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 Dedication
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DLOC PCANAL
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093678/00030
 Material Information
Title: Zonian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date: 1939
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093678:00030

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 1a
        Page 2
    Dedication
        Page 5
    Main body
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Advertising
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
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        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Back Matter
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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A . : ;

"~t7' 9~~r~:~ u a Ear 9


A S you leave high school and go out into life you will
Look back and realize ever more strongly that your high
school years were golden. If you can drink of the bitter waters
without allowing experience to destroy faith, efface ideals or
sour the heart, you will have found the Fountain of Youth.
You have my sincere wishes for contentment and happiness
in life.

FRED W. HOSLER,
Principal.







































































S..

,.4
. I,




































































4A4







or




















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/zonian1939balb





















DEDICATION


SIn gratitude we dedicate
this Zonian to the Old
Timers of the Panama
Canal who gave the
best part of their lives
to fulfill the dream of
centuries. May their
spirit of cooperation and
good fellowship live on
,in the hearts of pos-
iterity.












































ADMINISTRATION


ilr. Ben lf. Willhams
SuperintnenJcnt
of schools


Dr. George Howard
Assistant to the
Superintendent


Dr. Fred 1'. Hosler
Principal




















. l~ li~-i-~.


TEACHING STAFF
Batalden, Calmer A. ...................................................................................... Indutrial Arts
Branstetter, Neil V. ....... .................................................................................... Music
Butler, M ary E. ................................................................................................. Com m ercial
Candee, Alice ................................. ........................ Social Science & General Mathematics
Collinge, Roger W .................................................................. ................... English, Journalism
Eneboe, Agnes R. ..................................................... Social Science, English
Esser, Segurd E. .................................................. ........................ ............................. English
Franklin, Max C. ............................. ...... .............................................. Industrial Arts
Frost, Olga J. ........................................ Spanish. French
Hatchett, Edward W. .......................................................................................... Mathematics
Hayward Dorothy G. ............ .. ............ ................... Commercial
Hollingshead, John H .. ne & Mathematics
Jessup, Katherine E(... .......................... ........................ English
M cN air, Jam es S ........................................................................................................ M them atics
Newman, Mary S. ........................... ................................... ................... Household Arts
Parsons, A lice ................................................................ ................................. Latin
Prentiss, H ervey P. ....................................................................... ........................ Social Science
R obson, Elinor D ................................................................... .................. ................... Spanish
Parrill, Irw in H ............................................... ................................................................ Science
T urbyfill, Subert ........................................ .................................................. a. D ram atics
Ward, Allen B. ....... .... Spanish, Latin
Wardlaw, George .L .. ..... Mathematics
Whaley, Myrtle ... English. Library
Zierten, H. J. . . .Industrial Arts

7
,,
iJi







FORWARD
TO record the activities of Balboa High
School in 1938-1939 is the purpose of
this Zonian, but the staff has tried also to in-
corporate in it a little civic pride and school
spirit. In honor of the twenty-fifth anniversary
of its building we have used the Canal as a
theme for our plates, comparing the school to
the Canal, and the classes to ships going through
from the ocean of illiteracy to the ocean of
wisdom. Thus we hope to further the appre-
ciation of the great work done both by the
builders of the Canal and the builders of our
education-the teachers.










SCa"^ c"if^ ^ *^




I --

I -








L~ -



9

























Mr. Hatchett
Sponsor


President

Fred Huldtquist Jr.

Canal Zone








4el"A NA"


-.va








Secretary

Virginia Grey Thornton

Colon


Mascot Miss Jessep
Sponsor


.I b.A lre "ijan m lr ite..If.rrap .au
re,, hr, t:., b& I'.rd.
Basfbjl I 4 Slofihll I 2 ',
FLbilbll 2 ) \ice Prs.deni
Prieidtrn I LrrJe The.rre 4 Golf
; 4 Tennf, I Th.-t Di) oi Graie,
Night of .3lnu.jr 16






"PtJ. Ac ar i.rkn rts al." jand
prce'p .i il .ir t fPal/s..i
Orcheirr 1 2 ) 4 Lirdle Therre
Orchestra I 2 4. lhrmI:itr Club
4 Band I S.olibill I. 2 ;, 4.
Bsketibill 2 i, 4 T1rclk 2 5 4:
Tenni 2. 4A, Soccer 1, Foioball
2, & 4






".1 'asita , r i. .'-, I hAer
jil/. 7 rppling hir. '
Sorball 2 Si.ccer 2 \'lleyball I
2 Snimmin I Tnr.i; .' Glee
Llub 4 Quill and Scrill I.













Blanche Eleanor Adler
Canal Zone
"Let all things he done decently and
in order."
Swimming 1, 2, 3; Student Asso-
ciation 3, 4.





Fulvia Elena Arosemena
Panama
"My own thought are my
companions."
Swimming 3; Spanish Club 3, 4.









Olga Victoria Arosemena
Panama City
"Let us, then, be up and doing."








Sherry Austin
New York City
"Kind words and few art a woman's
ornament."
Parrakeet 4.


Garland Allelia Avera
Fort Bliss, Texas
"Laugh and live, then learn."
University of Missouri High School;
Fayetteville High School, N. C.; Ten.
nis; Zonian 4.


Elva Nancy Bauman
Cristobal
"A regular girl and the beft of pals."
Cristobal High Schoo'; Softball 1,
2. 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2 3, 4; Ten-
nis i, 2 3. 4: .. ... 1, 2. 3.
4; B wling I. 2 Glee Club
1 2 5. 4; Biology Club I, 2:
Litle Theatre 4; Parrakeet 4; G. A.
A. 3, 4; Golf 4; Crocodile Isle; All
At Sea; Three Days of Gracie; Pep
Squad 2; N;.ir of January 16':
Quill and i ... u .



Thomas Albert Bender
Canal Zone
"I ho hears music feeh hit solitude
people at onr."
Softball. ; .',r,-,, Ba'ketball. Lit-
tle Theatre oi. tI. ri Junior College
Orchestra.






Josephine Ruth Blanton
Panama City
"Ark and leryr."
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2,
3; Volleyball 1, 2, 3; Swimming.





Roy George Boggs
Canal Zone
"He has merit. good nature, and
integrity. '
Water Polo 1, 2, 3, 4: Football 1,
2. 3. 4; Swimming 1. 2. 3, 4; Soft-
ball 1. 3, 4; Baseball 2






Jeanne Bonwell
Montana
"In the twinkling o, an eye."
Lee H'Lr School. Virginia; Spar-
row's I' ..ir High School, Maryland.








Wilena Bowen
Alabama
"A nature sweet, a disposition
pleasant."
Swimming 1, 2, 3. 4.













Donald Justin Bowen
Englewood. New Jersey
"Sport went hand and band with
Science."
Fc.rr Ichich Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4;
Foo.lall 4; Baketball 2, 4;
Stimp '-lub I H...ktt 1! 2. 3; Glee
(-lub I Fort Lcrdcr S t': 3.






Doris Bradford
San Antonio, Texas
"Courteous is she and willing to be
of service."







Richard Brislawn
Kentucky
"For courtesy wins woman as well
at valor may."
Columbus High School, Georgia;
Tennis 2: Biology Club 2; Parrakeet
4; Julius Caesar 3.






Doris Brotherson
New Jersey
"You have a merry heart."
Basketball; Crocodile Isle; Parra-
keet 4.







David Bruce
Canal Zone
"He lives as peace with all mankind."
Cristobal High School 1, 2; Glee
Club 4; "Gypsy Rover"







Maude Isabelle Bruce
"Let thy words he few."
Ci,,..bl Il;,h 1, 2; Glee Club 1,
2; Spn..h I jiu 1, 2; Biology Club 2.


Louis Caldwell
Panama City
"IHO/ r II hli, u of lt I e 'lsi









Alice Calabreves
Columbia
"I, Ito a? sit' 1:."
Swirmminn I 2. 1 1 Ba.eball I
Span.'h Club.







Minerva Calabreves
Columbia
"Silence W"srr tr'ela, )0
Samimin 1 2 i 4-. Spanish
Club I 2. fr're Club 1 2. 4 -4







Doris Claire Chan
Canal Zone
"T1, Int Ie dre,il r,#.h mriden

Stc.ball i, OrchEtirr






Irene Virginia Chan
Canal Zor.e
"I' n we arni 1o 1 ,.'a ato aif a

Art editor Zonian 1. 2, Art pies.
idenr ,







Alfred Chase
Ancon
"Learn the irtet r'iaiL o a .Akr.Jl
2. Band 2 4
S hirball I. 2. Band I 2 .. .4


r










Beverly Comley
Canal Zone
"Her ways are ways of pleasantness
and all her paths, of peace."
Volleyball 3, 4; Little Theatre 3,
4; Softball 3. 4; Swimming 1, 2, 3,
4; Parrakeet 4 Golf 4; "Eyes of Ta-
loc"; "Ci'-.o lc Isle"; Spanish Club
2; Glee Club I, 2; Pep Squad 2;
Treasurer I Nireh of January 16";
Quill and Scr.: 11




Ruth Jeanne Connor
Bridgeport, Connecticut
"She dances through lif. with never
a care."
Booth & Bayliss Business College;
Softball 1, 2, 3; Volleyball 1, 2, 3;
Swimming 1, 2, 3; Tennis 2; Bowling
1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2.





Joaquin Estehan Cruz
Gonzales
Panama
"How much we ijin waho make no

Softball 1, 2; Tennis 2, Basketball
3; Swimming 1.






James Cruz
Panama
"I am in earnest."
Spanish Club.







Francis Joseph Cryan
Canal Zone
"I love a road margin to my life."
S-imrrin_ 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1,
2, 4.




Mary Rita Cryan
Canal Zone
"A cheerful disposition it a fund of
ready capital."
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1,
2, 3, 4; Slimminr 1, 2 3. 4; Bowl-
ing 1, 2, : .11 at Sea"; "Gypsy
Rover"; Glee Club 4.


Jean Burke DeMott
Long Beach, California
"As jolly as the day is long."
Colonial School; Frcrch Club 1;
CGle Club 1; Parrakeet 3; Dramatic
Club; Volleyball 1; Badminton 1, 2.





Marjorie Dennis
Canal Zene
"Her a r was never to offend and
every acra'ure was her friend."
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Parrakeet;
"All At Sta"; "The Ci r
Swimming 1; Softball .1-.1 ,11
1; Bowling 1.





Jerry Wayne Dettamore
West Virginia
"That man is the richest who's
p:asiures are the cheapest."
ua;n'.r..r.u, 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 4;
C-i i..r. 3, 4; Biology Club 4,
Band 1.





Phyllis Deveneau
Chicago, Illinois
"And the best of me i' diligence.'
Softball; Bowling 1; Archery 1;
Biology Club 2. 3. 4; Chemistry Club
4; Parrakeet 4; Tennis 1, 4; Quill
and Scroll 4.





Paul Martin Disharoon
Virginia
"Every man has hit devilish
moments."
Water Polo 1, 2, 3. : Softball I,
2, 3, 4; Football 4; Baseball 4; Soc-
cer 1; Band 1. 2, 3, 1; Swimming
1, 2, 3, 4.





Richard H. Dodson
Canal Zone
"Another specimen of contented
satisfaction.''
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Water Polo
1, 2, 3, 4.












Harry Do ell
Cristobal
"Worth makes the man."
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 3, 4;
Sammin 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2,






Martha Raye Duncan
Texas,

"A pard-!ike spirit, beautiful and
swift.'
Nathaniel Hawthorne Junior High,
Tey-s Glee Club 2, 3; Little Theatre;
ParriA.k 4; The Food; Three Days of
Gracie.





Roy Chester Dwelle
Canal Zone
"Handsome is that handsome does."
Water Polo 1, 2, 3, 4; Football,
Trnn;, 12, 3, 4; "A Wedding";
Dirr, Hands."






Wallace Bruce Dyer
Canal Zone
"Thou wast a hero on many a field.''
Soccer I; Football 2, 3, 4; Soft-
ball 1, 2, 4; Baseball 3; Track 3, 4;
Basketball 3, 4; "B" Club 2, 3, 4.





Arthur Clyde Ellis
Arkansas

"Time is but the stream I go a
fishing in."
Football 2, 4; Baseball 1, 3;
Softball 1, 2, Basketball 1, 2, 3,
4; Water Polo 1, 2, 3, 4, Golf 2. 3,
4; Tennis 1. 2: Track 4. Band 3, 4;
Soccer 1; V ',c. Basketball 4; Parra-
keet 4.




Phillip Erbe
Canal Zone
"A studi-., .., and a

Track; S. fIbjll 2; Football 3; De-
bate 3; liul.u Caesar"; Zonian 4.


Susan Ewing
Ancon, Canal Zone
Li g'.,i r-. I*. aii a d :I.- L. . 'P









Thelma Louise Fayard
New Orleans. Louisiana

-t ,.* J fi.. I. r

CIk -lAut. I : Sofrball 2
S 4 i .bit l b b:. 11 l d i 2 4






Maurice Eugene Fitzgerald
Cristobal, Cani Zone
'S,- ,. it 1 .- , ' /

S.-.lhlr l 4 B,:.bi'l Bikci.
2il F...c.ibill : 4 Lithle
Tl- r e I ? s I R lu.lnti A'..,la
I.,.r. G lee .clu r d. c:,l- i'hr.d ,
.A l A, St) GCp P.'.itr Par.
rjtiiulr





Fernando Anthorny Foster
Canal Zone
"S .,c th' ,,. a ,..v; d.,re,-,r ir hi.
I,. ,Ai.'.; ...and .,f lor, t:ilg

Biebill 2 1 E,:.'tbll I 2
1-. F.J rball ; 4.






John Daniel Edward
Gallivan
Canal Zone

El, t,,R I . ,f..j L I 1i i. 1 l j
(amenrrr I ub Brand 1 2 Swim.
mn- I Zon n n. IQ, uAl .d i Srll





Jack Kenneth Gamble
Belleville, Illinois
It rt, T ,, Iff, -,'/-l,u I.-
.,, t ;.
F.,.ibill 2 4 B ,-eb.,l' 2 4
o. .kcrbll 2 B Clubh 4 Bjnd
I Otcherra L.etil Thetie Ofr
iht- ,ira 2 Tra,k .i. Q 'I aJnd S..ioll
I














James Gardner
Kentucky

"One who never turned his back but
marched ever forward."
Louisville Male High School; May-
field High School.






Patricia Jean Getman
Birmingham, Alabama
"Not bold, not shy, nor short nor tall,
A pleasant mingling of them all."
Swimming 1, 2; Spanish Club 2;
Softball 4; Parrakeet 2.







Dorothy Bell Godfrey
New Jersey
"Her thoughts are as still, as water
under a ruined mill."
Archery; Spanish Club.




Pete Green
England
"But lo! I held them spellbound."
W ater Polo 1, 2, 3, 4: ,'r.:r ..:
1, 2, 3, 4; Football 4: ...tel I
Track 4; Camera Club.








Helen Elizabeth Hall
Colon
"Prim, proper, and precise."
Parrakeer 1.








Katheryn Jane Hall
Canal Zone
"Patient endurance is godlike."


June Frieda Hambelton
Columbus, Ohio
"Put on her garments of gla'ness."
Softball 1, 2. 3, 4; Volleyball 1,
2, 3. 4; Bowling 1, 2. 3 4; Tennis
1, 2, 3, 4; Pep Squad 3. 4; G. A.
A. 3, 4; "Three Day's of Gracie."




James Manual Harness
Fort Monroe, Virginia
"Formed on the good oid p'an, a true
ar;d brave and dou artgo honest
man.
Hampton High, Va.; Phoebus High.
Va.; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1,
2. 3, 4. Softball 1, 2; Basketball 2,
3; Baseball 2; Student Association re-
presentative 2; Secretary treasurer 3;
"Dorothy Vernon of Haden Hall."





Ewart Gladstone Harvey
Virginia
"lie is a little chimney and heated in
a moment."
Glen Allen High School; Softball
4; Swimming 4.







Florence LeRoy Henry
Washington, D. C.
"Happy am I and from cire I'm free."
San Francisco Girl's High School;
Glee Club 4.







