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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Dedication
 Faculty
 Editorial note
 Classes
 Alumni
 Literary
 Exchange
 Society
 Athletics
 Back Matter
DLOC PCANAL
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093678/00021
 Material Information
Title: Zonian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date: 1928
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093678:00021

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Dedication
        Page 4
    Faculty
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Editorial note
        Page 8
    Classes
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Alumni
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Literary
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Exchange
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Society
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Athletics
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Back Matter
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
Full Text




















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Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries













http://www.archive.org/details/zonian1928balb


































THE ZONIAN


1928


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BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL


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a* *******-**THE ZONIAN ****& ******


Vol.. XIX' B.RBIROA. CANAL ZONE, 1928

PUBLISHED BY THE BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL


CONTENTS


W Page
0 DEDICATION . . . . . .. 4

FACULTY .... .. ..... 5

I EDITORIAL NOTE . . . . .. 8

CLASSES . . . . . . . 9

4 ALUMNI . . . . 45
f 0
* LITERARY . . . .. ... . 49

* EXCHANGE . . . . . .. 67

a SOCIETY . . . . . . . 73

ATHLETICS . . . . . 91

* DVERTISTNG . . . . . 107 0

4 #
4* 4*40 ***** fS*44 @400**@








4 lhe Zonian


THE SENIOR CLASS
GRATEFULLY DEDICATES THIS VOLUME


TO
Herbert E. Northrup
AND


Roger W. Collinic
WHOSE KINDLY INTEREST HAS ASSISTED IN MAKING
THIS YEAR A SUCCESS,






Zonian


MR. J. L. McCOMMONS
Qe^11S--


I 111


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~fhe 73onian


STeen
BOgda


FrosT
McMaHon
MElgaard

Flint
DolAn
Collinge
NorthrUp
Laws
VeTte
WhaleY

C. A. R., '28


J. L. MCCOMMONS
Nebraska
State Normal School, Pensylvannia
A. B., University of Nebraska
A. M., Columbia University
Principal



LESTER S. FLINT
Massachusetts
B. S., Tufts College
JMathematics



HERBERT E. NORTHRUP
South Dakota
A. B., State University of South Dakota
Science
]

^1 .'' ^
f. '~ .


IDA O. ERICKSON
Wisconsin
Teachers College, River Falls,
Wisconsin
Assistant Principal



O I.% T. FROST

A. B., Sparnsh an.iFren'h


RUTH E. MELGAARD
Minnesota
University of Minnesota
A. B., Wellesley Col
4w A


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31 _~;_=
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MYRTLE A. DOLAN
Nebraska
Nebraska Wesleyan University
Nebraska School of Business
Gregg School of Shorthand, Chicago, Illinois
Stenography and Typetriti.





j each Kearney, Nebraska
A. l^ T- University, Denver, Colorado
Hlistor3!


ULVA Lois L .
Ohio i
A. B., Ohio --an U .
A. M., ,I;i'1,ur.' School oNat uages
L- L .ldllitdicluy, Vermont
Spani.,'h


THOSE. R. KINC
Wisconsin
Beloit College, Wisconsin
Stout Institute, Wisconsin
University of Wisconsin, \\Wiconsin
Supervisor, Indus'trial /Ari


RUTH EMLEY BOZEMAN
Wales, England
King's College, Wales
Presbyterian American C, lltg, Colombia
Spanish and Household Arts


EDWARD A. BOGDA
Wisconsin
Physical Education fot Botys


HENRY GRIESER
New York
S,.'lning Instructor


Household Artr L


RoFR W./CO 4GE

A.B., L\ ii college, Wisconsin
} F?,. i.h



HELEN CURRIER BAKERAJ
Minnesota
A. B., University of Minnesota
Supervisor of Public School lusic


LOUISE HANNA
Kentucky
New Haven School of Physical Training, New
Haven, Connecticut
Physical Education Jor Girls


'.


nioan


V'EN.\ Srl FN
'. in es, Ia
Matalcstrr Colleg St. Paul, Minnesota
RasmusseB A63uincss College, Minnesota
Commercial Subjects


MYRTLE M. W AL

A. B., UniverSjo ,Washington
Enit z6 t.,ommercial Subjects



ALICE McMAHO*-
Iowa, c
A. B., State Uni -rst of Iowa



GRACE A. PETERSON
Colorado
A.B., Colorado Teachers' College, Greeley,
C- j I







8 ..r ...Ze oniz'an


* *











EDITORIAL NOTE
The staff offers no apology for this annual.
It has made a conscientious effort to produce a
ZONIAN worthy of the name, and which will
serve to recall the brighter, pleasanter side of
our four years of high school life. If it has suc-
* *











0 The staff finds its own fun and reward this work.
^^it^^l~eaB^^^^ ^^^ jii^ ^^ *







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* *

* *
SENIOR CLA.\S
President .... ......-.-...- ..... .... JON OHLSON
S1'ice-Pre.ident ........-.... ... ..... .. WARREN GILMIAN
SSecrelary .......... ... .......- ..........- ELVA SMITH
Treasurer ....... ....... ........ ....RICHARD GRIMISON
Ad so. ......... ..... ... -------... .. .. .. I M R. NORTIHRUP
S'olt;or, f.........- .. .... ... BLACK AND GOLD i
SFlower ............... ....................... -...-. .... CosxOS
Slo.tto ............ ...........--.- .......TOUT BIEN OU RIEN
fMarcot ............ -BABY ALLIGATOR
I *
AHLFONT, VERA KEY, RACHEL
BARDELSON, IVARGARET KNAPP, MARY BELLE
BROWN, JOHN KOCHER, MILDRED .
SBRADNEY, ANNA MAKERS, GERALD
f CAMERON, JANICE MARSTRAND, ROBERIr
0 CARR, ETHEL MARTIN, BELLE *
CLEMENT, VIRGINIA IAUBORGNE, JOSEPH
0 CLISBEE, THATCHER ICCoNAGHIY, MARGARET
COLE, CATHERINE McDAuD, MARY .
SCOURVILLE, LYDIA McGROARTY, MARY Lor
DE CASTRO, JACK McGUIGAN, GAYLE
f* DE PAREDES. RAIr. McKEOWN, EMMA *
- DE LA PEnA, SARAH MECKEL, TERISA
t 1DOOLING, JEANNE M1DDIETON, MAY *
EVERSON, JOHN MILLER, CARLOS
*EwING, VIRGINIA MORGAN, HELEN
FORBES, HELEN O'i-, '.. IDA
GARRETT, MILDRED OHLSON, JOHN
GELABERT, MARC(CS PALACIO, CHARLES
GILMAN, WARREN PALACIO, ROSE
CRANBERRY, HARRY PRICE, PEGGY *
GRIMISON, RICHARD PRICE, STELLA
GURNEY, ANNETTE REESE, BEN
f GURNEY, SAM RODGERS, CHARLES
HALLEN, BARBARA SAPHIR, ANNA
SHARRISON, GERTRUDE SMITH, ELVA
* HEARNE, LUCILLE STONE, QUENTIN
HUNTER, FRED TAYLOR, EDGAR
SJACKSON.ADA TOEPSER, GISELA A
& JACKSON, CHARLES TOLEDANO, SOLELY
JONES, NORBERT WAINER, AMOS
SKERR, LOUISE WHALER, ELSBETH
'ft Yn',r. FR : *v


*
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'Vt.HA A.L LE A. .AtI.FO'.T
Ma.s-ch'hni'etts
Orchetr3. "25. 26


MARl %rF.T BA I.tL -
Illinoil
Supp.r Club. '26, 2 '.
Srimminr,. '2'5
studentt C,uunI 'I.
ZoIrM StAll, 2M


JOHN BROuNr
Can.,l Zone
Glee Club. '25
Bjseb.,ll, '2'


A:ir;.\ BR DNJ Y
C.nal Zone

Supper Club, '26. '27, '2-
Glee Club, '26
ClLs_ Pla., '28









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Cinil Zone
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GCle Club, '25. '20
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Maine
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throp. M.I,. '23
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r VIRGINIA CLEMENT
Canal Zone
Central High School, Min-
neapolis, Minn., '26
Track, '27
Supper Club, '27, Vice-Pres.
'28
(;lee Club, '27, '28


RAUL GARCIA DE PAREDES
Panama
ZONIAN Staff, Business Mgr.,
'28


i L r.i COURVILLE
Martinique


Ccj,


CATHERINE COLE
Missouri
Wakenda High School, Wa-
kenda, Mo., '25
Supper Club, '26
Class Play, '28


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JOHN A. EVERSON
Canal Zone


Cristobal High School, Cris-
tobal, C.Z., '25
Soccer, '27, '28


SARAH DE LA PENA
Canal Zone
Class Secretary, '25
"A Castle in Spain", '26


JEANNE DOOLING
Pennsylvania
Central High School, Wash-
ington, D.C., 23. '26

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$ Class History


Barbara Hallen, '28
Peggy Price, '28


The historian's job, you know: the continuity
of history. We thought to ask Miss Vette, our
history teacher, about that, but somehow or other
it just slipped our mind. ..... We were looking for
"contiguous" and ran across "continuity". ....
Webster defined it as the "quality or state of
being continuous", and that's clear enough save
that we just don't see how the idea can be applied
.... Unless we ippl. it to two or three mara-
thon love-affairs we might mention. We don't
however ..... They're not too continuous, any-
way; intermittent. .... .We had in mind to begin
with the verdant year, but somehow got side-
tracked .... Whikh reminds us that Edward
Latham. .....We can't for the life of us reconcile
the dignity of the Senior girls with fluttering over
a ten-gallon hat of Colombian-or was it Costa
Rican?-manufacture. (Panama hat) What's
the big idea?...... And didn't Jiggs Cross ....
a mighty Senior ....set off a package of fire-
crackers in a room adjacent to assembly?.....
But let's get on ......
That year of '24 when we, together with the
rest of the class, came timidly through the gates
to join the ranks with those mightier ones the
Sophomores, Juniors, and the illustrious Seniors
........ The sandman must have lived with us
during those brain-racking months or else deposited
the largest bag of sand amidst us. ..... But Senior
dignity is not half as confusing .... as our first
class meeting of the Sophomore year......when
Harry Granberry looked embarrassed in spite of
the orer-intelligent audience he had before him

It must have been at Christmas time. .......in
Mr. Northrup's assembly ......for we seem to
recall too, how Bobby, Kay and Babs corrupted
the morale of the high school. .... appearing


in that studious (?) hall with jingle bells securely
hidden in their garters. .......
Then passing on to our Junior Year we simply
must record in our worldly annals. .... that
John Ohlson was President, with Helen Morgan
subbing. Elva Smith carried the books to and
from the meetings. Charles Rcdgers was positively
financial, my dear ...... And who was the Su-
perintentcent of the head-shavers?. ..... We seem
to recall Sam Gurney's fist on the clippers. ....
Oh yes, the heroic actions of Mr. Northrup and
Tim at Tabcguilla. .... .rescuing the fair young
damsels Margaret McConaghy and Ethel Carr..
..... when they felt the Hesperus enveloping
them. We can't imagine why this should be so
defamed. .... unless that pantomine by Barbara
Hallen, Thatcher Clisbee, Tim Mann and John
Ohlson at our marvelous party at the Y.W. be the
cause ..... The verdict on that was unanimous
.... .a sea of blankets. .... John lost his dignity.
The Jazz-seekers, Charlestoners and Black-
bottomers strutted their stuff at our overwhelm-
ingly successful card party and dance at the
Tivoli........ ."Eliza Came To Stay" along
toward the end of the year and Gertrude Har-
rison has remained in our memory ever since, to-
gether with Warren's "Uncle Alexander"; Gerald's
"Herbert"; Sam's "Mi.ntc.gbt"; Virginia Ewing's
"Vera"; and Stella's "Aunt Pennybroke". .......
Bobby Whaler's "Mrs. Allh ay" deserves a set
of dots by herself.........
Our long-hoarded, hard-earned cash was put
into the mouths of those pompous but starring
Seniors. .... the Junior-Senior Banquet ......
with servings of more delectable chicken than..
..... Bedtime stories in the assembly. ... the
last day of school by iMrs. Patterson...... "aux
enfants". .......


lb

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Let Mary Lou's coming in October make up for
the three months intervening until we donned our
cloaks of dignity. .....New faces. .... those ot
Warren Gilman and Richard Grimison .......
graced the roost of officers. Shortly afterwards
Warren disappeared for a short period of three
months, with the explanation that he was slav-
ing for. ..... West Point .... but we really
wonder if he wasn't taking his yearly siesta?. ...
..... Can we ever forget MI. Colling.'s "tak-
ing" ways?...... his lust for compacts. .... per-
haps to give his lady friends, other than those
in school. .. .
Now let me see ..... a buffet class meeting
serving class arguments as an appetizer. ... That
heavenly Senior Leap Year Party at the Yacht
Club ...... We wonder whose audacious idea it
was. ........
We've just glanced over that about the awful
dignity of the Seniors. It reminds us that That-
cher Clisbee, John Everscn, Lucille Hearne, and
Ada Jackson weren't too efficient in policing up to
grounds .....all except John. We think he
learned his accuracy by carrying a cane. .. It's
just a little confusing, that Senior dignity and
policing the grounds ....Our never-forgettable
prima donna Helen Morgan in "Lelawala"....We
have often thought that there was a little of the
savage in Billy Rader. ..... Little Chief early in
the evening, but Big Chief "When You Are Near"
...... and Ding the inspiration. ........


"Tea Toper Tavern" was opened with........
Peggy Price as "Celeste" with her everlasting
"Madame, Madame"; Elva Smith as "Dixie"..
. .. the horse (?); Robert Marstrand as "Mike"
with that bewitching Irish brogue; Kay Cole, as
Harriet, the lollypop high school flapper, with
Gerald Maiers as her worldly-wise college freshman,
Barry; Mary Lou McGroarty as Rosie, that kiss-
able rival; Richard Gr:mison as Brian Pierpont,
Rosie's boy friend; Anna Bradney as Tess, the
smallpoxed maid; Barbara Hallen, as Gloria S.
Jerome, that mushy old widow; John Brown as
John Sedgewick, the ardent admirer of Miss
Marion Day; their lenient chaperone by Anna
Saphir; Mary Belle Knapp, the persistent social
worker; Harry Granberry as the Episcopalian
preacher-man; and Thatcher Clisbee as Dallas
Thorne, that irresistible lover ......
This year our mouths were filled with ...
chicken of our model taking successors. ......
Juniors .. .. .Classnight .. .. that ever mem-
orable evening of pranks, prophecies, wills and
histories. .. .. Baccalaureate. .... the last at-
tempt to try to start us on the straight and nar-
row path. Last of all. .. .. commencement. .....
And that reminds us that we haven't settled this
continuity thing ...... We leave the portals of
Balboa High with real regret.......even an em-
barrassed tear .....Certainly a wealth of happy
memories........ and loyalty ...... There's our
continuity.


@%cCAiA,


28


; ~~____~_ ..








ti~e iZon fan


Class Prophecq


Elsbeth Whaler, '28


New York City
October 18, 1936
Dear Diary:
The days certainly do fly--it can't possibly
be two weeks since I landed on my trip over from
Paris. I certainly hope that Peggy will take
good care of the office, for, you know, Price and
Whaler's Law Office is one of the rising law es-
tablishments in Paris. And-here I am in New
York, and staying at Anna's house. Anna Saphir,
my old school-chum, is now a rising young au-
thoress, and quite independent, if you please.
Her next book, she tells me, is to be entitled-
"Why is a Lemon?"
Anna is quite enlhusilastic about lectures, it
seems, and tonight we are scheduled to attend
one at Liberty Hall. I am not much in favor of
it, but one has to be acquiescent at times, you
know!


Diary:
You'd neverguesswhcm I saw at the lecture!-
I guess I'll have to tell you-this seems to be
quite the season for running into old class-mates.
Gayle McGuigan was there, lecturing on but-
terflies. He has become foremost butterfly
authority in the world, as well as owner of the
world's largest and most assorted collection of
them. John Everson, noted authority on Evolu-
tion, also one of my old classmates, was there,
too. He did not actually lecture, but was in-
troduced on the platform. Will wonders never
cease?

