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The Mineral industry of Florida
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 Material Information
Title: The Mineral industry of Florida
Series Title: Information circular
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Geology
United States -- Bureau of Mines
Publisher: Bureau of Geology, Division of Interior Resources, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources in cooperation with U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1976
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mineral industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: Some no. consist of preprints of the U.S. Bureau of Mines Mineral yearbook chapter on Florida.
General Note: Description based on: 1972.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1983.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 05277645
lccn - sn 86026148
System ID: UF00093544:00006

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FLRD GEOLIOWC( ICA SURflViEWY~


COPYRIGHT NOTICE
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The Mineral Industry of Florida



This chapter has been prepared under a cooperative agreement between the Bureau of
Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Florida Bureau of Geology.


By John W. Sweeney' and Charles W. Hendry, Jr.2


The value of mineral production in Flor-
ida decreased from $1.7 billion in 1975 to
$1.6 billion in 1976; the decrease was prin-
cipally caused by decreases in the value of
phosphate rock.
Of the 49.2 million tons of phosphate
rock produced in the United States, Florida
and North Carolina produced 41.5 million
tons. Of this total, Florida was the pre-
dominant producer and, for the 83d con-
secutive year, supplied more than any
other State. The State ranked first in the
value of phosphate rock, fuller's earth and


titanium concentrate production and fifth,
in the value of peat production. Staurolite
and zircon concentrate were produced only
in Florida. Florida and North Carolina
supplied 84% of the domestic phosphate
rock market and most of the exports from
the United States. Phosphate rock was ex-
ported from the ports of Tampa, Boca
Grande, and Jacksonville. The principal re-
cipients were Canada, Japan, and France.
1 State Liaison Officer, Bureau of Mines,
Tallahassee, Fla.
a Chief, Bureau of Geology, Florida Depart-
ment of Natural Resources.


Table 1.-Mineral production in Florida'

1975 1976
Mineral Value Value
Quantity (thousands) Quantity (thousands)

Cement, portland ...-....-- thousand short tons-. 1,721 $62,525 1,949 $67,882
Clays ...........---------------- -do.... 712 17,063 680 20,672
Lime ---------------------------- do 199 7,708 179 7,798
Natural gas ..........-------...million cubic feet-. 44,883 48,185 43,165 42,888
Peat ............... -----thousand short tons.. 82 1,037 79 1,287
Petroleum (crude).thousand 42-gallon barrels.. 41,877 490,258 44,460 499,578
Sand and gravel ......--thousand short tons-. 13,237 20,199 13,204 19,164
Stone ------------------------------ do.... 39,071 73,372 38,606 74,412
Value of items that cannot be disclosed:
Cement (masonry), magnesium compounds,
natural gas liquids, phosphate rock, rare-
earth minerals (monazite), concentrate,
staurolte, stone (dimension), titanium
concentrate (ihmenite and rutile), and
zircon concentrate ------------------- XX 1,060,1538 XX 919,106
Total - -------- -- --- XX 1,775,500 XX 1,652,232
Total 1967 constant dollaTs --------- XX 702,565 XX P 593,977
P Preliminary. XX Not applicable.
1Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production (including con-
sumptiow by producers).
Excludes dimension stone; value included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed."






2 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1976


Table 2.-Value of mineral production in Florida, by county
(Thousands)

County 1975 1976 Minerals produced in 1976 in order of value


Alachua ....-----.....-------.......---- $2,404 $1,629
Bay --------------- 474 470
Bradford ..............--------- .. W W
Brevard ------------------- W 1,821
Broward ------------------ 11,093 8,711
Calhoun ------------------- -- W
Charlotte ------............--------... -.. W
Citrus .--------------------.............. 1.881 2,700
Clay ....................-------------.. 30,556 81,672
Collier -------------------- 2,884 14,920
Dade ----------...................------------.. 66,148 W
Dixie -----.........------------...... W W
Eacambia ----- --- 169 86,081
Gadsden -- ----- W W
Glads ------------------- W W
Gulf --------------- W W
Hamilton ------------------ W W
Hendry -------...............------------... W 86,655
Hernando ----------------- W W
Highlands .............----------- 868 356
Hillsborough --------- W W
Jackson .....------------------ W W
Lake ..---------------------...... 2,926 2,278
Lee ----------------------- W 18,267
Leon ---------------------- W W
Levy ---------- --------- 290 877
Manatee ------------------ W W
Marion ---- ----- 6,092 6,582
Monroe --------- 881 W
Nasau -------------------- W W
Okalcosa ------------------ W W
Okeechobee ---------------- W
Orange -------------------- W W
Osceola --------..............----------... 144
Palm Beach --------- W 120
Pasco 8-------------- 48 999
Pinellas ------------------ W
Polk ---------------------- W W
Putnam ------------------- 2,079 W
St. Lucie --------...........----------... W 295
Santa Rosa ---------------- W 450,881
Sarasota ------- W 1,827
Sumter -------------------- W W
Suwannee -_- ------ 2,643 W
Taylor ------ ....-------------... 578 W
Wakulla ------------------- 1 W
Walton ----------- 269 W
Undistributed ------------ 1,644.841 992,806
Total ------- ----- 1,7765,600 1,652,282


W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data: included with "Undistributed."
SThe following counties are not listed because no production was reported: Baker, Columbia,
De Soto, Duval. Flagler, Franklin, Gilchrist, Hardee, Holmes, Indian River, Jefferson, Lafayette.
Liberty. Mad son. Martin, St. Johns, Seminole, Union, Volusia, and Washington.
2 Includes values of counties Indicated by symbol W.
3 Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding.








QE



.A 53

noc .'12


Stone.
Sand and gravel.
Natural gas liquids,
Stone, sand and gravel.
Do.
Sand and gravel.
Sand and gravel, stone.
Stone, phosphate rock.
Zircon, Ilmenite, rutile, staurolite, sand and
gravel, clays, monasite.
Petroleum, stone, natural gas.
Cement, stone, and and gravel.
Stone.
Petroleum, natural gas, send and gravel.
Clays, sand and gravel.
Sand and gravel.
Magnesium compounds, lime.
Phosphate rock.
Petroleum, sand and gravel, natural gas,
stone.
Stone, cement, lime, clays.
Peat.
Cement, stone, sand and gravel, peat.
Stone, sand and gravel.
Sand and gravel.
Petroleum, stone, natural gas.
Sand and gravel.
Stone.
Cement, stone.
Stone, clays, sand and gravel, phosphate rock.
Stone.
Titanium, zircon, monazite.
Sand and gravel.
Peat.
Stone.
Do.
Do.
Phosphate rock, sand and gravel, stone.
Clays, sand and gravel, peat.
Sand and gravel.
Petroleum, natural gas liquids, natural gas,
sand and gravel.
Sand and gravel.
Stone, lime, peat.
Stone.
Do.
Sand and gravel.
Do.