Julio Hernandez
China
"Large is his bounty, and his soul
sincere,.
Baseball 1, 2; Softball 3, 4; Basket-
ball 2, 3. 4; Tennis 4.






Ralph Henriquez
Panama
"M'y heart is as true as steel."
Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Swim-
ming 1. 2; Tennis 1, 2. Softball 2.
3, 4; "Tropical Night"; "Lambauta.















Robert C. Herrington
Canal Zone

"To know how to hids one's ability
ts great skill."







Maxine Harriet Schoeffler
Hilbert
Brooklyn, New York
"A peppy little piece of humanity."
Thomas Jefferson High ?-:hiool.
Tta... Orchestra 1; Parrakeet Quill
and Sc:roll 4.





June Marie Holcomb
New Orleans

"With a smile on her face and a
gleam in her eye."
Swimming 1, 2, 3; Softball 1, 3;
Water Polo 3; Spanish Club 1; "Hung
Jury"; Pep Squad.





Marion Leslie Horter
Phillipsbury, Pennsylvania
"So sweet war her ... *,,rai.'i'f.iw.
she could not be ,*"te.
Volleyball 1; Swimming 3; Parra.
keet 4.







Jack Hutchings
Panama

"Nature creates merit and fortune
brings it into play."
Tennis; Fr-.,ibll Basketball 3, 4;
Golf 3, 4; Ba.:tbill






Dorothy Catherine Irish
Canal Zone
"A pleasing countenance is no slight
advantage,"
Swimming.


Tomas Humberto Jacome
Panama
I, u.c 'In -rtNa 1 .ell unlsll h.
if.. ', hrndirf r nl.id i h rit shhbj il'
\ r i r Po:. 2 ; Bktlerball Pres
id-ni oi Spinh Club i






Andree Jerome
Paris. France
"A ,i ri it .J a h/lipr rl a la~ ""
'rieivb.l' Vo|leball I 2 B.kA ei-
ballI Ttnn,-. I BoalIne I. Glee
Club .





Alvin Johnson
Nebraska

"Anid 't' tja ..il' al .'It-h I l llrlrici
He ,.'' *
H e , v 1 t ,. a a tj r _r d ms, o a ,'s. "
GiIII, Hbh Schiojl -in Frmncro
( mtr ( Club 4 Srudet CA-,uncil 3.
4; Tenr. I





Helen Elizabeth Johnson
Cristobal, Canal Zone
"1 t.C0. ".r .t v.en e l OI *1. o0

Glee Club I. Sc.ph.:.more secretary





John Francis Kain
Canal Zone
e'Hr ,. .cfr..nl aPod ,lth5re and
ulel pri_ i.
Si Mhrji B; : HeV. F.c.iball .
i- B.-tbill I 2 i Biktiball I.
- 4. Tenni I 4 SAloDai] I Track
4 S.-:,r I B (.lub i. Cr-,co
d,il lilr jul'u ( a j *F Tfree
Da; of Griio Geie Llub 1. Or.
cherIt




Ruby L. Kent
Ancon
"'D ior i J tt,:lr a.lite t~
r t 'ie J.
Biology tlub 2 Swimming 2,
3. 4 Glee lub I 2














Donald Kendall
Washington, D. C.,
"It is not position but mind that
I want."
Rcerm' H;h Sh. .1 N'ewport, R.
I.; Q..,r H,i'i si'h : I Quantico,
Va




Dorothy Janet Koperski
Canal Zone
"She is young, wise, fair,--in these
to anture she's immediate heir."
Golf; Softball 3, 4; Volleyball 3,
4; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming 3;
Little Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4: Glee Club
1. 2, 3, 4; Studtnt Association 4;
"Merchant of Venice"; "Dirty Hands";
"All At Sea"; "Crocodile Isle";
"Gyp y Rover."




Virginia lola Krueger
Canal Zone
"Her gentleness, her srfi manners, all
who saw admired."
Mississippi 2. 3; Glee Club 1, 2,
3, 4.






Beatrice Merrit Lawson
Camp Merritt, New Jersey
"Let patience have her perfect work."
Glee Club 1; Operetta; "Crocodile
Isle."





Daphne Lewis
Canal Zone
"Right brisk is she, and full of
spirit."
Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1.
2, 3, 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Bowling
1, 2, 3, 4; Archery 1, 2. 3, 4; Glee
Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Little Theatre 4;
Parrakeet 4; "Elizabeth's young Man";
"Gypsy Rover"; "All At Sea."




John William Logsdon
Canal Zone
"Bashfulness is an enemy to poverty."
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2,
3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; "B" Club;
Band 1, 2; tennis 3. '.


Joseph Ludlum
New York
"I will go meet ith ladies."
Marion H 1, K-r.t-.-, Softball 2,
3, 4; Watcr i, I Swimming.







Margo MacKenzie
Texas
"Graceful and useful in at! she does."
lawton High School. Oklahoma;
Golf 4; Zonian 4; Quill and Scroll.






Susanne Marshall
Chicago, Illinois
"A deimure and studious girl."
Basketball 1; Vollerball 1; Soft-
ball 1: Backgammon I: Swimming
1, 2; Zonian 4; Quill and Scroll.






Albert Mathon
Connecticut
"Why worry over trifles."
Water Polo 1, 2, 3; Swimming 1,
2, 3, 4; Softball 3, 4; Soccer 1.







Donald Arthur McCaslin
Canal Zone
"A little bit goes a l( ng way."
Softball 1, 2; Football 1, 2; Swim-
ming 1, 2, 3. 4; Band 1, 2; Or-
chestra 4; Little Theatre Orchestra 4;
Zonian Staff; Tennis 3, 4.





Jane McCaw
Missouri
"Of softest manners, unaffected mind,
lover of peace and friend of
mankind."''
Holy Cross idrmn. ""'il h;nr .,
D. C.; Parrakeet % l',iti ..rr I lbt














Betty Jane McKenzie
Duncannon. Pennsylvania
"How sweet and gracioum."
Student Association Representative, 38.







Ellen Elizabeth Mead
Canal Zone
'"With heart and han4 both open
and free."
Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4: Swimming
2, 3, 4; Softball 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1.








Britta Ann Merill
Camp Custer, Michigan
"Great in all things but stature."







Macon Craig Michaux
Washington, D. C.
"He has a head to contrive, a tongue
to persuade, and a hand to execute
any mischief.'
Orchestra 2 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3,
4; Football 2, 3, 4; Swimming 1. 2,
3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2,
3, 4.





Judith Miro
Panama
"Why should life all labor be?"
Spanish Club 3, 4; Archery 3; Par-
rakeee 4.






Beatrice Marie Monsanto
Balboa
"So I told them in rhyme,
For of rhymes I had store."
Glee Club 1; Volleyball 1; Soft-
ball.


John Montayne
Pennsylvania
'Tbe J.cp.t r r.,tri nt lealt Jl,.
B ,k: ibj'l I 2 '. Baseball
2 4 SolrbjII I S crer I







la May Montgomery
Winnipeg, Canada
rr ;1 t .- f, oj L ', plea.

r', .
la'P..







Earl Mullins
Noith Carol;na
"'' *l"e i., tee ',t'tl,' .IJd J cli"'

Srmm.,n 2 4: Ba.kcrball 4,
S.Tball I 2 k B lub 4






Norine Nash
Ancon, Cana! Zone
"Fi ..'rc di' hAppr. 1..1 .osri. .i
I ,r .n ir, ,~a Ot









Lorna Nelson
New York
"Her lurl.ri. I ni.r k&te
UL'na l lt jll .d a n. '. "'
Draper Hijh School Nte Y.:.rl
Psrrakeetl





John Thomas O'Donnell
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
' NIothbng sI rr~.sbl.r to a ruling
hAart. '
Biebell 1 Sort all I 2 n 4
fI...iba ll I 2 : 4 S lImming I 2
N Merchant r \'enice Lairle Thea
ntl 1















Marion Orr
Ancon, C. Z.
"She has a friendly nature."
Biology Club 2, 3, 4.







Albert Palacio
Panama
"Then doth nature show her plan
When the world has fond a man."
Chemistry Club.








Bessie Lee Phillips
Canal Zone
"They that sow in tea, shall reap
in joy."








Eileen Phillips
Panama
"Speech is great bht silence is
greater."







Roy S. Phillips
Tennessee
"With books and studies he is at
ease."
Cristobal H.iI, School; Football 3,
4; Baseball i. Basketball 3, 4.







Dolores Sylvester Pimento
Paraiso, Canal Zone
"She is gay and gladsome."
Glee Club 2, 3; Softball, Swim-
ming; Volleyball.


Guillermina Ponce
Panama
"Life is not life at all without

Professional School; Glee Club 4;
Sl:anish Club 4.






Franklin Dorsev Price
Ecuador
"Another specimen ol contented
a tsfaction."
Julius Caesar; Biolo", Club 2, 3,
4; Chemistry Club 3.





James Ridge
Canal Zone
"The great end of life ii not
knowledge but aLtion.'"
Golf 1 2, 3. 4; Tennis 1. 2, 3,
4; Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4; Football
2, 3, 4; "B Club ., 4; Glee Club
1; Pep Sqi ad 2: Quill and Scroll 4;
Farrakeet 4.




Anne Carey Riggs
Washington, D. C.
"Her ro ie was reer so!t, gentle, and
low, an excellent thing in uoman."
Brownsville High. Texas: Chnmi(rr"
3. 4; Edit r Zon.an 4; Qu.l[I ,-.d
Scroll.




Jeanne Rocker
Canal Zone
"Her irrcprersible gayer~ ii the cause
of her popularity."
Volleyball 3, 4; Band 3. 4; Or-
chestra 3. 4: Student Association 1;
Pep Squad i: Three P- of Gracie;
The Fool; Eyes of Tli. Meet the
Missus; Hung Jury, Poor Old T..i
Those Immortal Lovers. Speech
test: Swimming 1, 2, 3,. 4; The Va-
lient.




Carlos R. Rodriguez
Panama
"His word burned like a lamp."
Parrakeet 4: Spanish Club 2, 3, 4;
Quill and Scroll 4.


6 I













Juanita Margaret Rosson
Canal Zone
"My life is like a stroll along the
beach."
B;clo&g Club 2, 3, 4; Glee Club
3, 1





Bette Lou Shearer
Washington, D. C.
"By far the best proof is experience."
Austin High, Texas; Girl's High,
Georgia; Commercial High; Parra-
keet 4.




Warren Harding Sherwood
Brooklyn, New York
"Content is better than riches."
Softball 3. 4; Football 3, 4; Base-
ball 2. 3, 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4; Basket-
ball 3, 4.







Douglas Sidney Smith
New York
"Why aren't they all contented like
me?"
Football 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2;
Track 1; "B" Club, Glee Club; Base-
ball 1, 2, 3; Little Theatre.






James Edward Smith
Panama
"Still you keep o' the windy side of
the law."
St. Mary's High, Berkeley, Cali-
fornia; Photography.







Marion Ellen Devore
New York
"She is gay and gladsome."


It
k4 :h,


Ernesto Garcia Soils
Panama
"Sticlirf i Eold n."
Centro Pollrrtn'co E'p.rhol, Madrid,
Sp:.n Spjnh C.lub -i, Srudent
A',otiaron 4






Joseph Robert Snyder
Newark. New Jersey
"C i,,zI ~V. .. Ike r 'd uaf on
II i Lit,. '
B ball I 2 r, FU.rball I 2
3, 4 Ba ktrbi I 2 S miT .
mitp I 2 4






Graciela Spano
Havana, Cuba
"To bet ,L ',,,.e Ya.z ., r r' S .

Spani:h (lub 4 GIL- Club 4






John S. Sullivan
Washington, D. C.
"Th -.,', l i,,., ,.s it, e cr.
M'nhuimrr Hieh Schcol K1jni,
F;. .i ll P.I ,-. Threr R in ei B .i ker
jll Zc.ni3n.







Thomas A. Symington Jr.
California
"I uit l; '.....rd for t bet.erei

Tc.me School NMjrsijnJ, Carrmra
Club 4, Juliu-. _aeC ir






Audrey E. Taber
Balboa
"C, ,leil lauAghter .iti1jej i a

G:ee Club i. 2 3 4 Crocodltc
Isle; All At Sea. \'oll- bill I 2, .
4; Soltbill I 2 1 4 G A .A 4













David H. Tiger
Camden, N J.
"He was six feet o' man, A-I clear
grit an' human n4tur'."
Joe Brown Jr. High, Atlanta, Ga.;
Boy's H.gh School; Tennis 4; Track
2, 3; Camera Club; Biology Club.







Milton Lee Turner
Plant City, Florida
"Thought is deeper than all speech."
Softball 4; Basketball 4.





Cornilia Elizabeth
Van Siclen
Balboa, Canal Zone
"Good humor is the health of the
soul."
Softball 1; Volleyball :1 Archery
2, 3; Bowling 1, 2, 3; Swimming 2,
3: Tennis 1, 2; Per S.-. 1 2; Biology
Club 2; Spanish '.lutb Little Thea-
tre; Parrakeet 1, 2, 4.





Rusell Wells
North Carolina
"What better fare than well content."
Farfetterville High Scliool.







Catherine Frances Whelan
Canal Zone
"Mirth makes the banquet: sweet."
Baseball 2, 3, 4.







Peggy White
Canal Zone
"Speak to the earth, and it shall
teach thee."
Swimming 1, 2. 3, 4; Volleyball
2, 3, 4; Archery 3; Softball 1, 2;
Biology Club.


James Wood
Canal Zone
"Nothing great was *: er achieved
without enthusia-m."
Football 2, 3; Softball 2, 4; Base-
ball 3; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Parra-
kert 4.






Ben Yohros
Brooklyn, N. Y.
"I like work: it fascinated me. \
I can sit and look at it for hours."
Swimming 3, 4.








Dorothy Ruth Young
Chicago, Illinois
"I tackle things as they come."
Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4






James Young
Maryland
"Rare compound of alblity, frolic,
and fun."
Softball 1, 2, 4; Water Polo 1, 2.
3, 4; Baseball 3; Soccer 1, 2; Foot-
ball 2, 3.






Isolda Myers Jorge
Panama
"As faithful as Old Faithful."
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4.







Angus Matheney
Alaska
"Let us have wine and i. 'i..
mirth and laughter.
Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4; Water Polo
2. 3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Foot-
ball 2, 3; Basketball 2. 3; Soccer 1;
Tennis 1, 4; Crocodile Isle.








Vera Helene Fuller Polly Perkins
Ancon, Canal Zone California
"She bas a merry, good nature." ,e .~' Mrd it pps ihj.gkr.
E.oal in 1, 2 Spir.;b Club 1; \W hirir Linion Hilh Californi
Tenni~ I 2; Simmiing I, 2, 3. Sa.mming punishh Club Pirrakeer
Junior Cla" Secrentr)

Emilio Madrigal
Canal Zone William Henry Cox
Point Pleasant, West Va.
"Without danger, the game grows
cold."'' "l o" .. s .
Softball 1, 2; Football 2, 3, 4; Pc.]in Plea,:n r I PE,.ba'l F..-i.
Soccer 1; Baseball 1. 2, 3, 4; Track b-ll TrlJk. bakerbIll. S.l'bill
1. 2, 3, 4; Bikecibill 1, 2, 3, 4;
"B" Club 2, 3, 4; Swimming 1.


