Zonian

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Title:
Zonian
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Publisher:
St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication:
St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093678:00028


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Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/zonianl936balb








The


Zonian


1936 -











Balboa High School


Balboa, Canal Zone



























DEDICATION

We, the senior class of 1936, dedicate this
ZONIAN to one who has helped our class,
and one whom we hold first in our hearts -
MISS GEORGE WARDLAW.













FORE 1OR D
Lest the passing years should erase your
memories of high school days as the long trop-
ical dry season evaporates the waters slowly
wearing away the rocks over which they fall, we
present this ZONIAN with the hope that it will
bring back the happy days of your school life
as successfully as the rainy season renews the
waterfall.


















TABLE OF CONTENTS

Administration
Classes
Activities
Sports
School Life
Advertisements











Administration




























TO THE MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1936:

This year will find you leaving the portals
of the free public school system of your Zone
and nation. You have had an opportunity to
receive during your period of training a prep-

aration for future work and a development for

efficient and intelligent citizenship. I want to
congratulate you upon your achievement thus
far and to wish for you every success and happi-
ness for the future.

FRED W. HOSLER, Principal.










i '
I8I


'' "-'





















Fred W. Hosler .....................Principal
ADMINISTRATION

Ben W. Williams .................. Superintendent
Virgil H. Barker .........Assistant Superintendent
Fred W Hosier .............. .......... Principal
Dorothy Sundberg .......... Secretary to Principal



FACULTY


Mary E. Butler
W. E. Campbell
Agnes R. Eneboe
Sigurd E. Esser
Olga Frost
Noel E. Gibson
Edward W, Hatchett
Dorothy G. Hayward
Katherine E. Jessup
George O. Lee
Mary S. Newman
Alice Parsons


Edward M. Pease
Hervey P. Prentiss
Elinor D. Robson
J. C. Swanson
Ruby M. Syrcle
SuLert Turbyfill
Allen B. Ward
George Wardlaw
Myrtle Whaley
Mary Worrell
Madalyn J. Wright
Harold J. Zierten




I


MIRAFLORES LOCKS


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PANAMA CITY FROM AMADOR


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ias a~i5 sil













THE OLD BELL RINGS


FROM

PEDRO MIGUEL

CLAYTON

COROZAL

ALBROOK FIELD





BALBOA ANCON

QUARRY HEIGHTS

AMADOR

PANAMA CITY


THE PUPILS COME

TO

BALBOA HIGH
SCHOOL


. -. .-. -,..


i--~Bin' -I--

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SUNSET












Seniors

















IN MEMORIAL
FRANCES WELCH


It cannot be
That you are gone,
For only yesterday
You gladdened us
With willing smiles
And friendly words.


We cannot say
You left us,
For though we miss
Your gentle deeds
And kindly ways,
Your spirit lingers,
And well we know you bid us,

CARRY ON.

























CLASS OFFICERS

President .................... Robert Rathgeber
Vice-President ..................... W alter Friday
Secretary ..................... Marguerite Horter
Treasurer ........................ Edward Roth
President of S. A ................ Bernard Keegan
Representatives to S. A. ......... Mildred Rayburn
ThiInas Foley
Class Colors ........ Green and White




` 4
.'. i


S, /


ROGER WAYNE ADAMS .
Canal Zone
Glee Club; "Once in a Blue
Moon"; "Cat o' Nine lails".
"Gold in Them Hills";
Swimming.
"On the stage he was natural.
simple, affecting,
'Twas only that when he was
off, he was acting."
l. .


- I-


HERNANDO ARROY( Y,
COLUNJE
Panama
"Gold in Them Hills':: Glee,
Club; Tennis; Basketball,
Soccer; Softball; a
Baseball.
"Villain and he be many riles
asunder."

I


O y isL A. BO-CS ,
Senior miju r










\ Little Tleatre.
"She's fair divinely fairfit love





for Gods."
JANET CAINLENDHELE

San Antonio, Texas.
V" Supper Club: we Check_'Club:
"Gsrld n Theli Hills";
Little Tlheatre. /. ,




"S silence more musical than airt love
songo"
JANET CAkLENDER
Washington, D. C.
,Alam6 Heights High School.
San Antonio, Texas.
"Silence more musical 'than any
song."


MALURICE S. BROWN
S Nevp York
Band: Orchestra: Glee Club;
-6Album Clubl ZONIAN Staff;
Electrical Engineering;
Softball.
4I see and approve better
i' ,things :



ALLEN BUTTON
Connecticut
Basketball; Baseball; Softball;
Football.
"None but himself can be his
Parallel."




A,&EORGE CAMPBELL
Canal Zone
ZONIAN Staff; Softball;
Baseball.
"Formed on the good old plan,
A true and brave and down-
right honest man."


CLA JDJFE. ANDERSON
J Panama
ZO )N Staff; Senior Luncheon
emnmittee: Softball; Foot-
r Y ball; Basketball.
,"'The deepest rivers make least
y din."


/I




V -





SARITA CASTEL
Panama
Spanish Club.
Manchester High School for
Girls,
Manchester. Enli r i
"She pretty to walk v.i.h.
Witti to talk wit.'
Ari'leasnt t6. to think on."



W LLIAN JEAN COLEMAN
S Iowa
S*Once in a Blue Moon"; Senior
Luncheon Committee; Glee
Club; Softball.
"I see you have a singing face."


BETTY HUGHES COMLEY
Canal Zone
Glee Club; Supper Club; We
Check Club; Pep Squad; Study
Hall Unit; Homeroom Unit;
Astronomy Club; Social Com-
mittee; PARRAKEET Staff;
Zonian Staff.
"The thrill of a happy voice
And the light of a pleasant
eye."

JOE CORRIG.N L
Canal Zone
Little Theatre Basketball;
"&old In Them Hills"; Di-
rected lMeet the Missus.'"
St. Joseph College at Princeton;
La Salle College.' Panama City.
"He was six feet o' man, A-i
Clear grit an' human natur'."



DAVID L. DE LA PERA
Canal Zone
Glee Club, Spanish Club;
STenris.
"Handsome is that handsome
does."



) LUCILLE BELLE DL'G.CN -
CAnal Zone
Study Half Servde4"Unit; Varitty
Soltbll, Litle Theatre-. PAR-
RAKEET taffm; ZONIAN 'Staft
'Gold ui Them Hills:"
"'Grace silently orders her ac-
Slions Wnd follows her move-
ments"


,



GENE E. CLINCHARD
Iowa
"What's the use of worrying?
It never was worth while."





. %RFo.fET t,OLUISE COhFNS
Pennsvlvhnia.
t e C!uu. PARRAKEET.
SHer voi c wv.as tever soft, gentle
and low, an excellent thing
in woman." *


MARTHA CORNWELL
Canal Zone
"But let me silent be."





ETHEL V. DEENEY
Canal Zone
Biology Club.
Lewis and Clark: Washington.
"Good sense which only is the
gift of Heaven,
And though no science, fairly
worth the seven."



E' ELEA'NOR .1. DENNIS
S 'N e.'. Yor.:

PPl1ktbus Hith hujol. X'Viiinia;
, Leria'rdo Hi-_lh School. New
i .nJersey.
'Bend on me then thy tender
eye.
As -tars look on the sea."

kPC
DOROTHY MAY DUGAS
Canal Zone
We Check; Study Hall Service
Unit.
"Her ways are ways of pleasant-
ness, and all her paths
are peace."












PROBER r DUVALL -_
Iowa
"From the looks-not the lips,
Is the soul reflected."





DONALD A. FERO
Nova Scotia
Glee Club; Treasurer of
Class '33.
"Happy am I; from care I'm
free!
Why aren't they all contented
like me?"



MARY FOLEY--
Panama
"For all that faire is, is by
Nature good."
St '




IWALTER C. FRIDAY, Jr.
i Missj ,ppi
Basketball; Baseball; Tennis;
- "rBand; Glee Club; "Gold in
Them Hills"; Vice-President
of Freshman and Senior Class.
"My specialty is being right
when other people are wrong."



ROBrRT GLtSSNEn
/ New York
Red Bank High School, New
Jersey. Gepre2 Wvthe.
VirVinria
BgskeLlhll. Softball Tennis
\To those vfho know thee not,
S np words can pint"





GORDON A. GRAHAM ^
Canal Zone
"His way is not always serious."


JULIA FERNANDEZ DEL
CAMPO
Panama
Glee Club; Spanish Club; PAR-
RAKEET Staff; ZONIAN
Staff.
"And she hath smiles to earth
unknown-"
*.



MAIR L. FFFZP.RICK
~inal ,Zone ,
." Bollng: Basebahll. r
'Thou .hvino_ ray o( intellectual
fire." .



J -
01r .4OOM" J.LEY **
Patama.
.Band-toeb~ e Club:' Pep Squad;
Little Theatre; Senior Represen-
)tat ve: PARRAKEET: Directed
"Moonshine."
,;Too busy with the crowded
hour to fear to ive or die."




DENNIS ALFRED GILBERT
Panama
Basketball
"The flash of his keen, black
eyes fnrerunniig the
thunder."





CHARLLS GORNELL
Panama
President of Class '33; soccer.
"Kindness is his virtue-
His courtesy knows no bounds."





ALLAN M. GREENLEE
S Pennsylvania
Softball
Shortridge High School. Indiana
"Let us attend to serious
matters."











.M._R.Y-NORENE GULBRANSEN
,Utah
Biology Club
"Never idle a moment, but
thrifty and thoughtful
of others."





SJEAN ANNA HALL -
Canal Zone
Volleyball
"Not much talk-a great sweet
silence."

.4^- P^ .

SMARY 1AI.RGARET HAW
C.ian1 l Zuile .
IFWairfax Ii0i ,0 \. Hollywood,

Trei-tner of Freshmen Girls;
PARRAKEET Staff; We Check;
Glee Club; Little Theatre;
Astronomy Club.
"A golden mind stoops not to
show of dross."
. -


CARL IIOFFhI.N Jr.
C-Anal Ale
/ "Tra,:k. Backetuall.
East 'Bi-:h i hho':l. Roch'1s
Ne\ Yor. .
"Who shall dispIute hiAt
critics say?
Their word's siuficeii, "
It


thel
the


RUTH SHORTER e"
S Pahama V'
C blass Treasurer '34.
"A happy soul, that all the way
'fo heaven hath a summer's
da'y."



THO1MS DANIEL HU'FF
S Canal Zone

R3R 'PRAKEET r a ff; "Chil-
derl, 0f jhe i ':-.,', Biology
Clu .,., Ba& etoall. Track;
l'Soc'cCa: ,Baseoall.
nature fo~me debut one such
Sl' man."


JOS PH W. I.ACH1T


Basketball; Efiball.
ki IWorth makes Ithe enain."






ARTHUR H. HAMMOND, Jr.
Canal Zone
Baseball; Soccer; Golf;
Album Club.
"A man of mark."


HUGH
/*


IOlDVNE IllGGIN-
BOTH.1il


.Flhri ida
Baseball; Saftball.
Landon High .~S ool.
"His talk was like a stream
which ra&-
With rapid change from rock
to roses'

/ .,


Su1pfr' Chiib. Ol Club; We
I ti-'cr'i i Vigc -t lti, dvllt '33;
'etiv 5 6, i li Them
SHifll ', Little Theatre.
"A' smile that glow'd celestial
rosy red, love's proper hue."




LENA MAE HOWARD
Canal Zone
"These lovely lamps, these
windows of the soul."



/J-t U ~- r C


DORIS HUTCHISON
Pennsylvania
Nifty Fifty; Glee Club
"A quiet mind is richer than
a crown."

3

5!1 D ic










SEVA ALICE JACVSON
Florida
Mimminger High Scbool.
Charleston, S. C.
"How sweet a-nd fair she seems
to be."


.J
.~ /
t FESTHER J. JdHNSON
./ Panama
.Mirth WVaJes the blAquet

A' '. .



DAVID C. KELLY, Jr.
Texas

Band; Basketball; Softball;
Senior Luncheon Committee.
Lawton High School.
"A man-/of gladness seldom
falls into madness."


.- D.AL P. KILE L -E
Canal Zone
SoiltallI: Basketball; Electrica
"" *Engineer. J
'"0. love is th Ie t .,
Irishman .; .' ".
He loves all that's el r
all that can i .
With his .g ol11U CRnd'd"
shamr(k sa.cre-" -
y Z ,j

RGARET .fi .


'Sta di ;or-6&-Ief
^r Z' _IAD rsiaf: r i 'r '-I1.iA




/ .drf .ie PRRAKEZ. .
'BBlarmf trAe t sie ut/
---merit ip ps he",o!if '
S -'* ,- p ,


"Blue


JUANIFA M1ANTHEY JENSEN
Washing ton
Glee Club; Orchestra; "Once in
a Blue Moon"; Astronomy
Club.
"Gentleness of speech and of
manners."


BERNARD J. KEEGAN '
New York
Class President '35; Chairman
of Student Council; Science
Club; "Children of the Moon";
"Cat o' Nine Tails"; "Drums of
Oude"; "Sire de Maletroit's
Door;'' "Gold in Them
Hills "
"The play's the thing wherein
I'll catch the conscience of
a king."

MARY M. KIERULFF
Oregon
.- Glee'-Club
"There was a soft and pensive
g race,
'A cast of thought upon her
face,
7nat suited well the forehead
high.v
'" \



MURIEL RUTH IN
Philippipes
Topeka Hig h-School, ,
"But she is wond ous fair!",~


JOHN F. LAT1MER
Florida
Softball -AsketbaJ,,A'
Landail e Schoo a riA fn-

Tho t sa dsputed
thin
:r sL a lgle



ROYCE B. LEWIS
Texas '
"He is complete in feature, and
in mind, -
With all e11d race 'to grace
a ger:ftlfnan."
i"


BETTY LEWIS --
Canal Zone
)reher eyes as the fairy
elks ilkethe dawn of








*1 / ,.. + ,,

SJEDGAR LINDO i-
I9 Panama
Glee Club; Spanish Club;
PARRAKEET Staff.
'But really a handsome and
charming man."


P .r

RAYMOND HENRY LLOYD
/Panama
Album Clut. Science Club: Or-
chestra. 'Once in a Blue
1 Moon". Soccer.
S "I am in earnest"



FRANCES SUSAN MAGUIRE
Canal Zone
SPeo Squad; Little Theatre;
: PARRAKEET Staff; Directed
"A Wedding."
"To hear her speak, and sweet-
ly smile
SYoiu were in Paradise the
S while."

SCOTTY MICHAELSON
SCanal.Zone
ZQNTLAN Staff. Athletic Asso-
c-atio: General Science Club;
Soccer. Baseball: Batketball;
"Gold In Them Hills."
"He was a man, take him for
all in all,
We shall not look upon his like
again."

)


MURIEL E. MOORE
Canal Zone
Volleyball: Basketball; Softba
PARRAKEET Staff; Spanis
Club.
"She has a friendly nature.


LOUIS JOHN LIPZINSK -
S -- Panama
Soc ~ aball. Track.Bas-
ket
Ath etic Association.
"Is he bashful! Is he7 shy
Can't he talk, or wor he try?"




ART LUR H. LI SE
a.-' ,-'- "--

Basketball; Softball
Columbus High School, Georgia.
"I see puzzling things."


JOHN J. McGtIIRE
Canal Zone
Science Club; PARRAKEET
Staff.
"A good man happy is a com-
mon good."




i FRED R. ,IIDDLETON '--
Canal Zone
Basketball; Soccer: Glee Club;
Spanish Club.
"With eyes that looked into the
very soul-
Bright-and as black and burn-
ing as a coal."


'3 1
JEAN McLEOD MORGAN
Canal Zone
Little Theatre; Tennis; Glee
Club.
"A face with gladness over-
spread!"


11;
h


ELIZA THR., HILLPPS
S Ca z'oe


I pi
14ed Ci P'RRAT
tg(f: Svma i Tefim.
U' 4u 1 aie a a ery heart ''


r


VIRGINIA NELLIE PRESTON
Canal Zone
Glee Club; Pep Squad; Astro-
nomy Club; "Once in a
Blue Moon."
"Filled to the brim with life
and fun."







jIL,


VFRNA MARION PRICE
Panama
Pep Squad; PARRAKEET Staff.
E-v-er in pursuit of studies
and labors."





SIDNEY RANDOLPH, Jr.

Canal Zone
President of Class '33; Student
Association; Advertising Com-
mittee '34; Water Polo.
"I find we are growing serious."


R ROBERT H. RATIHGABER
Canal Zone
Pres. of Class '36: Vice-Pres of
Class '35: 'Gold In Them Hill'"
"A Full House". "Sire de Male-
troit's Door": Basketball.
"It is pleasing to be po.intd at
with the finger and to have it
said, There goes the president
of the Clain of '36.'"





_.,,l 7oiDG?
;.L ~,C4iW dJ Zoriar? I' ,
Baseball; JSoccei-. Orc-.'r L
"Ay, devilish handsome
was he!"


*.


., LOIS ASSO /
(" f ./Panama
S Basketball: Spanish Club.
"Your fair discourse hath been
as ,Wgmar.
r Making the hard way sweet and
delectable."




MILDRED I. SEELEY ',--
Canal Zone
Volie,'ball
"Thine eyes 'are springs' in
whose serene' and silent waters
heaven Is seen."


"Earth has not anything to
show more fair."






,I EIJZ ETi. RATH
New York
Olee -^fub: littlZ theatre;
"Once in a WBe Moon."
"Happiness seems made to be
,/ shared."




MILBDR ~M. RAYBURN
jkentucky
FARR A 'ETfS't af I; Student
aooclijdion; Senior Luncheon
Grnmitmtee-; *"Gold in Them
Hills."
SIt's. lever, but is it Art?"




\ VAR il ROTH
S Cynl Zone
Sof all: 'track: Senior Trea-
irer; .Stydent Association
~ treasurer
\:This js no laughing matter."





SOPHIE SEABURe
Canal Zone
'Quietness is best."





CULBERT H. SHEDLOCK ,.
New York
PARZKEET Staff; General
Scienii c "ub: Track; "Gold in
v Them Hills."
S man o' busy hours."










ALBERT W. SIMKA
Canal Zone
Basketball.
"Men cf few words are
best of men."


MA NY JMASON SHEPIIERD
Ntb*a-x.l.
"A pleasing cou.llrtfl-i'n is no
slight ,arit xt.a. -"



C12


WALTER H. SIMS
Philippine Islands
Band; Orchestra.
"A lanky youth without a care."


IRA SOLE BERGER -
North Dakota
PARRAKEET Staff.
"Choice word and measured
phrase, above the reach of
ordinary men."
A t ,


ROSARIO SPINELL1
Pa nama
tLtrin:. Quartet, Orchestra; Lit-
Stie Theatre Oichestra; Tennis;
SSoccer; Basketball; Track.
S "Music hath charms to soothe
a Sbciae breast."


E ALDINE TUTTLE
w rk
Staff ; PARRAKEET
taf; tu 1 Service
hW teve e did, was done
/J'w ith as uch ease,
SIn her alone 'twas natural to
please."


BIENVENIDA VILLA
Panama
Spanish Club.
I "What sweet delight a quiet
life affords."





DOROTHY WALSTON --
North Carolina -
Science Club; Biology Club;
Astronomy Club.
"Smooth runs the water where
the brook is deep."


/ /
./ -


S,. /.


S .1~.IA V. SYMONDS
SNew Jersey
S PARAKEET Staff;
* Zir'-N[AN Staff.
"I lit 'r dje ti, rite
.I ,,1 ii ; a l i tan .'"



IIL Z N VAN CLIEF .
e :J CNal Zone Ty._
t., i Ba.t:et:r Jll, Base-
.. Int, S .. i m ri ii

I ,.ei L C tU ',ou1Aet ': our eyes
01 olut ", -
r UJ' the \.::, :t I came




BILL VIOLETTE
Rhode Island
Softball; Swimming.
"What better fare than well
content."


MARJCRIE WEIGOLD
New Jersey
PARRAKEET Staff; Glee Club;
Study Hall Service Unit.
"You are pretty,
-We know it."




A^. ^^. A 4





iA AlBERT WEEMPE
Canal Zone
"Once in a Blue Moon"; Glee
Club; Swimming.
"T'p' irnc- on thee. ljttl' man.
Euilt along the flagpole plan!"

ti.... .r / -^ / _. ...*^.


'( I
t


J


STANLEY N. WHALER
Canal Zone
Basketball; Science Club;
ZONIAN Staff.
"Handy limbs in a manly mold
For sports and contests bold."





WILLIAM A. WORLEY, Jr.
Texas.
Basketball; Softball.
"When night hath set her silver
lamp on high,
Then is the time fcr study."


MARTIN WEMPE
Canal Zone
Swimming: Softball; Glee Club;
Tennis.
"All the world's a circus."






EDITH A. W1KRAN (,
" New York
Cristobal High School.
'Nor wastes her sweetness in
the desert air."
t--



H SOHNAN RITT WRIGHT
Canal Zone
Little Theatre; "Children of the
Moon"; "Cat o' Nine Tails";
"Gold in Them Hills"; Directed
"Red Carnations."
"Oh! let me live my own life,
and die so too!"


V


SCATHERINE ATKINSON
Canada
"A quaint precision rules her
days."



DWIGHT K. SHURTLEFF, Jr.
Pennsylvania
Immaculata High School,
Leavenworth, Kansas.
"I am Sir Oracle, and when I
ope my lips, let no dog bark."



JOHN RUSSELL TRETT
Missouri
Baseball; Tennis, Softball.
Cleveland High School, St.
Louis, Missouri
"I like work; it fascinates me.
I can sit and look at it
for hours."

