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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093678/00016
 Material Information
Title: Zonian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: St. Petersburg Printing Co.
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, FL
Publication Date: 1922
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Subjects / Keywords: Yearbook
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System ID: UF00093678:00016

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Foreword
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Main body
        Page 4
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        Page 69
    Back Matter
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text











9








































BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL.


FOREWORD.

We appreciate to the fullest extent the help
given by our many friends in making this issue of
THE ZONIAN a success. Especially do we thank
the staff of The Panama Canal Press for the
personal interest they have taken in us. We also
thank our faculty for the helping hand which
they have always given.












THE


VOL. XIII


ZONIAN


BALBOA, CANAL ZONE, 1911

PUBLISHED BY THE BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL


VEl W OF BALBOA PRADO WITH 1 TDAmL STRATIOsN Bi ILIoNG IN THE DI1.0s I l


CONTENTS.


Foreword ..
Zonian Staff
Editorials. .


...... WILLIAM SERGEANT, C., '22.
A. H. CLARK, '23


Faculty .. ....... ...
Graduates ....
Senior C hart . . .. ... . . .. ..
Alumni ............. CATHERINE M. L LCKEi '22
Class Prophecy ...... .... .. .
Evolution of the Class of'22. WILLIAM SERGEANTI, 22.
CATHERINE I. L.:CKEV, '22.
Class Will and Testament .......
Senior Songs . . . . ..
Good Roads Composition ....... ESIHER WIFT, '23
Junior C lass.... . .. .. .. ...... ..
Juniors' Alphabet ............ ANITA W\OOD, '23
Toby's Rise to Fame ......... JOSEPH CATE, '25,
A Vision ......... ...... NINA RIDENOI R, '22.
Sophomore Class ......... ........ .. .
A Nameless Day in B. H. S ....NINA RIDENOUR, L2.
Freshm an Class . .............


Panama l.a Via .ej .
The Scrap. ...
Stung! . .
L life's All.. .. .. ..
Spanish Sketches:
In "Chautfeur" Listo
iQue Mlaiana?
Society. . .
School Belles
Class Play .
The Morning After
Emblems .
Boys' Athletics
Girls' Athletics
Exchange,
Paradise Iost .
.imericks
Jokes .. .

Autographs and Addresses


IMILDRED GILL, '24
RICHAiD ROHUEN, '24
.. EDITH FoSTER, '22.
A.NIIA W \OO, '2..

B RI. B II.CEN, '22
HORACE CLARK, '23
VIO1.A BEWli.EY, '22.




ROBEKr .NGELKE, '24
CECILIA 'l'\V(IMEV, '22
IRENE SlIE.\VART, '22
VIOiLA BExItLE '22

.MARJORIE CAR IER, '24
ROBERI r NOFL ET, '23










THE ZONIAN.


Zonian btaff.


Editor-in-Chief.
Assistant Editor


BUSINESS BOARD.


Business Manager
Assistant Manager


STHOMAS DORAN, '22
JOSE GRAU, '22


Circulation Manager
Assistant Circulation Il.., .I


SGEORGE 1' \I'lO, '23
LONA RATHBONE, 24


ARTISTS.


HAROLD CAHALIN, '22.


BERYL ILGEN, '22.


EDITORIAL STAFF.


Literary Editor .
Alumni Editor
Athletic Editor (Girls)
Joke Editor .


NINA RIDENOUR, '22
CATHERINE LUCKY, '22
CECILIA TWOMEY, '22
ROBERT \.- itr f f, '23
Freshman Representative


Exchange Editor
Society Editor
Athletic Editor (Boys)
Joke Editor .
RICHARD ENGELKE, '25


SIRENE STEWART, '22
VIOLA BEWLEY, '22
ROBERT ENGELKE, '24
. MARJORIE CARTER, '24


SWILLIAM SERGEANT, C, '22
HORACE CLARK, '23







THE ZONIAN.


OUR OPPORTUNITY E S.

"United States' markets lie south and west, not in Europc.


The above statement was made by Senator
McCormack, of Illinois, before the Convention of
Illinois bankers. The truth of these words concern-
ing our markets to the south is manifested in the
increasing popularity of the study of Spanish in
high schools and colleges throughout the United
States.
Americans realize that if they are to get their full
share of Latin-American trade, which has been
practically monopolized by European countries,
they must change their tactics.
Progressive American business houses are no
longer is.rndliL' men to Latin-American republics
who can not speak Spanish. Their representatives
now, not only speak the language fluently but
also have a political, historical, and an economical
knowledge of the country, and above all, respect
the people and their institutions.
Balboa High School is turning out its quota of
Spanish-speaking students. These students have
splendid chances to learn and become acquainted
with the customs and manners of their fiun.ll..
neighbors, the Panamans, and can easily apply
the Spanish that they learn in school.


So bearing in mind Senator McCormack's
prophetic words, and taking advantage of our
opportunities, let us, students of Balboa High,
not only continue to study Spanish diligently but
also prepare ourselves, in order that the day any
of us go to the lands that "lie south" where some
of our alumni have gone and have made good,
it Ill be a credit to ourselves, an honor to our
High School, and a help, not a hindrance, to our
country.
'ILLIAM SERGEANT, C., '22.

RADIO-IS IT HERE TO STAY?

And now another result of the Great War has
come into the limelight. The World War was
responsible for the great improvement in such in-
ventions as aeroplanes, guns, and the like, and for
the advancement in the manufacture of dyes and
other necessary articles which formerly came from
Europe, but whose acquisition was made impos-
sible by the war. The great forward stride taken
by the science of radio communication can also
be traced to the war, although the advancement







THE ZONIAN.


made since the close of hostilities is as great, if
not greater than that made during the war.
At the present time, the world, and especially
the United States, is "radio mad." Hundreds of
new radio manufacturing companies have sprung
into existence, and the old ones have increased
their output threefold, indeed-some of them have
their next six months' output already sold, and
are not iaccptinl any more orders.
Every large electrical company and quite a few
colleges, maintain broadcasting stations from
which are sent out music, stock and weather re-
ports, news b.illcrirn-, speeches, sermons, and lec-
tures, which are picked up by hundreds of thou-
sands of waiting amateurs. During the war, many
men were trained by the Government to be expert
operators, who, after they were discharged, kept
right up with radio. These men have played no
small part in the creation of the present "craze."
But with all this enthusiasm prevalent, it is only
natural that one should wonder how long it is going
to last. To some people, radio has come to have
a permanent position in their daily life. There are
thousands of farmers, for instance, who depend
almost entirely upon wireless for their weather re-
ports, which are sent out by the Government.
Ma!n men, whose occupations carry them far
from human habitation, are put into communica-
tion with the outside world through the medium
of wireless. Radio, unlike automobiles and aero-
planes, may be Lnjiuycd by the poor as well as
the rich; the size and capacity of one's set only


is limited by the size and capacity of one's pocket-
book. Of course, a large and more expensive set
is better than a smaller, cheaper one, but the per-
son who can afford only a cheap set will g&t his
share of. the benefits and pleasures of wireless
just the same as his more fortunate brother.
The big trouble with radio, is its lack of pr iacy.
It is impossible to prevent anybody who wants to,
from "listening-in." In this respect, the telephone
and the telegraph are superior to wireless because
the number of persons who can "listen in" is nec-
essarily limited. Static disturbance is another
thing which must be overcome in some way. The
Government has made laws and appropriated
money to enforce these laws, which will regulate
the "use of the air" so as to cut down the inter-
ference with Government and commercial stations
which is caused by "ham" operators and "air-
hogs," who are usually rank amateurs who per-
sist in filling the aid with a meaningless jargon, and
who either don't understand, or don't want to
understand the hundreds ofQR T's (stop sending
which are sent him. Of course, every amateur
must begin at sometime or other, but unless this
sort of unnecessary annoyance is curbed, the Gov-
ernment will be forced to restrict, instead of en-
courage, amateur radio work.
Whether radio will keep on at the rate that it
is going now, seems to be a question which only
time can answer, but, as far as can be seen, inter-
est in it is not on the decline-nor will it be for
some time to come.
A. H. CLARK, '23.


SUNSET.

Anita Wood, '23.


The sun made love to the sky all day,
He flattered, cajoled, in a methodical way;
He smiled, he winked, Oh! What a shame
To play with the heart of this pretty dame!


Now the sky was fickle and very vain;
She vowed the heart of the sun to reign;
But she lacked courage and was quite shy,
Especially at time to say good-by.


For you see 'twas time for the sun to set,
And, as he sank, the sky's eyes he met;
He hesitated-then kissed her cheek, so fair-
She blushed, and it was sunset there.






THE ZONIAN.


Saculttp.


A. R. LANG.
Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools.
A. B., Nebraska W...,]..i University.
A. M., University of Nebraska.

F. X. KARRER.
Assistant to Superintendent.
Wilson's Modern Business College, Seattle.
Washington State Normal School, Ellensburg.
A. B., University of Washington.
M. A., Columbia University.
M. Pd., New York University.

BERNARD I. Boss.
Principal.
Graduate work, Oshkosh.
Wisconsin State Normal School.
Ph. B., University of Wisconsin.
Post Graduate work, University of Wisconsin.
Science.

OLGA J. FROST.
A. B., Mount St. Vincent-on-the-Hudson.
I ,..-, and Spanish.

EDNA L. V. BAER.
A. B., University of \\ '...ni. .
Sheboygan Business College.
Gregg School.
Commercial Subjects.

WALLACE M. LEE.
Wooster College.
Manual Training.


A. BEASLEY DENNY.
B. A., University of Texas.
Mathematics.


HATTIE B. PALtL.
B. A., M. A., University of California.
Spanish and History.


HELEN L. CARRIER.
Supervisor of Public School Music.
A. B., University of \1i,.. ,..r i.

NELLIE A. HOPKINS.
A. B., University of South Dakota.
English and Latin.


FLORENCE A. WELTS.
A. B., University of Washington.
English and History.


META GUMMERSHEIMER.
A. B., Illinois College.
Graduate work, University of Wisconsin.
Graduate work, University of Nlichig.in.
Science and Commercial Arithmetic.


ETTA V. NORCUTT.
B. S., Nl.nr.ii i State College, Bozeman.
Home Economics.


ej




8 THE ZONIAN.


4.9a
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THE ZONIAN.






VIOLA RHUE BEVWLEY..

Pennsylvania.

"Very gentle, good, and true,
A friend to me, a friend to you."


School activitiess.

1919-Glee Club.
1921-Class President.
1922-School librarian; Social Editor,TH-E /oI AN; Class
President; Pianist for Assembly


IRENE ELIZABETH SrEWART.

Indiana.

"Graceful and useful all she does,
Blessing and blest where e'er she goes."


School .ctiities.

919--Glee Club; Class Basket Ball.
192---School Librarian.
1921-Class Secretary and Treasurer.
1922-Secretary of THE ZONIAN Staff; School Li-
brarian; Class Secretary and Treasurer;
Exchange Editor, THE ZoNIAN.


CECILIA TWOMEY.

Michigan.

"There is many a black, black eye, they say,
But none so bright as mine."

School activitiess.

191,)t-Athletic Council; Class Basket Ball; Track;
Glee Club.
1,zo- Athletic Council; Class Basket Ball; Track.
1921--AthleticCouncil;ClassTennis; Track; Basket
Ball.
1922-Athletic Editor (Girls), THE ZONIAN; Athletic
Council; Track; Tennis; Basket Ball.


BERYL G. ILGEN.

Nebraska.

"If style is the dress of thoughts, he has brilliant thoughts."

School activities .

1919-Class Basket Ball.
1920-Class Basket Ball.
1921-StagClub; Class Basket Ball; Track; Tennis.
1922-Class Vice President; Athletic Council; Staff
Artist, THE ZoxNIA; S-a;e Manager of
Senior Play; Stag Club; High School Swim-
ming Team; Class Tennis; Basket Ball.




THE ZONIAN.


zz








THE ZONIAN.


ELLEN MARIE ROBERTS.

Ohio.

"She sleeps nor dreams but ever dwells
A perfect form in perfect rest."

School Activities.

1919-Class Secretary and Treasurer; Glee Club;
Class Basket Ball.
1922-Senior PI ., High School Tennis.


CECI.E AGNES GARDINER.

Kansas.

"Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate."

School Activities.

192o--Class Basket Ball; Track.


EDITH TOPLEV FOSTER.

Pennsylvania.

'I thoughts are my companions,
Nor care I for the love of man."

School activities .

1919-Glee Club.
192o-Class Basket Ball.


JOSE ROMAND GRAU.

Spain (Catalonia).

"Men of few words are the best men."

School Activities.

1921-Class Basket Ball.
1922-Assistant Business Manager, THE ZONIAN;
Class Basket Ball.




THE ZONIAN.


12


. It










THE ZONIAN.







MARGARET JANE MIONTGOMERY.

Iowa.


"Nor grace nor charm is wanting
To set the heart on fire."


School .ct iit'ies.

1919-Glee Club.
,92co-Class Basket Ball.
i,22-Senior Plav.


NINA AL.I N RImi-ENOUR.


Ohio.


Indiana.


"She is a friend, kind-hearted and tuii "


Sc/oowl .ci:,itics.


1919-Glee Club.
192o-Class Basket Ball.
1922-Alumni Ediitor, THI ZoxNIXs.


"She opens her mouth with wisdom and in her
tongue is the law of kindness."


School cti cities.

1922- Iirerary Editor, THE Zo.ANx; High School
Tennis.


WI.LIANM MAI'v.E ScERGc C.

Cuba (Habana).


".o! Though vanquished, he can ,. .. ll
But his place in our hearts is hard to fill."


School/ Activities.

1919-Class Basket Ball.
1920-Representative, Student Council; Mustache
Club; Class Basket B .II, Baseball.
1921-Athletic Editor (Boys), THE ZONSIA\; Vice
President of Overall Club; Stag Club;
High School Tennis; Class Basket Ball.
1922-President, Athletic Council; Editor-in-Chief,
THEZoX I(N; Senior Play; Stag Club; High
School Tennis; Class Basket Ball.


CATHERINE MARY I.Kl IE




14 THE ZONIAN.










^^vA^^










THE ZONIAN.


THOMAS EDWARD DORAN.

New York.

"Singing he was, or playing all the day;
He was as fresh as is the month of May."

School Activities.

1919-Winner, Class "Four-Minute Speech."
19i--Stag Club; School Orchestra.
1922-Business Manager, THE ZONIAN; Stag Club:
School Orchestra; Class Basket Ball.


GEORGIA ADA FRANSEN.
HELEN ANETA ALBIX.
Mis sissippi.
New York.
"Lo! Where she comes along with
portly grace,
Like Phoebe from her chamber of the "In her very quietness there is charm."
East."
School Aclivities.
School Activities.
tli9-Glee Club; Class Basket Ball.
1919-Glee Club.


MARJORIE EARLE GERRANS.

California.

"Fair and fair, and twice so fair,
As fair as any may be."

School Activities.

1919--Winner of High School Declama-
tory Contest.
1922-Senior Play.


HAROLD JOHN CAHALIN.

New York.


"Good looking, full of fun
With a smile for everyone "


School Activities.

1920-Mustache Club.
1921-Staff Artist, THE ZONIAN; Overall Club; Stag
Club.
1922-Staff Artist THE ZONIAN; Senior Play; Stag
Club; High School Swimming Team; Class
Basket Ball.












16 THE ZONIAN.


SENIOR CHART.


NAME. NICKNAME, TRADE MARK. PET POSSESSIONS. HOBBT. WHEW FOiND.


That's it exactly..............

O, Jiggers'...................
Don't show your ignorance ...
Oh, yeah?. .................
Aw, shut up!..................
Oh, Joy! ..... ...............
You're good ....... .. ......
Allons enfants!.... ....
Pause!..... .......

You're wrong!..... .

You and me both ........
Honey Dear ... ....
Uh-huh.......... .
Oh, no-o-o!. .... .

Good Morning! ..........
Oh, Goody! .........
Great guns! .... .. ....


Can't see from where we sit.
Class of '22.............
His gracefulness ...........

His girl .... .............
Her 23 credits...........
Her walk .............
Striped shirts, flashy ties....
Her grin..............
Her Spanish....... ....

The Zonian......... .
Mickey .......... .
Her alluring smile.........
Literary genius...........
Her coiffure ........ ... .
His chances for a diploma.,
Saccharine smile........
Her Gunn .......


Saying little. ........... ...

Calling Class Meetings......
Dn. inr

Kidding the girls...........
Exercising her voice.........
Rehearsing the Senior play...
Drawing .................

Getting blows ............
Collecting dues......:...
Arguing .. ......... :.,

Typing ........ ........
Bluffing ...............
tu-,iair[. L pt in

Taking vacations.......
Making ,.(; L hi th ,. ,jriLtai
Shedding sunshine........

Quitting school............


At the movies.
At the piano.
At the dances.
With girls.
In Ihb ltudy Hall.
SPlay practice.
With pen and brush.
SAt the Gun Club.

Library.
. Boss's Office.

STyping Room.
Union Club.
Physics laboratory.
Prof. Schneider's Studio.
H i a i good lime.

SCooking.
Hunting with her Gunn.


U. S. Destroyers Anchored at Pacific Entrance.


Aneta Albin ......

Viola Bewley.....
Harold Cahalin....
Thomas Doran.....

Edith Foster ......
Marjorie Gerrans..

Beryl Ilgen.........
Cecilia Twomey...
Irene Stewart.....

William Sergeant..
Catherine Luckey.
M. Montgomery.
N. Ridenour....
1 R.:.bri.

Jose Grau.........

Agnes Gardiner....
Georgia Fransen ..


'Nita.......
Vide.....

SHarry ......
Tommy.....
Edie........
Olive........

Nick........
Ciel ........
Rene.......

Uncle Billy.

Tatty.....
Peggy Jane.
40-love ....