CLASS PROPHECY


D EAR Diary:
I'm so happy! DONALD KENDALL,rhat nice health officer, finally lifted my quaran-
tine and I'm mumpless once more. To make it complete, PHILIP ERBE. the Eastern
Union boy, brought a telegram from MILTON TURNER, inviting me on a get-together cruise
to Panama, in honor of our 10th Graduation Anniversary.
The first persons I saw, once aboard, were LULA LaVALLE, famous movie star, in reality
none other than BEBE MONSANTO, and PEGGY WHITE who has made a name for herself
as torch singer at Beechnut Grove.
I was secretly pleased at the 45-minutes delay for dinner i my figure you know)i while the
cooks, JUANITA RUSSON and BEVERLY COMLEY, argued as to whether there were 200
or 300 calories in 3 raisins. During the argummn a hunger riot was in full suing in the engi-
neer's mess and I saw RALPH HENRIQUEZ beating the third assistant bilge wiper. BEN
YOHROS, over the head with a catsup bottle.
We are now well out at sea and it is growing late, and so to bed.
June 20, 19-9
We docked at Cristobal just as the whistle on the Cristobal laundry announced noon and
skidded down the gangplank into the waiting fleet of caramertas on ned by that ardent follower
of horses, HARRY DOWELL.
As we started down the street, we stopped at "La Peritte Pris', owned and managed by
M'sieu Le Twink BOWEN, and watched models MARY CRYAN and SHERRY AUSTIN
display the new crinkle-proof cellophane bathing suit created by JOSEPHINE BLANTON.
Meanwhile the men chatted with MAURICE FITZGERALD, famous manufacturer of the Am-
ericanized Hawaiian shirt. In his employ are designers ALICE and MINERVA CALABREVES.
DAVID TIGER and FERNANDO FOSTER model his shirts, uhich are advertised in JEAN
DeMOTT's monthly magazine "What The Well-dressed Male Should Wear." Jean has ER-
NESTO SOLIS (public enemy number 1246 and his moll FLORENCE HENRY. gunning
for CARLOS RODRIGUEZ and JIMMY RIDGE, her competitors, who edit "What The Well-
dressed Woman Should Wear." Policemen EWART HARVEY and WARREN SHERWOOD
told us that they had just captured the two, double handed, and taken them before Judge JIM
GARDNER who is still trying to convince them that they should reform by attending JAMES
YOUNG, ANGUS MATHENEY and Sister GARLAND AVERA'S revival meetings
As we left the store a popsicle vender, TOMAS JACOME rollerskated by. All patronized -
him, with the exception of Captain Turner who wasted his rime bargaining with chiva driver
RICHARD DODSON and trolley car owner ROBERT HERRINGTON to find who would
drive us across the Isthmus the cheapest. We decided upon the trolley car. The first stop was
the city of Frijoles where Mayor MACON MICHAUX led the welcoming committee com-
posed of flower girls DOROTHY GODFREY and OLGA AROSEMENA. JOE LUDLUM
presented the golden key, valued at 5 00.12 by pawnbroker ALBERT PALACIO. JOE hasn't
turned up yet with the key.
In Gamboa we found MARJORIE DENNIS, who owns and operates the "MARGIE"
beauty salon. In her employ are KATHRYN and HELEN HALL, manicurists, and MAUDE
BRUCE. MAUDE was very busy giving TOMMY SYMINGTON a lovely "dreame" per-
manent.







Passing the Rocka Breaka Smilla fraternity house, we saw JOHN "GORILLA" GAL-
LIVAN, president of Gamboa State University, leading the student body in their theme song,
"Whistle While You Work."
The next stop was the "Rainbow Roof Garden" where we heard "Jitterbug" JANE Mc-
CAW and her superswing band while the famous dance-team of DEVENEAU and HARNESS
rendered a modern version of the Carioca.
June 21, 1949
I don't remember the name of the Hotel we stayed at last night, but we were awakened
by a call from switchboard operator VIRGINIA THORNTON, informing us that muleteer
EARL MULLINS was waiting below to transport us to Obispo, the well-known winter resort.
Halfway there, we interrupted a dramatic scene between ANNE RIGGS and BILL LOGSDEN,
on location with the Panama Snapshots Corporation. After apologizing to director TACK O'-
DONNELL we continued on our way Imagine my surprise finding DORIS BROTHERSON
doing the family wash on the banks of the Chagres!
Obispo at last! While eating HORTER'S "HONEY-KIST" ICE cream at the Chagres
pavilion owned by IRENE and DORIS CHAN, MARION ORR presented us with some orchids
with the compliments of the management. Meanwhile the floorshow began, and Mistress of
Ceremonies MARTHA RAY DUNCAN introduced the "Three B's" JEANNE BONWELL,
BILLIE BOWEN, and DORIS BRADFORD, singing JIMMY WOOD'S new blue song, "Sky
Blue Pink."
Hearing a loud roar, we ran to the window and watched AUDREY TABER, aviatrix,
make a beautiful four-point landing Seeing us, she offered us a ride to Balboa. Once in the
air everyone smiled trustingly, but little Audrey just laughed and laughed because she knew
this was her first flight
We were discharged from JOHN SULLIVAN'S Hospital today. We hated to leave
JIMMY SMITH, still suffering from a severe case of inferiority complex. We said goodbye
to DAPHNE LEWIS, the night nurse who always gets mixed up in her schedule, and cele-
brated our release by going to JANET KOPERSKI'S golf club, "Thorn Turf." Here we amused
ourselves by watching golf pro THELMA FAYARD trying to teach the elements of golf to
JACK HUTCHINGS, while sipping JUNE HOLCOMB'S specialty, marshmallow fluff. Driv-
ing by in his own invention, the Wellsmobile, (it runs on liquid sunshine) RUSSEl I. WELLS,
invited us to go with him to a party. We accepted and soon found ourselves in front of BAU-
MAN'S Beef Club. (This night spot boasts the only floor show trained in the Goofy Athletic
Association, each specimen guaranteed muscle-bound.) How amazed we were to see those
three super-play-boys of "J" Street, RICHARD BRISLAWN, JULIO HERNANDEZ, and
ROY PHILLIPS being thrown out bodily for flirting with Cigarette Girl, BETTY McKENZIE.
(Kelly does all her own bouncing.) When we entered the club, we saw the members of the
Henpecked Husbands Club banquetting under the table and hunting for dimes. Master of
the hunt was JACK GAMBLE chairman of the entertainment committee.
FULVIA AROSEMENA showed us to a table close (too close) to ALVIN JOHNSON'S
Kapok Klub orchestra, the red-hottest band north of the North Pole.
Never a dull moment! With an ear-splitting crash, "Two-Gun JOHN MONTANYE
entered, with his trusty 1.45 squirt guns frothing at the barrels. I came along home, and so
to bed.
July 11, 1949
I was awakened at exactly 7:361,' a. m. this morning by newspaper girl DOROTHY
IRISH yelling "Extra"! Extra! All about the drug robbery Montanye robs a slot machine in
JUDITH MIRO'S drug store!" It was the early morning edition of the "Daily Scribble",
edited by MAXINE HILBERT.
After breakfast, prepared by Chef EMILIO MADRIGAL, we went to the circus, which
had just come down from the States under the management of JOHN "BOBO" KAIN
Upon arriving, we saw ANDREE JEROME, BEATRICE LAWSON, and MARGO
MACKENZIE doing the hula at a sideshow, while BERT SHELTON was vigorously trying to
drum up sales. A blast from bugle-blower JOE SNYDER announced that the big show was
going to start, so we bought our ticket from GRACIELA SPANO and hurried into the tent.
Ring leader ALBERT MATHON, attracted our attention to the famed equestrian twins,
BESSIE PHILLIPS and EILEEN PHILLIPS. Meanwhile JUNE HAMBELTON was executing
(this one will kill you) her famous triple back somersault. Later, as we drew near to DOLO-
RES PIMENTO the bearded lady, we noticed BETTE SHEARER, the only sword-swallowing
woman in the world. Bette started on bolos when she was a senior in B. H. S.
We arrived at the Wild West show just in time to see LORNA NELSON leading the
parade astride a beautiful white mule of about twenty-five years. RUBY KENT, SUZANNE







MARSHALL, and ILA MONTGON!LRY soon rode out to demonstrate the art of bull-dozing.
Ruby was first. She hit the bull so hard that she killed it, and, since they had only one bull, the
act ended. Next on the program was a bareback race between ISOLDA Nt'ERS and ELLEN
MEAD. Due to the fact that Isolda's horse slipped and sprained Its eyebrow in the home stretch
Ellen took the cake, donated by HELENE FULLER'S bakery.
July 12, 1949
Our good ship, "Stagnation," arrived here from the other side today, piloted by IOAQUIN
CRUZ. RUTH CONNER and BRITTA MERRILL rode up on their scoorer-bikes to deliver
a cactus to BLANCHE ADLER, thr stewardess. Presently, dinner. When the big rush was
over, FRED HULDTQUIST climbed down from the chandelier and began serving.
A cry of "man overboard" soon had everyone hugging the rail There in the water was
DOROTHY YOUNG swimming around with her little pekinese. CATHERINE WHELAN,
famous aquatic star, who had just won a prize for swimming the Hellespont, died in and
saved the dog.
July 1", 1919
We docked at San Francisco this morning MARION SMITH. Mayor of Obispo, has
just wired that G-Woman GUILLERMINA PONCE, has just captured Ludlum and the golden
key.

CLASS WILL

BRITTA MERRILL leaves her immense height to MAYBELLE PERKINS
JUDITH MIRO leaves journalism to MR. COLLINGE.
BEATRICE MONSANTO leaves her ability to speak before the class to BETTY
SUTHERLAND.
ILA MONTGOMERY leaves ALLAN MONSANTO to GRACE SCHACK.
ISOLDA MYERS leaves her voice to MARY JANE PHILLIPS.
LORNA NELSON leaves her smart ideas in making and designing clothes to JANE TOMP-
KINS.
MARION ORR leaves her studious air to SHIRLEY NELSON.
BESSIE and EILEEN PHILLIPS leave B. H. S. to JULIUS CHANEY, with all the trimmings.
DOLORES PIMENTO leaves her shorthand medals to DOROTHY PARISH.
DAVID TIGER leaves his tigerish temperament to BARBARA HAYDEN.
MILTON TURNER leaves FRIJOLES to the P. R. R.
RUSSELL WELLS leaves his effervescing personality to "pop".
JAMES WOOD leaves his large vocabulary to WILLIAM HYDE.
BEN YOHROS leaves business correspondence to JA .1ES McGAHHEY.
JAMES YOUNG leaves his packard to JOHN KILEY.
ANNE RIGGS leaves BILL COX to the highest bidder.
GRACIELA SPANO leaves her resemblance to SONJA HENIE to SHIRLEY SASSO.
MARION SMITH leaves her sweet smile to DORA SHELTON
VIRGINIA THORNTON leaves her office hours to MARY MARCH.
CORNELIA VAN SICLEN leaves her ability to guzzle cokes to RITA and MARGARET
DORAN.
CATHERINE WHELAN leaves her slow but sure smile to EVELIA VELARDE.
DOROTHY YOUNG leaves her bright eyes to OTIS MYERS
NORINE NASH leaves her love for B. H. S. to SARA SHYTLE.
JEAN DeMOTT leaves her library job to WILLIAM MONZON.
We've tried and tried to get JOHN GALLIVAN to leave BILLIE BOWEN to somebody, but
he just won't do it.
WALLACE DYER leaves his diet to BARBARA STOUT, DICK LITTLE, and NEAL SMALL.
MADE BRUCE leaves her skates to GRACE McCASLIN.
PAUL DISHAROON leaves his careful driving to JOE YOUNG.
JACK HUTCHINGS leaves all his unpaid golf dues to ANN WARNER.
FRANCIS CRYAN leaves his looks to MIATHEW CRYAN.
JANET KOPERSKI leaves her collection of pennies to HARRY HATCH. minus inheritance
tax.
JIM GARDNER leaves his Southern accent and stiff collars to CARLYLE HARVEY.
JIMMY HARNESS leaves his stratosphere nose to JOE BURGOON.
MARTHA DUNCAN leaves her basso profundo to TOM LINDO.
FRED HULDTQUIST leaves the presidential selt to any sucker.
DORSEY PRICE leaves "that Latin air" to VINCENT "Heart Render" BRADLEY.







DAVID BRUCE leaves his tales about Gloucester fishing boats to anyone who can swallow them.
JULIO HERNANDEZ and BOB HERRINGTON are jointly leaving their energy to BILLY
MON SANTO.
ALFRED "Chuso" CHASE leaves his cherubic countenance to ANNETTE EVERS.
MARJORIE DENNIS leaves her sophisticated manner to EILEEN FITZPATRICK.
RICHARD DODSON leaves his romantic escapades to BOB BURKLE.
MACON MICHAUX leaves his baseball ability to OSMOND AUSTIN.
FERNANDO "Sandino" FOSTER leaves his superiority complex to JOHN "Lefty" McGLADE.
SHERRY AUSTIN leaves her back homework to NETTIE ANDREWS.
MAURICE FITZGERALD leaves his broken spirit to MIKE DAILEY.
ROY DWELLE leaves his book "How to Make Friends in 10 Easy Lessons" to ANNE
CHIPMAN.
BILL LOGSDON leaves his basketball trunks to JOHN DAVIS.
THOMAS "Aloysius" SYMINGTON leaves his middle name to NORMAN MATLOWSKI.
ELLEN MEAD leaves her typing ability to JOHN CLARK.
ANDREE JEROME and VIRGINIA KRUEGER leave their medals for shagging to JOAN
RIDGE and ELVA REED.
DOROTHY IRISH leaves her impromptu vocabulary to AGNES AT INSON.
RUBY KENT leaves "Muggsy", her dog, to MARIA BORDT.
BEATRICE LAWSON leaves her sweet personality to DOROTHY KALAR.
DAPHNE LEWIS leaves her dancing to EILEEN MALONE.
MARGO MACKENZIE leaves her poster making to JEANNE McLAVY and MARGARET
SULLIVAN.
SUSANNE MARSHALL leaves the eighth period trigonometry class to LOLITA PROVOST.
PAUL BARNARD leaves his Boy Scout uniform to PORTER CRAWFORD.
THOMAS BENDER leaves his violin to GEORGE MAKIBBIN.
DONALD BOWEN leaves his "twinkle toes to JACK HAW.
JERRY DETAMORE leaves his way with the girls to WAYNE BARKER.
RICHARD BRISLAWN leaves his puny sense of humor to GORDON McCORMICK.
PHILIP ERBE leaves his gay air to JOHN UREY.
JACK GAMBLE leaves his blond hair to JOSEPH HAGGERTY.
PETE GREEN leaves his mysterious "L. B. Green Jr." to Detective WILLIAM SHERLOCK
to work on.
EWART HARVEY leaves his falsetto to FRANK ALOY.
RALPH HENRIQUEZ leaves his voice to FERNANDO TAPIA.
BLANCHE ADLER leaves her sweet disposition to MARGARET WHELAN.
FULVIA AROSEMENA leaves her "fulosophy" to ANNA VALDES.
OLGA AROSEMENA leaves her flowers to CECILIA SIMMS.
ELVA BAUMAN leaves her athletic prowess to NANCY NORTON.
JOSEPHINE BLANTON leaves he; knowledge of business arithmetic to CHRISTINA
AROSEMENA.
JEANNE BONWELL leaves her peaches and cream completion to DOLORES WELCH.
JUANITA ROSSON leaves her bus rides to ALICE MARINE.
GARLAND AVERA leaves her Zonian experience to JEAN KNICKERBOCKER.
JUNE HOLCOMB leaves her abundant nothings to EILEEN CRYAN.
MARION HORTER leaves her nickname "Honey" to MARGARET BRUGGE.
DORIS BRADFORD leaves her reserved manner to GERTRUDE McCONAGHY.
DORIS BROTHERSON leaves her lingo to PEEKO.
ALICE CALABREVES leaves her earrings to DOROTHY JACOB.
MINERVA CALABREVES leaves her ability to be everywhere unnoticed to her shadow.
DORIS CHAN leaves her viola to HELEN HAGEN.
IRENE CHAN leaves her painting ability to EDWARD CORRIGAN.
BEVERLY COMLEY leaves her ability to refrain from swearing on the golf course to the birdies.
RUTH CONNER leaves her blond hair to MURIEL EVANS.
MARY CRYAN leaves her gift of gab to LOUISE RATHGEBER.
POLLY PERKINS leaves her American birth, Cuban rearing, Spanish vocabulary, and South-
ern accent to anybody who thinks he can take it.
PATSY GETMAN leaves her finger nail polish to FRANCES WOODMAN.
DOROTHY GODFREY leaves her poems to SARA KEITH.
HELEN and KATHRYN HALL leave their sisterly love to EDWARD and HOWARD MOORE.
TOMAS JACOME leaves the Spanish club to HUGH NORRIS.
ALVIN JOHNSON leaves his ability to truck on down to HOWARD RHODES.
DONALD KENDALL leaves his way with the women to JOHN UREY.
JOSEPH LUDLUM leaves his chair balancing tactics to DALMA SALA.
EMILIO MADRIGAL leaves his athletic ability to NARCISO TALAVERA.







