Zonian

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Zonian
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St. Petersburg, FL
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Yearbook
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University of Florida
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Lii


THE ZONIAN


192 7


























I ---------
I














STHE SENIOR CLASS GRATEFULLY
DEDICATES THIS VOLUME TO

Miss Alice McMahon

1N APPRECIATIONOF HER
KIND. AND ABLE ASSISTANCE
IN ITS PREPARATION.


01 ym 3-, in W IVA & vm &QWVI










unumania THE ZONIAN




VOL. XVIII BALBOA, CANAL ZONE, 1927.

PUBLISHED BY THE BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL


BALBOS HIGH SCr.lOL.

CONTENTS.


Ex Libris...... ....
Dedication.... ... .... .. .
Faculty ..... .. ..
Editorial .... ....... iICHAR JOHN-ON. '27
Classes:
Senior Class.......
Junior Class.........
Sophomore Class........
Freshman Class ..
Senior Class History .... ... AGNEs E. JoHNSON. '17
Senior Class Prophecy HELEN FRENCH, '27
Last Will and Testament of Seniors. '27 JANICE GRIMISSN, '27
What the Seniors Go to School For.
History of the Junior Class . ... ELVASMITH, '28
History of the Sophomore Class .... AMELIA IHTCtHING '29
History of the Freshman Class ........ oY JEWELL, '30
ZoNIAN Staff ... ..
Student Council...
Glee Clubs...... .
Orchestra ........ .
The Season's Flames ... ...
Alumni ...... ....
Alumni Foreword .. WILDURR WILLING, '26
FLORENCE PETERSON, '26
News from Our Alumni...... ..
Mars is Dead ......... CHARLE BUTTERS, '26
Panama ... .. ... .BErTTY JACK, '27
Literary:
Literary Foreword ........... GEORGIE GooDHU'., '27.
KATHERINE CONGER. '27.
T he Stories ........... . . I ...
A Legend of Old Panama .......... BETTY BACHUS. '27.
The Iron Cross ... ...... . CONCEPCI6N LUTZ. '29
Joseph .... .. ......BEVERLY HARRISON, '28
The Sacrifice....... .... ...ANNA SAPHIR. '28
Colonel Juan ................... CHARLES PALACIO, '28
Old Panama.... .. ...... EDGAR TAYLOR, '28
Old Panama-1927 Model .. .....ANNA SAPIIR, '28
Searchlights ...... .. .. KATHERINE E. CONGER. '27
Night......... ..HELEN TWYMAN, '27
One Point of View .... ......... .. ANNA SAPHIR, '28
The Lottery Drawing .......... .....LOUISE KERR. '28


Literary-Continued:
As I Am .... .. .. PATSY HARVEY, 28.
Radio en la Zona del Canal ROBERT C. ESSEX 27
A Grass Fire .ELOISE LULL, '27
Sunset Across the Canal .HELENt TWYMAN. '27
A Sonnet GEORGIE GOODHUE. '27
To Our Cellar Door MARY E. CURRY. '27
Vision. ... ELOIsE LULL, 27
A Would-Be Sonnet .. MARION E. DANIELS, '27
Tie Tropical Tattler
So ity .'
Society Foreword FRANCES BROWN. '27
JESSIE BANAN. '29
School Parties:
Se' ior Taboga Outing.
Junior Taboguilla Outing. ...
Junior Party..
Junior Dance and Card Party....
Sophomore Tacky Party ...
Fr shman Girls' Party.......
Festival Night at Y. W. C. A .
School Plays:
Senior Play,
Junior Play..
Songs;
"Bye-Bye. High School"...
"Call Me Back Balboi High". .
Senior Cake Sale ...
Junior Luncheon ..
Talk by Doctor Evans .......
First Assembly Meeting
Conquistadors '27 of THE ZONIAN Seas .
High School Calendar .
To Our Teacher ........ ARREN GILMAN. '28
Exchange .
Exchange Foreword .
Sport,.. .
Foreword-Boys' Athletics JHN FRENCH. '27
HARRY CRANBERRY. '28
Forewor --Girls' Athletics ANGELA KLEMMER, '27
KATHERINE SUNDQUIST, '27
Advertisements .
Jokes..








THE ZONIVAN.


Teachers.
Baod ror.- Yr. Grieer, Mr. Williams, Mr. King, Mr. McCommons, Mr. Flint, Mr. Granrud, Mr. Northrup. Mr. Bogda.
Middl ror.-Miss Dolan. Miss Steen, Miss Frost, Miss Erickson, Miss McMahon.
Fr awtrol. NMiss i. A 1I. I l. MI, I Ir.I i-- Vette, Mrs. Koperski, Miss Laws, Mra. Patterson.







THE Z)NI AN.


IDA O. ERICKSON.
Wisconsin.
Teachers College, River Falls,
Wisconsin.
Assistant Principal.

HELEN CURRIER BAKER.
Minnesota.
A. B., University of Iinin,-, .r.i.
Supervisor of Public School Music


LESTER S. FLINT.
Massachusetts.
B. S. Tufts College.
Matheimaics.


J. L. McCoMMONS.
Nebraska.
A. B., University of Nebraska.
A. M., Columbia University.
Principal.


ALICE MCMAHON.
Iowa.
B. A., State University of Iowa.
English.

EDWARD A. BOGDA.
Wisconsin.
hool of Physical Education,I.a crosse,
Wisconsin.
Physical Education for Roys.


RUTH E. MELGAARD.
Minnesota.
University of Mlinesr. r..
B. A., \\ li \ Clk-.:.
Latin.


ULVA I.oIs LA' -
)hia co-'
A. B., Ohio i', :in Utniversity.
A. \M.,Iji[. ur\ School of Languages.
Mbddlcbury, Vermont.
Spanish.

S VERNA STEEN.
Minnesota.
S Mi.r.ilr.t..r College, St. Paul, Minnesota.
1 RRasmussen Business College, \11inn.,'.r.i
C.. '

M .ki iF .I \\. I .
\\ ad hinyr.l /
A. B., 1 ii c,.-,r ..I \\.i-hington.
English ....1.. . j. :.' '

1 s i a i ; i l \' 'i i
iowa'
Ta:i'-hcr CiJljI-t', Kcarncy, Nebraska.
A. B., I \nver I'n in 'rI r. )Denver, Colorado.


OLGA J. FROST.
S Canal Znci. -
A. H., iT.unr t. VIwr-t-rn,-The- iudson.
/ Sr,'nii,' andFrench.

GARNET GROVER KOPERSKI.
Kansas.
B. S., Kansas State Aariculrur.l College.
University of California.
Household Arts.


RUTH McKELVEY PATTERSON.
Nebraska.
A. B., University of Minnesota.
Assembly. .. "'

LOUISE HANNA.
Kentucky.
New Haven School of Physical Training, New
Haven, Connecticut.
Physical Education for Girls.

HENRY GRIESER.
New York.
Swimming Instructor.

MYRTLE A. DOLAN.
Nebraska.
Nebraska Wesleyan University.
Nebraska School of Business.
Gregg School of Shorthand, Chicago, Illinois.
Stenography, Typewriting.

THOSE. R. KING.
Wisconsin.
Beloit College, Wisconsin.
Stout Institute, \W i.....n i.
University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin.
Supervisor, Industrial Arts.

HERBERT E. NORTHRUP.
South Dakota.
A. B., State University of South D.ak.ta.
Science.

a. J J






6 THE ZON IAN.


| EDITOR IAL.

- - ---- -------------- ----------

I-

T HE school year draws to a close. Soon the Seniors receive their diplomas, and
the Class of Nineteen Twenty Seven leaves the old familiar walls and class
rooms, takes leave of teachers and fellow-students, and-is gone, scattered, flung
to the four winds.
In a few years all of our old classmates, all of our old schoolmates will be hut
names, dim memories of the past. If this edition of THE ZONIANcan make t h.se once
well-known names more familiar, can revoke fond old memories, can lessen the
distance between us, then and only then has it risen to highest hopes and fondest
expectations.
S We have tried our best to make this little volume breathe the spirit of our school.
we have tried to put in print some of the intangible influences surrounding us. we
have tried to mirror the tangible, and if we have accomplished our dim, credit
must be givenwhere creditisdue-to THE ZONIAN Staff, to the Faculty, to our classes,
to our contributors, and to the members of The Panama Canal Pre-s Staff, who have
given immeasurable aid and assistance in its preparation and edition.
^ RICHARD JOH.NON.,
|21 EJilor-ti-Chil a







ZONIAN. 7








THE ZONIAN.


SENIOR' CLASS.


President. ...... .....
Fice President........
Secretary............ .
Treasurer.......... .


............... RUSSEL JONES
............... ROBERT ROBINSON
................ FRANCES BROWN
............ ELIAS MIHALITSIANOS


Crass Colors, Maroon and Gold
Class Flower, Crimson Bougainvillae
Class Motto, Administrare, non administrari
Class Adviser, Miss Ruth Melgaard


AHLFONT, HAGAR
ALLEN, MARIAN
ARRIETA, CARLOTA
BACHUS, BETTY
BANAN, LESLIE
BARR, BARBARA
BEVERLEY, RANDOLPH
BISCHOFF, JOHN
BLANEY, ROBERT
BROWN, FRANCES
BRULAND, MARGARET
CAMERA, JOSEPHINE
CHEESEMAN, FORREST
CLOUD, EUGENE
CONGER, KATHERINE
COOPER, HAL
CURRY, MARY
DAILEY, EARL
DANIELS, MARION
DEVEREAUX, Mrs. VICTOR E.
DORAN,JAMES
DORSwrTT, EDWARD
DURAN, JOSEPH
ESSEX, ROBERT
FRASER, RUTH
FRENCH, HELEN
FRENCH, JOHN
GAEB, MARCELLA
GOODHUE, GEOROIE


CRANBERRY, ELIZABETH
GREENE, LEON
GRIMISON, JANICE
HALLORAN, MIRIAM
HEARNE, JULIAN
HELMERICHS, FRED
JACK, BETTY
JAMES, POLLY
JOHNSON, AGNES
JOHNSON, RICHARD
JOHNSON, RUTH
JONES, RUSSEL
KIRBY, KATHERINE
KLEMMER, ANGELA
KNEECE, CECIL
LULL, ELOISE
MATOS, WILLIAM
MX M '. i. MARY ALICE
MIHALITSIANOS, ELIAS
ORR, JUANITA
PETERSON, STANTON
ROBINSON, ROBERT
SMITH, FRANCES
'tll 'l)B.Rr., DOROTHY
SUNDQUIST, KATHERINE
TWYMAN, HELEN
VAN SICLEN, MATILDA
VAN SICLEN, WILLIAM
WATTS, DORA


~Is K


5








THE ZONIAN.


RUSSEL JONES.

Pennsylvania.

Cristobal High School, '24.
Basket ball, '25, '26, 27.
Baseball, '26, Captain, "27.
Handball, Captain, '27.
Class Play, '27.
Class President, '27.


F. RICHARD Ji ".'.



ZONIAN Staff, ''.. r... :
ZONIAN Follies Sr.rt,i '.-
Class Play Staff, '. :-
Baseball, M.n i.-r. *:
President, 'r~,,el 't Cnun.:l, .-


FRANCES RUSSELL BROWN.

Canal Zone.

ZONIAN Follies, '24, '25.
Class Play, '26.
Class Secretary, '27.
Student Council, '27.
ZONIAN Staff, '27.


ELIAS MIHALITSIANOS.

Greece.

Basket ball, '24, '25, Captain, '26, '27.
Track and Field, '24, '25, Captain, '26, '-
Baseball, '24, '25, '26, '27.
ZONIAN Follies, '24, '25.
Class Treasurer, '26, '27.


MR 5207-2













S'" mm N" 6

6. 6R

C a.nal Xone

( S, Allentown High School, lleo.rown, Pa., '25.
i I' Swimming, '24, '26.
Baseball, '24, '27.
Basket ball, '24, '26, Captain, :27.
Supper Club, '26.
Track and Field, '27.
Class PI.N, '27.





EARL DAILEY.

Colorado.

Baseball, '27.
Basket ball, '27.
Handball, '27.
Tennis, '27.
Bowling, '27.





MARIAN G. ALLEN.

New York.

Baseball, '24.
Glee Club, '24.
Swimming, '24, '26.
Supper Club, '26.
Basket ball, '26, '27.
Track and Field, '27.
Class Play, '27.





JOHN C. FRENCH.

Canal Zone.

Bnr linL, Captain, '27.
Baseball, '27.
Handball, '27.
Class Play Staff, '27.
ZONIAN Staff, '27.









THE ZONIAN.


LESLIE JORDAN BANAN.

Massachusetts.

Junior Carnival, '24.
Assembly Pianist, '26, '7.
Glee Club, '26.
Class Play, '26, '27
Track and Field, '27.






MARION E. DANIELS.

New York.

Bowling, '24.
Baseball, '24.
Swimming, '24.
Glee Club, '24.
Basket ball, '25.
Supper Club, '?2
Assistant I ilr rl.,n, '2'.


JOHN LAWRENCE BISCHOFF.

Wisconsin.

Central High School, Washington, D. C., '24, '25, '26.
Class Play Staff, '27.


GEORGIE GOODHIE.

New Jersey.

Commercial High School, Providence, R. I., '22, '2;,
'24, '25.
ZONIAN Staff, '27.


~







THE ZONIAN.


MARCELLA R. GAEB.

Canal Zone.












EDWARD DORSWITT.

New York.

Swimming, '27.










ROBERT L. BLANEY.

New York.

D. T. H. S., Leisenring, Pa., "24, '25.
Class Play, '27.
Bowling, '2-.










*-' BEwy CRIGHTON JACK.

- Illinois.

Class Play, '24, '25.
ZONIAN Follies, '26.








THE ZONIAN.


JOHN RANDOLPH BEVERLEY.

Texas.

Belmont High School, Los Angeles, Calif.,'24.
Main Avenue High School, San Antonio, Texas, '26.


ELIZABETH FAY GRANBERRY.

Canal Zone.

Junior Fair, '24.
ZONIAN Follies, '25.
Junior Program, '26.
Track and Field, '27.
Class Play, '27.


I.EON G. GREENE.

New York.

ZONIAN Follies, '24, '2.
Declamatory Contest, '25.
Class President, '25, '26.
Track and Field, '24, '25, '26, '27.
Class Play, '26.
ZONIAN Staff, '26, '27.
Cheer Leader, '27.
Swimming, '2-.
Water Polo, '27.




POLLY JAMES.

Canal Zone.

Warrentown Country School, '24.
Short Story Contest, '25.
ZONIAN Staff, '26.
Student Council, '27.







14 THE ZONIAN.


INGRID MARGARETH BRULAND.

Norway.

Luncheon Club, '24.
Supper Club, '25.









JAMES ROBERT DORAN.

New York.

Haddington Road National School, Dublin, Ireland,
'23, '24.
Track and Field, '26, '27.







HELEN FRENCH.

Canal Zone.

Class Play ,'23, '26, '27.
Glee Club, '23, '26.
Central High School, Washington, D. C., '24.
Callao High School, Callao, Va., '25.
Supper Club, '27.




/


JOSEPHINE CAMERA.

British Guiana.

Junior Program, '25.
Supper Club, '26, '27.








THE ZONIAN.









FORREST R. CHEESEMAN.

Mississippi.

Class Vice President, '26.








ELIZABETH ANNE BACHUS.

Michigan.

Nathaniel Hawthorne High School, San Antonio, Texas,
'24.
Columbus High School, Columbus, Ga., '25.
Glee Club, '27.
Class Play, '27.
Short Story Contest Winner, '27.








JULIAN SPENCER HEARNE.

Alabama.

Pachuta High School, Pachuta, Mississippi, '24, '25, '26.










ELOISE CLEVELAND LULL.

Vermont.

Windsor High School, Windsor, Vermont, '24.
South Portland High School, South Portland, Me., '2.
Class Play, '26.
Glee Club, '27.








THE ZONIAN.


FRED O. HELMERICHS.

Canal Zone,

Class Treasurer, '24.
Swimming, '24, '25, '26, '27.
Water Polo, '24, '25, '26, '27.
Variety Sho~,*, '25, '26.
Track and Field, '26, '27.


KATHERINE DICKSON KIRBY.

New Mexico.

High School of Commerce, Portland, Oreg., '24, '25, '26.


KATHERINE ELIZABETH CONGER.

Ohio.

Western High School, Washington, D. C.
Glee Club, '25, '27.
Class Play, '26.
ZONIAN Staff, '27.


Mrs. VICTOR E. DEVEREAUX.

Illinois.

King's Conservatory of Music, San Jose, Calif., '13, '14, 'I5.
Brown's Rockford Business College, Rockford, Ill., graduated
'21.
Rockford High School, Rockford, Ill., '22.
Parker High School, Chicago, Ill., '23, '24.


ti~c~


, 1, -.r fl /-'








THE ZONIAN.


AG,.Es EUGENIA JOHNSON.

Canal Zone.

Christmas Program, '2.
Supper Club, '25, '26, '27.
Glee Club, '-7.
Student Council, '27.
Class Play Staff, '27.


WILLIAM A. VAN SICLEN.

New York.

Class Secretary, '26.
Class Play Staff, '26, '27.
Baseball, '26, '27.
ZoNIAN Staff, '27.


FRANCES ri 1,.i1i "'il,. L

I 1M i nr.

N ,ih irael IH i, hil.rni Junior Higl/School, San Antonio,
"T e' .,, 4 "- 'i
Main AvenU,: Fhiab h, ,,l. San Antonio, Texas, '25,
'26 -


HELEN VIRGINIA TWYMAN.

Rhode Island.

St. Mildred Academy, Laurel, Md., '2., '-;.
Flushing High School, Flushing, N. Y ,/2b.
Glee Club, '27.
Cheer Leader, 27.


MR 5207-3








THE ZONIAN.


JOSE DURAN, M.

Spain.

Junior Show, '24, '26.
Declamatory Contest, '25.
Class Play, '25.
Track and Field, '26.
Basket ball, '26, '27.








HAGAR G. V. AHLFONT.

Massachusetts.


Glee Club, '24.
Class Play, '27.









DOROTHY C. E. SUNDBERG.

New Jersey.

Supper Club, '25, '26, '27.











KATHERINE ANNIE SUNDQUIST.

Canal Zone.

Dickinson High School, Dickinson, Texas, '24.
Orchestra, '26.
ZONIAN Staff, '27.








THE ZONIAN.


JUANITA NILE ORR.

Canal Zone.

Swimming, '25, '26.
Supper Club, '25, '26, '27.
Bowling, '27.
Track and Field, '27.
Baseball, '27.
Class Play, '27.
ZONIAN Staff, '27.



ANGELA S. KLEMMER.

Maryland.

Swimming, '24, '25, '26, Captain, '27.
Track and Field, '27.
ZONIAN Follies, '25.
Basket ball, '26, '27.
Bowling, '27.
Baseball, Manager, '27.
Supper Club, '26, '27.
ZONIAN Staff, '27.
Class Play, '27.





HAL BL.UEFORD COOPER.

Canal Zone.

Declamatory Contest, '24, '25.
Radio Club, '27.
Orchestra, '27.






RUTH MARION FRASER.

Canal Zone.

Supper Club, '25, '26, President, '27.
Track and Field, '27.
Baseball, '27.
Basket ball, '27.
Bowling, '27.
Class Play, '27.








20 THE ZONIAN.


SL/ *



RoBERT E. ROBINSON.

California.

Tennis, '26, '27.
Track and Field, '27.
ZONIAN Itff, '27.
Class Vice President, '27.










CARLOTA J. ARRIETA.

Panama.










STANTON M. PETERSON.

Canal Zone.


Junior Program, '24.
ZONIAN Follies, '24, '25.
Class Play Sr if, '26.
Student Council, '27.
Class PI.1, '27.







MIRIAM LOUISE HALLORAN.

Canal Zone.

Luncheon Club, '24.
Class Play, '24, '25, '26.
Winner, Declamatory Contest, '4.
Supper Club, '25, '26, Secretary, '-.
ZONIAN Staff, '27.








THE ZONIAN.


BARBARA JEAN BARR.

California.

Lowell High School, San Francisco, Calif., '24,'2,, '26.
Cheer Leader, '27.


ROBERT CURRIE EssEx.

Canal Zone.

Glee Club, '25.
Orchestra, '5, '26, '27.
Radio Club, Secretary-Treasurer, '27.


MARY ALICE McMIANVS.

Massachusetts.

Girls' High School, Atlanta, Ga., '24.
Newport News High School, Newport News, Va., '25.
St. Hilda's Hall, Charlestown, West Va., '26.








RUTH PAULINE JOHNSON.

Ohio.

B. M. C. Durfee High School, Fall River, Mass., '24.
Supper Club, '25, '26, '27.
Bowling, Captain, '26, '27.
Basket ball, '27.
Baseball, '27.
Class Play, '26, '27.







22 THE ZONIAN.


MARY EMILY CURRY.

Kentucky.

Basket ball, '24.
Glee Club, '24.
Science Hill School, Shelbyville, Kentuck%, '25.
Nazareth Academy, Nazareth, Kentucky, '26.








DORA PORTER WATTS.

England.


Supper Club, '25, '26, '27.
ZoNIAN Staff, '27.

^J k_- L LTrc"


EUGENE C101'


WILLIAM MATOS.

Porto Rico.

Central High School, Santurce, Porto Rico, '24, '25.


Orchestra, '26, '27.
Glee Club, '26, '27.
ZONIAN Follies, '26..




C1S







THE ZONIAN.


CLASS HISTORY.
A.gnes E. 7ohnson, '27.


W.1


Who has not a dream ship, a graceful, antique
craft with great white sails which comes from a
land of nowhere, bearing beautiful gifts and happy
experiences for the future? This ship to the Fresh-
men in 1923 was the shining old ship "Balboa High
School," which had carried many cargoes safely
over the often rough and stormy sea of Education,
yet which always held in store an everlasting sup-
ply of rosy dreams of success.
It was on a bright tropical morning in October
that the unruly crew of Freshmen besieged the
frigate. They made the decks ring with their
shouts, and after a while had explored all its secret
nooks and crevices. To guide the ship toward a
distant, longed-for goal, Commencement, the crew
chose for helmsman a long-experienced pirate,
Fred Brady, and for pilot, a loving, sympathetic
lady, Miss Thomas. "Balboa High School"
with its restless crew drifted lazily in tropical
waters, and no one heeded much its fate until one
night on the brig a gay fiesta was given for all the
pirates and damsels. The decks once more rang
with laughter, music, and cheering, for the Fresh-
men had made everyone forget his woes and
grudges. Again obscurity claimed the poor frigate
until in the happy month of June a great walking
of the plank was ordered given. Many survived
this; few were lost. The successful Freshmen
assumed the name of "Sophomores" and hastened
off to receive their reward-a long rest at home for
three months.
As September drew to a close, the eager seamen
gathered together their weapons and regalia and
once more embarked on their sturdy craft to re-
sume their quest for the treasure, Diploma. At
a great gathering on the deck, the Sophomores
chose Fred Holzapfel for their helmsman and NMi,s
Hopkins for pilot. After a half year, the crew
had to select a new leader. This time it was Leon
Greene, a bold, active pirate. To manifest the
Christmas spirit abroad, the crew caused a mass of
mates to assemble with them to hear inspiring
music, and to enjoy a successful one-act drama,
acted by members of their company. As a relief


from their life on the rolling sea, the group essayed
to climb the hill in Ancon to view the beauties of
the surrounding country. With much merriment
the gallants and ladies danced the graceful Virginia
reel at a wayside lodge, and then continued their
climb. At the summit all engaged in singing bal-
lads, gazing at the moon, and munching savory
"hot dogs." Soon after, a great sale of food, a
"luncheon," took place at the mess hall, together
with a spirited dance on deck. Everyone spent his
coin lavishly and v as happy. In its cruise in
southern waters the ; .j. I ship stopped one day at
the "typical tropical" isle, Tail' ..L'a. Here for a few
short hours all were in high spirits, plunging into
the salt waves, roaming on the sand, or basking in
the sun. After another walking of the plank in
June, the crew and leaders abandoned the frigate
for a season at home.
Reveling in their great wisdom and sagacity,
the Juniors boarded the "Balboa High School"
in October, 1925. Leon Greene, having been very
successful in guiding the craft, was again chosen as
helmsman, and Miss Rauner, a general favorite,
gladly accepted the rank of pilot. Very early the
crew scratched their heads for schemes, outside of
looting, to gather gold to expend on the great
banquet which was approaching. One plan was a
luncheon given on deck. Although quite similar,
it was more successful than the one given the year
before. To celebrate with the Juniors, the crews
of the craft donned rags or the clothes of their
grandfathers and came to the "Tacky Party" to
frolic and dance. Another raid on the island of
Taboga proved a jolly time for everyone. Upon an
order from the helmsman, the galley, with the help
of all the crew, prepared many delicious foods for a
sale. The bountiful assortment was soon sold, and
the Juniors turned their faces again toward the sea.
On a memorable night a crowd of friends and
visitors swarmed to witness a fine display of art,
"Nothing but the Truth," dramatized cleverly by
our pirates and damsels. Not long before the part-
ing of the Seniors, a grand banquet was given them
by the Juniors. On this night, of all in their long


(


r---~----~







THE ZONIAN.


journey, the Juniors and Seniors were gloriously
thrilled. After another annual test of knowledge
and courage, the crew separated for a time.
When the dignified and vain Seniors, as these
seamen were now called, again met on the deck
of the "Balboa High School," great rejoicing took
place. All were glad to see each other, and
looked forward with anxiety to the land of Com-
mencement. Russel Jones, a sturdy seaman, and
NMiss M -l7sarl were chosen to direct the craft in
this last year of its travel These two were destin-
ed to a hard trip, for at this stage a crew becomes
leisure-loving, and dreads work. As a beginning,
the Seniors presented to the library of the good
ship a considerable stock of handsome new vol-
umes. The second endeavor of the group material-
ized in another sale of food which required labor
yet which afforded much pleasure to i.ery one.


Tossing all care to the winds, a huge crowd
assembled to laugh at "A Bachelor's Honey-
moon," the far-famed comedy of the Seniors.
Laudable talent was displayed by the actors, and
all their fellow seamen rejoiced at their success.
Once more, and for the last time, the company
of Seniors eagerly landed on the picturesque island
of Taboga. There was much feasting, dancing,
swimming, and pleasure-hunting crowded into a
few short hours of abandon and holiday. Then
the return to work!
And now, as this ship sails away, leaving us hap-
py with the treasured diploma in our hands, and
with our hearts overflowing with joy in the
realization of the golden dreams it held for us, we
can only cherish these memories and wish the same
happiness to other voyagers on the sea of Educa-
tion.


SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY.
Helen French, '27.


S. S. B,. ', '
Mediterranean, June 17, 1937.
This morning while I was strolling around the
deck trying so hard to find a companion for this
long cruise which I am taking, I noticed a man
most loudly dressed in gaudy clothes that might
appeal to a man of flashy taste. With him was a
woman dressed equally as conspicuously. I followed
them. Imagine a person so base as to follow a
couple in their walk! I was lonely and curious.
However, I heard enough of their conversation to
learn their names. I rushed to the purser to dis-
cover more about them. They were Russel Jones,
owner of Jones' Circus, and Helen Twyman, lead-
ing acrobat and tiL'hr-rnpe walker of Mr. Jones'
Circus. I found these names on the ship's record
under the heading of Jones' Circus:
M ,R( \K r F BRULAND. ............ Snake Charmer
JOSEPHINE CAMARA............ Bareback Rider
DOROTHY SUNDBERG. ..............Strong Lady
HAL COOPER ......... ...........Lion Tamer
What complexes these former classmates of
mine must have developed! Perhaps it is due to
reading such in,-.irinr putrv as "To a Skylark"
and "Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright."
* *
I went up to the radio oncfi to-night and when
the operator gave me a blank to fill out I almost


stuttered, I was so surprised to recognize Stanton
Peterson. Remember what a radio bug he was in
his last year at school? He told me that Leon
Greene is a world-renowned aviator having just
finished a flight to Heaven. He was sainted for his
faithful efforts.
I read the latest bulletins received by radio and
saw that Barbara Barr is making a name for her-
self in Africa teaching culture to the natives. I
read also about a wonderful singer who has just
startled the world with her melodies. She is Kath-
erine Sundquist. I remember how sheusedtoswim
in the Pedro Miguel pool to improve her breathing.
In the same bulletin I saw that an expedition
was on its way to Denmark to investigate the his-
tory connected with Hamlet. In this enterprise
are the following brilliant English students:
Mrs. DEVEREAUX CARLOTA ARRIETA
FRANCES SMITH %'ILL.IAM VAN SICLEN
ROBERT BLANEY ELIAS MIHALITSIANOS
*
I have read the list of passengers and discovered
that Katherine Conger is aboard ship chaperoning
several students of the Johnson Seminary. This
college is owned by Agnes and Richard Johnson.
They teach ten subjects to over two hundred girls.
The captain just came around to say that we
would have a good time to-morrow ashore in







THE ZONIAN.


Algiers. I notice something familiar about his
voice; I think he is Eugene Cloud. I'll find out soon.
\Well, we went ashore and had a pleasant visit.
Dora Watts met us at the boat. She is ant col-
lector for the Black Flag Disinfectant Company.
We had luncheon at the Regal Hotel and enjoyed
the dancing exhibition by those true artists, Leslie
Banan and Ruth Fraser.
The sights of Algiers are amusing. We saw
a caravan leave for some out-of-the-way place.
Katherine Conger recognized William Matos as
the leader and Joe Duran as chief sheik.
A beggar asked for alms. He is said to be the
richest man in Africa and I can easily believe this
because he begs constantly and people give. He
said, "In memory of our many years in Balboa
High School, give to me that I may not die."
Of course we were more than startled when some
one in our crowd said it was Edward Dorswitt.
We talked to him a while. He said that Julian
Hearne had been there not long before on his way
to Madagascar to fight lions.

I hated to leave, but we had to reach the ship
because the whistle blew. I managed to buy a
a few newspapers and shall enjoy a thorough
reading of them.
GREAT RAILROAD MONOPOI.Y BROKEN UP.
FAMOUS CAPITALIST GOES BANKRUPT.

RANDOLPH BEVERLEY, MAGNATE IN RAILROAD
WORLD, CONVICTED BY MARY CURRY,
MOST ABLE JUDGE OF DAY.
So that's what happened to them! Well, well,
I'm sorry Randy is broke, but he has many friends
to mend him.
Heavens, I'm so excited! Pete just rushed in to
show me a radiogram. Marion Daniels, John
Bischoff, Mary Alice NlcMlanul, and Georgie
Goodhue won an important debate in the Senate
against Fred Helmericks, Earl Dailey, Robert
Robinson, and John French. They were fighting
a bill that advocated an eight-hour school day six
days a week.
* * *
Julie, one of the children that Katherine Conger
is chaperoning, came in with a note from Captain
Cloud saying we could go ashore to-day at Tunis.
Betty Bachus lives there. I'll get some news of our
classmates from her.
MR 5207--