Slim....
Joe. .......
Sunny......
Jorgee.....









THE ZONIAN.


STREET LEADING TO ANCON HOSPITAL


MR 81059-2


17


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18 THE ZONIAN.


Catherine M. Luckey, '22.


"On bravely through the sunshine and the showers,
Time hath his work to do, and we have ours."


Charles Grobe, '21, our Editor-in-Chief of last
year's ZONIAN, is now working in Saginaw, Mich.
Charles expects to enter college this fall.
Maria McMahon, '21, is now in Miami, Fla.,
where she has a position as a stenographer. We
hear that Miami is a beautiful place, but wonder if
Marie isn't lonesome for Panama and her B. H. S.
friends.
Catherine Parmeter, '21, is in College of Mount
St. Vincent-on-the-Hudson. It is rumored that
she is afflicted with homesickness, and may return
to the Zone in the Spring.
Harry Bissell and Leonard LandEr-', both of
'21, are taking up Chemical I.nginerirng and are
making splendid records. Harry is in Villlanova
College, Villanova, Pa., and Leonard is in Wash-
ington State College.
Theodore Knapp, Elois Pierson, William Allen,
Alice Bleakley, Gertrude John, Catherine Kaye,
and May IW'. nn., have remained on the Isthmus
after their graduation, most of them being em-
ployed here in various places.
Annie and Ruth Boyd, both of '21, are in a
school of Industrial Arts, in Denton, Tex. They
are taking special courses and getting along very
well.


George Danskin, '21, is working in Elizabeth,
N. J. He writes that he is also studying Gregg
Shorthand; several of the girls in the commercial
classes have voiced doubts as to whether George
will master Gregg or not.
lMa Duncan, '21, is going to be a nurse, and is
now a student in Letterman's General Hospital
in San Francisco. We all know May will make
a good nurse, and wish her the best of luck.
Catherine Kaye, '21, has taken up millinery as
a profession, and is studying in the Normal School
in Panama City.
Ethel Getman, '21, has a position -as a stenog-
rapher in a real estate office in Birmingham,
Ala.
George Capwell, '21, is doing well in Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute. He is studying Chemical
Engineering.
MARRIAGES.
Dan Cupid has been very busy, claiming many
victims among our B. H. S. classmates, this last
year, and marriages and engagements are rapidly
increasing.
Elois Pierson, '21, and Lieutenant Potter were
the first to join the ranks, and were married in


--








THE ZC


August, They are now living at Fort Clayton,
where Lieutenant Potter is stationed.
Miar'.irct P. Halligan, '21, was married to
Ensign P. D. Lampert, U. S. N., in December.
Mr. and Mrs. Lampert are now livingin Wasl.ing-
ton, D. C.
Jane Calvit, '20, and Herbert Knapp, who
were married in September, are now residing in
Houston, Tex.
Frances Westberg, also of '20, was married to
Mr. Barr this last year. \Mr. and \I-,. Barr are
now living in Pedro \lii,:l.
The n-.irri.a,. of Francis X. Kerr, 'I9, and Abbie
I. McKeown, was quite a surprise to their many
friends. Mr. and Mrs. Kerr, although married
in New York in September, kept their marriage
a secret until December. They are now living in
Champaign, Ill., where Francis is finishing his
college course.
Another marriage of interest to the graduates
of '18, was that of Beatrice Glawson of Balboa,
to Mr. A. Fernandez. Beatrice and her husband
are now living in Houston, Tex.
Charles Davis, '18, and Gwennie Layland, were
also victims of Cupid's darts and were married
in August. They are now in Pullman, \Wash.,
where Charles is going to college.
Lois Greene, also of '18, was married recently
to Mr. MI.L'In.rr.Mr. and Mrs. \l.IL' r are now
located in Ai2u.aditlc, where they will remain
temporarily.
Clara Wood, '20, was married to Sgt. Sidney
Neville in February. Mr. and Mrs. Neville are
now living in Quarry Heights.
Andrew Fraser, '15, was married to Miss
Gaither, our Physical Directress, in February.
Mr. and Mrs. "Andy" Fraser are now living in
Balboa.


The Alumni is rapidly increasing every year,
and our limited space will not allow us to print
the names and addresses of all of past graduates.


)NIAN. 19


So far as we have been able to find out, the ad-
dresses are the same as in 1921 ZONIAN, with the
exception of the following:

Fred (Whiston) Bailey, 's1, Balboa, C. Z.
Gabriel Butler, '16, Balboa, C. Z.
Ave Maria Agnes Doyle, 'r6, Cristobal, C. Z.
Edward Lloyd Greene, '17, care of Theta Xi Frat., Pullman,
Wash.
James Stephen Engelkc, '18, Balboa, C. Z.
Beatrice Glawson Fernandez, '18, Houston, Tex.
Charles Davis, 'i Washington State C.:l ..-, Pullman, Wash.
Lucille Koperski, 'I Pedro Miguel, C. Z.
M argaret Hi 11.... 11, '18, Cristobal, C. Z.
Blanchard Vivian Hutchings, '19, Panama Construction Co.,
Mensabe, R. P.
Jane Calvit Knapp, '20, 2305 Gano St., Houston, Tex.
Frances Westb.rg Barr, '2, Pedro "\lLi,.. C. Z.
John Muro Golden, '19, Colorado School of Mines, Golden,
Colo.
GRADUATES OF 1921.

Charles Grobe, i 20 Cass St., Saginaw, Mich.
Theodore Knapp, Balboa, C. Z.
Elois Pierson Potter, Fort Clayton, C. Z.
Harry Bissell, Villanova College, Villanova, Pa.
Alice Bleakley, Balboa, C. Z.
Annie Boyd, C. I. A. Station, Denton, Tex., care of Smith,
Carrol Hall.
Ruth Boyd, C. I. A. Station, Denton, Tex., care of Smith,
Carrol Hall.
George Capwell, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy,
N. Y.
George Danskin, 335 Livingston St., Elizabeth, N. J.
Mlay Duncan, Letterman's General Hospital, San Francisco,
Cal.
Ethel Getman, 12i Princeton Ave., Birmingham, Ala.
Margaret Halligan Lampert, Washington, D. C.
Gertrude John, Cristobal, C. Z.
Catherine Kaye, Panama City.
Leonard E. Landers, care of Theta Xi Frat., Pullman, Wash.
Florinet Matter, Balboa, C. Z.
Marie McMahon, 46 Fifth St. NW., Miami, Fla.
Catherine B. 1'r,,. rer. College of Mount St. Vincent-on-the-
Hudson, Ne.. York City.
Elizabeth Twitchell, ;24 Highland St., Columbus, Ohio.
Cornelia Van Hardeveld, 133. Grant Ave., Denver, Colo.
Gertrude Van Hardeveld, 1335 Grant Ave., Denver, Colo.
Mae Jeanette Wynne, Balboa, C. Z.
Eleanor Bello, 379 Bloomfield Ave., Newark, N. J.


THE VAMPIRE.
(With apologies to Kipling.)

.darjorie Carter, '24.


There was a girl and she did her hair,
(Even as you and I)
With a rat, and a switch, and a hairpin there,
And called it the "Mode of Vanity Fair,"
(Even as you and I)


She bobbed her hair and rolled her sox,
(Even as you and I)
Shaved her eyebrows and curled her short locks
Bought silk stockings with silver clocks,
(Even as you and I).








THE ZONIAN.


CLASS PROPHECY.


It %.i,- nc.ir Br',:iadva.i in Ne%% Ycork Citr, in
the big theater district, at 8.30 p. m., on Friday
evening, October 21, 1942. I had just landed in
the old city, and, not knowing how to spend the
evening, strolled down to the theaters. Glancing
at the highly illuminated electric signs, as I went
along, none seemed to tempt me, until suddenly
as I came to the New Century, I saw in red, green,
and white lights, this:



THE PLAY OF THE SEASON
"THE MAN WHO WENT,"
WITH THE
WORLD'S GREATEST ACTOR,
STEVEN SLACK.



I couldn't believe my eyes. Could it be my old
schoolmate? I've got to see that show, and see
him again. I went to the ticket window, and
bought a box seat, near the stage. As I
entered the box, my vision seemed to fail me
again. There sat Aneta! Yes, there she was-
"Why, Aneta Albin," I said.
"\I dear friend," she crid,]. "What a joy to
meet you again, but for the L years, I've
never signed myself as Allinl. r you hear?
I was married to the deares t boy'in the world,
Steven Slack. Ion't you remember him? He's
playing here to-night. Steven, our old classmate."
After the play they both begged me to spend the
night with them, with the promise to tell me where
to find another of our old class of 1922 in the
mn.rnrnL'. It was Edith Foster, now head super-
intendent of all the large New York high schools,
and she was graduated in '22!
After breakfast, I said I simply had to go to the
Fifth Avenue Bank to cash a check, so I bade them
adieu for the present.


I walked into the bank and presented my
check. I was told I could'nt cash it there as I'd
brought no one to identify me. "\\ell," I said,
"I'll see the president, and explain my case."
And who should it be but Tommy! Yes! Thomas
Doran, President of that bank, and worth more
money than he could count. Cash my check!
I guess he did! But his appearance was some-
what changed. He'd grown stouter, and wore a
mustache. And still a bachelor! How that poor
boy suffered from lovesickness 20 years ago in
Balboa High, when he'd have married that girl,
if he'd only had the money! "Tommy! not found
'Miss Right' yet?" But he whispered "There is
someone, old pal, she's traveling in Europe just
at present. You remember Georgia Fransen? Sure
you do; well, she's the only girl for me; had to
pick a Pedro Miguel girl after all. You just wait
and see. Going to tie that knot very soon when
she comes back." "Here, Miss Luckey," he said,
"see that this is O. K'd, please." Why, another of
our old crowd! Tatty Luckey, now a private
secretary to one of New York's biggest bankers.
She was just the same girl of 20 years ago. My,
it was good to see her again!
As I walked out of the door, whom should I
meet, but two ladies "dressed to kill," right up to
style. Ellen Roberts and Viola Bewley. Both
in the musical world. Ellen to make her debut in
the Metropolitan Opera House this coming fall,
and Viola playing in the big Strand Orchestra.
Who'd have thought it! I was simply bewildered
to know what to do. Who was the next one I'd
meet?
I flew back to Steven, Aneta, and Edith.
"My Lord! I've seen Tommy, Ellen, Vi, Catherine,
and heard about Georgia, besides you three!
Are there any more around this place?"
"Yes!" said Steven, "you can find Bill Sergeant
down near the East River, in charge of the building
of that huge bridge they are erecting before they
do away with old Brooklyn Bridge. He has drawn
all the plans and is entirely responsible for the








THE ZONIAN.


success of that undertaking, but he's a genius in
his line, and that's going to be the greatest piece
of work the world's ever heard of. And here, read
this." He handed me the society page of the
New York Times. I read: 'lI -e. Agnes Gard-
iner and Nina Ridenour, both B. A.'s and M. A.'s,
and graduates of Columbia University, New York,
will lecture on 'How to Keep Your Husbands
Home.' The proceeds to be donated to the Bachelor
Girls' League, as a consolation to their ill luck at
not having a life partner to worry over." I
glanced on in the paper, and to my surprise saw:
"Spain overthrows her king! Jose Grau to be the
first president of the new republic!" Jose Grau,
who sat beside me in English literature, the boy
with the glossy pompadour, now President of
Spain! What a funny, strange world! How times
change.
Well, it was 6.30 p. m. so I said I'd ride down
town. Aneta and Steven declined the invitation to
accompany me, as the latter had to act.
Lateron in theevening I was passing St. Patrick's
Cathedral when the sounds of Lohengrin's weddingg
N\.irih reached my ears. I stopped to listen,
and a car pulled up. Out stepped a charming
bride. Heaven's above! It was Mir., ir .r Mont-
gomery. Whom was she marrying! She, the
girl who said she'd never get married. \ho had
made her lose her heart? I stood there gazing in
bewilderment when someone bumped me, and
made me get my senses back.
"Oh, pardon," he said, "didn't mean it."
''", stars! Beryl Ilgen, what are you doing
here?" I managed to stammer.


"Why, my old friend," he said, grasping my
hand. "What a surprise. I've come all the way
from the middle west to cartoon our old pal,
Harold Cahalin (now professor of ballroom danc-
ing), who is to get married to Margaret, -v1
believe me, some picture of him is coming ou' ii,
to-morrow's paper. He played me a devil
trick that way, when I got married. Come on in
with me and let's see Harold drop the ring."
\1. goodness! Who's that as chief bridesmaid,
Beryl," I asked, "she looks familiar."
"Why, that's Cecilia Twomey; haven't seen
her since B. H. S. days, but I hear she's the great-
est all-round woman athlete in the United States.
She sails next year to compete in the Olympic
games. Here comes the bride and groom. \ ish
'em luck. If he's as happy as I am, he'll be (. K.
I've the sweetest little girlie! Said I'd get married;
remember that day we were talking in the stuld
hall in Balboa High? Well, old classmate, I did;
but not at the age you folks said and she's the
only girl! She's a real dream! I.ook us up when
you come West; do. It's good to meet a true
friend. How do youI like this cartoon ? You know
that's nm line, decided to take it up after all;
earn over 20oo a week now! ()h! say, by the way,
did you see in yesterday 's paper that Irene
Stewart is in 'Frisco, and is a candidate for
the next president of the Inited States- But -
I must say good-by now; have to catch the li.,3
train home. .1dios, Margie. Drop me a line."
I returned to Aneta that evening, feeling very
satisfied in mind, having seen or heard of every
member of our old class of 1922.


EVOLUTION OF THE CLASS OF i.
Catherine Luckev, '22.
IWilliam Sergeant, '2.


ANCIENT HISTORY, 1918-1919.

In the month of October, the year of our Lord,
1918, a band of eager students came to Balboa
High. Upon seeing the great richness that abound-
ed therein, they decided to settle and make their
new homes in this beautiful spot. These Fresh-
men, as they were called by all the Upper Classmen,
would have been contented and happy in their
new-found home, had it not been for the cruel
persecution, which they were subjected to, at the
hands of the Upper Classmen. Mlan: of the Fresh-


men fled to other regions, while those who re-
mained, were reduced to a state of vassalage and
as a badge of being such, the males were com-
pelled to shave off all their hair.
Little else is known of these early settlers as
few records were written; their civilization being
of an extremely low order; and, moreover, they
did not have the time, for they were continually
fleeing from their enemies, a tribe called the
Sophomores. This tribe was of a warlike nature
but was on about an equal footing inll.. II, ll.
with the Freshmen.








THE ZONIAN.


MEDIEVAL HISTORY, 1919-1920.

After many ages, numbering roughly about
12 moons, these early colonists gained much power
and invaded the Sophomores' territory; driving
out the hated Sophomores who sought refuge in
the land of the Juniors. The invaders decided to
call themselves Sophomores since they were occu-
pying the territory of this name. These new
Sophomores became famous for being fearless
explorers. Among their most noted explora-
tions was a perilous voyage to Taboga, a volcanic
island in the South Sea. Another voyage was
made to Taboguilla, a barren island, far to the
south of Panama.

MODERN HISTORY, 1920-1921.

Three years after the colonization of Balboa
High, the class of 1922 became known as the
Junior clan. The progress of this clan was rapid
and in a very short time they had organized a
strong republican form of government; in the
first presidential election, Viola Bewley was
chosen to be their George Washington. President
Bewley filled this important office in a most
efficient manner during her entire administration.
The Juniors, satisfied with their faultless govern-
ment, discarded politics and turned their atten-
tion to industry (studying) and to society. In
the former they were not very successful but they
excelled in the latter.
With the aid of Miss Simpson, who was the
expert advisor of the Junior clan upon all matters
of state, they emerged ictruri,:us in a hard-fought
battle for first place in the High Schoul Christmas
entertainment. Their program "A Mock Wed-
ding" won for them a tremendous applause, as
well as a little check (-'5) for first prize.
Another important social event was a brilliant
costume dance which they gave at the Tivoli
Hotel. This popular dance cost the Juniors a
large sum of money, but the fun and good time
that everyone had, more than made up for the
paltry (?) sum.
Probably the most talked-of event for many
weeks, was the Junior-Senior banquet, held at


the Hotel Tivoli. This banquet was given by the
Juniors in honor of their ally, the Senior Class of
'21. The most delicious dishes accompanied with
the sweet strains of the orchestra; spiced now
and then with an eloquent speech or a real joke,
will never be forgotten by those who were present.

HISTORY OF THE YEAR 1922.

At the beginning of the fourth and final year
of their colonization of Balboa High, these
students broke away from their tiresome oppres-
sors (the faculty), and proclaimed themselves the
U. S. of Balboa High (meaning United Seniors
of Balboa High). A Constitution was drawn up
and accepted, by which the new government was
to be governed. In the elections for 1922, the
Girls' Party easily swept away all opposition
and elected Viola Bewley, President, with Beryl
Ilgen as Vice President and the energetic Irene
Stewart was entrusted with the responsibilities
of Secretary of the Treasury (Secretary and Treas-
urer). Miss Hopkins was selected as Advisor to
the State.
Early in the year, a serious dispute threatened
to split the government. The trouble was due to
the inability of the citizens (Seniors) to decide
on graduation pins or rings. Seeing a revolution
inevitable unless the question was immediately
settled, the Executive called a meeting of the
leaders of both sides to arbitrate the matter.
The desired results were obtained by wisely allow-
ing each party to have its choice.
Society progressed by leaps and bounds during
this period of 1922 but will not be discussed here,
since it is written up in detail in the Society Section
of the 1922 ZONIAN, the official record.

SUMMARY.

The past progress and development of this
mighty class of '22 has had no parallel in history.
This opinion the authors base on their thorough
investigations of historic facts. And there is no
doubt but that the future history of the world will
be largely shaped by its members who are now
venturing forth with pen or sword to conquer
and to subdue.








