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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Administration
 Classes
 Activities
 Sports
 School life
 Advertising
 Back Cover
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093678/00027
 Material Information
Title: Zonian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date: 1935
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093678:00027

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Front Matter
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Title Page
        Page 7
    Dedication
        Page 8
    Foreword
        Page 9
    Table of Contents
        Page 10
    Administration
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Classes
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Activities
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Sports
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    School life
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Advertising
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Back Cover
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
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'zoretuorb

THIS ZONIAN has endeavored to present
a pictorial history of the year 1935
in Balboa High School. Such a task has
been difficult indeed, for our high school
life in the Panama Canal Zone is so inter-
mingled with the glamorous, exotic atmos-
phere of its tropical setting that words and
photography are all too inadequate to por-
tray its pleasures and its pains, its sunshine
and its shadows. However, as time steals
away, and the experiences of this year be-
come but vague remembrances, we hope
that this ZONIAN will recall to you some
of the memories that you would wish to
treasure.














abkl of Cmontents

Administration
(classes
Acti cities
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Abiteisrtments














Abirministration


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It has been a pleasure to work with the
class of 1935 this year and I want to express
to them my appreciation for the fine school
spirit that they have shown. As you go out
into life you ;carry my good wishes and God-
speed for success and happiness in the
future.


FRED W. HOSLER.


















,k ami 1niistration

BEN W. WILLIAMS .................. .... Superintendent

VIRGIL H. BARKER. ............. Assistant Superintendent

EVERETT B. SACKETT. ...............Director of Research

FRED W. HOSLER ........................... ..... Principal

DOROTHY SUNDBERG ........... Secretary to the Principal



Sacult


Gerald W. Akers
Emilie Amundson
Helen C. Baker
Floyd Buckley
Chalmers S. Carson
Agnes Eneboe
Sigurd E. Esser
Olga J. Frost
Noel F. Gib-on
Edward W. Hatchett
Dorothy Hayward
Katherine Jessup
George O. Lee


Mary Stuart Newman
Alice Parsons
Edward Pease
Hervey Prentiss
Elinor Robson
J. C. Swanson
Ruby M. Syrcle
Subert Turbyfill
George Wardlaw
Rowena Wellman
Myrtle M. Whaley
Mary Worrell
Harold Zierten































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Portrait

Tropical skies . .. lazy crawling breezes . . whisper-
ing palm trees . .. silvery moon . . winding narrow streets
S. . rickety carametas . . wide-eyed tourists . . sweaty
policemen. . boisterous fruit vendors . . weary lottery
ticket sellers . . noisy newsboys . . dusty boot-blacks
S. . laughing sefioritas . . echo of native tamboritos .
gaity . . laughter . . picturesque polleras . . Pa-
nama! .


Anna Ramirez.


















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lass (Offitcers

James T. Johnson ................. ......... President
Edward Coyle ...................... ..... Vice-Pres;dent

Jean Stillwell ......... ..... ................. Treasurer
Wilma Wickens ................. ................. Secretary

















311i 4 m0llorim1
GEORGE McCONAGHY


To Him . from Us


It seems but yesterday
That he was here,
Surrounding us with smiles
And spreading tender comradeship ,
But now he is hushed
And answers to no calling . .

?r.'g.i visions of the fSast
Parade in faded tints of melancholy musings,
And gnawing at our hearts
BindL. each and every sorrow,
Into one whole and mournful cry
Of dee and multiple emotions.

Each friend and each acquaintance
All -
Stand numbed beyond recall
And wonder . .
He that was so 7oved by all,
Why did he have to go?

Go, -:d I say? His body, yes
But his memory lingers caressingly
In each and every comrade's heart.

He is not dead . .
He has just been borne away
To some enchanted shore
Of sweet and rakiured haainess.








THELMA E. AHLFONT Canal Zone
Supper Club; General Science Club; History Club;
Study Hall Service Unit.

1 F you become quite entranced by the sound of an engaging
lisp, you may be certain that Thelma is on the warpath again, for
Thelma believes that young ensigns surrender more frequently
to femininity than to "fascism."

ELIZABETH A. AKIN Texas
Glee Club; Little Theater.

- LIZABETH may be as bashful as she claims to be, but who,
after seeing her in the Senior play, will believe her? Besides,
aren't those shy glances that we see around school just evidence
that she has individual as well as dramatic technique?


GLORIA MARY AMBURG Canal Zone
Pep Squad; Sapper Club; Little Theater; Art Club;
Spanish Club.

( LORIA may seem quiet, but if the faculty offered a prize for
efficient whispering we know who the winner would be.



WINNIE FRANCES ANDERSON Pennsylvania
Zonian Staff; Glee Club; "Once in a Blue Moon."

4fRANCES' first year with us makes us wish we had had her
all the time instead of just for our senior year. She is as easy to
look at as she is difficult to surpass in scholastic work.



HIRAM ANDRADE Cuba
Study Hall Service Unit; We-check Club; Spanish Club.

Il HEN Hiram begins to sputter Spanish, who are we to decide
whether he is promoting another Cuban revolution, or merely
explaining why he does not like poetry?


JULIUS ANGER Hungary
Soccer; Spanish Club.

| ULIUS is what you might call a "hot-cha-cha boy." If you
have ever seen him dance, you know the meaning of "Hungarian
Rhapsody."











MARIA R. AROSEMENA Scotland
Spanish Club; Album Club.

11 ARIA is the girl who has her own car to drive to school. As
if this were not enough, she also has brains, beauty, and beaux.


CARLOS G. ARZE Panama
Spanish Club.

4 F you have ever heard a noise in the hall which sounded like
a geyser running wild, it wa- probably only Carlos spouting Span-
ish. If volubility and audience appeal Ere an index of the quality
of his speech, we poor English-speaking mortals have missed a
rare treat.

EDITH WEEKS BAKER Canal Zone
Spanish Club; Little Theater; Tennis.

(,DITH is the quiet little girl who whispers all the answers to
the teachers. Perhaps she is merely keeping her voice soft to
help her be the perfect librarian she plans to be.



BEVERLY MILRE BOGGS Pennsylvania
Spanish Club; Charm Club; Biology Club; Little Theater;
"A Murder Has Been Arranged."

eIUMOR has it that Beverly is beautiful, but she can't be
"dumb." Did you know she was graduated at mid-term, when
she was only sixteen years old? Unusual?

ANN ELAINE BOHAN
Charm Club; Little Theater; Inner Circ'e; "The Three Graces";
'1A Murder Has Been Arranged"; "A Full House"; Music
Club; Glee Club; Zonian Staff.
ZVERYONE loves piquant little Elaine, who is such a depend-
able worker that we have never been able to decide whether her
infectious smile is flirtatious, or merely friendly.



AUGUSTO BOYD Panama
A UGUSTO is a Panamanian who is as big as he is jolly. His3
only care has been to secure marks sufficiently high to admit him
to his chosen university.







MATHILDE M. BREWERTON New Jersey
Study Hall Service Unit; Fed Squad; Swimming Team;
Parrakeet Staff; "A Full House."
JRETTY Mathilde trips through the halls with a cheerful little
hum. Stop and listen to her. She doesn't talk; she effervesces.
What fun!




JOHN RAYMOND BRL'LAND, Jr. Canal Zone
Parrakeet; General Science Club.

0 YOU want to laugh? John will turn your "tickle box" over
several times. Many students remember joyous hours with him.



MARJORIE A. BULLOCK Canal Zone
We-check Club; Spanish Club; Little Theater; Inner Circle;
"A Murder Has Been Arranged"; "A Full House"; Glee
Club; Study Hall Service Unit.

fl ARJORIE is deservedly well-known in the dramatic field.
Lively, joyous, carefree, that's Marjorie!



BLANCHE CHENEY Canal Zone
Nifty-Fifty; Hispano-America; Glee Club.
4 LANCHE is known as the office helper. Her secretarial work
must be efficient, because everyone asks for her.




GENEVIEVE VIVIAN CHRISTLE North Dakota
Study Hall Service Unit; Little Theater.

IIVIAN is a good bridge player, and contract, too! We all envy
that. She wants to be a nurse, and we think she'd be a good one.



REBA LILLIAN COLBERG Panama
Little Theater; Astrcnomy Club; Biology Club.
Basketball, Baseball.
,, SMILING junior by merit of her ability became an even
more smiling senior. And we were as happy about it as she.












LUCILLE MADE COOK New Mexico
Parrakeet Editor; Supper Club; Art Club; Albumettes;
Spanish Club; Class Prophet.

T ITH Lucille as its editor, our Parrakeet has been doing
some effectual chirping this year. Lucille herself is a rara
avis; she always has her homework prepared.


HENRY COURVILLE Panama

1EDONAIR and attractive, Henry is the boy that every-
body wants to know. Perhaps he realizes the effectiveness of
his flattering French smile.



EDWARD G. COYLE Canal Zone
Business Manager of the Junior Play; Vice-President
of the Senior Class.
WIHEN he is interested, Edward is a sincere and earnest
worker. As vice-president of the class he has proven invalu-
able in upholding our senior dignity.


LOIS JEANNE DE LA MATER Canal Zone
Zonian Staff; Parrakeet Staff; Biology Club; Glee
Club; Little Theater; Charm Club; Music Club;
Album Club; Nifty-Fifty; Editor of School Bulletin;
"Once in a Blue Moon."

iMALL, energetic, and clever is our Lois. Facetiously, she
is known around school as "Betty Boop."



MANUEL H. DELVALLE Panama
Spanish Club; Debating Club; Band; "A Murder Has
Been Arranged."

A CTOR, debater, student of no mean ability, and withal
good-looking. I agree; 'tis enough for one boy.




TED E. DOMBROWSKY Canal Zone
Treasurer of the Class, '32; General Science Club;
Parrakeet Staff.
ZED is our Johnny Weismuller. Not only in the pool but
elsewhere, he is quickly recognized by that shiny mop of hair.







JEROME O. DURFEE Panama
Soccer; Basketball; Album Club; Glee Club.

AEXT to soccer, soap box oratory is Jerry's favorite pas-
time. But don't worry; the fire in his eyes is belied by his
flashing, friendly smile.

SHIRLEY RUSSON EDWARDS Canal Zone
Pep Squad; Little Theater; Charm Club; Glee Club;
Secretary-Treasurer of Class, '33; Music Club;
"A Full House."
" HIRLEY made a beautiful, gracious Queen of the Carnival,
but we like her because she is a smiling pal, always friendly
and ready for fun.


ERNEST A. ERICKSON Connecticut
Glee Club; Engineering Club; Track.
SLUFF your way through life! That's Ernie's philosophy,
and Ernie is one of the few people we know who lives con-
sistently in accordance with his philosophy.



BARBARA E. EVANS Canal Zone
Charm Club; Glee Club; Pep Squad; Album Club;
Little Theater; Spanish Club.
I1 ARBARA'S cool look of sophistication is only a mask for
a happy disposition and a keen enjoyment of life.



HENRY EVERS Canal Zone
Science Club; Album Club.
EEING Henry around school, one would never dream that
he is the modest possessor of rippling muscles that give him
an uncanny brute strength. Watch him swim though.


OCTAVIO GARCIA FABREGA Panama
Soccer.