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table 3.-Indicators of Florida business activity

1975 1976 P Change,
percent

Employment and labor force, annual average:
Total elviliwn labor force ...............-------....thousands.. 8,472.0 3,476.0 +0.1
Unemployment .................--------------------...-------do.... 870.0 814.0 -15.1
Employment (nonagricultural) :
Mining ------.....------- ---- -------do.... 9.6 9.2 -4.2
Manufacturing ...-------..-------- --------d...-- 886.5 848.1 +2.0
Contract construction -- ... ------ do...-- 181.4 167.0 -7.9
Transportation and public utilities .--- ---....do.... 182.7 180.6 -1.1
Wholesale and retail trade ....--- --- ----- do-- 716.4 727.1 +1.5
Finance, insurance, real estate .. .-----d....~. d--- 187.9 188.0 +.1
Services ............------------- -----.do.... 588.2 615.8 +4.7
Government .----- .---...........----------do_.. 547.4 552.0 +.8
Total nonagricultural employment ...------....do-- 2,760.1 2,782.8 +1.2
Personal income:
Total ........- ---- -..............--- -----........---.....millions.- $46,820 $560,690 +9.4
Per capital ......................-----....................---------------- $5,696 $6,020 +7.6
Construction activity:
Number of private and public residential units
authorized ----------------------------------------- 47,989 66,691 +39.0
Value of nonresidential construction ........-----..millions $02.3 $87.5 +9.6
Value of State road contract awards .------ --. $268.7 $280.0 +4.2
Shipments of portland, and masonry cement to and
within the State .........----......thousand short tone.. 3,404 3,569 +4,8
Mineral production value:
Total crude mineral value --.--.........----..---.....-- millions.. $1,775.5 $1,652.2 -6.9
Value per capital, resident population .. .... ... $214 $196 -8.4
Value per square mile ----------------------------- $80,246 $28,214 -6.7


P Preliminary.
Sources: U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S.
struction Magazine, U.S. Bureau of Mines.


The Federal Energy Administration
(FEA) ordered Tampa Electric Co. to
convert four of its Gannon Station genera-
tors back to coal and install pollution
abatement equipment. The company has
previously optioned to burn oil to meet air
quality standards. Tampa Electric also an-
nounced plans to construct a coal-fired, 850-
megawatt powerplant in southwest Hills-
borough County. Construction is anticipated
to begin in 1980, with a projected plant
opening in 1985.
Florida Power Corp. announced it ex-
pects to start burning coal in powerplants
having 877,000 kilowatts of generating ca-
pacity that are currently burning oil.
Florida Mining & Materials Corp. con-
verted its new cement mill near Brooksville
to a coal-burning plant. The cost of the
conversion was approximately $1.5 million.
Florida Power & Light Co.'s third nuclear
powerplant came onstream. The St. Lucie
Unit No. 1 at Hutchinson Island has a ca-
pacity of 802,000 kilowatts and was con-
structed at a cost of $480 million. Another
unit, St. Lucie No. 2, is being constructed
adjacent to the first and is scheduled for
completion in the early 1980's.


Department of Labor, Highway and Heavy Con-



Florida Power Corp.'s 825-megawatt nu-
clear plant at Crystal River was near com-
pletion and expected to go onstream in
early 1977.
Cape Canaveral has been selected as the
American headquarters of the International
Solar Energy Society.
Belcher Oil Co. proposed building a small
refinery at Port Manatee. The small crude
splitter would process about 15,000 barrels
of crude oil per day and cost about $2.5
to $3 million and would employ 10 to 20
persons.
Exxon Corp., Texaco, Inc., and Gulf Oil
Corp. are the only petroleum companies re-
turning leases in the eastern Gulf of Mex-
ico. The reclaimed leases are in the Destin
anticline where only dry holes have thus
far been drilled.
The first stratigraphic test well was
scheduled in the southeast Atlantic waters
in an area known as the Georgia Embay-
ment. The 16,000-foot test well to be drilled
74 miles east of Jacksonville will be to
gather geological data prior to Outer Con-
tinental Shelf (OCS) leasing.
A partnership of Mobile Oil Corp. and
Amerada-Hess Corp. purchased four OCS





MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1976


0 I I I" I
1960 1965 1970 1975 1980

Figure 1.-Value of petroleum, stone, and total value of mineral production in Florida.


tracts off the central Florida coast for $4
million. The four tracts are about 100 miles
west of the Bradenton-Sarasota area.
The Florida Cabinet approved oil com-
pany requests to drill 15 exploratory wells
in the Big Cypress Swamp. To win ap-
proval. the oil companies had to agree to
remove the drilling pads, water wells, and
access roads at the conclusion of the
operation.
Dolime Minerals announced it was con-
sidering constructing a sulfur facility at
Port Manatee. Dolime plans on importing
sulfur from Canada. melting it at the Port
Manatee facility, and shipping it molten
to the Polk County fertilizer users. The


operation would process about 200,000 tons
of sulfur annually.
Two contracts have been let on deepen-
ing the Tampa harbor from 34 feet to 43
feet with funds authorized by Congress in
1974. The revised cost of the 43-foot chan-
nel is now $120 million.
The Jacksonville Port Authority will is-
sue up to $50 million in tax-free bonds for
Occidental Chemical Co. to build loading
facilities at the Port of Jacksonville. Occi-
dental previously announced the deal under
which it will sell the U.S.S.R. 1 million tons
per year of superphosphoric acid for 20
years in return for ammonia. The new
facilities will have a capacity to store 90,000