ANGUS MATHENEY leaves his "bajan" accent to ROBERT WERTZ.
ALBERT MATHON leaves his chemistry to PAT PATTERSON
BETTY McKENZIE leaves her grades to "ELA" ANDERSON.
JANE McCAW leaves her plumage to "PEEKO'.
THELMA FAYARD leaves her small feet to ELIZABETH HENRY.
JEANNE ROCKER leaves her acting ability to MARIE KEEGAN.
JOAQUIN CRUZ leaves his studious characteristics to his brother JAMES.
DONALD McCASLIN leaves his wine and women to JOE HUNT.
PEGGY WHITE and JOHN SILLIVAN leave their unusual names to ROSA PUTCHKOFF
and GEORGE GRAZIANI.
JACK O'DONNELL leaves his paper route to ANNE GREEN.
PHYLLIS DEVENEAU leaves her cast-off hair to the new batch of "scobie," and hopes ALICE
HAUGHTON will do likewise next year.
ALBERT PALACIO leaves his nickname "Stinky" to JOHN TOWERY.
DOUGLAS SMITH leaves his "five o'clock shadow to XEN HOSLER.
AUDREY TABER leaves her composure to ANITA STILSON.
BETTE SHEARER leaves her handwriting to the Junior boys.
BERT SHELTON leaves his public speaking ab'lry to EDWARD CORRIGAN.
WARREN SHERWOOD leaves his public speaking ability to EDWARD CORRIGAN.
BERT SHELTON leaves his flute to STANLEY HUNTER.
CLYDE ELLIS leaves his perfect diving form to JOHN FOLEY.
GUILLERMINA PONCE leaves her enormous height to JANE "TINY" STEVENS
EARL MULLINS leaves SHIRLEY SASSO to ALBERT MONGOLD.
JOHN MONTANYE leaves his alertness to AUBREY LEWIS.
ROY PHILLIPS leaves his sail boat to ROY SHUEY.
JAMES RIDGE leaves VERA HOWELL to CHARLEY but he prefers he would LEA'ER alone!
CHARLES RODRIGUEZ leaves his ability to write editorials to BETTY and MARTHA
BRADLEY.
ERNESTO SOLIS leaves MARIE ANTOINETTE to JOHNNY ANDERSON.
JOE SNYDER leaves his soda jerking to THOMAS ETCHBERGER.
JUNE HAMBELTON leaves her lackadaisical manner to GUY YOUNG.
FLORENCE HENRY leaves her lipstick to MARGARET KUNKEL.
MAXINE HILBERT leaves her bubbling personality to BARBARA MILLER.



CLASS HISTORY
MACON Michaux is now a well-known professor of physics in dear old Palooka College.
Incidentally, two years ago Professor Michaux had a most interesting experience. "It
was the year 1970. I was conducting a series of experiments on the reversal of time.
I had just completed the instrument and was ready for the acid test. During the finai check-up,
one of my colleagues accidently threw the switch. The following moments will live with me
forever as the most exciting in my life. The machine hummed, rubes glowed, and then-blooey!
I was lost in the night of eternity. I saw before me scenes of happy days in high school
with the class of '39.
"I saw my freshman classmates sticking tacks on seats, throwing paper wads and airplanes.
I saw "Bobo" Kain on the stage made up as a darky in the operetta "Crocodile Island." Then,
Emilio "Maga" Madrigal was winning honors for our first year in high school, showing his
heels to the rest of the 440 runners .
"Then I saw myself looking in the Parrakeet for the list of honor roll members and it
never failed to list a few of my friends. At the dances the young upstarts were beginning their
social whirls. I remember when I was a freshman. I was just beginning to enter into the
activities offered us, sometimes becoming brave enough to ask a girl to one of the dances,
even trying out for plays. The students who couldn't be discouraged by not being given leads
the first time they tried out for a play, kept going, and were given diamond masques, or at
least had the honor of going to the Little Theatre banquet. In May, 1936, the second Little
Theatre banquet was given for the first time at the Tivoli Hotel.
"I remember when the junior college was completed, and we held the distinction of be-
ing the first freshman group having classes there.
"In my sophomore year I became a little better acquainted with the activities offered, and
tried harder to participate in them. I remember seeing "Wappin' Wharf", when Red Joe
was supposed to shoot a gun and it wasn't loaded. And also seeing "The Fool," Merchant of

26








Venice," and the operetta "All At Sea." Then there was a Leap Year masquerade dance at the
Tivoli and we boys surely got a treat All we had to do was sit by the telephone at home and
wait for a girl to date us. The baby dance was a prize event. Every person was required to
come in costume-and afterwards we danced to the Cotton Club orchestra. In my sophomore
year I was quite proud of finally reaching the last years in high school and was no longer afraid
to participate in any activity offered.
"In my junior year I was interested in all of the goings on about the school and espe-
cially in class meetings. Before this year I would try to say something at a class meeting, but
the words just wouldn't come out and my knees became very shaky. Now this was no longer
true. This year Dr. George Howard substituted for Dr. Fred Hosler. Health class were given
to the seniors for the first time by Dr. George Eugene. I remember when they started
handing out identification cards for us to drag along when we went to the movies, but it
didn't work at all.
"Then this year the 'B' club and the G. A. A. were first started. The 'B' club was the
club opened to outstanding boy athletes, and the G. A. A. was for the girls. These two clubs
began giving luncheons and dances, which I enjoyed a great deal. Both clubs had banquets at
the end of the year. The 'B' club had their banquet at the Yacht Club, where the) gave out
awards to the winners in all sports. Then af:er the banquet they intended to dance to a
nickelodion. The G. A. A. had their banquet at the Tivoli Hotel and had both old and new
members attending. Oh yes, I will never forget the softball games between these two clubs
held at Razzberry Park, and how the 'B' Club defeated the G. A. A.'s. I couldn't leave out the
candy sale the seniors gave in the halls, and how I scraped up all my pennies to buy some.
My old friend, Johnny Gallivan, was in an orchestra called the 'Harms', composed of high
school students. This year my music teachers were changed from Mrs. Helen Baker to Mr. Neil
Branstetter.
"Boy, was I sore when the Zonians came out! Our junior pictures looked as though we
were skinned rars instead of people The clubhouse play, "The Eyes of Tlaloc", in which
Jeanne Rocker let out a hair-stander-upper of a screech, has left an indelible mark on my
memory. Of the many Little Theatre plays, "Hung Jury" and "Julius Caesar" were unforget-
able. One of the class artists received a letter of acknowledgment and approval of a portrait.
The artist was Irene Chan and the Duches of Windsor was her subject. Many a titter and guffaw
went thru the crowd that watched the traditional juniors vs. seniors tug-of-war, in which the
grunting juniors were dragged through the traditional fire-hose stream in the traditionally
approved manner (in accordance with the tradition of B. H. S.). That year the Junior-Senior
banquet was pretty good. During the breezy faculty speeches, Dorsey Price was seen playing
tit-tat-toe on the table cloth, Patsy Getman playing pick-up sticks with the surplus silverware,
and Roy Dwelle playing eeny, meeny, meiny, moe to choose which tool to eat with. You must
never never repeat this, but guess who tried to swipe several helpings of silverware? When
he arose from his seat they spilled out of his coat pocket.
"Now we were the high and mighty seniors; we had worked hard and had had lots of
fun.
"During vacation our B. H. S. Gymnasium was remodeled, and a new shop was built for
the boys. This year a new plan was made for commercial students, thus changing the schedules
of many seniors who had planned to take one year of shorthand. The Girl Mariners were or-
ganized to show the salty Sea Scouts how it is done. After three hectic years of building, the Sea
Scouts completed a land boat which they used as their headquarters. A general vote was held
in our junior year to try to replace scobying with a field day. The freshmen were scobied the
next year. Later on we gave them skull caps to tip to upperclassmen and a whackem pole
to salute. To relieve personal tension, a welcome dance was held after the first day of school.
It was well attended by upperclassmen, but the frosh were scarce. All Student Association
members were supposed to receive a copy of 'The Murphys Mind Their Manners.'
I remember when we had a big election for our class officers. Fred Huldtquist was re-
elected president. We had the Security Parry which went around putting up posters. Oh yes, we
took first aid and used to go down to Doctor Eugene's office and get special bandaging
lessons. I remember when I went to that dance at the Tivoli on Hallowe'en. That was a
grand dance! But how could we ever forget the play 'Three Days of Gracie' and how little
Bijou the playful pup almost stole the show! Our orchestra played for that play and was be-
coming bigger and better all the time.
"And then my machine quit on me and back I came to the present. All very, very interest-
ing. Very interesting indeed! "the professor concludes, mumbling into his beard.








ROGUES' GALLERY


NAME
Blanche Adler
Fulvia Arosemena
Olga Arosemena
Garland Avera
Sherry Austin
Elva Bauman
Josephine Blanton
Jeanne Bonwell
Billie Bowen
Doris Bradford
Doris Brotherson
Maude Bruce

David Bruce
Paul Barnard
Roy Boggs
Thomas Bender
Donald Bowen
Alfred Chase
William Cox
Joaquin Cruz
Francis Cryan
Jerry Detamore
Paul Disharoon
Richard Dodson
Harry Dowell
Clyde Ellis
Wallace Dyer
Roy Dwelle
Phillip Erbe
Maurice Fitzgerald
Fernando Foster
John Gallivan
Jack Gamble
Peter Green
James Harness
Ewart Harvey
Julio Hernandez
Alice Calabreves
Minerva Calabreves
Doris Chan
Irene Chan
Beverly Comley
Ruth Conner
Mary Cryan
Jean DeMott
Marjorie Dennis
Phyllis Deveneau
Martha Duncan
Thelma Fayard
Helene Fuller

Patsy German
Dorothy Godfrey
Helen Hall
Kathryn Hall
June Hambelton
Florence Henry
Maxine Hilbert
June Holcomb
Marion Horter
Andree Jerome
Dorothy Irish
Ruby Kent
Janet Koperski
Virginia Krueger
Beatrice Lawson
Daphne Lewis

Margo MacKenzie
Susanne Marshall
Jane McCaw
Betty McKenzie


ALIAS

Blanchie
Negra
Olga
G. A.
Duchess
Kelly
Peggy
Bonnue
Weener
Doris
Tiny
Maudie

Dave
Pablo
Bugs
Tom
Twinkletoes
Chuso
Bill
Curly
Spider
Dets
Pabby
Dicker
Hare
Frank Buck
Train
Gigolo
Phil
Fitz
Sandino
Banana
Kid Rojo
Pete
Jim
Snookie
China
Callie
Minnie
Dody
Rene
Gassy
Alibi
Topper
Jeanie
Midge
Phil
Mopsy
Thel
Fooyer

Pat
Dot
Helen
Kay
Hambone
Flo
Max
Tuppy
Honey
Andy
Dot
Patsy
Kop
Ginger
Bee
Slew

Margo
Suzy
Peeko
Bet


IDENTIFICATIONN

Neat Dresi
Drling a car
Flowers in hair
Collecting gadgets
Red hair
That innocent look
Collection of loIe letters
Horseback riding
Johnny
That southern rwang
Talkaii'e
Shorthand -kill

Singing toice
Boy Scour:
'Bajan icerit
Violin
100's in businre rrrih
His guildw
Wise cracks
Arguing
Jallopy
Silence
Height
Man-abou i-owr.
His liking for hor'cr
Shoulder -hruteirng
His littleness
That userla.sl, geoee
Being ieriou
Patsy
Riding hi, bicycle
Billie
Witty
Photography
Playing the irunmprt
That accent
Girl-shy
Plodding
Always eillmng
Sweet rFtsonallt
Drawing.
Her ga) morod
Assortment of alibi
Chewing gum
Her diet
Braided hair
"Oh mjtrvClou' "
Her hair r,~les
Easy going manner
Her ability Ic do
nothing in a hjary
Pretty nails
Prim manner
Her quiet ways
Dilirent worker
That lall'
Perseverance
Her incesirsn talk
That strut'
Flitting around
Squeaky voice
Black hiir
Speed in raping
Her smile
Sweet d' poniion
Her plasianines
Her ab.lry to get ilLng
with everyone
Her art
Her head wear
Her size
Prim drcss


\ HEN OUT WILL BE

Luc l dretsmakrr
Foreign buyer
Owner of slower ga den
An old maid
Soda lerker
Nurse rra d
Arithmetic teacher
Married to a rich arm officer
Good houseurfe
Good ctenographer
Editor uf .oman page
Sorld s shorthand
sp-ed record holder
Capljan ofi a fishing boat
Siill .a Bo$ Scout
Jur the i ame
Jazz F'jyei-maibe

Ljd.e4 man
A hjnuted man
A preachtr
lunkmin
Riding around in trailer
Furnirtrre mover
Mhan -boi .a-cir'
Getirtg user iI
Jumping off cliffs
Reducing
Looking fur a gal
Reined
A he man
Third male on Date i fishing boat
Still trying to get in Annapolir
Gerring married
Sidl the Troupe plotogripher
Glad of it
Something
Gerring over II
Srtll plodding
Q.ie n hbe
Sull going
Great Arirri
Scomebc-d s cook
Secretai, in Ihe morgue
Shining sioei
A Sruin girl
Making a hoopie!
Buildng caitlei
Kindergarten teacher
MlanJufcrurer of unbreakable glasses
Author of How itr Acquire
a Southern Accent
MNari.curir
Teacher
Forced to talk
Talented musician
Baseball player
Tap dancer
W'ar Correrpcndent
Da, dreaming
Bill collect-:r
Frcnch maid
Allihator hunting
Tsping champ
Golf pru
' irh George
Baker
An old lashiuned itterbug

Unknown
Hat designer
Vorld famous
President ; wife.









ROGUES' GALLERY


NAME

Ellen Mead
Britta Merril
Judith Miro
Beatrice Monsanto
Ila Montgomery
Isolda Myers
Lorna Nelson
Norine Nash
Marion Orr
Bessie Phillips
Eileen Phillips
Ralph Henriquez
Jack Hutchings
Robert Herrington
Fred Huldtquist
James Gardner
Thomas Jacome
Alvin Johnson
John Kain
Donald Kendall
William Logsdon
Joe Ludlum
Emilio Madrigal
Angus Matheney
Albert Marhon
Donald McCaslin
Macon Michaux
Earl Mullins
John Montanye
Jack O'Donnell
Albert Palacio
Roy Phillips
Dorsey Price
James Ridge
Carlos Rodriguez
Bert Shelton
Douglas Smith
Dolores Pimento
Polly Perkins
Guillermo Ponce
Anne Riggs
Jeanne Rocker
Juanita Rossun
Graciela Spano
Bette Shearer
Marion Smith
Audrey Taber
Virginia Thornton
Cornelia Van Siclen
Catherine Whelan
Peggy White
Dorothy Young
James Smith

Ernesto Solis
Thomas Symington
Joe Snyder
John Sullivan
Warren Sherwood
David Tiger
Milton Turner
Russel Wells
James Wood
Ben Yohros
James Young


ALIAS

Betty
Small Fr)-
Chirela
Bebe
Monty
Solly
Larry
Rene
Dopey
Babe
Flip
Ralph
Hutch
Bob
Hokie
Charlie McCarthy
Tommy
Sobersides
Bobo
Don
Loggy
Ludy
Maga
Pesty
Al
Shorty
Speedy
Moon
Glass Arm
Reds
Tire
Doc
Chico
Horsecollar
Charlie
Jack
Doug
Dippy
P2

Pannie
Froggy-
Nita
Grace
Cuddles
Chubby
Little Audrey
Cinderella
Nealie
Catita
Peg
Dot
Windy

Chichi
Simple Symington
Joe
Pascuali
Russian
Dave
Beans
Wells
Jim
Ben
Jim


IDENTIFICATION

Just the way she is
Short skirts
Wink
Good speeches
Quietness
Independent qualities
Sweet smile
Happy ways
Scholar
That mananaa" fever
Demure
Himself
Golf
Hiding his ability
Friendliness
Stiff collars
Spanish club
S. A. President
Way with the gals
His old car
Solemnity in class meetings
Hunting
Sports
Getting into trouble
That moon-struck look
Heighth
Happy manner
Grin
Shyness
Red hair
Drawing
Quietness
History shark
Sports writing
Editing the Parraket
Flute
Dancing
Hair bows
Happy-go-lucky ways
Continual smile
Editor of the Zonian
Her winning ways
Girl Scout activities
Sonia Heinie features
Handwriting
Wedding ring
Her many questions
Her love affairs
Her witty personality
Pleasant manner
Her researching
Funny little smile
These tall tales!