/


~t~t2


I


* J *


1
1









CRYSTAL LIES


Madame Predicto's shop was just large enough for two peo.
ple to squeeze into, to say nothing of the doughty Madame,
seated before a small table on which reposed a small crystal
ball. She fastened her beady bright eyes on her interlocutors'
faces as they asked her, "What does the future hold for our
class?"
"The future will be pretty large to hold what I see in my
infallible crystal," she said, after making a few passes at the
thing, and muttering words that sounded strangely like, "You'd
better work this time, old crystal, or out you go!"
"I see a fog, but it's clearing. Oh, I see the floor in the
SENATE. (It needs sweeping.) Ur-and there's Dwight
Shurtleff, the great Senator from Kansas. He's filibustering
as usual but there's so much noise I can't tell what about. Then
there's Bernard Keegan, the ex-actor, who is trying to get the
floor. Albert Simka, the President of the Senate, has gone to
sleep over his gavel. (His neck will probably feel like the gavel
went to sleep on him.) Ah, the scene has faded.
"I see a large banquet hall with a long table laid with the
feast. One person only do I see-It's Stanley Whaler, President
of the United States' Tall Story Club. It seems the other mem-
bers dropped out when he became president. Too much com-
petition! The scenes are coming quick and fast. Here's a large
building, occupying five city blocks. It's Scotty Michaelson's
School for Learning the Art of Leisure. It is packed with peo-
ple and poor Scotty is working so hard he has no time for prac.
timing what he preaches. Incidentally, the building was de-
signed by the eminent artist, Gene Clinchard, and has huge caria-
tures designed of glass on the outer walls.
"And now I see a theatre packed to capacity. The name
announces that Corrigan's Colossal Theatre now presents in
1i'rscn that glamorous star of stage and screen, Phyllis Bue-
chele. Her beauty is to be sent all over the country via tele-
vision, an invention which has been made a household word by
Sidney Randolph. In the front row sits her proud publicity
agent, Culbert Shedlock, and two rows behind him is the notori.
ous critic, Carl Hoffman, who looks exceedingly glum because
he can't, for the life of him, find anything wrong with her per.
formance.









"In the foyer, selling tickets and smartly smacking her gum
(chewing gum) is Lois Sasso. Brilliant celebrities, announced
by Donald Fero, pause to speak into the telemike. Among them
we find Alma Symonds, famous writer; Mary Fitzpatrick,
scientist, who discovered the "itchykootchie," a germ carried by
the common flea; Bob Rathgaber, head of the United States
Society for Prevention of Poor Grammar, and his co-professor
Ed Roth; Dennis Gilbert, one of the star pupils at the School
for Leisure; Walter Friday, a comely looking doctor from Johns
Hopkins.
"Oh, there's Fred Middleton. He's an usher, but he's al.
ways being fired for dancing when the music for the show
starts. And there's Tom Foley, the star's director. Jean Cole-
man, famous singer, is in the audience.
"Now I see the business room of a large magazine publish.
ing corporation, owned and managed by Mildred Rayburn. She
is seated in a room marked 'Private,' seeking inspiration. Her
office staff includes the efficient Frances Maguire, who, by vir-
tue of her position as the best director in the Little Theatre, is
now the drama editor of the magazine; Edith Wickran, editor
of the saccharine fiction department; Carol Boggs, who main-
tains a department "Men, and How to Marry Wealth"; and
Eleanor Dennis, who manages the section of 'Family Problems
from Budget to Baby.'
"Down in Panama, I see a modern, well-kept building called
'Ye Olde Modiste Shoppe.' Within its luxurious interior I see
Muriel King describing the latest in spun platinum gowns to a
group of fashionably dressed ladies. Without much difficulty,
I can see Peggy Horter, the well known figure in naval society;
Sarita Castel, known for her dramatic interpretations of people
who've been in the tropics too long; Betty Phillips, illustrator
and art editor of the Panama Journal, and Jean Morgan, in-
structor of swimming at the world's largest open-air pool near
Bella Vista. In another room I see typists doing a rushing
business, and among them I see Virginia Preston, the world's
fastest typist, Verna Price, an interpreter as well as typist; and
Mary Foley, another rapid typist.
"That scene has faded, but now I see the roof of what ap.
pears to be the same building. An autogiro, the only kind of
airplane now in existence, is warming up. (There's been a spell
of cool weather.) All dressed up in his suit of woven glass is
pilot Robert Duvall who carries the latest styles from Panama.
the center of style fashions, to all points north, west, south, and









east. Down in the shop again ('Tis marvelous old crystal!) 1
can see Mildred Seeley, the beautiful model, posing for third
dimension pictures. Dorothy Dugas, designer of the gown,
stands by ready to help."
The fortune teller paused, wiped her brow, and held out her
hand. We dropped some coins in her palm, and satisfied, she
resumed her crystal gazing.
"The athletic field has come into view. A bunch of stuffed
cabbages-I mean stuffed shirts-are witnLs-ing tryouts for
the World Olyimpics, to be held in Cairo, Syrup-1 mean Egypt.
Helen van Clief is exhibiting much skill in throwing steel roll-
ing pins, as is Muriel Moore. Louis Lipzinski, Bob Ridge, and
Hernando Arroyo have already been put on the team to repre-
sent Central America because of their proficiency in the art of
dodging missiles, including rolling pins. At the pool, Al Wempe
and Ira Solenberger are exhibiting such fents of swimming that
their audience is held brainless-er-breathless. It fades.
"This time I see the broadcasting room of 'Ye Second
Hande Chewing Gum Factory' in Panama, which is doing much
to keep people from parking old gum in inconvenient places by
providing receptacles for the purpose. The collected gum is
then processed at the factory until it is better than new. This
factory is owned by Toni Ramirez. Too bad you can't see it too,
but of course it is my hidden power which enables me to see so
accurately. Roger Adams, Claude Anderson, Betty Comley,
Betty Rath, Julia Fernandez, and David Kelly (Jesse James,
Jr.) are presenting a skit via the teleradio. Tom Huff, public
accountant seated in the audience, is trying to account for the
fact that the troupe has been allowed to remain on the air.
Edgar Lindo, owner of the station, is tearing his hair in the
wings (not by the roots?) He should worry, for right after the
skit comes the violin impresario, Rosario Spinella, who is at
present trying to hit flies with mothballs that came out of his
violin case. David De La Pena, Alice Blanton, Esther Johnson,
Sophie Seaburg. and Bienvenida Vila, who form a well known
literary group, have fallen to playing tit-tat-toe. I hear a sud-
den scraping which frightened a few of the ladies. No fear!
It was merely the world famed baritone, Joe Hachat, clearing
his throat. His act comes after Rosario's. The navy must be
in, for I see that austere naval officer Robert Glessner, bending
his eagle eye on a wart adorning the neck of the person next to
him. That swaggering soldier of fortune, who has published
several books about his exploits, is none other than Allen Button.









"The scene has shifted to New York, and I see a crowd
milling around a tall SKyscraper. Tmns is the Convention for
the Prevention of the Election of Alice Jackson as the F'irst
Woman President of the United States. Her staunch supporters
are Juanita Jensen, striving hard to become her private secre-
tary, Dorothy Walston, ghost writer of the Honorable Miss
Jackson's speeches, Ruth Horter, who is the ghost behind the
ghost writer, and Betty Lewis, who arranges all the details
pertaining to campaign traveling. Margaret Haw, crusading
newspaperwoman, has contributed much of her time and talent
to the writing of fiery editorials for the cause. They are hav.
ing a heated discussion with a group of lobbyists who will sup-
port 'Little Eva' for certain concessions. I see Gordon Graham,
pleading frantically with her to support his well-known pro.
posal known as Prohibition of Labor Bill. Burritt Wright has
higher aims, and is insisting that she endorse a bill subsidizing
a National Theatre which will star him alone. John Trett wants
her support of the Bill Forbidding Teachers to Give Grades of
Less than 'A,' and Martin Wempe insists his system of reducing
exercises be made compulsory in all schools, and demands all the
royalties for originating the plan. Walter Sims is proclaiming
loudly that from his own experience of energy wasted by ex.
cessive talking, he has conceived the idea of harnessing the
waterfalls of words wasted in Congress and converting the
energy into electricity to light the dome of the capitol, thus re-
ducing the government budget. Martha Cornwell is trying to
make herself heard above the babel of words, but it is quite
impossible. No one knows what the other is saying anyway,
and I doubt that it matters. Charles Gornell, chairman of the
committee of lobbyists, is politely sitting in a corner.
"Just a block away, doctors Martha Andrade and Allan
Greenlee are discussing a weighty problem: is the fore foot or
the hind foot of a mosquito the most useful? If not, why not?
This is a meeting of the Medical Society, and lending several
interested ears are dental nurse Perle Tuttle, her associates Jean
Hall, Mary Shepherd, and Janet Callender. Other nurses dis-
cussing the question of how to hold the patient's hand while
taking his pulse, are Margaret Comins, Ethel Deenev, Pat
(Mercedes) Arrieta, Lucille Dugan, Marjorie Weigold and
Catherine Atkinson.
"Back in Panama I see a bridge, an exact replica of the
Bridge of Sighs in Venice, reaching from Panama mainland to
Coiba. It was designed by construction engineers who bear the
names George Campbell. Maurice Brown, and Dan Kilev, who
still doesn't remember whether or not he put the decimal point









in the right place, but trusts his Irish luck. This is the gala
dedication of the Bridge of Sighs, which was allpropriately de-
dicated to John Latimer, a fellow engineer. Present to make a
speech is Bud Hammond, a prosperous businessman. Rival en-
gineers, John McGuire, Arthur Luse, and William Worley, whose
own bridge collapsed the first day, are present, and hopeful.
Rodney Higginbotham, teleialdio announcer, is on hand with an
eloquent speech. I suppose it's eloquenit-he's talking so fast
no one can understand him."
The fortune teller paused a moment, and we asked breath-
lessly, "Is that all?"

"Wait!" she said.

We waited.

"Oh, now I see the students reading their ZONIAN, and
Margaret Kuhn is running from a mob. I wonder why."

















NONENTITIES


Laughing children-
Men and women of tomorrow-
Face the future eagerly.
But a little while
And they too
Will be beaten under-
Or will they stand against the violence
And steady driving of the forces
Tending to stifle them?
Some-ah yes-
Those possessing courage
And a will to do,
Others not so strong
Will drift with the masses,
And become nonentities-


A. V. S.













Juniors















F'


JUNIOR GIRLS


Abraham, Polly ^Lutz, Virginia'
Azcarraga, Raquel ) Mann, Louise
SBauman, Ruth --Moon, Flora B. v
Beissel, Charlotte =.McDaid, Margaret
Boggs, Patsy Martin, Dolores /
-Booth, Lilian Mitchell, Vera
-Brown, June Murray, Lamar
Brown, Ruth Nachman, Vera
Carr, Annabell Palacio, Nelva
Comins, Barbara Ross, Betsy /_
-Corr, Gloria Rath, Betty Y
/Dickson, Jane Russon, Dolores .
/DuVall, Dorothy -. Salterio, Grace -D
-Durfee, Julia Schierloh, Mary
Enright, Jane Seeley, Norma ,
-Gibson, Patsy Shepherd, Julia
-Gormely, Virginia Simka, Esther-
Gritz, Judith -- Simms, Virginia /
Hack, Bertha A- Stapleton, Bess /~
-Heileman, Margie Stillwell, Norma
"Hobson, Eleanor -- Stoudnor, Jane-
Holston, Dorothy -i luck, Violay _
-Huntoon, Aura Vila, Olga -.
W. Jackson, Mary -Violette, Frances
' Johnson, Helen Wainio, Alyce --
4 Joyner, Dorothy- Walling, Jayne j
- Judd, Dorothy Whelan, Mary
King, Betty -- White, Eugenia
-Kuhn, Betty Wikran, Edith v -
- Kundroth, Mildred Woodruff, Mary Jane
7--Lewis, Phyllis Young, Louise y( -_

















-Arosemena, John
SArze, Alejandro
- Atkinson, Fred
- Benedetti, Eloy
-Blake, Robert
- Blanton, Thomas
Boyd, Alfred
Brayton, Donald <
Brotherson, Graham
Bullock, Martin
Clarke, Howard ,
- Collins, Winter _p
Cox, William -A
- Cullen, James
Cuthbertson, Rodric ,
-Deyton, T. W.
- Dockery, Harry Jr.
- Doyle, Manuel
-Dwelle, Ned
SEdwards, Leland
Erickson, Robert
Evers, Wendell
- Fenton, George
Ferguson, John ..
Ferguson, Leo
,--Fitzpatrick, John
-Freer, Arden
Gibson, Archie A
Gornell, Charles ,
Grier, Robert
Halliday, Robert
,-Hearne, Webb -. -
Hunter, James .
-Levy, Harry
Lipzinski, Todd


- Makibbin, Henry
-- Malone, Tom
- March, Douglas
- Marti, Teddy --
- Matheney, Robert -
- McConaughy, Richard
- McCormack. Robert
SMcElhone, Harry a
McFadden, George
Mead, Burton 1
-Meigs, James
-Mendez, Juan C.
-Neumann, Charles D
- Orr, Mattes
- Pearson, Harry
Porras, GCirr-..,
-Pratt, Robert B.
Price, William
--Rance, George
Rice, Thomas
,Ridge, Lawrence
_.Ridge, Vincent
--Rinehart, Jack
-Robinson, Earl
Roth, James
Sanger, Vernon
Shelton, George <.
Siler, Jack p
Speir, Woodrow
Stempel, Lionel
Scobie, Fred x
Stilson, Donald
Trower, James
Wahl, William X,
Young, George
SZirkle, John -


JuTNIMO IoYs











JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY


The Balboa High School Junior Class of '36 held its first
meeting of the school year on the tenth of October. At this
meeting the following officers for the class were elected: Leo
Ferguson, President; Richard McConaughy, Vice-President;
William Price, Treasurer; and Vera Mitchell, Secretary. Robert
Erickson and Jane Stoudner were elected to represent the
junior class in the Student Association.
The junior play, which incidentally was the first dramatic
production of the year, was attended by a large audience at
both the matinee and evening performances. Because it was
possible not to attend school on the afternoon of the play a great
number of students went to the matinee performance who would
otherwise not have gone at all. Altogether the junior produc-
tion, "Cat o' Nine Tails," brought a nice sum of money to the
Student Association fund.
Two junior dances were held at the Tivoli Hotel this year.
The first was held on January 24 and the second on the 24th of
April. Gus Schmidt and orchestra furnished the music at these
dances which proved to be very successful. Dr. Prentiss, the
junior class adviser, was well pleased with the dances and with
the committees under whose direction each dance was run. The
junior-senior banquet climaxed the social events of the year
for the junior class.
Ini the sport world the junior class came out on top in the
basketball classic, defeating the other classes easily. Although
there was no inter-class softball a great majority of the mem-
bers of the top and better teams were juniors. When the Zonian
went to press the tennis, track, and soccer had not been run.
In their own sport world the junior girls won the inter-class
volleyball contest.
It must be noted that the junior class boys must be more
intelligent than the girls since they were able to put Robert
Blake and William Price on the hizh honor roll a number of
times during the year. Or is it possible that Robert and William
deserve the credit rather than junior boys in general?












Sophomores













































SOPHOMORE GxIRIS


Adams, Katherine %
'Alexander, Reba ,
Anderson, Mildred
Bender, Natalia
Bougan, Claire
/Bowen, Dorothy
Brayton, Dorothy
Brown, Margaret
/Brugge, Mary Nell
Burmester, Eileer,
Collignon, Ellen
/Comley, Mary Jane
/Conlan, Ellen i
,Dennis, JeanA
/Dryden, Helen /
/Evans, Norma /
SFoley, Genevieve c J
Fuller, Fay V
Glann, Rachel
Grossman, Helen
Grier, Margaret /
Gulbransen, Polly-Anna
/Haggerty, Marie 1
/Haldeman, Betty j


Haldeman, Gail
Hamlin, Jane (
Henrie, Neva
Herrera, Judith
Hudson, Audrey J
Johnston, Shirley
Journey, Lucile -. V
-Kalar, Olive;
Komp, Anita
Lamb, Rita
Lindo, Elaine
Lindo, Eleanor
Lord, Shirley v/
MacMurray, Margaret /
Marcy, Lois
-Meigs, Margaret )
Michaelsen, Helen
Miller, Blanche
Mohr, Judith --
Moore, Marguerite
Morales Anita k
v-Morgan, Ferne
Morgan, George Ann
Morrison, Lorraine
J-Neville, Beverly -


Oller, Griselda
-Pearl, Evelyn -
Pearson, Mary
Peterson, Helen
/Rathgaber, Bernice
Raymond, Theresa
/Ridge, Virginia
XRocker, Wyllis _
SRozburski, Jessie
Ryan, Patsy
Sanger, Elsie
-Schloming, Beatrice $^
Smith, Mary
/ Sommer, Virginia
Spector, Ada
Stilson, Dorothy
SStrauss, Alice
Tonneson, Elizabeth
'Tuck, Virginia
Urey, Blanche -
Welch, Vireiria v
'Wright, Ruth -
Young, Elinor
Zidbeck, Alice















Adams, Alan
Adams, John
Bain, Duncan
Baker, Lawrence
Baldwin, Albert.
Baughman, Bill
Benny, William -
Brennan, Frank
Bunker, Jack
Bunker, James
Byrne, Robert
Carey, Jack
Casey, Martin
Cobb, Horace
Cornwell. Edward
Clarke, Howard ,
Coyle, Francis
Crawford, James
Dailey, Elmer
Dalton, John
Delvalle, Edward
Dodson, Dean
Dugas, Ralph- -
Egger, William
Emerson, William
Ewing, Jack
Ferrari, Florencio
Fessler, Paul
Fitzpatrick, Martin


Foster, Harry
French, Billy
Galimany, Alberto
Grajales, Manuel
Hahn, William
Halstead, Zachary
Hampton, Robert
Harness, William
Hilbert, Albert
Horter, Milton -.
Howard, Vance
Hughes, Pete
Hunt, James
Johnston, William
Joyner, Edward
Keller, William, Jr.
Kelso, Lee Walter, Ji
Lawson, William
LeBrun, William
Lehman, Hugh
Lloyd, William
MacMurray, John -
Matlowsky. Samuel
McCoy, Robert
McNulty, William
Mitchell, Donald
Muller, Walter
Mulling, Eugene
Paterson, Oliver


Pearson, Edmond
Polychrome, Jimmy
Poole, Henry- -
Provost, Robert
Quintero, Diogenes,
Rhodes, Ralph
Runyan, Raymond
Russon, George, Jr.
Russon, William
Sandberg, Albert
Sanborn, Harold
Schmidt, Theodore
Severson, John
Snyder, Vernon
St. John, Adrian
Sullivan, Thomas
r. Talty, John
Trower, James, Jr.
Tudor, John
Turner, Eugene
Van Siclen, Robert
Villegas, William
Underwood, Hawain
Walbridge, Jack
Wallijol-:-:- Mack
Weeks. Kenneth
Whaler, George
Whitsett, James -
Wine, Chester


SOP"1IOMORE 4l oy













CLASS OF '38



The sophomores with a larger class than ever, started school
this year feeling very important in their new position.
At the first class meeting of the year the Student Associa-
tion plan was discussed and Gail Haldeman was elected as the
sophomore girl representative to the Association. Chester Wine
and Betty Haldeman were nominated for president. As there
was not time for voting at this meeting, the votes were taken
in the home rooms, Chester Wine being elected. Miss Parsons,
the sophomore adviser, presided at the meeting.
At the next meeting Betty Haldeman was elected vice-
president; Bernice Rathgaber, secretary; Francis Coyle, treasur-
er; and Elmer Dailey as the sophomore boy representative to
the Student Association. Plans for the coming year were dis-
cussed and the class was found to be generally in favor of having
a dance, besides the usual sophomore party.
In sports generally, the sophomores came in third, as was
the case in inter-class basketball. However, in swimming and
track the sophomores had a chance to show more competition.
Athletically the girls fared better than the boys.
As last year, there were many students who turned out for
drama. This class has quite a few young artists who might turn
out to be good actors, with the proper practice.
The sophomore class is well represented both athletically
and in other outside activities, and with two years still lying
ahead, it should achieve many fine accomplishments by its senior
year.