I) NE never hears much from Octavio. Quiet, unassuming,
he is a gentleman of the old school. You will know him by
his little mustache.











MARGARET P. FESSLER Canal Zone
Volleyball; Basketball; Parrakeet; Pep Club; Baseball.
~'PORTING? Why they call her AllAmerican. Tall, ath-

letic-looking, Margaret commands the respect of all who know
her.


DAISY MONICA FIELD Trinidad, B.W.I.
Spanish Club; Charm Club; Pep Squad.

HE is a daisy! Petite Daisy has a smile fcr every one.
The stars predict that there will soon be some one tall, dark,
and handsome in her life.


WILLIAM FLEMING Chile
Parrakeet; Zonian; La Fraternid3d; Homeroom Ser-
vice Unit; Study Hall Seivice Unit; Swimming; Bas-
ketball; Athletic Council; Social Committee.

ILL is a scholar without being a grind. Since the harder
the problems are the better he likes them, Bill is making his
four-year high school course in three years.


RIGGS FORREST Virginia
Athletic Association; Baseball; Album Club; Biology
Club; Soccer; Basketball; Glee Club.

IIIHAT-A-MAN RIGGS is known for his prowess in athle-
tics. His loyalty to his school is too well known to need ex-
planation.



WILLIAM THOMAS GORMELY Canal Zone

T ONSERVATIVE in action, polite in manner, William
ranks as one of Balboa High School's most commendable
students.


GEORGE WRIGHT HALDEMAN Canal Zone
General Science Club; Biology Club; Album Club;
Swimming; Astronomy Club.

i ALDY is another outstanding athlete, scholar, and go-
getter. Physics and chemistry are his weaknesses, but he also
has a yearning toward Emily Post's book of etiquette. Note
his distinctive style of dressing.









Softball League.

(L OM HALLIDAY won his title, "Silent," among the girls.
Six feet, two inches tall, he doesn't have to notice the fair
sex; they notice him.


ELAINE HALMAN Panama
Spanish Club; Study Hall Service Unit; Zonian Staff.

4- LAINE is known for her willing helpfulness. That is why
we made her one of the chosen few to do the typing for the
Zonian.



EUGENE HAMLIN Canal Zone
Class Secretary, '32; Vice-President of General Science
Club; Band; Scholarship C=mmittee.

( HAT this "little fella" wields a mighty pen is evidenced
by his lengthy thesis on the "Cuckoo Treasure." To 'Gene the
honor roll is just another one of those things.


GRACE V. HARRIS Pennsylvania
Swimming; Basketball; Volleyball.

, ERE is another sportswoman, who makes a dependable
teammate. You may be sure that Grace will make her goal
in life.


FRED HENDRICKSON Canal Zone
Tennis; Glee Club; Music Club; Spanish Club; General
Science Club; String Quartette; Orchestra in
"A Murder Has Been Arranged."

f RED is the old maestro who can make a violin weep for
sorrow or laugh for joy. You'll hear more from him. Music
is his hobby, but tennis is his "racket."


GEORGE J. HERRING Washington, D. C.
Glee Club; Orchestra; Spanish Club; "Riding
Down the Sky."
() EORGE'S favorite form of greeting is, "Hey, Stupe!" But
we forgive him even this because he has such an engaging
twinkle in his eye, and because he manages to keep himself
from falling into the stupid class.


New Jersey


THOMAS B. HALLIDAY












CLAUDIS M. HOWELL South Carolina
Basketball; Little Theater; Volleyball; Baseball; Ath-
letic Council; Glee Club; Spanish Club; Charm Club;
Nifty-Fifty; B Club; Class Secretary, '32; "Mrs.
Bumpstead Leigh"; "Children of the Moon."

',CHOOL Spirit? If you want anything done for class or

club, just ask Claudie. She'll smile most winningly as she

takes the load on her small, sturdy shoulders.

VIRGINIA R. HUGHES New York
President of Girls, '32; Spanish Club; Homeroom
President, 33.

tlRGINIA is the girl who takes life with a smile. Evi-

dently she believes that poise is more important than push,

and perhaps she is right.

KATHRYN LAURIE HUMMER New York
Vice-President of Girls, '32; Glee Club; Little Theater;
"The Three Graces."

iRATHRYN is that senior with the gorgeous hair and a

husband. She is just one more argument for the truth of the

old statement, "Gentlemen prefer blondes."


BILLY HUNTER Louisiana
"Once in a Blue M:on"; Track; Class President '33.

4IF BILLY were allowed to choose the class motto, he would

probably suggest his own, "Live, love, and then learn."

ROBERTA GUY JOHANNES Canal Zone
S:udy Hall Service Unit; Tennis; Valleyball; Basket-
ball; Spanish Club.

SUIET? At times Roberta may be quiet, but she is merely

conserving her energy. The force she stores by refraining

from idle chatter can certainly make a ball sing.

TAMES THOMAS JOHNSON Canal Zone
Orchestra; Glee Club; String Quartette; Band; Bas-
ketball; Swimming; Water Pola; Science Club; As-
tronomy Club; Engineeering Club; Class Vice-Presi-
dent, '33 and '34; Class President, '35;
Social Committee.

SALL, handsome, courteous, fun-loving Jimmy! No won-

der we made him our class president! And it is to his popu-

larity, patience, persistence, and planning that we owe much

of the success of our senior year.









We-check Club.
1ILiLIA.M'S cerebral agility fairly staggers us. You should
hear him rattle off propositions and proof. Even poetry does
not quite "get him down."


JOSEPH ANTHONY JOYNER Panama
Album Club.

W HEN you hear that peculiar noise around the campus,
you need not start looking in the trees for some rare type of
bird that you think is probably responsible. More than likely
it's that individual sounding horn on Joe Joyner's car.

MARY JOYNER Canal Zone
Study Hall Service Unit.
T ARY'S red hair is her crowning glory and serves to em-
phasize her happy disposition. She is just another one of the
joyful Joyners.


RICHARD KOPERSKI Canal Zone
Parrakeet; Band; Manager of Baseball;
"A Full House."
SURELY Richard believes in the admonition, "Gather ye
rosebuds, while ye may," for he dances through life with never
a care.



JACK WILSON KROMER Canal Zone
Class President of Class of '36 in '33 and '34; Glee
Club; Band; Baseball; Soccer; Track.

YACK comes to us from the Class of '36. Their loss was
certainly our gain, for Jack stars in everything he does.



RODERICK N. MACDONELL Pennsylvania
Engineers Club; Biology Club.
11 HEN we look at him, we know his name is correct, for
he seems to symbolize the fighting spirit of some ancient
Scottish clan.


WILLIAM W. JONES


Canal Zone










MARY FAITH MAGUIRE Canal Zone
Study Hall Service Unit; Spanish Club; Supper Club.
't HAT a secretary she will make! The teachers, quick to
see her efficiency, appreciate Mary's nimble brain and fin-
gers. As for us, we prefer her ready smile and friendliness.

THOMAS CONN MAKIBBIN Canal Zone
Swimming; Study Hall Service Unit; President of
Science Club; Bulletin Board Committee;
Editor of the Zonian.
(OM is one of the quiet ones, but his dry wit has enlivened
many dull classes. Because of his artistic ability and his re-
putation for dependability we made him responsible for our
year book. Was our choice good?



HELEN JACQUELINE MALSBURY Canal Zone

(! HAT dignified-looking, well-dressed girl is "Jacky." Is
she just being coy when she says that ring is "just a ring?"




RICARDO MARTINELLI Panama
Science Club; Glee Club; History Club.
SICARDO'S earnest expression reveals that he is stead-
fast in purpose; his flashing smile portrays that he has an
unusual capacity for friendship.


EDWIN MATTOON Kansas

J F COURSE you have not seen him around much. He is
a newcomer, but already he has caused serious heart trouble
among the girls.




MARGARET P. McELHONE Canal Zone

~iER delicate Irish beauty captivates every eye, and her
roguish smile enthralls every heart.








ELIZABETH ANN McKEE New Mexico
Glee Club; Little Theater; Art Club; Music Club.
4I ETTY has that sleek, sophisticated air that suggests bore-
dom. As we have known her, she has a keen zest for living
and a healthy curiosity about life.



OCTAVIO A. MENDEZ Panama

_* UAVE, polished, handsome, and intelligent, Octavio is a
gentleman in the real sense of the word. We wish there
were more like him.



HELEN JEAN MITCHELL Canal Zone
President of Girls, '36; Astronomy Club; Supper Club;
Pep Squad; Study Hall Service Unit; Zonian Staff;
Home Room S-rvice Unit.

N OTHING is so welcome as the sound of Jean's, "That's
all right. I'll do that for you if you do not have time." Nothing
is so contagious as her wholesome, good-natured glee.


LOUIS T. MOFFATT Nova Scotia
Manager of Baseball Team; Science Club.

OUIS wants to join the merchant marine. Since the sea
holds an enduring fascination for him, we hope he will be happy
in his chosen work.


WILLIAM ROBERT MOORE Canal Zone
Track; Soccer; Basketball; Baseball; Property Man-
ager; "A Murder Has Beeen Arranged";
Class Committees.

W ILLIE is ever ready to participate in all school activities.
He is interested in everything and everybody.



BETTY LOUISE NOLAN Panama
Art Club, Supper Club.

Il ITH quiet efficiency, Betty manages to combine work
and pleasure and thus get the most from life.










LOUIS CHARLES NOLI Panama
History Club; Business Manager of the Zonian.
OME are authors; others are orators; Louis is both. When
his knowledge fails, he falls back on his charming personality
and "gets there just the same."


ROBERT OLLER Canal Zone

O1 0 NOT be deceived by the fact that this picture shows
Robert as rather a serious looking young man. He is really
full of mIschief and fun, which he conceals with a sober face.


MARY NETTA ORR Canal Zone
Supper Clu'; Study Hall Service Unit; Spanish Club;
Parrakeet Staff.
W, HAT strong, determined look on Mary's face means that
she knows she is an all A student, but her keen sense of
humor keeps her from taking herself too seriously.


ANNABELLE E. OWENS Massachusetts
Parrakeet Staff.
15iTFUL-LOCKING Annabelle is really the most enthusias-
tic talker that we know. Her most outstanding fault is that she
did not join us until this year.



PATTY PALMER Utah

V ATTY'S cameo-like features and delicate coloring make
her appear to be very demure. Actually she is full of fun
and the joy of living.



JUAN PARDINI Panama

II HEN Juan works, he works whole-heartedly. He plays
the same way. The world needs more people like him.


~L;t









Baseball.
F E can't decide whether or not Harvey is serious about
life, but we have our suspicions.



JOHN T. PARMELEE Canal Zone
Baseball; Album Club; General Science Club.
A T LEAST one girl thinks he is good-looking; several boys
think he is a good pal. What more could Jack want?


ROBERT L. PERLEY Philippine Islands
"A Full House."
( UR acquaintance with this engaging young man is short,
but we should like to extend it. To us he seems to be a
"regular guy.


MARGARET G. PERRY Texas
Charm Club; Album Club; Spanish Club; Parrakeet
Staff; We-check Club; "Children cf the Moon";
Study Hall Service Unit.

