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 Foreword
 Dedication
 Table of Contents
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093678/00017
 Material Information
Title: Zonian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date: 1924
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093678:00017

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Foreword
        Page 1
    Dedication
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Main body
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Advertisements
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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f0lret 0rh. wre take this opportunity to
JJ thank the Faculty, and all
our friends whose help and assistance has been
so generously given us in order to make this book
possible. And in particular do we wish to express
our gratitude to Mr. Robertson, our class advisor,
and Miss Hopkins, our English instructor, who
have worked with us unceasingly.
We have tried to portray the school spirit and
activities of Balboa High in this annual, and
hope that in future years all may look back over
its pages with pleasure, and recall scenes and
fond recollections that have become dimmed in
the passing years. -The Zonian Sta'f.































I



.- ,T ur hbc1.

I Scmir Clii i
ZoNI N lur a


IBebiation.


vei Faculty, aN an appr-ciation i"t
v~ done t'.r i'-ur School, \c, the
it 1924, rcppccrttfull\ Jd dica e this
n u1ial.
-7 T ,: ..w Ca.., '2 .


I m "I m U-j-I.l Wi miN --51F












THE


ZONIAN


B \1 B \. CANAL ZONE, 1924

PUBLISHED BY THE BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL


Foreword..
Dedication
Zonian Si.if.
Fditorlals..


ELIZABETH INoRFLEEr, '24
AG.NES .MCDADE, "2
FLUORIDE ED VARD,, '24
PHVI. LIr ILLIKEN, '24
(GWENI))I.YX BARDE1N. I24


Faculty.
Graduates
Senior Chart
Junior Class.
Sophomore Class
Freshman Class
Last Will and Tetamernt of Seniors, '24
Class Prophecy
The Tragedy of Gaining Wisdom .
Literary:
A Legend ..... IPrRIC.IA RHODuE, '26
The Fountain of Youth. HATlrIE BE LI- RADER, '2'
A Trip to the Village of Ar ii n M. BiwoX, '24
The Legend of San .l..1 .. Cathedral
.1 FLORENLE I)DER, '28
The Fountain of Youth and Bea:uty
MNIA'A McKim, '2l
Woodcraft Wisdom --Painoram
La Avenida Central ... LciE: WR\icrI, '2;
The Two Pearls.. .. HORACE FOsrER, '2,
The Answer .. .VN C. SI.vERLMA, '2;
Can You Imagine?....
One Good Turn Deserves Another .
LORETTA KIiOCHER, 2


I.i trary Continued:
Irs. Gra l Squirrel and Her \in:er Supply
DoKorH- EIASMAN, '2
The River (;IED),L BA'DEN\, 24
The Carnival HArli-E BELLE R \DER, '2
To Rost. IIliLENE GR.IMIiON, '2
A Trip to Ir.u. CONSTANCE GRAFF, '2
The Lost Cirt: CoxseF.i.o CAMARA, '2h.
Old Panama: JOS EPHINE CAMARA, '27
A Tropical Sceni G WZ\l)uoL, BARsDE, '24
Just a Dreamn RI TH SrOXE, '2


Socierv
What I Lippenicl


ELIZAIll iHr NoR, 11 '24


Alumni:
T he Class of 1i2j .
Marriages
As \We See Othiers
Bu,)s' Athletics .... RBE E .XGEI.KE, 24
Girls' Athletics .
Physical Work on the Canal
F A. Bo( iA, Physical Director
"Come Out of the Kitchen"
"That Ramblin' Wreck from (Gorgia. Tech"
EVEx l N C. SI LVEIRMF '2,
With Due Apolol,ie, to Shakespeare
FrVEILV C. SlII\"lRMAs, 2(
Our Clss ROBERT Et.i FLE-- 24
Evening in the l'ropics .. HORACE FIosi'iEI, '25
Reminisccences ... I X WEIS, '2
Horse I.affs ..
Advertisements


VOL. XV


No. I


BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL.

CONTENTS.































Zonian I--

6tafft


.sjistaw, Edvtor-i,.Chie"'
B.sit,'i laagerr
illl.il.l BR incs., Mlanage'r
Cr,' h,, ,t .1 fanag
,shiiitani Circti.'aing Alnielge'


oLTON WHIIE
4uNiREW \HITLOCK
DOROTHI El ~IMAN
PrILIr THORNTON
PA'L DlURAN


Jirfry; Edtil-
SfAn'r Edit.'
7'! 4 r Edi.r-


LILUZABL H NORI LE I
I" HEL \\A In
NIAR\ I\ I.OC F
AGNE. IC I)ALIE
R H .IH [ .\,( I i.
NIASINI BANIUN


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I'l .' Nt ,.e'f Ed3it..r

r 1." .'t R.'ir, Edtel.i
I )ieil, i,, Refre' lct. l1"


NLISA McKim
MA 4IELEE BROWN
FIANCES GREENE
FriBERT ENGEI KE
FRED BRADY


1924

.- i^---
" ."I







THE ZONIAN.


IT'S NOT TOO LATE.


Elizabeth 'orUleet, ''/.


Do you take school as a joke? Have you con-
sidered your years of study a waste of time? Do
you feel you could have done better had you
stopped after c.mpl': riL_ grammar school? Some
of you do, hut you few have made yourselves feel
that way. You have gone to school because you
were made to go, not because you wanted to work
and improve yourselves. Each moment should
be used in study-study which helps so much even
if you have left school.
Education helps everyone. There is no one
that can not be improved by the right sort of
training. How much better it is to be taught in
school to help yourself, than by the experience
of hard knocks. If you put yourself in the proper
attitude to receive instruction, you will learn
,omlethinL every day which will help you later
on. Turn over a new leaf at once. Make your-
self like school for your future life's sake. Study
seriously. Notice how many things you will learn
in the hours you had thought wasted. Then you
will learn to make a success of.i n, rhin.g you under-
take.
THE HILL OF DIFFICULTY.
Agines McDade, '2j.
For every person in this world, there is a hill
of difficulty. Though some of these hills are


higher than others, none are insurmountable. If
the people of the world were divided into distinct
classes, we could see just how these hills of diffi-
culty are treated.
There is one group that goes to the foot of the
hill, and examines it. It looks at the size of the
hill, its height, its width; and then sits down and
waits for the hill to move itself. This group is
always disappointed; for the hill, instead of mov-
ing itself, piles higher and higher.
There is another group that goes to the foot of
the hill, and measures it, and then decides to try
to walk around. Very few of this group ever suc-
ceed, for when the dlt,_r..nr members get to the
other side, they can not find the path, and so can
not go on.
There is another group that goes to the hill, and
feeling that it cannot climb the hill decides to
tunnel thr. llh it. If the tunnel is straight, and
the digging is performed so that the walls will not
cave in, this group is successful. Unfortunately,
however, the various members of the ...p., are
in too great a hurry, and when the tunnel is dug,
the walls cave in, and the people can in no way
get out.
There is another group that can climb the hill
with a little assistance. Some people, who under-
stand the difficulties better than the climbers do,


ED I TOR AL








THE LONIAN.


can guide their first steps, after that the group
can be left alone. The ones who are willing to
help these people, are the ones who can most easily
ascend their own hills.
Another group that goes, thinks that the climb
will be easy, and looks down upon those who do
not think so. Man\ members of this group slip
and fall. Some of these start out with a new de-
termination, and reach the top of the hill safely;
but many others stay at the bottom, and wait for
the hill to move itself.
The last group is the one that looks at the hill,
sizes it up, and with grim determination, decides
to climb it. Very few of this group fail, for "Well
begun is half done." They do not try to rush up
without any effort, they do not wait for a miracle
to carry them to the top, but they themselves
get busy and work hard.
Everyone falls into one of these classes. In
which one are you? Work for the last one; it
may seem at times that you can not succeed, but
persevere, and you will win.


YOUR OPPORTUNITIES.

Floride Edwards, '24.

The majority of students in High School do not
realize that they are in the formative period of
their lives. Minor incidents in daily life, as bor-
rowing a sheet of paper, failing to return a pencil,
or telling a little white lie to get out of an assign-
ment, all lead to greater negligence in more ma-
ture years.
Habits formed in youth follow one throughout
life. As the bones in one's body take on the shape
that they will carry through life, while one is
young, so does one's brain expand or lie dormant.
Vigorous exercise of the brain in youth permits
earnest thinking and heavy brainwork in later life.
If assignments were done each day, not com-
pleted just for a grade, but honestly studied and
honestly learned, each day, what a fund of know-
ledge one would have!
Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, do not wait
until you are Seniors to realize what school means!
Do not wait until you can only regret that you


didnotmake moreof your High School course, but
study each day! Take advantage of" your oppor-
tunities as they are offered to you.


BEWARE FRESHIES!

Phyllis Milliken, '24.
"Early to bed and early to rise makes a man
healthy, wealthy, and wise." This may be an
old saying but, nevertheless, it is true. How can
one expect to get his lessons if he is up late.every
night? It is impossible. Freshmen say, "'Oh,
well, if I do fail in anything this year I shall have
three more years in which to make it up." But
this is not the attitude to take because if one has
to carry five subjects, he is very likely to fail again
in his Sophomore year and during his Senior year
it will be difficult to carry five studies. Beware,
Freshies, for you may want your good times now
but when you lack one credit to be able to attend
the Junior-Senior Banquet you will wish you had
sacrificed all good times. Start in now and wurk
for the greatest desire in your life-your diploma.


CAREFULNESS.

Gwendolyn Barden, '24.
Carefulness is one of the things which we should
learn in school.
In doing our written lessons, if we are in a hurry,
we are likely to be careless and leave some small
unimportant word out, or misspell a word, which,
if we took time to think, we no doubt would spell
right. These small things are sometimes over-
looked by the teachers, but later in our business
life, our employers will not be so willing to over-
look our errors.
Many days we come to class with our lessons
unprepared, expecting the teacher to give us an-
other chance to catch up. If we were careful in
the planning of our work there would be no need
to ask for another chance.
Carefulness is something which we should try to
develop while we are in school, so that in after
years we will not regret our careless, slovenly way
of trying to get through life.








THE ZONIAN.


faculty.


BERNARD L. Boss.
Principal.
Science.



HELEN L. CURRIER.
Supervisor of Public School Music.



FRANCES F. FINNEGAN.
University of MiLhii.in.
University of California.
Collegiate Business Institute.
Commercial Subjects.



LESTER S. FLINT.
B. S., Tufts College.
Mathematics.


OLGA J. FROST.
A. B., Mount St. Vincent-on-the-Hudson.
Spanish and French.



META GUMMERSHEIMER.
A. B., Illinois College.
Post Graduate Work, University of Wisconsin.
Post Graduate Work, University of Michigan.
Science and Commercial .rithmetic.


NELLIE A. HOPKINS.
A. B., University of South Dakota.
Post Graduate Work, Columbia University.
English and Latin.



PETER R. ROBERTSON.
University of Washington.
Supervisor, Industrial -Arts.



LEORA A. SHERER.
Stout Institute.
University of Minnesota.
University of Chicago.
University of California.
Chicago Fine Arts Academy.
Supervisor, Household Arts.


GRACE I,. SHERMAN.
A. B., Ohio University.
University of California.
Spanish and History.



RUTH THOMAS.
Kansas University.
A. B., Kansas City University.
English and lHistory.


I


f~~-------




THE ZONIAN.


Erevo










THE ZONIAN.









PHILIP THORNTOx.

Virginia.

"But there is more in me than thou understandeth."


-Basket Ball.
-Basket 1, I, Baseball.
-Treasurer of Class.
-Class President; Senior Pla.y; ZosXAN Staff; Basket
Ball.


ALTON WHITE.

Mississippi.

"That man that hath a tongue I say is no man, if xith his own
tongue he can not win a woman."

1924-Vice President; Senior Play; ZosIAN Staff.


ELIZAIBETH NORFLEET.

Mexico.

"On the highest cliffs of f:me,
I would some day paint my name."


1921-Basket Ball.
1922-Basker Ball.
1923-Class Vice Presiden-: Musical Ten.
1924-Senior Play; ZOXIA Staff; Secretary, Senior Class;
Indoor Baseball.


MARY HEARNE.

Alabama.

"She taketh most delight in music."
1921-1924-Pianist.
1924-Class Treasurer.




to THE ZONIAN.


I IL-


5?


W^










THE ZONIAN.


Louis ALLEN.

New York.

\1, own thoughts are my companions."






MARVIN BANTON.

Iowa.

"I am sure care is an enemy to lift."

1924-Senior Play; ZONIAN Staff.








GWENDOLYN BARDEN.

Iowa.

"Oh for a seat in some poetic nook,
Just hid with trees and a sparkling brook."

1924-Senior Play.




RUTH BICKFORD.

Wisconsin.

"I am nothing if not sincere."

1922-Declamatory Contest; Swimming.
1923-Basket Ball; Swimming.
1924-Basket Ball; Senior Play.








12 THE ZONIAN.



































-fin









THE ZONIAN. 13


MATTIELEE BROWN.

Texas.

"Thou hast a mind that suits with this
Thy fair and outward character."


j921-Class President.
1924-Senior Play; ZONIAN Staff.


CHARLES CROSS.

Maryland.

"Napoleon was only five feet two."


1924-Baseball; Senior Play.


FLUORIDE EDWARDS.

Georgia.

"She is pretty to walk with,
And is witty to talk with,
And pleasant, too, to think of."


ROBERT ENGELKE.


1921-Basket Ball.
1923-Class Secretary.
1924-Senior Play.


Virginia.

"You have him laughing,
You think he's all fun,
But angels will laugh
At the good he has done."


1921-Swimming; Baseball; Basket Ball.
1922-Class President; Swimming; Baseball; Basket
Ball; Senior Play.
1923-Class President; Baseball; Basket Ball; Track;
Swimming; Senior Play; ZONIAN Staff.
1924-ZONIAN Staff; Senior Play; Swimming; Baseball;
Basket Ball; Track.




14 THE ZONIAN.


! I

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I
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THE ZONIAN.


PHYLLIS MILLIKEN.

Maine.

"Grace was in all her steps,
Heaven in her eyes."

1923-Xmas Play.






RICHARD MOORE.

New York.

Special Student.

1924-Baseball.






ABNER SILVERMAN.

Rhode Island.

"True to his word, his work, and his friends."

1924--Basket Ball; Senior Play.



ANDREW XWHITLOCK.

New Hampshire.

"Full of vigor, dash and go,
And different from the rest you know

1923-Musical Ten, Baseball.
1924-Senior Play; Baseball; Track; ZOXIAN Staff.





















SENIOR GRAMMAR
---------------------------------------


PROPER
NOUNS


i. Louis Allen.......

2. Marvin Banton...

3. Gwendolyn Barden

4. Ruth Bickford....

5. Mattielee Brown..

6. Charles Cross....

7. Floride Edwards..

8. Robert Engelke...

9. Mary Hearn .....

io. Phyllis Milliken...

In. Elizabeth Norfleet

12. Abner Silverman..

13. Philip Thornton...

14. Alton White......

15. Andrew Whitlock,


PRO-
NOUNS


A l.......

Banton...

Gwen....

Rufus....

M at......

Jiggs.....

Livy. ...

Shingles..

Mary'ern.

Cutex....

Bebe....

Ab. .....

Flip .....

White...

Andy....


100....

4. .



10 ... .
26. ..

5....

54....

90 ....

76....

30. . .

2..,.


36....
6 ...

. .

I . .


INTERJECTIONS


Well you see..........

A-a-Well-a-a-a..

You oil can.......

Absolutely...........

Whoa dear!.... ...

Dead broke... ..

Oh, sweetness.. ....

Seen Musa?..........

Oh horses ..... .

Oh yes? How come?...

Blah.................

All little frills..........

Sure........... .....

How come?..........

Can't be bothered......


INFINITIVES, DESCRIPTIVE
ADJECTIVES


To study-Studious .......

To hunt-Impish ....... ..

To flirt-Poetical.........

To swim-Clownish.......

To draw-Practical........

To eat banan.i.-Wit-y.'...

To sew-Dignified........

To procrastinate-Devilish.

To be with Dinty-Musical.

To smile-Charming.......

To dance-Eng Iging

Tochew n vhinrg-Re served

To please-Geni i

To hunt duck--Capable

To tease-Bashful


COMMON NOUNS COMMON NOUNS
(What we want to be) (Whatwe probablywill be)


Journalist.........

Engineer..........

Poetess..........

N urse...........

Architect.......

Electrician........

Interior decorator.

Lawyer............

Musician........

Beauty specialist..

President

Laua.er

Buincesis mn

Eliectrsi]in

Music;ian


Professor .....

Bum ..........

\Washer omin .

Opera Sinr .. .

Jockey ........

Fruit vender...

Sprinter.......

A pug..........

Dint's wife......

Housewife......

Peanut ro.,srer

Baller dancer

Butler

Street cleaner

Organ grinder


ARTICLES
(Pet possessions)


Typewriter.

Gun and dogs.

Harold.

SBathing suit.

Curls.

Bananas.

Mah Jongg set.

Pompadour.

Her piano.

SVanity case.

Her bobbed hair.

Sideburns.

Diploma (when he gets it).

Trigonometry.

Hisa ix.


1 1 -1-i- -- -~-


































































I 6 Destrovetrs in o'utun Lock, .




























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THE ZONIAN.


JUNIORS.


President.-DoRoTHY EASTMAN.

Vice President.-DOUGLAS CROSS.

Secretary and Treasurer.-JoHN TATOM.


Class Flower.-Cosma.

Class Colors.-Blue and Yellow.


ELEANOR AVERS

THERRESSA BETZ

WILLIAM ALLEN

RUTH BRENEMAN

KATHERINE BROWN

JAMES BuRGooN

RENA DE IYO'NG

HORACE FOSTER

JEROME GEARY

EARLE GERRANS

CONSTANCE GRAFF

HELENE GRIMISON

IDA RUTH HAMMER

M1ARYON LOCKED

AGNES NIcDADE


ALICE OLIVER

LORETTA KOCHER

MARY PEACE

VIVIENNE PLATES

CAROL RIcBV

EVELYN SILVERMAN

RUTH STONE

EDITH TROWBRIDGE

FLORENCE ROBINSON

ETHEI WVAINIO

ALICE WALKER

LEON \\EISS

LUCIE WRIGHT

J l.lA ZIDUBCK

OLIVER SCHROYER











?I W I

1 11 U"'IY.W 313







Ill"










THE ZONIAN.


SOPHOMORES.


President.-RIcHARD ENGELKE.

VIice President.-BURNETTE MIEACHAM.

Secretary and Treasurer.-HATTIE BELLE RADER.


Class Flower.-Ginger Lily.

Class Colors.-Purple and Gold.


HERBERT ALLEN

NAENIA BAXTER

MARGARET BOYD

DOROTHY BROOKE

IRENE BROWN

MARGARET BRULAND

CONSUELA CAMERA

RALPH CLEMENTS

EuGcNF CLOUD

ANDREW DONOVAN

EDWARD DORSW ITT

PAUL Dt RAN

EDNA DUVALL

MARY DYER

PATRICIA FLINT

FRANCES (;REENE

ALICE HALLORAN

CLARA H'BER

BYRNE HI THINGS

HELEN KEENE

ANNA INAPP

HARRIETTE GILL


ELOISE LORING

MARY JOE LOWE

MARY McCoNAUGHY

ANNIE MCDADE

IL'SA McKiM

KATHERINE XlLLER

FLORENCE MIRTAGH

STELLA NEW BOLD

T'HOMAS NORIHROP

MIiLDRED OLIViFR

JAMES 'PERRY

ILOREs\CE PE IERP.ON

ALBERTA POWERS

PATRICIA RHODES

VIKGINIA ROBINSON

JOHN RVAN

MARION SLrAIN

NiCOLINO STANZIOLA

PAcL St IVAN

FLORENCE TONNESON

\IL.LIAM \EDWAI.UT

WILSON MORRIS










































































Fi..I m n (.'Ii%











THE ZONIAN.





FRESHMEN.


President.-FRED BRADY.
fice President.-JAMES DRISCOLL.
Secrtearv and Treasurer.-FRED HELMERICKS.


Class Flower.-Bougainvillaea.
Class Colors.-Maroon and Gohl.