Black hair
Knowing everything
Slowness
Personality
Boating
That sleeping position
Fishing
Can't say
Vocabulary
His business speeches
Junk


WHEN OUT WILL BE

Poet
Looking for Babe
Personality teacher
Soap box orator
Person of many words
Accommodating
Unchanged
Mannequin
Strll a scholar
A go-get-em!
Just about the same
Still himself
Bobby Jones III
Honor student
President of Fooland
Toy Manufacturer
Doctor
Full of pep
Teacher of this art
A butcher
Wiser
Taxidermist
Still sporting
Looking for a date
Hooked
Who knows?
Violin musician
Engineer
Flirting
Runner-up in the soap box derby
A nervous wreck
More outstanding
A preacher
Getting along
Having fun
Dentist
A different man
A-1 Steno
World famous
Owner of a chicken farm
Texan guide
Ina Ray Hutton II
Dietician
A Prima Donna
Jungle exploring
Still married
Number one answer girl
Assistant to Dr. Hosler
Hiking around the world
School secretary
Scientist
Just something
Forced to keep still
more than two seconds
Running a store
Brilliant
Soda jerker
Having a wonderful time
Canal Pilot
Bright and alert
Pescador
An acrobat
Writing a dictionary
An orator
Ain't a sayin
































































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JUNIORS










JUNIORS


Alloy, Frank
Anderson, John
Austin, Osmond
Barker, Wayne

Bradley, Vincent
Brown, William
Burgoon, Joseph

Burkle, Robert
Carries. Ruben

Cheney, Julius
Clark, John
Corrigan, Eddie

Corrigan, Edward

Covington, Albert
Crawford. Porter

Cryan, Mathew

DeCamp, Francis
Davis, John
Dailey, Michael
Erbe, Richard

Etchberger, Thomas

Foley, John
Grimm, Donald
Gaines, William

Graziani, George
Haggerty, Joseph

Harer, Leon
Harvey, Carlyle
Hatch, Harry
Haw, Jack

Hayden, James

Holford, Lawrence
Hosler, Xen
Hunt, Joe

Hunter, Stanley
Hyde, William
Kiley, John

Lewis, Aubrey
Lewis, John
Lindo, Thomas


Boys

Little. Richard
Lucy, Willard
Maduro, George
Makibbin, George

Matlowsky, Norman

McClain, Robert
McCormick, Gordon

McGahhey, James
McGlade, John

Midence, Raymond

Mongold, Albert
Monsanto, Allan

Monsanto, William

Moore, Edward
Moore, Howard

Myers. Otis
Morris, Hugh
Patterson, Pat

Presley. John
Quinrero, Edgard
Reedy, William

Rhodes, Howard

Sanchez, Luciano
Schnake, John

Seeley, Vernon
Sherlock, William

Small, Neal

Stemmer. Roland
Talavera, Anibal
Talavera, Narciso

Tapia, Fernando
Thomas. William
Tomey, William
Towery, John

Urey, John
Wainio. Robert
Wilcox, Arthur

Willet, Harold
Young, Guy
Young, Joe


Girls

Andrews, Nettie
Arosemena, Christina

Atkinson, Agnes
Bordt, Maria
Bradley, Betty

Bradley, Martha
Brugge, Margaret
Calvo, Gloriela

ChIpman, Anne
Cryan, Eileen

Davidson, Marilyn
Doran. Margaret
Doran, Rita

Dwyer, Reesanne
Evans, Muriel
Evers, Annette
Fitzpatrick, Eileen

Green, Ann
Hagen, Helen
Haughton, Alice
Hayden, Barbara

Henry, Elizabeth

Hernandez, Maria

Kalar, Dorothy
Keegan, Marie
Keith, Sara
Knickerbocker, Jeanne
Kunkel, Margaret
Lavinghouze, Barbara

Maldonado, Rosaura
Malone, Eileen
March, Mary
Marine, Alice
McCaslin, Grace

McConaghy, Gertrude


McLavy, Jeanne
Miller, Barbara

Nelson. Shirley
Norton, Nancy
Perkins, Marybelle

Phillips. Mary Jane
Provost Lolita

Putchkoff, Rosa
Ramey, Eloise
Rathgeber, Louise
Reed. Elva
Ridge. Joan

Sala, Dalma
Sasso. Shirley

Schack, Grace
Shytle, Sara
Schmidt, Mary
Shelton. Gloria
SKelton, Dora

Simms, Cecilia
Stevens, Jane
Stilson, Anita
Stout, Barbara
Sullivan, Margaret

Sutherland, Betty
Talavera, Francisca
Tompkins, Jane

Valdes, Ana
Velarde, Evelin

Warner, Ann
Weiss, Ruth
Welch, Dolores

Whelan. Margare*
Woodman. Frances







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SOPHOMORES


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SOPHOMORES


Abadi, Edward
Anderson, Norman
Arps, Billy
Bailey, Ted
Baldwin, Wallace
Barlow. Chester
Barr, John
Bishop, Raymond
Boisseau, Harvey
Bouche, Adrien
Calhoun. Crede
Carey, Robert
Chen, Marco
Colberg, Carlos
Coma, Fred
Comins, Clare
Corco Miguel
Crew, J. W.
DeLima, Rene
Dodson, William
Dugas, Norman
Etchberger, Billy
Fair, Charles
Ford, Alan
Fredette, Raymond
Gamble, Edward
Grey, James
Guerin. A. Earl
Guardia, Zozimo
Harer, Henry
Heintz, Harry
Henriquez, Edward
Hinman, Robert
Hollowell, Freeland
Horter. Ernest
Howard, George
Howard, William
Huldtquist, Elmer
Husted, George
Husted, Louis
Hutchings, Alba
Jiminez, James
Johnston, Lester
Johnson, Herschel
Jones, Simon
Journey, Buddy


Boys

Keegan, Larry
Kasde, John
Kent. Lloyd
Laurerback. Ed ard
Leach. Raymond
Lord, Douglas
Linnet, John
Llopis, Edward
Ludlum, Warren
Lynch, James
McIlhenny, William
Michaelsen, Jack
Mongold, Joe
Montanye, Kenneth
Moon. David
O'Connell, Gale
Orr, Robert
Page, Ralph
Pearson, Bradley
Pereira, Sonny
Peterson, Thomas
Phelps, Joe
Prager, Lewis
Price, Herman
Purvis, Jack
Quintero, Eneas
Reyes, Thomas
Ridge, Paul
Ryan. Fred
Schack, Joseph
Skelton, Huston
Snook, Joseph
Stallings, James
Sullivan, Eddie
Tap a. Alfonso
Taylor, Joseph
Tonneson, Jack
Towery, Raymond
Vallarino, Ricardo
Walton, Charles
Ward, Bill
Winkes, Gerard
Wright, Murray
Wyatt, William
Zamblera, Louis
Zemer, Billy


Abrahams, Julie
Anderson, Ethel

Anderson, The!ma
Anguizola, Melida

Arosemena, Olga
Ayala. Sara

Barker. Lorene
Belanger, Evelyn

Benoir, Audrey
Bradley. Peggy

Burr, Katherine

Bunker. June
Church. Frances

Coleman, Frances
Crowell, Frances

Dyer. Shirley
Eleta. Yolanda

Espener, Elsa
Ferrari. Yolanda
Flynn, Jeanne
Frum, Martha

Garrett. Mary Virginia
Gibson, Isobel Agnes

Gibson, Cecelia

Gilbert, Mary
Gonzales. Hilda

Gornell, Bertha

Guizado, Raquel
Harris, June
Hilbert, Sofia
Horan, Nancy

Irwin, Elizabeth
Jaen, Gladys
Jones, Virginia
Jorgensen, Shirley

Kain, Alice
Kelly, Dolores
Keifer, Barbara

Kiley, Patricia


Girls

Lange. Gloria
Lawson, Mildred
Lilijegreen, Betty Lou

Lucy. Jeanne

McCaw, Ann
McGuire, Rita

Metz, Audrey
Mendez, Alicia

Miller, Esther

Millett, Rosemary
Milliken, Margaret

Moolchan. June

Morales, Nesta
Morris, Zona

Moya, Olga
Moreno, Alicia
Muller, Adrienne
Nicolon, Mercedes

Pierce, Lucile
Porras, Rose Marie

Rabiteau, Jean
Renz, Carla

Rosson, Leah
Shuey, Edith

Snediker. Adela
Stewart, Virginia
Sullivn, Eleanor
Tapia, Laura

Thornburgh, Myrtle
Velarde, Gracie!a

Waggaman, Betsey

Walbridge, Phydelis
Wallace. Frances
Weisiger, Edythe

Westerlin, Elida

White, Mary Jane
Winkes, Marie
Yohros, Rachael


9

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FRESHMEN


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FRESHMEN


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y'^gy^-.


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Boys


Abadi, Hyman
Arias, Antonio
Arias, John Jr.
Baldwin, FloI V sd ,
m Basque, Drid' '
Beardsley, Bobby
Beland, Robert
SBougan, Charles
Bradley, Jan
Brugge, Fred
Bryan, Jack
Calvo, Orlando
Carrera, Santiago
Casanova, Roland
De la Mater, Billy
Denney, Robert
Dennis, Robert
Chan, Harry Jr.
Cobb, Newton
Collins, Alfred
Corkran, Jack
Dwyer, John
Courtney, Alexander
Enriquez, Antonio
Enriquez, Franklin
Evers. Frederick

Fir/g.ild % illimn
Flores, Angel
Forsythe, Robert
Glaze, Glyn
Gornell, Roy
Graham. Jerry
Grier, Sam
Hallett, Charles
Hansen, Henry
Henriquez, Jack
Hobson, James
Hunter, William
Hutchings, Robert
Jones, Mallory
Kourany, Miguel /
Krueger, Ernest .'
Kunkel, Francis


Lamb, Francis
Larsen. Thomas
Leaver. Charles
Linney, Albert
Midence, Adolpho

Muller, George
Myers, Walter
Neal, Kermit
Nolan, Frank
Neal, William
O'Donnell, Dan
O'Donnell, Robert
Pearson, Palmer
Phillips, James
Pidgeon, John
Piper, Homer
Polatty, Thomas
Putney, Edward
Quinn, William
Reeves, Walter
Reyes, Rafael
Ridge, Patrick
Rodriguez. Alvaro
Romagosa, Esteban
Romagosa, Lawrence
Runyan, Paul
Searcy, Roy
Shuey, Roy
Simms, George
Skanse, Peter
Skinner, George
Starrert, William
Stephens, Joseph
Thornton, Richard
Townsend, William
Truis, Luis
True. Robert
Vandevanter, Brooks
Wilke. Charles
Wohlforth, John
' ..,,udrufi. Marion
% r-ir,h Harvey
W yatt, Linwood




i,. .-


Anderson, Helen
Arps, Jacqueline
Arruda, Elsa
Arruda, Emma
Bailey, Marjorie
Baker, Marie
Barlow, Carolyn
Bauman, Hope
Bergherm, Heler.
Boyer. Mary
Brown, Gladys
Bubb, Mariam
Burr, Betty
Cauthers, Margare:
Crespo, Doris
Dayton, Elba
Dean, Margarita
De Lima, Sybil
Doran, Catherine
Conner, Miriam
Davis, Lynette
Farr, Florence
Farrell, Hazel
Fletcher, Anna
Grass, Dorothy
Hele, Alice
Harer, Helen
Howell, Vera
Husted, Dora
Kain, Katherine
Kiley, Winnie
Kleasner, Bonnie
LaPeter, Marion
Lavergne, Dora
Lindstrom, Jane
Lombroia, Jane






'+--


Girls
Lopez. Elisa
Lund Opa ,, J,
t.l.i' M jr L, ,'- ""'
MacKenzie, Marie
Maduro, Peggy
Maurer, Yolanda ..
Mallia, Mary ...
McLintock, Gloria
McLintcck, Olive
McNulty, Olga
Michell, Jane
Mitten. Billie .
Morris, Catherine
Neumann, Bernice
O'Leary. Barbara /N
Paine, Margaret
Patterson, Graciela
Ponce, Fulvia
Presley, Ruth
Prizer, Jeanne
Quintero, Manuela
Ramey, Helen
Ramirez, Mary
Ramanol, Mary
Sanborn, Marilyn
Schmidt, Ruth
Shirley. Peggy
Strauss. Jean
Trowbridge, Connie
Tuck, Roberta
Ward, Roberta
Watson, Elba
Weiss, Agnes
Wheeden, Viola
White, Alice
Wiggins, Virginia

J'&^u^o ^^*C^









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CALENDAR OF EVENTS


The Faculty arrives in style.


they said there'd be no more

/'I


'Agi
-4 0,
'/


The Little Theatre gets off to a
flying start with "Three Days of
Gracie."




The ever-present gossips get to-
gether at the first school dance




Sulivan tries to convince Chipman
that Sullivan should be President.



Class elections coincide with nat-
ional elections as Daphne casts her
vote on November 8.




The boys study hard to make up
for the mid-semester slump


Our energetic students before vaca-
tion.




Our energetic C?) students after
vacation.


-And
scobies.







CALENDAR OF EVENTS





The January 6 dance looks like fun.








Students prepare to participate in
the Carnival.





Off for Taboga as Easter vacation
rolls around.




Students take a last fling before
exams start.





Mike takes time off for a last min- .. "
ute cram.








Mr. Parrill looks pretty serious
about the exam papers.






Editor-in-chief celebrates completion
of Zonian.
While Business Manager "Windy"
says a last goodbye to B. H. S.






>1ir


ORCHESTRA


M ORE violins and horns tuned
before.


up this year for work, or play, in the orchestra than ever


To provide for all these students, and to make the orchestra a better one, the school
ordered seven new instruments. They included everything from the bass drum to the oboe.
Among those that they received were two cellos, two A clarinets, one French horn, and a
set of tympany drums.
The horns issued forth their first toots at the high school play. They were heard fre-
quently after that at such places as the college play, the Christmas program in the patio, the
high school and Civic Council operettas, and the music festival. After the music festival, the
orchestra gave concerts for all the Pacific side grade students. Director of these ac'iities was
Mr. Neil Branstetter.
Charles Fair's trumpet solos were high lights of several programs.
The orchestra made its final appearance at the high school and junior college Com-
mencement exercises.


N I-
















































FRENCH HORNS CYMBALS FLUTE
Bill Gaines Connie Trowbridge Ben Williams
Terrv Graham


TRUMPETS
Jack Bryan
Roland Casanova
Alfred Chase (solo)
Billy De La Mater
Paul Disharoon
Ralph Dugas
Clyde Ellis
Charles Fair (solo)
Paul Fedde
James Harness
Jimmy Hobson
Xen Hosler
Niel Small
Donnell Howard
Alvard Rodriguez


PICCOLA
Peggy Mad 4
DRUMS
Virgin a Garret
Jack Howell
Willard Lucy
CLARINETS
Thelma Anderson
Franc s Cryan
Florence May Farr
Alan Ford
George Howard
Emma Jane Lombroia
Margaret Milliken
Roberts Wertz


TROMBONES
Dick Little
John Pidgeon
BASS
Tom Lindo
BARITONE
Vernon Seeley

SAXOPHONES
Sam Grier
Harry He'ntz
Freeland Hollowell
Roy Searcv
Linwood Wyatt


BAND


N EW instruments, new songs, rind new members carried the band through a successful
year.

