Zonian

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Title:
Zonian
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Publisher:
St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication:
St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093678:00019


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Ii e, the .Snior Class,
dedicate this annual to Miss
Olga Frost and to Miss Nellie
Hopkins in appreciation of their
~ kind help during our four years
Sat Ba/boa High School.
KtKEHg M MA.,
.t. .0 N 1, xA_ .M , .


___~ __~ _~1















THE


ZONIAN


BALBOA, CANAL ZONE, 1926.


PUBLISHED BY THE BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL


BALBOA HIGa SCHOOL.


CONTENTS.


Foreword. ... .. ..
Dedication.:... .. .
Dedication, ... __ ............ ...... ...........
Zonian Staff. ..
Editorial Note. ...... ........
Faculty ................ ...... .. . ....... .
Senior Class................
Graduates .... . . .
Rogues' Gallery ..... ......... ...
Junior Class........ .... ..... .......
Sophomore Class.............
Freshman Class ................ .......
Last Will and Testament of Seniors. '26......... ....
Class Prophecy......... ........ ... ..AMOS CARR, '26.
Class History. .............. ..HATTIE BELLE RADER, '26 .
Edjacation ................. .HATTIE BELLE RADER. '26 .
Literary:
The Response............... HATTIE BELLE RADER, '26.
Pancho Castillo's Carnival........ .CHARLES PALACIO, '28.
Castaways ............. O.. .. THOMAs NORTHRUP, '26.
The Return ................... AGNES WILLOUGHBY. '27
Twenty Years Later............ .... .....
The Good Old Days .................. ROBERT ESSEX. '27..
A Moral Tale................... ANDREW DONOVAN. '26.
Lily May Hortense Marie's Visit to the English Court,
THERRESSA BETZ .
A Ditty................. MIRIAM L. HALLORAN, '27 .
Viva La Carnaval...... ..... HATTIE BELLE RADER. '26
FLORENCE PETERSON, '26.
AMOS CARR, '26.
THERRESSA BETZ ....
Enchantment.............. HATTIE BELLE RADER. '26..


Fables-
The Red Thief....
Procrastination....


RALPHH HENDRICKSEN, '27
... .. SYDNEY SMITH, '27.


Literary-Continued:
Fables-Continued:
Fable for Pacifists......
A Fable...... .
Minnie Monkey.....
The Camp of Garaison.....
Streets .. .. ......
To Bob or Not to Bob.....
The Wailof the Would-be P
The Glamour of the Tropics
The Glamour of the Tropics
The Bus Temperamental..
The Vilest Inventions ......
Panama................
The Balboa Peek-a-Boo........
Society ... . ..
The Senior Play.. ..... .
The Senior and the Freshman..
"Nothing But the Truth"
"The Monkey's Paw".... ..
"Castles in Spain"........
"Chorus". ..
The Tragedy. ...............
Alum ni... .... ..... .
A Famous Raid.......
Exchanges..... ... .
School Notes.....
The Ideal Girl ........
Boys' Athletics.......
Girls' Athletics .. ... .
The Nursery Romance.........
In Memoriam ................
Jokes......... ........ ..
Advertisements...... ....


... RIC
...FR

.. GI
.AND
SMIRIAM
....JOSE
..... .M I
... ANDI
CONS

HATTIE

.N


S. .. KATHI
.STELLA ISA
... JA


.BYRE
..M.


.MARY


HARD JOHNSON, '27.. 43
ANCES BROWN, '27. 44
ELOISE LORING. '26_ 45
SELA TOEPSER...... 46
REW DONOVAN, '26.. 47
L. HALLORAN. '27. 47
?HINE CAMERA, '27,. 47
LDRED WHEAT. '26., 48
REW DONOVAN. '26.. 48
UELO CAMERA, '26.. 49
ILDRED OLIVER, '26.. 49
BELLE RADER, '26. 49
......... . 5 1
AENIA BAXTER, '26.. 53
. ...... 57
SSYDNEY SMITH... 57
.... .... . 58
. .... 58
. 58
. .... .... .. 5 8
ERINE CONGER. '27.. 58
BEL NEWBOLD, '26.. 59
MES DRISCOLL, '26 60
IRENE BROWN. '26.. 63
...... .. 63
........... . 63
NE HUTCHINGS, '26.. 65
ARY JOE LOWE, '26.. 71
S.BETTY JACK, '27. 71
.... ... .. . 72
SMcCONAGHY, '26.. 75
.. ....... . 79


VOL. XVII










THE ZONIAN.


Zonian 6taff


Assistant Editor..... ...

Business Manager .... ...
Assistant Business Manager.
Circulation Manager.....
Assistant Cirrt,...ir,,i Manager
Literary Editor ... ...
Society Editor .


....... RICHARD JOHN. O:
........... RALPH JEN.EN
....... ... JOSEPH DL RAN

......WILLIAM WEDA LDrT
... ...CHARLES Blr-rERR

..POLLY J IME,
.. ... N E IA BAX IER

Literary ldorso, ......


Exc4bange Edtov

l.tari Editor

Sltaf .Pitn it

Boys' .3thtetic Editor.
Girt/' .ItUeti Editor

Busrne.i. .Idvisor.

Mhss Hopkiss


IRENE BROu
STELL. NEWBOLD

Nl RI MNCCOA.GHY
LEO. GREENE
B\RNE HL rCHIN %

MRV Jo LUOE.
1MR. NkICo1MMOS


ELit.a 'i .L ief


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THE ZONIAN.


',fl!f hfh1E r l Ij ,1 l [:i '-'IIflTTF :',: 7 l '-:: :: > ,- !: : _: -:i:::' -----







I wish to thank everyone who has cooperated Ii
with me to make this issue of THE ZONIAS a
success. I wish especially to thank Miss Hopkins,
Mr. MIC inMn.-, and lI-. Sandford, for their
kind and untiring aid. I wish personally to
S thank the office force for its kind help in type- i
writing manuscripts. Among them are Miriam
Halloran, Frances Brown, Stella \',C.A ...l Hattie
Belle Rader, Helen Forbes, Annie McDade, ,H
Marcella Gaeb, and Alice Halloran.
SFor the help of THE ZONIAN staff I can find no
words to express adequately my thanks.
Bl Ren F









THE ZONIAN.


THOSE. R. KING.
\Wisconsin.
Beloit College, Wisconsin.
Stout Institute, Wisconsin.
University of Wisconsin, Wiscons
Supervisor, Industrial Arts.


ULVA L. LAWS.
Ohio.
A. B., Wesleyan University.
A. M., Modern School of Languag
Middlebury, Vermont.
Spanish.


HELEN C. SANDFORD.
New York.
A. B., Syracuse University.
Graduate Work, Columbia UniveI
English.


VERNA STEEN.
Minnesota.
Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota.
Rasmussen Business College, Minnesota.
Commercial Subjects.



,~lNVrE. M. WHALEY.
Washington.
A. B., University of Washington.
Graduate Work, Columbia University.
English and Commercial Subjects.



MILDRED C. RAUNER.
Mrihii: r,
A. B., University of Michigan.
Graduate Wi.rk, University of Chicago.
Graduate Work, University of Madrid.
History.


HELEN L. CURRIER.
Minnesota.
A. B., University of Minnesota.
Supervisor of Public School
in. I Music.



LESTER S. FLINT.
Massachusetts.
B. S., Tufts College.
es, .athematis.
J. L. MCCOMMoNs.
Nebraska.
A. B., University of Nebraska.
A. M., Columbia University.
Principal.
OLGA J. FROST.
Canal Zone.
sity. A. B., Mount St. Vincent-on-the-Hudson.
Spanish and French.


GARNET V. GROVER.
Kansas.
B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College.
Household Arts.




NELLIE HOPKINS.
South Dakota.
A. B., State UTniversity of South Dakota.
Graduate Work, Columbia University.
English and Latin.




HERBERT E. NORTHRUP.
South Dakota.
A. B., State University of South Dakota.
Science.










THE ZONIAN.


SENIOR CLASS.

President, RICHARD ENGEI.KE

Vice President, BYRNE HL'TCHIXCS
Secretary and Treasurer, HATTIE BE.LLE RADER


Class Colors, Purple and Gold

Class Motto, Noblesse oblige

Class Advisor, Miss FROST


BAXTER, NAENIA
BROWN, IRENE
BUTTERS, CHARLES
CAMERA, CONSUELO
CARR, AMOS
CONLEY, EMILY
DONOVAN, ANDREW
DRISCOLL, JAMES
ENGELKE, RICHARD
GREEN, FRANCES
HACK, Lotuis
HALLORAN, ALICE
HUTCHINGS, BYRNE
JENSEN, RALPH
KNABENSHUE, KARL
LORING, ELOISE
IOWE, MARY Jo
MANLEY, ELIZABETH


MILLER, KATHERINE
McCONAGHV, MARY
MC)ADE, ANNIE
McMIlLLAN, MIAZIE
MURTAGH, FLORENCE
NEWBOLD, STELLA
NORTHROP, THOMAS
OLIVER, MILDRED
PENTZ, EVERE'ET
PETERSON, FLORENCE
RADER, HATTIE BELLE
RLSSEY, JOHN
TROWBRIDGE, CHARLES
WEDWALDT, WILLIAM
WHEAT, MI.DRED
WHITAKER, CHARLOTTE
WILLING, WILDURR


SPECIAL STUDENTS.


ALLEN, WILLIAM
BETZ, THERRESSA
BLANK, ROY
BONNEY, DOROTHY
CALVO, PABLO
COOPER, Mrs. H. C.
FISHER, Mrs. G. W.
IUR, PAUL


GUIZADO, ZONIA
JEWELL, CECIL
KNIGHT, Mrs. C. E.
MEAD, GEORGE
PESCOD, LICY
ROBEsON, Mrs. Z. M.
WOODRIFF, JAMES



























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THE Z( NIA.N.


RICHARD WO)DWORTH ENGEI.LK
Washington, D. C
"\hate'er he did was done with so much ease,
In him ione 'tw.s n.tur.l to please
1923-'24-'; -'; -Cl..ss President.
1923-'24-'.:--ZUI ~ Staff
1923-Musical Ten.
;h.imrock MNinsrels
Program-L-.eend of Sleepy Hollow.
I,24--Swimnlrmn
I :" Jluniur Pla .
-ZoNIAS Prorjm.
1926-Senior Play.
,-,
HATTIE BELLE RADER.
West Virginia.
"Her heart is like a throbbing star."
1923-Glee Club.
Musical Ten.
Program-Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
Luncheon Club
1924-'25-'26-Class Secretary and Treasurer.
1924-Dramatic Club.
Secretary of Supper Club
195--Class Night Program.
192r--Supper Club.

PATRICK BYRNE HUTCHINGS.
Mississippi.
"On prince or bride no diamond stone
Half so gracious ever shone,
As the light of enterprise
Gleaming in a young man', e. e "
1923-'24-'25-'26-Baseball.
1923- 24-'25-'26-Swimming.
S1924-'-2 '-'26-Class Vice President.
1925-Junior Protr.ni
ZomIAN Program.
i',:'.-Soicor Foot ball.
SBisket ball.
ZOSIAl Staff. Senior Play.


O'T MARY Jo LOWE
Canal Zone.
"" "So sweet was her companionhip,
S. She could not be alone."
1922-North Side Junior High School, Te ,as
I 1923-'24-'25-Basket ball.
1924-'25-'26-Swimming.
S 1'4--Tennis.
Indoor Baseball.
S i,: -Zo'i'. Program.
Junior Progrim
i 926--Zo'. Staff.









THE ZONIAN. 9


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NAENIA PERRY BAXTER.

Canal Zone.

"She moves a goddess, and she looks a queen."

1923-'24-Glee Club.
1923-Musical Ten.
Program-Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
1925-Junior Program.
1926-ZONIAN Staff.
Senior Play.



CHARLES BUTTERS.

Canal Zone.

"He was six feet o' man, A-1,
Clear grit an' human nature .

1923-Program-Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
1924-'25-'26-Tennis.
1924-'25-'26-Golf.
1926-Baseball.
Basket ball.



IRENE ESTIILE BROWN.
Canal Zone.


"She doeth little kindnesses which most
despise."


1923-Luncheon Club.
Basket ball.
Program-Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
1924-'25-Supper Club.
1925-Junior Program.
1926-President of Supper Club.
ZONIAS Staff.





AMOS JAY CARR.

Maine.

"Deeper than e'er plummet sounded."

1923-'24-'25-Winthrop High School, Massachusetts.
1926-Soccor Foot ball.


leave undone or


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THE Z )NTAN.




EMILY KEITH CONLEY.

South Carolin I,

"Oh, thou art fairer than the evening air
Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars."

1923-Glee Club.
Class Secretary and Treasurer.
1924-Commercial High School, Atlanta, Ga.
1925-Follies.





ANDREW EDMUND DONOVAN.

Kansas.

"The love of learning, the sequestered nooks,
And all the sweet serenity of books."

1923-Brookline High School, Massachusetts.
1925-ZONIAN Staff.
S 1926-ZONIAN Staff.





CONSUELO CAMERA.

British Guiana.

"A violet by a mossy stone
Half-hidden from the e': "


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1923-'24-Glee Club.
1923-Program-Legend of lIecp! Hollow.
1925-Junior Program.



JAMES DRIscOLL..
New York.
"His nature brooked no lonely lair
But basked and bourgeone.j in copartners,
Companionship and optn- icr oin ed glee."
1923-'24-'25-'26-Tennis.
1924-'25-'26-Basket b.all
1925-Junior PI.;..
1925-ZoNIAN Program.
1926-Soccer Foot b.ll.
Track.
Swimming.
Senior Play.









THE ZONIAN.


FRANCES GREENE.
Virginia.
"To you, whose temperate pulses flow
With measured beat, serene and slow."

1923-'24-Glee Club.
1923 -Luncheon Club.
Program-Legend of -l. I Hollow.
1924-'25-'26-Supper Club.
1924-Dramatic Club.
1925-Junior Program.
ZoNlAN Staff.
1926-Senior Play.


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Lu.rs HA(K.

New Jersey.

"Young fellows will be young fellows."

1923 '24--'25-Camden High Sc'l ol, Caml.en, N. J.






ALICE ELIZABETH HALLORAN.

Massachusett;.

"['o her whose quiet life has been
The mirror of as calm a heart."

1923-Lunchean Club.
1924-'26-Supper Club.
i92--Junior Program.


RALIPH CHRISIIAN JENSEN.
Maryland.
"The gentle mind by gentle deeds is known;
For a man by nothing is so well betrayed
As by his manners."
1922-'23-Sparrows Point High School, Maryland.
1925-Declamatory Contest.
ZONIAN Program.
Junior Play.
Tennis.
1926-Manager of Tennis Team.
Baseball.
Soccer Foot ball.
ZONIAN STArI.
SENIOR PLAY.











THE ZONIAN.


MARY ELOISE LORING.

Maine.

"Infinite riches in a lIttle room."

1923-Yourmouth High School, Maine.
1924-Dramatic Club.
1925-'26-Supper Club.
1925-Junior Program.






THOMAS EDISON NORTHROP.

Panama.

"One who never turned his back, but marched breast forward."

1924-'25-Junior Program.








ELIZABETH FRANKLIN MANLEY.

Virginia.

"Maiden with the meek brown eyes
In whose orb a shadow lies
Like the dusk in evening skies."

1923-'24-'2~5-Clifton Forge High School, Virginia.







KATHERINE ELIZABETH MILLER.

Canal Zone.

"Thou whose locks outshine the sun-golden tresses!"

1923-'24-'25-'26-Glee Club.
1923-Program-Legend of kleep. Hollow.
1925-Junior Program.









THE ZONIAN.


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MARY AGNES MCCONAGHY.
Pennsylvania.
"Variety's the very spice of life!"
1923-'24-'25 -'26-Basket ball.
1923-Track Meet.
Swimming.
Glee Club.
Spanish Play.
1924-Supper Club.
1925-Indoor Baseball.
Junior Play.
1925-'26-Bowling.
1926-ZoNIAN Staff.
Senior Play.


JOHN JOSEPH RUSSEY.

Florida.

"The happiest heart that ever beat
Was in some quiet breast,
That found the common daylight sweet
And left to heaven the rest."

1923-'24-'25-Tech High School, Georgia.






ANNIE FRANCES McDADE.

New Jersey.

"Rare compound of oddity, frolic, and fun,
To laugh at a joke and rejoice at a pun!"

I 24-'25-'26-Supper Club.






CHARLES LoUis TROWBRIDGE.

Cuba.

S1'. life is like a stroll along the beach."

1923-Cristobal High School.
1925-'26-Basket ball.
1926-Baseball.










14 THE ZONIAN.


FLORENCE WINIFRED MURTAGH.
New York.
"She is gay and gladsome,
SHas a laughing face."
:19 23-'24-': '-',-B. .sker ball.
I923--Luncheon Club.
STrack Meet.
.: Glee Club.
Swimming.
Program-Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
1924-'25-'2:.- -'2 upEr Club.
S "' ". ": 1924-'25-'26-Bowling.
1925-Indoor Baseball.
Junior Program.

WILLIAM ALBERT WEDWALDT.
New York.
"There's something in a noble boy,
A brave, free-he-rted, careless one,
With his unchecked, unbidden joy,
His dread of books, his love of fun."
1923-Curtis High c Ih,,,l, New York.
1924-'25-'26--Baseball.
1924-'25-Basket ball.
1925-'26-Swimming.
I* 1925-Junior Program.
ZoNIAN Program.
S1926--ZONIAN Staff.
Senior Play.
Soccer Foot ball.


STELLA ISABEL NEWBOLD.
Panama.
"The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good."
1923-'24-Glee Club.
1923-Musical Ten.
Spanish Play.
Program-Legend of Slkep'. Hollow.
1925--Junior Program.
1926-ZoNIAN STAFF.




MILDRED OLIVER.

Ohio.

"Bliss it is to be alive,
But to be young is very he.:ven."

1923-Cristobal High School.
1924-' 25-'26-Supper Club.
1924-'25-'26-Orchestra.
1 924-Glee Club.
: ." 1925-Junior Program.
4....."-







THE ZONIAN.


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CHARLOTTE LDIA WHITAKER.
Canal Zone.
"Happy iam I, from care I'm free!
Why aren't they all contented like me?"
I92;-Program-ILegend of Sleepy Hollow.
Glee Club.





VILD RR WILLING.
M ississippi.
"Of all those arts in which the wise excel,
Nature's chief masterpiece is writing well."
1923-'24-'2z-Brookline High Scho)l, Massachusetts.




FLORENCE MARIF. PETERSON.
Minnesota.
"But were it to mY fancy given
To rate her charms, I'd call them heaven."
923--Luncheon Club.
Glee Club.
Program-Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
1924-''2'26--Supper Club.
1925-Junior Program.




EVERETT WARD PENTZ.
Kentucky.
"True as a did to the sun,
Although it be no: shine.i upon."
r923-El Paso High School, Texas.
1924-Nicholasville High School, Kentucky.









16 THE ZONIAN.


KARL KNABENSHUE. MILDRED KELLER WHEAT.
New York.
Texas.
"Is wit e'er dull when there's humor in it?"
425,26 "All that's best of dark and bright
1924- '2 5-'26 -Baseball.
1924-'25-'26-Basket ball. Meet in her aspect and her eyes."
1925-Track.
I926-Tennis. 1923-'24-'25-Long Beach High School, California.




Florence Mlur T agh
C O nsuelo Camara
Em I ly Conley
James Driscol L

Louis H A ck
Nae N ia Baxter
Stella Newbol D

Everett P entz
Franc E s Greene
Thomas No R throp
Florence Peter S on
William W E dwaldt
Andrew Dono V an
Elizabeth Manl E y
Charles T R owbridge
Ch A rlotte Whitaker
Joh N Russey
Mary Mc C onaghy
Anni E McDade

Wildurr Willing
Mildred 01 I ver
Katherine Mil L er
Eloise L oring

Richard En G elke
Iren E Brown
Charles Bu T ters

Mar Y Jo Lowe
Am 0 s Carr
Byrne H U things

Hat T ie Belle Rader
Alice H alloran
Ralph J E nsen
Mild R ed Wheat
Karl Knab E nshue
















Name.


Naenia Baxter...
Irene Brown.

Charles Butters
Consuelo Camar.a..
Emily Conle .
Amos Carr
James I)iscoll
Andrew Donovan .

Richard Engelke
Frances Greene
Louis Hack...
Alice Halloran

Byrne Hutchings
Ralph Jensen
Mary Joe Lowe
Eloise Loring
Florence Murtagh..

Elizabeth Manlex
Katherine Miller.
Mary McConaghy
Annie McDalde
Stella Newlbold
T'homas Northrop.
Mildred Oliver.
Everett Pentr
Florence Peterson
Hattie Belle Rader
John Russey.
Charles Trowbridge
William \Wedwaldt

Charlotte Whitaker
W ildurr iii;.,.


Alias. Description.

Mike... Her stylish clothes
Rene Her seriousness


Red
Manna.
Inkie ,
Car
Jimmie.
Andy..


His red hair .
Her quietness
Her beauty
His curls.
His height.
His wisdom.


Dick His big le..rt
Fran Her athletic appe irance
Louice His walk . .
Al Her domestic ways.


Hutch.
Ha ns
Jo Jo.
Chick
Flo

Betty
Kay.
Partt
Ann.
Sin
Chester.
R ie .
Slim
Sal
Wawa
Red ..
Charlie.
Bill


His smile .
His drawl
Her figure
Five feet two.
Her walk

Her hashfulnes ,
Her complexion
Her red hair
Her personality.
Her willingness
His manly carriage.
Her specks
His voice
Her complexion
Her giggles
His hair
His height
His tertsng


Charley.. Her "Hello"
Willie Tackx .


Identification.

That's the berries.
Ya think so

Great guns .
Good night
Good night
Gee whiz!.
My word
1 don't think so

\here's Naeni i?
?.."..ni.. cars
\\ ,,,r ,e ta do it! .
I don't know..

I ca.int
Hey, guy
Yes, me too
Oh, dear
Oh, Heck

Nay, nay, Pauline
But, Mr. Flint-
Oh, Judas ...
Iz zat so.,
O, for crying out loud
Yes, hut don't you think
M y conscience
Huh
How could you
But, Miss Frost-
It wasn't, either.
Aw, Miss Steen.
No, no, th.it's no goo 1.

Heavens bless us
Hit me with a fender.


Hang Out.

Her Ford
With Anna

Toonerville
With Fnmma ....
'Twould be telling
Home studying
Any tennis court. .
Library. .

Or Centr.d Avenue
At Senior Play Priatici.
With I.imey
Mr. McCoimo:ms' office.

I known
\Wi h Elva
Not home, it's sure
With Annie
With bi' Flo .

Rae .
Home .
With Florence.
In anybo.ly's car
Typing room ,
Movie booth.
With Betty
B. H. S
At home
At home
Corozal:
Clulbhouse
Swimmin- 'l;>)

With ( ?)
With Mir:-


Crime.


Typing .
Reading

\ ,, ,'. long poems .
Being quiet.
Getting out of work ....
Getting o10 in chemistry
Playing tennis.. .
Reading .

Having class meetings
Studying .. .
K... i his hair slick
I '1 ... to Mr. Northrop.

Talking to ?
T ,' ;,,_ to Elv.t
Swimminng
Being too quiet. .
Dancing

Pestering Patrick
Breaking test tubes
DI) incg Charleston
Giggling
Walking to school
givingg speeches
PI tying the uke.
Not being a gool mixer
Blushing
Studying
No one knows .
Living in To,nerville.
Arguing

1I..... the pi o .1 ...
Dan.l in' .


Sentence.


'o be an opera singer.
To prove that all blondes are
not light headed.
To be a poet.
To go to Europe.
T''o go to Florida.
To make radios.
To beat Tilden.
T''o be editor of the North Pole
Ga tielle.
To go to South America.
'To lee the world.
To be a doctor.
To go to Boston Cooking
School.
To gi tio Georgia Te-:h.
Io lie a s ucess.
To lie a diving champ.
'To be an old maid.
To be a professional basketball
plaYer.
T1o he a stenographer,
To lie a lawyer.
T1o le a jazz, lali.
Io grow tall.
To lie a s:'hool te icher.
To he a ship builder.
TI'o bIe a traine I nurse.
To go to college.
To be ia business won ma:l,
To be an English professor.
To travel.
'To he ia Iusineiis mnl n.
T'o )be the only mechanical
eClinieer.
II o he a music te.tcher.
To he ftmiriti.


ROGUES' GALLERY.





























































Junior Class










THE ZONIAN.















JUNIOR CLASS .


LEON GREENE


V'ice lPrede.;

Se'ret'ar ...


TreasnrYr.


.... FORREST CIEESESMAN

... WILLIAM VAN SICLEN

... .. . E lA ANANTACIADO



Cl.rus ,isot, Mis RAUSER,


.,NLL, ,MARIAN
'.HLFONT, HAGAR
ANASTACIADO, ELIAs
ARRILTAI, CARLOTTA
BACHIs, BE'TTY
BANANA, LESLIE
BETZ, BERI
BLANEY, ROBERT
BRILAND, MARGARrE
BROWN, FRANCES
CAMERA, JOSEPHINE
CHEESEMAN, FORREST
CO\GE:, KATHERINEI
COOPER, HAL
CRosS, FRANK
DAILEY, EARl.
DANIELS, MARION
DORAN, JAMES
DURAN, JOSEI'H
EssEX, ROBERT
FRASER, RUTH
FRENCH, ARCHI:
GAEB, MA:RCELLA
GRANBERRY, E.LI ABETH
GREENE, IEON
GRIMISO\, JANICE
FERMANDEZ, CAI MEN
I ALLORAN, MIRIAMX


HARRISON, BEVERI.Y
HELMERICHS, FREI)
HODGES, IRIS
JA' K, BETrV
JAMES, POILLV
JOHNSON, AGNES
JOHNSON, RUTH
JOHNSON, RICHARD
JONES, RISSEL
KI.EMMER, ANGELA
KNABENSHUE, KARL
LEAR, DORA
LULL, FLOIS'S
MAITOES, WILL.AM
MENGES, WILLIAM
ORR, JuANIIA
ROBINSON, ROBERT
SUNDBERG, DOROTHY
SUNDQUIST, KATHERINZ
S'HVIDT, HERBERT
SMII H, HAer V
Sn5111, SYDNEY
TOMB, ELEANOR
TOMB, KATHERINE
VAN SICLEN, IATILDA
VAN SICLEN, IILLIAM
\WATTS, DORA
WILLOGHBY, AGNES































































opllhomore Cllass,











THE ZONIAN.







SOPHOMORE CLASS.

President, HARRY (;RANBERRV

lice Presialidet, V\'ir(ax.lA E\lvI\

Secretary, ELVA SMITH

TreId l/tir, RICHARD GRIMISON


(Class dvisor, Miss \VHALEY


AHLFONT', VERA
ALLEN, EVERETT
BARDELSON, MARGARETr
BLEAKLEY, GLADYS
BRADNEY, ANNA
BROWN, JOHN
BUTLER, PHARE.
CARR, ETHEL.
CLINBEE, THAITHEK
COLE, CATHERINE
CO'RVILLE, LYDIA
DORAN, MARGARET
)E CASTRO, JACK
)E LA PENA, SARAH
EvANS, JAX.
VERSION, JOHN
EwING, VIRGINIA
FARLEV, W\lL.L IAM
FISHER, FTHEL
FLINT, SOPHIA
FORBES, HELEN
GARRE'I, MILDRED
(ELABERT, MARCO.
GOLDEN, LAIRENCE
CRANBERRY, HARRY
(RIMISON, RICHARD
HALLEN, RBARBARA
HARRISON, GERTRL DE
HEAR, LUCILI.E
HODGES, BEVERI.EY
JACKSON, ADA
JACKSON, CHARGE.
JENSEN, CHARLOTTE
JONES, NORBERT
KERR, iLOUISE
KEY, RACHEL
KLUMIP', DOROITHY
KOCHER, MILDRED
MlAIERS, GERALD
MANN, ALMA
MANN, TIMOTHY


MlARIN, BERLI.E
IARS.IRAN), ROBLRI
MCCoNAGHY, M~(;ARARE
MCl)ADE, MARY
M l GAN, GAYLE
McKEON, EMM'.
MECKfEL, 'TERE>A
EREDIITH, X\ILLARD
MIDDLuETON, MAY
MILLER, CARLO!
MI, GAN, F.E EN
O'BRIEN, IDA
OHL2SON, JOHN
OLDFIELD, ADEL.AIDE
PALACIO, CHARLES
PALACIO, RO E
PARADEs, RAI DE
PIERCE, FRANKLIN
POWEIL, JOHN
PRICE, PEG(;Y
PRICE, STELLA
Ql INlERO, JI !.O
REESE, BEN
RODGERS, CHARLER
SAPHIR, ANNA
SHERMAN, JOSEPHINE
SLACK, HELEN
SMI1H, EILVA
S Il 1'H, ILOkEl
SIROBI.E, FREI
TAYLOR, EDGAR
'OILEDANO, SOIL\
V'ENGOECHEA, JOSN
\ESNTMAN, ETHEL
WIHALER, EI.SBET.I
W\HIIT, MAI GAkEl
\WOMACK, RUTH
YoUNG, FRANK
ZEITE, ELI.A
ZIDBECK, FLORENCE



























































Fronhmnili Class.










THE ZONIAN.




FRESHMAN CLASS.


Boys' Club.


Girl's Club.


President, WIILLI AM READER President, MAJORIE QUINN


Vice President, EARL ORR

Secretary, JAMES QIINN

Treasurer, OTTo HELMERICH.S

Advisor, Mr. FLINT




ADAM, WILLIAM
BANAN, JESSIE
BICKFORD, NATHAN
BOOZE, TOM
BOwlIN, ANDREW
BROWN, CARRIE
BROWN, MINNIE
BRULAND, JEANETTE
BRYAN, PAUL
BiTILER, FRANCI
BYRNE, JOE
CAIN, CATHERINE
DE GRUMMUND, LYLE
DE LA PENA, EVA
DEMUTH, ZONABEL
ERLENKOETTER, ROBERT
FIDANQUE, VAL
FISHER, ETHEL
FRANSEN, WYILHELMINA
FRENCH, ZONA
GILHLS, DOROTHY
HAYS, VANCE
HELMERICHS, OTTO
HOZAFFEL, RiUTH
HUDSON, ANITA
HUTCHINGS, AMELIA
HUTCHINSON, RI TH
JACQTES, DONAI.D
JETT, JOHN
JOHANNES, ELEANOR
JONES, EDWIN
KI.UMP, CHARLES
KYLEBER, ELIZABETH
LARSEN, HENRY
LAWIOR, \WILLIAM
LOWE, GEORGE
LUTHER, MARTHA
LUTHER, MARY
MACK, AGNES
McDONALD, ALICE
McGUIGAN, KATHLEEN'
McGUIGAN, ROSE
MCINTIRE, VIOLA


I'ce President, SHIRLEY
PERSONS

Secrtary, AMELI A HUTCHINGS

Treasurer, ANITA RANKIN

.Id!isor, Miss LAWS



MENGES, BERIT
MILLER, FRANK
MILLER, MARGARET
NELSON, NORMA
NuPP, VERNA
OLIVA, F.INICE
ORR, EARL
PERCY, WILLARD
PERSONS, SHIRLEY
PHILLIPs, MILDRED
POOLE, BERNELL
POOLE, THERESA
PYLE, RUTH
QUINN, JAMES
QUINN, MARJORIE
READER, WIILLIAM
RANKIN, ALVIN
RANKIN, ANITA
REED, ERNEST
REEDER, LOUISE
RIDGE, ISABEL
ROWE, GILBERT
RESSEV, ERNEST
SEAL, MARION
SHUMATE, HALLIE
SLACK, ETHEL
SLACK, FRANK
SI.AVIN, RICHARD
SLEEPER, SABINA
SMITH, FLORES
SPRilGUiE, LOUISE
THOMPSON, PAUL
W'ALSTON, Ru'BIO
WALKER CARY
XWARWICK, NOVA
WESTENDORFF, EDNA MAE
\HITI.OCK, VIRGINIA
WHITE, STUEDMOND
WIILLIAMS, ROGER
WIL LOUGHBY, WII.LIAM
WILLOUGHBY, JOHN
WILSON, ELOISE
WOOD, WILLIAM









THE ZONIAN.


- L


LAST WILL AND TEST'IAMNT OF SENIORS.


WE, THE SENIOR CLASS of Balboa High
School, in the year of Our Lord, one thousand
nine hundred and twenty-six, being of sound body,
and sane in mind and reason, and being about to
pass from the life of students to the life of over-
coming the dim uncertainties of the future, do
make and ordain this, our last will and testament,
thereby setting aside and ldeclrin., null and void
any other wills. The Sophomores, whom, as their
name implies, we believe to have a little more
sense than the Freshmen, we appoint executors
of this will.
To the faculty we leave our sincere thanks for
all they have done for us and kind remembrance
of the hours spent with them.
To the Juniors we leave the honor of achieving
the dignity of Seniors, warning them not to lower
said dignity by allowing themselves to be (au,_ht
talking without permission.
To the Freshmen, herded in rooms on the lower
floor, we leave the privilege of permanent seats
in the assembly hall. We also wish to advise
them that if they would obtain diplomn:s, they
must work hard and unceasingly for said docu-
ments.
Being blessed with many individual gifts which
are sadly lacking in some of the lower classmen,
we bequeath them as follows:
Stella Newbold, being of an exceedingly gener-
ous nature, leaves a foot of her stately stature to
be divided equally between her two beneficiaries;
namely, Ada Jackson and Dolly Allen.
Naenia Baxter leaves to Charlotte Jensen the
privilege of jumping up from her seat in Miss
Whalt \ 's class to watch the fire engine go by.
F.'lorciiLc Peterson leaves to the successor of her
seat in the assembly the privilege of fussing with
another Senior over the question of whether said
successor should close the door near her seat when-
ever she wills.
Richard Fnuclke leaves to Leon Greene his
position as president of the Senior Class and his
ability to make the Seniors work.
Amos Carr leaves his beautiful curls to Joe
Duran knrfliniL the latter's immediate need of
them.


Andrew Donovan leaves to Les:e Banan his
ability to argue without getting flustered.
Irene Brown leaves her ability to keep out ot
mischief to Janice Grimison.
John Russey leaves his beautiful blush to all
Freshmen, knowing that its red will harmonize
well with their green.
Charles Butters leaves his poetical tiuih to'
Archie French.
Alice Halloran leaves her slenderness and her
dignity to Bobby Whaler, having noticed Boblby '
lack of both these attributes.
Florence Muurtagh leaves her ability. rn play
basket ball to Anna Saphire, and also her newly
published book on "How to Become Captain of a
Basket Ball Team."
Byrne Hutchings leaves his energy tr athletics
to Paul Bryan.
Seeing that it would be an aid to her maidenly
beauty, Katherine Miller leaves her vanity case to
Jane Evans.
Frances Greene, after due consideration, be-
queathes to 'Mary Knabenshue her stateliness and
di nity as becomes a Senior.
James Driscoll leaves to Miss Rauner his excess
historical knowledge and a mangifying glass by
which she may be able to find this knowledge.
Charlotte Whitaker leaves t, Ruth Pyle her
ability of aLquiring credits lwthout overtaxing
her memory.
Thomas Northrop leaves hi. (-reek profile to
Louise Sprague.
Mary McConaghy, having, bh close acquaint-
ancc.rhip noticed Margaret hlcConagh's quiet
nature, leaves her jazzy ways and impulsive
manner to Margaret, advising her beneficiary tr
make good use of this bequest.
Elizabeth Mlanley leaves her curly hair to
Katherine Conger.
Louis Hack leaves to Mr. Northrop his "shiek
trousers" and requests that Mr. Northrop take
special care of them, as Louis parted with them
only when he saw the lack of such a stylish require-
ment to said beneficiary's wardrobe.
Emily Conley leaves to Agnes Johnson her
ability to giggle at anything.


~


i


19-~---------


a








THE ZONIAN.


Eloise LT.i-ri,- leaves her ability to help, and her
responsive nature to the entire Junior Class.
Annie McDade leaves her jolly nature to the
McGuiggan sisters, advising them not to take
life so seriously.
To Fritz Helmerichs, knowing well that he needs
them, Ralph Jensen leaves his one and only pair of
orange-colored Paris garters.
Hattie Belle Rader leaves to Elias Anastaciado
her habit of accepting without question all state-
ments made by Miss Whaley or any other teacher.


Consuelo Camara leaves her long hair to Viola
Jordan, a;id i.ini Viola to take special care of said
bequest and resist the temptation of the barber's
shears.
To the Freshmen, Wildurr Willing leaves his
surname, advising them to use it as their motto.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF we have hereunto
set our hand and seal.


THE SENIOR CLASS.


[SEAL.]


A scene around entrance of Hotel Tivoli, Ancon, Canal Zone.









THE ZONIAN.


CLASS PROPHECY.
Amos Carr, '26.
____________- ____ ,


"Then this machine can really predict the
future?" I asked Professor Pietro.
"Why, yes. Don't you believe it?" he replied.
"Well," I said skeptically, "it seems hardly
possible, but I'm willing to see the thing work-
if it will."
"Very well, you shall see!" he answered, a little
angry that I should doubt his wonderful invention.
He threw in some switches, and began turning
various dials on a panel at one side of the room.
"You shall learn from that screen," hesaidpoint-
ing, "the fate of each one of your classmates.
However, the machine is not perfected as yet,
and even though many of the girls may be married,
it will not disclose the fact. The scene that will ap-
pear on the screen will occur about in the year 1940.
If you have any questions to ask, repeat them
softly to yourself, and they will be answered
through this headset."
With this he turned the indicator to the section
marked New York. There was a hum of machin-
ery, a flickering of lights; and on the screen
appeared a picture.
Buildings soar to the dizzy height of ioo stories,
the air is full of small aeroplanes, and the streets
are crowded with huge trucks, some of which bear
the inscription: RUSSEY & Co., Aerial Freight-
New York-Central America-Europe.
At a busy street-corner, directing traffic, is
JAMES DRISCOLL, "the fighting cop," who is
expected to win the middleweight championship
the coming fall.
Masses of people are going in and out of the
stores, riding to their various destinations on the
elevated moving sidewalks, which were recently
installed by NORTHROP & Co., Contractors.
Through my headset I was informed that their next
contract is to build new aeroplane landings on
several of the larger skyscrapers.
Here the scene fades for a moment; then Fifth
Avenue comes into view.
M.iany women may be seen entering and leaving
the famous establishment of MADAME BAXTER,
where the ,t \ l1c of the world are set.


In a show window, farther down the Avenue,
is displayed the latest model sport plane manu-
factured by the WEDWALDT FLYING FLIVVER COM-
PANY. The plane was designed by EVERETT PEN T Z,
the American flyer who won the Bulitzer cup the
year before.
With a change of the dial, the scene shifts to a
beach in California.
On the sands, a moving picture, "The Trouble,
of a Bachelor," is being filmed. BYRNE HUTCHING .,
the troubled bachelor, has just made a thrilling
rescue, and is heroically emerging from the
breakers, carr% ing EMILY CONLEY. Nearby stand
FLORENCE PETERSON, also an acitrues. who ha-
just completed her latest picture, "The War with
Mars."
Beside the cameraman, who is RALPH JEN IEN,
formerly of Pathe News, RICHARD ENGELKE, the
director, is frantically motioning to Byrne, "h,.
apparently doesn't see him.
An interested spectator is CONSUELO CAMARA,
a well-known opera soprano, who is on her vaca-
tion.
The picture fades and disappears, revealing
another, of the New England estate of ANDRE:
DONOVAN, whose latest book, The End of '.-/,cre,
has been joyously received by the public. Andrew
is entertaining Dr. KARL KNABENSHUE and
WILDURR WILLING. The former is a surgeon of
some prominence and is at present, with himself
as the subject, studying the effects of sleep on the
individual. WILDURR \\'i.LLG has earned fame
through his correspondence courses in voice
culture.
Next a caravan is shown crossing a desert in
Egypt. The expedition is under the direction of
MARY MCCONAGHY, who is searching for King
Tut's brother-in-law, as an addition to the col-
lection in FRANCES GREENE'S private museum,
which is one of the largest of its kind in the States.
The next scene is of Bella Vista beach, which has
become a popular winter resort since CHARLES
BUTTERS, an enterprising real estate agent, erected
a large amusement park and zoo nearby.









THE ZONIAN.


On the piazza of the Leaview, one of the larger
hotels of the resort, are sitting MILDRED OLIVER
and KATHERINE %liIi. tF.. Mildred is on the staff
of the Dictorial Preview and Katherine is one of the
foremost woman lawyers in the United States.
They are di,,u-,ini the latest scandal from the
Searchlight, a society paper edited by STELLA
NEWBOLD.
On a flt it- field a short distance away, a report-
er for the Blah and Herald is interviewing HELEN
FRENCH, the world's most daring aviatrix.
As this picture fades, one of Congress comes into
view.
CHARLOTTE WHITAKER has the floor and is dis-
coursing vigorously on the constitutionality of an
appropriation donated to MILDRED WHEAT, a
prominent clubwoman, for the perpetuation of the
"Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Pedes-
trians."
ANNIE MCDADE, in another part of the House,
is preparing notes for her speech on the Tacna-
Arica plebescite, which has not vet been settled.
Now, shown on the screen, is the interior of the
private coach of CHARLES TROWBRIDGE, president
of the Canal Zone-Galveston Railroad.
Charles is entertaining Lotns HAcK, a professor
of entymology from Quinceton University, who is
visiting the tropics in search of a new species of
the humbug.
On the platform of an observation car, admiring
the tropical scenery, are ELIZABETH MANLEY,
dean of Garsar College, and \1I1 i M.MI i., .
who is touring the States and Central America,
lecturing on "The Evils of Gum Chewing."


With a slight change of the indicator, a picture
of the new Balboa Clubhouse appears.
In the swimming pool, MARY JOE LOWE,
Olympic champion, and instructor of swimming
and diving for the "Pink, Green, and Yellow
Troupe," is busily engaged with a group of
youngsters.
In another part of the building, FLORENCE
ML'RTAcH, scenic artist, is preparing the stage for
"Samlet," the well-known play by ALICE HAL-
LORAN, to be produced by the Balboa Stock
Company.
After a short wait, the spacious waiting room
of the Balboa radio station is shown. ELOISE
LORING, the hostess, is conducting IRENE BROWN,
a violinist from the Boston Soundsphony Orches-
tra, to the broadcasting studio, where an announc-
er for the station is listening interestedly to a
bedtime story being broadcast by HATTIE BELLE
RADER.
As the machine ceased working, the ringing of
an enormous 2l..n broke the oppressing stillness,
and resounded through the room.
Professor Pietro, his face ashen, worked at his
controls-but in vain; the forboding crackle of a
lightninglike electrical discharge-then a deafen-
ing explosion. Parts of the machine flew in all
directions; something struck me on the head,
and directly afterward I heard a voice-
"It's 7.30. If you're :..in' to school to-day,
you had better hurry."
I sat up and sleepily looked around.
The alarm clock had just stopped ringing, and
a book, which had fallen from a shelf above, was
lying on my pillow.


View of Balboa Prado with Administration Building in the distance.








THE ZONIAN.


CLASS HISTORY.
Hattie Belle Rader, '26.