HAGAR AHLFONT
MARION ALLEN
ELIAS ANASTACIADO
CARLOTTA ARRIETA
LESLIE BANAN
URBAN BHEGOECHEA
BERT BETZ
GRACE BOYD
ALBERT BROWN
FRANCES BROWN
BETTY BUTLER
CHARLE BtUTTERS
JOSE'HINE CAMIARA
FORREST CHEESEMAN
HAL COOPER
MARY CURRY
EARLE DAILEY
EDWINA DAVIS
WILLIAM I)E SERRES
ISABELLE DIXON
JAMES DORAN
JOSEPH DiRAN
ROBERT ESSEX
ARCHI E FRENCH
JoHn FRENCH
SixCILAI GANNsu
PAU LINE GLIDEWELLI
ELIZABETIH (RANBERRY
JANICE (;RIMISON
MIRIAN HALLORAN
HELEN IHENDRICKSEN
RALPIH HENDRICKSEN
FRED HOLZA 'FE L
GEORGE HIDSON
OLIVE HI EBNER
BETTY JACK
RANDOLPH HEALD
LUCIE JEFFERS


AGNES JOHNSON
RICHARD JOHNSON
NORBERT JONES
KATHERINE KERi'
ANGELA KLEMNMER
KARL KNABE NXHIE
MARY KNABENSHIiE
ROSALIE 1.A RI E
DORA LEAR
AMELIA ,LLCO
ALLEN MIADINOX
CHARLES MAHONEY
EMMA McKEOWN
WILLIAM IMENGES
STANTON PETERSON
FRANKLIN PIERCE
BERNICE PIERSON
BRON.ON POWELi
(;NEXIEV'E (QUINN
HAL ROBERISOS
JONEPHINE SHERMAN
JOHN SHERIDAN
HERBERF SCHAMII)
MARJORIE SPECHT'
FRED STROBI.F
I)OROTH SNt Ou ERG
EIUGENE TA TrOM
JOHN iERNEY
CHARLES TROWBRIDGE
MIArILDA VAN SICLEN
WILLIAM VAN SICLEN
NEIWTON \IARWICK
DORA \VA'TI.
CHARI.OFTE \WHITAKER
AGNES \WILLOUGHBY
ROBERT WOOD
LUCAS ZARAK
MILDRED GARRETT








THE ZONLAN.


I.AST \\ ILL AN ) TESTAM ENIT (F SENIORS, '24.


We, the Seniors of BalboIa High, being s'.unld if
body and of perfect mind and memory, praise be
therefore given, do make and ordain rhlis ,ur pries-
ent and last will and testament in manner and
form as ftll-umth:
First, and principal we commend our tutuLrus
into the hands of Fate, hoping throuieh the kind-
ness of our successors, to have full and free pardon
of all our sins, and to inherit everlasting memrnir
in Balboa High, and our mental supericriort\ s
commit to ye Juniors, t- be decnthl\ carcd t,-.r,
and passed on in due time, a, ti, hinig the dipo-i-
sition of all such temporal .ttarc a, hath been
bestowed upon us, we 1Ji\ e anId dl'plT'Se lthrcdo
as followeth:
Alton White leaveth r. \ e l. (iraice Slihrman.
his gum-chewing proplnsitic..
Gwendolyn Barden Icattrh to e MarL'arct
Boyd, her sylph-like figire.
I -ordlc Edwards leateth t. \e \ irinia R..hin-
son, her long dresses inll statcl\ Larriage.
Andrew \\ hirtlck lecaeth to e \ lhcnias Edison
Northrop, his "Shieki-h" a:,pir:itir.n:.
Abner Silverman learcth t I. Mr. I.Lestcr Hintl.
his powers as a egurinand, n;inlm,,l. r, at an;y
thing.
Marvin Banton leaveth t, ve JamniL Perr--, his
ability to bluff and his mischief.
Phyllis Milliken lea\cth t.. \c Ida Ruth lH.i--
mer, her artistic taste in ,iLssin,..
Elizabeth Norfleet kl-;aith toi .,. CnnIr (jratf',
her "pep."
Mlar% Hearne leaveth trio Mr. Bernard Boss,
her musical ability.
Robert Engelke leaxeth ti, i c J-erne Gear.\, his
well trained pompadour.


Phillip Thcrnton leaveth to ye Horace Foster,
his w itch sri that in the future ve will arrive at
sii'hil in tulle.
Mlatticl'e Bro.s\n leaveth to .e Carol Rigby,
her culls.
Charles Cross leaveth to ve Lucy \\'right, his
L'oid nature under all circumstances.
[.Luis Allan leaveth to ye Norberr Jones, his
-tudious habits.
Ruth Bickford leareth to Ne Rena De Yo)ung,
her lovce for swimming.
Our s ill is. if an\y of the above legatees fail to
Ilaim his bequest, same be divided equally
aming.st the remaining students. Our desire is
that nur advisors, Miss Nellie Hopkins, and
Mr. Peter Robertsun. be il\vrseers of this, inur
last will .-nd testament.
Dated in Balbua, Canal Zone, e tmenty-third
dan of April, in the .car of our I.ord, one thou-
sand nine hundred twent\-fur. 1 1924.


I' it. I


THE SENIORS OF '24,


Signed, scaled, published, and declared by said
Senirs of Balboa High School, as and for their
l:isrt ill and testament, in the presence of us,
wh., at their request, in their presence, and in the
prericilcc-i I each other have hereunto subscribed
Iou ni in1ai s as attesting witnesses to said instru-
me.nt.
Miss NELLIE HOPKINS.
PETER ROBERTSON.
B. .. Boss.


x









THE ZONIAN.


CLASS PROPHECY.


...... LOTrA BULL
. ...... Izz FOOLISH
.......DRAG IMOUT
.....A. TEAPOT DOME
....Miss DEMEANOR
.......... IVA COLD

al Zone,
April 30, 1914.


AMERICAN "PUG" WINS LAURELS IN ENGLAND.

"Shingle" Engelke, as this is the name he com-
monly goes by, has finished the light-weight box-
ing champion of England. He is not a "south-
paw" as most people believe, but packs his knock-
out wallop in his right glove. Mr. Engelke is an
expert in all the most skillful devises known in
boxing, and employs some of his own making.
This young man made his debut in Panama
where he was enthusiastically cheered whenever
he made his appearance. All are looking forward
to the time when "Shingle" will be proclaimed
"light-weight boxing champion of the world."

NEW WONDER DISCOVERED IN EGYPT.
ALTON WHITE. FOUND TO BE AN EXPERT ON 1HE HABITS OF
BUTTERFLIES.
Mr. Alton White was discovered on the Sahara,
hunting for butterflies by Professor Sneeze of
Bugum College, well-known bug specialist. Pro-
fessor Sneeze states that Mr. White did not know
he knew so much about these fascinating crea-
tures until he was thoroughly quizzed on this
subject. Mr. \\'hitc spent most of his boyhood in
Panama, where he devoted his spare time to
searching for the most exquisite specimens. He
has the largest collection of tropical butterflies in
the world. He declares that had he not been so
fond of these flying beauties, he would never have
been the learned man that he is to-day.

FAMOUS PIANIST TO GIVE CONCERT.

Miss Mary Hearne will render one of her famous
musicales to-night at the \linuharii ii.I Theatre.
The feature of the night will be her soul-reidinia'


STAFF


Editor .................. .
Assistant Editor...........
Business Manager..........
Circulation Manager..........
Society Editor .... .........
Literary Editor.............


interpretation of ''I'.il.re,:. .ki on a Hot Tamale"
with which she has held her audiences
i', d l I I' t11 .] .
Her m:I:n.Iv.-, Mr. Richard Moore, guarantees
perfect discords, and a splitting headache to all
who attend. It is said that she may favor her
dazed audience with an encore "Fly Birdie, Fly."
(That is, if they can keep the doors closed.)

ACCIDENT TO ARCHITECT.

The friends of Miss Mattielee Brown, promising
architect, will be glad to hear that her recent ac-
cident, which occurred when she fell from the top
of a 40-story building, for which she was design-
ing a steeple, left her a little dazed, but not seri-
ously hurt.
It is rumored that the city intends to sue for
damages done to the sidewalk, upon which she
left a deep impression. The janitor has threatened
to rc-in if she continues this nerve-racking work
as he doesn't want to have to clean up the side-
walk.

WORD RECEIVED FROM ARCTIC EXPLORER.

Word has been received from the world-re-
nowned Arctic explorer, Prof. Philip Thornton,
that he has at last discovered the North Pole,
having stumped his toe upon it, while stumbling
around during the six months' darkness.
Camels were used in this expedition, and the
Professor says that he finds they do not notice
the heat as they are very fond of ice cream and
eii.. the change from the cold climate in which
they o liin.ill. came.
The company has encountered numerous hordes
of the intelligent Ikmik, some of which they in-
tend to bring back with them to the United
States for exhibition.

NEW RIFLE INVENTION.

Our honored and revered Gen. Abner Silver-
man, it is reported, has just completed his famous
nonshoot rifle, which will be used by his raw re-
cruits, thus doing away with the danger of acci-
dents to himself and others.


Balboa Can


''''^''









THE ZON IAN.


He claims that this rifle has great possibilities
in future wars, as It icouldl be ea.il exchanged, by
stni'c expert nl:iiine criln, t;,r the enemies' rifles,
thui ."Ititingd inI iur to his nil men, and an casy
Xlitir. This i. nil\ ne uof the niumcr, u plans
iat campaign which G(encral Silcerman has in
stare in case ,fl wa.r. This, hi ever, he tishhes
to kcIp secret, i, .ill \ he, read this, plcnic re.n'mnm-
her "nlum" is The word.

.\ rrLN rION, POET LOVERS!!

.All ho cniio% p-,ctr. will be delighted to hear
thar Mis' (;Gwenlclil\ n Barlcii has just completed
her nri\\ book of p',ems, thich %%ill suon be lnal
sale ;t .ill public Ioikstrires. ',he is. ,tut ring this
iolk at an exceptioiinall% lon\ price, s.l that all
nilai share its benctirs; ianmcl $.c,5 per copy,
with z per cent L-is;count for .ash.
A. Inllll th im isr iinct resting t it the c illr.i tin,
are her Russ,ian piciems "[\ anan 1fulitch," "'Must-r
hafl'as.inke," and "K itchcrthlliakii." rthcrs
equally inspiring arc "Tulip Time in Alaska," and
afterr Water! I've gat Hot Lips."
Tlhi. bIook hc has loi inu'lV dedicated t,-, Balbon
High School nhlish students ti, Ibrak the miiont-
il..' it Shakespeare andl NMilt.n. She tao, once a
.turident there herself.

>\NI) i(H- 1.I. l. i NEW'-- E\k I'kE'iiiENI FLEL iif)
IN s ;NDi\ IL H Ii, \ N, '.

Mr. l.ulis Allen has licn ,iiing \eicellenrt cam-
paign tt'rk in the Sand wich Islandl-, andn crtainl\
de,.erves this hi nmr. Bcsilds this gcoud tcoirk, he
has introduced the s:andl tth t, thcse. islanders,
thus sa.iviim the people fri in the famine theta were
in imminnt Jdanger of. Mr. .Allen ha.s ttritten
to some of his friends saying that he is confidleiit
that this republic will soon be ready to join the
League of Nations.
It must be remembered that Mr. Allen was a
student of Balboa High School, of Panama, and
all who know him are confident of the prosperity
of the republic which has chosen him as their
leader.

BIG GAME HUNTER NOW IN AFRICA.

Marvin Banton, the world renowned hunter is
:again in the wilds of Africa. His main ambition
from Il"(\ hiii was to hunt all of the various big
game of the African jungle.


The latest news Irom this hunter was received
ti-dav by Mr. \\hite, also a; great hunter, from
the Belgian Congo ivia carrier pige.nsl. Banton
has shit many speciInen, aming which are: The
Iln -t:rilcd, trunkless elephant; the great antlered
IliCs iif the l hire-tailcd td er; :ils, many other
specimen that the pigeons were unable to bring
I ba:k.
IERI's"I.OREI\ RTI'sT IN TOWN.

Miss Elhzabeth Norflet and her delightful
troupe of toe-dancers, are to perform at the Gay-
et\ Theatre in this cit\ t-nighr.
Miss Norfleet till appear in one of her most
Graceful numbers. "The Dying Buzzard." This
number helped very much in gaining Miss Nor-
flcct such world-%ide popularity. She conceived
the use Of" this dance after careful study of the
buzzard, which is plentiful in her old home, the
Panama Canal iZnc. It has been presented in all
if the leading theatres of the world and received
with prafiound admiration for Miss Nortlect.

(.RET WORK BEINg, DONE BY I'ROMINENT Y.W.C.A.
WORKER.

Miss Floride Edwards is doing much good in
this ity. She is connected with the athletic de-
partmenti in the Y. \V. C. A., and is developing
manii "stars" from the material she has to work
\with. She specializes in developing sprinters and
hall-mile runners. Being an exceptionally good
runner herself, she is well able to demonstrate
what she desire ti make clear to her prodigies.
Miss Edwards has a e\rv enviable track record.
She hell mnan\ rciiirds and was the track star
while at-ndlling Ballbs.a High Schoiol in Panama.

HOLLYWOOD STARS.

A very delightful informal tea was enjoyed at
the home of Miss Ruth Bickford, the charming
motion picture star who takes the leading role in
J. K. Baxter's latest dramatic success entitled,
"She's as Pure as a Lily."
Miss BickfoiIrd isthe dail-hter of the well-kn, I n
veterinary H. A. Bickfird.
This charming i in n lady came into our midst
from Panama. She has worked here now just two
\ ears, but her remarkable ability to interpret and
act this stirring drama has made her famous.








THE ZONIAN.


NOBLE WORK IN FIJI ISLANDS.
Mr. Andrew \hitlii.k, missionary to Bacalao'
has designed a new braided grass skirt for the
native belles. He converts these people with his
Irish ditties played on his saxophone, so that they
are willing to wear these fantastic skirts two
inches longer than the previous ones.
We believe everyone will agree with us that
this is an improvement which should not be over-
looked. We are also confident that greater works
will follow from the hands of this great man.
GIRLS! GIRLS! GIRLS!
The famous beauty specialist Phyllis Milliiken,
has just returned from her trip to the interior
where she has been busy putting marcel waves
into the hair of the San Bias Indians. She has also
helped to acquire a peaches and cream complexion
for the native brunettes.
She is to open a beauty parlor here, and every-
one is confident that all will take advantage of


her exceptional prices, and excellent work. Her
special work will be the remodeling of noses, so
she states. She found this type of work especially
profitable in New York.

GREAT BANANA MAGNATE HEARD FROM.

Mr. Charles Cross, the great banana magnate
from the B.t\., .i River, is back here with many
startling tales of raising bananas.
Mr. Cross has been experimenting in grafting
the banana, with other verdure of the tropics. He
has experimented with the "Ice Cream Bean" and
the banana and has grown the most delicious ban-
ana ice cream known. Mr. Cross has at a great
cost, made an ice plant there, with which he is
trying to produce banana ice.
Mr. Cross is the best-known scientist, and his
many experiments and inventions have benefited
the progress of this and all of the other ages very
much.


2c~n:;It .* -


Ancon Hospital and Gruunds.









28 THE ZONIAN.


THE TRAGEDY OF GAINING WISDOM.


A comedy in four acts.
A play full of dramatic action and good laughs, portraying
the struggles after wisdom of the class of 1924.

Time.-Autumn, 1920-Spring, 1924.
Place.-Balboa High School, Balboa, Canal Zone.

CAST OF CHARACTERS.

Leading Characters.

FLORIDE EDWARDS
PHILIP THORNTON Twelve years experience in this com-
ALTON WHITE pany.

Characters appearing in all/our Characters appearing in two
acts. or more acts.


MARVIN BANTON
FLORIDE EDWARDS
ROBERT ENGELKE
ELIZABETH NORFLEET
PHILIP THORNTON
ALTON WHITE


ANDREW WHITLOCK
GWENDOLYN BARDEN
RUTH BICKFORD
MATTIELEE BROWN
PHYLLIS MILLIKEN
Loums ALLEN


Those present in climax only.


CHARLES CROSS


ABNER SILVERMAN


Director.-PETER ROBERTSON.

SYNOPSIS.

AcT I.

Assembly Hall, Row 8.-General commotion. Classification.
Enter Freshmen, much besmeared and tousled (boys with
heads shaved, girls with one sleeve off and one shoe on). Elec-
tion of officers (pretty rough). Hollowe'en party (social de-
but-slight errors). Examinations (numerous failures.).


ACT II

Assembly Hall, Row .-Slight degree of culture and refine.
ment attained.
Important class meeting (election of officers. Class part).
Beauty contest generall turmoil and confusion in feminine
circles). Anita Sergeant crooned faith laurels. Class hiy
ride. Pictures for annual Illurry of powder-puffs and va.iIt
cases). Examinations :many proud Juniors resulting.

.CT Ill.

Assembly Hall, Row ;--..%ene t.-High degreeof civilization
has been acquired. Dignir' easily discerned.
Class Meeting (reelection of officer.i. Deafening commo-
tion plain for Junior Dance). Tickets for sale. Chri.rm.ia
entertainment-huge success a5 Juniors' act won.
Scene 2.-Declamator\ Conte.t. Ruth Bickford awarded
olive branch. Junior Dance, crowning success whole sum of
forty dollars collected, dismal outlook for Seniors 1. Cake Sale
Scene 3.-Junior-Senior Banquet Ihigh degree of social cul-
ture arrived at). Seniors delighted.

ACT IV.

Assembly Hall, Row I.-Counting of credits.
Scene I.-Extreme quiet, worried expression on faces of dig-
nified Seniors. Mysterious trips to office. Beaming smiles-
all are Seniors.
Scene 2.-General hubbub-ZossNas Staff elected. Zonian
dance tickets for sale. Benefit .howa at clubhouse
Scene 3.-Extreme excitement. Senior plhy being chosen.
"Come Out of the Kitchen" rake the cake. Play tryouts-
more excitement. Rehearsalsi care-%orn expressions-hys-
terics, tears and more te ir;. April i ir:4, i tA l date. Pl.a
a great success. Smile.
Scene 4.-Continued (minnmoion Junior-Senior Banquet.
Baccalaurate Sermon. Cla;: Niaht. Examinations (tleeing
glimpses of Seniors). Commencement radiant facesi. Al
umni Banquet.
(.,ltnll.


General View of Ane Hoppital; Commissary in foreground.








THE ZONIAN.


A LEGEND.


Patricia i
Chaos and destruction reigned in the doomed
city of Panama. Only one of the stately homes
was spared-that of the murdered Don Juan de
Sanuigo, which was occupied by the conqueror,
Henry M..i-a:in. The one incident which marred
his triumph was the failure of his followers to
discover the hiding place of the immense treasure
of the ancient house of Sanuigo.
Dolores, the daughter of the Spanish nobleman,
alone knew the secret, but she refused to reveal
it. They brought her before \1 I'g.i and his
most trusted lieutenant, a young Englishman
named William Abbington. She inclined her head
slightly as she approached them, her beautiful face
haughty and impassive.
"M, guest seems to forget that I have thrice
before sent him my answer to his command."
"Nay, but I would not be harsh with you. As
soon as you have told me where the gold is hidden,
you may return to Spain."
"And allow the priceless treasures of my house
ta fall into the hands of the British dogs! You,
the murderer of my father, insult me by suggest-
ing such treachery!"
"You scorn my offer! Then you shall rot in a
dungeon!"
Her eyes flashing and her body li ii 1, she re-
plied: "Better to rot in my father's halls than tj
leave them forever disgraced!" She swept from
the room.
When she was gone, \..r 11 turned to William
Abbieir..n. "Have her confined without food or
water, but visit her every day to see if she is will-
ing to reveal the secret."


"Surely, you do not mean to carry out your
cruel threat!" exclaimed the horrified lieutenant.
"It is true that our Majesty is zealous in defiance
of the Spaniards, hut imprisoning and murdering
ladies is preposterous to think of!"
"Silence! If you do not obey my commands, I
am capable of taking as drastic measures with
Vou."
Abbington was stunned by his leader's merci-
less pursuance of his sole object-gold. A wild
plan presented itself to him. He would no longer
serve the despotic leader whom he detested for
his cruelties and for whom he had no respect.
The English ships lay in the harbor, one of which
he commanded. They would escape, he and Do-
lores, to safety. If they could only leave the city
without being detected, all would be well.
He arranged everything for their departure
that night, for Dolores was to be conducted to
her cell the next morning. They hurried toward
the small boat waiting for them at the shore.
Suddenly, a figure loomed out of the darkness-
Morgan, prowling about the destroyed city and
gloating over its ruin!
"William Abbington, to-night two prisoners will
be left in the dungeon to perish instead of one."
They were hurried to the prison and descended
the long qilr of stone steps. Grotesque shadows
leaped on the wall and the drawn, white faces
of the condemned prisoners looked unearthly in
the red glare of the torches. The slimy cell into
which they were thrust was illuminated for an
instant, and then the chill, black darkness swal-
lowed them alive.