__













Freshmen












































FRESHMEN GIRLS


( Adler, Blanche .
Alfonte, Mary
Arosemena, Olga
Bauman, Elva
A(Blanton, Josephine ,
)Bowen, Billie -
Boyd, Edith
Boyd, Elena
Boyd, Mildred
Brayton, Shirley
s.Brotherson, Doris
Busch, Betty
Cabrera, Patricia
Calobreves, Alice
Calobreves, Minerva
Callender, Catherine
Cannon, Edith
Caruthers, Jessie
SChan, Doris
1 Chan, Irene
*Comley, Beverly .
Craig, Margaret
Cryan, Mary
Daniel, Lucille
Deal, Doris
Dennis, Marjorie i.~
Deveneau, Phyllis
SDodson, Marian .
Enright, Margaret
Escroffery, Edna
Ewing, Susan


Ewing, Thelma
Fayard, Thelma
Friedman, Harriet
/ Fuller, Helene
Fuqua, Ruth
Gamboa, Angelina
Getman, Patricia
Giavelle, Elizabeth
Gill, Myriam
Godfrey, Dorothy
Greenwell, Billie
Grossman, Shirley
Hall, Helen
Hall, Kathryn
Hambelton, June
Harris, Geneva
Hilbert, Maxine
Hinds, Dorothy
Hirsh, Margaret
/Holcomb, June
Horter, Marion
Jacobs, Anne
Jette, Jeanne
Keegan. Marie
Kent, Ruby
Koperski, Janet
-' Krueger, Virginia -
Leason, Ofelina
Lewis, Daphne


X McGuire, Roberta
McKenzie, Betty
Mead, Ellen
Mendez, Edna
Meyers, Isolda
X Monsanto, Beatrice ..-
/Morrison, Bette
.Nash, Helen
Nash, Norine
Noyes, Anne
Oiler, Manuelita
Orr, Marion
Phillips, Bessie
Phillips, Eileen
Pimento, Dolores
Quinn, Claire
SRocker, Jeanne
Rodgers, Betty
Rosson, Juanita
Scott-Simmons, Fannie
X. Sexton, Gene
Smith, Marian
Sullivan, Eileen
Taber, Audrey
)Van Siclen. Cornelia
Weir, Bessie
Whelan, Catherine
White, Peggy
Willett, Betty
Williams, Faye
Yarbraugh, Frances














Aloy, Frank
Arias, Gilberto
Atkinson, Quintus
Austin, Louis
Austin, Osmond
Ayola, Austin
Babcock, Leslie
Barnard, Paul
Bender, Thomas
Boggs, Roy
Bryan, Robert
Burlin, Charles
Caldwell, Louis
Carlos, Damian
Chase, Alfred
Cresopules, George
Cohen, Gordon
Criste, Francis
Cruz, Joaquin
Cruz, Jaime
Cryan, Francis
Detamore, Jerry -
XDisharoon, Paul -
Dodson, Richard
Dowell, Harry
Draughon, Woodworth
Dunley, H.
Dwelle, Roy
Dyer, Wallace --
Edmunds, Kenneth


Egger Thomas
Ellr. Clyde
Erbe, Phillip
Fitzgerald, Maurice
Foster, Fernando
Freer, C.
Gallivan, John
Green, Peter
Halman, Donald
Harness, James
Hernandez, Julio
Henriquez, Moises
Henriquez, Ralph
)Herrington, Robert
Huldquist, Rudolph
Hunter, Stanley
Husted, George
XHyde, William
Innan, Thomas
Tames, William
Justice, James
Koperski, Robert
Lauterback, Charles
Leach, Raymond
Logsdon, Bill
Ludlum, Joseph
Madrigal, Emilio
'5 Matheney, Angus
McCaslin, Donald
Michaux, Macon
Montanye, John


Mullins, Earl
Murwin, William
O'Donnell, Jack
Palacio, Albert
Palmer, Duncan
Rames, Bernard
Parsans, William
Price, Dorsey
Rea, Everett
Rice, Julian
Ridge, James
Rios, Antonio
Rodriguez Charles
Schwartz. Karl
Scobie, Herbert
Shelton, Bertie
Sherwood, Warren
Shierloh, John
Smith, James
Smith, Ralph
Snider, Joe
Stallings, James
Sutherland, Jack
Torbert, Woodrow
Toledans, Chester
Trower, John
Trower, James
Weeks, Homer
Weil, Edward
Wood, James
Young, James














FILRES.IIAN CLASS OF '35 AND '36


The Freshman Class of '35 and '36 is determined to be mark-
ed down not as "just average," but as "above par." Already it
boasts at least two members of the PARRAKEET staff, one
member of the ZONIAN staff, a reasonable membership in the
Student Association, an enthusiastic participation in athletics,
sixteen boys and girls competing for places in dramatics, with
Faye Williams being voted the second best actor in the one-act
play contest, and a commendable sprinkle of freshmen names
on the Honor Roll.
Although the class was organized rather late in the year,
it showed good judgment in selecting as its officers the follow-
ing: Roy Dwelle, President; Julian Rice, Vice-President; Betty
McKenzie, Secretary; Beverly Comley, Treasurer; and Jeanne
Rocker and Maurice Fitzgerald, Representatives to the Student
Association.
As a class the freshmen purpose to be noticeable and note-
worthy in all activities and scholastic work during the remain-
ing years of their life in Balboa High School.












Activities






















LITTLE THEATER'S JUBILEE PROGRAM
On Friday, October 18, the Little Theater presented a ju-
bilee program in honor of its admission to membership in the
National Theater Conference. Under the direction of Mr. Subert
Turbyfill two one-act plays were given. During the intermission
Mr. Ben M. Williams, Superintendent of Schools, gave a brief
talk on "What the National Theater Conference Membership
Means to Us."
The first of the plays on the program was an original co-
medy, To Be or Almost Be, written by Dorothy Judd, a student
in Balboa High School. The setting of the play was the Man-
nings' four-family quarters in Balboa, Canal Zone, in the year
1935. The plot, in an amusing way, revealed the hopes and in-
trigues of Mrs. Manning to preserve her family's happiness.
The characters were: Ruth Wright as Mrs. Manning; John Zirkle
as Billy Manning; Virginia Gormeley as Patricia Manning;
Jack O'Donnell as the little brother; Edward Roth as Mr. Rock-
wood; Blanche Miller as Mrs. Davis; Nathalia Bender as Mrs.
Brown, and Ellen Conlan as Mrs. Jones.
The second of the one-act plays was the dramatic version
of Sire de Maletroit's Door, by Robert Louis Stevenson. The
scene of this romantic episode is laid in Burgundy, France, in
1429. The characters in the production were: Bob Rathgeber as
Sire de Maletroit; Lucille Dugan as Blanche de Maletroit; Ned
Dwelle as Francois; Bernard Keegan, Jr., as the priest; Tom
Foley as Denis de Beaulieu; and Harry Foster and Robert Van
Siclen as men-at-arms.
The French pronunciations were supervised by Miss Frost.
The music was furnished by the Little Theater Orchestra under
the direction of Mrs. Baker. Those playing were Neva Henri,
Rosario Shelton, Rosario Spinella, and Ruth Wright.












C1AT 0' NINE TAILS


Cat 0' Nine Tails, presented by the junior class at Balboa
Clubhouse on Friday, lNovember 15, is a mystery drama in three
acts, written by Lawrence Worcester. The scene of the play is
laid at the Gordons' hunting lodge in Maine, and the action
takes place at midnight on a day in November and during the
following evening. 'ine play centers around Henry, the chore
boy, who is discovered in the last act to be the mysterious "Cat
o' Nine Tails."
A very energetic and capable cast directed by Mr. Turby-
fill presented the play. Bernard Keegan, Jr., starred as Henry,
the chore boy, who exercised unsuspected hypnotic power over
Norma Stillwell as Theodora Maitland. Robert McCormick por-
trayed Mr. James Gordon, Sr.; Blanche Miller, Mrs. James Gor-
don; Roger Adams, Jimmy Gordon; Burritt Wright, Jacob
Weber, the caretaker; and Virginia Ridge, Betty, his daughter.
Louise Mann as Miss Smith and Jack Siler as Mr. Fox skillfully
impersonated the inadequate detectives. Ruth Brown as Nora,
the cook, and Mary Jane Comley as Peggy, her daughter, added
an element of contrasting comedy.
Thomas Foley, Jr., the stage manager was ably assisted
by William Le Brun, Robert Van Siclen, Francis Coyle, Gene
Clinchard, Ruth Brown, Jane Stoudner, and Mr. Richard Moore.
The business and advertising were managed by William
Price, John Zirkle, and Dean Dodson.
The high school orchestra, under the direction of Mrs.
Baker, furnished appropriate music.




















(xOLD IN THEMI HILLS
GOLD IN THEM HILLS is a melodrama in three acts
which the seniors presented under the direction of Mr. Subert
Turbyfill. The action takes place in the old homestead of Hiram
Stanley, an honest farmer, and Big Mike's bar and dance hall
in the Bowery. The city villain's pursuit of "Our Little Nell,"
the honest farmer's daughter, leads to many complications,
which are untangled in traditional melodrama style.
The unusually large cast for the production was as fol-
lows: speaker of the prologue, Joe Corrigan; the housekeeper,
Mildred Rayburn; Barbara Stanley, Genevieve Foley; Hiram
Stanley, Walter Friday; Nell Stanley (heroine) Phyllis Bue-
chele: John Dalton (hero) Roger Adams: Richard Murgatroyd
(villain) Hernando Arroyo; Sam Slade, Bernard Keegan, Jr.;
Jenkins. Bob Rathgaber. Other members of the cast were Bur-
ritt Wright, John Fitzpltr'icIk, Tom Folev, Jr., Lucille Dugan,
Stanley Whaler, Phyllis Lewis, Audrey Hudson. Virginia Gor-
meley, Alice Strauss, Dorothy Duval, Arthur Michaelson, Bob
Erickson, Martin Casey, Marguerite Horter. Norma' Stillwell,
Jack Siler, Jack O'Donnell, Jean Coleman. Francis Coyle, and
last and least but most important, Little Eddie Hatchett.
The staging, advertising, properties, publicity, and business
were handled adequately by Joe Corrigan. Bob Rathgaber,
Thomas Huff, Stanley Whaler. Arthur Michaelson, Marjorie
Weigold, Raymond Lloyd, Donald Fero, James Trower, Audrey
Hudson, Virginia Preston. Alice Strauss. Dorothy Duvall. Vir-
ginia Gormeley, Thomas Foley. Jr., Bob Van Siclen, John Zirkle,
Culbert Shedlock, and Lucille Dugan.
Appropriate music for the play was furnished by the high
school band under the direction of Mr. Swanson.







DIRANIATIC ACIIIEVEMIENTS
This year the students of Balboa High School have taken a
keen interest in dramatics, under the direction of Mr. Subert
Turbyfill. The Little Theater has sponsored a production each
month, and competition for the privilege of participation in
these productions has been enthusiastic.
During the inter-semester one act play contest the pupils
who were qualified were permitted to act as directors, and
Burritt Wright, Joe Corrigan. Frances Maguire, and Thomas
Foley, Jr., presented plays to the public. The audience voted for
their choice of best director, actor, and actress. Frances Ma-
guire was given first place as a director, and Joe Corrigan was
given second place. As actors Ned Dwelle was judged first and
John Talty, second. Gail Haldeman was given first place among
the girls, with Faye Williams as second.
The year's program included the following:
OCTOBER-Jubilee Program-"To Be or Almost Be".
"Sire de Maletroit's Door".
NOVEMBER-Junior Play-"Cat o' Nine Tails".
JANUARY-Inter-semester Plays-"A Wedding".
"Moonshine"
"Red Carnations"
"Meet the Missus"
FEBRUARY-Senior Play-"Gold in Them Hills"
MARCH-OPERETTA
APRIL-Festival Plays-"Willow Pattern"
"The Valiant"
MAY-Moliere's Comedy-"The Imaginary Invalid".
























THE PARRAKEET
Under the efficient direction of Miss Eneboe, the PARRA-
KEET has had an unusually successful year. Its outstanding
achievement was its admission to Quill and Scroll on its first
application for membership. Margaret Kuhn as editor-in-chief
and Dorothy Judd as news editor deserve special commenda-
tion for their faithful work in organizing and supervising the'
publication of the paper. In collecting material and editing they
have been assisted by the following additional members of the
staff: associate editor, Robert Blake; sports editor, Donald
Brayton; feature editors, Hope Toulon and Alma Symonds; ex-
change editor, Mercedes Arrieta; reporters, Martha Andrade,
Natalia Bender, Ruth Brown, Margaret Comins, Betty Com-
ley, Elmer Daily, Lucille Dugan, Nancy Foster, Vance Howard,
Virginia Gormeley, Gail Haldeman, Bernard Keegan, Virginia
Lutz, John McGuire, Muriel Moore, Mildred Rayburn, Norma
Stillwell, Hope Toulon, Peggy White, and Betty Willett.
The business staff, with Miss Butler as sponsor, has done
its work quietly but effectively with Marjorie Wiegold as man-
ager; Perle Tuttle in charge of circulation, assisted by Ellen
Conlan, Ruth Wright, and Norma Stillwell; Mercedes Arrieta
as advertising manager, assisted by Betty Phillips, Winter
Collins, and Frances Maguire.
Roger Adams, Phyllis Buechele, Dorothy Dugas, Edgar
Lindo, Verna Price and Helen Van Clief have contributed their
time as typists, preparing the copy for the printers.










Zo)NIAN STAFF
Editor-in-Chief .. .......................... Maurice Brown
Associate Editor ........................... Mattes Orr
Senior Editor .. .......................... IMargaret Kuhn
Junior Editor . .......................... Martin Bullock
Sophomore Editor . ......................... Paul Fessler
Freshman Editor . ......................... Peggy White
Activities ................................. Eleanor Hobson
Boys' Sports .. ............................. Walter Friday
Girls' Sports ................................. Lucille Dugan
Literary Editor ............................ Alma Symonds
Art Editor .......... ...................... Irene Chan
Assistant ..................................... Judith Gritz
School Life .. ........................... Claude Anderson
Assistant .............................. George Campbell
Cameramen ............................... Vera Nachman
Hope Toulon
Arthur Michaelson
Graham Brotherson
Advertising Manager ... ..................... Betty Comley
Assistant .. ............................... Julia Fernandez
Literary and Make-up Adviser .......... Katherine E. Jessup
Art Adviser .............................. Mary Worrell
Business Advisers ...................... .. Harvey Prentiss
Mary Butler

























ORCHESTRA


STRING QUARTETTE











'U. r
9t


GIRLS CHORUS


BOYS CHORUS




*HEII 1EE


GLEE CLUB
The Glee Club consists of both boys and girls who have
had one year in the girls and boys choruses. On many of the
programs the Glee Club is assisted by the boys and girls of the
choruses.
To most people, the Christmas program given in the patio
of the school is the outstanding program of the year, combin-
ing as it does costuming and effective lighting with the familiar
Christmas carols, the selections from Handel's The Messiah, and
the festive Christmas spirit.
In addition to the Christmas program, the following events
were given during the year:
February-French Music, a program given for the Ancon
Morning Musicale.
March-The Operetta, a production given with the assist-
ance of the Little Theater.
May-The Music Festival.
June-The Commencement Music.










CROCODILE ISLAND


CROCODILE ISLAND, a modern operetta with a tropical
setting and very tuneful and melodious music, was given by the
glee clubs at Balboa Clubhouse on March 12. This operetta,
which was produced under the direction of Mrs. Baker and Mr.
Turbyfill, provided opportunity for practice in solo, duet, quar-
tette, and four part chorus work, as well as giving the orchestra
experience in accompanying.
On Crocodile Island the king was to be given as a sacrifice
to the sacred crocodiles because the sorcerer had said the cro-
codiles demanded such a sacrifice. In the midst of the excite-
ment some American tourists came to the Island. Two of the
young American boys fell in love with the two daughters of
the king. Everything ended happily when the sorcerer was
found to be an impostor.
The twelve individual parts were played by the following:
Jean Coleman as Pearl, Margaret Haw as Petal, Webb Hearne
as Tom, Gene Clinchard as Jeff, Ruth Baumann as Miss Crisp,
John Fitzpatrick as the king, Norma Stillwell as Mammy Lu,
George Russon as Dr. McSnoozer, Francis Coyle as the sorcerer,
Dorothy Judd as Miss Brewster, John Kain as Hopalong, and
Roy Dwelle as Nitwit.
Other members of the glee clubs sang in the various cho-
ruses which added color and interest to the production.










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THE BAND
Under the direction of Mr. J. Chester Swanson, the band
has done much to enliven the spirit of Balboa High School. Be-
sides playing for the basketball and baseball games and the
opening of the softball season, the band contributed the neces-
sary atmosphere for the senior play. During the Christmas
hohdays they serenaded both Balboa and Ancon, and played for
a Christmas entertainment at the Balboa Clubhouse. During
National Music Week they gave an outdoor concert, and one
in Balboa Clubhouse. At least once they went over the air in
a broadcast from the Miramar Club.
The members of the band are cornets-Walter Sims, Dean
Dodson, Tom Foley, James Harness, Leland Edwards, Neal
Small, John Davis, William Cox, John Gallivan, Alfred Chase,
and Paul Disharoon; clarinets-Albert Baldwin, Donald Mc-
Caslin, Jack Carey, Robert Van Siclen, Fack Gamble, David
Kelley, Louis Caldwell, and Francis Cryan; saxaphones-William
Reinig, George Lane, Bill Logsdon; flutes-Bertie Shelton, Jean
Rocker, and Thomas Immon; alto-horns-Charles Neumann,
Florencia Farrari, and George Callender; baritone horns-Ver-
non Seeley, Charles Fair, and Hugh Deeney; bass-horns-James
Crawford, Ralph Dugas, and George Whaley; drums-William
Harness, George Russon, Ned Dwelle, and Harry Pearson.

















ILroG3oc,-y Cii'-B


Under the direction of Mr. G. O. Lee the biology club has
expanded its membership this year. At the meetings which are
held in the evening, Mr. Lee gives a talk on some subject of
interest to coming biologists, and this is followed by a group
discussion. Refreshments furnish an important part of the
program.
The officers of the club are: Mattes Orr, President; Martin
Fitzpatrick, Vice-President; Barbara Comins, Secretary-Trea-
surer.
The following pupils are members of the club: Ethel Deeney,
Vera Nachman, Eugenia White, Dorothy Walston, Ruth Wright,
Natalia Bender, Marjorie Heilman, June Brown, Mildred An-
derson, Gail Haldeman, Janet Callender, Mary Gulbranson, Pol-
lyanna Gulbranson, Ned Dwelle, John Zirkle, George Young,
William Price, Roderick Gulbertson, Martin Bullock, Donald
Mitchell, Tom Sullivan, and James Polychrome.






SPOTLIGHTS ON ACTIVITIES


THAT MEMORABLE BIOLOGY TRIP TO THE
SUMMIT EXPERIMENTAL GARDENS.









BEHIND THE SCENES-STAGE CREWS
OF
"Go!d in Them Hills"

and
"Crocodile Island"











BORN FIFTY YEARS TOO LATE OR
What the gay nineties missed
THE VILLAIN IN THE PIECE
TWO TROPICAL SONGSTERS
Webb Hearne
Jean Coleman











TWO OF THE CHORUSES OF
"CROCODILE ISLAND"











MUSIC APPRECIATION WITH THE
PANAMA NATIONAL BAND












Sports

























BASKETBLA LL
The athletic schedule of Balboa High School underwent a
radical change last fall with the introduction of intramural
athletics. This new system gave an opportunity for all boys to
participate in sports rather than merely the few who were
varsity material.
The first sport to fall under the intramural program was
basketball. One hundred and twenty boys responded to the call,
and under the direction of Mr. Ward, language teacher, ten
teams were organized and a playing schedule made out.
Early in the intramural games, Arroyo's Los Macs and
Michaelson's Sixty-Niners forged ahead, and throughout the
season these two teams set the pace. In the end, The Sixty-
Niners came out one game short and Los Macs were set for the
series with Cristobal's winning team. Unfortunately for us,
however, in spite of Arroyo's brilliant shooting and Huff's con-
sistent floor game, Los Macs fell under when they met the boys
from the Gold Coast. All the games of the series were very
closely played, Balboa losing two of them by one and two point
margins.
Although it must be admitted that some of the students,
especially the varsity men, have not been in favor of intramural
games, after all is said and done it is more profitable to have
a large number rather than a select few receive this training
in playing the game.











SOFT'BA .I


Early in January the boys' softball season started off with
a bang as some one hundred end seventy would-be players re-
ported for action. The sport was given a royal send-off by the
boys' band under the direction of Mr. Swanson. Even the school
officials tore themselves away from their work long enough to
give the occasion their recognition. Beginners were inspired by
seeing last year's champs presented with letters.
Mr. Edward Pease, mathematical wizard, organized the
players by allowing each boy who wanted to manage a team to
choose his group and submit the list to the sponsor. In this man-
ner an eight-team league of boys who wanted to play regularly
was formed and given the imposing title of "National League."
For the pleasure of those who could not report regularly, Mr.
Pease organized what he called the "Free-Lance League."
As the season drew to a close, the race for the gold balls,
emblems of the winning team of the National League, became
a three cornered one. The Cubs, the Giants, and the Dodgers
were well matched, but the real battle was between the Cubs
and the Giants. In a hard fought, exciting game on February
5, the Giants cracked up, and the Cubs came through with a deci-
sive victory. The Cub players who received the gold balls were:
Culbert Shedlock, Manager; Jack Siler; Buddy Wahl; Roger
Adams; Harry Dockery; Arthur Luse; Tod Lipzinski; Donald
Fero; John Latimer; Stanley Whaler; the Walbridge twins, and
Walter Friday.


























SWVINIMMING
It has been repeatedly shown that the average high school
boy of the Canal Zone is a better swimmer than the average boy
of the States. Of the graduates of Balboa High School, Eddie
Wood, Henry Brewerton, Robert Smith, George Haldeman, Ro-
bert Wempe and William Grant are only a few of the many
boys who have reflected credit on the Canal Zone by their swim-
ming in the States.
During the past season, the get-together meets held during
the school term have afforded an opportunity for mediocre
swimmers to bring honors to themselves and to their classes, as
the stars were limited to entering only a few events. After
several hard fought games, the seniors succeed in winning the
inter-class water polo competition with the juniors.
The boys who should be given special honor for the pro-
gress they have made in swimming this year are: Roger Adams,
Albert Wempe, Martin Wempe, James Roth, Harry McElhone,
Bob Erickson, Bob Hampton, Vernon Snyder, and Ned Dwelle.
As swimming director, it has not been Coach Grieser's pur-
pose to produce a few outstanding stars, but to encourage a
large number of student to enjoy swimming and to learn to be
effective life-savers. Coach Grieser is to be commended for his
success in achieving his purpose.












BASEBALL.


