Zonian

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Zonian
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English
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St. Petersburg Printing Co.
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St. Petersburg, FL

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IF YOU can keep your head when al; about you
Are losing theirs a blaming it on you;
If you can trust yours when all men doubt .* ii
But make allowance for their doubting, too .' ....
Syou can wait and not be tired by waiting, ,. .
Or being lied about, don't deal lies,: .
Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look to good, nor talk too wise; .. ....

IF YOU can dream-and not make dreams your master:
If you can think.-and -not make thu :j im: ::: M
If you can meet with 'triPuh sand D" master :
And treat thime two inipsts jut the r li
If you can bear to hear th ru trh yo napola -
Twisted by ki.ay to e.a .. m fo.t oo:t. ..;,
Or watch -the: hln s you a" year -lif to .hekenj: .
.And lstop aa4b iiH'M up with worn-outta t
i .alng hat d . ..t ie ... .""'dn .:: -turn,











IF YOU can make one heap of all your wlnn -in : '. .' : ' **''"
And risk it on one turn of pdt -ntpl-to ;
SAnd loei, d start and t yo tour. b.."s
And newr breathe a "*"' ;4',i' i
" r- you canaf taftoiu t o'ttind ier e :eAw p S ."e .5 *:"s
To serve yourwia ltra *r s. go
eq hold tn whn ere 1f pou
I= t MIMI W ... 1840 JRO. ot 7

IF YQI can talk with riwdsi keep your Virtue, -
dOr walk with Kingsi-not lose the common top... :. ..
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt -you,
If all men count with you, but none too much; .. :
If you can fill the unforgiviea minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run.
Yours Is the Earth and everything that's iIt:
And-which Is more-you'll be a man, my an .

S-RUDYARD KIPL fi




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THE


ZONIAN


BALBOA, CANAL ZONE, 1921


PUBLISHED BY THE BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL


Business Manager
Circulation Editor
Exchange Editor .
Staff artist .


Zonian Otaff.

Editor-in-Chief, CHARLES A. Gxoss
. THEODORE C. KNAPP Joke Editor
S LEONARD LANDERS Society Editor
MAE J. WYNNE Alumni Editor
HAROLD CAHALIN Athletic Editor (Boys)
Athletic Editor (Girls', ETHrSL GrTM.N


G3.txG3 D.%ANSIN
. CATzr-IzNF B. PARMETER
Rura C. Bovo
WILLIAM SARGENT


CONTENTS.


Zonian Staff. ...............
Editorial ............ .. .... CHARLES A. GaoBz
Graduates ..... ... .....
Faculty.......... ... ..... .. .... .
For Value Received ..... ALFRED T. CLIFTON, Ja.
The Midnight Follies..... .......... MAE J. WYNNE
Young and Old ................ .MAI MR MAHON
In the Heart of a Gypsy. .......... ANITA WOOD
Cristobal Coaling Station ........... Louis O'BRIEN
Spanish Sketches ......... ..
A Trip into the Interior...... ....LAWRENCE HOPPE
Snowballs in Panama.............. WALTER BRowx
Panama-A Legend ...............MAE J. WYNNE
A Senior Trip to Pearl Islands........ GERTRUDE
VAN HARDEVELD


I Last Will and Testament of the Class of '21,
3 Ga:ZTs-oD. VAN H lTDVELD
4 Class Prophecy ............... ...MARIE C1MAHON
1 C lass Play ........ .......
12 S:iety ... . .. CATAra:tX EPARMa-Tr
(6 Boys' Basketb.l! Teim.
:7 Athletics, B ys'. .. .. W\\'I.LI.AM SAxGENT
:9 Athletics, Girls' E. THE. P. S. GETMAN
!2 Exchanges...... .MAE J. WvY ;N
15 Alumni ...... ...... R r C. Bcyo
17 JJkes .......... ...GEO DANSKIN
;3 Sad but Sweet . . ELoIS PEARSON
i2 An Incident in the Spanish Class......CORNELIA
VAN HA;-LDVELD


VOL. XII


No. i





























FOREWORD.

We wish to take this means of thanking all of
those who have helped to make this issue of the
ZONIAN a success. Especially do we thank the
staff of The Panama Canal Press for the "fatherly
interest" they have taken in us. We also want
to thank the Abou Saad Temple for the use of
their mosque for our dance and to thank our
faculty for the helping hand which they have
always given us.






THE ZONIAN.


EDITORIAL


a<%-'.- -


PERSONAL EFFORT.


IT CAN BE DONE.


"Somebody said it couldn't be done,
But, he with a chuckle, replied,
"That maybe it couldn't, but he wouldn't be one
Who would say so 'till he had tried."
So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin
On his face. If he worried, he hid it.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn't be done, and-he did it.


Some students in Balboa High School are doing
poor work. How many of us when we come to a
thing which is a little bit hard are willing to say,
"Oh, I can't do that," or to hide behind the old
excuse that one can't be expected to do as much
in the tropics as in the States or elsewhere.
That is an excuse which absolutely can not hold
water. Balboa High School graduates have gone
to some of the best colleges in the United States.
The majority of these graduates rank with the
leaders in their classes. This goes to show that we
can get as much out of school on the Canal Zone
as students do in the States. It would be impossi-
ble for any one to go to college and do good work
if he lacked the elementary training.
I am sure that if we would just apply the theme
of the little verses quoted above and, when we
come to a thing which is hard, sit right down, put
in the effort and stay with it until we have finished,


Somebody O.....r..I, "Oh, you'll never do that-
At least no one ever has done it."
But he took off his coat and he took off his hat
And the first thing we knew he'd begun it.
With a lift of his chin, and a bit of a grin,
Without any doubting or quiddit,
He started to sing and he tackled the thing
That couldn't be done, and-he did it."


then we could with a smile of satisfaction say that
we have done something which perhaps not half
of the rest of the class have done.
\e must not get too ambitious, however, and
look at things in a selfish manner and strive for
personal glory, for it is teamwork that wins the day
every time. In athletics the successful team is the
one that has every player putting in the best in
him and the one that has all its members working
together. A team may be composed of star play-
ers and yet lose most of its games because some
one of its players is striving to gain personal glory
rather than working with the rest of the team.
So, come on, Balboa High School! Let more
of us tackle some of these things that can't be
done, and, let's do them!

CHARLES A. GROBE, '21.


T!.








4 THE ZONIAN.


CHARLES A. GROBE, President.
"In joys, in grief, in triumphs, in retreat,
Great always, without aiming to be great."











THEODORE C. KNAPP, Vice President.
"I know thee for a man of many thoughts."











ELOIS PEARSON, Secretary and Treasurer.
"But to see her was to love her;
Love but her and love forever."











WILLIAM H. ALLEN.
"* A lazy lolling sort,
Unseen at church, at senate, or at court."








THE ZONIAN.


ELEANOR D. BELLO.
"Her looks do argue her replete with
modesty."











HARRY E. BISSELL.
Thou, Ethel, thou has metamorphos'd me;
Made me neglect my studies, lose my time.











ALICE CHI TAYLOR BLEAKLEY.
"They could not deem me one of such; I stood
Among them, but not of them."











ANNIE IRENE BOYD.
"There was a soft and pensive grace,
A cast of thought upon her face."









THE ZONIAN.


RUTH CATHERINE BOYD.
"She that respects herself is safe from others;
She wears a coat of mail that none can
pierce."











CHARLES R. CAMPBELL,JR.
"A little tow-headed good-for-nothing,
And mischief-making monkey from his
birth."











GEORGE L. CAPWELL.
"Well, rhen, the world's mine oyster,
Which I with sword will open."










GEORGE W. DANSKIN.
"That he is mad, 'tis true, 'tis true, 'tis pity;
And pity 'tis, 'tis true."







THE ZONIAN.
















MAY L. A. DI'NCAN.
"Life's a jest, and all things show it;
I thought so once, but now I know it."












ETHEL P. S. GETMAN.
"Hail to thee, blithe spirit."












NIARGAREI PHVILLIS HALLIGAN.
"A dancing shape, an image gay,
To haunt, to startle, and waylay."











GERTRlDE M. JOHN.
"* * Her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express
How pure, how dear, their I..ll... place."








THE ZONIAN.


CATHERINE M. KAYE.
"Bright as the sun her eyes the gazers strike,
And, like the sun, they shine on all alike."










LEONARD E. LANDERS.
"0, what may man within him hide,
Though angel on the outward side."











FLORIENET C. MATTER.
"Brown eyes with wondrous, witching charm,
To bring us good or to work us harm."











MARIE E. McMAHON.
"Behold the child, by nature's kindly law,
Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw."









THE ZONIAN.















Louis J. O'BRIEN.
"* * Be thou, spirit fierce,
My spirit! Be thou me, impetuous one."











CATHERINE BERNICE PARMETER.
"Oh! blest with a temper whose unclouded ray
Can make to-morrow cheerful as to-day."











EMILY ELIZABETH TWITCHELL.
"Be silent always, when you doubt your sense
And speak, tho' sure, with seeming diffi-
dence."










CORNELIA C. VAN HARDEVELD.
"She doeth little kindnesses
Which most leave undone or despise."










THE ZONTAN:
















GERTRUDE CAROLYN VAN HARDEVELD.
"I had rather have a fool to make me merry.
Than experience to make me sad."












Lois MAY WIGGINS.
"* * her voice was ever soft;
Gentle, and low; an excellent thing in
woman.










MAE JEANNETTE \WYNNE.
"For if she will, she will, you may depend
on't;
And if she won't, she won't; so there's an
end on't."








THE ZONIAN.


f acultp.


A. R. LAX;,
Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools.
A. B., Nebraska Weslevan University.
A. M., University of Nebraska.


F. X. KARRER,
Assistant to Superintendent.
Wilson's Modern Business College, Seattle.
Washington State Normal School, Ellensburg.
A. B., University of Washington.
M. A., Columbia University.
M. Pd., New York University.


BERNARD L. Boss,
Principal.
Graduate work, Oshkosh, Wisconsin State Nor-
mal School.
Ph. B., University of Wisconsin.
Grade work, University of Wisconsin.
Science.


OLGA J. FROST.
A. B., \Iuni St. Vincent-on-Hudson.
French and Spanish.


EDNA I,. V. BAER.
A. B., University of Wisconsin.
Sheboygan Business College.
Gregg School.
Commercial Subjects.


HAZEL C. JARVIS.
B. S., University of California.
Post Graduate, University of California.
Science.


BESS B. BUCKERIDGE.
B. S., University of Missouri.
English.


CHARMIAN E. Si. PSON.
A. B., A. M., University of Oklahoma.
English and Latin.


HATTIE B. PAL..
B. A., M. A., University of California.
Spanish and History.


A. BEASLEY DENNV.
B. A., University of Texas.
Mathematics.


LOA FOSTER.
Bradley Polytechnic.
Indiana State Normal.
Household Arts.


WALLACE M. LEE.
Wooster College.
Manual T' .. ..


(a


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12 THE ZONTAN.



FOR VALUE RECEIVED.

SAlfred T. Clifton, 7r., '23.


The sun rose in a blaze over the rim of the
South Pacific, lighting up a broad expanse of
heaving ocean, void of everything, save for a
tiny speck on the far-off western horizon. As one
neared this speck, it gradually formed itself into
an island. It was about a mile in length, flat and
densely wooded, except at the northern end,
where a sharp hill rose abruptly about 300 feet,
covered with sparse grass andafew trees struggling
for nourishment among the loose rocks and bould-
ers. At the base of the hill was a small harbor with
a sand\ beach, where tiny waves lapped gently
on the shore. But the thing one noticed first was
a small sailing ship lying at anchor with her bow
toward the shore, and on her stern in neat black
letters the words Pricilla, East Harniss, Mass.
The Priscilla belonged to Capt. Josiah Whit-
ley, an ex-sea captain and a man of wealth and
sense. He, like many other old "salts" had saved
more money than most people thought, and now
was taking a pleasure trip among the South Sea
Islands, accompanied by his nephew, Larry
Barnes. The Priscilla was of the same build as
most fishing smacks seen off the cod banks of
Newfoundland, except that she had been over-
hauled and had had more sleeping quarters in-
stalled; and also that she had been divested of
that extremely "fihv" odor that almost invari-
ably accompanies most vessels of her kind.
On board, all was silent, save for the creaking of
tackle as the ship swayed genrly with the tide.
Suddenly a boy appeared out of the stern hatch-
wav and stood for a moment surveying the land-
scape, then advanced to the bow, where, leaning
on the rail, he scrutinized interestedly the bay
and shore. It was Captain Whitley's nephew,
Larry Barnes. Larry was a boy of about 17;
well Iuilr, and had dark, curly hair and chestnut-
brown c- es. Hi1 face was tanned by the sun and
wind, and was rather gd,1 to look at. Larry was
a true specimen of the type of boy that grows into
a true and sincere man. As Larry stood watching


the shore in the hope of seeing some inhabitant
of the island, the members of the crew of the
Priscilla appeared one by one and began putting
things in order and clearing the decks, as only the
absolutely necessary things had been done the
night before, when the ship dropped anchor.
Soon Captain Whitlcy appeared and strolled
up to where Larry was standing. "Morning,
Larry," he said, "what do you thinkof the island?"
"Oh, good morning, Uncle Joe," replied Larry,
when he heard his uncle's voice, "Why, to tell
the truth, I don't think much of it, so far. Are
you sure there are people living on it?"
"It's marked 'inhabited' on the chart," de-
clared Captain Whitley. "Maybe it's a mistake,
but I guess we'll find out pretty soon, because if
there are people living here, they'll likely be
curious enough to investigate us."
"I sure hope there are people here, and that we
can get a few pearls," said Larry, as this was their
first stop since they had left Panama.
The Captain and Larry exchanged ideas for
some time more, the latter hoping all the time
that somebody would appear on shore. Finally
the breakfast gong rang, and he followed his uncle
below without having been rewarded in his search.
After breakfast he eagerly sought the deck
again, but was still disappointed. Finally he
determined to ask his uncle to let him row ashore.
He was just about to enter the hatchway when a
sudden shout drew his attention to the shore.
There he saw a number of natives running down
the beach toward the water, some firing guns as
they ran. Suddenly one who seemed to be the
leader, held up his hand for the rest to stop firing.
Then Larry noticed another native in the water,
swimming toward the Priscilla.
"Uncle Joe!" called Larry.
"What's up ?" came his uncle's voice from below.
"Come up on deck, quick!" answered Larry,
watching closely the swimming native, as were all
the crew on deck.






THE ZONIAN. 13


Soon the Captain appeared. When he saw what
was happening, he took his pipe from his mouth,
and going to the rail, looked closely at the scene
being enacted. When the swimmer was about
halfway from the beach to the smack, Larry
saw that he was beginning to tire, although he had
only swam about 150 yards. Evidently he had
been pursued through the woods before he took
to the water, and the chase and swim added, was
telling on him. The leader of the party on the
shore had foreseen this, and as the ship was twice
as far from the opposite shore, and as help from
the ship was certainly not to be counted on, the
object of his late chase could be safely permitted
to swim in reality out to the sharks.
As all this came to Larry, a cold wave of horror
swept over him. "He'll never make it," he mut-
tered hoarsely. The native was about 50 feet from
the Priscilla when a sharp fin cut the water about
10 yards to the left. It moved slowly through the
water, describing an arc behind the struggling
man, and gradually disappeared, only to appear
again coming back. Evidently the swimmer had
seen it. He tried to swim faster, but could not.
He was almost exhausted. Finally he raised his
head and looked toward the ship, a look of mute
agony and appeal in his eyes. The ship was his
only hope.
Larry hesitated no longer. Ripping off his shirt,
he was soon over the rail and moving swiftly
through the water toward the native, who was now
barely making headway.
"Larry! Come back here!" roared Captain
Whitley, but in vain.
In a minute Larry was back at the ship's side
again and the native, now unconscious, was lifted
on board and taken below. The shark had been
frightened away by the commotion caused by
Larry's appearance in the water.
On shore, the leader's rage was terrible to see.
His followers scattered in all directions before him.
He threw his weapons into the sea; and gouged
great furrows in the sand with his hands and feet,
sending it everywhere. Gradually he calmed
down and, calling on all his crude gods, vowed
vengeance on the white man who had cheated him
of his prey. Finally he strode into the woods and
disappeared.


Aboard the Priscilla, after the native had been
brought to consciousness, Captain Whitley called
Larry aside. "Larry" he said, "you did a some-
what rash thing. This fellow may be an enemy
of the tribe or tribes living on the island. Ifhe is,
it may be necessary for us to leave very soon, if
we don't want a pack of cannibals down on us; and
as we've gone this far, we couldn't leave this
fellow here to be murdered, so we may have a
wild man to take care of."
"I'm sorry, Uncle Joe," replied Larry, "but it
was more than I could stand to see the poor
fellow out there with that shark swimming around
him. I did the only thing I could have done."
"Well, we'll have to make the best of it as it is,"
soliloquized his uncle, and that ended the conver-
sation.
Two hours later, as the Captain and Larry
were sitting on deck the former said, "Larry, let's
go see if that fellow can speak English, by any
chance."
The native was lying in a berth in the one extra
stateroom the small ship contained. He appeared
to be asleep, but when he heard the man and
boy, he opened his eyes and looked up. "Are
you the boy that saved Azuni from drowning?"
he asked in English, looking at Larry.
The latter's jaw dropped about 6 inches. Cap-
tain Whitley's pipe fell from his teeth. This
was more than they had expected. "Wh-what
the --?" Larry managed to splutter.
"You are surprised that Azuni talks English,"
said the native with a smile. "If my masters
wish I will tell them my story."
"You bet!" exclaimed Larry interestedly, at
the same time seating himself beside his uncle on
the other berth which the room contained.
"Azuni was born on this island 30 years ago.
My father was the chief of the Azon tribe. When
I was 9, a ship came here and missionaries of the
white man's God went to my people and taught
them the white man's religion. They told my
father they would take me and teach me the white
man's language, and how to read and write, and
after much talk, my father consented. For 5
years I lived with the missionaries and learned to
read and write the white man's language. Then
I returned home, and when my father died, 10
years ago, I became chief of the tribe, as I still am.






THE ZONIAN.


"W\hire men have sometimes come to this island,
and we have traded pearls and shells for the white
man's guns and powder and things we could not
make. One .ai. when my people were diving for
pearls, the chief of the tribe on an island near here,
was visiting me. We were talking together when
an old man of my tribe came up to me. He held
out his hand to me and in it was the largest pearl
ever found here. It was about the size of the first
joint of my thumb. 'For ni master,' he said and
stumbled off. I and my friend stared at it. He
t ik it oat of my hand ant I saw his eyes light
with greed. He returned the pearl and soon after
he left for his i-land. As his canoe pushed off, he
turned and said. 'Some day I shall have your
pearl.' I laughed and thought nothing of it,
but a month later-two days ago-he appeared
with his warriors and said he had come for my
pearl. Then began the battle. We drove them
back, but not off the island.
"Yesterday I and my warriors went out against
them. I was separated and had to flee and hide.
This nmrning they discovered me and gave chase.
The rest my master knows, except that the pearl
is hidden in my hut; and my tribe, I am sure,
is still holding out. I was trying to swim to the
village when my master's son?"-he said the
last qI.i-tirninril -"rescued me."
"He's my uncle," said Larry, after a silciin last-
ing some minutes.
"You'd better go to sleep now," said Captain
\\ hirl:y, thoughtfully, "Come on, Larry."
That evening three natives paddled out to the
Priscilla from the point where Azuni had said


his village was situated. By various signs they
said they wished to see Azuni. After a short
consultation with the latter, they took him ashore,
and after he had thanked Larry as best he knew
how for his brave rescue.
Two days more the Priscilla lay at anchor;
then Captain Whitley ordered everything pre-
pared for departure. While the orders were being
carried out, a canoe put out from the point where
Azuni had landed. Larry, who was on deck,
noticed, as it drew nearer, that it contained Azuni
himself.
The canoe drew alongside and Azuni climbed
to the deck. "I would speak with my master,"
he said, at the same time untying a small pouch
from his girdle. "This is the pearl I told you of,"
he continued, as he drew the bauble from its
pouch.
Larry took it carefully with a smothered cry
of surprise. He called his uncle and then turned
to the examination of the pearl. while e Azuni
and his uncle were talking, he and a few of the
crew sur c\l ed it with interest, until he heard his
uncle's voice say "Good-bye, Azuni," when he
looked up and found Azuni gone.
"Azuni! Your pearl!" he cried as he ran to the
rail. The native was just pushing off in his
canoe. He looked up and a smile flitted across
his face.
"The pearl is yours," he said, "Azuni does not
forget such deeds as 'ours," and he turned and
paddled swiftly to shore, where, after running his
canoe up on the beach, he waved his hand and
then disappeared into the forest.


THE SECRET OF Sl'CCESS.

The stamp .aid, is stiikin to it.
To succeed, said the knife, be bright and sharp.
Keep up to date- said the calendar.
Don't knock, it's old fashioned, said the electric
bell.
Do a ,lri% inu business, said the hammer.
And the barrel said, never lose your head.
Mlnak light ofev'er. tling, the fire observed.
But always keep cool, said the ice.
Aspire to grater things. said the nutmeg.






THE ZONIAN.


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Ancon Hospital Grounds.


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16 THE ZONIAN.



THE MIDNIGHT FOLLIES.
,1 J. 't , ,.


Of course it started all sorts of conjectures when
I appeared in school Tuesday morning with an
unmistakable black eye. It had occurred once
or twice before-once when I was a mere infant
in the second or third era.le and beat up the boy
next door, and once after a basket-ball game with
the class of'20. But this time I had no basket-ball
alibi and knew better than to attempt the well-
known fiction about stubbing my toe and fall-
ing downstairs, so I simply baffled them all with
a tantalizing air of mystery.
Then the Star & Herald flaunted 6-inch head-
lines: "Pete Williams in hands of Police,"
"Not.,r ius thief and gunman captured," "Word
came to us late last night," and so forth and so on.
John Peter Williams has been the idol of Pana-
ma's lawless element for months. He is our one
melodramatic character. Romance's faithful
standby, gunman, thief, wizard, and general
all-around bad man. He used to be only a harm-
less, commonplace young negro. But on one
evil day he sought and obtained employment
in ".'iller's Specialty Shop." While there he
spent his time voraciously reading everything
he could lay his hands on, rapidly dcl loping a
taste for dime novels, detective stories, and penny
thrillers. H, was discharged by the Honorable
Boob .Mlilcr for idleness, and being in need of a
little change, entered (unil itole) a house in the
Canal Zone and appropriated the property of one
of Uncle Sam's e'npl'i..' For this trifling mis-
demeanor he was landed in the "calaboose,"
but not caring for the place he shortly left, without
lpirmi-,i',n, and launched himself fairly in his
"career of crime." He was very spectacular-
robbing the Governor, Judge Hanan, and the
Ancon post office; c,.i.dling capture, boldly
appearing in the streets in broad d.a light, tearing
down the posters offering a reward for his cap-
ture, fighting daily pistol battles with the Panama
pol1., and cnr.rally havingig like an ideal bad
man. He amused me and I enjoyed many a
hearty laugh over the superstition of the negroes


who claimed that he bore a charmed life, could
turn aside the bullets of the police and change his
form at will.
Nevertheless, Peter Williams-or some of his
dusky admirers-systematically went through all
the houses in our neighborhood. They unlocked
the doors and they cut the screens; they cleaned
off the clothes lines and they cleaned out the
ice boxes; and just generally made themselves
obnoxious.
But to come to the point. I spent the best part
of Monday afternoon in Endara's studio having
my "Zonian" picture taken and the rest of the
afternoon shopping. Had two visitors after supper
and when they left settled down to a new maga-
zine and read it through from cover to cover.
Then I decided to do my shorthand. By the time
I finished it was quite late. Even if the whole
family had not been asleep I should have known
it was late because I heard the pop-corn wagon
pass, so I locked up the house and went to bed.
I dreamed that I was blowing soap bubbles,
the biggest of which turned into a red and yellow
balloon, and Florienet stuck a pin into it. It
popped with a terrible noise and woke me up. I
lay in bed trembling with the shock of my sudden
awakening. Hark! What was that? Surely
someone was walking on the back porch-there's
one board that always creaks unless you know
exactly how to step on it.
I listened for a moment, holding my breath,
then sat up cautiously. After a moment I slid
over the end of the bed to prevent the spring
from squeaking and carefully felt about with my
foot to locate my slippers. Smothering an
exclamation as my big toe struck against some-
thing hard, I stooped with elaborate care and ran
my hand along the floor until it closed about the
object in question, my kid brother's baseball bat.
I concluded that it might be useful, also that my
slippers would be a bother. Again came that
ominous creak of the back porch floor. Softly
and slowly I crept down the hall, testing each






THE ZONIAN.


board with my foot before trusting it with my
weight, determined that no squeak should herald
my stealthy advance. I suppressed a scream as
I felt a huge cockroach crawl from under my bare
foot and ducked as my face came in contact with
a spider's web, invisible in the darkness. At last
I gained the door to the back porch. Sure enough,
in front of the ice box, dimly silhouetted against
the sky was a dark, blurred figure.
Then, of course, the inevitable, the impossible,
occurred-I sneezed! And it was a perfectly
terrific sneeze. What immediately f.l..... I
remains confused in my mind. The corner of the
ice box door struck me a wicked blow over the
eye-all sorts of skyrockets went off-there was a
crash of breaking glass-a sound of splashing
water-the "flippity flop" of mother's slippers, and
a startled "What the devil--!" in a very fami-
liar masculine voice. Then some one turned on
the light.


Yes, it was l)ad. He had got up to get a drink.
NM sneeze had startled him so that he bumped
against the ice bx door, shoving it in mx eye; and
dropped the jar of ice \vate:r, smashing it to hits.
W\\, m),ther tu:-ned on the light so suddenly,
we sto() I)blinking and 'i ;,_ the situation.
()f course I was told to explain-they always
make im explain. Whi-n I had finished, all the
Irish in D)ad came to the surface; he just threw
back his head and r/ar.:d, an. after a helpless
im'ment's struggle for st -possessi(on, mother
joined him, and laug e.l 'til the tears rolled down
her cheeks. As for me, my eve was hurting to):
much for mn- to appreciate the humor of the
situation. I dropped the ..i.i1i bat which I
still held, and tecliing very much bruised in mind
and b ody, went haughtily back to bed.


YOUNG AND 01D).

.1iari, .1c.1, A '2r.


Oh! Why couldn't she stay home? Her mother
was too cruel. What good would education do a
broken heart? Why did she have to go to school,
where all would soon know of her disgrace? So
thought Peg, as she trudged slowly on her way
to the hated school. Not that she had anything
against the school; it was the children, and es-
pecially unfaithful Pete. She could h ir. lI realize
that it was but last week when he was her ac-
knowledged "fellow." Yes, school was all right
then, for he had gone to and from it with her,
and she sat behind him. Humph! She'd soon
fix that! She certainly wouldn't sit there another
day! The unfaithful thing! The idea of dropping
her for that new girl at school! What if she did
have curls and was so pretty? She's an old "fraid-
cat," that's what she is! Well,she'd show him he
wasn't the only pebble on the beach!
Here she came in sight of the school; upon
her arrival she was surrounded by a group of
young playmates, all anxious to see how she was
bearing up; in their eyes she was a heroine. "Oh,
Peg," said Polly, her most intimate friend, "I
saw Pete come to school with Maru to-day; what's
the matter, had another fight?"
MR 77349-2


"Oh, no," languidly replied Peg, "I'm just tired
of having him trailing along after me evceryw here
I go and I told him so. She's welcome to him, for
all I care!" and she sauntered off, grasping Polly's
arm. "Polly, ,ou wait for me after school and I'll
tell you about it, but Yvo must promise never to
t. 11 a soul."
How Peg e\ r go through that day she never
knew. In the first place the teacher wouldn't
let her change her seat and she must, perforce, sit
behin.I Pete. But the longest, hardest time must
end sometime, and it was with a sigh of relief
that she gathered up her b iks andi prepared to
leave with I'P.i .
Thev walked off, talking of x various happenings
of the daV. Finally, Poll, unable to contain her
curi ,sity, burst forth, "\Vell, aren't you going to
tell? You said you would."
"Criss-cross Yvur heart, hope to die yxou won't
tell?" questioned Peg.
\hen Polly had sworn her secrecy by this for-
mula, Peg '... '."Oh, who cares for him anyway?
He's no good; I just hate him. But, gee! I'd
like to get hold of that NIargy' the bold -l} ,
she sat there and wrote notes to him all day; not






I8 THE ZONIAN.


that I care, though. But anyway, Saturday he
came down to my house and we were swinging in
my backyard when he started to talk about curls.
First he said how much he liked them, then he said
why didn't I wear my hair in curls; then he kept
it up and finally he said how awful cute he thought
Margy was. Then I got mad and said I wouldn't
be like her for anything in the world, and if he
wanted to talk about her all the time for him to go
right straight home. Then he got mad and I got
madder and we had a big fight; then I told him tD
get out of my yard and go on over and play in her
yard if he thought so much about her and her old
curls. That's all; 'cept I saw him walking home
from Sunday school with her yesterday. I guess
she's his 'girl' now, but I don't care. I can get me
another one, but then Pete was so nice. 'Mem-
ber, you promised not to tell, don't forget."
"Oh, no, I won't tell! Oh, I think you're just
grand! But aren't you afraid he'll stay mad?"
"Stay mad! Let him stay mad! Who wants
him to get glad? Not me."
Here the road branched and their ways parted;
Peg following one and Polly the other. "Oh
Peg," called Polly, "wait for me here to-morrow,
%%llI you?"
"Sure, I'll meet you here at 7.30. Don't tell."
That night after supper, Peg sat on the porch
with her sister, who was 'most grown up. Peg was
reading, but from time to time she glanced up at
her sister in the swing; finally she got up and sat
beside her. "Sister," rimiill.
"Yes, dear, what is it?"
"I want to ask you something."
"Well, what is it?"
'"Well, 'spose you were mad at a fellow and
wanted him to make up, how would you do it?"
"Well, that depends. What's the matter, Peg,
mad at Pete? Why not tell me all about it and
then perhaps I can help you. I won't tell."
So once more Peg related the sorry tale; at
its close her sister said, "That is a mix-up;
why don't you just let him drop and get another

"But I don't want anybody but Pete, he's so
nice."
"Then I'd just ignore him for a f.w lay, Act
as if you didn't know he was there. That'll
bring him around in no time. They're all the same,


too conceited. Well, run along to bed now, honey,
and don't forget to tell me how it all comes out.
Good night."
So the next day the ignoring of Pete began. Peg
followed the advice she had received thoroughly;
so thoroughly, that Pete began to avoid even pass-
ing her. Thus the days slowly passed, 'til Friday
arrived. Peg was beginning to get worried.
Suppose her sister was wrong. She knew a lot-
but not about Pete. Oh! all she'd done was to
make matters worse. Anyhow, she'd hurry home
and tell her sister about it.
She had loitered so long that even faithful Polly
had gone on. When she came out, who should she
see, waiting for her under the tree, but Pete.
As she passed he smiled sheepishly and said,
"C'n I walk home with you?"
"Suit yourself," was the laconic reply.
He shuffled along beside her in silence for a
while, then said, "Aw, say, what ya mad at?
Why don't you ever speak to a fella any more?"
"Oh, I'm not good enough to speak to you; I
haven't got curls."
"Aw, lay off that stuff, will ya? I don't like
curls, anyway, you've got lots more hair than
her."
"Thanks, awfully."
"Say, Peg, can I be your fellow again? I don't
like old 'arg". 'tall. She can't do nothing. Gee!
all we did when I went over to her house was to sit
on the steps. We didn't play Injun, or nothing .
Say, why can't I?"
"Well, I won't make any promises, 'cause maybe
I'll change my mind, but I'll think about it. Are
you sure you like me best? Oh! You got a black
eye! Who did it? Did ya have a fight?"
"Oh, I just had a fight with Ben Wilson. He
said you were 1' w--liggcd; but don't you worry,
I made him take it back."
"Oh, the mean thing! I'm not either; it's just
the way I walk, isn't it, Petei"
"Sure, it is; anyway they're a lot straighter'n
they used to be. But you ought to see how I
mussed up Ben's map. He ain't what he used to
be."
"')h, Pete, I think you're the bravest thing!
I guess you're about the bravest boy in all this
school."






THE ZONIAN.


"Aw, go on, I ain't either." come on down to my house to-morrow and we'll
"Yes, you are, I guess I know what I'm talking play like we always do, will you?"
about, don't I." "Sure, so long."
"Oh, yes, sure," quickly agreed Pete, wary of With a parting glance Peg set joyfully off for
further trouble. home, her faith in her sister completely restored.
Here they paused at the crossroads, "Pete,


(


IN THE HEART OF A GYPSY.

A4,ita II'ood, ';.?.


Q


The last -'. p-' wagon had stopped beneath the
trees. Already the fire had been started, sending
a thin veil of smoke toward the evening skies.
Gypsy women moved here and there, preparing
the evening meal. Gypsy men swo-e nrw and
then while smoking f .Jl-- n 11r; pipes o: feed-
ing the horses. And bright ab ve the m >3n h: t
risen, while a star twinkled here an. there.
Apart from the rest and alone sat a young b i.
His large, black eyes shone from his dark-skinned
face as bright as the stars ab-ve. His 1jng, wavy,
black hair hung carelessly about his faie. In one
hand he held a violin, and in the other, a bow.
He looked toward the sky, and raising his violin,
began to play. His music had a mystical charm,
entrancing one; making the gayest cry, the sad-
dest laugh. Suddenly he .r *1'\I..., as a woman
drew near him.
"Play for us ze music zat iz more lively,"
she said, while a few other women stated them-
selves on the grass beside him.
The boy smiled. He once more raised his violin,
this time playing a lively tune. A tall, slenter gi:1l
aroused herself from the group and began t.) dance.
Faster and faster he played and faster the girl's
feet moved. A twist, a turn, and the music:
stopped. The girl laughed and sank to the
ground exhausted, while the men, who were
greedily eating from a kettle which hung over
the fire, stopped long enough to clap f)r more.
Far into the night the boy played while the
women danced, now and then the men joining
in. Then a man was posted as sentinel while the
rest crept into the wagons or curled upon the
grass to sleep.


It was early in the mining. No one had yet
a-'isen at the summer res: rt when George Mason,
a large theater manager, tired of the city life,
an.l disgusted with the theater, decided to take a
walk. He chose a path that led through the
wo,,s and was soon in the best of spirits. He
had walk:.1 a mile or more when suddenly he
stopped. What was that? A bird? No, it could
not b --ves-it was a violin! Mason's eyes shone
brighter as he listened. A smile parted his lips.
He stood motionless until the last note had faded
away.
"By Jove!" exclaimed 1 i..n. "That's music!
But who in the world could be playing out here
at this time of da ?" For a minute or two he
stood wondering, then shrugging his shoulders,
walked on.
After walking quite a distance, Mason heard
the music again. It sounded nearer this time-
very close at hand. He stopped and looked about
him. About a hundred feet away a fire was burn-
ing near a red painted wagon.
"Gypsies! Great Scott! This is no place fr
me! They'll steal the last piece of clothing off
my back if they find me here!" exclaimed. Mason
to himself.
Again the violin was playing. Mason's face
was full of emotion. Never before had music
had this effect upon him. When the music ceased
he took a step forward. There, almost at his feet,
half hidden by the brush, sat a '. p,. boy, a
violin held carelessly in one hand.
Upon hearing the movement of the brush the
boy looked up at Mason with a startled look upon
his upturned face. As quickly as a frightened deer
he arose and faced Mason.







THE ZONIAN.


"What iz et zat you care for? You are one of
ze police, yes?" he asked, with a frightened look
toward the w a.ins. "Ze man zat you desire long
ago has been gone.. We know nozings of heem."
"Here, 6b,," smiled Mason, "I'm no police.
I've been listening to your playing. Boy, you're
wonderful!" The boy smiled, and looked a little
more at ease. He grasped his violin tighter and
smiled, .hi,.ini a row of white teeth as he an-
swered, "Oh, but ze fright you L;e': to me! Yes,
I have been playing ze sweet music many years.
I long to play more better. N1. name is Pietro."
"Here, Pietro, if you will come and play in my
theater I'll give you Sloo a month to start with."
Poor Pietro! He had never had as much money
in his life. Why in two months he would have as
much as Zela, the queen, had in her little silver box.
"But ze men of my tribe!" he cried, not yet
over the effect the thought of so much money
had upon him. "Zey will run after me! Zey
will catch me and put me in ze heavy ropes!"
"Here, here, lad! No, they won't! I'll see to
that! You come with me if you want to and
they'll not get you."
Pietro paused a minute. His eyes glistened.
He looked toward the camp and then, turning
to Mason, whispered, "Come, let us go! Quick,
before zey mees me!" and started down the path
with MI..a in at his heels.
At the hotel, \lMas-n hastily packed his satchel
and sent a few telegrams to New York. After
that he went to the village and bought a suit of
clothes for Pietro, for they were to take the first
train to New York.
Whey they arrived in New York the news had
already spread through the theater lovers' world
that Mason, the theater king, was bringing a
surprise to the city.
The next night the Zenith Theater was crowded
with curious people. Old, tired, business men
had been .Ir.ii a,'d from comfortable chairs at home
1, curious wives. (igellirnL shop uirl., seated in
the cheaper seats, chewed pumn noisily between
their conversations, which were L'.. n.:r.ill of more
,lain- than an,,. rliini else. Stretching their necks
here and there, they commented on the people
constantly _.ntr.rinu the theater. \1.rr..nly look-
ing women chaperoned their daughters to the
better seats, while fashionably dressed parties
took the boxes above.


At last the curtain went up. Not a sound was
heard throughout the audience. People craned
their necks, eagerly searching for the surprise.
Then Mason stepped upon the stage. He ex-
plained how he had come to find Pietro. At the
signal to enter, Pietro stepped upon the stage.
Giving three low sweeping bows he advanced
toward the center of the stage. It all seemed
very queer to him.
The shopgirls whispered to one another,
"Ain't he handsome?" and "Hasn't he beautiful
hair and cyc'.cs while the poor daughters chaper-
oned by matronly women could only sigh, and the
tired business men smiled and looked at their
curious wives, who had a far-away look in their
eyes.
Unaware of it all, Pietro raised his violin to his
chin. He forgot the audience before him. He
forgot all except the birds, the trees, and the blue
skies of the springtime of which he was playing.
On and on he played, a certain note of longing
and anguish in his music. The tired business men
forgot to be tired, the giggling shopgirls forgot to
giggle, while the matronly women forgot the
daughters at their sides.
When the music stopped the applause was
immense. It seemed as though the very walls
with their painted figures would shake and fall.
Never before had the theater known such ap-
plause.
Pietro, still in a daze, was clapped on the back
by the eager Mason, and told to play more.
This time he played a lively tune. Only two
nights before he had played this very tune and
Luna had danced to it. He could see her now,
her snappy eyes, her smile and glistening white
teeth, her long braids of thick black hair. Again
he was .ippllIu.ldd, as before, but refused to play
again.
"That's all right, Pietro," said MNIi ..n, "I know
how you feel. Just step into that room and I'll
see you there in a minute."
Wliin Mason returned he could find Pietro
nowhere, but on the table in the little room he
found a scrap of paper, and on it was written:
I could stand ze noizes of ze veety no longer. I long for
zat which I leave behind me. Ze money is nozing to me.
PIETRO.




































































Hotul Tiivoi. Atlio.i







22 THE ZONIAN.




CRISTOBAL COI.AING STATION.
L ', .
iI


The Cristobal coaling station is one ofthelargest
and most modern of its type in the world. It
is about 450 feet by 2,000 feet in size, situated on
an island in Colon Harbor, and connected with the
mainland by a d:awb:idge. On the mainland is
the checking-in shed, where all the t.i.nmmers
and other wo:kmen are checked before going to
work. Here they are given shovels, which are
their passes to the island. Two motor boats, each
holding fr-om
90 to Ioo men,
carry them to
work. In ad-
dition there
are two small
motor boats
for carrying ,
m :s-'a .-_ be-
tween the sta-
tion and ships.
The i.la,,in .t
and oil for the
use of these .
boats is kept w ..
on the island,
in specially
constructed
tanks. One
end of the
island is occu-
SNTFRIOR VIEW OF CRIS
pied by the The Canal hai ro.o r.I f .. f ; thin i..i .
coal and the Iai from I .... ... ... hour: f,
necessary machinery for hnn lling it, and at the
other end are the office, oilhouse, storehouse,
and machine shop. The storehouse holds all the
extra part; of machinery besides the different
electrical appliances, belts, and other articles used
in the station. All minor repairs can be made in
the machine shop, in which is the 550-cubic foot
air compressor that supplies the station with air
force. The station is able to take care of itself
in practically every way. The electricity which
runs the plant is supplied by four big trans-


farmers; three of these are in service all the time
while one is kept in reserve in case of a break-
down. These transformers will supply from iio
to 2,300 volts.
The coaling plant has a capacity of 500,000
tons of coal. At present there are 58,000 tons for
commercial use and 52,000 tons belonging to the
Navy. The coal is stored in a larg: bunker 750
feet long by 450 feet wide. This is di rided into two
parts, one of
which, hold-
ing the Navy
coal, is under
water. Over
the bunker
are two steel
bridges which
can be moved
under their
own power
from one end
S.. I of the bunker
is t;i to the other.
On each of
these bridges
Sis a movable
"4-L digger which
S can pick up 5
tons at a time.
On a level
OBAL COALING STATION.ith these
o..... ,. i .j I.,r*...r i.. a i hcan w ith these
............. .. ...... brid ges and
ru nin i all around the bunker isaviaduct on which
cars run, each holding io tons of coal. By means of
several turntables the cars can be turned and sent
in any direction. The cars are run by electricity
which is transmitted to them through an over-
head trolley system. In order to unload, a collier
is tied up at the station between the island and
the mainland. Here is the steam plant, which
consists of four towers each having a steel boom
priecrtin, over the ship. The digger is forced
out along the boom by steam and lowered into the


;I
.
a

























































SCALING G STATION AT ('I.'rTOR L
Who savs that the tropiicis are slmw? D vlivctin a tem of I d O.hvery o1 : kri lliil a i i f r I hou 1 1 Ijr i lnll ti s rirhlan I it OIn Inbrlkeri at thatl iill tI I l vilt'l _'r
S ...... ,. il ' , I a 1 25.. 'Sr . .p h1 i alll *., tI .1'1 I i 9 hi5 ,i iJfvo ii Whilt (he
.. I I... 1 1. ''I" r II I I I I'l I f t r, v nh; r I, r Novern .. ,l i I i ,03l0 to(s from the ,olher
I 1' 1 1o1 t ni I at 2 inutei on iovimlner 12 tit j sbim year






TH Z/t)N N.


hold by means of cables. It is then hauled up
by the cables anti runs back into the tower by
'r, .. of gravity. Here the digger empties into a
car and when the car is full, it is started and
travels down the viaduct toward the bridge, where
a man takes charge and turns it onto the bridge.
The car is then over the bunker where it is dumped
and sent back. This operation is repeated until
the ship is unloaded.
When a ship is coaled, the ',ri 1l'. moves down
over the coal heap and the digger begins to take its
;-ton mouthfuls. These are placed in the cars and
the cars move down opposite the ship. Here the
coal is dumped into hoppers which drop it onto a
42-inch rubber bAt, called the approach belt.
W while the coal is p.i -in.. ove- this belt it isv. .i-' I
by a machine that can weigh even the "wear" on
the belt. The belt runs parallel to the ship and
drops the coal onto another belt called the boom
belt that runs out to the ship. When there are
n: ships to be loaded the cars are filled and held.
This means that at a m nment's notice :,:- .tons
of coal can be 1! aleJ.
At the end of the station is the wharf bunker,
which is stationary. The ship is run alongside


the bunker and the coal is dumped into the hoppers
and down the chutes to the ship. Originally
these chutes were stationary, but now they can
swing in a wide arc and deposit the coal in several
places. This does away with the one big pile that
had to be trimmed, thus saving time and money.
This bunker loads at the rate of 500 tons per hour.
In order to have communication with all parts
of the plant, 30 telephones were installed in the
most prominent places. Whenever any one of the
supervisor's force is needed and he can not be
reached by telephone, a loud whistle is blown.
Each man has his own signal and in this way he
can be summoned with the least possible waste of
time. The station employs between i,ooo and
I,200 silver men and 0o gold men, work in three
shifts of 8 hours each, and has every convenience
such as drinking water and wash rooms.
Several notable records have been made at the
station. On November 12, the collier Ulysses
discharged 12,030 tons in 15 hours and 25 minutes.
This is an illustration of the past work there.
\~l:iy improvements effected in the plant since it
was built have made the station one of the most
modern and efficient coaling stations in the world.