Mr. Neil Branstetter, director, ordered instruments through the commissary, which
were paid for by the Divisior, of Schools. They purchased new songs and played them with
amazing zest. One could hear "Song of India", "Alexander's Ragtime Band", and "Little
Rastus", somewhat toned down, ejecting from the Annex.

The band played at the Admin and High School at Christmas, the opening ot the new
corral, the opening softball game at Razzberry Park, the hardball opening at Balboa Stadium,
the opening of the new shop, and the Balboa-Cristobal track meet.

On various occasions, Mr. Branstetter gave Charles Fair, sophomore, the baton.






































LEFT TO RIGHT:
Murray Wright. Bobby Peterson, Bert Shelton, Gloria Shelion Rol Dwelle, Joe
Haggerty, Donald McCaslin, Charles Fair, Thomas Bender.


LITTLE THEATER ORCHESTRA

FOR four years the Little Theater Orchestra has donated its talent and time to Balboa
High School and community, under the supervision of Mrs. Helen C. Baker, who ori-
ginared it.
This year the orchestra consisted of nine students, including student director, Bert Shel-
ton. They were Bert Shelton, flute; Thomas Bender, and Murray Wright, violins; Roy Dwelle,
viola; Charles Fair, trumpet; Gloria Shelton and Joe Haggerty, cellos; Donald Mr Caslin, cla-
rinet; and Tom Peterson, piano. It met fifth period, Tuesdays, in the junior college music room.
Rehearsals were conducted by Mrs. Baker.
The musicians played at three Little Theater functions and several outside performances.
They presented their annual program for the Ancon Morning Musical Club, at which silver cups
were awarded to five "master musicians" selected each year from the senior class.
Each member of the Little Theater Orchestra, in order to enter this honorary group, must
demonstrate outstanding skill in his first two or three years in high school.








































GLEE CLUBS

T HE songsters of the glee clubs have warbled through another successful year.
The first enterprise the combined glee clubs undertook was the traditional Christmas
carols sung in the patio of the High School on December 22. Besides singing the old
favorites, "Glory of the Lord", "O Come Emanuel", and "Lift Thine Eyes", they offered "Halle-
lujah Chorus" from the "Messiah" for the first time. One hundred and twenty girls in white
robes marched around the patio carrying lighted candles and singing "Angels We Have Heard
on High."
The glee clubs had hardly time enough to catch their breaths before their director Mr. Neil
Branstetter, was rehearsing them for the operetta, "The Gypsy Rover". Sophia Hilbert was
chosen for the feminine lead. Fernando Tapia got the male lead. Others participating were
Janet Koperski, Bob Burkle, David Bruce, Marion Deveneau, Roy Dwelle, Jean Strauss,
Maurice Fitzgerald, Tom Lindo, Roy Boggs, Bill Etchberger, and a chorus of about rhirry.
The glee clubs made their last appearance of the year at the annual Music Festival when
they sang "The Soldiers' Chorus" and "Funiculi Funicula".








































ifrnie Dennii Cl,de Eilii jJmet % .,ud
Betterle, mm c s .:ornsel.i Vanr S'.len Phylli Dc-,enesu
[Di'hne Le[Ca line M c Ca .lk Gamblt
Mlr..n H.-'.nr Pully Prlk.rn Maxine HIalber
V'irg ej. Thirnran Sherr Auvin I hartle Ry:,dr[guez
lud-,h i l*. M.arrel Whelan Jalme Ride
Malzha Dunran Janet Koperik. Richird Br,:lawn
L.orna Netion Buctr Sherer Doris Brothers.n
Mr (Colling .lame, Smith Al.n Johnn:n



PARRAKEET STAFF

EVERY otler week there's a click-click of rypewriters, rustling of paper, shuffling of
feet, a mad scramble, and then-zoom! the Parrakeer is our.
Students scan the frciit page for the largest school news. When the page is turned over
to Peek and Boos Nesances a giggle here and there breaks the silence. "In Tune with the
Teens" sums up the newest social events. The editorials teach, arrack, defend, and praise stu-
dents and student life. Peeko shouts out his sport gossip and rhe hottest games are recorded
on the sport page All school activ'rl is interpreted to the members of B. H. S. through the
efforts of the class in journalism.
This year, each journalist was given a turn as managing editor or associate editor of one
or more pages. The entire Parrakeet was wrirren and edited by this staff.
An extra edition was issued priot to the all-school elections. This consisted of two pages
of campaign promises together with a picture of each candidate.
All told, the Parrakeer served ', worthwhile purpose. It kept the student body informed.
It added zest to school life.
































TOP ROW: Margo Mackenzie. Anne Riggs, Miss Candee, Garland Avera, Susanne Marshall.
BOTTOM ROW John Sullivan, Philip Erbe, Donald McCaslin, John Gallivan.
ZONIAN
T HE Zonian is out! Hustling seniors become the targets for underclassmen--for what
is a year book without friends' signatures? A few favorable comments frorn the stu-
dents are rewards enough for Editor-in-Chief Anne Riggs and her staff.
All year Anne and her activities editors, Susan Marshall and Garland Avera, have been
busily digging up news, covering parties and dances and other social affairs.
John Sullivan, sports editor, who keeps up to date with baseball, football, and track he-
roes, has been calling on John Gallivan and his group of sharpshooters to get pictures of all
these events to show tnose who participated in sports that their efforts were appreciated.
Margo MacKenzie has supervised cover designs and drawings that grace the pages of the
Zonian, while Phillip Erbe, business manager, has supervised the money.
Features Editor Donald McCaslin, directed work on the senior history, will an] prophecy.
Under the guiding influence of Miss Alice Candee, Zonian sponsor the staff organized
their work.
Others who have worked on the book are Elva Bauman, Maxine Hilbert, Jimmy Wood,
Jack Gamble, Cornelia Van Siclen, Beverly Comely, Janet Koperski, and Alvin Johnson.
Titles have meant little however. The staff has been just a happy Zonian family, every-
one helping the other to take care of the departmental children.

QUILL AND SCROLL
UILL and Scroll, national honor society for high school journalists, is the hole-in-one
of all editors, writers, and business managers of school publications.
To be eligible for membership in Quill and Scroll each candidate must be in the upper
third of his class scholastically, which means he must have a "B" average. This single re-
quirement left several would-be candidates behind. Outstanding ability in c.itin._. writing,
or business management must also be evidenced.
Candidates were chosen trom the Zonian and Parrakeet staffs by Miss Alice Candee and
Mr. R. W. Collinge advisers.
Successful candidates, who received Quill and Scroll pins and subscriptions to the society's
magazine were: Jack Gambit, James Ridge, Virginia Thornton, Maxine Hilbert, Beverly
Comely, Kelly Bauman, Phyllis Deveneau, Margaret Whelan, Carlos Rodriguez, and Alvin
Johnson, Anne Riggs, John Gallivan, Margo McKenzie, and Susanne Marshall.





































Frank Alloy Juan F. Arias Melida Anguizola YolIndi Eleta
Carlos Rodriguez Ernesto Solis Hilda Gonzales Tomas Jacome
Alberto Palacio Graciela Spano Ert1l] Velarde Chr.Ina Aroemena
Lorenzo Romagoza Dorothy Young Guilleim-na Ponce Doin Crespo
Alfonso Tapia Alicia Moreno Ralph Henriquez Gladys Jan
Francisca Talavera 'Ion Arlna


SPANISH CLUB

A T the beginning of the school year the Spanish Club was faced with a membership
problem. There were far too many members to allow for efficient management. Thus,
some had to be eliminated. Two types of slps were placed in a box. "member" slips
and blank slips. Those drawing "member" slips automatically entered the club; the less for-
tunate were dropped.
The Spanish Club is now in its eighth year in B. H. S. Its object is to develop an in-
terest in the Spanish language and the culture of Latin American countries, and to awaken
in the American people the desire to learn Spanish.
Membership is composed of Tomas Jacome, president; Kitty Arosemena, vice president;
Doris Crespo, secretary-treasurer; and about thirty members.
The Spanish Club opened its activities with the first of a series of lectures given by Agus-
tin del Saz, professor of literature at Panama University. It closed with a parry held jointly
with Kappa Epsilon, of the college.





































Alvin Johnson Pete Green
Shirley Dyer Thomas Symington
David Tiger Bill Townsend
Virginia Thornton John Clark
Paul Barnard John Gallivan


CAMERA CLUB

N INE months ago a group of seven boys obtained permission to organize a camera club.
They were given a room in the junior college building for a darkroom. Soon all mem-
bers were acquainted with me fundamentals of developing and printing and were doing
their own work. The results, at first, were a bit on the bad side. However, as time went on
they were able to supply the Zonian with a great number of its pictures.
There were other activities as well. Speeches were delivered by authorities on photo-
graphy, contests were held, pictures were exhibited, trips were taken, social gatherings were
held, and a full time calender was provided for all. Not to be forgotten is the fact that, early
in the year, the membership of the club was increased to a large extent. In addition, new
equipment was received for the darkroom whichresulted in a considerable improvement in the
quality of the pictures.
The outstanding value of tht camera club is the opportunity it offers, not only for instruc-
tion from local authorities on photography, but also for the practical experience involved. For
example: many of the pictures published in the Parrakeet were taken by members of the Ca-
mera Club. This gave them experience in newspaper photography and taught them the knack
of fast developing and printing.
To the casual observer, who sees cameras being packed around the school grounds, who
sees fans twisting their bodies to get angle shots at school dances, who sees results irn the form
of bulletin board pics-of-the-week, the Camera Club must seem a live organization. But the
casual observer doesn't know the half of it.
Officers for the year were John Gallivan, president, and Paul Barnard, secretary.







































r harle. .. Ike PhVllj Dereneiu
Haszz H.tch Lotua Piovost
Dorsey Price Marion Orr
Allan Monsanto Jane Stevens
Gerard Winkes Margaret Milliken
Otis Meyers
Bradley Pearson Martha Bradley
John Foley Juanita Rosson
Mr. Lee Mrs. Lee


BIOLOGY CLUB

BIG bugs and little bugs, little microscopes and big biology, students make uf the high
school Biology Club. This year, with 24 members, the club announced i:> purpose:
to deepen members' interest oy keeping abreast of the current press. to make and record
personal observations, and to maintain fellowship.
In the latter part of January the new officers were elected: Dorsey Price as president;
Marion Orr, vice-president; and Jane Stevens, secretary-treasurer.
Scientific reports were given at the monthly meetings, followed by each member's best
field-note episode. Emphasis in the last few years has been in individual observraton rather
than mass field trips. This past year no field trips were undertaken by the club ar a whole,
although many reports were made by student members who had observed anyhing note-
worthy on individual trips. Frog-eating snakes and breathing test contraptions were among
the items studied.






































Albert Palacio Bert Shelton
John Clark Jane Stevens
Harry Hatch Jane McCaw
Howard Rhodes Lolita Provost
Thomas Lindo Vincent Bradley
Roy Boggs Phyllis Deveneau


CHEMISTRY CLUB

THE activities of the Chemistry Club are guided by four principles. They stimulate more
interest in chemistry. They focus current happenings in chemistry. They create a
hobby for the members. They create a better understanding of the chemistry of the
universe and man's power over it.
Officers of the Chemistry Club 1938-1939 were: president, Bert Shelton; vice-president,
John Clark; secretary-treasurer, Phyllis Deveneau; program chairman, Tom Lindo; associate
chairmen, Roy Boggs, and Howard Rhodes; publicity agent, Jane McCaw. Other members at
the beginning of the school year were Xen Hosler, Robert Wertz, Jack Sutherland, James Smith,
Vincent Bradley, Harry Hatch, Leon Harer, Albert Palacio, Jane Stevens, Lolita Provost, Anne
Warner, Allan Monsanto, and Anne Riggs.
Regular meetings of the club were held every other Thursday. It was during the meetings
that a great part of the club activity took place. Talks were given, experiments conducted and
experiences exchanged. Several times during the year, leaders in the field of chemistry address-
ed the club. Motion pictures were used extensively to illustrate the talks.
The last, but by no means the least important phase of the work was conducted in the
laboratory. Here club members carried their knowledge into actual practice.
The Chemistry Club was organized early in the school year. All members were required
to address the club as a requirement of membership.



























- 4 .
Sall .'


John Kain Alvin Johnson Jirne KoperiS
George Howard James Hob-on Sharlev Dvser
John Mc Glade Dorothy Kalar Blanche Adler


STUDENT COUNCIL

BURIED deep beneath ninety-nine and nine tenths per cent of school activities is usually
found the Student Association. The Council, which is composed of se en student re-
presentatives of the various classes, has made it its policy not only to work for the stu-
dents, but also to work with them. With this in mind, the Council launched a drive for im-
provement of the school in general.
First of all came the installation of the student suggestion box in order to further participa-
tion in student government. Then came the new system of outing successfully Then it was
announced that members of the association would receive reduced rates at the Cecilia Theater.
Then, too, Booklets of manners were given to S. A. members: to s-.y nothing of the victrola
dedicated to B. H. S. by the S. A. Council of '39.
For those who enjoy dancing, the year '38-'39 boasted four S. A. dances plus one banquet.
In addition there were three junior college dances open to high school Association members.
As to the sophomores and freshmen, each had a party of their own. There were four Little
Theater plays, as well as operettas, debates, and contests.
For those engaged in athletics, awards were given if they were S. A. members. \nd finally,
there were bi-monthly issues of the Parrakeet, plus this Zonian.
According to observers, the Student Association was not only young in organ;.ation, but
in ambition to better B. H. S., of which it was a worthwhile p.rt.
Members of the council for 193S-1939 were Alvin Johnson, president: Janet Koperski and
John Kain, senior representatives; Dorothy Kalar and John McGlade, junior representatives;
Jim Hobson, freshman representative.

































LITTLE THEATER


THE fifth anniversary season of the Little Theater marked a session of successful per-
formances.
The first curtain rose on two one-act plays called "Nettie" and "The Finger of God."
Crede Calhoun, Ernest Horter, John Schnake, and Howard Rhodes gave the leading roles.
The second curtain rose just in time to catch "Gracie", Louise Rathgaber, entertaining her boy
friend, John Urey, and a conglomeration of young guests. Meanwhile, Auntie, Martha Duncan,
who disapproved of parties, supposedly was away for the week-end. We saw Effie, the shuf-
fling old maid, played by Elva Bauman, almost driven to tears by Bijou, Gracie's dog, as he
practically tore the house upside down. Who could forget those two hours and fifteen minutes
during which "Three Days of Gracie" showered us with laughs?
The next curtain starred Maurice Fitzgerald as "Poor Old Jim" and Jeanne Rocker as
his wife, engaged in a moral lesson on intoxication. Stage hands stepped in and in a short time
the stage was ready for "Elizabeth's Young Man." Crede Calhoun's part was to frighten Eliza-
beth's old aunt, Daphne Lewis. Daphne believed he was insane. Gail Haldeman and Robert
Whitely, junior college directors, stood in the wings supervising proceedings
Our blood tingled with pride as a group of twenty boys and girls read the poem "The
Congo" in a talking chorus. This was a new stunt in B. H. S.
Not entirely in the curriculum of the Little Theater, but falling under its auspices, were
the speech contests. Edward Corrigan took first place with his oration "War Is Futile", and
was closely followed by Jeanne Rocker in second place and Fred Huldtquist in third. "I'm
Jesse James" exclaimed Maurice Fitzgerald and took the gold pin for his reading of the famous
Western outlaw. Elva Bauman and Florence May Farr places second and third respectively with
their interpretations.
"It was the 'Night of January 16, said Prosecuting Attorney Edward Corrigan.
"I object in behalf of the defense," roared John Urey. And the trial of Karen Andree,
Janet Koperski, proceeded under the scrutiny of Judge Bob Burkle
The fifth season ended with the Little Theater banquet held for members of the B. H. S.
Little Theater group.






























