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July 2011 Volume I, Issue V THE INTERNATIONAL GATOR 3rd Place Faculty, Staff and Alumni Category Kelly McLarnon The Neighborhood Kids Near the town of Messailler, Haiti 2010

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A NOTE FROM THE DEAN INSIDE THE NEWSLETTER UF Students win Gilman Scholarship Page 3 International Student Services Restructuring Page 4 Goings On Page 5 Goings On Through Photos Page 6 SEAGEP visits Chile and China Page 7 I often hear people talk about the quiet summer months here in Gainesville but in the UF International Center, this period is anything but quiet! As we work with study abroad students, more than 1000 of whom are overseas right now, prepare to welcome an array of new international students, and assist with hosting distinguished international visitors, this office is humming with exciting activity. Staff this summer have been in China, South Africa, Botswana, Germany, Spain, Canada, Italy and Belgium in support of UFIC-led activities. More travel lies ahead in addition to maintaining efforts here in Gainesville with changes in personnel, complicated budget issues, review of our strategic plan, and continuing efforts to further campus internationalization. The hardest thing is for us to fit in our vacations and time with family! This issue of our newsletter captures some of the excitement of what is happening here through the summer months. International efforts led by the UF International Center never take a break. Enjoy this issue of The International Gator. Andenjoy the rest of the summer.

PAGE 3

The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program offers grants for U.S. citizen undergraduate students of limited financial means to pursue academic studies abroad. Such international study is intended to better prepare U.S. students to assume significant roles in an increasingly global economy and interdependent world. International experience is critically important in the educational and career development of American students, but it can also require a substantial financial investment. The Gilman Scholarship Program broadens the student population that studies abroad by supporting undergraduates who might not otherwise participate due to financial constraints. The program aims to encourage students to choose non-traditional study abroad destinations, especially those outside of Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand. The Gilman Scholarship Program aims to support students who have been traditionally under-represented in study abroad, including but not limited to, students with high financial need, community college students, students in under-represented fields such as the sciences and engineering, students with diverse ethnic backgrounds, and students with disabilities. The program seeks to assist students from a Lily Wan UF in Beijing, Chinese Language Matthew Caesar UF in New Zealand, Biodiversity & Conservation Aria Kitchen Pareja ECELA, Buenos Aires Emily Eitzen UF in Beijing, Chinese Language Maggi Wu Korea University, Business School Nora Zaki UF in Fez, Arabic Language Everton Allen UF in Florence, Journalism Cady Sandler UF in Fez, Arabic Language Anel Disla UF in Florence, Journalism Khama Weatherspoon UF in Fez, Arabic Language Huynh Ho UF in East Asia, Architecture Latrice Bouie UF in London, Business/Internship Max Gelber Bard College, American University of Central Asia diverse range of public and private institutions from all 50 states, Washington, DC and Puerto Rico. Award recipients are chosen by a competitive selection process and must use the award to defray eligible study abroad costs. These costs include program tuition, room and board, books, local transportation, insurance and international airfare. This congressionally funded program is sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State and is administered by the Institute of International Education through its Southern Regional Center in Houston, TX. 12 UF STUDENTS SELECTED AS WINNERS OF THE GILMAN SCHOLARSHIP University of Florida is proud to announce that 10 students were selected for the Summer Scholarship and 2 were selected for the Fall Scholarship. The awards ranged from $2,000 -$5,000. Please join us in congratulating the following students:

PAGE 4

ISS has undergone some organizational changes created by the increase in international student admissions. We now have six advisers to assist departments and our international students in all aspects from creating new incoming student I-20s/DS-2019s to updates of documents and application processes for students requiring Leave of Absence (LOA), Reduced Course Load (RCL), CPT, OPT etc. The international students are divided among the advisers according to the first letter of their last names. In addition, we have upgraded our Senior INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES RESTRUCTURING Advisers are listed in the alpha order of the students they assist: Patricia Alba F-1 students A-C palba@ufic.ufl.edu Ethel Porras F-1 students D-J eporras@ufic.ufl.edu Scott Davis F-1 students K-L, Certificate students and UF J-1 sponsored degree and non-degree seeking students sdavis@ufic.ufl.edu Candice Debose-Tyson F-1 students L-Q and Senior Adviser for new I-20 Document Preparation cdebose@ufic.ufl.edu Jessica Kelly F-1 students R-T jkelly@ufic.ufl.edu Martine Angrand F-1 students U-Z mangrand@ufic.ufl.edu Adviser position, currently held by Martine Angrand, to Assistant Director who will be responsible for the day-to-day functions of ISS operations. Rounding out the ISS staff are two reception positions: a front desk receptionist and a phone receptionist. ISS is also in the process of updating the website which we hope will be more user friendly to our constituents. We have developed a section just for Departments which we hope will serve as a main resource to guide you through our processes and the immigration regulation requirements. Debra Anderson Coordinator Responsible for overall functions of ISS, including supervising immigration operations at all off-campus instructional sites that have international students on location, managing the I-17 Certification processes, oversight for all DSOs (21) assigned to UF/ISS. danderson@ufic.ufl.edu Martine Angrand Assistant Director Responsible for day-to-day operations of ISS and F-1 students U-Z mangrand@ufic.ufl.edu Phyllis Molena Front Desk Receptionist pmmolena@ufic.ufl.edu Megan Crowley Phone Receptionist m.crowley@ufic.ufl.edu

