• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Table of Contents
 Letter of transmittal
 Preface
 A word of commendation
 Statistics, showing gallonage received...
 Reports of work done by inspec...
 Over ten million automobiles in...
 Registration of automobiles by...
 83 Per cent of motor vehicles in...
 Gone forever
 Possible saving in gasoline
 Headlights on highways
 Are the highways safe for...
 Law, rules and regulations
 Report of analyses
 Rules and regulations














Group Title: Biennial report of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Florida, Division of Oil Inspection
Title: Report
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091715/00001
 Material Information
Title: Report
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida. Dept. of Agriculture. Division of Oil Inspection
Publication Date: 1921-1922
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091715
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 001758675

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Preface
        Page 9
    A word of commendation
        Page 10
    Statistics, showing gallonage received by months, receipts and expenditures by months
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Reports of work done by inspectors
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Over ten million automobiles in the United States
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Registration of automobiles by States
        Page 24
    83 Per cent of motor vehicles in this country
        Page 25
    Gone forever
        Page 26
    Possible saving in gasoline
        Page 27
    Headlights on highways
        Page 28
    Are the highways safe for travel
        Page 29
    Law, rules and regulations
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Report of analyses
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Rules and regulations
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
Full Text







Seventeenth Biennial Report
OF THE

DEPARTMENT OF

AGRICULTURE
OF THE

State of Florida



DIVISION of OIL INSPECTION


FOR THE YEARS
1921-1922
AND SOME STATISTICAL DATA FOR THE YEARS
1919-1920


W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


T. J. APPLETYND, PRINTER. TALLAWASSEIE FLOIAI*







5-. o-0 7
~6356r






FLORIDA'S CAPITOL BUILDINGS


Upper Right: Begun 1838, Finished 1842; Upper Left: Begun 1901, Finished 1902;
Centre: Begun 1022, Finished 1923.






















CONTENTS


Picture of Capitol Building.
Letter of Transmittal.
Preface.
A Word of Commendation.
Statistics, Showing gallonage received by Months, Receipts
and Expenditures by months.
Reports of work done by Inspectors.
Over Ten Million Automobiles in the United States.
Registration of Automobiles by States.
83 Per Cent of Motor Vehicles in this Country.
Gone Forever.
Possible Saving in Gasoline.
Headlights on Highways.
Are the Highways Safe for Travel.
How to Keep Fog and Mist off the Wind-Shield.
Report of Analyses.
Law, Rules and Regulations.


























LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, STATE OF FLORIDA,

COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE.


Jan. 15th, 1923.
To His Excellency,
Hon. Cary A. Hardee,
Governor of Florida.

Dear Sir:

Herewith is transmitted to you the Biennial Report of the
Oil Division, Department of Agriculture, for the years 1921 and
1922.
Respectfully submitted,
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.




























PREFACE



The Report of the Oil Division of the Department of Agricul-
ture presents a very interesting and instructive volume.
The Legislature creating the law made no appropriation what-
ever for its enforcement. To get the money with which to be-
gin work, the Commissioner got each of the three large oil com-
panies doing business in the State, to make a loan, and that
was the way the work was started.
The Oil Division has paid its way and has given a large sum
in the little over three years that it has been in operation, to the
State Highway Department; all of this has been done by the
collection of the small sum of 1-8 of a cent per gallon on gaso-
line, kerosene, and signal oils.
The law is a good one and is appreciated by the people, and
by the oil companies doing business in the State.






















A WORD OF COMMENDATION


The Oil Division has been successfully operated. Its scope
has been even broader than the author of the law or any one
else contemplated.
The success of the law has been due to a great extent to the
following gentlemen who worked in season and out of season
to make it a success: Mr. Cade E. Shackleford, the faithful and
efficient clerk of the Oil Division, who has been with the
Division since its creation.
Mr. E. T. Casler, the first Chemist of the Division, who by
able and painstaking care and accurate analyses, enabled the
Division to do its work. Mr. Casler resigned Sept. 11th, 1922,
to accept a more lucrative position. The Department was most
fortunate in securing as his successor, Mr. N. B. Davis, who,
like Mr. Casler, was a student of the University of Florida, and
who has had broad experience which eminently fits him for the
position.
The Inspectors in the filed, composed originally of Mr. W. H.
Mapoles, of the Pensacola District, Mr. E. M. Johns, of the Jack-
sonville District, and Mr. Geo. B. Hills, of the Tampa District.
Mr. Mapoles resigned in June, 1920, and was succeeded by
Mr. W. S. McLin, and Mr. Hills resigned in June, 1921, and was
succeeded by Mr. Geo. T. Spear, all of whom have rendered
most efficient service. They have traveled their districts gath-
ering samples of the various -oils for analysis, examining and
testing self-measuring pumps and acquainting the people and
the dispensers of gasoline and oils with the intention of the law.
Any one to read their reports in this volume can easily see the
important service they have rendered.












THE GASOLINE INSPECTION LAW



For some years it had been believed that Florida had become
the dumping ground for gasoline that could not pass the speci-
fications of other states, and complaints were continually re-
ceived as to the unsatisfactory behavior of some of the gaso-
line sold in this State.
The Legislature of 1919 passed the "Gasoline Inspection Law,"
which empowered the Commissioner of Agriculture, among other
things, to "promulgate such rules and regulations not inconsis-
tent with the provisions hereof as in his judgment may be neces-
sary to proper enforcement of this Act; and to define and fix
the standards and specifications for all the oils and gasses re-
ferred to in Section 1 hereof; such standards and specifications
to be fixed before any of such oils and gases shall be sold or
otherwise dispensed in this State."
The Commissioner of Agriculture immediately began investi-
gations with the intention of making specifications that would
be at once fair to the producers of oils, and satisfactory to the
motor users of Florida. In these investigations it was found that
-many of the states had specifications that were unreasonable
and unscientific. The specifications as outlined by the U. S.
Bureau of Mines were finally adopted, as the studies by the
Bureau had demonstrated that gasoline of this nature gives very
satisfactory service in the present day motor car, and at the
same time such gasoline does not greatly curtail the supply.
When specifications had been agreed upon, three months were
given the oil companies in which to dispose of all the gasoline
in their tanks in the State, with the stipulation that none should
be shipped into the State below the specifications during this
time. During these three months, a great many samples were
analyzed to see if the complaints had been well founded and if
the gasoline sold in Florida really was of poor quality. It was
found that, generally speaking, the complaints were well founded
since 28% of the samples analyzed proved to be below the stan-
dard adopted, and some of them were very bad indeed. Since
the law became operative, we have occasionally found that bad
gasoline has been shipped into the State, but it was immediately
detected and withdrawn. We pride ourselves upon the fact that
none of it has gotten by and found its way to the consumer.

INSPECTION OF PUMPS

A very important feature of our work is the inspection of
self measuring pumps, of which there are more than twelve
hundred in the State. The Law provides that "In addition to
the fergoing, it shall be the duty of the gasoline inspectors pro-
vided for herein from time to time to inspect and test all self-
measuring gasoline and oil pumps used in the State; and in
the event such pumps shall be found to be giving short measure,
the use thereof shall thereafter be unlawful; and unless within
the judgment of the said Oil Inspectors the said pump can be
so adjusted as to give the proper and true measurements, they











12

shall be subject to and may be confiscated by order of the Com-
missioner of Agriculture. In order to do this work in the best
possible manner, special cans were purchased which seemed
most satisfactory for the purposes. These cans were sent to
the U. S. Bureau of Standards, where they were tested as to ac-
curacy, and sealed with the seal of the Bureau of Standards.
This insures no question as to their accuracy. This feature of
the law has also been the means of saving money to the gasoline
users of Florida. A few pumps were found to be giving as lit-
tle as three and one-half gallons for five gallons. Other pumps
were found so badly worn that by no amount of repairs could
they be made more accurate. These were condemned and re-
placed by new ones.

The Oil Companies Complying With the Law

The oil companies are complying with the law. Without ex-
ception they seem to be doing their utmost to co-operate with
the department. We have found that in most instances where
bad oil gets into Florida, it is the result of a mistake on the
part of some employee at the refinery, and not the result of the
business policy of the company.

Water Not Used As An Adulterant

Water is never used to adulterate gasoline. It is true that
water sometimes gets into the gasoline through accident and by
"sweating" of tanks, but we do not believe that it is ever pur-
posely added as an adulterant because the two substances will
not mix, and is easily detected. We do not allow gasoline to
be sold, however, if it contains water, and are constantly watch-
ful of this condition.

Service Station Operators Honest

The great majority of service station owners are honest. .We
have only found one instance of deliberate adulteration of gaso-
line with kerosene. We have found that almost to a man they
have been more that willing to make repairs to condemned
pumps, or to replace them without argument with new ones
when necessary. They seem to greatly appreciate the service
extended them by our inspectors. Until this law went into ef-
fect they had no dependable way of knowing whether their
pumps were correct or not.

Every One Can Be An Inspector

Every citizen can be of great assistance to the department.
You can report to us any dealer who in your opinion is not fol-
lowing the provisions of the law, and we assure you we will in-
vestigate his case at once. We have only three inspectors to
cover the entire State, and under the law, their expense ac-
counts are limited. It is, therefore, obvious that they cannot
be everywhere at once, and that they cannot make their rounds
as often as could be desired. We have received valuable assist-














ance. from some of the citizens of the State, and we invite the
co-operation of everyone. At the same time we wish to extend
to everyone our services in any way that we can be of use, and
will be glad to furnish any further information along these lines
that may be requested.

Conditions in Kentucky

In The Louisville Courier Journal and The Louisville Herald,
both bearing date of August 29th, 1922, it was stated that out of
59 stations visited, only 4 passed the test. That finding this con-
dition existing in Louisville, it was the purpose of the investi-
gators to carry their investigations into every part of the State
as rapidly as possible. From the investigation made, it was
estimated that through short measure alone, motorists in Ken-
tucky were defraunded out of more than $300,000 annually.

Reversed Conditions in Florida

Three months after the law was in operation, December 1st,
1919, the citizens of Florida have had a standard gasoline and
have gotten the gallonage paid for. The State of Florida is for-
tunate in having the present easily enforced gasoline law. Be-
sides furnishing a standard gasoline and insuring full measure
to users of gasoline, the balance of the tax collected, after pay-
ing for the enforcement of the law, at the end of the year, has
been turned over to the State Highway Department.

Report for the United States

From a Washington dispatch to the Times-Union, Sept. 16th,
1922: "Short Measure" selling of gasoline was estimated today
by the National Motorist Association to be costing purchasers
$90,000,000 a year. It was estimated each of the 10,000,000
motorists of the United States buys two gallons and the average
filching amounts to tow pints in each five gallons, a total daily
loss of 1,000,000 gallons, valued at approximately $250,000. The
Association announced its intention to combat the "Short
Measure" selling. "No evidence has been found," the state-
ment added, "that the fraud is countenanced by the oil com-
panies."











14

Interesting Statistics

The following tables, showing the gallonage, receipts, expen-
ditures, and work of Inspectors by months, are most interesting.

Total Gallonage of Gasoline, Kerosene and Signal Oil Received
by Months in 1919.


SGallons Gallons Gallons
MONTH Gasoline Kerosene Signal Oil

September ......... .. ........ 2,958,334i 812,3281 1,681
October ...................... 3,274,418 942,854 3,664
November .................... 3,486,123j 1,083,872 2,477
December .................... 4,144,107 1,428,0931 3,539
Total ...................... 13,862,9821 4,267,2471 11,361
Grand Total Gallons ................................ 18,141,490

Total Gallonage of Gasoline, Kerosene and Signal Oil Received
by Months in 1920.


Gallons Gallons Gallons
MONTH I Gasoline Kerosene Signal Oil
I I
January ...................... 5,328,246 1,465,043 2,711
February .................... 4,076,962 1,434,612 1,384
March ....................... 4,812,203 1,089,767 2,375
April ......................... 4,225,691 1,050,317 2,099
M ay ......................... 4,138,182 929,991 2,689
June ......................... 4,149,304 830,344 1,717
July ......................... 4,014,649 860,239 1,165
August ....................... 3,888,662 833,578 624
September ................... 3,779,903 919,5751 849
October ...................... 4,213,512 1,080,987| 2,476
November .................... 4,704,621 1,371,457 2,347
December .................... 5,440,1471 1,559,548! 4,456
Total ....................... 1 52,772,0821 13,425,458 24,892
Grand Total Gallons ............................... 66,222,432













Total Gallonage of Gasoline, Kerosene and
by Months in 1921


Signal Oil Received


I Gallons Gallons Gallons
MONTH Gasoline Kerosene Signal Oil

January ..... ... ... ..... 5,353,081 1,522,677 4,430
February .................... 5,173,783 1,331,992 2,143
March ....................... 5,742,490 1,231,876 1,159
April ......................... 5,234,363 1,088,272 3,374
May ......................... 4,663,860 972,874 1,161
June ........................ 4,705.397! 885,922 1,712
July ......................... 1 4,475,8151 886,501 1,468
August ...................... 4,832,522; 946,274 879
September ................... 4,668,358| 958,547 1,074
October ..................... I ,066,052 1,181,131 867
November ................... 5,553,895i 1,335,023 2,401
December ................... . 5,987,726j 1,517,6071 3,012
Total ....................... 61,587,3421 13,858,6961 23,680
Grand Total Gallons ............... ...... ........ 75,469,718

Total Gallonage of Gasoline, Kerosene and Signal Oil Received
by Months in 1922.


Gallons i-allons Gallons
MONTH Gasoline Kerosene Signal Oil

January ...................... 5,864,545 1,707,872 3,577
February .................... 5,963,993 1,335,154 2,156
March ....................... 6,450,359 1,366,887 3,161
April ........................ 5,934,845J 1,204,9681 1,165
M ay ......................... 5,737,4371 1,144,910 1,042
June ......................... 5,523,7941 1,058,1911 1,583
July ......................... 5,441,5021 1,011,5021 1,612
August ....................... 5,340,845 1,126,568 525
September .................. .. 5,558,577 1,123,635 1,435
October ...................... 5,507,0711 1,307,985 1,046
November .................... 6,227,685 1,456,772 1,620
December .................... 7,070,981 1,665,2271 1,775
Total ....................... 70,621,634 15,509,671 20,697
Grand Total Gallons ............................ . 86,152,002











16

Total Gallonage of Gasoline, Kerosene and Signal Oil Received
in Four Years.


Gallons Gallons Gallons
MONTH j Gasoline IKerosene Signal Oil

1919 ......................... 13,862 982i 4,267,147 11,361
1920 ......................... 52,772,0821 13,425,458 24,892
1921 ......................... 61,587,342i 13,858,696 23,680
1922 ......................... 70,621,6341 15,509,6711 20,697
Total .......................1198,844,040i 47,060,972 80,i30
Grand Total Gallons .............................. 245,985,642

TOTAL RECEIPTS BY MONTHS
For 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922


MONTH 1919 1920 1921 1922

January ...........1$......... $ 8,567.821$ 9,756.77 $ 9,399.76
February .......... .......... 8,028.90 8,143.54 10,374.50
March ............. .......... 7,226.17 7,538.70 8,675.82
April .............. .......... 8,242.95 8,697.66 9,631.59
M ay ............... .......... 5,776.69 7,678.52 8,859.43
June . . .................... 5,701.84 6,917.58 6,816.51
July . ..... 4,893.89 6,557.311 8,786.51
August .......... .......... 6,553.96 6,783.10 8,219.43
September ......... 6,800.00 6,130.01 7,269.29 8,172.60
October ........... 1 4,286.951 6,106.67 7,078.60 8,207.58
November ......... 4,767.63 7,235.271 9,274.23 8,621.82
December .......... 6,192.50 8,020.431 8,580.02 10,183.10
Total ............ $ 22,047.081$ 82,484.601$ 94,277.321$106,183.10

RECAPITULATION

Total Receipts for 1919 ...................... ..... $ 22,147.08
Total Receipts for 1920 ............................. 82,484.60
Total Receipts for 1921 ............................. 94,277.32
Total Receipts for 1922 ............................. 106,183.10

Grand Total of Receipts ..........................$305,092.12










17

DISBURSEMENTS BY MONTHS
For 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922

1 I 1
MONTH 1919 1920 1921 1922

January ....... .......... $ 1,516.99 1,230.35 $ 1,141.64
February .......... .......... 1,535.83 1,364.36 1,061.06
March ............. .......... 1,708.37 1,513.44 1,350.99
April .............. .......... 1,650.32 1,077.95 952.07
May .............. .......... 1,319.85 846.96 1,127.67
June .............. ......... 1,188.02 1,213.53 829.79
July ......................... 1,3.u.89 678.76 1,022.94
August ........ .. ... .......... 1,258.56 958.07 1,214.51
September ......... 1,661.421 1,214.81 1,002.21 990.43
October ........... 1,293.96 1,308.98 1,019.36 1,009.76
November .........I 1,059.05 1,258.56 838.32 877.05
December ......... 1,019.05 1,335.89 1,020.98 942.73
-$ 5,033.481$ 1,632.071$ 12,764.44|$ 12,590.64

RECAPITULATION

Total Expense for 1919 ............................ $ 5,033.48
Total Expense for 1920 ............................. 16,632.07
Total Expense for 1921 ............................. 12,764.44
Total Expense for 1922 ............................. 12,590.64

Grand Total of Expense ..........................$ 47,206.63

Total Receipts ..................................... $305,092.12
Total Disbursements .................. ............. 47,206.63

Net Receipts turned over to State Road Department.. $257,885.49










18

REPORT OF INSPECTORS FOR 1921 AND 1922
W. S. McLin, Inspector


Pumps Inspected Samples Taken Miles Traveled


1921 Good Bad Gasoline Kerosene Auto. Rail

January 24 .. 12 3 168 498
February 116 23 6 538 705
March .... 121 14 23 7 260 782
April ..... 12 23 7 109 1510
May ...... 20 68
June ... ... 29 8 230 682
July ...... 8 4 335 315
August ... 73 1 31 8 525 395
September 42 .. 12 5 50 538
October .. .. .. 6 3 410
November 68 3 11 4 288 80
December 22 1 6 2 .. 620
Total 1921.1 478 19 184 58 2503 6539
1922 1
January . 168 8 24 8 1190 677
February .
March ....! 3 .. 20 9 386 824
April ..... 7 2 417 325
May ...... 28 2 21 8 139 290
June .... 42 1 15 6 461 614
July ..... 142 .. 24 10 459 342
August ... 44 4 2 177 582
September 17 1 560
October ..I 41 1 10 4 475 630
NovemberI 62 1 14 4 312 572
December 116 2 12 6 270 461
Total 1922., 691 16 151 49 4846 5317

Total for 1921 and 1922


Pum ps inspected ......................................
Pumps condemned ....................................
Gasoline samples taken .................................
Kerosene samples taken ................................
Miles traveled by auto ................................
M iles traveled by rail ..................................


1169
35
335
107
7349
11856












REPORTS OF INSPECTORS FOR 1921 AND 1922

E. M. Johns, Inspector


Pumps Inspected Samples Taken IMiles Traveled


1921 Good Bad Gasoline Kerosene Auto. Rail

January .. 90 54 18 280 22b
February 65 1 39 13 80 642
March ....| 60 47 15 80 982
April ..... .. .
May ...... .
June ..... .
July ...... ..
August ... 98 34 12 200 411
September 65 41 20 450 270
October .. 76 1 52 16 190 960
November 52 36 12 300 450
December 45 25 8 350 560
Total 1921 557 2 328 113 1930 4501
1922
January ..1 54 40 13 200 390
February 70 2 50 17 320 320
March ... 98 1 47 15 500 710
April ..... 49 44 11 175 750
May ..... 52 52 13 250 850
June ..... 115 3 44 14 350 470
July ..... 57 .. 24 10 461 614
August ... 36 .. 30 10 260 475
September 87 .. 1 240 510
October .. 110 .. 10 4 475
November 27 .. 20 7 130
December .. .. 11 4 60
Total 19221 775 | 6 393 1 118 3421 5719

Total for 1921 and 1922


Pum ps inspected .......................................
Pum ps condemned .....................................
Gasoline samples taken .................................
Kerosene samples taken ................................
M iles traveled by auto ..................................
M iles traveled by rail ..................................


1332
8
721
231
5351
10220


Note: Mr. Johns was not on payroll for the months of April,
May and June, being member of State Legislature.










20

REPORTS OF INSPECTORS FOR 1921 AND 1922
Geo. B. Hills, Inspector


Pumps Inspected Samples Taken Miles Traveled

SI I I
1921 Good Bad Gasoline Kerosenel Auto. Rail

January ..1 65 1 30 10 68 1143
February 92 18 6 344 705
March .... 101 2 36 12 535 1456
April ..... 108 .. 36 12 640 727
May ...... 144 4 30 10 960 673
June ..... 92 .. 6 2 208 276
Total 19211 602 8 156 52 2501 4970

Inspector Hills resigned June 15th, 1921. Succeeded by Geo.
T. Spears.










21

Inspector Geo. T. Spears


SPumps Inspected I Samples Taken Miles Traveled


I II
1921 Good Bad Gasoline Kerosene] Auto. Rail

June ..... 81 18 6 116 827
July ...... 79 2 18 6 272 704
August ... 115 2 36 12 207 598
September 82 3 42 16 155 709
October .. 150 3 24 8 445 819
November 64 2 24 8 276 543
December 52 .. 30 10 494 289
Total 19211 623 12 212 66 1965 4489
1922 I
January .. 105 2 42 14 703 418
February 43 2 44 14 938 386
March .... 117 1 30 10 760 56
April ..... 58 4 44 12 216 727
May ..... 121 2 49 16 1365 320
June ..... 47 7 37 12 546
July ..... 64 2 24 8 618 623
August ... 122 1 19 6 726 50
September 103 4 16 4 1081
October .. 83 .. 41 13 780 56
November 55 2 /4 8 543
December 87 2 18 6 846 42
Total 19221 1005 | 29 385 | 113 1 9122 2678

Totals for 1921 and 1922
Pumps inspected ...................................... 3731
Pumps condemned ............................ .......... 49
Gasoline samples taken ................................ 753
Kerosene samples taken ................................. 231
Miles traveled by auto. ................................. 13588
M iles traveled by rail .................................. 16137












22

OVER TEN MILLION AUTOMOBILES IN THE U. S.

Statistics compiled by the B. F. Goodrich Rubber Company
give a total of 10,524,395 cars and trucks registered in the coun-
try during 1921. This is an increase of 1,229,023 or 13.2 per cent
over 1920 when there were 9,295,372 motor vehicles registered.
The gain made during the past year warrants the consideration
of the automotive pessimist. The automobile business has gone
through its supreme test. It has emerged victorious and there
is no longer any room for pessimism. Authorities concede that
over one-third of the cars running are owned by farmers. De-
spite the fact that six large agricultural states show a decrease
over the previous year, the industry has forged*ahead. It is
remarkable that so few states show a decrease. Wheat and corn
in 1921 sold at extremely low prices, frequently far below the
actual cost of production. This itself would tend to restrict the
use of automobiles by farmers yet in such states as Kansas, Ne-
braska and Iowa where the agricultural depression was most
acute, the number of cars has increased. Motor vehicles are
becoming as essential as tarm implements.
New York again leads the field with 816,010 cars and trucks, an
increase of 123,836, the largest made in any state over the pre-
vious year. Ohio is second with 726,700, a gain of 108,700 over
1920. Pennsylvania clings to third place with 689,589, while
Illinois is close on its heels with 670,434.
The largest percentage gain was made by West Virginia where
an increase of 38.1 per cent is recorded over 1920. California and
Florida reflect the popularity of their climate and roads with
respective gains of 19.5 per cent and 24.8 per cent.
It is interesting to note that six states account for over one-
third of the year's increase in registrations. Illinois, Indiana,
Michigan, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania accomplished this
with a combined gain of 573,347 cars. Any one of these states has
more cars than the entire European continent. Their aggregate
total of 3,781,849 is greater than the total registration of the
country in 1916, and greater than the present world registrations
excluding the United States.
Nevada is on the bottom rung of the ladder with 10,800 cars.
Delaware is only one step above with 21,413. By comparison
these states are not as badly mired as it seems, for either one
of them has more cars than the entire Chinese Empire.
There was one motor vehicle for every ten people in the coun-
try in 1921 as compared with one for 11.8 in 1920. If this average
were maintained throughout the world there would be 170,000,000
cars in use. The world registration today is approximately
12,500,000. California and Iowa lead in the number of cars as
compared to population with one car for every 5.2 inhabitants.
South Dakota has third place with an average of 5.3. Nebraska,
the 1920 leader, dropped to fourth place with 5.4 people for each
car. Alabama makes the poorest showing in this respect with
28 persons for each automobile. New York with the greatest
number of cars has an average of 12.7 people for each one in
use. If the leader's per capital average could be maintained
throughout the country we would now have 20,327,000 motor
vehicles in use. The saturation point has hardly been reached.










23

Car Mortality Low

At the outset of 1921 various authorities agreed that at least
600,000 automobiles would be scrapped during the year. National
Automobile Chamber of Commerce, and other production figures
for the year, compared with the increase in registrations show
this total to be well under the four hundred thousand mark.
Cars are delivering exceptional service. Instead of being dis-
carded at the end of the estimated five-year period, they are de-
livering at least six years' service. The total production of cars
and trucks in 1921 was 1,575,686. Registrations increased 1,-
229,023. It is reasonable to believe that the difference between
these two figures, or 346,663, represents the number of cars that
were junked last year.
The rapid strides made by the industry reflected in the steady
increase of registrations each year, prove conclusively that the
motor vehicle is a utility, and is essential to the prosperity of
the country, says the Goodrich Company. Its recreational value
is a minor consideration today. Automatically it commands the
building of better roads. Through its use, distant rural sections
have been opened to prosperous development. No other factor
has contributed more to the happiness and convenience of the
people.










24

State Registrations

State registrations for 1920 and 1921 as compiled by the Good-
rich Company are given below, together with the rank of each
state last year, and its percentage of gain or loss over 1920.
Pet.
Gain or
STATE Rank 1920 1921 Loss
Alabama ............. ... .. 33 74,637 82,343 10.3
Arizona ...................... 45 34,700 35,049 1.0
Arkansas ..................... 36 59,628 68,000 14.0
California .................... 5 550,690 658,030 19.5
Colorado ..................... 21 128,940 145,739 13.0
Connecticut ................. 23 119,037 137,526 15.5
Delaware ..................... 48 18,350 21,413 16.7
District of Columbia ........... 38 54,329 62,096 14.3
Florida ....................... 29 78,500 97,957 24.8
Georgia ..................... 24 157,000 130,901 16.6
Idaho ....................... 41 50,856 51,294 .9
Illinois ....................... 4 568,745 670,434 17.9
Indiana ....................... 9 332,709 400,342 20.3
Iowa ......................... 8 437,265 460,528 5.4
Kansas ...................... 14 265,319 289,540 9.1
Kentucky ..................... 25 112,680 126,371 12.2
Louisiana ..................... 34 70,000 80,000 14.3
M aine ........................ 35 63,300 77,527 22.5
Maryland ..................... 19 117,394 159,304 35.7
Massachusetts ................ 10 314,631 362,580 15.2
Michigan ..................... 6 412,690 478,774 16.0
Minnesota .................... 13 323,800 332,000 2.5
Mississippi ................... 37 65,000 65,491 .8
Missouri ...................... 11 298,240 346,437 16.1
Montana ...................... 39 60,650 58,785 3.1
Nebraska ..................... 16 219,000 238,704 9.0
Nevada ....................... 49 10,464 10,800 3.2
New Hampshire ............... 43 34,700 42,039 21.1
New Jersey ................... 15 227,600 272,994 19.9
New Mexico .................. 47 22,040 24,833 12.6
New York .................... 1 692,174 816,010 17.9
North Carolina ............... 20 140,869 152,990 8.6
North Dakota ................. 31 90,840 92,644 19.9
Ohio ......................... 2 618,000 726,700 17.6
Oklahoma .................... 17 213,218 212,000 .6
Oregon ....................... 27 103,783 118,615 14.3
Pennsylvania ................. 3 584,184 689,589 18.1
Rhode Island .................. 40 49,356 54,957 11.4
South Carolina ................ 32 93,843 90,546 3.5
South Dakota ................ 26 122,500 119,274 -2.6
Tennessee .................... 28 101,852 117,503 15.4
Texas ........................ 7 431,938 467,616 8.3
Utah ......................... 42 42,531 47,485 11.6
Vermont ...................... 44 31,616 37,265 17.8
Virginia ...................... 22 142,154 140,000 1.5
W ashington .................. 18 168,398 191,070 13.5
W est Virginia ................ 30 68,000 93,940 38.1
W isconsin .................... 12 293,298 341,741 16.5
W yoming ..................... 46 23,924 26,619 11.3

