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The Mineral industry of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093544/00023
 Material Information
Title: The Mineral industry of Florida
Series Title: Information circular
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Geology
United States -- Bureau of Mines
Publisher: Bureau of Geology, Division of Interior Resources, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources in cooperation with U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 2005
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mineral industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: Some no. consist of preprints of the U.S. Bureau of Mines Mineral yearbook chapter on Florida.
General Note: Description based on: 1972.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1983.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 05277645
lccn - sn 86026148
System ID: UF00093544:00023

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Full Text

EUSGS
science for a changing world
2005 Minerals Yearbook

FLORIDA


U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Geological Survey


August 2008














FLORIDA


PINELLAS


Shell


0 100 Kilometers
I I


LEGEND
County boundary

Capital

City

1 Crushed stone/sand
and gravel districts

MINERAL SYMBOLS
(Major producing areas)

Cem Cement plant

Clay Common clay
CS Crushed stone

Ful Fuller's earth
Gyp Gypsum plant

Gyp-s Synthetic gypsum

IS Industrial sand
Ka Kaolin
Lime Lime plant

MgCC Magnesium
compound plant
P Phosphate rock


Shell

Steel
Ti
Vm

Zr

L


Peat
Perlite plant

Sulfur (natural gas)

Construction sand
and gravel
Shell

Steel plant
Titanium minerals
Vermiculite plant

Zirconium mineral

Concentration of
mineral operations


Source: Florida Geological Survey/U.S. Geological Survey (2005)






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

This chapter has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Geological Survey and the
Florida Geological Survey for collecting information on all nonfuel minerals.


In 2005, Florida's nonfuel raw mineral production was valued'
at $2.89 billion, based upon annual U.S. Geological Survey
(USGS) data. This was a $570 million or a 24.6% increase from
the State's total of $2.32 billion in 2004, which was up 12.1%
from that of 2003. The State remained fourth in rank among the
50 States in total nonfuel mineral production value, of which the
State accounted for more than 5% of the U.S. total.
Florida continued to lead the Nation in phosphate rock mining
in 2005 with about 75% of U.S. production, producing more
than six times as much as the next highest producing State.
Phosphate rock is produced in only four States. In terms of
value, crushed stone moved ahead of phosphate rock as Florida's
leading nonfuel mineral commodity, followed by phosphate
rock, cement (portland and masonry), construction sand and
gravel, zirconium concentrates, and titanium concentrates
(ilmenite and rutile), the combined values of which represented
97% of the State's total nonfuel mineral value.
In 2005, most of Florida's mined nonfuel mineral
commodities increased in value, nearly all of which also
increased in unit value. The largest increases in value took place
in crushed stone, cement (portland and masonry), construction
sand and gravel, and phosphate rock, the unit values of each
commodity showing significant increases. A 9.5% increase in
crushed stone production led to a 46%, or $314 million, increase
in the commodity's total value and close to 11% more cement
production resulted in a more than 22%, or $118 million,
increase in its value. Construction sand and gravel production
rose 28%, the value of which increased by $64 million, a 44%
increase. Phosphate rock, with a relatively marginal increase in
production, rose by $54 million while moderately increasing
in unit value. These were followed by zirconium concentrates,
up $9 million, and fuller's earth and rutile, up about $6
million each. The most significant decreases in value were in
magnesium compounds and ilmenite, down about $5 million
and $2 million, respectively. Data on mineral production are
provided in table 1.
The Florida Geological Survey2 (FGS) provided the following
narrative information. Production and other data in the following
text are those reported by the FGS, based upon that agency's
own surveys and estimates. The FGS data may differ from some
production figures reported to the USGS.


'The terms nonfuell mineral production" and related "values" encompass
variations in meaning, depending upon the mineral products. Production may
be measured by mine shipments, mineral commodity sales, or marketable
production (including consumption by producers) as is applicable to the
individual mineral commodity.
All 2005 USGS mineral production data published in this chapter are those
available as of December 2006. All USGS Mineral Industry Surveys and USGS
Minerals Yearbook chapters-mineral commodity, State, and country-can be
retrieved over the Internet at URL http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals.
Spencer, Professional Geologist, and James Balsillie, Coastal/
Economic Geologist, authored the text of the State mineral industry information
provided by the Florida Geological Survey.