And so I did. We had a real gab feast. \1.rcella
Gaeb, who is now a famous toe-dancer, came in for
a chat. She corresponds regularly with Betty
Granberry; and she said Betty was giving
Salome dances in Alaska for the benefit of starving
Eskimos. Hagar Ahlfont, Frances Brown, Janice
Grimison, and Katherine Kirby are all married
and more or less happy. Forrest Cheeseman, the
world-renowned poultry man, has received his
thirty-ninth divorce. Somehow he can't find the
right woman, or if he does she's already married.
Betty certainly can get more news in her wonder-
ful home. Robert Essex, the violinist of great
note, is visiting her next month.
::* *
We stayed in Alexandria long enough to go to
the opera. Dolly Allen and Juanita Orr have
grown up and are really tall. They were there
with two dukes. It is whispered that they (the
girls) are notorious husband hunters. And they
were quiet little things in school. Ah, I must
not forget to tell you about the performance,
which was very good. Angela Klemmer sang the
lead and Betty Jack the vamp part. Eloise Lull
was the comedian and so very funny that I cried
after laughing too much. Miriam Halloran danced
so beautifully.
Professor Polly James was outside in the lobby
when we left. She said she was president of a poet's
club that urged less violence in poetic license. I
wandered around the lobby gazing at the advertise-
ments of coming performances. I was truly sur-
prised to see a much-disguised picture of Ruth
Johnson above this caption: "Mitzi Polowich, the
World's Champion Gum Chewer Here This Week."
So all of the practice Ruth got in school has really
done some good.
I was about to leave the theater when a voice
took me back to the scene where every day that we
had library assignments for English, Pat Doran
and I would go to the library to'gethir.
"Sure, Helen, let's go to the library," said Pat,
"in memory of those tedious climbs up the Admin-
istration hill." Pat says he will never forget school
da % s even if he does win the office of Governor-Gen-
eral of Ireland, for which he is now a candidate.
After talking to Pat a while I had to rush back
to the ship because the whistle blew. I finally fell
asleep, after thinking of all the success that has
come to my former classmates.


~~~







THE ZONIAN.


11


-anre Grim.n, '2,-
IILAYh ST \V1LL AND TESTAMENT OF THE CLASS OF 1927.


^ ^^ ^_.-._ S~- - -


KNOW ALL MnN BY THESE PRESENTS,
That We, THE CLASS OF 1927, of Balboa High
School, Balboa, Canal Zone, being of sound and
disposing mind and memory and fully under-
standing the nature of our act, do make, publish
and declare this our Last Will and Testament:
I. We do give, devise, and bequeath to the
teachers of the High School our hearty apprecia-
tion of all they have taught us; to Mr. McCom-
mons, the High School, trusting he will care for it
with as much zeal as heretofore; to the Juniors,
who have need of it, we leave our dignity; to the
Sophomores, we leave our sincerest hopes that they
will some day reach the Senior Row, and to the
Freshmen we leave our faculty for learning.
2. The members of the Class of '27 do give,
devise, and bequeath their various and sundry
possessions as follows:
; To Roberta Jacques, Dolly Allen leaves all the
magnificent height which generous Seniors have
left her in past years; to the tender mercies of the
Class of '28, Richard Johnson leaves THE ZONIAN;
to Helen Morgan, Helen French leaves her hair
and other uxorldly possessions; to Ruth Womack,
Angela Klemmer leaves her fondness for the water
and diving board; to Eloise Willson, Georgie
Goodhue leaves her red pocketbook hoping she will
care for it as fondly as Georgie has in the past
year; to Rose McGuigan, Mary Alice McManus
leaves her curly hair; to Franklin Pierce, Joe
Duran leaves his sheiky ways; to Billy Rader and
Edward Smith jointly, Barbara Barr leaves her
megaphone.
To Henry Knight, Katherine Kirby leaves her
forsaken ambition to be a barefoot dancer; to
Betty Clement, realizing that they are urgently
needed, Ruth Fraser leaves her long legs and
ability to jump; to Bobby Whaler, John French
graciously leaves his slim figure; to Charlotte
Jensen, hoping it will be brushed daily and other-
wise properly cared for, Robert Blaney leaves his
long hair; to all those unfortunates who intend
carrying five subjects next year, Katherine Conger
leaves her desk space, best wishes, and prayers;


to Gerald Maiers, Fred Helmerichs leaves his gal-
lant inclinations; as an incentive to all those
Freshman girls who are tired of life, Fanny Brown
leaves her engagement ring; to next year's Ex-
change Editor, Miriam Halloran leaves all the
magazines and annuals that come in THE ZoNIAN
mail; to Fred Banan, Russel Jones leaves his
ability to give directions and have them carried
out; to Janice Cameron, Agnes Johnson leaves
her grin.
To Mark Schapiro, hoping it will not be mis-
treated, James Doran leaves his Irish brogue;
to Kathleen McGuigan, Ruth Johnson leaves her
giggle; to Edna Mae \\'estendorff, John Bishchoff
leaves his inclinations and ready ability to argue all
questions; to Jose Vengochea, as an inspiration,
Helen Twyman leaves her boyish bob; to Teresa
Meckel, Katherine Sundquist leaves her Spanish
vocabulary; to Sam Gurney, Flizabeth Gran-
berry leaves her ability to refrain from whispering
in classes; to John Jett, Margaret Bruland be-
queaths her dexterity as a typist; Eugene Cloud,
being in a very giving mood, leaves his wonderful
ability to keep out of trouble to John Powell;
William Matos, feeling that he will have no more
need of them in High School,leaves to VanceHayes
his short trousers; to Roger Williams, in order
that he may get to school on time once in a while
next year, Polly James leaves her jitney.
To Paul Bryan, Marcella Gaeb leaves her regu-
lar Saturday morning with Mr. Flint, hoping he
will profit by it as much as she did; to Phares
Butler, as he is sometimes in dire need of it, F lia
Mihalitsianos leaves his ability to speak fluently
with his hands; to Margaret Bardelson, Frances
Smith leaves her inclinations to flirt at all times;
to Thatcher Clisbee, Earl Dailey very generously
leaves all the sulphuric acid in the chemistry
laboratory; feeling that she may at sometime
make use of it, Marion Daniels leaves to Marion
Willis, her freckles and nickname; to Alberta
Mead, Hal Cooper leaves his ability to laugh at
anything and everything at all times; to Otto
Helmerichs, Stanton Peterson leaves his aptitude







THE ZONIAN.


for writing poetry; to Mr. Northrup, our esteemed
friend and teacher, Leon Greene leaves his auburn
curls; to Herbert Engelke, as it will afford him
much valuable practice, Juanita Orr leaves the
pleasure of typing all I. C. ZONIAN material;
\\illi.im Van Siclen, leaves to his sister, l:uill.ia,
the ribbon off his diploma to help tie hers securely
when she receives it.
To Vera Ahlfont, Robert Robinson leaves his
ability to whirl a mean tennis racquet; to anyone
who can tie as good knots in the window curtain
cords as he, Robert Essex leaves his seat in Ameri-
can History class; to Norbert Jones, Carlota
Arrieta leaves all her extra credits; to Jeanne
Dooling, Leslie Banan leaves his voice and ability
to speak so that he will be heard; to Eva de la
Pefia, Dora Watts leaves her Cockney accent.
To Lydia Courville, Hagar Ahlfont leaves her
vanity case; to Rachael Key, Dorothy Sundberg
leaves her intense love for stenography; to Harry
Preston, Josephine Camara leaves her remarkable
ability to draw and paint; to Charles Jackson,
Mary Curry leaves her "doggy purse" hoping he
will cherish it the rest of his High School \la \;


to Docia Clisbee, Edward Dorswitt leaves his
respect for the faculty; to Quentin Stone, Ran-
dolph Beverley leaves his left-over brilliant ideas
to be carried out next year; Julian Hearne leaves
his habit of watching the clock in History class to
John Ohlson; seeing that he has need of it,
Betty Jack leaves her ability to bluff to Everett
Allen; to Louise Sprague, Betty Bachus be-
queaths her beauty spot.
To Rene Bissonnette, in view of the tremendous
task he faces daily in carrying home his numerous
textbooks, Mrs. Devereaux leaves her brief case;
to Helen Forbes, Eloise Lull leaves her theatrical
ability; to Agnes Mack, hoping she will use it
frequently, Janice Grimison leaves the office
typewriter; to Harry Granberry, Forrest Cheese-
man leaves his constancy in his a.ilrlr s d'amour.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, WE, THE CLASS
OF '27, do set our hand and seal, at Balboa, Canal
Zone, on this 24th day of June, in the Year of Our
Lord one thousand nine hundred and twenty-
seven.


(SEAL.)


SENIOR C.ASS.


WHAT THE SENIORS GO TO SCHOOL. FOR.


Leon Greene-To get demerit slips.
Barbara Barr-To vamp the sheiks.
Joe Duran-To charm the Freshmen girls.
Katherine Sundquist-To be studious.
Fred Helmerichs-To please the ladies.
Katherine Kirby-To get her diploma.
Mary Curry--To pass the time away.
Cecil Jewel-To learn to do what she "can't do" in English.
Robert Robinson-T'o keep Joe Duran entertained in
English.
Agnes Johnson-To win scholarships.
Richard Johnson-To hold highest rank on Honor Roll.
Dolly Allen-To learn how to grow.
Jimmy Doran-To tell us all about Ireland.
Nita Orr-To be with Rusty.
Rusty Jones-To be with his "Five-feet-two."
Marion Willis-To skip classes.
Elias Mihalitsianos-To tell us what a smart boy he is.
Lonny Van Siclen-To spend his noon hour with Muriel.
Marian Halloran-To help the teachers.
Robert Essex-To "fiddle."
Janice Grimison-To chatter and play.
John French-To help Lonny enjoy his noon hour.
Helen French-To keep Forrest attentive.
Stanton Peterson-To take leading roles in class plays.
Betty Bachus-To flirt.
Forrest Cheeseman--To be near Helen.
Eloise Lull-To get her Trig.


Cecil Kneece-To lose his southern drawl.
Betty Jack-To get into mischief.
Leslie Ban:an-To tc:ech Miss Dolan shorthand.
Katherine Conger-To be literary.
Julian Hearne-To graduate.
Fanny Brown-To be a success in ? ?
Marion Daniels-To have her picture taken.
Angel., Klemmer-To fight with Ruth Pyle.
Josephine Camara-To be cute.
Polly James-To hold up our dignity.
Ruth Fraser-To have a good time.
Hagar Ahlfont-To make a good impression on the Navy
Eugene Cloud-To kid the teachers.
Dorothy Sundberg-To make high speed rates in typing.
Ruth Johnson-To be a smart girl.
Georgie Goodhbue-To be a lady of leisure.
Helen Twyiman-To keep pep going.
Mary Alice McManus-To play.
John I.. Bischoff-To set the world on fire.
Carlota Arrieta-To learn shorthand.
Dora Watts-To get "A" in bookkeeping.
Elizabeth Granberry-To teach us how to Char!eston.
Hal Cooper-To smile.
Edward Dorswitt-To be a man of few words.
Frances Smith-To giggle at everything.
Randolph Beverley-To find a girl.
Mrs. Devereaux--To study.
Earl Dailey-To keep excitement going.






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THE ZONIAN.


A~ M


JUNIORS.

President ... JHN OHLSON
SyFice President..... .. HELEN MORGAN
Secretary. "x. .. SMirH s/ \ I
STreasiurer.'. .CHARLES RIIDGFR,
Class Adiser, Mr. \, .

SAHI.FONT, VERA FWlING, VIRGINIA I ERR, ,.OISE OH1SON, JOHN
BARDLSON, RGARAET FORBES, HELEN KEY, RACHEI. PALACIO, CHARI.E
InCHOrT, F IrrN' (GARRETI MILDRIED KIOCIER, MIL.DRED PALACIO, ROSE
s ^ .-,Y( k''4 -. GELABERT, MARCOS MAILERS, (ERALD PRICE, PECGG
Hi I ri t r l Il, (II.MAN, WARRENN MANN, ALMA PRICE, STEL.I.4
C(- .11 .-., J 1 1 I CRANBERRY, HARRY MARSfRAND, ROBERT REESE, BEN S
CARR, ETHEL GRIMISON, RICHARD MARTIN, BELLE RODGERS, CHARLES
CLEMENT, VIRGINIA G RNEY, ANNETTE IMcCoNAGHY, MARGARIET SAPHIR, ANNA
CI.SBEE, THATCHER GCRNEY, SAM MCl)ADE, MARY SMITH, EIVA
COLE, CATHERINE HALLEN, BARBARA McGUIGAN, GAYLE STONE, QI'ENT IN
COURVILLE, LYDIA HARRISON, BEVERLY N1cKE(oWN, EMMA STROBlE, FRED
DE CASTRO, JACK HARRISON, GERTRUDE MECKEL, TERESA TAYLOR, EDGAR
DE LA PENA, SARAH HEARNE, LUCILLE MIDDLETON, MAY TOEPSER, GISELA
DE PAREDES, RA'I. HERNANDEZ, CARMEN MILLER, CARLOS TOLEDANO, SOLL.
DOOLING, JEANNI JACKSON, CHARLES MORGAN, HELEN WAINER, AMOS
SEVANS, JANE JENSEN, CHARLOTTE NICHO.S, HENRY W\HALER, E..LSBETH
VERSION, JOHN JONES, NORBERT O'Rirl" IhDA Yo'NG;, FRANK


HISTORY OF I. HII JUNIOR CLASS.
;V .. Smith, '2S.

It has been a long hard r ..ti; 1'r- e are getting there, we the Juniors of 27, the Seniors
, of '28.
S Our first year went by \k ih\ .:id quietly because, although called Freshmen, we lacked
Sthe fresh part; besides wj \crc-ru,.r all men.'
In our second year we Il eiN4'L ul. .Ind gave our first party; it was like all other Sophomore
Parties, a great success. "
S Today, as we look back oyer past years, we decide that so far our Junior year has been
the best. First, came the tp to Taboguilla which everyone enjoyed. Next, came the party
at the Y. W. C. A. hi l,, proved a success. There was the cake sale by means of which
a good-sized sum of nmurle was realized; there was the big dance and card party at the |
T 'ivoli; the luncheln;'The play called "Eliza Comes to Stay," which was a laugh from start
to finish; and nim.t- inprtr.nt of all was the Junior and Senior Banquet which was held at
Sthe Hotel Tioli- F' r'l Junior was present, for was this not one of the honors we had been
planning for a lon, r .inme? Yes, it was one of the great desires of a Junior fulfilled, and the
Other desire, w hii' i, still greater than the first, is to get our diplomas.
S Her&endeth the history of our first three years of high school. May the fourth be as
Sjolly ard successful as our third. We owe sincere thanks to Mr. Nrrhrup, our class adviser,
Sfor his help during the year.

_______ T ftiTIM2 r217 aL-L.i Lbj; ifj ULIL ki-i L & a N L,






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President.. . ... ... VANCE h ..
i, JPH( ). l 1, ";.


1 ....lVice President. ................... ... MARJORIE (QUINN
Secretary ... . .. .. AMELIA HI-ICHINGS
Treaser. .. JAMES Qi INN
SClass adviser Miss W\HALEY


I ALL.EN, EVERETT FRENCH, ZONSA MACK, AGNES ROMIG, WILIIAM
BANAN, JESSIE (;ARRETT, JlI.ANA MCGUIGAN, KATHLEEN RUSSEv, ERNEST
BAXENDALE, ALICE HALLORAN, GEORGE McG lIGAN, ROSE SEALEY, MARION
SBICKFORD, NATHAN HAYES, VANCE MEREDITH, WILLARD SMITH, FLORES
BISSONNETTE, RENE HELMERICHS, OTTO MILLER, MARGARET 1 SPRAGUE, LOUISE
Booz, TOM HOLZAPFEL, RUTH MILLER, I .-. STRACSS, CECELIA
OWMAN, KATHRYN HUMMER, JOSEPH MOLLER, \' I THOMPSON, PAIL
BOWMAN, CLYDE HUTCHINGS, AMELIA MORRISON, J."l. VAN BUREN, NANCY
BROWN, CARRIE H TCHISON, RTITH OLIVE, EUNICE VENGOECHEA, JOSE
BROWN, JOHN JACKSON, ADA ORR, EARL WALKER, CARY
BROWN, MINNIE JACQUES, DONALD PATCHETT, SAMCEL \WALSTON, RUBIO
BRYAN, PAUL JOHANNES, ELEANOR PHILLIPS, MILDRED WARWICK, NOVA .
BUTLER, FRANCIS JONES, GLORIA PIERCE, FRANKLIN W ESTENDORFF, EDNA MA.
CODY, ISABELLE KNIGHT, HENRY POOLE, BERNELI. \ WHITLOCK, VIRGINIA
DEMUTH, ZONABEL KYLEBER, ELIZABETH POOLE, THERESA WILI.SON, ELOISE
SDE GRUMMOND, LYLE LARSEN, HENRY PRESTON, HARRY WOMACK, RUTH
DE LA PENA, EVA LAWLOR, WILLIAM POWELL, JOHN WOOD, JOSEPH
EKWURZEL, LARS LOWE, GEORGE QlINN, JAMP WOOD, WILLIAM
ENGELKE, HERBERTE LUTHER, MARTHA QUINN, M> p. WOODHILL, MURIEL
ERLENKOTTER, ROBERT .UTHER, MARY READER, hl YCAZA, PHILIP
FIDANQUE, VAL LUTZ, CONCEPTION REED, ERNEST ZIDBECK, L.. f *.. L.
S FISHER, ETHEL RINK, EDWARD




THE SOPHOMORE CLASS.
Ienifia Hutchis..'2, ,r

S Fellow Sophomores, two years have we passed, and two years are yet belr,- us' \s
look back we behold a year of glorious success and achievement.
S In April, the Sophomores held a tacky party in the gymnasium of the Y. W. C. A. One
U IX of the big events of the evening was the grand march. It was composed of the tackiest lot
i that ever trod the gymnasium floor. Games were played and comical prizes given. Delicious
^ refreshments were served. About in o'clock, after an evening of enjoyment, the party
S broke up and the Sophs regretfully went on their way.
g The Sophomores have not been very successful in athletics this year. Although we came
S in third in the interclass track meet, we made a fair showing, considering that we had such
a small number of our class to compete. A great deal of class spirit was shown and the
I cheer leaders were good ones.
; To Miss X ha:ilc, our class adviser, we are very grateful for her helpful suggestions through I
S out the year.

-LL" 'L -UL j, ... ..........L AA ,, "-





i c. _


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THE ZONIAN. 3


EJA~RN HL RM R O o Euo S o BERTHA



II
| i . .. ... .. . .." A







BooZ, FRANCIS HIRSH, ELIZABETH NEWHARD, RAE SULLIVAN, VINCENTI
BRETCH, MARGARET ICKMAN, JAME OGDEN, EDWIN TABER, JACK

I BUTLER, CLDE JACQUES, ROBERTA PALMER, MARGARE, T AN VALKENBU RGH, '
SBUTLERON, STAML JEIRT, JOHN PARKERR, EUEANOR VALERIA
CARRIANON, RLENI HMEWELL, BOBBs PERCA, WILLIARD VILLANEVA, ROBERT
BCLARK, EDITH HONES, EDWIN PEscoRD, AICE WIARW'ICK, RANDC
BCLARK, ELEANOR HONES, HAYDEN PIMENTO, CARMEN TABSON, ROBERT
^ CLEMENT, BETTLI JORDAN, VIOLA PYLE, R LTH WEIGOLD, DONALD
CLISBEE, DOCIA HOYNER, EVELYN REIMAN, ELSA tVENTSLER, MANOLA
DE LONDES, AMEN IRKPATRICK, RALPH RINK, BERNARD AHITLOCK, BERTHA
DOLING, HALVOR IOEWE, EDWARD RIZCA LLA, ARTR ILLET, ADELAIDE
DRISCOLL, RITA LULL, RICHARD ROBBINS, SHELBY WTi i; 1f MARGAREr
SCEVANS, RUTH LJONE, CANDELARIA RUSSEY, EMMA \\ WIC. ROGER
S EVERSO, BERNHARD MACDONELL, JAMES SCHAPIRO, MARK WAILLIN, ROBERT
FINNIGAN, CONRADO MADURO, FREDERICK SCHWINDEMAN, AUGUS WILMOT, EVELYN
SFRANSEN, WILHELMINA MALONE, EDWIN SCHACKELFORD, META WOODHULL, VIRGINIA
GORMAN, WALTER MARCY, VINCENT SIMONS, ENA YOUNG, ELIZABETH
GOYEZ, Louis MARTIN, LOUISE SMITH, CECILIA YULES, EMMA
HALLET, DORIS A MATTER, ROGER SMITH, CLARITA

STHE FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY OF 1926-1927.
Bobby Jewel!, J'o.

S Every girl and boy naturally says that his or her Class is the best in the school, but they
all, secretly if not openly, admire another. The Freshman Class this year is that "next to
best" in most of the upperclassmen's estimations.
Unlike the others, we are divided into two parts, the boys and the girls. We have separate
meetings and different officers, but this does not interfere with our class spirit.
Last fall the Freshmen won the interclass swimming meet. Later on in the year we beat
the other classes in soccer. In March we ran a very close race with the Seniors for first place
in the interclass track meet. In all of these and other competitions we were applauded
for our enthusiastic class spirit.
On the 18th of March, the girls gave a "stag" party, so to speak, at the Y. W. C. A. It
was quite a success, thanks to the appointed committee. The room was decorated in green
Sand white, our class colors, and looked very attractive. During the evening they played
different games, after which delicious cake, sandwiches, and punch were served, which had
Been made by some of the girls.
S All of the Freshmen owe a great deal of credit to our class advisers, Mr.;. Koperski and
Mr. Flint, for this successful year. Whenever advice has been needed they have always
a given us the best possible and they are always ready to help us in any way thev can.
I We all think we did very well in electing our officers, and we wish to thank our presidents,
SMargaret Avers and Elliott Monaco, for their splendid leadership throughout the year.


MR 5207--5








34 THE ZONIAN.


ZONIAN STAFF.


Editor-in-Chief ........... .. ..... RICHARD JOHNSON
Assistant Editor ... ....... ... ...... ANNA SAPHIR
Staff Adviser.................... Miss ALICE MCMAHON
Business Manager. ............... WILLIAM VAN SICLEN
Assistant Business Manager ....... .... ...JOE DURAN
Circulation Manager ............ ROBERT ROBINSON
Assistant Circulation Manager. ............ JOHN OHLSON
Literary Editor ....... ...... ..GEORGIE GOODHUE
Assistant Literary Editor............. KATHERINE CONGER
Society Editor. ........ .. .... .. .FRANCES BROWN
Assistant Society Editor................. JESSIE BANAN


Exchange Editor ...................... MIRIM HOLLORAs
Assistant Exchange Editor .. ......... Do AT
Alumni Editor.....................\\ILD~ R \W\'iLt I
Assistant Alumni Editor.......... FLoREN CE EPETER. '-
Art Editor............ ........ LE. L GRFEsL
Assistant Art Editor. ................ CH RI L P.ALA\IIJ
Boys' Athletic Editor .................. .J .JOHN FF EN H
Assistant Boys' Athletic Editor........H AHRR G R S BE a R
Girls' Athletic Editor ............... ANGELA KLEI MLk
Assistant Girls' Athletic Editor. .... K i HE RIE si i'. 1
',af, Typist ........... ............JUANrTA ORR


5~~







THE ZONIAN.


STUDENT COUNCIL.


RICHARD JOHNSOX
JOHN O LSO. .
FRANCES BROWNx


Senior Representatives.
POLLY JONES
AGNES JOHNSON
STANTON PETERSON


Sophomore RepIresentatives.
JESSIE BANANA
AMELIA HUTCHINGS
VANCE HAVES


,Junior Representatives.
MARGARET BARDELSON
JANE EVANs
JOHN OHLSON


Freshmen Representatives.
MARGUERITE AYERS
ELIABETH HEARNE
EL.IOTT MONACO


Back row. -Vance Hayes, Elliott Monaco, John Ohison (Vice President). Robert Robinson. Thatcher Clisbee. Richard Johnson (President).
Front row.-Marguerite Ayers. Margaret Bardelson. Frances Brown (Secretary). Elizabeth Hearne. Agnes Johnson, Polly James. Jessie Banan.


.. President
1ice Presider.t
. . ..Seretar


1 3blilgll


O





36 THE ZONIAN.


GLEE CLUBS.
T :
o l


:-








THE ZONIAN.


ORCHESTRA.


U,'1<


Back row.-Eugene Cloud, Edward Smith. Hal Cooper, Anna Saphir, Robert Essex. Virginia Whitlock.
Front row.-Sam Bardelson, Robert Bullock. Jack de Castro, Norma Nelson, Otto Helmerichs.




.11 (T


f~---~~--





s;j----~-------





38 THE ZONIAN.


~"e~T~







THE ZONIAN.






THE ZONIAN.


34R-1 3-VA O HE


FOREfWORL


PANAMA may be considered the cross roads of the world for it is through Panama
that much of the world's commerce passes. The ships that go through the Canal
carry our graduates, with their cargoes, to all parts of the world. For this reason
it has been hard to keep in touch with those who have passed from our horizon.
To those whose whereabouts were known to us we have written, asking them to
contribute some message or greeting for the 1927 Annual. Many have shown us
the greatest courtesy in answering; but we hope that in another year the replies
will be still more numerous.
We thank all those who have given so generously of their time in responding to
our request and in contributing to our columns.


-Wildurr Willing, '26.
-Florence Peterson, '26.


F


MAW AV, FAWAV, AVn W NW'I!VAlI







THE ZONIAN.


I N' \I ii N XII \I\I


EL CENTER, COLOMBIA.
El Centro, our camp, is located about twenty-
eight kilometers from Berranca-Bermeja, the
Colombian town, on the NM.1ldl t.l:i River. The
main offices of the field are located there. This is
my first time in an oil field, and everything has
held a certain fascination. Until I actually saw
the drilling process and the working of the derricks,
I didn't know how oil was taken from the earth.
There is an immense amount of work connected
with an oil field which one never dreams of until
one sees it.
A number of men come here expecting a Para-
dise, and of course they are disappointed. Having
lived in Panama during the construction period,
I came here expecting nothing, hence I was agree-
ably surprised. The living conditions are very
good; and sanitation, as far as possible, is excel-
lent. Our food is very good, and there is plenty
of it. The jungle practically surrounds the camp.
At night there is very little noise with the excep-
tion of the rigs which are working. The nights here
as a rule are wonderful, the air is crisp, and there
are always plenty of stars and usually a moon.
I, personally, am very fond of this place,
but sometimes I am bored with the sameness.
Then I content myself with "there are worse
places than this." You know the old saying:
"Everyone to his own taste."
I should like to hear from some of my friends and
they can reach me by this address:
R. W. ENGELKE,
c/o Tropical Oil Company,
Cartagena, Colombia.
My very best wishes for THE ZONIAN and con-
gratulations for the Class of 1927.
Sincerely,
RICHARD W. ENGELKE, '26.

VILLANOVA COLLEGE,
PENNSYLVANIA.
How I wish you could enjoy with me that de-
lightful, ever-new feeling of coming spring that is
now re-awakening Villanova! The grass is green;
the trees are covered with new leaves; birds are
flying about the campus.
MR 5207-6


On the upper field the baseball team is practis-
ing; on the lower field the football team is having
spring practice. Here and there fellows may be
seen walking in twos and threes along the paths
which wind through the campus. The truck college
atmosphere is found at Villanova.
When I first came, I was lost-one among many
strangers. But that did not last long. The fellows
at Villanova are very friendly. Total strangers
greeted me with a smile and a cheerful "hello."
At once I was made to feel at home-a stranger
among friends.
The first few days were great fun; meeting new
friends; registering and starting classes. But all
of this was soon stopped, for alas, we were only
Freshmen, and the under dogs.
The Sophomores started it off by making the
Freshmen carry their trunks to their rooms. In
the evening the Freshmen lived in the fear of being
hazed. NiLhrl. the Sophs collected in a room and
brought some poor Freshman there to be hazed.
He was made to dance, sing, and do tricks.
Then came the initiation-a night of terror and
dread. We had to put pajamas on over some old
clothes; we were blindfolded and covered from
head to foot with molasses and feathers. Then
we were introduced to the "hobble-gobbles."
That meant that every time a Soph yelled "hobble-
gobble" we all had to fall on our knees and touch
the ground with our foreheads. Then we were
made to grasp a long rope and march down to
Bryn Mawr, .inoirlig our college songs all the way.
When we reached Bryn Mawr, we were taken
into an empty lot where we were allowed to remove
our blindfolds and walk back to school. What a
sight we were! The Sophs had made a good job of
it, for they had turned off the hot water and we
had to bathe in ice cold water at one o'clock in
the morning.
Of the many rules which we had to observe, the
one that impressed me the most was the traditional
one of saying "hello" to any and every college man
one met, whether he had ever been seen before or
not. This rule explains the frikil-.lii'. .. shown me
when I first arrived.
Good luck to you all,
WILLIAM WEDWALDT, '26.


ON


"2-







42 THE ZONIAN.


EL CENTRO, COLOMBIA.
The one thing that surprised me most when I
came to South America was the difference between
the real South America and the South America
that the American authors write about; therefore
my message will be on this topic.
These so-called authors never get beyond con-
tour lines, vague architecture, and ambiguous
generalties about the natives. They never make a
sunstr glow; never do they giveyou a glimpse of
the glittering green foliage, the talking denizens
df the jungle; never do their encounters with men
and women seem like meetings between human
beings.
One time while I was stopping in a little village,
the natri es t lcomcd mnt, but said: "An Americano,
un escribante, stopped himself in this pueblo one
night. We receive him like friends. He, when he
sc fuj@, wrote unkind things about us. For that
we would kill him if he sometime return."
The majority of these authors are so infatuated
with themselves that they fail to see the virtues in
others. Bare feet and dirty faces are to them just
bare feet and dirty faces, and the owner ranks in
their personal card index on the level of bare feet
and dirty faces. They never make an attempt to
get at the soul, at the heart of these people.
They never relax into the courtliness which the
Latin American values above good looks and a
full purse.
The authors sometimes complain that the people
do not accord them the respect which they think
they deserve. What more can they expect?
They come among these people on shanks' ponies,
dressed like tramps, with manners which match
the appearance, and a yearning for free enter-
tainment and accommodations, and they are re-
ceived as tramps. For this no one is to blame but
themselves. The Latin American decries drabness.
Dress a man in a tuxedo and present him to your
South American and the latter will give him his
family tree. Dress the same man in rags and the
South American will flout him. With the South
American a neat, prosperous appearance is the
open sesame to his friendship, home, and hand of
his daughter; and a bedraggled exterior provokes
his scorn and contempt.
Much success for the lr1- ZONIAN and con-
gratulations to the class of 1927.
Sincerely yours,
CHARLES TROWBRIDGE, '26.


BALBOA, C. Z.
B. H. S. stands for three noble words that I
will always hold in fond remembrance.
I am confident that THE ZoN A N, like almost every
great thing, will be a success with each coming year.
MARY A. McCONAGHY, '26.


BALBOA, C. Z.
The years will always bring memories of the
happy days spent in B. H. S.
I wish THE ZONIAN every success in the future-
may you always uphold its standard.
ELOISE LORING, '26.


HAKNEMAN HOSPITAL,
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
I am very far from home and my present work
is very different from my work a year ago. I
often think of my high school days and sincerely
hope this year's ZONIAN will have the same success
as last year's.
Good luck, ZONIAN.
MILDRED OLIVER, '26.

AKRON, NEW YORK.
I wish that all of you could share with me the
wonderful times and experiences I have been
having at Alfred University this past winter.
My best regards to you all and a big success to
this year's ZONIAN.
Sincerely,
FRANCES GREENE, '26.


BALBOA, C. Z.
"Absence makes the heart grow fonder,"
as the saying goes. I have often wished I could do
my four years of high school over. I hope the
class of 1927, after two years' absence, will feel the
same as I do.
ALICE OLIVER, '25.

BALBOA, C. Z.

Although I'm working now, I still look back
fondly on the days spent in B. H. S. Best wishes
and success to you all and to THE ZONIAN.
AGNES McDaDE, '25.







THE ZONIAN.


BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

To the members of the class of 1927, 1 extend all
best wishes for their future. And here's good luck
to this year's ZONIAN. May its contents be the
best ever, its sales the biggest ever, and its success
the most ever!
Sincerely yours,
ANITA WOOD LARSON, '23.
(Missi Anita Wood was kind enough to send us
an announcement of her recent marriage to En-
sign Robert Warren Larson, U. S. Navy.)

PEDRO MIGUEL,C.Z.
I am very proud to be a graduate of the Balboa
High School, and I know the class of 1927 will soon
share this same pride in graduation with me. Please
accept my best wishes for the class and for the
success of THE ZONIAN.
HELEN T. HUBER, '22.


ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA.

As most of my friends have left the Isthmus, I
was quite surprised and delighted to receive a
letter from the Balboa High School.
Panama is, and always will be, the land of my
dreams, I am sure; and I feel very envious of all
who are fortunate enough to be down there still,
and especially of those still attending school.
I am sure that you have the same marvelous
times that we used to have.
There is nothing I would enjoy more than to
attend one of your alumni meetings, but I will
have to satisfy myself with wishing you all a most
happy and lengthy stay on the Isthmus.

Very sincerely,

ESTHER L. RYAN.
(Esther L. Frances, '2.)


MARS IS DEAD.
Charles Butters, '26.


Crack of a Serbian pistol!
The echoes died on the air;
Fell the last of the Austrian princes,
With death-dew on his hair.

The nations rose in anger,
As quarrelsome boys arise;
The war drum throbbed in Paris,
And echoed to the skies.

There were sounds of manly marching,
And rumbling armored cars;
The earth was torn with trenches,
And shrapnel's brutal scars.

Valiant were the warriors,
Valiantly they died;
But wails of maids and orphans,
Pursued the bloody tide.

Season followed season,
And year trod after year;
Europe bled in anguish,
Beset with haunting fear.


Then nation after nation
Rose weary from the field;
The victors reeled in triumph,
The vanquished also reeled.

Each feared no more the other-
That had no strength to fear;
Each yearned to be a brother,
The anguished past to clear.

So side by side in council
They sought the reason for
Their woes; and then resolved
To kill the god of war.

Now Mars had been a bully-
A loud-mouthed bragging boor,
Who'd had mankind in shackles
From Troy to Marston Moor.

His sway was ne'er berated,
For none dared say him nay;
With nations separated,
He held his ruthless sway.


But all that has beginning But now the nations, heads together,
Must sometime cease to be; Invoked the dove of peace-
So Europe ceased her sinning- Declared the future all fair weather,
From war at last was free. And bloody Mars deceased.
So now you'll find on Mount Olympus
The hoary gods of yore-
Apollo, Jove, and merry Bacchus,
But no rough god of war.








44 THE ZONIAN.


PANAMA.
Betty Jack, '27.
The locks that let the waters through,
Wanted to know what the ocean knew;
For they were young, and the ocean old,
And this is the tale that the ocean told.

"Time out of mind I have washed this sand,
While race after race has ruled the land.
There are stories in plenty of who held sway,
Before the Aztecs, who ruled the day
That the first of the Spanish explorers came,
And claimed the land in his monarch's name.
Others soon followed, and seized the soil,
And forced the natives as slaves to toil,
Or struck out into the great unknown,
For the glory of God, and the Spanish throne.
Then raised by the labor of conquered foes,
The stately city of Panama rose.
The greatest of new world cities then,
It reached the height of its glory when
The pack trains, laden with golden spoil
Of conquered Incas, Spainward did toil,
O'er the Camino Real, through jungle green,
To Porto Bello on the Caribbean.

"But in sixteen hundred and seventy-one,
The sands in the city's glass had run.
For across the Isthmus came NM..r. n's band,


To sack the city, and harry the land,
To murder, pillage, slay, and burn,
And then in triumph, back to turn.
The years rolled on, till there came a day,
When the land revolted from Spanish sway,
Which had grown more feeble, until at last,
In eighteen nineteen it finally passed.
The gold rush of eighteen forty-nine
Saw the start of the railroad line,
Which was built at the cost of a life a tie,
For men laid down their tools to die.
But over the road with its dead scarce cold,
Returning miners carried their gold,
Or new adventurers hurrying on,
Traveled at speed toward the setting sun.
And now we come to the present time,
When another invasion from alien clime
Brought a horde of workers to dig a way,
From the Caribbean to Panama Bay.
The ships of the world now follow the route,
That Balboa took when he first set out,
The Camino Real from shore to shore
And the track that the miners of forty-nine wore."

This is the tale that the ocean told,
As upon Panama's shortest rolled.


C thedrel Tower-Ruins of Old Panama.






THE ZONIAN.






46 THE ZONIAN.


FORE WORD.




M ANY things may be judged by the motive behind them, not by the actual
result. He who looks for the hidden thought, for the kernel within the shell,
shall most often find something of worth. The world is crying for finished products,
for rounded, perfect things; but there is promise of future perfection in the stilted
product of a beginner's pen.
The literary training received in high school isinvaluable to the prospective writer,
for not only does it instruct him in the mechanics of authorship but it teaches him
S literary appreciation. Here it is that the young person learns to love and revere the
j masterpieces that shall afford him the greatest pleasures later on, perhaps when his
S own resources have failed him. Since "there is nothing new under the sun," all
writing must, of consequence, be a sort of "cocktail" of other writings, the dramatic
essence of one, the flowing style of another, the poetic phraseology of a third, until
the finished product is as definitely different as all the others were. All the literary
masterpieces that English-speaking peoples have loved for years have been studied
S and analyzed, and carefully read by our young authors, until it seems as if they
1| must have absorbed, in some small degree, a bit of the skill that has made these
| 0 men and women famous.
I| In these days of concentration upon commerce and business organization, these
S days of soul-killing routine and sales campaigns, a literary appreciation is doubly
S valuable to the person who is to live a complete life. To everyone there comes a
S time when his own thoughts and actions fail to be sufficiently engrossing, and it is
S then that the living characters and the stirring scenes of the great romances, both
of poetry and prose, shall be his to live over again.
With a plea for indulgence are these pages published, in the hope that they
may be viewed with some degree of favor, and appreciated for what they are-the
sincere efforts of a group of sincere young people, endeavoring to give the best
that is in them to the task on hand.
-Georgie Goodhue, '27.
S-Katherine Conger, '27.

I M R a LBLL-,L -6-p -T n Y m







THE ZONIAN.


THE STORIES.


It is the custom for Balboa High School to
conduct an annual short story contest, the winning
stories to be published in THE ZONIAN. This year
two stories were chosen from the entire school and
two were selected from each class. These stories
considered worthy of note were given honorable
mention. The decision was made by a committee
of three, Mrs. William Lawlor, Mrs. Frank
Murray, and Mrs. Seymour Paul. We wish to
take this opportunity of thanking them for the
work they have done, and the great assistance they
have rendered us. Their interest was very keen,
and they gave much valuable time to the stories.
Their decisions were as follows: The best from
the entire school was "A Legend of Old Panama,"
by Betty Bachus, '27; and "The Iron Cross," by
Concepcion Lutz, '29, was given second place.
The winning stories from the Senior Class were
"A Legend of Old Panama," by Betty Bachus, and
"Joseph," by Beverly Harrison. Those stories


receiving honorable mention were "An Excerpt
from the Journal of an Ancient Lady," by Georgie
Goodhue, and "Treasure Chest," by Katherine
Conger. The winning stories from the Junior
Class were "The Sacrifice," by Anna Saphir, and
"The Rebel and Strong Drink," 'i\ Charles
Palacio. Those stories receiving honorable men-
tion were "Children of the Sky," by Gertrude
Harrison, "A Jivaro Trophy," by Elva Smith,
and "He I.eft it to Chance," by Phares Butler.
From the Sophomore Class "The Iron Cross,"
by Concepcion Lutz, and "Juan Herrera's For-
tune," by Kathleen McGuigan were adjudged best.
"The Wayside Shrine," by AL'nji-- Mack was given
honorable mention. The winning Freshman
stories were "The Miser's Whim," by Doris Hal-
let, and "Two Stolen Idols," by Roberta Jacques.
"Daily Life of a Pecora Native," by Margaret
Ayers, and "Brave Indian Boy," by Clyde Butler
received honorable mention.


A LEGEND OF OLD PANAMA.
Betty Bachus, '27.


The late afternoon sun was beating down with a
relentless heat, and my horse and I were just about
ready to drop from exhaustion. Never, it seemed
to me, had I been so tired. Wriuld I ever overtake
the rest of the party ? Since early in the afternoon
I had been seeking them; and now, as it was get-
ting along towards dusk, I was becoming right-
fully anxious. It is no pleasant thing to be wander-
ing along on an unknown trial in the middle of
Chiriqui province with no prospect of food or
shelter. I kept on, however, in the hope of coming
to a hill or some such vantage point from which I
might ascertain, if possible, where I was.
Finally, I was relieved to see a large hill; and
urging Broncho Pete forward, I hurriedly climbed
it. I reached the summit and anxiously scanned
the horizon. At first it seemed as though I were
to be disappointed; but at last I saw a little wisp
of smoke trailing its way upward, coming from
amid a cluster of trees in the valley below. With
renewed hope I quickly sought the fire that was
mothering the smoke. I knew without a doubt
that the smoke I had seen had come from my
friends' campfire. Imagine my feeling when, upon
drawing near, I saw a queer little native hut, and


an old, wrinkled, wizened woman sitting on a
stone in front of the door, calmly smoking her
pipe, and industriously rubbing what seemed to
be some sort of brass ornament.
I knew now that all chances of catching up with
my lost party of friends were gone, that I might
as well make the most of this opportunity that
had presented itself, and ask the old woman if I
at least might not camp near her hut during the
night. These possibilities rapidly presented
themselves, and finally I ventured my question in
Spanish.
"Ah, Senorita, but to be sure, my small hut is
at your disposal," she replied with that innate
courtesy of the Latins.
I tied Broncho Pete to a stump nearby and sat
down beside my newly-acquired hostess. My eye
was caught by the bright glitter of the ornament
she was so carefully :p. lihing ; and curiosity getting
the better of me, I asked her what it was. For
reply she handed to me a tiny golden frog, a thing
of marvelous design and exquisite workmanship.
"Ah," she said, slowly shaking her head, "there
is a sad story woven about that frog."
I, all curiosity, listened caLcrlk as she related it
to me.







THE ZONIAN.


".lan v, many years ago, when our tribe was
)"unIg, the Conquistadors came and spread
desolation and sorrow in their wake. Our villages
were plundered and burned, our dear ones tortured
and killed, our sons and daughters made slaves.
"Lolita, the most beautiful girl of our tribe,
was taken prisoner. Tall, dark, slender was she,
with beautiful, long, lustrous hair, melting dark
eyes, red lips, and gleaming teeth. Day in and day
out she labored for the cruel Spaniards. Her body
sickened and the ethereal loveliness of her beauty
became intensified.
"She became infatuated with one of the dashing
Conquistadors, Don Carlos. Cruel and heartless
he was, but hiding it all beneath ,an exterior of
smiling suave mannerisms.
"Amusing to this Don Carlos it was that a
mere girl of the tribes should love him, a Knight
of the King.
"'But,' thought he,'through seeming love I can
lure from this Lolita the tribal secrets. I will learn
where their treasures are hidden, and enrich
myself; as well, the coffers of my King.'
"All tenderness he became to the lovely Lolita.
In vain we warned her of his duplicity, but to us
she would pay no heed. At last he learned the
situation of our ancient burial grounds in whose


mounds lay priceless hidden treasures with our
dead.
"One night he stole from the village accompanied
by two Spanish slaves. Ah, but he was to enrich
himself; as well as the coffers of his King! Deep
they dug and uncovered a burial mound in which
were innumerable treasures. Eagerly they reached
for the gold. As their fingers clutched the treasure
they were stricken dead. In I)Dn Carlos' fingers
was this golden frong.
"In the morning their dead bodies told the story.
'See,' said the cacique,'what happens to those
who disturb the sleep of the dead!'
"All was clear now to Lolita. She saw how she
had played into his faithless hands. In a frenzy of
grief, she killed herself.
"From that day to this, this golden frog has
been a token of warning to all our young maidens
who would love without the tribe. They shall not
meet the same fate as did the luckless Lolita."
Both of us sat silent for a few minutes, lost in
reverie of those adventurous times. At last the
old Indian woman arose, bade me good night, and
disappeared into the doorway of her hut. I pulled
my blanket around me, lay down on the ground and
went to sleep under the tropical stars. Broncho
Pete whinnied wistfully.


THE IRON CROSS.
Concepci6n Lutz, '29.


I left my tent with my guide to explore the Saint
Joseph's ruins that were farther in than the rest
of the ruins of Old Panama. As there was no path
leading to them we had to cut out .a% through.
We came to an opening about ten feet wide covered
with large stones in such a way that no grass could
grow between them. In the middle was a large,
thick iron cross. It was a plain cross but there was
s'imtnchina majestic about it. Looking closely at it
I read these dates, then almost invisible-"1494-
1564." I asked my guide if he knew anything
about it. He said he did but that he would tell me
of it when we were out of the hot sun. This is the
story I heard sirring under a tree with the tropical
breeze blowing across my face.
"In 1520, a year after Pedrarias Davila founded
the city of Panama, there came to this city a young
Spaniard by the name of Pedro Cairillm,. He was a
young man of twenty-five years, a -tronLe, active


man, and a blacksmith by trade. In those times
when horses and carts were needed for travel and
carrying, a blacksmith was very much in need.
Pedro did not lose time, but built himself a small
shop and fell immediately to work. Soon he had
a' good business started.
"As the village increased in size, so Pedro's
business increased. Many good smiths came to
Panama but none of them succeeded, for they set
to work with their minds on the gold that was being
found. They soon left their shops to go in search
of gold. But Pedro kept his work. Neither did he
become lazy. He was the clock of the village. The
few housewives used to rise when the first 'Tin,
tin, tin' of his hammer was heard, for they knew
that then it was six o'clock. He was known in the
village as 'Our Pedro.' In the evening when he
had finished his work he could be seen smoking
at the door of his shop.







THE ZONIAN.


"When Pedro built a small but pretty house
beside his shop there was much gossiping in the
village. When people asked him who was going
to live in the little house he would smile and say:
'You shall see.'
"The next trip of the Carmen brought Pedro
his bride. Then everybody knew why he had
built the little house. Isabela, his bride, was a
happy little person with an eternal, sweet smile
on her lips. Pedro lived very happily with Isabela.
She used to mingle her song with the song of Pedro's
hammer.
"A son was born to them and they named him
Pedrito. Isabela said that she wanted her son to
be like his father and that the name would help.
But the name did not seem to do so, for as Pedrito
grew up he showed signs of laziness. Two other
sons were born to them, Juan and Pablo. They,
like Pedrito, did not want to work. Instead of
helping their father they used to go fishing. They
were always seen t.L'--thtr. When the people saw
them they said, 'Poor Pedro.' But Pedro did not
seem to care. He went on with his work.
"When Pedrito came of age he went to a neigh-
boring village and there he married the rich
daughter of the Alcalde. Later Juan and Pablo
went to live with them. The people were sur-
prised that Pedro did not stop them.
"Years passed. Pedro and Isabela were old now.
Isabela no longer mingled her voice with the song
of the hammer. The 'tin, tin, tin' of the hammer
grew dim. Now was the time for other smiths to
work and they took advantage of theiropportunity.
The discouraged men encouraged the others to do
steady work. Soon Pedro had nothing to do, for
the young men were putting up new shops and
were taking his work.
"Isabela died leaving Pedro alone, but Pedro
found something to do. He could be seen with a
sack on his back and his eyes on the ground looking
for something. He was looking for pieces of iron,
old nails, rusty screws, or other objects of iron.
The people whispered that his mind was becoming
simple, but as he was harmless they left him alone.
Some even helped him with his task. All the iron
he accumulated in a corner of his old shop and


every night when he added to it his day's work he
would smile. The pile in the corner grew slowly
but steadily.
"Then came a day when Pedro was not seen
abroad. Pedro was sick. He sent for his sons
and asked that Pedrito bring his wife with him.
When his sons arrived he was dying. He was glad
to see them again, but knew that he had only a
little time left in this world. He made them a
sign to approach his bed and said to them:
\1 children, I am dying. The only thing I
ask of you is that you make me an iron cross.
I beseech you to make it for me. To save you ex-
pense I have gathered the iron needed. You will
find it in my shop. I want . He could
not continue-he was dead.
"His sons were surprised at the odd wish of their
father. Pedrito's wife said that they must carry
it out, for it was their father's last wish.
'But how are we going to do it?' they asked,
for they knew nothing of their father's trade.
"The three boys went to work. It was a very
hard task, for they had to melt all the small pieces
of iron into one mass. To make the work less
difficult they divided it. It took them a long time
to make the cross. Ae.:iini the merry 'tin, tin, tin'
of the hammer was heard, at first dim but stronger
every day. Again the sparks of fire flew from the
hot iron and again a sweet voice mingled with the
song of the hammer. It was Pedrito's wife who was
singing to give them strength and courage.
"At last the cross was finished and ready to be
taken to Pedro's grave.
"When they returned from the graveyard, Juan
said: 'I have learned to love this work and I want
to stay here.'
"There was a pause. Then Pedrito said:
'Brothers, I know now why our father wanted us
to make the cross. He wanted to compel us to
work. He picked the little pieces of iron to make
our task harder. As for me, I will stay with Juan
and continue working in this trade.'
'And so will I,' said Pablo.
"They stayed and named their shop 'The Three
Working Brothers.' And there was no man that
could surpass them in business or happiness."
Thus ended my guide.


MR 5207-7







THE Z )NNIAN.


JOSEPH.
Beverly Harrison, '28.


I first saw Joseph at the clinic in the spacious
airting room of this "Past-,, rd-m-hospital."i
He was just an ordinary little negro boy, with big
questioning eyes and a humorous mouth. He sat
with the other small black boys waiting to be
called into the "inner shrine" of the doctor's office,
to have throats, ears, and eyes examined-
although one could never imagine anything wrong
with Joseph's eyes.
Joseph was the largest cf a group of four and
seemed to be the moral support of the others, all
of whom had come from the hospital ward in vari-
ous sizes of issued pajamas. In this case it looked
as :huugh the little ones had drawn the big"sleep-
ers" and the larger ones had drawn the small ones.
Joseph, though small, not over eight or nine years
old, was decidedly "in too far;" and his black, pink-
soled feet were hardly on speaking terms with the
extremities of his garment. Patiently he waited,
occasionally whispering reprimands to his com-
panions when they seemed to grow restless, but
never so much as moving a muscle of his own small
body.
My next meeting was a "closeup "as themovie
people say-I stumbled over him, scrubbing the
floor, in our own kitchen one day.
"Why, Katherine, is this your piikaninii\ ?"
I exclaimed.
"Yes, Mom," said Katherine, who was dili-
gently pressing the famnil linens which she took
care of each week; she was our laundress.
"You never said anything about having any
little folk," I went on.
"Laird, Mi1-, I have five of them. This wan is
the oldest of the lot," said she. And Joseph, with
his wide, friendly grin continued to rub the floor
in a most thorough manner.
"This wan, Joseph, is my right arm, mom,"
continued Katherine in her quaint Jamaican
dialect. "He takes care of the smaller wans at
home when I am away working; and when I get
over-tired or behind with my work, he helps with
that, too. He is a good boy, mom-indeed."
This I could readily believe, as I watched the
small, lithe body so busy completing his task. In
mv thoughts, I compared him to the white children
ofmy acquaintance, many of whom were unable at


his age to dress themselves. I pitied them and
envied J. seph, so able and cheerful, radiating joy
in every move of his body.
"\\hat do your children do for recreation,
Katherine?" I asked.
"They have no time for that, mom," she answer-
ed. "The little wans play about the house a bit,
and on Sundays I dress them all and send them off
to Sunday school. They are glad enough to have
food for their mouths; play does not worry them."
Saying nothing, I resolved in my heart that in
some way Joseph, at least, should have a taste
of the good things of life he so richly earned.
On further inquiry I found that Katherine's
family were of the better class of Jamaicans, but
even the better class have to struggle to live on
the Isthmus, so great are the numbers. Joseph's
father was one of the horde who stayed on after
construction days in preference to returning to his
own native Jamaica. He considered himself a
gentleman; and rather than do menial labor,
which he left to the weaker half of his family, he
chose to run a wee tailoring shop in the front of
their living quarters. These quarters I found a
few days later at number 45.
It was one of those rare, cool, dry season morn-
ings with the trade winds blowing and no hint of
heat or mugginess in the air-just soft balminess
that lured one to the out-of-doors. My thoughts
turned to Joseph-in secret, however, for my
family would have been horrified to know that I
had any serious interest in a little negro boy.
Fverrone about the place was occupied, and I
on some flimsy excuse set out to find him. It
was an adventure to me, too, and my heart thrilled
with the beauty of the morning and the quest in
view.
I had never had a more intimate view of Chorilla
than that seen from Balboa road and I felt strange
and out-of-place. I began exploring the side
streets 1, ,king for the address Katherine had given
me. In the dirty narrow streets, hordes of small
Jamaicans romped. Life had surely taught them
the law of self protection, for they scattered like