PAGE 5

The U.S. government requires schools to be certified in order to host international students admitted to their universities on an F-1 student visa. This requires continuous updating of certain information in the Student & Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and a recertification review every two years. However, the federal government only recently initiated the two year reviews and recertification process after the original implementation in 2003. Since the original certification many rules and regulations have changed and updates have been made to the I-17 Certification document. One of the major changes since 2003 has been the change to include instructional sites not just branch campuses, where students my receive 51% of their instruction on site. UF/UFIC are currently undergoing the recertification process which should be completed by September 27, 2011. Study Abroad Services will conduct a training session for faculty reviewers. This will be a hands-on workshop covering the reviewers role working with online applications in Studio Abroad. The session will be led by David Maas and Yanina Morero. We intend to repeat this workshop every semester or as needed. UF, F-1 RECERTIFICATION GOINGS ON STUDY ABROAD BLOGS In addition to the work that we do in the International Center regarding the logistics of studying abroad, we work to provide different methods of helping students share their experiences with other students, faculty, family and friends to help increase the awareness of the benefits of studying abroad and experiencing other cultures. One of these programs is our UFIC Blog from Abroad where students on various programs in various locations blog about their study abroad experience. This summer we have 15 students contributing to our blog representing 13 countries on 5 different continents and it has been by far the most successful group of bloggers that we have had so far. By blogging, students are able to share information about the country they are studying in (Check out Tylers post about Politics and Culture in South Africa), tell funny stories about adjusting to the new culture (Check out Lindsays post on being invited to a Chinese Wedding), and even convey realizations about their experience and their place in the world (Check out Marianas post on the struggles of missing home while in Buenos Aires). To learn more about our bloggers, be sure to check out the Meet our Bloggers page and be sure to follow our blog to see the daily updates from our students at http://globalgator.wordpress. com. STUDY ABROAD SERVICES

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GOINGS ON THROUGH PHOTOS UF STUDENTS STUDYING ABROAD IN CHINA, 2011 COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT SIGNING WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF HAVANA Above: Mr. Bill Messina, Dra. Marta Rosa Munoz, Dean David Sammons, Dr. Fred Royce, Dr. Juan Federico Llanes Regueiro Above: Dr. Chonghua Zhang, Director of the UF Beijing Center, (the man with the white shirt on the left). Also, Associate Provosts Dr. Angel Kwolek-Folland (wearing dark glasses) and Dr. Bernard Mair (wearing a striped shirt) who visited our students in Beijing in June.

PAGE 7

All across the country, interests in increasing and enhancing students global experiences continue to grow. And at the International Center, if we arent bringing the world to our students, we are bringing our students into the world. Since the beginning of March, UFICs Program Development unit has been working with the Southeastern Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (SEAGEP) and the Innovation through Institutional Integration (I-Cubed), both funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to bring a total of 54 graduate students from the University of Florida, the University of South Carolina and Clemson University to Chile, China, South Africa and Brazil. The program, Science and Engineering in the Global Context, intends to heighten students global awareness and to develop their intercultural competencies in preparation for and pursuit of academic and professional careers. More specifically, Students who participated in the Chile trip began it with a cultural tour of Santiagos Pablo Naruda Museum, Isla Negra and the Rocks Beach. Dr. Christian Cardenas, a UF affiliate faculty member and Director, Agencia Chilena de Eficiencia Energtica (Chile) served as the groups main tour guide and, as participating PhD student in Environmental Engineering, University of Florida, Darina Palacio states, was a wonderful host. Early in the visit, SEAGEP students and administrators had the privilege of visiting the US Embassy in Chile. At the Embassy, students were given a briefing from Science, Technology and Health Officer Ms. Mary Brett Rogers-Springs and shared their first impressions of the country with government officials. SOUTHEASTERN ALLIANCE FOR GRADUATE EDUCATION AND THE PROFESSORIATE (SEAGEP) SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING IN THE GLOBAL CONTEXT STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM graduate students on these trips have the opportunity to visit local universities and industries, to meet with local researchers and professionals, to network with faculty and students and to present original research on one of four assigned topics science and technology, science communications, technology transfer and science education in the visiting countries. Now, while students admitted into the program can only participate in one of the four trips, all 54 students and program administrators will have an opportunity to exchange research findings and travel stories at an international symposium, the SEAGEP Annual Meeting, in September. And as we understand that attending the SEAGEP Annual Meeting may not be in your foreseeable future, we would like to use this newsletter to share with you how SEAGEP is making an impact overseas and at home. With that, we take you on a quick tour of SEAGEPs first two trips to Chile and China. CHILE Chile, cont. on pg. 8