Exploration and Development

Expansion of phosphate mining has been proposed in west-
central Florida (Hardee and Manatee Counties), to the south in
DeSoto County, and in northern Florida in Lafayette County,
involving some 32,900 hectares (ha). While sand supplies
were adequate, the same was not true for cement, gravel, and
crushed stone. Cement and stone aggregates continued to be
imported into Florida, although not in quantities exceeding
Florida's production levels. Industry standard distances from
the source to construction sites for the Nation commonly have
an average transportation trucking range of 80 kilometers
(km) (50 miles) based on economics (National Stone, Sand
and Gravel Association, 2005). In Florida, more than one-half
of the crushed stone aggregate comes from the southernmost
part of Florida, in Dade County. The remainder of Florida is
experiencing progressively larger transportation distances for
delivery of stone aggregates, commonly up to 240 km (150
miles). This, in turn, owing to increasing fuel prices, is elevating
aggregate costs to the consumer. In northern Florida, although
precise quantities are unknown, stone aggregate is arriving
by barges down the Mississippi River and by rail and ships.
A shortage in qualified truck drivers is aggravating delivery
accommodations. Florida is experiencing a rapid population
growth and a shortage of qualified construction personnel
to build housing. As aggregate production levels rise, it is
anticipated that the State's reserves might be exhausted or in
economic jeopardy in a relatively short time. This is partly
owing to public opposition to mining and environmental
concerns, preemption of mining rights because of zoning or
deed restrictions, and (or) other litigation-related land-use
constraints.
Florida's mineral resources reach beyond those of terrestrial
origin or siting, especially for Florida's excessively broad
continental margins in the Gulf of Mexico. The Florida
Geological Survey's research on the State's marine waters
off the Gulf of Mexico has received recognition by the U.S.
Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service
(MMS). A significant number of investigations have been
published or otherwise reported on concerning offshore
sediments along Florida's Gulf of Mexico coastline. Balsillie
and Clark (2001, p. 1) compiled a comprehensive treatment of
the subject on a regional, subregional, and Florida county-by-
county basis. Their study was undertaken to identify what is
known about potential sources of sediment for beach restoration
and maintenance renourishment. They annotated publications
and reports so that the user will have a grasp of the information
and area of applicability of each included work.


FLORIDA-2005







Commodities Review


Industrial Minerals

In 2005, Florida continued to be the only State to process
rutile (titanium concentrate) and to mine and produce staurolite.
The State also remained first in the quantity of phosphate rock,
masonry cement, and peat produced (listed in descending order
of value). Florida continued as first of two States that processed
zirconium concentrates and ilmenite (titanium concentrate), and
it rose in rank to second from third in the production of crushed
stone, to fourth from fifth in fuller's earth clay, and to fourth
from sixth in portland cement. While the State decreased to third
from second in magnesium compounds, its mines continued to
produce significant quantities of construction sand and gravel
and industrial sand and gravel.
Florida is among the States gaining the most in population,
with some 25,500 new residents arriving monthly. Basic
materials to support infrastructure, the commercial service
sector, and housing have been affected. As in recent years,
the construction industry has been hampered by an inadequate
supply of materials, in particular, shortages of aggregates,
cement, and steel. In 2005, the mining and processing of basic
construction materials in Florida (limestone or lime-rock
aggregates, whether termed gravel or crushed stone, sand, and
cement) comprised about 56% of the total nonfuel valuation of
all mined mineral resources or mined commodities of the State.
Cement.-High-purity limestone is used to manufacture
the clinker for masonry and portland cement. Florida was
a major producer and consumer of both types of cement in
2005. Limestone is mined in a number of counties throughout
the State; cement clinker was produced only in Alachua,
Dade, Hernando, and Suwannee Counties. Cement plants that
ground imported clinker operated in Hillsborough and Manatee
Counties. American Cement Company has applied for an air
construction permit to build a dry process portland cement plant
in Sumterville. The City Commission decided in a unanimous
vote that Florida Rock Industries was allowed to double the
cement-making capacity of its cement plant near Newberry.
Suwannee American Cement near Branford was issued a permit
to double the size of their mill.
Clays.-Fuller's earth, common clays, and kaolin were mined
in several locations in Florida in 2005. Fuller's earth, which was
mined in Gadsden and Marion Counties, is typically used as an
absorbent material; kaolin, which was mined in Putnam County,
is used in the manufacture of paper and refractories. Common
clays were mined in Clay and Lake Counties and in smaller
quantities from various locations throughout the State.
Phosphate Rock.-CF Industries, Inc., Mosaic Fertilizer,
LLC, and PCS Phosphate Co. are the only active phosphate
mining companies in Florida. The phosphate industry is located
in the counties of Hamilton, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee,
and Polk. Mosaic closed its Kingsford mine owing to depleted
reserves in September 2005. The closure resulted in the
elimination of 275 jobs. For general information concerning
phosphate mining, please visit the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Bureau of Mine Reclamation Web
site at http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/mines.


