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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Table of Contents
 Dedication
 Front Matter
 Classes
 Alumni
 Literature
 Society
 Boys' athletics
 Girls' athletics
 Advertising
 Back Cover
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093678/00022
 Material Information
Title: Zonian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, FL
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
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System ID: UF00093678:00022

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Dedication
        Page 4
    Front Matter
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Classes
        Page 8a
        Page 8b
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Alumni
        Page 52a
        Page 52b
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Literature
        Page 54a
        Page 54b
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Society
        Page 62a
        Page 62b
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Boys' athletics
        Page 70a
        Page 70b
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Girls' athletics
        Page 88a
        Page 88b
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Advertising
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



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THE ZONIAN
19,29


e o & (D










2 ZONIAN


BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL


















ilontents


(I [ a r a -:- -:- -:-

Alumnit -:- -:- -:-

Etteraturp -:- -:-

orittetg -:- -:- -:-

loyg' Athlettra

(S6ris' Athletit

Abuertiitng -:-








4 ()N I A N


THE SENIOR CLASS
GA.TEFULLY DEDICATES TIllS VOLUME
TO
l .oier if'. Ci/n.,ic
AND
(;'te,, (. [ec
IN \PI'HECIA IION OF- IIlEIR FVRI NIlL.Y
INTI:lI:STN I IIlE '. LII. AlE 01 IOULi Ci.\>,s








ZONIAN 3









6 ZONIAN



1929 CLASS DAY LITANY




Sometimes We Seniors feel a solemn urge
To pause and sing a gentle, wistful dirge
About the Davis and McKibben.
About those gone and eke, eke, on the living!
It seems but yesterday the year began
When first We Seniors saw the great McMahon
Though then commencement seemed some umpSteen years
Away, we felt relieved and dried our tears,
Resolved to Coil inge-nuity to light
The way to graduation day, good-night!
We hired a Miller milling daily
To sing a song both glad and somewhat Whaley.
We fought and Claude each other then to see
The Hodges-podges play upon the Lee!
Yea, then the road seemed long and hard as Flint
And there's nO'Conn or guff we thought in it-
When Meyer asked us if we knew, one day
Who stole the "L" from LEMMONS, yea or nay!
Each day that passed we felt was worse than lost
If on the ground we saw no signs of Frost!













ROGER W. COLLINGE HELEN CURRIER BAKER
Wisconsin Minnesota

A. B., Lawrence College, Wisconsin A. B., University of Mlinnesota

English and Commercial Subjects Supervisor oj Public School .IIusic









ZONIAN 7


LOUISE HANNA JOHN O'CONNOR
Kentucky De Smet, South Dakota
New Haven School of Physical Training B.S., Stout Institute, Menomania, Wis.
New Haven, Connecticut Alanual Training
Physical Education for Girls


RUTH J. McKIBBEN
L Cleveland, Ohio
.., ~ larietta College, Marietta, Ohio
French and Spanisrh




Yr IT.\ L. EmMONS
/ Mansfield, Texas
/ A.B., Baylor University
4i < r. M. A., University of Texas
History




RUTH H. MILLER
Knoxville, Iowa
A.B., Simpson College
Columbia University
English and Latin




GEORGE O. LEE
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Cornell College
B.S., Iowa State College
University of Minnesota
University of Chicago
Sciences


MILDRED M. DAVIS
Los Angeles, California
A.B., Colorado State Teacher's College
Greeley, Colorado
Commercial Subjects



LESTER S. FLINT
Massachusetts
B.S., Tufts College
Jlathenmaics.



IDA O. ERICKSON
Wisconsin
Teachers College, River Falls Wisconsin
Aristant Principal



OLGA J. FROST
Canal Zone
A.B., Mount St. Vincent-on-the-Hudson
Spanish


ULVA Lois

A.B., Ohi q~y University
A.M.,1 M%1ANhur School of Languages
iddlebury, Vermont
Spanish









8 Z0 ONIAN


FRED J. MEYER
Talmn a Iea
-X LA 'B.A., State L 'niersitv of Iowa
Jlatlhematic.r




H. J. GRIESER
Teacher's College, Columbia University
Physical Education, Boys and Girl,


VERNA STEEN
Minnesota
Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota
Rasmussen Business College, Minnesota
Columbia
Commercial Suh,'>l;I


MYRTLE M. WHALEY
Washington
A.B., University of Washington

English and Commercial Subjects



ALI MAHON
>jt) Iowa
m, State University of Iowa
English



GRACE A., PETERSON
Colorado
A.B., Colorado Teachers' College,
Greeley, Colorado

Household Arts


Miss Frost
Miss Davis
Mr. Flint
Miss Whalev
Miss Miller
Miss McMahon
Miss McKibben
Mr. Lee
Mr. Collinge
Mr. Meyers
Mr. O'Connor
Mr. Hodges
Mrs. Claude
.Mi%, Steen
Miss Emmons


With short hair.
Not being sweet.
Wearing 'W\hoopee Pants."
With a Butteifly Skirt.
Being strict.
Without library keys.
Greeting students with out-stretche.l aim.
Forgetting to tell Bedtime stories.
Without the girls.
Without Mr. Collinge
Speaking to the girls.
Wearing a hat.
Without her freak fountain-pen.
Without Miss Whaley.
Without a sense of humour.




















S










































































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... .. ,. "..isllff.,, :






ZONIAN 9


61







10 ZONIAN


Our Der
Ed iTo r STupe

EDITORIAL NOTE
I, in behalf of the staff wish to express
a heart-felt appreciation for the co-
operation and help of the entire school
in producing this, the 1929 Zonian, and
sincerely hope that it will meet with
the approval of both the student body
and the Faculty.
THE EDITOR.











ZONIAN 11


BANAN, JESSIE
Massachusetts
Knowle4qe i. power.
Student Council '27
Interclass track '27. '28
Swimming '27, '29
Supper Club '27, '28
Librarian '28, '29
Zonian Staff '27, '28




BOWMAN, KATHRYN
Iowa
The light that lie.( in woman's cye.--
"Lelawala" '28
"All at Sea" '29
Glee Club '28, '29





BROWN, CARRIE
Canal Zone
She doeth litllek indnecr.
Which mo.t leave undone or de.pi.,re.





BROWN, MINNIE
Canal Zone
Oh! ble.rt with a temper w.hofe unclouded ralv
Can make tomorrow cheerful a.x loday.
Librarian '29
Swimming '29
Zonian Staff '29
Supper Club '29





BRYAN, PAUL
Mississippi
Behold the child by nature', kind/ law
Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a sraw.










ZONIAN


CAPLES, STEPHEN
Virginia
Hi. words. like ,ro many nimble and airy servilors
trip about him at command.
Western High School,
Washington, D.C. '26, '27, '28
Zonian Staff '29
Baseball (M r ) '29
Swimming (Mgr.) '29



CLEMENT, BETTY
Canal Zone
Napoleon was onlyfire feel two.
Swimming '27
Supper Club '27, '28
Basketball '28
Track '28
"Is Zat So." '29
Vice Pres., Supper Club '29


CONARD, JANICE
Vermont
Those about her
From her ,rhall read the perfect ways oj honor.
W\,,.hiniiCtin Lee,
Clarendon, Virginia '27
Zonian Staff '29


CRAFT, BEATRICE
Washington, D. C.
So sweet t was her companionship
She could not be alone.
Holy Cross Academy,
Washington, D. C. '26
Friends' Select, Philadel-
phia, Pennsylvania '27, '28
"All at Sea" '29
"Is Zat So" '29

DANIELS, GEORGE V.
Canal Zone
That lower oj strength
Which stood jour-.rquare to all IA, .,,n.l
that blew.
Cristobal High School, '26
Monroe Preparatory School,
Mandeville, Jamaica '27
Tennis '28
Soccer '28
"Lelawala" '28
Glee Club '28
Baseball '28, '2a
Swimming '28, '29
"Is Zat So" '29
Zonian Staff '29









ZONIAN




DE GRUMMOND, LYLE
Canal Zone
I dare do all that may become a man; who dares"
do more is none.
"Lelawala" '28
"All at Sea" '29
Track '29
"Is Zat So" '29


DEMI.TH, ZONABEL
Canal Zone
The swreetexl thing on earth, a w'oman'.l longue,
A x!ring which hath no discord.
Class Treasurer '26
Orchestra '28
Supper Club '27, '28, '29
Treasurer, Supper Club '29

DIXON, DOROTHY
Georgia
There'.r language in her e/e, her cheek, her lip.
Dublin High School, Dub-
lin, Georgia '26
Gainesville High School,
Gainesville, Florida '27 '
Basketball '29

EKWURZEL, LARS
Wyoming .
I am Sir Oracle, and when
I ope my lips let no dog bark.
Roxbury Latin, Boston,
Mass. '25. '26
Western High,
Washington, D. C. '26, '27
"Lelawala" '28
Glee Club '28, '29
"Is Zat So" '29 '
Swimming '29
"All At Sea" '29
Zonian Staff Editor '29

PIPEH .II ZONA
Canal Zone
Her voice waS ecer ,roj, ..r,,t'i.* and low-
an excellent thim, in woman.
Track '26
Supper Club '2 7 '28, '29
Swimming '28


I,
4i :.-'1 -
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PV
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tr










14 ZONIAN


GARRETT, JULIANA
New Jersey
.1 love(y lady, garmented in light
From her own beauty.
Supper Club '25, '26, '27
"Is Zat So" '29





Hir i.nr N. GI:nri RC .

t, i,, ., .I .i ,~, koJGod

Tr., k '/ '
SwM^ '-7 '28, '29





HARRIS, WILLIAM
Massachusetts
There ij no wisdonm like jranknejr.
East Ridge Water High
School, East Ridge Water,
Mass. '26, '27, '28


HELMERICHS, OTTO
Canal Zone
Whatever he did wal done with so much eare,
In him alone 'twa.a natural to please.
Class Treasurer '26
Class Vice President '28
Class President '29
Orchestra '27, '29
Zonian Follies '27
"Lelawala" '28
"All at Sea" '29
Glee Club '26, '27, '28, '29
Track '27
Soccer '28, '29
Bowling '28
"Is Zat So" '29



HERMIDA, RAMON
Republic of Panama
Deeper than e'er plummet rounded
Institute Pan-Americano,
Panama '25
Soccer '27
Track '27











ZONIAN 15


HODGES, BEVERLY V.
Virginia
To you, whose temperate pulse.i Jlow
II ,Ii measured heat, serene and slow.
Blair Junior High School,
Nor folk, Virginia '26




HOLZAPFEL, RUTH
Virginia
She moves a goddess, and Lhe looks a queen.
Glee Club '28, '29
Orchestra '28, '29
"All at Sea" '29
Supper Club '26, '27, '28 '29



HUGHES, NEAL
Rhode Island
Though I am not splentliive and rash,
Yet have I something in me dangerous.
Asheboro High School,
Asheboro, North Carolina '26
Denton High School,
Denton, North Carolina '27
Zonian Staff '29
Swimming '29



HUTCHINGS, AMELIA
Canal Zone
For truth has such face and such mien
A.r to be lovd needs only to be seen.
Baseball '26, '27, '28
Track '27
"Lelawala" '28
Glee Club '26, '29
Zonian Staff '28, '29
Class Secretary '26, '27, '28, '29
"All at Sea" '29
"Is Zat So" '29



HUTCHINSON, RUTH
Pennsylvania
You with your soft eyes darky lashed and
shaded,
Your lips like a living, laughing rose.
Supper Club '25, '26, '27, '28
"Is Zat So" '29











16 ZONIAN


JACQUES, DONALD
Alabama
iy lide ij like a roll along Ihe beach
Band '28
Orchestra '27, '28, '29
"Lelawala" '28





JENSEN, CHARLOTTE
Maryland
She look, a.r clear a morning iqrojes
.Newvly washed with dew.
Orchestra '25, '26, '28, '29
Basketball '25, '26, '27
Track '27, '28
Swimming '27, '28
Glee Club '28, '29
"All at Sea" '29




JETT, JOHN
Washington, D.C.
YoutnqJellow. will be young yellow'
Orchestra '28, '29
Band '28
"Is Zat So" '29




JOIuAINFs, El F'NOR
Canal Zone
Silence ir a p, ./f-I I/,, '. J .1/ O ...
I were but little ha ','r .. /. /J, .. t '.. '. n. tl
Glee Club '2
"Lelawala" '8
Supper Club 'I2
Librarian '29




KYLI m P. Ei iz tLiui
Ne.% YorkI,
Happy anm I '. ',.' ..r I/'". I,','
If In., arena /I,r'. ll n l,,, '' l.-.i / .7. Ic.
Supper Club ''-. '25.
Basketball '
Librarian '*2










Z ONIAN


LINDGREN, CHESTER
Mihlne ,,lt.
He was ix fjeet o' man, A-1
Clear grit an' human nature .






LOWE, GEORGE
Canal Zone
M.en of Jew words are best.
Soccer '28, '29
Track '27, '28, '29
Bowling '28
Swimming (Capt.) '28, '29




LUTHER, MARTHA
Canal Zone
On the highest clijff of fame,
I would some day paint my name.
West High School,
Akron, Ohio '27
Supper Club '28, '29




LUTHER, MARY
Canal Zone
Her looks do argue her replete with mode.sy.
West High School,
Akron, Ohio '27
Supper Club '28, '29






MACK, AGNES
Canal Zone
Brown eyes with wondrou,, witching, charm
To bring us good or to work us harm.
Supper Club '27, '28, '29
President of Supper Club '29
Track '27, '29
Glee Club '29
Zonian Staff '29
"All at Sea" '29









18 ZONIAN


MATTATALL, PATIENCE
Illinois
She knows her man, and when you rant and
wear
Can draw you lo her wilh a ,sinle hair.
Troup Junior High School,
Hew Haven, Connecticut
New Haven High School,
New Haven, Connecticut
Northfield Seminary,
Northfield, Massachusetts
East St Louis High School,
IllIIni n.
Zonian Staff '29



McGUIGAN, KATHLEEN
Canal Zone
But there is more in me than you underslandeth.






McGUIGAN, ROSE
Canal Zone
Jfy own tltrli:. l. are my companion.





McKIM, JOSEPHINE
Pennsylvania
She walker the waler like a thing of lie,
And ceemn to dare itie Ilere,t, o It rif,-
Jamaica, New York, High
School '2'. '2b
Edgewood High Shnnol.
Pittsburg, Pennsyl ..ni.i '28
Swimming (Capt.) '29
Glee Club '2q
"All at Sea" '20
Zonian Staff '29



MOLLER. .%1 I L-.
Canal Zone
Golden hair-
Like aliht fire'ji 11..
Glee Club '26 '29
Supper Club '27. '28. '29
"All at Sea" '29










ZONIAN N1


O'DONNELL, PHOEBE
Alabama
Rare compound of ability, frolic and fun,
To laugh at a joke and rejoice at a pun.


OLIVE, EUNICE
Nevada
IIf I,i, her tender eyes
The heavens of ipril with it tender light.
Austin High School,
Austin, Pennsylvania '25




ORR, EARL
Canal Zone
To be honest as this world goes, iJ" to be one man
picked out of ten thousand.
Class Treasurer '29
Vice-President '26
Glee Club '26, '27, '28
Zonian Follies '27
"Lelawala" '28
Soccer '29
"Is Zat So" '29


PHILLIPS, MILDRED
Canal Zone
I am a part of all that I have met.





