PAGE 1

January 2011 Volume I, Issue II 2nd Place Study Abroad Students Category Jennifer Jean Mackey Pathways to a Globalized Culture Frankfurt, Germany 2010 THE INTERNATIONAL GATOR

PAGE 2

Welcome to the second Newsletter from the UF International Center. I hope that you are finding this to be both informative and enjoyable as a way of learning further about the work of the Center and the broad international priories of our campus. As we all understand, not all international work is accomplished by the UFIC nor can or should it be. The success of UF institutionally in the international arena is propelled by the success of units across the campus in the intentional promotion of an international dimension in your work. One of my goals for this Newsletter is to make known the extraordinary and creative international activities that are going on across the campus. Towards this end, this issue of our Newsletter begins what we intend to be a regular feature: a Spotlight on the international work of a particular unit, in this instance the College of Design, Construction and Planning. We will be featuring a different unit in each issue, so please let us know if you would like to have your units work featured in a future issue. Read on to learn about your colleagues in DCP and about other activities of interest in the recent months. Best wishes, David Sammons, Dean UF International Center A NOTE FROM THE DEAN INSIDE THE NEWSLETTER A Study Abroad experience Page 3 UFIC employee recognized for contributions Page 5 A look back at International Education Week Page 6 Spotlight on: College of Design, Construction and Planning Page 7

PAGE 3

Though many people pursue travel for a fun and adventurous time, the ability of travel to teach is often overlooked. Of my years at UF and in other educational institutions I believe the periods of time I learned the most were those spent traveling, or more specifically, studying abroad. In the summer between my sophomore and junior years I traveled with UF to study tourism and the environment in Australia and Fiji. Aside from being a phenomenal experience in which I got to snorkel in the Great Barrier Reef, explore the Australian Outback, discover the oldest rainforest in the world and stay in a traditional Fijian village, it was perhaps the most educational 6 weeks of my life. There were 22 students on my trip from majors including tourism, architecture, nursing, psychology, sport management, geography, and perhaps a dozen more. This diversity of interests allowed us to learn from each others background and experiences. Though the majority of us were settled in our majors, studying abroad has a unique ability to provide clarity for those seeking direction. Many of my classmates have become more specific in their educational goals or chosen their direction post-graduation based upon what they learned about themselves while studying abroad. Though I was always a tourism major, since returning to UF I have narrowed my focus to educational tourism. Every student who studies abroad will have a different experience, however almost every student gains a set of skills that are invaluable for future learning and any prospective career. The very method of learning abroad is different. Many of my lectures were presented on a beach, in the rainforest or on a boat. Some students even take courses that are taught in a foreign language. When you are taken out of your element, perhaps being asked to write a paper by hand, without a computer in the Australian Outback, you learn how to learn, regardless of your surroundings. On a study abroad program you learn more than class material: you learn about others, about yourself, about academics outside of UF and outside of an American perspective. It is these skills that have carried me forward. Upon returning to UF I have used my experiences to gain opportunities that otherwise would not be possible. I have interned at the UF International Center, and in the spring I will begin working for another study abroad organization. I also became a Study Abroad Peer Advisor for a group on campus that assists at the International Center and promotes study abroad. Every one of its over sixty members says the same thing: essays, presentations, interviews, cover letters, resumes, applications, personal statements and sometimes even life are easier because of the abilities we gained on our study abroad programs. In almost every interview since studying abroad, we have discussed our adventures. This is not only because it sounds cool to brag, but also because those reallife experience questions, have suddenly become a lot easier to answer. Employers truly appreciate someone who has a distinct story to tell, and studying abroad certainly gives you that ability. There are certainly many obstacles to studying abroad: finances, critical tracking concerns and the ever-present voice telling you to concentrate on real studies. Obstacles are meant to be hurdled. Study abroad advisors and other UFIC staff are ready to help you hurdle those obstacles, and there are countless resources online as well. Studying abroad solidified all the knowledge I had already gained at UF and laid a strong foundation for everything I have done since. For every possible reason to not study abroad I could give you 10 for why you should. I have outlined just a few as for the rest, well, youll just have to wait and see! A STUDY ABROAD STORY HANNAH STRANGE This article is a reprint and was originially published in The UF Explorer, a Newsletter for Exploratory Students at the University of Florida.