JN SPITE of the fact that Peggy has been in the tropics for
more years than she remembers, she is still brimming over
with energy. Look at her long list of activities and recall the
speed with which she covered the distance between the two
buildings.


FRANK L. PETERS, Jr. New York

4F RANK is another new man whose appearance and man-
nerisms make him "stand out from the crowd." Those who
know him say he is different and interesting.


THOMAS PIMENTO Canal Zone
Baseball; Scftball League; Science Club.

Ay EVER tempt Tom too much! He will either make you
la.eh or run. Although Tom is "one of the boys," he does
not care much for the girls.


HARVEY PARKER


New Jersey












Spanish Club; Glee Club.

SNN is one of those who were given many talents; conse-
quently, she has difficulty in deciding whether to be an artist,
an acrobatic dancer, or a concert pianist.




RUBELIO D. QUINTERO Panama
Track.

tUBELIO says he does all things in moderation. Maybe
such temperance accounts for the perfection of his sprinting.



ANNA M. RAMIREZ Panama
Hispano-America.

. NNA is our class poet. Strange as it may seem to those
who know her, she writes more frequently in a serious than
in a humorous mood.



JOYCE CECILIA RANCE New York
Supper Club; Study Hall Service Unit; Little Theater.

S0 YOU believe she is serious when she says she is a
man-hater? Joyce may have unusual ideas, but when she be-
gins her barnyard impersonations, we know she is all right.



JOHN RATHGABER Canal Zone
Soccer.

ACK manages to get along in this world with seemingly
very little effort. He doesn't even have to work to make the
girls like him.



JOSEPHINE ANNE REIBER Minnesota
Art Club; Study Hall Service Unit.

OSEPHINE'S twinkling eyes and gamin smile suggest fun
and mischief, but we know her as a dependable student and
a worthwhile friend.


ANN QUINN


New Jersey


P I,







WILLIAM REINIG Canal Zone
Softball; Engineers Club; Spanish Club.

SEST you should think that we accidentally slipped in a
picture of Harold Lloyd, we hasten to assure you that this
young man is really William Reinig. Such a preternaturally
serious expression cannot mean that he is sorry he is a senior.



SARA ELLEN ROBERTSON Georgia
Pep Squad; Glee Club.
Q(HEWING GUM is Sara's favorite form of exercise, but
she finds time to specialize in friendships.


THOMAS FRANCIS ROTH Canal Zone
We-check Club; Study Hall Service Unit; Debating
Club; Swimming; Biology Club.

SOM can readily be found in a crowd. Just go where the
laughter is loudest and most carefree, and you'll find this
happy-go-lucky fellow.


ISABEL SCHLOMING Canal Zone
Supper Club; Glee Club; Parrakeet Staff; Zenian
Staff; Athletic Council; "A Murder Has Been
Arranged"; "Children of the Moon."

JISABEL'S deep-throated voice has won her deserved dis-
tinction in dramatics. It also made her our girl tenor in the
glee club.


LOUIS HENRY SCHMIDT, Jr. Maryland
Spanish Club; Homeroom President; Zonian Staff.

CAPTAIN SCHMIDT is our champion fisherman. The
ones he catches are really big ones. He does not have to
tell you about them; he can show them.



JEAN ELIZABETH SCHWARTZ Pennsylvania

P ISTINGUISHED by her intelligence, her self-reliance,
and her poise, Jean is the envied possessor of the most beau-
tifully arched eyebrows in school. They're natural too.











MARGARET L. SEALEY Canal Zone
Volleyball; Glee Club; Album Club.
JF YOU have ever heard Margaret's infectious laugh, you
will know one of the reasons why she is popular.




GLADYS AMY SHELTON Panama
Glee Club; Music Club; Spanish Club.

(iLADYS is another member of our brain trust who slipped

easily into college in February. She wants to be an inter-
preter and she should make a brilliant one.



ROSARIO SABINA SHELTON Panama
Glee Club; Music Club; Spanish Club.
4 ESIDES being a faithful student, Rosario is a modest
and gifted musician-the perfect accompanist.



AILEENE ELIZABETH SMITH Canal Zone
Biology Club; Glee Club; Supper Club; Z-nian Staff.

SILEENE is blessed with that rare quality which is still
known as dependability; consequently, we knew she would be
an asset to the staff.


JEAN STILLWELL Canal Zone
Album Club; Spanish Club; Parrakeet Staff; Little
Theater; Class Treasurer, '35; Business Manager of
"A Full House"; Study Hall Service Unit;
Social Committee.
EAN is one of those versatile people who are always kept
busy doing things that the less able are not to be trusted to do



JACK SUTHERLAND Michigan
Baseball; Basketball; Soccer; "Children of the Moon";
"A Full House."
I ISTINGUISHED for his prowess in athletics, Jack is also
known in dramatics and among the ladies.








LUCILE TARFLINGER Georgia
Glee Club; Little Theater; Zonian Staff; "A Murder
Has Been Arranged"; "A Full House"; Athletic
Association; Study Hall Service Unit.
gUCILE plans to run a beauty parlor. We know now why she
was the make-up artist for the Little Theater.



WILFRID H. TOEPSER Germany
Orchestra.
1N FEBRUARY Wilfrid left us to return to Germany. We
wish him success in his new life.



ELWOOD A. TONNESON Panama
Glee Club; Basketball; Album Club.
.6LWOOD may be called "Keyhole," but his six feet plus
of amiability and good fellowship would be too much for any
keyhole we know.



THELMA PEARL TORBERT Canal Zone
Little Theater.

(! HELMA is one of the few quiet ones around school. She
seems to believe that it is better to have a few very faithful
friends than to "run with the herd."



HARRY EDWARDS TOWNSEND New York
i ARRY has just come down for his senior year. We won-
der whether or not he finds Balboa different from New York
City.



MILDRED E. TRUE Massachusetts
Glee Club; Music Club; Study Hall Service Unit;
Christmas Programs; "Once in a Blue Moon."
ILDRED is our gifted soloist. Hearing her sing the
Christmas music will be one of the pleasures of high school
that we will long remember.











JULIA ELENA VILLANUEVA Panama
Spanish Club.

ULIA is another member of our class brain trust. In Feb-
ruary she left us to go to the Canal Zone Junior College.


JULIO A. VENGOECHEA Colombia
Soccer.

Xe ULIO always manages to surprise us. When we least ex-
pect him to do so, he volunteers some choice bit of erudition
that leaves us gaping.

CHARLES J. VINCENT Pennsylvania
Orchestra; String Quartette.
P ID Charles play the rhumba on his cello down in Pana-
ma? We wonder whether or not it was "Chuck's" fear of
losing a mere fiddle in his hip pocket that caused him to
choose a cello instead. Anyway we are glad we knew him
musically.

BARBARA E. WALBRIDGE New York
4JF SILENCE were golden, Barbara would be a millionaire.
Is she really quiet, or does she just seem unusually quiet
when compared with other members of the class?

ROY S. WALSTON North Carolina
General Science Club; Astronomy Club; Study Hall
Service Unit; Hzmeroom Service Unit; Advertising
Manager for "A Full House."
SOY will answer to "Crawly," "Stew," or anything else you
might want to call him. When you see him saunter along the
street, you can guess what part of the country he comes from,
but when you hear him wisecrack in that slow, good-natured
drawl, you know you are right.

MURIEL PATRICIA WATERS Canal Zone
H URIEL is one of the brilliant ones who quietly piled up
enough credits to send her into the Canal Zone Junior Col-
lege in February.




























































r r1
...~\\1~a


RAYMOND V. WELCH New York
4 AVE you ever heard him talk? He is quiet, but ambi-
tious. Having passed all necessary subjects with very good
marks, "Slim" decided to take some of them over again just
to prove he could repeat success.

HARRY C. WERTZ Louisiana
"\ OTICE the development of his jaw muscles. If you will
interview him he will confide in you that such development is
a by-product of his skill in "cracking" chewing gum. Harry
achieved his high degree of ability in this line by continuous
and unremitting practice.

HUGH HEALD WHITE Canal Zone
Biology Club; Engineers Club; Album Club;
Basketball.

SUGH spends most of his time studying jungle life and
dabbling in photography. His Ford is one of the unforgettable
landmarks of our high school.

WILMA E. WICKENS Virginia
La Fraternidad; Study Hall Service Unit; Albumette;
Little Theater; Class Secretary, '35; Biology Club;
Homeroom Service Unit; Parrakeet Staff; Pep Squad;
Cheer Leader.
WIlILMA is that pretty little girl who is so energetic and
efficient. Even with her many duties she finds time to make
collections of such interesting things as scorpions and taran-
tulas.

DONALD EARL WILLIAMS Panama
Glee Club; "Riding Down the Sky."
1 ONALD must have been :aught that young people should
be seen and not heard, for he is another one of those quiet,
likeable young men.

EDWARD F. WITSELL Hawaii
"A Full House."
11 HILE we expect Edward to be an admiral in Uncle Sam's
navy, to us he will always be "Officer Mooney." Edward has
been in our school only a short time, but we all like him.





JAMES CADY WRIGHT, Jr. Panama
Glee Club; Little Theater; Engineers Club; Science Club;
"A Full House."
IMMY is an actor off the stage as well as on. We remember
him as the leading man in several romantic roles.

JAMES WALLACE YATES Florida

AMES, whose little body lodges a mighty mind, does not know
whether or not he will follow the family tradition and be valedic-
torian of his class. Is it possible that he prefers Juan Franco?

MARIANO GASTEAZORO Panama
Spanish Club.

HI HEN Mariano makes up his mind that he wants something,
he does all he can to get it. More power to him!

HORACIO ALFARO, Jr. Panama

IiERE is another one of those handsome Panamanians. Was
he afraid to have his picture published?

DALE A. BOGGS Canal Zone
Album Club; Treasurer, '31; "A Full House"; "A Murder
Has Been Arranged"; Spanish Club.

IERY erect and alive is Dale both in body and brain. Can it
be that Indian blood?

ALBERT BOYD Panama
Biology Club; Spanish Club.

,,LBERT i1 one of those ambitious boys who couli not wait
until June to go to the Canal Zone Junior College.

PETER T. CORRIGAN Canal Zone
Baseball; Basketball; Class President, .34'

SETE has led us, has fought for us, and has laughed with us.

GEORGE MARTIN Illinois

()EORGE is one of the students who left C. H. S. to join us.

WILLIAM RILEY POOLE Canal Zone
Soccer.

IILLIAM is such a "regular guy" that everyone calls him
Bill. His chief characteristic is his incessant talking.

JAMES M. YOUNG New Jersey

AMES finds his sail boat more than enough to take care of his
cpare time. He even deserts the girls because of it.














Zrn or Newer!