POWELL, JOHN
New York
True to his word, his work, and hij friends.
Glee Club '26, '28
Zonian Follies '27
"Lelawala" '28
Soccer '28, '29
Track '28, '29
Basketball '28, '29
Baseball '28, '29
Zonian Staff '29


8 i
L ,,..,. X"









20 Z 0 N I A N


PRESTON, HARRY F.
Washington. D. C.
jfy only books were women't look,
And folly'r all they've taught me.
Glee Club '28, '29
Band '28
"Lelawala" '28
"All at Sea" '29
Baseball '29
Track '28, '29
Swimming '28, '29
Bowling (Capt.) '28. '29

QUINN, JAMES B.
Canal Zone
To be great is to be misunderstood.
Glee Club '26
Class Secretary '26
Class Treasurer '27, '28
Soccer '28, '29
Baseball '28, '29
Bowling '28
Basketball '29
"Is Zat So" '29
Zonian Staff '29

QUINN, MARJORIE
Canal Zone
She's all nmyjancy painted her;
She's love(l, rhe's divine.
Class President '26
Zonian Follies '26
Vice President '27
Glee Club '28, '29
"Lelawala" '28
"All at Sea" '29

RADER, WILLIAM C.
West Virginia
God rent his singers upon eath
With fong., of radnesr and oj mirth.
Class President '26, '28
Vice-President '29
Handball '28
Swimming '28
Glee Club '26, '27, '28, '29
"Lelawala" '28
"All at Sea" '29
"Is Zat So" '29
Bowling '28. '29'


R Lt.
Cann rne
He was a mn\q take him for all in all.
I shall ',olt lkupon his like again
Baseball '"26 '27 '28 '29


/











ZONTIA N 21


ROMIG, BILLY
Massachusetts
One who never turned hi, back, but marched
breast forward.
Track '26
Basketball '26, '27, '28, '29
Swimming '28, '29
Glee Club '26, '28
"Lelawala" '28




SCHAPIRO, MARK
Republic of Panama
Friend I have made, whom enmy must com-
mand,
But not one Joe whom I would wi.h a friend.
Glee Club '27, '28
"Lelawala" '27, '28




SEALEY, MARION
Canal Zone
I am nothing if not sincere.
Supper Club '27, '28, '29
Glee Club '29
"All at Sea" '29





VAN BROCKLIN, ANNA RUTH
Canal Zone
Thou hamt a mind that ,uiilt with thi.r
Thyjair and outward character.
Freeport High School,
Freeport, lllinll- '26
Tustin Union High School,
Tustin, California '27
Supper Club '28, '29




VENGOECHEA, JOSE
Colombia
Thefirir of hi, own merit make. hir own way.
Track '27
Soccer '26. '27(Capt.),'28
Tennis '29











22 ZONIAN

WAINER, AMOS
Minnesota
It is a maxim with me that no man was ever
out of reputation but by himself.
Central High School,
Minneapolis, Minn. '25, '26, '27
Tennis '28, '29
Basketball '28, '29
Soccer '28, '29
Handball '28
Track '29
Swimming '29
"Is Zat So" '29


WALSTON, RUBIO
Canal Zone
To me more dear, congenial to my heart
One native charm than all the glosr of art.
Supper Club '25, '26, '27
Track '25




WESTENDORFF, EDNA MAE
South Carolina
Your hair is golden,
Ar the tender tintr of sun.rhine.
Supper Club '26, '27, '28, '29
Glee Club '29
"All at Sea" '29



S'FLF.- R, MARGARET I.
Illinois
Bright as the sun her eyes the gazerj strike
And, like the sun, they jhine on all alike.
Western High School,
Washington, D.C. '26
Leavenworth High School.
Leavenworth, Kansas '27
"Is Zat So" '29




WIVLIIITE, STEPHEN A. L.N
Texas
And the best of me '.. dilhteence.
Tate Agricultural High
School, Gonzalez, Flori-
ida, '26
Cristobal High School, Cris-
tobal, Canal Zone
Zonian Staff Business
Manager '29
"Is Zat So" '29











ZON AN


WILLIS, MARYON
Kentucky
Beneath the rule of men entirely great
The pen i mnu hltier than the .word.


WILLSON, ELOISE
Canal Zone
Thai carer,ring and e.quiiile grace ever present,
Which just a Jew women por.fe.r.r.
Glee Club '29
"All at Sea" '29
Supper Club '28. '29



Woo, JosEPH
Canal Zone
II i,,. Mhen the world' .r miy ov.ler,
Which I with .,word will open.
Basketball '29
Track '28. '29
Zonian Staff '28
Athletic Council '29
"Is Zat So" '29
Soccer '27' '28


Woon, WILLIAM
Canal Zone
Oh-he ,rit.r high in people'.r hearts.
Baseball '26. '27 (Mgr.)
'28. '29 (Capt.)
Track '28 (Capt.), '29
Basketball '27, '28, '29
Soccer '28 M1sr ); '29
Handball '28. '29
Bowling '28

\'i..-l i I M URIEL.
New York
.',e i.r gay and gladrome,
Ha.r a laughing face.
Erasmus High School,
Brooklyn, New York '25, '26
Supper Club '27. '28. '29
Basketball '28
Baseball '28
Track '28
Athletic Council '29


I:,, M t:
. .r. .





24 ZONIAN


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b"t She A lninki to


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ZONIAN 25


























B~f15,


~E~i~r~rrr~~~r- T:;--
4. ~f. *g&


-;





7z









JUNIOR CLASS


II ~~ ~S~e~bYI~~
~YBE,













ZONI AN


JUNIORS


ADAMS, ROBERT
BARDELSON, ROBE.RT
BARDELSON, SAM
BOLAR, MAX
BOWMAN, CLYDiE
BRINGiAN, GEOR(nIEl
BULLOCK, ROBERT
BUTLER, STANLEY
CAIN, GEORGE
DELVAIL.E, ERIC
DicK, SOMERS
Des LONDES, JAMES
EvERSON, BERNIIARD
FINCK, EDWARD
HuMMER, JOE
JONES, EDWIN
JONES, HAYDEN
KIRKPATRICK, RALPHt
LOWiE, EDWARD
MADURO, FREDERICK
MALONE, EDWIN
M1 '. VINCENT
MATTER, ROGER
MITTEN, JUNIOR
MONACO, JOSEPH
MORRISON, JACK
ORR, ELMER
PERCY, WILLARD
PEREZ, ALEXANDER
ROBERTSON, XWILL.IAM
SCHWINDEMAN, ACUUST
SOLENBERGER, EARL
SOLENBEEGER, WAYNE
SULLIVAN, VINCENT
WATSON, ROBERT
W i'r i,,I I.. DONALD
WRIGHT, FREDERICK
WRIGHT, LEWIS
YCAZA, PHILLIP


Girl"

BEiARANO, II L.EN
BEi., JoYCE.
BRUiLAND, NEi.LIE
CLISH.E, DocIA
CONARD, KATHiLEEN
Di LA PlEA, Eva
DRISCOL., RITA
ESLEECK, IDA
FRANSEN, WVILHELMINA
GERBER, DOROTHY
GoouWILi., EI.IZAiBETI
GRAY, EDNA
HA I.ETT, DORIS
HAII.ORAN, PAULINE
Hli AININ, EL.IZAnBETi
JACQu i:s, ROBERTA
LEWIS, FRANCES
LUTZ, CANDELARIA
MARTIN, LOLISE
4 EA D, A I Rl.UERTA
MEAu, EMI.EY
ME IEIAN, I )ANE
MERRI.LL, RUTH
MI.ITCHELL, AIARY L. F
NEWHIAR, RAE
PARKER, EL.EANOR
PHILLIPS, SARAn
PIIENTO, CARMIEN
POSEY, IDA MiAE
REIMANN, ELSA
SHIAFFER, MARY ALoriSE
SIMONS, ENA
SMITI, CILARITA
SMITIi, CECILIA
SMITH, BOiSIF
STAPLE EiTON, M RGAI R .e
WENTSLER, MIANOLA
WILLETT, ADELAIDE
\VOODit'ULL, VIRINIA
YULES, E.i'IA








28 2 ON I A N





o s

Torra*[ T oi The Mo sT Po a tr k Q ar
WTh The. irts On The Cabpvns
















IA
qss cirA I cTion r.
cHard T Lc ork
C ire ulatlm


/. SwimmrncrtrA n a\\
onu wuakhs irt fha mt\






ZONIAN 2S


I\


0


I





















































SOPHOMORE CLASS












Z ONIAN


Boys

BEHR, ROBERT
BYRNE, JACK
DE GRACIA, JUAN
DOCKERY. CONROY
EVANS, HERuBERT
-', ltl l i. K ENNI-.TH
GAEB, HARRY
GIST, HAROLD
HACK, El.mER
HEARNE, NVIJ.l AM
HELE, XWiI I % '
HENRY, JAMES
HERMANSON, HARRY
HILBERT, GEORGE
HUFF, MANNER
HUMMER, CHARLES
JOHNSTON, DOUGLAS
JUuSON, DONALD
KEY, FRANCIS
KIRKPATRICK, Gi.EN
LAPEIRA, JUI.IO
LEWIS, JAMES
MACDONEIL, ALEXANDER
MACDONELL, JAMES
MADURO, MONTE
MAIERS, KENNETHI
.t ,'r.., ROBERT
MONACO, RALPII
MORALES, JohN
MURRAY, FELIX
PENSO, MARCEL
PRICE, KEMPER
REYNOLDS, VINCENT
SANGER, VICTOR
SIHRAPNEL, BLISS
SMITH, EDWARD
THOMPSON, EDGAR
VAN VALKIENIBUR(GH, LESTIER
WALSTON, WIrl.IIAM
VAN SICI.EN, ANDREW
WINQUIST, KARL
YATES, FRANKLIN


AL.LEN, DOIOHYlr
AMotIOL, AL RA
BEvEI LY. EIrZABL.T
BiCIl IORI, MAIRY KI.a1
BoYI), A LIC l
BOY.), RI'TH
BRADLEY, jIKSS\CA
BROWN, PEARL
BYRNEs, EIIIE
COLVIN, 1.CEI K )
DEM-ru, fVIA 1MAE
I', I- I, .VIRGINIA
FENTON, MARIE
FREEMAN, BETTY
GODWIN, MARIAN
GRAHAM, ERMA
HARRIS, HAZFL.
HIRSH, ElIZABEI'II
Hopwou, KATIr,-
JOHANNIES, JENNII
LAWYER, GRACEt
McKINLEN, \.IAR;As r I
MURRAY. Doms
NOI AN, DORIS
O'DONNELI MAR II
OLI.E, OPHEL.IA
PARKER, ELIZABETH
PERRY, EVELYN
POOLE, MARY
POTTER, JANET
REYNOLDS, SARAH
l' *, BARBARA
SANDBERUc CORuRINE
STROOP, BERTHA
SUNDBERG, HrtilVIl,
SUNDQUvIr, CONSTANtCE
TAYL.OR. OPAl.
TRAPOLINO, LA(I'RA
VAN VAil.KNIIURGII, VALERIA
WATROILS. MARGtRl I IT
W'1L1.AAMS, MlA RnARlT
SVY .LE CLARE
VYi.I: LIL. .IE
, I. 1. 1 I... 1 'J, ,' ) L )u.LL


--


4


.. .. SOPHu.'- I I" 1,







32 ZONIAN





















brT
S'il re ss


;s \-\n~cr~t\er t~an the Sulr~r~









ZONIAN 33







__ __ )CYL


FREISHIMEN CI.ASS


I~pna
1R
1~ I

1~


NT
tIfU r












35


ZONIAN


FRESHEN


Boy

ADAMS, CLEON
BOOTH, J. F.
BREWERTON, HENRY
BURDGE, WILLIAM
CARVAJAL, HUMBERTO
CHASE, JACK
CONLAN, RENE
CONLEY, WILLIAM
COVINGTON, ROBERT EARL
DE LA PENA. MOISES
DEW, MICHAEL
DOMBROWSKI. JACK
ENGELKE, HOWARD
FAVOUR, CUTTING
FRENCH, ROBERT
GUYOT, HECTUO
HARRISON, CHARLES
HELE, ALBERT
HELMERICHS, ROBERT
HENR). WILLIAM
HICKMAN, THOMAS
HUTCHISON, DONALD
JOHNSON, JAMES
JONES, WALTER
KLOHE, LOUIS
KOCHER, PAT
KUNKEL, EDWARD
LAMBERT, KENT
LAWRENCE, CLAIR
LYNN, WILLIAM
MACDONELL, NEIL
MADURO, EDWARD
MADURO, JACK
MADURO, MORRIS
M. 4I.ONE. WALTER
MAUBORGNE, BENJAMIN
McGROARTY, GRATTON
MEAD, FRED
MICHAELSON, WILLIAM
NI L~K. ',N. DONALD


PALACIO, RALPH'
PETERSON, CLARENCE
PHILLIPS, NOBLE
PRICE, BILLY
RAYMOND, DAVIS
ROMIG, ROBERT
SALTERIO, ARTHUR
SALTERIO, JOSEPH
SANGER, VINCENT
SERGIEVSKY, OREST
SMITH, DAVID
SMITH, ROBERT
SMITH, MATTHEW
TAYLOR, WILLIAM
WAINER, MAX
WALBRIDGE, HARRY
WALLING, HOWARD
WILLETT, EARL
WILLIAMS, CHARLES
WOOD, ERNEST
TONNESON, AGNES
TRIPPE, ELEANOR
TWYMAN, RUTH
VANDERVOORT, SUSAN
WACHSBERGER, IRENE
YATES, JUDITH

Girlf
AHRENS, HILDA
ARROYO, ZENAIDA
ASPARREN, MERCEDES
BAKER, ANTOINETTE
BOWER, PHILLIS
BRADNEY, MARY
BROOKS, ANNA ELIZABETH
BROOKS, MARJORIE
BROWN, DOROTHY
BRULAND, SOLVEIG
BURNS, MARION
CALHOUN, MARGARET
CALVIT, VIRGINIA
CLINCHARD, CONSTANCE


CURTIS, ALICE
CURTIS, MARY
DEAN, MARY
DENNIS, DOROTHY
DERSHIMER, LEONORE
DOMINGUEZ, ESTHER
DORAN,IRENE
DORAN, MARY
DORSWITT, ALICE
DURFEE, DIANA
EWING. WINIFRED
FAVOUR, MARGARET
GALLIVAN, CATHERINE
HALLEN, PRISCILLA
HEARNE, HAYDEN
HEATH, CARLOTA
HOUGHTON, DORA
HUDSON, HELEN E
JONES, ELLA
JOYNER, BEATRICE
JOYNER, GEORGANA
KALAR, JEAN
KEY, OPHELIA
KYLEBER, FERN
LAWRENCE, KATHLEEN
LEVY, RAQUEL
MAKIBBIN, MILDRED
MARSTRAND, LILLIAN
McGLADE, CHARLOTTE
MOFFET, LOIS
MOORE, MARGARET
PIMENTO, ANGELA
PRESTON, RUTH
QUINN, RITA
RANDALL, VIOLET
REYNOLDS, WrLMA
SEABERG, GEORGIA
SEABERG, OLGA
SEIBOLD, IRIS
SHERWOOD, EMILY
SMITH, EDNA MAY
TIOMAS, MARGARET


I










F17




11 i//i





T1 A .