In sustained interest the baseball league fared better than
either basketball or softball. Early in February a league was
organized by Mr. Lockridge. Last year's varsity members were
distributed as fairly as possibly to insure a keen and lively com-
petition.
The first half of the season ended March 6, with the Tro-
jans leading, having won every game. Their toughest contest
was with Trett's Cubs, whom they defeated only after a hard
fought game and with an exciting final score of 1-0. The out-
standing players for the Trojans were Friday, Hammond, and
Bain.
At the time the yearbook was going to press the baseball
season had not been completed. Eventually the winning team
from the second half of the league will meet the Trojans. The
season will come to a close with a series of games played be-
tween the Trojans and the winner of the second half, and the
winner of that final series will be the high school baseball cham-
pion and will receive the gold baseball's as awards.
The teams in the league have been captained by: W. Fri-
day. J. Siler, W. Hearne, J. Crawford, L. Stempel, and T. Lip-
zinski.



























TENNIS
At the time the ZONIAN went to press the tennis season
had hardly begun. However, the program as it had been plan-
ned called for an interclass match to be played as soon as the
teams had organized and had had sufficient practice.
The senior class boasts an array of "racqueteers" such as
de la Pefia, Luse. Arroyo. Louis Lipzinski and Friday, who will
play each other close battles you may be sure to determine which
one will have the privilege of representing the class against the
players of the other classes.
In the juniors, the seniors are going to find the combina-
tion of Todd LiDzinski and Hearne a hard one to beat. but they
expect to have little opposition from the players selected from
the underclassmen. But then prophets, you know-.

















TRACK
As the yearbook goes to press it is the consensus of opinion
among those wise in the world of sports that the interclass
track meet will be largely a scrap between the seniors and
juniors. At least that is what the upperclass track men con-
fidently expect. The seniors present Ed Roth on the dashes,
Tom Huff on the distance races, and Sidney Randolph in the
weight department. These stars are expecting some keen com-
petition from such juniors as Tom Rice, Leland Edwards, and
Howard Clark.
Among the promising underclassmen there are Jack Casey,
Pete Hughes, Emilio Madrigal, and John Talty who may prove
to be dark horses of the track and upset the elections of the
confident seniors.


,..,..~,, ,~



























ARCHERY AND BOWLING
The first sport that the girls participated in during this
school year was archery. Quite a few prospective archers turned
out. Among those interested in this sport were Helen Grossman,
Dorothy Dugas, Phyllis Lewis, Shirley Johnson, Phyllis Deva-
neau, Shirley Lord, Thelma Herrington, Daphne Lewis, Edith
and Genevieve Wikran.
The archers claiming the most merit were Phyllis Lewis,
Helen Grossman, Thelma Herrington, and Dorothy Dugas.
The girls enjoyed archery during the months of October
and November and it was with regret that this sport had to
be abandoned because of rain.
The same girls who went out for archery met on the bowl-
ing alleys. They reported for practice every Wednesday super-
vised by Miss Hanna.
In this sport the girls who attained the highest rank were
Phyllis Lewis, Helen Grossman, Thelma Herrington, and Helen
Van Clief.




















SO)FTBA I.
The girls of B. H. S. came out for softball with a bang. The
teams were organized and the four most likely members were
made captains. They were Thelma Herrington, Gene White,
Betty Haldeman, and Virginia Ridge. The softball season lasted
from the first of January to March 6th.
The most creditable team was captained by Virginia Ridge.
The other members of the team were B. Rathgaber, E. Tonne-
son, A. Morales, P. Devaneau, M. Fitzpatrick, J. Jitty, S. Lord,
M. Dennis, and R. Baumann. The girls of this team who had
not more than two unexcused absences and who were up in
three-fourth of their studies received iwa-rds.


























VOLLEY'BA LL
Although there were only two inter-scholastic games be-
tween Cristobal and Balboa this year, a creditable number of
girls turned out for the inter-class contests in which the juniors
won first place. When the season closed the class scores were
as follows:

Won Lost
Juniors 9 2
Sophomores 7 4
Seniors 5 6
Freshmen 0 11

The juniors on the winning team were: Eugenia White,
Dorothy Duvall, Phyllis Lewis, Virginia Simms, A. Morales,
Grace Salterio, F. B. Moon, E. Pearl, and Virginia Gormeley.
At the close of the inter-class season a playshed team com-
posed of the best players chosen from all the teams was or-
ganized to play the inter-school games. The members of this
team were: G. Haldeman, B. Haldeman, R. Baumann, E. Ton-
neson, G. White, V. Ridge, F. B. Moon, V. Simms, and B. Rath-
gaber.
Balboa High School won both games played with Cristobal.


















S,4wiMMINGC
Following the example of such noted Canal Zone products
in swimming as Josephine McKim and Alma Mann, members of
American Olympic Team, the high school girls have given en-
thusiastic cooperation to Mr. Grieser's efficient instruction at
the Balboa pool. Those who have distinguished themselves by
their progress in swimming are: Betty Haldeman, Gail Halde-
miar. Eugenia White, June Holcomb, Helen Van Clief, Betty
Phillips, Billie Bowen, Jeanne Rocker, and Audrey Hudson.
Among the many events in which these girls 'tarred the Club-
house production of King Neptune's Court, a colorful pageant
of night swimming, and the inter-class swim meet, which the
sophomores won, were outstanding.


-. y .k





























TENNIS
This year the girls of B. H. S. seemed to take greater in-
terest than ever in tennis. The tournaments started on the 6th
of March and ended April 6th. Those who turned out were
Elizabeth Tonneson, Virginia Ridge, Mary Fitzpatrick, Audrey
Taber, Daphne Lewis, Betty Rathgaber, Gail Haldeman, Francis
Violette, Phyllis Lewis, Betty Haldeman, and Mildred Anderson.
Of those who entered, Mildred Anderson, Mary Fitzpatrick,
Betty Haldeman, Gail Haldeman, Virginia Ridge, and Elizabeth
Tonneson were outstanding players.


















School Life


00 III1II











-


CLASSES SETTLE DOWN.

Pupils are eager for the day

to begin.

The daily races are on.




THE SENIOR CLASS ELECTS-
Bob Rathgaber, President
Edward Roth, Treasurer
Walter Friday, Vice-President
Peggy Horter, Secretary
Bernard Keegan, Student Association
President
Mildred Rayburn, Senior Representative.




THE NEW TEACHERS GRIN AND BEAR IT.
Mr. Ward, Spanish
Miss Wright, Science
Miss Butler, Commercial.


tjiaC-,
^T


V SCHOOL CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER

SCHOOL OPENS

Scobies get haircuts.

Pupils begin the grind.











IBUSSES BLOCK THE TRAFFIC.


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8




U.


OCTOBER.



THE PARRAKEET appears.


All the literate read the first issue.










THE ART ROOM BLOSSOMS WITH
"Art for Art's Sake."


THE TYPEWRITING CLASSES CLACK
WITH INDUSTRY.
THE STUDY HALLS CLACK.









THE JUNIOR CLASS ELECTS-
Lee Ferguson, President
Dick McConaughey, Vice-President
William Price, Treasurer
Bob Erickson and Jane Stoudnor,
Representatives to the Student
Association.






THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS WIN A
SWIM MEET:
Mr. Grieser-Coach.


THE LITTLE THEATRE TRIUMPHS
D. Judd, embryo playwright, pre-
sents her first play with E. Roth,
V. Gormeley, J. Zirkle, R. Wright,
and J. McDonnell.





All-star cast produces
"Sire de Maletroit's Door."


I'----...


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S;-<'*.*. "^



By''"


THE BAND BROADCASTS.


t








NOVEMBER


THE JUNIOR CLASS PRESENTS
"Cat o' Nine Tails."








They also serve, who only serve
behind the scenes.

Mr. Tarbyfill, Director.






BASKETBALL CALLS OUT TEAMS CAP-

TAINED BY-Corrigan, Hachet, Arroyo, Daily,
Snyder, Whaler, Brayton, and Michaelson.

Mr. Ward, Coach.






THE FIRST HONOR ROLL HAS FIVE
STUDENTS IN THE A's:

Freshman-Fannie Scott-Simmons.
Sophomores-Rith Wright, Gail Haldeman.
Seniors-Mary Fitzpatrick, William Wigg.
WHERE WERE THE JUNIORS?





THE NEW SPORT OF ARCHERY FOR GIRLS
CREATES FOUR CHAMPIONS.


VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE CLASSES ARE
INTRODUCED FOR FRESHMEN.





THE SENIOR LUNCHEON IS A GASTRO-
NOMIC, TERPSICHOREAN, AND
PECUNIARY SUCCESS.


4,Q
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::






DECEMBER-JANUARY.

THE SOPHOMORE AND FRESHMAN

CLASSES ELECT OFFICERS.







LOS MACS PLAY CRISTOBAL IN
BASKETBALL.


WATER POLO SEASON OPENS.





JUNIOR GIRLS WIN IN VOLLEYBALL.


CHRISTMAS TREES


AND


CHRISTMAS MUSIC USHER IN THE


HOLIDAYS.







PUPILS PRODUCE INTER-SEMESTER
PLAYS.

FRANCES MAGUIRE-BEST DIRECTOR.

ALBERT WEMPE AS A HANDSOME
HIGHLANDER IS READY
for the
SENIOR MASQUERADE DANCE.





EXAMINATIONS BRING THE USUAL


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EPIDEMIC OF CRAMMING.


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FEBRUARY.


THE SENIORS SPONSOR

"Gold In Them Hills."



THE PARRAKEET wins membership in
QUILL AND SCROLL


D. Judd, News Editor
Miss Eneboe, Sponsor
M. Kuhn, Editor-in-Chief.








THE DRY SEASON STARTS THE ANNUAL
BIOLOGY STROLLS

Groups of girls handle specimens
gingerly.

Three biology neophytes match brain and
brawn against current and fins.







FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES DANCE.


BOYS GET ATHLETIC TROPHIES.


TEETH AND TONSILS GET THE
ONCE OVER.











PANAMA NATIONAL BAND HONORS THE


HIGH SCHOOL WITH A CONCERT.







MARCH.


SOFTBALL SEASON CLOSES-eight of
the sixteen captains.



Umpire Dockery dons his protective
apparatus.


BASEBALL SEASON BEGINS.










THE GLEE CLUB PRODUCES


"Crocodile Island."



The American tourists help with the
choruses and the rescue.






FIRST REPORT CARDS OF THE SECOND
SEMESTER BRING SMILES.



All-star volleyball players are selected.












SOPHOMORE GIRLS WIN A SWIM MEEr.


SENIOR BOYS ARE STRONG IN TENNIS.


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APRIL-MAY


EASTER HOLIDAYS MEAN-


fun at the swimming pool,

lazy hours on the beach,

and carefree jaunts to the interior.



DRAMATIC FESTIVAL CLOSES THE
LITTLE THEATER SEASON.







Speech class speaks.
Students produce "The Valiant"
and
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE.





SOME OF THE LEADERS FIND THE MOCK
CONVENTION AS HILARIOUS AS A
REAL ONE.


COMMENCEMENT IS IN THE AIR-

Mary Fitzpatrick- -Valedictorian

Dorothy Dugas-Salutatorian.


OUR SELF-APPOINTED TRUANT OFFICER

LOOKS HOPEFULLY TOWARD THE END

OF HIS JOB OF STANDING IN THE

WAY OF OUR SKIPPING.


THE ZONIAN APPEARS.


a!'




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JUNE.


LAST GLIMPSES OF SENIORS.

Margaret Haw

Mary Kierulff

Catherine Atkinson




George Campbell

Maurice Brown

George Shelton





Julia Fernandez


Margaret Comins


Jean Morgan


Doris Hutchison








Alice Blanton


Esther Johnson


Gene Clinchard


David de la Pefia







Muriel King


Eleanor Dennis


Robert Glessner


Lena Mae Howard


Tom Foley









































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JUST ANY TIME
















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-UL---














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THE YEAR AROUND
--- ---

JAMES E. LEWIS
MANAGER
P. O. Address: CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
















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Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds



The Recreation and Subsistence Division of the
Panama Canal, has for the convenience and
benefit of U. S. Government employees and their
families at Ancon, Balboa, Pedro Miguel, Gatun
and Cristobal, Athletic Fields, Playgrounds,
Tennis Courts, Gymnasiums, Swimming Pools,
Billiard Tables, Libraries, Motion Pictures, Res-
taurant and Refreshment Service, and other
General Community Activities.















Compliments of


The Panama Railroad Company
and
Panama Railroad Steamship Line


Vou mill alwmas get
*erirce anb (Qualitu
in
Eletteloping printing
Enlarging Copging
license anb Vassport plhotos
at tle
ca. $T. l. *h)to Alop
6unbrebs of Plotographs of the Ianal one aub Panama
- OQretting garbs for t~try occasion -
3johu V. Ylatau, l4totographer



















THE

Ancon Greenhouse
Ancon, Canal Zone

Member
Florists Telegraph
Delivery Association

CUT FLOWERS

Phone: Balboa 2390

Cable: "ANCOGRE"


PERMANENT
WAVES

Soft and Natural
$5.00



/ ..: (



All Other Branches of
Beauty Culture
American Licensed
Operators
Ancon Clubhouse
Beauty Shop
Telephone: 1322


In Union There Is Strength


Workers will receive the full share of what they
produce when they organize and buy their own
union-made goods.

COMPLIMENTS OF

THE CENTRAL LABOR UNION

and

THE METAL TRADES COUNCIL

of the

CANAL ZONE



























































Panama


Are you bothered by glare?
Does sunshine mar your
furniture?
We manufacture Venetian
Blinds in any color and
size. Do not forget that
we are the sole agents in
the Republic of the world
renowned

"DUNLOPILLO
MATTRESS"

Life's Latest Luxury
FOR SALE AT
Cowes Furniture
Company
Via Espana, Bella Vista


r SEE
FELIX

for
Latest Creations
in
EVENING, AFTERNOON
and SPORT FROCKS
Sizes 12 to 20
FELIX B. MADURO

OPEN DURING NOON
HOUR
21 Central Avenue


Phone Colon Phone Panama
800 335-336

Smoot-Beeson, S. A.

BUICK, CADILLAC
LA SALLE, CHEVROLET
Distributors


Colon 17th & I Streets
G & Melendez Panama City


DRINK





Delicious

and

Refreshing


The Panama Coca-Cola

Bottling Company, Inc.
Panama 65 Colon 84






































































Calle I and Ancon Ave.


The
Discriminating Shopper
Chooses a


NIC H 0 L S

Chinese Rug


On display in
Century Club Block,



Panama City, R. P.

P. O. Box 377 Ancon. C. Z.


Central America's

Finest Store


FRENCH BAZAAR


PANAMA CITY

-0
---- O --

A modern up-to-date establish-
ment, offering its customers ex-
ceptional merchandise, values, and
modern up-to-date service.


Compliments

of


Harry C. Nicholls


Distributor of

PACKARD

DODGE

&

De SOTO




























COMPLIMENTS
of
Pearl Hat Shop
Central Avenue
Panama City



WE CLEAN CLOTHES
CLEANER -

TROTT THE
CLEANER
10 MONTESERIN STREET,
off Jay Street
PHONE 453




MOTTA'S

Panama Hats

107 Central Avenue
Panama


Compliments of

Arias Plumbing Co.


COMPLIMENTS
of

AMERICAN

BEAUTY SALON

Panama City


General Electric

REFRIGERATORS
RADIOS APPLIANCES
ALBERT LINDO
Central Ave. No. 35
General Electric Distri-
butor.


Hollywood Beauty Shop
SPECIALISTS
in
PERMANENT WAVING
HAIR DYEING
BLEACHING
Reasonable Prices
Expert Work
Phone: Panama 2312
No. 7 Fourth of July Avenue

















Kodak Panama Ltd.

offers
A COMPLETE LINE OF

KODAK

PRODUCTS

and

PILOT RADIOS

-0---
KODAK PANAMA LTD.
111 Central Avenue
Panama City


Compliments of


DURAN

Paul Joe
'25 '27
CAFE


PURO


25 Years of Steady Pro-
gress is Your Assurance
of Merit


COMPLIMENTS

from

Panama's

Leading

Store


ANTONIO'S


HAVE YOUR EYES
EXAMINED

Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your eyes
examined. If you need glasses,
you will be surprised to find
what a comfort they are when
accurately and becomingly fitted
to you.

Scadron Optical

Company

Registered Optometrists and
Opticians, New York
23 Central Avenue, Panama
9.034 Front Street, Colon















CHRYSLER & PLYMOUTH CARS
CHRYSLER-FARGO TRUCKS
"FIRESTONE" PRODUCTS
PHILCO RADIOS & BATTERIES
PERFECT CIRCLE PISTON RINGS
"PUROLATOR" OIL FILTERS
LOCKHEED HYDRAULIC BRAKE PARTS

-o0

DAY & NIGHT GARAGE CORP.
Distributor
PHONE PANAMA 1298





LIGHT, POWER, GAS

Telephones Tramways

Refrigeration

Our modern, efficient plants and buildings are
open at all times to inspection by students of
Balboa High School. Call Public Relations Dept.,
Panama 3000, and arrange for a personally con-
ducted trip.

CIA. PANAMEIA DE FUERZA Y LUZ


"At Your Service, Always"


COLON


PANAMA


















THE


MEMBERS OF THE ZONIAN STAFF

Wish To Take Advantage of This

Opportunity To

THANK SINCERELY:


-The sponsors of the various. activit;cs for
their assistance in collecting information.
-Mr. Swanson for his work on the organization
pictures
-Mr. Kelly for the picture of the locks.
-Mr. Flatau for permission to use the picture
of the moonlit scene, and the small views of
the surrounding towns.
-Mr. Russell for his gift of the sunset scene.

-Mr. Matthews of the PANAMA AMERICAN
for his advice and assistance in publication.
-The advertisers for their cooperation.
--The pupils who contributed pictures.
The Student Association which sponsored the
ZONIAN financially.







'I


kK
''
:;'


Ii ;1


* : .. .. ... ... .. .



S . .. ..; ..


N-.t



















,CANAL
ZONE


P*







Full Text

PAGE 3

.... -rl MADDEN DAM :..;

PAGE 5

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/zonian 1936balb

PAGE 7

The Zonian -1936 -Balboa High School B a lboa, Ca nal Zone

PAGE 8

DEDICATION We, the senior class 0/ 1936, d e dicate this ZONlAN to on' e who has helped our class, and one whom we hold first in our heartsMISS GEORGE WARDLAW.

PAGE 9

FORE'\'OUD L es t the passing yell/'s s holtlcl e ra se your m e m.ori es of hig h school clays (IS the l o n g trop. i c al d,. y se a so n evaporates the w at e r s s lo w l y weari/l g awa y the ro c k s over whic h they fall we prese n t this ZON IAN with the hope that it w ill bring bac k the happy days of y ou,. s chool life (IS s u ccessfully a s the ,.ai// y se a son r e news the w at e ,.fall

PAGE 10

"rAHLE OF' Administration Activities Sports School Life Advertisements

PAGE 11

Admillistration

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TO THE MEMBER S OF THE CLASS OF 1936 : This yea r w ill find you l e a v ill g the portals of the free public s chool sys t e m of your Zone and lIation. l' ou have Iwd an opportunity to r ece ive during your p eriod of training a pre p aratio//. for future work and a developme llt for efficient and illt e lligent ci tizenship. I want t o con gratulate you upo n yow' a chievem ent thus far aud t o w i s h for you ever y success Clnd happi. n es s for the future FRED W. HOSLER, Principal.

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ADMINISTRATION Ben W. William s Virgil H. Barker Fred W. Ho s l e r . Dorothy S undber g ... Sup erintendent A ss istant Supel'i n tendent Pl'incipal .. Secretary to Principal F ACULTY Mary E. Butler W. E. Campbell Agnes R. Eneboe Sigurd E. Esse r Olga Frost Noel E. Gibson Edwaj.d W. Hatch ett 'u' "i!,y, Doroth y G. Hayward Kath e r ine E. Jess up George O. Lee Mary S. Newman Alice Parsons Edward M. Pea se H ervey P. Prentiss Elinol' D. R obw n J. C. Swa nson Ruby M. SY1'cle Sul:;ert TUl'byfill All e n B. Ward Geor ge Wardlaw Myrtle Whale y Mary Worrell Mada l y n J Wright H arold J. Zierten

PAGE 14

MIRAFLORES LOCKS

PAGE 15

PANAMA CITY FROM AMADOR

PAGE 16

FROM PEDRO MIGUEL CLAYTON COROZAL 4.LBROOK FIELD THE OLD BELL RINGS

PAGE 17

THE PUPILS COME TO BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL BALBOA -AN CON QUARRY HEIGHTS AMADOR PANAMA CITY

PAGE 18

SUNSET

PAGE 19

Seniors

PAGE 20

IN MEMOIHAM FHA:"."C E S 'VEI.CII It cmlllot b e That YOIL a,. e gOlle Fo,. only yesterda y You gladde n e d u s With w illill g smiles Ami f,.i endly wonis. We cannot sa y You l eft us, Fo,. tho u g h we mis s You,. gentle ll ee d s Ami killdly w ays You,. spirit linge,.s, And lve ll we know you bid us CARRY O N

PAGE 21

CLASS OFFICERS Pres ident Vic e-Pl'esident S e c retal'Y Treas u r e l Pl'esident of S, A, Repl'esentati ves to S, A, C l a ss COl O l'S Rob e l't Rathgebe r W a l tel' Fl'ida y Mal' g uel'ite Horter ... Edward Roth B e mal'Cl K egan Mildred Raybul'l1 Thomas Fol ey G r ee n a nd White

PAGE 22

ROGER WAYNE A D AMS .. ,Canal Zone G le e Club; "Once in a Blue M oon"; C a t o Nine lails"; ';Gold in The m Hill s ; Swimming. "On the s tagp. h e wa s natural, simple. affecting. 'Twas only that when he off, h e wa s acting." Gold in Them Hill s : ; Gle'l Club; Tennis; Basketball" Soccer; Softball ; Baseball. ". Villain and h e be many asunder, ,Jl"HYL 'l. I S ANNE ItuECH E L E \ I' Pa m i\"l a / IIII Supper Club; We Check Club; \ I \ / fair. f.it love JANET CAI,LEN D ll R washingtOl; D C Ala m o H i g l ; t s H ig h S c hool. San Antonio Texas. Silenc e more mus i cal 'than any song C LAUD E / E. AND ERSON .J Panama Staff; Senior Luncheon mittee; Softball; Football; Basketball. he deepest rivers make least ; 0 ; .. ARRAKEET woul ,)k; ho }t talked!" J } f l Y M BLANTON f.\ J Canal Zone Bas k etball. 'Gentle of s peech, beneficent \\,1"1 of mind." I M A U R J!:E S. BROWN ./ New York Band; Orchestra; Glee Club; lbum Club; ZON IAN Staff; Electriqal Engineering ; Softball. 'II see and approve better things} : A LLEN B U T TON Connecticut Basketball; Ba;eball; Softball; Football. None but imself can be his arallel." Canal Zone J ZONIAN Staff; softball; BasebalL "Formed on the good old plan, A true and brave and downright honest man."