Dear Diary:
Elva Smith is the crack swimmer of the Amier-


ican Olympic team-how fortunately, for she
certainly used to love athletics. I just gathered
this from today's New York Times. We
attended the theatre the other night, and to
tell you the long and the short of it, I was ac-
tually shocked when I saw on the program the
announcement of a dance by the Frangi-pani
dancing team, composed of Virginia Clement and
Joseph Mauborgne. The Pathe News showed me
what real surprise is-for there, staring out at
me was Belle Martin, and the announcement that
she was one of the season's leading Presidential
candidates; and also a picture of Lydia Courville,
whose noble nature forced her to go to Patagonia
as a teacher of the tango to club-footed natives.
This was not all, however, for in the main picture
entitled "Fruits of Passion," the familiar coun-
tenances of Fred Hunter and Ada Jackson stared
out at me. They actually had the leads! What
wonderfully good fortune has come to my former
classmates!


Dear Diary:
News is continually Iomlmng in! Anna gave
a large supper party the other night, and .I've
just had time to write about it. I met quite a
jot of people I used to know! Amos \'ainer,
who is now an Admiral-in the Navy, and Margaret
Bardelson, his bride, were thtre: the marriage
probably resulted from their wonderful conversa-
tions in English 12 class.
Jeanne Dooling, who has once again regained
her maiden name, was there, also, looking
as charming as usual in a lovely black velvet
gown. It is whispered that she is a notable
divorcee.


E
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ffhe Ionian


October 31, '36
Dear "Di":
Anna and I, since it is the custom here, went
down to the pier last night to see the Chinaland
off on her trip around the world. Amnng those
embarked for Africa was Lucille Hearne, who
is leading a big game expedition into the African
wilds. Those in her party were Ida O'Brien,
Charles Palacio, Rachel Key, Quentin Stone and
Edgar Taylor, all important in the hunting world.
Raul de Parcdes was also on the ship, outward
bound. He is hiking around the world, so he
says, and will commence hiking when the ship
reaches China.
The paper this morning contained quite a bit
of news-real news, too. Warren Gilman has
won the world's tennis championship, Sarah de
la Pefia, noted theatrical producer, is producing
a new musical comedy, and the leading man is to
he Solly Toledano. The name is "Are Men
M.inli, %?" Gelabert and Young, department
store owners, have imported a new mannequin,
and she is no other than Rose Palacio, who has
been studying in Paris.
Anna just came in, holding in her hand a copy
of the Sunday News. On the front page is
a large picture of two lovely girls, and under-
neath are their names. Catherine Cole and
Barbara Hallen-what scrape have these girls
gotten into now? Remember how at school they
were always cutting up? The paper announces
that they have become hermitesses on a lonely
isle in the South Seas, having renounced Society
and all its claims. I wonder-


November 7, '36
Diary:
The theatre, Criterion, was packed last night-
and why wouldn't it be-for Thatcher Clisbee
and Virginia Ewing were the attraction of the
evening. They are co-leads, in Sam Gurney's
new production. Gertrude Harrison did a solo
dance wonderfully, between acts. Another be-
twecn-act number was a song by Helen Morgan.
Her voice certainly is wonderful!
Oh!-and "Di," I forgot to tell you that Vera
Ahlfont was on the "Chinaland" too. She has
become a missionary, and is bound for the head-
waters of the Amazon. My! how she has changed!


November 24, '36
Dearest Diary:-
Night life is what attracts me! I simply can't
resist it. Accordingly, last hight we went to a
wonderful new night club that had just opincd,
named "The Pink Pelican." Can you ima-
gine my surprise when I heard that Anna Brad-
ney was the owner? Granberry's Orchestra,
quite the sensation of New York Society, was
there pli' ing dind Mr. Granberry, the leader,
is none other than Harry! Mary McDade was
there, playing the sax! She has become the lead-
ing sax player of the age! Giscla Tocpser was
the solo dancer of the evenirg. She is very
popular in New York.


November 30, '36
Diary:
This morning the maid announced an inter-
viewer, and-when I got downstairs to my sur-
prise, Charles Jackson, of "Old Balboa High",
was there. It seems he is a reporter on the "So-
cial News"-a paper owned by Mary Belle
Knapp. We had quite a chat about old times
on the Canal Zore.
He gave me quite a bit of information: Gerald
Maiers has opened a Home for B rl k gged Babies,
and Richard Grimison is chief doctor of the es-
tablishment, while Annette Gurney is head-
nurse.

December 1, '36
Diary:
I really missed Stella Price! She was here a
few hours on Monday to see me-and I was out.
She has become the celebrated Dean of Wassar
College, and one of the most prominent on her
staff of efficient teachers is "\Mil" Kocher, who
is instructress in the use of keyless t. ping ma-
chines. They've certainly succeeded.


December 10, '36
"Di":
PIANO PLAYING MADE SIMPLE
USE THE "M-M-M" PIANO
NEW METHOD TAUGHT FREE!
Such was the front-page announcement that
greeted my eyes as I picked up the paper this


30


5









Wfhe 2onian


morning. And-following this was a long article
telling of the invention of a new piano by the
Misses Teresa Meckel, M\la Middleton, and
Emma M.\lKeiun. This piano is played with
one's toes, and really is simpler, easier to learn,
as well as more musical. The girls have been
experimenting ever since they left High School.


December 30, '36
Diary:
Last night I attended one of the most delight-
ful banquets I ever hope to attend. John Ohlson,
famous New York banker, tendered it in honor
of Charles Rodgers, returning South American
tin-can magnate. Ben Reese, one of New York
"400's" most eligible bachelors, was there, with
his alleged fiance, Miss Mary Lou MlcGroarty,
society belle of Philadelphia and Newport. Carlos
Miller, actor of the legitimate stage, also attended,
as did Jack de Castro, famous lecturer, Helen
Forbes, one of the greatest surgeons of tlie day,
and Mildred Garrett, whose new hotel in Miami
is the popular resort of all society. Ethel Carr,
authoress of the new "Nnn-Prorouncirg Dic-


tionary", remembered me, and came over to chat.
She told me that Robert Marstrand had been
asked, but could not come because of baby's
teething. Louise Kerr and Janice Cameron,
beauty shoppe owners, were late, but came any-
way. Altogether it was one of the most delight-
ful evenings I've spent since High School days!
- I met so many old friends!
Norbert Jones, photographer, and his compe-
tent assistant, Margaret McConaghy, came in
later to take our pictures. They came out love-
ly, too!


S. S. RANGOON
Bound for France
January 8, 1937.
Dear Diary:
I've had a wonderful trip. Can't begin to tell
you. It was almost like a class reunion-and-
really-how fortunate my classmates have been.
All of them were so wonderful, too.
I'll close now, as I have to get ready for the
Bal Masque aboard ship to-night. Will write
later.


A SENIOR PREPARING FOR HIS
MORNING CLASSES


~_







32


Class fhWie o



Class Vill


WE, THE SENIORS of Balboa High School,
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hun-
dred and tent. -eight, being essentially sane
in mind, reason, and conduct, do hereupon
draft and sign this our LAST WILL AND
TESTAMENT. We take this opportunity to
declare any other will or wills ever made by us
null and void, and we appoint as executors the
Sophomore Class, this being their first responsi-
blc office since Ihl.;r ingress into the High School.
To the ever-suffering faculty we bestow our
sincere admiration and wonder that they have
been able to accomplish what they have done
for us.
To the Juniors we bequeath the privilege of
becoming Seniors, counselling them to be dig-
nified and haughty, as best suits the role.
To Carr, our trusty janitor, we bequeath the
refreshing news that we are going, never to
return, thereby relieving him of our aggravating
presence.
The fact that we are individually possessed
of numerous gifts that we must sorrowfully
relinquish to various of the underclassmen, leads
to the following generous bequests:
John Ohlson, after due and deliberate re-
flection, leaves th- Editorship of the ZONIAN
to some guileless Junior who little realizes the
trials and tribulations connected with the position.
Warren Gilman bequeaths his ability to wield
a mean racquet to Otto Helmerichs, under the
express condition that it be used frequently
against Mr. Flint.
Being in a genial state of mind, Helen Morgan
entrusts the care of her primadonna-esque voice
to Nlork Shapiro.
Mildred Phillips is the lucky young lady to
whom Elva Smith bequeaths her blonde curly hair.


With the earnest hope that they be appreciated,
Mildred Kocher relinquishes each and every
claim to Gerald's affections to Dorothy Dixon.
Gerald Maiers, himself, however, refuses to
be outdone and consequently leaves "Dot" to
John Jett, Esq.
Thatcher Clisbee grants to Hal Dooling,
grati,, his ability to get into mischief and yet
keep within the law.
Stella Price benevolently forsakes her long
hair and ability to argue, especially the latter,
in favor of Mary Lulthr.
The library keys pass from Anna Saphir's
hands to Jessie Banan, as does her position of
"()In.t;iL.,i, Pianist" to Ruth Holzapfel.
Barbara Hallen leaves Zonabel Demuth her
childish manner and, incidentally, her ability
to talk herself out of scrapes.
To Billy Rader, Catherine Cole surrenders her
ability to get through Physics without working.
Raul de Paredes leaves to Willard Percy his
"speed" and his Oakland, recommending that
both be aired on moonlight nights. As a point
of interest, Fred Hunter leaves Willard the re-
refreshing information that the said Oakland
is mirtL. i: l to the hilt in some seventeen or
eighteen ga-ag:s in Panama City. (N.B. All that
glitters is not gold).
Harry Granberry wills his million kopeck
banjo to the Guy in the Green Gloves.
Sara de la Peiia, after investigating the "Hun-
dred Neediest Cases", leaves to Stanley Butler
her secret of talking fast without stuttering.
James Quinn is the beneficiary of Frank
Young's magnanimity in parting \ith his cher-
ished patent-leather hair comb.


Lucille Hearne, '28
John OhlIon, '28


I


f









~fbze Zon kin


Being of the opinion that Barbara Roe could
make ready use of the ability to take four years
of mathematics without flinching, Rose Palacio
leaves her this gift.
Vera Ahlfont bequeaths her many naval ad-
mirers to Florence Zidbeck (Yeah-ho for the
briny deep!)
After research into the subject of finances in
the Junior Class, Ida O'Brien has decided that
a bequest of ten cents ought to raise the available
working capital enormously, and has therefore
willed it this sum.
Peggy Price leaves her ability to express her-
selt clearly in seventeen different languages,
including the deaf and dumb, to Valeria Van
Valkenburgh.
Janice Cameron scratched her head in thought
and thereby conceived the idea of bequeathing
her permanent wave to Mary Katherine Bick-
ford.
John Brown leaves his position as pitcher on
the school nine to Jimmy DesLondes, providing
the latter promises to redeem the honor of dear
old Balboa High. (I'd die for dear old Rutgers!)
MIarcos Gelabert bequeaths his masterly abili-
ty to play soccer to the one and only Edward
Latham.
To Jack Morrison. Lucille Hearne leaves her
uncontrollable tendency to stamp up and down
the stairs, hoping that he will be more successful
in "getting a" ay" with that accomplishment
than she.
Gertrude Harrison leaves her queenly poise
to Rae Newhard, who can doubtless make much
good use of it.
Sam Gurney, with many a tearful sigh of
regret, wills his Chesterfieldian manner to George
Lowe, although he greatly doubts the possibility
of its affecting the conduct of the recipient.
May Middleton leaves her soft quiet voice
to Elizabeth Hirsh.
Charles Jackson cannot resist his little Solie
so he bequeaths four of size No. 3 shoes to Lars
Ekwurzel, hoping thereby, to equal one of the
latter's No. 12's.
Solly Toledano, as an inspired gesture, leaves
a portion of his surplus stature to Jack Byrne.
Annette Gurney surrenders to Charlotte Jen-
sen all rights, includingg the Scandinavian),
to "Eddie" and the Buick.


Robert larstrand. with characteristic gener-
osity, leaves to Joe Hummer the singular privi-
lege of entertaining "Alice" during Ispare mo-
ments.
To all the Freshmen, Bobby Whaler makes a
bequest of her knack of creating a disturbance
in the assembly, and then getting away with it.
Ada Jackson passes on to Betty Clement
all her previous inheritances of height from
generous past seniors.
Rachel Key bequeaths the charge of the office
typewriter to Agnes Mack.
To Zeno "Alabama" Knapp, Gayle McGuigan
wills his ease in absorbing vast amounts of
knowledge readily.
In view of the fact that umbrellas are indis-
pensable Emma McKeown leaves hers to Eliza-
beth Hearne.
lMargaret Bardelson donates her priceless
glasses to the Field Branch of the Museum of
Unnatural History of Siam, with the special
request that they be kept submerged in a bath
of concentrated banana oil when not in use.
Kenneth Forrest falls heir to Norbert Jones'
inclination to sleep in the assembly.
Richard Grimison leaves the cares and worries
of the position of Senior Treasurer to Lyle de
Grummond.
Jeanne Dooling, no longer being able to enjoy
her "buggy ride" to school each morning, wills
the same to our mutual friend, "Maggie" Ayers.
Virginia Clement, in order to perform her
perennial act of kindness, leaves her naivete to
Rita Driscoll, who can no doubt make excellent
use of it.
The decoration of the Knight of the Benevolent
Order of the B. H. S. Fatigue Squad is left by
John Everson to erring Sophomores.
Lydia Courville leaves to Peggy Wheeler her
passionate love for Domestic Science.
Qucntin Stone reluctantly, oh how very reluc-
tantly, leaves his incomparably innocent look
in an argument to William Lawlor.
.Mildrel Garrett confers upon Wilhelmina
Fransen the arduous job of keeping the Pedro
lMiguLl girls quiet until the bus arrives.
Helen Forbes wills her soft brown eyes to the
Smith twins, to add to their already numerous
charms.


~







34


9phe


,Zonian


Anna Bradnev very thoughtfully wills her
abundant brown locks to all the repentant
possessors of boyish bobs.
Fd;.. r Taylor leaves his Viking aspect to Marcel
Penso, with the understanding that the benefi-
ciary live up to the best Viking traditions.
Mary Belle Knapp makes a final bequest of
her "question box" to Donald Weigold.
Gisela Toepser leaves her interesting European
accent to the sophisticated Sophomores.
One glance, and Ethel Carr determined to
bestow her shy and retiring manner upon Bertha
Whitlock.
In the hopes that they be appri.cial.td. Louise
Kerr leaves her original ideas to Marjorie Ouinn.
Jack de Castro bequeaths his flute to Bobby
Batton.
Charles Rodgcrs leaves his rn.ippy orchestra to
the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Chronic Dance M.\ni.a,..
MI.|I(.0I t McConaghy wills her small, de-
licately-shaped hands to Sefior George Nieves.


Charles Palacio leaves his hobby of caricaturing
the teachers to all playful Freshmen with an eye
towards "art."
Belle Martin relinquishes her ability to lose
books to Mary Poole, however much the school
librarian may object.
Carlos Miller dolefully leaves "Chichi" to Earl
Orr (the answer to a maiden's prayer).
Mary McDade, after considerable mental cal-
isthenics, bequeaths her cunning dimples to Val
Fidanque.
Joseph Mauborgne, while in an expansive
mood, decided to leave his well-known football
build to Conroy Dockery.
Mary Lou McGroarty wills her ability to sell
tickets to Mr. Collinge to any who may have such
to dispose.
And last, but not least, Teresa Meckel leaves
the Presidency of the Supper Club to Franklin
Yates, if he dare claim it.
Done on the first day of June, nineteen hundred
and twenty-eight, IN WITNESS WHEREOF
we hereunto set our hand and seal:










(Signed)


THE SENIOR CLASS OF '28


r











-f Ihe ZJonL an


B. H. S. AQUARIUM June, 1928


Species of Fish

Chamelen
Goggle Eyes

Angelfish
Poor Fish
Angler
Saucer Eye
Mud Puppy
Goose Fish
Scamp
Clam
Pipe Fish
Spate
Red Snapper
Lady Fish
Hog Fish
Butterfly Fish
Turtle
Man o' War
Hermit Crab
Porpoise
Big Eye
Crab
Shark
Rainbow Trout
Siren
Little-Head Porgy
Pin Fish
Shrimp
Bo-bo Fish
Sea-Urchin
Sea Raven
Devil Fish
Barnacle
Hellbender
Alligator
Snail
Sea Elephant
Mutton Fish
Parrot Fish
Lizard
Lobster
Snook
Salamander


Name

Vera Ahlfont
Margaret Bardelson

Anna Bradney
John Brown
Ethel Carr
Janice Cameron
Virginia Clement
Thatcher Clisbee
Catherine Cole
Lydia Courville
Jack de Castro
Raul G. de Paredes
Sarah de la Pefia
Jeanne Dooling
John Everson
Virginia Ewing
Helen Forbes
Marcos Gelabert
Harry Granberry
Richard Grimison
Annette Gurney
Sam Gurney
Barbara Hallen
Gertrude Harrison
Lucille Hearne
Fred Hunter
Ada Jackson
Charles Jackson
Norbert Jones
Louise Kerr
Rachel Key
Mary Belle Knapp
Mildred Kocher
Gerald Maiers
Robert Marstrand
Belle Martin
Joseph Mauborgne
Margaret McConaghy
Mary McDade
Mary Lou McGroarty
Gayle M\cGuig nI
Emma McKeown
Teresa Meckel


Haunts

Club
N. E. Corner of Eng.
Room
Home
Dinty's car
Amador
Pedro Miguel
Chem. Lab.
Playshed
Babs' House
Shorthand Class
Music Room
Phys. Lab.
Upstairs office
His Ford
Commissary
The way home
Home
The market
Ancon
Taboga
Mr. Northrup's room
In a Buick
Front Steps
Betty's House
Clubhouse
With Catherine W.
Office
Meat counter
Dentist
Swimming pool
Office
With Bobbie
Ding's house
Clubhouse
With Alice
Reading room
Quarry Hts.
With Benny
In the Pontiac
Frankie's car
Library
Balcony
Chem. Lab.