GYMNASIUM CLASSES

W ITH the completion of the niin ~mn~sium. a new course was added to the freshman
and sophomore curriculum,. Balboa decided to make strong, sturdy people cut of her
students, so the underclasnien were re uired to take physical education.
Each student had tAo classes a 'eek in which he was given exercises designed o build up
his bod) Boys' and girls' classes \\r. held sepirarely, but their schedules included almostt the
same acri ties Tie girls were also taught a few litterbug tactics vhen they learned to do the
Ljmbeth Walk
Mr H B. Crov ley was assigned4 the job of making men out of the boys, while Miss
Doruth. Rector was given tne job of making Annie an Amazor..











.-








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LEFT TO RIGHT
Mlrlhi bridle Shirlt% D1ir lean R.abelau Brin Bradl Malrbelle Perkini Marne
S;hmr.id. Gia e Sth.li PE hine11. Coich Grittr.

GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM


SWIMMING

THE senior natators. wirth such material as Roy Boggs, Clyde Ellis. Jack Sutherland,
Paul Disharoon, Patsy Kent Peggy White, Billie Bowen and June HolcomD, won the
interclass swimming meet and the water polo league by nosing out the sophomores on
both occasions.
Two new high school records were established during the year. Roy Boggs smashed the
120 meter medley record and sophomore Alan Ford came through in record breaking time to
hang up a new record in the 100 yard backstroke. In water polo the sophomores wen the first
half of the league and the seniors snercd the second half, both earning entry into the playoffs.
The seniors emerged victorious by ? score of eight to six in the water polo championship
game to win the interclass loop.
The triangular meet was scheduled to be held at the Balboa pool on March 23 with
Balboa, Cristobal, and the junior college our to win first place honors. Balboa was predicted
to valk away with the meet, the prediction being based on times made in practice swims.


BOYS' SWIMMING AND DIVING


Coach Greiser John Foley Bill Ward Alan Ford Wallace Bildwin Michael Dailey






































Thomas Jacome Paul D:sharoon
Joe Ludlum Clyde Ellis
Roy Dwelle James Dodson
Bert Shelton Roy Boggs
Angus Matheney Ry BouIs
Mr. Grieser Earl Mullins


BOYS WATER POLO

T WO water polo leagues swam this year at Balboa pool-interclass and intramural. The
best team won in the interclass league and at the end of the season the senior boys
sported shiny gold balls. They were well earned, however, for they stood not only for
skill and fighting spirit, but also for faithful attendance.
The second half of water polo season saw the intramural teams go into action. Bill
Zemer's team won the first half, not losing a single game. During the second half, however,
Clyde Ellis' team turned out in full force and swamped every opponent. The intramural league
consisted of four teams, Zemer's, Baldwin's,Ford's, and Ellis'.
All teams showed excellent sportsmanship, according to Coach Henry Grieser; all the boys
turned out eager to learn. Individually they could not surpass last year's crop, but they were
better than average
Among the unforgettable were Allan Ford, Wallace Baldwin, and Roy Boggs for their
outstanding ability in center position; Ted Bailey and Paul Disharoon as guards; Billy Zemer,
forwarding the highest number of goals for the entire year; and Clyde Ellis, who was mainly
responsible for the superior playing ef his undefeated team in the intramural series.




























LEFT TO RIGHT
Raisel Rcete. Ifhrle [ Leaver Baich Rujn. Datid Mot.n Bubo Kain
INTER-CLASS MEET


TRACK

AFTER losing to Crisrobal Hi-h School by half a point in 1938, the track and field team
rook revenge on the Atlantic side opponents at the Balboa stadium on March 25 by
winning the triangular track and field meer alth ease. The scores were:
Balboa ........ ... .... ........ .... ........ ....... .... 67 points
Cristobal ....... .. .............. ... .... .. ...... 38
Junior College ... .... ....... ... ................ .... 25
Four record, fell before the met- .as completed. three of nhich were shattered by Balboa's
Track team Captain Bobby Burkle cleared the pole vault bar it 10 feet ? inches to establish
the first new record. Harr) Dowell t'ien came through and clipped four tenths of a second off
the 880 record The i4(nO-ard relay team then completed Balboa j record smashing by clipping
twor tenths of a second off the old record time made in 1938 Members of the relay team were
Charle% Leaver, Macon lMichaux, Howard Moo:e. and Fernando Tapia. Ed Green, rf C. H. S,
brcke the other record w.h:n he thr,:'. mne discus lu2 feet I inch


nH
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John Anderson Joe Msong,.Id
Howard Moore Jio Young
Albert Mongold Roberr Burkle
John Kain '. allace D'er
Jack Gamble Donald Bowen


ALL-STAR FOOTBALL TEAM



TOUCH FOOTBALL

TOUCH football invaded B. H. S. three years ago. As the years go by, interest in the
sport grows. This year's league was probably the best of the lot. The teams nere much
more evenly matched and the grade-A performances turned out by such stars as Al and
Joe Mongold, "Bobo" Kain, and Bob Burkle added interest to the games.
Games between Wallace "Train" Dyer's Gophers and Howard Moore's Tigers could be
called battles of the ages-the topnotch playing of the two teams kept each from defeating
the other. A game that lasted nine quarters was finally decided in favor of the Gophers for the
gold awards.
The high school all-stars made a good showing. However, a Cristobal game never mater-
ialized because Cristobal's league had not begun when Balboa's league finished. The all-stars,
out of a total of four games, won three and tied one. They were tied by the junior college fresh-
man team. The teams on the stars' victim list included the all-star freshman team, which they
played twice, and the working boys.
Only one tackle game was attempted during the year It was played at a result of a
challenge from the college freshman team. The score was 20-0 in favoi of the high school
stars.