LANG! CLANG! rang out a loud bell aboard the airship
"Bumpanburst," awakening us all in a most alarming man-
ner from a peaceful slumber. I say peaceful because we
all had confidence in our pilot, George Haldeman. We were
sure he would not crack us up on a peak of the Andes or in the
Amazon as so many pilots working for Eugene Hamlin's and
James Yates' airline were accustomed to doing. Perhaps it was
George's pleasing manner with the ladies that made Edith and
me cancel our reservations on John Bruland's boat for the trip
from Buenos Aires to Florida. Edith's name was no longer
Baker, and I had long since been led astray by way of the altar;
but we still liked thrills and decided it would be exciting to go to
our meeting in Florida in one day and night on a speedy comet-
ship designed by the eminent aeronautical architect, William
Poole, and greatly improved upon for comfort by Ted Dom-
browsky.
But that sharp, soul-stirring gong accompanied by the boom-
ing voice of the co-pilot, Henry Evers, telling us to stand-by, for
an instant made me wish in my sudden terror that I had entrusted
my care-worn body to John Bruland's boat, especially, since I now
remembered how well his chief engineer, Louis Moffatt, used to
engineer his little canvas kayak at the Balboa Boathouse back in
the good old high school days twenty years ago.
"Man the life-wings! Women and children first!" bellowed
the steward, Thomas Roth, as he ran into our room to chase us
out on deck. This was to be the test for the "infallible life-wings"
invented by the up-and-coming aviatrix, Joyce Rance, to corre-
spond to life boats on steamships.
"What has happened?" asked Edith, her knees beating a
tattoo under the weather-tempered material of her night clothes.
(Raymond Welch had invented a kind of weather-tempered goods
for clothing that would make the wearer comfortable in any cli-
mate, and save the expense of summer and winter wardrobes.)










"We ran into Harry Wertz, one of those blasted nigh' pilot?
who break all traffic regulations without sending out their wave
vibrations to show their position to other ships. I don't know
what use it was for Hiram Andrade to invent that apparatus if
ship owners don't use it."
Our roommates, Thelma Torbert and Barbara Walbridge were
so horror-stricken that they ran out on deck without waiting for
Tom's explanation; but Barbara did not forget that precious 1935
model Underwood typewriter that she was taking to the conven-
tion in New York to demonstrate the marked improvement of
Edward Coyle's dicto-scribe machine-which incidentally drove
such excellent secretaries as Mary Joyner, Margaret Perry, Mary
Netta Orr, Margaret Sealey and Mary Maguire out of the busi-
ne.s world into the domestic world of dish-washing machines, and
thermo-controlled apparatus, for preparing baby food while
mothers kept the television wires hot with the latest "Witsell"
news ("Witsell," by the way, is the game made popular by Ed-
ward Witsell to replace bridge.)
Edith and I left our room in such haste that she forgot her
box of removable and replaceable false teeth designed by Wilma
Wickens, the painle_.s dentist, to lessen people's dental troubles.
On the trip to the ground in our life-wings ship, however, Manuel
Delvalle attempted to alleviate her distress over her inability to
eat anvrhin2 but soup until she could order another box of teeth
from Wilma's laboratory by saying that in a few years everyone
would be eating his condensed standard food tablet which could
be eaten quickly and daintily without danger of indigestion or the
necessity of teeth.
Elizabeth Akin, who waz also on her way to the Women's
Anti-Public Television League in Florida, had just started to make
a sarcastic reply, when we all felt our life-wings thud on some-
thing hard, and roll over on one side, making us all to sprawl in
uncomfortable positions. Jean Schwartz, representative of the
Invisible Spectacles Company, cocked one quizzical eyebrow and
calmly stated, "Well, I guess we have reached land after all."
James Young, the officer in charge of our group, mustered up
enough nerve to open the trap door and look around with his
searchlight to see where we were. The Reverend Jack Kromer,
and his devout wife, Aileene Smith, told us all to get on our knees
and thank the Almighty Power above which had led us to safety
instead of into the ocean somewhere.
While officer Young was still outside looking around, we
heard a familiar noise. "Say, that sounds like the horn on a
Ford!" exclaimed Joe Joyner. who had built up a good business
repairing cars.
"Well, go out and see for goodness sakes!" said Isabel Sch-
loming, the great Hollywood actress. "Frank Peters and I have










to be on location inside of twenty-four hours, or those ham-actors,
Robert Perley and Anne Quinn, will get our roles, and those old-
skin flint producers, William Jones and Harry Townsend, are
liable to break our contracts."
"Yes," added Margaret McElhone, the model housewife, and
my husband is going to get tired of taking care of the children,
if I don't get home from this business trip of mine right away."
Edin Mattoon, founder of the Mattoon Cookie Company,
and Thomas Pimento, who was gathering rare specimens of trop-
ical bugs for the Boyd Institute, donated to Panama by August
Boyd, the leading Panamanian specialist in tropical diseases,
volunteered to accompany Joyner in his search for what we hoped
to be a Ford.
In our nervousness we imagined all sorts of horrors, such as
our men being attacked by uncivilized native tribes in some part
of Central America which had not been reached by Josephine
Reiber's and Jean Stillwell's missionary society.. However, we
definitely heard the running of a motor, and in the gray of the
dawn we could make out through the porthole that several men
were standing conversing beside a vehicle of some sort a few
yards away.
Officer Young came running up saying that we had heard a
Ford. Fred Hendrickson was returning to Panama with his bus
from Nicaragua, and would be only too glad to take us to Panama
City, which was only twenty miles away. "Then we must be on
Nelson Rounsevell's Central American Highway," breathed the
airship's nurse, Elaine Bohan. "Is Fred's wife, Lois De La Mater,
with him?" she asked, but she had jumped out of the ship and
run into the arms of her old school chum Lois, before anyone could
answer her question.
"What luck that you appeared along right now, old man," said
Jack Rathgaber, the radio announcer for Frances Anderson's,
Barbara Evans,' and Marjorie Bullock's radio harmony trio. "You
can tell us all about our old friends in Panama."
But the revelation of our classmates' circumstances in life,
did not begin until Fred was driving us swiftly towards Panama in
his bus. The only ones who did not show much interest in what
was being said were Thelma Ahlfont and Elizabeth McKee, who
had swooned in ladylike fashion into the arms of their naval offi-
cer husbands, as soon as the suspense of the accident was over.
"To begin with," said Fred, "Jack Parmelee is governor of
the Canal Zone now and is at present entertaining James John-
son and his wife, the former Claudis Howell, who are on their
way to the embassy in Sweden. Of course you all know that
Julio Vengoechea is president of Panama after the hard fliht he
had against Horacio Alfaro. Louis Noli really won the elections










for him by his good oratory, but Donald Williams did all in his
power to sway the approval of the people to his colleague Juan
Pardini, the third candidate for presidency. Panama's present
minister to Washington, D. C., is Octavio Mendez.
The leading store in town is now run by Carlos Arze and
Ricardo Martinelli. Anna Ramriez is a mannequin in their store,
as she represents the true Latin beauty to tourists. Reba Colberg
still teaches school to keep her husband, Willie Moore, in cigar-
etes when he loses too much on his Sunday horse races at Henry
Courville's race track."
Lois could no longer contain herself by just listening to Fred.
"Have you heard any of Grace Harris' latest Household Hints
over the radio? She is explaining her method of keeping phy-
sically fit as a sixteen-year-old girl by taking setting-up exer-
cises, while Sara Robertson's marvelous time-saver, the Me-
chanical Mender, darns hubby's socks.
"Charles Vincent and Rosario Shelton accompanied Mildred
True on the world-wide broadcast last night, and Mildred sang
so beautifully it brought tears to my eyes. But I bet Jacqueline
Malsbury is making just as much money with her torch singing
as any of those high-class musicians, because Thomas Halliday
is her manager, and Virginia Hughes since she married her mil-
lionaire has been able to give her lots of publicity. Did you
hear about Jean Mitchell's spectacular rise from working girl in
William Gormerly's and Elwood Tonneson's hairpin factory to
a seat in Congress? Through her hard work she passed the bar
examination with the aid of Richard Koperski's and William
Reinig's home correspondence course. They say she is very
good at law, and got over her stage fright by taking lessons in
Riggs Forrest's School for Confident Speakers."
By this time we had reached Panama, where we were met
by two newspaper reporters whom Fred had notified with the
little radio set on his bus that we were coming. One was Robert
Ridge who worked for Rubelio Quintero, editor of the Star and
Herald, and the other was Mathilde Brewerton, the sole reporter
for Thomas Makibbin's paper. Betty Nolan asked immediately
for the morning issue of the newspaper because she wanted to
see how the stock in which she had invested all of her savings,
accumulated as the private secretary to a Wall Street speculator,
was coming along. I was not the least bit surprised to see Je-
rome Durfee's name spread all over the front page as the insti-
gator of an "anti-everything" party to abolish the present state
of world affairs. I also saw that the daughters of Shirley Ed-
wards and Mary Arosemena were vying for the honor of being
carnival queen. They were both avowedly so beautiful that there
was danger of an uprising among their supporters before the
carnival season began.











On the society page was Annabelle Owen's daily syndicated
column of the social doings of the elite in the various capitals
of the o*,rld, as well as a huge write-up of the party given by
our friend Patty Palmer, now the wife of a major general. The
advertising section had placed the advertisements for Lucile
Tarflinger'a ultra-smart beauty parlor and Ribert Oiler's barber
shop, right next to an advertisement for Margaret Fessler's
money-saving hair tonic which kept the hair at the same length
all the time without its having to be cut. Hugh White was offi-
cial photographer for the Canal Zone; so an example of his art
adorned the sport page in the form of a picture of coach Bill Flem-
ing's Red, White and Blue troop, of which Kathryn Laurie Hum-
mer's children were the star swimmers. Roberta Johannes, as
manager of the Balboa playshed, had a notice in advising parents
who wanted their children to learn the terpsicorean art that
Madam Daisy Fields would give lessons in the rhumba and the
Panameiia, the dance made popular by Fred Astaire's successor
in dancing films, Billy Hunter.
On the literary page, which Julius Anger and Ernest Erick-
son edited, I noticed the weekly reviews of the best novels of
the month, but I never did like their choices of literature. George
Martin, the star feature reporter of the paper, had in quite an
interesting story about Roderic Macdonell, chemistry teacher
in Balboa High School, who had formed a club for chemistry
students that allowed them to abscond with whatever apparatus
they took a fancy to without incurring the wrath of the school
administration.
Edith and I decided to go to the lovely home of our old
friend Vivian Christle, now the wife of the leading surgeon in
the Panama Hospital, in Bella Vista, to wait for the time for
John Bruland's boat to pick us u.p and take us safely on the last
lap of our journey. We drove past the establishment of Elaine
Halman, Gloria Amburg and Blanche Cheney. The fame of
these modistes, authorities on individualized frocks, had spread
so far that Edith wanted to stop in and get something to wear
to the opera when we reached New York. We got into a traffic
jam, which officer Octavio Fabrega was trying to straighten out
despite the fact that one couldn't tell which way the streamlined
automobiles were supposed to be heading. While we were
waiting, Octavio told us that Roy Walston had resigned his posi-
tion on the Canal Zone police force because he found the new
canl so confusing, and that he was now living a life of ease (!)
at the home of his in-aws.
When at last we had arrived safely at Vivian's home thank-
ful to be safe from rumble and roar of Panama City, we sank
into the luxury of a comfortable lounge and Edith murmured,
"How good it is to be home again after twenty years."












