stacy-I'm going to Lous i a na Tech to become an e n gineer. Jeannie-I'm going to Califor nia to start m y career in Cos m etology Amy-I'd li k e become the own e r of a c h ain of Lingerie Bou t iques. GOODBYE I would like to say a special thank you to Mrs. Othon for h e r fri endship, which will c h e ri s h foreve r -Jeannie CONGRATULATIONS TO ALU" . 1. .' p -. / --I -

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STUDENTS' FREEDOM OF PRESS by Wendy Forster The Supreme Court ruled on Jan. 13 that censorship of a studen t newspaper by public offici a l s was not unconstitutional as long as it was "reasonably related to l eg itimate pedilogical concerns" and had a va l id educational purpose. Justice Byron R. White said school officials, act ing i n thei r "capacity as publi s her of a school newspaper or producer of a school p l ay, had authority to bar speech that is, for example, ungrammatical, poorl y written, i nadequatel y research ed, b i ased or prejudiced, vu lgar or profane or unsuitable for immature aud i ences." In dissent, Justice Brennan sa i d school offi cia l s acting in such a manner "violated the First Amendment' s prohibitions against censor sh i p of any student ex press ion that neither disrupts classwork nor in vades the r ights of others, and against any censorship that is not narrowl y tai lored to serve its purpose. T h e case Hazel'vood School Distri c t v. Kuhlmeier, involv ed a Missouri high school principal who barred publication by the school newspaper of severa l articles on teenage pregnancy and the impact of divorce on certain students. The princ ipal Robert Reyno lds, said the arti c l es were inappropriate i n that they m ight reveal the identities of the pregnant students, who were not named in the article, and reference to sexual activi ty and birth control were improper for younger students who woul d read the newspaper, A l so, Reyno lds said, one articl e contained a sharp criticism by a daughter of her father, who was not allowed the right to respond. The censorship was challenged by the student members of the newspaper staff as violat ion by a government. or public, official of their First Amendment rights of free speech In the Hazelwood case White also cited the high court' s 1986 ruling that. First Amendment rights of students in public school s are not automatically coextensive with the rights of adults in other settings" and "must be applied in light of the special character isti cs of the school environment. .. A key issue was wheth-HACAL7NE-S C / EN CE/ M E D I C INE SPOR T S 28 ......... 30 ..... 33 ..... 34 er the school newspaper was a forum for publi c expression or a part of the school' s curriculum. The student newspaper, written and edited by the school's Journalism II class, clearly was part of the school' s curriculum, White con cea led. Officia l s "must be able to take into account the emotional maturity of the intended audience in determining whether to disseminate student speech or potentially sensitive topics. " A school must reta i n the authority to refuse to sponsor student speech that night rea sonably be perceived to advocate drug or alcohol abuse, irresponsible sex or conduct otherwise inconsistent with the shared values of a civi l ized social order," H e added that schools could censor speech that might "associate the school with any position other than neutralization on matters of political controversy," .. ('I ini l'"lag/ 2 i

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ENTERTAINMENT / BOOMBA-HEY BOOMBA-HEY BALBOA by Cat h e rin e Ne lson I r yOll lik e high s c hool students they love you ba ck!" Mark S harenbroi c h proved his point as students l a ughed and appla ud ed hi s an e cdo t es on January J 8. S h arenbro i c h has been speakin g on a professional l eve l for ten years. His job. whi c h he c onsiders a hobby h as taken him to over 800 high 5e ll00l s. ''I'm away from my famil y abo ut two nig llts per week," sa i d S h a r e nbroich I t s a l ways h ard to l eave home I t's a l ways wonderful to return, During the hour l ong as s e mblies. one of Sharenbroich s goals was to 11el p students to see their own in-dividua li ty and value. 1 l ove to t e a c h a nd try to h e l p high 5elloo1 students see what lIl: high sch oo l years c an be," '" l ove being wit h teen agers I see so Il1UCl l hope and despai r excitem e nt and boredom, th e b es t of times and th e worst of tim es It i s s u c h a tim e of growth when a person rea l l y begins to se n se indivi d u a l ity directi on and independence." S harenbroi ch s main goal is to c hoose life over ex istence. Celebrate \\fho you are, w here YOll are ce lebrate life!" Hi s s tory of a s m all child, k issing it s re n ectio n in a mirror, d e scribed thi s goal. "Hig h sc hool if a time of c h a n ge and growt h:' sa id Schre nbroich. "To grow, one h as to part i cipate. Give in stead of just taking. Base your participation o n a sense of self wort h W h e n I liee, r espect, a n d valu e w h o I am; I t e nd to r espect. and valu e o th e rs. As I value m yself and others, I participate in positive growth ways. It s okay to compe t e in order to be til e best of w h o you are, but avoid compar in g yourse l f t o ot h e r s w i t h I wis h lists I w i s h I was lik e that person instead of like this S h a r e nbroi c h advi sed. You are no better than anyon e e l se. And no o n e in this world is better than yo u & "'I absolute l y loved m y trip to Panama. Part l y because it's like walking through National Geographi c ; partly because it i s a S ignificant part of history in the making; mostly because t h e peopl e are so givin g. The wonderful peopl e I m e t are such loving, g iving peopl e It's so very easy to f ee l so close to so many i n such a short pe riod of time. My Panama friends truly have a s p ecia l pla ce in m y h e art. W ishing m y Balboa friends a life tou c h e d with laughter, love, and tears of joy" "'lin; Mag 28 Eric C herry on the move! "Involved, Inte nse, creative l y infecti o u s, In spiring and thoughtful a f ew of th e descriptio n s audie nces h ave stated about Eric C h erry, a talented mus i cia n w h o is risin g in recognition in th e Chris ti a n mu s ical are n a. H e has ga in e d the reputati o n of bein g de p endabl e, Chris t-centered, h as become popular with the teens and young adults h e r e l ates to. The m y raid o f ex per i e n ce h e draws from e n r i c h h i s self-assured de li very and aid in his e m path e ti c counseling. H e worked at a Christian camp w here his musical skills a n d 'down right crazyman person ality were te s t ed, honed and w e ll utilize d E ric's love for youth and music came appar e n t to his audie n ce a t B H .S. H e was enjoyed by the students and his s in cerily humor, and spiritua l c h a ll enge of his spiri tu a l m essage enha nced his audie n ce on March 7 1989 at Balboa High School. ... GARY DAVIS b y Brian L ieberm a n Sin ger, songwriter, and producer, all in o ne, Gary Davis A description of Christian Contempory music m an Durin g a two-w ee k visit to the R epublic of Pana m a, Davi s s t oppe d in at Balboa Hig h School to host two assemblies. Aft e r a short Junior ROT C d emonstration, Dav i s entertaine d his audience with "music with a M essage Using anecdot es from his life, the 30-year old Davis tri e d to relate his t ee n age ex p e riences to those of his audience. Th e assemblies were d es ign e d to stir in teres t for a fullblown, but free concert on Saturday, February 4 1989. This con cert was attended by Balboa High School students and the public. His message con ce rn ed his b elief in God and Christian religion. Davis, v isits high school throughout the country spreading his belief in J esus Chri st. ...

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MOVIES BEST OF SCREEN Th e Accidental Tourist Dangerous Liaison s A Fish Called Wanda The Last T emptation of Christ Little Dorvit The Manchurian Candidate Mississippi Burning Rainman Who Framed Roger Rabbit Wom e n on th e V e rg e of a Nervous Breakdown WORST OF SCREEN Anothe r Woman Arthur 2 on th e Rocks Betray e d Cocktail Colors Far North Frantic Rambo III Running on Empty Young Guns ----== ----------------------------------1. Anthrax 2 Metallica .3. Slayer --------------------------------------------4 Megadeth 5. Motorhead 6. Scorpions 7. Loudness 8 Guns N Roses 9. AC /DC 10. Cinderella TREIYDY IS OUT by Jeri Wheeler As the showrooms unveiled the B9 fash ions th is fa II. there were crowds but sa l es were low. S i nce mid 1987 womenswear sa l es have been dismal. To day. most women work and spend '''' o f their c lothing budget on busin ess o utfi ts. Women have learned to say no. and d i d so to the X-rated mini and the "walking shorts and jacket for the office." Rising pri ces are being met w i th lower Quality Women complain that sa lespeopl e never seem to know about thei r mer c h andise Contrary to this menswear sa l es a r e booming Information gathered from NEWSWEEK De cember 5 1988. Th e Panama Canal. a waterway that links the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. cele brated its seventy-finh anniversary in 1989. In 190.3 a treaty be tween the United States and Panama gave the United States the right to build a canal. On August 15. 1914. the first ship transited. I n 1971. negotiations designed to replace the 190.3 pact began and in 1971 two treaties were Signed. One treaty gave Panama control of much of the zone area begin' ning October 1 1978. The other provided for Panama to take full con trol of the cana l on December .31. 1999 THE PANAMA CANAL I N S AND OUTS OF 1989 IN OUT I N OUT Maine potatoes California raisins Over-40 rockers Under-20 popsters Love Bead s Crystals Faxing Phoning Shooting Quail Bashing Quayle Blue s u its Brown suits Cher Li z Laser disc DAT Beestung l i ps Liposuction Toto A liens Big U.S. ca rs Small imports Batman Mickey Mouse Cash Credit Cards Regional Berrs Imported beers Pat Sajak Vanna White Brazilian pop African pop VH-l MTV C l eavage Legs Nostalgia Futurism Keith Richards Mick Jagger Mic h elle Shocked U2 Anne R i ce Stephen King Orange Pink C loth coats Fur coats H elping the home l ess Wall Street greed Liquid protein diets Counting calories Madonna Tiffany Ninetendo Pictionary Motorcycl e fashion Bicycle fash ion Touring the USA International travel Stews Raw a n ything Candi ce Bergen Cybill Shepherd I"lini M ag /29

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NEWS THE CHALLENGE by Cari e Morris Th e 20th century h as been fraught with change and challe n ge Durin g tile last forty yea r s a decoIoni zed world has been dominated b y two r ival s uperpowers, t h e United States and t h e Sov iet U nion, seeking military and id eo logi ca l supremacy Enter Mikhail Gorba cllev, n ewest Soviet Pres ident, with a sweepi n g vision of a n ew worl d order for the 21st century. In hi s v i s i on there wo n t b e a relia n ce on military power or ideo logy for dominance among nations. Gorbachev spok e of his vis ion to th e Un i ted Nati o n s in D ecember, 1988. During his s p eec h Gorbachev's vIsion for a new world order h e in clude d some entic i ng initiatives: e m igra tion, human r i ghts arms control and troop with drawa l from M g hani sta n and Easte rn Europe. His new policies of openness and economic growth in t h e Sov iet Unio n l end themsel ves t o support this "new world order. Gorbachev's gambit Mini Mag 30 does have dange rs for t h e U.S. and Western Europe. Although these i deas h ave b ee n repackaged, th ey s ee m n e w w h e n spoken of b y a s elf assured Soviet l ea d e r who h as d i s pl ayed a k ind of seductive charm the worl d i s not accustome d to. His new thinking" is a significant sh i ft but the U.S. r e m a in s wary of this m a n whose timing and magnetic personality give him a most comm anding prese n ce on the worl d stage. Skepticism of course i s probabl y warranted and ce rtainly prudent, however the question is not whether Gorbachev is sincere but can h e suc ceed? Th e most immediate challe n ge to the U .S. is to prese rv e th e unity of the North Atlantic Treat y Or ganization (NATO), and then prepare for the long-term economic bat tl e for Europe. Gorbac h e v s initi at ives c reat e a grand opportunity for George Bush and his n e w team. H e must redefine America' s role in the worl d with a boldness that could quic kl y bring Bush out of the shadows of both Gorbachev and R eagan. Bush should emphasize the common id eals of fr ee markets, free trade and fr ee peo ple. H e s hould a l so la y out a vision that tran scends W es t e rn goals in what has b ee n ca ll ed the col d war struggl e .... Information gathered from TINt! De c ember 1 9. 1986. The Qorbilcllev C h al lenge PEACE AND THE PLO by Jeri Wheel e r Th e PLO was p ersuaded to turn from t errorism to negotiation when the Ame ri ca n Jews accepted th e U.S. position, and for once did not endorse Isra eli d e fiance Th e Sw e dish government a lso served as an inte rmediary. President Bush was said to understand that th e b est way to persuade th e PLO to take risk in the peace process is to r educe the security threat, and one way i s to make Arafat keep his word. The p eace talks b ega n to roll when U S Ambassador Robert Pell etreau met with four PLO officials i n Carthage. H e commented that serious d iscussion of how Israel might trade land for p eace now seemed possible. T erms were set for these negotiations b y a 1975 promise by Kis singe r which stated that 1) Th e U.S. w ill not deal with the PLO until i t acknowledges Israel s right to ex i st. 2) All countri es h ave the right to live in pea ce with re cogni zed boundaries. And Reagan added that 3 ) The PLO renounce t e rrorism Arafat accepted I sra el's r ight to ex ist and was ready to negotiate a settlement to r enounce terrorism. Two negotiations be g an in Stockholm on Dec. 6 1988. Palestinians beli eve that these talks should l ead to an international peace conferen ce. All discussion will cease if the PLO is found to still e ngage in terrorism .... The following information I<.'aS gathered direcU y from Deali n g ""ith Ararat. 16 NEWSWt:fl\, December 26. 1988. ARMENIA by Heather Lumpkin Pi cture a small, quiet soviet country suddenly jolted by two earthquak es l eav ing 40,000 people dead and 500,000 others homel ess. At 11:41 a.m. the I first quake, registered at I 6 9 on the Richter sca l e shook Leninakan, Armenia' s second largest city A second quake followed shortly after, causing almost as much damage as the first. M Eighty percent of L en-inakan was destroyed, ju and almost as much damage was done to Kir-ovakan and Stepanavan, a two smaller cities to the east. Another city o( u 16,000 people, Spitak, was comple t ely wiped out from the intensity of Pa th e tremors. Ri Reporters and eyewit-tl nesses described the I'"

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area as complete chaos. They also recollected r esc uers working around th e cloc k u s ing what little machinery was available, but mos tl y c learing the rubble with their bare hands. Although this was a time of grief and s hock, it showed the growing bonds between the superpowers and other n ations. For the first time since WWII, Soviets accepted h elp from t h e U .S. and other Western countries. Vartan Gregorian, President of New York lic Library and Brown University, sa id Armenians are like swallows, th ey k eep returning to their home and rebuilding because there is else to do." ... Information gathered from NeWSWeeK THE CRISIS by Carie Morris n Wednesday December 14th, 1988, U.S. Am-to Panama ArI Davis spoke to the IAm.'r;c"n Chamber of 1C, )mmerce. This was his second public on Panama ian politics since his a rnearl y three years Mr Davis spoke princilI y of the deteriorated Panamanian I human rights, ustice and the rule of he reit... ,-",.'rl that the economic 1<'",<,< was brought on by political crisis, not .S. sanctions. Mr. Davis h is concern I th e reports by the namanian Human Committee that were being held (wjithl)ul due process of law_ The same commit tee has called repeatedly for detainees to be allowed to see their l aw yers and exercise their right to a speedy trial. The ambassador ex pressed h i s concern for a free and democratic e l ec t ion on May 7th, 1989, should the current crisi s continu e with no significant change in leader ship. He indicated his desire to be here for the elections to see how it turns out. However h e followed the protocol of s ubmitting his resignation to President-elect Bush s decision, the Ambassador plans to be in Panama well into 1989_ H e closed w i t h the assurance that the United States will meet its obligations under the Panama Cana l Treaty in what h e fervently hopes will be a democratic Panama. Finally, h e expressed solidarity and support for the Panamanian people in their continued aspirations to restore democracy, human rights and free enterprise in Panama in the year ahead. Information gathered from the Tropic Times December 16,1988 .... THE PERSIAN GULF by Thomas Myer Th e ninety-five month old IranIra q War came to an end on August 20, 1988_ The war erupted, as many others h ave, over a border d i spute. The S hatt a i -Arab river, the junction of the T igri s and Euphrates rivers which nows down into the Persian Gulf has been repeatedly shifted since World War Two. The frontier question nearly caused war in 1963 and 1968, but in 1975 the two nations came to an agreement. In 1979, the Islamic Revolution exploded throug h I ran and Pres Hussein of Iraq felt that it would threaten Iraqi sov ereignty. He severed diplomatic t i es with I ran on September 17, 1980. On September 22, 1980, Iraqi tanks surged towards the Shatt ai-Arab on a 300 mile-wide front. After heavy fighting through October, the Ira qis took Abadan and Khorramshar, both Ke y Iranian citi es in the oilrich Khuzistan province o f Iran. However, by June of 1982, Iran had re pelled the invaders_ During the summer of 1982, Hussein made many vain attempts to procure a cease-fire agreem e nt. From 1983 to 1988, there occurred a slow progression by both sides towards total war. I ran re li ed on humanwave tactics : commanders would rush waves of unarmed or poorly armed men at Iraqi posi tions to wear down the enemy; worse conscripts were rushed across minefields to clear them. This disregard for human life caused over 500,000 men of draft age to nee Iran for Turkey be tween 1983 and 1988_ In 1984, Iraq first used the chemical agents Tabun and Mustard Gas both supplied by the West Germans_ Tabun, a nerve gas first produced by the Nazis in -1936, causes nausea di-arrhea and convulsions before death. Mustard Gas, heavily used in World War One, causes burns, blindness and suffocation_ In April of1984 Iraq began bombing Iranian oil tankers; Iran retaliated by attackin g any vessel in an Iraqi or Kuwaiti portof-c all. This eventually escalated into the War of the tankers.-' The final step towards total war was taken in the summer of 1984: the bombing of civilian masses by both sides. In early 1985, the fighting for Basra began_ Bas ra Iraq' s sale port on the Persian Gulf, was nearly in vested by the Iranians, but its defenders stoodto and managed to push the enemy back to the border by February of 1986. Basra provt;;d to be the turning paint in the war for Iran: she suffered over 200,000 causalities in the pitched battle for the port_ A period of long buildup ensued. On June 13, 1988, the stalemate was shattered as Iran went on the offensive_ They were being bottled up and dri ven back within only 19 hours_ On July 18, a war-wea ry Iran proposed a cease fire Iraq answered with a new offensive on July 22 Tom by this final offen sive I ran made a last bid for peace on July 26, and Iraq, under U.N pressure, accepted. The cease-fire went into affect on August 20_ ... In(ormation foml Ne"S"'ft'1( Mini Mag /oJl

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ELECTION 88 By Carter Griffin \Yere h eld in Winston-Sal e m North Carolina and Th e 1988 American Los Angel es Californi a. Presidentia l Cam-Most analysts felt t hat paign b ega n eve n Dukakis Wall th e IIrst de-before Ron ald Reagan bate and Bush won the was elected for a second se cond. term in 1984. A vice-presidentia l de-By 1988, Gary Iarl and bate was h e ld in O m a h a Jesse Jackson had seN ebraska, \\Ih i et, Bentsen cured a S i gnificant edge was said to have wall. over tlle i r othe r Demo-Until the fin a l wee l'..s of cratic rivals. During t h e the: campaign. Michael sprin g of 1988. 8 Demo-Dukakis had trouble recratic candidates wer e in vealing himsel f and de:-t h e running: Bru ce Bab -fining his candidacy. b ilL Joe Biden, M i c h ae l M a n y peopl e v i ewe d him Dukaki s Ricllard Ge-as a Carter-styl e libe r -phardL AI Gore. Gary a l and technocrat who tla r L Jesse Jackson. and would destroy m a n y of Paul Simon. the gain s made b y RonO n the same token. 6 aid Reagan in th e past 8 Republicans placed a bid yea rs. f o r the presidency: George Bu s h on the George Bush. Bob Dol e other h and, was often A I H a i g Jack .... eak' privi Du Pont. and Pat t who had son his grammar L a t e in the In th e fin a l the sa m e the campaign, crats and campai g n ed on chose their party s progressive. lib dates. The theme. By th e n h e Atlanta selected fin a ll y d e fin e d his ch ussets direc kis as their weeks before who in turn c h o night. Se n ator Lloyd Bcntsen De spile th e last minute as Ilis running mate. The surgc in t h e poll s by Du Republicans in Ne \ y Or-kakis, th a t put a scor e in leans c hose Vice Pr es i -the Bush Ca mpai g n dent George Bush and In -America n s overwhelm-diana Senator Dan in g l y voted George Busll Quayle as their presiden-as the 4 s t President of tial and vice-presidentia l th e United States with a picks. respectively. 54% 46% margin in th e In tile heated months popular vo t e and a 426 between th e Republica n :1] 2 difference in tile convention and th e e l ece lectoral college .... tion, Dukakis and Bush fought f o r w hat has been Information gathered ca ll ed the most powerful from N e wsw ee k Nov. 21. e lected orfice in the ]988, and TIME, 2 1 worl d 1988 Pres identia l debates -George Bush George Herbert W alke r Bush was born in Milton. Massachusetts. o n June 12, ]924. H e gradua t e d from Phitlips Academy in Andover. Mass in June. 1942. and receive d his \\lings and commissi o n in the U S Navy at age 18, th e youngest pilot at that time. H e entered and gradua t ed from Yal e Uni ve r s ity after World War 11. when h e became an oit busi n ess m a n in Texas from 1948'1966. Bush th e n b ega n his politica l ca r ee r w h e n e lect ed to th e U .S. 110use of R epresenta ti ves and was re-elect ed in 1968. From 1971] 973, h e serve d ditigently as U.S. Ambassador to th e Unit ed Nations. and as Chairm a n of th e R epublican National Committee from 1973-1974. \ "hen h e the n becam e the Ctlie f of th e U.S. Liaison Office in th e People's Republic of Chi n a. During the period ofl976-1980, h e serve d as Director of th e Central Intellige n ce Agen cy. Ronald Reagan chose Busll as his running mate in the 1980 R epublican con vention; h e was e lected as Vice-President on November 4 and sworn in o n January 20. 1 981. as th e 43rd Vice-Presi d ent or the U .S. and ser ve d with R eaga n until ea rt y 1989. Bush was nominated b y the Republicans to run in the 1988 e lection. and beca m e a triumphant 4] st President of th e U.S. on January 20, 1989. President Bush and our First Lady Barbara Bu s h along with Vice Pr es id ent Quayle and his wife will l ea d us from 1989 tllrough 1992 ... OUTLOOK '89 NO new taxes Bala nce the f e d e r a l budge t Maintain defense Continue Reaganomics R e m a in acti ve in fore i g n policy C reat e 30 millio n new jobs

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SCIENCE SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY by Heather Lumpkin h e world h eld its breath and waited as the fin a l sec-nds were counted 3 2 1 b l ast The Space Shuttle Discovery had a predawn launc h on October 6 It had been three I y .ea Irs since the Cha ll enger's explosion. During those three years eng i n eers worked v igorousl y to redesign the shuttle and put America back in space. The shuttle was launched (rom K en nedy Space Center into crysta l blue skies. H oweve r a change in weather threatened the shuttle s wings posing a minor setback. Once in space an ice clogged duct presented a problem. The astronauts had to increase the heat in order to melt the i ce Whe n a specia l commun i catio n s a nt e nn a extended into space (rom the cargo bay doors it (ailed to rotate and was rendered u se l ess (or the rest o( the fli ght. The astronauts were abl e to perform success (ul routine duties without a n y major complications. Although NASA and the United States were sati sfied with a success (ul launc h many criti cs re m a in dubious. NASA s associate administrator Richard Trul y comment: ed "Somewhere in the future of our country I think we a r e going to have another accident." In( o nnat io n gathe rt'd fro m N EW S WeeK Oct obe r 10 1968. Liftoff LIRolf" p 22-27, TWO GRAY WHALES "The human p e rsist e n ce and d e t ermination by so many individua l s on b ehal( o( th e wh a l e s shows mankind' s conce rn (or th e e n vironme nt. It has b e en an inspiring endeavor, said Pr e si d ent Ronald R e aga n afte r two gra y w h ales e s caped entrapment (rom th e arcti c i ce on O c to-ber 28, 1988. Due to th e efforts o( a t eam o( Eskimos, s c i enoil worke r s and two Sov iet I ce-breaking cargo ships they th e n made t heir way through a 220-mile long channe l to open sea . Th e resc u e was tim e c onsumin g becaus e of b it t e r cold and shifting i ce but aft e r three w e eks o( d e l a y word came (rom circling h e li copte rs that th e wha l e s h a d made it through th e c h annel sa(ely. by Stephanie Russellburg and Brian Lieberman WHO'S RIGHT? by Rebecca Wetzstein W e have kids be in!! born. who are gOing blind without this research," Ron a l d Boothe at Emory Uni ve r sity s Yerkes Center said. By me doing this researc h we ca n prevent t h e m (rom going blind. Most people, given that c .hoice, wi ll think it isjustlfied. That i s the way some people (eel about the highly controversial and moral issue o( using anima l s (or r esearc h There is a lso another view to the is s u e Roger Caras, a naturalist. sums up this view I believe that animals have the right not to suffer pain or (ear o( physical deprivation inflicted upon the m by us. In o n e year alone, 17-20 million animals were used to conduct laboratory experim e nts. H ere at Balboa Hig h School. animals are used (or ed ucation. Frogs and cats a r e two o( the most commonl y used animals and it i s a question thai I S not eas il y put to rest due to the two-(aceness o( the whol e issue There are benefits (or humans and pain (or animal s Who has the ri ght to a happier li(e ? Inf ormation gathered from OCt obe r 1 0 1988. Oeccmbe' l 26 1968 or rain and t'rog ress AIDS by Carie Morris The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, otherwise kn own as A IDS, is and h as been attackin g the United States and many other nations Thousands o( people the country are testing positive to t h e AIDS virus S in ce June 1981, a total o( 72 ,766 cases o( the virus have been reported in the U.S" according to the Centers (or Disease Control. In 1988, eleven states had an increase o( 100 p ercent more report ed cases The virus is spreading with no known cure, but advancements in the knowledge o( AIDS have been made. Recently there h as been a possible link drawn between the bacterial organism Treponema pallidum, the organism that ca u ses syphilis and the AIDS virus Whether or not there is a link between AIDS and syphilis is a problem ari S in g in the U.S t hat may be well precedent in history. Only time will g iv e the answer to the question o( what AIDS really i s But can the nation just sit and wa it while the number o( cases sky-ro cket? Informa t ion IJdthcred from Tropic Times Januar)' 1989 M i ni f'lag /.J3

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\ t L ;J SPORTS OLYMPICS Th e 1988 O lympic Summer Gam es were held in Seoul. South Korea "Land of t h e Morning Ca l m The games. last ing onl y 16 days, we r e seve n years in the: makin g. T h ey began with the colorful pageantry expected from t h e O ri e n t. They were t h e first Olympics in 16 yea r s fr ee from a m ajor boycott. and to pit the U.S. versus th e U S.S.R. East m e t W est in th e most memorable competition ever. Although scarred by th e biggest drug scandal in O l ym pi c hi slory the athl etes shone through with m a j es ti c displays of sports m anship and spirit. Everyone was awed when Greg Louganis almost met disaster when h e smashed his h ea d on the springboard, but bounced bac k and won gold. winnin g a second straigh t O l ympics. Both m a l e and f emale Soviet gymnastic teams dominate d the competition. All gymnasts w e r e school ed by Sushinova. Romania. \ vho took 3 of 4 go lds The U.S. f emale team \ vas d enied a m eda l. During K elly Garrison s event, teammate Rhonda Fan e r emoved th e springboard and stayed on the p l atform A wary East German judge cited a rarel y u sed rule and accused Fane o f coaching Garrison. They were p enalize d half of a point and E. Germany' s team was abl e to win the bronze; foul play. maybe. Many records \vere broken and history made in swimming Anthony Nesty won Surinam' s first Olympic medal. Costa Rica a lso won their first medal in the Olympic competition Matt Biondi. U S .. won 5 golds and set a worl d record for Min i Mag 3 4 the fastest swimme r J a n e t Eva n s U.S . took home a gold for ea c h of her .:5 races. Kristen Otto. E. Germany. s howed who was th e b est female swimme r by gliding to 6 go l ds, The U S sent its strongest volleyball team to Seou l FOUL PLAY MAYBE? QBed b y Joh n Stork who l e d th e m to the m edal round. K a rch Kiraly, considered th e best in the world. and Steve Timmons. with his pat enled sp ik e helped conquer the Sovi e ts and capture Ih e gold, In bas ketball. we witn esse d th e U.S. fall from glory, For the first tim e the U.S. team pl ayed for l ess than gold setting for bronze. Coach Thompson team los t to the Sovi e ts in their first meetin g s in ce 1 972. The Soviets b ea t Yugoslavia for Ihe go ld Oscar Schmidt, Bra zil. set an O l ympic re cord b y scoring 55 pOints in one game. The U.S. wome n were n t c h allenge d in their quest for go ld T ennis. o n e of the original O lympic events at Athens in 1896. was reintroduced to Ih e Olympics after 6 4 years. The who l e U.S. had more than its s hare of controversy in boxing. When Cuba boycolted on b e h alf of N. Korea the U.S was picked to sweep the golds. The U.S. found opponents and jUdges h ad other ideas R ay Jones dominated in boxing th ro u ghout th e O l y mpics but was robbed of his go ld after fi ghting Korea n Park Si Hun Tood Fost e r was ordered to refight Korea n Chung b ecause Chung was confus e d b y a bell from another ring. Foste r b ea t Chung again The U.S. did win .3 golds .3 s il vers and 2 bronzes howe v e r. In the race to find th e fastest man. Ben Johnson blew away the pac k and the c lock. Later. h e was disqualified for using steroids and Ca rl Lewi s re ce i ved a b elated gold. L e wis a lso won gold for a second time in th e Long Jump. a record K e nya s w ept Ih e 800m to lO,OOOm races. Th e fasted woman was Flore n ce Griffith-Jo y ner, who took 3 gol ds. Jacki e Joyne r-K ersey U .S. won gol d in the Heptathalon and Louise Ritter. U.S won th e High Jump for the first time in 20 years. The 132 pound po c ketH e r c ul es Nairn Silevmanoglu. who d efected from Bulgaria to Turkey, prove d to b e t h e biggest little man in th e sport of weightlifting. In wrestling. Kenny Monday. U.S . won gold against the defending Soviet champ. Ironica ll y. Monday had just learned how to wrestle 6 months ea rli er. The marathon. whic h ends th e Olympics. was won by a n Italian. G elinda Bardin. It was th e first time an Ita lian has had a s hot in 80 years. History again was made in the momentous Games of 88. by Marc Ferguson STEROIDS by Mark Caffrey. Th e 1988 Summer Olympics, in Seoul Korea. w ere an historical event. Many countries won their first medals ever and several world records were shattere d The Olympics, however, wili be infamous because of ster oids. Steroids surfaced twice in the Olympics. First, two Bulgarian weightlifters were disqualified and stripped of their gold medals, whic h l e d to the entire Bulgaria n weightlifting team leaving Seoul. The second and most noted time steroids appeared was in the 100-meter dash, Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson shattered his own world record and breezed to the gold medal. Howev e r he failed his urinalys i s which was round to have traces of large amounts of steroids, and was strippe d of his world record and gold medal. Ben Johnson l e ft Seoul in a scandal and upon returning home to Canada, he was banned from competing on the Ca nadian National team for life. This tragic display of "doing anything to win" brought media attention to the enormous problem of steroid abuse. Steroids are a derivative of the male hormone testosterone, which builds muscle size and strength Athle tes take