p -w-
7



~~~aib1


BACK ROW: Wallace Dyer. Jack Gamble. Joe Mongold, Douglas Smith. John Ka:n, Emilio Madrigal,
Albert Mongold. Joe Young, John Davis.
FRONT ROW: Bil: Logsdon, James Ridge. John Urey, John Anderson, Howard Moore, Donald Bowen.
"B" CLUB

"B" CLUB AND G. A. A.
SPORTSMANSHIP is the keynote of the two athletic associations.
The "B" Club was formed two years ago by Mr. G. C. Lockridge, and has been going
steadily forward. At the beginning of the school year 1937-1938, there were nine mem-
bers, of whom six were seniors and three juniors. At the time the Zonian went to press, the
club had more than doubled. Of course many are seniors and will graduate this June. but still
the membership will be high, as more and more underclassmen are getting In. The "B" Club
is more or less a varsity club, and a boy is eligible only after he has been elected to an all-star
team by his teammates. After he is elected to an all-star team he is told to be present at a
certain place and certain time in order to receive his initiation. The initiation isn't exactly
rough-well, not too rough. The boy is now presented with his letter and he anxiously waits
for the chance to initiate somebody else.
The G. A. A. is the equivalent, for girls, of the "B" Club. It was started by Miss Louise
Hanna last year, and at the beginning of the 1937-1938 school year there were only two
charter members, both seniors. However, six new members entered.
The only way a girl can get into the G. A. A. is to be a member of the all-star softball and
volleyball teams or get the required number of points through the new point system, intro-
duced at the beginning of this year. The points are based on attendance, winning team, and
all-star team.
The "B" Club and G A. A. put on one successful dance together; then the girls showed
their initiative and had luncheons and dances by themselves.
"B" Club officers were John Kain, president, Jack Gamble, vice-president, James Ridge,
secretary, and Bill Logsdon, treasurer.
G. A. A. officers were June H.imbleton, president, Louise Rathgeber, vice-president, and
Kelly Bauman, secretary-treasurer.
G. A. A.











Shirley Dyer June Hambeton Louise Rathgeber Mary Jane Phillips Audrey Taber Gloria Shelon
Shirley Dyer June Hambleton Louise Rathgeber Mary Jane Phillips Audrey Taber Gloria Shelton











































lhn Pcc .-n i E rl M ull '
.I p-.m '. 1 ..-j I Jr.i'u, M ih e
j.rmm ... -: '- ,d Eflis%

N NG SO ALL BOYS



ALL- R SOFTBALL


Julio Htrni-idz C lIde Ellis
Bert Shelton Albert Mathon
Joe Young Joe .MonecId
Jame V cood


Ber Shelon
Ar.ge FSlore
ice Snook


R.chard Dud:on
Joe LudIua
Earl Mull.ns










SOFTBALL

THIS year's softball had as many forfeits as any preceding year, but it was success in
that allstar softballers were permitted to enter the "B" club for the first time.
From the first game it was apparent that Julio Hernandez' Red Sox would. take the
league, with Albert Lindo's Colonels making a shaky second. The reasons for the Red Sox
power were Julio's pitching, and the hitting of Joe Ludlum, Mathew Cryan, and Junior Jones.
Lindo's Colonels were a combination not to be trifled with. He had lots of luck, good field-
ers and good hitters, but no pitcher. Bert Shel.on's White Sox, under Earl Mullins' manage-
ment, were plugging along near the bottom. On this team there was a batch of glue-gloved
fielders and a goldmine of hitters like Bert Shelton, Porter Crawford, and Earl Mullins. To
their rescue came a dark horse, Jim Wood. With a tentative rise ball, some speed, and a little
control he boosted the team's morale and started them on the upgrade. Lindo's and Boggs'
teams scattered like chaff before the onslaught. Up came the White Sox to challenge Hernan-
dez. But Julio and his cohorts proved too powerful. The Whites defeated the Reds and won
the tie off for the first half. This tie was facilitated by Lindo's unpredictable luck. He defeat-
ed the Reds, who trounced the Whites, who conquered him.
This circle, with a few variations, ran until near the last of the season. Lindo was left in
the cold by the Reds. The WX'hes took the second half and trimmed the Reds foi the gold
balls.
The unlucky allstars who attended the "B" club initiation came off with the usual bumps,
bruises, and swells. Clyde Ellis turned up in school with a sling and a pillow.




BASKETBALL

W ITH the settling of the dust on the baseball diamond, basketball stepped into the sports
limelight with new teams and a new method of play.
The new plan, introduced by Coach Lockridge, was designed to allow as many boys
to play basketball as possible. Since the number of boys who signed to play the sport was large
enough for twelve teams, two leagues were formed. The "A" league consisted of six teams of
the best players. The "A" league captains took their choice before the "B" league captains, and
what was left after the "A" league, made up the "B" league. The six captains chosen to lead
the "A" league teams were Howard Moore, Bill Logsdon, Emilio Madrigal, Jimmy Ridge,
John Kain, and Julio Hernandez. The "B" league captains were Fred Ryan, Bud Huldtquist,
Bob Burkle, Norman Anderson, George Makibbin, and Vincent Bradley.
At the time the Zonian went to press, Howard Moore's Pirates looked like the team to
watch in the "A" league. In their first try they defeated Kain's highly touted Ramblers by 12
points. Throughout the contest the Bucaneers outplayed the Ramblers in every division of the
game.
In the "B" league, there were two teams which should be fighting it out at the end of
the campaign. The Dodgers and Rams, under guidance of Fred Ryan and Vincent Bradley
respectively, won their first games easily, displaying fine teamwork for "B" league quintets.
The Dodgers set a record for the other five teams in the league to shoot at in points scored.
While playing the Cardinals in the first game the dodgers won 47 to 9. The Rams also show-
ed plenty of team work and fighting spirit in their first encounter.
At the end of the season the winners of the "A" league were tc play the 'B" league
champions for the gold balls offered by the Student Association. Two days later the all-star
team was scheduled to travel to Cristobal to play the C. H. S. all-stars at the Cristobal High
School gymnasium.





































Nancy Horan Adeli Srdker shrTle D[ir
Jeanne Lucy Phdel, ..Ibi riFc 1-ibel Gibh.mn
Audrey Taber Allce Hei MNar'e Schm,dr


GIRLS' WINNING SOFTBALL TEAM



GIRLS' SOFTBALL

A MBITION, skill, and sportsmanship dominated in the girls' softball league this year.
At the beginning of the series, Kelly Bauman s Whizzers and June Hambelton's Top-
pers appeared to be the teams to defeat, but as the three-month season closed the
Whizzers and Toppers were on the bottom and Shirley D)er's Tornadoes headed the list.
The teams taking part in the league were Gloria Shelton's Slashers. Mary Janr Phillips'
Steppers, June Hambelton's Toppers, Shirley Dyer's Tornadoes Louise Rathgeber's Nifties, and
Kelly Bauman's Whizzers.
Players chosen for the all-star team were Jeanne Lucy, Peggy Brugge, Eloise Ramey,
Esther Miller, Ph)dellis Walbridge, Vera Howell, Connie Troubridge, Alice Hele, Dorothy
Kalar, and Isabel Gibson.
The league games were under the direction of Miss Eileen McAuliffe, girls' physical! director,
who was substituting for Miss Louise Hanna, absent on vacation in the Stares.






































Howard Moore John Montanye Bobby Dennis
John Anderson Tomas Reyes Hendri Hanson
Norman Anderson Ro!and Stemmer Alexander Courmey
Fred Ryan Warren Sherwood Bll Ga.nes


WINNING BASEBALL TEAM



BASEBALL

EMILIO Madrigal led his Giants to the championship of the intramural league for the
second consecutive year when he defeated Jack McGlade and his Yankees by a score
of 6 to 3 at the stadium in the championship battle.
Madrigal went the route for his team in the final game, while Joe Burgoon and Tommy
Larsen shared mound duties for the Yankees. The Giants made four of their six runs in the
sixth inning.
After the season was completed, all boys who played in the league got together and select-
ed the all-star team, which met Cristobal High School at the stadium on March 13. Balboa
High School won 6 to 5 in a game that will be remembered for some time to come. Cristobal
was leading Balboa 5 to 2, going into the last inning. Then the Balboa siege guns opened fire
and scored four runs, amidst the wild cheers of the many B. H. S. rooters who were on hand.
The winning team consisted of the following players: John Kain, catch; Tom Larsen,
pitch Emilio Madrigal, pitch; Don Eowen, first; Ernest Horter, second; Osmond Austin, third;
Jim Ridge, short stop; Jack Gamble left field; Jack McGlade, center field; and Fernando
Foster right field. Joe Burgoon and Howard Moore had been selected to the all-star team as
utility players.
































Grace McCa'l;n Betrr Sutherland Ruth Preiles
Rosemra) Milleu Je.in Flnn VeTr Hon-ell
Louise Rathgebtr (Carohline Barlo. Mar, .lane \W'hae

GIRLS' WINNING VOLLEYBALL


GIRLS' VOLLEYBALL

W ITH fast names and faster reams, volleyball ranked first among the girls this )ear.
In spite of a late start the Victors. Slashers, Whizzers, Toppers, Hurricancs, Nifties,
Tornadoes, and Steppers burnt up the three months ot volleyball. Season menaces were
June Hambelton, Shirley Dyer, Kel!) Bauman, and Vera Howell. After winning the round
robin tournament, Gloria Shelton's Smashers played serious volleyball against the Nifties, but
Lou Rathgeber's happy-go-luck) team proved their superiority, copping the elimination series
from Shelton's team and then seizing the best two-out-of-three-game play-off
Laurels go to all of the captains June Hambelion, Kelly Bauman, Audrey E. laber, Mary
Jane Phillips, Barbara Hayden. Gloria Shelron, Blanca Westerlin. and Louise Rathgeber. They
worked admirably, getting the girls to come out, coaching their players, and displaying sports-
manship everywhere
The winning softball and volleyball teams received their "B's" and a sound round of
applause at the girls' annual sports ral!y.
The rejuvenated gym provided just the atmosphere for the uniformed athletes. Regula-
tion shoes, shirts, and shorts gave the girls a chance to "kick around" and really play volley-
ball. Coach Louise Hanna was out fc- every game, refereeing and coaching. "Pass, girls! Over
the line!"and "Stop cracking your gum! would remind us that Miss Hanna was on the job.
Leaving with this year's seniors are Comley, Rocker, Hambelton, Taber, Lewis, Koperski,
and Bauman, but stepping in to try zo take their places are Walbridge, Howell, Dyer, Simms,
Brugge, and Rathgeber. Each year they are renewed, but never replaced, and each yea. B. H. S.
loses a grand gang of volleyballers who can never forget the familiar shrieks, and whistles,
and thumps that accompany the pla) ing of their favorite game.










TENNIS


A FTER being runner-up to "Big Bill Le
Brun in last year's tournament, Jimmy
Ridge won the annual. tennis tourna-
ment by defeating Johnny Presley 6-4, 2-6, 6-3
in three well-played sets on the stadium courts
on March 21. By virtue of taking the tournament,
Ridge received the Scholastic tennis medal which
is given to all school champions throughout the
United States by the "Scholastic Coach" n,.aL.ei
zine.
Ridge won the tournament by defeating John
Towery, Roland Stemmer, Sonny Pereira, and
Johnny Presley. Presley reached the finals by
eliminating Louis Towery, Tommy Peterson, Bert
Shelton, Jack Hutchings, and John Anderson.
While this was Presley's first complete tournament in Balboa High School, R.idge had
competed in every tournament from his freshman year on, until a senior, he finally took first
place.
The doubles tournament was scheduled to begin after the Easter holidays, when the Zonian
went to press. Several of the combinations that had already announced their desire to com-
pete in the doubles and were being given a little better than average chance to win the event
were Stemmer-Hutchings, Matlowsky-Shelton, and Ridge-Kain.
The winners in the boys' singles and doubles tournament, along with the girls' singles
champion, were scheduled to travel to Cristobal on May 9 to match strokes against the Cris-
tobal champions for the school championship of the Isthmus.





ARCHERY

W HEN the rainy season began, the girl
archers of B. H. S. started shooting. The
freshman and sophomore girls went out
on the range every Tuesday, and the junior and
senior girls tried their skill on Thursdays.
Daphne Lewis, senior, and Eloic Ramey,
junior were the only two veterans this year. The
new members were Martha Duncan, Loin, Nelson,
both seniors, Jane Tompkins, Peggy Brugge, Doro-
thy Kalar, Adela Snediker, Agnes Atkinson, and
Margaret Kunkel, all juniors.
The sophomore and freshman Robin Hoods
were Carolyn Barlow, Alice Hele, Constance
Trowbridge, Shirley Dyer, Ester Miler. Jane
Lindstrom, and Laura Tapia.
At the time the Zonian went to press, Daphne Lewis had the highest score, and Eloise
Ramey was second.












GOLF

SITH Jonnny MacMurray out of the way,
the golf championship for Balboa High
School was left wide open for the large
crowd of turf diggers who signed up to play golf.
MacMurray, in the 1958 tournament, had finished
36 holes in 157 strokes, which was good enough
to defeat his nearest rivals.
At the time the Zonian went to press noth-
ing definite could be stated as to where the tourna-
ment would be held or how many holes would be
played The professional at Pedro Miguel links
had offered his services as golf instructor for the
players, who knew very little about the game.
His first attempt to teach golf to B. H S. stu-
dents was scheduled for April 29 at the Balboa
stadium. The golf classes were to be held every
Saturday after that until one week before tourna nent play began.
Among those who were expected to be at the top at the end of the match pla were lack
Hutchings, Johnny Presley, or George Makibbin. Among the girls Anne Warner is said to be
an outstanding player.












The Zonian staff wishes to express its
appreciation for the helpful cooperation it
has received from the members of the faculty,
the journalism c-ass, the Camera Club, the
seniors, Jack Fisher, the typists, and others.
They) have given invaluable assistance in
making this Zonian possible.

-A I















'II IS Hi
ML
Now

|! |llI












P o 3e


P. O. Box 1573
Ancon, C. Z.


I Street )


R. de Panama


98 Central Avenue
Panama City


The Office Service

Company

CATHEDRAL PLAZA

Dorribulrol of Royal Portable


Telephone '60.361
Apar-menr No 4 1

Compliments of

Antonio Fong & Co.


a __


Be attractive and wear a

Panama Hat from

M OTTA'S

PANALMA

*!------------


KODAK


A complete line of Kodaks, Cine Kodaks, Kodascopes and Eastman
made photographic accessories and supplies for the
amateur and professional photographer.


Developing, Printing, and Enlarging Cine Kodak FiLa
Processing Camera Repairs



KODAK PANAMA, LTD.


Panama Plumbing

& Contracting

D. W. FARRELL


Phone 2152
Res. 2)41


Front Street
Colon














IT IS NO SECRET!


Everybody knows that

the best photographic

work in Panama

costs the least at

the studios of



FOTO WOLF


101 Central Avenue Tel. 676


m


*- *. .














Best Wishes

to the

Class of 1939






THE MARINE STUDIO

DURING





The Only Portrait Studio On

The Isthmus OwnLed And Operated

By An American






S ____ _------------------------------------E













L.3


I r


NEW INDIA
125 Central Avenue
Panama 125


American Tailor

Formerly of Coco Solo & Fort Clayton

Importer of English Woolens and
Irish Linens

Specializing in Officers Uniforms
and Civilian Sui:s

116 CENTRAL AVE. PANAMA

Branch At
FORT MONMOUTH NEW JERSEY

Tel. 951-B


Prop. J. GROSSMAN


P. 0. Box 601
Ancon, C. Z.




Oriental Store
Isthmus


Phone 381
Panama




The Leading
on the


LIGHTS, POWER,

GAS, TELEPHONES


"At Your Service Always"


Cia. Panamefia de Fuerza y Luz


Panama -0- Colon


1W


i r


r


L





















Compliments of


American Federation

of Teachers


Pacific Local No. 227


CASA PHILCO

Central Avenue No. 39

Always wishing to please its nu-
merous patrons it offers easy
payments on the accredited
Philco Radio and the
comfortable and chic
looking furniture


"Filipino
Bamboo"


2-------------------


KIST ICE CREAM


















Telephones:
Panama Colon
65 84


n


-I


I


















THE MUSIC CENTER
No. 6 Calle 23, Panama

(Old United Fruit Co.)
Phone 320-Panama, R. P.

THE HAMMOND ORGAN
ESTEY REED ORGANS
WURLITZER PIANOS
SELMER WOODWINDS
BUESCHER SAXOPHONES
GIBSON GUITARS
EXCELSIOR ACCORDIANS
HOHNER HARMONICAS
KAY STRING BASSES
LUDWIG DRUMS
ROTH VIOLINS
POPULAR SHEET MUSIC
BOOKS AND FOLIOS


Patronize

The Music Center






Central Tailor Shop
61 Central Ave. 61
The best English Serges and other cloth
for the confection of suits.
Reasonable Prices.
Part payment accepted Pay us a visit
ALL WORK GUARANTEED






Compliments of


ANTONIO'S


Panama's Leading

Store

a--


Call for S A L IH

Bazar Hindustan
115-B Central Ave.
Panama 115-B
Specialises in French Perfume
Panama Hats and Oriental
Goods






HOTEL HABANA

51-Central Avenue-51

Phone 826 Apart. No. 438


AIDA Vda. DE COLLAZOS
Proprietor




Apartment No. 1025
Telephone No. 1704

Zapateria "Cecilia"

H. T. CHUNG & Co.
82 Central Avenue, 82
Panama. R. de P.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL







AMY HOLDER

DRESSMAKING AND
LADIES' TAILORING

94 Calle del Estudiante Panama


a--F-














L. C. Smith
&
Corona Typewriters

ROBERT DIXON
196 Central Ave.
Box 699, Panama





Bazar Central
R. Castel

Dresses Lingerie

Phone 1173 Central Ave. 74







SHOEMAKER
SHUENG HING
Ave. Central No. 122





Compliments of

The National
Mattress Factory
Panama
Manufacturers of
SOUND SLEEP INNER-
SPRING MATTRESSES
3_____


WM '57


NMC+tOLS


CHINESE


RUGS









IC.rrrs ret. .f

Margarita Florist

Cr.i, obal




VISIT
W. T. LUM
The larger Oriental furniture &
Novelry Siores on the
Isrhmus
Select t our pradua3n n and ,:-ther gift
from the eirenive line uo American &
(hnete Gc.odi iluLbla e lot Boi and
Girlk. at LLM S Store,
Colon O.I6 Boliar Ase
Panama mih S Central AMe
S_____
















Compliments
of

LUPI'S

for
Panama Hats



a-----------



Tony The Barber


Antonio Esquius

Panama


~3-------------


C-.


Diamonds, Wedding Rings,
Well-made Watches


PANISI Y TORRE

Central Avenue 83
Panama City


----------------


TREAT YOUR BEST GIRL
AT THE

Rendezvous

9th Street Central Ave.

3 ___


An extensive and complete assortment of ladies' wear, renewed weekly
by direct shipments from our New York office.


DRESSES HATS

HANDBAGS HOSIERY UNDERWEAR



LA MODA AMERICANA


Central Ave. and B. Street












Read -


6^e Panama Amrican

First in the Field
The gateway to a liberal education is your daily
newspaper Read it intelligently!

For Local News -
Full and authoritative coverage of the daily
happenings on the Isthmus.

For Foreign News -


Complete United Press
world-wide events.


Cable Service on


For Editorial Comment -


The Washington Daily
Sound Digest of Local
News.


Merry-Go-Round-
and United Stares


Read


~Iie bn~Etunall


Anterican


WE PRINT THE NEWS


'is















Heladeria y Fruteria

LA FLOOR DEL
JAVILLO

Barochis y Palada, Props.
Calle 13 Este, No. 3
Tel. 212-3
a-------------


Compliments of

La Oficina Ideal
Cathedral Plaza Panama
Supplies to the Panama Canal of
Burroughs Adding and
Calculating Machines

Phone 114


Lloyd's Electric Store

14 W. & C. St. No. 13

Phones 2178-1830


3--------------


ANCON BAKERY
Estudiance St. No. 105
Behind Century Club

P. O. Box 191 Ancon, C. Z.

Telephone 2123

Pa


In School Days or Vacation Days


The Commissary Division provides

for your needs in things to eat

and things to wear.


Our Best Wishes for a Happy Vacation


Commissary Division

Panama Railroad Company


s______........_________

















Escuela Privada

"Gregg"

Do you know Gregg Short-
hand in English? You do?
Well, perhaps you want extra
practice. Do you want to
learn it in Spanish? Start
now and in four months
call yourself an

English-Spanish stenographer

DON'T PUT IT OFF

Telephone 1443-J


Central Ave. 116


National Floral Shop

BrJil BuuquuEU W'earilh. Flower Basktb
& min) orher FlorCl Designs
made to ordei

Telephone 2,)U J Suieet No. 11

!--------------


Walk


in comfort


Walk in Bata


Sandals.


66995-90


I n-?


I _i


-
















Compliments of

Colon & Kingston's

Furniture Store

JOSE MARIA GONZALEZ
Col6n, Rep. de P.



a-------------
VISIT

"THE ENGLISH
BAZAAR"
Colon's Most Up-to-date Dress Shop
ATTIA ABBO & CO. LTD.
Bolivar Ave. Between 8th and 9th Sts.
Colon. R. of P.
Box 2366 Cristobal, C. Z.


w *0


Angel Severino

EAT
SEVERING CEREALS


Street G No. 7
Panama

2;


TAI SING WOO

Chinese Store
10 & 11 Bolivar St.
Colon P. O. Box 10
DEALER IN KEYSTONE
EQUIPMENT


Compliments of


The Panama Railroad Company


and


Panama Railroad Steamship Line


M 1111111111111111111111111 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin iiiiiiiiin i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii n in i 1111111111111111111111111111111111. 11 iiii i


14








































1 1-


In Filling Your Prescription
We Offer to You
Honesty-Efficiency

English Pharmacy
Johan V. D. Hans & Co. Panama
Across from Herrick Cli-ici
27 Central Avenue

!-------_ --


Central America's


Finest Store





French Bazaar





Panama City


121-La Florida-121

Montecristi Panama Hats
Souvenirs, and Silks

Central Avenue
Panama
.I


Compliments


of


JOHN FISHER


f. ...


1 II


-s L


c
















Sing Kee &

Company

Importers and Exporters
of general merchandise

Wholesale & Retail Sales

Phone 248, Calle 13 Este
No. 13.

Apartment No. 609
Panama, R. de P.


1~.


m


Compliments

of

LUCKY STRIKE


Trott

The Cleaner


Suits and Dresses
dry cleaned

We chemically clean
Chinese, Oriental and
Domestic Rugs

Reasonable Prices

Phone 453 Panama

a-------------F3


t-


















Always Remember

A man is judged in life by
two things, his friends
and his clothes

The

American Bazaar

Haberdashers & Tailcr%: h.r men uf
Good Tasre

O. K. STORE

Panama Colon


ABIGAIL

Smartest dresses for
every occasion.

Cille B No 6


1 H


P. 0 Bor ,6 Telephone ;0)

Wong Chang &
Company, Ltd.
5rh.e'orls ,> La He8g & Co
H PD'rARE DRY GOODS AMMIrNI
TIONS SHIPS TACKLE PAINTS
& FISHING TACKI.E
Ccr.'cr 9h, A& Fr.i.s, S'reer .iu.a Are.
Color.. R P

3 e


Congratulations

to

BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS
OF 1939

and

Best Wishes for Success

to

THE ONCOMING CLASSES


Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds

(Recreation Division of the Panama Canal)


lu. r


^ I __ I __.__...._.. .





















Chambonnet

CENTRAL AVENUE 79

"The Center of Feminine Mode"


DURAN'S COFFEE

29 YEARS OF PROGRESS
IS YOUR ASSURANCE
OF MERIT.



--!


HOTEL TIVOLI

A comfortable, restful, ideally located hotel, commanding a
magnificent view of the Pacific Ocean and tropical scenery. The
center of social life, close to every point of interest on the Pacific
side of the Canal.

JAMES LEWIS, Mgr.-Ancon, Canal Zone


93----


^--*I


* )


- -



















Felix B. Maduro

"The Style Center"

21 Central Ave.
Panama City

OPEN DURING NOON
HOUR


PERMANENT WAFES

Anto-Thermic
Permanent Waves
No Machines
No Chemical Powder

And All Other Branches
Of Beaury Culture

AMERICAN OPERATORS

Ancon Clubhouse

Beauty Shop

Telephone 1322

E















Compliments of

Shung Fat & Co.

13 East St. No. 22
Panama





MARTINEZ & CO.

141 Central Ave., Panama
9034 Front St. Colon, R. P.

Genuine Alligator Skin Good-

Box 904, Panama Phone 1799-J

a--


WISP-O -WEIG H
with Lastex yarn


Ladies' Hats

A complete assortment
of the
latest designs

4th of July Ave.


'-


Compliments

of

Panama Canal

Metal Trades Council


--~-uu














Beautify Yourself, Face and Body

at the former

CLARA KAISER BEAUTY PARLOR

Number 18 J. Street
Under Entirely New Management.

Largest, Best Equipped, and Most Well-known
Beauty Shop in Panama.

LINA ALVARADO in Charge with a
Corps of Graduate Operators.

Every Aid to Beauty That You May Desire.
Call personally or Telephone Panama 607 for Appointment

S L Keep Fit!
_i Keep yourself up to par in every way, ready for the
day's gruelling grind in business, or for trying and
tiresome social affairs. Build Beauty and Health
through the medium of SWEDISH MASSAGE which
tones up the system, stimulates circulation and im-
proves al body functions. We have complete equip-
ment and practice the art as taught by the Battle
Creek Sanatorium.

Health Center

ELODIA T. SMITH, Director
No. 18 J. Street
At ex-Clara Kaiser Beauty Parlor
Telephones 927 and 607

_________-------------------------------















r4 &4


The

Ancon Greenhouse

"Don't be backward

and shy - -
Flowers will always

get you by."

Ancon, Canal Zone
Phone Balboa 2390
Cable: Ancogre




I


Articles for Men
at low prices

in

"ELEGANCIAS"
40-Avenida Central-40
Panama


ANTONIA

Dressmaker


Central Avenue and B. St.
Panama City


"Once again MOLLOY-MADE
quality and workmanship scores
as the 1939 Zonian is cased in a
MOLLY-MADE covei from

THE BABCOCK COVER
COMPANY

411 East 91st Street
Los Angeles, California."
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