Title: UF International News
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093438/00009
 Material Information
Title: UF International News
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: UF International Center
Publisher: UF International Center
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: Winter 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00093438
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

winter08 ( PDF )


Full Text









Published by THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL CENTER U www.ufic.ufl.edu N VOLUME 4 No. I U WINTER 2008
I LJ.,..L..,., J AL._ ':. _ .... J....L' .AL.L L _-.J.- -L L .~. ..tl ,..4 LJU"..z. .. W ,_ &L _,.:J L.U.:_


I ran's Message .

Awards recognize UF's

top international faculty
Ambassador Dennis C.Jett (Ret.), Ph.D.
Dean of the UF International Center
This edition of the news-
letter includes an article on
the International Educator
of the Year Awards and
the ceremony where the
Provost presented them.
Accomplishing any goal
at an institution of higher
education, especially a
large research university,
requires the full support
and active participation of
its faculty.
This is particularly true
when the objective is the further internationalization
of the campus and the curriculum. Some believe
that international involvement will detract from
their research or their teaching responsibilities. Oth-
ers may have doubts about the degree to which such
efforts are really valued.
The purpose of the International Educator Award
is to recognize the most outstanding work done by
faculty members to promote the greater intema-
tionalization of UF and to show that such achieve-
ments are highly valued and rewarded. By serving
as examples to other faculty members, the award
winners demonstrate in a wide variety of ways how
an international dimension can enrich teaching and
enhance research.
The diversity of the ways in which the awardees
accomplished this is another example of the
breadth, as well of the depth, of the scholarly activi-
ties at UF. Hopefully it will also demonstrate that
any faculty member can engage in intemationaliza-
tion and incorporate a global perspective in all that
they do.


G fo6alfCulture
N Photo Contest


Yr -,

S.


LU 1.* L4
ENGLISH by Brandi Hill
Winner


IOi


StudyAbroad Category
Location: Sand Sloot, South Africa
The UFIC recognized photographers in the 2007 Global Cul-
ture Photo Contest. Read about the contest on page 4.

Learning tropical biology on site:
The REU Program in Ghana
By DANIEL A. WUBAH, PH. D.
Will the Ghanaian mangrove oyster become
one of our next delicacies? Can the seeds of a
pepper plant in West Africa be used as a crop
insecticide in the U.S.? What is the necessary
environment for the survival and propaga-
tion of a stingless bee? These are some of the
questions that U.S. undergraduate students
tackle when they take part in a unique summer Wubah
research program in Ghana.
In the past six years, 34 students have spent the summer
working on carefully selected projects at the University of
Cape Coast (UCC) in Ghana. The program was funded by
the Office of International Science and Engineering and the
Directorate of Biology at the National Science Foundation
See Ghana, p. 7










Ret. Col. Ann Wright discusses

officials who practice dissent
Retired Army Col. Ann Wright came to the University
of Florida to talk about people who spoke out about il-
legal activities and policies of the United States and paid
with their careers, their reputations and in cases, their
security. She is among them.
Wright, author of "Dissent: Voices of Conscience,"
also signed copies of her book during her visit and pre-
sentation on Jan. 29.
Wright grew up in Bentonville, Ark., and got a mas-
ter's degree and law degree from the University of
Arkansas. She joined the Army during the Vietnam War
to get out of Arkansas and to see the world. She spent 13
years in the military and 16 years in the Army Reserves.
She joined the Foreign Service in 1987 and served in
numerous countries, the last being Mongolia.
That is where she was based when the Bush adminis-
tration was preparing for the invasion of Iraq, which took
place in 2003. Wright did not like what she was hearing
from the White House about the case for weapons of
mass destruction. Ultimately, she resigned her post and
became an activist against a war she considers illegal
and an administration that does not respect the rule of
law. Her book chronicles the lives of other government
employees who have sacrificed their careers to speak out
about illegal government activities.
One of them was Joe Darby, the Army specialist who
brought to light the photos in Abu Ghraib showing the
abuse of prisoners. Because of his actions, the United
States had to confront its illegal treatment of prisoners
and change the way they were treated.
If that were the end of it, the story could be considered
positive. But Darby was sitting in a mess hall in Iraq
when Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld was dis-
cussing the photos. Over the air, Rumsfeld sarcastically
thanked Darby for bringing them to light, and Darby
became known in the Army is the guy who squealed.
Why did Rumsfeld disclose Darby's name, Wright
asked the audience. "You think he might want to intimi-
date anybody else who has the nerve to speak out against
the things that are going on, torture, a policy of torture
that Donald Rumsfeld was approving?" Today, Darby's
life is in danger and he is in a federal witness protection
program, she said.
Sibel Edmonds is another. The Turkish-American
worked as a translator for the FBI after the terrorist at-
tacks Sept. 11, 2001. She complained that her translations
were being altered, apparently to suit government policy


