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 Material Information
Title: The Mineral industry of Florida
Series Title: Information circular
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Geology
United States -- Bureau of Mines
Publisher: Bureau of Geology, Division of Interior Resources, Florida Dept. of Natural Resources in cooperation with U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1972
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Mines and mineral resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mineral industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Summary: Some no. consist of preprints of the U.S. Bureau of Mines Mineral yearbook chapter on Florida.
General Note: Description based on: 1972.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 1983.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 05277645
lccn - sn 86026148
System ID: UF00093544:00002

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FLRD GEOLIOWC( ICA SURflViEWY~


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information and permissions.








The Mineral Industry of Florida



This chapter has been prepared under a cooperative agreement between the Bureau of
Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Florida Bureau of Geology.


By William F. Stowasser and Woodson R. Oglesby 2


The value of mineral production in Flor-
ida was $424.3 million. This was an increase
of $81 million or 23% more than that in
1971.. Cement, lime, magnesium compounds,
natural gas, natural gas liquids, petroleum,
stone, titanium concentrates, and zirconium
concentrates all showed significant increases
in production over 1971 levels. Monazite
was produced for the first time since 1968.
Recovered sulfur production increased 22-
fold, and natural gas production increased
17-fold. Phosphate rock, perlite, staurolite,
and kyanite concentrates reported smaller
increases in production and value in 1972
compared with that of 1971.
For the 79th consecutive year, Florida
produced more phosphate rock than any
other State. Nationally, Florida again
ranked first, in terms of value, in the
production of fuller's earth, second in the
production of titaniumni concentrates, and
third in peat and kyanite production.
Staurolite was not produced in any other
State. Florida and North Carolina supplied
84% of the domestic phosphate rock mar-
ket. Only Morocco exported more phos-
phate rock to world markets than did
Florida. Florida increased exports 11% over
the 1971 level; this represented 95% of
phosphate rock exports from the United
States. Exports from Florida moved through
the ports of Tampa, Boca Grande, and
Jacksonville to 27 countries. Japan and
Canada each received over 2 million short
tons, and over 1 million short tons was
shipped to Western Europe.
Crude petroleum production by Humble
Oil & Refining Co. from the Jay field in the
northern Panhandle near the Alabama bor-
der is expected to increase to 93,000 barrels
per day.
Although the development trend was


continuous, production buildup from the
Jay field was basically a function of planned
construction. In 1972 there were one 2,000-
barrel-per-day, three 6,500-barrel-per-day,
and three 12,000-barrel-per-day nominal
capacity field separators for a field total of
57,500 barrels per day. Three 12,000-barrel-
per-day separating plants will complete the
facilities. The last one was due to start up
early in 1972. Ultimate fieldwide separator
capacity will be 93,500 barrels per day.
Legislation and Government Programs.-
The Governor of Florida signed into law,
bills providing for coordinated management
of Florida's water resources, purchase of
environmentally endangered forests, and
State control of land use development. The
"Florida Environmental Land and Water
Management Act of 1972" will have an
effect on the phosphate mining industry.
The section on water management gives
the Department of Natural Resources the
power to conserve, protect, and manage
all the waters of the State. The Depart-
ment of Natural Resources will establish
a Statewide water use plan that will im-
pose regulations on well drilling and all
consumptive uses of water. The land use
section allows the State to purchase or
rigidly control development of about 5%
of the State's land area., These lands will
be designated to be of critical concern to
the State and be protected.
The Attorney General of the State of
Florida has renewed his request for a
hearing on his motion for a preliminary
injunction against the issuance of phos-
phate mining leases in the Osceola National
Forest. The State filed suit in 1971- against
Physical scientist, Division of Nonmetallic
Minerals-Mineral Supply.
Assistant administrator-Oil and Gas, Florida
Dept. of Natural Resources.




5~5~7. ~-e7


MINE~RALS YIVARBiOOK, 1972


the Secretaries of the U.S. Department of
the Interior and the U.S. Department of
Agriculture after it was disclosed that pre-
ferrntial rights leases had been applied for
by wrveral companies in the Osceola Na-
tional Forest. A moratorium was placed
on the issuance of leases by the Secretary
of the Interior to permit completion of
environmental impact statements. The At-
torrny General contended that the Environ-
mental Protection Act and other statutes
supeTrwdet the mining laws that direct the
Fetviral Government to issue mining per-
miti if specified conditions arc met.
A 5% corporate profit tax was enacted by
a special tsesion of the Florida State legis-
lature in Dec-rmbcr 1971 and will affect the
mining industry in Florida in 1972. The
corporate profit tax was predicted to gener-
.are approximately $150 million a year.
On April 1. 1972, the State of Florida
was paid a total of $1.221,659 in severance
taxes for phosphate rock mined from July
I through December 31. 1971. The initial
&mrnonth payment was based on a 3% assess-
ment rate. This rate will increase to 4%
un July 1. 1973. and 5%, July 1, 1975. The
value per ton of phosphate rock assigned
by the Department of Revenue for tax
purpocwct was $3.11. Of the $1,221.659 total,
3258.718 was deducted from the ad valorem
tax paid to the county in which the com-
pany operated (21%), one-half of the re-
mainder. $181.470 (39%). was returned to
the industry for land reclamation, and the


remainder, $481,470 (40%), was deducted
from Federal taxable income. The Federal
tax credit was $231,105 (19%) The industry
payment to the State was reduced by de-
ductions and tax credits to $250,354 for a
6-nonth period.
A new Statewide ban on high-phosphate
detergents was announced by the Florida
State Pollution Control Board. Effective the
first of 1973, the rule limits the phosphorus
content of soaps and detergents to 8.7%.
This is the same ceiling imposed by the
States of Connecticut, Indiana, Maine,
Michigan, and New York. Dade County
has banned the sale of detergents contain-
ing any phosphorus. Some cities, including
Chicago, Ill., and Buffalo, N.Y., have total
bans on phosphate detergents. The Florida
ceiling of 8.7% phosphorus content in de-
tergents applies only to laundry products,
not to automatic dishwashing detergents or
personal hygiene products, that is, shampoo
or toothpaste. Detergents sold for industrial
or institutional use were also exempted
from the phosphorus limitation.
The Florida Pollution Control Board
adopted safety regulations designed to pre-
vent damaging slime spills from holding
ponds associated with phosphate rock proc-
essing operations. The Board tightened re-
quirements for construction, operation, and
maintenance of dams designed to retain
the slimes. The new rules set minimum
standards on the dams and emphasized in-
tensive surveillance by State inspectors.