TRY SMILING.

When the weather suits you not-try smiling,
When your coffee is not hot-try miilii';
When your neighbors don't do right or your rela-
tives all fight,
Sure it's hard, but don't you think you might try
smiling?
It can not make them worse-just mililing,
And it seems to help your case, brighten up a
Iel ,m v place,
Then it sort of rests your face-just smiling.
--Telephony .1 1a, i.

























H

N
0
V:
















,2


l. t r at,-, battl"e:ip in Gatu, IL,,,.








THE ZONIAN.


Opani O SO etttes

UN SITIO HERMOSO.

Theodore C. Knapp, 'z1.
Estaba rendido cuando me pare cerca de la
orilla de un hermoso arroyo en el medio de un
bosque. Que hermoso sitio era! El agua se
percipitaba bailando y cantando su canci6n que
me hizo el coraz6n brincar de alegria. Habian
violetas a cada lado del arroyo oscilando de un
lado a otro con el viento suave mientras su aroma
llenaba el aire. Los Arboles estaban mas verdes y
b:illantes que lo usual. Los paja:-loe s ierboles
cantaban sus aires me!6dicos. De vez en cuando
una mariposa volaba de una floor a otra perezosa-
mente chupando el dulce nectar de las flores. El
cielo que estaba azul y despejado, poco a poco
empez6 a tefiirse de muchos colors bellos pues n2
el oeste se ponia el sol. A media que desaparecia
el sol, disminuia el canto de los pijaros, hasta que
s6lo se oia el murmullo del agua y el susurro del
viento en las ramas de los Arboles.

LA VOZ DE JUAN-CHIQUILLO YV- \-
DEDOR DE PERIODICOS.
Theodore C. Knapp, '2..
No habia nada de particular en ese joven que
Ilamara la atenci6n. No era su apariencia que
hacia a los transeuntes deternerse, sino su voz.
Juan era un huerfanito que vendia peri6dicos en
las esquinas concurridas. Era casi impossible
pasar y nodetenerese para oir su voz debil y mel6-
dica. Tenia una atracci6n extraia que era como
un imin sobre el tropel confuso de transeuntes
Hombres apresurados y angustiados inevitable-
mente se veian I.lli -.,l ,, a detenerse y a comprar.
Hombres avarientos metian las manos en los
bolsillos y compraban sin saberlo. Otros daban
el precio de su desayuno para comprarle a Juan.
iPorqu& hacian eso? iQue recibian. Nada sino
esa simple respuesta infundida de miedo: "M I hi-
simas Lrn...is, Sefior."

1.5 AUTOIIP)GRAFIA DE UNA ESTRELLA
FI (;A.Z.
Gertrude M. John, '21.
Cuando tenia hastante edad para caminar sin
a) uda, se me ocurrio la idea de tomar un viaje.


Fsscoi un vestido de muchos colors, y cuando
estuve lista, me fui.
Caminaba por la via lActea, y, como hacen
todos jovenes, me ocupaba con muchas cosas que
no eran ce mi negocio. Examinaba todas las
cosas, y siempre me tropezaba con otras estrellas
mas viejas. Ellas me regafiaban, y, sin parar, me
escapaba y seguia mi camino.
De repente me hall cayendo! Por haberme
ocupado del negocio de otros, me habia resbalado
y caido de la via lactea; me cogi, y vi en frente de
mi la luna! Determine visitarla, pero cuando me
acerque a ella, ay! que grande! El viento estaba
muy fuerte y como soy muy pequefia, me choque
contra la luna. Otra vez me hallaba cayendo.
M:irte se present en mi camino! Tropec6 con
el, y como era aun mas grande que la luna, no
pude mas que caer con gran velocidad.
Cuando vi que no podia pararme, determine
escoger un sitio favorable para posarme. El
viento casi me aturdi6, tanta era la velocidad con
que caia. Un gran mont6n apareci6 en frente de
mi. iQue podria ser? Al acercarme, vi que era el
mundo. Escogi un lugar hermoso, y me alist6
para descender cuando senti un cambio de aire y
unsentidoextrahio * ymeestalle!


Elois Pearso', '2r.

He estado aqui desde que el mundo es mundo;
sin embargo nadie me ha visto. Ocupo todo el
espacio pero no obstante soy la parte mas pequeia
del universe. Soy una de las grandes fuerzas del
mundo pero soy la mis debil; en efecto no tengo
energia ni fuerza cualquiera. Ocupo el lugar mis
important en la vida de la gente; primero, por-
que me tienen miedo, y segundo, porque no
pueden entenderme. Los hombres pelean por
causa mia sin saber porque; los nifios me tienen
micdo pero no puedo hacerles dari, ; las mujeres
son desdichadas por motivo mio pero no puedo
traerles desgracia. Las guerras se original, las
tiudades vienen a menos, los imperios caen y la
historic se hace por cuenta mia. No (,% sobrena-
tural, misterioso, cruel ni important; pero soy
invisible, mudo, desvalido; sin substancia, sin
vida, sin inteligencia, sin verdad, porque soy
simplemente "N 'ad y "Nada" sere parasiempre.







THE ZONTAN.


A TRIP INTO THE INTERIOR.

Lawrence Hoppe, '22.


On a Monday night ;n January we left Panama
City on the gasoline boat .ionl bound for Yaviza,
a town in the province of Darien, near the
Colombian border. By 3 o'clock, Tuesday after-
noon, we arrived at La Palma, a native village at
the mouth of the Yuyra River. Here we put over
until the next m..rnirii when we continued our
journey up the Yuyra. At noon we arrived at
Real de Santa Maria, where we put in to unload
supplies. While here some of us landed to visit
the village. The natives were excited and followed
us around; a white man is not a common sight in
this part of the Darien. My father tried to snap
a picture of a group that followed us, but they
scattered like quail at the sight of a camera.
Wednesday night we went jacking f:or crocodiles
below Real. We killed quite a number of small
ones. When we had skinned them, the crew of our
boat, mostly natives, ate them raw. Thursday
morning we started up the Chucanaque River, on
our way passing flocks of monkeys and parrots
in the jungles along the banks of the river. At
noon we arrived at Yaviza. The entire village
came down to the beach to greet us, as they had
learned of our coming from a native who had
preceded us from Real. Here we took up our
quarters in part of the schoolhouse. We then went
through the village to look it over and also to buy
some eggs and chickens from the natives. We
were surprised at the cheapness of foodstuffs,
eggs being 15 cents per dozen.
Saturday morning we took a piraqua and
headed up the Chico for the Choco Indian village,


but we met the natives ..nmili down to Yaviza
dressed for a holiday. These Indians are well-built
and athletic. The men's everyday costume consists
of an antia, or loincloth, but their holiday attire
is much r.ore resplendent. They wear the antia,
as usual, and also wear large silver cuffs, silver
earrings, beaded headbands, beaded belts across
their shoulders, and instead of a string to hold the
antia, they have a beaded belt about 6 inches
wide. Around their necks they wear necklaces of
tiger's teeth and silver trinkets. Their bodies
are painted with black stripes and their faces with
red and black stripes. They also dye their teeth
black. The women wear short skirts about 18
inches long, made of red print cloth, wrapped
around the hips. They also paint themselves,
but d- nort wear so many beads or trinkets as
the men. The babies are carried on their backs.
Weapons consist of bows, arrows, spears, knives,
and machetes. A few have muzzle loaders of the
percussion cap type.
These Indians joined our party and we con-
tinued up the river to a deep hole where we dyna-
mited for fish. For some reason the fish did not
float on the surface, but sank. The Indians dived
for them. Some stayed under the water for at
least 3 minutes, coming up with a big 5-pound
sabado in their mouths and several fish in each
hand. We got about 200 big fish, most of which
we gave to the Indians, keeping a few for our-
selves. We gave the Indians some presents of
beads and tobacco for which they were very


~;-=--;==







THl I, Z 'NIMAN.


thankful, showing their appreciation by giving us
hog meat, chickens, and sugar-cane. We returned
to the village and the Indians pitched camp on the
outskirts. They soon started Hlcklir. into the
village dressed in what they considered civilized
costumes; sometimes it consisted of only a hat
or a vest.
They came up to our quarters to see our guns
and knives and other things. They would jabber
anill n themselves about the l't-irfl things and
then leave. I took my rifle, a .351 W i\nh'.-'-r,
high powered, self-loading, and gave it to the
chief to try. The men gathered around us to
watch this new type of weapon. The chief aimed
at a stick in the stream and blazed away. I
told him to pull the trigger, which he did, firing
the gun again. At this he grew excited and
emptied the clip which contained five cartridges.
The other Indians attributed this to something
mysterious and perhaps evil, for they fled. The
chief was too dumb-founded to move. After
some time the Indians returned, which they did
mostly from curiosity. We then explained the
working of the piece to them. They soon under-
stood and then all wished to trade for a rifle.
We also showed them a .45 automatic and fired
it into the ground several times. They tried to
dig out the shell tip, but could not reach it. At
this they were very much surprised. They like
.in% things bright, such as silver, but L'..1 they will
not touch, Jl.ininl .' it is .l.\i's money, which
superstition dates back to the Spanish invasion
under Balboa. The Cuna Indians, whose country


lies about 2 days' travel by piraqua from Yaviza,
will not even permit a white man to enter their
country. If any try they are promptrl killed and
beheaded, as the Cuanas are headhunters. Some
i.;, that they are cannibals, but of this I am not
sure.
Soon the Indians started going to the China-
man's to get drink. They are very fond of liquor
and have a liquor of their own which they make
'.v having the women chew corn and yam roots
and spit it in a bowl. This they allow to ferment
and it makes a very intoxicating drink. The
Chinaman is the only merchant in the village.
In fact in all the interior villages he is the business
man. He issues wooden money, which is a chip
of wood with Chinese writing on it. This money
he gives in exchange for hardwoods, rice, rubber,
and like articles. The natives use it only at his
store.
We tried to get some pictures of the Indians,
but they were afraid of the camera. One old
woman fled into the piraqua and, with the aid of
her husband, paddled away; however, the camera
was quicker than she. At last, after much demon-
strating of the camera and giving of presents, we
managed to get the chief and some of his men to
pose. The Indians stayed a few days in Yaviza;
then they started to leave for their own village.
At the same time we took our piraqua and went
downstream to Real, where we met the Anton
11:ildineL up lumber. When she had finished we
started on our homeward journey.


IT'S \I \I R TOO LATE TO BE SORRY.

Maae 7 I ,vnne, '21.

It's never too late to be sorry,
I'm sorry I bluffed -l '..n,
I wish I could change my test marks
And make my credits more strong.
I can't 'tend the classes I've cut-
There isn't a liinii I can do,
But it's never too late to be sorry,
And you would be sorry too.
















































Blh..i Amp, lock and pier.


MEN 0,







30 THE ZONIAN.


SNO\WBAI..LLS IN PANAMA.

R P,, R, R ; 1 ; , .'.


9


We were having a great time throwing snow-
balls. The sun shone down with its full heat on
tYe road. The ice plant in Balboa cleans the ice
ard frost off the pipes in the cold storage rooms
three or four times a year. The ice and f:ost is
generally thrown in the rear of the ice plant but
for the first time it was thrown on the sid walk in
frcnt of the building. We made snowballs and
threw at working men coming home to lunch and
at others going back to work at 12 o'clock. Some
would say "let them fly," while others became
angry. Soon all the men had returned to work
and we started throwing at passing autos; since
this was dangerous we threw at negroes. One
man came along on a bicycle rnd we fired our
snowballs at him. He jumped off the wheel and
threw st nes at us, but our snowballs drove him
away. We kept up our throwing; several times
I tih uL'Lht of leaving and going home to eat my
lunch, but I could not leave the sport I had not
ini' L d for 7 years.
"Cheese it," shouted some one; but it was too
late.
"All right, you kids start marching," ordered
the "cop," who came through the ice plant from
the rear entrance.
Marching in two's we started up the street to
the clubhouse. At the corner of the commissary
we kept straight on toward the clubhouse.
"Come on, turn down he:e, don't try to get
funny, you kids know where you're Li-iL," he
ordered.
We started down the street for the police sta-
tion. Every boy was silent and pale. Cries of
"W'hat did you do now, Brownie?" "You will,
will you?" and "What's the trouble?" were asked
of us as we marcfd to the police station. At
last we arrived at the station.
"So you got that gang at last, Slim?" asked the
desk sergeant.
"Yes, I got them, and we'll make an example of
them for the rest of the toughs in this town,"
answered Slim.


"What's your name? Where do you live? How
many times have you been here before?" were
some of the many questions asked of us.
"You kids stand in line over by that wall and
stand at attention too," ordered the desk ser-
geant.
We lined up against the wall and stood at at-
tention. We stood for half an hour when we began
to get tired ofstanding and leaned against the wall.
"Stand straight there; get away from that
wall," commanded the sergeant.
Someone brought the sergeant's lunch. He
sat in f;ont of us and ate it. We sure were hungry,
but it didn't look as if we were going to eat
lunch that day.
"The judge will soon be in, won't he, Bill?"
asked the desk sergeant of a policeman entering
the door.
"Yes, I think he just called the chief," was the
answer.
At the mention of "judge," a lump rose in my
throat, as I didn't care to go before a judg:. Two
hours passed and we were still at attention.
"Got my kid there?" asked a voice, as the door
opened and a man's head appeared.
"Yes, sir, we got him," replied the desk ser-
geant.
"All right, keep him and give a good jail sen-
tence,"said the man, leaving. The boy was ready
to cry. Tears formed in his eyes.
Another hour passed and we were still standing
at attention. The telephone rang, very few words
were exchanged, and then the desk sergeant turned
to us.
"The judge won't be here to-day, so you kids
can beat it. I'll let you know when to show up for
trial."
There was a rush for the door. It seemed good
to be out of that place. Each boy scattered home
to get something to eat. For several days each
of us waited to be called to court but we were
never summoned. I am cured of throwing snow-
balls in Panama.


15 ,fi



































































'Iv '* ` DRin DOK.
Large r,i,n lh f r th, I iis t nslti ; t:ll.. Halboa kslops to the I fi. t i to bmiId it shli;nf wi di y






THE ZONIAN.


PAAM.\a, A l.FGIfND.

Mae 7. Wvnnr. '21.


Did you ever hear the legend of how Panama
got its name? Of course there are legends and
legends. Some say the name means "plenty of
fish," and others that it means "plenty of butter-
flies." But the tale that, to me, always seemed
the most probable, is this:
\lain, many years ago, before ever the great
Panama Canal idea was conceived; before the
Spanish conquistadoress" braved the unknown
terrors of the sea to wring a fortune from the new
world; long before even Columbus set sail to
discover a new route to India; before Lief Eric-
son touched at the coast of Labrador; 'way, 'way
back in the beginning of things, when the world
was young, and foolish perhaps, these events of
which I tell took place.
Between two great continents lay a narrow strip
of land, a garden spot of the earth. It was a land
of fruits and flowers, of birds and butterflies, of
sunshine and joy, of life and love; a land of
sun-kissed hills and pleasant valleys-a land
"of beauty and a joy forever."
1minyu the pleasant hills and valleys of this
earthly paradise wandered an Indian tribe.
Legend tells us little of them, save that they were
a comely and a goodly band. They wandered
from day to day, from spot to -I '. happy and at
peace with the world and one another. When
they hungLri.,l, tlh.. picked the fruit of the trees,
hunted in the forests or fished in the streams.
\ hen they LgrL tired i' '. threw themselves upon
the soft grass and slept. Theirs was an idyllic
'. \-rT,. I, ., h:'ppl carefree, full of the joy of life
and the love of living.
But one sad day all this was i h:iiiL'..-l. The tribe
became careless and unkind to one another, quar-
rels arose, fists were resorted to, and fin.dlA sticks,
stones, and other weapons. The serpent )iscord
had crept into this tropical Eden and had it in its
power where, slowly but surely, he squeezed the


lifeblood, kindness, and unselfishness, from it
drop by drop.
The tribe broke up and drifted one from the
other, bickering still. The noise of their quarrel-
ing frightened the fish from the streams and the
birds and beasts from the forest. The fury of their
anger withered the delicate blossoms, the sun hid
his face for shame, the fruits ceased to ripen, the
whole land drooped and famine set in. One by one,
then in increasing numbers, the tribe decreased.
Soon all had starved to death but one family.
They were a hardy few, but weakening fast. Soon
only five were left-the mother, father, and three
strapping sons. One day they held a family
council to decide what was to be done. Their
situation was becoming desperate, all were gaunt
and sunken-eyed, all were weak from hunger.
Finally they came to the conclusion that one must
sacrifice his life to save the others, but could not
decide which one it would be. None would agree to
draw lots and soon they were quarreling bitterly.
At last, the mother, being the weakest, became the
victim.
Anyone passing a few moments later would
have seen a savory pot of stew cooking over a
rn, .inL' fire and a group of four hungry-eyed men
each holding a little pan in his hands and eagerly
sniffing the aroma. Ah! It was done; the father
was helping himself when the voice of a son cried,
"Give me a pan o' Ma!"
The waves hl:ppin the beach caught at the
words eagerly and murmured "Pan-a-ma." As
the meal came to a close, the rain came down in
torrents to baptize the land; the wind blew hard,
roaring, "P:in :1 ma'" The thunder rumbled
'1'.in .1 mi:i," and the lightning wrote it in
characters of living flame across the sky. "Pana-
ma." So "Panama," the land becami-, and
"':m:i:im:11:1 it remains.


C








THE ZONIAN. 33


A SENIOR TRIP TO PEARL ISLANDS.

Gertrude -an Hard::'e.d, '2,'.


Very early Saturday morning my slumbe:rs
were rudely interrupted by the loud and per-
sistant ringing of the telephone. I ran to answer
it, glancing at the clock in passing. Good heavens!
A quarter to two! I knew immediately what the
call was for.
"Hello?" I said timidly.
"Hello? Hello? Hello!" said the voice of a
well-known Senior.
"Please speak a little louder, I can't hear you.
Are the girls going on the Senior trip?"
"Why, yes." I answered.
"Well, we're supposed to start at 2." With
which my angry summoner hung up.
I awoke my sister; we dressed hurriedly and
literally ran down to the dock. We were greeted
with a stony silence which was worse than awful.
We had been late, and,what was more, we had kept
the entire crowd waiting. As soon as we had
clambered meekly aboard, the Alargaret put out
to sea, headed for the Pearl Islands.
Various members of the crowd tried to sleep,
but various others by exercising their vocal
cords (I dare not call it singing), or by raving in
a loud voice about the moon, the waves, sea-
sickness, shipwreck, and other trivialities, made
sleeping impossible.
"\lc thought I heard a voice cry 'Sleep no
more', was the slogan, motto, and password.
Dawn came at last, and each of us breathed a
sigh of relief that we had been spared the humilia-
tion of being seasick. The sun came out of the
ocean like a great ball of fire. The islands came
into sight and the panorama was beautiful. The
islands stretch along the ocean for about 3 or 4
miles, making a kind of half circle. We were
headedforoneofthelargest,which has avillageon it.
Many and often were the ejaculations of fear
and nervousness as the party scrambled over the
side into the wobbly cayuco and the beautiful red
panga which nevertheless brought us safely to
shore where we were immediately surrounded by
pearl venders.
MR 77349-3


These natives dive for pearls and carry them
about their person in a most careless manner.
One exhibited his, rolled up in a $5 bill. Pearls
can be had for almost nothing.
While we prepared our breakfast, the people
stood about in a curious but respectful audience.
They seemed greatly amused by such expressions
as:
"For the Kaxes!"
"Oh, for the love of John!"
"Ye gods!"
"Gee, ma Neddy!"
And really, who can blame them? They must
have liked it though, for they honored us with
their presence again at noon.
Breakfast finished, most of us went up into the
village. This is like all other native villages except
for its being a little less civilized. The church
is at the highest point, and the rest of the houses
are scattered about it. A winding path sometimes
almost as wide as a road, sometimes too narrow for
two people, leads from the church down to the
beach. A card is tacked on the door of each shack,
stating that it has been inspected by the Govern-
ment; but from the appearance of the huts, we
judge that the inspector must have been blind.
\1..ng-els, pigs, and chickens ran in and out the
huts at will and followed us all over, along with
the children, and some of the grown people. After
bargaining for pearls and visiting the village we
went swimming.
The beach is one of the best I have ever seen.
It stretches along for about a mile, and its fine
sand is almost white. Another island with a
beach is almost opposite, but the rest of the sur-
r..t li_,I islands are barren. They are of a black
rock formation with no beach, and the sparse
vegetation is all on the top of the island-the
only place where soil collects. There are many
caves and openings probably worn out by the
sea; some of them contain interesting formations
and shells. On exploring these tiny "warts on


$


s m = !!!:= : ; ^ :;:: !!:- !. =. .. , , ......,.... ., , .. -- . ,, ... .







THE ZONIAN.


the sea" one thinks what an ideal place they
would make for a moving-picture company to
gather "atmosphere."
By 4 o'clock we were assembling aboard the
boat.
"Well," said a certain youth, as he pulled him-
self aboard, "who'll be the first to get seasick?"
We all Ilaughtd, but each prayed fervently that
it would not be him. When we got outside the
islands the .i igali'et began disputing to herself
as to which side she wished to roll. She began to
experiment and suddenly I heard a shout of de-
rision. I stuck my head into the cabin, and there,
over the side, hung the last-mentioned youth,
with apparently no thought in life, but to be
generous to the fish.
As the Margaret was in a constant state of in-
decision from then onward, and as the sea was
trying to help her by practical demonstration,
others began to stick their heads over the side,
sheepishly at first, but even anxiously as the
debate became more vehement. By 6 o'clock all
forms, stages, and kinds of seasickness could be
seen at a glance. One of our dinifi,'. Seniors
and one of our most dignified faculty la\, in
complete abandon, upon the floor. A certain


corpulentJuniorlmistook these two for the promen-
ade and proceeded to act upon his mistaken idea.
You can imagine how much pleasure he got from it.
By way of variation, our brilliant red panga
severed relations, and, in trying to recover it, we
lost the boathook, so we had to leave it to the
disposition of the waves. The Margaret must
have been very sad at the parting for she gave
vent to her grief by the most fantastic contortions
imaginable; whereupon many stuck their heads
out of the windows so that their tears might flow
into the sea, and not swamp the boat.
When we reached the channel, the sea became
quiet, also the passengers. It seemed, both
figuratively and literally, like the calm after a
storm. People began to look more respectable
and to swear that they hadn't been really sea-
sick, or that they had draped themselves so
charmingly out of the windows because it appeared
to be the fashion, but the "seagoing" ones knew
better.
How welcome was the sight of land and the
rattle of jitneys! Good-bys and thanks were
hurried but sincere, and a happy, tired, and be-
..raqi'led troop straggled off to "Home and
Mother."


Golf links on the Sabannas, Panama City.








THE ZONIAN.


KNOW YE ALL, BY THESE PRESENTS That we, the
Class of '21, being sane of judgment and sound of
mind, knowing, that before the passing of another
6 months we will be no more of the Balboa High
School world, do deem it both wise and necessary
to make, publish, and declare this, our last will
and testament, hereby revoking all former wills
and bequests and devises, of whatever nature by
us made.
First: To our beloved class adviser, M\ ,i. Frost,
we give our sincerest thanks for the way she has
piloted our ship to its port.
To our honored faculty we leave our best wishes,
our appreciation, and the full extent of our sym-
pathy; the growth of which has been in direct
proportion to the broadening of our minds.
In view of the fact that the Class of '20 "regret-
fully relinquished" the right and privilege of oc-
cupying the desks in rows 7 and 8 in the assembly
hall of our beloved high school 'luilldir., and, fur-
thermore, that they willed and bequeathed to us
all the dignity, reserve, and power belonging to a
senior class, together with its rare ability to dis-
cuss and decide questions of importance without
the usual quarrels and contentions, we, having
availed ourselves of aforesaid gifts, and the same
still being in serviceable condition, do relinquish
same to the Class of '22, with the best of will.
Second: The individuals of the Class of '21
bequeath their several gifts as follows:
Charlie Grobe leaves his position of president
with all its honors, advantages, and disadvantages
to any member of the Class of '22 who shall be as
well fitted for it as he was.
Theodore Knapp donates to the entire Fresh-
man Class, his studious habits.
Elois Pearson bequeaths her daintiness to
Jimmie Miller.
Elizabeth Twitchell leaves her quiet disposition
to Ruth Foster.
Annie Boyd requests that her dislike for dancing
fall to Earl Palhemus.


Cody van Hardeveld gives the extreme pleasure
(?) of rescuing the perishing on the Pearl Island
trip to Irene Stewart.
To Bessie Watkins is bequeathed May Duncan's
ability to "rough it" and to make the best of every-
thing.
George Capwell leaves his love of athletics to
MI:iriric Gerrans.
Alice Bleakley, having no further use for her
extensive kilcll:e of Latin, leaves the same
to the safe-k.c ping of Adlais Claybourne.
Eleanor Bello surrenders her admirable self-
possession to Margaret Johnson.
Bill Allen presents his ego and his strident voice
to Agnes Gardner, the latter to be employed
especially in the classrooms.
Ruth Boyd endows Dorothy Dockery with her
queen-like dignity.
George Danskin inflicts upon Lawrence Hoppe
his garrulousness in the hope that the latter,
thus endowed, will also be heir to a little life,
liberty, and pursuit of happiness.
Ethel Getman entrusts her Spanish vocabulary
to Elizabeth Bradley, charging her to increase
its volume.
lM:e Wynne bequeaths her cleverness and de-
lightful giggle to Edith Foster.
Leonard Landers leaves his unfailing skill at
basketball to the Freshman girls' team. We trust
that they will not win last place by forfeits here-
after.
To Mary Slack, Lois Wiggins leaves her unob-
trusive qualities.
Cathryn Kaye gives her intensive social career
to Arthur Krause.
Louis O'Brien, always willing to help the needy,
wills his agility to Gladys McCullen.
Catherine Parmeter leaves her sweet disposition
and even temper to Alice Reese.
Gertrude John has had many hints as to the
disposition of her demure demeanor and has
finally, after profound consideration, decided that
Doroth6 Abendroth is the most in need.


LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF THE
CLASS OF '21.
Gertrude van Hardeveld, '21r.





36






1T


THE ZONIAN.


~c`~p


IAK







THE ZONIAN.


Florienet Matter believes that Alice Orr can
make good use of her varied styles of hair dress-
ing, her wad of gum, and her power to exercise
her voice.
Harry Bissell intends to write a book on "The
Pleasures and Displeasures of Prank-playing and
Its Effect on the Faculty," and to give it to
Esther Greene.
Wilbur Meyers will be the happy recipient of
M'rie ll.l ihlin's ever-ready smile. She assures
him that it will grow brighter with use.
Margaret Halligan endows Charles Krouse with
her speed record in loquacity and her "gift of gab."


Gertrude van Hardeveld dedicates to Olive
Woo her ability to get out of work.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we have hereunto set
our hand and seal.
SIGNED, SEALED, AND PUBLISHED by the said
Class of '21, as and for its last will and testament,
in the presence of us, who, at its request, in its
presence, and in the presence of each other,
hereunto subscribe our names as attesting wit-
nesses to said instrument.


(Their mark)


CLASS OF '21.


CLASS PROPHECY.

AMarie Mlc.lihon, '21.


NEW YORK, N. Y.,
June 2, 1931.

DEAR ELEANOR:
You don't know how sorry I am that you
couldn't arrange to come to the reunion. I am
inclosing a newspaper J;ipl[.i, giving a complete
account of the wedding and reunion.
I am just so rushed for time, trying to get my
things ready for the trip, but when we arrive at
Mae's, I'll write you again.
With love,
M'rie.

"One of the prettiest weddings of the season
was that of Miss Catherine Parmeter, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Parmeter, of Iowa, to Mr.
Guy Van Horn, who is very well known in New
York. The R. Rev. Theodore C. Knapp, a former
classmate of Miss Parmeter, officiated.
"Society was well represented at this charming
affair, for though \Il-i Parmeter is but a recent
arrival among us, she easily won the hearts of all,
and is often spoken of as one of the most popular
members of the younger set.
''"i., Parmeter, as many already know,
received a large part of her education on the Canal
Zone, graduating from the Balboa High School


with the Class of'21. Miss Parmeter endeavored
to have as many as possible of her former class-
mates present at the ceremony.
"The Class of '21 has gone down in the annals
of Balboa High School as being the finest class
ever graduated, and it has produced a great many
famous men and women.
"Quite a surprise was the huge old-fashioned
wedding cake, baked by Miss May Duncan, now
chief cook in the White House. This cake was the
gift of Miss Duncan to her classmates.
"Immediately after the ceremony, the members
of this class,with the exception of the bride, held a
reunion in the form of a class meeting. The follow-
ing is a report of this meeting as written by the
Secretary:
"\l.ctiing called to order by the President,
Charles A. Grobe. Motion made and carried that
each member present give an account of himself,
either in a speech or by an exhibition of his
talents. The meeting then became informal and
the following impromptu program was carried out:
r. Sketch-School Days. Cast-Famous Bissell and Dan-
skin Troupe, ably supported by the well-known actress, Miss
Fiorienet Matter, and Mrs. H. E. Bissell, n&i Ethel P. S.
Getman.
2. Toe Dance, Lois Wiggins.
3. Original Reading. Miss Mae J. Wynne, who has won
her laurels in the literary field.


(a


-- ~-~


I -----------ra







THE ZONIAN.


4. Dance. Professor William Allen of Allen's Dancing
Academy.
S. Address. President of the new Irish Republic, Louis
O'Brien.
6. Miss G. John, bareback rider of Bailey's Circus, made a
short speech, promising to give an exhibition of her skill in
the near future.
7. The R. Rev. T. C. Knapp, closed the meeting and, im-
mediately after, delicious refreshments were served.

"Those present at the meeting, not taking part
in the program, were: Mr. and Mrs. George L.
Capwell, nie Gertrude Van Hardeveld; Mr. Cap-
well is well known to thousands of baseball fans
as a second Babe Ruth. Mr. Leonard Landers,
popular football coach of Princeton; Miss Cathryn
Kaye, a worthy representative of Panama's
beauty; Mrs. J. Jones, wife of Admiral Jones,
U. S. N., nee Mlargarct Halligan; Mil. Alice
Bleakley, missionary to Fiji Islands; Mrs. Charles


Grobe, formerly Miss Ruth Boyd; Miss Elois
Pearson, who has been traveling in China; Miss
Annie Boyd, prima donna; Mrs. Charles Camp-
bell, snake keeper of Bailey's Circus; Miss Eliza-
beth Twitchell, matron of St. John's Orphan
4svlum; Miss Cornelia van Hardeveld, A. B.,
A. M., Ph. D. At the close of the meeting, each
member received a jar of'M'rie's Freckle Cream.'
This cream has made the name and complexion
of Miss McMahon famous the world over. The
only member who was unable to attend this
happy reunion was Miss Eleanor Bello, who re-
cently entered a convent.
"After a few days' stay in the city this famous
class will go aboard the yacht Margarite, en route
for the summer home of Miss Wynne, at Pearl
Islands, Pacific Ocean. Here they will take part
in a pleasant house party."


WHY SMITH LEFT HOME.


The Class of 1921 successfully presented "Why
Smith Left Home," an interesting comedy by
George H. Broadhurst. The cast of characters
was as follows:

JOHn SMITH ....... Who loves his wife and lives in New York
GENERAL BILLETDOLtX .......... .His wife's second husband
COUNT vow GUGGENHEIM ......... Who made them twisted
MAJOR DtNCOMBE. ........... With memories of last night
RoaBR WALTON ..................Mrs. Smith's brother
MKs. SMIrHH .' h,, I. es hrr husband, no matter where he lives
M iss SMITH .... ...... ........A lady in waiting
MRS. BILLE.ITDOV ................ Mrs. Smith's aunt
Rose WALTON .... ........ Robert's bride of a day
JULIA .. ........ Touchingly clever
E1, .... ... .... A maid
L.AvI'OA DA.v ......... ....... \\ h. I .1 I I and knows it

ACT I.

Mr. and \lr,. Smith, ne.wl. % eds, are prevented
from t.ikin, their honeymoon on account of busi-
ness affairs and later are surprised by visits from


relatives. Miss Smith, the first to come, is fol-
lowed by Aunt Mary and the General. The latter
immediately becomes a slave to Julia's charms.
Smith comes to an agreement with Lavinia, the
new Irish cook, to do her best "bad cooking"
in the hope of shortening Aunt Mary's visit.
Much to Mrs. Smith's dismay, Bob, her brother,
who has just been married to Rose, appears, an-
nouncing that they have come to spend their
honeymoon. The curtain falls just as Mrs.
Smith witnesses Mr. Smith kissing Julia. Later he
explains that he mistook her for his wife, because
she had on one of his wife's discarded dresses.

ACT II. (Double scene.)

Smith explains his actions and he and his wife are
reconciled. Aunt Mary catches the General in a
tete-a-tete with Julia. He explains that,like Smith,
he mistook her for his wife on account of the
dress. There is a little scene in which Count Von








THE ZONIAN.


Guggenheim arrives, asking for the hand of Miss
Smith. He claims to have seen her in the street
and to have fallen in love with her at first sight.
The rest of the scene is a farce in which some of the
characters are trying to get something to eat.
This condition of .irlr-, causes \I,- Smith and
Aunt Mary, who are in the parlor, to overhear the
conversation between the General and Mr.
Smith in which the latter describes the costume
which Julia is to wear that evening at a masquer-
ade. The servants are giving this party in Smith's
home in the absence of Mrs. Smith and Aunt
Mary who are supposed to go visiting but in
reality have decided to attend the party, Aunt
Mary to dress like Julia.

AcT III.
In this act the Grman Count gets himitlf into
dire trouble bv insisting on proposing to Mrs.
Smith whom he had thought to be Miss Smith.
When he finds out his mistake, he willingly gives
Miss Smith up to the Major, her suitor for years.
There follow various comical situations caused by
the costumes, such as the General kissing his wife
for Julia and Mrs. Smith as a French maid trying
to flirt with him, but getting no response. In the
midst of the merriment of the servants' party, the
various disguises are discovered and the play
ends by Smith announcing that this time his
honeymoon will be a reality and ordering his and
his wife's baggage to the Waldorf.


Much credit is due to Harry Bissell and Cath-
erine Parmeter as Mr. and Mrs. Smith for their
splendid acting. Their parts, which are Ii-F, lir,
were interpreted with much grace and ease.
George Danskin successfully acted the part of
General Billetdoux who is as tame as a lamb in his
wife's presence and very frivolous otherwise.
Ruth Boyd made a good Aunt Mary. There was
no doubt in the mind of the audience that she
ruled the General with an iron hand. George
C.i ....l, as the Count, was splendid. His Ger-
man accent and hopelessly twisted English were
very much enjoved. The Major, Miss Smith's
true suitor, was cleverly played by William Allen.
Louis O'Brien and Margaret Halligan, as Bob and
Rose, made a very charming young c: uple. M.irie
IMcMahon impersonated to perfection Miss
Smith, a coy and sentimental old maid. Florien-t
Matter, as Julia, could nmit help but attract the
General's attention. Cornelia van Hardeveld, in
the r6le of Elsie, made a very prim and proper
maid, showing, however, a talent for dancing in
the masquerade scene. May Duncan creditably
played Lavinia the cook, who, insisting that she
was a "cook lady" and a staunch union member,
got many a laugh from the audience.
The success of this production has been mainly
due to Miss Zahrah Preble's effort in coaching
the play. The members of the Class of 1921 wish
to express their sincere appreciation.


Administration Building of The Panama (anal, facing Panama.





























































































Quarry Heights and Balboa f:om Ancon Hill


~I~







THE ZONIAN.


5 DC















Ca:il:rinis 1

"We don't know where we're going but we're on
our way," thus sang the "Happy Twenty-eight"
as the old hay-filled truck bumped and thumpedc
over the road to Corozal. But they did know where
they were goingand theoccasion for their going was
the annual Senior hayride. They were Gamboa
bound and were taking what proved to be a most
memorable trip. The night, the sky, the stars,
everything, spelled romance, but-Oh, we had a
wonderful time. N'i'st-ce pas, Senior? Nuf ced!


"Gee, we haven't had a party all year," be-
wailed a moody looking Senior, "let's do some-
thing." So the happy crowd decided on a I 11.. -
een party. All were invited to attend ye olde tyme
party, to be held in the domestic science room.
Everyone masked or wore a fancy costume. Fun
waxed fast and furious, and the little gloom imps
were banished for the evening. Seniors cast away
their dignity and acted as foolish as Freshmen.
Old-fashioned games were played and Miss Frost
was judged to be the champion apple-ducker.
Hurrah for Miss Frost! During the evening
honest-to-goodness Halloween refreshments were
served, consisting of nuts, apples, raisins, oranges,
cake, and ice cream. Miss Gertrude John was
judged to be the most originally costumed as a
Star &dHerald girl. Not until the mystic hour of
12 was sounding from our "Big Ben" did the
merry party break up.


5


4. CblA4j^ -


.1;71 ":icr, ';'.


An event occurred on April 13 which should go
down in the annals of the Balboa High School
history. The basketball banquet, in honor of the
Senior team, the winners of the Girls' Interclass
League. Will we ever forget it? Although the
thirteu:nth is supposed to be an unlucky day, it
proved i tself to be just the opposite. The banquet
was held at the home of Miss Arlee Greene, a
member of the Sophomore team, and a more lovely
place could not have been selected. The tables,
decorated very originally with purple bougain-
i1'., i vine, certainly were ri .... And oh,
what a wonderful dinner-in truth, "a feast for
the Gods." The cooks are to be highly compli-
mented on the magical way in which the food dis-
appeared, make praises odious. During the eve-
ning toasts were given )by members of each team,
the four teams; being represented; Llona Rath-
bone spoke for the Freshmin; Arlee G:eene f r
the Sophonm ;'e ;, Ceceiia Twomey for the Juniors;
and Marie iMcMahon for the Seniors. Miss
McMahon also) gave a mjst fitting toast to our
coach, Miss Gaither, telling her of the appreciate m
of the :I l r -i teams f.r the splendid way in which
she had handled. them. Miss Gaither responded
in a few well-chosen words which endeared her
more than ever to the girls who already love her
so well. After dinner, d. m .i;, singing, and games
were enjoyed until a late hour. M\I-, Rathbane,
as a fancy dancer, and Miss Matter, as pianist,
did much to entertain. The party broke up with








42 THE 2

the singing of the old favorite "Good-night,
Ladies," and all agreed the banquet certainly was a
success. We owe many thanks to Mrs. Greene
for her kindness in lending her home for the occa-
sion and to the girls who were responsible for
the "perfectly ripping time."

JUNIORS.
Another brilliant and successful affair was the
dance gi vcn by theJunior Class at the TivoliHotel.
Costume or fancy dress was the rule of the even-
ing and everyone seemed to have tried to outdo
the other in beauty and originality.
Miss Gertrude Jchn again scored a triumph
by taking first prize
with her Star&
Herald costume.
Congratulations
are in order for the
Sophomore class
for the splendid
party they ga.iv to
the students and
faculty of Balboa
High School, the
afternoon of the
declamation con-
test. It was held in
the domestic sci- A corner of the f
ence rooms. Punch
and sweet cakes were to be had in an unlimited
supply and certainly were done justice. The
school victrola furnished excellent dance music
and even the faculty indulged in tripping light
fantastic.

FRESHMEN.

Not to be outdone just because they were
Freshmen, the "Pistachios" agreed to have a
hay ride. It proved to be an affair which even
the Seniors would be proud of (hurrah!). Lunch
was eaten on Gamboa road. A regularr" picnic
lunch, too-"weenies," rolls, piikle,, toasted
mi.rshm;ill,.s,, 'n c',:r\ thini,. Keep up the good


:ONIAN.


a8


work, Freshies; by the time you are Seniors you
will be quite a class.
"Christmas comes but once a year," so says a
poem, a song, or som thing, and the Balboa High
decided to celebrate it by an entertainment.
Mr. Lang kindly allowed us the half day of the
17th, and the talent was contributed from the
different classes. The stunt scoring the most
applause and winning first place was the mock-
wedding given by the Juniors. Miss Ida Brown, as
the blushing young bride, fitted the part perfectly
and looked trees charmante with her bouquet of
red roses almost as large as herself. Lawrence
Hoppe, the thinnest (?) boy in school made a
matchless mate for
- her. The wedding
S.party was also be-
yond criticism.
S Miss Marjorie Ger-
rans played the
wedding march to
S perfection and the
whole ceremony
was extremely well
carried out. Much
credit is due Miss
Simpson for its
success.
mous Hotel Tivoli. Seniors won sec-
ond place, Florin-
ette Matter and Catherine Parmeter acting and
singing the song "Rose of Washington Square,"
also Cornelia van Hardeveld andi Catherine
Kaye in "Oh, By Jingo." Sophomores took
third and Freshmen fourth place, with piano and
violin solos and readings, Marjory Carter win-
ning especial applause. After the entertain-
ment, all adjourned to the domestic science
rooms where cake and ice cream were in order.
Then the hard-worked victrola was once more
called to the front and dancing was the rule of the
remainder of the afternoon. A more Merry
Christmas entertainment and party has never
been held by the high school before and we hope
the su' cceling ones will be just as merry.







