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The Mineral industry of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093544/00012
 Material Information
Title: The Mineral industry of Florida
Series Title: Information circular
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Geology
United States -- Bureau of Mines
Publisher: Bureau of Geology, Division of Interior Resources, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources in cooperation with U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1994
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mineral industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: Some no. consist of preprints of the U.S. Bureau of Mines Mineral yearbook chapter on Florida.
General Note: Description based on: 1972.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1983.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 05277645
lccn - sn 86026148
System ID: UF00093544:00012

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THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA

This chapter has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Bureau of Mines, U.S.
Department of the Interior, and the Florida Geological Survey for collecting information on all nonfuel minerals.


Florida ranked sixth among the 50 States in total
nonfuel mineral value' in 1994, climbing from 8th in 1993,
according to the U.S. Bureau of Mines. The estimated
value for 1994 was $1.5 billion, an 12% increase over that
of 1993. This followed a 9% decrease in 1993 from that of
1992. The State accounted for 5% of the U.S. total value
and continued to lead significantly the other U.S. States in
phosphate rock production and value. The total value
decreased in 1993, mainly due to a drop in phosphate rock
values. But the rebound in 1994 was attributed to a
combination of increased values for phosphate rock,
crushed stone, construction sand and gravel, and masonry
cement. The latter three commodities have increased
consistently during the last 3 years. Florida, almost
exclusively an industrial mineral producing State, remained
first in the production of phosphate rock, masonry cement,
peat, titanium concentrates, and metal; second in rare-earth
concentrates and fuller's earth clay; and third in crushed
stone and magnesium compounds. The State rose from
sixth to fifth in portland cement production. Compared
with 1993, the value of phosphate rock, crushed stone,
construction sand and gravel, masonry cement, industrial


sand and gravel, and peat increased in 1994. Decreases
occurred in the value of portland cement, common and
kaolin clays, and the rare-earth metal concentrates.
In 1994, the phosphate industry rebounded somewhat
from significant production and value drops in 1993-one
of the most difficult of recent years. Production of
phosphate rock, primarily used to manufacture fertilizer,
increased moderately in 1994 and some previously closed
operations were able to reopen. Consumption increased
substantially, especially for diammonium phosphate, in
large part to supply increased export demands. The
industry continued research to develop technologies that
would enable mining companies to further reduce the need
for deep-aquifer water. Presently, the industry recirculates
about 80% of the water it uses in certain manufacturing
processes. Limestone production was moderately up in
1994 compared with that of 1993; this was due, in part, to
increased highway and residential construction.
Compliance with the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air
Act (CAA) was a controversial issue for mining facility
operators who were required to obtain permits for work
already in progress in addition to all new work, according


TABLE 1
NONFUEL RAW MINERAL PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA'


1992 1993 1994p
Mineral Value VQ y alue Qua Value
Quanti (thousands) Qu y (thousands) Qu y (thousands)
Cement:
Masonry thousand metric tons 310 $22,424 351 $27,264 462 $35,900
Portland do. 2,898 161,969 4,195 210,762 4,120 207,000
Clays2 do. 367 37,201 407 52,699 408 52,800
Gemstones NA 1 NA W NA W
Peat thousand metric tons 191 3,158 219 3,781 250 4,060
Sand and gravel:
Construction do. 21,107 66,141 e22,800 e73,100 25,000 83,700
Industrial do. 433 5,167 504 5,911 W W
Stone (crushed)3 do. e53,796 e266,900 64,926 313,270 e72,000 e360,000
Combined value of clays [common, kaolin
(1994)], magnesium compounds,
phosphate rock, rare-earth metal
concentrates, staurolite, stone [crushed
dolomite and limestone (1993-94), crushed
marl (1992)], titanium concentrates
(ilmenite and rutile), zircon concentrates,
and values indicated by symbol W XX 876,799 XX 623,845 XX 724,000
Total XX 1,439,760 XX 1,310,632 XX 41,470,000
eEstimated. PPreliminary. NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; value included with "Combined value" data.
XX Not applicable.
1Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production (including consumption by producers).
2Excludes certain clays; kind and value included with "Combined value" data.
3Excludes certain stones; kind and value included with "Combined value" data.
4Data do not add to total shown because of independent rounding










to the Florida Limerock Institute. mine shipments, mineral commodity sales, or marketable production as i
applicable to the individual mineral commodities.


'The term value means the total monetary value as represented by either

TABLE 2
FLORIDA: CRUSHED STONE' SOLD OR USED BY PRODUCERS IN 1993, BY USE

Quantity value Unit
Use (thousand Vau
Use thousandd (thousands) value
metric tons)
Coarse aggregate (+1 1/2 inch):
Riprap and jetty stone 125 $572 $4.58
Filter stone 349 2,228 6.38
Other coarse aggregate W W 2.21
Coarse aggregate, graded:
Concrete aggregate, coarse 10,937 63,806 5.83
Bituminous aggregate, coarse 3,280 21,821 6.65
Bituminous surface-treatment aggregate 936 6,891 7.36
Railroad ballast W W 5.07
Other graded coarse aggregate W W 8.00
Fine aggregate (-3/8 inch):
Stone sand, concrete 5,097 29,924 5.87
Stone sand, bituminous mix or seal 2,116 11,564 5.47
Screening, undesignated 5,167 20,816 4.03
Other fine aggregate W W 6.84
Coarse and fine aggregates:
Graded road base or subbase 19,884 72,266 3.63
Unpaved road surfacing 418 1,881 4.50
Crusher run or fill or waste 2,043 4,493 2.20
Other coarse and fine aggregates 963 3,113 3.23
Other construction materials2 2,727 18,490 6.78
Agricultural:
Agricultural limestone 366 3,111 8.50
Poultry grit and mineral food 593 4,787 8.07
Other agricultural uses 238 (2) (2)
Chemical and metallurgical:
Cement manufacture 3,515 18,297 5.21
Glass manufacture 46 701 15.24
Special:
Asphalt fillers or extenders 150 2,294 15.29
Other fillers or extenders 169 1,562 9.24
Other specified uses not listed 871 2,759 3.17
Unspecified:3
Actual 891 4,193 4.71
Estimated 4,045 17,698 4.38
Total 64,926 4313,270 4.83
Total5 6 71,569 313,270 4.38
W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included with "Other construction materials."
'Includes dolomite, limestone, limestone-dolomite, calcareous marl, and shell.
2Excludes limestone-dolomite value from State total to avoid disclosing company proprietary data.
3Includes production reported without a breakdown by use and estimates for nonrespondents.
4Data do not add to total shown because of independent rounding.
5One short ton is equal to 907 kilograms or 2,000 pounds. To convert metric tons to short tons, divide metric tons by 0.907185.
6Total shown in thousand short tons and thousand dollars.










TABLE
FLORIDA: CRUSHED STONE SOLD OR USED, BY KIND

1991 1993
Kind Number Quantity Value Unit Number Quantity Value Unit
of (thousand of (thousand
of (thousand (thousands) value of (tho. usand (thousands) value
quarries metric tons) (thousanquarries metric tons) (thous )
Limestone' '96 '52,774 '$252,422 '$4.78 85 62,492 2$300,827 2$4.81
Dolomite 3 822 5,059 6.15 3 W 5,015 W
Calcareous marl (3) (3) (3) (3) 1 W 3 W
Shell 5 1,043 5,103 4.89 8 1,126 4,239 3.76
Total4 XX '55,005 '264,847 4.81 XX 64,926 313,270 4.83
Total5 6 XX '60,633 '264,847 '4.37 XX 71,569 313,270 4.38
'Revised. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included with "Total." XX Not applicable.
'Includes "Limestone-dolomite," reported with no distinction between the two.
2Excludes limestone-dolomite value from State total to avoid disclosing company proprietary data.
3Excludes calcareous marl from State totals to avoid disclosing company proprietary data.
4Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding.
5One short ton is equal to 907 kilograms or 2,000 pounds. To convert metric tons to short tons, divide metric tons by 0.907185.
6Total shown in thousand short tons and thousand dollars.



TABLE 4
FLORIDA: CRUSHED STONE' SOLD OR USED BY PRODUCERS IN 1993, BY USE AND DISTRICT

Thousand metric tons and thousand dollars)

District 1 District 2 District 3 District 4
Use
Quantity Value Quantity Value Quantity Value Quantity Value
Construction aggregates:
Coarse aggregate (+1 1/2 (3) (3) W W 669 3,037
inch)2
Coarse aggregate, graded4 (3) (3) (3) (3) 5,836 38,367 10,056 59,597
Fine aggregate (-3/8 inch (3) (3) (3) (3) 3,493 13,952 8,660 47,136
Coarse and fine aggregate6 (3) (3) 6,201 23,195 W W 12,721 43,647
Other construction materials (3) (3) 4,135 14,181 (9) (9)
Agricultural7 (3) (3) (3) (3) 786 3,026
Chemical and metallurgical 46 701 (9) (9) (9) (9)
Special10 (3) (3) (9) (9)
Other miscellaneous uses 1,906 8,817 3,531 18,800
Unspecified:"
Actual 321 2,409 447 2,683 122 653
Estimated 713 4,050 819 3,624 563 2,863 1,950 8,804
Total12 1,873 8,024 8,623 42,364 16,842 81,862 37,588 181,020
Totall3 14 2,065 8,024 9,505 42,364 18,565 81,862 41,434 181,020
W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included with "Other construction materials."
'Excludes limestone dolomite value from State total to avoid disclosing company proprietary data.
2Includes filter stone, riprap and jetty stone, and other coarse aggregate.
3Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included with "Total."
4Includes concrete aggregate (coarse), bituminous aggregate (coarse), bituminous surface-treatment aggregate, railroad ballast, and other graded coarse aggregate.
5Includes stone sand (concrete), stone sand (bituminous mix or seal), screening undesignatedd), and other fine aggregate.
6Includes graded road base or subbase, unpaved road surfacing, crusher run (select material or fill), and other coarse and fine aggregates.
7Includes agricultural limestone, poultry grit and mineral food, and other agricultural uses.
8Includes cement manufacture and glass manufacture.
9Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; included with "Other miscellaneous uses."
10Includes asphalt fillers or extenders, other fillers or extenders, and other specified uses not listed.
"Includes production reported without a breakdown by use and estimates for nonrespondents.
12Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding.
130ne short ton is equal to 907 kilograms or 2,000 pounds. To convert metric tons to short tons, divide metric tons by 0.907185.
14Total shown in thousand short tons and thousand dollars.