Title: UF International News
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093438/00007
 Material Information
Title: UF International News
Series Title: UF International News
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: UF International Center
Publisher: UF International Center
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 2005
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00093438
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

Newsfall05 ( PDF )


Full Text






Published by THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL CENTER U www.ufic.ufl.edu U VOLUME I No. I U FALL 2005


Table of Contents


UF STUDENTS HAVE NEW STUDY-ABROAD OPPORTUNITIES

INTERNATIONAL NEWS IN BRIEF

IMMIGRATION UPDATE

PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS

UF'S INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS SHARE THEIR CULTURE WITH
ALACHUA COUNTY STUDENTS

FULBRIGHT SCHOLARS VISIT UF

INTERNATIONAL FULBRIGHT STUDENTS LEARN ANDTEACH AT UF

INTERNATIONAL AND U.S. STUDENTS MEET AT INTERNATIONAL COF-
FEE HOUSE

UFIC TO SELECT INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR OF THEYEAR

FALL AND WINTER CALENDAR


International News












Published by THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL CENTER U www.ufic.ufl.edu E VOLUME I NO. I U FALL 2005


in (Brief
NEW UFIC STAFF
he International Center welcomes two new staff
members this fall.
Yvette McKinney joins the UFIC as coordinator
of International and Faculty and Scholar Services.
Yvette returns to UF, having earned her bachelor's
degree here in business administration with a
concentration in marketing. She later obtained a
master's degree in liberal studies at Georgetown
University while working for the Georgetown
University Law Center in the Office of Faculty
Support and Campus Services. She assists visiting
faculty and scholars, international researchers and
post-doctoral students with obtaining immigration
status and preparing to work on the UF campus. Her
e-mail is mckinney@ufic.ufl.edu

Amisha Sharma is a new international student
adviser with UFIC.
Sharma completed her master's degree at Tulane
University in Latin American Studies this spring.
She conducted her research on democratization in
Guatemala, spending three summers there first
studying Spanish and later conducting research for
her thesis. She earned her bachelor's degrees in
women and gender studies, and religion studies at
Louisiana State University.
Sharma helps international students obtain and
maintain their immigration status while they
complete their studies at UF. Her e-mail is
asharma@ufic.ufl.edu


NSF GRANT FORADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT
ST researchers Mark Brown and Sandra Russo
hhave been awarded a $3.3 million grant from
the National Science Foundation for a doctoral
program in the wise use of water, wetlands and
watershed, drawing on UF and international
resources.
See International Briefs, p. 7
Return to Table of


UF STUDENTS HAVE

NEW STUDY-ABROAD

OPPORTUNITIES

WT 7th new study-abroad programs
throughout the world and schedules
tailored to tight academic calendars,
University of Florida students have more choices
than ever before for international education.
New programs in France, Germany
and Spain are quickly catching the at-
tention of students. Well-estab-
lished programs are attracting
students in record numbc ir
The University of Flon-
da International Center
assesses the interest
of students and their
availability to study
abroad, and assists faculty
in designing programs to fit
their needs.
This academic year, 1,950 UF students studied
abroad, an increase of 16 percent over the previous
academic year.

NEW OPPORTUNITIES
Among the trends this year is a strong interest in
programs in China, said Susanne Hill, UFIC
study-abroad coordinator. At UFIC's Study Abroad
Fair in September, students expressed an interest in
studying in China.
"I was surprised at how many students wanted to
go to China. It is really a trend now," Hill said.
It also is an opportunity. The UF Center for Inter-
national Studies in Beijing opened in June, joining a
growing number of U.S. universities establishing
programs in China. The conference center is located
in the city's Haidian District, an area known as the
"university zone" because 10 Chinese universities
See Study Abroad, continued








Return to Table of Contents


Study Abroad, continued
are based there. The center supports existing inter-
national study programs and the creation of new
ones focusing on Chinese language and culture. The
center also expects to serve Chinese students inter-
ested in earning credits and degrees from U.S. uni-
versities through distance-learning programs.
In another positive move for international stud-
ies, students are likely to return to Israel for their in-
ternational studies following the recent UF decision
to lift the ban on studying in Israel, where UF has
programs in Haifa, Tel Aviv and at Ben Gurion Uni-
versity in Be'er Sheva.