THE ZONIAN.


43


I--.''


f


%Ar -1


.MORI"O. O*BRIEN. B RKHIO.DERI (Coach). LANDERS (Manag rt. AN-D BROWN.
BISSELL, CAPWELL ((Captainl. AND KXAPP.


~c- ---1







THE ZONIAN.


ATHLETE


ES


William Sargent, '22.


This year has been one of the most successful
in athletics that the Balboa High School has
recorded. It is true that we have met withsome
reverses, such as the loss of the High School
Basketball Championship of the Canal Zone, but
the interest shown and the number of participants
in the different sports have exceeded that of pre-
vious years.
Many members of the high school have become
proficient with rifles and next year a gun club
will probably be organized.

BASKETBALL.

This year, as in former years, basketball is
vimen preference over the other sports. One of
the first duties which the newly elected Athletic
Council undertakes is the formation of a schedule
and rules for the interclass basketball series and
the irL;ani:iri',n of the high school team.
In the early part of the season, due to poor
teamwork, we suffered several defeats. More
practice, however, proved Balboa High School
basketball team one of the strongest teams on the
Isthmus.
The interclass basketball was easily won by the
Seniors. The Freshmen and Juniors were second
and third, respectively. Much enthusiasm pre-
vailed :lurinL' the interclass 'Lri;c, as the teams
which win first, second, and third places, receive,


55, 25, and 15 points for the cup, which is one of
several inducements to promote athletics in the
high school.

HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIP.
In three consecutive games, Cristobal High
School defeated Balboa High for the Canal Zone
High School basketball championship. Although
the games were rather one-sided, Balboa High
hotly contested every point, and both teams
played clean basketball, which made the games
very interesting for the rooters.


THE TEAMS.


Balboa High School.
J. C. Burkholder, coach.
Brown, f.
Bissell, f.
Capwell, c. (captain)
Landers, g.
O'Brien, g.
Morton (substitute)
Knapp (substitute).
Danskin (substitute).


Cristobal High School.
T. C. Wilson, coach.
Doyle, f.
Raymond, f.
Henter, c.
Townsend, g.
Harrison, g.
Cloke (substitute).
Bliss (substitute).
Quinto (substitute).


FIRST GAME.
Cristobal High School, 36; Balboa High School, 7.
SECOND GAME.
Cristobal High School, 28; Balboa High School, 12.








THE ZONIAN.


THIRD GAME.
Cristobal High School, 25; Balboa High School, ii.

U. S. S. "CLEVELAND" (HEAVYWEIGHTS) VS. BALBOA
HIGH.

Balboa High played the U. S. S. Cleveland
heavyweight team four games of basketball.
The sailors won the first two games, but the high
school team won the next two. The final game
was the most exciting game played so far this
season. When time had been called the score was
found to be 31 to 31. Five minutes' extra time
was played. Balboa High won by a free throw.

FIRST GAML.

U. S. S. Cle-eland, 21; Balboa High, ii.

SECOND GAME.

U. S. S. Cleveland, 33; Balboa High, I9.

THIRD GAME.

Balboa High, 29; U. S. S. Cleveland, 19.

FOURTH GAME.

Balboa High, 32; U. S. S. Cleveland, 31.

U. S. S. "CLEVELAND" (LIGHTWEIGHTS) VS. BALBOA
HIGH.

The U. S. S. Cleveland lightweights were twice
defeated by the high school five. The feature of
the first game was the defensive work of Landers
and O'Brien. The second game was more exciting
as it was anybody's game up to within a minute
of the end, when Balboa scored the final basket.

FIRST GAME.

Balboa High, 30; U. S. S. Clee'and, 3.


SECOND GAME.

Cadet Company, 29; Balboa High, 22.


U. S. S. "TACOMA" VS. BALBOA HIGH.


One of the best games that have been played
on the Balboa floor took place January 26, when
the U. S. S. Tacoma basketball team was defeated
after having apparently won the game from the
high school squad.
Balboa High started the game by scoring the
first basket. The sailors also scored and the first
quarter ended with Balboa High School 8 and
Tacoma 6. The sailors gained in the second quar-
ter and at the end of the first half the score was
12 to ii in favor of the U. S. S. Tacoma. During
the third quarter many fine shots were made,
especially by Brown of Balboa, but the high school
was still one point behind the sailors when the
third quarter ended--U. S. S. Tacoma, 20; Balboa
High, 19. The combination of Capwell, Bissell,
and Brown made a gap in the U. S. S. Tacoma's
defense through which basket after basket was
shot. The final score of the game was, Balboa
High, 28; U. S. S. Tacoma, 22.


TENNIS.

The annual high school tennis tournament found
the Juniors and Seniors contenders for first place.
The Seniors won, however, with a total of 21
points. The Juniors were second, scoring 14
points, the Sophomores third with 10 points, and
the Freshmen last with no points.
The Sophomores and Freshmen were not repre-
sented on the courts with full teams although there
are many good players in the classes.

BOYS SINGLES.


Semifinals.
SECOND GAME.


Balboa High, 21; U. S. S. Cle:leland, 19.

CADET COMPANY VS. BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL.


W. Sergeant (Junior) defeated L. Landers (Senior),6-4,6-2.
W. Banton (Sophomore) defeated R. Engelke (Freshmen),
6-4, 4-6, 6-4.


Finals.


FIRST GAME.


Balboa High, 28; Cadet Company, 22.


W. Sergeant (Junior) defeated W. Banton (Sophomore), 6-1,
6-o.









THE ZONIAN.


GIRLS SINGLES.
.' /n tl'l,. .

Elois Pearson (Senior) defeated Gertrude Van Hardeveld
(Junior) 6-0, 6-o.
Arlee Green (Sophomore) defeated Freshman ; ..r .. i1.

Finals.
Elois Pearson (Senior) defeated Arlee Green (Sophomore),
6-1,6-0.
MIXED DOUBLES.
Semifinals.


Cecelia T.'.rimc \\m. Sergeant (Juniors)
Green-Wm. Banton (Sophomores), 6-3,7-5.


defeated Arlee


Elois Pearson-L. Landers (Seniors) defeated Freshmen
l1 ir. i r )
Finals.
Elois Pearson-L. Landers (Seniors) defeated Cecelia
Twomey-W. Sergeant (Juniors), 6-4, 6-2.
BOYS DOUBLES.


W. Sergeant-B. Elgin (Juniors) defeated Freshmen .torlei,.
L. Landers-E. Brady (Seniors) defeated W. Banton-H.
Clark (Sophomores), 6-3, 4-6, 6-2.

Finals.
L. Landers-E. Brady (Seniors) defeated W. Sergeant-B.
F IL', (Juniors), 6-4, 7-5.


BROVN, IORTON, KNAPP AND ALLEN.


AQUATICS.


The 1921 aquatic team has been a great credit
to Balboa High. The relay -%Iimmi,,!i: team, W.
Bro'.. n, G. \l'rtWn, W. .lli.n, and T. Knapp,
won the Isthmian Relay Championship against
all comers, ini l llini our old rival, the Cris-
tobal High School. The outlook for a -tr.,nu
swimming combination for next year looks very
poor, as three of our best swimmers, William
Allen, George Ca "ll and Theodore Knapp, will
graduate this year. Fortunately this pessimistic
view was completely swept .i".i\ as the Fresh-


M1..rtn, W. Meyers, A. Krause, R. Pearson, R.
Engelke, and F. Newhard.

HIGH SCHOOL AQUATIC MEET.

On February 12, 1921, the Freshmen and Senior
aquatic teams met at the Balboa swimming
pool to participate in the Annual Balboa High
School Aquatic Mcl.r. The Juniors and Sopho-
mores did not enter teams as very few of the
athletes in these classes are fast swimmers. The
Seniors were confident of winning, as their team


46'


man class contri--'


nilendid material in G.









THE ZONIAN.


consisted of crack swimmers, although their
number was limited. The Freshman class took
advantage of their superior number of swimmers
and entered fresh swimmers in every event, which
the Seniors were unable to do; consequently the
Freshmen took second and third places in almost
every event. They also won three first places out
of the eight events, which, with the aid of the
Freshman girl swimmers, enabled them to win the
meet by the close score of 66 to 62 points.

Boys' 5o-yard breast stroke.
R. Engelke, first, time 37 seconds (Freshman).
R. Pearson, second (Freshman).
Krause and Allen tied for third place.

Boys' 42-yard back stroke.
R. Engelke, first; time, 32 seconds (Freshman).
T. Knapp, second (Senior).
W. Meyers, third (Freshman).

Boys' plunge for distance.
Winm. Allen, first; distance, 54 feet (Senior).
A. Krause, second (Freshman).
W. Meyers, third (Freshman).

Boys' relay race.

Allen, Capwell, Brady, and Knapp, first (Seniors).
Morton, Meyers, n-a.ii-.., and Krause, second (Freshmen).

Boys' flrac diving.

F. Newhard, first (Freshman).
R. Pearson, second (Freshman).
T. Knapp, third (Senior).


TRACK.

The Canal Zone High Schools held their annual
track and field meet at the Balboa Stadium on
Saturday, April 2, 1921. Balboa High School won
the meet, defeating Cristobal High School by 9
points. Frank Raymond, the all-around Cristobal
athlete, was the highest point winner. He took
four first places, two second places, one third place,
and made a total of 27 points. For Balboa High
Landers was the highest scorer, making 8 points;
he was ably assisted by Bissell, Miles, Miller,
and Morton in making a winning score of 38
points.
The results of the events are as follows:


Event XNo. r--oo-yard dash.
I. (C. H. S.) Raymond, time not recorded.
2. (B. H. S.) Miles.
3. (B. H. S.) Bissell.

Event No. 2-220-vard dash.

1. (C. H. S.) Raymond (time not recorded).
2. (B. H. S.) Miles.
3. (B. H. S.) Landers.

Event No. 3-12-lb. shot put.

i. (B. H. S.) landers (distance, 35 feet I inch).
2. (C. H. S.) Dues.
3, (C. H. S.) Raymond.

Event No. --Running broadjump.

1. (C. H. S.) Raymond (distance, i5 feet io inches).
2. (B. H. S.) Merrill.
3. (B. H. S.) I.anders.

Event No. .-' . :. broad jump.

I. (B. H. S.) Miles (distance, 8 feet Ii inches).
2. (C. H. S.), Raymond.
3. (B. H. S.) Bissell.


Event No. 6--jg o-ard shuttle relay race.


1. (B. H. S.) Miles, Campbell, Bissell, and l.anders.
2. (C. H. S.) Doyle, D)uey, Eherenz, and Raymond.
3. (B. H. S.) Ilgen, Knapp, Morton, and Miller.

EvLent No. 7-Running hIp, step, jump.

I. (C. H. S.) i Raymond (distance, 3 fitet 7 inches.)
2. (B. H. S.) M irton.
3. (1. H. S.) landers.

Event No. S-Running high jump.

i. (B. H. S.) Bissell (height, 4 feet 9 inches).
2. (C. H. S.) Raynmond.
3. (C.H.S.) Due).

Total sore, girls and boys.

i. Balboa High School, 7s.
2. Cristohal High School, 67.

Total score, boys' events onlv.

I. Balboa High School, 38.
2. Cristobal Hgih School, 34.

S., -Homer Baker, H. Manassa, and G. Wainio.
Starter.-J. C. Burkholder.
Scorer.-R. Hughes.









48 THE 2


BASEBALL.

The Balboa High School baseball team was
organized rather late this year and so far this
season only four games have been played-one
ga:111 with the Quarry Heights enlisted men's
team; and three with Cristobal High School for
the Canal Zone High School Baseball Champion-
ship.
The Canal Zone High School series was won
by Cristobal after a hard fight with the Balboa
High School team. By winning the 1921 cham-
pionship in baseball, Cristobal High has finally
realized one of its great ambitions, which has been
shattered year after year in the past by a stronger
Balboa nine.
FIRST GAME.

The first game of the series was played at the
Balboa stadium February 26, 1921. Raymond
of Cristobal was in fine form, allowing but two
singles. Landers of Balboa pitched the first three
innings but retired after the third, on account of
his arm. Cristobal High managed to get only one
hit from Landers in three innings. Pena pitched
the remaining six innings for Balboa High and
was touched for two hits. Balboa was one run
ahead of Cristobal until the eighth inning, when
J. Solomon knocked a 3-base hit over Pearson's
head, with second and third bases occupied. With
this addition Cristobal took the lead from Balboa
and maintained it to the end.


Cristobal Hig'; School.


ONIAN.


SECOND GAME.

The Balboa High School baseball nine crossed
the Isthmus on March 5, 1921,to tackle the Cris-
tobal team on the Colon diamond in the second
game of the series. A hard struggle was antici-
pated as the teams had played excellent ball in
the first game and seemed to be evenly matched.
The expectations for a fighting game were not
realized, as Balboa easily defeated Cristobal by
the one-sided score of 19 to 9. Both sides made
many errors; Cristobal was credited with II and
Balboa with 8. Zimmerman pitched for Cristobal
but was removed in the fifth inning. During the
southpaw's five-inning career, Balboa High made
ii runs. Raymond filled the gap but did not
succeed in stopping the Balboa sluggers and was
knocked for eight more runs. The slugger of the
day was Capwell, who poled out two doubles and
three singles out of six trips to the plate.


Ba.boa IIgh School.
Players. AB. R. H. E.
Miles, 2b..... 6 2 2 2
Brown, If ..... 4 2 I 0
Engelke, ss..... 4 3 o I
Capwell, c.... 6 3 5 I
Landers, 3b.... 4 o
Ill- il' ., Ib. 4 0 0 1
Morton, cf.... 5 I 1 I
NewharJ, rf.... 2 4 I 0
Pena, p........ 5 3 2 0

Totals....... 40 19 12 8


Balboa High Sc.ioI.


Cristobal I-Hg'i Schco.
Players. AB. R. H. E.
Doyle, 3b..... 5 2 3
Eberenz, b.... 5 o I 2
Townsend, ib.. 5 I I 3
J. Solomon, ss.. 5 2 0 0
F. Raymond,c-p 4 2 1 I
Zimmerm'n, p,lf 4 2 2 o
Duey,rf....... 5 o o o
Cloke, cf....... I o 2
White, lf...... 2 o o o

Totals....... 36 9 7 11


Score by innings.


Players. AB. R. H. E. I' i.-


5
4
3
4
4
3
3
4
3


34


0 0 1 M iles, 2b ......
I 0 o 0 l'. '. .., ss ..
0 0 4 Pearson, rf..
I I o Capwell, c ...
1 2 o Peni, 3b., p....
o o o Brown, If. ....
l o o Morton, cf..
o o 0 I1. l k Ib .
o o o Landers, p. 31b.
000


4 3 5


AB.R. H. E. Balboa High School....... 2 0 2 5 I 4 2 1-19
4 1 0 1 CristobalHigh School..... o 0 0 3 2 2 2 0 o- 9
5 o o 1 U.npies-Carty, J. Raymond. Scorer-Sergeant.


Totals....... 36 3 2 2


Score by innings.
Cristobal High School...... o 2 o o o o o 2 o-4
Balboa High School........ o o 0 0 0 0 -3
Umpire-Pfiffer. Scorer-Burkholder.


THIRD GAME.

In the most exciting game of the series, Cristobal
High School defeated Balboa High School by the
close score of 8 to 7. This game was the third
and dl.dinr game of the series and by this vic-
tory over Balboa, Cristobal High now holds the
championship in baseball for the Canal Zone
high schools.
Raymond and Landers were assigned to do the
pitJihiig. Both pitchers were very liberal in allow-
ing men to reach first. In the third inning,


I IIL rI ', 2b ....
Henter, ib.....
Doyle, 3b.....-
E. S)lomon, c..
J. Solomon, ss..
Raymond, p ..
Dluy, rf ....
Towns-end, If.,.
Cloke, cf ..
White, 3b....

Totals. .....


i










THE Z(


Landers became too generous and permitted the
Cristobal team to chalk up five runs, consequently
he was relieved by Pena. Pena was hit for two
runs in the fourth inning but easily held the Cris-
tobal High scoreless during the rest of the game.
Up to the seventh inning Cristobal was leading by
a big margin but in the eighth inning Balboa
High made a rally which brought in four runs.
With two men down, a ninth inning rally was
also formed, which brought in another run before
the game was ended by Eberenz's pretty catch
of Engelke's foul fly after a hard run. J. Solomon
and Raymond were conspicuous with their batting;
the former knocked out four singles at four times
at bat, while the latter procured a triple which
was the only extra base hit of the game. Another
feature of the game was Miles' one-handed catch
of white's s line drive, which should have been a hit.


)NIAN. 49


for the day. Capwell hit a home run into deep
center, while Engelke hit a long drive into left
field which enabled him to reach third base.
Isaac starred for the soldiers, as he played a
faultless game at third and got three singles at
four times up to the plate.


Q'tan'y Heigi:s.


Players.
Isaac, 3b .
Neville, ss...
Conrad, c ...
Day, ib .....
Standorf, 2b.
Bushy, cf...
Seher, If...
Hirshman, rf.
Goldstine, p..

Tota! . .


AB. R. H. E.
4 1 3 0
S4 o0 0 1

3 1 0
3 o i i
2 0 0 0
.3 0or 1 I
. 2 0 0 1


26 2 7 6


B.lboa Ilg'i School.
Players. AB. R. H. E.
Newhard, rf... 2 2 1 0
M iles, 2b.... 4 1 1 o
Engelke, ss ... 4 2 0
Capwell, c . 4 I I 0
Bleakley, ib .. 3 o 1 1
Brown, If..... 3 o 0 0
Pearson,3b... 3 o 0 0
Morton, cf.... 3 0 0o
Pena, p... . 3 1 1 c

Totals...... 29 7 7 i


Cristobal High Sch/ol.


Ba.'ba High School.


Score by innings.


Pl.o..r.. AB. R. H. E. Players. AB. R. H. E. Balboa High School............. 3 1 0 1 I I x-7
oyle, 3b...... 4 I o 3 Miles, 2b 2 2 o 4 Quarry Heights .... ............o o o 2 o c-2
berenz, c..... .3 1 o I Brown, If ..... 4 1 o Umpire-Neeson. Scorer-3urkh.clder.


Henter, ib.....
Solomon, ss....
Raymond, p...
Mendez, rf....
Ashton, zb...
White, If......
Linczer, cf.....
Duey, If.......


Engelke, ss..
Capwell, c..
Bleakley, Ib..
Newhard, rf..
Pena, 3b.-p..
Morton, cf....
Landers, p-3b.
Pearson, rf...


Totals....... 34 8 7 5 Totals.


Score by innings.


Cristobal High School....... o 5 2 o
Balboa HighSchool ........ 2 0 0 0
Umpire-Meser, Burkholder. Scorer-


0
5 I
4 I
S 3 I
S4 0
3 I
4 0
S2 0

S35 7



0 0 0n
0 0 4
-Knapp.


QUARRY HEIGHTS VS. BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL

The Quarry Heights enlisted men's base
team challenged the Balboa High School teal
a game of baseball. The high school accept
and the teams met on the Balboa diamond
March 2, 1921. The game that followed was
exciting as the high school team greatly outcla
that of their rival. Good sportsmanship
vailed throughout the game and not a hint o
argument was noticed, due no doubt to the
manner in which Neeson, a high school stud
umpired. Capwell and Engelke earned ho
MR 77349-4


0 0
I 0
I 1


INTERCLASS TRACK MEET.


1 0 In the Balboa High School interclass athletic
1 0 meet for 1921 the Senior and Freshmen classes
o1 were again competitors for first place, recalling the
0 Intense rivalry which existed in the interclass
S aquatic meet between the Seniors and Fresh-
6 6 men. Much of the great enthusiasm which has
always been characteristic in this event was lack-
ing, due partly to the number of athletes who have
S been barred in all school activities because of
0--0
1-7 failing work; many athletes have specialized in
other branches of athletics. The Seniors this
time defeated the Freshmen and made up for their
L. defeat in the aquatic meet. Bissell and Landers
,ball were the high point winners, scoring 16 and 15
Sto points, respectively, for the Seniors. For the
ted, Juniors, Miller scored 8 points. The Freshmen
Son high scores were Miles, who made II points, and
Krause, who scored 6 points. The class scores
not a
are as follows:


ssed
pre-
f an
just
ent,
nors


SCORES.

Seniors.......... ..
Freshmen................
Juniors ..................
Sophomores ...............


Points.
38
9
9


D
E










50 THE ZONIAN.


EVENTS.
IOO-YARD DASH.
I. Landers (Senior). Time not recorded.
2. Miles Fr hmn .nl.
3. Bissell (Senior).

220-YARD DASH.
I. Landers (Senior). Time not recorded.
2. M iles I- r-hrnr i ,.
3. Bissell (Senior).

RUNNING BROAD JUMP.
I. Miles ; Frc- hn.in Distance, 16 feet, 9 inches.
2. Bissell (Senior).
3. O'Brien (Senior).

STANDING BROAD JUMP.
I. Miller (Junior). Distance, 8 feet, 8 inches.
2. Krause (Freshman).
3. Bissell (Senior).


SHOT PUT.
I. Landers (Senior). Distance, 33 feet, 2 inches.
2. Krause (Freshman),
3. Capwell (Senior).

440-YARD RELAY.
I. O'Brien, Capwell, Bissell, and Landers (Seniors).
2. Miles, Engelke, Krause, and Morton (F re-hmn t.
3. Blizzard and Ilgen (Juniors).

RUNNING HOP, STEP, AND JUMP.

I. Bissell (Senior). Distance, 32 feet, 6 inches.
2. Morton (Freshman).
3. Engelke (Freshman).

RUNNING HIGH JUMP.
I. Bissell (Senior). Height, 4 feet, 7 inches.
2. Miller (Junior).
3. Engelke (Freshman).


GIRLS' ATHLETICS.

Ethel P. S. Getman, '21.


Our climate being a most favorable one for
year around athletics, our high school is naturally
interested in them, both boys and girls. Girls'
athletics this year have comprised more sports
than ever before, consisting of swimming, diving,
basketball, track and field, and tennis. Basketball
seems to be the most popular, and everyone from
the Freshmen novices to the adept and proficient
Seniors flocked out for the team trials. We have
had two leagues, an Interclass and an Isthmian,
which have developed some excellent players.

INTERCLASS BASKETBALL.

Interclass girls' basketball was again easily
.;aprured by the Seniors, who for three years in
succession have won first place, the last two years
with 1,000 per cent. The fact that five of the
Senior pl.u1'rs were chosen for the high school
team certainly speaks well for the ability of the
Senior team. The other places went to the
Juniors, S.phii.m, r,, and Freshmen, in the order
named.
The Seniors, who have also Ipriogrc,,,l in uni-
forms, surprised the other classes last year with


red middies and black bloomers, our class colors.
This year, we appeared on the floor in red athletic
jerseys and black bloomers. The high school team
has adopted this uniform in the high school colors,
gold and black. Our lineup is: Marie MeMahon,
captain and f.; Florienet Matter, f.; Catherine
Parmeter, g.; Cornelia van Hardeveld, g.; Mae
Wynne, c.; Ethel Getman, c.; Marie McMahon,
'21, captain of both the Senior and high school
teams, deserves much credit for the work as
captain of three teams during her four years of
high school. With her as leader, the Sophomores
of 1919 won the league championship for the first
time.

ISTHMIAN BASKETBALL LEAGUE.

The Balboa High School girls made their first
appearance in the Isthmian Basketball League
when they played Ancon on December 4, 1920.
The team, picked by ]\li Gaither, our coach, was
made up of the following: Marie McMahon,
captain and f.; Florienet Matter, f.; Catherine
Parmeter, g.; Cornelia van Hardeveld, g.; Arlee
Greene, g.; Olena Hutchings, f.; Gertrude van









THE ZONIAN.


Hardeveld, c.; Ethel Getman, c. This proved to
be a most exciting game. The hall was crowded
with fans who were not disappointed. The game
was not decided until the very last minute, when
Florienet Matter of Balboa made a neat basket
which barely cleared the net as the whistle blew
for time. Balboa cheered Ancon and Ancon
promptly returned it, and the Balboa girls trotted
off the floor with one of the hardest game ever
played to their credit. The score was 28 to 27
in favor of Balboa.


January 29 we played Gatun again and easily
beat them by a score of 18 to 8. This game tied
Gatun and Balboa for first place, causing another
game to be played in order to decide the winners
of the championship. We won another easy
victory from the Cristobal team a week later by
a score of 40 to i This one completed our sched-
ule with them. We think that Cristobal has done
well during the short time they have been organized.
The championship game of the Isthmus,
between Balhoa"and Gatun, was played on the


ETHEL GETMAN. ARLEE GREEN, CATHERINE PARAMETER. MIARIE MICMAHON (Captain). (GERTRLUDE VAN HA\RDEVELD, CORNELIA VAN
HARDEVELD. OLENA HUTCHINGS, AND FLORIENET LATTER.


We played our second game at Gatun, Decem-
ber II, with the fast Gatun six. Things went
evenly all the way through until Gatun scored a
basket. Though we tried hard, we could not get
another basket to square things up. The final
score showed the Gatun team victorious by two
points--I to 9.
The game with Cristobal on December 18 was
a walk-away for Balboa, the score being 44 to 8.
While Cristobal played hard, Balboa was too fast
for them.
Balboa and Pedro Miguel are not very well
matched as the latter team is new at basketball,
but they took their defeat like good sports.
Pedro Miguel was unable to score while Balboa
made 41.


gym ... r at the Cristobal Army and Navy "Y."
Both teams were at a disadvantage here, as neither
had ever played on this floor before. The members
of the two teams compared very favorably in
size and skill and when the whistle blew 12 nervous
girls found their positions, determined to fight to
the last second.
The first half was practically all played by the
Gatun forwards and Balboa guards. Shot after
shot was tried but all fell short of their mark.
When the Balboa team finally did get the ball to
its forwards M.ii. McMahon scored the first
goal of the game. \\ I.-ii time was called the score
stood 2 to o. Gatun refused to let it remain so
and in the third quarter they scored a goal, making
it two all. In the last quarter, every player was


0A 4 IL A










52 THE ZONIAN.


on her mettle. No one was left unguarded for a
second and real teamwork showed why Balboa and
and Gatun stood at the top of the league. Florie-
net Matter, of Balboa, made a goal; then Lulu
Henter scored for Gatun. The side lines were in
an uproar and Balboa's 3 rooters were given
Gatun's 20 a run for their money. The whistle
blew and the referee announced that Gatun had
made a foul. As Marie McMahlin stepped into
the ring to make a free shot the room was quiet
but a second afterwards it was filled with shouts
and groans-for she had made it! In vain did
Gatun try to retaliate; but Balboa stood firm
and every girl played as she never played before.
When the last whistle sounded Balboa had won
by one point the Isthmian championship.

AQUATICS.
Swimming, our year around amusement, was
well represented this year and a new champion
surprised us all. Eleanor Garrard, of the Fresh-
man class, starred in the interclass aquatic meet.
All past girls' records were broken for the dashes
and although Miss Garrard has only been swim-
ming about a year, she promises to develop into a
real champion if her rapid advancement continues.
Our former champion of the Isthmus and high
school, Marie Mc.lhiah.n, of the class of'21, has
given up \swimming, appearing for the last time
in the aquatic meet. Fancy diving is a new art
in which [lhrlinct Matter, also of the class of'21,
has made a name for herself by doing perfect
swans from the 34-foot tower. The following is a
result of the events of the interclass aquatic
meet held at the Balboa swimming pool.
EVENTS.
50-YARD BREAST STROKE.
I. M. McMahon, '21.
2. G. van Hardeveld.


50-YARD SWIM.
E. Garrard, '24.
A. Greene.
M. McMahon.
10o-YARD SWIM.
E. Garrard, '24.
M. McMahon.
G. van Hardeveld.
22-YARD SWIM.
E. Garrard, '24.
A. Greene.
M. McMahon.


22-YARD BACK STROKE.
I. E. Garrard, '24.
2. G. van Hardeveld.
PLUNGE FOR DISTANCE.
i. M. Wynne, '21, 49 feet.
2. M. Nicewonger.
3. L. Rathbone.


FANCY DIVING.
F. Matter, '21.
E. Garrard.
G. van Hardeveld.


RELAY RACE.
I. Freshmen (G ,rr r. \Ji.:e:.'.r,: .r R 1rhtb,,ne, and Garwood).

CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL US. BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL
TRACK MEET.

We were surprised to see so many of the
Cristobal High School girls come over for the
track meet this year, as heretofore the Balboa
girls have never been called upon to defend our
title to the championship. Saturday, April 2,
we won another victory over Cristobal by beating
them in the track meet. This makes us champs
of basketball, swimming, and track. The latter
was the hardest of all to win as Cristobal has some
excellent athletes. Edna Campbell of Cristobal
scored in almost all the dashes, while Llona Rath-
bone, '24, and Ethel Getman, '21, won the broad
and high jumps for Balboa, setting new records
for the Canal Zone in both events. The list of
events was as follows:
50-YARD DASH.
I. E. Campbell (Cristobal).
2. L. Lawandi (Cristobal).
3. E. Getman (Balboa).

75-YARD DASH.
I. E. Getman (Balboa).
2. E. Campbell (Cristobal).
3. M. McMahon (Balboa).


BASEBALL THROW.
E. Campbell (Cristobal).
M. McMahon H ri.l.ii.
L. Henter (Cristobal).

BASKETBALL THROW.

F. Matter (Balboa).
E. Campbell (Cristobal).
C. van Hardeveld (BjlLo.j








THE ZONIAN.


RUNNING BROADJUMP.

1. L. Rathbone (Balboa) 12 feet.
2. E. Campbell (Cristobal).
3. E. Getman (Balboa).


RUNNING HIGH JUMP.

I. E. Greene, '23, 3 feet, 8 inches.
2. L. Rathbone.
3. A. Greene.


STANDING BROAD JUMP. 75-YARD DASH.


I. L. Rathbone (Balboa), 6 feet, 7 inches.
2. M. McMahon (Balboa).

RUNNING HIGH JUMP.

I. E. Getman (Balboa), 4 feet, 2 inches.
2. L. Rush (Cristobal).
3. E. Campbell (Cristobal).


RELAY RACE.
I. Cristobal.
2. Balboa.

INTERCLASS TRACK ril i.

Not so much interest as is usually shown was
taken this year in the track meet on April 16,
especially by the upper classes, and the Sopho-
mores had no trouble in winning it. Cecelia
Twomey, '22, made the highest individual score
in points, with 23. Llona Rathbone, '24, was
next with 16, and Esther Greene, '23, a close
third with 14 points. The f .i *..' i; arc thl re-
sults of the events:

BASEBALL THROW.

i. E. Twomey, '22, 140 feet.
2. A. Greene.
l. M. McMahon.


BASKETBALL THROW.

A. Greene '23, 53 feet.
C. van Hardeveld.
H. Piper.


STANDING BROAD JUMP.

I. L. Rathbane, '24, 7 feet, 4 inches.
2. C. Twomey.
3. A. Greene.

RUNNING BROAD JUMP.

I. L. Rathbone, '24, 12 feet.
2. E. Greene.
3. T.Jensen.


I. C. Twomey, '22.
2. E. Greene.
3. A. Greene.

SO-YARD DASH.
I. C. Twomey, '22.
2. E. Greene.
i. L. Rathbone.


20C-YARD RELAY RACE.
I. Seniors.
M. McMahon.
M. Duncan.
M. Wynne.
G. John.

2. Freshmen.
L. Rathbone.
T. Jensen.

3. Junior.
C.Twomey.



OUR CHAMPS."

Robert Pearson of the Balboa High School
swimming team, in a recent aquatic meet swam
a distance of 303 feet under water. By swimming
this distance submerged, Pearson not only has
broken the Isthmian record, but has alsa shattered
the world's record.
In June the famous Canal Zone Red, White,
and Blue Troupe will go to New York to perform
in Madison Square Garden. The members con-
sist of expert children swimmers and divers,
ranging from 4 years up. The troupe has per-
formed for President Porras of Panama, President
Harding, General Pershing, and other notables.
Swimming instructor Mr. H. J. Grieser, who
organized the troupe, will have charge and will
be assisted by "Bob." While in New York, Pear-
son will meet the present underwater champion
of the world, to contend for the title.


53








THE ZONIAN.


Mae 7. 1, .:,, '2r.


"Oh, wad some power the giftie gie us
To see oursels as others see us!"

and truly an rFch.irn Department is both the
power and the gift. Kindly criticism is one of the
greatest good things in the world and a wonderful
aid to progress. If this department helps by
ever so little even one of our ci\hanuL.,, it will
have proved itself worth while.
We offer our sincerest thanks to our exchanges
for the cooperation they have shown and hope to
put their suggestions to L -' id use.
Our exchange list now numbers 40 strong and
we should like to increase it. The following school
papers and magazines have been received this
year:
The Argonaut, \l.irnhLl., Mass.
The /rgus, Gardner, Mass.
The Bayonet, Germantown, Ohio.
The Bulletin, Montclir, N. J.
The Caribbean, Cristobal, C. Z.
Commerce /I Columbus, Ohio.
The Chatham Chatter, Clih nh i, N. J.
The Distaff, Boston, Mass.
The Early Trainer, Lawrence, Mass.
The Easterner, Washington, D. C.
The Florida iFambeau, Tallahassee, Fla.
The Gleeman, Bellevue, Pa.
The i,/.. i.,.-:, Richmond, Ind.
The 1i, School Herald, Westfield, Mass.
The High School Recorder, Saratoga Springs, N. Y.
The High School Review, Lowell, Mass.
The John Marshall Record, Richmond, Va.
Junto, Easton, Pa.


The Key, Battle Creek, Mich.
The Lincolnian, Newcastle, Me.
The Lookout, Derby, Conn.
The Lyceum, Chillicothe, Ohio.
The Micrometer, Cincinnati, Ohio.
The Mirror, Columbus, Ohio.
The Missile, Petersburg, Va.
The Nobleman, Boston, Mass.
Nor'easter, Kansas City, Mo.
The Orient, Minneapolis, Minn.
The Review, Washington, D. C.
The Sel-ala, Selma, Ala.
The Sentinel, Leisenring, Pa.
The Spectator, Trenton, N. J.
The Spotlight, Fort \\ .r nc, Ind.
The Student, Covington, Ky.
The Student, Oklahoma City, Okla.
The Tabula, Chicago, Ill.
The Trapeze, Oak Park, Ill.
The Vidette, Lancaster, Pa.
Westward Ho, Baltimore, Md.
The IIt *'ap, Wilmington, Del.
The Wigwam, Yakima, Wash.
The It l./.J'an, Willimantic, Conn.


BOOK REVIEW.

OURSELVES AS OTHERS SEE Us.

THE ZONIAN-The Spanish stories were excellent; so were
the geographical pictures. Would not a Current Events
column add to your paper?-The Disi,;ff.
THE ZoNIAN-One of the best graduation numbers received.
Very original is your idea of scenes; also that of the French
and Spanish stories.-The Student, Oklahoma.


-4








THE ZONIAN.


THE ZONIAN.-Your magazine is very attractive with its
numerous pictures. We admire your novel way of arranging
your Society Notes. Come again.-The Review, Lowell, Mass.
THE ZONIAN from Balboa High School is an interesting
magazine. Your cover design is one of the best we have seen.-
The Nobleman.
THE ZONIAN.-We like your artistic cover, your stories are
good, your jokes have pep; but why leave so much blank
space after stories, etc.? We hope your little poem "Why We
Stay," will be an incentive to other writers.-The IVyndonian.
THE ZONIAN.-You have an excellent little paper. Accept
our congratulations.-The Bayonet.
THE ZONIAN.-Your annual is well arranged. You have
many good stories and articles and your class prophecy was
very clever indeed. You also have many beautiful photographs,
but there seems to be a shortage of drawings, II,.rr ,r. r,.
cartoons, and headings. Haven't you any artists? We would
also like to suggest that you enlarge your exchange depart-
ment.-The Tabula.
THE ZONIAN.-Your paper is an especially fine one. The
illustrations add much to its interest and attractiveness. We
were pleased to learn that your graduating class gave the
same play "Green Stockings" that our graduating class gave.-
The Argus.
THE ZONIAN.-We are glad to have THE ZONIAN among our
exchanges this year. The general excellence of its literary
content is a reason for pride in which its sister school, dearold
Cristobal, shares. No exchange among the many good ones
received, with a far larger student body, excels it. It is an
enduring monument to the accomplishment of its contributors
and a silent tribute to the devotion and zeal of its teacher of
English, Miss Myrtis M. Gallup.-The Caribbean.


As WE SEE OTHERS.
Commerce Life, Columbus, Ohio.-Your paper is very attract-
ive and your snapshot arrangements particularly clever.
"Commerce Bells" deserves special mention. Why not add
a few more stories?
The Distaff, Boston, Mass.-A good paper well supported by
the students. Wouldn't some new cuts help?
The Student, Oklahoma City, Okla.-A snappy paper. Your
cuts are good; also your poems.
High School Recorder, Saratoga Springs, N. Y.-Your
literary department is very good.
Westward Ho, Baltimore, Md.-A good magazine through-
out. Your literary department is excellent and the idea of
illustrating the stories quite original in a high school magazine.
The Student, Covington, Ky.-A splendid paper-your cuts
are fine.
The Gleeman, Bellevue, Pa.-The Gleeman is true to its title.
Your jokes are excellent.
The Herald, Westport High School, Kansas City, Mo.-
You have a very attractive magazine. Your pictures are good
and the little sketch, "Mars, A Tragedy," was very clever;
but wouldn't it improve your magazine to have a few stories
and jokes and an exchange column?
The Tabula, Chicago, 111.-A fine magazine, one of the best
exchanges we have received. We like your stories, we like
your illustrations, we like your jokes-we like your magazine.
The Caribbean, Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.-
One of our best exchanges. The Caribbean is a splendid maga-
zine. The articles of local interest are especially good and the
school notes are very well arranged. The stories and snap-
shots are excellent. As loyal "Zonites" we are certainly proud
of our "sister paper," The Caribbean.


Low tide at Panama City.







THE ZONIAN.







THE ZONIAN.


Ruth C. Boyd, '21.


Cecil W. Hussey, '18, who is taking a chemical
engineering course at Ames, Iowa, has won a
place as one of the 19 in a class of 169, who have
passed the five standards in the physical efficiency
test.
Maria Hunsecker, '20, has decided to be a
commercial teacher, and is attending Mr. St.
Joseph College, Boston, .MaI-.; she is also study-
ing music.
John Kuller, '20, is continuing the excellent
work that he did in high school, in the University
of Illinois, taking a course in chemical engineering.
Eva Swineheart, '14, formerly playground
directress at Cristobal, is attending the Russian
Vestoff School of Dancing in New York City.
William Fraser, '14, is employed as a civil
engineer with an oil company in T-llmpiL Mexico.
Maria Elsie Johnson, who, since she finished
high school in 1911, has been very successful in the
music world, has given many excellent violin
recitals in ditfercnt parts of the States. Recently
she gave a concert at the opening of New Theater,
Greenville, M\h.. At present she is studying in
Lavelle, Fla.
Blossom Compton Bonitez, '14, is living at
Fort Hancock, N. J. Word has been received that
Captain Bonitez may be transferred to Fort
Amador, C. Z. It is hoped that this is true, as
Blossom's many friends will be very glad to wel-
come her again.


"Our Scientific Farmer," Lyle Womack, who
was graduated last year, is taking a course in
dilir in. this year in the Iowa State College.
Ames has attracted another of the boys of the
class of '20, Fowler Banton, who has taken up
electrical engineering.
Francis Holleran, Jr., '16, who during his high-
school career was an important figure in athletic
circles, is working in Balboa, and is playing base-
ball with the Panama-Ancon team.
Charles Watson is taking an agricultural course
in the University of Missouri.
Mrs. Eugene Ash had a most enjoyable Balboa
High reunion at her home, in Mount Vernon,
Iowa, during the Christmas holidays. There were
seven present who were former members of Balboa
High School, five of them being alumni members.
They were: Helen Kaske, from Hammond, Ind.;
Gift Shady, '18, from Davenport, Iowa; Eliza-
beth Ash, '16, and David Ash, from Mount
Vernon; and Lyle Womack, '20, and Cecil Hussey,
'18, from Ames, Iowa.
Lewis and Frank Moore are back on the Isth-
mus. Lewis, 'I5, is employed by the Municipal
Engineering Division, Balboa, and Frank, '17,
is working in the Personnel Bureau, Balboa
Heights.
Charles Weiss, '18, is studying surgery in Co-
lumbia University, New York.







STHE ZONIAN.


- "Bob" Getman, '20, seems to be making quite
a name for himself and the CanalZonein swim rmin
at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. In a
competitive meet, December 17, 1920, he won the
5o-% ard dash, lowering the record to 27 4/5 sec-
onds. He also took the ioo-yard swim; set a
new record for the 220-yard swim at 3 minutes
2 4/5 seconds, and besides captured first place in
the plunge, thereby making the highest individual
score--18 points.
Albert Thayer, who was graduated last year, is
taking a literary course at Ann Arbor, l1ic h.
George Dewey Mitrrn, 'I6, will soon return to
Purdue College, Lafayette, Mich., to finish his
engineering course. He is at present employed
as an engineer for the Electric Motor Company
of Detroit, Mich.
Frances Thornton and Georgia Ellsworth, both
of the 1920 Senior class are taking secretarial
courses. Georgia is attending school at Pough-
keepsie, N. Y. Frances has entered Southern
Seminary at Buena Vista, Va., where she is also
taking a course in modern languages.
William Christian, '20, is doing excellent work in
the University of Marylanld, having taken up a
course in dentistry.
Ruth Wilson, '20, who was the alumni editor
last year, and who took an active part in all school
affairs while in high school, is attending Pacard's
Business School, Woodhaven, L. I.
Charles E. Davis, '18, who attended Washing-
ton State College last term, is emnpl,)\dl with the
Section of Surveys, Balboa Heights, but will
return to college soon.
Jane Calvit, Francer \\'t.-rbcrLr, Clara Wood,
Helen Mlillrv, Harry Grier, and Mur1, Golden
of the class of 1920, have remained on the Zone,
several of them being employed here.