PAGE 23

'" "').I SARITA CASTEL Panama Spanish Club. Manchester Hig h School for Girls Manches t e r. EnlZl!i pd. "She pretty to walk wiCJ'\. t o tal k w itloV AI nt. tOO':" .to think on." _..,>'" JY .. \ )'o'''''?> yttUA.N JEJ\N CO L D IA N I'.,Y' \ Iowa ,1"Once in a Blue Moon": S e ni o r Luncheon Conunittee; Glee Club; Softball. I see you have a singing fac e." BETTY IIUGIII!S COMLEY Canal Zone Glee Club; Supper Club; W e Check Club; Pep Squad; Study Hall Unit; Homeroom Unit: A stronomy Club; Social Committee; PARRAKEE:T Staff; Zonian staff. T h e thrill of a happy v o ice And the li ght of a pleasan t eye ." JOE CORRIGAN Canal zone Little Theatre; Bas k etball; Gold In Them Hill'''; Di-rected "Meet the St. J os eph College at Princeton; L a Salle College : Panama C ity. H e was six feet o man, A-l Clear grit an' human natur'. DAVlD L. DE LA Canal Zone Gl ee Club; Spanish Club; TenniS. H a nd so m e is that handsome d oes BELLE D UGI\N Y (1 ca.nal z9nei"'" l,. Study Jj;>' SoftQa'll; Llt}l e TheatJr e; i!'ARAKEET,Staff; iONIAN 'Staff; G
PAGE 24

DUVALL '-_ I owa "From the looks -not the lips, I s the sou l reflected." DONALD A. FERO No va Scoti a Glee Club; Treasurer of Class '33. Happ y am I ; from care I'm free! Why aren't they all contented lik e me?" MARY FOLEY -_ Pan a m a ;'For all that Cair e i s, i s by na}ure good." WALTER C. FRIDAY, Jr. Mi ssiS5ippi Basketball; Baseball; Tennis; r Band; Gl ee Club; Gold in The:n H ills"; Vice -Pr esi dent of Freshma n and Senior Cla ss. "My specialty is being r i ght when other people ar e w rong." ROB RT GL SSNEr: / New Y ork p I' Red B ",nk ,High School, New Jers ey: Gepr. e Wythe ., ,virginia. Baskelbltll; Softball: Tennis ('iTO tholte who know thee not, \ l1fJ words can paint." GORDON A. GRAHAM 'Canal Zone "His way is not always serious." JULIA FERNANDEZ DEL CAMPO Panama G lee Club: Span'sh Club: P A R R A K EET Staff: ZONIAN Staff. And s h e hath s mile s to earth unk now n-" / , MAR,. L. FtTZPA7 ICK Zone B as eball. -"Th?U .hvin ray of intellectuaj fi3e." J" ..J I' 'f, OM'AS J-' llandl Deb e Club(Pep Squ a d ; Little Theatr S enio r R epresen)tat've; O'rected ':;,Too busy with the c rowd e d hour to f ear to )ive or di e." -\2. iV"'" / f'\ DENNIS ALFRED GILBERJ,' anama BaskEtball "The fla s h of his keen, black ('yes fnrerunni"g the thunder." CHARLES GORN'ELL Panama President of Class '33; Soccer. Kind ness is hi 5 virtue-Hi s courtesy kn o w s no bounds," .ULAN M. GREENLEE P en n sy l van ia Softball Shortridge Hi g h School, Indiana Le t u& ..ttend to serious matters.

PAGE 25

OJ 1..-P MAjtY-NORENE GULBRANSEN Utah ]I Biolo gy Club "Never idl e a moment. but t.hrifty and thoug ht.ful of others." JEAN ANNA HALl Canal Zone Volle yball "Not much talka g reat sweet silence." FC Fairfax ifltl DOl. Hollywoo d rnia Treas r of Fre&hmen Girls; P A RRAKEET Staff; We Check; Glee Club; Little Theatre; Astronomy Club. A golden mind stoops not to s how of dross." I t'f CARL HOrnUN. Jr. \ 'nal 2f'one r-' I T r ok: ahsketball. East \ljig h Se.hoo l Rochester, I Ne v York. Who shall d ispule what the critics say? Their word's sUffic ienJ" R Ttl HORTER '" J Panama Class Treasu r e r '34. "A, happy .oul. that all the way To heaven hath a summer' s d :l'y 0:>Cf" TH 'Canal Zone 0) CI 'Se C ss lr} J aff; 'Chitn of I 0::>11"; Biology Club:" Track; 'vsoccer: ,U>t.tture t one s uch I m a n 11' 1..4 JOSE-PH lV, I1ACH,\T ,fOI';O r Basket ball: Sj>flball. '" s.J Worth makjlS ,r:ne -,t"an." )/, I r ARTHUIt 1 1. H AMMOND, Jr. Canal Zone Base ball; s occe r ; G olf; Album C l ub. A man of m ark." IHIGIi RODNE'I!: H1GGIN-/ BOTHAM Florida Baseball: S .ltllall. "His whic h rat"" Wit h rapid chang e ri'om r ock to roses.' ./ 'I' i J.-. PaOI'n1 a I .J.4 './1-.1 Sup'p(ol' C'ub; 0 1"" Q}ub; We I '33; ":i6: ilalld' The m '_ HiTIs": Little Theatre. s mile that g low d celestial ro sy red love' s proper hue." /a,.'Yl ......
PAGE 26

EVA AUeE" JAOKSON 'Florida Mimminger High Sabool, Charleston, S C H ow sweet a-rrtl fair she seems to b e." DAVID C. KELLY Jr. T exa5 Band; Basketball; S oftball; Senior Lu nc h eon Committee. Lawton Hi g h S chool. A m ao o f gladness se ldom fall s into madness." oJ V DASIEL P KILEr / 7 BETTY LEW1S Canal Zone eyes as the fairy Hr;r" ee s Ii e dawn of d r / JUAN1J'A MAN'IHEY JENSEN Wa shington Glee Club; Orche stra; Once in a Bl ue Moon"; Astronom y Club. Gentleness of speec h a nd of manners." BERNARD J. KEEGAN New Y ork Clas s Presiden t '35; Chai rman of Student Council; Sci e nce Club; Ch,ildren of the Moon" : "Cat 0' Nine T a il s"; "Drums of Dude"; Sire de Maletroit's Door'" "Gold in Them Hills "The play' s the thing wherein I'll catch t h e conscience of a M. KIERULFF Oreg on :There was soft and pens i ve g race A cast of t hough t upon her face, Tnat s uited well the hig h ." (' ROYCE B LEIV1 S t\ {i\ T exas H e i s completelln feature, and in mind, \ Vit h all P'Q"ct p"race to g r ace a g el !'erMn." ,/

PAGE 27

Y EDGAR LINDO c.: ... i9 Panama Glee Club; Spanish Club; PARRAKEET Staff. Bu t really a handsome and charming man. ,. j RAiYMOND HENRY LLOYD '-r I Pan1ma Album Club; Science Club; Orc hestra: 'K>nce in a Blue ... Moon": Soccer. I R)l1 in earne st. " FRANCES SUSAN M t\GUlRE Canal Zon e V Peu Squad: Little Theatre; Staff; Directed A Wedding. " To hear her speak, and sweetly smile "'Y ou were in Paradi s e the whil e h SCQ,'I'TY MrCHAELSON Canal. Zone z.\lNlAN Staff; At)lletic AssoG enerf\.! S'cience Club" Soccer; Ba s ketball ; Gold I n hem H ills." H e was a man, take him for all in all. We shall not look upon his like a gain. tc.. /' tf' .,..[.\/. M URIEL E. MOORE Canal Zone Volleyball: Basketball: Softball; PA'RRAKEET Staff: Spanish Club. "She has a friendly nature." JOHN LIPZINS -Soc ( ball ; Track ; Bas-et . l,./" Ath e tic Associatio n I s h e bashful' I s I s h y C a n t he talk or wo e tr y?" Basketball; Softball C o lumbu s Hi g h School, G e or gia. I see puzzlin g things. JOHN J McGlJlRE Canal Zone S cience Club; PARRAKEET Stafr. ;;A g ood man happy i s a common g ood." L v f FRED R MWDL TON
PAGE 28

Panama Pep Squad; PARRAKEET Staff. "Eager in pursuit. of studIes and labor s." S ID NE Y RANDOLPH, Jr. Canal Zone Pre sident of Class '33; Student. As.sJciation; Adverti s ing Committee '34: Water Polo. find we are g rowing serious." R O B ER T H R A T H G A B E R Canal Zone Pres. of Class '36; Vice-Pres. of Class 35: "Gold I n Them Hills"; "A Full H ouse"; ';Sire de t.roit's 'Door": Basketball. "It i s pleasing to be pOilrted at with the finger and to have i t said, 'There goes lhe pl'esiden t of the Class of '36.''' li!! ,-1lIf9P.I ....... I. Ay, devilis h was he!" v jOiS 's'Asso / :/Panam1l ) Basketball; spanish Clu;'. Y our fail' discourse hath b ee n as engar, Making the hard way sweet and delectable." ilHLDRE D I. SEEL E Y '-_ Canal Zone Volleyball "Thine eyes are springs in w1'!0se serene and silent waters heaven i s seen," M A RI A Q UIJANO Panama "E:ll't h has not a n ything to s how mo(e fair." R A YB U R N Kentucky be PARR EET1s\ a f f; Student ssocia Semol' L u n c heon Gold i n Them ;.I H ills 'It's elever, but i!, it Art?" I' ) D WARf) 1. ROTH cfn I Zone ;;tot all' !rack; Sen io r Trearer;' 8;t.1Jdent Associat ion reasu r er. .. his is no laughing matter." S OPHIE SEA B URt. Canal Zone Q u ietness is best CU LB ERT H. S H E D L O C K \.. New Y ork KEET S t a f f; General Track: G old In Them H ills." man o busy hours.1O

PAGE 29

\l A WALTER B S I M S f Philippine Island5 B and: Orchestra. no A lanky youth without a care." I l RO S ARIO S P NELLA palijima String Orchestra: Little Theatre 0 chestra; T ennis; So cce r: S a E:tball: Track. "Music hath charms to soothe a sa)age breast." i!>11,,,W M La f ; u 1 Service le ld 'id. wa s done as lIch ease, I n her alone 'twas natur a l to please:' V I LLA Panama. Spani.>h Club I'll t'What s weet delight a Quiet life afford s." DOROTHY WALSTON North Carolina. Science Club; Biolo g y Club; Astronomy Club. "Smooth runs the water where the brook i s deep. tJ '-f\LSERT W. SIMKA Canal Zon e Basketball. "Men cf f ew words a r e the best of men." ..c: ,u. lilA SOLE, BERGER -North Dakota ,,' Base-I came <-
PAGE 30

A L"B E R W EMPE Canal Zone "Once in a Blue Moon"; Glee Club; Swimming. Q.,. .. all thpp.. litHo Euilt along the flag p o l e plan!" S TANLEY N WHAL E R Canal Zone Basketball: Sc ience Club: ZONIAN "Handy J=mbs in a manly m old For sports and contests bold WILLIA M A. WORL E Y Jr. Texas t . B3s ketball ; Softba ll "When n i ght hath set h T s il ve r lamp on hig h Then is lQe time f e r tudy." MARTIN WEMPE Canal Zone Swimming: Softball; Glee Club; Tenni s. All the world's a c i rcus. " -,.J c..; "'7 EOu:.H A WIKRAN <.._ New York Cri.tobal H i g h School. Nor wastes her sweetness in the de sert air." .) .... .... WRIGHT Little Theatre; "Children o f t h e Moon ; "Cat 0' Nine T ails"; "Gold in 'Ihem Hills"; Directed "Red Carnations." "Oh! let me live m y own life, and die so too!" )J CATH ERINE ATKINSON Canada r,.l ",S (\ v A quaint preciS i o n rules her days." DWIGHT K S H URTLEFF, Jr. Pennsylvania Immaculata Hi g h School, Leavenworth. Kansas. 1 a m Sir Orac le, and when I ope m y liP5, let no dog bark." JOHN R U S SE LL TRETT M issouri Baseball; Tenni s. Softball. C leveland H ig h S chool, st. Louis, Missouri I like work: it fa scinates me I can sit and look at it for hours." dw ..,d .... v v/ \ ..,., ,," "., ...j

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CHYlSTAL LIE8 .... Madam e Pre di ct o 's s ho p wa s ju s t large e n o ug h fo r two peo pl e t o s qu eeze into to say n o t h II1g o f t h e d o u g h ty lVia d a me, se a te d bef o r e a s mall tabl e o n whic h r e p os e d a s mall c r ys t a l ball. Sh e fas ten e d h e r b ea d y bl'i g ht eyes on h e r inte rlocutors' face s as they a s k e d h e r "Vv h a t do es th e future hold f ol' OUl' cla ss ?" Th e future will b e pl' etty l a r ge t o h old w ha t I see in m y infallibl e crys tal ," s he sa id aftel' m a kin g a f e w pa sses at th e thin g, and muttering word s that sound e d stra n ge l y like, Y o u d bette r w ork thi s time, old cl'ysta l Ol' o u t you go " I see a fo g, but it 's c l earing. Oh, I see t h e f loor in t h e SEN ATE. (It n ee d s s weepin g.) U m-a nd th e r e's Dwi g h t ShUltl eff, th e gl'eat S e n a t ol' fl' o m K a n s a s H e's fili b u s te l'in g as u s u a l but th e r e's s o much n o i s e I ca n't t ell wh a t a b o u t. Th e n t h e r e's B ernard K eega n th e ex actol', w h o i s tl' y in g t o ge t t h e floor. Albert Simka th e o f th e S e n a te, ha s g on e t o s l ee p over his g a vel. (Hi s neck will pl'ob a bly feel lik e th e gave l w ent to s l ee p on him.) Ah. th e sce n e h as f a d ed. I see a large b a n q u e t h all w ith a long t able laid with th e f e a s t One p e r s on onl y d o I s e e-It's Stanley Wh a l e r President of th e Unite d Sta t es' Tall StOl'Y C lub. It see m s th e othel' m emb e r s dro pp e d out wh e n h e beca m e pl' esident. Too mu c h comp e t itio n! Th e sce n es a r e comin g quic k a nd f as t H e r e's a l a r ge buildin g, o c c up y in g five c i ty blocks. It's Scot t y Mic ha e l so n 's S c hool f O I L earning th e Al't of Lei sure. It i s pa c ke d w i t h people and poor S cotty i s w o rkin g so h a rd h e h a s n o time f ol' p l'a c t i cing what h e pre ach es In cide n t ally, t h e buildin g w a s d e s i g n e d b y the e min ent artis t, Gen e C lin chard, and has huge c al'iatures d es igned of gla ss on th e o u te r w alls And now I se e a th eatre p ac k e d t o c ap a cit y Th e nam e a nnounce s that Corrigan's Coloss al Th eatre n o w pl' ese n ts in p e r s on that gl a moro u s star o f stage and sc reen Phyllis Bu e che l e H e r beauty i s t o b e se n t all ove r th e coun tl'y v i a te l e v i s i on, an inven t ion whi c h h as bee n mad e a h o u se h old wOl'd b y Randolph. In th e f r o n t row sits h e r pl'oud pu blic i ty agent, Culbert Shedl o ck and two r ows b e hind him i s t h e n oto ri o u s critic, Carl H o ffm an. who l ook s excee din g l y g lum beca u se he can' t for the life of him find a n y thin g wro n g w i t h h e r p e l'. form a n ce.

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" In the foyer, se llin g tickets a nd s m a rtly s m ac king her gum (chewing gum) is L o i s Sasso. Brilliant celebrities, announced by Donald Fero, paus e to s p ea k into t h e telemike. Among t h e m we f ind Alma SY!11Onds, famou s writer; Mar y F i tzpatrick, sci e nti s t who discovered the "itchy koot c hi e," a ge rm calTie d by t h e c ommo n f l ea; Bob Rathgab e r h ea d of the United States Soc i ety for Preve ntion of Poor Grammar, and his coprofe ss or Ed Roth; D e nni s Gil b e rt, one of the star pupi l s at the School fo r Lei sure ; Wal te r Fl'iday, a come l y lookin g doctor from Johns H opkins. "O h there's Fre d Middl eton. H e's an u s h e r, but he' s a t ways being f i red f o r dancing when the mu sic for t h e s how starts. And thel'e's Tom Fo l ey, t h e star's dir ector J ea n Col e man famous s ing e r i s in the audience. "Now I see the b u s in ess ro o m of a lar ge ma gaz in e publis h. ing corporation owned and man age d by Mildred Ra y burn. She is se ated in a room mal 'ked 'Private,' seeki n g in s piration. H e r office s taff inc l udes the efficient Fl'an ces Maguire, who, by v ir tue of h e r posit i o n a s the best dil' ecto r in the Litt l e Theatre, i s now the dra m a editor of t h e m agazine; Edith Wickra n editor of the s accha rin e fiction department; Carol Bogg s, who main. tain s a d epa rtm e n t "Me n and How to Marry W ea lth"; and E l ea n ol' D e nnis, w h o m anages the section of 'Family Probl e m s from Bud ge t to Bab y.' Down in Panama, I see a m o d ern, well-kept bui l ding called 'Ye Olde Modiste Shoppe.' Wi th in its lux uriou s intH i or I see Muri e l Kin g d esc l ibing the l ate s t in spu n p l atinum gow n s to a g roup of f as hion ably dressed l adies. With out mu c h difficulty, I can see P eggy H orte r t h e well known figUl'e in na va l soc iety; Sarita Caste l known for h e r d ramati c int e r p l 'etat i ons of peop l e who've been in t he tropic s too long ; Betty Phillips, illu strator a nd art e ditor of t h e Panama Journal, and Jean Morgan, in. stru ctor of sw immin g at the world 's largest open-ail' pool neal' B ella Vi s ta. In a noth e r room I see typ i sts doin g a rus hin g busin ess, and among them I see Vil'gini a Pres ton t h e wor l d 's fastest ty pi st, Verna Price, a n interpreter as well as typist ; and Mary Fo l ey, another rapid typ i st. That sce ne ha s faded, but now I see the roof of what ap pears to be the same b u ilding. An autogiro the only kind of airp l ane now in ex i ste nce, is warming up. (There's been a s pell of cool weather.) All dresse d up in hi s suit of woven g l ass i s pilot Rob ert Duvall who carries the latest styles f],om Panama. the center of styl e fashions, to all points north wes t, sou th, and

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east. Down in the s hop again ('Tis marvelou s old cl'ysta l!) I can see Mildred Seel ey the beautiful mode l posing for thml dim e n s ion pictmes. D orothy Du gas, d es igner of the gown, stands by l'eady to help." Th e fortune teller pau sed, wiped h e r brow, and h eld out h e r hancl. W e cl!'opped some coin in her palm, and sati s fi ed, s h e resumed h el' crystal gazing. The athletic fi eld h as come into view. A bunch of s tuffed cabbages-I m e an stuffe d shirts -are witn essing tryouts for t h e World Olympic s, to be h eld in Ca iro, Syrup-l m e an E gy pt. H e l e n van Clie f i s ex hibitin g mu c h s kill in throwin g s teel roll ing !Jins, a s i s Muri e l Moor e Loui s Lipzin s ki, Bob Rid ge, and H e r nando AlToyo hav e already been put on the t ea m to lepre sent Centra l Am e ri ca b eca u se of t h e ir profici e nc y in th e art of dodging missiles, includin g rolling-pins At the pool, Al W empe llnd Ira Solenbe1'l! e r are exhibiting s u c h fe"ts o f s wimming that their aud i ence i s h eld \;rainl ess el-breathless It fade s Thi s time I se e the broadcasti n g room of 'Ye Seco nd Hancl e Che wing Gum Factory' in Panama, which is doing much to kee p pecple from parkin g old gum in inc o n ven i e n t places b y p roviding receptacl es for the pmpose Th e collecte d gum i s then processed at t h e factory until it i s bett e r than new. Thi s facto r y i s owned by Toni Ramirez. Too bad you ca n t see it too, but of cou r se it i s m y hidd e n power whic h e nabl es m e to see so accmatel y Rog-e r Adam s Claude And e rson, Betty Comley, Betty Rath, Juli a F e l'l1and ez, and Da vid K ellv (Jesse James, Jr.) are pre se n ting a sk i t via the t e l e radio. T o m Huff, publi c acco un tant se ated in th e aud i e nce. i s t r y ing to account for th e fact that the tro up e ha s b ee n allowed to r e main o n the ail'. Edgar Lindo owner of t h e s tation. i s tea rin g h i s hair in th e wings (not bv th e roots?) H e s hould wOlTy. for ri ght after the skit comes th e v iolin impn: sa rio, Ro sari o Spinella, who i s at pre se n t try ing to hit flie s with mothballs that cam e o u t of his v iolin case Da vid D e La P e na, Alic e Blanton, Esth e r J o hnson Sophie Seaburg. and Bienve nida Vila, who form a well known literar y group, have fall e n to playing tit-t3t toe. I h ear a ud den scraping which frig-hte ned a few of the l ad i es No f ear! It wa s m e rely th e world f a med baritone, Jo e Hachat, c l ea rin g Jlis throat. Hi s act comes after Rosario 's Th e navy must b e in, fOl' I see that austere naval offi cer Robel t Glessner, bending his eag l e eye on a wart adorning the neck of the person n ext to him. That swaggering soldi e r of fortune, who ha s published severa l books about his exploits, is none other than Allen Button.