History is a mirror. In its clear depths are
reflected the happenings of the past, n3 matter
what their character or what their tone. Was there
ever a mirror of jollier scenes than that of a class
history? Youth and its joys, its troubles, and its
aspirations-all run rampant in it. Sometimes
there are no big things which stand out in the
memory like sentinel posts on the horizon of time;
but there is always that golden, appealing atmos-
phere of happiness that endures forever in the
hearts of those who made that history.
Leave your tasks and settle down with me for a
while and I will show you a mirror I have had for
four years, a very small and shining one into which
eyes, filled with longing reminiscence, will gaze
when the youth of to-day is the age of to-morrow.
"Scrubs" here, "Scrubs" there, "Scrubs" every-
where! Female scrubs, short-skirted, short-socked,
evidently short-sighted! Male scrubs, sheared and
shorn, embarrassed, red-eared, herded into the
room by cruel and prodding upper classmen! The
assembly at last qliicrrt 1, the classes in order, the
teachers in supervision-that is the first day of
school.
Here are the scrubs at their first class meeting.
Chatter, chatter, chatter, nothing but chatter!
They must be called to order every few minutes.
At last after seemingly ages of confusion they
elect their officers: Richard Engelke, President;
Burnett Meecham, Vice President; Emily Con-
ley, Secretary and Treasurer. They decide upon
dues, and every meeting after that their Secretary
has to plead in all the eloquence at her command
to make them meet their obligations. They listen
to her ani immediately forget. The days pass and
high school becomes a habit. The teachers begin
to pound, pound, pound. In February the scrubs
who pull through the examinations, are automati-
cally converted into Freshmen. They no longer
stare at the upper classmen; the upper classmen
no longer stare back-there is peace.
The Freshmen, assuming new dignity in spite
of the amused contempt of their elders in the high
school, decide to enter theatrical life. The Fresh-
man English Classes dramatize "The Legend of
Sleepy Hollow," by Irving, and present the


*1
I1


intriguing little tale before the assembly. The
whole thing is a success. The Freshmen are
transported into the seventh heaven of conceit
Taking couraLg they plan a tacky party and
invite the whole school. Every class attends.
Senior plays side by side withFrcshman; prejudice
is forgotten. The Freshmen congratulate them-
selves on their entcrtaiinLn, ability. The spell
of egotistical delirium is broken only when the
harassing time of examinations again arrives. At
the end of the year those who emerge triumphant,
drop off the title of Freshmen and become Sopho-
mores. So endeth the first year.
The second year now opens in our mirror of
history. The Freshmen,round-et ed and childish,
have grown into gangling Sophomores. The first
day no longer holds terror for them, for there is
another herd of scrubs to prod. The Sophomores
prod them hardest of all, and when their victims
stare at them, they stare back. At their class
meeting they still persist in the usual program of
chatter althouvzh they display the new importance
one year of high school has given them. The
election of officers takes place. Richard Engelke
is reelected for President; Byrne Hutchings be-
comes Vice President, and Hattie Bell Rader,
Secretary and Treasurer.
The Sophomores now settle down to hard work,
saving all their money and relinquishing every
form of pleasure to prepare themselves for the
enormous expenses sure to meet them in their
Junior year. They have taken one more step of
the long and difficult journey to Seniorland.
The third year in our mirror of history now
opens. We see the Juniors at their class meeting.
They are a little more attentive and the election is
more deliberate. The old officers keep their
positions. Before them appear many hills to
climb, and the way is hard.
At the beginning of the term many competitors
enter the Declamatory Contest, but Thomas
Northrop, a Junior, carries off the highest honors.
In February the Juniors hire a truck, dress them-
selves in carnival regalia and join the merrymakers
in Panama City. In March they again enter
theatrical life, presenting before the public a


F9~








THE ZONIAN.


program of vaudeville, including a one-act play.
They are more than successful in their enterprises,
for they secure enough money to carry them
through the expenses of the banquet for the
Seniors and to give their memorial to the school--
a hundred dollars worth of books for the library.
The Junior-Senior Banquet arrives and the Seniors
are given a splendid send-off. So endeth the third
year.
The fourth and last year now opens in our mirror
of history. The insignificant little scrubs have
become dignified Seniors, assuming their new role
with dictatorial demeanor and magnanimous con-
tempt for those just starting out to climb the long
steps to the throne of Knowledge. The choice of
the election again falls upon the old officers. The


Seniors begin work on their play and in February
they stage "Adam and Eva" at the Balboa club-
house.
Months pass and slowly the Annual is compiled.
At last the end of the year comes and the Seniors
revel in the delights of Senior ceremonies. They
accomplish their duties, passing out of scho l with
a step that is eager and yet reluctant.
The doors of the world open before them. The
Class of '26 is gone. So endeth the fourth year.
The dancing reflections are still now in my little
mirror, for the history does not follow into the years
to come. Let us put it away into its shining silver
case where it may rest in sweet content until
eyes, filled with longing for a glimpse of the past,
again gaze into its clear depths.


EDJACATION.
Hattie Belle Rader, 'z6.


Who am I?
I am the high school student,
Highbrow and intellectual.
My memory holds close within its powerful
grasp
Every theory of science formulated since the
world began.
My mind downs into the rut of despair
The poor, struggling attempts of my teachers
To keep pace with it;
And sends forth profound and mystic thoughts
Rich in the knowledge of English grammar,
history, and languages-
For who is greater than he who understands the
sequence of tenses,
The use of "shall" and "will," and the diagram-
ing of sentences?
The adoring world strives to lift its head
To the high pinnacle of my intellect,
But I spurn the rabble fawning at my feet,
Pleading for the happiness of a single glance


From my penetrating eye.
Within the deep and silent recesses of my brain
Knowledge unfolds like the petals of an opening
rose.
Men, blinded by egotism and jealousy,
Denounce the majestic workings of my mind
As the <.l, ['I ,i.. of conceit.
But I, possessing psychic powers unknown to
the vulgar lot,
Know that such has been the fate of genius
through the centuries;
And I suffer their scorn with courageous heart,
Secure in my martyrdom.
The cheap and tawdry diversion of the cinema,
The feeble-minded, syncopating jazz bands-
These make no appeal to my lofty spirit far
above the multitude.
World, cease your attempts to reach the ele-
vated heights of my thought;
I can never stoop to common things, for I've got
edjacation.


Ruins of Old Panama.

















































'.7


1.,.
t*' ~.z ` '
.; ' . .. s **
.' ,* > *;; -. : '*

y .-:. *;^ ^.. .'^ .**-^ *'..- :e; *


Gatun Spillway.


I -1








THE ZONIAN.


.-.
l" '- t .






LITERARY

THE RESPONSE.
Hattie Belle Rader '26.
First Place -Short Stor\y (nte ,


Taboga Island lay smothering in the heat of
midday. The cross on the top of the hill at the
farther end of the island stood, a white flare, as
the sun burned into the bare sides of the incline,
withering the dull grass in its listless struggle for
life, and harshly revealing the stony trail worn
by the feet of enthusiastic romance seekers deter-
mined to reach the cross in spite of all drawbacks
presented by tropical heat and the steepness of
the slopes.
From its sheltered corner the Hotel Aspinwall,
seemingly deserted, looked out over the Pacific
where, in the distance near the sail of a fishing
scow, the long, lithe form of a United States
destroyer cut the waves. The sea rippled in
streaks of deep blue, scars left upon its calm sur-
face by the ruthless plowing of ships bound for
ports far over the horizon.
The road from the Aspinwall stretched, a
blinding strip of white, symbol of invading civil-
ization, through the torrid village where chickens,
pigs, and children lolled in lazy content on the
dirt floors of some of the houses. With the hazy
air minuill. the scent of roses in the sun from the
gardens inclosed in their warped and weather-
beaten board fences.
At the end of the road lay the mango grove
suffering uncomplainingly from the heat in the
langour of habit. A few half-breed children
sprawled about on the ground, which was covered


with dead leaves; a naked baby choked over a dry
crust of brea 1, and ran, screaming hysterically,
from the friendly advances of a mange-eaten cur.
An urchin ventured upon the scorching sand, but
fled back, howling for fear of blistered feet.
On the beach were the figures of a man and a
woman, leaning on an overturned rowboat on the
top of which lazily stretched the form of a young
child. The woman, undoubtedly young in years
but already showing the signs of departing youth,
which appear so early in women of the tropics, was
half-clad in a torn gingham dress which hung in
untidy folds about her bare feet. Her hair, straight
and black, was tangled into a matted rope down
her back. Her face with its heavy jaw, and the
thick, distended nostrils of her nose clearly be-
trayed her negro blood in spite of the contradic-
tion of her pale skin.
The man, with the legs of his khaki trousers cut
off at the knee in jagged strips and his faded
shirt carelessly open at the throat, was as r.iu,-JI
and dirty as the woman at his side. The attire of
the boy was repulsive and slovenly.
The child in response to a harsh command
from the man, jumped from the boat and they
both set to work to turn it over. Having ac-
complished their task, they lifted it to the water's
edge. A moment later the woman pushed the
boat, with her two companions in it, out into the
waves, and stood \..t, liiii- it until it drifted from









THE ZONIAN.


the sandbar to the open sea and around the corner
of the island. Then she turned and went slowly
up to one of the ramshackle huts on the edge of the
grove.
The hours dragged on through the siesta to late
afternoon; and with the passing of time, the heat
lessened. On the horizon, where the blue of the
sea met the blue of the sky, a haze darkened into a
black cloud that swept down over the earth in a
torrent of rain. The smooth undulations of the
waves broke into stinging mists of spray that
lashed the beach in uncompromising fury. The
wind, roused into a sullen roar, snapped the
fronds of a palm tree until they hung lifeless and
dropped to the flooded ground.
The woman who had been on the beach in the
sunshine, hours before, now stood on the sand-
bar, staring at the sea through the rain that beat
upon her uncovered head and streamed down her
face, set andstrained with anxiety. Her dress clung
to her in heavy -iL, ine-s, revealing the tenseness
of her body. Beside her had gathered a little group
of villagers drawn to her in sympathy to keep the
vigil for those two who had gone out in the sun-
shine and never returned. Three ragged men
pushed their boat out into the waves and turned
to wave their hands through the curtain of the
mist as if to encourage the watchers.
An hour passed and the storm that had risen
so suddenly retreated and ceased its fierce attack
on the earth. The little group still stood on the
beach, waiting and hoping against hope for the
success of the search party. From around the


corner of the island two boats, one empty, the
other with three occupants, came through the
drizzle. The three men had returned but the man
and the little boy who had gone out in the after-
noon had left nothing but their boat drifting
aimlessly on the waves. The women bowed their
heads, one murmuring in hushed and frightened
breath, "Ma.i.lr de Dios." When the boats were
drawn up on the sandbar the little group dis-
persed to the grove leaving the woman leaning
on one as she had been earlier in the day.
.M rice, the chill of despair crept out of the wind
and laid clammy hands upon her until she shivered
in its cold embrace. She shuddered, moaned, and
lay still. When the soft tropical night was calling
over the island, she raised her body, tired whth
sorrow, and stepped forward to meet the tide
advancing on the sandbar. It rose, and fell -
reached her bare feet-splashed on her knees.
The slow march continued until the long black
rope of her hair floated on the salty billows. T,,
the prayers she had sent out over the waves therc
had been no response.
The world lay relaxed from its struggle with the
storm and the island dreamed in the mild wind
that blew gently from the south. The cross on the
hill gleamed a cool silver in the beams of the rising
moon. In the shadows of the Aspinwall, the :ilt
of y unL voices blended with the mellow twanging
of a guitar, but the little hut on the edge of tht
grove was silent and dosertc., while the wavec
rippled in unbroken serenity over the sandbar.


PANCHO CASTILLO'S CARNIVAL.
Charles Palacio, '28.
Second Place-Short Story Contest.


Carnival time was coming again and Pancho
found himself in need of spending money with
which to celebrate and make merry as is proper
at this season. Pancho was a \ uLjng Panamanian
who plied at the trade of "panguero," which
translated means boatman. He was short in
stature, his skin was of a light brown color and
he was handsome for his race. This young man's
personal possessions consisted chiefly of his
"p;an:i," his other suit of working clothes, a much
cherished Sunday suit (used by his father for the


same purpose before the latter's death), a gypsy
dreambook (much thumbed and frayed by con-
stant reference) and a razor, somewhat rusty and
sadly in need of honing. All of these things were
secured in a small compartment in the stern of his
"panga."
Pancho was self-dependent, with no relati ves
to bother about. Altogether, Pancho's life was
easy and simple. During the day he either took
passengers to and fro from their boats to the shore.
or did the odd jobs of a longshoreman or lolled in








THE ZONIAN.


the shade, the last named being the more usual.
He kept himself part of the time in "La \l:i ii.1i,"
a boarding house on the waterfront near "La
Presidencia" which has a convenient landing place
for passengers of coastwise vessels. Pancho was a
very familiar figure along the waterfront, always
smiling and cheerful, with his head bare under the
hottest of suns, his shirt sleeves tucked up to the
elbows and his trousers rolled up to the knees.
His feet were never clad in shoes, for he either
wore canvas slippers or went barefoot.
Now there was one thing about Pancho, though
he worked rather hard and earned a bit of money;
he had none put away for a rainy day and, in fact,
had barely enough for his meals. His money
melted in various ways; namely, lending, gamb-
ling, and drinking. His chief ambition was to
have money by the bagfulls, and since he could
not save it, he proposed to win the lottery. Every
week he bought a 0o-cent ticket, and every Sun-
day he saw his little scrap of paper become worth-
less. This continual loss did not discourage him;
with true gambling spirit he persisted in buying
his ticket.
This week Pancho bought his ticket as usual,
but hoped more than ever to win the big prize,
for the Sunday of the lottery drawing was Carni-
val, and no one wanting happiness could afford
to be without money.
At 9.30 on Sunday morning Pancho was at
"La Loteria Nacional' and chose a convenient
site from which to witness the drawing at 1o.
By Io o'clock the crowd was so dense that Pancho
could barely squirm. He saw the ivory balls twirl-
ing in their spherical container; he saw the little
trap door open and a child pick out a ball. The
ball was handed to an attendant who unscrewed
it, showed it to the public and hung up a metal
number which corresponded to the one in the
ball. This operation was repeated until a 4-digit
number was formed, which was the % 1ini
number. Some of the people shouted and laughed,
for they had won, but the greater part of the mul-
titude groaned and muttered their disapproval.
The lottery dr..MingL. proceeded until two more
such 4-digit numbers had been posted. The
cashier's windows were now flung open in order
to pay off the favored ones.
Pancho was disappointed with the first result,
but the gods of luck favored him with the second.


Several seconds elapsed before Pancho could
realize that he had won part of the second prize.
He looked again and again at the number in his
hand and compared it with the winning number.
His hand shook and his heart beat wildly as he
convinced himself of his good fortune. He felt
suddenly very happy; he was at peace with the
world. He wanted to shout or to laugh to relieve
his feelings, but he managed to control himself.
At a window a very busy cashier dealt out 1i
crisp -2:, bills to the wild-eyed Pancho, who had
never seen so much money before in his life.
Pancho went over to "La Marina" and sat down
on an empty box to decide how to spend his three
hundred dollars. His decision made, he first went
to San Jos6 Church, the church with the golden
altar, and thanked God and all the saints with a
fervent prayer and a twenty dollar bill which he
dropped into an alms box. This duty done,
Pancho felt that he was free to act as he pleased.
He put two hundred dollars of his money into
the little compartment in his "panga" and with
the remaining money went out to make elaborate
preparations for his first real carnival. He took
Pepe, his closest friend, with him and went out to
do the necessary shopping and to make the neces-
sary arrangements for a regular good time. Since
it was Sunday, all the stores were closed, but it is
said that "money makes the mare go" and it did.
Pancho bought for himself and his friend two
magnificent Turkish costumes, profusely deco-
rated with sparkling beads and trimmed with
gold lace.
That afternoon Pancho and P6pe joined a
gay "comparsa," which is a troupe of fun-seekers
'I.l. .,i,; to some club who unite and face the
pleasures of the day together. The "comparsa"
rode up and down Central Avenue in their
float, having a wonderful time. The busy street
was packed with floats; holiday crowds thronged
the sidewalks. Everywhere there were grand
confetti and serpentine battles. The air was filled
with music, song, and laughter. Everywhere there
was life and color What a motley scene was pre-
sented by Central Avenue that afternoon; the
gaily decorated floats, the gaudily arranged people,
the vari-colored streamers of serpentine waving
from projections where they had been caught.
At night the "comparsa" broke up and each
member began a private tour of the dance halls









THE ZONIAN.


and cabarets. Pancho and his friend went from
one gay place to another, now dancing the native
"tamborito" to the sound of the "tambor" and
now doing their best at dancing the Charleston
to the ear-racking noises of a pick-up jazz band.
At every place they consumed quantities of
liquor, from the strongest native rum to the
finest and most expensive champagnes. Pancho
and P6pe had enough at about 4 in the morning,
at which time they went to the latter's home to
rest for the next night's festivities.
Soon Pancho's friends began to hear of his luck,
and they borrowed large sums shamelessly, which,
as usual, they never intended to repay. Pancho
had two more friends to help celebrate the carnival
on the second day, and he spent his money faster
than ever. Pancho went home with P6pe at 5
o'clock on the morning of the second day, quite
inebriated from the effects of the rum, wine, and
beer which he had consumed.
On the third day Pancho spent his money with
less discretion than ever. Also, he made supple-


mentary loans, and new loans, and repaid slight
favors in currency. Pancho suddenly became very
popular; that night he had a regular troupe of
friends trailing him; and he generously paid all
of their bills. At one dance hall Pancho got mixed
up in a drunken brawl and was conducted to the
police station, where he was released upon pa\ -
ment of a stiff fine. At dawn that morning Pancho
found his way to "La Marina," where he thrc%
himself on the floor and slept off his drunkenness.
He was a sight to see; his costume torn, his face
red from excessive drinking and serpentine looped
about him.
It was not until the fourth day that Pancho
could think sanely enough to determine his
position. Inside of three short days he had
squandered three hundred dollars, and had noth-
ing to show for it other than the.sweet memories
that remained. Pancho crossed himself devoutl\
and promised to turn over a new leaf; meanwhile
he proceeded about his interrupted business ot
"panguero."


CASTAWAYS.
Thomas Northrup, '26.
Third Place-Short Story Contest.


Just over the horizon, the moon was rising,
casting its light on each side of the bay, giving a
blue hazy tint to the hills beyond, and an immacu-
late white to the shores on the bay of Titicaco.
The breeze had died down, though not sufficiently
to stop the water from rolling its phosphorescent
white foams on the shore.
The Nancy Anne, a distinctly and purely sailing
sloop, was in the bay with sails furled and anchor
down. It was not the only sloop that had come
to the island of Titicaco. On the lee side, covered
by the bare shadow of the sloop at anchor, was a
little tender. The red and green lights had but a
faint glimmer, so faint indeed, that one might
have seen a star on a moonlight night much more
easily.
Presently two men climbed over the side of the
little sloop on the jacob ladder into the tender,
and started for the shore in the direction of the
shadow of the vessel which led them to the center
of the bay. Before them there was a long and
narrow plain that ascended to the blue-tinted hills
in the bl.ukL'rnunil. The men alighted from the
little tender and made for the jungle, which
bounded the plain on the right, and followed it


along until they came to the templeofChichicoco,
the great and miraculous god of the islanders.
Though nothing better than a thatched house
from the outside, the interior was Greek in style.
Along with this simple Greek decoration, were
the scalps, fishes, beads, and other trinkets which
the islanders had bestowed on the god during their
successive and successful fights. This temple.
of which the natives boast so much, dates back rto
the time of the rule of kings and emperors in
Europe. It was begun a few months after the
arrival of the two ".1Aroes," as the natives called
them. They had come to the island and won the
confidence of the natives; won their battles:
taught them many new things; and finally per-
suaded them to build a temple to the god of the
moon, who, they said, had done so much for them.
As a token of their friendship, these two Argoes
had placed t wglit tearing stones, which the natives
admired and coveted very much, in the eye sockets
of the statue. These two stones were the famous
diamonds in the crown of Peter the Great which
had been stolen by two intriguing Russians of the
Court who took the opportunity at the time of
an impending revolution. The names of Orloff








THE ZONIAN.


and Herman were blazoned in the papers, and
the police had searched in vain for them. They
had made for the border and then for the islands
in the Archipelagoes with the intention of return-
ing some day to a famous collector of jewels named
Peter Dubra. But the day never came. Peter
Dubra had waited and died, and so had Orloff and
Herman. The subsequent descendants of this
collector had looked forward to these jewels as a
prize well worth while getting. It had been their
vow to get these two diamonds at any cost.
Of these descendants, was Alamand Dubra, the
last of his line. His sharp features, his piercing
eyes, his thin sharp nose, his long slender and
obtrusive body showed the unscrupulous man
whose deeds were never to be forgotten by all
Fur..pi, or those who ever saw his devilish smile.
He had been traveling all over the South Seas
in search of these stones during the last 20 years.
He had been travelling all alone, and now he was
getting old. He needed a companion. About a
year before he had picked up a chap whom he
termed as "a drunken youth" at Singapore.
"He would make a fine henchman," he had
thought. It was these two that had come to the
island of Titicaco in the sloop, and had gone
cautiously up to the temple under the cover of the
jungle.
Alamand Dubra had come to get the diamonds
at all costs. The youth had come to make a new
start, and would dare to do anything to begin.
He was indebted to Dubra for the chance, though
he was like a slave. They had been waiting at the
edge of the plain near the temple to see that no
native was watching.
"Whew!" let out the youth as though he was
tired.
"Sh- Remember, it is now or never.
There is one native who knows!" whispered Dubra.
The youth was a chap of some 20 years whose
powerful biceps, and Greek physique had been
developed during his time on the sloop. He had
been like a faithful dog to Dubra, had braved
many dangers, and seen many squalls, gales, and
storms, for the one purpose-to make up what he
had lost.
They rushed up to the temple with daggers on
one side, and silent colts on the other. They
entered the temple and looked about to make sure
there was no one there. Opposite the door, two
eyes glittered in the apparent darkness. They
were the eyes of the god.


"Get the stones," commanded Dubra, "while
I watch for the natives."
The youth made his way cautiously to the
statue. Along the opposite edge of the plain
which the two had taken, a native was coming
toward the temple. Fear and courage seemed to
strike Dubra alternately. His hand passed over
his dagger and then over his colt. He looked in
the direction of the statue only to see the eyes still
there. He wondered what could be keeping the
youth, or whether he was playing him a trick. The
native was still coming. He measured the time it
would take the native to reach the temple and then
looked at the statue. The eyes were still there.
To speak in the clear still night would be to arouse
suspicion, for the sound travelled well over the
island. He looked at the native again. It would
be 7 minutes, he judged, before he would get to the
temple. He looked again at the statue with relief
to see that one of the eyes had disappeared. The
other would be down soon, he knew. He would
watch the native now, he thought, and make plans
for the escape. Five minutes to go, he thought,
as he heard behind him the stumbling of the
youth.
"What's the matter?" he finally asked off his
guard.
"I- I stumbled," the youth murmured.
"Shut up! Here comes a native. Hurry!"
Aided by the shadow of the temple on the side
which they had chosen to come, they started for
the jungle, and then hurried like panthers on the
chase to the shore where the tender lay. They
jumped into the boat, started the engine, looked
at the muffler and then at the sloop. They rigic.l
the sloop and began sailing slowly out of the har-
bor. Once out of the bay, the sloop encountered
stormy weather. The moon was overcast by
clouds, and a strong breeze had begun to ruffle
the calm waters. Over the horizon in the darkness
of the night, lightning flashes were bursting the
clouds. They were heading into the stormy
weather.
The youth had taken to the tiller, while Dubra,
the better cook, prepared something to eat. After
a repast which was accompanied with work, Dubra
asked for the diamonds. The youth handed him
one.
"Where is the other?" queried Dubra.
"That is mine!" he answered.
"Oh, I see. That is right. Arr.-iincit."








THE ZONIAN.


He took out of his pocket a jeweler's miscro-
scope and put it up to his right eye. With his
nimble fingers, he was feeling the stone as he saw
the minute construction. He looked at the youth.
It was the first time the chap had not acted like
a faithful dog. He was getting too independent.
He surveyed the stone again. "W'rh one I can live
comfortably several years," he thought, "but
with two-ah, well- I can live like a million-
aire, even longer." He looked at the youth again.
Somehow, his vision was blurred. Yet he knew
the youth was there.
"Let me see your stone?" he asked with a
devilish smile.
"N..."
"I only want to examine it."
"..N ."
"I see. You do not trust me. I'll let you keep
my stone while I look at yours."
"Don't be so annoying. Can't you see what
we're heading into?"
"Yes, yes, my friend. But give me that stone.
You may lose it in this storm."
"It is safer with me," retorted the youth.
Dubra looked at his stone again. He moved
closer to the youth.
"Give me that stone!" he commanded.
..N ..."
Overhead hung dark clouds. Lightning with its
fiery flashes of wrath broke the clouds above that
sent the torrents of rain upon the little sloop
which increased in volume as the short moments
passed by. Peals of thunder, like the crushing
of large bowlders or an avalanche of rocks made
the pitter patter of the rain noiseless. Rain was
streaming down like sweat upon the two as they
sat near the tiller. Dubra, with his devilish smile,
was 1lnkirn at the youth, while the latter was
straining his eyes for the sight of a landmark or
the familiar lights of a ship. Dubra's hands were
circling the throat of the youth. The youth caught


his hand in a grip of steel and muttered "Enough!"
But Dubra's other hand was free. With it he
sought his trusty dagger and stabbed the youth.
His grip l'.-osened. and his body collapsed over the
lap of Dubra. Dubra searched the body of the
lad for the -lone, found it, and threw the body
aside. With a last look of satisfaction he got up,
looked at the youth and then at the stone. Hr
was going to the cabin. There was a flash, a peal
of thunder and then a calm. It was the last stroke
of the lightning for the night. The rain poured
several hours and then ceased. It n as close to
morning when the sun began to rise. The sloop,
with no one at the tiller, had been sailing in circles
and drifting. Close to noon, the southh awoke
from his swoon. He dragged his body over to the
keg and feebly opened the pipe. He let the after
drip into his parched throat for several minutes.
There was a dull pain on his left side, but he did
not care. He wanted to sleep. \\hen he awoke
again, he felt much stronger. He c\amined his
wound to find that it was only minor. He dressed
it crudely with a handkerchief and a part of his
shirt. "Where is Dubra?" he wondered. "If
he meant to kill me, he would have thrown me
overboard. He ought to be at the tiller." But
Dubra was not at the tiller. On his way to the
cabin, he saw the lifeless body of Duhra. He
examined it. There were parts of the body that
were scorched, while the bones were all shattered.
and as he felt the mass, it made him shudder. It
was like ajelly. There was still the devilish smile
on the face of Dubra, as if something had been
accomplished. The youth took two diamonds
from the hands of the victim and looked at them
curiously.
"Oh, well," he murmured, "Men die forever
when they have wasted their lives, but men die
to live again when they are innocent."
The youth moved to the tiller, looked at the
t.i npal'., and steered a new course.


A Fine Highway between Cristobal and Gatun.








THE ZONIAN.

THE RETURN.
Agnes It i.. .. .- '27.


Ten years ago Thomas li...1l was on a hunting
trip in Alaska. One cold and lonely day he came
upon a log-cabin set far off from the little dreary
settlements which seemed so deserted. A woman
of about 50 years stood at the door and invited
him in, and told him to make himself at home--
as was the custom of the country.
It was a delight to him to be in such a cozy home
after having lived for weeks at a time in hunters'
cabins-with all that it implies of dirt floors, un-
made beds, tin plates, and bacon and beans. Those
cabins were cheerless, but this was a home which
rested tired eyes and refreshed one. His delight
showed in his face, and the woman saw it. She
answered him as if he had spoken to her.
"It's all her own work."
She conducted him to a bedroom in order that
he might freshen his appearance; such a room he
had not seen for years. E\%r', rhiri' was so clean
and neat. Just as he finished, she reentered the
room and showed him a picture of the most beauti-
ful girl he had ever seen.
She said, "Just sixteen her last birthday and--
ah, but just wait until you see her."
"Where is she now?" he asked.
"She's away now at school, and has been gone
for two years."
"When will she return?"
"She'll be here Sunday at about 7 o'clock."
Meade was sorry to hear this because he wanted
to see her, and yet he had to return to his home
before the trails became impassable, so he told the
woman this. On hearing hisstatement, the woman
begged him to stay and see her daughter because
she liked company and would be lonely if no one
but her mother was there to greet her on her
arrival. She begged so hard and he had fallen so
much in love with the girl that he decided to stay
The first day after his arrival slipped away. The
second evening, when it had grown dark, an old
pioneer came to see the old woman. He greeted
them and said, "I just dropped in to ask when the
little miss is coming home. Have you any news
from her about her arrival?"
"Oh, yes, I have a letter from her. Would you
like to hear it, Mr. Hardy?"


"Well, I should say I would!"
The woman then got the letter and read it-
a charming letter full of love and of messages to
her old friends not forgotten even in two years.
The letter finished, Mr. Hardy arose and at the
door he promised to be on hand to meet her when
she arrived.
The following evening, Saturday, more old
friends came to visit her and the letter was also
read to them, all promising to be there Sunday
evening
When Sunday arrived the lady was very nervous
and anxious. Every few minutes she would run
out to the trail to see if the girl was in sight.
Then she would enter the house and ask \I. ~i. if
he thought anything had happened to her, and if
he thought she would arrive on time. About 5
o'clock the people began to arrive, and the new-
comers decorated the house. A few minutes before
7, five of the men brought their instruments out
and began to play dance music. Toasts were
drunk to the arrival of the girl, and everybody
was merry.
It was nearly seven when Mr. Hardy gave the
woman a drink of cider, to "give her courage"
as he put it. Just as she swallowed the drink the
clock struck seven. She heard it and looked toward
the door to see her daughter come in, but she
suddenly became drowsy and the people put her
on the bed where she immediately fell asleep. At
this the guests began to leave and Meade begged
them to stay and wait for the girl. They looked
at each other and finally Mr. Hardy said, "Poor
girl, she has been dead for 5 years."
"What? Dead?"
"Yes, she went away to school 7 years ago and
was frozen to death on the trail when she was
coming to see her mother, who became insane
when she saw her daughter's body and she has
never remembered her death. She acts like this
only when the day of her daughter's death comes
round. Then we come to see her, and on the day
of the supposed arrival we decorate the house
and at the last minute drug her so that when she
awakens, she will think her daughter is with her
and will be all right."









38 THE ZONIAN.


rFREET LEADING TO ANCON HOSPITAL.


I -









THE ZONIAN.


TWENTY YEARS LATER.


Wellville, Calif.,
May 3, 1946.
DEAR AL: You asked me in your last letter
whether I had ever been in the Canal Zone.
Decidedly, yes. My whole life, up to 20 years ago,
was spent in Balboa. At that time I thought the
place had become too tiresome and monotonous.
1 could see no beauty in the orderly lines of houses
and the well-laid-out highways and neat lawns.
I suppose I should have been glad to live in such a
modern Utopia, but I was not. Somehow the
whole thing depressed me. When my graduation
time came, I welcomed it joyously as the breaking
of the last tie which was binding me to the tropics.
At last I was g'..in to the States, where people
would be eln-rU:.ri, and the cold breezes and the
snow crunching under foot would invigorate me.
Since then I have visited many places, only to
find myself always dissatisfied.
For a long time I scoffed at the "Spell of the
Tropics" idea suggested by friends, but finally I
came to realize that there was something inex-
plicable, mysterious, that seemed to keep the
tropics ever before me.


Last summer I became even more conscious of
this mysterious spell. While li ing in this quiet
and peaceful town, I was continually assailed with
dreams. I would sit on the piazza of my little
. .tt r_.. and sometimes drop off to sleep. My
dreams rep i.ii. 1'. brought before me the soft
swishing of the cool breezes through the palms, the
liquid ripple of water on a shining white beach
fringed with palms, the chirping of the locusts, and
the mellow brightness which a white, full moon
diffuses over the tropics. I would awake and sigh
and think of the happy times I had had on the Zone.
My dreams recurred many times, until at last I
could stand it no longer. So I have sold my resi-
dence here, and shall leave on the first boat for the
Zone.
By the time this letter reaches you, I shall be
happy again in the land of my dreams, held by the
"Spell of the Tropics."

Sincerely yours,

ANy GRADU ATE--CLASS '26,
Per A. C. and T. N.


U. S. Battleship passing thro,,nh tie Panama (anal.
THE GOOD OI.D DAYS.
Robert Essex, '27.


In days gone by in Balboa High,
The Juniors had it easy.
To make their marks in English high,
They could read a poem breezy.

To prepare a lesson was a simple task,
Didn't even resemble toil.
They never knew what it was to bask
In the rays from the midnight oil.


They could take a poem some author wrote,
From a book on the library shelf,
And explain the theme without missing a note;
'Till the poet would be!ieve it himself.

But times have changed as they always will,
And the change could not be worse,
\Ve not only prepare out English still,
But have to do it in verse.


Now in Balboa High we can not shirk,
The good old days have flown.
Poems still form part of our English work,
But now we must write our own.


I.----


V.i


a









THE ZONIAN.

A MORAL TALE.
Andrew Donovan, '26.


During the reign of the Emperor Shunchiabi,
there was brought to the palace a bird of great
beauty called, in the language of the country, the
Krobora. Its song was more bcautllul than that of
the Oii, so it was given a place in the palace. The
Emperor was enchanted by its singing, and
ordered that it should have a golden perch in the
Hall of the Seven Houri. He furthermore com-
manded that it.be attended by six men, of the
Tajehal tribe, dressed in cloth of gold bestrewn
with moonbeams, and wearing wigs powdered
with star dust.
All this was done, and every evening the Krobora
sang its beautiful song, and every evening the
Emperor was overjoyed and wept pearly tears
upon the jasper pavement.
All went well until the six attendants, dressed
in cloth of gold bestrewn with moonbeams and
wearing wigs powdered with star dust, observed
that the Krobora was losing its song.
They came in haste before the Emperor and,
falling upon their knees before him, said, "Oh,
most divine and august ruler of the Two Empires
of the Sisisquissetabai, and loved of the Gods,
we find that the great Krobora loseth its song
through loneliness."


The Emperor gave orders that a companion be
brought from the royal aviar., and be installed on
a perch near the great Krobo-a.
The commands were obeyed, and things went
happily till the newcomer, the \\a; inccchii bird,
began to scold the Krobora. The Krobhra gre\n
angry and, in high tones, scolded the \avinecchii
bird.
This continued day after day until rhe attend-
ants, dressed in cloth of gold behsrea n with moon-
beams and wearing wigs powdered with star dust.
saw that the Krobora was getting, a sore throat.
They held council, and it was decided that the
Wayinecchii bird should be put to de.ith.
The decision was realizcJ, and things went \ ell.
Every night the Emperor sat under \MoLaru and
Kabazaru and Zuazaru, and wept ptrrly tcars
upon the jasper pavement.
Thus things went, but soon the Kr._,b, ra missed
its companion, the Wayinecchii bird, and fell sick.
The royal doctors tried to save its life but it was
useless. Day by day it grew m.re silent, and one
morning the six attendants found it dead on the
golden perch.
Thus passed the Krobora.
National mourning was proclaimed throughout
the land.


LILY MAY HORTENSE MARIE'S VISIT TO THE ENGLISH COL'RT.
Therressa Betz.


".Ml hand me husbandd 'ho is han Henglishman
whent to Hengland. \\e whent on de boat from
Jamaica to Hengland. When we got to Hengland
the people hall went to see me hand tink hi cute,
hand me Henglish husbandd handsome .
"\\'hen we in Hengland Queen Helizabet she
hask us to vist 'er hat 'er co'rt-me hand me
English 'usband-han' we go hin ha fine coach
hand de Queen Helizabet she welcome me hand
me husbandd hand hask hall about Jamaica hand
if me hand me Henglish 'uband like Jamaica better


than Hengland. Hand hi just sa\, 'No mum''
Han' the Henglish ladies 'ave straight 'air so
dey tink hi hand me Henglish husbandd 'ave pretty
'air.
"Den when hi go to leave from the Henglish
co'rt with me Henglish husbandd de Queen she put
'er 'ands in me 'air an' say, 'M.y, what adorable
curls you 'ave.' And den me hand me Henglish
'usband- "
"That'll do, Lily, thank you. Please get that
dress ironed; you've been on it an huur now'"


A DITTY.


Miriam L. Halloran, '27.
She was so pretty I fell in love!
Her eyes were blue like the sky above;
Her lips were like a blushing rose,
And she had a pretty tip-tilted nose.
But I finally decided she wouldn't do
When I learned she had just reached fifty-two.









THE ZONIAN.


VIVA LA CARNAV'AL!


Carnival! Carnival! ()Soul of Carnival! Mad,
passionate spirit of fire! Creature of a thousand
moods! The wild, tremulous beating of the wings
of joy on the silent air! The flaming arrows of
light darting from the blaze of hearts glowing
scarlet with delirium! The rndii. scream of
melancholy crushed beneath the rush of capering
feet! Above the harsh undertone of pandemonium
the sibilant bleating of carnival pipes! The release
of dormant passions! The whirr of .iirfuI.
serpentine! The blinding flashes of confetti!
The exquisite blending of love and forgetfulness!
The whirl-golden, scarlet! Joy unrestrained!
Free! Viva la Carnaval!
Hattie Belle Rader, '26.

Mi Pollera, Mi Pollera, sung to the beat of
native drums is heard far and near duringCarnival,
for all are happy. All cares are thrown to the
wind for four days of merrymaking.
Laughing, 1.1in ii., singing! All interrupted now
and then by a screech of pain as some senior filled
with the spirit of Carnival squirts another merry-
maker in the eye with the cool, smarting, perfume
so common during Carnival.
Costumes, ah, what costumes! All kinds of
creations! Babies, and even grandmas and grand-
pas, have their fancy dresses. Oh, what brilliant
colors on that darky! What a rosy bloom she
has, and an attempted milky white complexion
from under which splotches of black can be seen.
But still-with all this merrymaking there seems
to be something lacking. Could it be that the


people are tirin._, of Carnival, supposedly the gay-
est time of all the year? Perhaps it is, at least it
seems so anvwaY.
-Florence Peterson, '26.

The Carnival, the mad racing crowd, the heavy
perfume and confetti H'...tirng on the air, the vari-
colored mt)b whirling and dancing for these p:'ecious
minutes The laughter and artful smiles, thrill-
ing-but thrilling the next girl just as well, for
flirting i. in styl:. And who doesn't want to be in
style?
We crowd, we are blocked for hours; but what
care we-we have our paradise here once a year-
dancing, drinking, laughing, flirting with the grace-
ful caballeros and catching the kisses of their
beautiful senoritas.
Yes, it is paradise for three days!
-Therressa Betz.

Flashes of re.i, >.I .... and green; cries of
"Serpentina" from peddlers; the blare of dis-
cordant music; passing floats, representing four
nations of the universe; exclamations in seven
,i'._,. ,,, language;; red rouge on black faces; a
pushing, elbowing crowd, struggling to see the
parade; flying confetti and streamers; the
monotn ous chant of MAi P//era; more or less
interested onlookers; crowded balconies; natives
in holiday attire; tourists, out for a good time;
a pleasure-ma.l populace with all cares forgotten-
The Carnival.
-. mos Caro, '26.


ENCHANTMENT.
Ha.tete Belle Rader, 'e6.


Panama, Panama, \itch of the Tropics,
Tell me what charm you have laid on mi eyes;
Tell me what makes me so restless and longing
To see o'er my head the bright blue of your skies.
Is it a silver cord, silken and twining,
You've passed through the sensitive strings of my he.:rt,
Twisted and turned it until you have woven
A pattern that ne'er will be broken apart?


Panama, Panama, Ladv of Mystery!
Palm trees, deep shadows, and silverY leans,
Spirit adventurous, passionate, daring,
Yet frail as illusions in rose-tinted dreams!
The low wistful murmurs of wind in the ruins
The souls of your people to sadness inspire,
And memories, poignant and swee: as the orchid,
Still hide in vour city once loved of fire.


Panama, Painama, W\himsical Charmer,
Old fancy runs rampant in your narrow streets;
The shining new brasses of civilization
Will never eclipse the dull gold of antiques.
The Spirit of Longing, pale jeweled in teardrops,
I.ets down from the low-hanging points of your star,
The silver cord, silken, persuasive, and clinging,
And calls me to love you from countries afar.









THE ZONIAN.


FABLES.


Spring was in the air. The birds were flying
north. Tiny buds were making their first appear-
ance and Forestville was all enraptured. For
was not spring here again and was not old Pro-
fessor Owl giving his annual radio concert for the
kiddies?
Mr. Owl had given a radio concert for the kid-
dies every spring they could remember. This
delightful party had always been the scene of
much merriment and joy, though, to be sure, Miss
Nellie Bullfinch had cast a blight on the last part\
when she had accidentally upset her chocolate
on her new frock.
This year's party would undoubtedly be quite
the most interesting of all as programs were being
broadcasted from NBA, the new station in Pan-
ama, the winter resort of not a few of the best
families of Forestville. The Clancy O'Pi-.sum-u
were visiting their cousins, the Possums, of Pan-
ama, and were thinking of making their home
there. Panama was so romantic and had such an
ideal climate.
All the kiddies were at the Owl's. Nice Danny
Beaver, sly Willie Fox, sweet Lily Whitepaws-the
Whitepaws were related to the Hare family but
recognized no one beneath their station-little
.Amy Chipmunk, big Brownie Bear-all these
were there and many more.
After the kiddies had all been seated and served
with cool sherbert, Mr. Owl, looking quite the
scholar and very wise, began speaking: "All you
except the tiny, tiny tots have listened over my
radio. To-night we shall hear some very nice bed-
time stores. I'm sure all of you will love them."
All assented, though deep in her heart, Minnie
Mouse wished they might tune in on the Ritz'
peppy jazz orchestra.
"'Furrhrmnir,-," continued Mr. Owl, "I am
going to ask Danny Beaver, and Billie and Nana
Goat to tune in and get us something. Billie, you
try first."
Billie was all athrill and you may be sure, very,
very, very, very red. He walked up, and pretty
soon all the kiddies heard a man's voice ctminii
right through the air. They listened, excited and
breathless.


"Station S-T-A-T-I-C, trains for Chicago and
the far east. Dear little radio listeners, the first
bedtime story is called--

THE RED THIEF.
Ralph Hendricksen, '27.

One da' while Brother Fox was wandering
around in the woods he noticed Miss Deer making
a rhubarb custard. Now poor Brother For had a
bad habit of eating between meals so he waited
until Miss Deer had finished the custard; and then,
when no one was looking, he went and stole it.
While Brother Fox was going home, he met
Brother Bear who immediately asked him where
he got the custard.
"If I tell you, will you promise not to tell
anyone?" asked Brother Fox.
"Yes," said Brother Bear.
"Well, I stole it from M11s Deer."
They walked along through the woods until
they met Brother Wolf.
"\\ here did you get the custard ?" asked Brother
Wolf.
Brother Fox thought for a while and then de-
cided to tell him.
"Promise you won't tell and I'll g' t \c'u some."
"All right," said Brother Wolf.
Then Brother Fox told him and the three went
through the woods eating the stolen custard. They
were talking of their good secret and promising
Brother Fox over and over that they would ne er
say a word about it, but poor Brother Fox was
sorry that thcv knew his secret.
A few weeks later Miss Deer came to town and
in the market she overheard the chief gossipers
talking of the wonderful rhubarb custard that
Brother Fox had been seen with. N1iss Deer went
to Judge Lion and told him that Brother Fox
had stolen the custard from her, and poor Brother
Fox was hanged.
MORAL.-Three can keep a secret-if two of
them are dead.-Franklin.


i


0i


F9








THE ZONIAN.


"How wicked Brother Fox was," whispered
little Dickie Turtle. "I'm sure he deserved hang-
ing."
"Dear little radio babies, the next story is
'Procrastination.' In case, little ones, you do not
understand the meaning of this big word may you
know that it means postponement."

PROCRASTINATION.
Sydney Smith. '27.

"It was nearly the end of the school year in the
Hollow Stump Schoolhouse. The word "examina-
tions" was the topic for many conversations am ng
the little animal children. Each day Mr. Owl,
their teacher, reminded them of the need to review
their lessons.
Some of the wiser children, like Willie Fox, pre-
pared themselves long in advance by hard study.
However, one of the boys, Jimmy Frog, who was
very lazy, kept puttingit off. He justified himself
by saying, "I can look through my books and find
everything I have forgotten, on the night before
the exams. If I learned it now, I would forget it
again, anyhow."
He went on in this way until at last the eve of
the fatal day arrived. Then "Temptation" came
in the form of a diving exhibition at the Frog Pond.
"I guess I really ought to study," thought Jimmy,
"but I promised to take Susie to the Frog Pond
this week, and to-night is my last chance."
So instead of studying, Jimmy succumbed to
"Temptation" and took Susie to the Frog Pond.
The next morning he began to study and was
surprised to find how much there was that he
didn't know. He kept his book open until the last
minute, and then went toclass hoping the examina-
tion would be easy.
Jimmy floundered through the examination,
guessing at most of the questions; and when the
marks were given out, he found that he had failed.
MORAL.-Never leave for to-morrow what you
can do to-day. .
"What a bad, bad boy Jimmie Frog was, and
what a gruff voice that man has." Little Daisy
Skunk, whom one would think possessed of a
vicious nature, was quite frightened and mysti-
fied.
"The next fable is a story of a bold seaman and
his jolly crew. The wind whistles and the storm
rages fiercely. We're off."


FABLE FOR PACIFISTS.
Richard 'Johnson, '27.