THE PRESENT SENIOR CLASS WHEN THEY WERE LOWLY FRESHMEN



THE PRESENT SENIOR CLASS \'HEN THEY WERE LOWLY FRESHMEN









37


ZONIAN


Class Iis tory


.larion Sealey '29
Let us all look back over those four years in Balboa Hi. We didn't seem so happy
at the time but who wouldn't like to start again? Let us turn the hour-glass upside
down and begin over.
* October, 1925. Everyone troops in to fix up his schedule, somewhat happy that
the long vacation is over and curious to see the new teachers. The meek scared little
Freshmen wander helplessly around, quailing before the haughty eyes of the upper
classmen. What wouldn't they give to have that superior air! The Freshman boys
dazedly rub their hands over the sharp prickly stubble of their newly shaved heads,
wondering how long the locks will take to grow. "Well, anyway," they console them-
selves. "I won't have to comb my hair for awhile."
The next day all classes open. Mr. Flint breaks the record that the rest of the
teachers have made by giving eight whole pages of queer-looking symbols and long-
sounding words to the humble "scobies" who haven't yet acquired sense enough to
object. The prevailing opinion is that Mr. Flint must be trying'to teach them Greek
or Egyptian by the looks of that book.
The next week comes and Thursday is the day set for the class meetings. Miss
Laws is the girls' adviser and Mr. Flint the boys'. After an exciting election the officers
are chosen.
Boy( GirL,
President, William Rader President, Marjorie Quinn
Vice-President, Earl Orr Vice-President, Shirley Persons
Secretary, James Quinn Secretary, Amelia Hutchings
Treasurer, Otto Helmerichs Treasurer, Anita Rankin
The mid-year exams soon hang like the proverbial sword over everyone's head.
Long sighs of reliefs are heard after the danger zone is past. The "scobies" are now
Freshmen in the dignified sense of the word and hard knocks aren't felt quite so
keenly now. Our poor class is not destined to excel in athletics. A couple of class
parties are given; one a picnic to Chiquita pool.
School is nearing the end and the Zonians are doled out. The Seniors have been
generous in bequeathing us many things which in their opinion we lack. The most
appreciated gift is that of occupying seats in the spacious assembly.
October, 1926. The long vacation closes as teachers and students troop back to
school to put their noses to the grindstone once more. Our intellectual Sophomores
eye the new set of "scobies" with disdain and wreak their vengeance with glee. Two
new teachers have arrived, Miss Melgaard and Miss Vette. Aha! Now we shall
have some fun. Class meetings are held. President, Vance Hayes; Vice-President,








38 ZONIAN

Marjorie Quinn; Secretary, Amelia Hutchings; Treasurer, James Quinn. Some new
Sophomores have joined our ranks; among them are Clyde and Kathryn Bowman
and Lars Ekwurzel. Miss Whaley is our class adviser. The drudge begins again
punctuated here and there by tricks played in the assembly and class parties or dan-
ces. Our athletic abilities, though we come third in the track meet, don't seem to
be numerous. However our class spirit is growing and we hope for better in our
Junior year.
In April we put over a "Tacky Party." What "old-clothes" man would not be
filled with envy on taking a peek at this villainous crowd! The prizes are just as
comical as the clothes.
We wade through final exams again and most of us are transformed into hard-
working Juniors. School finally ends leaving us to make up for time lost burning the
midnight oil.
Aha! 1927. The "scobies" are duly hazed and the tonsorial abilities of the
upper-class men are fully displayed. Yonder goes a freshie with only a fringe of hair
surrounding his upper story (to quote Professor Flint); in the same direction goes one
with a cross of hair in the same locality. Some of the "freshies" escape but not for long.
Bliss Shrapnel and a few others who have acquired a pompadour are selected and
their luxuriant locks depart with the exception of one long tuft on the top. which is
moistened or mixed with grease until it stands up straight. A piece of colored
ribbon is found and artistically tied to the upright lock. The "scrubs" are put into a
wagon or anything on wheels and are hauled up and down the Prado amidst jeers and
laughter. One diminutive "scrub" has nothing but a spit curl in front of his noble
brow reminding one of the well known poem, "There was a little girl,-and she
had a little curl etc."
But now we make the sparks fly from the grindstone. Class meeting is held
and Billy Rader achieves the distinction of becoming President of the illustrious
Junior class. Otto Helmerichs secures the Vice President Office; Amelia Hutchings
the Secretary; James Quinn, the Treasurer. Miss Melgaard is the happy choice as
adviser. Who is the new student in English? Whom did you say? Oh Neal Hughes!
My but he looks timid and bashful. Ah! and the girl over in the corner. Patience
Mattatall? I wonder if she lives up to her name? She must if she continues to let
her hair grow. Who is that Junior in Mr. Flint's geometry class who is so out of
style in wearing short pants? Is that his name? Allan Wilhite? Thanks, Ah!
There go three other new Juniors, Anna Ruth Van Brocklin, Dot Dixon and Peggy
Wheeler. They look like worth while additions to our class.
How do you like our Household Arts teacher, Miss Peterson? I have heard
very favourable reports of her And that Mr. Collinge! What taking ways! How
in the world does he remember which vanity case is which? He and Mr. Northrup
are as inseparable as the Siamese twins.
Our first and greatest problem is how to raise money to feed those ravenous
Seniors at the Banquet. The Junior Luncheon has raised part of the money but a
cake sale will have to be resorted to, to drag in the rest.
The Junior-Senior Taboga Trip was quite excellent although it was hard to tell
who were the chaperons. Instead of giving a class play, a dance and card









ZONIAN 39


party is staged at the Tivoli Hotel. At last the Junior-Senior Banquet arrives.
The names on the menu must have been printed in Greek or Chinese for all we can
do is wait and see what the queer named dishes really are. Usually it is Chicken a la
King or fish with a high sounding name. There is no doubt but that every
one has thoroughly eni .\ -d the affair. Mr. McCommons sincerely expresses his
regrets on leaving such a nice school and all the lovely students. Ahem!!

Otto Helmerichs evidently decides that nothing but the truth is the best course
to pursue so in his speech he politely tells our guests, the vain Seniors, that we are
only feeding them because we have to, not because we want to. We all wonder
how he has the nerve to say it.

Class Night is a glorious affair, the Seniors executing a grand march with their
mascot, a l.al:.y alligator, leading. Class songs are sung and the dancing begins after
the pr.raim. Now comes Commencement Night. What Junior doesn't feel a tiny
bit sad as he watches the Seniors walk down the aisle to get their diplomas, knowing
that next year he, too, will be leaving his school days behind him? School closes; one
of our best beloved teachers, Mr. Northrup, is leaving us. We shall miss him.

October 1928! We are now dignified Seniors and are taking every advantage of
that fact. What new faces appear on the faculty this time? Ah! Mr. Lee, Mr.
Hodges, .\li Miller, Miss McKibben, Miss Davis, Mr. O'Connor and Mr. Meyer.
Goodness! We must have drained the U. S. of teachers. But where is our principal?
Did he get lost on the way? No one knows. Mr. Hodges takes the principal's job.
We now import or rather steal Miss Emmons from Cristobal. My! What a row the
Gold-Siders raise. Queer how some of these teachers resemble their predecessors.
Miss Emmons is quite as queer and full of good spirits as Miss Vette was, even more
so. Mr. Lee seems quite adept in spotting skullduggery. He certainly resembles
Mr. Northrup in this respect. Queer isn't it, how wise and knowing they are? Would
I be severely reprimanded if I quoted that old saying "Knowledge is gained by ex-
perience"? Enough for the faculty.

October 11th, all Senior boys are requested to wear short pants in honor of
Wilhite Day. \Wlhite refuses to don long pants and swears that he will wear
short pants e"en when Lradi.i:ting Woe be to him if he so much as appears on the
stage in those Scotchman trousers. The new class officers are Otto Helmerichs,
President; Billy Rader, Vice-President; Amelia Hutchings, Secretary; and Earl Orr.
Treasurer. Mr. Lee takes Mr. Hodges' place as class adviser and fills his office to
perfection. Earl Orr begins fishing for last year's dues. He deserves a medal if he
succeeds in extracting them. The Zonian Staff is elected, Lars Ekwurzel chosen
as editor-in-chief. Announcement and ring orders are sent off in due time. Class
colors, motto, flower and mascot are chosen. The Seniors give a Taboga party
and invite the Juniors and the Juniors give one and invite the Seniors. Both affairs
are very successful. The Class of 1929's lucky star makes its appearance this
mem rahlk year. So far we have won track, swimming, basket-ball and ad infinitum.
It' about time, to be sure.









40 ZONIAN


Miss Miller is frantic. How can she keep order with such a class? Miss Emmons
is increasing her vocal power and range by practicing every day in talking against
its roar--a veritable Niagara of clacking let loose at our teachers' heads. Did I not
mention that retiring, humble newcomer of the year before, Neal Hughes? Something
must have happened during vacation; he is now the ringleader of the side shows-
cracking jokes and providing amusement for the class at any time.

Only a few school days are left before most of us pass out of Balboa High School's
portals forever. There are still the Junior-Senior Banquet, Class Night, Baccalaur-
eate, Alumni Banquet and Graduation before us.

Let us stand and sing "Auld Lang Syne." There! Thanks! S' Long, youse
guys!


SENIOR CLASS
Prerident... .... .. ........... ......... OTTO HELMERICHS
Vice-Presidenlt .- ............... .............. ..... BILL RADER
Secretary ..... ............... ....................... AMELIA HUTCHINGS
Treasurer ........... .................. . ..............EARL ORR
Adviser ... .............. ......... ........... ........M R. LEE
Color ................................................ BLUE AND GOLD
Flower .. ............... ...... ORCHID
Motlo....... "'THEY CONQUER WHO CONQUER THEMSELVES"
a cot......... .................................. PARAKEET








ZONIAN 41




Class 1rophecq


Complimentarty and otherwise
Janice Conard '29
Agnes Mack '29
If prophesy we must
In Fate we place our trust;
Originality's our aim
The Editor gets all the blame.
Now Jesie Banan, to begin this lay, as a scholar, we think, the world will sway.
And Kitty Bowman, who loves to talk, tells bedtime tales for station "WALK"; while
Carrie Brown, by special request, will be a bacteriologist. But Minnie Brown, be
there a law of chance, will successfully write a great romance; and then Paul Bryan,
the studious type, writes history while it's ripe. Our Steve Caples, by good grace, as
a tattoo artist will find his place. And Betty Clement, 'tis said by some, a haughty
duchess will become. The Conard called Janice in the halls of fame as a criminal
lawyer will write her name; while Beatrice Craft, for the rest of her life, will surely be
an admiral's wife. Why Georgie Daniels! The wicked thing! He'll become the head
of a bootleg ring. Lyle DeGrummond, the electrician erratic, shall install fine radios
in your attic. Now Zonabel Demuth shall be a teacher near a southern sea; but Dot
Dixon, we'll have you know, shall be a headliner in a Broadway show. While Lars
Ekwurzel (a dirty deal!) is a walking ad for Chesterfield; and Zona French, the
talkative creature, in the halls of Congress will be a feature. What! Julie Garrett!
Was this her aim-to set all masculine hearts aflame? George Halloran, oh, such a
talker, will make a living as floorwalker, and William Harris, that big tall guy, will
be a civil service spy. Otto Helmerichs, our class president, in the White House is a
resident. Ramon Hermida we can feature giving dictation as a teacher. Now
Beverly Hodges, of talents varied, will be settled down and married. Ruth Holzapfel
soon will grace a coveted orchestra place. And Neal Hughes we won't begrudge the
job of a beauty contest judge. Amelia Hutchings in any plane will success and hap-
piness gain. Ruth Hutchison, ('tis quite contrary), will find fruition as a secretary.
Donald Jacques, to be franker, will become an eminent banker. While Charlotte
Jensen we shall grant the place of Mabel Walker Willebrandt. But John Jett, we
clearly see, a butter 'an egg man soon shall be. Eleanor Johannes ('tis fixed) makes her
bow as an aviatrix. Now Chester Lindgren shall arise in an army blimp to scale the
skies. Then Martha Luther-who shall say-may be in talkies some sweet day. While
Mary Luther, not exempt, as a governess makes an attempt. But Pat iMattatall, in
future time, a snake charmer will stand in line. The McGuigans. Kathleen and
Rose, as dancers find their pose. Joe AYcKim, a talented miss, now is training
scaleless fish. Alice .h illr, our school canary, on Victor records sings lyrics airy.
Phoebe O'Donnell, by a turn of chance, will, we think, go in for the solo dance. And








42 ZONIAN

Eunice Olive, a maiden fair. shall soon become a painter rare. Earl Orr, that famous
English bard, we see a member of Scotland Yard. Now Mildred Philip.. without
distress is a very good writer we must confess. And Johnnie Powell, as he's begun, a
string of busses soon shall run. larri Preston, we shall make, a deep sea diver in Gatun
Lake. Jimmie Quinn, because of his diction, we shall see a writer of fiction. Marjorie
Quinn, 'tis clearly seen, shall give her time to the silver screen. Billy Rader, we are
told, will ballyhoo for circus gold. Ben Reese, our prize reader of verse, soon, as an
actor, will rehearse. Bill Romlq a teacher of Spanish will be, in some big University.
And Mark Schapiro, we know at least, will make his debut as the best of modistes.
Now Alarion Sealey, a quiet maid, she shall be caught in a night club raid. While
Anna Ruth, that popular one, will have her married life begun. Jose, a caballero gay.
will ever go his carefree way. And Rubio Walfion, its' been seen, shall, of the
underworld be queen, while Amos Wainer, by vocal powers, now in the ministry
does flower. But Edna MJae, along with Byrd, from the artic circle now is heard.
Peaq Wl'heeler has dramatic will; we hope she lands in vaudeville. Alan ril/hlie,
(I'll be darned!) by the arts of forestry is charmed. IlarYon Willis, goodness knows,
must submit to a teacher's woes. Eloise Wilson comes out on top as manager of a
beauty shoppe. The able Wood boys, Joe and Bill, professorships quite nobly fill.
iMuriel Woodhull, true to form, offers advice to our love lorn.


c~4


One AdvanrTae Of


Leaving Pa na rnm








ZONIAN 43



Class Will



WE, THE SENIORS of Balboa High School, in the year of our Lord one thou-
sand nine hundred and twenty-nine, thoroughly believing ourselves to be sane in
mind, reason and conduct, do hereupon draft and sign this our LAST WILL AND
TESTAMENT. We do solemnly, and with due regard for our legatees, declare all
other wills made by us null and void, and do hereby appoint the present Freshman
class as executors, hoping they will discharge their moral duties in a way befitting
the honor of the aforesaid Senior Class.
To our over-worked, but efficient, faculty, WE leave sincerest regards for their
noble efforts in raising us from the status of Freshmen to our present high state of
learning.
To the ever-aspiring Juniors, WE bequeath our sophistication and savoir-faire
in the hope that they will treat it with the delicacy and finesse that this bequest
deserves.
To Mr. Hodges, the Zonian Staff wishes to express its appreciation for the use
of the upstairs office as a haven of seclusion for the hardworking members of the
staff, and hereby bequeaths this room to next year's Zonian Staff.
Various members of the Senior Class have, out of the kindness of their hearts,
left some of their most valued possessions and attributes to individuals in the school
who we hope will be properly appreciative and duly grateful.
Mr. Lars Ekwurzel leaves his pedal extremities to the navy so that only thirteen
of the proposed fifteen new cruisers will have to be built.
Miss "Babs" Roe is benefitted by Pat Mattatall's bequest of her ability to
wander through the halls with that blissfully unconscious look.
Miss Joe McKim leaves her ability to fall in love with a different boy every week
to Rae Newhard.
Mr. Steve Caples leaves his ability to fall in love Joe McKim to Edwin Jones.
Johnny Powell bequeaths his afternoons off to Orest Sergievsky.
Neal Hughes wills his trusty steed to Juan Franco.
Maryon Willis wills her curves to the El Valle road.
Agnes Mack bequeaths Vincent Marcy to Valeria Van Valkenburgh.
Amelia Hutchings leaves her waving locks to Eleanor Parker.
Peggy Wheeler leaves her famous saying "But why does it do that?" to Jeanne
Meehan.
George Daniels leaves his luxurious beard to Robert Bullock.
Ruth Hutchison leaves the Pedro Miguel queenship to Connie Sundquist.
Allan Wilhite leaves his short pants to Mr. Collinge.
Buddy Evans is in receipt of Eleanor Johannes' ability to keep within the law.








44 ZONIAN

"Midge" Quinn, out of the kindness of her heart, leaves her stony stare to Mar-
garet McKinley.
Ben Reese, hoping that it will be well and honorably used in defeating Cristobal,
leaves his pitching ability to Dan DesLondes.
Harry Preston, showing noble self-sacrifice, leaves the Buick to who ever thinks
he will get the most girls per hour out of it, (or into it?).
Otto Helmerichs leaves the presidency of the Senior Class of next year to whom-
ever the present Junior class may decide upon to take the heavy burden from his
shoulders.
Bill Wood, with unusual generosity, bequeaths to Jackie Morrison his majestic
stature.
Amos Wainer leaves his ability to produce hot air to the air service for use in
inflating their dirigibles, hoping Congress will duly compensate his generosity.
Lyle de Grummond leaves Joe Williams' bus to Willard Percy, with hopes the
two rumble seats will drop off.
Mary Luther leaves her ability to drive her little "Chevie" to Beatrice and
Georgiana Joyner.
Ruth Holzapfel leaves her placid dignity to Lucette Colvin.
Jessie Banan leaves her ability to answer quickly and correctly all questions in
Civics Class, to George Cain, hoping he will take advantage of any opportunity to
use it.
Kitty Bowman leaves her ability to argue with Miss Miller to Elizabeth Beverly.
To many members of the lower classes, whose names it is deemed best not to
mention, Carrie Brown leaves her quiet and unobtrusive manner.
Minnie Brown, after painstaking use of her will power, bequeaths her diet list
to Claire Wyle.
To Junior Mitten, Paul Bryan very graciously wills all the sulphuric acid in
the chemistry laboratory.
Betty Clement leaves her tiny pedal extremities to Charles Harrison who seems
to have a hard time getting shoes big enough to fit him.
To all those unfortunates who intend carrying five subjects next year, Janice
Conard leaves her desk space, best wishes and prayers.
Bee Craft leaves her ability to sing in classrooms and get away with it, to An-
toinette Baker.
George Daniels wills his impersonations of a drunkard to Jack Morrison in
hopes that he may be able to use it as successfully in next year's play as he, himself,
used it.
Zonabel Demuth leaves to Ida Esleek her beautiful curly hair.
Dot Dixon leaves her grin to Adelaide Willett with the express message to use
it as frequently and as effectively as she has done in the past.
Zona French, most willingly, leaves her extensive vocabulary to Winkie Ewing,
realizing how effective it will be in overawing Freshmen.
George Halloran leaves Via Mae in the care of Earl Solenberger, hoping that
Earl will take as good care of her as he has.









ZONIAN 45

To Oiest. William Harris leaves his artist-like hair-cut.
To Frank Key, who most urgently needs it, Ramon Hermida wills his mechanical
drawing table and his ability to get good marks.
Beverly Hodges leaves her seventh period office work to Virginia Woodhull,
who seems to be aspiring to the position of stenographer.
Donald Jacques and Edwin Jones jointly bequeath their ability to talk to each
other in assembly to Eddie Smith and Manola Wentsler in consideration that
they use this privilege daily, even as they have done.
Charlotte Jensen leaves her tall slimness to David Smith.
Elizabeth Kyleber wills to Priscilla Hallen her bellhop costume, as she is certain
Priscilla will be an usher some day.
Chester Lindgren wills his four-inch smile to Freddie Wright with the instructions
that he use it to charm the Freshman girls.
George Lowe leaves his magnificent physique and jumping ability to Howard
Engelke knowing that he certainly will appreciate it.
Martha Luther, thinking it will add to the dignity of at least one Freshman,
leaves her long curly hair to Agnes Tonneson.
Mary Luther, understanding Racquel Levy's position, hands over to her, her
car. Now Racquel, you won't have any more excuses for being late, except "Being
out of gasl"
Rose McGuigan, in hopes that her gift will enable the receiver to graduate with
high honors, sometime in the near future leaves her grades to Junior Wentsler.
Kathleen McGuigan, in view of the urgency of the occasion, leaves to Evelyn
Perry her quiet bearing and her habit of speaking only when spoken to.
As an incentive to all those girls who are tired of life, Alice Moller bequeaths
her Annapolis pin.
Phoebe O'Donnell wills her hairpins to Mary Louise Schaffer.
Eunice Olive leaves her little hop-skip-and-jump to Frances Lewis.
Earl Orr leaves his extensive knowledge of chemistry to the Freshman boys with
the hope that they will not use it to bluff their teacher.
Mildred Phillips leaves her winning ways to Herbert Evans in the hope that he
will use them successfully when he gets into trouble.
John Powell leaves his utter indifference to Freshmen, to Jimmy Lewis.
James Quinn leaves his adorable mustache to whomever it will benefit.
Bill Rader leaves to Stanley Butler his ability to act up successfully in the
classroom as well as on the stage..
Billy Romig leaves his villainous laugh to Paul Furr (we hope Paul won't try
to impersonate Desperate Ambrose Lecause of this gift).
Mark Schapiro leaves his chaperonage of Louise Martin. Elsa Reimann and
Chichi Lutz to Freddie Mladuro.
John Jett leaves his ability as an actor to Elmer Hack, knowing that this gift
will enable Elmer to be chosen in any future play cast.








46 ZONIAN

Marion Sealey bequeaths to Hayden Hearne her umbrella. Hayden will ap-
preciate it a great deal, as she freckles ro easily.
Anna Ruth Van Brocklin kaves her keep-cool appearance to Ruth Twyman.
Jose Vengoechea wills his Spanish accent to Jiggs Byrne.
Rubio Walston bequeaths to Marie Fenton hzr slender figure and all secrets
of acquiring it.
Edna Mac Westendorff leaves her age and ability to some paor student wishing
to work during summer vacation as a chauffeur.
Eloise Willson, after much strenuous deliberation, leaves to Dorothy Dennis her
ability to whistle and annoy Miss Whaley in first period assembly.
Joe Wood leaves his athletic ability as a complement to Robert French's scholas-
tic ability.
William Wood leaves his ability to make "baskets" to the San Bias Indians.
To Mary Doran, Juliana Garrett bequeaths her vivid personality.


When DWe7 Eure T T*oK F o

To Do Thr,We Won der- W s


WorTh IT







47


ZONIAN


-. r^.4


A-
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47


O


Now"
llwu '^^
"~Am-~'s.-/- .Y













PARODIES ON HOLLYWOOD


Co-rtar


Jessie Banan
Kittie Bowman
Carrie Brown
Minnie Brown
Paul Bryan
Steve Caples
Betty Clement
Janice Conard
Beatrice Craft
George Daniels
Lyle De Grummond
Zonabel Demuth
Dorothy Dixon
Lars Ekwurzel
Zona French
Juliana Garrett
George Halloran
William Harris
Otto Helmerichs
Ramon Hermida
Beierl\ Hodge-
Ruth Holzapfel
Neal Hughes
Amelia Hutchings
Ruth Hutchison
Donald Jacques
Charlotte Jensen


Reba Crawford
Colleen Moore
Irene Bordonis
Alice Joyce
Wallace Beery
Richard Dix
Nancy Carroll
Irene Rich
Bessie Love
Buster Brown
"Buddy Rogers
Eleanor Boardman
Alice White
Lars Hanson
Corinne Griffith
Clara Bow
Charles Martin
Joey Martin
Lloyd Hamilton
Glen Tryon
Constance Talmadge
Ann Pennington
Harold Lloyd
Myrna Loy
Mary Brian
Rod La Roque
Lilyan Tashman


Wayne Solenberger
Kennie Forrest
Allan
Bill Poh
Rose McGuigan
'Jo'
Earl Solenberger
Billy Lawlor
The navy
Valeria
'Dot'
Joe Wood
Lyle
'Peg'
Absentee
Otto
Via Mae Demuth
Betty Freeman
'Jule'
He won't tell
Carly Newhard
Phil Bollar
Hayden
'Thatch' Clisbee
Jack Pittman
Estrella
Duke


On Location

In Library
Miss Miller's dqsk
With Zonabel
Miss Davis' room
Clubhouse
Any bar
Play Practice
Any bridge party
The Union Club
On the beach
In the Ford
Walking home
In Lyle's Flivver
Zonian Office
Never at home
On front steps
1402 B Carr St.
Miss Miller's room
Peter Mike
In every classroom
In the Auburn
Peter Mike bus
Swimming Pool
In the Commissary
In a Float
With Estrella
His ship


Identification

A bunch of keys
Her wisecracking
In Joe's way
Typing
Acids
His walk
Politeness
Helping someone
Her dancing
His beard
Joe William's bus
Yeah??
Petiteness
Big Feet
Klimshakes
Curly red hair
Green silk suit
The 'cheshire' grin
Is Zat So?
Quietness
A typewriter
Severeness
Horses
Those eyes
Her placidity
His poetic haircut
Seagoing chatter


I.












Chester Lindgren
George Lowe
Agnes Mack
Pat Mattatall
Jo McKim
Alice Moller
Phoebe O'Donnell
M. li ed Phillips
John Powell
Harry Preston
James Quinn
Marjorie Quinn
Ihll Rader
Ben Reese
Billy Romig
Mark Schapiro
Marion Sealev
Anna Ruth
Jos6 Vengochea
Rubio Walston
Amos Wainer
Edna Mae
Peggy Wheeler
Alan Wilhite
Maryon \1 111l.
Eloise Wilson
Joe Wood
Bill W\,.i.1
Muriel Woodhull


Warner Oland Mildred Phillips
Ben Lyon Janet Potter
Sue Carrol 'Vinny
Lupe Velez Johnny Powell
Joan Crawford We lost track last week
Phli Il, Haver Bob
Greta Garbo Mark
Betty Compson Chester
John Gilbert Pat Mattatall
Nils Asther Muriel
George Lewis He has a secret passion
Billie Dove 'Buster'
'Doug' Fairbanks Posey
Clive Brook Docia
George K. Arthur Marion Sealey


Ricardo Cortez
Laura La Plante
Baclanova
Rudolph Valentino
Janet Gaynor
Buster Keaton
Vilma Banky
Betty Bronson
Buster Collier
Nazimova
Thelma Todd
Richard Arlen
William Haines
Dorothy Mackaill


Phoebe
Billy
Joe Stier
A suppressed Desire
Doug
'Hokie'
Her Eagle Scout
'Stupe'
Hedvig Sunberg
Eddie Rink
That dark-haired knock-out
Zonabel
Woman Hater
Harry


Taboga
Playshed
With Vinny
Miramar
On a date
With the Luthers
Ye Olde Sweet Shoppe
In somebody's car
In school??????
Playshed
Peter Mike Clubhouse
Century Club
With Ed Smith
Pool Room
Corozal
In a group of girls
At Carol's house
In the yellow car
Playshed
With Juliana
Amador
South Pole
In a porch swing
Star and Herald
Amador Movie Hall
Y.W.C.A.
1402 B Carr St.
Clubhouse
Hanging over balcony


Six foot a man
PhII. %-Iue
Vinny
Babs
Her bracelets
Brown eyes
Curls
Baby face
His flivver
The Buick
His hair
Her grace
Furtive Osculation
Poetry
Bum Wing
Roaming nose
A good book
Blonde curly hair
A basketball
Beautiful hands
Talkies
Looking for a girl graduate book
Oh-really???
Those Pants!!!
By the Iln,.li o of her skirts
Her "chevy"
Eloquence
His Spanish
Sweet disposition





















































4. ~3 .


ZON MAN STAFF


: -











ZONIAN 51


THE GUILTY ONES


Editor-in-Chief ......................
Aerriant Editor....................... ..............
Business Manager.................... ...... --.
Assistant Managers........ ......... ....



Cirrculwilon Manager.............. ..................
A~nistant Circuliati l Manager........................
Society Editor.................................
Assistant Society Editor ................. ...
Alumni Editor..................... .... .
Staff Artist.... ................... .... .........
Asrisxant Staff Artid ............................
Boys' Athletic Editor..... .................. ..
Assistant Boys' Athletic Editor .....................
Girlr' Athletic Editor............................
A.,ijtant Girls' Athletic Editor................
Staff T.vp i.'
Stall Photographer. .....................
Staff Adviser....................... ............


. .... ... ..........LARS EKWURZEL
........... .......JANICE CONARD
A.. -ALLAN WILHITE
...................ELLIOTT MONACO
FREDERICK MADURO
WORTHINGTON J. THOMPSON
................ ... ...-JOHN POWELL
.--.....-.... ..........- NEAL HUGHES
.......... ............. AGNES M ACK
............ _.......... BARBARA ROE
......... ............. ANNA SAPHIR
........... .........STEPHEN CAPLES
.......... ..-.PATIENCE MATTATALL
............... ... .....JAMES QUINN
.....................GEORGE DANIELS
............ .JOSEPHINE McKIM
..............AMELIA HUTCHINGS
MII 'I. BROWN
..............JOSEPH MAUBORGNE
.......................M R. COLLINGE


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS



To Miss Pat Mattatall, without whose untiring efforts, unfailing originality,
and diligent application this book would probably have been exactly what it is. I
hereby express my sincere appreciation.
STEVE CAPLES

To Mr. Steve Caples, without whose untiring efforts, unfailing originality.
and diligent application this book would probably have been exactly what it is, I
hereby express my sincere appreciation.

PAT MATTATALL

To our editor, whose loyalty, invaluable assistance, and original
suggestions have made our work largely, if not wholly, impossible, we hereby
express our sincere appreciation.
PAT MATTATALL
STEVE CAPLES









52 ZONIAN


WHAT THEY REMIND US OF

"Ivan Scavinski Scavar". ............... ....... .......Orest Sergievsky
"I Wonder How I Look When I'm Asleep"............. ......Neal Hughes
"Ten Little Miles from Town". ......... .The Miramar Club
"Anchor Aweigh". ............Charlotte Jensen
"Laugh Clown Laugh"....... ......Bill Romig
"W hoopee".. .... . .............................. Pat M attatall
"Too Busy"................... .........Zonian Staff
"So Tired".... .................. ........... ................... ... .........John Powell
"To Know You Is To Love You"...........................oe McKim
"Oh Yah, Yah". .. .. .Mark Schapiro
"What Does It Matter"............ ..................Us Students
"Here's That Party Now in Person"........................Midge Quinn
"Girl of My Dreams".................... ........... ..... Joe Wood
"Is There Anything Wrong With That?"... ...............Dot Dixon
"I Faw Down Go Boom"......... ..... ...George Daniels
"And Then Came the Dawn"....................... ...William Lawlor
"Sonny Boy". ... ... ................ .... ........ Jack Morrison
"I Can't Do Without You". ..... .. ........... One of the Smith Twins
"Hallelujah, I'm a Bum"....... ... Vincent Marcy
"I Can't Give You Anything But Love, Baby". ....HHarry Preston
"She's Funny That Way". ................ .........M... aryon Willis
"My Troubles Are Over". ............ ............ Senior Class
"Coquette" .............. ...... .... ... .. ......J.. uliana Garrett
"D riftwood" .................. ........ .......... Bill H ele









f01Q,
/j ZO406q
/ If












ZONIAN 53

ALUMNI
Alumni are becoming a serious problem to editors of the Zonian, for nlturallv
every year there are more and more. Finally it was decided that the graduates of the
classes of 1926, 1927, and 1928 would prove of most interest to the present members of
Balboa High School. To these favored few, therefore, we sent the following card
DEAR GRADUATE:
The 1929 Zonian would like to hear from you.




Address- ALUMNI EDITOR
The 1929 Zonian
Balboa High School
Balboa, C.Z.
Some obligingly answered; more did not. They're so very busy, you know.
Truly the efforts of their former English teachers were not in vain. Many of the
letters were jewels of style; some alumni expressed their fond memories of Balboa
High in verse; several of the letters were model business letters (score one for the typ-
ing teachers). But after these communications were gratefully received the editor
announced that the briefer the Alumni section was, the better. Consequently, much
to our regret, we are unable to print them or even extracts from them. Generaliza-
tion of the letters reveals the following facts:
Many of the former students of Balboa High School are in college throughout
the States doing excellent work.
Several have attained fame.
Many are earnestly working in Panama and the Canal Zone.
Some are happily married.
In a word, our alumni are average Alumni, who unanimously wish the class of
1929 and the classes thereafter the best of luck.
These are the most recent addition to the ranks of the Alumni.
Thatcher Clisbee .............................. Carnegie Tech.
Jack de Castro...................... .... .. working in Panama
Raul de Paredes .............. ....- ............University of Michigan
Marcos Gelabert ... ............-......... working in Panama
John Everson.............. ............. .. Balboa Shops
Harry Granberry-..................... .... ..-....Hotel Tivoli
Annette Gurney........ ..........................Lady of Leisure in Corozal
Sam Gurney...............-.......... ..........Gentleman of Leisure in Corozal
Fred Hunter....................... ................ ...Balboa Shops
Virginia Ewing................. ........................University of West Virginia
Charles Jackson................. ......................working in Panama
Norbert Jones................ ........... .....Vice-President of Biscuit Company in
New York (so he says).









54 ZONIAN

Lucille Hearne...................................................Nurse in Training, Los Angeles Hospital
Gerald Maiers.--..-................ .......................Penn. State College
Ada Jackson......- .......- ....................working in Panama
Robert Marstrand............... ...................Administration Building
Bobby Whaler .......................... ..................... Junior College, Michigan
Gisela Toepser........ ... ..................----- working in Panama
Joseph Mauborgne....................--------..............-- Post Graduate
Catherine Cole-................-------..............University of California
Gertrude Harrison......................---........ working in Chicago
Mary Lou McGroarty...............................-working at Quarry Heights
Margaret McConaughy Benny......................-----happily married
Emma McKeown............................. ..-- -------working in Panama
Teresa Meckel............-- ..................--- Nurse in Training in San Francisco
May Middleton .............. ...................---- working in Balboa
Helen Morgan .. ............ ...-- ..............Cincinnati Conservatory
Peggy Price.................... ....-----------...............Trenton Normal School
Elva Smith..... ..............----------........Teachers' Training School, Virginia
Stella Price.................... ...-------------............Nurse in Training, New York
Ida O'Brien .................. .........---------- .........---working in Panama
Sarah de la Peia....................... ..............--- working i1 Ancon Court House
Gayle McGuigan.. ----..........................Catholic University. Washington, D.C.
Anna Bradney..........--..........-------......Post Graduate
Jeanne Dooling ................ ...........Women's College, Delaw are
John Ohlson....... .----..................University of Michigan
Lydia Courville... ..............----.......----.............Interpreter in Gorgas Hospital
Virginia Clement---.................-----.....................--- School in Wisconsin
Charles Palacio -........... ...................University of Washington
Louise Kerr- ....-............................ Administration Building
Rose Palacio ................. ........................ University of Washington
Charles Rodgers .......... ....................------University of Washington
Rachel Key......----------.............--.....--...--..........working in Panama
Mary Belle Knapp ..................... ................working in Alabama
Quentin Stone.................. .--...........working in Corozal
Anna Saphir..................... ............ Post Graduate
Mildred Kocher................................ working in Gorgas Hospital
Edgar Taylor ...........- -......--....... ..working in Balboa
Belle Martin---..................---------............-- Lexington, Ky. Lady of Leisure
Mildred Garrett ..............----------............----working in Jersey City
Ethel Carr--------- ................... somewhere in the States
Janice Cameron ..Administration Building
Solly Toledano .. ..... -------....................----Gentleman of Leisure in Panama
Vera Ahlfont ............ Administration Building
Frank Young .New York University
Margaret Bardelson. . Post Graduate
Richard Grimison ..Gentleman of Leisure
















































' I
....
C .. . -- I\
.. ~.... 1.
.... -
..

















S















































I'











































\;





: *:









ZONIAN


LA CASA DE SANGRE

.ia.ryon IFillir '29
Pondering and smokinL he contemplated the verdant pattern of the all pervading
tropic vegetation as viewed from his lofty perch on the inn veranda. Languidly his
eyes followed the thin silver serpent of the trail which coiled down the emerald pro-
fusion of the mountainside. In the west the sky glowed with a thousand different
riotous colors like some gigantic easel hastily abandoned by the artist, who, in part-
ing, had thrown over his work the sheer, transparent veil of dusk. The air was filled
with the odor of damp verdure, for it was rainy season and even the pungent odors
of nature were tinged with a mu'lt.y, decayed smell. Nothing broke the heavy silence
except the ceaseless drip, drip, from the leaves or now and then the weird call of some
jungle bird that pierced the quiet like a shrill cry of pain. Occasionally from the
native quarters he caught the sound of laughter, a half wild gurgle of savage delight.
Though the evening was oppressively warm, he shivered and drew his coat more
closely about him, instinctively glancing to a jagged peak high above the hotel,
whose rocky promontory was destitute of tree or bush. Its ruggLtd bareness, bathed
in the crimson glow of the setting sun, was an ugly wound in the mountainside which
smirched the freshness of its surroundings with bloody gore. Perched in the center
of this hideous waste, like a huge vulture, a decrepit thing scarcely worthy to be called
a house glared down on the town through the leering blood-shot eyes of its scarlet-
suffused windows.
It seemed as though the sinister glance was particularly directed toward the
man who sat petrified on the porch of the inn, gazing in horrified fascination at the
loathsome apparition above him. A moment only the impression lasted before the
jagged outlines merged into the merciful oblivion of early dusk. But the stranger
on the porch did not relax his taut posture. In his eyes there was the horror of a
man who has listened to a death sentence pronounced-on himself.
Night came, (hanging the lacy greenery to ebony obscurity. within n the inn
natives bustled around performing the customary nightly preparations with the
utmost rapidity so they might hurry off to some fantastic gathering in the village.
Lights were kindled and etin;uiihed, doors opened and closed. The noise in the
house ceased and the weird chanting of frenzied natives in the village grew shriller
and still more shrill, rising to fever pitch. The darkness seemed to grow thicker,
minutelyv obscuring everything save a dim path cast on the floor by a lamp far inside
the inn. And still the man sat gazing steadily into the impenetrable jungle while
the steady pulse of the tom-toms throbbed through the black silence.
He must have been sitting there for hours before he became aware that he was
not alone. Someone was leaning against the railing of the porch. In the dim light
cast by the lamp in the inn, he could vaguely discern that the figure was old and
stooped and leaned heavily against his support as though in inestimable fatigue.
Must be some native emboldened by curiosity. He stirred uneasily. There was no
one else except himself stopping at the inn, to his knowledge, unless someone had
arrived since dinner while he was on thc porch and that was practically impossible
as the position where he sat commanded a view of the entire trail leading up from the
town.








56 ZONIAN

Even while he contemplated the wisdom of addressing his impromptu companion,
he was startled to hear his name spoken.
"Sefor Meredith-I trust I do not intrude?"
The enunciation was self-consciously perfect, as that of a person who has spoken
another language in childhood and later acquired English with pain and study. The
cadences ot the voice, deep and measured, were unmistakably those of a person of
great age.
Though the American replied courteously that the other's company was no in-
trusion but rather a pleasure, he had great difficulty in refraining from demanding
of the other who he was and how he happened to know that name so well. According
to the inn-keeper there was no one who spoke English within miles of that vicinity.
He was at the same time interested and perturbed that his secluded retreat should
be shared by a man who not only knew English but was apparently well educated and
cultured. If this man stayed on at the place, they would necessarily be thrown to-
gether and he had no taste for the strained companionship of a stranger. He had
chosen this location so that he might escape association and be utterly alone to
recover from the nervous tension which his daily contact with hundreds of people
met in his important position in the far away metropolis of New York demanded
of him.
"Seior seems much impressed with the scenery. I take it this is his first visit
to 'El Pueblo de la Casa'?"
"Yes, I have never been here before-but it is strange. I feel as though I had
known it always." He hesitated a second, then -"You are familiar with this country?"

That ought to make him explain his presence. Why didn't the man come out
of the darkness so he could see him? It disturbed him to be conversing with a vague
shadow. To his taut nerves the situation seemed ghastly and almost supernatural.
enhanced by the intangible and vibrant tones of the man's voice. However any
expectation he might have had of learning his identity was shattered by his answer.
It came haltingly, reluctantly, definitely forbidding further inquisitiveness.
"Yes, I am familiar with this country-very familiar."
The cadences of his voice were retrospective. Meredith shifted uneasily and
turned the conversation to the house which had impressed him so at sunset.

"Then you can tell me of the old ruin on the crag directly above here? There
is something about it which fascinates me. I have been able to think of little else
since I arrived here this afternoon. If I am not mistaken, there is an old legend con-
nected with it, is there not? Perhaps you can tell me what it is?"
The man against the bannister turned slowly. In the darkness his features were
not visible. Meredith felt instinctively rather than saw the burning gaze directed
upon himself.

"Yes-I can tell you the story of 'La Casa de Sangre,' 'The House of Blood.'
as it is called."









ZONIAN 57


There was a faint extenuation on the "I". It might mean anything-and noth-
ing. Meredith sat rigid, listening.
"In the old days it was owned by Don Carlos de Mendoza, who made his vast
fortune in the ruby mines of Natia. There are countless stories of his fabulous eaI;llh,
and the magnificence of his marvelous home was known throughout Ventura. He
was a handsome young man, the descendant of one of the proudest lines of old Span-
ish nobility. And from them he inherited his impetuosity and ardent, quick-tempered
disposition.
"He had two passions, his rubies and Dolores Ramon, the beautiful girl whom he
was engaged to marry. Nothing was too much for her to ask of him. He showered
her with gifts, and chief among them was the gown which he presented her as bridal
array. It was said to be covered with gorgeous rubies sewn into the fabric, and
crowds came from far and near to gaze upon its carmine splendor.

"As the day of the wedding drew near, there was great rejoicing in the "pueblo",
for the people loved and admired Don Carlos for his generosity as much as they feared
to displease him. But there was one who did not share in the rejoicing. That one
was Dolores. She despised Mendoza for his arrogance and loathed him because of
his pagan worship of the crimson stone. But Mendoza was all-powerful in
the country and her father both feared to refuse him and desired the rich "dot"
he would gain by the marriage.
"So, as the feasting and the festival heralded the approach of her wedding day,
Dolores frantically racked her brain for a plan of escape. She had no money of her
own and if she had it would have been impossible for her to leave without being re-
cognized and dragged back. The forests were impenetrable. It was unthinkable
that a girl brave their dense undergrowth alone.

"The day set for the ceremony arrived and found her still helplessly praying for
some means of escape. The bridal attendants came and gowned her in the heavy
beauty of the wedding robe. Above the sparkling splendor of its rich folds, her face
was dead white as lily petals. They piled her thick black hair high upon her head
and caught it with a ruby studded comb. Around her throat they fastened a necklace
of the priceless gems. Her hands dripped with red fires which flashed from rings and
bracelets. She felt as though she was being slowly suffocated, stifled by these em-
blems of involuntary servitude. With the bridal toilet complete they left her for a
tew brief minutes before the procession was to start for the church.
"Alone she gazed helplessly around the room, dazed by the proximity of the wed-
ding. And then her eyes lit on something on the table, something that shimmered
and gleamed in the sun's rays. It was a long, slender, intricately carved paper knife,
fashioned in the form of a diminutive dagger, one of the many gifts Mendoza had pre-
sented to her. It was the glitter of the rubies with which the handle was set that had
attracted her attention.

"When they came to escort her to the cathedral they found a crumpled carmine
heap. Around her there slowly formed a growing pool which was a deeper, brighter
red than the crimson profusion of the rubies.








S58 ZON IAN

"Some say Mendoza went mad from the shock. He became possessed with a
passion for vengeance. The house was abandoned and with his departure the village
also was deserted and no one knows where he lives. But there are those who believe
he still haunts the ruins of his past glory and has his treasure concealed some place
in a crevice of the rocks. Once every year he appears in the town and leaves in
his wake a horrible trail of wanton murder. Beside every victim he leaves a blood
red ruby, the symbol of his vengeance. That is all, Senior."
It was well toward dawn when the old man concluded. Meridith rose and stretch-
ed his cramped muscles. He had not moved once during the recitation. Funny-
how he had let a fantastic recital like that get under his skin! The old fellow was more
than likely demented-queer! He thanked the man for his efforts and bade him
good-night. He had a long journey that day and was tired, without sitting up all
night listening to some old half-wit relate a ridiculous atrocity. Just before he dozed
off to sleep, he vaguely wondered if the ring he had noticed on the old man's hand
when he said good-night was-a ruby?
The next morning the cleaning woman knocked timidly at Meredith's door and,
receiving no answer, opened the door and entered the room. She was fully inside
before she noticed the thing that lay crumpled across the bed. The white sheets were
saturated with a dull red stain and on the breast of the body a huge red ruby blinked
its malicious eye in the morning sunlight.












MY HEART'S HOUSE

Amos Wainer '29
I thought I had locked the House of my Heart,
And thrown the key away!
But dearest, my dear, here's all that I've found,
Alone on this rainy day!

I thought I had locked the House of my Heart,
But it stays as it always has been!
For dearest, my dear, it's to-day that I found
I had locked you securely within!





ZONIAN .59

4,4





I0









60 ZONIAN

OUR BACK YARD
.largaret Bardelson '28

1. In sun,hine
The birds are building in our back yard-I watch them by the hour. They are
building in an old straw hat that we nailed to the wall. You see, we nailed the brim
flat and cut a hole in the top; it makes a perfect home for little brown wrens.
They're making a fearful fuss about their home-making. She is such a busy
little creature, but I fear he is inclined to neglect his whole duty. Oh, I know he
means well, but he is so very happy he just has to do something about it. You see,
he can sing and she can't, so he sits on the clothes-line and sings and sings; and she
flutters back and forth with bits of straw and twigs and string. She never stops a
minute for frivolities but just hurries and hurries, while he tells the whole world how
proud he is of her and their new home. Of course this is nice of him-but sometimes
she seems not quite pleased with the state of affairs and she flies at him scoldingly
and he flies away. But he is soon back, eagerly pouring out his whole little heart
in song.
Sometimes it seems as if a sense of obligation moves him and he flies to the ground
to get a twig, too. He comes back and sits on the clothes-line with it, waiting until
she finishes putting her twig into place; for there's really not room for two to work
at once. And dear me, just think-when the children get grown! And he is so very
inefficient, too, for if he doesn't drop his twig to sing, before she comes out, well,
then, he can't maneuver it through the door. He's stupid that way. He flutters
against the opening with a bit of stick that is twice as big as he is, and just keeps
on trying and trying to get it in cross-ways instead of taking hold of one end and
pulling it in after him the way she does.
2. In shadow

I sit on the back steps with Jerry and watch the rain patter down around me--
feel it, too, for it spatters on the steps right beside me. Its beating fills my ears and
the smell of the damp earth rises in front of me as I sit in my sheltered nook and
enjoy the rain.
The birds like it, too; they throng in the bushes, all fluttering their wings and
chirping and twittering-shy little brown birds, just lots of them, and shy little
blue birds. But the shyest are the red ones. They're the most beautiful, too, but
they show their beauty grudgingly. I don't think it's because they're selfish or proud
-they're just modest.
I can see the dull world brightening, the brown parched grass hinting of a green
hidden radiance. The trees bow and twinkle their leaves under the patterings of
the raindrops. The whole hillside gleams with the rich rust-color of the wet under-
brush, and the rain comes down and down.
In a little it slackens and finally just dribbles a bit. The sun throws long slant-
ing shadows over the damp face of the earth and a little evening breeze stirs up. It
spills all the raindrops off the trees. The birds are happy as anything-they twitter
so busily it does my heart good to hear them.









ZONIAN 61

A patch of blue sky widens until it covers the great expanse of the sky with fleecy
clouds billowing about; and presently there is a sunset-a gentle misty sunset, all
delicate tintings that make the trees seem not green but faintly golden.
Out of the corner of my eye I can see something move quietly in the bushes. It
is a cat, one of the wild ones that live in the jungle growth back of our house. He
seems to enjoy the twilight, too. I glance at Jerry apprehensively. He is asleep,
snoring gently, with his head between his paws.
Soon it is dark, and I go into the house. Jerry stays out and later I hear him
howling mournfully. After-the-rain-time is just a wet time to Jerry.















FANCY

Going to the school library for the purpose of studying.
Mr Flint when he isn't giving a lecture on the younger generation.
James Quinn with his hair combed.
Kenny Maiers not happy and showing it.
The Study Hall quiet.
Pat Mattatall looking worried.
John Powell without "Fedinga".
Lucette Colvin self-conscious.
Joe McKim when she isn't in a hurry to go somewhere (we'd like to know where
this elusive place is).
The McGuigan sisters neglecting to do their lessons.
Miss McKibben not dealing out 995's.
Balboa High School without its present senior class.
The Smith Twins without each other.
Docia Clisbee a senior.
Joe Wood taking a drink.
Neal Hughes not doing someone else's French.





62 ZONTAN


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ZONIAN 63


CALENDAR OF THE YEAR'S HAPPENINGS
October, 1928

4-A mass of sorrow-laden mortals "with hideous execrations and with uproarious cries of dis-
may" wends its way to the Temple of Wisdom.
7-Something missing. It must be that famous class of '28.
11-William Harris appears with tenderly cared-for side-burns and an artistic haircut well befitting
the dignity of a Senior.
12-All Seniors requested to wear short pants in honour of Wilhite day.
15-Assembly teacher comments for the first time on the busy appearance of the study hall.
23-First 995 appears. Who was the victim?
28-To the huge delight of everyone except Mr. Collinge, Eloise Willson whistles his favorite tune
"Kiss Me Again" in the assembly.
31-Halloween: Spooks and how!

November, 1928

1-Everyone late-no bell-no buzzer-no clock pendulum-statue missing. Desk found in rear
of assembly.
2-Carr uses dinner bell to summon students to classes.
3-Statue of wine-giver found in Mr. Flint's room-don't you want a little statue in your home?
If not, light a Murad.
5-Students cross-examined concerning missing clapper.
9-Honored principal discovers culprit with clapper in his hip-pocket.
16-Senior Tacky Party! Big Success!
18-Disappointed faces. Report cards do not come up to expectations.
20-Artists in our midst!! Art Book (illustrated, and how!) found in possession of Upper Classmen.
22-Thanksgiving with its scrumptious feasts and their inevitable results.

December, 1928

3-Earl Orr with triumph, stamped on his beaming face drives a mule (or what have you) down
Cart Street. We wonder which was the happier, Earl ot the other mule.
6-Mr.Collinge extends to the second period Commercial Geography Class a special invitation to
remain with him after school. Strange to relate, everyone accepts.
10-Bill Rader did vacate his seat in the first period assembly and did sit in the seat of the scornful,
in Miss Frost's room.
15-Fire sale! Sudden appearance of numberless butterfly skirts.
21-Christmas Carols. Vacation-everyone happy!
25--Now guess what?

January, 1929

1-By the way, what year is this?
2-School begins with many new resolutions.
9-Miss Miller discourses to her 3rd period English Class on the subject of love However, she
wishes it understood that all she knows upon that subject has not been gained by experience
but through information given by others.
10-Lightning strikes building. Gray dust filters into assembly hall. Red tiles fall from roof. No
holiday declared! Tough luck.
15--What happens to Choke?










64 ZONIAN


22-A poor innocent dog wends his way into tle .i.-emlly room and an interesting game of ta. ensues.
23-Alterations! Miss Laws now Mrs. Claude! Congratulations!
24-George Daniels appears with a two weeks old beard.
February, 1929.
4-Beginning of a new semester. Everyone working with amazing energy.
8-Carnival! Strange to say, all students wish to be excused because of headaches or what not!
11-No snow today!
18-Orest tells Betty she is the alcohol in his vodka.
22-No school, thanks to the "Father of our Country."
28-Big-hearted Junior Mitten plans a surprise party for Mr. Lee on the 29th.

March, 1929.
4-Miss Davis starts "beginning typing class" off with phonograph.
11-Bill Rader is victim to those "regular mumps." It is also of historical interest to note I han on
the same day, Bill cuts two wisdom teeth.
17-St. Pat's.Day. Orange and green compete for prominence.
18-Stormy! Everyone late. Mr, Hodges announces that all who have wet feet may be excused.
Great commotion!
20-Docia Clisbee, Winky Ewing, Rita Driscoll and countless others join the Mumps Brigade.
31-Minnie Brown is visibly restrained from presenting Miss Davis with a chocolate Easter bunny.

April, 1929
1-All Fools' Day.
7--Operetta "All At Sea"-Everyone is.
8-Zona French wears stockings this morning.
15-Great buzzing around the girls' section. Alice Moller sports an Annapolis pin
22-Practical application of the Einstein Theory. Paul Bryan plus sulphuric acid equals missing
pants.
25-Queer! Notice: Swimming team picture will he taken for Zonian. E\er.one MUST %ear
a bathing suit.
30-Senior Play Cast busy.
May, 1929
1-Amelia Hutchings appears at school with a tremendous bump on her head as a result of strenuous
play practice.
7-Civics class visits Court. What an appealing defendant. What whiskers!
10-"Is Zat So" Yeah, Zat's So! and what a success!!
18-Junior Dance atTivoli. Some hop!
24-General unrest. Only four more weeks of school.
28-Exams! Ay de mi!

June, 1929
3-Blue Mondac .
7-Junior and Senior Banquet. With the soup course a musical sound can be heard coming from
the direction of Harry Preston.
15-Class Night. Three cheers for the Senior,!!
16-Baccalaureate at Union Church. Inspiring sermon by the Rev. Mr. Marshall.
19-Ancon docks with returning Alumni. Welcome home!
21-Graduation! Best wishes for the Seniors in the future.










ZONIAN 63



































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66 ZONIAN

THE SENIOR TACKY PARTY
The Senior Tacky Party began at eight o'clock sharp on Friday November the
sixteenth. The Yacht Club was decorated to represent a barn. Everyone was
pepped up and ready for a good time since this was the very first school affair of the
term. Such a motley crew! Merely the word "tacky" would not justly describe
them. After refreshments had been served and everyone had trooped upstairs
again, the energetic Seniors performed a snake dance to the strains of "Hail! Hail!
The Gang's All Here!" The Syncopators played their best that night, and w hen the
revelry finally came to a close it was to the regret of all. Everyone agreed that it
had been a long while since he had had such a good time.

THE ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CAROLS
"And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed." And indeed .it was revealed
as the Christmas carols were being sung in the* patio. From one of the upstairs
rooms, a cornet sounded and a chorus of children's voices was heard singing a very
beautiful carol. At the first note of the cornet a hush fell over the entire assemblage:
a gentle breeze swept over the open court and swayed the green trees to and fro.
To the people listening it was truly beautiful, a picture made perfect by music.
The most finished number was Handel's "Messiah" sung by.< the
High School Glee Club. Mrs. Baker deserves a great deal of credit for the cable
way in which she handled this recital.
The songs sung were:
Adeste Fidelis........................ ......................................................... Junior H igh Glee Club
Cradle Hymn................................................................ ........ ........ Grades 1 and 2
Silent Night............................................................Entire School
The First Noel ................... ............. .... ..................... Entire School
We Three Kings... .. ... .... Entire School
Cantique de Noel........................ ........ .......... ....David Smith and Chorus
"He Shall Feed his Flock", from "The Messiah"........................... 5th and 6th Grades
Under the Stars ........ ..... .. -..- ...-. ............... .. Entire School
Hark, The Herald Angels.. ....... Entire School
"And The Glory of the Lord" from "The Messiah"................High School Glee Clubs
THE JUNIOR DANCE
On January the eleventh the Juniors gave a very lovely dance at the Yacht
Club. Unlike the Senior Party it was quite formal and everyone was dressed in
his best. The Serenaders, that popular orchestra composed mostly of Balboa High
School boys, furnished the music for the evening. Quite a few of the faculty mem-
bers were present, among them Miss Miller and Miss Emmons, who donned aprons
and helped serve the refreshments.

THE SENIOR TABOGA TRIP
On Saturday, January twenty-sixth, the "Big Bill" left Pier Seventeen for
Taboga. The sturdy little craft was loaded with gay Juniors and Seniors out for a
good time. No doubt they had more than a good time for when they returned late
that night they were exclaiming about the wonderful food, the good weather, and
the jolly crowd. All agreed what excellent chaperons Mr. and Mrs. Lee and Miss
Emmons were and what a big success the trip had been generally.









ZONIAN


THE ORCHESTRA
The Sophomore class gave a very pleasant party at the Y.W.C.A. on the night
of the twenty-first of February. Dancing and games were enjoyed. A four-piece
orchestra furnished the music for the evening. Delicious refreshments were served
by the committee in charge. Miss Davis, the class adviser, assisted.

THE JUNIOR LUNCHEON
Our Juniors seem to have done quite a bit this year; on March the twentieth they
added a luncheon to their long list of achievements. Tables were placed on the
balcony, and luncheon was served in cafeteria style. At eleven-thirty the Junior
girls began their task of serving two hundred hungry students. Potato salad, soft
drinks, sandwiches, or sinkers were on every plate. At twelve o'clock the Serenaders
began to play and dancing was enjoyed until twelve forty-five when the bell rang for
us to resume our studies.

THE JUNIOR TABOGA TRIP
March the second saw the "Big Bill" again headed for Taboga, with a gay party
of Seniors and Juniors aboard. Miss Miller, the Junior class adviser, was chaperon-
ing. All those who went on that eventful trip will remember it for many years to
come. Hardly had the boat got under way when Bill Rader and Harry Preston
decided to form a private party in the dory tied to the stern of the boat. The story
is: Bill made the jump. Harry did not. We picked up this slightly moistened member
of the party and arrived at Taboga without further accident. But again Fate was
against our party for we had been ashore only a short time when Betty Freeman, one
of our popular schoolmates, fell from high wall and had to be rushed toGorgas
Hospital in the captain's barge of the U. S. S. California. The trip would have
come to a close without any more trouble if it had not been for one sorrowful sextette
which came back from a hike too late for supper!














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Z 0 N I A N


BREEZY BITS
Looking back over the year we find that we have been most fortunate in having
a number of very good speakers address our assembly.
The first person whom we had the pleasure of hearing was Congressman Winters
of Wyoming, who spoke on "Territorial Expansion." Two da;s later, on January
the seventh, Mr. Hanks, a noted lecturer who was here on a tour, spoke to us on
'Aiming High in Life." On February the twenty-first, Captain Taylor, Chaplain,
of the U.S.S. "California", spoke to us on "'ltking the Most of Our Opportunities."
Monday the twenty-fifth, Commander Richardson from the U.S.S. "Denver" gave
an interesting talk on "Athletics in the Schools." Commander Richardson was form-
erly coach at the U. S. Naval Academy.

"ALL AT SEA"
From the first Lord of the Admiralty down through the wailings of the Lord
High Executioner, to the antics and chortlings of the Midshipmite, the entire cast
of the Balboa High School's presentation of the light opera, "All At Sea", sang
and played their parts to perfection.
The solo, the trio, and the chorus work of the cast was remarkable, showing
evidence of careful and persistent training. The group singing led by Lars Ekwurzel
ap Siz loseph. with his hand picked beauties, the sisters, the cousins, and the aunts,
cause much moaning on the part of Junior Mitten as the Lord Chancellor, because
of the bareness of his existence, while he warbled out beautiful words to the more
fortunate.
The vocal work in this instance was excellent and credit is due to Mrs. Helen
Baker, of Balboa High School, who trained both the Glee Club and the orchestra.
Miss Lang had charge of the dramatics.
THE CAST
The Cantain of the "Pinafore" ....... .. .. William Rader


Sir Joseph Porter...................
Lord Chancellor.........................
Pirate King.......................
The Fairy Queen........................
Police Sergeant.............
The Mikado.............. ......
Koko, Lord High Executioner..
Pooh-Bah...............................
Frederick............................
Boatswain...............................
Midshipmite..................
Patience
Josephine......... ......
M abel.. .............. ........
Phyllis-................- .......... ....
Strephon..............................
Grosvenor......... ....... ..
Buttercup .
Ralphitti ....
Pitti Sing...-- --..............


.Lars Ekwurzel
.Junior Mitten
.Harry Preston
Mariorie Quinn
Otto Helmerichs
.Amelia Hutchings
Anna Saphir
.Beatrice Craft
.Ralph Kirkpatrick
.Elmer Hack
.Howard Engelke
Agnes Mack
Alice Moller
..Cecilia Strauss
Grace Lawyer
Charlotte Jensen
.Vincent Marcy
.David Smith

SJosephine McKim









70 ZONIAN


"IS ZAT SO"

The Senior Class, in their class play, turned out one of the best entertainments
given this year. The cast was picked only after every senior who wanted to be in
the play had been tried out. The best of the group was taken out and these seniors
were molded, after weeks of hard work under the able direction of Miss Emmons,
into real actors.
The story is one of the prize ring. Its gaiety is based on the utter incongruity
of its being unfolded in a Fifth Avenue mansion among the more or less idle rich.
It all starts because a wealthy young New Yorker needs a trainer, more to keep
him from drinking himself to death than any other reason. The fighter and his mana-
ger enter the home as servant-trainers, spending part of their time as butlers and part
keeping their employer in physical condition.
The breath-taking manner in which, once under way, they make things hum
provides laugh upon laugh. They not only save the family fortune for their benefac-
tor from his crooked brother-in-law, but then fall in love with the nurse and the
secretary, and in their spare time capture the championship ring crown and become
independently wealthy and famous.

The cast follows:


Eddie (Chick) Cowen, a coming-up lightweight.
A. B. (Hap) Hurley, his trainer and manager.......
C. Clinton Blackburn, A New Yorker... ...........
Sue Blackburn Parker, Clint's sister...................
Florence Hanley, nursemaid at the Parkers'........
Robert Parker, of Morse, Parker & Blackburn
Marie Mestretti, his secretary............. .. --- -.....
Master James Blackburn Parker, also coming up.
Grace Hobart, a friend of Sue.........................
Fred Hobart, her husband
Major Maurice Fitz-Stanley
John Duffy, Mrs. Hobart's chauffeur
Smith, butler for the Parkers'...........................
Guests at the prize-fight


William Rader
Otto Helmerichs
George Daniels
Amelia Hutchings
Peggy Wheeler
Amos Wainer
Juliana Garrett
Betty Clement
Beatrice Craft
Earl Orr
James Quinn
Edwin Jones
lohn Jett
Ruth Hutchinson
Zonabel Demuth
Lars Ekwurzel







Y
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km*Pa 9











ZONIAN 71


INTER-CLASS SOCCER

This year's Inter-Class Soccer season was the most hotly contested series ever
recorded in the Balboa High School athletic annals.

All four classes were determined to win the Championship, but after the first round
of matches had been played off it was quite evident the honors would either be won
by the Seniors or the Freshmen.

Although the Seniors, who were last year's winners, outweighed the Freshman
team, they were unable to break up the splendid pass work exhibited by the Freshman
forwards.

The Freshman team was without a doubt one of the most well-balanced teams
that ever played in our annual inter-class series. Its forward line was fast, shifty and
worked together while their half-backs and full-backs were strong kickers and could
be depended upon to clear the ball.

The outstanding players of the series were: Vengoechea of the Seniors, Hele of the
Sophomores, and Dew and Lamb of the Freshmen.








72 Z ONIAN

INTERSCHOLASTIC SOCCER
The high school arranged a series of three games with Cristobal. It was the
first time that B. H. S. had played Cristobal in soccer.
The first game of this series was played in Cristobal. A large crowd of rooters
went to Cristobal to support the team. The game was played in the afternoon at the
New Cristobal grounds.
From the first it was all Balboa. On a wet and slippery field the soccerists from
B. H. S. dazzled the Cristobal team with their splendid teamwork and were ne'er
in any danger of being scored against. The forwards, led by Capt. Vengoechea.
again and again brought the ball to within shooting distance. The Balboa backs did
their job well and practically no ball got to the goalie. The game ended with Balboa
on the long end of a two-to-nothing score.
The second game of the series was played at Balboa on the following Saturday.
The game was fast, full of action, and thrilling. Ball,ia started off with a pierce
onslaught in the first half, scoring two pointers before Cristobal tallied once. As
the half ended Dew scored another point for Balboa, making the tally three to one.
During the first minute of play, in the second half, Cristobal with a whirlwind
attack netted another point. From then on the play was fast and furious Intil Bal-
boa again scored. At the finish the score stood Balboa four, Cristobal two.
Dew, of Balboa, starred, making three out of the four goals. Vengiiech and
Hele also deserved commendation.
BALBOA VERSUS PANAMA ALL-STARS
December 6, in the fastest and cleanest game of the season, Balboa lost to the
Panama All-Stars by a 2-0 score.
The first half opened with Panama taking the offensive and Balboa fighting for
every foot of ground. Just before the end of the first half, Kopcke of Panama kicked
two cross corner goals, which were too hot for Wainer to handle. At the end of the
half the score was 2-0 in favor of Panama.
The second half was a nip and tuck affair with Balboa taking the offensive and
shooting for the goal, but the Panamanian defense tightened and Balboa was unable
to score.
For Balboa, Vengoechea, Orr, Dew, Hele and Maduro were the outstanding stars,
while Kopcke and Fletcher starred for Panama.
BALBOA VERSUS COI.OMBIAN OLYMPIC TEAM
December 7, in a game featured by excellent team work and brilliant playing.
Balboa lost to the Colombian Olympic soccer team by a 6-1 score.
Considering the team that Balboa was up against, the score was not disgraceful:
on the contrary rather good.
The first half opened with Colombia taking the offensive and Balboa grimly
fighting to ward off the Colombian attack and it was not until after the first ten min-
utes of play that Colombia was able to score the first of their six goals. The half
ended with the score standing 4-0 in favor of Colombia.
The second half was a repetition of the first half with Balboa occasionally threat-
ening the Colombian goal, but unable to score. Just before the end of the second
half, Vengoechea of Balboa dribbled through the Colombian team to score Balboa's
only goal.
Vengoechea, Dew, Hele and Wainer starred for Balboa, while De la Rosa and
Jimenez starred for Colombia.








ZONIAN


TENNIS

As usual a tennis tournament was started a week or so after school opened, with
32 boys in the line-up. Due to the large amount of rain the playing of many of the
matches was delayed. causing the season to be started about a week later than last
year. In the tournament the losers in the first round, 16 in all, played among them-
selves and the eight winners played the eight losers in the second round. These
played together and the four winners played the four losers in the third round.
In this way each boy got at least two chances, against different men, to prove his
ability.
The final team was composed of nine men. 1. Frederick Maduro, Captain.
2. William Hele. 3. Amos W\ainer. 4. Somers Dick. 5. Michael Dew. 6. Jack
Maduro. 7. William Taylor. 8. Monte Maduro. 9. Edward Maduro.
The first tournament was played on December 16, 1928, against the Pacific
Court of Ancon, at the Ancon courts. The High School succeeded in not allowing
the Court a single set out of the 10 played and won the tournament 5 matches to 0.
As this was their first tournament of the season, the boys were a little nervous
so none of them showed up well. Nevertheless they did better in this than they ever
have done in the first tournament of any season before.
The second tournament was played on December 23, 1928, against the Balboa
Radio Station. As in the first tournament the boys did not allow the opposing
court a single set and won 5-0 (matches).
For the High School Dick played well while his opponent, Keating, excelled for
the Radio Station.








74 ZONIAN

The third tournament was played on December 30, 1928, at Fort Amador against
the Fort Amador Army Post. For various reasons only four boys could go out to
play, the third, fourth, sixth, and seventh men on the team. Things looked somewhat
dubious but the boys got together and won 4-1 (matches).
The fourth tournament was with Cristobal High School at France Field on
January 12, 1929. The boys fairly outdid themselves for they only allowed Cristobal
5 games in the 65 played. Balboa won 5-0 (matches).
First Match F. Maduro Won from Mueller 6-0 6-0
Second Dick Drake 6-1 6-0
Third Hele Sargeant 6-1 6-0
Fourth Wainer & Taylor Mueller & Maher 6-1 6-0
Fifth Dick & J. Maduro Mundberg & Harmon 6-2 6-0

30-5 30-0
30-5 30-0 60-5
(games)
This was by far the worst beating that a Balboa High School Tennis Team has
ever given Cristobal.
For Cristobal, Harmon played a steady game but, as a whole, the Cristobal boys
were no match for Balboa.
The fifth tournament was played at the Ancon Courts on January 13, 1929,
against the Corozal Army Post. In this tournament the High School lived up to
its reputation and didn't allow its opponents a match. Balboa won 6-0 (matches).
This was the longest tournament the boys had thus far played. For Balboa F.
Maduro and Dick did good work in singles while Wainer & Taylor pulled through a
difficult match in doubles by their ability to stick. The deciding game went to over
30 points. For Corozal Smith and Lieutenant Stodter played well.











XS -'.C P

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ZONIAN 75

The sixth tournament was played on the Ancon Courts against Cristobal High
School on January 19, 1929. This was the first time that more than one tourna-
ment had been arranged in one season by the two high schools. Balboa won easily
5-0 (matches).


F. Maduro
Dick
Wainer
Dick & Dew
Wainer & Taylor


Won from Wilkinstad
." Drake
S Mueller
S Drake & Wilkinstad
S Mueller & Harmon


6-4 6-1
6-1 6-1
6-1 6-0
6-1 6-3
6-2 6-2

30-9 30-7 60-16
(games)


The Balboa boys did not play up to their usual form in this tournament. It
was quite evident that the Cristobal boys came over ready to do better than they
had done at home. On the other hand the Balboa boys had had such an easy time the
Saturday before at Cristobal that they thought they didn't have to work. Wikinstad
and Drake played well for Cristobal.
The seventh and last tournament proved to be Balboa's Waterloo. Here they
met their first defeat against Fort Clayton Army Post team at Fort Clayton on Jan-
uary 20, 1929. If Clayton had not had a super-player like Major Van Vliet, Balboa
would surely have won, but with the Major always on deck and a good second in
Captain Hanst, Clayton proved too much for the boys. Clayton won 3-2 (matches).
All the boys played well. They had to for they had good material up against
them. This court got the highest number of games of any court thus far played.
F. Maduro and Dick played well for Balboa in singles while Dick and Dew
showed up strong in doubles. Major Van Vliet and Captain Hanst excelled for Fort
Clayton.
Somers Dick acted as captain during the last half of the season and was unani-
mously elected captain for the coming year, 1929-30.


Season in Concise Form


Date
Dec. 16, 1928
Dec. 23, 1928
Dec. 30 1928
Jan. 12, 1929
Jan. 13,1929
Jan. 19,1929
Jan. 20, 1929


Place
Ancon Courts
Radio Station
Fort Amador
France Field
Ancon Courts
Ancon Courts
Fort Clayton


Opponent W
Pacific Court B
Radio Station
Fort Amador
Cristobal H. S.
Corozal Army Post
Cristobal H. S.
Ft. Clayton Army Post


Score In
inner Matches Games
alboa H. S. 5-0 60-17
" 5-0 63-31
S 4-1 62-43
" 5-0 60-05
6-0 76-31
5-0 60-16
Ft. Clayton 2-3 40-45

32-4 421-188


L. S. FLINT, Coach.


First Match
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth









76 ZONIAN


BASEBALL


Season in Concire Form
PL,. et Won Lost Tied
12 9 2 1
B.H.S. vs. Battery F 65th Coast Artillery
Fort Amador....................... 4 7
B.H.S. vs. Outlaws at Corozal ................... 2 3
B.H.S. vs. Battery F 65th Coast Artillery
Fort Amador...................... 5 1
B.H.S. vs. U.S.S. Antares ......................... 7 7
B.H.S. vs. U.S.S. Robin. ............................ 7 0
B.H.S. vs. U.S.S. Denver............................ 11 5
B.H .S. vs. S13... ... ....... ......................... 2 1
B.H.S. vs. Cristobal (Feb. 2)...................... 19 7
B.H.S. vs. U.S.S. Arkansas ..................... 6 3
B.H.S. vs. U.S.S. Detroit......................... 7 5
3.H.S. vs. Cristobal (Feb. 9)....................... 6 5
B.H.S. vs. U.S.S. Robin ....... ............... 11 1

Inter-Claw
The Seniors, aided by the bludgeons of W. Wood and Reese, won every game,
thereby winning the series. Every class fell before the heavy hitting of this team
and it had little trouble winning its games.


Seniors.................... 4
Juniors ........................ 3
Fre lhmen 1


0 1.000
1 .750
3 .33.5
4 .000


0


Sophomores..










ZONIAN 77


INTER-SCHOLASTIC

Immense interest was shown in this series, due to our team's winning two st right
games from Cristobal. The first game we took by the score of 19 to 7, and the next
Saturday, on the home ground, we won, 6 to 5.

FIRST GAME

A special train was run to Cristobal for the first game. The grandstand was
filled with students from both schools. Balboa, headed by Wood, Quinn, Held
and Reese, won this game in a walk.
Balboa got off on the right foot in the first part of the game. A hit, a passed
ball, and an error accounted for one run. In the third Cristobal got three runs,
which put them in the lead. Reese's triple with one on knotted the count in
the fourth. However, in the last half of the fifth, Cristobal scored another run and
regained the lead. Balboa stepped out with three runs in the sixth and was never
headed after that, although in the eighth Cristobal came within one run of tieing
the score.
In the ninth a deluge of hits and runs, accompanied by five free passes, sent
Maurer to the showers and swamped Cristobal. Two home runs, a double, and
four singles were reaped by the Balboa sluggers in this inning.
Box Score as follows:

CRISTOBAL BALBOA
Players AB. R. H.P.O. A. E. Pl.cr, AB R. H. P.O. A. E.
Wickenstadt, If........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 Morrison, cf...... ... 4 2 1 1 0 0
Willis, If ................ 3 0 0 3 0 0 DesLondes, lb .... 4 3 1 13 0 2
Pescod,3b ............5 0 3 4 3 2 Wood, 2, ...... 4 3 2 2 2 0
W. Wickenstadt, 2b.. 5 0 0 7 2 0 Hel, ss... 6 3 2 4 4 1
Wertz, cf............ 3 0 0 1 1 0 Reese, p, rf...... 5 3 2 1 2 0
Brandon, rf......... 0 0 0 0 0 0 Quinn, 3b.......... 5 2 3 0 5 0
Higgason, rf. ........... 3 2 0 0 0 0 Jones If ........... 4 1 1 0 0 0
DeReuter, ss......... 2 2 2 3 3 Powell,c ........ 5 1 0 6 1 0
Hayden, lb, p........ 4 0 1 5 0 1 Bridges, p........ 1 0 0 0 2 0
Stewart, c ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 urray, rf.............. 2 1 1 0 0 0
Babbitt, c- .......... 4 I 1 4 1 1
Pettit, p.. Ib.......... I 0 0 1 0 0 40 19 13 27 16 3
Maurer, p ................ 4 2 1 0 3 2

36 7 8 27 13 9

Summary
Two base hits, Wood, Jones; 31 hits, Reese, Pescod; Home runs. Reese, DesLondes,
DeReuter, Wood; Double plays, Wertz to DeReuter to W. Wickenstadt, Pescod to W. Wic-
kenstadt to Hayden; Base on balls, off Reese 6, off Maurer 6, off Pettit 1, off Bridgens 1, in
1% innings; Winning pitcher, Reese; Losing pitcher, Maurer. Umpires- Longnecker and
Graham.

Score by Innings
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R
123456789R
Balboa 1 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 13 19
Cristobal 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 2 7













SECOND GAME

Before a record-breaking crowd Balboa defeated Cristobal in the final game of the
High School Championship Series by a score of 6-5.

Wood, Jones and Reese of Balboa, and DeReuter of Cristobal, starred at the bat,
while Bridgens of Balboa turned in an excellent game, striking out 11 men and, ex-
cept for a streak of momentary wildness in the first frame, having Cristobal well under
control.


CRISTOBAL


Player
Wills, If....................
Brandon, If..............
Wickenstadt. 2b.........
Pescod, 3b, p..........
Wertz, cf.............
Higgason, rf..........
DeReuter, ss...........
Hayden, Ib, 3b........
Babbitt, c...................
Maurer, p, lb............
Whidden......................