Retired Army Col.Ann Wright signs copies of her
book, "Dissent:Voices of Conscience," at a UF presenta-
tion.
or conceal its actions. She complained, and less than
a year later she was fired. The Justice Department's
Inspector General's report showed that her whistle-
blowing activities were the most significant factor in
her firing. Only recently have media reports docu-
mented her struggle.
Major communications companies have allowed
the United States government to illegally monitor
private phone calls for the past five years. Two and a
half years ago, Russ Tice, an NSA insider, spilled the
beans that the United States was illegally spying on
its citizens. He was fired. The practice continues. The
communications companies have not been punished.
"You can commit illegal acts, in fact the govern-
ment can encourage you to commit illegal acts, and
nobody is being be held responsible for it, nobody
except perhaps whistle blowers who even dare say
anything about these illegalities," Wright said.
Wright was deeply troubled by the U.S. treatment
of prisoners in Guantanamo. Because most were ap-
prehended by bounty, their actual involvement in
See Wright, p. 3

International News
is published by the University of Florida Interna-
tional Center.
Dean: Dennis Jett
Executive Editor: Sandra Russo
Editor: Larry Schnell
We welcome submission of articles and photo-
graphs on international themes from faculty and
students. Send to srusso@ufic.ufl.edu.
The University of Florida International Center
P.O. Box I 13225
Gainesville, FL 3261 I
(352) 392-5323, Fax: (352) 392-5575
www.ufic.ufl.edu

Winter 2008










COL.WILKERSON GIVES 6 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESTORING U.S. INTEGRITY


Retired Col. Lawrence Wilkerson presented six rec-
ommendations he would give to a new president in the
wake of seven years of administration that he described
as appalling.
Wilkerson, who visited the University of Florida
Nov. 7, 2007, gave a speech entitled "How to Fix our
Foreign Policy An Open Letter to the New President."
"Foreigners ... judge us by what we do, not by what
we say, and what we have done in the world in the past
few years has mostly been quite appalling," Wilkerson
said.
UF International Center Dean Dennis Jett introduced
Wilkerson, who shared some of Jett's career moves, in-
cluding a career in diplomacy and in higher education.
Wilkerson's 31-year career in the U.S. Army included
serving as deputy executive officer to then-Gen. Co-
lin Powell. After retiring from the military, Wilkerson
served as chief staff to Secretary of State Powell.
He is now widely quoted in news media and is
professor of government at the College of William and
Mary as well as professional lecturer at George Wash-
ington University.
In his speech at the Reitz Union, he outlined his six
recommendations for a new president and criticized the
Bush administration's policies at home and abroad.
1. The foundation of power is not just our ideas and
values but also our economic might. Good armies and
navies are costly, but with a debt at the time of $45 tril-
lion, the economic picture is precarious. "Mr. President,
get your economic house in order."
2. Have open discussions. Talk to friends and allies.
It may not be necessary to heed their advice, but at least
listen to them. They look to the United States for leader-
ship. "Don't bur anybody. Talk to everybody."
3. Talk to your enemies. Follow the Arabic prov-
erb "keep you friends close and your enemies closer."
Throughout the Cold War, the United States and the
Soviet Union were at odds, but the channel of com-
munication was open. "Throughout that entire time we
talked with the Kremlin," he said. "Why do we refuse to
talk to the Cubans, to the Syrians, to the Persians, and
up to this point, the North Koreans?"
4. Identify terrorists and go after them for what they
are, what they can do to the U.S. That would be 25,000
to 30,000 people who are enemies. "Go after the people
who really want to do harm to the United States."
5. De-emphasize the role of the armed forces. The
military is burdened by doing what can better be done
International News


with other tools. Less than
1 percent of the 300 million
Americans are bleeding and
dying in Iraq and Afghanistan
Sand a few other places in the
world. "Our president has not
asked us to make one sacri-
fice."
6. Return to basics, spe-
cifically the U.S. Constitution.
Wilkerson That is the document that every
soldier takes an oath to support. Return to the rule of
law and provide due process to people we have made
prisoners. The practice of incarcerating people without
legal rights has been the biggest recruiting tool for al
Qaida. "Because ofAbu Ghraib and Guantanamo, in
part, we are now the laughing stock of the world."