black birds at the honking of my automobile horn.
On a small side street leading off from the dis-
trict made up of saloons, dance halls, and other







THE ZONIAN.


such places, I found the object of my quest. He
sat with a baby on his lap, at the same time watch-
ing the shop, the baby, and a group of children
playing in the street. If his heart yearned to be
with them, there was no sign of it in his counten-
ance, for his expression was that of perfect peace.
At sight of me his mouth spread into a wide grin
with a vast display of showy teeth. I wonder why
negroes are blessed with such marvelous teeth, or is
it just the contrast of their black skin that gives
the teeth that ldn/.linii whiteness!
"What do you say we go for a ride out to the
Sabanas, Joseph?" I asked.
"Oh, Ml,-, could we?" He gasped with eager
embarrassment and his great eyes shone; but
then after a moment's thought, "I could not leave
the little wans, mom," and he was ready to give
up all thought of going without protest, because
the "little wans" could not be left.
"Can't your father keep them?" I asked im-
patiently.
"Bur he is not here and I have to watch the
shop and give a mon his clothes."
I am sure I felt far more disappointed than did
Joseph, who expected so little of life; and being
accustomed to having my own way, I was not ready
vet to give up my plan. After due consideration,
I decided to wait until the father returned, hoping
that he might otLer to relieve Joseph of the babies.
But he did not come, and the sun was climbing
higher in the blue sky. I was eager to be off, not
to mention the fact that I felt horribly conspicu-
ous and unnecessary, parked on this sordid street
surrounded by a group of curious-eyed little
Jamaicans.
By this time Joseph's three other charges ap-
peared on the scene and were announced, rather
than introduced, in Joseph's little old-man way as,
Irene, Anna, and Daniel. The baby was Winifred.
At least Katherine had a sense of symmetry when
it came to names. Daniel especially fitted the
cunning little black baby, not more than three,
who grinned at me from behind his two sisters.
Still no father in evidence, but the "mon"
came for his clothes and relieved our minds of
that obligation; and when an hour passed with no
relief from the babies in sight, I, who was beginning
to be charmed by the whole family anyway, decid-
ed to take them all. Joseph assured me that it
would be perfectly safe to leave the shop to its
fate. Nurhiit lying about looked of much value
to thieves.


Imagine the excitement of washing faces and
getting into best clothes. This I left entirely to
Joseph's management and efforts, waiting outside
in my car until the children appeared-faces shin-
ing and eyes aglow.
Have you ever felt the warmth and radiance of
joy from bringing happiness or pleasure to some-
one? It is a wonderful thing; and I do not mind
announcing that nothing ever gave me more satis-
faction, or to express it more vividly, a greater
thrill, than did taking that r.,tup of pleasure-
hungry little folk for an outing. For children are
children the whole world over-be they black,
white, or n..idicLrntr in color. Too awed by the
occasion to be noisy or hilarious, as our own
children would have been, they sat like wee black
mice-Joseph and the baby in front with me, small
Daniel and the two much-braided girls in the rear
seat.
May I remark again that it was a glorious morn-
ing? A smooth road ahead, that wound like a
white ribbon between rows of feathery coconut
palms and l.ini-i',; hibiscus hedges, invited us.
Gorgeous purple and red 1' II.g.In ill.P..i blossoms
shouted to us on every hand, and the sft jasmine-
scented breeze kissed our cheeks, black and white,
impartially.
We bowled merrily along, first to Old Panama
where the children scrambled about the ruins for
awhile; and then, still not satisfied to take the
happy _ri.I.p back, I decided to drive on down to
Pecora, or at least in that direction. This was a
regretful decision on my part, for many weeks to
come; but who can always be sure of doing what
is best?
The need of food being manifested by my own
inner being, I felt sure the call was even greater
with mv guests; so we sought a "chino" store and
I secured a supply of sardines, tinned fruit, and
crackers. We ai .....1 a picnic to the utmost, on
the banks of the lovely Pecora River.
After hilarious wading in the stream and a
drenching or two when the rapids pulled the little
ones down, we thought of home again. During the
whole journey Joseph had never once left the baby
but had carried her about and held her like grim
death. It was very evident that he was going to
have nothing happen to that baby. Yet, through it
all, his cheerful grin never disappeared nor did he
seem to tire or show any desire for skipping off to
stave with the three others who were not much
younger or smaller. I could see the little man was






THE ZONIAN.


growing uneasy though, as the shadows began to
lengthen and evening drew near. So shooing the
little black birds again to the car, we set off on
what later proved to be our fateful journey
homeward.
The road never seemed so beautiful to me. Tall
mahogany trees and jungle growth almost over-
lapping above us made it a veritable lover's lane
for miles, and the numerous bridges over lovely
clear streams never failed to call forth a squeal of
delight from my charges. I did not want to hurry
and miss any of the beauty of the distant moun-
tains or nearer hills, but I felt sure Katherine would
be fretting about her missing progeny, when she
returned-my own family might begin to wonder
too; so I stepped on the gas and resolved to come
another day for my nature study.
There is no twilight hour in the tropics; the day
ends suddenly and darkness falls without warning.
It seemed in a special hurry that day for by the
time we had reached the Juan Diaz bridge, it was
necessary to switch on the lights and we were
still a long way from home. I felt I must hurry
a little faster or both families would be alarmed.
I had told no one where I was going; and although
neighboring eyes had watched me depart with the
children and would no doubt report to Katherine,
I did not want to cause her any undue alarm.
"Well, at least," I thought, "the road has been
surfaced from here on home and though it is
treacherously narrow, there is not much traffic on
it."
The miles were being literally devoured when
suddenly from over the rise of a slope, blinding


lights appeared; so blinding were they that every-
thing else was lost in utter darkness. I attempted
to give the dimming signal, but the oncoming car
was upon me before I had hardly time to think.
There was a sudden sickening crash, and I knew
no more.
The next day I awakened in the hospital with a
broken hip, a crushed hand and a badly lacerated
face and head. By my side sat my aunt with a
grave, unsmiling face. I wanted information and
after convincing her that she would best tell me
the worst, this is the story she gave me.
\Ve had been hit by a wild "chiva" driver and
overturned. He had not stopped to assist us, but
had left us and had gone on his way. None
of the children had been seriously hurt-the little
girls had minor bruises and were resting in the
hospital. The baby had escaped without a scratch;
and Joseph, blessed Joseph, although he had
received a cut on his leg had pulled us all out,
bound my bleeding hand with the baby's dress and
gone for help.
It was he who had explained to the policeman
in Spanish, just what had happened; and later
had telephoned my family from a nearby "chino"
store. It was Joseph who had dried the girls'
tears, first examining them for injuries, and quieted
the baby when no one else could. It was little
Joseph no larger than a mite, with his old-man
mind and his heart of gold, who stood at the foot
of my bed this minute with his wide grinning
mouth and big expressive eyes inquiring: "Are
you all right now, mom?"


THE SACRIFICE.
Anna Saphir, '28.


"MNI,rgan'" gasped the Bishop with ashen
lips and countenance. "Where?"
"NM rgan with two thousand armed men three
miles from the city, in the meadows. They have
had no food for seven da s; but now they have
killed a herd, which was grazing in the meadows,
and are feasting on it. They will attack to-
morrow," panted the trembling slave.
The entire assembly of priests showed visible
signs of terror. Who had thought that Morgan
would dare to attack Panama even though he had
conquered Fort San Lorenzo and New Providence
Island so easily? Like one person they all turned


to the Bishop for him to direct them as usual. He
seemed to know at once what to do.
"Place all the women, children, and jewels on the
galleon. At full tide set sail for Peru. Let all the
men be assembled before my palace. Summon the
infantry! Hide all the gold! Load the cannon!"
Suddenly he stopped; then whispered hoarsely,
"What of Taboga?"
Everyone immediately thought of the beautiful
little island where all was so quiet and peaceful.
"They must be warned," ejaculated His High-
ness.







THE ZONIAN.


Immediately one of the best-liked priests, Father
Diego, stepped forth. He was no longer young;
but he said forcefully, "HIL'hii-'. I will go. The
young men are needed here."
"Go, Father Diego, and may God be with you!"
The priest made straight for the beach with a lay
brother. Together they searched desperately, but
in vain, for a panga.
Father Diego decided to swim! After he had
stripped himself, he gave his robes to his com-
panion; then with a murmured prayer he dived
out into the water.
The priest swam rather slowly for he knew
swimming twelve miles would require endurance,
especially in a man of his age. He alternated by
swimming the back stroke and then the crawl or
breast stroke. The first six miles were not so bad;
then the unaccustomed muscles of the priest
began to weaken, but steadfastly murmuring his
prayers, Father Diego kept on.
Oh! the island became plainer and clearer to
view! Only one mile and a half more! But, ch
God! what was that black fin that cut the water


so devilishly, coming ever nearer? The priest
attempted to quicken his strokes. That shark
would not get him! His one thought was that he
must get to shore to warn the people.
Through the tiny village of the island a black
ran -lrikilni' that someone was swimming a mile
out and that a shark was but cne hundred meters
from him. A dozen men dashed for their ]..Ing.I .
How they pulled! They had to save that man!
Sacred Virgin, he had gone under! But no, he could
not drown, for the men, with a shout, had pulled
him into the panga. He was unconscious; but after
they had forced spirit through his colorless lips, he
revived. However, he was unable to speak
although he tried convulsively. Finally, he man-
aged to whisper, \I.rg.in' Panama!"-weakly
made the sign of the cross, and closing his eyes in a
very tired way, breathed his last.
On top of the highest hill of Taboga is a large
stone cross under which the priest is said to be
buried. And to this spot come devout islanders
to pray for the spirit of the brave priest who gave
his life that they might live.


COLONEL JUAN.
Charles Palacio, '2S.


"Juan, General G6mer wants to see you immedi-
ately," barked a soldier in a ragged uniform to a
sleepy individual reposing in the shade of a mango
tree. Juan, also in a tattered uniform, rose grudg-
ingly and walked over to the small, .lil.1,'id:itd,
thatch-roofed hut that served as the General's
headquarters.
A short, stout, tart man was General G6mez.
His Bolshevik-like whiskers and his small, wicked,
blood-shot eyes lent ferocity to his already austere
face. As Juan came in, the General was pacing the
mud floor heavily, his hands clasping and unclasp-
ing behind his back. His troubled countenance
bespoke a weighty problem on his mind.
"Juan," he nqiip;ild, as he caught sight of this
cE ntlt mi n, "you are about to undertake a danger-
ous mission. The government forces have cornered
us and are starving us out. We can't hold out any
longer. Our only chance is to bluff them. Go
over there and threaten them with complete ex-
termination unless they clear out and let us pass.
Tell that long-legged General Le6n that I shall


order my forces to attack his bunch of cowards if
he doesn't move out by morning. Tell him that
Jacinto Aristides G6mez, Commander-in-Chief
of the forces of the true government, sends you."
Poor Juan turned ghastly white as he heard his
audacious General order him to his death, for it
was common knowledge that General Le6n was
a cold-blooded, merciless scoundrel, and he would
not hestitate to order a deserter from his ranks
shot, much less a rebel with such an insolent mes-
sage.
"But, General, you are sending me to my death.
I am a married man. What will my poor wife and
children do after I am gone?" wailed the distracted
Juan.
"Wi.hr'" shouted the indignant old warrior,
"have I a coward in my ranks? Either you go or
I'll put you to a firing squad for insubordination.
Now, get out!" With this the hot-tempered old
man turned on his heels and began to pace the fl. .. r
again.
Poor Juan left in a cold sweat, fully ,. \pi.. rtieg to






THE ZONI AN.


meet his Maker in carrying out the command. Fate
had played him an ugly hand. He was to be a
martyr for his cause. That he of all that little
rebel band should be chosen to deliver the insulting
message of his hot-tempered leader! He went
around the little camp and sorrowfully bade fare-
well to his comrades, and told them what to say to
his relatives when he was dead and gone. It was
really an impressive sight to see poor Juan fondly
embracing his friends for the last time, as a token
of undying friendship. Now Juan, aided by his
tearful and sympathizing friends, made prepara-
tions for his departure. He got a large, white
sheet and tied it to a long bamboo pole. He raised
his emblem of peace high over head, so that it
could be seen a mile away; and with a sick heart,
he marched down the little path to the river where
General Le6n had his army encamped.
Juan's heart beat faster as he advanced step by
step toward the dreaded enemy's lines. At every
turn in the path, he imagined an ambush waiting
for him.
"Halt! Who goes there?" challenged a sentinel,
suddenly emerging from a by-path, at the same
time raising a heavy hunting rifle to his shoulder
and aiming at the terror-stricken Juan. One look
down the deep, ominous barrel of the sentinel's
rifle decided Juan. He threw all discretion to the
winds, and, tossing his emblem of peace into the
bushes, whirled around and started hastily to
retrace his steps.
"Halt! Or by the eternal, I'll shoot you full of
holes!"
Juan stopped short in his retreat, and stood as
if frozen to the ground. The tone in which the
sentinel uttered this last threat was so sincere that
Juan was persuaded to stay. It was fortunate he
stopped, for the grim old soldier would no doubt
have fulfilled his threat. He grabbed Juan's
collar unceremoniously and led him away as one
would a dog. The sentinel took him to a small
shack in a clearing and saluted pompously a lanky
officer wearing a fancy uniform resplendent with
gold lace, medals, and other trimmings.
"Sir," he said, "here is a rebel from old G6mez'
army. He comes with a white flag and desires
your audience."
The lanky one twirled his waxed mustache
between his delicate fingers, and before giving poor
Juan a chance to speak for himself, said, sarcastic-
ally:
"So that old rascal has turned yellow, eh?


He wants peace, does he? I knew he would give
in as soon as his meals began to come irregularly.
Napoleon was right when he said that an army
marches on itsstomach. Well, speak up, what does
the old rascal say ?"
Poor Juan now felt that his career was at a close.
He mustered all his remaining courage, which, by
the way, was very little, and said, in as tirm a voice
as he could command:
"Sir, I am afraid that you are under the wrong
impression. General G(mez does NOT surrender.
He orders me to say to you that his patience is at an
end, and that he a ill kill every one of you, unless
you let us pass."
"\\ar! You dog! How dare you!" cried
General Le6n, red with fury. "When I could crush
your whole band if I had the mind! Pedro!
Pancho! Put this scamp in irons and keep him
on bread and water for a while. As I live and
breathe, I shall do the same to every last one of
them, or I'll know the reason why. Old G6mez
can't bluff me." With this off his mind, the tem-
peramental General Le6n sat down on a bench and
twirled his mustache vigorously, while Juan was
dragged away by the two huskies who had come
at their leader's call.
Juan soon found himself bound and fettered to a
sturdy sapling, with ancient, rusty chains that
clanked every time he moved. In spite of the
heavy and cold chains, Juan actually felt light-
hearted, since the foppish general with the
sanguinary reputation had spared his life, for the
present, at least. But-but, he might be saving
him for a worse fate than shooting. He recalled
that General Le6n had once starved a prisoner to
death, and that he had tortured other victims in
various ways. Juan's blood turned cold as he
remembered the stories and he almost wished that
he had been ordered shot.
Soon the night came, and with it the chill % inds
that penetrated his tattered clothes and left his
body trembling. He moved himself around in an
effort to huddle, and in so doing, he twisted his
chains. He heard a faint snap, and felt his bonds
slip to the ground. His captors had put too much
faith in that old, rusty chain, and a slight strain
had caused a weak link to snap, thus putting Juan
at liberty.
Juan shouted for joy inwardly, but outwardly
kept as still as a mummy, lest the clanking of the
chain attract some zealous sentinel to the spot.
However, ten minutes passed and all was still,







THE ZONIAN.


except for the ru-h of the nearby river, the count-
less .hilrplinL and buzzings of jungle creatures,
and the steady snore of the .-lccpi'g men about
him. Juan saw that it was a case of "now or
never;" so he cautiously edged his way out of the
,I,_epiini camp and began to follow the trail back
to the rebel encampment. He had not gone fifty
yards when he came across a body sprawled full
length on the path. Immediately Juan recognized
it as the sentinel who had brought him to General
Le6n. Nearby was a half bottle of rum, of
which the sentinel had evidently been partaking,
and the tF.,. cof which had incapacitated him for
active duty. The temptation of the rum lying
at his feet was too much for Juan, and he lifted the
bottle to his parched lips and took a long and
mighty draught. It entirely revived Juan, so he
took another, and another, and yet another, until
the bottle was empty. It made an entirely new man
of Juan. He had taken just enough to be termed
"dangerous" but not "drunk." Juan decided to
add a few thrills to his escape, and make the
adventure worth the telling.
Accordingly, he went back again and made his
way to a small lean-to where thegovernment party
kept its guns and ammunition. There were dozens
of rifles, swords, bayonets, and machetes piled on
the floor, and rounds of shot heaped in small
crates all around. Juan, exhilarated by the drink
and thus rendered immune to fear, carried the
guns to the river brink nearby and dropped them
one by one noiselessly into the rushing water.
In a few minutes his job was completed, leaving
only the ammunition, useless without guns. Next,
Juan went to fierce General Le6n's shack and
quietly walked in through the open door. On a
cot lay the lanky General, his feet dangling over the
end and the habitual blase expression on his face
transformed by sleep into a foolish, blank grin.
He was snoring noisily, as regularly as he breathed.
Juan gave but a fleeting glance at the General in
the arms of Morpheus, however, and concentrated
his attention on some articles that hung neatly


on a nail on the wall. These were none other than
the Beau Brummel uniform of the vain General
Le6n, which Juan remembered having seen
earlier in the day. Now he went up to them and
cautiously lowered them from the wall. Care-
fully he tucked his trophy under his arm and
slipped noiselessly from the camp that had brought
him such sorrows, and recently such joys. With
a light heart and a reeling brain, for the effects
of the liquor had begun to tell, he walked gaily to
his camp.
There was a light burning in General G6mez'
little hut, and toward there he turned his steps.
He found General G(mez pacing the floor, his
brow knit with trouble and his grim expression
suggesting anxiety and concern. Imagine his sur-
prise when he caught sight of Juan, whom he had
given up as lost, since he had not returned.
"Juan! Are you here!" cried the amazed old
soldier.
Juan gave his best military salute and said, in
a manner quite unusual for him when he was sober:
"Sir, I have carried out your instructions to the
best of my ability and I am here to report. I
have disarmed the government troops and thus
rendered them unprepared to meet us in the field of
battle."
"What! The devil, you say!" exclaimed the
dumbfounded General.
Thereupon Juan, aided greatly by his alcoholic
imagination, gave a much altered story of his
experiences with the government troops. The
General was forced to believe Juan's story, and
his usual sour disposition was changed into one
almost jovial. He shook Juan's hand again and
again, and slapped him on the back amiably.
"Juan," said the happy old warrior, "you are a
hero. You have saved us from a most critical
situation. I hereby raise you to the position of
colonel, and I authorize you to use your newly
acquired uniform. Also, prepare to attack the
government forces at day break, for now is the
time to take advantage of your heroic deed."


Village of Anton, Panama.


I







56 THE ZONIAN.


OLD PANAMA.
Edgar Taylor, '28.
During the early exploration period in American
history, the Spanish explorers, led by such pictur-
esque characters as Pizzarro, Cortez, Balboa, and
many others, subjected the Indians, plundered
their villages and took their gold. At the crossroads
of the gold traffic stood Old Panama. Old Panama
was a cosmopolitan city whose population was
made up of gold seekers from many nations,
the Spaniards predominating. Attracted by this
wealth, the bishops of Spain came over and built
churches. About one out of every five buildings
was a church, and Old Panama has been called the
"city of too many churches."
As many men of all types were constantly stop-
ping at Old Panama for short periods, it was only
natural that it should be the scene of much activity.
In the many saloons liquor flowed freely; there was
much gambling and consequently many brawls.
In the commercial section, rich merchants display-
ed their silks and other luxuries to the travelers.
The plan was like that of most Spanish cities.
There were many plazas from which flowed the
narrow, winding streets. The city was surrounded
by a high thick wall to protect it from the pirates.



SEARCHLIGHTS.

Katherine E. Conger, '27.


The sky is a great teakwood bowl
Polished by careful hands,
And interwrought with silver mesh
To catch and hold the lands.

Suddenly from out a hill
A glimmering streak of light
Comes shooting; other bright blades pierce
The silence-and take flight,

Sweeping ceaselessly in search
Of that dull growing roar
Which comes and goes. They stop.
We've seen the lights at Amador.


OLD PANAMA-1927 MODEL.
;anna Saphir, '28.
," swears the furious motorist
"these Panamanians have a mighty funny way of
mending roads." And the automobile zigzags
perilously between a deep ditch and overturned
barrels. Suddenly the bridge, over which Morgan
crossed, comes into view. Under it stagnates
muddy water, and nearby two men are stapling
barbed wire to a fence. On the opposite side of
the road the convent and the monastery are in
the most dilapidated condition possible. Farther
on are two small thatched huts. Chickens cackle;
goats, dogs, calves, and brown, naked babies
sprawl lazily before the doors.
At last comes the end of the road. A half-mile
of oozy mud forms the vista, for the tide is out.
On either side of the road is a cantina where soft
drinks only are sold. However, the hilarious action
of a party of revelers belies this fact. From the
entrance of the stately cathedral tower, a bull
shambles. An immense porker waddles hurriedly
from under the wheels of the automobile. A
turkey gobbles threateningly at a little black kid,
bleating for its mother. And wondering what it is
all about, a group of tourists gaze in bewilderment
at what was once, before Morgan's time, the
prosperous city of Panama.



N EIGHT.

Helen Twyman, '27.


Soft mystic spell of enchantment,
Woven of life's sweetest dreams,
Solitude now is most pleasant,
Silence is peace, now it seems.

Sweet lady moon casts a mantle
Soft o'er the tree tops so high;
Silvery dust now lies sparkling
On leaves, sleeping quiet neath the sky.

Dry soothing wind so caressing,
Makes one feel gay, want to dance,
Fills one with strange tender feelings-
This is the spell of romance.

Eyes fill with tears so unwanted,
Throats seem to close up so tight.
Spell of the quiet makes you wonder,
Spell of the tropical night.







THE ZONIAN.


ONE POINT OF VIEW.
.Inna Saphir, '28.
There are libraries-and libraries. There are
also many librarians. The following is a descrip-
tion of one particular high school library as seen
from the viewpoint of one particular high school
librarian.
It is ten minutes past two-time for the library
to open. I obtain the library keys and saunter into
that room. The wind is blowing fiercely; so I
slam the windows down. That door of the closet
where some students keep their books is open
again. I shut it hastily, for I hear footsteps. I
am just in time, too.
"Well! I see that door is shut to-day!" says the
principal.
And I dutifully r,;p,.11, "Yes, sir." Now for a
quiet fifteen minutes to study civics.
Suddenly-"A-.-a;-\li- Thomas would like
six books on wild flowers." And I patiently give
the required books to a shy little eighth-grader.
Peace once more; then-
"I want a biography!"
"Is Ben Hur any good?"
"Will Mr. Brown let me read Jfane Eyre?"
A horde of students has descended upon me.
And so the questions continue. I am patient for a
little while. After I check the book of a little
shorn-headed Freshman, he murmurs "Thank you,
Ma'am."
A mighty Senior storms in. "Where on earth
can I find The Mind in the Making?" I show him.
Finally, I begin to tire of it all; consequently,
I let loose.
"Jimmy! This library is no recreation hall!
Jack! You're supposed to get books in here, not
look at ZONIANS! How do I know what your
teachers will let you read? Mary and Alice! Stop
that loud talking!"
Suddenly an unnatural quiet descends. The
head of our respected principal is seen peering in
the doorway. At last, the blessed buzzer! I snap
out, "Let me have your pink slips! This place is
shutting up at three sharp."
Now, draw your own conclusions about a school
library. I storm and rage, and yet I wonder what
I would do if I could not have charge of it the
seventh period, when I can enjoy observing the
characteristic timidity of a Freshman, triumph of
a Sophomore, independence of a Junior, and finally
the haughtiness of the Senior.
MR 5207--8


THE LOTTERY DRAWING.


Louise Kerr, '28.

The lottery drawing takes place every Sunday
morning at lo o'clock in a small office near Cathe-
dral Plaza. The place is always crowded at this
hour; and as I arrived just as the first number
was being drawn, it was very difficult to fin I a
place in which to stand. It happened that I stood
just back of an old Panamanian. It was only with
extreme difficulty that I could see around the old
man; and so, during the intervals of drawing the
numbers, I had ample opportunity to study him.
His thin face was deeply l:ned with innumerable
wrinkles; and his shoulders drooped forward,
causing his bony arms to hang loosely at his side.
In his hand was a solitary ticket. As the first
number-a 4-was placed on the board, his hand
shook so that he almost dropped the ticket.
The second number was drawn-a 6. The old
man's eyes, that a minute ago seemed lifeless,
fairly shone now; and eagerly he looked for the
next number. It was a i. Now the numbers read
4-6-1. Only one more number to be drawn
to complete the first prize! Not being able to stand
the suspense of ,a.irin, the old man made his
way through the throng out on the street. The
last number was drawn-a 7; but there was not
a sign of the eager old figure with the solitary
ticket. The second and third numbers were placed
under the first; and, as the crowd thinned out, I
saw the old man with faltering step approaching
the office. With a decided effort he looked up at
the numbers. His body swayed as though he were
going to fall, but instead he uttered a low, dejected
groan. Upon glancing over his shoulder, I saw in
heavy black letters on the ticket he was loosely
holding, the numbers-4-6---6.


AS I AM.

'aitsv Harvey, '2S.

I have not washed the dishes,
Nor made my iunpled bed;
But out along the roadside
The leaves are turning red.

"'is proper to be tidy,
And cle.nly if you must;
But I'd rather watch the leaves turn red
Than save a house from dust.







THE ZONIAN.


RADIO EN LA ZONA DEL CANAL.
Robert C. Essex, '27.


Hace como tres afios muchos de los aficionados
al radio que viven en Balboa, formaron un club
con la idea de construir una estaci6n radiodifusora.
El club se llam6 the Balboa Radio Club. El
cuerpo de seiiales del ej6rcito en France Field
cooper prestindole al club un transmisor radio-
telef6nico de bajopoder. El transmisor se install
en un edificio (que pertenece a la marina) cerca de
los muelles de Balboa. Pero no habia dinero para
operar la estaci6n; se necesitaba comprar gasoline
para el motor que operaba el engendrador el6ctrico
y muebles para el sal6n de radiodifusi6n. Los
fondos necesarios para hacer esto se obtuvieron
vendiendo radior eceptores y parties para construir
los, y tambi6n, asesando a los socios del club una
cuota de entrada de cinco duros.
La estaci6n estaba en operaci6n como tres o
cuatro meses cuando el cuerpo de sefiales pidi6 el
transmisor y el club tuvo que devolverlo a France
Field. Entonces el club decidi6 construir de su
propia cuenta un transmisor de alto poder. A
este tiempo habia un club en Crist6bal y uno en
PanamA. Los tres clubs convinieron en contribuir
su parte de los gastos, pero el de Balboa contribuy6
casi todo el dinero y todo el trabajo. Se pidieron
las parties de los Estados Unidos y cuando llegaron,
armaron el transmisor algunos de los socios en
Balboa.
La estaci6n transmite como un afio bajo el


nombre de NBA con una onda de 375 metros de
longitud, a un poder de entire i.ooo y 1.700 vatios
mientras que la otra tenia un poder de 400 vatios
solamente. El nuevo transmisor da much
satisfacci6n y se ha oido en los Estados Unidos.
Transmite dos o tres veces a la semana. Hay
programs del sal6n de radiodifusi6n suplidos por
talent local, y los domingos se transmit el oficio
divino de una de las iglesias en Balboa. Cuando
no se hace esto, los programs de various sitios de
diversion se transmiten a la estaci6n por lineas
telef6nicas que deben ser balanceadas muy cuida-
dosamente.
Con el establecimiento de la estaci6n radiodi-
fusora ha habido un gran aumento en el nimero de
radiorreceptores y en el interest general en radio.
Muchos de los nifios han construido receptores de
cristal con los cuales obtienen buenos resultados.
Una multitud de receptores de vilvulas se han
construido por los aficionados mis peritos. Se
pueden ver antenas sobre los techos de un gran
nimero de las casas. En la escuela superior se
ha formado un club de los estudiantes para aprender
la construcci6n de radiorreceptores y los nombres
y usos de las varias parties empleadas en la cons-
trucci6n. Tambien algunos de los socios han
aprendido el c6digo international de radio para
poder comprender las estaciones que se sirven de
este m6todo para transmitir despachos.


A GRASS FIRE.
Eloise Lull, '27.


The shrill cadences of a bugle blown in haste
tear the lazy, smoke-laden air of the early after-
noon. With a start the garrison wakes from its
midday languor, and listens with strained atten-
tion to the rise and fall of the notes, which come so
fast that they seem in their haste to trip over each
other. Fire! The word which usually strikes
terror into the hearts of men in this case seems
to have little of its accustomed affect. "Just
another of those confounded grass fires," as one
man puts it, seems to be the general attitude.
The companies form and march to the scene of
action with the fire buckets and old brooms. In
this case it happens to be the target range. The
long, flat, open field with its dry grass affords a
perfect spot for a careless smoker to drop a match
and start a flame, which, under ordinary circum-


stances, would result in nothing but a small charred
area. But in this case the fire has been urged on by
the steady trade wind, which blows it in the direc-
tion of the buildings.
The bucket brigade soon forms, and spreads out
along the whole length of the line of fire. After
unsuccessfully attempting to beat it out with
brooms and shovels, and drown it out with water,
they finally resort to laying a six-foot wide zone of
sand, through which it is almost impossible for the
fire to pass. When occasionally the fire does get
through, it is quickly beaten out by the fighters.
At last the signal for retreat is given and the men
march home, hot, dusty, tired, and covered with
cinders, leaving behind them a blackened waste of
ground, from which an occasional thread of smoke
still rises.







THE ZONIAN.


SUNSET ACROSS THE CANAL.

Helen TwYman, '27.


Of all the things I have seen since I came to
Panama, the sunset across the Canal fascinates
me most. There is a special mountain over which
the sun disappears, and that mountain seems to me
almost a land of dreams.
Whcn the sun is just above the top crest the
rays are so strong it is hard to discern the shape.
Soon, as the sun sinks a little lower, the top ridge
cuts a little piece out of the circle of light. The





A SONNET.

Georie Goodhue, '27.

To think that in this whole wide world of ours
There's not a soul that has its counterpart;
There's not a single, solitary heart
That's issued like another. All the hours
This earth has whirled about, bearing its flowers
Of Sin, Deceit, and Death, Life flings its dart,
Hits every) mortal with the self-same art,
Yet each grieves but according to his powers!

Then shall we not, Oh, Omnipresent One,
To whom our little differences are known,
Guess, when our tiny earthly tricks are done-
The seeds that we have come to sow are sown--
That for this very difference Thou'lt receive us,
And of our weighty, worldly woes relieve us?



VISION.

Eloise Lull, '27.

This rugged hill, clean swept by every wind,
Uplifting to the skies its open face,
Expressing, at the touch of winds that chase
O'er its broad expanse, all moods known to mankind,
Becomes a vantage point from which I find
All things made clear which lie between its base
And a horizon reaching far in space.
On lesser heights, by looming things that bind,

My vision is too much obscured. And so
It is in Life, when through our own mind's eye,
So oft made blind by petty doubts and low,
And held fast-bound in cold convention's sway,
Except when lifted by emotion high,
We do not see the right and blindly stray.


sky then begins to turn a deep orange. As the
sun sinks lower and the sky becomes redder, the
mountain turns almost black against the red back-
ground. There is a little cup in the top of the crest
which I believe, from the dark outline, to be entire-
ly barren except for one tree. This tree is on the
right slope and is shaped like an opened parasol.
The sky changes from red to a deep bluish
purple. The outline grows dim, and now night is
here and the sunset is over.





TO OUR CELLAR DOOR.

Mlarv E. Curry, '27.

O, cellar door, that gave me so much fun
As down your worn and polished face I slid;
First built to shield a passage, as a lid,
Protecting stores from rain and wind and sun.
Your painted face at first was all too stern,
But soon we found beneath that coat so red,
Av \ ll,..r., .to please. The news soon spread,
Then boys and girls alike would wait their turn.
And now, O, cellar door, you're but a memory,
For time has passed and life with all its cares
Has swept away, except in reverie,
Appreciation of the simple fares.
And if I could, back through the years I'd slip,
A %whir, a slide, a scream, a thump, a rip.



A WOULD-BE SONNET.
Marion E. Daniels, '27.

The first eight lines must introduce a thought,
Oh, dear, what possibly could that thought be?
I've tried and tried until it seems to me
That my poor brain is woefully distraught.
There must be five feet to a line; it ought
To rhyme, a-b-b-a and c-d-e.
I've tried so hard to do it right, but see-
The first eight lines are done without the thought!

The outcome in the sextet must be told,
Of thought contained in the preceding part.
A sonnet must be fourteen lines in all.
The ending now to you I must unfold-
My fourteen lines accomplished, I'll depart,
Not t.:.lli,: you one single thing at all!









NEWS NOT ACCEPTED TNEW p ial T attltr NEWS NOT ACCEPTED
AS The Trpia BY
POST-OFFICE MATTER NOTHINGKNOWS NOTHING INTELLIGENT PEOPLE
VOLUME .SEE BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL, CANAL ZONE,RIDAY, JUNE 3 PRICE: TI SENSE
VOLUME .oooooo BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL, CANAL ZONE,.PRIDAY, JUNE 13 PRICE: TIN SENSE


SCHOOL CHILDREN STARVING!


A startling discovery was made on
April 4, of the sad plight of some of the
Seniors of B. H. S. The unfortunate
victims, Messrs. Forrest Cheeseman,
Balboa, C. Z., and Randolph Bever-
ley, Balboa Heights, C. Z., told their
story to the sympathetic ears of their
classmates the afternoon of March 31,
and their tale :o affe-ted their instruct-
ress that she sent them to the class
adviser for suggestions.
The two boys have struggled along
this year as best they could; but, as
one of them said pathetically, "To-day
we felt we must have food."
Kind-hearted "Betty B.," as her
friends call Miss Elizabeth Bachus,
Fort Clayton, C. Z., having on her desk
a box of candies given her by an
ardent admirer, generously told For-
rest he could have the whole box. Mr.
Cheeseman, having assuaged his


RATS TO BE IN GREAT DEMAND

Cat Racing Soon to Start in Pan-
ama.
Stadium Now Being Built in Bella
Vista by Mr. Solly Toledano.

We have been informed that work is now
being rushed for the completion of a stadium
for cat racing, a sport that is in much vogue in
China at the present time and which will be
introduced here by Mr. Solly Toledano, sports-
man and cake eater.
It has also been announced that the famous
cat trainer and breeder. Mr. Jack De Castro,
is en route from China with 2,000 specimens,
from the best cat-raising farms in the Orient.
Pari-mutual will be sold. Under such
management the enterprise will surely be a
success.
BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL HAS A
POET LAUREATE.

Mr. Robert Blaney, the budding young poet
of Balboa High School, has been chosen by the
National Poets' \ i.. r.i *, .r ii r i i ,- rre
of Central and '.ii .,i, \rrr Hi; uo ..K I
poems, "Gleanings from a Vacuum," won him
this fame, especially his most-remembered
poem. "To a Buzzard," which will stay in the
hearts of the trop;..d L.-..[- f .'r'-. ,r. His
S;i i.il .1 L .. ri.ii. h in l.-. i l u rl l,, and in-
., .n [,;r 'M'.- rh, ir, n,-J,- hi.r hrrl [Ih name of
P.. I .i-.. i it \ r Bl.tr., A. I 1i hee!
NEAR RIOT.

Insist on Attending School Des-
pite Closed Doors.

Police Called.

On Saturday morning, March 26, the school
at Balboa was besieged by a large body of
itu '- ri al. ,1. .d. i l,- d .. doors ir;. dI t.
o,, i'- it, ', ', I- h- Il.r. M r. M ,.( ..m .
m n. r,. ,l ',1 iL' 1, ,i .'r." the crowd by
telling them that this was not a school day.
However, the ambitious students insisted that
teacher hbe sent for and school held.
As a last resort police were called to the
scene to preserve order. Numerous policemen
were stationed around the school for the rest
of the day to avoid similar attacks.


hunger, gave the box to his friend, who,
he knew, was also nearly starving.
The members of the class were unable
to conceal their emotion at such an
occurence, knowing, as they did, the
cause of it. Miss McMahon, who was
in charge of the class, felt it necessary
to inquire as to the cause of the excite-
ment; and she said on inquiry, "I
shall never regret the impulse which
prompted me. It led to the exposure
of such suffering as I had never dream-
ed of. The thought of these poor
children overtaxing their little brains
in attempting to cope with English
literature while longing for enough
food to support life will never leave
me."'
The boys were vehement in their
thanks to the girl who gave them the
sustenance they craved. "We owe
it all to her," they said.


BENJAMIN REESE CHOSEN
SCHOOL ATTORNEY

Mr. Benjamin Reese, the honored :. -trl. i,
of Balboa High School, was chosen S.I.,. .1 \i-
torney for the session of '26 and '27. Mr R,. -.
made his big hit a few days before the first
semester examinations. Miss Whaley, the law
instructor, asked a question which required
deep thought. After asking some of the less
intellectual students, she said: "Benjamin,
what do you think about it?" Ben, rising from
his seat, drowsily answered: "Madam, I was
just dreaming over the matter." and again
retired to his comfortable seat.

MUSICIAN GIVES PIANO RE-
AT BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL
ON ST. PATRICK'S DAY.

Prominent Senior Plays Famous
Irish Song for Schoolmates.

James Doran, the prominent musician of the
Senior Class of the Balboa High School, gave a
delightful piano recital during the noon hour
of March 17, St. Patrick's Day. Jimmy could
not bear to let the day pass without some sort
of an Irish song being played. Accordingly, he
went to the piano in the Assembly and rendered
with great beauty, technique, and feeling that
grand old piece, "The Wearing of the Green."
As the last notes died away, everyone broke into
loud and lingering applause and the smiling
Jimmy was besieged by admirers. The Irish
members of the school were particularly loud
in their praise. We hope that sometime in the
near future this celebrated musician will give us
another recital.


FUNERAL NOTICE
The inmates of the aquarium were
found dead the morning of March 30.
1927. Murder is suspected. The
police have several clues, which they
are ri-.\r.tir.c- 'i' The funeral will
be i i. ni April 1. 1927. All
friends and relatives are invited to
attend the services, which will take
Solace in the laboratory of Balboa
igh School.


EDITORIAL.
We have just accepted the post of
Editor of this great and noble organ
of Balboa High School. We are very
grateful for it, as we had reached our
last hot dog, and that only slightly
warm.
They tell us that an editorial is sup-
posed to take up great questions of the
day, more or less intelligently-the
less the better. We have carefully
thought it over and decided that this
hair-raising business is the most im-
portant. All the girls have -rarred in
a modest way to let their hair grow,
since they say they are far too often
mistaken for Freshmen boys at the
beginning of the year. This would all
be very well, only they go around
looking shaggy for weeks and then
re.al:rn and bob it again.
\\e think that the Government
ought to do something about it. We
don't know just exactly what, but
something. Maybe a subsidy (what-
ever that is) would fill the bill. Maybe
it would not.
Fellow students, we call upon you
to decide!
3U31$ilNOIO $ ------ atUuE-3
CATASTROPHE OVERTAKES
ENTERPRISING YOUNG
CHEMIST OF B. H. S.

Earl Dailey Is Almost Unclothed
By Effects of Strong Acid.

On March 22, Early Dailey, chemist of the
Balboa High School chemistry class, spilled
some strong acid, whicrl unfi-rirunr,t.l came
into contact with the t ru,,. r- .I Mr Dailey
and a fellow chemist. it,,- ..,'l u rmd Mr.
Dailey's leg and soon the young chrriri' be-
came aware of the degenerating Irif-t .it the
acid on his trousers. Immediately the alarm
was sounded and Mr N.,riru.p p.amre dashing
to the rescue with a ',.ttl- ,-.I .mmuni. water.
The day was saved; but, unfortunately, Mr.
Dailey's clothing was not. Enough of Mr.
Dailey's attire had been rescued, however, to
allow him to sneak home to rpr.-;r the dsiie,,
Much should be said of Mr. \..rr[rup tlmei
rescue and display of bravery. Herushedtothe
scene without thought of self. :thi. rndanFrring
his noble life. Young Daile: .to-ld heI eafi
without flinching and was calm ihr,.-ugl,.,ji Ith
trying ordeal to which he had been subjected.
UNIQUE HAY RIDE ENJOYED
BY PROMINENT PROFESSOR
AND FAVORITE PUPIL.
Professor L. S. Flint and Randolph Beverley
received a ride to Ancon on the front seat of an
enormous truck used to transport dead leaves
and grass. T'he r,,r,,.urthi .Alrelbra m..adlr a-'d
his favorite curfil h.jlad ',ii Inrermnbl. b-
the police station for a bus. Their patience was
exhausted, great matters were waiting to be
settled, in ij,'. r ..l ,. .i -take Pro ldence,
in the gil:- ..i ia i.cnti. truck N.'o 3ns1 came
to their ..d TIh- intrepid Irea.her begcerd a
ride from th. ri .rl. truck dlri.-r who.e heart
was touched so much by thr ernr,-aleti i.t lie
consented to allow the tired men to ride on the
front seat, providing they did not disturb the
two negro 1l0i.t r. r liw.,:r,-: :I ping Iticr The
rescued men we're ri nu-ii.,o,, .Ih.ut the ride.
even if the truck was loaded high with dead
leaves and dry grass.






THE ZONIAN.






THE ZONIAN.


FORE WORD.




SOCIETY-companionship and youth-where can a better example be found than
in dear old Balboa High? Just the mere getting together means all of this-jazzy
noon hours, class meetings, plays, dances, outings, festivals, luncheons-everything
in which youth centers its vitality and delight. Each year there has been an in-
crease in the student body, and with it, a greater enthusiasm in social activities,
for as the old saying goes, "The more the merrier."
None but those who have experienced the same or similar happy moments can
appreciate the wealth of joy which these few pages represent. To the alumni,
let these events recall fond memories, and renew old friendships; and to those
who are to take our places, let them be an incentive to carry on the proud name of
Balboa High with the same whole-hearted and vigorous spirit as ours.
-Frances Brown, '27.
-Jessie Banan, '29.







THE ZONIAN.


SCHOOL PARTIES.


SENIOR TABOGA OUTING.

The clock of the Army launch announced 2.30
just as she pulled out from Balboa headed for
Taboga. Singing and laughter seemed to possess
the occupants. Yes, it was the Seniors and their
friends on their way for a day of rollicking and
fun on that typical, tropical isle. Four o'clock
found them at Morro Island either donning bathing
suits or knickers for there was to be swimming at
Taboguilla for those who cared to go, and a hike
to the Cross for the others. Great fun was had
in the beautiful surf at Taboguilla, and the hours
seemed to fly for it was not long before all swim-
mers were aboard the launch headed for Morro
Island. Here they found the returned hikers
urging them to hurry and dress for the beach sup-
per that was being prepared. A huge bonfire
was built and it was not long before the fragrant
odors of coffee, roasted wieners and other appetiz-
ing eatables were filling the atmosphere.
Supper over, it was decided that a few games
should be played before going to the Hotel Aspin-
wall. Eight o'clock found the lively group at the
hotel, where Mrs. Malla.y was giving a dance.
Dancing, the lulling of the waves, the whispering
of the palm trees in the breeze, and the tropical
moonlight-what more could have been desired?
Laughter and gaiety bubbled through the happy
crowd, and it was with an almost regretful feeling
that the party boarded the launch at o1 o'clock,
homeward bound. As the last bright lights of the
little village faded out of sight, all felt a deep
affection for the little island which had afforded
them such a day of joy.



JUNIOR TABOGUILLA OUTING.

On the 3d of December, an army launch filled
with a group of merry-makers left Dock 17 at
4 sharp. It was not long before they had
reached their destination and made themselves
at home on the beautiful beach at Taboguilla.


No one was afraid to take a dip in the old ocean,
as "Bill" Allen was the available lifeguard.
Energy was plentiful, as was proved by the races
held on the beach. The lucky winners received
sweet prizes (Hershey bars). Of course the most
outstanding event was that of eating, and it was
not long before the boys had built a huge bonfire
and everyone got down to real business and roasted
wieners. After all had had their fill of pickles,
Eskimo pies, and hot d1-,, "Professor" Northrup
proved himself quite human and played a most
melodious mandolin.
Time simply flew, and it was not long before the
crowd returned to the launch, one boat load after
another. Talk about your Volga Boatmen, they
surely could not hold a candle to "Professor"
Northrup and Tim Mann. It was quite evident
the chaperones, Miss McMahon, Miss Melgaard,
Miss Laws, and Mrs. Bardelson, enjoyed them-
selves just as much as any of the students, and pro-
nounced the time well spent.



JUNIOR PARTY.

We will certainly have to hand it to the Juniors
for their "get up and go" when it comes to having
a good time. That Friday night on the 21st of
January spent at the Y. W. C. A. will long be
remembered by everyone.
The first thing on the program was a comic
boxing match, of four or five rounds, in which
Pugilist "Tim" Mann won the laurels for the
evening. Everyone agreed that the victory was
well won.
A pantomime followed, which was read by
"Larry" Golden and enacted by Barbara Hallen
and Thatcher Clisbee, the lovers; Tim Mann, the
father; and John Ohlson, the "vulgar" boatman.
It was well done, and special mention should be
given to those taking the part of the waves.
The remaining part of the evening was spent in
dancing and eating-no wonder everyone had
such a good time!


(a







THE ZONIAN.


JUNIOR DANCE AND CARD PARTY.
The month of May introduced one of the most
successful dances and card parties ever given by
Balboa High School. This was engineered by the
Juniors on the evening of M\l. 7, at the Hotel
Tivoli, and an invitation to attend was extended
to the public.
Lew hard's s Canal Zone orchestra presided over
the beautiful ballroom and with jazzy music met
the demands of the enthusiastic dancers. Bridge
and pinochle games were played, and many of the
beautiful prizes of the evening were given to the
winners of these games. "Dance and be merry,"
seemed to be the motto of all, and there is no doubt
that everyone did just this. Balboa High can
feel proud of the way in which her students pro-
duced such a happy and successful evening.

SOPHOMORE TACKY PARTY.
Those attending the Sophomore Tacky Party
given at the Y. W. C. A., Friday evening, April 1,
pronounced it a huge success.
Miss Whaley, the popular class adviser, who was
assisted by Mrs. Robert Hutchings and Mrs.
Herbert Engelke, helped everyone to -nlioy him-
self, although it was not a hard thing to do. Sev-
eral games, such as "Cat" and "Double Letter,"
were played with much enthusiasm; and prizes
of bracelets, music boxes, dolls, and rattles were
awarded to the lucky winners. Since it was a tacky
party, all were dressed in very amusing costumes,
among which those of funny old men, babies,
tramps, and old maids were ridiculously conspicu-
ous. For her unique costume of an old spinster,
Zonabel Demuth received the girl's prize. The
"sure 'nuf" bum, whom we know in daily life as
Joe Hummer, was well-deserving of the boy's prize.
The inevitable "good eats" were present, which
played no little part in the good time. As one
Sophie so well put it: "The only people who have
cast any JisparahinL comments about the Sopho-
more Party are the upper classmen, who tried in
vain to be included anlcng the guests." According
to that statement it must have been good.

FRF.SHiA.N GIRLS' PARTY.
Friday evening, March 19, the Freshman Girls
of Balboa High School gave a party at the Y. W.


C. A. After many games had been played, the
jazzy little phonograph was put to work and the
girls spent the rest of the evening dancing. Mrs.
Koperski, the popular class adviser who was
acting as hostess, had planned delicious refresh-
ments and found little trouble in making the first
activity of the Fre;hman Girls a very successful
one.



FESTIVAL NIGHT AT Y. W. C. A.

The second annual Festival Night of the Balboa
High School Supper Club was held at the Y. W. C.
A., April 9, at 7 o'clock.
The various booths, where hot dogs, candy, ice
cream, frozen suckers, and punch could be pur-
chased, were attractively arranged, to say nothing
of the fish pond, where all young sportsmen could
fish to their hearts' delight, or rather as long as
there was a supply of ten, fifteen, or twenty-five
cents "fishes."
The first and largest event of the evening was
the heart-rending drama, "WildNell, the Pet of the
Plains," or "Her Final Sacrifice." The story was
of Wild Nell, who, when she saw her lover won
by a fairer maiden, made a supreme sacrifice.
The Indians were preparing to burn the fair one,
Lady Vere de Vere, when \\ild Nell discovered it
and hastened to tell Handsome Harry. The two
were such wild fighters that they soon killed all of
the Indians and saved Lady Vere de Vere. Then
Wild Nell stabbed herself, so that she would not
be in the way of the lovers. The curtain fell on a
scene with dead Indians lying in the background,
and the two lovers bowing their heads in respect
to the sacrifice of the dead Wild Nell, who claimed
middle stage.
The Goop Stunt, the sad chant of a lonesome
goop, was very popular. The talented actress is
concealing her identity.
The last event on the program was a recitation
