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 Introduction
 Institutional and state level...
 Institutional readiness
 Appendix






Title: Request to offer a new degree program
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Title: Request to offer a new degree program
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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Institutional and state level accountability
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Institutional readiness
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Appendix
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
Full Text




Florida Board of Governors
Request to Offer a New Degree Program


University of Florida
University Submitting Proposal

College of Design, Construction and Planning
Name of College or School

Historic Preservation and Conservation
Academic Specialty or Field


Fall Semester 2008
Proposed Implementation Date

College of Design, Construction and Planning
Name of Department(s)


Master of Historic Preservation
Complete Name of Degree
CIP Code 30.1201


The submission of this proposal constitutes a commitment by the university that, if the proposal is
approved, the necessary financial resources and the criteria for establishing new programs have
been met prior to the initiation of the program.


Date Approved by the University Board of Trustees


Signature of Chair, Board of Trustees


Date


President


Vice President for Academic Affairs


Provide headcount (HC) and full-time equivalent (FTE) student estimates of majors for Years 1 through
5. HC and FTE estimates should be identical to those in Table 1. Indicate the program costs for the first
and the fifth years of implementation as shown in the appropriate columns in Table 2. Calculate an
Educational and General (E&G) cost per FTE for Years 1 and 5 (Total E&G divided by FTE).


Implementation
Timeframe


Projected Student
Enrollment (From Table 1)


Projected Program Costs
(From Table 2)


Contract &
Total E&G E&G Cost
HC FTE Grants
Funding Fundin per FTE
Funding
Year 1 26 19.5 $200,071 $0 $17,397
Year 2 39 24.75
Year 3 39 29.25
Year 4 38 28.5
Year 5 36 27 $267,891 $0 $24,967
Note: This outline and the questions pertaining to each section must be reproduced ithin the body of the
proposal to ensure that all sections have been satisfactorily addressed


Date


Date










INTRODUCTION


I. Program Description and Relationship to System-Level Goals

A. Briefly describe within a few paragraphs the degree program under consideration.
Including (a) level; (b) emphases, including concentrations, tracks, or specializations;
(c) total number of credit hours; and (d) overall purpose, including examples of
employment or education opportunities that may be available to program graduates.

(a) Description:

This proposed forty-two-credit (42) graduate program for a Master of Historic
Preservation will be given through the College of Design, Construction and Planning
(DCP). The program will consist of academic courses, research, community service and
practice or internships. It will be modeled on the industry-recognized criteria specified
by the National Council for Preservation Education (NCPE) for degrees in historic
preservation. Neither the present Master of Science in Architectural Studies (with
emphasis in historic preservation) (10 students now) nor the Interdisciplinary
Concentration and Certificate in Historic Preservation (ICCHP) (15 students now) are
considered professional degrees by NCPE.

(b) Emphases, including concentrations, tracks, or specializations:

While taking the core coursework required for a Master of Historic Preservation,
students will also have the opportunity to take nine (9) credits of faculty-approved
electives in a focus area including, but not limited to architecture, anthropology,
building construction, cultural tourism, design history interior design, landscape
architecture, law, museum studies and urban and regional planning.

(c) Total number of credit hours:

Of the forty two (42) credits for the rigorous degree program, twelve (12) credits will be
required, core historic preservation courses, six (6) credits of approved history, eighteen
(18) of approved electives from HP courses (or appropriate "back-up" courses such as
marketing, public relations, etc.), and six (6) hours of Thesis.


(d) Overall purpose, including examples of employment or education opportunities


UF Proposal for Master of Historic Preservation


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that may be available to program graduates.


The degree of Master of Historic Preservation will be the advanced professional degree
for graduates with baccalaureate credentials from all undergraduate programs and
could be the first professional degree for these students. This program will provide a
solid academic grounding and practical experience in the profession of historic
preservation. The core historic preservation courses will prepare qualified students to
become qualified professionals.

Graduates of the program would pursue numerous current opportunities for
employment within the continually growing field of cultural heritage preservation
including the research, identification, and/or evaluation of historic sites and the
planning, design, conservation, and long-term management of landmarked properties.
Students will be in position to develop careers in local, state and federal government
agencies, non-governmental organizations and in the private sector both in the US and
abroad.


B. Describe how the proposed program is consistent with the current State University
System (SUS) Strategic Planning Goals. Identify which goals the program will
directly support and which goals the program will indirectly support. (See the SUS
Strategic Plan at http://www.flbog.org/StrategicResources/)

The SUS Strategic Planning Goals:

The professional graduate program in historic preservation is listed in the State
University System's (SUS) 2005-2013 Strategic Plan, Appendix (see 30.1201 "Historic
Preservation and Conservation" under "Targeted Program").

According to the 2005-2013 SUS Strategic Plan, the professional graduate program in
historic preservation, as it relates to design and construction-two significant areas in
the proposed program-will meet critical workforce needs in the State of Florida (see
SUS Strategic Plan I.B.3.e.). These jobs will be increasingly relevant because historic
preservationists contribute to the state's economic development and quality of life. The
proposed degree also qualifies under: "Build world-class, academic research capacity
and nationally recognized programs" given that it will be run through the College of
DCP and will be focused on educational partnerships with international institutions,
agencies and organizations.

A central priority of the SUS is to improve the quality of its educational offerings.
Further, one of the core goals in UF's work plan is to increase the size and quality of


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graduate programs consistent with the top ten American Association of Universities
(AAU) public institutions. Only two of the top ten AAU public institutions (University
of Texas, Austin and University of Oregon) currently offer graduate degrees in Historic
Preservation. Thus the addition of this proposed program would enhance UF's
prominence and distinguishing it among the other top public AAU institution. While
UF has offered coursework in historic preservation for over half a century, there is no
historic preservation studies programs in the SUS or elsewhere in the state that include
the multidisciplinary track described in this proposal.

Legislative Mandate:

UF was given responsibility for the management and maintenance of 32 historic
buildings in the National Historic Landmark District of St. Augustine in 2007. Bill HB
851 states the UF "...will help meet needs of St. Aiigstiic and the state through educational
internships and practice. The goal for contracting with the University of Florida is to ensure
long-term preservation and interpretation of state-owned historic properties in St. Agstiilc
while facilitating an educational program at the University of Florida that will be responsive to
the state's needs for professionals in historic preservation, archaeology, cultural resource
management, cultural tourism, and museum administration."

INSTITUTIONAL AND STATE LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY

II. Need and Demand

A. Need: Describe national, state, and/or local data that support the need for more
people to be prepared in this program at this level.

Since the passage of the National Preservation Act in 1966 and the establishment of the
National Register of Historic Places and the federal tax act for the rehabilitation of
landmark properties, historic preservation has become a major force impacting the
society, culture, and economy of the United States.

To makes sure that historic preservation issues are handled professionally, the National
Park Service, the US Department of State, the General Services Administration (among
other government organizations) require specialists in historic preservation on all the
projects which include historic sites. The Heritage Preservation Services division of the
National Park Service is the federal agency responsible for preservation and is a
wonderful source of good information about historic buildings, archeology and
preservation. The National Park Service's Teaching with Historic Places program is
accomplished by professionals around the country.


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The National Trust for Historic Preservation-the nation's lead preservation advocacy
organization-has national and regional offices that employ historic preservation
professionals. The National Trust for Historic Preservation also manages a Main Street
program across the country that hires professionals to help local citizens enhance the
design and appearance of their downtown areas through historic preservation. Each
town has a design committee and a Main Street manager and staff who are professional
resources.

All states have historic preservation offices specified in the NHPA and are required to
staff these offices with qualified historic preservation professionals. Some local
governments have historic preservation offices, and in Florida there are regional
historic preservation offices. Historic Preservation Programs have been recognized as
having special merit by being designated as a Certified Local Government (CLG). The
CLG's identify local landmarks and enact and enforce preservation ordinances that help
identify and preserve cultural landmarks. The Certified Local Government program
provides technical assistance, awards, and grants and coordinates a network of
participating communities.

The national need for historic preservation specialists is also demonstrated by the more
than 250 positions currently listed on the leading historic preservation job listings
website, PreserveNet.1

In the State of Florida, the authors of a widely recognized study of the Economic
Benefits of Historic Preservation estimated that in 2000, $350 million was spent on
rehabilitation of historic properties in Florida-$135 million on historic residential and
another $215 on historic non-residential.2 Expertise in identifying, researching,
planning, designing, conserving and maintaining these structures and sites are
particularly critical activities in the historic preservation field. Further, historic
preservation contributes to the state's significant tourism industry with total annual
economic impacts in 2000 estimated at "$3.721 billion in annual spending by Florida
heritage travelers."3 Significant districts, landscapes, museums, Main Streets and other
sites that attract these heritage travelers need to be evaluated, protected, interpreted
and sustained. Graduates of UF's proposed Master of Historic Preservation will be able
to fulfill these jobs both in Florida and nationwide.

In 2006, the state's Bureau of Historic Preservation supported 117 project grants to


1 See http://www.preservenet.cornell.edu/employ/jobs.cfm.
2 David Listokin, Mike Lahr, Timothy McLendon, JoAnn Klein, 2002, Economic Impacts of Historic Preservation in
Florida, p. 31.
3 Ibid, pg. 50.


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undertake historic preservation initiatives around the state.4 Further, Florida residents
recognize the significant contributions of historic preservation to their quality of life .
"A 2005-2006 survey found that Florida residents are aware of historic sites (roughly
55% of 1505 respondents had visited a historic site in the past year) and value the role
that historic preservation plays in the state of Florida. Specifically, preservation is
valued for what it can contribute to future generations (24%), for aesthetic reasons
(17%), for educational reasons (14%), and for environmental reasons (13%)."5

Many communities throughout Florida have preservation organizations dedicated to
preserving local heritage. Most cities or counties have historic preservation
commissions (a citizen's council appointed by the local government).