THE ZONIAN.


THE FUl'NTAIN OF YOliTH.
Hattie Belle Rader, '26.


O Dreamers of the world, come gather in Old Panama. Lis-
ten to the tales of this ruined shrine of romance, revel in the
spirit of adventure, come back over the years, side by side,
hand in hand, with the ghosts of yesterday, and listen to their
melancholy voices, speaking in the tropic night, echoing near
and far, lost in the swish of the waves, whispering to the
shadows in the swaying trees-list' to the ghosts of yesterday.
About half a century ago, in Panama, there
lived a grand old Spanish family of reputed name,
Valdes. Health, wealth, and happiness were
theirs. Don Ramon, lost in the maze of research
work; Carmen, his wife, beautiful and gr.ci,,us;
Jose, just entering upon stalwart, youngmanhood;
Carlos, quiet and studious, and Mariquita, the
baby, vivacious and joyful.
Jose, proud of his daring .pirir, the gift of his
Spanish forefathers, excelled in all of the sports
of the day. His was the skill of youth, ever ven-
turing into forbidden waters. But like all for-
bidden things, Jose bounded once too often from
the bow of his canoe and found a watery grave
in the alligator-ridden depths of the Chagres.
Don Ramon found the shock too much even
for him to bear. Continued reflections upon the
tragic death of Jose, at the very threshold of man-
hood, caused him to be possessed of the idea that
Jos6 would live again.
The Valdes family, lost in their grief, dropped
out of their former gay life and became melan-
choly wrecks of their bright, cheerful selves.
Don Ramon, in his great sorrow, soon showed
the signs of an unbalanced mind, and two years
later the world discovered that the once lauded
man was a fanatic and a lunatic.
Don Ramon, his madness increasing each day,
lived in a hazy world of his own. He was sure of
one thing, and that became his sole purpose in
living. Jos6 was not dead, for his soul was Ra-
mon's soul. Ramon must find the magical Foun-
tain of Youth and grow young like Jos6, before
Jose could return. Firm in this conviction, Ra-
mon's mind ci njiur.d all kinds of visions in which
the famous Ponce de Leon appeared to him and
directed his actions.
These supposed visions, forever preying upon
his mind, caused him to forfeit his entire estate


in a vain search for the Fountain of Youth. He
was besieged upon all sides by grafters %with wild
schemes, who sought to take advantage of his
madness.
At last the Valdes family, poverty stricken and
helpless, were forced to move into an uld, deserted
native hut near the well-know~n tow.er of Old
Panama, relic of a once prosperous city, where
Don Ramon declared Ponce de Leon had in-
structed him to search for the Fountain of Youth.
There the family lived for four years in dirt
and squalor. Carlos was a young man and Mari-
quita an old-womanish, withered blossom of a
child. Carmen, in these dank surroundings, lost
her bloom and beauty, and became ugly.
Don Ramon had never given up the search for
the Fountain of Youth. One night he had a mar-
velous vision in which Ponce de Leon led him
through the woods and whispered to him a great
secret-the blood of a maiden or a \outh mnust
mingle with the soil about this rock ind thereupon
the Fountain of Youth would gush, pure and
sweet, to him who called, and all those who drank
thereof would have eternal youth.
Don Ramon, 'r,,,ding over this, suddenly
chanced upon an evil scheme. In his madness,
all paternal love had left him. Tricking Carlus
one night near the rock, he stunned him with a
huge stone, sprinkled the blood of \ utrh over the
rough ground and buried the body (if his faithful
son beneath the rock. For days D In Rnami-n sat
with patient expectations by the altar fhi his hope,
but no Fountain of Youth gushed forth to crown
his tireless efforts.
Carmen, broken beneath the too heavy burden
of her unhappiness, at last knew the peace of that
happier land beyond the conception of man.
M.lriquira buried her poor mother under the cold
sod at the side of the gloomy hut, with neither
casket nor ceremony. There were but two
mourners, a withered, bent child, and a white-
haired, chuckling old man.
Don Ramon, chagrined at his failure, conceived
the idea that the rock needed more sacrifice to


G


j-Y








THE ZONIAN.


make it magical, and so with fiendish craftiness
prepared for the death of his only one, \1.,inluta.
The night was very gloomy and dark. The
moon shone blood red in the heavens and gave
off no light, the waves, lapping upon the shore,
sang a melancholy lullaby, and the leaves in their
chanting foretold the coming of evil. Don
Ramon, at the height of his madness, pursued his
screaming daughter through the woods straight
to the rock. Mariquita, horrified, pleaded for
mercy in vain.


The Fountain of Youth gushed clear and cool
from that rock, and Don Ramon drank deeply,
deeply, deeply, and through the woods that night
a young man walked.
JosC had returned.


Dreamers, hear the whispering of the trees, the soft patter
of youth's footsteps on the paths of life. Come back through
the mistv clouds, over the trails of the years, come back, side
by side, hand in hand, and list' to the ghosts of yesterday, w h
seek for the Foutain of Youth.


A TRIP TO THE VILLAGE OF ARAJAN.
11. Brown, '24.


Six o'clock Friday morning, the eighteenth of
April, found a happy, enthusiastic company of us
bound for pier 18. In our company were: Mary
Joe Lowe, Alberta Powers, Frances Brown, Mattie-
lee Brown, .Mr,. George Lowe, Philip Thornton,
Marvin Banton, Alton White, and Douglas Cross.
That we had seven miles of hot, dusty and stony
trail to cover before we reached our destination,
bothered us little. The morning air was delight-
ful; we had eaten and drank our fill before leaving;
we were comfortable.
We crossed the Canal in two rowboats, and then
began our (we didn't realize how very I ... I hike
to the native village, Arajan. For the first three
miles conversation flowed easily, with frequent
bursts of laughter; but soon both became more
infrequent. The sun's presence was now felt.
The trail was getting steeper.
Soon we came to a native hut where we stopped
to fill our canteens, and to rest. The Spanish
woman there was very pleasant, and even pro-
duced a mirror that thegirls might "brighten up"-
all their energy had not gone yet. She also served
papaya, which we devoured in little time. Then
we resumed our hike.
A._,:iii conversation brightened, but soon only
puffs and "whews" and "ohs" were heard as we
trudged on, the sun's rays 'I... in' upon us. It
began to seem as though we'd traveled fifty miles,
and with each curve we prayed that when it was
rounded, Arajan, cooling and ..F h. lli' ,, would lie
before us. I say cooling and refreshing, for vou


see, we hadn't been there before and had had a
beautiful picture of a stream, overhung by moss-
covered trees and all -you know, the regular trop-
ical scene.
Presently however, we knew better. Arajan
lay before us, and as we could not have gone a
step farther, we sank down on the grass under some
trees and lay there until we were rested to get up
and hunt the stream.
We found it, or rather the watering place of the
village. But what a disappointment! It consisted
of a little pui.l.lb. of water about twelve inches in
circumference, and about as deep, surrounded by
rocks from which slowly trickled the water. We
had had a vision of dipping our poor tired feet in
the cooling water, but now we saw that we were
lucky to have something to drink.
No need to mention that we were starved.
That is a mild expression compared to the condi-
tion we were in. So we sat down in the shady
place and soon made short work of the lunches
prepared 1,\ the girls.
One of the girls, sad to say, had worn her shoes
out on the trip, so we went on a shopping tour up
in the ill where rope-soled shoes were pur-
chased for the --of' riu I one. The rest of the dax
was spent in exploring and resting by turns.
Time soon came for us to, be on our way. The
boys went up to the village to round up some
horses. They were able to get only five, and as
their owners would not let us ride double, the
boys had to walk.


S








THE ZONIAN.


Three of the girls had never ridden before, and
it was rather amusing at the beginning of the
trip. Later on, we were in for some real excite-
ment, however. Two of the horses had bad dis-
pistii.,n., but nothing was thiouht of it until the
got together in a little clearing where a free-for-all
began. Their riders, one of the girls and the chap-
eron, were both thrown headlong upon the ground,
the girl also rcciivinii a kick from one of the
horses. After the horses were caught and their
riders deposited on the grass in more comfortable
positions, we all sat down to get our nerves ti-
gethTer.



THE LEGEND OF S.A
Mary F...,.-



Even the most practical of people are apt to
go romancing when they look upon those fa.t
decaying walls of the buildings that composed
that once great city of Old Panama.
In our imagination we are able to see that beau-
tiful, famous city as it once stood, before the com-
ing of that notorious English buccaneer, Sir Henr%
Morgan-the Alexandria of the Americas, with its
tall church spires and palatial homes. Now, I am
going to tell you the Legend of San Agustin Cath -
dral; it has been told by father to son for nearly
four hundred years.
In the year 1671, San Agustin Cathedral was the
largest church in Old Panama. In its belfry, the
ruins of which you can still see, was a bell that
could be heard all over the city, and in all the out-
lying districts. With the first ruddy rays of the
sun in the morning and the last copper ray in the
c\veling, the angelus could be heard, like the voice
of a padre giving blessing to the whole city.
One evening the padres were walking to and fr.-,
in pairs, outlined against the rich gold and fainr
opal tints of the sky, repeating their prayers a,
was their custom. The air was sweet with th,:
tropical odors of rose, jasmine, and ginger lilh,
because there were many beautiful flowers in the
grounds that surrounded the Cathedral. Slowi
the sun sank, changing the blue Pacific into a
shimmering mass of shining metal. The sun, like
a fire ball, shone red, half hidden by the purple
veiled mountains in the distance. The first lone


Bur hav ing little time to ~aste, we mounted our
"steeds" again and tor k up the trail, which by the
%a\, was nirit -~, clear no~ as it was getting quite
dark. lhe stars eariae out, and the night prom-
ised rn be a beaurifli m,.irtnlight one. Soon the
liIhthouse amen in eight and then the Canal.
Our bLairs hadl I1,cn left high and dry by the
rxccdirn tid., and nfrer getting them into the
water \i'th nil little teffrt, %e started across the
Canal. \\' longed lfor "home sneet home," and
lost no time in Lctring thire. But %e all look back
iith pleaure t-i fur fir .t-and some vow their
lat --trip tfr thr native village of Arajan.



A(,LiS [IN CAV'IHF DRAIL.
"z"



pleadinil g cry of the riihr third \as heard, and the
\na\ rlct struck the sh.re- \itrh a s,,ft lapping
sound; all %\as silent as the da\ closed.
Padre Dicgo ,rgnaled to Padre Pedro, whosee
dut\ it \.is r( rinu the anyclu because he .as the
\voulresrt. Padre Pedri Jli imhcd the I oden steps,
w)orn s mirth h\ mana, feet that had climbed it


fi the same purp.Jsc. At the toip he paused to view
the s~ c ne \ Iu and I woituld hrave dinerthcn he rang
the bell si, lioni clear t.-. lls t he sun sank behind
th," mi Uiintain Ica\ ing the sk\ aflame behind it.
\hat \:as that-s., tar off that it et resembled
a might cara :an of ants coming on the highway
fIr the other side of the Isthrmu2 Why such a
laire truop coming unheralded? Morgan! Like
lightning the th.,ught struck Padre Pedro. Mor-
gan and his pirate band cimiing to plunder and
devastate that wealthv city. For months the


-,'.








THE ZONIAN.


people had heard that Morgan was coming, but
instead of preparing to fight him they had left
their protection in the hands of the padres who
chanted mass every morning for the safety of their
beloved city. Now they were coming. Pedro was
terrified. Instantly he started to ring the '..II
with all his might. The loud clangs of the bell
seemed to be crying, "Flee for your lives! Flee
for your lives!"
Some padre from within the chapel below called
to find out the cause of this ringing of the bell.
All that Padre Pedro was able to answer was, "Warn
the people to flee for their lives! Morgan comes!"
The city became panic stricken; people seemed
mad; they rushed hither and thither, burying
their wealth in holes or hollow places. "till the
bell rang to warn those farther away from the city.
People started to burn those things which they
were unable to take with them rather than let
them fall into ri.rgain's hands. Somehow the
Cathedral started to burn, the origin of the fire
was one of the many mysteries that occur when
people are terrified. From that minute on the
padres were so ne..c_ .1 in trying to save the beau-
tiful things of the church, that they almost forgot
Padre Pedro. Still the bell rang.


When Abad Diego realized that Padre Pedro
must still be ringing the bell, quickly he ran to
the foot of the stair case. The heat in the Chapel
was intense; the vast altar and part of the floor
were burning.
Gasping for breath Diego called, "Padre!
Padre! Padre! the Cathedral burns, come quickly
or the steps will be burning and you will be unable
to leave the building."
"Flee! Save yourself. There are those who
yet must be warned; to warn them is my duty,"
came faintly to the straining ears of Diego. The
flames were scorching his robes and the heat was
SiH .'.ia rj ; blindly Diego staggered to the open
door, turning again he saw a long flame like some
tongue of Satan reach out and encircle the stair
case. Still the bell rang. He staggered into the
patio and looked once again at the building. Out
of every opening shot long flames, but still the
bell rang. The walls started to crumble. The
bell gave one long peal, as though to say good-
bye. In that tone there seemed to be the satis-
faction of one who has done his duty.
A crash. The stair case and part of the belfry
had fallen, and the bell was silent.


lIII. i-iL.NI \l\i i[ l I I11 A.NM) Bi. -\L Il.
1 ,' > ,' ,1. _


(IDIO


In a small hovel in old E.'". !'s slum lived a
very queer old man. He was dwarflike, and his
thin, white beard hung halfway down his chest.
His hair was thin, but curly, and clung about his
stooped shoulders. Out of his ancient face gleamed
two little blue eyes. His nose was slightly hooked
and his teeth were pearly white and probably
false. He wore a tunic of thick material of a dull
crimson, and about his neck he wore a charm.
Anyone who had touched this charm had great
chills of horror, and no wonder, for the thing re-
sembled a human eye. It looked as if it were made
of glass or china but on feeling it, you had the
feeling of touching a peeled grape.
His den was gloomy and at night was lighted by
a single candle which cast a queer, uncertain shad-
ow about the room. The furniture consisted of a
chair, on which he never sat, which was beautifully
MR 91031-3


carved and resembled a throne. It was covered
with cobwebs and several families of mice found
the lining of the richly embroidered cushions very
comfortable. There was also a straight chair
which he always used, on old table, and a large
chest which seemed to match the throne-like
chair. If you took a peep into this chest you
would see colored bottles filled with queer sub-
stances, small boxes, which might hold almost
anything, mysterious leather books, old papers,
and a certain amount of cobwebs, dust and spiders.
This old man, though queer, was not harmful
and would not hurt a fly, but he had a very hasty
temper. It made him hideously angry when any-
one doubted his word.
One day an elderly gentleman came into his
doorway. With a frown he glanced around the
room. The old man hastily arose and offered him









THE ZONIAN.


the chair. The English gentleman pulled out a
large handkerchief and with another frown,
dusted off imaginary dust-for the chair was al-
ready quite clean-lifted up his coat-tails and
sat down. After surveying the room for a minute
or two, during which an :ingr1 shadow crossed the
old man's face, he spoke.
"Mr. A-er- "
"Doctor Heffe," prompted the old man.
"Ah, Doctor Heffe, I have come on a matter of
some importance." He paused as if the old man
were not capable of understanding too much at
one time.
"I have heard from various sources that you are
somewhat of a-er-well, magician. Is this true?"
"It is," answered Doctor Heffe.
"I have heard," continued the gentleman, "I
have heard also that you claim to be able to re-
store youth. Is that true also?"
There seemed a slight sarcasm in his voice. The
old man leaned nervously against the table; he
was plainly angered.
"It is," he said. He fingered the charm around
his neck.
"Could you be so kind as to tell me how? If
that is possible?" The sarcasm had gone out of
his voice and he talked in sugary tones.
"'-Wll," said the old man bitterly, "Yes, I
could. I have never told anyone the secret but
I am getting very old now and I do not, by any


An Isthuian Pighway.
means, want my youth again. First, you must
have a great many people, for it is great trouble
to go through the process for only a few."
"Oh, certainly," replied the gentleman, who had
become interested and had put his gloves on the
table without giving it first a thorough dusting
with his big handkerchief, "Yes, indeed! I know
I can get many people."
"Very well. Day after to-morrow morning be
outside the city gates at the east side about one
hour after sunrise."


"Thank you, Doctor Heffe, very much!" his eyes
lighted, then he sneered: "But see here! If there
is any humbug to this- !" he grabbed the old
man's tunic near the throat-his hand touched
the charm; he started back with horror in his
eyes. With trembling hands he picked up his
hat and gloves and with a muttered "good-day,"
he hurried out of the gloomy room.
When he was out in the street again he took a
deep breath.
"M'~ word! Whatan ierd place." He shivered.
He then remembered that he had dropped his
handkerchief in there, but he quickly entered
the coach which was waiting for him.
The news was spread all over the city the next
day and the people, middle-aged and old, were
frantically inquiring about the ne" scheme.
The next morning, an hour after sunrise, six
hundred eager people were gathered outside the
city gates waiting for the old magician. \\hen he
came, there came behind him six hundred gray
donkeys with blue bridles and saddles. Doctor
Heffe rode a small, nimble donkey ith a crimson
bridle and saddle.
The people wondered but did as they were bid
and silently mounted the donke) s. They rode for
many hours without stopping to eat or drink.
When it was almost sundown and the people, being
old and not used to riding donke. s, ab hed in every
bone, they came to a large mountain. On one side,
much secluded by large bowlders and shrubbery,
was a dark tunnel.
He bade them follow him. The tunnel "as in
pitch darkness and the people became frightened
and begged to go back. The old man unly an-
swered that he knew perfectly what he "as doing.
Suddenly they saw a light ahead. "It is the
daylight," they cried. Indeed it was the bright
sunshine.
"But," they exclaimed, "it was dusk %hen "e
entered the tunnel!"
"Yes," he answered them, "You are now in the
land of Youth and Beauty."
They found themselves in a most magnificent
garden. The paths were paved with rosy shells.
Graceful lilies, fragrant roses, and flowers of every
kind and color bloomed. There %were many foun-
tainsin which goldfish swam about. In the shady,
lacy trees birds of paradise and gorgeously colored
parrots screamed and scolded. Many of the trees
drouied down; they were so heavily laden with








THE ZONIAN.


lucious fruits. It never rained in this wonderful
garden but always the grass was green and a cool
breeze fanned the air. Though the people wander-
ed far into the garden they found no end.
"We are in a beautiful garden, most certainly,
but we are too old and tired to enjoy it. Where
is the Fountain of Youth?" asked one old man of
Doctor Heffe.
"Come with me," he said. He lead them to a
beautiful spot, the most wonderful in all the gar-
den. There the birds sang the sweetest, the .l A,. r s
bloomed the fullest and the trees bore the ripest
fruits. In the center of this spot was a delicately
carved marble fountain. But no trickling water
issued from it.
The people exclaimed, "The Fountain of Youth
and Beauty has dried up!" They looked sorrow-
fully and disappointedly at old Doctor Heffe.
"No, my people, I have here in my hand a jug
which contains the last of a substance that, with
the aid of you all, vill bring back the youthful
water."
"At sun-up every morning each one of you must
put into the crystal Fountain the oil in the skin
of half an orange, the oil of seven yellow rose
petals, and the sweet of three honeysuckles. Do
you understand? If you fail to do this the foun-
tain will gradually dry up and the Fountain of
Youth and Beauty will be banished from this
world. To keep your youth you must bathe your
faces every morning at sunrise. Do you all hear
me? This is the last," he cried, with his eyes on
the excited people, "This is the very last of the
priceless substance."
He then walked over to the quiet fountain and
from the jug which he held, spilled all of the con-
tents into the fountain. Immediately the bowl
of the Fountain became full and there rose a thin
stream of water in the air. It chuckled and gurgled
merrily as if glad to be out of the jug.
M\lan. days passed. The people became young
and gay again. All day they laughed and played
in the garden. They spent their time playing
games or sleeping sweetly in the warm sun and
to gathering fruits and playing lovely music. But
alas! They became too carefree and too happy
and often complained about their duty to the


fountain. When Doctor Heffe left them he told
them not to forget, and they did not for a time
until one day a rosy youth, who had once been a
yellow, shriveled, old man, said to his gay compan-
ions, "Friends, I see no reason why we should do
this tiresome thing every day and every day, do
you?" The merry young people I .i I. and
clapped their hands and shouted, "Neither do we!
Neither do we!"
"Of course," continued the youth, "we will put
some of the stuff in but will the fountain know
if we put just a certain amount in or not?"
They all laughed.
The next day :ir.ll half of the people put in
their portion. It was also that way the following
day and the next. One day a beautiful girl with
a skin the color of milk cried, "I do believe the
water in the Fountain is getting less and less!"
They told her that she had perhaps drunk too
much of the rich grape wine and laughed her fears
away.
But day by day the water in the fountain grew
less. Everyone then began to notice it but try as
they might, by putting more preparation in its
bowl it did not rise.
Every morning they bathed their faces in its
cool depths. It sent a tingling feeling through the
body and flushed the cheeks. One bright sunny
morning everyone arose with the sun and went to
bathe his face. To the perfect horror and amaze-
ment of the youths and maidens the fountain was
absolutely dry. They wailed and mourned and
wrung their hands but to no effect. About mid-
day the magician came to them. By then their
faces were worn and L.i-1'.ir l and had lost their
youthful tint, and their bones ached. They came
weepingly to him.
But he only said, "As I th ..lit. You were not
worthy. You would not do a little thing, so small
a sacrifice for so great a reward. I am sorry, but
there is nothing that I can do. The Fountain of
Youth and Beauty is banished from this earth!"
They looked at one another and cried in dismay.
They were old and shriveled once again. As they
looked about them they found themselves at the
other side of the mountain and the gray donkeys
were impatiently waiting.
















I


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I-








THE ZONIAN.


WOODCRAFT WISDOM.
Panor.;m.l.


After having studied the subject of camping for
some time, gaining practical experience by sleep-
ing with all the windows open and wasting several
days camping in a pup tent, I have acquired suf-
ficient knowledge to define the following terms:
Camping.-An old Arabian word meaning time
of trouble.
Camp.-The place where one hooks the biggest
fish (but the fish always escape). "Growing fish"
are also found here. They grow larger at every
telling.
Site.-This word means the place of n:iniiIg,
not how it looks after being used a week.
Canteen.-A metal container with a large hole
in top to put the water in, and a small hole in the
bottom where it always leaks out. It is generally
full while being carried, but has leaked empty
when a drink is wanted.
Blankets.-Made in two sizes-too large and
too small. They should not be shrinkable, for if
one is caught in the rain overnight it is hard to
find them in the morning.
Poison Ivy.-A vine cruelly resembling straw-
berry vines. To tell the difference one should rub
the suspected leaves on the arms. If blisters
come, its ivy. Caution: Never eat ivy, as blisters
inside are incurable.
Skunk.-A treacherous animal whose resem-
blance to a cat sometimes causes embarrassing
circumstances too sad to mention.
Grub.- -W\hoi .:,mpiiu, this word refers to food
and not to a garden pest.
Coffee.-A mixture about the color of mud,
which, if made that way at home, would be
thrown in the sink, but which on a camping trip
is hurriedly gulped down and c.i, . .ld-a la Coue.


Pancakes.-A common rubbery food, burned
brown on one side and left white on the other.
It is sometimes used for washcloths and some-
times for putting out the fire.
Potatoes.-Called "spuds." Not good to eat
but useful in case of attack by lions. Should not
be carried in a canoe, as canoes are likely to sink.
Watch.-Called "turnip." It is often tied to
articles to hold them down during a wind storm.
To tell time in the dark, one should count the
ticks until morning and then subtract from the
number of ticks in twelve hours.
Fire .... ;..-A combination of two blocks of
wood, a bow, and a spindle. If these implements
are in proper order and the bow is sawed back and
forth long enough to some rollicking tune, it is
supposed to take fire. If a little smoke appears,
one need not be alarmed. Nothing will happen,
and after an hour or so the worker will be so hot
he doesn't need a fire.
IVeapons.-(a)-Knife.-Care should be taken
to close the blade before returning it to the pocket.
(b)-- .S", Shot.-Good for mosquito hunting.
Pup Tent.-Very fine-for pups.
Compass.-A box with a needle hung in it
which usually points north; however, it should be
used with discretion.
Sense of Humor.-A quality of the mind which
makes one say when he comes back, "I've had a
whale of a time! Never better! I'm going again
next year."
I hope if you have been patient enough to read
this through you will have gained a better know-
ledge of camping, but remember always-"Ex-
perience is the best teacher."


U. S. Battleship in Gatuu Lecks.


1s


Ns
hg:








THE ZONIAN.


I.A .AVFNID.A CENTRAL.
L., 'ir n -"i i, '3 .


Lights and a blazing glare of colored costumes
were her first impressions of La Avenida Central
as her car swung out of Calle "J" and joined the
others in the Carnival procession. Carnivalmeant
nothing to her; she was just one of the many trav-
elers p.assinr through Panama on her way to
South America. Despite this, however, she could
not help but feel a tinge of excitement as she
watched the ga.. spectacle. On either side of the
street were noisy, dashing, dazzling people; some
were throwing confetti and others that vile-smell-
ing liquid which made its victims scream in pain.
Others ran along the sidewalk singing and bump-
ing into one person and then another. There
were people of every description and color, they
were speaking different tongues, motioning after
the manner of their nationality, and gayly flirting
back and forth, from the half-clad natives to
the richly dressed Hindus.
Her car seemed to poke along; her chauffeur
swore softly under his breath as he narrowly
missed hitting the small native boys who ran into
the street to pick up fallen confetti. She thought
of her life as she rode along; it had been strange;
her people had died when she was only a child,
and since then she had spent her life spending
her father's immense fortune, traveling from one
place to another, meeting many people but never
making friends. Her name, Martita Cabrie, was
known from one end of Europe to the other. Had
not her father been the richest man of France for
half a century and her mother the most notorious
woman? Yes, and those two facts made her
travel, never staying in one place long enough to
be pitied. She did not want pity, she wanted love
and companionship. She was young, scarcely
over twenty-four, and beautiful, and yet she was
terribly uinhhapp'y.
The car turned into Central Plaza and Martita
gave an order to park in some convenient place
where she could watch the crowds parade around
the plaza. Then she picked up a small, black
mask and put it on. She knew no one knew her
and yet masks were mysterious and she loved
mystery. Her dress was the dress of Spain: the


black lace mantilla; and with her black hair and
eyes and full red lips it suited her perfectly.
Perhaps an hour went by before Martita grew
tired of watchingg Then as she was considering
leaving, she noticed a tall figure come out of the
Hotel Central, not twenty feet aw ay, and pause a
minute on the pavement. He was dressed in a
grey tweed suit, with a small felt hat of grey also.
The familiar stoop of his big shoulders convinced
her that he was Barry Craven, the American, a
wanderer like herself, and she hastened tn com-
mand Henry the chauffeur to go for him instantly.
In a minute he was beside her, shaking her hand
and telling her enthusiastically.
"IM), it is good to see you, Martita, in this part
of the world. Take off your mask, I hardly know
you!"
Removing her mask she replied, her voice shak-
ing slightly:
"And it is good to see you, Barry. I am on my
way to Peru. Tell me, where are you going?
And do you realize it has been six months since
we dined at the Ritz-Carlton? Time simply flies."
He took off his hat and settled back to have a
longtalk. His hairwasblackand thick,a little gray
over the temples, Martita noticed, but he was still
the same Barry Craven, whom she had met almost
five years ago on a hunting trip in South Africa.
He was nine years her senior but a man of the
world, an attractive, interesting man also. Every
once in awhile in her travels she would meet him,
and they would talk and sight-sec together, w hile
her traveling companion would rest, and Martita
always missed him when they parted.
"Martita," he continued, "I have been talking to
an old man in that hotel, and he told me that no
one could count the number of people that have
met on the Avenida Central. He told me of the
hundreds of persons who walk or ride up that
avenida, from all parts of the world, and of the
tragedies and comedies that have happened on
La Avenida. I hardly believed him, and yet I
run into you the minute I step out on to it! You,
whom I have thought of much in the last months,
and I have missed you, too, little Martita."


- ---- -- = -- -


gjg-= = =,,,,, , ^^,,,^^^^;^;.,--- .,....,.,.,...,.,.......,.,..-- ..-- .,.,.,.,.,,;;,;, ,;;;; .


.,-----








THE ZONIAN.


The lights of the city turned on; there is no
twilight in Panama. Martita gazed around; the
crowd seemed tired and yet it was a bizarre back-
ground. The lights and colors dazed her for a
minute, and she looked back into the cool, grey
eyes of the man and said:
"I have missed you, too, Barry. I'm so tired
of this wandering life!"
He took her small hand into his own and leaned
just a trifle forward.


"For five years I have missed something in my
life, something imoi. rt.ar, and it is only now that
I realize what it is. It is you, my Martita! I
love you! Let us marry and leave this life for one
that is better, happier-a home!"
In later years, as they look back, the words they
said, the clothes they wore, and their impressions,
perhaps, will all be forgotten, but the place, La
Avenida Central, will always be remembered.


THE TWO PEARLS.
Hlorace Foster, '2.?.


The two men walked slowly down the road,
apparently forgetful of all humanity other than
themselves. A more ill-matched pair could scarce-
ly have been found, one of them being tall and
wasted-looking, as th..u'lh a disease was marking
his life. He seemed, however, to have a clear and
honest face, and a glance into his eyes would have
confirmed the tlhl..llt. while the other, older and
crafty-looking, had nothing sincere in his make-up.
Him I knew to be a crook with quite a local repu-
tation. As they passed, one of a group of street
lun.' ._, remarked: "There goes Drake with his
new partner, MacPherson."
The two went straight to the waterfront and
entered a boat. As it was small and unfitted for
deep-water sailing there was but one possible ex-
planation of their journey, and that was to search
for pearls.
This place, l.'. *%, once had a great reputation
along that line, but of late the pearls were neither
numerous nor large, so the trade had fallen away.
A few moments later they were joined by a
barrel-chested, lithe-limbed native. It was then
that I was positive of their intentions and felt
nothing but pity for the ,niii~-.,l .1 youngster who
was placing his life in such danger, as Drake would
kill if need be.
MacPherson was all enthusiasm and talked a
great deal of his life. "You know if we find any
pearls it means life to me," he said. "The doctor
told me a few years in Colorado would entirely
cure me, and you don't know the life I've been
leading, avoided by people, looked upon by others
with loathing, and hi.uin.i, 'Let him alone, he


has consumption,' until it has nearly driven me
crazy." He broke down and cried until he had
recovered himself sufficiently to help manage the
sails.
All day long the diver brought up oysters which
were eagerly opened and carefully examined. A
few poor pearls were the result, hardly enough to
pay for the trouble and labor, but MacPherson
was undaunted.
The same story continued day after day, until
even he became at last a mere walking automaton,
dreaming of his future. It is true they had found
one pearl of commercial value, but it was not suf-
ficient for them both, so the hope of finding its
mate drove them onward. If they were lucky
enough to find its mate, both would be rich, and
MacPherson hated to admit defeat.
Late one afternoon, the knife was busily tearing
open the oysters, when the perfect match for their
own appeared, almost as a gift from Heaven, so
suddenly was it laid before their eyes. That night
they sat up late, and talked, one with a gleam
of avarice in his eyes, the other with a far-away
expression.
Each of them, they decided, would keep a pearl,
and when they were sold, MacPhersons' share
would keep him at a sanitarium long enough to
regain his health.
The next day both were due for a sad disap-
pointment. One of the pearls was not the same
size as the other, which necessitated their being
sold separately, and materially lowered their
value. The money that would be received would


~j~-~








THE ZONIAN.


not serve to keep MacPherson in a doctor's care
long enough to allow him to recover, and the old
careworn expression returned.
That night he slept heavily on his mattress
and did not hear the stealthy steps of Drake as
he approached. Taking his own pearl from his
purse, Drake slipped it into his tattered and work-
worn clothes. The side pocket being the most
accessible it was there it reposed, along with the
one which he slipped from the money belt of his
partner. This act performed, he stood motionless
for a second watching MacPherson warily to de-
tect any signs of consciousness. Seeing none, he
turned, and quickly left the room.
\\'hen MacPherson awoke a few hours later he
was surprised to find both the pearls lying beside
his bed. Placing them in his belt, he sallied forth
to inquire as to the whereabouts of Drake, and


was told that he had left on the steamer San Nlark
a few hours before.
After the theft, Drake had boarded the San
Mark, paid his passage to another island, glowing
with the satisfaction of having successfully com-
pleted the robbery. As the boat moved away
from the dock he put his hand in his pocket, and
a blank expression came over his face. Good God!
There was a hole in his pocket! Raving and curs-
ing, his demands to be put ashore met only with
ridicule. The pearls were lost to him forever.
A few years later MlacPhtrson sat by the fireside
with his wife, his face glowing with the tinge ot
perfect health, and spoke in a reverent tone, his
eyes filling with tears. "He gave me my chance,
and, sacrificing all he had, left me the pearls
which changed my life. My partner, the squarest
man I ever knew."


THE ANSWER.
Evelyn C. Silverman, '25.


Once upon a time there were three brothers who
dwelt together in peace. But the mayor of their
city was a very cruel man, and he put upon the
citizens severe punishments. At last the brothers
decided to go to another city where one might
enjoy more freedom.
Now they heard of the city of Maline, and they
thought they would go there. In order to become
a citizen of this town one had to go to the market
square and be questioned by the Council of Wise
Men. If the person showed that he had a good
character and a little common sense, he was ad-
mitted.
On the weary journey to the town, the oldest
brother remarked, "I know I shall be admitted,
for I am the oldest and wisest of us all."
"I know I shall get in, for I can solve any riddle
that is put before me," boasted the second brother.
Only the third one remained silent.
Finally they reached the city. They were met
by the \\1ic Men, and told that they had two
days in which to prepare themselves for the test.
The two brothers continued to boast of their wis-
dom, but the youngest brother thought much and
said little.
At last the day came. All the townspeople
gathered in front of the market square to hear the
test put before the strangers. The Wise Men ad-


dressed the three brothers, and told them that the
one who answered the riddle correctly would re-
ceive as a reward the hand of the most beautiful
maiden in the city. Again the two brothers fell
to boasting, but as before, the third one remained
silent.
The oldest brother came before the \ise Nlen.
"Tell us," they said, "if it takes five boys an
hour and a half to play a game of basket ball, how
many pancakes will it take to shingle a box car?"
The young man began to utter incoherent
streams of mathematical calculations, but he was
soon rejected.
The second brother although confident of vic-
tory, met the same defeat.
At last the younger brother approached the
Wise Men timidly. When the question was put
before him, he did not answer. "I will think
twice before I speak once," thought he.
When the Wise Men sawthat he was silent,
they were glad, and said, "You have answered the
question by being silent, for there is no solution
to the problem."
Many days later the young man married the
beautiful belle of the city. Out of kindness to
the youngest brother, the other two were allowed
to remain.
Moral.-Think twice before you speak once.










THE ZONIAN.


Aspinwall Statue, Hotel Waahiington Gardens.


CAN YOU IMAGINE?


Marvin Banton forgetting to get the last word?
Anyone getting Ioo in a Physics test?
Leon Weiss with golden locks?
\ IrL ... Robinson forgetting to flirt for one minute?
Alton White in charge of an assemble?
Any girl with newly bobbed hair keeping her fingers out ofit?
Horace Foster learnedly explaining to the Physics class some-
thing they don't know and he does?
Mr. Boss getting a sho:k from an electric switch?
Rena De Young with straight red hair skinned back from
her face ?
Therressa Betz using lip-stick and rouge?
Carol Rigby admitting there's one book she hasn't read and
doesn't know all about?
Dorothy Eastman getting an "E" because of her wonderful
h ndwriting?
Behe Norfleet with hair frizzle,1 out like a Zulu'


Floride Edwards flirting?
Katherine Brown serious for one second?
Johnny Tatom without his Southern drawl?
Douglas Cross delivering a i 5-minute lecture on behavior in
student assembly?
Richard Engelke 6 feet 2 and slender?
Agnes McDade without a giggle?
Miss Hopkins married?
Miss Frost with bobbed hair?
Mr. Flint without Esther?
Hattie Belle Rader not talking at the rate of five words per
second?
The Vaselinos without their patent leather hair comb?
James Perry laughing?
Horace Foster getting to school on time?
Mattielee Brown not hanging around the mistletoe?


Panama Race Track.


A Native Ox cart.


1


I


Gatun Golf Course.









42


C


ONE GOOD TURN
L oy.nat


Mrs. Cottontail, who lived near a big river in
Florida, sent little Peter Cottontail fishing to
catch some fish for their supper. Peter went down
down to a high bank and fished and fished, but in
vain, for the fish just wouldn't bite. When he
was so tired that he could hardly hold the lines
anii longer, he felt a strong tug. My how Peter
pulled! He pullk I and pulled until at last a mon-
strous fish flopped on the bank almost knocking
him over.
"Oh, you great big pretty fish! You will be
enough supper for all of us." Peter was just going
to drop the fish into the bag, when he saw that
there were tears in the fish's eyes. Then wonders
of wonders! The fish spoke and said:
"Peter Cottontail, I know you and I know that
you are a good little boy. Please, oh, please don't
take me home and eat me." And he flopped over
and wept. Little Peter felt so sorry for him that
he simply couldn't take him home, supper or no
supper.
"Please, please, Peter, put me back or I'll die,"
gasped the poor fish. And Peter did.
As the fish landed in the water and swam down-
ward he said:
"I will return you kind deed some day, Peter,
until then-Good-bye."
Oh, what a scolding Peter got when he reached
home! He was put to bed without a bite, for do


DESERVES ANOTHER.
K., er, "5.


you think that Peter's mother believed his tale?
I should say not.
About a week later, Peter was sent to fish again.
This time he was a very hard-hearted Peter and
pitied no one. When he got down to the bank, he
saw a long, round log lying in the water, and he
went out on that to fish. He fished and fished
and fell asleep. After a while he awoke with a
jerk to find the alligator log away out in the river.
My, how frightened Peter was! Oh, but he was
scared! He began to scream:
"Oh, Mr. Alligator, good Mr. Alligator, nice
Mr. Alligator, please, please, take me home."
But old Mr. Alligator was so covered with mud
(that's why Peter thought him a log' that he
didn't hear him. Peter kept on crying and then
finally he heard a voice:
"N\ ait a minute, Peter, I will help you," and
Peter on looking around, saw his friend, the fish,
in the water. He had with him about a dozen
other fish all holding fins. The big fish jumped
over the alligator and knocked Peter off his back
on to the raft of fish. They took Peter home and
gave some little fish to him, for his mother. As
they swam away the big fish said:
"Good-bye, Peter, always be good and kind to
everyone." And all the fish together said:
"For one good turn deserves another."


MRS. GRAY SQUIRREL AND HER WINTER SUPPLY.
Dorothy Eastman, '25.


M rs. Gray Squirrel yawned and stretched in her
bed of soft grass at the foot of an old oak tree.
It was such a shame that she had to get up on
such a lovely morning. Mrs. Gray Squirrel had
thought this same thing, every morning during
the summer, and each morning she had stayed in
bed, comforting herself with the thought that
summer was not gone yet. There would still be
time enough to lay in her winter supply of nuts.
This morning, however, there was a chill in the
air; summer had come and gone; fall was giving
place to winter. Sadly, Mrs. Gray Squirrel shook
her head; she truly must get up.


Once she had decided that important question,
she sprang up, washed her face and hands care-
fully, and made a dainty breakfast on two hazel
nuts, all that were left from her last winters
store. As she nibbled these reflectively, she
thought again that she really must work hard and
gather some nuts that day; it was getting cold.
Going to the cupboard, which consisted of a hollow
in the base of the tree, with branches for shelves,
she took out with great care an oak-leaf bonnet,
fashioned on one of her leisure days from oak
leaves pinned together with thorns from the wild
rose bush, and decorated with a cluster of polished,


THE ZONIAN.

-- "


--








THE ZONIAN.


shining acorns. It was truly a work of art,
thought Mrs. Gray Squirrel as she tied it on,
gazing in a pool of water to see if it was tilted at
the right angle.
At last she was off for her day's work. She
skipped along merrily, feeling very gay and cheer-
ful. Shortly she same to a grove of nut trees.
Now for work, she thought. But Alas! There
was not one single nut on the ,;.'uiid; there was
not even one on the tree. Tired already, she
bravely trudged on. She spent the forenoon going
from grove to grove and finding not one nut. Mrs.
Gray Squirrel was so tired and hungry she could
hardly move. Still she hopped along, somewhat
painfully to be sure, for she had blisters on both
hind feet. At sundown she was ready to give up
and had already started to return home, when
she saw just a head of her a nut tree; as it was
protected by bushes on all sides it had not been
visited and nuts covered the ground. Joyfully
she ran forward, bruises forgotten, and gathered
and ate two or three of the largest.
Comfortably and cheerfully Mrs. Gray Squirrel
looked around her. Why it was quite dark! She
knew she really should take care of those nuts,
but, Ho! Hum! she was so tired. There was
always to-morrow, and she'd come back bright
and early. So she turned, and carrying a nut
for her supper, hopped briskly off.
When she reached home, she was so tired, she
could hardly wait to take off her precious acorn
bonnet, wash her face, and eat the choice nut she
had selected. Finally, supper finished, she con-


tentedly lIuL''l,.l1 down in her warm bed and was
fast asleep on the instant.
The sun, shining brightly in her eyes, woke her
up the next morning. Why, she thought, it must
be late. Quickly she jumped up and forgetting
her bonnet and breakfast, she ran down the path
to make sure of her winter supply.
She had scarcely gone twenty-five yards when
she met Brownie Red Squirrel with a big sack
over his shoulders. As he saw Mrs. Gray Squir-
rel, he called out, "Good morning, Mrs. Gray
Squirrel, I have had the best luck this morning!
What do you think I found?"
"I can't imagine," said Mrs. Gray Squirrel,
who was really afraid she could guess what he
had found.
"It's nuts, loads of them!" he cried c .. ;r iil,
"I found them under a tree so well protected by
bushes that no one had found them. Oh, I surely
am fortunate! Good day, lr-. Gray Squirrel, I
wish the same to you."
With a great fear that grew greater with every
step, she hurried on. Finally she came to the
place where she had found the tree; trembling
she pushed through the bushes and found her
worst fears realized. There was not a nut on the
ground. Gone was her winter's supply! There
was nothing to do but appeal to the charity of her
neighbors for food. If this was refused, starvation
stared her in the face. She had learned a lesson:
never again would she leave a thing undone that
could be finished that day.
Moral.-Never put ,,H for to-morrow what one
can do to-day.


THE RIVER.
Gwendolyn Barden, '24.


The river softly murmurs, as it gently glides and flows,
Thru a dreamy dusky town, between shady orange groves.
Where the golden laden poppy nods it sleepy, yellow head,
To the murmur of the river, as it slowly glides ahead.

Now the river shouts and laughs in a wild and frenzied glee,
As it rushes down the caion, in its journey to the sea.
Hear the river roar and bellow at the foot of lofty walls,
As it makes a final leap to reach the frothy Seven Falls.


The river whispers softly to the dry and parching plain,
In its onward, onward travel to the far and distant main.
The murmur of the river lu!ls the herdman to his sleep,
In its everlasting effort to reich the briny deep.

In the life of every person comes a rush of tho'ts and dreams
As they struggle toward a goal, as do the mighty streams.
Our tho'ts surge and rise as the waves on tossing seas,
And our dreams are wafted upward thru the branches of the
trees.








4 THE ZON.I N.


-Th


THE CARNIVAL.
Haute B,.',e Rade,, '26.


Ah, the carnival in Panama! The golden carnival
in the land of dusky pulchritude. A mad festival
of pleasure before long, quiet weeks of meditation.
And the joys of it that precipitate themselves
into the shadows of age. Just one delicious taste
of the Fountain of Youth.
Call it primitive if you will, the wierd costumes
of lace and silk and of tatters display the love of
fun of that melancholy people whose only magic
comes in the throes of carnival nights.
And costumes! Yon dusky maid with swishing
pollera excites the envy and curiosity of dignified





Z L





In Carnival attire.
Americanos. So, young man, with flashing eyes,
you are indeed handsome in your fashionable
black domino. Perhaps, queer person, you should
have been born a fowl, for see your love of feathers
and your strut like some proud cock of the barn-
yard. And you, misguided man, do not think
that you can imitate the dainty charms of femin-
inity, for even with your ruffled skirt and rosy
cheeks, you are betrayed.
Would that my eyes could penetrate that whirl-
ing, twisting, brilliant flash of color, that I might


You asked me to write you a poem,
I really have nothing to say.
Would you mind if I told you a story
Of a rose I found one day?
Its petals were velvet and fragrant
On its heart lay the fresh morning dew
And while 1 gazed on its beauty
M:. thoughts were of love and you.


see clearly each man and maid, that I might know
each unit of life's kaleidrisckope and comprehend
each little heart-breaking story :'f sorrow and hap-
piness that build the lfundations of life's carnival.
What queer arniimal is it that stares at me from
yonder high building? Above is that horror,
curiously realistic, like a nightmare in a haunted
house. So, young Billikin, think %uu that I am
afraid of your impudence? (Ine blow of m tfist
would send you crashing tu the street if my spirit
did not rebel t marring the humor of your grin.
Better to laugh and forget.
And when one uets into the endless procession,
one's brain cca-c.s t I Functiin as he beholds the
endless, seathinga stream '.' flower and ribbun-
bedecked vehicles an I % icrd creatures, resembling
humans, on all sides. Nu place for escape until a
frantic prayer is answered In the fiorm of an insig-
nificant alley, cunspicuuus in its emptiness.
Ah, the sting if that sickening sweet perfume
as it whizzes, barbed \with a thousand needles,
into the eyes, t hilt the mischief\ inus culprit grins.
There is serpentine enough to %eas~ a thousand
hued carpet t.,r all Panama, and cunitti enough
to bury all of its bu\crs. "Tangled in a fine mesh
of rainbow-hued srrpcntinc, buried in showers of
brilliant coinfEtti, and blinded %with perfume, is
not unusual: in the carnival n hirl.
Perfume, serpentine, c-nfettti, the things they
signify, the fun they make, the trouble they
cause-yet who uwuld not endure them all for
one mad sail in the sea of magic?
Come, you sorrowful and forgotten, join in the
merry jest o' the carniv al, carry high its slogan:
"Laugh and the world laughs with you."

) ROSA.


Helene Grimison, '25.
Now Ah. r do '.:.. think of mn. rh.thrm
And h h.,t Jo %,ou think oft the rh me?
Perh.[. ,.ou ill h .ke our head idl.
Anl tell me rnm Ine'. .ut of time.
I'm s',.rr,. I'm nor a horn p.er.
i-,,r if I iere thar, Rosi, dear,
I would drop -il m other di strlons
Anid rrite picnic the rest olf he ear.


'44





9


~1U








THE ZONIAN.


A TRIP TO IRAZU.
( r., 25.


Irazu, an active volcano between ten and thir-
teen thousand feet above sea level, is situated near
the little town of Cartago, Costa Rica. It is
famous throughout the country; interesting to all,
but especially so to those who endeavor to reach
the top.
While in Costa Rica, a party of tourists of which
I was one, set out on this trip. We left C.irr r- i
on horseback at two o'clock in the afternoon.
Four hours later, having accomplished one-half
of the distance, we stopped at the national sani-
torium where we spent the night.
A few hours before dawn, with a guide and
plenty of warm clothing, we started on the jour-
ney over the hills. Up, up, up, we went-fearing
that the horses would lose their footing at any
moment; but no, these are sure-footed little ani-
mals. However, even they found it so .lii..rlir
to climb some of the slippery passes, that we were
obliged to dismount, and, holding on to the horses'
tails, make the ascent on foot.
By i.i. brr.ik we had reached the top of the


mountain far above the clouds. We breathed a
sigh of relief as we stopped for a moment and
gazed at the beauty below, shivering at the same
time from the piercing cold. We guided our
horses along this mountain ridge for a short dis-
tance, feeling as though we were on top of the
world.
Suddenly we came to the crater's edge, where
we beheld great clouds of steam rushing upward.
A feeling of loneliness swept over each of us as
we gazed at the dead trees and vegetation; we
looked for the sign of some living creature, but
instead gray rocks and desolation met our eyes.
We strained our ears for the sound of living
insects; a silence-a vast and deafening silence-
answered us.
As we stood there the '.r.-hr. rin, sun which
cleared away the mist destroyed the weird beauty
of it all and left nothing but an endless vista of
waste. Still filled with the sense of awe, we
mounted our horses and retraced our journey
homeward.


THE LOST CITY.
Consue/o Camara, '26.


Once, a long time ago, no one knows how long,
there lived in the midst of the San Bias country
a superior tribe of San Blas Indians. They dwelt
in a beautiful city, adorned with the art with
which they were gifted. There were gorgeous pal-
aces, beautifully carved; best of .,l, the people
were very peaceful and content and everyone
was happy.
In this city there lived a beautiful maiden. She
was tall and slender like the graceful bamboo
trees, and her eyes were large and black like the
velvety darkness of a dark night, and her teeth
were like pearls when she smiled, and when she
laughed her laughter was like the tinkling of little
silver bells on a still night. Her hair was black
and glossy as the softest silk and lihn. down to
her hips. She wore a garment of many beautiful
colors wound tightly around her boly, and reveal-
ing her graceful form, and her feet were bare.


Now this maiden was the most beautiful of the
tribe, so she was put in their temple of worship
to dance at their ceremonies and please the spirits.
She was not allowed to see anyone or leave the
temple lest the evil spirits harm her.
This maiden was very happy, for was she not
beautiful, and did she not please the good spirits
and make them happy so that they bestowed all
good things on the tribe? She was accustomed to
dance in a beautiful garden of the palace where
there were many beautiful tropical flowers, and
the air was sweet with the perfume of orchids, and
musical with the songs of the birds. One day as
she was dancing there, a young Indian chief was
passing through the palace; glancing at the garden
he saw the maiden dancing, and he loved her.
Looking up she saw and worshipped him, for he
was very brave and handsome. After that, every
day the maiden danced in the same garden and


(9








THE ZONIAN.


the Indian chief passed and admired her and she
was happy; but when she was alone, she was
quiet and silent and mournful like a beautiful bird
in a cage that has given up hopes of flying around
free and happy in the beautiful tropical gardens.
The high priest of the temple noticed the sadness
of the maiden and decided to watch her, and when
he saw, he was very angry, so he forbade her
dancing in the garden, and she was kept in
the palace all alone. This made the young chief
very angry, so he came and took away the maiden.
This act enraged the high priest and in his rage
he was as fierce as a lion. He summoned the
people of the city before him.
It was a clear m..onlight night when the people
assembled and everything was very quiet except
for the mournful hooting of an owl and, from the
jungles, the doleful, mournful cry of a beast at
prey. When all were there, the priest denounced
the maiden and said that for her sin against the


go-.d spirits the city would disappear entirely
and the people would be divided into tribes, home-
less and wandering, and :he maiden would have to
wander, lonely, ever sorrowful, looking for the
lost city, always seeking until the spirits forgave
her. As the priest invoked this terrible punish-
ment, there was a sudden stillness. Then there
was a rumbling sound as of thunder far away, and
then a rending, awful crash and everything disap-
peared. Nothing was left, nut even the slightest
footprint to show that there had been a city.
Now, on still nights when the moon is full and
bright and you listen closely you will hear a
mournful, hopeless, soft cry, it might be blended
with the soft rustle of the bamboo leaves, blown
gently by the breeze or with the wash of the rest-
less sea on the beach. Wherever you hear it you
will know it is the cry of the lonely maiden, sorrow-
fully seeking for the lost citN and her lost love.


OLD PANAMA.
Josephine Camara, '27.


Let us imagine old Panama as it was many
years ago, where once stood gorgeous palaces and
large cathedrals with golden altars, and where
once %erelbeautiful gardens with a variety of
tropical flowers,'and the many stately streets,
where day after day passed many beautiful senori-


Ruins of Old Panama.


tas, who had large mrnteriou, black eyes, and
black hair, and who were dressed in gaily-colored
costumes with gorgeous mantillas and combs. The
Spanish gentleman would walk the same streets
with his wife or sweetheart or stand under a bal-
cony serenading his senorita. There would be
little children running around; also native men
and women in their native dress, some working


hard, others lazily basking in the sun. In the
convents and monasteries could be seen nuns and
monks. The large boats came in with cargoes, or
went out with their many sails swelling in the
breeze, taking priceless treasures of pearls, gold,
and silver.
Let us think again of Panama as it was in war,
when Mrirgan, the pirate, with his thousands of
followers landed in this peaceful city, frightening
the people; the senoritas and children all running
to the convents and monasteries for protection;
the nuns and monks comtfrting them, while still
others stood in the large cathedrals solemnly
praying. But still the bloodthirsty pirates came
on and fought against the terrorized Spanish
people, and the clash of their swords could be
heard at a distance, while one could see flashes
in the bright sun. Then the yells of the pirates
were heard, and the answering yells of the at-
tacked, hopeless but brave and defiant, until
finally the people were driven from their homes
and the city plundered and destroyed.
Now we come back to the present again and
see the old desolate ruins standing there like ghosts
of a once happy and bright city. Oh! if those
walls could talk what tales they would tell!








THE ZONIAN.


A TROPICAL SCENE
Gwendolyn Barden, '24.


A glorious tropical moon shed its light on the
white sand beach, which sloped gently down to
the ocean's edge, where the silver waves lapped
caressingly a,'ainit the shore.
In the distance a ship with white sails was to be
seen creeping noiselessly onward, to the great un-
known ocean.
To the left was a cluster of bamboo huts, with
smallfires in front of each. The light from the fires


cast weird dancing shadows upon the white sand
and reminded one of the distorted figures of elves.
Somewhere from the vicinity of the huts came
the twang of a guitar, and the low voices of the
natives were to be heard chanting some semi-bar-
baric tune.
In the background, the slender palms waved
their branches as if bidding good night to the
peaceful scene.


JUST A DREAM.
Ruth Stone, '25.


"Yes, that's right, and very well done,
It's snappy and bright and full of fun,
Your theme is one I'm proud to see
I'll surely mark it with an 'E.' "

These blessed rare words came to my ears,
And I cast off my unfounded fears,
I'd made an "E" in my English theme,
Now, I thought, school's not so mean!

Then to my Latin I soberly went
My mind upon the lesson bent.
"A good recitation," the teacher said,
"An 'E' for Ruth," from a book she read.


My history class was simple and gay,
I answered every hard question that day,
"Why, Ruth, you've improved," the teacher now smiled,
As we rose from our seats and from the room filed.

Somehow my Spanish I never could get,
And over this lesson each day I'd fret,
But this day I translated every long line,
And at the end was rewarded with, "Fine."

The bell started ringing; it sounded so queer,
It startled me too, for it was quite near.
Then somebody shook me: I felt like a fool.
Forb I'd een in bed, just dreaming of school.


Airplane View of Balboa.


(a





--


83LBJ4 B6-LMB PAcirIC TLFtiVha SJILDING*
-.-:.W; : -" 'Sc-Lo HE C4ANA
Aa~


47








48. THE ZONIAN.


The ZONIAN Staff gave a splendid entertain-
ment on January eighteenth for the "cause" of
our Annual. It was a huge success from the open-
ing number to the last scene of the "movie."
The clubhouse was crowded, and this made all of
our actors and actresses eager to do their best.
And they succeeded beyond all hope. There were
several fine numbers from the school talent. Our
school is blessed with having excellent and willing
workers. We are greatly indebted to them and to
the other local talent for assisting us. We wish
to express our sincere thanks to all who helped
to make the event the success it was.


The Juniors were the center of all interest
around the holidays for giving the H. S. that de-
lightful party on December twenty-first. Every-
body came prepared to have a good time and
even then had a better time than expected. The
Juniors had a novel way of entcrtaininr their
guests, which added a great deal of interest to
the games. All the colleges were represented by
little pennants of their own colors, and each of the
Junior girls tried to outdo the other in obtaining
followers for the college she stood for. Helene
G:in.ison had the honor of having more pledged
allegiance to her college. When everyone had
arrived the games and competition began. Every-
one was interested in beating the others.
Of course there was dancing and the dancers
danced unceasingly to all the latest music by a
"peach" of an orchestra. And then, too, refresh-
ments were served on the balcony.
Everyone had a wonderful time! By the way,
a reputation was lost during the evening. How
about it, Mr. Flint? Has it been found yet?
The Juniors and their advisor, Miss Sherman,
are to be congratulated on their "peppy" party.
It added an extra "merry" to the many "Merry
Xmas" that everyone wished everyone else.


T:2 Juniors again sh n- inI "dc ing t'irir bit"
for The Z3NIAN. By their Carnival in February
they startled the world i. i'., students, faculty,
and residents. There \as a splendid crowd to
look over the various bouths and amusement
centers. A program wa, given in assemblyy by
our dancers, singer;, and actors. This was loudly
applauded and the performers responded gener-
ously. The for:une-tellers were in demand as
everyone wished to kn.:,w what the stars held for
him; the fish pond t'u, w.ia popular an always
crowded. The hot-dog b._th %was neTer empty
either of hot dogs or customers. Cake and candy
booths doled out their wars continually. The
tea-garden drew a gr-eat many als':. After every-
one had spent all his inm.-ncy on us, we danced on
the balcony, and a pc.-,;ftlv grge.us cvncing-
to say the least-was en.jI cd.

Was there ever a "pppier" dance given for
THE ZONIAN than that of the Scni,_rs on December
fourteenth? We douht it, fur all \\ho were there,
students, faculty, and loads of other dance lovers,
had a wonderful tim-. Just ask 'em. They'll
always remember it. The time, place, music, and
crowd all contributed in making it the dance of
the year. Seniors-y i are to be congratulated
on that very successful dance.

THE JUNIOR PROM.
On May 9, 1924. the class of '2; now Juniors,
gave their annual Pr,.m. The affair was held at
the Mosque which had be:'n dec'-'rated with ferns
and flags by the Junior bjys. IDurithy Eastman,
the Junior Class president, Mr. Boss, and Mr.
Robertson received th- guests. Dorothy pre-
sided over the punch b most of the evening;
and, in consequence, punch %as in great demand.
Everyone enjoyed the dance immensely, anJ
agreed that it was one of the very nicest of school
parties.








THE ZONIAN.


The Playshed was the rendevous for Balboa,
Ancon, and "suburban" dancers on the memorable
night of our ZONIAN Dance. Currier's orchestra-
better every time, if possible-played for all to
trip around. Two of our distinguished seniors-
Miss Mary Hearne and Mr. Dinty Moore-cap-
tured the prize fox trot. "Practice makes per-
fect?" Socially and financially the hop was
"great."

The Dramatic Club of the High School has
been doing wonders this year. Play after play
has come from them, each one better than the


last. "The Six Who Passed While the Lentils
Boiled," was splendid. Dorothy Eastman took
the boy's leading part and Katherine Brown was
the queen, and she surely was fitting in her part.
"The Maker of Dreams," was next with Dorothy,
Ida Ruth Hammer, and Edna Duvall. Then-
"Mr. Bob!" We were sure nothing could be
better than the other two, but were we pleasantly
surprised. Edna Duvall and Ida Ruth again
took the leads and they, helped by the rest of the
cast, were all delightful. Girls of the three upper
classes belong to it, and we all hope they keep up
the good work which has been so well started.


WHAT HAPPENED.
Elizabeth Norlteel, '2/.


A moon shines out upon a beach,
Some rocks, here; there, some others.
A breeze blows through some whispering palms;
Enchanted are two lovers.

The breeze blows up a few dark clouds,
Those two row on unheeding,
They leave the shore for a rock out there
Where the waves the wind is reeling.


The silvery sheen of the moon's bright path
Is lost as the storm comes on,
The lovers see they are far from land
And their little boat is gone.

The dawn's bright light breaks through the clouds,
And welcome is the day.
The palms keep whispering ever on,
But bare is the rock in the b.v.


See.e at Balboa Playshrd.


MR 91031 4









THE ZONIAN.


THE CLASS OF j92;.


The class of '23 are scattered evervywhere.
Many have gone aw\ay to schools in the United
States, and others have remained here.
Anna Van Siclen, '23, has g tn e to Kingston,
Penn. to prepare herself for business career.
Although Anna is ,mall in stature, her anmbi-
tions are very large.
Horace Clark, '2l, has, taken lung jiourncy to
Seattle, Wash. He is working very hard, and
from all reports, is getting alng \cry- niLel..
We all wish Horace luck.
Dudley Sansbhur%, '23, George Waini:, '23,
and Robert Norlccrt, '23, after spending fuur
years together in Balboa High Schol,, have all
gone to Georgia Sihoul of Technology. Robert
is very interested in other things bcNides school
work; we wonder uhat it is?
Isabella M illi), '2,;. that quiet little maid of
the Balboa High School, has entered the Univer-
sity of Boston. She is progressing very well and
we hope she %ill return to the Canal Zone for
the summer vacations.
Helen Hulbr, '2.;, the Shortha.nd Shark, has
just returned frrm schoiJ i here she has finished
her course in StLn ,graph\. It looks vcr\ good to
see her back.
One of the nimibchrs it' the Class of '2; en jo\
school life so imuhi that he has decided to join


the ranks: Angel Pena, '23, is now teaching
school in the interior.
What has becim. itof James Shuber, '23? \'here
is he? I'll tell you abhut Bab%; he is studying
in a Prep. ou \t est to enter Annapolis, and will
take the e\ams. this summer. Baby has our best
wishes for success.
Esther Girecne, '21. The studious member of
last year's class, did nut get enough last year, so
she came back for more.
Nctta Hearne, '21, Florence Luckey, '23, Olcna
Hutchings, 2, \ayne Banton, '23, and Anita
\W. ', '23, have all joined the business world.
Netta and Florence are "Cupies" in the coupon
department at Balboa Heights. Olena is a hard-
working sten,,grapher in the Accounting Depart-
ment. \Wa\ne, now a weather man, can be found
at the HN drographer's Office. Anita is employed
in the Army, a,-a stenographer; she is working
for Major \alsh of the Aviation Corps. They
all seem to be satisfied and happy with their work.
Last, but by no means least, is our own beloved
Anita Sergeant, '2.;. "'iva La Reina!" Queen
of 1i121 American L-gion Carnival and a belle
of the High School. Miss Sergeant is residing
in Crisrobal with her parents. But we hope that
we have not lost Anita and that she will soon
return from the Gold Side.


so








THE ZONIAN.


MARRI


Dan Cupid is making very good matches for
the Canal Zone High School graduates. Some of
his latest victims from B. H. S. are:
Miss Eva Doyle, '16, and Lieut. James E.
Dyer were married by the Rev. Father Burns at
Cristobal, on September 15, 1922. Mrs. Dyer has
just recently sailed to California where she will
make her home.
Miss Lucille Koperski, '19, and Mr. Henry
Brewer, were married at Balboa on January 5,
1923. Mr. and Mrs. Brewer are now residing at
Cristobal, C. Z.
Miss Margaret Hollowell, 'I9, and Mr. Fred
Denny were married in New York City in April
of 1923. Mrs. Denny is now visiting her parents,
Mr. and NMrs Fred Hollowell, of Cristobal.
The following was taken from a newspaper
article: Miss Katherine Kay, of the Class of 1921
of the Balboa High School, and Mr. Humber, of
Panama City were quietly married at the Cathe-
dral of St. Luke's Ancon, Canal Zone. Mr. and
Mrs. Humber are now residing at Panama City.
Miss Gertrude Johns, '21, and 11r. Ralph Pear-
son are now residing in Cleveland, Ohio. They
were married at Cristobal on July 30, 1923.
Miss Mae J. Wynne, '21, and Mr. McFarland
were married at Balboa last year. Mrs. Mil-.ir-
land sailed recently for California where she ex-
pects to make her home.
Catherine Parmeter,' 21, and Lieut. Hal Jones
were married at Washington, 1). C., in December,
1922. Lieutenant Jones is stationed at Coco Solo.
A marriage of much interest to the Class of
'18 was that of Beatrice Glawson of Balboa and
Mr. A. Fernandez. Beatrice and her husband are
living in Cristobal.
Ruth Farrell and Ray Burmester are now re-
siding in Ohio. They were married in Balboa on
November 23, 1920.
Julia Nielson, '19, and Mr. C. R. Hartman
were married at Balboa, on December I 1919.
Mr. and Mrs. Hartman are now residing in
Balboa.
Jane Calvit, '20, and Herbert Knapp were mar-
ried last September, and have just returned from
Houston, Texas.


AGES.



Frances Westberg, '20, and Mr. Barr, who were
married in 1921, are now residing in New York
City.
Dorothea Westberg, of the Class of '18, who
was married in 1919 to Mr. Fitzpatrick, now re-
sides with her husband in Ancon.
Mable Lee, Class of '20, and Westley Hutchings
were married in 1922. It is rumored that they
will return to the Canal Zone.
Clara Wood, '21, was married to Mr. Sidney
Neville in February, 1922. Mr. and Mrs. Neville
are now residing in Balboa.
Elois Pierson, '21, and Lieutenant Potter were
married in August of 1922 and they are now sta-
tioned at Fort Meyer.
Francis X. Kerr of the Class of '19, and Abbie
I. McKeown, both very popular young people of
Balboa, were married in New York, September,
1922.
A very recent marriage of much interest, is that
of lMi,' Ruth Seavy of the Class of 1919, and
Doctor George Owens, which took place at At-
lanta, Ga. in M. rch of this year.
Andrew Fraser, 'i and Miss Gaither, the
physical directress, were married in February,
1922. Mr. and Mrs. Fraser are residing in Balboa.
The Alumni is rapidly increasing every year,
and our limited space will not allow us to print
the names and addresses of all the past graduates.
Ruth Hackenberg Dwelle, 'i 2, Balboa, C. Z.
Marguerite Stevens, '12, Los Angeles, Calif.
Edith Stevens, '12, Los Angeles, Calif.
Maria Johnson, '12, West Palm Beach, Fla.
Coriene Browning Alley, '12, Balboa, C. Z.
Adeline Babit, 'j, Chicago, Ill.
Fred Barber, '13, San Antonio, Tex.
Dorothy Hamlin, '14, Balboa, C. Z.
Paul Warner, '15, Balboa, C. Z.
William Fraser, '14, Mexico.
Andrew Fraser, 't Balboa, C. Z.
Gabriel Butler, 'i5, Balboa, C. Z.
Lewis Moore, 'iS, Balboa, C. Z.
Maria Holland, '16, Ancon, C. Z.
Elizabeth Porter Ash, '16, Balboa, C. Z.
Phyllis Kelly Warner, '16, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Lieut. William Tomey, '16, Fort Benning, Ga.
Agnes Kuller, '6, Pennsylvania.
Frank E. Moore, jr., '17, Balboa, C. Z.
Ethel Otis Page, '17, San Francisco, Calif.










THE ZONIAN.


Gertrude McKenone. 'l-, Mla.ibma
James Stephen: FEncelkc, 'it, Glend.ile, C.li.
Enmevn Robert Cjr.ojn,. 'is, S. ',. :..ti.
\ ri inia \\% iquir, i', B.Alb. C. /
George %\ inquiry, 'i Ba.ilb'., C Z
Fr.ince Nelonn, i Ancion, CL Z
Ct:il Huse,. i.,, .Ame.,, InA
Ch.,r'e, \W.r.,,i. 'i Peri, 'lmucl. L. Z/
M.arc rcr C inppell, '.,,, T i.1 h.. .et, FI,
Dor.rthv Brow nine, i ', B.ll.or, C /.
\' i.,in Hurchirln ir,, B.ilb'.I ,, C. Z
I .ne Fr -er. 'i,;. B.lbo'i, C. 7
Hubert L. n]o, 'i ,, L.Lu Ani.ele.. C lit
U ,c'.rL'ii Flls.w,rth. 'i i, Crir., K,
iFranccs Ih:.rnro:n. :*. B. lb ... C Z
M.iri.. Hune..ker, ':.. B i..... C /
I. Ie \\-.m..;k, '.:., B ilb .i., C /
Ruth \V til '.:., B.ilb.... C /
Fowler B.intl.n, ':*, B lIbo.,, C. Z
M.irih:. Z -r i. "'. P.inacm R. ,Je P.
Robert Germmin, ':, TIrr,., N Y
NMuroi Golden. ':', Colror iild
Helen Mill... '2:, B.,l u C L.
So-e Mllen, '"c, Ne* Y .,rk, N '1


Theodore Knapp, '2t, Ames, Iowa.
H rr:. Bitsel, ':2, New York, N. Y.
Alice Bleakle,e ':i, Balboa, C. Z.
inie Bo, ., ':1, Balboa, C. Z.
Ruth B.v, 'i, Balbo ,, C. Z.
urgee Cipuell. '21, Troy, N. Y.
l.,i. Duncan, ':], San Francisco, Calif.
I l- ritnet Marter, '2!, Balhoa, C. Z.
M.irc McMihon, ':l, Miami, Fla.
V...l, Be" le ':22, Balbo,, C. Z.
Irene STc art. 'z2, Balboi, C. Z
Fallen Roberts, ':2, B-lboa, C. Z.
A-nc. G.-irdiner, '2:, Balboa, C Z.
\\ill.inm Sergc .nrt \%, \ahington State.
Nni Ri]d nrur, '::. Radcltff, Virginia.
(,cor.~I F-ransen, '::, Pedro Miguel, C. Z.
Berl IIven, ':2, Nebraska.
Cc,.ilii I' 2ome 2, ':2, Baltimore, Md.
.1..,e Gr n, ':2, Panama, R. de P.
Jlith F-,,rer, '22, Penns, Ivania.
C.irherine Luckey, '::, Balboa, C. Z.
I'hom.,i Dorn, '2., Pedro Miguel, C. Z.
Helen Aneta Albin. '22, Brooklyn, N. Y.
iM riorie Gerr mn, '2:, Balboa, C. Z.
.ohn Kuller, Limn er:itr of Illinois.


AS. \\E SEE OTHERS.


r h r, .,Ga, J',,r, .l,,1 ..- I h ,, t..., ie r c r .i .i ,nd
well bhil n ed \ c .ire ver, l lI r'. cU h.in.e irh .,:u

iPanii,: ii. B.m a, t'i.i'.t'.', ) -Your athletic dtep :rtnrrini
!ur.rrh\ of .peci.l nitrition it i er w cll irr nie.d. \\ c are
-erti l.ii r, e', h nie ,th i:,

T t k-,8b.t. (.. , -- Y."..r .,...k i- ...rtr i .il prais ,
aind ii jr liter.ir. ..I p rtI u rir Ir el > clrilrrn ilI, ir' .cI.
T"/ >.\t:,J, lt .," t,-'.';.t, l .- Y ..ur ,,.h ,,.I n.l u.r l,: l ie r,, .r i p ri.
ted, 1.nl miuch in ri .,,r ., rhlcri,:n
The C.. .r i;, II '',.- 1- .ur h.,.k i, .ic .t ll. _,.J.d
The I.iier.mr I)ct l rritmient i. ~ ertr ir.l' ..irrh,. ,i nicr.ri..in

.V\'. V ,/.., ,.:.- ,,,;,,, I`.Z',,, Y- ..tr [, i.l-r. f.)r u, c I it-
:i pc I- term I_',..I
The 1 'nJex, F.,'ti.., .. }'.- Youri p i r 14 a, ipp:. n..i
itt,. \Ve should like to hear from ; ,i i -lt
The ,V.;r'ra,ter, Kai'ia. Cit, ifo.-Your paper iS er.. inter-
esTine, but uh noir .id ..ine i.ke'; inrl hven ,r up'
7T ', 1r..a:rF *,i,.r ..i. ; I h,. q'i.. r I. r L'...i..,..n.
the |'cr,..n dI n ,.n:- ii it ir Int r t .! n.. \\ l.~ l r ~,..i h, [.,.-
silbi tI.. i dii .. .rr,e...
A'er. tItal .. L"..' P'.'l,,,t I l.... r.l u l.) .lt. -r re .,,r ... ri
sumamentc interc..r nr i- 1. i J tr- l.il Jd ,1,. uultr..i- no
Ipucren lail ir dl tnri,:rt nr i.1 L.11 i LO rr l iti t ior
The T,.r, /Harns.-0 '.e'/ 'a Y ,ir i , ll- I I inc r m ic i,-
7ine, and the ilrerar ,J.ip.,rrment J. cr'. clcdcr.


TI, Pi.ater ette, F.irt IIr, Tex.-Your athletic department
i. tr\ orod. Ft dentlv the school is interested in athletics.
Tie Highi, .Sloo; RA'eod./tr, Saaraoga Sprncr, .V. ".-Your
bA,-,.k s cry good, but wnh not add a joke department instead
tof cartering the jokes through the book?
T il .;pi,: Ci r, Ka .;.ii Cit, I e..- Your \ery nod paper
1: IL.t oull .I school spirt.
T-- ':,,i ,' ', G.i.tei. n, Tex.- Your paper is ter,' clecer
,idJ thie p'..ems ,ire exceprionlall good.
7'.i Pi.:..nu, H /ioi','m,, Haunaii --Thl is an excellent paper,
relicl-inlu ell the sch.ucol iJciitries.
7 i Ga~iet.a'r, B'rr :, Dr.,:,i'a, .l.Jaaka.-Your paper is v\cr
go. ,l, bit whI not add omne inke- or cartoons to lhen it up'
I I ./ti ri, l.'o ie,, ,V Y.-Yours is a very good magazine,
and it i pleasure indeed to read it. The "Y's Cracks" are
\er' good. Why not separate the advertisements from the
other departments of the book?
T"i C.'r.,t,r ('te i, Colhrmbri, .' C.-Yours is a well-balanced
nIi i, i.n, in.l ae hope to h.,%e sou on our exchange list all
'i it li ii t
'-.., .hinr.i, iti, A eer', .\. --Your magazine is vert
LIc .cr, buhi w h not enlarge the "Sense and Nonstnse" depart-

TF C'rr',i-'. Parr.tse',,, V. 7.-Your magazine is very good
,nl rl.e J.'kes ire e:ttprional, but ahi not gather them all irito
tine apartment.








THE ZONIAN.


BOYS' ATHLETICS.


INTER-CLASS TRACK AND FIELD MEET.

Robert Engelke, '2/.


On Saturday, February 9, the inter-class track
meet was held at Balboa Stadium. The Sopho-
mores won the meet, getting in all 28 points; the
Seniors came a close second with 22 points; the
Freshmen third, with 13 points; and the Juniors
with 5 points.
Andrew Whitlock was the hiulr. t individual
point getter, scoring 19 points for the Seniors.
Ralph Clements was the second highest with 14
points; and Sullivan, third, with Io points for
Sophomores.
The events were run off in the following order:


Shot Put.

i. Ralph Clements, 29 feet 6 inches.
2. Andrew Whitlock.
3. Wilson Morris.
Broad Jump.
i. Andrew Whitlock, 15 feet 6 inches.
2. Ralph Clements.
3. Leon Greene.
Discus.

I. Andrew Whitlock, ioi feet 6 inches.
2. Robert Engelke.
3. Ralph Clements.


INTERSCHOLASTIC TRACK MEET.


On Saturday, February 23, 1924, the annual
track meet between C. H. S. and B. H. S. was
held at Balboa Stadium.
The interest taken by the Balboa boys is not
at all commendable. The meet was scheduled to
start promptly at 9 a. m. This was understood
by everyone concerned, yet at 9 a. m. there were
only two Balboa boys there to represent our
school. The Cristobal boys came across the
Isthmus without the least hope of winning the
track meet; but they had the fight and spirit,
the chief requirements for any form of athletics;
and they won.
The following is a list of the events and the order
in which they were run:


FEBRUARY 23, 1924.-BALBOA STADIUM.

loo-yard Dash.


1. Cristobal-George Oakes, time I 2 5 seconds.
2. Cristobal-Pepe Arosem-na.
3. Balboa-Andrew Whitlock.

Shot Put.

I. Cristobal-Jack Coffey, distance 31 feet 6 inches.
2. Cristobal-R. Fisher.
3. Cristobal-George Oakes.


22o-yard Dash.


i. Balboa-Andrew Whitlock, time 25 seconds.
2. Balboa-Paul Duran.
3. Cristobal-Pepe Arosemrna.

High Jump.

i. Balboa-Ralph Clements, height 5 feet.
2. Cristobal-Chester Pike.
3. Cristobal-M. Eggleston.
Broad Jump.
I. Cristobal-Pepe Arosem6na, distance 16 feet 9 inches.
2. Cristobal-George Oakes.
3. Balboa-Ralph Clements.

44o-yard Dash.
I. Balboa-Elias Anastaciado, time I minute I second.
2. Balboa-Paul Duran.
3. Cristobal-William Cousins.

88o-yard Relay.
i. Balboa-Paul Duran, Elias Anastaciado, William Allen,
Andrew Whitlock.

Totals: Cristobal 31; Balboa 28.

Highest number of points individually:
Cristobal-George Oakes, 9; Pepe Arosem6na, 9.
Balboa-Paul Duran, 7"; Andrew Whitlock, 71.


_! ,_ .M


~~


~i4

































































































BOH'( BALEBLL TL\M


111-1 ......-....11.... ...-.-. - .... 1111~~-..1... ... .-...1.-.-1.. .I-.i~ ......-...I*-..-.I*-....11111








THE ZONIAN.

BASEBALL.


The first game of the annual series played be-
tween B. H. S. and C. H. S. was scheduled for
Mount Hope. On January 19, 1924, B. H. S.
team boarded the noon train for Mount Hope
which arrived a little late, thus delaying the game
until 2.30. Since the Balboa team desired to
catch the four o'clock train from Colon, an agree-
ment was made before the game started that the
game should stop sufficiently early. Only five
innings were played, but C. H. S. was defeated
from the first inning; and when the game ended
the score was then 8-2, with little fear of Cristobal
getting any more runs.
The batteries for C. H. S. were Papi and Klunk,
and Whirl..ik and Stanziola worked for B. H. S.
On Saturday, January 26, 1924, C. H. S.
crossed the Isthmus to revenge their defeat of
the previous week. The game was played at
Balboa Stadium; and both teams were out to
win. Cristobal lost no time in starting, they got
the first run of the game in the first inning. Bal-
boa tried to retaliate but were unable to do so.
C. H. S. added two runs more to their score in
the third. This looked very bad for B. H. S.;
they seemed to be dazed, bewildered; they had
men on bases practically every inning but could
not bring them in.
Up to the sixth inning it looked as though B. H.
S. wasn't going to get any runs. In this session,
however, Morris, the first man at bat, received a
base on balls; Foster bunted along first base line
and beat it out, Morris going to third; Foster
attempted to go to second but was caught between
first and second, Morris going home on the play.
The next two men up were put out and the side
retired. This was a start for B. H. S. and a rather
exciting inning. B. H. S. scored in the eighth


and had three men on bases when the third out
was made. C. H. S. nearly scored in the last half
of the eighth inning, but Brown was caught at
the plate.
Papi was the star of the game, getting the hit
that drove in the two runs in third, and making
several spectacular catches of fly balls out in
center and left fields. Papi has the "makings"
of a good ball player.
This was a well-played game on the part of both
teams and the players showed good sportsmanship
throughout the game.
The third game of the series was played at
Mount Hope on Saturday, February 2, 1924.
In order to have plenty of time to complete the
game, the B. H. S. players left Balboa at 7.o5 a. m,.
and arrived at Mount Hope at 9.10. The game
started about 10.30 and was rather slow and
drawn out. Again C. H. S. was beaten from the
first inning. Fisher started the pitching for C.
H. S. but lasted only two innings. Fisher had
successfully defeated B. H. S. the previous week at
Balboa Stadium, which occurrence is still a mys-
tery to those who witnessed the game. Fisher
hasn't had much pitching ..\[''i. I..., he was un-
dul brcil, put in because there was no one better
for the job. He dill.i l no curves whatsoever
and he threw the ball in the "groove" most of the
time.
There are fewer boys in C. H. S. to choose from
and the baseball team was chosen in a short time,
although C. H. S. had a schedule that told at
what time in the year the baseball series would be
played.
Much credit is due the C. H. S. for the way they
played and the sportsmanship that was shown
throughout the series.


BASKET BALL.


It has been an established custom on the Isth-
mus, due to the intense rivalry between C. H. S.
and B. H. S., that they play a series of game.,
either three or five games, in which the winner of
the majority receives the honor for that year.
The first game of the series of five games was
played at Balboa playshed on April 5, 1924, C.
H. S. was defeated by the score of 46-16.. BH.
S. showed good teamwork and accurate basket


shooting. C. H. S. was handicapped by not hav-
ing their regular center, who was unable to play.
The second game of the series was played April
12, 1924, on the Army and Navy Y. M. C. A.
floor at Cristobal. C. H. S. was again defeated
but this time the game was not so one-sided.
The addition of Oaks at center gave C. H. S.
new life and they displayed a fighting spirit
throughout the game. The first quarter ended








THE ZONIAN.


o-o. The second quarter ended 5-2; the third
quarter ended 16-9, and in the last quarter B.
H. S. had the game mostly their own way. Good
sportsmanship was shown on the part of both
teams. The playing and point making of Lucas
Zarak was the feature of the game; he made
10 points out of the 27.
C. H. S. is to be commended for the school
spirit they displayed and the way they back
their athletic teams.
On Friday, April 25, 1924, B. H. S. and C. H.
S. played the third and final game of the series
at Gatun Clubhouse. Since the two previous
games had been played, one at Balboa and the
other at Cristobal, the third game was arranged
to be played on a neutral floor.


Mr. Robertson.


The game started after the moving-picture show
and was witnessed by many of the residents of
Gatun. On Wednesday, April 23, 1924, a dance
had been held in the gym hall, and there was a
ten-foot strip across the center of the floor that
was still slippery from the dance. This afforded
much amusement for the spectators, because one
could hardly stand on this portion of the floor.
However, the game was well played by both teams.
C. H. S. was handicapped by the loss of Oaks at
center, but they put up an extraordinary good
game. B. H. S. displayed fine teamwork which
counted very much toward their winning. The
final score was 22-8 in favor of Balboa.


SWINI I NG.

The interest in s\ imnming this viar in B. H. S.
was not so enthusiastic as it has been in the pre-
ceding years. The intcrschrolastic swimming meet
between B. H. S. and C. H. S. iwas forfeited to
C. H. S. because moct of our bet men were behind
in their studies.
B. H. S. swam several tleet teams and hadl very
little difficulty in dLtcating them, but outside of
this there was very little cimperttiun in sw imming
this year.
(GOL F.
The newest innovation otf ports into Balboa
High this year was golf. One tournament \las
played at the adminiiisrrat-in golf course, and
Newton Warwick, a Freshman, emerged c ictori-
ous with a total of 3- trrkc, tfir the ', holes.
Interest ran high thrcnughoiiit the rTournament,
in which there were 14 entrants. It is hoped that
next year an interscholastic meet might he ar-
ranged to decide the Zone school championship.

GOLF rFUL RN.AMENT.
Since golf became such a popular game in the
last three years, B. H. S. endea.urcd to have an
interclass golf tourn:miicnt. There wcre fiurteen
boys entered and ti,. C iirnrament %.%a, pla.1\e on
the nine-hole golf ;urs: in fr,.ot ft r': Balba.i
Administration Buildina.
The tournament was '.ion b,. Newrt n \\'ar\wick.
I freshman representative in ;-. T"IheLre \\ais oun-
siderable interest display. ed, and this tr-,urnament
was quite a novelt) k~.In the first of itr kIin on
the Isthmus.
O; R CO \LHE-.
Miuch credit is due and mu i:h apreelation 1I Il:
for our coaches, Mr. RKibcrt,in, Mr. Gris.scr, and
Mr. Bogda. We are especiiall grateful ti Mr.
Robertson for his untirina crt';,rr, ti[ deleltip the
best athletic teams p s-l 'l_- I'uLt ft the material
in the high school.
Mr. Grieser also ha dJnc much tj dcvelp a
strong swimming team in B. H. S. He is regarded
with much respect b\ the T-.rudnts ou this school.
and it is known that we all h.iv\- a friend in H. J,
Grieser.








THE ZONIAN.


INDOOR BASEBALL.
On Saturday, April 21, 1924, Cristobal indoor
baseball team crossed the Isthmus to play the
Pacific side team.
The game was exciting throughout, for the
players as well as the spectators.
Cristobal took the lead from the first of the
game, but were gradually caught and passed Bal-
boa had a hard uphill fight from the first to the
seventh inning, but it was the fight and team-
work that made them win. Cristobal played good
ball and showed excellent sportsmanship. The
final inning ended with Balboa in the lead, the
score being 5-o10.
On Saturday, May 3, 1924, the Pacific side
journeyed to Cristobal to play a return game of
indoor baseball. The game was played on the
New Cristobal playshed floor and was well played
throughout by both teams.
Balboa started the game by getting a number
of runs the first inning; they took the lead and
were in no danger at anytime.
The Cristobal girls tried hard, but they were
outplayed at every stage of the game.
TENNIS.
After the indoor baseball game on April 21,
1924, tennis games were 7i.\ c.1 between B. H. S-
and C. H. S. The singles were played first, and
C. H. S. had little trouble in defeating the B. H. S.
team. Belle Martin and Mary Joe Lowe repre-
sented B. H. S. while Charlotte Housel and Gladys
Lowande played for C. H. S. Due to the lateness
of the hour there was not time to play the doubles.
S\\ I NI MING.
Swimming has lately made very rapid progress
on the Isthmus., Due to the fact that there was
no competition for the girls high school swimming
team, there were no meets; however, there is very
good material in the B. H. S. Under the coaching
and direction of H. J. Grieser, our swimming in-
structor, two of our girls are going to try out for
the 01' mpic teams.
Josephine MNI: im, who holds the ladies' cham-
pionship in all crawl strokes races on the Isthmus,
is going to try for a place in the Ioo-meter race.


Angela Klemmar, one of the most graceful high
and fancy divers on the Isthmus, is going to try
to make the ladies' Ili ini team.

BASKET BALL.

A series of four games was arranged between
Cristobal High School and Balboa High School.
The first game of this series was played at Balboa
playshed. This was a very exciting game, and
there was doubt throughout as to who would win.
However, at the end of the fourth quarter, Cris-
tobal High School was in the lead by two points,
the final score being 1-9.
The second game of the series was played at
the Cristobal playshed. Due to the fact that some
of our best .l.-n ur were failing in their studies,
substitutes had to be used. Nevertheless, Balboa
High School was determined to win if possible,
and the fighting spirit that was displayed was ex-
cellent. The game was won by Cristobal High
School by the close score of 9-7.
The third game of the series was played at Bal-
boa plla-hcd. At this one, there were many
rooters to support our team. This seemed to stim-
ulate them, and to give the courage needed, be-
cause the resistance of the guards and the snappy
teamwork, cheered by the rooters, were the reasons
for the defeat of Cristobal High School. Balboa
High School had awakened; the final score being
6-5.
The final game of the series was played at Cris-
tobal playshed. This was a struggle from the
start to finish, both teams endeavoring to their
utmost to win. Balboa High School seemed to
have lost s3me of their fighting spirit, but Cristo-
bal High had a difficult time winning at that.
The final score ended 11-9 in favor of Cristobal.
The sportsmanship and spirit shown on the part
of both teams were of the best, and there was no
contention of any kind. What the referee said,
went, without any dispute.
The line-up for Balboa High School during the
series was as follows: Florence Murtagh, f; Mary
Joe Lowe, f; Alice Oliver, c; Florence Tonneson,
s. c; Mary McConaughy, g; Marie Jensen, g;
Ida Ruth Hammer, sub; Ruth Bickford, sub.


Oirls' Ottletics.

























































































GIRLS BASKET BALL SQUAD.


. .. ...* ...................... .... .. it n..n.n..nnnn.i ......... ... .... . ....... ... .. ....








THE ZONIAN.


PHYSICAL WORK ON THE CANAL.
E. 1. Bogda, Physical Director.


For some time the idea has been prevalent in
some educational quarters that competitive ath-
letics in a tropical climate are injurious, and that
out athletes so3n burn up. This is not true on the
Canal Zone, because our system of competition
is so arranged that no harm can possibly develop
from our various forms of athletics. We know
that the human body under ordinary environ-
ments has the power to protect itself against un-
due changes of temperatu-e by increased perspira-


Mr. Bogda.
tion, deep breathing, etc.; consequently we are
very careful not to tax the devices for contracting
the heat produced through exercise. Therefore
we eliminate vigorous exercises; shorten the
periods of games; and, in general, lessen the pos-
sibilities of attaining what sometime is called
"Athletic condition." Nevertheless our high
school athletics are on a par with similar activi-
ties in the United States, perhaps due to the fact
that the average high school boy on the Canal


Zone who participates in athletics is better devel-
oped physically than the average boy of equal age
in a northern climate.
\Mu h credit is due to the Health Department
for the efficient check that they have made on
each child living on the Canal Zone. This en-
ables the authorities in physical education to
work on authentic records, without which they
would frequently find themselves in a dirfi..ul
and compromising situation regarding the per-
formances of individuals.
As a whole, we deal with our athletics from the
standpoint of recreation and health, thereby
teaching the games instead of developing "stars."
Our attention is given to the mass and not the in-
dividual. By the time an athlete is in his prime
some College or University is taking the credit
for 'a. iai turned out a "star." Of course they
forget that their new found "star" has had pre-
vious training; but having lived in the tropics
he was not given the opportunity to put forth his
very best efforts.
The necessity of physical education on the
Canal Zone is more imperative than perhaps any
place in the United States, because the youth here
has few home responsibilities and his surplus en-
ergy must be taken care of in the right way. Then
too, the climatic conditions are such that it is
possible to have outdoor activities the year round.
Under these conditions, what is more essential
than physical education and the supervision of
play? A visit to any of our local playgrounds will
convince any pessimist that physical education
is the important part of a boy's or girl's life on
the Canal Zone.


Tarpon Fishing at Gatun Spillway.


I








60 THE ZONIAN.


COME OUT OF THE KITCHEN.

Cast of Characters.

Olivia Dangerfield, alias Jane Ellen...... FLORIDE EDWARDS
Elizabeth Dangerfield, hersister......... MATTIELEE BROWN
Mrs. Falkner, Tucker's sister ......... ELIZABETH NORFLEET
Cora Falkner, her daughter .......... GWENDOLYN BARDEN
Amanda, Olivia's black mammy. .......... .RUTH BICKFORD
Burton Crane, from the north.. .......... MARVIN BANTON
Thomas Lefferts, statistical poet ............ ALTON WHITE
Solon Tucker, Crane's attorney and guest. ABNER SILVERMAN
Paul Dangerfield, alias Smithfield....... PHILIP THORNTON
Charles Dangerfield, alias Brindlebury. .....CHARLES CROSS
Randolph \ ceek-. agent of the Dangerfields. ROBERT ENGELKE

Stage Manager, ANDREW WHITLOCK

Time.-The present.
Place.-The Dangerfield mansion in Virginia.

Synopsis of Scenes.

AcT I.-Drawing room of the Dangerfield mansion.
AcT II.-The kitchen-afternoon-two days later.
AeT III.-The dining room-just before dinner on the same
day.

Colonel and Mrs. Dangerfield are traveling in
Europe for the Colonel's health. The four Dan-
gerfield children, Olivia, Paul, Elizabeth, and
Charles, have planned to lease the Dangerfield
mansion through Randy Weeks, the family friend
and real estate agent. They have leased it to
Crane, a Yankee millionaire. They are sitting in
the drawing-room awaiting the arrival of the four
servants from Washington, and discussing the sit-
uation, when Randy comes in and tells them that
the servants have decided to break the contract.
This places the Dangerfields in a very difficult
position. Olivia comes to the rescue with the sug-
gestion of their acting as servants themselves.
Olivia's suggestion meets with disapproval and
they are still undecided, when suddenly they hear
a car approaching. They decide to conform with
Olivia's plan. Crane arrives with three guests,
Mr. Tucker, his attorney, Mrs. Falkner Tucker's
sister, and Cora, her daughter. Mrs. Falkner is
desirous of a match between her daughter and
Crane and she does everything within her power to
bring it about. Cora is infatuated with a poet,
Thomas Lefferts. Her mother has tried to dis-
courage Lefferts, but her efforts have proved in


vain. The Dangerfield children have taken up
the new work with optimistic views, with the
exception of Elizabeth, who is very much opposed
to the plan. With the arrival of Mrs. Falkner
many difficulties and misunderstandings arise over
the cook, Olivia, who by the way, has won the
hearts of all the gentlemen in the house. The
final outcome is the dismissal of Elizabeth and
Charlie, also the hasty exit of Mrs. Falkner and
Cora. Later, Charlie disguised as an old man and
cause of Paul's dismissal, renters. Oli ia. Crane,
and Tucker are the only ones left in the old man-
sion and Tucker is leaving that evening. Olivia
receives a cable telling of the Colonel's recovery.
At dinner that evening Randy strongly objects
to Olivia and Crane remaining in the house alone.
This causes an argument between the two men and
they decide to let Olivia do as she pleases. Olivia
stays with Crane. After the guests have gone,
Crane tells Olivia that he loves her. The feeling
is evidently mutual as the delightful comedy ends
with Olivia in Crane's embrace.
Curtain.

Floride Edwards, as Jane Ellen, made a most
irresistible cook. She played her part with excep-
tional ease and won the hearts of all who saw her.
Mattielee Brown, as Araminta, depicted a maid
who would please the most exacting of mistresses.
Elizabeth Norfleet, as Mrs. Falkner, showed dra-
matic ability in playing the rble of an aspiring so-
ciety woman. Gwendolyn Barden as Cora, was
very demure and dainty. Ruth Bickford deserves
credit for her excellent characterization of a
Southern mammy. Marvin Banton, as Burton
Crane, was a man who could in any maid's heart.
Alton White, as a poet, deserves honorable men-
tion for his clever acting. Abner Silverman, as
Tucker, played his part very cleverly. Philip
Thornton played the part of an English butler to
perfection. Charles Cross, as Brindy, was very
original. Robert Engelke, as Randy Weeks, was
a very law-abiding attorney and not bashful in
expressing his feelings.
We wish to extend our thanks and show our
appreciation to: The management of the Balboa
Clubhouse, the district quartermaster, Mrs.
Campbell Cross, Andrew Whitlock, and his assist-
ants; also the coach, Mrs. Halzell, who so kindly
made the presentation of the play possible.









THE ZONIAN.


"THAT RAMBLIN' WRECK FROM GEORGIA TECH."

Evelyn C. Silverman, '25.


Cast of Characters.


Alfred
Ned..
Jack
Dick .


.... An English lad; freshman at Tech
Sophomore football star; roommate to Alfred
............. Sophomore roommate to Dick
A sophomore


Place.

In Georgia Tech; in Dick's room.

Time.
Afternoon.

Alfred.-Alfred is a tall athletic English lad who has
not as yet adapted himself to the way of American
college boys. His clothes are up to the minute as far as Eng-
lish style is concerned. His manner is somewhat stiff).-"I say,
so this is an American college! It is not a bit what I expected.
The jolly fellows are so confounded-er--er rough and
unreserved; not a bit like our aristocratic English boys. They
actually seem to enjoy that extraordinary game of football.
I dare say it would shatter my nerves. Now I much prefer
that jolly game of cricket. (He sits down at the desk and is
soon absorbed in reading.)
nit.r Jack and Dick. They are all bedecked with ribbons
and banners in full evidence of having come off the football
field. They do not notice Alfred, at first.)
Jack.-"Wasn't that game a corker! Seven to six in our
favor."
Dick.-"I'll say it was! But wasn't Ned a trump to make
that winning touchdown. He'll be the hero of the school for
weeks to come!" (Door opens; enter Ned. He is in his foot-
ball togs; he shows good evidence of having been in the thick
of the "battle.")
Jack (making a leap for Ned).-"There you are old man!
Congratulations! You turned the trick." (The two boys de-
vote their full attention to Ned.)
Alfred (Getting slightly interested).-"1 say, old dears, what
is all the bally excitement about?" (The two boys grasp him
by the arm, and dance him about the room until he is a wreck
of his former self.)
Together.-"Excitement! Our pal won the game for the
Sophs!"
./ i'. (Trying to smooth his ruffled self).-"Jolly well, old
dear, jolly well."
Ned.-"Did you see the game?"
Alfred (Somewhat taken back).-"Why, I thought you
understood that I do not contemplate seeing a crowd of ruffians
engaged in such- er-- "
Dick.-"By heck, you'll see the next football game this old
school plays, or I'll eat my hat!"
Alfred.-"I-I say, don't get rough."
Jack.-"Never fear, mama's sweet patootie." (Alfred exits
hastily.)
Ned.-"Who ever thought I would get a roommate like
that; he hasn't a grain of sand." (Silence for a moment.)


Jack.-"I tell you, let us begin to reform him."
Dick.-"Reform him! Kindly leave me out."
Ned (With sarcasm).-"I say, old top, how exacting do
you---
Jack.-"We'll turn into a bally Englishman ourselves; feed
the fellow pink tea, swear off football and adopt the bally
bligther's ways. Some plan, eh what?"
(Light dawns on the two boys.)
Together.-"By jove, old dear, a corking idea!" (Ned exits.)
Jack.-"Well, old dear, we must go and dress for 'dinnah.' "
Dick.-"Capital, old top." (Exits.)
(Alfred enters. He is dressed very formally for dinner. At
first he seems deeply absorbed.)
.1/fred.-"I say, I wish I were a bit like these jolly American
fellows. Let me see (silence for a moment), I dare say I'll
go out for football; and what is more, I'll make some jolly
flapper-what is it now- er- ah, yes, fall for me. (To
himself) What say you now, old dear?" (He takes off his
dinner jacket and loosens collar and tie.) "I rather think that
looks sporty." (He struts about the room not as stiff as pre-
viously.) "Now! That's just corking." (He beams with sat-
isfaction.) i <\l enters, dressed very formally for dinner.)
Ned.-"How's the bally blighter this evening?"
I'. I (Not as stiff as formally).-"Just corking!"
Ned (Aside).-"Sweet papa, what's happening!"
(Enter Jack and Dick.)
T '. '.-"Good evening, gentlemen."
Ned.-"The top of it to you, sirs!"
.lfred.-"Good- er- evening."
Jack (Consults watch).-"The darned thing has stopped,
again. I say Alfred, I should jolly well like to ascertain the
time of the day, eh what?"
Alfred (Rather suspiciously).-"My watch has stopped also."
(A servant brings the dinner in. They sit down at the table.)
Ned.--"\', e, Alfred, we have decided to adopt your sedate
ways; we have been going at it rather fast lately."
Jack.-"I jolly well suggest that you give up football. The
game is altogether too rough, old timer."
.Afred.-"Rather queer, I thought I would like to take up
the jol-game."
Al/ together.-"Learn the game! By Jove!"
Alfred (Aside).-"I'll be a- what do you call it- a tea
hound yet." (To the astounded boys.) "I must go now. I
have an engagement with my-- er- sweetie (aside) who
isn't." (Exit.)
Ned.-"A sweetie, eh-well, I never!"
Dick.-"He wants to go out for football. Hit me hard, will
vou, Ned?"
Jack.-"We will be professional reformers yet."
(Curtain.)

ACT II.
(A month later.)
(Jack and Dick are seated at opposite sides of the room.
They are deeply absorbed in study. Jack slams his book
down.)
Jack.-"I can't get this theorem."










THE ZONIAN.


Dick.-"Well, who could, when a fellow knows that his
class is going to wipe those freshman off the field, and we not
there to see it!"
Jack.-"I did think 'Ducky' was a better sport than to
'stick' us for this afternoon merely for 'cutting up' in math
class."
Dick.-"Listen to those freshmen yell. Gee, what's hap-
pening?"
Jack.-"You don't mean to say those freshmen are winning!"
(They make a rush for the window.) "Look! The ball is on
the six-yard line! There goes the freshmen fullback! Ow!
Hold it! !"
Dick.-"He's down in his ovn tracks. Hurrah!!"
Jack.-"Stopped again! And by Jove, Ned did it." (They
are wild with excitement.)
Dick.-"What's the matter now! I guess some little freshie
has weakened." I4.:k tears his hair with nervous excite-
ment.)
J,, --"Ye Gods and little fishes, look! That's not Alfred
coming out, is it?"
Dick (Sarcastic).-"It is! It will be easy sailing for the
Sophs with Alfred as the freshmen fullback. I hope we will
be able to locate his scattered remains."
Jack (Seriously).-"They are calling signals."
Dick.-"Great Scott! There goes Alfred through the line
for four yards." (They groan.)
Jack.-"Those freshmen are going wild!"
Dick.-"See! Roddy has the ball now! He gains a yard."
Jack.-"If those freshmen win, we will never hear the end
of it."


Dick.-"Thev ire calling signal,! Oh, if the Sophs will only
hold them this time, the gamt aill be our-."
Yack -''Ir's the last down' Alfred has the ball again! He's
making in end run"'
Dick -"l.c.ok at that mrerference, 1l you?"
Jack --"Oh bo There goe- Ned after him!"
Dick --"L.ok .,r rhat line tackle!"
(Agroin esi pes from the tmo bois i
Jack.-' There he goes icr,,n the line' Ye Gods! Alfred
has wen rh e game fitr rhe 'lre-hies'.
Dick -"And ti think th.t 'e didn't realize what a jully
good fellow the old bho\ i.'" IThe pace the room Aith nervous
excitement.
Jack --" h,,pc Ned brinia the uld fellow up here." (Ned
and Alfred enter a rh 1 cro,%d of bo', s.
Dick-- Here the\ -ire novw Hello, old min, it was just
corking! ConL'r:iaulalirn-'"
Ned '\e s.phs m.iN ha.e I-' rlte ginme, but I am gl.l
that you ha.i: pro'.,l \sour-ell northh of the old school. I aim
proud "o h.r't oa tir nm. r.,ommare."
(AlfredJ i- omen. har t ken aback b.. all the sudden popular
ity; he grin- i
Alfrdj.--"Lct', -go b.. s!"

"I'm rimnblin areck
From Geori i Te, h
And .1 heck ol an Engin-er," ent.


SArrinOMAS lClmuRY !4'0!PANAMA LU. DiSTRIC
HOsIrAI. CLUB R' R TarTlO CcOURT
ANt COM


Airplane View of Panama IJ,


WITH DUE APOLOGIES TOSH HAKESPE.AR E.

Etr. ,, C. Silverman, '-*;


All the world's a school,
(So it seems sometimes)
And all the boys and girls are merely pupils:
They have their expulsions and graduations;
And one student in his time plays many parts,
His acts being the four years in High School.
At first the "Freshie" with a swelled head
And puffed chest, he struts about.
Then the Sophomore with a thoughtful
Countenance, sighing like a furnace, with a woeful essay


On "C:aes.r's use ,d L.atin in the Gilh \Wars."
The third :ceiie 'hilft into the Junior,
Light of f:.t :,nd brain, the c're,
Of the pururt t at knowledge disturbing not hi. bljnd
Counttn in, .And so he pla:,s his part.
Last scene of .ill, that ends this strr-nge e,.'enful story
Is the Senior. Hi- hc.d in the cloud,
He see- not an', trhin in rhis Ilol. aorld.
For it i; all hi ,
Plus hLppinms, plu success, plus fame, plus everything.









THE ZONIAN.


OUR CLASS.

Robert Engelke, '2 .

Four years ago in Balbho High,
There entered a joyous crowd
Of Freshmen, who were very green
And also very loud.

We were not use.l to customs here,
As anyone could see,
We looked about in bewilderment,
Like a man "that's up a tree."

The Seniors looked so dignified,
"Hello, you scrub," they'd say,
"Look here, young man, you are too fresh
Just get out of my way."

But now that class it has advanced,
'Tis Nineteen Twenty-Four,
We are no longer ignorant scrubs
As we were four years before.

The Freshman eye us up and down,
They have a little knowledge:
"Those hams'll get theirs, without a doubt;
W ait till they get to .. II' "


EVENING IN THE TROPICS.

Horace Foster, '25.

I sit on the porch in the evening,
And the moon rises over the sea,
Shedding its glorious radiance
Over the I indscape an. me.

The twilight deepens to darkness,
While the heavens are turning to jet;
The breeze which moans through the paln trees
Restores memories we never forget.

The swishing and hissing of breakers
As they advance up the sandy beach,
Make one pensive and silent,
Precluding all thought of speech.

Peace under starry canopy,
Bliss, and ecstacy, too,
Such the tropics can give one,
If he her treasures will woo.


REMINISCENCES.

Ien ll','iss, '2J.,

As through the busy world we roam,
Our thoughts will always take us home;
Back to the place we love the best,
Our dear old school, our B. H. S.

Our pleasant thoughts once more will fly
To the happy days so long gone by.
'Twas there we studied with pain and strife,
To fit ourselves for afterlife;
And all we'll ever be, we'll owe
'To what we learned so long ago.


View of Balboa Heights.








64 THE ZONIAN.


Jackie.-"Ikey, you should put the curtains
down when you kiss your wife. I saw you last
night."
Ikey.-"The chokes on you, Jakie. I wasn't
home last night."

Jack.-"Sis, what does chaperon mean?"
M. B.-"It isn't used any more, dear."

Wife.-"Isaac! Isaac! I can hear a man snor-
ing under the bed! He must be a burglar."
Hubby.-"Hush, Rebecca! Don't vake him,
an den ve vill charge him for a nights' lodging
in de morning!"

Gerrans (applying for a position).-"Have you
an opening here for a bright young man?"
Employer.-"Why, yes, but please don't slam
it when you go out."

White.-"What makes you think Green is tired
of his wife?"
Flip.-"Well he placed an ad in THE ZoNIAN,
'Honey for Sale.' "

Bulshi.-"Wanna go on a sleighing party?"
Viki.-"Who are we gonna slay?"

/'I',.!.'i.-"May I hold your hand?"
Edith Trowbridge.-"Of course not! This isn't
Palm Sunday."
White.-"\'ell, it isn't Independence Day,
either."

Ryan.-"Gee! Isn't NMarvin narrow-minded,
though?"


Flip.-"Ill saN! Why he'd c-it his hand if he
rubbed his forehead."

A TRIBUTE.
Breathes there a girl with soul so dead,
Who ever to her sheik hath said,
When do we cat ?

AS YOU LIkE IT.
Dvlgga.'.s Crois.

We have many cliques and clubs
In our curriculum
And certain\ hope that they endure
For many a millennium.

The Anion Valentinos,
That loyal band and true,
They have a sheik for leader
And %hat he says they do.

The Three Mlusketeers are eccentric
And their whims have given them fame
They've spent a Christmas vacation
On :he Tigri hunting for game.

These arc but a few of the many
Of whIh something should be said,
But their fame "ill live as their doings,
Immortal when we are dead.

"Silently, one by one
In the infinite books of the teachers,
Bloom the neat little zeros,
The forget-me-nots of the pupils."








THE ZONIAN.


Lester
Katherine Brown
Dorothy Eastman
Robert Engelke
Richard Engelke
larvin Banton
Horace Foster
Andrew Whitlock
Alton Whirc
Philip Thornton
Paul Sullivan
Don Harvey
Dinty MI...rc


Esther
Dorothy Eastman
Katherine Brown
M11,. McKim
''.\ k.." Baxter
Lucy Strawn
Theressa Betz
All of the Girls
Helene Grimison
MIar' .. Locken
Burnette \ 1,.i, h.i1n
Connie Graff
Mary Hearne


Banton.-'l"r. Boss, we're busy with the play.
Could you spare me for a few minutes."
Boss.-"I could spare you forever."

ist Freshie.-"I hear your dad has a wooden
leg."
2d Freshie.-"Yes, it pained me last night."
Ist Freshie.-"How come?"
2dFreshie.-"He got angry and hit me over the
head with it."

A man was driving along in his Ford one day
with his foot hanging over the door, and a young
boy, seeing him, pipes up with "Say, lircr,
you've lost your other roller skate."

Bobby (taking a moonlight walk).-"This cold
air chills me to the bone."
Musa.-"Why don't you put on your hat?"

Marvin.--"M\1 math. teacher, Mr. Flint, has
lost his job."
i;./.-"Really, how's that?"
Marvin.-"Yep, he's not my math. teacher any
more.

Miss Finnegan (in bookkeeping).-"Did you
foot it up?"
Paul Duran.-"No, I came in the bus."

"This fellow Foster tried to tell me that he has
had the same automobile for five years, and has
never paid a cent for repairs on it," said the fat
man. "Do you believe that?"
"I do," replied the thin one, sadly. "I'm the
man who did his repair work for him."


THE AFFECTIONATE ONES.


Foster.-
tiggs.-
Foster.


-"Are you married?"
-"No."
-"The lucky woman."


Mike Baxter.-"It is only 6 o'clock and I told
you to come after supper."
Dick.-"I'hat's what I have come after."

Flip.-"Did you see where a fellow went 35
days without a bath?"
Rena.-"No, I never read dirty stories."

Abner.-"Why do you keep asking me if I was
wounded in the Great War?"
Helene.-" \ ,l, you seem to have lost the use
of your arm."

Flip.-"Central, give me Balboa 22 double 2."
Central.--" 2222 ?"
Flip.-"Yes, and hurry! I'll play train with
you some other time!"

Guest at Taboga.-"I wish I had come here a
week ago."
Proprietor.-"Ah! You are flattering my es-
tablishment."
Guest.-"Oh, I don't know about that. What
I mean is I would rather have eaten that fish then
instead of now."

Maryon (reading conclusion of her love letter
aloud).-"And then I'll come home and marry the
sweetest little girl on earth."
Horace.-"What a mean trick after being en-
gaged to you, too."

Banlon.-"If a body sees a b:)dy
Studying for a quizz,
If a body helps a body,
Is it anybody's bizz?"
Boss.-"Well, I guess it iz."

Gery.-"'See that fellow from London? He
just passed without speaking to me."
Mr. Robertson.-- \\,il, he's English, and its
hard for him to see a joke."

ist Zoo flea.-"Come with me and we will have
a game of golf."
2dZoo flea.-"Where can we go?"
IstZoo flea.-"Oh, we will go over on the lynx."








~fIE zON$IANi.


One poor lone Freshman was nearly killed by
a train of thought running through his mind.

"Wake up," said the conductor to Douglas
Cross.
"I wasn't sleeping, but I hate to see women
sti nding."

Connie.-"Your new partner, Geary, is a rotten
dancer."
Maryon.-"I know-but, Oh how he can sit
out."

Hostess.-"Will you have pie or ice cream,
Philip ?"
Philip (after much thought).-"Neither, thank
you, I'll have a pie a la mode."

Young female clerk.-"Let me show you some
pretty stockings."
Young male customer.-"Now, now, that's not
nice. Pappa spank."

An Irishman while passing through a grave
yard saw these words written on a tombstone:
"I still live." Pat looked a moment and then
said, "Bijabbers, if I was dead I'd own up to it."

Salesman (trying to sell a farmer a bicycle).-
"But think, what a nice thing to ride around on,
and just for $35."
Farmer.-"No, I think I'll save my money and
buy a cow."
Salesman.-"But think, how funny you would
look riding around on a cow."
Farmer.-"Not half as funny as milking a
bicycle."

Parson (pinching a little boys legs).-"My, who
has nice, fat, chubby legs."
Little boy.-"l amma."

Teacher.-"Johnny, what is 2 times 3?"

Teacher.-"That's pretty good, Johnny."
7ohnny.--"Pretty good nothing, that's per-
fect."

White.-"Well, sir, my shot gun let out a roar,
and there lay a dead wolf ahead of us."
Mr. Boss.-"How long had it been dead."


Mr. Flint.-"W\on't you give me a kiss, little
man?"
Little Boy .hiding behind colored nurse girl).-
"You do it, Nora."

Boss.-"The acoustics are terrible in this
room.
Gerrans.-"Yes, I thought I smelled something
rotten."

Mother.-"Johnny, if you eat any more you
will burst."
fohnny.-"All right, mother, pass the cake and
get out of the way."

Tatom.-"But Dorothy, I haven't done any-
thing."
Dorothy (very indignantly).-'"No, you never
do! Good night."

Ralph.-"Why did your pop say I reminded
him of a telescope?"
Connie.-"Because you're so easy to see through
and you magnify e% erything."

Gwendolyn Bar.dr.-"Blame it all. I can't go
to the club dance. My trunks haven't come."
Simple Freshie.--"Oh, but it isn't that kind of
a dance."

First Maid.-"How do you like working for the
college Prof?"
Second Maid.-"Rotten! He and his wife are
always fighting and it keeps me going from the
keyhole to the dictionary."

Northrop.-"What does the Greek Professor
get?"
Knobinshue.-"Oh, about 3,000 per."
Nirthrop.-"How much does the football
coach get?"
Knobinshue.-"About 12,00o."
Northrop.-"Quite a discrepancy, I should
say."
Knobinshue.-"Well, did \ou ever hear 40,000
people cheer a Greek recital?"

Burglar (pointing pistol at Bobby).-"Your
money or your life."
Bobby.-"Shoot! You can't kill me. I wear
Paris garters; no metal can touch me."








THE ZONIAN.


Burnette.-"That roast duck in the window
makes my mouth water."
Paul (the brute).-"Well, then spit."

Bang! Went the rifles of the maneuvers. Oh!
screamed Mary Joe, stepping back into Andy's
arms. Then-"Oh, I was frightened by the rifles.
Pardon me."
"Not at all," said Andy. "Let's go over and
hear the artillery."

Attorney.-"And where did you see him milking
the cow?"
Witness.-"A little past the center, sir."

Frances B.-"How do you catch tripe ?"
White.-"I usually catch 'em with a butterfly
net."

Miss Gummersheimer.-"Is there any connec-
ting link between the animal and vegetable king-
dom ?"
Douglas.-"Yes mam! HASH!"

Dinty.-"What's the greatest danger in auto-
mobiling?"
Foster.-"Police!"

Bobby.-"If you won't love me I'll hang myself
on that tree right in front of your house."
Musa.-"Oh, please don't. Father hates to
have fellows hanging around."

Traffic cop.-"Say, didn't you see me wave
my hand to you?"
Esther.-"Yes, you fresh thing and if Lester
were here he'd paste you one."

Thornton.-"I was over at my girls house last
night, and someone threw a brick through the
window and hit the poor girl in the ribs."
Silverman.-"That's too bad. Did it hurt her
much?"
Thornton.-"No, but it 'busted' three of my
fingers."

Judge (to victim of hold up).-"And while you
were being relieved of your valuables, did you call
the police?"
Victim.-"Yes, your honor, everything I could
think of,"


Nowadays, that school-girl complex n is usually
found on the lapel of some man's coat.

Dentist (extracting tooth).-"This will cost you
ten dollars."
Patient.-"Keep the old thing!"

Miss Frost (as White falls down stairs).-"Oh,
Alton, did you miss a step?"
White.-"No mam, I hit every darn one of
them."

Weary infant (whose father is trying to walk
him to sleep).-"For the love of Mike, Pop, is
that the only step you know?"

Connie (to optician).-"Oh, doctor, I've just
broken my glasses. Will I have to be examined
all over again?"
Optician.-"No, just your eyes."

Miss Sherman.-"What is a single tax?"
Buster Burgoon.-"A tax on bachelors."

BAREFOOT GIRL.
"Blessings on thee, little Dame,
Barebacked girl with knees the same,
With thy red lips reddened more,
Smeared with lipstick from the store.
With thy rolled down silken hose,
And thy very scanty clothes,
From my heart I give thee joy,
Glad that I was born a boy."

7ohnny.-''Xl father has a wooden leg."
Jiimmy.-"That's nothing, my grandmother
has a cedar chest."

Stranger.-"What kind of a fellow is Gerrans?"
Mr. Boss.-"Well, he's one of those fellows who
always grabs the stool when there is a piano to be
lifted."

Sheiks at Ancon Clubhouse-Give us each a
Sheik sandwich.
The Waiter-"Which will you have-ham or
cheese."

Boss.-"What is play?"
Student.-"A very important business that
school interrupts."








THE ZONIAN.


Andrew W. (dashing into the office na -il hold-
ing his head).-"Give me something for my head
quick; give me something for my head."
.11. Boss.-"Get into the assembly, I wouldn't
take it as a gift."

Mr. Robertson.-"Boys, always love vyour
teachers."
Foster.-"Yes, I tried that once and she got
mad."

HOW WE KNOW THEM.

Evelyn Silverman.-"It's simply corking!"
Connie Graff.-"Isn't it precious?"
Maryon L.-"It's adorable."
Margaret Boyd.-"When do we eat ?"
Hattie Belle R.-"I want a picklie"
Abner Silverman.-"It's against my principles."
.ip.. McDade.-"Hooray for me! I'm Irish!"
Loretta Kocher.-"I thought I'd die!"
Florence Geary.-"\\ h re's the jolly old thing?"
Bebe Norfleet.-"Aw quit!"

FAVORITE SAYINGS.

Miss Frost.-"It's the selfsame thing."
Miss Sherman.-"One more time and I'll meet
your mother."
Mr. Boss.-"Now we're getting off the sub-
ject.-Oh, here is some more poetry I want to
show you."
Foster.-"But, Mr. Boss."
Jiggs.-"Can you im:a.'inr that!"
White.-"Como viene?"
Whitlock.-"Can't be bothered!"
Thornton.-"Oh, he don't know any better."
Elizabeth Norflee/.--'"Nio., see here!"
Miss Gummersheimer.-"Pupils, please don't
talk!"
Mr. Flint.-"Nothing is better than shrimp!"
"Isn't it thrilling?"
Mr. Robertson.-"I'll see that they do it."
Miss Finnegan.--"No! Do that lesson over!"
Maryon Locken.-"I don't know, but I'll ask
mother."


Mat. Brown.-"I think you are awful."
Gerrans.-"The way we used to do that in
Jamaica- -"
Banton.-"I'm sorry, but I've got to go hunt-
ing."
FlorideEdwards.-"Now don't tickle me!"
Loretta.-"I thought I'd die!"
Dorothy Easn,:an.--"\\here's Katherine?"
Miss Hopk:ns.-"\\'hen I was young and
tender."
IM POSSIBILITIES.
Gerrans.-Without a red nose.
Mathematics ,'acia; '.-Not bathing three times
a day and eating more than shrimp, crackers and
milk.
l/ ',:.'oci.-Not having a marcel wave.
Foster.-Ccming t': school fully dressed.
White.-Not squinting one eye.
Flip.-Havirm his Span;ih lesson.
Morris.-Nrit being poul r.om Santa Claus.
Banton.-Never in trouble.
Geary.-Not sa-sinL a school teacher.
Maryon anid P.,lria,.-Not bumming Foster
for a ride.
D.rw',vY.-Separated from Katherine.
Mr. Boss.--\ithout his songs and poems.
Doug Cross.-Flirring with girls.
MatBrown.-Not hanging around under mistle-
toe.
j.'*', r',.-Nrrt getinrw kkickd by a horse.
Loretta.-\Walking to school.
RobertEng,,.'.-Not having back %work.
Jiggs Cros..-Keeping away from Elizabeth
Granberry.
Elizabeth Ai:/l,.t.-Not getting some one in
trouble.

A tiny bit of powder
A tiny little rat.
A monstrous bunch of feathers
Something called a hat
A pair of high-heeled bootees,
A tiny little curl
Makes the freshest thing on earth
The modern high school girl.








THE ZONIAN.


69






70 THF ZONIAN.

5I I

A GAS STOVE

IS A COAL RANGE WITH A
| COLLEGE EDUCATION

IF IT CAN BE DONE WITH HEAT
YOU CAN DO IT BETTER WITH GAS

j ~Panama-Colon Gas Company
|B At Your Service



When in Panama
DO NOT FAIL TO CALL AT

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LARGE DEPARTMENT STORE

I A"'J.S0S Headquarters for Parisian Novelties
lPANAMA


COLON


PARIS






THE ZONIAN.


LA "EXPOSISION"

Furniture Factory

k=2 z THE LINE SECOND TO NONE =Z ~

All our goods are guaranteed to be of GENUINE NATIVE
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we will be glad to show you our large assortment of goods.

Sucesores de
CARLOS A. COWES CO., Prop.
AVENIDA CENTRAL, No. 28 PANAMA





Banco Nacional de Panama

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS B. 1,088,347.76
soEstab!ished in 1904

ml Administrator and Depository of the Panama Government
L Agencies in all the Provinces of the Republic

Ea GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES TO LET |
Jjuri1^^?^^^'^^^^'^!^'^^







72 THE ZONIAN.



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THE ZONIAN.


CECILIA THEATRE

(Panama's Home of
Photo-Dramatic Art)


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EVENING SHOWS 7.15 and 8.45 |



INTERNATIONAL HOTEL
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MEALS A LA CARTE AND TABLE D'HOTE

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THF. ZONIAN.


gI CHAMPIONSHIP ATHLETIC TEAMS
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THE ZONIAN.


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P. O. Box 284 P.O. Box, Cristobal 0o45
Phone, Panama 335 il MLU llG aE g UCU Phone, Colon 5
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r311










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THE ZONIAN.


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THE ZONIAN.


Ri ------I 4 [RFE 14 7



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ESTABLISHED 1892
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THE ZONIAN.


Dependable School Equipment

SThe "Lightning" Line

SL ANo. "400" Lathes are Recognized as "STANDARD" by all Institutions
r ie Bcciist
S 1z They are 300 to 500 pounds heavier than any other Manual Training Lathe
2 Variable Speed Motor Headstock can be furnished for either direct or alternating current
3 Control apparatus is built in and all operating mechanism entirely enclosed
4 Careless or inexperienced student cannot injure himself or the machine
S 5 Boys never play hookeyy" from "400o" Lathes
























No. "4co-A" Type faith totally enclosed variable speed D. C. Motor He dtocs and b It-:n c llrr1


The J. A. Fay c& Egan Company
ESTABLISHED 1830
World's Oldest and Largest Manufacturers of
WOODWORKING MACHINERY

Robertson Avenue at 34th Street CINCINNATI, OHIO, U. S. A.


Fbi.: book printed and bound at The Panamr. Canz.' Prcs,, Ml. H-fpe, Ca'nal Z j..




.'.








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