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


tons of superphosphoric acid. Forty thou-
sand tons of dry fertilizer and 30,000 tons
of ammonia are to be received from the
U.S.S.R. in the purchase-trade agreement.
Florida Steel Corp. announced plans to
increase its capacity by 185,000 tons by
1980..
Legislation and Government Pro-
grams.-The Florida House of Representa-
tives passed SB 950 which provides that no
State pollution control standard which is
more stringent than a comparable Federal
standard can be enforced by the Depart-
ment of Environmental Regulation unless
approved by the Cabinet.
The State of Florida paved the way for a
bigger involvement in international com-
merce by signing into law a bill to establish
free trade zones in the State. The bill em-
powers corporations or Government agen-
cies, such as cities or counties or other
Government entities, to apply to the Fed-
eral Government to set up a free trade
zone. In the trade zone, companies could
import goods, store them there or assemble
or process them, and export again to for-
eign nations with no U.S. or State tariff
requirements. The goods or products must
never leave the trade zone, however.
A U.S. District Court judge ruled that
the Interior Department should imme-
diately issue preferential rights leases to
Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. for its applica-
tions on land in the Osceola National
Forest. The order brought protests from
U.S. Senator Richard Stone and Florida's
Attorney General Robert Shevin. Each
urged the Interior Department to appeal
the circuit court decision and postpone the
letting of the leases until the ongoing De-
partmental study on the effect that mining
would have on water quality and wildlife
is completed.
The Council on Environment Quality rec-
ommended that the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency (EPA) prepare an environ-
mental impact statement (EIS) on the
current and projected development of the
central Florida phosphate industry. It was
determined that the proposed new phos-
phate expansions requiring Federal permits
will have a potentially significant effect on
the quality of human environment. The
study to be conducted by EPA's Atlanta
regional office, is expected to take 18 months


to complete and will provide economic and
social analyses of the potential impacts on
the region of the phosphate industry. Texas
Instruments, Inc., was awarded a contract
to develop the information necessary for the
draft central Florida phosphate industry
EIS. Upon completion of the draft EIS,
public hearings will be held before the
final EIS is prepared. The Federal Bureau
of Mines cooperated with the contractor
and furnished information on reserves and
resources of phosphate rock and forecast
production plans to the year 2000 in the
central Florida area.
A moratorium due to the EIS prepara-
tion was not established. All existing op-
erations continued. No Federal permits for
new operations will be let until the study
has been completed.
The EPA released EPA-520/4-76-018 "A
Preliminary Evaluation of the Control of
Indoor Radon Daughter Levels in New
Structures," The report states that construc-
tion modification can reduce radiation
levels to acceptable limits in homes con-
structed on reclaimed phosphate lands
where radiation levels are above that al-
lowed by the Surgeon General.
The EPA also released EPA-520/5-76-014
"Radon Dose Estimates to Phosphate In-
dustry Personnel" which concluded that "all
measured direct gamma exposures, even as-
suming continuous occupancy, are below
the current Radiation Protection Guides of
0.5 rem per year for individual members
of the population."
The U.S. Geological Survey in coopera-
tion with the Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Suwannee River
Water Management District, and the Flor-
ida State Department of Environmental
Regulation released a report assessing
Radium-226 in Florida waters.4
The Florida Resource Recovery Council
conducted a statewide energy recovery fea-
sibility study evaluating the potential for
producing fuels via solid waste conversion
systems for use in utility powerplants and
in industrial and institutional boilers.

a Engineering and Mining Journal. Iron and
Steel Demand Off in '76; Moderate Recovery
Projected for '76. V. 177, No. 8, March 1976.
4 Irwin, G. A., and C. B. Hutchinson. Recon-
naissance Water Sampling for Radium-22.6 in
Central and Northern Florida, December 1974-
March 1976. U.S. Geological Survey WRI 76-
108, October 1976, 16 pp.






MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1976


Several reports and articles were also
published.3
In 1976, the Florida State Energy Office
was awarded a grant by the FEA to write
an energy conservation plan for Florida as
required by the Energy Policy and Conser-
vation Act of 1975.
Two advisory groups to the State Energy
Office were established: Ten Regional Ac-
tion Committees (REAC's) and the State
Energy Advisory Council (SEAC). The
Energy Office published a statistical report
detailing energy use in Florida.,
Governor Askew formed a Governor's task
force to recommend to the Legislature the
organization structure to qualify Florida for
Federal funds to implement a Coastal Zone
Management Program.
The Florida House of Representatives
passed (H4014) which requires the issuance
of permits by the Department of Environ-
mental Regulation before developers could
dredge or fill Florida's coastal marshes.
The Florida Legislature amended Florida
Statutes 17-3.04 (2) (a) 2.a Effluent Stand-
ards for Phosphate Rock Subpart R-Phos-
phate Rock Subcategory Florida Adminis-
trative Code for the purpose of establishing
effluent guidelines and standards for mining
and processing phosphate rock.
The Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Regulation promulgated regulations on
the discharge of effluents from phosphate
settling areas into State streams and other
bodies of waters. The regulation limits the
particulate matter that these discharges
contain.
The Federal Bureau of Mines awarded a
grant to the Florida Bureau of Geology to
inventory and categorize mined central
Florida phosphate lands to determine the
relationship between mined lands, re-
claimed lands, and waste disposal areas and
elevated radiation levels attributed to these
areas. The study will be correlated with an
ongoing EPA program studying radiation
levels in structures built on "reclaimed"
phosphate lands.
A cooperative research project to develop
methods of dewatering phosphatic clay-
slimes continued through 1976. The phos-
phatic clays research project was jointly
funded by the Federal Bureau of Mines
and the Florida Phosphate Council, repre-
senting 10 phosphate rock mining com-
panies. The Bureau of Mines programs were
conducted at the Tuscaloosa Metallurgy


Research Center. During the year, research
on the effects of reagents on dewatering
slimes, filtration behavior as related to
slime composition, dewatering phosphate
slimes by static filtration and gel methods,
and scanning electron microscope studies
was carried out. Research grants at Auburn
University to promote channeling in a con-
tinuous gravity sedimentation process and
at the Florida State University to investigate
flocculation and settling in phosphate slimes
using.-scanning electron microscope tech-
niques were funded through the project.
Several field tests evaluating sand slime
layering techniques and flocculation were
evaluated during the year.
The Bureau's Albany Metallurgy Re-
search Center, Albany, Oreg., continued for
the third year its program on direct acidula-
tion of Florida phosphate matrix. Prelim-
inary data indicate that 92% to 96% of the
PI'/) content of the matrix is recoverable
and the P.O, concentration in the product
acid ranged from 21% to 30%. The waste
filter cake appears suitable for use in land
reclamation.
Characterization and beneficiation studies
on the phosphate-bearing Hawthorne For-
mation were also conducted at the Bureau's
Tuscaloosa Metallurgy Research Center.
The project, a cooperative program with
the Florida Bureau of Geology, is to deter-
mine if the phosphorite in the Hawthorne
Formation is amiable to beneficiation.
The Bureau of Mines was awarded U.S.
patent 4,000,067 for a process that enhances