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"The scene ha s shifted to New York, and I see a crowd milling arounc l a tall sK,)'scrapel'. '1'l11s We GonvemlOn tor t he Prevention of the .b;lectlOn of Alice Jackson as the j<' il' s t Woman Pres ident of the United States, Her staunch s upport ers are Juanita Jen sen, striving hard to become her private secretary, Dorothy Walston, ghOst writer of the Honorabl e Mis s Jackson 's speec hes, Ruth Horter, who is the ghost behind the ghost writer, and Betty L ewis, who arranges all the detail s pertain in g to campaign traveling Margaret Haw, crusading newspaperwoman, has contributed much of her time and talent to the writing of fiery ed itorial s for the cause They are hav_ ing a heate d discu ss ion with a group of lobbyist s who will s upport 'Littl e Eva' for cel'lain conce ss ion s I see Gordon Graham, ple adin g frantically w ith her to s upport his we ll-kno wn pro_ pos al known a s Pro hibi t ion of Labor Bill. Burritt Wright ha s higher aims, and i s insisting that s h e endorse a bill s ub s idizing a National Th eatre which will star him alone, John TI'ett wants her support of the Bill Forbidding Teacher s to Give Grade s of Les p t han A,' a nd Martin Wempe ins i sts his system of reducing exe rci ses b e made compulsory in all sc hools, and demand s all the royaltie s fOl' originating the plan Walt e r Sim s is proclaiming loudl y that from his own expe ri ence of energy wa ste d by ex cess ive talking, he h as conceived the ide a of harne ss in g the wate rfalls of word s wa s ted in Congress and converting the energy into e l ectricity to light the dome of the capitol, thus r e du c ing the government budg et. Martha Cornwell i s try ing to make her se lf heard above the bab e l of words, but it i s quit e impo ss ible, No one knows what the other is saying a nyway, and I doubt that it mattei'S Cha rl es Gornell, chairman of the committee of lobbyists, i s polit e l y s ittin g in a cornel', "Jus t a b lock away, doctor s Martha Andrade and Allan Gr ee nlee are discu ss ing a weighty problem: i s the fore foot 01' t.he hind foot of a mos quito the most u se ful? If not why not? This i s a mee t ing of the Medical Society and lendin g se veral interes t e d (,al'S are dental nurse Perle Tuttle her associates Jean Hall, Mary Sh e pherd, and Janet Callender, Other nurses dis cussing the q ue s tion of how to hold the patient's hand while taking hi s pulse, a re Mal'g 'aret Comins E t hel Deenev, Pat (Mercedes) Arrieta, Lucille Dugan Mal'jori e Weigold and Catherine Atkin son, Back in Panama I see a bridge, an exact replica of the Bridge of Sig h s in Venice reachingfrom Panama mainland to Coiba It was d es ign e d b:v con struc tion engi neel's who bear the n ames George Campbell. Maurice Brown, and Dan Kilev who s till doesn't remember whether or not he put the decimal poin t

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in the ri ght p l ace, but trusts his Iris h lu ck. Thi s i s th e gal a rle dication of the BI'idge o f Sighs, which was appropriatel y cle c licat ed to John Latime r a f ellow e n gineer PI' ese n t to make a s p eec h i s Bud Hamm ond, a prosperous bus in ess man. Rival e n ginee rs, J o hn McGuire, Arthur Lu se, and William Wodey, whose own bridg e coJlap se d t h e firs t d ay, are pre s ent, a nd h opef ul. Rodn ey Higginb otham, t e l e r adio a nnouncer, i s o n hand wit h a n e l oque n t s peech. I s uppo se it' s e loquent-he's talkin g so fast 110 one ca n understand him." Th e fo rtune teJl e r pa u se d a mom e nt, and w e asked b reathl ess ly, I s that aJl?" "Wait!" s h e said. W e waited. Oh, n ow I see the stud e nts r ead in g their ZONIAN a nd Margaret Kuhn i s running from a mob. I wonde r wh y

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NONENTITIES Laughin g chi ldl'en -Men and women of tomOlTOW Face the fu ture eagerly. But a littl e \y hil e And they too Will be beaten underOr will they stand against the v io l ence And s t ea dy driving of th forces T ending to s tifl e them ? Som e ah yes Th ose possessing courage And a will to do, Othel's not so strong Will drift with the m asses And cecome nonenliti es -A. V. S.

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Juniors

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.J{;:-O-IO R GIl:.tL S Abraham, Polly Azcarraga. Raquel -Bauman, Ruth -' Beiss el, Charlotte Boggs, Pats y ,,"'Booth, Lilian --Brown, June -./ Comins. Barbara Gloria Dick s on, Jane / DuVall, Dorothy -Durfee, Julia -Enright, Jane -Gibson, Patsy ....... Gormely, Vir g ini a ./ Gritz, Judith Hack, Bertha 1-Heileman, Margie ?"'Hob s on, Eleanor Holston, Dorothy">\ --Huntoon Aura "'-J ackson, Mary ...." Johnson H elen ..c J oyner, Doroth y,*" Judd, Dorothy King, Betty '\_ Kuhn, BetLY '-Kundroth, Mildred r Lewis, Phyllis /Lutz. Virginia,.. Mann. Louise Moon Flora B. V' =-McDaid, Margaret Martin Dolores I Mitchell, vera-'9 Murray, Lamar iNachman, Vera f-. -Palacio, Nelva -Ross, Bets y Rath, Betty N RUSSOIl, Dolores tI';S. Salterio, Grace 1) Schierloh, Mary Seeley. Norma ., ShEpherd, Julia Simka, Esther ....... Simms, Vir ginia./ Stapleton, Bess.,. Stillwell, Norma / Stoudnor, J ane ...... j uck, Viola y _ Vila Olga" Violette Frances Wainio. Alyce )Walling Jayne 'f... -Whelan, Mary White. Eugenia _ Wikran, Ed ith" __ Woodruff. Mary Jane Young, Louise K __ ;

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-Arosemena. John Ar ze. Alejandro -Atkins o n Fre d Benedetti. Eloy -Blake, Robert -Blanton Thomas Boyd, Alfred Brayton. DOllald:;< -Brother son. Graham .-Bullo ck, Marti n Clarke. Howard y-.. Collins. Winte r j) Cox, William '-I-.... Cullen, James Cuthbertson. Rodric ><. Deyton, T W Do cke ry, Harry Jr. D oyle. Manuel Dwelle, Ned Edward s, Leland Erickson Robert D Evers Wendell Fenton, Ge orge F e rguson, John F e r g uson, L eo ,--Fitzpatri ck, John _Freel'. Arden Gibson, Archie -;.... .!> G o r nell. Charles x.. Grie r. R obe r t Halliday, Rober t Hearne, Webb __ 1> Hunter. James ,.... --L evy. Harry Lipzinski Todd -Makibbin. Henry Malone, T om -March. Douglas -Marti. T eddy ---Matheney, Robert ---McConaughy. Richard -McCormack. R obe r t McElhone H arry -McFadden. Georg e Burton ']) M eigs, James Mendez. Juan G. -Neumann. Charles n Orr. Mattes Pearson. Harry Porras George)4--Pratt, Robert B Price. William -t.... Rance. George --Rice, Thu mas _Ridg e Lawrence ...,.Ridge, Vincent -Rinehart, Jack _Robinson. Earl Roth. James Sanger Vernon Shelton, G eo rge "-.. S il e r Jack ]? Speir, Woodrow --. Stempel. Lionel Scobi e, Fre d x.. --Stilson. Donald ..-Trowel'. Janles Wahl, William x..... Young, George Zirkle, John y

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JUNI O H. CLASS HIS TORY The B alboa H i g h School Junior C l ass of '3 6 h e ld its firs t m eet i ng of th e school year on th e t e nth of Octob e r. At this m eeti n g the f ollo w in g o fficer s f o r th e c la ss were e l e ct e d: Leo Fe r g uson President; Richard McCon a u g hy, Vice-Presid ent; Willi a m Price, Treasure r ; and V e r a Mit c h ell, S ecretary. Rob e r t Erickso n and Jane S t o udn e r were e l ecte d to r eprese n t t h e j uni o r c l a s s in th e Stud e n t A ssoc iati on. Th e juni o r play, whic h in cidentally was th e firs t dla m a ti c pro d uct i o n o f th e yea r was attende d b y a l arge audience at bot h t h e ma tinee and eve nin g perfor m a n ces B e c a use it was pos sible n o t t o att end school on t h e afternoon of t h e p laya g reat number o f s tud ents w ent t o th e m a tinee p erfo rmance w h o would o th e rwis e n o t h a v e gone at a ll. Altoget h e r th e juni o r p r o du c ti o n "Ca t 0' Nin e T ails," brou ght a nice sum o f m o n ey t o t h e Stud e n t A ssoc iation fund Tw o j u nior d ances w e r e h e l d at th e T ivoli H o t e l thi s year. Th e first was h e l d o n J anuary 24 and th e sec ond o n th e 24th o f A p ril. G u s S chmi d t a nd o r c hestra furni s h e d the mus i c at t h ese d a n ces whic h proved t o be velY s u ccess ful. Dr. Pre n t i ss, t h e juni o r c l ass a d v iser was well p l e ased wit h t h e d a n ces a n d with the com m it t ees und e r w h ose dir ect i o n each d ance was run Th e j uni o l-senio r b a nqu e t c lim axe d th e soc i a l eve n ts of t h e yea r fo r the juni o r class. h i .th e s p ort wor l d th e j uni o r c l ass ca m e out on top in t h e b as k e t ball c l assic, d e f ea tin g t h e ot h e r c la sses easily. Alth ou g h th e r e wa s n o inte r-cla ss softb all a g r ea t maj ority o f th e m em b e r s o f th e top a nd b ette r t ea m s wer e juni o rs. Whe n t h e Z onia n went t o press the t e nnis, track a nd s o c c e r had not bee n run In th e i r own SpOl-t w o r l d th e jun i o r girl s won th e inte r -class volleyball c ont es t. It mu s t be n ote d t h a t th e juni o r c l ass b oys must b e m o r e in telligent t han th e g irl s since th ey wer e ab l e t o put Rober t Blake and William Price on t h e hisrh h o n o r roll a num be l o f t im es durin g t h e yea r 01' i s it poss i b l e th a t R o b ert and Willi a m dese rve the credit r ather th a n juni o r b oy s i n genera l ?

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Sophomores

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Adams, Katherine)( "Alexander, Reba Anderson, Mildred v Bender, Natalia Bougan Claire / Bowen. D orothy ).( / Brayton Dorothy \ Brown, Margaret / Brugge, Mary Nell I( B urmeste r Eileen ... Collignon, EJlen Comley, Mary Jane 'I( /Conlan Ellen A/ / Dennis, / Dryden, Helen I / Evans, Norma I / Foley, Genevieve __ ,J Fuller Fay,j Giann, Rachel Gulbransen, Polly-Anna / Haggerty, Marie h I Haldeman, Betty I GIRLS H a ldeman. Gail)( Hamlin, J a n e X. Henrie. Neva Johnston, Shirley J Durney. LU9ile v Kalal', Olivel" Komp, Anita Lamb, Rita Lindo, Elaine Lindo, 'Eleano r I "-Michaelsen, H e l e n Miller, Blanch e Mohr. Judith __ Moore Mar g u er i te Morales Anita Morgan, F e r ne Mor ga n George Ann Morrison. Lorraine i Neville Beverly Oller, Grisel d a / P earl, Evelyn P earson, Mary P eterson, H e len / R athgaber. B ernice Ra y mond, Theresa / Ri dge, Virginia )(Rocker, Wyllis .,." "" R ozbursk i Jessie R yan, Patsy San ger, Elsie -Schloming, B eatrice--;... Smith, Mary ,. Sommer, Virgin i a Spector, Ada Stilso n Dorothy Strauss, Alice Tonneson. Elizabeth / Tuck Virginia ,. Ur ey, Blanche __ Welch. Vir g i n i a v 'Wright, Ruth / __ You ng, Elinor Zidbeck, Ali ce V

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Adams. Alan Adam s John B ain, Duncan B aker. Lawrence Baldwin. Albert .:..:" Baughman. Bill B en ny Willi a m Op .... Br en n an. Frank Bu nke r Jack Bu nk er. James Byrne Robe r t Carey, Jack Casey. Martin Cobb, H orace Cornwell Edward Clarke. H oward "-_ Coyle. Francis Crawford. James D ailey. Elmer Dalton. John Delvalle Edw ard Dod son. Dean Dugas Ralph -E gger. William Em e r son. William Ewing. Jack F e rrari. Fl o rencio Fe ssler. Paul Fi tzpatrick Martin S OPIIO:\lORE BOY:"; Fo ster. Harry Fren c h. Billy Galimany, Alberto Gr ajales. Manuel Hahn. William Halstead, Zachary Hampton, Robert H arness, William Hilbert, Albert H orter. Milton __ H oward, Vance X Hughes, Pete Hunt, James Johnston, William Jo yner, Eo ward Kelle r William. Jr. Kelso. Lee Walter, Jr. L awso n William L eBrun, William *-_ Lehman. Hug h Llo yd. William MacMurray. John __ Matlow s ky. Samuel McCoy. Robert McNulty, William Mitchell, D o nald Muller. Walter Mull ing. Eugene P aterson, Oliver Pear son, Edmond Pol ych rom e, Jimmy P oole, H e nr y "-_ Provo st, Rob e rt Quintero. D iogenes. Jr. Rhodes, Ralph Run yan, R aymond Russon Geor ge. Jr. Ru sson, William Sandberg. Albert Sanborn H arold Schmidt. Theodo re Sever so n. John Snyder, Vernon St. Joh n, Adrian Sullivan. Thol'na s Talty, John Trower J ames, Jr. Tudor. John T urner. Eugene Van Siclen, Robert Ville gas, William Underwood H a wain Walbrid ge, Jack Walbridge. Mack Weeks, Kenneth Whaler. Geor ge Whitsett, James Wine, Che ste r

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CLASS OF '38 The sophomor es with a lal'gel' class than evel', started school this yea r fee lin g vel'y important in their new pos ition, At th e first class mee ting of the yea r the Student A ss ocia tio n plan was discu ssed and Gail Hald e man was e l ected a s the sop homor e g irl r eprese ntativ e to the Association. Chester Wine a nd B etty Haldem a n were nominat e d for pre side nt. A s there was not time fOI' voting at this mee ting the votes were taken in the home rooms, Chester Win e being e lect ed, Miss P arso ns, the sop homol'e adviser, presided at the mee tin g At th e next meeting Bett y H aldeman was e lected vice president; B emice Ra t h gabe r, sec r etary; Francis Coyle, treasur e r ; and Elmer Dail ey as th e sop homor e boy r e presentativ e to the Student A ssoc iati on. Pl a n s for th e coming yeal' were dis cusse d and th e c la ss was found to b e ge ner a lly in favor of having a dance, besides the u s ual sophomore party, In sports ge n e r ally, the sop homore s ca m e in third, as was the case in intel'-cla ss basketball. How eve r in sw imming and tt'ack the sopho mor es had a chance to s how mOl'e competition. Ath leti cally the g irl s fared better than the boys, As last yea r, there were many students who turned out for dra ma Thi s c la ss ha s qui te a few young artists who might turn out to b e good actors, with the prop el' practice. Th e sophomor e class i s well represe nted both athletically and in othel' out side activities, and with two years still l ying a h ea d it s hould achieve many fine accomplishments by its senior yea r.

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Freshmen

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\( Adl e r Bl a n c h e _ Alfonte, M a r y Aro s e m ena, Olg a B au m an, E l va B lanton, J osep h ine ....... X. B owen B ill i e -Boyd, Edi t h Boyd, Elena Boyd, Mildred Brayton, Shir ley .)i;,.B rot herson, D o ri s Busch, Betty CabrEra Patricia Calob r eves. Alice Calob r eves Miner va Ca l len d e r Cath erine Can no n, Edit h Carut h e r s, Jessi e '" C h a n D o ri s "Y C h an I rene "":"Comley. Bever ly Crai g Mar g a ret Cryan, Mary Dani el. Lucill e D eal, Doris .J Denni s Marjor i e j... D evenea u P hylli s J D od so n Mar ian ":fEnright, Margaret E scroffery. Edna Ewing, Su san GIRLS E w ing, Thelma Fayar d, Thelma Fri e dm an. H a rriet ." Fu lle r Helene Fuqua. Ruth G a m boa, A n g eJina Getman Patricia Giavell e Elizabz t h Gill, M yriam G odfrey. Dorothy Gr ee nwell Bil lie Grossman, S h i rle y Hall, H e l e n H a ll Kathry n H ambe lt o n Ju n e1<. H arris, Gene v a Hilbert M axine Wnds D o roth y Hirs h M a rgare t H olco mb Jun e H o r te r M arion J aco bs, A nne J e t te. J ea n ne K eega n M arie Kent, Ruby K o p e r s k i, Janet .. Kr uege r VirginiaLeason, Ofelin a L ew i s D a ph ne X M cGuire R o b e rta M c K e n zIe, Betty Me a d Ellen M endez Edn a M eye r s, I solda Monsa n to, Beatrice ,.IM o rri s on. Bette l
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Aloy, Frank Arias, Gilberta Atkinson. Quintus Austin, Loui s Austin, Osmond Ayala, Austin B abcock Les lie Barnard, Paul B ender. Thor.1as Boggs, Roy Bryan, Robert Burlin, Char les Caldwell. Louis Carlos, Damian Chase, Altred Cre sopules. George Cohen Gordon Criste, Francis Cruz, Joaquin Cruz. Jaim e Cryan, Francis Detamore. J erry XDisharoon, Paul Dod so n Ri c h a rd D owell. Harr y Draughon, Wo odwort h Dunley, H Dwelle. Roy Dyer, Wallace __ Edmunds, Kenneth E gge r Thomas Ellis, Clyde Erbe. Phillip Fi tzgerald. M a urice F oste r Fernando Freer C. Gallivan. J ohn Green. Peter Haim an Donald H ar ne ss. James H ernandez, J ulio Henr i quez, Moises H e nriqu ez, R alph y:. H errington, Rob ert Huldquist. Rudolph Hunter Stanley Husted, George X Hyde, William I nnan, Thomas J ames. William Ju stice. Jame s K operski, R obert Lauterback, Charles Le ac h Raymond Logsdon, B ill Ludlum, Joseph Madrigal, Emilio )( Matheney, Angus McCaslin, D onald Michaux, Macon Montanye, J ohn Mullins. 'Earl Murwin, William O'Donnell, Jack Palacio. AJbert Palmer, Duncan Rames, Bernard Parsans, William Price, Dorsey Rea, Everett Rice. Julian Ridge, J ames Rios, Antonio Rodriguez Charles Schwartz, Karl Scobie, Shelton, Bertie Sherwood, Warren Shierloh. J Ohn Smith, J ames Smith, R alph Snider, Joe Stallings, J ames Sutherland, J ack Torbert. Woodrow T oledans, Chester Trower, J ohn Trower. J ames Homer W e il. E::lward Wood. J ames Young, J ames

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'3S Al"D '36 The Freshma n C l ass o f '35 and '3 6 i s d ete rmin e d to be marke d down n ot as just average but a s "above par. Alr ea d y it boas t s at l eas t tw o m embelS of th e P s t aff, one member of th e ZON IA N s t a ff, a r easo n a b l e m ember s hip in th e Stude n t As soci atio n an e n t hu s iasti c p a r t i c ipati o n in a thl etics, s ixtee n boys an d g irl s compet in g f o r p l aces in c hamatics, w ith Faye Willi a m s bein g vote d th e seco nd bes t a ctor in t h e o n e a ct p l ay con te s t, and a comme ndabl e s prinkl e o f freshme n n a mes o n t h e H o n o r R oll. Alth ou gh the c l ass was o rganized r athe r l ate in t h e year, i t showe d goo d jud g m e n t in sel ect in g a s i ts o ffic e r s t h e f o llow ing: Roy Dwelle, Pre side nt ; Jul i a n Rice, V ice-President; B etty McK e n z ie, Sec r eta r y; B eve rl y Comley, Treasure r ; an d J ea nn e Roc k e r a n d M au rice F itzge r ald, R eprese ntatives to t h e Stude nt A ssociation. A s a c l ass t h e f r eshme n purpose t o b e n o t i c ea b l e and n o t e wort h y in all a ct i v it i es and scho lasti c work durin g t h e r em ain ing yea r s of t h eir lif e in B alboa Hi g h School.