.THE ZONIAN.


CLASS WILL AND TESTAMENT.


We, the Seniors of 1922, being of as sane a mind
as any class could be after 4 years of hard labor,
do hereby make, publish, and present our last will
and testament, making null and void all former
wills made by us:
First. We, the class of '22, do solemnly and
generously bequeath to our Superior Faculty, our
many virtues, also hope they will instill the spirit
of our class in the lower classmen for the coming
years.
Second. To the Juniors, we bequeath all our
dignity, reserve, and power as a Senior class;
also rows seven and eight, to have, to hold, and to
cherish until they depart from the Sacred Hall
of Knowledge.
Third. Having various individual talents and
traits of character, we bequeath them to our fellow
classmen as follows:
Jos6 Grau graciously bequeaths his fondness for
modern novels to Alfred Kelts.
Cecilia Twomey leaves her total lack of for-
mality to Anna Cate, and knows the transition will
be appreciated if possessed by Anna.
Nina Ridenour gl.idl% relinquishes her matron-
like disposition to Ruth Foster.
Irene Stewart, in view of the urgency of the
occasion, leaves her knil..l.'.., of books to Mar-
garet Kerr.
Catherine Luckey bequeaths her ability to dress
her hair beautifully and artistically to Esther
Greene. We (knowing from experience) feel it
our duty to warn the heir of this inheritance of the
damage that can be done therewith.
Marjorie Gerrans most willingly leaves her
English accent and force of expression to Naomi
Gates.


Georgia Fransen readily relinquishes her slight
figure to Aen:- M\I I)ade.
William Sergeant wishes to leave to \I tr'. n
Banton his ability to argue, and hopes that Marvin
will be as successful in "getting his opponent's
goat.
Viola Bewley leaves her pep and every-ready
willingness to lend a helping hand to Oliver
Schrover.
Aneta Albin wishes to leave her respect for her
elders to Jeannette Griffith.
With full intentions of leaving something to the
Freshman class, Beryl Ilgen bequeaths to Leroy
Atkins his "dandyish" appearance.
Harold Cahalin lovingly gives his dancing
ability, and .Afi r i. ri, for the lower class women,
to Lewis Scull.
Thomas Doran, hoping he will accomplish his
dream of winning the "only" girl he has had to
leave behind him, bequeaths his art of "falling in
love" to Carl Newhard.
Edith Foster, from the depths of her benevolent
nature, leaves her lack of vanity to Rena De Young.
Agnes Gardiner bequeaths to Robert Norfleet,
her modesty and optimism of nature.
Always willing to give, \l.ir.,r.. r M .nr..t.me -r,
leaves to Florence Robinson her short skirts and
artistic nature.
Ellen Roberts leaves to one of our beloved mem-
bers of the faculty, Mr. Lee, her ability to sing.
This document being duly witnessed and signed
is hereby declared legal and valid.
(Sieni. 1) THE SENIOR CLASS.
[OUR SEAL.]


TOURISTS-HOW YOU KNOW 'EM.
Mildred Gill, 'a4.


The men wear white pith helmets,
Field glasses on one shoulder;
And the book they always carry
Reads Panama Picture Folder.


The lassies have long, flowing veils,
And Panamas, brand new,
And woolen skirts, and tennis shoes,
And Chinese parasols, too.


But they a!l have sunburned noses,
They all have Panama flags,
They all have folding kodaks,
And they all have native bags.


a







THE ZONIAN.


S$e rorS


44
/ Jr


C.,oc"i
Ok3
C,0-0-"


-~------


--









THE ZONIAN.


SENIOR SONGS.


TABOGA ISLE.

(To the tune of "Sally.")

Edith Foster, '2.

Seniors, won't you come back
for our island is not the same?
You can raise old cain.
For what we're after is your
sunshine and your laughter.
No other crowd can be so jolly
in our hearts we miss your folly;
Won't you come back to our island,
Don't say no!


FAREWELL.

(Tune, "Sweet Lady.")

Ellen Roberts, '22.

Dear schoolmates, how we hate to say good-by
To everyone in Balboa High.
Oh! How when sailing o'er the ocean
We'll think of our four years of devotion
To Balboa High we love so dear.
It's here we spent so many happy years;
So, schoolmates, when you're mighty blue
Just think of the class of '22.


FLAT AII(H -SANTO DOMINGO C'HIRCH.


MEMORIES OF B. H. S.


(Tune, "All by Myself.")

Viola Bewlev, '22.

Now as we sail o'er the ocean
Now as the Seniors depart;
There is a mem'ry, that we shall always keep,
Of our teachers dear, our classmates near to heart,
Leaving our friends now behind us,
Our future ahead of us lie,
We strive for vic'try and life's greatest prL e
We'll never forget you, old Balboa High.


(From "Yoo-Hoo.")

Beryl Ilgen, '22.

You'll hear me calling Boo-Hoo,
When we graduate in June
But you'll surely think I'm coo-coo.
For I hope it will be soon
When I see those dreary faces, at commencement night, I fear
I'll break right down and blubber,
And everyone will hear.


0.S


l


BOO HOO.


^^A 0A..








THE ZONIAN.


"GOOD ROADS" COMPOSITION.


THE ZONIAN is pleased to be able to print the
composition by Esther Witt, "How Panama's
Possibilities Can Be Realized," chosen as the
best essay from the Canal Zone high schools, on
the general subject "How Good Roads are De-
veloping My Community." The Highway and
Highway Transport Education Committee of-
fered to the writer of the best composition on this
subject, a 34,':''o scholarship at a college of the


Up to the present time the building of the
Canal has been the greatest factor in the develop-
ment of Panama. It has certainly brought this
country into the limelight, but has had little in-
fluence on the interior, which is practically as un-
developed to-day as it was a century ago.
Very few people realize the wealth of Panama's
natural resources, or the absolute necessity of
good roads if these are to be utilized. The land
itself is one of the richest tracts on the face of the
globe, and should be able to maintain a popula-
tion of at least 3,000,000.


winner's choosing. The contest was open to all
students of high school age in the United States
and Territories; the essay was to be judged on a
basis of knowledge, composition, and appear-
ance. The 3 best from the Cristobal High School
and from the Balboa High School were gent to
the Administration Building where Esther's was
chosen; it is to be sent to the States to be judged
with the best from each State.


The region north of the Canal Zone right up
to the Costa Rican border is particularly fertile.
On the highlands the heat is never excessive, and
all who have studied the country have been im-
pressed with the possibilities of orange growing.
There are fine conditions for raising bananas,
pineapples, and other tropical fruits. If fruit cul-
tivation were properly developed there is no
reason why Panama should not supply all the
northern States with fruit during the winter
months, and thus establish a thriving trade. Very
little grain has been raised here, yet corn has been


S| HOW PANAMA'S POSSIBILITIES CAN BE REALIZED.
Esther Witt, 23.


k








THE ZONIAN.


known to reproduce itself for 20 years after the
first sowing, and experiments have shown that
wheat can be grown at the rate of 3 crops a
year. A high-grade tobacco can be grown in
Chiriqui. Sugar cane yields a quick return, some-
times giving 18 pounds to the stick. Mr. \ i tchell-
Hedges, who has just returned from a trip of ex-
ploration in the San I country, states that the
land in this district is eminently suitable for the
growing of what should be exceptionally fine cof-
fee, cocoa, corn, and in fact, almost unlimited
produce. In addition, a few medicinal plants,
mainly .1 -..q.,11 II, copaiba, and ipecacuanha,
and some very valuable vegetable i:., -rriiT.
flourish here. Thus, there is every reason for
believing that Panama could become one of the
greatest agricultural districts of the world. It is
needless to say that this is yet to b:.
The uplands of thi, country sve:n to be es-
pecially suitable fr cattle raising, as the cattle
can graze the whole year round, and the guinea
grass which grows here is capable of producing
from 20 to 30 tons to the a.cr.
Two-thirds of the area of Pan:ma is covered
with valuable wood, mango anJ giant balata rub-
ber trees growing in great profusion, while won-
derful native mahogany, lignun-vitre and other
hard woods abound. Here is a fine opportunity
for the lumber industry.
It is reported by those who have investigated
the matter that there are hundreds of square miles
suitable for the cultivation of rubber trees. The


fact that wild rubber trees are found all over the
country corroborates this statement. And yet
there are but a few hundred acres planted in rub-
ber trees throughout the whole republic.
Mining is carried on to a small extent. Gold
is found in the Province of Code, copper between
the plains of David and Bocas del Toro, and some
important salt mines have been discovered near
Aguadulce on Parita Bay.
Thus we find in Panama great stretches of
splendid farming and grazing land, acres of valu-
able timber, good mineral deposits, and fine con-
ditions for successful rubber cultivation. Both
the Atlantic and Pacific coasts can boast excel-
lent harbors, and at no great distance we find
ready markets for all Panama will be able to pro-
duce. And Vet, despite these facts, industrial de-
velopment can not be expected until adequate
means of transportation between interior and sea-
board are provided. In other words, the bane
of progress in this country is the lack of good roads.
Good roads, in any country, are an essential
wh)se importance can not be ignored. But here,
where impenetrable jungle covers hill and dale,
and the rivers, although traversing every part
of the Republic, are unfit for navigation because
they abound in rapids and are of uncertain vol-
ume, good roads are an absolute necessity. With-
out them, Panama is doomed to remain an un-
developed and unprogressive nation. With
them, great things are possible, and none can
tell what heights of prosperity may be attained.


A MOONLIGHT NIGHT.

.AJ ita 11'ood, 2'-.


The red and fellow fire burned low
And on the beach its light did throw,
In *, k.-i.... shadows here and there,
Like dancing figures, sprite and lair.

Behind, the majestic palmn trees stood
As tho' they ruled the very wood,
Nor waved their leaves, nor bent their trunks,
While standing there like solemn monks.


Before, the little wavelets played,
And on the beach their jewels laid,
Jewels, glittering and white,
Which sparkled there far in the night.

Then rose the moon far o'er the hills,
And shown down on the laughing rills,
So bright, so full, Oh, Moon of mine!
Who made the beach in splendor shine!


It mounted high into the heaven
And near the stars a place was given.
The red and yellow fire did swoon-
It was outrivaled by the moon.











THE ZONIAN.


JUNIOR CLASS.

Class Advisor, Miss BEASLEY DENNY.

President, HORACE CLARK.
Secretary, ANNA CATE.
Treasurer, HELEN HCBER.


Class Colors-Blue and Yellow. Class F.:... ,--Purpl. Bougainvilla.


MARVIN BANTON
WAYNE BANTON
EVELYN DEMMY
ESTHER GREENE
MARY HEARN
NETTA HEARN
OLENA HUTCHINGS
JESSIE LANGTON


CLASS ROLL.

FLORENCE LUCKY
RICHARD McBRIDE
ISABELLA MILLOY
EDITH MINCH
EUGENE MORTON
FRED NEWHARD
ROBERT NORFLEET
ANGEL PENA


DUDLEY SANSBURY
ANITA SERGEANT
ANNA VAN SICLEN
GEORGE WAINIO
BESSIE WATKINS
ESTHER WITT
ANITA WOOD








THE ZONIAN.


JUNIORS' ALPHABET.
Anita lWood, '2'.


"A" is for all of us in our alphabet,
Nice ones, jolly ones, all well-met.
"B" is for Banton, with hair so light,
Who over it so many girls do fight.
"C" is for Cate and for Clark. But say-
I just couldn't praise them enough in this way!
"D" 's for the quiet one-Demmy by name,
Upon whom, no mischief could anyone blame.
"E" 's for the mark we all hope to attain,
In numbers like drops of a tropical rain.
"F," is for failures-we hope there'll be few;
Our adviser, Miss Denny, is hoping so, too.
"G" is for Greene-a girl hard to beat,
For, as you know, she's a great athlete.
"H" is the letter which everyone learns
Stands for Huber, and Hutchings and both of the Hearns.
"I" is the Isthmus on which we exist,
Where tropical habits one can not resist.
"J" is the jokes in our High School found,
There're some in our class if you'll just look around.
"K" is the knowledge we wish that we had,
When report cards show our marks to be bad.
"L" is for Luckey, with me you'll agree,
She's pretty good in stenography.
"M" is Milloy, she's very frank you will say,
And for Minch and McBride, liked more every day.


"N" is for Norfleet--you'll have to admit,
He's too full of fun, though quite fond of it.
"0" is an exclamation of wonder, pain and such,
An everyday word that we use very much.
"P" is for Pena, one of our best athletes,
And is always on hand at all our track meets.
"Q" is for queer ones-I'll leave it to you,
The queer ones in our class are indeed very few.
"R" is the reception we give "pistachios,"
They're little green nuts, as everyone knows.
"S" is for Saisbury, a good-looking fellow,
And Sergeant, so pretty, with hair that's so yellow.
"T" is for the talkers who talk every day,
And therefore assembly rules do not obey.
"U" is the uproar we raise every noon,
\\hen somebody rings that school bell too soon.
"V" is Van Sicklen, a dainty little maid,
She's small, she has dimples, what more can be said?
"W" is for Wainio, and of course, \itt and Wood,
You'll have to agree they're all very good.
"X" is for xyloid heads, Oh! list to the bard,
W\ho tells us that xyloid means "like wood," hence hard.
"Y" is the yawns we give frequently,
"Out late at night?" with Miss Frost you'll agree.
"Z" is the zoo, and I don't think I'm wrong,
When I sav that is where all the Freshies belong.


MIAlr'HRES LOCKS AT NIGHT.


(a


V


(




































































OuR SCHOOL--LooKiN ACROSS THE PATIO.








THE ZONIAN.


TOBY'S RISE TO FAME.
Joseph Cate, '25.


Toby Smith, newly registered and initiated into
Balboa Troop I of the Boy Scouts of America, was
a dreamer. His chief regret was that he had not
been born in the fourteenth century and could woo
and win his Lady-Love by saving her from some
cruel monster. His Lady-Love was known to the
unromantic people of Balboa as Phyllis Windsor,
the center of attraction at all social affairs and
dances. She secretly liked Tobv but his one
drawback was his inability to swim, dive, and
dance like the other boys of her acquaintance.
Toby's main rival was Lester Clayborn, a bov
who possessed good looks, a strong imagination,
and the "Gift-of-Gab." His favorite topic was the


exploits and g nd features of Lester Clavborn.
If the I's in his conversation could be photo-
graphed, they would appear as the telegraph poles
seen from the Twentieth Century Limited running
with a wide-open throttle under a full head of
steam. When Toby was taunted by his play-
mates he would say, "I might not be a member of
Grieser's 'Troupe o' Human Fishes' or a send
Henry Manassa on the tack, but I challenge any
of you to a canoe race at any time." Of course his
challenge was never accepted so his prowess as a
paddler was never confirmed. His boast, however,
brought upon him the name of "Toby the Puny
Paddler."


One day Mr. Burkholder, the Scoutmaster,
announced that on the following Saturday the
launch Chepillo would take the boys of the Troop,
Mr. Windsor (the Chairman of the Local
Council), and his family, up the Bayano River,
a half mile from the "Rapids." Of course the
whole Troop showed up and the Chepillo was
crowded.
Having arrived at their destination, Toby,
Phyllis, and Lester set out, by trail, to a point
above the "Rapids" which was famed for its
tropical beauty. Toby carried his camera, an
elaborate affair, which he had bought with money
he had earned at back-breaking labor on a farm.


Upon reaching their destination, the natives
immediately made love to Toby's camera and
wanted it, whether or no. Toby mentally made
a note of their infatuation.


* *


* *


Two hours later, in a tropical jungle, a strange
sight w'.ild have met the eves of a passer-by.
A small 1b >, in the uniform of a Boy Scout, could
he seen -rr'.-L'lii-e under a human burden much
larger than himself. This was Toby carrying
Lester back to what might be called, in that mass
of undergrowth and trees, civilization. Lester's
leg was swathed in a white cloth which held on


Iix.i


4--
_. -J' -- '.1
k .-- . d
1*

-. '.j... -


A TYPICAL COAST SCEN;








32 THE ZONIAN.


the rude splints which Toby had put on the
fractured limb. Phyllis went ahead picking out
the back trail while Toby struggled with Lester
and his camera. Arrhing at the village Toby
noticed five canoes IlraiLn up on the shore. Re-
membering the natives' love for his camera he
offered it to them for a canoe. They agreed and
watched him swing into the stream with Lester
lying in the bottom and Phyllis sitting in the bow.
Seeing that he turned toward the "Rapids" they
raised a great shout and from their gesticulations
Toby understood that to run the "Rapids" was a
very dangerous proceeding. It was the exception
and not the rule for a man to come out alive at the
end. Nevertheless, Toby went on, the words "A
Scout is Brave" ringing in his ears. Two more
strokes and he was on his way for the Chepillo
as fast as the current and his strokes could carry
him. Ph)lli., in the bow, was constantly in
fear of being unceremoniously dumped into the
Bayano River. In front of her loomed a jagged
bowlder just beneath the surface. They surely
must hit it and Phyllis after confessed that she had
just started the "Now I lay me --" when with
a deft dip of the paddle Toby stemmed off the
impending danger. There were many more
narrower escapes than the one just mentioned.
When they finally pulled into the stream, a half
mile from the Chepillo, Toby's arms ached from
the wrist to the shoulder. Ahead of him he saw
the most gruelling race he had ever run. Still
ringing in his ears with every stroke were the words
"A Scout is Brave," "A Scout is Helpful." Then
he determined that he would get Lester into proper
hands in record time if it was the last thing he ever


did. The half-mile record for canoes is not known
to me but Toby broke all records in that race
against time and danger. When he had gone a
quarter mile every muscle in his body ached and
anyone else would have given up then and there.
That's where Toby was different from anyone
else. Whnii he determined to do anything he did
it. At last the Chepillo came into sight around
a bend and Toby put every bit of strength he could
muster into the strokes. Drawing up alongside
he was greeted with surprise. A boy, seeing the
predicament and sensing the cause, proceeded to
help Phyllis out and told someone else to take out
Lester. As for Toby, what he had done was more
than flesh and blood could bear, and while tender
hands were lifting Lester out of the boat Toby
slipped into the bottom dead to the world. He
was noticed by Phyllis, who rushed to his aid and
ministered to him all the way home. She told
everyone the story and at the next Scout meeting
(a month later), Lester presented Toby with a
new camera and a gold medal which said on the
back "To Toby Smith, expert paddler, for duty
well and bravely performed."
Toby is now a town favorite and whenever any
one calls him "Toby, the Puny Paddler," they have
a fight with Lester Clayborn, a much changed boy,
and who would be a cripple but for Toby's kind
aid. Phyllis likes both boys but it is very apparent
that her favor leans toward Toby and some day in
the future (about 7 or 8 years hence) there will
most likely be engraved cards circulating, an-
nouncing the marriage of Toby Smith and Phyllis
Windsor.