5 Everett. K. J. Transfer Stations in Florida.
State of Florida Resource Recovery Council,
Res. Recovery/Solid Waste Tech. Assistance
Ser., Rept. No. 1, May 1976, 61 pp.
---. "What's in the Garbage?" Municipal
Solid Waste Composition in Florida. State of
Florida Resource Recovery Council, Res. Recov-
ery/Solid Waste Tech. Assistance Ser., Rept. No.
3, September 1976, 4G pp.
Everett, K. J., and J. W. Roy. Solid Waste
Sampling Developing a Post Collection/Pre-
Processing Methodology. State of Florida Re-
source Recovery Council, Res. Recovery/Solid
Waste Tech. Assistance Ser.. Rept. No. 2, April
1976, 19 pp.
Florida Environmental and Urban Issues. Re-
source Recovery: A Choice for Florida? May-
June 1976, pp. 1-5.
Journal, Florida Engineering Society. Should
All Our Waste Go To Waste? April 1976, p. 24.
Resource Recovery Counoll. Energy Recovery
From Solid Waste: A Resource Recovery Solu-
tion for Florida. March 1976, 178 pp.
Roy, J. W. Integrated Waste Utility System.
Res. Recovery/Solid Waste Tech. Assistance
Ser., Rept. No. 5. 1976, 9 pp.
State Energy Office, Department of Admin-
istration. Statistics of the Florida Electric
Utility Industry 1960 Through 1975. September
1976, 268 pp.







THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


the rate of settling of fine particles in phos-
phate rods slime by adding optimum
proportions of various fluorine compounds.
The Florida Bureau of Geology, Depart-
ment of Natural Resources, continued
studies of mineral resources and hydrology
throughout the State during the year.
Waste Management, Inc., and the Federal
Energy Research and Development Admin-
istration (ERDA) signed an agreement for
the design, construction, and operation of


an experimental facility to convert urban
solid waste into methane gas. This new fa-
cility is expected to cost $2.5 million and
will be constructed on the site of the com-
pany's existing waste shredding facility in
Pompano Beach. The plant is expected to
process up to 100 tons of garbage per day,
producing gas through a bacterial digestion
and fermentation process. Construction is
expected to begin in early 1977.


REVIEW BY MINERAL COMMODITIES


NONMETALS

Nonmetals accounted for 62%; fuels,
36%; and metals, 2% of the State's total
mineral production value in 1976. The prin-
cipal nonmetals produced, listed in descend-
ing order of value, were phosphate rock,
stone, cement, clays, and sand and gravel.
Cement.-Portland cement shipments
increased 13% from 1975 levels. Portland
cement shipments were 1.9 million tons
valued at $67.8 million, an 8% increase in
value from that of 1975. Masonry cement
shipments decreased 1% while value in-
creased 2% over that of 1975.
Types I and II (general-use and mod-
crate-heat) Type III (high-carly-strength),
and Type V (high-sulfur-resistant) cements
were produced. Most of the shipments of
both portland and masonry cements were
used within the State.
Portland cement shipments mainly in
bulk form were made by truck (88%) and
by rail (12%). Principal consumers were
ready-mix concrete companies (55%), con-
crete products manufacturers (20%) build-
ing materials dealers (10%), highway con-
tractors (8%), and the remainder for mis-
cellaneous uses.
Raw materials used in the manufacture
of cement were mined principally within
the State and included limestone, clay, sand,
and staurolite. Oolitic aragonite imported
from the Bahamas was used exclusively by
one company while another used lesser
amounts. Small amounts of gypsum and
blast furnace slag were obtained from out-
of-State sources.
Eleven rotary kilns were operated at five
plants. Ten plants used the wet process
and one, the dry process. The National
Portland Cement Co. plant in Port Manatee


processed imported and domestic clinker for
sale in the State. Maule Industries, Inc.,
also processed imported clinker. Almost 300
million kilowatt-hours of electrical energy
were consumed in the manufacture of ce-
ment; 100% of the power was purchased.
Florida Mining & Materials Corp. con-
verted its new cement plant near Brooksville
from oil to coal.7
Clays.-Total clay output decreased al-
most 5% while the value increased 21%.
Florida fuller's earth production ranked
first in the Nation. Fuller's earth output in-
creased 7% and the value increased 20%.
Two producers were active in Gadsden
County and one producer in Marion
County. The unit value of fuller's earth
was $46.03 per ton. Fuller's earth was used
for fertilizer fillers, pet waste absorbents,
pesticides, drilling mud, paper coating, and
other uses.
Kaolin output increased about 10% and
the value increased 21% over that of 1975.
The unit value for kaolin was $42.06 per
ton. Kaolin was produced by one company
in Putnam County; principal uses were in
electrical porcelain, whiteware, and wall
tile.
Miscellaneous clay output decreased about
21% but the value increased 38% above
that of 1975. The unit value for miscel-
laneous clay was $2.60 per ton. Clays used
in the manufacture of cement contributed
to the decline in output, while the clay
used in the manufacture of lightweight
aggregate remained the same. The clays
were used primarily for the manufacture of
cement and lightweight aggregate. No com-
mercial brick was manufactured in the
State during 1976. The one producer in
Escambia County closed down because of
7 The Tampa Tribune. Oct. 27, 1976.





MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1976


natural gas curtailments to its kilns. Other
clay mines were operated in Clay and Her-
nando Counties in 1976.
Fluorine.-Fluorine in -the form of fluo-
silicic acid was recovered at six plants as a
byproduct of wet-process phosphoric acid
manufacture. Fluosilicic acid was used to
produce cryolite, aluminum fluoride, so-
dium silica fluoride,. and for water fluorida-
tion. The value of fluorine byproducts is
not included in the State's mineral produc-
tion value.
Gypsum.-Imported crude gypsum was
calcined by three companies for use in the
manufacture of gypsum building products.
United States Gypsum Co. and Celotex
Corp. operated plants near Jacksonville,
Duval County; and National Gypsum Co.
operated a plant near Tampa, Hillsborough
County. The three plants used calcining
kettles, one rotary kiln, and one holoflite in
processing gypsum and manufacturing of
gypsum products. A total of 378,000 short
tons of calcined gypsum was produced, an
increase of 10% over that of 1975.
Lime.-Basic Magnesia, Inc., in Gulf
County; Chemical Lime, Inc.. in Hernando
County: and Dixie Lime & Stone Co. in
Sumter County produced 179,000 tons of
lime valued at $8 million for magnesia.
water treatment, sewage disposal, and other
uses. Output was 10% below that of 1975.
The lime was all used in Florida.
Magnesia.-Basic Magnesia, Inc., Port
St. Joe. Gulf County, produced caustic
calcined magnesia and refractory-grade
magnesia from seawater. Shipments and
value increased 10% and 19%, respectively,
over that of 1975.
Perlite.-Four companies produced ex-
panded perlite from crude ore shipped into
the State. The quantity sold or used in-
creased to 23,611 short tons from 21,344
short tons in 1975. The value of the quan-
tity sold or used was $1,551,927, an increase
of 8% over that of 1975. Production from
plants in Broward, Duval, Escambia, and
Indian River Counties was used for horti-
cultural uses, construction, formed products,
and insulation uses. The value of expanded
perlite is not included in the State's min-
eral value.
Phosphate Rock.-Marketable produc-
tion of phosphate rock increased 2% in
quantity, but the value declined 17% re-
flecting a price softening trend that began
in 1975.


Florida's 1976 production data are com-
bined with that of North Carolina to con-
ceal the latter's output because there is
only one producing company in North
Carolina. Marketable production sold or
used totaled 37.4 million tons valued at
$775.1 million, a 1% decrease from the
38 million tons in 1975. Agricultural uses
accounted for 73%; industrial uses, 1%; and
exports, 26%. Exports from the two States
were valued at $255 million. Agricultural
uses were for normal superphosphate,
triple superphosphate, wet-process phos-
phoric acid, direct application to the soil,
and defluorinated phosphate rock. Indus-
trial uses included the manufacture of ele-
mental phosphorus.
Mine production of crude dry ore in
Florida and North Carolina was 158 mil-
lion tons with a PO.-, content of 17.8 mil-
lion tons.
Land-pebhle phosphate was produced at
20 mines by 11 companies in 3 counties.
Two companies processed tailings from old
wastes.
Soft-rock phosphate was produced by four
companies operating six mines in two coun-
ties. Total mine production was-29,320 tons
with a PO, content of 5,971 tons, valued
at $542,000. The soft-rock phosphate was
used for direct application to the soil.
Marketable phosphate rock was produced
from Florida land-pebble phosphate mines
by Agrico Chemical Co.; Borden, Inc.;
Brewster Phosphates; Florida Agglite Corp.;
Gardinier. Inc.; W. R. Grace & Co.; Inter-
national Minerals & Chemical Corp.
(IMC); Mobil Oil Corp.; Poseidon Mines,
Inc.; Occidental Petroleum Corp.; Swift
Chemical Co.; T. A. Minerals Corp.; and
U.S.S. Agri-Chemicals, Inc.
Agrico Chemical Co.'s Fort Green mine
went on-stream in midyear and, after com-
pleting its shakedown, operated at design
capacity. Agrico announced it had agreed
to acquire 40% of Compagnie Francaise del
'Azote (COFAZ), France's second largest
fertilizer company, along with a 40% stake
in a joint phosphate mining venture to be
set up in Florida to supply COFAZ. A de-
finitive article on Agrico's Fort Green mine
was published."
Beker Industries Corp. received approval
from the Manatee County Commissioners

Pit & Quarry. Agrico Chemical Company's
New Florida Phosphate Washer. V. 69, No. 2,
August 1976.






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Lo apply for building permits for its pro-
"osod mining operation in Manatee County.
The company continued to follow the
critical path for permitting in anticipation
of going onstream with its Manatee County
mine in 1980.
Borden Chemical division of Borden, Inc.,
received approval from both the Hills-
borough County Commissioners and the
Planning Commission to develop its 4,864-
acre Big Four mine in southeastern Hills-
borough County. Site clearing and construc-
tion were underway at midyear. The Big
Four mine is planned to produce 1.25 mil-
lion tons per year of product to be used
internally in fertilizer manufacture.
Brewster Phosphates began mining at its
Lonesome mine in Hillsborough County.
The design capacity of the operation is 2.8
million tons per year and costs over $75
million. Overburden on the Lonesome prop-
erty averages 25.5 feet, and matrix, 11.5
feet. The phosphate product is expected to
grade about 70% to 71% bone phosphate
of lime (BPL) .*
C. F. Industries Inc. submitted its Devel-
opment of Regional Impact Study (DRI) to
the Central Florida Regional Planning
Council to mine its 19,555 acres in Hardee
County. The mining plan shows that an
average of 574 acres will be mined annually
for 25 years producing over 94 million tons
of phosphate rock. The initial phase calls
for a 2-million-ton-per-year mine and
washer. When the mine goes onstream in
1978, a 400,000-ton-per-year phosphoric acid
chemical plant will be constructed with
plans to go onstream in 1979. The last
phase will be to expand the mine from 2 to
4 million tons per year in 1981.10
First Mississippi Corp. purchased 2,000
acres of phosphate reserve lands in south-
eastern Hillsborough County. According to
the company, the lands contain 7.5 million
tons of high-grade phosphate reserve.""
Freeport Chemical Co. announced that it
had leased 6,000 acres of phosphate lands
in southwestern Hardee County and has op-
tions to. buy another 7,700 acres in the
county. Mining of these deposits is esti-
mated to begin in 1981W2
Farmland Industries purchased 721 acres
of phosphate reserve lands in De Soto
County. No immediate development plans
were announced.'c
W. R. Grace & Co. announced that it has
holdings of almost 80,000 acres in central


Florida with 80 years of phosphate reserves
which include both primary and secondary
deposits. The company continued its plans
for development of its Four Corners mine
and continued to develop data for the re-
quired permits."1
Gardinier, Inc., purchased 178 acres in
fee and another 135 acres of mineral rights
adjacent to its lands in Hardee County.
IMC announced plans to construct a $36
million animal feed ingredients plant ad-
jacent to its New Wales complex. The new
plant will have a production capacity of
435,000 tons per year. Construction is ex-
pected to begin in late 1977."
IMC also has taken an option on 21,000
acres in Brevard County known as the
Desert Ranches, Inc. A company spokes-
man stated that any operations in this area
would be 10 to 15 years away and would
follow other anticipated Florida operations
now underway."1
Mississippi Chemical Co. purchased or
has options on 20,000 acres in western Har-
dee County and reiterated its intentions to
mine in 1980. Plans call for permit applica-
tions in 1976. Detailed engineering is to be
completed in 1977 and construction of the
washer-beneficiation plant is to begin in
1978. The phosphate rock products will be
shipped to Mississippi to be converted into
fertilizer.17
Noranda Phosphate, Inc., purchased 320
acres of phosphate reserve land in Hardee
County expanding its holdings to about
10,000 acres.18
Occidental Chemical Co. (Oxy) signed
the first chemical purchase contract under
its long-term fertilizer agreement with the
U.S.S.R. The contract calls for Oxy to buy
an average of 350,000 tons per year of am-
monia for a 10-year period beginning in
1978. In addition, Oxy will sell 1 million
tons per year of superphosphoric acid to
the U.S.S.R. and buy back 1.5 million
tons per year of ammonia, an equal amount

o Engineering and Mining Journal. Phosphates
Are Vital to Agriculture-and Florida Mines for
One-Third the World. V. 177, No. 5, May 1976,
p. 86.
10 The Wachula Herald-Advocate. July 8, 1976.
11 Saraeota Herald-Tribune. July 28, 1976.
12 The Lakeland Ledger. Nov. 26, 1976.
1 Arcadian. Feb. 5, 1976.
1, The Lakeland Ledger. Oct. 15, 1976.
15 The Tampa Tribune. Nov. 5,. 1976.
10 The Tampa Tribune. Oct. 26, 1976.
17 Wachula HeraldAdvocate. Jan. 15, 1976.
's Wachula Herald-Advocate. July 8, 1976.







MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1976


of urea. and 1 million tons per year of
potash."1
The Jacksonville Port Authority agreed
to issue up to $50 million in tax-free bonds
to Hooker Chemical Co. to build loading
facilities in the port of Jacksonville with
capacities of 90,000 tons of superphosphoric
acid. 40,000 tons of dry fertilizer, plus fa-
cilities of 30,000 tons capacity for storing
Soviet ammonia."
Phillips Petroleum Co.'s development of
a regional impact statement to mine phos-
phate in De Soto and Manatee Counties
was approved by the county commissioners
of both counties. The company continued
the critical path for permitting in anticipa-
tion of developing its Manatee-De Soto
properties in 1978.
Swift Chemical Co.'s plans for developing
its Manatee County properties will be de-
layed because of Manatee County's morato-
rium on processing mining applications.n
T&A Minerals Corp.'s Polk County facil-
ities came onstream during the year. The
plant is designed to produce one-half mil-
lion tons of phosphate rock annually. T&cA
is operating two mines: One which proc-
esses debris, mining it with a 14-inch by
12-inch cutterhead dredge; the second op-
eration mines virgin land using conven-
tional Florida phosphate mining practices.
The processing plant has been designed to
be flexible in processing ores from the ad-
jacent property or ores shipped to the plant
by truck from the Citrus County mine.
Several articles were published describing


technical advances and innovations in the
central Florida phosphate areas.s2
Sand and Gravel.-Sand and gravel out.
put totaled 15 million tons valued at $19
million. Production and value decreased1
2% and 5%, respectively, from that of 1975.
These slight decreases in sand and gravel
output in 1976 indicate a stabilization in
the construction industry in Florida and
along with other indicators, reflect the be-
ginning of a more stable economy.
Lake, Polk, and Broward Counties were
the leading producing counties accounting
for 47% of the output. Polk, Broward, and
Lake Counties led in the value of sand
produced and accounted for 41% of the
value.
During the year, 50 companies operated
63 mines in 24 counties. Nearly all the sand
produced was by commercial operators. Of
the 63 sand and gravel operations, 7 pro-
duced between 500,000 and 1,000,000 tons,i
24 produced between 100,000 and 500,0001
tons, and 32 produced less than 100,000
tons. Virtually all of the sand and gravel
was transported by truck with minor
amounts by rail and water. The sand and
gravel was mainly used for construction
purposes with a small amount going into
industrial uses.

I Chemical Week. Dec. 1, 1976.
0 Sarasota Herald-Tribune. July 80, 1976.
21 The Bradenton Herald. May 6, 1976.
2 Engineering and Mining Journal. V. 177,
No. 8. March 1976.
Phosphates Are Vital to Agriculture-
and Florida Mines for One-Third the World.
V. 177. No. 6. May 1976, pp. 79-89.
-- V. 177, No. 9, September 1976.


Table 4.-Florida: Construction and industrial sand and gravel sold or used
by producers

1976
Use Quantity lue ue
(thousand Value Value
short tons) thousandsa) per ton
Construction:
Sand ---- ------- --- -- 10,829 $12,958 $1.25
Gravel -------- --- 2,585 4,792 1.85
Total --- ---- --- ---------- 12,914 17,750 1.87
Industrial sand ------------------- -------. 290 1,414 4.88
Grand total ------------------- ----------............ 18,204 19,164 1.45






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table 5.-Florida:


Construction sand and gravel sold or used, by major use category


1976
Use Quantity Value V&lue
(thousand alue
short tons) (thousands) per ton
concretee aggregate (residential, nonresidential, highways,
bridges, dams, waterworks, airports, etc.) ------ 4,855 $6,210 $1.48
concretee products (cement blocks, bricks, pipe, etc.) 3 ,686 5,398 1.46
Asphaltic concrete aggregates and other bituminous mixtures- 674 1,355 2.01
Roadbase and coverings ....---- ..--. ------.--. 1,698 2,498 1.47
Fill ...------............................. 2,842 2,084 .89
their uses --------..--- .------------------------. 168 205 1.80
Total -- ....---------.-------------- --- 1 12,914 17,750 1.87
2 Data do not add to total shown because of independent rounding.


Staurolite.-Staurolite was recovered as
i byproduct of ilmenite production at the
Highland and Trail Ridge plants of E. I.
du Pont de Nemours & Co., in Clay County.
Production and value increased. Staurolite
was mainly used in sandblasting with minor
aniounts for cement. Florida is the only
State with a recorded production of
staurolite.
Stone.-Florida stone (all limestone) is
divided into two types-hard rock and soft
rock. Each type has a different end use and
value. Hard rock is used as concrete, bitu-
ininous and macadam aggregates, and
ranges in value from $1.50 to $3.99 per
ton. Soft rock limestone is used as dense-
igraded roadbase material, surface treatment
aggregate, and in the manufacture of lime;
it ranges in value from $0.80 to over $2.00
per ton.
Crushed limestone output was 38.0 mil-
lion tons valued at $73.3 million, a decrease
of 1% in tonnage while the value increased
1% above that of 1975. These statistics in-
dicate a stabilizing of the construction ac-
tivity in the State. Output came from 65
companies operating 122 quarries in 24
counties compared, with 69 companies op-
erating 119 quarries in 21 counties in 1975.
The three leading producing counties were
!Dade, Hernando, and Broward, which sup-
plied 68% of the State's total tonnage and
57% of the value. Eight companies pro-
duced over 1 million tons from 18 quarries
and accounted for over 50% of the crushed
stone output and 65% of the value. Of the
total crushed limestone sold or used, agri-
cultural stone accounted for 3% of the
quantity and 5% of the value; concrete ag-
gregate, 30% and 35%, respectively; bitu-
minous aggregate, 7% and 7%, respectively;


and dense-graded roadbase, 36% and 27%,
respectively. Four companies processed
oyster shells for roadbase material.
The American Stone Co. quarried dimen-
sion limestone in Manatee County for cut
stone, rough construction, and dressed
flagging.
Sulfur.--Recovered sulfur from petro-
leum production at Exxon's desulfurization
plants in Santa Rosa and Escambia Coun-
ties increased from 284,833 long tons in
1975 to 306,721 long tons in 1976. The value
of byproduct sulfur is not included in the
State's mineral production value.
Vermiculite.-Exfoliated vermiculite was
produced by two operators at four plants
in Broward, Duval, and Hillsborough Coun-
ties from crude ore shipped into the State.
The exfoliated vermiculite was used for
lightweight concrete aggregate, plaster ag-
gregate, insulation, and other uses. The
value of vermiculite is not included in the
State's mineral value.

METALS
Metals accounted for only 2% of the
State's total mineral production value.
Rare-Earth Minerals.-Humphrey's Min-
ing Co., Nassau County, and Titanium En-
terprises, Clay County, produced monazite
concentrate as a coproduct from their heavy
mineral operations. Output and value de-
creased from that of 1975.
Titanium Concentrate.-E. I. du Pont
de Nemours & Co., and Titanium Enter-
prises produced ilmenite and rutile concen-
trates from their plants in Clay County
and Humphrey's Mining Co. produced
ilmenite concentrate from its mine in Nas-
sau County. Overall production and value
increased.






MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1976


Zircon Concentrate.-Production of zir-
con concentrate from E. I. du Pont de
Nemours Sc Co.'s Trail Ridge plant and
Titanium Enterprises' Green Cove Springs
plant, both in Clay County, decreased 7%
in quantity and 21% in value from that of
1975.
MINERAL FUELS
Mineral fuels produced were natural gas,
natural gas liquids, crude petroleum, and
peat.
Natural Gas.-Total marketed produc-
tion of natural gas in Florida in 1976 was
about 43.2 billion cubic feet. The difference
between the marketed volume and the 46.5
billion cubic feet measured at the wellhead
was due to a 12.3% content of H2S, CO,.
and N,. plus plant losses and in-plant con-
sumption for fuel. All of the gas sold was
from the Blackjack Creek and Jay fields,
except a small quantity that was produced
from the nearby Mount Carmel field. Gas
production at the Jay field currently ex-
ceeds 100 million cubic feet per day, and
more than 300 billion cubic feet are ex-
pected to be produced during the lifetime
of the field. Production of butane, propane,
and ethane began at Jay in 1975 when a
new gas liquids plant began operation. The
facility strips approximately 20,000 barrels
of gas liquids per day from the natural gas
produced in the field.
The Five Flags Pipeline Co. sold natural
gas and ethane produced therefrom to in-
dustrial customers in the Pensacola area.
Commercial and residential customers pur-
chased the remaining methane from the
Florida Gas Co.
Prior to distribution to the Florida Gas
Transmission Pipeline Co., a subsidiary of
Florida Gas Co., the gas was stripped of
natural gas liquids at a plant in Jay field,
northern Santa Rosa County. The Btu value
of the gas was reduced from 1,450 to 1,040
Btu per cubic foot before distribution
through the interstate pipeline of Florida
Gas Co.
Peat-Peat production decreased from
82,000 tons in 1975 to 78,800 tons in 1976
while the value increased from $1,037,000
in 1975 to $1,287,000 in 1976, representing


a 4% decrease in quantity and a 24% in-
crease in value. Twelve companies produced
moss, reed-sedge, and humus peat. Ship.
ments totaled 78,800 tons and consisted of
92% moss, 7% reedsedge, and 1% humus.
Most of the peat was shipped in bulk and;
used to pack flowers, plants, and shrubs;
for general soil improvement; and in pot-
ting soils.
Petroleum.-Total oil production in
Florida was 44.5 million barrels in 1976.
The 6% increase was primarily attributed
to increased production in the Jay and
Blackjack Creek fields. Jay field yielded 25%
of .the total crude oil production in the
State. The wellhead value of northwest
Florida crude oil and associated gas aver-
aged $12.30 per barrel in January 1976."
Petroleum production in the Jay field is
now over 90,000 barrels of oil per day. The
Jay field is expected to produce an esti-
mated 345 million barrels of oil before it is
depleted in the 1990's.
South of Jay, the Blackjack Creek field
is now producing 15,000 barrels of oil per
day. The field began production in Januar,
1975. A new waterflood plant began opera
tion in the Blackjack Creek field in 1976
The plant injects more than 25,000 barrels,
of water into the underground oil reservoir'
per day to help maintain pressure and in-
crease the ultimate recovery of oil to ap-
proximately 40 million barrels, about twice
the amount which would be possible with-
out the secondary recovery program.
Crude petroleum production from south
Florida was derived entirely from the Lower
Cretaceous Age Sunniland Limestone For-
mation. The average depth of a develop-
ment well in the Sunniland trend is about
11,500 feet. There are 74 producing wells
in 8 fields in this trend.
Approximately 4.85 million barrels of
crude oil ranging from 250 API to 32* API
gravity, representing 10.9% of Florida's
total production, were produced from south
Florida fields. Wellhead prices ranged
from $5.15 per barrel in January to $11.40
per barrel in December 1976 for old and'
new oil combined.
3 Based on 5% grow production tax reported'
to Florida Department of Revenue.








THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table 6.-Florida: Oil and gas well drilling completions in 1976, by county

Proved field wells1 Exploratory wells Total
County
Oil Gas Dry Oil Gas Dry Wells Footage

Jollier ------------------- 8 2 -- 4 9 99,967
De Soto ------------------ -- -- 1 1 11,662
escambla 1 -- -- 1 2 16,211
Franklin ------------- 1 1 11,950
ulf ---------------------- -- -- 1 1 18,606
Flendry --.-----------. 2 -- .. 2 28,182
Lee -----------------------. 4 -- 2 -- 1 7 82,505
3anta Rosa -------------- 1 1 8 5 79,278
Walton ------------------- 2 2 4,894
Total --------------- 11 -- 5 14 80 848,255

1Development wells as defined by American Petroleum Institute.
Source: American Petroleum Institute.



Table 7.--Principal producers

Commodity and company Address Type of activity County


Cement:
Florida Mining & Materials Box 28965
Corp. Tampa, Fla. 88622
General Portland, Inc ..... 4400 Republic National
Bank Tower, Box 824
Dallas, Tex. 75221
Maule Industries, Inc ... Box 2085 PVS
Hialeah, Fla. 88012
Southeastern Materials, Box 2684
Inc. Hialeah, Fla. 88012
Clays:
Engelhard Minerals & Menlo Park
Chemicals Corp. Edison, N.J. 08817
Mid-Florida Mining ---....... Box 68-F
Lowell, Fla. 82668
Pennsylvania Glass Sand Berkeley Springs, W. Va.
Corp. 25411
Gypsum calcinedd) :
Celotex Corp ............------- 1500 North Dale Mabry
Tampa, Fla. 88607
National Gypsum Co ......---- 325 Delaware Ave.
Buffalo, N.Y. 14202
United. States Gypsum Co 101 South Wacker Dr.
Chicago, Ill. 60606
Lime:
Chemical Lime, Inc ---....... Box 250
Ocala, Fla. 82670
Dixie Lime & Stone Co.' __ Drawer 217
Ocala, Fla. 82670
Magnesium compounds:
Basic Magnesia, Inc. .... Box 160
Port St. Joe, Fla. 82456
Peat:
Delta Peat --------------- Box 155
Mango, Fla. 83550
Oxford Peat Co ----------- Box 154
Oxford, Fla. 32684
Superior Peat & Soil .-.... Box 1688
Sebring, Fla. 88870
'erlite (expanded) :
Airlite Processing Corp. Route 2, Box 740
of Florida. Vero Beach, Fla. 82960
Armstrong Cork Co -.... Box 1991
Pensacola, Fla. 82589
Chemrock Corp ----------- End of Osage St.
Nashville, Tenn. 87208
W. R. Grace & Co. ...----.... 62 Whittemore Ave.
Cambridge, Mass. 02140
?etroleum (crude) :
Exxon Co., U.S.A -----....... Box 2024
Houston, Tex. 77001
Sun Oil Co ------ Box 2880
Dallas, Tex. 75221
See footnotes at end of table.


Plant ------
Plants -----------

Plant ------
--.... do ------------

Open pit mines ---


Plant --
--...- do -----


Hernando.
Dade and
Hills-
borough.
Dade.
Do.

Gadsden.
Marion.
Gadsden.

Duval.
Hillsborough.
Duval.


--do -------Hernando.
----do ------ Sumter.

----do ------------ Gulf.


Bog -----............---
Bog ----........-----..
Bog --------------

Plant .............
Plant ------------

---- do -----


Hillsborough.
Sumter.

Highlands.

Indian River.
Escambia.
Duval.
Broward.


Wells ------ Santa Rosa.

----do ---- Collier and
Hendry.







MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1976



Table 7.-Principal producers-Continued


Commodity and company

Petroleum (refined) :
Seminole Asphalt Refining,
Inc.
Phosphate rock:
Ag-rico Chemical Co

Borden, Inc ------ --

Brewster Phosphates --.--
Gardinier, Inc ------------

International Minerals &
Chemical Corp.
Mobil Oil Corp. --- ..

Occidental Petroleum Corp-
Swift Chemical Co -----

U-.S.S. Agri-Chemicals, Inc-

W. R. Grace & Co ----

Sand, and gravel:
Florida Rock Industries,
Inc.

E. R. Jahna Industries,
Inc.
Ortona Sand Co -------

L. W. Rozzo, Inc

Warren Bros. Co -----
Staurolite:
E. I. du Pont de Nemours
& Co.5
Stone:
Florida Crushed Stone Co__

Florida Mining and
Materials Corp.
Florida Rock Industries,
Inc.e

Maule Industries. Inc --

Southeastern Materials,
Inc.
Titanium concentrate:
Titanium Enterprises7


Address Type of activity County


Box 128
St. Marks, Fla. 32355

Box 3166
Tulsa, Okla. 74101
Box 790
Plant City. Fla. 33566
Bradley. Fla. 33835
Box 3269
Tampa, Fla. 33601
Box 867
Bartow, Fla. 33830
Box 311
Nichols, Fla. 33863
White Springs, Fla. 32096
Box 208
Bartow, Fla. 33830
Box 867
Fort Meade, Fla. 33841
Box 471
Bartow, Fla. 33830

Box 4667
Jacksonville, Fla. 32201

First & East Tillman
Lake Wales. Fla. 33853
First & East Tillhman
Lake Wales, Fla. 33853
4435 SW. 26th St.
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33314
Fairfield. Maine 04937 ---

DuPont Bldg. D-10084
Wilmington, Del. 19898

Box 668
Ocala, Fla. 32670
Box 59351
Miami. Fla. 33159
Box 4667
Jacksonville, Fla. 32201

Box 2601
Hialeah, Fla. 33012
Box 2634
Hialeah, Fla. 33012

Green Cove Springs, Fla.
32043


Refinery ---------- Wakulla.


Open pit mines and Polk.
plants.
Open pit mine and Do.
plant.
--do ------------ Do.
--- do -_---- Do.

Open pit mines --- Do.

---do ----------- Do.

Open pit mine -_- Hamilton.
Open pit mines Polk.

Open pit mine --- Do.

Open pit mine and Do.
plant.

Pits ------------- Clay, Dade,
Glades,
Lake.
--do ------- Lake and
Polk.
Dredge --------- Hendry.

Pit ----------- Broward.

Pit ---------- Sarasota.

Plant ------------- Clay.


Quarries ---------- Hernando and
Sumter.
Quarry ----- Hernando.

Quarries .---------- Collier, Lee,
Sumter,
Suwannee.
--do -------- Dade.

do ------- Do.


Mine and plant Clay.


' Also stone.
'Also lime.
Also phosphate rock and exfoliated vermiculite.
Also elemental phosphorus.
Also titanium and zircon concentrates.
" Also sand and gravel.
Also zircon concentrate and rare-earth oxides and thorium oxide in monazite concentrate.




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