"Fifteen men on a dead man's chest! Yo, ho,
ho! and a bottle of ru-u-m! Ship ahoy, matey,
what's ver port o'call?" Saying this, Bloody Jim,
the Terror of the Seas, and his owner's special
pride, flew over to the woods, where a bird con-
vention was in progress.
"We'll all organize and get them bloody cats
that- ."
"Let's wait for 'em ter cum over hvar again,
an' then git 'em."
"No, we ain't, we're agoin' over to their place
to get 'em, and--"
"Stow that line amidships, and tell ver daddy
which way the wind blows," commanded the
Terrors of the Seas, approaching the group.
The chairman told him in a hurried fashion
that the cats of the Marblehead region had been
killing off birds by the hundreds, and that they
were planning to organize and exterminate the
cats. Jim thought this a very .\ Ill.r plan, and
agreed to join them in their f..rr-, or, as he said,
"sign shipping' papers wid the blooming' cusses."
That night they started out, huge and tiny,
strong and weak. Old Daddy M.l.i'pic was leader,
and who could have desired a stronger or fiercer
one?
All night long they travelled, but at daybreak
they stopped to rest and to hide. They all flocked
into a small, deserted house, and alichtedl in every
conceivable place, even on the floor, where they
then proceeded to rest.
"Hey, captain, where's yer harbor watch?"
askedJim. "You'd better post 'em. I'm a sailor-
man, by gum, an' I'll take my rest in the crow's
nest," and he flew out to a nearby tree, where he
immediately "hung his hammock."
\\hn he awoke it was nearly niii'hrf.ll He
shouted down, "Hey, captain, are you goin' to
set sail soon?" but his only response was a loud
clatter. Looking down he saw that the cats had
fallen upon the company, and nothing but bones
was left of the gallant company.
The Terror of the Seas puffed out his chest, his
head flew back, and the old sea chantey came
rolling out "But one man of the crew alive what
put to sea with 75! B'1...- me down to Rio!"
Then he hauled in anchor, spread his sails
and soon was homeward bound. 'Twas no fault








THE ZONIAN.


of his that his mates had been wrecked, for they
wouldn't set a watch.
MORAL.-Prepare for danger in time of calm.

"I'm sure you all enjoyed that jolly yarn very
much," old Mr. Owl said, "I feel quite salty my-
self."
"N.,r salty, tarry. Tar and feathery," bad
\\'illie Fox murmured.
"Oh, Mr. Owl, can't we please get NBA? I'm
sure that old static gets on my nerves. Think
how nice it would be to hear from our jungle
friends." iM.mric Meadow Mi.u.c was not very
polite but she had voiced the sentiments of all.
"Why, yes, my dear. If you wish it. Danny,
it's your turn. NBA, please."
Quite a while passed before Danny met with any
success; but, at last, after endless waiting, a
drawling voice from the radio brought the kiddies
to attention.
"Station NBA, Panama. To-night, dear chil-
dren, old Mr. Topin has consented to tell some of
his famous bedtime stories. Radio listeners, Mr.
Topin."
"Dear children, my first story is called-
A FABLE.
Frances Brown, '27.
Not so very long ago in Farmer Gray's potato
patch, there existed a little village of bugs called
Bugsville. Now it happened that all kinds of bugs
lived here, and among this mixture was a very
happy little family of crickets. It consisted of
Daddy Cricket, Mother Cricket, and Chirpy
Cricket. Chirpy was the first, the last, and the
only child of the Cricket family, and of course
the apple of his mother's eye. What great long
legs Chirpy had for a bug his size! But it was no
wonder, for this trait was a family characteristic.
Chirpy was a lively little cricket-in fact, the
livliest little cricket in Bugsville. That's why he
had so many friends. Best of all these many
friends was Johnny Red-Breast who used to sing
out such cheery "good-mornings" to Chirpy as he
hopped along to school. But one morning Chirpy
didn't see or hear a thi:in of his friend as he jumped
through the old potato patch. He was quite sorry
not to find his friend, but it was not long before he
saw sl..nthin- that created more sorrow in his
little heart. Just before him was Tommy Gray
who was actually .arr',in- Johnny in his hands.
This made Chirp'. furious.


"But how had all this happened?" Chirpy
asked himself. Yes, he had gtes.sed right-it
was the work of a .ling-shot. But he'd help
Johnny.
Up he hopped on the lI 's shoulder and chirped
for dear life (I mean his friend's dear life I Chirpy
was wise enough to kno, that boy)s like noise, for
you see his mother had read to, him urt idl" Nlutht
Bug's Rhymes that little bho, \iere made ut of
noise. Well, he knew rhar hesurcl could dr that
little thing to a "T." This hy% proved not to be
an exception to the rule, and when h- discovered
such a racketty little inscL huppinm ab,,ut him he
set out to capture it. )1 course,, he forget about
Johnny Red-Breast who had escaped to the old
apple tree. Chirpy led hi. puruer a merry chase
and it wasn't long beif,r e h had completely left
him in the dust.
Later on in life, when Chirps had become quite
old and feeble, he strolled do% n the old Potato
Lane thinking of his :ai;t '.-,uth. He wnas so en-
raptured by his thought-, that he did not realize
where he was until it a ia, .o late. He had walked
right into the parlor of the inmst- e-ared man and
tyrant of Bugsville, Dadd. ILong Legs. This was
called the Chamber ot Horrors, and no man had
ever been known to come pout fd it alive-let
alone come out at all.
Struggle and chirp as he did, it was .of no avail;
Daddy Long Legs just grinned hungrmiy and made
Chirpy feel very uncomftrrtabl. Chirpy realized
that it was all off with him -but he decided to die
manfully, so he said hi. pra~.crs and closed his
eyes, quietly waiting i.,r the inevitable to happen.
Such a terrible tugging and shaking!
"Daddy Long Legs ha. surely bec inle a victrin
of elephantitis," thought Chirpy.
He could stand it no: longer so he opened his
eyes, and behold! there stood Johnny Rcd-Breast
where Daddy Long Legs should have been.
"I heard you as I passed by," c\plained Johnn\.
"But where's that old demi n?" asked Chirps,
still a little uneasy.
"Lose your fears, mi friend, and just look at
him flying across that field. 1 couldn't do it more
beautifully myself. I'm gla 1 that I found you,
and now that my debt i. paid I must hurry along,
for Jenny Wren is calling."
So with these parting \:iords, Johnny. left his
friend who had once saved his life.
Mo, i .-One Pgo. 1. deed Letscrves another.








THE ZONIAN.


"And now, dear listeners, I am quite worn out,"
old Mr. Topin's voice came over the air. He was
terribly old-some said 300 years.
"Three hundred years!" Oscar Ottar was
astounded as were the rest of the children.
"I hope that you have enjoyed this program
as much as I have. I hope to be with vou again
next week. My last story and good-by "
MINNIE MONKEY.
Eloise Loring, '26.
Now I suppose you have been wondering what
was in the letter that Mr,. Monkey had received
from Bright Eyes, the parrot. She was just as
anxious to read it as you are and as soon as little
\l:irm:it irr, hopped upstairs to bed, she tore open
the envelope.
"Dear Mrs. Monkey," it began, "Keep a sharp
lookout for Mr. Wildcat. He is prowling about."
Bright Eves.
"Oh, dear, oh, dear," sobbed Mrs. \l.nkciy, as
she jumped from one branch of her house to
another, "''.\ I will have to keep little Marma-
zetto indoors. What shall I do? Mr. Monkey
has gone to Bananaville for the week end, so
perhaps I had better call up Uncle Ape."
Then over to the telephone jumped poo- Mrs.
Monkev.
"One, two, three, red shingled house,
Uncle Ape or Little Miss Mouse," she called in
a trembling voice.
Soon she heard Uncle Ape's dear little house-
keeper's voice:
"Who is calling? Here I am
Busily making mango jam."
"Is Uncle Ape there?" inquired Mrs. Monkey,
anxiously.
"He went to Cocoanutto this morning,"
answered little Miss Mousie.
"Oh dear, oh dear," cried Mrs. Monkey, and
with a "\'-' i. mind, I'll call again," she hung up
the receiver and the next minute asked Central
for the Police Station.


"Police Station, please be quick,
Policeman Orang-Outang with his hickory
stick."
"He is in Orangetown," answered a voice,
"Won't be home until to-morrow."
By this time poor Mrs. Mlonkev was frantic.
She cried and cried until little Marmazetto heard
her and came running down the stairs.
"Don't be afraid," he consoled her, "I still have
my little coconut popgun."
Just then, "Rap, rap, rapperty," sounded on
their kitchen door.
"Oh, dear me, what shall we do?" cried Mrs.
Monkey. "That must be Mr. Wildcat."
She hastily picked up a large coconut and
opened the door. Just as she made ready to bang
Mr. Wildcat over the head with the coconut,
what was her surprise to see, not the terrible
monster, but dear old Uncle Ape! He had just
returned from Cocoanutto and had run over to
see what was the matter.
'Why, goodness gracious meebus!" exclaimed
Uncle Ape. "What is the matter? One would
think something dreadful had happened."
"Something dreadful is going to happen,"
cried Mrs. Monkey, f..r'_..rtiii how bravely she
had picked up the coconut.
And in the next story you shall hear what
happened after that, while Uncle Ape settled him-
self to read the Monkevbridge Bughl and await
developments. Good-night to all.
And now Mr. Owl's party was at an end. They
had stayed dreadfully late-till 9 o'clock. And
how they had loved it. The stories had been so
nice, and the refreshments! Oh! But it was over
for another year, for all good things must come to
an end.
"Good-night, dear kiddies," said Mr. Owl as
they were leaving. "Please come again to my
party next year, for then I am inviting the Wood-
land Fairies."


A Irv, of Athleti (;ir!,








THE ZONI.AN.


THI-. C.AMPO(F ( RAISON.
Gisela Toepser.


After a horrible passage from Mad.lagaskar to
\Mars,ill.s, which, being war time, took us five
weeks instead of thric-, we were sent to the camp
at Garaison, situated in the High Pyrenees not
far from Lourdes, the famous Catholic pilgrims'
destination. We arrived there in December,
1916, after an imprisonment of more than two
years.
Garaison was a concentration camp of about a
thousand people: a few Germans, Bulgarians,
Turks, Fyvptiann and people from all nations;
even many English, Italian, and French women
with their children who were married to Ger-
mans, lived there. Garaison is an enormous old
convent near the Spanish frontier, surrounded
by high walls and Iguard.-. bv a body of soldiers.
M\ parents, my two-year old sister and I
arrived along with a Suloniki transport; my
father was put into a room with about one hundred
twenty people of the Balkans, and we had to
live with Hungarian and Bulgarian women and
children. Though we came from the intense heat
from Madayiaskar, without winter clothes, the
French gave us only half a cotton blanket and a
straw mattress full of vermin, and infected. This
we learned when we were unable to sleep on ac-
countofinnumerablelice, fleas, and bugs, and when
we became ill with scabies and nasty abscesses.
We had to sleep on the ground and to hang the
straw mattresses up on the wall in the morning at
7 o'clock. There was no stove, no fire, no light,
all the long, dark winter. The snow came in
through the :inanv broken window panes. We
suffered intensely from the cold. Three times a
week we were allowed a walk, but this meant that
we had to pace up and down 400 yards in a country
lane, up to our ankles in deep or melted snow,
between a row of soldiers with loaded guns. The
worst was that we had to stay there for one and
a half hours which made us d.lreaitd'ull tired; we


were forbidden to dry the er shoes and stockinls
at the window. So they never ugt dry at all. \\e
felt terribly hungry all the tim.n. The amount 1if
food we were entitled to was wrirten down on a
notice board in the passage: a piece tf bread
and black coffee in the minrning, halt" a pint to
soup or beans each for dinner and supper. That
was all. Yet ver% often we c iuld nt cat even
that. The beans were not hallfc',,kd from lack ,of
fuel; to make up for it, handfuls ol soi.a 0 were put
into the meals which made us all ill. \\e \were not
allowed to draw any money frm our possession%
in Madagaskar. There were no wash basins and
as the women could not go out into the open court-
yard, break the ice and wash in the presence of all
the men and as they had nr m n.- 1 to buy basins
and jugs, many of them washed themselves hardly
at all. The rest of our money had gone to buy
plates and cups at horrible prices.
Was it to be wondered at, that the place behind
the church yard wall where the dead prisoners were
interred was thronged? When after three months
we could get the first box with clothes from our
grandparents, my parents and I were sick in the
so-called hospital (there was no nurses and my
little sister had been buried three days before
The French did not release my mother, contra-
dictory to their arrangements with Germany,
until by intermediation of Switzerland we were
permitted to go to German .
It had been agreed between Germany and
France that women and children, if they wished
for it, should be repatriated. lMy mother, in vain,
applied for it. Though several female transports
were leaving, we were ordered to stay when on
the point of starting, without being given an%
explanation. By intermediation of a Swiss dele-
gation, who visited the prison camps, we finally
got leave to quit France for Germany.


9


a
H U
z









THE ZONIAN.


STREETS.
.-ndresw Donorian '36.


Streets, all streets, have a fascination. Little
side streets and great broad avenues are colored
by a romantic charm. And what are "avenues"
but little by-streets grown up?
In Panama one comes upon the most delightful
streets. They are always just around the corner!
Leaving the noisy market place and passing
through a damp, musty passage, one comes on a
little cul-de-sac. It is a tiny dreamy corner of the
Old World, a bit from an opera-La Tosca or La
Boheme. The outer world does not seem to affect
its somnolent repose. Slanting sunlight throws a
brilliant gash of flaming gold on the plaster wall,
and makes simmering, flickering shadows on the
gray pavement.
A signboard above a shop announces that within
are sold anchors and seafaring equipment of all
kinds. To substantiate this statement there are
displayed anchors and blocks, ropes and paints,
and sundry other materials for the use of those who
"go down to the sea in ships." Great green doors
open into the cavernous depths of the store. From
the darkness within comes the steady murmur of a
voice crooning over accounts. It rises and falls
melodious and plaintive, and at times stops, as if
the worker were looking through the heavily bar-


red window at the blue sky above. And it is
intensely blue, that sky--the blue of a happy
day-a blue that throbs and palpitates, resplend-
ent with the joy of life!
A tree, shaking in the breeze, throws quickly
moving shadows, and shades the narrow passage-
way. One can see, through its airy foliage, the
corner of a tiny plaza and the brilliant clothes of
the children at play. From the cul-de-sac a set of
steps wends, by easy stages, up into the plaza.
They are set at varying angles and show traces of
long use. Green streaks cross their creamy sur-
face and in the center they are worn into little
hollows where the rain water rests. The rains of
years have given them a rich, antique finish and
they look like pieces of old ivory in a museum.
Presently a lottery-ticket vendor comes along,
chanting the numbers of his tickets. He wears a
faded, r:iLuuel coat and on his feet are alpargatas
like those brought over by the conquistadores of
long ago. He walks slowly and, as he nears the
steps, his numbers fall into a mumble and he sinks
wearily onto the topmost stone and, with his head
against the wall, falls asleep. And above, the sky
is blue-intensely blue.


TO BOB OR NOT TO BOB.
.Miriam L. HallorNn, '27.


To bob or not to hob?
That is the question now;
Or if I should begin to hob
Sit up and tell me how?

Will it be a shingle close,
Or a boyish bob so dear;
Or will I have it short in front
To show my pinky e:ir?


\ill I copy sweet Ponjola
And look just four years old;
Or now affect a sheikish bob
With Stacomb hair so bold?

To bob or not to bob?
That is the question now,
Or if I should begin to bob
Sit up and tell me how?


THE WAIl. OF THE WOULD-BE POET
Josephine Camara, '27.


I've written stories by the score,
And made success by one or more;
I've started poems from time to time,
But never could 1 make them rhyme.
Indeed, they lacked good sense and thought.
0 dear! 0 dear! I fought and fought
To try to make them sound so great
That one would never hesitate


To straighten up and take some notice,
And I would maybe hear them quote this,
"How wonderful what he can do,
His name you'll see in 'Who Is Who.' "
But never, never shall it be,
As all my dream I now can see,
Are just mere castles in the air,
Which never get me anywhere.









THE ZONIAN.


THE GLAMOUR OF THE TROPICS.
Mildred heat, '26.


Who has not, when he has driven out on a wind-
ing road that is a white ribbon stretched before him
in the moonlight, with the balmy night air in his
face, felt the lure of the tropics?
Where else, but the tropics, can one fold back
the automobile top and ride in perfect comfort,
without wrap or rug, with naught but the starry
sky and the moon overhead.
What a charm there is to narrow streets with
Old W\\rld t'uilling', blended in soft pinks and
blues, and .-.vcrhaneinL' balconies; glimpses of
cool patios with exotic plants and an occasional
gorgeously colored bird; roads lined with feathery
coconut palms; hedges of bright-hued hibiscus
and sweet-scented jasmine and the vivid greens
everywhere!


The very atmosphere lulls the sensen and creates
an :ndiffertncc to worri and Fc tt. cares which are
apt to fret and irritate onc in coulcr climes. NIrh-
ing seems of vast or vital importance. The da\s
slip by so easily and with si, little efforr, that it a
thing isn't done today "manara" will suffice.
Human nature loves ease and curmfort which come
so naturally in the tropl-,. There I in:i worr ifl
heavy clothing or layrin in the winter fuel; no
long periods of staying in trim the cold. E ver\'
day is a "good" day; ec en the dailk showers il
the rainy season are codling and refreshing.
It is difficult to anal ze o.r e\prc~s this lure in a
definite way. It is in itsclt so vague and subtle
that it steals upon vou and takes h_,ld of vyiu
unaware. But who, once he ha. cxp-rineced it,
would leave it voluntarily, or going, fail ti return


THE GI.A.MoUR OF THE TROPICS.
Andrew Donovan, '26.


Around the docks of the great city clings the
faint, elusive perfume of the tropics. It has been
carried there by ships sailing from old nameless
ports of the Spanish Main-ships of romance and
mystery, quiet ships from unknown passages and
strange seas. It is a perfume reminiscent of many
things: of green jungles and still waters, of brightly
plumed birds, of adventure a nd Lu .d, anld i f-death.
For it comes from a country where the Gods are
kind, and where death comes often. This perfume
lingers and penetrates even into the great iron
city, tempting calling
The curious listener who wanders along the
water side will hear many strange tales from the
old sailors who sit in battered chairs tipped against
the great, grc\ walls of the wharf buildings. They
tell of rippleless seas, and of marvelous sunsets,
and of e. rl\ morning in the jungle when the sky
seems to be shut out and grey mists hang about
the billowing tree tops. They tell of men who
laughed and took the junglm trail, vanishing into
the stillness of its depths, of their empty ringing


laughter as they strodt away--great stalwart
men, drawn by the jungle quiet as if by a lodestone.
And do they tell of the jioous return Ah, no,
there was no joyous return, n, h-.aps uf gold and
tales of new kingdonms-rhe jungle peace holds its
secrets . forever. There are stories I!
phantom ships flying, with all sails set, across a
midnight sky and beckoning the sailors to follow,
'til, one by one the) go-sorro.vful, homeless,
figures with fixed, vacant e~es and clrisei lips.
Ah, these old sailors have seen worse---thc.
have seen things they dare not speak about, things
which sound ludicrous in the bright sunlight but
which happened under the brooding skirs of the
South. They light their stubby pipes and the:
pungent tobacco odor seems vet another link with
the mysterious tropics.
One goes through the Lobbled street into the
iron city and tries to forget all this but at night
there is a tugging at one's heart. It is the glamour
of the tropics, drawing d. . rarmin
relentless.


e
I~ .S
2


Ii'aI








THE ZONIAN.


THE BUS TI- 1I PF RAM MENTAL.
Consuelo Camera, '26.


All of you people who do not like to walk and
think that by taking the bus you will "get there"
sooner, listen to my advice and you will ride in
more comfort than usual. But you really should
walk, you know; it keeps your figure slender, as
demanded by fashion, and your complexion beauti-
ful. But if you must ride (as I do), then do not lose
your temper.
Oh, busses are temperamental, and you should
not grow impatient as such a slight thing as a
quarter of an hour's wait under a tree, dodging the
hot sun that shines through the almost leafless
branches as the breeze sways them. And when the
bus does come along, more than likely it will be
crowded; if any kind friend offers you her lap, I
warn you to stand; it is more comfortable-I
have had experience and I know, for I did not want
to tire the person by being too heavy, but rested
most of my weight on my feet, so that when I got
off the bus my knees were so wobbly they threat-


ened to bend under me any minute. I also had a
queer feeling that my walk had certainly under-
gone a sudden change.
Before you enter the bus, always look to see if
you are short enough to stand erect, or you may
receive a sudden surprise when your head comes
in contact with the roof. Also be careful, when
you get in, to choose a seat and make it your target,
and the driver will do the rest. He starts the bus
with a jerk and, presto! before you know, if you
have been wise in gaiL'iniL your distance, you will be
shot safely to your seat. However, you must be
sure to sit down or you will whiz like a comet
clear out of the window at the back. Have no
fear when you feel your neck pulled almost out of
place; it is only the slight jerk when the driver
stops; and if you look around, you will notice that
the other passengers' movements have been in
harmony with yours.


THE VILEST INVENTIONS.
Mildred Oliver, '26.


Now it came to pass that four wise men were
gathered together so that they might proclaim the
vilest inventions of the age.
And the first wise man spoke, saying: "Verily,
I say unto you, of all the fantastic and evil dance
steps, it seems to me that the '.Ar~,nlin- tango'
is the vilest on earth."
But the second wise man gainsaid him, answer-
ing: 'Tis true,but still more wicked and offend-
ing is the 'flea hop.' "


And the third wise man protested, saying:
"Verily, I say unto you, 'tis very vile; but what
wouldn't be vile with the name of such a .li,.L'rcc-
able insect! Methinks the 'half turn' is the most
provoking of them all."
But the fourth wise man lifted up his hands and
mocked them, saying: "Condemn them not, for
none is like the 'Charleston.' Watch and I will
illustrate."


PANAMA.
Hattie Belle Rader, '26.


Oh, give me a Panama tropic'd isle
With a tall, bent coconut tree,
Where the sun will beat down on a gold strip of beach
Cooled by waves from the Southern Sea;
Where, down in the thick, tousled leave; of some branch,
Will be hidden a parakeet gay
That will scream at the clouds, at the birds, and the flowers,
In chattering all through the day.
Where the wind from the jungle will rustle the air
With the orchid scent still on its wings,
And a yellow canary will fly by the door
And perch on my roof as it sings.


Then build me a native hut, thatch it with grass,
Throw a p llet of straw on the floor,
Trail a red bouganvilla up over the roof,
Plant a bush bright with bloom by the door.
I.et me dream in the hot-blooded languor and peace
Th-at only the tropics can give.
Away on my Panama tropical isle
Abandon me-there let me live!
And the sun will glare down on the gold strip of beach
Lapped by waves from the Southern Sea,
While the shadows are filt'ring in lazy design
Through the fronds of the coconut tree.




























I


P l .!n l i lll H. lr ..i ilI..i Ir P.' i, I Ti.i Cil\












FOR THE PEOPLE e ITl) RIjSffl1=R0 to1 l FOR THE NEWS
WHO DO NOT TIe P'I4alb VJI-W4-'aLSI NOT FIT TO
THINK LONG LIVE THE WAGGLER! PRINT


VOL. I-NUMBER I


BAL30S, CANAL ZONE


Lord Andrew Gordon Loses Velvet Skin in Heroic Rescue


Wonderful Courage

Displayed
Young Woman, Resident of Coro-
zal, Nearly Drowns but for
Daring Courage of Nobleman.
As Lord Andrew rode'by at the chase lhe
noticed a woman floundering helpless in the
three feet of water covering the bottom of the
pool. In haste he stopped, removed his shoes
and monocle, and dived recklessly in. from the
r.r1i I. ,'cht of 10 feet! Drawing close to the
JrI. 1i,' woman, he knocked her senseless
"..I1 Iu *,,I her ashore.
Bleeding profusely from wounds received by
scraping the bottom of the pool. Lord Andrew,
weak and exhausted, worked over thie woman
while bystanders watched in amazement his
daring bravery.
The victim, Miss Mary Knabenshue, soon
recovered, but Lord Andrew was taken to tie
hospital in the ambulance intended for her.
Lord Andrew. because of the ugly bandages
I, rl.i. his face. has refused to see his friends
l..r ,Ill Ie glad to hear from them.
It is hoped that the patient will soon be with
us again even though the outer skin of his face
may be missing. -Frances Greene.

TRAGIC CATASTROPHE
SUFFERED BY
ACTOR
James Driscoll, Male Star of "Adam
and Eva," Loses Short Story
in Wastebasket.
BALBOA. Canal Zone, March 17. 1926-
"Where is my short story?" was the cry wrung
from the white lips of James Driscoll, one of the
most virile attractions in "Adam and Eva"
which has had suci a tremendous success at
the Theater Balboa on Great Palm Prado.
James Driscoll, the young actor before whom
the world has bent its knees and who, it is
rumored, has received 3.000) fan letters within
the last two days from love-stricken maidens.
stood in the assembly hall of the High School.
Itt-rl, -i' ctt'd hIre told his sympathetic

STORY FOUND MISSING AT 3.00.
Miss Hopkins had ordered all short stories
to be in at the seventh period, but James had
had an idea that would make his evenmore
brilliant and delayed handing it in until 3
o'clock. After entering -"i -- ir.i.i and going
to his desk, however, hi- I -.r, I ii r his short
story was gone. It was then that he uttered
the dolorous exclamation.
FRIENDS SEARCH TIRELESSLY FOR
MISSING STORY.
His friends, marking the young man's
agitation by the nervous way in which lie ruffed
his lustrous hair usually so smooth and skiing.
attempted to console him, saying that they
would search for it.
Frantically they ran about the assembly
looking on the floor, in the desks. on the tables--
in fact .--r---i+or1 uit in vain. It apparently
w as ' li*i* .i I I,,,,,
ELOISE LORING AT LAST SUCCESSFUL
IN SEARCH.
At Last. Eloise Loring, fearing that James'
artistic temperament was being harassed too
muchforir i.. i. r .. ." .. lure.
was succe 'itl 1 'r .rc i i.. r on
top of a pil ..i ri.r .ri.' 1 , ., ,- '
Jam es. 1 .I.i ,r r. .I I ,, by
the unconquerable persistency of a faithful
p ll, r-i .. h i. .r I 1 1.' *r .I. 1" .[r y
possessions are always in the wrong places!"
-Hatlie Belle Rader.


TEACHER COM-

MANDS PUPILS

TO PERISH



Thi l .l h l" [Ce I i. h.- I rll j

I I r [ i
.1, r r i. i i.. I l 1 I ..
,, I , r
,1 r r I r r. I r 1 ..


.. r .. I




II, 1 1 r i I .. II
I ...r h r. ..h .. ,I n

- II ..h .. i .. .. .


-ii

















Si+
9S


Monkeys to Make

Touching Appeal

To Zone Friends

Annie McDade and Stella Newbold
Perform at Balboa Clubhouse.
Anrie McDade and Stella Newbold, the
B. H. S. Twins who have finished a course in
-l,;-ifr-l irie l i)t the Jazzemup Institute in
I ..l...r 1 1. III . _I .. . i iT ... 1 r..
fornmance will go toward providing a i .-
for the mjnkeys outside the Clubhouse I I .
dancers are very graceful and are especially
skilled in the turkey trot. Consuelo Camara,
the famulo ;..i. ir .; ner, is also r 'i ,,
with tl.is Ir. .,. i I' monkeys -,il ar. ,..
appreciate a large attendance at I.- i.- *. ir
performance. -Con villo Camara.

HIGH SCHOOL SHEIKS
ABANDON BEARDS

Messrs. Duran and Anastaciado
Are Nearly Mobbed by Play-
mates.
The two famous sheiks of the Balboa High
School, Elias Anastaciado and Joseph Duran.
are now proceeirr to raise beards. Tnese vourng
_..1,., once before had the intense desire
i i. .. L large, drooping mustachios. but oni
account of the numerous questions from the
public as to why they did sutich a horrible thing,
tt:ey saw it would be useless, and perhaps would
even detract from their good looks.
An interviews with Messrs. Anastaciado and
Dcran at the school was almost impossible.
for tht r. r i 'i..r.. i ill about them,
They r. .Ir.- r I .I I r .r interview toa
room and the door closed in orler that they
might be alone. They stated that the chief
reason for wanting to ha\ve beards is that they
might look likeard 1. ii, ;.i. i,.. ,, .r
ance of Longfellow, cr r r. r.r. r I i i .
-Stella Newbold.


mi miansmitaminini M


JUNE, 1926


Charlestown

Champion Dies

Before Eating

"Charleston Forever!" Was the
Anguished Cry on the Lips of
Wildurr Willing, Dancer.

The death of the world's most famous
Charleston dancer. WVildurr Willing was an-
nounced to-day. Tilds well-known collegiate
dancer died at his home this morning before
breakfast when lie had just received the sad
news about the Charleston. lIe was told that
the Charleston had passed away as a modern
dance. Wildurr immediately stabbed himself
with Ihis wife's hat pin in the vicinity of Iis
heart, and died with the words. "Charleston
forever'" on his lips. His death is mourned as
much as that of Booker T. Washington.
--ollis Dufiel.

FRISKINESS OF PALS
DISTURBS PARTY
AT TABOGA
There is a rumor going about that certain
members of the party of students that went to
Taboga oa March 29. are going to be question 1
as to hlow the clothing of the bathers was so
badly mixed.
There were three students who didn't go in
'i. i;.-,,. .. 1 .i.- the bathers came back they
I ir,.I i i. 1 I theircloth,,r I, i L < r i'i r
ea and the rest was to he r-.. I 1 .rri I
someone else.
It islot i i ..- ., r I t.-' r -
and that i. r i.,, i I. I I ...r Ir.I ,
w ill be se.. i L.... i.. -- '. i ,...

Economics Inspire

Richard Engelke
'Tis food for my soul! Take it away from
me and 1 shall die!" exclaimed Richard Engelke
as hli fLater vainly tried to wrest iis Economics
book from Iim.
Kichard's parents have always insisted upon
hiis retiring at half past six. as they do not wish
to strain their son's delicate constitution by
allowing trim to keep late hours. Kichard has
always complied with their desires until last
evening. wihei he uid a most extraordinary
thing.
About eight o'clock Mrs. Ergelke went into
her son's bedroom to see that the windows were
closed against thle night rain. and was terrified
to find t.iat Richard was not in iis bed. The
whole house, including tile downstairs apart-
ments. was raise. to look for the ois;. r .... .g
man. A policeman wlho was i'- ..", I ..r
street also volunteered his services ani a search
ii.i r i .; hours of terrible anxiety.
Is. '..r I -1;. ,ri the dry clo et. W hen the
door was opened. his friends saw him sitting on
the foor. his Economics bo'lrk in his hl id, foaily
r "'- over and over again to himself:
.1 i is tire tools of production."
W hea ?. r i: -c -Ik. .1 i ir, ,- I ,I -I -Il ,,
Richard ... 'I.r ,. ** '** I l ** r
mother would not be pleased to know that lie
was upi after seven o'clock. so le secluded him-
se'lf in the dry closet to peruse the thrilling
pages of his E-onomics book.
The Engelke family are biset by continual
worr I. ii. I -i. J ; i, r it i they
iear ..h~ 1.II i IIh. I k. I 1 k. ,,,I .... Ithat
it. ce r.' t. .lr-p with Iis Economics book
i. i.-..I ,, I i ,ll, I .i i..i i.e m ay gain
-Ha. ie Belle Rader.
Hattie Belle Rader.












THE BALBOA PEEK-A-BOO


y itorial.
By ELOISE LORING.


As the students of the Balboa High
School are subject to many laws and
restrictions, it is but fair that the
Seniors be granted one privilege; that
is the right to eat candy, sandwiches,
peanuts, and other forms of refresh-
ment during study periods.
The great need of this privilege is
evident to the most casual observer,
if he but step into the assembly hall
about the fourth period. There a piti-
ful sight will meet his astonished eyes.
The Sophomores sit smilingly be-
hind their books, thinking of the
pleasures they will have when school
is over, for their studies rank only
second in their carefree lives.
But the Juniors are more serious.
They are beginning to drop their
youthful habits, for they realize that
school is not a place for recreation.
They bend seriously over their books,
looking neither to the right nor the left.


But at sight of the Senior row, the
observer's heart is filled with com-
passion. The Senior girls, more than
the boys, are in a piteous state. They
have spent the entire morning in
classes, and have become so over-
worked that they have not thestrength
to hold up their books. Their heads
are bowed, their shoulders droop, and
they are in the last stages of hunger.
Oh, for a peanut! Even a lollipop!
But alas, they can not be satisfied in
this way, as it is against the rules to
partake of any refreshment in school
hours!
If the School Board would be so kind
as to permit the overtaxed Seniors to
take enough refreshment to sustain
them until noon, they would be re-
paid a hundred fold by their in-
creased zeal and deep gratitude.


FAIR NAENIA BAXTER
TRIES TO DEMOLISH
CURBS ON SIDEWALKS
TMi-- N n,, ru Bixter uh,,t rt.., rntI atcld ith-
:..r ,I L .t Ir, it.i. >r.n,.,r Pl a. wu:; arre. d
:.-t -rd i r i. ni rii .. e. .- t. rarn-rr or
t .. *l.I, alk. ,Il dr,,. ir. Mi.- B tier i'al
t! iii N. fid rni makr- i Irge tour 13 r,-unIl
in.g L ronr a. t I 11n hi n o.- in i.rnri rl in
I like i. dr ,' iin nl. l.tlv Forl I'nlupe
she stated \.nil1n.l Inlltrf .in\ in .rrir j I..
whom or 1it. I liii \nIl ,l..i n i] I iii rliip
pieces oni LIi- anil- 11k iit a ri.., i idult
Harder, m, im i li1t.h Jt h,-'I.. d litJ tin -rn.,-.-
As thl- j. \I-.. Batl.\ r rr-i .,ii-ffrn ith
judge fined Ir..r r.ir inr. I.. r I.. I ki, I ; lag., r
turns where a-, ir.,ir' d I. - rii r.
--4 Mn-Hf' / amir-I


PROMINENT STUDENT
SUSPENDS HIMSELF
BY ACCIDENT
Ci-. *i,-r NarilaiT.1. iiranaan.-rir ait'l. ..rn,,.,l
bOC t. I rT hN l .lrL II Iff l th1- pia li,', Irii otlt.ii-
bo3 i .i- rii i.ankirnm Hr. a. tih. p. iu r.a i 11.j-
ing ir h i- n IT lli mI,.rn.ri.
Il ti ,. ii a r-t i h-ipiHt b% 1i a. itin.,ia. inraen.
that i'. i 1,i v H.J Ii .rri Ehe 1. hirl-tuunr l.d ir, ih:
tragedy, a3 .1 P In-rr. rnlll, d Th, Dan. er.
was found In hin. i,.n.-..I-.n
He expl ini j lIui.- cr. Il.i I.i: h. .3 blen
trying to Ihnc I|., pciur'e nhi-. ih,- chir an
which he .'..i- ,niinHing. slpcd .,uE ir.im under
him. Ti, .i I. -ta-- lJrih-r h-I .a i.,rc-d I
grab TH," ra. iliri mnilH li, d ri, pr.v-r. 'i i.'I A
from ite ,' r rIr. l.r i. r
It .-. I.. ,d h, I.'l.ti r ht i.. I r- mino irnends
may n r i.. -r ir.m i h.-i r ir n ai r
-.1 *nja Carr.


Photograph of Loal Notables Taken on Steps of Balboa Brewery.
Top Row--east to west: Mr. MeUncommon (tooting the little green whistle); Professor Dent (asri-a.. *,h..ui
"mental gymna.sticsl"): Miss Hopping (watch her!).
Bottom row: Mi a runner standingg still); Miss O. Heat (watch her freeze); Miss Henryford (noted suffer i.t i


~-- ---









THE ZONIAN.


SOCIETY
Aaeniia Baxter, '26.


On the Monday before Easter, the Seniors had
a swimming party at Taboga Island. At eight
o'clock, 16 enthusiastic Seniors met at Pier 19,
to take the boat for Taboga. Mrs. Goodenow, and
Mrs. Lowe went .il..n_ as chaperones; and jolly
ones they made, too!
The party arrived at Taboga at 9.30, and went
immediately to the Aspinwall Hotel where they
engaged a room to be used for resting and dressing,
and for a place to put their numerous packages.
Then they strolled through the old village where
they explored the church and even climbed the
narrow, wxin dinii steps to the bell tower.
After this little adventure, the griup accepted
the invitation of the Girl Reserves to visit their
camp and enjoyed the walk through the grove.
At the camp the boys demonstrated to the
admiring members of the opposite sex, their ability
in climbing trees, and presented the party with
pods of ice cream beans which tasted very good.
The rest of the morning was whiled away in
theatricals. The Seniors dramatized "Cinderella"
under the direction of Mrs. Goodenow, and the
Senior Play Cast entertained both the campers and
their own classmates with a comic burlesque, in
Jamaican, of "Adam and Eva" which the audience
said was excellent.
At 12 o'clock the Seniors found that their hunger
was becoming very great so they returned to the
Aspinwall where they procured their lunches and
left for the hill in back of the hotel. There they sat
on the edges of an old cistern and enjoyed their
dinner.


During the afternoon most of the party went
swimming at the sandbar. The ones who did not go
strummed on ukeleles all afternoon and the patrons
of the Hotel were serenaded with music whether
it was welcome or not.
The party returned to Balboa at 10.3o after a
moonlight ride over a rippling sea.

It has always been the custom for the teachers
and the students to assemble in the patio and on
the balconies of the school building the last day of
school before the Christmas holidays to sing carols.
On this occasion the parents and the friends who
are interested are invited to attend; there is
always a great response.
With the passing of time this old custom be-
comes more and more dear. This year it was
especially charming.
As usual Miss Currier had prepared a program
of several numbers. It opened with the entrance
of the very tiniest children in the grades bearing
gifts for the poor to the Christmas tree in the
middle of the patio. Then the grades caroled
through "Holy Night," "Hark, the Herald Angels
Sing," and the other old anthems. One class of
very wee girls and boys lisped through "Away in
a Manger." At intervals everything became very
quiet; then voices, faint as though far in the dis-
tance, were heard, gradually growing louder as
the singers approached from a room in the corner
of the building.
The High School Glee Clubs assisted in the
music.









THE ZONIAN.


Everyone was requested to sing the last hymn.
There was such a response that the very air rang
with the Christmas spirit.
At three o'clock the program terminated and
the students rushed forth eager for Santa Claus
and two week's vacation.

The Junior Tacky party, given for the Seniors
in January, was certainly worthy of the reputation
the Junior's have of being "pI'P and original.
The affair took place at the Y. W. C. A. and was
chaperoned by '\Ii, Rauner, \I-1- Sandford, and
SI i- Frost.
Everyone was instructed to abandon all scruples
he might have about fine appearances and to
attend dressed in anything that was not too dis-
reputable. The rc,-lts, although not exactly
fashionable, were highly entertaining.
During the Grand March, which afforded as
much hilarity to the spectators as it did to the
participators, the tackiest costumes were chosen
by the chaperones. Eleanor Tomb, who went
back some 20 years into the past to achieve the
startling effect of her gown, and Wildurr Willing
who clearly betrayed his masculinity, in spite of his
flapper disguise, by wearing men's garters to hold
up ladies' silk stockings, excelled all other attempts
at tackiness and carried off the prizes. Eleanor's
young heart was delighted with a squeak balloon,
while the charmingly feminine Wildurr was
awarded a rattle to improve each shining hour of
amusement.
The rest of the evening after the Grand March
was frolicked away in dancing with Knight's
Orchestra playing.


Punch was served for refreshment.
On the afternoon of October 14, 1925, the Sup-
per Club met for the first time since adjourning
the previous June. At this meeting the f. 11, irin
officers were elected: Irene Brown, President;
Florence Peterson, Vice-President; Eloise Loring,
Secretary; Florence Nlurr.uih, Treasurer; and
Frances Greene, Parliamentarian. As Mrs. Toone,
our Advisor, was soon to leave on a vacation, Mrs.
I1.illi.i.. was elected to take her place.
The first supper in.. ti i- of the year was held
on October 21. The teachers of the high school
were present and witnessed the installation of
officers.


This year Conference .-,pened In the thirteenth
of N', ember. It was held in Balbra and was very
successful. Our Club v.on th,: <..n contest with a
Girl Reserve song writt :n [,b H:ttrie Belle Rader.
One of the most inte:-.-rin- meetings of the year
was the one held on A~oii Hill in Februarv. W'e
climbed the hill just bf-ore -..insct, ini. returned
in the moonlight.
During Easter week a .. amp .1. Ihrld at Tabkga
Island. 71h,. was the ii'c irrn that ain:p had
been held during the .ch i! \c.r. It '.;is i rrr
successful and we hope rc. h:a an.ithr i- one next
year.
Plans are now underv\'.i 1t a c :rni. al to be
held in order to secure ftndsI r- <-nl delegate
to one of the Conference' in the Srate; this summer.
The English Literature Jcl.a attended the
reading of Burns' pl.ei., Ii. NI-M. "Scotty"
Patterson of Balboa, at the Y. \'. C. A.
The reading was verN amusing, and one had to
pay strict attention, in order t.- get the meaning
from the Scotch dialect. As Mr. Patter, :n i;
Scotch, his dialect is tlunrt and he has man:
humorous remarks and jokes.
After the reading, Mr. Patterson was asked to
sing some Scotch sones. Mr. Patterson has a
very good l, ikc, and Scorch songs are always
pleasing. He sang among thcr selections, the
old, but always popular ballads, "Auld Lang
Syne," and "Annie Lauric."



On Friday, May 23, the High School Basket-
ball team gave a dance at the MNIsqclue.
This dance was given in ord-r to get basketball
equipment for the boys' team.
Of course all the Hiah Schio.il was there, and
Currier's Orchestra was at its hest. But there is
one hliing we would like to knrw: \\'here were
the refreshments?
However, the dance \ais success and everyone
had a e' i..d1 time.


On April 17, eighty -tu1l':nts L'athered early in
the in.llnriii at Pier i-, for the Junior Taboga
trip. They were chaperneicd by Mr. and Mrs.
lcLi.mmnlnl Mii.s Sanftird, Niis. Rauner, and
Mr. Northrup. The Army Inunch ..1 'a', under
the supervision of Lieutenant t Stephens of Fort
Clai twin, was chartered lfr the trip.





THE ZONIAN.


ial


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UK
IS/.l


V~..~ '


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THE ZONIAN.


The launch left the pier at eight-thirty. Pea-
nuts and chewing gum were passed around. Two
ukeleles, combined more or less harmoniously
with eighty voices, furnished the music for the
voyage.
When the launch reached Taboga landing at the
Aspinwall dock, there was a mad scramble for
bathing suits and cameras, these articles having
been secreted in the various nooks and crannies
of the boat. While the boys unloaded the eats,
which consisted of hot dogs, rolls, and ice cream,
the girls walked up to the house which was set
aside for the picknickers. As everyone was hot
and in a rather wilted condition as a result of such
arduous duties, bathing suits were quickly donned
and the party regathered at the dock.
There were rowboats waiting at the dock to
take the bathers to the beach, all of which were
soon filled-some, overfilled. One of the latter
happened to have the unlucky 13 in it; naturally
it swamped. As the boat was close to shore,
everyone swam out so there were no casualties
resulting. Upon reaching shore, the shipwrecked
passengers found that the excitement had caused
a ninety pound corbina to leave the water via a
native fishing line, evidently preferring being
caught than remaining in the water where there
was so much commotion.
The water at the beach was fine. Sand baths,
voluntary and otherwise, toy cayucos and punts,
and a ball, lent diversity to the dip. Many
snapshots of many groups were taken and a "real
good time was had by all" despite the fact that
many were by this time sunburned to a beautiful
sunset hue.
After the swim, the party went in rowboats
back to the picnic house for luncheon. Here a
big camp fire had been built over which the "dogs"
were heated to suit the taste of the eater. Leon
Greene, the "Presidump," (as he terms himself)
of the Junior Class, presided over the ice cream
freezer. So it has yet to be determined whether
all were served with the dessert.
For the afternoon's entertainment a dance was
held in the Aspinwall ballroom. Knight's fam-
ous orchestra furnished lively music and everyone
enjoyed the dJaiinir,. The time for departure
arrived all too soon, and to the regret of the entire
party the music ceased.
At five o'clock the party boarded the launch
and left Taboga on the homeward journey. All


were in high spirits at the start but gra uallv
subsided as the launch made its way through a
rough sea. This caused quite a number of stu-
dents and chaperones to succumb. An occasional
burst of song from some brave enthusiast, or a
few chords enlivened the trip home.