A VISION.
Nina Ridenour, '22.
FOREWORD.
The following foolish little allegory was written spread out before me-its joys and sorrows, its
for English class to portray the unjust cruelty of guilt and crime. There were a few joyful homes
assignments imposed. The queen and her court and contented families-some happiness-but this
are symbolical of our own Mli- Hopkins and her was greatly overshadowed by the gloom and
Junior English class; the first task was the mid- misery.
year examination; and the second, the crowning I sat late into the night; the fire burned low, the
impos-libility -Writing and Allegryv. shadows deepened about me, and the misery I
beheld in my Magic Crystal seemed to overwhelm
me. I had almost come to the conclusion that
I sat, very sad and lonely, looking into my Magic there never was any pure happiness, never any
Crystal. In it was a panorama of the world lasting peace and contentment, when, as I gazed,








THE ZONIAN.


one picture seemed to stand out more clearly than
the others. It was a peaceful scene, of a beautiful
queen, and her court of lords and ladies. They
all seemed exceedingly happy and satisfied. I
thought, 'P-_rh.,i. at last I have found perfect
satisfaction and happiness. Perhaps the world is
not all misery, after all," and a peaceful calm
seemed to settle over me at the very thought. I
watched the picture pass though the swiftly
gliding years. The queen loved her subjects and
was more than beloved by them in turn. Supreme
contentment governed all. I could see fair ladies
with wavy, golden hair, and handsome ones with
bobbed hair-like their queen's. And all the
knights were of *...ir.-.i excellence. Some were
tall and dark, some neither tall nor dark; some
\.. ...ii .l'' brilliant, some exceedingly .111
But withal, there was much talent; one knight
showed aptness for fancy diving, another unusual
executive ability; one princess surpassed in high-
jumping, another wrote remarkable poetry.
But presently, as I gazed, I thought I co':.l de-
tect a wanness overspreading the checks of the fair
ones, and their hands trembled with weakness.
What could be the trouble? Ah! it came to me with
a shock. Their queen was too exacting! In her
desire to have her court an ideal one, she was
asking impossible tasks of their, and it was their
grief at not being able to gratify her expectations
of their study and I.-rniii. that was destroying
their gayety. I looked. 1.irtr. rs were growing
worse. There was no more laughter. All spent
their time trying to accomplish the impossible
tasks set by their queen. Oh, would she not see her
mistake? No. Matters grew worse and worse.
The court grew daily more sad and despondent;
the ladies wept; the knights hung their heads in
despair.
Then she set them a task unusually difficult.
All labored most diligently in pr-.paration. There
was great fear that they might disappoint their
queen. The time came. They toiled and slaved.


A few failed utterly; some were able to accomplish
the task only fairly well, but even for these the
overwork and shock to their nerves was almost too
great.
And then-their doom had come! The queen,
each day becoming more idealistic, each day seeing
more of the great general laws and less of the
physical about her, seemingly forgetful that her
subjects were only human, set a task absolutely
impossible to mere mortals. She asked, each one of
them to produce a work of art, stupendous in
size, difficult of execution, which would embody all
their hopes, all their loves, all their ideals, express-
ing them so clearly that the most dull in the realm
could understand, yet so subtly that the most
cultured would be enthralled. Oh, misery! Oh,
woe!
The sibiects began to work, each one putting his
heart, his life, his very soul into the undertaking.
Day after day, each oie would secrete himself, and
toil feverishly, giving no thought to time or rest.
Food was forgotten entirely-sleep was unheard
of. Each was growing weaker and weaker, but
realized it not, in lie zeal of his vast undertaking.
The cheeks of all were pale, their eves sunken,
their whole bodies atrernmble, their nerves on edge,
but no heed was given to anything so trivial as the
physical body. Each was putting himself, his
ambition, his hope, his heart, his very soul in
this supreme effort to gratify his queen.
Yes, they succeeded, but, merely human, they
paid the price of their mortal life. Each one
brought his completed work, laid it at the feet of
his queen and -milinll fell dead.
And the poor queen! She had not realized what
she was doing. I watched her, broken in mind
and spirit, clothed in sackcloth, and with ashes on
her bobbed locks, wandering up and down, up
and down, among the twenty-four graves.
My theory of life had proved correct; there
was no lasting joy or happiness in the end-only
misery to all.


MR 81059-3











34 THE ZONIAN.


SOPHOMORE CLASS.

Class Advisor, Miss ETTA NORCUTr.

President, RoPBRT ENGELKE.
Vice President, CARROLL MILES.
Secretary, DEWITT MILES.


Class Colors-Scerlet and Silver. Class Flower-Frangipani.


CLASS ROLL.


DOROTHY ABENDROTH
RICHARD AMSDEN
JOSE AROSEMENA
WILLIAM ASHTON
TIHEL.MA BABBITT
MAY BELIE BAIRID
ELLA MILES BECKHAM
RUTH BICKFORD
(EORGIA BIXBY
HAROLD BOYDI.
NIATTIELEL BROWl
MARJORIE CARTER
CATHERINE CLAYBOURN
CLOVIs COU RVII.LE


MIRIAM DEMMY
VIRGINIA DE ROSEAR
JOSEPH DORAN
FLORIDE EDWARDS
DONALD FORD
NAOMI GATES
EARLE GERRANS
MILDRED GILL
PHYLLIS MILLIKEN
JEANNETTE GRIFFITH
DELLA HARDWICK
HAZEL JOHNSON
ERNEST KNAPP
EMIL KNAPP


LORETTA KOCHER
ELSPIA NELSON
ELIZABETH NORFLEET
ALICE ORR
LONA RATHBONE
KATHLEEN REEDER
RICHARD ROHDEN
KENNETH SIMONS
MARY SLACK
EVA SWEET
ROLAND TAYLOR
PHILIP THORNTON
MINNIE TWEEDLIE
ALTON WHITE







THE ZONIAN.


A NAMELESS DAY IN B. H. S.
Nina Rid-nour, '22.


One day the school decided that we had Albin
such Sweet Angel-s that we Wood appeal to the
Clements-y of the Powers-that-be, and beg for a
holiday. When the committee went to the Boss to
plead, he was just Locken the office door, and
singing "Jo-se can you see," and it made him
angry to be interrupted, for Prvor to this he had
announced that he never wished to be interrupted
during his morning Carrol. As soon as the
subject of a holiday was broached, he began to
Pratt-le away about how much he had been en-
Duran, and would we never
get it into our empty Scull-s [....:
how Luckey we were to get '
to go to school at all. How- :.'-
ever, when he found how
much in Ernest we were,
he began to relent, and said,
as much as he hated to
waste a whole Golden : BsF ;'
day, he supposed he would
have to Slack-en the dis-
cipline this once. He said .. Batti,.h


I


that we could have a n


all-day hike, and he hoped we would all try to
Foster good f,.lin., but that in order to insure
quiet in leaving the Iuildie, he would appoint
some one to act as Sergeant-at-Arms, and punish
all offenders. Dorothy ran home to get her East-
man, and then we started.
About 2 \,11.., out from town, we stopped at a
very quaint, old-fashioned farmhouse, where a
little Kerr entertained us by jumping over Gates;
the Gardner, who was working in the yard, said
that the house used to be a mill, but the Miller


had moved away, and a Taylor lived there now.
Presently we came to a beautiful Greene meadow,
surrounded by lovely little Knowles covered with
White flowers, while through the middle ran a
Mary little Brooke, down in a cool shady Gill.
Some of the boys started Batton a ball around,
and presently a baseball game was started. Every-
body was making Betz and trying to put every-
body else Weiss as to which side would Wynne,
but nobody was \right, for the game was a tie.
In the middle of the day, most of the crowd took
a Knapp, while the rest
exercised their Witt in story
t. 11;1,,. and a spelling match.
\iio. told the story of
Tx%,. I.l. -dum and Tweed-






i , k how to Carter home, but
final dec guided tho Walker,
.match broke up when all



in spite of her cries ot "Oh, it Herz.
,One of the girls turned
her ankle; we didn't know
how to Carter home, but
finally decided to \Walker,
in spite of her cries of "Oh, it Herz."
We were all a-Doran the beauty of the Wayne-
ing sun when some one remarked, "The Ayers
getting rather damp," which seemed the signal
for a general breaking Ip. Somebody suggested
that we form a club to walk an hour every day,
but we all agreed that we would much rather
Ridenour.
All too soon we reached the place where our
paths separated, our last Farrells were said, and
each one took his homeward way.


Q


(a


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36 THE ZONIAN.


FRESHMAN CLASS.

Class Advisor, Miss FLORENCE WELTS.

President, MARYOl LOCKEN.
Vice President, RICHARD ENGELKE.
Secretary, HELEN HERZ.
Treasurer, CONSTANCE GRAFF.


Class Colors-Blue and Gold.


Class Flower-Cosmos.


LEROY ATKINS
ELEANOR AYERS
FENTON BATTON
DOROTHY BROOKE
THERESSA BETZ
ANDREW BLEAKLEY
RUTH BRENEMAN
JOSEPH CATE
ADELAIS CLAYBOURN
RALPH CLEMENTS
EDWIN DENST
RENA DEYOUNG
DOROTHY DOCKERY
PAUL DURAN
EDNA DUVALL
DOROTHY EASTMAN


FRANK FARRELL
RUTH FOSTER
MABEL GLIDEWELL
AGNES GRANBERRY
HELENE GRIMISON
IDA RUTH HAMMER
HARRIET HERZ
RUTH JENKINS
ANNA KAYE
ALFRED KELTS
MARGARET KERR
IDABELLE KNOWLES
RICHARD KOCH
BENJAMIN KULLER
ARDATH LENGEL
\'.L, McDADE


CLASS ROLL.

AMPARO MALDONADO
ARTHUR MANASSA
CATHERINE MILLER
CARL NEWHARD
ROBERT NORRIS
HELEN ORR
VIVIENNE PLANTS
ALBERTA POWERS
HORACE PRATT
DONALD PRYOR
LAVIN:A REYNOLDS
FLORENCE ROBINSON
VIRGINIA ROBINSON
ELIZABETH RUCKER
JOHN RYAN
OLIVER SCHROYER


LEWIS SCULL
CHARLES SLACK
Lucy STRAWN
PAUL SULLIVAN
GRACE SUMRALL
FLORENCE TONNESEN
ALICE WALKER
DOLORES WALTERS
ETHEL WAINIO
WILLIAM WATKINS
FRANCES WICKHAM
LEON WEISS
LUCY WRIGHT
ARTHUR WYNNE
ANTONIO ZARAK
JULIA ZIDBECR


rlRL .


----


rI


^1


WI










THE ZONIAN.


rhe thick growth of th" jungle
Creeps up the ancient walls,
And through the waving palm trees
The soft, white moonlight falls.

Where once were streets are giant trees,
With roots twined round a stone;
High on the old cathedral wall
One more huge tree has grown.


And everywhere are ruins,
Yet as I wandered here
A thriving Spanish pueblo
Before me did appear.

I saw it as it had been-
The men at merry feasts,
The laughing little children,
The sober, black-garbed priests.


Old Ruins.


All was calm and peaceful,
I watched it in delight,
For the joy in their faces
Was indeed a pleasant sight.

It changed, and coarser voices
Mingled with those of fear,
Away, away, good people,
The Englishmen are here.


I heard the shrieks of women,
The children's frightened cries;
The men fought, but 'twas hopeless-
They were taken by surprise.

"The town is burning, Spaniards,
Flee quickly or we die,"
All vanished, but a blood-red glow
O'erspread the evening sky.


This faded, and the ruins
Were standing, tall and grim;
And a great black eagle came and perched
Upon a rotting limb.









THE ZONIAN.


THE SCRAP.

Richard Rohden, '24.


One day while walking down one of the narrow,
crooked little streets of Panama, I was attracted
by a crowd of "native sons." I crossed the street
and gazed over the shoulder of one of the rooters.
Every time he cheered, he jumped up and down;
and, to see the disturbance, I also jumped up and
down in unison with him.
There in the center of the (ui,.,l were two
women, fighting for all they were worth. The
taller was a lairtiniqriran woman and the other was
a Jamaican.
The Martiniquan woman was gaudily dressed in
a green dress which hung down to the ground, and
a very brilliant red waist, and a turban equally
red which fitted her head like a huge bandage;
her shoes were men's shoes, evidently cast off by
"friend Hubby."


The Jamaican woman was not so spectacular.
Her clothes consisted of a white skirt, a blue
waist, and large tennis shoes.
The French woman's arm flashed like ebony in
the sunlight, as it rose and fell time after time on
the head and shoulders of the Jamaican woman
who clung like a leech to the right arm of her ad-
versary. (I afterwards learned that she had
bitten one of the arteries in the arm of the French
woman.) During this time fierce cries in a half
French dialect issued from the throat of the
Martiniquan. Just at this time a "bombero" and
a "cop" came running around the corner. The
crowd dispersed, and the prize fighter- were
"collared."


STUNG!
Edith Foster, '22.


"Gimme me dime," bcu'ul'd 6-year old Jim, a
r.IL-d little urchin who stood on the boardwalk
with a bundle of newspapers'under his arm.
"I'll give ye a kick if yer don't shut ycr trap,"
answered io-year old Max, who was kneeling on
the boardwalk holding the dime tight in his fist.
"Well, gimme me dime and I'll shut me trap,"
wailed Jim.
"I ain't got your dime. 'Losers are weepers and
finders are keepers,'" taunted lMa\.
"I didn't lose it, I only dropped it and you
picked it up before I could," answered Jim.
"Well- ," Max looked again, "\.., it can't
be- yes, it is," whispered Max to himself as he
peeped between the cracks of the boardwalk upon
which the sun beat furiously. Jumping to his


feet, he handed Jim the dime, saying, "There
take yer dime, cry baby."
Jin, glad to get his dime and fearing that IMax
would change his mind, hurried along, notwaiting
to see what made Max change his mind. lMean-
while Max found a long stick and had put the
piece of gum that he had been chewing on one end.
Then, kneeling on the boardwalk, he pushed the
stick between the boards and after poking around
for a few minutes pulled up the stick. Instead of
the gold piece that he expected to find there was a
round piece of gold paper that had once been on
the end of a piece of candy.
"Oh, pshaw! I guess Mr. Cox was right when
he said that 'all is not gold that glitters!' sulked
Max, as he shuffled down the street.


A ROUGH NECK'S PRAYER.


loArd, help me take the wallops
That fortune slips across.
And let me keep a wadin' in,
Not quite a total loss.
And help me land one occasional,
T' show 'em I'm not a cheese,


And that, although I'm nearly out,
T'aint my nerve that's weak, but my knees.
And no matter how I'm battered up,
And my chances knocked to hell,
I want t' be up and coming' still,
When they tap the final bell.
-Exchange.


(a


a-











THE ZONIAN. 39


NINa -
'!{7" *- 7. !*-f


RuINs-OLD PANAMA.








THE ZONIAN.


In the Village of Life, lived Every Boy, who was
very intimate with two others, Diligence and
Studies. These three were constant companions
and found much in each other's companionship.
But one day Every Boy and his two companions
strolled toward the post office to find the latest
news to be the arrival of a new girl in the village.
Upon inquiry Every Boy found that her name was
Raving Beauty.
And while the conversation about the new girl
was at its height, she appeared on the scene.
Every Boy was so struck by her and her com-
panion, Magnetic Charms, that his two friends,
Diligence and Studies, left him. Every Boy didn't
care much, for he made friends with two other
boys of the village, Foolishness and Dreaminess.
During the days that followed Every Boy saw
much of his new friends, Foolishness and Dreami-
ness, while his old friends, Diligence and Studies,
took a boy by the name of Sorrow to fill Every
Boy's place.
One day, after having known Raving Beauty
for quite a while, Every Boy suggested that Rav-
ing Beauty and her two friends, Magnetic Charms
and Fickleness, go with him and Foolishness and
Dreaminess on a picnic.
The picnic day dawned bright and fair. It was
decided to row in a boat belonging to Persistence,
a friend of Every Boy's, to the Island of Appetite,
where there was a nice place to prepare a picnic
luncheon. But before they knew where they were
going, the merry party had drifted far from the
course which led to the Island of Appetite.
Foolishness remembered that a map showing
all the waters near the Village of Life was in his
pocket, and, upon consulting it, found that they
were drifting out on the Sea of Love. A strong
wind came up and pushed the boat out farther to


sea. Fickleness began to grow sulky and a bit
tiresome, so Magnetic Charms suggested that they
eat what they could of the lunch they had brought.
When Every Boy opened the lunch basket he
found many things, but none they could eat on the
Sea of Love. There was a bottle of "cold looks,"
a tin of "cold shoulders," a jug of "chilled tears,"
and some jealous sandwiches, which were too
warm to eat, yet. But Fickleness said she could
wait no longer for her noonday meal and partook
rather greedily of the "cold looks" and "cold
shoulders." Raving Beauty, in a sudden fit of
anger, kicked the jug of "chilled tears," and the
jug broke, letting the tears flow all over the boat
of Persistence, and making it sink farther in the
Sea of Love. Foolishness began to act queerly
and the others thought he was seasick, but later
found it to be his usual way of acting. And all
of this time Dreaminess sat in the bow of the boat
and winked isely at Mlagnetic Charms.
After drifting an hour or two, the wind changed,
and the boat began to drift back to the Village of
Life. It was a good thing, for everyone was
getting disagreeable.
No sooner had they arrived at Raving Beauty's
home, when a visitor from Out-of-town called on
Raving Beauty. Raving Beauty told Every Boy
that the visitor's name was Heart's Desire. Im-
mediately Raving Beauty shifted her affection
and attentions to the visitor, whereat Every Boy
became vicious and ate several of the jealous
sandwiches that were left. After that he went to
see an old girl friend, Enduring Affection, and sent
Sorrow to tell Raving Beauty not to look for his
daily visits any more. Sorrow bore the good news
to Diligence and Studies, who straightway re-
newed their friendship with Every Boy.


e LIFE'S ALLEGORY.
Anita Wood, '23.