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his drug to increase heir athletic ability and erformance. In recent ears. however. steroids urfaced outside of ports. Bodybuilders to 01 i cemen have been
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Th e time was h ere. The offic i a l s had been c h ose n and the white c h alk separa t ed th e rivals The 1988 Football Jamboree ki c k e d off what prom i sed t o be a n exciting athleti c season Football trad i tionall y marks the b eg in ning o f sports at BNS. Football begins with Jamboree and ends wit h Homeco m ing. Shortl y after the g irl s sports season jumpe d to a start wit h basketball sea so n. Bo ys baske tball, boys t ennis and tra c k and field followe d the end of th ese s easo n s Swimming girls t enn i s a n d baseba ll brought th e I S ports 3 6 OUR OWN PACE last stretch of the sports seaso n to a fini s h. Towards th e e n d of th e sc hool year, th e athletes compe t e d in severa l d i ffer ent sports ranging from vol l eyball to soccer. A ll the s p o rtin g acti vi ti es wer e w ell attended. Tum out at o u r s p o rtin g acti v i ti es are quite good h ere a t BHS for the reaSon tha t the team s are well ba lanced and provide competitive and entertaining action," commented R ey n a Royo For most of the sporting acti v iti es at BHS, the ath l e te s wer e c hosen by a draft syste m Eac h athlete tried out, s h owcas in g their ta l e nts. Th ey we r e the n pl aced on Balboa High Schoo l Bulldogs, Balboa Ni g h Sc hool R ed Machine C urundu Junior Hi g h School Cou gars and the Panama Cana l Coll ege Green Dev il s These teams practi ce d long h ours preparing the m se l ves for eac h sport. The four teams and the Cristobal Junior'Senio r High Sc hool Tige r s compete d aga in s t one a noth e r sev e ra l times throughout the different sports season s "To do our b est. we h ad to se t our own pa ce to m a k e s ure w e would n t burn out befor e th e sports seaso n ende d," sa id Mark H o rn e t o summarize the sports season Interc eption "It' s someth ing that i s routine f o r Car l o s Wel c h said f e ll ow t eammate Ju stin W int e r s W e l c h s k illfully snat c hed the pass intended for Daryl Moore o f t h e Cou g ars Introdu c tion /'"}7

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Sports It's a bird. It' s a p l a n e No irs a ye llow penalty nag. "Balboa Red Machine must be playing the Bal boa Bulldogs'" The Red Ma chine Booster C lub ye ll ed and r at ti ed th eir Blg Red" ca n s at th e om c lals from th e stands. Football was a well attended sport for var i o u s rea ons. One of th e rea s on ,"as th e great number of stude n ts Invo l ved In the porI. Fou r c h eer l adlng sq u a d of e ight members eaCh and four teams of fort y players in cluding manage r s were seen on th e field T h e band. the dance team and JROT memo bers a l so parti c lp a t d in the m any Friday night games. In the sta nd s friends and family allk cheered th e i r favorite team o n "The competitio n b tween th teams was a lot c l o er this year. Because of that and the c h eer leaders the crowds were enCOu r aged to participate more by c h er in g their favorite team s onto vic to' ry:. sa i d Lisa Momtt, cheerleader o f th e Curundu Junior Hig h Sc hool Cougars. A former A bookkeeper noted Beads of sweDltrlckled down their faces as anxiety oven."helmed the players Red and Devils prepared for a h ead -on c ollision Sep tember 2.J. 38 that football ge n era t ed more funds than a ll of the other sports com bined. Mr H o lland. Principal of Balboa Hi g h School. stated. "Football has taken over as the American sport and there fore i s the number o n e spectator sport in the United States'" H e went on to add. Stu d ents s how muc h more enthus i asm and spirit at the beginning of th e year than the rest o f the year." I The Devil's squad: Teresa Monson Jenny Navarro MoniQue Serrano Kristine Strom berg Elizabeth Costa Tanya Parr Kathie Harrington Tanya Cuerra took It to the top Cutting up field Cougar Sergio r-l c K enzie s first dO\\Ill set things up for a TO. W;lh a minute l eft, Bulldog K e n Jenkins up set the Devils by scori n g the onl y TO. Hardlll ork and l earn compa nion s hip paid off for these peppy Bulldog ch eerleade rs S h erri Anderson and Karen Kirby led their t eam In a ch anl. "You h ave to keep concentrating on the game so when It's your time to go on the fiel d you perform ." said Javier Velez of the C urundu Cougars. Foolball /.J9

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JAMBOREE Th e BHS Chiva raced to C ristobal for th e Jambo r ee. The football playe r was anxious to hurry up and get off the bumpy b u s. As h e gazed out the window, h e con centrated o n the plays. Onl y a few h ours r e m a ined until the competition began Ear l y in th e evenin g it was diffi cult to tell which team would fini s h first. The c hampi o n s from last year, Red Machine, recaptured their previous title The o nl y obstacl e in OurquicJi rea c tin g lin ebackers a nd o ur fast defensive ba cks make: the defense th e best part of our game:' s tated Mar c Ferguson of the Co ugar s Jermaine Puryear #53, i s a prime exampl e orthe Cougars t e na cio u s def e n se Running throug h the h e art and sou l of t h e Red ('l a c hin e Defe nse. Edward W inkl e r oHhe Bal boa Bul l dogs rind s out it's n ot an easy thin g to do. Sports 40 their tre k to g lory was the Curund u Cougars, but Red ca m e away from that game with a tie. By 10:30 the Balboa Red Machin e was awarded th e J amboree troph y for the second yea r However the team and most o f the fans missed this great moment of v ictory. Mi c h ea l Joseph of Red said h e was "takin g a HOT show er, while t h e trophy was being pre-sented. Weary -eyed Ja so n Swee n y takes a welt de served brea k a t Jamboree '88. T h e job or a quarte rba c k i s not to win ga m es but to m a k e t h e right deci s i ons D e nni s Cm ... l es shows he' s got w hat it tak es.

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B l o cked/ Terry Munter orthe D evils with hi s o ut s tr e t c h e d arm s b ats dovJn Rand y J o n e s pass. With o u t wasting any tim e R e d Ce l e brat e d a v i c tori o u s homecoming Th e fina l gam e o f the se a so n w as h e l d o n N ovembe r 1 0th. R e d d e f ea t e d the Bulldogs 14 -9. Bnd of the Line Conce ntr a ti o n l Dary l F i shbo u g h se t s hi s aim on the Quart e rb ac k durin g the h o m eco min g game. Homecoming ,we ve wa ited a l o n g time for this o n e a n d i t fee l s great to bea t t h e Bulldogs! excl aimed Stephanie Helin. veteran Red c heerleader. after wi nnin g t h e Homecom i n g ga m e Even t hough we d idn' t have th e personnel t hat we ve had i n t h e past. it's hard to beli eve we l ost. l a m e nted Li sa Des l o ndes. Bulldog c heerleader. It had been at l east five years s in ce R e d had bea t e n t h e Bu lldogs and t h e v ictory was we lcom e d by Red fans. "Both team s tried extrem e l y a n d f o u g h t for v i c tory. b u t i t was obvi o u s t hat t h e Red Machine was t h e better of the two tea m s d u e t o hard work a n d good coach in g sa i d Ray Underwood. presiden t of t h e Red Machine Booster C lub. T h e Ho mecoming ga m e o n No ve mber te n t h mark ed t h e end of t h e footb a ll season. R e a c h for the Skyl R e d c heerl ea d ers k ep t their tea m insp i re d t h ro u g h o ut t h e c ham pio n s hi p ga m e R e d I"Tac hin e / 4J

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[ L r Sports Stephanie Helin I\eyna Royo. Kara Two h y Dawn McArthur Katie Ooodwln Lisa Palm Kim Thompson Andrea Ruddock B a footb a ll c oach I S a tough cha ll e nge The JOb r equires disc iplin e d e dication a nd e n thu s iasm for th e game The c oach really needs to enjoy footb a ll a a sport In order to p ass along winnin g qua li ties to th e team A footb a ll c oa c h tries to in st ill sports m a n Ship, pride and com -Fl1 42 -----mitment into th e playe rs. Most importantly the c oach teaches th e team that winning means p er formin g to th e best of their ability, playing f air, and e n Joying the game. Win or lose a team will always co m e out a h ead If it accom pli s h es those three things As a coac h I f ee l su cce ssful wh en th e pl ayers on m y team h ave enjoye d th e season l ea rn e d something about th e ga m e o f football, a nd h ave become more confident in their own abili ties. 00 R e d l One can put the opposition in a hole if you have a goOd puntcr Torre) Oragg punter for Red. pinned the Bulldogs deep in their 0\\'T1 tcrrItOI)'. I RED MACHINE SCOREBOX RED MACHINE OPPONENTS 25 7 21 7 34 10 13 14 C HS PCC CJHS WHITE CHS PCC CJHS WHITE o o 6 7 o 6 6 9 Front Row Derek Smit h M ike Joseph Pat Fahy Warren Stephens Dennis Cow l es Da vid Daniel. Leonardo Brooks Darrio Dennis Luis Cantu Carlo s W e l c h Middle Row Leann I'lc Conaughey Kara Twohy Katie GOodwin Reggie Davis Ted Joyce Rick Az carate Gera ld Gordon Francis c o Leone Ronald o Olton Robert Vase David Lipman Torrey Gragg John tl aning Cliff Ayo, erich Scheman James Myers Andrea Ruddock The g u ys depend on u s to ge t everyo n e m otivated and foc used o n the f ootba ll gam e." s tated D awn Red c h ee r l eader Noted for their outsta ndin g s u pport t h ese Red II'l ac h i n e rans s h ook their h o m e made raUles and waved their "Number-On e l ands at every Red r oo tb a ll game With their resound ing p lrlt they c h eered t h eir t ea m on to unanim o u s vict ory Sweeping aro und ale corne r Dario Dennis o f R e d keeps hi s t ea m s scoring drive alive b y ga inin g a k y fir s t down Kim Thompson Zenia Neely Bac k Row Coac h erhart Jackie Brogie R eyna Royo. Dawn McArthur Nesa I e lm Reynaldo Royo. Kevin Barnes. B l ai r Bates George Willi a m s Gary Grosl dler Justin Winters Todd U nd er wood H ar lEm Crouc h Darren Chastain Robert Flu mach. Dean Wilkinson Ivan Levy. Fred C h auvin Gary Crowder Stephanie He l in Lisa Pal m Mar cos Go n z a l ez Lis a Ooodwin Coac h Dah l S lrom Red

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Sports ff/Off ANXIETY Th e way I see it. football i s m y time to vent frustrati o n I figure, the angrie r I am, th e better I p lay jus t p l ay th e whis tl e Go ing to the ga m e a li ttl e p eeved gets m y adrenaline nowing. Things start poppin' as I s t e p into th e l o c k e r room. Th e p l ace s m ells worse than it did yes t e rda y yes terda y I had s worn i t r eeked like th e in s id e of swea t y topsid e r s I climb over th e m ess : h elme ts p ads bo dies I rea c h for m y locker gag! I forge t to take my c loth es home from l as t practi ce My raw n erves sta rt t o s i z zle Juli e Wilso n Adrlan e Rowley. Ang i e Ga r cia S h errl And erso n Kar e n K irby Li a Des Land S J u dit h C larke. Bull do g Brand y Huff firs t Downl Runnin g u p Ihe middl e Carl Ne s bitt pic k s up a first dO\\lIl rOI hi s tcam Peopl e all around m e are argu in g pushing, s hovin g -all ego bruis in g actions Tens ion builds, and I ge t defen s i ve H ey! Will someone h e l p m e t ape my ankle!" No response Everyo n e i s busy doing some-. thing that r esembl es nothing. Then C oa c h walks in and yells "Bac k s and r eceivers, m eeting in the heal th room, NOW! My pads are onl y h alf o n I hobbl e off to the briefing; I know beLLer Lhan Lo k ee p Coac h waiting. Who knows why th ey ca ll ed Lhe m ee tin g a n yhow? They sa id the sa m e o l d sLuff they say in pra ctice Anxie ty mounts. The r e p etition lets m y m ind wander. "Calm down n e rves! t e n minutes til warm-up. Se l f -doubt c reeps into my mind. "WhaL if I rea ll y blow it? Warm-up begins. It's greaL to be doing somethin g -finally! I m at m y p eak! Talk about pre ssure! I stret c h out yellin g the counts. Sort of h e l ps to re lax, and at l eas t I h ave som et h ing to do. It's time and I'm ready to g i ve iL m y a l l. We say our team prayer, and I pray thaL they get the b all first so we ca n nail the m '. BULLDOGS SCORE BOX BULLDOGS 7 35 19 7 o 14 28 9 OPPONENTS PCC CJ H S CHS RED PCC CJHS CHS RED o o o 7 o 6 o 14 Front Row Angie Ga r cia Shem And erso n Juli e Wil so n Kar e n Kirb y Lisa DeSl andes, Brandy Huff Jud i t h C l arke Adr i a n e Rm\ll ey Se c ond Row -E ric H olland R a lph furl o n g Dary l FiShbaugh, Eri c Hajduk R o b ert Thrift L a wr e n ce Groo m Third Rm Andr e Goss E nriqu e Marqu ez Jeff Kna pp e nbur ge r T e d Alvarad o Carl Nes bitl Rob ert N i eves Steve T o rr es Lind a R e ill y F o urth Row Coac h How e A l an r-l atheney. L o ui s Mit c hn e r Jay Ste ve n s Roge r Tay lor, Mike Ca l apini. A l ex Stir l i n g Jennife r E nder. Fifth R owCoa c h M artinez Kirby Kaufman Casey r-lorri s B ull dog Mascot. K e n Jenkin s Doug Coffey Ana Lampas Bac k Row Sha nnon Wint ers, Ja so n H e nry f erna ndo Vasquez Jurrie n Va n D e n Akker C hri s tian C h arris Joseph C lark Na n cy Tibli e r A ll Smilesl Manager s Ana Lamp as and Linda R e ill y ce l ebra t e aft e r a B ulldog victory, Inte n se Pr essure! Robert Thrift o f the Bull d ogs deliver s a s h ort pass before paying the pri ce H igh Spirits I Th e Bulld o g c h ee r l e aders k e pt the ir t ea m 's s pirit hi g h throu g h o ut the sea so n Bul l dogS /45

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46 Up th e middle David Wall takes an "Adam Coon handofr for.) hard earned yard s Wh e n all e l se rall s go fi shlngi" front Row : David Larner Benny Te l esca James Dickerson Sergio Oomez Juli an W a ldron, H lcky Larkin Joh n Ilain s David Wall John Shaffer, Joe Daigle Ed\ vald Woodward !"Urldle R ow : Robert 1"1 eyers !"Ii cheal Bana ick, Roberto Nieves Adam Coon. John Hutt fred Davis hris findley SPOrts Ken Crowl ey Robert Kimbroug h Dave VasQuez Ben Kcclhler. Josc Ga llardo, Back How : Eddylynn Corrigan. April King, Denise Alberga Doug Hannin g Russell Stromberg. Ric k orer Kevin tell Steve Hovan ROddy 1"1okillo. Jason \\ eenc)" Robert Petrosky Terry I 'lunter. harles Thomas. Tim Denly. GREEN DEV ILS SCOREBOX GREEN D E VILS o o 2 4 6 o 6 19 8 WHITE REO C H S CJ H S WHITE REO C HS CJH S OPPONENTS 7 7 6 1 6 o 1 0 6 12 .i n e ba c k e r BIiUI Ted Joyce of t h e Red !"lachine o rced Adam Coon. quarterbac k to throw an n complete pass Jnable t o adva n ce the Tigers were stopped ol d by a hot Dev il def ense TOp to bottom: Tanya C u ellar. Teresa I"10nson. T a nya P arr. !"l o niQu e Serrano Tan y a Navarro, Elizabet h Costa Behind: Kath y Harrington and Kristine Stromberg, MANIC MANAGING Get our water llQ\v! Dry tl1e foot b a ll s! tlusU e! Hu ti e! Whew! It o n e n see m s th a t th e m a nager s do m o r e running and respon d in g to orders t h a n th e fo otball player s do. Football m a nagers a r e p a rt of th e t ea m T hey go throu g h muddy initi a ti o n s and p a rticipate in s loppy ga m es T hey a r e th e r e to give s upport a n d e n couragem ent; t o dry th e fo otbal15 durin g ra in y ga m es ; to run wate r to thirs ty p layers; to provide minima l m edica l care; and eve n t o ride th e hal. s m elly s \ veaty b u ses A Gree n Dev il manager sa id that m a nagin g h e l p e d her m a k e fri endS and f ee l like a n importanl part o f th e leam. It gOlme into footba ll spirit. Il was fUll t o be o n th e s id elines. rat h e r than in th e s t ands," Running b a ll s and taking stats were Just a few Jobs done by m a na ge r s Denise A l berga and A shley Anderson duri n g ga m es O r ee n Devi l s / 4 7

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Sports Ta m a r a S i m m o ns. 6 ecca W etzs tein Leanne Thrift. Linda Lee Nichol e S t arnes Rachel Ber ge r Yvonn e I shbo u g h Li sa M ofnll v-/-c-T-O-RYI F rida y ni ght ga me s arc not whdt hccr I adlng I s al l dboul. It's a week l y commit menl. and oth r dft e r sc hoOl a c tiviti es tak s ond pri o rit y l 'lndlng tI", t o do h o m e work I s l) real c har. All h eer l ad rs n e d t o be at pra c t! e to muk It worthwhU and produc tl v cutlon o f stunts a nd c h eers ar made posslbl ont y If evcl)ionc p u ts In o n e !lundr d I>cr ce nl. I"londays see m t o s tart o n s lowt y \V h ave to force to go to pra c ti c e We talk aboul the s u cc esses a nd e rrOrs made o n rrlday ni g ht. T u esday s prJcLl C Is J lItt1c marc s tru c lur d a nd marc I:, c;rccompllsh ed New Id as S lan flowin g III th e c l catlve minds of a c h h e rlcader W edn sday -Arg h l It Is m ld wcek a nd post r s Stili n e d to )c mad W a lt \ve sti li ha v T hurs da y t o do th em -bef or th pcp rall y 011 yea h th e p p ral l y Eac h cheerleader ncecl s t o be r c m l n c lccl that s h m u s t bak e goodl s Gam es n cd to be planned out. c h eers mus t b c hos nand pra cticcd. 0 th a t th e g u ys wil l be prOud 0 1 th II' c h e r I adlng squad. Thursday W e walk the h a ll s in J dale. spea kin g onl y \vhen spoken to. W c h ave abo sOlut e l y no e n e r gy and pra c ti ce Is Illa h ys t erla Ru h r u s h rus h first \ve must finish th e posters th en r un Uno ugh the cheers and chants quickly before the pep rally The c he er leader do one 01' tw o spc ta cular c h eers to boost t ea m spirit and pride. Time to s na c k what a n experi n cel I l ayers every where demanding gOOdies Afi e"..-ard the c h ee rl eaders t ake on the dUI) of c l ailing up 48 th m ess friday This Is th e day we s how our t ea m olors at s c hool by wearing our "day outnts," Afier sc hool we finall y ge l to go h orne and rest before: the ga m e Oetting to Ihe ga m al>out 4 5 minutes earl y g i ves u s crlough time t o se t up th poste rs a nd then \varm -up. T h e game b gi n s and somehow we make I I th ro u g h th e nl ghll h a t is full o fexcil e m e nt. Joy and sir s All energy i s ge nerated to c h ee rin g our team to victory. C OUGAR S SCOREBOX C OU G AR S o 3 1 6 1 6 6 2 0 6 12 OPPONENT S W HI TE C I 1 S R ED P CC WHIT E C H S R E D P CC 3 5 6 21 6 14 6 13 8 Peopte don t rea l ize th e importance or the punter until It co IS them the game or a touc hdown. -R)'an oon. punter for t h e Curundu Cougars It s a t h ankless job but managers Tra cy Perez and Erin Hat c h ett are able to sweat it out. F r o n t row Kevin Damon, Roberto Sealey Rick Szymans ki. Edward r-l cDonald. frank Digiovanni. Jim I"1cOinnis. Kedar r-lason Jer' m ai n e Jerman. l"Ienry Curry, Martin Tremb la y and Lydia Oarrido. Second row Angel B rito. Raymond tlunler. Mark P erez C h e 6u val Sergio M c K enz i e N ick T h reat. J u a n Bar rowes John Banasi c k David Larkin. Darne l Oa rdner. and Jennifer Carr. T hird row' Ja vier Tosado. Manuel Love. Ryan Coon. Car los M c Kenzi e Jermaine Puryear Shado On t h e pro w l the Co u gar defense stops D evi l running ba c k David Vasquez. col d before h e cou l d ge t t o th e outside. S t oppe d s h ort, Raymond t'l u nter e ludes tackl e r s b u t falls shan of th e goa l lin e on t h is punl re tu rn B ea rd ea u x Rene A cuna. C harl es Taggart Dann y Magee David Cal a pln L and Erin Hat c h elt. Fourth row -John Burn e tt Mar c f e r g uson Jason Gragg Sleven Wheele r James Naum. Rand y Jones. Tony Moreno. Tracy P e r ez and Amy Vowell. Back row Coac h Bales and Coac h r-lcOann, Cougars /49

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Jump Start The jump ba ll pops up; on e t eam t a k es pos s ession A quic k pass a littl e dribble a nd th e n a shot. Time s lows a s the ball floats throug h th e air toward the hoop. T h e fan s hold th eir breath, t eammates whi s p e r th e i r thoughts a loud, all eyes are a r e g a z in g SWIS H I Th e first two points a r e on th e board. So b eg an th e 1 9 8 8 G irl s RED MAClfINE Liz Th o mpson Vallna cotlland. I tlel Manni n g Nicol e afrr y Lav l S h e pp ard. Ann a P a e oac h T h a x to n A shle y S t eine r Mic h e l l Ila y d n Jess i a H o l d e r J e ri Wheel r I { e n e I b arra. J e nnlr er R ouse I"'larcl a 5 011. Kim Leckey. r'l aria Ascana Coac h 011. ver J ennif e r R O dger s. S h anno n L o r d h r i s l y Oliver I"'l c l ody Oli vcr J e nnir r N e lm s. NOl pictured D e n eira Serran o Lisa LOy. and M a r l a 6 l a c k Sports 50 Bas ketb all season re pl e t e with a lot of acti o n a n air ba ll o r a "bric k off th e backbo ard w h a t eve r th e c a se th e f a n s still c h ee r e d and the t ea m mates hope d Aft e rw a rd Oh w ell, it was jus t o n e ga m e W e ll t ry harder n ex t time sa id h a nn o n Lord o f th e Bulldogs. T h ese th o u g h ts might h ave fill e d th e minds o f m a n y pl aye r s b eca u se n o t ea m w ent und e f ea t e d Individua l pre p a r atio n prove d to b e a s essentia l a s t ea m work. If o n e pl aye r h a d a bad game th e wh o l e t ea m suffe r e d If th e t eam l e ad e r was off, it might have m eant dis a s t er. I looke d up t o both J eri Whee l e r and V alina Scolliand. Th ey h ave both b ee n playin g f o r a l o n g time s t a t ed Mic h e ll e Hay d e n o f th e R e d Machine "Our r ecord t his )ear was 6 2 overall O u r per for m ance c an t ge t much beller bu t \oJe could h ave used tal l er gir l s c om mented r'l s Freund abo u t t h e '88 season "'tet b y a stro n g R ed def e nse, Kim eCky of White is f orced to seek h elp. Up f o r Grabsl Lori !"J e rrill o f t h e Cou g ars tipped away Jeri Wheel er"s hopes for a R ed fast br e ak Bac k in the R acel R e d teammates r ejo ice an e r a c r ucia l b u c k e t was ma de Jean ette Anto n g i o r gi. L a u rie M a n g um V a n ette W arner Libb y Rid d e r J a n e t C azab o n T e rrel L ewis, Kati e S c hn er inger Nin a Ford Co a c h F re und L ori !"I e rrill Vira Th eo kti s t o Nilc a Th o ma s D onna McGill. Liz R eye s. 1"'1ary Nelson NOl pic tur e d M elissa H arvey. Tr ade n e S mith Mis t y R e nfr o Uva Anckle Alle s ha Ave Lali e m a n t Lor e n a T e ra n !"la rgot Tr e mblay, Mari a ten Rlos. Coa c h !"l omt, K y ra R o b i n s o n Eilee n M arquez, Ti s h a Price. G l ad y s U atta b a u g h S u s a n Nel s o n Ann M athe w s. S all y Oa k l ey. Not plctured J u stina J a c kson and jOy H a u s er I try t o k ee p my min d off t h e g am e befor e It s tarts b y staying up a n d a bo u t but cal m so w h e n I g o out I do m y best:' s tated K yra R o b ins o n o f the Devils Oirls Bask etball/ 5 1

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Scouting the competitio n Bull dogs C oa c h Olive r rai d s a n o p pos in g game. M ee t you a t th e hoop. S hanno n L o r d Bu ll dogS drives to the n e t for two. Sports 'fii 52 What d o you m e an t ec hnical?" Coac h f'-1 0ffiU of Devils questions a n o fficial s ca ll durin g a game aga in st R ed Eve n tho u g h the Cou gars we r e second pl ace f o r t h e 'SS sea son t h ey d o m in a t e d the l our nament c hampionship Receiving h e r well-deserved trophy. L o ri I"1erri l i s congratulated by D r C h eville for h e r out standi n g p e r f o rmance in t h e '88 Girl s Basketbal l Tourn a m e n l. H ands t o H eave n ? U va An c k l e Devil s : and Valina Scotland. R e d : antici pate d the re b ound. Wit h a h alrcourt p r ess Joy Hau se r o f the G r ee n D ev i l s i s capa bl e of b l o cking J e an ette Antongiorg ; fro m De v il territory. Make the m count! During a pep t a l k Coach Thaxton o f Red pre p a r es h e r team f o r second h a l f ac tion On the r as t brea k Ana Pace s p rints past a determined A l ies h a Ave L a ll e m a n t, dri vi n g deep into Dev il t erritory. Fr o m the o utside. Bu ll dogs' 1I-1 e l o d y O l ive r t a k es a c lear shot for three points Girl s Basketball 53

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Th e whistle cut throug h the action and all h eads pivoted from the noor t o th e r ef. H e indi ca t ed a personal foul had oc curred and number fift een would be awarded two free -throws. The pl ayer acce pted the ball and tri e d to calm hi s fr antic breathin g. He dribble d to gain time and t o h elp r e l ax his fra yed n erves A quic k g l an ce at th e time c l o c k ve rified what h e alread y kn ew fift ee n seconds to g o an d on e pOint behind. The boy took control of the b a ll and c rou c h e d His acti o n s see m e d automa ti c as h e sprung. direc tin g th e b a ll t oward it s mark. Th e ba ll hit th e backboar d h es itated o n th e rim and then sw i s h e d throug h th e hoop. sending th e f a n s into fr antic ecs tas y Severa l minutes p asse d b e fore th e c rowd quie t e d a nd th e r e f h and-" No ( o ul s n o (ou lsl" Ins tru t e d o a c h Reyes H.yan Do n Oarmo n Alex H eyes Om3r f'1 0 rJles. Ju a n Barrmwes, K ir b y Kaufm a n and O r 9 hncrl n gc r l a k es a breathe r durin g a lim out. Spons FU 54 e d the ball to the young pla yer. The stra n g l ed s il e n ce broke only when the ball hit the noor's hard s urfa ce Time and breathing stopped as eyes foll owed t h e ball' s ni ght from the bOy's hands toward the hoop. It missed th e m a rk and d i d not rebound from t h e ba ckboard. but in stead tippe d over th e edge and throug h th e n et. Th e 88'89 BOyS' Basketball sea so n was a l so rife with te n se mom ents Th e C u rundu Cou gars s w ept a 7-1 r ecord f o r the c hampionship. but th ey got off to a s haky start b y losin g th e i r first ga m e to th e Green Devils. The Devils prove d t o b e a strong matc h Th ey ti e d for second pla ce with the Cristobal Ti ge r s (5-3) Fin i shing th ird was th e Bu lldogs with a (3-5) record and R e d ca m e in fourth with no wins. The reason for our success this year was the fac t that we had an unselfish team They worked hard and were equally as satisfied when they got an assist as when they scored the basket." Cougars coac h Ramon Reyes OfT th e ba ckboard, Raymond Hunter and Briar \ Do d com e up \oJith a k ey o ff e n s ive reboun c a gains t R e d In a battle f o r p ossess i o n Alex H ome-slice: :eyes from Cou gars o ut jumps D a ve: Winn Red ) t o g ive th e Cou gars fir s t chance to sco r e --Ov e r th e l opt Malt S c hn eringer hurl s the ball o ver a Cri s t o bal p l ayer f o r a tr ic k y two points. Pulling up ror the jump shot, P edro Silva of Cougar s s cores agains t Whit e Running th e C r ee n D evil offe n s e Rob ert f'l oral es l eads hi s l eam down co urt D es pit e a wide ran g e of abilities in th e teams lhe '89 sea s on was a building o r charact e r (or some and leadership and unit y (or ot h e r s," Mark t-iome Red M a c hin e Bo y s Basketball / 5 5

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:,=. .. , BULLDOG S Back : oach Quinn. Enrique Jones. Terry Tevis Kevin Hunter, John Riley Front : Fernando WIlliams. Fernando Vas quez Tlto CouoPerez Brian Cochran. Tradene Smith, I vette Thomson. R[D MAC HIN[ Bac k : oac h Alvare z Terr I Lc\vls Pat faye, Ri ardo Gonzalez Dave Winn Ken Paul Joyce Mark 1 lorne, raig WOOd, Kcn Crowley. Robert astillo. Joseph CaSSidy. front: Tanya Oar la C h r is White Albert fallin, E d\vin Dai z Darrell f>100re, Bert Maldonado fernando Dick on. Lamar Youn gs Dixie O Brien Sports FI 56 Dr. J up for the slam. James K eller. first year player ror Cougars. was a \ varded f>1VP. I GREEN DEVILS Rick y Larkin. Casey Morris Brian Wood, Evere tt e Wafford Edwin H errera Rod y r-lok ill O Raymond liunter. Ca rlos Arana C oa c h Capabl o Eric fis h er Chad Collier. Dary l Moore. J ermaine J emmott. Adriano Diaz. Chris r ee n Robert Morales J COUGARS Bac k : Tammie I'"latheney Malt Schneri nger. Rand y Garmon, Tony tlerrera Kirby Kaurman Alex R eyes Coach Reyes James Keller. Ryan Coon. Waiter Amadee. AMici Davidson Greg Schneringer. Leanne Thrift. front: Adrienne Oliver. Byron S chneringer. Omar Morales Juan 6arrowes. Pedro Silva. latt ferguson. Dinah eastham. e w J f} ,-r'''' :.... ox> -< 6 0ys 6asketball/ 57

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RfD MACH INf Bac k : Ch ris Skora Michae l 1 l oITman, Pau l De l a Guardia Brian Swen t y Roger Sanchez, Roberto Ch eva lier, Coac h M o ffitt front: Johnny I I alnes Dana Brown M ic h ae l B l elc hwehl, Dar ren Ch astai n David Vasquez Michae l B enllez, Carlos Quintero. Potentia l f n ergyl R eady t o spring at anything. E rni e tl o ll a nd o r 0 v ii s 3 \vai ts the serve I n a healed exchange Jason Wilson or Cougar p l a c es t h e ball out orllis opponent' s reach with a strong ba ckhand. Sports BALBOA BULLDOGS Back : Michae l Stump. Erik Staffe ldt. S hawn Al l e n Jeff Naum, Fr ont: Chris Barber. Scott J Throndson (Iolike Bra zello n Coach Oliver. Not p i ctured: Juan Arias. Chris Berrea n Herb 11armo nd Ben Bea n C h ris Spears. "There s n o way Whi t e is oin g to beat Red T h eir own coach can t keep his s hoes tied imagine the t eaml" Coach Moffitt Red pee GRffN D EVilS Ba c k : frank Delima. Antonio P e r eira Coa c h Tucker, Louis Cordero, Chris Narot ta. Front: Juan Hourado u Ro berto C han. P ete r Liehr. Not Picture d : Manuel Troncoso. Er.ie H o lland. Oai shi Yo s himoto. Scott Wood. William Ridder. I :! -i --;-_ -,", __ ill CUR UNDU COUGARS B ac k : Jose Carb o n e l l. Jason Wilson. Mike Bolt. Ric hard S a mson Coach S chulte Front: You n g 500 Kim. A l ex Garcia Keita Sakon. Car los Rui z Sak u Sakon. Not Picture d : Mik e K e ll y Robbi e Garcia (Iolatt C h ee MET AT TlfE NET W i th quick r e nexes, R e d (lola hine' s Dave Vasquez dives ror he ba ll ror a p erfec t putaway. L obsters in season The backh ands a n d f o r ehands were poise d ready a n d waiting. A c lose race wit h just two ga m es separating t h e top three teams, provided for an excitin g tennis season Th e Gree n Devil s boosted by strong draft c hoices, captured the titl e with a 9 record. Th e Bulldogs and Red Machine followed c losel y behind. "The stiff competition among the teams m a d e this t ennis season fun and excit in g:' commente d Jason Wilson. All the games were c lose and action' pa cked: Th e tennis season culmi nated w i t h a come from behind" v ictory for Bull dogs, 5 games to 4 over R e d Machine This gave th e Bu lldogs sol e possession of 2nd p lace, and Red Ma chine was forced to settle with a 3rd pl ace fini s h Th e Green Dev il s wo n the cham pionship in the l as t game, wit h a convincing vi ctory over Sl. Mary s Imitatin g Andre Agassi's serve Scott J Throndson o r Bulldogs u ses his "Aries K power to lob th e ball deep into his oppon e nt's court. Boys Tennis/59