The annual short-story contest among the
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors, was held in the
latter part of March. The short stories con-
tributed by the students were sonim of the best
that have ever been written bh them. The
English teachers; Mrs. A. B. Goodenu i; Mrs.
W. A. Lawlor; Miss Mae Smith, the principal
of the grades; and Mrs. Abernath., the eighth
grade instructor, were the judges. They awarded
the first four places to: "The Response," by
Hattie Belle Rader; "Pancho Castillo's Carnival,"
by Charles Palacio; "The Castaw% as," by Thomas
Northrop; and last but not least "The Return,"
by Agnes N\illoughby.
There were several other stories that received
honorable mention which the limited space in
the annual prevented being printed. These were:
"The Command," by Andrew Dfnovan; "Chi-
quita Pool," by Mary MacDadc; "The One-eyed
Villian," by Robert Essex; "The Pit of the Dead,"
by Ralph Hendricksen; and "I \\Wnder," by
Fred Helmerichs.


In November the Juniors entertained the entire
school and the faculty at a calftcr.ia luncheon
served on the third floor of the schuiiI buiilding.
A tempting array of sanduiches, pickles, cakes,
and other dainties was displaced on thrc- tables
behind which attractive Juniors cto,.d and in-
formed the hungry students just hrb delici ,us this
sandwich or that cake was. -A a result %within a
half hour they were sold out, and the w aitcrs would
have gone lunchless had they not exercised their
cleverness and kept a reserve suppyI in the kitchen
at the Domestic Science Bulding. Lli1; Rauner,
petite but efficient, presided at the end of the line
and supervised the finances.
At 12 o'clock Knight's orchestra enticed ev cry-
one from eating to dancing. Mlr. McCommnns
extended the lunch hour is minutes that the
students might indulge in jazz a while longer before
settling down to calmer intellectual pursuits.
The affair was a tremendous success.








THE ZONIAN.


THE SENIOR PLAY.


On the evening of March 19, at 8.15 in the
evening, the Senior Class presented "Adam and
Eva," a clever three-act play by Guy Bolton and
George Middleton.
The leading parts were taken by Naenia Baxter
and James Driscoll, the former as Eva and the
latter as Adam. They deserve praise for the mas-
terly handling of their lines. The others taking
part were: Mary McConaghy, Frances Greene,
Helen French, William Wedwalt, Byrne Hutch-
ings, Ralph Jensen, Wildurr Willing, and Richard


Engelke. They were skillful players and deserve
commendation.
The play was produced under the able direction
of Mrs. A. B. Goodenow, with whom the cast
agrees it was a pleasure to work. Every one
thanks Mrs. Goodenow for her kind work and
excellent coaching.
Not a small bit of the success of the play is due
to the efforts of those helping on the stage and
selling tickets. The students who typed the parts
are doubly thanked and our only regret is that we
are not able to give a list of their names here.


"Adam and Eva"
A modernized version of Milton's
immortal and not to say immoral
epic
"Pair o' Dice Lost."
By Guy Bolton and George Middleton
An apple of enticement to be offered by the
Senior Class of Balboa High School
on Friday evening at eight-fifteen at the
Balboa Hothouse.
Satan offers special reserved seats in the
lowest level at only one dollar each.
Good fireside seats may be obtained from
the stage manager,
Mr. Beezlebub, at 75 cents each.


Of Eva's just obedience, and the wealth
of that forbidding man, whose mortal taste
Broughtsorrow unto the Kings,and all their woe,
With loss of home, till one greater Adam
Should restore them to their sense, and their
Blissful state, Sing, O heavenly muse, who,
On the secret top of Ancon Hill, didst inspire


Fair Adam and fair Eva with her directional aim;
sing,
O sing, of jolly Andrew's fate, at the hands of
Adam's
Chosen spouse, and of the dire event which
completed Clinton's woe and made the family
o'er. Sing, Ogracious muse, of the outcome of it all.
But no-no more of this, come and learn yourself.


THE SENIOR AND THE FRESHMAN.
Sydney Smith.
Once a little freshman hit a senior on the back,
The senior, big and husky, sat the freshman on a tack.
"Wah!" bawled the little freshman, "I'll get you for that."
He went right that instant, and sat on the senior's hat.
"Aha!" cried the great big senior, as the ruined hat he spied,
"There'll be murder in the woodshed; I'll warm your little hide."
The freshman struggled vainly to do the senior hzrm,
The senior gave a laugh, but he didn't give a darn.
At last within the woodshed, he wielded hard the birch,
And the freshie, sore but wiser, on a pillow had to perch.










THE ZONIAN.


"NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH."

A Comedy in Thr, Acts
By JAMES MONTGOMERY.

Presented on May 21, 1926, by the Junior Clacs
of Balboa High School, at the National Theater.
Panama City.


Cast of Characters.


Directress.......... .


lMr C P4TTERitia


Robert Bennett................... WILLIAM MENGES
E. M. Ralston ........ ..........LEON GREENE
Dick Donnelly..................... HARRY SMITH
Clarence Van Dusen..................... LESLIE BANAN
Bishop Doran .................. ...... .ARCHIE FRENCH
Gwendolyn Ralston.................. ..KATHERINE TOMB
Mrs. E. M. Ralston ....... ........ MIRIAM HALLORAN
Ethel Clark ..... .... ........ ELOISE LULL
Mabel Jackson ..... ......... ........ RUTH JoHNsON
Sabel Jackson.......... .........FRANCES BROWN
Martha. ....... .. ......... KATHERINE CONGER


At the Balboa Clubhouse on Friday evening,
June 4, the Balboa High School, for the benefit
of THE ZONIAN, put on the following vaudeville
program, with music supervised by \lis Currier:

High School Boys' Glee Club................ College Songs
Four-part Songs .................. ..Ancon Sixth Grade
"THE MON KEYS PAW."
Play in three scenes.
Dramatized by Louis N. Parker.
Characters.
Mr. White..................... JAMES DRISCOLL
Mrs. White ......... ...........FRANCES GREENE
Herbert White................... ..SYDNEY SMITH
Sergeant-Major Morris ............ EUGENE CLOUD
Mr. Sampson ......... ....... ....AMOS CARR

Tap dance ........ .... .ELIZABETH GRANBERRY
Gypsy Dance ................. GERTRUDE HARRISON
Three-part Songs ................ BALBOA SIXTH GRADE
Toe Dance. ........ ......... MARJORY QUINN


"CASTLES IN SPAIN."
A Sketch.
Characters.
Spanish girl ........ .......... SARA DE LA PENA
American girl ..........................BETTY JACK
Spanish Dancers.. ..... GERTRUDE HARRISON, ALMA MANN,
JOSEPH DURAN

'Roll 'Em Girls". .... DOROTHY DUVALI., SARITA DE LA PAZ
Ballet:
Under the direction of ELIZABETH GRANBERRY.
Saw Solo ............... ........CHARLES WILLIAMS
"Give Me a Kiss"........ ZONABELLE AND MARGARET AYERS


Synop-_ i of S0cnc-
Act I. Interior of a broker', office i, one of the principal
uptown hotels.
Acts 2 and 3. Parlor in summer home ..I F M R ilston,
Long Island.


Clock operator and propel, ii0,;,
Advertising Manager....
Manager of ticket sale...


i 1 L ION PETER'l,'>
RKiH RD JOHN ON
SII 1[AM \.1 lA SIlK1. F.-


Music furnished by the High A, hool Orche-trr under the
direction of Miss Helen Currier

CHORLiS

"Ch irlkcon
\\ho'"
"Yes S:r. I h-ir', MR B.ib "

MARY MCCONAGHY, GERrit oE H R sRI.i's. \IARGARE r A\ E R'
VZONA AYERS, FLORENCE .II. XTAGH. LLIZtBEI G RANBE.RRY,

Under the direction of ELLIZBE.T GRANSBERRY.

Accompanists.... ANNA SAPHIR, FLORENCE TENNESON
Advertising Manager RICHARD JOHNS o
Stage Manager..... T'n's NORTHRL i
Sponsor........... M,. 'NELLIE HopkIN



TH- 1 RAGF.DY
Kat-,r,' (.'5, .r '.

The shades of night were filling i't
When through the streter, toward honmr there parsed
A youth, who muttered with uild rce
A strange, sad word (I vuonder % h% '
"[- \.lnl ln.ition I'

His brow was sad; he he.i edl .1 -.ih.
"A coincides with B. Bur h ';"
What language this he muttered lo :
What thing was it tha: % exed him so:
"Examinations!"

A week had passed; but, ah! not he,
And so he pined away, "You see,"
He whispered as he breathed his last,
"I foolishly have tried to pass
'Ltxaminason,' "








THE ZONIAN.


A LU MN I
Stella Isabel Newbold, '26.


It is wonderful how the Alumni pass through
the doors of Balboa High School to places both
near and far. There is very little record of some,
but of the others we have been able to obtain the
following:
1925.
Dorothy Eastman, President of the Senior Class,
is attending the Boston Conservatory of Music.
John Tatom is in the Annapolis Training Class
at Hampton Roads, Va. Word received recently
is that he is progressing steadily.
Katherine Brown is at present studying music
in the Eastman School, Rochester, N. Y.
Florence Robinson has a clerical position in one
of the large department stores in Germantown, Pa.
Earle Gerrans is taking a course in dentistry
at the University of Pennsylvania.
After a long vacation spent in the States, Mary
Peace is living with her parents in the Canal
Zone. Marpare r Woodruff and Edith Trowbridge
reside at Quarry Heights and Pedro Migucl.
respectively.
Florence Tonneson has returned from an


extended trip to the States. While away, Florence
had a position as stenographer in New York.
William Allen, Theressa Betz, James Woodruff,
and Constance Graff are taking up further work
in Balboa High School.
Paul Sullivan is working for a construction
company in Colombia.
Latest news from Marion Locken is that she is
attending the College of Mount St. Vincent-on-the-
Hudson.
Paul Duran is at present employed by the
Panamanian Government in Panama City.
Helene Grimison is in the Cedar Crest College
at Allentown, Pa.
Nicholas Stanziola has gone to Italy with his
parents where he will make his future home.
Leon Weiss has gone to San Antonio, Tex., with
his parents.
The following are successfully employed in
different departments in the Canal Zone: James
Burgoon, Jacob Van Hardeveld, Agnes McDade,
Rena de Young, Loretta Kocher, George Gregory,
Eleanor Ayers, Alice Oliver, and Oliver Schroyer.










THE ZONIAN.


Ruth Breneman is holding a temporary position
with the Army at Coroial.
Ralph Clement is working in a real estate office
in Seattle, \\ash. He gave up the idea of going to
culleuc because he felt that there was a great
ipportunir f.r advancement in this position.

P.I %F;.Ri A(,F, ANLD ENM(,. \ E F.NT'.

I thel \\aini,, '2;, was married to Herbert
Staplcs and is at pr-eseit residing in Pedro Miguel.
Juha Zidbeck, '2;, and NMa Coino\r were
ill.e tlv married a few months ago and are now
li ing in New O(rleans
Mar\ Hearne NMoi,re. 4, and her husband,
Richard M...ire, '24, live in Balbua.
.ucv \\right Franklin, s, till resides i, Ancon
with hzr husband.
An encaaemncnt 'i' much interest to her class--
mares was hat of Viola Bewle>, '22, to Fred
New hard.
Ruth Ri:\d, '21, was married t, Dick Taylor
if th e Adm inistratioin Building and the\ are now"
li%111' in Balboa.
Aneta Albin, ':2, is married to Stuart Bates, a
f rmer em[.lo\ e of the Gatun Commissary. They
are residing with the bride's parents in Babvlon,
I.,,n Island, N. Y.
Ida Ruth Hammer. '2;, and Howartd M. Fuller
cere married at the Balboa Union Church. the
evening of April 2.s, 192h. They left very shortly
after for El Centro, Santander, Colombia.
1924.

Fltrida i-.dwards is still doing stenographic
w..rk in an office in New York Cits.
\Manr in Banton is engaged in construction ourk
in ials ador. His work with the Hebard Cmnipany
I lt mist satisfactory.
Alton White i' at present in Arica. He is
r:\pecred toi return soon and will resume his duties
in the Canal /one.


Andrew Whitlock, Phyllis Milliken, Mattie Lee
Brown, Robert Engelke are still holding positions
in the Panama Canal Service.
Philip Thornton is at the University of Pennsyl-
\anin. in Philadelphia.


Anna \'an Sicklen, Olena Hutchings,and Anita
Wood are all employed in the Administration
Building.
Horace Clark, after spending a year in the
L'ni ersity o\' Washington in Seattle, is now spend-
ing his time doine construction work in Salvador.
Horace expects to return to the Canal Zone for
a vacation some time in the near future.
How's the weather to-da Just ask Wayne
Banton, for on account of being in the Hydro-
grapher's Office, he knows.
\nita Sergeant is on the Gold side, but she
hasn't forgotten us, for she pays us a visit once
in a while.
Ihe Health office is verse fortunate in having
Helen Huber to work for them.
Esther Greene is in the Rochester Business
Institute in Rochester, N. Y. Word received lately
i' to the effect that she enjoys her studies.
.rlee Greene is a physical director in a Y. W.
C. A. building in Germantown, Pa.

I22.-'

Those working in the Canal Zone are: Thomas
Doran, Majorie Gerrans, Catherine Luckey,
Margaret Montgomery, Viola Bewley, and Irene
Stewart.
Ber I Ilgen is attending college in the States.
\illiamn Sargeant works in Cristobal and re-
side, there with his parents.
Ellen Roberts is studying law and music in the
Cleveland Law School, in Cleveland, Ohio. She
will go to New York next year where she will
complete her studies.


A FAMOL.S RAID.
'liait., Drs t..'.', "'.6


lil1en, ni children, minl jLu ,hall he.ir
)Or I irlmjils r iiil il i bu'.c.incer.
I ie (.ir i l P.in.im it .erenc
%i hen PIr .re i .ret.i .ippe.ired on the scenee
F-. hr.'\e.l the lunenle,, their heat an l thirti.
An I tin ill .n the ce irinL. ibur t,
Appe ire. ir rhe iir'. `i '-i ,
Anjd Cr h r spin ,rI. in rhe run
Plunder ind inurder were hll .inm
B'. ...hih, in Fn.l.in.l, he wun gre.it lime.


Weird rales of cruelty. are often told
\\nth romance woven hundredfold
Around this famous buccaneer
\\ho neither man nor God did fear.
But all in .ill ou will agree
Ihis famous authorr of cruel\
In a public square should have been hung
And the bells of all the churches rung
For the ending of a bloods career
Of an infamous, notorious, buccaneer.



























































Steamer entering Miraflores Locks from Pea Level-Panama Railroad at left.












THE ZONIAN.


I- \CH ~\(,I *"
ft. -.


By the aid of our exchanges we are able to
keep in touch with other schools from year to
year. Through the exchanges we learn what is
being featured in other schools for the year, and
what our school is doing in comparison with the
larger schools in the United States. We are al-
ways glad to receive our old friends, and there is
always a welcome for the new ones.


The following exchanges were received this year:
The Owl, Wellsville, New York.
The- .' . Covington, Kentucky.
The .'rgus, Gardner, Massachusetts.
La Reista, La Salle, Panama,
The Key, Battle Creek, '.l1.l n
The Caribbean, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
The High School Recorder, Saratoga Springs, New York.
The It'hisp, Wilmington, Delaware.


SCHOOL NOTES.


We have information of former teachers of the
faculty of the Balboa High School as follows:
Miss Edna V. Baer, Commercial teacher,
1920-1922, now has a good position as teacher in
Auburn, California.
Miss Hattie B. Paul, teacher of Spanish and
History, 1920-1922, is now living in Dunnigan,
California.
Mrs. Harrison Williams, formerly Miss B.
Denny, Mlathcmatiis teacher, 1920-1922, now
resides in Galveston, Texas.
Mrs. Ford Attaway, formerly Miss Etta Nor-
cutt, Domestic Science teacher, 1921-1923, is
living in Balboa. Occasionally she does substi-
tute work for the Sewing and Cooking classes.


Mr. Bernard L. Boss, Principal, 1920-192;,
lives in Abbotsford, Wisconsin.
Miss Ruth Thomas, English and History
teacher, 1922-1924, teaches English and Spanish
in Elko, Nevada.
.lMi, Sheila Cockeran, Commercial teacher,
1922-1923, is at present attending the University
of M.IuIl i, at Madrid. Spain.
Miss Grace Sherman, Spanish and History
teacher, 1922-1925, attended the University of
California the first semester of this year and re-
ceived her California Teacher's Certificate. She
is now residing in Danville, Ohio.


THE IDEAL GIRL.


CHARACTER.

Poise.-Naenia Baxter.
Charm.-Emily Conley.
Gentleness.-Eloise Loring.
Wit and Humor.-Annie McDade.
Vivacity.-Mary M CXinaghy.
.Athletic A.;,'i.'.-Florence Murtagh.
Refinement.-Florence Peterson.
Assurance.-Stella Newbold.
Modesty.-Consuelo Camara.
Domesticity.-Alice Halloran.
Soft voice.-Elizabeth Manlc.l..
Sportsmanship.-Mary Jo Lowe.
Musical Ability.-Mildred Oliver.
Cahnness.-Frances Greene.


PHYSICAL APPEARANCE.

Skin.-Eloise Loring.
Hair.-Emily Conley.
Eyes.-Emily Conley.
Evebrows.-Emily Conley.
Nose.-Naenia Baxter.
Mouth.-Elizabeth 1.inlcey.
Teeth.-Hattie Belle Rader.
Chin.-Florence Peterson.
Neck.-Katherine Miller.
Shoulders.-Katherine Miller.
Arms.-Katherine Miller.
Hands.-Hattie Belle Rader.
Figure.-Consuelo Camara.
Cloihes.-Naenia Baxter.












14 IHE A()NIAN.




































The Track
s Team

Strndire--
Lea to ri bt
\'ergyecLhea
G MGlmgan
F. Crua
C Butwre
C. Trowbrldge
H Smith.

Kneeltog-
Left to rnght

L. Greene
E. Anastaeiade,


























tandring- *L
Left to right:
Mr. Wilson
J. WodruR




J. Drescoll .
R. Jensen

Frrn t ro.
I Fri Iorolyhl
R Rnblnr., I
F r'r.s,
I' Butitlro
K K rat iJlu,









THE ZONIAN.


BOYS ATHLETICS.



IBASEBALcins '..

BASEBALL.


Balboa "Hi" was again victorious in baseball
by winning from Cristobal "Hi" two games out
of the three scheduled in the 1926 series.
The first game was played on the Twilight
diamond at Balboa and was won by the B. H. S.
team. The second game, scheduled to be played
at Cristobal the following Saturday, was a defeat
for the Balboa "Hi."
The final game, as coaches B:)gda and (;t')drich
decided, was played at Cristobal. The grounds
were dry, so the game was fast. The excellent
playing of both teams is to be mentioned, as well
as the game being clean and sportsmanlike. B. BH.
S. got right into the game as did C. H. S.; but as
soon as C. H. S. put three runs across the plate,
B. H. S. started. The fi.llii, off C. H. S. allowed
only 8 hits and 6 runs, while that of B. H. S. al-
lowed 2 hits and 3 runs.


The following are the results in box score of the
last and deciding game:


Balbo.l High School.


Cristoh:dl High School.


Plaers A.1.R. H. Plvers A.B. R. H.


Cross, 1).
James. jb
Butters, 2b.
Van Siclcn, rf.
Russey. rf.
Driscoll, ss
Trowbridg, c
Knahenshue,cf
Wedwait, If
Hutchings, p


2 \\ills, 21,
( CotTfi, h), c
2 Ordway, 11)
o Klunk, c, p
Peterson, If, 3b
2 Wirtz, nm.
i Grider, p
o Higgason, It-.
o Miller, ss. .
a Eggleston, rf..
xDavs.


uotals


3 (> 8 Totals ,. . .3 12










THF ZONIAN.


Standing: H. J. Greiser; L. Golden; E. Alien; H. Knight; R. Wood; C. Burkr,
Sitting: W. Wedwaldt; B. Hutchings; H. Granberry; F. Helmerichs.

SWIMMING.


A great deal of interest was taken this year by
the boys in swimming. An interclass meet was
planned and run off in great style. Some swim-
mers, not even thought of, came to the front and
gained favor for the on-coming interscholastic
meet with Cristobal. The final score was in
favor of the Sophs.
The Sophs scored 50 points, the Juniors 34, the
Seniors 29, and the Freshmen 18.

INTI.RCI.'A S SWIMMING MEET.
5o-yard Dash.
Golden and Hutchings tied for first.
R. Wood and McDonald tied for third.

5o-yard Dash (girls).
1. Angela Klemmer.
2. I-1- I. Ih W haler.
3. Juanita Orr.
4. \l -iru rer Bardelson.


so-yara B-, i_...- Ae a b.v.,
I. W. Wedwaldt.
2. C. Butters.
3. L. Greene.
4. J. Duran.
j5 -yaiJ hi. .-.t !r...t I :r.'. I.
1. Angela Klemmer.
2. Louise Kerr.
3. Janice Grimison.
So-yar, B;iia'- ,tok, I'..., I


t. P. Hutchings.
2. L. Golden.
3. L. Greene.

I. E. Allen.
2. H. Granberry.
3. W. Wedwaldt.

I. Louise Kerr.
2. Elsbeth Whaler.
3. Juanita lrr


oo-y .rd DaI I b-.i ,-.



oo0..ia. D..j ,fr., *









THE ZONIAN.


22o-yard Dash (boys).
I. H. McDonald.
2. R. Wood.
F. E. Allen.
Fancy Diving (bhuys).
I. B. Hutchings.
2. T. Mann.
3. R. Williams.
4. L. Golden.


Fancy Diving (girls).


i. Angela Klemmer.
2. Janice Grimtison


I.. Golden.
H. Granberry.
E. Allen.


9


INTERSCHOLASTIC SWIMMING MEET.

The interscholastic swimming meet came off
on February 20; and just as has always l.ip'lr-; ic1.
B. H. S. proved too strong for C. H. S. Although
C. H. S. lost, they showed fine spirit in keeping up
their courage until the end. The swimming meet
was run off as follows:

5o-yard Dash.
1. J. Klunk, Cristobal.
2. F. Helmerichs, Balboa.
3. B. Hutchings, Balboa.
4. S. Taylor, Cristobal.


loo-yard Dash.

J. Klunk, Cristobal.
I. Golden, Balboa.
E. Allen, Balboa.
S. Taylor, Cristobal.

5o-yard Back-Stroke.
B. Hutchings, Balboa.
H. Granberry, Balboa
; tied for second.
J. Klunk, Cristobal
W. Coffey, Cristobal.


1.
T. H. Knight, Balboa.
2. M. Eggleston, Cristobal.
3. S. Taylor, Crisrobal.
4. F. Helmerichs, Balboa.

220-yard Switm.
I. R. Wood, Balboa.
2. W. Wedwaldt, Balboa.
3. M. Eggleston, Cristobal.
4. T. Parson, Cristobal.

0o-yard Breast-Stroke.
I. W. Coffey, Cristobal.
2. W. Wedwaldt, Balboa.
3. C. Butters, Balboa.
4. P. Hayden, Cristobal.


Fancy Diving.
i. W. C.r T, Cristobal.
2. B. Hutchings, Balboa.
3. 1.. Golden, Balboa.
4. P. Hayden, Cristobal.

.... / Rel/ay swim.

I. Balboa High School:
B. Hutchings, F. Helmerichs, L. Golden, E. Allen


Relav Swim.










THE ZON IAN.


lBASK I




As THE ZONIAN goes to press before basket-
ball is under way, only a few of the B. H. S. games
can be recorded. From the games already played
this year the team has proved that it is able to
defend the B. H. S. title. All the players in these
games deserve mention for their hard playing
and clean sportsmanship.
The regular line-up for the team is:
Jones. ..... ...... .... .. Forward
Anastaciado ........... ..... Forward
W oodruff. ......................... Forward
Russey ...... ............ .. .. Forward


SI'Hil I .


Trowbridge.
Driscoll.....
Butters.. .
Wedwaldt. ..
Knabenshue.
Rowe.....
Hutchings...
Duran .....


Center
Center
SCenter
.Guard
Guard
Guard
Guard
Guard


The games that were scheduled and played are:
B. H. S. 24 vs. Corozal Rinkydinks 16.
B. H. S. 2; vs. Corozal Rinkydinks 2o.
B. H. S. 46 vs. Amador I8.


INTERCLASS TR ACK MEET.


It seems that athletics are taking a better hold
on the students of the B. H. S. fcr as before in all
the other events, an interclass track meet was
planned also, for the purpose of finding out "who's
who" in track. The Juniors took the contest by
the overwhelming score of 42 points. The other
classes were as follows: Seniors, I; Sophomores,
o1; Freshmen, q. The following are the list of
events and the winners:

5o-yard Dash.
1. Anastaciado, Junior.
2. Vengoechea, Sophomore.
3. McGuigan, Sophomore.


loo-yard Dash.

i. Williams, Freshmen.
2. Anastaciado, Junior.
3. McGuigan, Sophomore.
20o-yard Dash.
1. Duran, Junior.
2. Vengoechea, Sophomore.
3. Greene, Junior.


Cross, Junior.
Anastaciado, Juni
Duran, Junior.


/ L'-I,'./ Dash.

or.

Shot Put.


i. Trowbridge, Senior.
2. Duran, Junior.
3. Knight, Sophomore.
High Jump.
I. Greene, Junior.
Butters, Senior.
3. Taylor, Sophomore.
Broad Jump.

i. Anastaciado, Junior.
2. Butters, Senior.
3. Helmerichs, Junior.


i. Junior team:
Anastaciado, Dur.n. Smith, Greene.
Totals in points:
Juniors, 42.
Seniors, 1.
Sophomores, 10.
Freshmen, 5.


I\ I- R.,CHOLASTIC TRACK MF..T.


The interscholastic track meet was held at
Balboa Stadium, February 27. C. H. S. came
over in 2I_... form and at the '. gii;iin: of the
meet the B. H. S. stood no chance with them.
\LN\ rrlheI.,, B. H. S. did not give up and grad-
ually came through with many first places, so that
B. H. S. won the meet with the score of 42 to 17.
The results were as follows:


5o-yard Dash.

i. Anastaciado, Balboa.
2. Eggleston, Cristobal.
3. Hutchings, Balboa.
High 7"'"lp.
1. Eggleston, Cristobal.
2. Hutchings, Balboa.
3. Greene, Balboa.









THE ZONIAN.


loo-yared Dash.
I. Eggleston, Cristobal.
2. Anastaciado, Balboa.
3. Hutchings, Balboa.
,Shut Put.
1. Knight, Balboa.
2. Trowbridge, Balboa.
3. Eggleston, Cristobal.
20o-yard Dash
I. Duran, Balboa.


2. Greene, Balboa.
3. Hutchings, Balboa.

Br ad '7mip.


I. Hutchings, Balboa.
2. Eggleston, Cristobal.
1. Anastaciado, Balboa.


Relai Rare.
I. Balboa:
Hutchings, Duran, McGuigan, Anastaciado.


SOCCER FOOTBALL.


The introduction of soccer football in the ath-
letic line of B. H. S. caused a great deal of excite-
ment among the boys. Every boy eligible turned


out but only a few games were played. It is
hoped that there will be more games the following
year.


F -1K l =1n 1 FLMM 1 J-r

g \\c ,ih r,. th. nk Ir. H. I. (Gr .i r F. 4. |
|2| B..i_,>l, M r. 1. R. Kin, .,,, M r. H. \,rrb rup 1'.. I
| rhL supp rt hih rlic'. h. e i r n ii s 6I:ll.. in ||
| 'h :i \ i\ h, lpill i' r ri, ':'t r in ur .ir thIIl' c ..
\ ^ 't :appru s.i.it,_' thl ir hl' l p .ll, c p .m lp |, i, th.atr |
| t, ''i i i.. ,rl-- i L ht-. pr... i t rihen, rh.h Ir |
| w h.:-r Ji %,l % .t i-.r thc .i ni l..r rhe -c. .l. |5

,!_,.a- .Tz, X.z,,











































































i irl d. % IIll T. ,r,










THE ZONIAN.


GIRLS ATHLETICS
.llaVx "Jo Lo 'e, '26.


BOWLING.


'ova


BALBOA CS. CRISTOBAI..

Saturday, December 5, 1925, the Balboa Girls'
Bowling Team competed against the Atlantic side
team. The game was not unusually interesting;
in fact the result was the same old thing. The
Balboa team defeated their opponents by a margin
of 42 pins. This showed plainly that the players
from Balboa were l,,iri ....1i the best. The


game was played on the (atun .,1i.. The follow
ing girls bowled:


Cristobal.
I lelen lousel
Edna NIav Ran
Clara May
Beatrice Housel
Helen Bath
Lillian Housel


Ba/boa.
Ruth Johnson
Ilorence Murtagh
Gladys Bleakley
Mary McConaghy
Dorothy Klump
Agnes WNi. ...1h.


T1I'E NURSERY ROMANCE.
Betty Jack, '27.


The little toy soldier was walking his post,
At the nursery doorway one night.
The house was asleep but the moon tht sho:.e iin,
Bathed the whole of the room with her light.

The soldier was weary, and lonely, ;and cold.
His watch seemed exceedingly long,
But he knew he must stay at his post till relieved,
For to leave before then would he wrong.

The Grandfather's clock in the hall had struck i o,
When he heard a soft step close at hand.
His challenge, "Who's there?" brought a terrified gasp,
From the shadow behind the bookstand.

With hesitant step the intruder approached,
While the soldier stood ready to fire.
He took but one look at the doll who appeared,
Ere results to his heart were most dire.


She was dressed inl a dance frock ot crimson chition,
Slashed with silver, embroidered with pearls,
With slippers of silver, a wrap trimmed with fur,
And a coronet comb in her curls.

The little toy soldier, with never a qualm,
Deserted his post at the sight.
\ith their heads in the clouds and hand locked in hand,
The pair wandered away in the night.

They walked on and on, till the found a mmoonbeam,
And up this they strolled to the moon.
Where in Queen 1iuna's palace, they danced till the dawn,
Which for both of them came much too soon.

The light of the sun brought the pair down to earth,
Though the fill was a long one to take.
While their race to the nursery door was scarce done,
Before the whole house was awake.


If this story you doubt stay awake and you'll find,
That while the vigil you keep,
Your to s come awake and play all the time
That people are spending in sleep.








THE ZONIAN.


3n Atemoriam
Louis ALLEN
1906-1925

"I have sworn to win a harvest out of barrenness and
pain."

In memory of one who, even in his youth,
seemed destined to great things-one who lived
high in the hearts of his fellow men and pursued,
through difficulties, a high ideal past our under-
standing and knowledge.































,,o
-.,-. . ._- '



eH



- - e-V' 09a ..s-!1F a-- --e---- -- -* --m--a--w e __-
_ z


Baseball Stadium, Balboa, Canal Zone.


i- -





THE ZON IAN.


/NHO


IS IT?


-3


...c<......


I


.=I









THE ZONIAN.


Mary McConaghy, '26.


With joy I swim in water clear and bright,
And wear a suit that fits a bit too tight;
And yet, I feel no biting sting of shame,
Because all others there are clad the same.
-Charles Butters, '26.

MAiss Hopkins.---".iry's worst fault is that
she is too loquacious."
AMr. I',',,..-"Yes, and besides that, she talks
too much."


Sheba.-
Sheik.
Sheba.


-"Hello, Maple Sugar Daddy."
-"Why so confectionery!"
-"Because you're such a refined sap."


Helen (in science).-"'lr. Northrop, did you
correct our papers!"
Mr. Northrop.-"I'm ashamed to admit it
hut I forgot to do my homework."
Helen.-"Oh, that's all right, I forgot to do
mine, too."

Not very long ago Bilgray ran a special train
on a Saturday night for the opening of his dance
hall. The next day the Union Church ran a special
train to Balboa for the dedication. This clearly
shows which side of the Zone is 4_. irnL' to the devil.

TRUE.

Mr. N.-"I shall be tempted to give this class
a test."
John R.-"Yield not to temptation."

The shades of night were falling fast,
As through a Panaman village passed
A youth who bore mid fields of rice,
A banner with the strange device-
Maniana.


ON THE STREET CAR.


Two young girls were discussing their favorite
opera. As the conductor came up, one girl said,
"I simply love 'Carmen!' The conductor
blushed and whispered:
"Try the motorman, Miss; I'm married."

YOU NEVER CAN TELL.

My little grandchild, who is thirteen,
Came and sat upon my knee,
Opened wide her book of history
To recite the page to me.

Then I saw her finger pointing
To a picture of two men:
Reminiscence, vague, and haunting,
Rushed upon my mem'ry then.

"Elias Anastaciado
And this dashing Joe Duran
Are studied now," she told me,
"To get the atmosphere of man.

"For though they never were great statesmen,
They had much influence on their age,
For why lead a standing army,
When your haircut's all the rage."
-Hattie Belle Rader, '26.

Archie.-"Last night I made an awful mistake."
'7ohn.-"That so? How come?"
Archie.--"I drank two bottles of gold paint."
John.-"How do you feel now."
Archie.-"Guilty."

Perhaps she might call him a Deer but he's a
Stag if he hasn't the Doe.









THE ZONI AN.


He.-"Why do you call your children Peas,
Beans, Corn, and Tomatoes?"
She.-"So I can holler 'soup' and they'll all
come home."

BETTER STILL.

An old maid was approached by a welfare
worker:
"Will you subscribe for the homeless men's
fund?" asked the solicitor.
"No," snapped the old maid, "But I might
consider taking one of the men."

THE BITTER END.
"\\''ll be friends to the end."
"Lend me ten dollars."
"That's the end."

Miss Hopkins.-"Who is talking?"
Cheeseman.-"It's me."
Miss Hopkins.-"It is I."
Cheeseman.-"Well, what did you ask me for if
it was you?"

M/r.F.:',n-,t.-"This is the last time I am going to
tell you to stop talking."
French.-"Thank goodness! Now I can talk in
peace.

Little grains of greenness,
Little grains of sass,
Little grains of dumbness
Make the Freshman Class.

First Roomie.-"I get the hard pillow to-night."
Second Roomie.-"Well, I gave it to you."
First Roomie.-"You're all wet! This hasn't got
two feathers in it."
Second Roomie.-"That's just it; it's hard up
for feathers."

.i,.~. Sanford.-"Timothy, have you your lesson
to-day ?"
Absent-minded Tim.--"No, Ma'am, have y- i '

Rollo.-"Latest reports say that lipstick is now
being flavored with fruit juices."
Wallo.-"Oh, now I understand what Jim
meant when he said Alice gave him the raspberry
the other night!"


"You crook, I'll have nothing to do with you!"
said the blotter to the spot of ink. "You're just
out of the pen!"


SO UNNECESSARY.


Teacher.--"Johnny, how many days are there
in each month?"
Johnny.-"Thirty days hath September;
All the rest I can't remember;
The calendar hangs on the wall-
Why bother me with this at all?"

PASSING FANCIEs.

In the field of dentistry,
A thought oft comes ti, me,
Of a man I'd like to see
Named Phil McCavit'I

THE MODERNI- r

"Oh, what a cute little doll~ D)oes she cry
'mamma' when you squeeze her?"
"Naw! 'M, doll-'s a modern doll! She says
'Oh, boy!' when you squeeze her."

Joe.-"Say, Elias, you who are supposed to be
smart, what would you call a cannibal who has
eaten his father and mother?"
Elias (after deep concentration).-"\\hy, an
orphan, or course."

Golden.-"That was the most touching scene I
ever witnessed."
Margie.-"'\\ htre were you?"
Golden.-"Up in the tvpet writing room."

YOU MAY BET..

CL,.'n,..,,I.--"Women are wanton things, eh,
what?"
Golden.-"Yeh, always wantin' something."

Elias.-"Why do the people of Samoa wear so
little clothing?"
70e.-"Guess it's too hot for Samoa."

Hutch.--".1iss Hopkins, I want to ask you
about a tragedy."
Miss H.-"Yes, go ahead."
Hutch.-"What's my grade "









THE ZONIAN.


AS USUAL.

Two girls were talking over the wire. Both were
discussing what to wear at a coming party. An
impatient masculine voice kept interrupting.
Becoming indignant, one of the girls asked:
"What line do you think you are on, anyhow ?"
"Well," he answered, "I am not sure, but
judging from what I've heard, I should say a
clothesline."
WHAT'S IN A NAME?

Sweet Naenia was a Senior;
She had a Ford coupe,
And everywhere that Naenia went,
She rattled on her way.

Now Stella was her classmate,
She also had a car;
And though it was not closed in glass,
It took her just as far.

But, dearie me, these maidens sad,
Were pricked with jealous swords,
For students always laughed and jeered
At their poor struggling Fords.

But Stella, with courageous heart,
Asked, "What's in a name?
I know we make an awful din,
But we get there just the same."
Hlatie Bell/ Rader, '2-6.

A WORDY THREAT.

Eu chre justify could get you I'd divest ure
head dis may.

/ife.-"Oh, I'm so tired of married life."
Husband.--"So's your old man."

Sing a song of students
Cramming for exams,
Flocking to the library
Like a bunch of lambs.

When exams are over,
Students begin to sing,
"Put away the text books-
At least until next spring."

There was once a young lady named Stella
Fell in love with a 1 .. 1. *--. j fella.


This risky young chap
Let her sit on his lap
And she fell clear through to the cella.

In the State of Arizona
(row some things for us to frown on
There grows the finest cactus
That ever I sat down on.

\Aorb/rtc7.- "W\here arc you going to cat?"
B/anv.--"Let's cat up the street."
Vorbert 7.-' ....., I don't like asphalt."

I'A(,' MR. FILNT.

I.,on Gr;e'ne.-- What is a polyglot?"
.'lidrew D)oncan. -"I don't know; I never
studied geometry.

AMr. .--" What are the constituents of
quartz?"
1T'iliamn ll'ed abdt.--' I', ,r ."

OVERHEARD IN PHYSICS.

AMr. McCommon s.-"What is the center ot
gravity ?"
Russell Jones.-"The letter 'V.'

Ix HISTORY.

Aliss Rauner.-- lsheth, what makes the Tower
of Pisa lean?"
ElsbLth [Ihialr.-"I don't know, or I'd take
some myself."

Golden.-"See any change in me?"
Bob.-"No, why?'
Golden.-"I just swallowed is cents."

Paul Duran.--"Why can't the English tell
jokes on Saturday night?"
Charges B.---"Because they are afraid they will
laugh in church."

Frances and Elsbeth r.l.;ni. sentimental
poetry:

/Esbcth.- "Ah, listen to this:
'I'm sorry, dear,' he said,
And his cheeks were wet."
Fr;ances (skeptically).- I IiiirI. I :'d prob-
ably just washed his face."














Travelling on the ocean
To me is no delight;
For when the ship's in motion,
And land is out of sight


THE ZONIAN.


Agnes II i'.:'oig.1 '27.
There comes a funny feeling,
And then I start to wail,
And soon you see me creeping
In the direction of the rail.


Seven days I stand it
With not a ,-iht of land-
When people say they like it
I fail to understand.

CHIMES FROM THE BUGHOUSE.

She's my cockroach
I'm her bug.
She's my chewing gum,
I'm her plug.
If she's crazy,
I'm demented;
If she's happy,
I'm contented.
Coo! Coo!


_ __







THE ZONIAN.


PI THE ADVERTISERS IRK
I II
Are a Big Factor in the
Success of "The Zonian"

Ii


ITS READERS IN

Are Requested to Give Them
First Consideration. M IR
lI E mI I
n.E tl_ l ulllis.a d mlinl ~ dl~ ~ h l.dJadium l il;l._l Ilililll::__.lIll_.11.,ilh:.lO IIIh',l flu shl~lt II{_ll..mltau uhlls .J. _, J n hdlh,,t. _lh.. ,Lllllslli.ill,.lll, l h ,liadg ,unlaul.0J I nAl llJIu.lh.,lhindi T [,'lJ 1:ES1






TH ZONI.AN.


Remingtof


.22 Calibre Repeating


Rifle


Model 12

--oeA plan's Sport Through and Through
HOOTING trains the eve, steadies the nerves and
the fellow who has never "squinted" down the
barrel at a scurrying rabbit has
missed the biggest thrill of real spot.


The Remingron Model 12 Repearing
Rile is just the thing for all small game
or target shooting a little gun that
gives big results!


%;1


The magazine takes 15 short, 12 long or 10 long
rifle cartridges without adjustment. Reloads in a twink-
ling by merely sliding the fore end
back and forward..
( ( 76 Light to carry and easily taken apart for
cleaning, the Model 12 is all that a .22
calibre rifle should be-and more.
Let your dealer show you
this wonderful little gun-today.


REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, Inc.
25 Broadway, New York, U. S. A.


POCKET KNIVES


_
___


~_ ~


80


IUMCE EMINGTON


FIREARMS


AMMUNITION







THE ZONIAN.


IIF ELECTRIC IRONING
Ss Cheapest and Best
Why not learn that

ii Electric Cookery
C,7 Is Cheapest and Best
In- NO FOOD WASTED IN EVAPORATION
OR TAINTED WITH
"l POISONOUS FUMES AND SMOKE
/ SEE OUR NEW RANGES |
YOUR SATISFACTION
mg EASY PAYMENT TERMS I

SCia. Panamefia de Fuerza y Luz
|| PANAMA COLON
I M_ .rIi1 lT ^1 IE SE JBEmE.B. nJ- E


I D RINk !N

|l D E L I C 10 L. S

iH1 ltim
1 I

. Delaware

II

HE Punch g


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0 -
Antonio's
S.1 Central iinue : : P.j:nai,.i Cil
: U
-kf
I'I
IsL
11 .4I01Q .ARTERS FOR
l Parisian Novelties ,

and

SDDresses


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THE ZuNIAN.


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Compimnts |
OF

A, Panama Agencies Co.

|P P.NAMA CRISTOBAL BALBOA i,
HI
lIIO

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Compliments


Balboa


R. H. W. MITI
DENTIST


'EN Z


:anal Zone

1


I (Compliments


I
q" Canal Zone Iteotaurant5 o




log CARL STROM m1
t19 Manager NI

I'N l_ i i








THE ZONIAN.


.t1\C~- .:


*"' .*
: What's Your Score?
1=0; To geI from outdoor, the thrill Ihat f
outdoors owes .\ou-have 3o0ir et> -
examined withour delay .
i The Scadron Optical Compan.

.t (Cenir.al \9nuJ I i r. jil K r tI

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Compania De
l Navegacion Nacional |
EplI (National Navigation Co.)
i 1 I|

STEAMSHIP SERVICE TO ALL PACIFIC I
PORTS OF THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
MAIL CONTRACTORS TO THE PANAMA '
GOVERNMENT

SPassenger and Freight Service

SRegular Sailings to Pedregal for ,
--1| Boquete
|.--- =
iiFor Rates and Dates of Sailing, Write or Phone
Addre-ss
jl National Navigation Company I
Box 18o, Panama Cary
Ph.ones. 1o68 ani 542 Corporation





,Ii -777 1. i 11 L T
ri : I:] kflT unu an allnn r





AUTOMOBILE PROTECTION


Fl FIRE
Fl THEFT
S COLLISION F1F
PROPERTY DAMAGiE -

I : Special Rates for th l Canal Zone :

ill National Fire Insurance Co of Hartford I.
1 II. T. Bonne Enrique de la CGurdia i
S ( n \qr \s.n1 <(.an \-

CENTRAL HOTEL BLDG.
F- g

1F .\ NA .\ Fr A
I=- II~


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1 -H Zo)N IA.\.


PANAMA COLON
S p. o. Box 284 P.i poBox, icisobalo45 18
S Phone, Panama 335 Pa aI ne Garage Co. Phone, Colon 5 45
SCADILLAC HARLEY-DAVIDSON -
OLDSMOBILE Goodyear Tires MOTORCYCLES
I OAKLAND Motor Accessories
CHEVROLET DELCO LIGHT
SCARS Best Service Station in Panama EXIDE BATTERY



FOR P. O Box 4?,; P 0 Box 2004
FR 9d PANAMA ANCON. C. Z.
GRADUATION DRESSES I C


"C" FOSTER I R. LINCE & Co.
22 CENTRAL AVENUE IMPORTERS & EXPORTERS
ml INEI SOF Jim!
M NO 11 PANAMA HATS
Headquarters for Woman's Apparel : NI

SQUARE DEAL TO ALL

The
ONLY AMERICAN STORE |1~I 83 Central Avenue Telephone 965
Of It's Kind |I PANAMA, R. P.

noi Igi



DR. WM H. GRANT
DISTRICT DENTIST

g TELEPHONE 890 .. .. .. 4th OF JULY AVENUE. No. I

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THE ZONIAN.