Dorothea Atchison is now a junior in the Mich-
igan Agricultural College, Lansing, Mich.
Gift Shady, '18, is studying chiropractic in
Davenport, Iowa.

MARRIAGES.
A wedding that was of interest to many on the
Zone, especially members of the class of '18, took
place at the Balboa Union Church, November 23,
1920, when Ruth Dieter Farrell, '18, became the
brideof Mr. Raymond Burmester. Mr. and Mrs.
Burmester have made their home at Balboa.
Dorothea Westberg, '18, who was married to
Mr. Raymond L. Fitzpatrick last spring, is li i ing
in Brooklyn, N. Y.
Frankie Reisner Meroney, 'Ii, was recently
married to Mr. Bennett in St. Louis, Mo.
Two of our most popular teachers, Miss Estelle
McKelvey and Miss Myrtis Gallup, were married
recently.
Miss McKelvey, teacher of Latin, Ancient
History, and Freshman English, was the first to
leaves. ShewasmarriedtoMr. CunninghamPat-
terson last October. They are residing in Balboa.
Last November our English teacher, liss Gal-
lup, was married to Mr. Harry T. Drill, formerly
principal of Cristobal schools, but now teacher
of physics in the State Agricultural College of
Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Drill have made their
home in Corvalis, Oreg.
Paul H. Warner, '15, who was married some
time ago, has returned to the Canal Zone with his
bride. Mr. and Mrs. Warner are residing in
Balboa, where "Paul" is employed.
'William R. Tomey, 'I6, completed his course
at West Point last year, and was commissioned a
lieutenant, and at present he is stationed at Camp
Benning, Georgia. He is to be married to Miss
R. Hayes of Cleveland, Ohio, in July.


ADDRESSES.


"The Alumni" grows so much bigger each year,
We can't find the addresses of some names that are here;
%\ h.', r ren inquired and tried, but in vain
For some of the girls' names are not just the same.
1911.
Maria Elsie Johnson, I.avelle, Fla.
'1 rIntrl,. Stevens, Box 242, Balboa, C. Z.


1912.

Edith Stevens, Box 242, Balboa, C. Z.
Ruth Hackenberg Dwelle, Balboa, C. Z.
Helen Michels, Ohio.
Katherine Francis Farmer, Bocas del Toro, R. P.
Myrtle Lindersmith, California.








THE ZONIAN.


1913.

Corinne Browning Alley, Balboa, C. Z.
Emma Stubner.
Emanuel Perry.
Fred Barber.
Adeline Babbitt, Meriden, Conn.
Helen Calkins, Sherman St., Morris Park, Long Island.
Arthur Howard, Brookline, Mass.


1914.

Marion Blake, Hobart, Ind.
Joe Udry, New York.
William Fraser, Box 216, Tampico, Mexico.
Dorothy Magnuson Hamlin, Balboa, C. Z.
Blossom Compton Bonitz, Fort Hancock, N. J.
James Loulan, X\ hIwl r.-i D. C.
Miriam Stevens Bauman, Cristobal, C. Z.
Eleanor Comber.


1915.

Richard Hunter (deceased).
Paul H. Warner, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Lewis Moore, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Fred (Whiston) Bailey, Alvaredo Mining and Milling Co.,
Terral, Chihuahua, Mexico.
Andrew I r .... Box 642, Balboa, C. Z.
John Loulan (deceased).
Ethel Gowan, 2522 Upperline Street, New Orleans, La.
Frankie Reisner Bennett, 2317 University Ave., St. Louis, Mo.
Dorothy Wonson, Boston, Mass.
Esther Francis, 890 Beech St., St. Paul, Minn.
Josephine Prochaska, Jefferson, Philadelphia, Pa.


1916.

Leslie Jennings Appleton, New Orleans, La.
Elizabeth Porter Ash, Mt. Vernon, Iowa.
John J. Bradley, Jr.
Gabriel Butler, Box 258, Ancon, C. Z.
Ord G. Chrisman, c/o Kappa Sigma Frat., Moscow, Idaho.
Richard J. Dorsan, Balboa, C. Z.
Ave Maria Agnes Doyle, College of Mount St. Vincent-on-the
Hudson, New York.
Sarah Elizabeth Harrison, Cristobal, C. Z.
Catherine N. Hinton, Richmond, Va.
Maria Elizabeth Holland, Ancon, C. Z.
Francis E. Holleran, Jr., Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Phyllis Kelley Warner, Balboa, C. Z.
George Dewey Mitten, 776 Leverenz Ave., Detroit, Mich.
James Y. Smith, 295 Miller Ave., Columbus, Ohio.
William Hartman Stevens, Balboa, C. Z.
Lieut. William R. Tomey, Camp Benning, Ga.


1917.

Edward H. Clendenin, Hdqrs. 4th Div., Camp Lewis,
Tacoma, Wash.
Edward Lloyd Greene, c/o Epsilon Nu Gamma, PIlln .i,.
Wash.
Charles M. Kennedy, Box 233, Jersey Shore, Pa.
Agnes Beverly Kuller, Sansom St., Philadelphia, Pa.
Lillian McGeachy, Fancygap, Ind.
Gertrude McKenzie Absten, Balboa, C. Z.
Ruth Medinger, 2511 2th St. NW., Washington, D. C.
Frank E. Moore, Jr., Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Ethel Ruth Otis Page, 9 Third Ave., Presidio Terrace, San
Francisco, Cal.
\\ iI ,r I Ropes Trask, Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass.
Emilio Villegas V., University of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, l.a.


1918.

Gift Shady, 421 E. i4th St., Davenport, Iowa.
James Stephen Engelke, Cristobal, C. Z.
Dorothea Westberg Fitzpatrick, 263 12th St., Brooklyn, N. Y.
John W. Hussey, Box 161, Station "A," Ames, Iowa.
Florence Dorothea Atchison, Box 525, East Lansing, Mich.
Beatrice Glawson, Balboa, C. Z.
Harry Roberts Carson, 4314 Bancroft Hall, U. S. Naval
Academy, Annapolis, Md.
Stewart Macfarlane, 42 Morningside Rd., Edinburgh, Scotland.
Virginia E. \\ 1.. rI, Balboa, C. Z.
Louise Dexter, 28 Johnson Park, Buffalo, N. Y.
E.Charles\\ .. .11 -. i..-Hall, 416-418, Columbia University,
New York, N. Y.
Winnie Mae Stevenson McCauley, 2128 Avenue 1, Birming-
ham, Ala.
Branson G. Stevenson, Box 243, Helena, Mont.
John Ed. Wilcox, Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy,
N. Y.
Charles Ed. Davis, Pedro Miguel, C. Z.
Myron M. Weaver, 17th Co., 5th Regt., Quantico, Va.
Ruth Farrell Burmester, Balboa, C. Z.
Frances E. Nelson, Box 22, Ancon, C. Z.
George W. Winquist, Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy,
N. Y.
Calvin B. Breden, U. S. Military Academy, West Point, N. Y.
Lois Kelso Greene, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Charles P. Clarity, Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy,
N.Y.

1919.

Carolyn Lacy, 719 Madison Ave., Montgomery, Ala.
Charles J. Watson, Jr., 604 Providence Road, Columbus, Mo.
Ruth Abbey Seavey, Balboa, C. Z.
Margaret V. Campbell, F. S. C. W. Brower Hall, Tallahassee,
Fla.
Earl Charles Palmer, Suite No. 23, 137 Peterboro St., Boston,
(17), Mass.









6o THE ZONIAN.


Lucille Olive Koperski, 602 Emmett St., Ypsilanti, Mich.
Manuel L. Quintero, Columbia University, New York, N. Y.
Norine M. Hall, Gatun, C. Z.
Dorothy A. Browning, 2518 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md.
Francis X. Kerr, Ioo0 South 6th St., Champaign, Ill.
Margaret F. Hollowell, Balboa, C. Z.
Evelyn J. Erickson, Balboa, C. Z.
Blanchard Vivian Hutchings, Chickasaw, Ala.
Julian Nielsen Hartman, Balboa, C. Z.
Janet E. Fraser, Box 642, Balboa, C. Z.
Hubert M. Langlois, Villanova College, Villanova, Pa.

1920.

Georgia L. Ellsworth, 270 Mill St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
John W. Walker, 1001 South 6th St., Champaign, Ill.
Frances Thornton, Southern Seminary, Buena Vista, Va.
Willis R. Pressell, San Francisco, Cal.
Carla Smith, Mt. Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass.
William P. Christian, 24-26 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md.
Jane Calvit, Balboa, C. Z.


Maria Hunsecker, Mount St. Joseph College, 617 Cambridge
Street, Boston, Mass.
Lyle Earle Womack, 119 Lincoln Way, Ames, Iowa.
Ruth Wilson, 55 Dennington Ave., Woodhaven, L. I.
Fowler Banton, c/o Sigma Chi, Ames, Iowa.
Martha Zarak, Panama, R. P.
David Neville, University of Idaho, Idaho.
Frances Westberg, Box 581, Ancon, C. Z.
Albert M. Thayer, 609 Monroe St., Ann Arbor, Mich.
Mabel Lee, Clyde, Ohio.
Robert A. Getman, R-nsselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy,
N.Y.
Anna Sire, R. F. D., Westminster, Md.
Warren D. Jordan, c/o W. D. D:ysdale, 545 New St., Daver,
D-l.
John Muro Golden, Balboa, C. Z.
Clara Woo, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Susie Allen, c/o T. J. Breheney, 6o5 E. 138th St., Bronx, N. Y.
Harry Grier, Balboa, C. Z.


Religious proeesaion, Panma City.








THE ZONIAN.


Owen Moore went away
Owin' more than he could pay,
Owen Moore came back one day
Owin' more.

Capwl// (sweating)-"Gee, I worked hard in
v ..... ... T ]- t "
Landers.--"\\hat were you working on, your
head ?"

Cap-ie'll/.-"How can I keep my toes from falling
asleep ?"
Bissell-"Don't let 'em turn in!"

AIr. Boss-"What's the matter, O'Brien, you
look sick?"
O'Brien.--"I am. I gotta cold in muh head."
Mr. Boss-"Oh! It must be a cold. It couldn't
be anything else."

"What is a study of solid g,: .mn:r :"
"A study of the human cranium."

"How are you on spiritualism, George?"
"Oh, medium."

Soph.-"Ain't nature wonderful?"
Fresh.-"Why?"
Soph.--"Because it gives us our face, but we
can pick our own teeth."


Catherine Parnietcr--"What is the difference
between Margaret Halligan and an umbrella?"
Danskin.-"You can shut up an umbrella."

"What's your dog's name?"
"Ginger!"
"l)oes he bite?"
"No, Ginger snaps!"

Air. Boss-"O'Brien, why were you late!"
O'Brien-"Well, the road is so slippery every
time I took a step forward I slipped back two."
Mlr. Boss (thinking he had O'Brien)-"How did
you ever get here?"
O'Brien-"Oh, I turned around and started for
home."

"I wanna nice chicken."
"Wanna pullet?"
". .*., wanna carry it."

Craven-"Do you serve lobsters here?"
II'aiter-"Yes, we serve anybody. Step right
up.

Capwel/.-"How many feet must an aviator
get off the ground before one may say he is fly-
ing?"
Bissell-"At least two feet."


t.GeoT"e LmajnSK dl.







62 THE ZONIAN.


Frrs1'.-"Did playing football give you the
black eye?"
Senior.-- No, only the black. I had the eye all
the time."
Newsboy-"All about de awf'l wreck!"
Old lady-"I want a paper."
Newsboy-"Sure, lady, maybe one of your
friends was killed."
A sign on a western florist's store reads:
"SAMUEL RZESCHEWSKIOVITZ.
Say it with flowers."
Miss Crespi-"Draw your figure on the board,
Capwell."
Capwell-"Gee, it would take up the whole
board."
Shrekmeister--"Hist! The American soldiers
in there are planning a massacre."
Picklesteiner-"So?"
Shrekmeister-"Ja. I heard one say 'shoot 50'
and another 'shoot io.' Then I heard a sound
like the rattling of the victim's teeth."

A young theologian named Fiddle,
Refused to accept his degree;
"For," said he, 'tis enough to be Fiddle
Without being Fiddle D. D."

Cop-"Say, what's the matter with you? This
is a one-way street."
Abe (in a new car)-"Vell, vat's the matter
vid you; I'm only going vun vay, ain't it?"

After the clerk in the store had shown the con-
tents of all but a few boxes, a lady customer said:
"Never mind, I don't want anything, I was only
looking for a friend."
"\ell," said the clerk, "if you think your friend
is in any of the remaining boxes, I'll take those
down too."

He that knows not and knows that he knows
not, is a Fresh-Honor him!
He that knows not and knows not that he knows
not, is a Soph-Help him!
He that knows and knows not that he knows,
is a Junior-Pity him!
He that knows and knows that he knows, is a
Seni',r \\W.tLh him!


She-"I like a man of few words and many
actions."
He-"You must want my brother; he has
St. Vitus dance."

In France they make a drink with prunes and
call in prunelle. In America they make the
stuff with raisins; why not call it raisin 'elle?
Why not?

"Father, I need a new riding habit."
"Can't afford it," he growled.
"But, father, what am I going to do without a
riding habit?"
"Get the walking habit."

"Did that rich uncle of yours leave you many
heirlooms ?"
"I should say so. A new heir looms up every
minute."

Chris and John had been away from home
against their mother's commands, and she was
waiting for them with a switch.
"Chris, vare you been?"
"Mit John."
"John, vare you been."
"Mit Chris."
"Vare you both been?"
"Togedder."

Miss 7arvis-"Danskin, name three substances
containing starch."
Danskin.-"Two cuffs and a collar."

Professor-"Now I put the number 7 on the
board. What number immediately comes into
your mind?"
Class (in unison)-"Eleven."

A farmer hitched his horse to a telephone pole.
"Here," hollered a cop, "you can't hitch
there!"
"Can't hitch!" shouted the irate farmer, "Well,
why Joes the sign say, 'Fine for hitching?' "

Mrs. Smith-"The butcher said it was spring
lamb."
Smith-"He's right. I've been chewing one of
the springs for the last 5 minutes."








THE ZONIAN.


Mrs. Flannegan.-"I wish your father was
home, so he could see how you behave when he's
out."

''IM," said Mr. Klumsay, "this floor's awfully
slippery. It's hard to keep on your feet."
"Oh," said the fair one sarcastically, "then you
were trying to keep on my feet? I thought it was
purely accidental."

"What is it when you're married twice at the
same time?"
"Polygamy."
"And when you're only married once?"
ri n ,r, ,1\'."

He.-"May I have the next dance?"
She.-"I'm particular with whom I dance."
He.-"Well, you can see I'm not troubled the
same way."

"Who was the first man out of the ark?"
"Noah."
"The Bible says Noah came forth."

It was on a moonlight sleigh ride,
As we glided o'er the land,
That I softly called her "d iIrlinc,."
And stroked her little- raincoat.

I held her little raincoat, "Oh,
How fast the evening flies."
My soul filled with rapture
As I gazed into her-lunch basket.

I peeped into the basket
And I longed for one sweet taste.
There sat my little sweetheart,
With my arm around her- umbrella.

I still held her umbrella
What a lovely little miss.
She smiled in pleased confusion
When I boldly stole a sandwich.

The culprit's name was Look Hoo
A Chinaman 'twas clear,
The lawyer addressed the Court;
"Your honor, Look Hoo's here."
The judge replied with brevity,
"Eliminate the levity."


THE NEW DANGER.

"Sister," said the deacon severely, "you should
avoid even the appearance of evil."
"Why, deacon, what do you mean?" asked
the sister.
"I observed that on your sideboard you have
several cut-glass decanters, and that each of them
is half filld with what appears to be ardent
spirits."
"Well, now, deacon, it isn't anything of the
kind. The bottles looked so pretty on the side-
board that I filled them half way with some floor
stain and furniture polish, just for the sake of
appearance.
"That's why I'm cautioning you, sister,"
replied the deacon. "Feeling a trifle faint, I
helped myself to a dose from the big bottle in the
middle."

It was midnight on the ocean,
Not a street car was in sight.
The sun was shining brightly,
For it rained all day that night.
'Twas midnight and the rising sun
Was setting in the west,
The little fishes in the trees
Were cuddled in their nests.

While the organ peeled potatoes,
Lard was rendered by the quire,
While the sexton wrung the dishrag,
Some one set the church on fire.
"Oh, what smoke!" the sexton shouted
As he watered the place dry.
Now the place resembles Wall Street,
For the ruins are piled up high.

ODE TO HGCI.

O, calomel! O, calomel!
I love you, yes, I do
Like !

As George was going out one night,
His mother questioned, "Whither?"
And George, not wishing to deceive,
With blushes answered "With'er."








64 THE ZONIAN.


"Oh, mother, may I go out to swim?"
"Oh, yes, my darling daughter,
But hang some clothes on each pretty limb,
For the police insist you oughter."

The cat that nightly haunts my gate,
How heartily I hate her;
Some night she'll come and mew 'til late,
And then I'll mew-ti-later.

The grind just murders every quiz;
While I flunk mine, I must confess;
But would I change my. marks for his?
Hell, yes!

Landers.-"Say, Brady, if Shakespeare was
alive now he'd be looked on as quite a remarkable
man, wouldn't he?
Brady.-"Sure, he'd be 300 years ,Ih1!"

Icy sidewalks all remind us
That we should have a lot of sand
Or the stars we see may blind us,
When
we


SAD BUT S\\H -. .

Elois Pearson. '21.

First it was the beautiful violet blue eyes that
attracted the attention of the man; eyes shaded
by bng, thick, black lashes and well-shaped,
black brows. Then her gollcn brown hair that
fell in soft waves around a pretty forehead. A
very pretty chin; a perfect cupid's bow mouth;


a little delicate nose; beautiful, soft, round, blush-
ing cheeks and pretty little pink ears claimed his
attention. Then he noticed her perfect dress;
her small white hands and soft round arms; her
dainty ankles and her fairy feet. With a thought
of his 200-pound wife he turned away and said
with a sigh, "Oh, what a pity that all women
aren't as perfect as that dress form!"



AN INCID1-NT IN THE SPANISH CLASS.

Cornelia van Harde:e!d, '21.

It was one of those hot, sultry days when you
just pray for the least excuse to giggle or make any
kind of a disturbance. Spanish III class was
at the board conjugating irregular Spanish verbs.
George was writing by the window, and, gazing
down the long sun-baked, deserted, cement walk,
he saw a Jamaican banana vender, with her tray
balanced on her head.
M la rjric was in the middle of a recitation when
the whole class looked up in astonishment and
burst out laughing. There in the door stood the
negress, barefooted, with her ragged skirt tucked
well up out of her way, her tray of fruit on her
head, and an expectant grin on her shiny black
face.
Miss Frost looked quite stern, but had hard
work to keep from joining in the merriment.
"\\hat do you want?" she said.
"De young gentleman, him call me, mom,"
said the n"gre., courtesying and pointing to
George who was perusing his Spanish grammar
very diligently.
"I'm sure he doesn't want you now; this is a
school."
"Oh, mom, I begs your pardon, mom, I didn't
mean for to break into de class."
At this, the negress left and we heard her grum-
bling as she went down the stairs: But, chuck,
mon, him try to play poppy jokes on dis old
nigger, dem is always humbugging me. My f i.der,
King George -
Miss Frost turned to George, and said:
"G(Corg., you may report to me at 3 o'clock
and conjugate the verb 'to buy'."






THE ZONIAN.


Phone: 1031 Panama P. 0. Box 55, Ancon, C. Z.

BOWDRY
T.71 "The Busiest Store on the Isthmus"

DESIGNERS, IMPORTERS, BUILDERS

ON AMERICAN MILLINERY AND DRESS PARLORS

ISADORA BOWDRY, Proprietor




Oppst A o l'I(Yorr name here

Opposite Ancon Post Office No. 1-3 Calle 4 de Julio Panama





SWhen in Panama

SDO NOT FAIL TO CALL AT

R I% The French Bazaar





7 pi P" \ AN. 1Headquarters for Parisian Novelties


PANAMA
N COLON
SPARIS S



MR 77349--5
~;L): L ~:: ,~,i~i~.~~ i'Ll CM
hlK 773~FN






THE ZONIAN.


SPALAIS ROYAL J. S. Pereira, Prop. T,

We Specialize in Men's Clothes
I READY MADE SEMI-READY MADE TO ORDER
ALL KINDS OF Corner Central Avenue and Ninth Street
HABERDASHERY PANAMA




SY MILBURY
ATLANTIC

Sweaters I
w ,A
i ; s Bathing Apparel

Bath and Lounging Robes :
LINES OF DISTINCTION
Largest Line Manufactured in America ..,
;,. Over 500 different styles
.i All prices at the bottom -'
EXCEPTIONAL VALUES I
TO" Send for net price list for large dealers -
MILLS: Rabwa%, N J.
-" SALEFPOOMS- 513 Broadway,d
'*;. **"- New York Ciy .--- .- a .




1 The Electrical Store
ret) CARDOZE & LINDO
----- PANAMA CITY
'.. Phone 323 P. O. Box 112
Dealers in UNIVERSAL Heating Devices
S- We Back the Quality with Our Guarantee
iE MM HNENAMENERMERMERN





THE ZONIAN.


^ T

k IA A














UNi S Car C
. i i' "' -4' "" *I f -ii. .'





1 U4 7-1
- i~~ ROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y.
'-, ,. ,,.- .r /


"NI.., I -- - .


^ At the Traps Use



?BLACK SHELLS
Smokelej- and Black Powderj Hi
B,


SUnited States Cartridge Company
SIII ROADWAY, NEW YORK, N.Y.

'M-- - -- -- -- ** -- -~ ~2 5C ~ *i -- _ --- .----------






THE ZONIAN.


Stationery Office

n For the School Supplies
I and the Home ..AT WHOLESALE
,ME Trade Mark
CORRESPONDENCE WITH MERCHANTS AND LARGE CONSUMERS INVITED