by Virginia Clement which was quite cleverly
done, showing that women are capable of changing
their minds-many times at ihe most critical
moment.
Dancing claimed the rest of an evening that had
met with great success.







THE ZONIAN.


SCHOOL PLAYS.


SI \'IOR PLAY.


One of the most successful plays of the season
was given by the Senior Class of Balboa High
School, Friday evening, April 22, at the Balboa
Clubhouse. From the time the curtain rose,
interest was intense until the lively plot had come
to a close. "A Bachelor's Honeymoon" met with
great success due as much to the splendid acting
as to the interesting and extremely humorous
plot.
Sampson Bachelor, a widower, has just been
secretly married to a beautiful young chorus girl,
Lettie Lamb. The newlyweds steal away to the
groom's country lodge on an island off the coast of
Maine, in order to coneal their secret from Min-
erva, Sampson's older sister, in whose hands his
fortune lies. Instead of being away from their
world, as they had planned, Lettie and Sampson
are unpleasantly surprised by the arrival of James
Howson, one of those nuisances who always present
themselves at a most inopportune moment;
Minerva Bachelor, an aristocrat, arrives, bringing
with her the rest of the uninvited guests. Minerva
is Sampson's sister and she is raising her brother's
twin daughters, Polly and Molly; Polly, a modern
young flapper and excitement seeker; Molly, just
sweet seventeen and the apple of Hector Fournay's
eye. Other intruders are Hector Fournay, a
doctor, former fiance of Lettie Lamb and Molly's
lover; Linda, Mable, Maud, Bessie, and Peggy,
the twins' lawn party guests and lively ones at
that. Seth and Comfort Coffin, the general care-
takers and housekeepers of Sampson's lodge, be-
come quite upset by their employer's peculiar
actions.
In order to prevent inMmer\.'s disinheriting
Sampson, and to avoid the possibility of her
reputation being ruined, Iettie poses as Sampson's
cook under contract. The interlacing difficulties
work themselves into such a knot that it seems
next to impossible for disentanglement. However,
the climax comes after Howson has accomplished
his mad-dog episode and lMiLr\.ia has ordered
Sampson to leave his home, and his daughters to
think of him as a "dead one." Sampson then
MR 5207-9


resolves to defend his wife's honor by a duel with
Fournay and make a clean breast of the affair
to Minerva.
When questioned by Minerva, Sampson says he
is going out to shoot, and she naturally thinks he
is going to commit suicide. She hastens to entreat
Lettie to save him, and in return she grants the
young woman .ii. trhiL' that she might desire.
This is the turning point that puts aright the grand
entanglement.
The cast, as they appeared, on the scene, are:
Angela Klemmer, who took the part of Lettie
Lamb and enacted the part of an attractive, witty,
chorus girl to perfection; Stanton Peterson, Samp-
son Bachelor, the newly wedded man whose pre-
dicaments and actions kept the audience in an un-
ceasing strain of laughter; Roberty B1Hmiy, Seth
Coffin, the caretaker, who played his part extreme-
ly well (the whistling especially); Ruth Fraser,
whose inquisitive nature and manner of drawing
conclusions made her a very humorous and lik-
able character; Leslie Banan, James Howson, one
of those general nuisances who are always in-
truding into other people's affairs. Leslie is certain-
ly deserving of the highest praise for his dramatic
talent. Helen French, showed her excellent talent
for acting, as Minerva, an old maid. We must say,
Helen made a matron entirely too attractive to
have ever been a spinster. Betty Granberry fault-
lessly pictured the vim and vigor of a young
flapper, Polly; Ruth Johnson, Molly, proved that
the old fashioned girl is loved as much as her
modernized sister is admired. The roles of Linda,
Mable, .l.ini., Bessie, Peggy, were taken by Ma-
tilda Van Siclen, Janice Grimison, Hagar Ahlfont,
Juanita Orr, and NI.iri.:ln Allen, respectively.
These pretty, lively flappers took their parts quite
naturally. Last, but not least, is Russel Jones
whose role of Hector Fournav was excellently done.
As ever, Mrs. Baker furnished pleasing music
between acts, with her capable orchestra. Let
it be added that the Senior Class owes the success
of this play to Mr. E. L. Hogan, who so graciously
gave his splendid services in directing the play.


(a


'''




le







66 THE ZONIAN.


JUNIOR PLAY.


Friday evening, M.i1 27, at 8.30, the Junior
Play was given at the Balboa Clubhouse. As every-
one remembers, "Eliza Comes to Stay" proved to
be a great success.
The cast of characters was as follows:


Sandy Veroll
Montague Johnson
Uncle Stoop Alexander
Herbert, the valet
Eliza Vandam or Dorothy
Vera Lawrence
Aunt Elizabeth Pennybroke
Mrs. Attoway, the nurse


. THATCHER CLISBEE
SAM GURNEY
WARREN GILMAN
GERALD MAIERS
GERTRUDE HARRISON
VIRGINIA EWING
S STELLA PRICE
SELSBETH WHALER


The setting is in a bachelor's apartment in New
York. A short resume will help to recall the spicy
plot. Young Sandy Veroll is expecting a ward,
supposedly a golden-haired baby girl, and finds
himself in a predicament when this golden-haired
child turns out to be an awkward, unattractive girl
of eighteen years. He is engaged to an actress, Vera
Lawrence, who breaks the engagement when


learning of Sandy's financial condition, and his
troublesome ward. Matters go from bad to worse.
Eliza falls in love with her guardian, driving him
to distraction and to Europe as well.
Upon his return Sandy finds that his ugly duck-
ling has been transformed into a beautiful, at-
tractive girl, whom he realizes he loves. For his
sake, presumably, Eliza, now Dorothy, has en-
gaged herself to Montague Johnson, and Sandy
makes a desperate attempt to prevent such a
marriage by trying to send her to a convent. At
this, she resolutely determines to leave her guard-
ian and go out into the world to support herself,
whereupon Sandy makes a proposal of marriage in
his wild fear of her leaving. In the meantime news
has come that Vera has married Sandy's wealthy
Uncle Stoop. To make a long story short, they
are married and live happily ever after, as the
story books say.
Let it be added that the splendid acting of the
cast as a whole played no little part in making the
performance a highly enjoyable one.


SONGS.


Yes, we like to sing! That's what makes our
world go "round," and let me tell you, Banan is
right there where it comes to composing words to
what we like to sing. Mrs. Baker gave us a day
off from chorus several days ago and we sang our
class songs. Here are two of our favorites:


BYE-BYE, HIGH SCHOOL.
(Tune--"Blackbird.")

We're leaving all these halls so gay,
We checked in all our books to day,
Bye, bye, High School.
No more cramming for a "D,"
No more staying after three,
Bye, bye, High School.
Teachers never seemed to understand us,
Oh, what hard looks they all used to hand us!
But, whi!e we make our way thro' life,
We'll think of you thro' all the strife,
High School, bye, bye.


CALL ME BACK, BALBOA HIGH.
(To the tune of "Call Me Back, Pal O' Mine.")
Call me back, Balboa High,
To those days long gone by,
Call me back to your halls once again
In the sweet reverie,
Of that dim memory,
I see you once again.
Though the years come and go,
And though life's ebbing low,
1 shall never forget "Auld Lang Syne."
And the tears come at last,
When I dream of the past,
Of those days spent in old Balboa High.


If you don't believe they are good just try them
on your piano.







THE ZONIAN.


SENIOR CAKE SALE.

Congratulations, Seniors, your first activity of
the year was a booming success!
On February Ii, at 2 o'clock, a great crowd
gathered around a table beautifully decorated with
purple bougainvillae, at the entrance of the Balboa
commissary, to feast their eyes on a sight worth
seeing. They not only saw, but also bought, for
the tempting dishes of cakes, salads, baked beans,
candy, fresh rolls, and pies, were irresistible.
Senior class spirit maintained its past record
of good support, and the committee composed of
Agnes Johnson, Ruth Fraser, Matilda Van Siclen,
James Doran, Russel Jones, and Stanton Peterson,
received excellent help and cooperation from
fellow students.
The Chairman, Agnes Johnson, is to be con-
gratulated on the well-planned, and orderly man-
ner in which the activity was engineered to
success.


TALK BY DOCTOR EVANS.

A special assembly was called Friday morning,
February 25, at 8 o'clock; and Assistant Super-
intendent Ben Williams introduced Dr. Evans,
who is closely connected with The Chicago Tribune,
in which he has a department devoted to the teach-
ing of better health and better living. Dr. Evans
is known for his energetic and powerful public work.
He has been honored with many degrees, among
which are the dIlrc- of L. I. D. by Tulane Uni-
versity, and the dce'rcc of Doctor of Public Health
by the University of Mi hiL:.in.
Dr. Evans proceeded to address the assembly on
the subject of "Intelligent Curiosity." In the
room, no sound was audible, except the clear,
ringing tones of Dr. Evans' voice, which held the
students spellbound.
The only unpleasant thing about this interesting
talk was that its twenty, minutes' duration was
entirely too short. I am sure that in the years to
come, we will all consider these questions, which
will be very valuable to us in solving many of
life's problems.


JUNIOR LUNCHEON.

At 12 o'clock, on April 27, old Balboa High
seemed to be transformed into a tlirt.r..it place,
and one found on the second t. r of the building a
lunch room. Long white tables holding plates of
sandwiches, cakes, cookies, salads, pickles, and
even a cooler of that refreshing beverage, Delaware
Punch, immediately called the attention, as well as
the appetites, of hungry students and teachers
alike who passed down the long line where they
were promptly served by gay Juniors.
After everyone had answered the call of the wild
(the starved), the orchestra, which was a combina-
tion of Rodger's and Knight's orchestras, afforded
such jazz that no time was lost in finding a dancing
partner and stepping out. Thanks to Mr. Mc-
Commons, we were given a quarter of an hour
extra and it is useless to say that we "jazz-seekers"
made the most of it.
The only sad part of the luncheon was that at
I o'clock we were all students once again, and had
to get down to some conscientious studying.


FIRST A, \M I WLY MEETING.

The first assembly of all the classes was held
Friday, February 4, at 2.45. The purpose for this
meeting was to work up sch ol spirit and yells for the
"Big Game" the following afternoon with Cris-
tobal High, upon which the year's championship
was pending.
Principal McCommons presented Mr. Bogda,
who stated the specific purpose of this meeting
and urged Balboa High from its lull in school
spirit. Then cheer leader Greene elucidated upon
the manner in which our yells were to be 'i* ,i
and showed us how to do so, with his team-
Barbara Barr, Helen Twyman, Hill'." Rader,
ani "Jew-B)y" Smith. They did their ".r4rf"
and worked up enough school spirit to take Rome
itself.
This is the first record of Balboa High's ever
getting down to a real show-down of school spirit
You've got it in you Balboa High, so don't fall
down on the job by forgetting it in the future!






Pages
Missing
or
Unavailable







70 THE ZONIAN.


HIGH SCHOOL CALENDAR.


OCTOBER.
I. Registration.
2. We can't wait till Monday comes.
4. Back to the old grind again with a new in-
terest in new teachers, new students, and bald-
headed scrubs.
5. Business of renewing old friendships.
o1. Sheik Elias returns to our midst from Colom-
bia.
13. Miss Currier and our fifteen minute song
period start us out on the right foot.
14. First meeting cf classes. (Class.meetings.)
20. Class advisers are appointed.
21. Election of class officers; Viva Russel Jones,
senior president!
22. Back to our jazzy noon hours with Banan at
the piano.
29. The first month goes out with a bang.

NOVEMBER.
i. We miss the old seniors of '26.
4. New teacher. Welcome, Miss Vette!
8. Nominations for ZONIAN staff.
9. Report cards and, oh, what worried faces!
o1. Robert Blaney got a hair cut. Will wonders
never cease?
12. Wildurr Willing, '26, just can't stay away.
Comes back for a P. G. course.
15. Final election of ZONIAN staff; that means
work.
18. A bird by the name of Static has whispered
that we have a Radio Club.
24. Blessed of all days, Thanksgiving Day,
comes to-morrow.
25. Everyone did the turkey justice.
29. Blue Monday. The four days' rest has
spoiled us.
30. Principal McCommons addresses THE
ZONIAN staff.
DECEMBER.
I. Banan gets poetical and composes words to
lost chord.
2. "Little" Henry Knight, Miss Vette's pet, gets
a front seat in American History so he won't miss
anything.
3. Junior Taboguilla outing. It was all wet, but
oh, what fun!
6 Senior Valentinos go on barber strike
7. Phy%.ical exams. Doctors out looking for
work.


8. Banan once more in the limelight, featuring
new words to "Black Bird."
9. Senior Play Committee appointed.
13. Gnashing of teeth over senior play.
14. We wonder why Herby Engelke was sent out
of commercial arithmetic with a girl's wooly
sweater on.
15. Misi. Currier is teaching us the Christmas
Carols for the 'ndredth time. Will we never learn?
16. Valentinos prosper! Mustaches and beards
can by recognized on a few.
17. Off for the Christmas holidays. Merry
Christmas to all!
JANUARY.
3. Everyone back with good intentions and
numerous resolutions.
4. Miss Currier and Mr. Baker were quietly
married on December 17. We all join in to wish
them every happiness in the world.
5. We also find that Miss Grover has forfeited
her life of single blessedness. Good luck to the
newlyweds.
6. Latest fad. Girls wearing bobby-skirts, boys'
ties, shirts, and belts. "Girls will be boys."
7. Seniors' first activity meets with misfortune.
Cake sale prevented by that of Balboa baseball
team.
10. Stella Newbold, '26, visits our old halls.
They just can't keep away.
I1. High School sheiks now wearing girls' slave
bracelets. What has become of our boys?
13. Three rousing cheers; we have a Student
Council!
14. English 7 attempts first sonnet-writing. No
one received any laurels.
15. Miss McMaNhoin enters Ancon Hospital.
We're all very sorry-but she made us write those
sonnets.
18. Helen French has also been in the hospital
and returns to-day, bringing good news of Miss
McMahon.
19. Miss Vette tells her history class that the
Civil War Veterans are the dearest and sweetest
old men, and that she just loves them!
20. We notice that Wildurr has taken a fatherly
interest in showing one Annette Gurney around
old Balboa High. We just wonder about that post-
graduate course he came back for.
21. Junior party. Good crowd, good eats, good
time!







THE ZONIAN.


24. Everyone joins in a hearty welcome for
.Mi], McMahon.
26. M i.. Jewell of The Panama Times addresses
THE ZONIAN staff.
27. No snow to-day.
31. The month ended with the last day.

FEBRUARY.

1. Marion Daniels has had her graduation
pictures taken three times and isn't satisfied yet.
'Smatter with those pictures?
2. Powder puffs and lip-sticks busy. ZONIAN
staff pictures taken.
4. \'1.rhtir nature got her dates mixed. Rained
to-day and this is supposed to be dry season.
7. Helen French wants to know why it is that
Mr. Northrup can stand in the back of the room
and hear her whisper up in the front of it.
8. Senior rogue gallery turned into staff. What
an assortment!
9. Will someone please tell Ada Jackson the
exact spot where President Garfield was shot?
I I. Senior cake sale a huge success.
12. John Powell runs off to the interior but re-
turns in time for exams. Tough luck, Johnny;
we feel that we'd like to have done the same.
15. Books open day and night. Cramming for
exams tomorrow.
16. Torture to all present.
17. Words can't express our sentiments.
18. Everyone is worried and worked to death.
21. The misery is over but everyone looks
haggard-even gray.
22. Holiday, thanks to George Washington.
And that's no lie!
23. Miss Frost wants to know why her Spanish
7's can't sing the Panamanian National Anthem.
So do we.
24. Principal McC,.mnmriin goes out to do some
recruiting (to take a vacation).
25. Dr. Evans speaks to us on "Intelligent
Curiosity." Evidently he has not talked to any of
our girls.
27. Carnival now in full sway. Lessons are for-
gotten.
28. Report cards. Draw your own conclusions.

MARCH.

I. Return of the Carnival prodigals-the reign
of the Devil is over.


3. Marian Willis has an artistic turn of mind in
history class; but Miss Vette can not appreciate
her drawing a fly on Caesar's nose, in her book.
6. Although we always knew "Dolly" Allen was
a little creature, we were quite taken back when
she told us to-day that she was an ant (aunt).
7. Short stories turned in. Here's where the
plots thicken.
8. love's highway is rough-Helen and Forrest
quarrel.
9. English 8 learns that there's a book in the
Administration Building Library on the "Breed
and Variety MI. dlrn Chickens." Probably some
interesting book on the modern flapper.
1o. Helen and Forrest kiss and make up.
14. Earl Dailey shows inclinations towards
being a great penman-stuck finger in ink well
to-day.
16. The deep basses in chorus got so good that
.Mr,. Baker had to remind them not to accompany
their own solo.
18. Sunny weather to-day; if it doesn't rain.
21. Editor-in-Chief of THE ZONIAN staff has a
sore toe.
22. Dailey once more in the limelight; burns
trousers near to extinction with sulphuric acid in
Lab.
23. We wonder why Russel blushed so this
morning in chorus, when we sang "Juanita."
24. Spirit worked up at class meetings for inter-
class track meet.
2;. Friday, because Thursday has gone and
Saturday hasn't come yet.
28. Seniors come out the victors in the class
meet, but Freshies surely gave them a run for
their money.
29. Heartless English teacher dismisses three
hungry Seniors from class for partaking of the
forbidden lollypops.
30. School in mourning-the aquarium died
to-day.
APRIL.

i. All Fools' Day; Sophies gave a party.
4. Balboa High wins track meet from Cristobal.
6. Stone-hearted Principal wakes Sheik Duran
from beauty nap at sixth period.
7. Mary Curry almost went to sleep in English 8.
Too many parties?
8. First rainfall to-day.
12. Congratulations in order. Betty Bachus
wins short story contest.







THE ZONIAN.


13. Easter holiday begins.
18. Back to the old grind again.
19. Poor Barbara Barr has the a hrmuping cough.
20. Helen and Forrest were dismissed from
English for inattentiveness-to the lesson.
22. Laughs galore. Where? Senior play.
25. Ruth Pyle and Angela Klemmer had a hair-
pulling contest to-day when Mrs. Patterson left
the assembly for a few minutes.
26. Frolicsome aeroplane flits by window of
English 8's room-trying to tempt us!
27. We are sorry to learn that Marian Willis'
health is forcing her to leave us.
28. Junior luncheon-good eats and a jazzy
noon hour.
29. Ba bara is whooping no more. Welcome to
our midst, comrade.
MAY.
i. May Day-it may rain.
3. Another affair progressing. Lonny wins the
fair Muriel's favor.
5. Lost and Found. Very "personal" letter
addressed to "Charlotte." Owner kindly remove
same from Editor's desk. (Row I, seat 12.)
6. The Editor notices that the "Charlotte" note
has been removed.
7. Junior Card Party and Dance at the Tivoli.
o1. Remarkable event of the day-Emma
Mic Keowin had her Spanish lesson prepared.
Ii. Miss Vette says she'd like to go to Haiti to
see the barbarous natives that make human
sacrifices. She's more curious than we are.
12. Annette and Wildurr met for the 'nth time
to-day. Must be a bad case.
13. Unlucky day-for school books.
14. Senior Taboga outing.
16. Ada Jackson tried to put something over
when she said her two-minute current events topic
was too long to give in civics class to-day.
17. Nita Orr had on a new dress to-day.
18. The sorrow of sorrows! The well-beloved
frozen sucker has been ostracized from our society.


You can scarce expect one of our age
To write for the public or the stage;
And if we chance to fall below
Bryant or Edgar Allen Poe,
Don't view us with a critic's eye,
But pass our imperfections by.


21. Miss Vette says she really feels sorry for
some of her civics class who expect to graduate.
An angel in disguise, a sympathetic teacher at last.
23. Junior's treasurer threatening murder to
those delinquent in class dues.
24. Everybody manifesting spring fever-or
rather, mariana fever.
27. Junior Play at Balboa Clubhouse.
30. Robert Robinson and Joe Duran held hands
in English class to-day. That is probably a
demonstration of "brotherly love."
31. It won't be long now, Seniors.

JUNE.

1. Greetings. Summer has come!
2. Assembly clock stopped at 2. Wonder which
one of the freshmen looked at it?
4. Dolly Allen talked fifty miles a second to-day,
and got sent to the office for stamping her feet.
5. Frances Smith wants to know if goats really
eat tin cans.
7. Everyone busy picking out graduation
clothes.
9. Post office business picks up-"Quituation"
invitations floating all over the country.
10. Junior-Senior banquet.
13. Little Henry Knight no longer gets into
mischief in civics class; he goes to sleep.
14. We wonder what will become of the "Old
Trysting Place" when Nita and Russel graduate?
16. ZONIAN entertainment.
17. Class Night. Seniors night of reign (no-
body got wet though).
19. Baccalaureate sermon at Balboa Union
Church.
20. Seniors really begin to look studious.
21. Exams! !!
24. Tears, smiles, and dignified Seniors. Com-
mencement exercises.
27. Balboa High da\ s are drnaaing to a close.
28. The Ship of '27 has sailed beyond the
horizon. Hail the Seniors of '28.


TO OUR TEACHER.
Warren Gilman, '28.
Just give us time, and by and by,
We'll appear in print before your eye;
Large streams from little fountains flow;
Tall oaks from little acorns grow;
And all great men-like you and me-
Once had to learn their A, 8, C,




THE ZONIAN.


U 0- ,1


MR 5207-- 10


7.3






THE ZONIAN.


3 FOREWORD.




S EVERYDAY down hereon thelsthmus of Panama beside the far-famedCanal, peo-
ple pass our way from distant shores. We who live here are constantly exchanging
friendly greetings with strangers. It seems only fit and proper that a school so
situated as Balboa High School is, should have a large Exchange Department.
Our aim this year was to increase our Exchange Department; but due to the
slowness of the mails and the great distance that separates us from the majority of
schools, we regret to say that we have not attained the goal for which we strived.
May next year's class have better success.
We are proud of all of our exchanges. From them we gain a knowledge of what
other schools are doing. They render us new ideas and inspiration. We, as a
school, welcome them and hope to hear from them again next year.
-Miriam L. Halloran, '27.
-Dora Watts, '27.








THE ZONIAN.


THROUGH THE CRITIC'S EYE.


We received your publication, THE ZONIAN, this week.
Thank you for sending it. Your pictures are fine, especially
those intimate snapshots, and your views. Your whole maga-
zine shows thought in planning it.
Netop, Turners Falls High School,
Turners Falls, Massachusetts.

We think THE ZONIAN is a very interesting magazine, and
are very glad to make the exchange.
Eastonia, East High School,
Salt Lake City, Utah.

We are always eager to welcome the only other annual of the
Canal Zone. The material in your book is splendid, and we
wish you success in your future productions.
Caribbean, Cristohal High School,
Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Hacko, Centenary Collegiate Institute, Hackettstown,
N.J.
We like THE ZONIAN very much. The original write-ups
are very clever, the jokes are extraordinarily good, and in
general, the entire magazine is fine.
Hacko, Centenary Collegiate Institute,
Hackettstown, N. J.


We wish to say that THE ZONIAN was one of the most inter-
esting of the magazines which have come to our attention.
We shall ie glad to have your school on our exchange list.
The Ledger, High School of Commerce,
Portland, Oregon.

Your magazine is very complete and you have ave ery good
literary department. We especially liked your Peek-a-Boo
Section.
The Wai[h Hoo, Allegheny High School,
Pittshurg, Pa.

We received a copy of the 1926 issue of THE ZONIAN. It is
an excellent magazine and shows fine cooperation among the
staff members and students. Your joke department is enter-
taining and original. The page entitled "Rogues Gallery" is a
novel idea. We also enjoyed your literary department and
alumni notes. Our one suggestion is that you increase your
exchange department.
The cWhisp, Wilmington High School,
Wilmington, Delaware.

We thank you for exchanging with us and sincerely hope
you will enjoy the Parker Annual as we have THE ZONIAN.
Parker annual Parker High School,
Chicago, Illinois.


WE ACKNOWLEDGE THE FOLLOWING EXCHANGES:


The Argus, Gardner, Massachusetts.
Cardinal Notes, Girls Commercial High School, Brooklyn,
New York.
The Caribbean, Cristobal High School, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
The Eastonia, East High School, Salt I.ake City, Utah.
The Hermes, Hudson Falls High School, Hudson Falls, New
York.
High School Recorder, Saratoga Springs, New York.
The Key, Battle Creek, Michigan.
The Ledger, High School of Commerce, Portland, Oregon.
The Nautilus, Greenville High School, Greeneville, South
Carolina.
Netop, Turners Falls High School, Turners Falls, Massachu-
setts.
The Oracle, Jamaica High School, Jamaica, New York.
The Owl, Wellsville High School, Wellsville, New York.
The Parker Annual. Parker High School. Chicago, Illinois.


Red and Wlhite, Iowell High School, San Francisco, Cal-
ifornia..
The Reflector, Ferndale High School, Johnston, Pennsylvania
The IVah Hoo, Allegheny High School, Pittsburg, Pennsyl-
vania.
The IVhisp, Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Dela-
ware.



OUR NEWS-STAND.

The Blotter, High School of Commerce, Portland, Oregon.
Lake Breeze WVeekly, .r h lI'. I, Wisconsin.
Cardinal News, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.
The Dakota, High School, Alcester, South Dakota.
The Lowell, Lowell High School, San Francisco, California.
The lVestport Crier, Kansas City, Missouri.
The Zanesuillian, Zanesville, Ohio.


We acknowledge the following late arrivals:
The archive Northeast High School, Philadelphia, Pa.
The Cedar Chest, Toms River High School, Toms River, N. J.
Erasmian, Erasmus Hall High School, Brooklyn, N. Y.





















i-Y






mo. ox-






















Aoii
















4-1-




THE ZONIAN.


v-v


SPOLRS






78 THE ZONIAN.


FORE WORD.



BOYS' ATHLETICS.
BALBOA High School had a very successful year in athletics. We showed our
superiority in handball, tennis, track,and swimming; butwe fell dow n in baseball.
Our swimming coach, Mr. Grieser, turned out a fine team of swimmers. He
worked very hard with the boys and we express our thanks to him for his services.
Mr. Bogda, physical director, was an important factor in the success we had in
athletics; and we are very grateful to him for his interest in the sports of the
school.
Our school showed that it was not lacking in school spirit. In all of the
interclass and interscholastic meets, a large crowd always came out cheering the
participants. Each class had its own cheer leaders.
With our school spirit and success in athletics we had all that any school could
desire.
S- Joni F'.'.i,., "-7.
-Harry Granberry, '28.




GIRLS' ATHLETICS.
SPORTS and athletics have played a very important part in the activities of
Balboa High School this year. Students have shown greater interest and enthusi-
asm than in the past, and more stress and effort have been put forth in that field.
Class spirit has, indeed, been very much in evidence. Teachers and pupils alike
have turned out for all events; cheer leaders have been chosen; bands have been
on the scene; and in general, a true, whole-hearted school spirit has been displayed.
We owe a great deal of our success in athletics, however, to our instructors;
and we wish to express our appreciation to Miss Louise Hanna and Mr. Henry
Grieser.
-Angela Klemmer, '27.
--Katherine Sundquist, '27.

NM MI2MzMNER ~N V EMMV-A ~ yw ylyVA







THE ZONIAN.


Ba:ball Team.
Back row.-Mr. Bogda (Coach). Ben Reese. WVilliam Wood, Robert Robinson, Richard Johnson (Manager). John French, Earl Dailey,
Elias Mihalitsianos.
Front row.-Ernest Russey, Willliam Van Siclen. Roger Williams, Russel Jones (Captain), Thatcher Clisbee.


BASEBALL.


INTERCLASS BASEBALL.

A series of different games was arranged be-
tween the different classes of Balboa High School.
Although this has not been the custom it was
thought that this was the best and easiest way in
which to pick a team to represent the high school
as a whole. The Seniors came out first in the series,
winning mainly by their hitting ability. The
Juniors came second with the Freshmen next and
the Sophomores last. The result of the games are
as follows:


i. Seniors,
2. Juniors,
3. Seniors,


17; Sophomores, 1o.
7; Freshmen, 2.
to; Freshmen, 7.


4. Juniors, 9; Sophomores, 4.
5. Freshmen, 8; Sophomores, S.
6. Seniors, 15; Juniors, 7.


Thirteen players were chosen according to their
merits in the above games. They are:
i. Thatcher Clisbee 7. Elias Mihalitsianos
2. Earl Dailey 8. Ernest Russey
3. John French 9. Robert Robinson
4. Richard Johnson 1, i to. Ben Reese
5. Norbert Jones i Win. Van Siclen
6. Russel Jones (Capt.) 12. Roger Williams
13. William Wood

INTERSCHOLASTIC BASEBALL.

The first game of our scheduled three-game series
with Cristobal was played on the Gold Side. Grider
was Cristobal's twirling choice, while Reese did
mound duty for Balboa. We started out early,
getting to Grider for a one-run lead in the second
which might have been increased but for Clisbee's
mental "boner" when he took his time to reach
second after a caught fly.







80 THE ZONIAN.


Cristobal came back strong in the fourth and
pushed five markers across the platter on one
measly hit, a walk, three or four stolen bases, and
the same number of errors.
We kept pecking away at the offerings of Grider
and in the sixth hammered out two more runs,
but the rally was again cut short by foolish base-
running.
Greene, who succeeded Grider in the seventh,
was in good form and let us down for the rest of the
game without the semblance of a run, and Reese
also kept up his fine heaving.
Loose fielding and loose baserunning beat us,
Clisbee being the chief offender in this respect,
with his four errors and two mental lapses, being
quite ably seconded by the rest of the team,
and though defeat was bitter, it was some conso-
lation to know that Cristobal was not the deter-
mining factor.
The outstanding star of the game was Benny
Reese. He allowed Cristobal but three hits, all
of the bingles being garnered by the tail end of the
batting order, whiffed eleven of the Gold Coasters
and participated in all of our run scoring, driving
in two and scoring the other. Cristobal's shining
light was Greene, with his fine pitching, faultless
work in the field and general heads-up playing,
his work being marred by none of Reese's in-
frequent lapses.
HOW THE RUNS WERE SCORED.
Second Inning.
Balboa.-Reese was hit, stole second, and went
to third on Klunk's passed ball. Russey doubled
over second, scoring Reese. Clisbee singled to
second, Russey holding third. Jones struck out.
Elias flied out to right, Clisbee being doubled off
second for the final out.
Fourth Inning.
Cristobal.-Greene walked and stole second.
Arcia whiffed, but took second and Greene scored
when Clisbee threw the missed third strike into
right. Johnson threw out Bissonnette, Arcia
scoring when Clisbee missed Jones' throw to catch
him at the plate. Days singled to center and stole
second. Peterson walked and Days and he en-
gineered a double steal Grider hit to Elias who
played the ball home, all hands being safe. Grider
stole second. Peterson scored and Grider went to
third on a passed ball, and Grider scored on Reese's
wild heave just afterward. Will and Klunk both
fanned.


Sixth Inning.

Balboa.-Williams walked. Wood doubled to
left center, Williams holding third. Reese singled
to right, scoring both men. Grider caught Reese
sleeping off first. Russey popped to third. Clisbee
singled to center and stole second. Jones w alked.
Clisbee was caught at third on an attempted double
steal.
BOX SCORE.


Balboa High School.
Van Siclen, cf. ................
Williams, ss ........ .........
Wood, If ................... ...
Reese, p....................
Russey, rf ......................
Clisbee, c. ........... .......
Jones, ib....................
Elias, 2b......................
Johnson, 3b....................

Totals.....................


Cristobal High School.
Will, 2b .....................
Klunk, c. ............... . ..
Lowande, ss ................. ..
Greene, p, Ib. ..... ...........
Arcia, If. ..................
Bissonnette, 3b.......... .....
Days, cf...................
Wikingstad, cf............. .....
Peterson, rf................... .
Grider, p ................. ....
Rankin ib....................


AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
4 0 0 1 o o
3 1 0 1 2 0
4 1 1 o o o
2 I I 2 I 0
4 0 1 0 1 0
4 0 2 10 4 4
3 0 0 8 0 0
4 0 0 2 1 1
i o I o 3 o

29 3 6 24 12 5


AB. R. H.
3 o 0
4 o .o
4 0 0
2 1 o
3 1 o
3 o 0
2 I I
1 O 1
I I I
3 I o
0 0 0
0 00


Totals............... ..... 26 5 3 27 I 2

Score by innings.


Team. i. 2. 3. 4. 5- 6.
Balboa........ o I o o 0 2
Cristobal...... o o 0 5 o o


9. T.
0--3
x--5


Summary.
Two-base hit-Wood. Stolen bases-Reese, Russey, Clisbee
(2), Greene (2), Days (2) Peterson (2), Grider. Double plays
Will to Lowande to Greene, Peterson t4 Lowande. Hit
by pitched ball-By Grider Recese Hits-Off Grider, 6 in
6 innings; off Greene, 0 in 3 innings. Struck out-By Reese
ii, by Grider 4, by Greene 2. Base on b.ills-Off Reese 7,
off Grider 4, off Greene I. Earned runs-Balboa 3, Cristobal
o. Left on base-Balboa 5, Cristobal 5. Winning pitcher-
Grider. Umpire-McGinley.

The second game was played on our home
grounds and we drew a huge crowd. Grider was
Cristobal's pitching choice again and we used
Reese who heaved so well in the first encounter.







THE ZONIAN.


We got to Grider early again, touching him up
for one unearned run in the first and increased it
by two in the next stanza on Jones' hit, Lowande's
error,Van Siclen'sclout and Johnson's Texas leaguer.
Reese started his off-color work in the fourth,
when after one run had been tallied he obligingly
crowded the sacks, and then pulled out of the hole
by bearing down on Grider and Will.
In the fifth he donated a fat run to the cause
when he allowed Peanuts Days to stroll with the
sacks crowded, Klunk's double and free passes to
both Greene and Arcia telling the story. Then
just for contrast he let Peterson and Bissonnette
down without even a foul.
Reese passed but one man in the sixth and the
outlook began to get rosy, but the seventh hap-
pened to be the next inning. In this frame he
passed the first three men to face him, and a
conference was then called. After a short discus-
sion he was allowed to stay in, mainly on his prior
tendency toward *-riinini.' upon demand. But
Greene scored on an infield out and Bissonnette
unloaded the sacks with a timely double, which
did the damage. Grider got better as the game
went on, and we again finished two jumps behind.
Reese was again the center of attraction. His
free passes balanced his strike outs, and all came
at the wrong time. His generosity both in the
pitcher's and batter's boxes was the deciding
factor, although he gave but six singles, one more
that Grider allowed.
The farmer from Gatun pitched a nice game,
holding the head of our batting order to a row of
zeros, and his fine work is worthy of praise.
One anm.i/ia feature of the game was the ability
of Arcia and Days to populate the cushions, the
pair reaching first eight times out of ten trips to
the pan.
HOW THE RUNS WERE SCORED.
First Inning.
Balboa.-Williams hit to Bissonnette who
fumbled and then let loose a wild heave, Williams
taking second. Clisbee sacrificed him to third, and
he scored on Wood's long sacrifice to center.
Reese popped to Lowande.

Second I,, i'.''
Balboa.-Russey walked, but was caught steal-
ing. Jones singled and advanced to second on
Lowande's boot of Elias' grounder. Van Siclen
singled over third, Jones stopping at third. With
the infield plvaing in short, Johnson popped a
MR 5207-11


Texas leaguer over second, scoring Jones and
Elias. Williams lined to Lowande, and Van
Siclen was doubled at second.

Fourth Inning.
Crisloba.--Greene struck out. Arcia .ili.l
and went all the way around when Clisbee missed
Russey's throw. Days and Peterson got four wide
ones apiece. Bissonnette singled, Days holding
third, but all three men were left stranded when
Grider whiffed and Will was caught at first on a
slow roller to second.

Fifth Inning.
Cristoba/.--Klunk doubled, and took third on a
wild pitch. Reese threw Lowande out at first,
Klunk holding third. Greene walked, Arcia also
strolled, and Reese walked in a run by completely
losing control and passing Days. However, he
fanned both Peterson and Bissonnette to end the
inning.
Se'.nth Inning.
Crislobal.-Greene walked for the second time,
and stole second, going to third on a wild heave.
Arcia also walked and stole second on a short passed
ball. Reese filled the bases again when he passed
Days for the fourth time. \\ ll., ii- threw out
Peterson, Greene scoring on the play. Bissonnette
doubled to right center, i.ri. the bases.
Grider fanned, and Will was out on a hit to the
pitcher.
BOX SC'O E.


Cristobal High School.
W ill, 2b ...... .
Klunk, c. .....
Lowande, ss .
Greene, b ...
Arcia, If .
Days, cf .
Peterson, rf ....
Bissonnette,b h...
Grider, p ....

Totals ..... ..

Balboa High School.
W illiams, ss . ......
Clisbee, ib....
Wood, If ... .
Reese, p ...
Russey, c.........
Jones, cf.....
Elias, 2b. .........
Van Siclen, rf ...
Johnson, 3b... ......


Totals,..


H. PO.

8 S
1 2
0 0o
o 2


o 0
0 0


I c
4 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
0 1
I 0

7 3


33 5 6 2-


R. H. PO. A.
I 0 2 1
o 0 13 o



1 2 0 0
1 1 1 5

0 1 0 1


32 3 5 2- 10 2











Team.
Cristobal.
Balboa. ..


Score by innings.
2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7- 8. 9- T-
o o I I 0 3 0 0- 5
2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0- 3


Summary.
Two-base hits-Klunk, Bissonnette. Sacrifice hits-Clisbee,
Wood. Stolen bases-Reese, Elias, Klunk, Greene. Double
plays-Lowande to Will, Johnson to Elias to Clisbee. Hit
by pitcher-By Reese (Arcia). Struck out-By Reese II,
by Grider 8. Bases on balls-Off Reese io, off Grider 3.
Earned runs-Balboa o, Cristobal 4. Left on bases-Balboa
6, Cristobal Ii. Umpires-Currie and Burgoon.

TENNIS.
Thirty contestants entered a tournament to
decide the championship of the school and to pick
the six-man team which was to represent the high
school in all matches. In the finals, Warren Gilman
was defeated by Robert Robinson by the scores
6-6- 6-4, 6-4. In this, Robinson was considered to
be slightly better than his opponent; but as Gil-
man is a fine player, it was expected at any moment
that he would spring a surprise and come through
winning. However, Robinson played a good
and steady game as is shown by the above scores.
The six men that were to make up the team
were picked according to their merit in the tourna-
ment. They were Robert Robinson (captain),
\Wa rr n Gilman,Phares Butler, Earl Dailey, Francis
Butler, and Randolph Beverley. Willard Meredith
eventually defeated Beverley for sixth place.
BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL VS. CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL.
Balboa High School made up for last year's
defeat in tennis by winning every match played
against Cristobal High School. The games were
very uninteresting for competition was not
sufficiently keen. The results of the matches were:
Gilman defeated Klunk, 6-2, 6-o.
Robinson defeated Will, 6-1, 6-o.
P. Butler defeated Wikinstad, 6-o, 6-1.
E. Dailey and F. Butler defeated Will and Lowande, 6-2.
This is the first time in three years that Balboa
High School has won in the inter-scholastic games
of tennis.
BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL VS. BALBOA HEIGHTS.
The High School eac;il\ defeated the Heights,
winning three matches of the four plaJ ed.


BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL fIS. PACIFIC CLUB.


The High School won four marches and lost one.
Gilman lost this onl. match, playing a hard game
against Stapi. At first it was thought that Gil-
man would win, but his opponent was too ex-
perienced.

BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL i'S. P.\NA\MA-BAIBOA.

The High School came out ahead by winning
three matches out of the five played. These were
the closest of any of the games played thus far.
As is customary with the high school spirit, Robin-
son won a hard battle which, up to the end, he was
losing. Gilman won the next match, playing with
great skill. The next games, Phares Butler of the
High School lost. This was a great disappointment
for it was expected that Butler would win. Dailey
and F. Butler lost the next match to Stag and
Obarrio.
The High School boys made a ery poor showing
not being able to stand up against the skill of their
opponents. The next match n as doubles and upon
this depended the victory. Robinson and Gilman
won by the scores of 6-2, 6--3, finishing the games
off in great style.

BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL VS. .NCON COURT CLUB.

This proved to be the High School's Waterloo.
They lost every match, making it a complete
defeat. Robinson and Gilman lost the first
doubles match, not playing up to their usual form.
The next games were singles. Gilman lost the first,
not being able to stand up against his opponent's
drives. Robinson lost the next match, but by a
very slight score. This was the most exciting
match of the day. P. Butler lost the third singles
game, for his opponent proved too steady for him.
The next match was doubles played by the Butler
brothers. At first it looked as if they were going to
win, but their opponents' experience brought about
the High School boys' ultimate defeat.
These games ended the Balboa High School
tennis season for the year of 1927. All in all, it
was a most successful season, for the High School
lost only one match out of the five played.


THI- ZONIAN.







THE ZONIAN.


Tennis Team.
Back row.-Mr. Flint (Coach). Phares Butler. Warren Gilman. Robert Robinson (Captain).
Front ror.-Earl Dailey, Francis Butler. Willard Meredith.


SOCCER.


This is the first year that soccer has become an
interclass sport; and from the spirit displayed, the
game will be very likely to continue. Soccer will
probably be to us as American football is to the
schools in the United States. The warmness of the
climate prevents us from enjoying this national
sport; so, therefore, soccer naturally takes
American football's place.
Although only a few boys knew how to play
soccer, a large group turned out when it was


announced that this was to be an interclass sport.
Each class was then represented by a team. Three
games were to be played, but unfortunately only
two took place. The Freshmen won from the
Sophomores, and the Seniors beat the Juniors.
The two victors were to play to decide the cham-
pionship, but, as stated before, this game was not
played. It is hoped that next year soccer will
become an interscholastic sport between Cristobal
High School and Balboa High School.







THE ZONIAN.


Boys' Swimming Team.
Back ro.--Everett Allen. Henry KEight, Fred Helmeriehs, Leon Greene, Phares Butler, Laureaee Go!den, Mr. Grieser (Coach).
Fr;r.t rJ:.-Edward Corsaitt, Harry Granberry, August Schwinderman, George Halloran, Timothy Mann. Jack Humphrey.


S\\ I%!MING.


INTERCLASS SWIMMING MEET.
The interclass swimming meet was held at the
Balboa pool before a large crowd. Balboa High
School was well represented. As usual, the
Freshmen handed us another surprise by winning
the meet with a total of 47 points. The Juniors
came next with a total of 42 points followed by a
tie between the Seniors and Sophomores, both
teams having 28 points to their credit.
Fred Helmerichs, of the Senior Class, was the
high honor man, winning the so-yard, ioo-yard,
220-yard swims and also was a member of the
winning relay team.
INTERSCHOLASTIC SWIMMING MEET.
On Saturday, l-clruary 12, at the Washington
\,imminL' pool, the Balboa and Cristobal High
Schools clashed for the Canal Zone Interscholastic


Aquatic Championship for the year of 1927. The
meet was a huge success; the spirit behind it was the
best ever. All of the swimmers and divers were in
top notch form, as the result of their strenuous
training for this annual event. The meet was
characteristic, in that five of the old Canal Zone
interscholastic records were smashed and bright
new ones hung up in their place. Cristobal was in
fine shape and gave our boys a hard battle. The
surprise of the day was when Jack Humphreys,
a Freshman of our school, took the diving cham-
pionship from Cristobal High. For the first time
in five or six years Cristobal High School beat
Balboa High in the relay race. Our boys were up
to their regular standard of swimming but seemed
to be inclined to swim crooked, so disqualifying
themselves in the relay race. The results of the
day were as follows:







THE ZONIAN.


5o-yard Crawl Stroke.
1. Jack Klunk (Cristobal). Time, 25 215 seconds. New
record.
2. Fred Helmerichs B ilbo., I
3. Edward Lowande (Cristobal).
5o-yard Breast Stroke.
1. August Schwinderman (Balboa). Time, 3 seconds. New
record.
2. George Halloran (Balboa).
3. Walter Wikingstad (Cristobal).
50-yard Back Stroke.
1. Everett Allen (Balboa). Time, 34 seconds. New record.
2. Harry Granberry (Balboa).
3. Woodford Babbitt (Cristobal).
loo-vard Crawl Stroke.
i. Jack Klunk (Cristobal). Time, 59 I5 seconds. New
record.
2. Fred Helmerichs (Balboa).
3. Edward Dorswitt (Balboa).
22o-yard Crawl Stroke.
i. Edward Dorswitt (Balboa). Time, 2 minutes 53 seconds.
New record.
2. August Schwinderman (Balboa).
3. Robert Payne (Cristobal).


Relay Race.
I. Cristobal (Jack Klunk, Edward
Babbitt, Foster Tufts).
2. Balboa (disqualified).


Lowande, Woodford


Diving.
i. Jack Humphreys (Balboa).
2. Jack Klunk (Cristobal).
3. Albert Days (Cristobal).

Balboa High School won the meet with a score
of 36 points to Cristobal's 23 points. Of the five
records, Cristobal made two with Klunk taking the
50-yard and loo-yard crawl, and Balboa took
three, with Allen taking the 5o-yard back stroke;
Dorswitt, the 220-yard crawl; and Schwinderman,
the So-yard breast stroke.

TRACK.
INTERSCHOLASTIC TRACK.
In the track meet with Cristobal High School,
Balboa came out with an almost one hundred
per cent victory. We won czcr% event except
the running broad jump. Besides this event, the
only other competition we were given was in the
running high jump. However, George Lowe, a
Freshman, sprang a surprise when he came out first.
Credit should be given to Mr. E. A. Bogda,
physical director, who did everything possible
to put the boys in the right shape. That he did
this very successfully is shown by the results.


INTERCLASS TRACK.
The Senior Class came out victorious in the
annual interclass track meet li\ a lead of 3 points
over their nearest rivals, the Freshmen.
The Freshmen seemed assured of victory after
winning the first four events. However, the other
classes did not give up hope. The Seniors were
the most determined and managed to tie the Fresh-
men near the end of the meet. Upon the boys'
high jump, which was the last event, depended the
victors. Leon Greene, a Senior, won this event.
Individual honors in the boys' events go to Roger
Williams, who made 15 points, and Leon Greene,
with 11 points.

HANDBALL.
Much interest was displayed in handball this
year for the reason that the school developed bet-
ter handball players. In all of the games played,
both in the elimination and in the interscholastic
games, there was always a crowd present to root
for one or another of the players.
Sixteen boys entered in the High School elimina-
tion contest, and the four who came out the
highest made the team. These four boys had to
play each other in order to determine the cham-
pion of Balboa High School. The results were as
follows:


William Van Siclen
Earl Dailey ..
Russel Jones.
John French.


I t 2d 3d
game.ame.ame. m.
21 19 21
14 21 I~
21 19 21
13 21 10


Ist 2d
Van Siclen Io 13


JoInes


21 21


After having defeated Van Siclen, Jones became
champion of the High School.

BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL VS. CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL.
The Balboa team showed themselves superior
players by winning all nine games from Cristobal
High School. Three matches were played, each
match containing three games.
First match.-This match was between Van Sic-
len of B. H. S. and Iowande of C. H. S. Lowande
was the first to serve the ball but was immediately
put out. Not being satisfied with this alone, Van
Siclen started to get a number of points and it
was not until he had ten points that Lowande stop-
ped this run. As the game went on, the playing
seemed too fast for Lowande. Van Siclen was
master of the game at all times, not having to fear
his opponent at any stage.







THE ZONIh.N.


The scores were:


Van Siclen.
Lowande.


ist game. 2d game. 3d game.
21 21 21
13 6 o1


Second match.-This match wavs pla \ed by Dailey
and French of B. H. S. .'.,iinst Peterson and
Klunk of C. H. S., for doubles championship.
For the first few points the teams seemed evenly
matched and it seemed as if the game was going
to be close all the way through. However,
Cristobal's hope of avenging Lowande's defeat was
short-lived for soon IFriimh and DI)ilr:, settled
down, baffling their opponents with cleverness.
The following are the scores:


Dailey and French......
Peterson and Klunk.......


Ist game. 2d game. 3d game.
21 21 21
to 8 I


T6,,r! match.-Russel Jones, captain of the
B. H. S. team, played Charles Will of Cristobal
in this match. In the first game Jones had it all
over Will, placing the ball in the least expected
places. In the second game, which was the closest
of all those played, Will hit his stride. This game
was very fast and both contestants played excel-
lent handball; the object of Jones was to make it a
perfect day for Balboa, while that of Will was to
have Cristobal win at least one game. The final
result was that Jones defeated Will by two small
points. Jones finished this match in great style,
:1lla ini_, Will but four points. The scores were:

1st game. 2d game. 3d game.
Jones. .... ... ... 2i 22 21
W ill ... ... . .... 8 20 4

The team also pla,. cd matches with the Work-
ing Bi\s, Fort Clayton and Quarry Heights,
winning all with comparative ease.


AlthoiiLh bowling is a minor sport at Balboa
High Scho,-,l, much interest was created by it both
in and out of the school. As the competition with
other bowling teams was grcat there was always a
., I-sicJd crowd that came out to witness the
games played.
A high school climinatirn was held and the six
who held the highest scores made up the team.
They were Larl Dailey, Robert Blaney, William
Van Siclen, Roger Williams, James Des Londes.
and John French. Besides these players, the
filliMing substituted in somnce ol the games:
Norbert Jones, \\illiam Wood, Archie French,
and Jack Campbell. John French was elected
captain.
MATCHES.


Balboa High School.....
U. S. S. Rochester.......

Balboa High School....
U. S. S. Rochester......

Balboa High School.....
U. S. S. Rochester. .....

Balboa High School.....
Pedro Miguel.........

Balboa High School.....
workingg Boys..... .. .

Balboa High School.....
\\., rk,I- Boys..........

Clayton .........
Balboa High School.....

Balboa High School.....
Clayton. .. .. ....

Clayton........
Balboa High h. ..I ....


Total Pins.
...... .. 459 4-4
....... 442 3


447 426
440 400

...... 478 426 449
. ... 416 433 407

......... 41 440 426
..... 409 445 425

..... 412 411 444
. ... 407 422 429

..... 445 440
... 427 402


. .. .. .. 478 502
....... 4 440


....... 4, 427
......... 397 381

. ........ 452 445
. ....... 415 420


I~I


BO\\l.I NG.







THE ZONIAN.


Girls' Basket Ball Team.
lack roi.- Ruth Fraser, Dovia Clisbee. (Charlotte Jcieen. Angela Kleiun.r. PBlle Martin. Ethll C'arr.
Front ro.--Rita Dricoll, Marian Allen, Janice Grimison (Captaini) Rae Newhard. Louise Kerr.
BASKET BALI.


The first of the series of basketball games be-
tween the teams of Balboa and Cristobal was play-
ed on the Cristobal playshed floor, February 12,
1927. The game started out fast and continued
snappy throughout. In the first quarter Cristobal
scored four points and Balboa made one point on a
foul. The second quarter ended 6 1, the third


S 2, and the last quarter o1 2, giving Cristobal the
first game. The Balboa centers and guards dis-
played very good pass work and made up the back-
bone of the team, while the forwards played poorly,
passing up many opportunities and possibilities to
make baskets. Both Cristobal and Balboa teams
showed excellent spirit and sportsmanship. Bal-







88 THE ZONIAN.


boa, although the losers, put up an especially good
game. considering that they played under the
handicap of having a team composed of allnew
players, with the exception of the center.
The line-ups were as follows:
Cristobal. Balboa.
Marian Boomer, F. Ethel Carr, F.
Helen Montgomery, F. Janice Grimison, F.
Dorothy Svensson, C. Louise Kerr, F.
Dorothy Wertz, S. C. Charlotte Jensen, F.
Evangeline Smith, G. Angela Klemmer, C.
Ethel Westman, G. Marian Allen, S. C.
Ruth Johnson, G.
Belle Martin, G.
Ruth Fraser, G.
The second or return game was held on the home
floor, Balboa playshed court, February 26. The
Balboa girls were determined to win this game,
for to lose it to Cristobal would mean to lose the