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(;r lra t ini C'la. of 1926
,!1 ;m 7 the


PA NA1 RAI 10:
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Compliments IK

FROM

Sl Hospital de Panam ,





2-1
4 1- _ _ _ _1







THE ZONIAN.


gymmmmil M I T-n I II:

g When in Panama
DO NOT FAIL TO CALL AT

The French Bazaar *

i,- -+I
S. LARGE DEPARTMENT STORE

S1 Headquarters for Parisian Novelties
PANAMA

Sii,},' COLON
PARIS







1I, aL.l ON THE ISTHMUS

Large asntruments Io Tropical Clothing of all Descriptions
N5usical InIrrumen(
including I
SL ull Line of Wardrobe Trunks and
II VERY OLD VIOLINS I Genuine Leather Bags

KLELES. GUITARS fine assortment of Tweeds, Serges,
1.- Linen and Khaki Drills- Boots
MAhNDOLINS, Etc. i. and Shoes, Hats and Caps,
MANDOLINS, E. Shirts, Collars, Ties,
Slf, 159 Etc.
RIII 'E CARLOS W. MULLER
RE.\SONABLE PRICES PROPRIETOR
I
FBI -FUF r '- I i_ [JIZ.:lIt 71I'lll lll l I ,I..1 i- JJ







THE ZONIAN. 87

iv 11 1I9 SB 1 E r: :'i an r i un 7 B r iu.1 i aE r n:u:1 i !: :1:'7 i' LI :UM '; :.1.3 !!flu u mi __
ST r Ice Cream, Soda Water, Coca Cola, Orange Crush,
S0 Ginger Ale, Club Soda, Eskimo Pies and Glassware
Call Colon 84 or Panama 65Fi J

SThe Panama Coca Cola Bottling Co.
, : . ... .... ...... ... ..................... ..L .. .. ...
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SBenedetti gNina Mastellari

SHermano FASHION STORE

Si I'entra! Xenuie and 9th Street !

Drugs, I i'
g Stationery, g -
SPrinting 1

SPanama R.P. 1

PAN A M[ A I' PHONE 13
* 1 1 I:I 11 Ii
:- : I fl i: -.: -- :.: i.::: : = : "-_ -r ..r.. .:r- --, i ..t :... .. . ..'.'_ J:.
r;-'p mi.. : ". ai -.... -2 - -E ---- ._. .__ .

STEPHFN LANE FOLGER, Inc.
LST. l. ISIllD 1'1'

11.o 1BR1 .41) IA 1V. NE"I iU 'ORK

CLUB AND COLLEGE PINS AND RINGS ..: GOLD, SILVER AND BRONZE MEDALS i
!E. .7r1 IinI 3 r.::.?ri .[:-ii II r:.- .:iia.nrnrrrfl.l:?:lU : : ::Ir. n l.r: E I jr ril tl3 ; i n z:






THF ZONIAN.


lrnm'ff f mm,' .llt ninnni m mwr" nrnunuwnTm m m mEm =1 fimmEifm T L yM I


A GAS STOVE

IS AN ORDINARY RANGE WITH A
COLLEGE EDUCATION

"IF IT CAN BE DONE WITH HEAT
YOU CAN DO IT BETTER WITH GAS!"

Panama-Colon Gas Company
|i| At Your Service

g, gfl imiff ni flhiffifflaml nn'ri'Tfliiinnnjiilfhi'[flnjfl'Tifi 'Th VF@ I! RIrI If 1 1 01iELIIII TW1

IPICTURES! Taken of anything, at any time, and anywhere


.*. WE SPECIALIZE IN .. .

i Quality Portraits



THE MARINE STUDIO
i| No connection with any other Studio
S109 CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA CITY
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Full Text

PAGE 1

WeZONIAN 1926 ,f.., > I I

PAGE 3

jforeb:Jorb. I I T S ill Ihe warm d,y air; I I Ille b r eeze Iha! blows ill l iiI gtlln or ill lill)' wlJispers ; Ille II eOerl{IJlill,'( blue oj Ihe deep, II deep, sky; Ihe stlilillg clouds; I Iheglealllillgsea ; /IJesoJll1ig!Ji wilh il.r I r illllllillg oj slars II Ihis git/Illou r oj the I r opics mE which ,ve hope 10 have caughl ill Ihe pages oj 01/1 allllual. iii

PAGE 5

THE ZONIAN "Qt. xnl B:\L BOA, C : \:"-::\ L ZONE, 19 _'6_ ________ _____ F o r e w ord Dedication Zonia" Staff Editor ial Note Facu lt y Senior Cla"" Graduates Rogues' Junio r C la ss Sophomore C la ss Class P U BLI S H E D BY THE BALB O A HI G H SC H OO L B .\1.80 ... HlOl 1 ScHOOL CON TENTS. LiIClOlry-Cont;nucA BEn HATTIE BELLE RADER, '2 6 40 \ Raid 40 Exchang(s 4' School ... Tlw Ideal Girl Bo)"s' ,\thietics Girls'Athletic..; The Romance I n Memoriam RALPH I-iESORICKSEN. '27 4 2 jokes 5YDSEY '27 43 JAMRS DRISCOLL '26 60 IRE:" E BROWS, '20 6.1 6 J 6J B"R:-':E H l.'Tclllsc .... '2 6 )IARY JOE LoWE. '26 i l BETTY jACl.:. '17 " MARY '26 75 79

PAGE 6

BII,JI'/(J! .-IJJiJlfllll BIISilleIJ ,\fa / Ulger C ircullll;OI1 .\/a n agf'r ,'/uIJlanf Circlllal ion ,\1(Wflxer / ,Iurar.v Edllor Soc;e,., &/i/or THE ZON IA:-.'. Ionian $taff Edito r-ill_CM4 .' \SOREW DOXO\'AX RIC HARD JOHXSON Exchaux Edit o r R AI.PH JENSEN Alumni Editor JOSEPH D URAN ] olu EdilOr \\'II. .I.IAM WEQW,UDT S /Iif/ .1rliJl CHARU:S B t :TTER:. B o.,; /Il hietic Edi/o r. P ,H.I. Y Girl s .-'llhie /i, Edi/o r 1'\A [:O:1 1\ BAXTER, B/fs ;1/n s A d visor. i\t I SS HOPKI N S J R ESE BROWN STEI.I-A :'\'[\\'801..0 i\ IAH i'oiCCONACH'LEOS GREENE BYR:"E Hl"TCHIXCS i'.I AR\" .10 LOWE

PAGE 7

THF. ZO:-\1.-\;\. ji}ote. I \\ i 5 h to thank everyon e wh o has coo perated wir h me to mak e thi s issu e o f TilE ZON'l r\X' a sliccess. I wish to thctnk ;\ I iss H opkins, l\l r. i\IcCornmons apd J\l i ss Sandford, (or t h e ir kind an d UlHiring aid. I wish p e r so nally to thank the office for ce f o r its kin d h e lp in type writing manlisc rilH s. Am o n g them are l\liriam H alloran, France s 13ru\\ 11, Stella :'\'t:\\ hoJJ, Hartie B elle Rade r H elen Forb es, :\Illlit' I\l c Dade, l\larcella Gae b and Alice Halloran. F o r the h e lp of T H E ZOXI \" staff I ('an lind 110 wo rds to express adequately my thanks.

PAGE 8

6 T H E ZON J .'\:-I. ..'1facultp. e THos. R K ,NG. \,i scollsi 11. B e loit College, \\" isconsin. Stout lnstitute, \\'isconsin. University of \\'iscolls in, \\'isconsin. S uperj)isor, Indus/rial / IrIs. ULVA. L. I .A\\"s Ohio. :1 .. B. \\'es leyan University. A. 1\1., Modern School of Languages, Middlebury, Vermont. Spanish J L. ;'\'ebraska. HELEN L. CURRIER. I\l innesota. A. B., University of Minneso ta. Supervisor oj Public School Alusic. LESTER S FLINT. 1\lassachusetts. B.S., Tufts College. Alath e matic s A. B., University of Nebraska. A. M., Columbia University. HELEN C SANDFORD. New York. A. B., Syracuse University. Graduate '''ark, Columbia University. Engli sh. VERNA STEEN. Minnesota. Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota. Ra smusse n Business College, I\' linnesota. ComJlJacial Subja/s. l\IYRTLE 1',,1. \\'HALEY. \\'as hillgton. A.. B., L niv e r sity o f \\'ashington. Graduate \York, Columbia University. Eng/is/l and Commercial Subjects. C. R \lnO-:R. Michigan. A. B. University o f l\lichigan. Graduate \\'o rk University of Chicago. Graduate \York, Uni versi t y of i\ladrid. Histol)'. Principal. OLGA J FROST. Canal Zone. A. B., l\lount St. Vincent-on-th e-Hudson. Spanish and Fr e nch GARNET V. GROVER. K ansas. B. S., Kansas State Agri cu ltural College. H Ollsehold Ar/s. NELLIE HOPKINS. South Dakota. .'\. B., State University of South Dakota. Graduate \\'ork, C olumbia University. Eng/islz and La/in. HERBERT E. NOR"nlRt:J>. South Dakota. : \ B State University of South Dakota. Science

PAGE 9

THE SENI O R PusidwI. RICHARD E:"CEU,.!'-V;u PrUidenl, B\-RSf.l l t.:TCHI'\C'> Sl'Cri'/flry and Trt{ulllt'I", HArnE BeUE RADER CI{lSJ Color s P urple :Jlld Gold ellis] .\/0110, :-':oble .. sc oblige Clan .idt'iJor, ;\I i ... FRO"T BAXTER, :\""110 BROW', IRE:" E BL"TrERio, CHARU:S CAMARA, CARR, .-hlOS CO!l.I.EY, E:o.IIL\" DONOVAN, .-\:-'OREW D IU SCOLL, jA:'IES ESGELh.E, RICHARD GREEN, F RA:"'CE S II A CK, L OL"IS H.S Hl.:E, "-\RL LORINe, ELOIH. L OWE, ;\ IAH ) 0 :\IAXI.\, ELIZABET H ALLEN, \\' II.I.IA:'o1 B ETZ. THERRESioA BLANK, Roy BOSNE\' DOROTll Y CAl\'O, PABLO COOI'ER, J\l r s. H C. FISHER, l\l rs. G W F'UR, PAUL :\111. 1 ." KATHERINJ:: ;\IcCOXACH\, \ I AR\' ,\lc DADE. : \ S:.olf. ;\1<;,\111.1 .... ,. i\ lAlzl E ;\1L-RTACII. ;"'!F.\\'BOLD, STf.L,I.A ;""OR'I'HROI', OLIVER, E \'ERf.TI' F L ORI::>; CF. RADER, I BF'LU" TROWHRII>CE, CHARLE!> \\'ED\\ALDT. \\'HEAT I \ I!LOREI) \\"UITAI\..R. CHARLOTTE WILl .... e \\' IL DL"RR Ct'Ii'.AI)O, ZO'IA .I);,\ \EI.L, CECI l. ,\Ir .. C. E ,\h:AD, GEORG.: L l C\' ROIH: sO:' !\ I r s. Z i\1. \\'OODRtrr,

PAGE 10

THE ZO:\I.-\:\. RICHARD \\'OODWORTH ESGEI. .... .:. Wa s hington, D C. "\\'haft:'cr he did was done with so much e:lse. I n h im a l one 'twas narur,.] to ple3se. 1I)':!.3 '25 Pr esident. 1923 '14 '1; ZO'L" Staff. I "Jl1-T en. Shamrock ;\ l in<;treh,. P rog r lIn -l.egend of Sleepy H ollow, 19':!. ... Swimming:. 1915 J unior PI;I). ZOSIAS Program. 1916-Senior IATI'IE BELI.E RAOt:R. \'irginia. Her heart je; like:t throbbing: star:' H)13-G1ee Club. Ten. P rottram L egend of 1-10110\\. L uncheon Club 192 ... '26 -Cbss Secrer;try and T rc:lsurc r 19:::..,-Or,Lm:Lric Club. Sc c n:tarr of Supper Club If),:, Ctass P r ogr.lTn. I ()!/, SUiJrc r Cluh, PATRie .... BntSE H L 1CtU:..O:o.. ;\ I ississippi. "On prince or bride n o d i:1monJ s t one II tlf so gr.lcious e\e:r shone:, A!o the light of enterprise Gl e.:ming in a young m:tn') eye"." ':!6 B .lsebaIL 1913 '.25 '.!6--Swi mming 19.24 '',26Clas:o \ ice P resident IBasker lull. : Swimming. I ndoor B aseball. 19.25-Z0'1" Pr og rJ.m Junior Progr am. J 9.26 Zo, 1\" Staff,

PAGE 11

THE ZON I A:\, :'\AI'.:\IA PERRY 13AxrER. Canal Zone. "She mo\'c<: a goddess, ami she look ... 1 queen." 1913'14 Glee Cluh. '913--i\l usical T en. Program-I.egend of Sleepy Ii ollow. 191s Junior P rogr,lIll. 1926-Z0XIAX Staff. Senior P lay. CH,\RLES B l TTI:.R S Canal Zone. H e \\,1<' "I, (eet 0' nun,:\ I, Cle,lr l:nt .ut' human natur'," 1913Prograrn-L cl!cnd of Iiollow. 1914 '2-" '924 '25 '26-Golf. 19.!6-B .lseball. B aSket ball. I REX": E..,TELl.E HROW\:. Canal Zone. 9 "She docth little killl.lncsses which most 1C.I\-C undone o r despise," 191J Luncheon Cluh. Basket ball. Program-L egend of Sleepy 1101[0\\1. 1914 'zs Supper Club. 191s-Junior Program. 1926-P resident of Supper Club. Staff. i\L line Deeper th,11l e'er plummet "ollnde(I." 192J '1,. '2s-\\'inthrop H igh School, 1926 Soccor Foot lull.

PAGE 12

10 THF. KEITH CO';I.E\-, fourll Carolina. "Oh, thou ,Irt (:nrer tll:tn the evening .. it Clad in the be:lUt)' of a rhous:md stars," I 92.1Glcc Club. Chlss St!crctarr and Trc:lsurer. 1(),24ColTltllcrcial H igh School, Atlanra, Ga. 192< F ollie .. \!IoDRE'\-ED!>ll"XD D o:-,-ovAx. K ansas. "Tht: love of learning, the sequestered nooks, o\/lei all the sweet sereniq of books." HpJB rookline School, L>.l:tss:l.chusctts. 11)15' ZONIA:" StaR', 1926-Z0SIAN Staft". C.HIARA British Guiana. ":\ violet bY:1 mossy stone H alf-hidden from the eye." I 92J '24 Glee Club. I 92.1-Program L egend of H ollow. Prog r am .lAMES DRISCOlL. ;-':ew Y ork. His nature brooke.-! no I:m Hut baske.l and bourgeoned in copartner} ;IOJ open-windowed glee." 192J '24 '25 '26-T ennis. 1924 '25 '26-Basket ball. 19.2;; J unior Play. P rogram. 19.2IlSoccer Foot ball. T rack. Swimming. Senior Pl ay.

PAGE 13

THE ZO:,\IA'\, \ 'irginia. T o you, \\hose temper:ue Ao\\ \ Yith mc.l<;ured beat. serene aId s1O\\ ," 1923 Club. 19'23L UIlChcon Club. P rogr,lln L cgcnd at Sleep) 10110\\ 1924 '25 '26 Supper Club. 1924 D r.lm::tic Cluh. 19Z.; Jullior ZO:>.IA'< Statf. I Q2h-$elllor 1-'1 :'1\ L e n s ew J ersey. YOUlH! term\S will be young: rellow!>." 192J '24 '!5-Camden H igh Sc'uol, Cam en ,:-':. J \lIe r EliZABETH HALLOR""_ T o her \\ hose qUiet life h;ts bccn The m:rror o( as calm :l heln," 192J-I.unchc;)11 Chlh. 1914 '26 -Supper Club. 192o;-Junior Progr:lI11 HALl'" jE'''D . T he gentle !llllld gentle dec lis I'> knO'o\ln: F or ;t 111111 by nothing is so well bcrr;l\cd ,-\<. by his 1. IA' SrA! I SESt OR PLAY. II

PAGE 14

12 THE ZONJAN. i\IAR\' EI.OISE LORISG. I nfinite riches in a Cult: room." 19'23Yourmouth H igh School, l>.f aine. 19'14D rarnatic Club. 1915'z6 -$upper Club. P rogram. THOMAS EDISON ;'\IORTIIROI>. Panama. "One who never turned his back, but marched breast forward." 19'1r'2s-Junior Program. \'irginia. "i\laiden wit h the meek brown eyes I n whose orb a s hadow lies L ike the dusk in evening skies." 1923' ::Q ''25-C1iIOll F orge H igh School, \ 'irginia. E LIZABETH i\ 1 11.LER. Canal Zone. T hou whose locks outshine thesun-golden tresses!" '923 '2..;. '15 '26 Glee Club. I 9'l3 Progr:II111 ,egend of Sleepy H ollow. 19'15-Junior P rogram.

PAGE 15

THE 2 01'.'1 :\:--;. ;\I.U\ ACS"ES ;'\IcCONAGHY. P ennsyl\,:tllia. 'Tariety's the \ 'crr spice of lifd" 1 923 '2, '26 Basket ball. 192J T rack S\\immillg. Glee Club. Sp:mish P lay. I 924-SUPI'Cr Club. [92 [ndoor J unior Plar_ 192, '26B owling. 1926 ZO:\IAl\ St;IR" Senior P ia\,. J OHS" JOSEI'H Florida. T he happiest heart that c\'cr be:n \\':1<; in some quiet breast, That found the common d:lylight sWeet '\nd left to hea\'c n the rest." [')2.1 '24 'le;-T ech I l igh School, Georgi:!.. Sew Jerser. R .lre compound of frolic, and fUll, T o bugh at:\ joke :lnd rejoice at a pun!" CHARLE<;' L on!> TR,OWBRIUCE. Cub:>. ";\1\ life is like:\ stroll along the beach," 192J CrislObal H igh School. 1915 '26 Rlsket ball. 1926B a<;eball. I]

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THE ZO:-':IAN FLORESCE \\'IXIYREO i\luR'rACH, Y o rk "She is gay and gladsome, H as a laughing fate." 1923'24 '25 '26-B"sker ball. I 923-l.lI ncheon Club. Track i\l cet. Glee Club. Swimming. P rogr.un I. egend of S!eepr 1-I01:ow. J 924 '25 '26 -Suprcr Club. 1924 '2 5 ':!ll B ow lin g. B aseball. J unior Program. \\'llLiAM Al.BERT \\'EDWALD ... :'\'ew Y ork. "Thert:'s somt:thing in a nob!e !Joy, A brave, free_he::ned, Ont:, With unchecked, unbidden Ilis dre:ul of books, his love of fun." '92J Cunis H igh School, :,\'ew Y o rk. 1924 '2 5 '2(, R aseba ll. 1924 ball. [92 5 '26 Swimming. 192s -.lunior Program. ZONIAN Progr,tm. 192() ZONIA:-Staff. Senior P lay. SocCt:r Foot ball. STELLA ISABEL ;"'\\,80LI), Pan:tffi;l. "The h . nd th,u hath m:de you fair hath made you good. 1923 Club. Ten. Spanish P lay. P rogr,lm L egend of Sleepy H ollow. 192, J unIor P rogr:lm. STAI r. ;\III.DRED Ol.l\'f.R. Ohio. Bliss it i, to be ali\'e. HlIt to be young is \er.1 he .\'en." 192J-Cristohal H igh School. '15 'z6-Supper Club. 1924 '26 Orchestra. 1924Glec Ciub. 192, J unior P rogram.

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T H E Z01\' TA'\. CHAR.LO'ITZ I.\'DIA WHITAKER. C:lIlai Zone. Happy :lIn I. from care rill free! \Yhy aren't they .tli contented like mer" 19:3P rogram -l.c3cnd of Sleepy H ollow, Glee Club. "or all those arts in which cne wise excel, ':\'ature's chief masterpiece is writing well.' 192.1 'l-t-'z.;B rookline H igh Schon!, FLQREl-OCE ;\IARIE PETERSO,\. ;\ ]ulIlcsota. But were it to my gi\'en Tor,lte her charms, I 'd call them he:tven.' 1913-L uncneon Club. Glee Club. P rogram L egend of Sleepy H ollow. 1924 '2j'16 -Supper Club. '91,-J unior P rogram. "True as:t di,1 to the sun, Although it be no, shineJ upon," 1913-EI School, Tex:'l.s. 191-t-:\icholasville H igh School, K entucky. IS

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THE ZO :\, I A N. KAR.I. i\I U.DRED KELLER WHEAT. Xew York. T exas. I s wit e'er dull when there's humo r ill It:" 1 92 4 -'.2s-'26-Basket ball. I 91s-Track. 1926 T ennis. "-\11 that's best of dark and bright in her aspect and her c)'cs." '92J-'14-'25-L o n g B eac h I-ligh School, California. Flore nc e ;\lur T agh C 0 Il s u e l o Camara Em I Iy Conley James Driscol L I .ouis HAck N ia B axter Stel la :\' e wbol 0 Everett P C l1t z F ranc E 5 Gree n e T homa s R t h rop F loren ce P eter S o n W illiam II' E dwaldt : \ ndrew D o n o V an Eli zabe th E y Charles T Rowbridge Ch A rlotte Whitaker J o h N R u ssey J \ la,,' M c C onagh)' Anni E M c D ad e WildurrWilling 0 1 I ver l\:atherinc i\lil L er Eloise L oring Richard En G elke I ren E B rown Charles Bu T ters Y J o L o w e .-\111 0 5 Carr HUtchings Hat T ie B elle R ader Alice H allo ran R al p h .I E n se n R e d W h eat Karl Knab E nshue

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Name. N a enia Baxt e r I r e ne B r o wn Charles Butters Cons uel a C amar. I Emi l ) Am os C:trr I ames Dri scoll :'\ndre w D o novan R i c h a r d Engelke Fra n ces Gree n e I .ouis Hack Alice H :tll o ran BYrne H u tc h i n gs .I en e n M a r y J oe L o w e El oise L ori n g Fl o r e n ce Murtag h . Eli zabeth Manle \ K:tth e rin e Mill e r .. M a r l' M c C o nagh y Anni e S tella Newbol d Tho m as l orthro p M ildred Oli ve r. E ver e tt Pen tz Fl o r ence Peter so n H a tti e B elle Rader J o hn R u ssey Charles Trowbri d ge Will iam W ed w a l d t C h arlotte Whitaker Wil durr W illin g Alia s. I Mike R en e I R e d Manna I nki e C a r Jimmie Andy . D i c k Fra n L o uie A I Hutc h H a n s .10.10 Chic k Fl o B etty K a y : P att)' Ann. ,n Chester R ae Slim S l l \OVa w a R ed Cha rli e Bill Charlcy. W illi e D ese r i ptio n H e r s t ylis h c l o th es H e r His r e d ha i r H e r quietness H e r beautl' His c url s H i h e i ght Hi s w isdo m H i s big h e .. rt I H e r ath let i c appe mInce Hi s w a lk Her domesti c w a)'S. H i s smi l e H i s d r awl H e r figur e F'ive fee t tw o H e r wa lk H e r b as hfulne;s H e r co mpl exion H e r reel h a ir Her personalit),. H e r will i n g n ess H i s manl)' ca rri age H e r s p ec k s His v o i ce H e r co mpl exio n ./ H e r g i gg l es H i s h a ir H i s h e i g h t H i s t e asing H e r "Hello" Tack,' R OGUES' G .'\LLE RY I d entification. That's t h e b e rri es Y a th i nk So Gre :tt g un s Goo d night G ooel night G ee whi z MI' w o rd I don t think so W h e re's aeni. I ? SuA' e r i n g cat, W ant m e t a d o i t I d o n t know C.lll1t Hey, g u y Y es me t oo Oh, dear Oh, Heck ny, 11<1)" P
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Junior rht!lN

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THE Prt'SI.I<'JlI / 'lft' PU.>l.lt'I.1 ',I I 1 \ X /Hlf,XT, H',C\R :\'A ... E l.I \ ... \IUULT\, C\RI.01IA g .\(:HI', Bf.rlT LE:.IIE BI:.I l. BERt BI.A -.;[y. n O BERT BII.LlA'D, :\IAII.G"KI"I BRow-,;, jO'>EI'HI,t:: CHEE ... EMAN. FORRr"T Co,c.E.:l;, KATHE R I,r ('OOI'ER, HAL CIW .. :., FRA:>.rD'dLEY, E\RI, DIXIE.I.!>, .\IARIO' DORAN, j.\\IE" D t 11...1.', jO',:I'H 1. .... 10.....:, ROBER' I FIl.A\ER,l h :TfI FKf.XCH. :\J:CHI: G \FR, G:::'A-.;nERR\ / : J Anl-TH GI: 1:1:..-'; L F.o, GJO\lIS;)'. j A-'; ICE.. l h:IU,H'DE"I., C."'\II:' IIALLOil.A' .\1111.1\'.1 1-1"11.:0'0'. Btc,\EKu' 1-I1:.1.MERltH\. FKEn 1-1(1)(;1'>,111,1" j A ". BTI \ ./\\I',l'fll,l\ J OH"O', .-\<;'''.., JOII-'; ... O'>l, J{t"'rH JOH","O', nlCtlAKD J 0:-E'>, H I \\1:.1 I\:I.E\I\I K, ",'GELA "'ABE''>Hl"F. I-\"RL LEAR. 1.( 1 1., EI,OI.,:: \ 1 \I[OE .... \\'11.1.1.\\1 ,\ 1 F \\ [1.11<\ \1 011.:(, j l 'A'"' A ROR" ..,0:-, ROIH; R I St"'IlRERC, DORonn KATHERI:-;:: S H\;IIlT. HERi:lERr S\1I1 H. HA'l1 \' S\tlllI, $n;"EY '1'0\111, EI.EMIOK TOM8 KArHEKI",J \'A:>. SICI.E'. i\IAI"Il.U,\ \'..1.-'; S [ CI.E.."" \\'11. 1 1-\.\1 \\An .... D OKA \\'ILLOIGIUI\',

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o

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THE Z O\"IA\". (!.1l1 .-{filtH!I. \\ IlALE\ -\HLIO\', \1.1.". EI ;\IARG"RI I BRAU,"!::\, :\'l1\' \ B RO\I:>. JOH\ BVrJ.ER. PI"AIH. CARll, CI.I'BEE, THA rl..Hf.1t COU: CATHER'" CarkVILLE, L\I)I \ DORA'. :'I.1.o\.RGAREI D E ("'>TRO, J D E L A PE.\A, SA-UAII J ht:R ... O .... JOH\ \\ l'G, \'IRG!\L ... FARI.E\' \\'11 I .IH\ FI!>HER, ETHEl, Fl.I.\ r, SOI'HIA HEU. \ GARREI, l\I!LI)IUIl ( ; t .IARt:Kf, .\IIRu" (;OI.D\, L .. XKE\U. GRA:'8I:..RRY. HARI/,\ ( ;kJ\ll:>O', RICHAIW 1 -1. ... 1.1.1':,. IIAtO! "O\, GEKnu 1)1 IIEHl\, L U .. 1JIF 1100(,'. BE\FKJ.l; \ J oI.Ch.!)Ul\ (IIAkl, Jf,,.'E .... CH .... KLOnt J O:-'F', :'\'OKIlEKT "ERR, LOl[\E I-:fY, K,.nll"', DORonn KOCHEk, .\II10RI:I) .\1.O\It.R ... GERAI,!) :XL,s:., AUlA ,\IAs:" T\:\IOTHY \IAII.II:', HUI.I: l ':OIHR I ;"ILCO'AC.H\, \ 1 \11.<,,\11.1. 1 \IcDAO, ;\ IAln \ILGtiCA:', GHr f '\:l"O:", .\1\\' ;\!I(':I..I:I. TEREH ;\IEREDITH, \\"ILI -\);.0 \ I IODI .ETO'. \lA\ .\IIILER.. C\R.I.o ;\1.11 (.A". 1 -L '" O'llRID, l OA OHI. "OX". JOH' OI.DIIELO, .\J)I-,l.AIOI P -\L ,llIO, CHAM IE .. P A UCIO, R O .. I P AR A DE ... I{ u r l)f PIERCE. FRA'J...lI' 1'0\\ ..1 L, JOH' PRIL'E, Pr:(.C\ I'RllE, $1"11. 1 .. \ (ll 1:"1"11.0, J I 110 BE' nOOGER ... CHARU" S .4.I'HIR, :\:"A JO"'f.I'Hl'l:. SLAl:J..., HEI.E:" !-!\IrrH, EI.\A S'lll H. S I R OBI. I:., FRU) TAI I .OR, .[)(;AR TOI t ,OAM.l, .sOI.L' \"E:'CIlECHEA, .10\1 \\"F'TMA:", E :IHH \\HAI.ER. I "HET, I \\"HII r. ,\1-\1 C"Itrl \\O;\IAC"-. l{tT H )"Ot "C, FltA' .... ZETr "-. Eu-\ ZII)BECr;;:, FLORE:. ... !: 21

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1 rJa.;:-;, >-l X tTl N o Z

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T H E ZO:\I A:\'. CI.ASS. B o)'s' Club, Prr1sidOlI RADER Surclmy, j A;\IF.S QL'INN Girl's Club, Pruit/ml, i\lAJoRIF. Q U IlO'-ria Pr e.sidml SHIRI.F.\' PER1>O"" SUrt'llll:l', :\\IELIA H l 'TCHIt.'GS Trr:(lsurer,O "n'o H E I .\\FIUC!'I" ;\lr. F t 1.'11' :\DA\\, \\'II. LI BA'A:", J B ICt-;.FORD, :"ATH. \:.. BOOZE, TOM BOWLIN, BRoWN, CARRIE I how:..,l<. ll:""'E BR1'LAND, J EA:" ETTE BRYAN, PALL BL'n ER, FR\"':" BYRNE, JOE CAIN, CATHEIO:-:E D E GRIJMMll:"'D, L'LE D E L A PENA, EVA DOlt'TH, ZONABEI. ERLENKOETTER, ROBERT FmA:"'Q.t'E, \AI. FISHER, ETHEL FRANSEN, \\'II.HEL.,,,,,, \ FRENCH, 20"A GlI,Ht"!>, D o ROTH I" I I An., VANCE o-no HOZAfTEL, I h :TH HI'I)SON, ,AI'ITA H L "rCHINGS RI'TH .I I\CQlJES, DONALI) JETT, JOHS J O HAI':NES, EI.EASOR JONES, EI)\\'IS CHARU:,> "n,EBER, I.ARSE:-:, HENRY LAWI.OR, \\"lI,I.1A\I I.OWE, GEORGE L t 'rllER, I.I 'THER, I<.IACK, : \GNE'> ;\l c DoSAw, "-\I"](;E ;\lCGl'IGAl'. KATHLEE:.. ;\IcG1.;IGAN, ,\lclI':TIRE, \'IOl.A UERI ;\!JLI,ER, FRA:"t-;. ;\IARG,\RE1 ;-"EL1>O:", t 'I'I', \ERNA OLI\ A E t 'NICF PERCY, \\'II.LAIW SHIRI.EI PH[LLII' .... ;\I II,OREI"> POOLE, B Ell.:" El.l. POOLE, THERE .. ,", Pn,E, H n "H QUSN, J A ME" Qt INN, j \ IAII.JORIF. RADER, \\'II.LIA\1 R Axt-;.r:.., .-\I.\']:RAst-;./.\, .'''[1'\ ERSES1' REEDER, L oe r q:: HIDGE, I<;MH: I. HOWE, G[L8ERT I h "SS E \ E R1H:ST SEALY, I<.IARIOS HAlI. I E SLACK, En",E!. SLACh., F RASt-;. SI.A\I:", SI.EEI >ER, SAIHNA S \ lrrH, FI.ORES SI'I:.IGI;E, 1.ons E PAl'1. \\"AI.STO:-, H t 'Q]() \\'AI."-R, CAR" \\"A II. WI CJ... ;-"()\' A EDXA ;\L\F. \rHI rt.OCt-;., \ [RGISI A \VHln: 5 1 ED.\10:"[) ROGER \\'ILI.0I.GH8\", \\'lI,toLGHB\, JOHS \\"[l.SOS, E I ,O I')E \\'000, 23

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THE ZO;-.JIAN . I..-\ S T \\"11.1 . -\\TIJ E\T O F SE\T I O R S \\'F., THE SE'iI O R C LA SS o f B a lb o a H igh S c h oo l in t h e y ear of Our L o r d o n e t h o u sand nin e hundre d and tw enty-s i x b e ingofsound b ody, and sane in min d and r e a so n, and be ing about t o pa ss fr o m th e lif e o f students [Q the lif e o f o v e r co min g the d im uncertainties o f the ruture, d o make and ordain thi s Ollr las t will and t estament, the r e by setting a s id e and d e cl arin g null and void any othe r will s The S o p h o m o r es, who m a s the ir name impl ies w e beli e 'c to ha ve a little m o r e se n se tha n the Freshmen, we appoint exec utors o f thi s will. T o the faculty w e l eave o u r s in ce r e thanks ( o r all the y ha ve d o n e f o r liS and kin d r e m embrance o f th e h O llr s S ;1ent with t h em. T o t h c JUl1i) r s W e l ea,'e the h o nor o f a chievin g t h e d i g nity o f S e ni o r s warning the m n o t t o l o wer s aid all o wing the m se h 'es to h e caught t alkin g with out permi ss i on. T o the Fres hm e n, h e rd n l in r oo m s o n the l o w e r R oo r w e l e ave the pri vilcge o f p ermanent seats in t h e a ssembly hall. \\'e also wis h to advise th e m that if the y wou l d obtain d ip l omas mu s t w o rk hard and 1Illc ea.;;ingly f o r s aid doc u m ento;. B e in g h lessed with indivi d ual g ift s whi c h a r e sadl y lac k i ng in SOllle o f the l o wer cla ssllle n we beq u eath thelll a s f ollows : S t e lla N e wb o ld, h c ing o f an exce e dingly gener o u s na ture, l e a ves a f oo t o f h e r stature to he d i v ided equally h e tw ee n h e r two b c n efic.::iari es ; A d a J a c k so n and D olly : \lIen. :,\faellia Ba x t e r lea, es to Charl otte Jt:n se n t h e p r i vilege o f jumpi n g up fro m h e r scat in i\l i ss cla ss ro watc h the fir e e n gine go hy. Floren ce Peter so n l e a veS t o t h e s u ccessor o f h e r ill t h e ao;sembly the privil ege of fussing with :lI1ot her Se n ior over t h e questio n o f w h ethe r s ai d successo r s h ou l d c l ose t h e door Ilear h e r Seat w h e n eve r she wills R ic hard En g elk e I ca vt:s to L eo n Gre en e his positio n a s p r esiden r o f t h e S enio r Class and his ahi lity ro make the Senio r s work. Am os Carr leaves his bt:au t iflll c uri s to .lot: Duran knowing t h e latter 's immediate n ccd o f t h em. :\ndrew D o n ovan l eaves t o L eslie Banan his abi lity to argue without g etting Rustt'red. I r ene Brown l e a v e s h e r ability t o k ee p our o f mi sc h ie f t o J ani ce Grim i so n. J ohn R ussey l eaves his b eautiful blus h t o all r n:shrn e n kno win g that its fed will harmo niz e w ell with their gree n. Charle s Bute r s l eaves h is poe ti cal tou c h to Arc hie Frenc h. Alice H all oran i cCI\'cS h e r s lt'nderness and her d i gnity to hal e r ha v in g n o ti ce u lac k o f both rh e ... t' attributes. Fl o r e nce l\lurragh l eaves h t'f abi lity to bas k e t ball t o : \nna Saphire an d also h e r n e wly publi s h e d b oo k o n H o w to R eco m e Captain o f a B a s k e t Ball T eam."' B y rn e Hut c h in gs l eaves his e n e rgy f o r athletics t o Paul Bryan. S eeing t hat it w o uld b e an aid t o h e r maidenly h eauty, h:athe rin c "fille r l eaves her vanity c a se to Jane E vans. Frances Greene, afte r due co n s id eratio n b e qu e a t h es to Knabens hu e h e r state lin e ss and a s hecom es a Senior. James D ri scolllea\'es to l\l i ss R auner his e xc ess hi,t o rial knowledge and a mangifying gla ss whi c h s h e may b e abl e to find thi s kno wledge. Charlotte \\'hitake r l eaves t o Ruth P y l e h e r o f acquiring cr edits without overtaxing her m e m o ry. Thomas ?\'orthro p leave s his Greek profile t o I .o ui se Sprague. i\IcC onaghy, having, by cl ose acq uaintanc e s h ip, noti ce d i\largaret !\lcConaghy's qui e t nature l eaves h e r jazzy ways and to i\largare t, a dvis ing h e r b e neficiary to make g oo d lise o f thi s beques L Eli zabeth i\l anley l e a ve s h e r hair t o Kathe rin e C onga. L o ui s H ack l eaves to i\1r his "shick t ro u se r s and requ ests t hat J\lr. :\forthrop take s p ec ial care o f the m a s L ou i s parte d with t hem onl y w h e n h e saw the l a c k o f s u c h a s tyli s h rcquire m cnt t o s aid bencfi ciary's wa rdrobe Emil y C onley l eaves to Agnes J o hn so n h e r ability t o gigg l e at anything.

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THE El o i se Loring leaves her ability to h elp, and her resp o n s iv e nature to the e ntire .r tlnior C l a ss Anni e i\l c Dade leave s her jolly qature to t h e i\IcGuiggan s ister s, advising th e m n o t to r \\ IT:\E55 \\"H E R EOF we have h e r eunto set our han d and se al. THE SE'iI O R CLASS. [SEALi A seent>!.l'()Ulld enlrnu{'eof HOlel Th-oli .-\rK"O-l.C'Bn:all.on ..

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26 THE ZON I AN. y; y; e CL."ISS PROPHECY e lmos Carr 20, I '" "The n thi s can r e ally predi c t the fut ur e ? 1 a s k ed Pro f esso r Pie tr o " h y yes D on't yo u b e l i e v e it?" h e r e pli e d. \V eli," I s ai d s k eptic;t!ly "it see m s p oss ibl e, but I m willing to sec t h e t h ing w o rk if it wilL "re r y w ell, YOli s hall see! h e an s w e r e d a littl e ang r y that I s h ould doubt his w onde rful inventio n. H e thre w in som e switc h es, and b egan turning v ari olls dials on a pane l at o n e side of the ro o m. "Yo u s hall l e arn fro m thatscr ee n ,"hesaidpoint ing th e fat e o f e a c h on e of y o ur cla ssmates. H o w e v e r, t h e ma c hin e i s n o t p erfec t e d a s and even tho u g h many o f the girl s may b e married. it will n o t di s clo se rh e (a c t. The sce n e that will ap p ear o n th e scree n will occ u r about in the year [9-+0. I f you have an y ques ti o n s to a s k, r e p eat t h e m softl y to y ourse lf, and the y will b e ans w e r e d through this h e adset. \\'ith this h e t urne d t h e indicato r t o the sectio n marked N e w Y ork. The r e was a hum o f machin a flic k ering o f lights ; and o n th e sc r een appeared a picture Buildings soar t o the dizzy h e ig h t o f 100 stories, the air i s full o f small a e r oplanes and the street s are c r o wded with huge truc k s som e o f whi c h b ear t h e in sc riptio n: RUSSEY & Co., A e rial Fre ightN e w Y orkC e n t ral Americ a E urope At a busy street-corne r, directing traffi c i s J AME S DRISCOLl., "the fighting cop, who i s expected to win the middle w eight c hampio n ship t h e coming fall. o f peopl e are g o in g in and out o f the stores, r id in g to t h eir v ari o u s destinatio n s o n the e levated movin g s idewalks whi c h w e r e recently installed N ORTHROP & Co., C ontractors Through m y headset I was informed that th eir n ex t contract i s to build n e w aer opla n e lan d in gs 011 severa l o f t h e larger skyscrapers. Here t h e sce n e fades for a m o m ent; the n Fift h Avenue comes i nto v iew. i\Iany wo men may be see n e nterin g an d l eaving t h e famou s establi shme n t o f MADAJ\IE BAXT ER, w here t h e styles o f t h e world a re set. !,; I n a s h o w windo w farthe r d o wn the Avenue, i s di splayed the lates t m o d e l s p ort plane manu fa cture d by the \VEDWALDT FLYING FLIVVER COJ\l PANY. The plane was d es ign e d b y EVERETT PE NTZ, the American flre r who won t h e Bulitze r cup the b e f o r e \Vith a change o f the dial, th e sce n e shifts t o a b e a c h in California. On the sands, a moving picture "The o f a Ba c h elor," i s b e in g filmed. BYRN E H U T CHI:-!GS, t h e t r ouble d bac h e l o r has j u s t made a thrilling r esc ue, and i s h e r o i c all y e m erging fr o m the breake r s carry in g Er-.II L Y CON L EY. N earby stands FLORENCE PE TERSON, also an a ctress wh o jus t compl e t e d h e r lates t pi cture "The \Var with i\iars B es id e the cameraman, who i s RALPH J ENSEN, f ormerly o f Pathe N e w s, R I C H ARD E NGELKE, the d irector i s frantic all y m o ti oning t o Byrne wh o apparently doesn't see him. -\n inte r es t e d s p ectator i s CONSUELO C A M A R A a w ell-kno wn o p era soprano, wh o i s o n h e r v a c a ti o n. The pi cture fad es and d i sappears, r e v ealing anothe r o f the :"Je w England estate of ANDREW DONOVAN, wh ose lates t b ook, Th e End oj l V ow!Jere has b eelljo yoll s l y r ece ived by the public Andre w i s entertaining Dr. K ARL KNABEXSHUE and \\'ILDURR \\'ILLING. The forme r i s a s urgeon o f som e promine n ce and i s at present, with himself a s the Sll bj ec t studying t h e effe c t s of sleep on t h e in d ivi dual. \\'ILDURR \\'ILLING has earne d fam e through his corres p o nden ce courses in v o i ce culture. a caravan i s s h o wn c rossing a d esert in E gypt. The expeditio n i s unde r the directi o n of i\I ARY M CCONAGH\', wh o i s searching for King 'fut's brothe r in law, a s an addition to the col l ec ti o n in FRANCE S GREENE' S private museum, whi c h i s o n e of th e larges t o f its kind in the States The n ex t sce n e i s o f B e lla \ i sta b e a c h w h i c h has b eco m e :l p opular winte r r esort s in ce CHARI.ES B UTTERS an ente rpri s in g r e al estate agent, e r ec ted a large amuse m e n t park and zoo n earby.