With its focus on sensitively rehabilitating and adapting existing resources to meet ever
changing needs, historic preservation is an integral part of the sustainability movement
and green design and construction efforts. UF established the Office of Sustainability in
2005 with the mission "...to make the University of Florida in its operations,
education, research, and outreach a model of sustainability, integrating the goals of
ecological restoration, economic development, and social equity. In pursuing this
mandate, the Office of Sustainability will encourage and facilitate the collaborative
efforts of faculty, students, and staff to generate knowledge, acquire skills, develop
values, and initiate practices that contribute to a sustainable, high quality of life on
campus, in the state of Florida, and across the globe." The various units of DCP and the
faculty and students have been asked to take the lead in addressing sustainable efforts
on the UF campus. The historic preservation graduate program will serve as a
significant resource, helping guide campus efforts to sensitively rehabilitate and to
make more energy efficient the contributing buildings of UF's celebrated National
Historic Landmark District. These efforts will be informed by the recent Preservation
Master Plan completed by a former DCP historic preservation faculty member serving
on the committee for the existing, interdisciplinary historic preservation certificate.

For UF, the Master of Historic Preservation program will enhance the institution's
offerings. The new program will offer increased study opportunities for current and
potential students with interests and backgrounds in a variety of subjects, including,
but not limited to, those interested in art history, history, anthropology, natural
sciences, archaeology, architecture, cultural tourism, building construction,
engineering, interior design, landscape architecture, law, business, real estate, urban


4 See the Florida Division of Historical Resources, Bureau of Historic Preservation for a listing of the projects and
the funding awarded at http://www.flheritage.com/grants/info/awards/search.cfm.
5 Larsen, Kristen. "Cultural and Aesthetic Values Relevant to Historic Preservation in Florida," Contributions of
Historic Preservation to the Quality of Life in Florida (2006), p.vii.


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and regional planning, conservation, sustainability, museum studies, medicine and
many other disciplines across the campus. With its broader scope, the program will
provide greater opportunities to study different aspects of the field. Although initially
conceived as requiring no additional courses, the new program could eventually
provide more courses that address both the academic and practical aspects of historic
preservation work. Such courses will have to do with the history and philosophy of
historic preservation, education and interpretation, preservation law and preservation
technology.

In 2004, forty-four years after the introduction of the first historic preservation courses
at UF, DCP introduced an Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Historic
Preservation (ICCHP) that is now available to students in the professional fields of
anthropology, architecture, building construction, interior design, landscape
architecture, urban and regional planning, museum studies and cultural tourism. This
exceptional option is cross-campus and extremely popular. It also makes the certificate
one of the most interdisciplinary academic undertakings on campus and the distinct
among historic preservation certificates at other universities. Additional partners
throughout the university are being sought for the certificate program, including law,
history, business and engineering. Although the ICCHP has been highly successful, it
is not a professional degree. Further, students must be in one of these designated
programs in order to participate. The Master of Historic Preservation will use the
interdisciplinary and cross-campus connections already established by this certificate.

Reference national, state, and/or local plans or reports that support the need for this
program.

In addition to the reports referenced above, a variety of national, state and local sources
testify to the need for historic preservationists. The non-profit National Trust for
Historic Preservation supports several significant programs, most notably the Main
Street Program, which provides jobs to specialists who work to encourage commercial
revitalization in historic downtown across the country. Currently, there are 49 Main
Street Programs in Florida.6 The National Park Service through the National Historic
Preservation Act, originally adopted in 1966, runs multiple programs at the national
level, including the National Register of Historic Places7 and tax incentives programs,8
which require a network of national, state, and local experts involved in identifying,


6 See http://www.mainstreet.org/content.aspx?page=2876§ion=15 for a list of the Florida Main Streets active in
the program.
7 See National Register. Sites in Florida identified for current and possible future protection are listed on the
Florida Site File. See FL Master Site File and Master Site File FAQ.
8 See Federal Historic Preservation Tax Incentives for more information.


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safeguarding, and monitoring historic sites.9


In addition to the statewide historic preservation plan,10 the state's growth management
legislation requires all cities with a population of 50,000 or more and counties with
populations of 75,000 or more to prepare a Historic Preservation Element." These local
governments typically hire consultants or full time preservation planners to draft and
implement these plans. In addition, special programs, such as the Florida Folklife
program, and local and private heritage sites also provide opportunities for graduates
and for research.12

Requests for the proposed program which have emanated from a perceived need by
agencies or industries in your service area.

The need for the program has been demonstrated by students who have earned
degrees in architecture, landscape architecture, or other units while there were only HP
courses taught (without a degree), and went on to become specialists in historic
preservation. These include Rolando Rivas-Camp, Director, Center for Historic
Buildings; Bonnie Burnham, President, World Monuments Fund; Charles Chase,
former Executive Director, San Francisco Architectural Heritage, formerly City
Architect and Preservation Officer for the City of Charleston; Mark Tarmey, President,
Florida Trust for Historic Preservation, and architectural specialist in Historic
Preservation;, Susan Tate, Professor Emeritus of Interior Design, UF; Beth Grassoff,
Historic Architect, Kim Del Rance, LEED AP, Associate at Gould Evans, former
Preservation Officer for the City of St. Augustine, HP Planner; David Ferro and Phillip
Wiseley, Historic Architects with the Florida Division of Historic Resources; Robbie
Cangelosi, Historic Architect for the Cabildo Restoration, New Orleans; Wilson Stiles,
former Arkansas State Historic Preservation Officer, and Historic Interior Design,
Tampa; Betty del Queto, Professor of Historic Preservation, University of Puerto Rico,:
John Myers, Director, Preservation Research Center, Georgia Tech; Kristin Larsen,
Professor in Urban and Regional Planning, UF, and chair of the UF historic
preservation and interdisciplinary certificates committee; Richard Crisson and Peter


9 See the following sites for documents that address federal, state, and local compliance:
Compliance Review
Certified Local Governments
Protection Laws & Regulation
Management Standards & Operational Manual
10 See the following site for Florida's preservation planning documents:
Comprehensive Preservation Plan
11 FLA. STAT. 163.3177(6)(I).
12 See the following site for more on this program: Florida Folklife Program.


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Dessauer, Preservation Architects with the National Parks Service; Mark Voight,
Administrator Historic District Commission, Nantucket, MA. This listing is far from
complete, because with absence of a degree, the university does not track graduates
with a certificate and/or who specialize in historic preservation at this time.

B. Demand: Describe data that support the assumption that students will enroll in the
proposed program. Include descriptions of surveys or other communications with
prospective students.

Student enrollment in the Master of Science in Architectural Studies program that
allows them to concentrate in preservation without a professional degree has been
steady at about ten (10) new students a year since 2000. Eight of the students who are
presently taking this option are also enrolled in the ICCHP program because the former
does not give them a professional degree and the concentration does not appear on
their diplomas. In the past two years, students have enrolled in the MAS with the
expectation that they could transfer to the Master in Historic Preservation program
once that is approved and offered.

Many prospective students use the NCPE list of institutions that offer a specialized
Master degree in Historic Preservation in order to choose a university to attend. Since
the UF is not on that list, the institution is not attracting the amount of students it
should.

Students who take the ICCHP in order to get a record of their specialization must be, at
the same time, enrolled in a professional degree in a unit of DCP (architecture,
landscape architecture, interior design, urban and regional planning or building
construction) or in archeology, museum studies or cultural tourism. This leaves a void
for other related disciplines from across the university. It is expected that the amount
of students seeking a Master in Historic Preservation will double the number presently
pursuing historic preservation studies and certificates.

C. If similar programs (either private or public) exist in the state, identify the
institutions) and geographic locationss.

A survey of other Florida institutions revealed that where historic preservation-related
courses are listed, the programs are informal ones. The University of West Florida
(UWF) is the only established program, although it does not offer a Master of Historic
Preservation, rather a Master of Arts in Historic Preservation through the archeology
and history departments. This UWF program uses the state-owned historic properties
of Pensacola for field projects and class room space. Similarly, if the proposed degree


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is approved, UF will use the state-owned historic properties in St. Augustine as a field
laboratory. Unlike UWF, the fieldwork by UF faculty and students will not focus
solely on archaeology and history, but include, but not be limited to, architectural,
interior and landscape conservation, building technologies related to rehabilitation of
historic properties and museum studies and issues of interpreting sites.

With the wealth of heritage resources in Florida-which will only increase as buildings
and sites from the post-World War II era age and are considered for landmark status-
it is vitally important that SUS provide at least one formal program for educating and
training historic preservation professionals skilled to identify, assess, plan and design
the preservation of structures form this period.

Summarize the outcome(s) of any communication with such programs with regard
to the potential impact on their enrollment and opportunities for possible
collaboration (instruction and research).

There will be minimal impact on enrollment in the Master of Arts in Historic
Preservation at UWF as that program is limited to concentrations in history and
archeology. Housed within the College of Design, Construction and Planning, the
proposed Master in Historic Preservation at UF will be able to offer concentrations in
architecture, building construction, interior design, landscape architecture and urban
and regional planning as well as the other disciplines associated with the ICCHP, such
as museum studies, cultural tourism and anthropology.

Since the two programs will be complimentary to each other and draw upon their
extant resources and strengths, there may be opportunities to collaborate including
long-distance learning courses. Discussion is already underway to establish such a
course at each institution, an introduction in archeology at UWF and an introduction
in architecture/landscape/planning aspects of historic preservation at UF.

It is the intent of the two programs to apply to the Florida Department of Historic
Resources for funding to plan and initiate these collaborative long-distance learning
courses, as a pilot effort that may lead to the development of others. In all likelihood,
other institutions around the state could take advantage of these courses or collaborate
with UF to develop similar exchanges.

Provide data that support the need for an additional program.

The UWF degree is not the same as the one proposed at UF. The UWF degree does not
have the multidisciplinary, complementary studies needed in architecture, building


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construction, cultural tourism, interior design, landscape architecture, law, museum studies or
urban and regional planning. UF's proposed program will have a much broader appeal
and will contain the interdisciplinary aspects of the historic preservation profession.

D. Use Table 1 (A for undergraduate and B for graduate) to categorize projected student
headcount (HC) and Full Time Equivalents (FTE) according to primary sources.
Generally undergraduate FTE will be calculated as 40 credit hours per year and
graduate FTE will be calculated as 32 credit hours per year.

Refer to Appendix B for Table 1-B.

Describe the rationale underlying enrollment projections.

Enrollment projections are based on the growth of the two historic preservation
certificate and concentration programs currently established at UF and the increased
enrollment over the last three (3) years. The increased number of inquiries from both
UF and non-UF students-in particular Florida residents-interested in pursuing a
graduate degree in historic preservation has also been taken into consideration when
forecasting enrollment projections.

If, initially, students within the institution are expected to change majors to enroll in
the proposed program, describe the shifts from disciplines that will likely occur.

Some students may shift from the Master of Science in Architectural Studies (MSAS)
because of the lack of recognition for that degree by NCPE and the need to have a
specialty recorded on the diploma.

E. Indicate what steps will be taken to achieve a diverse student body in this program,
and identify any minority groups that will be favorably or unfavorably impacted.

An active campaign has been in place for a number of years to recruit minority students
for the existing historic preservation certificate program, exhibited by the number of
current students taking historic preservation courses. These efforts will continue and
expand with the establishment of a Master in Historic Preservation. The DCP faculty
member currently overseeing minority affairs and recruitment serves on the historic
preservation certificates committee. This faculty has helped make important
connections with minority colleges and organizations. In addition, an agreement of
cooperation has been discussed with Florida Atlantic University and Florida
International University, two state institutions with a significant number of minority
students, but who do not presently offer historic preservation courses. A symposium
on the importance of preserving the "Recent Past" planned for fall 2008 at UF will have


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a session devoted to African American cultural history in North Central Florida.

The historic facilities for which the Florida Legislature has given the university
stewardship responsibility in St. Augustine offer new opportunities to have Spanish
Heritage historic preservation courses.

Lastly, the current historic preservation program at UF is an affiliate with the Center for
Latin American Studies and the Center for African Studies. Students involved with
each of these centers will be actively recruited.

The university's Equal Opportunity Officer should read this section and then sign
and date below.

The Equal Opportunity Office is providing a letter.

III. Budget

A. Use Table 2 to display projected costs and associated funding sources for Year 1 and
Year 5 of program operation. Use Table 3 to show how existing Education & General
funds will be shifted to support the new program in Year 1. In narrative form,
summarize the contents of both tables, identifying the source of both current and
new resources to be devoted to the proposed program. (Data for Year 1 and Year 5
reflect snapshots in time rather than cumulative costs.)

Refer to Appendix B for Table 1-B.

The proposed Master of Historic Preservation program will be using existing resources.
There will be no shift in funds and there will be no additional costs at this time.

The faculty required to teach the core courses and electives, as well as to chair and
participate on master thesis committees is already in place. These scholars already teach
in the MSAS and ICCHP programs. Therefore, no other units or programs will be
impacted by the reallocation of existing resources.

The nine (9) credit course hours currently offered through the well-established (35-years-old)
and well-attended Preservation Institute: Nantucket-an off-book program-also assists with
launching the Master of Historic Program without the requirement of additional funding. The
field school at Mount Lebanon Shaker Village is also another opportunity for students to receive
nine (9) credits of required historic preservation coursework. This program is self-sustaining
and does not require resources form UF.


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B. If other programs will be impacted by a reallocation of resources for the proposed
program, identify the program and provide a justification for reallocating resources.

There are already faculty form the five individual disciplines making up DCP-
architecture, building construction, interior design, landscape architecture and urban
and regional planning-educated and experienced in historic preservation that help
guide and teach courses for the MSAS and ICCHP certificates. These positions will
continue to make up the core faculty for the Master of Historic Preservation program.

The existing Master in Architectural Studies with an emphasis in Historic Preservation
will remain as a degree option. It will continue to be used by the School of Architecture
for students specific to that unit who are not design-oriented. However, due to the
professionally focused nature of the proposed degree, many more students will select
the MHP because it will be recognized, essentially "accredited," by NCPE.

The ICCHP will remain a viable option for students who are pursuing a degree in
archeology, architecture, building construction, cultural tourism, interior design,
landscape architecture, museum studies and urban and regional design, but wish to
obtain a certificate in historic preservation who do not wish to pursue the Master in
Historic Preservation.

Specifically address the potential negative impacts that implementation of the
proposed program will have on related undergraduate programs (i.e., shift in faculty
effort, reallocation of instructional resources, reduced enrollment rates, greater use of
adjunct faculty and teaching assistants).

There will be no negative impacts on undergraduate programs. Faculty effort is
expected to remain the same.

Also, discuss the potential positive impacts that the proposed program might have
on related undergraduate programs (i.e., increased undergraduate research
opportunities, improved quality of instruction associated with cutting-edge research,
improved labs and library resources).

There will be more graduate students to provide teaching assistance to undergraduate
programs. Undergraduate coursework will be positively impacted by increased
research and activities associated with the new degree. Graduate students in historic
preservation will be able to participate and help advance the research agendas of the
core faculty, many of which focus on or include substantial historic preservation and
sustainability components.


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C. Describe other potential impacts on related programs or departments (e.g., increased
need for general education or common prerequisite courses, or increased need for
required or elective courses outside of the proposed major).

Other departments or related programs should not be impacted by this new degree, all
the required courses and electives are already being offered. This is a graduate
professional degree that requires no prerequisites.

D. Describe what steps have been taken to obtain information regarding resources
(financial and in-kind) available outside the institution (businesses, industrial
organizations, governmental entities, etc.).

DCP has a full-time development officer and staff that liaison with the UF Foundation.
Fundraising efforts already in place targeting individuals, corporations, and private
foundations will continue and benefit the Master of Historic Preservation program. For
existing historic preservation activities, grants have been applied for and received from
governmental organizations and private organizations. The sources of funding will be
approached to continue to support UF historic preservation. The establishment of a
new program will help in enhancing a strong statement of support, demonstrating the
continued success of historic preservation at UF and the commitment of the State of
Florida and SUS.

In addition, DCP has a Board of Advocates for Historic Preservation Programs with an
active subcommittee on fundraising. The Board of Advocates is comprised of several
members with extensive experience in fundraising and development and critical
connections to philanthropic organizations throughout the United States. The
subcommittee is currently working with UF faculty and development staff to create a
new case statement of support for enhancing the Preservation Institute: Nantucket, a
key component of historic preservation studies at UF. The statement will be expanded
to include a new Master of Historic Preservation program.

Describe the external resources that appear to be available to support the proposed
program.

Partnerships

Over the last five years, the activities and visibility of the existing Historic Preservation
Program at UF have been elevated by a number of strategic partnerships and projects:


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World Heritage Center in Paris: In 2004, the World Heritage Center awarded the UF
historic preservation program a grant to host a symposium on preserving the Recent
Past. A publication was supported by the Graham Foundation.

World Monuments Fund: The current director was appointed to serve on the
prestigious selection panel for the World Monuments Fund's World Monuments Watch
List of 100 Most Endangered Sites along with ten (10) other international experts from
the field of cultural heritage preservation. UF was the only educational institution
represented on the panel. The director's participation was an opportunity to share and
showcase the work of UF and to make significant contacts with several organizations
that could help support historic preservation activities, including The Getty
Foundation, UNESCO and the World Heritage Committee.

UF was also asked to serve on the World Monuments Fund's Traditional Building
Craftsmanship Task Force dedicated to identifying innovative approaches to
integrating the academic and craft components of historic preservation. This Task Force
and related activities were supported by a number of private foundations.

International Council for Monuments and Sites: The director of the historic
preservation program delivered a paper and promoted UF at the International Council
for Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) General Assembly in China in 2006. With
divisions in over 100 countries, ICOMOS is responsible for collaborating with UNESCO
to develop and direct funds to cultural heritage projects internationally.

Getty Foundation: UF received a substantial grant from the Getty Foundation to
prepare a conservation master plan for the historic campus. It is anticipated that
additional funding would be available through the Getty Foundation to support
preservation and education activities.

National Trust for Historic Preservation: UF partnered with a number of leading
preservation organizations, including the National Trust for Historic Preservation to
develop a special topics historic preservation course that placed students in the field as
part of service-learning projects to assist with the assessment and planning of recovery
of landmark properties in the neighborhoods of New Orleans and towns of coastal
Mississippi following Hurricane Katrina. This high profile and well-publicized project
led substantial funding to implement work.

Florida Historic Resources Division and The Florida Trust for Historic Preservation:
UF has collaborated with state agencies and organizations on a number of initiatives,
including a symposium and workshop on the historical resources of Florida's Recent


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Past scheduled to take place in November 2008. This public event is funded in part by
state and local sources.

The partners in the activities listed above included, but was not limited to : Architects
for Humanity, International Council for Monuments and Sites, the Getty Conservation
Institute, National Center for Preservation Training and Technology, National Trust for
Historic Preservation, Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans, Preservation
Trades Network and World Monuments Fund.

Several of these organizations and non-profits manage grant programs that helped
support the work. It is anticipated that these partners will continue to collaborate with
the historic preservation education efforts of UF.

Programs

St. Augustine, FL: As previously noted in this proposal, the Florida State legislature
has given UF responsibility for the planning and stewardship of 32 historic properties
in the St. Augustine, Florida National Historic Landmark District. The Masteer of
Historic Preservation program has been developed to respond to the expectation
established by the state legislature. Stewardship for the St. Augustine buildings
provides opportunities to engage UF students in hands-on, service-learning and offers
potential new streams for funding these activities.

Nantucket, MA: As the nation's oldest field school dedicated to historic preservation,
the Preservation Institute: Nantucket (PI:N) has been operated by DCP for 35 years.
This program focuses on documenting, planning and preserving the structures that
contribute to the Nantucket National Historic and local landmarks district. The well-
respected program and unique venue attracts scholars, practitioners and notable
faculty and students from universities all over the country and abroad. In addition to
being offered on the main campus, students have the option to take three of the core
courses for the proposed Master in Historic Preservation at PI:N. was initially endowed
and continues to be supported by the Walter Beinecke family. In addition, the self-
sustaining program has attracted other financial support.

New Lebanon, NY: For the past two years, the Historic Preservation and Traditional
Building Field School took place at the Mount Lebanon Shaker Village National
Historic Landmark District-recognized as the premier Shaker site in the US.
Preservation Institute: New York (PI:NY) offers UF and non-UF students interested in
historic preservation the opportunity to study in the field with expert professionals and
craftspeople and the option of earning nine (9) graduate credit hours through the


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university. This initiative has been partially funded by the World Monuments Fund
and involves additional partnerships including the American College of Building Arts,
the Preservation Trades Network and the Timber Framers Guild.

DCP is exploring the potential of offering similar initiatives at several other sites in and
outside of Florida, including the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed campus of Florida
Southern College National Historic Landmark District, Lakeland, Florida and the Holy
Cross National Historic Landmark District, New Orleans, Louisiana.

The exiting off-campus programs at some of America's most celebrated historic sites
have helped strengthen existing and forge new partnerships and expand the
constituency for UF, DCP and the proposed Master in Historic Preservation program.

IV. Projected Benefit of the Program to the University, Local Community, and State

Use information from Table 1, Table 2, and the supporting narrative for "Need and
Demand" to prepare a concise statement that describes the projected benefit to the
university, local community, and the state if the program is implemented. The projected
benefits can be both quantitative and qualitative in nature, but there needs to be a clear
distinction made between the two in the narrative.

From its rich Native-American history to it status as gateway to the New World to its
wealth of post-World War II built heritage, Florida has a diverse and fascinating past. Its
cultural resources and traditions represent the presence and activities of some 12,000 years
of human activity. As previously noted, it is this amazing wealth of heritage sites that help
attract tens of millions of domestic and foreign visitors to Florida each year, generating
over $50 million annually.

Historic preservation professionals take the lead in identifying, protecting, and preserving
the diverse heritage that makes Florida special for residents and attracts visitors. Yet,
despite growing public appreciation of heritage resources and the role it plays in drawing
tourists, each year irreplaceable buildings are demolished, historic public records are lost,
archaeological sites are destroyed and cultural traditions are lost. The professionals created
through the proposed Master in Historic Preservation will benefit the public by leading the
effort to preserve the state's past legacy for the betterment of the economy and the quality
of life that it brings to the community. UF, the state's flagship university, should take the
lead in educating the next generation of historic preservation specialists responsible for
safeguarding Florida's heritage.

As the new degree program recruits actively, and takes advantage of UF's existing
reputation for preservation education, we anticipate at least 10 students the first year and


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an average of 20 per year in the future. The new program will attract students from other
state schools, and from out of state programs. The new master degree will offer existing
and future students an alternative to transferring to another non-Florida institution that
offers a graduate degree in historic preservation.



Demand for program emanating from perceived need by agencies or industries in area:

Over the past year, UF faculty currently offering courses toward the existing historic
preservation certificate programs have surveyed colleagues throughout the state working
for public agencies (state, regional and local) and for private companies (architecture and
design firms, landscape architects, planners and other disciplines specializing in historic
preservation) about the need for a Master in Historic Preservation. All inquiries have
indicated a need for more graduates with training in cultural heritage preservation. This
informal survey has been reinforced with the number of inquiries from the same agencies
and organizations requesting recommendations for interns and entry-level positions.

UF students graduating with a certificate in historic preservation have easily found
placement with agencies, institutions and organizations both within and outside Florida
and internationally.

V. Access and Articulation Bachelor's Degree Only

N/A

INSTITUTIONAL READINESS

VI. Related Institutional Mission and Strength

A. Describe how the goals of the proposed program relate to the institutional mission
statement as contained in the SUS Strategic Plan and the University Strategic Plan.

The SUS Strategic Planning Goals:

According to the 2005-2013 SUS Strategic Plan, the professional graduate program in
historic preservation, as it relates to design and construction two significant areas in
the program will meet critical workforce needs in the State of Florida (see SUS
Strategic Plan I.B.3.e.). These jobs will be increasingly relevant because historic
preservationists contribute to the state's economic development and quality of life.
The proposed degree also qualifies under: "Build world-class, academic research


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capacity and nationally recognized programs" particularly given that it will be run
through the College of DCP.

The University of Florida Master Plan:

The institutional mission statement in the UF Master Plan approved by the Board of
Regents includes the goal of strengthening and enhancing the institution's standing as
one of the most comprehensive land-grant research universities in the country,
encompassing virtually all academic and professional disciplines. Introducing a
historic preservation master program will help meet this objective.

The College of Design, Construction and Planning Master Plan:

The mission statement of the Master Plan of the College of DCP references the
exceptional professional education programs addressing design, development,
construction and preservation of the built and natural environments. Through faculty and
doctoral-level basic and applied research, DCP faculty critically assess ongoing
processes of change in human settlements, engage students in projects intended to
guide those processes and bring new strategies and approaches to bear on work in the
professions of architecture, building construction, historic preservation, interior design,
landscape architecture and urban and regional planning.

In addition, Goal 9 of the Master Plan calls for the college to strengthen graduate
programs in DCP, including increased graduate enrollments and improved quality of
graduate students and specifically requests for the development of a Master in
Historic Preservation to meet student demand for a recognized preservation degree
program.

B. Describe how the proposed program specifically relates to existing institutional
strengths, such as programs of emphasis, other academic programs, and/or
institutes and centers.

The Master in Historic Preservation degree will be offered through the College of
DCP. The College will offer expanded learning, research and service opportunities for
graduate students participating in the proposed graduate program.

The university already has well-established programs in such disciplines as history,
anthropology, art history, archeology, architecture, building construction, cultural
tourism, interior design, landscape architecture, museum studies, urban and regional
planning law, business, engineering, conservation and the natural sciences. The


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existence of such programs that contribute to the discipline of historic preservation
will benefit the new degree program, which will be a multidisciplinary endeavor.
The program will offer new specializations or offerings for students in these allied
disciplines.

Historic preservation courses taught in the past have drawn students from art history,
history, anthropology, natural sciences, archaeology, architecture, cultural tourism,
building construction, engineering, interior design, landscape architecture, law,
business, real estate, Latin American Studies, African Studies and other parts of the
university, indicating the interdisciplinary appeal of the subject and the way such a
program could enhance the degree programs of other departments and help foster
interdisciplinary exchange across campus.

C. Provide a narrative of the planning process leading up to submission of this
proposal.

Preservation courses began in the UF College of Architecture in 1965, by Professor
Emeritus F. Blair Reeves. In 1972, the Preservation Institute: Nantucket was founded
by Professor Reeves and Walter Beinecke, Chairman of the Nantucket Historical
Society. In 1983, Mr. Beinecke provided the funding for a Chair in Historic
Preservation. These were early activities leading up to a graduate degree in historic
preservation.

On January 28, 2002, the then Dean of DCP designated the Committee on Historic
Preservation Programs and charged the members to address historic preservation
instruction and research from an interdisciplinary perspective. Committee members
Kristin Larsen (Chair), Pete Prugh, Rhonda Phillips, Blair Reeves, Richard Smailes
(replaced upon departing the university in 2003 with Walter Dukes), Susan Tate
(replaced upon retirement in 2007 with Morris Hylton III) and Kay Williams met in
February 2002 and decided to draft a strategic plan to guide and strengthen the
program. The strategic plan, submitted to DCP in May 2002, advocated for the
creation of an interdisciplinary center of excellence in historic preservation,
establishment of a Master in Historic Preservation, take advantage of the
interdisciplinary potential of existing resources across campus (which led in part to
the Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Historic Preservation) and
examine the opportunities associated with the Beinecke-Reeves Chair position (which
led to the hiring Roy Eugene Graham, Director of Historic Preservation in the
College).

In Fall 2002, under the chairmanship of Professor Larsen, the committee began to


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explore a minor in historic preservation, which would become the Interdisciplinary
Concentration and Certificate in Historic Preservation (ICCHP). Approved in April
2004, the ICCHP now includes all the units in the College and three outside the
College-Museum Studies, Tourism and Anthropology.

In October 2003, Roy Eugene Graham was hired to become the Beinecke-Reeves
Distinguished Professor and Director of the College of DCP Historic Preservation
Programs. Among the job description was the need to fulfill the objectives of the HP
Master Plan. Among these objectives was the establishment of a new center (Center
for World Heritage Research and Stewardship in November 2007.

In Fall 2006, a state-wide task force consisting of Dr. Judith Bense, UWF, Dr. Michael
Gannon, UF, Hershel Sheppard, Professor Emeritus UF, Roy Eugene Graham,
Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Professor, Dr. Kathleen Deegan and Roy Hunt,
Former Dean of the UF Law School was formed to advise the Florida legislature on
the future stewardship of 32 historic state-owned buildings in St. Augustine which
were then being utilized for the Department of Cultural Resources and maintained by
the city. The task force recommended that the property be given to the "a university
which gave a degree in historic preservation." As previously noted, the State of
Florida has given UF responsibility for the St. Augustine historic properties.

In Spring 2007, outside experts were consulted to begin the planning process for the
proposed graduate degree. These included Dr. Michael Tomlan, Director of Historic
Preservation Planning, Cornell University; Robert Milner, Getty Foundation; Andrew
Farrell, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training; and Morris
Hylton III, then at World Monuments Fund.

In Spring and Fall 2007, the College of DCP Historic Preservation Committee, chaired
by Kristin Larsen, and consisting of Kay Williams, Walter Dukes, Peter Prugh, Roy
Eugene Graham and Morris Hylton III (Fall 2007) drafted a plan that outlined the
curriculum and structure of the proposed Master of Historic Preservation. On
November 13, 2007, the pre-proposal for the new graduate degree curriculum was
reviewed and approved by the DCP Curriculum Committee. Final approval was
given in February 2008.




Include a chronology (table) of activities, listing both university personnel directly involved
and external individuals who participated in planning. Provide a timetable of events
necessary for the implementation of the proposed program.


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Planning Process
Date Participants Planning Activity
1965 Blair Reeves, Professor Established course in College of
Emeritus Architecture
1972 Blair Reeves and Walter Established Preservation
Beinecke Institute: Nantucket
1983 Walter Beinecke Endowed chair of historic
preservation



Implementation Activities
Date Implementation Activity
January 2002 Formation of historic preservation committee by DCP dean
May 2002 Approval of Historic Preservation Strategic Plan by DCP
dean
November 2007 Approval of Pre-proposal from College of DCP
Curriculum Committee
October 2003 Appointment of Director of Historic Preservation
Fall 2004 Establishment of Interdisciplinary Certificate in Historic
Preservation directed by DCP
November 2007 Approval of Center for World Heritage Research and
Stewardship approval from Provost
Fall 2007 Development of curriculum, structure and plan for Master
in Historic Preservation degree by DCP historic
preservation committee

VII. Program Quality Indicators Reviews and Accreditation

Identify program reviews, accreditation visits, or internal reviews for any university
degree programs related to the proposed program, especially any within the same
academic unit. List all recommendations and summarize the institution's progress in
implementing the recommendations.

The National Council of Preservation Education (NCPE) is the accreditation organization
for degrees in historic preservation. The proposed Master in Historic Preservation degree
adheres to the guidelines and recommendations of NCPE and its development had input
from Michael Tomlan, Director of Historic Preservation graduate program at Cornell
University and Chair Emeritus of NCPE.


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VI. Curriculum


A. Describe the specific expected student learning outcomes associated with the
proposed program.

The required twelve (12) credits of core HP classes include a three-credit introductory
history and theory seminar (DCP 6710), a three (3) credit course in documentation of
historic sites (ARC 5810), a three (3) credit practicum (ARC 6821) and a three (3) credit
course in a preservation topic (ARC 6805). In addition, the degree requires six (6)
credits of approved history coursework. Eighteen (18) hours of electives offer students
the opportunity to specialize in an area such as urban and regional planning.
Landscape architecture, interior design, museum studies, cultural tourism, law, Latin
American and African American studies and other disciplines participating in the
current ICCHP certificate program. In addition, two summer programs, the
Preservation Institute: Nantucket and the Preservation Institute: New York each offer
three (3) courses each in historic preservation. These courses are among the electives
listed below. Finally, six (6) hours of a thesis must be selected, researched and carried
out under the direction of a supervisory committee.

If a bachelor's degree program, include a web link to the Academic Learning
Compact or include the document itself as an appendix.

N/A

B. Describe the admission standards and graduation requirements for the program.

Students with a bachelor's degree in any discipline from an accredited university are
eligible to apply to this program. This is a three (3) to four (4) semester program (42
hours minimum) that includes a thesis. (No more than six (6) hours of thesis credits
may be counted in the minimum credit hours for the degree.) Interdisciplinary study is
encouraged.

The applicant must provide:

a) Official transcripts and credentials from all previous higher education institutions
attended. The undergraduate grade point average is calculated from the last 60
semester credits (or 90 quarter credits) of the applicant's bachelor's degree, of
which 3.00 is the expected minimum.

b) Minimum grade average of B for all upper-division undergraduate work and


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scores that are acceptable to the program to which the student is applying on the
General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) (or on the Graduate
Management Admission Test for Administration) for students with an earned
bachelor's degree only or its international equivalent. These scores must be used in
the context of a holistic credential review process.

c) Three letters of recommendation from people qualified to assess a student's
academic performance or professional experience.

d) A letter of intent, detailing the student's motives and goals in pursuing graduate
education in historic preservation.

e) All international students seeking admission to the Graduate School must submit
satisfactory scores on the GRE General Test, or GMAT for selected programs.
International students must submit a satisfactory score on the TOEFL (Test of
English as a Foreign Language: computer=213, paper=550, web=80), IELTS
(International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English
Language Assessment Battery: 77) or successful completion of the University of
Florida English Language Institute program.

International students who meet the following conditions may be exempt from the
English language test requirements:

1. International students whose native language is English.

2. International students who have spent at least 1 academic year in a
degree-seeking program at a college or university in a country where
English is the official language, if their attendance was in the year
immediately prior to UF admission.

3. International students with unsatisfactory scores on the TOEFL, IELTS, or
MELAB; unsuccessful completion of the University of Florida English
Language Institute program; or an unacceptable score on the verbal part of
the GRE must achieve an acceptable score on an essay administered by the
Academic Written English program at UF.

If English skills are not acceptable, then performance on the essay will be used to
place students in appropriate courses that will not count toward a graduate
degree.


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C. Describe the curricular framework for the proposed program, including number of
credit hours and composition of required core courses, restricted electives,
unrestricted electives, thesis requirements, and dissertation requirements. Identify
the total numbers of semester credit hours for the degree.

This is a proposal for a graduate program for a forty-two (42) credit Master in Historic
Preservation to be granted through the College of Design, Construction and Planning.
The program will consist of academic courses, research, and practice or internships. It
will be modeled on the criteria specified by the National Council for Preservation
Education (NCPE) for degrees in historic preservation. The interdisciplinary program
will allow students the opportunity to do graduate work in a disciplinary specialty
(anthropology, architecture, building construction, cultural tourism, interior design,
landscape architecture, museum studies, urban and regional planning, etc.) and at the
same time complete a concentrated study of professional historic preservation courses.

Specifically:

Supervisory Committee:
Two faculty members including one from the College of DCP Historic
Preservation Committee

a. Degree Title: Master of Historic Preservation
b. Degree Type: Thesis or Thesis Project
c. Major Title: Historic Preservation and Conservation
d. Credits:
Only core courses in the College of Design, Construction and Planning will be
accepted for major credit (see courses listed in Section D, below)

Overall: 42
Major: 12
Designated electives: 6
Approved electives: 18
Thesis: 6

e. Grade Point Average of 3.00 must be maintained.
f. Thesis Supervisory Committee=thesis rule (chair from one of the units in the
College of DCP Historic Preservation Committee) plus one faculty member.


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D. Provide a sequenced course of study for all majors, concentrations, or areas of
emphasis within the proposed program.

12 Credit Hours of Required Historic Preservation Coursework



ARC 5800: Survey of Architectural Preservation, Restoration and Reconstruction (3)
This course serves as a focal point for PI:N. It provides a multi-disciplinary overview
of the history, theory and practice of preservation through lectures and workshops by
preservation professionals, advocates, governmental agencies and preservation
organizations. The course examines the historical evolution of preservation in both
public and private sectors. Management and technology issues of conservation,
documentation, restoration, rehabilitation (adaptive use), compatible design,
reconstruction, stabilization, maintenance, and interpretation are explored.

ARC 5810: Techniques of Architectural Documentation (3) This course provides basic
instruction in graphic, photographic and archival documentation and analysis. The
documentation process will help participants develop an understanding of the building
form, spaces, materials and methods of construction, interpretation of building features
and details, and recognition of architecture as a visual record of history.
Documentation of an historic Nantucket building to standards of the Historic American
Buildings Survey (HABS) will be part of this course.

ARC 6805: Architectural Conservation (3) This interdisciplinary course presents a
methodology for building analysis and conservation adopted from the historic
structures reporting process of the National Park Service's Cultural Resource Center.
Research and analysis of historic building materials, methods of construction, social
history, archival sources and historical records are included. A Historic Structure Report
(HSR) will be developed for selected historic Nantucket sites.

ARC 6821: Preservation Problems and Processes (3) Preservation in the larger context.
Practicum in neighborhood conservation plans, establishing historic districts;
procedures and architectural guidelines for their protection.

DCP 6710: Introduction to Historic Preservation (request for new title already
submitted and approved by College Curriculum Committee change to History and
Theory of Historic Preservation) (3) Emergence of preservation as an independent
field including events and affiliated fields that made its development and evolution
possible. International as well as national, state, and local policies and programs will
be explored within a historic context. Theoretical concepts that shape the way we view,
protect, and preserve historic interiors, structures, sites, districts, and landscapes also


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form a critical component of this course.


6 Credit Hours of Designated Electives

Students must take 6 credit hours of history, either from this list or other history courses which
have been approved by the Supervisory Committee.

ARC 5791: Topics in Architectural History (3) Explores special topics in architectural
history such as the history and application of traditional building trades.

ARC 6705: Graduate Architectural History (3) Survey of the history of architecture
from 1850 to the present.

ARC 6711: Architecture of the Ancient World (3) Key built work from Egyptian,
Greek, Roman, and Meso-American civilizations: the cultural context for these works,
and the construction technologies used to make them. Examines their use as ruins and
their contemporary meanings.

ARC 6750: Architectural History: America (3) Development of American architecture
and the determinants affecting its function, form, and expression.

ARC 6793: Architectural History: Regional (3) Group and individual studies of
architecture unique to specific geographic regions.

DCP 6931: Special Topics in Design, Construction, and Planning (request for new
course submitted to the College Curriculum Committee change to History of the
Built Environment for Preservation Practice) (03)
This overview of the built environment from Pre-Columbian and Colonial America to
the mid-20th century U.S. will incorporate the perspectives of the multiple disciples
that comprise historic preservation. To develop a national and global perspective of
planning, design, and craftsmanship in the built environment, this course will consider
structures and sites interacting with social and individual historical contexts.

LAA 6716: History of Landscape Architecture (3) History of man as expressed in urban
form, gardens, parks, and public spaces.


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18 Credit Hour of Approved Electives

Electives include these existing, pre-approved courses and others that will be developed and
approved by the faculty over time.

ARC 6822: Preservation Programming and Design (3) Architectural design focusing
on compatibility issues within historic districts and settings.

ARC 6851: Technology of Preservation: Materials and Methods I (3) Materials,
elements, tools, and personnel of traditional building from the colonial era through the
nineteenth century.

ARC 6852: Technology of Preservation: Materials and Methods II (3) Prereq: ARC
6851. Explores issues, such as climate, technology, structural systems, integration of
modern technology into historic structures, and related concepts.

DCP 6931: Special Topics in Design, Construction, and Planning (request for new
course submitted to the College Curriculum Committee change to Historic
Preservation: Principles, Practice and Engineering) (3) Explores the legal and
regulatory framework in which practitioners operate. Students are also taught how to
proceed with a Historic Structures Report.

DCP 6931: Special Topics in DCP: Building Analysis, Research and Conservation (1-
4; max 6) Can include any topical seminar offered that focuses on historic preservation,
examples include Building Analysis, Research and Conservation as well as Historic
Hotels and Restaurants.

BCN 6585: Sustainable Construction (3) Sustainability principles applied to planning,
design, operation, renovation, and deconstruction of built environment. Emphasizes
resource efficiency, environmental protection, and waste minimization.

IND 5106: History of Interior Design I (3) Design philosophy and interior elements in
an architectural and sociological context. Record of human achievements expressed in
the built environment. Foundation for contemporary design and interior preservation
practice.

IND 5136: History of Interior Design II (3) Continuation of IND 5106. Evolution of
contemporary design philosophy. Foundation for contemporary design and interior
presentation practice. Nineteenth-century revivals through current developments.


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IND 6154: Preservation of Historic Interiors: Historic Interior Materials (3) This
course introduces the materials and methods used to create historic interiors and the
techniques employed to conserve their decorative treatments. The focus is American
interiors from the Colonial era to the Industrial Revolution. Topics include flooring,
millwork, plaster, wallpaper, and paint and finishes.

IND 5157: Preservation of Historic Interiors: Theory and Application (3 credits) This
hands-on course presents interdisciplinary approaches to assessing and integrating
new design into historic interiors, while preserving significant features. Development
of the rehabilitation project includes: historical research; identifying period styles and
salient historic details; documenting alterations over time and determining level of
authenticity; complying with current codes and regulations, including accessibility;
addressing environmental controls; and developing a proposal for reuse.

LAA 6935: Gardens of the World (3) Explores the garden as a complex expression of
human relationships with each other and the larger environment, both physical and
cultural.

URP 6100: Planning Theory and History (3) History of planning and the associated
development of theory. Rational, incremental, advocacy, and equity planning are
among the approaches explored. The political setting for comprehensive planning is
emphasized.

URP 6884: Community Conservation and Revitalization (3) Community conservation
is a major thrust of National Urban Policy. Relates community revitalization and
conservation to the methodology of identification of problem areas, planning and re-
planning for all types of locations, use and adaptive uses. Federal and state assistance,
tax incentives, and other programs are examined.

URP 6905: Exploration and Directed Study (3) Explores look at urban form in various
cities throughout North, Central and South America. We will analyze city
development, from historical roots to globalization trends. Students will learn several
theories of urban form and consider urban development in light of sustainability
principles and historical values.

ARH 6797: Museum Education (3) Issues and content related to education in museums
and other nontraditional education settings.

ARH 6895: Collections Management Seminar (3) Information needed to access and
conserve objects. Risk management, preparing objects for travel, and legal issues in


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collections management.


ARH 6938: Seminar in Museum Studies (3) History, purposes, and functions of
museums in general, and art museums in particular.

LEI 6839: Heritage Tourism (3) Theory, practice, and current issues of heritage and
cultural tourism planning and management. Travel as learning. Historic sites and
events as attractions and destinations.

ANG 6930: Special Topics in Anthropology (3) Addresses the maintenance,
conservation and protection of human cultural achievement.

6 Credit Hours of Graduate Thesis guided by a Supervisory Committee

Master in Historic Preservation Credit Hour Summary
Coursework Credit Hours
Historic Preservation Core Courses 12
Restricted Electives 6
Unrestricted Electives (specialization) 18
Graduate Thesis 6
Total Credit Hours for Degree: 42

a. For all programs, list the specialized accreditation agencies and learned
societies that would be concerned with the proposed program. Will the
university seek accreditation for the program if it is available? If not, why?

The National Council of Preservation Education (NCPE) is the accreditation
organization for degrees in historic preservation. NCPE's "Guide to Academic
Programs in Historic Preservation and Allied Fields" lists 24 universities in the
U.S. which offer professional degrees in historic preservation.

Provide a brief timeline for seeking accreditation, if appropriate.

UF will seek the approval of NCPE immediately following the establishment of a
Master in Historic Preservation.



b. For doctoral programs, list the accreditation agencies and learned societies that
would be concerned with corresponding bachelor's or master's programs
associated with the proposed program. Are the programs accredited? If not,


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why?


N/A

I. Briefly describe the anticipated delivery system for the proposed program (e.g.,
traditional delivery on main campus; traditional delivery at branch campuses or
centers; or nontraditional delivery such as distance or distributed learning, self-
paced instruction, or external degree programs).

The Master in Historic Preservation will depend on traditional systems of delivery on
the main campus, St. Augustine, Florida campus (there is an opportunity to use the
historic sites there for laboratory, classroom space and field work). These will include
classes, lectures and site visits to historic sites. Practice will be provided in various
locations at historic sites in St. Augustine and around the state of Florida. An
internship, should a student take that option instead of a recognized practice may be
undertaken at approved historical sites, government offices and design firms, both
within the state and elsewhere in the nation. Some of these are offered by the National
Trust for Historic Preservation, the Smithsonian, the Department of State, the National
Park Service, US Committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites,
Florida Trust, St. Augustine Historical Society among others.

The historic preservation field programs at Nantucket, Massachusetts and Mount
Lebanon Shaker Village, New Lebanon, New York will continue to offer students the
opportunity to take nine (9) hours of core historic preservation coursework and will be
used for practice, research and hands-on field work.

Opportunities for distance learning is also being examined as part of the larger
initiative launched this year by UF and DCP.

If the proposed delivery system will require specialized services or greater than
normal financial support, include projected costs in Table 2.

N/A

Provide a narrative describing the feasibility of delivering the proposed program
through collaboration with other universities, both public and private.

Since there are no programs in the state of Florida with the depth and interdisciplinary
nature that this proposal would create, UF would like to take the lead in offering
distance learning opportunities to many other schools across the state.


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The UWF and UF are already discussing ways to create distance learning courses that
would be complimentary to each other's program and focus on their own strengths.
Discussion is already underway to establish such a course at each institution, an
introduction in archeology at UWF and an introduction in architecture, landscape, and
planning aspects of historic preservation at the UF. The Florida Division of Historic
Resources has indicated an interest in funding such courses.

Already, the Preservation Institute: Nantucket and the Mount Lebanon Shaker Village
field programs schools regularly include students not only from Florida but from
across the country. The Mount Lebanon Shaker Village practicum is in partnership
with the American College of Building Arts, which provides half the enrollment and
most of the faculty. Other students have come from Cornell University, College of the
Redwoods and Savannah College of Arts and Design.

Cite specific queries made of other institutions with respect to shared courses,
distance/distributed learning technologies, and joint-use facilities for research or
internships.

In addition to the collaboration with UWF, queries for help in establishing and sharing
courses have come from Flagler College, University of Miami, Florida International
University, Florida Southern College and Florida Atlantic University. The UF program
has discussed the establishment of an undergraduate program at Flagler with the
President of the College. There could be UF courses offered at this college taught by
PhD students who use the properties stewarded by the university.

IX. Faculty Participation

A. Use Table 4 to identify existing and anticipated ranked (not visiting or adjunct)
faculty who will participate in the proposed program through Year 5. Include (a)
faculty code associated with the source of funding for the position; (b) name; (c)
highest degree held; (d) academic discipline or specialization; (e) contract status
(tenure, tenure-earning, or multi-year annual [MYA]); (f) contract length in months;
and (g) percent of annual effort that will be directed toward the proposed program
(instruction, advising, supervising internships and practice,)

Refer to Appendix B.
B. Use Table 2 to display the costs and associated funding resources for existing and
anticipated ranked faculty (as identified in Table 2). Costs for visiting and adjunct
faculty should be included in the category of Other Personnel Services (OPS).


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Provide a narrative summarizing projected costs and funding sources.


Refer to Appendix B.

C. Provide the number of master theses and/or doctoral dissertations directed, and the
number and type of professional publications for each existing faculty member (do not
include information for visiting or adjunct faculty.)

Faculty Name Theses Dissertations Professional Publications
Walter Dukes TBD TBD Several papers presented at
professional meetings, consultant
reports on curriculum for accreditation
and evaluation.
Roy Eugene Graham 5 (Chair), 1 2 Member 1 peer-reviewed journal article, 3
Co-Chair, 12 technical reports, 3 book reviews, 4
(Member) grant panels
Morris Hylton III 2 (Member) N/A 2 peer-reviewed papers, 3 exhibitions


Dawn Jourdan 11 (Chair), 6 2 Member 5 peer-reviewed journal articles, 2 book
(Co-chair), 13 chapters.
(Member)
TKristin Larsen 13 (Chair), 13 2 Member 5 peer-reviewed journal articles, 6
(Co-chair), 14 entries in a peer- reviewed
(Member) encyclopedia, five technical reports,
and one comparative book review.
Peter Prugh 30 (Chair), 1 Member
20 (Member)

Christopher Silver 2 (Chair) 2 (Chair) 5 books, 20 chapters and refereed
articles

Sara K. Williams 25 (Chair), 2 Member co-design of 1 exhibit, 1 peer-reviewed
6 (Member) journal article, co-author of 1 peer-
reviewed journal article, co-author of 1
book, chapter contributor to 3 books,
co-editor of 1 peer-reviewed
conference proceedings, co-author of 4
technical reports or monographs, 1
book review in peer-reviewed journal

D. Provide evidence that the academic unit(s) associated with this new degree have
been productive in teaching, research, and service. Such evidence may include
trends over time for average course load, FTE productivity, student HC in major or


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service courses, degrees granted, external funding attracted, as well as qualitative
indicators of excellence.


Walter Dukes
Semester Course No. Course Title Credit Hours Enrollment
Spring, 2002 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD
Fall, 2002 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD

BCN 3027 The Construction 3
Profession and Ethics
Spring, 2003 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD

BCN 3027 The Construction 3
Profession and Ethics
Fall, 2003 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD

BCN 3027 The Construction 3
Profession and Ethics
Spring, 2004 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD

BCN 3027 The Construction 3
Profession and Ethics
Fall, 2004 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD

BCN 3027 The Construction 3
Profession and Ethics
Spring, 2005 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD
Fall, 2005 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD
Spring, 2006 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD
Fall, 2006 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD
Spring, 2007 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD
Fall, 2007 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD
Spring, 2008 BCN 3012 History of Construction 3 TBD



Roy Eugene Graham
Semester Course No. Course Title Credit Hours Enrollment
Spring, 2004 ARC 6821 Preservation in the larger 3 15
context

DCP 6931 Topical Seminar in 3 17
Historic Preservation
Fall, 2004 ARC 6356 Architectural Design 6 20

ARC 6805 Architectural 3 15
Preservation, Restoration,


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Reconstruction Topics
Spring, 2005 DCP 6710 Introduction to Historic 3 28
Preservation

DCP 6931 Topical Seminar in HP 3 15
Fall, 2005 ARC 6821 Preservation in the larger 3 15
context

ARC 6805 Survey of Architectural 3 16
Preservation, Restoration,
and Reconstruction
Topics
Summer, 2005 ARC 4323, ARC 6356 Architectural Design 4, 6 15
Spring, 2006 DCP 6710 Introduction to Historic 3 37
Preservation
Summer, 2006 ARC 6940 Supervised Teaching 3 6
Fall, 2007 ARC 6821 Preservation in the larger 3 18
context
Spring, 2008 DCP 6710 Introduction to Historic 3 29
Preservation



Morris Hylton III
Semester Course No. Course Title Credit Hours Enrollment
Spring,, 2008 IND 2130 History of Interior Design 3 46
2

IND 4226 Advanced Architectural 3 23
Interiors 2


Continued on next page


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Kristin Larsen
Semester Course No. Course Title Credit Hours Enrollment
Fall, 2002 URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 22
History

URP 6745 Housing, Public Policy 3 5
and Planning
Spring, 2003 URP 4000 Preview of Urban and 3 54
Regional Planning

URP 6931 Introduction to Historic 3 16
Preservation
Summer A, 2003 URP 4000 Preview of Urban and 3 26
Regional Planning
Fall, 2003 URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 24
History

URP 6745 Housing, Public Policy 3 13
and Planning
Spring, 2004 URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 15
History

DCP 6710 Introduction to Historic 3 14
Preservation
Fall, 2004 URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 20
History

URP 6745 Housing, Public Policy 3 7
and Planning

URP 6341 Urban Planning Studio 6 17
St. Augustine Studio
Spring, 2005 None N/A N/A N/A
Fall, 2005# URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 19
History
Spring, 2006 URP 6100 Planning History and 3 15
Theory

DCP 6710 Introduction to Historic 3 14
Preservation
Fall, 2006 URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 25
History

URP 6745 Housing, Public Policy 3 21
and Planning


# Receives one course release annually in return for duties as URP Graduate Coordinator.


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Spring, 2007# URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 16
History
Fall, 2007 URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 28
History

URP 6745 Housing, Public Policy 3 17
and Planning
Spring, 2008# URP 6100 Planning Theory and 3 18
History


Kay Williams
Semester Course No. Course Title Credit Hours Enrollment
Spring, 2002 LAA 6342 Landscape Architecture 3 15
Criticism

History of Landscape
LAA 2710 Architecture 3 27
Fall, 2002 LAA 4935 Gardens of the World 3 12

LAA 6342 Landscape Architecture 3 10
Criticism
Spring, 2003 LAA 2710, LAA 6716 History of Landscape 3 32
Architecture
Fall, 2003 LAA 2710, LAA 6716 History of Landscape 3 28
Architecture
LAA 6656C
Advanced Landscape 3 12
Architecture Design
Spring, 2004 LAA 4935 Gardens of the World 3 15

Special Topics in 3 12
LAA 6931C Landscape Architecture
Fall, 2004 None N/A N/A
Spring, 2005 None N/A N/A
Fall, 2005 LAA 2710, LAA 6716 History of Landscape 3 30
Architecture
LAA 3230, LAA 6231
Theory of Landscape 3 12
Architecture
Spring, 2006 LAA 4935 Gardens of the World 3 15

LAA 6342 Landscape Architecture 3 12
Criticism
Fall, 2006 LAA 2710, LAA 6716 History of Landscape 3 31
Architecture


# Receives one course release annually in return for duties as URP Graduate Coordinator.


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Spring, 2007 LAA 4935 Gardens of the World 3 24

LAA 6342 Landscape Architecture 3
Criticism 10
Fall, 2007 LAA 6716 History of Landscape 3 34
Architecture

LAA 6656C Advanced Landscape 3 10
Architecture Design
Spring, 2008 LAA 3352C Planting Design Studio 5 12

LAA 4905 Cultural Landscapes 3 16

LAA 6935 Gardens of the World 3 26


Peter Prugh
Semester Course No. Course Title Credit Hours Enrollment
Spring, 2002 ARC 6852 Preservation Technology 3 9
2
Summer, 2002 ARC 5800 Preservation Theory & 3 13
Practice

ARC 5810 Documentation 3 13

ARC 6805 Building Analysis & 3 13
Research
Fall, 2002 ARC 6851 Preservation Technology 3 9
1

ARC 6821 Preservation Problems & 3 6
Processes

ARC 5791 Architectural History 3 6
Spring, 2003 ARC 6822 Preservation 3 10
Programming & Design

ARC 6852 Preservation Technology 3 18
2






Summer, 2003 ARC 5800 Preservation Theory & 3 16
Practice

ARC 5810 Documentation 3 16


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ARC 6805 Building Analysis & 3 16
Research

Fall, 2003 ARC 6851 Preservation Technology 3 18
1
Spring, 2004 ARC 6852 Preservation Technology 3 15
2
Summer, 2004 ARC 5800 Preservation Theory & 3 10
Practice

ARC 5810 Documentation 3 10

ARC 6805 Building Analysis & 3 10
Research
Fall, 2004 ARC 6851 Preservation Technology 3 12
1
Spring, 2005 ARC 6852 Preservation Technology 3 14
2
Summer, 2005 ARC 5800 Preservation Theory & 3 15
Practice

ARC 5810 Documentation 3 15

ARC 6805 Building Analysis & 3 15
Research
Fall, 2005 ARC 6851 Preservation Technology 3 10
1
Spring, 2006 ARC 6852 Preservation Technology 3 8
2
Summer, 2006 ARC 5800 Preservation Theory & 3 16
Practice

ARC 5810 Documentation 3 16

ARC 6805 Building Analysis & 3 16
Research
Fall, 2006 Assigned to teaching
in Vicenza, Italy
Spring, 2007 Assigned to teaching
in Vicenza, Italy
Summer, 2007 ARC 5800 Preservation Theory & 3 7
Practice

ARC 5810 Documentation 3 7

ARC 6805 Building Analysis & 3 7
Research


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X. Non-Faculty Resources


A. Describe library resources currently available to implement and/or sustain the
proposed program through Year 5.

UF Smathers Library System: The UF Libraries hold over 4,000,000 bound volumes and
numerous non-book resources such as government documents, visual resources and
archival and special collections of national distinction. Specifically related to the subject
of historic preservation, the UF Libraries include over 4,400 volumes and 110 journals,
for a total of over 4,510 entries. In addition, the Libraries' holdings for the related
disciplinary emphases for art, art history, museum studies, history, anthropology,
archaeology, etc. are already in place.

UF Architecture and Fine Arts: The Architecture and Fine Arts (AFA) Library is a
branch library of the UF Libraries, located in the Fine Arts A Building directly adjacent
to the Architecture Building. The AFA Library is designed to serve the programs of the
College of Design, Construction and Planning and the College of Fine Arts. AFA
supports a wide variety of fields in art and architecture and contains over 120,000
volumes; 450 print serial subscriptions; 39,000 microfilm units; and 1200 video titles-
many of these materials directly support the instructional and research activities related
to historic preservation studies.

Off-Campus Resource Access at UF: In the larger university environment, the UF
Libraries hold membership in the Research Libraries Group and other consortia,
ensuring convenient access to materials not held locally. The reference collections of the
Humanities/Social Sciences Library (Library West), the University Map Library, the
Latin American Studies Institute, and the Marston Science Library are also extensively
used by historic preservation program researchers.

UF Special Collections and Archives: The University Special Collections have received
the complete office archive of Alfred Browning Parker, a graduate of the program, a
friend and follower of Frank Lloyd Wright and Florida's leading architect since 1945.
Edgar Tafel, a Frank Lloyd Wright apprentice and practicing architect, has also
committed to donating his archives to the University of Florida Libraries. The archives
of EDSA of Fort Lauderdale, one of the nation's premier landscape architecture firms,


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are also held at UF and include over 400,000 slides of landscape designs and historical
examples. Recent acquisitions include the papers of architects Rudolf Nims and
Kenneth Treister. The acquisitions of architectural archives are carried out with a
library team involving staff from the AFA Library, Special Collections, and technical
services departments. The subject scope of library collections appear to be adequate for
the historic preservation program's needs but they would need augmentation and
additional budget allocations if it is to offer a near-comprehensive research level for a
master's program in historic preservation.

The UF Libraries also house the Archive of Florida Architecture whose mission is to
acquire, conserve and make accessible the growing legacy of visual materials from the
rich history of design and practice in this state... The Archive functions as a unique
program in the cataloging of the products and processes of the environmental design
arts. It serves scholars, researchers, students and historians...

Library at Preservation Institute: Nantucket: The Preservation Institute: Nantucket
(PI:N) maintains a specialized library at Sherburne Hall, part of the DCP Nantucket
campus. Dedicated to preservation history, theory and technology as well as island
history and cultural resources, the collection contains over 900 volumes and hundreds
of research papers, brochures, technical notes, and preservation-related publications.
The PI:N library also houses a number of preservation-related periodicals and journals
from leading professional preservation organizations including the National Trust for
Historic Preservation, the National Park Service, the Association for Preservation
Technology International and professional trade journals. PI:N has over 10,000 slides
and digital images of preservation projects around the world.

The PI:N program is also associated with the Nantucket Historical Association
Research Library which houses PI:N research reports, archival drawings and historic
structure reports from over 35 years of UF involvement on Nantucket. The program
also draws upon the NHA Research Library collections of island history, maritime logs
and records, genealogical research, periodical and newspaper records, government
records and extensive collection of island images.

Library Resources at St. Augustine: The St. Augustine historic properties which the
University of Florida anticipates managing includes a vast library of preservation-
related books, reports, periodicals and archival materials which were once part of the
State Historic Preservation Board in that city. Other sources in St. Augustine include
the St. Augustine Historical Society Library and Archives and the library of Flagler
College.


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The field school at the Mount Lebanon Shaker Village has access to the over 18,000
volumes of the Shaker Museum and Library, which includes an extensive archival
record as well as secondary sources for historic preservation, museum studies, and
building construction. This field school takes regular trips to the conservation
laboratories at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Columbia University (Avery
Architecture and Fine Arts Library), which they use to supplement the research on their
historic preservation topics.

Provide the total number of volumes and serials available in this discipline and
related fields.

Including the Architecture and Art Library, other Smathers libraries with materials
relevant to historic preservation including, but not limited to the Law and Science
Libraries, and holdings at the Preservation Institute: Nantucket, it is estimated that
there are 50,000 volumes. This estimate does not take into account all the materials
available through interlibrary loan with other institutions.

List major journals that are available to the university's students.

Association of Preservation Technology International
Future Anterior, Columbia University Historic Preservation Journal
International Council for Monuments and Sites Publications
National Council for Historic Preservation Journal
National Trust for Historic Preservation Forum Journal
Society of Architectural Historians Quarterly Journal

Include a signed statement from the Library Director that this subsection and
subsection B have been reviewed and approved for all doctoral level proposals

B. Describe additional library resources that are needed to implement and/or sustain
the program through Year 5. Include projected costs of additional library resources
in Table 3.

No additional resources are required at this time.

A separate letter is being provided by the library director.

Describe classroom, teaching laboratory, research laboratory, office, and other types
of space that are necessary and currently available to implement the proposed
program through Year 5.


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Traditional lecture courses will be taught in classrooms that already exist. Campus
museums and galleries will serve as laboratory spaces for students. The program will
not need additional office space on the UF campus. Office and studio spaces are
provided at the existing field schools and at the Government House in St. Augustine

C. Describe additional classroom, teaching laboratory, research laboratory, office, and
other space needed to implement and/or maintain the proposed program through
Year 5.

N/A

Include any projected Instruction and Research (I&R) costs of additional space in
Table 2. Do not include costs for new construction because that information should
be provided in response to X (J) below.

N/A

D. Describe specialized equipment that is currently available to implement the
proposed program through Year 5. Focus primarily on instructional and research
requirements.

N/A

E. Describe additional specialized equipment that will be needed to implement and/or
sustain the proposed program through Year 5. Include projected costs of additional
equipment in Table 2.

N/A

F. Describe any additional special categories of resources needed to implement the
program through Year 5 (access to proprietary research facilities, specialized services,
extended travel, etc.). Include projected costs of special resources in Table 2.

N/A

G. Describe fellowships, scholarships, and graduate assistantships to be allocated to the
proposed program through Year 5. Include the projected costs in Table 2.

Several assistantships that relate to this program already exist. The Florida Trust,
Florida State Department of Historic Resources and many private organizations have
indicated the need and willingness to offer assistantships. Second-year students could


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possibly apply for paid internships at historic preservation related agencies and private
offices across the state and country. Students may also apply for competitive
scholarships and fellowships through the UF Graduate School.

H. Describe currently available sites for internship and practicum experiences, if
appropriate to the program.

See the response to question III.D above for a description of the following extant
programs that offer practice or internships:

Preservation Institute: Nantucket (Nantucket, MA)
Preservation Institute: New York (Mount Lebanon Shaker Village, New Lebanon, NY)
St. Augustine, Florida

Multiple local, state and national public agencies and privates organizations including,
but not limited to, the following:

Florida Historical Resources Division
Florida Trust for Historic Preservation
Getty Conservation Institute
International Council for Monuments and Sites
National Center for Preservation Training and Technology
National Park Service
National Trust for Historic Preservation
World Monuments Fund

I. Describe plans to seek additional sites in Years 1 through 5.

A sub-committee of the existing DCP Historic Preservation faculty committee will be
formed to oversee the development of practice and internship criteria that adhere to the
NCPE guidelines. As part of this process, formal agreements will be put in place with
the organizations listed above and others that fulfill the criteria. In addition, alumni
will be engaged to help develop internship opportunities wit private firms and offices
throughout the state and country.

J. If a new capital expenditure for instructional or research space is required, indicate
where this item appears on the university's fixed capital outlay priority list. Table 2
includes only Instruction and Research (I&R) costs.

N/A


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K. If non-I&R costs, such as indirect costs affecting libraries and student services, are
expected to increase as a result of the program, describe and estimate those expenses
in narrative form below. It is expected that high enrollment programs in particular
would necessitate increased costs in non-I&R activities.

N/A



XI. APPENDICES

APPENDIX A
The National Council for Preservation Education Standards for
Historic Preservation Degree Granting Programs

1.0. PHILOSOPHY:

1.1. The purpose of the standards is to foster the attainment and maintenance of
excellence in preservation education, while recognizing the importance of program
diversity and the plurality of disciplines and skills demanded in the field. Every
program should provide experience in and engender respect for this interdisciplinary
nature and the recognition that preservation focuses on cooperative work.

1.2. Each program should develop a Mission Statement identifying its purpose and
objectives, and describing the means used to achieve them. Programs with special
emphasis in archeology, architecture, heritage education, history, landscape
architecture, planning, etc., shall clearly identify this focus.

1.3. The Council believes that self evaluation, rather than regulation, provides the most
effective assurance of quality of student preparation.

1.4. It is expected that each program should undertake a review of its Mission
Statement and resources (faculty, space, financial support, computer capabilities, etc.)
on a regular basis.

2.0. PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

2.1. The program must have a director or coordinator.


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2.2. The program shall be supported by an identifiable faculty, full-time and adjunct,
whose educational preparation and professional experience qualify them to teach
preservation.

2.3. Completion of the program should contribute to the award of a university degree at
the graduate or undergraduate level.

3.0. PROGRAM CONTENT
Consistent with the Council's belief in diversity, it should be noted that these elements
or suggested standards are intended as minimum guidelines for preservation programs
that lead to a graduate or undergraduate degree, and are not intended as a curriculum
model.

3.1. FUNDAMENTAL COMPONENTS
Recognizing the diversity of approach and expertise required in the field of
preservation, the Council expects that all programs will develop specialties in one or
more of the following areas of knowledge. The objective of such instruction will vary in
response to the goals of the individual program as identified in the Mission Statement,
and may extend from awareness of the issues in a particular topic, through
understanding, to the development of expertise.

The Council expects that all programs will provide instruction in, or require as a
prerequisite, the following skills and knowledge deemed common and essential in the
field of historic preservation:

3.1.1. Instruction equivalent to at least two (2) courses in the history of the designed
environment, (including, for example, the history of architecture, urban development,
landscape architecture, archeology, or material culture.)

3.1.2. Instruction equivalent to at least one (1) course devoted to the history and theory
of preservation.

3.1.3. Instruction equivalent to at least one (1) course devoted to documentation and
recording techniques used in preservation and archeology.

3.1.4. Since preservation required the field application of knowledge, including
communication skills, the program should encourage a significant period of practical
experience, equivalent to an internship, practicum, or apprenticeship.

3.2. SPECIALIZED COMPONENTS:


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3.2.1. Design Issues
Issues of appropriateness, restoration rehabilitation, in-fill, exterior and interior
concerns at a variety of scales, and their effect on buildings, neighborhoods,
communities and landscapes.

3.2.2. Technological Issues
History, evaluation and conversation in the normal range of building materials and
systems.

3.2.3. Economics Issues
Marketing principles, private and public finance, property management, and budget
preparation.

3.2.4. Legal Issues
Constitutional law, preservation case law, federal, state and local regulatory legislation
and administration.

3.2.5. Planning Issues
Fundamentals of zoning, strategic planning, housing, and the social aspects of real
estate development, archeology and cultural landscapes.

3.2.6. Curatorial Issues:
Site development, interpretation and management.

4.0. ALUMNI PERFORMANCE:

Since programs are measured by the performance of their graduates, programs should
have a system of placement for their graduates and for monitoring their career
progress.




APPENDIX B (See attached sheets)

Table 1-B Projected Headcount from Potential Sources (Graduate Degree)
Table 2 Projected Costs and Funding Sources
Table 3 Anticipated Reallocation of Education & General Funds
Table 4 Anticipated Faculty Information


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