Wright, from p. 2
Retired Army Col. Ann Wright came to the University
of Florida to talk about people who spoke out about il-
legal activities and policies of the United States and paid
with their careers, their reputations and in cases, their
security. She is among them.
Wright, author of "Dissent: Voices of Conscience,"
also signed copies of her book during her visit and pre-
sentation on Jan. 29.
Wright grew up in Bentonville, Ark., and got a
master's degree and law degree from the University of
Arkansas. She joined the Army during the Vietnam War
to get out of Arkansas and to see the world. She spent 13
years in the military and 16 years in the Army Reserves.
She joined the Foreign Service in 1987 and served in
numerous countries, the last being Mongolia.
That is where she was based when the Bush admin-
istration was preparing for the invasion of Iraq, which
took place in 2003. Wright did not like what she was
hearing from the White House about the case for weap-
ons of mass destruction. Ultimately, she resigned her
post and became an activist against a war she considers
illegal and an administration that does not respect the
rule of law. Her book chronicles the lives of other gov-
emment employees who have sacrificed their careers to
speak out about illegal government activities.
One of them was Joe Darby, the Army specialist who
brought to light the photos in Abu Ghraib showing the
abuse of prisoners. Because of his actions, the United
States had to confront its illegal treatment of prisoners











UFIC recognizes outstanding photography


G To b6aCulture

Photo Contest


HOLY LAND PENTECOSTAL CHURCH
by Courtnay Micots
Winner
Faculty, Staff and Alumni Category
Location:Anomabu, Ghana

The UFIC recognized photographers in the 2007
Global Culture Photo Contest with prizes for faculty,
staff and students for photos taken in the United States
and abroad.
Winners received awards and cash prizes at a recep-
tion Jan. 22 in the Grinter Hall Gallery, where the photos
were on display through early February. They will be
exhibited in the HUB.


UFIC Executive Associate Director Lynn Frazier
presented the awards. Judges selected 12 winners and five
honorable mentions from 70 entries.
Top honors in the four categories were:
Study abroad
First: Brandi Hill, "English," Sand Sloot, South Africa
Second: Brandi Hill, "Just Friends," Sand Sloot, South
Africa
Third: Joanna Lis, "Ksiegamia," Krakow, Poland
Honorable Mention: Angel Nieves, "Life Experienced
Through the City Streets," Shanghai, China
Honorable Mention: Untitled, by Kat Fowler, Hopkins,
Belize

International students
First: Inigo de Amescua, "Liberty," New York
Second: Wei Zhou "The New Generation on Wheels,"
Gainesville, Fla.
Third: Wei Zhou, "Inseparable Isolation," Gainesville,
Fla.
Honorable Mention: Anna Szyniszewska, "Patriots"
Miami, Fla.

Faculty, staff and alumni
First: Courtnay Micots, "Holy Land Pentecostal
Church," Anomabu, Ghana
Second: Lesley Gamble, "Cleared for Departure," Bali,
Indonesia
Third: Steven Brandt, "A Boy and His Donkey," Lamu,
Kenya

Photography and journalism students
First: Jeremiah Wilson, "Smoke Break," Andros Island,
Bahamas


Study abroad fair highlights new international opportunities


New study abroad opportunities in China, Japan,
France, India and other countries joined a host of inter-
national educational opportunities at the UFIC Study
Abroad Fair in January.
UF in Chengdu, China, offers UF students a year's
worth of credits in beginning Chinese language at the
Southwestern University of Finance and Economics.
During 12 weeks, the students also can earn credits
through a Chinese economy course. Chengdu is the capi-
tal of the Sichuan province in southern China.


