Zonian

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Title:
Zonian
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Publisher:
St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication:
St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093678:00023


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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THE ZONIAN

1930 -:




















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers


Libraries


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r llarhara o.\c 4
i tll Snie r Glass hCi'cates this 10ol1m11 to tl' Inmloirl) of 1i. Ii.n.
lor, on1 respe'ttL' an1ib lotich1 of li'er sclonolinmats.

(O)tolirr 15, 19. 12 1januar) IN, 19.l: ll.
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NATURE GROWN AUDIBLE, WITH CROONING VOICE


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THE SHOUTS OF BUCCANEERS, THE GLINT OF GOLD


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A TROPIC ISLE WHERE ROMANCE LINGERS


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FOR LAUGHTER, SONG, AND JOLLY PICNICKINGS


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TWIXT CARIB BLUE AND SOUTH SEAS GLAMOROUS, A JOINTURE


WHEN LEARNING'S VOICE IS HUSHED AND LAUGHTER'S BOLD


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AND THESE HEIGHTS, TOO, ARE NOT ATTAINED BY FLIGHT


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WHERE PALM TREES WHISPER SECRETS TO THE BREEZE


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GEORGE 0. LEE
Minnesota
Cornell College
B. S. Iowa State College
University of Minnesota
University of Chicago
Sciences



GLEN R. L .

A BXL Vleyan College
ir! and S' i'ti



MARION PRATER
Oklahoma
B. A., ULiti. r-it~ of Oklahoma
M. A., University of Wv,'rmwln
Mathsematics


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FACULTY


GRACE PETERSON WARNER
Colorado
A. B., Colorado Teachers' College
Household Arts ,


MYRTLE M1. VH EY
I'

A. B., Univ'es l \Washington



H. J. ZIERTON
Minnesota
B. S., Bradley Tech.
Mechanical Drawing

ELINOR D. ROBSON
Iowa
B. A., M A.. Iowa State University
Eiar!ishl (nd Spanish







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VERNA STEEN
Minnesota
Macalester College
Rasmussen Business College
Commercial Subjects


D. L. PETTIBONE
Wisconsin
Lacrosse School of Physical Education
Physical Instruction


4 H. G. SPALDING
S Vermont
p BA University of Vermont
' R A., Teachers' College. Columbia U.
Sf ~Principal ,
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IDA I). KSON


Teachers' Collegk, River Falls, Wisconsin
Q ,n. ,t Principal


HELEN CURRIER BAKER
Minnesota
A. B., Universi;y of Minnesota
Supervisor of Public School Miusi,


C. S. CARSON
.hir \\
A. B., I'l vi ,i 11 1 M tj. 1,_ i
A. M. Harvard University
Spanish


ROGER W. COLLINGE
Wiscons'n
A. B., L .'. ie ceni C I.lli:
English and Commercial Subjects


MILDRED M. DAVIS
Califolnia
A. B., Colorado State T'I.n -I I I' College
Cujii,'iii,.: ,, i Subjects


MARTHA L. EMMONS
Mansfield, Texas
A. B., Baylor University
A. M., University of Texas
History, Latin, and English



OLGA J. FROST
anal Z.--.
A. B.. Mount t. Vir,.' nr-rfi-tr .- Hu son
S nish and French


HENRY J. GRIESER
New York
Teachers' College, Columbia U.
Swiimming Instructor


LOUISE IIANNA
Kentucky
New Iaven School of Physical Training
Physical Education for Girls



C. B. HODGES
Texas
A. B., North Texas Su.,, Teachers' College
Columbia University
History



E. M. KRUMBACH
Missouri
A. B., University of Kansas
English



H. T. LIESEY
Nebraska
A. B., University of Neb:.aska
Morningside College, Iowa
Notre Dame Coaching School
Physical Training for Boys


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To Mrs. EMMA MAE KRUMBACH

te oute our gratitnbe for the sincere
interest that slie slhotue in the
*rnior (Tlass by birecting
tlhe seniorr 'laln.

GOYVZ^^- 4IA-JlLC-Am

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To Mr. GEORGE 0. LEE,

abtiscr anb fricnb of tl!e class of 19l30,
for I!is kinb care anb excll'iit muana-
armienit during all of our acti'itirs
throuilhoiut the near. go tlhe
tlhll s of etitry *~rnior.


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We pass swift hours in Learning's Halls


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AFTERWARD
By' Rita Driscoll

Strength to begin again when school is done,
Rising tomorrow refreshed and strong,
Braving whatever befalls, seeing it through,
Facing undaunted each day anew . .

Strength to begin again, that's all we ask!
If we should falter in some given task!
If we should stumble on the road we near,
Strength to begin again, that is our prayer.

Strength to begin again, in spite of tears
Faith to begin again...Hope's brigher years...
Strength to begin again, Life, this we ask;
And care not the cost, nor how trying the task:


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SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS
President ................ ............... Earl Solenberger
Vice President ......... .............. Somers Dick
Secretary ....... .. ..... ........... .. Elmer Orr
Treasurer .............- ................. Rae Newhard
Class Adviser ............ ............. Mr. George Lee
Class Colors ..... ................... Red and White
Class Flower ............ Red & White Roses
Class Motto ................ Dum Possum. Debeo
Mascot .................... ............. ..... Iguana







CLASS SONG

( To the tune of Sleepy Vallley "


Dear old Balboa Hi, we must say goodbye,
And we're grieving 'cause we have to leave you.
Dear old, good old, school, dear old Balboa Hi,
You've stood the test,
We know you are best,
We love you.
All our troubles, cares of the day,
In high school memories
Soon fade away.
Sunshine thru' your door,
Good times we've had galore,
Who could ask for more,
Than Balboa Hi School?







".... "


EARL SOLENBERGER
North Dakota
"Born for success he seemed,
Wilt grace to win, with heart to hold
With shl n-ing gifts that took all eyes."
Class Secretary '28
i'i Il '28
Band '23
Basketball '29 '30
Debating Club '30
Orchestra '30
Zonian Staff '30
Class President '30
Handball '30
SOMERS DICK
South Carolina
"Let knowledge grow from more to more."
Hawtho ne High. San Antonio, Texas '27
Tennis '29 '30
Baseball '30
Zonian Staff '30
Basketball '30
Class Vice-President '30
RAE NEWHARD
Canal Zone
'Sthe's all my fnccy painted hcr;
She's lovely, she's divine.'
Zonian Follies '27
Glee Club '27
Zonian Staff '28
BaSketball '27 '28 '29 '30
Baseball '27 '28 '29
Track '27 '28 '29
Volleyball '28 '29 '30
Bowling '28 '29 '30
Supper Club '29
Class Treasurer '27 '28 '29 '30
"Honor Bright" '30 ,
ELMER ORR
Canal Zone
Within the I mit of becoming mirl! /
I never spelct an hour's tal,,k withal." .
"A terrier man ai
Glee Club '27
Bowling '27 '28 '29
Band '28
"Lelawala" '28 -._
"Honor Bright" '30
Class Sec:'etary '30
Popularity Contest '30


ROBERT K. ADAMS
Canal Zone
"My heart is true as steel."
Gooding High School. Gi;,,din'- Idaho '27
Glee Club '29, '30
"All at Sea" '29








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NELLIE BRULAND

New Jersey
"My life is like a stroll upon the beach.

Bowling Team '27


ROBERT O. BULLOCK
Illinois
"The price of wisdom is above rubies."

Glee Club '27, '28
Orchestra '27, '28, '29, '30






JOHN STANLEY BUTLER, Jr.

Canal Zone
SI'rUie me as one woho loves his fellowo-men."





GEORGE L. CAIN
New Jersey
"I dare do a'l that may become a mnin;
Who dares do more is none."
Palmyra High School, Palmyra, N. J.
Glee Club '29


DOCIA CLISBEE

Canal Zone
"A friendship that like love is warm
A love like pii 'ladlilp. steady.'
Zonian Follies '27 Glee Club '27
Bowling '28. '29, '30
Supper Club '29, 30
Track '27, '28, '29
Class Secretary '27
Basketball '27, '28, '29, '30
Baseball '27, '28, '29, '30
Swininlinp '27, '28, '29
Volley Ball '27, '28, '29, '30,
Athletic Council '29, '30
Zonian Staff '30 Debating Club '3
Popularity Contest 30








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SAM BARDELSON, Jr.

Canal Zone

"He cometh unto you with a tale which holdeth
children from play and old men from
chimney corners."

Orchestra '27, '28, '29, '30
Band '28
"Honor Bright" '30
Debating Club '30



ROBERT P. BARDELSON

Canal Zone

"He knew what's wh at."

Glee Club '27
School Band '28
Orchestra '30
Debating Club '30
Play Staff '30


HELEN CECILIA BEJARANO

Canal Zone

"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind'"








JOYCE BELL

North Carolina

"So sweet, so soft, so hushed an air."

Bridgetown. North Carolina '26, '27, '28


GEORGE A. BRINGMAN

Wa'l hlll ii'ti. D. C.

'Great truths are portions of the soul of men
Great souls are portions of etcrnity."

Du Pont Jr. High, Du Pont, Washington

Lincoln High. Tacoma, Washington

Tennis '30


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JAMES E. COLE
Louisiana

"His life was gentle and the elements
So mixed in him that nature might stand up and
say to all the world 'This is a man'."
Jesuit High School, New Orleans, La. '27 '28 '29
"Honor Briiht" '30
President of Debating Club '30




KATHLEEN CONARD
New York

"I gaie the call-
I can no more."
Washington-Lee High School, Clarendon, Va.




RICHARD T. CONLEY
Florida

"None but himself can be his parallel."
Ga. Military Academy, College Park, Ga. '27, '28
Cristobal High School '29
Track '30
Football '30





ELIZABETH CUNNINGHAM
Georgia

"That indcjinab:e thing called charm has she."
Girls' Hi, Atlanta, Georgia, '27
Chattanooga Hi, Tennessee, '28
Cristobal High School, '29
Librarian '30




MADGE DE GRUMMOND
Canal Zone
"Henceforth thy pa llih wi lies
among the stars."
"Les Marroniers", Belg urn '28 '29
"Convent of Ursuline, Belgium '27
Debating Club '30
Basketball '30







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EVA DE LA PENA
Canal Zone
"Hers is gentle wit; it injures none."
Tennis '27 '28
Basketball '27 '28


JAMES DES LONDES
Indiana
"I never saw his like; there lives
No greater leader."
Soccer '27, '28, '29, '30
Basketball '27, '28, '29, '30
Bowling '27, '28, '29, '30
Baseball '28, '29, '30
Track '28, '29, '30
Handball '28, '29
Athletic Council '29, 30
"Honor Bright" '30


RITA WINIFRED DRISCOLL
Canal Zone
"But were it to my fancy given
To rate her charms, I'd call them heaven."
Track '27
School Band '28
Bowling '28 '30 Basketball '27 '28
Baseball '27 '28 '29 '30
Supper Club '27 '28 '29 '30
Play Staff '30 Glee Club '29
"All At Sea" '29
Debating Club '30


IDA ESLEECK
Virginia
"A nature sweet, a disposition pleasant."
Blair Junior Hi, Norfolk, Virginia '27
Glee Club '29 '30
Supper Club '28
"All At Sea" '29



BERNHARD EVERSON
Norway
"I love my fellow-creatures, I do all the good I
can."


Band '28
Glee Club '28
"Lelawala" '28
Class Secretary '29
Orchestra '29 '30
"Honor Bright" '30


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DOROTHY KLUMPP GERBER
Massachusetts

"For never anyihinio oan be amiss
When simpleness and dutii tender it."
Bowling '25 '26
Basketball '25 '26 '30
Baseball '26




DORIS HALLETT
Massachusetts
"Weaingi all that weight
Of learning lightly like a flower."
Supper Club '27 '28 '29 '30
Librarian '30
Zonian Staff '30




PAULINE HALLORAN
Canal Zone
"She is a woman, therefore may be woo'd
She is a woman, therefore may be won."
Swimming '27 '28
Supper Club '29 '30

ELIZABETH HEARNE
Canal Zone
"0, thou art fairer than the evening air
Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars."
"Zonian Follies" '27
Class Vice-President '27
Bowling '27
Student Council '27
Glee Club '27 '28
"Lelawala" '28
Supper Club '28
"Honor Bright" '30

WILLIAM HELE
Canal Zone
"Who to himself is law, no law doth need
Offends no law, and is a king indeed."
Baseball '28 '29 '30
Basketball '28 '29 '30
Soccer '28 '29 '30
Tennis '28 '29 '30
Track '28 '29
Swimming '28
Handball '29 '30
Football '30


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CAROL HERFURTH ? r
Washington, D. C.
"There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple."
McKinley High School.
Washington D. C. '29 '30
Supper Club '29 '30



THEODORE JACK HUMPHREY
Canal Zone
"Genius does what it must. talent does what it
can."
Central High, Bay City,
Michigan '29
Tennis '27 '28 '30
Swimming '27 '30
Debating '30


ROBERTA MACE JACQUES
Alabama
"No daintier flower or herb grows on group?'. "
Glee Club '27 '28
Henry B. Plant High School,
Supper Club '28
Florida '27
Zonian Follies '27




EDWIN JONES
Canal Zone
"Why should a man whose blood is warm within
Sit like his grandsire cut in alab aster?"




HAYDEN B. JONES
Pennsylvania
"I awolce one morning and found myself famous."
Soccer '27 '28 '29 '30
Basketball '27 '28 '29 '30
Baseball '28 '29 '30
Handball '28 '29 '30
Football '30













RALPH H. KIRKPATRICK
Canal Zone
"A true friend is forever a friend."
Glee Club '29
"All At Sea" '29
Zonian Staff '30
Play Staff '30






EDWARD LOWE
Panama
"I thank whatever gods may be
For my uinonq, i'rabic sou'."







CANDELARIA CHICHI LUTZ
Colombia
"A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance."
Supper Club '27 '28 '29
Tennis '27
Glee Club '28 '29
"Lelawala" '28
"All At Sea" '29


JAMES MACDONELL
Pennsylvania
"This is the short and long of it."
Lock Haven High School,
Lock Haven, Pa.
Track '29
Football '30
Basketball '30


VINCENT CHARLES MARCY
Washington, D. C.
S"A man that blushes is not quite a brute."

Band '28
Swimming '27 '28
Track '27
Basketball '28
"All At Sea" '29
Glee Club '29 '30


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LOUISE MARTIN --
Texas
"Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her
paths are peace."
Glee Club '27
Zonian Follies '27
Swimming '27 '28
Indoor Baseball '27 '28 '29 '30
Track '27 '28
Volleyball '27 '28 '29 '30
Tennis '27 '28 '29 '30
Basketball '28 '29 30




ROGER MATTER
Canal Zone
"And what he greatly thought ne nobly dared"




EMLEY B. MEAD
New Jersey
"Kind hearts are more than coroners." .
Glee Club '29
"All At Sea" '29
Girls Reserves '27 '28 '29 '30
Shorthand and Typewriting ) '
Contests '29
Zonian Staff '30



JEANE MORRILLA MEEHAN
New York
"So sweet was her companionshlzp I
She could not be alone." J
Zonian Staff '30 ..
Supper Club '30 .
Libra: ian '30


HARRY MITTEN
Canal Zone
"Stately and tall he mores in the hall
The chicf of a thousand for yp;ace."
"All at Sea" '29
Glee Club '29 '30
Soccer '30
Basketball '30
Baseball '30
Football '30
Play Staff '30







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ELLIOTT MONACO
W.-shington. D C.
*lThe noblest miund the best contentment has '
Pres.den '27 "28 '29
Zonian Staff '28 '29 '30
Students Council '27
Student Counil '27
Debating Club '30



JACK MORRISON
New York
"He is coinplete in feature, and in mind,
With all good grace to grace a gentleman."
Danville H. S., Danville, Va. '26
Cristobal High School '27
Swimming '29 '30
Baseball '29 '30






ELEANOR K PARKER
S* Canal Zone
"Joy rises in me like a summer's morn."






WILLARD ELMER PERCY
New York
"He oave with a zest and he gave his best;
Give him the best to come."
Glee Club '26 '27
Zonian Staff '30


CARMEN ANNA PIMENTO
Canal Zone
"Many daughters have done rir'In ,l tl, but thou
excellent them all."
Orchestra '29 '30







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MARY POOLE
Canal Zone .
"I havc no other than a woman's reason ."
Class President '28
Indoor Baseball '29
Volleyball '29
Bowling '29
Track '29
"Honor Bright" '30
Zonian Staff '30
Dedating Club Vice President '30
Popularity Contest '30


IDA MAE POSEY
Oklahoma
"The light of love, the purity of grace,
The mind. the music ',i h' i from her face."
Lawton High School, Lawton, Okla., '27 '28 '29
"All At Sea" '29
Glee Club '28 '29





KEMPER PRICE

New Mexico
"No moan can produce q crat things who is not
thoroughly sincere in dealing with himself."
"Honor Biilc!t' '30
Glee Club '30






ELIZABETH RAYMOND
New York
"She smiled and the shadorwis departed."
Cristobal High School '27 '28 '29





ELSA LOUISE REIMANN

Canal Zone ,
"Those true eyes
Too pure and too honest tn aught to disguise
The sweet soul shining through their "
Glee Club '27 '28 '30
Zonian Follies '27
Supper Club '27
"Lelawala" '28
"Honor Bright" '30







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DOROTHY ROSSON
Texas
"Her loveliness I never knew
Until she smiled on me."
Palo Alto Union High '27
Napa Union High School '27-'30





ENA LOUISE SIMONS
Canal Zone
"Howe'er it be, it seems to me
'Tis only noble to be good."
Supper Club '27 '28 '29 '30
Glee Club '28




CECILIA ARIAS-SMITH
Canal Zone
"Of surpassing beauty and in the bloom of youth."
Zonian Follies '27
Tennis '28 '29 '30
Swimming '29
Baseball '27 '28 '29
Basketball '28 '29
Supper Club '27 '28 '29


CLARITA ARIAS-SMITH
Canal Zone
"A sweet, attractive kind of grace
A full assurance given by looks."
Zonian Follies '27
Tennis '27 '28 '29 '30
Supper Club '27 '28 '29
Baseball '27 '28 '29
Basketball '28 '29
Swimming '28



EDWARD SMITH
Illinois
"He knows how tedious life is."
Class Treasurer '27
Handball '28
Basketball '28





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BOBSIE SMITH

Kansas

"A rose is sweeter in the bud than full blossom."

St. Mary-of-the-Woods
Terre Haute, Ind. '28
St. Mary-of-the-Springs,
E. Columbus, Ohio '29






WAYNE SOLENBERGER
North Dakota

"Studious of ease, and fond of humble things."
Handball '29
Vice President '29



MARGARET STAPLETON
Mississippi
"Her air, her manners, all who saw admired."
Supper Club '27 '28 '29 '30
Track '28
Basketball '28
Volleyball '28 '29 '30
Bowling '28 '29
Baseball '28 '29 '30
"Honor Bright" '30
Debating Club '30



VINCENT E. SULLIVAN
New York

"Hi3 smile is sweetened by his gravity."
Tennis '27 '28 '29
Bowling '27 '28 '29




ANDREW VAN SICLEN
New York

"He was not merely a chip of the old block, bui
the old block itself."
Glee Club '27
Swimming '27
"Honor Bright '30
Football '30








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VALERIA VAN VALKENBURGH
Canal Zone
"Mli heart is like a singing bird."
Track '27
Supper Club '28
Zonian Staff '30
Swimming '30




ROBERT O. WATSON
Canal Zone
"They're only truly great who are truly good."
Swimming '28
Oemnatinr Club, Secretary '30
zonian Staff '30
"Honor Brint" '30




DONALD WEIGOLD
Canal Zone
"For a man by nYot lh.Iia is so well betrayed
As by his manners."
Glee Club '27
Zonian Follies '27 y
Orchestra '2t8 '29 '
Band '28




LAID.E'E. WILLETT
-,.Can:al Zone

Thliou lst a meitnd ihat suits iwili this
7IlIy a j1 iil irtimtward character."






KARL WINQUIST
Canal Zone
"A good heart is better than all the heads in the
world."
Band '28
"All at Sea" '29
Orchestra '30
Play Staff '30








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VIRGINIA WOODHULL
New York
"A daughter of the gods, divinely ta.l,
And most divinely fair."
Supper Club '27 '28 '29 '30
"Honor Bright" '30
Zonian Staff '30
Bowling '28
Volleyball '28



FREDERICK E. WRIGHT

New York
"Men of few words are the best men."

Bryan High School, Bryan,
Texas '26 '27
Main Avenue High School,
San Antonio, Texas '28




LEWIS WRIGHT
New York
"Life is not life ai all without delight."

Main H'gh, San Antonio,
Texas '28
Bryan High School, Bryan
Texas '27


PHILIP L. YCAZA
Canal Zone

"He lines in that ideal world
Whose language is not speech tut song.'

Glee Club '27 '28



MARK MEYER SHAPIRO

Wisconsin
"How forcible are richt wvor"ds
"Lelawala" '28
Glee Club '28
Ecole Internacionale. Geneva,
Switzerland '29

VIOLET DIXON
"A lovely lady garmented in light
From her own beauty."
Massachusetts '
Somerville High School '27 '28 '29


AUGUST SCHWINDEMAN

New York
"If she undervalue mnr
What care I how fair she be."
Track '27 '28 '29 Tennis '27
"Honor B:ight" '30 Baseball '30
Debating Club '30 Football '30
Swimming '27 '28 '29 '30
Soccer '29


Ci;----- - ---
C


J~~~ ~ /1"^/ .1 t',^*,..^ ,






."* o-7i f1l



















CLASS HISTORY
--- YBY

EI.EANOR PARKER AND VIN'( *NT' MAICY


In October, 1926, two gigantic dirigibles carrying the inscription "B. H. S. '30' took the
air with several other ships to cruise about the dark world of knowledge with Commence-
ment as the goal. The first ship, "The Bald Scobie", was officered by Captain Flint, Pilot
E. Monaco, Co-Pilot F. Banan, Radio Operator A. Schwindeman, and Mechanic E. Smith.
The other ship, "The Spirit of '30", flying green and white colors was officered by Captain
Koperski, Pilot M. Ayers, Co-Pilot E. Hearne, Radio Operator D. Clisbee, and Mechanic R.
Newhard. The jolly crews were enlisted and enthusiastically fell to work, though hardly
knowing where to start. Those who failed to do their duty aboard the "blimps" were pushed
over to land in the turbulent sea, Obscurity.
The airships came to rest to permit the crews to divert themselves occasionally. At thb
first landing the crews invaded the sports world and carried away the blue ribbon in soccer
and swimming, and the red in track.
These two ships soared to very high altitudes. Their mark was surpassed only by "The
'27 Special."
On June 24, 1927, clouds filled the sky. "The '27 Special" passed from sight and the
"B. H. S. '30"s were forced to land. "The Bald Scobie" was wrecked but the crew was saved.
Three months passed before the remaining ship, "The Spirit of '30", was ready to take off.
In October, 1927, the ship flying the red and white soared to even greater heights.
Captain Vette, Pilot E. Monaco, Co-Pilot B. Jewell, Radio Operator E. Solenbeger and Me-
chanic R. Newhard handled the mighty "Spirit of '30" with its crew of one hundred nine-
teen souls.
Again the crew invaded the athletic camps and carried away by storm the blue ribbon
In track, baseball and swimming. After a hard struggle they came away with half the blue
ribbon in basketball and the red in soccer.
Upon a suggestion from the steward the crew pitched in and gave a party in honor
of themselves. Ice cream, cake, plenty of punch, a short play and dancing were the high-
lights of the event. Superintendent Williams of the Dirigible Works boarded the stip in mid-
air to attend the party. Upon another suggestion from the steward each member of the
crew made a cake or unpocketed a dollar to cover the expenses of the party.
The gas bag sprang a leak in June, 1928, and the ship was moored for a three-month
period to be overhauled and repaired.
October found the crew reassembled and ready to go. Captain Miller, Pilot E. Smith,
C.l-Pilut W. Sulenberrer. Radio Ope,.ntor E. Solenberger and Mechanic R. Newhard sent the
ship off at top speed. However. Pilot Smith became air-sick and retired, leaving E. Monaco
at the controls. Radio Operator E. Solenberger, who had been worn to a skeleton by the
long tedious hours the previous year, resigned his post in favor of B. Everson.
This year, although the crew made a raid on the athletic camp, they were unable to
carry away any loot. Indeed, the venturesome band scarcely came away whole.
The crew became conscious of the fact that "The '29 Special" was nearing its journey's
end and deserved a hearty farewell. A banquet was decided upon. To raise the wherewitha!
ihi.- gave a luncheon aboard ship. Next in order they descended on the Tivoli Hotel where
the Merry Hoofers and Card Sharks de-oured more than the proceeds amounted to Next







.;',' ... ,_ -


came the operetta, carefully prepared aboard ship and presented in a friendly manner at the
Balboa Clubhouse. The title it bore was "All at Sea."
The farewell was extended on June 8, 1929. The crew of "The '29 Special" were given
good food, a merry time, and were sadly bidden adieu. They receded swiftly from sight, never
to be seen again.
The ship lay idle for three months during which time the preparations for the final
leg of the journey were made.
In October, 1929, the mighty "Spirit of '30" rose gracefully into the air and sailed
away. This year also the red and white streamed in the wind. Pilot E. Solenberger, and
Co-Pilot E. Smith attempted to steer the ship through the storms under the guidance of
Captain Lee. Pilot Smith decided to get off the ship, so Somers Dick was chosen to take his
place. Radio Operator B. Everson, weary-eyed, and haggard from overwork, resigned his
post to E. Orr. Mechanic R. Newhard entered into her fourth year of service in manipulating
the mechanism.
Early in the cruise the crew made two successive descents on the Yacht Club to make
"whoopee." Then the steward demanded a cake from each for a cake sale. Some preferred
to plank down a dollar. A raid on Taboga Island was nipped in the bud. "Honor Bright" was
presented by some of the crew at the Balboa Clubhouse after much practice.
Again a descent on the athletic field and again a heap of spoils.
Near the time to leave the ship the crew were guests at a farewell banquet. One last
revel together, then baccalaureate. At last a passport to new lands.
The crew placed the worthy old ship in the B. H. S. museum and dispersed their
seventy-three ways exceedingly happy in their newfound freedom, yet cherishing the tender-
est memories of the fateful cruise.





C iA Ss4 PROPHE C Y
(From "The Zonian", 1940)
"There is a divinity that shapes our ends
Rough hew them how we will."

Robert Adams led a parade of the G. A. R. He was proud of the feat of walking so many
miles in spite of the fact that he was loaded down with medals and a wooden leg. Bob Bardel-
son is quite a cowboy nowadays. He rides a government mule out on the Miraflores Locks. Sam
Bardelson belongs to the "Rainbow Quartet" which also consists of Donald Weigold, Bernard
Everson, and Stanley Butler. They have won fame because of their ability to make musicians
green with envy by making gray days rosy, playing the blues.
Helen Bejarano is a sociologist. She is now in the Fiji Islands trying to get them to add
an inch more grass to their skirts. Joyce Bell is the Countess Domuch. Her smart social af-
fairs are the envy of the younger matrons of Ostend. George Bringman has invented a new
curling fluid which is widely used by the girls. He used it himself and proved it successful.
Nellie Bruland is a budding artist. Her latest picture entitled "Shy and Innocent" is in the
Metropolitan Art Museum.
Robert Bullock and Carmen Pimento are still trying to play concert numbers. They once
were arrested because they played a whole piece that didn't sound "flat". The public grew
suspicious and they were held in custody while an investigation was being made. George Cain
has become an efficient tailor. He got his experience trying to fit tights on weenies at the
commissary.
Docia Clisbee leads a clean life. She is a janitress in the Woolworth Building. James
Cole and Elmer Orr are miners. They certainly had to dig to get through their last year in
B. H. S. Kathleen Conard is the head of a humane society. She is trying to make it a capital
offense to scratch red bugs, swat mosquitos, and be rude to ants. Tom Conley, the Comical
Comedian, is emblazoned in lights on Broadway.He got his start when he lost his shoe in study
hall. Elizabeth Cunningham is a traveling saleslady for dog biscuits. Puppy love always was
in her line. Eva de la Pefia runs a column for advice to the lovelorn in a small newspaper of a
college town.
James Des Londes has thrown himself into reverse and is now an evangelist inspiring
multitudes in outdoor camp meetings. Somers Dick has become a plumber. He was a social







4 ., .. f/. ',_


climber and that. was the only way he could get into the homes of wealth and culture. Watson
& Humphrey's Circus has won fame through the able management of its owners and through
its five main attractions, petite Rita Driscoll,the tight-rope walker, Elizabeth Raymond, the
fat lady of the circus, Harry Mitten, the midget, Jack Morrison, the tall man, and August
Schwindeman, the strong man. "Augy" always could bend the girls to his will.
Violet Dixon has invented an ideal "Lightning Calculator" for use in Commercial Arith-
metic classes. Dorothy Gerber has settled down and is making the world safe for democracy
by rearing her ten boys and six girls in the principles of liberty, fraternity and equality.
Edwin Jones, noted master of languages, is on a lecture tour in Europe, accompanied by Doris
llallelt. his interpreter and secretary. Pauline Halloran is married and living in Balboa. I
don't know her husband's name.
Elizabeth Hearne is now a famous criminal lawyer. Her experience in high school, getting
herself in and out of scrapes, fitted her for this position. The largest case she has handled
is that of Hayden Jones and Karl Windquist, the counterfeiters. They have the friendliness of
the public because they "mint" well. Bill Hele has sent his picture in to the movie magnates.
He is that Spanish type to which the girls invariably succumb. Buddy Rogers had better
watch his laurels.
Ida Esleeck chose the position of stenographer because of her fondness for chewing gum.
Carol Herfurth is somewhat of an artist. She is in Abyssinia teaching the natives the art of
makeup. Bobby Jacques went into the electrical business. She always did like to shock people.
Ralph Kirkpatrick broke the world's speed record in his new style machine at Daytona Beach.
Edward Lowe has been working on a formula for non-explosive gasoline. Chichi Lutz is a
beauty specialist. Her fate was decided when Mr. Lee, on seeing her using her compact, asked
her if she needed beautifying. She decided that she didn't but looking around she saw plenty
who did and thereupon decided that there was money in the business.
James Macdonell is running a Lost and Found Bureau. He is following this line because of
his widespread experience in B. H. S. Louise Martin is a famous chiropodist. She gained
her wisdom sitting at the feet of Elsa Reimann. Roger Matter has invented a machine which
prevents the "hard" looks of teachers from having any effect on the one intended to be the
recipient. Emley Mead is a nurse. Her specialty is tall, dark young men with diseases that
do not affect the eye.
Jeane Meehan. the noted oculist, cured Rae Newhard of a disease called Crossiliapuzzili-
tis, caused by doing too many cross word puzzles. Jeane gained experience in her early years
by cutting the eyes out of potatoes. Elliott Monaco is doing duty as ambassador to Morro Is-
land. A new book, "Piercing Percltlagr-" by Willard Percy, contains succinct epigrammatical
witticisms. Eleanor Parker is recuperating from the effort she made in trying to determine the
number of miles of yards in a golf ball.
Kemper Price is a forest ranger in Yellowstone. This vocation was chosen for two reasons:
He always liked the wide open spaces and he has the chance of seeing a different set of pretty
girls every two hours. Mary Poole is a great swimmer. She's been around pools all her life.
Ida 313e Posey has become an aviatrix. She always was a rather high flier. Elsa Reimann -
"They call him Junior." Dorothy Rosson is a collector of antiques. Maybe that's what comes
from a habit of saying "Hello, there, Old Thinr"'
Mark Schapiro is now thrilling thousands as a hero in the talkies. He always was in-
clined that way. The Smith Twins are married. Their electric bills are exceptionally high be-
cause one runs the vacuum cleaner all day and the other plays the radio all night. Bobsie Smith
may be found every year at Christmas time standing on a corner, ringing a bell and begging
for money for the Salvation Army. Ena Simons has become a great financier. She was in-
Ilucncred in the choice of her career largely because of the pleasure derived from her office as
Supper Club treasurer.
Earl Solenherper has just been granted his seventh divorce. It seems his line was just
low enough to trip them. Wayne Solenberger is a horticulturist. He has just cultivated a spec-
ial species of peach which he has named the "Marvellous Margaret." Vincent Sullivan, through
the money gained from the dog races, has been able to retire and he is now living in a Span-
ish villa which is guarded by two immense dogs. Margaret Stapleton is Chairwoman of the
Anti- F.vrryvthnii. Society.
Andrew Van Siclen has become a designer of gowns, largely because of his belief that
women don't know anw,'thimn Valeria Van Valkenburgh is a contortionist. Her ability to dou-
ble up in classes has helped her profession.
Adelaidr Willett is matron of a huge Home for Homeless Hopeless Humans, in which the
inmates eat humble pie and wear heavies all the year round. Virginia Woodhull is a mani-







S- ,. . 1 i J ,



curist for the society women in New York. How well I remember her triumph when she dis-
played three whole finger nails! The Wright brothers are now deep sea divers. They have be-
come famous because of the discovery of some treasure belonging to Captain Kidd. Philip Ycaza
has won the world's record for hitting more bumps between Ancon and Balboa than any other
bus driver.






LAST V ILL AND TiESTAMIN'T
SENIOR CLASS OF 1930.

We, the Seniors of 1930, being of as sane mind as any class could be after 4 yea s of hard
labor, do hereby bequeath and present as follows:
ARTICLE I. First, and principally, we commend our futures into the hands of Fate, hop-
ing through the kindness of our successors to have full and free pardon for all our mis-
takes, and to inherit everlasting memory in Balboa High.
ARTICLE II. To our benevolent faculty we do here and now return thankfully all the
low marks which they have so generously given to us in former years, with the request that
they be just as generously bestowed upon our successors. And to Balboa High School we
bequeath various bits of knowledge which will be found marked here and there throughout
the school, and also the startling information which has been gleaned from our examina-
tion papers and our recitations.
ARTICLE III. To the Juniors, our IndI'-1 l..[I we do commit our awe-inspiring name
of Seniors and the dignity that goes with it, our mental superiority to be decently cared
for and passed on in due time. To the sophisticated Sophomo:es, whom, as their name im-
plies, we believe have a little more sense than the Freshman, we do bestow the eminent
honor of being executors of this will. To those lowly creatures, the Freshmen, we bestow
the honor of upholding the sacred traditions of old Balboa High, the Alma Mater of se
many brilliant, endeavoring and successful students.
ARTICLE IV. Being blessed with many individual gifts we bequeath as follows:
To Emily Sherwood, Nancy Parker bequeaths her giggles in Spanish class.
To Jean Kalar, Junior Mitten bequeaths a foot of his stately stature.
To "Ruby" Adams, Donald Weigorld leaves his "sax" appeal.
To John Morales, Willard Percy bequeaths his ability to use astonishing words and
phrases.
To Kenneth Maiers, Tom Conley leaves his right of asking foolish questions in the solid
geometry.
To "Winky" Ewing, Virginia Woodhull bequeaths her bottle of peroxide and the accom-
panying pamphlet, "Why Gentlemen Prefer Blondes."
To Connie Sundquist, Nellie Bruland bequeaths her slenderness and her dignity.
To James Lewis, Vincent Marcy bequeaths his "sheik trousers" with the request that
Jimmy take special care of them since Vincent parts with them only as a special favor.
To Aggie Tonneson, Docia Clisbee bequeaths her ability of getting into and out of mis-
chief.
To Dorothy Allen. Kathleen Conard bequeaths her name of "Chicken," bestowed oi
her by the former's boy-friend.
To Elmer Hack, Hayden Jones bequeaths the fords, "If I had been there it would have
been different."
To Ralph Monaco, George Cain bequeaths his job at the comissary.
To Sadie Asparren, Dorothy Gerber bequeaths her history books and her ability to ask
questions.
To Ophelia Key, Vincent Sullivan leaves his ability to remain quiet at all occasions.
To Catherine Woodard, Ida Esleeck leaves her secret ambitions to be a detective.
To any one of the many needy freshmen, .:,'i;l-'rer Stapleton leaves her ability to say
humorous things at unexpected times.
To the bright members of the Junior class, Robert Bardelson and Ka:l Winquist res-
pectively bequeath the honor of making the motion to adjourn the class meetings and of
seconding it.
To Alice Westman, Elsa Reimann bequeaths her sunny smile.
To Bill Bleakley, Roger Matter bequeaths his way of attracting women.






r "' / "1
S r---/".--.- ... 7 .


To Hazel Hortense Harris, Valeria Van Valkenburgh bequeaths her ability to cube
the initials of her name.
To Oreste Sergievsky, James Macdonell bequeaths his beautiful violinist's haircut.
To Johnny Calhoun, Wayne Solenberger bequeaths his brains, with the request that
:hey be not overworked.
To any twins that may come into the Balboa High School, Cecilia and Clarita Smith
bequeath their joy of being taken one for the other.
To Ruth Boyd, Elizabeth Hearne bequeaths her distracting giggle.
To Nana Grace Jennings, Madge De Grummond bequeaths her short socks.
To Edward Latham, Robert Adams bequeaths his art of throwing his feet to the side
while walking.
To Franklin Yates, Jack Morrison bequeaths the honor of being a target for Mrs.
Krumbach's jokes and satires.
To Bob Helmerichs, Elmer Orr bequeaths his winning smile.
To the Seniors of next year, Somers Dick bequeaths his ability to affect an attitude
of superiority.
To Moises de la Pefia and Edna Fluharty, Benhard Everson bequeaths his and Eleonor
Hammond's corner of the balcony, hoping that they enjoy its seclusion.
Feeling that the lowly Freshmen of next year will be in need of it, Frederick Wright
generously bequeaths his sheik pompadour.
To Howard Engelke, Andy Van Siclen bequeaths his strut and his "Desperate Ambrose'
talk.
To Elizabeth Beverley, Bobsic Smith bequeaths her bov_'h bob.
To some needy lower classman, Mark Schapiro bequeaths his Greek profile.
To Grace Lawyer, Frances Lewis leaves het permanent wave. begging if her to take
good care of it.
To Tucker Hiunmer, Eva de la Peia bequeaths her art of speaking Spanish fluently.
To Mr. Hodges, Louise Martin bequeaths her little gray runabout with the hope that
he will get as good service from it as she has.
To Alton Casanova, Freddie Maduro bequeaths his "grand opera voice."
To Stanwood Specht, Carol Herfurth bequeaths her chewing gum.
To Elizabeth Beverly, Jeane Meehan bequeaths her ability to put up her auburn hair.
To Erma Graham, Doris Hallett bequeaths her ability to study in the noon hour.
To Fern Kyleber, Rita Driscoll bequeaths her hearty laugh.
To the Balboa-Ancon Bus Line, Philip Ycaza and Ralph Kirkpatrick bequeath their Ford and
Nash respectively.
To the American History students of the coming year, Joyce Bell bequeaahs her re-
port on George Washington
To Edna Mae Smith, Carmen Pimento bequeaths the position of pianist in the High
School Orchestra.
To Francis friday, Helen Bejarano bequeaths her knowledge of American History
and being of a generous nature she also bFqueaths the Ford to Dorothy Dennis.
To Aura Amole, Dorthy Rosson bequeaths her "Ever-Ready smile" and the privilege
of having a new b.)y friend every week.
To Stanley Specht, Jimmy Des Londes bequeaths his captainship of every team of
which he is a member.
To Jack Chase. Sam Bardelson bequeaths his bass horn knowing that he is the only
one who has enough wind to blow it
To Marcel Penso, Lewis Wright bequeaths his art of plucking the heart strings of
all the cils in high school.
To Gladys Booth, Rae Newhard bequeaths her athletic abilries
To Harry West.ncsorff, August Schwinderroan bequeaths his breast stroke championship
To Carl Dailey, Stanley Butler sorrowful but with great confidence in Carl, bequeaths
Priscilla Hallen.
To Georce Hilbcrt, James Cole bequeaths his New Orleans accent.
To Kenneth Nlatirs Eddie Smith bequeaths his imitation of Helen Kanes "Boop-r'op-
a-doop."
To Michael Dew, William Hele bequeaths the right of being on all athletic teams and
tett'ng letters for all sports.
To Kenneth Marcy, George Brincmnni bequeaths his assortment of bow ties and en-
joins upon him the r.-p-nsib:it:,' cf being sure that thly sit right.
To William Cochez, Rober, B3llio k bequeaths his antiqur' fiddle







S .. /"/' /77/" / i'7 /7' J H


To Caleb Clements, Jack Humphrey bequeaths his noisy shoes so that the future
classes may enjoy the rhythmic sound of the boom-boom-boom in the corridors.
To Billy Burdge, Bobby Watson bequeaths his pigeons and pigeon coop, with the re-
quest that the next baby pigeon be called "Wootsie-Woo."
To Lily Wylie, Emley Mead bequeaths Kenneth Forrest.
To Douglas Johnston, Elliot Monaco bequeaths the art of smoking tv.I el-r.v-fi cent
cigars.
To Marion Dugan, Betty Cunningham bequeatns John Hall, urgently expressing the de-
sire to have him well cared for and not treated roughly.
Freddy Banan, being elated with having proved by mathematics that he has as much
money as Henry Ford, bequeaths half of it to Lillia Monsanto so that she will be able to
carry out her plans for establishing an old maid's asylum.
Earl Solenberger gives back all his special assembly privileges to M-. G. R. Lee since h"
has no more need of them.
To Hcdwig Sundberg. Pauline Halloran bequeaths her moonlight walks.
To Joyce Haldeman, Mary Poole bequeaths her attractions, hoping that she also will be-
come the most popular girl in high school.
To Diana Marine, Adelaide Willett leaves her belief that "children should be seen and
not heard."
To Flores Lockwood, Ena Simons bequeaths her secretarial inclinations.
To any one who can fill the requirements for the position. Ida Mae Posey bequeaths
the honor of being "Miss Oklahoma" of Balboa High School.
SIGNED
THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1930.
SEAL
We, whose names we do hereto subscribe, do certify that, in this rainy season of 1930.
th' Senior class of the aforesaid year subscribed their John Henrys and Annabelle Lees.
in our presence, to their Last Will and Test:ment, and requested us to sign our names
hereto, as witnesses of the execution thereof. which we hereby do in the presence of the
i"stator during the said season.
SIGNED
Weir Sapps
U. R. Two













RITA DRISCOLL'S B. H. S. Z 00



Don't Feed the Animals


WHO


Doris Hallett
Carol Herfurth
Docia Clishee
Jeane Meehan
Rae Newhard
Bobby Jacques
Rita Driscoll
Mary Poole
Emley Mead
Adelaide Willett
Joyce Bell
Marg. Stapleton
Rich. Conley
Lewis Wright
Kemper Price
J. Humphrey
J. Morrison
Jim DesLondes
William Hel6
Ena Simons
Madge de Grummond
Elsa' Reimann
Louise Martin
Ida Mae Posey
Fred Wright
Kail Winquist
Ralph Kirkpatrick
Nellie Bruland
Robert Bullock
Don. Weigold
Stanley Butler


HE (SHE)
Answers T


Dot
Kay
Do
Gee
Eppy
Bobby
Sapolio
Mary Ann
Em
Ade
Joy
Marg
Tom
Louie
Choke
Jack
Jackie
Dan
Bill
Ena
Madge
El
Louisa
Posey
Fred
Winkle
Kirk

Nellie
Choppy
Wiggles
Butler


WHAT


Hoot owl
Flying fish
Ameba
Hawk
Bunny
Blue Jay
Sparrow
Deer
Mosquito
Duck
Butterfly
Ploth
Monkey
Snail
Camel
Kangaroo
Shrimp
Doodle bug
Lion
Lizard
Shark

Grasshopper
Zebra
Peacock

Lady bug
Parrakeet
Squirrel
Chipmunk
F lea,
Locus
Crow


PREY


Carol H.
I've wondered, too
Guy with green gloves
Library students
Guy with black hat
Any boy
Jack D.
"HIM"
Alec
Studies
Boyd
Choke
One or all
I'll bite
Margaret
Jack M.
Jack H.
That certain party
Home runs
Now, let's see
Geometry problems
Junior
Patients
I'll bite
.hat's her name?
Mrs. Krumbach
Pedestrians
"REDS"
"His pony"
Six & Piano
We wonder


WHERE FOUND


Carol's
Razzbery Park
Right there
Library
On the track
Miramar
Front steps
Home
P. M. Clubhouse
Home
New Ford
Her abode
Clubhouse
Century Club
Work, of course
That car


Clubhouse
Whose steps,
Ancon
Tennis court
Assembly
Hospital
Corozal-?- ?-
Cecilia-?-
English room
His car
And his car
P. M.
Jail
Clubhouse


RECOGNIZED BY


Pleasantness
Doris
You think of one!
Red hair
That certain car
Yawns
(Seeing's believing)
Innocence
Typing pins
Silence
Red hair & Liz.
Her drag
That posture
Looks
Legs
His laugh
Stature
Orations
That picture
Her-wave- ?
Goggles
Junior--?-t-
That car!
Just "POSEY"
The "Dodge"
His wisdom
Sailor hat
And him
Antique violin
That hair comb
Craziness


FAVORITE GROWL


You bet!
My cowl
Aha, genius
I'll report you!
Let's make history!
For crying out loud!
I'll scream!
Saaaay-
Yeah-
Ditto
Oh Yeah-
Weeelll-
What ya say?
Now, now!
Look out!
Hey, heyl
Huh?
Sweet Adeline
Who told you?
Noo-oo
I knew it!
What of it?
Well-s-a-y
Hold that line
Who wouldn't?
I'm going to--
Oh, no!
And that's all
A-a-ah!
Eh--eh
Sez you?


ii ;i~~~~- -- ----- ---ii -- ----- -- ii -- i I








Fred Maduro
Anita Parker
Eleanor Parker
Smith Twins
Junior Mitten
Wayne Polenberger
Eliza. Raymond
Earl Solenberger
B. Everson
Hayden Jones
Chichi Lutz
Vincent Marcy
Roger Matter
Robert Watson
Willard Percy
Helen Bejarano
Somers Dick
Bobsie Smith
Va-. Van V.
Elliott Monaco
Virgie Woodhull
Fred Banan
Elmer Orr
Eliz. Hearne
Pauline Halloran
James Cole
Dorothy Rosson
James Macdonell
Philip Ycaza
Andrew van Siclen
Vincent Sullivan
Robert Bardelson
August Schwinderman
Mark Schapiro
Bob Adams
George Cain
George Bringman
Eva de la Pefia
Kathleen Conard
Ida Esleck
Sam Iardelson


Fred

Nita
Nancy
Twins
Herb
Maggie
Eliza.
Soly
Emo
Jonsey
Chichi
Vince
Roge
Bob
Percy
Helena
Stoneage
Bobsie

Vs

Monac
Banana
Ginny
Watts
Liz
Polly
Jimmie
Dot
Jim
Phil
Andy
Sully
Bob
Augie
Sapiro
Bob
Cain
Bring
Eva
Hokie
Ida-
Sam


Hummingbird Anyone who'll listen


Codfish
Golf bug
Doves
Giraffe
Owl
Elephant
Bee
Devilfish
Blowfish
Angel fish
Cootie
Radio Bug
Tiger
Marmoset
Clam
Woodpecker
Whale
Goose fish
Sculpin
Coyote
Frog
Dog fish
Skylark
Kitten
Doormouse
Caterpillar
Robin
Dashund
Weasel
Scotch terrier
Beetle
Swordfish
Leech
Spaniel
Mouse
Pig
Moose
wolfhound
Eel
Hyena


Has she?
Golf balls
Each other
Well, it was
Marg. IB.
"Nadie"
Business
Elea nor
Anyone
A-ah-Mr.-oh
Poor cookie
Electric Juice
Important people
Mr. Webster
Typewriter
Studies
Who knows?
George D.
Spring Chickens
Piano keys
Elmer
Virginia
Jimmie
Moonlight
Wish we knew
Bill
Emma Van Clief
School kids
Girls (freshmen)
Checkers
That horn
Nurses
Elsa. Louise, etc.
Solid Geometry
Weenies
Quien sabe ?
Officers
Swimming
Bob
EXAMP


Anywhere
Is there?'
Golf Links
Panama

The lFord
Admin
Home
Office
Balcony
Playshed
Dog races
With Cookie
In his car
On someone's trail
Under some car
Typing room
Home
Corozal
P. M.
Clubhouse
Someone's Home
The car
Ditto
Ice Creasm Parlor
IImie ( ?) sumetimei
An on
Panama
Clubhouse
That bug
Clubhouse
Kennelworth
Cooper's Orchestra
Panama Hospital
Frost's Room
Park bench
Neat counter
quarry Hts.
Clubs
Swimming pool
Swniming pool
Cabli office


"The Voice"
"One alone"
Golf bag
Setting me crazy
Tall-and how!
His learned ways
Cristobal
Business look
Eleanor
His line about Rusty
Mr.-ah--ah
His "Street Sweepers"
That car
His camera
The junk
Her Spanish
That look
That Bob!
Artist's HAIR
Drums
Mire goggles
Each other


Ji -mie
Bashful look
His Shakespeare
Bill
Emma
The same
His wal
Red hair & Frel-kles
Quiettness
His car
His way with women
Dignity
Big white apron
His Math.
Mark Shapiro
Winsome smile
Pout hern accent
His line


When I was-
Tickets for sale!
Fore!
Where's-
Tst, tst
Here's the way I do it
(Silence reigned)
Aw-gwawn
Now I'll tell one!
He's terrible!
1 don't understand!
Eh-ehl
Now 1 think-
I want your picture
Don't you feel honored?
I'll tell you what!
Down with the frosh!
I'm all alone!
Mailanal
Ladies and Gentlemen:
Yap! Yap!
Hi!
How ya means?
Stop that!
Home, Sweet Homel
I beg your pardon!
You would!
When I was young-
Going to Ancon?
Who me?
Your move--
It isn't my fault-
You're all wrong!
Oh! Mrs. Krumbachl
I wish I knew
How manyT
Now- now-
Y como!
Can ?1
I'm a sleuth!
Up in Malne--


^^_CII______II__II11111 __ -~~-----------
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JUNIORS


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JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS


President ....
Vice Presider
Secretary .....
Treasurer ...
Adviser .......


....... Alexander Macdonell


nt .................. Charles Hummer
-.................... Douglas Johnston
....................... Elizabeth Hirsh
..................... M r. G. R. Lee


JUNIOR CLASS


Allen, Dorothy
Androus, Florence
Banan, Fred
Bickford, Mary
Boyd, Alice
Boyd, Ruth
Bratton, Julia
Brown, Pearl
Byrne, Ethel
Byrne, Jack
Dailey, Carl
de Gracia, Juan
Demuth, Via Mae
Engelke, Virginia
Esleeck, Ida
Evans, Herbert
Fenton, Marie
Forrest, Kenneth
Gaeb, Harry


Gist, Harold
Graham, Erma
Hack, Elmer
Haldeman, Joyce
Hall, John Randolph
Harris, Hazel
Hartzell, Elena
Hearne, William
Hilbert, George
Hirsh, Elizabeth
Honeycutt, Margaret
Huff, Maennpr
Hummer, Charles
Jennings, Nana Grace
Johannes, Jennie
Johnston, Douglas
Jones, Mary Louise
Kirkpatrick, Glen
Lapeira, Julio


Lawyer, Grace
Lewis, Frances
Lewis, James
Lockwood, Flores
Macdonell, Alexander
Macdonell, James
Maduro, Monte
Maiers, Kenneth
Malone, Edwin
Mead, Alberta
Messer, Robert
Morales, John
Monaco, Ralph
Murray, Doris
Nolan, Doris
Oller, Ophelia
Parker, Elizabeth
Penso, Marcel


Perry, Evelyn
Potter, Janet
Reynolds, Sarah
Reynolds, Vincent
Sandberg, Corina
Sanger, Victor
Shrapnel, Bliss
Stroop, Bertha
Sundquist, Constance
Thompson, Edgar
Van Valkenburgh, Lester
Warwick, Rand
Westman, Alice
Woodard, Catherine
Wyle, Clare
Wyle, Lillie
Yates, Franklin
Zidbeck, Lilly


JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY

Elizabeth Beverley, '31


Our Junior year proved to be the best yet. We were given those long-looked-for seats in
the assembly. Our class meeting was held to elect officers.

Charles Hummer resigned his position as Vice President late in the year, and Kenneth
Maiers was elected to fill that position. Miss Morell was our adviser, but she left Balboa
High in December and Mr. G. R. Lee was appointed to take her place.

First in a long list of activities, came a dance at the Yacht Club. Next the trip to Taboga,
which was a great success. Then a luncheon on the balcony of the high school, where two
hundred hungry students were fed. Next among our achievements was a food sale, and on
April 5th came the Junior Dance and Card Party, held at the Tivoli. On May 16th we pre-
sented "The Charm School," a comedy in three acts, at the Balboa Clubhouse. Plans were
then made for the Junior-Senior Banquet.

Here ends the history of our third year in Balboa high; may our fourth and last year
be as successful and as happy as this.


.._...


























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SOPHOMORES






__ .'


SOPHOMORE
President -................
Vice President ..........
Secretary .................
Treasurer ............
Adviser ..........-----


Adams, Cleon
Amole, Aura
Arnold, Emily
Arnold, Frances
Arroyo, Elisa Zenaida
Asparren, Mercedes
Barrett, Robert
Booth, James
Bower, Phillis
Boyd, Lola de
Bradney, Mary
Brewerton, Henry
Brooks, Anna Elizabeth
Brooks, Marjorie
Brown, Dorothy
Burdge, William
Bruland, Solveig
Burns, Marion
Calhoun, Peggy
Calvit, Virginia
Carvajal, Humberto
Chase, Henry Jackson
Chcsney, Mary Esther
Clair, Florence
Clinchard, Constance
Conlan, Rene
Conley, William
Daniels, Howard
de la Pefia, Moises


CLASS OFFICERS
.....Jack Dombrowsky
....James Booth
....Phillis Bower
... Gratton McGroarty
... Miss Davis


SOPHOMORES


Delvalle, Eric
Dennis, Dorothy
Dershimer, Lenore
Dew, Michael
Dockery, Conroy
Dombrowsky, Jack
Doran, Irene
Dorswitt, Alice
Durfee, Diana
Engelke, Howard
Ewell, Julian
Ewing, Winifred
French, Robert
Gallivan, Catherine
Guiot, Hector
Hall, Sarah
Hallen, Priscilla
Hambelton, Elizabeth
Heath, Carlota
Hambelton, Lillian
Hearne, Hayden
Hele, Albert
Helmerichs, Robert
Hermanson, Harry
Hickman, Thomas
Hudson, Helene
Hutchinson, Donald
Jarvis, Dolores
Johnson, James


Jones, Ella
Joyner, Georgana
Judson, Donald
Kalar, Jean
Kellond, Jane
Kendall, Bud
Key, Ophelia
Klohe, Louis
Kunkel, Edward
Kyleber, Fern
Lambert, Kent
Lawrence, Kathleen
Macdonell, Neil
Maduro, Edward
Maduro, Jack
Maduro, Morris
Maduro, Walter
Malone, Walter
Mauborgne, Benjamin
Marstrand, Lillian
McClellan, Jean
Moffett, Lois
Moore, Margaret
O'Donnell, Marie
Palacio, Ralph
Peterson, Alan
Peterson, Clarence
Phillips, Noble
Pimento, Angela
Preston, Ruth


McGlade, Charlotte
McGroarty, Grattan
Michaelson, Billy
Quinn, Rita
Raymond, David
Reynolds, Wilma
Romig, Robert
Salterio, Arthur
Salterio, Joe
Sanford, De Forest
Seaberg, Georgia
Seaberg, Olga
Seibold, Iris
Sergievsky, Orest
Sherwood, Emily
Smith, David
Smith, Edna May
Smith, Matthew
Smith, Robert
Sundberg, Hedwig
Tonneson, Agnes
Torbert, Annie
Trippe, Eleanor
Vandervoort, Susan
Walbridge, Harry
Walling, Howard
Walston, William
Watkins, Lauretta
Willett, Earl
Williams, Margaret


CLASS HISTORY By Phillis Bower
The Sophomore class was composed of fifty seven boys and fifty seven girls.
At the girls' meeting -the class officers were elected.
Blue and gold, by unanimous vote were the class colors a contrast to the green and
white of last year.
The choosing of the Athletic Council representatives was quite a task. Frank Key left
school so Michael Dew took his place as representative for the boys and Ella Jones was
chosen representative for the girls.
The report cards came out and the Sophomores did not seem to agree with their sub-
iects. The topic of "low grades" was brought up meeting after meeting, and Miss Davis did
her best to encourage the students to do bett-r work, but evidently her efforts were in vain.
A Tacky-Bunco Party was held at the Yacht Club by the Sophomores on Friday, Feb-
ruary 21. 1930. For those who did not play bunco, music was furnished by the musical mem-
bers of the class. Mr. Lee and Miss Davis were the chaperones.
"Dooserdoo!" was the plaintive cry of the Treasure- from the time he was elected. To
assist Gratton in collecting the class fund, two boys and two girls, Henry Brewerton, Edward
Kunlel, Mariorie Brooks, and Kathleen Lawrence were appointed.
To the satisfaction and enioyment of the class, Mr. Flint wrote a letter expressing his
gratitude for the kindness of the pupils.
In the world of snorts the Souhomore boys captured first place in soccer, second in base-
ball and basketball. and third in track. The girls carried away first place In volley ball, base-
ball and basketball. The boys and girls carried away first place in the swimming meet.


____ __ ___ __ __ __._ ~~ _
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FRESHMEN


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FRESHMAN GIRLS' OFFICERS
President ........................ Charlotte Wahl
Vice President ............... Frances Ayers
Secretary .......................Marion Hutchison
Treasurer .........................Jerelind MacMurray
Adviser ........................ Miss Whaley


FRESHMAN BOYS' OFFICERS
President ............................Jack Poole
Vice President ............... Stanwood Specht
Secretary ......................... Edward Neville
Treasurer ..... ................Bruce Onderdonk
Adviser ......................... Mr. Carson


FRESHMEN


Adams, Robert
Alexander, Jeanette
Alfaro, Eloy
Allen, Edna
Allen, Harry
Alley, Thomas
Arroyo, Charles
Asparren, Armenia
Ayers, Frances
Banton, Pembroke
Barker, Joseph
Bidwell, Robert
Bigelow, Bettyanne
Bleakley, William
Booth, Gladys
Boyd, August
Brown, Walter
Browne, Clarence
Calhoun, John
Casanova, Alton
Castillo, Nicanor
Clarke, Leslie
Clement, Caleb
Cleveland, Roscoe
Cochez, William
Cole, Allen
Conner, Agnes
Daly, Eleanor


Daniels, William
de la Pefia, Estrella
Dershimer, John
Dixon, George
Doran, Mary
Dowell, Elsie
Dugan, Marion
Dunham, Margaret
Eldermire, Armin
Emmons, James
Fabrega, Elisa
Ferguson, Sara
Field, Cyrus
Fluharty, Edna
Friday, Frances
Galimany, Bruniselda
Garrett, Willoughby
Grant, Billy
Guerrero, Elena
Hall, Etta Fay
Halman, Consuelo
Hammond, Eleanor
Herring, George
Herring, Marie
Hilbert, Caroline
Howard, Robert
Husted, Annette
Houghton, Juliette


Hutchison, Marion
Johnston, Andrew
Jones, Grace
Jones, Walter
Kalar, Harriet
Kull, Norma
Lamb, Bernard
Lawson, Wilma
Leon, Victor
LeBrun, Alberta
MacMurray, Jerelind
Maduro, Doris
Marcy, Kenneth
Marine, Diana
McCormack, Mary
Mead, Frederick
Monsanto. Lillia
Morales, Electra
Morgan, Roberta
Moritz, Adolph
Muller, John
Neville, Edward
Novey, George
Ohlson, Anne
Olive, James
Onderdonk, Bruce
Patino, Tita
Perkins, Roy


Piper, Raymond
Poole, John
Pyle, Sarah
Rader, Ruth
Replogle, Thomas
Robinson, Albert
Robinson, Thirza
Runyon, Clotilda
Salterio, James
Sampsell, Anna Mae
Sheely, Inez
Sherlock, Doris
Spearman, Patricia
Specht, Stanwood
Simons, Samuel
Stewart, Marion
Stroop, Doris
Treichel, William
Van Clief, Emma
Wahl, Charlotte
Walston, Ruth
Watson, Dorothy
Westendorff, James
Wilhite, Lilburn
Wood, Edward
Wood, Ernest
Yates, George
Yates, Isabel
Young, Leslie


CLASS HISTORY
By
Jack Poole and Charlotte Wahl
The Freshman boys and girls held separate meetings. The class officers were elected
near the beginning of the school year.
The question of dues was discussed and both classes decided to make them two dollars
a year. The boys asked for their dues to be in by December sixth, but the girls set no date.
Of course they were not in by that time, but the class didn't expect them to be, so it was
all right.
In December we elected representatives io the Athletic Council. Stanwood Specht was
chosen by the boys and Emma Van Clief by the girls. They both proved to be good re-
presentatives.
In the meeting of January sixth, held by Mr. Spalding and the class advisers and class
officers, Mr. Spalding gave us an interesting talk on class and school spirit, which was very
beneficial to us all.
In the soccer games the boys came second, in baseball last, in track last and in swimming
second. The captains elected were: Jimmy Saltrio for succer, Stanwood Specht for baseball,
Jimmy Salterio for track and Billy Grant for swimming. The Freshman girls came third in
basketball, third in volley ball, third in baseball, and second in swimming. Emma Van Clief
wPs elected contain of the basketball, volley ball and swimming teams, and Edna Fluharty
was the baseball captain.
There were no socials at all in either class since we, like other Freshman classes, had to
save the "dough" for later years.


,A,.
- - - "


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TnEr RUN THE SENIORS
AND EVERYBODY RUNS: TETI r

Aft


TH05E wHO o01 THiE WORK
FOR THE SENIOR CLASS

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SOPHOMORES THAT HAVE
RISEN TO FAfME


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UNU5SUAL rpts5HrlN


HIGH FREAK CLUB
-FREAKS SYN ATURE-


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JUNIORS WHO KNEW THE.
ART OP ENTERrAINING


TuIS BUS RECCIVED HONORABLE rPIEHTNI


VO


----


----


I


! 1







SCHOOL Lif1







0 L N
4- 40 -


And then came hours of laughter and song





















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:







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ZONIAN STAFF


E. Monaco

D. Johnston


E. Solenberger



Business Manager

Assistant Bus. Mgr.


...... Editor-in-Chiec



G. KjrI;jju ii: .Assistant Editor-in-Chief


S. Dick


Associate and Sports Editor


NEWSPAPER STAFF


ANNUAL STAFF


E. Beverley ................
D. Clisbee ........... Sp
C. Woodard .....
V. Van Valkenburgh
W. Percy ....
E. Clement .....
J H all .......... ......
M Poole .............
V. Marcy
R. Watson ....
J. Meehan


---.-... Ne
iorts Edit
Socie

Jo
Alum
Exchan


ws Editor
or (girls)
ty Editor
SArtist
ke Editor
ni Editor
ge Editor
Reporter
Reporter
Reporter
Reporter


M. Poole
E. Beverle
C. Woodanr .
D. Clisbee ..............
J. Meehan ... Assistant
V. Marcy Assistant
J. Hall .....
V. Van Valkenburgh
K. W indquist .........
R K Ir LI:'; In [ ..........
R. Watson ....... As


Senior Editor
Literary Editor
... Society Editor
Sports Editor (girls
SSports Editor (girls)
Sports Editor boysi
Exchange Editor
...... ....- Artist
......Assistant Artist
............ Photographer
sistant Photographer


D. Hallett. V. Woodhull. E. Mead.


B|RXK-- !^^-
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.~..
.%v~////'/.


t


Staff Typists













OCTOBER, 1929
1. We settle down for nine more months. More homework! 5. Plenty of new teachers
and rules. Golly! 9. No free haircuts for Scobies this year. Anyhow, they aren't supposed
to get any. 11. More bowlegged girls. Now, boys. 15. Lots of tests. 18. Dance at Yacht Club.
More fun. 19. Plenty of students in Miss Davis' room taking up typing. 26. "Heap big" Hal-
lowe'en party at Margaret S's. 31. "Class Meeting" at . . .
NOVEMBER, 1929
3. Good for Panama's Independence Day! 7. Miss Davis starts phonograph for typing
students. (The little dears have the best time.) 16. Snappy football game. Seniors win! 18.
Hot debate in Miss Emmons' room. Negative wins. 26. "Zonian" published for first time. Swell
little paper. At least we think so. 28. Two holidays. Whoopee! Poor turkey. 129. Senior Class
party at Yacht Club. Games and fun galore.

DECEMBER, 1929
1- Dues! Dues! Dues! Come pn, cough up. 5. Grand meeting of Athletic Council. 6.
Junior Taboga Party. Swell time for some carousing about the cemetery. 10. Heavy snow.
Roads blocked. 18. Lost: One of our teachers. Miss Morrell leaves. 19. Seniors gather Christ-
mas trees for little folk. 20. Corridors ring with beautiful voices singing carols. 24. Cupid hits
the school.

JANUARY, 1930
1. B. H. S. well represented at the clubs. 5. Estrella springs a new wind blown. 10. Jun-
ior Luncheon. Plenty of good things to eat. 11. Senior Dance at Yacht Club. Big crowd. Hot
music and a swell time enjoyed.by all. 12. Sidewalks covered with ice. Many absent. 18.
Junior Class loses a popular member. 25. Bigger and better explosions next year, kids.

FEBRUARY, 1930
3. New fashion predominates around halls. 8. B. H. S. victorious over C. H. S. Whoopee!
14. DeMolays stage wild dance at Mosque. Swell time. 21. More snow. Little folk make snow
men.

MARCH, 1930
1-3. Many absent. Three guesses why. 7. Hot time at Yacht Club. Juniors hosts for
dance. 8. Senior food sale. 20. Miss Emmons' Latin classes give Latin Playlet at Y. W. C. A.

APRIL, 1930
1. Students picked for special exams by surveyors. April Fool! 4. "Honor Bright." Ex-
ceedingly bright cast. 5. Juniors have cake sale. 5. Juniors hold annual Card Party and
Dance at the Tivoli. Best dance in years. 5. Junior play-cast picked. Many sighs of disappoint-
ment from the losers. 15. Our budding young poet, Edgar Thompson, contributes much to our
paper. 16. Whoopee! Three glorious holidays to get ready for the Easter bunny. 25. Senior
Masquerade Ball. Astonishing costumes!

MAY, 1930
3. Juniors hold another food sale. No:end to them? 10. "The Charm School" given by
Juniors. Cha:minO' 14. Seniors talk about spending their money. 19. Most everyone on his
toes. It won't be long now.

JUNE, 1930
13. Class Night. Good luck, Seniors! 14. Junior-Senior Banquet at Tivoli. Record crowd.
15. Ba,:r'ailurv':t services at Union Church. 20. Graduation. "Hail, Hail, the gang's all here."
21. E.-rv,'thin,, is over. The cat is put out and the doors are closed until October.







f-r .


ATHLETIC COUNCIL
From Left to Right: Dailey. D)ew E. Jones. Clishee. Specht, Des Londes




GIRL RESERVES SUPPER CLUB

On October 9 the Girl Reserves Supper Club held their first meeting at the Y. W. C. A.
The following officers were elected:

Docia Clisbee ......President

Via Mae Demuth........Vice President

Priscilla Hallen........Secretary

Ena Simons........Treasurer



November 29 the Seniors held a "Be Yourself" party at the Yacht Club for Seniors and
their guests.
The Yacht Club was decorated in red and white, the Senior colors. Games were played
and special dances given to entertain the crowd until ten o'clock. Leslie Banan conducted a
four-ptece orchestra for dancing until twelve.
Refreshments were served during intermission.
Chaperoning the party were: Mr. and Mrs. George Lee, Mr. and Mrs. Spalding, and Mr
and Mrs. Barker.


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4 '/0 4*Mn


SENIOR TAIM)(;A TRIP
At eight o'clock Saturday morning, Janua:y .6th, the "Big Bill" left the Yacht Club for
Pier 19 to take on gasoline and passengers. At Pier 19 Donald Weigold was informed that he
would be unable to get the gasoline but would have to go to the oil crib. The lizty-tlhre::
students then got on the boat. The soda pop and eskimo pies went along.
The trip from Pier 19 to the oil crib was a memorable one. It was a beautiful day. The
singing, hilarious crowd was looking forward to a perfect outing. But it all came to a sudden.
tragic end when, a gasoline explosion violently shook the boat. Several of the students and
chaperones were seriously burned. Fire broke out and the party left the "Big Bill" in flames
after throwing lunches, cameras and other valuables on the dock. An ambulance was sum-
moned for the injured. Thus ended what promised to be a most pleasant Senior Taboga Trip.
The chaperones were Mr. and Mrs. G. O. Lee, Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Lee, Miss Whaley and
Nlli- Steen.



JUNIOR TA(HO)(A TRIP
The yacht 'Sil'.r Spray" glided into pier 18 at nine o'clock Saturday morning of De-
cember 7, 1929. "All aboard" and sixty-five students leapt on almost before the boat had
stopped. After getting comfortably seated on the life-savers which were thrown all over the
hatches, the gay party started out for the day. The two hour ride to Taboga soon came to
an end ..ift.r many struggles to keep one's seat from the other fellow. Arriving at Taboga
at eleven o'clock, some went into the village and others stayed at the beach to go bathing,
Rummaging about the graveyard, hill climbing, swimming and eating were the diversions
of the day. At four o'clock the rain began to pou:' down and the party decided to call it a
day. At seven o'clock that evrrnine the Silver Spray and its gallant passengers pulled up to
the pier at B ilbI,.i The i.h:lpei)rn- of the party were Mrs. Krumbach, Mr. and Mrs. Lee,
and Miss NMl.irrll, and Mr. and Mrs. Spalding.


__ ~j


--' '


H. IH. S. O('R(II1E.!,TRA.





,i7


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GLEE CLUB


The Sophomore Class gave a party at the Yacht Club, February 21. Entertainment for the
evening consisted of dancing and bunco. The music for the dancing was furnished by an or
chestra made up of boys from the Sophomore Class.
Mr. Lester S. Flint, our former mathematics teacher, left for the States on the S. S. "Cristo-
bal", December 23. Nothing definite of Mr. Flint's future is Knowvn but he has been a patient in
a state sanitarium in Massachusetts.
The Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors, and the faculty of B. H. S. presented Mr. Flint
with a steamer rug and carrying strap in appreciation of his services in the high school.
On February twenty-first the Sophomore Class gave a very successful party at thi.
Yacht Club. The chaperones for the party were Mr. G. R. Lee and Miss Davis, the class ad-
viser. Dancing and bunco were the amusements for the evening. Refreshments were served.
An orchestra made up of some pupils of the Sophomo e Class furnished the music.
The players were: Ernest Wood, David Smith, David Raymond. Harry Hermanson, Jack Poole.
William Burdge and Noble Phillips.
On March eighth the Seniors held a profitable food sale in front of the Balboa Club-
house. Many goodies were displayed to the eyes of customers, some of which were baked
beans, potato salad, all kinds of cakes, candy and pies.
The Juniors, not to be slighted, also he'd a food sale. March fifteenth, in front of the
B.lboa Commissary. Their sale was as profitable as the Seniors'. The wares consisted of
potato salad, baked beans, pies, cakes and candy.
March seventh was the occasion for the Juniors' first dance. The affair was held at
the Yacht Club, which was filled to overflowing. The Isthmian Syncopators furnished the
music. Refreshments were s-rved during; the intermission.
The chaperones were Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Hodges and Mr. Lee.


I I


. .... _~ .











HONOR BRIGHT
The Seniors certainly gave a good exhibition this year in "Honor Bright." The cast
was well chosen and trained, under the direction of Mrs. Emma Wale Krumbach.
Mary Poole and James Des Londes were given the.leads and were well supported by:
Watts, the butler ....................................Elmer Orr
Foster, the gardner ............... Bernard Everson
Michael, the chauffeur ........ Andrew Van Siclen
Mrs. Barrington .............................. Elsa Reiman
Rev. James Schooley ................. Kemper Price
Mrs. Carton, wife of Rev. Carton .... E. Hearne
Rt. Rev. Carton .................................. James Cole
Annie, the maid ................ Margaret Stapleton
Maggie, the cook ................ Virginia Woodhull
Tot Marvel ........................................ Rae Newhard
Simpson, deputy sheriff ............. Robert Watson
Jones, deputy sheriff .................. Sam Bardelson
Ouija ...................... .. ................. ........ H im self
Bill Drum .......................... August Schwindeman
The story goes thus: Dick Barrington thinks he is in love with a chorus girl from the
"Snap It Up" Company and he invites her to his home to meet his mother. Before she is
scheduled to arrive he receives a telegram from her saying she is delayed but will come as
soon as possible. This upsets Dick very much and while he is trying to think up an excuse to
give his mother, Honor Bright, a book agent, calls and tries to sell him some books. Dick
tells his troubles to Honor and he begs her to stay and take Tot's place. She finally consents
only after he promises to buy a set of books. All goes well until Tot unexpectedly arrives to
find Honor in the arms of Dick. Tot confesses that she doesn't love him and never did but
her reason for accepting his invitation is to spite Bill Drum, her real lover. Drum also ar-
rives on the scene and Tot is overjoyed but still doesn't want to give in to him. Bill shows
his capability in handling Tot and all ends happily.
--------.(3--------~


THE CHAR M SCHOOL
The Juniors put on a "Charming' play May tenth before a capacity house at the Bal-
boa Clubhouse. The cast was picked and trained by Mr. Howard Spalding.
The leads were given to Mary Louise Jones and John Hall. The rest of the cast follows:
Austin Bevans ............... .... ................ John Hall
David MacKenzie ............. Alexander Macdonell
George Boyd ......................... Vincent Reynolds
Jim Simpkins .............................. Charles Hummer
Tim Simpkins ............................. Kenneth Maiers
Homer Johns ................... ........ ....... Julio Lapeira
Elise Benedotti ...................... Mary Louise Jones
Miss Hays .......................... Margaret Honeycutt
Miss Curtis ........................... Elizabeth Beverley
Sally Boyd ...................... Constance Sundquist
Muriel Doughty ............................... Grace Lawyer
Ethel Spevin ................................... Alice Westman
Alix Mercier ..................Mary Katherine Bickford
Lillian Stafford ........................ Elizabeth Parker
Madge Kent .............. ................ Alice Boyd
Dotsie ..... ..... .... ... ......... Dorothy Allen
The plot is an interesting one.
Austin Bevans, an automobile salesman, has just inherited a girls' school and to the
surprise of his friends insists on running it. He thinks the girls should be taught to be
charming so he proceeds to take a look at the school. To all his chums he gives a position
as one of the teachers and what teachers they make. Austin falls in love with the presi-
dent of the Senior class and has plenty of trouble before the term is up, but promises to
wait until she is of marriageable age.





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AN INTERVIEW WITH NOAII
By Elizabeth Beverley

Characters-
Noah
Mrs. Noah
Reporter
Parrot
Miss Frost

The rising curtain reveals that it is a foggy morning. The fog is a thick fog that
swirls as it must have in those far-off, primeval mornings when the world was young. There
is the sound of lapping water, and a dim shadow in the background that suggests a boat.
Through a rift in the fog Noah is visible, standing beside the gangplank. He is dressed in
white oilskins from head to foot, a spectral figure. In fact tne only tning not spectral about
him is his voice; it is very human, with even a touch of complaint in it.
Noah: My beard's getting all wet! It weights a ton! Mrs. Noah! (A second figure ad-
vances timidly toward the Great One and stands uncertainly in the fog.) I want a wrap
for my beard. I'll catch my death of cold.
Figure: (in a nervous voice) There's there's some mistake! I'm the reporter from the
Zonian, Balboa High newspaper-
Noah: (with some asperity) I called for Mrs. Noah!
Reporter: Yes, yes, I heard you. I thought maybe, if you weren't too busy The editor
wants an interview, and-
Noah: An interview!
Reporter: About your trip. It will only take a minute-
Noah: Can't be bothered! Too busy! Unhealthiest climate I was ever in. Bound to catch
a cold pneumonia it's awful!
(The animals begin to come down the gangplank in ghost-like procession.)
Reporter: Now if you'd just tell me-
Noah: Can't you see I'm trying to get these animals checked? (Counting on fingers)
Giraffes pa, ma, sonny All present and accounted for.
Reporter: Sorry to interrupt, but I must get this story. The Zonian goes to press tomor-
row and I have-
Noah: Bears, two; monkeys, two; rabbits, sixteen-
Reporter: How many animals have you in all?
Noah: (absently) Couple hundred, maybe--(With anger) How do you expect me to get
these animals checked, with you interrupting every second? Oh, Mrs. Noah! Will you see
where the white horse is? He didn't get off with the black one!
Reporter: Did you have a stormy trip, and what do you think of the modern school
system?
Noah: After the rain stopped it was quite smooth Oh, Mrs. Noah, did you find the
white horse?
Mrs. Noah: (from a distance) Can't find him anywhere!
Noah: Well, look in the study-hall!
Reporter: Study hall!
Noah: Three chickens, four cats, dogs Where's the white one with the brown ear"
Reporter: -Mr. Noah!
Noah: Young woman! You will have to wait until I get these animals checked! Now
that brown-eared dog is missing. Best in the lot, but incorrigible!
Reporter: Where do you intend to go now?
Noah: (as a parrot walks off) There! That's that!
Parrot: S'long, Noah, old salt! Fifteen men on a dead man's chest Yo-ho-ho, and a
bottle of rum!
Reporter: Now.may I see the boat?
Noah: I haven't much time to waste. Mrs. Noah!
Mrs. Noah: (c-ming down the gangplank) The horse and dog were in the study-hall.
They wanted to finish their home-work.
Rprerterr (in astonishment) You don't have school on board!






l, ,, ." .< 7 7 ,,", / /7 7 /7 .,..,,... ,, t


Noah: Why, certainly! You don't think we could sail for a year and a half without
-ehool! Unthinkable-
Reporter: (amazed) Homework!
Mrs. Noah: Of course. How can there be school without homework?
Reporter: Oh, I know there can't be. But I don't think I'll put that in my story. It
wouldn't make much of a hit-
Noah: (doubtfully) Perhaps not-
Mrs. Noah: Well of all things! I do believe the parrot's coming back!
Parrot: (returning) Mr. Noah, you must give me a list of my credits. How can I go to
college without them? "Sixteen men on a dead man's chest-Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"
Quite remarkably the appearance of things begins to change. During the transition can
be heard the parrot's voice growing fainter and fainter in the distance.
Parrot: Credits! ......... I want my credits.......... Sixteen men..........
And finally the past becomes the present, the Ark becomes Miss Frost's desk, and (dare
we mention it?) the assembled animals, the students of one of her French classes.
Miss Frost: You've been asleep!
Reporter: (sleepily) Noah!
Miss Frost: Why Why. you have been asleep! How can you deny it?
Reporter: Noah That is, yes It's an interview-
Miss Frost: (grimly) An interview with me at three!



-:- j i i I i -


FAREWELL
Edgar Thompson, '31
The hour is here at last when we must part.
The time has come for us to say farewell;
And, launched upon the sea of life, we start
Our sailing, with what fortune none can tell.

'Tis hard to leave thee, dear old happy spot.
For he e our hearts were ever light and gay;
A joyous memory, which fadeth not,
Thou'st given us to cheer us on our way.

And, as our brightest days we call to mind,
A soft emotion, neither smile nor sigh
But both commingled, in our hearts we find:
Farewell to thee, dear Balboa High!

FANCY!
A new high school building.
The Scobies getting bigger and better.
Mr. Spalding and M.. G. R. Lee Swapping heights.
Bud Evans without a weekly 995.
Having an escalator at school.
Henry Brewerton in long trousers.
Carl Dailey a dignified Senior.
Percy's joke column with some jokes.
Mrs. Krumbach embarrassed.
The Sophomore Class with out Michael Dew.
Monte Maduro without his line
Percy sporting a diploma.
Miss Robson trying to frown.
Edgar Thompson not knowing the answers in physi
David Smith with a man's voice.
B. H. S. without the class of '30.











UNIDENTIFIED
Edgar Thompson '31

Down the iron railed steps of the brownstone dwelling he stumbled, Arthur Murphy, the
picture of dejection. Rejected! Her refusal had been keenly sarcastic. He winced as he re-
called her words: "As for marrying you, Art, I'd much rather wed a mouse. You haven't even
the courage of your convictions."
As he slouched along the street, his eyes downcast, his hands in his pockets, he began to
wonder how much truth her words had contained. He'd never thought of himself as a co-
ward but merely a mild, inoffensive person. Bit now he could recall a certain hesitancy and
nervousness which had been manifest in him on several occasions. "Perhaps she was right,"
he murmured inaudibly. "Perhaps she was right."
On and on he walked, heedless of all around him. Brownstone and granite mansions
gave way to shops and tall office buildings. The fashionable uptown traffic was replaced by a
never-ending stream of busy trucks and busses. Through the bustling, pushing, crowding
throngs of shop-goers he passed unnoticed.
Due to his carelessness he hal just been elbowed off the curb into the street. As he was
attempting to regain the sidewalk, he was startled by a terrified scream. To his horror, he
saw that a small, ragged boy had wandered into the path of a speeding delivery truck. For a
split second he wavered, hesitated, then with a despairing plunge he reached the child and
half-rolled him, none too gently, from harm's way. The next instant he was hurled head-
long by a terrific force. He heard a woman's hysterical shriek, and a confused murmur and
bable obf voices; then all faded into nothingness.
In an uptown house of brownstone, a girl was carelessly scanning the headlines of the
closing edition. Holdups, murders, elections, society notes, all sprawled in glaring type over
the sheets. Just as she was about to cast the paper aside she noticed a modest bit at the
bottom of the last page. "Man killed after saving child from truck. Unidentified."
A moment she mused over the item. What a contrast! Her thoughts were still on Arthur
Murphy. She wondered vaguely if she'd ever see Art again. With a last glance she laid the
paper down, murmuring to herself, "Poor devil! Wonder who he was."



-POEMS-

,"MID-YEAR"
Elizabeth Parker, '31

We were crowded in the classroom,
Not a person dared to speak.
It was "mid-year" time in high school.
And the strong were feeling weak.
So we shuddered there in silence,
While the brightest quaked with fear;
And each student pale and trembling,
Knew his Waterloo was near.
As we sat in trepidation,
Each one breathed a hurried prayer.
"I am lost!" one student uttered
In a voice of grim despair.
But his brave companion whispered,
When he heard the wretched voice,
"Don't surrender quite so quickly!
Ah! Look there! We have a choice."
As this heartening, cheery statement
Reached the timid comrade's ear,
He bent down and started working,
And his grade was high that year.





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BALBOA, C. Z. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1930
PUBLISHED BY IRRESPONSIBLE YOUTHS


EDITORIAL

We have observed several faults with
our school. We don't believe it is
handled right. For instance, it isn't
placed at the disposal of all those who
wish to study under its portals. There
are those poor children living in Coro-
zal, Ft. Clayton, and Amador, who
earnestly seek knowledge and are un-
able to get all they want simply be-
cause they are unable to attend the
evening sessions beginning sharply at
three. This is due to the fact that
there are no busses furnished for those
who wish to linger after three. It is a
heart-rending spectacle to see a kind,
indulgent instructress say, "John, you
must stay with me this afternoon for
a half hour," and hear John say almost
tearfully: "Teacher, I'd love to stay
but I must catch the bus''
Something must be done about this.
We can't let these poor students rest
in ignorance for want of an extra
bus. We suggest a charity food sale
to pay for the operating expenses of
one.

MARCY "TWO-TIMES"
IS SUED FOR BREACH OF
PROMISE

Vincent Marcy of Corozal, C. Z., is
being sued for breach of promise by
F. Wright also of Corozal, C. Z. Marcy
is charged with having proposed to
Wright and after being accepted hav-
ing failed to appear for the wedding.
Wright in bringing suit asks two cents
damages for the humiliation suffered.
The damaging evidence is supplied by
a photo taken of Marcy in the act of
proposing. The photo is reproduced in
this magazine somewhere in order that
curious people may see for themselves .
Marcy has been leading a double life
according to F. Wright and it is to be
hoped that the culprit will be found
guilty.
(Continued Page 4)

NOTICES FOR THE WEEK

If you like this book keep it for
yourself. If you don't, do the same.
Courtesy to "Zdnian" editor.
All articles not finished on this page
are continued on page four.
995's already filled in and signed
ready for distribution. 1015's served
on a week's notice. Apply to H. G.
Spalding.
Weather forecasts: Fair today. Rain
tonight, snow tomorrow, no moon at
ill. Sleet next week. Hail storm coming
with typhoon. Otherwise sunshine.
Found: Somebody's false teeth and
one pair of ladies' hose. Owner may
have same after identifying them in
room 6.
Jokes: Willard Percy, Bill Hele,
Fred Banan, Maduro tribe. Kit Carson,
Tom Conley. and Others.


PRICE WANTED FOR
MURDER
2 CTS. REWARD, DEAD OR ALIVE

Kemper Price, a notorious killer, is
wanted for murder. He was last seen
in Trig Class on Tuesday of last week.
This man has no feelings and is quite
dangerous. Being in a rush for no
cause at all he stepped on and killed
a helpless old ant. All ,reari-': .... ,I'
will be brought to bear -'nii r tihe
criminal to bring him to) ;" r

SOPHS ARE
EXCELLENT

MR. SPALDING FINDS THAT ONLY
52% HAVE RATING BELOW
AVERAGE
The Sophomores Class has set a new
record. This record is the rewards they
have gained after six weeks of hard
labor in their studies. After all the
averages of the four class had been
carefully computed by Mr. H. G. Spald-
ing it was found that the sophomores
excelled in scholarship. They made a
record of having only 52.% oof their
members with a standing below aver-
age. The sophs have received many
.:-..r -r.,riT. .T.ni for this and will prob-
.-lI. r- f,.- tome more in the near
future. This record will undoubtedly
stand for years. However, we feel that
some of the faculty are also deserving
of much praise for preparing the way
for the enthusiastic sophs. The sophs
will also make some new records be-
fore this school years closes, we be-
lieve since they appear to be made
for great things.

CONLEY MODEL
YOUTH

Thomas Conley has been set up as
a model for American youths. While
attending school Thomas never failed
- to get a-t least one "D". Let
this be an example to all ambitious
American youths.

REVOLUTION UNDER
WAY

Edward Smith, vice-president of the
Senior Class, and Charles Hummer,
\ice-pr,-d;lenr of the Junior Class, have
-r.i-1 1 -r higher pay. They stated
that their rcrspc.nrb;,li'ie were far too
great for -he ilry the.- were receiv-
ing. They also contended that their
duties were much harder than the
r.re-'lr, l' andrl since the presidents
r-cc,' ed ev'ctil nothing they should
ret ten per cent more. This was un-
kindly refused them so they struck.
They are now spreading consternation
:,mor-e ihe other men of high positions
rnil v'hre is much danger of there be-
ing blood shed.


COLLINGE IS A HERO

In the hearts of enthusiastic wor-
-1i.l,- r* Professor Collinge has taken
MRr Fr.ii place as the world's best
shot. Mr. Collinge doesn't use chalk
since he doesn't wish to iniJ.r, Profes-
sor Flint's status but a.-e- erasers.
After having been annoyed by a canine
for some days Mr. Collinge slipped an
eraser in his pocket and lay in wait
for the dig A. the dog failed to ap-
pear Mr. Colrne went in search of it.
He soon discovered the whereabouts
of the culprit and gave chase. He then
threw his eraser and, knocked the hark
off the dog and returned to his work
well pleased with himself.
"I knew I could do it all the time,"
he said.


HELE TO TEACH

ENGLISH

W. Hel, has finally accepted the
offer to teach English at Columbia
University. This offer was made him
because of his outstanding accomplish-
ments in the pronunciation of difficult
words. Hele has to his credit many
perfected pronunciations. For further
information ask him about gangster.
Liberty Digest, Clarinet Lemonades,
Tom stories, or about Spain resigning
her minister to Cuba.


FIGHTS FRIDAY

EXTRA HEAVY WEIGHTS HAVE
CONSENTED
In order to meet the demand for
excitement, Marcel Penso. extra-heavy
of Panama and David Emith, mammoth
pie eater of Sosa Hill Region, have
consented to have a grudge -i:hr W'
are giE in i, understandd that *h. r.rin
of *he ic-.r"l. is not to be considered.
Penso has been training on sawdust
and tacks for months and Smith, who
has eaten only trinitro-cellulose, is sure
he can knock him out. Nevertheless it
is going to be a good fight while it
lasts. Everybody can come if he comes
unarmed.


PATRONIZE LEE'S FOOD
MARKET
Domesticated fresh fish, pre-
served pigeons, all sorts of pickled
insects suitable for pie filling:
green corn. young tomatoes,
radishes, .pinsch. and other such
foods are ofrereJ to the public at
reasonable prices.
Proprietor---. 0. Lee.
Opposite Library Tel. B-1812


Vol. 2


No. 13





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DEBATING CLUB


Although this is not the first year that debating has flourished in Balboa High it is the
fi: st year that a club has been organized. When the debating club seed was sown out the
beginning of the school year it sprouted and sjon produced a club.

There were a number of elimination debates, prior to the picking of a high school squad.
In these the students manifested lack of training but great capabilities; consequently Pro-
fessor Hodges is to be commended for subsequently coaching the students. He also deserves
credit for picking the high school squad so unerringly.


President


James Cole


Vice President


Reporter
Sponsor


........ Mary Pooie


Robert Watson
Mr. C. B. Hodges






ll; *i.~
-~ i'rC I


JOKES


Tella: "With patience you can do
anything."
Mother: "Will patience fill a sieve
with water?"
Tella: "Yes, if you wait for the water
to freeze."
-THE ZONIAN --
Mrs. Baker: "What is an operetta?"
Mary: "It's a girl who works for the
telephone company."
-- THE ZONIAN
Cloro: "My Scotch uncle just gave
me a Lincoln."
Form: "Car?"
Cloro: "No, penny."
THE ZONIAN
He: "I got fooled, did you?"
She: "Yes, I'm married, too."
THE ZONIAN
"He certainly is stuck on himself."
"Yes, I suppose that's why nobody
c!se sticks to him."
-- THE ZONIAN
You may call a woman an old friend,
but you better not tell her she looks it.
THE ZONIAN
"John. define wise crack."
"A winning smile."
THE ZONIAN
Sap: "Hasn't Herbie a large voca-
bulary?"
Olio: "Yes, and he uses it all in tell-
ing you he has nothing to say."
THE ZONIAN
Lill: "Is there anything in disarma-
ment?"
Bill: "The girls seem to be getting
along without hairpins and hatpins."
THE ZONIAN
Prof. "Well, did your girls' club pass
any resolutions?"
Stude: "Passed enough resolutions to
reform the world if people ever lived up
to resolutions passed by other people."
THE ZONIAN -
"How is Erma making out in the
talking movies?"
"Well, .he has to have a double for
four-syllable words."
THE ZONIAN -
He had opened a shop, and had a
sign painted. It read: "Fresh Fish Sold
here."
"What did you put the word 'fresh'
in for?" said a customer. "You wouldn't
sell it unless it were, would you?"
So he changed it to "Fish Sold Here."


"Why do you say 'here'?" asked an-
other customer. "You're not selling it
anywhere else, are you?"
So he took out the word "here."
"Why use the words 'sold'? You're not
giving it away, are you?" asked a third.
So he painted out everything,but the
word "Fish."
Next day a fourth customer came in
and said: ''I don't see the use of that
sian 'fish' when you can smell it a block
away."
---- THE ZONIAN
Daily: (As clock strikes twelve) "Noon.
Noon all over the world."
Mr. Lee: No, Carl, you're wrong. It's
seven o'clock in the evening now in Cairo,
half-past six in the morning in the wild
Marquesas, five o'clock in the afternoon
in Jondon, half-past ten at night in-"
Daily: "Well, I'm thankful I live in
a town whe:e noon's noon."
--- THE ZnNIAN -
.. "Jack said he'd kiss me or die in the
attempt."
"Gracious! And did you let him?"
"Well. you haven't seen any funeral
notices, have you?"
--- THE ZONIAN
Mr. Lee- "And imagine the spectacle
the old-fashioned heroine must have been
when her 'eyes popped out' and her 'lash-
es fell'."
---- THE ZONIAN
Judge- "This is the third time you're
here before me."
The Accused (brightening up)- "Ah,
ves sir (hic) I thought I'd met you be-
fore."
---- THE ZONIAN
Miss Davis- "In ,teaching shorthand
and typewriting we are strong on ac-
curacy."
Suiveyor- "And how are you on
speed?"
Miss Davis- "Well, of last year's
class six married their employers within
six months."
-- THE ZONIAN
Smith- "Friends are a great consola-
tion."
Jones- "Not if you're broke."
--- THE ZONIAN
Judge- "Well, my boy, do you know
what an oath is?"
Reds- "Yes, sir! I was a golf caddie
for a whole month last summer."


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SCIENCE CLUB


Mr. G. O. Lee presented the idea of a scientific club to his classes in science and the
idea was heartily endorsed by the pupils. The president is Charles A royo, and the secretary,
Jerelind MacMurray.

This club is made up of students who are interested in science. Those ii-iibl to the
club are those who are doing "A" or "B" work in some scientific course or have passed some
science subject creditably. The membership of the club is so large that all the members can-
not meet at any one time because there is no special period set aside fo: the student's dis-
posal. The meetings are called on Mondays and Thursdays at 3 o'clock, unless there are too
many conflicts. At such meetings some class topic which has aroused special interest is
studied more thoroughly. If the pupils have found interesting experiments from scientific
publications they perform these. They no their own original experiments.

At 6:30 in the evening special meetings are held whenever the opportunity is available
to invite an outside speaker to speak on some subject, or to go on field trips, or both. Oc-
casionally the science club is able to obtain an outsider to speak during school hours.

Some of the outstanding events have oeen: The discovery that a fairyland exists behind
the lenses of a compound microscope: the trip to the large telescopes at Pedro Miguel; the
lecture and study of the evening sky by Mr Hess; the trip to the telephone exchange and
the lecture and demonstrations by Mr. Daniels: Mr. Hr-.-:n1' talk on the experimental
gardens; Dr. Curry's talk on child health; demonstrations in first aid by Dr. Presnell; anC
Roger Matter's demonstration of transmit ing electric power through the air.


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$e OA

And games: What more to life than these ?
To learn and laugh and, laughing, win !


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SOCCER
Back row, left to right: Dailey, Mitten, Hele, Des Londes, Jones.
Front row: Fields, De la Pefia. J Salterio, Capt. Dew. Michaelsor.
Not in the picture: J. Salterio, A. Saltelio. Booth.






N LEAGUE STANDING

LEAGUE STANDING


Team

Sophomores
Freshmen
Seniors
Juniors


P W L T Pet.


1.000
S .666
1 .200
1 .000


Balboa High ran true to form in the interschool soccel contest this year when they
succeeded in winning the championship from Cristobal. Three games were required to deter-
mine the winner, Balboa taking the first and the last, while Cristobal won the second.

The first game of the series was played at Balboa with our team walking away with
the contest with a score of 10 to 3. The second was played over in Cristobal where the sand-
crabs live on the soccer field. We lost the game 3-2. The third game was the best of the
three. Balboa won the toss-up so it was played in our back-ya d. It was clean and close
throughout. Our team won 2-0, taking the crown.


C-L-~-~ ~~-~ ~-~--- ~ --------------~--


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UI
I' i
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1-


GIRLS' BASEBALL
Left to Right: Tonneson, E. Jones, Driscoll, L. Hambelton, Clisbee,
G. Jones, Martin, E. Hambelton.



INID)()1R I ASEA;A LI
INTERSCHOLASTIC



On Saturday, March 22, the Cristobal indoor baseball team crossed the Isthmus to play
the Pacific side team at the Balboa playshed. They were defeated by a score of 28-18.

The second game of the three-game series was played on March 29, at the Cristobal
playshed, and although both teams played well, Balboa tasted defeat. The score was 18-14.

The third and deciding game of the series was played April 5, at the Balboa playshed.
Balboa took the lead in the early part of the game and kept it th: oughout-the score at the
end being in Balboa's favor, 33-10.



INTERCLASS


Team


Sophomores
Seniors
Freshmen
Juniors


Played Won Lost


3 3 0
3 2 1
3 1 2
3 0 3


Standing


1.000
.667
.333
.000


_ ._. ____~ ~


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BOYS' BASKETBALL
Left to right: Coach Cllinge, Dick, Capt. Hele, Specht, Jones Bleakley,
Des Londes, Mitten, Dai.ey, Dew, Fieias, Soenoerger lviacaonetl, A. Hiee.


1
It has been contended for years that the weather on the Isthmus of Panama is too
warm for the game of football. However, this past year Mr. Zierten aided the boys greatly
in promoting a game between the Seniors and Underclassmen and another between the
high school and the boilermakers. Captain C..iilli _] 1I from Quarry Heights deserves speci!.l
mention for his services rendered in the latter game. The participants in these games, after
receiving some coaching and a little practice, demonstrated that football can be played down
here.


RESULTS


14 High School
0 Boilermakers


fi
.. h


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r ~


Seniors ... ..--.--
Underclassmen






7 /~~7ii/7/,~'/% 11J14AL.J ~


U


GIRLS BASKETBALL
Left to right: Newhard, Stapleton, Clisbee, G. Jones, Martin, Tonneson E. Jones.


It A S K ET I 1A I LL
INTERSCHOLASTIC


A series of three games was arranged between Balboa High School and Cristobal High
School. The first game of the series was played at the Balboa playshed and sent to the Balboa
team. The final score was 40-8.
The second game was played at the Cristobal playshed, and once more Balboa was vic-
torious and came home with the pennant. The score at the end of the game was 50-5.
The Cristobal girls tried hard and showed excellent sportsmanship but were outplayed
at every stage of the game.


INTERCLASS


Played Won Lost


Standing


6 6 0 1.000
6 4 2 .667
6 2 4 .333
6 0 6 .000


Team


Sophomores
Seniors
Freshmen
Juniors






M


F: '


4C.


Standing: Bringman, Hele, Mauborgne, Maduro, Evans
Kneeling: Capt. Dick, Humphrey, Sanford, Dew.


T E N N I .

The tennis eliminations tournament began at the opening of school with some sixteen
players in the contest. Due to rainy weather the tournament was not carried to a finish, but
merely far enough so that the seven men on the squad could be picked. Those picked were:
Freddie Maduro (who later went to Cuba for the Central American Olympics representing
Fanama), Somers Dick (Capt.), Bill Hele, Ben Mauborgne, Jack Maduro, Michael Dew, and
Jack Humphrey. These players, backed by several others, formed the team that played
Cristobal High.

INTERSCHOOL TOURNAMENTS
FIRST MATCH


Dick t(B 6-1, 6-2
Drake (C)

Hele (B) 6-2, 4-6
Pescod (C)


Dick (B) 6-1, 6-3
Drake (C)

Mauborgne (B)
Wikingstad (C) 6-1, 6-4


Mauborgne (B) 6-0, 6-1
Harmon (C)

Mauborgne (B) 6-3, 6-3
Humphrey (C)

SECOND MATCH

Dew (B) 6-0, 6-1
Harmon (C)

Bringman (B) 6-3, 6-1
Maduro (B)
Wikingstad (C)
Mundberg (C)


Dick (B) 6-2, 4-6. 6-3
Dew (B)


Pescod (C)
Drake (C)


Sanford B)
Evans (B)

Pescod (C) 6-2. 6-4
Drake iC)


~~_~_~_ _.._ __ ~___ ~__~~~_






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-- I


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GIRLS' SWIMMING
Left to right: Quinn, Haldeman, Wahl, Van Clief, Conard,
Jones, Pyle, Van Valkenburgh, Ky.eber
Coach Grieser.


SWiIMMI;NG

Balboa saw one of its best years in swimmihrg during th3 past 1930 season. Although
Josephine McKim graduated last year, her place was more than filled by the development
of new material.

INTEIRCLASS
The interclass meet was won by the Sophomores with the Freshmen and Seniors close
behind. With such stars as Walston, Quinn, Brewerton, hearne and Kyleber, the Sophomores
easily took the meet even when the other classes had swimmers like Schw-nderman, Conard,
G:ant, Humphrey and Wood to put against them. With such an array of stars in practice.
clipping seconds off records, itcertainly looked dark for Cristobal when our team showed
its ni-iht

INTERSCHOLASTIC
FS.ituld.v. April 26th, Cristobal Hi, h received the most disastrous defeat of its school year
when Balboa defeated them 96-12 in the interschool swimming meet.
All of the swimmers for' Balboa did splendidly and they allowed Cristobal only two sec-
onds and six third places, out of thirteen contests. This was a crushing defeat for them and
a brilliant victory for our natators.

..AmIi-!i' the IiiLh-lilct.s of the meet was the record swim of W:I.Itri who tied the Inter-
rscholastic Record in the United SI.itei. when he swam the 50 yard dash in 24 seconds. Other
good marks were made by B:ewerton in the 220 when he made it in 2 minutes 33 seconds,
and the breast-stroke in 30 seconds by Schwindcrman rounded out a complete victory.
The schedule of events follows:


~~


__~~___





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BOYS' SWIMMING
Girls Boys
50 yd. Free Style


Conard (B)
Haldeman i Bliss (C)


Walston i B
Wood (bi Time: 24 seconds
Mundberg iC)


220 yd. Free Style
Brewerton tB;
Grant (B) Time: 2 min. 33 seconds
Kroll (C)
50 yd. Breast Stroke


Quinn (E)
Van Clief
Hall (C)


Conard (B)
Pyle (1) Time:


iRB T'me: 42.2 sec.


1 minute


Haldeman (B)
Van Clief (B)
Stevenson (C)

Kyleber (B)
Quinn (B)
Pyle (B)

Balboa Time: 1 min. 50 s
Quinn
Pyle
Haldeman
Conard


Schwinderman (B)
Wcstendo:'f IB1 Time: 31 seconds
Jones, W. : B3
100 yd. Free Style
Walston I B
Humphrey iBi Time: 59.6 seconds
Grant (B)
50 yd. Back Stroke
Wood (B)
Kroll (C) Time: 31 seconds
Jones, W. (B)
Fancy Diving
Brewerton (1B
Turner (C)
Hachett (C)


Relay


Balboa Time: 1 min. 24.8 sec
Wood
Grant
Humphrey
Walston


_______ __.__ ~ _~~__~__ .___ ~~_ _


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-I,'.


7 /~r' 7't~i'7i,,? 7.~'.2~' ~ -


VOLLEY BALL


V O LL EY B ALL


INTERSCHOLASTIC


By the winning of two of the three arranged matches the Balboa girls showed their
superiority over the Cristobal girls in volleyball. The first match was played at the Balboa
playshed and went to Balboa with little difficulty. The scores were 21-0 and 21-10
The second game took place at the Cristobal playshed and once more Cristobal tasted
defeat, Balboa taking both games by a good margin. The scores were 21-5 and 21-8. The Balboa
team exhibited excellent teamwork throughout both games.


INTERCLASS


Team


Sophomores
Seniors
Freshmen
Juniors


Played Won Lost Standing

6 6 0 1.000
6 4 2 .750
6 2 4 .250

6 0 6 .000


__ __
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BASEBALL
Standing: Hele, Jones. Mitten, DessLondes, Specht, Dew.
Knee:ing: Dick Johnston (Scorer), De La Pena, Morrison.
Not in the picture: torrest.


Name


DesLondes
Dew
Specht
Morrison
De la Peia
Morchosky
T. Pescod
Maurer
W. Wikingstad
Wood
Wertz
Dick
R. Wikingstad
Egolf
Hele
C. Pescod
Jones
Will
Mitten
Forrest


Team Pos. AB R H PO


P. 8
L. F. 7
3 B. 9
C. F. 9
R. F. 6
C. 7
3 B. 7
P. 7
2 B. 8
R. F. 4
L. F. 9
2 B. 7
1 B. 7
S. S. 8
S. S. 10
C. F. 7
C. 8
R. F. 4
1 B. 6
L. F. 0


4 5 1
1 3 3
1 3 3
0 3 0
1 2 0
1 2 15
1 2 3
2 2 0
1 2 6
0 1 1
1 2 4
1 1 1
0 1 17
0 1 3
2 1 3
2 0 4
1 0 19
0 0 0
0 0 25
0 0 0


A E Pet.

7 0 .625
0 3 .426
5 3 .333
0 1 .333
0 0 .333
7 1 .284
5 1 .284
7 1 .284
1 0 .250
0 0 .250
0 1 .222
4 1 .142
0 1 .142
0 3 .125
8 1 .100
0 0 .000
5 0 .000
0 0 .000
1 0 .000
0 0 .000


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FIRST GAME
12345678 9 Total
000005000 5 Balboa
0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 2 7 Cristobal

SEA SCOUT GAME


SECOND GAME
123456
010000
002000


12 3 4 5 6 7 89 Total
1 0 0 3 0 0 1 1 2 8
1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3


INTERCLASS BASEBALL
LEAGUE STANDING


W. L. Pet.


1.000
.666
.333
.000


On Saturday, March 22, the Cristobal tennis team came over to Balboa to play the
first tournament of the three tournament series. Louise Martin of Balboa carried away the
singles against Ann Powers. Both girls played splendid tennis, Martin having the upper hand
during the last two sets. Clarita and Cecclia Smith played against Pauline Hearn and Vilma
Hall, defeating Cristobal after having lost the first set.
The second tournament was played at Cristobal, March 29. Once more Louise Martin of
Balboa won the singles from her opponent. Balboa took the doubles by forfeit after the Cris-
tobal team failed to put in their appearan :e.


FIRST TOURNAMENT

L. Martin (B) 5-7, 6-4, 6-4
Ann Powers (C)

C. Smith (B) 3-6, 6-2, 6-3
C. Smith
P. Hearne
V. Hall (C)


SECOND TOURNAMENT
L. Martin (B) 3-6, 6-2, 6-3
Ann Powers (C)



C. Smith (B) Won by forfeit
C. Smith


HANDBALL
A comparatively new sport in the hi.h school this year was handball. While this game
has been played before during the school year it had never taken a firm enough hold on the
I "'il to be permanent. However, this year it aroused a great deal of enthusiasm and both
single and double tournaments were played off.
The winners in these two tournaments arranged for three matches to be played with
Cristobal lh I'i In the first of the tournaments our boys easily defeated Cristobal on our
home court by taking all the singles and one doubles match. The second tournament, the fol-
lowing week, however, was taken by Cristobal when our team made a poor showing on for-
eign ground;. Balboa succeeded in captu ing the third tournament when we took two singles
and one double to give us two out of there tournaments.
The boys who receive special mention in this game are Hayden Jones, William Held.
f:leb Clemnts. Albhrt Hele and Earl F ii-nbertc r With the start it has made this year the
f:nme shmif'd rirw more interestt in the future and become a head-liner.


Cristobal
Balboai


Total
4
3


Balboa
Sea Scouts


Team

Seniors
Sophs
Juniors
Freshies


TE N N I S


IL___ __~__~ ~~ ~___ __ ~_


ii..

---r.-~ (.il II -~.._


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Offers to the Public Through its Authorized
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Kodak Products, a Complete Kodak
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CLASS OF 1930


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PANAMA


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Representatives of


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COMPLIMENTS

.. . T O .


The Graduating


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Produced by The Zonian Staff of Balboa High School
Art Work by Karl Winquist, Senior, B. H. S.
Engravings by De Poole, Panama City, R. de P.
Printed by The Panama American Printers, Panama City, R. de P.







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Full Text

PAGE 5

THE ZONIAN :-I93 -:

PAGE 6

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/zonian1930balb

PAGE 8

NAllURE GROWN AUDLBLE, W[TH CROONIN G VOICE TilE S HOUTS OF BUCCANEERS, TilE GLINT OF GOLD

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A TROPIC ISLE WHERE ROMANCE LINGERS FOR LAUGHTER, SONG, AND JOLLY PICNICKJNGS

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TWIXT CARffi BLUE AND SOUTH SEAS GLAMOROUS, A JOINTURE WilEN LJ::ARNING 'S VOICE I S H USHED AND LAUGHTER'S BOLD

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AND THESE HEIGHTS. TOO, ARE NOT ATTAINED BY FLIGHT WHERE PALM TREES WHISPER SECRETS TO THE BREEZE

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Min n eso t a Cornell Co llege B S Iowa State Co llege Unive r s ity of Minnesota University of Chicago Sciences G LEN R La:...,..J-' Col lege and SCience MARION J'RATER Okl a homa B A., University of Oklahom a M A., University of Wyomlng FACULTY G R ACE PETERSON WARNE R Co lorado A B. Co l o rado T eac h e r s' College A B., Washin gton H J ZIERTON Minnesota B S., Bradley Tech M ec hanical Drawing ELINOR D ROBS ON Io wa B A M A. Iowa State Uni v e r s ity English a n d S7Janish

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VEltN A STEEN M!nnesota Macal ester Co ll ege Rasm us se n Business College Commercia l Subjects D. L PETTIBONE W i sco n sin Lacr osse S c hool of Phy s ical Physical Instruction II G. SPALDING V ermont Unive r sity of Vermont "";/ :ff M A .. Teachers' Coll ege. Co lumbia U. f' """ Principal IDA 0 .. 1 7 s Teag1cr l Rive r F a ll s, WISCOn SlI1 yvv .. r "sistant Principal IIELEN CURRIER BAKER Minnesota A B .. of Su pervisor 0 / Public So'z.ool Musir C. S. CARS O N A B .. Uni I chigan A M Harva r d Unive:'s ity Spanish ROGER W Wisconsin A B .. L awrcn Coll ege /. English (wd C ommercial Subject s MILDRED M DAVI S Califo n d : A B., Colo rado State"Teachers' College Subjects M A R T II A L EMMONS M a n sfie l d, Toxas A B . B::..yl o r llniversity A M .. {:fniv e r sity of Texas H isLory. Latin. and English J. FROST anal Zan A B .. Mount 81 n ish and French HENRY J GIUESER New York Teach e r s College, Colurnbia U Swim.ming Instructor LOUISE II 1\NNA Kentu cky Nc\'; IIave n School of Phys ical Training Physical Education lor Girls C. B. HODGES Texas 1\. il .. North Texas s,!:,at e Teach e r s College Columbia Univ e r s ity History E. M. KRU MB1\ CII Missouri A B., Univers ity of Kansas Englis h II T. LIESEY Nebraska A B., U niv e rsity of Neb :-aska Mo rnings id e College, Iowa Notre Dame Coaching School Physical Training lor Boys

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To Mr. GEORGE O. LEE. alHtiscr of tI!,,, c1il55 o f 1 for I,is I dnl' cart' ani' l'x rdlcnt mana!)CI11Cl1t [Jurill!\ all of our nctiuit i cs ti!rollgl!l1ut till' 00 till t1,ilIli;s I)f l'tH'r!.! :Senior To Mrs. EMMA MAE KRUMBACII \lte 0\\1" oUt nratihtl'lc fo\ : till s incere illtrt"cst i1!at sl!l' 51,0\\lc[I in tll(' I"ruinr
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L -, We pass swift hours in Learning's Ha ll s

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AFTERWARD B)I R ita Drisco!! Strength to begin again when sc hool i s done, Ri sing tomorrow r eFres hed and strong, Braving vvhat e 'er befalls, seeing it through, Facing undaunted each day anew ... Strength to begin again, that's all we ask If w e should Ellter in so m e given task! I F we should stumble on the road we near, Strength to begin again, that is our prayer. Strength to begin again, in spite of tears Faith to begin again ... Hope's brigher years ... Strength to beging again Life, this we ask; And ca r e not the cost, nor how trying the task:

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SENIOR C LAS S OFFICERS President Vice P re s ident Secr etary Treasur er Class Advi se r Class Col ors C h'3s Flcwer Cla ss Mottn Mascot E a rl Solenbe r ge:' Somers Di ck EItn er Orr Ra e Newhard Mr. G eo rge Lee Red and White R ed & White Rose s DUm P 03sum, D e b eo I gu'3.l1u CL ASS SONG ( '1'0 tl7e tllm q/ "Sleep), I '((III!)' ") Dear o l d 13alboa Hi, we m u s t s a y goodbye, And w e' r e grie,'ing calise wc have to leave you Dear old,good o ld, sc hool, dear o l d Balboa Hi, Y o u've stood the t es t, vVe knoll' are best, W e love vo u All our troubles ca r es of the day, I n high school m emori es Soon fad e away. Sun shine thru' your door, Good ti m es we've h a d galore, Who could ask for more Tha n B alboa Hi School)

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EARL SOLENBERGER Nor:h Dakota ,. B orn lor success he seemed. With 91 to win. with heart to hold Wi,Il sh;ning gifts that took. all eyes." C lass Secretary '2 8 C;wimming '28 Bana '2J Basketball '29 '3 0 D e batin g Club Orchest:'a Zonia n Staff '3 0 Cl ass President '30 H andbaH '30 SOMERS DICK South Carolina "l.cl knowleclge grow /rOl1t more to m ore." Hawt.hOlI"! e High. San An ton io T exas '27 Tenn is '29 30 Baseball Staff '30 Basketball Class Vice-President '30 RAE NEWHARD Canal Zone 'She's all 111y fanc,lj painterl her; She's love ly, she s (livine. Zonian Follies '27 Glee Club '27 Zonian Staff '28 Basketball '27 '28 '29 '3 0 Baseb all '27 '28 29 Track '27 2 8 '29 Volleyball '28 '29 Bowling '28 '29 Supper Club '29 Class Treasure r '27 '28 '29 Honor Bright" '3 0 ELMER ORR Canal Zone Within the ("mit oj becominff mirfll I uever S]JC11t au hanr'.., tnlle witlwl." "A m ,errier man Glee Club '27 Bowling '27 28 '29 Band '28 L c lawala" '28 Honor Bright" S ec:'eta ry 30 Popular!ty C ontest '3 0 ROBERT K ADAMS Canal Zon e "111.1/ heart is true as steel." Good in g Hig,h School. Gooding. Idaho '27 Glee Club '29, All at Sea" '29 / j /

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NELL[E BRULAND New Jersey ull1y life is like a stroll 1L1)On the beach. Bowling Team '27 ROBERT 0 BULLOCK tllinois "Tile price a/wisdom is above Tllbies: Glec Club '27, '28 O "cilest .. a '2 7 '28, 29 '3 0 JOliN STANLEY BUTLER, Jr, Canal Zone "Write m e a s one who loves l lis fellow-men." GEORGE L. CAIN New Jersey .,/ clare cio a'l that may b ecome a 1II,'l1l; W ha elar es clo more is none:' P almyra Hig h School, Palmyra, N J. Glee Club '29 DOCIA CLISBEE Canal Zone A j1'iclIclsIU1J that like lo ve is warm A love like frie1ldship, s t eady.' Zonian Follies '27 Glee Club '27 Bowling '28, '29, '30 Supper Club '29, 30 Track '27, '2 8 '29 C l ass Secreta r y Basketball '2 7 '28 '29, 30 Bascb a ll '27, '2 8, '29 30 SWImming '27, '28, '29 Vol: ey B a ll '2 7 '2 8, 29, 30 Athletic Counc il '29, '30 Zonian Staff '30 D ebating Club '30 Popularity Contest 30

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SAM BARD ELSON, Jr. C a n a l Z o n e "lIe c01net h unto you with a tale which l1ol(letl1 c h ilclren from I J lay and old men /r071l c h i m ney corners," Orc hestr a '27, 28 '2 9 '3 0 B and '28 Hono r Bright" 30 D e baLing Club 30 ROBERT P BARD EL SON C a n a l Z o n e H e knew what's what." G lee Club '2 7 School Band '28 O r c hestra 3 0 D e bating Club '30 P lay S t a ff '30 HELEN CECILIA BEJARANO C a n a l Zo n e G e n tle 0/ speech, benefio ent oj mhd" JOYCE B ELL N o r t h C a r olina S o S1Veet. s o soft. so hI/shed an cur, Bridget own. NortJh Carolina '26, '27. '28 GEORGE A BRINGMAN W ashingto n D C G re a t t r uths are IJorliollS 01 the suni 01 men Great soul s (Ire 1JOrti01lS of eternity D u P ont Jr. Hig h Du P o n t. Washington Lincoln Hi g h Tacmn a. Washington T ennis 30

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JAMES E Louisiana t 'His life was gentle and t lt e eleme nts So mixed in him that nature m igh t sland 1(.1J and say to all the 'World tThis is a 11l,an'." Jesuit Hig h S c hool New Orleans, L a. "27 '2& '29 "HOllor Bright" 30 Pre s id e n t of Deb a tin g C lub '30 KATHLEEN CONAilD New York / g,;ve the callI can no m071e." W ashington-Lee Hig h School, C l arcn d l lll. Va. RICHARD T CONLEY Florida "None b u t hims el f can b e his parallel Ga. Military Academy, College park, Ga. '27, 28 Cristobal Hig h S chool '29 Track 30 Football ELIZABETH CUNNINGHAM G eo r g ia "That thing c'llled charm 11':(8 s he." Girls' Hi, Atlanta, G eorg ia, '27 Chattanoog a Hi Tennessee, '2a Cri stobal Hig h S chool, '2 9 Librarian '30 MADGE DE GRUMMON D Cana l Zone H enceloT dz. tllY pl,lhway lies among the slars." Le s M arronie r s", B clg 'um 2 8 '2) "Convent of Ursuline. Be l gium '27 D e bating Club Bas ketball '30

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EVA DE LA PENA C a n a l Zone "Hers is gentle wit: it injures none," T ennis '2 7 '28 Bas ketball '2 7 '28 JAMES DES LONDES Indi a n a J never saw his like .. there lives No greater leader." y Soccer '2 7 '28, '29, '3 0 Basketball '27, '28, '29, '3 0 Bowling '27, '28, '29, '3 0 Baseball '28, 29 30 Track '28, '29, '30 Handball '28, '2 9 Athletic Council '29, '30 H ono r Bright" '30 RITA WINIFRED DRISCOLL Can a l Zone ,. But were it to my fancy given T o Tale her charms, /'cl call them, heaven," Track '2 7 School B and '28 Bowling '28 30 Basket b a ll '27 '28 Baseball '2 7 '28 '29 '30 Suppe r Club '27 '28 '29 '30 Play Staff '30 Glee Club '29 All At Sea" '29 D e bating Club '30 IDA ESLEECK Virginia "A nature sweet, a disposition 1Jleas(Lnt." Blair Junia:' Hi. Norfolk, Virginia '27 Glee Club '29 '3 0 Supper Club '28 All At Sea" '29 BERNHARD EVERSON N o rwa y "/ love my jellolV-creCllures, I do all the good 1 can." B and '28 Glee Club '28 L e lawaJa" '28 Class Secr e tary '29 Orchestra '29 '30 "Honor Bright" 30 l Y \

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J j DOROTHY KLUMPP GERBER M assac hu setts "For never anyihing 0011, be mniss \V hen sim1Jleness ancZ duty tender it." Bowling '25 '26 Bask etba ll '25 '2 6 '30 Baseb a ll '26 DORIS HALLETT Massach usett s .. Wearing all that weig h t Of learni11g lightly like a flower:' Supper Club '27 '28 '29 '30 Libr3 ri a n '30 Zonian Staff 30 PAULINE HALLORAN Cana l Zone She IS a tooman lhc"'e !ore may be wOlfe' Sh e is a woman, therefore may be won:' Swimming '27 '28 Supper Club '29 '30 E LIZABETH HEARNE Canal Zone 0 thou art fairer than t he evening air Clad in the beauty oj a thollsancl stars." "Zonian F ollies" '27 C lass Vic e-Presid ent '27 Bowling '27 Student Council '27 Glee Club '27 '28 L e law a la" '28 Supper Club '28 "Honor Bright" 30 WILLIAM HELE C anal Zone Who to h i m se! is law. 110 law doth need Offends no law, and is a king illdeed:' Baseball '2 8 '29 30 Bask etball '28 '29 '30 Soccer '28 '29 30 Tenni s '28 '29 '30 Track '28 '29 Swimming 28 H a ndball '29 30 Football 30

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CAROL HERFURTH Washington, D C. uThere's nothing ill can elwell in such a te111,1)le." M cKinley High School. Washington D C. '29 '3 0 Suppeo Club '29 30 THEODORE JACK HUMPHREY Canal Zone "Genius cloes what it must. ta'ent cloes what it can Central High. Bay City, Michigan '29 T ennis '2 7 '28 30 Swimming '27 '30 Debating 30 ROBEHTA MACE JACQUES Al abama
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RALPH H KIRKPATRICK Canal Zone f A tnle jriel1cl is Im'ever a j1'iP71rl." Glee Club '29 All At Sea" '29 Zonian Staff '30 Play Staff '30 EDWARD LOWE P a nama J thcw Ie whatever god s ma!J be For 1ny u1tconq1L!3rabie sou;." CANDELARIA CHICHI LUTZ Colombia "A 71wrry heart malceth a c li eer/ul counte1l anc e." Supper Club '27 '28 '29 T ennis '27 Glee Club '28 '29 L e lawala" 28 All At Sea" '29 JAMES MACDONELL P ennsy lvania "This is t h e ShOTt and 1011g 0/ it." Lock Haven Hi g h School, Lock Haven, Pa. Trac k '29 Football '3 0 Basketb a ll 30 VINCENT CHARLES MARCY Washington D C t'A m .an that blushes is not quite (l brute." Band 28 Swimming '2 7 28 Track '2 7 Basketball '28 All At Sea" '2 9 Glee Club '2 9

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LOUISE MARTIN T exas Her ways are ways 01 1Jleasanlness. ancl all her pat h s arc Glee Club '27 Zonian Follies 27 Swimming '27 '28 Indoor Baseb a ll '27 28 '29 '30 Track '2 7 '2 8 V olleyb a ll '2 7 '28 '2 9 '3 0 T ennis '2 7 '28 '2 9 '3 0 Bas ketb all '28 '29 ROGER MATTER Canal Zo n e H A nd what he greatly thought ife nobl1, dared" EMLEY B, MEAD N ew J e r sey Kinel hearts are more than coronets. Glee Club '29 All At Sea" '29 Girls Reserves '27 '28 '29 '3 0 Shorthand anci T y pewritin g Contests '29 Zoni a n Staf[ JEANE MORRILLA MEEHAN New Y ork "So sweet was hCl' c011l.pani0l1sl11P Slle could not be alone," Zonia n Staff Suppe r Club '3 0 Libra: i a n '30 HARRY MITTEN Canal Zone "Stalely c w.d tall he mOl'es il1 lhe hall T he chicf oj a thousand jar YULee." .. All at Sea" '29 Glee Club '2 9 '3 0 Soccer Basketb all '3 0 Baseball '3 0 Football '3 0 Play Staff '3 0

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ELLIOTT MONACO Washington D C T he noblest 1nind the best conten tment has:' Pres! d e n t '2 7 2 8 '2 9 Zonia n Staff '28 2 9 '3 0 Students C ounc il '27 Stude n t C ounic l '2 7 D e bating Club 30 JAC K MORHISON N ew Y ork H e is 0011L1 Jlete in feature, anel in m.ind, With a.ll gooel grace to grace a. gentlem.a1l. D anville H S., Danville, Va. '26 Cri sto b a l Hig h S c h o ol '27 Swimming '29 ':10 Baseb a ll '29 '30 ",,'" K. PARKER C a n a l Z o n e __ v' ..... Joy rises in me like a summer"s m orn.' WILLARD ELMER PERC Y N ew Y ork .. H e gave 'lozth a zest and he gave his best; G ive him the best to come." Glee Club '26 '2 7 Zonia n Staff '30 C ARMEN ANN A PIM E N T O C a n a l Zon e "Many daughters have clone virt1107fsly. but thOll excclles!. them, all." O r c hestr a '29 '3 0

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MARY POOLE Canal Zo n e / hare no other U lan a woman' s Class Presid e n t 2 8 Indoor Baseb a ll '29 Voll ey b a ll '29 Bowling 129 Track '29 H onor Bright" '30 Zan i a n Staff 30 D cdating Club Vice Preside n t '30 Popul arity C o ntest '3 0 IDA MAE POSEY Okla h o m a "The light 0 / love, the purity oj g race, Th e mi1ld. lhe music breathing /r011t her face," Lawton H'gh School, L awton, Okla" '27 28 29 All A t Sea" 29 Glee Club '28 '29 KEMPER PRICE New M ex i co "No 111(17/ can 1)l'orillCe grcat things w h o is Hol thorolLf/hly since) c i1l clC'tlillg with himse!j." H o n o r Bright" '3 0 Glee Club '30 ELIZABETH RAYMOND New York "She smiled and the shadows departecl. Cristobal Hi g h School '27 '28 '29 t:LSA LOUISE REIMANN Canal Zon e "Those true eyes Too 1Jllre ((l1ri lao h011est lLught to disCluisp The SH..'cet son l shining Lhrouyl, lhem" Glee Club '27 '28 '30 Zonian F o llies '27 Supper Club '27 L e lawala" '28 H o n o r Bright" '30

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DOROTHY ROSSON T exas I'Her loveliness 1 never knew Until she smiled on me. P a l o Alto Union Hig h '27 Napa Union Hi g h School 27' 30 ENA LOUISE SIMONS Canal Zone "Howe'er it be, it seents to me Tis only noble to b e good Supper Club '27 '28 '29 30 Glee Club 28 CECILIA ARIAS-SMITH Canal Zone "Of Sll1"lJassing benuty and in Lhe bloo11/, of youth." Zonian Follies '27 Tenni s '2 8 '29 '3 0 Swimming '29 Baseball '27 '28 '29 Bas ketball '28 29 Supper Club '2 7 '28 '29 CLARITA ARIAS-SMITH Canal Zone "A sweet attractive kinel 0/ grace A full assurance giv e n by looks." Zon i a n Follies '27 Tennis '27 28 '29 Supper Club '2 7 '28 '29 Baseball '27 '28 '29 Basketb a ll '28 '29 Swimming '28 EDW ARD SMITH Illin o is H e knows how te(liolls lif e is.'C lass Treasur er '27 Handball 28 Basketball 28

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BOBSI E SMITH K ansas A rose is sweeter in the bud than full blossom." St. Mary-of-the-Woods Terre Haute, Ind. '28 St. Mary-of-the-Springs, E Colurnbus Ohio '29 WAYNE SOLENBERGER North D akota "Studious oj ease, and jourl of 1l:lL11lble things." H andball '29 Vice President '29 MARGARET STAPLETON Mississippi [ Ier air, her manners, all who saw admired." Supper Club '2 7 '28 29 30 Track 28 Bas k etball 28 Volleyb a ll '28 '29 30 Bowling '28 '29 Baseball '28 '29 30 Honor Bright" '3 0 D ebatin'l" Club '3 0 VINCENT E SULLIVAN N ew York "His smile is sweetened by his gravity. Tennis '27 28 '29 Bowling '27 '28 '2 9 ANDREW VAN SICLEN N ew Y ork H e lL''lS not merely a eIL:1) oj the old block. bw' the old block itself." Glee Club 27 Swimming '27 "Honor Bright" 30 Football '3 0

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VALERIA VAN VALKENBURGH Canal Zone "My heaTt is like a sill gin[1 biHl. Track '27 Supper Club '28 Zonian Staff '3 0 Swimming '30 ROBERT 0 WATSON Canal Zon e They' re only truly greal who arc truin {jooel. Swimming '28 D ebating Club, Secretar y '30 'onian Stafr '30 Honor Bright" '30 DONALD WEIGOLD Canal Zone "For l a man by nothing is so well betrayed A s b1J his 11I(l111lCrs." G lee Club '27 '27 X u r c hestr a '28 '29' "Banel '28 WILLETT ,' anal Zone "Tholl"ll( t-a mind dUll suits with fhis Thy j:tir (t!lei ollllOarcl character. KARL WJNQU IST Canal Zo n e "A gooel heart is than all the lielld,<:; in the world," Banel '28 "A ll at Sea" '29 Orchestr a '30 Play Staff '30

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VIRGINIA WOODHULL New York "A daughter oj the gods. divinely And most divinel1j jair:' Suppe:' Club '27 '28 '29 '30 "Honor Bright" Zonian Slaff '30 Bowling '28 Volleyball '28 FREDERICK E, WRIGHT New York "JI1en of Jew 100tds are the best men." Bryan High School, Bryan. Texas '26 '27 Main Avenue Hi g h School. San Antonio. Texas '28 LEWIS WRIGHT New York Life i s not life o i all without delight." Mlin H 'g h. San Antonio, Texas '28 Bryan Hig h Schoo l Bryan. Texas '27 PHILIP L YCAZA Canal Zone "fie lille,fI in that ideal world Whose language is not speech btl sOllg." Glee Club '27 '28 MARK MEYER SHAPIRO Wisconsin "How (oroiblc nre riall( wnrd'\ " L e lawala" '28 G lee Club '28 Eco l e I ntcl'nacionale, Geneva, Switze rland '29 VIOLET DIXON .. A lovely lady (Jarmented 171 11gltt FrOl1t her mun beaut v ." Massachuset.ts Somerville High School '27 '28 '29 AUGUST SCHWINDEMAN New York "1/ sl1e 1L1lclerVaZlle 11L". W hat care I how fair she be," Track '27 '28 '29 Tennis '27 "Honor B: i ghl" 30 Baseball '30 Debating Club '3 0 Football '30 Swimming '27 '28 '29 '30 Soccer '29

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Y JJY --ELEA:,\O H. PAlU'-E H. ""''' In October 1 926. t w o g igan t i c dirigibles carrying the insc!.iption B H S 3 0 ': took the ai r with several oth e r ships to cruise abo u t the dark worl d o f kno wled ge with Commence men t as the goal. The first ship, "The B ald Scobie", was officered by C aptain Flint, P ilot E. Monaco, Co-Pilot F B a n a n Radi o Operator A S chwinde m a n and M echanic E. Smith. The other ship, "The Spirit o f '30 ", fl yi n g g reen a n d w h ite col o r s was o fficel e d b y Captam K o p e r s ki Pilot M Aye: 's Co-Pilot E Hearne, Radi o Ope rator D C li sbee, and Mechan i c R. New hard The jolly c r e w s wer e e nli s t e d and enthu s iastically fe ll to wor k t h o u g h hardl y knowing wher e to star t. T hose who f a iled to do t h e i r d uty a board t h e "blimps" w e r e pus hed ove r to l a n d in t h e turbulent sea, O bsc urity. The air ships cam e t o rest to p e:.mit t h e cre w s to div ert t h e m se l ves occasi o n a lly At thv fi rst l a n di n g t h e crews invad ed the spo rts world a n d carried away t h e blu e ribbo n in socce r a n d swimming, and the red in t rack These two s h ips soared tn very h i g h a l t i t u des. Their mark was surpassed o n l y b y "The 2 7 Special." On June 24 1927 c l ouds filled t h e sky. The 2 7 Spec i a l passed fro m s i ght and t h e B. H S. '30"s were forced to land. "The Bald S co bie" was w r ec ke d but t h e c rew was saved Thr ee month s passed before the r e m ai n i n g shi p, "The S pirit o f '30", was read y to t a k e o ff I n October, 1927, the ship flying the red and w hite soared to even g reater h e i g hts. Captain Vette, Pilot E Monaco, Co-Pilot B Jewell Radi o Operator E S o len b e: gel' and Mechanic R Newhard handled the m i g hty "Spiri t o f '30 w i t h i ts c r ew o f one hundred nin eteen souls. Again the c r ew invaded t h e a t h leti c camps and carried away b y storm t h e blue ri bb o n In track baseball a n d swimmi ng. A fte r a h a r d stru gg l e t h ey cam e a way w i t h hal f t h e b l u e ribbon in basketball and t h e r e d in soccel. Upon a suggestion f rom the steward t h e c r ew pitch e d 1n a n d gav e a party in h o nOI o f themse l ves I ce cream, cak e p l e nty o f punc h a short play and d a n cing w e r e the hig h lights of the event. S uperintendent Willi a m s o f t h e Diri gi b l e Works boarded t h e stlip in midair to attend the party. Upon another s uggestion fr o m t h e steward each m embe r of t h e c rew made a cake Or un pocketed a dolla r to cover t h e expenses or t h e p a r ty. The gas bag sprang a leak in June, 1928, and t h e ship was lJloo r e d f o r a three-m o n ti p eriod to b e overhauled and repaired. October found the crew reassembled and ready to go. Ca ptai n Mill e r Pilot E. Smit h Co-Pilot W Solen berge r Radio Operator E. So lenb e r ge r and M ec h a ni c R. N ew h a rd se n t t h e ship o ff at top s p ee d Howe ver Pilot Smith became a ir-sick a n d retired, l eav in g E. M o n aco at. t h e contro l s. Radio Operator E So lenberger, who had b ee n worn to a s k e l e t o n b y t h e long tedi o u s hours the pre viou s year, resigned his post in favo : o f B Ever son. This year, alt.hough the crew madf' a raid on t h e athleti c camp, they w e r e t o carry away any loot Indee d the venturesome band scarcel y cam e away w h o le. The c r ew becam e conscious o f the fact that The '29 Special was near i n g its jVllrn ey':\ rnd and deserv e d a heart.y f arewell. A b anqud was dec ided upan T o r a ise the w herewithg1 they gav e a luncheon aboard Ship. Next. i n order t h ey descended o n t h e T :voli Hotel w h e r e t.h e M erry H oo fer s and Card d"'-!oured more t han t.h e procee d s amounted to Next

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cam e the operetta, carefully prepared aboard :;hip and presented in a friendly manner at the Balboa C lubhou se. The title it bore was All at Sea." The fa r ewe ll was extended on June 8 1929 The crew of HTh e '29 Special" w ere given good food a merry time, a n d were sadly bidde n adi e u. They rece d e d swiftly from s i g h t, never to b e seen again. The s h.ip lay i d l e f o r three months dUl' in g which time the preparations for the fin a l leg of the jou r n ey wer e made. I n October 1 92 9 t h e mighty "Spirit of 30 ro se g race fully into the air and sailed away. This year a l so t h e red and white streamed in the wind. Pilot E Sol enbel'gel', and Co-Pilot E Smith attempted to steer the shi p throu g h the storms unde r the g uid a n ce of Captai n L ee. Pilot Smith decided to get off the s h i p, So Somer s Dick was chosen to take his p l a c e Radi o Operator B. E ve rson wearyeyed, and haggard from overwork, resi gned his post to E. O r r. M ec hani c R New hard ente!'ed into her fourth year of service i n m anipulatin t h e m ec h anism. Earl y in t h e cru ise the crew made two success ive descents on the Yacht Club to m a k e "wh oopee. Then the steward demanded a cake from each for a cake sale Some p r e f erred to p l ank down a dollar. A rai d on Taboga Island was n ipped i n the bud. Honor Bri ght" was p resented b y some of the crew at the B a lboa Clubhouse after much practice. Again a descent on the athletic field and again a heap of spoils. Near the time to leave the ship the crew were guests at a farewell banque t. One last reve l together, then baccalaureate. At last a passpor t to n e w lands. The crew placed the wo rthy o l d ship in the B H S museum and dispersed their seve nty-three ways exceedingly happy in thel r newfound fr ee d o m yet che: i shing the tenderest memor:es of the fateful cruise. CLAS!-i PROPIIEC Y ( F r o m T h e Zo ni a n ", 1 940) .IThere is a divinity that shapes our ends Rough he w them how we will." Rob e r t Ada m s l e d a parade of the G A R He was proud of the feat of walking so many miles in spite of t.he fact that h e was loaded down with m edals and a wooden l eg. U o h B a r rle l s o n is quit.e a cowboy nowadays. H e rides a governrne n t mul e out on the Miraflo res Locks. Sa m Bard e l s o n be longs to the "Rainbow Quartet" which a l so consists of Don a l d W e igold Bern a r d EVCI"s o n a n d S tanley B u tl e r They have won fame becau se of their ability to make musician s g r ee n w it.h e n vy by making gray days r osy, playing the blues. H e l e n B ejar a no is a s ocio logist. She is now in the Fiji Islands trying to get them to add a n inch more g rass to thei r s k i rts. JOyce B cll i s the Countess Damuch. H e r smart soc ial affai r s are the envy of the younge r mat:'ons of Ostend. George B ri n gman has invented a n ew curlin g flu i d which i s w idel y used b y the girls. H e u se d it himself and proved i t successful. Ne lli e Bru l and i s a budd ing a r t ist. H e r lates t pic ture entitle d "Shy and Innocent" i s in the M et.ropolitan Art Museum. R.ob ert Bu llo c h : and Carm e n P im ento are still t r yin g to play concert numbe:s. They once we r e arrested becau se they p layed a whole piece that didn't sound "flat". T h e public grew s u s p i cious ancI t h ey were hel d i n custody while a n investigation was being m a d e. George Cai n has b eco m e an efficient tailor. H e got his experience trying to fit tights on w ee ni es at the commi ssar y Doc i a Clis b ee leads a clean life She i s a janitress in the Woolworth Building. James C o l e and E lm e r O r r are miners. They certainly had to dig to get thr ou gl"\ their last year in B. H S Kathl ee n Conard is the head of a huma n e soci ety. She is trying to make it a capital o ff ense to scratch red bugs, swat mosquitos. and b e rude to ants. T o m Conley. the Comical Comedian, is emblazoned in lights on B roadway.He got hi s start when h e lost his shoe in st.udy hall. E lizab eth Cunningham is a traveling salesl a dy for do g biscuits. Puppy l ov e always was in her line. Eva d e l a P e i i a runs a column fo r advice to the lov elorn in a small n ews papel of a college tow n J a m es D es J onde s has thr own himsel f in to rev e r se and is now an evan ge list inspiring multitudes in o utdoor camp meetings. S om e r s D i c k has becorn e a plumbe r H e was a sociai

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climber and that was t h e only way h e c ould ge t into the homes of w ealth and cul ture. \Vatson & Humphrey' s Ci r c u s has wo n f a m e t h r ou g h the a b le m a nagem ent of its own e r s and through its five main attract io n s, petite Rita Driscoll t h e ti ght-ro p e walker, Elizabeth Raymond, the fat lady o f the ci r c u s, Harry Mitten, t h e lllid ge t Jack Morrison, the tall m a n and August Schwindeman, t h e stron g lnan H Au g y alwa y s could b end the g irl s t o his will. Viol e t DLxon has invented a n ideal Lightning C a lcul ator" for use in Commercial A rithmetic c l asses. Dorothy Gerber has settl e d d own and i s m aking t h e world safe fo!" d emocracy by rearing her ten b oys and s ix girls in the plinciples of liberty, fraternity and equality. Edwin Jones, n o ted master of l a n g u ages, i s on a lec ture tour in Europe, accompanied by Dori s Hallett, his interpreter and secreta r y. Pauline Halloran i s married and living in Balbo a. I d o n't know her hus b and's n a me. Eliz abeth Hearne is n ow a fanlOus criminal lawyer. H e r expe ri ence in hig h sc hool getting herself in and o u t o f sc r a p es, fitted h e r for thi s po sition. The larg est case she has h andl e d is t hat o f Hayden Jones and Karl VJindquist t h e counterfeite r s They have the friendliness of the p ubli c becau se they "mint" w elL Bill Hele has sen t his pi ctu:'e in to the movie magnates. H e i s tha t Spanis h type to whic h the girls inv ariably s uc c umb. Buddy Ro gers had better watch his l aure l s. Ida Es l eeck c h ose t h e p ositio n of stenog r aphe r be cause o f h e r fondness for c h ewing g um Carol Herfurth i s so m ew h a t of a n art ist, She i s in Abyssinia teaching the natives the art 01 m a k eup. Bobby Jacques w ent into t h e electrica l business She a lw a y s did like to shock p eopl e Ralph Kirkpatrick bro k e t h e world's s p ee d r ecord in his n e w style machine a t Day tona Beach. E d w a rd Low e has b ee n working o n a fO:'mula for non-explos iv e g a soline. Chichi Lutz is a beauty speci alist. H e r fate was d ec id e d whe n M r L ee, on seeing her u sing her compact, ask e d h e r if s h e needed beautifying. She d ec id e d t hat s h e didn't bu t l ooking around she saw plenty who did and t h e r eupo n d ecide d t hat t h e r e was mone y in t h e business James 1\tacc1oneJl i s running a Lost and F ound Bureau H e i s followin g this lin e b e c a u s e of h i s w id esp read experie n ce in B. H S Louise Martin is a f amous chiro p o dist, She gained he:;: w i sdo m s itting at the feet of Elsa Reimann. Roger Matter has inve nted a machine whi c h p r eve nts t h e u h ard" lo o k s of teache r s fro m having a n y e ff e c t on t h e one intende d to b e the rec ipi e n t. Eml ey l\tea d i s a nurse, H e r s pe cialty i s tall, d ark young men wit h diseases t h a t do not affect t h e e y e. Jeane M eehan, t h e noted o c uEst, cure d Rae Newhard o f a d isease c a ll e d Cro ss ili apuz ziii t i s, caused by dOin g t o o many c r oss word puzz l es. Jeane gaine d expe ri e n ce in h e r ea:' l y y ears by c utting the eyes ou t o f potatoes. E lliott Monaco is d oing duty as ambass3. d o r to Morro Island. A n ew b oo k Piercing P e r c iflage" b y \ Villard Pel' cy, contain s s u cc lnct e pi gl'ammat!cal wittici sms. E leanor Parker i s re cupe rating from t h e e ffor t s h e m a d e in trying to d ete:'mine the numb e" o f miles o f yards in a golf b a ll K empe r Pric e is a f o rest r a n ge r in Y e ll ows t o ne. This vocation was chosen for two r e a sons: H e always liked t h e wide ope n s paces and h e has t h e c h ance o f seeing a diffe r ent se t of pre t t v gi rl s eve r y two hours. 1\1.ary Poole i s a g reat swimme r She's b ee n around pool s a ll h e r life. Ida 1\la e Po sey has b eco m e a n aviatrix. She a ] ways was a rather hig h flier Elsa Reimann T hey call hi m Junior." Dorothy Ros son i s a collec t o r o f a n t iqu es. M a yb e that's what come!' from a habit o f saying H ello, t h e re, Old Thing Mark S c h a piro i s now thrilling t h o usands as a h ero in t h e talki es. H e a lways was inclined that way. The Smi t h T wins are married. Their e lectric bill s a re e xception a ll y hig h because one runs the vacuum c leaner a ll day and the oth e:' plays t h e r a di o all n igh t Bobsie Smith may be found every year at Christmas ti m e standin g on a l!o l'n e r ringing a b e ll and b egging for money for the Salvation Army. Ena Simon s has b e c o m e a g reat financie r She was in fluenced in the c h oice o f her car ee r largel y becau se o f the p leasu :'e d e ri ve d fro m h e r offi ce as Supper Club treasurer. Earl Sol e n b e r ge r has j ust b ee n g ranted h i s seventh di vorc e It see m s his line was just. low enough to t rip them. Wa y n e Solenb e r gel' i s a hort i culturist. H e has jus t c ultiv a t e d a s p ec ial species of peach which he has named the "Marvell o u s M a rgaret." Vincent Sullivan, throug h the money gained f rom the dog : aces. has been a bl e to retir e and h e i s n o w livin g in a Span ish villa which i s guarded by two immense d o gs. Margaret Stapleton i s Chairwoma n of Anti-Everything SOCiety. Andrew Va n S i c l e n has become a deS i g n e r o f gowns, l a r ge l y because of his b elie f that women don't know anythi ng. Val eria Van Val ken burgh i s a c on tort ioni s t Her a bility to double up in c lasses has helped her p r ofessio n Ade J aiUe \ V ill ctt is matr on o f a huge Home for H o m e less H o p e l ess Huma ns, in whi c h th!! inmates eat humble pie and wear heavies a ll t h e year ro und. Virginia Woodhull i s a mani-

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curist f o r t h e s oci ety wom e n in N e w York H o w w ell I r e m e m be r her triumph w h e n s h e disp l a ye d three who le finger n a ils! The \ Vright brothe r s a r e now deep sea dive rs. They have becom e f amous b e c a u se of the discov e r y o f so m e t reasure belo n g ing to Captain Kidd. Philip Y c az:l has won t h e world's r e c ord for hitting more bumps between A nco n and Balboa than any othe r bus driver. '\' ILL SENIOR CLASS OF 1930 W e, the Seniors o f 1930, b eing of as san e m ind as a n y class co ul d b e after 4 o f hard labor, do h e r e b y b equeath and prese n t as foll o w s: ARTICLE I. Firs t and principally. w e commend our fu tures into t h e h a nds o f Fate, h oping throug h the kindness of our suc c essors t o have f ull and fr ee pardon f o r a ll our mistakes, and to inhe ri t e v erlasting m emory in B a lboa Hi g h ARTICLE II. T o our b e nev olent faculty we do and now return t h ankfully a ll t h e low marks which t h e y h a v e s o ge n erous l y g iven to u s in forme r years, wit h the r e quest t hat they be just a s ge n erously be s tow e d upo n our s u c c esso r s. An d to Balboa H ig h Schoo l we bequ e a t h various bits of knowl e d ge whi c h w ill b e f ound m arke d h e r e and ther e throu g h o u t the s chool and a l so t h e s t a r t lin g information whi c h has b ee n g lean ed f rom our examination p a p e r s and OUr recitations. ARTICLE III. To the Juniors, our unde r<:;tud i es, we do c ommit our awe-inspiring n a m e of Seniors and t h e di gnity that goes wi t h it, our m e ntal superiority t o b e d ecently carect for and p asse d on in due time. To the sophis ticat e d S ophomo: es, wh o m as t h eir n a m e im plies w e beli e v e have a little more se n se t h a n t h e Freshman, w e d o b esto w the emine n t honor of b eing executor s o f this will To th(lse l o wl y c reatures, t h e Freshme n w e bestow the honol' o f upho l ding t h e sacre d traditio n s o f o ld Balboa Hi g h the Alm a Mate r o f so many br!lliant, endeavorin g and s u cc essful students. ARTICLE IV Being bl esse d with m a n y indi vidua l g ifts w e b equeath as f o llow s: T o Emily She rwood N a ncy P arke r b equeath s h e r g i gg les in Spa ni s h c l ass. To Jean K a l al', Junio r Mit t e n b e qu eaths a foot of his stat e l y statu :'e. To "Ruby" Ada m s Don a ld W e i gorld leaves his "sax appeal. To J ohn Mor a l es, Will ard P e r cy b eq ueaths his a bility to u se ast o ni shing wo rds a n d phrases. T o K enneth M a i e r s, Tom Conl e y leaves his ri ght o f asking fooli s h questi o n s in the solid geometry. To "Winky" Ewin g, Vir ginia W oodhull b ( )queath s her bottle o f p e r ox id e and the accom panying pamphlet, "Why G entleme n Pre f e r Bl ondes." To Connie Sundquis t N e lli e Bruland bequeaths h e r s l enderness and h e r d i gnity. T o J a m es L ewis, Vinc ent M a r cy b equeath s his "sh e ik t r o use: 's" with the request t hat Jimmy t a k e s p e ci a l c a r e of the m since Vin ce n t p a rts w i t h t h e m only as a special favor To A g gi e Tonnes on. Docia Cli s b ee b e queath s h e r a bility o f getting into and ou t of mischief. T o Dorothy Alle n Kathlee n C o n ard b e qu<3ath s h e r n a m e o f "Chic k e n ," bestowed 011 h e r b y the form er's boy-friend. To Elmer Hack, Hayde n Jones b e queath s t h e fords, "If I h a d b ee n t h e r e it woul d h ave be e n different." T o R alph Mon a co G e or ge C ain b equeaths his job at t h e comissary. To S a di e A sparren, Dorothy G erbe r b e q u eath s h e r history b o ok s and h e r a bility to ask quest ion s. To Ophelia Key Vincen t Sulliv a n leaves his a bility to r e m ain quiet at a ll occasi o ns. T o Catherine W o od ard, Ida E s le ec k leaves h e r sec r e t a mbi t ions to b e a d e t ective. To anyone of the many nee d y freshmen. Ma rgaret Stapleton leaves her a b ility to say humorous things at unexpecte d times. T o t h e bri ght membe r s of the Junio r c l ass. R o b e r t B arde lson and K a : l Vvinquist r es pectiv elv b e queath t h e honor of making t h e motion t o a dj ourn t h e c lass meetin g s and of seconding it. T o Alic e W estman, Elsa R e im ann b e qupath s h e r sunny s mil e. T o Bill Bl eakley, Ro ger Matte r b e qu e a t h f hi s way o f attracting w o m e n

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To Hazel Hortense Harris, Valeria Van V alkenburgh bequeatbs her ability to cube the initials of her name. To Oreste Sergievsky. James Macdonell bequeaths his beautiful violinist's haircut. To Johnny Calhoun, Wayne Solenberger b equeaths his brains, with the request that they be not overworked, To any twins that may come into the Balboa High School, Cecilia and Clarita Smith bequeath their joy of being taken one for the other. To Ruth Boyd Elizabeth Hearne bequeaths her distracting giggle, To Nana Grace Jennings, Madge De Grummond bequeaths her short socks. To Edward Latham, Robert Adams bequeaths his art of th:'owing his feet to the side while walking. To Franklin Yates, Jack Morrison bequeaths the honor of being a target for Mrs Krumbach's jokes and satires. To Bob Helmerichs, Elmer Orr bequeaths his winning smile. To the Seniors of next year, Somers Dick beqlleaths his ability to affect an attitude of superiority. To Moises de la Pen a and Edna Fluharty, Benhard Everson bequeaths his and Eleanor Hammond's corner of the balcony, hoping t.hat they enjoy its seclusion. Feeling that the lowly Freshmen Of next year will be in need of it, Frederick Wright generously bequeaths his sheik pompadour. tall,: To Howard Engelke, Andy Van Sic!e" bequeaths his strut and his "Desperate Ambrose T o Elizabeth B e verley, B obs;" c;mith "equpaths her bOYS'>' To some needy lower classman, Mark Schapiro bequeaths his Greek profile. '1'0 Grace LawYI!r, France3 Lewis leaves I 'f} manenL waVf=. be gging iiI tH'r to good care of it. To Tucker H lll'lme r Eva rlE la Peik. b equeaths her art of speaking Sp!.lllish fluently. To Mr. Hod ges, Louise Martin hequeatT'!s her little g:'ay runabout with th hope t.hnt he will get as good service from it as she has. To Alton Casanova, Freddie Madulo bfqueaths his "grand opera voice." To Stanwood Specht, Carol Herfurth bequeaths her chewing gum. To Elizabeth Beverly Jeane Meehan bequeaths her ability to put up her a.uburn nair. To Erma Graham, DO:'is Hallett b eqpcar.hs her ability to study in the noon hour. To Fern Kyleber, Rita Driscoll bequeaths her hearty laugh, TC' the Balboa-Ancon Bus Line. Philip YcaZ:l and R alph Kirkpatrick b equeath their Ford and Nash respective ly To the American History students o f the coming year, Joyce Bell bequaar.hs her re poct on G eorge Washington To Edna Mae Smith, Carmen Pimento bequeaths the of pianist in the High School Orchestn:" To Francis l:>ri(!rlY, Helen Bejarano bequeaths her of Am e rica! History and being of a genarmls nature she also o Fqueaths the Ford to Dorothy Dennis. To Aura Amole, Do:-thy Ros so n bequeaths her "Ever-Ready s mUe and the privilege o f having a new b ry fri'nd every week. T o Stanley Specht, Jimmy Des Londe s bequeaths his captain.,hip of every tram ot which he i s a To Jack Chase. S.l1l1 Bardelson bequcat.hs !.is bass horn knowing that he is only on!" who has enourih wind to blow it. To Marcel Pen3o, L ewis Wri ght bf-'qHca lhs his art of plucking the heart strings of a1J the gL-l s in hig '1 school. T o Ghdys BO'Ji..h. Rae Newhard h s lier athletic abiHties. T o H arry We st.enc:or ff August bequeaths his l':l'ea'5t stroke cr.nrr.llionsnip To Carl Dailey. Stanley Buller sOl'lcwf ul but with great confidence in Carl. bequeaths Prisci lla Hallen, T o G eo r ge Hilbert, James Col e bequeaths his New Orleans accent. To Kenneth M aiers. Eddie Smith bequeath s hi s imitatio n of Helen s Boop-QoP a-doop," To Michael D ew. William H e l z the ri ght of bemg on aU athletic team'; an:i rro t'ng letters for a ll sports, To K enneth Marcy, George Bringman be:}lIcaths his assortmenl of b.'J\J t.ics ;-tnd enjo in s upon him the respcnslbilIiy c f sure that. they sit rig'l':.. To William Cochez, Rob e r ; Bullock bequ eaths his antique fidelle,

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T O Ca l e b C l e m e n ts, Jack Humphrey b e queath s hi s n o i sy s h oes so that t h e fut u r e classes may enjo y the rhythmic sound o f the b oom-boom b oo m i n the corri do r s. T o Billy Burdge, Bobb y watson b e qu eaths hi s pi geons a n d p igeon coop, w ith the requ es t t h a t the n ext b a by pi geo n b e c a ll e d Wootsi e -W o o ." To Lil y Wylie, Emley M ead b equeaths K enneth Forres t. To Dou g la s Johnston, Elliot Monac o b e queath s t h e a r t o f s m o kin g twe nty-five ce n t cigars. T o M a rion Dugan B e t t y Cunning h a m bC'queatn s J ohn H a ll urgently t h e des ire to h a v e him w e ll car e d for and no t r o u g hly. Freddy Banan, b eing e l a t e d with h aving p r ove d b y m athe m a ti cs t hat h e has as much money a s Henry Ford. b e queaths h a lf of i t to Lilli a M o nsan t o s o that s h e w ill b e able i..D c arry out h e r pl a n s for e s t a bli shing an o l d m ai d 's asylum E a rl S o l enbe r ger g i ves b ac k all his spe c i a i assembly privil eges to M:. G R L ee s i nce has n o more nee d o f t h e m T o H cdw;g Sundberg. P a ulin e H a ll o r a n ucq ueath s h e r m oo nli g h t wa lk s To J oyce H a ld e m a n M ary P oo l e bequeath s h e r attracti o n s, h o pin g t h a t s h e a l so w ill b'2'come the mo s t popula r g irl in hi g h sc hool. To Diana Marine, Ad e l a ide Willett l eaves h e r b e ref t hat "childre n s h o uld b e see n and not heard.1> To Flores Loc k w ood Ena Sim o n s b e queaths h e r sec retari a l i n cli nations. T o a n yone who c a n fill t h e : equire m e nts f o r t h e posi t i o n Ida Mae P osey b e queath s t h e honor of b eing Miss Okla h o ma" o f Balboa Hig h s c hool. SIGNED THE SENIOR CLASS OF 193 0 SEAL We. wh ose n a m es we do hereto s ub scribe, d o ce r t: f y t hat. in t hi s r a in y seaso n o f 1 930. t'1" S enior class o f the yea r s ub scl'iiJed their J ohn H enrys and Ann a b elle L ees. in our presence to their Last Will and Testam e n t, and r e quested u s to s i g n our nam e s h e r e to. as witn esses of the e x ecutio n the:e o f whi c h w e h e r e b y d o in the prese n ce o r l !'s t ator during the said seaso n SIGNED W eir S a pP5 U R Two

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WHO Doris Hallett Carol Herfurth Dacia Clisbee Jeane Meehan Rae ewhard Bobby JS'cques Rita Driscoll Jary Poole Emley Mead Adelaide Willett Joyce Bell Marg. Stapleton Rich. onley Lewis \Vright Kemper Price J. Humphrey J. l'r-lorrison Jim DesLandes William Hele Enn Simons Madge de Grummond Elsa Reimann Louise Martin Ida Mae Posey Fred Wright Katl Winquist R,lph Kirkpatrick Nellie Bruland Robert Bullock Don. Weigold 5tanley Butler HE (SHE) Answel's 17 Dot Kay Do Gee Eppy Bobby Sapolio Mary Ann Em Ade Joy MaTg Tom Louie Choke jack Jackie Dan Bill Ena Madge El Louisa Posey Fred Winkie Kirk Nellie Choppy Wiggles Butler WHAT Hoot owl Flying fish Ameba Hawk Bunny Blue Jay Sparrow Deer Mosquito Duck Butterfly loth Monkey Snail Camel Kangaroo Shrimp Do die bug Lion Lizard Shark Grasshopper Zebra Peacock Lady oug Parrakeet Squirrel Chipmunk F l e8' Locus Crow RITA DRISCOLL 'S B H. S. ZOO Don't Feed the Animals PREY Carol H I've wondered, too Guy with green gloves Library students Guy with black hat Any boy Jack D. "HIM" Alec Studies Boyd Choke One or a ll I'll bite Margal'et Ja'ck M. Jack H That. certain party Home rUIl!:; Now, let's see Geometry problems Junior Patients I'll bite hel' name? Mrs. Krumbach "RED" H is pony" SlX & Piano We wonder WHERE FOUND Carol's Razzbery Park Right there Library On the track Miramar Front steps Home P. M C lubhouse Home New Ford Her abode Clubhouse Century lub Work, of course That car C lubhouse \Vhose steps. Ancon Tennis I!ourt. Assembly Hospital COl'ozn l-?-?Cecilia-'!Engli h room His car And hi s cur P. M. Jail C lubh o use RECOGNIZED BY Pleasan tness Doris You think of one! Red hair That cert8'in car Yawns (Seeing's believing) Innocence Typing pins Silence Red h a i r & Liz. Her drag That posture Looks Legs His laugh Stature Orations That picture Hel'-wave-? Goggles Junior-?-7-That car! Just "POSEY" The Dodge" H is wisdom S=tilor hat And him Antique violin Tha t hair com b Craziness FAVORITE GROWL You bet! My cowl Aha, genius! I'll report you I Let's make history! For crying out loud! I'll scream! Saaaay-Yeah-Ditto Oh Yea h WeeelllWhat ya say? Now, now! Look out! Hey, hey! Huh? Sweet Adeline Who told you? I knew it! What of it? W ell-s a-yl th., t line! Who wouldn't? l'm going to-Uh. no! Ancl that's all A-a-ah! Eo-eh !:lez you? ,j

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Fred Maduro Anita Parker E leanor Parker Smith Twins .Tunior Mitten Wayne Eliza. Raymond Earl Solenherger B. Everson Hayden Jones Chichi Lutz Vincent Marcy Roger Matter Robert Watson Willard Percy Helen Bejarano Somers Dick Bobsie Smith Va1. Van V. Elliott Monaco Virgie Woodhull Fred Banan Elmer Orr Eliz. Hearne Pauline HaJ10ran James Cole Dorolhy Rosson James Macdonell Philip Ycaza Andrew van Siclen Vincent Sulliva n Robert Bardelson August E'chwinderman Mark Schapiro Bob Adams Ceorge Ca in George Bringman Eva de l a Pena Kathleen Conard Ida Esleck Sam Bardelson : : Fred Nita Nancy Twins Herb Maggie Eliza. Soly Emo Jonsey Chichi Vince Roge Bob Percy H elena Stoneage Bobsie v, Monne Banana Ginny Watts Liz Polly Jimmie Dot Jim Phil Andy Sully Bob Augie Sapiro Bob Cain Bring Eva Hokie Id", S'am Hummingbird Codfish Golf bUll Doves Giraffe Owl Elephant Bee Devilfish Blowfish Angel fish Cootie Radio Bug Tiger Marmoset Clam WOOdpecker Whale Goose fish Sculpin Coyote Frog Dog fish Skylark Kitten Doormouse CaterpiJlar Robin Dashund Weasel Scotch terrier Beetle Swordfish Leech Spaniel Mouse Pig Moose wolfhound Eel Hyena _'\.nyone who']] listen Has s h e 'f Golf balls Each oth e r Well, it was Marg. B "Nadie" Business Elemor Anyone A-ah -Mr.-oh Poor cookie Electric juic e Jmportant people Mr. Webster Typewl'iter Studies Who knows? George D. Spring Chickens Piano keys Elmer Virginia Jimmie Moonlight Wi s h we knew Bill Emma Van CHeC Scbool kids Girls (freshmen) Checkers That born Nurses Elsa. Louise, etc. Solid Geometry Weenies Quien sabe? Officers Swimming Bob EXAMEl Anywhere I s there'! Golf Links Panama The Ford Admin Home Office BaJcony Playshed Dog races With Cookie ]n his car On someone's trail Under some car Typing room Home Corozal P. M Clubhouse Someone's Horne The car Ditto lce Cream Parlor Ho:ne ( 1) sometime Ancon Panama Clubhouse That hug Clubhouse Kennelworth Cooper's Orchestra Panama Hospital FrosCs Room Park bench Neat counter Quarry Hts. Clubs "'\\'imming pool Swimming pool Cabl office "The Voice' "One alone" Golf bag S tting me crazy Tall-and how! His learned ways Cristobal Business look Eleanor His line about Rusty Mr.-ah-ah H is 'Street Sweepers" That car His camera The junk H e r Spanish That look That Bob! Artist's HAIR Drums 1\1 goggles Each other Ji:nmie Bas hiu I look His '3hakespearp Bill Emma Th same His wal!t Red hair & FJ'e:.!1des; Quietness H is Dignity Big white &pron His Math. Mark Shapiro W.insome smile His line When I wasTickets for sale! Fore! Where's-Tst, t.t Here's the way I do it
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JUNIORS

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Allen, D o rothy Androus Fl orence Banan, F re d Bickford, Mary Boy d, Ali ce B oy d Ruth Bratton, Julia Bro w n P ear l Byrne, Ethel Byrne, Jack D ailey, Carl de Gracia, Ju a n Demuth, Via Mae En ge lke V i r ginia E s l eec k, Ida Evans, H erbe r t Fenton, Marie Forrest, Kenneth Gaeb, Harry JUNIOR C L ASS OFFICERS President ..................... ..... Alex a nd er Macdonell Vice President. ............. Charles Hummer Secretar y Treasurer Adviser ............. __ ... D ouglas Johnston ................. ..... Elizabeth Hirsh ... Mr. G R Lee JUNIOR C LASS Gist, Harold Graham, Erma Hack, Elmer Haldeman, Joyce H a ll J ohn Randolph H aze l Hartzell, El e n a H earne, William Hilbert, George Hirsh, Elizabeth Honeycutt, Margaret Huff, Maenl1l'r Hummer, Charle s Jennings, Nana Grace J o hann es, J e nni e Johnston, Douglas Jones, Mary Lou ise Kirkpatrick, Glen Lapeira, Julio L awyer, Grac e L ewiS, Frances L ewis James L ockwood, Flores Macdonell Alexander Macdonell, James Madura, Monte Maiers, Kenneth Malone Edwin Mead, Alberta Me sse r Robert Morales, John Monaco, Ralph Murray, Doris No l an, D oris Olle r Ophelia Parker, Elizabeth Penso, Marcel C LA:O-;S lIISTORY Elizab eth Beverley, '31 Perry, Eve lyn Potter, Janet Reynolds, Sarah Reynolds, Vincent Sandberg, COl'ina Sanger, Victor Shrapnel, Bliss Stroop, Bertha Sundquist, Constance Thompson. Edgar Van Val ken burgh, Lester Warwick, Rand Westman, Alice Woodard, Catherine Wyle C lare Wy l e, Lillie Yates, Franklin Zidbeck, Lilly Our Junior year proved to be the best yet. We were g iven those long-l ooked-for seats in t h e assembly. Our class meeting was h e ld to e lect officers. Charles Humm er resigned his position as Vice President late in the year, and Kenneth M a ie:-s was e l ected to fill that p osition. Miss Morell was o ur adv i ser, but she left Balboa Hi g h in December and Mr. G. R. L ee was appointed to take her place. First in a long list of activities, came a dance at the Yacht C lu b. Next the trip to Taboga, which was a great success. Then a luncheon on the balcony of the high school, where two hundr ed hungry students were fed. Next am::mg our achievements was a food sa le and on A p ril 5th came the Junior Dance and Card Party, h e ld at the Tivoli. On May 16th we presented "The Cha,m School, a comedy in three acts, at the Balboa Clubhouse. Pla n s were then made for t h e Ju nior-Sen i or B anquet. H e r e ends the history of our third year in Balbo a hi g h ; may our fourth and last year be as s u ccessfu l and as happy as this.

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SOPHOMORES

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SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS President ............................ Jack Dombrowsky Adams, Cleon Amo J e, Aura Arnold, Emily A : nold, Frances Arroyo, Elisa Zenaida Asparren, Mercedes Barrett, Robert Booth, J a mes Bower, Phillis Boyd, Lola de Bradney, Mary Brew erton, Henry Brook s, Anna Elizabeth Brooks Marjorie Brown, Dorothy Burdge, William Bruland Solveig Burns, Marion Calhoun, Peggy Calvit, Virginia C arvajal, Humberto Chase, Henry Jackson Chesney, Mary Esthel" Clair, Florence Clinchard, Constance Conlan, Rene Conley William Danie ls Howard de l a P eila, Moises Vic e President ___ .............. James Booth Secretary ................... ... Phillis Bower Treasurer ........................ Gratton McGroa: "ty Adviser .............................. Miss Davi s SOPHOMORES Delvalle, Eric D enniS, D O:'othy Dershimer, Lenor e D ew, Michael D oc k ery, Conroy Dombrowsky. Jack Doran, Irene Dor s witt, Alic e Durfee, Diana Engelke, Howard Ewell, Julian Ewing, Winifred French, Robert Gallivan, Catherine Quiot, Hector Hall, Sarah Hallen, Priscilla Hambelton. Elizabeth Heath Carlota Hambelton, Lillian Hea: 'ne. Hayden H e l e, Albert Helmeri chs, R o bert H ermanso n H arry Hickman, Thomas Hud son, H e lene Hutchinson, Don a ld Jarvis, D o lore s Johnson, James Jones, Ella Joyner, Georgana Judson, Donald Kalal', Jean Kellond, Jane K enda ll Bud Key. Ophelia Klohe, Loui s Kunke l Edward Kyl e b e r. Fern Lambert, Kent Lawrence, Kathleen Macdonell, Neil Maduro, Edward Maduc o. Jack Maduro, Morris Maduro. Walter Malone, W alte r Mauborgne, Benjamin M a rstrand, Lilli a n McClellan, Jean Moffett. Lois, Moore, Margaret O'Donnell, Marie P a lacio, R alph Peterson, Ala n Peter son, Cla :'e nc e Phillips, Noble Pirnento, An ge l a Preston, Ruth CLASS HISTORY By P h illis Bower McGlade, Charlotte McGroarty, Grattan Michaelson, Billy Quinn, Rita Raymond, David Reynolds, Wilma Romig, Robert Salterio, Arthur Salterio, Joe Sanford, De Forest Seaberg, Georgia Seaberg, Olga Sei bold, Iris Sergievsky, Orest Sherwood, Emily Smith, David Smith, Edna May Smith, Matthew Smith, Robert Sundberg, Hedwi g Tonneson, A gnes T orbe;:t, Annie Trippe, Eleanor Vandervoort, Susan Walbridge, Harry Walling, Howard Walston, William Watkins, Lauretta Willett, Earl Williams, Margaret The Sophomore class was composed of fifty seven boys and fifty seven girls. At the gi r ls' meeting' the class officers were elected. Blu e and gold, by unanimous vote were the class colors a contrast to the green and white of last year. The choosing of the Athletic Council representatives was quite a task. Frank Key left s c hool so Michael Dew took his place as representative the boys and Ella Jones was chosen repre sentative for the girls. The report cards came out and the Sophomores did not seem to agree with their subiects. T h e topic of l ow grades" was brought up meeting after meeting, and Miss D av i s did her best to encourage the students to d o bett"r work but evidently her efforts we :'e in vain. A Tacky-Bunco Party was held at the Yacht Club by the Sophomores on Friday, Februa ry 21. 1930 For those who did not play bunco, music was furnished by the musica l members of the class. Mr. Lee and Miss Davis were the chaperones. Doo se rdoo! the plaintive cry o f the Treasure:f rom the time he was elected. T o Gratton in collecting the class fund. two boys and two girls, Henry Brewerton, Edward KunJreI Mariorip B r ooks. and Kathleen LaWTence were appointed. To the sg,tisfaction and en10yment of the class, Mr. Fl :nt wrote a letter expressing his gratitude for the kindness ot the pupils. In t.he world of snorts the Soohomore boys capt.ured first place in soccer, second in b ase hall anci b'.:\sl(et.l"--AI1, 3nd third in track. The girl s carried away first place tn volley ball, baseball and basketball. The boys and girls carried away first place in the swimming meet,

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-B A L B'O A-C H =0 O _L-FRESHMEN

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GIRLS' OFFICERS Preside n t ..... C h arlotte Wahl Vice Pres id e n t ................. Fra n ces A ye r s S ec retary .... . Mario n Hutchison Treasure r ....... Jerellnd MacMurray Ad v iser ........ Miss Whaley F R E S H MAN BOYS' OFFICERS President ............... .... ...... Jack Pool e Vice Presiden t ... ..... stanwood Specht Secretary ... ..... Edward Neville Treasure r Adviser ..... .... Bruce Onderdonk ..... _._ .. ____ M r. Ca rson FRESHMEN Ada m s, Robe r t A lexander, Jean e tte Alfa r o, E lo y All e n Edna All e n Harry Alley, Thomas Arroy o Ch a rl es A s p arre n Arm e ni a A ye r s, Fra nces B anto n P embro k e B a r k e r J oseph Bidwe ll R o b e r t Bige l o w Bettyann e Bleakl e y W i lli a m Booth Gla dys Boyd, Aug ust Brow n W a lter Bro wn e C l a : 'e n ce C a lhoun, J ohn Casano va, A l to n Castill o Nican o r C l arke, Leslie Cl e m ent, C a l e b C l eve l and, R oscoe Coc h ez. Willi a m C o l e. All e n C onne r A g n es D a l y, E lean o r D a ni e l s Willi a m d e l a P e lla, Estr e ll a D e r shime r J ohn Dixon, Geor ge D o r a n Ma r y Dowell El s ie Dugan Marion Dunha m M a rgaret E ld ermire Armin Emmo n s J a m es F abrega, E lisa F e r g u so n Sar a Fie ld, C yrus Fluharty. E d n a F r iday, Fran ces G aliman y Brun i se lda Garrett. Will o u g h by Grant, B illy Guerre r o, El e n a H a ll Etta Fay H a l m a n Con sue l o H ammond, Elean o r H erring, G eo r ge H erring M a ri e Hilbe rt, Caroline Howard, R o b e r t Husted, Annette H o u g hton J u liette Hutchi so n M a ri o n J ohns t o n Andre w J o n es, Grace J o n es, W alte r K a l a r Harriet Kull. N orma L amb, B ernard L awso n Wilm a L eo n Victor L eBrun, Albe rta MacMurray, J el'elind Maduro, D o r is M a r cy, K enneth Marine, Diana McCormack. M a r y Mead Frede ri ck Monsanto. L illi a Mor a l es Electra Mo:.--gan, R obe rta M o ritz, Ad olph Mull e r J ohn N e vill e E d w a r d Novey, George Ohl so n Anne O liv e James Ond e r don k B r u ce Patino. Tita P erkins. Roy CLASS HISTORY B y Jack Pool e and C h arlotte W ahl Piper Raymond Pool e, J ohn P y l e, Sarah Rader, Ruth Replogl e Thomas Robinson Alb e r t Robinson, Thirza Runyon C lotilda S a lter io, J a mes Sampsell Anna Mae S heel y, Inez S h erlock D oris Spearma n Patricia Specht, Stanwood S imons, Samuel stewart, Mario n Stroop, Doris Treich e l W illiam Van Clief, E mma Wahl, C h arlotte Walston Rut h Watson. D o rothy Westendorff. James Wilhite, Lilburn WOOd, Edward W ood, E rnest Yates, George Yates. Isabel Yo u ng, Les li e T h e Freshma n b oys and g irl s hel d se parute meetings. The class officers were e lected nea:' t h e b eginning o f t h e sc h oo l yea r T h e questio n o f du es was discuss e d and both classes d eci ded to mak e t h e m two do ll a r s a year T h e boys ask e d for t h eir dues to b e in b y Decembe r s ix t h but t h e g i r l s set n o date. Of course they w e r e not in b y t hat t i me but t h e c lass didn't expect t h e m to b e so i t was a ll r i g h t I n D ecem b e r we e l ecte d r eprese ntati ves the Athleti c C ounc il. Stan woo d Spec h t was c hosen b y t h e boys and Emma Van C liel by the girls. They both proved to be good rep : esentatives. I n t h e meeting o f J anua r y s ixth h eld b y MI'. Spa lding and t n e ClaSS a d v i se r s a n d c lass o ffi ce:'s Mr Spalding gave u s a n interesting talk on c l ass and sch oo l spirit. which was ve r y b e n efical t o u s a ll. I n the soccer game s t h e b oys cam e second. in baseb all last, i n t rack last a n d i n swi mming fecond. The captain s e l e c te d we r e: Jimmy S alt:=r !o for s u cce r Stan wood Specht for baseball, .Tirrm v S a l teri o f o r t r a ck and Bill y Gran t f o r swimming. The F r eshma n gir l s came thir d i n bask et b all, third in v olley b all, third i n baseball and second i n sw immin g. E mma V a n C lief e l e cted c':t.nta i n of t h e basketb all. volley ball and swimming team s a n d Edna F l uhar t y was t h e baseb a ll capt ain. TI1e r e we r e no soc i a l s a t all in e i t her c lass since we, lik e other Freshman c l asses. had t o S3.ve the d o u g h f o r later yea rs.

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fAME T H E Y RUN "THE SENIORS AND EVERYBODY R UNS TN" M THOSE wHO D I D THE WORK FOR THE:. SENIOFt c:t..A S,5 SOPHOMORES HAVE RISEN TO FAME; UNUSUAL. F"R$HMEN '\H,CiH FREAK Cl.ue -FREAKS BY NATURE-JUNIORS WHO KNEW THE. AR.T ot:" ,ENTERTAINING eLls REC,IVO HONORA9L..E

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S'"001 f.fFE And then came hours of laughter and song

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ZONIAN STAFF E. Solen berger Editor-in-Chief E Monaco Bu s iness M a n ager G. Kirkpatrick Assistant Editor-in-Chicf D Johnston Assistant Bu s. Mgr. S. Dick Associate and Sports Edito: NEWSPAPER STAFF ANNU AL STAFF E B everley News Editor M. poole Senior Editor D Cli s bee Svorts Edito r
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CALENDAR FOR YEAR OCTOBER, 1929 1. We settle down for nine months. More homework! 5. Plenty of new teachers and rules. Golly! 9. No free haircuts for Scabies this year. Anyhow, they aren't supposed to get any. 11. More bowlegged girl s. Now boys. 15. Lots of tests. 18. D ance at Yacht Club. More fun. 19. Plenty of students in Miss Davi s' room taking up typ'ng. 26. "Heap bi g" Hallowe'en party at Margaret S's. 31. "Class Mee ting" at NOVEMBE R 1929 3 GOOd for Panama's Independence Day! 7. Miss Davis starts phonograph for typing students. (The little dears have the .best time. ) 16. Snappy football game. Seniors win! IS. Hot debate in Miss Emmons' room. Negative Wins. 26. "Zonian" published for first time, Swell little paper. At least we think so. 28. Two holidays. Whoopee! Poo,' turkey. ,29. Senior Class party at Yacht Club. Games and fun galore DECEMBER, 1929 L Dues! Dues! Dues! Come pn, cough up. 5. Grand meeting of Athletic Council. 6. Junior Taboga Party. Swell time for some carousing about the cemetery. 10. Heavy s now Roads blocked. 18. Lost: One of QUI' teachers. Miss Morrell leaves. 19. Seniors gather Christmas trees for little folk. 20. Cor:'idors ring with beautiful voices Singing carol s. 24. Cup:d hits the school. JANUARY, 1930 1. B. H S. well represented at the clubs. 5. Estrella springs a new wind blown. 10. Junior Luncheon. Plenty of good things to eat. 11. Senior Dance at Yacht C lub. Bi g crowd. Hot music and a swell time enjoyed. by all. 12. Sidewalks covered with ice. Many absent. 18. Junior Class loses a popular member. 25. Bi gge r and better; next year, kids. FEBRUARY, 193 0 3. New fashion p :'edominates around halls. 8. B H S. victorious over C. H. S. Whoopee! 14. DeMo lays stage wild dance at Mosque. Sw e ll time. 21. Mor e snow. Little folk make s now men. MARCH,1930 1-3. Many absent. Three guesses why. 7. Ho t time at Yacht Club. Juniors hosts for dance. 8. Senior food sale. 20. Miss Emmons' Latin classes g ive Latin Playlet at Y. W. C. A. APRIL, 1930 1. Students picke d for s pecial exams by surveyors. April Fool! 4. "Hono r Bright." Exceedingly bright cast. 5. Juniors have cake sale. 5. Juniors hold annual Card Party and Dance at the Tivoli. Best dance in yea:s. 5. J Unio r play-cast picked. Many s ighs of disappointment from the lo sers. 15. Our budding young poet, Edgar Thompso n. contributes much to our pap e r. 16. Whoopee! Three glo rious holidays to get ready for the Easter bunny. 25. Senior Masquerade B a ll. Astoni shing costumes! MAY, 1930 3. Juniors hold another fOOd sale. No ,end to them? 10. "The Charm School" g iv e n b y Juniors. Cha, rming! 14. Seniors talk about spending their money. 19. Most everyone o n his toe,. It won't be lon g now. JUNE, 1930 13. Cla ss Night. Gooel luck, Seniors! 14. Junior-Senior Banquet at Tivoli. Rccorel crowd. 15. Baccalaureate services at Union Church. 20. Graduation. H ail. Hail. the gan g's all h e r e." 21. Everything is ,over. The cat is pu t out and the doors are closed until October.

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ATHLETIC COU CIL From Left 10 RlI!hl: D:uley. Dew, E. Jones, ClIshee. Specht. Dh GIRL RESERVES SUPPER CLUB On October 9 the Girl Reserves Supper Club held their first meeting at the Y. W. C. A. 'I'he followin g o f ficers were e lected: Dacia Clisbee ...... Preside n t Via Mae Dem u th ..... Vice Presiden t Priscilla Hallen ..... Secretary Ena Simons ._._._.Treasurer November 29 the Seniors h e l d a B e Yow'self" party at the Yacht C lu b for Seniors and their g u ests. The Yacht Club was decorate d in red and white, the Senior colors. G a mes were played and specia l dances g iven to entertain the c rowd until ten o'c l ock. L eslie Sanan conducted a four-p:ece orc hestra f o r d a ncing unt il twelve Refreshments were served during intem l i ssion. Chaperoning the p a : -ty were: Mr. and Mrs. George Lee, Mr. and Mrs. Spalding, and Mr and Mrs. B arker.

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B. II-:. T .\.1I0( ; \. THIl' At e ight o'c l ock Saturday morning, J a nua:y ,,6th, the B ig Bill l e f t the Y ac h t Club for Pier 1 9 to tak e on gasoli n e a n d passe n gers A t FieI' 1 9 Da:mlJ We i go l d was informed that h e would b e unable to get the gasoline bu t woul d have 10 go to t h e oil c rib T h e fifty-three students then got on the b oat. The soda pop and es k imo pies we n t a l ong. The trip f rom Pi e r 1 9 to t h e oil c rib was a memorable one. It was a b ea u ti f u l day. The singing, hila r ious crowd was l ooking fO:'war d to a perfe:!t outing. Bu t i t a ll ca m e to a s udd e n tragic end when, a gasoline explosion violently shook the boat S eve r a l of t h e students and chaperones were ser!ously burned. Fire broke out and the party left the Bi g Bill" i n flames nfter throwing lunches, cameras and other valuables on the dock. An ambul a n ce was s um moned for the injured. Thus ended what to b e a most p leasant T aboga T r i p. The chaperones were Mr. and Mrs. G. O. Lee. Mr. and Mrs. G R L ee. M iss Whal ey a n d Miss Steen. The yacht "Silver Spray" glided into pier 18 at nine o'clock Satu rday mo rn i n g of De"ember 7, 1929. "Al l aboard" -and sixty-five students leapt on a lmost befo"p the boat had f)topped. After getting comfortab l y seated on the life-savels which t hr own all ove r t h e hatches, the gay party started out for the day. The two ho u r r ide to Taboga soon cam e to end after many struggles to keep one's seat fr om t h e other f ellow Arri ving at Taboga at eleven o'clock, some went into the village "nd others stayed at t h e b eac h to go bathing Rummaging about the graveyard, hill climbing. sw imming and eati n g we r e t h e d i ve r s:o n s of the day. At four o'clock the rain began to pou" down and t h e p a r ty decide d to call i t a day At seven o'clock that evening the Silver Spray and its gallant passenger s p ull ed up to the pier at Balboa. The chaperones of the party were Mrs. K rumbach. MI'. a n d Mr s. L ee, and Miss Morrell, and Mr. and Mrs. Spalding.

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GLEE CLUB The Sophomore Cla s s gave a party at the Yacht Club F ebruary Entertainme n t for the evening cons i s t e d of dancing and bunco. The mU3: C f o r the cla n cing wa s furnis h e d b y a n or clles\,ra m ade up of boys from the Sophomore Cl ass. Mr. Lester S Flint, au: former teach e r l e ft for t h e St:ltes o n the S S "Cristobal", Decembe r 2 3 N othing definite of Mr. Flint's fu ture is Know n but.. h e has b ee n a patien t i n a stat e sanitarium in Ma ssachusetts TIle Sopho m o re s, Juniors and S enio r s, a n d the of B H. S. prese n te d Mr. Flint with a s t eamer rug and carrYll1 g st:'ap in apprec iation a t his se rvi ces in the h ig h sc hool. On F ebrua ry twe n t y -first the Sophomore Glas.; gave a v e r y s u ccess ful p :.ut y at tht.: Yacht Club. The c h'1p erones for the p arty w e r e Mr. G R L ee and Miss D avis t h e c lass a d Vi3Cl'. DJ.ncin g and bunc o w ere the amuse m e nts for the e veni ng. R efreshments were se r ved. An orc h 2stra made up of some pupils o f the S o:;>homo e Class f u r n i s hed the musk. The playe r s W E r e : Ernes t WOOd. David S ll1ith Du v id H arry H ermans on, Jack P oo l e. William Burdge und N o ble Phillips. On M arch e l g h t h the Seniors h eld a prOfita bl e food sal e in fr o n t of t h e B a lboa ClUb hous e Many go o d ies w ere displaye d to the eyes o f c ustom e r s, so m e o f whic h w e r e bak ed beans, potato sala d. all kinds of cakes, candy and pi es. The Juniors, not to be sli ghte d. a l so h e'd a f o o : l s:11 e. M a r c h fifteen t h in fr o n t o f the B'llhoa Commissary. Their sale was a s prOfitablE' as t h e S::miors'. The wares CO!1s istcd of potato salad, b akej beans, pies, c a kes and can dy M::ll'cn se v enth was the occasion for the Junio:' S first d a n ce. The a ff air was h e ld at the Yacht Club. whic h was filled t o ov erflow i pg. The Isthmia n Syncopator s furnis h e d the n 111s ic. R e fr es i 1mf'nts w e r e s .... l'ved durin!! t h e intermiss i o n. The were Mr. ancI M rs. C. B Hodges and Mr. L ee.

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H Ol""O R BRIGHT The Seniors certain l y gave a good exhibition this yea r in Hon o r Bri ght." The cast was well chosen and trained under the di rect ion of Mrs Emma Wal e Krumb ac h Mary Po o l e and James D es Landes were g i ve n the leads and we r e well s upp o rted b y: Watts, the butler ................................... Elmer Orr Foster tne gardner B e rn ard Everson Michael, the chauffeur. And rew Van Siclen Mrs. B arrington .... ....... Elsa Reiman R ev. James Schooley K em p er Pri ce Mrs Carton, w if e of R ev. Carton E H earne R t. R ev. Carton James Col e Ann i e, the maid Margaret Stapleton Ma gg;e the cook Vi=ginia Woodhull Tot Marvel Rae Newhard Simpson, deputy sheriff R obert Watson Jones. deputy sheriff ...... Sam Bardelson Ouija Him self Bill Drum August Schwindeman The story goes thus: Di ck B a rrington think s he i s in l ove with a chorus gir l fro m t h e "Snap I t Up" Company and he invites her to his home to meet his m other. Befor e she is schedu led to arrive he receives a te l egra m from her sayi n g she is delayed but will come as soon as possible. This upsets Di ck very much a nd while he is t r y in g to think up a n exc u se to give his mother, Honor Bri ght, a book agent, call s and tries to sell h i m some b oo ks. Di c k tells his troubles to Honor and he b egs her to stay and take Tot's place She finally conse nts only after he promises to buy a set of books. A 11 goes well unt il Tot unex p ectedly a rriv es to find HO'1or in the arms of Dick. Tot confesse s that she doesn t love him a nd never did but her rea so n for accepting his inv itation i s to spite B : ll Drum her real lover Drum a l so a r rives on th e scene and To t i s overjoyed but st ill doe sn't want to g iv e in to him. Bill shows hi s capability in handling Tot and a ll ends ha ppily. -----\!.!J-----CHARM SCHOOL The Juniors put on a "Charmin g play May tenth before a capacity house at t h e B a l boa Clubhouse. The cast was picked a n d trained by Mr. Howard Spalding. The lead s were g iven to Mary L ouise Jones and John H a l L The rest o f the cast follows: Austin Bevans Da vid MacKenzi e George B oyd J im Simpkins Tim Simpkins Homer Johns Eli se Benedotti Miss Hays Miss Curtis Sall y Boyd Muriel Doughty Ethel Spevin .... Alix Mercier Lillian Stafford Madge Kent Dotsie The plot is an intere sting one. John H all Alexander Macdonell Vin cent Reynold 3 Charles Humm e r Kenneth Maiers Juli o L apeira Mary L ouise Jones Mar garet Honeycutt Elizabeth B eve r l ey Con stance Sundqu ist Grace Lawyer Alice westman M ary Katherine Bi c kford Elizabeth Parke;' Alice B oyd Dorothy Allen Aus tin Bevans, an automobile sa l e s man. has just inherited a g irl s' school and to t h e surprise of hi s fri ends insists on running it. He thinks the girls should b e tau ght to be charming so h e proceed s to take a look at th e schoo L T o a ll his chums h e g i ves a position a s one of the teachers and what teachers they make. Austin falls in l ove with the president of the Senior class and has plenty of tro uble before the term i s uP. but promises to walt until s h e I s of marriageable age.

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tf .J.f"nr R.0Gues' LOOl
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Characters-Noah Mrs. Noah Reporter Parrot Miss Frost B y Elizabeth B eve rl ey The rising ctctain reveal s that it is a foggy morning. The fo g i s a thick ( og that swir l s as it must have in those far-off primeval mornings when the wor ld was young. There is the sowld of lappin g water, and a dim shadow i n the background that s uggests a boat. Through a rift in the fog Noah is visible, standing besid e the gan gplank. He i s dresse d in white o!lskins (rom heact to foot, a slJect.ral ngure. in fact tne onl y L.nmg not spectra l a bou t him is his voice; it i s very human, with even a touch of complaint in it. Noah: M y beard's getting all wet! It weights a ton! M:s. Noah! ( A second figure advances timidly toward the Great On e and stands uncertainly in the fog. ) I want a wrap for my bear d. I'll catch m y death of co l d. F igu re : (in a nervous vo i ce) There's so m e mistak e! I'm the reporter f rom t h e Zonjan. Balboa High n ews p a per-Noah: (with so m e asperity) I call e d for Mrs Noah! Repo rter: Ye s, yes, I heard you. I t h o ught maybe, if yo u weren't too busy -The editor wants a n interview, andNoah: An interview! R eporte r : About you r trip I t w ill only ta1{e a minute-Noah: Can't be both e:'e d! T oo bu sy Unhealthiest c lirnate I was ever i n Bound to catch a co l d -pneumonia it's awful (The animals begin to come down the gangplank in g h ost-like proc ess ion ') Reporte r : Now if you d just tell m e -Noah: Can't yo u see I'm trying to get these anim a l., c h ecked? (Counting On fingers) Gira ffe s -pa, m a, sonny All present and a c counted for R e porter : Sorry to interrupt, but I mus t get thi s story. The Zonian goes to press tomor-row and I h a ve-Noah: Be a : s. two; monkeys, two; rabbits, sixteen Reporter : H ow many animal s have you in all? Noah: (ahsenUy) Couple hundred, maybe-(With anger ) H ow do yo u ex pect me to these animals checked, with you i nterrupting every second? Oh, Mrs. No a h! Will yo u see wher e the white horse i s? H e didn't get o ff w ith the black one! Reporter: Did you have a storm y trip, and what do yo u think of the modern sc h ool system? Noah: After the r a in stopped it was quite smooth -Oh, Mrs. Noa h did yo u find the white horse? M:s. Noah: ( from a di s t a n ce) Can't find him a nywh e r e! Noah: W e ll lo o k in the stUdy-hall! Reporter: Study hall! Noah: Three chickens, four cats, dogs Wh e r e's the wh:te one with t h e b row: l ear" Reporter: Mr Noah' Noah: Y oung woman! You will have to wait until I get these animals checked! Now that brown-eared dog i s mi ssi ng. Best in the lot, but incorrig ibl e! Reporter: Whe:e do yo u intend to go now? No a h : (as a parrot walk s off) The r e That's that! Parrot: S 'long, Noah, old salt! Fiftee n m e n on a dead m a n 's chest Yo-h o-ho, and a bottle of rum! Reporter: Now may I see the boat? Noah: I haven't much time to wa.ste. Mr s. Noah! Mrs. Noah: flown the gan gplank ) The h o rse and dog were in the study-haIr. They wanted to finish their home-work. Reporter: (in astoni hment) You don't have school o n board!

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Noa h : Why, certainly You don't think we co uld sail for a year and a half without :.;('11001! Unthinkable-Reporter: (amazed) Homework! Mr s. Noah: Of course. How can there be s::hool without homework? R eporter: Oh, I know there can't b e. But I don't think I'll put that in my story. I t wouldn't make much of a hit-Noah: (doubtfu lly) Perhaps not-Mrs. Noa h : W ell of all things! I d o b elieve the parrot's co m n g back! Parrot: ( retu r ning) Mr. No a h, yo u must g iv e me a list of m y credits. How can I go t.o co lle ge without thern? "Sixteen m e n on a dead man's chest-Yo-ho-ho. and a bottlc of rum!" Quite remarkably the appearance of things b eg in s to change. During the transition can b e hear d the parrot's voice growing fainte r f ainte r in the distance Parrot: Credits J want my credits Sixtee n m e n And finally the past become s the p :'csent. the Al k becomes Miss Frost's desk. and (clar e we m ention it?) the assembled anima ls, the of one of h e r French c l asses. Miss Frost: Y o u 've b ee n asleep! R e p orte r : ( s leep i ly) Noah! Miss Frost: Wh y Why. you have b ee n asl eep H ow can yo u deny it? Reporter: Noa h -That i s, yes -It's an inte rview-Miss Fros t : (gri m l y) An interview -with m e a t three! :POl' Ill S FAREWELL Edgar Thompson, '31 The hour i s h e r e at last when we must part. The time has come f o r us to say f a r ewell; And, launched upon the sea of life. we start Our sailin g, wit.h what for tune n o n e can tell. Ti s h ard to leave thee, dear o ld happy s po t, F o r h e:'e our hearts wer e eve r light and gay, A joyou s m emory. which fadeth not, Thou'st give n u s to cheer u s on our way. And, as Our brightest days we call to mind. A soft emot ion, neithcr smile nor s i g h But bo t h comming l cd. in our hearts we find: F a r ewe ll to thee. dear Balboa Hi g h FA c y A n ew hig h sc hool building. The Scabies getting bigger and better Mr. Spalding and M r. G. n.. L ee Swapping h e i ghts. Bud Eva n s without a week ly 995. Havin g an escalator at sc hooL H enry Brewerton in long trou se r s. Carl D a iley a dignified Senior. Percy's joke column with some jokes. Mrs. Krumbach embarrassed. The S ophomore Class with out Mi c hael D ew. Monte Maduro without hi s line P e rcy sporting a diploma. Miss Robson trying to fro wn. Ed gar Thompso n not knowin g t h e a n 5we r s in physi D av id Smith wit.h a m an'!" voice B H S. without the class 0 f '30.

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Edgar T hompson '31 Down the iron railed steps of the brownstone dwelling h e stumbled, Arthur Murphy, the picture of dejection. Rejected! Her refusal bad been keenly sa rca stic. He winced as he recalled her words: "As for marrying you Art I'd much rather wed a mouse. You haven't even courage of yOLU convictions, As he slo uched a lon g the street, hi s eyes dow ncast, his hands in his pockets he began to wonder how much truth her wO:'ds h ad contained. H e' d never thought of himself as a coward but merely a mild, inoffensive person. B It now he cou l d recall a certain hesitancy and nervousness which had be e n manifest in him on several occasions. "Perhaps she was ri ght," he murmured inaudibly. "Perhaps she was right." On and on h e walked heedless of a ll aro:Jncl him. Brownstone and granite mansion s gave way to s hop s and tall office buildin gs. Th e fashionable uptown traffic was r e placed by a never-ending stream of busy trucks and bUSS3S. Throu g h the bustling pushing crowding throngs of shop goers h e passed unnoticed. Due to his carel essness he h a l just been e lbow ed off the curb into the street. A s h e was attempting to regain the sidewalk, he was startl ed by a terrified scream. To his horro r, h e saw that a small ragged boy had wandered into the path of a speeding delivery truck. For a split second he wavered hesitated then with a despairing plunge he reached the child and h a lf-rolled him none too gently, from harm s way. Th e next instant he was hurled headlong by a terrifi c force, H e hea :'d a woman s hyster:'cal s hri e k and a confused murmur and bable obf voices; then a ll faded into nothingness. In an uptown house of brown stone, a gir l was carelessly scanning the headlines of the c l osing edition. Holdups, murders electio n s, soo:iety notes, all sprawled in g larin g type over the sheets. Just as she was about to cast the paper aside she noticed a mode s t bit at the bottom of the last page. "Man killed after savng child from t,uck. Unidentified." A moment s he mused over the item. V/hat a contrast! Her thoughts were still on Arthur Murphy. She wondered vaguely if s h e d ever 'ee Art again. With a last g lance she laid the paper down, murmurin g to herself Poor devil! Wonder who he was." -POEMS-"M1 D-'r"EAR Eli zabeth Parker. '31 We were c : owded in the c l assroom Not a person dared to speak. It was mid-year time in h : g h sc hool. And the stro n g were feeling weak. So we s hudd e r ed there in sile nc e, While the brightest quaked with fear; And each student pale a nd trembling, Knew his Waterloo was neal'. As we sat in trepidation Each one breathed a hurried prayer. H I am lost! one student uttered In a voice of grim despair. But his brave companion whispered, When he heard the wretched voice Don 't surrender quite so quickly! Ah! Look there! We have a cho ice." As this heartening, cheery statement R eached the timid comrade' s ear, He bent down and started working, And h's grade was high that year

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13. H S v< "Yeh! Honest?" \ F" +Fe.t

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THE HI LIGHT Vol. 2 BALBOA, C. Z. FRIDA Y FEI3RUA R Y 13, 1 9 3 0 P UBLISHED UY IRRESPONSIBLE YOU T H S '0.13 EDITORIAL I PRICE WANTED FOR COL LI NGE IS A HERO We have 5e\'era1 faults with lVIURDER --OUI" school. We don't belic\'c it i!l 2 CTS REWARD DEAD OR ALIVE In the heal"l s of cnthus iasti c wor handled I"ight. For instance. it isn't . shiPI)erS f"'ofel:lsor Collinge has tuken placed at the disposal of all those who Keml)Cr Price. a notorious killer. i s wi"h to study under its I)ortal:>. There wanted for muruel. H e W:l!i la!it seen since hc ,loe5n't wish to injure Profl.'S nrc those poor children li ving in Coro ill C lass on Tuesday of wcd,. sor Rtatu8 but uses crasel'<;. zn l. Ft. Clnyton. Ilnd Amador. who This man hn s no feelings and is (Iuile After becn annoyed by a l'u'niu(' earne!!tly seek knowledge and arc un ll:mgerolls. Being in n rush for n o for some days Mr. Collinge slipped an nblc to get all they wHnt simply be C:UISC at all he stcllped on and killed eraser in his pocket anti lay in wait three. This is due to the fact that c rimin;;.1 to bring him to justice. H e soon discovered the whcreabouts thcr .. are no busse!l furnished for those of the culprit and gave c hase. H e theu who wish to linger nfter three. It is a SOPHS ARE EXCELLENT t h e Illll!!t slay with me this aftel'noon for he said. ----------t::: about this. AVERAGE HELE TO TEACH W I t th I t The Sophomores Class has set a new in e f::e I ENGLISH btl'!. 'Ve stlgge!lt a charity foo\1 saie to I'"IY (or the oper1.ti1w e'Cl'en'>e'l of -------------1 MARCY TWOTIMES' I S SUED FOR BREACH OF member s with a standing below aver. PROMISE age. The soph s have recei\'ed m:InY Vincent Marcy of Coroza!, C. Z., is bein!! sued (or breach of promise by F. Wright abo of Coro?:!1. C. Z. Marcy i ll charged with having proposed to Wrij:.'"ht and after accepted h:\\,inn failed to O'fIIH.>nr for t .. c wel!dinj:;. \Vris:ht in bringing !luit asks tWO cents t1nmnJ!c s for the humiliation !!uUcred. The damaging evidence i s 8UI)I)lied by n photo taken of Marcy in the :lct ('Or pro"osinv-. The photo i s rCI)I'oduccd in thi!! magazine in order that curiolls people may sec for Marcy has been ICll'ding n double life according to F. Wright and it is to be hOlled that the culprit will he fOlln!1 j!uilty (Continued Page 4) NOTICES FOR THE WEEK If you like this book keep it for your!llclf. If YOU (\()n't, do the same. Courtesy to "Zoninn" editor. All articles not finished on this page nre continued on page (our. !l%',. already filled In nnd signed really ror distribution. 1015'!! served on a week's notice. Apply to H. G. Spalding. Weather forecnsU: Fair today. Rain snow tomorrow, no moon ot nil. Sleet next week. H nll ItOI'm com in"! with typhoon. Otherwile sunshine. FOllnrl: Somebody'" fnlse teeth nnd ('"(' pall' or ladies' hOllle. Owner mav hnv(' !'lame after identifying them in room G. Jokes : Willard Percy, Bill Hcle, Fred l3annn. Maduro tribe, Kit Carson. Tf)m Conley, nTid Otherll. congra.tulations (or this and will prob ably rcceive some more in t h e lIen-r future. This record will undoubtedly stand for yenrs. However, we (eel that some of the faculty are also deserving of much praise for prcpnring the wny for the enthusiasti c sophs. The 80phs will also mnke some new records be fore this school years closes. we be. lieve since they appear to be mad e for g reat things. CONLEY MODEL YOUTH Thoma'J Conley has been set up 83 a model for Americ:1I1 youths. 'Vhile altl:ndinl: !lchool 'fhoma"i never failed --to get at lealll one "0". \.('t lhis be lin c:otample to nih America n youths REVOLUTION UNDER WAY Smith. vicepresident of the Senior Cia'S!:!. and Charles Hummer, of the Junior C1:1SII, have IItruck for higher pay. They stnted that their responsibilities were far t()O grent for the aalary they were receh ing. They nlso contended that thf'ir duties were much IlIlrder than th", president's and since the presidents received exactly nothing they shoul d I:('t ten oer cenl more. This was tm kindly refused them so they IItruC'\-:. They ore now spreading consternation amonSt the other men or high positi!'\nll and there Is much dnnlter or there he inl{ blood IIhed. W. Hel": has finally accepted the offer to teach English at Colum!.Ji I University. This offcr was madc h i'll because of his outstanding acctlmpli'4h. ments in t h e J)l'onunciatiOIl of rUffiel!! words. Helc has to hi s cre.lit mli'llY Ilerfected prOllullciations. For (urthcr information ask him about Liberty Digest. Clarinet Lemonade'l. Tom slories. or about S I)ain her minister to Cuba. FIGHTS FRIDAY EXTRA HEAVY WEIGHTS HAVE CONSENTED I n order to meet the demnl\fl fM excitement. Marcel Penso. e:ottraheavy of Panama and David mBmmoth pie eater o f SOSn Hill Region. have consented to hn\'e a. j::"rudge fight, "'e ore given to understand that the oris;:in of t h e is not to be considercd. Penso hn s been t raining on sawlillllt and t:locks for months and Smith. who hall eaten only ;'4 "ur.:> he can knock him out. Neverthcle!ls it is to he a good fifcht w hile it last!!. Everybody can com e if he come!! unarmed. PATRONIZE LEE'S FOOD MARKET Domesticated fresh fish. pre served pis::eoll'l. all sortl of pickled insects suitabl e for pie fill in/! : green corn. Y
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TR.OPICAL N BS Sorhs C los,," 'tour I"lo"Th rhe "ut A rO ./7Jahce reYe&/(.,d '" t h Ye<, Scenes Pr;ac.tlce? I'. -. -I ho,""" (SI, "urry) r I ... Gett I n Hotte r I N a .... .of (". of tho ( She srn'/"s ,,"d how W;II '10v? Th(l fa'ft:t( 1l/.es hon hO",q \No hurr])

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DEBATING CLUB Although thi s is not the first year that d ebating has flOUf!sh c d in B alboa Hig h i t i s the fi:st year t hat a c lub has been organized. 'When the d e b ating club seed was sown out the beginning of the school year it sproute d and 5:>on p :'oclu ce d club. The re we r e a number of elimination debat es, prio r to the pi cking of a hig h sc hool squad. I n these the students manifested lack of traini n g bu t great capabilities; consequently Prof esso r Hodges i s to be commended for sub sequently coaching the students. H e al s o d ese rve s credit for picking the hig h sch oo l squad 50 unerl'ing "ly President James C olc Vice Pres i de n t M ary Pooie Reporter Robert Watsor. Spo nsor Mr. C B Hodges

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JOKES Tella: "With patience you can d o 2nyLhing. Mother: "Will patience fill a s ieve \\oith water?" T c lIa: Yes, if you wait for the wate r to fr eeze." --THE ZONIAN --Mrs. Baker: "What i s an operetta?" Mary: 'It's a girl who works for the telephone company." --THE ZONIAN --C!oro: M y S cotch uncle just gave m e a Lincoln." FOl'r!1: "Car?" Cloro: "No, p enny." --T H E ZONJAN -He: I go t f oo led, did you?" She: "Yes, I'm married, too." --THE ZONIAN--" H e certainly i s stuck on himse lf. 'Yes, I suppose that's why nobody c!se sticks to him." --THE ZONIAN --You may call a woman an old f :'iend. but you better not tell her she Inoks it. --THE ZONIAN--" John. d efine wise crack." A winning s mil e." --THE ZONIAN --Sap: Hasn't Herbie a large vocabulary?" Olio: Y es. and h e use s it all in telling you he h as noth'ng to say." --THE ZONIAN --Lill : I s the re anything in disa l'rnamenl:.?" Bill : 'The girls seem to b e getting along hairpins and hatp' n s." --THE ZONIAN --P rof. W e ll did your girls' club pass a:1Y resolutions?" Stude: "Pa]s e d enough r eso lutions to r eform the world if p eople ever lived up to resolut:ons p:l sse d by other peopl e." --THE ZaN IAN --"How i s Erma making out in the t alking movies?" Well has to have a double for ( our-syllable words." --T H E ZONIAN --H e had opened a shop, and had a sign painted. It read: "Fresh Fish Sold here." "What did you put the word 'fresh' in for ? said a customer. Y ou wouldn' t s('l1 it unless i t were, wou ld you?" Eo he changed it to "Fish S o ld Here:' "Why do you say 'he:e'?" asked another c ustom e r. You r e not se llin g i t anywhere e l se, a r e you?" So he took .out the word h e r e." "Why lise the words 'so ld '? Y ou're not giv: r g it a way, are you?" asked a third. So he p ainted out everything but the word "Fis h ." N ext day a fourth c ustom e r came in and said : I don't see the use of that s il?;n 'fish' when yo u can s m e ll it a block away. --THE ZONJAN --D :uly: (As c lo c k strikes twe lve) "Noon. No o n all over the world." Mr. Lee: No. Carl, yo u 're wrong. It's seven o'clock in the evening now in Cairo, s ix in the morning i n the wild Marquf:sas. fiv e o'clock in the aftern oo n in .. '.anclon ten at night in-" D a ily : Well, rm thankful I live in a town whe: e noon's noon." --THE znN1AN --.. Jack said he'd ki ss me o r die in the attempt." "Grac iou s And did you l e t hin1? " W eJl. yo u haven't see n any funeral notices. h a v e you?" --THE ZONIAN --Mr. Lee-"And :magi n e the spectacle the old-fashioned heroine must bave been whe n h e r 'eyes popped out' and h e r 'lashes fell'. --THE ZONIAN --Judge-"This i s the third time you r e here b efore m e The A cc user! (brightening up)-" All, yes sir (hie) I thought I'd met you before --THE ZONIAN --Miss Davis-"In ,teaching shorthand and typewriting we are strong on accuracy." Sm veyor -"And how are you on spee d?" Miss Davis-" Well of last year s class s ix m arrie d their employers within s ix months." --THE ZONIAN --Smith-"Friends a r e a g reat consolation." Jones-"Not if you're broke. --T H E ZONIAN --Judge-" W e ll m y boy, ,do you know what an oath is?" Reds-" Y es. s ir! I was a golf caddie for a whol e month last summe r ."

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Double. ; \" -JU"!o,-t nt-.a. N ,rT ...... e. ") PI"':.>' Balboa Yea I ". -t' .... o ...... '"\. <:. ... -r .....L .. ,; ,""0",",,-F ... _! In Confe .... e.nc: e

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SCIENCE CLUB Mr. G. O. Lee presented the idea of a scie:ltific club to his classes in science and the idea was hC3.rtily endorsed by the pupils. The p::-csident is Charles A : royo and the secretary, Jerelind MacMurray. This club is made up of students who are interested in science. Those eligible to the club arc those who arc doing "A" or "B" work m some scientific course or have pussed some science s ubject crzdito.bly. The membership of the club is so large that all the members cannot meet at anyone time because there is no special period set aside fa:' the student's disposaL The meetings are called on Mondays and Thursdays at 3 o'clock, unless there arc too m::lny confEcts. At such meetings some class topic which has aroused special interest is studied more thoroughly. If the pupils have f ound interesting experiments from scientific publications they perform these. They do t.heir own original experiments. At 6:30 in the evening special meetings are held whenever the oppo:tunity is available to invite an outside speaker to speak 0!1 some subject. or to go on field trips, or both. Occasionally the science club is .able to obtain an outsider to speak during school hours. Some of the outstanding events have bean: The discovery that a fairyland exists behind the lenses of a compound microscope: the trip to the large telescopes at Pedro Miguel; the lectur e and study of the evening sky hy Mr Hess; the trip to the telephone exchangp and the lecture and demonst:'ations by Mr. Daniels; Mr. Higgins' talk on the experimental gardens: Dr. Curry's talk on child health; demonstrations in first aid by Dr. Presnell; ;lnd Roger Matter's demonstration of transmitting electric power through the air.

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And games: What more to life than these? To learn and laugh and, laughing, win!

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SOCCER Ba.ck row, t o right: Dailey. Mitte n H e lc, Des Londes, Jones. Front Fields. D e l a Pena, J Salterio. Dew, MichaelsOT. Not in the pictm"e: J Salterio. A Salte! io. Booth. LEAG UE STAIIWING Team P W L T Pet. Sophomores 1.00 0 Freshmen 6 .666 Senio r s 6 200 Juniors 000 B a lboa High r a n true to form in the interschoo l saCcel contest this year when they s ucceeded in winning the championship from C ristobal. Three games were requio'ed to determine the winner, Balboa taking the first and the last. whlle Cristobal won t.h e second. The firs t game of the se ries was played at Balboa with our team walking away with the contest with a sco r e of 10 to 3. The second was played over in Cristobal where the sand c r a b s live on the socce r field We lost the g arne 3-2 The third ga m e was the best of the three. B a lboa won the toss-up so it was play c d in our back-ya:d. It was clean and c l ose throughout. Our team won 2-0 taking the crown.

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GIRL S' BASEBALL Left to Righi : Tonneson. E Jones, Driscoll, L. Hambelto n C lisbce. G. Jone .. Martin. E H a mbelton )()I.:. J.J. INTE RSCHOL ASTIC On Saturday. March 22. the Cristoba l indoo r baseball team crossed 1 he I s t h m u s to p lay the Pacific side team at the Balboa playshed. They were defeated b y a sco r e o [ 28-IS. The secon d game of the three-game series was played on Marc h 29, at the playsh ed. and although both team s played wel L Balboa tasted defeat. The sco r e was I S -14. The third and dec iding game o[ the series was p layed April 5. at t h e B a lboa p laysh e c L Balboa took the lead in the early part of the game and kept it th oughou t h e sco r e at thc cnd being in Balboa's favor 33-10. I N T E R CLASS Team Played Wo n Los t Sophomores 1.000 Seniors .667 Freshmen I 2 .333 Juniors 0 3 .000

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BOYS' BASKETBALL to right: Coach C"iline-e. Dick, CaIH. Hele. Specht. Jones Bleakley, Des Londes, Mitten, DaLey, Dew, Fie;(ls, :::'o","oerger. lYIaC(lonell. A. Helc. FO(Yl'B.\.LL It has been contended for years that the weather on the Isthmus of Panama is-too warm for the game of football. How ever, this past year Mr. Zierten aided the boys g::eatly in promoting a game between the Seniors and Underclassmen and another between the high school and the bo!lermakers. Captain Clll1ningham from Q u arry H e i ghts deserves mention for his service s rende r ed in the latter game. The pa: ticipants in these games, after receivin g some cO:1.ching and a little practice, demonstrated that foo:'oall can be played clown her e. Seniors Underclassm e n 14 o RESULTS Hi g h School Bo!lcrrnakel's 13 7

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GIRLS BASKETBALL L('ft to ri ght; Newhard S t a pl e t o n C li s hee, G J o nes, M artin, T onneson E J o ne,>. B A !-oj K E T L L INTERSCHOLASTIC A se n es o f three games was a : T a n ge d be t w e e n B a lboa Hig h S c h oo l a nd Cri s t o b a l Hig h School. T h e fir s t game o f t h e series was played at t h e B a lboa pl a y s h e d and se n t to the B a lboa t eam Th e fina l sc or e wa s 408 The sec o nd g am e wa s played at t h e Cristobal p laysh e d a nd o nce m o r e Balbo a was victo riou s a nd ca m e hom e wit h t h e pe nn a n t Th e sco r e at t h e e nd of the ga m e wa s 50-5 The Cri s t o bal g ir l s tr i ed har d and s howed excelle n t s p o rt s m a n ship bu t w e r e outplaye d a t e v e r y s tage o f the game. INTERCLASS T eam Playe d Won Los t Standin g Sopho m o res 1.000 S e nior s 4 6 67 Freshme n 3 33 Junior s 0 00

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Standing: Bl'in gman, H e le, Mauborg ne. Maduro, Evan s Kneeling; Capt. Dick, Humph"ey, Sanfo" d Dew. The tennis eJiminations tournament began at the ope nin g of schoo l with so me s I xteen pl aye r s in t.he contest. Due to rainy weath e r the tournament was not ca r r ied to a fini sh, but merely far eno u g h so that the seven men on t h e s quad could b e picked. Those picked we r e: Freddie Madura (who later went to Cuba for the Centr a l Ame r!c a n Olympics r ep resentin g Fanama), Somers Di ck ( Capt .). Bill HeM, Ben M a ubor g n e, Jack M ad ura Michael D ew, and J ac k Humphrey. These players, backe d by se veral others, formed the team that played Cristobal High. Dick I B I 6-1 6-2 Drake ( C ) H e l e (BI 6-2, 4-6 P esco d ( C ) Dick ( E I 6-1, 6-3 Drake ( C I Mauborgne ( B I Wikingstad ( C ) 6-1 6-4 INTERSCHOOL TOURNAMENTS FIRST MATCH Mauborg n e I B) 6-0, 6-1 Harmon ( C ) Mauborgne ( B I 6-3, 6-3 Humphrey ( C ) SECOND MATCH Dew ( E I 6-0, 6-1 H armon ( C ) Bring man ( B ) 6-3 6-1 Maduro ( B ) Wikingstad ( C ) Mundbe r g ( C ) Dick IE) 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 Dew ( B I "escod (CI Dra k e (C) Sanford IB, Evans (B) P escod (C, 6-2, G-A Dra k e IC)

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GIRLS' SWI MM I NG Lf>ft to right: Quinn. Haldeman. Wahl. Van CHef. Conard. Jone!>. PvlE', Van Valkenburgh. Ky.e:""r Coach G,-ieser. SWIMMIN G Balboa one of lts best years in swim:nipg du:ing P:lst 1930 season. AlLholl3h Josephine McKim graduated last year, her pl.1c C was morc than filled by the development of new material. INTERCL ASS The interclass meet was won by the Sophomores with the Freshmen and Seniors c l ose behind. Wit.h stich as Walston. Quinn. Brewerton. and Kylcbcr. the Sophomore.; easily took the meet even when t.he other classes had sYJimmcl's like Schw ndcl'man, Conard. G_ ant, Humphrey and Wood to put against them. 'With su:: h an array of st.ars in prlcticC'. clipp in g seconds off l'C'corcls. itccl't:linly looked d a rk for Cristobal when our team showed Its might. INTERSCH O L ASTIC Saturday. April 26th. Cristobal High received the most disastrous defeat of its school year when Balboa defeated thcm 96-12 in t.he interschool swimming meet. All of the swimmer s foc Balboa did splenctirlly and they allowed Cristobal only two seconds and six t.hird places, out of thirteen contests. This was a crushing defeat for them and a brilliant victory for Ollf natators. Among the high-lights of the meet was the r('cord swi m of Walston, who tied the InterRccord In the United States. when he swam the 50 yard das h in 24 seconds. Other marks were made by B_'ewerton in the 210 whcn he made it in 2 minutes 33 seconds, and the breast.-stroke in 30 seconds by Schwhcic.rman rounded out a complet.e victory. The srhedule of events follows:

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BOYS' SWIMMING Girl s Boys 5 0 yd. Free S t y l e Co nard (8) \iV'alston IB) H a ldeman (Bl Time: 30 seconds Wood ( b ) Time: 2 1 Bli ss IC) Mundberg IC) (B) 22 0 yd. Free Style B rewe r to n ( B ) Gr ant. ( B ) Tim e: 2 min. 33 seconds Kro ll IC) 50 y d Breast S t r o c Schwinclerman (B) Van CH e f (B) T :me: 42.2 sec. H a ll IC ) \,vcstenc1o::f (D) T ime: 3 1 second s J ones. W ([3) Conard IB) P y l e (13) Time: 1 minute Halde m a n ( B ) Van Clio! ( B ) St.evenson (C) K ylebe r I B ) Quinn ( E ) Pyle I B ) 100 yd. Free Style Walst on ( B ) Humphrey (B) Time: 59. 6 seconds Grant ( B ) 50 yd. Back Stroke Wood ( B ) Kr oll ( C ) Time: 3 1 seco nd s Jones, W. I B ) Fancy Diving Br e werton (B ) Turne r e e l Hachett I C ) B 'l lboa Time: 1 min. 5 0 sec. Balboa Time: 1 min. 24. S sec WOOd Q uinn P y le H a ldrman Conard Grant Humphrey Walston

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VOLLEY BALL V O LLEY B ALL INTERSCHOLASTIC By t h e winning o f two of the t hr ee a rran ge d matches the Balbo a gi r l s s how ed t h e ir s up erio rity over the Cristo b a l g i r l s in volleyb al L The f irst m a tch was played at t.he Balboa playshed and wcnt to B a lboa with little difficulty. The scores were 21-0 and 21-10 The second game took place at the Cristobal playshed and once more Cristobal tasted defeat, B a lboa taking both games by a good margi n The scores were 21-5 and 21-8. The B a lboa team exhibited excellent teamwork through o u t b oth ga m es. Team Sophomo r es Seniors Fre s hm e n Juniors INTERCLASS P layed Wo n Lo s t Standing 1.000 750 .250 000

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BASEBALL Standint: : H elc. Jones. Mitte n DessL ondcs. Specht, Dew. Knee.ing; Di c k Johnston (Scored, D e La P ena, Morrison Not in the picture : rOI'reS I Nam e Team P os AB R II PO A E Pet. D esLa ndes B P 8 4 0 62 5 D ew B L F 3 .426 Specht B 3 B .333 Morrison B C F 0 .333 D e la Pena B R F 0 333 Morchos ky C C. 1 5 284 T Pescod C 3 B . 284 M aurer C P .284 W Wikingstad C 2 B . 250 Wood C R F . 250 Wertz C L F .222 Dick B 2 B 4 1 42 R Wik; ngstad C 1 B 17 0 1 42 Egolf C S S 3 0 1 25 H e le B S S 10 8 100 C Pescod C C F 0 .000 J ones B C 0 1 9 5 .000 Will C R. F 0 0 0 0 .000 Mitten B 1 B 0 25 I 0 000 Forr es t B L F 0 0 0 000

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FIiRST GAME SECOND GAlIlE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total Cristobal Balboa 000005000 5 000320002 7 Balboa Cristobal 010000102 4 0020UOOOI 3 SEA SCOUT GAME Balboa Sea Scouts 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total 1003001128 101010000 3 INTERCLASS BASEBALL L EAGUE TANDING Team Seniors Sophs Juniors Freshies w. L. Pet. 1.000 .666 .333 .000 On Saturday, March 22, the Cristobal tennis t.eam came over to Balboa to play the first tournament of the three tournament SCI ies. Loui se of Balboa carried away the singles against Ann Powers. Both g irls played sp l endid tennis, Martin having t h e upper hand during the last two sets. Clarita and C ecelia Smith played against Pauline Hearn and Vilrna Hall. defeating Cristobal after having lost the first set. The second tournament was pl aye d at Cristobal, March 29. Once more Louise Martin of Balboa won the singles from her oppone nt Balboa took the doubles by forfeit after the C ristobal team failed to put in their appc:tran FIRST L Martin (B) 5-7, 6-4. 6-4 Ann Powers (Cl C. Smith (8) 3-6. 6-2. 6-3 C. Smith P Hearne V Hall (Cl IIANDBALL SECOND TOURNAMENT L Martin (B) 3 -6, 6-2. 6-3 Ann Powers (C) C Smith (B) Won by forfeit C. Smith A comp'l r atlvely new sport in the hi g h school this year was handball. Whil e this game has bren played before during the sc hool year it had never taken a. firm enough hold on the P II pi l.; 10 be pcrmanent. However, this year it aroused a great dea.l of enthusiasm and hoth and double tournaments were played off. Thf' winners in these two tournaments arranged for three matches to be played with Cristobal Hir,h. In the fir s t of the tournaments OUr boys pasily defeated Cristobal on our home COil 1'1 by takin g a11 the s in g le s and one double s match The second tournament. the fol l owirw \I,.'cf'}:. how('vrr, was taken by Cristobal when our tea m madc :1. po I' showi n g on for p i gn R a lhoa s u cceeded in captu ing the third tOllrn;)mcnt when we tOok two s in g l es 1.nrl onc (1011 hIe to r.ive u s two out of thre tournaments. Thr boys who r eceive spec ial m pntion in this game are Hnvrlrl1 T ones. William Helc r.nlf'h rl('mr"1t'" Alh"lt Hel c and Earl With t.he start if h1. S made this year the (';'ImC' !;lv!I'd dl"lW more ;nterrst in the future 1.nc1 becomc a henrilincl'

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ADVERTISING 'l'h e Adv ertis e rs fir e a big f a ctO?' i71 til e J/lcc ess q / T h e L:OII iml liS ?eade n {Ir e 7 e 'l/l ester! to g ive tlielll /i'nt ('011 J ider a t iOIl

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ST AR PHOTO =STUDIO= A civili a n concern (oeal e d 31 rear o f Army & Navy Y. M. C A Building Portraits AND Enlargements Childre n & Babies Photographed A lso PORTRAITS CIVIL SERVICE AND CHAUFFEUR LICENSE. KODAK FlN I SHINGS. Compliments of All America Cables, Inc. Colon Panama Balboa ---( I OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK DEPOSITORY OF THE UNITED STATES TREASURY PANAMA R AILROAD PANAMA CANAL THE UNITED STATES ARMY AND NAVY CRISTOBAL BRANC H PANAMA BRANCH (;. S. SCHAFFER. T H E R ES O U R CES OF T H E ENTI R E BANK I S BEHIND EAC H BRANC H

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The r e s something t o a n ews p a p e r tha t w ins undisput e d l eader ship in jOltT short years. I t1r1epe?1.de7lt 1\1 om ing D a it)' Newspaper ESlablisll e d The Panama American Panama, R d e P

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HOTEL CENTRAL CATHEDRAL PLAZA PANAMA CITY SITUATED ON TH E MOST ATTRACTI VE P ARK OF H1 S T OR1C PANAMA AND 1 N TH E CENTER OF THE CITY'S BANKING AND S HOPP1NG ACT1V H I ES, HOTEL CENTRAL 1 S DOUBLY I NVlTlNG T O SEA-ROVER S AND TOURIS T S OF THE ,."ORLD R ebuilt, reno va ted throughout and newly furni s h ed--wi th palm garde n pati os, a n d balconies so decorated a s to sat i s f y t h e tastes o f family refinements --a nd w i th d upli cate e levator se r v ice comp-l ete, it o ff ers a cco m odations uniqu e and o f the best DINING HALL TEA-ROOM, CAFE AND BAR, ALL IN THEIR SERVICE BEAR THE STAMP OF QUALITY AND EXCELLENCE UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT ANDH.E" ;\1.\.SA.C':ISr.

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DRINK DELICIOUS Delaware Punch Complete Assortment OF "GOLDSMITH" ATHLETIC GOODS AND "JANTZEN" SWIMMI NG SUITS I. L. MADURO Jr. Oppos;t e CENTRAL HOTEL J PANAMA C ITY Art Metal Steel Furniture Monroe Calculating Machine s Sundstrand Adding Machines Royal Typewriters General Office Supplies OFFICE SERVICE Co. PHONE 1360 CATHEDRAL PLAZA

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FRENCH BAZAAR PANAMA WE HAVE ALWAYS ON HAND THE LATEST AMERICAN NOVELTIES IN HATS surI'S SHIRTS NECK'I'IES HANDKERCHIEFS S IFEA'l'ERS SUIT CASES SHOES E'L'C. ONE PRICE ONLY "ARTISTICA" PHOTO STUDIO & CEDENO PROPRIETORS 48 Central Avenue -PANAMA Telephone 756-L. SPEC IALISTS I N P O. Box 37 Portraiture Enlargements, Crayons, Wate r and Oil P aintings, Etc. W e Keep the Negatives.

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K 0 D A K PAN A M A, L T D.I Subs idi a r y o f the Eastman Kodak Company Offers to the Public Through its Authorized Distributors a Compl ete Line of Kodak Products, a Complete Kodak Finishing Se rvice, and Cine Processing Se r vice Kodak Panama, Ltd. Panama City BEST WISHES for the FurURE SUCCESS of the CLASS OF 1930 Felix B. Maduro 21 Centra l Avenue PANAMA I OPEN DURING NOON HOU.U Coca Cola, Orange.Kist, Cascade Ginger Ale, Club Soda, Eskimo Pies, and Glassware. .:. CALL .:. Colon 84 or Panama 65 ---The Panama Bottlin g Co. P. O Box 4 8 3 Panama, R P R. LINCE & CO. IMPORT E R S & EXPORTERS -=OF-'------PANAMA HATS A SQUARE DEAL TO ALL 83 Central Avenu e PANAMA, R P I Telephone 965

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I SASSO -FUHRIN G i & CO. Fifth Street No. 32 Panama, R. P. R epresenta tiv es o f Wilson's Products Peak Frean Biscuits Lipton's Tea Bayer's Cafiaspirine AUTO SERVICE COMPANY EVERYTHING FOR THE MOTORIST BUT THE CAR COMPLIMENTS --T O The Graduating Class of 1930 Panama Railroad Co.

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DR. HIRAM O KELLERMAN CLUB OFFICE 9 .00 A. to 1 2 2 .00 P. 10 6 .)0 P B .... \'''PU I :''\'1'.'\ IKST O:,,\LY .. lIo ... g PA:-'-A-'IA We specialize in dry cleaning and dyeing ladies dainty garments --Tno'rrr THE PANAMA Phone 453 13 J St. COLON Phone 250 8050 B alboa Ave. H ONES T SERVIC E C O UNT S 1'.10S T = WITH The Latin American Sales Corp. Inc. -. Manufacture r s' R epresentative -. P a n ama City Phone 709 HIGH Ck\.SS II I I ,BEST ENGLISH WOOLENS AND LINEN DRILLS, 1:"rO All Work Guaranteed ST ANDARD MADE HABERDASHERY ONLY IMPORTED "llalai.s Corne r Centro l Aven u e & Nimh Street PANAMA

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THE FASHION TAILORING ESTABLI SHMENT CATHEDRA L PARK PANAMA RODRIGUEZ & MARTINEZ The only house tha t s trictl y guarantees the Ame ric a n s t yles I! B e f o r e eye-s tr a in w rinkl es beconle p erma n ent and n e rv o u s fatigu e b e c o nles chronic, have your eyes e x anlin e d If yo u n e e d gl ass es, yo u will b e surprise d t o find wha t a c omfort they a r e whe n accur& t e l y and beconl i n g l y fitt e d t o YOU HAVE YOUR E YES EXAMINED Scadron Optical Co. I Reg i s t e r c d Optom e n i s(S & Opticians Establishe d in Panama Over lOY ears PANAMA 23 Centra l Ave, COLON 903 4 F r ont S tr e e t H a l yVord/ o w MANAGER OF T H E Cecilia Theatre CONGRATULATES THE CLASS OF '30 Tel epho n e P a n a m a -717 Compliments BOWDRY INC. HOT EL CENT R A L PANAM A HATS DRE SSES ACCESSORIES

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ESTABLISHED 1812 ISTHMIAN BRANCHES PANAMA CENTRAL AVENUE 19 Dr. William H. Grant DIST RICT DENTIST TELEPHONE BALBOA 2830 OPPOSITE ANCON POST OFFICE COLON FRONT AT 7TH. COMPLIMENTS OF -------4) GREBIEN ==&== MARTINZ, INC. PANAMA -AGUADULCE COLON --

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BEAT THE HIGH COST OF LIVING Our CAFETERIAS VICTROLAS --RADIOS -wiII save you time and money A FEW BREAKFAS T SPECIALS CORON A T YPEWRITERS Bacon and E ggs Two Eggs-Boile d or Frie d H a m and Eggs .. 3 0 e. 17 e 3 0 e. REACH. WRIGHT & DITSON Griddle Cakes, 2 for Dry T o a s t two for Butte r e d Toast . Se. 3e. 3e. 5 e. 5e. 5e. 5 e. !le 7 0. SPORT ING GOODS C r eam of \Vheat or Oatmeal Shredde d Wheat B iscuits .. Ste w e d Prunes o r Apple S a uce. Breakfas t Ce real s BASEBAll, BASKETBALL, BOXING, TENNI S, GOLF S liced Ph:eapple or P a paya Bake d Apple, or Grape Fruit Sle w e d Rhubarb 5e Porridge and Hot Milk 5c. C A S H OR C O UPONS ACCEPTE D ALBERT LINDO THE PANAMA CANAL RESTAURANTS ANC ON BALBOA CRISTOBA L OPP. R R ST ATION PANAl\I A HENRY EHRMAN ST. ANA 22 CEXTRA L AVE. ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES CORNER OF "ANCON" AVENUE AND H STREET PANAMA CITY Latest d es i g n s in Shade d Jig-hts and Mo d ernistic f ixtures. The last \\ ord in Va ll Brack e t s. Lowest prices o n P e r co lators, I ro n s and Toasters. Comp l e t e s tock o f a ll e lectrical fixtures and applia n ces. R e p air and r e placem ents a speci a lty. \ViII fi gure o n a n y job large o r s m a ll Colore d Bulbs Mazd a Bulbs Flame T y p e Bulbs Cooking r a nges and water heat e r s G e neral E lectric Refriger a tors F r i g idair es. R o p e r Gas Ranges G. E E lectric Fans SUB-AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC SIDE OF THE CANAL ZONE. Co n sult u s whe n i n d oubt Panam a 968. \Va t c h for the f ixture Club. Popular prices. Reser ve your num ber early.

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HOTEL TIVOLI A co c. z. A. comfo rt ab l e, rest ful hotel, ideally located wit h ma g niticient view of t h e P acific Ocean, midst picturesque scenery. The center of social life c l ose to eve r y point o f interest o n the P acific Side of t h e Canal. All l a rge outside rOOI11S, commodiou s and cool, with private baths a n d te leph o n es. Excellent CUISin e and se rvi ce, modern c o n veniences. B all room, banquet h alls, wide s hady verandas, a nd pleasing surroundings. by THE I'ANAMA AMeRICAN PR INTERS I Hr. PANAMA AMI:.RICAN PUBL I SHING CO Paruma, R oj P

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\ Produce d b y The Zonian Staff of B alboa High S chool Art Work by Karl Winq uist, Sen;or, B H S Eng ravings by D e Poole. Panama City. R. d e P Printed b y The P a n a m a Ame ric a n Printers, Pan a m a City, R de P