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Activities

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LITTLE TJlEc\.TER'S J UBILEE PnOGRc\.:\I On Friday, October 18, the Littl e Th eate r presented a jubilee progl am in honor of its admission to m embel s hip in the National Thent e l Conference, Under the direction of Mr, Subert Turbyfill two o n e -act p l ays were given, Durin g the in te rmi ss ion NIl', Ben M, Williams, Superintendent of Schoo ls, gave a b ri e f tal k on "What th e Nationa l Theater Confel ence Membership Mean s to Us The first of the p l ays on the program was an o ri gina l co medy, To Be or Almost Be, written by D orothy Judd, a student in Balboa Hi gh School. Th e setting of the p l ay was the Man nin gs' four-family q uarters in Balboa Canal Zone, in the year 1935. Th e p l ot, in a n amusing way, revea l ed the hope s and in trigues of Mrs. Manning to pl'e se rve her famil y's happine ss Th e c haracter s were: Ruth Wl 'ight as Mrs. Manning; John Zirkl e as Billy Manning; Virginia Gormele y as Patricia Manning; Jack O 'Donnell as the lit t l e b l 'other; Edward Roth as Ml'. Rock wood; Blanch e M iller as Mrs D avis; Nathalia Bender as Mrs. and Ellen Con lan as Mrs. Jones. The second of the o n e -act p l ays was the dramatic vers ion of Sire de Maletroit's Door by Robert Loui s Stevenso n Th e sce ne of thi s romantic ep isod e i s l aid in BUl'gundy, France, in 1429. The characters in the production wel'e: Bob Rathgeber as Sire de Maletroit; Lucille Dugan as Blanche de Maletroit; Ned Dwelle as Francois; Bemard Keegan Jr., as the pl'iest; T om Foley as D enis de B ea ulieu; a nd HalTY Foster and Robert Van Sic l en as m e n-at-arms. The French pronun c iation s were s up e rvis e d by Miss Frost. The music wa s fumished by the Little Theater Orche stra under the direction of Mrs. Baker. Tho se pla y ing were Neva Hel1l'i Ro s ario She l ton, Rosario Spinella, and Ruth Wl'ight

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Cat 0' Nine Tail s, p r ese nted by the junior c l ass at Balboa C lu b h ouse on Friday, Nove mb e r 15, i s a mystery dra m a in three acts, written by L aw r e nc e WOl'ces t e r. Th e sce n e of t h e play is l aid at t h e Gordons' huntin g l o d ge in Maine, and the action takes p l ace at midni ght on a day 111 November and during the followlI1g evel1lng 1 1le p l ay centers around H enry, the c h ore boy, who i s di scove r ed in the last act to be the mysteri o u s "Cat 0' Nine Tail s A ve r y e n el'geti c and capab l e cast directed by MI'. Turby fill pl'esented the play. Bemal'd K eega n Jr., stal'l' ed as H enry, the cho r e boy, who exercise d un s u spected hypnotic powel over N O1'ma Sti lh, eli as Theodora Maitland. Robert McCormick portrayed MI'. James GOl'don, S r. ; Blanche Miller, Mrs. J ames Gor don; R ogel' Adams, Jimmy Gordo n ; Burritt WI i ght, Jacob W ebe r thl! car eta k er; a nd Vit' g ini a Rid ge, B etty, hi s daughter. L ou i se M a nn as Miss Smith and Jack Sil e r as MI'. Fox s killfully imp e rsonated th e inad equate d e t ectives. Ruth Bl'own as NOl'a, t h e cook, a nd Mary Jane Comley as P eggy, h el' dau ghtel', added an e l ement of contrasting com edy. Thomas Foley, Jr. th e stage manager was ab l y ass i sted by Willi am L e Brun, R obe r t Van S i c l e n Francis Coy le, Gene Clin chard, Ru th Brown, J ane Stoudner, and MI'. Richard Moore. Th e busine s s and adve r tis in g we r e managed by William Price, J ohn Zirkle, and Dean D odson. Th e high schoo l orchesb'a, under the direction of Mrs. Bakel', furnished appl'opriate mu s ic.

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C.OLD 1:-.' TIIE.\. GOLD IN THEM HILLS i s a m e l odrama in three acts w hi c h the senio r s pI'esente d under the dire c ti o n of Mr Subert T1l1'hyfill. Th e acti o n take s p l ace in t h e old h o m es tead of Hiram Stan l ey a n h o n es t farmel', a nd Bi g Mik e's bal' and d a nce hall in the B owe ry, Th e city v ill ain's pursuit of "OUl' Litt l e Nell," the h o n est fa rmer's dau ghte r lead s to many comp licati ons, whic h m'e untangl e d in tra ditional m e lodr a ma sty le, Th e unu sually l a r ge ca s t fo r the pI'oduction was a s fol lows : spea kel' of thE' pl'o log ue, Joe Corrigan; th e h o u se keeper, Mildred Raybum; Barba r a Stanley, Genev i eve Foley; Hiram Stanl ey Walter Fl'iday; Nell Stanley (heroine) Phy lli s Bue c h e l e : Jo!'n Dalton ( h e ro ) Adams: Ri c hal'd Murgatroyd (villain) H emando Arroyo; Sam S l a de, B emanl K eeg an J I ',; Jenki n s Bob Rathgaber, Oth e r membe r s of the cast were Burritt Wril'!'hL, John Fitzpatricl(, T o m Folev, Jr" Lucill e Dug-an S t an l ey Wha l e r, Ph yllis Lewis, Aud rey H u dson Virginia Gor me l ey, Alice Strauss, D orothy Du val, Arthur Micha e l son Bob El'ickso n Martin Casey, Margueri te Horter. NOl'ma Stillwell. Jack Sile r Jack O'Donn ell, Jean Col e man F r anc i s Coy le, and last a n d least but m ost imp ortant, Little Eddie Hatchet t Th e s ta ging, adverti sing, pI'opel'l i e s publici tv. and business were h and led a d eq ua te l y b y Joe COl'l'i ga n B o b Rathgabel', Thomas Huff, Stanley Wh a l e r AlthUl' Mich? e l son, Marjorie Weigold, Raymond Llo yd, Don ald Fero, J a m es Trowel', Audrey Huds o n Presto n, Alic e Str a u ss. Doroth y Du vall. Vil' g i nia Gormeley, Thoma s Fo l ey. Jr., B o b Van Sicle n John Zirkle Culber t Shed lock and Lucill e Du gan. Appropl'iate music fo r the p l ay w a s fumis hed by the hig h f c ho o l band u n de l the dh' ect ion of Mr. Swanson

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DnA .\JATI C Th i s yea r the student s of Ba l boa High S choo l hav e take n a k ee n interest in dramatics, under t h e direction of MI'. Sub ert Turbyfill. Th e Littl e Th eate r h as sponsored a production each m o nth a nd competi t i on for the privi l e ge of partic ipation in these production s h as been enthusiastic Durin g the in te rs e m estel o n e act p l ay contest the p upil s who we r e qualif i ed we r e perm i tted to act a s director s and B UlTitt Wri ght, Joe Conigan. Frances Maguire, and Thoma s Foley J1"., p I ese n te d p l ays to t h e p ublic. The audience voted for their c hoice of best director, acto r a nd actress. FIance s Ma guire was g i ven first place as a dilector, and Joe Corrig a n was gi ven second p l ace. As acto r s Ned D welle wa s judged first and John Tal t y seco nd Gail H aldema n wa s given first p l ace amo n g t h e g irls, with Faye Willi ams a s second. Th e yea r s program i'l c luded the following : OCTOBER -Jubilee P r og r am-liT o Be 01' A lm o s t B e ". "Sire de Maletroit' s Door NOVEMBER -Junior Play-"Cat 0' Nine Tail s" JANUARY-Interse m e ster P lays-"A W e ddin g". "Moo n shine" Red Cmnati o n s" "M e e t t h e Mis s u s FEBRUARY-Senior Play-"Gold in Th em Hill s MAR CH-OPERE TTA APRIL-Festiv a l Plays Willow Pattern" Th e Valiant" MAY-Moliere s Comedy -"Th e Im ag inary In va l id".

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J TilE PAIHVd\:EET Under the efficient dir ect ion of M i ss En eboe, the PARRA KEET ha s had a n unu s ually s u ccessfu l year" Its outstanding ach i eve m ent was its admission to Quill and Scroll on its first applicati o n fOl" m e mb e r ship" Mar ga ret Kuhn as e ditor-inchief and Dorothy Judd as n ews editor d ese rv e spec ial comm e nda tion for their faithful work in organ izing a nd s up e rvi sing th e publication of the papel"" In collect in g material and editin g they hav e been ass i s t e d b y th e following ad dition a l m embe r s of t h e assoc i ate editor, Rob elt B l a k e; SpOl-tS e ditol", D o nald Brayton; feature e ditor s, Hope T oulo n and Alma Symonds; ex c han ge edit o r, M ercedes Arrieta; r eporters, Martha Andrade, Natalia B e nd e r Ruth Bro w n Margaret Comins, Betty Coml ey, Elme r Daily, Lucill e Du gan, Nancy Foster, V a nc e Ho wa rd Virgini a Gorme l ey, G ail H aldeman, Bemard K eega n Vil"gini a Lutz, John McGuire, Muri el Moore, Mild r e d Raybum, Norma Stillwell, H ope T oulon, Pe ggy White, a nd Betty Willett" Th e bu s ine ss s taff, w ith Miss Butler as s p o nsor ha s don e i ts work quietly but effectively with Marjorie Wiegold as man agel'; Perl e Tuttle in c h arge of circulation, assiste d b y Ellen Conla n Ruth Wright, and Norma Stillwell; Mel"Cedes Anieta as advertisi n g man age l", a ss i s ted by Betty Phillips, Wint e r Collins, a nd Frances Maguire" Rogel Adams, Phylli s Bu eche l e, DOl"Oth y Du gas, Edgar Lindo, Verna Price and H e l e n Van C lief h ave contributed theil" time as typists, preparing the copy for the printe rs"

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Editor-in-Chi e f Assoc iate Editor Senior Editor J u nior Editor Sophomol'e Editol Maurice Bl'own Mattes 01'1' M a rgal'et Kuhn Mal'tin Bullock P a u l Fe s l e r F I 'eshman Editol' ....... . P eggy White E l ea n ol' Hob so n Walte r Friday Lu cille Dugan Alma Symonds Il' e n e C han Judith Gritz ......... '. C laud e And e rson George Ca mpb ell V e r a Nachm a n Hop e Tou lon A r thul' Micha e l so n Gl'ah a m Bl'oth el's on Bett y Com ley Jul ia F e l'llandez Katherine E. J es s up .... Mal' Y W o n ell Hal'v ey Pl' e nti ss Mary Butl el' A c tivi t i es ............................... Boy s' SPOl'ts ............. Girls' SpOl'ts Li lel'al'Y Editol' .................. ......... Art Editol' Assistant Schoo l L ife Ass istan t C ame l'am e n Advertising M anage r Assistant Litel'al'Y and Make up Adviser Al't Advi;,el' Bu ine s s Advisers

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ORCHESTRA STRING QUARTETTE

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, ti:ttlli\ \ f t '-[' I, or.. '_L.L :_-GIR L S C H O RU S BOYS CHORUS

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G LEE e LVR The Glee C l ub con s ists of both boys and girl s who have had one year i n the g irl s and boys c horu ses On many of the programs t h e Glee C l ub i s assisted by the bClys a n d girl s of th e choruses. To mos t peop le, the Christmas program g iven in the patio of th e sc hool is the outstanding program of the yeal, combin ing as it does costuming: and effective lig hting with the familial' C hri stmas carols, the se l ect ion s from H a nd e l 's Th e Mess i a h and the fe s tiv e C hristma s sp i r it. In addition to the Christmas program, the followin g events wer e give n durin g the year: F e bru aryFrench Music, a pro g r a m g iven for the Ancon Morning Mus i ca le. Ma r ch-The Operetta, a producti o n g i ven w ith the ass i s t ance of the Littl e T h eater. May The Music Fes tival. .June-The Commencement Music.

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CROCODILE ISJ.c'l.l'\"D CROCODILE ISLAND a model'l1 operetta with a tl'opical setting and very tuneful a nd m e lodious music, was g iven by the g l ee c l ubs at Balboa C lubh ouse on March 12, Thi s operetta, whic h was prod u ced under the direct ion of Mrs. Bakel' and Mr. Turbyfill. pj'ovided oppo r tunity for practic e in so lo. duet, quar tette, a nd foul' part chorus work, as well as giving the orchestra expe ri e nce in accompanying. On Crocodi l e I s land the king was to be given as a sac rific e to the s acred crocodi l es because the sorcere r had said the cro codiles demanded s u c h a sac rifice. In the midst of the exc i tement some American tourists came to the I s l and. Two of the young Ame ri ca n boys fell in l ove w i th the two daughters of the king. Everything ended h appi l y when t h e so r cere r was found to be an imp ostor. Th e twelve indi v idu a l parts were played by the following: Jean Col ema n as Pearl, Margaret H aw as P eta l Webb H ea rne as T o m Gene C lin chard as J eff, Ruth Baumann as Miss Cri sp, John F itzpatri ck as the king No rm a Stillwell as Mammy Lu George Ru sso n as Dr. McSnoozer, F r ancis Coyle as the sorcerer, Dorothy Judd as Miss Brew ster, John Kain as H opalong, a n d Roy Dwelle as Nitwit. Other members of the g l ee clubs san g in t h e various cho ruses which added color a nd interest to the production. f

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Under the direction of Mr. J. Ches t e r Swanson, the band ha s done much to enliven the spirit of Balboa Hi g h School. B e sides p l ayi n g for the basketball a nd baseball ga mes and the opening of the softb all season, the band contributed the nec es sary atmosphere for the se nior play. Durin g the C hristma s holIdays they se r e naded both B a l boa and Ancon, and pla yed for a Chr i stmas entertainment at the Balboa C lubhou se. Durinl{ Nati ona l M u sic W eek they gave an outdoor concert, and one in Balboa C lubh ouse. At ieast once they went over the ail' in a bro adca s t from the Miramar C lub. Th e m e mb ers of the band are cornets-Walte r Sims, D ea n Dodson Tom Foley, James H arness, L e l a nd Edwards, Neal Smail, John Davis, Willi a m Cox, John Galliva n Alfred Chase, and Paul Dis h a roon ; clarinets-Albert Baldwll1, Donald Mc Cas lin Jack Carey, Rob ert Van S i c l en, Fack Gamble, David Kelley, Loui s Ca ldw ell, and Francis C l'yan ; saxa phone s-William Reinig, George Lane, Bill Log s don; flutes-Bertie She lton Jean Rockel', an d Thomas Immon; alto-horns-C harle s Neumann, Florencia Farrari, a nd George Callender; baritone horns-V e r non See l ey, Char l es Fail', and Hug h D ee ney ; ba ss -horn s-Ja me s Crawfo rd R a lph Du gas, and George Whaley ; drums-William H arnes s George Ru sson, Ned Dwelle and HalT Y Pearson.

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BIOLOC;Y CLuB Under the dil'ection of MI', G, 0, Lee the hiology c lub has expanded its membership this yea I', At the me etings which are held in the evening, Mr. Le e gives a talk on so m e s ubj ect of interes t to coming biologists, and this i s follow e d by a group di sc u ss ion Refres hment s furnis h an important part of the program, The officer s of th e club are: Mattes 01'1', Pre ident; Martin Fitzpa t rick Vic e-Pres id ent; Barbara Comins, Secretary-Treasure r. The following pupil s are m embe r s of the c lu b: Ethe l D ee n ey, Vera Eugenia White, D orothy Wal sto n Ruth Wri ght, Natalia Bend el', Marjorie H e ilman June BI'own, Milch' e d An d e rson Gail H aldeman, Jane t Callender, Mary Gulbran so n Pol lyanna Gul branson, Ned Dw elle, John Zirkle, Geol' ge Youn g, Willi am Price Roderick Gulbertson Martin Bullock, Donald Mitchell, Tom Sullivan, a nd James Pol y chrome

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SPOTLIGHTS ON ACTIVITIES THAT M EMORABLE BIOLOGY TRIP TO THE SUMMIT EXPERIMENAL GARDEN S BEHIND THE SCENES-STAGE CREWS OF G o' d i n The m Hill s and C r oco d ile I s la n d BORN FIFTY YEARS TOO LATE OR Wha t the gay nine tie s misse d THE VILLAIN IN THE PIECE TWO TROPICAL SONGSTERS We bb Hearne J ea n C o l e m a n TWO OF THE CHORUSES OF "CROCODILE ISLAND" MUSIC APPRECIATION WITH THE PANAMA NATIONAL BAND

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Sports

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BA!-'I';:ETIIALL Th e athletic sc hedu l e of Bal boa Hi g h Schoo l und e nvent a radi c a l c han ge last fall with the intl'oduc t i o n of intl'amural athletics. Thi s new syste m gave an oppo r t unit y fOI all boys to particip ate in sports rathe r than m ele l y the few who were varsity mate rial. The first sport to fall und e r th e intramural program was basketba ll. One hundre d and twenty boys r esponde d to th e call, and und e r the dIr ect ion of Mr. Ward, l a n g ua ge teacher, te n teams were organized and a p la yi n g sc hedule m ade out. E a rl y in th e intramural ga m es, Anoyo's Los Mac s and Mich ae lson 's Sixty Nin e r s for ge d a h ead, a nd throughout the seaso n these two t ea m s se t the pace. In the e nd, Th e Sixty Nin e r s came out one game s hort and Los Macs were set f o r tl1e se ri e s with C ri s tob a l' s winning team. Unfortunately for us, how eve r in s pit e of Arroyo's brilliant sh ootin g and Ruff's con s i stent floor ga me, Los Macs fell und e r when the y met the boy s from the Gold Coast. All t he games of the series wele v ery c l ose l y pla yed, Balb oa l osing two of t h e m by o ne and two point m a r gins. Although it mu s t be admitted that som e of the stude n ts, especially the vars ity m en, have n ot been in favor of intramura l games, aft e r all is sa id and done i t i s m o r e profitabl e to h ave a large numb e r rath el than a se l ect f ew r eceive thi s training in playing the gam e

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SOFTBALL Earl y in January the boys' softball seaso n starte d off with a bang as som e one hundre d e nd seventy wo uld -be p l ayers l'e ported for action. The sport was give n a ro ya l se nd-off by the boy s' band under the direction of Ml'. Swanson, Even the sc hool officia l s tore t h e ms e l ves away fl'om th eir work long e nou g h to give the occasion their l'ecog nition Beg'i nn e r s were in spire d by see ing last year's champs pre sente d w ith letters. Mr, Edward P ease, mathematica l wizard, organized the players by allowing each boy who w a nted to manage a team to choose his group and s ubm i t the l i s t to t he s ponsor, In thi s man n e r an eight-team leagu e of boy s who wanted to p l a y r eg ularl y was formed and give n the i mpo s i ng titl e of "National L e a g u e For the p l easure of t h ose who cou l d not report regu l arly, Mr, P ease ol'ganized what he called the Free-Lance Lea g ue A s the season ch'ew to a clo se, the race for t h e gol d balls, emblems of the winning t ea m of the Nati ona l League, became a three cOl'l1e red o ne. The Cubs, the Giants, and the Dodgel' s were well matched, but the rea l battl e was betw ee n the Cubs and the G i ants, In a hard fou ght, exc i t in g game on February 5, the Giants cracked up, and the Cubs came through w ith a dec i s ive viCtOI'Y. The Cub p l ayers who r eceive d th e go l d ball s w e r e: C u lbert Shedlock, Manager; Jack S i ler ; Buddy Wah l ; Rogel' Adams; Harry Dock e l 'y; Arthur Lu se; Tod Lip zinski; Donald Fero; John Latim er; Stanl ey Wha l e r ; the Wa l bridge twins, and Wa lter Friday,

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It has been l'epeated l y s hown that the average high school boy of the Cana l Zone is a better sw imm e r than the average boy of the States, Of the gl'aduates of Balboa Hi g h School, Edd i e Wood, Hem'y Brewerton, Robert Smith, Geol'ge Hald e man, Robelt W e mpe and W ill iam Gl'ant al'e onl y a few of the man y boy s who have l'eflected credit on the Canal Zone by their sw im min g in the States, During the past seaso n the gettogether meets held dUl'ing the school tel'm have afforded an oppoltunity fol' mediocr e sw immer s to bring honol' s to themse l ves and to their classes, as the star s wel'e limited to entering only a few events, After seve ral h31'd fought games, the se nior s succe ded in winning the inter-c l ass water po lo competition with the juniors, Th e boys who s hould be given spec ia l honor for the pro gress they have mad e in s,v i mming this yeal' are: Ro gel' Adams A lbert Wempe, Martin Wempe James Roth Harry McElhone, Bob Erickson, Bob Hampto n Vel'llon Snyder, and Ned Dwelle, As sw imming director, it has not been Coach Gl'ieSel"s PUl' pose to produce a few outstanding stal's, but to e ncourage a large number of stud ent to enjoy sw immin g and to l ea l'll to b e effective life-savel's, Coach Gri esel' i s to be comme nded for his s u ccess in achieving hi s purpo se

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BASEBALl, I n s u s tain e d in tel'es t th e ba se ball l eag u e fared bett el' than e ith e r ba s k etball o r s oftball. Earl y in Febl'Uary a league wa s o l'ganized by Ml'. Loc krid ge. Last yea r 's varsity m e mbers wer e distributed as fairly a s poss ibl y to insure a keen and livel y competi t ion The firs t h a lf of the seaso n ended Marc h 6, w i t h the Tl' o jans l ead in g, ha ving won eve r y game. Th e il' toughes t cont es t was w ith Trett's C ub s, w hom they d e f ea t ed only aftel' a hard fought game a nd w ith an exc i ting fina l SCOl'e of 1-0. Th e out s tanding p layers for th e Tl' oja n s wel'e F ri day, H ammo nd, and Bain At th e time the yea l'book was going to p r ess the baseball se a so n had not been comp l eted. Ev e ntuall y the w innin g tea m from the sec ond h a lf of th e l e agu e will meet the Trojans Th e se a s o n will come to a c lose w i th a se ri es of ga m es p l aye d b e twee n the Troja n s and t h e winn e r of th e sec ond half, and t h e w inn el' of that fina l sel'ies will be t h e hig h sc hoo l ba seball c h ampion and w ill l'ece ive the g o ld ba se ball 's as awal'ds Th e teams in the leagu e h ave been captaine d by: W Friday. J. Sil el', W H eal'l1e, J C r awford, L. Stempel, and T. Lip zin s ki.