Students also can study in Tokyo this summer and
earn six credits over six weeks through the UF in Tokyo
program. In two courses, students explore the culture of
Japan through critical reading and writing, journaling and
blogging, visual communication and first-hand experi-
ences.
The Paris Research Center has added the course Eu-
ropean Integration from Napoleon to Nice: Law, Politics
and Institutions of the European Union in the 21st Cen-
tury to an array of courses. Undergraduates can get
Winter 2008











The Global Culture Photo Contest


The UFIC recognized photographers in the 2007 Glob-
al Culture Photo Contest with prizes for faculty, staff and
students for photos taken in the United States and abroad.
Winners received awards and cash prizes at a reception
Jan. 22 in the Grinter Hall Gallery, where the photos were
on display through early February. They will be exhibited
in the HUB.
UFIC Executive Associate Director Lynn Frazier
presented the awards. Judges selected 12 winners and five
honorable mentions from 70 entries.
Top honors in the four categories were:
Study abroad
First: Brandi Hill, "English," Sand Sloot, South Africa
Second: Brandi Hill, "Just Friends," Sand Sloot, South
Africa
Third: Joanna Lis, "Ksiegamia," Krakow, Poland
Honorable Mention: Angel Nieves, "Life Experienced
Through the City Streets," Shanghai, China
Honorable Mention: Untitled, by Kat Fowler, Hopkins,
Belize

International students
First: Inigo de Amescua, "Liberty," New York
Second: Wei Zhou "The New Generation on Wheels,"
Gainesville, Fla.
Third: Wei Zhou, "Inseparable Isolation," Gainesville,
Fla.
Honorable Mention: Anna Szyniszewska, "Patriots"
Miami, Fla.

Faculty, staff and alumni
First: Courtnay Micots, "Holy Land Pentecostal Church,"
Anomabu, Ghana
Second: Lesley Gamble, "Cleared for Departure," Bali,

New study abroad opportunities in China, Japan,
France, India and other countries joined a host of interna-
tional educational opportunities at the UFIC Study Abroad
Fair in January.
UF in Chengdu, China, offers UF students a year's
worth of credits in beginning Chinese language at the
Southwestern University of Finance and Economics. Dur-
ing 12 weeks, the students also can earn credits through
a Chinese economy course. Chengdu is the capital of the
Sichuan province in southern China.
Students also can study in Tokyo this summer and
earn six credits over six weeks through the UF in Tokyo
International News


G lobalfCulture
Photo Contest


rr-


LIBERTY by Inigo de Amescua
Winner
International Students Category
Location: Metropolitan Museum, NewYork

Indonesia
Third: Steven Brandt, "A Boy and His Donkey," Lamu,
Kenya

Photography and journalism students
First: Jeremiah Wilson, "Smoke Break," Andros Island,
Bahamas
Second: Marvin Halelamien, "Acrobatic Circle" Andros
Island, Bahamas
Third: Jeremiah Wilson, "Basket Baby," Andros Island,
Bahamas
Honorable Mention: Marvin Halelamien, "NcL\\ Day"
Andros Island, Bahamas
program. In two courses, students explore the culture of
Japan through critical reading and writing, journaling and
blogging, visual communication and first-hand experi-
ences.
The Paris Research Center has added the course Eu-
ropean Integration from Napoleon to Nice: Law, Poli-
tics and Institutions of the European Union in the 21st
Century to an array of courses. Undergraduates can get
credit for political science, and graduate students can earn
law credits. The course runs this summer from June 15
through July 26. The Paris Research Center also offers










Fine Arts faculty Joan Frosch,Victoria Rovine
named UF Educators of theYear for 2007


Theater professor Joan Frosch and art history as-
sistant professor Victoria Rovine were named Interna-
tional Educators of the Year for 2007.
The UF International Center recognized these and
other faculty members for their outstanding intera-
tional accomplishments. Frosch won the Senior Faculty
Award, and Rovine won the Junior Faculty Award, with
the College of Fine Arts sweeping the awards.
UF Provost Janie Fouke presented the awards at a
ceremony Nov. 13.
UFIC Dean Dennis Jett noted that UF consistently
ranks in the top 20 universities for international stu-
dents and scholars. "Those numbers are in large part
due to you and your colleagues who are internationally
involved," Jett said.
The UFIC gives the awards annually to recognize
outstanding international endeavors by UF faculty in
support of UF's strategic goal of internationalizing the
campus and curriculum.
Frosch, a dance ethnographer and Certified Move-
ment Analyst, is assistant director of the School of
Theatre and Dance and co-founder/co-director of the
Center for World Arts in the College of Fine Arts.
Among her achievements are her documentary feature
Movement (R)evolution Africa: A Story of an Art Form
in Four Acts. Her grants and awards have generated
hundreds of thousands of dollars for UF, and include an
award from the inaugural EMPAC commission to pro-
duce a film "Nora Chipaumire: A Physical Biography."
Rovine's dedication to international research and
education is reflected a wide range of her activities,
from research and service to mentorship and teaching.
Her work is marked by a commitment to using visual
art as a window to cultures, individuals, and histories.


Each college was
asked to nominate two
candidates in the catego-
ries of tenured and unten-
ured or recently tenured Joan Frosch, right, accepts her
faculty. Consideration international educator award
was given to research, from Provost anie Fouke.
teaching and service. A committee judged applications
and selected winners. Other nominees and their col-
leges are:
Wesley Bolch, Engineering
Brian Child, Liberal Arts and Sciences
Daniel P. Connaughton, Health and Human Perfor-
mance
Hartmut Derendorf, Center for Drug Food-Drug Inter-
action Research and Education, Pharmacy
John Freeman, Journalism and Communications
Franz Futterknecht, Liberal Arts and Sciences
E. Paul J. Gibbs, Veterinary Medicine
Mark Jamison, Business Administration
William F. Keegan, Florida Museum of Natural History
Joseli Macedo, Design, Construction and Planning
Prabhat Mishra, Engineering
W. Steve Otwell, Florida Sea Grant Seafood Extension
Natalia Peres, Gulf Coast Research and Education Cen-
ter, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Alfonso Perez-Mendez, Design, Construction and Plan-
ning
Alice Poe, Nursing
Jiunn-Jye Sheu, Health and Human Performance
Michael Weigold, Journalism and Communications
Carol West, Center for International Business Educa-
tion and Research, Business Administration
Contact: Mabel Cardec, mcardec@ufic.ufl.edu


Peace Corps representative describes international opportunities for UF students
UF is the largest contributor of Peace Corps volun- tive image of the United States to people who have no
teers in the South, and a Peace Corps representative other opportunity to know the people of this country.
was on campus in January to encourage more students The Peace Corps is seeking volunteers in agriculture,
to volunteer. Allene Zanger, regional director of Peace business, education, health, youth development, the en-
Corps Programs for Inter-America and the Pacific, said vironment and others fields. About a third of the 8,000
the Peace Corps offers a unique experience. volunteers worldwide work in HIV prevention and in
"The Peace Corps experience will change your life," care of people, such as orphans, affected by AIDS, she
she said to an audience of former and potential volun- said. In some areas, HIV and AIDS have taken such
teers. "But more importantly, it will change the lives of a toll on middle-age people that even with a cure, it
everyone you meet." would take years for recovery, for youths to enter the
Zanger said Peace Corps volunteers bring hope to workplace and return the area to productivity.
people who have no opportunities and convey a posi- Contact:Amy E. Panikowski, peacecorps@ufic.ufl.edu
6 Winter 2008











Residents host international students
Oank Hlamninok Rc'tic'ii'int Co'lniniutIII\ Ic'sidcnt
hosted 1-h iinl'icn1Kll I a til dclln f[o1i Illlnch bc't\\ccl D':c
23 and Dec 25 Kiik andi Glonia NcDonald. Ruth and
Both Pnrraiid. Pat and Dick Niarin. Linda Danuco.
Brenda Thomas and Edna Hindson each shared a
holiday meal and traditions with graduate students who
stayed in Gainesville over the holidays. This was the
first collaboration between UFIC and Oak Hammock.
Contact: Heather Barrett, hbarrett@ufic.ufl.edu

Zambrano is new study abroad adviser
Hernando Zambrano is a new study abroad adviser
in charge of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and
Belgium programs. A native of Colombia, Zambrano
received his bachelor's degree in economics from the
University of North Florida.
Contact: HZambrano@ufic.ufl.edu

Yanping Cheng joins UFIC as fiscal assistant
Yanping Cheng has joined the staff of the Intema-
tional Center as fiscal assistant in charge of Medex
Insurance issues. She assists with accounts payable and
receivable. A native of Beijing, she has a bachelor's
degree in business management.
Contact: Cheng@ufic.ufl.edu


UFIC Dean Dennis jett, right, and Academic Technology
Director Fedro Zazueta join elementary students in a
celebration of global art.
Elementary art by international students
"It's Elementary! World Art from Gainesville" fea-
tured an exhibition of global art created by students in
Alachua County schools. The photos were on display
at the Hub Nov. 12-16 in celebration of International
Education Week and then at the UFIC through Feb. 11.
The exhibit was sponsored by the UFIC and the Center
for Academic Technology.
Contact: Heather Barrett, hbarrett@ufic.ufl.edu

Winter Events
Feb. 27, Brown Bag Student Speaker Series, UF
alumnus Minh Vo, 11:45 12:45 International Center
conference room.
Through March 30, "Here and There: Highlights from
the UFIC Global Culture Photography Competition,"
Alachua County Public Library.


Ghana, from p. I
the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)
program. The students were mentored by scientists from
UCC, and they learned various approaches to research
in tropical biology, especially in ecology, biodiversity,
conservation biology, bioprospecting, and environmen-
tal science; experiences they could not obtain in the
United States. Participants design experiments in col-
laboration with their mentors, collect and analyze data,
and present results at the end of the program in Ghana
and at regional and national meetings in the U.S.
Answers to questions above? Alexandra Sutton dis-
covered that cultivating oysters through aquaculture has
high potential, but further study on the oyster's ability
to filter salt is necessary. Dzifa Gbewonyor found that
an extract from the Ashanti pepper plant seeds has an
insecticidal effect on cowpea plants. Nicholas Dav-
enport demonstrated that deforestation has a negative
effect on the survival of stingless bee.
So what is special about research in Ghana? A De-
cember 2007 report by Conservation International states
that the diversity of butterflies in the Atewa forest of
Ghana is twice that of the continent of Europe. In addi-
tion, 17 rare butterflies and a spider with origins as far
International News


back as the dinosaurs were
recently discovered in that
forest. More reasons to study
biodiversity in Ghana? The
only known group of a most
critically endangered species
of frogs, Conraua derooi,
was found at the Atewa forest
in 2006, and it is the only
surviving group that is keep-
ing this frog species from
extinction.
Do herbalists in a West
African village hold the key .-
to curing diseases in the
U.S.? The answer may lie in Willa Brown ofWil-
the hands of future partici- liams College inspects
pants in this program. This her insect trap near the
REU program was recently Kakum Forest in Cape
renewed, and UF will serve Coast.
as the host institution for the
next three years. Additional information can be found
at http://www.honors.ufl.edu/ucc/index.html.
Daniel Wubah is associate provost for undergraduate affairs







The University of Florida
International Center
PO. Box I 13225
Gainesville, FL 3261 I


NONPROFIT ORG
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
GAINESVILLE, FL
PERMIT NO 94


Sgfo6ar Culture

P Photo Contest ..-

SMOKE BREAK by Jeremiah Wilson
Winner
Photography & Journalism Students Category
Location:Andros Island, Bahamas



Graduate student gives UF students an Iraqi perspective on U.S. occupation


Ayad Ali, an Iraqi doctoral student at UF, gave students
and faculty his perspectives on the U.S. presence in Iraq.
His presentation on Nov. 7, 2007, was entitled "Iraq:
Liberation or Occupation? A Perspective from an Iraqi
Gator." He answered the question raised in this title: The
U.S. is an occupier that has caused widespread death and
suffering of the Iraqi people.
After four years of the presence of U.S. troops, the toll
on the Iraqi people is high, he said. About 100,000 people
died in air strikes at the beginning of the war, half of them
women and children. Another 600,000 have died in sub-
sequent fighting, by some estimates. Terrorism is at an all
8


time high, and human rights abuses abound, he said. More
people have been tortured than under Saddam Hussein.
More than 170 academics have been killed and half the
students have discontinued their education, he said. The
infrastructure has never been restored.
"We are an oil-rich country," he said, "and we still
don't have electricity."
He concluded that a stable, constructive dictatorship
is better than anarchy and destructive democracy. Iraq
should not be divided into regions of three ethnic popula-
tions, Shia, Sunnis and Kurds, he said. Iraq is integrated
and would suffer under an ethnic division.
Winter 2008




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs