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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093678/00026
 Material Information
Title: Zonian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date: 1933
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093678:00026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Dedication
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main body
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
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        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Advertising
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text




























































































































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Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/zonian1933balb









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THE


ZONIAN


Published by the
Student Body of
Balboa High School
Balboa, Canal Zone,
June, 1933
















DEDICATION




























TO HOWARD G. SPALDING,
OUR PRINCIPAL, WHOSE
COUNSEL, PATIENT SYM-
PATHY, AND SCHOLARLY
HELPFULNESS HAVE MADE
POSSIBLE THE BRIGHTER
TONES OF SCHOOL LIFE RE-
FLECTED HERE, WE DEDI-
CATE THIS ZONIAN.






TO THE SENIORS

IF YOUR HIGH-SCHOOL CAREER HAS
DONE FOR YOU WHAT IT SHOULD, YOU
HAVE GAINED MUCH INFORMATION ABOUT
THE WORLD AND ITS PEOPLE. YOU HAVE
DISCOVERED YOURSELF YOUR POWERS
AND HOW TO DIRECT THEM TOWARD PRO-
FITABLE TASKS. YOU HAVE FOUND YOUR
BEST PERSONAL INTEREST TO BE IN BUILD-
ING UP THE GOOD NAME OF THE INSTITU-
TIONS OF WHICH YOU ARE A PART, IN MAK.
ING YOURSELF A WORTHY MEMBER.

THE COMING YEARS WILL PROVE THE
QUALITY OF YOUR METTLE; AGE WILL
MAKE YOU MORE TOLERANT OF YOUR FEL-
LOWS, AND MORE CAREFUL IN THE SEARCH
FOR TRUTH; TIME WILL BRING YOU THE
REWARD OF YOUR LABORS.

BEN M. WILLIAMS,
SUPERINTENDENT.





































IN MEMORIAL

JERELIND NIACMURRAY
ISABEL YATES
















THE FACULTY


BEN WILLIAMS

VIRGIL BARKER

HOWARD SPALDING

IDA ERICKSON

HELEN CURRIER BAKER

BEATRICE S. GARDNER

EMILIE AMUNDSON

CHALMERS CARSON

ROGER COLLINGE


ALVIN COOKE

OLGA FROST

HENRY GRIESER


WALDEMAR GRONDE

LOUISE HANNA

EDWARD HATCHETT


CLAUDIUS HODGES

GUY JOY

EMMA MAE KRUMBACH

GEORGE LEE

GLENN LEE

HENRY LEISY

G. C. LOCKERIDGE

MARY NEWMAN

ALICE PARSONS

ELINOR ROBSON

VERNA STEEN

RUBY SYRCLE

GEORGE WARDLAW

MYRTLE WHALEY

HAROLD ZIERTEN


_
















N











/






THE SENIORS


Motto......... An Honest Man's the Noblest
Work of God

Colors ................. Blue and White

Mascot ............. Owl



To THE CLASS OF '83
It is with sincere regret that I say good-bye and good luck
to you. For two years we have worked together for Balboa High
School and for our class. As a result of that association I can
say with genuine feeling that I shall miss your friendship. your
cooperative spirit, and your loyalty.
The pathways of life are calling you. I hope your response
to their call is as generous and loyal as it has been to yoar
school. My very best wishes go with you.
E. W. Hatchett


THE ZONIAN
10








CLASS OF ':1:1
F OUR years! It seems so short a time
since the Class of '33 was organized
early in October, 1929. And yet four years
have passed-four years of progress in educa-
tion and in the betterment of the high school;
four years of parties, dances, and games
mingled with school work; four years of vic-
Stories and defeats on the sports field.

When the class wa3 first organized, the
boys and girls held separate meetings. Fifty-
five inexperienced boys, under the direction
of Mr. Carson, class adviser, elected Jack
Onderdonk Poole Poole, president; Stan Specht, vice-president:
Friday Clarke Ed Neville, secretary; Bruce Onderdonk, trea-
surer. If the boys' meetings were accompanied with some noise and disorder
at first, as undoubtedly they were, it was due to the playful, grammar-grade spirit
which still prevailed, the high school spirit of orderliness and formality not yet
having developed.
The girls, under the counsel of their adviser, Miss Whaley, began the year
by electing Charlotte Wahl president, Frances Ayers vice-president, Marion
Hutchison secretary, and Jerelind MacMurray treasurer.
The question of dues came up early in the year, was discussed, and settled
at two dollar- a member. In January Mr. Spald:ng delivered a talk on class and
school spirit to the class advisers and class officers.
On the sports field both victories and defeats marked that year. In soccer
and sEwimming the boys took second place, but in baseball and in track they
suffered defeat. The freshman girls' games were not altogether successful
either. They took second place in swimming, but came third in the rest of the
sports.
That year the class held no social functions, but, like most freshman classes,
postponed the parties and picnics until later years.
It is interesting to note the development of the high school as a whole dur-
ing the four short years that the Class of '33 has graced its halls. Prior to the
entrance of the class into high school only three organizations other than classes
had been started. But the year 1929-1930 saw a noteworthy increase in the num-
ber of these activities. Before the school year was over the clubs and organiza-
tions had increased to seven.
After the vacation, the Class of '33 returned to school again, its ranks swelled
to one hundred twenty students. With Miss Davis as adviser, the class pro-
ceeded to re-elect Jack Poole president. Ruth Rader was elected vice-presi-
dent, while the offices of secretary and treasurer were given to Edna Fluharty
and Jim Salterio respectively.
This year, the class began stepping out in sports. The boys won the swim-
ming events by a wide margin, came second in soccer and basketball, but had
to be content with third place in the other major sports. The girls did their
bit by taking second in basketball, volleyball, and indoor baseball. Besides


THE ZONIAN
11
m -






















































THE ZONIAN
12


these activities, the class was well represented
in "Riding Down the Sky," the operetta suc-
cessfully presented by the glee club at the
clubhouse in April.
After some hesitation, the class decided to
leave its treasury untouched, keeping in view
bigger and better class affairs for the coming
year. When the class finally separated for the
welcomed three-months' rest, it was with a
fine feeling of satisfaction. The second lap of
their high school careers was successfully
passed! Now to prepare for greater efforts and
achievements to carry them on triumphantly
toward their goal.
The half-way mark in the history of the
Class of '33 found the high school further ad- Mrr. Hatchett
vanced than ever before. By popular demand, Class Adviser
five more clubs had been started, the school now boasting twelve different or-
ganizations. Louder and louder rumors of student government and student-
controlled study-halls were beginning to be heard. This problem was to become
very important to every member of the high school the following year.
When the halls again echoed to the cries of the, students, Balboa School
witnessed the starting of the Class of '33 upon the last half of its high-school
career.

The class now consisted of exactly one hundred boys and girls. Under the
supervision of the new but able class adviser, Mr. Hatchett, it began the year
by electing Stan Specht president, Jack Poole vice-president, Frances Ayers sec-
retary, and Leslie Clarke treasurer. As upper classmen, and with the pleasan-
prospect of enjoying coming dances and parties, the social committee was ap-
pointed, the dues were set, and the program for the year was planned.
In December, the first social affair handled by the Class of '33 was given
at the school a delightful party at which only members of the class and their
guests were present. Then came the usual junior luncheon, very well patronized,
and therefore successful.

Taking the lead, the junior class for the first time in the history of the
school presented a play at the clubhouse. Hitherto only seniors had sponsored
plays, but the Class of '33 broke all tradition in its sponsoring of the Little Thea-
ter's "Skidding," which proved to be a reasonable success.

It would be useless to enumerate all the parties and social affairs that that
junior class enjoyed. Suffice it to say that the crowning affair of the year, the
Junior-Senior Banquet, was one of the best banquets ever presented at the Tivoli.
In sports, the class won swimming by a wide margin, came second in both
soccer and basketball, but had to be satisfied with third place in baseball.
The problem of student government became of vital interest during this
year and finally resulted in the organization of the student council and several
student-controlled study-halls. The various clubs and other organizations had
now increased to eighteen.







Before the junior year was over, the Class
cf '33 had elected Bruce Onderdonk president
of the senior class-to-be. By popular request
Mr. Hatchett remained class adviser.
Few of the members realized that the
things they were to accomplish now were to be
the last, perhaps, in the company of the other
members, and few were the pulses that did
not quicken at the thought of leaving the school
for good.
Elections had to be gone through once
more. Bruce Onderdonk had been elected
president the ,ear before. Now Jack Poole
was re-elected vice-president despite his objec-
tions. Frances Friday took the office of secre-
Mr. Collinge tary and Lesin e Clarke was again made trea-
Zonian Adviser surer, a compliment to his ability to collect
dues. As it happened, no dues had to be collected, since the class found its trea-
sury well supplied.
Credit must be paid the social committee this year for the brilliant social
affairs they succeeded in presenting. Every dance, luncheon, and picnic Ywa
well advertised and exceptionally well managed. Not only this, but the program
for the year was more attractive than it had ever been before.
In October the class was treated to the first dance of the year at the Yacht
Club. Then followed at least one social affair each month, most of which were
eagerly attended. November brought the luncheon. December saw a dance on
the seventeenth and the Red Cross charity drive, in which the seniors participated
with gratifying success.
About this time preparations for the annual senior play, presented at the
clubhouse, were begun. The play chosen by the Little Theater was a mystery
thriller, "The Creaking Chair." After it had been presented on January 27
and had proved both financially and dramatically successful, the senior treasury
was so well stocked that parties for the class began to be free of charge. In
February the class enjoyed a picnic to Far-Fan beach. March saw another Far-
Fan beach picnic, this time in company with the juniors. The first of April
brought the April Fools' Dance at the Yacht Club.
The Class of '33 now began to make preparations for graduation, which
seemed so near, too near, at hand. After much argument for and against, it was
decisively voted to wear caps and gowns at graduation. The caps and gowns
were forthwith sent for.
The program for the rest of the year read: June 2, Junior-Senior Banquet...
June 10, Class Night... . .June 11, Baccalaureate. .. June 16, Com-
mencement.
Certainly the last year for the Class of '33 was a full one. In sports the class
did fairly well, coming in first in soccer and track and second in swimming. Be-
sides this, the class won the high-school scholarship cup, presented by the Home
Room Unit, five out of six times.
Student government was on the ascendancy this year, with seniors manaj-
ing every study hall in the school. The four years since the Class of '33 had
entered had at least seen some progress toward an ideal high school.


THE ZONIAN
13








JEANETTE ALEXANDER
Canal Zone
Glee Club '30, '31. '32, '33; Orchestra '31;
Press Club '31, '32; Physics Club '32; Parra-
keet '31'; Little Theater '32, '33; "The Three
Graces" '33; Zonian '33
ELOY ALFARO
Ecuador
Spanish Club '31; Elcrys '32.
*

HARRY H. ALLEN, Jr.
Illinois
Science Club '30, '31; Press Club '31, '32.
Chemistry Club '32; Nift. Fifty '32; Parrakeet
'32, '33; Orchestra ;1, ''. Pro and Con '33;
Home Room Unit '33.
THOMAS ALLEY
Canal Zone
Nifty Fifty '32; Chemistry Club '32; Parra-
keet '32; Baseball '32. '33; Swimming '32, '33;
Basketball '32. '33; Little Theater '33; Soccer
'33; Track '33; Pro and Con "33.


HARRY ANDERSON
New Jersey
Cristobal High School '30. '31; Little Thea-
ter '33: "The Three Graces" '33.
CHARLES ARROYO
Panama
General Science Club '30; Spanish Club '31;
"Riding Down the Sky" '31; Chemistry Club
'32; Engineers' Club '32; Tennis '32; "Skid-
ding" ';32: Little Theater '32, '33: "The Creak-
Chair" '33


ARMENIA ASPARREN
Canal Zone
Supper Club '30: Science Club '30; Spanish
Club '31, '33.
ANTOINETTE BAKER
Canal Zone
Citamard '31; Supper Club '3:; Art Club '33.

*

PEMBROKE BANTON
Panama
G!ee Club '30; Parrakeet '32: Engineers' Club
"':2 Physics Club '32; Little Theater '33; "Th.'
Crnaking Chair" '33; "The Three Graces" '33
HELEN BLACKMAN
Pennsylvania
l:lerys '32; Little Theater '32


THE ZONIAN










GLADYS E. BOOTH
Panama
Spanish Club '31, '32. '33.


DOROTHY BROWN
Canal Zone
*

DONALD E. BRUCE
Maine
Physics Club '32


HARRIETT BURKS
Missouri
Club Service Unit '32, '33.



MARIAN C. BURNS
New York
Glee Club '31, '32. '33; Elcrys '32.


JOHN C. CALHOUN
Canal Zone
Science Club '30, '31: Pro and Con '31 '33;
Album Club '32; Glee C:ub '32; "Skidding" '3.I:
Little Theater '32, '33; Parrakeet '33; Advanced
Glee Club '33; Home Room Unit '33; "The
Creaking Chair" '33.



LESLIE CLARKE
Virginia
Biology Club '31; Nifty Fifty '32; Chemistry
Club '32; "Skidding" '32; Parrakeet '32; Little
Theater '32, '33: Treasurer '3,. '33; Soccer '22,
33; "The Creaking Chair" '33.


ROSCOE CLEVELAND
Georgia
Glee Club '31; 'Riding Down the Sky" '31;
Track '31. '33; Engineers' Club '32: Zonian '33.



ALLAN COLE
Louisiana
Physics Club '32.

WILLIAM H. CONLEY, Jr.
Canal Zone
Engineers' Club '32; Spanish Club '33.


THE ZONIAN








AGNES CONNER
Connecticut
Supper Club '30, 31; Spanish Club '31; Little
Theater '33.

ALICE COOK
Philippine Islands
Little Theater '33; "The Creaking Chair" '33.



ROBERT W. CRANDALL
Canal Zone
Swimming '31, '32, '33; Chemistry Club '32;
Study Hall Unit '33; Athletic Council '33.

WILLIAM CRANDALL
Massachusetts
Chemistry Club '32: Study Hall Unit '33;
Pro and Con '33.



ELEANOR M. DALY
Canal Zone
Spanish Club '32: Study Hall Unit '33.

WILLIAM DANIELS
New York
General Science Club '30; Glee Club '30;
Orchestra '30 '31, '32, '33; Album Club '32;
String Quartet '32, '33; Club Service Unit '33;
"The Creaking Chair" '33.



ROY T. DAVIS, Jr.
Missouri
Chemistry Club '32; "Skidding" '32; Science
Club '32; Wecheck Club '32; Little Theater '32,
'33; Parrakeet '33; Zonian '33; Club Service
Unit '33; "The Creaking Chair" '33; "The Three
Gra-es" '33.
ESTRELLA DE LA PERA
Canal Zone
Basketball '29, '30, '31, '3L, '33; S..~,~'r Club
'30, '31 '33; Spanish Club '30. 'dl I 33;
Study Hall Unit '31, '32; Elcrys '31, '32. '33;
Nifty Fifty '32; Little Theater '32; Home Room
Unit '32, '33.


MOISES DE LA PERA
Canal Zone
Soccer '30, '31, '32, '33; Baseball '30, '31, '32,
'33; Glee Club '31. '32, '33; Tennis '31, '32;
Basketball '31, '32, '33; Track '31,- r' '33:
* R. lIn Down the Sky" '31; Pro and Con '32;
LIlI '32.
DOROTHY DENNIS
Panama
Glee Club '28; Swimming '28; Basketball '.8.
'29; Elcrys '32.


THE ZONIAN









WILLIAM K. DIBBLE
Texas
Little Theater '33.


MARION LEA DUGAN
Canal Zone
Science Club '30; Supper Club '3.0 '31, '32,
'33; Decima Legio '31; Elcrys '32. '33.



MARGARET L. DUNHAM
Pennsylvania
Supper Club '30. '31. '32, '33; Elcrys '32. '33
Little Theater '32, '33, Study Hall Unit '33


ETHEL EISENMANN
New York


ARMIN FMIL ELDERMIRE
Panama
Glee Club '30. '31, '32: Spanish C'ub '30, '3 :
"Riding Down the Sky" '31 : Soccr '32.


ELISA FABREGA
Panama
Spanish Club '30, '31.

*

IRMA FAYARD
Louisiana
Supper Club '31, '32 '33; Elcrys '31. '32. '33;
Little Theater '32. '33.

SARA KATHRYNE FERGUSON
Canal Zone
General Science Club '30: Supper Club '310.
'31, '32. '33; Decima Legio '31; Spanish Clib
'32; Litite Theater '32, '33: Parrakeet '32, '33;
Study Hall Unit '32, '33; Zonian '33.


EDNA FLUHARTY
Canal Zone
Supper Club '30. '31. '32; Basketball '31;
Volleyball '31. '32; Indoor Baseball '31, '"
Nifty T;ii '32: Athletic C3unccil '3:3; Littl,
Theater Study Hall Unit '33.


ROBERT FRENCH
Canal Zone
Glee Club '29 '30; Bowling '.9, '30. '31 ,
nri,:.,. '30: Album Club '32; Elcrys '32 :
Nn i ,mt '32.


THE ZONIAN

17








FRANCES FRIDAY
Mississippi
Volleyball '30; Glee Club '30, '31; Baseball
'30; Supper Club '30. '31, '32, '33: "Riding
Down the Sky" *31; Nifty Fifty '32; "Skidding"
'32; Little Theater '32. '33; Elerys '33; Pro
and Con '33; "The Creaking Chair" '33; Secre-
tary '33.


EDWARD J. GORMELY, Jr.
Panama
Track '33.


BERNICE MABEL GREGG
Texas
Biology Club '32 '33; Elcrys '32, '33

ETTA FAY HALL
Michigan
Supper Club '32; Writers' Guild '33; Parra-
keet '33; Zonian '33; Study Hall Unit '33.
*

JOHN A. HALLWAY
Kansas
Track '33; Basketball '33.

ELEANOR HAMMOND
Canal Zone
Volleyball '30, '31, '32; Basketball '30, '31,
'32; Baseball '30. '31, '32; Little Theater '33.
*

ELIZABETH HARRIS
Florida
Supper Club '33; Little Theater '33.

MARIE HERRING
Pennsylvania


MARIAN HUTCHISON
Pennsylvania
Secretary '30; Glee Club '30; Little Theater
'32, '33.

HARRIETT KALAR
Canal Zone
Glee Club '30, '31; Supper Club '30, '31, '32,
'33; Little Theater '32; Study Hall Unit '33.


THE ZONIAN








NORMA KULL
Panama
Supper Club '30, '31. '32, '33: Little Theatex
'31, '32; Spanish Club '32: Study Hall Unit '33.

BERNARD LAMB
New York
Science Club '30: Glee Club '31; "Riding
Down the Sky" '31: Little Theater '32.



WILMA LAWSON
New Jersey
Glee Club '30. '31, 3:2: "Riding D)wn lth
Sky" '31: Parrakeet ':;1, '32 '3': E! l y '32;
Little Theater '32. '33:: Zonian ':,.

VICTOR B. LEON
Canal Zone
Album Club '32, '33: Spanish ('Clb '3;: C'lu
Service Unit '33.


ANNA Y. MAHIN
Philippine Islands
Biology Club '22, *:;.

MARGARET C. MAHIN
Philippine Islands
Biology Clubl, '2, ':;:.



CHARLES SCHUBER MALSBURY
Canal Zone
Engineers' Club '31, 32; Chemistry Club '31.
'32; Album Club '31. '32: Little Theater ':1,
'32: Golf '31, '32.

KENNETH MARCY
District of Columbia
Swimming '29. '30: Little Theater '::l. '32:
Baseball '32 Wecheck Club '32.



DIANA ISABEL MARINE
Canal Zone
Supper Club '30 '31, '32. '33; Glee C'b ':i
'31, '32; "Riding Down the Sky" '31; Spanish
Club '31, '32: Writeis' Guild '32;: Elc ys '32
'3:1; Parrakeet '33
MARY MARGARET McCORMACK
Iowa
Pro and Con '30: Glee Club '0, '31 : "Iidlilng
Down the Sky" '31; Spanish Club '30. '31;
"Skidding" '32; Parrakeet '32. '33; Little Thea-
ter '32, '33: Writers' Guild '32. '33; Club Ser-
vice Unit '33: Zonian '33- "The Three Graccs'
,23 .


THE ZONIAN








DAVID F. MEAD
New Jersey
Baseball '30, '32, '33; Basketball '33.

LILLIA MONSANTO
New York
Pro and Con '30. '31; Supper Club '30, '31
'32, '33; Decima Legio '31; Parrakeet '31, '3r..
'33; "Skidding" '32; Little Theater '32. '"3:
Writers' Guild '3.; "The Creaking Chair" '33:
Club Service Unit '33.


ELECTRA MORALES
Canal Zone
Deeima Legio '30, '31; Supper Club '30, '31,
'32, *'3; Spanish Club '31. '32; Writers' Guild
'32, '33; Parrakeet '33; Zonian '33.
EDITH ROBERTA MORGAN
Canal Zone
Glee Club '30 '31, '32; Supper Club '30, '31,
'32: Pro and Con 30, '33; "'Riding Down the
Sky" '31; Elerys '32: Study Hall Ur.;t '32, '33;
Little Theater '32, '33.

JOHN MULLER
Canal Zone
Engineers' Club '32; Little Theater '32, '33;
"The Creaking Chair" '33.
GEORGE NOVEY, Jr.
Canal Zone
Spanish Club '33; Basketball '33.
*
ANNE OHLSON
Canal Zone
Pro and Con '30; Spanish Club '31, '32; Little
Theater '32; Elcrys '32; Writers' Guild "3i.
JAMES F. OLIVE
Pennsylvania
Glee Club '31, '32, '33; Chemistry Club '32:
Nifty Fifty '32; Parrakeet '32; Pro and Con
'33; Home Room Unit '33


BRUCE ONDERDONK
New York
Treasurer '30; Science Club '30: Swimming
'30, '31. '32, '33; Engineers' Club '32; Chemis-
try Club '32; Little Theater '32; "Skidding"
'3i; Soccer '33; "The Creaking Chair" '33;
Pro and Con '33; President '33.
LEILA PACE
Texas
Spanish Club '32; Club Service Unit '33;
Zonian '33.


THE ZONIAN

20









TITA LIVIA PATIO
Panama
Elcrys '32.


CARLOS A. PATTERSON
Panama
Spanish Club '31, '32, '33; Physics Club '32;
Engineers' Club '32; Nifty Fifty '32; Chemistry
Club "33



CHARLOTTE PAUL
Canal Zone


ROY W. PERKINS
New York


NOBLE PHILLIPS
Canal Zone
Glee Club '30, '31, '32: Orchestra '3O, '31,
'32: "Riding Down the Sky" '31; Engineers'
Club '32: Little Theater '32, '33.


GAY PIERCY
New Jersey
Chemistry Club '31; Little Theater '32;
Elcrys '32.



PABLO PINEL
Panama

RAYMOND B. PIPER
New York
Science Club '30; Orchestra '30, '31; Album
Club '32: Engineers' Club '32; Swimming '32:
Zonian '33.



JOHN H. POOLE, Jr.
Canal Zone
Glee Club '30; President '30, '31: Orchestra
'30, '31. '32, '33; Album Club '32; Vice-Presi-
dent '32, '33: Soccer '33: Home Room Unit '33.

RUTH RADER
New York
Vice-President '30; Supper Club '30; Glee
Club '30, '31, '32, '33; "Riding Down the Sky"
'31: Little Theater '32, '33.


THE ZONIAN








ADEL RAJSCOK
Connecticut
Hyattsville High School '30; Spanish Club
'32; Elcrys '32.

THIRZA ROBINSON
Virgin Islands
Science Club '30; Supper Club '30, '31, '32,
'33; Wecheck Club '32; Parrakeet '33; Little
Theater '33.


JAMES W. SALTERIO
Ecuador
Soccer '30, '31, 31, '33; Treasurer '31: Bas-
ketball '31, '32, '33: Glee Club '32; Track '33.

DORIS O. SHERLOCK
Maine
Golf '30.
*

FRANCIS JOSEPH SHERLOCK
Maine
Parrakeet '31, '32; Little Theater '32, '33;
"The Creaking Chair" '33; Study Hall Unit '33.

NIGEL A. SIMONS
Canal Zone
Parrakeet '31: Spanish Club '32, '33; Elcrys
'32, '33; Little Theater '33; Orchestra '31, '32.
*
STANWOOD SPECHT
Maine
Vice-President '30; Athletic Council '30 '31;
Baseball '30, '31, '32, '33; Basketball '30, '31.
'32, '33; President '32; Study Hall Unit '32:
Soccer '32, '33; Orchestra '32.

JUNE TILLEY
Texas
Supper Club '32, '33; Little Theater '32, '33;
Elerys '33: Pro and Con '33; Home Room Unit
'33.
*

EMMA VAN CLIEF
New Jersey
Supper Club '30; Baseball '30, '31; Glee Club
'30. '31: Basketball '30, '31, '32; Volleyball '30,
'31, '32; Athletic Council '30, '31 Swimming
'30, 31 '32, '33
CHARLOTTE WAHL
Illinois
President '30; Glee Club '30, '31. '33; Parra-
keet '31, '32, '33; Zonian '31, '32. '33: Swim-
ming '31; Little Theater '32, '33.


THE ZONIAN








DAVID J. WALSH, Jr.
Illinois
Nifty Fifty '32; Engineers' Club '32; Elcrys
'32, '33; Pro and Con '33: Little Theater '33;
Study Hall Unit '33; Club Service Unit '33;
"The Creaking Chair" '33; "The Three Graces"

RUTH WALSTON
North Carolina
"Skidding '32; Little Theater '33; "The
Creaking Chair" ';:3; Club Service Unit '33;
Parrakeet '33.



DOROTHY WATSON
Canal Zone
"Riding Down the Sky" '31: Glee Chili '31.
'32; Supper Club '31, '3', ':1; Nifty Fifty '32;
Elerys '32; Little Theater '1,2 '33; Home Room
Unit '33.

JAMES WESTENDORFF
South Carolina
Swimming '30, '31. '32, '33: Track '31, '33:
Engineers' Club ':12.



GEORGE ROGER YATES
Florida
Spanish Club '31; Parrakeet '32, '33; Study
Hall Unit '33; Writers' Guild '33: Zonian '33.

OLGA YCAZA
Panama
Spanish Club '30, '31.



LESLIE ANNA YOUNG
New Jersey
Glee Club '30, '31. '3L, '33: 'Ridin', Down
the Sky" '31; Biology Club 3:i.

JOSEPH SHIRLEY
Nebraska


THE ZONIAN




























































THE ZONIAN







CLASS OF '8'1
H IHE year 1933 was indeed a full one for
the junior class. What with presenting
.l.,r successful social functions, striving hard to
i i in interclass athletics, presenting the junior
Spli'.p, and studying industriously to get the much
:o eted scholarship cup, little time was left in
which to idle.
The juniors were spurred to action early in
the year by Mr. Gronde, their competent class
adviser, who encouraged the creation of a pro-
gram of social affairs entirely new in the high
I '", 1 school. The strides that the social committee
I'x' ... finally decided to take would set the class far in
Kromer Dwelle advance of any junior class before them. The
Johnson Westman approval of Mr. Spalding was soon obtained for
presenting the Derby, the German, and other novel entertainments that were
planned for the enjoyment of the whole school.

The first junior social affair was the dance in honor of the soccer team,
which was held at the Mosque. Although the boys had been defeated by Cris-
tobal, the class showed its spirit by dedicating its first dance to them. The affair
was as brilliant in defeat as it would have been in victory.
The next number on the program was the Junior Derby, a glamorous novelty
entertainment in which the class put forth its best efforts to provide a distinguish-
ed affair. The dance, which took place at the school, was ideally decorated, and
the prizes offered were much coveted, those lucky students who won them being
looked upon with envy by the less fortunate ones. The juniors expected no fin-
ancial return from the Derby; they wished only to entertain in good fashion, and
they succeeded beyond their furthest hopes.
The luncheon which the juniors held to replenish their treasury was next in
line. There was plenty of food and drink, and it was conducted in an orderly
fashion generally missing from other luncheons presented at the school. Every-
one was satisfied with the luncheon, the junior class realizing a nice profit. In
this, as in all the other junior programs, great credit is due to the social committee
and the officers of the class for arranging all the details and handling them so
smoothly, thus insuring the success of the affair and making a reputation for
presenting delightful programs.

Next the German, with its balloons, confetti, serpentine, colored lights, and
gay decorations! The Yacht Club offered an ideal place in which to hold just
such an entertainment, and the curios and favors which the juniors b.-,,.'-ir for
prizes still more enhanced the brilliance of the affair. Another entertainment to
add to the juniors' list of seemingly never-ending successes! The class surely
created a favorable impression by the Junior German.
The remainder of the program for the year included an informal barn dance
and the annual Junior-Senior Banquet, something to look forward to with plea-
surable anticipation.


THE ZONIAN
25






















































THE ZONIAN
26


ESIDES these social activities, the juniors
were the leading class in athletics, large-
ly through the aid of the girls. The boys came
second in track and swimming, tied two other
classes for second in baseball, won third place
in soccer, but did poorly in tennis. The girls
showed fine ability in sports by winning all of the
interclass series, and thus set the juniors ahead
of the other classes in athletics. Donald Judson
and Julie Asparren represented the class in the
Athletic Council.
The presentation of the junior play, now an
annual affair, was one of the highlights of the
year for the juniors. Mrs. Krumbach's Little
Theater Club presented "The Three Graces,"
sponsored by the junior class. In the contest Mr. Gronde
that the juniors staged with the seniors in selling Adviser
tickets for each other's play the Class of '34 showed commendable spirit and
wise cooperation. No matter that the seniors won the contest. It was a move
that increased the financial returns from "The Three Graces," and proved that
the two upper classes could cooperate without friction for the general benefit of
both. The junior play was a creditable performance a worthy forerunner to
the greater success of the senior play in 1934. With the experience gained from
the presentation of "The Three Graces," the junior class could look forward
with confidence to their next year's dramatic venture.
Now, all through the year, the juniors strove and studied industriously to
win the much-desired scholarship cup presented to the most learned class each
six-weeks period. They succeeded once in grasping and carrying away the cup
triumphantly, and the efforts of the other times when they failed were not
wasted, for they gained in knowledge what they missed in grades.
Through all the trials and successes of the juniors, the untiring zeal and
patience of their loyal adviser, Mr. Gronde, must not be forgotten. It was in
him that all the new dances and entertainments which so increased the success
of the junior class originated. He labored to make the class an outstanding one,
and the juniors owe him a great debt of gratitude. The Eocial committee and the
officers of the class are also to be commended again for their fine spirit and
work, which made the junior class a better one.
All the work of the juniors, their successes and failures, has paved the way
for a superior senior class in 1934. Their successes will serve them in good stead;
their failures through the alchemy of experience will turn to successes.
It may be said that the juniors will never finish where they start.
The words of Tennyson
"How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnished, not to shine in use."
might well apply to them always moving forward, accomplishing something.
The junior class has established its reputation, it has carved its niche in the
halls of Balboa High School, and, most important of all, it has established a
worthy example for future junior classes to follow.









THE


Is


? p

JUNIORS



9998
@9 SJ' "

t34' iI


THE ZONIAN


























THE S( OPHOMO )IRES
OFFICE( IZS

Adviser Mr. G. R. Lee

President Billy Hunter

Vice President Jimmy Johnson

Secretary-Treasurer-Shirley Gerchow


THE ZONIAN
28







i _CLASS OF '35o
I HE sophomores held their first and only
JI class meeting at the beginning of the
year when the officers were elected, the social
committee appointed, and the dues set at one
dollar. Chosen to head the class as president
was Billy Hunter, as vice-president was Jimmy
Johnson, as secretary-treasurer was Shirley
Gerchow. Mr. G. R. Lee acted as class adviser
~ 3 throughout the year.
Governments vary with the consent of the
governed. Since the class, at its first meeting.
Felt that business meetings were not a vital part
of the year's activities, the conduct of class af-
fairs was placed in the hands of the class officers
Mr. Lee Hunter
Johnson Gerchow and social committee and left there. Class ai-
fairs were ably administered by the group.
The sophomore social program included two dances, one open to the whole
school and the other limited to sophomores and their guests. The school dance
was well attended and well managed, while sophomores report their own class
affair to have been enjoyable. The committee responsible for both events num-
bers among its members Billy Hunter, Lois de la Mater, Elaine Bohan, Claudis
Howell, Fred Rathgaber, Shirley Gerchow, and William Moore. This same
group managed the food sale held at the clubhouse. As a result of the sale the
sophomore treasury was materially increased.
The class was capably represented on the Athletic Council by Dorothy Grif-
fin and Jack Brown, who represented perhaps the most athletically determined
group in school. One bright spot in the interclass program of games was the
unflagging determination displayed by the sophomore boys in their effort to win
the championship trophy. They were outplayed on several occasions, but never
outfought- The result of their efforts was second place in the interclass stand-
ings. They shared first place in tennis with the seniors, defeated the highly
reputed juniors for second place in soccer, shared second place in baseball with
the seniors and juniors, came in third in swimming, and shared last place in
track with the freshmen.
The girls did as well, they, too, ending the athletic year in second place, this
time trailing the juniors. Their ten points in the final standings were acquired
by second places in basketball, volleyball, and swimming, and a last place in
indoor baseball.
Scholastically, the class has been distinctly unable to point with pride, its
members having given rein to their energies in other directions. However, the
class has been an asset to the school in the quality of the spirit it has shown. It
has in the past been ususual for any class to feel an identifiable esfrit de corfs
until well on into junior year, but this year's sophomores have been proudly and
almost noisily sophomores. That, the school as a whole believes, is a good sign,
both for the Class of '35 and for Balboa High School.


THE ZONIAN
29
nW m

























THE FRESHMEN
OFFICERS


GIRLS
Adviser Miss Whaley
President Jean Mitchell
Vice-President Peggy Horter
Secretary Lois Nash
Treasurer Margaret Haw


BOYS
Adviser Mr. Carson
President Jack Kromer
Vice-President Walter Friday
Secretary Tom Huff
Treasurer Donald Fero


THE ZONIAN
30
















..__. ^.. ..









Miss Whaley Mitchell Horter Haw Nash
Mr. Carson Kromer Friday Fcro Huff

CLASS OF '3(
AS is usual with freshman classes, the Class of 36' began its first year in
high school with the boys and the girls holding separate meetings. Of
the girls' group, Miss Whaley was the adviser, Jean Mitchell president, Pesggy
Horter vice-president, Lois Nash secretary, and Margaret Haw treasurer. Mr.
Carson advised the boys, who chose Jack Kromer president, Walter Friday vice-
president, Tom Huff secretary, and Donald Fero treasurer.

Much of the discussion of the first meetings of the year concerned orienta-
tion in high school procedures. Out of these discussions was born an interest
in the school that was unusual for a freshman class and that spoke well for the
future. The year was one of unusual achievement. Save for the obstructionist
tactics of a wilful little group within the much larger body of the class as a whole,
it would have been a year of superlative achievement.

Athletically, the class had to be content with last and next-to-last places
and the satisfaction of having fought well. Alth.:boch the boys of the class walked
humbly at the end of the athletic parade, they walked so knowing that they had
had their moments. They had arisen unexpectedly to smite down the upper classes
in baseball for a glorious first place. In other sports they had fared badly. Their
best was equal only to the sophomores" in track, to the juniors' in tennis. Their
best was poorer than the other classes' in soccer and swimming.

The girls of the class did somewhat better in athletics, coming in third in
the four-class race. They took a second in indoor baseball, third in volleyball
and swimming, but were outclassed in basketball.

Notwithstanding the rather frequent freshman defeats, the class each time
came up smiling, ready for another encounter. Its interest was laudable.

If the year was not a thoroughgoing success competitively, it was at least
the brightest freshman year within senior memory. Three years remain for
them, years of fine accomplishment. The Class of '36 has been finding its
leaders and discovering its capabilities for its achievements of the future.


THE ZONIAN
31













BOOK II
PLUMS


0"*"l







Ltt(e JocI k o '4
sat n. ,corner
Eot Iq l, oXm0 (I*>
Ife stuiK h 'S ktyb
pIIled out a0 plum
hd sod-Ahof a oood
L ~bov amI/ 1


A


















































THE ZONIAN
34


JACK HORNETS









Onderdonk Alley Salterio Mitchell Kromer

PRESIDENT
TO be president of the senior class and then to be chosen the most popular
boy of the class is an indication that Bruce Onderdonk possesses ability
coupled with tact. He has successfully avoided the reefs of class dissension and
brought the senior craft safely to port. For that we honor him. But he has done
more; he has upheld the reputation of his class and school in swimming and in
soccer. In addition, it was his managership of the senior play that went far to
make it a financial success.

PLAYWRIGHT
W HEN the Little Theater offered a prize for the best one-act play writ-
ten by a student of the high school, the prize went to "Thanks for
Everything," from Margaret Alley's versatile pen. The ease and grace of the
dialogue and the sustained interest of the story won the regard of the judges.
Less spectacular, but nonetheless worthy, has been Margaret's news editorship
of the Parrakeet.

CAPTAIN
W E suggest for honors, James Salterio, captain of interscholastic soccer
and interscholastic basketball: not for leading his teams to victory,
because each lost its series, but for the high quality of sportsmanship with which
he has graced his play. He has shown us that he can give his best, and lose with-
out excuse, bitterness, or recrimination.

NEOPHYTE
BOTH popularity and ability lay behind the election of Jean Mitchell as
freshman girls' president this year. While the office has not given her
an opportunity to display all her abilities of leadership, it has at least revealed
to us that in Jean the school has a student who will be outstanding in years to
come. We predict that she will bring honor to the freshman class.

ORIGINALITY
N OBODY denies that the juniors have been the most original class of the
year. Once acquired, a reputation for originality is one of the most dlf-
ficult to maintain, yet Tom Kromer, junior president, has managed to maintain
just that reputation for his class. While the ideas that have made the junior
program so successful have not all been Tom's, it has been largely his leader-
ship that has created and sustained the unusual junior spirit.













i-1

-. p tl I'! 'I i ,


Left to right-Hallett, Rose, Ha'deman, Rader, Young, Westman, Gerchow,
Salterio, Maessen, Gormely. Wahl, De la Mater, Baker, Boggs, Quinn, Pearre,
Strauss, Dunham, Alexander, Young, Woodland. Dennis, Brown, Dioelle,
Williams, Davis, Daniels, Saphir, Poole, Calhoun, Hull, Peterson.

ADVANCED GLEE CLUi'H
E VIDENCE of the popularity of the Glee Club with the students of the
high school lies in the fact that advance enrollment indicates that the
organization is to double in number for next year. Nearly forty singers, under
the always capable direction of Helen Currier Baker, have this year produced
some of the finest music the school has known.

The school has been brightened by the club's efforts. At Christmas its
Childe Jesus cantata, designed to vary the annual carol program, met with well
merited commendation. The presentation of folk songs from the British Isles
in the assembly early in the second term pleased all the students privileged to
hear it. Perhaps the outstanding musical feature of the year was the Brahms
centennial program:

Talk, concerning Johannes Brahms. ......................... Clelia Calhoun
W altz in A ........... .. .............. ......... String Ensemble
Solo, William Danie!s
Hail, Holy Light ...................................... Boys' Glee Club
The Little Dustman ...................................... Girls' Glee Club
Solo, Mildred True
Barcarole ........................................ Girls' Double Quartette
Adagio Movement
Violin ................... ......... ..... ...... Fred Hendrickson
Piano ........... ............ ............. Jeanette Alexander
Lullabye ....................................... Girls' Advanced Glee Club
O Lovely May ......... ........... ............ .Advanced Glee Club
Hungarian Dance ............... .......... ..... ... String Quartette
Accompanists: Jeanette Alexander, Annie Pearre


THE ZONIAN
35




















































THE ZONIAN


/ JB I / '^.
p .-
I I
___ 'd tfl







THIE (CItEAKING CIAIRI"
A PRICELESS Egypt:an head-dress is stolen from its hiding place, the
scream of a beautiful girl rings out when she is intruded upon by a
menacing stranger, a shot sounds, a woman is murdered, a helpless man disap-
pears from his wheel-chair, tl-e guilty one is forced to confess, and then abruptly
it is over, far too soon.

"The Creaking Chair," presented by the Little Theater under the auspices
of the senior class, with excellent cast, stage management, and direction, proved
to be perhaps the most successful play of the year.

Frances Friday played t'e part of the pretty, hysterical Anita well. It was
necessary for her to acquire an entirely new accent. Rov Davis successfully
transformed his entire character into that of Mr. Latter. Two completely oppo-
site roles were undertaken by William Burdge. He was Speed, Egyptian news-
paper reporter, and the doctor, utterly changed in voice and appearance. Many
of the audience failed to recognize him in t'he second role. Alice Cook's poise
as the lovely Anita and the confidence of Leslie Clarke as her fiance completely
.on the audience. Jean Steele, convincingly the pert little maid, provided merri-
ment. With very great dignity John Calhoun butlered hs way through the play.
There was nothing on lnd or sea that David Walsh, detective from Scotland
Yard, did not know.

William Daniels haJ the audience scratching, while Robert Payne's gawki-
ness and vacant stare elicited gales of laughter. Disappointingly, because the
audience wanted more of her, Lillia Monsanto graced only one act. Charles
Arroyo s silent role was wcli acted.

A great deal of credit must be given to Emma Mae Krumbach, who devoted
four weeks of her time to the direction of this, the first mystery drama attempted
by students of the high school. Ruth Walston, prompter, probably had the most
tedious work of the whole production, and performed her task faithfully.

An outstanding phase of the production of "The Creaking Chair" was the
business management, ably handled by Bruce Onderdonk and his assistants,
Peter Johnson and Pembroke Banton. The ticket sale broke all records, partly
due to the excellent advertising with which the community was flooded. Posters
for the campaign were designed by the art students of Miss Gardner's classes.
The record for the largest number of tickets sold went to Robert Payne, a mem-
ber of the cast.

Stage management was under the direction of John Muller, assisted by
Francis Sherlock, Robert Dwelle, and Roberta Morgan. Mr. Zierten's crew, con-
sisting of Kenneth Marcy, Stanwood Specht, James Salterio, and John Lloyd,
sawed and hammered their way to a dramatic triumph, while the audience filed
in under the guidance of Robert Crandall and his corps of ushers to the sound
of their activity. Mr. Joy and the orchestra provided the between-act music.
An interesting sidelight of the performance was the way in which "The
Creaking Chair" broiih the junior and senior classes to a better cooperative
understanding of each other's purposes. The ticket-selling competition produced
a constructive rivalry that spread into undiscovered corners of other class activi-
ties as well, resulting in a richer year for both classes.


THE ZONIAN
37












A


THE ZONIAN
38


ALIi'M CLUI.
M iAINTAINING the reputation that they
are the hardest worked boys in school,
the Album Club members have been dashing
Here and there all year snapping pictures. Presi-
dent Victor Leon has taken the more important
- i ones, assisted by the other officers of the club.
There have been fifteen members, with
Edward Lawson as vice-president, Dale Boggs as
treasurer, and Bud Hammond as secretary. The
club has had no social functions, for, as the
militantly male members of the club declare, it
has been a business club. With the exception of
the senior pictures and a very few others, the


Leon Lawson Album members have taken all pictures for both
Boggs Hammond
the Parrakeet and Zonian.
Long has the Album Club been reputed to be the most active club in school.
This year Victor Leon, Edward Lawson, Dale Boggs, Bud Hammond, Renaud
Leon, Bob Reiber, Jack Ridge, James Durfee, Christian Skeie, Maurice Brown,
Henry Drake, Thomas Alley, John Calhoun, Roy Davis, and Bud White, have
not tarnished that reputation.


IhIIPA NO-AMERICA
T HE opportunity for an extensive study of
other language cultures than our own
exists on the Isthmus as it exists in few other
communities. Hispano-America has taken full
advantage of our unique position to examine in- _
tere'tinglv and with value into the culture of
Latin America. The club, under the leadership
of Charles Patterson and the advisership of Mr.
Carson, has met each week for discussion and
entertainment. Other officers have been George
Novey, vice-president, Albert Boyd, secretary,
and Rodrigo Arosemena, treasurer.
Among its activities, the club has published Patterson Novev
a newspaper each month during the school year. Boyd Arosemena
Editorial duties have been assumed by Charles Patterson, mimeographing done
by Victor Leon, art work under the supervision of Carmen Aloy. The newspaper
has been published in Spanish by people interested in the language.
Hispano-America numbers among its members A. A. Arias, Mary Arosemena,
Rodrigo Arosemena, Gladys Aiorbes, Olga Aloy, Isabel Angelini, Carmen Aloy,
Gil Arze, Blanche Cheney, Gladys Booth, Albert Boyd, Roberto Boyd, Margarita
de la Guardia, Estrella de la Pefia, Raquel del Pino, Juan Eskildsen, Octavio
Fabrega. Mariano Gasteazoro, Virginia Hughes, Elaine Holman, Diana Marine,
Melba McNair, George Novey, Charles Patterson, Rubelio Quintero, Sam Simons,
Luis Vallarino, Julia Villanueva, Victor Leon, Ricardo Martinelli, J. Pardini,
and Charlotte Paul.


I
t








I


Krumbach Davis Williams Arroyo Calhoun

LITTLE TIIEATEIR
T HE Little Theater has the distinction of being the largest club in school
in point of membership. Started last year under the guidance of Mrs.
Krumbach, it has grown until its roster includes more than fifty boys and girls of
the high school. Within the larger group is the Inner Circle, composed of the elect
who have earned five points for achievement. Points may be secured by acting in
three-act plays or by acting in and directing one-act plays.
The officers chosen this year were: president, Roy Davis: vice-president,
Rebecca Williams; secretary, Charles Arroyo; treasurer, John Calhoun.
Bright in the memory of the members is the dinner given during the year.
Each guest chose by lot one of his fellow members to imitate during the course
of the evening. Many a guest was amazed by his lost identity.
In serious mood, the club is interested solely in producing plays. It acts in
them, directs them, creates sets for them.
Assume that John Student is a member of the Inner Circle. He requests
permission to produce a one-act play. Permission granted, he selects his play,
chooses his cast, designs the set, and directs the actors. The play, if pronounced
good by the Little Theater group, is then produced for the entertainment of the
entire school.
Many plays have been so presented during the year. Among the outstanding
was "The Finger of God", directed by Rebecca Williams and Jack Chase. In
this play William Burdge made a dramatic name for himself by attempting the
most ambitious role of the year. Jeanette Alexander and Robert Dwelle won
applause for their portrayals as well.
Another of the plays, well received by the audience, was "Enter the Hero".
James Wright's success in the junior play may be traced to this, his first effort.
Catherine Roper, the heroine, and her mother, Joyce Rance, were convincing.
Major activities of the club were the junior and senior plays, produced at
the clubhouse. Every producing detail of both plays was carried out under Lit-
tle Theater direction and the actors selected from Little Theater membership.
Both were successful.
It is in activities such as these that the respect with which the school re-
gards the Little Theater has its origin. Throughout the history of the organiza-
tion Mrs. Krumbach, founder, has kept its purpose steadily before its members
with a singleness that has led to gratifying results. There is little doubt that
the Little Theater is making itself increasingly a part of the cultural life of Bal-
boa High School and the community,


THE ZONIAN
39


DS9IFAO




































THE ZONIAN
40


go~~LI-







"TIItE TIIREE (xIRACIEs"
B EFORE a not-too-large but certainly an appreciative audience, the Little
Theater, on May 5, presented "The Three Graces". The play, written by
Kenyon Nicholson and Dena And, concerns college life. For nearly a month the
large cast had worked under Mrs. Krumbach's direction in preparation for the
production. Each member of the cast deserves credit for his good work; the
thanks of Balboa High and the junior class in particular should go to Mrs. Krum-
bach for her splendid direction of the play. Nor should the class forget those
who remained behind scenes; their efforts added much to the play's success. We
write of Robert Wempe, Kenneth Marcy, Jack DombrowAky, and Stanwood
Specht, who constructed and handled the stage sets. Lillia Monsanto prompted
the play.
Nancy Marshall (Rebecca Williams) inherits a house from her grandfather.
In need of money and unable to dispose of the house she, with her chums Har-
riett Holmes (Margaret Woodland) and Sara Chadsey (Jean Steele) as partners,
decides to open a tea room, which they call "The Three Graces". When Bob
Nordyke (James Wright) eats a waffle the day before the big game, complica-
tions arise, which are happily made right in the end.
Each person did his part well, but certain members of the cant deserve spe-
cial credit. Roy Davis, as Pinkie Davis, a freshman reporter for "The Tattler,"
was r;chi there when it came to getting a story. The part seemed made for Roy
and of course he carried it off excellently. Jean Steele, with her never-satisfied
appetite, was a great favorite as Sara. Rebecca Williams and Jimmy Wright were
very good. The part of the superior Eloise Smythe of New York was splendidly
done by Mary Magaret MacCormack. Margaret "Woodland was convince ng as
practical Harriett Holmes. The complete cast follows:

M r. Sims ........ .............................. Robert Dwelle
Harriett Holmes ...........................Margaret Woodland
Nancy Marshall.................... ........Rebecca Williams
Sara Chadsey ....................... ..........Jean Steele
Bob Nordyke.................... .... .......... James Wright
Eloise Smythe .................... M ary M ; i,-TI M cCormack
Pinkie Davis ......................................Rov Davis
M iss Price .................. ....... ..........Laura M organ
Horace Babson ................... .......... Harry Anderson
Edna Carr ................. .................. Elaine Bohan
Coach Tanner..................................David Walsh
Dean Coulter........... .................. William Burdge
Captain Brown ................... .............. John Muller
Cheer Leader. ........ ......... .......... Francis Sherlock
Three Sophomores .......................Eugene Saphir, Dean
Eppley, Robert Daniels
Dancing Couples .........................Ruth Westman, John
Calhoun, Jeanette
Alexander, Walter
Jud so n, Kathryn
Laurie, Harry Allen,
June Tilley, Gay
Piercy.


THE ZONIAN
41

















































THE ZONIAN
42


JACK HORNERS





...... . . ..


Halloway De la Penia Asparren Kromer Sherlock
NEWVCOMER
A LTHOUGH he was a newcomer at the beginning of the year, John (Inky)
Halloway has found his place in school athletics. He has become one of
our most dependable athletes. Inky is particularly good at track. He captained
the team. He helped to equal the existing record in the medley relay. Evidently
he had a good influence over his team, for they excelled or nearly excelled records
in most of the events on the track program.

RECORD-HOLDER
N addition to being a three-letter man (soccer, baseball, track) Moises de
la Pefia is a record-holder as well. Moi ran the 220-yard dash in 23.6
seconds, the lowest time ever recorded in interscholastic competition here. Ev z ry
race that he has run this year has been close to record time. In all his sports
activities Moises is known as an athlete who will not be defeated. All his energy
is in the game.

LEADER
THE freshman boys were wise in their choice of Jack Kromer as president
for he has made an excellent leader. He is industrious, capable, and has
a good sense of responsibility. Jack has succeeded in making a place for himself
in school athletics. He was a member of the freshman baseball team and played
right field with the varsity. He has played the trombone in the orchestra and
in the band.

ATHLETE
JULIE ASPARREN may well be called our outstanding girl athlete for she
has, in the last year, earned four letters for her play in basketball, tennis,
volleyball, and baseball. Last year she captured three letters, in baseball, basket-
ball and volleyball. Whatever game Julie has taken part in she has done her
best for the school. Julie was captain of the girls' baseball and basketball teams.

MANAGER
F RANCIS SHERLOCK was chosen the most dependable person in the
senior class. We suspect that his untiring work on the social committee
earned him this honor. He has been largely responsible for the success of the
social affairs of his class during the past year. Francis has successfully managed
the seventh-period study-hall. For his work as manager of athletic teams he has
received two letters.






























iV





STR IN N QUA RTETT
F RED HENDRICKSON and William Daniels with their violins, James
Johnson with his viola, and Charles Vincent with his 'cello have always
been popular musicians. This year they have attained more popularity than ever
as a quartette. Helen Currier Baker has directed them.
Perhaps the most beautiful and popular musical program presented during
the entire year was the Brahms Centennial given on Friday evening, May 19.
Becau-e the month of May in this year marked the hundredth anniversary of the
birth of Johannes Brahms, the glee clubs and string quartette joined with other
music-lovers of the v;orld to honor him. While the students were unable quite
to reach the depths of Brahms' great chamber music, they were able, at least, to
show a phase of his greatness, his beauty and simplicity.
The quartette, with a few additional pieces to form an ensemble, played the
famous and popular aWaltz in A, Vwith a violin solo by William Daniels. The first
violinist of the quartette, Fred Hendrickson, gave the adagio movement from
THE ZONIAN
Sonata in D Minor, accompanied at the piano by Jeanette Alexander. To com-
plete the enjoyable program the string ensemble played Hungarian Dance, V. 43
Nearly every musical program this year has contained music by the quartette.
It contributed to the Christmas program in the patio, to the Easter music, to most
of the assembly concerts, and has added grace to several community events.
Of the group, William Daniels alone is being graduated this year. When
his place is as capably filled as it has been this year, we will be assured of the
continuation of one of the school's most popular groups.




























Standing: Van Clief, De la Pei~a, Sutherland, Asparren, De la Guardia,
Patterson, McNair. Sitting: Griffin, Dryden, Feaster.

BASKETBALL


INDOOR BASEBALL
Front: Salterio. Second row: Gawry, Van Clief. Third row: Griffin, Jones,
Howell. Fourth row: Asparren, Wright, Haldeman, Dryden.







TRACK
C OACH Leisy's track squad was the best the school has seen for some
years. In March, by a score of 45 to 38, the Balboa track and field men
defeated a Cristobal team that was also outstanding. Four Isthmian interschol-
astic records fell.
In the course of the March meet, Calhoun, Squires, and Captain Halloway
lost the high-jump to Pescod at 5'4"; G. Novey, Halloway, and Clarke lost the
broad-jump to Marchosky, who set the record at 20'7"; in the discus-throw,
Westendorff and Clarke bowed to Tarflinger and his 96'4"; they and Wempe
could not equal Tarflinger's record 38'6" in the shot-put. The only distance-run
was the half-mile, taken by Eldermire's 2:21. In the dashes De la Peiia took
both the 220 and 50, with a record 23.6 in the 220. In the hundred-yard dash,
D. Novey and Hall lost to Alberga. Balboa won both relays when De la Pefia,
Halloway, Stevenson, and Walker took the medley, and Alley, the Noveys, and
Hall set the record at 1:32 in the quarter-mile.
Other meets resulted in victories for Baiboa over Corozal and Amador, and
a defeat by Clayton.

HA lK I:T1 LAI.LL
LED by Captain Asparren and drilled by Coach Cooke, the girls' basketball
team Asparren, Dryden, De la Guardia, Griffin, Sutherland, Feaster,
De la Pefia, McNair, Patterson, and VanClief completely smothered their
Cristobal opponents during the series played in January and February. The stud-
ents from the Atlantic side failed to win a contest.
To no particular player goes all credit for the Balboa victory. Captain Aspar-
ren was chief scorer, and her endurance was a big factor in each contest, but
without the cooperation of her team-mates her performance could not have been
so impressive. The two centers, Feaster and Dryden, displayed clever floor work.
The agility of Patterson at forward was marked. De la Guardia succeeded in
doing what no Balboa guard has heretofore been able to do she stopped
Elizabeth Hayes.
In VanClief, Griffin, Sutherland, and McNair, Balboa had a group of sub-
stitutes who will develop into the first-team performers of the future.

INDOOR BASEBALL.
A FTER a well contested series, the girls'indoor baseball team managed
to capture four of the seven games on schedule for February and March.
It was a versatile team that Balboa sent to meet its opponents. In Asparren,
Dryden, Wright, Jones, and Haldeman, the high school presented a lineup of
hitters that was the despair of Cristobal pitchers. Each was a good fielder as
well. Not so deadly at the bat, but unusually effective in the field, were substi-
tute pitcher VanClief, catcher Salterio, utility fielder Gawry, and second base-
man Howell.
Outstanding during the season was the pitching and hitting of Captain Aspar-
ren. Her fast ball and change of pace, together with rather better than average
control, made her offerings difficult. Her ability as a batsman is evidenced by
the fact that she accepted the first pitch of the season for a home run.
The team was coached by Miss Hanna.


THE ZONIAN
45








MIRTH
ARLY in the year the senior social chairman, Stanwood
,I Specht, with his committee, Jeanett Alexander, Edna
SFluharty, Eleanor Hammond, Frances Friday, Mary Margaret
McCormack, Harry Alien, Robert Crandall, and Roy Davis,
Sdrew up an excellent social program for the class. In December,
the chairmanship went to Bob Crandall; it was necessary for
Crandall Specht to devote his time to baseball.
The seniors generously gave over their Christmas dance to charity, the pro-
ceeds to go to the Junior Red Cross. To augment the proceeds, girls were given
admittance upon presentation of old clothing or canned foodstuffs. The boys
gave cash. Loyal seniors tried to persuade freshmen to bring girls in droves,
but without success. Freshmen grow more wary year by year. Both upper floors
of the school were tastefully decorated. Chaperons were Mrs. Hatchett and Miss
Frost, sponsor of the Junior Red Cross.
With the beginning of the second semester, Francis Sherlock became chair-
man of the social committee, assisted by June Tilley, Robert Crandall, David
Walsh, and James Salterio. To this group goes praise for the April Fools' dance,
given at the Yacht Club. Senior colors were everywhere, beautifully arranged.
Several novelty dances were well received.
No recital of events can reflect the success of the senior program during the
year. It is enough to say that it has gone to form a cherished collection of high-
school memories.

JTOLLITY
T HE keynote of the junior social program this year ha,
been originality. Social Chairman Dwelle contributed
some of it, Mr. Gronde a good bit more, the Charm Club a full
share. That the school has appreciated the efforts of these
tireless juniors has been amply evident in the favorable com-
ment that has followed each of the junior affairs.
The first junior and school dance was given in honor of the Dwelle
soccer team. The Mosque was a mass of red and white streamers and colored
lights, the whole arrangement drawing attention to the miniature soccer field in
the center of the floor. Ruth Westman and the Charm Club contributed their
always interesting talent in serving and entertaining.
THE ZONIAN Possibly the most successful party of the year was the German, presented
for the entertainment of the entire school at the Yacht Club, in February. From
46
the imaginary grand march under the orange and white junior colors to the final
S novelty dance in which a potato was the price of a fox-trot with the girl of one's
dreams, the eager students were unable to determine whether Mardi Gras or
circus predominated in its confection. And little did it matter; even the chaperons
enjoyed the affair. Among the many willing juniors who assisted the social chair-
man were Joe Joyner, Marguerite Dryden, Julie Asparren, Betty Bohan, Louis
Everson, Peter Johnson, David Percy, and James Morales.
Another interesting affair was the luncheon. It either surpassed the senior
luncheon or it did not, depending on the point of view. The seniors had the cus-
pQI tomers, but the juniors had the food.







"CREAKING THE TRYOUTS
CHAIR" JT SOON!



PARRAKEET

VOLUME IV. No. 4 DECEMBER 9, 1932

LITTLE THEATER SUPERINTENDENT WILLIAMS PROMISES
WLL GVE PRIZE THAT W A TER COOLERS ARE TO BE
INSTALLED IN MAIN BUILDING SOON
What the Nobel prize is to
world litterateurs, the Little OFFERS PRIZE Considering Permanent
I heater prize promises to be System
to Hieh s-hool scribblers.
The Liltl- Tliejit T it is an-
nounced, is to offer a cash SPALDING FAVORS
prize of five dollars for the
bes. one-act play written by Ice-water is to be a reality
students and adaptable for pre- in Balboa School. Assurance to
sentation in the assembly. that effect was given by Su-
The contest is to close on perintendent Williams to Lillia
February 8 and all material Monsanto, Parrakeet editor,
must be handed to Mrs. Krum- nlas week in the course of an
bach by three o'clock on that interview on the subject. Until
date. permanent installation of a
The rules are as follows: cooling system can be made.
1. Any student, or group of temporar- coolers will be set
students, in Balboa High School up at convenient points about
is eligible. the building in the very near
2. All work must be in by future.
three o'clock on February 8. School authorities have long
3. If presented, the play must realized the need of a new sys-
last between twenty-five and tem of cooling water, but have
thirty minutes. 'refrained from installing one
4. Play must be typed and until it could be proved effi-
double spaced. cient. At present such a sys-
5. Do not sign your work. tem is being installed in the
A committee of competent new Cristobal High School, and
judges will be selected and the if this proves sil. ljT:... a
plays are :o be judged ac:ord- similar one will r. I-n;'ili, at
ing to originality, style, and Baiboa. However, this installa-
cleverness. Mrs. Krumbach an- EMMA MAE KRUMBACH tion will not take place for sev-
nounces that there must be at .. originality, style and eral months. Until this time
least five contestants or the cleverness. in order that the students maN
prize cannot be awarded. be accommodated, the individ'
C HARACTERIZED by a fearlessly aggressive policy, the Parrakeet has
This year made greater progress in high-school journalism than during
any year since its inception, in October, 1929. Much of the credit for the advance
must be given Editor Lil Monsanto, the vigor of whose editorial personality has
made each issue of the newspaper a looked-forward-to event. She has made of
the Parrakeet a living voice of the school.
But the editor has not achieved alone. In George Yates she has had a cap-
able assistant editor, whose craftsmanship has been reflected in makeup. Mar-
garet Alley, news editor, has managed to bring to light many a story of special
interest to the student body. The lighter tones of school life have been captured
by Virginia Foster, features editor. Under the guidance of Robert Dwelle, the
sports page has had growing influence in its interpretations of the swift panorama
of the sports program.
Other editorial staff members have been Annie Pearre, Mary Margaret Mc-
Cormack, Sara Ferguson, John Wainio, Beverly Boggs, Georgia Reynolds,
Frances Maguire, Teresa Michaelsen, Ruth Brooks, Billy French, Rebecca Wil-
liams, Mary McGillivray, Margaret Haw, Lucille Cook, Woodrow de Castro,
Electra Morales, Charlotte Paul, Carmen Aloy, Frank Fitzpatrick, William
Burdge, Margaret Fessler, Dorothy Watson, and Clelia Calhoun. Columns have
been produced by Harry Allen, Catherine Roper, John Calhoun, and James Olive.


THE ZONIAN
47



















































THE ZONIAN
48


JACK HORNERS

i_








Pace Leon Monsanto Ferguson Walston

BECAUSE they are, next to the valedictorian and salutatorian, the out-
standing scholars of the Class of '33, we point with pride to five seniors.

ARTIST
L EILA PACE has succeeded in completing her hiph-_chool course in three
years. Spanish and French appeal to her, although all her studies are
interesting. Her artistic ability is apparent in many of the art blocks of this
volume. Leila intends to develop her talent still further, upon graduation. She
expects to enroll at the New York School of Fine and Applied Arts.

PHOTOGRAPHER
N addition to being an honor student throughout his h;gh--shoc'l years, Vic-
tor Leon has been greatly interested in photography. His work is scattered
throughout this book. When not taking pictures as president of the Albums, he
likes to fish, he says. When school is over, Victor hopes to secure an apprentice-
ship in photo-engraving.

JOURNALIST
T O have Lil Monsanto's scholastic record as well as her extra-curricular rec-
ord is perhaps too much achievement for one student. She hopes to con-
tinue one of her activities journalism after graduation. Failing that, she w:ll
teach English or Spanish. Ambition, ability, frankness, humor, are qualities as-
sociated with her. We add another success.

LIBRARIAN
ARA FERGUSON is most interested in mathematics, of which she has
completed four years, and languages, principally Spanish and Latin. She
hopes to enter Duke University in the fall to take a four-year course in the liberal
arts, after which she will specialize in library work. In preparation, she has been
one of Miss Whaley's best assistants. Her other extra-curricular activities have
been in the field of journalism, as reporter for the Parrakeet and sectional
editor of the Zonian. Outside school, Sara likes best to read.

DRAMATIST
AFTER thoroughgoing preparation of homework, Ruth Walston has been
most interested in the Little Theater, in which organization she is an In-
ner Circle member. She is interested in all things in and of the theater, al-
though her skill as prompter has kept her much in demand in that field. Other
outside activities have been chiefly concerned with the Parrakeet. Ruth will
attend the junior college next year, and eventually will complete her studies in
the States.







JACK HORNERS


Piper Friday Hunter Monsanto Davis

IEDIT)OR
B ECAUSE of his ability to do things and do them well, the seniors chose
Raymond Piper to edit the Zonian. He has spent a great deal of time
and energy to make the book a success. Music and engineering claim his in-
terest. During his four years in high school Raymond has played the saxophone
and the trumpet in the orchestra and the band. He was vice-president of the
Engineers' Club last year.

POPULARITY
T HE reason the seniors chose Frances Friday their most popular girl needs
no explanation, for Frances is popular wherever she is. Franny, as her
friends call her, has been class secretary this year. A member of the Little Thea-
ter, she has played an important part in its activities. Last year she was Estelle
in "Skidding", and this year she successfully played the very difficult part of
Anita in "The Creaking Chair."

PRESIDENT
A FAVORITE with everyone, Billy Hunter was elected to lead his class
through its second year. He has proved capable and a hard worker. Need-
less to say, he has been a worthy leader. His determination to make the affairs
of his class successful has been reflected in the tirelessness of his assistance
to the sophomore social committee in its dances and fund-raising campaigns.
Interclass sports baseball, basketball, and soccer claim him as a devotee.

AGGRESSIVENESS
LILLIA Monsanto attained the honor this year of editing the Parrakeet -
the second girl to achieve it. No one can say her work has been unworthy
of the honor. Lil is perhaps the most aggressive editor the paper has ever had.
Besides this work she has been interested in dramatics, having played Mrs. Car-
ruthers in "The Creaking Chair," and been co-author of "Dreaming Murder,"
one of the Little Theater contest plays.

ACTOR
F AMILIAR to everyone, Roy Davis, as president, has made this a most suc-
cessful year for the Little Theater. As actor he has successfully portrayed
various types of characters: Andy in "Skidding", Mr. Latter in "The Creaking
Chair", and Pinky in "The Three Graces". He was one of the war-debt collectors
in the debate held at the clubhouse. Versatile, "Stinky" has been a member of
the Parrakeet and Zonian staffs.


THE ZONIAN
49



















































THE ZONIAN
50


Arrouo Fidanque HItedr;ic'sn -.- .

TENNIS
SHE tennis court- witnessed more than .
their share od athletic rivalry during I
three February Saturdays .v hen the Balboa
players matched strokes \ith their rivals _.
firim the Atlantic side. The fact that Balboa MlcCartneN
took all three matche- is no criterion of the Alorales
relar e skill of the opposing players. Each game was hotld con-
:eted. each player aware, at its conclusion, that he had met an
opponent worthy of his effort-.
Number One. Hendrckson. coolly fought his av to victory '
over Pescod in the singles in a manner that brought cheers from i
the spectators time and time again. His play was steady, con- Donovan
sistent, equally heady winning or losing. Observers admired his Spinelli
backhand, his catlike ability to cover the court. His singles Mr. Lee
were invincible; he came through the series without the loss of a set.
James Morales, ranking number two, succeeded in winning each of his sets
of singles against Cristobal opponents. A cannonball serve, an effective change
of pace, coolness under pressure, were qualities that characterized his play.
Number three man, Charles Arroyo, finished the series with two victories
and one defeat, the defeat by Lockwood, whose steadiness served well against
Arroyo's erratic play. The defeat can be attributed to an amazing lapse from the
almost deadly monotony of Arroyo's usual style.
No tournament player was Number four. Nelson Fidanque, whose brilliance
was outstanding in practice games but whose nervousness lost him point after
point against Gold Coast players. Coupled with Donovan, he succeeded, how-
ever, in eking out a doubles victory.
The Novey brothers, Richard and George, lost one of their matches, prin-
cipally thr-niich weakness at the net. When Coach Lee has succeeded in bring-
ing Richard's net play (George is a senior) up to his back court skill, he will be
a formidable contender.
The doubles team of Spinelli and McCartney took two out of three victories
at times when victory meant match for Balboa. Both are sophomores, and are
looked upon as foremost contenders for high rankings in the future. Their place-
ments are uncanny, their game soft and smooth.
Competition for positions on the team was unusually intense. It was ulti-
mately necessary for Coach Lee to institute challenge matches for the extra
three or four places.
It appeared that tennis popularity was definitely on the increase. The
crowds attending the games were small, but they were interested. Their number
showed a decided increase over those of the year before.








VALEI)ICTOR IAN

-T O rank first in a class for one year is an
achievement of which anyone may well
be proud. But to remain at the head of a class
of ninety-five students for three years is an even
greater achievement. This record made George
Roger Yates valedictorian of the clast of nine-
teen thirty-three. This is the second time a Yates
has received the honor. Two years ago George's
brother, Franklin, led his class.

During his sophomore year George was an
active member of Hispano-America. A member
of the Parrakeet staff for two years, he became
assistant editor and was in charge of make-up. Have you ever wondered who
wrote headlines and arranged the pages of the Parrakeet? It was George. Every
Monday night before the issue of the paper he could be foBind at school busy
wi th his scissors and paste. George has been a member of the Study Hall Unit
this year and has taken an active part in its efforts to establish student govern-
ment. His work as a member of the Literary Guild showed strength.
Quiet and unassuming, George has preferred to spend his time with his
books instead of engaging in athletics.
After graduation George plans to attend college to study banking and finance.



SALUTATOR I A N

H AVING received practically all A's for
the last three years, Margaret Dv nham
ranked second in her class scholastically. In
addition to her school work Margaret finds time
to work in the Study-Hall Unit. She is chAef
secretary and is in charge of roll-takers in it .i-
halls. Margaret belongs to the Little The-rer
and to the Elcrys. She was in charge of the c-
tumes for the program which the history clkh .
gave early in the year. For the last four %ear-i, ;.
Margaret has been a member of Supper Clu b. L' -Z
This year she was chairman of the service com- 51
mittee. She and her committee helped several needy people in Panama at
Christmas time and brought joy to the hearts of the orphans from Bella Vista
with an Easter party at the Y. W. She has devoted some of her study periods
to working in the library.
Margaret is quiet and persevering. But no matter how busy she may be,
she is never too busy to help someone else. She likes a good time and does her
part to make others enjoy themselves.
Margaret plans to go to Philadelphia upon graduation, where she will attend
Pierce Business College this fall. She intends to do secretarial work when she
has finished her course there.






WE GIVE YOU


-O
-r







_


FRIENDLINESS
Alice Cook


PUNCTUALITY
Thirza Robinson


THE ZONIAN
52


HUMOR
John Calhoun


ALERTNESS
William Crandall



OF THE CLASS O)F '3


IB1


*1*I.
' .


SINCERITY
Leslie Clarke

LOYALTY
Bruce Onderdonk



COURTESY
Helen Blackman


ALTRUISM
Jack Poole


INDUSTRY
Adel Raiscok


DEPENDABILITY
Francis Sherlock
















a I v



Sutherland Corrigan Alley Brown Mead Forrest Neville

BASEIHALL
r HE high-school baseball team came through with colors flying when, con-
trary to all predictions, it defeated Cristobal in three -ilrsalhi games to
win the series and the championship. Before the season began, the boys from
the Gold Coast were picked by the experts to win, but Coach Zierten's team dis-
played such fi;.hrint qualities that the experts were completely crossed. The
team was led by Pete Corrigan, who, besides playing a star game at first base,
proved an able captain as well.
It was spirit that made the team, spirit coupled with faithful practice under
the tutelage of Coach Zierten. From Moises de la Peiia or Jack Brown behind
the plate, from the looming figures of Stan Specht and Coach Zierten at third
base, from the noisy corner at first where Captain Pete and Jack Dombrowsky
made themselves heard, to the farthest outpost of Ed Neville's center field,
there was evidenced that crackling brilliance that makes a baseball team.
The first game was won by Balboa with a score of four to three, and was
featured by the excellent relief hurling of Tom Alley, who replaced Mead in the
fourth. Tom had the Cristobalites eating from his hand. Stan Specht's steal
home in the seventh provided the winning run. The pitchers received steady
support in this game. The infield, Corrigan, Sutherland, Judson, and Specht,
turned in several brilliant plays, one of which was a back-hand stop by Judson
of what should have been a sure hit over second.
The second game was won eleven to six. Balboa's heavy hitting featured
this contest. Alley and De la Peiia each accounted for three, while Corrigan and
Neville slammed out two apiece. Mead and Alley pitched steadily for Balboa.
The game that ended the series was taken four to three. Tom Alley went
the whole distance on the mound and turned in his most brilliant performance.
The winning run came in the seventh when Ed Neville drove the ball into
the outfield.
With senior players barred from competition, Cristobal took the remaining
games of the seven-game schedule.
Assistant Coach Dombrowsky proved himself a valuable addition to the
staff th.r,.,,'-, ,i the series.


THE ZONIAN
53
























BOOK III
CUPBOARD






























9 4 9
^^Crj^BBB







r^i^nBiBftfi^








H^I^^^^^^^


,a


_~__ ~__P







DRAMATICS


THE ZONIAN
56


' HE actors win the praise. And they
should, but not all of it. Their purpose
is artistic, and the extent to which they succeed
in their purpose should be translated into favor- .
able comment. Just now, however, we are in-
terested in a phase of the class dramatic pro-
ductions that was highly utilitarian. We refer 5
to that body of students who put the dollars S
in their class treasuries.


"THE CREAKING CHAIR"
THE most intensive campaign ever used to advertise a high-school play
here was begun during Christmas vacation when Bruce Onderdonk, Pem-
broke Banton, John Muller, Lorna and Virginia Duff, Antoinette Baker, and
Gene Clinchard began to make posters. And early in January the campaign
really started. The posters did much to create interest in the play. Bruce Onder-
donk, assisted by Pembroke Banton and Peter Johnson, managed the sale of
tickets. "The Creaking Chair" was presented before a full house and was,
financially, the most successful play ever sponsored by a class of Balboa High
School. The proceeds were five hundred dollars.

"THE THREE GrRAC('."
W HEN school reopened after the Easter holidays another advertising
campaign began. This time the juniors were in charge, for they
sponsored "The Three Graces." Margaret Alley, Marguerite Dryden, John
Muller, James Morales, Robert Hazeldine, Peter Johnson, and Ernest Chu made
posters. Pete Johnson and Pembroke Banton managed the business while James
Morales and Joe Joyner handled advertising. The juniors made about two hun-
dred fifty dollars from their production.

CONTEST
TO quicken the sale of tickets for "The Creaking Chair" and "The Three
Graces" a contest was arranged between the two classes. There was
keen, yet friendly competition between them. This was a good example of the
fine spirit which existed between the juniors and the seniors. During the first
part of the contest a large clock was placed in front of the assembly to show
the daily progress of the sale of tickets. A blue and white hand showed the
senior results while an orange and white hand recorded the juniors' progress.
Bob Payne, a junior, sold more tickets than anyone else. Estrella de la Pefia and
Lilia Monsanto led for the seniors. The orange and white hand showed the
juniors' high mark at one hundred thirty-eight dollars and fifty cents.
For the second part of the contest, the juniors used two large thermometers
to show results. On the last day of the contest the seniors were still thirty-five
dollars behind their goal. It looked as if the juniors had won. But the seniors
got busy and forced their thermometer to rise, first to the junior high-water
mark and then to one hundred forty-eight dollars and fifty cents.
To honor the seniors as the winners of this contest, the juniors gave a beach
party at Far Fan followed by a hayride to Madden Dam.























BUSINESS STAFF
At the \\heel. Onderdronik P.as-
sengers: form.il. Johnloi-iimformal.
Banton.

T C3 F-LM. A






P, LL
10 0
B ri









by Antoinette Baker.
^ 1--J



PART OF THE PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN
On the left, by Gene Clinchard; on the right,
by Antoinette Baker.


THE CREAM I NG
CHAIR







BALBOACLUBHOUSE-
JAN27 s1. 75 .50


THE ZONIAN
57


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THE ZONIAN
58


FINANCES



Johnson

TREASURERS
Senior ..................... Leslie Clarke
Sophomore ............. .Shirley Gerchow
Junior .................... Peter Johnson
Freshman girls ............ Margaret Haw
Clarke Gerchow Freshman boys .............. Tom Huff
Haw Huff

JUlNIOR1 RED CROSS
WITH "every home-room a member" as its goal, the Junior Red Cross
drive of last November was among the successful financial drives
of the year. To continue membership in the American Junior Red Cross it was
necessary to renew the subscriptions to the Red Cross Journal. Miss Wardlaw's
home room responded almost immediately and the seniors were nearly as prompt.
After deducting the membership fees the association had a small sum left,
which was added to the Junior Red Cross fund started last year.
On December 17 the seniors sponsored a dance at school to secure food,
clothing, and money for Panama charity. This affair brought in thirty dollars,
which was divided between the Panama Red Cross and the Salvation Army
soup kitchen. The food and clothing was distributed among the poor under the
direction of Miss Frost, Junior Red Cross sponsor.

1)Uis
N spite of the depression the finances of the senior class were such that early
this year it was decided that dues would be unnecessary. After "The Creak-
ing Chair" was produced so successfully on January 27 there was no need for
the class to hold the usual cake sales. The junior class, with the annual Junior-
Senior Banquet and the Zonian of next year to finance, found it necessary to
charge dues amounting to three dollars, which were paid by most of the class.
Although there are no special demands made upon the underclassmen for fin-
ancial support, the sophomores and freshmen did their due-ty promptly. The
freshman boys were in their usual position, last.

IUN !C -II I.N'S
( HE annual junior and senior luncheons were not as successful this year
as they could have been. The food supply for the senior luncheon in
November was not sufficient to satisfy the crowd which turned out as a result
of the able advertising campaign. On the other hand, the juniors did not suffi-
ciently advertise their luncheon in February and consequently failed to have
enough customers to do justice to themselves and to their efforts. But in spite
of these handicaps the seniors made a profit of fifty-nine dollars and the juniors.
forty-five.

























PUBLICATIONS STAFF
First row: Charlotte Wahl, Miss Parsons,
Annie Pearre. Second row: John Bruland,
Eugene Saphir, Roscoe Cleveland.

LUNCHEON TOTALS
SENIOR CHARITY DANCE
COMMITTEE AND ASSISTANTS


THE ZONIAN





















































THE ZONIAN
60


.. FINANCIER
. / SK Miss Steen; she knows.She knows which
Sj classes have not paid their dues, how much the
juniors made on their play, whether or not the Bio-
logy Club can afford the picnic they have been talking
about, how many more issues of the Parrakeet are
coming out. She knows because she receives and
audits the funds that make all these things possible.
From Miss Steen, treasurers learn their first lesson
in business that records count, not surmise-. They
learn the rudiments of financial housekeeping.

Miss Steen CLU

W ITH Dorothy Watson as president, the Supper Club had a very suc-
cessful year. In October the cabinet decided that dues would be un-
necessary, since the monthly suppers and other activities would raise sufficient
money to send a delegate to the National Girl Reserve Camp. To accomplish
this the club held a depression dance at the Yacht Club, and their annual lunch-
eon. By way of service, the girls helped the poor at Christmas and gave an Easter
party for the children of the Bella Vista home.
The Supper Club is an important part of the work the Y. W. C. A. does here.
Due to financial conditions it is not likely that the club will be continued next
year.

ASSOCIATIONS
DUE to lack of cooperation on the part of certain members of the student
body, the Athletic Association drive was unsuccessful this year, for they
were able to raise only one-third of their one-hundred-and-eighty-dollar goal.
The Athletic Council consisted of two representatives from each class Rober-
Crandall and Edna Fluharty of the seniors; Walter Judson and Julie Asparren
of the juniors; Jack Brown and Dorothy Griffin of the sophomores; and Louis
Lipzinski and Helen Van Clief of the freshmen. Mr. Zierten advised the group.

CAKE AND CANDY
IN December the sophomores held cake sales at Ancon and Balboa. Lois de
la Mater was in charge of both, assisted by Claudis Howell, Elaine Bohan,
Shirley Gerchow, Jimmy Johnson, Willie Moore, Billy Hunter, and Fred Rath-
gaber. The proceeds were forty-five dollars.
On May 10 the Elcrys sold candy at school. The purpose of this sale was ta
raise money to buy a picture for the school.

PUBLICATIONS
W ,ITH Miss Parsons as sponsor, the publications staff handled the sub.
scription drives for the Parrakeet and the Zonian, secured advertise-
ments, and managed all business affairs of both publications. Charlotte Wahl
was business manager, with John Bruland as her assistant. Eugene Saphir, as-
sisted by Jean Steele, Margaret Perry, and Lucille Cook, managed circulation.
Roscoe Cleveland was advertising manager. Lillian Wright. Teresa Michaelsen,
and Gladys Salterio solicited advertisements. Annie Pearre was exchange
manager.













































































THE ZONIAN


ZJ

























BOOK IV
TUFFET'



















w A
A \N k


a


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LITERATURE AND ART
AMONG the most satisfying of life's privileges is the expression of the
truth and beauty of one's surroundings in terms of brush or pencil. Few
are the students of the school who are not seekers after the inner meanings of
scenes and activities about them, but the number who endeavor to define their
impressions is unfortunately small. What they lack in number, however, they
supply in enthusiasm. The following brief pages suggest a few results of that
enthusiasm, selected from among the projects of three organizations.

LITERARY GUILD
HE members of the Literary Guild find it fascinating to seize upon an
idea and nurture it carefully until it has grown into a poem, or a fea-
ture article, or an essay. Interest in writing is the common bond that has drawn
them all together. During the year, the Guild has had no officers and no regular
membership roll; just an adviser and a place for meeting. The adviser has been
Mr. Collinge, and the meeting-place Room 27. The only requirement for mem-
bership has been a desire to write, attested by a written contribution at each
meeting. Among those students who have fulfilled the requirements are Mar-
garet Alley, Etta Fay Hall, George Yates, Charlotte Paul, Mary Margaret Mc-
Cormack, Mildred Makibbin, Electra Morales, and Gladys Shelton.

SKETCHING CLUB
T 0 see and to create beauty is the twofold purpose of a group of students
known as the Sketching Club, under the guidance of Miss Gardner.
Their search for beauty has led them to many of the more charming retreats of
the Isthmus the Missouri Botanical Gardens, gem-like Miraflores, the cool
ravine that is Madden highway, Fort Amador, Old Panama in order to repro-
duce with pencil some of the. charm of the outdoors.
More, the group has awakened in the students of the high school an added ap-
preciation of the beauty to be found in our own patio. The delightful variety of
foliage, the patterns of sunlight and shadow, and the simple architectural back-
ground have been sketched for us with fine insight.
The members of the club are Carmen Aloy, Marjorie Bullock, Lois Nash,
Vivian Orvis, Miriam Whitsett, Edith Wickran, Betty Lewis, Lucille Cook, Betty
Nolan, Nadene Dennison, Josephine Reiber, Sophie Seaburg, and Dorothy Siler.
That the school has been interested in the Sketching Club is evidenced by
the clusters of pleased students who have noticed their sketches on exhibit.
THE ZONIAN COSTUME DESIGN CLUB
64 HO knows? When little girls cut out paper dolls they may be training
IW for membership in the Costume Design Club. This group, whose presi-
dent has been Jacqueline Malsbury and whose adviser Miss Gardner, continues
just that activity of childhood-but with a serious purpose. The dolls that are cut
South are representative of feminine types. Each type demands its own style of cos-
tuming. By experimentation harmony is achieved. The whole process represents
a nice balance between artistic and utilitarian purpose.
Lois Nash has been vice-president of the group. Carmen Aloy has been
S esecretary-treasurer.








sI *



STUDY
IN the above sketch, Carmen Aloy has been successful in giving us an inter-
pretation of one rather important phase of school life. You see a student
evidently lost in deep study. She is oblivious to the busy hustle and bustle of
the rest of the school. That last-minute glance may mean a great deal to her.
It may be a history test! How many times have we all slipped away to a quiet
corner, there to get acquainted with Caesar during that precious five minutes
before the examination? School life! There's nothing like it.


THE ZONIAN
65

FIFO' 4=" M

















































THE ZONIAN
66
4 -


4 ,rf. D'pe 'I



A CORNER OF THE PATIO
T HERE is beauty to be found within the walls of Balboa High School as
well as knowledge. In the above sketch, Nadene Denison, one of Miss
Gardner's pupils, has succeeded in capturing a bit of the elusive charm which
is to be found in our patio.
Here is peace, the peace that will steal over the school during the long vaca-
tion days. No running students, no sudden shouts or scuffles, no scholastic
babble floating out through classroom doors. There is an enduring something
here something that perhaps expresses some of our inmost thoughts concern-
ing the school.


| :" ** ';-.< s H
In 4- i|
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()li) IIR(N) II)ES
A BOVE is a portion of the famoros old vessel that played such an important
part in the history of our country. Her resistance during numerous
naval engagements earned for her the name of "Old Ironside-."'
Nadene Denison has here succeeded in capturing some of the rugged beauty
and glamor which envelopes the old vessel. This sketch, drawn while "Old Iron-
sides" was in port here, clearly illustrates one of the most interesting charac-
teristics of old-time vessels, the artistic figurehead. Although "Old Ironsides"
is over a century old, she still retains her majestic indomitability, and sails
serenely across the Feas with the wind filling her sails.


THE ZONIAN
67





















































THE ZONIAN
68


PICTURESQUE PANAMA
O NE interesting scene, just at the fringe of Panama City's industrial
life, is the harbor near the market, where quaint fishing craft ride the
swells or lie dejectedly awaiting the return of the tide, and sea-birds soar and
dip from dawn to dark. In the above pencil-sketch, Octavio Mendez has been
successful in depicting some of that quaintness.
The harbor is not alone in its beauty, however. Wherever high school stu-
dents have roamed, wherever their search for the gayeties of life has taken
them, they have discovered bits of tropical color and harmony.
Who has not thrilled to the serenity of the bay at Taboga, to the blue-green
breakers along the beach, to that single pelican dreaming the day away from
his perch on top of an outjutting root? What student is there who has not ad-
mired the blended colors of Panama City from the point at Fort Amador? Who
has not been carried two hundred years back into the mystery of the past by the
lonely tower at Old Panama, last brooding sentinel against the return of Morgan
and his pirates?
These are the bits of color of which so much of the patch-work of high school
life is constructed. The deep green of the jungle in the early morning after you
had spent the night at your hunting-camp.... Cruces Trail, still echoing to the
cries of your gay picnic-party..... Santa Clara beach where frigate-birds soar....
Chiquita's pool, in whose somber depths old romance still lingered..... tropical
moons and the faint touch of the restless breeze on your cheeks.
The students of Balboa High School have a way of scattering to the far
corners of the earth. But they will carry with them many a memory picture of
scenes and events, of which the harbor above is only a reminder, that will serve
to bribghen odd moments wherever they go.







NOIII,.ITY


By Charlotte Paul

Night -
I contemplate the stars,
White and silent.

I grow mute
Before their calmness.

I would that I were like the stars
To bear my burning heart
So nobly.




NIGlHT

By Mary Margaret McCormack

The gypsy sky in its sequin gown
And one crescent ear-ring
Tirelessly climbs its blue stair
On studded heels -
Up and down.





L.ONGSING

By Mary Margaret McCormack

My heart died when roses dropped their ruffles,
And birds, weary of philandering, turned toward home again.
Now autumn leaves, children of the sun,
Lie upon the ground and turn their freckled faces up.
Their laughter mocks at one who knows -
Come nimbly, Spring!
Let roses bloom again!


THE ZONIAN
69






CAPTAIN B


By Thirza Rob;nson


NOTHING could be more enjoyable than a few hours of Captain Barden's
company. Although the old gentleman has been blessed with pure white
hair for many years, his activities and common sense, his excellent humor and
lovable disposition, have not left him. His whole heart, his dreams, his life,
in fact everything, is locked away in the trim white schooner that adds beauty
and grace to the surrounding craft at the Yacht Club. Afternoons find the skip-
per of the ANNIE B sitting on a dilapidated fish box, pipe in one hand, a chin
of fine distinction in the other, gazing intently, adoringly, at his boat. His heart
is filled with pride, with love, with peace.

Tall and straight, lean, burned a hue darker than the spars on his ship, the
captain is ever ready to lend a capable hand, to exchange a winning smile, or to
render a worthwhile tale. His blue eyes portray a world of expression: their
seriousness can make one feel a prick of guilt; their twinkle passes on a feel-
ing of good will.






TI: N PERA.NCE


By Charlotte Paul

If after all these years of silence
My lips should once more form a prayer,
These be the things I ask:
A calm and constant mind:
A soul gentle and mellow as rain;
A heart abstemious.
For this I know:
Deep in the earth of my heart
Stirs love the sun has smiled upon.










Hatch. I
KWate w Go

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THE ZONIAN
























BOOK V
HUMPTY DUMPTY













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THE ZONIAN
74


Collinge, Hodges, Joy, Spalding, Gronde, Grieser, Zierten, Lee

PAST MASTERS
AFTER seeing the faculty baseball games we have concluded that: Mr.
G. R. Lee swings a bat as he would a driving iron, except that he misses
oftener; Mr. Spalding really can reach high, low, and wide for throws from un-
reliable arms; Mr, Zierten's pitching success must be attributed to his ability
to inspire awe, for he has nothing on the ball; Mr. Collinge talks a better game
than he plays; Mr. Gronde's luck in circus catches fails him when important
blows come his way; Mr. Hodges can scoop them up and cock his arm like a big-
leaguer, but throws out into Roosevelt Avenue; a blue note from the band so
paralyzes Mr. Joy that he lets easy outs go for home runs.
It is perfectly true that the faculty struck out, fell down, threw the ball
away, and day-dreamed. But those who were unkind enough to make fun of
their shortcomings were met with the unanswerable argument:
Faculty, 12, 8, 11.
Seniors, juniors, and sophomores, 7, 9, 10.

t ,, LAST
Tr HE Freshmen again brought up the rear
in the Athletic Association drive. We
(I \ \ wonder what the trouble was this time. They
certainly hadn't that excuse of Old Man Depres-
sion any more. Could they possibly have lost
their dollar bills through holes in the pockets?
/ Or perhaps they secretly put them into a depres-
Ssion fund for themselves, deciding that they
would probably need it in future years more
than the Association did then. Better still, they might have encountered some
unfortunate person and their good kind hearts, unable to bear suffering, cheer-
fully gave up the Association's much-needed money. Whatever their excuse
was, it certainly did not help the Athletic Association drive.

LOWEST
T HE freshmen must have had a perfect defeatist attitude. They usually
came out last in everything they undertook. They ran true to form when
they came out lowest in interclass athletics.
Could they possibly have had the belief in their young minds that if they
came out last in the early stage of life they would would be first in later years?






.', LOYALTY
S -S* PEAKING of the heroes of 1933, one is
inevitably attracted by the feat of one
S_ Sam Burks, resident of Grondeville.
S : \ It seems that the residents of that little
/ ` village organized a magistrate's court early this
S\ i year. Judge Judson presided. Culprits passed
the bar of justice with gratifying faithfulness
? until well after mid-year, when business began
S' to fall off. Was the court to be idle the rest
of the year?
But no! One staunch supporter came to the rescue. Again and again he
came. He threw erasers, broke parole, attended senior meetings in order to
come, but he came. The faithful one was Sam Burks.
And that, we submit, is loyalty to law and order.



Rub-a-dub-dub, that third-floor tub
Got Betty a fass to Biology Club.
T is a well known fact that any aspiring stud-
ent who wishes to gain membership in the i
Biology Club must first produce evidence f
original research or experiment in the biolov ,
field. We submit the experiment conducted b
Betty Bohan as the year's most original.
There was nothing Etrange or new about
the tub in which Betty planted her third-floor garden to gain her membership.
There was nothing strange or new about the soil that went into the tub, about
the gentle rain that moistened the soil that went into the tub, about the sunshine
that brought cheerful warmth to the soil that went into the tub.
What was original was the crop. That which ye sow, not necessarily shall
ye also reap.

/ "\STIFIC'ATIO )N
I. / AW HAT'S the use?" demanded senior "
girls.
"Are you asking us?" affirmed junior girls.
i "Just be patient," suggested Mr. Gronda
and Mr. Hatchett in chorus.
But then, murmured the upperclass girls at
dancing class, Mr. Gronde and Mr. Hatchett
weren't teaching bashful junior and senior boys
hew to dance. They just didn't understand.
Great ideas are seldom recognized by the generation that produces them. The
dancing classes have come and gone. Official edict ended them. But we insist
they were a great idea. They were justified. They produced the dancers in "The
Three Graces".


THE ZONIAN
75





























SOCCER
Standing: Durfee, Alley,
Brown. Clarke. Novey, Onder-
donk. Courville.
Sitting: Specht. Lipzinski,
Salterio.

VOLLEYBALL
Standing: Fluharty, Aspar-
ren, Dryden, Dennis.
Kneeling: Haldeman.
Wnght.
Sitting: Salterio. Howell.

BASKETBALL
Standing: Salterio, Meade,
Sutherland. Eskildsen, John-
son, Novey, Halloway, Specht.
Kneeling: Sherlock.
Sitting: Crandall.


THE ZONIAN







GAMES
T is nowhere recorded that Humpty-Dumpty was ever an athlete. It is true
that he set a world's record for the last half of the high-jump, but, since
his first attempt at the record was so completely successful, it is to be inferred
that he never trained. And without training there can be no athlete.
Comparison, therefore, between Humpty and the interscholastic soccer, bas-
ketball, and volleyball teams, is unfair. Humpty fell, and so did they. Beyond
that we cannot go, for the school teams that failed to keep their balance on the
competitive wall tried and tried nobly. They gave their conscientious best. They
won whatever victories there are in defeat.

SOCCER
Something happened in soccer, something that athletes refer to as bad
breaks of the game. Paper comparison of the two Canal Zone teams admittedly
revealed an advantage for Balboa. With such players as Captain James Salterio,
Moises de la Pefia, Armin Eldermire, Bruce Onderdonk, Jerry Durfee, Louis
Lipzineki, and George Walker, whose knowledge of the game and skill was of
an unusually high order, Balboa perhaps might have won. Fate ruled otherwise.
Not Fate exactly: tribute must be paid to the Cristobal players for their deter-
mined spirit and the indomitability with which they threw their full power into
the game at crucial moments.
The scores: Cristobal, 2-1; Balboa, 3-2; Cristobal, 3-2 Balboa, 3-0; Cris-
tobal, 4-2.

]A.K ETHItAIL
Both offensively and defensively Cristobal had the better basketball team.
Under the able direction of Coach Zierten, the Balboa five fought valiantly to
overcome their rivals, but fruitlessly. There are those who say that not until
Charley Pescod and Mandy Marchosky are graduated will the sunshine of
basketball victory flood our patio again.
Among those who roamed successfully in forward territory with one eye
on the goal were George Novey and Juan Eskildsen. Center position was cap-
ably played by Edward Wood. Defensive strength was built around James
Salterio's speed, Stan Specht's sure-footedness, and Inky Halloway's deter-
mination.
The scores (incomplete): Cristobal, 28-24; Cristobal. 32-22; Cristobal, 37-22.

VOLLEYBALL,
Julie Asparren, captain of many teams and star of several, directed the
destinies of Balboa in girls' volleyball under the guidance of Coach Hanna.
The girls and the school as well were confident, perhaps over-confident, of
victory. When the last game of the last series had been entered on the records,
ii was discovered that a smoothly cooperative Cristobal team had defeated
Balboa's individually outstanding players. The finest playing for Balboa was
done by Captain Jt;lie Asparren, Edna Fluharty, Gladys Salterio, and Margue-
rite Dryden.
The scores: First series: Cristobal, 21-15, 21-19; Balboa, 21- 9
Second : Cristobal, 21-19, 21-16; Balboa, 21-10
Third : Cristobal, 24-22, 22-20: Balboa, 21-14
Fourth : Cristobal, 21-17, 21-20: Balboa, 21-14
Fifth : Balboa, 21-14; Cristobal, 21-18


THE ZONIAN
77







S AMBITION
ST HE freshman boys in Room 27 had only
/ one ambition in all the world. When
i' it was attained, they would consider themselves
conquerors. And they were right to consider
S) ( j themselves heroes should they succeed, for it was
an almost impossible task they had set for them-
S-selves. Many had tried only to fall back into
Oblivion. But the world had hopes for these boys,
i /for in their faces was the light of grim determin-
I action and the desire for achievement.
i/ Question: What was the ambition?
Answer: The scholarship cup.
Question: How near did they come to achieving it?
Answer: They were at the bottom of the list every six weeks!


ALIBI?
T y HE Depression hit us" was the wall of
Jt the freshman boys. Due to the fact
that their parents were getting furloughs and
fifteen per cent cuts in salaries, the freshmen
claimed that they absolutely could not get their
dues paid.
"Why, do you know that we even had to
pay our dues on the instalment plan, and that
sometimes a penny was all we could afford
to give?"


"p~4y .w Dvc2

*1J_

(((7 t-


A very sad story it was and cur sympathies were with them until we be-
gan to think it over and realized that even the class that came first in paying
dues must have suffered from Old Man Depression's blows also.
We leave it up to posterity. Was the alibi a good one?


STElEDS


THE ZONIAN
78


,,, J :. //


( ) )
_Ct), ^


C LEAR the tracks for the largest, most
thrilling race of Balboa High School --
the Junior Derby. All trainers and entries re-
port to stables. Strike up the band! The con-
testants are passing in review. Choose the win-
ner. Place your bets. They're lining up! They're
off! Trainers frantically signal their steeds.
"Roll those dice!"
"Wonder if they're loaded? Dombrowsky
made them....."


The crowd is going wild with excitement. Two paces more to go! The senior
entry wins! Coonie and Tillie step to the front to receive their prize horse, AND
the loaded dice!