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At th e time the ZONIAN went to pre ss the t e nni s seaso n had hard l y begun. How e v e r the pro g l 'a m as it had been p l an n e d calle d for an int ercl ass matc h to be p l ay e d as soo n as the teams had organized and had h a d s uffi c i ent p ractice. Th e se nior c la ss boasts an array of "racque teer s" such as de l a P eiia. Lu se Arroyo. Louis Lip z in ski a nd Friday. who will p l ay eac h ot h e r close battles may be sure to rletermine wh i c h o n e will have the p ri vile!!e of r ep r ese ntin g the c l ass aga inst the p l ayel's of the ot h e r c l asses. In the juniors, the senio r s are go i n!! to find the comb ina t i o n of Todd LilJZins ki a nd H earne a hard one to beat. bllt they exp ect to h ave littl e onnos iti o n from the p l ayers se l ecte d from the und e rcla ss m en. But then proph ets, you know-.

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As the yea rbook goes to pre ss it i s the concensus of opinion a m o n g those wis e in the world of spo rts that the interc l a ss tra ck m eet will \:;e l a r ge l y a sc r ap bet\\-een the senio)-s and juniors At least that i s what the upperclass tl-ack m e n con fide ntly expec t. Th e se nior s present Ed Roth on the da s h es, Tom Huff on the distance races, and S id n ey Randolph in the weiQ-ht department. Th ese stars are expecting some k ee n com pet iti c n fro m s uch juniors as Tom Rice, L e land Edwards, and H owa rd C lark. Amon g the promising un de r c l assmen the r e a r e Jack Casey, Pete Hu ghes, Emilio Madrigal, and John Talt y who ma y prov e to be dark horse s of the track and up se t t h e e l ect ions of the confid ent

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ARCHERY BOWLII';G Th e first sport that the girls participated in during thi s schoo l year was archery. Quite a f ew prospective archer s turned o ut. Amon g those interested in this sport were Helen Gros s man, Dor othy Du gas, Phylli s Lewis, Shirley Johnson, Phy llis Deva neau, Shirley Lord Th e lma H erring ton, Daphne Lewi s Edith and Genevi eve Wikran Th e archers claiming th e mos t m erit were Phylli s Lewis, H e l e n Grossma n Th e lma H eIT in gton, and Dorothy Dugas. Th e g irl s e njo yed arc h e r y during the months of October and November and it was with re gret that this sport had to be aba nd o n e d beca u se of rain. Th e sa m e g irl s who went out for archery met on the bowl ing alleys. They reported for practic e e v ery Wedne s day super v i sed by Miss H a nna In this sport the g irl s who attained the highest rank were Phyllis Lew is, Hel e n Grossman, Th e lma Herrington and Helen Van Clie f

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SOFTBALL The g irl s of B. H. S. ca me out for so f t ball with a bang. Th e team s wer e organiz e d and th e four mo s t lik e l y m e mb e r s were made captain s Th ey w e re Th elma Herrin gto n Gene White, Betty H alde m an a nd Virginia Ridge. Th e so ftball seaso n l asted from the firs t of J anuary to Marc h 6th. Th e most c r e ditabl e team was captained by Virg inia Rid ge Th e other m emi::e r s of t h e team were B. Rathg ab e r E. T o nn e s on, A. Moral es, P. Devan eau, M. Fitzpatri ck, J. J i tty, S. Lord M. D e nnis, a nd R. Baumann. Th e g irl s of thi s team w h o had not more than two unexc u se d absences and who were up in t hre e -fourth of their studi es jeceived awards.

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"OLLEYRALL Although there were only two inte r-scholastic games I:;e t ween Cristoba l and Balb o a thi s yea r, a c reditabl e number ,,[ g irl s tUl'l1ed out for the inter-class contests in which the juniors won first place. When the seaso n closed the c la ss s core s we!! a s follow s: Won Lo s t Juniors 9 2 Sophomores 7 4 Seniors 5 6 Freshme n 0 11 The juni o r s o n the winning team wele: Eugenia Wh ite, Doroth y Duvall Phyllis Lewis, Virg ini a Simms, A. Moral es Grace Sa l terio, F. B. Moon E. P ea rl, and Vir g inia Gormel e y At the clo se of the in te rc l ass seas on a pla ys hed team c'Jmpos e d of t h e best p l aye r s chosen from all the teams was or ganize d to pla y the inte r -sc hool ga m es The m embe r s o f thi s team were: G. H a ldeman, B. Hald eman, R. Bau mann, E. Ton n eson, G. White, V. Rid ge, F. B. Moon V. Simms, a nd B. Rathgaber. Balboa Hi gh Schoo l won both games played with Cristobal.

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S I;\nn:XG Following the examp l e of such noted Ca n al Zone products in sw immin g as J ose phin e McKim and Alma Mann, m embe r s of American Olympic T e am, the high schoo l gi rl s have g i ven en thusiastic cooperation to Mi. Grieser' s e fficient in stnlCtion at the Balboa pool. Th ose who have distingu i s hed themselve s by their p r ogiess in sw immin g a r e: Betty H aldeman, Gail H a l de man. Eugenia Whi te, June H olcomb, H e l e n Van Clief, Betty Phillips, Billie B owen, J eanne R ocker, a nd Audre y Hud son. Among the man y events in wh i c h these g il'i s stan-e d the C l u b hou se production of Kin g Neptune's Court, a colorful pageant of night swim ming, a nd t h e inter-class sw im m ee t, wh ich t h e sophomo r es won we r e outstanding.

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'l'EN:-'-I S Thi s yea r t h e g irl s of B H. S see med t o t a k e g r eate r in te r est tha n ever in te nni s Th e tOUl'Ila m ents started o n th e 6 t h of Mar ch a nd e n ded A p ril 6 th Th ose w h o tUl'Ile d out wer e E l izabeth T o nn eson, Virg ini a Rid ge, Mar y Fitzpatric k Audrey Tabe r D aph n e L ew is, Betty Ra thgabe r G ail H alde m a n F r a n c i s V io l e t te, P hyllis L ew is, Betty H alde m a n a nd Mildre d And e lson. Of t h ose who e n te r e d Mild red Ander so n M a r y Fitzpatric k Betty H a ldem a n Gail H a lde man Virgi nia Rid ge, and Eli za b eth To n neso n wer e outs t a ndin g playe r s

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School Life

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S CHOOL SEPTEMnER SCHOOL OPENS Scobies get haircuts. Pupils begin the grind. BUSES BLOC K THE TRAFFIC. CLASSES SETTLE DOWN. Pupils are eager for the day to begin. The daily raCES a r e all. THE SENIOR CLASS ELEC TSBob Rathgaber. President Edward Ro th, Tre asu r e r Walter Friday, Vice-President Peggy H o rter. Secretary B ernard K eegan, Student A ssociation Pre s id ent. Mildred R ayburn, Senior f-tepresentative THE NEW TEACHERS GRIN AND BEAR IT. MI'. Ward, Spanis h Miss Wright, Science MISS Bu t ler Commercial.

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OCTOBER. THE PARRAKEET appears. All the literate read the first i ss ue. THE ART ROOM BLOSSOMS WITH "Art for Art's Sake." THE TYPEWRITING CLASSES CLACK WITH INDUSTRY. THE STUDY HALLS CLACK. THE JUNIOR CLASS ELECTSLee Fergu son. President Di c k M c Conau g h ey, Vice-Pres ident William Price, Treasurer B o b Eri c k so:l and Jane Stoudnor. Representatives to the Student A ssoc ia tion. THE HIGH SCHOOL B O YS WIN A SWIM MEET: Mr. Grieser-Coach THE LITTLE THEATRE TRIUMPHS D. J udd embryo pla ywright, presents her fir s t pla y with K Roth. V G or m el ey J Z irk l e R Wng:l t and J M c D onnelL All-star cast produ ces Sire de Malelroit's D oor." THE BAND BROADCASTS.

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NOVEMBER THE JUNTOR CLASS PRESENTS "Ca t 0 Nine Tails. Th e y al s o serve who only serve behind the scenes. Mr. Torbyf1lI, Director. BASKETBALL CALLS OUT TEAMS CAP-TAINED BYC orrigan, Hachet. Arroyo, Dally, Snyder Whaler. Brayton, and Michaelson. Mr. Ward, Coach THE FIRST HONOR ROLL HAS FIVE STUDENTS IN THE A's : Fre shman-Fannie scott-Simmons. Sophomores-Rith Wright, Gail Haldeman. S emors-Mary Fitzpatrick, William Wigg. WHERE WERE THE JUNTORS? THE NEW SPORT OF ARCHERY FOR GIRLS CREATES FOUR CHAMPIONS. VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE CLASSES ARE INTRODUCED FOR FRESHMEN. THE SENTOR LUNCHEON IS A GASTRONOMIC, TERPSICHOREAN, AND PECUNIARY SUCCESS.

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DECEMBER-J AN U AR Y THE SOPHOMORE AND FRES HMAN CLASSES ELECT OFFICERS. LOS MAC S PLAY CRISTOBAL IN BASKETBALL. WATER POLO SEASON OPENS. JlJNlOR GIRLS WIN IN VOLLEYBALL CHRISTMAS TREES AND CHRISTMAS MUSIC U SHER IN THE HOLIDAYS. PUPILS PRODUCE INTER-SEMESTER PLAYS. FRANCES MAGUIRE-BEST DIRECTOR. ALBERT WEMPE AS A HANDSOME HIGHLANDER I S READY for the SENIOR MASQUERADE DANCE EXAMINATIONS BRING THE USUAL EPIDEMIC OF CRAMMING.

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FEBRUARY. THE SENIORS SPONSOR G old In Them Hills." TilE PARRAKEET wins membe r ship in QU I LL AND SCROLL D Judd, News Editor Miss Eneboe Sponsor M Kuhn, Editor-in-Chief. THE DRY S EASON STARTS THE ANNUAL BIOLOGY STROLLS Gr oups o f g irl s handle s p ecimens gingerly. Thr ee biology neophytes match bra i n a nd brawn aga inst current and fin s. FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES DANCE BOYS GET ATHLETIC TROPHI ES TEETH AND GET THE ONC E OVER. PANAMA NATIONAL BAND HONORS THE HIGH S CHOOL WITH A CONCERT.

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MARC H SOFTBALL CLOSES-eight of the s ixt een capta in s Umpire D ocke r y don s his protective apparatus. BASEBALL SEASON BEGINS. THE GLEE CLUB PRODUCES "Croc o dil e I sland." The American tourists help with the choruses and the rescue. FIRST REPORT CARDS OF THE SECOND SEMESTER BRING SMILES. Allstar volleyball players are selected. SOPHOMORE GIRLS WIN A SWIM MEEr. SENIOR BOYS ARE STRONG IN TENNIS.

PAGE 82

APRIL-MAY EASTER HOLIDAYS MEAN -fun at the swimming pool l azy hour s on the beach, and carefree jaunts to the inter ior. DRAMATI C FESTIVAL CLOSES THE LITTLE THEATER SEf.SON. Speech c l ass s peak s. Students produce The Vali&.nt" and THE MERCH AN T OF VENICE. SOME OF THE LEADERS FIND THE MOC K CONVENTION A S HILARIOUS AS A REAL ONE. COMMENCEMENT I S I N THE AIRM a ry Fitz J latrick -V aledictor i a n Dorothy Dugas-Salutatorian O U R SELF-APPOINTED TRUANT OFFICER LOO K S HOPEFULLY TOWARD THE END OF IDS JOB OF STANDING I N THE WAY OF OUR SKIPPING. THE ZONIAN APPEARS.

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JUNE. LAST GLIMPSES OF SENIORS. Margaret Haw Mary Kierulff Catherin e Atkinson George Campbell Maurice Br own G eo r ge Shelton Julia F er nandez Mar ga ret Comin s Jean M organ D oris H utchison Ali ce Blanton E s ther J ohnson Gene Clin c h ard D a vi d de l a P efla Muriel King E leano r Denni s R obert Glessner Lena Ma e H oward Tom Fole y

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JUST ANY TIME

PAGE 85

Advertisements

PAGE 86

Read-'Qr 11C a n a m a c-\ m c.ri ret It First in the Field The g lltewa y to a liberal education is your daily 1IeWSpllpe r -Read it illtellige1ltly! l"or Local VelVs -Full and authoritative coverage of the daily happenings on the isthmus. For Foreign News -Co m)ll e t e United Press Cable Servic e on world-wide event s. For Editorial Comment -The \Vashing lon Daily l\1err y-GoR ound -The Nationa l \Vhirligig -SOllnd Diges t of Nationa l New s READ Jan&lltct TWO EDITIONS DAILY We-Prillt-The-News

PAGE 87

The Judgment oj The Majorit y ... USUALLY SAFE TO FOLLOW Tha t our phot.o g r aphs a r e satis factory in all r es p ec t s seems t o b e the unanimous opinio n of 8. H S. Senio r Class of 1936. Call S ee Ollr Sample s L earn Our Prices. The y ll Conv ill ce You, Too! 81 CENTRAL A VE. PHON E 206

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HOTEL TIVOLI ANCON CANAL ZONE A comfortable, restful hotel, ideally located, commlmding a magnificent view of the Pacific Ocean and tro/Jical scenery, The cel/ter of social life, close to every /Joint of interes t on the Pacific side of the Cmllll. 'V:U T McCORMACK Manager .4.ncon, Canal Zone HOTEL WASHINGTON Une lJual! e d For Situation and Comfort A Hot e l in keeping with the di gnity spirit an:! s er v ice of th e Pana m a Ca nal. GOLF SWIMMING -WATER SPORTS -TARPON FISHING THE YEAR AROUND --0--J A i\'l ESE. LEW I S MANAGER P O Address: CRIS TOBAL C Z

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PHONE 697 SUBSCRIPTION RATE S One Month 81.25 Si x 1\10nth s S7.00 One Year 8 1 3.5 0 Your Daily Newspape r World News Perh31) S More Important Than At An y Time In History, Is Being E nacted D a il y. To Keel) Abreas t Of The Times, You Mus t Read .'\ Good Journal Of 'fhe Day's Event s. These Events Are Bro u ght To Readers Of The I sthmus Through The Star & Herald C lear And Con c ise R eports Of Events Of Inte r n ationa l Importance Are Given Daily B y The Larges t Group Of Newsg3therer s In The W orld. Have The STAR & HERALD "Central America's Lf"adin g NewSpal)er" DELIVERED DAILY TO YOUR HOME Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds The Recreation and Subs i stence Divi sion of the P a n a m a Can al. lIas for the convenie nce and benefit of U. S. Government employees and their families at Ancon, Balboa. Pedr o M i g u el. Gatun and C ri stoba l Athletic Fields, Playgrounds. Tennis Courts. Gymnasiums Swimming Pool s. Billiard Tables, Libraries, Motion Pictures Res laurant and Rdreshment Servi ce and other General Communit y A ctivities.

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Compliments of The Panama Railroad Company and Panama Railroad Steamship Line luill ah.uSl!5 or! anll (0ualif!! in Jittteloping lflrintittg -1!iCCltfiC a11l1 JaSSV01 : t JI/ofos 01111' l!. $\t. or. CO\., lfll ,oto or or lil' (lis"oi '::0"< -Qirutinll for occasion -]ohu ;If. ;Ifialau

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THE A ncoll G reenho u s e Ancon Cana l Zo n e M embe r F lori s t s T e legr a l)h Deliv e r y Asso c i ation CUT FLOWERS Phone: B a lboa 2390 Cable: "ANCOGRE" PERMANENT W A V E S Sofl and Natur a l 55.00 All Other Branc h es of Beauty Culture .<\m l' ican Licensed Operators Ancon Clubh ollse B e auty S hop Telephone: 1322 In Union Th e r e Is Strength Workers w ill recei ve the full s h a r e of wha t they produce w h e n t hey organize and buy their ow n unio n -made g o o d s. COMPLlME .'IT S OF T H E CeNTRAL LABOR U N I O N a n d T H E METAL TRADES COU N C I L o f the CANAL ZONE

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Are yo u bothered b y glare? Do es sUlishine mar your furniture? lVe m anufacture Venetian Blinds in any and size. Do not lorget. that w e are the so l e agents in the R e lJUbli c or the world renowned "DUNLOPILLO MATTRESS" Li re s Latest Luxury FOR SALE AT Cowes Furniture Company Via E spana, B ella Vis t a SEE FELIX lor L a t es t Creations in EVENING. AFTERNOON and SPORT FROC K S S i zes 1 2 to 20 FELIX B MADURO OPEN DURING NOON HOUR 2 1 Centra l Avenue Pana m a DRINK D e licioll S and R efreshing The Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Inc. P a n a m a 65 Colon 84 Phone Colon Phone P anamll 800 335-336 Smoot-Beeson, S A. BUIC K t;A DTLLA C LA SA LL E CflEVROLET Distributors Colon 17th &I I Streels C & M e l endez Panama C ity

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The Discriminating S hoPI) e r C h oo s es : l l [CHOLS Chinese Rug On (li s pJa y i n Century C lub B loc k. P anama City, R P P O. Box 377 Ancon C. Z. COIllI)liments of HarT Y C. N i cholls Dlstl'ibuto r of I'ACKAIW DODGE & De SOTO C alle I and Aneon Ave. Centra l A m erica's Fines t S t o r e FRENC H BAZAAR P D I ,UIA C I TY --0--A modern liP to-d a t e estahlishm ent, crrering its exceptional merchandise, v alues, and modern IIp -to-date service. COM I'LIMENTS OF LUCKY STRIKE Cigarett es

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COMPLIMENTS ur Office Service Company COMPLI MENTS or Pearl Hat Shop Central Avenue Panama City WE CLEAJIo CLOTHES CLEANER --TROTT THE CLEANER 10 MONTES ERIN STREET, off Jay Street PHONE 453 MOTTA'S Panama Hats 107 Central Avenue Panama Compliments of A rias Plumbing Co. o r AMERICAN B EAUTY SALON Panama City General Electric REFRIGERATORS RADIOS APPLIANCES ALBERT LI NDO Central Ave. No. 3S General E lectric Di,:;tributor. Hollywood Beauty Shop SPECIALISTS in PERMANENT WAVING HAIR DYEING BLEACHING Reasonable Prices Expert 'Vork Phone: Panama 2312 No.7 F o urth 01 July Avenue

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Kodak Panama Ltd. orrers A COMPLETE LINE OF KODAK PRODUCTS and PILOT RADIOS --0 -KODAK PANAMA LTD. 111 Central Avenue Panama Cit)' from Panama's Leading Store ANTONIO'S P a ul '25 Compliments oJ DURAN CAFE PURO Joe '2 7 25 Years of Stead y Progress is 'Your Assurance of Merit HAVE YOUR EYES EXAMINED Before eyestrain wrinkles become permanent and nervous f atigue becomes c hronic, have your eyes examined. If you need g lasses. you will b e surprised to find whal a (lo rn fort the y are when accurate l y and becomingly fitted t o you Scad ron Optical Company Registered Optomet"ish and Opticians, N e w York 23 Central Avenue, Panama 9.034 Front Street, Colon

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CHRYSLER fsI PLYMOUTH CARS CHRYSLER-FARGO TRUCKS "FIRESTON E PRODUCTS PHILCO RADIOS fsI BATTERIES PERFEC T CIRCLE PISTON RINGS "PUROLATOR" OIL FILTERS LOCKHEED HYDRAU LI C BRAKE PARTS --0--DAY & N I GHT GAR AGE C ORP. Di stributor PHONE PANAMA 1 298 L I G H T, POW E R GAS Tel e p hones Tram way s Refriger a ti o n Our modern, efficient p lants and buildings are Ol)en at all times to i nspection b y students of Balboa Hig h School. Call Public Relation s Dept. Panama 3000. and arrange for a p e rsonally con-du cted trip. CIA. PANAMENA DE FUERZA Y LUZ }l.t Your Service, Always" C OLON

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THE MEMBER S OF THE ZO N IAN S l'AF F Wi s h To Take Adnllltage o f T hi s Opportunity To THANK S I NCERELY: -T Ile spulIsors of the variOus. activities for their assistance in collecting in/ormation. -Mr. Swaflsotl for I,is work o n the or90",'z3t;011 pictures -Mr. K eJly for th e picture of the locks. -Mr. Flatau for permission to usc the pictu r e of the moonlit scene, and small views of the surrounding towns. -Mr. R llsseJl for his gift of t},e SIU/sct scc"c. -Mr. Matthews of d,e PANAMA AMERICAN for his advice and assistance i n {wblication. The a dvertisers For their cooperation. The pupils who contributed pictures. -The Student Association which sponsored the ZONI AN f;nanc;a/ly.


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