series. The first quarter looked like a walkaway
for Cristobal, for when the time was up the score
was 4 to o in favor of Cristobal. The second
quarter ended also in Cristobal's favor with the
total of 6-2. In the last half, however, Balboa
forged ahead, making 3 points in the third quarter
and 4 in the last, to Cristobal's 2 points. Thus
ended the game in a victory for the home team.
Balboa showed good teamwork and a marked
improvement over their previous playing. It
would be unfair to say that any individual stood
forth in the game, for the entire team was in good
shape and did its best. Cristobal had the same
team as before, but Balboa's was somewhat
changed:


Balboa.
Ethel Carr, F.
Rae Nehmj, T F.
Janice Grimison, F.
Angela Klemmer, C.
Marian Allen, S. C.
Ruth Fraser, G.
Ruth Johnson, G.


Cristobal.
Marion Boomer, F.
Helen Montgomery, F.
Dorothy Svensson, C.
Dorothy Wertz, S. C.
Evangeline Smith, G.
Ethel Westman, G.


Cristobal met us on the Pedro ligucl floor,
March 5, for the third or decisive game of the
series. Excitement ran high, for both teams were
equally anxious to win. Finally, the whistle blew
and the girls took their places on the floor. The
players put forth all their effort and pep, hoping to
bring their side to victory. Balboa, in the first
quarter made one basket, while Cristobal failed to
score. The score 2-0 remained unchanged during
the entire game. Balboa thus winning the series.
The teams played as they never had before, and
the Balboa guards did better than ever. Balboa's
team was just a little different from last time;


Rae Newhard and Ethel Carr playing forward;
andJaniceGrimison and Ruth Fraser pla ingguard.
Although the girls won the game, much honor
and credit is due Miss Hanna, our instructor, who
so willingly devoted her time and patience in
coaching a new team. Just a word for Cristobal.
Cristobal had an excellent team. \'e congratulate
them on their playing and acknowledge them to be
good sports, and we hope to have the pleasureof
meeting them again soon.

TENNIS.
The girls this year, more than ever, seemed to
have taken agreatinterest in tennis. Over twenty
girls participated in the tournament, which started
in November and lasted through December. All
entrants did exceptionally well, and when the
games were played off, Cary W\alker and Eva de la
Pena were the two left to play the finals which
were to decide the winner. The game was schedul-
ed for December 16, and proved to be very exciting,
both girls being evenly matched. Cary Walker,
however, finally carried off the laurels, the score
being 8-6, 6-2. This left Eva de la Pena and Ethel
Carr tied for second place. In playing off the tie,
Eva defeated Ethel, thus winning second place
and giving third to Ethel. All those taking part
in the tournament deserve hunorable mention,
and make up a squad any school would be proud
to have bear its colors.
Saturday, April 3oth, the Cristobal girls met
us on our courts for the Interscholastic Tennis
Tournament. Our girls were in splendid form
and had little or no difficulty in defeating their
opponents. Carey Walker, Virginia Ewing, and
Louise Martin, made up the Balboa team and
displayed some very good playing. Virginia
Ewing and Louise Martin defeated Dorothy
Wertz and Marian Boomer of Cristobal in the
doubles, by a score of 6-1, 6-0, while Carey Walker
took the singles from Helen Montgomery of
Cristobal, 6-0 6-I.

TRACK.
The Senior Class came out victorious in the
annual interclass track meet of the Balboa High
School, which was held March 26, at the Balboa
Stadium, by a lead of 3 points over the Freshmen,
theirnearest rivals. Themeet was a combined boys'
andgirls'meet with total of 15 events. Individual
honors in the girls' events go to Rae Newhard
with i i points and Jessie Banan with Io points.







THE ZONIAN.


TRACK.
The Girls' Interschool Track and Field Meet,
April 3oth, at the Balboa Stadium, proved very
successful and all our best athletes were present
to help carry their school to victory. Balboa,
as in all other matches and meets, beat Cristobal.


Our triumph was evident from the very first,
winning a great number of points to Cristobal's
few, and taking the meet by the overwhelming
score of 54-5. Rae Newhard won the greatest
number of individual points, ii', Amelia Hutch-
ings being second with II.


Girls' Swimming Team.
Mr. Grieser (Coach), Louise Kerr, Doia C'lisbee. Elizabeth Hirsh, Elsbeth Whaler ,Jessie Banan, Angela Klemmer.
SW I \1 \11NG.


January 20th, at 3.30 p. m., an interclass swim-
ming meet was held at Balboa. Very few girl
swimmers turned out for the event, although there
was some good material. To Elizabeth Hirsh goes
the honor of winning the greatest number of
individual points for the girls. The Freshmen
walked away with the other classes in the meet,
taking the high total of 48 points. The Juniors
were second with 42 points, and the Sophomores
and Seniors tied for third place with 28 points each.
INTERSCHOLASTIC SWIMMING.

Balboa High School defeated Cristobal High
School by a 27-23 score in the Canal Zone inter-
high school sAimnming meet for girls, which was
MR 5207-12


held at the Hotel \WaV, hiLr-E.n Pool on .lai 7,
1927. Angela Klemmer, of Balboa, was high-
point winner and compiled a total of 13 points by
winning two firsts and one second place. Marian
Boomer was Cristobal's star with a total of 94
points, garnered from one first, one second place,
and being a member of the winning relay team.

3o-yard Free Style.
1. Angela Klemmer, Balboa. 17 2/5 e:zonds.
2. Marian Boomer, Cristobal.
3. Louise Martin. Balboa.
3o-vard Breast Stroke.
i. Louise Kerr, Balboa. 25 seconds.
2. Kathryn Lambert, Cristobal.
3. Euphemia Woolnough, Cristobal.







THE ZONIAN.


.o-yard Back .Mroke.
i. Marian Boomer. Cristobal :i 3 seconds.
2. Aneela Klemmer, Balboa.
3. Kathryn Lamberr, Cristobal.
60-v ard Free S.v!e.
i. Elizabeth halerer, Balboa. 45 :.' seconds.
2. Lucille He.,rne, Balboa
3. Rita Joce, Cristob ..


Fan'-y DiJr,I.
Angela Klemmer, Balboa.
Rita Joce, Cristobal.
Dorothy Helm, Crisrobal.
i.o-iard Reiav.


i. Cristobal .Idrault I.
i. Lambert.
2. Boomer.


J. Joyce.
4. \\oolnough.


(.i;irl Bi h'l Team
.n, l ijuln.aFn flr.re. !mlth A.ni.alMa IlmI.enmer. Ml... Hvr, Ca I h. Rh rt..ir kl.ath Jobrnao,, jinlura IFrr

BOWLING.


Tno much can not be said about the spirit and
enthusiasm which was display' ed in bowling. The
girls turned out faithfully every \ednesdayv for
practice and were in good t'rm f1r the first match
which was bowled with Pedro Miguel on the
Balboa alleys. The game was arranged for Decem-
ber 4, and the following girls were chosen for the
team: Ruth Johnson, Matilda Van Siclen, Angela
Klemmer, Juanita Orr, Violet Stroop, and Ruth
Fraser. Although Pedro Miguel had no well-
,irganized team, they were good sports and put up
a good showing. During the entire tournament we


were lar in the lead, the final score ending in a
decisive victorN for Balboa.
A return match was held on the Pedro Miguel
alleys, December Is. A change, however, was
made in our team, substituting Flores Smith,
Anita Hudson, and Jeannette Bruland, for Matilda
Van Siclen, Juanita Orr, and Violet Stroop. This
time Balboa did not have such easy picking as
before, and Pedro Miguel won the first game,
making Balboa step. But luck did not stay with
them, for we won the next two games, again
bringing home the bacon.


















































HOTEL TIVOLI
ANCON, C. Z.

VFERLOOKING the Pacific Ocean and the city of Panama, lending an inviting variety of scenes. Its
location is ideal. One of the many amusements ni... .: in Panama; Guests leaving the Hotel Tivoli for
the morning canter over trails blazed by Spanish Dons of centuries past.
ITH a cuisine unexcelled. Our tables are supplied with the choicest meats, tropical vegetables and fruits,
fish from the Pacific Ocean, and game from our neighboring jungles.

E. S. HECKLER, Mlan..r












S*r





































































C








































"






i





THE ZONIAN. 91


The
II ADVJE R TIS E*R S
ARE A BIG FACTOR IN THE
SUCCESSS OF "THE ZONIAN"

FIS
ITS READERS
ARE REQUESTED TO GIVE THEM
FIRST CONSIDERATION









II


COMPLIMENTS
TO
STHE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1927

Panama Railroad Compa
i Panama Railroad CoIpa,'




_ 5iL2 Ni Jg ICaLM JJ'Jg' JS MIL^ iVi:X AK^'.M.S^. *SS J'A~fJJ .VrS LBjg*ia S





THE ZONIAN.


I THE PANAMA HOSPI

4-


LOCATED IN
PANAMA CITY



A PRIVATE HOSPIT
!1 A PRIVATE HOSPIT


TAL


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THE ZONIAN.


Dr. WIILLIAM H. GRANT
DISTRICT DENTIIST

Telephone 890 :: 4th of July Avenue, N1, I .


__ a ____ VL. U L )A.A 1 .L 1a Ia ljsLj L J a aaiaaaL a LTA 'liL l' J' H L Ltfj" -211 I 'LI'L


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Mrs. Koperski.-"Ruth PyNle, will you nei!ver
learn to gather?"
Ruth (exasperated).-"Aw, gee, I can't make
my wrist shimmy, Mrs. Koperski."

Miss I'halev.-"Janice, give an example of
humanity in its very simplest form."
Jantice G.-"A Freshman."

Mr. Northrup.-"I think that was the worst
lesson we ever had, and I did most of the reciting
myself."

Mrs. Patterson.--John, did you spit in the
waste basket?"
.ohn P.-"No, I missed it."

HEARD IN ENGLISH CLASS.

English teacher (to Elias who is writing in auto-
graph album).-"What are you writing in that
book?"
Elias.-- *I hi II "
English teacher.-"Well, erase it immediately."


Compliments

of

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THE ZONIAN.


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Mr. Hogan (to stage hand).-"All right, run
up the curtain."
JohnF.-"Huh, Do you think I am a monkey?"

Teacher (to Freshman in Commercial Arith-
metic class).-"You should sleep before coming:
to class."
Freshman.-"Sorry, I only have one period
before this class."

Russel (in class meeting).-"We are gathered
here to-day- -"
(Heard from the back of the room).-".Any one
would think that we were a bunch of grapes."

Leon Greene.-"Say, what do you think of my
family tree, Doran?"
Doran.-"Well, the tree may be a good one, all
right, but it seems to me that the crop was a
failure."

Miss McMahon.-"Yes, Norbert, an Indian's
wife is called a squaw. Who knows what the little
baby Indians are called?"
Norbert.-"I know, teacher-squawkers."






THE ZONIAN.


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Richard J.-"I want to do something big and
clean before I die."
Helen M. makingh a suggestion).- "Why
not wash an elephant?"

Stanton Peterson (on the telephone).-"Hello!
Is this the weather bureau? How about that
shower to-night?"
Weather Bureau.-"Don't ask US. If you need
one, take it."

Herbert E.-"Are you going to the Hallowe'en
dance to-night, Dolly?"
Dolly Allen.-"Sure, I'm going as a milk maid."
Herbert.-"But you're too small to go as a
milk maid."
Dolly.-"Well, then, stupid, I'll go as a condens-
ed milk maid."

Teacher.-"Nw,, if I stand on my head the
blood all rushes to my head, doesn't it?"
Class.-"Yes, sir."
Teacher.-"Well, when I stand on my feet, why
doesn't the blood all rush to my feet?"
Class.-"Because your feet are not empty."






96 THE ZONIAN.


Give Her the Comforts of Home


Cia. Panamefia de Fuerza y Luz


COLON 0i



Teacher.-"How many seconds make a minute
Willie?"
Willie.-"Masculine or feminine?"
Teacher.-"What do you mean by masculine
or feminine?"
Willie.-"There's a big difference. When father
says he'll be down in a minute, it takes him sixty
seconds; but sister's minutes contain six hundred
seconds."

Farmer Corntassel.-"I can't find any old clothes
to put on the scarecrow."
Wife.-"You might use some of the fancy duds
our boy Josh brought home from school."
Farmer Corntassel (quite disgusted).-"I'm try-
ing to scare crows, not tickle them to death."

Joe Duran.-"Oh, yes, I have quite a reputation
as a lady-killer."
Betty G.-"Of course! I suppose you bore them
to death."

Pat Doran.-"Hey, foolish!"
Greene.-"Gosh, there he goes talking to himself
again."


PANAMA


.J


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THE ZONIAN. 97




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"Dear sir," wrote the anxious mother, "I am
afraid Johnny is not trying enough."
"Dear Madam," replied the harassed teacher,
"you may rest assured that Johnny is trying
enough. To be perfectly honest, he is the most
trying boy in the class."

Miss Whaley.-"Ben, can you tell me what a
hypocrite is?"
Ben Reese.-"Yes, ma'am. It's a boy that comes
to school with a smile on his face."

Mr. McCommons (in physics class).-"Here it is
Monday. Tomorrow will be Tuesday, and the
next day will be Wednesday. The whole week
half gone and nothing done yet."

Leon Greene.-"I've just been reading that the
aviators to-day can do anything a bird can do.
Yes, sir, they've got the thlji': down so fine that
there isn't a bird alive that has anything on them."
Essex.-"Is that so? Well, when you see an
aviator fast asleep, hanging on to a branch of a
tree with one foot, then I'll come around and listen
to you."


MR 5207- 13-Panama Canal-6-8-27-500


lmi ; ` umm ~ I


W1
01
01
01
01


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Full Text

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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.arch ive .org/details/zon ian 1927balb

PAGE 7

THE ZO/l/JAN

PAGE 8

rIO"'''' I I II THE SENI O R C L ASS GRATE r ULLY DED I CATES THI S V O LUME TO Miss Alice M c Maho7l I N APPRECI A T ION O F H E R K IND,AN)) ABLE ASSI S TANCE I N I T S PREPARATI ON.

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_ v o .. X V ' _________ C A N A L ZONE, '9'7. P U BLl S H E D BY T HF. B A LBOA HI G H SC H OO L E x Libris Dedication Vacuity EdLto r iai ( Ia<:."' .... : Seuior C lass Junior Class .. Sopho m o r e C lass Freshman C lass Senior C l as!; H is tory Senior P r OI)hecy Last \ ViII a n d Testament of Seniors. What the Seniors Go to School o r \ iistor )' of the Junior C l a ss Ii istor ) of the Sophomor e ellss H i story o f t he F reshman Cb<:.s ZOSIAN Staff Student Council The Se,..on's Fl a mes A l u m ni A l umni Foreword Newsfrfllll OUT .\lumni De.L d Pall.11113 Literary: Literar y F o reword The S tories \ L e gend of O l d Panama The I ron C r oss J osep h T Ile S.'1crific e Colonel Juan Old Panam a O l d l )an:11113-\ 927 Model Sear c hli gi ll s N i ght O r l(' P o int of i e w The l .Allte r )' Draw in\( Iht.8o\ BIOI! Sc.IJOL CONTEN TS. '\('!"ms E. JOIIS<"OS, 27 }iI,L E N FRE"' ( U '21 '21 J \ ... t CI; GRTMI<;OS, '17 EL\'AS"trll, 'VI AME LIA 1 IL'TCIIIN(;o.;, 'l" D OBOY J 0 \VILDURR \VtU.I/,;(" '2CJ P ETE R'>ON, '2(. ('li AR:"" '2(; BETT" J\C K '17 ,GEOUGIE GOOOlIll;;. '17 "ATIIERISE COS'.ER, 'li BETT l BACIIL'<;, 21 C"OSCEPCIO'" LeT1. '1(1 ." : \/';/';A SAPIllR. '28 CIIAR I .ES P A LACIO, 'UI T A n .OR, '28 ANNA SAPIIIR, '2t1 "ATIlER 1SE E CONGHI(, '!.7 h:LES TWYMAN, '21 ANSA S"PIIII(, '../8 Lou"'I-; "I-:R R '2R Pagc. , ,. .\0 '2 21 ", 27 2Q .11 j.o l4 1_5 16 J7 18 .09 40. 41 4.1 H 4t; 47 47 '0 $2 50 5<> 56 57 Literary-Continued: \ s 1 Am Radio en l a Zona del Canal \ ... Fire tht" Canal \ So'1I1('t T o OUT Cellar Door \ \VOIlld-BeSonn('t The Tropical T.nlle r So...i" I}' Socictr F o r e w ord School Patties: Taboga Outing Junior T.Lboguilla Outing Junior Junior Dance and Card Part}' Sophomor e Tack )' P arty Fr ... shman P.ut} i"ight :It \' W C, :\ School Play,,: &ni o r Play Junio r Ph), Byc-B ye, Jligh &-1 1001" "Call lJa(k 11311>')1 Sc'1 i o r Cak e ::'.l l e Junio r Luncheon Talk b y Doctor E\';"\ns Fir:;t \ ,,>;clll b l}' l\\t:eting o f TilE Seas High School Calc'ldar PAT,>" I-I-"Jotv!!:\,. '28 C. E...sEX '27 Et. Ot",E LlILL. '27 '17 GI;;QR(,tt; GO OI)IlUE. '27 MARY E. CURRY. '21 EI.OhF. L ULL, '1, 1 l\IARtO'" E DA!I1IF.L";, '27 FIt"NCI-;'" BROWN, 'n JI, ... .,IE H"''''''N '29 To Our Te:tch e r \VARR ..... GII. ) I A"', '28 Exc hange F o rcword Sports F o r e w ordBo)'s' \thletics J O liN FU:NCIL '27 H ARR" GRANOERJot\', '28 F o rewor : -Girls' Athletics ANGE I A t..:LEMMI-:R, n Adve r t isemellls J o k e .. SU"'OQUI,>T, '27 Page. 57 -' -'. 5" 59 50 60 6 62 6j 6 6j 6 .. 6, 6' 65 66 66 66 67 67 6 7 67 6' 7. 1J 74 77 18 9 ol

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4 T H E ZON IAN. jfacultp. --"" Teachl'ra. IInrl-rDII Yr. Gn(>.t f Mr. W1l1i31fs. Mr. Mr. M cf'ommons, Mt Vhnt. Gr31ltud Mr. Northrup Mr. BOltd3. l iWdl rOI M'-"! SUOCII, MI98 FrO:!l, tooh ... Erick so n ".,,,,.,,,," \\ h alty. Mdp.1,d r('ut'. Law8, l' altl'rsGn.

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THE ZONTAN. 1 0<\ O. ERIC KSOX. \\'isconsin. T e a c h e r s Coll ege Ri" er Fall s \ Viscon s i n. ,I.iSiJ/fllll Principal. HELEN CL'RRIER B A KER. l'linneso ta. A. B.) o f M innesora. Suptrvisor oj Public Sc/tool tl/usic. '\UCE illcilI AHON. I o wa. B A., State of I o wa. EII ![/ish. EOWARD A. BOGDA. \\' i sco n sin. Sc h oo l of Physica l E d u c ati o n L a crosse, \V iscol1sin. Physical Education Jor 80_vs. I.ESTER S. l\ I a ssac h lIsetts. .I. L. ilIcCo""oNs. RUTH E. f\ 1 E:LGAARD. i\linnesota. Nebraska. B S. Tufts Coll ege. A/fllhf'wal;rs. A. B ., University o f N e braska. :\. C o lumbia University Univ e rsity o f Minnesota. B. A., \\'dles l e : College. Principal. L a / in L 'I.\,A 1.01> L l\\"s r1J i21 I.fJY' A B. Unive r sity. A. ill, li.Ir1!m,lIry School of I. a nguages. i\!id d l ebury, ,fermo nt. "poJ/isIL rERNA STEEN. i\ lin n esota. College, Sr. Paul, R asmusse n C ollege i\linnesota. COJJ/IJlt'rrial Slfbj,,(/s. iljYRTLE \\'R \I.F.Y. \\"a shingto n. ) A. B ., linive,,' o f \\' ashingtol1. English fl':f!tr;:6lJ1mercial S'''dals i\iARCL-ERI 'I:tr.: \ W, l o va. T e a h s Clle 'K'carney, :'\'ebraska. A . H., J) \ tel" D e nv er, C o l o rado. \. /fi.rlon. OLGA .I. FROST. Canal Z o nc. ......., A. B., rount St. Vin<:e -o n {h. H ud so n. Spa u ish and Fr"}frh. GARNET GROVE R KOPERS KI. Kans a s B S., "ans a s State Agri cultural C ollege Univ e r s ity o f California. H ousehold Arls R UTI-l i\'IC K E L VE" PATTERSON. N ebras ka. : \ B L 'nive r s ity o f i\iinnesota. LOUISE H J\NNA. K e ntu c ky. :'\'ew H av e n Sc h oo l of Physica l Trainin g New H aven C onnectic ut. PJ,)'sical Educalion Jor Girls HENRY GRIESER. Y ork. Swimwing lus/ruc/or. MYRTLE A. D O LAN. Nebra ska. :'\Tebrask a \\' es l eyan N ebraska School o f Business. Gregg Sch oo l of S horthand, C h icag o, Illin ois. S/l'1Jograph )', T vpt'wri/ing THOS. R. ING. \\' i sco nsin. Bel o it College, Wiscon s in. Stout I n s titut e \\' i sco n sin. Unive r s i ty o f \\' i sco n s in, \\' i sco n sin. S upt'rvi sor Indus/rial ArIJ 1-1 ERHERT E NORTHRUP. S outh Dako ta. .'I. B., State linivers ity of SOllt h Dako ta. Scienu. T,J.

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6 THE ZO:-l I A:-I. EDITORIAL. THE sc h ool year draws to a close. Soon the Seniors rec e iv e their diplomas. a nd th e C l ass of N i netee n Seyen ]C3\"CS th e old f a miliar walls and class rOOms. ta k es leave of t eac h e r s a nd fellow-students. and i s gone. scattered, flung t o th e fouf wind s. I n a f e w yea r s all of our o ld class mates, all o f our o l d schoo lmates will b e b u t names, dim m e m o ri esof the paslo I f t hi s editi o n o f THE can m a k e t h asea nce wellkn own names m o r e famili a r. can r evo k e f on d old m e m ories, can l esse n t h e distance b e tw ee n LIS th en a nd only then has it rise n t o highest h opes a nd fond est expeClat ions. \\' e ha\'c tried our b e s t t o make this lilli e \'o lum c breathe the spirit o f our sc h ool. w e have tried t o put in print so m e o f th e inlal1 g i b l e inAu e n ces surroundin g u s, w c ha\'e tried to mirr or th e tangibl e, a nd if we have acco mpli s hed our aim. credit mu s t b e g i\' c n w : l e r e c r editisdue -lO THE Staff, t o the Facu lty, to our clas ses to our contributo r s, a nd t o the m embe r s of The P a n a m a Canal Press Staff. who ha\'e g i ve n immeasurable ai d a nd assi s t a n ce in it s prepara ti o n a nd ed iti o n. RICIIARD JOHNSON, Editor-ill-Chief.

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T H E ZO,\IA,\. 7

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I e THE ZON I A N. SENI O R C L ASS. Via PresUellt SUrtlar,Y T reamrer J ONEl> R O BEII. r FRANCES BROWN EI.I AS :'\ h H A I.ITSIANOS Gnu Colors, J\l aroon a n d Gold ClaH Flou;er, C r imson B ougtlinvillae ellIS! 1\10/10, A dmi n ist r arc, non adlllinisirar; ClaJs Aduiur, J\l iss Rut h J\t c lga:lrd .!\HUONT, HAGAR AI,tEN, J\I A R I AN ARR I ETA, CARLO"rA B AC HUS, B Erry BANAN, LESLIE BARR, B AR B A R A BEVERLEY RANDOL"H BISCHOH, ]OH:" BLANEY R O BERT BROWN, FRANCES BRULAND, J\ IARGARET CAMARA. JOSEPHINE C HEESEMAN, FORREST C LOUD, EUGENE CONGER, KATHERINE COOPER, HAL ClIRR\",1\IARY D A I LE\', EARl. DASI E L S l\I AR ION DEVER E AUX, l\\rs. \ ICTOR E DOKAN, J A M E S OORl>\\ lIT, EOWAR D DURAN, jOSEl'H ESSEX, R O B E R T FII.ASER, RUTH FRENCH HELEN FRENCH, JOHN GAEB 1\IARCELLA GOODHt:E, GEORGIE GItANBEItR", ELIZABETH GREENE, LEON GItI MI.!.DN, J AN ICE H A I LORAN, J\IIR I A M HEARNE, .IL1, I"''' H E I,MERICHS, FRED JAC"-, BETT\' JAMES, PO!.I.Y jOH1Io' S01lo" AGNES JOHNSOS, RICHARD JOHNSON, Rl'TH JONES, Rt'SSEL KIRBY KATHERINE KLEMMER, ANGELA KNEECE, C E CIL Lul.I" ELOISE ;'\ IATOS, \\'ILLiAM 1\ lcl\lANus, 1\IAR\' ALICE l\I IH A LlTSIAl\OS, E L I AS ORIt, J L IASITA PETERSON, SrANTON R O B INSON, R O BERT S M ITH, FRANCES SUNDBERG, DOItOTH\' S l N D Q l IST, TwnIAN, HEI.EN \'AN S I C I,EN, i\IATI LDA \'AN SICI,EN. \\'A1IS, DORA I

PAGE 15

THF. ZONIA:". IV;lnia. Cristob.d H igh School. '24_ B asket l u ll, '1 5 '26, ';!-. B aseball. '26, Captain, '2-, H and h :111, Captain. '2-, Class Pia},. '2-, Class Pr esident, '2-. F RICHARD Can:!! ZOlle. ZONI.AN Staff, '211, Editor. '2-. ZONIAl\ Follies Stnff, '26. Class P lay Staff, ''26. '2-, B aseball, Manager, '2 7. President, Studenr COllncil, '2"! Canal Zone ZONIAN F ollie s ''24. '25 Class Play, ''26. C l ass Secretarr, '2-, Student Council, '27 ZOI\'IAN Staff, '2-, ELIAS l\I1HAI.ITS IAl\O
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10 Glee Club. ''24. 1 Allentown High Sc h ool, .-\Ucillown, P a., '25. Swimming, ''24 '26. B asebal l '24. '27. B :lskel ball, ''24. '26, Captain, '27_ Supper Club, '26. T r.1ck and Field, '27. Clas!> P];IY, '27. EARL DAILEY. Color .lde. B aseball, B asket ball, '27. '1 '-Y.Y Handball, ''27. T ennis, '27. B owling, '27. ,.,l i\tARIAX G. ALLB', :\' ew Y o r k. B aseball, '24_ Glee Club, ''24_ Swimming, ''24. '26. Supper Club, '26. B asket bait, 26, '27-T ra c k and F ield, 2 7 Cla ss Play. 27. JOHS' C. FRENCH Calldl Zone. B owling, C. ,ptain, '2-, B aseball, '2-:". H.ndb lI, ',-, Cla ss P lay Staff, '2;. ZUI\IAN St:lff, '2-,

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THE 20:'> 1 :\:'>. LESI. I E JORDAN BANAS. !\I assachm :etls. J unior Carnival, '2 .... A sse mbly P iani .. t, '26, Glee Club, '26 Class Play, 26, '27. Track and Field, '2-. E DA-:I EL!lI. B owling, .... B aseball, Swimming. '2';. Glee Club, '2.;. B asket ball, '25, :--.'ew Y o rk ( Suppe r Club, '2-. ; \ssistant l. ibr:\rIan. '2-. \\' i sco nsin. Central H igh Sc h ool, \\':lsh ington, D C, '2.;. '25, '26. CI:lsS Pby Staff, 'r;. ... GOODHl'F.. New J e r sey. Co mmerci:ll High School, Pro \'il:ence, R. 1., '22, '2;' ) IT

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12 THE ZON 1.'\N. 1\1.O\RCEI.lA R GAE B Ca nal Z one. E D W ARD D O R SWH . )J e w Y o rk S w immi ng, '2i. R O B E R T L. BI.ANEY New Y o rk D T I -I. S., L e isenrin g P a., '2.J. '25. Cl ass P l ay, "r. Bowl i ng, '27. Class Play, '24. '2,. ZONI AN F ollies, ''26.

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THE ZON I A N. JOHN RANDOLPH I h :VEIU.EY. T exas. B elmont H igh School, L os Angdc: s, Ca l if., '2 ... i\l:t in Avenue: High School S:1.n .'\monlo, Texa,. '26. E I'ZABF.TH FA\ GR,,,UERR\', Canal ZOI1t:. J unior Fair, '2 ... ZOSI AN Follic:s. '25. Junior Program, '26. T rack and Field, '2-, Clas s Pby. ''2-, York ZONIAN F o l lies, '24. ''25. Declamatory Contest, '25. Class P re sident, '25. '26. Track and Field, 2 ... '25. '26 '2-, Class P lay, '26. ZONIAN StaR', '26, '2-, C heer Leader '27_ Swimming, '2-, W:Her P olo, '2-, Canal Zone \\'arren town School, S hort Story COnlc,,!, '25. ZOSIAN Staff, '26. Student Coullcil, '2-, t' .,

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'+ T H E ZON IAN. INGRID MARGARETH RRULAND. Norwar L uncheon Club, ''2..j.. Supper Club, '15. JAMES ROBERT DOItAX, New Y ork. H addington R o:td National School, Dubl in, I rel a nd, 23, ''2..;.. T rack and F ield, '26, '17. HEl.EN FRENCH. Canal Zone. Class Pla y ,'2 3 '26, '27. Glee Club, "3, ',6. CeOl r al H igh Sc h oo l W ashington, D c.. ''2..j.. Ca l lao H igh Sc h ool, Callao, V a., ''25. Supper Club, '27. JOSEPHINE C" .... AkA. Bri t i sh Guiana. Junior Program, ''25. Supper Club, '26, ''27.

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THE ZON IA'-.'. (las!> Yice P r esident, ''26. EI.IZA8ETH : \NNE BACHL'S. Mi chig,Ul. H awt h orne H igh School, San Antonio, T exas, '24 Columbus H igh School, Columbu s, Ga., '25. Glee Club, ''27. Class P lay, ''27. S hort Story Contest Winn er, ''27. J UI.IAN SPESCER. HEAR.SE. Alabama Pachuta H igh School, P ac huta, M ississippi '24, '25, '26. ELOI S E CI.EVELAS"D 1.1'1.L. \ 'er mont "'indso r H igh School, W indsor, \ermont. '24. South P ortland H igh School, South Portland, i\l c., '2,. Glee Club, ''27. 5

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THE ZON I AN. F RED O. I-h:I.MRICHS. Canal Zone. Class T reasurer, '24. Swimming, '24. ''25, '26, ''27. \ Vat e r P olo, '"24, ''25, '26, ''27. V ; lr iery S h ows, '25. ''26. Tr.1Ck and Field, ''16, ''27 h:ATHERINE DIC KS01' KIR8Y. New Mexi co. H igh School of Commerce, Portland, Oreg., ''l.h '25 '26. KATHERINE E I .Il..'\8ETH CO .... CER. Ohio. Western H igh School, W ashington, D. C. Gle e Club, ''25, ''27. Class Pl ay, ''26. ZONIAN Staff, ''17 l\ln,. V'CTOR E. DEVEREAUX. Illinois. King' s Conserv,ifory of r..lusic, San J ose, C;tliL, "J, '14, '15-Br ow n 's R ockford Business College, R ockford, 111., graduated R ockford H igh Sch oo l, R ockford, I II., '22. Parker H igh School, C h icago, I ll., ''!]. '24_

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THE j Ol-l:-;,!,ON. C.IIl,tl Zone. Prog r,llll, '25 Supper CillO, '25. '26. '2'7. Glee Club, '1"'. Student C o un cil, '2-, Cla ss Play Staff, '1-, New Y ork. Cla ss '26. Class Play Staff, '26 '2-, B aseball, '26, '2-, ZONIAN Staff, '2-, I FRA'CE' HElD' ER ';'ITOUJ /"-' I. Nathanjel r.taw..clorne J lInior San Antonio, '24. ,vi l\lain A ven u e I-ligb c hool San Antonio, Texas, ''25. "6J)/ Rhode I s Lllld St. l\l i l d r ed : \ cade m y, L a ur el, l\ld., '2+, Flu shing H igh School, Flushmg, X Y '26. Glee Club, '27_ Cheer L eader, '2-, )IR5l0;-3 1 7

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J 8 T H E ZON I AN JOSE D URAN, M S p ain. Junior S h ow, '14 ''26. Declamator y Contest, '25. C l a ss Play, '25. Trac k and Fi e ld, ''26. B aske t b a ll, '26 ''17. HAGAR, G. V AHlfONT. r.lassach u setrs. Glee C l ub, ''24 C l a ss Play, "27. D O ROTHY C. E. SUNDB E RG. New Jerse}' Supper Club, ''l5 '26, '27_ KATUERINE ANNI E SUNDQUI S T Canal Zone D icki n so n Hi g h Sc h ool, Dic k inson, Texa.s, ''24. Or c hestra, ''26. ZONIAN Staff, '27.

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JUANITA N II E OkR. C : m : ll Zone. Swimming, ''25. '26, Supper Club, ''25 ''26, ''2-. Bowling, ''2 7 Track and Field, ''2,. B ase b all, ''27, Cl:t s s Ph)" ''2-. ZON\.o\.N SI:lff, '2,. S f',laryland. Swimming, ''!-+, ''25 ''26, C:lpt:lin, '2-. TrJ.ck and Fietd, 2;. ZOSIAN F ollie .. '1 5 B.ls ker b:tll, '2 6 ''2-. B owling, 1 / B : l s eb:tll, f',1 :tn:tger, '2;. Supper Club, '2.Il, ''2-. ZONIAN St,lff, '2 7. Class Play, '1,. 1 -1, .... BI.tJEro RI) C OIH'ER Call:tl Zone. Dt:cl a m:uor r COil te st, '1-+, ''25. R adio Club, '27 Orche s t r a, '2,. R UTH f',1. ... R ION F R"'!>ER, C:I 11:1 I Zonc:-. Supper Club, ''25 ''26, Prc:-"idC:-llr, ''2, Trac k and Field, ''2;. B a seball, ''27. B asket b:lll, ''2i. Bowl i ng ''27, Class P lay, ''27 THE ZO IA N 19

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20 THE ZON 1A"N. / R O BEI:. T E. C:t l iforni: l T enni s, ''26, '27. T ra c k and Fidd, '27. ZONIAN Staff, '27_ Cbs ... Vice P rec;i de nt, '27. C ARIOTA ,' ARRIETA. P a n a ma. Can:tl Zone. Junior Program, '24. ZONIAN F ollies '24, '2" Class P lay Staff, ''26. Student Council. '2-, Class Pla y, '2-;. i\IIRIA\' LOl' ISE f-L o\l .l.OkAN. C:lnat Z one. L un c h eon Club, '24. Class P lay, '2-+. '25. '26. \\'inner, Decbm:nor y COIlICS I ''24. S u ppe r Club, '25. '26, Secretary, '2-. ZO'JA' St;lff, '2-.

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THE ZONIAN. RARII"!!." JEAS HARR. California. L o well H igh Sch oo l, San Frn n c i sco Cal if., ':24 '15. '26. Cheer L e ader, '1-. Rot n :RT C URRIE F :',., EX. Canal Z o ne Glee Club, '25. Orc h e s tr:1, ''25. '26 ''27 R : tdio Club, St:crct:H}'4T rea s lIr c r, ''17_ i\la ss a c husetts. Gir l s H i g h S c hool, Atlant:!, Ga., ''24. Newport New s High School, ;\' e wp o rr New s \':t., ''25. Sf. H ilda' s H all, Charlestown, W e s t \ ':1" '26. R l l T11 P H 1LlSE JOIlNSON. Ohi o. B M C. Durfe e H i g h S c hool, Fall River, 1\l:Iss. ''14 Supper Club, '15, 26 '1,/. B o wling Captain, 1 6, ''2-, B a s ket ball, ':2-;. H a seball, 2;. Cla ss Pbr. 26, '1, 11

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'2'2 EVGENE CLOUD Orchestra, '26 '2'" ; Glee Club, '26, ',!-ZOSIAN F ollle '2n THE ZON I AN. MARY EMlu' CURRY. B asket b a ll, Glee Club, ''24. Kentucky. Science Hill S ch oo l Shelbyville, Kentucky. ''25. Naz:lret h AC.J.demy, Naz::irf't h K eo tu..:k y, '26. England Supper Club, '25. '26, '2;. Staff, ''27. \VILLIAM P orto Rico. Centr.d H igh Sc h oo l Sanrur ce, Porro R ico, '24, '25.

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THE ZONIAN. '23 CLASS H ISTORY. \Vh a h as not a dream s hip a gracefu l antique craft wit h great white sails w hi c h comes from a land o f nowh e re, bearin g beautiful gifts and happy experie n ces for the future? This ship to the r.'res h men in 192] was the shining o l d s hip" B a l boa H i g h S c hool," whi c h had carried many cargoes safe l y o v e r t h e o ft e n r o ugh and storm y sea o f Educati o n, yet w hi c h a lways h e l d in store an everlasting supp l y o f r osy dreams o f s u ccess It was o n a brigh t tropical m orning in October that the unruly crew o f Freshmen bes ieged the f rigate. They made the decks r ing with the ir s h outs, a n d after a whil e ha d expl o red all its secret n oo ks a n d c r evices. T o guide the s h ip toward a distant, l o ng edf o r goa l Comm e n ce m ent, the c r e w chose f o r h e lm sman a l o ng-experienced pirate, Fred Brady, a n d f o r pilot, a loving, sympatheti c lady, Miss Thomas "Balboa H ig h Sch ool with its restless c r e w drifted l azi l y in tropical waters, and n o o n e heeded muc h its fate until o n e ni g h t o n t h e brig a gay fiesta was g i ven f o r all the pirates and damsels, The decks once more rang with laug hter, music, and c heering, for t h e Fresh m e n had made everyone f orget hi s woes a n d grudges. Again o bscurity claimed the poor frigate until in the happy m onth o f June a great walking of the plank was ordered given, survived thi s ; f e w were lost. The s u ccess ful Freshmen assumed the name o f "Sophomores" a n d has t e ned o ff to r ece iv e the ir r eward a l o n g rest at h o m e for three m onths A s Sept embe r drew to a clo se, the e ager seame n gath e red togeth e r their weapons and regalia a n d o n ce m o r e embarke d o n the ir sturdy craft to r e sume the ir q uest for t h e treasure, Di p l oma, At a g r eat gath e rin g on the deck t h e Soph o mores c hose Fred H o lzapf e l f o r their h e lmsman and Miss Hopkin s f o r pil o t. After a h alf year, the c rew had to selec t a n e w l e ader, This time it was Leon Greene, a bold, active pirate, T o manifest t h e Christmas spirit abroad, t h e c r e w caused a mass o f mates t o assembl e with the m to hear in spiring music, and to e njoy a successful o ne-act drama, acted by members o f the ir company. A s a r elief from t h e ir life o n the r o lling sea t h e g r oup essayed to climb the hill in An co n to view the beauties of t h e surrounding country \\'ith muc h m erriment t h e gallants and ladies dan ced the g r a ceful \,irginia r ee l at a ways id e lodg e and the n contilllled t h e ir climb. At the summit al l e ngaged ill singing bal lad s gazing at t h e moon and munching sav0 r y h o t dogs. 50011 after, a great sal e o f food, a luncheon, took place at t h e m ess h all, togeth e r with a spirited dance o n deck. E\'cryone spent hi s coin and \' as I n its crui se in southe rn wate r s the good ship stopped o n e day at the "typic al tro pical i s le, Taboga. H e r e f o r a few s h ort h ours all w e r e in hi g h spirits, plunging into t h e salt waves, r oaming o n the san d or basking in the sun. After another walking of t h e plank in June the c r ew and l eade r s abando ned t h e (rigate (o r a sea so n a t h o m e. Reveling in t h e ir great wisdom and sagac ity, the J u n iors boarded t h e Balbo a H igh S c hool in Octobe r, 925. Leon Gree n e having b ee n v ery success ful in guiding t h e craft, was again c h ose n a s h e lm sman, and Rauner, a gen e ral favorite g ladly accepted the rank o f pil o t ,'er), earh the c rew scratc hed their heads for sch e m es, o utside o f looting, to gath e r gold t o ex p e n d o n t h e great banque t whi c h was approachin g One plan was a lunc heon g i ve n o n deck. : \Itho u g h quite similar, it was m o r e s u ccess ful than the aile given the year b e f o r e. T o ce l ebrate with t h e Junio rs, the c rews o f the craft donned rags o r the cl othes o f their grandfath e r s and cam e to the "Tacky Party" t o f r olic and dance Anoth e r raid o n the i sland o f Taboga p roved ajolly tim e (or everyone. Upo n a n order fr o m t h e helmsman, t h e galley, with the h elp o( all t h e crew, pre pared many delicious foods f o r a sale. The b ountiful a ssortment was soo n sold, and t h e Juni o r s turned the ir faces again toward t h e sea. On a m e m orable night a c r o w d of (ri e nds and visitors swarmed to witness a fin e display o f art, but the Truth," dramarized cleverly our pirates and damsels. :\TOt l o n g before the parting o f the S e ni o rs, a grand banquet was given them by the Juniors. On this night, o f all in their l ong

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THE ZONIAN. journey, the J uniors and Seniors were g l orio u s l y thrilled After another annual test o f know l edge and courage, the crew separated f o r a time. \\' h e n the dignified and vain Seniors, as these seamen were now called, again met o n the deck of the" Balhoa H igh Sc h oo l," g reat rejoicing took place. All were g lad to see eac h other, and looked forward wit h anxiety to the land o f C o m men cemel1[. Ru ss d J ones, a sturdy seaman, and i\l iss l\l elgaarc.l were c h osen to direct the craft in t his last year orits travel These two w e r e de s tin ed to a hard trip, for at this stage a c r e w becom es l e i sure-lovi ng and dreads work. .'\ s a b eginning, the Seniors presented to rhe library o f t h e good ship a considerable stock of handsome new vol umes. The seco nd endea \ 'or o f the group materiali zed in another sa l e of food w h ic h required labor yet which afl'onled much pleasure to everyon e. T oss in g all car e to the winds, a huge crow d ass embled to laugh at A Bac h e lor's H o neymoon, the farf a med co medy o f the Seniors. Laudabl e talent wa s displayed by the actors, and all their f ellow seame n rejoiced at their s u ccess Once m o r e, and f o r the last time the compan y of Seniors eagerly landed o n the pi cturesq u e island o f Taboga. T h e r e was muc h feasti n g, dancing, swimming, and pl easurehunting c r owded into a f e w s h o r t h ours o f abandon and h oliday. The n th e return to wo rk! And n o w, a s thi s ship s ail s away, leaving u s hap p y with the treasured dipl oma in our hands, and with our hearts overflow in g with joy in the realizatio n o f the g o lden dreams it h e l d f o r u s, we can ani), c heri s h these m e mories a n d wish th e same happin ess to other voyagers o n the sea of Education SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY. S S. B e/gallla lld i\iediterr3ne3n, June [ 7, [ 937 Thi s morning while I was str o llin g around t h e deck trying so hard to find a companio n f o r this long cruise which I am taking, 1 noticed a mall most dressed in gaudy cloth es t hat might appeal to a man of flashy taste. \\' i t h h im wa s .l woman dressed equally as conspi c uously. I f o llow ed them. Imagine a person so base as to follo w a couple in their walk! I was lonely and curious However, I heard enough of their co nversation to learn their names. I ru s h ed to the purser t o discover more about r h e m. "rhey were Russe l J o n es ow ner of J o nes' Ci r c u s, and H e l e n Tw),man, l ead ing acrohat and rig ht-rope wa lk e r of Mr. J o n es Circus. I foulld thcse names o n t h e ship's record unde r tht.: h eading of .Jo nes' Circus : j \ IARGARET BRL L .\ND .Snake Charmc r CAt-lARA B a r e ba c k Rider DOROTHY SL Srrong Lady HAL COOPER L ion Tarner \\'hat complexes these former classmates of mine must have developed! Perhaps it is d u e to reading such inspiring poetry as T o a Skylark" and "'Tiger, T iger, Burning Bright." I went up to the radio office to.night al1ll w h e n the operator gave me a blank to fill o u t I al most stutte r ed, I wa s so surprised t o recogni ze Stanton P e t e rson. R e m ember what a radio bug h e was in his l a s t y ear at sc h ool? H e tol d m e t hat L eo n Gree n e is a world-renowned aviator hav ing just fini s h e d a flight t o Heaven. H e was sainte d f o r his faithful e ff orts I r ead the lates t bull etins r eceived by radio and saw tha r Barbara Barr is maki n g a name f o r herself in Afri c a teachin g culture t o the natives. I r ead a lso about a wonderful si n ge r who has jus t startled the world with her melodi es Sh e i s Katherin e Sundquist. I r e m embe r how s h e u sed toswim in the Pedr o Mi g u e l pool to improve h e r breathing. 111 the same bull e tin I s aw that an ex p ed iti o n wa s o n its wa y to D enmark t o investigate th e history co nn ec t e d with Hamlet. I n this ente rpri se are t h e f ollow in g brilliant Englis h students: Mrs. DEVEREAUX FRANCES SMITH ROBERT BLANEY C ARLOTA ARRIETA \ V ILLIAM VAN S I CLEN ELIAS MIH A Ln S IANOS I have read th e lis t of passe ng ers and discovered that Kath e rin e C o n ge r i s aboard ship chaperoni ng several students o f the J o hn son S eminary. This college i s o wn ed by Agnes and Ri c h a r d J o hn son. They teach t e n subjects t o over two hund r e d girls. The captain j u s t cam e around to say that we would h a v e a good time to-m orrow ashore in

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THE ZONIAN. }\Igie r s. I noti ce so meth ing familiar about his voice;] think h e is EugeneCloud. [ 'II find Oll[SOQI1. \ Vell, we went as h ore and had a ple a sant visit D o r a \ ,Vatts met liS at the boat. Sh e i s ant col lector for the Black Flag Dis infe ctant Company. \\I e had lun c h eo n at the R egal H o tel and e njoyed the dancin g exhibition by th ose [rue artis t s, L eslie Banan and Ruth Fraser. The sights of Algier s are amus ing \\'e s aw a caravan leav e f or so me out-of-th eway pla ce K athe r i n e Conge r recogniz ed \Villiam r d ato s a s t h e leader and J oe Duran as chie f s h e ik. A beggar asked r o r alms. H e i s s aid to be th e rich est man in Afri c a and I can easi l y beli eve this becau se h e begs constantly and peopl e give. H e said, H ] n memory of QlIf man)' years in Balboa Hi g h Sc h oo l give to m e that I rna y n o t die." Of cou r se we were more t h an startled whe n som e one in our crowd said it wa s Edward Dorswitt. W e talk ed to him a while H e s aid that Julian H ea rn e had b ee n t h ere not l o ng b e for e on his way to Madagascar to fight l ion s I hated t o leave, but we had to reach the s hip becau se the whistle blew. I manage d to bu y a a f ew newspaper s and s h all e njo y a thorough r eadi n g of t hem. GREAT R A ILROAD MONo po!., BROKEN UP. FAMOUS CAPITALIST GOES B ANKRUPT. RANDOLPH BEVERLEY, MAGNATE IN R AILROAD WORLD, CONVICTED BY I A RY CURRY, MOS T ABLE JUDGE OF DA So that's w hat happen ed to them! \V e ll, well, I'm sorry Randy i s broke, but h e has many fri e nd s t o mend him Heavens, I'm so excited! Pete just rushed in to s how m e a radiogram. Marion Daniels, J o hn Bi sc hoff', Mary .J\lice M cManus and Georgie Goodhue won an important debate in the Senate agains t Fred H e l merick s Earl Dail ey, Robert R o bin so n and J o hn Fre n ch. They we re fighting a bill that advocated an eighth our sc h ool day s i x days a week. Julie, one or the c hildr e n that Katherine Conger is chaper oni n g, came in with a note from Captain Cloud saying we co ul d go ashore to-da y at Tunis Betty B ac hu s liv es there. I 'll get so m e new s o f our classmates from h er. 5207-.1 And so I did. W e had a r eal gab reast. Marce lla Gaeb, w h o is n o w a famous toe-dancer, ca m e in f o r a chat. She correspo nds regularly with Bett)' Granberry; and s h e said Betty was giving Salome dances in for the b e n e fit o f starving E s kim os Hagar Ahlfont, Frances Br own, .I anice Grimisoll, and Katherine Kirby are all married and m o r e o r l ess happy F orres t Cheeseman, t h e w o rld r e nown ed poultry man, h as r eceived his thirty-ninth d iv o r ce Somehow h e can't find the right w oman, o r if h e does s he's already married Betty certainly c an get m o r e n ews in her wonderful h o m e R o b ert E ssex, the v i o lini s t o f great n o t e, i s v i s iting h er next m onth. \\' e stayed in l o n g e n ough to go t o o p e ra. D olly .'\IIen a n d Juanita Orr have grown up and are really tall. They were th e re with two dukes. It is whisper ed that they (the girls ) are notorio u s hu sband hunters, And they were q uiet littl e things ill sc hool. Ah, I mus t not forget to tell yo u about th e p erformance w h ich wa s very good. An ge la Klemmer sang t h e lead and B ett)' J a c k th e vamp part. Eloise Lull was the co m ed ian and so ve r y funny that [ cried after laughin g too m u c h. Miriam H alloran danced so b eautifully. P rofessor P oll y J am es wa s a u tside in the lobby when w e l e ft. She s aid s h e was president of a poet's club t ha t urged l ess violence in poetic license [ wande r ed around t h e l obby gazing at th e advertise m ents of coming p erformances J was truly sur pri sed to see a muc h -d i sguised picture o f Ruth J o hn so n above this captio n:
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26 THE ZO:'
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THE ZOl\' IAN. f o r writing p oe tr),; t o !'VI r. N orthrup, our es t ee m ed fri e nd and t c a c h e r, L e on Gree n e l e a ves his auburn curls; to H erbert En ge lk e a s it will aftort! him muc h val ua b l e prac ti ce Juanita Orr l eaves the pl e a sure o f typing all I. C ZONI AN' m a t e rial; \,\ illi3111 r an Sicl e ll, l e a ves to his s i s t e r, J\Jatilda, th e ribbo n o f F h i s dipl oma t o h elp ti e h e r s w h e n s h e rece i ves it. T o V e ra Ahlfonr, R o b ert l eaves his ability t o whirl a m ean t e nn i s r a cquet; t o anyo n e wh o can ti e a s g o od k n o t s in th e window curtain cords a s h e Robert E sse x l eaves h i s seat in Am eri can H i s t o r y cla ss ; t o N o rb ert J o n es, Carlota Arri eta l eaves all h e r extra c r edits; t o J eanne Dooling L eslie Ballan l eaves his v o i ce and to s p eak so that h e will b e h eard ; to Eva de la P e na, D o ra \\'arts leaves h e r C oc kney a ccent. T o L ydia C o urvill e, Hagar Ahlront l ea v es h e r vanity c a se ; to Rachae l Key, Sund b e r g l eave s h e r inte n se l o v e ( o r s t e n ography; to Harry P r eston, J ose p h in e Camara l e a ves h e r r emarkabl e ability to draw and paint; to C h arl es J a c kson i\1ary Curry l eaves h e r "doggy purse h oping h e will c h eris h it t h e r es t o f his H igh S c h oo l days ; to D oc i a Cli s b ee E d w a rd Dorswitt leaves his r es p ec t ( o r the ( acuity; to Quentin S t o ne, Ran d o lph B everley l e a ves his l e ft -ove r brilli a n t idea s to b e ca rri ed out n ext year; Julian H e a r n e leaves his habi t o ( w a t c hin g the cloc k in History class to J o hn Ohl son; seeing that h e has n eed o r it, B etty .la c k leaves h e r ability to bluff t o E w rett :\lIe n; t o I. ouise Sprag u e B etty Ba c hu s b e qu eaths h e r b eauty s p o t. T o R e n e B i sso nn ette, in v i e w o f th e t re m e ndou s ta s k h e faces dail y in carry ing his numerou s t extboo k s, i\l r s D eve r eaux l e a ves h e r bri e r c a se ; to H e l e n F o rb es Elo i se Lull leaves h e r theatric al ability ; to A g n es i\l a c k h o pin g s h e will lise it (r eq u e ntl y, J ani ce Grimison l e a ves th e office t y p e writ e r; t o H arry Granberry, F orrest C h eeseman l eaves his con stancy in his afFai r es d'amo ur. 1:\ W IT:"ESS WHEREOF, WE, THE CUSS OF ''27, do se t our hand and sea l a t Balbo a C a nal Z o ne, o n this 24th clay o ( J un e in t h e Y e a r o ( Oll r L o rd o n e tho u sand nin e hundre d an d tw e ntyseven. (SE A L. ) SENI O R eI.A!)S II"I-I.-\T THE S E:-II O R S G O TO 'C[-[OOI. F O R Greene T o ge t dCIllc.:rir s l ips. B:trb:tr a B:tr r T o vamp th c <;h cik s J oe Du r.tn T o cha r m t h e Fres h men K.Lth ertne S undqui.,t T o be studious. Fr ed Hdmerich!>T o ple:t,e t ht: bdit:s. K .!t h erint: h:irby T o get her diplom :1. Curry T o P;L!>S t h e time aw:ty. C c(i l J t:wd T o l ea r n t o do w h :tt :.hc "c;l n't do" i n Fngli<;h. R o b ert kt:ep J oe D ura n e nter tained in -\g ne!> win !>chobr s h ips. R ic h ard J o hn son T o h o d high es t r: m k o n H onor R o ll. D olly : \llez .. T o learn h o\\ to g r o w J i mm y D o r:tn T o tdl ti S :Ill :!hour Irdand. i\' i t a OrrT o be w i th Ru sty. R u s t y J o n es-T u be wirh his Fi\' c-r"ee!-two. W illisT o s k i p cl:tsses. E l i:ts t ell us wh;tt a s m :trt h oy h c i!>. \'an Sider.Tospcm! his nOOIl h o u r \\"i th \ I u rie!. H.dltJr an T o h elp ti ll: teac h ers. R o bt"r t E ssex T o "fiddle." J .mict! Grimison T o c hancr ;Lnd J o hn Fr ench T o hdr l.onny enjoy his noo n h our. H e l e n Frt"nch T o keep F o r!"CSt attentive. S tanton [.Ike It:ading r oles i n cl:tss p1.L Y S Betty B .lc h us T o flin. F o rr es t Ch e e!>em.lIlT o be nt:ar H elen. Eloise Lull T o h e r Trig. Ct"cil K nee c e T o hi!> sout hall Beln' J .Ick T o d Into misc hief 1.t:!>l ie B .m:tn T o tc;\ch Dol.lI1 shorrh;lnd K .lt h erine Conge r T o be liter,lry. .Iuli .1Il Hc:trllcT o g r:td u ate. Fanny Bro\\ n T Q be:t in ? ? ? \!:tnon D.lIlielc:T o ha\' c her picturt: [;Iker t Klt:mmer-T o fight w ith Ru t h Pylt:. C:tm:tra T o be Clae. J:tlllt"s-T u h old up ou r dignity. Ru th Fr:tser T o h ;l\"e ;1 good tilllt:. H ag:t r Ahl font T o m ,lke:t good imp r d<;iOIl on t ht: :'\ ':L\ \ E ugen e Cloud T u k i d the f e. t c h e r s. D Or0thy Sun.lhc.:r g T o m:tke high s peed i n t\ pmg:. Ru t h J u h nson T o be:t s n1.lrt girl. G eo r gie GoodrueT o b e :t lad\" of h:i<;urc. l-Idt:n T wym.IIl T o k eep pe p goi n g. .\I:try A lice j \ l d l.l!lLls-T o play. J o h n I.. Bic:c holfT o set t h e 'A()rl d Oil fire. C .. r lot:l -\r riera T o le:tr n s horth and. D or:t WansT o get ".-\ in boo k kee p ing. Elil:abet h Gr.lnber r y T o te:lch u s h ow to C h :trlc .. t on. H a l Cooper T o c:mile. Edw.lrd D ors wiuT o be a m:tn of few word s. Fr.ln..:es Smith T o gigg l e at e\ie r y[ h ing. I h ndoJph B e \ e rleyT o find :I girl. :\ l r s D everea u x T o studr. Farl D t i l ey T o keep going.

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T H E I \')1 \ 1 II(V ::::;"" JUN'DRS J\ T",,,,,,.n-CH,"'''' IIn,)(,,., \ (/,,,, AHI-FONT, \ ERA \ lRC1'lIA KERR, LOll"!': OUI. ... O'l, J o,,, B AROI-: L!lON, i\IARGARFT 1 -1F.:1.f:' t-.::EY, RAtHEL PALACIO, P R ICE, SrEL1. \ I"', CAMERON, JANH'r: GItANBEItR\', IIAIUI \ RESE, Ih.N C ARR, ETHEL G RIM I SON, H 1 C HAlm i\l A;{T1N, I h : I.I E RODCERS, (11AIU .. Cl.,.:MENT, V lltGI'II-\. GllR'IEY, t\IAR(;AI!.IT SAPH1II., As'l" CJ.lStlEE, THATCH!-:R Gl'II.NEY, SAM ;\Ic. D ,\DE. i\ I AR'" S\IITH, EIYA Cou:, CATHEIUNF. H AI LEN, BARBARA ;\1cGl1ICA", GAHF. STONE, QI'E:O:TI" COI'llVlI.LE. L\'o", IIARRISO:-:. BEVERI. \ ,\IcKEO\\'''. E\I\U STROHLE. FRED II I)E CASTR O J ACh. IIAIOtlS01'O GERTRI'OE ;\IECKEI., TERt:SA TAn.OR, EDCAR I 1) LA PESA SARAH f-IEAR1>'E L L CILI!, ;\IIOOI.ETON, i\IA\ TOEP.,ER, GI')I A 1= I JANE JENSEN, CHARJ.(HIF NICHOLS,I IE:'I.' It" \\' HALER, ELSHETH YOI"G, FRA"" \ HISTOR Y OF TIIF. .IL '\,I O R CL\SS. I t ha s b een a l o n g hard r oad; bu e are getting there w e the .Juniors of '2 7, the Seniors of Our fir s t year went ruld b ecause althoug h called F res hm e n we la c k ed t h e fres h part; b es i des w e all m e n. I n our second year w e and gave our firs t party; it was like all oth e r Sophomore parties a great S UCCeSS, ... ", T odav, a s w e l oo k back 0 er past vears we decide that so far our Junior veal' h as b ee n t h e h es t F ir s t, c am e t, P t o which ever yo n e enjoyed. Next, c;me the party at t h e Y C. A. whi < I so prove d a s u ccess. T h ere was the ca k e sa l e b y m eans o f w h i c h a g oo d -si zed S UIll 0 'J11 ley wa s r e a l ized; there wa s t h e big dan ce and card at th e I ivoli ; t h e l un c h eon; l e p lay c all ed "Eliza C o m es to Stay," whic h was a lau g h from star t to finis h ; and most '(llportant o f all was the J unior and Senior Banqu e t which was h e l d at t h e H otel Tivo j. ....very J uni o r was present, for was this not o n e o f the h o n o r s we had b ee n p lanning for a I n tim e? Y es it was o n e o f t ht! great desi res o f a J uni o r fulfilled, and the other desire, w hic i s still greater t han the first, i s t o get our diplom as. 1 H e r&..en d e t h th h istory o f our first three years of hig h sc h ool. l\lar the fourth b e as jolly successful a s our t h ird. \\'e o w e s in ce r e thanks to i\ I r Northrup, our cla ss ad v i se r, I for his h e l p duri n g t h e vear.

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THE ZO:-lI: \:-I.X1j __ .:-, ,." 3 1 I ...... II II z::::: II Scrrl'ltll)' .-\,\II:L.IA ,{'ras"n,. JAMES Q ",,' =1. I !@ Cia" .{d,i"". II'HA I.,,' '\ AI.LEN, E\"I::RE1T FREI\(,H, i\IACh., RO\IlC, II ;:-i3ANAN, .11-:1>5110 CARRE-n, Jt'LIANA i\IcGu IGAN, KATHLEEN RUSSEY, ERNES T BAXENDALE, LICE I I AI.I.ORA!,<;, GEORGE i\IcGlj IGAN, ROSE SEAI.E\', l\iARION II = -B1C"'. 'ORD, H A \'ES, VANCE l\IEREDITH, \\"LLARD -SMITH, PLORES . iT BiSSONNETTE, l h:"'E HELMERIC Hs.01"I"O l\IILJ.ER, i\IARGARET SPRAG!:!::, LonSE g 13007., TOM HOLZAf'rEI Rl'TH j\lll.LER, FRASK CECELIA B OW!'olAN, KATHR";-' H UMMER, J O .... EI'H i\10Ll.ER. ALIC \' THOMPSON, PAl"!. )... BOWMAN, CU'DE l -il';TCHINGS, A"E', I A I\ I ORRI:->O"" .I0H \'AN B UREN, NANC \ BROWN, CARI:tIE Hl:TCHISON, Rl'TH OI.lVE, E UN ICE VENGOECHEA, J O S E SAMUEl. II BRYAN, PAUL. PHILI,II'S l\'1ILORED \\'ARWI CK., ;\'O\,A BUTLER, FRANCIS.. PIERCE, FRANKl.I N \\'ESTENOORFF, EDNA l\ IAE COOY, ISABEl.l.E K N IGHT, HENR\' POOLE, BERNELL i \\' IITTl. OCK., VIRGIN I A DEMUTH, ZONABEl. I(\'LEBER, EI.IZABETH POOI.E, THERESA t \\'II.LSON, ELOIS E D E GRUMMO)..-o, LYLE LARSEN, HENRY PRESTON, HARRY \\'OMACK, RCTH 1=" D E LA PENA, EVA LAWI.OR, \\"LI.I \;\1 POWELL, J O H N \VOOD, JOSEPH I EKWURZEL, L AR S LOWE, GEORGE Ql""'N, J A MI:::S \\'000, \\' II I.IA ,\I ENGELKE, HERBERT I.l:THER,i\l,\RT H A Q U1NN,l\IARJORtp' \\'OODHl' I .I., l\I UI( I L ERLENKO'ITEtt, ROBERT L l'THER, l\IAR\' RADER, Y CAZ A, P H ILIP I FlI)ANQUE, \'AI. L c'rz, CONCEI'CIO!\' R EI::D, ERNES'r ZIOBECh., FLORENCE -1= F"HER. ETHEl. .," ,,"" I II THE CLASS. ,-{mr/ia IIlf lchil!gs '29, F ellow Sophom o r es two years hav e w e passed, and two veal'S are "et betore u s. I l oo k ba c k we b e h old a year of g l orious s ucc ess and achi eve m e nt, J = I n April t h e Sop h omores hel d a tacky party in t h e gymnasium o f t h e Y II'. C. A. One of the big events of t h e eve ning wa s t h e grand march. I t wa s composed of t h e tac k iest lot I that ever trod the gymnasium Aoor. Games w e r e and com i ca l prizes given. D elic i o u s r efres hments were se r ved. Ab out II o'clock, afte r an eve nin g of e nj oyment, t h e party br o ke u p and t h e Sop h s r egret fully went o n their way. ) The Sophomores hav e n o t been successful in athletics this r e ar, Alth o ugh we ca m e in t h ird in the interclass track meet w e made a fair s h owing, co n s i de ring that w e ha d suc h I t a smalll1umb e r of our class to compete, A. great deal of cla ss spi rit was s h o wn and t h e c h eer leader s w ere g ood o n es I I T o i\l i ss \\' haley, our class adviser, we are very grateful for h er h e lpful s uggesti ons through I Out the year, I I