CATCH THIS MAN


MAKING AN ER- .4
ROR? IT CAN'T
BE DONE! HE
HAS JUST COM-
PL ET ED THE
COURSE OF LES-
SONS OF THE
FRESHMAN
SCHOOL OF BASE
BALL. .......
READ WHAT HE .
SAYS: .--



I BEFORE A F'TE'l,
"I was a one-sport man. The only outdoor fun I could enjoy was swimming.
I was lonely and longed to engage in all the sports my playmates engaged in,
especially baseball. I was at my wits' end when I read the inspiring advertise-
ment of the Freshman Baseball School. I mailed the coupon at once and was as
eager as a child at Christmas when I received my first lesson. Now I am popular
on the baseball field and have friends wherever I go. Many thanks to the Fresh-
man Baseball School and its helpful lessons." H. J. Zierten.




5E'NIORS, You CAN DO As WTVEL,
SENIORS OF BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL, no longer need you envy people
who are always the center of attraction on the baseball field. You can learn
NOW, at home, in TEN EASY LESSONS. Specialize in your favorite position -
pitcher, batter, fielder right in your own back yard, and become an ACCOM-
PLISHED BALL-PLAYER. These simple lessons will lift you right off the
bench and onto the field.

Two other classes, reputedly less intelligent than you, have learned from our
experts. The freshman Baseball School's simplified instructions, presented by
experts who have PROVED THEMSELVES on the field, show you just how to
do it. NO POSSIBILITY OF ERROR.

MIAIL 'I'IIIIM COI'O N:
Every lesson is a fascinating game. You
can actually see yourself progress. There is no Freshman Baseball School:
teacher to frown at you and no wearying prac- Without obligation to me plena.
twice to plague you. send your first less n for trial.
Signed................. ...
SEND IN YOUR COUPON AT ONCE!
Address ........ ...........


THE ZONIAN
79


















































THE ZONIAN
80


o : PR ORMPTERS
S.: TELL-a-but-oh dear, what is the
"-r next line?"

Si.'. "Psst! Oh, my aunt from Cal-."
( I I "0 yeah! Oh, my aunt from California is
S- going to a-er-hmm."

S' The one-act play "My Aunt from Califor-
nia" deserves special commendation for the ex-
S., ," cellent prompting of Virginia Foster and Bobbie
SMorgan. They knew their lines. They should
have; they had the book. The costuming was excellent and the actors couldn't
have looked nicer. The scenery was the finest the Y. W. possessed.
It was the most outstanding play of the year outstanding for lack of
memory displayed by the cast.

HUDDLE 7
NE minute to play! The sophomores r ,
went into a huddle.
"Hey, Jack, you going' to the dance tonight?"'. 7
"What a swell show at the clubhouse last \ /
night!"
"Bob, did you get that second problem in 7.
algebra?"
Such were the various remarks the sopho-
mores were probably voicing during huddles in
the football game to which they had challenged the seniors. The senior team
say that approximately ten minutes elapsed before each sophomore play. It
might as well have been sixty. The seniors won, 48 to 0.

GRAB
LD Man Depression spoke to the senior
,. class in terms of caps and gowns. At
: I / first little attention was given him, and the boys
S k ) tried gravely to decide between tuxedos and
I flannels as the most appropriate graduation cos-
Stume, while the girls struggled among nets,
voiles, organdies. Class meetings were a riot
of costume design.
;. But who were the seniors to talk back to so
notorious a character as Old Man Depression? Caps and gowns were finally
ordered, measurements taken, money paid to Clarke, and new suits and evening
gowns surreptitiously designed to be concealed under the Economy Plan.

SOPHOMORES ONLY
N O sophomore school dances!" was the cry.
Seniors began it; juniors augmented it; freshmen nodded elfin heads.
But there was a sophomore dance for sophomores only. Seniors and
juniors said a good time was had by all.








SHUN G ER
[ -'T HE sun was shining, the birds were sing-
) ing, and the day was not too hot. Soft
K music caressed the breeze, couples were danc-
Sing, and, in general, everybody seemed happy;
S \" '. even the lovely tenor voice of Moi de la Pefia
could be heard. Everything was perfect, but....
The two forlorn-looking dogs, Trixie (Roy
SWalston's) and her pal, pictured here, have the
same criticism of the affair to offer that every-
one there had the mere fact that there wasn't enough food!
We write of the senior luncheon.


VANISHING A. M :EIICANS
T HE bug of knowledge bit the P. G.'s sev-
erely around the first of September, for
the class that enrolled was the largest Balboa
High School had ever had. Even officers were
elected and class meetings held, a thing never
before heard of in a P. G. class. But evidently the
effects of the bug wore off in a very short time.
for one by one they dropped out of our sight and
only a few stayed the year.
We!l, it did seem too perfect to be true.


K.?


IMPVetChlmen


V/
,A (


- I


office, the class has g
to have been settled.


r ? IIMP1ACIIENT
D OWN with the president! Either the
Si president or his term of office must
/ 1( expire! Such were a few of the angered cries
/(il of the rebellious sophomore class. According to
the mutinous group, the president is a ladies'
man and was elected by the overwhelming ma-
jority of females in the class of '35. Well, ap-
parently the girls refused to let their emotions
be swayed, for the gigolo president is still in
given a very excellent dance, and matters in general seem


CATASTIO)PHE
T HE race was on! The contestants in the Red Cross drive were all the home
rooms in school. Which would win and which would lose? Room 52
was at first ahead while Room 27 brought up the rear. No one was very much
surprised for these two were in the position where it had been anticipated they
would be. But wait the seniors began shooting ahead to the finish and to the
surprise of everyone, Rooms 37 and 38 came last. These sophomore rooms must
have felt they needed a rest from money matters.


THE ZONIAN
81


'^




















































THE ZONIAN
82


LUPIN
Here lies the corpse of quite a crook.
We must deplore the name he took.
His life we fear was sad misused
And all his assets much abused -
eCr L Arsine Lupin.
.H e first appeared the second term,
S And in each student put the germ
1o s- I To steal whatever struck his sight
i '" And on the spot just boldly write -
.. Arsene Lupin.

His first offense he stole the cup
The senior boys had just put up.
Great glee was ours, much fun and laughter,
To see the students all chase after -
Arsene Lupin.

It earns a laugh to steal a cup;
But laughter's pain too long kept up.
Thanks to the godsl With sides sore pressed
The harried students slew the pest -
Arsnne Lupin.


PICNIC
/A LCHEMISTS in the past strove long and
laboriously to change basic metals in-
to gold. The juniors, anno domini 1933, turned r(
the trick without any effort at all, apparently. .-
Everything was planned announcements '
made, money paid, situation selected, every- '
thing done in preparation. 'i
Were the juniors afraid of exposing their
tender skins to the sunny atmosphere of the'
open, or uneasy about bugs or sharks? Or may- i \ -
be they just didn't like the idea of roughing it?
Anyway, the fact remains that the junior picnic did turn into a party.


BOAST
"f E who laughs last, laughs best." The old proverb proved itself correct
in every way in the case of the juniors around the middle of the year.
Having come out high in almost every sport in interclass competition, their heads
expanded slightly. They did make boast of topping soccer honors as well. But
vanity has its own reward. The other classes matched brains and plotted secret-
ly to teach the juniors a lesson.
When results were averaged, where were the juniors? Only at the bottom!






SENIOR NV'ILL

THE senior class of 1933, being in the;r right minds and about to pass from
high school life into the open world, do hereby will and bequeath the
following articles and fancies to the persons mentioned, in the hope that they
will forever treasure them.
Stinky Davis wills his Packard and chauffeur to Hugh White.
Diana M arine leaves her ability to pose in pollera dress to Esther Maduro.
To Dick Stoudnor, Jack Poole bequeaths his immunity from the fairer sex.
Jeanette Alexander wholeheartedly gives her ninety-three pounds to Joyce
Rance.
Frances Friday bequeaths her popularity to Shirley Gerchow.
Leila Pace gives her talent in drawing to Chuck Vincent and requests that
he use it in decorating the school desks and walls.
To Annie Pearre, Lillia Monsanto grudgingly bequeaths Bob Dwelle and
asks her to take good care of him.
Sara Ferguson wills her task of furnishing paper to forgetful students in the
library to Mary Ruth Dunham.
Bill Crandall leaves his pessimistic nature to Jimmy Wright, and hopes he
will have just as much fun with it.
John Calhoun bequeaths his ability to recreate butlers in school plays to
Bob Dwelle.
To Hilda Quintero, Irma Fayard leaves her fair head.
George Yates leaves his excellent grades to Mr. Joy's freshman boys.
Thomas Alley and Eleanor Hammond bequeath their nominations of each
other in senior meetings to Dick Stoudnor and Thelma Seeley.
To Renaud Leon, Victor Leon wills the presidency of the Album Club.
Eloy Alfaro leaves his ability to be everywhere, but unheard, to John Ridge.
To Josephine Reiber, Wilma Lawson wills her Fiji Island hairdress.
Robert French wills his nonchalance to Culbert Shedlock.
Adel Rajscok, Ruth Walston, and Margaret Dunham jointly leave their
"A's" in shorthand to some future struggle in that same subject.
Francis Sherlock bequeaths to Bob Hull his note-reading habit in seventh-
period study hall.
Ruth Rader leaves her school-skipping-with-excuse ability to Helen Gawry.
To Bob Daniels, David Walsh leaves his legal air.
Helen Blackman bequeaths her senior picture with that Lillian Gish naivete
to Mildred Garlow.
James Westendorff wills his stature and blondness to Billy Jones.
Charles Malsbury leaves his car to Charles MacMurray.
To Laura Morgan, Bobbie Morgan bequeaths her broad "A" accent.
Buddy Phillips wills his drums and his orchestra to Jimmy Malone in order
to enable him to compete against Cab Calloway and Vincent Lopez.
Bruce Onderdonk leaves his ability to tell the senior class what to do and
get away with it to the next president.


THE ZONIAN
83






















































THE ZONIAN
84


Thirza Robinson wills her moonlight rides to Taboga on the "Alpha" to
Marjorie Hallett.
Margaret Mahin bequeaths her ability to double for her sister to B. H. S.'s
next twins.
To Rita Strauss, Marion Dugan leaves her enviable pair of dimples.
Leslie Clarke bequeaths his hard-hearted ability to draw money from the
pockets of seniors to Louis Everson and hopes the next senior class will have as
many free dances.
Bill Daniels leaves his ability to act stupid in school plays to Billy Sheehan.
To Betty Jones, Dorothy Dennis leaves her famous Mr. Spalding-wants-you-
in-the-office greeting.
Stan Specht leaves his batting ability to Jerry Durfee.
Bob Crandall, Harry Allen, and Moi de la Pefia bequeath their great interest
in underclass girls to Dean Eppley, Sam Burks, and Richard Potter.
To Elaine Bohan, Edward Gormely leaves his ability to refrain at all times
from cracking a smile.
Jimmy Olive wills his original way of signing photographs to Joe Joyner.
Gay Piercy and Inky Halloway bequeath their talent for the Follies to Dot
Messer and Milly Walters.
June Tilley donates to Betty Bohan a card of safety pins to prevent blouse-
and-skirt divorce in certain public places.
To Alberta LeBrun, Gladys Booth leaves her ability to sell cakes to the
Ancon Inn.
Charlotte Wahl bequeaths her privilege of having the family name on the
front page of the newspapers to Billie Westman.
Anne Ohlson and Mary Margaret McCormack will their school-day friend-
ship to Jean Steele and Dot Griffin.
Charles Patterson leaves his ability to circumnavigate the floor in a tag
dance without being seen to Joe Shirley.
To Narcissa Reeder, Estrella de la Pefia bequeaths her Southern drawl.
Harriett Burks wills her long ride home in the wee small hours of the morn-
ing to Virginia De Young.
Norma Kull leaves her ability to learn to speak the English language in
such a short time to Mary Kierulff.
To Wanda Doyle, Betty Harris bequeaths her meekness and demureness.
Harriett Kalar leaves her inability to be seen on account of her smallness
of stature to Lillian Stockwell.
To Marie Gallivan, Dorothy Watson wills her joviality.
Jimmy Salterio bequeaths his ability to take it as well as to dish it out to
James Spalding.
Charles Arroyo leaves his dignified expression to Robert Payne.
To Pete Johnson, Pembroke Banton bequeaths his ability to make seniors
sell play tickets.
Pablo Pinel, Sam Simons, Armin Eldermire, and Bernard Lamb leave their
regards to the class of '36.








Alice Cook leaves her privilege of being the only girl who drives her own car
to and from school to Reba Colberg.
Anna Mahin and Charlotte Paul bequeath their motorcycle rides to any other
girl who has a strong heart.
Armenia Asparren leaves unto Julie Asparren the last of the family name
for three successive years.
To David Percy, Harry Anderson wills his unfortunate ability to make sar-
castic remarks at the wrong time.
Doris Sherlock wills her love of Fort Amador to Dorothy Smith.
Marie Herring leaves her good luck in just making senior grade by taking
six subjects to George Herring.
Ethel Eisenmann bequeaths her ability to be on excellent terms with Mr.
Hodges to Kathryn Laurie.
To Teresa Michaelsen, Antoinette Baker wills her romantic Taboga house.
William Conley leaves his shyness to Billy French.
John Muller bequeaths his stage-hand ability to Chris Skeie.
To Betty McKee, Etta Fay Hall leaves her ability to look intelligent with
the aid of glasses.
Agnes Conner leaves her sweet shy smile to Anna Mae Quinn.
To John Bruland, Donald Bruce wills his unique ability to go native.
Ned Neville bequeaths his privilege of playing in Twilight League games on
teams other than the school team to Riggs Forrest.
Tita Patifio, Elisa Fibrega, and Olga Ycaza will their illegal third-period
senior assembly conversations to any other three talkative persons who get such
an advantageous spot.
To Marny Dryden, Leslie Young bequeaths her sun tan.
Electra Morales bequeaths her jet-black tresses to Helen Van Clief.
Bernice Gregg leaves that unfortunate situation of having a sister in high
school to keep a critical eye on one's actions to Elsie and Thelma Dowell.
Kenny Marcy, Roy Perkins, George Novey, and Allan Cole leave their covet-
ed assembly seats to future seniors.
Roscoe Cleveland and Marian Hutchinson will their early newspaper ambi-
ions in Pedro Miguel to Martin Bullock and Sara Robertson.
Raymond Piper bequeaths his ability to haunt delinquent Zonian editors
to the next editor of the year book.
Emma Van Clief wills her vast collection of senior pictures to Edith Rowe.
Dorothy Brown and Marion Burns bequeath their dalliance to Lois de
la Mater.
Freddie Mead in all due modesty leaves that certain something of his to
Diny Judson.
Edna Fluharty leaves her friendly nature to Jessie Young.
William Dibble bequeaths his unfortunate rebukes, for chewing gum when
he is only chewing his tongue, to Frank McGahhey.
Eleanor Daly wills her membership in the Study Hall Unit to Marcarec
Bradley.


THE ZONIAN
85


























BOOK VI
SHOE




I If


A
n


II1


__


~l~l~=i~
~sc-I~Ls


e,~d;g


A











INTER CLASS

ATHLETICS


VARSITY stars win the
S headlines. Varsity- "
games are anticipated and re- Salterio
ported in the newspapers. But the interclass at!i-
letic program is a surer reflection of the athletic
activities of the students of the high school. Be-
cause the class teams have been ; tudent-orani:-
ed and student-trained, because the number of


.s.,


students engaged has been so large, and hecaii'e i R
the competitive spirit aroused b- the -ame_ has Onderdonk
been so intense, The Zonian rives you: TI.e Arroo o
athletes of Balboa High Schoo'!

Pictured above are the winning captains. To Julie Asparrcn
goes the unique honor of having captained all four winning
teams for the junior girls. For the seniors, Onderdonk has guid-
ed the swimmers, Arroyo has been leader of the racqueteers.
James Salterio has inspired the soccer players, and Halloway Asparren
has kept track spikes biting into the cinders. The lone fresh- Halloway
man, Hammond, surprised the other classes by presenting a base- Hammond
ball team that was good enough to defeat all rivals.
As a result of a point-system of values, in force for the first time this year,
the classes have been ranked in collective as well as individual sports. For first
place, the award has been five points; for second, three; for third, two; and for
fourth, one. On this computation, the class rankings at the time of goinr to press
were as follows:


THE ZONIAN

88


BOYS
Seniors 21
Track, 5
Soccer, 5
Baseball 2
Tennis. 4 (tie)
Swimming, 5
Sophomores 12L
Track, 1I (tie)
Soccer, 3
Baseball. 2
Tennis, 4
Swimming. 2
Juniors 11
Track, 3
Soccer. 2
Baseball. 2
Tennis, 14 (tie)
Swimming, 3
Freshmen 10
Track, li (tie)
Soccer 1
Baseball, 5
Tennis l. (tie)
Swimming. 1


GIRLS
Juniors 20
Volleyball, 5
Basketball. 5
Baseball, 5
Swimming, 5

Sophomores 10
Volleyball. 3
Basketball. 3
Baseball 1
Swimming. 3

Freshmen 8
Volleyball, 2
Basketball, 1
Baseball 3
Swimming. 2

Seniors 6
Volleyball, 1
Hl-IkTbAll 2
lii. -l t a 2
S- immrrlr. I


Remaining to be played when The Zonian went to press were boys' basket-
ball and girls' tennis and track. These schedules, however, could not displace
the leaders.