PAGE 4

Dont miss out on the opportunity to study abroad this summer! Wednesday, January 26 th 2011 Reitz Union Colonnade 10 a.m. 3 p.m With 60 study abroad program representatives and UF-sponsored programs expected, students will have an opportunity to explore the many possibilities that enable them to become Global Gators. UF faculty who lead study abroad programs and former study abroad students will be available to share their international experiences. The fair will also feature other universities and institutions that sponsor UF-approved study abroad programs and internships. The Study Abroad Services staff will be available to explain the application process and help students begin the steps to find the right program. A representative from financial affairs will also be on hand to answer questions about financial aid available to students studying abroad. Approved study abroad programs can count towards degree requirements such as General Education and summer study abroad counts toward the nine-hour residency requirement. Students considering study abroad must apply to the International Center in 170 HUB. The deadline for studying abroad during summer 2011 is February 18, and the fall semester and academic year deadline is April 1. For more information, visit: www.abroad.ufic.ufl.edu UF STUDY ABROAD FAIR

PAGE 5

In December 2010, Dr. Kathleen Colverson, University of Florida International Center Associate Director of Program Development, received the Presidents Volunteer Award from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) for her work in Kenya. During multiple trips to Kenya Colverson worked to develop and implement improvements to the value chain for limited resource small poultry farmers. A value chain includes all aspects of product generation from production to the distribution, marketing and consumption of the final product. After the success of her first trip, Colverson returned to generate a plan on a national scale for small poultry farmers throughout Kenya. This focused on developing public-private partnerships with the government to further improve the production and sales in the country. The nonprofit organization Colverson worked with, Winrock International, recruits highly qualified volunteers to work in selected countries on issues identified by the countries. These assignments are funded through the larger, Farmer to Farmer program administered by USAID. In 2010, over 500 volunteers participated in the program throughout the world. Of these, 17 were recognized for their exemplary contributions at the recognition ceremony in Washington, D.C.. For more information on these organizations, or if you are interested in getting involved, you may visit: http://www.usaid.gov/ http://www.winrock.org/index.asp UFIC EMPLOYEE RECEIVES HIGH RECOGNITION Above: Meeting with women farmers Above: Market scene from Wangege, Kenya Above: Summarizing value chain surveys

PAGE 6

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION WEEK RECAP Mini-concert by the African Choir during the IEW Kickoff Students sampling the Starbucks coffee from around the world Participants of reading around the world 2010 winners of the Global Photo Competition Lemane Delva, one of the Alec Courtelis Outstanding International Student Award winners

PAGE 7

SPOTLIGHT ON: THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND PLANNING INTERNATIONAL EFFORTS The College of Design, Construction & Planning (DCP) has been actively engaged in international education, research and service projects for more than 30 years. Currently, the College, which has approximately 1500 students in 6 units from undergraduate to PhD level, operates 15 study abroad and exchange programs and manages over 25 agreements with universities, research groups and NGOs in 18 countries. DCPs long range goal is to have every student in the college participate in an international experience before graduation. Some units such as the School of Architecture are close to that target with participation by students in one or more international programs over the course of their studies approaching 80%. Although individual faculty worked on international projects well before 1980, the first significant international initiative emerged from the Conference on Environmental Design for the Future of the Caribbean Basin held on the University of Florida campus in 1981. The conference, which was organized by the then College of Architecture and the UF Center for Latin American Studies, resulted in the establishment of a ten-year plan dedicated to the protection of the cultural and architectural heritage in the Greater Caribbean Basin called the Plan CARIMOS (Caribbean Monuments and Sites Plan). Two education and research groups in DCP also emerged from this conference to help put the Plan into action: the Preservation Institute: Caribbean (PI:C): and the Center for Environmental Planning and Design in the Americas, (TROPARC ). PI:C and TROPARC, directed by Professors Alfonso Prez-Mndez and William Tilson (School of Architecture) and Joseli Macedo (Department of Urban and Regional Planning), respectively, continue to operate successful education and research programs in Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. Students in the VIA program draw en pleine air in Venice.

PAGE 8

LANDSCAPE FIELD SCHOOLS Many of the DCP international programs and the projects they sponsor are rooted in service learning. For example, the Landscape Field Schools offered by the Department of Landscape Architecture during the summer are built around the theme of preserving the legacy of community heritage landscapes. These field schools offer students the unique opportunity to work with communities throughout Southeast Asia to help preserve the legacy of some of the worlds most important community heritage landscapes. The program is open to students interested in heritage planning, cultural landscapes, international development, design and planning. PARTNERSHIPS The Department Interior Design (IND) is moving ahead with plans for research and education programs with the School of Architecture, and the Architectural Conservation Program, from Lund University in Sweden and the Hochschule Ostwestfalen in Germany. These new partnerships support the departments commitment to service learning projects that emphasizes the role of research in guiding the design process. NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION In an addition to its ongoing exchange programs in Australia, Europe and Asia, The Rinker School of Building Construction has completed its 4th year of the National Science Foundation sponsored International Research Experience in Africa. The program supports students to undertake 8 to 10 weeks of research in construction technologies in Kenya during the summer. The theme of the program is optimizing the performance of building systems in Kenya, which will make a contribution to the Green Building Agenda. The key elements identified for the research are: water supply, thermal comfort as it relates to passive heating and cooling, building materials and solar power. The students conducted research on building technologies based on knowledge gained about the local context through collaboration with a host institution and then collectively designed, engineered, and constructed a demonstration unit that exemplifying the use of these approaches. DEPARTMENT OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING The Department of Urban and Regional Planning (URP) is part of the Network for European and U.S. Regional and Urban Studies (NEURUS) an international consortium of universities dedicated to the collaborative study of urban and regional development issues. NEURUS is based on a concept of research and education befitting an age of growing territorial integration and heightened global interchange. Through the use of Internet technologies, faculty and student exchange, distance learning, periodic transcontinental seminars, and traditional forms of research collaboration, NEURUS aims to make the resources and expertise of multiple universities available to researchers and students at any of the partner institutions. Students from DCP and Bali collaborate on a documentary video

PAGE 9

CENTER FOR WORLD HERITAGE RESEARCH AND STEWARDSHIP A new center of excellence, the Center for World Heritage Research and Stewardship directed by Roy E. Graham, FAIA, Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Professor addresses cutting edge conservation issues on local, state, national and international levels. The Center for World Heritage Research and Stewardship replaces and expands the Research and Education Center for Architectural Conservation which was authorized by the Florida Legislature and established by the State University System in 1978. The new center uniquely combines educational and research efforts in heritage conservation and management while increasing opportunities for faculty and students in the field. In addition to research and practica, the Center offers public and academic programs on local, state, federal, and international preservation issues by partnering with organizations such as UFs Center for Tourism Research and Development and the Center for Governmental Responsibility and numerous international groups, notably the World Heritage Centre in Paris, the World Archeological Congress Cultural Values Interest Group, the Getty Foundation and International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM). SUSTAINABLE DESIGN INTERNATIONAL DISTANCE PROGRAM The College has just launched a new international distance education program in Sustainable Design beginning this spring term. The curriculum for this program draws upon the diverse strengths of the College in architecture, building construction, historic preservation, interior design, landscape architecture and urban and regional planning. Fifteen students from the US, Singapore and China are members of the first cohort. The Sustainable Design Program joins the Master of International Construction Management (MICM), a long standing distance education program offered by the Rinker School, in the use of new electronic media tools to make our expertise in improving the built environment available to more people around the globe. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE The School of Architectures Vicenza Institute of Architecture (VIA) celebrated its 25th anniversary this past September. Started in 1985 by Professor Emeritus Francesco Cappellari in in the northern Italian town of Vicenza, a UNESCO World Heritage Centre, over 1700 students have spent a semester living in Vicenza, studying architecture and traveling through Europe. VIA remains one of UFs longest running international programs. SoA Director Martin Gold, AIA commented at the opening of an exhibition of VIA work in the studio in Vicenza this past September This is an exciting moment for us as we celebrate 25 years in Italy, consider our accomplishments and chart the course for the next 25 years. Students in the Mexico Studio Program tour a large scale water control project near Guadalajara

PAGE 10

For more information on DCP programs contact William Tilson, Assistant Dean for International Studies and Service Learning at wtropic@ufl.edu UF SOLAR DECATHALON TEAM The UF Solar Decathlon Team competed in the Solar Decathlon Europe Competition in June 2010 in Madrid, Spain-the first global competition of its kind. UF was selected as one of only two American universities to compete in the event. A collaboration among the College of Design, Construction and Planning, College of Journalism and Communications, College of Engineering and Warrington College of Business Administration, supported 125 students who worked across eight disciplines to submit Project RE: FOCUS, a solar-powered home modeled after the traditional Florida Cracker House. The team received two first place awards: the Public Choice Award for the Web and the Communications and Social Awareness Category Award, as well as taking second place in Electrical Energy Balance. They also placed 8th overall out of 17 teams. UFs house is 797-square-feet, and includes elements from historic Florida houses such as the North Florida vernacular Cracker House. Some of the borrowed elements include a covered open porch, a breezeway or dog trot oriented to the prevailing wind and a porous, breathable building skin. Project RE: FOCUS was led by professor Robert Ries from the M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Building Construction at the College of Design, Construction and Planning and included DCP Professors Mark McGlothlin and Bradley Walters from the School of Architecture, Professors Jim Sullivan and Russell Walters from the Rinker School and Professor Maruja TorresAntonini from the Department of Interior Design. WORK WITH THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES The College has 10 faculty affiliated with the Center for Latin American Studies and is a strong supporter of their activities. DCP recently co-sponsored the Centers 58th Annual Conference The Urban Divide in Latin America: Challenges and Strategies for Social Inclusion which was held in January 2009. This multidisciplinary conference brought together scholars and professionals, dedicated to improving the quality of life in urban Latin America. Former mayor of Curitiba, Jamie Lerner who popularized the concept of the urban acupuncture approach to solving intractable urban problems, was a featured speaker sponsored by the Ivan Smith Fund in the School of Architecture. The College will also participate in the Centers upcoming conference Looking Forward, Looking Back: Celebrating 80 Years of Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. DCP is committed to collaboration on international initiatives with other Centers such as the Center for African Studies, IFAS, and the new Masters Degree in Development Practice funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Completed project RE:FOCUS stands ready for viewing in the Solar Village in Madrid, Spain


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THE INENTOA . .


Volume I, Issue II


I January 2011


2nd Place Study Abroad Students Category
Jennifer Jean Mackey
"Pathways to a Globalized Culture"
Frankfurt, Germany
2010


jI International Center
U I UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA






























INSIDE THE NEWSLETTER
A Study Abroad experience Page 3

UFIC employee recognized for contributions Page 5

A look back at International Education Week Page 6

Spotlight on:
College of Design, Construction and Planning Page 7










Though many people pursue travel for a fun
and adventurous time, the ability of travel
to teach is often overlooked. Of my years
at UF and in other educational institutions
I believe the periods of time I learned the
most were those spent traveling, or more
specifically, studying abroad. In the summer
between my sophomore and junior years I
traveled with UF to study tourism and the
environment in Australia and Fiji. Aside from
being a phenomenal experience in which
I got to snorkel in the Great Barrier Reef,
explore the Australian Outback, discover the
oldest rainforest in the world and stay in a
traditional Fijian village, it was perhaps the
most educational 6 weeks of my life.

There were 22 students on my trip from
majors including tourism, architecture,
nursing, psychology, sport management,
geography, and perhaps a dozen more. This
diversity of interests allowed us to learn from
each other's background and experiences.
Though the majority of us were settled in our
majors, studying abroad has a unique ability
to provide clarity for those seeking direction.
Many of my classmates have become more
specific in their educational goals or chosen
their direction post-graduation based upon
what they learned about themselves while
studying abroad. Though I was always a
tourism major, since returning to UF I have
narrowed my focus to educational tourism.

Every student who studies abroad will have
a different experience, however almost every
student gains a set of skills that are invaluable
for future learning and any prospective
career. The very method of learning abroad is
different. Many of my lectures were presented
on a beach, in the rainforest or on a boat. Some
students even take courses that are taught
in a foreign language. When you are taken
out of your element, perhaps being asked to
write a paper by hand, without a computer
in the Australian Outback, you learn how to


learn, regardless of your surroundings. On a
study abroad program you learn more than
class material: you learn about others, about
yourself, about academics outside of UF and
outside of an American perspective. It is these
skills that have carried me forward.

Upon returning to UF I have used my
experiences to gain opportunities that
otherwise would not be possible. I have
interned at the UF International Center, and
in the spring I will begin working for another
study abroad organization. I also became
a Study Abroad Peer Advisor for a group
on campus that assists at the International
Center and promotes study abroad. Every
one of its over sixty members says the same
thing: essays, presentations, interviews,
cover letters, resumes, applications, personal
statements and sometimes even life are easier
because of the abilities we gained on our study
abroad programs. In almost every interview
since studying abroad, we have discussed our
adventures. This is not only because it sounds
cool to brag, but also because those 'real-
life experience' questions, have suddenly
become a lot easier to answer. Employers truly
appreciate someone who has a distinct story
to tell, and studying abroad certainly gives
you that ability.

There are certainly many obstacles to
studying abroad: finances, critical tracking
concerns and the ever-present voice telling
you to concentrate on 'real studies'. Obstacles
are meant to be hurdled. Study abroad
advisors and other UFIC staff are ready to
help you hurdle those obstacles, and there
are countless resources online as well.
Studying abroad solidified all the knowledge
I had already gained at UF and laid a strong
foundation for everything I have done since.
For every possible reason to not study abroad
I could give you 10 for why you should. I have
outlined just a few as for the rest, well, you'll
just have to wait and see!

This article is a reprint and was originally published in The UF
Explorer, a Newsletter for Exploratory Students at the University of
Florida.







S D A BFA I R A


Don't miss out on the opportunity to study abroad this summer!


Wednesday, January 26th, 2011
Reitz Union Colonnade
10 a.m. 3 p.m


With 60 study abroad program representatives and UF-sponsored programs expected,
students will have an opportunity to explore the many possibilities that enable them to
become "Global Gators."

UF faculty who lead study abroad programs and former study abroad students will
be available to share their international experiences. The fair will also feature other
universities and institutions that sponsor UF-approved study abroad programs and
internships. The Study Abroad Services staff will be available to explain the application
process and help students begin the steps to find the right program. A representative
from financial affairs will also be on hand to answer questions about financial aid
available to students studying abroad.

Approved study abroad programs can count towards degree requirements such as
General Education and summer study abroad counts toward the nine-hour residency
requirement. Students considering study abroad must apply to the International Center
in 170 HUB. The deadline for studying abroad during summer 2011 is February 18, and
the fall semester and academic year deadline is April 1.


For more information, visit: www.abroad.ufic.ufl.edu







* E M"O" R H i


In December 2010, Dr. Kathleen
Colverson, University of Florida
International Center Associate Director
of Program Development, received the
President's Volunteer Award from the
United States Agency for International
Development (USAID) for her work in
Kenya. During multiple trips to Kenya
Colverson worked to develop and
implement improvements to the value
chain for limited resource small poultry
farmers. A "value chain" includes
all aspects of product generation
from production to the distribution,
marketing and consumption of the
final product. After the success of
her first trip, Colverson returned to
generate a plan on a national scale
for small poultry farmers throughout
Kenya. This focused on developing
"public-private partnerships" with the
government to further improve the
production and sales in the country.

The nonprofit organization Colverson
worked with, Winrock International,
recruits highly qualified volunteers to
work in selected countries on issues
identified by the countries. These
assignments are funded through the
larger, Farmer to Farmer program
administered by USAID. In 2010,
over 500 volunteers participated in
the program throughout the world.
Of these, 17 were recognized for
their exemplary contributions at the
recognition ceremony in Washington,
D.C..

For more information on these
organizations, or if you are interested
in getting involved, you may visit:

http://www.usaid.gov/
http://www.winrock.org/index.asp


'\\\


Above: Meeting with women farmers
.i .----- -.-


Above: Market scene from Wangege, Kenya


Above: Summarizing value chain surveys







I TR ATIO AL E U ATI NW E REAP7


Mini-concert by the African Choir during the IEW Kickoff


Participants of reading around the world


Students sampling the Starbucks coffee
from around the world


2010 winners of the Lemane Delva, one of the Alec Courtelis
Global Photo Competition Outstanding International Student Award
winners








r SPOTLIGHT ON:A


Students in the VIA program draw en pleine air in Venice.


INTERNATIONAL EFFORTS
The College of Design, Construction & Planning (DCP) has been actively engaged in
international education, research and service projects for more than 30 years. Currently, the
College, which has approximately 1500 students in 6 units from undergraduate to PhD level,
operates 15 study abroad and exchange programs and manages over 25 agreements with
universities, research groups and NGOs in 18 countries. DCP's long range goal is to have
every student in the college participate in an international experience before graduation.
Some units such as the School of Architecture are close to that target with participation by
students in one or more international programs over the course of their studies approaching
80%.
Although individual faculty worked on international projects well before 1980, the first
significant international initiative emerged from the Conference on Environmental Design
for the Future of the Caribbean Basin held on the University of Florida campus in 1981. The
conference, which was organized by the then College of Architecture and the UF Center for
Latin American Studies, resulted in the establishment of a ten-year plan dedicated to the
protection of the cultural and architectural heritage in the Greater Caribbean Basin called
the Plan CARIMOS (Caribbean Monuments and Sites Plan). Two education and research
groups in DCP also emerged from this conference to help put the Plan into action: the
Preservation Institute: Caribbean (PI:C): and the Center for Environmental Planning and
Design in the Americas, (TROPARC ). PI:C and TROPARC, directed by Professors Alfonso
Perez-Mendez and William Tilson (School of Architecture) and Joseli Macedo (Department
of Urban and Regional Planning), respectively, continue to operate successful education
and research programs in Mexico, the Caribbean and South America.






DEPARTMENT OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
The Department of Urban and Regional Planning (URP) is
part of the Network for European and U.S. Regional and
Urban Studies (NEURUS), an international consortium
of universities dedicated to the collaborative study
of urban and regional development issues. NEURUS
is based on a concept of research and education
befitting an age of growing territorial integration and
heightened global interchange. Through the use of
Internet technologies, faculty and student exchange,
distance learning, periodic transcontinental seminars,
and traditional forms of research collaboration,
NEURUS aims to make the resources and expertise
of multiple universities available to researchers and
students at any of the partner institutions.

y'I


NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
In an addition to its ongoing
exchange programs in Australia,
Europe and Asia, The Rinker School of
Building Construction has completed
its 4th year of the National Science
Foundation sponsored International
Research Experience in Africa. The
program supports students to
undertake 8 to 10 weeks of research
in construction technologies in
Kenya during the summer. The theme
of the program is optimizing the
performance of building systems in
Kenya, which will make a contribution
totheGreen Building Agenda.
? The key elements identified
for the research are: water
supply, thermal comfort as it
relates to passive heating and
cooling, building materials
and solar power. The
students conducted research
on building technologies
based on knowledge gained
about the local context
through collaboration
with a host institution and
then collectively designed,
engineered, and constructed
a demonstration unit that
exemplifying the use of these
approaches.


Students from DCP and Bali collaborate on a documentary video


PARTNERSHIPS
The Department Interior Design
(IND) is moving ahead with plans for
research and education programs
with the School of Architecture,
and the Architectural Conservation
Program, from Lund University
in Sweden and the Hochschule
Ostwestfalen in Germany. These
new partnerships support the
department's commitment to
service learning projects that
emphasizes the role of research in
guiding the design process.


LANDSCAPE FIELD SCHOOLS
Many of the DCP international programs and the
projects they sponsor are rooted in service learning.
For example, the Landscape Field Schools offered by
the Department of Landscape Architecture during
the summer are built around the theme of preserving
the legacy of community heritage landscapes. These
field schools offer students the unique opportunity to
work with communities throughout Southeast Asia to
help preserve the legacy of some of the world's most
important community heritage landscapes. The program
is open to students interested in heritage planning,
cultural landscapes, international development, design
and planning.



























Students in the Mexico Studio Program tour a large scale water control project near Guadalajara

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN INTERNATIONAL DISTANCE PROGRAM
The College has just launched a new international distance
education program in Sustainable Design beginning this spring
term. The curriculum for this program draws upon the diverse
strengths of the College in architecture, building construction,
historic preservation, interior design, landscape architecture
and urban and regional planning. Fifteen students from the
US, Singapore and China are members of the first cohort. The
Sustainable Design Program joins the Master of International
Construction Management (MICM), a long standing distance
education program offered by the Rinker School, in the use of
new electronic media tools to make our expertise in improving
the built environment available to more people around the
globe.

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
The School of Architecture's Vicenza Institute of Architecture
(VIA) celebrated its 25th anniversary this past September.
Started in 1985 by Professor Emeritus Francesco Cappellari
in in the northern Italian town of Vicenza, a UNESCO World
Heritage Centre, over 1700 students have spent a semester
living in Vicenza, studying architecture and traveling through
Europe. VIA remains one of UF's longest running international
programs. SoA Director Martin Gold, AIA commented at the
opening of an exhibition of VIA work in the studio in Vicenza
this past September "This is an exciting moment for us as we
celebrate 25 years in Italy, consider our accomplishments and
chart the course for the next 25 years."


CENTER FOR WORLD
HERITAGE RESEARCH
AND STEWARDSHIP
A new center of excellence,
the Center for World Heritage
Research and Stewardship
directed by Roy E. Graham,
FAIA, Beinecke-Reeves
Distinguished Professor
addresses cutting edge
conservation issues on
local, state, national and
international levels. The
Center for World Heritage
Research and Stewardship
replaces and expands the
Research and Education
Center for Architectural
Conservation which was
authorized by the Florida
Legislature and established by
the State University System in
1978. The newcenteruniquely
combines educational
and research efforts in
heritage conservation and
management while increasing
opportunities for faculty and
students in the field.
In addition to research and
practice, the Center offers
public and academic programs
on local, state, federal, and
international preservation
issues by partnering with
organizations such as UF's
Center for Tourism Research
and Development and the
Center for Governmental
Responsibility and numerous
international groups, notably
the World Heritage Centre in
Paris, the World Archeological
Congress Cultural Values
Interest Group, the Getty
Foundation and International
Centre for the Study of the
Preservation and Restoration
ofCultural Property(ICCROM).






UF SOLAR DECATHALON TEAM


The UF Solar Decathlon Team competed in the Solar Decathlon Europe Competition in June
2010 in Madrid, Spain-the first global competition of its kind. UF was selected as one of only
two American universities to compete in the event. A collaboration among the College of
Design, Construction and Planning, College of Journalism and Communications, College of
Engineering and Warrington College of Business Administration, supported 125 students who
worked across eight disciplines to submit "Project RE: FOCUS," a solar-powered home modeled
after the traditional Florida Cracker House.
The team received two first place awards: the Public Choice Award for the Web and the
Communications and Social Awareness Category Award, as well as taking second place in Electrical
Energy Balance. They also placed 8th overall out of 17 teams. UF's house is 797-square-feet,
and includes elements from historic Florida houses such as the North Florida vernacular Cracker
House. Some of the borrowed elements include a covered open porch, a breezeway or "dog
trot" oriented to the prevailing
wind and a porous, breathable
building skin.

Project RE: FOCUS was led by
professor Robert Ries from
the M.E. Rinker, Sr. School
of Building Construction
at the College of Design,
Construction and Planning l
and included DCP Professors
Mark McGlothlin and Bradley
Walters from the School of
Architecture, Professors Jim
Sullivan and Russell Walters
from the Rinker School and
Professor Maruja Torres-
Antonini from the Department
of Interior Design. Completed project RE:FOCUS stands ready for viewing in the Solar Village in Madrid, Spain

WORK WITH THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
The College has 10 faculty affiliated with the Center for Latin American Studies and is a strong
supporter of their activities. DCP recently co-sponsored the Center's 58th Annual Conference
"The Urban Divide in Latin America: Challenges and Strategies for Social Inclusion" which
was held in January 2009. This multidisciplinary conference brought together scholars and
professionals, dedicated to improving the quality of life in urban Latin America. Former mayor
of Curitiba, Jamie Lerner who popularized the concept of the "urban acupuncture" approach
to solving intractable urban problems, was a featured speaker sponsored by the Ivan Smith
Fund in the School of Architecture. The College will also participate in the Center's upcoming
conference "Looking Forward, Looking Back: Celebrating 80 Years of Latin American Studies at
the University of Florida." DCP is committed to collaboration on international initiatives with
other Centers such as the Center for African Studies, IFAS, and the new Master's Degree in
Development Practice funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.


For more information on DCP programs contact William Tilson, Assistant Dean for International Studies and Service Learning at wtropic@ufl.edu




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