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]\IARCl-ERlrE BAXAX, FRED BARoEI.SON, HOllER I BARoELSON, SAM BEJARANO, Booz, F RANCI S BRETCH,l\iARGARET Iht:I,Al'l),1\'I.I, I E B L LLOC,,", ROBERT BL'TLER, CLYDE B L T LER, LEY CARRINGTON,I\I\R"ILE CI.AR ... EDIT H CLARK, ELEANOR CLEME:-n, BETT\' CI.IS8EE, D OCIA D ES LoNDES DOOLING,I i ALVOR DRISCOLL, RITA EVASS, RL'TH \'ERSOl', BERNHARI) FINNICAN, CONRAOO \\'ILHEUIINA GORMAN, \\'ALTER GOYEZ, LoUIS HALI.ET, DORIS T H E ZO:"I.-\:'\ PAlIl .... E I IAzEL I -IEARNE. EI.IZAIlEIIi HERHRTII, CAROl. HERMIDA, RA\ION EI.IZABFTlI I -lio.MAN, jA\I E S Hl'oSON, A:\lrA Ht\II'HRE\' J A C J ACQ.l'E'>, JErI', JOIl .... JEWELL, BOIl8\' JONES Eown. JONES, HA\'DEN JORDAN, \ I OLA JOYNER, E VELY!\" KIRKI'ATRICt.., RAt, I' H LOWE, EDWARD L L 'LL, RICHARD L t:TZ, CANDELARIA 1 \ IACoONELL, JAMES \ IAotRO, FREDERICK I \ IALONE, EDWIN i\ i ARC Y, \'INCENT i\IARTIN, LOUIS E ]\I A ...... ER, I'IAI), -\1111 RrA 1 \ IEAO, E\lI.I-.\ 1\IEEHA'I, 1\iERRII .L, R UTH ]\loNAco, EUlorr ;\'EwIiARn, HAE OGDEN, EOWI Otl.ER, CHAKLE'> ORR, EI. ;l.IR PALMER, i\I A R CARE" PARKER, E t .EANOK PERCY, \\'ILLARD P E S COD, AI.IC E PhIENTO, CARME:\ PYLE, R UTH REIMA:\"", RINK, BERNARD RIZCALLA, ARTHI;R ROBBINS SHELBY Rl:SSEY, EMMA SCHAI'IRO, i\IARI':: SCHWINDEMAN, A L 'GUS T SCIiACKELfORl>, i\1 ETA S I MONS, ENA S;l.IlTH, CECII I A SMITH, CLARI'rA 5Mtl'lI, EDWAKIl SOt. ENIIEKC ER,I .. ARL SOLENBERGER, WAYNE i\tARGARET 5rROOI', St:LI IVAN, \"NCENT TABER, J A C TIIO\!I"'O:\, GORDO'I S'CLES, \'AN \ AI ,EKI A \'1I, I ,ANl'EVA, r \\'ARWICK, RANI) \\'AI''>OX, ROUER' I \VEIGOI.I>, D O:->AI.O \\'ESTSLER, ]\IANOI, A \\'IIITLOCK, BERTIIA \\'II.I, E T ADELAIDE l\lARGAKEI' \\'ILLIAMS ROGER \\'ILLI S G \\'11,\10"', EVELYN" \\'OOOHUtI" \"KGI S I A YOUNGS E L IZABETH Y U L E S EMMA T H E CLASS HI STO R Y OF 1 926 192 7 B o bby 30, Every girl and hoy naturally says that his o r h e r Class i s th e best in the sc h oo l but they all, sec r e tly i( not openly, a dm ir e another. The Fres hrnan Class this year is that" next to best" in m os t of th e uppe rcla ss m e n' s es timation s L T lllik e the oth ers, we are divided into two parts, the boys and the girls. \\'e have separate meetings and different officer s but this does not interfere with our class sp irit Last fall the Fres hm e n won the interclass swimming meet, Later on in th e year we beat the oth e r classes in soccer. I n l\l arch we ran a very close race with t h e Seniors (or first place in the inte rcla ss track m eet J 11 all o f these and other co mp e titi o n s w e were applauded (or our enth u s ia stic cla ss spirit. On t h e J 8th o f t h e g i r l s gave a "stag" party. so to spea k, at the y, \\" C A. I t I wa s quite a s u ccess t hanks to t h e appointed committee T h e 1'00m was decorated in green I and white, o ur c lass co lors, an d l oo k ed verr attractive. During the eve ning they played d iff e r ent games, after which delic i o u s ca k e, sa n dwic h es, and punc h were served, which had 1 been made by so m e o f the girls, All of the F reshmen owe a great deal o ( credit to our class advisers, I\l r s. K operski and 1\11'. Flin t, for this s u ccessful year \Yhe n eve r advice ha s been needed h ave always n I given u s the best pOSSibl e and th ey are always read v to h e lp u s 111 anv way they can I \\'e all think we (lid ver v well In e l ect i ng Ollr officers, and we Wish to thank our preSidents, I and Elliott f or thm sp l emild l eade r s hip throughout t h e ear.

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T HF. &/itor-i".Chi4 Ass;slan, Editor S taff Aduiser Btujlltss Mtulll gcr ASS;j/(l1If Busilltu IHllIlfI.'{tr Circulation !\ftlllager /lUis/alii Circulation "Imulga Li/(rlIry Editor ."uiSltml Liurary Edt/or Saculy Edt/or fuis/flll' Socirly Ed:/()r ZONI.,\N S T AFF. RICHARD ,"'XXA SAI'HIR l\lIss :\I.ICE l\lcl\ l .... Wll.I.IAM VAN SICI,EN J OI': DURAN ROB1.'r I{OBIN!.O:'; OIlLSO:-' GEORCIE GOODHUE KATHhlU/I;c CONGER FItANCE!', BIWWN II 01 Exrhtwge Edaor E.\'Chflllgc Editor ."'IIImn; Editor .-7ssi '!/(lIIf .111/11111; Editor .r/r'Editor .fuis/{Ull .-11'1 Ed/lor 80_,'s' ,''''''nicEdi/ur .1ui.;flwl BO,\'J' .-{/hlr/if Editor Gi,./.s' .tlhlc/ie FdilOr .1nis/fUi/ Girls' .1fllMic EdilOr i\1 JR.IAM HOLLORAN \\'U.DURR WILLING FLORENCE PETERSON LEON GREENE CHARLES PALACIO J OHS" FRElIo'CH HARRY GRAS"BERRY A!IoCELA K LEMMI-:R K AI'HERIN E SL'SOQLI!"I J ORR

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TI-IF ZO:-JI A:'<. 35 Scllior POL!.'-JOSES : \CS'ES JOH'SOS STA ... TO' PETER\OX STL' DF:'\SE EVASS JOH"-OHL<,O' Frl'SlwulI Rf'prU(lI/{I(h'N. j \ IAkGl-ERITE AYERS ELI1.AlIETH EI I .lo'rr i\IONACO /:0('1. (0". Y:mct "a},{!!, Elliott Monxo. John OhWlfl \11'1' Pret'ldcntl Robert Hohul*lo, Thatcher Clisbee, Rich:ml Johnson (Preo;idtll l '. Frollt rOil" Mar,,"Utrile AyC1"8. M :trg:lrel Bardclson, Franees B r o"'n J:liubeth lI(':8rlle Agnes John;;on 1'001y Jan:Cd Je:..it Barun 'Ii

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]6 THE ZONIAN. -!I; r I e G LEE C L UBS. I !fi !II; iQJ I I

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T H E ZO:-
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THE ZONIAN

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THE ZO="I :\:,\. .19

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THE ZO;\I: \ :'\ FOREff/ORD. 1= II p -\:,\ T A,i' I : \ may b e cons idered t h e cross roads o r t h e w orld f o r it i s thro u g h Panam a that m uc h o f the world's comme r ce passes The ships tha t go t hr o u g h th e Cana l carry our g ra duates, with the ir cargoes t o all parts o f th e w orld F o r thi s r e ason i t ha s b ee n harci to k ee p in to u c h with those wh o ha ve passed (r o m Ollf h orizo n. T o th ose w h ose wh e r eabouts wer e known t o LIS w e have writte n, a s king the m t o contribute so m e J'n cssage o r g r ee tin g f o r t h e 1 9 2 7 Annual. i V lany have s h o wn li S th e g r ea test i n ans w e rin g ; but we hope that i n a n o th e r year t h e r e pl ies will b e stillmo r e nume r o u s. \\' e thank all those wh o have g i ve n so g e n e r o u s ly of t h e ir tim e in r es p o n ding to our r eques t and in contributing to our columns -Wildlirr I Vil/ing, '26. F lorenu '26.

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THE ZO:,\ IA:'-I. + -!Ii I NEII' S O l R ALL Et CENTRO, COLOI\ II3I.\. EI C entro, o u r camp, i s l o cate d abollt e i g h t kilometers from Berranc a B e rm eja, t h e Colombian town,OIl t h e l\l agdel e na R iv e r. The main offices o f the field a r e located the r e This is my first time in an oi l field, and everythi ng h a s h e l d a certain fascinatio n. Until r a ctually saw t h e drilling proc e s s and t h e w o rk ing of t h e d e rri c ks, I d idn't kn ow h o w oil wa s taken frol11 t h e earth. The r e i s an immens e amOllnt o f work co nn ec t ed w i th an oil fie l d w hich o n e nev e r dream s of until one sees it. A number o f men come here expe cti n g a Para d i se a n d o f course t h ey arc disappointed. Having liv ed in Panama during t h e c o n struction p e ri o d I ca m e h e r e expectin g nothing, h e nc e -' wa s agree abl y surprised. The living c onditions a r e ve r y good ; a n d sanitation, a s far as pos s ible, i s exce l l ent. Our food i s ve r y good, a n d t h e r e i s pl enty o f it. The jungle practically surro un d s t h e camp. At nig h t there i s very little n o i se with t h e e x ce p tion o f the rig s whic h are w orking. The nights h e r e as a rul e are wonde rful t h e air i s cri sp, and t h e r e a r e always plenty of stars and u s u ally a mOOIl. I personally, am very fond of t h i s pla ce but so metim es 1 am bored with the same n ess The n I confent m yse l f with "th e r e are w o r se p l a ces than this." You know the o l d s a ying: "Eve r yo n e to his own taste." I s h ould like to h ea r from s ome o f m y frie n ds an d t h ey can reach m e by this address : R \1'. ENGELKE c 1 0 T ropical Oi l Cartagena, Col ombia. [\l y very best wishes for THE ZONIAN and co ngratulations for t h e Clas s of 1927 S in ce r e l y RICHARD \\' ENGELKE, 2 6 VIL LANOVA COLLEGE, PENNSYLVANI A H ow I wish you could enjoy wit h m e that delightful, ever -n e w feeling o f coming spring that i s n o w r e -awakening illanova! The g r a ss i s green; the trees a r e covered wi t h new lea ves; birds are flying about the campus. ;\tR5207-6 On th e uppe r fie l d th e base ball team i s practis ing; o n th e l o w e r fie l d t h e f ootball team i s h a v in g spring prac ti ce H e r e and t h e r e f ello w s may b e see n w alking in twos and threes a l o n g the p a th s whi c h win d th ro u g h the campus The true college atmosphe r e i s f ound at V illanova. \\' h e n I fir s t came, 1 wa s losto n e amo ng many strange r s But that d i d n o t last l o n g The f ello w s at Villanova are ve r y frie n d l y T o tal strange r s greet e d m e with a s mil e an d a c h ee rful h ello." .-\t o n ce 1 wa s made t o f ee l at h o me-a stranger amo ng fri e nd s The fir s t f e w d a ys w e r e gre a t fun; meeting n e w r eg i s t ering and starting cla sses But all o f this wa s soon stopped, f o r ala s, w e w e r e only Freshme n, and t h e unde r dogs The S o p h omores starte d it ofl" b y making th e Fres h m e n carry t h e ir trunks t o the ir room s 111 t h e e v e nin g th e Fres hm e n liv e d in t h e f ear o f b e ing h a ze d. Nightly t h e S o p h s colle c t e d in a room and brought so m e poor F r eshman th e r e t o b e hazed. H e wa s made t o dance s in g an d d o tri c k s The n came th e initiatio n a nig h t o f t erro r and dread. \\'e had t o put pajamas o n ove r som e o ld clo th es ; w e w e r e bli ndfo ld e d and co v e r e d fr o m h e a d t o f oo t with m o la sses and f eath e r s The n w e w e r e introd u ce d to th e h obble-g o bbl es Tha t m eant that e v ery time a S oph yelle d h o bbl e g o bble" w e all had to fall o n our kn ees and tou c h the ground with our f o r e h eads The n w e w e r e made t o g ra s p a l o ng r o p e and marc h d o wn t o Br yn Mawr, s in g in g our colle g e so ng s all t h e way. \\' h e n w e r e a c h ed ("lawr, w e w e r e take n into an empty l o t wh e r e w e w e r e all o w e d to r e m o v e O llr blin d f o l ds a n d walk ba c k to sc hool. \l'hat a s i ght w e w e r e The S ophs ha d made a good job o f it, f o r they had turne d oR' th e h o t wate r and w e ha d to bath e in ice co ld wate r a t o n e o 'cl oc k in t h e m o rnin g Of t h e many rul es whi c h w e had t o o b se r ve, th e o n e that impressed m e th e m os t wa s th e trad i t i o nal o n e o f h ello to any an d ever y college man o n e m e t wh e th e r h e had ever b ee n see n b e f o r e or not. This rule explains the frie n d lin ess s h o wn m e wh e n I first arrived Good lli c k to y o u all 'YILLIAM \\' EOW A LOT, '2 6,

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. <2 T H E ZONIAN EL CENTRO, COLOMBIA. The one thing that s urpri sed m e most when came [Q South Am erica was the difi'e r ence b etwee n the real South America and the S outh America that the Am erica n authors write about; therefore m y m essage will be o n thi s topic. These so-c all ed autho r s n eve r get b eyo nd co n t our lin es vague architecture, an d ambiguous general ti es about th e natives T he y never make a sunset glow; never do they give yo u a g limpse of th e glittering green f o lia ge, the talking denize n s o f the jungl e; never do thei r e n counters with m e n and w o m e n secrn lik e meetings between human beings One time while I was stopping in a little v illag e, the natives w elco m ed me, but said: '."\n Americana, un escribante stopp ed him self in thss pue bl o one night. \\'e r ece iv e him like frie nds. H e, when h e sc fue, wrote unkind things about u s. For that w e w o uld kill him if h e sOJ"lletim e r eturn. The majority o f th ese authors are so infatuate d with t h e m se l ves that t hey fai l to see the virtues in o t hers. Bare feet and dirty fa ces are to them just bare feet and dirty faces and t h e owner ranks i n th e ir personal card index on t h e level o f bare feet and d irty fa ces T hey never make a n attempt t o get at the so ul, at the heart of these people. They neve r relax into the courtliness w h ich the L a tin American valu es above good look s and a full purse. The authors som etimes complain that the people do not accord the m the r es pect whi c h they think they deserve. \\'hat more can they ex p ect? T hey co m e among these p eo pl e o n shanks ponies, dressed lik e tramps, with manne r s whi c h match the appearance, and a yearning for fr ee enter tainment and accommodations, and they are rece i ved a s tramps F o r this n o one i s t o b lame but t hemselves. T h e I.atin American d ec ri es d rabness Dress a man in a tux edo and present h im to you r South Ame ri ca n anri t h e latter will give him his f a mil y tree. Dress the sam e man in rags and th e South American will Aout him. With th e South American a neat, prosper o u s appearance i s the open sesame to hi s friendship, home, and hand o f his dau ghter; and a bedraggled exterior provokes his scorn and contempt. ;\1uch success for the 1 927 ZONIAN and co n gratulati o n s to the class of 1 927, Sincerel y yours, CHA RJ.ES TROWB RIDGE, '26. B A LBOA C. Z. B. H S. stands f o r three noble words that will always h o ld in fond r emembrance. I am co fident t hat THE ZONIAN,lik e almost e v ery great thing, will b e a s uc cess with e a c h coming year. M A RY A. i\! CCONAGHY, '26. B A L BO A C. Z. The years will always bring memo r ies of t h e happy da)'s s p ent in B H S. I wis h T 'HE ZONIAN e v ery success in t h e futuremay you alwa ys upho l d it s standard. ELOIS E LORH\G, ''26. H AKNEl\IAN HOSPITAL, PHILADELPHIA, P A. am very far fr o m h o m e and my present work is ve r y diR'e r ent fr o m m y w ork a year ago. I o ft e n t h ink o f m y hig h school days and s inc e r e l y h o p e t h i s year's ZONIAN will have t h e same s uc cess a s la s t year's. Good lu ck, ZON 1AN. M ILDRED OLIVER, '26. AKRON, NEW YORK. wis h that all o f you could share with me the w o nd e rful times and experiences 1 have been having at Alfred Unive r sity this pas t winte r. b es t r egards to you all and a big success to this year's ZONIAN. Sincerely, FRANCES GREENE, ''26. BAL BO A C. Z. "Absence makes t h e heart grow fonder, a s t h e go es I have o ften wis h e d I could do m y four years of h ig h school over. I hope th e class o f 1 927, after two years' abse n ce, will feel the sa m e as I do. BALBOA, C. Z. Altho u g h Im working now, I s till look back fondly on the days spent in B H S. B es t wishes and s u ccess t o yo u all and to THE AGNES McDADE, '25.

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THE ZONIAN. 4.1 BROOKLYN, N E w YORK. T o the m embe r s of t h e clas s of '927, I exte nd all be s t wis h es for their future. And h e re's g ood lu c k to t his year' s ZONIAN. May its contents b e th e b es t ever, its sal es t h e bigg es t eve r, and it s s u ccess the most ever! Sincere l y yours, A N I TA \\'OOD L A R SON, ':23. (Miss Anita \\'ood wa s kind e n o u g h to se n d u s an announce m ent o f h er r ecent marriage to En s ign Robert \\'arren Larso n, U. S. PEDRO M,GUEL, C. z. I am very proud to b e a graduate of t h e Balbo a H igh School, and I kn o w the cla ss o f 1 927 will soo n share this same pride in gradua tion with m e Pl ease accept my best wis h es for t h e c la ss and f o r rh e s u ccess of THE ZONI AN H E LE N T. HUllER, '22. ST. PAUL, l\fINN E SOTA A s m os t o f m y frie n ds ha ve l e ft th e I sthmus, r was quite surprised and d elighted to r eceive a l ette r fro m the Balbo a Hi g h S c h ool. Panama i s, and alwa ys will b e, the lan d o f m y d rea"s, I am sure ; and I f ee l very envi o u s of all who are fortunate e n o ugh to b e down t h e r e s till, and es p ec iall y o f t h ose still attending sc h ool. I am sure that yo u have the s am e marve l o u s times that w e u sed to have. The r e i s nothing I w o uld e nj oy m o r e t han to atte nd o n e o f your alumni m ee tin gs, but I will have to satisfy myse l f with wis hing yo u all a most happy and lengthy s ta y o n the lsthmus V e ry s i ne e rel y, ESTHER L. RYAN L. Fr,lIIC1's, '12.) :-I A R S I S Charla Hutt!!r;. '26. Crac k of a Serhian pistol! The echoes died on the air; F ell the last of the Au stri:tn prince s W i th de:nh-dew o n his hair. The n :nio n s r ose i n :tnger, A s quarrelsome boys :trise: The war d rum t hr ob h ed in P aris And ec h oed to the s kie s. There wen;,: sou n ds of m:tnly m a r c h ing, And rumbling :trm ored cars; The earth was torn with trenc h es An d shrapnel's brut:tl sca rs. Vali ant w ere the warriors, \ '; d ia ntl r ther died; BlIt w ails of maids and orp han s, Pursued the bloody tide. Se:1son followed se:tso n An d year trod 'lfr e r ycar; Europe bled i n a n guis h with haunting fear. B ut :tIl that h as beginning i\lust ce:tse t o b e; So Europe ceased h e r s inning F rom war at la S t was f ree. Then na tion aftcr nation ROl>e wt:ary from t h e field; The v ictors r eeled in triumph, The vanquis h ed a l so ree l ed. E ach fe:Lrcd no mQre t ht: orht:rThat h :td no strength to fear; E ac h ye:lrn ed to b e a brothn, The :In guis h ed past to clt::tr. So side by l>ide in council They sought the reaso n f or Their woes; and then re so lved T o kill t h e god o( war. i\'ow had bet:n a bully : \ loud -mouthed hragging b oor, Who'd h:td m:tnkind in s ha c kle s Fr om T roy to i'.] oor. His l>W.1Y was ne'er berated. For none d:tred him n :t)'; With nation s separatt:d, H e h e l d his ruthles<; sway. But now the n:ttion s, h eads together, I nvoked the dove o f peaceD eclared t h e future all fair weather, -\n d bloo,ly j\l ars deceased. So now yo u'll find on j\lounr Olympu s The hoarr go.h of yo re-Apollo J ove, and Itl('c hu s, But no r ough god o( war.

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T H E ZON J AN. The locks that let the waters through, \\':lnfcd to know what the ocean knew; For they were young, a nd the ocea n old, -\n d this is the tale t h:1t the ocean told. T ime out o f mind I have washed this sand, W hile race after race has ruled the bnd. There are stories in plenty of who hdd sway, B efore the Aztecs, who ruled the dar That t he first of the Spanish explorers came, .""!ld claimed the lan d in his monarch's name. Others soon followed, and seiled the soil, :\nd forced the natives as slaves to toil, Or struck out into the great unkno wn For the glo r y of God, and the Span ish throne!. The n raised b y the labo r of conquer ed The St:ue!r city of P an:l.Ina r ose. T he g reatest of new world cities then, I [ reached t h e height of its glory when The pack trains, laden with golden spoil Of conquen:d I ncas, SpainwOlrd did toil, O'er the Camino R ea l through jungle green, T o Porto B ello o n t h e Caribbean. But in sixtee n hundred and seventy-one, The sands in the citv's glass had run, For across the came l\lorg:ln's band, Belly ]flrN. '27, T o sack the city, and harry the land, To murder, pillage, s la y, and '-'urn And t h en in triumph, ba ck to turn T he years r olled o n till there came a day, When the land revolted from Spanish s w ay, Which had grown more feeble, until at last, In eighteen nineteen it finally passed. The gold rus h of eig h teen forty-nin e Sa w the Start of t h e railroad l i n e, Whi c h was built at the COSt of a l ife a tie, For men laid down t heir tool s to die. But over the road with its dead sca rce cold, Returning miner s carrit:d t heir gold, Or new ach'enrurers hurrying o n Traveled at speed tow:lrd the settin g s un And now we come to the pre sent time, \\'hen another invasion from al ien dime Brought :l horde of worke r s to dig a way, From the Caribbean to Panama B ay. The s h ips of the world now foll o w the route, That B a l boa too k when he first set o ut, The Camino R eal from s h o r e to s hore And the track that the miners offorty-nine wore." This is the tale that the ocean told, A s upon P,mama's shorest rotled. c: thcdnl TOll'cr -Huin!l of Old Panama

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THE ZO;-..rl.'\;-..r.

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THE ZONIAN. .. 1= II M ANY things may b e judged b y the m o tiv e b e hin d t h e m, not by the a ctual resu lt. H e w h o l oo k s f o r the hidde n th ought, ( o r the kernel within th e s h ell, FOREfVORD. s hall most o ft e n find somethin g o f worth. 'fhe world i s c rying f o r fini s hed prod ucts. for rounded, perfect things; but there i s prornise o f future p e r fection in the stilted product of a beginner's p en The lite rary training r ece ived in high sc h oo l i s invaluable to the pros p ective write r, for not only does it instruct him in the m echanics of authorship but it t e a c h es him lit erary appreciation. H ere it is that the yo un g person l earns to love and r e v e r e th e masterpieces that s hall afford him the greatest pleasures late r 011, perhaps when his o wn r esources have fail ed him. Since "th e r e i s n othing n e w under the sun," all writing mllst, of co n seq u e n ce, b e a sort o f "cocktail" of o th e r writings, the dramatic esse n ce of o ne, th e flowing styl e of anothe r, the po e tic p hra seo log y of a third, until the fini s h ed produc t i s as definitely diff e r ent a s all the oth e rs w e r e All the literary rllasterpieces that Engl i s h -speaking peoples have loved for years have b ee n studied and a nal yzed, and carefull y read by our yo un g authors, until it seems as if th ey must have absorbed, in so m e small degree, a bit o f the s kill that has made these men a n d women famolls. I n these days of co n centratio n upon comme r ce and bu siness organization, these days o f so ul -ki lling rOll tine and sales campaigns, a lit erary appreciation i s doubly val uable to the p e r son who is to live a complete lif e. T o everyo n e the r e co m es a time when his ow n thoughts and acti o n s f ail to be suffic i ently engrossi ng, and it is t h e n that t h e livin g characters and the stirring sce n es o f th e great romances, both of poetry and prose, s hall b e his t o live over again. W it h a plea f o r indulgence are these pages publi s hed, in the hope that thev may be viewed with some degree of favor, and appreciated f o r what they are-th e sincere eRorts of a g r oup of s inc e r e young p eople, endeavorin g to give the best Ii that is in them to th e task 011 ha m!. G eorg i e GOOd/lllf, ':?7. 1 KaIM,';''' ConK'''' '27 1 -

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THE ZONIA:,\,. THE STORI ES. I t is the custom for Balb oa H igh School to condue[ an annllal s hort story contest, rhe winning stori es t o be published in fHE T his year two stor ies were c ho sen frolll t h e entire sc h ool and two were se l ected from eac h class. These stories co n sidered worthy of l10tc w ere given honorable mention. The decision was made by a cOlllmittee of three, \ Villiam L awlo r f\1rs. Frank i\l urray, and l\l rs. Seymour P aul. \\'e wish to take t hi s opportunity of thanking them for the work t h ey hav e done, and the great assistance they hav e r e nd e r ed LIS. Their interest was very keen, and they gave much va luabl e time to the stor:e s Their decisions were as follows: The best frolll the entire sc h ool was A L ege nd of Old Panama," by Betty Ba c hu s, '27; and "The I ron Cross," by Concepcion Lu tz, ''29, was given second place. The winning stories from the Senior Class were .,.'\ L egend of Old Panama," by Betty Ba c h us, and J osep h," by B everly H arrison. Those stories receiving honorable mention were :\11 Excerpt from the Journal of an l \ ncient Lady," by Georgie Goodhue, and "Treasure Chest," by Katherine Conger. The winning stories from the Junior Class were "Tht' Sacrifice," by Anna Saphir, and "The R ebe l and Strong Drink," by Charles P alacio. Those stories receiving honorable men tion were "Childr e n of the Sky," by Gertrude H arrison, ".t\ J ivaro Trophy," by Elva Smith, and H e Left it to Chance," by Ph ares Butl er. From the Sophomore Class "The I ron Cross, by Concepcion Lutz, and J uan Herrera's Fortune," by Ka thleen were adjudged best. "The \V ayside Shrine," by : \ gn e s ;\I ack was given honorable mention. The winning Freshman s[Qries were "The i\.l iser's ,,'him," by D oris H al let, and "Two Stolen Idols," bv Roberta J acques. "Daily L ife of a P ecora i\Tative," by i\largaret ; \rer s, and Brave Indian Boy," by Clyde Butler received h o norabl e mention. LEGEN D O F OLD PANAMA The late afternoon s un was beating down wit h a rele n tless h ea t, and my h orse and I were just about ready to drop from ex haustion. Never, it seemed to me, h ad I been so tired. \ \ 'o uld I ever overtake the rest of the party? Since ea rly in the afternoon I had been see king them; and now, as it was getting along towards dusk I was becoming rightfully anxious. I t is n o pleasant thing to be wandering a long on an unknow n trial in the middle of Chiriqui provin ce with no prospect of food or s h elter. I kept on, h owever, in t h e hop e o f co min g to a hill or so m e s u c h vantage point from which] might ascertain, if possible, where I was. Fin ally, I was relieved to see a larg e hill; and urging B ronc h o P ete forward, I h urried l y it. I rea c h ed t h e summit and anxiously scanned the h or i zon. At fir s t it see m ed as though I were to be disappointed; but at last I sa w a littl e wisp o f smoke trailing its way upward, coming from amid a cluster of trees in the valley below. \\,ith renewed h ope 1 quickly sought the fire that was moth e ring the smok e I knew without a doubt [hat the smoke I had seen ha d come from my friends' campfire. Im agine my f eeli ng when, upon drawing n ea r I saw a queer littl e native hut, and an o l d, wrinkled, wizened woman sitting on a stone in front of the doo r, ca lmly smoking her pipe, and industriously rubbing what seemed to be some sort of brass ornament. I knew now that all c han ces of catching up with my lost party of friends were gone, that I might as well make the most of this opportunity that had presented itself, and ask the old woman if I at least might not camp near her hut during the night. These possibilities rapidly presented themselves, and finally I ventured my question in Spanish. "Ah, Senorita, but to be sure, 111)' small hut is at your disposa l," s h e r ep l ied with that innate courtesy of the L atins. I tied Br onc h o Pete to a stump nearby and sat down beside my newly-acquired hostess i\lyeye was caught by the bright glitter of the ornament s h e was so carefully polishing; and curiosity getting the better of me, I asked her what it was. For reply she handed to me a tiny golden frog, a thing of man'elous design and exquisite workmanship. ".;\'h," she said, slowly shaking her head, "there is a sad woven about that frog." I all curiosity, listened eagerly as she related it to me.

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THE ZONI.,\N. "l\lany, many years ago, when our trihe was t h e Conquistadors came an d spread desolation and sorrow in t h e i r wake. O U f villages were plundered and burned, o u r dear olles to rtured and killed, o u r sons and daugh ters made s l aves. Lolita, the most beautiful girl of our tribe, was taken prisoner. T all dark, sl:::-tder was s h e, with beau ti f u l lo ng, l ustrous hair, melting dark eyes, red lips, and g leamin g teeth. Day in and day out s h e l a b o red for t h e cru e l Spaniards. Her bod\' sickened a n d t h e ethereal loveliness o f h e r beauty became intensified. "She became infatuated with one of t h e dashing Conquistadors, Don Carlos. Cruc) and hear tless he was, b u t hiding it all beneath an exterior of smili n g suave m an neri sms. to this DOll Carlos it was t ha t a mer e g i rl o f t h e tribes s h o ul d love him, :l Kn ig h t of the K i n g But,' t hough t h e, 'through seeming love I can lure f rom t h is L o lita t h e tribal sec rets. J will learn w here t h ei r treasures a r e hidden a n d enri c h mrself; as wel l t h e coR'ers of m y King. "All tendern ess h e becam e to t h e lovely L olita. I n v ain w e warned h e r o f h i s d upli city but to liS s h e wo u ld pay n o heed. At la s t h e learned t h e situation of our ancient burial g rounds in w h ose mounds lar pri ce l ess hidden treasures with our dead. "On e n ig h t h e stol e from t h e v illage a ccompa nied by two Spani s h s laves. Ah, bu t h e w a s to e nri c h himself; as well as t h e coff e r s o f hi s Kin g Deep t hey dug a n d uncovered a burial m ound i n w hi c h we r e i n n umerabl e treasu res Eagerly they reached for t h e gol d. A s t h e ir finger s clutc hed t h e treasure t hey wcre strick e n deacL I n D o n Carlos' finger s was this goldcn fr o n g. I n t h e m o rning t h ei r dea d b od ies t o l d the s t o r y 'See,' sai d t h e caci q ue, 'wh a t h a p pe n s t o those w h o d i sturb t h e sleep o f t h e dead!' ":\11 was c lear now to L o lita. S h e saw h o w s h e had p layed into his faithless h a nds. I n a frenzy o f grief, s h e kil led herself. From t hat dar [0 this, t hi s golden f rog h as bee n a token of w a rn in g t o all o u r young maiden s w h o wou l d l ove with o u t t h e t r i b e They s h all not meet t h e sam e fate as d i d the lu c kl ess L olita Both of us sat sil e n t f o r a few minutes, l os t in reverie o f t hose adventurou s times. At last the o l d J n d i a n wo man arose, bade m e good ni ght, and d i s appeared into t h e doorway o f h e r hut. I pulle d m y bla nket aroun d m c, la y down o n t h e g r ound and wen t to s leep under t h e t ropical s t a r s B r o n c h o Pete w hi n nied w istfullr THE I RO)! C ROSS. COllupcion Lutz, '29. I left my ten t with guide to expl o r e t h e Sain t Joseph's ruin s t h a t were farth e r in t h a n t h e rest of t h e ruins of Old Panama. As t here was no path leading to t hem we ha...l to cut out way throu g h \\'c came ro a n opening about ten feet wide covered \\'ith large stones in such a way t hat n o g r ass co ul d grow between t hem. 1 n t h e middl e was a la rge, t h ick iron cross. r t was a p l ain c r oss but ther e was something majestic abou t it. Lookin g c losel y at it r read these dates, then almost i n v isihl e '494-J 564'" 1 asked Iny guide if h e knew anything ahout it. H e said he did but that he wo u ld tell me of it when we were out of the hot SUIl. T his is t h e story r heard sitting under a tree with the tropical breeze b lowing across my face. n I 510, a year after Pedrarias Davila founded the city of Panama, there came to t h is city a yo ung Spaniard by the llarllC of Pedro Castillo. H e was a young man of twentr-five a stron!!, active man, a n n a blacksm ith b y t raoe. I n t h ose times w h e n horses a n d car ts w e r e needed f o r trave l and carryin g a b lack s mi t h was ve r y muc h in need. Pedro did not lose tim e, bu t buil t himself a small s hop and fell immediatel y t o work. Soon h e had a good b u s i ness s tarted. l' A s t h e v ill age i nc reased in s i ze, so Pedr o s bus in ess in c r e a sed Many good s m i t h s c a m e to P anama bu t n o n e of t h e m succeeded, f o r t hey se t to work with t h e ir m inds on the gol d that was b eing found. They soon left t h e ir s hops to go i n sear c h o f gold. Blit Pedro kept hi s work N e i t h e r did h e become l a2),. H e was t h e clock o f t h e v illag e. The few housewi ves used to rise w h e n t h e fir s t 'Tin, t i n, tin' of h is hamm e r was heard, f o r t her kne w t hat t h e n it was R i x o'clock H e was kno wn in t h e village as 'Our Pedro.' I n t h e evenin g w hen h e had finis hed h is work h e coul d be see n s m oking at t h e door of h is s hop.

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T H E ZON I A1\'. 49 ""Vh e n P etlro built a s llIall but pretty hOllse beside his s hop the r e wa s mllch gossiping in th e villa ge. \ \ h e n p eo pl e a s k e d him who was going to liv e in the little h ouse h e w.)uld s m ile and say: 'You s hall see .' "The n ex t trip of th e Cflrmfll bro u g h t P ed r o his brid e. Then knew w h y h e had bui l t the littl e hOllse. I sabe la, his brid e, was a happy little p e rs o n with an e t ernal, s w ee t s mil e on her lip s Pedro lived very happily with -'sab e la She u sed to min g l e her song with t h e so ng o f Pedro's hamme r. A son W,1S born to the m a n d t h ey named him P edrito. Isabela said that s h e wanted h e r so n to b e lik e his father and that t h e narn e would h e lp. But the nam e did n o t see m to do so, for a s P edrito grew lip h e s h o w ed of la z in ess Two other son s were b o rn t o them, Juan a nd Pablo. They, l ik e Pedrito, did not want to w o rk. l n s read of h elping t h eir father they used t o go fis hin g. They were always see n together. \\'he n th e p eo ple saw the m they said, 'Poor P edro.' But P edro did not seem to care. H e w ent on with his work. \Vh e n Pedrito ca m e of age h e went to a neigh b oring v illag e and th e r e h e marrierl th e rich daughter o f th e .'\lcalde. Later Juan and Pablo went to live with the m. The peopl e w e r e sur pri sed that P ed r o did not stop t h e m. Years passed P ed r oand l sabe l c l wereol d n ow. I sabe la n o l o nger mingled h e r voi ce with t h e song of the hammer. The 'tin, tin, tin' o f t h e hammer grew di m. Now was the time f o r other smiths to work and took acivantageoftheiropportunity. The di scouraged m e n e n couraged the oth e r s to do steady work. Soon P edro ha d nothin g to do, for t h e young m en wer e putting up n e w s hops and were taking his w o rk. Jsab e la died l eaving P ed r o alo n e, but P edro f ound so m ething to do. H e c ould b e see n with a sack on his back and his eyes on th e groun d looking f o r somethin g. H e wa s looking f o r pieces o f iron, o l d nails, rusty sc r ews, or oth e r o bjects of ir o n. The p eo pl e whispered that his min d wa s be coming simpl e, but as h e wa s harml ess t hey l e ft h im alone. Some even h elped him with his task. .-\11 t h e iron h e accumulated in a co rn e r o f his o l d s hop and e very nig h t w h e n h e added to it his day's work h e would smile. The pile in t h e COrl1!'r g r ew slowly b u t s teadily. "The n cam e a d a y w h en Pedro was not see n abroad. P ed r o was s i ck H e sent for his sons and asked t hat Pedrito bring his wife with him \\'he n his so n s arrived h e wa s dyin g. H e was g lad to see them again, but knew that h e h ad only a little t im e l e ft in thi s w orld H e made a s ign t o approach his bed a n d sai d to t h em: "'M y c hildren, I am dying. The only t hin g I a s k o f yo u i s that yo u make m e an iron cross. I b eseec h yo u to make it f o r m e T o save yo u ex p e n se I have gathered t h e iron needed. Y o u will find it in m y s h op. I want H e could not continue h e was dead. H i s SO il S were surprised at th e odd wish of t h e ir fat h e r. P edrito's wife said t ha t they must carry it out, f o r it wa s t heir fath er's last wis h. "'But h ow are we goi n g to do it?' they asked, f o r they kn e w nothin g o f t heir fath er's trade. "The three boys w ent to work. I t was a ve r y hard task, for t h ey had to m elt all the s mall pieces of iron into o n e mass T o make t h e work l ess difficult they divided it. 1 t took the m a l o ng time to make the c r oss A g ain t h e merr y 'tin, tin, tin' o f t h e hamme r wa s heard, at first dim but stronger ever y day. Again t h e spark s o f fire flew f rom the h o t ir o n and again a sweet voi ce mingl ed with th e so n g o f th e hammer. I twas Pedrito's wife who was s inging to give t h em stre ngth and courage "At last the cross was fini s h ed and ready to be taken to Pedr o s grave. \Vhe n t h ey r eturned from t h e graveyard, Juan said: J have l earned to love this work and 1 want t o sta y h e r e "The r e was a pause. The n P edrito sa id: ( Broth e r s, 1 kn o w n o w wh y our father wanted u s to make t h e c r oss H e wanted to compe l u s to w ork. H e picked t h e littl e pi eces of iron to make our tas k harder. A s f o r me, T will sta y with Juan and continue working in this t rade.' .. 'And so will I ,' sa i d Pablo "They stayed and named t heir s hop 'The Three \\'orkin g Brothers.' A.nd t h e r e was no man that cou l d surpass them in business o r happiness." Thus en d ed m y guide.

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T H E ZO:-.'I.'\ :'\'. J OSE PH I first saw J oseph at the clinic in t h e spacious waiting room of this Past-wc rd-in-hospitals." H e was just an ordinary little negro boy, with big questioning eyes and a humorous mOtlth. H e sat with the other small black boys waiting to be called i n to the "inner s h ri ne" of t h e doctor's office, to have t h roats, cars, and eyes t:x3mincci altho ug h one could nc\"er imagine anything wrong "ith J oseph's eyes. J oseph was the larges t c f a group o f fOllr and seemed to be the moral support of t h e others, all of whol11 had come from the hospital ward in various sizes of issued pajamas. I n t h is case it looked as though the little ones had drawn rhe big"sleeperg" and the larger ones had drawn the smail ones. Joseph, though small, not over eight or nin e years old, was decidedly "in too far;" and his bla ck, pinksoled feet were hardl), on s p eaking t erms with the extremities of his garrnent. Patiently h e waited, occasionally w hispering reprimands to his companions w h e n t h ey see m ed to grow restless, b u t never so mllc h as moving a muscle of h is own small body. i\l y next meeting was a "closeup "as t h e movie people sayI stumbled over him, scrubbing the floor, in our own kitchen one day. "\\'hy, Katherine, i s t h is your 1 exclaimed. Y es, i\)om," said Kath e rine, w h o was diligently press ing the family linens w hich s h e rook care of each week; s he wa s our laundress. You never said anything about having any little folk," I went on. Laird, i\ l iss, I have fiv e of them. T his wan is the oldest of the l ot," said s h e. And Joseph with his wide, friendly grin continued to rub the floo r in a most thorough manner. "This wan, is my right arm, m om," continued Katherine in her quaint Jamaican dialect. H e takes care o f the sl'naJla wan s at home when I am away working; and when J get over-tired or b ehind with my w ork, h e h e l p s with that, too. H e is a good boy, mom-indeed." This I co uld readily believ e, a s I watched the small, lith e bod)' so busy completing his task. I n rny thoughts, I compared him tothewhitechildren o f my acquaintance, many o f whom were unable at his age to dress themselves. J pitied them and envied Joseph, so abl e and c heerful, radiating joy in every mOve of his body. "\\'hat do c h i ldren do for recreation Katherine?" I asked. "They have 110 t im e for t hat, mo m s h e answer ed. T he little wa n s play abou t t h e h o u se a b it, and o n Sundays I dress t hem all and send t h e m o ff to Sunday sc hool. They are glad enough to have food f o r their mouthsj play does not worry t hem. Saying nothing, 1 resolved in my heart t hat in some way Joseph at least, s hould have a taste of t h e good t h ings of life h e so richly earned. On further inquiry 1 found t hat Kath e rine's family were o f the better class of Jamaicans, but even the better class have to struggle to l i ve on the Isthmus, so great are the numbers. Joseph 's fathe r wa s one of the horde who stayed on after construction in preference to returning to his own nativc J arnaiccl. H e considered himself a ge ntlernan; and rather than do rnen i a l labor whic h he l e ft to t h e weaker h a l f of h is fam il)" h e c h ose to run a wee tai l ori n g shop in t h e front of their living quarters. T hese quarters J found a few days later at number 45. I t wa s o n e of those rare, cool, dry season mornings with t h e trade winds b lowing and no hint of heat o r mugginess i n the air-just soft bal m in ess that lured one to t h e o u t-o f-doors. M y t houghts turned to Joseph in secret, however, for my family would have been h orrified to know t hat I had any ser ious interest in a little negr o boy. Everyone about the place was occupied, a n d J o n some flimsy excuse set out to find h im J t was an adventure to me, too, and my heart t h rilled wi t h t h c beau ty o f t h e morning and t h e quest i n vIew. 1 had never had a more intimate view ofCh orilla than that see n from Balboa road a n d I felt strange and out-ofplace. 1 began exploring t h e side streets looking for the address Katherin e had given me. I n the dirty narrow streets, hordes of small Jamaicans romped L ife had surely taught t hem the law of self protection, for t h ey scattered like black bird s at t h e honkin g of my automobile horn On a s mall side street leading off from t h e district made lip of saloons, dance h alls, and other

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THE ZON!'A!\'. 5 I stich places, I fOllnd the object of my quest. H e sat with a baby 011 h is lap, at the same time watching the s hop, the baby, and a group of c hil dn;:n playing in the street. I f his heart yearned to be with them, there was no sign of it in hi s countenance, f or his expressio n was that of perfect peace. : \ t s i g h t of me hi s mouth spread into a wiele grin with a vast displa y o f s ho\\ y teeth. I wonder \\ negroes are blessed with suc h marvelolls teeth or is it just the contrast of their black skin that gives the teeth that dazzling whiteness! "\\'hat do you we go for a ride out to the Sabanas, J osep h 1" [ asked. "Oh, i\l iss, could we?" H e gasped with eager embarrassment and his great eyes s h one; hut then aftcr a moment's thought, I could not leave t h e lirrle wans, mom," and he was reaLiy [Q give up all thought o f going without protest, because the "little wans" could not be left. "Can't your father keep them?" I asked Impatiently. But h e i s not h e r e and I have to watch the s h o p and give a mon his clothes. I am sure I felt far more disappointed than did Joseph w h o expected so little of life; and being accustomed to having my own way, I was not yet to gi\c up my plan. After due consideration, I decided [Q wait until t h e father returned, hoping t hat h e might oR'er to relieve J oseph of t h e babies. Bu t h e did not come, and the sun was ciirllbing higher in the blue sky. I was eager to be ofF, not to mention the fact that I felt horribly conspicuo u s and parked on this sordid street surrounded h y a group of curious-eyed lirtl e J arnaicans. B y this time Joseph's three other charges appeared 011 the scene and were announced, rather than introduced, in Joseph's little oklman way as, Irene, Anna, and Daniel. The baby was \\'inifred. At least Kath c rin c had a se nse of symmetry when it camt: to names. Danie l especially fitted t h e cunning little black baby, not more than rhree, w h o grinned at me frorn behind his two sisters. Still 110 father in evidence, but the "man" came for hi s c loth es and relieved our minds of that obligation; and when an hour passed with no relief from the babies in sight, I whowns to be charmed by t h e w h o l e fami l y anyway, decided to take them all. Joseph assured me that it would be perfectly safe to leave the shop to its fate. lying about looked of much val u e to t h it:ves. I magine the excitement of washing faces ami getting into best cloth es. This I Icft entirt:!y to Joseph's management and efForts, waiting outside in car until the children appearedfaces shining and eyes aglow, Have you ever felt the warmth and radiance of from bringing happiness or pleasure to someone? I t is a wonderful thing; and I dOllotmind announcing thar nothing ever gave me more satisfacrion, or to express it more viviLlly, a greater thrill, than did taking that group of pleasurehungry little folk for an outing. For children are c hildren rhe whole world they black, white, or indifFerent in color. Too awed by rhe cccasion to be noisy or hilarious, as our own children \\'ould h'l\'e been, ther sat like wee black mice Joseph and the baby in front with me, small Danit..:l and the two much-braided girl s in the l'e: lr scat. j \ lay I remark again that it was a glorious morning? A smooth road ahead, that wound like a white ribbon between rows of feathery COCOllut palms and flaming hibiscus hedges, invited us. Gorgeous purple and red bougainvillaca blossoms s houtell to us on every hand, and the soft jasmin escented breeze kissed our cheeks. black anJ white, impartially, \\'e bowled merrily along, first to Old Panama where the children scrambled about the ruins for awhile; and then, still nor satisfied to take the happy group back, I decided to drive on down to Pecora, or at least in that direction. This was a regretful decision on my part, for many weeks to come; hut who c:tn be sure of doing what is best? The need of food being manifested by my own inner being, I felt sure the call was even greater with my guests; so we SJ'.Jght a "chino" store and I secured a supply of sardines, tinned fruit, and crackers. \\'c a picnic to the utmost, 011 the banks of the lovely Pecora River. After hilarious wading in the stream and a drenching or two when the.:: rapids pulled the little ones down, we t:,ought of horne again. During the whole Joseph had never once left the but had carried her about an.1 held her like grim death. I t was evident that he was going to have nothing happen to rhat baby. Yet, through it all, his cheerful grin never disappeared nor did he seern to tire or show any desire for skipping otf to stay with the rhree others who were not much younger or smalier. I could see the little man was

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T H E ZO N 1 AN. growi n g uneas), t hough as t h e s hadow s began to lengthe n a n d eveni n g d r e w near. So s hooing t h e little b lack birds agai n t o th e car, w e se t o ff o n what l a t e r proved to b e our fatefu l j ourney homeward. The road neve r see m ed so b e au ti ful to m e T all trees a n d j un g l e grow t h a l most over lappin g above u s made it a veritable lover 's lan e for mil es a n d t h e numero u s bridges over lovel y c lear stre ams never fail ed to call f orth a squeal o f (re m Illy charges. I d i d not want t o hurry a n d mi ss al1)' o f the beauty o f th e d istan t m oun tai n s o r n eare r h ills, but I f elt su r e Kath e rin e w o ul d be fretting abcut I:er mi ss in g p roge n y, w h e n s h e returned-my ow n f a mil y mi ght b eg in to wo nder roo; so 1 step ped o n the gas a n d r eso l ved t o co m e anoth e r d a y f o r m y n a ture study. There i s n o tw ili g h t h our in th e t r o p i cs ; t h e e nds s uddenly a n d darkness falls wit h o u t warni ng. 1 t see m ed in a spec ial hurry that d a y f o r b y t h e t i m e we had r eac h ed th e Juan Dia z b r id ge, it wa s necess a r y to switch o n the lights an d w e w e r e s t ill a l o n g wa y fr o m h o m e I f e l t I m u s t hurry a little f as t e r o r b o t h famili es w o u l d b e ala r m ed 1 h a d tol d n o o n e w here 1 wa s g o in g ; a n d alth o ug h neighbo rin g eyes h a d w a t c h ed m e dep a r t with t h e c h i l d r e n a n d would n o doubt r e p ort t o K a t h e r in e ] d i d no t w ant t o cau se her any und u e alarm. "'\V ell, at least," I t h o u g ht, "the r o a d has bee n surfaced fro m h e r e o n h o m e and tho u g h it i s t reach e r o u s ly n arro w t h e r e i s n o t muc h traffi c o n i t The miles we r e b e in g lite r ally devoured w h e n s uddenly fr o m over th e r ise o f a s l o p e, blin d i n g lights appeared ; so blinding w e r e t h ey t hat e v ery thin g e l se wa s l os t i n utte r darkness I attempte d to g iv e t h e d im mi n g s i gnal b u t t h e o n co m i ng car w as upo n m e b e f o r e 1 h a d hard l y ti m e to t hi nk T h e r e wa s a s udden s i c k ening c ra s h a n d J k new n o m o r e The n ex t day I awake n ed in t h e h ospital with a bro k e n h ip a crus h ed hand a n d a bad l)' la cerated face and h e ad. B y m y s ide sat m y aunt w i t h a grave un s milin g fa ce. 1 wa n t e d info rmatio n and a ft e r co n v i n c in g h e r that s h e w o ul d b es t t ell m e t h e w o r s t t h i s i s t h e story s h e gave m e W e had b ee n h i t b )' a wil d c hiva" dri ve r and over turned H e h a d n o t s t opped t o a ss i s t u s but h ad l e ft u s and h a d gon e o n h i s wa y N o n e o f t h e c hil d r e n had b ee n se ri o u s l), hurtt h e littl e girl s had m in o r bruises and w e r e r estin g i n t h e h ospital. The bab)' h a d escaped w i t h o u t a scratch ; a n d J ose p h bl esse d J ose p h alth o u g h h e had r ece ived a cut o n h i s l eg had pulled u s all out, b o u n d 01)' b l eeding hand with t h e bab)"s d r ess and go n e f o r h e lp. I t wa s h e w h o h a d explai n e d t o t h e poli c e man i n S p a n i s h j u s t w h a t had happe n ed ; a n d late r h a d t e l e p h o n ed m y famil y f r o m a n e a r b y "ch i n o s t o r e It wa s J ose p h w h o had dri e d t h e gi rls' tear s first examining t h e m f o r inju r i es an d quie t e d the baby w h e n n o o n e e l se co u l d It wa s l ittle Josep h n o la r ge r t han a mite, with his o ld -man min d and his h eart o f gold, w h o s tood at t h e foot o f m y b e d t h i s minu t e with h i s w ide gri nn i n g m outh and big express i ve eyes inquiri n g : "Are yo u all ri g h t n o w m om?" THE SACRIF 1CE. M o rgan gasped t h e B i s h o p w it h a s h e n lirs a n d co un te n a n ce. "\\' h e re?" "Morgan w i t h rwo t h o usan d armed m e n three miles f ro m t h e city, in t h e m e adows. T hey h a ve had n o food for seven days; b u t n ow they h a ve killed a herd, w hich was g razing in t h e m e adow s, and are feasting o n it. T h ey will attack tomorrow, panted t h e t rembl in g s lave. T he entire assembly of priests s h o w ed v i s ibl e signs of ter ro r \Vh o had t h o u g h t t h a t I V lorgan wou l d dare to attack Panam a even t h o u g h h e had conquered Fort San L o r e n zo a n d New P rov iden ce I sland so easi l y? L ike o n e pe r so n t h ey all turned t o t h e Bis h o p f o r h im to d ir ec t t h e m a s lIs ual. H e see med to kn o w at o n ce w hat to do. "Place all t h e w o m e n c hildre n an d j e w e l s o n t h e galleo n. At full tide se t s ai l f o r P e ru. L e t all t h e m e n be asse mbl ed b e f o r e m y palace Summo n t h e infantry! H ide all t h e g o l d L o a d t h e c a n n o n !" S uddenl), h e s t opped ; t h e n w h i s p e r e d h oarse l y, \Vhat o f T a b og a 1" Everyon e immed iatel y th o u g h t o f t h e b e a u t i f u l littl e i s lan d w h e r e all wa s so quie t a n d p e a ce f ul. T h e y mus t b e w a rn ed," ejac u late d Hi s H ig h n ess

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T H E ZON I AN. 53 J mmediately o n e of t h e b est-l iked priests, Father Di e g o, stepped forth H e was no longer young; but h e sai d Highness, I will go. The you n g men are needed here." "Go, Father Diego, and may God be with you!" The priest made straigh t for the beach with a broth er. T o geth er t hey search ed desperately) but in vain, f o r a panga. Father Diego decided to swim After h e ha d stripped himself, h e gave hi s r o bes to hi s companion; then with a Illurmured prarer h e dived out into t h e water. The priest swam rather s lowly for h e knew s\vimming twelve miles would require endurance, especially in a man o f hi s age. H e alternated swimming the back stroke and then the crawl or breas t strok e. The fir s t six mil es were not so bad; t h en t h e unacc ustomed muscles of the priest began to weake n, but steadfastly murmuring his p rayers, Fath e r D iego kept on. Oh! the i s lan d became plainer and clearer to view! Only one mil e and a hal f m o re! But, e h G od! what was t hat black fin that C tl t the water so devilishly, corni n g ever nearer? The pric::st attempted to quicken hi s strokes. That shark would not get him! H is one thought was that he must get to s hore to warn the people. Through the tiny village of the island a black ran shrieking that someone was swimming a mile out and that a shark was but cne meters from him. .A dozen men dashed for their pangas. How they pulled! They had to save that man! Sacred \tirgin, h e had gone under! Bu t no, he could not drown, for the men, with a s hout, had pulled him into the panga. H e was unconscious; but after they had forced spirit through h is colorless lips, h e revived. However, h e was unable to speak although h e tried convulsively. Finally, he managed to whisper, made the sign of the cross, and closing hi s eyes in a \'ery tired wa)" breathed his last. On top of t h e highest hill of Taboga is a large stone cross under which t h e priest is said to be buried. : \nd to this spot corne devout islanders to pray for the spirit of the brave priest w h o gave his life t hat might live. COI.ONEI. .I U '\\'. Clwrles Palaci o '2 8 Juan, G e n e ral G6mel wanrs losee you immedibarked a soldier in a ragged uniform to a s leepy individual reposing in the shade of a mango tree, Juan, also in a tattered uniform, rose grudgingly and walked over to t h e small, dilapidated, t hatch -roofed hut that ser ved as the General's headquarters A s hort, stout, tart man was General G6mez. H i s Bolshevik-like whi s kers and hi s small, wicked, blood-shot eyes l ent ferocity to hi s already austere face. As Juan came in, t h e G e neral was pacing the mud Aoor heavily, h is hands claspi n g and unclasping b e hind hi s bac k. H is t r o ubled countenance bespoke a weighty problem on h is mind .oj lIan," h e snapped, as h e caught sight of this g entleman, ''you are about to undertake a dangero u s mission. The government forces ha ve cornered u s and are starving us out. \\'e can't hold out any longer. Our only chance is to blufr them. Go over the r e a n d t hreaten them with complete extermination unless they clear O u t and let us pass. T ell that long-legged General Le6n that I s hall order forces to attack hi s bunch o f cowards if h e doesn't move out by rnorning. T ell him t hat Jacinto Aristides G6mez, Commalloer-in-Chief of the forces of the tru e government, sends you." Poor Juan turned g ha s tl y white as h e heard hi s audaciolls General order him to hi s death, for it was common knowledge that General Le6n was a cold-blooded, merciless scoundrel and h e would not hestitate to order a deserter from hi s ranks s hot, much less a rebel with s:'l c h an insolent message, But, General, you are sending me to 111)' clear-h. I am a married man. \\'hat willm)' poor wife and child ren do after I am ganef" wailed the di5tracteJ Juan. ;' \Vhat!" s h outed the indignant o l d warrior, have I a coward in my ranks? Either go or I 'll put you to a firing squad for insubordination. :\TOW, get out!" \\'ith this the hot-tempered o l d man turned on hi s h ee l s and began to pace the floor again. Poor .Juan l e ft in a cold sweat, f ull y expecting to

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THE ZONIAN. meet hi s in carry in g out the command Fate had p layed him an u g l y h a n d H e was to b e a marty r ( o r his c au se That h e o f all that Ii ttl e r e bel band s h o ul d b e c hosen to d elive r the in sulting m essage o f his hot-t empe r ed l e a der! H e w e n t a r ound the little camp and sorrowfully bade fare w ell t o h is comrades, and tol d the m what t o s a y ro h is r elatives wh e n h e was dead and gon e I twas r e all y an impressive s i ght t o see poor Juan f o n d l y embrac in g hi s fri ends f o r the la s t time a s a t o k e n o f undying fri e ndship. 'ow Juan, aided b y hi s t earful and sympathiz in g fri e nds, made preparat i o n s f o r his dep arture H e go t a lar ge white s h ee t an d ti ed it to a l ong bamboo p o l e H e rai se d hi s emble m o f p e a ce high over h e a d so tha t it could b e see n a mil e awa y ; and with a sic k h eart, h e marc h e d d o wn the little path t o the rive r wh e r e G e n e ral Leon had hi s e n camped. Juan's h eart b eat fas t e r as h e a dvance d s tep by s t e p toward the dreaded e n e m y s lines. At ever y turn in the path, h e imagined an ambus h w aiting f o r him. "Halt! \\' h o goes the r e? c hall e nged a sentine l, suddenly e m e rgin g fr 0111 a b y-path, at the same time rai s ing a h e a vy hunting rifl e to hi s s h o ulder and aiming at t h e t erro r -s tri c k e n Juan. One look d o wn the deep, omino u s barre l o f the sentinel's rifl e decided Juan. H e thre w all d i scre t io n t o the winds, a n d tossing hi s emblern o f peace into the bus h es, whirled around and s t arted has til y to r etrace hi s s t e p s "Halt' Or by the e t ernal, I 'll s h oo t Y Oll fllil o f h o les!" Juan s t oppe d s h ort in hi s r etreat, and stood a s if fr oze n t o t h e g r o lll1(. l. The tone in whi c h the se n t in e l utte red t hi s l as t threat wa s so s in ce r e that Jua n was per s uaded t o stay I t was f ortunate h e stopped, f o r the g rim o ld !'o l d i e r w ould n o doubt have fulfilled hi s threat. H e grabbe d J lIan's collar unce r e m o ni o u s l y and l e d him away a s one w o ul d a dog. The sentinel t oo k him t o a small s h ac k in a clearing and salute d p ompous l y a lanky office r wea rin g a fancy uniform res pl e ndent with gol d lace, medal s a n d othe r trimm i ngs. "Sir," h e said, here i s a r e b e l fr o m o l d G o mez' army H e comes w i t h a white flag a n d desires your a u d i e nce." The lanky o n e t wirled hi s wa xe d mustac h e betwee n h is delicat e fin ge rs. and b e f o r e giving poor Juan a c hance to speak f o r h i m self, said, sar c a s ti c ally : "So t h a t o l d rascal has turned ),ello w e h? H e wants p e a ce d oes h e? I kne w h e would give in a s soon a s hi s m e al s began t o come irregularly Napo leon was right wh e n he said that an army marc h es o n its s t omac h \\' ell, s p eak up, what does the o l d rasc al s a)'?" Poor Juan n o w f elt that hi s caree r was at a cl ose. H e rnu s t e r e u all hi s r emaining courage, whi ch, b y the way, wa s ve r y little and said, in a s firm a v o i ce a s h e could command: "Sir, I am afraid that you are unde r the wron g impress i o n. G e n e ral G o m ez does NOT surrender. H e o rders m e t o say t o y o u that hi s patie n ce i s at an e n d and that h e "ill k ill everyon e o f unless you let u s pass." "\\'1 1 ; lt! Y o u d og H o w dare y ou!" cried G e n e r a l Leon, red with fury. "\\'he n I could c ru s h your wh o l e band if J had the minct! P edro! Panc h o Put thi s scamp in iron s and k ee p him o n bre a d and w a t e r f o r a whil e A.s I liv e and bre a t h e, 1 s h all do t h e sam e to la::t o n e o f t h e m o r )'11 kno w t h e r e ason wh y Old G o mez can't blu f F m e \\,ith thi s off' hi s mind, the t erl1p eramental G e n e ral Leon sat down o n a b e nch and t wirled hi s mustac h e vig o r o u s l y whil e Juan wa s drag ged away b y the two hus kies w h o had com e at t h e ir l eader's c all. I uan soo n f ound himself b ound and f ette red to a sturdy sapling, with anc i ent, rus t )' chains that clanke d e v e r y time h e m o ved. I n s pite o f the h e a v \ and col d chains, Juan a ctuall), felt light h earted, s in ce the f oppis h ge n e ral wit h the sanguinary r eputatio n had spare d hi s life, f o r the present, at least. But-but, h e might b e s a ving him f o r a worse fate than s hoot i ng. H e r ec all e d that G e n e ral l .c6 n had o n ce starve d a prisone r to and that h e had torture d othe r vi ctims in v ari O u s ways. Juan's hlood turned col d a s h e r e m embe r e d the stor ies and h e almost wis h e d that h e had b ee n o rd e red s h o t S oo n the ni ght came and with it the c hill winds that p e n etrate d hi s tatte r e d cl othes and l eft hi s body trembling. H e m o ved h i m self around in an eft'ort to huddl e, a n d in so d oing, h e twis t e d hi s chains H e heard a faint snap and f elt hi s b o nds s lip to the g r ound His capton. ha d put too muc h f a i t h in that o ld, ru s t y c h a in and a slight stra in ha d caused a w eak link t o snap, thll s putting Juan at liberty Juan s h o uted f o r inward l y, but outwardly k ept a s s till a s a rnllmmy, l es t the clanking o f the chain a t t r act so m e ze al o u s sentine l to the s p o t H o w e v e r, t e n minutes passed and all was s till,

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THE ZONIAN. 55 e x cept for the rll.:h of the n earby river, the COUlltless chirpings and bu zz ing s o f jung l e creatures, and th e s t eady s n o r e o f the s l ee pin g Ille n ab o u t him. J lIan saw that i t was :l c ase o f "no w o r n e v er;" so h e edged his wa y o u t o f the camp and began to f ollo w the trail bac k to the r e bel e n campment. H e had n o r gone fift y w h e n h e came a c ross a sprawle d full length o n the path. I mm ed iat e l y Juan recognized it a s t h e sentine l wh o had bro u ght him to G e n eral L e on. ;\Tearh y was a half b o ttl e o f rum o f whic h th e s entin e l had evide ntl y b ee n partaking, and the efFects o f whi c h had in capacitate d him for a ctive The t emptatio n o f the rUIll l ying at his f ee t was too mllc h f a r Juan, and h e lifted the b o rrl e t o h i s parc h e d lips and took a long and mighty draught. I t e n t ir e l y revi ved Juan, so h e t ook another, and anothe r and y e t anothe r, until the b ottle wa s empty. I t made an entire ly new man of Juan. H e had take n jus t e n o u g h t o b e t erme d "dangerous but n o t 'drunk." Juan decid e d to add a f e w thrill s t o hi s escape and make the adventure worth the t e llin g. Accordingly, h e w ent bac k again and made way to a small leant o wh e r e t h e government party k ept its guns and ammunitio n. The r e w e r e dozens o f rifl es s w ords baro n e t s and mac h e t es pil e d 0:1 the flo o r, and r ounds o f s h o t h eaped in small crates all around. Juan, exhilarated by the drink and thu s r ende r e d immune t o f ear, carried the gUll s to the riv e r brink n earby and dropped the m o n e by o n e n o i se lessly into the ru shing wate r In a f e w minutes hi s j o b wa s comple t e d leaving only the ammunition, u se less without gUllS N ext, Juan w ent to fie rc e G e n eral Leon's shac k and quietly walke d in through the o p e n door. On a cot lay the lanky General, hi s feet dangling over the end and t h e habitual blase expression o n hi s face trans f orme d b y s leep into a foolis h blank grin. H e wa s snoring noi sily, a s regularly a s h e breathed. Juan gave but a fleeting g lance at the G e n eral in the arms o f i\ i orphe u s howe v er, a n d co n centrate d hi s attentio n o n som e articles that hung o n a nail o n t h e wall. These w e r e n o n e othe r tha n the B eau Brumme l uniform o f the vain G e n e r a l Le6n whi c h J u al1 r e m embe red halin g seen earlie r ill t h e h e w ent up t o the m and cautio u s l y lower ed the m fr o m t h e w a ll. C a refull y h e tlI c keJ h is under hi s arm and slippe d n oise l ess l y f ro m the camp that had brought him c;u c h sorro w s a n d r ecently s u c h joys. 'ith a light h eart and a reeling b rain, f o r t h e effec t s o f the liquo r had b egun t o t ell) h e walked gail y to his c a :l 1JJ. The r e wa s a light bllrning in G e n e ral G o mez' little hut, and toward the r e h e turned hi s s teps. H e f ound G e n eral G o mez pacing the Roar, hi s bro w knit with trouble and hi s g rim e x p r ess i'Jn c;ugges'.:ill g a n d co n cern. I mag in e hi s s urprise wh e n h e caught s i ght o f J uan, wh o m h e had gi ve n up a s lost s ince h e had l1') t r eturned. Juan! Are you h e re!" c ried the amazed o l d sol ,lie r. Juan g ave hi s best military salute and said, in a manne r quite unusual f o r him wh e n h e was sob er: "Sir, I have carrie d out your in struc ti o n s to t h e b es t o f l11y ability and I am h e r e to r eport. I have di sarme d the gov ernment troops and t h u s r e nd e r e d the m unprepare d t o meet u s in the fie ld o f battle." "\\'hat! The devil, yo u s a y !" e x claimed the dumbfounde d G e n e ral. The r eupo n Juan, aided g r eatly b y hi s alc o h olic imaginatio n gave a muc h altered s t o r y o f his experie nces with the gO\ lernment troo p s The G e n eral was f o rced to b elieve Juan's s tHr)", and hi s u sual sour d i s positi o n wa s changed into o n e almost jovial. H e s hook Juan's hand a gain and again, and s lapped him all the bac k arniablv. "Juan, s ai d the happy o ld warrior, "yo:1 are a h e ro. You have s aved u s fr o m a most critic al s i tuatio n. I h e r e b y raise you t o the posi t i o n o f c o lon e l and I authorize you t o u se y our n ewly acquired uniform. Also, prepare t o attac k the governme n t f o rces a t day break, f o r n o w i s the time t o take advantage o f h e roi c deed. Village o f A nlon, P anama

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56 T H E ZONIAN. OLD During th e early ex pl oratio n period in : \ m eric 3n his tory, the Spani s h explore r s, led by stic h picturesq u e characters a s Pizzarro, Cortez, Bal boa, and many oth e r s subjec t ed the I nciian s, plunder e d their villages an d roo k th e ir gold. At the cross r oads of th e gold traffic stood O l d Panama. Old Panama wa s a cos m o p olitan cit y w h ose popu lation wa s made up o f go l d see k ers frol11 many natio n s, th e Spaniards predominating. Attrac t ed b y thi s wealth, tht! bis hops of Spain ca m e over and built churc h es A bollt o n e out o f e v e r y five buil dings wa s a churc h and Old Panama ha s b ee n called th e "city of too many churc hes." :\s many m e n of all types were co nstantly s t o p ping at O l d Panama f o r s hort periods, it was on l y natural that it s h o uld be the sce n e o f muc h a c ti v it)'. I n th e many s aloons liquor flo w ed fr ee ly; t h e r e wa s muc h gambling and co n sequently many brawl s J n the commerc ia l section, ric h m e r c hants d ispla y ed t h e ir silks and other lux uries to the travelers. The plan was lik e t hat o f m os t Spani s h c iti es The re wer e many p lazas f ro m w hich flowed th e narr o w, winding stree t s T h e city was surro unded by a hig h thick wall to protect it from the pirates SEARCHLIG HTS. E. COl1gn' ;?7. Thc s k y is a greky D ry sooth ing wind so c:lress ing, j \ l akes one feel gar, w.:nt to dance, F illsone wit h Slr ,lnge tender feclingsTlli .. is the !lpell o f romance. e!l fill \\i,h teare; so unwallled, Throats seem to close up so tigh!. Spell of the q u iet makes you w o nder, Spell o f th e tropica l night.

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THE ZOf'.' I AN. 5 7 ONE P O I N T O F \ 1 E\\' . 7111M Sapltir, '28. The r e a r e librari es -and librari es The r e are a l s o many librarians The f o l l owing i s a descrip t io n o f o n e parricular h i g h sc hool library a s seell (rol11 t h e vie w point o f o n e partic ular h i g h sc hool l i br a r i an I t is t e n m i nu t es past t\ \ o tim c f o r t h e l i b rar y t o o p e n I o b tai n t h e keys and s a un t e r into t hat rool11. T h e wind i s b l o w i ng fie rcel y j so I s l a m t h e w i ndow s d o wn. r hat d oo r o f t h e c loset w h e r e som e s tucle n t s k ee p t h e i r b oo k s i s o p e n again. I s hut i t h a s tily, f o r I hear footst e p s I a m j u s t in ti m e too. V eil! I see t hat d oo r i s s hut t o-d a y!" s a ys t h e p r i n c i p a l An d I d u ti f ully r es p o nd Y es, s i r N o w f o r a q u iet fif t ee n m i nu t es t o s t udy c i v i cs S udde n ly-"Aa a Mi ss Thomas w ould lik e six book s 011 wi l d A o w e r s." A nd r pati e n tl y give the r eq u ir e d b oo k s to a s h y littl e e i ghth-grader. P e a ce o n ce m or e ; thc n I w a n t a bio graph y " I s B e n H u r an y good?" "\\' ill M r B rown l e t m e r e a d 'ja n e E)IJ"e?" A h orde o f SWciC Il [ S h a s desce nded upo n m e An d so t h e ques ti o n s continue I a m p ati ent f o r a littl e w h i l e A f t e r l c h ec k t h e b oo k o f a little s h o rn h e ad e d F r es hman, h e mu rmurs "Thank YOll, J\lJa'am." A mi g h t y S enio r storms in. "\\' h e r e o n earth c an 1 find T h e N /il1d i n ti,e i\t/aking?" I s h o w hil11. F i nall y I b e gin t o tire o f it all; co n se q u ently, I l e t l o o se J i m m y Thi s l ibrary i s 110 r ec r eati o n h all! J ack! Y o u r e suppo se d t o g e t b oo k s i n h e r e, n o t look at Z O N I A N S H o w d o 1 kn o w w hat yo u r t each e r s will l e t YOLI r e ad? J\lary an d .-\lice! Stop t hat loud talk ing!" Suddenly an unnatural q u iet desce nds. T h e h ead o f o u r r es p ec t ed pri n cipal i s see n p ee r i n g i n t h e A t l a st, t h e bl esse d buzzer! J snap o u t L e t m e h a ve your pink slips! Thi s p l a ce i s s huttin g u p at t h ree s harp." Now, draw y o u r own co n c l u s i o n s a b o u t a sc hool librar y I s t orm and rage, and yet I w o n de r w hat I w o ul d clo if I could n o t have c harge o f it t h e s ev enth p e riod, w h e n I c an enjoy o b se r v ing th e characteris t i c timi dity o f a F r es hman, triumph o f a S opho m o r e i nd e p ende n ce of a Junior and fin all y t h e h au g h ti n ess o f t h e S e n i o r. T I I E L OTTERY DRA WI NG. L ouise K t,.,., '28 The l o tter y drawing takes p l a ce ever y S un d a y m o rnin g at 1 0 o cloc k i n a small office n e a r C a t h e dral Plaz a. T h e p l a ce i s al w a ys c r o wded a t t h i s h our; and a s I arri ve d j u s t a s the first Ilumbe r was b e in g drawn, it wa s ver y diffi cult to fin I a p l a ce i n w h i c h to stand. I t h appen e d t h a t I s t ood jus t ba c k o f an o ld Panamanian. I t w a s o n l y w i th extre m e diffic u lty t hat I co u l d see aro un d t h e o l d mall; an d so, during t h e intervals o f draw in g th e numbe r s I h a d amp l e oppo rtunity to s tudy him. H i s thin face wa s d ee pl y l : n e d with innume r abl e wrinkles; a n d h i s s h oulder s d roop e d f o r ward c au s in g h i s b o n y arms to h an g l oose l y a t h i s s ide. I n h i s h a n d wa s a solitary tic k e t A s t h e fir s t numbe r a 4 wa s place d o n t h e b oard h i s hand s hook so t hat h e almost dropped t h e ti c k et. The s e co nd n umbe r wa s drawn a 6. The o l d m a n s e y es t hat a minute ago seerne d l i f el ess fairl y s h o n e n o w; and e ag e rly h e l oo k ed f o r t h e n ext numbe r. It wa s a I N o w t h e numbe r s r e a d 4 6 -1. Onl y o n e m o r e numbe r t o b e d rawn t o compl e t e t h e fir s t prize! N o t b e i n g a b l e to stan d t h e s u s p e n se o f waiting th e o l d man made h i s wa y t h r o u g h the t h ron g o u t o n th e stree t The la s t numbe r wa s drawna 7 ; but t h e r e wa s not a s i g n o f t h e eage r o l d figu r e with t h e solitar y t i c k e t The seco n d an d t h ird numbe r s w e r e p l a ced u nder t h e first; and, a s t h e c r o w d t h inn e d out, 1 saw t h e o ld m a n with falte rin g s t e p appro a chin g t h e office. With a d e c i de d e ffort h e l oo k ed up at t h e n umbe r s H i s body s wa ye d a s t h o u g h h e w e r e goi n g to fall but in s t e a d h e litte red a l o w, d =jected groan. Upon glanc i n g o v e r his s h o uld e r '-s aw in heavy blac k l ette r s o n t h e tic k e t h e wa s l oose l y h o l d in g t h e l1umb e r s 4 6 1 6 A S l I have not wa s h e d t n e di s n e s i\'or m :tde m y I u npkd b ed; B ut o u t a l o ng t h e r o.td s ide T he le:tv es a r e turnin g r ed. 'Tis pro p e r to be And cleanly if you must; But I 'd rath e r watc h t h e lea\' e s turn red Tha n save a h ou se from dus t.

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S8 T H E ZO:-
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T H F ZO:-l I A:-I 19 5t..::-I5ET .KRO 5 T H E C :\).':\L. Of all th e thin gs 1 ha ve see n sin ce I c am e t o Panama, the S lIllset acros s the Canal fascinates m e m ost. T h e r e i s a speci al m Ollntain o \'er which th e SUIl disappears, and that m Ollntain see m s to m e almost a land of dreams. \Vh e n th e s un i s just above the top c r es t th e rays are so str o n g it i s hard to discern th e s hape S oo n, a s t h e SUIl sink s a littl e l ower, the t o p ridge cuts a littl e piece out o f t h e circle of light. T h e A 50).':-IET. Coot/hul', '::q. T o think th:tt in thi s whole wide world of ou r s The r e's not a sou l that ha s its counterpa rt ; There's not :t sin gle so lit ary h ea r t That's [iss u ed like another. : \11 the h ouro; This earth h as whirl e d about, bearing it s flower s O(Sin, D ece it, and Death L ife fling s its dan, H its ever)' mona I with the se lf -sa me an, Y et e:lc h grie \'I!<; but acco r di ng to his powe r ,! Then s h all we not. Oh, Omnipresent One, T o whom our little diffe r ences an:: known, Guess, when our tiny earthly !rick s :Ire doneThe seed .. that w e have come to so w a r e sow n That for thi s very ditferen ce Thou'lt re cei\e u s, A mi of our ",e i ghty, "'orldh \\OC, relie\'e us? \'15 10:-1. Eloi H Lull, '27. Thi!> rugged hill, cle:lll !>w ep t by every wind, Uplifting to the skies its open (:Ice, E xp r essi ng, at t h e touc h of win ds that c ha,e O'er i t s broad expanse all m oods known 10 nunkind. B ecomes ,t v:lI\t:lge point from which I find All thing<; made clear which lie bet\\ccn its b:lsc An d a hori/on r e:lc h ing far in sp:!.cc. On lesse r heights, by l ooming things th:!.t bind '\ l y vision is tOO much obscu r ed. An d so J I is in L ife, when through our own mind's e\'e, So oft made blind by petty doubts :mu low, And h eld List-bound in cold co nvention .... SW,ly, Except when l ifted by e motion high, \\ e do not see the r ight and blindl} !.Ir :ty. sky the n b eg in s to turn a deep o ran ge, A s t h e s un s ink s lower and the sky b eco m es redde r, th e m Ollntain turns almost black against the r e u bac k ground. There i s a littl e cup in the top o ( t h e c r es t whi c h I b elieve, (r o m th e dark outline, to entirel y b arre n except for o n e tree rhis tree is o n t h e right s l o p e an d i s shaped l ike an o p e n ed parasol. The s k y changes from r ed t o a deep blui s h purple T h e outline gro w s dim, an d n o w nig h t i s h e r e and t h e s Ull ser i s over. TO OUR CELL,\R DOOR 0, cell.l r door, th:tt g,tve me so much fun A s down your w o rn and polished (ace I :.Iid; Fir s t built to s hield :t p :lssage. as a lid, Protec ting stores (rom r:tin an d w ind :tnd s un. Y ou r painted face at first was alt too stern, But soo n w e found beneath t hat coat s o red, o'\ willin gness to ple:lse. The new<; soo n s prc .td Then hO\s and girls :tlike would wait t heir turn. : \nextet must be told, Of thought co nt:lme d i n the preceding part. A so nn et must be fourteen lines in :tIt. The emling now 10 you I mllst unfold-,\Iy fourte en lines accomplished, I'll dep:1ft, XO[ tdling \'au one .,in gle thing at all!

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NEWS NlsACCEPTED I m:be m:ropical m:attler POST-OFFICE MATTER SEES N OTHING-KNO WS NOTHING I NEWS NOT ACCEPTED BY INTELLIGENT PEOPLE VOLUME .000,000 BALBOA lflGH SCHOOL, CANA L ZONE, FRIDAY, JUNE 1 3 PRIC E : TIN SENSE 8CH OOL CHI L D R E N 8 TARVIN G Il:oor.al!*r:a:rna:st cat-raising farms in the Orient. Parl-mutUolicemen were !:\t:ltioned a round the schoo l f o r the r est of the da)' to a\'oiJ attacks, J ames Doran, the prominent musician o f thc Senior Class of the Balboa H igh School. gavc a dcJightful piano recital during the noon hour of i\larch 1 7. 5t. Patrick's Day. Jimmy could not bear t o let the day pass without some sort of an Irish song being played. Accordingly, he went to the piano in the Assembly a nd rendered with great beaut)', technique, a nd feeling that grand old piece, "The WeMing of the Creen." \ s the last nOtes died away, everyone hro keinto loud and lingering applause and the smiling Jimmy was b esieged hy admir e r s, The Irish members of the school w e re particularl y loud in their praise, \V e h OI)e that so metim e in the ncar future this celebrated musician wil1 give us another recital. FUNERAL NOTICE The inmates of the aquarium were found dead the morning o f March .lO, 1927. i\lurder suspected. The I>olice have several clues which tlie) are in\estigating. The funeral will h e at 2 I). Ill., April I 1927. All friends and relatives are invited to attend the sen 'ices, which will take place in the laboratory of B albo:). llij.(h School W e have j ust accepted the post of Editor of t hi s great and nobl e organ of Balboa Hi g h School. We a r c ve r y grateful f o r it. as w e had reached our bst hot dog, a n d t hat onl y slightly warm. They tellu>; that an editorial is supposed to take up great question s o f the clay, more o r l ess intelli gently-the less the better. We ha\'c carefully thought it over and decided that t hi s Inir-raisi ng business i s t h e most important. All the girls bave started in a modest way to let their hair grow, since they say they arc far too o ften mi staken for Freshmen boys a t the beginning of the year. This would all be very \\ell, only they go around looking s haggy for weeks and t hen weaken and bob it again. W e think that the GO\'ernment ought to do so m ething about it. We don't know j u s t exactl y what, but something. :,\Iaybe a subs id y t whatever that i s) would fill the bill. i\layb e it w o uld not. Fellow stud ents we call upon you to decide! CATASTROPHE OVERTAKES EN T E R P R I S I N G YOUNG C HEMIST OF B. H. S. Earl Dailey Is Almost Unclothed By Effect s of Strong A cid. On '\Iarch 22. Earh' Dailey, c hemi s t of the Balbo a lIigh School chemi stry class, spi lled some strong acid, whi c h unfortunately came into contact with the trousers of i\lr, Dailey and a fellow chemi s t The acid warmed Mr. D aile}"s leg and soon the chemi s t be came aware of the degenerating affect of the acid o n hi s trousers, Irumediatel) the a larm was sounded and ilIl r. Northrup cam e dashing to the rescue with a bottle of ammonia water. The day was saved: but. unfortunat(;[y. Mr. Dailey's clothinl,; was not. Enough of Mr. Dailey's attire had been rescued, howeve r to allow him to sneak home to rcpair the damage. Much should be said of '\'r, Northrup's rescue and display of bra\'ery. 1 l e rushed t o the scene without thought of self, thus endangering his noble lif e. Young Dailey s t ood the without flinching a nd was calm throughout the trying ordeal to which he had been s ubj ected UNIOUE HAY RIDE ENJOYED BY PROMINENT PROFESSOR AND FAVORITE PUPIL. Professor L, 5, Flint aud Randolph Beve rley r eceived a ride to Ancon on the fr ont seat of an enormOllS truck u sed to transport dead leave s and grass. The noteworthy algebm master and his favorit e PU1)iI had waited interminably by thc police station fo r a bus. Their patie nce wa s eXhausted, great matter s wcre waiting t o b e sc:nled, in fact much wasat stake. Providcnce, in the guise of a gigantic truck (No. 305). came to their aid. The intr el)id tead(er b egged a ride from the burl}' truc k driver, whose heart was touched so much b y the entreaties that he consented t o allow the tired m e n t o ride on the f rom sea l. providing they did not disturb the two negro helpers who we reslccping there, The rescued mcn w e r e enthusiastic about the ride. e\'ell if the truck was 1000'\(led high with dead leaves and dry grass.

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THE ZO:'-il :\:'-i 6 1

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THE ZONIAN. I SOCJETYcompanio n shipand youth where can a better examp l e be found than II in dear o l d Balb oa Hi g h ? Justth e m e r e getting toget h er means all o f this -jazzy noon h ours, class meetings, plays, dances, o utin gs, f estiva l s, lun c h eons -everythin g in which youth centers it s vitality and delight. Each year t h e r e ha s b ee n an in-c r ease in the stu dent b ody, and with it a greater e n t hu s i as m in socia l ac tiviti es, f or as the o l d say in g goes, "The more the m e rrier. II None but those who have experie n ced the sam e o r simil a r happy moments ca n -appreciate th e wealth of joy which these f ew pages r eprese n t. To t h e alumni, --l e t these events recall fond memories, and r enew o l d friendships; and to who are to take our places, let them be an incentive to carryon t h e proud n a m e of L Balboa Hi g h with the same w h o l e hearted a nd v i gorous sp iri t as ours. . -FrflIlU! Brown, 2 7. 7 eu ; e Btmflll, '29 I ==Wi= ",Wii",.WiiifJl\wWii\fl)1WiiWii\fl)1WiiWiWiiWiNiLmWl1WlWIDliWiiIWWill1.l1WiiIWWiilWlW

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THE ZON I AN. SENI O R TABOGA OUTI NG. The clock o f t h e Arm y l aunch a nn o un ced 2 .30 j u s t a s s h e pull ed o u t from Balb oa h eaded for Taboga Singing and laughter see m ed to possess th e occupants. Y es, it wa s the Seniors and their friends o n th e i r way for a day o f rollic kin g and fUll 011 t hat typi ca l, tropical i s l e F our o'clock f O lln d the m at j\ l rorro l s l and eit her do nning bathin g suits or knic k e r s f o r t h e r e was to be swimming at T aboguilla for th ose w h o cared t o go, and a h ike to t h e C r oss f o r t h e oth e r s Great fun was had in t h e b ea utiful s urf at T aboguilla, and the h ours see m ed to fly f o r it was not long before all swi m m ers were ab oard t h e laun c h h eaded for M or r o l s lancl. Here they f ound t h e returned hikers urging t h e m t o hurr y a n d d r ess For t h e beac h s up per that was b eing prepared. A huge b onfire was bui l t a n d it was not l o n g beFor e the Frag r a n t odor s o f cofree, roasted wie n e r s and other appetiz ing eatables were fillin g t h e a tmosph ere Supper over, it was decided that a few games s h ould b e pla yed before goin g to t h e H ote l A spinwall. Eight o'c l oc k f o un d t h e livel y group at th e h otel, w h ere Mrs Mall oy was givi n g a dance. Danc ing, t h e lullin g o f t h e waves, t h e w h ispering of th e palm trees in t h e breeze, and the tropical moonli ght-what m ore could have been desired? Laughter and gaiety bubb l ed t hr o u g h t h e happy crowd, and it was with an a lmost reg retful fee lin g that th e party boarded th e l aunch at 1 0 o'cloc k h o m ewa rd bound. A s t h e la s t bri g h t lig h ts o f the l ittle v illag e faded out of s ight, all felt a deep afrection for t h e littl e i s l and w hich h ad afro r ded t h e m s u c h a day of joy JUNI O R TAB OGU ILLA OUTI NG. On t h e 3d of D ece mb er, an army launch filled with a gro up o f merry-makers left Dock 1 7 at 4 s h arp It was not long before t h ey h ad reac h ed t h eir destination a n d made t h e m se l ves at h ome o n t h e beautiful beac h at Taboguilla No o n e was afraid to take a dip in t h e o l d ocea n as B ill" Allen was t h e avai l ab l e l ifeg u ard. E n e rgy was ple ntiful as was proved by the races h e l d on t h e beac h The luc k y winners received sweel prizes ( H ers h el' b a r s). Of co ur se t h e m ost oll tstandillg even t was t hat of eating, and it was not l o n g before t h e boys h ad built a hu ge bonfire an d every o n e got down to r eal business a n d roasted wien e rs. After all ha d h ad t h eir fill o f pickles, Eskimo pies, and hot dogs, P roFessor" North rup proved him selF quite human a n d p l ayed a most melodiou s mandolin. Time simpl y flew, and it was not l o n g before the crowd returned to t h e l aunc h o n e boat l oad after anoth er. T a l k abo u t YOllr V o l ga Boatmen, they sure l y could not h old a ca ndl e to ProF essor" Northrup a nd Tim l\1a nn. J t was quite evi dent the c ha perones, Mi ss M cMaho n Mi ss M e lgaard, i\1i ss Laws, a n d M r s. B ardelsoll, enjoyed t h e m selves just as mu c h as o f t h e students a n d pro n o un ced the time well spe n t. J UN I O R PARTY. W e will certain l y h ave to h a n d it to t h e J uniors F o r t h eir "get up a n d go" when it co mes t o ha ving a good time. That Friday nig h t on t h e '21 st of J anuary spe n t at t h e Y W. C. A. will l o n g be remem bered by everyon e. The first thin g o n t h e progra m was a comic boxing matc h of fou r o r five ro unds, in w h ich Pugilist T im" Mann won the laur e l s for t h e evenin g. Everyone ag r eed t hat t h e victory was well won. A panto mim e followed, w h ich was read by Larry" Go l de n and enacted by B arbara H allen and Thatch e r C l isbee, the l overs; Tim Mann, t h e father; and J ohn Ohlson, t h e "vulgar boatm a n j t was well done, and specia l mention s h ou l d be given to those taking t h e part of the waves. The remaining pa r t of t h e evenin g was spe n t in dancing and eatingno wonder everyone ha d sllc h a good time!

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THE ZONI A N JUNI O R DANCE A:--ID CA R D P A RTY. The 1110l1th o f !\lay introd u ced o n e o f the most sliccessful d a n ces a n d card parties eve r give n b y Balb o a H i g h S c hool. This wa s e n g in ee r ed b v t h e J uni o r s o n t h e eve nin g o f May 7, at t h e H o t e l Tivoli, and an invitatio n to att e n d wa s e xtended t o the public. L e w Var c\'s Canal Z o n e o r c hestra p r es i ded o ver t h e b eautiful ballroom an d wit h jazzy mus i c m e t t h e demands o f t h e e n t h u s ia stic dance r s Bridge and pinoc h l e games w e r e p l ayed, a n d many o f t h e b e autiful pri zes o f t h e e v e nin g w e r e give n t o the win n e r s o f t h ese gam es "Da n ce a n d b e m erry, see m ed [Q b e the m otto o f a ll, an d th e r e i s 110 doubt t h a t everyo n e d id j u s t thi s B albo a H i g h can f ee l pro u d o f t h e wa y in w h i c h h e r students produced s u c h a happy an d s u ccess f u l evenin g SOPHOMOR E TACKY P A RTY. Those atte n d in g the Soph o m o r e T a c k y Party give n at t h e Y \ V C A Frid a y evening, A p ril I pron o un ced i t <1. hug e s u ccess Mi ss \\' h al ey t h e p opular c la ss advi se r, wh o wa s a ss i s t e d bv Mrs R o b ert Hutc h in gs and Mrs H e r b ert E n ge lk e, helpe d ever yo n e to e njoy h im se lf, altho u g h it wa s not a hard thing to do. S eve ral g am es, s u c h as "Cat" an d "Do uble L ette r w e r e played wit h Illu c h e llt h u s ia s m ; and prizes o f brace l e t s, mu s i c b oxes, dolls, and ra t tle;) w e r e a w a rded t o the l u c k y winn e r s S i n ce it w as a tac k y party, all w e r e d r essed in v e r y amus in g costum es, amo n g w h i c h t h ose o f funny o l d m e n babies, tramps and o ld mai d s were rid i culo u s l y co n s pi clIo u s F o r h e r uni q u e costume o f an o l d s pin s t e r, Z onabe l D emuth r ece i ved the gi r l' s pri ze The "su r e 'Iluf" bum who m w e kn o w in l i f e a s Joe Humme r wa s w e l l -dese r v ing o f t h e boy' s prize The inevi t abl e "good ears w e r e p r ese nt, w h i c h played n o little part in t h e good time. A s o n e Sophie so w ell put i t : "The only p eo pl e wh o ha ve c a s t any d i sparagi n g comme n ts a b o u t t h e Soph o more P a rty are th e upper class m en wh o tri ed in vai n to he i ncluded a m o n g t h e g u es t s A cco r d in g to that statemen t it m ust ha ve b ee n good F RESH MA:--I G I RLS' P A RTY. Friday even i n g, Marc h '9, th e Fres hm a n Girl s o f B a lboa H i g h Sc h oo l gave a p art)' at t h e Y W C. A. Afte r manv games had b ee n playe d t h e Jazzy littl e pho n ograph wa s p u t to w o r k a n d t h e g i r l s s p ent t h e r es t o f t h e even i ng dan c i ng Mrs Koper s k i t h e p opul a r cla ss adviser w h o wa s a c tin g a s host ess had planne d d e l iciou s r e f re s h m e n t s an d f o un d little tro ubl e i n making the fir s t a c ti vity o f t h e F re;hman G irl s a ver y s u ccess ful o n e FESTIVA L N I GHT A T Y. W. C. A. The se c o n d annu al F es t i v al N i g h t o f t h e B a lb o a H i g h S c hool S uppe r C lub wa s h e l d a t t h e Y W C. A., Apri l 9, at 7 o 'cl oc k. The vari o u s boot h s w here h o t d o g s candy) i c e c r eam, froze n s u c k e r s and p un c h co ul d b e p u r c h a se d w e r e attrac ti ve l y arran g e d to s a y nothin g o f t h e fis h p o n d w h e re all young sports rnen could fis h t o t h e ir h earts d e lig ht, o r rathe r as l o n g as t h e r e wa s a s uppl y of t e n fif t ee n 0:-twen t y -fiv e cents "fis h es The fir s t and la r g es t even t o f t h e evenin g wa s t h e h e a rt-r ending drama, Wil d Nell, t h e Pet o f t h e P lain s, o r H e r F in al Sacrifi ce The story was o f \\'ild N ell, w h o w h e n s h e saw h e r lover wo n b y a fair e r maide n made a s upre m e s acrific e The ndi an s w e r e p r epari ng t o burn t h e fai r o n e L ady V e r e d e V e re, wh e n W ild N ell d i scovere d it and h a s t e n e d to t ell Handsome Harry The two w e r e s u c h wil d figh t e r s that t hey soon kille d all o f t h e Indians and saved L ady V e r e d e Ve r e. The n Wil d N ell stabbed h e r self s o t hat s h e wo ul d not b e in t h e wa y o f t h e l o v e r s The c urtain f ell o n a sce n e w i t h dea d n d ian s l y i ng i n t h e background, a n d th e tw o l o v e r s b o wing t h e ir heads in r es p ec t to t h e s a c rifice o f t h e d e a d W ild Nell, wh o cla im ed midd l e stage T h e G oo p Stunt, t h e s a d c hant o f a l on esome goop wa s ve r y p opular. The tal ented a c t r ess i s co nceal i n g h e r iden ti t y The la s t e v e n t all t h e pro g r a m wa s a r ec i tati on b y V ir g inia Cl e m ent w h i c h wa s q uite cleverly don e s h o w i n g t hat w o m e n are capabl e o f c hangi ng t h e ir min ds -many t i m es at t h e most crit i c a l m o m ent. Danc in g claimed th e r es t o f an e v ening t hat had m e t with g reat s u ccess

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THE ZON I AN. 65 SC H OO L PL A YS. SENI O R PLAY. O n e of t h e most sliccessful pla ys of t h e se a so n was given by t h e Se n ior C l a ss of B a lb o a H ig h Sc h oo l F r iday even i n g, April '2'2, at t h e Balboa Clubho u se Fr om t h e time t h e cu rtai n ro se, i nterest w a s inten se until t h e live l y plot had co m e t o a close "A B ac h e lor's H oneymoon" m e t wit h great s u ccess d u e as Illllc h to t h e splendid acting a s to t h e i nteresti n g and e xtremely humorous p lot. Sampso n B ach e lor, a widow e r, ha s jus t b ee n secre tl y marri ed to a beautiful young chorus girl, Lettie Lamb. The new l yweds s t e al away to t h e groom's co ulltry l odge o n an island oft' t h e coast of M aine, in order to coneal the ir sec r e t fro m rvl i n erva, Sa m pso n 's older s ister, in w h ose h a nds his (ortun e l i es. I nstead of be i ng away from t h eir world, as t hey h ad p lanned, Lettie and Sampson are u n p l easa n tly s u rpri se d b y t h e arrival o f James H owso n one o f t h ose Ilu i sances w h o a l ways pres ent t h emse l v es at a mo s t inopportu ne mom ent; i V l inerva B ac h elor, an ari stocrat, arrive s bringing wit h h e r t h e rest of t h e un invited guests. Minerva is Sampson' s siste r and s h e i s ra i s ing h er broth er s twi n daugh ters, P olly and P olly, a m o d e rn young Rapper and excitement see ker; just sweet seventeen and t h e appl e of H ector F ournay's eye Oth e r intru d e r s are Hector Fournay, a doctor, for m e r fian ce of Lettie Lamb and I\l olI)"s love r; Linda, l\l abl e, Maud, B ess i e, and P eggy t h e t w i ns' l awn party g u ests and lively Olles at t hat. Seth and Comfort Coffin t h e general caretaker s a n d h ouse k ee p e r s of Sampso n's lodg e b e come quite upset b y t h e ir em p loye r 's peculiar acti ons. I n orner to prev ent l\linerva's disinheriti ng Sampson, and to avoid t h e p ossi bility of h e r reputation being rui ned, Lettie p oses a s Sampso n' s cook under contract. T he interla c i n g diffi c u l ti es work t h e m selves into s uc h a knot t hat it see m s next to impos s ibl e for disentangl ement. H o w eve r, t h e c l imax comes after H owso n ha s accomplished his m ad-dog ep i sode and Minerva ha s ordered Sampson to leave his home, and his daughte rs to t h ink of h im as a "dead one." Sampso n then )IR520i-9 r eso lv es t o defend h i s wif e s honor by a d u e l with F o urnay and make a c l e an breast o f the affair to M inerva. \\' h e n questioned b y Min erva, Sampson says h e i s going out to s h oo t, and s h e naturally thinks h e i s going to co mrllit suicide. She h asten s to entreat L e tti e to save h im, and in return s h e grants the young woman anything t hat s h e might desire. T h i s i s t h e turning p oint tha t pu ts aright the grand e ntangl e m e nt. T h e cast, as they appea r ed, on the sce n e, a r e: Ange la Kle mm e r, w h o took the part o f Lettie Lamb and e na c t ed t h e part o f an attractive, witty, c horus girl to perfection; Stanton P eterso n, Samp. so n B a c h el o r, t h e n ewly wedded man whose pre dicam ents and a c tion s k ept t h e audience in an u n ceasing strain of laug hter; R o b e rty B laney, Seth C o ffin, t h e caretak e r, w h o pla yed h i s part extr e m el y w ell ( t h e whi s tlin g es p ec ially); Ruth Frase r, w h ose inqui s itiv e nature and manne r o f d rawing co nclu s i o n s mad e her a very humo r o u s and l ik abl e characte r; L eslie Banan, James H owso n, one of t h ose ge n e ral nuisan ces w h o are a l ways intrudinginto o t h e r p eop l e's afFairs. L eslie is certain l y deserving o f the hig h es t prai se for his dramatic tal ent. H e l e n F r e n c h, s h o w ed h e r excellent talent f o r acting as Minerva, an old mai d \\'e must say, H e l e n made a matro n entire l y too attrac ti ve to h a ve eve r b ee n a sp i nster. Betty Granbe rr y fault l ess l y pictured the v im and vigor of a yo un g Aapper, P o l l y; Ruth J o hnson, proved that th e o l d fashio n ed girl i s l oved a s mu c h as her mod e rni zed s ister i s admired T h e roles of Linda, M abl e, N lauu, B ess i e P e ggy w ere taken by 1'[ a tilda \'an Siclen, J anice Grimi so n Hagar : \ hlf ont, Juanita Orr, an d I\l arian :\llen, respectively. T h ese pretty, liv e l y Rapp ers took t h eir parts quite naturally. Last, but not least, i s Ru ssel J ones who se r o l e o f I lector was excellently done. i \ S e \ er, i\l rs Bake r furni s hed p l eJ.sing music b etween acts, with h er capable orc hestra. Let it be added that the Senior Class owes the s u ccess o f this play to i\1r. E. L. H oga n who so graciously gave his s plendi d se r vices in directing the play.

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66 T H E ZON I AN. J UN I OR PLAY. Friday evening, l\lay '17, at 8 .30, the Junio r Play was given at the Balboa Clubho u se Asever yo n e remembe r s, Eli za Comes t o Stay" proved t o be a great s u ccess The cast o f character s wa s as f ollows: Sa ndy \'croU i\ lonwgue J ohnson Uncle Stoop .'\ lc:xander Herbert, the vater Eli za \'andam or Vera L awrenl'e Eli zab..:t h Pennybroke :".lrs. Attoway, th e nur:.c THATCHER CLI SBEE SAM GURNEY \VARREN GIL,\IAN G ERALD MAIER:' GERTRUDE H .'IRR ISON VlIW1NlA EWING STELLA PRICE EL:'BE'rH \\'HALER The setting is in a bac h e l o r 's apartment in New Y ork. A s hort resume will h e lp to r ec all the s picy p lot. Sandy Veroll i s expec tin g a ward, supposed l)' a golden haired baby g irl, and finds h imse l f in a pred i c am ent whe n this g o lden-haired c hil d turns out t o b e an awkward, unattractive girl o f e i ghtee n yea r s H e i s engaged to an actress, Vera Lawre n ce w h o breaks the engage m ent when learning o f Sandy's finan cial condition) and his trou b l esc m e wa rd. l\' latter s go fr o m bad to wor se. Eliza fall s in love with her guardian, driving him to distraction and to Europe a s w e ll. Upon his r eturn Sandy finds that hi s ugl y d u c k lin g has b ee n trans formed into a b eautiful, attractive girl whom h e rea l i zes h e l oves. For hi s sake presumabl y, Eli za, n ow Doroth y, has engaged h e r self t o M ontague J o hn son and Sandy makes a desperate attempt t o prevent s u c h a marriage b y trying t o se n d h e r to a convent. At this, s h e r esolute l y determines t o leave her guardian and go out into the w o rld t o support h e r se lf, w hereupon Sandy makes a propos a l o f marriage in his wil d fear of h e r leaving. I n the m eantime n ews h as co m e t hat \'era h as rnarried Sandy's wealthy Uncle Stoo p. T o make a l o n g s t o r y s h ort, they are married and live happily ever after, as t h e s t o r y b oo k s say. Let it b e added that the splendid a cting o f t h e c a s t a s a w h o l e played n o little part in making the p erformance a hig h l y e njoyabl e one. SONGS. Y es, w e lik e to si ng! That's what makes our wo rl d go "round," and l e t m e tell you, Ballan i s ri ght th e r e wh e r e it comes to compos ing w ords to what w e lik e to s in g. Mrs Rake r gave u s a day ofl' fro m c h o ru s several days ago and we sang our class son gs H e r e are two of our favoriti es: B YE -BYE HI G H SC H OOL. (TlIlle-" Bla ckb ird. ") We're 1l! to da)', BYl!, bYl!, H igh School. more c r am min g for a 0," more st:tying after three, B ye, bre, H igh School. Tea..:hl!r.!. never see m ed to under.!.[.tnd u.!.. Oh, w h:tt h::rd look.!. all u sed to hand us! But, we make our way thro' life, \\'c'll t hink of you thro' all the strife, Iligh Sc h oo l bye, bye. C Al. L ME RAC" HIGH ( T o IIIe lune oj "Ctl// l\h' Blick, P,II 0' Minc.") Call me b:tck, Balb oa High T o those days long gone by, Call me back to your h alls once .Igain I n the swee t reverie, Of tnat dim memory, I see ruu once again. Thoug h tne years ..:ome a n d go, And though lift's ebbing l ow, I s hall ne\ e r forgl![ Aul d L ang Sync." : \ nd tnt tea r s come at last, Wh en I o f thc past, Of those days spent in old B alboa High I f you don't be l ieve they are good just try the m on your piano

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T H E ZO;\>I : \;\>. 67 SEN I O R CAKE S A LE. Congratulations, elliors, your first activity of t h e year was a b oo m ing s u ccess! On February It, at '2 o'clock, a great crowd gath e r ed around a table decorated with purple b o ugaillvilla e, at the e rHran ce of the B alboa co mmissary, to feast t h eir eyes on a sig h t wo:-rh seeing. T h ey not on l y saw, b u t a l so b o u g h t, f o r t h e tempting di s h es of cakes, s alad s baked b e an s, c andy, fresh rolls, and pies, were irre s i s tibl e. Senior class spirit maintained its past record of good support, and the committee composed of Agnes J o hn so n, Ruth Fraser, i\l ari lda \'an Siclen, J ames Doran, Ru sse l J ones, an d Stanton P ete r son, received excelle n t h elp :lnd coo p eration from fellow students. The Chairman, A g n es J o hnson, is to be COI1-gratulated o n the well-planned, and orderly manl1er 111 which t h e activity was e ngineered to success. TAL K B Y DOCT O R E \ '.-\:-.'S A specia l assernbly was c alled Friday morning) r.ebruary 25, at 8 o'cl ock ; and Assistant Superintendent B e n \\'illiams introdu ced D r. Evans, who is closely connected with T he Clll'cngo Tribune, in which h e h as a department devoted to the teachin g of better health and better living. D:-. Evans i s known for h is energetic and powerful publi c H e h as b ee n honored with rnany degrees, amo ng which are the degre e of I. L D by Tulane L'niversity, and t h e degree of Doctor of Publ ic H ealth by the l lniversity o f i\l ic h igall. Dr. Evans proceeded to address the assembly all t h e subject of Inte lligent Curiosity." I n the r oom, no sound wa s audible, except th e c l eaf, ringing tones o f Dr. Evans' voice, whi c h h eld t h e students spell b ound. The only unple a sant thing about t h is inte r esti ng talk wa s that its twem)' minutes duration was entirely too s hort. I am sure that in th e years to corne, we will all co nsider th ese questions, whi c h will b e very valuabl e to u s in soh in g many of life's p robl e m s .IL ';\>I O R LU;\>CHEO;\>. A t 11 o'clock, on /lpril '7, o l d Balboa H igh seemed to h e transformed into a different place, and o n e found on the second Roor of the building it lunch room. L ong white tables holding plates of sa ndwi c h es, cakes, cookies, sa lads, pickles, and even a coo ler o f that refreshing beverage, D e laware Pu nc h immediately called the attention, as well as t h e appetities, of hungry students and teachers alike w h o passed down the l o n g lin e where they were promptly served by gay Juniors. A fter e\'eryon e had answered the call of the wild (th e starved), the orchestra, which was a combination of Rodger's and Knight's orc hestras, afrorded such jazz that no time was lost in finding a dancin g partner an..! steppin g out. Thanks to M r. ;\I c C ommo n s, we were given a quarter of an hour extra and it i.; u seless to say that we "jazz-seekers" made the most of it. The only sad part o f the lunc heon was that at I o'clock We were all stud ents once again, and had to get down to some conscientious studyin g F I R S T .'\SSEMBI.Y The first assembly of all the classes was h eld Friday, February 4, at 2. The purpose for this meeting was to work upscl 1101 spirit and yells for the "Big Game" the f ollowing with Crisro bal H igh, upon whic h the year's champ i o n sh ip was p ending. Principal 1\lcComll1o n s presented 1\l r Bogda, who stated the specific purpose of this meeting and urged B alboa H igh from its lull in school spirit. Then cheer leader Greene e lucidated upon [he manner in which Ollr yells were to be given and s h owed us h ow to do so, his team Barbara BajT, ( Ielen '1\\')'m <1 11 Billy" Hader, al1J ".Iew B"y' Smith. They did their "slulf" ami worke,..Iup ellJugh sc h oo l spirit to take Rome it self. This is the first record of Balboa H igh's e \'er getting down to a real show-down of sch")ol spirit You've got it in you Balboa H igh, so don't fall down on th e job by forgettin g it in the future!

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THE ZONIAN. HIG H SCHOOL CALENDAR. OCTOBER. I. R eg i stratio n. '2. \Y e can't wait till i\l}o n d a y co m es + Back to the o l d grin d again with a n ew in terest in new teachers, n e w students and ba l dheaded scrubs s Bu si n ess o f r e n e wing o ld fri endships 10. Sheik Elias r eturns to our mids t fr o m Col o m bia. 1 3 Miss Curr i e r an d our fift ee n minute so ng period start u s out 011 the right (oot. '+ Firs t m eeting c f cla sses ( C l a ss m ee t i ng s ) 20. Cla ss ad v i sers aie appointed 2 1 E lecti o n o f class officer s ; Viva R u sse l J o n es, sen i o r pres id e nt! 22. Bac k to Ollf jazzy noon hours with Banan at the piano. '29. The fir s t month goes out with a bang. NOVEl\'IBER. T. \ V e mi ss t h e o ld se n i o r s o f 26 4. New t e a c h e r. \\'elco m e, Mi ss V ette! 8 Nominations f o r ZONIAN staff. 9 R eport cards and, o h what w o rri e d fac es 1 0 R o b ert Blan ey g o t a hair cut. V iII w onde r s n e v e r ce a se? 12. Vildurr '26, just ca n t stay away. C o m es back f o r a P G. COllr se. 1 5 Final e l ec tion o f ZONIAN staA-"; t hat m eans work. 1 8. A bird b y the name o f Stati c h a s whispered that we have a Radio Cilib. 24. Blessed o f all days, Thanksg ivin g Day, comes to-morrow. 25. Everyone did th e turkey justice. 29 Blu e M onday The f our days' r es t h a s spoiled u s 30. Princ ipal McCommo n s addresses THE ZON IAN s taff. DECEMBER. I. Banan gets poe ti cal and composes words to 10" c hord. 2. "Little" H enry Kni ght, Mi ss V ette s pet, gets a front seat in A m eric an Hi story so h e wo n t mi ss anything. 3 Jun ior Taboguill a o u ti ng. I t wa s all wet, but oh, w hat fun 6 Senior Va l entinos go on barbe r strike 7. Phys i c al exams. Doctors o u t l ook i n g for work. 8 Hanan o n ce m o r e in the lim elight, featuring n e w w ords to" Bla c k Bird." 9 Senior P lay Committee appointe d 13. Gnashing of teeth over senior play. I .... 'Ve wonder w h y H erby Engelke wa s sent out o f commercial arithmetic with a g irl' s wool y sweate r o n. 1 5 Mi ss Currie r i s t e ac h i n g us t h e C hristmas Caro l s f o r t h e 'ndred t h time. \ ,Vill w e never l earn? 1 6 Val entinos prosper! Mustac h es and b eards can b y r ecognize d on a few. 1 7 Ofl" f o r th e C h ri stmas holi d a ys M erry C hristmas t o a l l' JANUARY. 3 Eve r yo n e bac k with good intentions and numerou s r esolutio n s. .... Mi ss Currier an d l v r r. Bake r were quietly married o n D ecembe r 1 7 \\' e all join in to wis h t h e m ever y happiness in t h e w o rld. s W e al so find t hat Miss Grove r has for f eite d h e r lif e o f s i ngl e b lessedn ess Good l u c k t o th e n e w l yweds. 6. Lates t fad. Girl s w eari ng b obby-skirts boys' ties, s hirts, and b e l t s "Girls w ill boys. 7 S enio r s fir s t a ctivity m ee t s with m i sfortune Cake s al e pre v e nted b y that of Balbo a base ball t eam. 10. Stella Newbold, '26, v i s it s our o ld hall s. They j u s t can't k ee p away. II. H igh S c h ool s h e i k s now wearing girls' s lave bracele t s ''''hat has becom e o f our boys? 1 3 T h r ee rousi n g c h ee r s ; w e have a Student C o un c il! I .... Engli s h 7 attempts first sonn e t writing. N o o n e r ece ived any laure l s 15. Mi ss M c1\1 a h on enters A n con Hospital. ''''e're all ve r y sorry b u t s h e made us write t h ose so n n e t s 1 8 H e l e n Fre nch has a lso b ee n in t h e hospital and r eturns to-day, bringing good n e w s o f rvl i ss McMah o n. 1 9. Mi ss V ette tells h e r histor y cla ss that t h e Civil Var Veteran s are the dearest and sweet es t o l d m e n and that s h e jus t loves them! 20. V e n o ti ce that \ \'i ldurr h as take n a fatherly inte r es t in s h ow in g o n e Annette Gurney around o l d Ba l boa H igh. Wejlls t wonder abo u t that p os t graduate course h e came ba-::k f or. 21. Junior party G ood crowd, good eats, good time!

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THE ZONIAN. 71 2+ Everyone joins in a hearty welcome f o r 26. f\l iss J ewell of The Panama Timt.!s addresses THE ZONIAN staff. 27. No snow to-day. 31. The m Ollt h ended with the last day. rEBRUAR\'. r. l\Iarion D aniels h as had h e r graduation pictures taken three times and i s n '[ satisfied yet. 'Srnatter wit h t h ose p ictures? 2. Powder puffs and lip-sticks busy. ZONI.4.N staff pictures taken. 4-l\' lother nature got h e r dates mixed. Rained to-day and thi s is supposed to be dry seaso n. 7. H e len French wants to know why it is that \l r. Northrup can stand in the back of the room and hear her w hisper up in t h e front o f it. 8 Senior rogue gallery turned into staff. \\' ha t an assortm e nt! 9 Will someon e please tell Ada Jackson t h e exact s pot where President Garfiel d was s hot? I I. S enior cak e sale a hu ge s u ccess. 12. John P owell runs off to the interior but return s in time for exams. T ough luck, J ohnny; we fee l t hat we'd lik e to have done the same. 1 5. Books open day and night. Cramming for exam s tomorrow. 16. Torture to all present. 17. "lords can't express our sentiments. 1 8 Everyo n e i s worried and worked to death. 21. The misery i s ove r but everyone looks haggard-even gray. 22. Holiday, thanks to George \\'ashington. And that's no lie! 23. (\lli ss Frost wantS to know why h e r Spanish is can't sing the Panamanian National Anthem. So do we. 2-+. Principal i V lcCommons goes out to do som e recruiting (to take a vacation). 25 Dr. Evans speak s to u s on Intelligent Curiosity." Evidently h e has not talked to any o f our girls. 27 Carnival now in full sway. Lessons are (orgotten. 2S. Report cards. Draw your own conclusions. MARCH. I. Return o( the Carnival prodigals-the reign o ( the D evil is over. 3. \\'illis has an artistic ttlrll of mind in history class; but l iss Vette call not appreciate her drawing a fly on Caesar's nose, in her book. 6. Although we always knew" Dolly" Allen was a little creature, we were quite taken back when s h e told liS to-day that s h e was an ant (aunt) 7. Short stories turned in. Here's where the p lots thicken. S L.ove's highway is ro ughH e l en and Forrest q u a rrel. 9. Englis h 8 learns that t here's a book in t h e ,-\dministrati o n Building Library on the" Breed and Chickens." Probabl y some interesting book on the modern flappe r. 10. H e len and Forrest kiss and make up. q. Earl Dailey s hows inclinations towards being a great penman-stuck finger in ink well to-day. 16. T he deep basses in c horu s got so good that Mrs. Baker had to r emind t h e m not to accompany t h e i r own so l o. IS. Sunny weather to-day; ifit doesn't rain. 21. Editor-in-Chief of THE ZONIAN staf!" ha s a sore toe. 22. D ailey once more in t h e limelight; burns trousers near to extinction with sulphuric acid in Lab. 23. W e wonder why R ussel blushed so this mornin g in chorus, when we sang Juanita." 2+ Spirit worked up at class meetings for interclass track meet. 25. Friday, because Thursday has gone and Saturday hasn't come yet. 28. S e ni o r s come out the victors in the class meet, but Fres hies surely gave them a run for t heir m o ney. 29. Heartless English teacher dismisses three hungry Seniors from class (or partaking of the forbidden l ollypops. 30. School 111 mourning-the aquarium died to-day. APRIL. 1. All Fools' Day; Sophies gave a party. 4-. Balboa H igh wins track meet from Cristobal. 6. Stone-hearted Principal wakes Sheik Duran (rom beauty nap at sixth period. 7 Curry almost went to s leep in English S Too many parties? 8. First rainfall to-day. 1 2 Congratulations in order. Betty Bachus wins short story contest.

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T H E ZONIAN. I J Easter h o liday b egi n s 1 8 Ba c k to t h e o l d g rin d again. 19 P oor Ba"bara B arr h as t h e whoo pin g co ugh. '20. H ele n a n d F orres t we r e d i s mi ssed fro m E n glis h f o r inatten tive ness-t o t h e l esson. '2'2. L a u g h s gal o r e \\'he r e? Scn i o r p l ay. 25-Rut h P y l e a n d Angela Kl emme r had a hai r pull i n g contes t t o-day w h e n i\l r s Patter so n l e f t the asse m b l y for a f ew minutes 26 F rolicso m e ae roplane Airs b y window o f E n g lish 8's roo m -tryin g to t empt u s 27. \\'e a re sorry to l ea rn that Maria n \\'illis' h ea l t h is forcin g h e r to leave u s '18. Juni o r lun c h eon good eats a n d a j a zzy noo n h our. '29 Ba b a r a i s w h ooping n o m o re \\'elco m e to our mids t, comrade r.lAL I. i\lay Dayi t 1I1a)' r a in. 3 A nothe r affa ir prog ressi n g L on n y w i ns t h e fa i r i\l u r iel's favo r. 5 L os t a n d F o un d Very p e rsonal lett e r addr essed t o "Ch arlotte." Owne r kin d l y r e move s am e fro m Edito r s desk ( R o w I,sea t 1'2. ) 6. The E dito r no t i ces that the C h arlotte n o t e has been re m o \ ed 7. J unior Car d Party and Dance a t the: Tivo li. 10. R emarkabl e e vent o f the d a y Emma M c K eo wn had h e r Spanis h l esso n prepared. I I. Mi ss V ette says s he'd lik e t o go to H ai t i t o see t h e barba r o u s natives t hat mak e human sacrifi ces S he's m o r e c uri o u s than w e are I '2. Annette a n d \\'il durr m e t f o r t h e 'nth tim e to-day. M us t be a b ad case IJ. C nlu c k y day-for sc h oo l boo ks. q. Sen ior Taboga o u ting 16. Ad a J ac kson tried to put so meth i n g over w h e n s h e said h e r t wo-minute curre n t events t o pic w a s too l o n g to g i ve in c i v ics c l a ss t o-d ay. 17. fit a Orr had on a n e w d ress t oday. 18. The sorrow of sorrows! The wellb e loved frozen sucker has bee n ostracized f ro m o u r socie t y '21. i\l i ss V ette s a ys s h e r e all y f eels sorry f o r som e o f h e r c i v i es cla ss w h o ex p ec t to graduate. An ange l in d isgui se, a sympath e ti c t e a c h e r at l a s t. '23 .Juni o r 's treasure r threate ning murde r t o t hese delinqu ent in class clu es. '2+ Everybody m anifesti n g spring f e v e r-or rath e r, ma iiana fever. Junio r P la y at B a l b o a Clubho u se JO. R o b ert R o bin so n an d J oe Duran h e l d hands in En glis h c l a ss to-d a y That i s probabl v a dem o n strati o n o f "bro th erly love. 3 1 I t w o n't b e l o n g n o w S enio r s JUNE. I. Greetings Summer ha s co m e 2 A sse mbl y cloc k stopped at '2. \\'o nd e r w h i c h o n e o f th e fres h m e n l oo k ed at it? 4. D olly Alle n talked fifty mil es a seco n d t o-day, a n d got sen t t o th e office f o r stamping h e r f ee t. 5 F ra n ces Smith wants t o kn ow if goat s r eally ea t tin cans. 7. E ve r yo n e bu s)' pi c kin g out graduatio n clo t h es 9 P os t office bu s in ess pic k s up-"Quituatio n i n v itati o n s Aoatin g all over the country 10. J unior-Senior banq u e t. 1 3. I.ittle H enry Kni ght n o l o n ge r ge t s into mi schief in civ i cs cla ss ; h e goes to s l ee p. '4. W e w o nder what will b eco m e o f t h e "Old Trys tin g P lace" w h e n Nita a n d R u sse l graduate ? 1 6 ZONIAN entertainme n t. 1 7 Cla ss Nig h t. S enio r s n i ght o f reig n ( n o body go t we t t h o ugh ) 1 9 B a cc a l aurea t e se rm o n at B alb o a U ni o n Churc h. '20. S enio r s r ea lly b egin t o l oo k studio u s '21. Ex ams!! '2+ T ears, s mi l es and d ignifi e d S enio r s C o m m e n ce m ent exe r c i ses '27 Balbo a H i g h days are d r awing t o a close T h e Sh i p o f h as s ail e d beyond the h orizon. H ail t h e S eniors o f ''28. T O OUR TEACH E R Gilmflll, '28. Y ou can .!>carce expect onc of our ;1C T o write for thc public or the St;1gC; And if we c h;1ncc to fall below Bryant or Edgar P oc, Don't view u S with a critic's eyc, But pass our imperfections by. J ust give u s time, :tnd by a n d Ly, W c'lI appear in pri n t be f o r e yo u r eye; L a r ge streams from l i t tl e fountains A ow; T all oaks from litde aco r ns g r ow ; A nd all great men-like you a n d meOnce had to Icar n t h eir a c.

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THE 20:'<1.-\:'<. . ---)IR5.!OI-1O

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7 4 THE ZONIA N. I II EVERYDA' Y dow n h e reon the I sthmus of P a nama b eside the far-famcd Can a l peo-1 1 -p I e pass o ur wa y fro m distant s h o r es \"' e wh o live h e r e ar e co n s tantl y exc han g i ng frie n d l y greetings with s trang e r s. J t seems only fit and proper that a sc hool so s ituated a s Balb o a Hi g h Sc h oo l i s, s h o uld h av e a l arg e Exc h ange D epartme n t O u r aim t h i s yea r was to inc r ease OUf Exc han ge D e partm e nt; but du e t o the s lown ess o f t h e mail s and t h e great dis tance t hat se parat es liS fro m th e maj or it y o f I sc hool s, w e r eg r e t t o say t h a t we h av e not attained t h e goa l for which we strived. May next year's class have b e tt e r s u ccess. are proud of all o f our exc han ges Fro m the m we ga in a know l edge o f what o th e r sc hool s are doing. They r e n de r u s n e w i deas and i nspirat i on. \ Ve, as a sc hool w elco m e th e m and h ope to h ear fro m them agai n n ex t year. /vliriam L. fllI l/ora1l, '27. D ora II/a l/J, 27. ., il

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THE ZO:\' I A:\'. 7, THROUGH THE CRITIC'S EYE. W e received your publ icat i o n THE ZOI'OIAS, t hi s week. Thank )tou for se n ding it. Your pictures I re fine, especiallr th ose intimate s n aps h uts, and )'our views. Your whole zine b hows though t in planning it. NtloP. Turner!> F .lIls H igh School, T urne r s F:llh., We: t hink THe ZOJlaAS is a very Ill:l gazi ne, ;Ind are "ery g la d to make the EIISloui,l, East Hi g h School, S:dt Lake Cil}" Utah. We a re always eager to welcome the only other annu:tl of the Canal Zone The m;uer ial in your book is splendid, and we wish }'ou s uccess in your future productions. Ctiriblmlll. Cristobal H igh Sc h ool, Cri stobal, Canal Z o ne. I-/,UKO, Centenary Colh:giate I nstitute. H:tckenstown, N.J W e l i k e TH E ZONIAN very muc h The origina l write-ups 3re ve r y cle\ 'e r the jokes :Ire extraordin:uily good, and in general t he entire magaLine i s fine Ha ( k o, Centenary Colleg iate J nsritule, H ac kettstown, N. J W e wish to S.I)' that TH E was one of t h e most inter_ esting o f the mag::lIines which ha\ e come to our .lttellllOn. W e he glad to have your school on our c:xch.lngc: list. Tlu /jJZtr, High School of Commerce, Portbnd, Oregon. Y our mag:tLine i<; very complete .lnc! you h.lve" very goo.l literar) depanment. W e especial l y liked your P eek-a B oo Section. If/till /-foo, Allegheny H igh School, Pittsburg, P.L We received a copy of the 1926 issue of TH E Zo:.u:.. It is an excdlent m:lguine ano fine couperation among the staff membt:rs and Your joke dep.lnment is enter_ taining and origin.11. The p.lge entitled H ogues G.IlIer)," i" a novel idea. W e :tlso enjoyeJ YOllr l iterar), department and .llu mni notes. Our one s uggestion is Ih:u you incre'lse r(.ur exch.mgc: dl'partlllcnt. Wlli.sp, Wilmingwn H igh School, Wilmington, Dd.lw.lre. W e Ihank you for exc h anging with us .lnri sincerely hope rou will e nj o)' the tllll/wl .IS ''''e have Till::; ZOll.!IA:'. Pflrktr "tmlllfll, Parker High School, Chicago, I llinoi". W E AC K NOWLEDGE THE FOLLOWING EXCHANGES: Tht Arglls, Gardner, i\l ass.lcllliserrs. Ctlrdinfl/ NoI<'S, Girl s Commercial High Sch ool, B rooklyn, New Y ork. ThtCflribbuw, C r istobal Hi g h Sc h ool, C r isrob:d, C:tnal Zone T h,. E(lS/onin Eas t High Sch oo l Salt I. ake Ut.l h Tht Hrrmu, H ud so n F:tlls High Sc h oo l Hu,I5On Fall s, New Y ork. High S(hool Ruordrr, S:tralOga Springs, N ew Y ork. Th,. Kq, Battle Creek, i\l i c higan. 'I' M udgtr, High Sch ool of Commerce, Portland, Oregon. Nau/illts, Grc:envilte High Sc h oo l Greeneville, Smuh Carolin a Ntlop, Turne r s H igh School, Turners F : dl s, Tht' J amaic:l H igh School, J :lmaic", New Y o rk Th e 0'.(,'1, W ellsvi lle H igh School, W ellsville, Y o rk Pmkn-Amlltll/, H igh School, Chi cago, Ill inois. R"d (uul WIIIU, l .owell H igh School, S.1Il F r:tn c i .. co. Cal_ ifor n i.l. Tlu Rt'jfl'rlor, Fernd.de H igh School,John .. ton, Th e 11',,1, floo, Allc:gheny High School, Penn<;yl v:tni.l. Tilt' lI' hisp, W ilminglOn High School, W ilmingron, D d:l-OUR NEWS-C;TAND. Tilt' 13I0"t',., High School of COIllIllt'rce, Portbnd, Oregon. [.lI ke B,uu Sheboyg:lIl, W isconsin. Cm'diJwl News, \\';tllW:ltosa, \\'isconsin. Til" Dllkoll', H igh Sl.:hool, Akester, South D .lkota. The Lowell. L uwell H igh Schoo l San Fr.lIlcisco, CalifQrniJ. Tlu lI/nlp'Jrf Crit'r, t\ :iIlsas Citr, i\lis<;ouri. T he Zmlt'sdl/iul/, ZaneS\'ille, OhiO. We :lCkn owledge the f o l l owing late arrivals: Tht' .. NOrlheasf H ig h School, P hiladelphia, P". 'I'h"CdtlrChtJl, Toms Ri ve r H i g h School, Toms R ive r, N. J Erasm;fllI, Er:l s mu s H all H igh School, B rooklYIl. r.

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T H E ZON I AN.

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THE ZONIAN. 77

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THE ZONIAN. BOYS' ATHLETICS. BALBOA H i g h School had a very successful year in athle tics. W e s h owed ou r s uperiority in handball, tennis, track, and swimming; but we f ell down in base ball. OUf swimming coac h Nlr. Griese r turned o u t a fine team of swimmer s H e worked ve r y hard with t h e boys and we express our t hanks to him for his servi ces. l\1 r. B agela, physical d irector, was an important (actor in the s u ccess w e had in athletics; a n d we are ve r y grateful to him (or his inte r es t in t h e s p orts o f the sc h ool. Our sc h oo l s howed that it was not lacking in sc h ool spirit. I n all of the intercla ss a n d intersc h o lasti c m eets, a larg e c r owd a l wa ys came out c h eeri n g t h e participan ts. Each class had its ow n c h ee r leader s. \\' ith OUf sc h oo l spirit an d s u ccess i n athle ti cs we h ad all that any sc h oo l co uld desire John Frtl/ rh, '27. -/1(/1''-.1 Gnl1lberry, '28. GIRLS' ATHLETI CS. I I S P ORTS and athl e ti cs ha ve played a ve r y importan t part in t h e acti viti es of B alboa High Schoo l t his year. Students hav e s h ow n g reater interest and e n thusi asm than in the past, and more str ess a n d effort h ave b ee n put forth in that fie ld. Class spirit ha s, ind eed, been ve r y mu c h i n evid ence. T eac h e r s a n d pupil s a lik e have turned out for all events; c h ee r l eade r s have be e n c h osen; bands ha ve b ee n 011 the scene; and in general a true, wh o l eh earted sc h oo l spirit h as b ee n displayed. \\'e owe a great dea l of our s u ccess in athletics, h oweve r, to ou r instructors; and we w i s h to I,;'xpress our appreciati on to j\' l i ss Louis e H an n a and Mr. H en r y Grie s er. -Angela Klemmer, '27. K alll",.;nt' SUlldqlliJl, '27. II

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THE i9 lJa'M'bal1 Te:ulI Had; TOII'.Mr BOI;da (Coach). Ben Heese. \\llham Wood, Holx-rt itoblUl!(In, I hchnrd John""," I M:III3f:crl, Johu I'rench. Earl U adcy. Elias FrO""trOIl'.-ErnC6t Ru ssey, Wlllliam ran Sielell, Ro;;cr Wllh:t.ms. Russel JOliet! r('aptam) Thatcher CllShee. BASEBAI.L. 1NTERCLASS BASEBALL. A series of different ga m es was arranged b e tween th e dif f erent c la sses of B alboa Hi g h Scho ol. Alth o ug h thi s ha s not b ee n the c ustom it wa s tho u g h t t hat thi s was t h e b es t and e asiest way in w h i c h to pic k a team to r epresent th e hi g h sc h oo l as a who l e. The Seniors c am e out first in th e series, winning mainl y b y t h e i r hitti n g ability. The J uni o r s ca m e seco nd wit h t h e Fres hm e n next and the oph olllo r es la s t. The r esult of the ga m es are a s f ollows: I Seniors, I""; Sophomores, '0. Juniors, Fre sh men, 1. 3 Senior s 10; Fr eshmen, 4 J unior s, 9; Sophomores, <. 5 Freshmen, 8; Sophomores, 5 6. Seniors, 1 5; J uni o r s, Thirtee n play ers were c h osen according to their m e rit s in t h e above games. Ther are: I. Thatcher Clisbee -. Elias J\l ih"litsianos 2. Earl D ailer 8. E rnest Russe}' .1. J o hn F rench 9. R obert R obinson 4. R ichard J o hn son (J\l gr.) B en R eese .;. Jonc"! 11. \\'m. \'an Siden 6. (Capt.) 12. R ogcr W illiams 13. W illiam W ood I UASEIJA 1.1.. The first game of our sc hedul ed three-game se r ies wit h Cristobal was plav ed o n the Gold Side. Grider was Cristobal's twirling c h oice, while R eese did m o un d duty f or B alboa \\'e started out early, geuing to Grider for a one-run lead in the second which might ha\' e been increased but for Clisbee's m cn tal "boner" when h e took his time to r eac h seco nd afte r a caugh t fir.

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80 THE ZONIAN. Cristobal ca m e back strong in the fourth and pushed five markers ac r oss the platte r o n o n e measly hit, a walk three or four stol e n bases, and the sa m e numbe r of errors W e kept pecking away at the of ferings of Grider and in t h e sixth hammered out two m o r c fUllS, but the rally was again cut short by foolis h baserunning. Greene, w h o s u cceeded Grider in t h e seventh, was in good f or m and let u s dow n for t h e re s t of the game w ith out th e semblance of a rUIl, a n d R eese also k ept up his fine heaving L oose fielding and l oose ba serunning beat u s, C l isbee bei n g the chie f oR'ende r in this respect, with his four erro r s and t w o mental lapses, being quite abl y seco nded by the rest o f th e team, and t hough defeat was bitter, it wa s some consolation to know t hat Cristobal was n o t t h e determi nin g factor. The outstanding star of t h e game was B e nn y R eese. H e allowed Cristobal but three hits, all o f the bingles being garnered by t h e tail e n d of the batting order, whiff ed e leven of the Gold Coasters and participated in all of OUf run scori n g, drivin g i n two a n d scor in g the oth e r. Cristobal's s h ini n g lig h t was Gree n e, with his fine pitchin g, faultl ess work in the fie l d and general heads-u p playing, hi s work b e ing marred by none of Reese's infrequen t lapses. HOW THE RUNS WERE SCORED. Second Inning. Bn/bon. Reese wa s hit stole second, and went to t hird o n Klunk's passed ball. Russey doubled over second, sco rin g R eese. Clisbee singled to second, R ussey h o lding third. Jones struck out. Elias Ried out to right, Cli s be e be in g doubled oR seco nd for the final out. Fourlll J 1lI1ing. Cris t obal Gr ee n e walked and stoi c seco n d Arcia w hiff'ed, but took seco n d and Gree n e sco red when Clis bee threw t h e mi ssed third strike i nto right. J o hn so n t h rew out scoring when Clisbee missed J o n es' throw to ca t c h him at the plate. Days s ingled to center and s tol e s econd Peter so n walked a n d Days a n d h e engineer ed a doubl e steal. Grider hit to Elia s who p layed th e ball h OI11<, all hands b e ing sa f e. Grider stol e second. Peterson scored and Grider went to third on a passed ball, and Grider sco red o n Reese's wild heave just afterward. Will and Klunk b
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T H E ZO:" I .'\:". \\" e got to Grider earl)' again, tollc hin g him up for one unearn ed run in t h e firs t and increased i t by two in t h e Ilext stanza o n.Jo ncs' hit, L owancle's erro r \ an Siclcn 'sci oLI t a !lei OJ o h 1150n' S r l 'exas leaguer R eese started his off-color work in th e f ourth, w h en after one run had b ee n tallied h e obligingly crowded t h e sack s and t hen pulled out of th e h o l e by b earing down on Grider and \\'i ll. I n the fifth h e donated a fat run to the cause wh e n h e allowed Peanuts Da\'s to stroll w i t h t h e sack s c r o wded, l\..lunk's doubie a nd free p asses to both Gree n e and Arc ia telling t h e story. Then just f o r contrast h e let Peterson and Bissollnette down withou t even a foul. R eese passed but one m a n in the sixt h and the o utl oo k b egan to get ro sy but th e seventh happ e ned to b e the next inning. I n this frame h e passed the first three m e n to face him, a n d a confe rence was then called. After a s hort discuss i o n h e was allowed to star in, mainl y on h is prior toward stingi n ess upon demand. Bu t Green e scored on an infield out and Bissonnette unloaded t h e sack s with a timely double, w h ich did the damage, Grider got better as t h e game w ent 011, and we again fini s h ed two jumps behind. R eese was again t h e center of attracti o n. H i s free passes balanced his stl ike outs, and all came at th e wrong time. H i s both in t h e pitc h er's and batter's box es was t h e deciding factor, although h e gave but six bingl es, one more that Grider allowed. The farm e r from Gatun pitched a nice game, h olding the head of our batting order to a row of ze ros, and hi s fine work is worthy of praise. One amazing feature of t h e game was t h e o f Arc ia and Days to populate r h e c u s h ions, t h e pair r e a ching first eight tim es out of ten trips to th e pan. HOW THE RUNS WERE SCORED. Firsl inning. J3alboa. -\\' illiam s hit to Bisson nette who fum ble d and th en let l oose a wild hea ve, \\'illiall1s taking second. Clisbee sacrificed him to third, and h e sco r ed o n \Vood's l o ng sacrifice to center. R eese p opped to Lowande. Second fnnin g walked, but was caugh t steal ing. J o n es si ngl ed and advanced to second on Lowande's boot o f Elias' grounder. \'an Siclen sin gl ed over t hird, Jones stoppin g at third. \I'irh t h e infi e ld pla\ ing in s hort, J o hnson popped a 520i-ll T ex a s leaguer over second, scoring Jones and Elias. \\'illiam s lined to Lowand e, and \'an Siclen was doublt:d at second. fourtll II/I/il/g. Cristobai. Greene stru c k out, A .rcia sing led and went all t h e way around w h en Clisbee missed R ussey s throw. Days and Peter so n got four wide ones apiece. Bissonnette singled, Days holdin g third, b u t all three men were left stranded w hen Grider whiffed and \\'ill was caugh t at first o n a s l o w roll e r to second. Fij,h Illning. Cristobtll. -Klunk doubled, and took t h ird on a wild pitch. threw Lowande out at first, Klunk h o lding third. Greene walked, Arcia also strolled, and Reest;! walked in a run by losing contr o l and passing D ays. However, h e fanned both Peterson and Bissonnette to end t h e inning. S{'vel/tlilnuing. Crislobnl. Green e wal ked for t h e seco nd time, and stol e second, going t o third a ll a wild heave. A rcia also walked and stole second on a s hort passed ball. R eese filled t h e ba ses again when h e passed Days for th e fourth time, \\'illiams threw out Peterson, Greene scoring on the play. Bissonnette doubled to righ t center, emptying the bases. Grider fanned, and \\'ill was Ot.t 011 a hit to t h e pitcher. 80X :-'CORE. Cri:-.tobal H1gh School. \\;11, ,b Klunk, c Lowande, ss Greene, II, :\rcia,lf Da ys, cf P eterson, rf B issonnette, Jb Grider, p Totab B alboa H igh School. \\'illia1lls,ss Clisbee, I b Wood,lf R eese, p R ussey, c J ones, c f Elias,2b \'an Siden, rf Johnson, Jb Totals o 33 ': d3. H PO. A E. o IJ o J2

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THE ZONIAN. Te:lI11. Cristoba l B a lboa Score by inn i n gs. 3 4 5 6. o Summa r y. 8. 9 T. 5 0-3 Two-b a s e Bisso nn e tte. Sacrifice hits-Cli s b ee, W ood. Stole n bases R eese, Elias, Klunk, Greene. D ouble p l ays L owande to W ill, J o hn so n to Elias t o C l i sbce H it by pitc her-B y R eese ( Ar cia). Struc k o ut-B y Rl::cse J I b y G ride r S. B ases o n balls-Off R eese 1 0 off Gri d er J. E a r ned r uns-Bath an 0, Cristobal 4. L eft o n bases-B alboa 6, Cr istoba l I I Umpir es Curri e a n d Bur goon. TENNI S. Thirty contestants entere d a tournam ent to decide th e champions hip o f the sc h oo l and to pick the six-man whi c h wa s to r epresent t h e h igh sc hool in all matches I n the final s \\'arrell Gilman was de f eated by R o b ert R obin so n by the sc ores 6 --h 6 4 6 + -'n thi s R obin so n wa s co n s idered to b e s lightly b ette r than h i s opponentj but a s Gil man i s a fine playe r it was e xp ec t e d at any m oment that h e wou l d spring a surprise and c o m e through winning. H ow e v e r R obin s on playe d a good and s t eady game a s i s s h own b y the above scores. The six m e n t hat w e re to make up t h e team w e r e pi c k e d a ccording t o t h e ir m erit in th e tournam ent. The y w e r e R o b ert R o bin s on (captain), \Varre n Gilman, Phares Butl e r, Earl Dail e y, Franc i s Butl e r, and Randol ph B e v erle y. Willard M eredith eventually de f eated B everley f o r sixth place B ALBOA HIG H SCHOOL t'J. C R I STOBA l. HIG H SCHOOL. Balbo a H i g h Sch oo l made up ( o r l a s t y ear's d e f eat in t e nni s b y winning e v e r y match p layed agains t Cristobal H i g h S c h ool. The games wer e v e r y uninte r esting f o r competition wa s not suffic i e ntl y k een. The results o ( th e matc h es wer e : G ilma n de feated Klu n k 6 2,6-0. R o b inson defeated W ill, 6 [, 6-0. P Bu tler defeated W iki nstad, 6-0, 6 1 E D ailey and F Bu tle r defeated W ill a n d L o w a n de, 6 -1. This i s th e firs t tim e in three y ears that Balboa H i gh S c h oo l has w o n in the inte r -scholastic games o ( t e nni s BA UWA HIG H U S B A LBO A H E I GHTS The Hi g h S c h oo l e a silv def eated th e H eights w in ning three matc h es o f th e ( our pla y ed. BALBOA HIG H SCHOOL OJ. PACIFIC CI.UB. The Hi g h Sc h oo l won ( our matches and lost one. Gilman lost this only match playing a hard game againc t Stapf. At first it was thought that Gil man would win bu t his opponent was too ex perienced. B A LBO A HIGH SCHOOL O S The Hi g h School carne out ahead by winning t hr ee matches out o f t h e five played. These were t h e clos est of any o f the games p layed thus far. A s i s c ustomary with the high sc h oo l spirit, R ob in son won a hard battle w h ich, up to the end, h e was los in g. Gilman won the next matc h playin g with great skill. The n ext games, Phares Butl er o f the H igh Sc h ool l o s t. This was a great disappointment f o r it wa s expecte d that Butler wou l d win. Dailey and F. Butler lost t h e next match to Stag a nd Obarrio. The Hi gh Sc h ool boys made a very poor s h owi n g not being abl e to stand up against the skill o f their opponents. The next match was doubles and upon this depended t h e v ictory. R o bin son an d Gi lman won by the sco re s o( 6 -2, 6-0, finishing the games off in g reat style. BALBOA HIG H SCHOOL US. ANCON COURT CL U B. This pro ved to be the H igh School's Waterloo. They lost e"ery match, making it a com plete d e f eat. R obi n son and Gilman lost the first doubles match, not playing up to their usual (orm. The n ext games were s in g l es Gilman lost the fir s t, not b e ing abl e to stand lip against his opponent's drives R obinson lost the next match, but by a very slig h t score This was t h e Illost exciti n g match of t h e day. P. Butler lost the third singles game (or his opponent proved too s teady (or him The n ext match was doubl es played bv the Butle r brothe r s . I\t first it looked as if they were going to win, but th e ir op p o n ents' experience brought about t h e Hi gh Sc h oo l boys' ultimate defeat. These games ended t h e Balboa H igh Sc h ool t e nni s se a s o n (or the year o( 1 92 7 .1\\1 in all, it wa s a most sllc ce s s (ul season, for the H igh School lo s t only on e match o u t o ( the five played.

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THE 2O'>11 :\;,\,. T enms T eam. Back roll',' '\Ir. ninl (Cooc hl, Ph:lr('S Butler, W:mcn Gilman, Robert HobulllOn ( Capl:un l Pront fo::.rl Dall ey, Ilut l!'r. W llhml SOCCE R This is t h e first yea r t hat soccer has becom e an i n terclass and from t h e spirit displayed, t h e ga m e wili be very to continue. S occer will probablr b e to u s a s A merican foo tball is to th e schoo l s in the Unit ed States T he warmness of the c limate prevents LIS from r h i s national sport; so th e refor e, socce r tak es A merican football' s place. Although only a f ew knew how to pia), soccer, a l arg e group turned out w h en it was announced that rhis wa s to b e an interclass sport. F a c h cla ss wa s th e n r epresented by a team. Three games w e r e [0 be played, but unfortuna tely on l y two took place. The Fres hm en WOI1 (;-0111 the S opho m o r es, and the Seniors heat the J 1Il1iors. The twO victor s were to play to decide [ h e c ham pionship, but, as stated before, this game was not played. I [ i s hoped that next year soccer will h eco m e an interscholastic sport between Cristohal H i g h S c ho o l and Ba l b oa H i g h School.

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THE ZONIAN Day.;' Swimming Tea:n Rark rOlr,E\'crcU .. \l1cn, H en ry Klit:ht. J.'red Hclmcrichs, Leon Phares Butler. Go!dc:l. Mr Grieser (C'o:u::h ). if"r.1 fJII'.-EoII:lnl JI:my Granberry, August Sch windcrman. GCOI'ge H allor:m, Ti:nOlh y Mann, Jack H umphrey. S\\" IMMING. INTERCLASS SWIMfo.HNC The interclass swimming meet was h e ld at t h e Balboa pool before a large crowd. Balboa H igh Sc h oo l was well represe n ted. As u s ual t h e Freshme n handed LIS another surprise by winning t h e meet with a total of 47 points. T h e Juniors cam e next wirh a total of -+'2 points followed by a tie between the Sen i ors and Sop h o m o r es, both teams having 2 8 points to thei r credit. Fred H e lmeri c hs, of the Senior Class, was the high h onor Illall, winning the 50-yard, I DO-yard, 22o-yard swims and also was a member o f t h e winning relay team. I NTERSCHOLAS T I C SWIMMING MEET. On aturday, February 1'2, at the \\'as hington swimming pool t h e Balboa a n d Cristobal H igh Schools clashed for t h e Canal Zone Intersch o la s ti c Aquati c Championship for the year of 192 7 The Ir.eet was a huge s u ccess ; t h e spirit behind itwast h e best ever. All of t h e swimmers and divers we r e in top notch form, a s t h e r esult o f the ir strenu ous training f o r this annual event. The meet was c haracteristic, in t hat five o f t h e o l d Canal Zone intersch o lastic r ecords were smas hed and bright n e w o nes hung up in t h ei r place. Cristobal was in nne shape a n d gave our boys a hard battle The surprise o f the day was wh e n Jack Humphreys, a Freshman of our sc h oo l took the divin g cham pi o n s hip from Cristobal High. For the first time in five o r six years Cristobal Hi g h Sch oo l beat B a lboa H igh in the r e lay r ace. Our bo ys were up to their r egular standard of swimming but see med to b e inclined t o swi m crooked, so d i squalifying t h e m se l ves in t h e rcla,' race T h e r esults o f t h e day were a s follows:

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T H E ZONIAN. 85 jo-)'ard C rtlUlI S troke. I. J a c k Klunk (Cris t o b a l ) T i m e, '25 '21 5 seco n ds. New r eco r d. 2. F re d H elme r ic h s ( B a l bo a). 3 Edw:ml I...o w : mdt: (Cristo bal ) 50-yar d Brc!lls1 I A u g u s t Sc hwinderrn:tn ( B a lboa). T i me.J5 N e w r eco r d. 1. Geo r g e H all oran m:tlbo:l). 3. W : dter Wi kin gs ta d (Crist o b a l ) 50-,\ '( 11"4 BflCK Straltt'. I. E vc ren All e n ( B a lb o a). Timl:', J ... seco n ds. r eco r d. Harr), Gr:lnberry ( 8:1lboa ) J. W ood ford B a bbitt (Cristo b : d ) loo-)'ard C ra r d ."1II"O K I '. I J.tc k Klunk (Cristob al). T i me,5Si l i S scmnrls r eco r d. '2. Frcd Hdmeric h s ( 8:11bo:l ) 3. E d w a r d Dorswitt ( Balboa). 220-: "1111"" Cra:/JI S lr(J/U. I E d ward Dorswitt ( B albo a ) T illlt" 1 minutes 53 semncts. rt:co r d '2 Sc hwinderm a n ( R a l boa L 3. R o b e r t Payn e (Crisro b d L Rnu. I. Cristob a l Uack Klunk, E d w:'lrd l .o wande, \\'oodf o r d B:tbbin, F os t e r Tufts)' R:llbu.1 (disqua lified) D ir:illg. I. J.lc k H um phrey" ( B a lboa) J ac k Klunk (Crisrob,tI ) 3 A lbert (Cristob :d ) Balbo a Hi g h S c h oo l won t h e m ee t wit h a sco r e o f 3 6 p oints to Cris t o ba l s 2 3 p oints O f t h e fiv e r eco rd s, Cristobal made two wit h Klunk taking the 50-y ard a nd l oo yard c ra w l and B a l b o a to o k thre e, w ith Alle n taking t h e 50-yard ba c k s t r o k e ; D ors w itt, t h e 22o-yard c ra w l ; an d S c hwin d e rm an t h e 50ya r d br e a s t stro k e TRAC K INTERSCHOLAST I C TRACK. I n t h e trac k m eet w i t h C r i stob a l H ig h S c h oo l, B a lb o a came O u t w i t h a n a lm os t o n e hundred p e r cent victo r y \ V e won e v e r y even t e x cept th e runni n g br o ad j um p. B es i des thi s event, t h e on l y oth e r c o m p e t i t i o n we wer e g iv e n wa s in t h e runni n g high j um p. H ow e v e r, George L ow e, a Fre s hman sprang a surprise w h e n h e c am e out fir s t. C r ed i t s h o ul d b e giv e n to E. A. B o g d a, p h y s i c a l d i re c t o r w h o d i d p oss ibl e to put t h e b oy s i n t h e r i g h t s hape. That h e d id t h i s s u c cessfully i s s h o w n b y t h e r es u l t s INTER C LASS TRACK. The S e n i o r C l a ss c am e o u t victorio u s in th e annual interclass trac k m ee t b y a l e a d o f 3 points o v e r t h e ir n eares t r i v a l s t h e Fres h m e n. The F r es h m e n see med a ss ured o f victory afte r w i nnin g t h e fir s t f our events H o w eve r th e o th er c la sses di d nOt give u p h o p e The Seniors w ere t h e m os t de t e rmined and managed to ti e t h e F res h m e n n e a r t h e e n d o f t h e m eet Up o n th e b oys' h i g h jump, w h i c h w a s t h e la s t e v ent, depe n ded t h e v ictor s L eo n Gree n e a S e n i or w o n t his event. I n d i v i d u al h Ollo r s in t h e boys' eve n ts go to R oge r \\' illiam s, w h o made 1 5 p oints an d L eo n Gree n e, with II p oints. HANDI H LL. i\l u c h inte r es t wa s d i s p l a yed in h an d ball t h i s y ear f o r t h e r e a so n that t h e sc h oo l deve l o ped bet t e r h a n d b all p l",' e r s J n all o f the games pl.ved, b o t h i n t h e e liminati o n an d i n the inte r sc h o lasti c ga m es t h e r e was a l wa ys a c r o w d prese n t t o root f o r o n e o r an o t h e r o f t h e p l a yers Sixt ee n b oys e n t e r e d in th e H i g h S c h oo l elimina ti o n contes t an d t h e f our w h o c am e out th e h i g h e s t made t h e t e am. These f our b o y s h a d to e a c h o t h e r in o r d e r to de t e r min e t h e c ham p i o n o f Balbo a Hi g h S c h ool. The r es u l t s w e r e a s f ollo ws: ls i 2d 3d Y."IIU. l s i 2d Willi a m \';'111 Sidell 2 1 1 9 E arl Dailer 1-+ 5 \ ';tn Siden 1.1 R u ssel Jones 1 9 John Fre n c h 1 3 Jones :\ft e r h aving de f eate d V an Sicl e n J o n e s b eca m e c h ampi o n o f t h e H i g h S c h ool. B A L U O .o\ H I G H S CHOO l. VS. C R I STOBA L HIGH S C HOOL. T h e B alb o a team s h o w ed t h e m se l ves s u pe rior p l a ye r s b y win ning all ni n e ga m es fro m C r istobal H i g h S c h ool. Three matc h es w e r e pla yed, eac h matc h containing t h r ee gam es F i r s l maleh. -Thi s matc h w a s betw ee n \ a n Sic l e n o f B H S an d L o wande o f C. H S. L o w a nde was t h e fir s t t o se rv e t h e ball bu t was i mmediate l y p u t out. N o t b e i n g satisfied wit h thi s a l one, V an Sicl e n started to get a numbe r o f po in ts an d i t wa s n o t unti l h e ha d te n p oints that L o w a n de stopp ed t h i s run A s the g am e wen t o n, t h e p l ay in g see med too f as t f o r L o wan de, \ a n Sicle n w a s mas t e r o f t h e g am e a t all t im es, not having to fear h i s opponent a t s t age

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T H E 1:0:-<1 : \:-<. The scores wt' r e : \'an Sicie'n l .owande 1.<1 ld gam,'. 3d game. 13 Strond J}Jnlril.T h is matc h w as playe d D ail e y a nd F r e n c h o f B H S. a gai n s t anti K lunk o f C. H S. f o r d o ubl es champio n s hip. F o r t h e fir s t f e w p oints th e t eams see m e d eve nlr m;H(:h ed and it see m e d a s if t h e g illll e wa s go ing to b e c l ose all th e w a r t h r ough H o wever Cristob:"ll's h o p e o f :lvcllging L owandt;:'s def e a t wa s s h o r tli\ 'e d f o r soo n Fre n c h a n d se ttl e d down b a fflin g rh e i r opp o n ents with c1e \ er n ess The f ollo\\i n g are the scor es : B O\\"I.I:-
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THE Z ON It\:-.'. B:tskct Ball Team Uarl.: rOlr. Ihuh Fraser Ducia rharloue Aru::da K\('mf(;n. Bellc MarUII, Llhel Cart roll'. Iht:! Driscoll. Allen, Janice GmlliSOIl (C'all\:linl, Hae Newhard, Loui$(' Kerr BASKET BALL. The fir s t of th e se r ies of hasketh all games be tw ee n th e teams o f B a l b o a and C ristobal was p layed o n th e Cristobal Aoor, February 1 'l, 1 927. The gam e star ted out fas t a n d continued snappy thro u g h o u t 1 n t h e first q uarter Cristobal sco r ed f O llr p oints a n d l hlllOa made o n e point on a f o ul. The seco n d q uarter e nded 6 I, t h e third N 2, and the last quarter [ 0 2, giv i ng the first game. T he Balhoa centers ;:'Illd guards displayed good pass work and made lip the backbone of the team, while the forwards p layed poorly) pass i ng up many opporruni ties a n d possibi l ities to make baskets. Both Cristobal and Balboa teams showed excellent spirit and sportsmanship. 13al-

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8 8 THE ZONJAN. boa, although the l ose r s, put up an especia lly good game, considerin g that they played under the handicap of h avi n g a team composed o f all new players with the exception of t h e center The line-ups were as follows: Cr is t o b al. .\larian B oomer, F. Helen F. Dorothy Svensson, C. Wertz, S. C. Evangeline Smith, G. Ethel Westman, G. Bal b otl Ethel Carr, F J anice Grimison, F L ouise K err, F. Charlotte F. Angela Klemmer, C. Marian Allen, S. C. Rut h J o h nson, G. Belle !,\'Iartin, G. Ruth Fraser, G. The seco n d or r eturn game was h e l d on t h e h o m e floor, Balboa playshecl court, F ebruary 26 The Balboa g irl s were determined t o w i n t his game, for to lose it to Cristobal would m ea n to l ose t h e series. The first quarter l oo k ed lik e a walkaway for Cristobal for when the time was up t h e sco r e was 4 to 0 in favor o f Cris t o bal. The seco nd quarter e nded a lso i n Cristobal's fa vo r with t h e total o f 6-2. I n the last h alf, h o wever Balboa forged a head, making 3 points in t h e third quarter and 4 in the last, to Cristobal's 2 points. Thus ended the gam e i n a vic t o r y f o r t h e h o m e team. Balboa s h owed good tea m work an d a marked irnprovement over their previo u s p l aying. ] t wou l d be unfair to say that an y indi v i d ual stood for t h in the game, for t h e entire team was in good s hape and did its best. Cristobal had the same team as before, but Balboa's was som ewhat c hanged: Bal b OIl. Ethel Co:rr, F. Rae t\ ewhar d F J anice Grimi s on, F Ang ela Klemmer, C. Allen, S. C. Ruth Fra s er, G. Ruth J ohn son, G. Crj;J obal. B oome r F 1 l ele n Montgomery, F Dorothy Sven s son C. D o rothy Wertz S. C. Ev;tngcline Smith, G. Ethel Wes tman, G. Cristobal met us o n t h e Pedro Miguel floor, 1 \ l arc h 5, for t h e t hird o r decis i ve game of t h e se ries Exc itement ra n high for both t ea m s we r e equally anxious to win. Finally, t h e whistle b l ew and th e g irl s took t heir places on t h e floor. The pla y er s put forth all t h eir effort and pep, hoping to bring th e ir s ide to victor y. B a l boa, i n th e fir s t quarte r made on e basket, w hil e Cristobal failed to scor e The sc o re 2-0 remained un c hanged during the entire game Balboa t hu s win nin g the series. The t e am s p layed a s they never had before, a n d th e Balboa guards did better than ever. Balboa's t e am wa s jus t a little d iff e rent from last time; R ae Newhard a n d Eth e l Car r playin g f o r wa rd; andJaniceGr imison a n d Ruth FraserpJay inggu a rd. Although the girls wo n t h e game, much honor and credit i s due Miss Hann a, our instru c tor, who so willingl y devoted her time and patie n ce in coac hin g a n e w t ea m. Jus t a wo r d f o r Cristobal. Cristobal had an excellent team. \ V e congratulate th e m o n the i r p l ayi n g and a c kn owledge the m t o b e good s p orts, an d we h ope t o have th e p l e a sure o f m ee ting th e m agai n soo n. TENNI S The girls thi s yea r m o r e than ever, seemed t o have take n a great inte rest in te nni s Over twenty g i rls participated in the tournament, whic h i n November and lasted t h ro ugh D ecember. All entrants did exce pti o nall y well, and whe n t h e gam es were p layed of!", Cary Walker and Eva de l a Pena were the two l e f t t o pla y the final s whi c h we r e to decide the winner. The game was sc h ed ul ed f o r D ecem b e r 16, and proved t o b e very exci tin g, b oth girls b e i ng e v enly matched Car y Walke r h owe v e r fin ally carried off the laurel s the score b e ing 8 6, 6 -2. This l e ft Eva de la P e n a and Eth el Carr ti ed f o r seco n d place. ] n p l ayi n g off the t i e Eva def ea t ed Ethel, thus winning seco n d p l ace ar.d giving third to Eth el. All those taking part i n th e tournament dese r ve h o n o rabl e m e ntion, and make up a squad a n y sc h oo l wou l d b e proud to h a ve bear its co lor s Saturday, April 30th, the Cristobal girls met u s all our courts f o r the Inte r sc holastic Tennis T ourname n t Our girls we re in s pl endid f o rm and had little or n o difficulty in defeating the i r opponents. Carey \ Valk e r Virginia Ewing, and L o ui se Martin, made up the Balbo a team and d isplayed so m e very good p la ying. Virginia Ewing and L o ui se Martin defeated D o roth y \ V ertz and l\1arian B oo m er o f Cristobal in th e doubl es, b y a sco r e o f 6-1,6-0, whi l e Carey Walke r took t h e s in g l es fr o m H ele n M ontgo mery of Cristobal, 6-0 6-1. TRACK. The Sen ior C l ass ca m e out v i c tori o u s I n the al1nua l inte rcla ss trac k meet o f the Balbo a H igh School whi c h was h e ld Marc h 2 6, at the Balbo a Stadium, by a lead o f 3 points over the Freshme n their n earest rival s. The meet was a combined boys' a n d g irls' m ee t w i t h a total of 1 5 events. Indivi d u a l honor s in the girls events go to R ae N ewhard w ith I I } points and J ess i e Banan with 1 0 points

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THE ZO:-. Elil3belh Eisbeth Whale r .Jessu Banan KI('mmef. January 20t h at 3.30 p. 111., an interclass swirn min g meet was held at Balboa. err few g irl swimmers turned out for the event, although t here was sorne good material. To Elizabeth H irsh goes the h o nor o f winning the greatest number of individual points for the girl s. The Freshmen walked away with the other classes in the meet, taking the h igh total of 4 8 points. The J uniors were second with .. f.2 points, anJ the Sophomores and Seniors tieJ for third place with 2 8 points each. I:\'TER!)CHOL\:-,TIC Balboa Hi gh School defeated Cristobal H igh School by a 27 -23 score in the Canal Zone interhigh school swimming meet for girls, which was I\IRS10i-ll held at the Hotel Washington Pool on -, 1927. Angela Klemmer, of Balboa, wa s hig h point winner and compiled a total of 13 points b y winning two firsts and olle second place. i\iarian Boom e r wa s Cristobal's star with a total of points, garnered from one fir s t o n e second place, and being a member of the winning relay team. Jo-.wlrd Fyre Sf})r. I A.ngcla Klemmer, Balboa I : 5 _. ;\Iarian B oomer, Cri stobal. J. Louic;e ;\larnn. Bal boa. JO-)'ard Breflsl SlroJu I. Kerr, Balboa. 25 seco n ds Kathryn Lambert, Cri s t o bal. 3. Euph emia \\'oolnough, Cri stobal.

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T H E ZON I AN. 30.)'flrd Blick StroJu. I. Marian Boomer, Cristobal. '21 3 / 5 seconds. '2. Angela Klemmer, Balboa. J. Kathryn Lambert, Cristobal. 6o-)ar d Fru SI),le. I. Eli zabe th Whaler, B alboa. 45 'lI s seconds. . Lucille H ea rn e. B alboa. 3. Rita J orce, Cri stobal. Fllncy Di u ing. \. Angela Klemmer, B alboa. 2. Rita J oyce, Cristobal. 3. D orot h y H eim, Cristobal. 12oy ard RdIlY. I. Cristobal (def: lUh ) I. Lambert. '2. B oomer. J. J oyce. 4. Woolnough. Girls' Bowlin g Team Anita Ill,Id wll, norCJSmith, Angela Klemmer, Mi ss Hanna (Coac h ), Ruth Fraser, Ruth Johnson, JuanIta Orr. BOWLING. Too much c an not be said about the spirit and enthusiasm whic h wa s displayed in bowling. The girls turned out faithfully every Wednesday for practice and w e re in good form for the first match which was bowled with Pedro on the Balboo alleys. The game was arranged for D ece m ber -I> and the following girls were c h ose n f o r t h e team: Ruth J ohnson, Matilda Van Siclen, Angela Klemme r, Juanita Orr, Vio l e t Stroop, and Ruth Fraser. Although Pedro Miguel had n o wellorganized team, they were good sports and put up a good s howing. Durins the entir e tournarnent we were far in the lead, the final sco r e ending in a deci s iv e victory for Balboa. .J\. return ma'tch was h e ld o n the Pedro l\1 iguel alley s, December 1 8 .<\ change, however, was made in our team, substituting Flores Smith, Anita Hudso n, and J ea nn ette Bruland, for Matilda Van Siclell, Juanita Orr, and Violet Stroop. This time Balboa d i d not have s u c h easy picking as before, and Pedro i\l iguel won the first game, making Balboa step. But luc k did not stay with them, for we won the next two games, again bringing home the bacon.

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HOTE L TIV O L I ":"co:,,, c. z. t h e P acific Ocean and the city of Panama, lending an inviting varier), o f scenes. Its "-1:1' location is ideal. One o f the many amusements in Panamaj Guests leaving the Hotel Tivoli for t h e morning canter over trails b l azed by Spanish D ons o f centuries past. ?I1'711tlTH acuisine unexcelled. Qur tables are s uppli ed with the c h oicest meats, tropical \'egetables and fruits, fis h fr o m the P acific Ocean, and game (rom our neighboring jungles. E. S. H ECK L E R

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TH E ZO:--'I.'\:--'. /= 1/ The 1 -ADI/ERTISERS 1 -II I I I I I I A ilE A B I G FACT O R I N THE S lTCFSS O F "TH E ZON IA:'< 17S READERS ,RI: HEQUESTED TO GlrE 1'1 RST CONS I DERATIO:-.' -I / 11111__ II THE G R 'IDL .'IT I:--'G CL.'1SS OF 1927 '* P anallla R ailroad COlllpallY I I

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II T HF. ZON !.-\:\'. THE PANAMA HOSPITAL I I.OC.ATE O I N II -!-ill

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THE ZON I AN. 93 II ANTONIO'S II 30 Central Avenue .. P anama C;ty HEADQUARTER S FOR P ARiS iAN NOVIiLTlliS and II DRESSES II lvll"s. will you l1,:vt'r lea rn to ga ther?" RUlh (e::xasperatcu)."'-\w, gee I can't make wri s t shimmy, Koperski." j \ 1iss II "lJIllfV." Ja:licr.:, gi\'e an example of humanity in its very simples t form." :Janice C. "A I'r es hrnan." / \ lr. V o rlllrup. I think that wa s the wor s t l esso n we ev e r had, alld I did most of t h e r eciting mysel f ... l\lln. Pall erson. -"Jo h n, did YOll spit in th e waste ba s ket?" 7 0hn P. "No, I miss eo it," HEARD I N ENGLIS H CLASS. English l e n c h e r (to Elia s w h o i s writing in aU[Qgraph a l bum ) "\\'hat an;: writing in that book?" Elill.f. -"Norh ing." Eng/isll If'ar;'er. -''\\'ell erase it immediately."

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9 4 THE ZON J AN WHAT'S YOUR SCORE? To get fro m outdo o r s th e thrill T hat outd o ors owes y o u have y o ur Eyes eumined without d e lay. THE SCADRON OPTICAL COMPANY PANAMA COLON 22 Central Avenue I 9.034 Front Street I \WW'"tfiWWliwwml I I NOVEL7Y STO R E FIXED PRICES SUCCESSO RS TO MAURIC IO LlNDO Central Avenue, 89th Street Compaiiia de NAYEGACION NACIONAL -( NATIONAL NAVIGATION CO ) Mail Contractors to the Panama Government Passenger and Freight Service Regular Sailings to Pedregral for Boquete Steamship Service to all Pacific Ports of the Republic of Panama F o r rates and dates o f sailings, write or phone NATIONAL NAVIGATION CO. Mr. Hogan ( to s ta ge hand ) "All right run up th e c urtain." Jo IIl1F Huh D o yo u think I am a m o nk e,,?" T eaclze r (to Freshman in C omme r c ial Arith m e ti c cla ss ) Y o u s h ould s l ee p b e f o r e co min g to cla ss." Freslnnfln.-h S orry 1 ha ve o n e p eriod b e f o r e thi s cla ss." R ussel (in class m ee ting ) \ e are gath e r ed h e r e t o-day ( H e ar d f ro m t he ba c k o f th e ro o m ) An o n e w o u l d think that w e w e r e a bun c h of grap e s Leon G reen e .-"Sa y what d o you t h ink o f m y f a mil y tre e D o ran ? D o r a n. "\\f e ll, the t ree ma y b e a g ood o n e all rig h t, bu tit s e e m s t o m e t h a t th e c r op w as a f a ilur e Miss A4c Maholl. -"Yes N orbert, an I n d ian' s wife i s c alled a s quaw. \Vh o kno w s what the littl e bab)' I n d i a n s a r e called?" l V o rbt>rI." 1 kno w ) t e a c h e r s quawk e r s

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T H E ZON IAN. 95 FRENCH BAZAAR II PANAMA COLON I A Large Assortlllellt of Latest Jl1lportatiollS I I if American, English, and French Clothing Especial6 Suited for Studellts I' !!tMMCM1'Mi\;Y)\;.--1 II i -DUQUE CO., Inc. 101 + IlII 1= H ardware, Lumber and Building Materials A v enida Central A v enida N o rte PANAMA, R. P. P h o nes 59 2 and 596 :: Box 702 Richard J." I want t o d o som e thing big and clean bef o r e I die." Hel ell M. ( making a s u g g e stio n ) -"Why not wa s h an e l ephant? S lalll OIl P e l e rson ( 011 th e t e l e ph o ne ) -"Hello! 18 thi s th e w eath e r bur e au? H o w about that s hower tonight?" /-YealllCr Bllre all. -"I)OI1' t a s k US. I f you n e ed on e tak e it." H e r berl E "Ar e yo u g oing to the Hall o w e e n dance t o-night, Doll y?" D o ll y dllen."Sur e 1'111 g o ing a s a milk mai d." H c rberf.-"But you' r e too s mall to go a s a milk maid," D olI)' -"Well, th e n, s tupid I 'll g o a s a co nd e n se d milk mai d." T eflc h er.-"Now, if I s tand o n Illy h ead the blood all rus h es to m y h ead, do es n't it?" ClaJJ. "Y es, sir." T e acher." V ell, whe n I s tan d on Illy f ee t why d oesn't th e bloo d all ru s h to Illy f ee t ? CltlJJ B ecause your f ee t are n o t empty.'1

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THE ZON JA1\'. I G r r I C i ve nel" tile omjor,s?( HOllie "" II Cia. Panameila de Fuerza y Luz I il PANAMA COLON P a n a m a H a l l A S QU A R E DEAL T O A LL 83 Central Avenue T eacl ler. How man y seco nd s mak e a minute \\"illie?" N / i/li e Ma sc ulin c o r f e minin e?" Teacher." Vhat do you m ea n b y ma sc uline o r f e minine?" Willi e "There"s a big difference. W h e n father says h e'll b e dow n in a minut e, it takes him s ixty seconds; but s ister's minutes contain six hundred second s ... Farm e r Cornlassel. ( ca n t find any o l d clo t h es to put o n the scar ecrow." Wije. -"1"ou might u se som e o f the fancy duds our boy Josh br ought h o m e from school." Farm e r Cornlasse/ (quite disgusted) Im t ryi Ilg to scare crows, not tickle the m to dea th." Joe Durnll "Oh, yes, I have quite a reputati o n as a l ady-killer. Belly G.-"Of cour se I s upp ose you bore t h em to death." Pal Doran H ey, foolish!" Grecne. "Gos h there h e goes ta l king to himself agaIn.

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THE ZON IAN. 97 A GAS STOVE I S AN ORDI:--IARY RANGE II'ITH COLLEGE EDUCATIO:--l I F I T CAN BE DONE II'ITH HEAT YOU CAN D O I T BETTER W ITH GAS" Panama-Colon Gas Company AT YOUR SERVICE of New Orleans, La ., U. S. A. N a tiona! Insurance CO. o f Hartford Conn., U. S. A. WILL INSURE YOUR Life, ProJ:er ty, Aut omobi le H ealt h '7', Pan.m. II HARRY T. BOONE, General Agent -Phone 714-31 C'!ntrai Avenue ENRIQUE de Agent FRANK H. MORRIEE, Cashier MR 5207-IJ-Panama Callai6 8 -li-500 D ea r sir," wrote t h e anxious mother, J am a frai d J ohnny is not trying enough. " Dear l\ladam," replied t h e harassed teacher, "you may rest assured t hat J o hnny is trying e nough. T o b e perf ectly honest, h e is t h e most trying boy i n t h e class." i\1iss /f//w/ey.-"B cll, can you tell me what a h ypocri te is?" Ben Reese.-"Y es, ma'am. I t's a boy that comes to sc hool with a s m ile o n h is face." l Hr. l l1 cCommonJ (in physics class) Here it is Monday. Tomorrow will be Tuesday, and the next day will b e \\'ed nesday. The whole week half gone and noth ing done yet." Leon Gn'cncf. I've just been reading that t h e aviators to-day can do anything a bird can 00. Y es, sir, t hey've got the thing down so fine that t h e r e isn't a bird alive that has anything on them. EJJex. s that so? \\'ell, when you see an aviator fast as leep, hanging on to a branch of a tree with o n e foot, then I ll come around and listen to yo u.

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T H E ZO:-
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THE ZON I AN. 99 lomj>/im ents of D EN T I S T B alboa Canal Z o n e

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100 T H E ZONIAN. The Last Word in an Automobile , Ii T H :",' 9 2 7 THE BEST CAR ON THE MARKET FOR ITS VALUE Panama Automobile and Supply Company PANAMA-COLON CHITRE-AGUADULCE A WEIGHT Y PRORLEM. i\1r. l VorllJrup ( exp laining c h emistry pro blem to c1ass),-" N o w, pupil s, if yo u will kind l y watch the bla ckboard I 'll go throu g h it again. M iss Meillaholl ( c alling o n t h e Greek ) -"Elia s do yo u t hink yo u kn ow e n o ugh about this grammar t o exp lain it to me?" Br illiant Eli05. ] am sorry you can't unde r stan d it, but I'll try to t e ach it to you." LOIIII)' I/, -"Each hour I s p e nd with you i s lik e a pearl to me," \I/u r;r!. -"Oh f o r heaven's sak e, quit stringing Ine," Mr. N orthrup wa s instru c ting the G e n e ral S c i e n ce Class in natural history-"Can anyon e tell m e what an oyste r i s? A pause, and t h e n the hand o f Virginia Whit l oc k s hot into the air. I know! I know! An oys ter," triumphantly a n nounced Virginia, i s a fis h built lik e a nut!" COMPLIMENTS OF I Canal Zone R estaurants CARL STROM Il A[lIlIager -

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THE ZONI .'\N. 1 0 1 II PICTURES! 11_-4... 0 T a ken o f Any thin g A t Any T i m e !i A" d Anywh''" "'" ii II 1= II $ I I I 1 1 1._-'111 We Specialize in QUALITY PORTRAITS 1 -No connection with any ; I other Studio III Ii: I '"9 CENTRAL A VEN UE P ANAMA CITY B

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102 THE ZONI A N. OF "AN S T C LEN & BO G G S l\lembcr s A ssoc iation of B onded Attorneys Nina Mastellari -======================== 1= =1 F or F rench and f talictn Goods II I: II 1 -tJi I I Central A venue a n d 9th Street -Ph o n e 613 :: Panama, R P lvlr. / \ /rC ommolls "This p e riod i s onl), half over, but you 1113), go q u ietly if yo u don't wak e t h e oth e r cla sses Kath e rine Conger. "I)on't rou th i nk my voice s hould b e broug h t out?" A/iss Currier. -",:,\T o pus h ed bac k." Barbara B M i ss \'ette certainly had n o sense o f h Ulllo r w h e n s h e gave yo u a 'C' in civics." Lilll,-' cOllle?" 8m'bara B.-"Sh e pa ssed lip a good joke." Freshman t a Sopll. "Are yo u i n t h e S e nior P lay?" Elias. "\\'ill you go to the dance wit h m e?" nngeln. "No, b u t "II intr od u ce )'ou to a pretty girl w h o will." Elia.r. I don't want a p r etty girl, I want you." 11= -= .loche!, (!Uub

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THE ZON IAN. 1 03 F Ice Cream, Soda Water, Coca C o l a Orange Crush, = or Ginger Ale, C lub Soda, Eskimo Pies and Glas s ware ,"-';7;:7: .: :<-:<-=!00 CALL COLON 84, or PANAMA 6 S I; CENTRAL AVE. & l o th STREE T II PANAMA J GUZMAN F ., M a n age r II OVER 60,0 0 0 ITEMS IN OUR STOCK Particularly in Proprietary Medicines, II Perfumes, Rubber Good s Bru shes Combs, Chamoi s Sponge s Confecti o n s etc II '"000"'" !I Grtlllben),. "\\'hat size s h oe do you wear, F ritz?" FI'l'd f-I. "\\' ell, f our is my s i ze, but I wear seven s because four s hurt feet." T t l1cha -"F'ools ask questions wise m e n can't answer. BischoJf." T hat' s why 1 am repeating m y course with you." FtlJlJly."A lldy, clear, (must confess to you that my l e ft eye is made of g lass." /Ind)'. T hat' s all rig ht. T he diamond in your engagement ring is made of the same stllfl',,' H iss Dolon, T h ere's a button in my sandwich!" !'vIm)' M cDad e ( ahsent-mindedly ) T ypographical error, i\l iss Dolan, it s h ould be mutton." A / iss the quotation marks on your paper?" Helel1." \ V ell, I quoted from the person in front of me."

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THE ZON 1 AN. I AUTO SERVICE COMPANY i Everything for the Motorist BUT THE CAR


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