AB. R. H. P.O. A. E.
3 0 0 2 0 0
1 0 0 0 1 0
4 1 0 4 1 0
4 0 0 2 3 0
4 1 0 1 0 0
3 1 0 1 0 0
4 0 2 3 1 1
3 1 0 2 2 0
4 1 1 6 1 0
3 0 2 3 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 0

34 5 5 24 7 3


BALBOA
Player AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Morrison, cf............... 2 0 1 1 0 1
Preston, cf ............... 3 0 0 1 1 0
DesLondes, Ib......... 5 0 2 5 0 0
Hel, ss............... ... ..5 .5 0 0 3 1 0
Reese, If.................... 5 2 2 2 1 0-
Wood, 2b................ 2 2, 0 0, 1 2
Quinn, 3b................... 4 F1 2 3 0 2
Jones, rf.. ................. 3 0 3 1 0 0
Powell, c.................... 3 0 1 12 -1 0
Bridgens, p............... 3 1 0 0 2 0

35 6 11 28 7 5


Whidden hit for Brandon in ninth. Two base hits, Quinn; Three base hits: DeReuter;
Base on balls: Off Bridgens 3; off Pescod 2 in 5M Innings; Off Maurer 2 in 2% innings; off
Pescod 4 in 5% innings. Passed balls: Powell 2. Winning pitcher: Bridgens. Losing pitcher, Maurer.
Umpires: Williams and Holter.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9R
Cristobal 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 5
Balboa 0 1 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 6


78


ZONIAN









ZONIAN 79


TRACK


Inter-Cla/sr

The Seniors took the athletic meet by a margin of twelve points. The Juniors
were second with forty-three tallies and Frosh and Sophs followed in order with
twenty-five and seventeen markers respectively. The meet was hotly contested
and not a few Canal Zone high school records were shattered.
Bridgens, a Junior, broke all former marks for the discus throw and the broad
jump. He hurled the disc 131 feet, 4 inches, and jumped 18 feet, 102 inches, in
the latter event. Rae Newhard, also a Junior, set a new mark of 14 feet, 5 inches, in
the girls' broad jump. In the girls' high jump the bar was cleared at 4 feet, 7 inches,
which is a new high mark for this event.
Much credit must be given to Edwin Jones, high point scorer for the boys, who,
besides gaining 14 points for his class, equalled the record for the 220 yard sprint.
In the 440 yard run the record suffered when Preston clipped it down to 57% se-
conds. The points were scored as follows: five points for first place, three for second,
and one for third.











80 ZONIAN


50-yard Dash
Boys':
I. Schwindeman, Junior; time, 6 seconds
2. Preston, Senior
3. Held, Sophomore
Girls:
1. R. Newhard, Junior; time, 6 seconds
2. D. Clil'ee. Junior
3. Ella Jones, Freshman
100-yard Dash
1. Hele, Sophomore; time, 11 seconds
2. Jones, Senior
3. Schwindeman, Junior
440-yard Da-.h
1. Preston, Senior; time, 57 1-3 seconds
2. Jones, Senior
3. Rink, Junior
Girlr' Baseball Throw
1. Grace Jones, Freshman; 137 feet, 3 inches
2. B. Joyner, Freshman
3. R. Newhard, Junior
,q.,dt. Put 12 lb.
1. W\\'iner. Senior; 36 feet, 3 inches
2. Reese, Senior
3. Bridgens, Junior
Girls' 75-yard Dash
1. R. Newhard, Junior; time, 10 seconds
2. Grace Jones. Freshman
3. Ella Jones, Freshman
Boys' 220-yard Dash
1. Jones, Senior; time, 23.4 seconds
2. W. Wood, Senior
3. Preston, Senior
Girl,' Relay
1. Freshmen team; time 27.8 seconds
Boys' 880-yard Run
1. Wainer, Senior; time, 2 minutes, 24 seconds
2. Held, Sophomore
3. J. Wood, Senior
Boys' Discus Throw
1. Bridgens, Junior; 131 feet, 5 inches
2. Lowe, Senior
3. DesLondes, Junior
Running Broad Jump
Boyv:
1. Bridgens, Junior; 18 feet, 10j/ inches
2. Held, Sophomore
3. Lowe, Senior
Girl.r:
1. R. Neorl rd. Junior; 14 feet, 5 inches
2. G. Jones, Freshman
3. M. Poole, Sophomore
High Jump
Boys:
1. Lowe
W\'od. Seniors; tied, 5 feet 5 inches
3. Wainer, Senior











ZONIAN 81

Girl.:
1. D. Clisbee, Junior; 4 feet 7 inches
2. E. Jones, Freshman
3. 0. Key, Freshman
Bovys' 880-yard Run (Relay)
Seniors; time, 1 minute 52 seconds
Individual Honorsr:
Boy,y: E. Jones, Senior; 14 points
Girls: R. Newhard, Junior; 16 points

INTER-SCHOLASTIC

The meet was held at Fort Davis before a good sized crowd of students from both
schools. A large throng of rooters accompanied the Balboa athletes to the Gold
Coast, to see them win by a big margin. The meet was divided into two units: the
boys', which was won by Balboa by the score of 52-16; and the girls', in which our
athletes won by the score of 45-5.
Two Canal Zone high school records fell, both in the running broad jumps.
In the boys' running broad, Bridgens, high point man of the meet, turned in a mark
of 19 feet 213 inches. Rae Newhard, our all-round girl athlete also broke this event
for the girls.
Cristobal won only two first places, both in the short sprints, A summary of
the events follows:


50-Yard Dash
Higgason, (C); time, 6.9 seconds
Hele, (B)
Schwindeman, (B)
100-Yard Dash
DeReuter, (C); time, 11.2 seconds
Helb, (B)
Schwindeman, (B)
220 Yard Dash
Jones, (B); time, 24.6 seconds
William W,,no. (B)
DesLondes, i
440-Yard Dash
Preston, (B); time, 57.6 seconds
Jones, (B)
Williams, (C)

'0 ~.r.l Dark
Ella Jones, Balboa; time, 7 2-5 seconds
Rae Newhard, Balboa
Docia Clisbee, Balboa
75-yard Dasrh
Ella Jones, Balboa; time, 10 4-5 seconds
Rae Newhard, Balboa
Grace Jones, Balboa
High Jump
Docia Clisbee, Balboa
Grace Jones, Balboa
O. Key, Balboa


High Jump
1. Lowe, (B); 5feet, 4 inches
2. DeReuter, (C)
3. Hayden, (C)
Broad Jump
1. Bridgens, (B); 19 feet, 2%/ inches
2. Hele, (B)
3. Brandon, (C)
Shot Put. Slb.
1. Bridgens, (B); 40 feet, 2Y inches
2. Wainer, (B)
3. Joe \V...J. (B)
880-I ard Rela.
1. Won by Balboa
Time: 1 minute, 51.2 seconds.
Hiqh Point Scorers
Balboa: Bridgens, 10
Cristobal: DeReuter,
Girls
Broad Jump
1. Rae Newhard, Balboa; distance, 14 feet,
10 inches
2. Grace Jones, Balboa
3. Mary Poole, Balboa
Baseball Throw
1. Marion Boomer, Cristobal; distance, 161
feet, 4 inches
2. Beatrice Joyner, Balboa
3. Virginia Engelke, Balboa
Relay Race
1. Balboa.
2. Cristobal






7 0 N I A N


V.
I*


I











ZONIAN 83


INTER-CLASS SWIMMING

Tuesday, April 16. In the annual inter-class swimming meet held at the Balboa
Pool the Seniors wrested the championship laurels from the Juniors, who were last
year's winners.
The Freshmen sprung the big surprise of the day when they came second while
the Juniors and Sophomores finished in third and fourth places respectively.
Lowe of the Seniors, Walston of the Sophomores and Brewerton of the Freshmen
were the outstanding stars.
The 220 high school record fell when Lowe swam the distance in 2 minutes 42
seconds, besting his former record by 11 seconds.


50-Yard Crawl
Walston, Sophomore; time. 25.6 sec.
Romig, Senior
Key, Sophomore
100-Yard Crawl
Walston, Sophomore; 1 min. 7.6 sec.
Preston, Senior
Burdge, Freshman
220- Yard
Lowe, Senior; time, 2 min. 41.6 sec.
Brewerton, Freshman
W'ainer. Senior
Relay, 176 Yard.r
Seniors; time, 1 min. 38.8 sec.
Sophomore.;
Juniors
I:re .hmen


50-Yard Back Sit ,4.
1. Lowe, Senior; time, 35.8 sec.
2. Ekwurzel, Senior
3. Robinson, Junior
50-Yard Breat SI oke
1. Schwindeman, Junior; time, 31.8
2. Robinson, Junior
3. Halloran, Senior
Fancy Diving
1. Brewerton, Freshman
2. Morrison, Junior
3. Tie for third place: Dockery, Sophomore,
Peterson, Freshman.
Total Points
1. Seniors 44
2. Freshmen .",i
3. Juniors 12
1. Sophomores 101%










ZONIAN


INTERSCHOLSTIC S\WI'lMMING MEET
Held at W'ashington Pool
April 20, 1929
In the annual interscholastic Canal Zone swimming championship held at the
Washington Pool, Saturday, April the 20th, Balboa High School led by Captains Lo e
and McKim decisively defeated Cristobal High School by a 98-11 score.
Lowe, Walston and McKim netted 35 points for Balboa, while Meuller of Cris-
tobal garnered 4 of Cristobal's 11 points.
Lowe of Balboa again broke the 220 High School record, swimming the 220 in
2 minutes 39 seconds. The results of this meeting is in direct contrast ith last years'
meet in which Balboa barely managed to defeat Cristobal by a 30-29 score


BOYS' EVENTS
50-Yard Crawl-Stroke
Walston, Balboa; Time, 26.7 sec.
Romig, Balboa
Hayden, Cristobal
220-Yard Crawl-Stroke
Lowe, Balboa; time, 2 min. 39 sec.
Brewerton, Balboa
Meuller, Cristobal
50-Yard Brea.r--Slroke
Schwindeman, Balboa; time 33.5 sec.
Halloran, Balboa
Mundberg, Cristobal


120-Yard Relay
Won by Balboa team: Jones, Daniels. Schwinde-
man, Walston.
100-Yard Crawl-Stroke
I. Walston, Balboa; Time, 62 sec.
2. Meuller, Cristobal
3. Burdge, Balboa
50-Yard Back-Stroke
1. Lowe, Balboa; time, 35 sec.
2. Robinson, Balboa
3. Ekwurzel, Balboa
Fancy Diving
1. Brewerton, Balboa
2. Turner, Cristobal
3. Dockery, Balboa









ZONIAN


BASKETBALL SCHEDULE
Balboa 23 Cristobal 19
Balboa 29 Cristobal 16
Balboa 28 Corozal 15
Balboa 19 Corozal 26
Balboa 31 Corozal 9

INTER-CLASS BASKETBALL

Showing a marked superiority over their opponents throughout the season, the
Seniors easily won the championship of the Balboa High School inter-class basket-
ball league. The Seniors emerged triumphant in all their games, while their nearest
rivals, the Juniors, compiled an average of 500 in the six games staged.
Outstanding stars during the season were William Wood, Des Londes, Hel& and
Thayer.
Final Standing
W L Percentage
Seniors 6 0 1.000
Juniors 3 3 .500
Freshmen 2 4 .333
Sophomores 5 .167








86 ZONIAN

BALBOA HIGH VS. CRISTOBAL HIGH

The first game was played at New Cristobal playshed. The game was the most
hotly contested of all those played. Cristobal put up a stiff opposition, but was
finally downed twenty-three to nineteen.
From the first whistle both teams pitched into the game and played hard. The
score at the first quarter was eight to seven, Balboa. Then the forwards of each
team got busy and at the half the count was fourteen to eleven, with Balboa in the
lead by three points.
In the third Cristobal got away to score enough points to cut down Balboa's
lead and to pass them. This count ended Cristobal ahead by two points. However,
Balboa settled down in the last and held Cristobal down to two points while the
forwards were gaining six to win the game. The teams were fighting for possession
of the ball when the final whistle blew.
The outstanding performers for Balboa were Hele and DesLondes. The former
garnered thirteen of the team's points while the latter sank three field goals. Pescod,
gaining seventeen points for Cristobal, was the high point scorer of the game.
Box score of game:

B.H.S. FG FT PF TP
DesLondes R F 3 0 1 6
Romig RF 0 0 0 0
Hele L F-C 6 1 2 13
Quinn L F 1 0 0 2
W.Wood C 1 0 1 2
Wainer R G 0 0 2 0
Key R G 0 0 1 0
Jones L G 0 0 1 0
J. Wood L G 0 0 0 0

11 1 8 23


C.H.S. FG FT PF TP
Babbitt RF 0 0 0 0
Pescod L F 7 3 1 17
Hayden C 1 0 1 2
Blauvelt R G 0 0 0 0
Wickenstadt L G 0 0 2 0
Conklin 1, G 0 0 1 0

8 3 5 19








ZONIAN


Second Game
The game took place at Balboa pli% shdl, before a large crowd of students. The
game was hard fought and resulted in a win for Balboa.
With the whistle Balboa's scoring machine got to work and the quarter ended
with Balboa ahead, ten to three. Once it got the lead the home team was ne,-er
headed. At the half the score was nineteen to ten. The third quarter was the hard-
est fought period of the game. In this quarter the defence of both teams was good,
so that Balboa was able to get only four points while Cristobal got but a single field
goal. When the final whistle blew the score was Balboa twenty nine, Cristobal
sixteen.
HelM and W. \\'ood, with five field goals each, led the scoring for Balboa, while
Pescod showed Cristobal the way with eight points scored.


B.H.S.
DesLondes
Dew
Romig
Helh
Solenberger
Quinn
W. Wood
Wainer
J. Wood
Jones
Powell
Lapeira



C. H. S.
Babbitt
Pescod
Hayden
Blauvelt
Quinn
Wickenstadt
Conklin


R
R
R
LI
L
L I
C
R(
LG (
I. (
L C
L C


Box score of game:
FG FT
F 1 0
F 0 0
F 1 1
F-C 5 0
F 0 0
1 2
5 0
G 0 0
1 0 0
S0 0
G 0 0
S0 0

13 3


RF
L F
C
RG
R G
LG
L G


7 2


ATHLETIC LETTERS
Due to the efforts of the Athletic Council letters were given, for the first time
in Balboa High School history, to all those members of the teams % ho. in the
opinion of the Council, had earned them.


5 29
PF TP
0 4
0 8
0 4
3 0
0 0
0 0
2 0

5 16









Z ZONIAN


ATHLETIC COUNCIL


Following is a
SOCCER
Wainer
Rader
Orr
Booth
De la Peria
Michaelson
Vengoechea
Quinn
Dew
Taylor
F. Maduro
J. Salterio
Hele

TRACK
Hele
Schwindeman
E. Jones
W. Wood


list of all those who received letters.


J. Wood
Preston
Wainer
Ella Jones
Rae Newhard
Docia Clisbee
Grace Jones
Cphie Key
Beatrice Joyner
TENNIS
F. 1laduro
Hele
Dick
Wainer
Dew
Taylor
S\'I,1MING
Walston
Lowe


Romig
BreN erton
Schwinderman
Halloran
Robinson
Daniels
Morrison
Josephine %\IcKirm
Hayden Hearne
Docia ClisLee
Rita Ouinn
Fern Kyleber
Jessie Banan

BASEBALL
Des Londes
Hele
W. Wo.,:d
Quinn
H. Jones


Daniels
Po ell
Reese
!Morrison
Preston

BASKET BALL
H. ones
J. Wood

Ron-.ig
Quinn
\'ainer
Hele
De,,
Powell
Des Londes
Solenberger
Lapeira
Key


8S