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TIIEZO:,\IA:". On t h e piazza of the Lea\tiew, one of the large r hotds of t h e resort, are sitting ;\ lILDRED OLIVER and KATHERINE l\i ILLER. i\lildred is on the staA-' of the DiClorial Preview and Katherine is one of the for emost WOlllall lawyers in the L 'nited Srates. They are discussing the latest scandal from the Sl'tlrrhlighl, a society paper edited STELL \ :\EWBOLD. On a lielt! a short distance away, a reporter for [h e Blah lind IIn'ald is ilHen'iewing H ELF.;\" FREXCH the world's most daring aviatrix. A.s this picture fad es, aile of Congress comes into Iew. CHARLOTTE \\HIT.\ .... ER has the Roar ilnd is discoursing vigorollsly on the constitutionality of an appropriation donated to '\IILDRED \\'11 EAT, a prominent clubwoman, for the perpetuation of the "Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Pedes[nans. :\:\,1\ I E i\l c D \DE, in another part of the H Ollse, is preparing notes for her speech on the Tacn:t:\rica plebescite, which ha s not been settled. :\'ow, shown 011 the screen, is the interior of the pri\,ate coach OfCHARLE!l TROWHRIDGE, president o f the Canal Zone-G:t!"eston Railroad. C harles is entertaining Lot IS H \CK, a professor of entymology from Quinccwn L 'niversity, ",h' ) i" "isiting t h e tropics in search of a new species of t h e humbug. On the platform of an obsen'ation car, aLimi ;-ing the tropical scenery, are ELlZ.\l3ETH ;\14.:\,LEY, dean of Garsar College, and ;\ r A l zrE j \ l ci\IIl.L\1\', wh o is touring: the States and Central Allleri ('a, lecturing on T h e Evil s o f Gum Chewing." \\,ith a slight change of the indicator, a picture of the new Balboa Clubhouse appears. I n the swimming pool, i\IARY JOE LO\\"E, Olympic champion, and instructor of swimming and diving for the "Pink, Green, and Yellow Troupe," is with a group of youngsters. I n anotht.:r part of t h e building. FI.OREXCE .\1 l:RT\(,H, scenic artist, is preparing the stage for "Sarnlet," the well-known play .-\LICE H"I.-1.0R .. \;\", to be produced by the Balboa Stock Company. .-\fter a short wait, the spacious waiting room of the Balhoa radio station is s hown. ELOISE L ORI"G, the hostess, is conducting I REXE BROW:,\" a violinist from the Boston SOllndsphony Orchestra, to the broadcasting studio, where an announcer (or the station i s listening interestedl" to a bedtime story being broadcas; by H .<\T TIE BELI.f-. RADER. :\s the machine ceased working, the ringing o( all enormou s gong broke the oppressing stillness. and resounded through the room. Professor Pietro, his face ashen, worked at his control,, -but in \ 'ain; the forboding crackle of a lightninglike e lectrical discharge-then a deafening expl osion. Parts of the machine Aew in all directions: something struck me on the head, and aften\ ard I heard a \ oict' It's 7.]0 I f going to school to-day, you had better hurry." L sat lip and sleepily looked around. T h e alarm clock had just stol,ped ringing, an.\ a book, which had fallen from a shelf abovt', wa" lying on Illy pillow rIC'" or BalOOI Prado WIth AdulIllislration Build i ng III th e

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THE ZO:--rIAN. I CUSS H I S T ORY. \f{jj!J I/allie Beth Rader, '2 6 \'S.?l)jI History is a mirror. In ir s clear depths are n::Aecred'the happenings o f the past) n:) matter what their character or what t heir tone. \\' a s there ever a mirror of jollier sce n es than t hat o f a clas3 histon-? Youth and its iovs, its troubles, and as?ira'tionsall rUIl in it. Someti:11':."s t h ere are n o big things which stand Ollt in the memory lik e sentine l posts on the horizon o f time; but there is that gold e n appealing atmos phere of happiness that e n dures forever in the hearts of t h ose who made that history. Leave vour tasks and settle down \\ ith m e for a while and I will s h ow a mirror I have had for four year s a very small and shining o n e into which eyes, filled with longing reminiscence, will gaze when the youth o ( to-day is the age o( to-morrow. "Scrubs" here, "Scrubs" there, "Scrubs" everywhere! F e mal e scrubs, s hort-skirted, s h ort-socked, evidently short-sighted! tVlale sc ru bs, sheared and s horn, embarrassed, red-eared, herded into the room by cruel and prodding upiJcr classmcn! The assembly at last quieteJ, the classes in order, the teach e r s in is the first day of sc h ool. Here are the scrubs at thei r first class meeting. Chatter, chatter, chatter, nothing but chatter! They must be called to o rder every (ew minu tes. A.t last after seemi ngly ages of co nfu sion they elect their officers: Richard Engelke, President; Burnett M eecham, r ice Presidenrj Emil y Conley Secretary and Treasurer. They decide upo n dues, and every meeting after that their Secretar y has to plead in alt the e loquence at h e r command t o make them meet their o bligations. They listen to her an:l (orget. The days pass and high sc hool becomes a habit. The teachers begin t o pound, pound, p ound. I n F ebruary the scrubs wh o pull through the examinations, are automati cally converted into Freshmen. They no longer stare at th e upper classmen; rhe upper classmen no l onge r stare backthert: is peace. The Freshmen, assuming new dignity in spite o ( the amused contempt o( t heir elders in the high s chool, d ec id e to enter theatrical lire. The Fres h man Engli s h Class e s dramatize "Tht: Legend of Sleepy H ollo w, by I r ving, and present the intriguing little tale be (ore the assernbly. The whole thing is a success The Freshmen arl.:" trans?orteJ into the seventh heaven o( conceit Taking courage they plan a tacky party and invite the whole sc hool. class attends. Senior plays side br side with Freshman; prejudice is (orgotten. The Freshmen congratulate themsdves on their entertainin g ability. The spell o( egotistical delirium is broken only when the harassing time of examination:; again arrives. At the end o( the year those who emerge triumphant, d rop oR-the title o( Fres hmen and become Sophom o r es. So endeth the first year. The second now opens in our mirror of history. The Fres hmen,round-eyed and c hil dis h, have grown into gangling Sophomores. The first day no longer h o ld s terror (or them, (or there i s another h e rd o( scru bs to prod. The Sophomores prod them hardest of all, and when their victims star e at them, they stare back. At their class meeting they still persist in the usual program o( chatter although they display the new importance one year o( high sc h ool has given them. The election of officers takes place_ Richard Engelke is reelected (or President; Byrne Hutchings becomes \ 'ice President, and Hattie B ell Rader, Secretary and Treasurer. The Sophomores now settle down to hard work, saving all their money and relinquishing every (orm o ( pleasure to prepare themselves for the enormou s expen ses sure to meet them in their J tlnior year. The), have taken one more step of t h e long and difficult journey to Seniorland_ The third year in Ollr mirror o( now open s. \\'e see the Juniors at their class meeting. They are a little more attentive and the election is more deliberate. The old officers keep their positions. B efore them appear many hill s to climb, and th e way is hare!. At t h e beginning o( the term many competitors enter the Declamator y Conrest, but Thomas :\forthrop, a Junior, carries off the highest honors. I n the Juniors hir e a trllck, dress themse lv es in carnival regalia and join the merrymakers in Panama City. I n they again enter theatrical lif e, presenting before the public a

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TH E ZO:'\"I:\:". program o f vaudeville, includin g a o n ea c t play. They are m o rt: than su ccessful in th e ir ente rpri ses for they secure e nough m o ney to carry th e m through th e e xp e n ses o f th e banque t f o r th e Seni o r s and to g i ve th e ir m e m o rial to th e sc h oo l a hundr.:!t1 d o llar s w orth o f b oo k s f o r th e The J urlio:--S enio r Banqu e t arriv es an d th e S enio r s are g i ve n a s pl e nd i d se nd -oR". S o e nd e th th e thir d year. T h e fourth an d la s t y e ar n o w op e n s in o u r mirr or o f The ins ignifi cant littl e scrubs ha ve h ec om e dignifi e d S enio r s a ss umin g th e ir n e w r o l e with dic tatorial de m e an o r an d magnanimoll,) COI1t empt (or those J u s t starting out to climb th e l o n g s t e p s to th e throne o ( K n owledge The c h o i ce o f th e electi o n again fall s upo n th e old The S e nior s b e gin work on their pla y anti in th e y stage "Adam anu Eva" at th e B alb o a club h o u se l\l o nrh s pass an d s l o wly th e :\nnual i s co mpil e u . -\t la s t th e e nd o f th e rear C OllleS and th e S enio r s re \ ,ei in th e ddights o f S:;'nio r ce r e m onies a cco mpli s h th e ir duties passing out o f sc ho)1 with a s t e p that i s e a ge r and y e t r eluctant. The doo r s o( th e w o rld op e n b;;:f o r e th e m. T h e Cla ss of ''26 i s g o n e. S o enJe th th e fourth ve ar. The dancing re R ec ti o n s are s till n o w in my littl e mirror, f o r th e d oes n o t f ollo w into th e ytars t o co m e L e t U'i put it away into it s s hinin g -;ilv e r ca se it ma y res t in s we::t co nt..::1t until ey e s, fille d with l o n ging: f o r a g limpse o f th e pa s t, again g az e into its clear d epths I-.J)j.-\CAT IO:\. \\"h o a m I ; I :1111 the hig h sch oo l s tudent, H i g hb ro w and intell ec tual. m e m o ry h olds c l os e within ir s p o wt:rful gras p th eo ry o f sc i e n ce f ormulate d since th e w o rld b egan. min d d owns into th e rut o f des pa ir The po:)r strugg lin g attempts o f m y t eachers T o k ee p pace wi th it; .-\n d se n ds f orth pro f o un d an d th o u ghts R i c h in th e kn owle d ge o f En glis h grammar, his tory anu languages-F o r who i s greater than h e who UlH. i e r stands th e se qu e n ce o f t e n ses, The u se o f s hall" an d "will an d t h e di a g ram -ing o f se n te n ces? The adorin g w o rld strives to lift i ts h e a d T o th e hig h pinnacl e o f my intellect, But I spurn th e rabbl e fawning at m y f eet, Ple a d ing f o r th e happiness o f a s ingl e g lan ce Fr o m p e n e t ra tin g e r e \ \ ithin th e dee p and silent r ecesses o f m y brain Knowledge unfolds lik e th e p e tal s o f an o p e ning ro se blind e d by ego tism and j e alolls)" D e n::mnce th e m:ljestic workin gs o f min d .-\S th e o R:"pring o f co n ce it. But I p ossessing ps y chic p o w e r s lInkn,)WIl to t h e vul g a r l o t l-\:no w that s u c h h as b ee n th e fate o f ge niu s t hr o u g h th e centuries ; And I suR'e r th e ir sco rn with co ura geolls h eart. S ec ur e in The c h eap and tawdry divers i o n o f th e cine ma T h e f eeblemind ed, jazz bandsThese make n o appe al t o my spirit far abo v e t h e multitude \\'orld ct:a se your attempts to re a c h th e e l e vated h e ight s of th o u ght; I c an neVer stoo p to common thing s for I've got edjac ati on. or OIJ 1>:lUama.

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O ntull w o

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T H E ;':0"1 1". 31 LJTERARY THE RESPO"SI . Firi'l Place-:o,llOrt "'tory COlltt'"l Taboga I s land lay smoth ering in the heat of midday. The c r oss on the top of t h e hill at the farther t nt! of t hl: i sland stood, a white flare, as t h e SlIll burned into t h e bare sides of the incline, withering the dull grass in its listless strugg l e for life, and harshly revealing the trail worn by t h e feet of clHhusiasri c romance seekers determined to reach the cross in spite of all drawbacks prescl1tt::d by tropical heat and rhe steepness of the s l opes. From its s heltered corner t h e H otel Aspinwall, seeminglr deserted, looked Ollt over the P acific where, in the distance near the sai l of a fishing scow, the lon g, lithe fOflll of a L'nited States cut the waves. The sea rippled in streaks o f deep blue, scars left upon its calm surface by the ruthlt:ss plowing of ships bound for pons far ova the horizon. Tht: road from t h e Aspinwall strt:tched, a blinding strip o f white, symbol o f invading civilizati o n t hrough the torrid villag e where chickens, pigs, and children lolled in content on the dirt Aoors o f some of the houses. \\'ith the hazy air mingled the scent of roses in the sun from th.: gardens inclosed in their warped and weatherbeaten board fences :\t t h e end of the road lay the mango grm'e suR"erin g frol11 the heat in the langour of habit. :\ few half-breed children sprawled about o n the ground, which was covered with dead leaves ; a naked choked over a dry crust o f brea.l, and ran, screaming from the friendl y advances of a mange-eaten cur, :\n urchin ventured upon the scorching sand, but Red back, howling for f ear o f blistered feet. On the beach wae the figure s of a man and a woman, leaning on an overturned rowboat on tht: top of which lal..ily stretched the (arm of a young child. The w oman, in years but already s h owing the signs of departing routh, whi c h appear so early in women of the tropics, was half-clad in a torn gingham dress whi c h hung in ulltidr f o ld s about her bare feet Her hair, straight and b lack, was tangled into a matted rope down her bac k. Her face with its hea\'y jaw, and the thick) distended nostrils o f h e r n ose clearly hetrayed her negro blood in spite of the contradiction of her pale s kin. The man, with the legs of hi s khaki trouSers cut oft" at t h e knee in jagged strips and his faded shirt carelessly open at the throat} was as ragged and dirt)' a s the woman at his side. T he attirt: of the hoy wa s rt:pulsi\'e and The child in response to a harsh command from the mall, jumped fr o m the boat and both set to work to turn it OVer. Ha\ing :1Ccompli'ihe...i their task, they lifted it to the water's edge. .-\ moment later the woman pushed tht: boat, with ha two companions in it, out into the waves, ami stood watching it until it drifted from

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' I H E ZO :,\IA:'\ the sandbar [0 the op=::n sea and around the corner of the island. Then s h e turned and went slowly up to one of the ramshackle huts on the edge of rhe grove. The h ours dragged on through rh e siesta to late afternoon; and with the passing of time, t h e heat lessened. On the h ')rilo:l, w!lere the blue of rhe sea Iller rhe blu e of t h e a haze darkened into a black c l oud that SWt'pt down over the earth in a torrent o f rain. The s:no)th unJuiari:ms of r h e waves broke into stinging mists of spray that lashed rh e beach in uncompromising fury. The wind, r o used into a sullen roar snapped tht" fronds of a palm tree ulltil ther hung life less and dropped to the flooded ground. The woman who had bee n o n the beach in the sunshine, h ours before, now stood on the sandbar, staring at the sea through the rain that beat upo n her uncovered head and streamed down her face set and strained with anxiety. Herdress clung to her in heavy soggi n ess, revealing the tensene33 o f her B eside her had gathered a little of villagers drawn to h e r in to keep the vigil for t hose two who had gon e out in t h e shine and neve r returned. Three ragge.! pus hed their h 33t out int.) the waves anJ to wave t heir han I s through the cu:-tai n o f toe mist as if w encourage t h e watc hers. An hour passed and the storm that haJ risen so suddenly retreated and ceased its fierce attack on the earth. The little group still stood all the beach, waiting and hopin g against hope for success of the search party. From aroun.l the corner o f the island two boats; one empty, the other with three occupants, came through the urizzle. The three men had returned but the man and the little hoy who had gone out in the aftern oo n had l e ft nothing but their b::>at drifting aimlessly o n the waves. The women bowed their heads, on:;: murmuring in htn hed and frightened breat:l, "f\ladre de Di)5." \\'he n the h oats were drawn up all t h e sandbar the little group disperseJ to t:,-= g.-ave leaving the woman leaning o n one a s s h e had been earlier in the day. :\Ione, the c hill o f despair c rept out of t h e wind and laid clammy hands upo n her until s h e shive red in its col d embrace. She shuddered, moaned. and still. \\'hen the soft tropical night was falling over the island, s h e raised her body, tired with sorrow, and stepped forward to meet the tide advancing On the sandbar. 1 t rose, and fell reached h e r bare feet-spla s hed o n her knees. The s low march continued until the long black rope of h e r hair Roated on the salty billows. T o t h e prayers she had sent out over the wa\'es t here had been n o response. T h e w0r1d la y relaxed from its struggl e with the storm and the islan d dreamed in the mil d wind that blew gently from the s::)Uth. The cross on the hill gleamed a cool silver in the beams o f the rising mO :lI1. I n the shadows o f the Aspinwall, the lilt o f voices bien Jed with the mellow twanging of a guitar, but the little hut on the edge of the g rove was silent an--1 deserted, while the waves rippled in unbroken serenity o\'er the sanJbar. CASTILLO'S CAR'-.'ILIL. Charln P{i1nrio, '28 Second Pl:u.:e-Short StOrr Contes-t. Carnival time was coming again and Panch o found himself in need of spending money with which to celebrate and make merry as is proper at this season. Pancho was a young Panamanian who plied at the trade of "panguero," which translated means boatman. H e was short in stature, his skin was of a light brown color and he was handsome for his race. This young man's personal possessions l'onsisted chiefly of hi s "panga," hi s other suit of working clothes, a much cherished Sunday suit (used by his father for the same purpose before t h e latter's death L a dream book (much thumbed and frared by COI1-stant reference) and a razor, somewhat rusty and sadly in need o f h oning. : \11 of these things were secured in a small compartment in the stern of his "panga. Pancho was self-dependent, with no relati\'es to bother about. Altogether, Pancho's life was easy and simpl e. During the h e eith e r took passengers wand fr o from their boats to the s hore. or did the odd jobs of a longshoreman o r lolled in

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THE ZON I AI\". 33 the s ha de, t h e last named b e ing the m ore u s ual. H e kept him se l f part of t h e ti m e in L a l\'larina," a boarding h o u se o n t h e waterfront near '.a Presidencia" whi c h ha s a co nv enient landing place f or pass e n ge r s o f co astwise vesse l s. Panch o was a very familiar figur e alon g the waterfrO llt, alway s smiling and c h ee rful, with his head bare un der t h e hottest of SUIlS his shirt s l eeves tucked u p to the elbows and his trousers rolled lip to the knees. His feet wer e never clad in s h oes, f o r h e either wor e canvas s lipp e r s o r w ent barefoot. ;'\low t h e r e wa s one thing about Panc h o, though h e worked rather hard and earn ed a bit of m a ney; h e ha d non e put f or a rainy an d in fact, ha d bare l y e n o u g h f or his meals. H is m o n ey melted in various way s; namely, lending, gamb ling and drinking. H i s chief ambitio n was to have the bagfull s, and s in ce h e could not save it, h e pro p osed to win t h e Everr wee k h e b ought a 50-cent ticket, and every Sunday h e s aw his littl e scrap o f paper b ecome w o:-t h les s. This continual l oss did not discoura6 e him ; with true gambling spirit h e persisted in his t icket. This w ee k Pancho bou ght his ticket as u s ual, but hoped m o r e than ever to win th e big prize, for t h e Sund ay o f dl e lottery drawing was Carni va l and no one wanting happiness cmlld aR-ord to b e with out :\t 9 .30 o n morning P anc h o was at La L o t e ria Nacional' and c h ose a convenient s ite from whi c h to witn ess t h e drawin g at 1 0 B y [ 0 o'clock t h e crowd was so dense that Panc h o could bare l y sq uirm. H e s aw the ivory balls twirl ing in their sph erica l container; h e saw the littl e trap d oo r open and a chi lci pick alit a ball. 'T'ht:: ball was handed to an attendant who un screwed it, s h owed it to the public and hun g up a metal numbe r whi c h corresponded to the one in the ball. This operation was repeated until a +-digit number was formed, which was t h e number. Some of t h e people s h o u ted and laughed, (or t h ey had won, butthegreaterpartofthemul titude gro an ed and muttered t heir disappr oval. The l ottery drawing proce eded until two m ore s u c h + -digit numbe r s h ad been p os ted. The c ashi er's wind o w s were n ow flun g open in order to par off t h e fa va r ed ones. Panc h o wa s disappointed with the first result, but th e gods o fltH.: k fav o r ed him with t h e second. Several seconds elapsed before Panc h o cou l d realize that h e ha d won part of the seco n d prize. H e looked again and again at the number in his hand and compared it with the winning number. H i s hand s h ook and his heart beat wildly as h e convinced him self of h is good fortune. H e ftlt s uddenly very happy; h e was at peace with the world. H e wan ted to s h o u t or to lau g h to r elieve his f eeli ng s, but h e managed to control him self. At a window a very bus)' cashier dealt out I crisp 520 bills to the Pancho, wh o never seen so mu c h money before in his l i f e P anc h o went over to I .a Marina" and sat down on an e mpty b ox to decid e h ow to spend his three hundred dollars. His dec i sion made, h e first went to San J ose Churc h the churc h with the go lden altar, and thanked God and all the saints with a f ervent prayer and a twenty dollar bill w h ich h e dropped into an alms box. This duty done, Pancho f e lt that h e was fr ee to act as h e p l eased. H e put twO hundred dollar s o f his money into t h e little compartment in his "panga" an d wit h t h e remaining money went out to make ela b o rate preparations for his first real c arni val. H e took P epe, his c losest friend, wit h him and went out to do the s h opping a n d to make the necessary arrangements for a regular good time. Since it wa s Sunday, all the stores w ere closed, but it is said t hat "money makes the mare go" and it d i d. Panc h o bought for himself and his frie nd two magnificent T urkish costumes, profusely decorated with sparkling beads and trimmed with gold lace. That afternoon Pancho and Pepe joined a "comparsa," w h ich is a troupe of fun -see k ers belonging to some club who unite and face th e p leasures of the together. The "comparsa" rode up and down Central .. \ venue in t h eir float. ha ving a wonderful time. T he busy street was packed wit h Roatsj holiday crowds t h ronged t h e sidewalks. Everywhere there were grand confetti and serpentin e battles. The air was filled with music, so n g and laughter. t h ere was lif e and colo r \\' ha t a morley scene was presented by Central : \venue that afternoon; the gaily decOl 'ated Roats, t h e arranged people, the vari-colored streamers of serpentine waving from projections where ther had b ee n caugh t. : \ t night t h e "comparsa" broke up and each membe r b egan a private t our of the dance halls

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T H E ZONI.-\l\'. and cabarets. Panc h o and his friend went fr o m one gay place to another, now dancin g the native "tamborito" to the sound of the "tambor" and now their b est at dan c ing the Charleston to the of a pi c k -up jazz band. A t place they cons um ed quantities of liqu or, from the stro ngest nati ve rulll to th e finest and most ex p e n s iv e c hampagnes. P an c h o an d Pepe had e n o ugh at abo u t -I-in t h e m o rn i ng, at which tirne they went to the latte r' s hOllle to rest for t h e next night's festivit i es. Soon Pancho's friends began t o hear of his lu c k and borrowed large s um s shame l essly, which, as usual, t h ey never intended to repay. Pancho had two more friends to h e l p celebrate the ca rni val on t h e seco n d day. and h e spent his money faster than ever. Panc h o welH h orne with Pepe at 5 o'clock 011 the morning o f the seco n d day, quite inebriated from t h e eft'ects of t h e rum, wine, and beer whic h h e had co n s um ed. On t h e t h ird P an c h o s p ent his m o n ey with less d i scretio n t h an ever. Also, h e made suppl em e ntar y loans, and n ew l oa n s, and r e pai d slig h t favors in curre n cy. Pancho suddenly became ve r y popular; that night h e had a regular troupe of friends trailing him; and h e generously paid all of their bills. A t o n e dan ce h all Pancho got mixed u p in a drunken brawl and was conducted t o t h e police statton, wh ere h e was rel e a sed up o n pay m ent o f a stiff fine Atdawn that m o rnin g P an c h o f o u nd his wa), t o L a Marina, w h e r e h e t h rew him self o n the A oo r and s lept off his drunke nn ess H e was a sight to see ; h i s costume rorn, his (ace red fro m t:xcessive drinking and serpentine looped about him. I t was not until the fourth day that P a n c h o could think sa n e ly e nough to determin e his position J I1siJe o f three s hort days h e ha d squandaeJ three hundred dolla r s, a n d had nothing to s h ow f o r it oth e r than the sweet memories that r e mained. Pancho c r ossed himself devoutly an d promised to turn over a n ew leaf; meanwhil e h e proceeded ab!:>ut his interrupted business of pangueto CAST .". \VA YS. TI/Oma; Nor/lmlp, '2 6. Thir d Place-Sh ort Story COil lest. J ust over the h orizon, the m oo n was rising. casti n g its light on eac h side o f the givi n g a blue h azy tint to the hill s beyond, and an immaculate white to t h e s h o r es on the bay o f Titicaco. The breeze h ad died down, though not to stop t h e water from rolling its phosphorescent white foam s o n t h e s h ore. The Val/C) ..J"'Il', a distinctly and purely sai lin g s loop, was in t h e bay with s ail s furled an d anchor down. I t was not the only s loop that had come to t h e i s land of T iticaco. On t h e lee side, cove r ed by the bare s ha dow of the s loop at an c h o r, was a little tender. The red and g r ee n lights had but a faint glimmer, so faint indeed, that o n e might have seen a star o n a mo on light night mu c h more casily. Presently two men c1imhed over t h e side o f t h e little sloop o n the jacob ladder into t h e tender. and started for the shore in the direction o f t h e shado\\ of the vessel which led them to t h e center of the hay. Bdore them there was a long and narrow plain that ilscended to the blue-tinted hill s in the background. T he men alighted from th e littl e tender and made for t h e jungl e, which bounded the p l ain o n t h e rig ht, and followed it along until they came to the t e mpleofChi chicoco, t h e great and miraculous god of the i s landers. Though nothing better than a thatched h ouse from t h e ou t side, the interior was Greek in styl e. :\Iong with this simpl e Greek deco ration, were t h e scalps, fishes, beads, and other trinkets which th e islanders ha d bestowed on the god during their successive and s u ccessful fights This t e mpl e. of which the natives boast so mu c h dates ba ck to the time of the ru l e of kings and empero r s in Europe. J t was b eg un a f ew m Ol1ths afte r t h e atrival o f th e two ".J\rgoes," as the natives called t h e m. h ad co m e to t h e island and won t h e co nfid e n ce o f t h e natives; w on the i r battles; taugh t them many new things; an d finally p ersuaded them to build a ternple to the god of the 11100n, who, they sa i d, ha d done so mu c h f or them. : \ s a tokt'll of their friendship these two Ar goes h ad placed twoglitrering stones, whi c h the natives admi r ed and cove t ed very mu c h, in the eye soc kets of t h e statue. These two ston es were the famous diamomls in the crown of Peter t h e Great which ha d been stol en by two intriguing R ussians o f the Court who took th e at the time of an impending revolution. The nameS of Orloff

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THF. ZO;-\ I A:-.'. 35 and Herman wt:rc blazoned in the papers, and the police had searc hed in vain for them. They had made for the border and then for the islands in the Archipelago es with the intention of re[Urn ing some to a famous collector of jewels named Peter Dubra. But the day n eve r came. Peter Dubra had waited and died, and so had OrloR-and Herman. The subsequent descendants o f this collector had looked forward to these jewels as a priz e well worth whi l e getting. I t had b een tht:ir vow to get these twO diamonds at cost. Of these descendants, was A.lamand Dubra, the last of his line. His sharp features, his piercing eyes, his thin sharp nose, his long slender and obtrusive body s h owed the unscrupulous man whos e deeds were never to be forgotten by all F.urope, or those who ever saw his devilish smile. H e had been traveling allover the South Seas in searc h o f these stones during the last 20 years. H e had been tra\' elling all alone, and now h e was getting old. H e nt.::eded a companion. -\b ollt a "ear before ht.:: had picked up a chap whom h e as "a drunken at Singapore. H e would make a nne h enchman," h e had t h oug h t. I t was t h ese two t hat had come to th e island of T iticaco in the s l oop, and had gone ca u tiou sly up to t h e temple unde r the cover of t h e jungle. -\Iam and Dubra had come to get the diamonds at all costs. The youth had come to make a new srart, and would dare to do to begin. H e was indebted to Dubra for the chance, though he was like a slave They had been waiting at the edge of the plain near the temple to see that no native was watching. "\Yhew!" let out the youth as though he was tired. "Sh---. R e m ember, ir is now or n ever. There is one native who knows!" whispered D ubra. The was a chap of sOllle 20 yt.::ars whose powerful bicep s, and Greek physique had been developed during his time on the sloop. H e had been like a f aithful dog to Dubra, had braved many dangers, and seell many squalls, gales, and storm s, for the one purpose-to make up what ht: had lost. They rushed up to the temple with daggers on one side, and silent colts on the other. entered the temple and l ooked about to make sure there was no one there. Opposite the door, two eyes glittered in the apparent darkness. They were t h e eyes of the god. "Get the stones," comrnanded Dubra, "while I watch for the natives." The youth made his \\'a\' cautiollsir to rhe statue .. }\Iong the edge o f the plain which the two had taken, a native was coming toward the temple. rear and courage seemed to strike Dubra alternately. His hand passed over his dagger and then over his col t. H e loo k ed in the direction of the statue o nly to see the eyes still there. I It.:: wondered w hat co uld be keeping the youth, or whether h e was playing him a trick. The native was still coming. H e rneasured the time it would take the native to reach the temple and then l ooked at the statue. The eyes were still there. T o speak in tht.:: clear still night would be to arouse suspicion, for the sound tra \ elled well over the island. H e l ooked at the native again. I t would be 7 minutes, hejudged, before h e would get to the temple. H e looked again at the statue with relief to see that one of the eyes had disappeared. The o ther would be down soon, h e knew. H e would watch the native now, h e thought, and make plans for t h e escape. Fiv e minutes t o go, he thought, as h e heard behind him the stumbling of the youth "\\' hat's the matter?" he asked off' his g uard. 1---1 stumbled," the murmured "Shut up! H ere comes a native. H urry!" Aid ed by the s ha dow of the temple on the side which the\' had chosen to come, they started for the jungle', and then hurri ed like on the chase to the s h o re where the tender They jumped into the boat, started the engine, looked at the Illuffler and then at the s l oop. They rigged the s l oop and began sailing slowly out o f the har bor. Once out of the bay, the s l oop encountered stormy weather. The 11100n was overcast by clouds, and a strong breeze had begun to ruffle the calm waters. Over the h orizon in the darkness of the night, lightning R ashes were bursting the clouds. They were heading into the storm), weather. The \ 'outh had taken to the tiller, while Dubra, the bet'ter cook, prepared somet hing to ear. Aft er a repast which was accompanied with work, Dubra asked for the diamonds. The youth handed him one "\\'here is the other?" queried Dubra. "That is mine!" he answered. "Oh, 1 see. That is right. Agreement."

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THE 20;-;1.\:-;. H e took out of his p ocket a jeweler's l111sc r o scope and put it up to his right eye. \\,ith his nimble fingers, h e was feeling the ston e a s h e s aw the minute co nstruction. H e l oo k ed at the youth. I t was the first tim e the chap ha d not acted like a fait hful dog. H e wa s too ind ependent. H e surveyed t h e ston e again. \\,i th o n e I can live comfortabl y se \Teral h e thought, "but with two -ah, well--I c an liv e lik e a milli o n aire, even l o n ger." H e l oo k ed at th e youth again. Som e h ow, his v i sio n was blurred. Yet h e kn e w the youth was there. L e t m e see stone?" hl: a s k ed with a devilis h smi l e ":-; 0." } want to exa min e it." ":-; 0." I see Y o u do not trllst me. I 'll let yo u k ee p s t o n e while I l ook at yours." D on't b e so annoying. Can't y o u see what we're heading into?" Y es, yes, my friend. Bu t give m e that ston e. Y o u Illay lose it in this storm." I t i s sa f e r with me," retorted t h e youth. Dubra l oo k ed at his s t o n e again. H e moved c loser to t h e youth. "Gi ve m e that ston el h e commanded. Overhead hun g dark c l ouds. Lightning wit h its Ras h es of wrath br o k e t h e clo u ds above that sent th e torrents of rain lIp o n the littl e s l oop whic h increa sed in vo lume a s th e s h ort m o m ents passed by. P eals of t hun der, lik e the cru s hing of larg e bowld e rs or an avalanch e o f r oc k s made the pitter patter o f t h e rain noiseles s Rain wa s streaming down lik e sweat upon the two as sa t near the tiller. Dubra, with his devilish s mil e, wa s looking at t h e youth, whil e th e latter wa s strai ning his f o r th e s i g h t o f a lan dmark or the familiar light s o f a ship. Dubra's han ds circli ng t h e throa t o f th e youth. The youth caught his hand in a grip o f steel and muttered" Enoug h!" Bu t Dubra's other hand was fr ee \\,ith it h e sought his trusty dagger and stabbed t h e youth. H is grip l oose ned, and h is b o d y collapsed over th e lap o f Dubra. Dubr" searc h ed th e bod y of t h e la d for th e ston e, found it, and threw t h e body a s id e \\'ith a last look o f satisfacti o n h e got up, l oo k ed at the youth and t h e n at the ston e H e was going to the cabin. The r e was a Ras h a p e al of t hunder an d t h en a ca lm. I t wa s t h e la s t stroke of t h e lig htning fJr th e nig h t. The rain p oured several h ours and then ceased. I t wa s close to morning w h e n the s un began to rise The s l oo p, w ith one at the tiller, ha d been sai ling in circl es and drihing. Cl ose to n oo n, the youth awoke from his swoon. H e d ra gged his body over to the k eg and feebly ope n ed the pipe. H e l e t the water dri p into his parc h ed throat f or seve ral minutes. There was a dull pain on his l e ft s i de, but h e d i d not care. H e wanted to s l eep. \\'he n h e awoke again, h e f e lt mu c h strong er. H e exa min e d his w ou nd to find that it was on l y min o r. H e dressed it crudely with a handkerchie f and a part o f his s hirt. "\\'here is Dubra?" h e wonder ed } f h e meant to kill m e, h e would have throw n me overboard. H e ollght to be at th e tiller." Btp Dubra wa s not at the tiller. On his way to th e ca bin, h e saw the lifeless body of Dubra. H e examin ed it. There were parts of rhe body that were scorc hed, w hile the b o n es were all shatte r ed and as h e felt the mass, it made him shudder. } t was lik e a jelly. There wa s s till the devilis h s mil e on t h e face o f Dubra, as if so mething had b ee n acco mpli s h ed The youth to o k two diamonds fr o m t h e hands of the vict im and looked at t h e m c uri o u s l y. "Oh, well," h e murmured, "Me n die f orever when they h ave wasted their lives, but m e n die to liv e again wh e n t h ey are innocent." The you th moved to the till e r, looked at the compass, and steered a n ew course \ l in e 1:I11(Iowav between C'tlstobalanlGutuu

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THE ZON IAN. 37 THE RETU R N. Aglles I V illougMy, '27. T e n y ears ago Thomas l\l eade wa s on a hUllting trip in Ala s ka. One co ld and l o n e l y day h e came upon a l o gcabin se t far o ff from t h e little dreary settlements whic h see m e d so d eserte d. !\ w oman of about 5 0 y ears stoo d at t h e d oo r and invite d him in and told h im to make him self at h o m c a s wa s t h e c u s t o m of t h e I t was a delig h t t o him to b e in s u c h a coz y h O lll e afte r havin g liv e d f o r w ee k s at a t i m e in hunte r s' c abin s with all that it imp l i es o f dirt floo r s, unmade beds, tin plates and ba c on and b e an s Those cabins w e r e c h eerless but t h i s wa s a h o m e whi c h rested tire d e y es and r efres h e d o n e H i s d elig h t s h owed in hi s face, and t h e w oman s aw it. S h e ans w e r e d h im a s if h e had s p o k e n t o h e r. It's all h e r o wn w ork." S h e conduc t e d h im t o a b edroo m in o rtie r that he might fr es h e n hi s appeara n ce ; s u c h a r oo m h e had not see n f o r y ears Eve r y t h ing wa s so c l ean and neat. J L s t a s h e fini s hed, s h e r eente r e d the room and s h owe d h im a pi cture o f the m os t b eauti ful girl h e had e v e r see n. She said, J u s t sixtee n h e r la s t birthd a y andah, but just wait un til y o u see h er.' \Vh e r e i s s h e n o w ? h e a s k e d. "Sh e s away now at sc h oo l, and ha s b ee n g o n e f o r two years." \Vh e n will s h e r eturn?" "Sh e 'll be h e r e Sunday at about 7 o 'clo ck." i V Ieade was sorry to h ear t h i s b ecause h e wante d to se e her, and ye t h e had t o r eturn t o his h o m e b e fore the trai l s b ecame impass abl e so h e told the woman t h is. On h earing hisstate m e n t t h e w oman begged h im t o stay and s ee h e r daugh t e r b ecaust: s h e lik e d company and would b e l o n e ly if no o n e but h e r moth e r wa s the r e to gree t h e r 011 h e r arrival. S h e b e gg e d so hard and h e h a d fall e n so much in l o v e with the girl that h e d ec i de d to stay The fir s t day afte r his arrival slippe d away The second e v e ning, wh e n it had g rown dark, an o ld pion ee r came t o see the o l d w oman. H e g r ee ted them and said, I jus t droppe d in to a s k wh e n t h e litrl e mi ss i s coming h o m e Have an y n e w s from h e r about h e r arriv al t "Oh, y es, I have a l ette r from h e r. \\'o uld YOLI like to h ear it, Hardy? " 'e ll, I s h o ul d say J w o uld!" The w oman the n g o t the l ette r and r e a d it a c harming l ette r full o f l o v e and o f m t:ssages to h e r o l d fri e nds n o t f o r gotte n eve n in two y ears The l ette r fini s h ed 1\l r. H a rdy arose an d at t h e d oo r h e pro mi se d t o h e on hand to m ee t h e r w h e n s h e arri\e d. The f ollo wing e v e nin g Saturcby, more o l d fri e nds c arn e t o visit h e r and tht: l ette r wa s al so r e a d to th e m, all pro mi sing to b e t h e r e Sunday evening \\' h e n arrived tht: wa s an d anxi o u s E ve r y f e w minutes s h e would run out t o t h e trail t o sec if the g irl wa s in s i ght. The n s h e w o uld e n te r t h e h o u se and a s k i\l eade il h e thought anyth i n g had happe ned to her, and if h e thought s h e w o u l d arri ve o n t im e : \bout 5 o'cl oc k t h e p eo pl e b egan to arrive and the n e w co m e r s d ecorated t h e h Ollst: .-\ f e w minutes b e f o re 7, five o f the m e n br o u g h t the ir in struments out and b egan to danct:' mu s i c. T o a s t s w e re drunk to the arrival o f the g irl and wa s m e r r y I t wa s nearly seve n w h e n Hardy g avt: t h e w oman a drink o f c i de r to "givt: h e r courage a s h e put it. J u s t a s s h e s wall o wed rh e drink tht' cl oc k struc k se v en. S h e h eard it and l oo k ed toward t h e d oo r to see h e r d a u g h t e r c om e in, but s h e sudde nly b ecame dro w s y and the pe o pl e put h e r o n the b ed whe r e s h e immediate ly f ell a s l ee p. : \ r thi s rh e gu es t s began r o l e a ve an d M e ade b e gg ed t h em to stay and wait f o r the g i rl. The y l o ok e d at e a c h othe r and Hardy said, P oor girl, s h e ha s b ee n d ead f o r 5 years." What' D e ad?' Y es s h e w ent away t o sc h oo l 7 y ears ago and wa s froze n to d eath o n t h e trai l whe n s h e wa s coming to see ht:r m othe r who b ecame in sane whe n s h e s aw h e r daughter's b ody and s he ha s never r e m embe r ed her death. S ht: a c t s lik e t h i s whe n the day o f h e r daug hter's d eath com es r ound. T h e n w e c om e to see h e r and o n the day o f the s u pposed arri v a l wt: decorate the h o u se and at t h e la s t minute drug her s o that w h e n s h e awake n s, s h e will think ht:1' daught e r i s with h t:r and will b e all right."

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THE ZON1A:>I. I.E\D1I
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THE ZO" I A N. 39 I e TI\'E:'-!TY II e liville, Calif. Dt-:AK .-\1.: Y ou a s k e d m e i n yo u r la s t l etter whethe r I had e v e r b et:n ; n t h e Canal Z o n e. D ec i d edly, y es w h ole l i f e lip to 2 0 a go wa s ill 13:1lb o<1. A t that tim e I t h o u g h t t h e p l a ce had tOQ t i r eso m e and m o n o t o n o u s I cou ld set' n o in rh e o rd e rly lin es o f h o u ses a n d t h e well -laid-out h i g hways and n cat lawns I s uppose I s h o u l d have b ee n glad to live in s u c h a m o d e rn U to pia, but I wa s n o t. S o m e h o w t h e w h o l e t h in g m e. \\"h e n m y tim e c a m e I wdcom e d it j oyolls ly a s t h e br ea kin g o f t h e l a s t til'" w h i c h wa s binJing m e t o t h e tr o p ics At l a s t I was g oing to t h e States w h e r e p eople wou l d b e e n e rg e ti c a n d t h e co ld br eezes and t h e s n o w c r u n c hing unde r foot woul d invigorate m e S in c e t h e n I have v i site d many p l aces, only to fin d m yself a lways di ssatisfie d For a l o n g ti m e I scof f e d at t h e "Spell o f t h e Tropics" id e a s uggest e d b y fri ends but finally I c a m e to r e ali ze t hat t h e r e was som e t hi n g in e x p l i cable t hat seemed to keep t h e t r o pi cs e v e r m e. I a s t S lllllllH:r I b ecame even more consci o u s o f thili m.\,st e r io uli s p e ll. \\' h i le li\ in g in t h i s quiet a n d towll I wa s continually a ss ailed with dreams I w o ul d si t o n the piazl..
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THE ZO:-l IA:--.' . -\ T A LE. Andrnt' Donot'fln, '26. During the reign o f tht: Emperor Shullchiabi, there was brought to tht: palace a bird o f great beauty called, in the language of the country. the Krobora. I t s so ng was m ore b ea utiful than that of the Oii, so it wa s givel1 a place in the palace. T h e Emperor was enchanted by its singing and ordered that it s h o uld have a golden perch in the Hall of the Seven H o uri H e fL.lrthermore COI11-mandeJ that it b e atte nded by six men, of the Taje hal tribe, dressed in cloth o f gold b.-::strewn with moonbeams, and wearing wigs powdered \\ ith star dust. : \\1 this was done, and every evening the K r o bora sa ng its beautiful song, and every evening the Emperor was overjoyed and wept pearly tears upon the jasper pa ve m ent. :\11 went well ulltil the six attendants, dressed in cloth of gold bestrewll with m oonbeams and wearing wigs p owdered wit h star dust, o bserved that the Krobora wa s losing its song. T h ey came in haste before t h e Emperor and, falling lIpon their kn ees b efo re him, said "Oh, most diville and august rul e r of t h e Two Empires of the Sisisquissetabai, and loved of the G ods, we find that the great K robora loseth its so ng through lonelin ess." The Emperor gave orders that a companion be: brought from the royal aviary, and be installed on a p e r c h near the great T h e commands were obeyed, and things went happily till the ne:wcomer, t h e \\'a)'i n ecc hii bird, began to sco ld t h e Krobora. T he f..:.robora grew angry and, in high tones, sco lded t h e \\'ayinecc hii bird. T his cOlltinued day after day until the attendallts, dressed in cloth o f gold bestrewn with m oonbeams and \\caring wigs powdered with star dust, saw that the Krobora was getting a sore throat. T her held counc il, and it was decided that the Gird s h ou l d b e put to death. T h e decision wa s r ealized, and things went well. Every night the Emperor sat under anu and Zual.aru, and wept pearly tears upon the jasper pavement. Thus things went, but soo n the f..:.robora mis sed its companion, the \\'ayinecc hii bird, and f ell sick. T h e royal doctors tried to save its life but it wa s u se l ess by day it grew more silent, and one morning the six attendants found it dead on the golden perch. T hu s passed the Krobora. mourning was proclaimt:d throughout the land. LILY A I A Y H ORTE:-ISE ;\I ,\RIE'S \ I SIT T O T H E COU R T. TlmnS;fl Be,.:,. "i\l e hand me 'usband 'ho is han Henglishman whent to Hengland. \\'e whent o n de boat fr o m Jamaica t o H england. \\' hen w e got to H e n gland tht: people hall went to see m e hand tink hi cute, hand me H e ngli s h 'usband 'andsome. "\\' h e n we in H e n gland Quee n H e lizabet s h e hask u s to vist 'e r hat 'er co'rtm e hand m e H english 'usbandhan' we go hin ha fint: coac h hand de Queen Helizabet she welcome me hand mt" 'ushand hand hask hall habout Jamaica han d if me hand me I-Ienglis h 'uband like Jamaica bettt:r than H england. Hand hi JUSt say, '}\To mum!' Han' the H e ngli s h ladi es 'ave straight 'air so tink hi hand me Henglish 'usband 'ave 'air. D e n when hi go to leave from the H t:nglish cO'rt with mt: H e ngli s h 'usband de Queen s h e put 'er 'ands in m e 'air an' say, j\ lr, what hadorable c url s you 'ave.' : \nd den m e hand me H ellglish 'usband--" "That'll do, thank you. P lease get that dress ironed; you've been o n it an h our now!" D ITTY \f,r/am L. /-/(Illort/II, '27. wa:. prelt)" I fell in love! Her l!yes were blue like the sky alx}\'c; Her werl! like ,I hlushing rose, :\nd had .1 pretry rip-tilted nose. But I finall} decided she wouldn't do When I learned she had just reached fifty-two.

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THE ZO\,IA:", \ '1\'.'\ L\ CAR\,.'\ \',AL Carnival! Carnival! o SOli! of Carll ivai! passionate spirit of fir e Crearurt: o f a thollsand moods! The wild, tre lllul o u s beatin g of the wing" of joy all th e silent air! The flaming a!'rows of light darting from the blaze o f hearts glowin g scarlet with delirium! The rending scream of b e n eath the rllsh of capering feet! A.bo v e the hars h underton e of pandem oni ulll the sibilant bleating o f carnival pipes! The r e lease of d ormant passio n s The whi rr o f olltAung serpentin e! The blinding Ras h es o f confetti! T h e exquisite blending of love and forgetfulness! The whirl-gol de n scar l et! .10\' unres train edl F ree! \'iva la Carnaval! ""lilt Edle Rllder, '20. l \/i P o/fera, !\Ii Pol/era, sling to the beat of native drums is heard far and n earduring Carnival, for all are :\\1 cares are thrown to the wind for f our days of merr ymaking. Laughin g, :\11 interrupted now and the n by a screech of pai;i a s some se n o r filled with the spirit of Carnival squirts another m errymt'sn't w:tnt to be in ? \\'e crowd, :tre blocked for but w hat car e w e we have O:.Ir here OI1C'= a dancing, drinking, laughing, Rirting with the grac-eftll caballeros ,lIld catchin g the kisse" of t h e ir $t:I;r)ritaj. Y es, it is plll"lldi.r(' fJr days! T herresStl BI.'I':.. Flashes of reJ) and green; cries o f "Serpentina" from ped !lers; the blare o f d i scordant Illu s i c ; passi n g floats, representing four nations of the universe; exclamatio n s in seven difFerent langu:1se3; red rouge on black f:tces ; a pushing, elhowing strugglin g to see the pa:-ade; flyin g conf..::tti and str eamers; the m o n OtJnOU3 chant of .1/; Po!!! 'rfl; J113re or less inte:ested onlo:>kers; crowded halconies; natives in attire; out for a good time; a pleasure-Ill:lJ p1pulace with all cares forgottenThe Carnival. E:'\'C H.-\:,\Ti\ IE'\:T P an:l1ll:l, Panama, \\'Itch of tht: T ropics, T ell Ille what charm you have laid Oll my T ell me wllat makes Ille so rt:stless ,Ind T o see o'er Illy head the bright blue of YOdr skies. I s it a sil\'er cord, silken ,Inc! twininl;!, Y ou\'e passed through rhe sensitive string:;. of my he.trt. Twisted and turned it until you /Llve WO\en :\ pattern that nt:'t:r w;1l be broken ap:Jrt: Panama, P analll:l, I ul;.-ofi\l ystery! P a l m trt:es, deep !>hadolVs, ,Ind sl!\ery Spirit ad\'enturous, passiol1:lte, {bring, Yet fr.lil as in dre,lll1s! T hc 10\1 \1 isrful murmurs of wind III the The sOlll., of people to s'ldne.;s inspire, .-\nd memorie:;., poignant and Sl\et:, as the orchid, Stil! hide in lour citv onCt: love-.! of fire. Panama, P :ln:ttlla, \\'himsical Charmer, Old f.lnc\ runs rampant In your narrow .,rreets; The shining new br:lsst:s of civih!ation \\'ill ne\'er eclipse the dull gold of ant;qut:s. The Spirit of L onging, pale je\\eled ;n teardrops, I.ets down from the low-hanging point!"> of your sta r, The sill'er cord. silken, persuasive, and clinging, -\nd calis me to lo\'c VOll from cOllntr;es ;If.IT.