SHORT-TERM PROGRAMS
S hort, intensive courses during spring break and
the intersession between the spring semester and
Summer A are popular because many students are
in rigid schedules that do not permit studying
abroad for a semester. This year for the first time, a
study-abroad course in Munich is scheduled for the
week of Thanksgiving. The two-credit-hour history
course in Munich features tours of nineteenth and
twentieth century scientific, technical, historical and
cultural sites.
Another new international opportunity is UF in
Osnabriick, Germany, a six-week summer program
through the UF Department of Agricultural and Bio-
logical Engineering in engineering technology. Oth-
er programs are available in Prague, the Czech Re-
public, and Krakow, Poland.

STUDY IN PARIS
rhe Paris Research Center study-abroad pro-
I grams, initiated during the 2003-2004 academic
year, are quickly gaining popularity, in part because
of an attractive venue but also because of the diver-
sity of programs and scheduling options. In its first
15 months, more then 50 UF scholars participated
in research initiatives and workshops facilitated by
the center. In addition, the center has hosted more
than 150 international scholars at UF-organized
events and facilitated study-abroad programs from
all comers of the campus, with more than 220 stu-
dents participating. With programs in the fall and
spring terms, as well as spring break, May interses-
sion and summer, the Paris Research Center offers
myriad opportunities for students on restricted
schedules to enroll in a wide variety of courses in
many disciplines including the arts, history, culture,


architecture, language and literature, with many
more under development.
Study abroad programs also provide unique op-
portunities in exotic venues. The UF in Andros Is-
land, a summer program first offered two years ago,
features Caribbean woodcarving and tropical eco-
systems, with visits to historic archeological sites,
excavations, and animal and plant surveys.
The College of Business Administration's semes-
ter programs in Madrid, Rouen and London contin-
ue to attract high numbers of students, with up to 35
students in each per semester. In addition, 30 UF
students are taking an internship program in London
this semester.

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION IS A PRIORITY
UF has made international education a priority and
students increasingly seek international opportuni-
ties to prepare them for careers or graduate studies.
The UFIC has responded to this need by helping
faculty develop study-abroad courses. As part of In-
ternational Week, the UFIC is offering workshops
on setting up study-abroad programs.
The Study Abroad Fair in September hosted more
than 60 UF programs and independent providers of-
fering study abroad opportunities and support ser-
vices. The event, sponsored the University of Flori-
da International Center, highlighted international
study opportunities in every continent in a variety of
academic fields. Close to 2,000 students gathered
information on studying abroad at the event at the
Reitz Union colonnade.
For a complete list of programs, visit the UFIC
website at http://ufic.ufl.edu/sassponsored.htm.
Contact: Susanne Hill, SHill@ufic.ufl.edu

International News
is published twice a year by the University of Flori-
da International Center.
Dean: Dennis Jett
Executive Editor: Sandra Russo
Editor: Larry Schnell
We welcome submission of articles and photo-
graphs on international themes from faculty and
students. Send submissions to srusso@ufic.ufl.edu.
The University of Florida International Center
PO. Box I 13225
Gainesville, FL 3261 I
(352) 392-5323, Fax: (352) 392-5575
www.ufic.ufl.edu


Return to Table of Contents


International News







Return to Table of Contents


G f obal Culture

R. Photo Contest


RICH WITH TRADITION Two SOLDIERS
GUARD THE TOMB OF THE UNKNOWN
SOLDIERS by Eric Staufer
Winner
Study Abroad Student Category


PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS

X winners of UFIC's 2004 Global Culture Photo
Contest are included throughout this newslet-
ter.
The winners, pictured on this page and pages 6
and 7 are the best of each of four categories based
on the status of the photographers:

Study Abroad Students
International Students
Photography & Journalism Students
Faculty, Staff & Alumni

With hundreds of great photographs submitted,
these truly are the best of the best. Additional pho-
tographs are available on the International Center
Website, http://ufic.ufl.edu/photocontest04.htm.
Judges are reviewing submissions for the 2005
Global Culture Photo Contest.


Gfoba Cufture

Photo Contest


IMMIGRATION UPDATE
Tr e U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is
1 increasing the immigration filing fees effective
Oct. 26. For additional information, visit the USCIS
Website at http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/
2422/0 ljan20051800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2005/
05-19226.htm.
The Department of State has announced that reg-
istration for the 2007 Diversity Visa (DV) Lottery
will begin at noon on Oct. 5. Persons seeking to en-
ter the lottery program must register online through
the designated Internet website during the registra-
tion period. The website for registering for the 2007
DV Lottery, www.dvlottery.state.gov, will be avail-
able from noon Oct. 5 through noon Dec. 4.