F OR many a student .
the most colorful
portion of the school year has
been its music. Some have
Been privileged to take part;
others have been content
merely to listen and to enjoy.
But everyone ha- had his
school days brightened by the
melody-makers.

Mr. Joy Mrs. Baker

AMONG the musical organizations of the high school the orchestra must
rank high. From the hesitant organization of several years ago it has
grown, under the able leadership of Mrs. Baker and Mr. Joy, into a confident
group of twenty-three pieces.
When overtures were needed for the senior and junior plays, the orchestra
responded well. The last lingering echoes of high-school days for the seniors
will be melody from the orchestra at Commencement.
The organization numbers among its members: string Fred Hendrickson,
William Daniels. Harry Allen, Rosario Shelton, Ruth Brooks, Mary Hyde, Rosa-
rio Spinelli, Wilfred Toepser, Jimmy Johnson, Ruth Wright, Charles Vincent,
Bob Dwelle, Charles Daniels; wind Jack Poole, Robert Souder, Albert Bald-
win, Stanley Fidanque, James Prendergast, Raymond Lloyd: concussion Dick
Stoudncr, Maurice Brown; piano Annie Pearre.

IANI)
WE remember the raucous bedlam of sound that issued from the house-
hold arts building early in the year and then we remember John
Calhoun, chesty and sure, strutting along Morgan Avenue at the head of his fel-
low bandsmen. That contrast symbolizes the progress made during the year by
this group of musicians under the direction of Mr. Joy. Theirs was the music
that enlivened athletic contests; theirs, too, in conjunction with the Cristoba!
band, the melody that floated over the playfield during the May Day games.

ELEMENTARY CGLEE CLUIB
M ORE and more people are realizing that the real joy in music come;
from participating in it rather than merely listening to it. On that
basis we can account for the growing popularity of the glee clubs.
To attain proper usage of voice, proper breath control, and clear enunciation
is the threefold purpose of this club. Not only do the members strive for per-
sonal improvement, but they also give pleasure to others by means of their songs.
Activities this year have included:
December Christmas program in the patio.
February Folk music of the British Isles in the assembly.
April Easter carols in the patio.
May Brahms centennial program in the assembly.
June Commencement program at the clubhouse.


THE ZONIAN
89









UNITS


THE ZONIAN
90


SE have been stopped in
the corridors a nd
asked for our passes, admonish-
ed in study-hall not to create
disturbances, requested to fill Davis
out questionnaires. We have wondered who
were behind these phases of student govern-
ment. During the year, Harry Allen, Bob Cran-
dall, and Roy Davis have been directors of the
Home Room Unit, the Study-Hall Unit. and thc
Club Service Unit respectively, and they have
instituted many new measures in student gov- Allen Crandall
ernment which, though at times annoying, were Rowe Cook
primarily designed for the good of the school.
The Home-Room Unit has been sponsored by Miss Wardlaw, and has had
as its aim the fostering of loyalty to one's home room. It has had control of
bulletin boards and school announcements and was also in charge of the Red
Cross drive and Visitors' Week. The Unit has endeavored to raise the scholar-
ship of the school by offering a silver cup each six-weeks to the scholastically
outstanding home-room.
The Study-Hall Unit, sponsored by Miss Robson, has had two main purposes,
to determine the most efficient methods of running study-halls, and to train
students so to conduct them.
The Club Service Unit, sponsored by Miss Syrcle, directed most of their
energies toward evolving a point system for extra curricular activities, to be
used during the coming school year.

CHARM CLUB
THE History of Music, Past and Present.
Books Which High-School Students Should Read.
Any selection from among the interesting topics which have been discussed
by the members of the Charm Club would reveal the purpose and activities of
the group. When you sought the punch-bowl at a party, when you hungered for
dainty refreshments, when you wished confidence and grace at dancing-class,
the Charm Club members served you.
And who better than Miss Wardlaw to sponsor such a group?

ALBUNIETTES
I 5 HE Albumettes Mr. G. R. Lee, sponsor are a group of girls who are
interested in the mysteries of photography. They learn the principles of
taking and developing pictures.
Mr. Lee bought a special set of photographic oil paints, and two of the most
ambitious girls, Lucille Cooke and Jessie Young, tried their hand at painting and
tinting pictures with considerable success, judging from the crowds about the
display case where their work was on exhibition.








ELCRtYS


S ISTORY is not dead; it is vibrantly alive. Who has not
Sgloried in the supreme idealism of the Revolution, ad-
Smired the courage of the pioneer who chopped his home from
":- the hostile forest and sympathized with the miseries of his pri-
i J l mitive existence, or thrilled at the roaring westward trek of a
nation? To perpetuate the glory of this great nation of ours in
Walsh the minds of the students of the high school has been the pur-
pose of the Elerys, sponsored by Miss Syrcle and led by David Walsh.
This group early in the year presented a short historical play, "The Blue
Gate," to portray the story of the Mennonites of Pennsylvania. On Armistice
Day, it presented a program before the school in the course of which various
members spoke on the significance of the day. On Navy Day, it put the picture
of Theodore Roosevelt on display, draped with the flag.

The work of this club has tended to make the study of history more ab-
sorbing.



SCIENCE CI,1'1i

T HE desire to tinker with chemical and physical apparatus
and to conduct simple experiments that illustrate facts
of nature is peculiar to human beings of all ages, but particular-
ly to those of high school age. The students of Balboa High
School, through the medium of the Science Club, sponsored by
Mr. G. O. Lee and led by Jack Kromer as president, have been Kromer
able to give expression to their desire to experiment scientifically. This club is
open to anyone interested in matters pertaining to science.
Interesting meetings have been the rule. Reports have been presented on
matters of current scientific interest and their practical significance explained.
Always, however, the most fascinating and engaging feature of the meetings have
been the experiments conducted by various members before the club.



ASTRONOM.Y CI.i

ROPICAL nights are noted for their beauty. The heavens
are 'rirchr. But the stars, that have often lifted the poets
to heights of ecstasy, are infinitely more interesting when one
has a knowledge of stellar phenomena. So, when an observatory
was constructed by the Canal Zone, a group of students, hoping
to acquire knowledge of the heavens, gathered under the leader-
Jacques ship of Mr. G. O. Lee and Allan Jacques.
They met weekly during the dry season at Miraflores and, with Mr. Bullock
close by to offer them expert advice, gazed into the telescope, seeking the secrets
of the universe.


THE ZONIAN
91








PRO AND CON


THE ZONIAN
92


S T is human nature to be argumentative. Certain students
of the high school may be said, therefore, to be follow-
ing human nature when they try each other's disputatious met-
tie in Pro and Con, advised by Mr. Hodges and headed by
Moises de la Pefia.
De la PeFia Perhaps the year's outstanding achievement for the club
was the debate over the question of inter-Allied war debts, presented to an ap-
preciative audience at the clubhouse shortly after mid-term. William Burdge
and Bruce Onderdonk maintained that the debts should be cancelled, while Roy
Davis, Jr. and David Walsh took the opposite view. The negative won the deci-
sion after a tense verbal battle.
Other debates have been held in the assembly and at club meetings, among
them an interclass series to determine the school championship. The seniors,
Onderdonk, De la Pefia, and Walsh, defeated the sophomores, Jacques, De Cas-
tro, and Delvalle. The freshmen, Malone, Friday, and DeVore, defeated the
Juniors, Asparren, Gregg, and Morales. When the Zonian went to press the
school champions had not been selected from the two remaining contesting teams.
-

BIOLOGY CLUI .

B OYS, and even girls, find it intriguing to take bugs and
frogs apart and see what makes them run. The Biology
Club has done a great deal toward giving expression to this de- '"
sire to study living things.
Few indeed are those in the school who have not stepped
into the laboratory of Mr. G. O. Lee, who sponsors the club, to Reiber
gaze at the various forms of animal life there, collected in the main by the mem-
bers of this organization.
They have held meetings one evening each month in the school building.
Reports have been presented relative to different aspects of biology. Individual
experiments have been demonstrated.
Believing that wild life may best be studied in its natural surroundings, the
members of the club have roamed far afield, the most interesting of their expedi-
tions being the annual trip up the Coels River.

LA lRATAI-'!1NIDAD
SUE quieren hacer hoy?"
"Let's go over ...."
"Digame en espaiiol," says Miss Frost to the somewhat
reluctant member of La Fraternidad.
This club is a group of sophomore students who wish to
gain a more intimate knowledge of Spanish than can be obtain-
ed in the class-room. They wish to be able to read, write, and
speak the tongue fluently. To achieve this purpose they have
Wainio attended many lectures at the Y. W. C. A. They also visited the
Normal School in Panama, during National Week, and there learned much about
the industries and products of Panama.
The officers of this club are John Wainio, president, Betty Golden, vice-
president, Dorothy Griffin, secretary-treasurer, and Miss Frost, sponsor.




















I


ZONIAN STAFF
AND now we add another to the long list of annuals created by Balboa
High School students in the past. We have attempted in this volume to
reflect the activities of the school from patio to bell-tower. If we have omitted
some phases of our daily round within and without the walls of the old building,
it has been due to oversight. We beg your indulgence.
We cannot consider this volume complete until we have acknowledged our
indebtedness to those who have so willingly cooperated with us in the making
of our book. More than to anyone else we are indebted to our adviser, Mr. Col-
*inge, without whose patience and assistance this book could never have come
into being. We are indebted also to Virginia Richmond for many drawings; to
the art students, Chichi Aloy, Norma Kull, Harriet Kalar, and Charles Patter-
son, for introductory designs; to Miss Gardner for advice in art; to the Album
Club for pictures reproduced on these pages; to Harry Allen and John Calhoun
for added material; and to the business staff, Charlotte Wahl, John Bruland,
Eugene Saphir, Peggy Perry, Lucille Cook, Jean Steele, Roscoe Cleveland,
Teresa Michaelsen, Lillian Wright, Gladys Salterio and Annie Pearre, who have,
by working throughout the year with the finances, made possible the publishing
of this year's annual.
We submit to you: The Zonian, 1933. May we hope you will be pleased
with our efforts?
Raymond Piper, Editor
Wilma Lawson
Etta Fay Hall
Roy Davis
Mary Margaret McCormack
Jeanette Alexandei
Sara Ferguson
Electra Morales
Leila Pace
George Yates


THE ZONIAN
93







L POST
GRADUATES

J sheep, the post-gradu-
-I ates came back again, giving the
rest of the school a big surprise.
Bradney The surprise was not so much
Sthe fact of the return as the extent of it.
There were two schools of thought as to the
reason for such an unusually large number of
graduate students returning to the school. The
first group followed present-day practice and
SB laid the cause of their return at the feet of the
omnipresent depression. The other group refut-
Boyd Raymond
Dombrowsky Kunkel ed this idea and attributed the return solely to
love of learning. Throughout the discussion of the matter, the post-graduates
maintained a diplomatic attitude and refused to commit themselves either way.
Two points, however, were successfully established: that it was the largest
number of graduates that had ever returned, and that it was the first time in the
history of Balboa High School that the post-graduates had ever organized them-
selves as an individual class.
After making the important decision to enter the life of Balboa High School
as a separate and distinct class, the post-graduates speedily organized themselves
by calling a meeting and electing class officers. After the smoke had cleared
away, it was discovered that Mary Bradney had been elected president, Edward
Kunkel, vice-president, Alice Boyd, secretary, and David Raymond, treasurer.
Thus began the year.
At first the meetings were well attended, and many were the plans for mak-
ing the year a successful one. However, by the end of the first six-weeks the
novelty of the idea was beginning to wear off. By the end of the second six-
weeks the P. G.'s had begun to disappear. With the coming of the locks over-
haul many of the boys were given their chance to scale the first rung of the
ladder of success. Others openly voiced their preference for a life of ease and
comfort rather than one of mental industry.
The one and only social affair of the class was a theater party and dance at
the clubhouse and the school. After that, spirit died, to be revived again for a
brief moment when the P. G.'s appeared in the interclass athletic competitions
with a team.
THE Z ONIAN However, the high point in their career as a class came when the Twilight
94 Baseball League recognized them as bona fide, and two of their well-known mem-
bers, Jack Dombrowsky and Edward Kunkel, were allowed to play on the high
school team.
Scholastically, the class could point with pride to three more members,
Arthur Salterio, Harry Gaeb, and Sarah Reynolds, who graced the honor roll
with gratifying regularity. Others who might have formed a brain trust were
r prevented from publicly displaying their prowess by the fact that they were not
carrying full courses and were thus not eligible.
The post-graduate chance came and went. If they left no full record of
achievement behind them, it was the whim of Fate that it should be so. With
the coming of the junior college, Balboa High School may never shelter a class
of post-graduates under her shady porticos again.









The ladder In ruccesJ
12]


I ower oI.Ife
.- l(e
1uefPi_


THE ZONIAN


W. full


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LI.I L
E~n!Ir


























BOOK VII
ADVERTISING





















T HE Business Staff takes this opportunity to thank the merchants of
Panama, and the various organizations and interested individuals
of the Canal Zone, for making possible the publication of the 1933
Zonian. It hopes that the student body will reciprocate by supporting those who
have supported us:


Alexis Pereira
Aon Gco renhou se
Artistica Photo Studio
Auto Service Company
Buick Agencies
Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds
Coca Cola Bottling Company
Colombia Hotel
Colon Theatres
Daisy Lamb Hat Shop
D. L. Prather
Dr. Kellerman
Duran's Coffee Company
French Bazaar
Fuerza y Luz
International Association of Machinists
i. L. Maduro, Jr
Jimmie Deans
Lucky Strike
Marine Engineers' Local
Metal Trades Council


New Astor Hotel
Office Service Company
Pan-American Airways
Panama Pmerican Publishing Company
Pan-American Grace Airways
Panama Kodak. Ltd.
Pielroja Cigarette Company
Royal Bank of Canada
Scadron Optical Company
Standard Fruit Company
Star & Herald Company
Stevens Florist Shop
Sucesores de Carlos A. Cowes Company
Tivoli Hotel
Trott the Cleaner
United Fruit Company
Universal Export Corporation
W. A. Torbert
Walker Music Studio
Washington Hotel
Wholesale Tire and Supply Company
Wong Chang & Company


THE BUSINESS STAFF


Charlotte Wahl

John Bruland

Eugene SaAihir

Margaret Perry

Lucille Cook

Jean Steele

Roscoe Cleveland

Teresa Mlchaelsen

Lillian WSrght

Gladys Salter;o

























































THE ZONIAN
98


Kodak Panama Ltd.
Offers
A Complete Line
of

Kodak Products


KODAK PANAMA LTD.
111 Central Avenue
Panama City


UNITED FRUIT CO.

Steamship Service
GREAT WHITE FLEET
Weekly Sailing to:
New York New Orleans
also
Fortnightly Sailing
San Francisco & Los Angeles

Phones:
Cristobal, 2121 Colon, 20
Panama, 524


Save Two Days Out
of Three
TRAVEL VIA

Pan American Air-
ways System
22,000 miles of Airways in
Latin-America
Comfortable multi-motored
air-liners equipped with
two way radio.

Century Club Building,
PANAMA
Phone Pan. 2400
Administration Building,
CRISTOBAL
Phone Cri. 1882


S.: How do you manage to tell
the Mahin twins apart?
Halloway: I don't try!

Alley (in barber-shop): How long
must I wait for a shave?
Barber: About three years.

FRESHMEN DON'T WRITE LIKE
THIS!
The store will be conducted by
the son of Mr. Simpson who died last
winter on a new and improved plan.

The man was stabbed and it was
expected that he would die for some
time.

These verses were written by a
young man who has long since lain
in his grave for amusement.

We saw a man cleaning the street
with red whiskers. (Hooray for 3.2).