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THE ZO:" IA:". !Ii I e FABL ES. J :---Spring was in the air. T h e bir d s w e r e flyin g n orth. Tiny buds w e r e making t h e i r firs t appearance and F o r es t v ille wa s all enrapture d. F o r wa s n o t spring h e r e a g ain and wa s n o t old P r o f esso r Owl g i v in g his annual ra d i o con cert f o r tht: kiddies? '\ I r. Owl ha d g i ven a radi o co n ce r t f o r the kidd i es spring rh e y could r e mt:mbe r. This del i ghtful part)' had always b ee n the scen e o f muc h m erriment t h ough to b e SlIre l\l iss :".'e lli e Bu llfin c h had c a s t a bli ght o n the l a s t wh e n s h e had a cc identally upse t h e r c hocolate o n h e r n e w frock. This party w o ul d undoubtedl y b e quirt: the Illost inte r es tin g o f all as programs wer e b eing bro adca s t e d fr o m N B A the n e w statio n in Panama, the winte r r esort o f n o t a f e w of t h e best f a mili es o f F o r es t ville T h e Clanc y O'P ossums w e r e v i siting their cous in s t h e P oss u m s o f Panama, and w e r e thinking o f making t h e ir h o m e t h e r e Panama wa s so r omantic and had s u c h an ideal climate. .-\11 the kiddies were a t t h e Owl's ;\icc Beaver,sl), \\' illi e Fox, s weet Li l y \\'hitepa w s t h e \\'hitepaws w e r e relate d t o t h e Hare but recognized n o o n e b e n eath t h eir stat i o n -little Am)' Chiplllunk, big B r o wni e B earall t h ese we r e t h e r e and many m o r e, .-\ f t e r the kiddi es had all b ee n seated and se rved with cool s h e r bert, i' l r. O w l looking quite the sc h o l a r a n d ve r y wise, began speaki n g : ",-\\1 y o u except t h e ti n y tiny rots have lis t e n e d o v e r radio. To-n ig h t w e s hall h e a r so m e v e r y ni ce bedt ime srores. I'm sure all o f y o u will love t h em." .-\1\ asse nted, t h o u g h deep in h e r h eart, i\linnie wis hed t hey m i g h t t lln e in a ll the Ritz peppy jazz orchestra Furthermore, continued i\1 r. O w l I am going ro ask Danny Beaver, and Bill ie and :'\lana Goat ro tulle in and get u s someth i n g. B illie try first." B i llit! was all athrill and YOli Illa y bt! S llre, very \'cry, ve r y, very red. Ht! w alked liP, a n d pretn' soon all tht! kiddies heard a man's voice coming right t hrough t h e air. They listened, exc ited and brea t h less "Statio n S-T -! \ T I-C, trains f o r C h i cago and t h e far e a s t. D ear little radio lis t e n e r s t h e fir s t b edtime s t ory i s c alled--THE R E D THIE F R alph IImdrirRJrlJ '2i' One d a y whi l e B r othe r Fox was wandering around in the wood s h e n o ti ce d i\l iss D ee r making a rhubarb cllstard. p oor B r o t h e r F ox h a d a bad habit o f e a t in g b etwee n m e a l s so h e waite d untill\l iss Deer had fini s h e d t h e c u stard ; and the n wh e n n o o n e wa s looking, h e w ent a n d stol e it. \\' hil e B r othe r F ox was goin g h o me, h e m e t B r othe r B ear wh o immediate l v a s ked him w h e r e h e got the c u stard "If I tell Y Oll, will pro mi se n o t to tell a s ked B r othe r F ox Y es," sai d B r othe r Bear, \V e ll, I stol e it fr o m ;\ I i ss Deer." T h e y w a lked al o n g through the woods until l11e t B r othe r \\'olf. "\\' h e r e d id Y Oll ge t the c u stard t a s k e d Broth e r \\olf. Brothe r F o x though t f o r a w hile and t h e n de-c i ded to t ell him P r o mi se you w o n't t ell and I ll give y o u s o m e." "All rig ht," s ai d B r o th e r \\'olf. T h e n B r othe r F o x t old him and the t h ree w e n t thro u g h t h e wood s eating the s t o l e n c u stard, They w e r e talking o f th eir good sec r e t and prom i sing Brot h e r F o x o v e r and ove r t hat t h e y w o u l d Ilc \'er say a wo r d auout it, but poor B r o t h e r F o x was sorr y that they kne w hi s sec r e t. .-\. few w ee k s late r i\l i ss Deer came t o town and in the m arket s h e overheard t h e c hi e f gossipe r s talking o f the wo nderful rhubarb c u stard t hat B r othe r F o x h a d b ee n seen with, i\l iss Deer w ent t o J lIdge L i o n and tol d him t hat Brother F o x had stol e n the c u stard (r o m h er, and p o o r B r o t h e r F ox was hanged. :\ l oR.\L,Three can keep a sec r e t -if two o f the m arc de ad,Fr onkli",

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THE H ow wicked Br otht:r F ox was, whispercd liul c D ickit: T urtle. I'm sure! he! desen'cd hanging." Dear little radio babi!.':s, the nl.':xt story is Procrastination.' I n littlc ones, rou do not understand t h e meaning of thi s big word know t hat it means postponement." PROCRAST I SlIIllh. '.q. I t was nearly the end of the sc h ool in the H ollow Stump Schoolhouse, T he \ \ ord ;'examinatio ns" was t h e topic for cOIl\'ersations all1l1lg t h e little animal children. E ach ;\Ir. Owl, t h eir t!.':
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THE 1.0,,1.-\'\. of his that his mates had been wrecked, f I x they wouldn't set a watch. i\lORAL.-Prepare for danger in time of calm. \ 'm sure y o u all enjoyed that j o lly yarn mlJch," o ld i\lr. Owl said, feel quite s:t1ty my self." salty, tarr)' T ar and feathe r ) '," bad \\,i llie F ox murmured. "Oh, l\'Ir Owl, can't we ple
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T H E ".-\ nd now, d ear listeners, I am quite worn out," old i\lr. Topin's voi ce came o v e r the air. H e wa s o ld-some s aid 300 years Three O scar Ottar wac; a stounde d a s w e re the r es t o f the childre n. I hope that YOli have enjo y e d this program a s mu c h a s I have I hope to b e with again n ext week. 1 \ l y la s t and good-hy .. il l 1 l\':\, 1F. il IO"KF.Y loiJe L o r ing '26. :'\"o w I suppose have been wonderin g what wa s in rh e lette r that Mrs i\lonke y had r ece ived fro m Bright E yes, the parro t. She wa s juS t a s anxio u s t o r ead it a s are and a s soon a s little i\Iarmazetto hoppe d upstairs to b ed, s h e tore o p e n t h e enve l o p e "Dear i\l r s t\] o nk ey," it b egan, "I-::ee p a sharp look out f o r i\l r. \\' ild cat. H e i s prowling abollc" Bri ght E) es "Oh, dear, o h dear," sobbe d i\l r s M o nk e y, a s s h e jumped fr o m one branc h o f h e r iDUSt: to another, "\Tow I will have to k ee p little JVlarma zetto ind oors \\'hat s hall J d o : [\lr. has g o n e to Lhnanaville fo: the end, so p erhaps I had h ette r call up L Inde Ape." The n over to th e t e l e ph o n e jumpe d poo' ]\I r s ;\I.o nk e y. "One, tw o, tlHee, red s hingl e d house, Un c le -\p e o r Little [\f i ss l\l o u se," s h e c all e d in a trembling v o ice. Soo n s h e h eard L l ncl e Ape s d ear little h o u sekee p er's voi ce : ;' \\'ho i s c alling? H e r e I am Bu sily making mang o jam." I s Uncl e Ape th e re?" inquired t\l r s [\I o nk e y anxi o u s l y H e w ent t o C ocoanutto this m orning," ans w e r e d little [\l i ss l\i o u s ie "Oh d ear, o h d ear, crie d J\lrs ;\.I o nk e y and with a N e v e r mind, I 'll c all again," s h e hung up the r ece iver a '1<1 the n e xt minlltl:! a s k e d C entral f o r the P olice Statio n "Police Sta t ioll, pl c a se b e qui c k P oliceman wit h his hic k o r y s ti c k. " H e i s in Orangetown," ans w e red a \'o i t'e "\\'on't b e h o m e until to-mo r r o w this rim e poor ]\irs. \ I o nk e y wa s frantic. She cried and crie d until little t\1armazetto h eard h e r and came running down th e stairs "Don't b e afraid, h e co nsoled h e r, I s till have Ill)' little cOC.)tlu t p o p gun. .lust the n Rap, rap, sounded o n their kitc h e n door. "Oh, d ear m e, what s hall w e do ? cried l\l r s That mu s t b e I\l r. \\ildcat." She pick ed up a large c o conut and o p e n e d th e door. J u s t a s s h e made r eady to bang [\lr. \ \ ild car o v e r the h ead with the co c onut, what wa s h e r surprise to se.e, n o r the terrible m o n s t e r bu t d e a r old Uncl e !\peJ H e had just returned f ro m C ocoanutto and ha d run over to see what wa s the matte r. '\\'hy, goodn ess grac io u s m ce bu'5!" e x claimed L 'nde .-\p e "\\,hat i s the matter? One w o ul d think som ething dreadful had happe ned," "So m ething d r eadful is goin g to happen," cried t\l r s t\J o nkey, f o r getting h o w brave ly s h e had pic k e d u p t h e coconut. And in rh e n ex t stvr y y o u s hall h ear what happe n e d afte r that whil e Un c le Ape settle d him self to r e a d the ,\/oJlk(vb ri dgc BUX/l' and await d e v e lopments G oo d -night to all. An d now [\I r. Owl's party wa s at an e n d had staye d late-till 9 o c l oc k. A.nd h o w the y ha d l o ved it. T h e stories had been so nice and rh e r efres hm ents Oh! Bu t it wa s ove r f o r anothe r f o r all g ood things mu s t co m e to an e n d Good -night, dear kiddie s," s ai d Owl a s the y w e r e l e a v ing "Ple ase com e a g ain t o Illy nexr year, f o r the n I am i n vitjng the \\"00<.1-lan d F'airil.!s." \ )"-'\') uf \thIN ... Gir',

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THE e 11 ',', ':,' Gisela T nepser. :\fter a horrible passage frolll i\Iadagaskar t o i\larseilles w h ich, heing war time, took liS five weeks instead of three, we were sent to the camp at Garaisoll, situated in the H igh not far from Lourdes, the famous Catholic pilgrims destination. \Ye arrived there in December. 19[6, afte r an imprisonment o f more than tWQ r ears. Garaison was a co n centratio n ( 'amp of about a thousand people: a few Germans, Bulgarians Turks, Egyptians and people from all nations : even many Englis h, I ralian, and French women with their children who were married t o Germans, lived there. Garaison i s an enormous old convent near the Spanish frontier, surrounded high walls and guardeJ by a body of s')ldiers. My parents, my two-year old sister and I arrived a long with a Sldoniki transport; father was put into a room with about o n e hundred twenty people of the Balkans, and we had to liv e with Hungarian and Bulgarian women and children. Though we cam e fro:11 the intense heat from without winter clothes, the Fre nch gave us only half a COttoll blanket and a straw mattress full of vermin, and infected. This w e learned when we were unable to s leep on ac countofinnumerablelice, Aeas,and hugs, and w hen we became ill with scabies and nast), abscesses. \\Oe had to sleep on the ground and t o hang the straw mattresses up on the wall in the morning at 7 o'clock. There was no srove, no fire, no light, all the long, dark winte r The s n ow came in through the many broke n window panes. \\'e suffered fr o m the coLI. Three times a wee k w e w e r e all o w e d a walk, but this m eant that we had to pace lip and down 4-00 yards in a country lane, up to our anklt:s in deep or melted snow, betwee n a row o f so ldi e r s with loaded guns. T he worst was that we had ro stay there for one and a half h ours whic h made liS dreadfully tired; we were forbidden t o dry the wet shoes and stockings at t h e window. So they never got dry at all. \\'e felt terribly hungry all the time The amount of food we we r e entitled to was written down o n a notice board in the passage: a piece of bread and black coffee in t h e morning, half a pint of soup or beans each for dinne r and supper. That was all. Y e t very ofte n we could n o t eat even that. The beans were n o t half cO"Jked from la c k of fue l ; to make up for it, handfuls o f soja w e re put into the meal s which made us all ill. \\'e were not all owe d to draw any from our possessions in i\ladagaskar. There were no wash basins and a s t h e women could not go out into the open courtyard, break the ice and wash in the presence of all t,",e men and as t hey had n o lTI"Jner to buy basins anJ jugs, many o f them washed themsel ves at all. The rest of our money had gone to buy plates and cups at horrible prices. \\'as it to be wondered at, that the place behind the chur c h yard wall where the dead prisoners wert: interred was thronged? \\' h en after three months we could get the first b o x with clothes from our grandparents, m y parents and I were sick in the so-called hospital ( t here was no nurse) and my little sister had been buried three days before. The French did not release my mother, contradictory to their arrangements with Germany, until by intermediation of Switzerland we were permitted to go to Germany. I t had been agreed between Germany and France that women and children, if they wished for it,should be repatriated. J\1y mother, in vain, applied for it. Though several female transports were leaving, we were ordered to stay when on the point of starting, without being given any explanation. B y intermediation of a Swiss delegation, who visited the prison camps, we finally got leave to quit France for Germany.

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THE S TR EETS. Streets, all stret:ts, have a fascination. Little s id e streets and g reat broad avenues are co lored a romantic charm. :\n<.l what are "avenues" but little grown up? I n Panama one com es upon t h e most delightful stredS. afC always just around t h e corner! I.caving t h e n oisy market place and passing through a damp, must)' passage, o n e comes on a little cui-dc-sac. I t i s a tiny dreamy corner of the O l d \\'or l d, a bit frolll an opera La T asca or L a B o h e m e. T he outer world does not seem to affect its so mnolent rcposc. Slanting sunlight throws a brilliant gash of flaming gold on the plaster wall, and makes simmering, flickering shadows on the gra y pa vcmcn t. .-\ signboard abov!:! a s hop announces that within are so ld anchors and seafaring eq uipment o f all kinds. T o substantiate this statement there are anchors and blocks, ropes and paints, and sundry other materials for rh e use of t h ose w h o "gO down to t ht: se a in ships." Grear g r een doors 01)1.:'11 into the cavernou s depth s o f t h e store. From [ h e darkn ess w i t hin co mes t h e steady l11urmllr o f a voice croo nin g over accounts. I [ rises and falls mt'ioclious and plaintive. and at times stops, as if t h e worker were looking through the barred window at the blue sky above. .-\n d it i s blue, that $ky -the blue of a daya blue that throbs and palpitates, re splendent with the joy of lite! : \ tree, shaking in the breeze, throws quickh m oving s had ows, and s ha des t h e narrow paSS:lge Onl' can see, rhrough its airy foliage, thl: corner o( it riny plaza and the brilliant cloth es ot rhe c hild rl'n ar plar. F rom t h e cu l-de-sac a set of steps wends, easy stages, up into the plaza. are set at \ 'arying angl es and s how traces of long USe, Green streaks cross rheir creamy sur face and in th e center are worn into little hollows where rhe rain water rests The rains of years have given rhem a rich, antique finish and they look l ike pieces of o l d ivory in a mllseum. Presently a lottery-ticket vendor carnes alung, c hanting t h e !lumbers o f his tickets. H e wears a faded. ragged coat and on h is feet are a lpargatas lik e t h ose bro u g h t over by the co nqui stadon.-:s of l o n g ago. H e walk s slow ly and, as h e nears t h e s teps. his numbers fall into a mumble and h e s ink s wearily onto t ht: topmost stOlle and, with his h ead against the wall, falls asleep .-\n d 0 bold T o hoI, or not fO hoh? That is tht: qecstion nO\\, Or if I should bt:gin to 1>011 Sit up ;1Ilt! tdl me ho\\? T H E 11"-\11.01' !"II E lI"Ol I.I) _BF 1'0 11 I \'e wrinen srorit:s tht: l>cort:, And made succcss o ne or more: I \'e started poems (rom tune to tllllt:. But ne\'e r cou ld I make them rhyme. I miceli, la c ked good sellse ;lncl o de.lr! 0 dear! I fought and fought To to nuke them sound so gre.H That one woulJ ncver hesitate T o slr.lighten up ;tnd take some notice, -\nd I \\ouLi m;l\be hear rhem quOte rhi s, H o\ \ "oncertul \\ hat he can do. Iii .. n.lIne \ou'lI :-ct: in 'Wno I s \\ho.' BUI nc\er, nc!\'er s h all It bc, -\s .tll 111\ drC:Ull I no" can ,,"ce. -\re ju .. t Illere ca .. tles in the air, \\'hlc h /lever IllC anywhere.

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THI:. THI-: OF THE TROPICS. ,\/ildra/tr/Ufll, '2iJ. .. \\' h o has not, when h e has driven out o n a winding road that is a white ribbon stretched before him in the moonlight, with the balmy night air in his face, f el t t h e lure of the tropicsr \\'here else, but the tro pics, can one fold back the automobil e top and ride in pt:rfcct comfort, without wrap or rug, with naught but the starry s k y and the moon overhead. \\'hat a charm t here is to narrow streets with Old \\'orld buildings blended in soft pinks and blu es, and overhanging balconies; glimpses of coo l patios with exoti c plants and an occasional gorgeously colored bird; roads lined with coconut pal ms; hedges o f bright-hued hibi sc u s and sweet-scented jasmin e and the vivid greens The vcry atmosphere lulls the senses and creates an inciifl-erence to worry and petty cares which are apt to fret and irritate one in cooler climes. Nothing Seems of vast o r vital importance. The days slip by so easily and with so little e ffort, that if a thing isn't done today, "manana" will suffice. Human nature loves ease and comfort which come so naturally in the tropics. There is 110 worry of h eavy c lothing or laying in the wintt:r fuel; 110 long periods of staying in from the cold. Every day i s a "good" daYi even the daily s howers in the rainy season are cooling and refreshing. I t is difficult to or express this lure in a definite way. I t is in itself so vagu e and subtle that it steal s upo n and takes h o ld of unaware. But who, once h e has it, wou l d leave it voluntaril)", or going, fail to return? T H E OF THE TROPICS. D OIIOl'fW, '2 6 Around the docks of the great clings the faint, elusive perfume of the tropics. I t has been carried there by ships sailing from o l d nameless ports o f the Spanish !\lain-ships of romance and mystery, quiet ships frorll unknown passages and strange seas. I t i s a perfume reminiscent of mallY things: of green jungles and still waters, of brightly plumed birds, of ad venture and gold, and of-death. For it comes from a country where the Gods arc kind, and wh e re death comes often. 'rhis lingers and penetrates t:vcn into the great iron city, tempting calling The c uri aliS listen e r wh o wanders along the water side will hear many strange tal es from the uld sailor s who si t in battt:red chair s tipped against the great, grey walls o f the wharf buildings They tell o f rippl e l ess seas, and o f S tlnsets, and o f morning in the jungle wh e n the see m s to be shut out and mists hang about the billowin g t r ee tops_ They t ell of men who laughed and took th e jung l e trail, vanishing into the s tillness of its depths, of their ringing laughter as they strode away-great stalwart men, drawn by the jungle quiet as if by a !odeston(;'. A.nei do tell of the return? Ah, no, there was n o joyous return, no heaps o f gold and tales of new kingdoms-the jungle peace holds its secrets forever. There are stories of phantom ships flying, with all sails set, across :1. midnight sky and beckoning the sailors to follow, 'til, one by one go-sorrowful, homeless. figur es with fixed, vacant eyes and closed lips. Ah, these o ld sai lors have see n worse-they ha\r e seen things they dare not speak about, things which .;;ound ludicr o us in the bright sunlight but which happened under the brooding skit'S o f the South. They light their stubby pipes and the pungent tobacco odor seems yet another link with the mysterious tropics. One g oes through the cobbled streets inro the iron cit)' and tries to forget all this but at night there is a tugging at one's heart. I t is the glamour of the tropics, drawing drawing relentless.

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THE ZO:-..'IAN. 4 9 T H E All o f YOll p eo pl e who do not lik e to walk and think that b y taking t h e bu s yo u will "get th e re" sooner, listen to m y advi ce and you will r ide in more comfort than u s ual. But YOll r e ally s h o ul d walk yo u kno w; it k ee p s your figur e s l ende r a s demanded b y fas h ion,anci your complexion beau ti ful. But i f yo u mus t rid e ( a s I do), t h e n do not l ose your t empe r. O h, bu sses art: r e mperarnt.::lltal and yo u s h o ul d not g r o w impatient as s tich a slight r h ing as a quarte r of 11n h our's wait under a tree, dodging t h e hot SUIl that s hin es through the almost l eafless branc h es a s the breeze t h e m. An d w h e n the bus does c om e along, more than lik e l y it will b e crowded ; if any kind friend oft"er s you her la p, 1 warn YOll t o stand; it i s m o re comfortable-] ha ve ha d experience and T know, for I did not wan t t o tire the p e rs o n b y bein g too heavy, but r es ted most o f m y wei g h t 011 my fee t so that whe n J got otf the bu s m y knees w e r e so w obbl y t hey threatelled to b end unde r m e any minute. I a l so ha d a queer f ee ling that my walk had certainly unde r galle a sudden c h ange. B e fore you e nter t h e bu s always l oo k to see if you are s h ort e n o u g h to stand e rect, o r yo u may r ece iv e a s udden surprise wh e n your head comes in contac t with the r oo f Also b e careful, wh e n yo u get in, to c h oose a seat and make it yuur target, an d t h e driver will do t h e r est. H e starts the bu s wit h a jerk and, pres t o b e f ore yo u kn ow if you have been wise in g a g ing y our distan ce YOLI will b e s h o t s afe l y to your seat. H o wever, yo u mu s t b e sure to sit d o wn o r you will whi z l ike a co m e t c l ear o u t of the window at t h e bac k Have n o fear whe n yo u f ee l your n ec k pull ed a lm os t out of pla ce j it is only t h e slight j e rk w h e n t h e driver stop S j and if yo u lo o k around, you will notice t hat t h e other passe ng e r s movem ents h a ve b ee n ill harmony with yours. THE V ILES T INVENT I ONS. J/iMred Qliun) 26 Now it came t o pa ss that four wise m e n were gathe r ed togeth e r so that they might proclaim the vilest inv e n t i o n s o f t h e age : \ nd t h e fir s t wise ma n spok e \ 'e rily, I say LItHO o f all the fantasti c and evil dance steps, it see m s t o m e that t h e '. -\r gel1tine tango' is the vilest on earth." But t h e seco nd wise man gainsaid him, ans wer ing: ,. T i s t ru e, but s till m o r e wicked and offe n d ing i s t h e 'fl e a h op.' An d t h e t h ird wise man protested, s a y ing : \ e rily, I s a y unto yo u, ti s vile; b:'l t what wou ldn't be with the name o f s u c h a disagr eeable in sec t! l\l erhinks t h e half turn' i s t h e m os t pro\ r oki n g o f t h e m all. Bu t t h e f ourt h w i se man lift e d u p h i J lunds and m oc ke....l t h e m s a y ing: "Condemn t h e m n o t for n o n e is lik e the Charleston.' \\'atch and I will illustrate. P : \:\:\i\i: \ /-It/lite Bt!1I1! Rtder. '20 Oh, give l11e it l'alla111;1 tropicll isle \\' i t h a t;lll, bent cocon u t tree, \\'here the s u n will beat down on :l. gold strlP ot' be.tcll Coole.l by waves fro m the Southern Sea: \\' he re, down in the thick, to'.lsled leJ\'l',of some hr.lIlc h, \\'ill be hidden a parakeet ga} That will scre.utl at the clouds, at the bids, allli the Howers, I n c h attering: :111 through the day, Wh ere the wind fro m r h e jungl e will rustle t h e air W ith the orchid scent s till o n its wings, And a yello w c:llnrr will fly b y the door -\lId perch o n m y roof as i r sings. Then build me a lutn'e lUll, th.m: h it wit h gr.lss Throw a p diet of straw on the floor, T rail .1 rc:= I boug:\Iw;lIa up on:r the roof, I'lant: 1 bush brigh t with bloom h y the door. I.et me dream in the hot-blooJed languor and pe : l ce Th It t h e tropic:-can give. Aw.ly on my P,llUI1l:1 tropical isle : \ b Indon me-there let me li\ e! Ami tht: sun will g lare clown on the gold o f beac h L :l.pped w .lves from the Southern Sea, Wh ile the s hadows are fllt'ring in la1 y desi g n T h ro u g h the frollli$ of t h e coco nu t tree

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PUllam:.! Railrond Station in Panama City ...,., o

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Foa THE P .lO PL E WHO D O N O T THINK m:be jiial b o a N E w-;-1 N OT FIT TO PR INT LONG LIV E THE WAGGL E R VO L. 1 NUMBER I 8\L9:l\, C!l..N A t Z:>NE JUNE,1 9:!!. Lord Andrew Gordon Loses Velvet Skin in Heroic Rescue J a m es D riscoll Mal e Star o f A d a m a n d E\'a." Loses S h o r t S t o r y in Wastebask et, B ,\LBO,\. Canal ZOIl(', Ii, 1926---\ \'here my the cry wrung from the white lillS of J.unes one of the mos t \'iril e attr.lctions in ",\dam and Eva" which has had a tremendous succes,:. at the Theater Balboa on Great Palm Prado. James Driscoll, the actor before whom the w orld has bent ib knel'"s and who. it is rumored. recei\'OO 3.000 fan [etters \\ ithin the last two day'l from maiden'l. s tood in the hall of th<: High School. utterly dejected as he told the dire Story. STOR Y FOUND MIS S I N G AT 3 00 lI opkin;; had ordered all to be in at the period. but James had had an idea that would make his even more brilliant and delaycd handmg it in until 3 o'clock ... \fter cfltO;'rinJ,: Ihe and going to desk. ho"",,,\'er, he found that his .. hort stor y was gonc. It th",n that he ultcred the dolorous exclamation. FRIENDS SJ<: A R C II T IRELESS!. Y FOR STORY, H is friends, lIIarkinJ.: the young man's agilatio:J by the nen'ous way in which he ruffed his lustrous hair usnally ... mooth and .,I.ining. attempted to console him. !;.:lying that tlwy would search for it. Frantically they. rom about the as-c.-rnbly looking on the Iloo r ,n the on the table .. in fact. everrwher e, but in \ ;,in. It apparent!) was nowher e 10 be found. E!.O I S E L ORIN G AT I N S EA-R ell. .\t Eloise Loring, fearinR th:\! James' artistic tcmpl'"ramem heing harra,;-..("(j too much fo r his highstrunl;constitution 10 endure. was in the mi".inlt on lOP of a pile of in the wa,t(' James. saved irom a breakdown b)' the unconquerable pehi"tency of a faithful friend, sighed a" he pre,;,;ed his recovered piece to his hearl, 'Oh. dear. oh. dear! possessiolll! are alw"3.)";; ill the wrong places!" -fiallj(/$/"litRudtr. Monke ys to Make Touching Appea l To Zone Friends A nnie McD.l d e and S t e ll a N e w b o l d P erform a t B alboa C lubho use. ,\nrie .1nd Stella the B. II $. Twi'l'l who ha\'c fini'lhed a in dancing al the Institute in \\i[lgivea benc'lt Ill'"rformanceat the BaiboJ The proceeds of per ionnante will J:O tOwar.l providing 'L new cage fur tlw oUBide the These dancel;; arc graceful and are eS]>Cci.LlIy skilled in the turkey trot. Cor<;ue]o Camara, the famou;; iguan,l trainer. i.; al<;o tr.:L\eling ""ith tl.i.;; troupe. \\iI\ ,(trel\ly appn:ci"te a IMg.:> attendance at the benefit perform.,nco;>. -Collmdo CUIllI1"'. HI G H SCH OO L S H E IK S A BANDON B E A R D S M ess r s Dura n and A n a s t a ci a d o Are Nearl y Mobbed b y m ates The two f.unous of the BaH x)1 HiJ,:h School. Elils and Jo"t'ph DUT,lIl. are now p rO("CCl.il'R to ra i.;e youag !te:tllt:men on..:e hefore had the inten"e de,ire of h;l\'ing lar).:e, droopir.g mustachios. but on account of the numerOUH questions from the 1)I.blic to why the)' did such a horrible thin).:. tl:e}, "aw it would be and perhaps would e\'t:o detruct from their good look,,:. \n intt'n with .. and DLr.ll1 at the ,;c\;ool almost for there was a crowd gathered all about them They were therefore taken for an inten lew to a room and the door in orjer that Iher might be alone. The)' stated that Ihe chief reason for wantillR to ha\'e be.ud,. th:..t ther might look like ard have the intelligenl appear ance of Longfellow, Ollr g reat writer of 10nll: ago. -Sullu S,ubc/d. Charlestown Champion Dies Before Eating "Ch a rl es t o n F o r e v e r! Was the A n guis h e d C r y o n the Li p s of W ildurr W illing, D a ncer T he death of the world's most biliOUS Charleston dancer, \\'ildurr \Viltin g was announced to-day, This well_known dancer died at his home this m orning bdorc breakfast when he had just received the sad about the Charleston. lie was told that the Charleston had away as a modern dance. Wildurr imllloomteh' stabbed himself IVuh hi" wife's hat pin in the \'icinil}' of his heart. and died with the words, "Charleston foreverl on his death mourned as much as that of Booker T. -lIolfi$Dufful. FRISKI NE S S OF P ALS D I S T U RB S P ARTY A T TABO G A Ther.' a TUmor going about that cerl:ain of th.., I)'Htr of sluo..,ms that we:!t to Taboga 0.1 i\larch 2<,1. arc going to beQue!tione I as to the clothinJ,: of the batlH.:rs badl>" nllxed, The r e were three students who didn't go in b.1thinJ,:, and when the bathe r s came back the)' found that their clothing had eJ. and the rest to be found with thal of ,omeon..,else. I t hOI")I.:d that everyone found his belonJ.:inJ.:S .lIld that nothing been lost, The will be punIshed. -.\'urnru Bux/t,. Economics Inspire Richard Engelke 'Tis fooJ for soul! Take Lt aw.lY frolll me and I shall die!" exclaimed Richard Engelke as hi'l fkt'ler vainh' tried to w rest Eco:!omics book irom him. allO'Hnl! him to keep late hour"". h.ich:trd ha', complieJ with their de .. until la'"t whe,. he {lid ;t extr,l(lrdin.1ry closed aJ.:ainst the night rain, and IL:'rrified to rind (.I"t l{ich:ud was nOI in hi<; bed. The whole hOIl"e, incluCinJ.: the downstdiN aput also w,!unteered hi. 3U.J ""(',Irch part)" on:anized. .\fter tWO 1 0:1J: of (("frible anxiet}". Richard W,'$ found in the dry \\'hen the (\o.or ope:1ed, friend,., him sittin).: on the lloor. his bo?k in In Id. fo,I ... I}" r.:pealing ov('r and ov('r aRain 10 himself: --Calli tal i;; the tools of production," \\'he,l "Ir. Eligeikedemanded an explanation, Richard that he knew fatlwr and mOthl'r woulJ not he plea"l'ti to know that hL! up atter o'clock, he him in the to lhe thrilling of Economics hook. Thl.> E :tRelke family are b)' conlinu;.l that they lear hellth will be broken. [t is rLimorl'J th"t hI' to "Ie<'p with his Economics book under his pillow that he i:;ain from it durinit Ihe night. RaJt"

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THE BALBOA P EEK-A -B O O Hluili C,u n aTa. PROMINENT S T U DENT SUS P EN D S HIMSELF BY ACCIDEN T prominent high school 00)' found hanging from the picture moulding in roomlhi;; morning. It at thought by his intimate that inahility lO learn the Charleston led 1 0 the traJl,e lr. a pictuT(', entitled. "The Dancers." was found in his J)Ol'Session. H e CXI)iained. however. that he had been trying to hang the picture. whcn the chair on which he was slipped out from under him, Then. he states further. he was forced to grab tht: J?icture m oulding to prevent a fall from the dltzr height o f three feet. It hoped b)' C hester tha t hi<; m any friends ma}' soon recover from their fright. -"lmosCarr. I'h OIOJ;T!I:lli o f I.o, al l'"kO:II (111 .";tt:jlS (If B,Ilbo.1 Br ('we r y, T(J1l Bu" 10 10'('\0.1 : Mr ( toolin g the little II:t('C1l ProfeMQr Denl rarl:uin,IC :lbnut "mrrol:ll HOllpin[l: t1O':llch IIl'r! ) B o tt o m 8 lIullntr MI!
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T HF. ZON I AN. 53 SOCIETY On the j \ lond:l.Y before Easter, the Seniors had a swimming party at Taboga Island. At eight o'clock, 16 enthusiastic Senior.:; m::t at Picr 19, to take the Loat for Taboga. J\l r s. Goodenow, and !\I r s. L owe went along as chaperones; and oneS they made, too! T h e party arri ved .:1t T aboga at 9.30, and went to the Aspinwall H otel where the)' engaged a room to h e us e d for resting and dressing, and (or a place to put their numerous packages. Then they strolled through the o ld village where ther explored the cllLlrch and even ciim bed the narrow, winding step s to the bell tower. A.fter this littl e adventure, the group accepted the invitation of the Girl Reserves to visit their camp and the walk through the grove. At the camp the boys demonstrated to the admiring members of the opposite sex, their ability in climbing trees, and presellted t h e party with pods of ice cream beans which tasted good T hl! rest of the morning \\ as whiled in theatricals. The Seniors dramati zed "Cinderella" under the direction of l\l rs. GJodenow, tlrld the Senior Play Cast entertained hoth the campers and th eir own classmates with a co mi c burlesque, in .I amaican, of "A.dam and Enl" which the audier!ce said was excellenr. :\t 12 o'clock the Seniors found th:u their hunger was hecoming great s o returned to the ASllinwall where they procured t h eir lunches and left for rhe hill in halk of the h otel. There they sat o n the edges of an old cistern and enjoyed their d inn er. During the afternoon most of the party \\ent swimming at the sandbar. T h e ones who did not go strummed on uk e l e l es all afternoon and the patrons o f the H o t el were se r e naded with mu s ic whether it was w elcome or not. T h e party returned to Balboa at 10.30 after a m oonlight ride over a rippling sea. I t ha s been the custom for the teachers and the students to assemble in the patio and o n the balc onies o f the sc h oo l building the last day of sc h oo l be fore the Christmas h o lida ys to sing carols. On this occasio n the parents and the friends who are interested are invited to attend; there i s always a great \"ieh the passing of time this o l d custom b e comes more and m o r e dear, This year it wa s especiallr charming. .'\s u s ual Mi ss Currie r had prepared a program of several numbers. J t opened with the entrance of the tiniest c hildren in t h e grades b earing gifts for the poor to the Christmas tree i n the middle of the patio. T h en the grades caroled through H oly Hark, the H e ra l d Ang e l s Sing," and the other o l d anthems. One class of very wee girls and hoys lisped through ".Awa y in a l\Janger." At intervals became quiet; then voices, faint as though far in the distance, \\cre heard, graduall y growing louder as the singe r s approached from a mom in the corner of the building. T h e H igh School Glee Cluhs assisted in the mUSIC

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ZO:'\ I :\0.'. Everyone was requested to sing the last There was s uch a t hat the very air rang with the Christmas spirit. \ t three o'clock rhe program tern.in:ut:d and the students rush,:d forth eager for Sanm Claus ;'Ind two \\eek's \-acatir)l1. Thl: .Junior Tacky gi\'cn for t h e Senior.s in .J aJluary, \\ as of the r eputation th e J unio:" s ha' .L' nf being "peppy" ;lnd origin:tl. The atfair took place at th e Y \\'. C . -\. and was chal!eroned :\Ii ss R aul1er, ;\li ss S:tndfonl, and i\l is s Frost. was instructed to ahandon all scruples h e might h:t\ e ahullt fine appearanCl.'S and ro attend in t h i n g that was not roo disreputable. T he results, although nor exanly fashionabl e were entertaining. During t h e Grand ;\I:tr c h, which afforded as much hilarity to the s pectators as it did to the participators, the tackiest COStumes were c h osen b y t h e chaperon es. Eleanor Tomb, who went back so m e '20 into th e past to a chieve the startling eR'ect o f h e r gown, and \\'ildurr \\,illing w h o clearly his masculinity, in spite o f his flapper d i sgu i se, by wea rin g men's garters to hold up ladies' silk stockings, excelled all other attempts at tackiness and carri ed oR-the pri7t' s. Eleanor's young heart was delighted with a squeak ball oo n, while the c harmin g l y f eminine \\'ildurr was aW;lrded a rattle to improve earh s hini ng hour of amusement. The rest o f rhe evening after t h e Grand i\larch wa s frolicked away in dancing with "night's Orchestra playing. Pu nc h was served for refr eshment. On t h e afterno:)/l ofO..:tober [4, [9'25, t h e Sup per Club met for th-first time since aJjourning tht: previous J une. At this meeting the foll owi ng officers were dec ted : I rene Brown, President; Fl o,t:nce Peterson, rice-President; Eloi,:;e I.oring, Secretary; Florence ;'\Iurtagh, Treasurer; and I r;l11 ces Greene, Parliamentarian. : \ s ;\Irs Toonc, () Ir Ad\"isor, was soon to Icavt;' on a \'acation, \Ir.-;. Ii alliday wac; e1ectt:d to take h e r pi:tcc. T he first supper met.:ring of the rear was held (JIl October:! [. T h e teachers of the hig h sc h ool \\t.;re pn:sC:llt and \ ... itncssed the in';tallatioll of (lfficers. This year Conference open cd 011 t h e thirteenth o f I t was held in Balboa and wa s v e r y s uccessful. Ou-Club won the S!')(lg contes t with a Girl Reserve SO:H! writt':!l1 b\ Hattie B elle Rader. One of thL 1110s-t meetings of the W;lS the one hdd on -\:1con Hill in February. \Y e climbed the h ill just bdore S:II1SCt, and returned in the During Easrt.;r wee:.;: a camp was h e l d at Tabog a I sl
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TilE %0'\1.\ '\.

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56 T H E ZON I AN. The laun c h Idt the pier at eight-thirty. P eanuts and c h e wing gum wer e pass ed around. Two ukelele s, combined m o r e or less harmoniously with eighty voi ces, furni s hed the music for the voyage. \Vh en the laun ch reach ed Taboga landin g at the Aspinwall dock, the re was a mad scramble for bathing suits and ca m eras, these articles having been secreted in the variolls nooks and cranni es of the b o at. Whil e the boys unload ed th e eats, which co n s isted o f h o t d ogs roll s and ic e cream, th e girl s walked up to th e h o u se whi c h was set as i de f o r th e pic kni c k e r s : \ 5 everyone was h o t and in a rather wilted co nditi o n a s a re sult of s uch ardu o us duties, bathing suits w e re quickly donned and the party regath e r ed at th e dock There w e r e rowb oats waiting at the dock to tak e the bathers to th e b e ach, all o f whi c h were soon filled-some, ove rfill ed On e of th e latter happe n ed [0 have th e unlucky 13 in it; naturally it swamped A s the b oat was clos e to s h o r e eve ryon e s wam out so the r e w e r e no c a sualties resulting. Up o n n:: a c hing s h ore, t h e s hipwr ec ked pa sse ngers found that the excitement ha d ca u sed a ninety pound co rbina to leave the water via a native fis hin g lin e ev id e ntl y prefe rring being caught than remaining in th e water whe r e there was so much commoti o n. The water at the b eac h was fine San d baths, and o therwi se toy cayucos and punts, and a ball l ent diversity to th e dip 1\lan)" snaps h ots o f man)" groups w e r e take n and a real good tim e was had b y all" despite the fan that many were this time sunburned to a beautiful sun se t hue. After the swim, the party w ent in r ow b oa t s ba c k t o the picnic h ouse f or lunch eon. H e r e a big ca mp fire had been built ove r which the "dogs" were heated to suit t h e ta s t e of t h e eater. L eo n Greene, th e P res i dump," ( a s h e term s him se lf) of the Junior Class. pr esided ove r t h e ice c ream freezer. So it ha s yet to be determined whether all were sen' cd w ith t h e dessert. F or tht' afternoon's en t ertainment a dance was hdd in the : \ spinwall ballroom. Knight's fam ous orchestra furnished livdy mu s i c and enjoyed the dancing. The time f or departure arrived all too soon, and to t h e regret of the entire party t h e music ceased. At five o'clock the part)' boarded th e laun c h a n d Idt Taboga o n the h o m ewa rd journey. All w e re 111 hig h spiri t s at the start but gralually subsided a s the launch made its way thro ugh a r o ugh se a. This caused quite a numbe r o f s tu d ents and c hap e r o n es to succumb. :\11 occ a s i o nal burst of so ng fro m some brave enthusiast, o r a few c h o rd s enlivened the trip hom e The annual s hort-story contest am o ng the Sophomore s, J uniors, and Senior s, was h e l d in t h e latte r part of March. The short stories co n tributed b y the students w e r e so m e o f th e best that have eve r b een written by them. The En glis h teachers; :\. B. G oode n ow; i\l r s \\'. A. L awlor; J\l iss 1\Ia e Smith th e principal of th e grades; and J\l rs Abernath,', the eighth grade instructor, were the judges. They awarded the first f ou r places t o : "The R esponse, by Hattie B elle Rade r; "Panc h o Ca stillo's Carnival," b y Charl es P a la c i o; "The by Tho ma s N orthrop; and la s t but not least "The Return, b y Agnes \\'ill o ughby. The r e were seve ral other s torie s that received h o n o rabl e menti o n whic h the limit ed s pa ce in the annual prevented b e ing printed. These were: "Th e C ommand," b y A ndr e w D o no vanj "Chiquita P oo l," by i\lary i\'I"acDadej "The On e-eyed \ 'i llian by R o b er t E ssex ; "The Pi t of the D e a d, by R alph H endric k se n; an d I \\" o nder," b y Fred H elmerichs. I n :\Tovt'll1ber the J uniors entertaineJ the entire sc h oo l and the at a ca f eteria lun c h eo n served on the third floor of the sc h ool builJing. :\. tempting array o f sa n dwic h es, pickles, cakes, an d oth er dainti es was d i sp lay ed on tabl es behind which attractive Junio r s stood and in f or med the hungrystudentsjust how delic i'Ju s this sa ndwi c h or that c ak e was A s a result within a hal f h o ur they were so l d out, and the wait ers woul d ha\ c gone IUllchless had they not exercised th e i r cleve rne ss and kept a reserve s upply in the kitc h en at th e D omestic S c i ence Buil ding '\ I iss Rau ner, petite but effic i en t, pr es id ed at the end o f the lint" and supent ised the finan ces . -\t 12 o'c l ock K.night's orchestra enticed every one from eating to dancing. 2\l r. '\ l c Commons extended the lun c h h our 1 5 minutes that the students might indulg e injazz a whil e l onger before settling down to calmer intellec tual pursuits The: afrair was a tre m endo u s s u ccess.

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THE 17 T H E SEN I O R PL A Y O n t h e even i n g of l\larch 1 9, at 8 .15 i n t h e eve n i n g, t h e Se n ior C la ss p resented ":\dam and Eva," a clever t h ree-act by Guy Bolt on and George l\liddleton Engelke. T hey were s killful players and deserve commendatio n. The leading parts we r e taken by l\ae n ia Baxter a nd J a m es Driscoll, r h e f o rmer as Eva and t h e latter as A dam. The)' deserve praise f o r t h e mast erly handl ing of t h e i r l i nes. T h e oth ers taki ng part were: l\lcConaghy, Frances G reene, H e len Fre n ch, \Yilliam \\'ed wa lt, Byrne Hutc h in gs, R a l p h Jensen \ Yildurr \\'illing, and Richard The wa s produce d under the able di rection of ]\I rs :\. B. Goodenow, with whorn the cast agrees it was a pleasure to work. one t hanks M r s Goodenow f o r her k i n d w o rk and coaching, a small bit of t h e success of t h e play is due to the efforts of t h ose h elpi n g on the stage and selling tic k e t s The students w h o typed t h e parts a r e thanked and our regret is t hat we are not abl e to give a list of their names here, Adam and Eva" A modern iz ed version of i\lilton's immortal and not w say immoral epic Pair 0' D ice LaM." B y Bolwn and George ,\ I idd leton A n apple of t'llticement to b e offert'd by the Senior Cl a ss o f B a lboa H ig h Sc h ool on F rid a y even ing at eig h tfif teen at t h e Ba l b o a Hothouse. Satar. of f e r s special reserved seats in the lowest level at only o n e dollar each, Good fireside seats may be obtained from t h e stage manager, i\1r. B eezleb u h, at 75 ce n ts each Of Eva's j ust o bedience, and the wealth o f t hat f o rbiddin g man, w h ose m o :-tal taste Brollghtsorrow unto t h e Kings,and all t h t:ir woe, \\,i t h loss o f home, till one greater Adam S h o ul d reswr e t hem t o t heir sense, and their B l i ss ful state, Sing, 0 heavenly muse, w ho, O n the sec ret top o f Aneon H ill, d idst inspi r e Fair Adam and fair Eva wit h her directional aim; sin g, o sing, of jollr Andre\\ 's fate, at t h e hands of Adam's C h osen spouse, and of the di r e event which completed C linton's wo e and made the family o'er. Sin g, 0 gracious muse, of t h e Oll tcome of i t al L But no no m o r e o f t h is. come and learn yourself. T H E THE .":yJIlr'," .":",illi. Once:J little fre s hm an hit a s enior on the back, The senior, big and hu s ky, sat the freshman 011 a tack. "Wah!" b:twled the little freshm:Jn, ''I'll get you for th:IT." H e went right that instant, and sat o n d:e senior's h at .. : \ha!" c ried the gre : H big senio r, as the ruined hat h e spied, "There']] be murder in the woodshed: ,']] warm your little hide." The fre s hman struggle d v;;inly to do the !:enio r h::rm, T he senio r gave a laugh. but he didn 'r give a darn. ;\t 1 : lst within the w oods hed, he wielded h a rd the birch, :\nd the freshie, sore but wiser on a pillow had to perch.

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T H E Z01\' IA1\'. "NOTHI NG B U T THE TRUTH." A Comedy in Three /lcts By JAMES i\loNTCOMERY. Presented on i\l a)' 2 1 1926, by rhe Junior C lass of Balboa H igh School, at the National T heater, Panama Ci ty. C:ISI of C h aracters. DirulrnJ C. PATTERSON R obert Bennert \\' II .I.IAM i\.lENGES E 1\1. R alston D ick Donnellr Clarence V a n Du sen B ishop D ora n Gwendolyn Ralston E. 1\1. R alston Ethel Clark l\l:thcl J ac k son Sa bel J ackson i\larth:l LEON GREENE H .... II.II.\ SMITI .. L!'I.IE BANAN ARcmE FRENCH KATHERINE l\l rI/.IA;\I I A I. 1.0 11. .... I,t;LL Hun-. jOHN:'01\ FRANCES BROWN KATHERINE CONGER At t h e Balboa C lubhouse on Friday evening, J une 4, t h e B alboa High Sc h ool, (or h e ben e fi, of THE ZONIAN, put o n t h e following vaudeville program, w i t h m u s i c s upervi sed by Miss Curr ier: Synopsis of Scenes. Act 1. Int erior of a broker's office i:l one of the principal uptown hotels. A .cls 2 and 3. P arlor in summer home nf E. R alston, Long 1<;l:\nd. Clock ope,..lfor (//ul proper/.\' mall .1dvt'r/iJl I/,{ ,\fIlI/IlXI''' ,\fm/(/'l.l'rojlirJu/J fll,. STA!'Io'TO,," PEl'ER\O,," RICHARD JOIIN.!>OI'. \ \'11. 1 IAM VAN SICKU :I'. furni.!>hed br The Hi g h School Orchestra under the direction of 1 \ lis<; H elen Currier CHORUS. "Charleston." "\\' ho?" "Yes Sir, Th:tt's t\ly Babr. Hig h School B oys Glee Club F ou r.part Songs College Songs i\l AR\' i\ICCONAGH\' HARRI<;ON, An:R.!>, :\ncon Sixth Grade .. ZONA FLORENCE :-OICRTAGH, E L IZABETH GRASBERR\', "THE MONKEY'S PAW." Pla y in thr ee scen es. Dramatized b y Loui s Parker. Characrers. Mr. White .. Mrs. White H erbert \\'hite Sergean r .i\ i ajo r i\l orris Sampson JAMES DRISCOLL FRANCES GREENE SYDNE\' S"'lInl ECGENE C!.OLD :\MO.!> CU,R rap dance Gyps y Dan ce Three p:lrt Son({$ Toe D ance ELIZABETH GRANBERRY GERTRl lIH: HARRISO:" B AI.80A S IXTlI GRADt: ,\1.4.RJOR\ Q L 1NN "CAST LES I N :\ Sketch. Char.ltters. S pani s h girl Ameri c an girl pani s h Danc ers. '1(011 'Em G irl,," B allet: SARA DE L.4. P ES.\ BETTY JACK GERTRL'DE HARRI<,ON, At.\IA i\l ANS, j O SEI' H DURAl' DOROTH\' D L \ ALI SARITA OF.: LA PAZ Un der th e directi o n o f EI.IZA8ETH GRAN'OERII.\ Saw Solo CHARLE!> \\'ILLIA;>.lS "Give i\l e a Kiss" ZONA8ELLE ASO MAROARET A\ 'ERS Under t h e di r ection of ELIZA8ETH GRANBERRY. AccompallhlJ. .J\NSA SAPHIR, FLORENCE TEl'SESOS .-fduer/hillg l Wmwger S/llge ,l/mta'(,er SpOllJor j OHNSO:THOMAS :\'ORTHRUI' i\1 1 S :"JELLI E HOPKISS THE TRAGEDY. Kal},,:1;'U COll.'{t'r, '2i. The shades of night were f.tlling f:1St Wh en through the Str eets toward h ome t her e passed :\ yout h, who muttered with wild eye .-\ strange. sad word (I wonder E x:lInilt;ttions!" bro", was sad; he he.wed:t sigh. ".'\ coincides with B But wh}?" \\'hat language this he muttered low: What thing was it that \ 'exed him so? "Examinations!" :\ week ha d passed; bur, ah! not he, .And so h e pined awar. YOll see." H e whispered as he breathed his laSt, I foolishly have tried to pass 'Examinations!'

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THE ZON 1AN. 59 ALUMNl Stella I sabel Xewbo M 26 I t i s w o nd e rfu l h o w th e Alumni P:lSS thro u g h the door s o f Balbo a H igh S c hool t o pla ces b oth n ear and far. The r e i s ve r y lit tl e r eco r d o f so m e, but o f the othe r s w e have been abl e t o obtain the f ollo win g : 19'25 D o r othy Eastman, Pres id ent o f the S enio r Class, i s attending t h e B oston C o n se r vato r y of Mus ic J o h n Tato m i s in th e Annapolis T rainin g Cla ss at Hampton R oads, \"<1. \Vo rd r ece iv e d is t hat he i s progress ing s t e adi l y Kath erin e Bro wn i s at present stud yin g mus ic in t h e Eastman S c h oo l R oc h es t e r, Y. Flore n c e Robinson ha s a cle ri c al p os i t io n in one o f the large d epartment s t o r es in G ermantown, Pa. Earle G errans i s taking a course in d entistry at t h e Unive r sity of P e nnsylvania. i \fte r a long vacatio n spent in the States, [\rary P e a ce i s living with h e r parents in the Canal Zon e !\Ifargare t \V o odruA-" and E dith Tro wbridge r es id e at Quarry H eights and P ed r o J\l igu e l re s p ective ly. Flore nc e Tonneso n has r eturne d fr o m an ex t e nd e d trip to the States \"hil e away F l o r e nce had a positi o n a s sten ographe r in N e w Y o rk. \\' illiam All e n, The r ess a B e t z James \"oodruW, and C o n stance GraA-' are taking up furthe r w ork in Balbo a H i g h S c h ool. Paul Sullivan i s w orking f o r a co n struc ti o n company in C o l ombia. Lates t n e w s fr o m Mario n L oc k e n i s that she i s attending the Coll e g e o f M ount St. Vin cent-ont h e H u dso n. P aul Duran i s at present e mployed b y th e Panamanian G o v ernment in Panama City H e le n e Grimison i s in the C edar Cres t C olle g e at : \llento wll, P a. ::'\Tic h o la s Stanz i o la has g o n e to Italy wirh his parents wheie h e will make his future home L eo n \\'e i ss has gon e t o San Antonio, T ex with hi s parents The f ollo win g are s u ccess full y e mpl o yed in difl"er ent d epartments in the Canal Z o n e : James Burgoon, J a co b \ 'an H a rdeveld Agn es !\l cDade R ena de Y o u ng, L o r etta K oc h e r G eorge Gre g ory, Eleano r A ye r s A l ice Oli ve r and Olive r S chroyer

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6 e THE Rut h Bre neman is h oldi n g a t emporary pos iti o n w i t h t h e Army at Corozal. Ralph C lemen ts is work i n g i n a re al estate oRice in S eattle, \\'a sh. H e gave up r h e idea of going to college ut:ca u s e h e felt tha t the r e was it g r eat opportunity for advan ce m ent i n t his p os i t i o n ANO ENGAGEMENT S F t h e l \\'
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Rlcam c r Miruflort'R l.ockl'l fro m ca Lc"cl-Pnlls m a Hnilroud nt l eft. _I

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r l h c Beach a t B ella Vista P a n a m a. ROllil to F o rt i 6 c d Ent r ance to Cunal.

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T H E EXCH .'<:-IGES. I I rene B rown '26. --!Ii B y the aid o f our exchanges w e are abl e t o k ee p in tou c h wit h oth e r s c h oo l s fr o m year t o Thro u g h the exchanges w e l ea rn what is b e in g f eatured i n oth e r sc h oo l s f o r the y ear, and w hat ollr sc h oo l i s doi n g i n compariso n with t h e large r sc h oo l s in the Uni ted States \\'e afe al ways g lad to r eceive OUf o ld fr ie n ds, and the r e i s a welco m e f o r r h e n e w o n es T h e f ollowi n g exc h a n ges w e r e r ece i ved t h is yea r : The Owl, W ellsville, XCI'.' York. The Sludw!, Covington, Kentuckv. TI,,: 1rgus, G:lrliner i\b ssachusc;ts. La LII Sa/ft., Panama. Tlu I\ ey, Hattie Creek, .\ I ichig;tn Tlu Caribbean, Cristob:ll. Canal Zone. The High Scl/oof Rr!COItier. Sa r .Hoga Springs, ':\'ew Y ork. Tlu lI'hisp, Wilmington, Delaware. SCHOOL \\" e have informatio n o f f o r m e r t e a c h e r s o f th e fac ult), o f t h e Balbo a H igh S c h oo l a s f ollo w s : J\li ss E d na \ T Baer, C omme r c i al t e a c h e r 1 9 20-1922, n o w h a s a good p ositio n as teach e r in : \ lIbllrn C aliforni a f\l i ss H a t t i e B P a ul, r e a c h e r o f Spanis h and H i s t ory, 1 9 20-1 9'2'2, i s n o w liv in g in Dunnigan, California. ;\I r s H a rri so n \\'illiam s f o rm erh' f\l i ss B D enny, !\iathematics t e a c h e r n o w r es i des in Galveston, T e xa s i v l r s F ord Attaway f orme rl y Miss Etta Nor C tlt t D o mesti c S c i e n ce t e a c her, 1 9'2 1 1 9 23, i s living in B alb o a. Occa s i o nall y s h e does subs tiwte w ork f o r the S e win g and C ooking cla sses ;\Ir B e rnard L. B oss, Principal lives in -\bbotsford, \ \ 'isco nsin Ruth T h o m as, Englis h a n d t e a c h e r 19'2'2-1924, teach es English a n d Spani s h i n Elk o, i\l i ss S h e i l a C oc k eran, C ommerc ial teach e r, 1 9221 9'23, i s at present atten di n g t h e Uni ve r sity o f l\l a n i la, a t i\ladr id, Spai n !\l i ss Grace S h erman, Spani s h and H is t o r y t e a c h e r 1 9'22-1925, atte nded the U ni ve r s ity o f C aliforni a r h e first se mester of this year a n d r e ce i ved her Califo rni a Teacher's C ertificate. S h e i s now r es i di n g i n Danville, Ohi o. THE I DEAL G IRL. CHA RACTER. P oise -:'\Iae nia B ax t e r. C ltarm. -Emi l y C o nl ey. C entl('1Jt'ss.-Eloise L o rin g. IVi/ aJld HWJlor :\ nn i e i\Ic D adc:. Vivaci/y -0.lary l\lcCo lla g h y . -!tUe/ic -f-lbilil), Fl o r e n ce Murtagh Rfjinolli'u/ Fl o r e n ce P e t e r so n. issurance.-Sr ella Newbol d. tVlodes/.v C o n s u e l o Camara. D omcs / ic i/ y Ali ce H a l l oran SO]I voi.-e. Eli zabeth \ l anley. Spor/slllaJJs!lip.-J\f a r y J o L o w e l\fu.siod / I b i li /y.-i\l i l d r ed Oli ver. Ca/mue,fS Fran ces G (ee n e. P H \ 'S ICt\J, :-\PPEARA.\'CE. SkiJl.-E loise L oring. I air. E mily Con ley. E),t'S. Emily Con l ey. F.:yebrows.Em ily B axtt: r .\Iolllh.-Elizabeth l\lanlt:Y Teelh.-H attie B elle Rader. Chin.-Fl o r ence Peterson ,Veck.-Kath e r i n e M ille r S!I011lders.K at h eri n e :\ l iller. .-Irms.-Kath e r ille i\l i ller HtUlds. H attie B elle Rader. Figllre. Consuelo Camara. CIO!/lt'S.-;"'Taenia Baxter.

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TftOm Standlllf( Left 10 fight M r .Wil80h J Woodruff J .Dreecoll R J ellltn Frontro .. Ldlloright: R itobill8(ln F CrOl.'l C. Buttenl K Knat.ell9hue H.Swllh THE ZON I AN. SI3I1dinJ;:Left to right: J \'engoecbea G. McGuigan F. C r088 C. Butte"' C Trowbrid, e H .Smith. KneelingLeft to right: J. Duran L Greene E.Anaal3l'i3do

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THE ZO:,\ IA:,\ 65 BOYS ATH LETICS. IHSEB A LI .. Balhoa Hi" ag:1.11l \u.:torimls in haseball winning from Cristohal "Iii" [Wo g:Ulll'!' out of t h e three scheduled in the I ()!6 series. The foll()\\ing are the in ho, score of the last and game: T he.: first game was p layed 011 the T wilight diamond at Ba lboa and ,\as \\ on by the B H S. team. The secnnJ game, sc hejul ed to he played at Cristobal the following \\as a dcft:at lor the Balboa H i." The final game, as c):lchcs B Ig.la an I C; )')Jric!l decided, \\ as played at Cristohal. ThL' grounds were so the game was fast. T he e;..:cdknr of both teams is to he mentioned, a s wt'll as the game being clean and sportsmanlike. B H S. got right into rhe game as did C. II. S.; hut as soon a s C. H. S. put three.-' rUIlS across d1l: plate, 13. H S. started. The tiddil1gofC. H S. ,,11,,"cd only R hits and A rUIlS, whil!: r ha t of B H S. allowed 2. hits and 3 rUIlS. B.dlJo.1 I IIgh Schoul. '.B I{ Ih. .Ill BUller ... ::.11. \',In::'icle:l,rf. rf Dri .. coll. Tro\\ c I\:nahe n ... huc,d \\ed\\;lh. It I-Iulching .... p T OLI1 ... / 1 0 0 0 0 0 I lI!..:h 'ichool. P I.I\Cr ... I B R H \\ill ... :h Coffe" .111. (; Ordv.,I)". oJ, Klunk, c, p P etcr"on, II, 3h \rirtz,m. Grider, p l li gg.I'>on.lf l -.ggle"ton, rf xO;n'i TO(:lI..,

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66 T H E ZONL\N. H J L Golden: E Alien; H R. Wood: C'. B utters. !'iilt inJ!:: W W ed w:lld t: B. H G ra nber r y; F :\ g r e a t deal o f inter es t wa s take n t h i s y ear by t h e in swimming A n ilH e rcia ss meet was p l a n ned a n d run DR" in gr eat styl e S o m e s wim mers, no t even t h ought o f came t o t h e fr ont and gained ("\'01' for the o n -co mi n g inte r sc h o la s ti c meet wit h Cristobal. The fina l sco r e wa s in f avor of th e Sop h The Sop hs sco r e d 50 p oints, t h e J lInio r s 3 4 t h e Seniors 29, a nd t h e F reshme n 1 8 JNTE R CL.<\SS S\\'J MEET. jo-)m-d Dash. Golden and H utchings tied for first. R Wood and tied for third. 50-yard Dash (girls). I. -\ngeJa Klemmt:r .2. F h,bet h Wh:dt:r 1. Juanita Orr 4 B .lrdcl"OIl. jO_j'llrd (O(j)J). I. W \\'euwa ldt. 2. C. B utte r s 3. L. G reen c 4 J D u ran. jO __ "{/rd (gldJ). I. : \ngda K lemmer. '2. L o u ise K err. 3 J a n ice Grim ison. 50-J'{lrd 8{/ck. Slrolu (oop). I. l? H utc h i ngs. L. G o lden 3 L. Green e. l oo-.wlrd D{/Jh COO)'J\. I E Alle n 2 H G ra nbcr ry 3. W W ed wal dt. loo-j'{/rd D{uJI (girlJl. I. L o u ise Kerr. Elsbet h W h aler. 3 .Il1al11t;1 Orr.

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THE ZO:\' I A:\' 220_)'{lrd D{u/, (bCl}'J). I II. \ I ( D onak!. I e \\'00..1. I--\11en. I. B H utchings. 2. T :\I :mn. 3. R W illiams 4. L G o l den. I :\,TERSC H OL.-\ST I C S\\ I EET. The intersc holasti c swimming meet carne o R o n F ebruary 20; and just rlS h as always happe ned, H H S. p roved too stro n g f o r C. H S. Alt h o u g h C H S. lost, s h owed fine spirit in k eep ing lip their courage until tht end. The swimming meet wa s ru n o fr a s f ollows: I. J K llInk, Cristobal. '2. F I i dmerichs, B albo:t. 3. B Hu tchings, B alboa. 4 S. Tayl or, Cristobal. loo-.wml f)m/,. I J Klunk, Cristobal. L. Golden, B alboa. 3. E Allen, Balboa. 4. S. T a\ l o r, Cristobal. 50-.wml !Jflrlc_Slrokf'. I. B HUlching1>, Balbo.1. H Granberry, B alboa .1. J K lunk, Cri1>tobal 4. W Coffe\'. Cristobal. tied (or s..:conJ I. '\ngela Kleml11l!r. .I:1Il1("c (;rirni ... fJII I. L. G o l den. '2. H Gr a nbcrrr. 3. E Allen. 1. H Knigh t, Balh():t. '2. Eggleston. 3. S. lor, Cri .. whal. 4. F B ,Il I 'o:!. 22o-yard Swim. I. R \\'ood. B,llI}():1. _. \Y \\'edwald l B,lIix):!. 3. E ggle!>ton, C r istobal. 4 T P arson, Cristolul. 50-.\'(lrd I. W. \Y \\'edwaldr, B alboa. 3. C. B utter", B .dboa 4. P H ayden, Crj'tohal. Fdluy I. \\'. Coffer, Cristobal. '1. B H utchings, Ihlboa. 1. I.. Gold..:n. Ihlhoa. 4. P H ayden, (m.rn!!a!. I. B albo;\ HIgh School: B I hi tchings, F. I I e1merichs, L. Golden, F. : \lIen

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THE ZO:\IA:\. IHSI-:FTBAI.I .. :\s THE ZOX'IAX gOt:S to press before hasketball is ulll!t:r \\ onl y :I few of t h e B 1-1. S. game" can ht: n:l.:ordt:d. F rom the g: ll1les this year tht' team ha s \xo\'ed that it is ahl e to defend the B. 1-1. S. title. .-\11 the in these games descrvt: l11ention for tht:ir h:l:'d and dean D riscoll \\'edwald! n,lhcn .. hut: I {owe I iLllchinus l)ur.111 Center Cellter Center Guard Guard Guard l;uard (;u:ml T he rt:gtilar line-up for the tU1111 is: J ones :\nast;H:i,IJu \\'oodrutf For\\;.rd F orw:!rd Forward The gamt:s that were scheJulcxl and played arc: B. H S. \-s. Corozal R inkydinks 16. B H S. n. Corozal Rinkrdinks :20 B. H S. 46 "5 . 4.mador I R. I :"TERCI..-\SS TRACI-: It seems t hat athleti cs are taking a better h o l d on the students of the B. H. S. fer as befoie in all the other events an inter class track meet was planned also, f.)r th e purpose of finding out "who's w ho" in nack. The J uni o r s [Ook t h e contest hy t h e overwh elming score o f 4'2 points. The other classes were as f0l\ows : SeniClrs, I I; SOj)holllores, 10; Freshmen,). The following are the list of e\'ents and the winners: I. Anasnlciado, J unior. \ 'engoechea, Sophomore .1. Sophomore. loo-_,tlrd Da.rh. I. \\'illi;II11<" An;I<,tau;;t!o, J unior. 3. Sophomore. I. ])ur.Ln, J unior. \'t:nL!Oecht::L, Sophomore. .1. Creene, J LLniOr. I. Cro!':s, J unior. J uninr. 3. Duran. J unior. [. T rowbridge, Senior. Du rall, J unior. 3. Knight, Sophomore. Shul PUI. II/gIl Jump. I. Greene, J unior. BUller<:, Senior. ]. T aylor, Broad 7ump. I. .'\nastaci:1do, J unior. . Butters, Senior. 3. J unior. I. J unior team: : \ I1:1st;tciado, Dur.m, Smith. Greene. Totals in poinTS: J uniors, .r:.. Seniors, t I. Sophomores, 10. Freshmen, Ii I:"TERSCHOL.-\STI C TR.'\ CI-: The interscholastic crack meet was held at Balhoa Stadium, Fehruary 2-. C. 1-1. S. came mer in good form and at r h e heginning o f t ht' mect tht: B. II. S. stood no chanl:t: with th..:m. B II. S. did not gi\'t: up and gradually came through with many first places, so that B 1-1. S, won the mcet with t he scor e of .p to 1-. The rt:::,ults \\t:rl-as follows: jO+J"flrd DaJh. I -\nastaciado, B alboa. ., 1 '.c:gle!':lon. Cristohal. 3. Ilurchin.'!:<:, B;lIbo3. lIigh 7ump. I Eggleston, Cristobal. !. H utchlllgs. Bal boa. 3. Greene, B alboa.

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THE Z O:-lIA;\. Ioo-ynrd Dash. _. G reene, B alboa. I Fgglc!o;l. ,. Fgg:l c ... ton, CrislO h : d I Our,lll, L h loo:l. Eggleston, Cri<;fohal. .1. A na<:raciado, Balboa RallY R aN. I B a lho:.: Du ran, i\i c G uigan, -\na<:;t:1Ciado. SOCCER F OOTBALL. Tht: introd ucti o n o f socce r f oo tball in th e a th l e ti c lin c o f B. H S ca u se d a g reat de al o f exc i tem ent 111110 n g th e boys. Eve r y b oy e l eg ibl e turned Ollt hllt only a f ew games w e r e played. I [ i s h o p ed that th e r e will h e m o r e ga m es the f ollow in g yea r \\'e wis h t o thank f vIr. H J Gri ese r, j\' lr. E. A. B ogela, iVlr. T. R. King, an d Mr. H N orthrup f o r t h e support whi c h t h ey ha ve g iven u s f ello w s in t h e way o f h e lpin g LIS out thi s year ill our athletics \\Ie apprec i a t e t h e ir h e lp and h o p e that b y O ll r v i c t ories we h a \'e proved to the m t h a t what we d i d was f o r th e m an d for t h e sc h ool.

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.... o I I ( "I Ill S
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THE ZO:\l,-\;\. GTR L S ATH LETICS .Hm)' 70 Lowe, '26. BOIYU"iC. Bo'\ LBO ...... VJ. CRISTOB.-\ I.. D ecember 5, '92), the Balb oa Girls' Rawling T eam com p e tni against the Atlantic s i de team. T h e game was not unusually interesting; in fact rh e result wa s the same o l d thing. The Balb oa team defeated their opponents br a margin of +2 pin s This s h owed plainly that the from Balb oa were undoubtedly t h e best. The game was played on tht: Gatun The following girls bowled: Cris/ob(t!. H elen Iiousel Edna i\l, ty Ryan Beatrice H Ollsel IJden Bath L illian H ousel Balboa. Ruth Johnson F lorence ;\ l urt:l.gn Gladys Bleakler i\lary i\lcConaghy Klump Agnes Willoughby TilE :\l]RSERY RO.\I.\:\G .. The little tOr soldier w:llking his 1"0:-.1, A t the nurser} doorw:lx one nighr. The hawse \\;\S :Jsleep bUI Iht: moon Ih:lt "IH):.I: in, B:Jthed the whole 01 the room with ht:r light The soldier was weary, ,tntl lond\' ;lnd Lold H is watc h set:llled exct:ed1l1gly long, But he knew he must St;(\ at his po:.t till rclit:n:d, For to leave before tht:n would he wrOIlIo!. The Grandfather's clock In the lu[[ had I\Hl. When he heard a soft step close ;\( h:JnJ. His challenge, \\"ho's there?" brought .1 terrified gasp. F rom the shadow behind the hookstand. With hesitant the lntrudt:r .Ipproadled. W hile the soldier stood rt"ady to nrc. H e took but one look at the doll who appeared, Ere resuhs to his heart \\ erc most dirt". !:Jhe W;IS drt" .... :.t"J in .1 danet: frock 01 crimsun Chlifull. SbsheJ with silvcr, embroidered with pearls. \\ lth sJipper:-; of silver, ;l \\ rap tnmmtll with fur, -\nd a coronct comh In her curb . The Inrlt" toy soldier. \\ llh nt:\'cr a qualm, Deserted his at tht: sight. With thcir heads in the clouds and hand locked In hand, T hc p,lir \\;Indcred aw;!\ in the nighr. Tht:)' walked on and on, till rhcy found a rnoonbe;un, : \nd up this ther strolled to the moon. \\" here in Queen I.unas palace, rhey danced till the dawn, Wh ich for both of them carne much too soon. rhc light of the sun hrought the pair down to e;lrth. Though the (;Ill was;t long one to t;lkt:. While their race to the nursen' door wa., SCarce done. B efore the whule house awake. I f thiS scon' you doubt stay awake and you'll find, That while the vigil keep, Your rays come :J\\ake and play all the tnne That people are spending in sleep.

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T H E 20:-11.-\.:\. 3Jn LOL 1:-. ALI-EX "I ilm;e Jworn to win a JlflrU t 'JI oul oj &mTl'nlll'SS and pain I It m e mory of o n e who, even in his see m ed destined to great thin gs o n e who liv ed high in th e h earts o f his fello w m e n an d purs ued, through difficulties, a high ideal past our under standing and knowledg e.

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B o.o'all. tad i um, B a l b oa. Ctlon l Z o n e

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7 4 THE ZON rAN. W-ID IS / T ?

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T H E ZO:" I .'I:". 75 .\fury tl/cCo!lflghy, \\'ith I swim in \\ :lter dt;::1r :lnd b:-ight, : \ nd wear a suit that fit s a bit too right; : \ nd yet, [ feel no biting sting of sha:ne, Because all others there are clad the sa me -Chnrln BlIll1'rJ '2(,. Hiss 's worst fault i., that s h e is too l oquacious / \11". FliJII. "Yes. and b esides that, s h e talks too mllch." Sh,'bn. H dlo, Sugar Daddy." Slu-'ik. \\" h y so confectionery!" Shebn "Bec?lIse you're slic h a re fined sap." Helt'll (in scie n ce ) -";\Ir. did you (orn::cr our papers!" .lIr . \ T orlln-op I'm ashamed to admit it but I forgot to do my homework." Ht4ell."Oh, that's all right, r forgot to do Illlne, r00. ;\ot very long ago Bilg ray ran a s p ecial train all a Saturday night for the ope ning of his dance ha ll. The next day th e L fnio n Churc h rail a s p ecial train to Balb oa for the dedication. This s h ows whi c h side o f t h e Z o n e i s going t o the devil. TReE. AIr. ,y._HI s hall b e tempted ro give class a test." John R Yield not t o temptation." The :.h ade:. o f night "ere falling fast, A:. through a P anaman village pas se.1 :\ \ 'outh who bore mid of rice, : \ b : lIlner with [he qr;mge device -C T ON THE STREET CAR. T w o young girls were discussing their fav orite opera. A s the conductor came up, one girl s aid, I s impl)' J ove 'Carmen!''' The conductor blu s h ed and w h i spered: HTry the rllotorman, l\l i ss j }'111 marri ed." YO!..: NE\ 'ER CAN TEI.L. 1\1 1), l ittle grandch ild, who i s t hirteen, Came and sat upo n my kn ee, Open ed wid e h e r b oo k o f hist'ry T o r ec ite th e pag e to m e. T h e n I s aw h e r fing er p ointing T o a picture of two m e n : R e mini sce n ce vagu e, and haunting R ushed upo n m y mem'ry thl:l1. "Elias : \ nastaciad o A nd thi s dashing J oe Duran Ar e s tudi ed n o w," s h e told m e "'1'0 gt:t the atmosp h ere of man. "For th o ug h they n eve r were great stat es m e n T h ey had mu c h influence o n tht:ir ag e, F o r w h y l ead a standing army, \\' hen hair cut's all the rage .irchit'.-" L a st night I made an awful mistake." Jollll. T hat so? H o w come? .1rrllit'. drank two bottles of gold pain t." J o lm H ow do you f e el now." ... Perhaps s h e might c all him a Dee r but h e's a Stag if h e has n't [h e D oe,

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T H E ZONL\ N. He."\\'hy do you call your childre n Peas, Beans, Corn, and Tomatoes?" S;',.-"So r can h olle r soup' and the/II all corne horne." BETTER STILI. An o l d maid was approached by a welfare worker: "\\' ill you subscribe f o r the hom e l ess men's funci?" asked the solicitor. "No," snapped the o ld maid, "But I might consider taking one o f t h e men." THE BITJ'ER END. "\\'t'll b e friend s to t h e e nd." "Lend me ten dollars." That's the end." lvliss Hopkins. \\'ho i s talking?" Chcescman.-"It's me." ]\lJiss H opkins -"]r is I." CheesemaJJ.-"\\'e ll, w hat did you ask me for if it wa s you?" Hr. Flint."This is the last time T am going to tell you to stop talking." Fre n ch -"Thallk goodness! ;""' ow I can talk in peac e. Little grains of greenness, Little grains o f sass Little g r ain s of dumbness Make the Freshman Class. Firs! Roomie." I get the hard pillow to-night." Saond R oomie. \ V eJl, L gave it to Firs! R oomie You'r e all wet! This ha sll 't got two f ea t h e r s in it. Second R oomie. -"That's just it; it's hard up for feathers. ,. Hi ss Smiford "Timothr have yo u your l esson to-day?" dbsen!-lJIindfd i\Ia'alll, have yo u ?" Rollo." Late<::,t reports that lipstick is I1,)W being flavored with fruit juices." IPallo.-"Oh, now I understand what J im meant when h e said Alice gave him the raspherry the other night!" -------------" You crook, I 'll ha ve nothing to do with you!" said the blotter to the spot o f ink. "You're just out of the pen!" so UNNECESSARY. how rnany days are t h e r e in each month?" }o/a/JI)'. -"Thirty days hath September; All t h e rest T can't remember; T h e ca lendar hangs o n the wall \\' h y both e r me with this at all?" FANCIES. I n the field of A t hough t o ft co m es to m e, Of a man I'd like to see ?\Tamed Phil l\IcCa\rity! THE. ,\IODEKNIST. "Oh, what a cute little dolly! Does s h e cry 'mamma' when you sq u eeze her?" i H y dolly's a modern doll! She says 'Oh, boy!' when you squeeze h er." ]oe. -"Say, Elias, who are supposed to be smart, what would you call a cannibal who ha s eaten hi s father and mother?" Elias (after deep concentration).-I<\\'hy, an orphan, o r course." Cold en."That was t h e most touching sce n e 1 ever witnessed." Afargie_-"\Vhere were YOll?" Co lden. -"Up in the typewriting room." YOL O r.1\Y !lET. Cliuuman. "\\'omen are wanton things, eh, what?" G o!dc!}J." Y e h, always wantin' something." Elias. -"\\ 'hy do the people of Samoa wear so little clothing?" }oe.-"Gu ess it's too hot for Samoa. ,. Hll!rh. -",(d iss Hopkins, I want to ask about a ,\[is.r H.-"Yes, go ahead." Hlllch.-"\\'hat's grade?"

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TH E ZONJ "1\'. 77 \ S USUAL. T wo girls wer e talking over the wir e. Both were discuss i ng w hat to w ear at a coming party. :\n im patient masculine voice k ept interrupting B ecoming indignant, one o f th e girls a s k ed : \\"hat lin e do think you are 0 11, ;'\\'e1I," h e an s w e r ed, ( am not surC', hut judging from w hat ('ve h eard, T s h o uld a clot h esline. \\' H.'t"J" S r N A N\\IEr Sw ee t was a Senior; She had a Ford coupe, And that went, She r:1ttl ed o n her \\ay Stella wa s h e r classmate, S h e a lso h:1d a car; And thou g h it wa s n o t closed in g l a ss I t took h e r j u s t :1S far. But, d e arie me, t h ese maid e n s sad, \\'e r e pri c k ed with jeal ollS s word s, For students always lau g h ed and j ee r ed A t t h eir poor struggling F o rd s But Ste lla, wit h courageous h eart, A s ked "\\' hat's in a name? T know we make an :!wful dill, But w e g e t t here jun th e s ame." -l/flllit'Bt'IIt' {?ffdt'r, '.!iJ. A WORD\" TH REAT. Ell clH e co uld get I 'd di\'est lire head dis lI'ijt, -"Oh,I 'm so tired o f married life." -'"Sbfllld.-" S o s your o ld man," Sin g a so n g o f students Cramming (or exams, Flocking to t h e L ik e a bUllc h of lambs \\'hen exams ar e over, Students b egin to sing, '; Put the text h oo k s Ar-l e a s t until next sprin g." There wa s o n ce a lady name,l Stclla F ell in lov c with a h o w l egged f e lla. This risky c ha p I .et her sit o n his lap And s h e fell c lear through to thl: cella. I n the State of Ari zona Grow some things (or u s to (rown Oil T h ere g r ows the Cactus T ha t e \ 'ef 1 sat down 011. \ -orvat ]'"\\' h ere are going to eat?" IllaJlt' y L et's eat lip [h e street." \ T orbert ].-";'\'aw, 1 don't like asphalt." P\(;E \IR. FLINT. I.r' f)}! Crt I 'UI'. "\\'hat is a .-!udrr W /)f)lfo-:':fI}J. 1 d on't kn o w ; 1 n e \ e r studi ed geometry." il/l". ; \ -,. \\'hat are t h e constituent s of quarrz?" IrilliaJJl I/ 't'dwtddt Pints," OVF..RHE.\RD I X PHYSICS. AII'. t \ /rCoIJIJlloJ/J "\\'hat is th e center ot gra\ jty?" HI/Hell ]01lt>J',-" T h e letter r : I N H ISTORY. t\liss NatOlcr.El s berh what makes the T o wer of P isa lean?" Elsbt'th 1I'/JtlIt'I". l don't kn ow, o r I 'd tak e so m e Goldcu. "See c h an ge in mer" why?" Go!rlen. I just sw:tll owed 1 5 cents." Paul f)ul"an. "\\'hy c all' t the E nglish tell jokes 011 night?" C/Iflr/, S B." H eca u se t her :1re afraid will laugh ill c hu rch," f-ran ces and I -] sbeth reading sentimental : -\h, listcn to this: I 'm dcar,' h e sa i d, An d his c h eeks were wet." Frau{('J' (skeptically) I l ullllllp he'd prob ahly just washed his face."

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;8 Travelling Oil the ocean To me is no delight; For when the ship's in motion, And land is out of sight T H E ZON I AN. Se\'en days I stand it \\'ith not a sight of bnd\ \'hen people sar t her like it I fail to understand. There comes :t funny feeling, And then I stan to wail, And soon you see me creeping I n the direction of the fail. CH It\1 ES RO\1 TH E B She's my cockroach I'm her bug. She's my chewing gum, I 'm her plug. I f she's crazy, 1'111 demented; I f she's happy, I '01 contented. Coo! Coo!

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THE THE ADVERTISERS Are a Big Factor in the Success of "The Zonian" ITS READERS Are Requested to Give Them First Consideration 79 m I I

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80 TH E Z O:-.'I .'\N. R!!:mi ngtO{l, .22 Calibre Repeating Rifle Model 12 FIREARMS -c/l fJvfan' s Sport 7hroug h and 7hrough SHOOTIN G train s th e eye, s tea d ies th e n e rves and the f ello w w h o h a s n ever "s q u inr ed d ow n the ba rrel at a scurrying r a b b i t has m issed t h e big ges t thrill of real s p o ;t. The R e m i n gron M ode l 1 2 R epeatin g Rifle i s juS t th e thin g f o r all small ga m e o r m r ge t s hootin g -a lirrl e g un th a t g i ves big result s I The m ag a z i ne t a kes 15 s h orr, 1 2 l o n g or 10 l o ng rifle carrri dges with o ur adjust m e nt. Rel oa d s in a t w inkling by m e r e l y slirlin g the f o r e e nd back and forward .. Lig ht ro t ar r y and easily t a k en a parr f o r cleanin g, th e M o d e l 12 i s all that a .22 cal ibr e rifle s h o uld be-and m o re. L e t your d e al e r show you t h i s w ond e rfu l lilli e gun-today. REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, Inc. 25 Broadway, New York, U. S. A. r":=: I AMMUNITION

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THE ZO:--'I. -\\,. IF ELECTRIC IRONING I Clle:lpes ( ami /Je"t Why not learn that Electric Cookery i Is C h efl{Jt's t ; w r! H t's t iIIl NO FOOD WASTED I N EVAPORATION OR TA I!\T E D \ ITB I I P O ISONOUS FUMES AND SMOKE ml SEE OUR l'IEW RANGES I EVERY RANCE TESTED rOR YOU R SAT ISFACTI ON EASY PAYMEN T TERMS Cia. Panameiia de Fuerza y Luz PANAMA DRINK DELICIOUS Delaware Punch COLON Antonio' s 30 Cen tr a l Avenue Pal1llma C it y ml HEADOI' AlnERS FOR I III I P aris i an N ovelties I a n d Dresses

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S2 T HF. ZONIAN. (/[ompli m ents O F P a n a m a Age n c ies Co. PANAi\1A C R I ST O B :\L B : \LBOA
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THE ) What's Your Score? To gel fro m outdoor s the thrill o u tdoors owes you -have your eyes examined without delay The Scad ron Optical Company I'ANAM A ; COLON; 23 Ccnlr:1I A\' CIHIC 9 0 3 4 Fro n t Siree! P hone S66 P O. B ox 166 D R DO:":\LD R YOU:"G Graduate of :'\'onhwcsttrn L'nivcrsiq C h icago Santa .-\na Plata Panam a City ( l 'p"t:tir<; "\dorado T he;tlre l Compania De N a vegacion N aciona! (National Navigati o n .,. Co.) m AJ; !f,J MAIL CONTRACTORS TO THE P ANA M A mpany I Box 180, Panama City Phones : 1 068 and 542 Co rp o r atio n AUTOMOBILE PROTECTION FIRE THEFT COLLISION PROPERTY DAMAGE I I : Special R a tes for the Canal Zone: I I Na tional Fire Insurance Co. of Hartford 1-1. T. Boone Enriqu e de l a G U :lrdia G e n Assoc. Gen Age CENTRAL HOTEL BLDG. nox 1 11 TE!...71 4 PANAMA

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,lI i,l ill Iii 1 HE ZO:\L\:\. PANAMA Panazone Garage Co. COLON P. O. Box 284 P. O. Box, Cristobal 1 045 Phone, Panama 335 Phone, Colon 5 CADILLAC HARLEY DAVIDSON OLDSMOBILE Goodyear Tires BmCK MOTORCYCLES OAKLAND Motor Accessories CHEVROLET DELCO LIGHT CARS Best Service Station in Panama EXIDE BATTERY FOR. GRADUATION DRESSE S FOSTER 22 CENTRAL AVENUE Headquarters f o r Woman's Apparel The ONL Y AMERICAN STORE Of It's Kind P O lJos 483 PA NAMA P O 80); 200 .. Ai':CON. C. Z. R. LINCE & Co. IM PORTERS & EXPORTERS O F PANAMA HATS SQ ARE DEAL TO ALL 83 Centra l Avenue T e leph o n e 965 PANAMA R. P DR. WM H. GRANT DISTRICT DENTIST TELEPHONE 89 0 4th OF J ULY AVENUE. No.1

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T H E ZO:---! \ :..:. CampI i m ell t 8 tn the G1'.7r/II.1tiJJg C l a ss of 1926 from the 1":\:\:\;\1. \ R:\I LRO \f) EI Hospital d e Panama

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86 THE 2O:\'II\:\'. W hen in Panama DO NOT FAIL TO CALL AT Th e French Bazaa r LARGE DEPARTMENT S TORE Headquarters for P arisian Novelties PANAMA I. L. Maduro Jr. CATHEDRAL PLAZA :: PANAMA CITY L a rge assortm ents of Musical Instrumen(s including VERY OLD VIOLINS UKULELES, GUITARS MANDOLINS, Etc. REASONABLE PRI CES COLON P ARIS LA MAS C OTA 37 CENTRAL AVENUE LEADING MEN S FURNISHING HOUSE ON TilE ISTHMUS T r opica l C loth i n g of all Descriptions II Full Line of Wardrobe Trunks and i m I Genuine Leather Ba!!,s A fine assortment of Tweeds, Serges, Linen and Khaki D rills-Boots and Shoes, Ha ts and Ca ps, Shirts, Co ll ars, Ties Etc. CARLOS W MULLER PROPRIETOR

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T H E ZO'J IA\'. For I ce C ream Soda Water, Coca Col a, Orange C ru sh, Gi n ge r A l e, C lu b Soda, E s kimo P ies and G lassware Ca ll Co l o n 84 or Panam a 65 The Panama -== -Hermano Drugs, Stationery, Printing PANAMA ca Cola Bottling C o. Nina Mastellari = FA S HIO N STORE I Central !\renne and 9th Street I I i i Pan a m a R. P. PHONE 613 II! STEPHEN LANE F O LGER, I n c ESTA BLI S H E D I s n ]lralll/ fa ctl/ring J e w e l e r s 180 BROADWAl', Sf<;W l'ORh-C LUB AND CO LLEGE PINS AND RINGS

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THE Z ON I A N. A GA. S STOVE IS AN ORDINARY RANGE WITH A COLLEGE EDUCATION "IF IT CAN BE DONE WITH HEAT YOU CAN DO IT BETTER WITH GAS!" Panama-Colon Gas Company At Your S ervice PICTURES! Taken of anything, at any time, and a nywhere . WE SPECIALIZE IN :. :. Quality Portraits THE MARINE STUDIO No connection with any ot her Studio 109 CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA CITY

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MR 99669-Panama C1.nal-6-IO-26-500

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