PAGE 8

The rest of the trip included visits to Pontifica Catolica Campus San Jaquin, Federico Santa Maria Technical University and Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso. While at the different universities, students met with professors and Chilean students to discuss trends in engineering and biotechnology and present research. Trips to the Aconcagua Hydroelectric Plant, Los Quilos Installation, Chacabuquito Hydropower Plant and Biogas facility also proved to be very beneficial for the group as hydropower development is a rapidly progressing industry in Chile. The trip ended with final presentations and cultural excursions through the sprawling coastline cities of Vina del Mar and Valparaiso. For Palacio, Chile provided the opportunity to learn more about the carbon trading industry and how the mandates of the Kyoto Protocol define policy from the legislative level to the individual level. Furthermore, Palacio enjoyed driving through the city and identifying the various sustainable construction practices and the Chilean cuisine. She states, Never before have I seen that many green structures and the wonderful food at every meal may have been my most favorite thing about this trip. CHILE, cont. Fortunately, for those who visited China, UFs own Dr. Chonghua Zhang acted as the groups main tour guide. Upon arriving in Beijing, SEAGEP participants explored Chinas Forbidden City and Tiananman Square and watched a show at Hongs Theatre. After a first day of cultural activities, the group spent the week meeting with professors and students at Tsinghua University, Beijing University of Science and Technology and China Agricultural University. While on the university visits, SEAGEP students met with international affairs officials and lab professors and gave presentations. For PhD student in Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Titilayo Moloye, talking to the Chinese students and learn[ing] that China is heavily investing in research that could lead to potential breakthroughs in the field (biomedical engineering) made the university trips very beneficial. After further cultural immersion from visits to the Great Wall, something that Moloye claims, [she] will never forget, Chang Ling Imperial Tombs, Olympic Park and the Peking Opera House, the group eventually made their way to Shanghai. In Shanghai, the students visited Suzhou Silk Factory and Suzhou Industrial Park where they learned about the park planning process. The groups final day in China was spent touring the renowned World Expo China Pavilion, the Shanghai Museum and the Shanghai Urban Planning Exhibition Center. CHINA Stay tuned for a tour of SEAGEPs trips to South Africa and Brazil in the next UFIC newsletter!


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THE INENTOA . .


Volume I, Issue V I


July 2011


.. .



3rd Place Faculty, Staff and Alumni Category
Kelly McLarnon
"The Neighborhood Kids"
Near the town of Messailler, Haiti
2010


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1I International Center
U I UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


























INSIDE THE NEWSLETTER





Going's On Page 5

Going's On Through Photos Page 6
SEAGEP visits Chile and China Page 7







r SUETSSLCE AS WNES OFTEGLAN SCOARSHI


The Benjamin A. Gilman International
Scholarship Program offers grants for U.S.
citizen undergraduate students of limited
financial means to pursue academic studies
abroad. Such international study is intended
to better prepare U.S. students to assume
significant roles in an increasingly global
economy and interdependent world.

International experience is critically important
in the educational and career development of
American students, but it can also require a
substantial financial investment. The Gilman
Scholarship Program broadens the student
population that studies abroad by supporting
undergraduates who might not otherwise
participate due to financial constraints.
The program aims to encourage students
to choose non-traditional study abroad
destinations, especially those outside of
Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand.
The Gilman Scholarship Program aims to
support students who have been traditionally
under-represented in study abroad, including
but not limited to, students with high financial
need, community college students, students in
under-represented fields such as the sciences
and engineering, students with diverse ethnic
backgrounds, and students with disabilities.
The program seeks to assist students from a


diverse range of public and private institutions
from all 50 states, Washington, DC and Puerto
Rico.

Award recipients are chosen by a competitive
selection process and must use the award
to defray eligible study abroad costs. These
costs include program tuition, room and
board, books, local transportation, insurance
and international airfare.

This congressionally funded program is
sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and
Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of
State and is administered by the Institute of
International Education through its Southern
Regional Center in Houston, TX.





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th folo in stde ts -arc Bo e F in Lo d n-uiesItrsi







A TR ATIO A STDN SEVIE RETUTRN


ISS has undergone some organizational
changescreated bythe increaseininternational
student admissions. We now have six advisers
to assist departments and our international
students in all aspects from creating new
incoming student I-20s/DS-2019s to updates
of documents and application processes for
students requiring Leave of Absence (LOA),
Reduced Course Load (RCL), CPT, OPT etc.
The international students are divided among
the advisers according to the first letter of
their last names.

In addition, we have upgraded our Senior


Debra Anderson, Coordinator
Responsible for overall functions of
ISS, including supervising immigration
operations at all off-campus instructional
sites that have international students on
location, managing the 1-17 Certification
processes, oversight for all DSOs (21)
assigned to UF/ISS.
danderson@ufic.ufl.edu

Martine Angrand, Assistant Director
Responsible for day-to-day operations of
ISS and F-1 students U-Z
mangrand@ufic.ufl.edu

Phyllis Molena, Front Desk Receptionist
pmmolena@ufic.ufl.edu

Megan Crowley, Phone Receptionist
m.crowley@ufic.ufl.edu


Adviser position, currently held by Martine
Angrand, to Assistant Director who will be
responsible for the day-to-day functions of
ISS operations. Rounding out the ISS staff
are two reception positions: a front desk
receptionist and a phone receptionist.

ISS is also in the process of updating the
website which we hope will be more user
friendly to our constituents. We have
developed a section just for Departments
which we hope will serve as a main resource
to guide you through our processes and the
immigration regulation requirements.




















eprasuiculOd







rGIGS ON


STUDY ABROAD BLOGS


In addition to the work that
we do in the International
Center regarding the logistics
of studying abroad, we work
to provide different methods
of helping students share
their experiences with other
students, faculty, family and
friends to help increase the
awareness of the benefits
of studying abroad and
experiencing other cultures.
One of these programs is
our UFIC Blog from Abroad
where students on various


programs in various locations
blog about their study abroad
experience.

This summer we have 15
students contributing to our
blog representing 13 countries
on 5 different continents and
it has been by far the most
successful group of bloggers
that we have had so far. By
blogging, students are able to
share information about the
country they are studying in
(Check out Tyler's post about
Politics and Culture in South
Africa), tell funny stories
about adjusting to the new


culture (Check out Lindsay's
post on being invited to a
Chinese Wedding), and even
convey realizations about
their experience and their
place in the world (Check
out Mariana's post on the
struggles of missing home
while in Buenos Aires).

To learn more about our
bloggers, be sure to check
out the Meet our Bloggers
page and be sure to follow
our blog to see the daily
updates from our students at
http://globalgator.word press.
com.


STUDY ABROAD


The U.S. government requires schools
to be certified in order to host
international students admitted to their
universities on an F-1 student visa. This
requires continue us updating of certain
information in the Student & Exchange
Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and
a recertification review every two years.
However, the federal government only
recently initiated the two year reviews
and recertification process after the
original implementation in 2003. Since
the original certification many rules and
regulations have changed and updates
have been made to the I-17 Certification
document. One of the major changes
since 2003 has been the change to
include "instructional sites" not just
branch campuses, where students my
receive 51% of their instruction on site.
UF/UFIC are currently undergoing the
recertification process which should
be completed by September 27, 2011.


Study Abroad Services will conduct a training
session for faculty reviewers. This will be a
hands-on workshop covering the reviewer's
role working with online applications in Studio
Abroad. The session will be led by David Maas
and Yanina Morero. We intend to repeat this
workshop every semester or as needed.






0







0


SERVICES









r GOIN 'S ONTRUGHTSS


UF STUDENTS STUDYING
ABROAD IN CHINA, 2011


Above: Dr. Chonghua Zhang, Director of the UF Beijing Center, (the man with the white
shirt on the left). Also, Associate Provosts Dr. Angel Kwolek-Folland (wearing dark
glasses) and Dr. Bernard Mair (wearing a striped shirt) who visited our students in
Beijing in June.


COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT
SIGNING WITH THE
UNIVERSITY OF HAVANA


A t.,;.,. ri fh .I- _,1-1 nl:,,, U, fn, r P .-.l r l, .,,i-,.- I .e_5, 1 :_-, i,:l
S11,,, 1 Fie ] I' ,-, ,: I- 1 ,Jhinl le ,- 1_ s : I' ,lje ,,







SUHASENALNC FO GRADUATE EUA IO ANDTE RFS SRA TEB (SA GP


All across the country, interests in increasing
and enhancing students' global experiences
continue to grow. And at the International
Center, if we aren't bringing the world to our
students, we are bringing our students into
the world.

Since the beginning of March, UFIC's Program
Development unit has been working with the
Southeastern Alliance for Graduate Education
and the Professoriate (SEAGEP) and the
Innovation through Institutional Integration
(I-Cubed), both funded by the National
Science Foundation (NSF) to bring a total of
54 graduate students from the University of
Florida, the University of South Carolina and
Clemson University to Chile, China, South
Africa and Brazil. The program, Science and
Engineering in the Global Context, intends
to heighten students' global awareness and
to develop their intercultural competencies
in preparation for and pursuit of academic
and professional careers. More specifically,


graduate students on these trips have the
opportunity to visit local universities and
industries, to meet with local researchers and
professionals, to network with faculty and
students and to present original research
on one of four assigned topics science
and technology, science communications,
technology transfer and science education in
the visiting countries.

Now, while students admitted into the
program can only participate in one of the
four trips, all 54 students and program
administrators will have an opportunity to
exchange research findings and travel stories
at an international symposium, the SEAGEP
Annual Meeting, in September. And as we
understand that attending the SEAGEP Annual
Meeting may not be in your foreseeable
future, we would like to use this newsletter
to share with you how SEAGEP is making an
impact overseas and at home. With that, we
take you on a quick tour of SEAGEP's first two
trips to Chile and China.


CHILE
Students who participated in the Chile trip
began it with a cultural tour of Santiago's Pablo
Naruda Museum, Isla Negra and the Rocks
Beach. Dr. Christian Cardenas, a UF affiliate
faculty member and Director, Agencia Chilena
de Eficiencia Energ6tica (Chile) served as the
group's main tour guide and, as participating
PhD student in Environmental Engineering,
University of Florida, Darina Palacio states, was
a wonderful host."

Early in the visit, SEAGEP students and
administrators had the privilege of
visiting the US Embassy in Chile. At the
Embassy, students were given a briefing
from Science, Technology and Health
Officer Ms. Mary Brett Rogers-Springs
and shared their first impressions of
the country with government officials.
Chile, cont. on pg. 8






CHILE, cont.


The rest of the trip included visits to Pontifica Catolica Campus San Jaquin, Federico Santa
Maria Technical University and Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso. While at the
different universities, students met with professors and Chilean students to discuss trends in
engineering and biotechnology and present research. Trips to the Aconcagua Hydroelectric
Plant, Los Quilos Installation, Chacabuquito Hydropower Plant and Biogas facility also proved
to be very beneficial for the group as hydropower development is a rapidly progressing
industry in Chile. The trip ended with final presentations and cultural excursions through the
sprawling coastline cities of Vina del Mar and Valparaiso.

For Palacio, Chile provided the opportunity "to learn more about the carbon trading industry
and how the mandates of the Kyoto Protocol define policy from the legislative level to
the individual level." Furthermore, Palacio "enjoyed driving through the city and identifying
the various sustainable construction practices" and the Chilean cuisine. She states, "Never
before have I seen that many "green" structures" and "the wonderful food at every meal may
have been my most favorite thing about this trip."

CHINA
Fortunately, for those who visited China,
UF's own Dr. Chonghua Zhang acted
as the group's main tour guide. Upon
arriving in Beijing, SEAGEP participants
explored China's Forbidden City and
Tiananman Square and watched a show
at Hong's Theatre. After a first day
of cultural activities, the group spent
the week meeting with professors and
students at Tsinghua University, Beijing 1
University of Science and Technology
and China Agricultural University. While
on the university visits, SEAGEP students
met with international affairs officials and lab
professors and gave presentations. For PhD
student in Biomedical Engineering, University
of Florida, Titilayo Moloye, "talking to the
Chinese students" and "learn[ing] that China
is heavily investing in research that could
lead to potential breakthroughs in the field
(biomedical engineering)" made the university
trips very beneficial.

After further cultural immersion from visits to
the Great Wall, something that Moloye claims, "[she] will never forget," Chang Ling Imperial
Tombs, Olympic Park and the Peking Opera House, the group eventually made their way to
Shanghai. In Shanghai, the students visited Suzhou Silk Factory and Suzhou Industrial Park
where they learned about the park planning process. The group's final day in China was spent
touring the renowned World Expo China Pavilion, the Shanghai Museum and the Shanghai
Urban Planning Exhibition Center.
Stytue fo a tou of SAG trp to Sout Afrc and Brzi in th nex nwsetr




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