Food

Hash
Paper

Bananas
Lipstick
Leather
Dances
Poetry
Cloves
Soapy fudge
Sewing
Flutes
Soft soap
Jett
Tin
Pickles
Speed test
Transcripts
Pig tails
Banjo strings
Matches
English Plum Pudding
Applesauce
Oak-?
Seaweed
Bathing Suits
Nitric Acid
Spankings
Printers' ink
Milk & soap
Photos
Typewriters
Fights
Slams
Sax reeds
Pencils
High-brow poetry
Syrup
Rings
Stockings
Hairpins
Books
Umbrellas
Toothaches


Identification

Bandeau
Volubility

Quietness
Bashfulness
Athlete
Permanent Wave
Innocence
Sarcasm
Mischief making
Domesticity
His gait
Oakland
Flashing eyes
Dewiness
His watch
Bobby pins
Bundles
His Chevrolet
"Bless me"
Pompadour
Beautiful hair
Conceit
Her shriek
Diamond
Noisy feet
Catherine
Temper
Reporter
Nonchalance
Acrobatic
Shoulder flowers
Southern drawl
Joyousness
That sax
Size
Sombrero
Bulk
Glasses
Snigger
"I won't"
Memory
Drag
Business-like way








36 z


9/he 3onian


B. H. S. AQULARILU, June, 1928


Species of Fish

Slider
Octopus
Starfish
Flying Fish
Sea Soldier
King Fish
Fauneyes
Puddingwife
Doctor Fish
Soap Fish
Torpedo
Goldfish
Jelly Fish
Sergeant-Major
Eel
Schoolmaster
Whale
Seal


Name

May Middleton
Carlos Miller
Helen Morgan
Ida O'Brien
John Ohison
Charles Palacio
Rose Palacio
Peggy Price
Stella Price
Charles Rodgers
Anna Saphir
Elva Smith
Quentin Stone
Edgar Taylor
Gisela Toepser
Solly Toledano
Elsbeth Whaler
Frank Young


Haunts

Typing room
S. & H. Office
Cecelia
Ancon bus
Physics Lab.
Restaurant
Assembly
At Kirks
Miss Frost's Room
Learning Piano
At play-practice
Postoffice
Corozal
Nothing
Class meetings
Father's stables
Yacht Club
Shungela's


Food

Peace
Ammeters
Permanent waves
Fairy tales
Banana oil
Art gum erasers
Advanced Algebra
Lollypops
Roll cards
Toothpicks
Rubber bands
Shorthand
Day dreams
Magazines
Madagascar
Alfalfa
Doughnuts
Hi-yee


Identification

Soberness
Legs
Dusty steed
Earrings
Authority
Artistic touches
Lengthening hair
Ralph
Grimaces
Noise
Library keys
DeMola\ pin
Look for the sandman
Taffy colored hair
Accent
His height
Her laugh
Loud shirts


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PANAMA
BY ONE WHO HAS NEVER BEEN THERE

I ~ It

rREE RUINS OF
OLD PANttAI


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JUNIOR CLASS









SCfhe Zon'n -39










JUNIOR CLASS
*






Presiden.................................. WILLIAM RADER
Vice-President ..................... ..OTTO HELMERICHS
Secretary ...... ... ....... ....AMELIA HUTCHINGS
Treasurer .......... ........ ................ JAMES QUINN *
Advisor. \I' MELGAARD



BANAN, JESSIE LUTHER, MARTHA
BAXENDALE, ALICE LUTHER, MARY
9 BOICHOT, FRANCIS LUTZ, CONCEPCION
41 BOWMAN, KATHRYN MACK, AGNES
BROWN, CARRIE MATTATALL, PATIENCE H.
SCODY, ISABELLE McGUIGAN, KATHLEEN V
DANIELS, GEORGE McGUIGAN, ROSE ,
9 DE GRUMMOND, LYLE MEREDITH, WILLARD
41 DEMUTH, ZONABEL qMOLLER, ALICE
DE LA PENA, EVA OLIVE, EUNICE
DIXON, DOROTHY ORR, EARL
EKWURZEL, LARS PATCHETT, SAM
ERLENKOTTER, ROBERT PEREZ, ALEXANDER *
FIDANQUE, VAL PHILLIPS, MILDRED
F9 FI'i~l;m ETHEL PIERCE, FRANKLIN
FRANSEN, WILHELMINA POWELL, JOHN
SFRENCH, ZONA QUINN, JAMES
I FURR, PAUL QUINN, MARJORIE
SGARRETT, JULIANA RADER, WILLIAM
4 HALLORAN, GEORGE RINK, BERNARD
HELMERICHS, OTTO ROMIG, WILLIAM
HERMIDA, RAMON SHAPIRO. MARK
HODGES, BEVERLEY SEALEY, MARION
9 HOLZAPFEL, RUTH SMITH, FLORES *
Hli;t Hi NEAL STRAUSS, CECELIA A
41 HUTCHINGS, AMELIA VENGOECHEA, JOSE *
9 HUTCHISON, RUTH VAN BROCKIIN, ANNA RUTH
JACQUES, DONALD WALSTON, RUBIO i..
JENSEN, CHARLOTTE WARWICK, NOVA
JOHANNES, ELEANOR W~I I -t^.. ELOISE
KYLEBER, ELIZABETH WILHITE, ALAN *
9% LARSEN, HENRY W\\,,Vi. JOSEPH
4 LAWLOR, WILLIAM WOOD, WILLIAM
LOWE, GEORGE ZIDBECK, FLORENCE

* *
O a*

* *
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SOPHOMORE CLASS









ehe Zonion 41





SOPHOMORE CLASS
SPresident.... ..... ..............--.-- ELLIOTT MONACO
Vice-President _B......... ........... OBBY JEWELL
nf Secretary ........... ......... ...... EARL SOLENBERGER
Treasurer ................. ---...... RAE NEWHARD
0 Ahisor. .......... ........ ..-..--.. ... ..M iss VETTE
6 0
SADAMS, ROBERT MARTIN, LOUISE
AYERS, MARGUERITTE MATTER, ROGER
BARDELSON, ROBERT MEAD, EMLEY
BARDELSON, SAM MEAD, IDA ALBERTA
BEJARANO, HELEN MEEHAN, JEANE
BOWMAN, CLYDE MERRILL, RUTH
BRULAND, NELLIE MILLER, FRANK
BRYAN, PAUL MITCHELL, MARY LEE
BULLOCK, ROBERT MONACO, ELLIOTT
BL II.ER. STANLEY MORRISON, JACK -
CARRINGTON, MYRTLE NEWHARD, RAE
CLEMENT, BETTY ORR, ELMER
CLISBEE, DOCIA PALMER, MARGARET
CONARD, JANICE PARKER, ELEANOR
CONARD, KATHLEEN PERCY, WILLARD
DESLONDES, JAMES PESCOD, ALICE
DICK, SOMERS PHILLIPS, SARAH
DROOLING, HALVOR PIMENTO, CARMEN
DORAN, MARGARET PRESTON, HARRY
SDRISCOLL, RITA REIMANN, ELSA
ESLEECK, IDA RUSSEY, EMMA
SEvEkION, BERNHARD RUSSEY, ERNEST
FINNE3AN, CONRADO SCHWINDEMAN, AUGUST
a HALLETT, DORIS SHAFFER, MARY
HALLORAN, PAULINE SIMONS, ENA
0 HARRIS, HAZEL SMITH, EDWARD
HEARNE, ELIZABETH SOLENBERGER, EARL
HERFURTH, CAROL SOLENBERGER, WAYNE
HUMMER, JOE STAPLETON, MARGARET
HUMPHREY, JACK SULLIVAN, VINCENT
JACQUES, ROBERTA VAN SICLEN, ANDREW
JETT, JOHN VAN VALKENBURGH, VALERIA
SJEWELL, BOBBY WARWICK, RAND
SJONES, EDWIN WAISON, ROBERT
JONES, HAYDEN WEIGOLD, DONALD
JOYNER, EVELYN \'ENT iLR. MANOLA
SKIRKPATRICK, RALPH WESTENLORFF, EDNA MAE
LATERMAN, MARY WHEELER, PEGGY
LEWIS, FR4NCF.E WHITLOCK, BERTHA
0 LINDGREN, CHESTER 'hi r I.. LOC,. VIRGINIA
.' LowE. EIwARD WILLETT, ADELAIDE
*' LtLL, RICHARUD W'NIu. IS. KARL
0 LUTZ, CANDELARIA WOODHULL, MURIEL
SMADURO, FREDERICK WOODHULL, VIRGINIA
SlALONE. EDWIN NYCAZA, PHILIP
0 MARCY, VINCENT YOUNG, BETTY
91 YULES, EMMA
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fhe fonian i43







FRESHM1\.N\ CLASS

Boys' Organization Girls' Organization
S President ..... ................. FRANKLIN YATES President.................. .....MARY POOLE
SI ,'. President. .............ALEXANDER MACDONELL Vice-Prejident.................. ..VIA MAE DEMUTH
S Secretary ............... ......... DOUGLAS JOHNSTON Secretary ..........................-.....ELIZABETH HIRSH *
S Treasurer ...... .......-.-........- ... W ILLIAM HELE Treasurer ...................... .........ALICE CURTIS
Advisor .............-....... ....... ......-... M R. FLINT Advisor.. ..... ..... ................. M ss WHALEY


ADAMS,MINA HEARNE, WILLIAM NOLAN, DORIS
ALLEN, DOROTHY HELE, WILLIAM O'DONNELL, MARIE
AMOLE, AURA HELMERICHS, ROBERT OLLER, OPHELIA
BARRETT, ROBERT HENRY, JAMES PARKER, ELIZABETH
BATTON, ROBERT HICKMAN, JAMES PENSO, MARCEL
BEHR, ROBERT HILBERT, GORGE PERRY, EVELYN
BEVERLEY, ELIZABETH HIRSH, ELIZABETH PESCOD, THOMAS
BICKFORD, MARY K. HOLSTON, FRANCIS PETERSON, ALAN
BOYD, ALICE HOPWOOD, KATE POOLE, MARY a
Bi-% II, RUTH HUFF, MANNER POTTER, JANET
BRADLEY, JESSICA HUMMER, CHARLES PRICE, KEMPER
V BROWN, PEARL JOHANNES, JENNIE REYNOLDS, SARAH
B BURRASTON, JACK JOHNSTON, DOUGLAS REYNOLDS, VINCENT A
s BYRNE, ETHEL JUDSON, QONALD RINK, EDWARD
SBYRNE, JACK KEY, FRANCIS ROE, BARBARA
CAMPBELL, JACK KIRKPATRICK, GLEN SANDBERG, CORINA *
CAMPBELL, WALTER KNAPP, JAMES SANGER, VICTOR
CARRIZO, MAXIMO KOCHER, CARROLL SEABERG, LILLY
CARVAJAL, HUMBERTO LAPEIRA, JULIO SEABERG, OLGA
SCOLVIN, LUCETTE LATHAM, EDWARD SE'YMOUR, WORTH
CONLEY, RICHARD LAWRENCE, CLAIR SHRAPNEL, BLISS
SClrHTI,. ALICE LAWYER, GRACE SMITH, CECELIA
DAVIS, MARGARET LEVY, RACHEL SMITH, CLARITA
DEGRACIA, JUAN LEWIS, JAMES STROOP, BERTHA
DEMUTH, VIA MAE LULL, DAVID SUNDBERG, HEDWIG
DOCKERY, CONROY 1 li'. FLL, ALEX. SUNDQUIST, CONSTANCE
DO:.MINGUEZ, ESTHER MACDONELL, JAMES TAYLOR, OPAL
o ELLIOT, JACK MADURO, MONTE TOLEDANO, BERTHA
0 ENGELKE, VIRGINIA MAKERS. KENNETH TRAPALINO, LAURA
v EVNS. HERBERT MANHART, WILLIAM TRIPPE, ELEANOR
EVANS, RUTH MAUBORGNE, BENJ. VALDES, EDWARD
o FENTON, MARIE McKINLEY, MARGARET VAN VALKENBURGH, LESTER
FIi \vi. HENRY MESSER, ROBERT WALSTON, WILLIAM
FORREST, KENNETH MONACO, RALPH WATROUS, MARGARET
GAEB, HARRY MORALES, JOHN \\'.D.ERD CATHERINE
GIST, HAROLD M'URRAY, DORIS WYLE, CLARE
*, GRAHAM, ERMA MURRAY, FELIX WYLE, LILLIE
e. HACK, ELMER NAVARRO, OTILDA YATES, FRANKLIN
HALDEMAN, JOYCE NIEVES, GEORGE ZIDBECK, NORMAN



'0040-tF0 f e0 ifts iv 41^^l| - t *-*al^ a a** oi 40 aa %10 0 9 a









44


~f/ie Zonian


Editor-in-Chief.....................

Assistant Editor.......................

Business anager.....................

Assistant Businesst Manager...

Circulation Manager...............

Assistant Circulation Manager

Literary Editor.........................

Assistant Literary Editor........

Society Editor............................
Assistant Society Editor.........


............ JOHN OHLSON

......GAYLE McGUIGAN

...RAUL G. DE PAREDES

..........CARLOS MILLER

.......ELLIOTT MONACO

.......CHARLES JACKSON

........ ......ANNA SAPHIR

-MARGARET BARDELSON

.. GERTRUDE HARRISON
.........MARJORIE QUINN


Exchange Editor......................
Assistant Exchange Editor........
Alumni Editor............. ...
. l- i if A rtist ....... .... .......... ..........
Asistant St. lf Arti .............
Bo.s' Athletic Editor.. ............
Assiojant Boys' Athletic Editor
Girls' Athletic Editor.............
Assistant Girls' Athletic Editor-

Staff pixrt.........................
!.'a f JA di' or. ..... ..................


....-...... ELVA SMITH
...........JESSIE BANAN
.-.........JOHN FRENCH
....CHARLES PALACIO
.....ALAN PETERSON
...........JOSEPH WOOD
.CHARLES RODGERS
.........RAE NEWHARD
.AMELIA HUTCHINGS
....ELSBETH IIh.l.f 1-.
.......MR. COLLINGE


4 I`f
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S Whe Zoni
M-^3II 1 A'llUl-a fs


aluCil~







46 fle Ohl!/7












* 0

FOREWORD *
* 0
* 0



S j[S graduation draws near, many plans are being made by the Seniors. Everyone *
*' J assures himself that he is going to succeed in life. a
* Two courses usually are open to the alumni-furthering their education in ,
*. college, and work. The greater number choose the latter.
* Most of the Balboa High School alumni who decide to work remain on the
Isthmus-some in the employment of companies in Panama, others in the Ad- -
* ministration Building, and still others in the Balboa Shops. .
* In colleges and Universities in the States the alumni of this school are well
* represented. Annapolis, Tufts College, Michigan State University, Oshkosh
S State Normal School, Georgia Tech, Tulane University, Iowa State University,
Columbia, Brooklyn Polytech, Villanova, and the University of California, are .
S but some of the well-known schools attended by them.
But no matter who or where they are, these alumni will never forget the ileas-
_. ant times spent in High School-the class meetings, the parties, the plays.
John French, '27

* 0. '._-. @f
* 0aaa~~g~~a ~ ~CR99~sDs










~i~1Iz


The Zonian


"I'LL TELL THE \WORLD)-"
says John French
i4 Ic


We Give Him an "Old-Time" Send-Off-
"You all remember William 'Lonnie' Van
Siclen, secretary of the class of '27 and business-
manager of the '27 Zonian. Apprentice machinist
now, he plans to continue his education after
four years.
"Russel Jones-surely you remember 'Rusty'-
Senior class-president of '27 and basketball star.
He becomes a Brooklyn Polytech rah-rah boy in
September.
"Who is that with Russell? Why, Juanita
Orr, of course! What do you think Balboa High
made of Nita? A banker? No-but almost.
She's a stenographer in the National City Bank
of Panama.
"The Shops draw 'em. George Gregory, '25,
has been working as an apprentice machinist
sincehigh school days, and he says it's a lot
harder than working in high school. We agree;
aren't our happiest days spent in school? Andrew
Whitlock, of '24, is another apprentice-a drafts-
man.
"Frances Brown, '27, works at Gorgas Hospital
as a stenographer. Francs. by the way, was
society editor of last year's Zonian.
"Who's playing for the next dance? Why,
Banan's Orioles. Leslie, you know; '27.
"Let's see. This is that fellow who was the
star swimmer of the high school when he was
there. What is his name? Fred Helmerichs, '27,
of course, who is still swimming and winning
fame. He is another of those running the Isth-
mus from the Administration Building. As it
does Leslie, but even more so, high school still
attracts Fred.
"A quiet, unassuming brunette. Why, it's
Dora Watts, '27, another of those workers on
the Heights. The spacious Administration Build-
ing seems to draw graduates as a magnet draws
iron tilings. for here are Hattie Belle Rader,
famous for her high school poems, Louis Hack,
and Oliver Schroyer, all of '26.


"Do you remember Constance Graff and
Robert Engelke of '24? They used to go together.
Now they're t.1 cther for life, for they have mar-
ried and have a son. Bobby says the future will
see a great basketball player. Like father, son.
"The main star in the Mask and Wig Club is
Richard Moore, '24. Stage-director, husband
(Whom? Mary Hearne, '24), father. Yes, sir;
that's a beautiful baby.
"Tall 'Sully' Sullivan, '25. Beautiful Emily
Conley, '26. Mliarrid. Happy.
"I'll have to hurry. Packing, you know. I
see Eloise Lull and Mary Alice McManus, who've
been post-graduating with me this year. And
there's Ruth Johnson, '27, who has come over
from Gorgas Hospital-X-Ray work, you know.
Mary McConaghy, '26, I think, is with her; in
fact Mary is doing stenography at Gorgas, too,
in addition to looking after her home in Balboa.
"Is that Marion Daniels, '27? So she's back
from New York. Memories of the Zone were
too strong, I suppose. Katherine Sundquist,
too: moved from the high school office to Eastman
Kodak in Panama.
"Aviator Greene, '27. Not any more. He's an
architect in Panama, where you'll find Paul Duran,
'23. And the tall boy in engineer's boots? James
Driscoll, '26, is civil enginecrinng. to be sure. Hal
Cooper, '27, got the inspiration that started him
out at the Mir.i lorte Filtration Plant from one
of Mr. Northrup's observation-trips, I don't
doubt.
"Mrs. Ted Scott? I confess I'm at a loss.
Janice Grimison, '27, of course!


II 1E







48


9~e 29o enn


"And there's Eugene Cloud, '27, who's been
prepping for West Point. That gob is John (Reds)
Russey, '26, from U. S. S. 'Rochester'.
"It'll take some plain and fancy diving if I'm
to get away in time. I could use the skill
of Angela Klemmer. By the way, she's a steno-
grapher for the accounting department, Mechan-
ical Division."


He Boardsy the Transcontinental--
"Corozal. There's Frances Smith! Good lu-
"Cristobal. James (Irishman) Doran, '27,
and Forest Cheeseman. They're working for
the United Fruit Company."
He Peekr at Higher Education--
"Tulane University, New Orleans. Earl Dailey


and his mother ought to be easy to find. They
live together near the campus. Home quiet for
studies must be the stuff, for Earl is burning'em
up, I hear.
"The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,
wouldn't be quite the same without Richard and
Agnes Johnson, '27. Richard is putting the same
effort into his studies that he put into last year's
Zonian. Agnes is going him one better, they say.
"Hard to leave, but there's Iowa City and the
University of Iowa. I want to see Stanton, '27,
and Florence, '26, Petcrson.
"Oshkosh, b'gosh! Oshkosh Normal. Now
where's Robert Robinson, '27?
He Ends His Tour with a "Lindy"-
"This Cali, Colombia, is certainly a beautiful
city. I'll walk around town. Well, well! Old
Elias Mihalitsianos. How are you, anyhow?
Still sheiking? And the fruit business?
"I say! That was a real trip. Take it some
time. In imagination, anyhow. And when it's
all over, there's that added pleasure, as there was
for me-to set foot in Balboa again."










Phe 9onitn f49

























ITEI.ATUqF IS THE ONLy HISTOy,

THE EXPRESS0tn 0 THE HUMAN Sou..
OF LIFE IN*OD ..ITS TWO TESTS
oF TiuTH AND ARE IT5 UNIVERSAL
BEAUTY- ITIS INTEREST AWD ITS
THE wRITTEN ,pS0NAL STYLE.
SpECORIT-D OF HM% I.5 OBJECT IS TO
THOdC-HTS-E"OTioNS DIEL I.HT U5 AND To
(4 NO TH E SOUL oF
AS TH raORSo-- qAN RATHER THAN
IS THE HIstoR 15 ACTIONS ......









! iS S








50 jhe Z0onlan














* 0
S FOREWORD
* 0
40h .c a A


OUR revered Editor-in-Chief said, "Your department is limited." Behold the
A result. In place of the usual short-story contest a literary contest was held.
Mrs. K. Abernathy, Mrs. B. Lee, and Mr. C. Calhoun kindly consented to act as
judges. They made their selections on the grounds of literary value only, disregard-
ing errors in grammar and spelling. (Luckily for some people!) "Yellow" by a Sopho- 0
more, if you please, Janice Conard, took first place. The Seniors, however, won in
4 points for they took second and third places with "The Return of the Citizen of
the World" by Gayle McGuigan and "The Head-Hunters' Secret" by Thatcher
Clisbee. According to the judges "Picture Punches" by Robert Erlenkotter best
S fulfilled the requirements of a short-story. We are proud of our budding young poets.
* Aren't you?
8 1 Anna Saphir, '28
~t .largaret Bardelson, '28
a
S^*.#-^& ^^^S ^^^ ftte ^^^a ^-^-^ff~ft^ ^^^









9~/ze Z~onhin


YELLOW
Janice Conard '50


Above the roar of the sea he heard the two
Chinese shout directions to one another. His
head bumped sharply against a corner of the
locker and the small oil stove knocked itself
loose and fell near his feet as the boat lurched.
The lantern attached to the mast had long ago
been put out by the blinding sea spray and the
two Chinese boatmen no longer knew they had
a passenger in their concern for their own lives.
Dave drew the canvas closer around him and
shut his eyes. Wave after wave set the small
sampan at an angle. The stove had by this time
been washed overboard and the boy was momen-
tarily lodged against the side of the frail boat.
One of the men tripped over him on his way to the
stern but did not pause. Dully Dave heard to
his left the breakers as they crashed against the
coral reefs; they were being washed nearer-the
pounding surf grew louder and louder. The
boat seemed to stand on its nose only to sink
into some deeper hollow. The spray drenched
the canvas and, shivering, he wondered why he
was huddled there and how soon the waves
would completely cover them.


Suddenly his knees ceased shaking and re-
laxed, but his arms still clung to the broad plank
by which he kept himself from being washed
headlong into the sea. Slowly his mind turned,
seemingly too numbed by his fear of the storm
to any longer hold to the present.
He was once more in his father's house, buried
in a book, at one end of the long flower-filled
lanaii. He saw far below him the many colored
roofs of Honolulu, its surrounding hills, some
drenched in sunshine, some in rain. He looked
across the bay at Diamond Head, barren-topped
and pointing out to sea. Gradually the scenes
became less pleasant. He was walking up the
path at Punahow, climbing wearily to sit beside
the lily pond. The shadow slowly moved on the
sun dial close by and just as a breeze stIr.ed the
lily pads, down the hill ran h's tormentors shout-
ing, "Yellow, Yellow." They remembered the
time he had been afraid to shinny up the coconut
tree after a native who teased him-the time he
had shivered at the sight of a harmless snake.
They knew he lacked the courage to do the things
they did and when he was afraid to ride the surf


E


m








52 A f t he Zonri n


at Waikakii they called him "Yellow". He had
been afraid to approach the Blow Holes on the
leeward side of the island where the sea washed
up with the force of a giant water gun through
a small hole in the rocky shelf. His tormentors
only laughed and gaily. showered themselves
under this giant spray, then teased him-"Yellow,
Yellow." What matter if his father was the
x, ealthiest man on the island if he had no courage?
Another time he saw himself standing afraid
on the beach at Halicvva; afraid to go near the
great waves that washed his tormentors tumbling
at his feet yelling at him--"Yellow, Yellow." He
was afraid; he was yellow.
Now he saw their leering faces as they dared
him, double dared him to show them he was
not yellow, that he was not afraid to do some of
the things they did. He was tagging along with
them his tormentors, loitering with them along
the docks. Now they had stopped as if having
nothing to do but to tease him. One of them
molded some black gum into the shape of a worm
and dropped it down his back and when he
wiggled and frantically reached for it th-y
laughed and shouted--"Yellow!" Something h :d
happened then-a thing that didn't belong to
him but a thing that had to come of all this
misery, this yellowness. He had stood up straight
and gritted his teeth; he had said he would do
something even they were afraid to do. Then
pointing to a rickety sampan docked near them
and looking straight at the two Chinamen dressed
scantily and cursing at each other as they ate
their evening rice, he said he would go with
them to Moleki, to the leper island, that night.


He again saw them laugh and say "Yellow, Yel-
low"-he was only bluffing. Then astonished
they saw him going boldly up to the men, asking
them when they would return with their boat
from Moleki and what they would charge to
carry a passenger. Now he was sitting in one
end of the boat which had no cabin but simply
to canvas covered ends. Now he was hearing
the Chinamen conversing secretly to each other
-"they will split the money-rich man--easy."
Slowly he opened his eyes, gradually he loosed
his numbed fingers' grasp on the broad plank.
Now he rolled over on his back and stared blink-
ingly at the sun. Why was he lying torn and
chilled on the hot sands? Why was he not at
home? Then slowly he turned his eyes to scan
the sea, now calm and placidly lapping the
sand. His attention was caught by an object
washed up not far down the beach. It was a
boat, a sampan badly battered and its canvas
covering torn loose. His mind slipped back
to the storm, the waves, the fear of the ugly
night. He understood and only absently won-
dered what had become of the two Chinamen.
Dave knew that he had unconsciously clung
to the plank and thus come sately through the
storm. He wondered more interestedly what
was to happen to him now that he was on Moleki.
An ugly crab ran ov:r his erm, a wave reached
at h's feet. He did not draw back. But why
didn't he? Wasn't he yellow? Wasn't he afraid?
No! His father would find him; the crab was
nothing to tear. He was not yellow; he was not
afraid. How could he be after all that had
happened?


MORNING
Margaret Bardcl.on, '28
It has rained over night and this mornirg all thirds
Are carelessly glad as that bird with bright wir gs,
That chirps out his joy with his whole little heed,
Then dashes away like a gayly flung dart;
The sky is as pale as the silvery dew,
With just a faint hint of a slow-deep'nirg hue;
Not a blue like the smoke of the faraway hills-
Their color a peace and a longing instills;
There's a carpet new flung of the tender green grass,
Over which, with light footsteps, I laughingly rass:
Oh, 'tis good to be living and breathing and here,
After the very first rain of the year.









Ffhe aOnlan l


THE RETURN OF THE CITIZEN OF THE WORLD
(After the Manner of Goldsmith)
Gayl/ .1lcGui)iin. '28


Lately I accompanied my friend in black to a
theatre where entertainment of that sort that is
gaining favor in my country was being given. The
A.mericans give this amusement ihe harsh-sound-
ing name of the movie, or the moving pictures,
though some of them who affect knowledge and
culture call it the cinema.
On entering I was struck by many differences
between this theatre and the movie halls of my
own country. After we had reached our seats I
commented on them to my companion in black.
"I noticed as we came in," I said, "that this edi-
fice bore a great resemblance to those royal homes
I have seen on my travels. It was large and well-
proportioned, with many turrets and spires that
seemed to reach towards the sky. As I noticed
that the floors we trod on were of marble, that
several of the rooms were covered with costly rugs
and the walls with tapestries and paintings that
were, even to my eyes that are so ignorant of art,
from the hands of masters, I asked myself, 'What
can this place be?' When we entered the inner
rooms and were so courteously received by those
liveried guards who escorted us through magni-
ficent rooms and halls filled with beauty and splen-
dor, I asked myself as I now ask you, 'Can this
be the palace of some unfortunate mandarin who
has been so cruelly mistreated by Chance that he
has been compelled to stoop to using his ancestral
home for a public amusement hall?"'
My friend in black smiled and answered me most
courteously, "No, this building was erected for
the purpose to which it is now put. It is one of the
foibles of our people to believe that such outward
show will insure excellent entertainment within.
They are impressed by costly furnishings at all
times and prefer to stand crowded together (as is
often the case) in the midst of luxury to sitting
comfortably in drab surroundings."
He stopped, for the entertainment was begin-
ning. A news-reelappeared, and I was ovrrin'fed
to see some scenes of my native land, though
grieved that the events pictured on the screen
were of violence and desolation. While this new,-
reel was being shown I glanced about curiously


and was somewhat shocked to observe many
couples engaging in what is known in the vernac-
ular as petling. Those who participated in this
were seemingly shameless, as the obscurity of
the theatre was not such that rendered it difficult
to observe them. No one seemed to pay any
attention to them, and when I later remarked
on this to my companion and asked him if it were
the custom for chaperons to overlook these things
he answered, somewhat to my surprise, "Those
couples were not accompanied by chaperons.
Such guardians are rarely found today, and that
caressing and fondling is so common that no one
notices it much any more." I knew, of course, that
in my own country many of those belonging to
the class known as Young China are said to indulge
in such thirgs. but I did not give it credence and
believed that even if it were so the higher class
did not do it. I did not believe that even in Ameri-
ca, which is reputed to be ihe cint Ir, f the "modern"
life, would such things be found.
There was only one thing pictured that interested
me very much. There was shown an immense am-
phitheatre capable of holding many thousands of
pcople-the number given was one hundred and
fifty thousands; but I did not believe this, thinking
it was one of the exaggerations so dear to the
American people. In the center of this huge sta-
dium was a little square looking about as big as a
small match-box. I was about to ask my com-
panion to what use this was going to be put when
there was flashed on the screen:" The 'Battle
of the Century' takes place here on the twenty-
second." I was wondering what battle could take
place in so small an area when the answer was
shown on the screen: "The Champion working
out." Two men were shown dancing about and
strikingateach llher ilh theirhands, which were
muffled by large, mitten-like pillows. I was won-
dering why anyone could be fascinated by such
a tame sport when I saw "The Challenger",
who was striking a small bag suspended from a
table top; and then I knew. The play of muscles
was beautiful, and I was pleased to find that the
American people were so appreciative of beauty









~?the Zobian


of figure and muscle-development that they would
pay large sums of money to see them.
Then a comedy was shown, though I found but
little to laugh at in it. Among the things that pro-
voked laughter was the sight of a dignified gentle-
man slipping on a banana-peel and falling heavily
to the ground. I do not understand this American
sense of humor, since this sight inspired pity and
sympathy in me, not mirth. In the same manner
they laughed at a poor unfortunate who backed
into a stove and burned himself; and at a drunkard;
both objects of pity, not ridicule. A scene which
caused my companion in black to laugh was an
incensed lady leading away by his ear her husband
who had been gazing on a pretty maiden. I con-
sidered that she should have been applauded, not
laughed at.
There was one thing that rather offended me
in this comedy. A laundry was the scene of some of
the action, and one of the workers was the object
of much laughter. This man, who was of my own
race, was shown ironirg, and at intervals he would
fill his mouth with water and squirt it over the
clothes. This man did not have the face of a
coolie and it was evident that he was of the
upper classes. I was shocked that one showing
such evidence of breeding should have lowered him-
self to the role of coolie, a role that ridiculed his race.
After this comedy the lights flashed on and some
beautiful tableaux, representing, I was told, scenes
,from the photoplay about to be given, were pre-
sented. Then appeared a troupe of acrobats from
our neighbor, Japan, who earned a round of ap-
plause from the audience. A series of beautiful
dances was now given and I began to wonder what
would next be placed before our eyes when a young
woman stepped before us. I heard she was a
young woman who had recently won a divorce
from her millionaire husband. The details of this
trial, I was told, were so lurid that they were kept
from the public. "What kind of nation can this
be," I asked myself, "where women who in China
would be social outcasts, of such character that
to be seen in their company would be social sui-
cide, are among the chief attractions of a theatre?'


At last the main picture was shown. It was a
production of unusual beauty. In this picture I
found that many of the things with which I had
found fault in the comedy were lacking, and there
was but one piece of adverse criticism I could
make: it was too sentimental. "The American
public," my companion in black told me when
I questioned him about this later, "likes its pic-
tures so, for no matter how sophisticated they
may be and no matter how much they try to pre-
tend they don't, every one of them down in his
heart is idealistic and sentimental to some degree
at the very least." "Behind us sat a woman and her
two little sons. This woman persisted in reading
aloud the titles and made me very uncomfortable.
After a time, however, I noticed several grown
people reading aloud and I thought, "How kind
these Americans arel Those who can read take pity
on their less fortunate companions and tell them
what the titles, or rather subtitles, say." Imagine
my surprise when my friend in black told me the
next day that all the adults in the audience could
read. I then said, "I thought the audience suf-
fered these persons to read so that those who were
unable to could more completely enjoy the pic-
ture; but I now wonder that the audience could
stand it, and that the offenders could be so rude.
As for the mothers who read to their offspring, they
should know it their children cannot read they can-
not understand what the titles mean after they are
read."
My companion answered, "The audience does
not suffer it willingly; but after requesting silence
several times they stop rather than make a scene,
for those who offend in this respect are usually
persons of the lower class who dearly love
trouble."
I noticed that the picture ended with kiss on
the part of the hero and heroine which lasted
some moments, and I recalled that in China the
kisses on the screen are "cut" at the moment the
lips of the actors touch.
We left the theatre, at the close of the show, in
a flood of humanity, and parted-I to go to my
hotel; he, I know not where.


54









tThe Zonian


THE HEAD-HUNTERS' SECRET
Thatcher Clisbee, '28


There was a moment of strained silence as Jim
Blair finished his story, and then big Ed Brown
broke into a loud laugh which was echoed by
everyone in the room. Jim blushed but held his
ground and good-naturedly listened to the com-
ments that his story had aroused.
"If you fellows don't believe it," he said, "you
don't have to. It's the truth even if you won't
recognize it."
"Of course we believe you, Jim dear; how could
we help but believe such a perfectly plausible
story?" This from Ed Brown.
It was at this moment that Frank Havil hap-
pened into the Club. Seeing Jim Blair, one of
his closest friends, in our little group, he strolled
over, took a chair, and listened with a smile to the
fellows "ride" Blair. One of the world's richest
men, Frank Havil, but, for all of his money, one
who was always getting odd jobs here and there
and for a time disappearing from the face of the
earth, only to bob up unexpectedly in New York.
'He had only been home three months now from a
four-year trip to-no one but himself knew where.
After a time even the most persistent of the
jokers got tired of "riding" Blair and a hush fell
over the group. The long silence was at last broken
by Havil.
"Strange as it may sound," he drawled, "that
story of Blair's was absolutely truthful."
"Oh come off. You don't expect us to believe
anything as far fetched as that, do you?" It was
Ed Brown, the unbeliever, again.
"Many truths," Havil went on, without bother-
ing to answer Brown, "sound like the worst sort
of fabrications. That story of Blair's, for instance.
I would be inclined to scoff with the rest of you
if I hadn't seen the thing happen."
He paused, but no one said anything; even Brown
was silent.
"There are times," he continued, "when even
that old saying 'Seeing is Believing' won't work
at all. I've seen things in the past four years
that I could hardly believe, things that have
stumped our modern scientists."
He stopped for a moment to light acigarbefore
continuing his narrative.


"I left New York, April 16, 1924, on one of
the Grace Line boats. I had no particular des-
tination; in fact I intended to travel around
through the South American countries. On the
boat I met a young fellow by the name of Pa-
trick Kelley and we became quite friendly. He
was bound for Peru, where he had a job with the
National Railroad as a surveyor. Well, to shorten
the story a bit, when Kelley disembarked at ...
I was right with him. I didn't have any trouble
getting a job and the next week when the party
left I was right with them as a full-fledged sur-
veyor. We went deep into the jungle and at
last came to the Head-Hunters' district. Most
of the party were for turning back at once as we
had gone deep enough and it was dangerous to
go further. Young Kelley, however, was all for
pushing ahead.
"'While we're in here we might as well get all
the dope we can,' was the way he put it and he
wouldn't budge an inch. In the end a wild old
Irishman named Reiley, one native, and myself
decided to stay with him. We took most of the
remaining provisions, a few trinkets (such as
beads, etcetera) that we were carrying for the
Indians, plenty of ammunition for our guns and
pushed ahead.
"We had been gone from the other party two
days when we met the Head-Hunters. Our first
introduction to them was when about fifty.
suddenly popped up from the bushes all around
us. Our native took one look and collapsed,
and the rest of us weren't much better off. For
the first time in my life I was really frightened;
I had visions of my head, shrunken to the size
of a tea cup, dangling from some native hut.
Young Kelley, however, kept his wits and step-
ping forward raised his hand. One of the Head-
Hunters detached himself from the group around
us and strode forward. He was, I later learned,
the big chief. He stopped about five steps from
Kelley and began talking in a meaningless jargon.
Kelley waited until he had finished and then he
dug into his knapsack and brought out an old
revolver and several trinkets which he gravely
presented to the chief. The chief was delighted


I







56


ffhe ZonU.n


with the gifts and we were escorted to a native
village that was to become our base of operations
for the next three years. We were regarded as
friends; in fact we were treated like members
of the tribe. It was impossible to converse with
them until about a year later, for we couldn't
understand them and they couldn't understand
us. However, we made up a system of signs that
worked great until we learned the language.
"Have any of you ever tried learning a new
tongue without books, without some one to in-
terpret foryou, without any way to understand it?
"Take it from me, that's the hardest job in the
world. Even with the simplest of languages it's
hard; there's no way of starting. Young Kelley
learned fastest of us all and what he learned he
taught us. (Reiley and I.) He had a cool, level
head and nothing could please him. He became
the god of one of the old Indians. Why, the
fellow worshipped the very ground Pat Kelley
walked on! It was through this Indian, Kelley's
Friend we called him, that we learned how the
Head-Hunters shrunk heads. I don't doubt
that you've seen or heard about these shrunken
heads so I won't stop to explain the process just
now. Kelley's friend introduced us to many
strange superstitions and a few secrets but the
biggest secret of all was the grass that makes
teeth grow.
"We first heard of the grass that makes teeth
grow while we were sitting around the fire one
evening. Old Reiley, whose bad teeth were a
constant pain to him, was complaining of a tooth-
ache. The Indian sat and watched Reiley for
awhile and then he began to tell us about a certain
grass he knew of, a grass that if chewed would give
one a new set of teeth. Kelley and I looked at
each other and burst out laughing. Reiley didn't
laugh. He was ready to try anything to get rid
of the pain, and he plied the Indian with questions.
Kelley's friend, however, wouldn't say any more;
to tell the truth he seemed afraid because he had
told us that much. But he couldn't put old Reiley
off and by the end of the week he had agreed to
get the grass. It had cost Reiley an old rifle and
a revolver, for he had to pay Kelley's Friend and
also the chief. That evening Kelley's Friend dis-
appeared and didn't show up until four days later.
He gave Reiley the grass and instructions for its
use. When I heard those instructions I was darn


glad I wasn't after a new set of teeth, for they went
something like this:
"Take this piece of grass and chew it for about
half an hour. Take the chewed grass from your
mouth and put it into a gourd of warm water.
Rinse your mouth with this water and after
rinsing the mouth spit the water back into the
gourd. Do this for ten days using the same
water. Do it just after supper.
"Reiley started that night and Kelley and I
razzed him quite a bit. But we were due for the
shock of our lives; on the morning of the seventh
day one of Reiley's teeth dropped out and by the
ninth day all of his teeth were gone. Kelley and
I were dumfounded and Reiley was the happiest
man on earth. Again that evening the Indian
disappeared and this time he was gone nine days.
Reiley nearly went crazy waiting for him; every
day seemed a year. Well, Kelley's Friend finally
got back and gave Reiley a different kind of grass.
Instructions were a bit different: Reiley was to
chew the grass morning and night for fourteen days.
Reiley started immediately and Kelley and I,
both of us plainly skeptical, watched with interest.
"The fourteen days passed with no sign of teeth.
Reiley was beginning to look anxious and Kelley
and I were smiling sly smiles. But we smiled too
soon. On the morning of the nineteenth day the
whole village was awakened by wild shouts. We
rushed out and found Reiley dancing, jumpirg,
and howling with joy, for there in the veryfront
of his mouth was a little, white, hard lump.
A tooth! A month later Reiley was parading
all over the village with a new set of teeth and
Kelley and I were silenced forever. We offered
the Indians anything they desired for some of the
grass to take out of the jungle with us but they
refused every offer and, as our time was up, we
bade adieu to our Indian friends and trekked back
to- Reiley and Kelley will be here next week
and I'll bring them around and they'll tell you all
about it."
Havil stopped and looked around the circle of
interested faces.
"So you see", he drawled as he rose to leave,
"after seeing a miracle like that I can't help bitt be-
lieve that many of these so-called fish stories have
a background of truth. Can you blame me?"
We couldn't. Can you?









Sg Z~onn 57


ALONE

Margaret Bardelson, '28

Strange how alone we are in the world.
I have friends of a sort,
Yet never, never have I really known them,
Or they me.
They can't; I'm myself, a secret being,
Living in the world with others, meeting others-
Yet all the while there is in me
A something that no one can ever know.
I am alone.










~-~---- -





MY DREAM HERD

Frances Lewis, '30

I like to lie in the meadow,
Gazing dreamily at the sky
And watch the woolly cloud-lambs
That skip so merrily by.

The breeze is the tender shepherd
Who watches them all day long,
While the whispering trees below them
Sing a soft and joyful song.

I wish that I might follow
Those cloud-lambs on their way,
And leave my earthly discontent
To play as the cloud-lambs play.









-he Zonian


PICTURE PUNCHES
Robert Erlenkotter, '29


The office boy entered.
"Mr. Gibson! A guy with the name of Pedrc
Angel Vasquez wants to see you."
"Whdt's he look like?" I asked, being one
jump ahead of the law most of the time.
"Well, he got spats and one of those trick
mustaches and, say boss, I've seen his pictures
lots of times in 'Screen Scraps'. He's one of
those big guys in Hollywood."
'"Slmo\ him in. I'll take a chance," said I, as
I took my feet off the desk, put on my coat and
swept the cigar ashes into an empty drawer.
The door opened and I met the best dressed
man in Hollywood, judlging from appearances.
"Good morning, Meestar Geebson," said he.
I just stared. "Here ees a contract' for your
pugileest K. O. Finnegan for appearing in one
peecture under my management. Sign on thees
line."
I have seen only about ten pictures in my life,
but I know that no one would pick my K. O.
for any Rudolph Valentino, drunk or sober. How-
ever, I had presence of mind to ask how much he
would draw.
"Twenty-fife thousand dollars", was the an-
swer. I gasped, dove for my pen, and signed my
name before he could change his mind. I then
showed him out.
Well, I'm getting ahead of my story. I. used
to be one of the best in my class until I grew too
old to fight. Now I manage a string of fighters,
splitting fifty-fifty on all cash. I hit a lucky
break when I met K. O. Finnegan. At the time
I first saw him he was boxing under the name
of "Six-Second" Bollingsworth, being born Percy
Bollingsworth. He dropped the prefix soon after
this on the suggestion of the sport-writers who
declared he never spent six seconds in the ring
before being knocked-out. His face is what
made me christen him Finnegan as no man called
Percy could have it. A bullet head, flanked by
two cauliflower ears, an oft-smashed nose and a
prominent jaw were its chief characteristics.
However, those days are gone and he is now
champion of his class, but just as dumb and hand-
some as ever.


When he came into our flat that night, I ac-
quainted him with our success.
"So I'm a movie actor," he replied. "Well, I'll
see about that!"
"Remember the girls, kid", said I, knowing
his weakness.
"That's right. When do we start?"
About two weeks later we arrived in Hollywood,
not welcomed by any cheering crowds. We got
to the lot safely and went straight to Vasquez's
office. He showed us the scenario. It ran like
this. The hero, a fellow named Barclay is in love
with Peggy Joyce, the super-star. Her father is
on the verge of bankruptcy. Barclay substi-
tutes in a championship fight and, after taking
terrible punishment for nine rounds, knocks the
champ out in the tenth. He thereby clears old
man Joyce's debts and marries the daughter.
The next day was a trying one for me as I had
to steer K. O. clear of the girls. That night after
putting him to bed safely I went over to Vas-
quez's home and asked him to pull the fight off
quickly so that I could leave HI oll y'\od before
going crazy. He agreed to "shoot" it the follow.
ing day.
At last I got K. O. to his corner and explained
the coming fight in great detail to him.
"Pull your punches, Kid. Make 'em look
good but don't put any force into them or you'll
kill Barclay. Then in the last round take one
on the jaw and get knocked out. See?"
Vasquez came up just then and said, "Always
let Mr. Barclay look at the camera so eet can
catch his expressions.
Barclay who had just come in looked terribly
weak and un-conditioned, so I reiterated my
warnings to K. 0. about hitting hard.
Thefirst round was surprising if not astound-
ing. K. 0., trying to keep the star facing the
camera, took one on the point of the chin and
went down and out! He got up rather dazed
and rushed Barclay. Then we had some of the
hardest fighting I have ever seen, in the next
ten minutes. If K. 0. had not been dazed he
would have killed Barclay easily, but he used


58








~5f/ze


43~onian


no skill in his swings. I started toward the "I congratulate you and your boxer for the
ring to stop them, but Vasquez detained me, way you carried out my directions. Although
a light of great inspiration in his eyes. Finally not exactly to the letter they were satisfactory.
I could stand it no longer so I jumped into the We substituted the first round for the last one
ring and stopped the fight. Barclay collapsed, therefore it came out as planned. Enclosed
Seeing that our goose was cooked, I rushed find check for $25,000. This picture has been
K. O. into our dressing room and packed our criticised and pronounced the best boxing pic-
belongings. Then we caught the first train for ture of the age."
New York.
.New York. This is the first time I ever saw a bout fought
About a week after we arrived I received a let- ba s t it was gd neverthele
backwards but it was good nevertheless.
ter from Vasquez'which stated, in part:


~I-







S60U It I


HIGH-SPOTS
IN AMERICAN HISTORY


THE UNB er ROUND RAILROAD


FRAMING THE. -6NSTITUTIOI


HAVE YOU EVER SEEN


A BEACHCOMBER HARD AT WORK. A REAL BELLBOY?


AN OFFICIAL BOUNCER
ON THE JOB ?


-- I I ,,----









- -.r he Zonlanr,


NIGHT THOUGHTS
Gayle .l CGuijan. '28
The garden is bathed in splendor,
Touched by a master's hand;
The fronds of the palm-trees whisper,
Singing soft to the land-
And sea, where a path of glory,
Silver and straight and bright,
Runs out to enshroud a wraith-ship,
Wondrous with ghostly light.
A something arises within me;
I struggle to be free-
O! to stand up and be doing,
To face whatever may be!


~ ~

~C_


M









fhe Zonian


MYSTICISM
Anna Saphir, '28


In the darkened room, the my.stic bends over
his crystal. Suddenly:
A good-looking boy of fourteen years strolls
down a corridor. Poor boy, he has to wear a skull
cap, for the upper-classmen, to sooth their own
once-wounded vanity, have clipped off every bit
of his beautiful pompador. He appears to be
rather timid as if he were not quite familiar with
his surroundings. Yet he is defiant, too, since he
has been subjected to much razzing. Everybody
from Dad to baby sister calls him "scobie". Even
the teachers and the principal himself have a
terrible opinion of Freshmen. He is dutifully
carrying home an armful of books to study. Mr.
Steele, his home-room teacher, has impressed him
with the fact that he is no longer in grammar
school and must study to get his grades. Slowly
he passes out of view.
Goodness, there must be a fire somewhere!
This young fellow is certainly in a hurry. How
businesslike and efficient he seems. He is more
mature than the Freshman. Everyone realizes
that he can be depended upon. He is the Sophomore
Class President, business manager of the school
newspaper, and stage manager for the Follies which


the talent of the school is presenting. Nevertheless
he is on the honor roll. And if he isn't so popular
with the ladies, he does accomplish a lot in en-
couraging his class teams. With a glance at
his watch, the future financier briskly hastens
away to see to the sale of play tickets.
A blond young girl walks sedately over to a
bench in front of the school to await the next bus.
She has had a package delivered to her at school.
Unable to resist the temptation she again opens
the white box and tenderly examines for the tenth
time an exquisite dance frock. It is for the
Junior-Senior banquet, you know. She has waited
three long years to go to the'banquet. Naturally
disliking study, (it requires such effort), she has
just managed to make her grades. "C" isn't
such a bad mark, and she has had quite a number
of "B's"; never an "A" though. Well, anyway,
she is going to the banquet with Jimmy Brown
and expects to have a heavenly time. As she
steps into the bus she drops her history notebook
which she intends to complete when she arrives
home. She forgot to do it yesterday and it means
part of her history credit. Entirely unaware of
her loss, her thoughts are only of how pretty
silver slippers will be with her nice new dress,


62


fi


^TOp









9he Zonian


Swinging joyously along comes a pretty, viva-
cious girl. At last her Senior picture has turned
out decently and at last the class rings have come.
Admiringly she looks at the ring on her finger.
It is one nifty piece of jewelry. Suddenly she
sighs rapturously. Only three more months 'til
graduation. The thrill of it! Well, it has been
pretty hard work but it's worth it. Now for
college. She smiles in anticipation. Her trium-
phant happiness makes one smile in sympathy.
She is patronizing to members of the other classes
only in fun. Still smiling, the lovely brunette
jauntily continues on her way to play practice.
Standing in the front of a very large room in
which many students are studying, or are supposed
to be studying, is a young woman, evidently the
teacher in charge. She is not especially pretty
but has a very sweet face. Her dress and actions
give proof that she has excellent taste. In spite
of the fact that she is shy to such a degree that
she would rather write an announcement on the
black board than make it orally, she has complete
control over the roomful of restless pupils. Her
concern over unusual disturbances shows that she


is very sensitive and conscientious. Suddenly
a note flies through the air and falls almost at her
feet. The paper is open and she cannot help
but read its contents, blushing furiously as she
does so: ",liss Vanderlip is a darling. She's
adorable when she speaks. No wonder every-
body in this school loves her!" Miss Vanderlip
is this very teacher.
This scene fades out only to have appear a
man with an officious air. It is the Principal!
He is of dark complexion and wears an immacu-
late white linen suit. To the grade-school children
he is terrifying. High School boys do their best
to get in his good graces for he is inclined to make
mountains out of mole hills when they do wrong.
The girls are very pleasant to him for they are
secretly a little afraid of him. He is bluff, hearty,
pretending to be sterner than he is. One realizes,
however, that he is capable of terrible things if
aroused. Self-confidence emanates from him.
His pugnacious jaw admits that he loves an
argument. A twinkling in his eyes reassures one
that he has a sense of humor. He is entering his
office-The crystal grows dim.






NIVAL


Virginia Ewing, '28

There was no moon to shed her charming beams;
The stars alone were left to shine and gleam,
And spread their luster o'er the happy scene.
The brightest colored lights encircled round
The terrace, looming stately o'er the sea,
That rolled her calm and lazy waves aground:
Not Life's bright hours, but Time's monotony.
Unthinking folk-that gay, enchanted crowd,
Enraptured by the tom-toms, mystic, loud,
E'er beating for a people mad and proud.


E







64


~?7e Zionian


7~7r


ON WITH THE LUNCH
Charles Palacio, '28


It is just 11.30 A.M. and the entire assembly is
in a state of fervid expectancy, for the noon hour
recess is at hand. Mr. McCommons, noted
educator and principal of our beloved alma mater,
is firmly planted at the front of the room and
dominates the assembly with his commanding
eye.
"Everybody calm down and be seated", he
orders genially. "Look around under your desks
and pick up all stray bits of paper, and don'f
miss the basket as you go out." Then, in a very
soldierly manner, (for he belongs to the R.O.T.C.).
he snaps, "STAND, PASS!" A mad rush follows
this last order, as some one hundred and fifty
hungry students attempt to crowd past the doors
in one bunch. You are jostled and elbowed
unmercifully in the scurry down the two flights
of stairs that lead to blinding sunlight and free-
dom.
You join your favorite clique of friends and
make haste to th" nearby cafeteria. Fifty feet
away from the cafeteria door some famishing
chap breaks into a run and shouts:
"Last one in is a dumb gazook!"
This calls for a momentary emulation of
Paavo Nurmi, so away we all go. ..... for, of


course, no one cares to be a "dumb gazook."
Once inside the cafeteria you must be an ex-
pert to keep your place, for your hungry class-
mates have lost their consciences. You adroitly
snatch a tray from the pile and put it on the run-
ner in record time. And here begins the real test,
the survival of the fittest. You, of course, are not
disconcerted by the shoving and pushing. the
clattering of dishes and trays, the shouting,
chattering, and gossiping that sounds like Bedlam
let loose. Shouts of "On with the beans!", "Hey,
how do you get that way!" "Oh, that PIE!" do
not bother you in the least. An irresistible force
from the beginning of the line keeps your tray
moving rapidly, so you are on the look-out to
snatch your food from the counter as you pass by.
From a distance, your trained eye begins to search
for the biggest slice of pie, but you keep a watchful
eye on your tray lest some playful companion
slip some unwanted dish on it. Of course, being
an old hand at the game, you are not misled by
the price cards on the different dishes, for they
have very probably been switched by the chaps
before you. However, it is very pathetic to see
an innocent Freshman fall into the trap and pick
up some tempting dish marked five cents, only
to discover later when he receives his check that
it costs thirty-five cents.








- I -.e :-la -~


If you want an explanation for your friends'
frequent stomach-aches, look around and see
what they take. The fellow next to you has taken
two pieces of pie and a dish of ice-cream; the other
chap over there apparently does not like clam-
chowder, for he has only taken three bowls of it;
the one next to him has taken four orders of
french-fried potatoes, remarking, by way of
excuse, that it helps his French; and that other
little fellow who has taken two helpings of baked
beans claims that it reminds him of dear old
Boston. Ah, but look at what that fat girl has
taken: a few lady-fingers and a glass of iced-tea.
Apparently, someone is on a diet.
And then comes the eating of the lunch, a
spectacle that would make Emily Post weep
bitter tears of despair. One chap over there is
balancing peas on his knife; another is eating the
filling of his pie, to negotiate the crust later.


Of course, your eagle eye is still on your food,
unless you want to be choking on some choice,
morsel generously seasoned with double-hot red
pepper sauce, or sputtering briny water; two
common little pranks.
After you have completed your repast comes
the sad duty of paying the bill.
"Say, lemme two cents, will yuh?"
"Aw, go wash dishes, you cheap skate".
These trivial little transactions take place near
the cashier's desk, and are usually effected, but
not until the borrower has been forced to cross
his heart, give his Scout honor, and swear by a
stack of bibles that he will repay the original
sum, plus some unheard-of interest. Everyone
then pays his check, grabs a handful of tooth-
picks, (free), and walks off complacently.


THE CRY THAT BUILT "OLD IRONSIDES"
Gayle McGuigan, '28
Ye say that we should pay tribute,
That we cannot afford to fight;
Ye say we are burdened with taxes,
That we must bow down to their might;
Our fathers fought for their freedom-
Can their sons do less than the same?
"Pay tribute" ye cry in council;
Shall we yield-to our lasting shame?
Our seamen enslaved and tortured,
And their flag an object of scorn;
Pay tribute unto their captors,
And leave shame to our sons unborn?
Our women are sold like cattle
To the lords of the Moslem horde-
Our hands and our hearts are willing;
How can we but take up the sword?







66

=WI


fhe Z onlan


FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE ZONIAN SUBMITTED BY THE BUSINESS
MANAGER
Receipts


Senior class treasury ..--..-.....
Advertising.. --------.........
Circulation ............ --------
Money found on street -.............-. ----.......
Refund on cigar coupons.....-...-........-------
Pawning of editor's watch............. ----.. --
Borrowed from Mr. Collinge .... ......-.....
Sale of exchange publications for wrapping paper.
Donations from charitable institutions................


..-$666.66
.. 89.41
S0.35
S0.04
1.15
S0.75
S0.10
.. 0.23
7.07

$1000.00


Expenditures


Publication costs ......................... ----- -..
Cuts............... ...........-........... ......
Pencils for correcting proofs.............---... ....- .............
Shoe leather for business manager .-....- ........... ---
1 Bottle of Corn Cure for business manager ......-............
Two barrels of soft soap for asst. business manager................
Loan repaid Mr. Collinge......-...... ................
Thinking cap for artist................ ..........--
Salaries for staff................... ............. -- .....
Graft ...... ...... ........... ........--..
Incidentals..........................


............ $346.92
.----- 267.89
--...- 14.14
--- 8.00
....- 8.00
.-...- 18.98
.-...- 0.10
--.... 0.14
... -......- 300.00
---....-.. 192.08
........- 84.55

$1000.00




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68 he onln
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O @
* FOREWORD
* 0
* O
s O

TIVING is co-operative. One of its most co-operative features is the exchange of
Sides. If this department enables us to know others and others to know us
S a little better it will have attained its goal.
B Elva Smith, '28.
0 Jersie Banan, '29
O 0
*gee0000000000000000@0000000000000000000000@










jfhe Zonian


a


Cardinal Notes,
Girls Commercial High School,
Brooklyn, New York
A book that is interesting throughout, with something
worth reading in every section. The cover designs and
also the artistic cuts within are especially deserving of
mention.

The Owl,
Wellsville High School,
Wellsville. New York
We admire your publication with its large readable
type and its very interesting sections; that covering ath-
letics is especially complete.

High School Recorder,
Saratoga Springs,
New York
A very interesting magazine. You are to be commended
for the thorough manner in which the subjects are present-
ed and arranged.

Oracle,
Jamaica High School,
Jamaica, New York.
We find your publication very interesting, especially
the editorials and book reviews. It is our opinion that the
appearance of your book would be enhanced if the front
and the text of your book were kept free from advertising
matter.

The Wah Hoo,
Alleghany High School,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Your cover designs for December and the one for March
were very attractive. Your literary department is en-
tertaining. Your exchange section could be enlarged.
Don't you think a few more cuts would add to your book?

The Cambridge Review,
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Your stories are excellent. We liked your page of car-
toons, but where are the snapshots?

The Ledger,
High School of Commerce,
Portland, Oregon
We certainly can't advise you to have more cuts for your


book is full of them. We like the way you introduce each
department with a picture. The drawings in your social
section are exceptionally good. "When we were very
young" is a novel idea. We have but one criticism to
make. Where is your exchange department?

Whillier iMiscellany,
Wilmington, Delaware
A trifle sedate. Why not have more cuts? Otherwise
we like it.

The O-High,
Oberlin, Ohio
We like your literary department. Your "Hot Air
Column" is amusing and could be enlarged. We suggest
that you include some cuts in your book.


R. H. S. Chip,,
Richmond, Vermont
A very good magazine. A few cuts would enhance your
publication.

Pen Dragon,
Lowville Free Academy,
New York
We liked your February cover design and we were not
disappointed with the contents of your magazine.

The Lantern,
Newtown High School,
Elmhurst, New York!
Your material is interesting. It must be the "Golden
Age of Literature" at Newtown High. Might there not be
room for more school life?

The Red and Blue,
Jenkintown High School,
Jenkintown, Pennsylvania
A splendid magazine, but too formal for this age. A
section of wit and humor would not detract from its in-
terest to the student world.


The Red and While.
Portland High School,
Portland, Vermont
We can appreciate your emphasis upon content not
decoration. But don't you think that an action cut, or
two would enliven the school life section?


~
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--










70 he Zonlian


Key,
Battle Creek, Michigan
You have a splendid literary department and your
stories are entertaining. Your editorials are well worth
reading.

The Slampede,
Sunset High School,
Dallas, Texas
You have an attractive magazine. We liked your "Me-
dicine Man" section. Your style and form are unique.


The Whisp,
Wilmington High School,
Wilmington, Delaware
A magazine that is well composed and interesting from
cover to cover. We especially liked your literary section
with its store of short stories and poetry. The originality
and style of cover designs are entitled to their share of
praise.


Hermes,
Hudson Falls High School,
Hudson Falls, New York
One of our best exchanges. Attractive cover, good cuts,
amusing cartoons and a splendid joke department. What
more could one ask?

The Erasmian,
Erasmus Hall High School,
Brooklyn, New York
Your athletic department is quite complete. Your
School Notes are very interesting. We suggest that you
increase the size of your joke department and also your
exchange.

The Argus,
Gardener High School,
Gardener, Massachusetts
You have a very nice magazine. Your classified list
of advertisers is a very good idea. A few snapshots of
school life would tend to liven up your book.


WHAT THEY SAY



The Zonian, can find nothing to criticise--Cardinal Notes, Girls Com-
One of our most interesting exchanges and one of the mercial High School, Brooklyn, New York.
finest year books received.-The Owl, Wellsville, New
York.
The Zonian,
The Zonian, What a good looking magazine we have here-attractive
To us it is a precious breeze that carries with it the cover, excellent contents, everything that makes a popular
scent of tropical flowers and a vision of lazily-lilting palms. magazine. The class history is deserving of praise as it is
"A Legend of Old Panama" and "The Iron Cross" are refreshingly original and contains in its conclusion an
but examples of the fine work that can be produced by appeal that goes over effectively. I suppose it is only
students with the incentive of a short story contest urging natural that both the class history and prophecy should
them on. This is a practice worthy of the attention of have the sea as backgrounds. The literary department
other high schools. Except for the fact that the Exchange shows cooperation of the students as do the cuts.-High
column might be done in a little more detailed way, we School Recorder Saratoga Springs, New York.


WE ACKNOWLEDGE


MAGAZINES


O-High, Oberlin, Ohio
Hitter Miscellany, \VW mingiton. Delaware
The Red and White, Rutland, Vermont
The Red and Blue, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania
The Lantern, Elmhurst, New York
The Cambridge Review, Cambridge, Massachusetts
R. H. S. Chips, Richmond, Vermont
Pen Dragon, Lowville, New York
The Ledger, Portland, Oregon


The AJgus, Gardner, Massachusetts
Erasmian, Brooklyn, New York
Key, Battle Creek, M\ichign
Hermes, Hudson Falls, New York
Wah Hoo, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Cardinal Notes, Brooklyn, New York
High School Recorder, Saratoga Springs, New York
Oracle, Jamaica, New York
The Whisp, Wilmington, Delaware


The Owl, Wellsville, New York











The ZoniQn


NEWSPAPERS


Orange and Black, Dearborn, Michigan
The Buzzer, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
The Red and Black, Salt Lake City, Utah
The Zanesvillian, Zanesville, Ohio
Maroon and White, Uniontown, Pennsylvania
The Orange and Black, Hanover H. S., Hanover, Pa.


Teacher-"All those who want to go to heaven when
they die, raise their hands."
(Johnny does not put up his hand).
Teacher-"Don't you want to go to heaven, Johnny?"
Johnny-"Not with that crowd."
-The Whisp, Wilmington, Delaware

Found on Freshman registration card-Name of Parents:
Mama and Papa.
-The Whisp, Wilmington, Delaware

THE FRAIL YOUNG THING

"She could swing a wicked dumbell,
She could fence and she could box,
She could row upon the river,
She could clamber up the rocks,
She could golf from morn till evening,
She could play tennis all day long,
But she couldn't help her mother,
'Cause she wasn't very strong."
-The High School Recorder,
Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

A doctor fell into a well
And broke his collar bone.
The doctor should attend the sick
And leave the well alone.
-The Lantern, Elmhurst, N.Y.

Have you heard the one about the absent-minded pro-
tessor who shaved the cat and kicked himself?
-The Lantern, Elmhurst, N.Y.

Doc.--"Do you know something nice is going around
about you?"
Adeline-"No, what is it?"
D9c.-"Just my arm."
-Hermes, Hudson Falls, N.Y.


The Cardinal News, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin
The Blue and Gold, Maiden H. S., Maiden, Mass.
Student Lantern, Saginaw, Michigan
The Black Diamond, Midland, Maryland
Washington Junior Hi-Lights, Honolulu, Hawaii
The Green and While, Parker Senior H. S., Chicago, Ill.
The Spud, Alliance, Nebraska


Father-"Now, my son, I don't know the word for
people in Latin."
Latin Student-"Populi."
Father-"Johnny, how dare you accuse your father of
lying?"
-The Oracle, Jamaica, N.Y.


When the donkey saw the zebra,
He began to switch his tail.
"Well I never," was his comment,
"There's a mule that's been in jail."
-The Wah Hoo, Pittsburgh, Pa.


A rush of air-
Dripping water-
A clash of metal-
And the old man finished his soup.


-The Ledqr, High School of Commece,
Portland, Oregon.



Clars StoneJ-Freshman, emerald; Sophomore, blarney
stone; Juniors grindstone; Senior, tombstone.
-The Ledger, Portland, Oregon.



There was a good man from Calcutta,
Who talked with a terrible stutta.
He screwed up his face
And he tried to say Grace
And he blew his false teeth in the butta.


-The Owl, Wellsville, N.Y.


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j J AASTYME with good company
S I love and shall untvll I dvc *
' 1--Middle .\1i. Author Unknown
May all the future classes graduating from Balboa High enjoy themselves
S as much as we have ourselves in our years here.
*w
*. Gertrude Ilarrison, '28
lMarjorie Quinn, '29
S0-
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SENIOR CHRISTMAS PARTY


On December 16 at the Y.W.C.A. the Seniors
gave their first party this year. Due to the com-
mittee's excellent forethought and preparation,
with the help of our advisor, Mr. Northrup, the
party will be remembered by all as one of the best.
When the time came for the fun to begin, each
person received some "fun-money" which was to
be used in order to participate in the various games.
The program of events was:
Snow Ball Battle
Sleigh Ride
Game-Rose and Lemon
Jousting Tournament
Cake Walk
Dempsey and Tunney Fight


After the above was given, good old Santa ap-
peared, and distributed to each person present a
bag of candy and nuts, a celluloid toy, and a horn.
Immediately after Santa had taken to his surf-
board, sandwiches, eskimo pies, and cookies were
served. The rest of the evening was spent in
dancing and noise-making.
Among the faculty enjoying themselves and
helping us to enjoy ourselves were Miss Mel-
gaard, Miss McMahon, Mr. McCommons, Mr.
Northrup, and Mr. Collinge.
When the last strains of Home Sweet Home had
ceased, everyone gave three cheers for Mr. North-
rup, our class advisor, and shouted his appre-
ciation of the best school party they had ever at-
tended.


CHRISTMAS CAROLS


On December 22 the parents of the students
assembled around the patio of the school. The
annual singing of Christmas Carols was led by Mrs.
Baker, and all selections were rendered very beau-
tifully. Both the Grammar and High School


students took part. "The Cantique de Noel"
was sung by David Smith of the eighth grade,
and the High School Glee Club sang "And the
Glory of the Lord," from "The Messiah."


JUNIOR ATHLETIC PARTY


The Juniors of Balboa High started their social
activities with an Athletic Party. This party
was given with the purpose of getting the Junior
Class together and incidentally to celebrate the
victory of the Junior Soccer Team of '28.
All those present were divided into groups of
four-the Reds, the Blues, the Yellows, and the
Greens. In all the games that were played dur-


ing the evening a score was kept of the winners,
and when the games were all over and the points
were counted the Reds had won. The leader of
the Reds team was presented with a Silver Cup
(made of tinfoil) with the inscription, "To the
Winners of 1928," written on the front.
Refreshments were served. The evening ended
with dancing.


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COLONEL CHARLES A. LINDBERGH


Colonel Charles A. Lindbergh was the guest of
the Isthmus from January 9 to 12. During the
first two days of his visit here he was the guest of
President Rodolfo Chiari, President of the Re-
public of Panama. January 11 was set aside for the
Pacific Side of the Canal Zone, and on January 12
he was entertained by the people of the Atlantic
Side.
"Lindy" was presented to the school children
here, and they responded with the following song,
words written by Hattie Bell Rader of the Class
of 1926 of B.H.S., and put to the tune of "Mis-
tress Shady":


Hello dear Lindy, our fearless Lindy,
We're glad to meet you and greet you now.
We hope you're hearing that we are cheering
For you, Sunday, M.\-.nd .,, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday,-
Hurrah for Lindy now!

Among the events of January 11 was the public
reception given on the Prado where Colonel Lind-
bergh expressed his desire for every Isthmian to
boost the establishing of "air-lines" from the
United States through Central America to South
America.


COLLEGE CLUB CARD PARTY


The beautifully decorated Union Club was the
scene of the Bridge Party given on January 14
by the College Club. During the afternoon de-
licious refreshments were served. When the play-


ers had finished their game, the one holding the
high score at each of the seventy-nine tables was
given a pair of dainty Japanese slippers.


JUNIOR AFFAIR


The second Junior social festivity was held at
the Y.W.C.A. FLt buarry 2. In the :,ir'y part of the
evening games were enjrnvld by all present. Dur-
ing the time between games there were dancing,
jokes, and humorous anecdotes told 1b some of
the guests.
The most interesting event of the evening was
the mock wedding. Miss Mcllaard took the part
of the bride and our good friend M r. Northrup was
the lucky bridgeroom. Mr. Collinge, because
of his innocent face and reverent ways, was
chosen the minister. The procession proceeded


solemnly around the hall to the strains of "Ace's
Death." Mr. Northrup p;lyd the nervous groom
to p.:rf-ctlcon and .Mi1s 1. Ig1aair could be point-
ed out as the model lluihirg bride. Mr. Collinge
read the service in a most ministerial fashion. It
he had not alrcandy picked his life's work we should
surely recommend the ministry for him.
After the services we were all invited to the
banquet supper to which no invitations were re-
jected. After the supper, as th1 hour was grow-
ing late, all the guests took leave of the newly wed
couple and wished them long life and happiness.







78


The 7onian


SUPPER CLUB TEA


A delightful tea was given on January 21 by
the High School Supper Club at the Y.W.C.A.
The program included some very well given se-
lections by students of the High School. Misses
Helen Morgan and Virginia Ewing sang a charm-


ing duet in Spanish, and following was a violin
solo by Katherine Sundquist. Helen Morgan and
Eloise Wilson sang some very beautiful solos,
and during tea Anna Saphir and Ruth Holzapfel
entertained us with their selections at the piano.


SENIOR SPECIAL BUSINESS MEETING


As all know, we Seniors, the most important
and brainy persons in the High School, possibly
excepting the "professors", have a great deal of
business to discuss and execute. During one of
our all-too-short class meetings in January, some
far-sighted pupil suggested a Special Business
Meeting for the Seniors, to be held some evening
from 7 o'clock until each one had had his chance
to express his views. This was to do away with


any old business that had been dragging along
for any length of time.
The date was set, but none would promise to
come unless there was more inducement than fiery
debates. To settle this, and get the ill-fed Seniors
to come, it was announced that a buffet-luncheon
would be served afterwards.
They came, were fed, conquered.


EXCUSES


The baseball games held on February 4 at
Balboa, and on February 11 at Cristobal, between
Balboa High School and Cristobal High School,
were not very encouraging for us. Nevertheless,
we heard a short time after the game here at
Balboa that the reason for our losing was due to
the interest of the players in the rows of rooting
"co-eds," whose charming encouragement de-
tracted the players. At Cristobal, however, the
reason was more obvious; the attention of all the
onlookers was given over to a wild peanut fight.


Mr. Collinge and Mr. Northrup, who received
some very severe injuries, needed the week-end
to recover.
That's all right, Balboa! Although we didn't
win the Baseball Series, we won the Peanut-Throw-
ing Pennant, and that rare sport, the art of which
is known only by our Champion Peanut-Throw-
ing Team, will continue in full sway during the
baseball season as long as its promoters, Messrs.
Northrup and Collinge, remain in our faculty.


--- -
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SENIOR LEAP YEAR PARTY


By far the most successful party given by the
school this year was the Senior Leap Year Party,
which was open to the entire High School. From
what the girls said I know they never had a bet-
ter time, and I'm sure the boys will never again
feel quite so important as they did that evening
when the young ladies arose and offered them a
seat, and asked if they cared for a drink of water.
At 8:00 o'clock on Friday, February 24, the
girls went to escort their gentleman friends to


the Yacht Club. During the evening the girls
asked for the dances and played the part of the
gentlemen.
While the waltzes were being played all the
lights were turned off, and just the moon shin-
ing over the waters of the Pacific illuminated the
dance floor.
At 11:30 all left reluctantly, but not before
they found that the orchestra positively would
not play another selection.


THE NAVY DIRIGIBLE "LOS ANGELES'


Ting-a-ling went the fire bell at 11.05 a.m. on
February 29. All classes stopped their work and
marched down stairs onto the school grounds.
Ten minutes later the graceful, silver dirigible
"Los Angeles" passed over Balboa.


The "Los Angeles," the Navy's largest dirigible,
came trom Lakehurst, N.J., and stopped at France
Field, C.Z. It was on her trip back north that
she passed over Balboa.


1928 CARNIVAL


This year's Carnival was well attended by the
students of Balboa High. Many of the boys and
girls got together and hired some trucks, dressed
in costume, and had a very enjoyable time.
Balboa High was also well represented in the
parade, the Canal Zone float being made up of


Seniors and one Junior. Those in the Canal Zone
float were:
Anna Bradney
Gertrude Harrison
Barbara Hallen
Elva Smith
Marjorie Quinn









^y /et 9 onian


"LELAWALA"


"Lelawala," an operetta dealing with an In-
dian tribe and some early English adventurers,
was very effectively staged by the High School
Glee Club.
This production was the first of its kind to be
presented by the pupils of the High School, and,
being entirely different in all aspects, was well re-
ceived by an immense audience.
The success was due largely to the efforts of
Mrs. Baker, the director of the Glee Club, and
music teacher of the Canal Zone schools, and to
Mrs. L.O. Keen who took charge of the dramatic
features of the operetta.
The following, the cast of characters, played
their parts to perfection:

Wokomis (Great Heart)..................Carlos Miller
Klolowar (The Singer) -.......................William Rader
Lelawala (Falling Waters) ..............Helen Morgan
Marpeetopah (Four Skies).............. Phillip Ycaza
Hintola (Blue Hair)........................Stella Price
Sowanas (South Wind) ................ Sam Gurney
Shungela (The Fox)............... ...Frank Young
Wacootay (The Shooter)............ ....George Daniels
Wambebe (The Eaglei Mai k Shapiro
\'anvecai (The Firellv I ........................Elsa Reimann
Napanee (The Brook) ..................... Chichi Lutz
Eagle Eeye..... ................. ............ Humberto Carvajado
Maior Wallce................................ Otto Helmerichs
MabeL- ........................... Virginia Ewing
Captain Bliss ................................William Rader


Clarinda Bond..
Sergeant Bilks_
Lord Tatler-.......
Accompanist_...


.Lucille Hearne
-Lars Ekwurzel
Harry Granberry
.Anna Saphir


English soldiers, Indian Hunters and members of the tribe
of the Oniahgarahs.


A synopsis is as follows:

Years before, during a famine, the Great Spirit
called for the sacrifice of a virgin. The chief's
daughter, Necia, volunteered and on a set day she
drifted over the Niagara Falls in a white canoe.
This appeased the anger of the Great Spirit, and
the famine was ended. Now, war was threaten-
ed upon the Oniahgarahs by the Delawares,
a much larger tribe, so Lelawala, daughter of Chief
Wokomis, sacrifices herself to be the virgin of her
tribe, and is to follow the footsteps of Necia. The
council meets, and Lelawala is formally chosen to
die for her tribe, and to calm the anger of the
Great Spirit of the Thunder Waters so that they
will not have war. It is decided that in three
days Lelawala will drift over Niagara Falls in a
white canoe bedecked with flowers.

In the meantime the English people happen into
the tribe. At the same time Shungela asks for
the hand of Lelawala, and is rejected. This in-
furiates him and he kidnaps Lelawala and Mabel
while they are walking together. Klolowar, the














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Indian maiden's brother, interferes and is slain.
During the night the two girls are rescued, and
Shungela is sentenced to die, but at the plea of his
daughter Wokomis yields, for Lelawala tells him
the M' ini n:;ry said "to forgive as ye would hope
to be forgiven."
To celebrate the safe return of the two girls, the
English folk and people of the tribe begin to sing
and dance, but soon thcy are changed from hap-
piness into grk-f when ,in rpl-tt.pAh reminds them
that on the morrow Lelawala is to die.
When evening comes it brings Captain Bliss,
for whom Mabel has been anxious, into the
tribe. They sing a beautiful duet of untold
love, for neither had been sure the other was
living.
Soon Lelawala's heart is filled with happiness
for her Algonquin lover, Sowanas, has returned to
marry her, but sadness enters both hearts when
she tells him of her plan for the morrow. He begs
her to go away with him, and not to sacrifice her-
self.
Lelawala is about to enter her canoe when
Shungela arrives telling Wokomis the Delawares


will not wage war upon them for their chief has
been killed.
Marpeetopah then appears and says that the
Great Spirit has spoken to him again, but this time
says that his anger is appeased by the death of
Wokomis' son Klolowar, and that Lelawala is
spared.
This delightful operetta was concluded with
the tribe preparing for Lelawala's marriage to
Sowanas.
Helen M\li gan portrayed her part well, and her
beautiful voice was one of the operetta's successes.
Lucille Hearne and Lars Ekwurzel added a
great deal of spice to the performance with their
love affair.
Harry Granberry with his ever ready, "Bless
me", was a constant source of humor whether
speaking or not.
The duet by Virginia Ewing and Billy Rader
was so well sung and acted that they were com-
pelled to give an encore.
Too much cannot be said in favor of this delight
ful legend in form of an operetta, and each and
every member of the cast, and the directors, are
to be highly praised.


SOPHOMORE APRIL FOOLS' DANCE


On March 31 the Sophomores gave a very de-
lightful dance out at the Yacht Club. Members
of all classes were invited and a great number of
students attended.


During the intermission delicious refreshments
were served.
The Isthmian Syncopators furnished the music
and a jolly good time was had by all.


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ORCHESTRA
Lejtto rigJht-Norman Zidbeck, Jack de Castro, Richard Grimison. Zonabel Demuth, Mrs. Baker, Anna Saphir. Donald Weigold,
Sam Bardelson, Edward Smith, John Jett.



SENIOR HARD LUCK PARTY
SENIOR HARD LUCK PARTY


Before
Open to all classmen!!
Hard luck if you miss this swell party.
Farewell High School affair this year.
Novelties-Prizes--Come in your old rags.
Don't miss the chance of your High School years.
Music by the Isthmian Syncopators.
Balboa Yacht Clul--Frilay, April 13.
Free busses, before and after.
Come all ye Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors and
Seniors, your last chance.


.-lIer.
Some good time, and how!!
Leave it to the Seniors to give a swell party,
And to all the classmen to enjoy !hemselvs.


The last pa r tv for all classmen was a Hard Luck
party given byv the Seniors at the Balboa Yacht
Club on Friday, April 13.
The music was A-i, the refreshments delicious,
and the costumes funny, tacky, and otherwise.


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Just before intermission was the "Grand Mla rch"
which was won by Gertrude McKeown and Ro-
bert Marstrand. The girl's prize was a beautiful
shoulder flower, and the boy's, a necktie. As fate
would have it, Mr. Northrup was cheated out of
winning first, or booby prize. Having been re-
quested to be a judge for the "Grand March,"
his flour sacks, probably stolen from Minneapolis
or Rochester flour mills while on his tour of Ameri-
ca, (under freight cars), were not judged in with


the other contestants'.
The ninth dance was a "spot dance," and was
won by Betty Youngs and Robert Erlenkotter.
Betty was given a pretty shoulder flower, and
Robert a tie.
Shortly before the "Grand March" the Seniors
had a "snake" dance, and were joined later by the
Alumni, then the other classes.
The entire v.iniIr was a complete success,
and we're now looking forward to "Class Night."


JUNIOR-SENIOR MORRO ISLAND OUTING


By two-thirty on the afternoon of March 24
a hundred or more students from the High
School assembled at dock 18 to board the "-Big
Bill" for an excursion to Morro Island. Un-
fortunately the boat suffered a mishap and the
departure was delayed until an hour later. When
the "Big Bill" finally got under way everyone
manifested his joy by singing and clamoring up-
roariously, and except for a very few who were
sea-sick the voyage was greatly relished. Amnon~
the amusements were playing bridge, relating
anecdotes, scuffling and singing songs which were
accompanied 1 y Harry Granberry and his re-


nowne banjo.
Morro Island was reached about five-thirty
and there was a general scramble for bathing
suits. Almost the entire crowd joined in the
swim which was half the fun. Some made their
way to the top of the island to see the monument
there and others explored an old schooner which
was beached nearby. Soon the cry of "eats" was
heard and an eager line formed to attack the
frankfurters and Eskimo pies. After eating all
that they could possibly hold the young people
hurried to the top of the old boat house and
danced in the moonlight until nine.