*uwli'








































Alien, Helen
Andrade, Martha
Arrieta, Mercedes
Atkinson, Catherine
Burlow, Ruth
Blanton, Alice
Boggs, Carol
Buechele, Phyllis
Calhoun, Clelia
Castel, Sarita
Coleman, Jean
Comins, Margaret
Comley, Betty
Cornwell, Martha
Darnall, Eleanor
Dixon, Frances
Dugan, Lucille
Dennis, Eleanor
Dugas, Dorothy


Junior Girls


Foley, Mary
Gruber, Barbara
Gulick, Jean
Gulbransen, Mary
Haw, Margaret
Hall, Jean
Horter, Marguerite
Horter, Ruth
Hughes, Jane
Hutchison, Doris
Hyde, Mary
Jensen, Juanita
Johnson, Esther
Kierulf, Mary
Lewis, Betty
Maguire, Frances
Moore, Muriel
Morgan, Jean
Phillips, Betty


Preston, Virginia
Price, Verna
Quijano, Maria
Rayburn, Mildred
Richmond, Virginia
Rath, Betty
Sasso, Lois
Seaberg, Sophie
Seeley, Mildred
Shepherd, Mary
Sutherland, Fay
Symonds, Alma
Tuck, Viola
Tuttle, Pearl
VanClief, Helen
Vila, Bienvenida
Walston, Dorothy
Weigold, Margie
Welch, Frances
















Adams, Roger
Anderson, Claude
Bergh, Paul
Brown, Maurice
Brown, Thomas
Burdett, William
Button, Allen
Campbell, George
Clinchard, Gene
Corrigan, Joseph
Cowes, George
Dela Pena, David
De Vore, John
Duvall, Robert
Fairchild, Billy
Fero, Donald
Foley, Thomas
Friday, Walter


Junior Boys


Gilbert, Dennis
Greenlee, Allan
Graham, Gorden
Hale, Philip
Hammond, Arthur
Hoffman, Carl
Huff, Thomas
Keegan, Bernard
Keyy, David
Kiley, Daniel
Lindo, Edgar
Lipzinski, Louis
Lloyd, Raymond
Luse, Arthur
MacMurray, Charles
Madigan, Emmett
McGuire, John
Mendez, Manuel
Randolph, Sidney















c', ,L


Rathgaber, Bob
Rose, Jack
Shedlock, Culbert
Simka, Albert
Sims, Walter
Solenberger, Ira
Spinella, Rosario
Steiner, Ewald
Vallarino, Louis
Violette, Bill
Watson. Raymond
Wempe, Albert
Wempe, Martin
Whaler, Stanley
Wigg, William
Williams, George
Worley, William
Wright, Burritt


Kr)


T, '- 1.
1Hr-rb,; r


S4. b, w? .-
,- ; : : ". .. *- . : ';- I
3 --I --,. ... .. .., -I


*i '- M1& If "''
;1 i k t 1 i 1 a i | l f


f























Class Of '36


S THE curtain slowly ascended in September on the third
Sact of our high school drama, we found all the characters
eager to begin and hopeful for a successful performance.
Organizing early, the class made a wise step by electing as their
leading man for the year Bernard Keegan, as president. Bob
Rathgaber was given the role of vice-president, Peggy Horter that
of secretary, and Thomas Huff that of treasurer. As in most
plays much of the success of our act has been made possible by
our directors, Miss Wardlaw and Mr. Gibson.
The first scene of the act was the Junior-Senior Dance, which
had ,as its setting the Yacht Club, and was acclaimed with en-
couraging applause. In November, plans were commenced for
the junior play. For this, a three-act tragedy, Children of the
Moon, was selected and proved pleasing to the audience.
In order to finance this junior year, the class put into effect
a Student Association plan, in which the class worked as an inde-
pendent unit. Each junior who paid three dollars received a ticket
which admitted him to all junior and senior dances, to all athletic
events, and to the Junior-Senior Banquet.
The Junior-Senior Banquet furnished a peculiarly fitting finale
for the third act, and as the curtain now slowly descends the
players eagerly await their final triumph as seniors in the last act
cf the drama of high school life.























L~~pI~ttinww~e


SI"-


B
r





































Abraham, Polly
Azcarraga, Raquel
Boggs, Patsy
Booth, Lillia
Brooks, Betty
Brown, June
Brown, Ruth
Carr, Annabel
Coming, Barbara
Corr, Gloria
Deeney. Ethel
Dennis, Jean
Dickson, Jane
Durfee, Julia
Du Vall, Dorothy
Enright, Jane
Fernandez, Julia
Fitzpatrick. Mary
Gibson, Patv,:
Gormely, Virginia
Greene, Marie
Gritz, Judith
Hack, Bertha


Sophomore Girls


Hale, Phyllis
Herrington, Thelma
Hobson, Eleanor
Holston, Dorothy
Jackson, Mary
Johnson, Helen
Joyner, Dorothy
Judd, Dorothy
Knauer, Mildred
Laurie, Rita
Lewis, Phyllis
Lutz, Virginia
Mann, Louise
Martin, Dolores
McDaid, Margaret
Michaelsen, Helen
Mitchell, Vera
Moon, Flora Belle
Morales, Anita
Morgan, Virginia
Murray, Lamar
Nachman, Vera
Palacio, Nelva


Quinn, Regina
Richmond, Ruth
Robb, Janice
Ross, Betsy
Ruddell. Mary
Russon, Dolores
Salterio, Grace
Schierloh, Mary
Seeley, Norma
Simka, Esther
Simms, Virginia
Stapleton, Bess
Stillwell, Norma
Stoudnor, Jane
Tedder, Birdie
Toulon, Hope
Violette, Frances
Wainio, Alice
Whelen, Mary
White, Eugenia
Wilson. Julia Belle
Woodruff, Mary Jane
Young, Louise














Akin, Frank
Arosemena, John
Arroyo, Hernando
Arze, Alejandro
Atkinson, Fred
Baltozer, Richard
Boyd, Alfred
Brayton Donald
Brotherson, Graham
Bullock, Martin
Burlin, Robert
Byrd, Robert
Calvit, Robert
Clark, Howard
Collins, Winter
Craddock, James
Cullen, James
Davenport, Herbert
Deyton, Thomas
Dingee, George
Dockery, Harry
Doyle, Manuel
Dwelle, Ned
Edwards, Lelend
Erickson, Robert
Evers, Wendell
Ewing, Jack
Ferguson, John
Ferguson, Leo
Fenton, George


Sophomore Boys


Fitzpatrick, John
Gasteazoro, Mariano
Gibson, Archie
Gornell, Charles
Grier, Robert
Halliday, Robert
Hearne, Webb
Higginbotham, Rodney
Hunter, James
Levy, Harry
Lipzinski, Todd
Lushman, Luis
Makibbin, Henry
Malone, Douglas
Martin. George
Matheny, Robert
McConaughy, Richard
McCormack. Robert
McElhone, Harry
McFadden, George
McNulty, William
Mead, Burton
Meigs, James
Middleton, Fred
Moore, George
Morales, Ralph
Mullins, George
Navarro, Norbert
Newman, Charles
Newton, Allan


Orr, Mattes
Pearson, Harry
Pratt, Bruce
Price, William
Rance, Paget
Rice, Thomas
Ridge, Lawrence
Ridge, Vincent
Robinson, Earl
Robinson, Michael
Rose, Keith
Roth, James
Schaff, Alfred
Scobie, Fred
Shelton, George
Slier, Jack
Speir, Woodrow
Stempel, Lionel
Trett, Robert
Turner, Eugene
Wah), William
Wanke, Carl
Weeks, Kenneth
Welch, Paul
Whitsett, James
Wright, David
Wright, Hugh
Young, George
Zirkle, John


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The Class Of '37


A N SEPTEMBER 23, 1933, a new crowd of "scobles" and
girls with pigtails came to Balboa High School.
That first year they elected for their officers: Charles
Gornell, president; Ruth Richmond, vice-president; Lillia Booth,
secretary; and Leo Ferguson, treasurer. Through the leadership
of their adviser, Mr. Hatchett, the class was able to have two
dances. Before, the freshman class had never been able to en-
gineer more than one dance.
This year those same freshmen came back to Balboa High
as sophomores, and again Mr. Hatohett was their adviser. At
their first class meeting they elected Leo Ferguson, president;
Ben Calvit, vice-president; Helen Michaelson, secretary; and
Norma Stillwell, treasurer.
In athletics the sophomore girls' softball team conquered the
freshmen and seniors, and the junior class defaulted to them.
The sophomore girls who are on the school swimming team
are Dolores Martin, Eugenia White, and Phyllis Hale. The soph-
omore boys on the school team are James Roth, Robert Erickson,
and John Zirkle.
Four of the class have been distinguishing themselves in the
debates against the freshman team. These young orators are
John McCormick, Patsy Boggs, Carl Wanke, and John Zirkle. A
very talented member of the class is Janice Robb, who succeeded
in winning a place in the cast of the senior play.
If this unusual class continues its course as it has begun,
it is sure to have a very eventful career in Balboa High School.













ftzsIn ci


































Adams, Katherine
Alexander, Reba
Anderson, Mildred
Bender, Natalia
Bergh, Gunnel
Bougan, Claire
Bowen, Dorothy
Brayton, Dorothy
Brooks, Barbara
Brown, Margaret
Brugge, Mary Nell
Burmaster, Eileen
Byrd, Carol
Calobreves, Alice
Calobreves, Minerva
Comley, Mary Jane
Conlon, Ellen
Conner, Ruth
Dixon, Gertrude
Davis, Dorothy
Dodson, Marian
Dryden, Helen
Evans, Norma
Foley, Genevieve
Fuller, Fay
Gamboa, Angelina
Gentry, Betty
Grier, Margaret
GrosEman, Helen


Freshman Girls


Gulbransen, Polly Anna
Haggerty, Marie
Haldeman, Betty
Haldeman, Gail
Hale, Doris
Hamlin, Jane
Henrie, Neva
Herrera, Judith
Hudson, Audrey
Hyde, Ruth
Irwin, Jean
Journey, Lucile
Johnston, Shirley
Kaler, Olive
Knox, Dorothy
Komp, Anita
Lamb, Rita
Laurie, Dorothy
Lindo, Elaine
Lindo, Eleanor
Lord, Shirley
MacMurray, Marguerite
Marcy, Lois
Meigs, Margaret
Miller, Blanche
Mohr, Judith
Moore, Marguerite
Morgan, Fern
Morrison, Lorraine
Neville, Beverly


Oiler, Griselda
Orbaugh, Lee
Pearl, Evelyn
Pearson, Mary
Pegues, Frances
Peterson, Helen
Rathgaber, Bernice
Raymond, Teresa
Ridge, Virginia
Rocker, Wyllis
Ryan, Patsy
Rozburski, Jessie
Sanger, Elsie
Schloming, Beatrice
Sommer, Virginia
Spector, Ada
Stilson, Dorothy
Strauss, Alice
Sutherland, Pauline
Tonneson, Elizabeth
Tuck, Virginia
Urey, Blanche
Vila, Olga
Witsell, Barbara
Welch, Virginia
Wright, Ruth
Yarborough, Frances
Young, Eleanor
Zidbeck, Alice


.--_C1~.--l













Austin, Louis
Baker, Lawrence, Jr.
Barlow, Chester
Baldwin, Albert
Boughman, William
Benitez, Henry
Benny, William
Blake, Jack
Brennan, Frank
Brunson, Robert
Bryan, Robert
Bunker, Jack
Bunker, James
Burdett, Edward
Byrne, Robert
Carey, Jack
Casey, Martin
Cobb, Horace
Cornwell, Edward
Coyle, Francis
Criste, Francis
Cruz, James
Dailey, Elmer
Daniels, Charles
Daniels, Roy
Delvalle, Edward
Dodson, Dean
Draughan, Woodworth


Freshman Boys


Dugas, Ralph
Ferrari, Florencio
Fessler, Paul
Fitzpatrick, Martin
Foster, Harry
French, William
Hampton, Robert
Harness, William
Hilbert, Albert
Horter, Milton
Hughes, Pete
Hunt, James
Johnston, William
Keller, William
Key, Patrick
Lawson, William, Jr.
LeBrun, William
Lehman, Hugh
Lewis, William
Lloyd, William
MacMurray, John
Mara, Thomas
Marti, Teddy
Matlowsky, Samuel
McCoy, Robert
Melhado, Mariano
Mitchell, Donald


Moore, George
Niendorff, Harry
Orbough, John
Paterson, Oliver
Pearson, Edmond
Poole, Henry
Provost, Robert
Quintero, Diogenes
Randall, Raymond
Rhodes, Ralph
Runyan, Raymond
Russon, George
Russon, William
Sandberg, Albert
Sandborn, Harold
Schelling, Tom
Schmidt, Theodore
St. John, Adrian
Talty, John
Trower, James
Van Siclen, Robert
Villegas, William
Walbridge, Jack
Walbridge, Mack
Well, Edward
Whaler, George
Wine, Chester


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Class of '38


f OLLOWING the plan begun last year, the freshman boys and
girls held their class meetings together this year. At the
first of our class meetings the following officers were
elected: Elmer Dailey, president: John Talty, vice-president: Lor-
raine Morrison, secretary: and Patsy Ryan, treasurer. Mr. Akers
and Miss Frost were appointed as the class advisers.
Later other meetings were held to determine class dues and
to talk about any future social events.
During the year the girls made better records in athletics
than the boys, coming in first in volleyball and second in base-
ball. The boys, as is usual with freshman classes, came last in
soccer. This class, however, had several men on the track team
and has bright prospects for future years.
In the literary and dramatic activities the freshmen made an
unusual record for freshmen. They entered the debating contest
and although defeated by the sophomores, they won over the
juniors and seniors. At least they survived until the end of the
contest. One of the plays put on by the Little Theater had an en-
tire freshman cast and was a complete success, and freshman boys
have shown a keen interest in stage craft and stage lighting.
If this class accomplishes proportionately as much in the
future as it has in its first year, both in literary and athletic
events, there is much in store for it.














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Dedication of the Little Theater

N OCTOBER 24, 25, and 26, the opening of the Carr Street
Little Theater marked the beginning of a new era in the
history of dramatics in Balboa High School. The Y.W.C.A.
building, under the supervision of Mr. Ben M. Williams, Super-
intendent of Schools, and Mr. Subert Turbyfill, Director of Dra-
matics, has been converted into a miniature theater, equipped
with a stage, dressing rooms, and lighting facilities sufficiently
complete to serve as a practice place for the Little Theater
organization.
To dedicate the remodeled building two one-act plays were
given by the students under the direction of Mr. Turbyfill. Dur-
ing the intermission Mr. Hosler gave a short, but interesting talk
on "High School Speech Activities," and Mr. C. A. McIlvaine,
Executive Secretary of the Panama Canal, talked on the import-
ance of "voice culture."
The first of the plays to be presented was a tragedy by Dou-
gald MacMillan, "Off Nag's Head." The play, which takes place
in the hut of a North Carolina seashore fisherman, was distin-
guished by the scenery, lighting, costumes, and make-up. The
characters were: the fisherman, Jack Ridge: the girl, Viola Tuck;
the old woman, Rosamond Laurie; the doctor, Dale Boggs; and
the Eick woman, Shirley Johnston.
The second play presented was "The First Dress Suit," by
Russell Medcraft. This play was the funniest of comedies, fea-
turing Teddy Harding, the boy who has just received his first
dress suit, and is to wear it to the wedding of his sister, Betty
Harding.. The characters were Peter Corrigan as Teddy Harding,
Lois De La Mater as Betty Harding, Harvey Parker as Johnny
Drake, and Frances Maguire as Mrs. Harding.








The Little Theater

HIS year the Little Theater has given a production every
three weeks. Membership in the organization was deter-
mined by what the students had done in dramatic art up to
the date of March 1, according to a point system carried out by
the sponsor, Mr. Turbyfill.
Of the seventy or more students who have participated in
dramatics in some way, the forty listed below have done sufficient
work to entitle them to membership.
These students have worked in the casts and on the staffs of
the following one-act and three acts plays: "The First Dress
Suit," "Off Nag's Head," "Children of the Moon," "Poetry and
Plaster," "Juryman No. Six," and "A Full House."


Akin, Elizabeth
Boggs, Dale
Bohan, Elaine
Bullock, Marjorie
Brewerton, Mathilde
Byrne, Robert
Coyle, Francis
Corrigan, Joe
Corrigan, Peter
Casey, Martin
De La Mater, Lois
Dombrowsky, Ted
Eastburn, Burneast
Edwards, Shirley
Foster, Harry
Fleming, Bill
Foley, Thomas
Gormely, Virginia
Howell, Claudis
Jones, Bill


Keegan, Bernard
Koperski, Richard
Laurie, Rosamond
Le Brun, William
Lewis, Phyllis
Maguire, Frances
Perry, Peggy
Perley, Robert
Parker, Harvey
Rathgaber, Bob
Robb, Janice
Ridge, Jack
Schloming, Isabel
Sutherland, Jack
Tuck, Viola
Tarflinger, Lucille
Wright, Johnny
Wright, Jimmie
Van Siclen, Robert
Witsell. Edward


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Children of the Moon

HE PLAY, presented by the Junior Class, is a modern tragedy
in three acts. The author, Martin Flavin, ranks among the
ten best American dramatists, and "Children of the Moon"
is his third best play. The scene is laid at a seashore and the
action takes place in one day. The play centers around Laura
Atherton, the mother, who, in order to get her own way, does not
hesitate to ruin the lives of her husband, her son, and finally her
daughter.
A capable cast, directed by Mr. Turbyfill, presented the play.
Isabel Schloming portrayed the leading part of Laura Atherton,
with Claudis Howell as Jane Atherton, Joe Corrigan as Major
Bannister, Johnny Wright as Judge Atherton, Peggy Perry as
Madam Atherton, Jack Sutherland as Walter Higgs, Bernard
Keegan as Dr. Wetherell, and Tom Foley as Thomas, the butler.
Peter Corrigan, the stage manager, was ably assisted by Harry
Foster, William Le Brun, Robert Byrne, Gene Clinchard, Virginia
Richmond, Frances Maguire, Burneast Eastburn, Mathilde Brewer-
ton, and Lucille Tarflinger.
The business and advertising were handled by Tom Huff,
Sherman DeVore, Clelia Calhoun, and Walter Friday.
The high school orchestra, under the direction of Mrs. Baker,
furnished delightful music for the occasion.










A Full House
By Fred Jackson.

SFULL HOUSE is a farce in three acts presented by the
SSenior Class under the direction of Mr. Subert Turbvfill.
The action of the farce takes place on the afternoon, eve-
ning, and night of the same day in the Fleming apartment.
George Howell, a young lawyer, (Jack Sutherland) leaves his
wife, Ottily Howell, (Shirley Edwards) soon after their wedding
to secure some love letters for a friend, Ned Pembroke, (Bob
Rathgaber) from a designing chorus girl, Vera Vernon, (Elaine
Bohan.) Ottily's aunt, Miss Winnicker, (Marjorie Bullock) and
sister, Daphne Simpson, (Mathilde Brewerton) arrive, and upon
learning of the groom's sudden departure, the aunt begs her niece
to leave him.

The train on which George Howell returns is wrecked, and
in the confusion he takes the wrong traveling bag, which contains
the jewels stolen from Ned Pembroke's mother, (Elizabeth Akin)
by Nick King, a traveling (?) man, (Dale Boggs.) This leads to
many humorous and interesting complications involving the local
police, Sgt. Delaney, Moony, and Clancy, (Bob Perly, Edward
Witsell, Richard Koperski) an apartment owner, Mrs. Fleming,
(Janice Robb) and her servants, Parks (Jimmie Wright) and
Susie from Sioux City (Lucille Tarflinger.)
Bill Fleming and a staff of six were responsible for the stag-
ing, and Jean Stillwell, Business Manager, and a staff of four
were in charge of the production..
The music by the B. H. S. Band, under the direction of Mr.
Swanson, added to the effectiveness of the play.


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iu-irls (61ce Club


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Advanced Glee Club

HE ADVANCED GLEE CLUB is composed of students who
have had one year in the Elementary Club. The boys anl
girls of each group meet separately twice a week, and a
chorus of the advanced students meets once a week.
The Elementary and Advanced Clubs, however, worked to-
gether on all of the programs they gave.
On December 20 the Christmas Program was given in the
patio of the school. The procession of white-robed girls carrying
lighted candles as they sang was very effective, and added to the
well selected program which follows:
1. Adeste Fidelis ........ (Brass Quartet) ........ Reading
2. Carol ...... (Girls Processional) ...... Traditional French
3. 0 Come Emmanuel ... (Boys Chorus) ... Gregorian Melody
I Saw Three Kings ... (Boys Chorus) ... Old French Carol
4. Fairest Lord Jesus .. (Girls Chorus) .. 12th Century Hymn
Lo, How a Rose ....... (Girls Chorus) ....... Praetorius
5. Selections from Handel's Mess;ah......... String Ensemble
Combined Glee Clubs
In addition to this Christmas program, several others were
given during the year.
Jan. 11-Program at the Panama National Institute.
Feb. 6-Program for the Ancon Morning Musical Club.
May 1-Music Festival. This was held during the first week
of May, which was National Music Week.
June 14-The Commencement Program at the Clubhouse
Theater.
All of these programs were directed by Mrs. Baker, and were
accompanied by the high school orchestra and string quartette..











Once in a Blue Moon


HE OPERETTA, "Once in a Blue Moon." was the first event
of its kind given by the high school in four years. It was
given on April 11, by a cast selected from the advanced
glee clubs.

The cast of characters was as follows: the Moon Lady, Ml-
dred True; Hop Sing Hi, John Fitzpatrick; Suzanne, Lois De La
Mater; Mrs. Montgomery, Norma Stillwell; Sylvia Montgomery,
Frances Anderson; Leatrice Montgomery, Claudi- Howell; Mrs.
Lila Lavender, Lucille Tarflinger; Billy Maxwell, Roger Adams;
Sir Percival Chetwood, Tom Brown; M. Rene LeMon, Billy Hun-
ter; Mr. Babbitt Morton, Fred Hendrickson; Betty Morton, Jean
Coleman; George Taylor, Jimmy Johnson; Skylark Roams, John
Zyrcle; Mooney, Ned Dwelle. The chorus and dancers were mem.
bers of the glee clubs.

The story of the operetta is one of mistaken identity, in which
true love, under the protection of the Moon Lady, triumphs over
the obstacles in its path.

The composer of the music of the operetta, Noble Cain, is an
outstanding American musician, and director of the a cappella
choirs for the National Broadcasting Company.

The operetta was characterized by excellent vocal interpreta-
tion, ably accompanied by the string ensemble and some members
of the band. The distinguished dancing, contributed by the Quinn
Studios, sufficient acting, spectacular lighting effects, and color-
full costumes and scenes contributed to the effectiveness of the
presentation.

Through the cooperation and courtesy of the Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds both afternoon and evening performances were
given in the Balboa Clubhouse.


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The Band

SNDER the direction of J. Chester Swanson, who came to Bal-
boa High School in September, 1934, the band has grown
steadily larger. Mr. Swanson, besides his experience in
playing the flute and piccolo in concert bands and orchestras, has
previously directed a high school orchestra, a university band, a
little symphony orchestra, and a military academy band.
The members of the band are: cornets-solo, Walter Sims,
Dean Dodson, and Tom Foley; first, Leland Edwards: second,
Ralph Dugas; third, Florence Farrari and Manuel Delvalle;
clarinets-solo, Albert Baldwin, and Eugene Hamlin; first, Donald
Mitchell; second, Jack Carey; third, Robert Van Siclen and David
Kelly; saxokhones-alto, Burneast Eastburn, Henry Poole, Wil-
liam Logsden, and Donald McCaslin; tenor, Robert Payne; flutes
-Bert Shelton and Gene Willis; alto horns.-Charles Newman
and Richard Baltozer; trombone-Jack Kromer; baritone horn-
William Poole; bass horns-Richard Koperski and George Fitz-
gerald; cymbals-New Dwelle; bass drum-George Russon; snare
drum-William Harness.
This year for the first time the band has had uniforms, con-
sisting of blue capes lined with red, blue caps with the school
initials in red, and white trousers.
During this season the band has played for the Shriners'
Parade, November 12; a program at the Panama National Insti-
tute, January 11; the senior play, February 16; a radio broadcast
at the Miramar Club, March 8; the Far-Fan Water Carnival,
March 17; the junior college play, April 5; and for baseball and
basketball games.











Biology Club


A3 NEOPHYTE auxiliary of the Biology Club, known as the
"Bring 'Em Back Alive Bunch," has been working from
the beginning of the year, hoping that the quality of their
work would entitle them to full membership the second semester.
The many and varied interests of the "Bring 'Em Back Alive
Bunch" broke up the organization into groups that investigated
and learned about such things as tricking wasps into laying eggs in
test tubes, animating bits of meat by properly agitating them on
the ends of bristles in order to induce reluctant amphibians to
feed in the laboratory, noting peculiar adaptive structures on
animals, <'llecting representative specimens, and studying the
drowning jungle forest while Madden lake was filling.
The high standard of talent and effort which made this year
a success was due to two things: the superior quality of new mem-
bers, and the firm and exemplary guidance given by the older
membership-particularly Bob Reiber, now in Junior College-
under the able supervision of Mr. George Lee.
The officers are:
President .................. Keith Rose
Vice-President .............. M attas Orr
Secty.-Treasurer ........ Mildred Knauer


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>1


Parrakeet Staff

HE PARRAKEET, the school newspaper, is published on
alternate Fridays by the Parrakeet Staff. This staff is
composed of two sections-the editorial, of which Miss
Parsons is in charge, and the busine-s, under Miss Amundson.
Lucille Cook, the editor, who has been especially good at her
job, is largely responsible for the literary success of the paper.
Her assisting editors and columnists have been very faithful
workers. Peggy Perry, the student business manager, has done
excellent work, for the paper has not yet felt the pinch of depres-
sion. She has been assisted by the advertising manager, Mar-
jorie Weigold, and the circulation manager, Jean Stillwell.
The full editorial staff membership is as follows: editor-in-
chief, Lucille Cook; assistant, Thomas Foley; news editor, Ma-
thilde Brewerton; Eports editor, Bill Fleming; feature editor, Mar-
garet Haw; columnists, Ted Drombrowsky, Bill Fleming, Manuel
Mendez, Virginia Richmond, Andros Ferrari; reporters, Janice
Robb, Frances McGuire, Helen Van Clief, Bill Fleming, Mary
Foley, Katherine Adams, Blanche Miller, Margaret Fessler, Eleanor
Darnall, Dorothy Judd, Edward Coyle, Jack Siler, Margaret Meigs,
Gail Haldeman, Donald Brayton, Viola Tuck, Edith Baker, Clelia
Calhoun, and Annabelle Owens.
Of the business staff, MargareT Perry is manager; Jean Still-
well is circulation manager; Pearl Tuttle and Mary Orr are assist-
ants; Marjorie Weigold is advertising manager; Julia Fernandez
and Louis Noli are assistants.
The typists are Margaret Fessler, Sara Robertson, Barbara
Evans, Wilma Wickens, Roger Adams, and Lois De La Mater.









Zonian Staff


Editor-in-Chief .. ................... Thomas Makibbin
Associate Editor ... .... Isabel Schloming

Class Ed;tors:
Senior .................. ........ Frances Anderson
Class Prophet . .. .......... Lucille Cook
Junior ........... . Pearl Tu-tle
Sophomore ............ .... Phyllis Hale
Freshman ................... .... Paul Fessler

Activities ................... ....... Lois De La M ater
Assistant ...... .. .. .. Elaine Bohan

Shorts:
Boys ... ................ Bill Fleming
Girls .......................... Lucille Tarflinger
Literary Editor .. ............ Jean Mitchell
Poet .......... Anna Ramirez

Art Editor ........................... Virginia Richmond
Assistants ....................... Judith Gritz
Mildred Knauer
Gene Clinchard

Business Manager .................... Louis Noli
Assistant ......................... Louis Schmidt


Literary and Make-up Adviser ..........
Art Adviser ................... .......
Business Advisers .....................


Cam eram en .....................


Katherine E. Jessup
Mary Worrell
Emilie Amundson
Hervey Prentiss

George Haldeman
Hugh White
Joe Joyner


'1~~~'









A Zropi al tomeo

It's a sad and comical situation
That the tropics get one in -
There's the girl
And there's the place;
Moonlight and palms add the setting.
Sweet, soft breezes urge Romeo.
Timidly he starts his love confession,
And Juliet naively listens.
First, he stutters -
Then he stammers -
But gaining courage he ponders,
"Why, Mark Anthony, your eloquence by mine
Is but an unsubstantial shadow!"
Aloud, he vehemently swears,
"You, Love, will impel me on to fame.

Your eyes give forth such light
As draws from deep within me
All my manhood's strength ;
You have rebuilt me with your smile."
She sighs -
Her head droops on his shoulder;
He cups his hand beneath her chin,
And slowly lifts her lips
To meet his, bending down.
This perfect moment -
With time, and place, and loved one all together -

Is rudely shattered by a cry of fear.
The erstwhile Romeo
Let's go the yielding girl
In agony of pain, he slaps his leg and groans,
"Hang that mosquito! I'll probably get malaria."


Anna Ram;rez.












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--Ik


Baseball

EARING new uniforms, and coached by Mr. Gibson, Balboa
opened the series by winning the first game by a score of
7 to 5. The team was well balanced and played good ball,
but because of the very effective pitching of "Max" Sanders of
Cristobal, they were downed in the next two games, to lose the
series. Kromer from Balboa hit the only home run of the series,
a deep hit to center field, but it was to no avail, for Cristobal
rallied in the eighth inning to win the game and series.

Next year's team promises to be one of the best that has yet
hit our high school so they will be able to retaliate for the beating
they got this year.

Front-Parmalee, Huff, Higgenbottom, Foster, Michaelson, Byr-
nes, Hammond, Ferguson.
Rear-Coach Gibson, Ridge, Clarke, Trett, Kromer, Forrest,
Bruland, Corrigan.
















Track


P ALBOA, coached by Mr. Leisy, made up for the defeat they
suffered in track last year by winning the first meet against
S Cristobal by a score of 51 to 31. Winning one meet was
not enough for our boys, so they went on to win the three-way
meet held against the Junior College and Cristobal.
In this meet two school records were cracked; Quintero of
Balboa ran the half-mile in 2:15 to break Hallowell's record of
2:16, and Duey of Cristobal threw the discus 102 ft. 11 in. to bet-
ter Tarflinger's throw by 2 ft. 9 in.
The seniors won the interclass meet by a significant margin.
Results were as follows:

1. Seniors ............... 46 points
2. Sophomores ........... 22 points
3. Juniors ............... 15 points
4. Freshman ............. 8 points

Front row-Poole, Edwards, Hoffman, Ferarri, Moore, Gormley.
Middle-Shedlock, Lipinski, Clarke, Erickson, Huff, Rice.
Rear-Ridge, Quintero, Vincent, Coach Liesy, Capt. Kromer,
Evers, Whaler.





-" I 1


Swimming

HE Balboa High School has one of the best balanced swim-
ming teams on the Isthmus. Their victories throughout
the year against all comers make them the outstanding
swimmers of the year. Bill Fleming, their captain, is one of the
best swimmers and water polo players on the Zone; his swim-
ming and playing has been a big factor in many of the school's
victories. George Haldeman, victorious in many of the meets,
shares the spotlight with his teammate Bill Fleming.
The members of the teams are very much pleased to know
that they are going to get letters this year for their competition
with Cristobal and the Junior College. This is the first time in
three years that the schools have competed against each other.
Balboa High School has been very fortunate in having Mr.
Greiser for their swimming coach. He has travelled over most
of the world teaching swimming and learning new methods of
teaching.
Rear-Coach Greiser, Coyle, Roth, Erickson J. Roth, Melcado
Jones, Dombrowsky, Makibbin.
Front-Adams, Haldeman, Fleming, Wahl, Wempe.


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Tennis
HE '35 tennis team of Balboa High School has lived up to
the standards set by former Balboa teams. Hendrickson
and Arroyo were the only remaining varsity players from
the '34 team which had easily conquered Cristobal. This year's
team, though made up mostly with "green" material, has never-
theless, been whipped into admirable shape through the excellent
cooperation of Mr. Hachett. Tennis in B. H. S. was threatened
with extinction when the ruling was made that only major sports
would be participated in by the various schools as tennis on the
Zone is considered a minor sport. The racketeers, led skillfully
by Captain Hendrickson, should be proud if their efforts in try-
ing to convince B. H. S. that tennis should be continued as long
as B. H. S. is alive are not in vain.
TEAM: Christi, Wine, Trett, Lipinski, Arroyo, Burlin, Friday,
Hendrickson.




































Basketball

HE basketball team has comparatively few new players
this year. Hard working Coach Zierten developed the
team into a fast fighting combination which has hopes of
taking Cristobal over without any trouble.
Louis Lipzinski was unanimously elected captain of probably
the fastest quintet on the Isthmus.
Rear row-Capt. Lipinski, Clarke, Trett, Tonneson, Corrigan,
Kromer, Moore, Johnson, Arroyo.
Front row-Manager Parmelee, Whaler, Rathgaber, Fleming,
Michaelsen, Dailey, Huff.















Volleyball

HE first girls' sport for '35 was volleyball. From an enroll-
ment of 100 girls, freshmen, sophomore, junior, and senior
teams were organized, from which the varsity team was
selected.

A series of three games was played between Balboa and Cris.
tobal High Schools, the team winning the majority of games being
the champion. Balboa came out on top with five games to their
credit, while Cristobal had but two.

INTERSCHOLASTIC SCORES

Cristobal Balboa
November 10, at Cristobal ......... 11-21-21 21-16-16
November 17, at Balboa ........... 15- 8- 8 21-21-21
November 24, at Cristobal ......... 11 21

TEAM-Harris, Sealey, Booth, Jones, Van Clief, Fessler, Tonne-
son, White, G. Haldeman, B. Haldeman, Johannes.

INTERCLASS SCORES

Freshmen ...................... 5
Seniors ................... ..... 4
Sophomores .................... 4
Juniors ................... ..... 3



























Basketball

N FEBRUARY 2, Balboa's basketball players met their un-
fortunate fate in the interschool basketball series; they lost
2 to 1. It seemed that Cristobal's girls were too fast for
our team, even though they fought faithfully and steadily.
The first game was the most exciting of the three. Balboa
held the lead in the first three quarters but Cristobal scored two
baskets in the last two minutes of play making the score 31-28,
in favor of Cristobal. Muriel Moore and Grace Harris deserve a
great deal of credit for their work at forward and center positions,
respectively. Muriel made 24 out of the 28 points, and Grace did
exceptionally well playing at center.
The second game was played in Balboa and was taken by
Balboa with a score of 29-11. Muriel Moore upheld her star
playing by scoring 26 out of the 29 points made. Betty Haldeman
and Grace Harris demonstrated perfect guarding and center work.
Cristobal copped the series by winning the third game with a
one-sided score of 36-12.

INTERSCHOLASTIC SCORES*
Cristobal Balboa
January 19, at Cristobal ........ 31 28
January 19, at Balboa .......... 11 29
February 2, at Cristobal ........ 36 12
*No interclass games were played.

TEAM: Harris, c B. Haldeman, rg
G. Haldeman, sc Tonneson, Ig
Howell, cs Fessler, rg
Moore, rf Johannes, lg
Colberg, If


















Baseball
SALBOA started out with a bang! Balboa won the first game
with an overwhelming score of 24-7. In the game which
followed we succeeded in winning by a fairly good margin.

INTERSCHOLASTIC SCORES
Cristobal Balboa
March 16, at Balboa ........... 7 34
March 23, at Cristobal ......... 5 13

TEAM: Van Clief, p Morales, 3b
Fitzpatrick, p Haldeman, ss
Coleman, c Moore, If
Dugan, c Herrington, rf
Tonneson, lb Sealey, cf
Fessler, 2b Hale sub.








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Swimming

HE Balboa High School girls' swimming team has shown
remarkable success during the past year. Two of the mem-
bers, Betty Haldeman and Genevieve Foley were among
the most outstanding swimmers and divers that the Zone has
developed in years. Both these girls won Zone Championship,
Betty winning the women's 400 meter swim on New Year's Day
and carrying off the beautiful Grieser Swim Trophy.

The team is the fastest girls' swim team on the Isthmus. A
number of the members of the team are planning to enter some of
the big meets in the States this year.

TEAM: Foley, Brewerton, White, Phillips, D. Hale, Van Clief,
Hudson, B. Haldeman, G. Haldeman, P. Hale, D. Mar-
tin, Coach Grieser.


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James Johrson President
Edward Coyle Vice-President





Wilma Wickens Secretary
Jean Stillwell Treasurer


Mary Orr Valedictorian
Reba Colberg Salutatorian


Lucille Cook Editor of Parrakeet
Tom Makibbin Editor of Zonian


Claudis Howell Committee Worker
Willie Moore Committee Worker


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1 7


SC a I nl b a r

OCTOBER

-- Election of Senior Class Officers.
Election of Junior Class Officers
Dedication of Little Theater.

NOVEMBER
4 Election of Sophomore Class Officers.
f Award of Letters to Athletes.
Zonian Staff Chosen.

DECEMBER

JUNIOR-SENIOR DANCE.
Soccer Championship.
Capture of Volleyball Series.
P V- ^10RR A Junior Play "Children of the Moon."

Election of Freshmen Officers.
Christmas Music Program.

JANUARY

Dramatic and Music Evening.
S. Senior Donation of Scholarship to Canal Zone
Junior College.
Examinations.



I i"4










FEBRUARY

SENIOR PLAY
Baseball Defeat.
Girls' Basketball Defeat.
Freshman-Sophomore Debate.
Transfer of Mid-Year Graduates to Canal Zone
Junior College.

MARCH

Senior Capture of Interclass Track Meet Title.
Sophomore Dance.
Senior Dance
Victory in Track Meet.
Visitors' Day.
Championship in Girls' Baseball.

APRIL

SENIOR FIELD DAY.
Operetta.
Junior Dance.
Dramatic Festival.

MAY

Carnival.
Basketball Series.
Interschool Swim Meet.
ZONIAN ISSUED.
JUNIOR-SENIOR BANQUET.

JUNE

Class Night.
Baccalaureate Sermon.
Examinations.
COMMENCEMENT.


1935


nso-


yTOR
EDITOR


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*Rti REfHFE


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ao iancl E- one Juniovr (ollcqe


roin flalbua ,ligl school







The ZONIAN Staff wishes to thank:

1. The sponsors of the various activities for their co-
operation and aid.

2. Mr. Sackett for the pictures of the plays.

3. Mr. Flatau for his efficient work in photography and
his generous contribution of his time.

4. Mr. J. H. Smith for the picture of Madden Dam.

5. Mr. Matthews, of the PANAMA AMERICAN, far his
advice and assistance.

6. The pupils who contributed pictures.

7. The advertisers who helped financially.

8 The subscribers who had faith enough to order a
ZONIAN.




























THE PANAMA AMERICAN

congratulates

Balboa High School

upon the conclusion of a year that has been excep-
tionally free from turmoil, controversy and scan-
dal a year in which the morale of the school has
been maintained at a high standard and in which
pupils have made creditable progress in school work.

Nelson Rounsevell.


I













X4 i,


Compliments

of

Lucky Strike


FRENCH BAZAAR

Ladies' Store

and -

Agents for the Famous

Florsheim Shoes


SERVICE and QUALITY

in

Developing Printing
Enlarging Copying
-o-
Hundreds of Photo Post
Cards and Photographs
in Album Sets of

THE CANAL ZONE
and
PANAMA

Y.M.C.A. Photo Shop
JOHN F. FLATAU

Phone: Box 633-Balboa
Balboa 2781 Canal Zone


WE CLEAN CLOTHES CLEAN

TROTT
"THE CLEANER"
10, Monteserin Street off "J" St.
CALL PHONE 453














COMPLIMENTS OF

Wong Chang & Co.,
Ltd.

GENERAL HARDWARE,
FISHING TACKLE,
and -
COOKING UTENSILS


COLON
Across P. R. R Station
PANAMA
Across Cecilia Theatre


COMPLIMENTS OF

International

Association of

Machinists


Lodge No. 811


Clare Walker

MUSIC STUDIO

Piano and Harmony

Phone Bal. 3090
453 Gatun


We have introduced
A CALL & DELIVERY SERVICE
Prices Reasonable
Just phone us, 73 Panama

Pan-American Shoe
Repair
Representative
Audley E. Sasso,
H. J. FICE, Proprietor


Compliments of
of
R. E. HOPKINS


COMPLIMENTS

Office Service

Company

Panama City


DR. W. H. GRANT

Dist. Dentist
Opp. Ancon Post Office
Phone Bal. 2830


;I( Ij


19 -



















1-
:-------*>--------------------










A comfortable, restful hotel, ideally located, commanding
a magnificent view of the Pacific Ocean and tropical
scenery. The center of social life, close to every point
of interest on the Pacific side of the Canal

Wm. T. MeCormack,
Manager








CHRYSLER & PLYMOUTH CARS

FIRESTONE TIRES

PHILCO RADIOS


DAY & NIGHT GARAGE
DISTRIBUTOR
Phone Panama 1298
















BUREAU OF CLUBS & PLAYGROUNDS



The Recreational Division of the

Panama Canal


Has Located for your Convenience at
ANCON, BALBOA, PEDRO MIGUEL, GATUN AND

CRISTOBAL

Athletic Fields, Playgrounds, Tennis Courts, Gymnasiums, Swimming Pools,
Bowling Alleys, Billiard Rooms, Re3ding Rooms Soda Fountain Service,
Sound Motion Pictures, and Other General Community Activities


HOTEL WASHINGTON

UNEQUALED FOR SITUATION AND COMFORT


A Hotel in Keeping with the Dignity, Spirit

and Service of the Panama Canal


GOLF SWIMMING WATER SPORTS
TARPON FISHING
The Year Around

JAMES E. LEWIS P. 0. Address:
Manager Cristobal, Canal Zone


-9__._

















The American Federation of Labor has been improv-
ing working conditions throughout the country for more
than fifty years and is still striving constantly to secure
adequate labor laws. increased compensation, and more
favorable working conditions. Each and every wage
earner should become a member of this great organiza-
tion which is ceaselessly striving to secure better working
conditions for our millions of wage eaners.



Comrliments of

METAL TRADES COUNCIL

Canal Zone


THE
DISCRIMINATING
SHOPPER CHOOSES A


NICHOLS

Chinese Rug


on display in
CENTURY CLUB BLOCK
Panama City, R. P.


MRS. BETTY TALBOT
V. P., Manager


The
Ancon Greenhouse
Ancon, Canal Zone



Member
Flornst Telegraph Del;very
Association




CUT FLOWERS
Phone: Balboa 2399
Cable: "ANCOGP.E'


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Compliments

of the

Cinema

Pan-Americano




CECtLI -COLON
EL DORADO STRAND
THEATRES


COMPLIMENTS OF


DURAN


PAUL
'25


JOE
CAFE ,27

PURO


25 Years of Steady Pro-

gress is Your Assurance
or Merit


Kodak Panama Ltd.

offers

A COMPLETE LINE OF

KODAK

PRODUCTS


Kodak Panama Ltd.
111 Central Avenue
Panama City


PERMANENT
WAVES
SOFT AND NATURAL

$5.00


All other branches of Beauty
Culture
Four American Licensed Operators
ANCON CLUBHOUSE
BEAUTY SHOP
Telephone Balboa 1322


1.1


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MARINE STUDIO



The Judgment of

The Majority .

USUALLY SAFE TO FOLLOW.


That our photographers are satis-
factory in all respects seems to be
the unanimo'ls opinion of the B. H. S.
Senior Class of 1935.


Call See Our Samples Learn Our Prices.

They'll Convince You, Too!


81 CENTRAL AVENUE


'Y


$;


PHONE 206
















ARTISTIC

PANAMA
Ave. Central, No. 48 Telefono 7561 Apartado 37

SPECIALIST IN

Portraiture Enlargements Miniatures

Crayons Water and Oil Paintings, etc.

WE KEEP THE NEGATIVES














COMPLIMENTS OF

The Panama Railroad Company
and
Panama Railroad Steamship Line


a--IX


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