Totals ...................... 9,295,372 10,524,395 13.2













83 PER CENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES IN WORLD ARE IN
THIS COUNTRY

More than 83 per cent of the 12,588,949 motor vehicles in use
in the world are in the United States, with 10,505,669 in this
country and 961,030 in the other English-speaking countries there
are left only 1,122 for the rest of the earth.
Divided into continental classification, the world registrations
of motor vehicles are: North and South America, 11,162,110;
Europe, 1,110,996; Asia, 134,730; Oceanica, 125,281; Africa, 55,832.
Registration in Spanish-speaking countries aggregates 241,584.
These statistics were gathered by automotive industries.
Others from the same source show that countries in which motor
vehicles are most numerous are, in order: United States, 10,-
505,660; Great Britain, 497,582; Canada, 563,448; France, 236,146;
Germany, 91,384; Argentina, 75,000; Australia, 73,900; Italy, 53,-
000; India, 45,983; Dutch East Indies, 45,000; Spain, 37,560; New
Zealand, 37,500; Russia, 35,000; Belgium, 33,200; Union of South
Africa, 26,468; Brazil, 25,000; Mexico, 25,000; Denmark, 22,260;
Cuba, 20,000; Switzerland, 18,011; Austria, 16,350; Norway, 14,-
340; Sweden, 14,250; Holland, 13,500; Philippine Islands, 12,381;
Japan, 12,260; Algeria, 12,000; Poland, 10,700, and Chile, 10,000.
There are motor vehicles elsewhere, however. The Malay
states have 8,000; Turkey, 5,500; Egypt, 5,084; Czecho-Slovakia,
4,135; the Gold States, 3,500; Morocco, 2,500; Siam, 2,187; Do-
minican Republic, 1,800; Hawaii, 1,500; British Guiana, 1,050;
Canary Islands, 881; New Foundland, 600; British West Africa,
566; Portuguese East Africa, 400; French West Africa, 230; Mad-
agascar, 159; Italian Somailand, 66, and even Monrovia has 3.
The province of Ontario with 200,900 has nearly half the total
for Canada while the prairie province of Saskatchewan with 63,-
370 leads the old province of Quebec by 4,000.
Although Argentina has a total of 75,000 cars and trucks, the
city of Buenos Aires with a population of 1,800,000 has only 15,-
000, nearly half of which are taxicabs.
The total registration of 497,582 for Great Britain, including
England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales, shows one motor vehicle
for every 96-persons. France has only one for every 152 persons.
Mexico was the only country which imported more automobiles
in 1921 than in 1920 and careful estimates show that its auto-
motive registration increased nearly 50 per cent last year.
Porto Rico is using motor vehicles to supply transportation
not furnished by railroads. The development of bus lines on
the island has reached large proportions. The use of the motor
bus also is a recent development in Salvador.
Poland, with a population of 24,000,000, has only 10,700 motor
vehicles, a large percentage of which are in Warsaw, Lodz and
Posen. The free city of Danzig has 1,100.
Bulgaria, whose transportation system was wrecked during
the war, has only 1,140 cars and trucks for its 5,000,000 popula-
tion.
The increase in the number of automobiles in Belgium since
the war has been almost 100 per cent and the country now has
one automobile for every 230 inhabitants.














The Russian army operates 1,500 of the 8,500 motor vehicles
in Rumania and there are 3,400 in Bucharest alone.
China, with 60,000 miles of well-constructed courier roads and
a population of 400,000,000 has a motor vehicle registration of
only 8,150. Shanghai has 4,670 of these and Peking 1,127.
Approximately 7,000 of the 12,260 automobiles and trucks in the
Japanese Empire are in the city of Tokio. Poor roads have
restricted the sale of motor vehicles in Japan.
Bombay has 10,288 and Calcutta, 7,650 of the 45,983 in British
India.
Practically all the motor vehicles in Arabia are used in the
city of Aden.
Palestine, the cradle of Christianity, has 536 cars and trucks.
It now is possible to motor from Jerusalem to Damascus.
In comparison with the other countries of the world, the
density of the motor population in the United States is startling.
Final revised registration figures show one for every 5.49;
Colorado one for every 5.78; and Kansas one for every 6.14.
New York still leads in total registrations with 812,031. The
other leading states in order are: Ohio, 720,632; Pennsylvania,
689,589; California, 673,830; Illinois, 670,434; Michigan, 477,037;
Texas, 467,616, and Iowa, 460,528. The only other state to ex-
ceed the 400,000 mark was Indiana with 400,342.
There was an actual registration gain of 1,573,202 in the
United States in 1921 over 1920, or 17.6 per cent. The largest
percentage gain was in Florida. Five states gained more than
100,000 in registrations last year. They were New York, Penn-
sylvania, Ohio, California and Illinois.



GONE FOREVER

Enough gasoline to run a Ford Car 1,440,000,000 miles is
wasted each year in America through preventable evaporation
in storage tanks. So announce Johns-Manville engineers, work-
ing with the U. S. Bureau of Mines.
It seems like a big waste. It is.
But America is a land of waste. The old saying, that the food
we throw into our garbage pails would feed Europe, is not far
from correct.
However, like other people, most of us are reasonably econom-
ical. We turn the carpet to distribute bleaching by the sunlight
instead of letting the fading concentrate on one end. We make
the remains of a roast into hash. We mend and patch. And,
too, most of us save an atticful of stuff that "might come in
handy"-but never does.
The big waste in America cannot be prevented by the people.
The job is up to inventors and engineering experts.
A ton of coal leaves the mine with 29,000,00 British thermal
(heat) units locked up in it. But only 1,014,000 of these heat
units are actually converted into mechanical energy. The rest
is wasted-lost in transit, up the chimney or carried away by
the ashman.
You could fry an egg in a twinkling by holding the "spider"












over the top of the average chimney. No one has ever been
able to figure out how to save that wasted heat. Eventually
some one will. The solution may be in putting a hot water tank
a few inches above the chimney top, or water pipes crosswise
within the chimney.
Slag in the steel industry used to be wasted, piled up in small
mountains. Now it is ground up and used as a surfacing for
bricks.
The time was, in the earlier days in the oil country, when
the kerosene lamps were the only means of lighting houses,
that men around refineries washed their overalls in tubs of
gasoline and then dumped the gas out. The invention of gas-
oline motors have changed this condition and today gasoline
is the motor power for millions of machines and for hundreds
of different purposes. It is time to call a halt on all waste.



POSSIBLE SAVINGS IN GASOLINE

(From Bulletin Number Fifteen of Kansas City Testing
Laboratory, Page 147).

The Bureau of Mines estimates that the following savings can
be effected daily:
Gallons.
Tank wagon losses ................................... 7,200
Leaky carburetors, average 1-17 of a pint per car ........ 31,400
Poorly adjusted carburetors, pint per car........... 240,000
Motors running idle, 1/ pint per car.................. 150,000
Wasted in garages, 10 pints per day.................. 67,000
Saved by using kerosene in garages .................. 108,000
Needless use of passenger cars, 13-4 pints per car.... 897,400
This makes a total of 1,500,000 gallons a day, or 561,000,000
a year, whereas our war needs are 350,000,000 gallons a year, or
less than two-thirds of what may be considered as wasted at
the present time.

Suggestions to Gasoline Users

The following important suggestions for avoiding waste will
not only save gasoline, but users of motor vehicles will be bene-
fitted personally and individually through more efficient and
more economical operation of cars:
1. Store gasoline in underground steel tanks. Use wheeled
steel tanks with measuring pump and hose. They prevent loss
by fire, evaporation and spilling.
2. Dont spill or expose gasoline to air-it evaporates rapidly
and is dangerous.
3. Don't use gasoline for cleaning and washing-use kerosene
or other materials to cut grease.
4. Stop all gasoline leakages. Form habit of shutting off gas
at tank or feed pipe.
5. Adjust brake bands so they do not drag. See that all
bearings run freely.













6. Don't let engine run when car is standing. It is good for
starter battery to be used frequently.
7. Have carburetors adjusted at service stations of carbu-
retor or automobile companies-they will make adjustments
without charge.
8. Keep needle valve clean and adjust carburetor (while
engine is hot) to use as lean mixture as possible. A rich mix-
ture fouls the engine and is wasteful.
9. Pre-heat air entering carburetor and keep radiator covered
in cold weather-this will insure better vaporization.
10. See that spark is timed correctly with engine and prive
with spark full advanced-a late spark increases gas consump-
tion.
11. Have a hot spark, keep plugs clean and spark points pro-
perly adjusted.
12. Avoid high speed. The average car is most economical
at 15 to 25 miles an hour.
13. Don't accelerate and stop quickly-it wastes gas and
wears out tires. Stop engine and coast long hills.
14. Cut down aimless and needless use of cars. Do a num-
ber of errands in one trip.
15. Know your mileage per gallon. First fill tank full and
divide odometer mileage by gallons consumed.



HEADILGHTS ON HIGHWAYS

Nineteen thousand three hundred and eight miles of Federal-
aid road had been completed on August 31, 1922.
Ten million six hundred and twenty thousand four hundred
and seventy-one motor vehicles were registered in the United
States on July 1, according to the Bureau of Public Roads,
United States Department of Agriculture.
There are 2,500,000 miles of rural highway in the United
States.
Over 33,000 motor vehicles have been received as surplus
war material by the Bureau of Public Roads of the United States
Department of Agriculture and distributed to the states for use
in road construction.
Texas leads in miles of completed Federal-aid roads with
1,733 miles. Minnesota is second with 1,416.
In mileage of Federal-aid roads under construction, Texas is
first with 1,408 miles. Nebraska second with 970 miles, and
Iowa third with 945 miles.
Texas and New York are the states which receive the largest
allotments of Federal aid for highways, which is distributed on
the basis of population, area, and mileage of rural highways.
In August Missouri placed 126.7 miles of new Federal-aid work
under construction.
One thousand three hundred and fifty-two miles of road has
been completed by the Bureau of Public Roads of the United
States Department of Agriculture in our national forests, and
there is under construction 617 miles, which open up regions of
great natural beauty and rich in natural resources.













ARE THE HIGHWAYS SAFE FOR TRAVEL

Every day in the year there are more or less accidents
caused by motorists that could be avoided. The number of acci-
dents in Florida for 1922, which resulted in death or permanent
injury, is frightful. Much has been said on the subject of how
to make our highways safe, and what punishment should the
offender receive.
Rigid Laws Needed

The next Legislature should see that adequate laws are
passed to cover the subject and then the laws should be rigidly
enforced.
Permits Should be Issued

No one should be permitted to drive an automobile without
a written permit. This might seem hard when every one who
is big enough to take hold of a steering wheel is now privileged
to drive, but if half of the damage thus far done could have been
prevented, it would not be a hardship.

Some Types of Drivers
1st. The perfect driver. One who is always careful, observing
the ordinary rules of the autoist and one who will smillingly
stop his car if that is necessary, that fellows, who should have
the right of way, may go on without interruption.
2nd. The driver who thinks the right of way belongs to him,
and is likely to clash with you when he comes dashing in from
a side road or street.
3rd. The Speedster, who recognizes the speed limit to be the
limit of his car whether that be twenty or sixty miles an hour.
4th. The person who never looks ahead. He is as dangerous
as a blind bull in a narrow lane.
5th. The person who never looks forward or backward when
getting out of a parking.
6th. The Nervous Type. You never know what to expect of
them next.
7th. Children. You must watch them at all times. They
never watch themselves.
8th. The Hog. His license should be taken from him just as
soon as it is known that he belongs to the genus SWINE.
9th. The driver should be sane and of the age required by
law. Too often this is not the case.

RULES SHOULD BE LEARNED

Before Permit Granted

The automobile and other motor vehicles are here to stay.
If the highways are unsafe now, when we have one million peo-
ple, what will they be when the State has a network of good
roads and two million people?
The following rules, if followed and put into practice, would
go a long way toward making our streets and highways safe.














Rules for Pedestrians

1st. Cross highways at right angles.
2nd. Keep off the highways except when necessary to use
them. Highways should not be used as play grounds.
3rd. Do not take unnecessary risks in going in front of mov-
ing automobiles or in getting on or off of them.
4th. Look before entering a street or highway when coming
into same when the view has been obstructed.

Rules for Drivers

1st. Keep to the right when meeting autos or vehicles.
2nd. Go to the left when overtaking and passing them.
3rd. Keep your eyes on the road.
4th. Do not try to take the right-of-way when it belongs to
another.
5th. Do not exceed the speed limit. If no speed limit is pre-
scribed then do not drive recklessly.
6th. Do not be a "road hog." A "road hog" is a person who
uses more than his share of the road. He never deals fair.
7th. Do not try to get ahead of another car just to annoy its
occupants with "your dust." This practice often causes speed-
ing and reckless driving.
8th. Keep the automobile in good condition, giving special
attention, always, to the brakes and steering gear.
9th. Dim the lights when passing an auto or other vehicle at
night.
10th. Carefully observe all danger signs.
11th. Do not use intoxicating drinks when driving a car. One
car is bad enough to drive but when one "sees two cars," a
smashup may be expected.
12th. Give necessary signs before stopping or turning a cor-
ner, and use the horn. It is put on the car to be blown.

Engineers on Boats Must Have License

The United States Government requires all engineers on boats
to be properly licensed. The engineers on small motor launches
and the engineers on the great ocean liners are all treated alike.

Railroads Require Special Training

No one can become a railway engineer without years of ser-
vice and equipment. Usually four years is the time required,
and some men serve a much longer time than this.
To be a railroad engineer a man must among other qualifica-
tions have good common sense; must have served the required
time as an apprentice; must have self-control, and must have
good eyesight.
Nearly, or quite all of the railroads have semi-annual examina-
tions of engineers and no engineer is exempt, regardless of how
long he may have served. If the eyesight is insufficient or im-
paired, the engineer automatically goes on the discard.













There Are State and Government Regulations

All the States have rigid laws governing the operation of
railway trains. Among the things required of the railroads are:
They must have a full crew; they must have the best equipment
for their trains; they must have air brakes, automatic couplers
and electric headlights. These are just a few of the require-
ments for Florida.
Just suppose that any railroad operating, say, a passenger
train, would refuse to have the full crew composed of conductor,
flagmen, porters, engineers and firemen, would refuse to use
automatic couplers, air brakes, electric head lights, and carry
the required rear-end lights, how long would such trains be
permitted to operate?

Operators of Automobiles, Trucks, Etc., Should be Licensed

If the United States Government requires licensed engineers
for the running of all power boats, and if it takes years of train-
ing for engineers who operate our trains before they can become
a qualified engineer, and the trains they operate run on splendid
tracks of steel, how much more necessary is it that autoists who
usually know nothing about machinery, and who are privileged
to drive anywhere and everywhere, be required to pass some
kind of efficiency examination.

Railroads vs. Bus Lines

The railroads are responsible to the owners for the loss of
freight, and are subject to damages for the injury of a person,
or loss of life. The railroads pay many millions of dollars yearly
for these.
A cursory examination will show that the bus lines operating
in Florida, and that are carrying thousands of passengers are
not able to pay damages for injury or loss of human life. Is this
fair to the railroads? Are we not showing undue favor to the
bus lines?

Publicity Campaign

The Jacksonville Journal in its recent campaign against law-
lessness and recklessness by autoists, invited discussion on
the above subject, but I never saw where any one quite covered
the fundamental and basic points. If there was an age limit,
rigidly enforced, and a qualification limit properly observed, the
number of violations would be greatly reduced. Then if a jail
sentence were imposed on every one driving while intoxicated
and a jail sentence for "second offense" reckless or careless
driving, and the license or permit taken away for six or twelve
months, this class of crime would reach a minimum.











32

REPORT OF ANALYSES FOR YEAR 1921

Official Gasoline Samples Anaylzea ...................... 877
Special Gasoline Samples Analyzed ...................... 49

Total Gasoline Samples Analyzed ..................... 926

Official Kerosene Samples Analyzed ...................... 280
Special Kerosene Samples Analyzed ..................... 14

Total Kerosene Samples Analyzed ..................... 294

Total Samples Gasoline and Kerosene Analyzed ........ 1220

Illegal Official Gasoline Samples Analyzed ............... 6
Illegal Special Gasoline Samples Analyzed ............... 0
Illegal Official Kerosene Samples Analyzed ............... 1
Illegal Special Kerosene Samples Analyzed .............. 1

Total Illegal Samples Analyzed ....................... 8

Report of Analyses for Year 1922

Official Gasoline Samples Analyzed ...................... 976
Special Gasoline Samples Analyzed ...................... 20
996

Official Kerosene Samples Analyzed ..................... 314
Special Kerosene Samples Analyzed ..................... 16
330

Total Samples Analyzed .............................. 1326

Illegal Official Gasoline Samples Analyzed ............... 11
Illegal Special Gasoline Samples Analyzed ............... 2
Illegal Official Kerosene Samples Analyzed .............. 3
Illegal Special Kerosene Samples Analyzed .............. 2

Total Illegal Samples Analyzed ........................ 18

Total Samples Analyzed for year 1922 .................... 1326
Total Samples Analyzed for year 1921 .................... 1220

Total Samples Analyzed for 1921-1922 .................. 2546









,I DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
o R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OIL SECTION. N. B. DAVIS, A. B., Asst. Chemist.
Official Samples Gasoline Analyzed for Last Six Months, Beginning
July 1st, 1922, and Ending December 31st, 1922.
Samples Taken by Inspectors Under Act Approved June 4th, 1919.
Illegal Samples Denoted By Black Type.


00
S pi
OO




Florida
Standard
Adopted


2732|Gasoline.

2733 Gasoline.

2734 Gasoline.

2735 Gasoline.

2736 Gasoline.

2737 Gasoline.


o o 0 0
-a o 01 C- dC:
do d

M ,
ma p
o -o e


Not
Above 20 50 90 95
60


60.91

60.9[

60.91

60.9

59.51

aS.O0


96

96

96

96

9;. 51

90


NAME OF MANUFACTURER
AND PLACE TAKEN


225


204

204

204

204

217

S225


E. M.

E. M.

E. M.

JE. M.

|W. S.

1w. S.


Johns ... .[Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns .... |Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns.... Gulf Refining to., Jacksonville.

Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

McLin... Standard Oil Co., Apalachicola.

McLin... Sherrill Oil Co., Apalachicola.














OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.


F 0
z M



Florida
Standard
Adopted


2738JGasoline.

2739|Gasoline.

2740]Gasoline.

27411Gasoline.

2742 Gasoline.
2743 Gasoline.
27431Gasoline.
2741 Gasoline.

27451Gasoline.
27461 Gasoline.


61.1l

61.61

58.51

57.01

61.7

61.71

57.31

57.01

57.01


-0 gW
m-o .o .4-o






Not
60 20 50
Above


37 72

35 69

S26 57

S22 50

35.5 70

36 70.5|

24.51 56.51
I 1 I
S23 50.51

23 1 50


95.5i

96 I

93 !

91.51

95

95.51

93 1

91.51

91.51


0
S SENT
o o INSPI




Not
95 Above
225


98.51 210

99 211

99 217

98.51 221

97 207

98 I 208

98 219

98.51 220

98.51 221


IN BY
3CTOR


McLin...

McLin...

McLin...

Spear....

Spear....

Spear....

Spear....

Spear....

Spear....


NAME OF MANUFACTURER
AND PLACE TAKEN


Gulf Refining Co., Apalachicola.

Gulf Refining Co., Carabelle.

Standard Oil Co., Carrabelle.

Standard Oil Co., Oldsmar.

Gulf Refining Co., Oldsmar.

Gulf Refining Co., Oldsmar.

Texas Co., Oldsmar.

Standard Oil Co., Sweetwater.

Standard Oil Co., Sweetwater.


I


[


Adopted I I


,


,








2747 Gasoline.

2748 Gasoline.

2749 Gasoline.

2750 Gasoline.

2751 Gasoline.

2752 Gasoline.

2753 Gasoline.

2754 Gasoline.

2755 Gasoline.
2756 Gasoline.


2757|Gasoline.
27581Gasoline.
2759 Gasoline.

27560Gasoline.

27601Gasoline.

27621Gasoline.
2762 Gasoline.


58.11

58.1

58.1

58.12

58.2

58.2

56.8

57.0

57.1

57.1

57.11

57.11

60.91

60.91
60.91
60.91
1
60.91


44 25 56 92 | 98

45 25 56 92 98

48 24 56 93 99

48 24 56 93 99

49 26 56.5 93 99

48 24 55 93 99

44 24 55 92 98

45 23 54 92 99

43 25 55 93 99

46 24 54 93 99

43 24 55 93 99

44 24 55 93 99

44 31 68 95 98

44 31 67 95 98

44 31 67 95 98

43 31 67 95 98


217 IE. M. Johns....

217 IE. M. Johns....

217 E. M. Johns....

216 E. M. Johns....

216 E. M. Johns....

217 E. M. Johns....

216 IE. M. Johns....

217 E. M. Johns..

215 E. M. Johns....

216 E. M. Johns....

215 E. M. Johns....

216 E. M. Johns....

206 IG. T. Spear....

209 |G. T. Spear ....

209 |G. T. Spear....

210 MG. T. Spear....


Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

Standard Oil Cq., Jacksonville.

Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.


P













OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.

(DU Q
SSNT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER


Florda INSPECTOR

Standard Not Not
Adopted ** Above 20 50 90 95 Above
___ ___ 60 1 1.. 225!


2763 Gasoline. 60.9

2764IGasoline. 1 60.91

2765 Gasoline. 60.71

2767|Gasoline. 60.7

2768|Gasoline. 60.71
2767 Gasoline. 60.7
2768 Gasoline.1 60.71

2769 Gasoline.! 60.31

2770 Gasoline.I 60.81

2771 Gasoline. 61.31


95 98 209 G.

95 98 209 G.

91.51 96 213 E.

91.51 96 213 JE.

91.5! 96.51 214 IE.

91.5 96 214 IE.

91.51 98 217 IE.

92 96 212 IE.

94 98 216 LW.


Spear....

Spear....

Johns....

Johns....

Johns....

Johns....

Johns....

Johns....


Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Atlantic Refinipg Co., Jacksonville.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.


S. McLin... Gulf Refining Co., Pensacola.








27721Gasoline.

2773 Gasoline.

2774 Gasoline.
27745Gasoline.
2775 Gasoline.

27767Gasoline.

2778 Gasoline.

2779 Gasoline.
2780 Gasoline.

2781 Gasoline.

2782 Gasoline.

2783 Gasoline.

2784 Gasoline.

2785 Gasoline.


2786 Gasoline.

2787 Gasoline.
2787]Gasoline.


57.0 47

58.31 52

58.4 49

57.31 54

58.6 54

57.0 57

60.2 44

60.2 43

61.6 46

61.6 46

61.6 45

61.6 45

58.4 44

58.4 51

57.8 51

58.4[ 49


57 93

55 90

55 92

56 91

57 90

56 92

59 91

59 91

73 96

73 96

73 96

73 96

57 93

57 90

57.5 93.51

55 91


98

98

98

98.51

98.51

98.5

97

97

98

98

98

98

98.5

98.5

99

98


212 IW. S. McLin... Texas Co., Pensacola.

222 W. S. McLin... Island Refining Co., Pensacola.

219 W. S. McLin... Standard ,il Co., Pensacola.

217 JW. S. McLin... Citizens Oil Co., Pensacola.

223 jW. S. McLin... Island Refining Co., Pensacola.

220 W. S. McLin... New Orleans Refining Co., Pensacola.

217 E. M. Johns... Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

217 E. M. Johns.. .. Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

207 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

206 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

207 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

206 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

218 W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Milton.

223 W. S. McLin... Sherrill Oil Co., Milton.

216 W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Crestview.

220 E. M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.













OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.

0 0 Q0 'o
a) 0) C) 0
.- o o 0 00 .
o .- '4- A A-0 C H SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
1 o S INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN


0 .


Florida
Standard
Adopted

2788jGasoline.

27891Gasoline.
279Gasoline.
27901Gasoline.

2791 Gasoline.
279 Gasoline.
2792 Gasoline.
2793 Gasoline.

2794 Gasoline.

27951 Gasoline.
2796 Gasoline.
27961Gasoline.


Not
.".. Above
60

58.1 47

58.31 42

58.11 48

60.9 49

61.01 48

58.11 47

58.71 47

58.61 46

58.31 41


25 57

28 60

25 57

33 68

34 69

25 57

26.51 57

27 1 57

29 60


92

94

92

95

95

92 I

93

93

94.51


Not
95 Above
225

98 221 E.

98 210 E.

98 221 E.

98 208 E.

98 207 E.

98 | 221 IE.

98 217 IE.

98 | 217 IE.

98 | 210 E.


M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Orlando.

M. Johns.... Texas Co., Orlando.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Orlando.

M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Orlando.

M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Orlando.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Orlando.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Sanford.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Sanford.

M. Johns.... Texas Co., Sanford.








2797 Gasoline.

2798 Gasoline.

2799 Gasoline.

2800 Gasoline.

2801 Gasoline.

2802 Gasoline.

2803 Gasoline.

2804 Gasoline.

2805 Gasoline.

2806 Gasoline.

2807 Gasoline.

2808 Gasoline.

2809 Gasoline.

2810 Gasoline.

2811 Gasoline.

2812 Gasoline.


58.7

58.6

58.6

58.6

61.5

58.6

59.0

58.7

61.5

61.5

61.5

61.5

60.5

60.3

60.91

58.21


48 1 26


57 | 93


98

98

98

98

98

98

98.5

99

98

98

98

98

97.5

97.51

98.51

98


M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

S. McLin...

S. McLin...

S. McLin...

S. McLin...

S. McLin...

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

T. Spear....

T. Spear....


Standard Oil Co., Sanford.

Standard Oil Co., Sanford.

Standard Oil Co., Sanford.

Standard Oil Co., DeFuniak.

Gulf Refining Co., Chipley.

Standard Oil Co., Marianna.

Island Refining Co., Marianna.

Sherrill Oil Co., DeFuniak.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Moore Haven.

Standard Oil Co., Moore Haven.













OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.


0 E SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER




Florida
Standard Not Not
Adopted Above 20 50 90 95 Above
60 225 1
I I ll l l l


2813 Gasoline. 61.0

2814 Gasoline. 58.5

2815 Gasoline.| 60.7

2816JGasoline. 60.81
817Gasole. 58.
2817 Gasoline. 58.41
1
2818 Gasoline. 58.41
2819 Gasoline. 58.41

28201Gasoline.| 58.41

2821 Gasoline.1 58.41


Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Moore Haven.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Okeechobee.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Okeechobee.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Okeechobee.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.







2822 Gasoline.I

2823 Gasoline.

2824 Gasoline.

2825 Gasoline.

2826 Gasoline.

2827 Gasoline.

2828 Gasoline.

2829 Gasoline.

2930 Gasoline.

2831 Gasoline.

2832 Gasoline.

2833 Gasoline.

2834 Gasoline.

2835 Gasoline.

2836 Gasoline.

2837 Gasoline.


58.61

61.81

57.7

58.2

57.7

58.6

61.71

57.7

58.1

58.2

58.41

60.21

58.01

58.11

60.51

58.01


48 | 28.51 60


98.51 217

98 207

98.51 217

98 216

99 212

98 217

98 208

98 210

98 217

98 216

98 207

98 211

98.5 217

99 216

98 210

99 217


jG. T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

W. S. McLin... Gulf Refining Co., Perry.

W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Perry.

W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Live Oak.

W. S. McLin... Texas Co., Live Oak.

W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Lake City.

W. S. McLin... Gulf Refining Co., Lake City.

W. S. McLin... Texas Co., Madison.

W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Monticello.

W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Monticello.

W. S. McLin... Texas Co., Monticello.

G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Tarpon Springs.

G. T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Tarpon Springs.

G. T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Tarpon Springs.

G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Tarpon Springs.

G. T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Tarpon Springs.













OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.


cO E- o Z = o. 0
CO $A 3 S EN w 0 NAME OF MANUFACTURER
'= P SENT IN BY
SI OR AND PLACE TAKEN

Z ZP4

Florida Not Not
Standard ..... Above 20 50 0 Above
Adopted 60 225


2838 Gasoline.

28391Gasoline.

28409 Gasoline.

2841 Gasoline.

2842 Gasoline.

2843 Gasoline.

2844 Gasoline.

2845 Gasoline.

2846 Gasoline.
28461IGasoline.


59.0

58.2

58.3

58.0

58.1

58.1

58.01

58.01

58.1


94 99 217 IG.

92.51 98 215 E.

93 98 215 E.

92 98 216 E.

52 98 217 E.

92.5I 98 216 E.

94 98 210 E.

92 98 216 E.

92.51 98 217 |E.


T. Spear....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....

M. Johns....


Standard Oil Co., Tarpon Springs.

Standard Oil Co., Waldo.

Standard Oil Co., Fairbanks.

Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.

Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.

Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.

Texas Co., Gainesville.

Standard Oil Co., Archer.

Standard Oil Co., Archer.








28471Gasoline.

2848 Gasoline.

2849 Gasoline.

2850 Gasoline.

2851 Gasoline.

2852 Gasoline.

2853 Gasoline.

2854 Gasoline.

2855 Gasoline.

2856 Gasoline.

2857 Gasoline.

2858 gasoline.

2859 Gasoline.

2860 Gasoline.

2861 Gasoline.

2862 Gasoline.


58.0 48

58.2 46

58.0 48

58.3 47

61.7 43

61.7 42

61.7 43

61.7 43

61.7 43

61.7 43

61.21 41

61.21 41

61.2 40

61.2 40

58.81 40

59.21 38


26 1 57


26

25

27

37

37

37

37

37

37

36

36

36

36

31

32.51


93

93

92

93

1 96.51
96.51
9G.51
S96.5
96.5

96.5

96.5

96.51
S96.51

1 96.51

96.51

94 I

| 93


98

98

98

98

98

98

98

98

98

98

98

98

98

98

99

98


Standard Oil Co., Archer.

Standard Oil Co., Bronson.

Standard Oil Co., Williston.

Standard Oil Co., Williston.


217 IE. M. Johns....

S216 IE. M. Johns....

217 L. M. Johns....

216 E. M. Johns....

201 G. T. Spear....

201 |G. T. Spear....

201 |G. T. Spear....

201 G. T. Spear....

201 G. T. Spear....

201 G. T. Spear....

200 E. M. Johns...

200 E. M. Johns....

200 E. M. Johns....

200 E. M. Johns....

214 E. M. Johns....

214 E. M. Johns....


Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Refining Co., Jacksonville.


Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.


,


I


Gulf













OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.


X E4 *0 U
SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
.HQ SENON AND PLACE TAKEN
p z u P4~ INSPECTOR
dCd V 0
Z s m l _____________________
Florida Not Not
Standard Above 20 50 90 5 Above
Adopted 60 225
I I_ I .. ...


2863 Gasoline.

2864 Gasoline.

2865 Gasoline.

2866 Gasoline.

2867 Gasoline.

2868 Gasoline.

2869 Gasoline.

28701Gasoline.

2871 Gasoline.


199 214 IE.
5 98.51 214 E.

99 214 E.

99 214 iE.

99 214 E.

96 212 E.

1 96 212 IE.

96 1 212 E.

96 212 E.


M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.







2872 Gasoline.

2873 Gasoline.

2874 Gasoline.

2875 Gasoline.

2876 Gasoline.

2877 Gasoline.

2878 Gasoline.

2879 Gasoline.

2880 Gasoline.

2881 Gasoline.

2882 Gasoline.

2883 Gasoline.

2884 Gasoline.

2885 Gasoline.
I
28867Gasoline.
2887 Gasoline. I


58.0

58.1

60.0

61.5

61.0

57.8

58.0

57.91

60.41

58.01

58.0!

60.51

58.01

59.61

59.81

58.31


57

58

60.5

68

69

58

57

57

68

57

57

68

73

57

58

56


93 99

93 99

94 98.51

96 99

S96 99

94 99

92.51 99 |

92 1 99

96 1 99

S92.5 99

92 199

96 99

S95 | 97.5

S90 1 98
I
1 92.51 98

1 93 | 98.51


218 |G.

218 G.

211 G.

210 G.

208 G.

215 G.

218 G.

218 |G.

209 G.

218 IG.

218 IG.

208 JG.

206 IE.

219 IW.

215 |W.

217 |W.


Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Atlantic Refining Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Lakeland.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Terra Ceia.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Palmetto.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Bradentown.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Bradentown.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Bradentown.

Spear.... Iulf Refining Co., Manatee.

Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

McLin... Island Refining Co., Pensacola.

McLin... Island Refining Co., Pensacola.


S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Pensacola.


c


---













OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.

*U U w 0a
-o o Z 0 o o o
g4 E SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
z H H a o o INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
20o 73 Ag v2 A. C4


Florida Not Not
Standard Above 20 50 90 95 Above
Adopted 60 225


2888 Gasoline.

2889 Gasoline.

2890 Gasoline.

2891 Gasoline.

2892 Gasoline.

2893 Gasoline.

2894 Gasoline.

2895 Gasoline.

2896]Gasoline.


.5| 54

| 53


92 98 220 IW.

94 98 212 W.

93 98 213 |W.

94 98 210 1G.

93 98 216 E.

97.5 98.5 198 E.

95.51 97.5 202 G.

91 | 97 217 G.

91 97.51 222 G.


McLin...

McLin...

McLin...

Spear...

Johns....

Johns....

Spear....

Spear....

Spear....


New Orleans Refining Co., Pensacola.

Gulf Refining Co., Pensacola.

Texas Co., Pensacola.

Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Miami.

Texas Co., Miami.

Standard Oil Co., Stuart.


59.6

62.11

58.8]

58.7

58.61

60.7

60.1!

57.6

61.31








2897 Gasoline.

2898 Gasoline.

2899 Gasoline.

2900 Gasoline.

2901 Gasoline.

2902 Gasoline.

2903 Gasoline.

2904 Gasoline.

2905 Gasoline.

2906 Gasoline.

2907 Gasoline.

2908 Gasoline.

2909 Gasoline.

2910 Gasoline.

2911 Gasoline.

2912 Gasoline.


57.7

58.7

59.0

61.3

57.8

58.4

58.5

58.4

58.41

61.6
61.61
61.61

61.5

61.11

61.51

58.2|

58.81


55 24.51 55
1


91 I


56 ( 91


98 220 G. T. Spear....

97.5 217 G. T. Spear....

98 218 G. T. Spear....

97.5 210 1G. T. Spear....

97.5 218 G. T. Spear....

97.5 I 216 G. T. Spear....

97.5 216 G. T. Spear ...

97.5 217 G. T. Spear....

97.5 215 IG. T. Spear....

95 | 214 E. M. Johns....

97 1 212 1E. M. Johns...
98 211 E.M.Johns...

98 211 |E. M. Johns....
98 1 211.5 E. M. Johns....
98 1211.51E. M. Johns..,.

97.51 225 W. S. McLin...

97.51 223 W. S. McLin...


Standard Oil Co., Fort Pierce.

Standard Oil Co., Fort Pierce.

Standard Oil Co., Fort Pierce.

Gulf Refining Co., Fort Pierce.

Standard Oil Co., Vero.

Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Retining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Sherrill Oil Co., Pensacola.

Sherrill Oil Co., Pensacola.


I I


I


- I I












OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.


Oo


0" 0" ,C. a .g
- Q&o s o W V
-0 -0
011 si s^ a-1 5
-0-
aa ,^ g
g r
3B ^Sl E^ ^S


Florida Not
Standard Above 20
Adopted 60


2913 Gasoline.

2914 Gasoline.
I I
29151Gasoline. I

2916 Gasoline. I

2917 Gasoline.

2918 Gasoline.
I I

2918 Gasoline.
II
2919 Gasoline.

2920 Gasoline.

2921 Gasoline.


50


58.61 47 24 55

58.2 44 23 58

61.3i 52 34 66

59.01 54 25 57

58.1 50 23 52

58.1 47 23 52

58.11 45 22.51 53
I I
60.8 49 31 72

58.11 49 25.51 56


90 95


90.51

92

93 1

90

92

91

91.51

96
1


98

97.51

97

97.51

97.51

98

98

98

98


o
e SENT IN BY
So INSPECTOR


Not
Above
22S


221 lW. S.

216 W. S.

218 W. S.

227 W. S.

221 E. M.

221 W. S.

221 LE. M.

208 IE. M.

216 IE. M.


NAME OF MANUFACTURER
AND PLACE TAKEN


McLin... Standard Oil Co., Pensacola.

McLin... Texas Co., Pensacola.

McLin... Gulf Refining Co., Pensacola.

McLin... Chalmette Refining Co., Pensacola.

Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Ocala.

McLin... Standard Oil Co., Ocala.

Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Ocala.

Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Ocala.

Johns.... Texas Co., Ocala.


93 1


ot[
Above
gK


I I-


225








29221Gasoline.

2923]Gasoline.

29241 Gasoline.
2925 Gasoline.
2926 Gasoline.

2927 Gasoline.

2928 Gasoline.
2929 Gasoline.

9229 Gasoline.

2931 Gasoline.

29311 Gasoline.
I
2932 Gasoline.

2933 1Gasoline.

2934 Gasoline.

2933 Gasoline.

2936 Gasoline.

2937 [Gasoline.


58.0o

58.21

57.01

57.41

57.61

57.3

58.21

57.81

58.2

57.9

58.2

59.2

58.11

57.91

60.7


58.41 47


50 I 22.51 53


21.51 53


91

92

92

91.51

92

91

92

91

92

93

i 91

S91

91

90

91

90.5


98 222

97.51 217

97.51 219

97.51 218

98 218

98 222

98 221

97 219

97.5 217

98 217

S97.51 221

98 229

97 222

S97 220

96 221


.5 222


|E. M.

|W. S.

IW. S.

|w. S.

IW. S.

|G. T.
G. T.

IG. T.

G. T.
G. T.

G. T.


W. S.

|W. S.

W. S.

G. T.

E. M.


Johns... .Standard


Oil Co., Ocala.


McLin... Standard Oil Co., Century.

McLin... Standard Oil Co., Bluff Springs.

McLin... Texas Co., Jay.

McLin... Texas Co., Jay.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear .... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

McLin... Chalmette Refining Co., Pensacola.

McLin... Standard Oil Co., Lakewood.

McLin... Standard Oil Co., Laurel Hill.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.


I I


iI












OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.



Sd o E4o SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
c a 3 INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN




Florida Not Not
Standard Above 20 50 90 95 Above
Adopted 60 _225


29Gasoline.
29391Gasoline.

29340Gasoline.

2941 Gasoline.

29421Gasoline.

2943 Gasoline.
2944|Gasoline.

2945 Gasoline.

2946 Gasoline.
2946 Gasoline.


21

25

27

37

37.5

27

25

25

26


53 91

57 92

57.51 92.51
I 1
59 1 93

72 95

61.51 94

59 1 91.51

59 93

59 92 |


98 222

97.5 219

97.51 216

97.51 216

97.51 212

98 | 213

97 216

97 215

97.51 216


E. M.

jE. M.

|E. M.

E. M.

IE. M.

G. T.

G. T.

G. T.

|G. T.


Johns ...

Johns....

Johns....

Johns....

Johns....

Spear....

Spear....

Spear....

Spear....


Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.

Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.

Texas Co., Gainesville.

Texas Co., Gainesville.

Gulf Refining Co., Gainesville.

Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Texas Co., Tampa.

Texas Co., Tampa.


58.2

57.9.

58.2

58.21

62.01

58.81

58.71
58.2
58.21
58.21








2947 Gasoline.

2948 IGasoine.

2949 Gasoline.

2950 Gasoline.

2951 Gasoline.

2952 Gasoline.

2953 Gasoline.

2954 Gasoline.

2955 Gasoline.

2956 Gasoline.

2957 Gasoline.

2958 Gasoline.
2959 Gasoline.
2960 Gasoline.

2961 Gasoline.
2962 Gasoline.

2962 Gasoline.


58.11

58.1

58.3

58.1

58.1

58.21

58.31

63.0

57.9

57.9

59.7

58.0

58.71

58.21

58.5

58.4


58

58

53.51

55

51.51

56

57

69

51

51

69

56

70

54

58

58


98

98

97.58

98

97.51

98

97.5

98

97.51

98

98

98

98

98 ]

97.5|

98 1


T. Spear.... Texas Co., Tampa.

T. Spear.... Texas Co., Tampa.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... National Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Nichols.

T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Mulberry.

T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Mulberry.

T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Mulberry.

H. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Mulberry.

T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Mulberry.

M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.












OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.


r c" s cg 0 SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
: |- ii g INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN

s! z t p a0 a

Florida Not
Standard Not Not
Adopted Ab 20 50 90 Abo
60 ___225
S60~li~n 58 5P ^J7 ) ?E 57 9 5 ~ i n n "I 0


U6 Iaso ne.
2964 Gasoline.

29651Gasoline.

29661Gasoline.|
I I
2967Gasoline. I
I I
29689Gasoline. [

2969 Gasoline.

2970 Gasoline. I

29711Gasoline. I


57.5 90.51
I 1
52.51 91.5|

67 1 94

56.5 91

52 91.51

54 | 92

69 96

53 90.51


9i .5

98
98

98

98






98

97.51


JUohns... IulR ntening Co., JacKsonvlle.
Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Frost Proof.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Frost Proof.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Lake Wales.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Lake Wales.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Dundee.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Dundee.

Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.


uo. t

58.5

58.2

59.81
1
58.31

58.31

58.21

59.7[

58.61









29721Gasoline.

I I
2973 Gasoline.
2974 Gasoline.

29756Gasoline.

2976 Gasoline.

2977 Gasoline.

2978 Gasoline.

2979 Gasoline.

2980 Gasoline.

2981 Gasoline.

2982 Gasoline.

2983 Gasoline.

2984 Gasoline.
I n
2985 Gasoline.

2986 Gasoline.

2987 Gasoline. I


58.61 43

58.5 47

58.6 49

58.6 50

58.6 49

59.7 43

59.8 44

59.9 40

58.7 54

58.71 55

58.3 53

60.31 41

60.21 43

60.11 53

58.31 42

58.21 55


23.51

25

23

25

24

30

31

31.5

25.51

25

25

30

32 |

29

26

23


54 91.51

55 91

53 91

54.5 91

55 91

63.51 93

64 93

65 93

55 91

54 91

55.51 91.51

66 94.51

68 | 94.51

69 95.5

57 92

53.51 92 1


98 1 220 E.

98 219 E.

97.51 221 E.

98 1 218 E.

98 221 E.

97 222 G.

97 222 G.

97 220 G.

98 221 G.

97.5 220 G.

98 219 G.
98 217
98 217 IG.

98 1 217 G.

98 213 IG.

1 I
98 213 .G.

98 1 221 ]G.


M.

M.

M.

M.

M.

T.

T.

T.

T.

T.

T.

T.

T.

T.

T.

T.


Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jackson

Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jackson

Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jackson

Johns .... Standard Oil Co., Jackson

Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jackson

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Arcadia

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Arcadia

Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Arcadia

Spear.... Texas Co., Arcadia.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Arcadia.


ville.

ville.

ville.

ville.

ville.













i.

i.

i.












OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.

0 U U 0 i 0

S. 0 a SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
w |i H! 8 Z INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
6=i -o ba *
z o Z P4 SP PQ ae PQ
d B# _ ^S a p5 ^
6 zfi F~ ,g


2988 Gasoline.

2989 Gasoline.

2990 Gasoline.

2991 Gasoline.

2992 Gasoline.

2993 Gasoline.

2994 Gasoline.
2995Gasoline.
2996 Gasoline. I
29961Gasoline.


50 90

54.5 92

67 95

63 93.

67 | 92

67 93

62 93

62 92

61 92.

60.51 92.2


Not
Above
225


97.5| 219

98 217

98 216

97.5 221

97 220

97.5 214

97.51 214

98 I 216

97 215


G. T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Arcadia.

E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

[E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

IE. M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

E. M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

E. M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

E. M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.


Florida
Standard
Adopted


Not
Above
60


58.2

60.4

60.5

60.5

60.7

59.6

59.61
59.6
59.61
59.61


*


51








51I

51I








Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.
Gasoline.

Gasoline.
Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.
Gasoline. I


58.81

58.6

58.6j

58.61

58.6

58.6

58.0

....

58.11

58.61

59.21


58.1
58.3


58.31

61.81

58.31


24.51 57

25 58

24.51 57.5

24 157

25 |58

24.5| 57
I I
22.51 55

33 63

25 54

28 61

30 67

21.51 53.51

25 56

28 60

35 62 ]

25 | 56 |


92 98

92 98

92 j 98

92 98

92 97

91.51 98

91 97.51

92 | 97

92 1 98

92 1 98

93 98

91.51 98

91.51 97

91.5 97.51
I
90 95.51

91.51 98


215 G. T. Spear....

215 G. T. Spear....

214 G. T. Spear....

216 G. T. Spear....

215 G. T. Spear....

216 IG. T. Spear....

219 W. S. McLin...

216 W. S. McLin...

222 1W. S. McLin...

218 1W. S. McLin...

216 IW. S. McLin...

220 IW. S. McLin...

219 |W. S. McLin...

216 IW. S. McLin...

221 jE. M. Johns....

220 IW. S. McLin...


Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Standard Oil Co., Monticello.

Texas Co., Monticello.

Standard Oil Co., Greenville.

Texas Co., Madison.

Gulf Refining Co., Perry.

Standard Oil Co., Perry.

Standard Oil Co., Live Oak.

Texas Co., Live Oak.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Standard Oil Co., Lake City.











OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.

0 0 0

N SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
-e a 5 INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN



Florida Not Not
Standard * Above 20 50 90 95 Above
Adopted 60 225
SI |I _- __ 1 .. I ..


3013 Gasoline.

3014 Gasoline.

3015 Gasoline.

3016 Gasoline.

3017 Gasoline.

3018 Gasoline.

3019 Gasoline.

3020 Gasoline.

3021 Gasoline.


59.51
61.6

61.61

61.6

61.5

61.61

61.6

60.01

60.0


93 97. 5
93 97

93 97

93 97

94 97.5I

93 98

93 97.51

94.5 98

94 1 97.51


JW. S. McLin... Gulf Refining Co., Lake City.

G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

IG. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

fG. T. Spear.... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

G. T. Spear.... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.
G.T. Spear... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.








3022 Gasoline.

3023 Gasoline.

3024 Gasoline.

3025 Gasoline.

3026 Gasoline.

3027 Gasoline.
3028 Gasoline.

3029 Gasoline.

3030 Gasoline.

3031 Gasoline.
3032 Gasoline.


3033 Gasoline.
3034 Gasoline.

3035 Gasoline.

3036 Gasoline.

30374Gasoline.
3036JGasoline.

30371Gasoline.


60.0o 33

60.0| 39

61.8 38

61.8 37

60.9 36
60.91 36

60.91 37

60.91 35

60.91 35

59.4 43

.. 50

. . 42

58.1j 47

59.41 37

60.8 36

60.91 36

59.41 40


32 68

32 65

33 63

35 63

35 66

36 66

36 66

36 66

29 64

20.51 52

24 58

24 54

30 61

36 70

36 70

.... 63


93 98

94 98

92 97.5

92 97.5

93 97.5

93 98

93 98

93 98

93 97

91 98

91 98

91 98

93 98

93 97

93 97

93 97


213 [G. T. Spear.... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

214 G. T. Spear.... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

218 G. T. Spear.... Atlantic Refining Co., Tampa.

220 G. T. Spear.... Atlantic Refining Co., Tampa.

214 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

217 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

216 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

215 IE. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

220 JW. S. McLln... Gulf Refining Co., Quincy.

221 jW. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Quincy.

219 W. S. McLin... Sherrill Oil Co., Quincy.

224 E. M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

217 W. S. McLin... Texas Co., Pensacola.

210 iG. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Lakeland.

209 IG. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Lakeland.

212 |G. T. Spear.... Texas Co., Lakeland.













OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.


0E 0 S o 0 SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
-: o 0 4 5 INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
g- P4.s .s 4
A0 20 0

Florida Not Not
Standard Above 20 50 90 95 Above
Adopted 60 225


30381Gasoline.

3039 Gasoline.

3040 Gasoline.

3041 Gasoline.

3042 Gasoline.

3043 Gasoline.

3044 Gasoline.

3045 Gasoline.

30461Gasoline.


Spear.... Texas Co., Lakeland.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Lakeland.

Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Lakeland.

Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Johns.... Texas Co.. Jacksonville.

Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.








Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.

Gasoline.


61.1

61.1

58.21

58.21
58.21
58.2
58.21

58.21
58.21
1
58.21

60.2

58.1

60.11
I
58.41
I
60.31

60.61
I
59.51

60.9[


70

70

56

56

56

56

56

56

70

53

67

55

70

66

60

66


92.51 97.51 217

93 97 217
9 98 217

93 98 217

93 98 217

93 98 217

93 98 218

92 98 218

94 97 218

92 98 220

93 98 216

92 98 218

94 97 216

93 97 218

91.5[ 97 219

92 [ 97 214


M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Crystal Springs.

T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Knights Station.

T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Zephyrhills.

T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Trilby.

T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Dade City.

T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Dade City.

T. Spear.... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.


36 33












OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.

standard Above20 0 0 95 Above
SAd d SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
V-4 4 3 INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN



Florida Not Not
Standard Above 20 50 0 Above
Adopted ____60 I I 5 225 ______ __________


3063 Gasoline.

3064 Gasoline.
3065 Gasoline.

3066 Gasoline.
3067 Gasoline.
3068 Gasoline.

3069 Gasoline.
3069 Gasoline.

3070 Gasoline.
3071 Gasoline.


61.8 32 37

60.11 34 1 34
I
... 46 25

58.41 46 24
I
60.21 44 37

59.21 43 28

58.7 50 25

59.0 37 26
59.0 39
59.0| 39 33


1 92.51 97

S94 97
91 97.5|

91 98

93 98

92 98

S90 98

93 98

1 92.51 97


214 |G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

209 |E. M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.
220 W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Marianna.

218 W. S. McLin... Sherrill Oil Co., Marianna.

217 W. S. McLin... Gulf Refining Co., Panama City.

219 W. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Panama City.

217 W. S. McLin... Sherrill Oil Co., Panama City.

212 E. M. Johns.... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

212 W. S. McLin... Texas Co., Pensacola.








30721Gasoline.

3073 Gasoline.
3074Gasoline.
3075 Gasoline.
3076Gasoline.
30757Gasoline.

30768Gasoline.

3079 Gasoline.
30781Gasoline.

30791Gasoline.


. .. .

60.7

54.4

57.3

57.3

60.4

61.0

59.11


37.51

34

27

24

22

32

34

27.51


224 W. S. McLin... Louisiana Oil Refining Co., Pensacola.

220 W. S. McLin... Gulf Refining Co., Pensacola.

219 JW. S. McLin... Standard Oil Co., Pensacola.

318 W. S. McLin... Island Refining Co., Pensacola.

214 W. S. McLin... New Orleans Refining Co., Pensacola.

221 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

221 G. T. Spear.... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

120 G. T. Spear.... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.


I I I











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
OIL SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. N. B. DAVIS, A. B. Asst. Chemist.
Special Samples of Gasoline Analyzed for the Six Months Beginning July
1st, 1922, and Ending December 31st, 1922.
Samples Sent in by Citizens Under Act Approved June 4, 1919.
Deficiencies Below Standard Are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


-* *o Co
00 o.. o o a NAME OF MANUFACTURER
W E Mo 3 SENT IN BY AND PLACE TAKEN
P 0 0 P4
do 5 ^ QP

Florida Not Not
Standard Above 20 0 0 Abov
Adopted 60 225


71 Gasoline. 59.3 47 33 67 95 99 219 Beacon Ref. Co. Beacon Refining Co., Henrietta Texas.
72 Gasoline. 59.4 50 27 58 92 99 218 Sherrill Oil Co.ISherrill Oil Co., Pensacola.
|I I I I 1
73 Gasoline. 59.6 49 27 58.5 92 99 219 Sherrill Oil Co. Sherrill Oil Co., Pensacola.
74 Gasoline. 59.3 53 23 56 92 98. 214 Sherrill Oil Co. Sherrill Oil Co., Pensacola.
I I I Rf
751Gasoline. 62.61 45 37 69 94 98 213 Gulf Ref. Co... Gulf Refining Co., Miami.
Gasoline. 5.5 54 27 60 91 97.5 22Beacon Re Co.Beacon Refining Co., Henrietta, Texas.
761Gasoline. 58.5 54 27 60 91 97.51 223 Beacon Ref. Co.lBeacon Refining Co., Henrietta, Texas.








77 Gasoline.

78 Gasoline.

79 Gasoline.

**80 Gasoline.

81 Gasoline.

82 Gasoline.

83 Gasoline.

84 Gasoline.

85 Gasoline.

**86 Gasoline.

87 Gasoline.
I


60.0 54

62.2 43



58.6 53

59.5 42

59.1 53

61.0 36

59.4 45

... 45

58.21 42

60.0 42


27.51

35.5

22

30

31

21

37

27

23

26

26


**Illegal Samples denoted by.


94 97.5

93.5 97

92 98

92.5 98

91 98

92 98

94 97

95 99

91 97.5

90 95.51

92 97.5]
1


Gulf Ref. Co... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Gulf Ref. Co... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

S. J. Warren.. Greenville.

Escambia OilCo. Chalmette Refining Co.

Beacon Ref. Co. Beacon Refining Co., Henrietta, Texas.

Sherrill Oil Co. Sherrill Oil Co., Pensacola.

Gulf Ref. Co... Gulf Refining Co., Miami.

|EscambiaOil Co.Escambia Oil Co., Pensacolal

Standard Oil Co. Standard Oil Co., River Junction.

ISherrill Oil Co. Sherrill Oil Co., Pensacola.

Beacon Ref. Co. Beacon Refining Co., Henrietta Texas.













DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OIL SECTION N. B. DAVIS, A. B., Asst. Chemist.
Official Samples of Kerosene Analyzed for Six Months Beginning July
1st, 1922, and Ending December 31st, 1922.
Samples Taken by State Inspectors Under Act Approved June 4, 1919.
Illegal Samples Denoted By **



Name of f SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
Product o INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN

I FloS I
d U2 4 0

Not
Below Not
Florida 1000 F. Not Darker
Standard "Tag," Above than
Adopted Closed 600' F. 21
Tester Saybolt


902 Kerosene ......

903 Kerosene......
I I-
904 Kerosene.....

6051Kerosene......

906IKerosene .... I


590 +25

596 +25



1


IE. M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

W. S. McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Apalachicola.

W. S. McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Apalachicola.

G. T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Oldsmar.








Kerosene......

Keiosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......

Kerosene......


43.7

42.3

41.2

44.9

44.5

44.2

44.0

44.0

41.3

43.6

40.8

43.1

43.1

43.8

43.6

41.2


564



568

578



542

582

572

572

558

590

594

504

506


G. T.

jE. M.

IE. M.

G. T.

jG. T.

E. M.

E. M.

W. S.

W. S.

W. S.

W. S.

1E. M.

E. M.

W. S.

E. M.


Spear...

Johns...

Johns...

Spear...

Spear...

Johns...

Johns...

McLin..


Standard Oil Co., Oldsmar.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Uulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

Atlantic Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Pensacola.


McLin.. Texas Co., Pensacola.

McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Pensacola.

McLin.'. Island Refining Co., Pensacola.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Milton.

Johns... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.


IE. M. Johns... Texas Co., Orlando.


J_













OFFICIAL KEROSENE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.




Name of H o a SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
Product Z 0 INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
3 __Zo _

SNot
Below Not
FLORIDA 100" F. Not Darker
STANDARD "Tag" Above than
ADOPTED Closed 6000 F. + 21
Tester slnynoit


923 Kerosene......

924 Kerosene......

925 Kerosene. .....

926 Kerosene......

927 Kerosene......

928 Kerosene......

929 Kerosene......

930 Kerosene......

931 Kerosene......


44.Z

44.0

44.2

44.3

43.6

43.6

44.3

43.6

43.0


E3. M1V.

E. M.

W. S.

W. S.

E. M.

E. M.

G. T.

G. T.

G. T.


iohns... Grulf J nenniing Cu., an ouu.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Sanford.

McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Chipley.

McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Marianna.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Speer... Gulf Refining Co., Moore Haven.

Spear... Standard Oil Co., Moore Haven.

Spear... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.








932 Kerosene......

933 Kerosene......

934 Kerosene......

935 Kerosene......

936 Kerosene ......

937 Kerosene......

938 Kerosene......

939 Kerosene......

940 Kerosene......

941 Kerosene .....

942 Kerosene......

934 Kerosene .....

944 Kerosene......

945 Kerosene......

946 Kerosene......

947 Kerosene......


43.0

44.3

44.1

44.1

43.5

44.1

44.2

44.2

44.3

44.2

45.6

45.6

43.3

43.3

42.3

43.4


496


G. T.

W. S.

W. S.

W. S.

G. T.

G. T.

E. M.

E. M.

E. M.

E. M.

G. T.

G. T.

E. M.

E. M.

E. M.

G. T.


Spear... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Perry.

McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Perry.

McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Monticello.

Spear... Standard Oil Co., Tarpon Springs.

Spear... Standard Oil Co., Tarpon Springs.

Johns... Standard Oil Co., Fairbanks.

Jonhs... Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.

Johns... Standard Oil Co., Bronson.

Johns... Standard Oil Co., Williston.

Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Spear... Standard Oil Co., Sulphur Springs.













OFFICIAL KEROSENE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.




Name of SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
Product INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
< o zo

Below Not
FLORIDA 100 F. Not Darker
STANDARD "Tag" Above than
ADOPTED Closed 000 F-. -- 21
Tester Saybolt


948 Kerosene......

949 Kerosene ......

950 Kerosene......

951 Kerosene......

952 Kerosene......

953 Kerosene......

954 Kerosene......

955 Kerosene......
956Kerosene.
956jKerosene .....


43.8

43.6

43.3

44.6

43.8

43.8


T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Terra Ceia.

T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Bradentown.

M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

T. Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Miami.

T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Melbourne.

T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Melbourne.








957 Kerosene......

958 Kerosene......

959 Kerosene......

960 Kerosene......
I I
961 Kerosene......

962 Kerosene......

9631 Kerosene ...... I
I I

964 Kerosene......
964|Kerosene.....
965 Kerosene......

966 Kerosene.......

967 Kerosene......

968 Kerosene......

969 Kerosene......

9701Kerosene......

971 Kerosene......

972 Kerosene......|


43.3

43.2

43.5

41.4

43.4

43.5

43.2

43.5

44.4

44.4

44.4

43.6

41.4

41.5

42.9

42.8


126

129

125

125

127

128

127

126

124

127

128

126

128

126

125

125


+25

+24

+22

+16

+18

+16

+21

+21

+25

+25

+24

+19

+23

+24


E. M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

E. M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

W. S. McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Pensacola.

W. S. McLin.. Texas Co., Pensacola.

E. M. Johns... Standard Oil Co., Ocala.

E. M. Johns... Standard Oil Co., Ocala.

G. T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

G. T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

G. T. Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

G. T. Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

E. M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Gainesville.

E. M. Johns... Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.

G. T. Spear... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

G. T. Spear... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

G. T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Mulberry.

G. T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Nichols.













OFFICIAL KEROSENE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.



Name of W o 9 SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
Product INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN

Not
___-------------- __ ----__ Not -" __________ _________
Below Not
FLORIDA 100 Not Darker
STANDARD "Tag" Above than
ADOPTED Closed 600 F. + 21
Tester ___ aybolt
I~^ .""^ I ._


973 Kerosene......

974 Kerosene......

975 Kerosene......

976 Kerosene......

977 Kerosene......

978 Kerosene......

979 Kerosene......

980 Kerosene......

981 Kerosene......


42.5

42.5

42.8

44.4

43.6

40.8

44.5

44.0

44.0


M. Jonns... Gulf enfning uo., JacKsonville.

M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

T. Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

T. Spear... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

T. Spear... Texas Co., Arcadia.

T. Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Arcadia.

M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.









982 Kerosene......

983 Kerosene......

984 Kerosene......

985 Kerosene......

986 Kerosene......

987 Kerosene......

988 Kerosene......

989 Kerosene .....

990 Kerosene......

991 Kerosene ......

992 Kerosene......

993 Kerosene......

994 Kerosene......

995 Kerosene......

996 Kerosene ......

997 Kerosene......


+22

+22

+22

+22

+22

+23

+21

+24

+24

+24

+24

+24

+24

+24

+24


G. T.

G. T.

W. S.

W. S.

W. S.

W. S.

W. S.

W. S.

G. T.

G. T.

G. T.

G. T.

E. M.

E. M.

W. S.

E. M.


Spear... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

Spear... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Perry.

McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Perry.

McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Live Oak.

McLin.. Texas Co., Live Oak.

McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Lake City.

McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Lake City.

Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Spear... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Spear... Texas Co., Tampa Estuary.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Quincy.

Johns... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.


---


-~-~---












OFFICIAL KEROSENE ANALYSES, 1922-Continued.



Name of o E g SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
Product INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
P w S z AND PLACE TAKEN
0 0 zo 0

Not
Below Not
FLORIDA 1000 F. Not Darker
STANDARD "Tag" Above than
ADOPTED Closed 600* F. + 21
Tester Saybolt
___r^^ i- .. I ,


998 Kerosene......

999 Kerosene......

1000 Kerosene....

1001 Kerosene......

1002 Kerosene......

1003 Kerosene......

1004 Kerosene......

1005 Kerosene......

10061 Kerosene......


+24 G.

+24 G.

+22 E.

+22 E.

+24 E.

+24 E.

G.

G.

+22 IG.


spear... iGulf inning uo., LaKelanu.

Spear... Texas Co., Lakeland.

Johns... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Johns... Texas Co., Jacksonville.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Crystal Springs.

Spear... Standard Oil Co., Trilby.

Spear... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.








1007 Kerosene......

1008 Kerosene ......

1009 Kerosene......

1010 Kerosene......

1011 Kerosene......

1012 Kerosene.....

1013 Kerosene......

1014 Kerosene ......

1015 Kerosene......

1016 Kerosene......

1017 Kerosene......


44.1

43.6

43.1

42.9

44.2

43.0

41.5

43.2



43.8

43.8


572

564

570

510

564

504

570

560

508

561

570


+24

+24

+22

+22

+22

+21

+22

+24

+21

+22

+24


E. M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

G. T. Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

W. S. McLin.. Sherrill Oil Co., Marianna.

W. S. McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Marianna.

W. S. McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Panama City.

W. S. McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Panama City.

W. S. McLin.. Texas Co., Pensacola.

W. S. McLin.. Gulf Refining Co., Pensacola.

W. S. McLin.. Standard Oil Co., Pensacola.

E. M. Johns... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

G. T." Spear... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.














DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OIL SECTION N. B. DAVIS, A. B., Asst. Chemist.
SPECIAL KEROSENE ANALYSES TO JUNE 30, 1922.
Special Kerosene Simples Analyzed for Six Months Beginning July 1st,
1922, and Ending December 31st, 1922.
Illegal Samples Denoted by Black Type.



Name of SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
Product Z INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
0 O 0
---------z- o
Not
Below Not
FLORIDA 1000 F. Not Darker
STANDARD "Tag" Above than
ADOPTED Closed 600 F. t- 21
Tester Raybolt
- -- -


25lKerosene......

26 Kerosene......

27 Kerosene......

28 Kerosene......

29 Kerosene......


41.2

45.4

44.7

43.3

43.2


Beacon Ref. uo. Beacon Renining Co., Henrietta, lexas.

Gulf Ref. Co... Gulf Refining Co., Miami.

Gulf Ref. Co... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

Gulf Ref. Co... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

|Beacon Ref. Co. Beacon Refining Co., Henrietta, Texas.








30 Kerosene...... 44.3 127 578 +24 Gulf Ref. Co... Gulf Refining Co., Miami.
**31 Kerosene...... 43.0 128 517 +20 Stand'd Oil Co. Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

321Kerosene...... 42.3 127 517 +21 Stand'd Oil Co. Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.
33 Kerosene...... 42.2 130 07 +21 Stand'd Oil Co. Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.
331Kerosene ...... 4. 4 D












NOTICE TO OIL COMPANIES OPERATING IN FLORIDA

On and after Jan. 30th, 1923, the Specifications of Gasoline
sold in the State of Florida shall be as follows:
(1) Boiling Point must not be higher than 55 C. (1310 F.)
(2) Twenty per cent (20%) of the sample must distill below
105 C. (221 F.)
(3) Fifty per cent (50%) must distill below 140 C. (284o F.)
(4) Ninety per cent (90%) must distill below 2000 C. (392 F.)
(5) The End or Dry Point of distillation must not be higher than
225 C. (437 F.)
(6) Not less than Ninety-five per cent (95%) of the liquid must
be recovered from the distillation.
Changes in Gasoline Specifications have been made to conform
to those adopted and promulgated by the Bureau of Mines,
Washington, D. C., October 31st, 1922, official information of
which changes have just been received.
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.



GASOLINE INSPECTION LAW

CHAPTER 7905-(No. 123).

AN ACT Relating to the Inspection, Measurement, Analysis and
Fixing the Standards of Certain Oils and Gasses Sold in This
State; to Authorize the Collection of an Inspection Fee and
Disposition thereof; to Provide for the Appointment of an As-
sistant State Chemist, Oil Inspectors, Clerical Help, and Pre-
scribe Their Duties; and to Define the Powers and Duties of
State Attorneys and Other Presecuting Attorneys and the
Commissioner of Agriculture in Connection Herewith.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. That for the purpose of this Act all gasoline, naptha,
kerosene, benzine, or other like products of petroleum under
whatever name designated, used for illuminating, heating, cooking
or power purposes, sold, offered or exposed for sale in this State,
shall be subject to inspection and anlaysis as hereinafter pro-
vided. All manufacturers, wholesalers and jobbers, before sell-
ing or offering for sale in this State, any gasoline, kerosene or
other mineral oil for power, illuminating, cooking or heating
purposes, shall file with the Commissioner of Agriculture an
affidavit that they desire to do business in this State, and shall
furnish the name, brand or trade-mark of the oil or oils, which
they desire to sell, together with the name and address of the
manufacturer thereof, and that such oil or oils are in conformity
with the standard prescribed by the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture.
Sec. 2. That the Commissioner of Agriculture shall have
power and it is hereby made his duty to collect or cause to be
collected from time to time by his duly authorized agent or














agents, samples of any gasoline illuminating or heating oils
sold, offered or exposed for sale in this State, and to cause same
to be tested or analyzed by the State Chemist, who is hereby
required to report his finding to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, as other analyses are reported. The Certificate of Analysis
by the State Chemist, when properly verified by affidavit of the
State Chemist, shall be prima facie evidence in any Court of
Law or Equity in this State.
Sec. 2%. Any person purchasing any gasoline, illuminating,
or heating oils from any Manufacturer or vender in this State
for his own use may submit fair samples of said gasoline, illum-
inating, or heating oils to the Commissioner of Agriculture to
be tested or analyzed by the State Chemist. In order to protect
the Manufacturer or vender from the submission of spurious
samples the person selecting the same shall do so in the presence
of two or more disinterested persons, which samples shall be
not less than one pint in quantity, and bottled, corked and sealed
in the presence of said witnesses, and said sample shall be
placed in the hands of a disinterested person who shall forward
the same at the expense of the purchaser to the Commissioner
'of Agriculture; and upon the receipt by him of any such sample
as hereby authorized to require the State Chemist to test or
analyze the same, and he shall return to such purchaser or pur-
chasers a certificate of analysis, and such certificate when veri-
fied by the affidavit of the State Chemist shall be competent
evidence in any court of law or equity in this State.
Sec. 3. That the Governor shall, upon the recommendation of
the Commissioner of Agriculture, appoint an Assistant State
Chemist, or expert oil analyst, whose duty it shall be to analyze
all samples of oils submitted or caused to be submitted by the
Commissioner of Agriculture, or his duly authorized inspectors
or agents. Said Assistant State Chemist shall'hold office for a
period of four years, unless otherwise recommended by the Com-
missioner of Agriculture for misfeasance or malfeasance in office,
and shall receive a salary of Eighteen Hundred (1800.00) Dollars
per annum, payable monthly by the Comptroller on vouchers
approved by the Commissioner of Agriculture.
Sec. 4. The the Governor shall upon the recommendation of
the Commissioner of Agriculture appoint as many oil inspectors
as in his judgment may be necessary for the inspection of oils
as herein provided, said inspectors not to exceed three in num-
ber, one of whom shall reside in Pensacola, one in Jacksonville
and one in Tampa, who shall receive a salary of Eighteen Hun-
dred ($1,800.00) Dollars each per annum, and a sum not exceed-
ing Twelve Hundred ($1,200.00) Dollars each per annum for
traveling expenses, said salaries and sums for traveling expenses
shall be paid by the Comptroller on vouchers approved by the
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Sec. 5. That the Cdmmissioner of Agriculutre is hereby au-
thorized to employ an extra clerk or two extra clerks, if need be,
for keeping the records and collecting the revenue hereinafter
provided, who shall receive a salary or salaries of Eighteen Hun-
dred ($1800.00) Dollars and Fifteen Hundred ($1500) Dollars
per annum, respectively, in case the services of twd clerks are
found to be necessary, who shall be paid in the same manner
as prescribed in Sections 3 and 4 of this Act.











78

Sec. 6. That all such oils as hereinbefore enumerated and
designated that are used or intended to be used for power, illum-
inating, cooking or heating purposes, when sold under a dis-
tinctive name that shall fall below the standard fixed by the
Commissioner of Agriculture, are hereby declared to be illegal,
and shall be subject to confiscation and sale by order of the
Commissioner of Agriculture. It is hereby made the duty of
all manufacturers, wholesalers and jobbers and distributors who
sell, barter or exchange gasoline or other oils within this State,
to post conspicuously at the place of delivery to the consumer
a card or sign not smaller than 12x15 inches, setting forth in size
type not smaller than one inch in height, in the English language,
the degree of gravity of the product sold, offered or exposed for
sale.
Sec. 7. In addition to the foregoing, it shall be the duty of
the gasoline inspectors provided for herein from time to time to
inspect and test all self-measuring gasoline or oil pumps used
in this State; and in the event such pumps shall be found to be
giving short measure, the use thereof shall thereafter be un-
lawful; and unless within the judgment of the said oil inspectors
the said pumps can be so adjusted as to give the proper and
true meaurements, they shall be subject to and may be con-
fiscated by order of the Commissioner of Agriculture.
Sec. 8. That in the performance of their duties, the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture or any of his duly authorized agents shall
have free access at all reasonable hours, to any store, ware-
house, factory, storage house, or Railway Depot, where oils are
kept or otherwise stored for the purpose of examination or in-
spection and drawing samples. If such access be refused by the
owner, agent or manufacturer of such premises, the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture, or his duly authorized inspectors or agents,
may apply for a search warrant which shall be obtained in the
same manner as provided for obtaining search warrants in
other cases. The refusal to admit an inspector to any of the
above mentioned premises during reasonable hours, shall be
construed as prima facie evidence of violation of this Act.
Sec. 9. That for the purpose of defraying the expenses inci-
dent to the inspection, testing and analyzing oils in this State,
there shall be paid to the Commissioner of Agriculture a charge
of one-eighth cent per gallon on all oils sold within the State,
which payment shall be paid before delivery to agents, dealers
or consumers within the State. Each barrel, tank car or other
containers of oil shall have attached thereto a tag or stamp
showing the payment of the inspection fee specified in this sec-
tion; and the Commissioner of Agriculture is hereby empowered
to prescribe a form for such tag or stamp. Where oil is shipped
in tank cars or other large containers, the manufacturer of job-
ber shall give notice to the Commissioner of Agriculture of
every Shipment, with the name and address of the person, com-
pany or corporation to whom it is sent, and the number of gal-
lons so shipped on the date shipment is made. Provided no
inspection fee shall be charged on oils or gasoline unloaded in
any of the Florida ports for shipment into other States.
Sec. 10. All ,moneys payable under this Act shall be paid to
the Commissioner of Agriculture, and shall by him be paid .into













the State Treasury monthly to constitute a fund to be known
and designated as the "Gasoline Inspection Fund," out of which
all expenses incurred in the enforcement of this Act shall be
paid by the State Treasurer on warrants issued by the Comp-
troller. No money shall be paid to any inspector or employee
created under this Act except from the funds collected from the
administration of this Act.
Sec. 11. That the Comptroller be and he is hereby authorized
and directed to issue warrants payable out of the "Gasoline
Inspection Fund" on vouchers approved by the Commissioner
of Agriculture to cover all expenses incurred in the administra-
tion of this Act.
Sec. 12. That on January first of each year, the balance, if any,
remaining in the "Gasoline Inspection Fund," after all the
salaries and other expenses for carrying out the provisions of
this Act shall have been paid, shall be transferred by the State
Treasurer to the State Highway Fund, and placed at the disposal
of the State Road Department, for the construction and main-
tenance of the Public Roads of the State.
Sec. 13. That the Commissioner of Agriculture shall include
in his Biennial Report an account of the operation and expenses
under this Act.
Sec. 14. That the Commissioner of Agriculture shall promul-
gate such rules and regulations not inconsistent with the pro-
visions hereof as in his judgment may be necessary to the pro-
per enforcement of this Act; and to define and fix the standards
and specifications for all the oils and gasses referred to in Sec-
tion 1 hereof; such standards and specifications to be fixed be-
fore any of such oils and gasses shall be sold or otherwise dis-
pensed in this State.
Sec. 15. .That it shall be unlawful for any inspector provided
for under this Act to be interested, directly or indirectly, in the
manufacturing or sale of any of the oils herein mentioned.
Sec. 16. That any person, firm or corporation, who shall
knowingly violate any of the provisions of this Act or any rule
or regulation promulgated by the Commissioner of Agriculture
shall upon conviction thereof be punished by a fine of not more
than One Thousand ($1,000.00) Dollars, or by imprisonment in
the State Prison for not more than twelve months, or by both
such fine and imprisonment in the discretion of the Court.
Sec. 17. That it shall be the duty of the State's Attorney, or
oher prosecuting officer within the jurisdiction of whose court
the case may come, to prosecute all cases certified to him for
prosecution by the Commissioner of Agriculture immediately
upon receipt of the evidence transmitted by the Commissioner
of Agriculture, or as soon thereafter as practicable.
Sec. 18. That all laws and parts of laws in conflict with the
provisions of this Act be and the same are hereby repealed.
Sec. 19. That this Act shall become effective ninety (90) days
after its passage and approval by the Governor, or upon its be-
coming a law without such approval.
Approved June 4, 1919.











80

RULES AND REGULATIONS

For the Enforcement of the Gasoline Inspection Law, Chapter
7905, Approved June 4, 1919, as Provided by Section 14 of
Said Act.

REGULATION 1-PRODUCTS DEFINED

(Section 1)

All gasoline, benzine, naptha, kerosene or like products of
petroleum under whatever name designated, used for illuminat-
ing, power or heating purposes, or offered for sale in this State
for power, illuminating or heating purposes, shall be subject to
inspection and test to determine their safety and value for
power, illuminating or heating purposes.

REGULATION 2-REGISTRATION

(Section 1)

(a) All manufacturers, wholesalers and jobbers, before sell-
ing or offering for sale in this State, any gasoline, kerosene or
other mineral oil, as defined above, for power, illuminating or
heating purposes, shall file with the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, a statement that they desire to do business in this State,
and furnish the name or brand of the oil or oils which it is de-
sired to sell, with the name and address of the manufacturer,
and that the oil or oils will comply with the requirements of
this Act.
(b) Registration application blanks upon which these state-
ments must be presented will be furnished upon application to
the Commissioner of Agriculture.
(c) If more than.one illuminating or power oil is used in a
product offered, the component oils shall be set forth on the face
of the application.
(d) The Commissioner will refuse the registration of any
product under a name which would be misleading as to the
materials of which it is composed or when the names of each
and all ingredients of which it is composed are not stated.
Should any product be registered, and it is afterwards discovered
that it is in violation of any of the provisions of the Act, the
Commissioner will cancel such registration.
(e) All registrations, except the one provided for upon the
taking effect of this Act, shall be made annually on January 1st
of each year.

REGULATION 3-COLLECTION OF SAMPLES

(Sections 2 and 21/2)
Official Samples

(a) All official Samples shall be drawn in the presence of the
agent, dealer, distributor or manufacturer of any gasoline or
other oils, when and where sold or exposed for sale, from any











81

container whatever, within the State of Florida. In the absence
of the agent or person in charge of any tank, storage tank, ware-
house, service station or delivery wagon, said inspectors shall
have authority to draw fair samples of any gasoline or other oils,
for the purpose of submitting the same to the Commissioner of
Agriculture for analysis. All official samples shall consist of not
less than one quart, and s-all be placed in numbered tin cans
supplied to the inspectors by the Commissioner of Agriculture.
(b) All sample cans used for submitting samples of gasoline
shall be numbered consecutively as follows: G 1, G 2, G 3, etc.,
and all cans used for kerosene shall be numbered as follows:
K 1, K 2, K 3, etc.
(c) Such samples shall be delivered by the Commissioner of
Agriculture to the State Chemist, who shall analyze the same
as soon as received, or as soon as practicable thereafter, and
report his findings to the Commissioner of Agriculture. The
certificate of analysis by the State Chemist, when properly veri-
fied by affidavit of the State Chemist, shall be prima facie evi-
dence in any court of law or equity in this State.
(d) The State Chemist shall retain one-half of all official
samples for referee analysis, which shall be placed in a glass
bottle or tin can, sealed and identified by the laboratory number
and date, and placed in the custody of the Commissioner of Ag-
riculture. These duplicate samples shall be retained for a period
of three months from the date of the certificate of analysis. In
case of appeal from the analysis of the State Chemist (within
three months from the date of the certificate) the sample shall
be retained indefinitely, until the final disposition of the case.
(e) In case any manufacturer or dealer shall appeal from the
result of an analysis by the State Chemist, and shall demand
another analysis, the duplicate sample sealed and identified by
laboratory number as outlined above, shall be sent for analysis
.to some reputable chemist, upon whom the Commissioner of
Agriculture, the State Chemist, and the person demanding the
analysis shall agree, the cost of which shall in all cases be borne
by the person demanding such check analysis.

Special Samples

(a) Only such samples as are submitted in receptacles furn-
ished by the Commissioner of Agriculture, accompanied by a
letter of transmittal, blank forms and empty cans for which will
be supplied on application, will be accepted for analysis. All
special samples must be drawn in the presence of two or more
disinterested witnesses, one of whom shall forward the same
to the Commissioner of Agriculture at the expense of the owner.
The letter of transmittal must bear the name of the commodity
sampled, also the number or other marks shown on the recep-
tacle, and must not be enclosed with the package.


4-Oil Div.














REGULATION 4 DEGREE OF GRAVITY TO BE POSTED

(Section 6)

(a) A card or sign not smaller than twelve by fifteen (12x15)
inches, setting forth in size type not smaller than one inch in
height, in the English language, the degree of gravity of the
product sold, offered or exposed for sale, shall be posted at the
place of delivery to the consumer. Said card or sign shall be
furnished by the manufacturer, shipper, or distributor.

REGULATION 5 DUTIES OF INSPECTORS

(Sections 7 and 8)
(a) In the performance of their duties, inspectors shall have
free access at all reasonable hours to any store, warehouse, stor-
age tank, factory, storage house or railway depot, where oils
are kept or otherwise stored, for the purpose of examination or
inspection and drawing samples. Field tests will not be made.
All tests will be made in the Departmental Labortory at Talla-
hassee. Inspectors will carefully draw official samples of not
less than one quart from any container, carefully seal and for-
ward to the Commissioner of Agriculture, together with report
bearing the date of inspection, his name and other information
required thereon.
(b) In cases of rejection on account of the quality and fail-
ure to meet the standard of purity as fixed by Regulation No.
7, it will be illegal for any one to dispose of any of the contents
of said container without special permission of the Commissioner
of Agriculture.
(c) It shall be the duty of the Gasoline Inspectors to inspect
and test all self-measuring gasoline or oil pumps operated in
their respective districts, and in the event any pump or self-
measuring apparatus is found on examination and test to be in-
accurate, their use thereafter shall be unlawful until such time
as the owner or operator of such self-measuring pump or ap-
paratus shall have had the same properly and satisfactorily
adjusted to the satisfaction of the Commissioner of Agriculture.
(d) When any self-measuring pump has been tested and
found to be inaccurate, the inspector shall condemn the same
and place thereon a sign, in size twelve by fifteen (12x15) inches,
whidh shall have stenciled thereon in letters not smaller than
one inch in height, the following: "CONDEMNED by Oil In-
spector, Inaccurate."
(e) Inspectors shall make daily reports to the Commissioner
of Agriculture, covering all work performed, and a separate re-
port shall be made at each town or station before proceeding to
the next city or town. Weekly and monthly reports shall also
be made, showing the following information:
1-Name and number of towns visited.
2-Number of inspections in each town.
(a) Number of miles traveled by rail.
(b) Number of miles traveled by water.
(c) Number of miles traveled by automobile.
3-Expenses incurred.













REGULATION 6-REMITTANCE FOR STAMPS

(Section 9)

(a) All remittances for stamps must be made as follows:
Currency, postoffice or express money order, New York exchange
or cashier's check, drawn in favor of firm ordering stamps and
endorsed by firm to W. A. McRae, Commissioner of Agriculture.
Remittances not made in compliance herewith will be returned.
Remittances must accompany the order for inspection stamps,
which shall show the product on which they are to be used, to-
gether with the number of each denomination. All small pack-
ages of stamps will be sent by registered mail; large orders will
be sent by express, collect. All payments must be made prior
to inspection in the manner set forth above.

REGULATION 7-STANDARD AND SPECIFICATIONS

(Section 14)

(a) Gasoline to be high grade, must be refined and free from
water and all impurities.
(b) The appartus and method of conducting tests shall be
that now or hereafter authorized by the U.-S. Bureau of Mines.
(c) The word gasoline, whether used alone or in connection
with other words, shall apply only to the petroleum products
complying with the following minimum requirements:
(1) Boiling point must not be higher than 55* C. (131* F.)
(2) Twenty per cent (20%) of the sample must distill below
105 C. (221 F.)
(3) Fifty per cent (50%) must distill below 140 C. (284 F.)
(4) Ninty per cent (90%) must distill below 200* C. (392 F.)
(5) The end or dry point of distillation must not be higher
than 225* C. (437" F.)
(6) Not less than ninety-five per cent (95%) of the liquid
must be recovered from the distillation.

Kerosene

(a) The Oil shall be free from water, glue and suspended
matter.
(b) The Flash Point shall not be lower than 115 F.
(c) The End Point shall not be higher than 6000 F.
(d) The color shall not be darker than +21 Saybolt.

Signal Oils
(a) Where mixtures of heavy oils are manufactured for use
of railroads, boats, etc., in lighting trains, boats, etc., and in
signal lamps, are offered for sale, such mixtures may be sold,
provided such oil or oils shall have printed in plain letters,
"Signal Oil" (for Railroads, Boats, etc., Exclusively).
(b) All companies, firms or individuals offering these oils for
sale must deliver them exclusively for such purposes, and the
branding as above stated must be in strict conformity with this
Regulation.













REGULATION HEARINGS

(Section 17)

(a) When the examination or analysis shows that samples
are adulterated or misbranded within the meaning of this law,
notice of that fact shall be given in every case to the party or
parties against whom prosecution lies under this law, for the
shipment or manufacture or sale of the particular product, and
such other interested parties as the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture may direct, and a date shall be fixed at which said party
or parties may be heard before the Commissioner of Agriculture
and the Attorney General. These hearings shall be held in the of-
fice of the Commissioner of Agriculture at Tallahassee. These
hearings shall be private and confined to questions of fact. The
parties interested therein may appear in person or by attorney,
or submit a written brief, and may submit oral or written evi-
dence to show any fault or error in the findings of the analyst
or examiner.
(b) Interested parties may present proper interrogatories to
the analyst, to be submitted to and propounded by the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture. Such privileges, however, shall not in-
clude the right of cross-examination.
(c) If, after hearing held, it appears that a violation of the
law has been committed, the Commissioner of Agriculture shall
give notice to the proper prosecuting attorney.

REGULATION 9-DENOMINATION OF STAMPS

(Section 9)

(a) Stamps will be supplied in the following denominations,
to-wit: 1 gallon, 2 gallon, 5 gallon, 10 gallon, 25 gallon, 48 gal-
lon, 50 gallon, 52 gallon, 54 gallon, 55 gallon, 100 gallon, 500 gal-
lon, 1,000 gallon, 5,000, gallon, 10,000 gallon and 50,000 gallon.
(b) The cost of each denomination of stamps in the order
named are: /8c, '4c, %c, 114c, 31/gc, 6c, 614, 6Y2c, 6%c, 6%c,
121c, 62%c, $1.25, $6.25, $12.50, $62.50.
(c) Each denomination will be of a different color.

REGULATION 10-STICKERS OR STENCIL, SHOWING
TAX PAID

(Section 9)

(a) There shall be placed on each barrel, tank, tank car, or
other original package of oil, a sticker or stencil showing the
stamp tax paid, also the name of the manufacturer or dealer.
(b) No sticker or stencil showing the stamp tax paid shall
be required on a vessel filled from a container upon which the
stamp tax is paid.











85

REGULATION 11-INTERSTATE WAGON SALES

(Section 9)

(a) Where oil is brought into this State in wagons, each
wagon must have painted on it the name of the company operat-
ing said wagon, and also a sticker or stencil, in plain view,
showing that the stamp tax is paid.

REGULATION 12-ALTERATION OR AMENDMENT OF
REGULATIONS

(Section 14)

The above rules and regulations are hereby adopted by au-
thority of Section 14 of Chapter 7905, Laws of Florida, Acts of
1919, and are subject to amendment at any time without pre-
vious notice.

W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 1, 1920.




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