SBooks Games Toys Novelties
The Largest Wholesale Distributors in North America

S THE AMERICAN NEWS COMPANY, INC.
S9-11-13-15 PARK PLACE NEW YORK CITY
~~~ic~~~~~~~z~~~~~~~~~i ~i.~i~ON


F. ,- --~





SPALDING
M For more than 40 years 1
SSPALDING Athletic Goods
have been the Standard by
which quality is judged.
Just as good" is never just the same. -
SA. G. Spalding & Bros. m
S126 NASSAU STREET NEW YORK 2
MADURO BROS.
Agents for Panama
-*.---.*-*.w a cc, l
' %'SL4t'4.^ 24^ i^C


SSome things that will please
N ~ the BOYS and the GIRLS
Winchester Junior Rifle Corps

SRange Kit and Junior
STrapshooting Outfit g

| Small Caliber Rifles and Shotguns
Colt's Automatic Pistols and Revolvers
for Target Practice
'. Yale Bicycles Iver Johnson Bicycles
Pocket knives Roller Skates
Call or write for information
M EMANUEL LYONS
SGeneral Hardware Store
, 14 Central Avenue, Panama City 7"-
R 9^t'Mta't'wiaaa'~iwTasi'aa






THE ZONIAN. 69



S_ Q Speaking of

I Photographs!

R 'If You Want
One That is Artistic,
FI Does You Credit, and
S- Is of the Best Quality



ON I
SEE

ENDARA


| The High School Seniors
-Recommend His Work


LOCATION
1- CONVENIENT ACCESSIBLE
Near Cable Office on
.". CENTRAL AVENUE
Phone 386





ROBERT C. SMITH

PANAMA Opposite Smallwood Bros. Phone Corporation 218

g Tailor and Dry Cleaner

MR 77349-6





THE ZONIAN.


Be particular about the chocolates you eat!
I Insist upon the best-it can be had by specifying m


owne S


(3oco ates
Large assortments on sale at all Clubhouses and Commissaries
The Walter M. Lowney Company, Boston, Mass.
J. D. MAXWELL, Representative, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



SPICTURES! Taken of anything, at anytime, and anywhere


.. ... WE SPECIALIZE IN ...'.
Quality Portraits


THE MARINE STUDIO
iog CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA CITY |
;A ^





THE ZONIAN.


The Robbins Company : ATTLEBORO, MASS.
SCHOOL JEWELRY CLASS RINGS AND PINS
__ TROPHY PLAQUES PRIZE CUPS MILITARY INSIGNIA
CONVENTION NOVELTIES ADVERTISING
BADGES



M Panama Agencies R M BASTIAN BROS CO.
R Company MANUFACTURERS OF
SPANAMA CRISTOBAL BALBOA M Class Pins
Largest steamship agents on the Isthmus. Class Rins
S Prompt and efficient service. 01 ClaSS RingS M
SAthletic Medals
SReceivers and Forwarders of _
Cargo.
ENGRAVED COMMENCEMENT
Stevedoring and all branches of ENGRAVED COMMENCEMENT
Steamship Business. ANNOUNCEMENTS
General Importers, Exporters, AND
and Commission Agents. INVITATIONS .. CALLING CARDS

Write us. All inquiries answered promptly. R 595 Bastian Building
Cable address: "PANACO," Panama ROCHESTER, N. Y. A





Engravings for this annual furnished by N
RICHARD 0. BOLDT CO., Denver, Colorado

B~B~~B~BUQ. ~~(s~B~ss.~BI~MN






THE ZONA.N.


Method of Reproduction


4iTO


THE Tone Am-
plifier has s.,l ed
an old problem in
acoustics. Itis oval-
shaped and molded
of rare hollywood.
Like the sound-
ing board of a fine
piano, it is built
entirely of wood.
It is absolutely free
from metal.
By the Bruns-
wick method of pro-
jecting sound, tone
waves are unre-
stricted and are
allowed to unfold
into full, rich, mel-
low, and above all,
natural tones.
Brunswick Records will be welcomed as
the highest and most perfect expression
now available of the science and art of tone
recording.


Brunswick has a history of 75 years
of success. Its destiny is guided
by some of the ablest executives in
American industry. Its financial
resources are unlimited.


The Brunswick-
Balke-Collender
Company
EXPORT OFFICE
35 West 32d Street
New York City, U. S. A.
Cable Address: BRUNSWICK
Catalogues and prices, including
special information for dealers,
will be sent on request.


A CHANGE has
come about in
the music world.
People no longer
are satisfied with
j u s t "a" phono-
graph-they know
how to make com-
parisons and to
judge.
T he Brunswick
Phonograph will be
known to music
lovers the world
over for its marvel-
ous method of re-
production.
The ( Ir.,na is a
scientific, patented
Brunswick creation.
It pla.- all records
intinitclr better. It
involves a genuine
fundamental principle of reproduction.
There is no metallic sound, or quiver, no
machine sound to disturb the sensitive ear.
It is unli k any other phonograph or talking
machine. It is a mechanical achievement.


~


~~t~~S~~~~~~~~~~~~'~i~~~~f~~~~~J~~iS~i~L


n ' I


I





THE ZONIAN.


FADAMS
PURE CHEWIP UM


I One Oualitv


All Flavors
You can buy ADAMS Gum in
any flavor-from licorice to
peppermint or tutti-frutti.
Select your favorite-then
note the name ADAMS on the
package: it means absolute
purity and highest quality.
Use it regularly.

Everywhere
cC


N.


I


i
ki


,' '.'


TELEPHONE 329
COLON


J D. MAXWELL
Representative for the Canal Zone and Republic of Panama


P. 0. BOX 5026
CRISTOBAL


. .... i;


6 *-i;.


..






THE ZONIAN.


You

M can have no greater assur-
M ance of Quality at the soda
_ fountain than the presence
M of the "True Fruit" label. S" H
STRAWBERRY


M J. HUNGERFORD SMITH
COMPANY
f ROCHESTER NEW YORK



g YOU CAN'T PUT DIMMERS ON THE SUN
SBut you can do what amounts to the same thing -you can obtain a lens that takes the
danger out of sun-glare or strong artificial light.
GENUINE SIR WVM. CROOKS' LEvNS
have a delicate, almost indistinguishable tint that gives them their remarkable ability
to absorb the actinic rays so dangerous to the human eye.
STHE SCADRON GPTICAL COMPANY
PANAMA: 23 Central Avenue COLON: 44 Front Street




''I@ T.




























































(old Storaz, Plint at Mt. Hlone, '. Z


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THE ZONIAN.


NO Wie appreciate to the fullest extent
Sthe etlp giben bp *tate!' anb local ab=
bertiaers in making tbii is'ue of "ETje
Zonian" a financial success anb bespeak
for them tbe patronage of our manp
friends.
--..u.ine s --anager.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

1931 .. . ZONIAN . There \88. palm heefde "/Y''l op'eT1 '1 Wftose f,..o"d.s t e Souihe.,.." Shlt"les -ij,'I"'OlJ,9h_ '. -, .'

PAGE 2

.. "IF" IF YOU can keep your head when aU about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; If you caD trust yourself when all men dou bt But make allowance for their doubting, tooi If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don't deal in lies, Or being bated, don't give way to hating, And yet doo't look too good, nor talk too wise; IF YOU can dream-and Dot make dreams your master i If you can tbink-and not make thoughts your aim, If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster And treat those two impostors just the same; If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trop forfools, Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, And stoop and build 'em up with wornout tools; IF YOU can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-aDd-toss, And lose. and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you EJ:cept the Will which says to them: "Hold on!" IF YOU can talk wi th crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with Klngs-not lose the common touch, H neither foes nor Joving friends can hurt you, If all men count with you, but none too much; If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds' worth of distance run, Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, And-which is morc-you'll be a man, my son! -RUDYARD KIPLING

PAGE 3

THE ZONIAN \'01. XII Bwil/in .\lanagtr Cirm/alion Edi l o r E "'c/uwge Edit or Slall Artist Zoni : m Staff Editori. d GraJu:ttes Facultr F ;)r Valu e R ect!iveJ The F ollies Young and OIJ In the Heart of a C,.psr. Cristobal C oa l ing Station Sp: lOish Sketche; A Trip into t h e Interio r S:1owballs in Panama Panama-A L egend B -\LBOA CA:-;.-\1. ZO:-;E, '9" PUBLI S H E D BY THE HI G H SC H OOL Zonian E:lil ar-i1J.CIJi4 CHARLES A. G:t03:: THEODORE C. K!"Arp Jok( Edit;)r LEOS'ARD LANDERS SOcitl." Editor i\lAEJ. \\'n':-;E 1 !umn; Editor HAROLD .-{thltlir EI:I:)r (Bop) ,-{/h't/ir Editor ( Gi rls), ETHE.L G':T:'I \" CO:-\TE:\TS. ;\('.1 G .:::nc::. 0 \!'\SKIS' C\T:I::;:\'''F: B. PAR"I E TER Rur:-t C. 3.:1\ 0 \\'llll.\\1 S.\RCES'T CHARLES :\. Gaoo,;: Last \\'lil and T e.>t:tmc:lt of f he Cl:tss of '21, G "::l.T:l.L'O;;: VAS H \'tOZVELD 35 3, 3 8 :\LfRED T. j a. r..1 AE j \\\'!"!"E [1,1 \r.,tE \HO:o.' A!"ITA \\'000 Locls O'BRIE:" " s 7 9 '22 .J! Clase; .. Cbss PL.r S.):i:rr B oys' R tsked).d! TC10l Athl etics, B J)'s' .>\thletics Girl,,' Ex c h .lnges Alumni j.lkcs. Sad bu t Swec, r..IARIE r..:c.\I AHo:-o \\'!I.LI \\1 S\-,CS:ST ETHF.I r. S. GE.T\l \!'O J. \\\-. Rt:fH C. B ..... Yi) GEO G: O -\NSK[S' ELOIS PEARSON :\n Incice:lt in the Ci.lss. CORSELIA .' .3 . 50 5 57 6, 6 A Senior Trip [ 0 Pearl Isl ands LAWRENCE HonE B ROw .... M AE j ... GERTRUDE H \l.D:'VEl D VA;.l HARDEVELD 33 tJ6jJ9-o I

PAGE 4

FOR E W O RD \\'e w i s h t o take thi s rneans o f t h ankin g all o f t hose w h o have h e lped to make t h i s issu e o f t h e a s u ccess E s p ec iall y d o w e t h a n k t h e stafF o f The Pan::.ma Canal f o r t h e "fath e r l y interest" t hey have t a k e n in u s \\'e a lso wa n t to t h al1k t h e Abou S aacl T empl e f o r t h e use o f t heir mosq u e for ou r dan ce and to t h a n k QlIf faculty for t hl.: h e l ping han d w h i c h t h ey h ave

PAGE 5

THE ZON I AN. EDITDIlIAL PERSON. -\L EFFORT. "Som e body said it co ul dn'r b e don e, But, h e with a c hu ckle r e pli ed, "That may b e it couldn' t bu t h e w o uldn't b e o n e Wh o w o uld s a y so 'till h e ha d tri ed." S o h e buckle d right in with a t r ace o f a grin On his face. Ifhe worri ed h e hid it. H e started to s in g a s h e tackled the t h ing That cotddn'[ b e done, and-h e did i t. Some students in Balboa H i g h Sc h oo l are doing poo r w ork. H o w many o f LIS wh e n w e come to a thing whic h i s a little bit hard are willin g to HOh, I can't do that," or to hide b e hin d t h e o l d exc u se that o n e can't b e ex p ec ted to do as muc h in the t r o pi cs as in t h e States o r e l se wh e r e. That i s an excuse whic h absolutely can n o t h o l d wate r. Balbo a High Sc hool graduates have gone to som e o f the best colleges in the LJnited States. The majority o f th ese graduates rank with t h e leader s in the ir cla sses Thi s goes to s how that w e can get as muc h out o f sc h oo l o n t h e Canal Z o n e as stude n ts do in t h e States r t w ould b e imposs i bl e f o r anyone to go to college and d o good work if h e lacked t h e elementary training. ] am sure that if w e w ould jus t apply t h e the m e of the little ver ses quoted above and, when w e corne to a thing whi c h is hard, sit right down, put in the effort and stay with it until we have finished Somebody scoA-'ed, "Oh you'lI never l:O t hatA.t least n o aile ever has done it." Bu t h e took off his coat and h e took off h is hat A.nd t h e first thing we knew he'd begu n it. \\'ith a l ift orhis c hin, and a bit of a grin, \\"ithout any doubting or quiddit. H e started to si n g and h e tackled t h e t h ing That couldn't be done, and-h e d i d it." t h en we could with a s mil e of satisfaction say that w e have done something w hich perhaps not half of t h e rest o f the class have done. \\'e mus t not get too ambitious, however, and look at things in a selfis h manner and stri\"c for p ersonal glor)', for it is teamwork that wins t h e day ever y time I n athletics the s u ccess ful team is th e one t hat has every player puning in t h e best in him and the one that ha s all its members working togeth er. : \ team may be composed of star p layers and ret l ose mOSt of its games because some one o f its is str i\ ing to gain personal glory rath e r than working with the rest o f th e team. S o come on, Balboa H igh School! Let more of u s tackle som e of t h ese t hings that can't be don e and, let's do them! CUARLES A GROBE, '21,

PAGE 6

I vr THE ZONIAN CHARLES A. GROBE, Pre;idm/. I n jo},s, in grief, in triumphs, in retreat, Great always, without aiming to b e g reat." THEODORE C. KNAPP, Pia Presidml. "I know thee for 3 man of many th oughts." ELO I S PEARSON, Surflary and Trrosurrr. "But to s ee her was to love her; Love but her and l ove forever." \\'I LLlA M H AI. I .EN. . '" A lazy lolling sort, Uns een at c hurch, a t senate, or at court.

PAGE 7

T H E ZONIA"'-ELEANOR. D BELLO. "Her l ooks do argue h e r replete with modesty," H.AUY E. BISSELL. Tho u Ethe l t h ou has metanlorph os'd me; me neg l ect In)' studie s, l ose my time. ALICE CHI TAYLOR BLEAKLEY. "Ther could not deem meane of s u c h; I stood Among t h em, but n o t o f them. ANNI E IRENE Bon). "There was a so f t and pensive grace, A cast of t h o u g h t upo n h er face."

PAGE 8

6 THE ZO',l l AN. ] {urH CAmERINE Bm'D. "She t hat respects h e r self is safe from oth ers ; S h e wears a coat of mail that n o n e ca n pierce CAMI'BELL, J R "A l ittle row-headed good-for-no thing, And mi s chiefm a k ing monkey fr o m hi s birth." GEORGE L. CAIWELL. "\\'e ll, then, the wor ld's mine Whi c h I with swo r d will open Gf.ORGE W DANs K I N "Th,1f he i s mad, 'tis tru c 'tis true, 'tis pit}'; And pity 'lis 'r;" true.

PAGE 9

THE ZO T I A N L. : \ 0 1 seAS'. L ife s a jest, and all thing<; .. how it: I t hough t so once, but now I "nnw 11." ETHI. P S. I Ll1l to t h ee, blithe spirit." ;\1 \RGARr PHYLLIS 1 I AI..I.IOAl>.. A dancing s hape, an image gay, T o haunt, to startle, and warla}." G.RTRl'DE \1. J O HS. .... of H er face; W here thoughts serenely sweet c>.prc ...... I l ow pur.:, h ow dear, their dwcl1m,; pl.lte. 7

PAGE 10

THE ZONIAN. CATHERINE l\1. JeW::. B right as the sun h er eyes t h e gazers strike, And, like the sun, they shine on :'Ill alike." LEONAftD E. LA:-:DERS. "0, what mar man wit hin him h ide, T houg h angel on the outwar d side F ORIENET C B r own e yes wit h wondr o u s witc h ing c h arm T o bring u s good o r to work us h arm f\tARI E E. l\t c MAHOS. "Behol d [he c h ild, by nature's kin d l y l aw Pleased with a rattle tic kled wit h a s t raw.

PAGE 11

THE ZONIAN. L OUIS j B e thou, spirit fierce, /'IIy spi rit! B e thou me, impetuous onc." BERNICE "Oh! blest with a temper whose unclouded ray Can make to-morrow cheerful as to.d,,}'." ELIZABETH TWITCHELL. "Be silent always, when rOll doubt your sen s e i\nd speak, tho' sure, with seeming diffidence," COR SELIA C. VA:" HAltOE\,ELD. She doet h little Whi c h most 1e:1\' c undone or despise."

PAGE 12

) 0 THE ZO:\ l -\:\ : ------------------------LJERTRlOE C,\Rot.n; \'AX' HARDE\'EI.D. I had rather n:lve a fool to make me menr Than experience to make me sad." .\J.\\" \\'ICGIX". ht.:r oice W;\!j ever :.oft; Gelltle. and ,!ow; an excelle n t thintt in \\OI1l:ln. :'11\1:: .IE _","ErrF. \\\-"E. I'"or If l>hc will, she will, you mar dCI>cnd on't; And if she won't, !oh e won't; so t h ere s a n end on't,"

PAGE 13

THE ZON I AN. !'; jfacuitp. !li-A. R LANG, Supe rillI C ndl'n/ of Calltl l Z OJlt! Schooh II e --HAZEL C. J A RI IS. B S., Univ e r s it y of Califo rnia. A. B., N ebras ka \\'es leyan Uni ve r sity. POSt Gra duate, Univer s it y o f Califo rnia. A. L lnive r sity o f :'\ ebras ka. r. X. KARRER, .r1sS i s l nlll10 Sup erilllt?lIdnll, \\'ilso n 's J \ l ode rn Bus in ess C ollege, Seattle. \\' a s hin groll Stare :\' ofl11al S c h ool, Elle n sburg A. B., Unive r sity o r \\"as hington. 1 \1. A., C o llllllbia L 'nive r sity 1\1. Pd. i\Tew Y o rk Uni ve r sity BERNA RD L. B oss, Pr iJlc ipnJ. Grauuatt: w ork, O s hk os h \\' iscon sin State N o r mal S c h ool. Ph B., L 1nive r s ity o f \\' i sco n s in. Grad e w o rk o f i sco n s in. Sc il'1JCe. OLGA J FROST. A B., i\l o lllH St. \ 'in cent-o n H udson. }-"C}JC/t tl n d S p /lJlislJ. EDNA L \ B AER. A. B Univ e r sity of \\'i sco n sin. S h e b oygan Bu s in ess C ollege Gre g g S c h ool. C o mmer c iI'; Subja/ s Scil'II{f. B. B L : C KERID(.E. B. S L lniver s ity o f i\l i sso uri. Ellg/ish CH \ Ri\IIAX E. 51) A. B., A.. i\I., ofOklaho m:l. E n glish a n d La/in. H A T T I E B. P A L 'L. B A 1\1. A. Univ e r s it y of Ca l if o rni:l. S p a n ish find I l is/o r\'. : \ BEASLEY DENN"\'. R. A.) o f T ex:1s 1 \ / a/ilt lIIa/ic s. L O A FO::'TER. B ra d ley I n d iana State N o rmal. H o u sehold /11'1.1. W ALLACE LEE. W oos t e r Coll ege. A/t ll/ual Training. !Ii .:.Ii

PAGE 14

12 THE ZONIAN FOR Y ALUE RECEIVED. Aljrtd T. Clifton, Jr., '23-The s un r ose in a blaze over th e rim o f the South P acific, lighting u p a br oad ex pan se of heaving ocean, voi d of ever y thing, save f o r a tiny spec k on the far-oft western h orizo n. A s o n e neared this spec k, it gradually f ormed it self int o a n i s land. I t was about a J'niie in l e ngth, flat and densely wooded, except at the northern end, where a s har p hill rose abruptly about 300 feet, covered with sparse grass and a few trees s truggling f o r n o urishment among th e l oose r oc k s and bou lders. -".t the baseof the hill was a s mall harbo r with a sandy beach, where tiny waves lapp ed gently on the shore. But the t hin g one n oticed firs t was a small sailing s hip lying at a n c hor with her b o w roward t h e s h ore, and o n h e r stern in n ea t bla c k letters t h e words Pricilla East H arniss, L\1ass The Priscilla belonged to Capt. Josiah Whi tley, an ex-sea captai n a n d a man of w ea l t h an d sense H e, like many o th e r o l d "salts" h ad saved more money t h a n most peopl e t hought, a n d n o w was taking a p l eas ur e trip among th e S o uth S ea I s lands, accompanied by his nep h e w Larry B arnes. The Priscilla was o f th e s am e build as most fis hing smacks seen off th e cod banks o f except that s h e ha d b ee n overhaul ed and h ad h ad more s leepin g quarters in stalled; and a l so t hat s h e h ad b ee n divested o f that extremely "fis h y" odor that almost invari ably accompanies m ost vessels o f h er kind. On board, all was s ilent, save f o r the c r eak ing of tackle as the s hip swayed gently wit h the t i de. Suddenly a boy appeared out of t h e stern hatch way and stood for a mom e nt surveying the lan dscape, then advanced to the b ow where, l eani n g on the rail, h e sc rutiniz ed interested l y th e bay and shore. I t was Captain Whitley's n ep h ew, Larry Barn es Larry was a b oy o f about 7; well built, and had dark, c url y h air and c h est nu tbrown eyes. His face was tanned by t h e sun and wind, and was rather good to l oo k at. L arry was a true specimen of the type o f boy t hat grows into a tfue and sincere man. As L arry stood watching th e s h ore in th e hope of seeing some inhabitant of th e i s land, th e member s of the c r ew of the Priscilla appea r ed o ne by one and b ega n putting thing s in o rder and clea ring t h e dec k s, as on l y th e absolutel y ne cessa ry thing s ha d b een done th e night b e f o r e whe n th e s hip dropped anchor. Soon Captain Whitl ey appeared and str olled up to wh e r e L arry wa s standin g. I Vlorning, L arry," h e sa id, "what do you think of th e i s land?" "Oh, good m o rning U n cle J oe," r e pli ed L arry, wh e n h e h e ard his uncle's voi ce \ Vhy, to tell th e trut h 1 don't think mu c h of it, so far. Ar e you s ur e t h ere ar e peopl e living o n i t?" "It's m arked 'in habit e d on the c h art," declared Captain Whitl ey "Mayb e it's a mistake, but I guess w e'll find out pretty soon, because if th e r e are p eop l e living h ere, th ey'll lik e l y b e c uri o u s e n o ugh to investigate u s." I s ure h ope t h ere a r e peopl e h e re, and that w e c an get a f e w p earls," s aid Larr y a s thi s was their firs t stop since th ey had l e f t P a n a ma. The Captain a n d Lar ry exc h anged ideas for som e time m ore, t h e latter h opi n g all th e tim e that som e b ody w ould appea r o n s h o re. Finally th e breakfast go ng rang, and h e f ollowed his uncl e b e l o w with out having be e n r e ward e d i n his sea r c h Aft e r br ea kfa s t h e eagerly soug h t t h e dec k again, but was s till d i sappointed Fin ally h e determin ed to ask his uncl e to l e t him r o w a s h ore. H e wa s jus t abo ut to enter th e hatchway wh e n a s udden s h out d r e w his atte nti o n to t h e s h ore There h e saw a numbe r o f natives running down the beach t oward th e wat er, some firing gu n s as they r a n Suddenly one who seemed t o b e th e l eader, h eld up his han d f o r th e r es t t o stop firing. The n L arry noti ced ano th er native in t h e water, swi mmin g toward t h e Priscilla. "Uncle J oe!" called L arry. "What's up?" ca m e his un c l e s voice fro m bel ow. "Com e up o n deck, qui c k!" answered Larr y, watc hin g close ly t h e s wimming native, a s were all the crew o n deck

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T H E ZONIAN. '3 Soon t h e Captain appeared. When he saw what was happening, h e took h is pipe f rom his mouth, and going t o t h e r a i l, looked closely at t h e scene being enacted. \ Vhe n the swimmer was about hal fway from the bea c h to the smac k, Larry saw that h e was beginning to tire, although h e had only swam about 150 yards. Evidently h e had been pursued through the woods befo r e h e t oo k to the water, and the chase and swim added, was telling on him. The leader of the party on the shore had foreseen this, and as the ship wa s twice as far from the opposite shore, and as h e lp from the ship was certainly not to be counted on, the object of his late c ha se could be safely permitted to swim in reality out to the s hark s As all this came to Larry, a cold wave of h orro r swept over him. H e'll never make it," h e mut tered h oarse l y The native was about 50 feet from t h e Priscilla when a s harp fin cut the water about 10 yards to the l e ft. I t moved s lowly through the water, describing an arc behind the struggling man, and gradually disappeared, only to appear again coming ba c k. Evidently the swimmer had seen it. He tried to swim faster but could not. H e was alm os t exhausted. Finally h e rai sed hi s head and looked toward the ship, a l oo k o f mute agony and appeal in his eyes. The s hip was his only hope. Larry hesitated n o longer. Rippingolfhis shirt, he was soon over the rail and moving swiftly thr o ugh the water toward the native, who was now bare ly making headway. L arry! Come ba c k here!" roar ed Captain \Vhitley, but in vain. 1 n a minute Larr)" was ba ck at the s hip' s side again and the native, n o w unconscious, was lifted on board and takel1 b e low. The shark had beel1 frightened away by the commotio n ca used by L arry's appearance in the water. On s h ore, t h e l e ader's rag e was t e rribl e to see. H is followers scattered in all directions before him. H e thr e w his weapons into th e sea ; and gouged great furrows in the sand with hi s hands and feet, sending it everywhe r e Gradually h e calmed down and, calling on all his crude gods, vowed vengeance on the white man who had cheated h im of his pre)'. Fi n all)' h e strode il1to t h e woods and disappeared. Aboard the Priscilla after the native had been brought to consciousness, Captain Whitley called L arry aside. "Larry" h e said, "you did a somewhat rash thing. This f e llow ma), b e an el1emy of the tribe or tribes livil1gOl1 the i s lal1d. ]fhe i s, it ma)" b e necessary f o r us to l eave very soon, if we don't want a pack of cannibals down o n us; and as we've gone this far we couldn't leave this fellow h ere to be murdered, so we may have a wild man to tak e care of." I 'm sorry, Uncl e Joe," replied Larry, "but it was m ore than ( could stand to see the poor fellow out there with that s hark swimming around him. I did the only thil1g I could have done'" "\Y e ll, we'll have to make the best o f it as it is," soliloquized his lIncie, and that e l1ded the conversation Two h ours later, as th e Captain and Larry wer e sitting on deck the former said, Larry let's go see if that fellow can speak English, by an)' chance. The native was lying in a berth in the one extra stateroom the small ship contained. H e appeared to be asleep, but when h e h eard the man and b o)', h e opened his e),es al1d looked lip Are you th e boy that saved Azuni from drowning?" h e asked in El1glish, 1 00kil1g at Larr), The latters jaw dropped about 6 inches. Captain \\ hitl e)' s pipe fell from his teeth. This was more than they had expected. H\\'h-what the --?" L arry managed to splutter. Y o u are surprised that :\zuni talks English," said the native with a smil e "1 m y masters wis h T will tell them m)' story .. "Yo u bet!" exclaimed Larr)" interestedly, at the same time seating himself beside his uncl e on the oth er berth which the room contained. "Azuni was born on this island 30 years ago. i\l y father was the chief of the AWI1 tribe. When ] was 9, a ship ca m e h e r e missionaries of the white man' s God went to my peopl e and taught them the white man' s religion. They told my father they would take me and teach m e the white man' s language, and how to read and write, and after mll c h talk, my father consented. For 5 years I lived with the missionaries and learned to read and write the white man's language. Then I return ed hom e, and w h en my fath er died, to years ago, 1 became c h ief of the tribe, as I still am.

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T H E Z O N I A r .. ,,'hire men have sometimes come to this isla nd, and we have traded pearl s and s h ells for t h e w h i t e man's guns and powtler a n d t h i ngs we coul d not make One when peop le we r e divin g for pearls, the chief o f the tribe o n an isla n d near here, was \ 'isiting m e \ Y e were talking togeth e r w hen an old rnan o f my tribe came u p to m e H e h e l d Ollt his hand to m e and in it was t h e largest pearl c \'er f ound here. I [ was about t h e s ize o f t h e fir s t joint o f my t humb. For my master,' h e said and srumbled off', I a n d my f r ie n d s tared at it. H e rnk it OJ[ of my hand anJ I saw h is eyes l ig h t with greed. H e retu rn ed t h e pearl a n d soon a fter h e l e ft f o r his i land. ..\s his canoe p u s hed of r, h e turned and said. 'Som e day I s h all have YOllr pearl.' I laugh ed and t h o u ght noth in g o f it, but a m onth late r -two days ago--h e a ppeared with h i s warriors a n d s a i d h e had come f o r pearl. The n began t h e battl e \\e d rove t h em back, but not off t h e is l a n d Y esterday I and my wa rri o r s went out against th e m. I wa s separated a n d ha d to Aee a n d h ide. This morning ( h e r discovered m e a n d gave chase. The r es t my master k nows, except that (h e pearl is hidden in my hut; and m y tri be, 1 am S llre, i s s till h o lding out. was trying to s w i m t o t h e village w h e n 111)' l11aster's son ?" h e sai d ( h e last rne " He's my uncl e said Larry, a fter a si l e n ce lasting som e minutes Y ou'd better go to s leep now," said Captain Whitley, t h o u g h tful l y, "Com e o n Larry. That evening t h ree natives paddl ed o u t to t h e PriJCilla from t h e p oint w here A z uni had sai d his v illa ge w as situated. B y vari o u s s i g n s sai d th ey w i s h ed t o see A zuni Afte r a s h ort co n s u ltati o n with t h e latte r t h e y took h im a s h o re, a n d afte r h e ha d thanke d Larry a s b es t h e k n e w h o w f o r h i s brave r esc u e T w o d a ys m o r e t h e Priscilla la y a t anc h or; t h e n Captain \\' h itler o rder e d everything prep a r ed f o r departu r e \ V hile t h e o rder s w e r e b e in g ca rri ed out, a c a n oe put out fr o m t h e p o int w h e r e } \ z uni had landed. Larry w h o was o n deck n oticed, a s it d r e w n eare r that it conta ined A z uni h i m se lf. T h e canoe drew al o n gs ide and A z uni climbed to t h e deck. w o u l d s p eak with m y m as t e r h e said, at t h e sam e time unty i n g a s m all pou c h fr o m his g ir d l e This i s t h e pearll tol d yo u of," h e continued as h e d r e w t h e baubl e fr o m i t s pou c h L a rry took i t car e full y wit h a s m othe r ed cry o f surprise H e c all ed h i s uncle and t h e n turned to t h e examinat i o n o f t h e pearl. \Vhile A zuni and h i s uncl e w e r e tal k i ng, h e a n d a few o f t h e c r e w surveyed i t w i t h inter est, un t i l h e h eard h i s uncle's voi ce s a y Good-b ye A zuni, w h e n h e look ed u p and f o u n d A z un i g o n e A z uni! Y our pearl!" h e c ri e d a s h e ran to t h e r a il. T h e n a ti ve wa s JUS t pus h in g o f F in his ca n oe. H e looked up a n d a s mi l e flitted a c r oss h i s face. "The pearl i s yours," h e s ai d A zuni does n o t f o r ge t sllc h deeds as yours and h e tu rn e d and p a d dled s w i ftly to s h o r e w h e re, afte r runn in g h i s can oe lip o n t h e beach h e waved h i s hand and t h e n d i s appeared into t h e f o r es t. T H E SEC RET O F SUC C ESS. T h e stamp sai d i s s t icking to it. T o s ucceed, said t h e k n i f e b e bri g h t a n d s h a r p. Keep up to clate said t h e cal e ndar. D on't knock, it' s o l d fas hioned, s a id t h e e lectri c b e ll. 1) 0 a driving bus in ess, said t h e hammer. And the barre l said, never l ose yo u r h ead. light of everything, th e fir e o b se r ved. But a lways keep coo l, said t h e i ce A spi r e to grater thing s sa i d t h e nutmeg.

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T H E ZO;-,TI AN. 5 AuconHO:!pit:l\Groundi.

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16 THE ZONIA THE i\J10:--rI GHT FOLLIES. Mae J. 11'y,-mz, ';u. Of cou rse it start ed all sor t s of con j ec tures when appea r ed in sc h oo l Tuesday morning wit h an unmistakable bla c k eye It ha d occurred o n ce o r twi ce before-on ce when I wa s a m e r e infant in th e seco n d or third graJe an.! b ea t u? th e b oy door, anti once after a ba s k e t ball ga m e with the class of'20 But this time 1 had n o ba s k e t ball alibi and kn ew b etter than to attempt th e w ellknown ficti o n about stubbing my toe and falling downst airs, so I s imply baffl ed th e m all with a tantalizing air o f mystery. Then the Slar & H erald Aaunt d 6-inc h h"dlines: Pete \\"illiams in hands of thief an...l gunman captured "\\'ord carne to liS late las t nig ht," and so f o rth and so 011. J o hn Peter W illiams ha s b een the i do l of Panama's la w l ess e lement f or m : m ths H e i s our one mel od ramati c c hara c t er R o man ce's faithful standb y gunman, thi ef, wi z ard, and general all-ar ou n d ba d man H e u sed t o b e a harm less, commonpla ce youn g n egro But o n o ne evil day h e sought a n d obtlined e mployment in "",Iiller's Specialty Sh op \\' hil e the r e h e spent his time vorac i o u s l y reading everythin g h e could lay his h a nds on, ra p i d l y devel op ing a taste for dime nO\'c ls, detective stor ies, and penny thrillers. I-Ie was disc h arged by the H o n or abl e B oob :-l iller f o r i d l eness, and being in n eed of a little c hange, e n tered (ul1ill\'ited) a h o use in th e Canal Z one and appropriated th e pr operty o f o n e o f Uncle Sam's employees. F or thi s trifling rnisdemeanor h e was l anded in th e "ca laboose," but not ca rin g f or th e place h e s h o rtl y l e ft, wi tholl t permissio n, and laun c h ed him self fairl y in his "career of cr im e. H e was very spectacular robbing the G over n or, Judge H anan and th e Ancon poSt oRice ; evading capture, b o ldl y appearing in the streets in broad daylig ht, t e aring down the posters offering a r ewa rd for his capture, fighting daily pistol battles with th e Panama police, and generally behaving lik e an id eal bad man. lie amused me anJ I e nj oyed many a heart y laugh ove r the superstitio n of the n e groes w h o claim e d that h e bore a charmed lif e, could turn aside the bullets of the poli ce and c han ge his f orm at will. Nevertheless, Peter \ Villiams-or some of hi s dusky admirers-systematically went through all the h ouses in ou r neighborhood They unlocked the doors and they cut the scree n s; they cleaned off the clothe s lines and they cleaned out the i ce b o xes; and just generally made themselves obno xious But to come t o th e point. I spent the b es t part o f M o nday afternoon in Endara's studio h aving m y "Lonian" picture taken and the rest of th e after no::m s hopping. Had two visitors after s u pper an d when they left settled down to a new magazine and r e ad it through from cover t o cover. The n I decided to do m y s horthan d. B y the time I finish ed it was quite late. Even if the whole family h ad not been asleep I s h o uld ha ve kn ow n it was late be cause I h eard the pop corn wagon pa ss so I l ocked up the h ouse and went to bed. I dreamed that I was blowing soap bubbles, the bigges t o f whic h turned into a red and yellow balloon, and Flori e nct stuck a pin into it. It popped with a terrible noise and w o ke me up. I la y in b e d tre mbling with the s hock of my sudden awak e ning. H ark! \\'hat was that? Surely someon e was walking 011 th e back p o r c h-there's olle b oard t hat a lways creaks unless you know exactly how to step o n it. I lis tened f o r a moment, h o lding m y breath, then sat up cautiousl y Afte r a moment I slid over t h e end of th e b ed to prevent t h e spring frolll squeaking and carefully f elt about w ith my f oot to l ocate my slippers Smoth e ring an excl amati o n as my big to e struck against something h ard, [ stooped with e laborate ca r e and ran my han d along th e A oor until it closed about th e o bject in questi o n, my kid brother's bas e ball bat. I conc luded that it might be useful, also that my s lippers would b e a b o ther. Again carne that o min ous creak of the back porch A oo r Softly and s lowl y I c rept down the hall, testing each

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THE ZO,\IAY b oard wit h Iny foot b e for e trusting it with m y we i g ht, d e t e r m i n e d t hat n o squeak s h o ul d herakl m y ste a l t h y au\' a n ce I suppressed a sc r ea m as I f e l t a hug e cockroac h crawl ( r o m under ba"e f o o t a n d duc k e d a s face c am e in co n t a c t wit h a spi d er's w e b, invis ibl e i n t h e darkn.:ss :-\t last J gai ned t h e doo r to t h e b a c k p orc h Su re e n o u g h. in frollt o f the i ce b o x, diml y silh o u e ned a g ainst t h e s k y wa s it dark, blurred figure Then, o f c o u r se t ht:! inevitable rh e impossible occurre d I s n eezed! A nd it wa s a p erfectly t e rrific s n ee z e \\' hat f ollowed r e mains confused in m y m i n d T h e corner o f the ic e b ox d oo r stru c k m e a wicked blo w o \'er t he e ye-all sorts o f skyroc k e t s w ent oft' there w as a c ra s h of breaking g l ass-a sound o f splas h i n g water t h e "flippity flop" o f m other's slippe r s and a startle d "\\' hat the devil--!" in a fami liar m ascu lin e voice. T h e n som e one t u r ned o n t h e lig h t Y es, i t wa s Dad. had got u p to get a drin k ;\ 1 )' sneeze had startled h im so t hat h e humped against t h e ice ho'l: do:.>r, s hO\ing it in my cye; and dropped jar of ice watc, smashing i t to hits. \\' h e n m'H her on t h e l ig h t so w e sto::>d blinking and ing t h e situati o n. O f course I \ \ "as t,)ld to l''\plain t hc\ ah\-a\'S make 1)lf c'\pJain. I ha.1 tln i sheli all the I r i s h i n Dad came to rhe h e ju;o;t hack h is head ronr'd, an.! afte:-a helpl ess mTllen t'S struggle for s:l f-possessioll, m othe r joined h i m and laug,e I til t h .: tea rs rolk'd dO\\n her c h eeks" A s for me. m\ eYe was h llrti n g too m llc h for Ill'':: to apprecia'te humor of-t h e s ituation. I dropped the hasehall hat w h ic h I still held, a n d fecling \"Cry much hruiscli i n mind and \\"ent h a u g h ti l y hack to bed. YOL ''\G .,\:\1) Ol.\) 1/( 1/,1:011. '21 O h \\' h y c o uldn't s h e h o m e? H e r mother was t o o cru el. \\' hat good w o ul d educatio n do a broke n heart? di d s h e h a ve to go to s.: hool, w h e r e all w o u l d soon kno w o f her d isgrace? S o t h o ught Peg, a s s h e rrudged s l o\\ o n h e r to t h e hate d school. :'\'ot t hat s h e had again s t t h e sch oo l ; it wa s the c hildrL:ll, and esp ec i ally unfaith ful P e t e. She coul d r e al ize that it was b u t la s t week wh e n h e wa s h e r acknowledge d { ellow." Yes, sc hool \\as all righ t the n f o r h e had g alle to and fr o m i t w ith h a and s hl: s a t behind h im" Humph She'd soon fix t h ar! S h e certainly ,,"o u ldn 't s ir there a n other day! T h e u nfaithful t h in g T h e idea of d r o p pi n g h e r f o r t hat n e w girl at sc hool! \\'hat if s h e d i d have curls and was so p r etty? S h e s all o l d (raidcat," t hat's w hat s h e i s \\'e ll, s he'tl s h o w h im h e w a sn't t h e o n ly p ebble o n t h e b e a c h H e r e s h e came in s i g h t o f the sc hool; UpOIl h e r a rrival s h e was surrounded b y a g r o u p o f young playma tes, all anx i olls t o see h o w s h e wa s b e a rin g up; in t h e i r e yes s h e was a h e r oi n e "Oh, Peg," sai d P olly, h e r m os t intimate fri end, '" saw P e t e com e to sc h o o l with to-day;what's the m atte r had anothe r fight?" "MR773492 O h no," languidly repl ied Peg, I'm just tired o f ha\in g h i m trailing along afte r me e\Try\\here I go a n d toU h im so. She's welcome to him, for all I care!" a n d she sauntered ofF, graspin g P ol ly's arm. Polly, you wait fd:' me "fterschool and I 'll r ei I yo u a bo u t It. hu t you must p romisL nL'\ 'e r to tell a soul. Ilow Peg C\'L'r go t hrough t hat s h e ne\-er knew I n t h e tirsr placc the teacher wouldn't It.:t her c hange her seat and sht.: 111'.lst. perforce, sir h c hinJ Pt.:te" But the longt.:st, hardest tillle m ust e n d sometim e, anJ it \\;lS \\-it h :l sigh of relie f t hat she gathe"nl up her h) Iks :lnd prepared to l ea\-e \\ith P olly. T hey w a lked off, tal\ing of \-ariolls happenings o f t h e day. Finally unahle to cOlltain her cliri )sity. hurst forth \ \ 'e1I, aren' t going to tell? You sad you would." C r iss-cross your heart, hopL' to die you ,,'on't r ei I ?" P eg. \\' hen P olly had sworn her sene:.:y h ) t hi s formula, Peg hega n Oh," h o cares f o r h im a nyway? I Ie's n o good; I J U St hate h i m. Bu r, gee! I d lik e to get h o l d o f t hat t h e b o l d t hing; s h e sat t h e r e and wro t e n o tes to him all Jay; n o t

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t 8 THE ZO:>1JAN. that I care, though. But anyway, Saturda), h e came down to my house and we were swinging in my backyard when he started to talk about curls, First he said how much he liked them, then h e said didn't I wear my hair in curls; then h e kept it up and finally h e said h ow awful cute h e thought was Then J got mad and said I wou ldn' t be like her for anything in the world, and if h e wanted to talk about her all the time for him to go right straight home. The n h e got mad and I got madder and we had a big fight; then I told him tJ get out of m)' ),ard and go all over and play in h er yard if he thought so much about her a n d h er o l d curls That's all; 'cept I saw him walking home from Sunday school with her yesterday. I guess she's his 'girl now, but I don't care. I can get me another one, but then Pete was so nice 'i\ lember, you promised not to tell, don't forget." "Oh, no, I won't tell! Oh, ( think you're just grand! But aren't afraid h e 'll stay mad?" "Stay ma d Let him stay mad! \\' ho wants him to get glad? :"o t me." H ere the road branched and their ways parted; Peg folloll ing one and P o lly the other. "Oh Peg," ca lle d P olly, "wait for m e h ere to-mor row, will you?" "Sure, I 'll meet you h ere at .30. D o n 't tell." That night after supper, Peg sa t on the porch with her sister, who was 'most grown up. Peg was reading, but f rom time to time s h e g l anced up at her sister in the finally s h e gOt up and beside her. IISister," timidly. "Yes, oe:lr, what is it?" I want to ask you something." "\\'ell, what is it?" "'\\'ell, 'spose you were mati at a fellow anJ wanted him t ) make up, how woul.:l you do it?" "\\'ell, that depends. What's the nnlter, P eg, mad at Pete? \\'hy not tell me all ab:Jut it and then perhaps I can help you. r won't t.,ll." So once more Peg related the sorry talc; at its close her sister said, "That is a mix-up; why don't )'OU just let him drop and get another fellow?" "But I don't want anyhody but Pete, h e's Sl) nice." "Then I'd just ignore him for a f"w days. Act as if you didn't know he was there. That'll bring him around in no time. They're all the same, too conceited. \Y ell, run a long t o bed now, h o ney, and don't forget to tell me how it all comes o ut. Good night." So the next day t h e ignoring o f Pete began Peg followed the advice s h e ha d r eceived thoroughl)"; so thoroughly, that Pete began to avoid even passing her. Thus the days s l ow l)" passed, 'til Friday ar rive ... !. Peg was beginning to get worried. Suppose h er sister was wrong. She knew a lotbut not about P ete. Oh! all s he'd done wa s to make matters w o rse. Anyhow, s h e'd h urr y h o m e and tell h er siste:ab:)Ut it. She had loitered so l o n g that eve n faithful P olly had gone o n \\' hen s h e carne out, who s h ou l d s h e sec, waiting f or h er under t h e tree, but Pete. A s s h e passed h e srnil ed sheepishly a n d sa id, "C'n I walk horn e wit h you?" "Suit yourself," was t h e laconic rep l y. H e shuffled along b eside her in sil ence for a while, then said, A w, what ya mad at? \\"h y don't you ever speak t o a fella any more?" "Oh, I'm nOt good enough to speak to you; ( haven't got curls ." "Aw, layoff' t hat stuff, will ya? don't lik e curis, anyway, you've got lots m ore h air t h an her." "Th a nk s "5.1)" can l be your fellow again? I don 't like o ld 'tal!. S h e can't do nothing. Gee! all we did when I we n t over t:> h er house was to s it on the steps. \\'e didn't p lay (njun, or nothin'. Say, why can't J?" \\" e ll, I won't make an)' promises, 'cause maybe ( 'II c hang e my mind, but ) '11 t h ink about it Ar e YOll Sllre YOll lik e m e best? Oh! YOll gOt a black eye! \\"h o did it? D id ya h ave a fight?" "Oh, I jllSt h ad a fight with B en \\'i l so n H e said you were b:>w-Iegged; but don't YOll worr)" I made him tak e it back." t h e me:ln thing! ('m not cithej'; it's j ust the way I walk, isn't it, Pete:" "Sure, it is; an)"vay they're a lot straighter'n they used to b e. Bu r )'ou ough t to see how J mussed lip B en's map. H e ain't what he used to be." "Oh, Pete, I think you're the bravest thing! I guess you're about the bravest boy in all this schoo!."

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THE ZO:-JJ AN. "Aw, go all, I ain't eit her." Y es, yo u are, I guess I kn::nv what I m talking about, don't I." "Oh yes, s lIre," quickly agreed P e t e, wary of furt her trouble Here t hey paused at the crossroads, Pete, come o n clo wn t o my h o u se to-morrow and we 'll play lik e w e always do, will you?" "Sure, so l o ng." With a porting glon ce reg set off f o r h o m e h e r faith in h e r s ister comple t e ly r es tored. 1:,\ THE HEART Or. :\ GYPSY. .1niltl Irood, / The la s t gypsy W:lg o n h : d s t :J?pe J b::-n e: l.th th:! trees. Already the fir e InJ b.:::::n st:l:-teJ a thin veil o f smoke toward the evening Gyps)' wom e n move..! h e re and there, p rep: uin-.5 the evening m e al. Gyps)' m e n s w::ye n : nv anJ the n whil e smoking f J ul-smellill 6 pi;JCS 0: i ng the h o r ses An d b:-ight ab:we t:,e m))n h :Li ri se n, while: a star twinkle J he;e 01: 1 I t:,-;;:-e. Apart f.01ll the r es t allJ s:t t a y::)' .. ln:5 b)y. H is la rge, bla c k eyes s hun'.! fr o m his dar k -sk inneJ fac e as bright a s the stars abJve. H is I.:mg, W:1.VY, blac k hair hung carelessl y ab: )lIt his f.l-:e. I n o n.! hand h e h e l d a vio lin and in the othe:-, a b :)\\,. H e look ed t oward the sky, and rai si ng his began to play. H is mus i c had a Illy s ti c al charm, entrancing o ne; making t h e gayest cry, th e saddest laugh. Suddenly h e stopped, a s a W:)I1l:tll dre w near him. f o r u s ze mus i c zat i z m".):e live ly," s h e said, whil e a f e w other the m se l v es o n the grass him. The bar smil ed H e once Ill:xe rai se:..! his viJ iin, this time plaring a liv ely tun::-. \ t:t11, leI' g i : 1 aro:Jse d h e r se l f fro:11 the an..l b.!g:1Il tJ d:1.n ce F a s ter and faster h e played anJ LIs ter the girl's feet moved. A twist, a turn, an:..! t !,e m '.Js i.: stopped. The girl laug h ed and sank to ground exhausted, whil e tl, e were greedily eatin g f rom a k ettle whi c h Q \'er t!1e fire, stopped long e n ough to c la p f:Jr more. For into the night t h e boy played whil e th e women danceu, nC)w and then the men joining 111. Then a m a n was posted a s sentin e l w hile the r es t crept into the wago n s or curl ed upo n the grass to s leep. I t W:IS early in t:l e nnrning. one had ret at t:, e SU!1lmer resxt wh e n G .!orge i\lason, a large t:, e :tt e r m :lInge r, tired o f the city life, an! disg'Jste..! with the deci...ied to take a walk. c\l')se a path that l ed through the w.u..!s ;t!1J was soon in the b es t of spi rits H e had a mil e or m ore wh e n s ud..! en l y h e stoppc..!. \\'hat wa s that? A bi l'd ? No, it could n o t h.:::-yes-it wa s a violin! l\lason's eyes s hon e bri g hter a s h e : \ s mil e parted hi s lip s H e sto::;.d moti.)nless u:1til th e la s t n ote had fad etl away. B y Jove!" excl ai:-n ed ;\l ason, That's mus i c wh o in the worl J couiJ b e playing out here at this time o f dar?" F o r a minute or two h e srooJ w ') nd e rin g the n shrugging his s h o:Jlders, walked o n. : \ ft e r walking quite a distance h e a rd th e mus i c again. I t sounJed n e a rer this timevery close at hanJ. H e stopped and lo o ked about him. : \ bC)u[ a hunlrc..! away a fire wa s bur n in g n ear a reJ painte..! wagon. "Gyps i es G reat Sc:)u! This i s n o plac e ( J r m e The/II steal the last piece or clothin g of l' ba c k if they find m e h e r e!" exc l'1ime:..! l\I'1son to him se lf. :\gai n tiv vio lin wa s playing. l\lason's (a ce wa s full o f emotio n. \Te\'er b e fore had mus i c had this efrec t upo n hirn. \\' h e n the mus i c ceased h e took a s t e p f::;.rward. There, ailll:)st at his f eet, half hidden by th e b r u s h, sat 0 g)' psy b o)' 0 violin h e l d carelessly in o n e hand. L'ron h earing the m o \'em ent o f the brus h the looked up at 1\l a so11 with a startled look upo n h is upturned fac e. :\s quickly as a frightened deer h e arose and f.ced 1\1.son.

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20 T H E ZONIAN. "\Yhat i z e t Za[ Y Oll care f o r? Y o u are o n e o f ze p olice, y esl h e a s ked, ,, ith a fri ghte n ed l oo k to war d th e wag o n s Z e man zat YOli des ir e l o n g ag o h a s b ee n go n e \Ye kn o w n oz ing s o f h eem." H e r e, smiled 1 \ l a50n, "J'm n o p o l ice. I v e b ee n lis t e nin g t o y our p la y in g yo u're w o nderful! The b o y s miled, and look ed a littl e m o r e at e a se H e g rasped his v i o lin ti g h te r and s miled, s h o w i ng a r o w o f whi te t ee t h a s h e ans w e r ed, "Oh, but ze frig h t Y OLI ga\"e to m e Y es, I h a ve b ee n ze s w ee t mu s i c I l ong to p lay m o r e b ette r. J\L y name i s Pi etro " H e r e P i etro if YOll will co m e ano play in my t h eate r I 'll g i ve Y OLI 5100 a m onth to S t art with. P oo r P i etro H e had never h a d a s I11l1c h m o n e y in his lif e \\' h y in tw o m onth s h e w o uld h ave a s muc h a s Z e la t h e q u een, h a d in h e r littl e silve r b ox But ze m e n of my tri b e !" h e cried, n o t yet ove r t h e eft'ec t t h e t h ough t o f so muc h m o n e y h a d upo n him. "Ze y will r u n afte r m e Zey will catc h m e a n d p u t m e i n ze h e a v y r o p es " H e r e h e r e lad! ;.Jo t hey w on't! [ 'II see t o that! Y o u corne with m e if Y OLI W:lnt to and they'll n o t g e t yo u. Pi etro paused a minute H i s eyes glis t e ned. H e l oo ked t oward the camp and the n turning t o l\l ason, whi s p e r ed C orne l e t u s go! Qui c k, b e f o r e zey m ees m e !" and started down t h e path with M ason at h i s h ee l s At t h e h o t e l 1\l a so n hastih pac ked his satc h e l and sent a f e w t e l egrams to N e w Y o r k. Afte r that h e w ent to t h e villa ge and b o u g h t a suit o f clothes f o r P i etro f o r t h e y w e r e t o take t h e fir s t train t o York \\' hey they arrived in :'\ e w Y o rk t h e n ews had alre ady spread t h r o u g h th e t h eate r lovc.:rs' w orld that 1 \ l aso n t h e t h e a te r kin g was hrin g ing a s urprise to t h e c ity. The next nig h t the Z enith The a t el' was crowded wit h curio u s people O l d tire d bu sim:ss m e n had b ee n d ragged fro m comfortable c hairs at h o m e b y c uri o u s wives Gi gg lin g s h o p g irl s seated in t h e c heap e r seats, c h e w e d g um n o i sily b e tw ee n their conver sati o n s whi c h wcre ge n e rall y o f rna rc.: slang t han anythin g else. Stretchin g thcir n ec k s here and t here, t her commel1tc.:d on t h c p eople conc;tantly ent e rin g the t heater. i\l atrnn l r l oo k ing women chaperoned t h e ir d a u g hter s t o th e better seats, whi le fa shionab l y d r essed parties too k t h e b oxes above. A t l a s t t h e curtain w ent up. Not a sound was h eard t h r ough o u t t h e aud i e n ce Peopl e craned t h e i r n ec k s eagerly searc hin g f o r t h e surprise. The n I a so n s t e p p e d upon t h e stage H e ex p l ain e d how h e had co m e t o fin d P i etro At t h e s ignal to e n t e r, P i etro stepped u p o n t h e s tage. G i v i ng three l o w swee pin g b o w s h e advanced towa r d t h e c ente r o f t h e stage. 1 t all see m e d v e r y qu ec r to h im. T h e s h opgirls w h isper e d to o n e ano t h e r "Ain't h e h a n d s o m e ? and H as n t h e b e a u t i ful hair and e y es ?" w hil e t h e p oo r dau g h te r s c hape r o n e d by matronly wo m e n co u l d o n l y s i g h, a n d t h e tire d b u s in e s s m e n s m i l e d a n d l oo ked at t h e i r c uri olls wiv es w h o h a d a far-away l oo k in t h e i r eyes. L'n3ware of it all, P i e t r o rai sed h i s v i olin t o h i s c h in. H e f orgot t h e aud i e n ce b e f o r e h im. H e f o r got all e xc e p t t h e birds, t h e trees, and t h e blu e s k i es o f t h e springtim e o f w h i c h h e wa s playing On and o n h e playe d a certa in notc o f l o n ging and anguis h in h i s Illll s i c The tired b u s i n ess m e n f o rgot t o b e t ir ed, t h e g i gg l i n g s h o p g irl s f o rgot t o giggl e w h i l e t h e women f o r go t t h e daugh t e r s at t h e i r s ides \ \ h e n r h e m u s i c stop p e d t h e applause was Imm e n se 1 t se e m e d a s t h o u g h t h e ve r y w alls wit h t h e i r paint e d fig u r es w ould s hake and f a ll. N e v e r b e f o r e had t h e t h eate r kn owll slic h a p plau se P i etro, still in a d a z e w as clapped 011 th e bac k b y t h e eage r and t o l d t o play m o r e Thi s t i m e h e played a live l y tun e Only two nig h t s b e f o r e h e had played t h i s ve r y tun e a n d Luna had d a n ce d to it. H e co ul d se e h e r n o w h e r snapp), h e r s m i l e and glis t enin g whit e t ee t h h e r l o ng b rai d s of thic k b l a c k hair. Again h e wa s app lauded, a s b e for e but r efused t o pla y a g aIn. "That' s all rig h t, Pietro," s ai d Mason I kn o w h o w y ou f eel. J u s t step into t h a t r oo m a nd ]'11 see yo u t h e r e i n a m i nu te \\'he n M a s o n r eturned h e co u l d fin d Pi e t r o n o w h e r e but 011 t h e t abl e i n t h e little 1'00111 h e f ound a scrap o f pape r, and o n i t wa s writte n : r could stand 'i'C n bizc'l o f ze no lon ge r I l o n g for zat \\ hic h I l eave h e h i nd m e. Z c m o n ey i s n oz ing to me. P IETRO.

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H o t e l Tivoli. Ancon

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22 THE ZONIAN CRISTOBAL COALING STATION The Cri s t o bal coa lin g stati:::m i s one o f the largest ani most modern o f it5 t ype in the w .Jrld I t i s about 450 fee t by '1,000 f ee t in size, situatej on an i 3 1and in Col o n Harbo:, ani c O:1ne: te:1 with th;: mainland by a d 'awb. i.:ige O n the mai n bn.:l i3 the d:e::king-i n sheJ, whe:-e all t i l1:ne:s and other wO:'kme n are c hecke:i b e fore g.Jin:5 [J work. He:e they a : e g iven shovels, whi c h 'lie the ir passes t o the i.:;!anJ. Tw::> m :>tor b .)at3 elch f Jrmers; three o f the se are in service all the tim e w:lil e olle i s ketJt in r eserve in case of a b rea kdown. These trans f vrme r s will suppl y from 11 0 t.J 2,]0::) volts. The coa lin g plant ha s a c3.pacity o f 500,000 t.)n s o f coal. At pre sent there are 5 8,0::>0 tons f o r c:J:nmercial u se and 52,00:::> t:::>n s belo.lging to the N:tvy. The c o al i s stored in a larg bunker 7S0 l o n g b y 450 feet wice. This i s di l i ded into two h o lding L orn 90 t o 100 m e n carry the m to work. I n ad d iti o n the r e are t wo s mall m:>tor b o a tS f x carr ying m"sagos b > tw ee n the stati o n and ships. The gasoline and oil f o r th e parts o n e o f which, h o l ding t h e Navy coa l, i s unde r water. Over the bunke r are two steel b r i dges whi c h can be moved under their own power f rom o n e e n d of th e bu n ker u se o f th'5e to the othe r. b oats is k ep t 0 n e a c h 0 f o n th e i slanJ, t h ese bridges in specially is a movable co nstructeu d igger whi c h tanks. One c a n pic k u p 5 end of the rOils at a time. i s land i s o:cu -On a l eve l pied b y the The Canal hal ",hih ean wit h the s e coa l anJ the baJftom L Ht (11 the ship3 C3n re ei:e theeoul i n their bu:tke:ll bridges and ne cessa r y machinery f o r h a n d lin g it, anJ at the rU:1nin g all around the bJllke r i s a viadu c t on which other enJ are the office oil h o u se s t ore h o u se c:trs rUIl, eac h h ')ldin g 1 0 ton s of c o al. B y m e an s o f an i m3.c hine s h');>. The s t :>rehouse h aLls all s e v e ral turntables the c:trs can b e tur n e d and sent extra pl':'t.i of m : u: hin ; ry b.;siJ::s the dill' e r e n t in any d i rec ti o n. The cars are run b y e lectricity electri c al appliances, b elts, and othe r articl es u se J whi c h i s transmitted t o them thro u g h an overin station. All min')r repair s can I n mld'! in h e ad trolley sys t em I n o rd e r to unl o ad a coll i e r the machine s h o p, in whi c h i s the sso-cubi c fo::>t i s ti e J lip at the stati o n b etwee n the i s land and air compresso r t hat s upplies the stati on w i t h air th e mainland. H ere i s th e steam plant, whi c h f o r ce The stati o n i s abl e t o take care o f i ts elf co n s i s t s o f four t::>we r s eac h having a s t ee l b oo m in p ractically every way. The e l ec tri c ity whi c!1 projec tin g over the ship The digger i s forc e d runs the plant i s s upplied by f our big trans-out al o n g the b oo m b y s t eam and l o w e red into the

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('o,nINO R'rATTON AT rltlSTOll \1., Who saYs that the tropicR nre s l ow? a t Oil or cnaJ r\'f'ry !i seco nd s, and hepilllc it up f l r I hour aw l trimmc I n th e hunker s Itt that j q in th e l a n!;ufl.!;c o f l'lw e r classmen. ..... Get i t int o yow lIondl thi'i WI\\,: ria Ilounds 11 RI'('OIHI 21i t1'(2 l)ollll' l s a minll'I'. an:! 2 ]lIUUtJ 'I de1ivcrc,i in gf) h what th e Coaling Plant did whell it pItH'l'r! I 101 lOin au I 2 OliO 110LlrHiq if} tilt, hoi I or sle'\111 hill 1\' 011 Nove m her 2. i )f)20. II unloaled 1 2 0 30 tOil S rr o m the c ollie r Ulysses in the r ecord time o f 151 ou's and 2.5 minulel 011 Novelllhl'r ill the 83mc Yl'ar

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T H E ZO:-:IA;\. hold of cablcs. I t is then hauled up hy rhe cahles and runs back in[Q rhe [Ower by force of gra\ity. Hen:: the digger empties into a car and \\ hen the car is full, it is and down the \-induct toward the w here a man takes charge and turns it onto the b"idge. The en r j" thell the bun ker w h it is d lim ped and sent back. This operation is r..:peated until the "hip is unloaded. \\"hen a ship is coaled. the hriJge Ilnn,:!S down the coal ht::1P an.! the digger h.:girH t o tak-= its mouthful.... are pla..:e...l in the cars an..! the cars down opp.)sire the shit) th..! coal is dumpcd inw hoppers which drop jt ant,) a _p-inch ruhber b:lt, calle,1 t h e approach b elr. \Yhilt: tho: coal is passing-o\',,:-this h=l t it ic; w..:ighe.i lw 3 machinc that can \\cigh tTCn the "wt::ar" un rhe hclr. T he b,lt runs p;ralld to rhe s hip an.! drons th.: coal ontu 3notht:r calle, I t h e bOJm that runs O:lt to th.? ship, \\'hr:n are il'l ships to be 10a,Je.l thc Glrs arc filled a n d held. This mC:ln" that at 3 111 );}l:nt'S noticc tOilS of coal can IL I )J..It.: I. -\t the cnJ of the stati'Hl is th:: \\ h,r( bu n ker, \\hich is Thc ship is nlll a longsido,: t h e bunke r and the coal i s dumpe d into t h e hoppers a n d down t h e chutes t o the ship. Originally t hese chutes were stationary, but n o w the y can swing in a w i dt: arc and deposit the c o al in several p laces. This uoes away with the o n e bi g pi le that had t o b e trimmed, thus saving time and mone\', This bunke r loads at the rate o ( 500 ton s p e r h O ll'r, In o rder to have communicatio n with all parts of t h e plant JO w e r e in stalle d in the most prominent places. \\' h e n e v e r anyo n e of the s uper v isor's force i s neeJ e d and h e can not b e reacheJ t e leph o n e a loud whis tl e i s bl own. Each m a n has hi s own s i gnal and in this way h e can b e summo neJ with the l e a s t possibl e o( time, The statio n emplo y s b etween 1,000 and 1,20:1 silver m e n and [ 1 0 gold m en, work in t h ree shifts orR hours t:ac h anJ has e v ery conve ni ence such as Jrinki n g water and was h room s n3table records have been made at the station. O n 1 '2, the colli e r UI),sses di.;;charged [2,030 t o n s in 1 5 h ours and 2 5 minutes. This is a n illustrat io n o f the pas t w ork the r e ;\ Iany eff'ect e d i n the plant s ince it was bui l t have made the statio n o n e o f the most modern a n d effic ient coaling statio n s in the world. TRY \\'hen the weather suits you not-tr y s m i l i n g \\' hen your cotfee is not hot-try smilin g ; \\ hen your ncighbors don't do right o r your r e la ti\'cS all fig ht, Sure it's hard, hut don't YOll think you mi ght tr!' smiling? I t can not make thcm wor.se j ust smiling, _-\nd it seems to help YOllr case, bri ghte n lip a gloom), p lace, Thcn it sort of rests your face-just s m iling, T t'lt-pholl)' Jl/agazine,

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--------------_. -----------------\ -r;--Unite'i battics:lip i n Cahill Locks.

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THE ZO:- SITlO HERi\IOSO. TModorr C. ".-1Japp, '21. Estaba r e ndido cuanda me pare cerea de la orilla de lin hermcso arroyo en e l media de un bosque. Quc hermosa sitja era! EI agua sc percipiraba bailando y cal1tando Stl cancion que me hiza d caTazan brinear de alegria. Habiall violet as a cad a lado de l arroyo oscilanuo de un Iado a otTO con eI viel1to suave mient:' a s SLI a"oma e l ;:tire. L os arboles estaban mas verdes )' b: illantes que 1 0 usual. L os paja:'os ell los ",boles cantaban sus aire.; D e vez en cuanda una mariposa volaba de una flaT a otra perezosamente chup.ndo e l dulce nectar de la s Rores. EI cielo que estaba azul r despejado, p oco a poco empezQ a teiiirse de muchos calares b ell os pues 11': el oes t e se POllia e l sol. .A. medida que desaparecl:t e l so l, disminuia e l canto de l os ""ljaros, ha st:l que s6 1 0 se o ia e l murmullo del agua r el S:'I S UiTO del vicnto e n las ramas de l os arbol es LA \ 'OZ D E .IUA:-!C HI QU ILI. O \ 'ENDEDOR DE PERI O D I COS Th.'QdfJr( C. Knapp, '21. habia nada de particular en ese jO\'en que lIamara la atenci6n. !'\o era su apariencia que hacia a l os transeuntes deterllerse, sin o su voz Juan era un huerfanito que vendi a peri6Jicos en bs esquinas cOllcurridas Era cas i imposibL: rasar r nodetenerese para oir su VOL d[bil )' mel6-cica. unl atracci6n extrana que era como un iman sob r e t l tropel co nfu so de tranSClIllt.!S I Iomhrcs aprcsurados y angustiados inevitabl,.! mellte: se veian obl i .wdos a de t e n erse \' a cumprar Ilomhrcs metlall la s en l os bol5illos )' comprab.n sin saberlo Otros daban t:I precio de su dcsayuno para comprarlc a Juan, Porque hacian eso? recibian sino esa simpl e rcspucsta infundida de mic:da: "f\l u c hi simas gracias, Seilor." L : \ ALT0I310GRAFf." 1)1'. L ':,\.-\ ESTREI.I. A I L 'GAZ. C(rlrud(l/. John, 'Z!. Cuando tenia bastante edad para caminar s in ayuda, se me ocurrio In. idea de tamar lin v iajt:. Escogi lin de muchos colores, y cuando estuve lista, me fuL C
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THE ZON I AN 2 7 l TRIP [:-<'1'0 THE ['\'TERIO R Lawrenu !lappe. '22. i !!; On a iVlo n d a y night in J anU:l i Y w e l e ft Panama City on the gaso lin e b oat Alll o n b ound f o r Yav i zl, a town in t h e provine!;: o f D ari e n, n ear the Colombian b o rd er. By 3 o 'clock, Tuesd a y after noon, w e arrive d at L a Palma, a native village at the m outh of the Yu yra Riv e r. H e r e w e put o ve r until t h e next m orning wh e n we c ontinue d our journe y up the Yuyra. A t n oo n w e arri ve d at R e al d e Santa l\laria, wh e r e w e put in to unload s upplies. \\' hil e h e r e so m e of liS lande d to v i sit t h e v illage The nati ves were excited and f ollo wed us around; a w hite man i s n o t a commo n s i ght in thi s part of the D ari e n. l\'I y fath e r tried to snap a pi cture of a group that f ollo wed u s b;.n they scattere d lik e quail at the s igh t o f a came:-a. \ Vedne sday nigh t w e w ent jacking f : x crvcodiles belo w R e al. '\"e kil l ed quite a numbe r o f s mali ones. \Yhen w e had skinne d t h em, the cre w o f our b oat, mos tl y natives ate the m raw. Thursday morning we starte d up the Chucanaque River, o n our way passing floc k s o f m onke y s an...l parro t s in the jungles a l o n g t h e banks of t h e rive r. A t noon we arrived at Yaviza. The entire village cam e down to t h e b e a c h to greet u s a s t h e y had learne d o f our cOllling fro m a native w h o had preceded u s from R eal. H e r e w e too k u p our quarters in part o f the sch o ol h o use. \\'e the n w ent through t h e village to look it o v e r and a lso to buy some eggs a n d c hi c kens from the natives \V e were s urprised at the ch eapness o f f oodstuffs eggs being 15 cents per dozen. Saturday morning we took a piraqua and headed up the Chico for the Choco I ndian v ilia ge, but w e m e t the nativ e s c oming d o wn t :) Yav i z a dressed f o r a h olid a y These Indians are we l l -built a n d athle ti c The m en's ever yday costume cons i s t s o f an antia, o r l o incl oth, but the ir h oliday attire i s muc h respl e ndent. They w ear the antia, a s lIsual, and also w ear large silver cufF s s ilv e r earrings, b eade d h e a dbands, b eaded b elts a c ross the ir s h o ulders, and in s t ead o f a string to h o l d t h e antia, they have a b e aded b elt a b:)ut 6 in c hes wid e Around the ir they w ear n ecklaces o f t i ger' s t eeth and silv e r trinke t s Their bodies are painte d with blac k stripes and the ir fa ces with reJ an...l blac k stripes. The y a lso dre t h e ir teeth blac k T h e w o m e n w eJ.r s h ort skirts about 1 8 in::h es 1::)I1g lllJ.de of r e J print c l oth, wrap red arolinJ the hi ps T h e y also paint the mselves, b'.lt d J n o t w e a r so nnny b e al..l s o r trinke t s a s the m e n. Th::.' babie s are carrie d on the i r bac k s \\'eapo n s con s i s t o f b:)ws, arrows, spears, knives, and mac h e tes. :\. f e w have muzz l e l o ader s o f the p e r c u ss i o n ca;J t y p e These Indians j o in::.'d our par t y and w e con tinue d up the river t o a d eep h o l e where w e dynamite d f o r fis h. ror som e r e ason the fis h d i d n o t float o n the surface, b'.l t sank The I n d i a n s d iv e J f o r them. S o m::.' stay e j under the wate r f o r a t l e a s t 3 minutes, coming u p with a bi g s-p ounJ sabado in the ir m o u t h s and several fis h in each hand. W e g o t about 208 big fis h m os t of which w e gave to the r n d ian s keeping a f e w f o r our s e l v es \\Ie gave t h e .In dians som e presents o f b eads and tobacco f o r w hi c h t hey were v ery

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TH E ZO:\1:\:\. thankful, showing their appreciation by giving LIS hog meat, chickens, and sugar-cane. \\'e returned to the \ jllage and the I ndians pitched camp on the outskirts. They soon started flocking into the \ illage dressed in what considered ci"ilized costumes; sometimes it consisted of on ly a hat or a \"est. They came lip to OUf quarters to sec QUI' gUlls and knives and other things. They would jabber among themselves about the <.Iift"erent things and then leave. J took my rifle, a -351 \Yin c hester, high powered, selfloading, and gave it to t h e chief to The men gathered around LIS to watch this new type of weapon. The chief aimed at a stick in the stream and blazed away. I told him to pull the trigger, which h e Jid, liring the gun again. :\t this h e grew excited and emptied the clip which contained fi\'e cartridges. The oth e r Indians attributed this to something mysterious and perhaps e \ il, for they tied The chief \\as too dumb-founded to mo\'e. After some time the Indians returned, which they did mostly from curiosity. \\'e then explained the working of the piece to them. They soo n understood and then all \\ ished to trade for a rifle. \Y e also sho\\ed them a ... H automatic and fired it into the ground sC\'eral times. The)' tried to dig out the shell tip, hut could not reach it. At this they wee vcry much surprised. They like an)'thingbrighr,such siker, but gold they will not touch, claiming it is de viI's mane)" which superstition bal:k to t h e Spanish invasion under Balboa. The Cuna I ndians, whose cou n try lies about 'l days' travel by piraqua fr o m Yaviza, will not even permit a w hite man t o enter their If any try t hey are promptly killen and beheaded, as the Cuanas are headhunters. Some t hat t her are cannibals, but o f this I am not sure Soon the I ndians started goi n g to t h e Chinaman's to get drink. They are very fond of liquor and have a liquor of t heir own which they make by having the women c hew corn and yam roots and spit it in a bowl. This they allow to ferment and it makes a ve r y intoxicating drink. 'rhe Chinaman is the only merchant in the village. I n fact in all t h e interior villages h e i s t h e business man. H e issues wooden money, whic h is a chip of wood with Chinese writing on it. This m o ney h e gives in exchange for hardwoods, rice, rubbe r and lik e articles. The natives u se it only at his store. \\'e tried to get some pictures of t h e Indians but they were afraid of the camera. One o l d woman fled intu the piraqua and, with t h e ai d o f h e r husband, paddl ed away; however, the camera was quicker than s h e. At last, after much demonstrating of th e camera and giving o f presents, we managed to get t h e chie f and som e o f h is m e n to pose. The Indians stayed a few daysin Yaviza; then the)' started to leave for their own villa ge. At the same time we took our piraqua and went downstream to Heal, w here we met t h e Anion loading up lumber. \\' h en she had fini s hed w e started o n our homeward journey. IT'S TOO LATE TO BE SORHY ,\j,u 7 '21. I t's nen:r too late to be sorry, I'm sorry I bluffed along, I wish I could change my test marks ,\nd make my credits more strong. J can't 'tend the.: I've cutThere isn't a thing l can do, But it's never too late to be sorry, And you would be sorry roo

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I I Dlllho3 ShOPi dock. and pit.'r.

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30 THE ZONJAN SNO WB A LL S I N P ANAMA. If'aller Bro:J.Hl, '22. \Y e were having a great t i me throwing snowballs. The sun s h o n e down with its full heat on tI e road. The ice plant in Balboa cleans t h e ice ard frest off the pipes in t h e c o ld storage rooms th:-ee o r f our r in"es a year. The ice and f os t is generally thrown in t h e rear of the i ce plant but for the fir s t time it was t hrown on the sid w.!lk in fcent o f the bClilding. \\" e made s now b alls and threw at working men coming h ome to lunc h and at oth ers going back to work at '2 o 'cloc k. Some wculd "let the m fly," while others u ecame angry. all the men had retur ned t o work 3J:d we starrej throwing at passing autos; since this was dangercu s w e t hrew at n egroes. One man came along e n a bicycl e :-n d we fir e d our snowballs at h:m. H e jumped off the w h ee l and threw stClles at u s but our s n ow ball s drove him away. \\'e kert up our throwing; several times I thcught of lea\,ing and going home to eat my lunc h, but I could not leave th e spor t I had not enjoyed f e r -; ) ears. "Chee $ e it," shouted so n:e one; but it was too late. 11.'\11 right, you kids Start marLhing," ordered the "cop," who came thro ugh the ice plan t fro m the rear entrance. ;\Iarcl,ing in two's we starred up the stre e t t o the clubhcuse. P.t the corner o f tl:e (ommissary w e kept straigh t on toward the elu bhouse C omt: on, turn down he:e, don'r try t o get fl.:nny, you kids know where you're going," hI.! ordered. \\' e started ... n the street f u r th e pulice station. E vt:ry boy was silent and pale. Cries of "\\'hat did you do now, Browni e? "You will, will you?" and \\'hat's t h e trouble?" wcre a'!:k e d of us as we man h d to th e rol ic e statio n At la:;t we arri ved at the station. "So you got that gang at last, Slim?" asked t h e des k sergean t. Y es, I got them, and we'll make 3n example of them f o r the rest o f the roughs in this tow n," answered Slim. " 'hat's yo u r n a m e? \Vh e r e do you live ? H o w many timcs have yo u b ee n h e r e b e f o re?" w e r e some of t h e m a n y ques ti o n s ask ed o f u s Y o u k ids stand in lin e over b)' that w all anJ stallJ at attenti on t oo orde:-ed c.es k sergean t \ \ 'e l i ned u p :lgai nst the wall and stood a t a t tention. \\'estood for h alf an h o u r w h e n w e began t o get tired of stc:.n di n g a n d leaned against t h e wall. "Stan d s traight there; get away f ro m that wall," com m a nded t h e sergeant. Someone brought the l u n c h. H e sa tin (;'o n t o f u s a n d ate i t. \ V e sure w e r e hung r y, but it didn' t look as i f we were goi n g t o e a t lunch t hat day. "The j udge will soon b e i n wo n' t h e Bill?" asked t h e d es k sergeant o f a po l ic e ma:1 enteri n6 the door. Y es, 1 t h i n k h e j ust called t h e chief," t h e answer. A t t h e men t i on of "judg:.::, a I UI11? rus::: i n m y t h ro a t, as 1 didn t care to go b efore a T wo hours passed a n d w e were still a t atten tio n. "Got m y kid t here?" ask ed a voice, as t h e door opened and a man' s head appeared. Y es, sir, we got him, repl i ed t h e desk sergean t. "All rig h t k ee p h im a n d g ive a g oo d jail sent c nce, said t h e man l eavi n g. The b oy w a s ready to cry. Tears f ormed i n his eyes. :\nother h our passed a n d w e were still stand in g at atten t ion. The t e l e p h o n e rang, ver)' f-=w words were exc hanged, and t h e n t h e desk se rgean t turned to LIS "The judge wo n' t b e here to-d a y so yo u kids can beat i t. J 'lIle t YOll k n o w w h e n t o s h o w lip f o r tria!''' There was a rush f o r t h e door. I t see m ed good to bc alit of t hat p l a ce Each boy scattered h o m e to get som e t h ing to eat. For sevcral days each of LIS waitcd to be called to court but w e w e r e never s u m moned. I am c u red o f thro win g s n o w b all s i n P a n a m a.

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" -""" ... \ DIlY DOCK Large f ( r the big.;cst ships aflo at. B a lboa $ h p s t o the I ,r fitll:.J t o built! :1 shi p I r lie 'l'l!:1tl y w

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3'1 THE ZO;\ I A"' $-PA;\:\;\[A, A LEGE"'D . \lll( ']. ":rl11u. '21. D id ,'OU c,'er hear the iCl!cnd o f how Panama got its' Of course ; hcre are l ege nd s and legends S o m e sar t h e nam e mean s "pl enty of fish," and o th ers t ha t it means "plenty o f butte r Hies. But the tal e that, to m e aiw:t\,s seemed the most probable, is this: .\ lany, many years ago, before c \'er the g r eat Panama Canal idea was cOllcei,'cd ; b efore th e Spanish "conquistadores" braved the unknow n terrors of the sea to wring a fortune fr o m the n ew world; long before c\'cn C olumbus se t sai l to disco\'c r a new route to India; oefo r e f. i e f E ric son touched at the coaSt of Labrador; 'w:l.\', 'wa\' back in the b eginning o f things, w h e n was young. and foolis h p erhaps t h ese events o f whic h I t ell took p l ace. Retween two great continents lay a narrow s rri p o f land, a garden spot o f th e earth. I t was a land of fruits and AO\\ c r s, of birds and butte rfli es, of sunshin e and joy, of life and love; a land o f su n -kissed hill s and pleasant \ alle\'s-a land "ofheauty and forever." : \mong the pleasant hill s and \ allels of thi s earthly paradise wandered an I ndi-all tribe. Legend tells us litrle of them, sa\'e that the\' were a comely and a goodly band. Ther wa;1(lered fronl day to day I from spot to S pot, and at peace with the world and one anoth er. \\' h e n the) hungered, they picked the fruit of t h e trees hunted in the forests or fished in the streams. \\'htn the)' g r ew tired t:ll:)' threw thc:mst:lves upo n the soft grass and slept. Thcirs was an id\'lIic existence, happy, ca r efree, full (Jf t h e joy of life and the love o f living. Butone sad day all this was c han ged. 'Thl' tribe became careless and unkind to olle al1otl1l.'r, quar rels fists \\-cre rcsorted tn, and finall) sticks, stones, and other weapons. The serptl1t D iscord had Crtpt ill to this tropical h.lcn and ha d it in its power where, slow 1)' but surely, h e sq u eezed tht:: --lI; lifehlood, kin d n ess, and unselfishness, fr o m it drop by drop. The tri b e broke u p and drift e d o n e fr olll t h e otht.'!r, bic k e rin g s till. The n o i se o f the ir quarre l in g frig h te ned the fis h from the str e arn s and the birds and beast s from the f o r es t The furv o f the ir :1I1ge r with e red the delicate blosso m s SUIl hid his fac e for s h a m e, the fruits ceased to rip e n, t h e who l e land d rooped and famin e se t i n One by o n e, then in increasing numbe r s, t h e tribe dec r e as ed S oo n all h ad starved t o death but o n e famil)". T hey w e r e a hardy f e w, but w eakening fast. S oo n on l y five were l e ft t h e m othe r, fathe r, and t h ree strapping so n s One d a y they h e l d a family council to decid e what wa s to b e don e The ir situati o n was b ecoming desperate, all w e r e gaunt and sunke n-eyed, all w e r e weak fr o m hunger. Finally t hey ca m e to t h e co n clus ion that o n e must sacrific e his life to save the oth e r s but could n o t d ec id e w h ic h one it wo ul d b e None wo uld agree to draw l o t s and soo n they w e r cquarre lingbitterl),. At last, t h e moth er, being t h e w eakest, b ecame t h e \ '1([1111, : \nyo ne passing a f ew m ornents late r w o uld ha ve see n a S il\'ory p o t o f s t e w coo kin g over a roaring fir e and a group of f our hung r y-eyed Ille n e a c h h olding a little pan in his hands and eagerly s n iffing the aroma. Ah I t was don e ; t h e f athe r was helping him self w h e n the vo i ce o f a so n cried, "(;i\,t;: lilt' a pan 0' I\l a1" The wave s la ppi n g th e b e a c h ca u g h t at t h e words e a gerly and murmured "Pan a -ma. As t ht;: m e al caml;: to a c l ose t h e rain came d o wn in torrents to haptize t h e land; t h e w in d ble w hard, roaring, . P a n a rna!" The thunde r rumble d P an a ma," and t h e lightning wrote it in charac t e r s o f livin g flam e a c r oss t h e s k y, "Panama. 0 Panama," t h e lan d b ecame, a n d Panama" it r e main s

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THE ZONJA N. 33 Very early Saturday morning m y slumbe:'s were rudel y interrupted b y the l o u d and pers istan t ringing o f t h e tdeph o n c I ran to answe r i t, g lancing at the clock in pa ss ing. G ood heavens A quarter to two! I kn ew imm ediately what the call wa s for. H ello?" [ said timidly. H ello? H ello? H ello! said the voice of a well-known S e nior. "Please speak a little louder, I can't hear yo u. Ar e t h e girls going 011 the Senior t:-ip? "'Vhy, yes 1 answcrcJ. "\Vell, we're s upposed to start at '2. \Yit h whic h my angry summoner hun g Lip. I awoke my sister; we dressed hu rried l y and literally ran down to t h e dock. \\'e were greeted with a stony silence whic h was worse than awful. \V e had b ee n late, and, w hat wa s morc, we had kept the entir e crowd waiting. A s soon as w e ha d clambered meekly aboard, the M argaret put out t o sea, headed f or t h e P e arl I slands. V ariolls mem b ers o f th e crowd tried t o sleep, but variolls oth ers by exerc isin g their vocal cords ( I dare n o t cal l i t s inging) or b y rav in g in a loud voice about the m oon, the waves, sea s i c kn ess shipwreck, and o t h er trivialities, made sleeping imposs ib le. M e th ought I heard a voice cry 'Sl eep n 3 more', was t h e s l ogan, motto, and password. D awn came at last, and each o f LIS breathed a s i g h o f r e l i e f t hat w e had b ee n spared t h e humiliati o n o f being se a s i ck. The sun came out of t h e ocean lik e a great b all of fir e T h e is lands came into s i ght and t h e panorama was b eautiful. The i slands stretch a l o n g t h e ocea n f o r about 3 or 4-mil es makin g a kin d o f half c ircl e \\'e were headed f o r o neof th e la rgest w h i c h hasa v illa ge on it. 1\1311)' and often were the ejaculatio n s o f f ear and nervou s n ess a s t h e party scrambled over the s ide into the wo bbl y cayuco and the b ea utiful r ed panga whic h n everthe l ess brought u s safely t o sbore w here we were immedi atel), surrounded by p ea rl venders. These natives dive f o r pearls and carry them about their peison in a most carel ess manner. One exhibited his, rolled li p in a 55 bill. Pearls can be had f o r almost nothing. \Yhil e we prepared our b rea kfast, the peopl e stood about in a curious but respectful a u d i e n ce. seemed ,unused by s u c h expre ss i o n s as: For t h e K axes!" "Oh for the love o f J o hn!" Y e gods!" "Gee, ma J\leddy! And really, who can blame them? They must have lik ed it tho ugh, f o r t hey hono,.d u s wit h their presence again at n oo n. Breakfast finished most o f u s w e n t up i nto t h e village. This is lik e all oth e r native villages except ( v f its b eing a little l ess c ivil ized. The c hu rc h i s at t h e hig h es t point) and t h e rest o f th e h o u ses are scattered about it. A winding path sometimes almost as wide as a r oad, som e tim es t oo narrow f o r two peoplc) leads from t h e c hu rc h down to the b eac h. A card i s tacked 011 the door of eac h s hack, stating that it has b ee n inspected by the Government; but f rom t h e appearance cf t h e huts, w e judge t hat t h e inspector must have b een blin d l\i o ngiei s pigs, and chickens ran in and o u t t h e hu ts at will ami f ollo wed u s all over, along with the c hildren, and some o f the grown peopl e. After pearls and visiting t h e villa ge w e w ent sWImmIng. T h e beach i s one o f the b es t I have ever seen. T t stretch es br ab3ut a mil e, and its fine s:lIld is almos t white. An :Jt her island with a beach i s almost opposite, but the rest o f t h e sur r ou nding i s lanJs are barren. They are of a black r ock f.Jrmation with 11:J b each, and the sparse veg etation is all on the top of the islandt h e on l y p l a ce wh ere soi l collects There are many caves and openings probably wor n out b y t h e sea; some of t h e m contain interestin g formations and s h ells. On explorin g t h ese t i n y "warts o n

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THE ZO)lIAN the sea" one thinks what an ideal place they w o uld make for a moving-picture company to gather "atmosphere." By -+ o'clock w e were assembling aboard the boar. \Yell," sai d a certain yo u t h as h e pulled h i m self aboard, "who'll be the first t o ge t se a sick?" lY e all laughed, but each prayed fervently that it would not be him. \Yh e n we got outs ide t h e islands the MaJga!'e/ began disputing to h e rself as to w h ich side s h e wis hed t o r o ll. S h e began to experiment and s uddenly I hear d a s h out o f derlSIOI1 1 stuc k my h ead into the cabi n and the r e, over the side, hung t h e lastmentio ned YOllth, with apparently no thought i n life, but to b e generous to the fish. : \ 5 the j \ /argllret was in a co nstant stat e o f in decision frol11 the n onward, and as t h e se a wa s trying to h elp h e r b y practical dem o nstration oth ers began (Q s tick t h e ir h eads ove r t h e s ide, s h eepis hly at first, but eve n anxi o u s l y a s the debate became more ve h e ment, B y 6 o'clock all f o r ms, stag es, and kinds o f seasic kn ess could b e seen at a g la nce. One of OUf dignified Seniors and one o f our most d ignified faculty la y in co mpl e te abandon, upo n t h e floor. A certa in corpulent] uniorlmistook these two for the promenade and proceeded to act upo n his mistak e n id e a. Y o u can imagine how muc h pleasure h e got from it. B y way of variatio n, Ollf brilliant r e d panga seve red re lations, and, in try ing to r ecove r it, we lost t h e boath oo k, so we had to l eave it to the disposition o f the waves The A1nr gnret must ha ve b ee n ve r y sad at t h e parting for s h e gave v e n t t o h er grie f b y t h e mos t fantastic conto rti o n s wh e r eupo n many stu c k the ir h e ads out o f t h e windows so t hat t h e ir t ears migh t flow into the sea, and not swamp t h e b oat. \Vh e n w e reached t h e channe l, t h e sea b eca me qui e t a l so t h e passe n ge r s I t see med, both figurativel)' and lik e the ca lm after a storm Peopl e b ega n to l oo k more r es pectab l e an d to s wear that they hadn't b ee n r e all y sea s ick, or that t hey had draped the m se l ves so charming l y out o f t h e win dows b ec au se it appeared to b e the fas h i o n but t h e seago ing o ne s kne w better. H ow w e lcome wa s t h e sight o f lan d and t h e rattle o f jitneys! G oodb ys and thanks w e r e h urried but since r e and a h appy, tired, and b edraggled troop straggled oft' to .. H o m e and G olf linkJ on the SabaIlM'_ Pllnllmll City.

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THE ZONIAN. 35 LAS T \VJLL AN D TESTAMEN T OF THE CLASS O F I. van '21. KNOW YE A LL, B Y THESE PRESENTS That w e, the Class o f '21 be ing sa n e o f judgment and so und o f mind, knowing, t hat b efore the passing o f another 6 months we will be n o m o r e o r th e B alboa H igh School world, do dee m it b ot h wise and n ecessary to make, publish, and decla r e this, our last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills a n d bequests a n d devises, o f w hatever nature by liS mad e. First: T o our beloved cla ss adviser i\l i ss Frost, we give o ur s incerest t h a nk s f or the way s h e has piloted o ur s hip to it s port. T o our h onored f aculty we leave our best wishes, Ollf appreciation, and the full extent of our sympathy; th e growth of whic h h as b e en in direct proporti o n t o th e br oadening of our minds. I n view of t h e fact that the C l ass of '20 "regretfully rel in quis hed" t h e right and privilege or occupying t h e desks in rows 7 a n d 8 in t h e hall or our beloved hig h sc h oo l building, and, furthe,more, t hat they willed and bequeathed to u s all the dignity reserve, flnd power belonging to a senio r c l ass, together wit h it s rare ability to disc u ss and dec i de questi o n s o f imp orta n ce without the u s u a l q u arre l s and contentions, we, having avail ed ou rsel ves o f aforesaid gifts, and the same still being in servi ceable conditi o n do relinquis h sa m e to the Class of '2'2, with the best of will. Second : The indi v iduals or th e C l ass o r I bequ eath th e i r seve ral girt s as r ollows: C ha rli e Grobe l e a ves his po s iti o n or pres i dent wit h all it s h o n ors advantages, a n d disadvantages to any m embe r o r t h e C l ass or '" w h o s h all b e as well fitt ed for it as h e was. Theodor e Knapp donates to the e ntir e Fresh man Cla ss, his studi o u s habits. Elois P e ar so n b eq ueath s h e r daintiness to J immi e Mill e r. Elizabe th T w i tc h ell l eaves h e r quiet disposi tion to Ru th Foster. Anni e Boyd r eq uests t hat h e r dislik e for dancing fall to Earl P a lh e mus. Cody va n H ardeveld gives t h e extrem e pleasure (I) o r rescuing t h e p eris hin g o n t h e P earl I s land trip to I rene Stewart. T o B essie Watkins i s bequeath ed May Duncan's ability to r oug h it" and to mak e t h e best or every t h ing. G eorge Capwell l eaves hi s love o r athleti cs to i\l arjorie Gerralls. Alice Bleakley, having n o furt h e r use f o r h e r extensive knowledge of L.atin} l e a ves t h e sa m e to the sare-k e eping o r :\.d l ais Claybourne. Eleanor B ello surrender s her admirable selrpossession to i\f argaret J o hn son. B ill All e n presents his ego and his str ident voi ce to Agnes Gardner, the latter to be employed espec ially in t h e classrooms. Ruth Boyd endows Doroth y D oc k e r y with h e r queen-like d i gn it y. Ge::>rge D allskin inflicts upon L.awre nce Hoppe h is ga rrulousness in the hope that the latter, thus cncloweJ, will also be h eir to a little l ife, liberty, and pursuit of happin ess. Ethel Getman e n trusts h e r Spanish voca bular y to Eli z abeth Br ad ley, c har ging h e r to increase its vo l um e. i\l ae \Vy nn e bequeath s h er clever n ess and delig h tfu l gigg l e to Edith Foster. L eonard L a nder s leaves his unfailing s k ill at ba s k e tb all to the Freshman gir l s' team. \ V e trllSt that they will not win last p l ace by rorfeits h e r eafter. r o i\1a r y Slac k L o i s \Viggins leaves h e r un o b tru s i ve q uali ties Cathryn Kaye gives h er intensive socia l career t o Arthur Krause L ou i s O'Brien, always willing to help the needy, wills h is agility to Gladys Cath erine Parmeter leaves h er sweet disposition and even temper to Alice Reese. Gertrude J o hn h as h ad many hin ts as to th e disposition of h er de mur e demeanor and ha s finall y, after profound con s iderati o n, decided that D o roth Ab e ndroth is the most in need.

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---'-36 ____ THE

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THE ZONI AN. 37 Flori e n e t 1\[atte r belie ves that Ali ce Orr can make good u se of her vari ed styl es o f h air dressing, her wa d o f gum, and h er power t o exer c ise h e r v o i ce Harr), Bissell int ends to write a book on "The P leasures and Displeasures o f P rank -playing and I ts Efrec t o n the F acu lty," and to g i ve i t to Esthe r Greene. W i l bur M eyers will b e th e happy r ec i p i ent o f !VI'rie 1'1 c1'1ahol1'5 everr e a dy smile She a ssures him that i t will g r o w brig hter with use. Margaret H alliga n e n dows Charl es K rouse with h er speed r eco rd in l oqu a c it), and h e r "gi ftof gab." !Ii G ertrude van H ardeveld ded icates t o Olive \\'00 h er ability to get out o f w o rk. lxr \\'ITNESS \\'HEREor, w e h ave h ereunto set our h and and seal. SIGNED, SEALED, AXD PUBLIS HED by the sai d Cla ss o f '2.1 a s and f o r it s l a s t will and t es tament in t h e presence o f liS w h o at i ts r e quest, in it s presence, and in t h e pre se n ce o f each o th er, h e r eunto s ub sc rib e OUf n ames a s attesting witn esses to said instrument. (Their mark) CLASS OF '21. !Ii e CU.SS PROPHECY e ,1IcJ/tlhOIl, '21 \j; DEAR EI.EANOR: TEW YORK, N. Y., June 2, 1 931. Y o u don't know how sorry I am t hat y o u couldn't arrange to corne to th e reunion. I am inclosing a newspaper clipping g i ving a complete account of t h e wedding and reunion. I am j u s t so rus h ed for time, trying to get m y things ready f or the trip, but w h en we a rri\'e at i\lae's, I 'll writl: you again. \\,ith l ove 1\1'ri e One of t h e pre ttiest wedd i ngs o f t h e season was that o f i\l i ss Catherine P armeter, daughte r o f i\1r. and i\l r s F S. P armeter, o f Jowa, to i\lr. Gu y Van H o rn, who i s very w ell known i n New Y ork The R R ev Theodore C. Knapp, a f o rm er c la ssmate o f i\l iss P armeter, offic iated. USociety wa s well represented at this c harmin g affair, f o r t h o u g h 1\liss P armeter is but a recent arriva l am o n g us, s h e easily wo n the h earts o f all, and i s o ft e n spok en o f as one of the most popular m em bers o f th e youn ger set. i\ l i ss P armeter, a s many a l ready know, receiv ed a l arge part o f h er ed ucati o n o n th e Canal Zon e, graduating from th e B alboa H i g h Schoo l !Ii wit h t h e Cla ss o f '21 l V l i ss Paflllete r enciea vored to have a s man y as possibl e o f h e r f orme r cla ss mates present at th e ceremo n y uThe C l a ss o f ''21 h a s gon e down in th e anna l s of B alboa H ig h Sc h oo l as b e ing t h e finest cla ss ever gr a duated, and it ha s produced a g r ea t many famous men and women. "Quite a s urpri se was the hu ge old-fas h i o n ed wedding cake, b a k ed b y i\ l iss i\ lay Dunca n, now chie f cook in t h e T hi te House. This ca k e wa s th e gift of i\l i ss D un ca n to h er cla ssmates. Immediately a f ter th e ce rem o ny, th e member s o f thi s cla ss with the exception o f t he bride, h e l d a reunion in th e f orm o f a class rnee tillg. The f ollowing i s a r e port o f t hi s meeting as written by th e ec retary: called t o order b y t h e President, Charl es A. Gro b e Moti o n mad e and carried t hat e a c h m embe r present give an a cco un t o f him s elf, e i t h e r in a speec h or by an exhibiti o n of hi s tal e nt s The meeting th en b ec am e inf o rmal and the f ollowing impr omptu program was carried out: I. Sket ch-School D ays. Cast-F amous B issell ana D an. skin T roupe, ably supported by [he well.known actreo;s, l\l i ss I'ioriene[ l\latter, and l\lrs. H E. B issell, IIC': Ethel P S. Getman 'l. T oe D ance, L ois W iggins 3. Original R eading. l\l iss l\lae J W rnne, who has w o n her Iaurds in t h e literary field.

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3 8 THE Z ONIAN. 4. D ance. Professor W iUiam All e n of Allen's Danc in g A cademy Addr ess P resident of t h e new Irish R epublic L ouis O'Brien. 6. :\I iss G. J ohn, bareback rider of Bailey's CirclI s, made a s hort speech, promising (0 give .:m exhibili :Hl of h er skill in the near future -. T he R R ev. T. C. Knapp, closed th e meeting and, immediarelr after, del i cious refreshment s were served "Those preSent at the meeti n g ) n o t takin g part in the program, w e re : and G eo rge L. Capwe l l li fe G ertrude \ a n Hardeve ld; Cap w ell i s w ell k nown to t housands o f baseb all fanr. a s a second Babe Ru t h. IVIr. L eonard L a nder s, popular football co a c h of Princeton ; Mi ss Cathr y n Ka ye) a w orth y representative o f Panama's beauty; i'l rs J. J o n es, w i f e o f A d miral J o n es u. S. 1"., lIee H alliga n; Alic e B l ea k ley, m i ss i onary to F'ij i I s lands ; f\ I rs. C h arles G ro be, f orme rl y Miss Ruth B oyd; Miss Elo i s P earson wh o has b ee n trave lin g in China ; 1\1iss Annie Boyd, prima d onna; Mrs Charles Campb ell, s n a k e k ee p e r o f B ailey's Circus ; Mi ss Eli z a beth Twitc h ell, matr o n o f St. John's Orphan Asylum j iVfiss C o rn e lia van Harde v e ld A B A M., Ph. D. At the close o f the m ee ting, e a c h m embe r r ece ived a jar o f M 'rie s Freckle Cream.' This c r ea m has made the name and co mpl ex i o n o f M iss M cMaho n fam o u s the w orld over. The on l y m embe r wh o was unabl e t o atte n d thi s happy r e uni o n was Miss Eleano r B ello wh o r e ce n tI y e n tered a co n ve n t. "After a f e w days' stay in the city thi s famous cla ss will go aboard t h e y a cht IVla r gnri t e e n r oute f o r the summe r h o m e o f {Vfiss at P e arl I s l a n ds P acific Ocean H e r e they will take part in a p leasant h o use party." (!Class fJlap. WHY S M ITH LEFT HOME. T h e C l ass o f 1921 s u ccess f ull y presente d Wh y Smith L e ft H o me," an inte resting comedy by George H B roadhu r s t. The c a s t o f c haracter s was as follows: SMITH \\'h o l oves his w ife and live s in New Y o rk GE:-1ITH .1\ lady in waiting l\JRs. BILLETDOt:X R OSE W ALTON Jr'l.IA F LSI DALY A C T I. J\lrs. Smith's aunt R o bert's bride o f a dar T o u c hin g ly clever A maid Wh o iS:l lad}' and knows it [\1 r. and Mrs Smith, new lyweds, a r e prevented from taking their honeym oon o n acco unt o f bu s i ness affairs and late r are surprise d b y v i sits fro m r e lati ves Miss Smith, th e fir s t t o co m e i s f o l lowed b y Aunt M a r y a n d the G e n e ral. The latte r immed ia tely b eco m es a s la ve t o Julia's charrns S mi t h co m es t o an a g ree m ent with Lavinia, th e n e w I ris h cook to do h e r best "bad c o o kin g i n t h e h o p e o f s h orte nin g Aunt Mary s v i s it, l\l l uc h to 1\llrs Smith's d i smay, B o b h e r brothe r, w h o has j u s t b ee n marrie d t o R ose a ppear s, an n o un c in g that they have co m e t o s p e nd their h o neym oo n The curtain fall s jus t a s Mrs Smi t h witnesses Mr. S mi t h kissing Julia. Late r h e explain s t h a t h e mi s t oo k h e r f o r his wife becau se s h e had o n o n e o f his wife's discarded dresses A C T J I. ( D o ubl e sce n e.) S mith expla in s his a c ti o n s a n d h e a n d his wife are recon c i led. Aunt Mary catch es the G e n e r a l in a t e t e-at e t e with Julia. H e explains that, lik e Smith h e mi s too k h er f o r hi s wife o n a ccount o f the dress The r e i s a little sce n e in w hi c h C ount Von

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THE ZO:\J..\:\. 39 Guggenheim arrives, asking for rhe hand of i\I iss Smith. H e claims t o ha\'c seen her in the street and to have fall e n in love with her at first sight. T h e rest of the scene i s a farce in which some of tht: c haracters are trying to get something ro eat. This condition of affairs causes i\l rs. Smith and A.Ullt i\l a r y, w h o are in the parlor, to overhear the conversation between the General and ;.\I r. Smith in which t h e latter describes the costume which Julia is to wear that evening at a masquerade. The servants are gi \ing this party in Smith's home in rhe absence of j \ l rs Smith and Aunt l\larr wh o are supposed to go visiting but in reality ha\'c decided to attend the party, : \Ullt to oress lik e .Julia. '1e'1 III. I n this act the G ;.!rman Count gets hillH..!lfinto dire trouble by insisting on proposing to ;\lr5. Smith whom h e had thought [Q he Smith. \\' hen h e finds out hi s mistake, h e willingly gives i\l i ss Smith up to the ] \ Iajor, her suitor for years. There follow \'arious cornical situations caused by the costumes, such as the General kissing hi s wife for Julia and i\l rs. Smith as a vrench maid tryin:5 to Airt with him, but getting 110 response. I n the midst of the m errirm::nt of the sen'ants' party, the various disguises are discovert'd and the play ends by Smith announcing that this time hi s honeymoon will b e a reality and ordering hi s and hi s wife's baggage to the Waldorf. i\ luch credit is due to B issell and Catherine Parmeter as ,\ 11'. and .\ I rs. Srnith for their spl e ndid acting. Their parts, which are di fficult, were interpreted with much grace and ease. George Danskin successfully acted the part of General Billetdoux who is as tame as a lamb in hi s wife's presenct' and \'ery frivolous oth e rwise, Ruth Boyd mad(' a good -\unt ;\Iarr. There was no doubt in t h e mind of the audien ce that s h e ruled the General with an iron harl.!. George Capwell, as the Count, was splendid. I l is German accent and hopelessly twisted E nglish were very much enjoyed. The ;\Iajor, i\l i ss Smith's true suitor, played by \\'illiam .-\lIen Louis 0' B rien and i\largarct Halligan, as B o b and Rose. made a \'ery charming young t\J 1fie j\Jci\lahon imperson:lted to perfection ;\I iss Smith. a and sentimental old maid. F lorien:.:t j \ latter, as Julia, coul.! not help but attract the General's attenri')Il Cornelia \an Hardc\'el,i, in l h e role of El s ie. made a very prim and proper maid, s howing, however, a talent for dancing in the masquerade scene. ;\Ia\' Duncan creditably played Lavinia r h e cook, insisting that was a "cook lady" anJ a staunc h union member, got many a laugh from the audience. The success of this production has been mainly due to i\l iss Zahrah Preble's eHort in coaching rhe The members of t h e of 1911 wis h to express thei r s incere appreciation. Administration Building of The Panama Canal. (acing Panam!!..

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Quarr y Heights and B u lhoa f :olD Allcon Hill. ..,. o ;j t'I:l N o Z :; Z

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THE ZO;..rIAN SDC-...-ETY C,:k:riJu P.lr,II::(T, '21. "\\'e d on't know where we're going btl t we're o n our way," t h u s sa n g t h e Happy as the o ld hay-filled truck bumped and rhul1lpcJ o\'er th e road to Corozal. But t h ey did kn ow where they were going a n d t h e occasion f o r the ir going th e annual Senior hay rid e They were Gamboa b Ollnd and wcre taking what pro \'ed to be: a most memorabl e trip. The night, th e s ky th e stars, c\'erything, s pell e d r omance but-Oh, we ha d a w o n derful tim e . ''-'CSI-Ct' pns, Senior? :\uf ced! G ee, we haven't ha d a party all year," b e wail ed a moody l oo kin g Seni or, "let's do something." So the happy crowd decided on a H alloween party All were in \ ir ed to atte n d re aide party, to b e h e ld in th e domesti c scie n ce 1'00111. E v e r yo n e maske d or wore a fan cy costum.:. F un waxed f a s t and an d the little gbom imps were banis hed for th e evenin g Seniors cast away their dignity and acted a s foolis h as F re<;hmcn. Old-fas h i oned games were played and i\l i ss Frost was judged to b e the champion apple-Jucke;. Hurrah f o r l\l i ss F rost! Dur ir;G the honest-to-goodness H allowe:::n refieshmcnts were served, consisting of nuts apples, rais in s oran ges cake, and i ce cream. i\l i ss G ertr ude J o hn wa s j udged to be th e m os t originally costumed a s a S Ial' & fft:rnld girl. Not until the mystic h our o f 1'2 was sounding from our" Bi g Ben" tiiJ the merry party break u p. An event occurred o n A pri l 1 3 whi c h s h o uld go down ill th e o f t h e Balbo a H i g h Schoo l history. T h e b:1sketball b : lIlquct, in h o nor of th e Seni)!' team, th e winners of the Girl s Interclass L e ague. \\'ill we ever forget it? Altll')Ugh the thi rte= n t h i s supPQscd to an unlucky day, it itself to bejust the oppos ite. The b:1l1.Juet waS helJ at the hom::: o f Arlee Gict::n.!, a mem o f th e SopholllQrc tcam, and a more place could not ha\'e been selec t ed The tables, decurate ...! \'ery originall y with purple b o u gain \ illa-a \ in e, certainly were cffecti\'e. .-\ nd o h, what a wonderful dinner-in truth, "a feast f o r the Gods." The cooks are t o be highlr complimented o n the ll13gical in whi c h the foo--l disappc3red, make prai ses odiolls. During th:! evening toasts give: l b y m embers of e a c h te:Ull, th e f our tC:1I1lS bein g r eprc3cnted ; L.lo113 R :nhbone spo!,e fJf the F reshm.::n; G:e"::ile f u r the Soph0!l1'Jrc3, C ece lia Two m.::y for th e J uni o:'S; and I\brie fvr the Seniors. i\l is3 J\1c;\lah on also g.:t\'C a IllJ s t fittin g t.:)a3t t.:) our coac h, j \ I iss Gai ther, telling her o f the apprc:iariJIl tColITIS fJr thesplc:-tjiJ way in which s h e had hanJleJ them. I iss Gaither respon,hl in a few wdl-chosen w0ros whi.:h eilJeared her m ore than cv.=r to th.:: g irl s wh;) alrealy 10\'': h e r so well. :-\ fter di nn-=r, dancin:,! singin g, and wac c njoyeJ until a hour. l\l is3 a s a fan c), dancer, anl i\l i ss i\ latter, a s pianist, did muc h [Q entertain. The party broke up with

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4 2 THE ZONIAN. the singi ng of t h e o ld favo rite Ladies," and all agreed the banquet certainl y was a success. \Y e owe many t h a nk s to l\lrs Greene for her kindness in l ending h e r home for t h e occasion a n d to th e girls w h o w e r e r esponsible for the "perfectly ripping time J L'NJORS. brilliant and s uccessful afl'air was the dance given by t h e JuniorClass at th e Tivoli Hotel. Costume or fanc), dress was t h e rule of the eve n ing and eve r yone see m ed to ha ve tried to o u tclo t h e other in anri o riginalit y l\l i ss G ertrude J("hl1 again scor ed a triumph by taking first prize with h e r S/arE.3 H erald costume work, Fres h i es ; b y t h e time yo u are S e n io r s yo u will b e quite a c l ass. "Christmas com es but once a year," so says a poe m, a song, o r som e t hing, and t h e Balbo a H igh decided to ce l ebrate it b y an ente rtainment. Mr. Lang kindly allowed us t h e h al f day of t h e 1 7 t h and the tal ent was contribute d from t h e different classes. T h e s t unt sco ring t h e mos t applause and winning fir s t place wa s t h e m oc k w eddi ng g i ven by t h e J un ior s M i ss Ida Brown, a s the blu s hing young bride fitted t h e part perfectly and l oo ked Ires charmanle wit h h e r bo uquet o f red r oses almost as large as h e r se lf. Lawre nc e H oppe, t h e t h innest ( ? ) boy in sc h oo l made a match l ess mate for h e r. T h e wedd i ng party wa s a l so b eyond criticism. 1 V l is Marjo rie Gerrans playe d t h e wedding marc h to p erfec tion and t h e w h ole ceremony was extr e m e l y w ell c arri e d out. Muc h c r edit i s due Mi ss Simpson f o r its s u ccess Congratulatio n s are in oreler for t h e Sophomore class for t h e spl e ndid rarty they ga vc to t h e stude nts and faculty of Balboa High Sc h ool. the afternoon of the declamation conreSt. I t was h e l d in t h e domestic sc i ence r oo m s. Punch A corner o f the famous lio'Jte! Tivoli. S e n ior s won secand sweet cakes were to be had in an unlimited supply and certainl y were done j u s tic e T h e sc hool v ictrol a furnis hed excellent dance mus ic and even the fanilty indulged in tripping light fantastics. t 'RESHMEN. to be outdone just b ecause t hey w ere Freshmen, the Pistachios" agreed to ha ve a hay ride. I t proved to be an afl'air whic h evel1 rhe Seniors would be prollci o f (hurrah!). Lunc h was eatcn on Gamhoa road. A "reg'lar" picnic lunch, toO "wccl1ies," rolls, picklcs, toasted marshmallows, 'n evcrythin g Keep up t h e good o nd pla ce, F l o rin ette i\latter and Catherine Parmeter acting and sing in g t h e so n g R ose of \ IVas hingto n Square," also Cornel ia van Hardevel d and! Cath e rin e Kaye in "Oh, B y Jingo." Sophomores too k third a n d Freshme n fourth p l ace, with piano and vio lin so l os and reading s, 1\1arjor y Carter w i n nin g es p ec ial appl ause. Afte r t h e entertainm ent, all adjourned t o t h e dom es ti c sc i e nc e r oo m s wh e re ca k e and i ce crea m w e r e i n order. The n th e hard-work ed victrola wa s once more called to t h e front and dancing wa s th e rule o f the r emainde r o f t h e aftern oo n. A m o r e M erry C hristmas entertainment and party h a s never b een h eld by t h e hig h sc h oo l b e f o r e and w e h o p e th e s u cceeding o n es will be just a s merry.

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TH E ZOC\"T.-\C\", 4 3 ----------.--' :-'IORTO;-'-, O'BRIES, Bl'RKHOLDER (Coach), LA:-WERS ()I ;"tnagcr), BISSELL. CAPWELL (CaPtain), ASD K :-'-APP.

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44 THE ZONIAN. A THLET [8 I f/i!liam Sorgen/, '22. This y e ar ha s b ee n o n e of t h e most successfu l i n athle ti cs that the Balbo a H ig h School h as recorded. It i s [ru e that we have rnct with some r e v e r ses s u c h a s t h e loss of t h e H igh Sc h oo l Ba s k e tball Champio n s h ip of t h e Canal Zone, but the int e r es t s h o wn and the numb e r of participants in the d iff e r e nt s port s hav e ex cee d e d that of pre violls years :'I an y m embe r s o f th e h igh sc h ool have b e come pr ofic i ent with riAes and next a gun c lub w ill p ro babl y b e o r g aniz e d B AS K ETBA Lt. Thi s r e ar, a s in f onne r rears bas k e tball i s given pref ere n ce o v e r th e o th e r s p o rt s On e of t h e firs t d uti es whi c h th e n e w l y e l ec t e d Athl e tic C ou n ci l undertakes i s th e f o rmati o n o f a sch e dul e and rul es f o r t h e in te rcla ss ba s k e tball series and the organizati on o f th e hig h sc h oo l t e am In th e early part o f th e se a so n, d u e to p o or t e a m wor k we s uff e r ed several d e ( t at s l\r o r e practi ce, h oweve r proved Balb o a H i g h S c h oo l basketball te am o n e o f t h e stro ngest t e am s o n th e Isth m u s The inter class basketball was easily w o n b y t h e S e niors. The f.'reshm e n a n d J uni o r s w e r e second and third, respective l y l\1u c h enthusias m prevailed during th e in te r c lass series, a s the t e am s whic h w in firs t, second, and third pla c e s r eceive, 55, '25, and 1 5 points f o r t h e cup, whi c h i s one o f severa l induce ments t o promote athletics in the h igh sc ho o l. HI G H SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIP. I n three consecutive games, Cr istobal Hi g h School defeated Balb oa Hi g h f o r th e Canal Zone High Schoo l ba s ketball c hampionship Alth o ugh the games w ere rather o n e-s i ded, Balboa Hig h h otly co nt ested every point, and both teams played clean ba s k etball, whic h made the games very interesting ( o r th e rooters THE TEAMS. Bn/ h Oil High School J. C. Burkho lder, c o a ch. Brown, f. Bissell, f. Capwell, c (c aptain ) Land er s g. O' Brien, g. 1 \ l o n o n {sub s titute } K napp {sub s titute } O : m s kin (s ub s titute ) Crist o bal Hig h ScllOol. T. C. \\' ilson, coach. D o y l e, f. R a y mond f. H enter c. Towns end, g Harris on, g. Clo ke (s ubstitute ) Bli ss (s ubstitute ) Quinto (s ub s titute ) Cris t oball-ligh School, 36; Balboa High Sch ool 7 GAME Cris tobal High School, '28 ; B alboa High School, I":.

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THE ZONIAN. 45 THI RDCA:o.fE SE.COS"O CAME. Cristobal H igh School, 25; Balboa H igh School, II. Cadet Company, 29; Ihlb:>:'! H igh, '11 u. S. S. "CLEVELAND" ( HEA\ Y\\"EI GI-ITS) VS. BALBOA HIGH. Balboa H igh p layed t h e U S S. Cle velalld heavyw e i ght t ea m f our gam es o f basketball. The sailo r s won t h e first two ga m es but t h e h ig h sc h oo l t ea m w o n the next two. The fina l game wa s the most exciting game p layed so far thi s se a son. h en tim e had call ed t h e score was f ound to b e 3 1 t o J I. Fi ve minutes' extra time was pla yed. Balboa H ig h won by a free throw. u. S. S. Cle:ulaml, '21 ; Balboa H igh, II. GA"IE. u. S. S. Cle:Jtlalld, 33; B alboa H igh, 19. THIRD GAME. B alboa H igh, '29; U S S. Clr:;rlalld. '9. rOURTH GAME. B alboa High 32; U. S. S. ClcJeland, 31. u. s s. "CLEVELAND" (LICIJTWEIGHTS) VS. BALBOA H IGH. The U. S. S. Cleveland lightwe i g hts were t wice def ea ted b y the hig h sc h oo l fiv e. The f eature o f the fir s t game wa s the def ellsi ve work o f L a nder s and 0' Brie n. The second game wa s m o r e exc i ting a s it was any body's game u p to within a minute o f t h e e nd, wh e n Balboa scored the final b.l s k e t fiRS T GAME. B.alboa H i g h, 30; U. S S. CI,::"t 'and 3. SECOXD GAME. B a l boa H igh, '21; U. S. S. Cloeltllld, 19. C A DET VS. BALBOA H IGH SCHO O L r lRST B alboa High, '28; Cadet C ompany, 'l'l. u. S S. T ACOiv IA" VS. BALBOA HIGH. One o f t h e best games that have b ee n played o n t h e B a l boa floor took pl ace J anuary 26, w h e n the U. S. S. T acollia basketball team was defeated after having apparently won t h e game fro m the hi gh sc h oo l squad. Balboa E-1ig h started th e game b y scoring the first basket. The sai l ors also scored and the first quarte r ended with Balboa H i g h School 8 and T acoma 6. The sai lors g:tined in t h e seco n d quarter and at t h e end o f t h e first half the scor e was 1 2 to II in favo r of t h e U. S. S. T acoma During the third quarter m a n)' fine s hots w ere made, especially by B rown of Balboa, but t h e hig h sc h oo l was s till o n e point b e hind t h e sai l ors w hen th e thi r d quarter e nded-U. S. S. T acollla, 20; Balbo a H i gh, 9. The combinat i on o f Capwe ll, B issell, and B rown made a gap in t h e U. S. S. T acoma's d e f ense through whi c h basket a fter basket was s hot. The final score of the game was, B a lb o a High 28 ; U S. S T acoma, 2'2. TENNIS. The a nn ual hig h sc h oo l tennis tournamen t found the J uniors and Seniors contenders f o r first place. The Seniors won, however, with a total of 2 1 p oints The Junio r s were second, sco ring ,+ p oints t h e Soph o m ores third with 1 0 points, and the Freshme n last w i t h n o poi n ts The Sopho m ores a n d Fres hm en were n o t represented on the courts with full team s alth o u g h there are many good players in the classes. BO\,S' SI!\'GLES. Semifinals W. Sergeant (Junior) defeated L. Landers 6-:::. \V. Banton (Sop h omore) defeated R. Engelke (Freshmen), 6--h Fina/s. W. Sergeant Uunior) defeated W B ::lnton (Sophomore), 6-1, 6-0.

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. 1 6 THE ZO:\, IA:\' GIR.I.S '''GlES. SemijilltliJ Elois P earson (Senior) defeated Gt!rrrude ,":tn H arlicvcid (J uniorl 6-0, 6--0. A rlee Green (Sop h o more ) defeate d Fres hman ( forfeit ) Fillals. Elois P earson (Senio r ) de feare d :\rlce Green (So ph o more ) 6-1 ,6--0 MIXED OOl'SlES. Semifilllds Cecelia Twomey-Wm. Sergeant (Juni ors) defeated Arl ee Green \\"01. Banton (Soph omort:s), 6-j --5. Elois P e:lrso n -L. L anders (Se niors) defeated Fre s hm en ( forfeit. ) Fin tlis E lois P C:lfSonL. L anders (Se n iors) de feat ed Ce ce lia Twomey-\\'. Sergeant 6-.+, 6-2 OOl;SLES Semijilltl/J. \\'. Sergeant-B. El gin (Juniors ) defeated F res h men ( f orfei t ) I.. L anders-E B rady ( Seniors ) defeated W. BantonH Cla rk (Sopho m o res ) 6-3 -+-6, 6-2 Fi/wh 1.. L a nders-E. B rady ( Seniors) de feated W. Se r geant-B. Elgin (juniors), 6 4.7-5. AQ UAT1 CS The 1921 aquatic team ha s b ee n a g r eat c redit to Balb oa H igh. The rday swimming t eam, \\' B rown, G .\ Iorton, \\'. All e n, a n d T Knapp, won the Isthmian Relay Champions hip :tgainst ail comers, including our old riv:!1, t h e Cri stobal H igh School. The outlook f o r a str o n g swimming combination for ne x t rear l ooks ver y poor, as three of our b es t sw imm e rs, \\' illia m All e n Gtorg e Capwell, and T hc()(j on: Knapp, will g r ad uate this ycar. Fortunately t his p css imi s ti c vitw was co mplettly s wept away a s th e F re s h man class conrril nlendid mattrial in G. i\1orton, \ \'. A. Kr au se, R. P ea r so n R En ge lk e, and F Newhard HIG H !::.CHOOI. AQUATIC MEET. On 17cbruary 1'2, 1 9'2 1 t h e Fres hm e n and Senio r aquati c teams met at t h e Balb o a swimming poo l to participate in t h e Annual Balb oa H igh S c h oo l Aqunti c M ee t. The J uni o r s and S o ph omor es did not enter team s a s v e r y f e w o f t h e athletes in th ese c l a sses arc fas t s wimm e r s The Seniors were co nfid e n t of w innin g, as t h e ir team

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THE ZO:\,TA:\,. co n s i s ted of crack swimmers altho u g h their numbe r wa s limited. The Fres hm an cla ss took advantage o f t h e ir superio r number o f swimme r s and entered fres h swimme r s in ever y event, whi c h the S enio r s w e re unable to do; consequ e ntl y t h e 17reshmc n too k secon d and third pla ces in almos t every e v ent. They al so won three fir s t pla ces out o f the eight events, whi ch, with the ai d o f t h e Freshman girl swimme r s, e nabl e d the m to win th e meet b)' t h e cl ose scor e o f 66 to 62 p oints B o)'s' jo-)'"rd br((lSf slrokt. R. Engelke, fir st, time J-:-seco nd s (Fres hman). R. P earson, seco nd (Fres hman), Krause and Allen tied for third place. 80.\'$' -/2-)'n,.,/ ollck slrolu. R En gelke, first; tIIne 32 seconds ( Freshman). T Knapp, seco nd (S::niod W. i\leyers, third (Freshman). BOYJ' pllll/gi' for diJlana. Will. Allen, firs!; distance, H feet (Senior). A. Krause, second (Freshman). \\'. l\leyers, t h ird ( F reshman), B o.\']' mu. :\lIen, Cap""e1I, Brady, and Krupp, first (Se nior s). l\lorlon, l\lc\ers, Engdke, and Krause, second F )..'ewhard, first (Freshman). R. Pcarson, seco n d ( Freshman). T Knapp, third TRACK. The Canal Zon e H igh Sch oo l s h e ld the ir annual trac k and fie ld m ee t at the B alboa Stadium o n Saturda)" April 2 '92'. Balbo a H igh S c h ool "'o n the m ee t, defeatin g Cristobal Hi g h S c h oo l b y 9 p oints Frank R a yrnond, the all -around Cristobal athl e t e wa s t h e highest point winn e r. H e took f our fir s t pla ces twO second places, o n e thin.1 pla ce and made a total o f '17 points F o r Balbo a Hi g h Landers was the hig hest sco r e r making 8 points; h e wa s ably a ss i s t ed by Bisse ll, i\l iles, and in making a winnin g score o f 38 points. 'The r esults of the e v ents are as follow s : Eoml No. I-Ioo-yard ,1aJh. I. ( C. 1-1. 5 ) Raymond, time not r ecorded ( B. H S.) 3. (B. H S.) B issell Evml No. 2-22o-)'flrd dlllli I. (C. I I. S.) Raymond (ti me not reco rded). _. ( B. H S ) 3. (B. H 5.) L anders. Evml NO.J-12-lb. J/lol pilI. I. ( B I -I. 5.) Landers (distan ce 35 feet 1 inch). 2. (e. H S.) D uey. J. ( C. 1-1. S.) Raymond. Er:ml j \o.-/-Runnillgoroadjump. 1. (C. 1-1.5.) R :t\'mond (distance, I reet 1 0 in.::hesL _. l B II. S.) ternll. J (B. II. S.) I.ander s. EDOlf No. 5-S/(lIIdillg oroad Jllmp 1. ( B I -I. S. ) t iles (distance, 8 reet I [ 1Ilches ). (e. 1-1, 5.), Raymon d. J. (Il. 1-1. S.I B issell. Evenl No. 6--/00-)'(/1"(1 JI/IIIIII' rela)' mao 1. ( H II S.) \Iilc<;, Campbell, Bissdl, and Landcrs. 2. (C. II. S.) 00\ Ie, Duer, Eherer17, a.nd Raymond. .1. ( B I -I. S.) li gen Knapp, "-lorton, and j\J iller. I. (c. II. S.l I bymonJ (di<;tance,.H f.;ct inches.) _. ( H II. S.l "brton. J. (13. II. S.l L anders. Et'<'II1 ,\'0. S-R/UJ//ing Izigl/ Jump. 1. (13.1-1.5.) B issell ( h e i ght, + feet 9 inches). _. C C.II. S ) Raymond. J. (C. II. S.) Tor(z/ SC01"l!, gir/J aud bO)'J. I. Balboa H igh School, 76. '2. Cri s tobal I-ligh School, T olal Jeore 00.\'$' n'ol/J Oil!)', I. 1 3alb oa I-Itgh Schoo l 38. _. Cri stob.ll II '(ih Sc h ool, J+. 7l1dgeJ,-l-Iomer Baker. 1-1. ;\lanassa, allli G. Wai nio. Srmur. J. C. Burkhol der. Scort'r R H ughes 4 7

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THE ZONIAN. BASEB!\LL. The Balboa Hi gh S c h oo l bos e ball team was organized rathe r la te thi s year and so far thi s seas'Jll only f ou r games ha ve been playe:l-on e with rh e Quarry H eights enlisted m en's t eam; and three with Cristobal Hi gh S c h oo l f o r the Canal Z o n e H igh S c h oo l B ose ball Champio n s hip. The Canal Z o n e H igh Schoo l seri es wa s W Oil b y Cris t o bal after a hard fig h t with the Balboa Hi gh School t e am. B y winning th e 1921 c hal11-pi o n ship in bos e ball, Cristobal H i g h h as filnll) realized o n e o f its great ambitio n s, whi c h has b ee n shattered y ear after y ear in the pa:3t by n stro nger Balbo a nin e FJ RST GA:-'l E. The fir s t game of the series wa s p laye d at the Balboa stadium F ebruary '26 1921. RaYl1l':mj o f Cris t o bal wa s in lin c f orm, all o win g but two sing l es Landers of Balbo a pitched the first three innings but retire d afte r the third, on a ccount of hi s arlll. Cris t o b :t1 H i g h managed to ge t only o n e hit fro m Landers in three innings P ena pitc hed the remainin g six innings f o r Balbo 3 High and was touched f o r two hi t s Balbo a was one run ahead o f Cri s t o bal until the e ighth inning wh e n J Solomon knocked a 3-base hit over P earson's head, with second and third blsesoccupi e d. \\,ith thi s addition Cristobal took the l e a d fro m Balboa and m aintained it to t h e e nd CriSlobal J-/;-gi Sci/oat, P layers. Ebe r enz 2b I lenter, l b .. Do),le, Jb E S:)lomon, c. J Solomon 55 . Raymond, p D ucy. rf T ownsend, If. Cloke, cr Whi te Jb Tora!: .. AB. R, II. E. o 0 I 2J 4 E ngelke, ss J 0 0 4 Pt!:J.rson, d 4 I I 0 C;tpwell, C 4 1 1 0 P cn:!, Jb., p J 0 0 0 B rown, If cf o 0 0 l3Ie:J.klc)" 1 b o 0 0 Landers, p JI.> 1 0 0 0 Toral s Score b y inn ing'! AB. Il. H E 5 001 o I 0 5 I 1 0 o 0 0 000 400 0 Cristobal J ligh Schoo l .0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0-4 B;"b03 I f igh Schoo l '2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0-3 Umpire-P flifi'er. Scorer Bur k h o lder SECO:-;rD GA:o.'IE. The Balbo a H igh S c h oo l base ball n ine crossed the Isthmus all Marc h 5, 92 1 to tackle the Cristob:d t eam on the Col o n diamon d in the second game of the seri es A hard stru,5g l e w;!:; anti c i pate'.! a s the teams had playe d excellent ball in the fir s t game and see med to b e evenly matched. The expectatio ns f o r a fighting game were n o t realized, as Balbo a easilv defeated Cristobal by the on e -s ided score of 1 9 to 9 Both s i des made many errors; Cristob:d was credited w i t h II and Balbo a with 8 Zimmerman pitch ed for Cristobal but was removed i n the fifth inning. During the southpaw's fiv e-inning career, Balboa Hi g h made II runs Raym o nd filled the gap but d i d n o t succeed i n stopping t h e B a lb::>a sluggers a n d was knocked f or eight more runs The s l ugg e r o f the tby was Capwell, who poled Ollt two doubl es and three singl es out o f six trips t o t h e plate. B1.'h(J(I I/." g/i S cI/30t. C r isfoh.d tFg'/ Sci/to.'. Pbyers A B. R. I -I. E. 2b. 6 Pl:t),er s D J), l e 3b .. AB. R H E. 5 I B rawn, If.. En ge l ke 55 ... Capw e ll, c .. L an ders JI.> .. Gleakley,lb i\l orToli c f N ewharJ, rf.. Pc:1:t, p T o tal s .. .. 2 I 0 El.>e renz, 2b .. 5 J 0 I T ownsend, II.>. 5 I J. So l omo n, ss .. .. I 0 2 f. Ibymond,c-p .. .. Zimm e rm'l1, p,lf 5 I I I Du ey, rf. I 0 C l o ke, cf.. o White, If. 4 0 1 9 J'2 8 Totals ...... JS Score oy ianing:;, 0 I 2 I I 3 2 0 0 2 7 II B .tlbO:l H i g h Sch ool.. 0 1. 5 I 4 '2 1 -19 Cri s t oba l H igh S : h ool.. 0 0 0 3 '2 2 '2 0 0-9 U npi,cs-Cart)', J R aymoml. Scorer-Sergeant. TIIIRD CAME. J n the m os t exc itin g gam e of t h e series Cri s t::>bai Hi g h S c h oo l d e f eated Balbo a H igh Sch o o l b y the c l ose sco re of 8 to 7 This game was the third and d eciding game o f t h e seri es and by thi s v i ctory over Balbo a, Cristobal H igh n o w h olds t h e champ i o n s hip in base ball f o r the Canal Zon e hig h sc h oo l s Raymond and L a nders were ass igned t o do t h e pitc hin g. Both pitch ers WCI'C very lib e r a l in ing m e n to r e ac h first. I n the t h ird inning,

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THE Landers b ec am e t oo g e n e r ous an : 1 p ermitted the Cri s t o bal t eam to chalk u p fiv e runs consequ ently h e was r elieved b y P ena. P ena was hit for two runs in the f ourth inning but easi ly h e l d t h e Crist o bal H ig h scoreless during the rest of the game Up to the seventh inning Cristobal was leadin g by a big margin but in the e i g hth inning Balbo, Hig h made a rall y whi c h brought in f ou r runs \ Vith tw o m e n dow n a ninth innin g rall y was also f ormed whic h bro u ght i n another run the game was ended b y Ebere nz's pretty catch o f Enge lke's f o ul fly after a hard run. J So l o m o n and Raym o n d were co nspi c u o u s with t heir batting; the f o rmer kn oc k ed out ( nur s ingl es at f our tim es at bat, whil e th e latter procured a tri p l e which wa s th e only extra bas e hit o f th e game. A n o ther f eature o f th e game wa s i\lil es' o n ehan ded catch of White's lin e dri ve which s h oulJ ha vz b ee n a h it. Cris tobal f1ig!1 SclmJ/. B.,:!})" lIigh Sdtool. P layers. All. R H E. Pbrers. AB. R H E D oy l e 3b .. I 0 3 i\l iles, 'lb 0 Eberen'l c .. 3 I 0 I B r ow ll, If. I I 0 ( e nt e r, l b .. 5 I I 0 En gelke, ss I So lomon, ss .. I 0 Capwell, c 5 I I 0 R a)'mond, p 3 I I 0 B leakle y I b I fI.! endez, rr. I I 0 Newhard, rr. 3 I A s h ton, 'lb. 3 Pena,3b.-p 0 I 0 White,lf. I 0 0 cf 3 I I 0 L i n czer, cf.. 0 0 I L anders, p-Jb 0 0 I Duey If. . . P earson rI 0 0 0 T ot:ll s ... ... 3 8 7 Totals ... 35 Sco r e br inning. Cristobal High School. I 0 5 0-8 B a lboa H igh School. 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1-7 B urkholder. Scorer-Knapp. QUARRY H E I GHTS VS. BAJ.BOA HIGH SCHOOL. The Quarry H e i g hts enlisted m en's ba se ball t eam c hallenged the B a l b o a H igh Sc h oo l team to a game o f baseball. The hi g h sc h oo l accepted, and the teams I'ne t o n the Balboa d iamond o n Marc h 2 1921. The game that f ollowed was not exc iting as the high sc h oo l t eam g r ea tl y outc lassed that of their rival. G ood sportsmanship pre vailed throughout the game and not a hin t o f an a rgumen t was n o ti ced, due n o doubt t o t h e jus t manner in whi c h Neeson, a hig h sc h oo l student, umpired. Capwell and Enge l k e earned h o n ors MR 773-1.9-4 f o r tho day Capwell hit a home run into deep center Engelke hi t a l o n g drive into l e f t fiel d which enabled him t o r e ac h third base. Isaac st:1rreJ f.Jr the s:Jldiers, as h e played a f a ultl ess game at third and g o t three sing l es at f o u r tim:!s lip to the pia teo B'l/boil lIigi School. P l:tr ers AB. R H. E. P b yers A ll. R H. E. Isaac,3b I 3 0 Newh.lrJ, rr. I 0 ss 0 0 I 2b I Conrad, c I Engelke, ss 2 0 D:lr,lb J I I 0 Capwell c I Standorf, 2b BI.:.lkler, I b 3 0 B ushy cf 0 0 0 B rown, If. 3 0 0 0 Seher, If 3 0 I I P C:lrson,3h 3 0 0 0 H ir;;hman rf i\l o n o n, cf 3 0 G oldstine, p. 2 0 P en:l, p . Tou! 20 Total s 29 7 I B al b oa Sc h oo l 3 I 0 I I 1 'X-, Qu:ury HciJhts 0 '::> 0 0 0 S..:-orer-3urkht;lder. TR.KK I n the Balbn a H igh Sch oo l inte rclass athle ti c m ee t f o r 19'21 the Senio r and F reshme n cla sses w e r e again co mpetitors f.)r fir s t place, reca llin g the inte n se rivalry whic h ex isted in t h e interclass aquatic m ee t b e tw ee n t h e S enio r s a n d Fres h m e n. J\l u c h o f t h e great e n t h u s ia s m w h i c h has always b ee n characteri s ti c in thi s event wa s lacking, due partly to the number o f athletes w h o have b ee n barred in all sch oo l activities because of f a ilin g work; many athletes have specialized in o th er branc h es o f athletics. The Seniors thi s time defeated t h e Freshme n and made u p f o r t h e ir d e f eat in the a q ua tic m ee t. Bi ssell a n d L a nders w e r e t h e high p oint winn e rs, scoring 1 6 and I S p oints respectivel y, f o r th e Seniors. For th e J uni ors, i\lilJe r scored 8 p oints The Freshmen h ig h scores were J\J iles, who made 1 I points, and I\:rause, who scored 6 points. The class scores are as f ollows: Points. Senio rs.. 38 Freshmen.. J uni ors ............... Sop h omores ............

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50 THE ZONIAN. I. L nnde r s (Se ni or) T ime not recorded. J\l iles (Freshma n ) j. B issell (Se nior ) 120-YAKD DASH. Landers ( Seni or) T ime n o t r eco r ded. _. 1\l iies (Freshman) 3 B issell ( Seni o r ) Rl:XXIXC BROAD jLMI I. I iles ( F reshman) D istance, 1 6 feet, 9 :nches. '2. B issell (Senio r ) 3 O'Br ien (Se nior ) STANOIXC BItO,\O Jl':'ll'. I. J\ljller (Junior ) Dist;nce,8 feet, S inc h es. 2.. Krau se (Freshman) 3 B issell ( Senior ) I. L a n ders ( Senior ) Distance, 33 feet, '1 inc h es. '2. Kr ause (Freshman), 3 Capwell ( Senior ) 440-YARD RELAY. I. O'Bri en, Capwell, B issell, and L anders (Seniors ) '2. J\l iles, Engelk e, K rau se, and Mor ton (Fres hm e n ) 3. Blizzard and ligen (J uni o rs). RUNNING H O I', STEI', AND J UMI'. J. B issell ( Seni o r ) D istance, 3'2 feet, 6 inc hes. '2. i\lonon (Freshman ) 3 En ge lke ( F reshm an ) RUNNING HIGH JUMP. I. B i sse l l (Se nior ) H eig ht,4 feet, 7 inc h es i\ l iller (Junior ) 3 En gelke (Fres hm an ) GIRLS' ATHLETICS. Elfie! P. S. Gelman, 21. Our climate b e ing a m os t fav orabl e one f or year around athletics, our high sc h oo l i s naturally interested in t h em, b oth b oys and girls Girls' athle ti cs this year ha ve compri sed more sports than ever b e f o r e, co n s i s tin g o f swimming, diving, ba sketball, track and fie ld, a n d tenni s B a s k e tball see m s to be t h e m os t popular, and ever yo n e from the Fres hm e n n ovices to t h e adep t and profici ent Seni o r s floc k e d out f o r th e t eam trial s \ Ve h a ve had two leagu es, an Inte r c l a ss and 3n I s t h m i a n whi c h have devel o ped so m e excellent p l a ye r s I NTERCLASS BASKETBALL. I nterclass girls' ba s k e tball was again e a s i l y captured b y the Seniors, w h o f o r three year s in succession have won fir s t place th e la s t twO yea r s with 1,000 per cen t. The fact t hat five of t h e Senior p layers were c h osen f o r th e hig h sc h oo l team certainl y speaks w ell f or the ability o f the Senior team. The oth e r places went to th e Junior s, Sophomores, and Fre;:s hm e n, in t h e orde r named. The Seniors, w h o have al so p rogressed in u n i forms, surprised the other classes la s t year with red middies a n d blac k bloome r s, ou r class colo r s This yea r, w e appeared o n t h e floor in red athletic jerseys and bla c k bloo m ers The hig h sc h oo l t eam h as adopted this unifo rm in t h e high sc h oo l co l o rs, gold and bla c k. Ollr lin e u p i s : Marie M cMahon, captain and f.; F l orie net Matter, f.; Cathe rin e Parme t e r g.; C o rn elia van Hardeve ld, g ; IVIae \ \ I)'nn e c .; Ethe l Getman, c.; Mari e N I cMaho n '21 captain of both the Senio r and hig h sc h oo l t eams, d eserves mu c h c redi t for t h e work a s captain of three t ea m s during h e r f our years o f hig h sc h ool. With h e r a s leader, the S ophomores o f 1 9 1 9 won the l eag u e championship for t h e first time J STH)'IIAN I1ASKETBAJ.L LEAGUE. The Balb o a Hi g h S c h oo l g irl s made the ir fir s t appear a n ce i n t h e Isthm ian Bas k etball L eague whe n t h e)' pla yed An co n on D ecembe r 4, 19'20. The team pic ked by Mi ss Gai t h e r, our coac h wa s made lip of t h e follow in g : Marie M cMahon, captain and f.; Fl orie n e t Matte r f.; Cath e rine Parmeter, g ; Cornelia vall Hardevel d, g.; Arl ee Gree n e, g. ; Ol ena Hutc hin gs f.j G ertru de van

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THE 51 Harde ve ld, c.; Ethel Getman c. T his pro\'cd to be a most exciting game. The h all was crowded w i t h fans w h o were not disappointed. The game was not decided until t h e very last minute w hen Fl oricllet i\latter of B alboa made a ncat ba s ket whi c h bar e l y c leared the net as t h e w h i s tl e bl e w for time. Ba lboa c heered Ancon and Ancon p r o m p tl y returned i t, and th e B alboa girls t rotted of r t h e R oo r wit h on e of t h e h a rdest game ever p layed to t h ei r credit. The score was '28 to 2 7 in favor o f Balboa. January 29 w e played Gatun again and easily bea t them b y a score of 1 8 to 8 T hi s game tied Gatun and Balbo a f o r fir s t place, cau sing another game to b e played in order to decide the winne rs of t h e c hampio n s hip. \\'e w o n anothe r e a s y victory fro m t h e Cri s t o bal team a w eek late r by a sco r e of [0 [ [, This o n e co mpl e t e d our sc hedu l e wit h t h em, \Y e t h ink t hat Cristoba l h a s done w ell during thesh ort tim e th ey h a ve b ee n organized. T h e championship game of th e I sthmus, b e tw ee n Balboa .. 'and Gatlin, wa s played o n t h e ETlIEL CETMA's, ,\RLEE CREES, CATIIERINE :\IARIE )lc:\I\IIOS (Captain). CERTR\."DE \'AS II \RDE\'ELD, \",\S HARDE\'ELD. OLESA IIl'TeIllNC"',\S!) FI.OII;II;SEr :\hTTER, Y e played Qur second game at Gatun D ecem ber II, w i t h t h e fast G atun s ix. Thing s w ent evenly all t h e w a y th ro u g h u n ti l G atun scored a b as k e t Tho u g h we tried h a r d we could not get anoth e r b asket to sq uare t h ings up. The final score s h owed t h e Gatun t ea m vict o rious by two po intSI I to 9. The game wit h Cristobal on D ecember 18 wa s a wa lk-away for B a lboa, t h e sco r e b eing 44 t o 8 Whi l e C ristobal p layed hard, Balboa was too fa s t for t hem. B a lboa and Pedr o are n o t very w ell match ed as t h e latter team is n e w at ba sketball, b u t the)' took t heir defeat like good sports Pedr o was unable to score w h i l e B a lboa made 41. gyrn floo r at the Cristobal and Navy Y," Both t e am s w e r e at a disadvantage h e r e, as neith e r h ad e vt;:r play ed on t h i s floo r b e f o r e T h e m embe rs of t h e two teams compared v e ry fav orably in s ize and s kill and w h e n the whi s tl e blew 1'2 nervous girls f ound their p os iti ons, determined to fight to th e la s t seco nd, T h e first half was practically all played by the Gatun forwards and Balboa guards, Shot after s h o t was tried but all fell s h ort o f their mark. W h e n the Balboa team finall y did get the ball to its f orwa rd s i\\ arie j\[ ci\lahon sco r ed the first goal o f the gam e \\' h en time was called the sco r e s t ood :2 to o. Gatlin r efused to let i t r e main so and in th e third quarter they sco r ed a goal, making i t two a ll. I n the last quarter, every player was

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T H E ZONIAN. on her mettle. :\" 0 one was left unguarded for a second and real teamwork s howed why Balboa and and Gatun stood at the top of the leagu e. Fl o ri enet i\latter, of Balboa, made a goal; then L ulu l-lenter scored for Gatlin. T h e s id e lines were in an uproar and Balboa's 3 rooters were g iv e n Gatun's '20 a run f o r t heir m o n ey The w h i s tl e blew and the referee announced that Gatlin had made a foul. .-\.s l\\arie iVIcl\Iaho n stepp ed into the ring to make a free s h o t the room was quiet but a second afterwards it was filled with s h outs and groansfor s h e had made it! [ n vain did Gatlin try to retaliate; but Balboa stood firm and every girl played as s h e never played befo re. \\'he n the la s t whistle sounded Balboa had won b y one point rh e I sthmian c hampionship. AQUATICS. Swimming, QUf year around amusement, was well represented thi s year and a n ew champion surprised u s all. El ea n o r Garrard, o f th e Fres h man class, starred in the inte rcla ss aquatic m ee t. All past girls' records were broken for t h e dash es and although l\l i ss Garrard has ani), b ee n swim ming about a year, s h e pro mi ses to develop into a real champio n if her rapid advancement continues Our former champion of the Jsthmus and high sc h oo l J\Iari e J\!cJ\ Jahon, o f the class o f''1 I has given up swimming, appearing f o r the la s t time in the aquatic meet. Fancy diving is a n cwart in which Fl oricnet J\Iatter, also of the class o f '21, has made a name for herself b)' doing perfect swans from the 3 4 foot tower. The f o llowin g is a result o f the events of the interclass aquatic meet held at the Balboa swimming pool. EVE:"TS. 50-YARD BREAST STROKE. /. :u. '1, G. van H ardevel d 50-YARD S W I\I. I E. Garra rd, ''24' 1 A. Green e .1. I. E. Garra r d ''14. '2 3 C. van H ar de vel d 'l'l-YARI) SWIM. I. E. Garra rd, ''2.;. '1. A. Grt:ene. 3. '21-YARD BACK STROKE. I. E. Garrard, ''24. '2. G. v an H ardeveld P Lt;I'CE fOR DISTANCE. 1.1\1. W ynne, '21,49 feet. 1 Ni cewonger. 3. L. Rathbone. I. 17. ''21. 1. E G a rr ard 3. G. van H arde\'eld. RELAY RACE. I. r.r es hm en (Garrard, !\icewonger, Rath bo ne :md Garwood ) CRISTOltAL HIGH SCHOOL US. BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET. \\'e w ere surprised to see so many o r t h e Cristobal H ig h S c h ool girls come over for t h e track m ee t this year, as h ereto f o r e t h e B a lboa girls have never b ee n called upo n to d e f e n d our title t o t h e championsh ip. Saturdar, : \pril 2, we won anothe r victory over Cristobal by b eating the m in the trac k meet. T hi s makes u s c hamps o f bas k etball, swimming, and track. The latte r wa s the hardest or all to win as C r i s t o bal h as some excellent athle t es E dna Campbell o f Cristobal score d in almost all t hedas h es w h i l e Llana Rath b o n e '24-, and Ethel G etman, ''11 } won t h e broad and high jumps f o r B a lboa, setting n e w r ecords for the Canal Z o n e in b o t h event s The list of events was as f ollo w s : 50-YARD DA SH. I. E. Campbell (C r istobal). 1. L. L :l\vandi (Cristo bal) 3. E. Getman ( Balb o a ). 75-YARD DASH. I. E Getman ( B alb o a ) '2. E. Campbell ( Cristobal). 3. ( B alboa ). RAS E R A I I .'-HROW. I E. Camphell ( Cri s tohal). '2. i\Jc;\lahon ( B alboa ) 3 L. H elHer ( Cri s tubal ) I. F. ( B alboa ) '2. E. Campbell ( Cri stobal) 3. C. van J I a r develd ( B alboa).

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THE ZONJAN 53 R UNNING BROAD JUMP. I. L. Rathb one ( B a l boa) 1 2 feet E. Campbell ( Cri stobal) 3 E. Getm an ( B alboa). STANDI NG BROAD jU:l.IP. I. L. Rathbone ( B a l boa), 6 feet, 7 inches. 2 1\1. td d ... lahon ( B alboa) HIGH t. E. Getman ( B alboa), 4 feet, z in c hes. 2. L. R u s h (Cristo b al). 3 E. Campbell ( Cri stobal) IlEI.AY RACE. I. C ristobal. 'l. B alboa. INTERCLASS TRACK I\ IEET. Not so mu c h inte r es t a s i s u s uall y s h ow n wa s take n thi s year in the track meet o n A pril 1 6, especially by the lIp per c la sses, and tlt e S opho more s ha d n o tro ubl e in win n ing it. C ece lia T\vo mey, '22, made t h e hig hest individual score in points, with 23. Lla na Rathbo ne, '24, wa s next wit h 1 6, and E sthe r Gree n e, '23 a close t hird with 14 p oints The f ollo win g re sults o f events: BASEBAI. L THROW. I. E. T w omey, '.11 140 feet. 2. A. Greene. 3 1\1. '\ Iet-d a h an. BASKETBALL I. A. Greene ':!3, 53 fee t 2. C. van H ardeveld 3. H P iper 8ROAD JUMP. I. L. R:nhb o ne, '2..j., 7 feet, ..j. inc hl!s. 2. C. T womey 3. A. Greene RUXXING BROAD JUMP. I. L. R athbone, '2..j., 12 feet z. E. Gre ene 3 T. J ensen. RUNNING HIGH JUMP. I. E. Greene ''23, 3 feet, 8 in c h es. 2. L. Rathbone. 3 A Greene 75-YARD DASH. I. C T womey, ''l2. 'l. E. Greene 3 A. Gret:ne. 50-YARD DASH. I. C. T womey, ''l2. 2. E. Gre ene. 3. L. R athbone. 2oo_YARD RELAY RACE. I. Seni o rs. 1\1. l\lc1\lahon. 1\1. D uncan. 1\1. W y nn e G. J o hn. 2. Fresh men L. Rath bone T. J en sen. 3 J unior. C.Twomey. OUR" CHAMPS." R o b ert P earso n o f the Balboa Hi g h S c h oo l swimming team, in a r ecent aquatic meet s wam a distan ce o f 303 f ee t unde r water. B y swimming this di stance subme rg ed P earso n n o t o nly h as br o k e n t h e I sthmian record, but ha s al so shatte r ed t h e w orld's r eco rd. I n June the farn o u s Canal Z o n e Red, \ Vhit e and Bill e Trollpe will go to York to p e rform in i\I a d i so n Square Garde n. The membe rs co n s ist o f expert c hildren s wimm e r s and divers, ranging from + ye ars up. The troupe ha s per formed f o r Pres i de n t Porras o f Panama, Preside n t Harding, G e n e ra l P ers hin g, and othe r notables. Swimming instructor i\Ir. H. J. Gri ese r, who organized the troupe will have charge and will b e a ss i sted by B o b. \ Vhil e in York, P ea r so n will m ee t the present underwate r champion of t h e world, to contend f o r the titl e.

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5+ T H E ZON 1 AN. Jfae]. /1/ ),nl1(, '21. "Oh, wad so m e po,ver the giftie gie LIS T o see oursels :IS see us!" and truly an Exc han ge D epartment is b o th the power and the gift. Kindl y criticism i s o n e o f th e greates t good things in the workl and a wonderful aid to progress I f this d epartment h e lp s b y ever so little eve n o n e of QUI' exchanges it will have proved itself w orth while. 'e offe r our s in ce re s t thanks to our exchanges f o r the cooperation t hey have s h own and hope to put t h eir s ugge s ti o n s to goat! u se Our exc hange list n o w Ilumbe rs 4 0 strong a n d w e s h ou l d lik e to increase it. T h e f ollowin g sc h oo l pape r s and magazines ha ve be e n r ece iv e d t h i s year: T hr Argonaut, ;\lansncld, :\ i ass. The .-Irglls, Gardner, ).I;'lss. Tht BIl)'Qllel, Gt:rmantown, Ohio. 1'h( 8ul/e/ill, M ontclair, :-.:. J The Caribbeall, Cristobal, C. Z. L ife, Ohio. Chatham Chal/a, Chatham, '\. J The /)istaff, \1.1<'''. The Earl) Trauur, L awrence, The EaJUrner, Wa"hinl!ton, D. C. The Florida Flambetluf T allaha .. "cc, 1-1L. The Gluman, B ellevue, P a. The !/eadt;ght, R ichmond, I nd. The IIiXh School I/erald, i\la<;". Tlu l/iKh School Recorder, Sarawga Spring", N. Y. The Iilgh School Review, I. owell, i\l as ... The 'John 1\"orJhall Record, R ichmond, Va. 'Junto, Easton, P a Tile J..."(r, Battle Creek, i\l i c h. The Lincolnian, !\'ew castle, i\l e. Tlu L ookoll l, D erby, Conn. The Lycelllll, Ch illicot h e, Ohi o Til e M icrometer, Cincinn:lti, Ohi o The ,\lin'or, Columbus, Ohio. Th e ,\fissile, P eters bur g, \'a. Tile lVob/e mall, B os ton, f\lass. Nor'easler, Kan sas Cit)', 1\1 0 Tlu! Orient, I\l inneap olis i\J inn. Tile Revi ew W ashi ngton, D C. T ile Set ala, Se lma, Ala. Tile Senl in el, L eise nring, P a, Tlu Spectfllo r T renton,:-.:t .I. Th e Spot/ iglit, Fort Wa yne, Incl. Tile S lIldenl, Covington, K y Tlu S tlldml, Oklah o ma City, Okla. Tile T abula, Chicago, Ill. Tlu Trapru, Oak Park I ll. Tile f/idelle, L ancaster, P a. If'esl wtlr d I/o B altimore, i\l d Til e Irhisp, Wilmington, D el. Ti,e Yakima Wa s h. TIlt! lI 'jndo nit",. Will iman ti c Conn. BOOK R EVIE W OVkSEI.VE S AS OTHERS SEE Us. T H E ZONIAN-The Spanis h stories were excellent; so were the geogra phi cal pictures. W o uld not a Current Events col umn add to yo ur paper? Th e Distaff T H E ZONIAN-One of the best graduation numbers received Very ori gina l i s yo ur i dea o f sce nes; also c h ac of t h e F renc h and Spani s h stories.-The S tudent Oklahoma

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THE ZO:--lIAi'. 55 TH E ZOSIAl'O'.-our magazine is vcry attractive with its numerous pictures. \Ve admire your novel way of arranging your Soc iety Notes. Come again.-T ln' Re'Jit'w, L owell, Mass. THE ZONIAN from Balboa H igh School is an interesting magazine. Your cover design isone of the best we have seen Tht! Nobleman. THE ZOSIAS.-\\'C like your artistic cover, rour slOries are good, your jokes have pep; but why leave so much blank s pa ce after stories, etc. ? W e h ope your little pocm Why We Star," will be an incentive to oth er writers.-Tlle IV)'Ildolliall. THE ZONIAN.YOU have an excellent little paper .. 4.ccept our congratulations.-T /I( Ba)'otu/ THE ZONIAN. Your annual is well arranged. Y ou have many good stories and articles and rour class prophecy was verrclever indeed. Y ou also have many beautiful photographs, but there see m s to be a .. honage of drawings, illustrations, canoon s, and headings. Haven't you any anis-ts? W e would also l ike to suggest t hat rou enlarge your exc hange department. The Tllbulll. THE. ZONIAN.-Y Our paper is an especially fine one. T h e illustrations add much to its interest and attractiveness. W e were pleased to learn that your graduating cias" ga\'e the same pia)' "Green Stockings" that our graduating class gave.ArguJ. TH E are g lad to have TH E among our exchanges this year. The general excellen ce of its literar y content is a reason for pride in which itssistersch ool,dearold Cristobal, s h ares. No exchange among the man}' good ones received, with a far larger student bod)', excels it. I t is an enduring monument to the accomplishment of its contributors and a silent tribute to the devotion and zeal of its teacher o f Englis h ro.liss ro.1rrtis [\1. Gallup.The Cllribbuw. A s WE SEE OTHERS. Commerce Life, ColumblfJ, Ollio.-Y our paper i s very attractive and your snapshot arrangements particularly clever. "Commerce Bells" deserves special mention. Why not add a few more stories? DiJllljf, BOJIOn, .l/aJJ A good paper well supported by the students. \\'ou ldn't some new Cuts h elp? Studmf,Ok/llhomll Cit,v, Ok/a.-:\ snapp)" paper. Your cuts are good; also poems. lIigl, Scllool Recorder, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. Your literary department is very good. IVolwlml 110, Baltimore, ro.lcl.-A good magazine throughout. Your literary department is excellent and the idea of illustrating: the stories quite original in a high sc h ool magazine. SIUt/mt, Covington, K.y.-A splendid paper-your cutS are fine T luGlum(lJl, B ellevue, P a TluGlumllll is true to its title. Your jokes are excellent TIt( lIemlt!, Westport H igh Sc h ool, Kansas Ciq, ro.l o Y ou have:t very :tttractive magat.ine. Y o ur pictures are good and the littl e s ketch, "ro.lars, A Tragedy," was clever; but w ouldn't it improve your magazine to have a few stories and jokes and an exchange column? Tl,e T llbulll, Chicago, 111.-:\ fine magaline, one of the best exchanges we have r eceived. W e lik e your stories, we like four illustrations, we lik e your jokeswe lik e your magazine. 'n,e Cllribbean, Cristobal H igh School, Cristobal, C. Z.One of our best exc h anges. CtlribbMII is a splendid mag;t zinc. The articles of local interest are especially good and the school notes are very well arranged. T he stories and snap s hots are excellent. A s loral "Zonites" we are certainly proud o f our "sister paper," The Ctlribbrllll. Low tide at Pan:uIlll City

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6 THE ZONJA:-<. ___ -J

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THE ZONlAN 57 Ceci l \\" H u ssey, '18 who i s taking a c hemical engin ee ring c ourse at : \ m es I o wa, h as w o n a p l ace a s on e o f rh e 1 9 in a class o f 1 69 who have pass e d t h e fiv e standards in the ph ys i c al effic i e n c y test i\Iaria l-Iull sec k e r, ''20 ha s deci de d to b e a comme r c ial t e a c h e r and i s atte n ding l\l r St. J oseph C olle g e, Boston, s h e i s al so stud y ing m u s i c J o hn K ull e r, ''2 0 i s co n tinuing the excellent w ork that h e did in hig h sc hool in t h e L l niver sit), o f I llin o i s t a kin g a cOllrse in c h e mi ca l e n g ineerin g Eva Swill c h eart, '14-, f Jnnerly playg r o un d directress at C r i s t o bal, i s atten ding the R u ss i a n \'estoflSch oo l o f Danc ing in :"Je w York City. \ \,ilii am Fra se r, '14, i s e mployed a s a c ivil e ngi n ee r with an oil co m pany in Tamp i co, i\laria Els i e J o hn sol1, wh o s in ce s h e fini s hed high sc h oo l in 1911, has b ee n v e r y s u ccess ful in the mus i c w orld has giv e n mal1Y excellent vio lin r ecitals in diffe r ent parts o f t:l e States R e::e ntl y s h e gave a c o n cert at t h e o p e ning o f 'rheate r, Gre envill e J\l i ss A t present s h e i s studying in L a velie Fla. Blo s som Compton Bonitez i s living at F ort J \\'o rd has b ee n rece iv e d that Captain B onitez ma y b e trans f erre d to F ort Amador, C. Z. It i s hope d t hat this i s true a s Bl o ssom's many fri e n ds will b e v ery g lad to welc o m e her a g ain. "Our S c i e ntifi c Farmer," L y l e \ V omack, wh o wa s g ra d uated la s t rear, is taking a course in dairying thi s year in th e I o wa State C olle g e Ames has attrac ted anothe r o f the boys of t h e c l ass o f ''1 0 F owler B a nton wh o has take n up e l ectric al e n g i nt:er in g Fra n cis H olleran, Jr., 1 6 wh o during his hig h sc h oo l c a ree r was a n im portant figure in athletic circles, i s w o rkin g in Balbo a, and i s pla ying b:1se ball wit h the PanamaAn co n t eam. Charles \\'atso n i s taking an agri cultura l cou r se in the Uni versity o f J\li sso u ri. Eugene A s h had a most en j o y able B a lb o a H i g h r e uni o n at h e r h o m e in i\l o un t \Tern a n I o wa, d urin g the Christmas h olid a ys The re w e r e seven p resent who w e r e form e r m embe r s o f Balbo a H i g h S c h oo l 'e ofthc m b e in g alumni m embe r s They w ere : H e l e n Kas k e ( ro m Hammo n d Ind.; Gift Shady, '18, (r o m Davenport, I owa; Eli z a b eth A s h, 1 6 an d Dav i d A s h f ro m \ 'ernon; and L y l e \Vo m ac k, '20, and C ecil Hussey, 1 8 (r o m Ames, I o w a L ewis an d F rank are ba c k on the I sthmus L ewi s 1 5 is employe d b y the Munic ipal Enginee rin g Di v i s i o n, Balbo a and Frank, 1 7 i s workin g in t h e P e rsonn e l Bureau, Balboa H e ig h t s Charles \Y e i ss '18, i s stud ying surge r y in C olumbia Unive r sity, Nt!w Y o rk

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THE ZONIAN Bob" Getman, ''10, seems to be making quite a name for himself and t h e Canal Zone in swimming at the R ensselaer P olytec hni c Institute I n a competitive meet, D ecember 7 1920, h e won t he 50-yard dash, lowering the record to 27 + / 5 seconds. H e also took t h e fDO-yard s wim; set a new r eco rd for the 2'2o-yard swim at 3 minutes '2 4-5 seconds, and besides captured first place in the plunge, t hereby making the highest individual sco re-I S points. -\lbert Thayer, w h o was g raduated last yea r i s taking a literary course at Ann Arbor, rVlich. George D ewey i\Iitten, '16, will soo n return to Purdue C olle g e, Lafa),ette, Mi c h., to fini s h his engin ee ring co u rse H e i s at present e m p l oyed a s an engineer for the E lectri c lVlotor Company of Detroit, Mi c h. Frances Thornton and Georgia Ellsworth, both of the 1920 Senior class are taking secre tarial cou r ses. Georgia is attendi n g sc h oo l at Poughk eepsie, T Y. Frances h as entered South e rn Semi nary a t Buena Vista, \'a.} wh e re s h e is a l so taking a course in modern lan g u ages. \\'i lliam Christian, '20, i s doi n g excel l e n t wo r k i n the Univer sity o f l\laryland, havin g taken up a course in dentistry. Ruth \\'i l so n, ''20, w h o w as the a lum ni editor last year, and w h o took an active part in all sc h oo l affairs w h ile in h igh sc h ool, i s attendin g Pacard's B usiness School, \\'ood haven, L. I. Charles E. D avis, 1 8, w h o attended \\' a s hin g ton State College last term, is e mpl oyed with the Section o f Surveys, Balboa H eights but will return t o college;:: SOOI1. Jane Calvit, Frances \\'estberg, Clara W ood, H elen t\l illoy, Harry Grier, and Muro Golden of the class o f 1920, ha ve remained on t h e Z o n e, severa) of them being empl oyed h e r e D o r othea Atc hi so n i s n ow a junior in the Mj c h igan Agri cultural College Lans ing, Nlich. Gift S hady, I S i s studying c hiropractic in Davenport, I owa MARRIAGES. A wedding t hat wa s of inte rest to many on the Zone, espec iall y m embe r s of the class o f 1 8, took p lace at t h e Balboa Uni o n Churc h November 23, 1920, w h e n Rut h Dieter Farre ll, 'IS, became the bride of l\tJr.Ra y mon d Bu r mester. l\IIr. and l\'Irs Bu r mester have made the ir h o m e at Balboa. Doroth e a \Vestberg, 'IS, w h o wa s married to Mr. Raymond L. Fitzpatric k last spring, i s living in Brooklyn} i\T Y. Frankie R eis ner Meroney, I S was r ecently married to l\1r. B e nnett in St. L o ui s, M o T wo of ou r m os t popular teach e r s, M i ss E s t elle M c K e l vey and Mi ss Myrti s Gallup, were married r ecently rvfiss l\1c K e lvey, teach e r o f Latin, Anci ent History, and Freshman English was t h e fir s t to leave us. S h ewasmarried t o ]\1r. Cunningham Patterson last October. They are r es i d in g in Balboa. Last November our Englis h teacher,l\1iss Gallup, was married to Mr. H arry T. D rill, f or m erly principal of Cristobal sch oo l s, but now teacher of phys i cs in the State A gr i cultural C ollege o f Orego n. Mr. and Mrs Drill have made the ir h o m e in Cor valis, Oreg. P au l H. \\'arner, 1 5, w h o wa s married so m e time ago, ha s returned t o t h e Can a l Z o n e with his bride Mr. and Mrs \Varner a r e r es i di n g in Balboa, w here Paul" i s employed \\,i lliam R T o mey, 16, co mpleted his course a t \ V es t P o int last year, and wa s co mmi ssio ned a lieutenant, a n d a t present h e is stati o ned at Carnp B enning, G eo rgia H e i s to be marrie d to l\/[iss R H a yes of Cleveland, Ohio, in .T uly ADDRESSES. "The Alumni" grOW
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THE ZONIA N. C o r inne B rowning Aller. B alboa, C. z Emma Stubner. Emanuel P erry. F red B arber. A deline Babbitt, i\teriden, Conn. H elen Calkins, Sherman St., i\lorri<; Park, L ong I sland . '\rthur Howard, B rookline, Ma .. s l\l:trion B lake, H obart,lm!. J oe Udry, New York. William Fraser, B ox '116, T ampico i\l exico. D orothy i\b gnuson H :uplin B alboa, C Z. Blossom Compton B onitz, Fort j J ames Loulan, W a s hington, D. C. i\l iriam Stevens Bauman, Cristobal, C. z. Eleanor Comber. R ichard Hunter (deceased) P aul H Warner, Balboa H eights, C. Z L ewis i\l oore, Balb oa H eights, C. Z F red ( Whi ston) B ailey, :\h':ncdo l\l ining and l\l illing C o ., Terral, Chihuahua, l\l exico Andrew F raser, B ox 6.j.'1, B :dboa, C. Z. J o hn Loulan (dec eased ) Ethel Gowan, 25'2'2 Upperline Street, New Orleans, L a. Frankie R eisner Bennett, '2317 University /\ve., St. L ouis, r.l0. D orot h y W onso n, B oston, l\la ss. Esther Francis, 890 B eech St., St. P aul, r+.l inn. J osephine P rochaska, J effersoll, P hiladelphia, P a. Le<:lie J ennings Appleton, New Orlean s, L a. Elizabeth Porter A sh, r.l t V e rn o n, I owa. J ohn J. Br adley, Jr. Gabriel B utler, B ox '258, Ancon, C. Z. Ord G. Chrisman, c/o Kappa Sigma Frat., r+.l oscow, I daho. R ichard J D orsan, B a l boa, C. Z. Ave i\l aria ."g nes Doyle College of i\lount St. Vincent-on-th e H udson, New Y ork Sarah Elizabeth H arrison, Cristobal, C. Z. Catherine N. H inton, R ichmond, V a. Maria Elizabet h H olland, Ancon, C. Z. Franci s E. H olleran, J r., B alboa H eights, C. Z. Ph yllis K elley W arner, B alboa, C. Z. Geor ge D ewey Mitten, 776 L everenz Ave., Detroit, r+.l ich. J ames Y. Smith, '295 r.l iller :\ve., Columbus, Ohio. William Hartman Stevens, B alboa, C. Z. L ieut. W illiam R. T omey, Camp B enning, Ga. Edward H Clend enin, H clqrs ... ph D i \,_, Camp L ewis, T acoma, Wa sh_ Edward L loyd Gr eene, c / o Epsilon ;-"' u Gamma. P ullman, Wash_ Charles r.1. K e nnedy, B ox 233, J e r sey Shore, P a .. Agnes B everly K uller, Sansom St., P hilade lphia, Pa L illian M cGeac h y, Fanq-gap, I nd. Gertrude i\ld\:cnzie Absten, B alboa, C Z. R uth r.l edinger '251 1 12th St. N W. Washington, D. C. Frank E. l'vl oore, J r., B alboa H eights, C. Z. Ethel Ruth Otis P age, 9 Third Ave., Presidio T errace, San Francisco, Cal. W illard R opes Trask, Harvard College, Cambridge, M ass. Emilio Ville gas V., Unive rsity of L oui<:iana, Baton R ouge, L a. Gift Shady, 421 E. 14th St., Davenport, I owa. J ames Stephen Engelke, Cristobal. C. Z. Dorothea Westberg Fitzpatrick, '263 St., B rooklyn, ':'oJ. Y. J ohn W H ussey, B ox 161,Station "A," Ames, l owa Floren ce D orothea At chison, B ox 5"25, East L ansin g, Beatrice Glaw son, B alboa, C. Z. Harry Roberts Carson, 4 3'4 Bancroft H all, U S. Naval A cademy, Annapolis, r+.l d. Stewart r.lacfarlane, 4'2 r+.l orningside R d., Edinburgh, Scotland. \ 'irginia E. Winquist, B alboa, C. Z. L ouise D exter, '28 J o hn son Park, Buffalo, N. Y E. Charles W eiss HardIer H all 416-4 1 8, Colwnbia University, New York, N. Y. W innie r+.lae Stevenson r+.l cCauley, '21'28 Avenue I B irmingham, ."\ la. B ranson G. Stevenson, B ox '243, H elena, r.lont. John E d. W ilcox, R enssalaer P o lrrechnic T roy, :-J.Y. Charles E d. D avis, P edro r-.l igllel, c. Z. r+.l yron r+.1. Weaver, I ; th Co., 5th Rege, Quantico, \-a. F arrell Burmester, B alboa, C. Z. Frances E. Nelson, B ox '22, Ancoll, C. Z. George W Winquist, R enssalaer Pol ytechnic I nstitllte, N. Y. Calvin B. B reden, U. S. r+.Iilitary Academy, West Point, N. r. L ois K elso Greene, Balboa H eights, C. Z. Charles P Clarity, R enssalaer P olytechnic Institute, T roy, N. ) .-. Carolyn LaC}', 7 1 9 r.l adisoll Ave., r.lontgomery, .'\la. Charles J. Watson, J r., 604 Provide n ce Road, Columbus, r.l o Ruth Abbey Seaver, B alboa, C Z. J \ largaret V. Campbell, F. S. C. W. Br ower H all, Tallahassee, Fla. Earl Charles P almer, Suite No. 23,13; Peterboro St. Boston, (17),Mass

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60 THE Lucille Olive K operski,60:2 Emmett St., Ypsibnti, i\l ich. Manuel L. Quintero Columbia University, York, Y. :\orine H all, Garun, C. Z. Dorothy A Brown ing, 151 .,h e., B a ltim ore, Francis X. Kerr 1001 South 6th St., Ch3mpaign,l ll. M argaret F. H ollowell, B:llbn, C. Z. E\elyn J. Erickson, B alboa, C. Z. Blanchard \'i"ian H utchings, Chickasaw, Ala Julian H artman, Balb oa, C. Z. J anc:t E. Fraser, Box 6.f2, B alboa, C. Z. Hubert L anglois, \ 'illanov3 Colle,4e, Villan ov. l Pa, 192 0 Georgia L. ElIs ..... orth. Z70 St., )L Y J oh n W Walker 1001 South 6th St. Champaign, I ll. Fran ces Thornton, Southern Seminary, B uena V ist3, \'a. W illis R. Pressell, San Francisco, Cal. Carla Smith, :'I.h. Holroke College, South I bdler, ;\I:tss William P Christian, '2.V26 E. Baltimore St., B altimore, i\1J. J ane Calvit, B alboa, C. Z H U!1secker, l\lount St. J 03ep h C olle ge, 617 Cambri dge Street, B::>stOIl, l\bss. Lrle E:trle W om:tck, 119 Line::>ln W:t)", I owa. Ruth Wils on, 55 D .!nnington : \ ve., W o:::dhaven L. I. F ONler Blnton. c l o Signn Chi, Arne:;, I owa. l\l:trtha Zar:tk, P anam:t, R. P D avid ?\Ieville, Univ ersi ty of Idah::>, l d:tho Frances Westberg, B::>x 581, 1\n con, C. Z. 1\1. Th:t},er, 609 i\l onroe St., A nn Arb::>r, i\l ich. i\l. tbel L ee, Clyde, Ohi o A. G ..!tmln, Polrt:::hnic Institute, Tro}" N.\'. Anna Sire, R F. D., W estmi nster, W .lr r en D Jordan, C / 3 W. D D :), .dJie, 5-15 :--:e.v St., D Jv.!r, 1),1. J olm G.lIJe:l, Ihlbn, C. Z. Cllr.t \\'00.1, HeiJhts, C. Z. Su"ie Allen, c / o T. J 60S E. 138th St., 8ron'(, Y Harry Grier, B alb.:l:t, C. Z. It. hV(jut 1 !rI.K'I:SI(,l", l'luwma City

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THE ZO:\L\N. 61 George U.lllJl(tll, ;:!J, Ow e n w ent awa y Qwin' m o r e than h e co ul d pay, Owe n J\\oor e came bac k o n e day Owin' m o re. Cap,"",1/ (sw e"ing)-"Gee, I w o rk ed hard in w oo d\\orkin g I...nndt> rs -"\\'har yo u w o rkin g o n your h e a d? Ctlpwdl." H o w can I k eep my toes fr o m (ailin g a s leep ? l3isse/l D on't l e t e m [Urn in l\lr. !3oss-"\\'hat's th e mane r O'Brien, l oo k s i c k c" O'/Jrit!11. \ am. I g ona co ld in Illuh h ead." JIIr. 80ss-"Oh' I t mu s t b e a cold. I t couldn't b e anyth ing else." "\\'hat i s a s tud), o f so lid g eo m etry?" : \ study o f the human cranium." "Ho w arc y o u o n spiritualism, G eo r ge? "Oh, m edium." So ph.-"/\in't nature w onderful?" Fresh.-"\\'h)'?" So p h -"Because it giv es u s our face but w e can pi c k our own t eeth." C nlllt 'rinc P n rmel f r "\\'hat i s t h e d iff erenc e b etween ;\largare t H alligan and 3n umbrella?" D aJlskiIJ," Yoll c an s hu t up an umbrdla," "\\'hat's your J og s name?" Gin gcr! " D oes h e b i t e? Gin ge r snaps!" All', Boss"O' Brie n, why w e re you la t e !" O 'Bl'iCII-"\\'e ll, the road i s so s l ippery eve ry tim e I too k a s t e p f orward I s lipp e d ba c k two," 1/1'. 80ss ( t h i nkin g h e h ad O'Br i e n)-" H ow did e \'er ge t h e r e ?" O Bri e n -"Oh, I turne d around and starte d f o r h o m e " J wanna nic e chicken," "\\'anna pull e t ? wanna carry it. C}'aven D o Y Oll serve l o b s t e r s here?" Il"nill r Y es, w e serve anybo d y Ste p right up C npwflll. "I-Io w many f ee t mus t an aviator g e t off t h e g r ound b e f o r e on e may say h e is fly ing?" Bissc.>/I-"At l e a s t twO f eet."

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THE ZONIAN. Frcsh.-"Did pia ring football give ),ou the black eye?" ani)" th e black I had th e eye all th e time." JV"ewsbo}'-"All about de awf'l wrec k!" Old ladJ-"I want a paper. IV"fWsboJ-"Sure, lady, mayb e o n e of your friends was kill ed." A s ign o n a western flori s t's store r e ads : "SAMUEL RZESCHEWSKlO\ 'ITZ. Sa y it with flow ers. AliSJ Crespi uDraw your figur e on the board, Capw e ll." Capwell-"Gee, it woul d take up th e whole board Sl1rekmeis/c' r -"Hi st! The Am eric an soldie r s in there are planning a ma ss acr e." Pickles/einer-"S o?" Sl1r ekmeis /er-"J a 1 h eard one say 'shoot 50' and another s h oo t 1 0.' The n I h eard a so und lik e th e rattling o f th e victim's t ee th. A young theologian nam e d Fiddl e R efused to accept his degree; "For," said h e < 'tis enough to b e Fidd l e \\' ith out being Fiddl e D. D." Cop-"Say, what's t h e matte r with you? Thi s is a o ne-way str ee t /lbc (in a n ew c ar)-"'\ 'e ll, vat's the matte r vid you; I 'm on ly going vun vay, ain't it?" Aft e r th e clerk in the sto r e had s h own th e cont ents of all but a f e w b oxes, a lad y c ustom e r sa id: "l\ever mind, I don't want anything, I was on l y l oo king for a friend." \V ell," said th e cle rk, "if you t h ink your friend is in an y o f the remaining boxes, I ll take th ose down too. H e that knows not and knows that h e knows not, i s a Fr es h H onor him! H e t hat knows not anel knows not that h e know not, is a Soph-H e lp him H e that knows and kn o w s not t hat h e kn ows, is a Junior-Pity him! H t t hat knows and kno ws that h e knows, i s a Senior-Watch him! She-HI like it man of few words and many actions He-"You must want my brother; he has St. \ 'itus dance. 1 n France they make a drink with prunes and c all in prunell e I n America they make the s tuff with rais ins; w h y n o t call it rai sin 'elle? Wh y n ot? "Fath er, I need a n ew riding habit." Can'[ afl ord it," h e g rowl e d "But, fath e r, what am I going to do wit hout a riding habi[?" Get th e walking habit." Di d that ric h uncl e o f yours l ea v e you many h eirlooms?" J s h ould s ay so A new h eir loom s lip every minu[e," Chri s and J ohn had b ee n away from h ome against their m other's commands, and s h e was waiting f o r the m with a s witch "Ch ris, yar e YOll b ee ll?" J o hn. " John, yare you b ee n." "t\lit Chri s " \ 'are yo u b oth b ee n?" 'Togedder.' Alis s 7nruis-"Danskin, name thr ee s ubstan ces cOlltaining starc h Dtll1Skin.-"T 'wo cu ff s and a collar." Projesso r ow I put the numb e r 7 o n th e b o ard. \Vha[ numb e r imm ed iat e ly comes into your mind?" Class ( in lIni so n)-"Eleven." A farm e r hit c h ed his h o r se to a t e l ep h o n e po le. H e r e ," h ollered a cop, "YOll ca n 't hit c h th e re!" "Can't hitch!" shouted the irate farm er, "\"'e1I, w h y does the s ign say, Fin e f or hitching?'" ,V[rs Smi'h-'"The butch e r sa i d it was spring lamb. Smilll-"H e's right. l'v e be e n c h ew in g o n e o f the s pring s f or t h e l a s t 5 minut es

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THE lv/r s Flallllcgall. I wis h y o ur fat h e r was home so h e could see h o w you b e ha ve wh e n h e s o ut "iVry," s ai d 1'[r. Klums ay, thi s Roor' s awfull y s lipp e r y It's hard t o k ee p o n y our f eet." Oh s aid th e fair o n e s ar c a stic all y "the n you w e r e tr y ing to keep o n m y feet ? J th o u ght i t was pure l y ac c id ental." "\\' hat i s it whe n yo u r e m arried twi ce at the s am e tim e?" P o l vgamy " An d wh e n you r e only marri ed o n ce? [ ha ve th e n ex t dance? Shl'.-"\'1l1 parti c ular with wh o m L da n ce. H e "\\'e ll, YOll c an see I m not troubled th e s am e way." \Vho w as the firs t mall out o f the ark?" N o ah. "The Bibl e s a ys N o ah came f orth." It was o n a moonli ght s l e i g h r ide ."Is lVe glided o e r the lan d, That 1 so ftl y called h e r "darli n g," A n d stro k ed h e r little--rai n coa t I held h e r littl e raincoat, "Oh, H o w fas t th e evenin g flies. so ul fill e d lVith rapture A s I g a zed into h e r Iun c h b as ket. I peeped into the bask e t '\n d I l o n ged f o r o n e s w ee t taste, The r e s a t m y little s weeth e art \\' jth m y arm ar o und h e r umbr e ll a I s till h e l d h e r umbre lla What a lovel), littl e miss She s miled in pleased confu s i o n W h e n I b o l d l y stol e a --sandwic h. The c ulprit 's nam e wa s Look Hoo A Chinaman 'twa s cl e ar The law ye r a d dr esse d th e C o urt; "Your h o n or, L.ook H o o' s h e r e, Thejudge r e pli e d with brevity, "Eliminate th e l evity THE NEW DANGER. "Sis t er," sa i d t h e deacon sev erely "yOll s h o uld a v o i d even th e app e aran ce o f e vil. "\\' h y de acon, wh a t do you m e an?" a s k ed th e s ister. [ o bser ved that o n your s ideboard you have several cut-glass d ecante r s and tha t e a c h o f t h e m i s half fille d wit h what appears to b e arde n t s pirit s ." \V e ll, n o w, deacon, it i sn't anything o f th e k i n d The b ottles l oo ked so prett), o n the s id e boar d that I filled the m half w a), lVith so m e floo r s t a in a n d furn i tur e pol is h, jus t f o r th e s ak e of appea ran ce OIThat's why I 'm c auti o nin g you s i s t e r," r e pli ed the deacon. "Fee ling a triRe faint, I h e l ped m yself to a d ose fro m the big b ottle in the middle." I t w as midnight o n th e oce an Not a s treet ca r was in s i ght. The s un w as s hinin g brig htl y F o r it rai ned all d a)' that night. !\vas mi dnig h t a n d th e r i sing SUIl \Va s settin g in th e west, The l ittle fis h es i n the trees \\' e r e c u dd l ed in t h ei r nest s \\' hil e th e o r g an pee l eo p otatoes, L a r d wa s r e n de r e d b y the q uir e \\' hil e the sexton wrung th e d i shrag S o m e o n e set the c hur c h o n fire Oh w hat s m o k e! t h e sexton s h outed :'Is h e watered the pla ce d r)'. th e place r ese mbles \\' all Stree t, F o r the ruin s are pil e d up hig h. ODE T O H oCI. 0 ca l o mel! 0 ca l o m el 1 l ove you, yes, I do Like--! A s George wa s going out o n e night, H i s m othe r questi o n e d "\Vhithe r?" And George, n o t wis hin g t o decei ve, Wi t h blu s hes a n s w e r e d "With 'er."

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THE ZONIAN. "Oh, mother, may I go out to s wim? "Oh my darlin g daughte r, But h a n g some clothes on eac h pretty limb For the police insist yo u o u ghter." The cat t hat nightly haunts m y gate, H ow heartily I hate her; S o m e night s h e'll co m e and m e w 'til late, And then I'll mew-ti-later. The grind just murders every quiz; \Yhil e I Aunk min e, I must confess ; But woul d 1 change 111)' marks for his? H ell, )'esl Landrrs.-"Say, Brady, if Shakespeare wa s alive now he'd b e l oo ked on as quite a r emlrkable man, wouldn't h e? Bl'ad y .-"Sure, he'd b e 300 years o ld!" l ev s idewalk s all remind u s That we s houl d have a lot o f san n Or the stars we see mar b lin d LIS, \\'he n we s lip lik e thi s T h n d SAD B U T \\'EET. ; '21. First it was the beautiful vio l e t blu e eyes t h a r altracted the attention o f the man; eyes s haded by long, thick, black lashes and well-s haped, black brows. The n her golden brown hair that fell in soft waves around a pretty fore h ead. A very pretty chin; a perfect cupid's bow mouth; a Ii ttle delicate nose; b eautiful, soft round, blu s h in g c h ee k s and pretty little pink ears claimed hi s atte nti o n The n h e n o ti ced h e r perfect dress ; h e r small white hands and soft r Ollnd arms ; h e r dainty ankles and h e r fair y f ee t. \ Vith a thought o f his 2oo-p ound h e turned away anJ said \Vith a s i gh, "Oh, what a pit)' that all w o m e n aren't a s p erfec t as that dress f orm!" AN INCI D EN T I N THE SPA 'IS H CLASS Cornelia vim Hflrdcc/d, ':!I. I t wa s o n e o f those h o t, sultry days wh e n you just pray f o r the least exc u se to gigg l e or make any kind of a disturbance. Spani s h I I l cla ss was at th e b oard co n j u gating irregular Spanis h verbs. G eorge was writing b y the window, and, gazin g down t h e l o n g s un -baked, deserted, ce m ent walk, h e saw a Jamaican banana vender, w i t h her tray balanced o n h e r head, f\1arj orie was in the middle o f a recitati o n wh e n th e w h o l e c la ss looked up in astonishment a nd burs t out laughing, The r e in the door s tood the n eg r ess, bare footed, with h e r ragged skirt tucked w ell up out of h e r way, her t ra y of fruit on h e r head, a n d an ex pectant grin o n h e r shiny blac k fa ce. M iss Frost looked quite s t ern, but had hard work to keep fr o m joinin g in t h e m erriment. "\Vhat do yo u want?" s h e said. D e young gentle m a n h im call m e, m om," sai d the n cg r ess, courttsying and p ointing t o George wh o as peru s in g his panis h grammar very diligently. I'm sure hedocsn't want you now; thi s i s a sc hoo!." "Oh mom, I b egs your pardo n, m om, I di d n't m ean for to break into de c lass," At thi s, t h e negress l e ft and we heard h e r grum blin g a s s h e went down t h e stairs : "But, c hu c k, man, hiI'll try to play poppy jokes all dis o l d nigger, dem i s alays humbugging m c. M y faader, K ing G eo rge --Miss Frost turned t o George, and said: "George, yo u may report to m e at .') o c l oc k and co n j ugat e t h e verb 'to buy',

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THE ZO:,\ TA:'-I. 65 BOWDRY liT h e Busiest Stor e on the I s thmu s" DESIGNERS, IMPORTERS, BUILDER S AMERICAN MILLINERY AND DRESS PARLORS ISAD ORA BOWDRY, Proprietor {!3et1f7'UaPeA Dresses (You.r name here) No. 1-3 Calle 4 de Julio n3495

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to THE ZO'\I:\X J. S. Pereira, Prop We Specialize in Men's Cloth es READY MADE SEMI-READY MADE TO ORDER Corner Central Avenue and Nin t h Street PANAMA MILBURY ATLANTIC Sweaters Bathing Apparel Bath and Lounging Robes LINES OF DISTINCTION Largest Line Manufactured in Ame riC3 Over 500 different styles All prices at the bottom EXCEPTION AL VALUES Send for net price list for large dealer s MILLS; R ahway, N. J SALESROOMS: 543 Broadway New York City The Electrical Store CARDOZE & LINDO PANAMA CITY Phone 323 P. O. Box J [2 Deal e r s in UNIVERSAL Heatin g Devices We Back the Qualit y with Our Guarantee

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THE ZO:-\I.-\:-\. At the Tra p s Use United States Cartridge Company III E ROADWAY NEW YORK, N Y

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6 8 T H E 20:'\1.-\:'\ Stationery F or the School and the Home Trad e M ark Office Supplies AT WHOLESALE CORRESPONDEN CE WITH MER C H A NT S A N D L A RGE C ON S UM E R S INVITED I Books Games Toys Novelties The L argest Who l es al e Dis tributor s in North America THE AMERICAN NEWS COMPANY, INC. i;!]i 9-II-13 -1S PARK PLACE SPALDING F o r m o r e th a n 4 0 years S PALDIN G Athleti c G o od s h a v e been t h e Standard b y w hi c h q u a l i t y i s judge d . J u s t a s good" is n ev er jus t t h e s a m e A. G Spalding & Bros. u 6 NAS SAU S TREET iiP1 N E W Y ORK MADURO BRO S Agents for Pana m a NEW YORK CITY Som e thing s that will ple a s e the BOYS a n d the GIRLS Winch ester Junior Rifle Corp s Range Kit and Junior Trapshooting Outfit S m all Ca liber Rifles a nd S hot g un s Col t s Auto mati c Pis t o l s a nd R evo l ve r s for T a rget Pract i ce Y a l e B icycle s I ver J ohns o n Bicycles P o c ket k ni ve s R olle r S k a tes C all o r writ e f or inform n tioD EMANUEL LYONS Ge n e r a l H a rdwa r e S t o r e 14 C e n t r a l Ave nu e, P anama Cit y

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THE ZO:,\ I A:,\. -------------Speaking of Photographs! If You W ant One Tha t i s Arti stic, D oe s Y o u Cr e di t and :&ii I s of the Best Quality ENDARA The High Scho o l Seniors Recommend His W ork LOCATI ON CO N VENIE NT ACCESSIB L E Near Cable Office on CENTRAL AVENUE P hone 386 ROBERT C. SMITH PANAMA Oppo s it e S m a llw ood Bros. Phone Cor p oration 218 MR71J496

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70 T H E ZON I AN. Be particular about the chocolates you eat! Insist upon the best-it can be had by specifying chwney's (Jocolates Larg e assor.ments on sale at all Clubhouses and Commissaries The Walter M. Lowney Company, Boston, Mass. ] D MAXWELL, Representative CRISTOBAL C Z. PICTURES! Ta1<;en of anything, at any time, and anywhere .. ... WE SPECIALIZE IN . . .. Quality Portraits THE MARINE STUDIO 109 CEN TRAL AVENUE PANAMA CITY

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THE ZON J AN. 7 The Robbins Company SCHOOL JEWELRY CLASS RINGS AND PINS PRIZE C UP S MILITARY INSIGNIA NOVELTIES ADVERTISING Panama Agencies Company PANAMA CRISTOBAL BALBOA Largest s teamship agent s o n the I s thmu s. Prompt and effici ent s er vice. Receivers and Forwarders of Cargo. Stevedoring and all branches of Steamship Business. General Importers, Exporters, and Commission Agent s Write u s. All inquiri e s an s w e r e d promptl y. Cable addr es s : "PANACO ," Pan ama
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THE ZO="I .'I1". Method of Reproduction A CH.-\:,\,GI:: ha s come "bout in the music world. P eop l e 110 \ol1"cr arc satisfied wIth jus t "a" phol1Oknow how to make COI11-parisons a 11 J to judge. The B runswick Ph o nograph will b e k 11 0 W n ro mus i c lovers the w orld o\'e r f or its mar ve l OliS meth od of reproduction. The L'lrona is a scientific patented Brunswick Cfca tion. I t plap all records infinitehh etter. I t involves a gen uin e r H E T o n e Am plifier has so lved an old prob l e m in acollstics. J tis ova1-s hape d and molded of rare hollywood. Like t h e sound in g board of a fine piano it is buil t entire l y o f w ood I t i s absolute l y fr ee f ro m m e tal. B y t h e B run swick m e t h od o f pro jecting sOllnd, tone waves a r e un r e stric ted a 11 dar e allow e d to unfo ld into full, ric h, m e l low, a n d above all, natural tones. fundamental prin c ipl e o f repr od u c ti o n. 'There is no metallic sound, o r quiver, n o l1l::lchinf' soun d to d isturb t h e sensitive ear. I [ is unlike oth e r phonograph o r talki ng I'nachine. I t is a mechani c al achievem ent. B r un s wi c k Records will b e w e lcomed a s th e hig hest and most perfect e xpression n o w availabl e of th e sc i e nce and art of ton e r ecord in g. Brun sw ick ha s a hi sto r y of 75 yea r s o f s u ccess. Its destiny i s gui ded b y som e of the ablest executives in American indust r y. Its financial resources are unlimited. The Brunswick Balke-Collender Company EXPO RT OFF I CE 35 West 32d Street New York City, U S A Cable Addres s; BRUNSWICK

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THE ZO:--rl AN. 73 ADAMS PURE M One Quality All Flavors You can buy ADAMS Gum in any Flavor-From licoric e to peppermint or tutti Frutti. Select your Favorite-the n note the name ADAMS on the package: it means absolute purity and highest quality. Use it re gularly. TELEPHONE J19 COLON 5 --J. D. MAXWELL Representativ e for the Canal Zone and Republi c of Panama P O B O X 5016 CRl S TOBA L

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TII E ZQ:-1I.'\:-J. You can have no greater assur ance of Quality at the soda fountain than the presence of the "True Fruit" label. J. HUNGERFORD S MITH COMPANY NEW YOR K YOU CA T PUT OIMMERS ON THE SUN nu. you "on d o w h ""'OU"" '0 " ""''' ,10;' you "'" 010",;"" I n ",," "'." 'he dnn(!.cf our o r sun-j:!.I :lTC o r Siro n l! artificial lic.hl. GENUINE SIR '\VM. CROOKES' LENS 10m." d.n cao . "'mo,, ;"";";,,ou;, h,,bl ,;." .10" h e> ,h. m .he;, """,,bbl "blll.y 10 :Ib,orb lhe ;)ctini(: r ; IYS s o danlterous 1 0 the hunmn C)' C THE SCADRON CPTICAL COMPANY PANAM A: 23 Centra. l Ave nu e C OLON ; 44 Front Street

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('old Storn,e PI lilt at H ope, C. Z

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;b T H E 20:\1:\:\. Wllc appreciate to tbe fullest extent tbe belp glben bp anb local abo bertisers in making tbis issue of "m:be Zonian" a financial success anb bespeak for tbem tbe patronage of our manp frienbs. 2 i hlsims5.JjIDnnngrr. I

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