ADVANCE) STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING CLASSES


On May 2 and 3 the Advanced Stenography
and Typewriting Classes were taken on an in-
spection tour of the Administration Build'ng.
This visit was arranged for by Miss Dolan, and
the students were afforded the opportunity of
seeing in operation such office appliances as fol-
lows:
Mimeograph
Addressograph
Multtgraph
Electric typewriter
Adding Machines


Division Machine
.Mullipli ati',n M1a.hine
Subtraction Machine

The pupils were also shown how blue-prints
were made, and how filing was done on a large
scale. They were shown through the various
departments including the Coupon Department.

On a previous occasion this same group of
students were given a demonstration on how to
use the Dictophone by one of the local represent-
atives of that company.









Phe


Zonin


88


The High School Supper Club gave a very suc-
cessful Bunco party and Bridge party on May
5 at the Y.W.C.A. Those with high score at
each table of Bridge received a lovely crocheted


hand bag. The Bunco prizes were a fancy pin,
a novel ink-well and a box of talcum powder.
Delicious refreshments were served, and a very
good time was had by all.


MOTION PICTURES


Moving pictures were taken on May first of
some of th classes of the High School. The
Chemistry class, Domestic Science class, and the
participants in "Lelawala" were some who gave
their services to the "silver screen."
These pictures, however, did not turn out well,
so more were taken on May 11.


At this time they "shot" the Typewriting class,
Physics class, the students in Assembly, some of
the Grammar School children and in and around
the school. These turned out rather well and so
were shown the following day at the Clubhouse.
Two days after they had been taken, they were
on their way to be shown in the States.


GLEE CLUB AT UNION CHURCH


On Sunday evening May 6 the High School
Glee Club gave a program at the Balboa Union


Church. The soloists were Miss Virginia Ewing
and Miss Helen Morgan.


COLLEGE CLUB FROLIC


The Y.W.C.A. was the scene of merriment on
M,)v 7 when the College Club gave a Frolic for
the Junior and Senior girls of the High School.
Very interesting games were played, the girls
being divided into two groups, the Buffs, and the


Blues. The Blues had the most points when the
games were over, and won a lovely box of choco-
lates. Delicious refreshments were served, con-
cluding a very well enjoyed afternoon.


JUNIOR CARD PARTY AND DANCE

One of the main events of this year was the due to the many spot dances and the music of
Card Party and Dance given by the Junior the jazzy Isthmian Syncopators. Those who
Class on May 12 at the Tivoli Hotel. played cards were well rewarded, for the prize
Those who danced had an excellent evening were charming. A very nice door prize was given.


SUPPER CLUB CARD PARTY










Z he Zonion


"Tea Toper Tavern," this year's play given
by the Senior Class on May 11, was exceedingly
well presented. Each and every person took his
part well, and had been well directed by the coach,
Richard (Dinty) Moore.
The cast of characters is as follows:


Marion Day-.............................
Rosamond Reid...... ..... ..........
Sally Lee Dixon......................
Ann Annesly....................... .
Barry Reid...............................
Harriette Annesly..... ...........
Tess._........ -.......................
Mike Ryan...............................
Brian Pierpont......................
The Rev. Archibald Perry.....
Dallas Thorne.........................
John Sedgwick........................
Celeste....................................
Gloria Sherwood Jerome........


......_Anna Saphir
........--Mr-. Lou .M.,Gr,.jrly
........Elva Smith
..........Mary Belle Knapp
.........Gerald Maiers
...-....Catherine Cole
......Anna Bradney
........Robert Marstrand
......Richard Grimison
.........Harry Granberry
......Thatcher Clisbee
........ John Brown
........Peggy Price
.......Barbara Hallen


The theme of the play was the story of three
college girls who rented a mansion for the summer
and turned it into a tea-room in order to raise
some money for their college endowment fund.
Their tavern had only been open for two days
when it was placed under quarantine, for the
maid had taken small-pox. All those who were
then in the tavern were forced to remain. Short-
ly afterward it was found that the maid had had
only a slight attack of chicken-pox, and also
that the young man the girls had employed as
hired man was the real owner of the house. Every-
thing finally turned out in a most love-ly manner.
Everyone who saw this delightful presenta-
tion of "Tea Toper Tavern" will agree that it
was a very interesting show in which those who
took parts played them to perfection.


COMPENSATION


At last, we, the Seniors of '28 are about to be
repaid for our efforts.
Emerson said "Every act rewards itself;"
likewise is our case. For twelve long years we
have studied industriously and now cones the
Junior and Senior Banquet at the Hotel Tivoli on


June 8; there we'll eat, dance and be merry. Fol-
lowing on June 15 at the Mosque will be Class
Night when our Will is to be read to the rest of
the school, and the Class Prophecy given. On
Sunday evening, June 17, we graduates will go
en masse to the Balboa Union Church where


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Captain Ballentine will deliver the Baccalaureate
sermon.
The aforesaid events will be well enioyed. I'm
sure, but the most important will take plac on
Wednesday evening, June 20, in the Balboa


Clubhouse Auditorium; that will be Commence-
ment. Mr. Ben. M. Williams, Superintendent
of Schools will present the diplomas, and
Governor Walker will deliver the Graduation
Address.


THE ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY
CLASS OF B. H. S.


PROF. L. S. FLINT AND
ASST. PROF. PAUL FURR


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SFO D REWORD V




HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETICS
/IS we review the progress of athletics in the Canal Zone, especially those of
S are- Balboa High, we recognize the fact that from year to year better ,thlki tes
are being developed, closer adhesion to rules of the game are more readily being
* carried out, and a larger percentage of students are participating in games and
A* sports. We are of the belief that inter-class competition has contributed materially
to our progress.
S Athletics organized on the inter-class basis have in a way become standardized
-* in our school; and they are the best possible means of interesting the "masses"
S or at least of awakening the interest of the "masses". The usual immediate
result of the individual's taking part in inter-class competition is his or her desire
to make the school team. Naturally, making the school team requires more ,
skill and a better understanding of rules, and brings out a larger group of .
participants. Another essential result obtained by games and sports is the fine .
school spirit which is being developed. If our teams are more successful now
than they have been in the past years I am of the opinion that to a large '
measure this success is due more or less to the "school spirit". A group of
enthusiastic students on the side lines can help to win a game by bringing
forth the very best efforts of the individual player. "-
A. On account of our geographical location we cannot compete in tournaments ..
with high schools in the United States. However, we know, by comparing '
records, that our track-teams are at par with high school track-teams in the '-_
States and we know that our swimmers are far better than the average, but "5
we know little about the comparative strength of our soccer, baseball, basketball,
boxing, or wrestling teams. Statistics have proved to our satisfaction that
physically the students on the Canal Zone excel those in the North. This -
advantage is counteracted by the lack of training and conditioning. Unfor- 40
tunately the boys and girls feel that they do not have to train for an athletic -
event. In too many cases the athletes think that they can stand the necessary
continuous endurance, the nervous strain, and physical contact without paying
S the strictest attention to training rules. They discover their mistake only after
S it is too late. Ne'.erthekls, after carefully weighing all facts concerned as to
the advantage and disadvantage regarding high school athletic activities in the A
Canal Zone, I am led to believe that if our teams were matched with similar
teams in the United States theL\ would be able to give a creditable demonstration
of their ability in ph.kicil recreational activities.

E. J. Bogda
,* ,
schoo spiit wich s beng develop. I -urteam are ore uccesfulnow








$fhe 3on an
il "n[1 (75- / flU f- f= \


Standing, W.fi h -,..i i-- r Flint. William Hele, Warren (..Il. n \ri,-. Wainer, Robert Erlenkotter.
A','/,... .-\\ Illard Meredith, Frederick Maduro, \,,I Fidnn.i, J. Jack Humphrey.
BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL TENNIS SEASON
1927-1928
The tennis season was started the first week The first tournament was play
after school began. Ten consecutive tournaments Heights. Three matches weri
undefeated is the tale of it. singles and one double. The Hil
After the elimination matches, Mr. Flinttian- tournament, two matches to on
nounced the following ranking: a ver. good game against Arm
Warren (,ilm.,n ........first Heights, easily winning his ma
Frederick Maduro................... .....-........second On December 26, the High
William Hele .......................... .... ..third tournament of five matches with
Amos Wainer .. .... .. ...................- fourth Post and came out victorious,
Val Fidanque............ ....... ........ fifth two. This was a hard-fought t
Sam Gurney ........................ .... ....-.. ....... --------..-.. sixth
ack HumIfhrey .. ........... ...........ng nine hours. Gilman did very
Willard Meredith ........... .... ..............eighth Lieutenant Halm. Wainer also
Robert Erlenkotter ................ ................ ninth against his man. M.*jr Gurneq


Of these only Gilman and Meredith were of
last year's team. But by the end of the season
there seems to have been but very little differ-
ence among the abilities of most of the players;
any of them, when called upon, gave a very cre-
ditable showing.


Murray did well in doubles for
On January 2, a tournament
Fort Clayton Army Post. This
of five matches and was won three
Gilman's work against Lieutena
duro's work against Captain Ha


'ed against Balboa
e arranged; two
gh School won the
e. Maduro played
strong of Balboa
tch.
School played a
the Corozal .1A my
three matches to
tournament, last-
good work against
showed up well
y and Lieutenant
Corozal.
was playcl with
was a tournament
ee matches to two.
nt Lull and Ma-
nst were the out-







94


9he Zonian


standing features of this tournament. Captains
Van Vliet and Field proved too much for Fi-
danque and Wainer who, however, made them
work for each point.
On January 15, the High School again met
Corozal Army Post, this time at Ancon Courts.
They played five matches and won four; the last
being a tie, because the officers from Corozal had
to leave. The boys in this tournament seemed
to try to outdo each other and outclassed Corozal
in every department.
On January 22, a tournament of five matches
was played against the Pacific Court on the An-
con Courts. The High School won the tourna-
ment, three matches to two. Hele did very good
work in the singles against his man. Humphrey-
Meredith and Gilman Fidanque played first
class tennis in doubles against great odds. Burton
and Stapf did good effective work for the Pacific
Court, both winning their matches (singles), but
when they both got together in doubles Gilman
and Fidanque, by superb tennis, got the best of
the argument.

The next tournament was played with the Pa-
nama-Balboa Men's Tennis Club at Balboa Sta-
dium Courts. This tournament consisted of five
matches; the High School team won four matches
to one. Maduro's and Hele's work shone in the
singles, Maduro and Fidanque, and Gilman and
Humphrey did very good work in doubles. Gar-
rido for Panama was the outstanding player.
On February 5, the High School played the
Panama B, vs and won four matches to one.
Again Maduro and Hele did well in singles while
Gilman and Fidanque, and Meredith and Hum-
phrey, did very well in doubles. For Panama, the
outstanding player was Pereira.

On February 12, the High School played two
tournaments, one in the morning and one in the
afternoon. The one in the morning was the
tournament of three matches with the Balboa Ra-
dio Station. The High School won this tourna-


ment, three matches to nothing. Wainer played
very good tennis.
In the afternoon, the boys played the tourna-
ment against a picked tennis team from the U. S.
Airplane Carrier Saratoga and won the tournament,
three matches to two. Gilman, Maduro, and
Hele shone in singles while Wainer and Gurney
showed some good stuff in doubles. For the
Saratoga, Russett, and Dr. Chandler were the
outstanding players. Russett, in particular, was
a player of no mean caliber.
As a climax to this successful tennis season, the
Balboa High School met the Cristobal High School
at the Ancon Courts and vanquished them five
matches to none. Eight of the High School boys
were given a chance in this tournament and all
of them did very good work. So good was the
work that Cristobal did not get a single set in the
whole tournament. Edwards for Cristobal was
the outstanding player. For Balboa, everybody
did the best he could, so each was an outstanding
player.
According to custom, the High School Tennis
Team has been in the habit, at the end of each
season, of playing the Class-A Court of Ancon.
Up to the present time, the High School has never
got a match from this Court. This year they won
one match and were defeated by a score of four
matches to one. This is a very good showing for
the High School boys. Gilman rose to the pinnacle
of his present ability and smashed his way to
victory over a well-known player, Dreghorn.
Hele also showed very good tennis in his match
with Booth, but Booth was altogether too steady
for him. In doubles Gilman and Hele were almost
on equal footing with Erbe and Schropshire but
the older men eventually won out. Dr. Earhart
and Dryden played a very good game against Ma-
duro and Fidanque. Poltrino eventually van-
quished Maduro but only after a most stubborn
and persistent play.
This tournament culminated the Balboa
High School Tennis Season. It was a season that
every member of the team can be proud of.









Wfhe Zonian


THE SEASON IN CONCISE FORM


26-3 "
2-3
15-5
22-3
29-4
8-4
12-(A.M.) 3 matches
12-(P.M.) 3 matches
18-5 matches
22-1 match


Opponent


Balboa Heights- 1 iatch
Corozal-2 matches
Clayton-2 matches
Corozal-0 matches
Pacific Court-2 matches
Panama Men-1 match
Panama Boys- 1 match
Radio Station-0 matches
U. S. Saratoga-2 matches
Cristobal-0 matches
Class-A Court-4 matches
L. S. FLINT


BASEBALL


Inter-Clas
A series of games was played amorg the
different classes prior to the choosing of the nine
which was to represent the school. The Sopho-
mores captured the title of High School Baseball
Champions. They met little opposition and won
every game. The good work of Des Londes, Jones,
and Schwindeman accounted for the overwhelm-
ing victories.


PLAY BALL.
Inter-Scholastic
As usual the Cristobal and Balboa High Schools
met to determine the Canal Zone High School
Championship for baseball. Cristobal won two
games straight thereby winning the honor of
holding the title of the High School nines.
A brief account of the games follows.
A HARD ONE TO LOSE
The two school nines met for the first time this
year at the Balboa Twilight Diamond, commonly
called Razzberry Park. Cristobal brought with
with them a large number of the student body and


many loud yells. The High School Band rendered
selections between innings.
Cristobal opened up with an intent to kill the
Balboa nine's spirit. They got four runs in the
first inning and another quartette in the second.
All of these runs were scored on three errors, three
walks, and three hits.
Balboa appeared to be sleepy when on the field.
William Wood, the tall short stop, was guilty of
making an error when an easy double play could
have ended the inning. Taylor and Daniels were
convicted of muffing flies in the outer garden.
William Hele did his bit with the stick for Bal-
boa. After DesLondes had hit and Wood had walk-
ed, Hele sent the sphere into the bamboo trees in
deep left field for four bases.
The rest of the game was more snappy. Cristo-
bal crept away from Balboa until the sixth,
seventh, and ninth innings in which Balboa hit the
ball and ran the bases. The Balboa batsmen led
by Hele, Quinn, and Russey fell short of the mark
by two runs.
Although they outhit the Cristobal sluggers


Balboa High School

First Tournament, Dec. 16-2 matches


Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Sixth
Seventh
Eighth
Ninth
Tenth
Eleventh


Dec.
Jan.
" Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
" Feb.
" Feb.
" Feb.
" Feb.
" Feb.


fi








96 h onin f


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Standing--Hal Dooling, Ernest Russey, Thatcher Clisbee, Mr. Bogda, Wm. Wood, James Quinn, Douglas Johnston.
Knecing-llayden Jones. John Brown, John Powell, James DesLondes, Wnm. Hele.
n ..at., n c--l no, fiek ,a ,well BALBOA


A Box Score of the game follows:


Player
Wertz,rf- ......
Days, 3b .........
K lunk, c ...........
Greene, d........
Wikingstad, cf.
Lowande, ss......
Petit, If.........
De Reuter, lb.
Maher, 2.........

Totals ....


CRISTOBAL
AB. R. H. E.
.... -. 4 2 1 0
5 0 0 0
...... 5 4 1 0
4 2 2 0
... .4 1 0 0
......... 4 1 2 0
S 5 0 1 0
-. ----- .. 5 1 1 0
.......... 5 1 2 0

......... ..... 41 12 10 0


PI. er AB. R. H. E.
Q uinn, 2b ...............~.. ..... ............. 5 0 3 1
DesLondes, If, p ............-- .....-........ 6 1 1 0
Clisbee, lb ..............--.. ....-.... 4 0 0 0
Wood, ss .. ..... ..... -----............ 3 2 0 3
Hele, 3b ........ .... ....... ....... 5 3 4 0
P ow ell, c, rf. ......... ~.~.. ...... ........ .. .. 2 2 1 0
Taylor, cf. .........................---.. 2 1 0 1
H. Jones, cf ..................-.. -- .....-...- 2 1 1 0
D aniels, rf........ ............ ........... ........ 0 0 0 1
Russey, rf, c.... .. ..... .............. 5 0 3 0
Brown, p, If. ............................ 5 0 0 0

Totals......... .. .....- ... .... ...... 39 10 13 6