THE DANCE, by Piotra Matloka
Winner
International Student Category


Return to Table of Contents


Fall 2005








Return to Table of Contents


UF'S INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS SHARE THEIR


CULTURE WITH ALACHUA COUNTY STUDENTS


From every region of the world, they bring a
capsule of their culture to the students in
Alachua County schools.
Their encounters are brief lasting no longer than a
school period but their interactions are intense as
they present, answer questions and share personal
items such as clothing and photographs with students
in elementary, middle and high schools.
These volunteers are participating in the Intera-
tional Student Speakers Bureau in the University of
Florida's International Center. They are proud of their
cultures and that is the foundation of their volunteer-


EXPERIENCING SOUTH KOREA


Students at the Gainesville Country Day School learn
about customs in South Korea from UF student Ellie
Kang.

ing to tell young people about their home countries.
In an increasingly global environment where econo-
my, politics, conservation and recreation are crossing
borders like never before, their direct message plays
an important role in preparing young people in the
United States for a world that is much more intera-
tional than that of their teachers, their parents or the
previous generation.
The United States has extended its international in-
volvement to every part of the world, sometimes in


friendship, sometimes in war. The international
speakers believe that by bypassing government in-
formation sources and media, they can plant seeds
of diplomacy that will change how at least a few
people think about other nations and cultures for
years to come.

STUDENTS SHARE CULTURES
ania Habib, a Fulbright student in a UF doc-
oral program in linguistics, is volunteering
for her third year. With U.S. conflict and negative
rhetoric all too close to the border of her native
Syria, she wants to tell people that Syria is really
a warm and hospitable country. Not everyone em-
braces a fundamental religion, not all women
dress from head to toe in burkas, and peace is as
treasured as anywhere in the world.

"I felt it my duty to correct some of the mis-
conceptions that many Americans have about Syr-
ia and the Middle East in general," she said.
Atitaya Auithi, a doctoral student in civil engi-
neering, has plenty to share, both similarities and
differences, about his native India. He believes
students will be surprised to know that English is
a common language in India, a unifying factor in
a vast country where a different language is spo-
ken in every state.
The volunteer experience is an opportunity to
learn about the educational system in the United
States and about the values of young students.
Auithi wants to observe the body language, the
figures of speech, the interests and ideas of stu-
dents to see how they differ from students in In-
dia. He wants to see how other cultures approach
education.
"I want to know about the difference between
the elementary school in America and the elemen-
tary school in India," he said.
Other students welcome the opportunity for a
variety of reasons, to know young people from an-


Return to Table of Contents


International News








Return to Table of Contents


CROSSING
CULTURAL
BORDERS


Damiana Bonuom, an
Italian student in the
International Student
Speakers Bureau, talks
about Italy to elemen-
tary children at the
Gainesville Country Day
School.


other culture, to observe their attitudes about dif-
ferent cultures, and to practice English before an
audience.

SCHOOL CHILDREN BENEFIT
Students are the big beneficiaries, said Karen
Whip-ple, second grade teacher at the Gaines-
ville Country Day School. Through the Interna-
tional Student Speakers Bureau, she has had stu-
dents from Korea, Greece, Italy and African coun-
tries talk about their home countries and cultures
during her cultural unit in history.
"We believe it is educational for the children to
become aware of other cultures and countries
around the world," she said. "It is a geography les-
son as well as an important life lesson. Children
need to be taught that the way to bring people to-
gether is through understanding and tolerance.
Only through the knowledge and education of oth-
ers' existence can the students begin to lose their
egocentric attitudes."

VOLUNTEERTRAINING
In a mandatory orientation session for volunteer
ing this fall, Leslie Owen, the International Cen-
ter's coordinator for the project, warns volunteers
that while presentations are fun and informative,
students can put volunteers in the hot seat for a
period. Young students can be embarrassingly can-
did in their questions. Older students may raise is-


sues of dating and ask personal questions that need not
be answered.
Volunteers need to prepare in advance for questions
that are provocative, controversial or personal.
The bottom line, however, is that volunteers are a
valuable resource to the youths of Alachua County.
She tells them: "We're so lucky to have you here and
to share your culture with our children, many of whom
have never interacted with people from other countries
before."
A representative of the UF International Center
accompanies each volunteer to school presentations to
insure that the presentations go smoothly and to better
coordinate future presentations.
Teachers can contact the International Center to
arrange a visit by one of the volunteers from a country
or region of interest. This year's volunteers are from
Canada, China, Costa Rica, Eritrea, France, Germany,
Israel, India, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Jordan, Japan,
Kenya, Lebanon, Mali, Morocco, The Netherlands,
Norway, Nigeria, Peru, The Philippines, Romania,
Senegal, Spain, South Korea, Syria, Thailand, Turkey
and Uganda.
Contact: Leslie Owen, lowen@ufic.ufl.edu


Return to Table of Contents


Fall 2005








Return to Table of Contents


FULBRIGHT SCHOLARS VISIT UF
Four international Fulbright scholars are visiting
the University of Florida campus this year to
share research projects with host faculty.
These visiting scholars from throughout the
world have been awarded Fulbright grants in a high-
ly selective process. Working with host faculty,
these scholars focus their expertise on research top-
ics of mutual interest. The program is managed
through the UF International Center.
Fulbright scholars for 2005-2006 are:
Dr. Ali Boularbah, Morocco. Boularbah's re-
search topic is "Remediatation of Metal-Contami-
nated Soils by Using Iron Filings as Adsorbents."
His host is Dr. Gabriel Bitton, professor in the De-
partment of Environmental Engineering Sciences.
Dr. Laura Muiioz Mata, Mexico. Mufioz Mata's
research topic is "Researching Navigation Routes,
Ports and Strategic Interest: The Gulf-Caribbean as
a Frontier in the 19th Century." Dr. Richard Phillips,
head of the University of Florida's Latin American
Collection in the George A. Smathers Libraries, is
her host faculty member.
Dr. Lydia Ramahobo, Botswana. Ramahobo is
conducting her research project "Toward Multicul-
tural Education in Botswana" with Dr. Leo Villalon,
director of the Center for African Studies. Ramaho-
bo's research begins in March 2006.


Gcobaf Cufture

R. Photo Contest


Day of Bible by Elizabeth Shurik
Winner
Photography & Journalism Student

Dr. Marderos Ara Sayegh, Syria. Sayegh is re-
searching the topic "Program Integration of Solar
Thermal Systems with Architectural Design of
Buildings in Syrian Climactic Conditions." His host
faculty member is Dr. Dharendra Yogi Goswami,
professor of solar energy in the Department of Me-
chanical Engineering.
Contact: Lynn Frazier, Ifrazier@ufic.ufl.edu


INTERNATIONAL FULBRIGHT STUDENTS LEARN AND TEACH AT UF
O ne way UF students who cannot go abroad gain Anderson said. Most have a teaching assistantshil
insight into other cultures is through the under a UF faculty member. This year, four are
Fulbright Program, which brings students from teaching language courses in their native language
throughout the world to university campuses. Hindi, Indonesian, Turkish and Arabic.
This year, about 75 Fulbright students are Joita Dhar, from India, teaches Hindi to 25 U.S
studying at the University of Florida, with some 18 students, some of Indian descent, in the Departme
new international Fulbright students this semester. of Asian and African Language and Literature.
They contribute to the multicultural experience for "For the Americans it's totally a new language,
UF domestic students. In addition, 18 UF students she said. "For the Indian students, they are leamir
are studying abroad on Fulbright scholarships. their native language."
"The Fulbright Fellowship is a prestigious award In India she teaches English while working on
and it is highly desirable to have these students on doctorate at Batna University.
our campus, as well as sending U.S. Fulbright The cultural exchange also is an important
students to other parts of the world," said Debra element of the Fulbright program. Iraqi Fulbright
Anderson, coordinator of International Student scholar Ayad Kh Ali, in a master's program in


es,


:nt


hg

her


Services.
Fulbright students are chosen in a highly
competitive process. These students make major
contributions besides sharing their cultures,


pharmacy, wants Americans to see a side of Iraq
they do not know. American students often ask him
if Iraqis have homes and attend schools.
Fulbright, continued next page


Return to Table of Contents


International News











Debra Anderson, coordinator of International
Student Services, center, meets with students
at the International Coffee House.
INTERNATIONAL AND U.S. STUDENTS
MEET AT INTERNATIONAL COFFEE HOUSE
U university of Florida students bridged borders
and cultures at the International Coffee House
in the Reitz Union.
Students from every continent, with dozens of
languages, were represented at the new social event
organized by the UF International Center. More than
45 students, including students from the United
States, mingled at the Sept. 30 and the Oct. 21
events in the Reitz Union. Another is planned for
Nov. 10.
The goal of the program, said Nikki Kemaghan,
outreach coordinator for the Transnational and Glo-


bal Studies Center, is to provide a forum for interac-
tion between international and U.S. students, to fos-
ter greater cultural understanding and to provide the
opportunity to share their experiences at UF.
The International Coffee House is a social oppor-
tunity for students to meet and have conversations
that do not typically emerge in the classroom.
The group included some long-term international
students who gave tips to newcomers. Debra Ander-
son, coordinator of International Student Services,
attended the event to answer students' questions.
Contact: Leslie Owen, lowen@ufic.ufl.edu


International Briefs, from p. I
Brown, associate professor in Environmental
Engineering and Science, and Russo, director of
UFIC Program Development, are using cutting-
edge, field-based teaching and research in the
development of the adaptive management program
for doctoral studies in engineering, biophysical and
social sciences related to water, wetlands and
watersheds.
Adaptive management is the systematic process
for continually improving management policies and
practices by learning from the outcomes of
operational programs.
The program draws on the resources of four
colleges, 15 academic departments and three
research centers at the University of Florida as well
as research centers in Africa, Mexico, South
America, Australia and the Everglades in South
Florida.
Contact: Mark Brown, mtb@ufl.edu

Fulbright, continued
"I am astonished with such questions, but I do not
blame the Americans for these naive queries," he
said. "They forget Iraq is the cradle of ancient
civilizations and the starting point of all sciences
and knowledge."
He is establishing a student organization called
Explore Iraq to further the exchange between


GfobaftCulture

R. Photo Contest


A QUIET MOMENT byTammy Marinuzzi
Winner
Faculty, Staff and Alumni Category

Americans and Iraqis and to enhance understanding
and security.
The Fulbright program aims to increase mutual
understanding between the peoples of the United
States and other countries, through the exchange of
persons, knowledge, and skills.
Contact: UFIC, 352-392-5323 x 706


Return to Table of Contents


Fall 2005








Return to Table of Contents


UFIC TO SELECT INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR OF THEYEAR


rhe University of Florida Inter-
1 national Center recognizes out-
standing contributions to intera-
tional research and education in
November with the International
Educator of the Year awards.
The announcement Nov. 15 is a
key component of International Ed-
ucation Week. This is the second
year the awards are given.
Nominations have been accepted
for two awards, one for untenured
or newly tenured faculty, the other
for senior faculty. A university
wide committee judged the candi-


dates based on:
1. The international contributions
to the faculty member's discipline.
2. How the international contribu-
tion increased students' awareness
of international issues and involved
students in research abroad, and
3. How their work raised UF's pro-
file as a major research university.
Each winner receives $500.
Most colleges submit one nomina-
tion per award. The colleges of Ag-
ricultural and Life Sciences, Liber-
al Arts and Sciences, and Medicine
submit two nominations for each


award because of the larger number
of faculty.
Last year's winners were:
Thomas Oakland, professor in
the College of Education for his
work in more than 40 countries in
establishing enduring professional
relationships with colleagues
abroad.
Amie Kreppel, program director
and associate professor in the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
for her work in establishing a Title
VI Center for European Studies and
other international work.


FALL AND WINTER CALENDAR


November
1 Appreciation Reception Grinter Hall lobby 3 p.m.-5 p.m.
3 Fulbright Reception Grinter Hall lobby 4 p.m.-6 p.m.
4 Executive Advisory Board Meeting: Wadsworth Board Room 3 p.m.-5 p.m.
5-8 NAFSA Regional Meeting Biloxi MS
15 International Educator Award Keene Faculty Center 3 p.m.-5 p.m.
15 & 17 Faculty Seminars Reitz Union rooms 284 & 346 10 a.m-12 p.m, 1-2 p.m.
17 PeopleSpeak Event Reitz Union room 349 6 p.m-8 p.m.
18 International Festival Reitz Union colonnade 10a.m.-3 p.m.
18 International Coffee House Reitz Union 7 p.m.-9 p.m.
21 Thanksgiving Appreciation Dinner Grinter Hall lobby 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
30 Study Abroad Pre-departure Presentation Reitz Union auditorium
30 Global Workshop for K-12 teachers FLMNH 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
30 International Photo Competition Winners Announced
December
6 Pre-departure Seminar Reitz Union Auditorium
January 2006
6 Orientation: International & Exchange Students Reitz Union room 282 3 p.m.-4 p.m.
6 Reception: International & Exchange Students Reitz Union in front of room 282 4 p.m.-5 p.m.
25 Global Workshop for K-12 teachers SFCC Zoo P n.- 4 p.m.
25 Study Abroad Fair Colonnade, Terrace, Bryan/Matthews Lounge
16-Feb. 9 Global Photo Contest Exhibit Grinter Gallery
February 2006
9 Prof. John Mearsheimer, "Current U.S. National Security Policy" Keene Faculty Center 6:3k p.m.-8 p.m.


Return to Table of Contents


International News




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs