Title: VULNERABILITY OF AGRICULTURE TO INVASIVE SPECIES (presentation)
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Title: VULNERABILITY OF AGRICULTURE TO INVASIVE SPECIES (presentation)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Waldemar Klassen and Carlton G. DavisWaldemar Davis
Publisher: IFAS, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Kingston, Jamaica
Publication Date: January 13, 2005
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Bibliographic ID: UF00093348
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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i i... ..... ...... .....
V^^^^^^^^^^^


Waldemar Klassen and Carlton G. Davis
University of Florida


Institute of Food and Agricultural


Sciences


On behalf of the

Caribbean Invasive Species Coordinating Committee
CARDI, CABI, CDB, CARICOM, FAO, IICA, UWI, UF & USDA-APHIS


Meeting of Forum of Ministers of Agriculture, Kingston,
Jamaica. Jan 13-14,2005.


UNIVERSITY OF
*'"FLORIDA
IFAS






SSEi-'O A


J1. Invasive species include disease pathogens, weeds, insects, snakes, etc.

2. Agricultural trade & pest interceptions at ports of entry have been doubling
every 5-6 years.

3. As east west trade has increased many invasives now come from Asia.

4. All regions of the globe have operational regional safeguarding
organizations except the Greater Caribbean hence the need for CAHFSA +
partners.

5. Small island states & peninsulas such as Florida are especially vulnerable.

5D. Almost 1/3 of introduced species become damaging economic pests, i.e.
alien invasive species.

~P Shift toward combating pests before they arrive at port of entry.
.A LNI\ERSIl OF
y. WTO enforces the rules of IPPC-OIE-CODEX. FLORIDA
IFAS





AI H-_ G IA i LI I A IMP R IS AN D
PESTB INECPIN
.:.[33S\..:wiwit^ ^^.^^^


Tonnage of agricultural imports


Number of pests intercepted














PREVENTION
Pest-Free Areas of
Production or
Risk-Mitigation
Th rough Biocontrol,
Cer ification at
Origin, etc.


PREC LEAR AN CE
1-
Inspection
Treatment
Cerilfcation
(Port of
Expor0


EXCLUSION
I


In section
Qu arantine
(Port of
Import)


(___


(Incipient or Localized
Infestations)


CONVENTIONAL
INTEGRATED PEST
MANAGEME NT


BIOLOGICAL
CONTROL


(Wid spread I nfesta i on s)


(Ag. Products)

Exporting Country


Importing Country


NAPPO, ETC. ADVOCATE INTERVENTION AT POINT OF
PRODUCTION OR PORT OF EXPORT SO THAT CLEAN

PRODUCTS ARRIVE AT PORT OF ENTRY. % IERSI OF
.FLO IDA
IFAS


1


DETECTION,
CONTAIN ENT,
AREA-W IDE PEST
MANAGEMENT, OR
ERADICATION
I









'J. Can be catastrophic: loss of domestic or export market, e.g.
soybean rust, classical swine fever, etc.
2. Need to eradicate citrus canker: $600 million spent &
exported to Bahamas.
I Avian diseases need to depopulate entire flocks millions
of fowl.
4. Permanently increased cost of production.
I. Cessation of production.
L. Loss of feral bees, etc.



~i UNIVERSITY OF
"FLORIDA
IFAS





kMg in N IAI E / HALL NG S T
-tB^EPOSIjION AGRICULTURE

1. Form international partnerships & mobilize resources to upgrade
and establish new safeguarding facilities and capabilities
(quarantine, surveillance, diagnostic, communication, etc.)


2. Establish pest- free areas of production, e.g., Israel -medfly; Chile -
medfly; Florida caribfly; northern Mexico all fruit flies, etc.


3. Organize area-wide programs to suppress all foci of infestation -
highly effective but requires all producers to cooperate fully, sound
management + some high tech.


4. Implement trace back systems + other modern technologies.


j. These changes require training, modernization and organization at
all levels. ., UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA
IFAS








J. Formation of CAHFSA
November 1999: CARICOM Ministers of Agriculture initiated planning of
CAHFSA to replace the FAO CPPC.
Formation of Caribbean Regional Invasive Species Strategy
S At Caribbean Food Crops Society 2003 Grenada Symposium CARICOM
(Byron Blake) appointed 2 groups: (1) Policy ["CRISIS"] and (2) Technical
Projects.
S Initiative continued at Port of Spain, June 2004, Workshop with major
contributions from CARDI, CABI, CDB, FAO, IICA, MALMR, UWI, UF &
USDA-APHIS. CRISIS document was upgraded.
S The workshop planning committee has remained active, and a follow up
symposium in CFCS meeting is to be held in Guadeloupe in July 2005.
SOther Initiatives
S CAFP-SAQS
S Cooperative programs with UDSA-APHIS, USDAID-CRSP
S FAO & CAP, etc. L.u ERSI OF
FLORIDA
IFAS








The 2004 Trinidad Workshop recommended:

J A Greater Caribbean Basin wide approach is necessary to meet invasive
species challenge.

SCAHFSA should coordinate regional safeguarding (CRISIS), & partner with
non-CARICOM states.

SMobilizing technical, institutional and financial resources would be
facilitated by strategic partnerships with various states including USA.

J CAHFSA should also address safeguarding environmental, natural
resources & biodiversity components of trade.

J CAHFSA should urgently implement 2 region-wide projects: (1) Timely
Internet Tracking Of Invasives & (2) Diagnosis Via Distance Digital Imaging
& Internet Communication.
SUN DIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
IFAS











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA








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