Table 1.-Mineral production in Florida I
1971 1972
Mineral
Quantity Value Quantity Value
(thousands) (thousands)
C@mont:
Portland .... thousand short tons 2,177 $48,970 2,425 $59 ,778
Manonry ... ... ................. do.... 180 4,877 218. 6 901
Clya t r.... ............ .... do.... 998 12,884 922 10,886
.mr ... .....do ... 159 2,958 180 8,527
Natural KaM ... million cubic feet. 908 270 15,521 4,967
Poet ... .. thousand short tons.. 57 412 45 862
P.trulitum (erude).. thousand 42-gallon barrels.. 5,847 W 16,897 W
Sand and gravel ..... thousand short tons.. 28,228 18,8836 20,762 15,025
Stlon ......... .... ..... do.... 42,810 64,882 *58,098 '81,621
Value at items that cannot be diseloed:
Kaltn (clay), kyante, magnesium compounds,
natural gap liqufds, phosphate rock, rare-earth
metal concentrates. staurolite, stone (shell)
(1972). titanium concentrates, zircon concen-
trata, and value indicated by symbol W ........ XX 190,242 XX 241,775
Total-...........................=..... XX 848,781 XX 424,287
Tota t7 constant dollars .................. XX 292,274 XX p852,964
Prltminary. W Withheld to avoid 4iscloaing individual company confidential data;, Included with
"Value of Items that cannot be disclosed." XX Not applicable.
SProduction as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production (including consumption by
producers).
Exaludes kaolin; included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed."
Excludes shell; included with "Value of Items that cannot be disclosed."








THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table 2.-Value of mineral production, in Florida, by county 1
(Thousands)
County 1971 1972 Minerals produced in 1972 in order of value


Alachua-------------------
Bay....................----
Bradford-..................
Brevard...................
Broward..................
Calhoun...................
Charlotte..................
Citrus .....................
Clay......-............-
Collier....................-
Dade.....................
Escambia..................
Franklin-..................
Gadsden..................
Gilchrist.........-..---
Gulf ......................
Hamilton..................
Hendry........-----------------
Hernando.................
Hillsborough ..............-
Indian River-...............
Jackson--.................-
Lake......................
Lee.......................
Leon-.........-..........
Levy......................
Marion ....................
Monroe...................
Okaloosa ..................
Orange------...................
Palm Beach ------------..............
Pinellas ---------------
Polk......................
Putnam...................
St. Lucie..................
Santa Rosa................
Sarasota-------------------
Sumter....................
Suwannee.................
Taylor.................--------------------
Walton .................------
Undistributed a ..- --------.


$1,596
94
W
W
18,627
W
W
2,274
W
W
55,022
W
4
11,808
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
1,600
W
409
W
2,634
W
W
W
1,038
W
150,725
W
1,589
2W
W
W
W
W
101,315


$1,741
W
W
W
18,226
W
W
W
W
5,548
67,982
9,079
3
9,563
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
1,767
W
W
W
3,205
W
W
W
W
W
155,288
1,671
W
35,625
W
7,185
W
W
W
107,602


Stone.
Sand and gravel.
Natural gas liquids.
Stone, sand and gravel.
Stone, zircon concentrates, sand and gravel.
Sand and gravel.
Do.
Stone, clays, phosphate rock.
Titanium concentrates, staurolite, clays, zircon concen-
trates, kyanite, rare-earth metals.
Stone, petroleum.
Cement, stone, sand and gravel.
Petroleum, natural gas, sand and gravel, clays.
Peat, sand and gravel.
Clays, sand and gravel.
Phosphate rock.
Magnesium compounds, lime.
Phosphate rock.
Petroleum, sand and gravel, natural gas.
Stone, lime, phosphate rock.
Cement, sand and gravel, peat, phosphate rock.
Sand and gravel.
Stone, sand and gravel.
Sand and gravel.
Stone, petroleum.
Sand and gravel.
Stone.
Stone, clays, sand and gravel, phosphate rock.
Stone.
Sand and gravel.
Peat.
Stone.
Stone, sand and gravel.
Phosphate rock, sand and gravel, peat.
Sand and gravel, clays, peat.
Sand and gravel.
Petroleum, natural gas, sand and gravel.
Sand and gravel.
Stone, lime, peat.
Stone.
Do.
Sand and gravel.


Total .------------- 8438,781 424,287
W Withheld to avoid disclosing 'individual company confidential data; included with "Undistributed."
t The following counties are not listed because no production was reported: Baker, Columbia, De Soto,
Dixie, Duval, Flagler, Glades, Hardee, Highlands, Holmes, Jefferson, Lafayette, Liberty, Madison, Manatee,
Martin, Nassau, Okeechobee, Osceola, Pasco, St. Johns, Seminole, Union. Volusia, Wakulla, and Washington.
s Includes value of petroleum and natural gas from Escambia County.
a Includes value of counties indicated by symbol W.
Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding.

Table 3.-Indicators of Florida business activity.

1971 1972 P Change,
percent
Employment and labor force, annual average:
Total nonagricultural employment. -------------------thousands- 2,249.2 2,407.5 +7.0
Manufacturing..........................................------------------------------------do.--- 317.3 334.7 +5.5
Mining-----....-----.-------.--------------.-------------do ---- 9.2 9.3 +1.1
Contract construction.-----...---.-----.-----.--------------- do .-- 180.1 203.9 +13.2
Other nonagricultural employment ----------------------- do-... 1,742.6 1,859.6 +6.7
Personal Income:
Total -------------------------------------------- millions-_ $27,611 $30,397 +10.1
Per capita--------------..-------.....--------------.--------------- $3,930 $4,188 +6.6
Construction activity:
Housing units authorized-..-....-........------------------......--..---.------------161,585 282,279 +74.7
Value of nonresidential construction-.....----------......-..-..------...millions $848.4 $1,190.4 +40.3
Highway construction contract awards-----------..........-----....do--- $278.6 $210.0 -24.6
Farm marketing receipts-.........----........----------.............--------------....-----do ... $1,473.4 $1,680.7 +14.1
Mineral production value---------.---------............................-------------- do...---- $343.7 $424.3 +23.5
Export trade value.....------.--------------....-.........------------..-..-----do....--- $1,131.8 $1,319.2 +16.6
Import trade value---.-----.---..-----................................----------------------do...--- $1,173.6 $1,609.0 +37.1
P Preliminary. Estimate.
I Includes transportation and public utilities; services; wholesale and retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and government.
Sources: Survey of Current Business; Employment and Earnings; Farm Income Situation; Construction
Review; Area Trends in Employment and Unemployment; Roads and Streets; U.S. Bureau of Mines; and
Highlights of U.S. Exports and Imports Trade.






MINERAlS YEARBOOK, 1972


100 -









194S


isSO 1955 1960 1965 1970 1973

Figure 1.-Value of phosphate rock, stone, and total value
of mineral production in Florida


Tabir 4.-Worktimr and injury experience in the mineral industries

Man- Man- Number of Injury rates per
Avperagt Ilay hours InJurles million man-hours
Yoa r antd indlutry men Days worked worked --- --
working active (thou- (thou- Patal Nonfatal Fro- Severity
*lily tantld) sandst) quency

Mtatl 145 304 53 422 -
Nonmatal 8, 28 814 1,106f 8,H82 1 78 H.91 1,422
Sanm and gravel 562 248 140 1,284 87 28.81 1,804
Sto 2.,88H4 807 871 7,658 33 168 22.48 5,777
Total' .. 7,068 307 2,169 18,102 7 278 15.74 8,198

'Motal 180 3tt 658 4B3 .. 1 2.16 815
Nonmetal .....- 2.956 321 949 7,602 3 8 4.60 108
Sad ann traveL 846 261 91 H04 27 88.67 897
Ston 1,900 281 686 4.717 1 161 32.28 1,747
Total .... 5,860 380 1,682 18,686 1 214 16.88 709
SData may not add to totals shown because of Independent rounding.
I tn 1971 an4 ealier year, estimates were made of injury and employment data for those active operators
who itid not file reports: however, no estimates were made for active operators who did not report in 1972,.
Tabsulations wero made from data In file an of July 1, 1978 and are preliminary.


3 0




250
too




200

I
.p





THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


A research program aimed at solving the
problem of disposing of waste phosphate
slimes produced from beneficiating Florida
and similar type phosphate rock was
started.3 The Florida Phosphate Council,
representing 10 operating Florida com-
panies, and the U.S. Bureau of Mines are
sponsoring the work with the cost of the
program equally shared. The purpose of
the program will be to develop an eco-
nomically acceptable procedure to dewater
slimes. If this can be accomplished, con-
struction of earth clams to impound the
slimes will not be necessary, and the slimes
as well as the sand tailings can be used
to reclaim mined land. The technology
could be advantageously applied to North
Carolina, Tennessee, and possibly western
States' phosphate tailings.
Experimental studies by the Bureau of
Mines to recover phosphates and metals
from sludges generated in phosphate coat-


ing processes indicate that the process is
technically feasible and economically at-
tractive. Trisodium phosphate, zinc, and
iron are recovered. After the sludge is dis-
solved in hydrochloric acid, the iron as
ferric chloride is concentrated in isopropyl
ether, zinc is extracted by 2-diethylhexyl
phosphoric acid in kerosine, and phosphate
is recovered by crystallization from the
raffinate.
A number of research projects were
underway at the Bureau of Mines Albany
Metallurgy Research Center in Albany,
Oreg. These were (1) the recovery of fluor-
ides from phosphate rock, (2) direct acidu-
lation of phosphate ore with sulfuric acid,
specifically, land-pebble phosphate ore from
Florida to minimize slime formation, and
(3) a study of processes to separate phos-
phate minerals from carbonates in western
phosphate ores.


REVIEW BY MINERAL COMMODITIES


NONMETALS
Nonmetals represented 81%, fuels 15%,
and metals 4% of the value of the State's
total mineral production in 1972. The
principal nonmetals produced were, in de-
creasing order of value, phosphate rock,
stone, cement, sand and gravel, and clays.
Cement.-Shipments of portland and
masonry cement increased over 1971 levels
reflecting the strong demand for cement
from the construction industry. Consump-
tion of cement in 1971 was over 3.7 mil-
lion short tons and in 1972 was in excess
of 5.3 million short tons. Portland cement
shipments in 1972 increased 11%, and
masonry cement shipments increased 18%
over levels in 1971. Portland cement ship-
ments were 2.4 million short tons, and
masonry cement shipments were 213,000
short tons. The value of portland cement
and masonry cement shipments was $59.8
million and $6.9 million respectively and
showed gains of 22% for portland cement
and 42% for masonry cement compared
with values reported in 1971.
Although the number of cement plants
in Florida has not changed since 1966,
plants have expanded production facilities.
For example, Maule Industries, Inc., is in-
creasing clinker grinding capacity from a
level of about 0.5 million short tons in


1972-73 to 1.2 million in 1974 and 2.2 mil-
lion in 1975. General Portland, Inc., com-
pleted conversion of their Tampa plant
to use aragonite in the cement manufac-
turing process as a replacement for lime-
stone. The aragonite is dredged from the
Carribbean and is expected to reduce costs
and improve cement quality.
The consumption pattern of portland
cement in the State was 50% in ready-mix
concrete, 17% in building materials, 10%
to contractors, and the balance was used in
miscellaneous applications.
Clays.-Total clay production and value
decreased from 1971 levels.
Fuller's earth production decreased 18%
in quantity and its value decreased 21%
from those of 1971. Florida's fuller's earth
production was the second highest in the
Nation. Two companies operated mines in
Gadsden County, and one company oper-
ated a mine in Marion County. Fuller's
earth was used for fillers, absorbers, pesti-
cides, drilling mud, filter aids, and other
purposes.
Kaolin production increased 7% and
value increased 42% over that of 1971.
3 The Florida Times Union (Lakeland, Florida).
Waste Clay Disposal Plan is Outlined. Oct. 17,
1972, p. 21.
U.S. Bureau of Mines. Joint Research on
Florida's Phosphate Waste Announced by Mines
Bureau. Press Release, Nov. 4, 1972, p. 1.






MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972


Kaolin was produced from two mines in
Putnam County for manufacturing china
and dinnerware.
Production of common clay for manu-
facturing cement, lightweight aggregate,
and building brick increased 1.5% in
quantity and 2% in value. Four companies
in Citrus, Clay, Escambia, and Gadsden
Counties produced common clay.
Gypsum.-Imported crude gypsum was
processed into various building products
at two plants in Duval County and one
in Hillsborough County. The three plants
used nine kettles, one rotary kiln, and one
Holoflite unit to calcine gypsum products.
U.S. Gypsum Co., National Gypsum Co.,
and Kaiser Cement & Gypsum Corp., cal-
cined gypsum in Duval and Hillsborough
Counties.
A total of 594,000 short tons of calcined
gypsum was produced, an increase of 15%
over 1971 production. The value of the
production was approximately $7.0 million,
a 21% increase over 1971 value.
Crude gypsum was imported from mines
in Nova Scotia, Canada.
Kyanite.-E. I. du Pont de Nemours &
Co. recovered a small quantity of kyanite-
sillimanite mixture from a beach sand
deposit in Clay County. The mixture was
a byproduct of a heavy minerals separation
plant to recover titanium minerals. The
kyanite-sillimanite mixture was sold to re-
fractory manufacturers. Production and
value increased 4% and 5%, respectively,
above 1971 levels.
Lime.-Quicklime and lime hydrate sold
or used totaled 180,000 short tons and was
valued at nearly $3.5 million. Compared
with that of 1971, both quantity and value
increased 13.2% and 20.8%, respectively.
Basic Magnesia, Inc., Gulf County;
Chemical Lime, Inc., Hernando County;
and Dixie Lime and .Stone Co., Sumter
County, produced lime for paper and pulp
industries, recovery of magnesia from sea-
water, construction, waste neutralization,
water treatment, and other chemical pro-
cesses. Lime consumption in the State ex-
ceeded production.
Magnesia.-Basic Magnesia, Inc., Port St.
Joe, Gulf County, produced caustic cal-
cined magnesia and refractory-grade mag-
nesia from seawater. The plant's design
capacity is 60,000 short tons per year;
however, it has not produced at design
level. Sales increased 9% from 1971 levels,
and the reported value increased 42%.


Perlite.-From ore mined in Colorado
and New Mexico, four companies produced
19,124 short tons of expanded perlite com-
pared with 17,547 short tons in 1971. Of
the production, over 18,000 short tons
valued at $1,001,000 were sold or used.
Sales and value increased 9% and 10%,
respectively, over 1971 levels. Plants were
located in Dade, Duval, Escambia, and
Indian River Counties.
The expanded perlite was principally
used in plaster aggregates, formed pro-
ducts, and concrete aggregates with minor
quantities consumed filling masonry cavi-
ties and conditioning soil.
Phosphate Rock.-The production of
marketable phosphate rock from Florida
and North Carolina increased 6% over
that of 1971. Because TexasGulf, Inc., is
the only producer in North Carolina and
its production is concealed, the production
from the two States are combined. Phos-
phate rock provided the major part of
mineral production and value of the State.
The combined production of marketable
phosphate rock from both States was 34.1
million short tons. The value of the mar-
ketable rock increased to $174 million, an
increase of $6 million or 3.7%. Of the
total production in the United States,
Florida and North Carolina's share was
83.6%.
The quantity of marketable rock sold or
used from Florida and North Carolina in-
creased 11.3% compared with the quantity
reported in 1971. With sales and consump-
tion greater than production, stocks of
marketable phosphate rock declined from
12 to 10.5 million short tons or 12% dur-
ing 1972. Marketable phosphate rock sales
and consumption totaled 36.9 million short
tons valued at $188.3 million. This was an
increase of 8% in value over that of 1971.
Of the total sold or used, 63% was con-
sumed in the domestic agricultural market.
The balance, 37%, largely was exported
with a minor part used in -industrial ap-
plications. The consumption distribution
pattern of the domestic fraction was
22,889,000 tons (98.0%) for fertilizer,
177,000 tons (0.8%) for elemental phos-
phorus, and 289,000 tons (1.2%) for de-
fluorinated rock and other applications.
Most of the 13,992,000 short tons of
marketable phosphate rock that was ex-
ported in 1972 was exported from Florida
and represented an increase of 10.3%
above 1971 export levels.






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


The percent distribution by grade of
marketable rock sold or used from Florida
and North Carolina was as follows:

Grade percent BPL I Percent
distribution
Less than 60 ------------------- 0.1
60to 66-----------------------... 5.1
66 to 70----------------------- 44.8
70 to 72 ----------------------- 11.2
Over 72- -------------------- 38.8
1 1.0 BPL (bone phosphate of lime or tricalcium
phosphate) = 0.458% P2Os.

The average grade of phosphate ore
mined was 13.9% P20, and the average
grade of marketable rock was 32.2% P20s.
The average weight recovery of concentrate
and marketable rock as mined was 29.1%,
and the average P20g recovery was 67.4%.
Land-pebble phosphate rock was pro-
duced by 12 companies from 17 open pit
mines in three Florida counties.
Soft phosphate rock was produced by
five companies operating six open pit mines
in three Florida counties. Total soft rock
sold or used was 20,607 short tons equiv-
alent to 4,056 short tons P205, and it was
valued at $120,895. The product was used
for direct soil fertilization and animal feed
supplements.
The assets of Agrico Chemical Co., a
division of Continental Oil Co., were pur-
chased by the Williams Co., Tulsa, Okla.
Agrico Chemical Co. will operate as a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Williams.4
Agrico Chemical Co. announced plans to
improve its dock facilities at Donaldson-
ville, La., and begin a $50 million, 400,000-
ton-per-year equivalent P205 phosphoric
acid plant at this location. Completion is
scheduled for mid-1974.5
C.F. Industries, Inc., plans to double the
size of its fertilizer manufacturing complex
at Plant City.; The expansion will increase
finished product capacity to 650,000 tons
per year of fertilizer.
International Minerals & Chemical Corp.
(IMC) plans to construct a fertilizer com-
plex in central Florida. Production of
600,000 tons per year of diammonium
phosphate and triple superphosphate is
scheduled for 1974.
The Phosphate Rock Export Association
(Phosrock) established headquarters in
Tampa, and after July. 1, 1972, handled
the sales and distribution of phosphate
rock in the export market for, Agrico


Chemical Co., American Cyanamid Co., W.
R. Grace & Co., IMC, and Occidental
Petroleum Corp.
The Florida State Pollution Control
Board limited, the phosphorus content of
soaps and detergents to 8.7%. Dade
County banned the sale of phosphorus-
bearing soaps and detergents. The Board
also adopted new regulations designed to
prevent phosphate slime dam failures. The
regulations specify requirements for con-
struction and maintenance, as well as sur-
veillance by State inspectors.
Occidental Petroleum Corp. announced
that to maintain its domestic market po-
sition and expand markets abroad, the
Suwannee River mine in northern Florida
will be expanded to increase production
to 3.4 million tons of marketable phos-
phate rock by late 1973.7 A new 45-cubic-
yard dragline will be added to assist two
existing machines. Plans are also underway
to increase the production of superphos-
phoric acid.
Although Occidental's superphosphoric
acid capacity is only 225,000 tons per year,
Occidental is negotiating with the U.S.S.R.
to supply 1 million tons per year in ex-
change for ammonia and urea.8
Sand and Gravel.-Sand and gravel pro-
duction totaled 20.8 million tons valued
at $15 million in 1972. The combined
production from Dade, Lake and Polk
counties was 38% of the total State pro-
duction. Over 90% of the State's produc-
tion was distributed by truck, and the re-
mainder was shipped by rail. The produc-
tion was consumed by the construction
industry for building sand, paving sand
and gravel, and other miscellaneous uses.
Florida Mining & Materials Corp.,
Tampa, constructed a $750,000 concrete
block plant -that will be operated by its
Tampa Sand and Materials Div. The firm's
Aggregate Div., Brooksville Rock, completed
an expafision that increased capacity to 3
million tons per year. The new glass sand
plant of Edgar Plastic Kaolin Co. is on-
stream near Plant City. The plant was

4 Chemical Marketing Reporter. Agrico Unit
Changes Hands. V. 201, No. 19, May 8, 1972,
p. 3.
5 The Tampa Tribune. Agrico Expanding. Sept.
22. 1972, pp. 7-13.
C CF Industries, Inc. Annual Report, 1972.
I'. 11.
Occidental Petroleum Corp. 1972 Annual Re-
port. P. 19.
s European Chemical News. Occidental Proposes
Huge USA-USSR Fertilizer Deal. V. 22, No. 552,
Sept. 29, 1972,:p. 8.






MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972


Table 5.-F- rida: Saand nd gravel sold or used by producers, by county
(Thousand short tons and thousand dollars)
1971 1972
County
Number Quantity Value Number Quantity Value
of mines of mines
ey = = ,, 8 87 94 8 W W
ariwarl .,- -,-...., .--- 2 W W 8 760 W
.td. ------ 4 W W 5 2,218 W
E-abi .......... .--.-5 6 585 842 8 978 622
l.lt* 6 1,848 1,600 5 1,852 1,707
Uatg. .....--------------. 1 243 181 ....
PaIB Bwe ....-..-.-... .-----,-,=== 1 02 81
Polk ----- --- 12 8,187 8,665 8 8,760 4,646
-Putnam ... 4 705 908 8 W W
$nntatH isa -... .. --... .. .. .. ... 1 8 (7)
tL'altilsbtl ..' ...,..... ... -- -. 1,18 r 18,4a56 12,007 28 11, 180 7,9
Total --.-----------------. 56 5 28,228 18,880 59 20,752 15,025
k* laavi. W Withhald to avoid diclosing Individual company confidential data; included with "Un-
.(totrbthtld."
Ltawu than 4 unit.
Stnlu4ds Bfliwart. Calhoun, Charlotte, Clay (1971), Franklin, Gadsden (1972), Hendry, Hillsborough,
todi.an kiver (19t7). Jackon, Leon, Marion, Okalooaa, Plnllas, St. Luclo, Sarasota (1972), and Walton
O)at maiy nB.t a'id to totals hown because of Indoepndent rounding.


T.'blr 6.-Florida: Sand and gravel sold or used by producers, by use
(Thousand haort tons and thousand dollars)


ltildlint sand _
Pravint saand -
Paving gtttraval ---.
otth-r eand and .gravel


1971 1972
Quantity Value Quantity Value
8,087 8,764 7,886 7,488
1,276 1,280 8,258 8,148
499 775 W W
12,707 8,018 10,118 4,888


Total and and gravel .. .-.... ... 23,228 18,880 20,752 15,025
W Withheld to avid diselomlng Individual company data; Included with "Other sand and gravel."
Incldets gla s blast, ninee. filtration, fill, railroad ballot (1971), and other sanda; miscellaneous gravel
Dat may not addl to totals shown because of Independent rounding.


designed to operate at 125 tons per hour
to produce specification sand for the glass.
induittry.
SaroUtUc.-Florida was the only State
that produced commercial quantities of
thi-i complex silicate of iron and aluminum
mitinerl int 1972. It wa. recovered as a by-
product from the heavy minerals separa-
tion plants of E. I. du Pont de Nemours
* C;o at Highland and Trail Ridge, Clay
County. Production incrca.cd 1% and the
valuc of the production increased 11% in
1972 compared with the respective produc-
tion and value reported In 1971.
Stone.-Crushed limestone and dolomite
production was 53,1 million tons and was
valued at $81.6 million. Tonnage and value
increased 31% and 36%. respectively, over
1971 levels. Limestone and dolomite was
produced from 75 quarries in 16 counties
compared with 65 quarries in 15 counties
in 1971. Dade. Broward. and Hernando


Counties were, in the order noted, the
leading limestone-producing counties in
the State, supplying 73% of the total ton-
nage and 72% of the total value. Nine
companies operated 26 quarries, and their
combined production represented. 62% of
the State's production and 63% of the
total value.
Seventy-nine percent of the crushed lime-
stone was hauled by truck, 15% by rail,
0.6% was transported on water, and 5.4%
of the total was moved by unspecified
methods.
Oystershells were processed in two coun-
ties for roadbase material, and a minor
quantity was sold for other uses. This was
a decrease of 21% in tonnage and 16% in
value below 1971 levels.
Sulfur.-The recovery of sulfur as a by-
product of oil and natural gas production
in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties in-
creased from a 1971 production level of


I- - '






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Table 7.-Florida: Crushed limestone and dolomite sold or used by producers, by county
(Thousand short tons and thousand dollars)
1971 2 1972
County Number Number
of quarries Quantity Value of quarries Quantity Value
Alachua............................. 4 1,817 1,596 4 2,166 1,741
Brovard ............................. 2 W W 1 185 192
Broward........................... 16 6,989 10,661 19 9,278 14,618
Citrus............................... 2 W W 4 W 1,089
Collier.............................. 8 W W 4 1,766 W
Dado.-.............................. 12 i8,596 18,670 15 21,100 26,752
Hernando........-.....-----------.......--------.....--.. 5 7,657 12,480 5 8,617 17,186
Levy,-...- ....------------------ 2 116 W 8 415 W
Marion-....... -................... 5 844 W 5 1,099 2,486
Palm Beach ......................... 65 788 1,007 8 W W
Sumter..----------......---....----..------------- 8 8,817 8.782 8 4,698 W
Undistributed ...................... '6 6,441 11,222 9 8,778 17,611
Total -I.. .................... 66 40,458 69,819 75 58,098 81,621
r Revised. W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data; included with "Un-
distributed."
I Data for 1971 does not include dolomite.
Includes Jackson (1972), Leo Monroe, Suwannee, and Taylor Counties.
Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding.


Table 8.-Florida:


Crushed limestone and dolomite sold or used by producers, by use
(Thousand short tons and thousand dollars)


19711 1972
Use Quantity Value Quantity Value


Bituminous aggregate...................................-
Concrete aggregate.......................................
Dense graded road base stone...........................---
Macadam aggregate......................................-
Other roadstone .............................----------..----.
Unspecified aggregate and roadstone.............------.----
Agricultural purposes 4....................................
Cement and lime manufacture.............................
Fill ....... ....................................
Stone sand-------------------------------------------
Stone sand ..............................-..-..--.-.-._.-
Railroad ballast .........................................
Other uses A.............................................


2,721
9,275
15,562
(2)
1,662
2,911
502
8,761
999
2,678
W
601


5,104
15,714
21,706
(2)
2,098
8,072
1,782
4,128
776
8,968
W
1,041


8,848
16,578
17,270
848
4,824
1,084
W
8,029
2,885
861
8,977


6,488
28,042
24,678
492
4,249
4,278
W
8,219
8,100
688
6,448


Total ...................--..........--------------........----.....--. 40,458 59,819 58,098 81,621
W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data; included with "Other uses."
I Data for 1971 does not include dolomite.
Data included with "Other roadstone," to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data.
I Data include stone used for macadam and surface treatment aggregate.
4 Data include agricultural limestone and stone used in poultry grit and mineral food.
A Data include stone used in other fillers and uses not specified. 1972 data also include stone used in riprap
and surface treatment aggregate.
G Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding.


4,059 long tons to 87,842 long tons. Total
sales increased from 3,861 in 1971 to 85,915
long tons in 1972. Expansion of oil and gas
production Is expected, and associated re-
covery of sulfur as a byproduct is projected
to increase almost 3-fold in 1973.
Vermiculite.-Exfollated vermiculite was
produced from six plants in Dade, Duval,
Hillsborough, and Palm Beach Counties.
Compared with 1971 production and value,
1972 production and value declined 12.5%
and 8%, respectively.

METALS
Ferroalloys.-Three companies produced
ferrophosphorus as a byproduct of elemen-


tal phosphorus manufacture. The value of
ferroalloys is not included in the total State
mineral production value.
Rare-Earth Minerals.-Titanium Enter-
prises produced monazite concentrates from
a new plant near Green Cove Springs in
Clay County. Neither production, shipments
nor value may be published.
Titanium Concentrates.-Titanium En-
terprises, a new company formed by Amer-
ican Cyanamid Co. and Union Camp Corp.,
produced heavy minerals from an ancient
beach sand deposit near Green Cove
Springs. Conventional dredging equipment
is used followed by wet gravity, magnetic,
and high-tension concentrating processes.





MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972


Both shipments and value of ilmenitc
concrntrates increased 28% and 23%, re-
spectively. in 1972 compared with 1971 ship-
nmnt, anil value. Production of rutile was
reported for the first time from this mine
m 1972.
Zircon Concentrates.-Sales of zircon con-
rentratrs. recovered from the E. 1. du Pont
de, Nenmours & Co. ilmenite concentration
plants at Highland and Trail Ridge, Clay
County. improved compared with shipment
levels in 1971. Tonnage sold or used In-
creased 29% over that in 1971, and the
value of shipments was 25% higher than
that reported in 1971. The zirconium sands
were used in ferrous foundries, refractories.
;and in ceramics.

MINERAL FUELS
Mineral fuels produced were natural gas,
natural gas. liquids, crude petroleum, and
peat.
Natural Gas.---Total net sales of natural
gas in Florida during 1972 was nearly 13
billion cubic feet. The actual gas produc-
tion reported at the wellhead was about
19% greater than this amount. The differ-
ence between the two figures represents uni
avoidable loses, that is. "shrinkage." These
losses ocrurred from the lease use of gas in
operating pumps,. and principally from the
uew of Jay feld gas to operate the facilities
to remove acid gas (H2S) and to convert
the gas to elemental sulfur. An average ol
7,1 long tons of 99W, pure sulfur is re-
covered per million cubic feet of gas proc-
rrsed.
During 1972. the reported value of ap-
proximately 13 billion cubic feet of gas
processed and sold in Florida was about
S3i4 million. The reported sales value for
Jay gas was about $0.25 per thousand cubic
feet. It is assumed that natural gas liquids
that increased the normal Jay gas 1.050 Btu
content to about 1,400 Btu increased the
swiling price proportionately. If the under-
saturatcd reservoir at Jay and the two
nearby Smackover-Norphlet fields produce
salable gas with oil throughout the primary
recovery period at the current gas-oil ratio
(about 1.250 to 1), the estimated reserves
are 1571/2 billion cubic feet of gas. If the
same ratio were to be maintained during
secondary recovery operations, the reserves
would triple as would the projected oil
recovery.
Peat-Peat production decreased from
57.000 short tons valued at $412.000 in 1971


to 45,000 short tons valued at $362,000 in
1972. These were decreases of 21% and
12% in production and value, respectively.
Eight operations produced humus, moss,
and reed-sedge peat in six counties. The
majority of sales were in bulk form with
60% sold for packing flowers, plants, and
shrubs: 20% sold for general soil improve-
ment; and 20% sold for earthworm culture
and as an ingredient for potting soils.
Petroleum.-The cumulative total of
crude oil produced in Florida from 1943-72
was 41.671,950 barrels. Of this amount,
16,897,189 barrels were produced in 1972,
a threefold increase over the 1971 produc-
tion. Daily oil production in Florida is at a
current rate of approximately 90,000 bar-
rels, and 84% is produced in the Jay field.
Per barrel prices ranged from $2.66 for
heavy crude (about 250 gravity API) from
the Lehigh Acres field to $3.29 for high-
gravity (about 510 API) sour crude from
the Jay field in Santa Rosa County. During
1972. nine fields were producing in the
State. Six of the fields are located in the
Sunniland Limestone producing trend in
Collier. Hendry, and Lee Counties. The
other three are located in Santa Rosa
County. Jay field production extends into
Escambia County and across the State line
into Alabama where that portion of the
field is known as Little Escambia Creek
field. The fields in northwest Florida pro.
duce from the Smackover Limestone and
the underlying Norphlet Sand. which is the
main productive formation at Mt. Carmel
field.
In summary, hydrocarbon production in
Florida occurs only in the Lower Cretaceous
limestone in south Florida at depths rang-
ing around 11,500 feet. In northwest Florida,
hydrocarbon production has been estab-
lished only in the Jurassic limestone and
sand at depths of about 15,500 feet. The
usual spacing pattern in Florida is 160 acres
per well. Exceptions to this are at Sunni-
land, where 40-acre well spacing is em-
ployed, and at Blackjack Creek field, where
320 acres per well has been adopted.
"Primary" reserves in Florida are esti-
mated to range from 165 million recover-
able stock tank barrels to 414 million bar-
rels if secondary measures, that is, fluid
injection, are employed. "Primary" recovery
includes artificial lift by pumping that is
employed at the start of the productive
period in south Florida's fields. Although
the Sunoco-Felda field is being repressurized






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


by water injection, this procedure is not
used in other south Florida fields because
an almost unlimited water drive generates
about double the primary recovery usually
obtained from limestone reservoirs. In the
Jay field and at Blackjack Creek field, water


injection to pressurize the reservoirs will
probably be required in 1974 or 1975. It is
anticipated that the total recoverable oil
at Jay will be increased from about 115
million barrels to 300 million barrels with
this procedure.


Table 9.-Florida: Oil and gas well drilling completions, by county

Proved field wells I Exploratory wells Total
County -----_---_----- __________
Oil Gas Dry Oil Gas Dry Number Footage
of wells
Alachua ....................... ..----------------- -- -- -- .. 1 1 2,980
Charlotte -------------------- ............... .. .. .. 1 1 18,282
Collier.....................---------------------.. .. .. .. ..5 5 60,122
Escambia...................... 10 .. 1 .. .. 5 16 256 586
Hendry....................... 8 .. .. .. .. 6 9 102,851
Lake----.........------------------- .. .. .. 1 1 5,897
Lee........................... 1 .. .. .. .. 4 5 58,516
Monroe...................... .. ..------------ .. .. .. 1 1 12,662
Okaloosa ...................... ..------ .. .. .. .. 1 1 14,514
Oseeola ....................... .. .. .. .. 2 2 14,885
Putnam ....................... ..-.. .. -- 1 1 5,572
]St. Johns....................---------------.. .. .. .. .. .. 1 1 4,584
Santa Roas.................... 49 .. 8 2 8 62 992,975
Walton........................ .. .. .. .. .. 2 2 28,561
Washington.................... .. .. .. .. .. 1 1 11,692
Total................... 68 .. 4 2 .. 40 109 1,579,529
1 Development wells as defined by American Petroleum Institute.
Source: American Petroleum Institute.

Table 10.-Principal producers
Commodity and company Address Type of activity County


Cement, portland and masonry:
General Portland, Inc.,
Southeast Division.
Lehigh Portland Cement
Co.
Pennsaco Cement & Aggre-
gates Subsidiary of
Maue Industries, Inc.
Clays:
Fuller's earth:
Engelhard Minerals &
Chemicals Corp.
Florldin Co..........
Mid-Florida Mining..
Kaolin:
Ed ar Plastic Kaolin
Miscellaneous:
Appalachee Correc-
tional Institute.
Bickerstaff Clay
Products Co Inc.
Florida Solite Co.....

General Portland
Cement Co.
Gypsum, calcined:
Kaiser Cement & Gypsum
Corp.
National Gypsum Co.....
U.S. Gypsum Co.........
Lime: Primary:
Basic Magnesia, Inc......
Chemical Lime, Inc.......
Dixie Lime & Stone Co...


Box 22848
Tampa, Fla. 88622
718 Hamilton St.
Allentown, Pa. 18105
100 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fla. 88182


Menlo Park
Edison, N.J. 08817
Berkley Springs, W. Va.
25411
Box 68-F
Lowell, Fla. 82663


2 plants........----------
Plant.............
.....do...........



2 open pit mines..
Open pit mine.....-


Dade and Hills-
borough.
Dade.
Do.



Gadsden.
Do.


.....do..........---------- Marion.


Edgar, Fla. 82049 ........-- ..do..---.---.. Putnam.


Box 127
Chattahoochee, Fla. 82824
Box 1178
Columbus, Ga. 81902
Box 297
Green Cove Springs, Fla.
82048
Box 1528
Tampa, Fla. 88601
800 Lakeside Drive
Oakland, Calif. 94612
825 Delaware Ave.
Buffalo N.Y. 14202
101 S. Wacker Drive
Chicago, Ill. 60606
Box 160
Port St. Joe, Fla. 82456
Box 250
Ocala, Fla. 82670
Box 910
Ocala, Fla. 82670


.....do...........
Open pit mine and
plant.
.....do.........----------


Gadsden.
Escambia.
Clay.


Open pit mine-..... Citrus.

Plant----.----.-----......... Duval.
.....do----------- Hillsborough.
.....do.......--.---... Duval.

....do..--.-----........ Gulf,
.....do------.---......... Hernando.
----do------.........- Sumter.






MINERAL YEARBOOK, 1972


Table 10-Pr tinpal pruoducer.-C ntinu ed
Commodity and company Addresm Type of activity ,County


P 400 Mag4 1,1 Ing .-
Post;
Oxford Peat Co ar -
Psae River Post, In- ..
P. 1. Lses P -.- ...--,
Tra der Post Co -.. .- .
ZeUwood Peat Co.. --..
Parlitea. X9pIn4ad
Airiko Preesing Corp=
Armprog Cork Co-, ., .
C hb r oe k C o rp -.-.. .. .
W. RL Grwa & Co -----
PeFt0em;
i_4mblt 04it &6 Reinig Co
SAu Ott Company, -r.. -
Radary; Raminalt Asphalt


Agriao Chemical Co.,
B o r d e n n I. . . .
Browoto Phoepare ,
Chime $"vie* Co,-= .
W. R. Gra & Co -..
Interational Minerawtl
& Chebmal Corp,
Chemial Div.
Owaldetal Petroleum
Corp., sNuwannee
Rivew Phophate
Dtiv.
Swift Agr1rtural
01.0ia"t Corp.
U.,a,. Ari-CheminalLe,
Ine.
Pho:phoar. elemental:
riao Ch e cal Co.-. ...
Mobil Chnemical Co- -
Send and gravel
General Development
& R. JoaB Induetrie.,
Inc,.
Otunm and Co -...-.--
Seminole Ro k Pro4et,
adarN Sand &t S il&ea Co
staurolite.; 1, du Pont de
Nemauns & Co,
Ltan a enh:
Dla Lime Stone
Co.,
lorida Rook Induatry
Corp.
Genral Development
ilo>iafl-Iguvai.
Wrigt Co,.
Manie Inu4tries. In


Box 160
Port St. Joe, Fla. 8245
Box 164
Oxford, a.l, 82M84
P,0, BOX 1192
Bartow Vl, 88880
Rt. 1 Box 847-1
VasI o, Fla, 88594
Box 88
Vlorshome, Fla, 32868
Box 397
Zellwood, Pla. 82798
Rt, 8 Box 417
Vwo Beach, Fia. 82960
Box 861
Pna oi, Fla. 82502
End of Once St.
Nashvl, e, enm 87208
62 Whittemore Ave.
Cambridge, Maw, 02140
Box 2024
Houston To. 77001
Box 2886
Dal. Tax. 75221
Box 128
St. Marko, Pla, 82866


Box 810
Tul a Okla. 74101
Box 760
Plant City, 1Fl. 88506
Dradley 1, 8.88856,. ,,
Tampi. Fla. 88001
Box 471
Bartow. Fla. 88830
Box 8067
Bartow Fla. 88880
Box 811
Nichole. Via. 88868
Box 800
White Springp, Fla. 820906

Box 208
Bartow Fla. 88880
Box 867
t,. Meaod, Fla. 88841
5050 Poplar Ave.
Memphs, Tenn. 88117
Box 811
Nichols, Fla. 88808
1111 South Bayshore Dr.
Miami Fla, 88181
First & East Tillman
Lake Wale., Fla. 88858
F irt and East Tillman
Lake WalesLFla. 88858
8100 N,W. 74th St.
Miami, Va. 88166
.Box 85
Davenport Fla 88887
Du PontBld., D-10084
Wiamintoa, Del. 19898

Box 910
Ocals, Fla. 88970
Box 4867
Jacksonville, Fla. 8882201
1111 South BaBhor Dr.
Box 808 Smnolo Anneo
Vt, Laudrdale, Fla. 88810,
a Bonx 601
Hialesh, Via, 88018


Plant Gul. uf.

Bog..,,........, 8utimter.
Dog ............. Polk.
Bog S .......... Hitllsborougb,
Bog............. Putnam,
Bog............... Orange.


Plant...........
-,,4=,o=,,,,.,.,.,
-.y.,do ...........
Plant ............-

Jayfield. -..
Sunoco.-Felda field.,.
Plant..........


8 open pit mine ...
Open pit mine-..,.

-....do.,,......

8 open pit mines...
2 open pit mine...
Open pit mine ....


Indian River.
DEcambla.
Duval.
Broward and Dade.

Santa Ross.
Collier and Hendry.
Wakulla.


Polk,
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Hamilton.


2 open pit mine.... Polk.
.....do.....,,.., Do.


8 electric furnaces..
Electric furnace.,..

8 open pit mine...
Open pit mine ....
Dredge............
......do...........
Open pit mine....
Plant.............


Do.
Do.

Brevard, Charlotte,
St. Lucle.
Lake and Polk.
Hendry.
Dade.
Polk.
Clay.


5 quarries......... Jackon, L ,
i Marion, Sumter.
8 quaries......... Hrnando and
Suwannee.:
8 quarriem......... Charlotte and St.
Luole.
5 quarrie ........ AlMhua, Broward,
. I IDade.
8 quarries........ Broward and Dade.






THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA


Ta

Commodity and company
Stone-Continued
Oystbrshll:


ble 10.-Principal producers-Continued

Address Type of activity County


Bsy Dd & Box 1484
C. Tampa, Fla. 88601
Benton & Company, Box i847
Inc. St. Petersburg, Fla. 83781
Houdalle-Duval- Box 1588
Wright Co. Jacksonville, Fla. 82201
Radelff Materials, Box 1288
Inc. Mobile, Ala. 86601
Titanium concentrates:
E. I, du Pont de Nemours Du Pont Bldg. D-10084
& Co. Wilmington, Del. 19898
Titanium Enterprises..... Box 1086
Green Cove Springs, Fla.
82048
Vermiculite, exfoliated:
W. R. Grace & Company.. 62 Whittemore Ave.
Cambridge, Mass, 02140


Zircon concentrates:
E. L du Pont de Nemoura
& Co.
Titanium Enterprises....


Du Pont Bidg. D-10084
Wilmington, Del, 19898
Box 1086
Green Cove Springs, Fla.
82048


Dredge............
.....do...........
--..-do-...........
.....do-...........


Hillsborough.
Pinellas.
Duval.
Walton.


2 dredges and Clay.
plants.
Mine and plant....--- Do.


4 plants--..----...


Plant--------
Mine...-----.....---....


Dade, Duval,
Hillsborough,
Palm Beach.
Clay.
Do.


"r U.S. Government Printing Office: 1974-543-488/227