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"Whe n I run everythin g I s bloc k e d o ut. and m y mind is se t o n t h e rin I s h lin e," comme nt ed BulldogS' h urd l e r Vir gil Wilso n Ar g h l Lik e a s h o t from a canno n To dd Und erwoo d ( Whil e) p uts i t aw a y His p ut o f 4 1 4 was good e n o u g h for AII lsth mlan RUNNING WILD Shin sp lints torn qua d r i ce p s pulled liga m e n ts l ac k o f carti li d ge in knee j o ints due t o o v erwork. a nd ex h a u s t ed limbs from l o n g r uns. A ll t h ese ailments w e re suffe r e d b y t h e Jr. V a r sity a n d Varsit y T r a c k tea m m embers T h e B ulldogs boys var s i t y s qu ad an d f o u r m e m b e r s o f th e R e d girl s var s it y squa d wer e underdogs i n t heir r e sp ec ti ve d i v i sion s ye t t h ey beat t heir larger o ppon ents I t was c l os e in eac h f eat. th o u g h T h e secre t o f th eir s uc-" R unners tak e y our m ark Jen n ife r Sweeney o f Red \vaits w h ile adrenaline builds ready t o exp l ode at the insta n t t h e gun Sports 60 c e s s ? Coa c h Wau g h o f R e d a n d Coa c h Dahls trom o f White. ra n t h e i r squad s t hrou g h a c o m p r e h e n s ive se ri e s o f con d iti oning e xe r ci s es that l as t e d th e w h o l e s e aso n in s t e ad of t h e n r s t f e w w ee k s Mo s t important l y th e y tau ght th e i r s m all t ra c k squad s a great variety of e v e n ts long jum p e r s d i d hurd l es. lon g d i sta n c e runne r s s p rint e d hig h jumpers d i d s hot p ut. a n d d i sc u s t hrowe rs d i d l o n g dist a n ce ru nn i ng. Not onl y d i d this e n s u r e t h a t a tra c k parti c ipa n t c o ul d s core his maxi m u m ---------_. ---pos s i b l e poin ts a n d parti ci p a t e fu ll y i n eac h m e e t. it brough t more poin ts i n for th e t e a m in g e n e r a l. Bo y s Bulldogs won th e i r d i v i s i o n t h ey took a m a jor i ty o f AIHs thmia n s R e d Ma chine g irl s d u p li cated th e f eat in th eir c a t egory. Bo th boy s s Bulldogs a n d Red g i r l s will have to be c o m p l e t e l y r ebuil t n ext year s i n ce mos t of t h e m w e r e se nior s this year. and will b e m o v in g o nto bi g g e r and b ette r th i n g s a bl e t o l eap capital T in a sin gle bound It s its John Wil Iiams JV hi g h jumper for White No Guts ; N o Glo ryl A xe l Anton g i o r g i clears his dari n g v a u lt. J u s t t a k e it a n d r un l exc l a im e d K a t h i e l"Ia r ring ton R e d rel a y runn e r Track a n d fiel d B ack : Coac h Da hlstr o m Willi e W atson A,\eJ A n t o n g i o rg;. K r istine S t rombe r g Co l l ee n E lli s S h a n dra E lli ot. Nat h a n i e l W e l s h E ric Green Derek Geo r ge 1I'1 ark fl'l c lnt i r e T hir d R ow : A nn M cConne ll Kath ie A Harri n g IOn Car l os l"Iatta b a u g h Micheal J osep h Ser g i o M c K e n z i e R i c h ard R e b oriO To m fl'l yer. Joe Eric k so n Can s h e r ea ll y h eave t h e s h o t p u t or is i t for s h ow?"' comme nted Coac h W a u g h about S h erri Ande r so n J V S h ot putte r Seco nd Rmv: Je nnif e r Ritc hi e Ni c h o l e Starnes. Je nnif e r S \ veeney Jo hn Willi a m s J enni f er R o use. fl'like S n y d e r fred C h a u vin. Ryan S t o uff e r front : Coac h W a u g h L eann fl'l cCo n n ag h y Todd Under WOOd. J enni f er R o d gers fl'larcos Gonza le1, B r ian Lie b e rman Dan a Gordo n A c l ose e n co unt e r a t the e n d o f the 100 y d d as h R o b ert Thrift o f White and R a l p h Fur l o n g o f PCC give i t t h e ir a l l. S p e cia l tha nk S t o p h o t ograp her B ob W eedin. Tr ac k / 5 1

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BLAZING TRAILS G alluping into the sports season girls soccer m ade it s de but to th e answer of an in t e r es t poll concerning girls' varsity sports, Girls' soccer was introduce d this yea r on a tri al basis, If enough inter est was shm"n. th e n it would b e considered for varsity status, A 4 seaso n was good e n o u g h for first place by the Red Machine, Th e teams consisted of th e Balboa Red Machine, Balboa Bulldogs Curundu Cougars and t h e PCC D evils, "Although w e were out there to win we were also out there to h ave fun," commented Libby Ridder of Red "Winning made it all worth while, Using he r elbow t o re s t rain Me l ody O liver ( Whil e) Eil ee n M arq uez of D evils stays in co ntr ol. S h e s uccess full y m oved th e bal l away fro m h e r oppon ent. G ivin g it all s h e's gal. C hri stie Oliver o f R ed pOSitio n s h e r self t o wallop the ball to t h e cent e r Sports Fi62 In th e beginning t here \v3S a "HIUO'" -and so b ega n the game. Ana Coo k sey ce nt e r for Bulld ogs str etc hes h e r le g in ord e r to p os ition th e ball dO\\lnri e ld

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Busting Out! Out-maneuvering a t o u g h Bulldog derense Kell y ( Red Machine) kicks the ball into play. Red M achine -Bac k : Christy Oliver. I tzel 1"1anning. Libby Ridder. Yolette Walcott. Da n a Gordon, Coach Vicki Wagner. E lizabeth Costa. Kim Leckey Kelly 1"1allory Ana Lampas. Kristine Stromberg. Front: Elisa 1"1erriweather. Mary Nelson, Jennirer Sweeney Linda Lee Tijuana Flow e rs Leli Higley, Zu leyka Cunningham. Tisha Price Yaira Hu c. Wilma Diaz. Not pictured: Dorinda Codrington Jessica Alexander. ( A sst. Coach) B enny Telesca Bulldogs Back : Coach Cowley. 500 Chung Kim. Angela Springstead. Jennirer Toshok. Justina Jackson. Tina Donovant. Ana Cooksey. /"larisol Zamora. Ann I"latthews Claudette Wel c h ( Asst. Coach) Marcos Gonzales Front: Kimberly Hughes (Mgr,)' Katia Henriquez, Marisol Anglada. Susan Nelson. Oliver. Nilda Carrasquillo. Veronica Contreras. Andrea Ruddock. Diane Merriweather. Girls Soccer/63

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Sports "'n a hurry. Currey? Sea n Currey. BtlS $ \\limmer, z i p s t hroug h t h e wa t e r bac k stroke s t y le. 64 With a 5 wing span the albatross, J ohn Wi l liams, soars over t h e \\lat c r SWIM AND DIVE TEAM B a c k : Jer o m e noyd, Carlos Nieves, Se r gio Gomez. H a ri Sing h Eric G r ee n M ark M cintire J a m es Hit chie J ohn D Williams SCOlt Loy Da vid Bl e vins, Maria Le n Rio s. Third R ow: J ohn sull i va n Robin Ooehl:, Gen g o Kinugasa Marcos Gonzal ez Ric hard Adams, Juan U rr-iol a Teo A l va r3 cl0, J ennife r G a lang. Noelle A p erfect pike executed by M elanie Lawlor, BI15 diver. Woodro\\!, J ennife r Live l y Coach S w ee ney. Second RO\\I; Ruben Gom ez (Coac h ) April O l i ve r (Coach). Jennife r Aida Ange l Kathry n Ann tlarrington, Tracy 11unsaker Mayra Diaz Wilma Diaz Kimbe r l y 1 lug h es, J ess i c a Enriquez Coac h Beech front: Sea n Currey, L a u re n B u chhe i s l e r Michae l P Mon son Gi n a D 'Anetto Naoki Walanabe J I j

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--:rrrraf <1'(((( ( q{[{({[ .-. --" Hey Sullivanl What can you tell me: about the pool shark rumors? Robin Goehl e and John Sullivan chat during swim practi ce. from the very start. f"lark I"l c lntire i s off to a Quick l ead. Soaring into the season Aimee Vierra practices a few required dives bdorc her first meet. Swimming/65

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Sports SEVENTH INNING With Itchy f eet. Charles Rogers of White carefully edges off first. On a close play at home, Hurb 11armond of Green s lides under Steve n Whee l e r s ( Red ) tag. W e re sorry w e were unabl e t o f eature a Couga r team pi c ture : n o time \vas c onvenient for Coac h Martinez to have hi s team photographed. On an inside pitch. /l'l a th e w Schne rin ger drills the ball to ri ght field. F 66 "Airbo rn e : Erik Staffeldt. s hortstop and ke y player for Devils. attempts to pull off a tough double p l ay ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------from the stretch. Darrell /l'loore of Co u gars del ivers the pitc h BULLDOGS Back : Kirby K aufman, C harl es Rogers Greg Schneringer. Enrique M arquez Jose Ruffer. Ronald Olton. Brian Wood Wen' dy forster. Lisa /l'l o ffi tt. r-,idd l e : James Reo MACH INe Bac k : Coach Quinn. Tito CottoPerez. B rian Cochra n Mar c fergu son R ey naldo Royo. Satbi r Singh S t eve Hovan Mike Banasick W es l ey Major. Jermaine J emmo tt Mike Major. Reggie Davis L e \\lis DeVI LS Back : Coach Stromber g Kevin Barnes Rod y Mokillo. Ray francis, John Banasi c k Justin Wint er Hurb Harmond, K eith Krapn R y an Coon, Kevin Branden burg, Eric Holland. John Neidzeleck Coach Naum. Ric k y larkin. Ric k Co fer Luis Oakl ey Jaim e Oakl ey Corey finch. front: Mathew Sc hneringer. Rafael George Byron Schne r inger. Sergio r-'cKenzie Mit chner. Robert Thrift. Coac h Bales front: Janet Cazabo n Jennife r To s hok, Dann y Ve l ez Chris H ova n John Haines. Santos Cava' 50S, J u an H a radou. Hari Ken Sing h Steve Whee l er Dario Dennis Reyes front: Abdiel Davidson Robert r-, o rales Raul Reyes Dennis Cow l es Erik Staf feldt Craig Fishbau g h Alfonso Ellis Jeff Naum, Tim Den l y Sitting : r-lic h elle Berry S u zanne Stames Baseball 67

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Inten se involve m ent from th e ga l ler). Ne\\ Coaches, I"ls Coleman and l"l r tlmve, obser.e closel y their teams potential at a prese a son tournamen t h e l d o n february I I 1989 in Cristoba l. -..... -. -, -. . ... " w ::.-:: : ... _. .. . . D ouble Troubl e/ Mei Li n g Lavecc h ia and Adrien ne O liver o f the Bu lldogs are a vexatious twosom e T hrough cooperation. Ad ri e nne O l ive r backs up Me i Li n g as she e ffective l y V Olleys at t h e n et. Sh e s o n the ball! Tammie Mat h e n ey of Devi l s h u s t les back \ .... ard to save the bal l. Red MachinE':: Valerie H ae u sser, S u sa n Ne lson Anne McConne l, Ana Lam pas, Jennifer Brewer, Coach Howe, M elody O l i ve r M e li ssa Bow man, C h ristie Oliver, Bridgette K e ll y and Li s a G ood\ .... in. Sports 68 1 ; .. .. 1 Bulldogs: Shannon Smit h K a r e n H ernandez 11ealhe r Lumpkim, Ve r onica Bl eau, C oach Schul t e Me i Lin g Lavecchia, J ennifer S chulte Pha edra A ve-Lalle m a nt, S u sa n M artinez. Not pi cture d : April L eihr

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FOR THE ''LOVE OF IT!" Ba selin e bomberl With good f orm. f"l o ni c a Rios of Cougars. sweeps th e b all c ross -court Curundu Cougars: r'lelissa tlatton. f'li chelle Toledano, Vanessa Uhar chak, Tammy Mix Nicky Nassiff. Coach Higley r"loni ca Rios. Leti Hi g l ey, Kristine Stromberg. Jenny Sweeney, and Katie Goochvill ot pi cture d : Paulelle NassifT Eileen DePcna The sports sectio n would like t o thank reg 1'1eycr (or his h elp \vit h our photography. H aIr a scoop of please! Lisa Goodwin and Valerie Hae:usser of Red Machine. dish Qut good returns. pee OeYils : Erika Tsugane. Tammie "'lathe n:). Coac h Coleman Ni' col e Ca ffr ey Donna r-lcGiII Karen Williams. and Aliesha A\cLalle m anto Not Pictured: L ynn Chan. and Jenilee SZ) manski Girls T ennis 69

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Sweat dripped off the flu s h ed faces o f t h e runners as t h ey ca m e around the bend in t h e track. They all struggl ed to fill thei r lungs and stay w i t h the pack. T h en t h e cheers of the crowd reac h ed t h e i r ears. a n d the r u n n e r s knowin g they h ad t h e s u pport o f t h e fans purs u ed their goa l with a seco n d wind Like t h e fans w h o o ffer encouragement t o com pe ti tors. the clubs a n d orga ni zations at Ba lboa High School support the educational system "Clubs are a great way to get involved and to f ee l part of your sc hool." said Noe ll e Woodrow. V i ce Preside n t of ON THE SIDELINES the Drama C lub a n d T h es pi a n s Stude n ts cou l d c hoose t o participa t e in twe n ty-five ex citing COSAS (cl ubs. o r ga ni zat i o n s a n d student activities) T hey could express th e m se l ves thro u g h art. d a n ce dra m a and pho t ography a n d were rewar d e d f o r over-all aca d e m i c ex celle n ce and hig h achieve m ent in b i o logy. S p a ni s h dra m a and athl e ti cs B esides the internatio n a l l a n g uage o f love. students in Pan a m a p ractice d the for e i g n l a n g uages o f Fre n c h S p a ni s h a n d com pute rs. Students a lso glimpsed a t poten tia l ca r eers by ge t t ing invol ved with J R O T C, M o d e l Unite d N atio n s Office Administratio n Associ a ti o n Th e P a r a k eet. and T h e Zo n i a n. Pupils w h o applie d a n d we r e c hosen for CloseUp l ea rned a b out p oliti cs and government i ss u es; t h e n t h ey t ravelle d t o Washing t o n D .c' Students a lso got invol ve d with government b y being Student A ssoci a t i o n o ffi ce r s. Be ta I o ta K appa the B a l b o a I n volve m ent C lub. was s t a rted i n o rd e r t o ge t s t u den ts i nvol ve d i n extracurri c u l a r activ i t i es Clubs allowed the studen ts t o get off t h e m a i n track a n d explo r e t h eir i n te r ests on t h e s id elines. Clubs 70 Protrudin g tongues. wrinkled brow s and bulging biceps display the exertion that Car l os W e l c h and Gera l d Drumgoole are: pulling forth C harlie Co lugged their way to victory in this matc h a g ainst E cho Co at the O c tob er J ROT C Organization Day Int r odu ctio n 71

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.. SEN IORS Front Row: Eduardo Diaz T-anya Uhorchak, Mic h elle Toledano, Jennifer Rodgers, May ra Diaz Back Row : Paul I"litchell, Ana-Maria Romero. Marc ferguson. - -- -JUN I ORS front Row : Lisa Goodwin Kim Thompson Juan Barrowes. Back Row: David Kemp. Tis h a Pri ce. A lex Rayo, Canute Underwood Aimee V i e rra 1"1ar90t Howell. ---5QPtiOMORES front Row: Cath y Loveless, L ea Izbi cki, Jennife r Gal a n g, J eanne Denham, C h r i stine L e d ezma. Back Row : Mary Nel son t'\athleen K e ll y. P aul Hurst. Jennifer Rouse, Mic hael Madura, E lizabeth Ridd er, J ennifer Livel y. Student Life 72 Sitti n g pretty. S A Presiden t Michell e Montgomery spares u s a smile .. .. .-. .... '. . -. . -S A Vice Pre s iden t Aurora Sa l aza r sells a n S .A card loJudie B e a s l ey, S enior. Over three hundred cards w e r e sol d this year.

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Virtua ll y /l'lr. W augh and the S A are interested in partin g students with their money THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION: RACINO FOR Y OUR Th e S.A. i s the head of the Balboa High School government. I t i s a non -p r o fit organi zation created to provide a better school year for the students here:-Michell e Mo n tgo mery_ S A_ Presiden t said_ Th e S tuden t Association was larger and more .cohesiv.e during t h e 1988-89 sc hool year than i n pre v i o u s years. I t acted as a re f e r ee during H o mecomin g festivi t i es and various o ther eve n ts thro u g h o u t t h e year. Eve n t hough t h e c l ass officers d i d most of th e o rgani zi n g and decor at in g o f h a ll ways and O oa t s for Homecoming. The Student Assoc i ation was re sponsibl e for keeping or der. This was all geared toward lhe BHS students. "We lry to make sure every student has a good time at BHS. We se ll food. class s hades. and S .A. cards to t hem in our store. Our goal i s to spend money a n d to be a service," said Carl Dragseth an S .A. secretary. Representat i ves and their a l ternates chosen in the secon d week of school by firsl period classes attended meetings to d iscuss matter s i n quorum_ T h e next day t h ey reported to t h e i r firs t period classes. The economic t h eory of the 8ul l Market i s here d e monstrat ed by Carter Griffin S A Secretary. Th e S.A. Store was very successfu l this year. S .A. Secretaries for the 1988 school year were : Jo Carlisle Ro lando Linares Catherine N e lson Carl Oragseth and Carter Griffin (No t pictured : Maria Len-Rios .) Student Association j73

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National ffonor Society A tribute to our finest Will I trip in front of eve ryon: as I walk out?" the t h o u g h t bounced around in 11e r d ea d as s h e fixed Iler 'lair at til: last rn i n ut e The young man besid e her about to be initia t e d puts h i s f ace c lose to h e r s and whispere d misch ievou s l y L et's run and get t h i s thin g over with. tlowever ins tead of r unning the wellb e llaved students passed in front o f beamin g parents their head s 1 1e l d high. as tll initiation cer emon y began. Th i s ce r emon y was t h e Na tional tlonar Soc i e t y Init iation Clubs 74 h eld on Novembe r 1 6 i n tilE:: BH S Library. NtiS Pres i d ent Jeri W heel e r pres i d e d It was a great f ee l i n g to initiale 1I1: dese r v ing new N ti S m embe r s. T iley have worked 11ard in t h e i r communit y and school t o create a b etter atmosph e r e for a l l, s h e sa id. Guest s peak e r Mr. John Ma isto, D e puty U .S. Ambassador to t h e Repu b lic o f Panama, spoke to t hose gathered, abou t his initiation into t h e NHS. Mr. Ernest 11olla n d prin c ipal of Balboa t"lig h c o n clud e d t h e cer emon y b y swearing in til e initiates. OLD MEMB E RS Front Row: Eduardo Pon ce Karen Sch nack, M i c h e l l e Colbert, A l ex C h anio ti s. Bac k Row : Eduardo Di az M ark Dawson Ke li Gom ez Ana 1"1ari a R o mero, Jason Wilson Jean Gramlic h Erik StafTe l dC Rebe c ca Wetzstei n Carl D ragseth, Tracy Hunsaker, Wendy f o r s t e r T h eresa H a rn isch E i l ee n B r adley, Eri n Conno l l y. I NITIATE S : Juan Barrm .... es, Jac k i e Brogi e Ca r los A r a n a Carter Grimn, Timothy Huff, Carri e Morri s ( not pictured S herid i n a F i n n e y). Natio na l H o n o r Socie t y i n it iati o n s include t h e ritu a l h o l ding of t h e candl e b y a l l initiates. 1 1ere 1"1 a r i a L e n -R ios g i ves J u a n Barrowes his for t h e ceremon y. T h e guest s p ea k e r o f the night was M r Joh n Mai sto, D eputy U.S. A m bassador to t h e Republic o f P ana m a and m e mber of t h e Nati o n a l H o nor Society. The Natio n a l H o n o r S o ci e t y is a societ y t h a t h o lds high t h e values o f communi t y se rvice, a cademic accompl i s hment. leadership abili ties, a n d a n a ctive extra -c u r ri c u l a r life. The o m ce r s this year \ .... e re: President Jer i W h ee ler, Vic e -P res i den t A n aya n s i E n g li s h Secretary A d r i enne O li ve r a n d Trea surer Jacqu e line Lava l l ee.

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INITI ATES. Aimee Vierra Pau l ette Nassif! Jackie Brog i e Margot tl owe ll Me l ody O li ver Juan Barrowes. 2nd Row: Ben Burge Jeff Zornes S u san Ne l so n Me l Lavecch i a K i m Putnam Lisa Goodwin, S h aro n Cob ham, L o u anne Pearson Marisol Zamora S h erd i na f inney, K i m berl y Hug h es Ja m es D i ckerson Wilf r edo San c h ez Sea n Ca r so n T imoth y Huff Lenard So ll ami, P aul Ricketts .3rd row: Alex Reyes Jill S t a hl man Ana Cooksey Car l os Arana Susan Martinez Erin Connolly Noe l le Woodrow Bryant Ram i rez 4th Row: Jose R uffer Veronica B l eau Yolette Walcolt Tisha Price Aida Angel. B u rton Barrager 5th Row: M i ke Ca l aplni. Sandra I"l uggJer Alex C h anio li s Alex ROYo. Mike Hoffman. OLD MEMBERS front Row: Jean Gram li c h Rach e l frey. Tracy Hunsak e r Gilda Berm a n Back Row: Johanna L erner Edu ardo Di az Rebecca W etzs t ein, K are n Schn ack Uva Anckl e Rebecca Jose ph Carrie Co pier. Kel i Gomez Car l os f l o res. Jacq ueline Lavallee Mark D awson N ata t h e o ld es t regularl y atte n d ed c h ur c h in the Ameri cas, was vis ited by the BHS on their field trip BIOLOGICAL HONOR SOCIf:.TY TAKBS A lfIKB! E I Norte bore d o wn o n th e h a p l ess expedi tio n m embe r s. I t s d r i v i n g r a in and w il d w i n d drove t h e m from the i r ques t t h roug h endl ess jun g l e exp a n ses back t o th e w armth o f the i r hote l rooms. Th e m embe r s o f this ex p editio n w e r e from th e B io logi ca l Ho n o r SQci e t y a n d th ey we r e 011 th eir a n n u a l fie l d trip They se t off a t 7:30 a. m o n D ecembe r 17, from th e B H S JROTC a rea. The eventful trip i n c l uded a stop a t A g uadu l ce t o see th e s h r imp farm s a n d b e ing s t opped at Santiago b e ca u se th ey were travelling in a com m ercia l b us. T h ey arrived at Ho t e l F u n dadores i n Boqu e t e at 8 p.m .. just in time t o r i se at dawn to v i s i t t h e empty Lead in g t h e Bi Olog ical Honor So ciet y on jungl e e x pedition s and wil dernes s hike s were : L av i She p pard Eduardo Ponce P e t e r Liehr, and Ana y an s i Eng lish thi s year' s BHS offi c ers trout farm s in n earby B a m b i to. E I Norte' s c o l d w inds a n d r a in s kept t h e BHS from reaching the t o p o f E I Bar u o ve r 1 1 ,000 f ee t a bove sea l eve l. A ccording t o Mrs. R eeves s p o ns o r t h e B H S sch e d uled a n i n e m i l e hike fro m B oque t e t o Cerro Punt a s h oppin g in Costa Rica and a v i s i t t o t h e h y droel ectri c p l a n t n ea r Boqu e t e Th e B H S m embe r s h a d t o cop e with thin oxygen a n d c h i ll winds not t o m e n t i o n t h e fr eez in g s howers. I think w hat they l ea rn e d i s t h a t not everyone h as a h o t w a ter h ea ter," sa i d M rs. R eeves. T h e group r eturned on December 21, a fter v i s i t i n g Nata t h e o ldest. regu l a r l y a t te nded, c hurc h in t h e Ameri cas. BHS / 7 5

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front Row: Jeri Wheeler. Trac y Hunsaker. S u sa n Martinez, Jason Wilson. Back Ro\ .... : Tina Maisto, Kare n Schnack. Anayansi Englis h Eduardo Diaz Keli Gomez. Eduardo Ponce, Mr. figueroa. front Row : Edilma Carr. Shaleen White. Sandra MuggIer. Kalia H enriquez Gilda Berman. r-li c h e ll e Toledano. Alex Royo. Maria Capps. David Kemp. 2nd Rm .... : Lenard Sollal11i. Keli Gomez. 6ecca Joseph. Adrienne O l i ver, Tamara Matheney. Loida Cooper, Eduardo POllce 3rd ROVJ: P aul D e L a Guardia. Ca r los Arana. Elsa Washburn, Anays Nol t e. Alic ia Lewis. Sharmil a Nandwani. A lex C h aniotis. front Row: S harmila Nandwani. Thomas Myer. 2nd Row: Ana Cooksey, Tisha Price Uva Anckle. Monica Rios Sandra r-luggler, Katia tlenriquez. Maria Capps. 3rd Row : Jo Carli s l e K athryn l'Iarrington. Lynn Chan, Juan 6arrowes. Loida Cooper. 4th Row : Car los Arana. Elsa Washburn, Lavi Sheppard. Tanya Siraa A licia Lew is. Clubs 76 Spani s h Club m embers enjoy good fello\ .... ship at their cookout -amigas. yes? / Ed Ponce. a man of many ta l ents. shmlfS his s k il l as an outdoor c h ef.

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FRENCH AND SPANISH STUDENTS CROSS THE CULTURAL LINE Both the Spanish Club and the French Club were quite active at the very start of the school year, sponsoring a cookout and a field trip, respective l y, The Spanish Club sold 64 tickets for their cookout on September 10, but rain kept attendance down to 29 at the Albrook Bohios. Nonetheless, the cook out lasted from 1:00 p m to 4:00 p.m., the originally scheduled hours, and the majority of the hamburgers and hot dogs were consumed, leaving little to waste. As a respite the rain ceased to fall at 2:30 p m .. so the day ended in sunny weather. SALVO J enn Live l y and Span i s h Club members enjoy drink s a t the cookout. The Fren c h Club had their first field trip of the yea r on September 27, Over 60 French and s e lected Spanish students congregated at the Alliance Fran ca is e and at the Ferdinand DeLesseps restaurant downtown. At the Alliance, students met "Monsieur Pierre", the director of the Alliance Francaise in Panama. watched a film on French culture, and toured the fa cilities and classrooms devoted to teaching citize ns of Panama about French culture. The tour was followed by a French dinner at the Ferdinand DeLesseps restaurant in downtown Panama City, Both Bom in P a n a m a Mr. Vaz and Mrs. Cigarruista s h are the dulies of spo n so rin g Ih e Span i s h Club, a l ong with tea c hi ng Spani s h at BHS Fren c h And Spanish !77

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A CLASS ALL THEIR OWN Photograph y i s fun, but it i s so frustrating. So metim e s you look a t a scen e and take a pic ture of it. and when you de velop your film, i t com es out tota ll y wrong. sa id Mrs Whi te P h otograph y C lub sponsor. T h e 15 to 30 m embe r s of the Photography C lub took that lesson to h eart. Assign m e n ts g i v e n b y Mrs White were due each Wedn es d ay. Sometimes th e r e w as s u c cess other times frustra tion Part of th e solution was good i nstruction Mrs. Whi te l ecture d to novice p hotographers as muc h as she c o ul d B u t j ust as a p i cture is worth a t h o u sa n d words, a t h o u sa n d w o rds ca n not produc e a good pi cture You learn about photogra phy by doing it yourself." Whi te added, The club had n o o ffi ce r s this year, jus t fou r or five seasoned photog r aphers and darkroom a ficionados who h e lped Mrs. White o n Tuesdays and Thursdays i n th e photo l a b The Photography Club did not stress p erfection, I t s m a in goal was to t ea c h peo pi e how to observe th eir en v i ronm e nt. At first. photograph y c an b e on e of the most fru stra tin g ord e a l s I"1r5 Whit e knows that, b e ing a long tim e photograph e r h e r s e lf Fr o nt ROw: Mark Bower Maria Capps. B ac k Row : Thoma s M ye r John S ulli va n Carey Ocehl e Tina l' l a i slo, Pau letle Nassiff A nto nio Port e l a Katia I l e nriqu ez Carm e n Orti z Bec ca W e tz s t e in U v a Anckle, I' l e l od y Olive r Lisa II-loffiU Mr s W h ite Cl ubS 7 8 To t a k e a GOOD pi cture. o n e mus t do mor: than m ee t s t h e eye I l e r e I"lichael I"l o n 5 0l1, photograph e r a t large. zooms in on hi s n ex t vic tim

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-... front Row : Ana Vel ez. Lisa Des landes, 1"1aria Capps Tracy Hun saker. "'l ark tlomc 2nd Row: Eilee n Bradley Jennifer Toshok C harles Rogers Javier Vel ez S t eve n Torres Earl Dame, Robert Thrift Jeff Knappenberger Edw i n Diaz Mark Caffrey John Bern ett. David Dan i el. 1 1 3 rT)' Singh Sergio I"l ckenzie Thanks to lhededic ation of the Lettennen s Club Offi ce r s the Lettermen actua ll y were represented thi s yea r Pr es id e nt Lisa Deslandes Vice Pres i d e nt Mark f erg uson Treasurer Tracy 11unsake r and Se c r etary Maria Capps a l l dona ted great amounts of their time to make the Lettermen s Club a suc cess at Bal boa High Th e Lettermen were abl e to se nd (or jackets k eep accurate records of f e l low l etterme n and raise m o n ey t o se nd one club member to c ol l ege w ith a sports scholars hip Being a letterman invo l ved a l o t o f pride in acco mpli shme n ts. The pro cess of i n itiation into th e r anks wa s l ong and stre nu o u s but those w h o m a k e it can b e assure d sat isfaction that th ey are a true s portsman among other athl etes. Ric h a rd Reborio tra c k & field po l e vault e r and l ong distance runner, shows off what years of conditi o n i n g and disci p l ine brou g ht him. LOOKOUT BNS LETTE RM E N A RE IN TNE R U N NING! According to L i sa D es londes, pres ident of t h e re-born Lettermen' s C lub, th e B H S l ettermen are up to something good_ Bes ides keepin g track of lettermen and suppl yi n g Letterm en C lub members w i t h Lettermen jackets, t h e club p lanned to raise e n o ugh m o n ey to se n d one of t h e i r own departing Sen iors to college with a s izabl e sports scholarship. T h e w inner of t hat was announced at t h e Lettermen Banquet near the end of t h e year, a l o n g with the w inn ers of other awards a n d trophi es. A ll varsity let termen were honore d for the i r achievements. Lettermen j 7 9

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TlfE KIE CONNECTION T W it.s a n d co mput ers o t m a n y p eopl e w o d b e a bl e to COIlnect th e se tw o w o rd s; but, the c lub h a s to keep a r e l a the m for se v eral years. Not only do t h ey give o u t Twinkie s for b ecoming a m embe r but t h e y se ll th e m at lunc h t ime for tw e ntyfiv e ce n ts Twinkies have be c o m e a fun "tradition" for th e compute r club, Pr es. Richard Durazzo said, T h e Twinkies are a fun part of the c ompute r club that get people to j o in." The compute r club has a lso continued oth e r traditions this y e ar. They have b een in charge of o r ga nizin g th e annua l dance for 80 Club s V a l entine's D a y I n pre paration for th e "romantic" occasion, the club offere d the dating service. The d ating se rvi c e was a compute r program designed to match up the "perfect" coupl es of the sc hool. It was made u p of a se ri e s of questions about the p erson' s interests a n d desires for his/her "friend. From Twinkies to romance, the compute r club was full of fun, Experimenting wit h making C Orll pute r banne r s N aya t Martin ez a nd Eilee n Da P e na find o ut compute r s aTC fun life with a computer i s the onl y way to l ive f o r Allyson S t eine r r n ........... ,t",r ,...1.,.., "' ... ,. ..... OFf iCE R S : S p o n so r M rs. I ow ; Se c retary Allyso n Ste iner; P res id e nt. R ic h a r d Durazzo; Treasurer, C a r l os F lores; Vice -Pres id e nt, Brya n Wombl e . : r COMPU TER CLUB ; Fro n t roW: James Sager 2 nd Row: Sea n Carson James Sawye r Bac k row : Col c Rawde n Robert Morris.

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ZEP HYRUS STAFf: front rowJacqueline Lavallee Eduardo Diaz Carter Griffin 2nd row Monica Rios Wendy fries, Tina Maisto Roli Linar es Rachel Fr ey B ack rowAnnie English Erika King C hri s Mat so n P aul Mitchell, Myra Diaz Raymond Samuels Roberto Smith. Her sparkli ng smil e is not all Mr s Corbett g ives to the Zephyr u s as co-spo n sor. \ Be in g librarian a nd Zeph yrus sponsor keeps Mrs Han s on work ing a l l t h e t ime. In th e ir office". c o-editors Mark Bower a nd Tom Myer rev i e w stu dent's e ntri es. THB WRITB DBCISIOl'! Extra! Extra! Read all about it! The Stu d ent/Faculty literary magaz in e r eturns to Bal boa." With a growing inte r est in writing Tom Myer and Mark Bower d ec ided it was time to l e t the students and faculty show th ei r ta l e nt. The literary magaz ine, Zephyrus f a d e d from t h e high school in 1985. The return of it brought back excite m ent, and a staff of twenty-two students was organized within a f ew days. The staff, headed by Tom and Mark, was made up of intereste d and qualified stu dents on th e yearbook staff and in th e A.P. English C l ass. The chief editors and section editors decided th e m agaz in e would consist of poetry, s hort stories, oneact plays, and student artwork. Mark said, "We brought back a way for students and faculty to express th eir c reati vity. That's all we want ed. Zep h yrus /81

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A NEW NAME O nee upon a time in a little high school named Balboa, there was an Afro-American club_ One day, it vanished Well in 1987, the Afro American club retumed to BHS as the youth Black In volvement c lub. It was reorganized in order to, Get people together and out of trouble," said president Uva Anckle. BETA IOTA MPPA front fO\y: Yadlr a Tom linson (Sargent-at Arms ), Mrs. Sa n c hez (spo n so r ) Uva Anckle: ( Presid e nt). 2nd row : Diana Telesca Erika H arri son Mer cedes Neto Ana y ansi E n g l ish Jenni f er Allen Da vid Daniels Jessica H older D e r rick Danie l s Raque l Gonza l e z Analioska Cooksey. Trac i e Nesbitt Karima C l ark B ack row: Dixie O 'Brie n Jason Gittens John Caton Sheridina Finney. Clubs FR. 82 The name was changed to the Balboa Involvement club to sound more excit ing This new name summarized the club' s goal, but was not very eyecatching. It needed to have something more. Th e group decided to us e the Greek l e tters Beta Iota K appa, to r epresent the ini tial of the club' s name. They wanted their name to be different -to get people to join. The name change may not have fulfilled its original goal, but it did raise a few questions. Mr s William -Sa n c hez. B I.K sponso r : g ives h e r ide as f o r the a ctivilies p l anne d f o r the year. Pr esi dent Uva An ckle and Sargentat-Arms Yadira Tomlinso n plan t h e upcoming eve nts at a Beta Iota Kapp a m eeting .. ..... -- ---A DIFFERENT SQUEAK elick, click clickity, click, click. Those familiar sounds of the typewriter in the Parrakeet room were heard before each deadline. Students rushed to get their stories type d and ready to print. That part of the story didn' t change, but "Parrakeet" readers were surprised at some of the changes in the paper. Co. editors Melanie Lawler and Stephanie Russelburg spent one week at a journalism workshop at Indiana University during the summer. Changes in "the Parrakeet were made using ideas and knowledge gained from the workshop. Graphic skills were enhanced, which enabled the newspaper to be more interesting and attractive. Changes in the organization of the staff were made, as well as the changes in the body of the newspaper. To assist the co. editors, section editors, and an editorial board were added. This allowed more people to make decisions. These changes were made to satisfy the readers and to improve "the Parra keet. . ) o r.-Nico l e Ca ff rey get s her story c h ec k e d b y co ed itor S t ep hani e RU5se lburg as Joh anna Lerner waits her turn N e lanie Lawlo r works overtime Parrakeet Staff: front row : Co e ditor Melanie Lawlor Assistant editor Steve. Moore, co. editor Step hani e Russelburg 2nd row : Sandra fl-luggler 1"'1aria Capps Rac hel frey Katia Henriquez 3rd row : Christine Len mark, Catherine Nelso n Shei l a Fonke:n Va lerie Haeuser, Kath y Esca l era. Jeanie Denham Back row : Tom 1'-1ye:rs. Arnee: Vierra Brian Cochran Tim Huff Rob ert Smith P aul Ric k e tts David Kuwano c I'arrakcet 8.:}

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THE CAPITAL RACE 'come and take your chances to win a rag doll, radio and /or a 35 mm camera. You may h ave h eard something of this sort as yo u walked th e h a ll s of B H.S during lunch be tween c lasses. or after school. These were the voices of th e members of Close-Up. Close-Up had a lot of ,.ork to do in order to get ready for their trip to Wash ington D .C. They kicked ofT Using creativ e s e lling t ec hn iques Ja s on Wilson convin c es Pet e r Lie h r to pur c h ase a li c k e t t o Nun sens e Clubs 84 the year by holding a series of rames including: dolls, radios cameras a nd eve n Mr. H o ll and' s beach house. A lthough ram es were a large part of the fund rais in g the group h e l d car was h es and rented out the Ancon Theater Guild' s sho,. Nunsence. Ticket prices were raised a n d all the proceeds '.ent towards the D .C. trip. R aisi n g money was a n important part of CloseUp but they needed more than C lose Up m embe r s J eri Whee l e r Eilee n Bradley a n d T h e r esa !"Ia r nisc h as k questio n s about U S P a n a m a r e la t i ons d urin g a semin a r just money to go to D .C. The fifteen members of C loseUp were politicall y in formed. Once a week there was a class held after school. The c l ass l ed by Mr. Waugh and Mrs A lvarado, discussed U.S. and foreign events and brushed up on their government studies The group a lso met wit h speakers to learn more about current politic a l topics. After seven m onths of hard work and study the members of Close-Up were ready to take on Washington D .C. for seve n d ays D .C. woul d never be the sa m e Gathering r o r their weekly meetings Carter Griffin Jeri Wheel e r eil een Jason Wilson Lavi Sheppard and Erik Staffeldl awa it furth e r instru c tIons S tudents l earn about U S i nvolvem e nt in Ce ntral Am eric a d u ring a mi ni S e min ar a t Qu arry H e i g hts. Di e t or regul ar7 a sks Eilee n Bradl ey s ellin g sodas f o r the Close-Up trip to Washington D .C. CLOSE-UP Front ro\v : f>l s Alv arado Jeri Wheeler. Theresa Har nis c h I'li ddle row : Jason Wilson Erik Starfeldt lavi Sheppard Sha leen White Ana Cooksey Sarah Van Steenburg Lisa G ood\\ i n Bac k row : Mar c ferguson Cart e r Griffin Eileen Bradle} /'lana len Rios Rac hel Frey C l ose Up 85

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A DISCIPLINBD /tEART Mark time, march and ready fronti" You probably heard these words shouted loud and clear after school. No .lit wasn t JROTC. It was the pound of Heart Beat. better ('nown as the Dan ce Team Heart Beat wasn t a ll fun and games These seven young ladies were under a i very strict code of conduc t. ... constitution, and demerit -;r system There was no fool -f ing around when i t became -to being ladies. Walking down the h a ll s with their hands behind their backs was all part of their code of Me l a nie Law /or and S h eila fonk e n fill out Queslionairs a t t h e first Art Club m eeting Mr. Young watc h es ove r a l l t h e fu ture famed artists Clubs 86 conduct. Their practices even consi sted of drills similar to those of the JROTC cadets The team choreographed and learned o n e new dance each week Practicing two hours every day, plus individual work, they were ready to show their stuff at the Friday night football games The team started by Don na Tores in 1987, learned well over twenty routin es Don n a Tores director and coach ; Rosie West. capta i n ; Maria Arenas co-captain ; and dancer E l sa Arenas at-tended "Super Star" train ing camps i n Texas a n d Florida over the summer. The girl s brought new knowl edge a n d skills to the team. Capta i n Rosie West has learned, I f you love to dance and are ready for some hard work with no complaints, if you got i t. (then) jam it'" W e n dy Fn' es ( d a nce t ea m m a n a ger) wat c h es the g irl s j am a t the friday nig ht f oo tb all g am es Kath y K elly w orks o n a n art proj ec t aft e r school in Mr Youn g s r oom. Heart Beat Front row : E lsa Arenas ; Rosie West. c aptam ; Ar e nas co-captain Back row : Wend y fries man ager ; Jenmfer Diaz ; LUI flores; Vanessa C larke; Donna Torrez manager ART CLUB Front row : Shahnaz Awan Mike La Caze 2nd row : Sherdina finney. Sh e ila Fonken Melani e Lawlor Tiffany Sullivan Susan Nartinez Eric h S c heman f>lr. Young Back row : BanaSi c k Patri c ia Sitarz, John Williams R.obert Smith Erika King elsa Are na s R os i e W est. Mari a Ar e n as J e nnif e r D iaz, L u z Flo r es V a n essa Clarke H ea r t Bea l s h o w t h eir stuff a t the Jambo r ee Art & Dance 87

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. k, : .. ER Thespian Troupe 314 -Bac k Row : Kim Putn a m Ro lando Linares, Lisa P Moffitt. Wendy Forster, Tina I"l a i sto, Ray m ond Samue l s Tim Huff. Ba c k to Front: Canute: Underwood, f' lark Bower. Valerie forster, R ebecca Wetzst ein. and Noelle Woodrow. Man y of these people were in charge of. or involved in the student play T h e Prin cess Bride. Drama Club M embe r s -Top to bottom: Brian Li e b erman. Jenni fer Ewan tleat her Lumpkin, L ea Izbicki. Carrie Copier. 1"1 a ri a Capps, Tammy Mix Ro c h elle Casperson. Carler G riffin S h erdina Finney. Libby Ridder. Jennif e r Schulte Angie M o ffitt. J ennifer R o u se and Jessica Enriqu ez D rama 88

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" Not on l y Santa can stuff your stocki ng!" Rachel frey advertised and worked on the Thespian stocking grams with I'-I ark Bower and Rolando Linares You seem a decent fellow I hate to kill y ou," says Inigo You seem a decent feIlO\1J. I hale to die." says W estley. Brian Lieberman W es t le y ; a nd Raymond Samuels Inigo Montoya ; rehear se a fight sce n e from Th e Pri n cess Brid e. Co medy. satire and musi ca l s to night tragedy tomorrow Mr J directed Arsenic and Old Lace and The Wizard o f Oz. l eaving the trag ic plays for another year. Climbing to new heights the dra ma officers : I'-lark Bower Noelle Woodrow Rac hel frey, and Kim Putnam produced the s tudent produ c tion o f The Princ ess Bride aCln to Muncy TOgO. or not to go? That was th e question. Many T h espians struggled with the dec i s ion of attendi n g th e annua l Thespi a n conference in Mun cy. Indiana. This con feren ce gives a chance for young people to ex peri e n ce theater and drama workshops. Those w h o were interes t ed in attending the confer ence joined the race to Mun cy early in t h e year. The drama officers planned bake sa l es pizza sa l es. a n d so l d stocking grams for C h r istmas. The biggest fund rais e r for the year ,vas the student production of Th e Princess Bride Mak ing use of the techniques h e learned in Theater Arts. Mark Bower directed this pla y wit h Rolando Linares assistance At this writin g plans were in th e works for the Muncy trip. and severa l Thespians were planning to attend. Thespians j89 - ( ( ( ,

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Lights shone down on the JROTC Queen. Janet /"l cCormac k and King Stephen Ston e during t h e Homecoming Parade h eld on o vember 10. flanke d t o th e left and ri ght of the royalty a re Sherdina Finn ey and Eden G r ayson. Ouns in the sky! Kelvin Andrews (or Alpha Co . l'"1ike Snider (or Bra vo Co . Juan Galliano fo r E c h o Co . Joe C lark f o r C harlie Co.. and John Burnett for Delta Co. began t h e mil e rel ay 3 7 .J8 3 9 k eep going Virgil! S cott Lo y k e pt count and en courag ed Virgil Wil son. who fin r ished 42 pushups in 60 se conds. J Bouom Row : J Rit chie, J Quintero, L. P earson. C. Nie ve s S finney A e veritt, L. Reyes. K Lafnear ; Row Two: M S evon, C Taggart. S Moore M L o ve L Gonzale z. W Bartley R Vasqu e z J Shaffer ; Row Thre e : S Helin. J Zornes D Gordon. V Per e z A Guevara. E Merriweather. M Morales E Noguiera. G Go rdon; Top Row : A S cot tina. A fallin. A Finn P Ricketts. J Reyes. J FLoyd K Andre ws Clubs Bottom Row : V Wilson L. Garrido. M Fernandez. J Sager. A Camp bell. D Merriweather. L. Barrera. L Oakley. D Knappenbe rge r ; Row Two: D. Da ni el. R Sealey J Jac k son. T De camp. A Antongiorgi. A Thomas. A Whi te D H aning; Row Three: : S Gomez. S Hovan [ Grayson. T Saunders. C. Ladue. V Lay n e. T MOlina /"1 S nider; Top kRow: M Carter. H Launder. P C lark, C Riggs T Fitzgibbo n s C. W e l c h 0 Moore, enter Front: p Michaelis; Rmv Two: K Knox. J Heath. P /"litc h ell; O w Three: T Emigh L. Amat. /"1 Caton A /"latthews. G Drumgoole. Campbell. M A ll ey n e O Guillen L. Alba. J Dickerson. M N ceon e ll ; Row Four: W H arper. V W arner. J Castro. B Ca rgill. K Barnes. Veli z K Josephs. H webster. G Villarreal. H Vargas. Row Five : F lJillia m s J Borras, J Sa\vyer A Portela. 5 Brm\l11, /"1 6Anasi c k 0 orres R Gon za l ez R. Petrosky. R H a ncock Awful, awful Alpha. Chicken, chicken Charlie. Dumb, dumb Delta. I c k y icky E cho!" Brav o Company sang thisjody at the JROTC Organization Day h eld October third in the stadium. Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta Companies from Balboa High School co m peted aga inst o n e another and against Cristobal's E cho Company in a series of events. Th ese events ranged from basketball to bottle-sucking. Before the competition began the companies met in the gym to raise spirit. Alpha won the aaO-relay. Bravo won the basketball tournament with a total of two wins. Charlie won the tug of war (.ontesL eve n though they were short one man. Delta being the only team that was not disqualified won the mile relay. Th ey won the racquetball contest and made the most pushdowns" in push ball. Echo sucked the best in the bottle-sucking contest, and they took th e lead in the situp/push-up contest. At one o 'clock there was a break for lunch, and the exhausted competitors ate barbecued hamburgers and hot dogs. Echo prove d to be the overall winner of the e i ght hour Organization Day Del ta place d second, Charlie third, Bravo fourth, and Alpha fifth. Center Fro n t : J Burnett; Row Two: e. Connolly J lcCormac k L. Sollami ; Row Three: R George. F Bustamante. J Gittens. D Wil .lis \\ /l'l ena M H owell; Row Four: B Livingston. L. Huyghue. D O 'Bnen T Alkinson. F J Reyes T W alker; Row Five : O Yates Y Disl a M Weinnch. S Betty. E Moore. R Szymanski. C Wel c h F Chauv in ; Row Six : S Carson J Caton H Si n g h E SUbia JROTC / 91 I 1

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Performing for t h e crowd a t h alftime, the Male Drill Team rea c hes the apex o f t h e i r routine w i t h W il liam Spoo ner, E ri k Nogu ei r a and S t ephe n S tone k n eeling in f r o n l. a n d virgi l Wilson being surround ed b y the remaining cadets. Clubs Confide nce and b a l a nce are n eces sary f o r Ser g i o M c K e n zie t o climb up a s t aircase o f r ines during this daring routine Service with a smile l"Iut c h V a r gas, F ernando Willia m s and J a mes H eath h elp t o run the JR O T C Ilot Dog S t and. Ca t c h m e if you can Three fl ying guns a r e b eing eye d carefully b y ,..Iark ,..l cConne ll l"Ia ri Sing h and John Burnett, a s they practice d the tria n g l e toss.

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UNDERCOVER O fien times unreali zed a group ofversatile young adul ts playa major role in everyday sc hool life. The JROTC provided people to run th e ti c ket booth and hot dog stand at every football game and track meet. JROTC's drill team took part in half-t ime entertainment. and JROTC presented the colors yearround at various activities. They provided lunch for many students everyday, and made an average of 65-75 dollars a day. Not onl y were they in -Just for kids? No way l B eing on the: Drill Team involves many h ours of practice; but. both Drill Teams received recognition for their efforts on De cember 6 when they were interviewed by SCN (or "Just For Kids. vol ved in things from which the whole student body benefited, they also had a leadership school and a camp during summer vacation. They participated in an Organization Day; a Batallion Review ; Airborne, W a terborne, and Helicopter orientations; and the annua l "pig roast. It is a highly disciplined program which teaches students to be organized and to serve. It also allows stu dents to be leaders and to lead th eir fellow students on to success. The femal e Drill Team is made up of the following: front Center: D Knappenberger. Drill Team Commander; Row Two: G. Villarreal. M Caton; Row Three: K Knox. L. Barrera. W. 1"1ena; Standing: L. Pearson J. Jackson. T Decamp. D Gordon. and J Quintero. The 1'1alc Drill Team is made up of the follOwing: Kneeling: 1"1. McConnell. J. Sager. V Wilson. B. Campbell. E Nogueira; RO\\I Two: A Finn P. J'-l itche:lI S McKenzie Drill Team Commander. J neath. E Subia; RowThre:e: : J. McCormack. S Carson. H Singh. M Snider JROTC /93

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II Ready, A im, Fire I I Behind closed doors a transformation took place. Every day after school an e li te group of students met and trans formed a classroom into a shooting range The cadets in terested in being on the RiOe Team started practicing during the last weeks of Novem ber, and they practiced eac h afternoon to improve their aim. Their first goa l was to survive the cuts and make it o n to the RiOe Team. The members of the team not only competed aga in st o n e another, but they also sent t h e i r target sheets to Cristobal Ni g h School and to high schools in the States to ge t an idea of how they ranked At t h e beginning of the seaso n Enrique Subia won a turkey a nd a ham; Frank Kuwanoe won a turkey and a bottle of wine; and Tony Portela won a turkey w h e n they s h owed their skill at the Turkey S hoot h eld on November 19. Aim ing (or a buJrs eye To n y P o rt e l a steadies his lin e a nd c o n ce n tra t es o n c o n t r olli n g his b r eathing H e scor ed an 84 o n this roun d T h e fa culty oflhe JRO T C. Junior R eserve O m ce r s Training Corps., are; SfC Puryea r SSG W e b s t e r CPT Notyce and S f C C o o per. SSG Webste r comm e n ted t ha t h e e nj o y s work i n g w i t h t h e cadets b eca u se he likes t o see young adul ts su cceed:-Clubs 9 4 Th e cream of t h e crop, these students m a k e up the Stude nt S t aff of the JR O T C prog r a m a t B alboa Hi g h School: Fr ank Ku wanoe, J ess i ca I -Iolde r J an e t McCormac k S t ephe n S t o n e S e r gio M c K e n z i e S cott LOy. Carlos Mi g u e l Ni eves B radley D o u g la s K evin Dam o n and John B a n as i c k-(not picture d ) Loading ammunition into his rm e G entry Yates prepares for a n othe r r ound of shooting. Pus h and s hove! A t the Organiz a ti o n Da y D elta C o h a d a pushing m a t c h with E c h o C o whil e playing Pus h ball. a fun. semi d a n gerous competitive game With flags raised hig h Mike Snide r J a m es Sage r Mike Carter, The r es a D ecamp, and Chris Ladue preced e d m embe r s o f b oth drill t eams in the H o mecoming P a r ade. This is an optical illusion. What you are seeing i sjus t a small part o f t h e whol e for the r e i s no e stablishe d Color G u ard for e v e ry event. Cadets w h o voluntee r take the j o b for one e v ent. and the y ca n b e either a Right or Left Guard. o r a F lag B ea r er. This Color Guard i s m ad e up of: Sh erdina Finn ey James Sa ge r Doug H aning and J erome F loyd Th e Rifl e Team gelS a chance to aim at their firs t live target -U l e Front Row : K D amon. T Porte la S Betty. f S ubia, Y Ols l a p !",lItc h ell; Row Two: J S a \ vye r J Zornes a Y a t es H argas M W e lnnc h ; Row Thre e : SF C Pur y e a r L. V eliz M Torres L Al ba R H a n c o c k

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96 T h e satisfactio n of having pictures tum out is clearl y evident on the faces of Jeri Whee ler and Wendy forster. Senior Section. R egressing back to his Junior year Brian Li ebe rman a Senior gives ideas to and works with Lisa Deslondes on the Junior Sec tion f Calling her co-worker back to the world of yearbooks and Sophomore Sections. Heather Lumpkin asks for Cathy Balyeat's opinion. Teamwork the key to a winning game and to a great Sports Section Erik Staffeldt Todd Underwood and Adrienn e Oliver col laborate Clubs .:Raeing tot he NO! No Monday can not be a holiday." blurted Tom Myer t hat g i ves u s l ess time!" T h e stress of meeting dead l i n es became a rea lity for members of t h e Zonian staff_ As t h e year unraveled and the pace of the rat race quicken ed t h e dedicated staffers took pictu res : wrote .. captions and stories: made layouts: a n d as Lisa Des l o ndes put i t. tried "to recreate t h e hig hpoints of t h e school year. Gotta gel it r ighll The Zon;an stafT diligently wat c h ed ea c h even t in order to get t h e fac ts straight. This c lub was not all p l ay Tom Myer Rebecca W etzstein and Mark Bower put a plethora of hours of \vork into the Clubs Section I Worl d n Q o n h e r fina l Zonian. sponsor Ms Short disc u sses corre ctions with lecj;t')r in :hief. Cat herine Nelson h I i The ph o togr a ph e r s Roll Lin ares a n d Tina 1I'1 a i s t o deve loped many pictures and a close friendsh i p over deve loper. fixer. and stop. This is the lirel Maria Len-R ios and M i c h el l e Montgomery are p l eased to h ave finis h ed a nother p age of t h e St u de n t Life section P olishing h e r fina l s tory. Tracy Hunsaker works diligently on the Academ i cs sect ion. Brains t ormingl Ideas rain over the editors of the faculty section Rach e l Frey and Carie Morris D edicatio n fro m the Ads and Fin ance section:laria Capps Bonnie Hanson J udith Pow 'ell. and Kal i a HenriquCl. paid off Zonian 97

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I i i Test? What test ? If you have been known to say these words during the first f ew minutes of class then obvi o u s l y you weren t prepared. To do well in Academic s you s hould not onl y be pre pared but you s h ould be ready a n d willing to l earn Preparation was a must for some of the most challenging c l asses suc h as P h ys i cs AP E n g l i s h and Calculus. The overwhelm ing work l oad was very diffi cult to manage c oupled with aSSi gnme n ts from oth er c l asses Jason Wilson said Being in Cal culus, Physics and AP Eng li sh is a lot of work. You have homework every night and lots of tests I f yo u pa y attention I Academics 96 PI(EPIII(ING FOI( THE FUTUI(E and study a little the c l asses are pretty easy. S h a l een Whit e thought Fre n c h was her most fun a n d interest in g c l ass this year. "This was m y third year of French and I've e n joyed it despite disappointments like the waiters not speakin g Fr e n ch on our restaurant field trip. I think my knowledge of the language will h elp m e when I study French in college. School ca n b e compared to a m a rathon; without Aca d emics there wo u l d be no sc hool and without run n e r s there would be no marathon. To do well in Academics you n eed certa in skills like paying attention, being pre pared for c l ass and followin g d irections. In a race you n eed agi lity endurance and speed. You ca n t do well o n a test if you don' t stUdy a n d you ca n t win a ra ce if you do not train right a n d work o ut. T h ere will be times when yo u feel over loaded with homework and you re not goin g t o make it throu g h the week It's the sa m e f ee l in g of dehydration in a ra ce and wishing th e finish line was right i n front of you Although th e road to Academics and l earning i s n ever really over. hig h sc hool A cademi cs end at gradu ation. Hopefully by this t i m e in your life you will have learn ed what it ta k es to do well i n the future and be prepared. In th e libra ry K a ren Schnack often s tudied for her c las ses Advanced Placem e nt English. Cal culus Physi c s and Analysis kept h e r bus y thr oughout h e r senior year .. l i' I I \ Introduction 99

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One o f the peer h e lping training t echniqu es was f o r the o l d h elpe r s t o instru c t t h e n e w o n es S arah V a n S t eenbu r g li s t e n s t o Anita Nolte about w h at s h e wou l d d o in a ce rta i n case Train i n g t h e s econd ge n era ti o n o f pee r h e l p e r s i s well wo rth /"lr. Ander s o n s time and effo rt I I R ealizin g that the Civil Warreall y did a ff e c t his l i f e C h ris topher /"larotta peruses his textbook, Academics 100 T hanks to Nr. Sweeneys U S his tOI)' c las, Steven loore now knows \oJh ere t h e United States ca pitOI is, JOURNEY FROM TME PAST TO CREATE A BETTER TOMORROW Imagine t r aveling t o E urope. S outh Amer i ca China and the Mi ddle East. Imagine meetin g George W ash in g t o n A be Lin c o ln Na p o l ea n and the Emperor of J a p an Imagin e goin g back in time a n d l earning abut n e w diffe r ent. and exciting cultures Imagine a carpe ted c lassroom with thirty d es k s and m a p cover e d walls Y o u ca n go t o all o f these exotic p laces. m ee t all th ese f a m o u s peopl e a n d s tudy th ese interesting c ul t u res in so cia l studies c lasse s To g r ad u a t e you n eed t h ree c r edits of soc ia l s tu d i es : Worl d geography U.S his tol)!. a n d U S governme n t a r e t h e three most p opular c l asses to ta k e Th e r e are r easo n s for t h ese c l asses to b e r e quire d Mr s. Sosa said Soci al studies i s like sol v in g a p uzzl e : th e p as t and present in te rl o c k t o -f orm a picture of th e fu ture T h e challe n ge i s t o m ake t h e most of t h e in f oonation in o rd e r t o en ric h you r life," This yea r th e r e i s a n ew w ay t o ge t a soci al studies c r edit calle d P ee r H elping It i s a program o f tw enty-o n e students wh o a r e tra ined to h elp th eir p ee r s b y talking with th e m about their th o u g h ts r eeling s and probl e m s Mr, Ander son. the coordinator o f th e pro g r a m sa id T ee n age r s are m o r e l i k e l y t o accept feec;:lback from p eers o n how th ey com e across as person s. Pee r H elpe r s h ave a n o th e r p e r s p ec t i ve o n alte rn a ti ves in decis i o n m aking a s w e ll as pre p a rati o n f o r decis i o n s Wha t eve r a p e rson says t o a p ee r h elpe r i s k ept stric tl y confidentia l. This m ay b e important if you n eed a n ea r to lis t e n o r a s h oulde r to c ry on. -Taking l ecture notes i s essentia l f o r A n ni e Eng lish to pass econ omics During a peer h e lpin g session. G ilda Ber m a n list ens c lose I) t o M r Anderson s instruction s Socia l Studies/ 1 0 I

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Rulers pencils, and lines are a majo r n ecess i t y in Hona ldo Ollo n's me chanic a l drawi n g c l a ss, With tile flic k or a s w it c h P e t e r Pedersen fin i s h es his h o usewi rin g assi g n ment. Academics 102 Wilfl the Ilelp o f a sock e t wren c h Luis Cantu and Oi x i e O 'Bri e n c h a nge the waler pump in a car. LiglJtbulbs s wit c hes, wires and a l o t o f c o n centration are w h at it takes for Nat h anie l W e l s h to complete his work, \ I D II l <5 -", --. ---., ..

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HAVINO CAR TROUBLE ? Ca l ley Wharry, Erich Sheman, and Robert Nieves can help. They have taken auto mechanics. Working with e lectricity and wiring has given Nodial Sanchez a special skill. IIANDS ON elic k c lank, zap buzz, whirr These are all the sounds you may hear corning from the screened-in building which houses the industrial arts c lass es. The courses offered are split between drawing c l asses and classes where students work with mechanica l devices. The drawing c l asses taught by Mr. Willoughby. are mechanical drawing, machine drawing and architectural drawing. These courses are 1 1igh l y recommended for future interior decora-tors and architects. Reynaldo Royo said. I know th e drawing exper i ence I've ga in ed in me c hanical dra\\ling will h e l p me if I become a mechanical engin eer. I have learned many interesting things. such as: which kind of pencil to use for certain lines and how to draw machine parts .. The machine classes in clude: e lectricity and e lectroni cs small e n g in e repair. and auto mechanics. These courses are taught by Chenn. who sa id All of my classes are basically des igned to g i ve students a general knowledge of e lectricity. engine repair. and basic car maintenance. He recommends his classes for students wishing to pursue a career in the field of e l ectronics, engineering, or mechaniCS Unfortunately, there is not S ignificant equipment or facilities enough to do any major projects (s u c h as building an engine). Nevertheless. all industrial arts graduates should be better able to recognize potential probl ems. Industrial Artsj l03

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D e m o nstrating h o w to airbrus h Mr. Young s hows Shaleen White how to d o the back ground on her Art IV acrylics project. A steady hand, a good eye a nd lots o f patien c e produce quality art. R o b ert Kimbroug h combines those t raiLS a s h e fin i s h es h i s comme r cia l a rt I pr o ject. j-iiiii; ...... s::: Academics 104 ;:;----" " ------.-. -. -. -, Mixing colors i s a s h a d y business d e m o n strates Chri s Wil l i a m s at the paint tabl e .-.-

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Cautiou s p l anni n g a n d precise m easu re m e n t h e l p Jac k 11anna comple te his A rt I V projec t. Cutting and measuring K e n C r o wl ey and The r esa H a rnisc h plac e differ ent styl es o r l ettering r o r the Senior c l ass shirt logo. Carefully deciding whic h c o lors to u s e Pat ri c i a Sita rz works intently on h e r A rt II I project. a n illustration. NEW DIMENSIONS Art g a v e m e a n out l e t tha t othe r c l asses just did not give m e. I could not have survived hig h school without it." com m ente d The resa H a r nisc h o n her exp e ri e nce in a rt. P art of h e r exp e r i e n ce s include h e r yea r in Art with Mr. Y oung Mr. Young introduced There s a and the rest o f the Art III and IV c l ass t o his knowle dge o f art a ft e r a year of studies in the sta t e s N e w art" i s the concept h e t a u ght his students t o prepare the m f o r a ca r ee r in a rt. Not only w e r e the stude nts t a u ght n e w a rt tech niques, t hey l earned art vocabulary that would ser ve as a n ass e t t o those t rying t o s urvi ve in the art field. Commerci a l a r t. in cluding g r aphic s and computer art, we r e part of the new art" concep ts t hat returned \ \lith Mr. You n g. Student art was displ ayed throug h out the yea r Art/105

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Listening to Carrie Copi e r s ex p l a nation h elps Kar en tlernandez b e t ter und ers tand the World litera ture assignment. Pointin g o ut differ ent t ec hniques of de livery, Mrs Corbell gives a h e l p in g fin ge r to Jan Pie r ce With a look of fru s tratlofl. Eri n Connolly attempt s to answer Christina Yanes s diffi cult ques tion. Academics 106 Ad,'anced reading. wriling. and in terpreting skills were all necessary for RaQuel Gonzalez to do well in world literature, r Readin g has become a part of o ra l communications now that Jill Stahl man must study h e r rules of speec h givin g. SPEAK UP Surveys s how that the grea t es t f ea r?f a n y teenager I S making a speech or s t anding up in front of a c lassroom Mrs Corbett sa id "If you take m y c la ss th en you \oJon t have a problem." Oral Communicati o n s i s o f f ered to th ose who want to improve th e i r public s peaking abilities O ra l Communications focu ses on th e basi cs of making a speech Voice c larity and quality, cor rec t grammar. t h e s p eaker' s c haracter and expression, and audi e n ce appea l are a ll s p eec h ba sics World Literature a n d Resea r c h Writing, a c l ass for av id readers, pro' v id es a n e w p e rsp ec ti ve a b out life in diffe r ent c u i tures. This c l ass requires adva nced r eading skills, as well as writing and i n terpre tin g skills. The m a n y types of world literature c h a l lenge students and h elp them build a larger vo cabulary. R esea r c h in vo l vi n g interpret ation o f works. i s a supplement to th e reading. Students are a lso ex pected to m ake speech es and pre sentations o n their resea r c h e d lite r ature. Many foreign authors a r e g reat geniuses and th ey t e a c h as p ects from around th e world to their rea d e rs. Mr H owell stat ed that lite rature offers a good se n se o f com pariso n All unders t and in g of life is compari son." Int erpreting literary works is a big part o f Eddie Pon ce s like Cribbs and lanuel Landron' s \\ 'eekl y homC\vork, Body language and etciting facial expressions assist in capturin g Colle e n Ellis' audience. Spee c h And WOlld Lit 107

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M emorizing vocabulary \ vo rds, Sar a h forbes m a kes h e r s elf comfo rt a b l e o n h e r bed C r amming befor e c l a s s K r istin e S trombe r g and T e r esa 1'1 0 n son aLtempt to soak c hapter s of inform atio n into their brains CRAM IT! WHAT ARE TYPICAL STUDYING COND I T IONS fOR YOU? A.C. musi c and a drink Musi c to motivat e Videos, m y dog and lots of food Just P ink Floyd on th e s t e reo Nothing quie t Studying? I u sually stare a t m y books a lot t h e n ight b efore. In s p ec t m y ce i li n g M y radio w i th a Cu r e tape in it S tereo b larin g white wondering w h y I s t ay up so late Q ui e t atmosphere The ru s h during th e first fiv e minutes of class. I just keep putting it off. C rammi n g th e ni ght b e f o r e a test I don' t do it because I ca n t miss m y aft e r school cartoons. My bedroom radio on low, good li ghts comfortabl e c hair and desk. Spraw l ed on th e living room rug with the pl10ne a n ann' s l e ngth away, in th e midst of my brother and s ister's squabbles. S il e n c e a n d a s nack TIl e 4 5 minute s before schoo l. Academics 108 Lav ; Sheppard J ennife r A ll e n D errec k Townsend Jose Tunon Court Littl e Sarah Forb es Andri a Ruddoc k Mo ll y Dre ckman Tiffa n y Sulli va n Eddie Pon ce Stephanie Russelburg Mar c Ferguson Sandra Muggier Mic h e ll e Tol edano B e n Bean Carlos Arana Annie English Carri e Co p i e r Er i n Connoll y Preparing for the s e m este r exam, Amy B l a ckford Quickly r e views her clas s notes.

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Looking for a job? Su re we' ve a ll heard of working parttime during high school -(with pay of course), but. how about getting valuable work experience and credits for high school at the same time? And during school hours at that! This was all made possi ble by Cooperative Work Experi ence. CWE is a work study program in wh i ch students are introduced to the world of work, and are provided onthe:job tra in ing in particular career fields During the 1988 school year, 125 out of 850 students participated in CWE. These students were matched with jobs of their choices which ranged from teach in g to hospital work. Not only was the stu' dents benefited by the CWE program, the school and community were as well. They gained a we ll educated, experienced student in t h e working field a n d in the school c lassroom, the student's work experi ence aided in life skills. H owever, students that participated in CWE ob tained the most from the program. According to Ms. Col e m an and Ms. Man chester, CWE coordina tors, "Cooperative Work Experience is the best teacher for the job in your future. Creativity and enthusiasm h e l p J o hanna L effle r to do a layo ut for The Tropi C Times. Good morning may I help yo u ? As a eWE empl oyee at Gorgas l ospital Robin J e nnings performs one of h er many tasks As a life guard at Los Rios Pool. Jose Tunon i s never distracted f rom h i s post. At Gorgas H osp ital Linda Alba gently rocks a new born baby to sleep CIVE/109

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NEE D A LIFT? A riddle: What were the two non-credit classes taught by a dynamic lady with g l asses ? Each took two h ours each '\leek but both were worth th e ef fort. If you were thinking Drive rs Ed and the SAT Prep c l ass you were cor rect. Ms. Pylant taught each class as a n ex tra curric ular duty. The drivers' edu cation c la ss taught skill s t hat prepared young dri vers for the peril s of highway and city driving. These safety skill s were taught through lectures, films visuals and textbook tests Students learned: W h e th e r at home sc hool o r p l ay practice AlfOYO al\\lays f o und tim e to s tud r hi s SAT As l ec tu r e r he day, Mike r--l ajor reviewed thw.les of dri v ing in ad verse condit.s to his class ., I t A cademics 'fi! 110 how to operate a v ehic l e, the laws of the road, basic mechanics and main tenance, and the basics about how to buy and i nsure a car. The SAT Prep course was a brain goal for all prospective Scholastic Aptitude Test take rs I t taught test strategi es and techniques that in cl ud e d: l ea rned to think lil
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.-( ( .. jiJ .. .;( I Using the magn etic board in Driver' s Edu cation cla ss h elpe d ('lik e Calapini d escribe a car accide nt. With ruture plans in mind. Ana Lampas investiga tes possi bilities for coll ege t t J t D ri ve r s EduC3lion/1 J 1

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THE HUMIIN RIICE by Lisa Des londes B H S students li ve and study in a n environment with var i o u s and nu m erous cultures. P a nama brings so m a n y l an g u ages c ustom s and ex perien ces into peo pl e s li ves that are n t found e lsewh e r e in t h e world. A majority of BHS studen ts were born in Panama or other Latin A meri ca n countries. Those who r e m ain come from military families, and other part s of the world. The diversity a t BHS enha nces student ori g in a li t y and c r ea tivity To som e students Panama i s home and to others, only a n e w time and p l ace that b e com es a little p art of their lives. To others, Pan a m a i s beyond their imaginations. Eve n in its primitive wa ys Panama has so muc h to offer. First to com e to m a n y people s minds are its numerous beaches. Panama' s primitivis m restores its beauty, and life is good in Panama To exp er i e n ce Pan ama for all its worth, you mus t get out and enjoy it. One of the set backs i s that the many convenie nces US residents a r e accustom e d to cannot b e found in Panama. For BHS s tudents, Panama is an opportunity of a lifetime. ------------------------" '-People 112 NOI W e didn t plan thi sl Shahnaz A\van and Tiffany SUlli van are h\lO of the many talented s tud e nt s who attended Balb oa during th e 1989 s c hool year Il1lroduclion 113

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Sen iors Fa 114 Tric y c l e ricll g 1015. Interclass competitio n was a n important part o f th e school year. T h e H o mecoming tricyc l e ra ce was j u s t one o f Illany s p irit builde r s R enee Ibarra pilots the senior t rike t o t h e end. A pitc her i s in the making Ken Crowley g i ves his b es t t o the dunking booth during th e "I o mecoming pep ral l y Unfortunatel y it wa s B a ll four, take your base. Th e Homecoming hall decoratin g contest transfOnlle d the 300' 5 into the Wil d W il d W est. David Wall and G i lda Berman paper this passageway t o form the beginnings of cowboy country.

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s I reminisce to the beginning of t h e c l ass of 1989' s junior year, as your sponsor, I recall a c l ass determined to be the most auspicious class at Balboa High School. This c l ose l y knit class we lcom ed all o l d and n ew Department of Defens e students to participate in a jOinl venture toward unity. This c l ass ofl989, through its endeavors, has rea ched the pedesta l of exce ll ence and has far surpassed prior classes that I have spon' sor ed. You have: wrought coh es ion b y washing cars poppin g corn organizing, decorating a n d selling everything for the c l ass of '89. Th ese years of arduous toil a n d solidarity h ave been profitable and you have emerged as a positive en tit y between you r c lassmates and the facul ty a t Balboa Hi g h School. As classes go, a ll mus t end, and yours will be in June. Bul i t will b e a sad and happy ending knowing that you ha ve made these years for you and your classmates, th e best th ey could be I thank you for all your h a rd work and d edication, c l ass of 1989, a nd [ w i s h you muc h happiness a nd success in th e life after graduatio n T h ank you for th e beautiful yea r s a nd good luc k in your new beginning, '-------'------TO THE CLASS OF 1989 The C l ass of 1989 i s that unique mixture known only to DODDS sc hool s worldwide, Although many memories ha ve been life-long fri en d s and class m a t es stude n ts ente rin g BtlS are welcomed and e ncouraged by everyo n e in th e positive attitude which radiates from th e c l ass. Anyone w h o a tt e nded th e Senior Reception in September h as to remember th e sense of excitemen t unity, and camaraderie which was muc h in evidence. Most impressive was t h e fac t that the 200 classmates obviously enjoyed being a part of this group. s hOwin g pride and respect for the ta l e n ts a n d accomplishments of each other. My congratU lations are to you. The C l ass of '69, individ u a ll y and collective l y for the many s u ccesses you have enjoyed. I share in your excitement for the l i f e which will soon begin There' s reason why the graduation ceremony is called commencement Happy Life l I C lass Sponsors /l1S

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Alba. Linda Alberga. Deni se A l exande r Ves i ca Almendral. Lu i s An ckle. Uva J ea n e tt e Awan. Sha h n az Banasi c k J ohn Barriga. Tammy Bea n Benedict Beas l e y Judy Be l l. J ess i ca Seniors

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, \ THE INSIDE TRACK O ffl c ers : Pres i d e nt. T r a cy Hunsaker V i ce Pre side nt. Step h a n ie RU5 s eilb u r g S ec retary /"'I aria Capp s Spon so r s : Tru l y S c hram m I"l art y K o b e r B e i n g a c lass o fficer ta k es a g r ea t d ea l of time and effo rt t o crea t e s p ecta c ular m o m e n ts tha t will make t h e year m e m o rable With good leadership, any t hing can be achieved I h o p e everyon e has had a year full o f fun and s p i ri t. t hat's w h a t b e in g a senior i s all a b out!" sa id T racy Hunsaker, P r es ident. ''I'm honore d t o have b ee n g i ve n t h e o p p ortuni t y t o t a k e part i n c r ea tin g t h e mos t m e mora b l e moments o f our h i g h sc hool y ea rs But r e m embe r the c l ass offi ce r s didn' t d o it a l o n e th e Class of '89 did it!" says S t epha ni e Ru s s e ll b urg_ Good luc k t o th e S e n i o r s o f th e Class of 8 9 in th eir future endeavors:' says Mari a Capps. C l ass sponsors Ms. K o ber and Ms. S chra m m h a ve k ept se n iors i n line b y guid i n g t h e m i n th e direction t o w a rds g r aduation Togeth e r th e C lass of '89, t h e o ffi cers and sponsors, have work e d togeth e r a n d made the fin a l stre t c h eventful. B e r m a n G il d a B etty, Sean B lack Marl a B l a ckford, Amy Bo a twri g h t. Joyce Bo l t. M i c h a e l C l a s s Officers / 1 1 7

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Bower. Richar d Mark Bradley. E il ee n Brassfie l d Yessika Bridge s J effery Bri ggs Eri c Brown Julissa Brown. Nic ki Bundic k Kurt Burge B enjamin B u m elt. J o h n Ca ffr e y M ark Ca l apini. Mi c h ae l

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Capps, Maria Carlis l e Jo Carpenter, Henry Jr. Carter, Michael Casperson Ros h elle Castleton Samuel Caza b o n Janet C h aniotis Alex C hastain, Christoph e r C larke, Van essa Coch ra n Brian Colbert, M ichell e Seniors /119

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EL E ER '89 ..

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Connolly, Eri n Coon Adam Copier, Caroline Corri ga n Cass i e Collo Perez Tito rjl:!bs, Michael Crowl ey K enneth Cunningham, Zu l ey k a D An e ll o Gina G i selle Dabral, S h alini Daigl e Joseph Dani e l. David Seniors 122

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Dawson, Mark D e Jesus, Omayr a De La Guardia P ablo Decamp, The r e sa Dial, Eduardo Dial, Hector Dial, Jennifer Diaz Mayra Dragseth, Carl Dre ckman, Molly Durazzo, Richard Elliott. Brenda S e ni o rs / 1 2 3

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Engl i s h V i g u e r a, Anayansi Ferg uson Marc F lores, Carlos F lores, Lu z Mari a Fonken, S h e i l a Forbes, Sara h NEVER LOST THE AseniOr'S eye t\vinkl e d as it saw an unconsci o u s ro o t s t e p on the p l aque. "This i s where rank has privilege!" Edw i n Diaz state d with confI d e n ce. The C l ass o r ] 9S7 gave Ba lboa Hi g h Sc hool the brass pl aque that began a tradition t hat would carryon throug h th e years to corne. Sen ior p r ide s oared when an und e r c l assman was commanded to polish th e p laque aller s t epping on it. T h e p laque i s l o ca t ed in the m a i n h a l l w ay a nd has beco m e a n a n alilem a ror a n y student th a t i s not a se n i or. Due to t h e broke n end and worn bri s tl es or t h e toothbrush Bri a n Li e b erma n M a ria Capps and Tom Myer b ega n a rund to rai se money ro r th e n e ,,," C l ass or '89 toot h brush and ca n or B rasso. T h anks to th e contributions amounting to $4,89, Seniors are abl e to carryon in tile tradit i o n o r m a k ing th e guilty pl ebes" p o li s h th e plaque on command. I 124 SPIRIT 'This is where rank has priv il ege," said Edwin Diaz as Javi e r Velez shines Th e Plague.

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Forster, W endy Frey Rach e l Fries W endy Froude, P aul Garmon, R andy George, Dere k G iackino T ammy Gomez, K elitza Gon a l ez Raqu e l Gottseli g Thomas Gramlic h Jean Grimn, Carter Seniorsj 125

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I STAMINA WITH PROMISING R ESULT S I Natura l s ? Yes Carter Gri ffin and E i l ee n Bradley have that s pecial g m Both we r e active and a spiri n g senio r s who h o p e d t o accomplis h g r ea t things in the i r futures. T h e i r records reveal thaI they have pro m ise a n d w i l l sure l y s ucceed in t h e future. "The worl d s houl d be a b ette r p lace b eca use a man has live d," b e l i eves Gri ffin !i s v iew o r s uccess n o malte r what fie l d h e purs u es will b e to b etter o u r worl d I e values people with h i g h moral s ta n dards : p eople w h o k now w h e r e t h ey a r e going and w h y t hey want to go t h e r e. Carter was an ea rl y graduate from B H S tlis goal s included attendin g Yal e, Princet o n or Williams Unive r s i t y a n d earning a l a w degree H a nn a. Jack Hann a Jennife r Hanson Bonnie Harnisch T h e r esa Haz elrigg. Nad i n e Ann e H e l m Nesa Sen i o r s W h i l e atlen ding B H S Carter was a c t ive in the r'lodel United Nations C l u b a n d wa s involved in stude n t governmen t as SA Trea s u rer. A s a t a l e nted and girted s t u d e n t. Carter Griffi n look c ourses in R ussi a n a n d L atin H e i s Oue n t i n S p anis h a n d E n glis h and aspi r es to learn Chinese in c ollege. Carter parts with, I h o p e people see me for w hat I a m w i t h respect. I hope t h ey will be abl e to see me as helpful and lik ea b l e E i leen B radley d i s p layed h e r num erou s a n d varied ta l e nts i n m a n y areas including: sports, a cademics and c ommunity a ctiv i ties. S h e was a member of t h e Letterma n S Cl u b a c heerleader, a s hortstop for g i r l s softbal l. a n d a cayu c o paddl e r S h e cont r i b uted a lot t o B H .S. as a pee r h e l p e r S h e d iscovered her own va l ues, a n d h a s been avai labl e t o peopl e i n need. Eileen valued respec t honesty, and o penness in other peopl e S h e a lso bel o n g e d t o the Na tional a n d B i o logi ca l 110 nor Societies and wa s a ctive with service projects a n d field trips. A s a c o n currently enrolled student a t t h e Panama Can a l College a n d B H S ., Bradl ey c hose to get a head start earning credits toward a degree i n p u b l i c relation s a n d o n e day hoped t o become a Quality b usiness woman. 1 hope for a life f u l l o f great opportunities and lastin g exp e ri e n ce, a n d t o grow up being abl e to fa c e a d e m a ndin g a n d chal l e n g ing world'-

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H enriquez Katia H e n ry St epha ni e H erring Raym o n d Hinton, Mi chae l Holde r J e ssi c a Holdsworth, K a t y a Home, Mark Huff, Diana Hunsaker, Tra cy Ibara, Renee J enkins, Kenneth Jennings, Robin Senior s j127

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Joseph, Rebeca Joyc e Sleven Kell), Michael Kim, Yo ung Soo Knappenberger, J e ffrey Ko ilani, Yo Kuwa noe. I:;'r a nk La mpas, An a Lava ll ee Jacqu eline Law lor, M e l an i e L e ffl e r J o h anna Le n R i os Mari a 'Seniors

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L enmark. Chris tin e Lieberman. Brian Liehr. P e ter Jr. Lin Ting-W e i Linares. Rolando L ivingston. Bryon Lopez John Loy Mi c h ae l S cott Machazek. Mi chelanjhela Maisto. M Cristina Major. Mi chae l Mallory. Kell y SeniorS/ 12 9

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Marohl Mari a n Marom, 11agar Marquez Enrique M a rtinez S u san Mat h eney, Tamara McArthur, Dawn McColl, Jane McCormack J aneth M c K enz i e Sergio Medina, Luis Jr. Mi c haelis. Patrick Mitc h ell, P aul Seniors 130

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Moffitt, Lisa P Monson. Michae l Montgomery. Mic h e ll e Moore. Tom. Jr. Morri s Carie Muggier. Sandra Muniz Carlos Jr. Myer Thomas Myers James Ne lson. Catherine J. Nesbitt, Tracie Nieves Carlos Migu e l Seniors/131

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I Th e Senio r R eception w as h e l d on the patio o r Amador Offi ce r s Club on O ctobe r 24th rrom 1 :00 p m to 4 p m Enter' tainment wa s provi d e d by the t e a m m embers t h e m selves, Karen Shnack p l a y ed the piano, Ed u ardo Diaz the guitar, Li sa sang In Heaven s Eyes," and Legacy played songs to wh i c h seni o r s danced There we r e d iscussion s a nd voting on the Homecomin g th e m e class son g c lass motto, and graduation a n noun ce m e nt d es ign "It was a rantastic a ft er noon. I enjoyed talking t o rri ends a nd making plans ror our senior yea r," stated W endy Fri es, Everyon e in attenda nce was g i ve n a C lass or '89 cup. Seniors p articipated in t h e reception whi c h marke d the s tart or a great se nior year. Nolle, Anays Nunez Troy O Neal. Quentin Olive r Adrienne Oliver, Me lody Peder se n Ed lidis Se niors THE BEAT OF RACING

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Petroksy Robert. Jr. Ponce Eduardo Pratt. Tonya Quintero. Indira Quinero. Juli eta Rawd e n Col e Ray Scott A l a n Reilly Linda R e yes Al ex Rivera Fran k Rod ge r s Evo n Jennifer Rogers. C harl es S enior s /133

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Romero Ana Maria Royo, R ey n a Royo Rey na ldo Ruffer, Jose Rui z, Gino Russ elburg, Stephani e Sager, J a m es Jr. Sal aza r Areonda Sal azar Auror a Sawye r J a m es S chnac k K a r e n Scotlino, Anthony Se niors

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Shaw, Jennifer L. Shaw, Marco W. S heppard, Lavinia Sitarz Patricia Solis, Kar e n E Staffe ldt. Er i k S Stewart Erika Stone, Stephen J Sullivan, Tiffany R. Sweeney, Jason B Tejada Jose M Te l esca Diana J Seniors /US

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::'enior spirit shone throug h hard work and dedication which began weeks in advance "It marked the start of a g reat beginning," Sandra II-luggler reminisced Yes. they are his own s hoes. But the coat. shirt and tie belong to friends and famil y Alex Reyes along with 264 oth e r smiles. had their pi ctures taken in September Seniors U6 Doomed to destruction. Eduardo Pon ce and Car los F lores watch a s Bri an Li eberman puts th e fini shing touch on a pyramid of cans moments be f o r e i ts d est ru ction. DB -:::-..... Beauty and the Tuna. Dawn M cCarthe r and Jose Tunon share s pecial moments with fri ends during the Senior Reception h e l d at th e Amador Offi c e r s Club on September24,1988. \ A LOOK ALL OUR OWN Twel ve seniors consistently showed their c l ass spirit: Carie II-lorris Trace y Hunsaker, Maria Capps Stephanie Russelburg Brian Lieberman, Johanna Leffler Lisa Moffitt Jennifer Rod gers Sandra Mugg ier. Jeri Wheeler, Wend y Forster and Rebe cca W etz stein The Senior Reception united new and o l d Seniors attending B H S Jennifer Rodgers as well as 214 other Seniors shared special memories and other plans. Senior Reception / 1 i

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Thomas. Randa ll S. Thompson. Sammi e L. Threat. Nicky Euge n e i rJ.!!.. R o b e rt E. fr'l'dson S c ott a l a H owa r d t f 4< Tol e d ano. Mi c h e ll e M Tomlinson. Y adira T orres S t e v e n Tosh o k J ennife r Town send. D e rri c k Tuno n Jose J.

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NEW DIRECTIONS / -/ \ Hig h Sc hool i s o n e important c h a pter in t h e life o f every student. Alter graduation. life t a k es people down diffe r ent p aths w here t hey are faced with new opportunities and f o rced t o m a k e c h o i ces. M embe r s o f the Class o f '89 were asked what t hey hope life will h old for the m Virgil Wi/son (pictured) Janet Cazabon Derek George Jennifer Allen Scott Loy Linda Reilly Mark Horne ,.tare Ferg uson Jane f'1cColI Rebecca Joseph "I'm going to be an officer in tile f>larine Corp .. "I'm going to be a trans lalor and work in t h e U N .. "Aeronautics -maybe NASA!" "Success. money. fame, men. " / want t o go into CiJrdiology to find ways to improve the heart. I want t o give people a chanc e my father doesn' t have. " / want t o be the personal owner of Chippenda/es .. A broader perspective .. "Ny name wm be written across the skyline by the buildings I d es ign .. "Many a rich old geezer. let him die. and inherit all his money. " / hope to be a famous architect and construc t a great buildin g or to be a cloth es designer .. U horch a k Ta n ya Underwood, Todd V e l ez Anabell e V iswanatha n H e m a W all, Davi d W all, S hawn SeniorS/139

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I Washburn, John West, Ro sella Wetzst e in Rebe cca Wh ee l e r Jeri White S h a leen Wilkinson Dea n Willia m s Chri s Wi lson Jason Wi lson V i rg il Winn Dav id Wombl e, Rob e rt Jr. Wood, C r a i g Se n io r s 140

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Yanes, Tanya Yoshimoto, Daishi Gon za l ez Luis Landron, Manue l Lucero, Jennifer Mendez Jose STAND UP AND HOLLER Wild. Wild West was the the m e for t h e sen iors during t h e Homecomin g \ veek H a ll ways were decorated and judged on Novem b e r 7. The n oa t was decorated fo r the parade. h e l d November 10 at 8 :00 p m Seniors \ vere respon sible for making t h e best of their last Homecoming. Eac h a ctivity wasjudged by members of the community. T h e scores \ vere tabulated and the winners a n nounced. Se niors we r e awa rd e d 31 p oints and juniors and soph o mores tied with the s core of 28 points each Homec oming was h eld from November 7-10. 1988. C l ass spi r i t was d emonstrated by t h e participation of the students in the making of the n oat dre ss up day. and the h alhvay trans f ormation. Jo Carlis l e was among t h e seniors w h o contributed time and energy to t h e success or winning t h e competi t ion. Senio rs/141

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The Narks IJr others! f""ark Ca ffery k n o\v S t hat \Vh a t f"'1ark l l o rn e i s eating might separate them at the rri day nig h t football gam e ONE MOMENT IN TIME Dancing to the beat of "Pus h It," the Senior class d emonstrates it's spir it llth e Jamboree p e p ral l y Aft e r that, students pil e d into buses goin g to the A tlantic side f o r the 1988-89 Jamboree. 142 TI l e symbols o f l l i g h School s u ccess-class ring s s ho\V t h e h a r d \Vork a n d d edicalion need e d to graduate and move o n in life. Hebecca Wetz s t ein mode l s a numbe r of th ese \Ve il tre a sured rings that symbol iz e a great accomplishme nt. Randy Garmo n a n d friends stand a r ound in the h a ll s p ondering the l a test gossip tha t had jus t hit B I 1 S Cou l d it be the kidnapp e d Bu lldogs? rut a Iilifc power to it! The Homecom ing student/faculty vol leyball ga m e \Vas a b altic of the brains. Ben B ea n serves up a s t orl11.

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FACES IN THE RACES Most School Spirited Jeri Wheeler Bria n Lieberman Every school has students that are forerunners in the ra ce of life These people have qualities which are admired by their peers and the BHS faculty. The members contribute n ew ideas to their school and arc student rol e mode l s. Most Likely To Succeed Ana ya n s i E n g li S h Edurdo Diaz Most Dependable W endy Forster Ca r l Dragseth Best Personality Anabelle Velez Tra c y Hunsaker Re:ynaldo Rayo Friendlies t Mi c h elle Montgomery Enrique Marquez I I i Hall or fame /143

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I I (' lost Athletic D e nise A lbcrga Jack Sor e nson Robert T h r ift ('los t Attractive Tanya U h o r c hak Erik S t affe ldl I Best Artist Ana M a ri a Romero .lohn Banasic k Se n i o r s Best Dresse d Tamara Mat h e n ey Steven Torres I J44 1"1 0S I Tal ented Lisa Maffitl H.o l ando Lin a r es Class C lown Julissa Brown S t eve n Joyce Best D a ncer s Rosella West Darrel Moo r e Mr. and M s. B H .S. C harles Roger s and R ey n a Royo a r e familiar faces to th e faculty and stude n t s of Balboa "Ii g h Schoo l. Both are Zon i a n s, born and raised in Pan a m a. Life at 6t1S has man y s p ecia l qua lities. Reyna Royo f ee l s that, "It's been g reat a t BHS because I' m always having fun with m) fri ends," Charl es Rogers says that. "Baseball, cayu c o the beac h fri ends parties and R ey n a ( not necessari l y i n that order), havc c reated unforgettabl e m cmories f o r m e h e r e at BHS." A s Mr. and r-ls. B t l S they e)(elllp l ify w h a t hig h school students are supposed t o be throug h students eyes.

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Juniors/145

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Arturo Adams Jr. Ned Ika Y Aguilar Arturo Alanis Jr. Dela)ca L. All e n S ha\\ n Dale All e n f"li c h elle L. Alonzo Teoil i a Jorge Alvarado Luzmila Amat K e l vin O Andrews Aida P Angel 1"1arisol Ang l ada Froilan Ar c e f"l aria J. Arenas Sajid A A\oJan Clifto n Ayo Jr. C hri s topher J Barber Nata s h a Barker K ev in M Barnes Burton P Barrager Juan A Barrowes Eddie A Be Dore Shado Jason B e ardeaux C hri stopher P Berrean Beatriz C. B l ades Veronica A B l ea u Jaun E. Borras Rosemary Boy l e f"lic h ae l A Braze l ton TlfE FRONTRUNNERS Sh e s late for the meetin g! Not b y minutes not b y d ays but by months Th ey opened a s t o r e w i t hout h er. They ce lebrat ed Momecoming w ithout h er. But who is she ? Trade n e Smith took over as v i ce pres id ent o f th e junior class a ft e r Tanya P arr' s unex pect e d move to Al as ka S teve n Moore and Sherdin a Fin n ey opened th eir minds up to n ew ideas. as Traden e joine d the "Junior C lass O mcer Race. Eac h of th e officers wanted to i mprove junior c l ass spirit. Steven Moore. ,"anted to develop student partic ipation. I was aiming for the isolated sludenls who a r e never see n or heard," 146 Juniors

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Taking a breathe r outside the excite:ment of class, Loida Cooper, A l icia Lewis, and Sharmila NandvJani make time to re lax. Blea chers became battlefieldS each m onth for interclass competitions \ .... hic h were designed to promote school spirit and increase participation in activities. A group of juniors rushed to the frontline to peacefull y demonstrate their spirit. "WE HI/VE CAPTUI(EI) T ilE EXCITEMENT IINI) /)1( EAMS OF SUCCESS THIS YEAI( -STEVEN MOORE Jackie D Brogie Leonardo A. Brooks Celeste G Brm .... n Luis Carlos Brown Lauren V. Buchheister Angela G. Bumgardner Pallas L. Burke C h e Buval Burin Campbell Luis K. Cantu Jose Angel Carbonell Bersilia Cargill r-laril yn C. Carpenter Nilda Y Carrasquillo Sean E Carson Ricardo D Castro John N Caton Jr. Santos Cavazos III Lynn Cristin a Chan Julissa J Chandler r-l anue l Chavoya Amy L C honsky Melitza L. C hoy Boris Pierre Clement S haron J Cobham Dorinda Codrington Brandyl G Coffey Veronica Contreras Analioska J Cooksey Ryan B Coon Kimberly Jean Cooper Loida r-1. Cooper Elizabeth 1"1 Costa Sean E D Currey Earl J Dame Juniors/147

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Junior s Ke\in Damon S h annon C. Da\ is Rodrigo De La Guardia Jose 1"1. De lgado Frank J Delima 1"1ari ela R Demena Li sa D DeSlondes James A Di ckerson II Gilberto G Dixon Tina 1"1. Donovant Bradley A Doug las Katrina D Dunn Danie l Elina n Anita L. Elliott Colleen 1"1 Elli s Toni L. Emig h Jennifer L. Ender Kathy Esca lera Evan E Evan s Ashley Fal con Albert B Fallin Shir l y Fig u e roa S h e rdina Finn ey Yvonne M Fis hbough TUuana D f lowers Jerome F loyd Kri stine L. fox W es ley S. Fussell David Wayn e Ga lindo Mitz il a A Ga l l ardo Ange l a M Garcia Laura E. Garrido L ynn A Garza Willie 1"1 George II Ange l T G ibbons Ric h ard E G i l more Jason D Gitten s Sergio D Gomez R i cardo A Gonzalez Li sa A Goodwin Da n a R Gordon Ge ra l d A Gordon Torrey M Gragg E d e n Marce l G rayson Eri c Green Lawren ce K Groom Jr. A lmir G u eva r a Val e ri e L. Ha e u sse r John L. tlaines III Do u g las M Ilaning Mi c h elle A l larvey Carlos E. 11atlabaugh James R l l ee res Leticia C. I 'lig ley 1"1ich ae l V 110ITman S t eve n M tlova n Q""il .. 148 { I Ii

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M e r ce d es Ne t o Dixi e O 'Bri e n J u a n Barrowe:s and Tis h a Price time together a ft e r sc hool. Jac k i e Brogie and P aulette N a s siff wa t c h t h e l u n c h hour rat ra ce. Friendship/ A Race Bveryone Bnters T ick-l a l k ti c k tal k t h e sound o f a c lock p assing time: f o r the m e m bers o f l h ejunior c lass. a n d a lso t h e favorit e pasti m e o f most students as t h ey g r ee t e d each oth e r Ba lboa H i g h Sc hool's com p etitive allitude b r o u ght togethe r people w i t h similar in ter es t s a n d ideal s into a grou p o f acquainta n ces, tha t with a little effo r t, a n d a l o t crUm e for s haring a n d t a l k bec a m e a group of close f r i e n dS. This does n o t h appe n overn i ght. "It l a k es som e t i m e, sa i d S h a n n o n Davi s but I' ve becom e very close t o m y b es t f ri end. R e l a t i o n ships all s t arte d somewhere-a formal introd u c ti o n o r the reading o f a I I ello m y n a m e i s .. tag or som ething in between T h e outc o m e was s ti ll the sa m e; o bstacl es were re moved a n d f ri e ndships made for life. T h e b iggest hardships I've Ilad t o beat we r e j ea l o u sy and time," sa i d Davis. I n t h e e n d t hese f r i e ndships s ucceeded o r t h ey d i d n o t. But working h a r d for t r u s t a n d openness becam e the deci s i ve e l e m ent i n the race t o buil d a s p ecia l bon d or rel a ti o n ship tha t wou l d last a lifetime be fore the 1 1 i g h SCllool h o urs had lic k t a l k ti c ked the time away. The l ong and s h ort of it is t hat friends c o m e i n a ll sizes shapes. and co tors eviden ce d by Andria Ruddoc k and Carlos Arana. Friendship/149

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t> "Rank hath f l O privilege" d iscovered V ice Pr esident Ta n y a P arr. She was still (orced to shine th e plaque on Ba c k to Sc hool night. Juniors l S O Pana-mania i s the source of junior spirit for this yea r s Homecoming th e m e. Buying a c lass ring i s jus t one more reminde r to a junior that they are a lmos t the re.

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Taking time out rrom the grea t race Suzzane Nelson takes a breather. Sparked by "Unforgettabl e Fire Yvonne Fishbough daydreams. Captured in her thoughts Nancy Tiblier takes a seal on the field during a rootball game. Palm trees, sand, miniature Cuna Indians paddling cayucos down the 200' s toward a set or locks. These were only a f ew or the decorations th e juniors used to carry out their Homecomin g theme. Juniors/151

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1 5 2 TOPS f Margot A Howe l l Eliza b eth B Huff Timothy C. Huff K i mberl y M Hug h e s R a y mond B l"Iunter J r Dominic C. larossi J e r main e J J emmott Ca r l a D J ohns o n E n rique Jones Benjamin P K e ethle r Da vid A K emp R o b ert Ki mbrou g h April L. King Erika C. King R e n ee L. King Kare n T Kirby Dia n a L ynn Knappe nberge r K arla I. Kn o x S teve M Knuds o n Shirley E K r a pn Mi c h ae l R La C az c K elly 1"1. L arnear David J L ante r m a n Joseph S. L a rn e r M e i Li n g M La v ecchia Ki m b e r l y R Le c key Linda L Le e fra ncisco J D e L e o n e P aul A Le t t a u A I i e i a I Lewi s T errell A L e w i s Cour tt end Little M anue l J Love Lisa f'1 a ri e Loy L aurie S M a ngum Junio r s Lisa Goodwin: Age 16, born February 25, 1972 Birth place: Panama P ersonal file: Manage r of Red Machine, football and soccer. Red Machine tennis team, member of Close-Up, BHS, and a peer helper. .Daily life : This highly motivated student is al wa y s involve d "On a norma l day I go to school. sta y a ft e r to help with either SA junior class activitie s or sports. Then I go home tojog, do my homework, and crash." .Academics: I would like to go to college some where on th e E ast Coast and M ajor in foreign relations Personal goal: I like to work with people; I couldn' t stand to have a desk job. I want to work for the embassy as a diplomat. /N TI1B

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Juan Barrows: Age 16, born April 7 1972 Birth place: Los Angeles, California Personal file: Cougar football, basketball nd volleyball, SA alternate, member of NHS BHS, French Club, and a peer helper. Personal goal: I want to be successful and run m y wn business. Academics: I f ee l like I've worked hard, but I try not to think about having th e hig h es t GPA so muc h it ust adds pressure. Daily Life: I go to school and during lunc h I work as a peer h elper. Afte r sc hool I h ave sports, then I go home, eat. watc h T V .. and th e n do homework. On W ed n esday nights, I go to "Youth for Chri st. .. RACE --""" Tim Huff: Age 16; born July 17, 1972; Frankfurt, Germany. Personal file: Member of NHS BHS, and Parakeet. Musician, Thespian, and SA rep, .Talents: I play th e drums, piano and try to play sax . P ersonal goals: I would like to compose a song for next year's band .Academics: I ,vant t o go to college a t Notre D a m e and m a jor in ps yc h o logy wit h a minor in music. Chris topher J Marotta Patricia Eri n Ma sterson M e linda C. Matson Oscar G. Matter Anna Marie P Mayers L eann McConaughey Mark C. McConneJl M ark D Mcintire Morris S M c M a ni ga l Jose A Mendez Diane Carmen Merriweather C r a i g S Meyer Chrisla L. Mitchne r A lberto M izra chi Teresa A Monson Daryl Moore E l a in e N Moore Steven Moore Jerrod O Moses Brittany A Mousseau Takahiro Nakasu S harmil a U Na ndwani Pau lette M Nassiff James M Naum Deydamia M Navarro Zenia A Nee l y Christopher P Nelms Susan C. Nelson Carl N Nesbitt Mer c edes J Neto Carlos Manuel Nieves Stephani e M Norton Dixie-Ann O 'Brie n Luis G Oakley Jr. A yako Omachi Junior SpotJight/l5.3

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Carmen K Orti z Jerrod L. Paradiso Tonya f Parr Javier Parra Louanne 1'1. I 'earson Da \ 'id B Peck Ange l B Ni c holas A P ere1 Tracy Lynn P e r ez Via nor A t e ll a 1"1. I'etkidis Jan 1'1 Pierce Antonio G I'ortel a J u dith D PO\ .... ell Tis h a L Pr i ce Jermaine E Puryear Kim T I 'ulna m f ernando Q uesada Bryant Ramirez Li ssa M ae Ramirez Lel ys E Reyes Pau l E Ricke tts John P Ridao James S Riley Julia S Rit chie James L. Hit c hic V A n aya n s i Riv e r a R e n ee R Roch a P a t r i c i a J Rose A l ejandro A Royo Andri a L Huddock Joshua .1. Russell Sak u Sakon Marelisa P Samuel s Wilfr e d o Sa n c hez 1/ QUICK PITSTOP Eat. drink. and b e m erry'said a f a m o u s H oman. but in 1988 and 1989 it s tood for til n c \ .... Junior S tore in whic h stude n ts cou l d pur c h ase popcorn candy and p o p s i c les to satisfy these three urges. Eac h day. during the lunc h period. seve r a l junio r s m an n e d t h e pop corn machines. the freeler and the cas hbox to ca ter to t h e partici pants in the school wide rat race James Rit chie Tim liuff. and Tracy Perez work t h e concession stand. J un, o r s "fR. I !>4 \ \

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1 .1 1 Bryan A Sasso Kristin M Schare r G regory A Schneringer Jr. M a r c i a f Scott Roberto D Sea ley Deneiria L Serrano Roberto A Smith Trade n e D Smith Angel a M Snyder Lenard Sollami Jill M Stahlman N i c h o l e M Starnes Kevin J Stei l Kristine N Stromberg Enrique Subia Alfonso A Telesca Andre w S Thomas Charles A Thomas Way n e A Thomasson Kimberl y M Thompson Pam e l a N Thompson Ivelte Thomson Nancy L. Tiblier Martin A Tremblay Erika Tsugane Scott A Tweed Canute C Underwood Juan R Urriola Sarah Va n Steenburg David C. Va squez Rube n F vazquez francisco D Vela squez Jav i e r O Ve l ez Aimee Vierra Fr eddie Vinson III Amy E Vowell Y o l e tt e L. Walcott Julian J W aldron Keilh E Wall Vann ette P Warner Elsa M Washburn Jason M Weade Arlee n B Weeks Calley E Wharry Christoph e r C. Williams George E Williams John G Williams F ernando A Williams Jr. Brian E Willis Justin Wint e r Shannon L Winte rs B rya n K Womble Noelle Woodrow Christina M Yanes Gentry L. Yates Sarah 1'1 Zaldivar Juniors/ISS

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Chris toph e r M Tos h o k Juni o r s Jeffr ey S. Zornes I"lari sol Zamora Mingling and mun c hing o n t h e fron t s t e p s are Kare n M e i Li n g Le ann. P aulelte C hris t i n a Sara h Aimee a n d Ve r onic a C h emis try i s u s u ally no l a u ghing m a tt e r b ut Sar a V an S t eenburg a n d Loyd a Coope r s how tha t eve n ser i o u s l ea rn i n g c a n b e f u n 156 Redu cing h e r t e n s i o n N a tash a Barke r e a s e s into the lunchtime s wing U se your i m a ginati o n I A pictur e i s worth a t housand words said Mar elisa vai leI)'. and F e r n a ndo. A coop erati v e effort c h a nges 1'I0l11ecol11ing c h o res i nt o h appy m e mories f o r these juni o r s : M e i-l.i n g Veronica Na ncy. Apr i l. and E ri c

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sOPhomores/157

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CING TO -THE FINISH "Sophomores Numbe r One," Th e spirited sophomores c h ante d thi s over and over during th e first p e p rally of th e schoo l year. STARTING THE RACE Not the rain! It ca n t ra in today, shouted the photographe rs as the rain began to fall on th eir masking tape outline of a 91. Th e sophomore c lass schedul ed a c l ass picture to be take n on October 4 at the beginning of lunc h A ra i n s hower threat e n e d to It was n t uncommo n to see poste rs that boasted about wh ich c l ass had th e most sp i r it. Posters were a popu-N -\ Sophomo" es pi! 158 call off the picture, but l ast ed onl y a few minutes. Over 140 sophomores gathered on th e l awn be twe e n the shop building and the main building to take their class pi cture. lar way to ra i s e class spirit a n d student body excitement throughout the 1988-1989 school year, RRE G -I"INE A big hello, M i chelle Hay d e n N icol e Caffrey Sheri Perry, and Mo n i ca R ios stayed on the lawn a few ex tra minutes after the class picture on O ctobe r 4 4 --.

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'. Mrs, Lavallee's geometry c lass work s diligently on t heir homework assi gnment. Richard Adams Linda Alduende Kimberl y Allen Mic h ae l Alleyne Sherri Anderson Axel Antongiorgi Maljorie Aramayo Phillip Anni tage Mari a Ascano Tonya Atkinson Alies h a Ave-Lallemant Cath y Balyeat Mic h ae l Banasick Luki s h a Barrera Gina Barri ga Brett Batul i s Mi c h e l Benitez Da vid Ben nett M i c h elle Berry Robert B lackwell Melissa Bowman Deborah Boyd J ea n B radley J ennifer Brewer Randa l Bridges Jeanie Bunner /"'l anue l Bustamante-Herrero An ick Buval N icole Caffery David Ca lapini Sara Cales Jay Cal l C ri sthian Campos f l vin Capestan y fdilma Carr Jennifer Carver Julie Casperson Joe Cassidy Jose Cast r o Yeritza Castro Melida Ca ton Sophomore s /lS9

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Rob erto C h a n Agu stin C h a r r i s fred C hau vin Yvette C hau vin R y an Clo y d Bra d Co c hran Keyl a h Colt eryahn G ilb ert Cook s ey freddie Corde r o C rou c h Gary D enham a no Diaz lima Dia z n k Dig iova nni n a Dig iov a n n i "fernando Dixon .. OUT m Th e l ea d e r ship of Val e ri e Forster, class pres ident, Angie Spring s t ead, v ice president, and Ann M atthe w s, sec r e tary, h elped th e sophomore c l ass jump into th e race of high school life, I f ee l th e c l ass officers a r e r espons i b l e and h ardworking a n d have h e l p ed th e sophomores have a spirited yea r," sa i d J enn Rou se an active sopho m o r e The main goal of t h e o fficer s was to r a i se c l ass spirit and th ey achieved this during Parents N ight wh e n par ents ca m e to wander the h alls of BHS. The c l ass of 1991 won a free lunc h from th e Student Association b eca u se of th e ex ce ll ent p arent attendance. I h a d a lot offun being president and b eing invol ved in sch oo l activ iti es. I hope I was abl e to ra i se sophomore spirit and improve t h e i mage of t h e c l ass of '91," sa i d V a l e ri e Forster about h e r r o l e as a c l ass officer. So phomores 1 6 0 I t ( r f Pres i d e nt. Val erie For s ter; v i ce pres ident. Angie Spr i ngst ead ; and sec retary Ann M a tth ews

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Mi c hael Dooley Gerald Drumgoole Tracey Dubcak Abdul Dunn Luis Ellis Jessica Enriquez Marta Ernest Gilberto Espinosa Vanessa Esposito Federico Euson Aidan Everitt Rarae l fabrega Teshawn ferguson Dallas Hayden A lbert finn Tina Fitzgibbons Pam ela Flu mac h Mich elle Fonseca Julee Ford Valerie Forster Darren Fox Jennirer Ga l a n g Lydia Garrido Rarael George Carey Goehle Robin Goehle Tiffany Gonzalez E lenor Gordon Mi c h e l Gord o n Michael Gottselig 1"1ichell Greco Richard Groom Dea Guerrero Gloria Guerrero W a ldo Guillen Tanya H aines John H aning Indira 11a rdy Robert Harper Kathryn Harrington G ladys Hattabaugh Tony Harvell Mi c h e ll e Hayden Jim Heath Stephanie Helin Edwin Herrera Paul Herring /' lark Hirt Eric Holland /'lica h Howell Heather Hurst Paul Hurst Leroy 11uyghue Damon larossi Carlos Inchausti Cassandra lsals .... .a. Sophomoresj161

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Zandra Islas Aaron Izbi c ki Lea I zblckl Justina Jackson Demesha Jennings S h emi Jic h a Dede JOhns ton Mand as Jord an Karlm a JosephsCl ark Khaladl JosephS-Clark Takako K a ld a K a th l ee n K e ll ey Bridget Kelly 500 Chung Kim William Kirkl and Chris toph e r Klu:r3 Jason Krapf! Ann Kundinger David Kuwano e Paul Kyl c Ch ris Ladu e A lexander LandrO Il onya Latta Lion I Lav J rcn c e Vanessa Lay n e Ch ri tin e Ledezma Uyen Les t e r Ivan Levy A aron Lipk e J e nnifer Livel y Diane Lo c ke Cath eri n e Loveless Heath e r Lumpkin Michael 1'1aduro IlZel 1'1annlng I",ichael I"' aslin Alan M a th eney Ann 1"althews Sophomores 162 HALL TO HALL GOSSIP Hall to h all, g o ssip was th e favori te c h anne l o f communication. A rumor cou l d O y throu g h th e schoo l with li ghtning s p ee d as i s eviden ce d b y this conve r sation b e tw ee n J ennife r Schulte and V a l e ri e Fors t er. -'--.., ,----Heather Maynard Ann M cConnell Margaret McConnell J immie McConnack James M cGinnis S cott McGuinness Wanda Mena Gabriel Mendez Robert Me yers Tammy Mix Eric Mize Ange l a Moffitt Roderi c k Mokillo Eugene Monaghan Martin fl'lorales Brook Moreno Robert Morris Jennifer fl'lulligan Jeff Naum Jennifer Nelms fl'lary Ne lson Stephani e Nich o lson Rob erto Nieves Ruby Nobles Erick Nogueira Patri c k Nolan Jennifer Norton Christy Oliver Ronaldo Olton Elizabeth Palm Rob ert Paris Will ia m Parker Peter Pedersen lria n a Perez Sheri Perry G i na Pratt Richard Reboiro D enise Rel i ford Javier Reyes E lizabeth Ridder Christopher Riggs Monica Rios Ana Rivera K yra Robinson Jairo Rodrig u ez 1"1yma Rodriguez lliana Rodriguez'lesa Sophomores/l6.J

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Ye senia Rogers r-latthe\v Roque Marilla Rosa-Maldonado Jennifer H.ouse Angeline Hmvland Adriane Carlos Rui z I"lana R y an Keita Sakon R i cardo Sal aza r .... t-le ctor Sa n chez Yad;r a Sanchez Ed rdo S a n t iago tt nlO S Sasso Saunders Ba rbara Saw ye r Eri c h S c heman Jenni f e r S chulte ...... Dav i d Scott b. Ma r k Sevon .: John S h a ffer A m anda S hanl ey Tanya Siraa C h r i s topher S kora 1"1ichael Snider S teph an i e S n i d e r A l ice So ler Moniq u e Sori a n o Rudy So t o Will i a m S pooner A ngel a Spri ngstead A l lyson Steiner Jay S teve n s A l exa nder S tirl i n g G l enn Stouffer J ohn S ullivan J ennife r Swee n ey Szyma n s ki C harl es Taggart Linda Taylor Carl o s Testa E n e i d a T h o mas L eanne T h rift Daniel T orres Kar a Twoh y A rmando Urquidez Larry Vel iz C lark Ventura V i erre Vida l A l ex i s Villamil Gise l a Villarrea l Andrea W a lcott K i m b erly W a lker Tiffa n y Wal k e r Rodulfo Wall e r Sopho mores piil 64 j'" " II,' II<' \ l ...

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. ;,.-, ............. Juliet Wilson Leanne Watkins Hubert W ebster Me li ssa Weeks Michae l Weinrich C laudette Welch Nathaniel Welsh James westgate Steven Whee l er Anita Whit e Sana Whi t e April Williams John Williams K a r e n W illiams Serena Braga M e li ssa Winf ord Br ia n Wood C h ris t o ph e r Woodruff Lamar Yo un gs KEEPING ON "TRACK 'The class participation was good, but it seemed like the same twenty people did all the work, said Ms. Thaxton With her s hort stylish haircut, soft khaki s lacks, and paste l tee shirts. she looks more like one of th e students than a super charged coach formidable math t eac h er. and willing sponsor of the sophomore class. This was h e r second yea r as c la ss sponsor. I woul d like to see more participation from the class as a whole. It seems like the sa m e twenty peopl e do all the work." was the only compl aint that s h e h ad about workin g with the c l ass. The yearbook salutes Ms. Thaxton who gave h e r time and e n e rgy in making our classes race toward graduation C l ass Sponsor /165

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/ Ron /"Iancock searcllCS his brain for the correct answer. Working cooperatil' e l y f'1ary Ne lson a n e l Ann Matthews are interrupled b y a n unhelping h and. Lost in thoughl. J ennifer Ne l m s wails for h e r pizza \ q 166 9 .. ':,.; ... Tailing a /)rcatl1cr fr o m their f a s t p a ccd ( lay. Jamcy J lowell holds Ca ra [wan as s h e re laxes at lunc h

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f. 'oS .... ;, HERVEn DB HELL Whic h do you c h oose? That was the ques t i o n ask e d b y sophomores a t this year's Homecoming ga m e At h a l f -time. Ooats m a d e b y th e classes paraded around th e football fie l d. Th e soph o mores th e m e H eave n or H e ll was portrayed by a Ooat divided into two sections. H e ll was d e p i c t e d by th e D ev il laborin g over a boil in g c aldron. Heav e n was arrayed ,,,ith b ri ght co l o r s and d a n c in g angels. IV/la t s your favorite dessert ? Try a sop h omore noat. Sophomores enco uraged the ir c l assmates during the 11omccom' ing vo ll eyba ll ga m e. A pClplC\OO Valeric Forster races to the finis h linc d u ring the triqcl c r ace Arid tllc) nasI, t heir \\ f innin g smi les! Lisa asso !'Ialia R)an and Kim All e n \\ crc sophomore Ilo m ccoming princesses lomecomin g / 167

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FRESH FRCES Face it-Sophomores add excitem ent in th e race to the finish line. They are th e new faces on campus and th e r efore have to tol erate t h e p l ay ful pranks of th e uppe r c lassmen. Soph omores poli s h the p l aque. show good sportsmanshi p when teased abou t th eir status. and gen e r a ll y s pi ce-up the atmo sphe r e with gOOd humored r etorts. Anthony' s Pizza was a favorit e h a n go ut for Sop h o m ores especia l ly Brad Cochra n and Kathie Harrington Fr es h faces S h eri K ay P erry Tammy M i x a nd Nico l e Caffrey froli c duri n g lun c h L e a Izbic k i condescends t o c l e an th e Seniors prid e kol8!.l Sop h o m o r e s 168

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facult Y / 169

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I 1 H OLLAND TH B STARTBR SAYS "00 To B I 1 S Students: T h e 198889 schoo l y e a r holds fo n d m e m o ri es for both students a n d s t afT a t B a l boa H i g h Sc hool. Wha t y o u students have ex p e r i e nced a t t h i s s c hool will m old and s h a p e your future ca r ee r s and provide you with quality r e m i n iscin g ti m e o f BHS T h e s t afT a t B H S has w orke d hard to pre pare you for a profita b l e a n d e n joyab l e f u t u r e a n d it's our s in ce r e w i s h t h a t you t a k e w hat w e h a v e g i v e n a n d mak e you r life r a d i a t e e x c e ll e n c e O u r worl d n eeds c i t i z e n s w h o ca n m ee t c h a ll e nges w i t h c o nfi d e n c e and cope w i th d i ffi cult task s A s BHS stude nts t h e s t aff h as con fi d e n ce in you to ful fill these c h a ll e n ges. Sy l v i a de B a pt i s t e Ma gdale na d e Castillo T ina l a r oss i I sabe l L y nton E s t e b an M ayer s M a ria Nu nez Al r o n s o I llillip s !.il i a d e Rom e r o Guille rm o St e v e n s Soni a W e b l y 1 7 0 Ern e s t W H o ll and Prin ci p a l. B H S

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This is a rare occasion. to have Mr Holland. Ms Lewis and ,..1s. D e nl ey get together (or a casu a l moment. If you ever wander into the JROTC room you wi ll always lind SSG Webster :md SSG Puryear relaxing while Capt. Notyce is out. WhetlJer it's assignin g detentions, or cutting paper, Ms Lynton works. "This is a COde 2 a ll students clear the building." Cheerfully Sitting Ms Denley en joys watching others work. A h elping hand is what /"1s. Romero offers to Ms Lewis (acuity members, students. and staff members. A busy room is how many people will remember the hig h school's o ffi ce during t h e 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p m time period and th i s i s no exception O ffi ce /I71

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COACflBS TO TflB FINISfI I AI\arado: lIislOry JAmes: f'lath II Science C. Bruer: Comput ers I { C h e n : Industri a l Arts. S. C i ggarruista: foreig n Lan Capt Not), ce: JROTC S Corbett: E n glis h L. Cowley: I'l ath G fendrido" t1is iOry I"
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Tea cher unit y brin g s abo ut frie nd ship lo yalty a nd fun a s o u r fac ult y comes togeth er for a g roup pi c tur e Th e l o n g school h ours have fin a ll y tak e n the i r t oll o n M s Alvarado. THE PEP TALK Teachers having pep rallies? Not exactl y but school spirit spread throughout the faculty this year starting with Mr. Holl and' s e ncouragin g p e p ta l k Baseball hats and armbands were incorporated into th e teacher's ,,,ardrobe to trigger a c h a in reaction of spirit. The students may have never seen these hats and armbands, but they were there in soul if not on the body. There was a l a rger turnout of teachers this year at school pep rallies dances, and sportin g S h owing disapproval a t a s p eec h 1"15 Corb ett g i ves anothe r look Coming t o th e r esc u e M r Ander son g i ves co un se l i n g T r ernandez: Special E d ucatio n F Fig u e roa: for e i g n L a n g uage J G ardilL Englis h Spanis h C. George; Sci e nce L. G r egg f o r e i g n Lang uage L tlowe: M ath R Il o \\c: Math R Nowell; E n gliS h M Ja ege r : Sci e n ce J J ean; For e i g n L an g ua ge events compa red to last year. The e ncourage ment of th e faculty motivated students to show their unity throug h c l ass spirit. This was evid ent in the posters, gradu ation ca p s h a ll decoration contests, and we l co m eb ac k banners. Sc hool inservices with variou s programs s uch as "Onward to Excellence" helped t h e faculty spirit grow. Teachers read about how other sc hools made improvements through this program. They were required to report their find-ings. Mr. Holland wanted teach ers to rea li ze t hat th ey coul d make a difference. The e n d of the year came and students coul d look back and remember the f eeling o f t h e spirit that united th e faculty with t h e student body. Mr. Holland' s goal had been accomplished by faculty cooperation throughout the y ear. fac ulty/173

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R Johnston: English R Johnston: English Arts 1"1. K.ober : A rts 1'., K.unkc l : E n glis h J ourna lism J Lavalle : l"Ialh N 1'1anc h es t e r : eWE R ""artin: R emedial W l'1onlouis : I'lU s i c F 1'1orrissey: Bu siness C. O li ve r : Phys i ca l Education Explaining h o w t o use the dia p hragm i n c horu s, M s, Monlo uis g i ves h e r students som ething t o sing a b o u t. B omb threats don t see m to phase our t e a c h e r s faculty FR. 174 1 -... Te s t t aking in M r Wau g h s Econ omics class i s ser ious business t hat s n O'''OI not b e dis r upte d

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PETERSEN BEHIND THE STANDS Wh en the subjects Cal culus and Compute r Science come to mind_ so does Mrs. P e t e rsen Mrs P e ters e n has b ee n t eaching at BHS for nine years. Prior to coming to BHS she was also tea c h ing, but not in th e traditiona l sense. Mrs Petersen began her t eaching ca reer as a junior high math t eacher, At that time this did not present a c h allenge to her as a t eac h er. Through the influence of a fri end, she jOined the P eace Corps. The P eace Corps opened a door to an interesting, exciting t eac h in g opportunity_ She was thrown into th e n e w world" of Ghana, West Afri ca. Mrs. Peters e n spent t e n weeks training in th e city of Ghan a to l ea m th e language of Gh anians Twi h ealth ca re and many other areas of work. Aft e r compl eting h e r tra i n in g s h e was sent to a coll ege in Ghana. Th e r e she taught math and sc i e n ce to future teachers. While in West Alric a many cultura l aspects of the country made Mrs. Pe t erse n aware of what life was really about. The living conditions were not p l ea-C. Piper : Eng li s h f re n c h D Pipe r : Bu sin ess S. P yla nt : R ea d i n g L Quinn: Physica l Educa ti o n J Ramirez: 8usiness B Reev cs: S c ien ce. Art L Rosiczkows ki : l'Ii SIOry T San c hez: Math S cienc e T S chramm: Eng l i s h M Short : Engli s h Year Book surable a t times. The true m eaning of inde p ende n ce and r esponsibility be ca m e c lear to h er. This resulted in her e m erging from an idealistic young woman into a mature inde p endent adult. Mrs P e t e r se n took every opportunity to travel by bus throughout Afri ca to learn more about the world around h er. The trips on Torry buses in cluded ad ventures of intrig ue: ran ging from accusations of be in g a spy for the C IA to havin g a goat wet on h e r foot and being told it was a sign of "good luc k." Good fortune fOllowed. On one of h e r many expeditions Mrs P e t e rs e n m e t her husband. The c h alle n ge of Mrs. Pet e r se n s two years with the Peace Corps were at times d i m cult. but a l so h eld many good times. H e r adventure was rewarding as a t eac h e r and the personal maturity ga in ed was as Mrs. Petersen sta t ed W ell worth it. P e t e r se n / 175

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... 1 - T h e Surgeon Ge neral says that smoking cigarettes i s dan gerous to a person s health but 1"15. Thaxton wan t s t o know, "What about chalk? Transforming into a Thalean Physicist i s a lot of work. Kare n Schnack and 11ari Ken Singh r ealize this, b u t I'-1r. Thale coaches them o n R 50sa: Social Studies J Swee ney: 111story B Thai: : Science T Thaxton: Math M Urba c k : English R Va llarin o : Science C. Vaz ; Foreign Language K Waugh: Socia l Studies J Wickham: Science D Young: Arts faculty 1 7 6 A wise teac h e r lakes her ri g htful place under the student. as A l ex Reye s proves to Mrs P y lant "Do you have a pass? T h e famous words of our librarian, Ms Clark, a s s h e makes sure Chris Williams is not Skipping his class

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b eing a counselor cau ses Mrs. Cole m a n to b e a wom a n I n b y th e s tud e nts COLBMAN I N WALKINO TWO LINBS MS. Col e man' s advi ce to the students of Ba lboa High School is to, Be as honest as pos sible'" That was not the onl y advi ce s h e gave h e r students this past year as co unselor and co-worker in the CWE program. As a counselor s h e h elped students sch ed ul e thei r courses; Ms. Coleman made sure students were o n th eir way to g r ad uation with all their course requirements being filled. Also, as a counselor s h e h elped organize the variou s t ests that occurred during the year. As co-worker in the CWE program, s h e worked with Ms. Manchester. They w ould v isit the students' place of work, wh i c h Ms. K And e r son: C oun se l o r D White: Coun selor Being a librarian not only requires book knowl edge but it requires d ull desk work Coleman stated as being th e best part of her job. Ms Coleman was not onl y found in the classroom and counseling but she c ould be found doing sports a ctivities during her free time. She was seen on the PCC tennis court coachin g the PCC girls tennis team, and a lso on the golf course. Tennis and gol f are two of her favorite sports. Her goal for the year was to score l ess than a fifty in her nine-hole gol f game. Ms. Coleman ra c es two courses this year, a n d her favorite phrase may say a lot. EEEEEEEEEEEK!! Nursing is a family affair as Ms. Othon shows with her two daughters. Ms. H anson : Librarian Ms. C l ark : Librarian COlema nfl77

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TlfB\ ...... WAITINO LINBS Arcenio SOli s Barbajcan 11ughes Roqclio A nderson ( supervisor), Eduardo C'l a rtincz 1"1arilza Smith Taking a b r ea k before work begins, behind the scenes are the c ustodi a n s in their 1'00111 rewinding. r A -, -"'-I 178 ----l"Iamburgers are a a favorile of students a t BUS and the cook s a r e happy to make t hem. -r -r.. -S w eeping IIp after the daily sehol races o f stude n ts i s David Padilla Luis Salazar, Terez a d e Batista, An, B a n ia David Padill a ( Back ) OSG ""0nles, Anibat fl'l onlcs (Front)

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AdS/ ] 79

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) l r-., --:=// v'\::S 180 f--a'A

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HESTAUIlANTE PIZZERIA ITALIA PASCU ALE I OVANE GERENTE "Speci a li zes in Italian foods and it's famous p i zza. TAKE OUT ORDERS: 60-4159 Apartado 5-5496, E I Dorado Panama, R e p De Pan a m a Ave, Ricardo J Alfaro ( T U MBA M U E R T 0) T e l efonos: 60-4159 36-0015 GINZA GINZA TEPPANYAKI RESTAURANT Ca ll e D E I Cangrejo y Eusebi o A. Mora l es Te ls. 69-1796 69-1389 Apartado 603926 E I Dorado P anama R De P_ lfO lfO R/iS7iWUANT ('IIiN E SEPASTRY APEC I ALIZED Zsechuan and Cantonese Perkinese Du c k li n g-Young Chow Fr i ed Rice Tou Foo Hot Pot-Sweet N 'Sour Sea Food-Dimsum 1st F loor 9 AM-llPM Orders-to-go and Reservation Call 69-4741 Cafe r e ria Y R es t aurante La Punalada S.A. NIKO' S CA F E Congratul ations to th e c l ass of 1989 60 yea r s of tradition, o p e n 24 h ours a ll yea r round. V I A ESPANA Tel 64 0136 63 7070 EL TOQUE MAGICO Boul e var d E I Dorad o Ave. 17 B Norte Cent r o COll1c r cia l B ouleva rd E I D o rad o Local No. 4 6 --, Apart a d o 6-906 EI Dorado. P anama T c l e f o n os : 368 6 /60-6683 -AdS / 1 8 1

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n t h ony's Pizza the world's greatest BALLOONS A GIFT TO REMEMBER 182/Ads E L MUNDO DE LOS GLOBOS Jimmy DelValle TELEFONE: 69-2886 6 4 -0961 Dr. Luciano Gomez H. PANAMA PANAMA Cdific i o Royal Plaza V i a Grecia, Calle 6 ] C/ Carme n Apartado 481 5 Zon a 5 T e l e f o nos 6J-710 1 6J-7J09 6J-74J9 R eside n c i a 64-5029 BECAUSE A SMILE IS SO IMPORTANT T o B ecca Bring Joy: "Com o se dice, S o c k s?" To Jason : So m e things you v e jus t got t o k ee p t o yourse lf. Gwendo l y n W endy L ynne L ynne-L ynne Lin ea rd La rry Wha t th e heck i s you r n a m e? And th ey r e o m Ninja quickly t a k es th e l ead. L and S h a r k s in h o t pursuit. Now leaving th e s t arting line i s th e Blue Turtle To Bulldog C h ee rl ea d e r s th ank you f o r a g r eat year. I'll miss you a ll. Good L u c k n ex t year. Love, Li sa Yessika M a ri a and Aida! Always r e m embe r this yea r' s c r azy times! Th a n x f o r m aking life e a s i e r and a l ways being th e r e. H o p e our friendship n e ver ends B e s t o f luc k in everything. Lu v Sandra Bon Jov i II I "Son of J a So n o f Wil. J ee p s a r e only f amous but t h e L and Rover i s l egendary! B ecca W e tzst ein. Thanks f r o m th e ZONIAN t o Sandra Muggi er. W e all apprec iate you r work! O n ce upon a ti e t h e r e w as a t a l e o f th e t orto i se and th e h a r e T o d ay th e race i s simil ar-Th e c h arac t e r s have c h a nged The Blue Tur tl e vs. Th e L ans S hark Erik, Fr i endship i s a price l ess g ift Thanks for giving it to m e Gwe ndal y nne.

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Anamaria Bonnie Theresa BEST Of LUCK TO THE fUTURE CLASSES AT BHS fROM THOSE Of US WI10 STUCK IT OUT AND MADE IT THROUGH THE YEARS TOGETHER CLASS Of 89 IS 111. Pictured below: Jennirer. Adrienne, Jeanette, Janet. Tammie Linda Denise Reyna r-lOlly Anabelle Eileen Ana AdS jl8J

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Ads / 184 Thanks to all o f m y fri ends wh o m a d e m y hig h school yea r s the b es t they cou l d be, I w o n t f o rget you g u ys, Tiff,

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FRIENDS ARE FRIENDS by M;c hael IV, Sm;lh FOREVER W end) Forster Johanna Leffler Lisa P ""OmU Carie Morris Jeri Wh ee ler Packing up t h e dreams God plant--cd In t h e fertile soil of )'ou Can t belic\(?; t h e hopes tic s granted I'leans a chapler in your life is through But .... c II keep )OU close as 31 .... a)5 It .... on t e\en seem you \c gone Cause our hearts in big and small \,a)5 Will I<.cep the 10\': that keeps us snang. And friendS arc friends (oreler I f the Lord s the Lord of them. And a friend Idll nOt sa) nCler (dllSt':: the I\elcome Iym not end. Though its hard to let you go In t h e father s hands I,e know Thai a lifetimes not 100 longTo lile as friends With t h e faith and laIC God s gil' en Springin from the hope \
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MY LITTLB 01'115 Dedicate d to CallI) Nelson. 111) little OIlC. I am \Villi fllce and Lolill keep (lIce in all plac e s L\'I,ithcr thOll goesl. Genesis 2 8 : 15 IloLC JOu, 1"10m. 1"1) child, mJ little onc, JOLI are a gift from the Lord to me. I want to be so mall) t!lings to J Oll. I d like to take )011 t hrough eac h day in peac e and harmony. and sec the way JOll looh al life with eac h flew disC OI 'C/Y. So smile. my little Olle, arid lillie tile world by tile hand. C herish ea c h /lCW IJori7orl take a s tand. Then as yOIl go alraugll eac h nCL v day. you will find. a special plac e for you. that brings yOLl peac e of mind. Take lime. mJ little allC, enjoy a/l therc is (0 see, and be sure to make eac h day a victOly. Remember a s ) all go that all YOLI see can be your O h ln. if yOLl LViII SUiL C (0 be) OLlr s e Jf in love and honesty. And nolt!, m) little one, i( is (ir1'lc (0 let you go. The da)s are gone and you re flO longer mine. And thoug h I 0) I also smil e as I remember times, all tile timcs we shared together Lv/len you were still mine. l"Iold tight. my little one, your Fathe r s outstretc hed hand, slaJ c lose to IHm for lie is always t here. O/J smil e OJ) little one, and run, fast as you can, but as JOLI go don t pass me by, for -a time I h eld yOllr hand. I love you, my little one, I lovc you my little one. copyri ght 1976 Dottie Nelson oE.\..t Cof'g('o OeSS tne 0\ 'ff1

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THANKS FOR A WILD AND CRAZY YEAR! Rochelle Casperson Erin Connolly Tracy Hunsaker Sandra Muggier Lisa Loy Justin Winters Maria Capps Brian Lieberman Carrie Copier Mark Bower Jennifer Shaw J enn Rouse Kathie Harrington Laurie Mangum Scott Loy Rachel Frey Roli Linares Brian C ochran Mark Mcintire Mike Hoffman Adsj187

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Katie Good\ .... in, Dawn l"lcArthur, Steph anie I I elin. Reyna Rayo Kara Twohy Lisa Palm. t<.i m T hompson Andrea Ruddock. IBB THE ]988 RED MACH I NE BOOSTER CLUB MEMBERS ROBERT AND lHENE BARNES ROBERT AND ANN tU: ST RICt-lARD AND SWEETIE BROG t E RICI"lARD AND BLANQUITA CHASTIN JUNI US AND "lABI A CtlAUV I N JOtlN AND PENNY CHOWE R MR. AND MRS DAVI S ROBERT AND JEAN fLUMACtl JACK ANO NANCY GOODWI N ALEXANDER AND ELLA GORDON LARRY AND SIIARON GRAGG JOE AND TERRY 11ANING STEVE AND CANDY IIELIN fLASH AND KATIILEEN 11ELM DICK AND RUTII tlERN GEORGE AND BRENDA t"1CAURTl 1 U R DAVE AND FONITA r-lCCONAUGI n : Y GARY AND [!"lIlY I"'1CLEAN V ILMA R DE ROYO IIARRY AND RANDY SetI Er-lAN ItUGH AND DEN ISt: 5MITl1 EUGENE AND CtlER I E STt: "'''ENS LYN TllQMAS JOliN AND fAYE TIIOMPSON I I ENRY AND CAROL TWOHY RA Y UNDERWOOD DONALD AND BAHBARA VOSE H.ANDALL AND VAL W INTEI< RED MAClIINt. I S It I Ads r Nesa Ilelm, Li sa Goodwin, Jacki e 1 3 rogie, Zenia Neel y Leann M cConaughey Linda Da h l s trom I"l u rphy Da h l s trom

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CONGRATULATIONS TODD "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and Glorify your Father in Heaven." Matthew 5:16 UNDERWOOD Love Mom, Dad Ryan, Gypsy and Brandy Grandmother a n d Grandaddy Hu ggins AdS/ 189

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Ren ee Ibarra M a ri a Capps Mark Bower K e l ilZa Gomez Lavinia S h eppard Jennife r Hanna R e n ee Ibarra, K e lil7a Gomez, R ebeca Joseph, Maria Capp s K a tia H enriquez Sandra "'I uggler, Edd i e !'once, Tracy I"lun saker J ennife r 11anna Lavi S h eppard, Ro l i Linares, Karen S chnac k Aurora Sal aza r Annie Eng li s h Rach e l frey, Mark Bowe r Tina Maisto, Uva An c k l e Gilda B erman, Jennifer Rodger s Ads / 190 Rac h e l frey 7Wlex yoru J.rU9:Jf

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Aurora Salazar Tracy tlunsaker Katla 11enriquez Rebeca Joseph I Uva Anckle Eddie Pon ce Jennifer Rogers Roli Linares Tina Mai s t o Karen Schnack Sandra 1"1uggler Gilda Berman Anayansi Engli s h 191

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Bumpy ride! Lisa Desl o ndes i s o n e of the man y studen t s w h o climbs the Administration Building hill and slide s down on a piece o f card board. Clo')ing

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TO TilE FINISII LINE Y ears will pass Friends will l eave Goodbyes will be hard t o say. T h e times we r eca ll as being the best of our lives will soon start t o fade away During the moments you w i s h to t a k e a walk throu g h the past, let your Zon i an l ead th e way L e t the m emories and fri ends we h ave captured for you be c h er i s h ed as you nip eac h pa ge M y o n e wish i s for you to smile at th e memories this Zon i an evokes. Eac h hour of work we put into this annua l serves one purpose -t o pr eserve your m emories. A ll my love, (/yhW.-rLR fdrIOfL -/Yl -C/.v. f:6 Closi n g j 193

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BALBOA nIGn SCnOOL ZONIAN'S -A-ADAMS-A YO Adams, Ric hard D (10) 6 4 159 Ada m s J r., Arturo (11 ) -]46 Aguila r Ne d c l ka Y (11)' 146 A l anis J r ., Arturo ( I J ) 1 4 6 Alba, Linda D e l C. {121 9 1 95, 109, 1 1 6 Albe r g a Denise L (:I2l' 46, 47, 11 6 144. 183 Aldu cnde Linda (lO) 159 Alexander. Vesi ca n (12) 26, 11 6 A ll e n Dcl ayca L ( n ) -146 A ll e n Jennire r C. (12) 82 A l l e n Kimbe r l y D (10) 1 5 159, 167 Alle n Sha\vll Dale (1] ) 58, ]46 Al l eyne, M i c h ael R (lO) 9 1 159 AlmClldra l Lui s 1'-1. (12) ,13, 11 6 A lonzo.,Mi c h e l l e L. (1]) 146 A l varado. T e o fil o Jorge (11) 4 5 6 4 146 A lvarado, Patri c i a (Mrs.) -85, 1 72 1 7 3 Arnat. Luz rni l a (1]) 9 1 146 Ames, James T .. ) 72 Anckle U va C. ( 12) 5 1 53, 72 75.76.82. 116 190 Anderson K enne t h 100, 173, ]77 Anderson. S h e rri R (10) 39, 44, 45. 6 1 159 Andre w s K evlin 0 ( 1 '1) -90,146 Angel. Aida p ( 1 1 ) -22. 6 4 75. 1 4 6 An glada. M a risol (1:1) 1 9 6.3. 1 4 6 Antongiorgi. Axel F (10) 20, 6 1. 90. J59 Antong iorgi. J ea n ette ("12) -5 1 5.3, "1"16 18.3 Aramayo. Marjori e S (10) J.59 Ara na Ca r los A (lJ) -57, 7 4 75. 76. 149 Arce. Froil a n ( 11 ) -"146 Are nas, E l sa I. ( 12) 87 A r e nas, Maria I. ( 1 I ) 87, 146 Armitage, Phillip J (10) ]59 Ascano. M a ria Theresa (.10 ) 50. 159 Atkinson. Tonya Al yce (10) 9 1 159 A veLallemant, Aliesh a R ("10) -51. 53. 69. 159 Awa n Sajid A (11) 146 AVJan, S h al1naz M ( 1 2)87, 1.1.3. 116 I n d e x 1 9 4 INDEX AyO. Jr., C l ift o n (1:1) -4.3, 1 4 6 -6-BANAS I C K-BUVAL Bal yeat. Cath erine E ( 1 0 ) -96. ]59 BanaS i c k John C. ( 1 2 ) 4 9 67. 87. '116 144 Banasic k M i c hael F ( 10) 4 6 67, 9 ] .159 Baptis t e S ylvi a d e -170 Barbe r Chris t ophe r J n 1 ) 58, 146 Barker, Natash a (11 ) -146. 156 Barnes, Kevin (11 ) 4.3, 67. 9 1 146 Barrage r Burton (11) -75. ]46 Barrera, Lukis h a K (10) -90. 9.3. 159 Barri ga Gina M ( 10) -159 Barriga, Tammy A (12) 11 6 BarrO\lIes Juan A (]" ) 49, 54, 57. 72, 74 75, 76. 146, 149, 153 Bartley, Wilfredo E ( 12) -90 B a tu l i s Brett M (:10 ) -159 Baudin. Horte n s ia (Mrs ) -172 B eDore. Eddie A (11) -146 Bean. Benedi c t J ( 1 2 ) '116 142 Shado Jason (11) 4 9 )46 Beasl ey Judy ( 1 2 ) -"1"16 B ell. Jess i ca J (12 ) 116 B enitez Mi c h e l K (l0) 58 :159 B ennett. Da vid C. (10) 159 B erma n G i lda E (12) 1 4 22. 75,76 ,101, ]]4 1]7 1 9 0 B ernett, John' 79 Berrea n Christophe r P (l]) -.18 J46 B erry, 1'-l i c h e ll e T. (10) 1 9 67, 159 David B l ev in s Betty Sea n C. ( 12) 9 1 95, '117 B l a c k 1'-l a r l a K ( 12) 1 2 1.17 B lackford, Amy S (.12 ) 26, 108, .117 Bla ckwe l l. Rob ert -.159 B l a d es, Beatriz C. 0 1 ) -146 B l ea u Veroni c a A (11) -68. 75, 146 B l evins Dav i d E. (10) 6 4 1 9 4 Boat\\lri g h t. Joyce S ("12) -1] 7 Bojalil. Mon tserrat A (12)26 Bolt, Mi c hael T (12) 59, n 7 Borras. J u a n E ("1 1 ) -9 1 146 BO\lI e r Ric hard 1'-lark 02) 1 8 78. 8 1 88. 89. 96. 11 8 136 187, 1 9 0 Se r e n a Castro B r aga Bowman, r-l e lissa M (10) -68. 159 Boy d Deborah r-1. (10) 159 Boyl e Rosemary (11) -1 4 6 Bradley. E ileen p (12) 8 21. 74. 7 9 .84.85. )]8 126 Bradley J ea n C. (10) -159 Braga, Seren a Castro (10) 194 Brassfield, Yes sika (12) -118 Braze lton. Mi chae l A (11) -58, )46 Bre\lIer Jennife r D (10) 68. 159 Bridges, Jeffrey P (12) -rl8 Bridges, Randa l J (10) 159 Briggs. Eri c L (12) -118 Brog i e Jac k i e D (1]) 1.3. 1 5 4.3, 74 75, 147, 149. 188 Brooks, Leonardo A (:I 1 ) -4.3, 147 Brown. B redi o (]1) -9 1 BrO\\ln Ce leste G (]]) -:I 4 7 Brown, Julissa A (12) -24, 11 8 144 Brown, Nicki G ( 12) ] 1 8 Brue r Ca l vin ] 72 Bu chhe i s t e r L aure n V (11 ) 64, 147 Bumgardner. Ange l a G (l:l)-147 Bundick, Kurt W (]2) -"1"18 Bunner, J eanie A (.1.0 ) -159 Burge B enjamin R (1.2 ) 75, H 8 Burke, Pallas L ( 1 1 ) -147 Burnett Jr .. John E. ("12) 4 9 9 0 9 ] ,92, ]18 Bustamante-11errero. M a n u e l R ( ) O) -159 B u s ta mante-11errc r o Jesu s A ( n ) -9 1 Buval. Anick (10) 159 Bu v a l C h e (1 1 ) 4 9 14 7 -c-Caffrey Currey Ca ffrey, Mark A ( 12) -5 79, D8, 142 Caffr ey N icol e M (lO) 18, 50, 69 83, 158, 159, 168 Ca lapini. Da v i d S (10) 4 9. 159 Ca lapini. Mi c hael S (12) 4 5 75, 111. 118 Cales, Sara M (10) 159 Ca l l Jay D (10) 159 Campbe ll A ntoni o R. (10) -90 Campbell. Burin (11) -91, 9.3, 147 Campos. Cri sthia n M (10) 159 Cantu, Luis K (11) -4.3, 102, J47 Capesta n y Jr.. E l vin (10) 159 Capps. Maria P (12) -II. 1 7 76. 78, 79. 8.3 88, 97, 117, 119. 1.37 ,187, 190 Carbonell, Jose A ngel (11) -59, 147 Cargill Bersilia (11) 19, 91. 147 Carli s l e Jo D (l2) 15, 22, 7.3, 76. 11 9 ,141 Carpente r J r .. H e n ry (12) 11 9 Carpente r Maril y n C. ( 1 ] ) 147 Carr. Ed ilma r-1. (10) 76, 49, 159 Carrasquillo, Nilda Y (11) -6.3. 147 Cars o n Sea n E. (11)75,80, 9 ] 93. 147 Cart e r Michael G. (12) 90, 95. 119 Carver J ennifer ( 11 ) 159 Casperson Julie (10) 159 Casperson Ros h e l l e (12) -88. 119 187 Cassidy I I Joseph J (10) 56, 159 Castillo 1'1agd a lena (Mrs,) -170 Castleton, Samue l p (12) -119 Castro. Jose D (10) -9 1 159 Castro. Ricardo D (11) -]47 Castro, Y erilza (10) -159 Caton Jr .. J ohn N, ( n ) -82. 9 1 147 Caton, Me linda Y (l0) -90, 9.3. ]59 Cavazos Ill, Santos (11) -67.147 Cazabon Jan e t E (11) 5 ] 67. 11 9 ]8.3 Chan. L ynn C ri stina (11) 76, 147

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C han, Roberto (10) -59, 160 C handler, Julissa J (11) -147 C haniotis, Alex N (12) -74, 75, 76 .119 C harri S Agusti n B (10) -160 C hastain, Christopher D ( 12) -43 .119 Cahuvin, Fred P (10) -43, 61 91 160 Cahuvin, Yvette J (10) 160 Chavoya Manuel ( 11 ) -147 C h e n Rafael 172 C honsk y Amy L (11) -147 Choy Melitza L (11) -147 C igarruista Sonia (Mrs.) 77 172 C lark, Joseph -45, 90 C lark, Karima -82 Clark, Paul E (10) -90 Clark, P a m e l a (Mr s ) -176, 177 Clarke, Judi th E (10) -44, 45 C larke, Vanessa L. (12 ) -87,119 Clement, Boris Pierre (11) -147 C l oyd Ryan (10) -160 Cobh a m Sharon J (11) -75, 147 Cochran, Bradley L. (10 ) -160, 168 Cochra n Brian W (12) -6 ]], 23 .56. 67 .83.119. 187 Codrington Dorina E (11) -147 Coffey Brandyl G (11) 147 Colbert, l'-l. Mi c h e ll e (12) 74 119 Coleman Clare (l'-ls. ) -68. 69, 177 Colteryahn, Keyl a h E (10) 160 Conn o ll y Er i n K (12) -74, 75, 91. 106 122 187 Contre ras, Veronica (11 ) -63, 147 .156 Cooksey, Analioska J (11) -62, 63 75 76 82. 85. 147 R e b ecca Crowley Cooksey, Gilbert L. (10) 1 6 0 Coon, Adam C. (12) -26, 46, 47, 122 Coon Ryan B ( 11 ) -24, 49. 54, 57, 67. 147 Cooper, Dannie (5FC) -9 4 Cooper, Kimberl y Jean (11) -147 Cooper, Loida M (11) 7 6 147, 156 Copier, Caroline E (12) -9 7 5 88. 106. 1 2 2 187 Corbett, Sydney (1'-lrs.) -81, 106, 1 72 ,173 Cordero, Freddie A (10) 1 6 0 Corrigan, Cassie L. (l2) -122 Costa Elizabeth 1'-1. (11) -39, 4 7 63.147 Cotto-Perez Pedro A (12) -56, 67 122 Cowley, Lawren ce -63,172 Cribbs, Mi chael W (12) -6 11, 107, 122 Crouch Guthri e T (10) -160 Crowde r Gary D (10) -43, 160 Crowl e y Kenneth R. (12) 8 4 6, 56. 105. 114. 122 Crowel y Rebecca M (12) -195 Crusoe, Rya n R (10) 160 Cunning ham, Zu l eyka Y (12) 63 .122 Currey, Sean E D (11) -64,147 C uerra, Tany a 3 9 -D-DAnella -Duyga D 'Anello Gina Gisell e (12) -122 Da Pena Eileen (10) -80, 1 6 0 Dabral. 5 h alini (12 ) -122 Daigle, Joseph W (12) -46, 122 Dame, Earl J (11) 7 9, 147 Damon Kevin (11) 49, 94, 95. 14 8 Daniel. Dav i d A (12) -43, 79, 82, 90, 122 Darnley, Lisa Michelle (10) -160 Davis, Reginald D (10) -43, 67 Davis. Shannon C. (11) -148 Dawson. Mark 5 (12) -74, 75, 123 De Jesu s Omayra (12) -123 De La Guardi a Pablo A (12) -58. 76 .123 De La Guardi a Rodrigo J (11) -148 De c a m p T heresa A (12) 9 0 9 3 95. 123 De lcid, Luis -160 De lgado, Jose M. (11) -148 Delima Frank J (11 ) -59, 148 Demena. l'-l a riel a R (11) -148 Den ham, J eani e (10) 72 83, 1 6 0 Denley. Rosemary ( Ms .) -170, 1 7 1 Des londes, L i sa D (11) -13, 44 45. 7 9 96. 148. 1 9 2 D i az Adri a n o E (10) -57, 160 D i az Eduardo A (12) -72. 74, 75. 76, 81, 123, 143 D i a z Edwin C. (12) -8 5 6 7 9 124 D i a z He ctor R (12) -123 D i a z J ennifer l'-1. (12) 8 7 .123 D i a z 1'-lay ra C. ( 12) -64. 72 8 1 123 D i az Wilma L (10) -63, 64, 1 6 0 Dicke rson II. James A (11) 4 6 75 91. 148 D i giovanni. Frank (10) 4 9 9 1 1 6 0 D igiovanni, Virginia (10) 160 Disla Yvanronex E (11 ) 9 1 95 Dixon, fernando f (10) 160 Dixon. Gi lberto G (1 1 ) -148 Don o vant. Tina l'-1. ( 11 ) 6 3 148 Dooley Mi c h a e l E (1 0 ) 1 6 1 Douglas, Bradl e y A (II) 9 4 148 Dragseth, Ca r l E (l2) -6 8 1 7 18, 72 73, 74 123, 143 Dreckman, Molly C. (12) 13, 123.183 Drumgoole G e ra l d l'-1. (1 0 ) -71, 9 1 1 6 1 Dubac k Tracey M (10) 1 6 1 Dunn. Abdul Y (10) 1 6 1 Dunn, Katrina D (11) -148 Duraz zo Richard V. (12 ) 8 0 123 Du ygo, Cathl e en M (10) -110 -E-Elina n Ewan Elinan, Danie l (11) -148 Elliott, Anita L. ( 11 ) -148 Elliott, Brenda L. (12) -123 Ellis Colleen l'-1 (11) 6 1 107, 148 Ellis, Luis B (10) -161 Emig h Ton i L. (11) 9 0 148 Ender, J ennifer L (1 1 ) -45. 148 EnglishViguera Anayans i A (12) -74,75. 7 6 81, 82. 101, 124, 143, 1 9 0 Enriquez, J e ssi c a R (10) -64, 88. 161 E ri ckson, Joseph T (10) -6 1 E rn est Marta E. (10) 1 6 1 Esca l e ra Kath y (11) -83, 148 Espinosa, G ilberto (10) 1 6 1 Esposit o Vanessa M (l0) 1 6 1 E uson, f e re i c o Jr. (10) 1 6 1 Everitt, Aidan M (10) -90, 1 6 1 Ewa n Jennifer A (10) -88 -F-Fabrega -Fussell fabreg a Rafae l E. (10) 1 6 1 falcon, A shley (11) -SO, ]48 fallin, Albe rt B ( 11 ) -24, 5 6 90, 148 fendric k G ene -172 Fer g u son, Marc A (12) 40, 4 9 6 7 72 79 .85. 124 f e r guson, Teshawn N ( 10) 1 6 1 f ernandez Marc o A (11) -90 Amy F indl a y Figueroa. F e li x 7 6 173 Findlay Amy N (10) 195 Finn I V A l b e rt F (1 0 ) 9 0 9 3 1 6 1 Finney, 5 h erdina (11) 9 75, 8 2 87. 88. 90. 95. 1 4 8 Fishboug h Y vonne M (11) 4 8 148 Fitz gibbons Tina l'-1. ( 1 0 ) -90, 1 6 1 f lores, Carlos A (12) -75, 80, 124 .136 F lores Lu z M a ria (12) -87, 124 FIO\ver s Tijuana D (11) 6 3 148 Floy d J erome ( 1 ) -64. 90. 95. 14 8 Flumac h P a m e l a G (10) 1 6 1 Fonken, S h e il a S (l2) -83, 86, 87, 124 fonsec a Mi c h e l l e M ( 10) 1 6 1 forbes Sarah S (12) -26, 1 0 8 124 Ford. Julee C. ( 10) 1 6 1 Forster, V a l e r i e J (10) 9 18. 88. 1 6 0 1 6 2 1 67 Forster, Wend y L. (12) 1 7 18. 6 7 74 88. 9 6 125. 137 143. 185 Fox, Darre n B (10) 1 6 1 Fox Kri s tin e L. ( 11 ) -148 Fre y Rachel E. (12) -11. 18. 75, 81. 83. 8 5 8 9 125. 136. 1 8 7 190 Fries W endy J (12 ) -18. 81, 86, 87. 12 5 froude Pau l S (12) -125 Fussell, Wes l e y 5 (11) 148 -0-Galang Guille n Galang Jennife r P (10) -64, 72, 1 6 1 Galindo, Davi d Way n e (11) -148 Gal lardo, Mitzi l a A (11) -148 Garcia, Angela M (11) -44. 4 5 14 8 Garmo n Rand y B ( 12) 4 54. 57. 125 142 Garrido, Laura E ( 11 ) -90.148 Garrido, L ydia D (10) 4 9 1 6 1 Garza L ynn A (11) -148 Gardilt, Julianne (l'-l iSS) -173 G eorge, C e cilia ( M rs.) 173 G eorge, Derek A ( 12) 6 1 125 George, R afae l l'-1. (10) -67, 9 1 1 6 1 Geor g e Willie M II (11 ) 148 Gia ckino T ammy L. ( 1 2 ) 125 Gibbo n s Angel T (11) -148 Gilmore Ric hard E (11) 148 Gitte n s Jason O (11) -82, 9 1 1 4 8 G o eh l e R obin J ( 10) -64,65, 1 6 1 Goehle. Ca rey J ( 1 0 ) -78. 161 Gom ez K elitza S ( 1 2 ) 74 75. 76 125. 190 Gom ez, Sergio D (11) -46, 64. 90. 14 8 Index/ 195

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Gom o ll Fred W. (II) 20 Gonzal ez Jr., Luis ( 12) 11, 4 3 Gonzal ez M a r c o s A ( 12) II. 4 3 6 1 .63. 6 4 Gonzal ez Raqu e l ( II)' 82, 9 1 106, 125 Gon z al e z Ricardo A (11) 56, 148 Good\\'i n Lis a E ( I I ) 43. 68, 69. 72. 75. 8 5. 148. 188 Gordo n Dana R ( I L) 6 1 6 3 9 0 148 Gordon Eleonor R ( 1 0)93. 1 6 1 Gordon Ge r a l d A (11) 43, 9 0 148 Gordon. C"l i c hael W ( 10) 1 6 1 GOtl S C li g, C"l i c hael J (10) 1 6 1 Gotts e l i g, Thomas (12) 125 G ra gg, Torrey C"1. (II) 20, 148 Gramlic h Jean C"1. ( 1 2 ) 74 7 5. .\2 5 Grayson. Eden C"lar c e l ( I I ) 90. 148 G r e c o C"l i c h e l l e ( 10 ) "16"1 Gregg. Laura ( Miss ) 173 Green Eric ( 1 1 ) 6.1, 64. 148 156 Griffin Carter tl. ( I J ) 72 73, 74 .81. 85. 88, 125. 1 2 6 Groom Jr., Lawren c e K (ll) 45. 148 G room, Ric hard K (10) 1 6 1 G uerrero. D ea M ( 1 0 ) 1 6 1 G uerrero. G lori a 'Angela ( 1 0 ) 1 6 1 Guevara, Almir ( I J ) 90, 148 Guille n Orti z Waldo E (10)1 1 6 1 -H-Haeusser -Huyghue tlae usser. Valerie L. ( 1 I ) 68, 69.83. 148 tlaines I II John L ("II ) 46, 58, 67.148 t-Iaines, Tanya L. ( 1 0 ) 1 6 ] 1 1 a ncoc k II. R o n a l d T ( 1 0 )1 95. 148 tlaning, Douglas M ( I t ) 90, 95. 148 I I aning John 11. ( 10) 43, 1 6 1 11anna Jack ( 12 ) 105. 126 N anna Jennifer L ( 1 2 ) .126 J90 tlanson Bonnie n ( 1 2)-97, 1 2 6 tlanson, Joyc e (Mrs.) 81 177 t-Iard y Indira ( 10)-1 6 1 t-Iarni s c h T h eresa A ( 12)-1 5 74 .84.85, 105. 126. 183 Harper. Robert G (10) 1 6 1 tlarper. Willia m S 0 I ) 9 1 tlarrington Kathryn A (10) 3 9, 47,61 ,64,76, 1 61. 168 187 t-Ia rri s o n Erika Y ( 1 0 ) 82, 1 6 1 l"Iarvell. Ton y Rex ( 1 0 ) 1 6 ] l1arvey C"lic h e ll e A ( n ) 148 I Iattabau g h Ca rlos E ( I I ) 6 1 148 Ilatla b augh, G l a dys J ( 1 0 ) 5 1 I layd e n C"lichelle J ( 1 0 ) 158, Inde x 196 1 6 1 Ilazei r igg. Nadine Anne ( 1 2 ) 126 l leath Jamcs A ( 10 ) 90. 9 2 9 3 1 6 1 Ilccres, James R (11) 148 I I e lin, Stephanie C"1. ( 1 0 ) 42, 43, 9 0 J 6 1 188 tlelm, N esa R. ( 12) 1 4 ,43, 1 2 6, 188 1 "lenriquez. Katia L ( 1 2 ) 63, 76, 7 8 ,83,97, 127, 190 tle n ry Stephanie J ( 1 2 ) 127 l lcrnandez K a r e n G (1.1) 68, 1 06.156 1 l enera. Edwin R ( 1 0 ) 5 7 1 6 1 t l erring, P aul C. ( 1 0)-1 6 1 t-Ierring Raymond ( 12) 127 !"Iigley, Leticia C. ( I L) 6..) 69, 148 l linton, C"l i chae l T (.12 ) 127 11irt. C"l ark E (10) 1 6 ] 110 ffm a n C"lichael V (11 ) 58. 7 5 1 4 8 .187 11 o l der, Jessi ca J ( 1 2 ) 50, 82, 94.127 I o ldsworth, K a tya (.12) 26, 127 I olland, E ri c (10) 8 4 5 ,67, 1 6 ] H olland. E rnest 170, 171 Horne C"lark A ("l2) 5 55. 56, 79, 127. 142 l lovan S teven M (11) 67, 90 148 Iowe, L ee (r-I r s ) 80, 173 tlm"e, Ric hard 45, 68, J73 tlowell, C"largot A (ll) 72 75, 152 t lowell. C"l i c a h J ( 10)1 1 6 1 166 t lm"ell, Ralph 173 t1uc, Y a i ra D e l C. ( to) 63 1 1l1ff Di a na R (12) 127 t1urf. Elizabeth B ( 11)-45, 152 Huff. Timothy C. (11) 74 75, 83.88. 152. 153. 154 Hu g hes, Kimbe r l y M (11 ) 63, 64. 75. 152 I '!unsak e r Tracy L. ( 12) 1 5 1 7 23,64, 74 75. 76, 79. 97, 117 127, .137. -143 187. ]90 t lunter Jr., Raym ond B ( 1 1 ) 49, 5 4 .57, 152 t 'urst. !"leat her A ( 1 0 ) 1 6.1 !"Iur st. Paul W ( 1 0 ) 72 161 1 luyghue Leroy (10) 9 1 1 6 1 -1-l a rossi I zbic / i l a r o s s i Damon E. n o) 1 6 1 laros s i Dominic C. (11)' 152 laross i Tina (Mr s .) ] 70 Ibarra, Renee V ( 1 2 ) 50. I J4, 127. 190 Inc h a u s ti, arl o s R ( 1 0 ) 1 6 1 I s l a s, Ca ssandr a ( 1 0 ) 1 6 1 I s l a s, Zandra ( 1 0 ) 162 I zb i c k i Aaron A ( 10) 1 8 162, 168 I zbic ki. Lea N (10) 1 8 88, 162. 1 6 8 -J-Jackson -Joyce Jac k s o n J u stina C. ( 1 0 ) 63, 9 0 93. 1 6 2 Jaeger, Margie (C"lrs.) 1 72 173 Jae n Jose 173 J emmo tt. Jermaine J n 1 ) 49, 57, 152 J enkins Kenneth J ( 12) 45, 56, 127 Jennings. Robin R (12) 1.09, 127 Jic h a S hemayne f. ( 10 ) 162 J ohnson Carla D (11 ) 1 52 Johns t o n C hastit y Ann (10) ]62 J ohns t o n Ric h a rd ] 8 89, 1 74 Johnston. Ric Qua (r-I s.) 1 74 Jones Enrique (11) 56,152 Jordon, C"l a ndas D nO) 162 Joseph Rebec a L. U 2 ) 75, 76, 128. 190 JOSep h s C lark, Karima ( 10) 162 Josephs Clark, Khaldi no) 9 ] 162 Joyce, S t eve n J (12) 8 .128 ]44 Joyce, J ( 11)-2.56 -K-K aida K y l e Kaida Takako (10) 162 Kaurma n Kirby M ( 1 2 ) 4 5 54, 57. 6 7 K eethl e r Benjamin P (11) 46, ]52 Keiser, N icol e E. (10) 196 Keller, James J (11) 56, 57 K elle y, K athleen A (.10 ) 72 86, 162 Kelly, Bridget B (10) 68, 162 Kelly, C"lichae l W (12) "128 Kemp, Dav i d A (11) 72 7 6 ]52 N icol e Keise r Kim, 500 C hung (10) 63. 162 Kim, Y oung 500 (12) 26. 59, 128 Kimbrou g h R o b e rt (II) 4 6 104. 152 King, April L ( 11 ) 1 5 ,46, l52, 156 Kin g Erika C. (ll) 8 1 87, 152 King Renee L. ( I ] ) 152 K inguasa Gengo (10) 64 Kirby. Kare n T ( 1 1)-19,3 9,44, 4 5, 1 5 2 Kirkland, Will iam A (10) 1 6 2 K l uza, Chris topher W ( 1 0 ) 162 Knappenbe rger Diana Lynn (11 ) -90. 93. 152 Knappenbe rger Jeffrey n 2 ) 8 4 5,79. 128 Knox, Karla I. (I I) 9 ] 9 3 ]52 Knudsen. Steve C"1. (1"1) 152 K o ber, Mart h a (Ms.) l l 7 172. 174 Koitani Yo (12) 128 Kra pn Jason I. ( 10) ]62 Krapn, Shirle y E (II) 152 Kundinge r Ann M (IO) 162 Kunkel Karen (C"1 s ) 1 74 Kuwanoe. Davi d M (10) 83, 162 Ku\vanoe, Frank T (12) 94,128 Ky l e Pau l T ( 1 0 ) 162 -L-La Caze Lumpkin L a Caze Mi c hael R (1]) 87, 152 L adue Christoph e r L (10) 90, 95. 162 Lafnear. K elly C"l. ( 11 ) 90, 152 Lampas, Ana F (.12) 45, 63, 68. 111, n 8 183 Landron, A lexander (10) 162 Landron, Manuel L ( 12 ) 107, 14 1 Lanterman, Da vid J (1]). 152 La rner, Joseph S (11) 152 Latta, Sonya C. (10) .162 Launder II Hart)' S (11) 90 Lavall ee Jac q u e l i n e M ( 12) 74 75, 8 1 128 Lavall ee Judith (Mrs. ) 1 74 Lawlor, Jan e (C"liss) 172 Lawlor, M e l a n i e L. ( 12 ) 6 4 ,83, 86.87. 128 Lawre nce, Lione l A (10) 162 La y n e Vanessa r-1. (]O) 90, 162 L e c k ey Kimberly R (11) -SO 5 1 63. 152 L e d e z m a C h ri s t i n e L. DO) 72 162 Lee, Linda L. (] 1 ) 48. 6..) 152 L erner, Joh anna ( 12) 2 1 75, 83, 109, 128, 136. 137 185 L e n Rios, C"laria E (12) 2 1 5 ] 64. 72 74 85. 97. 128 Le nmark. Chri stin e A (l2) 83, 129 Leone, Fr a n c isco De J (11) 43, 152 Le s t e r Uye n T hao (10)' 162 Lettau P a u l A (J 1 ) 152 Levy. I va n L. ( 1 0) L 7 4 3 1.62 Lewi s, A li c i a I. (1.1) 76, 147, 152 Lewi s E l ai n e ( ll"s .) 170, :171 Lewi s Terre ll A (II) 24. 5 ] 56. 152 Lieberman. Brian C"1. (12) ] 7 1 8 2 1 6 1. 88. 89 Li e h r Jr., Pete r A (.12) 59, 75, 84.129 Lin Ting W ei (12) 21. 129 Linares III. Rol ando A (12) 1 8

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n 73. 8]. 88. 89. 97. 129 ]44 187 190 Lipke Aaron (10) 162 Little Courtlend (Jl) -152 Live l y Jennifer C (10) 64, 72. 77, ]62 Livingston. Bryon 9 ] 129 Lock e Diane R ( 1 0 ) 162 Lopez John A (12) -129 Love f"anuel J (11 ) -49. 90, 152 Loveless Catherine 72, 162 LOy Lisa 'arie ( 11 ) 152. ]87 Loy Mi chae l Scott (12) J6, 64, 90. 9 4 129. 187 Lu cero, Jennife r (12)1 Lumpkin. l eathe r (10) 68, sa. 96. 162 -M-l'1achazek l'1yers r-lachazek, Mi c h elanjhe l a (12) 129 ,..ladura Mi c hael J (10) 72 162 Maislo. M Cri stina (l2) 1 8 76. 7B 81. 88, 97. 129. 190 ""ajar I",ichae l \Y. (12) 67. n o 129 Maldonado, Bert W ( 1 1 ) 56 Mal lory. K elly 11. (12) 63, n9 Man c hester, Nancy (JI'l r s .) 174 Mangum. Laurie S ( U ) -23. 5 1 152. 187 I"1 a""i"9. I tzel Y (.10) 50. 63, 162 !"larahl. !",laria" J ( 12) -26, 130 ""a r o m Hagar ( 12 ) -130 Marotta. Christopher J (ll) -59. 100. 15.3 Marquez Enrique B (12) 8 45. 67. 130. 143 Martin. Ricky 174 f"'artinez. Nayat A ( 1 0 ) -80 Martinez. S u san f"1. (12) -68. 75. 76. 87. 130 r-1asterson. Patricia Erin ( 11 ) -153 Maslin, Mi c h ae l f (10) 162 Math eney A l a n O (10) -45. 162 Matheney Tama r a A (12) -2]. 57. 68. 69. 76. 130 144. 183 Matson, Melinda C. (LJ) -8 1 153 Matter. Oscar O. (]1) -153 f"1atth e ws Ann f (l0) -5 1 63. 91. 160. 162. 166 Maye r s Anna f"1arie p ( 1 ) 20. 153 r-layers. Esteban 170 r-laynard. Heather G (10) 163 r-l cArthur, Dawn r-1. (12) 42 43. 130. 136. 188 r-lcColl Jane E ( 12) 130 r-1cConaug hey. Leann (11 ) 43. 6 1 15.3. 156 f"1cConnell. Ann r-1 (10) -6 1 68. 163 r-lcConne ll f"1argaret Ann (10) -163 r-1cConnell, r-lark C. (11) 9 1. 92. 93. 153 McCormack. Janelh C. (12) 8 90. 9 1 9 1 94. 130 f"lcCormack Jr,. Jimmie L. (10) 163 McDonald. Edward A (11) 24. 49 McGinnis III James J (10) -49. ]63 McGuinness, Scott A (10) 163 Mcintire, Mark D (11)' 6]. 64. 65. 153, ]87 f"'cKenzie Sergio R (12) -39. 49. 6 1 .67. 79.92.93.94. 130 Mcr-l anigal f"lorris S (11) 153 Medina Jr .. Luis M (]2) 130 Mena Wanda S (10) 9 1. 93. 163 Mendenhall, H eidi K (12) 1 2 26 Mendez Gabri el E (10) 163 Me ndez, Jose A (12) 1 4 1 153 Merr iweather. Diane Carme n (11 ) 63. 90. 153 Merriweather, Elisa Carmen (10) 63.90 Meyer. C rai g S (11) 153 Meyers Robert f ( 1 0 ) -46, 163 Michaelis, Patrick (12 ) 15. 18. 22.91. 130 Minor. Mary G (12) 26 f"1itch e ll Paul R (12) 72 8 1 9 1 93. 95. 130 Mitchner, Chrisla L. (11) 153 Mi x Tamara L (10) -69, BB, 163. 168 Miz e Eric L (10) ]63 Mizra c h i. Alberto (11) 153 Moffitl. Angel a K (] 0) -88, 163 Moffitt, Lis a P ( 12) 1 5 48. 67. 78. BB. 131, 137 144 Mikillo Roderick J (10) 57, 67. 159. ]63 Molina. Tomas R (11 ) -90 Monaghan. Eugene f"1 (10) 163 Monlouis. Wilma 174 r-10nson f"1ichael P (12) -23. 64 78. 131 f"10nson Teresa A (11) 39,47. 108 ]53 r-1ontgomery, r-1ic h e ll e E (12) 8 72 .97. 1 3 1 143 f"loor e Darrel L (12) -56. 67. 90.144 Moore Da ry l (11) -57, 137. 153 r-loare, E laine N (11) 9 1 153 r-loore. Steven (11) -83. 90, 100, 153 Moore Jr., Tom G (12) 1 31 Morales, Martin O (0) 90. 163 More n o Brook ( 1 0 ) 163 Morris. Carie L. ( 12) 21 74 .97. 131. 137. 185 Morris III Robert E (10) 80. 163 r-10rrissey. Frances ( r-lrs .) -174 r-10ses. Jarrod D ell) -153 f"' o u ssea u Brittany A ( 11 ) 15.3 r-1uggler. Sandra C. (12) -75. 76. 83. 131 137. ]87. 190 r-1ulligan Jennifer (10) 163 r-1uniz Jr.. Carlos (12) 131 r-Iyer. T h o mas O (12) 18, 61. 76. 78. 8 1 83. 96. 131 Myers James D (12) 43, 13] -N-Nakasu -Nunez Nakasu. Takahiro (11)]53 Nandwani. sharmila U (11) 76. 147.153 Nas si fr. Paulette n (11) -7 5 78. 149. 153 156 Naum, James M (11 ) 4 9. 67. 153 Naum. Jeff D ( 10) -58, 67. 163 Navarro, Deydamia n ( 11 ) -39. 47, 153 Neely. Ze nia A (11) -1 5 4 3 153. 188 Nelms Christopher P (II) 153 Ne l m s Jennifer L. (10) -50, 163. 166 Nelson. Catherine J ( 12) -18 n 73. 83. 97. 131. 186. 193 Ne lson. Susan C (11 ) 51. 75, 63. 68. 75. 153 Nelson. r-lary E (10) -51. 63. 72 163. 166 Nesbitt, Carl (ll) -19. 45. Nesbitt. Tracie D (12) 82. 131 Neto. r-ler cedes J (11) 82, 149. 153 Nich o lson. Stephanie R. (10) 163 Nieves, Carlos Manuel (II) -64 90. 153 N ieves. Carlos Mi g u e l (12) 94. 13.1 Nieves, Roberto C. (10) -45, 4 6 103. 163 Nogueira. Erick (10) 90, 92. 93. 163 Nobl es Ruby 163 Nolan Patrick L. (10) 163 Nolte. Anays (12) -76. 100. 132 Norton. Stephanie M ell) 153 Norton. Jennifer r-1 (10) 163 Notyce. Conrado (Capt.) -94. 171.172 Nunez. r-laria ( Mrs .) -170 Nunez Troy A (12) 132 -0-O'Brien -Othon O 'Brien, D ixie-Ann (11) -56. 82. 9 1 102. 149 153 O Nel a Quentin D (12 ) -132 Oakley Jr . Luis O (11)51.67. 90. 153 Oliver. Adrienne 1. (12) 21.57 68. 7 4 76. 96. 132. 183 Oliver. Christ) L. (10) -50. 6 2 63.68. 163 Oliver. Cleve 50. 52. 58. 174 Oliver. r-lelody (12) -2]. 50. 53. 75. 78. 63. 68. 75. 78. 132 Olton, J r.. Ronaldo A (10) -43. 67. 102. 163 Omac h i. Ayako (11) -153 Ortiz, Carmen R (11) -78. 154 Othon, Joan (r-l rs .) -177 -p-Palm P ylant Palm. E li zabeth A (10) -4 2. 43. 163. 188 Paradiso. Jerrod L. (11 ) -154 Paris Robe rt W (10) -163 Parker. William E IV (10) ]63 Parr Tony a F (ll) 3 9. 47.150, 154 Parra Javier ("II) -' 154 P earson. Cra i g V ("10) -197 Pearson Louanne M (1]) 75. 90.93. 154 Peck. David B (11) 154 Pedersen E lidis Y (]2) 132 Peders e n Peter Lykke ( 1 0)102. 163 Cra i g Pearson P e n a A ngel 8 ( 11 ) 154 Pereira Antonio ( 1 2 ) -26. 59 Per ez Iriana C. (10) -163 Perez f"'ark Anthony (12) 3 P e r ez Nic h o las A (11) 154 Perez Tracy Lynn (11) 49 Perry S heri K (10) 158, 163. 168 Petersen Deanna (r-lrs.) 175 Petkidis. Stella 1"1. (1"1) -154 Petrosky Jr .. Robe rt L. (12) 91 133 Phillips. Alfonso -170 Pier c e Jan 1"1. (11) 18. 106. 154 Piper. Cynthia ( r-lrs .) -175 Piper. Dorothy (r-liss) 175 Pon c e Eduardo A (12) 74. 75. 76. 107. 133. 136. 190 Portela. Antonio G ( 11 ) -78. 91 94.95. 154 Powell Judith D ("11) 97. ]54 Pratt. Gi n a R (10) ] 63 Pratt. Tonya 8 133 Pri c e Tisha L. ( 11 ) 51. 63. 72 75, 76. 149 154 Puryear. Thurman (SSG) -94. 95. 171 Puryear. Jermaine E ( 11 ) 40. 49. 154 Putnam. Kim T (11)18.75. BB. 89. 154 Pylant. Susan ( I rs .) 110. 1 is. 17 6 -Q-Quesada -Quinn Quesada. f ernando (1] ) -154 Index / 1 9 7

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Quintc r o Indira I. ( 1 2 ) 133 Quint 1 0 Julie t a A ( 1 2 ) -9 0 93, 133 Quinn, La rl)' -56, 67, 175 -R-R amirez Ryan Ramircz, Bl)'ant (1l) -75, 154 Ramircz, Jose -175 Ramirez, Lissa I"lae (11) -154 H av,ldcn o l e E (12) -80, 133 R a y S cott A l a n ( 1 2 ) -133 R c b o iro, Ric hard L. (10) 6 -1. 79, 163 R e e ve s B a rl )a ra (1"Irs ) -175 R eilly Linda L. (2) -4 5 133 183 H eliford, Denise 1"1. ( 10) 163 Reyes, A l ex 1"1 (12) -54, 55, 57, 75, 133, 136 Reycs Javier A ( 10) -90, 9 1 163 Reyes L e lys E. (1:1) -9 0 154 Ricketts, I'aul E. ('11) -75, 83, 90, 154 Ridao, John P (11) 154 Ridder, Elizabeth R (10) 51. 63. 72 ,88, 163 Riggs, C hristopher B (10) -90, 163 Ril ey James 5 (11 ) -154 Rio s I"l o nka nO) 69, 76. 8]' 158, 163 Rit chie Julia S (]1)' 154 Rit chie V James L. (1 1 ) -64, 90, 154 Rive ra Ana Rosa (10) -:16 3 Rivera. Anayan si (11) -154 Rivera frank O (12) -'133 Robinson, K y ra L. (10) 5 1 163 Rocha. R e n ee R (11) 154 Rodger s Evon Jennife r ( 12) 8 1 6 ,50, 61. 72 133, 137 190 Rodri g u e z J airo R ClO) J63 Rodrig u ez I"l yma Luz (.10 ) 163 Rodri g u ez Mesa, Ilia n a (10) -'163 Rogers, C harles ( 12) -9 66, 67. 79. 133, 144 Roger s Yesenia E. (10) 164 R o mero. Ana I"l a ri a (12) -72, 74 134 144 Romero, Lilia C. d e (Mrs. ) -170. 1 7 1 Roque Matthew B (10) 1 6 4 R o a M aldo n a d o Marilza ( 10) 164 Rose, Patricia J (1'1) -154 Rosicz kowsk i. Leon -175 Rouse. Jennife r A (10) -50. 6 1 64, 72 ,88, 164. 187 Row land. Angeline T ( 1 0 ) 1 9 164 Rowle y Adriane 1"1 (10) -44, 4 5 164 Ro y o A l ejandro A (ll ) l B 72 7 6 154 Ro y o Heyna ( 12) 1 5 4 2 4 3 1 3 4 144, 183, 188 Ro y o l{cynaldo R. (12) -4 3 67. 110, 134 143 Ruddoc k Andri a L ('11) -42. 43, 6 3 149 154 188 Index 198 Ruffer Jos e 1"1. ( 12 ) -67. 75, ]34 Rui z Carlos C. ( 1 0 ) -5 9 164 Ruiz Gina G ( 1 2 ) -134 Russelburg. St ephanie D ( 12) 1 7 ,21. 23. 83,117 134, 137 Bu ssell. J o shua .1. (11) 154 B ya n I"l a ri Eugenia ( 10) 1 5 164, 167 -5-Sager Szymanski Sage r J r., James A (12) -80, 90, 93,95. 134 Sak o n K ei t a (10) 59, 164 Sak o n Saku ( I I ) -59, 154 Sa l aza r Aurora C. ( 12) 8 22, 72, 134 190 Sa l aza r Areonda -134 Salazar, Bi ca rd o E ( 10) 164 Samue l s Ray m ond E. ( 12) -88, 89 Samue l s 1"1 a r e li sa I ( I J ) -156 San c h ez lecLQr N ( 10) 103, 164 San c h ez Rog e r B n ] ) 58 San c h ez Toni Williams (l" l r s ) -82, 175 Santiago. Eduardo J II (10) -164 Santos. Art Jason Q (10) 164 Sasso, Bl)'an A (11) -155 Sasso, Li sa A nO) 1 5 164, 167 Saunde r s Tamika -90. 164 Sawyer, Barbara E (10) ]64 Sa\ \I)'er James C. ('12) -80, 9 ] 95. 139 Sc hafer. Kristin M 1 ) 20, 155 Sc h e m a n E ri c h 1'. (10) 43,87, 103, 164 Schnack K a r e n I. ('12) 74 75, 76.99, ]34, 176. 190 Schneringer J r ,. Gregory A (11) -54.57,67. 155 Hari K e n Si n g h Schramm. Trul y ( M i ss) 1 6 11 7 172, 175 Schulte Jennife r J ( 1 0 ) 68, 88, 162, 164 Scott, David A ( 10) 164 Scott Marcia f (11) -50, 155 Scottino III. Anthony E. ( 12) -90. 134 Sea ley, Rob erto D (11) -49, 9 0 155 Serrano, D e n e iria L. ( 1 ) -39, 4 7 155 Sevon 1"1 ark A ( 1 0 ) -90, 164 S h affe r J ohn ( 1 0 ) -46,90. 164 S haw, J ennife r L. ( 12) -135. '187 S haw, 1"1 a r c o W ( 12) 135 S h eppard, Lavinia ( 1 2 ) -50, 75, 76, 85. 13 5 190 S h ort, 1"1al)' (I" l rs ) -1 4 ,97, 175 Sing h t"lari K e n ( 12) 64. 67. 79. 9 1 .92,93, 176. 198 Siraa Tanya ( 10) -76, 1 6 4 S itarz. I'atric i a ( 1 2 ) 1 2 .26, B7 105, 135 Skora. Christophe r M ( 1 0 ) -58, 164 Smith. R o berto A ( 1 I ) -8 1 83. 87, 155 Smith. Trade n e D (11 ) -20, 5 1 56, 155 Snider, I"l i c hael L ee (:1O) -6 1 90. 9 3 ,95. 164 Snide r S tephanie L. ( 10) 164 S nyder Ange l a M (ll) ]55 Sol e r A l ice J (10) ]64 Soli s K a r e n E (2) 135 Soll ami, L enard (11) 75. 76, 9 -1. 155 Sorenson Jac k n 2) J4 4 Soriano M onique M ( 1 0 ) 164 Sosa, Rit a (Mrs ) -176 Sota. Budy R. (10) -164 Spoon e r William A (10) 92, 1 6 4 Springs t ead. A ngel a M ( 1 0 ) -64, 160. 164 S t a ff e ldt, Erik S (12) 58, 66, 67, 7 4 85. 96, 135, '14-4 S t ahlma n Jill M ('I]) -75, 107. 155 Stames Nichole M (11) -4 8 6 1 155 S t eil. Kevin J ( n ) ]55 Stein e r Allyson A (10) -SO, 80, 1 6 4 S teven s Guille r m o 170 S teven s Jay (10) 1 6 4 Stewart, Erika -135 Stirling Alexande r ( 10) 4 5 ]64 Stone, S t ephe n J ('12) 90, 92, 94, 135 Stourr e r G l enn (10) ]64 Stromberg, Kristine N ( I I ) -47, 6 1. 63. 69, 108. 155 Subia, Enrique ( 1 ) -9'1, 93. 95, 155 Sulliva n John P nO) -6 4 65, 78. 113, 1 6 4 Sullivan Tiffany B (12) ')2, 87, 135 S \ .... eeney, Jason B (12) -1 6 1 7 40, 135 Swee ney, J a mes -64, .100, 176 Sweeney, J ennife r L. ( 10) 1 9 6 0 6 1 63, 69, 164 Szy m a n S ki III. fre d e r i c k f ( 10) 4 9 9 1. 164 -T-Taggart Twoh y T agga r 1 C h a rles \Y. ( 10) 49, 90, 1 6 4 Tayl o r Linda S ('10) 164 T ejada, Jose 1"1 (12) -135 Test a Ca r los A nO) 1 64 Tevi s T e rrence 1"1. (.12 ) -56 Tha l e Bruce -'176 Thaxton, T e r esa (1"Iiss) 50, 53. 165. 176 T homas, Andrew S ( 1 I ) -90, 155 Tho mas, C harles A n l ) -155 Thomas. E n eida 1"1. ( 1 0 ) 1 6 4 Thomas Randa ll S ( 1 2 ) -138 T homasson Way n e A (11) 155 Thompson, Kimbe r l y M (.I 1 ) -1 5 ,20,42,43,72, :ISS, 188, 198 T h ompson P a m e l a N (11) -'ISS T h ompson Sammie L. (12) -138 T h o mson Ivette N ( 10) 1 9 56, 155 Thre a t. Nick y Eugene (12) 4 9 138 Thrift, L eanne E 9'10) 4 8 57, 1 6 4 Thrift, R o b erl E. (1.2 ) 1 5 1 7 45, 6 1 ,67. 7 9 ]38, .144 Throndson, Scott (12) -58, 59, 138 Tibl i e r Nancy L (1'1) 4 5 155, 156 Toala. Howard -138 Toledano, Mich e ll e M ('12 ) -22, 23, 69. 72 76, 138 Tomlinson Y adira E (11) -82, 138 Torres J r Danie l (l0) -9'1, 95, 164 Torres, S teven (12) 8 1 5 ,45. 79. 144 Torres, T h o mas ('1'1) -'138 Toshok, Chris toph e r 1"1. ( n ) 156 Toshok, J ennife r (12) -63, 67, 79,138, 183 Townsend, D errick (12) -24, 138 Tremblay. M artin A (11) 49, 155 Tsugane, Erika (1 1 ) -69. 155 Tunon. Jose J (12) -14. 109, 136 138 Tweed Scott A (1.1) 155 Twohy, Kara K (10) -1 9 ,42,43, 164, 188 Kimmy Thompson -u-Uhorchak -Urriol a Uhorc h a k Tanya 1"1, (12) 'I S Todd Underwood

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26, 12, 139, 144 U nderwood. Can ute C. fll) -18, 12,88,155 U nderwood, Todd W (12) 8 ,4,3, 60, 61, 96, 139, 189 Urba c k Ma rleen (Mrs.) 176 Urq uidez, Armando (10) -164 Urri o l a Juan R (11 ) -64, 155 -v-V allarino -Vaz Vallarin o Ros i ta (Mrs.) 176 Van S teen b urg, Sara h (11) 100, 155, 156 Vargas Hutch P (12) 91, 92, 95 N a n cy V a u ghn Vasq u ez Davi d C. (11 ) -46. 49, 58, 59, 90, 155 Vau ghn, Nancy (12) -198 Vazqu ez Ruben f (11) -46, 90, 155 Vel asq u ez Francis c o D (11) 155 Vel ez A nabell e (12) -79. 139, 143, 183 Vel ez Jav ier O (11) 39, 79. 124. 155 Veliz Larry C. (10) 91, 95, 164 Vent u ra Cla r k G. (10) 164 Vida l P ierre L. (10) 164 Vierr a A i mee (11) -65, 72 75, 83,155,156 Villamil Alex i s S (lO) 164 Vil larreal G isel a I. (10) 9 1 93, 164 V inson. III. Fr eddi e (11 ) -155 V iswanathan. H ema (]2) -139 Vowel l. Amy E. (11) -13, 44, 155 Vaz Carlos -77. 176 -w-Wal cott W o odruff Wal cott. Andrea (10) 164 Walcott, Y o lette L. (11) 6 3 75, 155 Waldron, Julian J (11) -46, 155 Wal k e r Kimberl y A (10) -164 Walker. Tiffany 9 1 164 Wall David B (12) 4 6 119 139 Wal l. K eith E (1l) -155 Wal l. Shawn M (12) 139 Waller, Rodulfo A (10) 8 164 Warner Vannette P (11) 9 51. 9 1 155 Was hburn, John J (12) -140 Washburn. Elsa M (11) 7 6 155 Watanabe. Naoki (10) 64. 199 Watkin s Lea nne M (10) -165 Watson. Willie E (11) -61 Weade Jason r-1 (11) -155 Webl y Sonia 170 Naoki Watan a b e Webster. Hubert B (l0) -91. 165 Webster. Robert (SSG) 94-Waug h Ken neth -61. 174, 176 Weeks. Arleen B (11) -155 Weeks. M elissa M (10) -165 Weinri c h Mi c hael C. (10) -91, 95, 165 Me. W a u g h Wel c h Carlos A (12) -37, 43, 71 9 0 Wel c h Claudette C. (10) 63, 91, 165 W e l s h Nathaniel (10) -61. 102, 165 W es t. Rosella G (12) 87, 140, 144 Becca We tzS t ein W estgate, James (10) 165 W etzstein Rebecca J (12) -48, 74 75 78, 88, 96, 137, 140, 142, 199 W h a rry. Ca l ley E (11) 103. 155 W heeler, Jeri R (12) 1 6 1 7 SO. 51 74 76, 84, 85, 96, 137, 140, 143, 185 Wh ee l e r Steven W (10) 4 9 66. 67, 165 White Shaleen M (12) 76. 85, 104, 140 W h it e Dorothy ( Mrs,) 6 78. 177 W h it e Christopher L. (10) -56 White Anita M (10) 90. 165 Wickham. Jimmie (r-1 rs.) -176 Wilkinson D ea n A (12) -43. 140 Williams. Chris M (12) -20. 104. 140 Wil liams, Christopher C. (11) 155, 1 76 Williams, J r. f ernando A (11) -56, 9 1 92, 155 Williams. George -43. 155 Williams. John D (10) 60. 6 1 64.87.165 Williams Joh n G (1 1 ) -155 W il l iams. Ka re n L. (10) -69. 165 W il l iams. S honda -9 Willis, Brian E (11) 155 Will i s Duane L. (10) 91. 165 Wilson. Vi rgili o A ( 12) 1 5 6 1 90, 92, 9 3 139, 140 Noell e Woodrow W ilson. Stacy Ann (12) 26 Wil son. Jason (12) -59, 74. 76, 84,85,140 Wilson, Juliet E (10) -44. 45, 165 W inford. Me li ssa J (10) -165 W i n n Da v i d 0 (12) -55, 56. 140 W i n t e r Justi n (11) 43. 67, 155, 187 W i n t e r s S h a nnon L. ( 11 ) -45. 155 Wombl e Bryan K (11) 80. 155 Womble J r .. Robe rt M (12) -140 WOOd. Brian J (10) 54. 57. 67. 165 Wood, Crai g M (12) -56. 140 Woodrow. Noell e (11) -18. 64. 75 88, 89, 155, 199 Woodruff. Christopher L. (1 0 ) 165 -y-Yan es Y oungs Yanes, C hristina M (11) -106 155, 156 Yanes. Tani a E (12) 141 Yates Gentry L (1 1 ) -91. 95. 155 Yoshimoto, D a i shi (12) -59. 141 Young Da vid 86. 87. 104.176 Youngs. L amar R (10) 56. ]65 -z-Zaldivar -Zornes Zaldivar. Sara h r-1. (]]) 155 Zamora, r-1 a risol (11 ) 75. 156 Zornes, J e ffrey S. (11) -75. 90, 95, 156 Index/199

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Ads pn. /200 Mrs Dottie Nelson Kevin J e n kins B o b W eedin, B obby F i shbo u g h Maria Nunez Dav e Youn g Sonia Web l y Mark Hire A l fon s o P h il lips, !'-l s. Joh n s t o n M s Pip e r !'-lr. Reyes Mr. Da h l strom. Li sa P Moffi tt. Carte r Griffin, M r s Romero, Este b a n Ma yers. C harl es Rodgers Enriqu e Marq u e z Broderbund Software. BI15 Vars i t y Coac h es Ray a n d R y a n Und erwood. Crossroads Chur c h X e rox !'-l a chine Mrs Sosa from Adri enne a n d B ri a n ; Mr. Vaz from Erik, Jl'l s Ku n k e l from Tom ; B l a k e Kuklin, W il l i e S h o rt, M s S hort' s Saturday s peci a l Sox. C h a r lie M i gnon. Poll y a n d K a ndii. B H S S e curit y Guard. Tra n sportation by the B l u e Turtle T h e La n d S h a r k t h e CDC a n d Er i k s mom, t h e s enio r class for c o l o r a n d t h e S A for f unds

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i , ,., .,. < .-