40








THE ZONIAN.


6panistb ftetdbes




UN "CHAUFFEUR" LIST.

Berv Ii/gen, '22.

Cuando a las nueve de la nochc, i,. el tren a
la estaci6n de Panamai, baj6 vY me dirigi a la calle.
Era forastero y, ademais, sintilndome cansado,
llam a tn "t .iii. iir." Quicro ir a ia mejor fonda
de la ciudad-le dije, al entrar en cl carro.-Si,
Seiior-replico el-le llevard a la "American.
Con esto, cerr6 la puerta y .lespu6s ie tratar en
vano varias veces, tuvo 6xito en p mer cn march
la miquina.
Acomodaindiome, saque mi relaI, not la hora
eran las nueve y cin:c, Ny m prepare a gozar tde
las vistas. Est, sin embargo, fLt imp sible porqub
no pude evitar de d:rinirme.
Unos pocos minutes desputes, o asi me pareci6,
oiel grito-! Despiert-se, Senfor, despiertese! hemos
llegado a su destiny. Al oir esto me sobresalt6
y mire mi reloj otra vez. A mi sorpresa, halle
que eran las diez v media. CCuinto vale?-1;
pregunti al ". I..ni. .L al Ib jar dil carr, .
-Solamente tres halh:as, Seior.
iAy! iqu habratA! :xclamb. I.e pagul, entrb
en la fonda y tomn un cuarto. Pocos minutes
despuCs estaba durmiendo a pierna suclta.
La maiiana i.nti..i. me levant temprano y
despues de desavunarme, sali a la calle en frente
de la fonda. En seguida vi al otro lado de la
calle un gran edificio de concreto.-Perd6neme,
Seilor-dije yo, dlii;n;ll1. 11. a un transeunte-
2 puede decirme ique es ese gran edificio?
-Si, Seiior, con much gusto, es la 6nica esta-
ci6n de Panamai. Es muv hermosa nj es verdaid?


{QUE \I \ANA?
Horace Clark, '-,.
Estoy acostumbrado a levantarme a las seis y
media. Una maiiana de la semana pasada, me
desperte, y mirando el reloj, hall que no eran miis
de las seis. iCna media hora mas para dormir!
iiQue bueno!! Di una vuelta y estaba a punto de
dormirme cuando oi un gran ruido-Mii-i-i-a-a-
o-o, mi-i-a-a-o-o, oo, oof, pssss-y por cinco
minutes que parecian una eternidad, tuve que
escuchar una gran pelca bajo mi ventana. Al fin,
el perro se record de una cita v se fu6-el silencio
reino supremo.
Otra vez estaba a punto de dormirme cuando
oi-Ba-a-na-na-as, man-go-os, pi-iia-a-s en una
voz alta, v vo conden- fcrvorosamente todas las
ha-a-na-na-as, man-go-o-os y pi-nia-a-s a una re-
gion mu\ lejos de aqui. Estuve soiiando de un
pais done no hiay ni escuelas, ni maestros, ni
lecciones, ni trahajo, ni nada parecido. iQu6 buen
pais---ir alli hoy mismo! -Sta-ar'n-n'er-r'uld-d,
Sta-ar'n-n'er-r'uld-d! iiDiantre!! Si quisiera
un peri6dico, no podria encontrar a un vendedor
de peri6licos, pero ahora que queria dormir, uno
me despert6!
--I luego, que?--Pero no tenia que esperar
much para informnarme. Esta vez era un Ford.
El hombre que vive en la casa vecina, tiene un
Ford, v todas las maiianas este bendito carro no
quicre correr, y por esto hace un gran ruido que
suena comn una gran 1. I r.ll Pero, el ruido que
hace antes de correr, parece el tic-tac de un reloj
en comparaci6n al ruido que hace cuando corre!
Al tin, el Ford se ifu, y me dormi. Entonces,
vino cl hombre que quita la basura y me despert6.
Dios, que bulla hace!! Cuando l1 se fu6, estaba a
punto de dormirnie, cuando mi madre grit--
vye, levantate, son las seis y media!-iAy! iCar-
amba! . . .. y me levant!









THE ZONIAN.


Viola Bewley, '22.


SENIOR HALLOWE'EN PARTY.

One of the most social of evenings was spent at
the High School, the 27th of October-Hallow-
e'en. The Seniors planned the big party and tried
to show everybody a "real good old time." "Pun-
kins," witches, ghosts, 'n everything "scary" was
drawn on all the blackboards. It surely did look
"hallowe'eny" all right. A big crowd came and
graciously applauded the following programme:
The first number was the appearance of a ghost.
Of course "it" caused quite a good deal of excite-
ment and several of our "baby Freshies" were
given pacifiers to quiet them. Next was a musi-
cal selection by the High School orchestra.
.M.\-rs. Bill Sergeant and Tom Doran appeared
in a black sketch. The jokes and foolishness cre-
ated much laughter. Miss Marjri.ri Carter gave
a very *.1clilhhtful reading. Marjorie has pleased
her audience many times by her clear and clever
rt.-iliinL". \i Anita Wood, the "toe-dancer,"
performed in several numbers and received much
applause. Messrs. Fred Newhard and Bob En-
gelke were black-faced comedians. Their main
number was "Pullman Porter Blues." (No one
could feel blue, after that.) The Freshmen gave
a mock trial, the defendant being Carrol Miles,
a Sophomore, who was accused of cutting the
Freshies' hair or "initiatin.' Much credit is due


the class and especially Richard Engelke, the
Judge, for his wittiness. The P. P. F. J. was a
dandy secret throughout the evening, until some-
one guessed that it meant "Panama Peppy Five
Jazzers." The name is very appropriate. The
jazz music started folks "a-swayin' and furnished
lots of pep.
After the programme, everybody went out on
the balcony and danced to Ben's three-piece or-
chestra. Games were provided for the nondancers
and there were lots of wafers and lemonade for all.
In the wee small hours, "Home, Sweet Home"
was played and everyone expressed himself as
having the best time in his life.

JUNIORS.

One of the most enio able events was the dance
given by the Juniors, December Io, at the Mosque.
An exceptionally large crowd was present and
everything went off to perfection. The well-
known Colonial orchestra put lots of pep in every-
body and the result was a wonderful time for all.
Juniors, we compliment you!

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Merry Christmas! That was the word passed
along in the Y. W. C. A. December 23, when the






THE ZONIAN.


SCHOOL

























----RyfF-T 3^
r)
















LouN RATHBONE
MARTIN LOCKEN


MARJORIE (ERRANS
CONSTANCE GRAFF








"THrJ '7ThTT A IT


44

High School gave that fine programme. A large
crowd attended and the good old Christmas spirit
filled the air.
The programme opened with a beautiful solo by
Miss Ellen Roberts. Miss Roberts has a sweet
voice and her solo was greatly appreciated. Next
was a comedy sketch, "Happily Married;" given
by Miss Viola Bewley and Mr. Steven Slack. Their
sketch created much laughter and-they'll be
Shakespeare players yet. M.:--r,. Beryl Ilgen and
William Sergeant also made a "rippin' hit" with
their sketch "Ma." Beryl, dressed as a girl, cer-
tainly "fit his costume," and even the boys fell in
love with him. With Bill as the "Dude," they
certainly made a "lovely pair." The Misses Mar-
garet Montgomery, Marjorie Gerrans, and Cath-
erine Luckey scored a big hit with their several
songs, especially with "I'll Steal You." Miss
M.ary Hearn gave several piano selections, among
them, some of the latest hits which started her
audience humming. Much credit is due Miss
Lona Rathbone, Messrs. Carrol Miles and Rob-,
ert Engelke fjr their clever act, "The Gift of the
Magi," which they themselves had dramatized.
One part was especially thrilling, when Carrol
(was supposed to have) bobbed Lona's hair. The
Freshmen closed the programme with their roarin'
comedy "School Days." Miss Ida Ruth Hammer
made an excellent school "marm" and her children
misbehaved as usual.
From the Y. W. C. A. we all went up to the
High School and enjoyed three things: dancing,
dancing, and dancing, to the pcppi music fur-
nished by the High School orchestra. The High
School is very fortunate in possessing two orches-
tras this year.
Old "Father Time" finally announced the hour
and so the party ended with a lot of "Merry
Christmases to all, and to all, good night."

OUR ANNUAL ZONIAN DANCE.

In February the ,1ique was again the Meccai
for dances. This time the hall was decorated in
American and Panamanian flags as "La Reina"
MlcrccJL-d of the Panama Carnival and Viola I,
Queen of the American Legion Carnival and their
courts were the guests of honor. The big event of
the evening, a grand march was splendidly done,
the two queens graciously leading the procession.


After the march the orchestra played some of the
"latest hits" and everybody, including the queens
and their attendants, joined in the dancing. All
present enjoyed themselves and the affair was
most successful.

OUR MOONLIGHT CLIMB.

"We don't know when we'll get there, but we're
on our way," sang the jolly twenty-four as we
slowly ascended Ancon Hill. The party consisted
of Seniors, Juniors, and Sophomores, with Miss
Hopkins, Mr. Boss, and the popular Mr. Grieser
as our chaperones. Every once in a while a halt
was made to enable us to catch our breath. Any-
way, with much struggling the top was finally
reached, and Oh, how good it seemed! After a
little rest the boys gathered logs and started a
camp fire. Soon the fire was blazing and the
weeniess" were roasted and then we had plenty
to eat and drink. Oh, yes! Mr. Grieser won a
new name, "POP" (from repeating pop for soda
water so many times). We sang many songs from
"Wabash Blues" to "Yankee Doodle." The
faithful moon, having neared its zenith by three
hours since we had been on the hill, advised us
that it was time to descend. Our descent was
certainly much faster than our ascent. When we
reached level ground again, we went to Nina's
home where we enjoyed refreshments; as our
motto is "Dancing is a virtue,"we thus ended our
memorable evening.

TABOGA.

The alluring Island of Taboga enticed a jolly
party of twenty over its cool waters to the peace-
ful hotel, the Aspinwall. The annex lent its spa-
cious rooms to our leisure moments during the
vacation. The first few hours after our arrival,
were spent in unpackin., getting our right rooms,
and eating lunch. The meals were very delicious
and continued to be so all during our visit.
Although quite a small island, there were many
things to do. Swimming and dancing were un-
doubtedly the two most important diversions.
With such a splendid full moon, making the phos-
phorescent water, for which Taboga is noted,
doubly bright, it is not to be wondered that many


Liufjir.ni











































qL








-* ,













VIEW OF TABOUA ISLAND.
Showing bathing beach in the foreground and Hotel Aspinwall at tihe extramP left,








THE ZONIAN.


enjoyable nights were spent rowing and motor-
boating. Then we must not forget the hikes, the
hill-climbing, and the fishing.
The third evening of our visit was enjoyed by
witnessing a "quiet wedding." It was supposed
to have been quiet but-someone "let the cat out
of the bag" and consequently all the hotel guests
and several natives of the village came to witness
the first wedding performed in the Hotel Aspin-
wall. The fact that the happy couple were stu-
dents of the Balboa High School added more sur-
prise to the event. The wedding supper was
served at 6 o'clock. How delighted we were,
when, upon entering the dining room, we found
that some kind little "elves" had decorated our
table with roses and ferns in honor of the intended
couple. It was a wonderful supper, prepared with
the greatest of care. At 8.30 o'clock, the wedding
march was played by one of our chaperones, Miss
Hopkins. The blushing young bride, following
the maid of honor, entered from the rear of the
room on the arm of her father, Mr. Bill Sergeant.
They were followed by the bridal party, the ladies
brightening the scene with the beautiful bouquets
of flowers which they carried. In the archway
they were met by the rather nervous groom and
his bestman. The Reverend Mr. Boss performed
the ceremony with much grace and pronounced
the contented couple "M:a and Wife." Hardly
had these words been uttered, when from every
part of the room, showers of glittering rice de-
scended on the newly-weds, who quickly disap-
peared out the side door. Who were the bride
and groom? Miss Viola Bewley and Mr. Fred
Newhard, and everybody pronounced it a good,
mock wedding!
The following evening we celebrated Tommy
Doran's birthday. All day long preparations
were made for the party, and as it was to be a
"surprise," it really was almost impossible to do
anything without having Tommy, who is naturally
of an inquisitive disposition, asking foolish and


embarrassing questions. Finally 8 o'clock arrived,
and when we entered the dining room, what a
scene awaited us! Again the table was adorned
with roses, ferns, and coral vine. Through the
kindness of Mr. Malloy we had two special cakes
baked and a "certain number of candles" told
Tommy's age. Several toasts were given and
Tommy in a few fitting words thanked the Seniors.
After the ice cream and cake everyone retired to
the parlor where dancing reigned far into the mem-
orable night.
The fifth and final day
found us hurrying to pack
up again and bidding our
many new friends good-
by. As our motorboat
gradually left the island
farther and farther away,
we realized more than ever
that our trip to Taboga
will always be a pleasant
memory in our lives.
Those in the party were h .
Miss Hopkins and Mr.
Boss, our chaperones, the
Misses Catherine Luckey, Nina Ridenour, Edith
Foster, Aneta Albin, Irene Stewart, \i'la Bewley,
Agnes Gardiner, Marjorie Gerrans, Ellen Roberts,
and Nlari.garer Montgomery, Messrs. Tom Doran,
Bill Sergeant, Beryl Ilgen, Harold Cahalin, Fred
Newhard, Wayne Banton, Robert Engelke, and
Horace Clark.

Taboga, Oh, T hc-.'
Yr.t, stole our hearts away,
Your luring beach and everything
Will be a memory.

We enjoyed our many pleasures,
As well as our brief stay,
Taboga, Oh, Taboga,
You will be a memory.










THE ZONIAN.


-7~--~r~--
1


5 .,,








THE ZONIAN.


The class of '22 made a most successful d6but
at the Cecilia Theatre in Panama, April 8, 1922,
in "The Black Feather," a clever comedy of
English setting. The cast of characters was as
follows:

Evelyn Thornton .... ...... MARJORIE GERRANS
Richard Kent... ....... HORACE CLARK
Jack Thornton. . .... .. .. ROBERT ENGELKE
Countess Wanda von Holtzberg.. MARGARET MONTGOMERY
Baron Earnest von Arngiem ........... STEVEN SLACK
Sir George Caxton ... ....... ... WILLIAM SERGEANT
Lady Venetia Caxton ........... .ELLEN ROBERTS
Paul Hogue ...... . . HAROLD CAHALIN
Barnes (the chauffeur) ...... .. ....... .FRED NEWHARD
Patton (the gatekeeper) ................. WAYNE BANTON

The drama was a pleasing mixture of intrigue
and romance. Jack Thornton, an unsuspecting
young Englishman holding a responsible govern-
ment position, is deeply in love with the Countess
Wanda von Hilrbcri.', an Austrian spy, who, in
league with the Baron von Ar-li.-.m, is trying to
secure valuable papers now in the possession of
young Thornton. Evelyn Thornton, Jack's sister,
on a visit one night to her brother's apartment for
the purpose of remonstrating with him on his grow-
ing intimacy with the Baron and the Countess,
meets there, not her brother, but young Dick Kent,
who has mistaken this house for that of a friend;
she recognizes him as a chance train acquaintance.
Sir George and Lady Caxton, on arriving at the
apartments, are greatly shocked at finding their
niece inrtrr.iiiniLn a stranger. From that time on,
however, Mr. Kent proceeds to appear at the most
unexpected times in the most unexpected places,
much to the disgust, sometimes, of Lady Venetia.
At a house party at the Caxton country estate,
),i ,'ui- Kent overhears the plans of the Baron and
the Countess. He sees the Baron give to Hogue,
an ...n.mpli. an envelope containing a single
black feather, significant from the fact that a single
black feather on a field of gold with the motto
Semper So/is (always alone) was the crest of the


Countess. This envelope was t3 be presented to
the Countess in London, who would recognize the
bearer as a messenger of the Baron's and deliver
to him the papers which she would by that time
have secured f,-om young Thornton, and which
were to be delivered in Vienna. That night, Dick
holds up Hogue, secures the envelope, and after
some trouble with Sir George and his friends,
makes his get-a-way to London. Arrived there,
he duly presents the envelope to the Countess,
and receives the papers which she has secured IbI
drugging Thornton and exchanging his papers for
blank ones. Before Kent can make his escape
he is recognized; Sir George, the Baron, Hogue,
and others arrive on the scene; there is great
excitement and demand for explanations. At
last, about one minute before train time, Kent
escapes by knocking down one of the men guard-
ing the door, arrives safely in Vienna, and delivers
the papers to their rightful owners. On his return
to London, the mystery is cleared up-he also
is a government agent-the spies are turned
over to the proper authorities, the Countess is
advised to make her future home in Vienna,
young Thornton is saved the disgrace of having
lost valuable papers, and, most important of all,
Dick and Evelyn realize that they are something
more to each other than "friends."
Mar ..ric Gerrans, as the attractive, modern
young English girl, forever shocking her aunt's
sense of propriety, played her part with an ease
and naturalness that made one forget it was only
acting; while Horace Clark, as capable, easy-going,
confident, self-satisfied Richard Kent, left nothing
to be desired as far as realism was concerned.
We all sympathized with "Bobbie" Engelke as
the artless, deluded young Jack Thornton in his
infatuation for the wily Countess who is merely
using him as a tool, and later in his grief and de-
spair over the loss of the papers. And yet, with
Margaret ~l,untrgom-ry in the rl6e of the fascinat-
ing Countess, we easily understand how any young








THE ZONIAN.


man would soon become prey to her charms.
Steven Slack, as the knavish, :i.,in. Baron
von Arnilein, made us shudder for the poor victims
he had in his power. "Steve" was every inch the
villain, even to his bewitching mustache turned
up at the ends.
But William Sergeant, as the irrepressible Sir
George Caxton, was the grand triumph of the
evening. Sir George had a very active vocabulary,
of which his wife did not wholly approve, but this
did not hinder its being put to good use many
times during the progress of the play. "Bill's"
interpretation of the r61e of this lively old gentl-
man, who "stood upon his rights as an English-
man," was irreproachable, and the memory of
the inimitable old Fn Inr.llhni.il and his "occasional"
swearing will live long in the memory of his
audience. Ellen Roberts, as Lady Venetia Caxton,
was a most efficient helpmate. We feel sure that
however far short of being a model husband Sir


George might have fallen, it is not due to any
lack of exertion on the part of Lady Venetia; and
we now know considerably more about the con-
duct of young ladies "in her young days," than
we did before in..ri,. Lady Caxton.
Harold Cahalin, as Paul Hogue, another villain,
is to be highly complimented on his interpretation
ofa ,I+i .ui role. We wonder how Harold learned
all that French, and where he acquired that accent.
Fred Newhard, as chauffeur, and Wayne Banton,
as gatekeeper contributed their part to add to the
realism of the entire play.
It would be impossible to praise highly enough
the efforts of Miss F!orence Welts, who had the
entire responsibility of .. ... ii,' and producing
the play. Mis Welts showed remarkable fore-
sight in h:r choice of characters, and unusual
dramatic ability in training them. Long live
Miss Welts and cast of the play of '22!
-N. R.


THE MORNING AFTER.
(THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT.)


Oh-h-h! Ah-h-h! Ten o'clock already? Ouch!
Oh! I can't move. Oh, my back! And my legs!
My arm! My neck! Is it a stroke or were all my
bones broken in the night? Ah! Light begins to
dawn. Tennis! Noble tennis! Who would think
knocking a light rubber ball over a net could have
wrought such havoc? You climb painfully and
laboriously out of bed. You never before realized
how many joints and muscles there were. Your
right arm is almost helpless from the thumb to the
shoulder. Your legs feel as if they were being
sliced with a knife at each move. You step into
your bedroom slippers. Wow, again! A blister on
each heel and several on the toes. Oh, well, such
is life. You heroically try to stand up and
stretch. You accidentally catch sight of yourself
in the mirror. Is a boiled lobster supposed to be
red? Oh, no, it would look green compared to
your face. And your eyes nearly swollen shut,
look like a Chinaman's would if stung by a bee.


After ab:)ut an h Iur and a half of arduous ff .r-
to dress, you stiffly and painfully hobble down the
stai-s, trying t:) aid yourself with your good left
arm (which isn't any too secure itself), and drop
exhausted at the breakfast table.
You are serenely happy as long as nothing and
no one touches you, and there is no necessity for
moving, even a little-but oh, my! Everything
vou want is just out of reach. Your clothes are
all stiff corners that rub your poor baked flesh.
Even your lips feel as if they had been dried for
days in a hot air furnace. You are sure that you
know exactly how it must feel to be cremated.
You wonder what on earth was the original pur-
pose of legs anyway, for you have found that they
were not meant for running; and incidentally
decide that whoever invented the right arm did a
ii.iht' bum job.
You sleep most of the afternoon, mope around
the rest of the day, accomplish nothing and grate-
fully fall into your little bed at 8 o'clock.


MR 81059-4









THE ZONIAN.


1 FNIBLFMVS.

*i '----e;


HIGH SCHOOL PINS.

The students of the Canal Zone high schools
represent many States of the Union. It is not
long after one's entrance to either of the Zone high
schools before the pupil begins to feel that he is
really of the Canal Zone pupils. Then it is that
he wishes to become owner of one of the Canal
Zone pins.
These pins are worn by all pupils of the Canal
Zone high schools. The pin is circular with a
scalloped edge. Just a little distance from the
edge is a small black band on which are the words
"Istmo de Panama" in gold. The circle formed
by this part is divided in four parts. In these
four divisions are the letters C. Z. H. S. The
letters are in black. These pins are highly prized
by the students and alumni of both the Cristobal
and Balboa high schools and is one of the most
effective means of permanently k'-.'inr the bonds
of friendship between the schools.


-THE ZONIAN, '14.


SENIOR, '22, PINS.
This year the Class of'22 started a precedent by
adopting both pins and rings for their graduating
emblems.
The pin is diamond shaped with an artistic
curved edge on the bottom. On this edge are the
letters C. Z., between the letters are engraved '22.
Bordering the sides of the lozenge are 16 snow-
white pearls. The pearls imbedded in the gold
gives a most brilliant effect. In the space formed
by this border of pearls, is a small luzerngc, which
stands out by being slightly elevated. The letters
B. H. S. in gold, on a black background occupy
this lozenge. The pin is very attractive and has
received many favorable comments.
SENIOR, 22, RINGS.
The rinL, chosen by the Seniors are very pretty.
The face of the ring consists of a hexagon within
which is another similar fiaurr with the year '22.
In the space between the hexagons are the
letters B. H. S. The band is beautifully engraved
with appropriate designing, which is very effec-
tive on the gold.


SAYINGS OF THE TEACHERS.


Miss Denny.-"A' right now."
Miss Frost.-"It's beyond me."
Miss IWelts.-"Get busy, folks."
Miss Norcutt.--(N~vcr has been heard.)
Miss Hopkins.-"Atten tri n, pupils."
Miss Paul.-"Close your books."
Miss Baer.-"This is rank."
Miss Gummershiemer.-"But-a don't
sleep!"
Miss Courier.-"We will now sing 'Lizette!' "
Mr. Boss.-"Ab-so-lutely."
Mr. Lee.-' Nrf-,, boys, stop that."









THE ZONIAN.


Robert i;. '24.


There was not much interest taken in athletics
this year due to the fact that most of our athletes
have gone to the States. Also, because of the rule
which was made that all students were prohibited
from taking part in athletics unless they averaged
seventy per cent or above in all their studies.
In a high school as small as Balboa High a rule
of this kind should not be made as it knocks
athletics "in the head." This rule is practical
in large high schools or colleges where there is an
abundance of material to pick from, but not in
our High School where material is limited. It is
hoped that next year this rule will be revoked, and
a renewed interest in school athletics will be taken.

TRACK.

The Inter-class Track Meet was held on Satur-
day morning, February 18. The Sophomores won
the meet scoring 47 points, the Juniors were
second best with 23 points, the Freshmen got
third place with 2 points. The Seniors had no
representatives in this meet. The following are
the results of the meet:


'.., ..;, .. ," Broad Jump.
1. E. Morton, '23.
2. W. Banton, '23.
3. F. Newhard, '24.


Shot Put.
I. R. Rohden, '24.
2. H. Clark, '23.
3. F. Farrell, '25.


Running Broad Jump.
R. Engelke, '24.
F. Newhard, '24.
W. Banton, '23.

o -yard Dash.
R. Engelke, '24.
\V. Banton, '23.
F. Newhard, '24.
20oo- vard Dash.
F. Newhard, '24.
W. Banton, '23.
L. Atkins, '25.


Running High 7fump.
i R F '.. i,' '24.
2. F. Newhard, '24.
3. W. Banton, '23.
too-vard Dash.
i. R. Engelke, '24.
2. W. Banton, '23.
3. F. Newhard, '24.
44o-yard Dash.
i. R. I LI.Ir.', '24.
2. E. Morton, '23.
3. F. Newhard, '24.


BASKET BALL.

CRISTOBAL HIGH VS. BALBOA HIGH.

First Game.

The first basket ball game between the two
Canal Zone high schools was played on the Cris-
tobal Y. M. C. A. floor, December 17, 1921. Both
high schools were out to win and it was a hard
fought game. Cristobal won by squeezing in one
extra point just a few seconds before time was
called. Score: C. H. S., 23; B. H. S., 22.

Second Game.

On the afternoon of January 2,, Cristobal met
us in a return game on the Ancon clubhouse floor.








THE ZONIAN.


Excitement ran high as both teams were in perfect
condition and a win by Cristobal High would give
them the series, while a B. H. S. victory would
even up the score. Balboa, however, was deter-
mined to win. At the sound of the whistle, the
Balboa five waded straight into the Cristobal de-
fense, broke it up and piled up a total of 21 points.
The Cristobal team in trying to strengthen their
defense, did not do
much scoring and
could only total is
points.
Eugene Morton
and Carrol M111,.
were the chief point
winners for Balboa.
Up to the time
this annual has gone
to press, the third
and deciding game
has not been played.
Cristobal High was
supposed to have
met us again on the
Ancon floor, the fol-
lowing week, but
they never came.
INTER-CLASS
BASKET BALL.
The Inter class
Basket Ball Series,
which at the start
promised to be as
interesting a s i n
past years, proved
to be a failure, due
to the above-stated
rule, which barred
most of the players____
from participating.


the result that the game ended, Balboa 4, Cris-
tobal 3.
On Saturday, January 28, Cristobal High met
Balboa High on the Balboa stadium diamond for
the second baseball game of the series. Balboa
met defeat by the score of 8-5.
Up to the last half of the ninth inning it surely
seemed as though Balboa High wasgoing to ha e an
easy victory. But
Sthe unforeseen hap-
pened! At the be-
ginning ofthe ninth
.- the score stood ;-2
in favor of Balboa.
Clark pitched a
steady game up to
this inning, then he
"blew up." He
walked 3 men
straight, then a
scratch hit over
first, an overthrow
at home and Cris-
tobal had the game
on ice. In this un-
lucky inning Cris-
tobal was given 6
runs while Balboa
High was unable
to bring a man
home. The final
score was Cristobal
8, Balboa 5-.
Fred New hard,
of B. H. S. played
an exceptionally
good game at short
and several times
pulled his team out
of tight places.


THREE OP THE SWIMMING TEAM.


BASEBALL.


The first baseball game between Balboa High
School and Cristobal High took place this year on
the MNI.unt Hope baseball diamond. The game
was scheduled to last seven innings but at the
end of the seventh inning the score was 2-2. In
the li.gLinnin of the eighth inning Balboa scored
2 runs and Cristobal in their half made I with


INTER-CLASS AQUATIC MEET.


On the afternoon of March 18 the Inter-class
Swimming Meet was held at the Balboa Swimming
Pool. There was more competition in this meet
than in any other athletic contest held during the
year. The Sophomores won the meet, scoring 24
points, the Seniors came second with 19 points, and
the Juniors third with 6 points.


N










THE ZONIAN.


The events were run off in the following order:


50-yard Swim.
I. Robert Engelke, '24.
2. Harold Cahalin, '22.
3. Beryl Ilgen, '22.

Plunge.
1. Robert Engelke, '24.
2. Beryl Ilgen, '22.
3. Richard Engelke, '2-;.


Ioo-yard Breast.
Robert Engelke, '24.
Harold Cahalin, '22.
Philip Thornton, '24.

42-yard Back Stroke.
Robert IF . 1i ',24.
Harold Cahalin, '22.
Fred Newhard, '23.


Fancy Diving.
I. Fred Newhard, '23.
2. Robert Engelke, '24.
3. Harold Cahalin, '22.

TENNIS.


The Seniors won the Inter-class Tournament this
year. The Juniors had the tourney by a comfort-
able margin until the final event, the mixed
doubles, was played. This event was taken by
the Seniors, giving them first place. The Fresh-
men won third place.
Richard Ml, rid,- played a splendid game. He
won the boys' singles, defeating Sergeant (winner
of last year's singles) to the tune of 7-5, 6-4.


Paired with \Vavne Banton, he also took first
place in the doubles.
Below are the results of the tournament.

Boys' Doubles.

I. W\. Banton R. McBride,'23.
2. Engelke F. Newhard, '24.
,3. B. Illgn W- Sergeant, '22.

Bors Siniles.
1. Richard McBride, '23;.
2. Robert IF iki. .'24.
3. Paul Sullivan, '2;.

lixed Doub/es.
I. Ellen Roberts-\. Sergeant, '2.
2. Marvon Iocken P. Sullivan, '2;.
Esther Greene W. Banton, '23

Girls' Doubles.
I. Nina Ridenour Cecilia Twomey, '22.
2. Anita Sergeant -Olena Hutchings, '23.

(;ira' Sil/es.

1. Ellen Roberts, '22.
2. Maryon Locken, '25.
3. Esther Green, '23.


ODDS AND ENDS.

Cecilia Twomey, '22.


And so 'twill be when we are gone;
The bell at school will ring each morn,
And other Seniors will pas; thru
What we are now compelled to do.

SENIOR FAREWELL.

Come lay thy hand in mine, dear,
We soon will go
Out into the cold, cruel world, dear,
Where winds do blow,
Perhaps some day we'll meet again
Here where the palm trees grow;
But do not grieve if you must leave
For friendship knows no woe.

YE INFERNAL EXAM.

He, who never sat late at night
Trying shorthand forms to write;
Who never has lain awake in bed
Cramming unknown verbs in his head;
Has never kept knowledge in a muddled jam;
He knows you not, ye infernal Examn!


I see before me, the Freshie stand
Green as the grass that covers the land;
His manly brow, his determined chin-
They h. .,;I go with his silly grin.

A GOOD EXAMPLE.

Marvin Banton was a pretty smart man
But consistency was not part of his plan,
So why should he study th whole nite thru
When just a little 1.1 ,ti .i would probably do?

mriE REAL rIHI\G.

Books! What dull strife
On which to waste one's precious life!
How much better 't wouldd be for me
To hear the whistle of the referee,
To hear the birdies sing "tweet, tweet,"
When I have been knocked "plum off" my feet.
To hear the starter's pistol crack
And feel the cinders on the track,
These things hold greater charm for me
Than history, math, or poetry!


SYSTEM.


PISTACHIO.








THE ZONI~N.


Cecilia Twomey, '22.


The Balboa High School may be justly proud of
its girl athletes. This year we have not as yet
had a chance to prove that ours are the best on
the Canal Zone but we are hoping that before
June we will have this opportunity.

TRACK AND FIELD MEET.

The girls' Inter-class Track and Field Meet was
won by the Junior Class. Esther Greene won the
highest number of points, and with the aid of
Olena Hutchings and Esther Witt, succeeded in
winning a decided victory for the Juniors. Esther
Greene is undoubtedly the best long-distance run-
ner and high-jumper of which the Canal Zone can
boast.
The Sophomores proved themselves to be dan-
gerous opponents, and only lacked a few points of
defeating the Juniors. Lona Rathbone, another
of our noted athletes, was the second highest in-
dividual point winner. With the aid of Thelma
Babbitt, she won second place for her class.
The Freshmen, although they sent three repre-
sentatives to the meet, secured only I point; Ida-
belle Knowles being the winner of this high score.
However, we are glad to see that they do not lack
class spirit and we sincerely hope that next year,
they will be able to make the upper classmen fight
hard for their honors,


The Senior Class, being composed of scholars and
not athletes, obtained only 16 points, which were
scored by Cecilia Twomey, thus placing them in
third place.
All the events were strongly contested and some
very close decisions were made. Two new events
were added to the list this year, the hop, skip, and
jump, and the hurdles. The results are as follows:

5o-yard Dash.
i. Esther Greene, '23. Time not recorded.
2. Cecilia Twomey, '22.
3. Lona Rathbone, '24.

75-yard Dash.
I. Esther Greene, '23. Time not recorded.
2. Cecilia Twomey, '22.
3. Lona Rathbone, '24.
Baseball Throw.
I. Cecilia Twomey, '22, distance, 117 feet 4 inches.
2. Olena Hutchings, '23, distance, i15 feet 2 inches.
3. Idabelle Knowles, '25, distance, 15 feet.
Basketball Throw.
I. Lona Rathbone, '24, distance, 66 feet 4 inches.
2. Thelma Babbitt, '24, distance, 60 feet Io inches.
3. Olena Hutchings, '23, distance, i5 feet i inch.

'..' atl l Broad Jump.
i. Lona Rathbone, '24, distance, 7 feet.
2. Esther Greene, '23, distance, 6 feet 4 inches.
3. Cecilia Twomey, '22, distance, 6 feet 2 inches,








THE ZONIAN.


Hurdles.
i. Lona Rathbone, '24. Time not recorded.
2. Esther Greene, '23.

Hop, Skip, and 7rump.
i. Esther Greene, '23, distance, 26 feet 6 inches.
2. Lona Rathbone, '24, distance, 24 feet 6 inches.
3. Esther \, i, '23, distance, 21 feet inches.


-
hQ


IRENE gTEWART.
Best gymnast.


Running Broad Jump.
i. Lona Rathbone, '24, distance, 12 feet I inch.
2. Thelma Babbitt, '24, distance, 1 feet 3 inches.
3. Esther Greene, '23, distance, I feet 2 inches.

Running High Jiump.
1. Esther Greene, '23, distance, 4 feet 4 inches.
2. Esther Witt, '23, distance, 4 feet I inch.
3. .ona Rathbone, '24, distance, 3 feet I inches.


BASKET BALL.

Basket ball has not held its proper place in the
activities of the Balboa High School this year.
Perhaps this is due to the fact that a suitable:
basket ball floor could not be found. It is at least
not due to a lack of interest nor an absence of the
proper material for a good strong team, as these
are possessions of which we are justly proud.


The Seniors, having only I basketball player,
were forced to combine with the Juniors who had
5. This gave us 3 teams, the Junior-Senior,
Sopho":ore, and Freshmen. The following girls
were elected as captains of the ,irt.. ri:-, teams:
Cecilia Twomey, of the Junior-Senior team, Lona
Rathbone, of the Sophomores, and Ida Ruth
Hammer of the Freshmen.

INTER-CLASS TENNIS.

This year's tennis tournament was instrumental
in bringing out some nNew athletes. The Seniors
were victorious due to the snappy playing of Ellen
Roberts in the singles, and Nina Ridenour and
Cecilia Twomey in the doubles.
The Juniv -s, represented by Esther Greene in
the singles, and ()lena Hutchings and Anita Ser-
geant in the doubles, were strong contenders for the
honors, but the Senior opposition was too forceful.
Maryon Locken upheld the honor of the Fresh-
men Class and although was unable to get a
partner for the doubles, she played a good steady
game throughout and won third place.


ELLEN ROBUETS.


I '-








TH F. ZONIAN.


AQUATICS.

The girl swimmers and divers of the Balboa
High School, in their recent swimming meet,
showed a very high grade of swimming. The
outstanding feature of the girls was the swimming
of Thelma Babbitt, who scored 19 points, winning
the plunge, fancy di inlg, and girls' back stroke.
Ida Ruth Hammer, a Freshman, is the holder of
the ladies' 6o-yard championship of the Canal


Zone. She is not only a wonderful crawl stroke
swimmer, but is rated as the best back stroke
swimmer for ladies on the Zone. The Freshman
Class in the meet were greatly handicapped in not
having Mlis Hammer compete, as she was figured
to make many points.
Others who scored points for their classes were:
Esther Greene, '23; Esther Witt, '23; and Julia
Zidbeck, '24.


COACH GRIESER AND THE RED, WHITE, AND BLUE TROUPE,
"Future Students of Balb3a Higb."








THE ZONIAN.


BOOKS-JUST OUT.

BY WELL-KNOWN LOCAL AUTHORS.

B. L. Boss-"How to Learn Music at Home."
H. CAHALIN-"Dancing in Five Lessons."
B. ILGEN-"Be An Artist!"
C. LUCKEY-"Hunt and Peck System of Type-
writing."
V. BEWLEY.-"Jazzing the Ivories."
A. ALBIN.-"Household Hints."
J. GRAU.-"Expert Pillslinging."
T. DORAN-"Advice to the Lovelorn."
M. GERRANS-"School of Expression."
M. BANTON-"Cute Things and When to Say
Them."
H. GRIMISON-' Palnic- Freckle Removing."
C. TwoMEY.-"How to be Sweet and Charm-
ing (Like Me)."
R. NORFLEET-"Gaining Four Pounds in Two
Days."
R. McBRIDE--" M Simple Method of Learning
Physics."


EPIDEMICS BREAK OUT IN B. H. S.

B. H. S. is just running over with diseases of all
kinds, -hal.'p-, and forms. The one that occupies
first place and is the most prominent is "Failure-
itis." Three-fourths of our school has this
dreadful disease, but it is hoped, by our faculty,
that this will be completely wiped out by the
end of this term. The other diseases, and those
afflicted, are:
Tardvitis, Margaret \l .r y..]i,..r \.
Pla itis, Marjorie Gerrans.
Pianoitis, Viola Bewley.
Dancingitis, Harold Cahalin.
1jietitis, Isabella Milloy.
G.: '.:.'i, Floride Edwards.
Noisitis, Kathleen Reeder.
Lo:itis, Richard Rhoden.
Talkitis, Arthur Wynne.
Stubbornitis, William Sergeant.


FUSSERS' CLUB.
President.-Freddie Newhard.
Vice President.-"Vide" Bewley.
Official Third Party.-Oliver Schroyer.


ACTIVE MEMBERS.


Jose Grau
Harold Cahalin
Beryl Ilgen
"Tommy" Doran
George Wainio
"Pat" Doran
Wa i n,: Banton
Horace Clark
"Pope" Rhoden
"Flip" Thornton
Robert Norfleet


Irene Stewart
M .,re.,ir, r M ,nrg, .m r,"
Marjorie Gerrans
Nina Ridenour
Anita Sergeant
Edith Minch
Lucy Wright
Connie Graff
Lucy Strawn
"Dot" Eastman
"Ciel" Twomey








THE ZONIAN.


N^ -Ii AN


Irene Stewart, '22.


We're proud of you, Exchanges,
You've helped us quite a lot,
We want to be your loyal friends
And give you all we've got.



And we indeed mean every word of what this
poem has said for us!
To be able to exchange different ideas is a won-
derful thing! Where would this old world be if its
people were isolated and were completely igno-
rant of affairs going on about them? If you have a
fairly good brain and can use it, you can easily
figure this out. Ma~l, le you would be on the Fiji
Islands or some other place in mid-ocean!
Criticism is one of the easiest things to do and
a wonderful help to others. Very few of our Ex-
changes have commented on the ZONIAN and we
are wondering why! Is not our magazine worthy
of criticism or is it so good that nothing need be
said? We hope the latter! Exchanges, please
comment and criticise our magazine!
Our Exchanges are not as many in number this
year but we are striving to make our list grow and

Let us offer our most sincere thanks to our
Exchanges for their hearty cooperation.


Again we say we're mighty proud;
By you we'll always stand.
We stretch to you our emblem,
"The Good-Luck Friendship Hand."


-V. B.


Again we say we're might proud of you and
stretch to you our emblem, "The Good-Luck
Friendship Hand."
The Comment, Cretin High School, St. Paul, Minn.-We
are glad to have The Comment on our exchange list. You have
a "dandy" exchange department. "Where, oh, where are the
jokes?" You need snapshots to enliven your paper.
The Sentinel, Leisenring, Pa.-Your paper is well arranged
and your editorials are something to be proud of. To your
contributors of the literary department, we see a bright and
blossoming future.
The Key, Battle Creek, Mich.-Your "Grilds" are fine!
The "Toonerville Clarion" was great and something original.
It is very disconcerting to be at an interesting part of a story
and then read "Continued on page ." Can't you better
this?
The Shield, Haddonfield High School, N. 7.-Your paper
has a good future ahead of it. Your class notes are written
well. Your jokes need to be put where they can be seen.
The Quill, Staten Island.-Your literary department is fine
and so is your Alumni. The Quill Review is a good idea. But
what you need is more jokes to put pep in your paper.
The Tabula, Oak Park High School, Chicago, I/--Your
literary department can not be excelled,


~---









THE ZONIAN.


The Comet, West Division High School, Milwaukee, H~is.-
Why not have a larger Alumni department to remind the
alumni of their school days? The future holds great prospects
for your staff artist.
The Nor'easter, Kansas City, Mo.-Your Christmas number
is simply wonderful. There isn't a thing to be said against
your magazine. We welcome the Nor'easter to our exchange.
Revista La .. .. Colegio de La Saile, Panama.-Su departa-
mento de literature es muy buero y los entretenemientos son
algunas cosas para divertirse. Si su libro tuviera mas foto-
graf.as seria mejor.
The Student, Holnes High School, Co,,ington, Ky -You
have a good paper with good jokes. We see several rivals for
the places of Milton and Shakespeare. Your poetry is very
well done.
The Ear/v Trainer, Essex County Training School, Lawenlce,
Mass.-We enjoyed reading your clever paper. The poem
"Just Grin" certainly has a good thought behind it.
The Record, John Marshall High School, Richmond, Va.-
Yours is a very neat paper. School spirit can well be seen
throughout. This poem certainly is true of your school:

School spirit everywhere,
The very halls are filled;
School spirit everywhere,
And pep, more pep, distilled.

The High School Recorder, Saratoga Springs, A. Y.-Your
literary department is good but could be enlarged. How
about more cuts?
The Buzzer, Baton Rouge High School, Baton Rouge, La.-
Glad to have you on our exchange. Come again.
The Spectrum, Chester High School, Pa.-We enjoyed read-
ing your paper. A few cartoons or photographs would increase
the interest of the reader.
The High School Herald, Ii'estfield High School, Mass.-
Why not exchange with different schools to learn about
what is going on around you? Would not a few cartoons and
snapshots add to your paper. We welcome you.
The Vidette, Lancaster, Pa.-You are a new exchange and
we hope you will come again. Why not add an alumni depart-
ment to your book? We are proud of you!
On Bounds, Montclair academyy, A. J.-Your paper is very
much alive-full of pep and school spirit. Why not add a few
more stories to your literary department?
Micrometer, Ohio Mechanics Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio-The
Micrometer is a magazine "tres charmante." Your geometry
definitions and propositions are something very original.
The Maroon and ll'hite, Uniontown, Pa.-"Laugh and the
world laughs with you, kick and you kick alone." Who could
keep from laughing when they read your wonderful jokes!
And there is no use to "kick" because yours is a well-gotten-
up paper.
The Ihisp, Wlfmington High School, Delaware.-Your
cover designs are well represented. More cuts would improve
your magazine "lots." Would like to have you as a regular
visitor on our exchanges.
Westward Ho, tWestern High School, Baltimore, Md.-The
drawings, portraying the characters in your stories add to
your literary department, "The Western World" is a clever


way to tell all of the t..... news from all parts of the
country." Won't you comment on our ZONIAN?
The Beacon, Grover Cleveland High School, St. Louis, Mo.-
My, but we are glad to receive such a good and well-balanced
magazine. Though you are a new visitor, we hope that you
will become a permanent friend to us. The snaps of the
different clubs make it very interesting. The silhouettes of
Cledison Club and signatures are grand. Come again, touted
de suite, Beacon!
The Efltrrian, llaverhill High School, ii Mass.-
We enjoyed reading your splendid literary department. What
Grinds you have are fine but why not have more? We hope
that you will become a regular exchange.
The Pattersonian, Mount fjo High School, Mount 7oy, Pa.-
Your poetry outrivals that of all the great poets! The notes
of each class show that your school works in unity.
The Vindex, Ehnir a Free Academy, Ehnira, N. Y.-The
Question Box is a novel idea and both questions and answers


Two of oar best exchanges.
"THE CARIBBEAN" and "NO'EASTER "

are very witty. You have the largest Exchange Department
of any magazine we have received this year and you should
be very proud of it. Your motto must be "Keep in touch
with the things going on around you."
I'estern Breeze, 1'iashington D. C.-Judging from your well
written paper, your school is one big family, all working
together for the good of the school. "Advice to the Lovelorn"
is very clever and witty.
The Spectator, llIest ll'aterloo Himh School, lowa.-Your
literary department c'est tres bien but why not add a few more
stories? We enjoyed reading The Spectator very much.
The Columbian, Columbia High School, Columbia, S. C.-
Yours is a small but mighty magazine. We want to see you
on our Exchange all the time.
The Voice, Knosville, Tenn.-You are a newcomer and we
certainly are glad to have you. You have a very attractive
cover and your magazine is as attractive. Nufsed!









THE ZONIAN.


The Caribbean, Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.-
Your magazine is one of the best we have received and we
are glad to exchange with our "sister school." "Y's and
Other Y's" is unique. Your cuts are fine. You indeed
have school spirit. What greater praise is there?

As OTHERS SEE Us.

A splendid magazine, full of school spirit and fun. We
hope to have you often on our exchange list-The Student,
Covington, Ky.


Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden
Were talking soft and low,
On looking up, Eve saw a tree,
"Apples! And I want one, so!"

"Now, Eve," Adam said to her aright,
"You know we were forbidden
To touch this fruit, which here you see,
Just pretend that it is hidden."

"Why, Adam, I insist, my dear,
That you get me that apple.
You never have refused my wish,
I don't understand your babble."

Adam hung his weary head,
He knew he should not do it,
For God had told them long ago,
"Take not, or ye shall rue it."

Eve pleaded and still pleaded,
"It's such a lovely red,
Oh, Adam, I entreat you
To get it now," she said.


You have a very attractive paper.-High School RI'order,
John Marshall High School.
THE ZONIAN is unique in its composition and delightful to
read. The reading matter is plentifully interspersed with
clear and handsome cuts, while the cover is distinctly original
and typical of Central America. While we appreciated the
annual very much, we would also appreciate receiving a copy
of your excellent publication monthly. Will you do that for
us, ZONIAN?-The Micrometer, Ohio Mechanic's Institute,
Cincinnati, Ohio.


Slowly, with reluctant steps
He nervously climbed the tree,
Until that apple he did get,
"Oh, Adam, please throw it to me."

Once more he was beside her,
Both munching at the apple,
"Oh, Adam, it's so sweet of you,
To get me that nice -"

Why, what next then did happen
Remains yet to be told,
They both realized their one great wrong,
Too late! They'd been too bold.

Eve ran to hide behind a tree,
She saw that she had sinned,
Adam madly tore his hair,
"Oh, why, did I satisfy her whim?"

A great clash came and then they knew
Their pleasure and its cost,
The only words that they could hear,
Was, "Paradise is Lost."


PARADISE LOST.
Viola Bewley, '22.









THE ZONIAN.


LIMERICKS.


s *







THOMAS DORAN.
A sleepy young man was Tommy Doran;
In class he was sure to be snorin'
Though he studied all day,
He ne'er hit the hay;
Therefore was Doran careworen.

IRENE STEW.ART.
There was a sweet 'I, i- Ir,.. ,
She could well take the part of a queen;
Her sweet charming ways
Helped to brighten the days,
For every one who knows our Irene.

HAROLD CAHALIN.
My story's about Harold Cahalin,
The great dancer who's always a sailin',
When he takes a new step
You must have lots of pep
To dance with Harold Cahalin.


CECILIA TWOMEY.
There was a sweet maid named Cecilia,
She had eyes that sure could steal ya;
She vamped all the boys,
Which caused a big noise.
This sweet little maid named Cecilia.

BERYL ILGEN.
There was a young man named Beryl;
In a play he made a fine girl.
He even wore socks;
He borrowed my clocks,
Oh, Beryl! Oh, Beryl! Oh, Beryl!

GEORGIA IRANSEN.
Georgia is a happy girl
Who likes all quiet fun.
She doesn't care for shooting,
But she's wild about a Gunn.


/_, ,L2
c ~----_
_=---=--
-/ ***'// -^ ^ s ^ M ^
___ __ = .... 1 ._ .. 0,




ow THEY "STIKE Vs."
How THEY "BTRIKF: I.'8."1








THE ZONIAN.


Marjorie Carter, '24. Robert Norfleet, '23.


Clark (in Science class).-"Do you believe,
Mr. B'..ss, that our ancestors were apes?"
Mr. Boss.-"Yours may have been apes, Clark,
but I'm sure that mine weren't."

"Beg pardon, sir, but could you tell me if there
is a man living in this hotel, with one eye named
John Hardly?"
M:\ Ie I could help you out. Do you know the
name of his other eye?"

Miss Hopkins (in English class).-"Angel,
what do you know about Fielding?"
A. Pena.-"Nothing much. I was always a
pitcher on the team wherever I played."

Scull.-"Mr. Boss, do you think that I need a
shot of this vaccine in me?"
Mr. Boss.-"I don't know whether you need a
shot of vaccine or lead in you."

"Hello, Brown, old top, new car ?"
''N.., new top, old car."

A\.0 0...-"Yes, I was a Freshmian once too.
Some of the happiest YEARS of my life were
spent as a Freshman." 0

Two little worms were digging away. They were
Jigging away in dead earnest. Poor Ernest!


WARNING TO FRESHMEN.-If there should be a
fire, don't run, as GRIc I things won't burn.

Mr. Boss enters the room just as Bill Sergeant
was rcadini this line from "Mac'berh:"
"Oh, hell, what have we here?"

"They say that these teachers lead a fast life."
Irene S.-"I doubt it, none of them passed me
last year."

"What's a pretzel?"
"A cracker that has the cramps."

Engelke (conducting a class meeting).-"Boys,
this talking will have to stop. It seems that every
time I open my mouth some idiot has to talk."

Mr. Boss.-"When I went to Coney Island last
year, I went in one of those whirling tubs, and I'll
tell you that it sure was a vcr\ u pleasant feeling."
Clark.-"Is that the first time that you'd been
in a tub?"

Miss Currier.-"If you are going to sing, you
will have to keep quiet."

M. Banton (outlining "Caesar").-"They
stabbed Caesar in the Third Act and buried him
in the Fourth Act."







THE ZONIAN.


THE USUAL GRIND.


S0OMETHIN4
TELL ME I'M
ON'NA BE LATE


I'LL NCVER
/--. \MAKE I T
SNOW.


*"O ONE
J U T. I
WNEAK I


., I..


-.t, ,'? C,


wVILLYVUM!
You MAY ~O
T' r T HE OFfice.
r-'


(6Mle MuST THINK
5HE'5 RUNNING'
A N I 4 HT 53COOL


IN(5
N
EA3 7


8LUH-- ,


0 \








THE ZONIAN.


Mr. Boss.-"I have made out the examination
questions and sent them to the printer; is there
a question anyone would like to ask?"
Josi Grau.-"Who's the printer?"

If you don't know your memory work you can't
forget it.














Tailor.-"Do you want a cuff on your trousers?"
Customer.-"Do you want a slap on your
mouth?"

Dad (sternly).-"Where were you last night?"
Son.-"Oh, just riding around with some of the
boys."
Dad.-"Well, tell 'em not to leave their hair-
pins in the car."

Miss Hopkins (in English V).-"How would
you rank Poe's "The Raven" with his other
works?"
Clark.-"It's very rank."

Sad one (jauntily).-" '(,uld you like a nice
partner for the next dance?"
Glorious one (innocently).-"Why, yes! Bring
him up!"

Simons.-"What are you running for, New-
hard?"
Newhard.-"I'm trying to keep two fellows
from fighting."
Simons.-"Who are the two fellow" s "
Newhard.-"Doran and I."

You can kid gloves and string beans, but you
can't bull frogs.


Jimmy (tearfully).--"Father, the d-donkey
kicked me."
Father.-"Have you been annoying it?"
7inmyv.-"No, I was only trying to c-carve
my name on it."


Norfleet.-"Your father must have been a
great athlete."
Sansbury.--"What makes you think so?"
Norfleet.--"Because he raised such a big
dumb-bell."

"I thought you had this quiz down cold?"
And thus replied our hero:
"Well, didn't I have it cold enough?
The grade I got was zero."

Sullivan.-"I dreamed of. you last night.
Do you ever dream of me?"
Lucy Wright (suppressing a yawn).-"No, but
I'd like to have the chance."


Anita S.-"George was the goal of my am-
bitions, but- "
Lona Rathbone.-"But what?"
Anita.--"Father kicked the goal."

Mr. Boss.-"Nina, what is Newton's law of
inertia?"
Nina R. (jauntily).-"The inability of an
object to start when in motion, stop when at rest,
and to turn when going around a corner."






rOH! THAT'S "-
FATHER COMING
KOOWN STAIBRl-


SOH BOY! AT LAST'
I GOT AN INVITE
TO BESSIE'S HOUSE
MAYBE I CAN MAlKE
A HIT YYWTH- HER OAD


YOUNG MAN
O YOU KN OW
WHAT TIME IT


Is?


ER-ER YES SIR~
IWAS JUST ABOU)
S TO LEAVE


WHAT THE MATTER
Y ITH- THAT FELLOW
My VYATCM A- "I
DC WN A ND I YYANTEOD
TO GET THE -
CORRECT TIM EcX6,4'








THE ZON'1AN.


First boy.--"Mly brother takes up l-Frinch,
English, German, Italian, and Spanish."
Second boy.--"ly! When does he study?"
First boy.-"He doesn't study, he runs an ele-
vator."

My bonnie leaned over the gas tank,
The height of the contents to see;
He lighted a match to assist him-
Oh, bring back my bonnie to me!

Ignorant scrub.-"Say, do you know that you're
awfully sunburnt; have you been sitting in the
sun?"
Cahalin (sarcastically).-"Oh, no, I got sun-
burned sitting in the shade."

Marion L.-"I wonder why Tommy borrowed
my old belt?"
Ella Miles.-"You know, you told him that he
was the first man you'd ever loved, so he gave the
belt to a finger print expert and he discovered
about 150 different finger prints on it."

Mr. Boss (in physics class).-'\\inin,, what's
a dry dock?"
Wainio.-"A physician who won't give out
prescriptions."

Elizabeth N.-"Have you heard to-day's gos-
sip?"
Helen H.-"No, I haven't."
Elizabeth N.-"Then I guess there isn't any."

Juliet.-"What's in a name?"
Romeo.--"\\ll, if you take mine you might
get a good home out of it."

Miss Norcutt.-"What plants flourish best in
tropical countries?"
Loretta.-"Ice plants."

Miss Frost.-"You cough easier this morning."
Ilgen.-"I ought to, I've been practicing all
night."

Ma.-"Johnnie, what are you studying now?"
y..,'.. .--.-"Molecules."
Ma.-"Well, I hope you'll do well; I tried to
get your father to wear one, but he never could
keep it in his eye."


Viola B. 'indignantly).-"You're a fine one! I
thought you could keep a secret!"
Eva Sweet.-"Well, I kept it a week. What do
you think I am? A cold storage plant?"

Mary had some little bees,
And they, to save their lives,
Went everywhere that Mary went-
For Mary had the hives.

Geography teacher.-"W\hat do they raise in
Mexico?"
Pupil.-"My mother doesn't allow me to say
that word."

McBride.-"See any change in me?"
Thornton.-"No, why?"
McBride.-"I just swallowed a cent."


-'._





.


A -., ." ," .. .'. :,


Tourist.-"What's that beast?"
Native.-"That's a razorback hawg, suh."
Tourist.-"What's he rubbing himself against
the tree for?"
Native.-"Just stropping hisself, suh, just strop-
ping hisself."

Sophomore.-"I have descended from a long
family tree!"
Freshie (to another Freshie).-"Gee. This nut
says he fell out of a coconut tree!"

"Miss Denny" was a dancer,
And hopped all o'er the "Lee."
(The public never saw her,
But we could see her free.)

Miss Hopkins.-"What is a dogma?"
Banton.-"A dog's mother."








THE ZONIAN.


In English Class:
Miss Hopkins.-"What does the prefix 'amphi'
mean?
Sergeant.-"In water or out of water."'
Miss Hopkins.-"Then what does amphi-
theater mean?"
Bright boy.-"A theater out of water."

Bobby.-"Mamma, please tie my shoe."
Mamma (who is passing through the room with
both hands occupied).-"Just a minute, sonny,
can't you see my hands are full? I have only one
pair of hands, you know."
Bobby (sighing thoughtfully).--"\.1inni i, why
do we have two feet and only one pair of hands?"

CHRONIC TROUBLE.

_/:.' IVelts.-"What troubled Germany about
1815-1866?"
Georgia Fransen.-"Indigestion."
Miss W"elts.--"Whcerc do you get that?"
Georgia.-"She was disturbed by the Diet of
Frankfort."

Teacher.- N- ., I want you to express in your
own words the f ,11l' .. i'1n extract from Longfellow's
'Ode to a Skylark;'
Hail to thee, blithe spirit!
Bird thou never wert?"
Pupil.-"Hi, Cockey, you ain't no blinkin'
bird!"


TRANSLATED.

"' .., children," said a teacher in an East Side
school, to her pupils, "I will read a little story to
you and I want you to listen carefully and then
write it in your own words. Here it is: 'I see a
cow. It is a pretty cow. See the cow's tail. Can
the cow run? Yes, the cow can run. Can the
cow run as fast as the horse? No, the cow can not
run as fast as the horse."
The following is what one pupil wrote:
"Git onto de cow. Ain't she a bute? Pipe de
cow's handle. Kin de cow git a gait on her? Sure,
\lik..' Kin de cow hump it wid de horse? Nit!
de cow ain't in it wit de horse."

A group of Japanese students had been reading
Hamlet's Soliloquy, and the Professor asked them
to express the first sentence, "to be or not to be,"
etc., in their own words. The following gems were
gleaned from their papers:
"To is or not to were,"
"To could or not to should,"
"To am or not to was."

Aliss Hopkins (after five pupils had answered
incorrectly).-"Next!"
Helene (suddenly awakening).-"Bobbed hair-
cut and a shampoo."

Always put off to-night what you are going to
put on in the morning .


I 'r J1"
-i~ ~- /-
^ ------ =''- f--i
_--"^ A









THE ZONIAN.


AUTOGRAPHS.


ADDRESSES.


~- --







THE ZONIAN.


"IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION\
PATRONIZE THEIZONIAN"A DS
YYE DID D
o .--


cahalnior tI I


I
i/'






70 THE ZONIAN.


INTERNATIONAL HOTEL
has the
SCleanest and Coolest Cafe in Panama

MEALS A LA CARTE AND TABLE D'HOTE

Planked Steaks .:. Planked Chicken .:. Planked Fish

SLarge Stock of the Choicest Wines and Liquors .

-ll PRIVATE DINING ROOMS II
SII For Large and Small Parties

JOHN McEWEN, Proprietor







ROBERT C. SMITH


Tailor and Dry Cleaner

PANAMA, opposite Smallwood Bros. Phone, Corporation 218

+K;
*i; 4
*S S4
47 47
'74474477477447 7477447447 47447747747744744774774






THE ZONIAN.


SWhen in Panama
SDO NOT FAIL TO CALL AT

SThe French Bazaar

S 'LARGE DEPARTMENT STORE


i IHeadquarters for Parisian Novelties
/ PANAMA
COLON
S^ PARIS




INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION
S(Owned by the National City Bank of New York)
HEAD OFFICE: No. 60 WALL STREET, NEW YORK CITY


4 Capital, Surplus and Undivided
Profits, over $16,000,000 . .

Special facilities through our direct connections in all parts of the world
4 for financing foreign trade.

^ 4 per cent per annum paid on savings accounts
.? 'A
A : A ... .. .. ,. ?A .. A A ,A A .A A ,A <. ,. : A' .. .. A4A4AA? . .. .. .. .. .. . , '?.4






72 THE ZONIAN.



^.-----6----------- --.i.

4- A

















SAt the Traps, UseI
^Q ^










BLACKK SHELLS I
*Hi ^^^^ Smokele"r^and Black Powderr




^ ~United States Cartridge Company |
in BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y.
Ij i------- -
4 ?
4? i
4? 4? rps s i~i

4?I C!~
4?Elli~~ ~lll~r
4?i~ci
4?iSoee~ n lckPweJ



4;B


4, 4; RAaARETYR( ,Y







THE ZONIAN.


_____ *peaking of

7i 3Iofotograpb !


If You Want
One That is Artistic,
Does You Credit, and
i h J ,l Is of the Best Quality

SEE

ENDARA



S."'The High School Seniors
Recommend His Work



.v LOCATION
CONVENIENT ACCESSIBLE
.Near Cable Office on
CENTRAL AVENUE
Phone 386




SYOU CAN'T PUT DIMMERS ON THE SUN . .
4? But you can do what amounts to the same thing-you can obtain a lens
That takes the danger out of sun-glare or strong artificial light -
Senuine bir m. Crookes' Lens
have a delicate, almost indistinguishable tint that gives them their remark-
able ability to absorb the actinic rays so dangerous to the human eye.
THE SCADRON OPTICAL COMPANY
PANAMA: 23 Central Avenue COLON: 44 Front Street
S P A 3
'4'?'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^'^






74 THE ZONIAN.


PHONES: 488 WILLIAMSBURG Cable Address "COWACO"
CONSOLIDATED WAFER CO., Inc.
+ MANUFACTURERS OF 100 PER CENT PURE
S See Cream Cones anb Wafer fperialties
A OFFICE AND FACTORY:
515-521 KENT AVE. BROOKLYN, N. Y.



Water .~i
SWater M rintpal ;rug *tore ?
+ Makes A A DR. A. C. DACOSTA GOMEZ
Ak
Sl I Jfresr) rugs, Coilet
~ 4 R rtide. Verfumerp
ALWAYS ON HAND
S iHair
SEven A Prescriptions Filled With Care
*iB a Curlier
S AMERICAN BEAUTY PARLOR Corner Bolivar and oth Streets
+kn itrI BEUT PARLOR
] No. 37 Front Street Colon P. 0. Box No. 84 COLON, R. P.
.'. ALL BEAUTY TREATMENT ... Telephones, Corp. 222 and 219



THE METAL ARTS COMPANY
SCHOOL JEWELRY MEN
SClass Rings and Pins, Commencement Invitations, Trophy Plaques,
A Prize Cups, Radio Pins Engraved, Commercial and Personal Stationery
4 CATALOGUE ON REQUEST
77 SOUTH AVE. ROCHESTER, N. Y.







THE ZONIAN.


cA Remington
Repeater


U g


Now! Shell

You are ready

with Remington

to do your best shooting


REMINGTON REPEATERS are
made in 12 and 20 Gauges. The
Model 10, handling 6 shots, has for
many years given trap shooters and
game hunters splendid service and
needs no further recommendation.
Our latest production, the 5 shot
Model I 7, is unquestionably the best of
the 20 gauge repeaters. A particularly
hard hitting gun when the 234-inch shell
is used. Light in weight (5s4 to 6 lbs.),
well balanced, and an action which
works as smooth as oil. A splendid gun
for a sportswoman.


R FMINGTON UNIC "WETPROOF"
SHELLS are an immense advantage
to the sportsman, because he can depend
on them to shoot and chamber perfectly
in all kinds of weather. No swollen cases
to jam and spoil your sport when the day
israiny or the atmosphere intensely humid.
Not only is the outside of the case wet-
proofed, but the shell is sealed at top wad
and crimp, making it air and water tight.
All our factory loaded brands, Arrow,
Nitro Club, New Club, and Remington, are
treated with this "Wetproof" process.
Write for booklet on Remington "Wetproof" Shells.


Remington Products are for sale by leading dealers
'who can supply or order for you

REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, Inc.
FIREARMS-AMMUNITION-CUTLERY
25 Broadway, New York

Don't forget to take along '.
a Remington Scout Knife
on your shooting trips. Tou
will find it mighty useful.


R3333
Scout and Camp Knife


75






76 THE ZONIAN.



PICTURES! Taken of anything, at any time, and anywhere


... .. WE SPECIALIZE IN ...-.

| ~ Quality Portraits



STHE MARINE STUDIO
No connection with any other Studio
0og CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA CITY




MICHELL & NESS
The Tennis and Golf Shop
1335 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA.
SWe are special representatives of the Bancroft line of Rackets,
which we string to order, insuring a freshly strung racket.
SThe Bancroft "WINNER" formerly called the "TILDEN"
is used by the World's Champion and most of the prominent
tennis players of the United States and Australia . . .
a WoVnberfullp 3Balanceb Racket : Price $13.50 %
Our special department for restringing
and repairing is the best in the country
i GOLF CLUBS REPAIRED AND MADE TO ORDER







THE ZONIAN.


SUsed by Uncle Sam's Expert Riflemen


SH 0 P PE' S T6itro ovwder e
sa______Sol-vernt WNo. 9 +
+6 (Trade Mark Registered)
For cleaning high power (Springfield) Rifles, Revolvers, Machine Guns, and Firearms of all kinds. +
A compound that will remove the residue of any high power powder,
+ including black powder. It will eliminate rusting and pitting in any +
climate.
iThis compound will neutralize any residue and loosen metal fouling +
and leading that may be left in barrel after cleaning.
-e_." jNo. 9 is the only rifle cleaning solvent that will remove rust, metal
,'-it 9 fouling, and leading.
E, -. No riflemen or quartermaster's department should be without it.

S '.:,, '.:'Sold by Hardware and Sporting Goods Dealers and at Post Exchanges
,-, pFRANK A. HOPPE, INC., Sole Manufacturer
S 32314 N. 8th STREET PHILADELPHIA
^ss7^^P^s^^^^s~~~s.^^^^^<^F^^'^:^^;


SMagazines

Books

Candies

Music

Stationery




Opposite Apecialton Post Officep
SOpposite Ancon Post Office ;i
4? Ws-
^?


"THE HYGIENIC LINE"

m Knit Bathing Suits
Sand
Athletic Goods
of every description made in
ALL QUALITIES
ALL STYLES
ALL SIZES
^' Knit Bathing Suits
Sfor
Men, Women, and Children
ALSO
? JERSEYS,
CIRCULAR and SHAKER SWEATERS

SHygienic Fleeced Underwear Co.
INC.
Mills: PHILADELPHIA, PA.






THE ZONIAN.


r STATIONERY
i FOR THE SCHOOL AND THE HOME

| OFFICE SUPPLIES
AT WHOLESALE
4 CORRESPONDENCE WITH MERCHANTS AND LARGE CONSUMERS INVITED

SBooks Games Toys -Novelties
The Largest Wholesale Distributors in North America

THE AMERICAN NEWS COMPANY, INC.
S9-11-13-15 PARK PLACE NEW YORK CITY
j^ .^~;P$;~;;;P ;QP;~P~7;; ;; n;~;;aa~~


MARK A(0

When you want
the real thing in
Sport Equipment
:pj4 .









NEW YORK CITY, U. S. A. 4;
SPALDING DEALERS EVERYWHEREwant
t think of 4

"SPALDING" i

4 A. G. Spalding & Bros. ,
+ NEW YORK CITY, U. S. A. w
SSPALDING DEALERS EVERYWHERE
4?4?4??4?4? - - - - -4


Bastian Bros.Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

SCla.s4 in!g
+ ( tasiS. 3ins
Ithlletic Atebals

Engraved
Commencement Announcements
and Invitations

S-. CALLING CARDS ..
^ -------------------si8?
S 731 BASTIAN BUILDING
4 ROCHESTER, N. Y.
^ ^f
3^ i-'-^s;;~~;P~siss~






THE ZONIAN.


OFFICE HOURS: Post Office Address:
S8 A.M. to Io A.M. Box 444, Ancon, C. Z.
Daily: 2 P. M. to 5 P. M.
L 6 P. M. to 9 P. M.
Sunday: 2 P. M. to 5 P. M. Telephone, Panama 911ii



SLARRY D. SNEAD

4S Doctor of Chiropractic



96 ANCON AVENUE Opposite
PANAMA, RP "The National Institute"
; PANAMA, R. P.
4 ^6 sS.6 1444 s4G4;


4 .
! In the "High School of Experience"
We Learn How to Produce


S"GREENE'S HONEY'

SAnd We Are Learning How to i"
SProduce Greene's Honey Better
IEAT
GREENE'S HONEY
;9; and
SSmile! Smile! Smile!
. .^
SSold in Retail Stores
PANAMA AND COLON
Wholesale and Retail
s* 794 Tavernilla Street
Telephone, 687 Balboa P. 0. Box 765, Balboa


fljttetropole otel
A.4 PANAMA N






I MAGERHANS I

| fret JtJeeler

S45 Front Street Colon, R. P.
^J^^^^^^^ ^^^^ijc;






go THE ZONIAN.



One Quality ,A11 Flavors
* 4











44?












SYMAXWELL-KELS SALES COMPANY






Canal Zone and Republic of Panama Masonic Temple, Cistobal, C. Z.
your faoie' e note the nam ADAM
tic



4? 4?
4? 4?
4?i +










4?i