Titanium and Zirconium.-E.I. du Pont de Nemours &
Co., Inc. and Iluka Resources, Inc. continued to operate heavy-
mineral titanium and zirconium-bearing sand mines in Baker,
Bradford, Clay, and Duval Counties. Ilmenite, leucoxene,
rutile, and zircon are the primary minerals of interest in the
heavy-mineral sand deposits of this region. Ilmenite, leucoxene,
and rutile are the primary ingredients in the manufacture of
titanium dioxide pigments, which are used in the manufacture of
lacquers, paint, paper, plastics, and varnish. The major uses of
zircon are refractories, foundry sands, and ceramic applications.
In December 2005, Iluka Resources, Inc. announced that
it would undertake a staged closure of its Florida/Georgia
operations during 2006 (Iluka Resources Limited, 20063).

Environmental Issues, Reclamation, and Awards

In 2005, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection
(FDEP), Bureau of Mine Reclamation issued 48 permits,
largely Environmental Resource Permits (ERP) and Wetland
Resource Permits, accounting for 1,831 ha of upland and
wetland disturbance and mine expansions and modifications.
Records indicate that 64% of land mined for phosphate has been
reclaimed since July 1, 1975; the land covered more than 68,800
ha with 44,500 ha having been reclaimed.
Since July 1, 1975, Florida has required that all mined lands
be reclaimed, as administered by FDEP's Bureau of Mine
Reclamation. In the past 10 years, more than $325 million has
been spent on mandatory as well as other related reclamation
projects. Mined land has been reclaimed for agricultural,
commercial, industrial, recreational, and residential purposes
and as sanctuaries for birds and other wildlife. Since 1980,
more than 30 million trees have been planted on reclaimed
lands. The mining companies have also donated thousands of
hectares to State and public entities for recreational uses and
for wildlife habitat. The industry has continued to work with
the FDEP and other State and Federal agencies to protect and to
restore ecosystems and to benefit wildlife. Of the commodities
mined in Florida, phosphate mining is the most land intensive.
In 2005, approximately 1,800 ha (4,525 acres) of land was
mined for phosphate. All phosphate lands disturbed from July 1,
1975, have a mandatory reclamation requirement. Reclamation
standards for phosphate lands are detailed in Chapter 62C-16 of
the Florida Administrative Code.
Florida Limerock & Aggregate Institute (FLAI), whose
members represent about 85% of the construction aggregates
operators in the State, was honored on March 17, 2005, as
National Stone, Sand & Gravel Association's (NSSGA) State
Association of the Year for 2004 at NSSGA's annual convention
in Las Vegas. NSSGA's President and CEO recognized with this
award how highly NSSGA valued and respected the work FLAI
has done and the Institute's leadership in promoting the interest
of the aggregates industry in Florida. FLAI was congratulated
for their successful partnership with NSSGA on numerous
workshops and seminars that have delivered excellent training

3A reference that includes a section mark () is found in the Internet
Reference Cited section.
U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY MINERALS YEARBOOK-2005


Metals







to aggregate industry workers, as well as the work they have
completed with Florida legislators, governmental agencies,
students, and educators in delivering the positive story of the
production and use of aggregates as "a model for the industry."

Government Programs

The erosional impacts of hurricanes Charlie, Frances, Ivan,
and Jeanne on the coasts of Florida in 2004 brought resounding
responses from Federal and State Governments. In 2004, the
Florida Legislature added an emergency appropriation of $68.4
million to its $30 million annual expenditure level for beach
restoration. These funds are, in part, used to cost-share with
local governments and with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
funding of more than $160 million for some 15 Florida beach
restoration projects. While most of the funding is used in design
phases and dredging and pumping activities, part of this total
funding is used for conducting sand search studies in offshore
waters. Marine sources of sand for restoration work have been
the norm for decades because upland sources have become
diminished and (or) not economic.
The FGS and the MMS have entered into a multiyear
cooperative agreement (cooperative agreement no. 1435-0001-
30757) with the specific goal of locating and characterizing
the areal extent and volume of available sands suitable for
beach nourishment that lie in Federal waters adjacent to State
submerged lands off the northeast coast of Florida. In the
second year of this study, 306 km of seismic data were collected
offshore in Nassau, Duval, and Flagler Counties. These data
were subsequently processed, interpreted, and integrated with
the data collected in the first year. A total of 52 vibracores were
collected offshore in Duval and Nassau Counties. Initial analysis
of all vibracore data available for inclusion in the FGS and
MMS report indicates inferred potential reserves of up to 152
million cubic meters of restoration-quality sand are offshore of
southern Duval County. The analysis of planned vibracores for
the third-year report will help identify the quality and quantity


of potential reserves offshore of northern Duval County and all
of Nassau County.
Geologic mapping continued during 2005 with Federal
matching funding from the STATEMAP program, a component
of the USGS National Cooperative Mapping Program, which is
congressionally mandated by the National Cooperative Geologic
Mapping Program (NCGMP). The USGS distributes Federal
funds through NCGMP to support geologic mapping efforts,
utilizing a competitive funding process. The NCGMP has three
primary components: FEDMAP, which funds Federal geologic
mapping projects, STATEMAP, which is a matching-funds
grant program with State geological surveys, and EDMAP, a
matching-funds grant program with universities that has a goal
to train the next generation of geologic mappers. In 2005, the
FGS completed geologic mapping for the eastern portion of the
USGS 1:100,000-scale Gainesville quadrangle and completed
the final maps and cross sections for the same area. The
completed maps and cross sections are available as part of the
FGS open-file map series (Evans and others, 2004).

References Cited

Balsillie, J.H., and Clark, R.R., 2001, Annotated and illustrated bibliography of
marine subaqueous sand resources of Florida's Gulf of Mexico, 1942-1997:
Florida Geological Survey Special Publication No. 48, 254 p.
Evans, W.L., III, Green, R.C., Bryan, J.R., and Paul, D.T., 2004, Geologic
map of the western portion of the U.S.G.S. 1:100,000-scale Gainesville
Quadrangle, northern Florida: Florida Geological Survey Open-File Map
Series No. 93, 2 plates.
National Stone, Sand and Gravel Association, 2005, 50 fascinating facts about
stone, sand and gravel: National Stone, Sand and Gravel Association,
brochure, 6 p. (Also available at http://www.nssga.org.)

Internet Reference Cited

Iluka Resources Limited, 2006 (January 19), December quarter 2005 production
& exploration report, accessed August 19, 2008, at URL http://www.iluka.
com/Default.aspx?page=130&did=6.


FLORIDA-2005








TABLE 1
NONFUEL RAW MINERAL PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA1, 2

(Thousand metric tons and thousand dollars unless otherwise specified)


Mineral
Cement:
Masonry
Portland
Clays:
Common
Fuller's earth
Kaolin
Gemstones
Lime
Peat
Sand and gravel:
Construction
Industrial
Stone, crushed
Combined values of magnesium compounds,
phosphate rock, staurolite, stone (crushed
sandstone [2004-05]), titanium concentrates,
zirconium concentrates, and values indicated by
symbol W
Total


Quantity


674
4,190


Value

82,900 e
323,000 e


94 1,280
W W
31 3,250
NA 1

373 7,440


30,900
624
97,100


141,000
7,270
587,000


XX 918,000
XX 2,070,000


Quantity


Value


763 97,600
5,230 432,000e

W W
234 W
31 3,280
NA 1
24 2,090
478 9,710


29,300
679
105,000 3


146,000
8,520
680,000 r 3


XX 945,000
XX 2,320,000


2005
Quantity

902
5,730

W
279
29
NA
23
464

37,500
715
115,000 3


Value

129,000 e
519,000

W
W
3,510
1
2,940
9,450

210,000
9,410
994,000 3


XX 1,010,000
XX 2,890,000


eEstimated. 'Revised. NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data. Withheld values included in "Combined value" data.
XX Not applicable. -- Zero.
'Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production (including consumption by producers).
2Data are rounded to no more than three significant digits; may not add to totals shown.
3Excludes certain stones; kind and value included with "Combined values" data.


TABLE 2
FLORIDA: CRUSHED STONE SOLD OR USED, BY KIND'


Number
of


Quantity
(thousand


Value


Number
of


Kind quarries metric tons) (thousands) quarries
Limestone2 77 r 102,000 $666,000 84
Dolomite 4 1,030 7,260 4
Shell 3 1,150 6,110 4
Total XX 105,000 680,000 XX
'Revised. XX Not applicable.
Data are rounded to no more than three significant digits; may not add to totals shown.
Includes limestone-dolomite reported with no distinction between the two.


2005
Quantity
(thousand
metric tons)
110,000
982
4,040
115,000


Value
(thousands)
$963,000
7,370
24,000
994,000


U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY MINERALS YEARBOOK-2005








TABLE 3
FLORIDA: CRUSHED STONE SOLD OR USED BY PRODUCERS IN 2005, BY USE'

(Thousand metric tons and thousand dollars)


Use
Construction:
Coarse aggregate (+112 inch):
Macadam
Riprap and jetty stone
Filter stone
Other coarse aggregate
Total
Coarse aggregate, graded:
Concrete aggregate, coarse
Bituminous aggregate, coarse
Other graded coarse aggregate
Total
Fine aggregate (-%/ inch):
Stone sand, concrete
Stone sand, bituminous mix or seal
Screening, undesignated
Other fine aggregate
Total
Coarse and fine aggregates:
Graded road base or subbase
Crusher run or fill or waste
Other coarse and fine aggregates
Total
Other construction materials
Agricultural:
Agricultural limestone
Other agricultural uses
Total
Chemical and metallurgical:
Cement manufacture
Chemical stone
Sulfur oxide removal
Total
Special, other fillers or extenders
Other miscellaneous uses and specified uses not listed


Quantity Value



W W
51 927
119 1,910
706 6,770
876 9,600

2,620 41,400
(2) (2)
13,600 185,000
16,200 226,000

(3) (3)
(3) (3)
1,410 17,600
9,800 104,000
12,400 128,000

14,000 66,200
2,040 7,920
10,700 101,000
26,700 175,000
2,650 12,700


5,080
240
5,320


6,150 18,200
(3) (3)
(3) (3)
6,950 29,300
(4) (4)
84 798


Unspecified:
Reported 41,300 348,000
Estimated 6,900 60,000
Total 48,200 408,000
Grand total 115,000 994,000
W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included with "Other coarse aggregate."
'Data are rounded to no more than three significant digits; may not add to totals shown.
2Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included with "Other graded coarse aggregate."
3Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included in "Total."
4Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included with "Unspecified: Reported."
5Reported and estimated production without a breakdown by end use.


FLORIDA-2005








TABLE 4
FLORIDA: CRUSHED STONE SOLD OR USED BY PRODUCERS IN 2005, BY USE AND DISTRICT'

(Thousand metric tons and thousand dollars)


Use
Construction:
Coarse aggregate (+11/2 inch)2
Coarse aggregate, graded3
Fine aggregate (-%/ inch)4
Coarse and fine aggregates5
Other construction materials
Agricultural6
Chemical and metallurgical7
Special8
Other miscellaneous uses and specified uses not listed
Unspecified:9
Reported
Estimated
Total



Construction:
Coarse aggregate (+11/2 inch)2
Coarse aggregate, graded3
Fine aggregate (-%/ inch)4
Coarse and fine aggregates5
Other construction materials
Agricultural6
Chemical and metallurgical7
Special8
Other miscellaneous uses and specified uses not listed


District 1
Quantity Value


W
W
W
4,610
2,000
2,730


2,580 18,500
1,200 11,000
5,770 53,800
District 4
Quantity Value


W
9,500
W
13,000


District 2
Quantity Value


District 3
Quantity Value


18 363 W
W W 5,730
W W 3,250
9,690 44,200 3,590
2,380
296
W W W
W
84


3,800 30,000
1,500 13,000
17,900 110,000
Unspecified districts
Quantity Value


13,500
1,100
33,500


W
87,300
38,600
21,600
10,700
2,590
W
W
798


115,000
9,700
302,000


W
123,000
W
105,000


W W 554 6,180


Unspecified:9
Reported 21,100 183,000
Estimated 3,000 26,000
Total 57,000 522,000 554 6,180
W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included in "Total." -- Zero.
Data are rounded to no more than three significant digits; may not add to totals shown.
2Includes filter stone, macadam, riprap and jetty stone, and other coarse aggregate.
3Includes bituminous aggregate (coarse), concrete aggregate (coarse), and other graded aggregate.
4Includes screening undesignatedd), stone sand (bituminous mix or seal), stone sand (concrete), and other fine aggregate.
5Includes crusher run or fill or waste, graded road base or subbase, and other coarse and fine aggregates.
Includes agricultural limestone and other agricultural uses.
Includes cement manufacture, chemical stone, and sulfur oxide removal.
8Includes other fillers or extenders.
9Reported and estimated production without a breakdown by end use.


U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY MINERALS YEARBOOK-2005








TABLE 5
FLORIDA: CONSTRUCTION SAND AND GRAVEL SOLD OR USED IN 2005,
BY MAJOR USE CATEGORY'


Quantity
(thousand
metric tons)


(th


Concrete aggregate (including concrete sand) 11,500
Plaster and gunite sands 1,370
Asphaltic concrete aggregates and road base materials 2,290
Fill 6,370
Other miscellaneous uses 2,420
Unspecified:2
Reported 7,140
Estimated 6,410
Total or average 37,500
Data are rounded to no more than three significant digits; may not add to totals shown.
2Reported and estimated production without a breakdown by end use.


Value
lousands)
$79,400
8,350
20,000
20,100
9,500


38,200
34,300
210,000


TABLE 6
FLORIDA: CONSTRUCTION SAND AND GRAVEL SOLD OR USED IN 2005, BY USE AND DISTRICT1 2

(Thousand metric tons and thousand dollars)


Use
Concrete aggregates (including concrete sand)3
Asphaltic concrete aggregates and road base materials
Fill
Other miscellaneous uses
Unspecified:4
Reported
Estimated
Total
-- Zero.


District 1 Districts 2 and 3
Quantity Value Quantity Value
660 2,550 12,200 85,200
2,290 20,000
659 855 5,180 16,100
S 2,420 9,500

7,140 38,200
2,270 12,200 4,050 21,600
3,590 15,600 33,300 191,000


District 4
Quantity Value



531 3,070




92 494
623 3,570


Data are rounded to no more than three significant digits; may not add to totals shown.
2Districts 2 and 3 are combined to avoid disclosing company proprietary data.
3Includes plaster and gunite sands.
4Reported and estimated production without a breakdown by end use.


FLORIDA-2005


Unit
value
$6.92
6.08
8.73
3.15
3.93


5.35
5.35
5.60