• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Main
 Fertilizer studies with shade tobacco...






Group Title: Department of Soils mimeographed report
Title: 1954 cooperative fertilizer trials with field crops
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091555/00001
 Material Information
Title: 1954 cooperative fertilizer trials with field crops
Alternate Title: Cooperative fertilizer trials with field crops, 1954
Department of Soils mimeographed report 55-4 ; University of Florida
Physical Description: 4, 2, 2, 5, 1 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pritchett, William L
Henderson, J. R
Mixon, Aubrey C
Breland, H. L ( Herman Leroy ), 1916-
University of Florida -- Dept. of Soils
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: December 1954
 Subjects
Subject: Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plants -- Nutrition -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: compiled by W.L. Pritchett ; cooperators, J.R. Henderson, Aubrey Mixon and Herman L. Breland.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "December, 1954."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091555
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 310115303

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Main
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
    Fertilizer studies with shade tobacco 1954
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
Full Text


JAN 27 1955


Department of Soils Mimeographed Report 55-4

December, 19l5














1954 COOPERATIVE FERTILIZEl TRIALS WITH FIELD CROPS


Compiled

by
W4 Lo Pritchett


Cooperators:


J. R. Henderson and Aubrey Mixon,
Extension Agronomists; County Agents;
and Herman L. Breland, Soils Department.


University of Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station
Willard M. Fifield, Director
Gainesville, Florida










1954 COOPERATIVE FERTILIZER TRIALS WITH FIELD CROPS


A series of fertilizer trials with corn, peanuts, and flue-cured tobacco
was initiated in 17 counties in North and West Florida in 1954. These field
trials, located on privately-owned farms, were conducted jointly by the Agricul-
tural Extension Service and the Soils Department, University of Florida.

The purpose of these trials was two-fold. The primary purpose was to corre-
late the levels of "available" plant nutrients, as determined by a chemical
analysis of the soils, with crop yield response to fertilization over a wide
range of soils. These values are to serve as an aid in interpreting soil test
results* A second objective was to check the present general fertilizer rec-
ommendations on the different soil types found throughout the field-crop producing
areas of Florida. A cooperative program of this type is a means of supplimenting
the work of the Branch Experiment Stations which are limited to a small number
of soil types*

The treatments for the experiments remained the same for all counties for
the corn, peanut and flue-cured tobacco trials so that locations served as
replications,

The general drought in the area during the early summer is reflected in the
relatively low corn yields and to a lesser extent in the peanut yields. The
small response to fertilizer treatments in certain areas can be largely attributed
to insufficient moisture during the growing period. However, the results of these
trials are not invalidated by the dry weather. A drought of this nature can be
expected in these areas of the state once in about every three years. It is there-
fore, important to know the reaction of crops to fertilization under dry as well
as under normal and wet conditions. It is planned to continue these trials over
several years to include varying climatic conditions, Certainly no conclusions
should be drawn from the meager information gained from these few trials.

FERTILIZER TRIALS WITH CORN

Four levels of a 5-10-10 grade commercial fertilizer were applied in the
drill at planting time to the whole plots. These rates were 0, 300, 600, and
900 pounds per acre. Each whole-plot was split into three sub-plots which
received (1) no fertilizer, (2) 200 pounds of sodium nitrate (16-0-0), and
(3) 200 pounds of sodium nitrate-potash (15-0-15), respectively, as sidedressing
at the second cultivation of the ccarn

In several instances where adequate precautions were not taken to prevent
contact of seed with the fertilizer material in the drill a reduction in stand
resulted* At the 900-pound rate of application the stand reduction was nearly
50 percent in a few instances. However, the effect of the 600-pound application,
or less, on stand was slight to negligible in most trials. No difficulty was
experiences in fields where care was taken to place the fertilizer below and to
the side of the seed, even with dry weather prevailing after planting

Considering the corn yield results as a whole, there was a definite and
economical response to base applications of 300 pounds of 5-10-10 over the check
in all cases except one (Holmes County). The average increase for this treatment
over the check treatment for all trials was 5.2 bushels per acre. However, in










only one-half of the trials was there a definite yield increase from the 600
pound application over the 300 pound application. The average increase in corn
yields of the 600-pound rate over the check for all ten trials was 9.6 bushels
per acre. Since the results from the 900-pound base application indicated
significant yield increases over the 600-pound rate in only three fields, one
might conclude that, in general, a base fertilizer application to corn exceeding
400 to 600 pounds of 5-10-10, or the equivalent, would not result in an economic
yield increase in a dry year similar to that of 1954. (Table 1).

It is generally agreed that prolonged droughts have a decided influence
upon the response or yield increase one expects from applications of fertilizer.
Furthermore, the extent of this influence is thought to be directly related to
the soil texture or moisture holding capacity of the soil. However, since the
largest yield responses to the base fertilization in these trials were obtained
on some of the lightest soils, an attempt was made to relate precipitation during
the growing period with yield increases to fertilization. lhile the rainfall
in general was heavier in the North Central counties than in the Western counties
during the months of April, May and June, the pattern was quite irregular and no
definite relationship was noted. This is probably not surprising since the
weather stations were not always located in the same part of the county as the
farm under study and since precipitation is only one factor contributing to the
influence of climate on yields.

The results from the top-dress applications are of more general interest
than those from the base applications. In the first four trials listed in
Table 1 there was a yield increase from the use of nitrogen as well as an
additional increase that can be attributed to the potash. In other words, a
top-dressing of 200 pounds of sodium nitrate increased yields by 3.1 bushels
per acre over the check on these fields while an increase of 7.4 bushels resulted
from a similar application of potassium nitrate. The difference of 4.3 bushels
is probably a potash effect.

There was no definite response to either nitrogen or potassium applied as
a top-dressing on the two locations in Okaloosa County. This was probably due
to the fact that the materials did not become available until the drought was
broken and this was too late to be of help. There was a marked response to
nitrogen top-dressing but no additional increase attributable to the potash on
the last four fields in Table 1. It would appear that a response to a top-dress
application of potash on corn might be expected even in dry years on fields that
contain less than around 70 pounds of exchangeable K20, in addition to the
response to nitrogen top-dressing. The average increase in corn yields from the
use of nitrate of soda sidedressing for all ten locations was about six bushels.
The increase from potassium nitrate considering all plots was only slightly more
than the sodium nitrate, or 6.2 bushels per acre over the check yields.

Thile these corn yield increases are little more than enough to pay for the
fertilizer material during a dry year when there is little leaching of nitrogen
and potassium from the basic application, much greater increases could probably
be expected during relatively wet years, Perhaps our fertilizer recommendations
for corn should put more emphasis on the sidedress application, especially when
applied to old soils with some build-up in phosphorus. This is to say that by
keeping the base application relatively low one avoids a loss during a drought
year and at the same time any deficiency in nitrogen and potassium can be over-
come by a larger sidedress application if the season happens to be a favorable
one.









Results of soils tests are difficult to interpret with information avail-
able. Only one field (Holmes County) was considered low in both phosphorus
and potash. On this soil potassium nitratp top-dress resulted in a 50 percent
yield increase on the average; however, no increase was obtained in the absence
of a drill application. Neither was there a yield response to the drill
application in the absence of a top-dress application

Table 1, Cooperative Field Fertilizer Tests on Corn

Yield of Corn, Bushels per Acre, for Various Treatments
Base Aplication, Lbso per Acre of 5-10- Available Soil
Top-dress Ave Yield -o Nutrients, Lbs./A.
Treatment heck 300 600 900 Sidedress Treat. PEp0 K90


20.0
24.6
27.7
24.1


28.5
33.9
44.7
55,7


28.2
32.4
26.6
29.1


25.7
28.2
24.1
26.0


20.2
24.3
18,9
21.1


12.1
17.5
12.2
13.9


24.6
32.3
30,8
29.2


30.0
40.8
49.3
70o-


Beach, Gilchrist County

24.6 38,5 26.9
354 26,2 29.6
33t9 33.9 31,6
31.3 32.9
Colson, Gilchrist County


49.3
4437
43-I1
45,71


54.7
47.0
50.1ol
"0.


40.6
41.6
46.8


Gilbert, Washington County


30.7
33.2
41.5



20.8
20.8
36,5



28.4
29.7
31,1
79.7


14.8
21.6
18e9
ITLl


28.2
31.5


27.4
37.4
37.4
3=1


28.6
33.6
36,7


Royals, Holmes County

19ol 25,7 22.8
22.4 34.8 26.6
39.0 3h0O 33.4
268 31.-5
Hilton, Okaloosa County

31.0 31.1 27.7
27.0 23.0 26.0
2$.7 25.7 25.4
27.9 26. C
Reaves, Okaloosa County


20.2
14.8
16,2
17.1


16.2
17.5
17,6
17.6


15.8
17.8
16.2


109


103


None
32-0-0
30-0-30
Ave.


None
32-0-0
30-0-30
Ave.


None
32-0-0
30-0-30
Ave.


None
32-0-0
30-0-30
Ave.


None
32-0-0
30-0-30
Ave.


None
32-0-0
30-0-30
Ave.









Table 1,. (Con't)
Yield of Corn, Bushels per Acre, for Various Treatments
Base Application, Lbs. per Acre of 5-10-10 Available Soil
Top-dress Ave. Yield of Nutrients, Lbs./A.
Treatment ,heck 300 600 900 Sidedress Treat, P90_ KE0

Walker, Jefferson County

None 8 7 29 29 18.2 12 78
32-0-0 21 30 37 40 32.0
30-0-30 17 32 42 40 32o8
Ave. 15.3 23,0 36.05 3.3

Dicks, Columbia County

None 20 16 26 15 19.2 27 116
32-0-0 21 21 22 20 21.0
30-0-30 18 20 26 22 21.5
Ave. 19.7 19.0 2 .7 19.0
Gatrell, Marion County

None 33.6 28.0 1546 58.8 43.7 53 173
32-0-0 47.6 58.8 56.0 63,0 56.3
30-0-30 .47.6 54.6 $7.4 67.2 56.7
Ave. 142.9 r71 5600 63,0
Maricamp, Marion County

None 39.6 49.5 61.6 77.0 56,9 41 84
32-0-0 57.2 70.4 86.9 88.0 75.6
30-0-30 92 59.4 68.0 70.4 61.0
Ave. Z7 8 9 72.2 7 --

Ave. yield for
all trials: 27.5 32.7 37.1 39.0

Ave. of top-
dress treat-
ments for
all trials:
None 30.0 bu. per acre
32-0-0 36.0 bu. per acre
30-0-30 36.2 bu. per acre








FERTILIZER TRIALS WITH PEANUTS


In the peanut trials five base treatments were applied to the whole plots.
These were (1) check, (2) approximately 300 pounds per acre of 0-li-14, (3) 400
pounds of 0-10-20, (L) 500 pounds of 0-8-24, and (5) 600 pounds of O-14-14L
These applications give a check and three levels of potash (40, 80, and 120 of
K20 per acre) with a constant level of phosphorus (40 pounds of P205) plus a
treatment in which both nutrients were applied at the rate of 80 pounds per acre.
The whole plots were split with one half receiving 500 pounds per acre of gypsum
and the other half receiving no gypsum as a top-dressing.
The results of the peanut trials are given in Table 2o

Table 2, Yield of Peanuts Receiving Varying Rates of Fertilizer and Gypsum.

Peanut Yields in Pounds Per Acre
Topdresing rill Applications, Pounds Per Acre of Nutrients Ave.
Lbs, per acre 0-0-0 0 060-0 0-40-80 0-N0-120 0-80-80 Yields
Bowman, Gadsden County

0 1350 1800 1750 1650 1350 1580
500 1700 2200 2050 2400 1550 1980
Ave. 15 2000 1900 202 1l 1780

Shepherd, Gilchrist County
0 918 1080 14o4 1116 846 1072
500 1098 1080 1152 1116 1170 1123
Ave. 1 10035I 1278 13 lo-1 00 o89
Carter, Holmes County
0 1160 1480 1520 1540 1480 1436
500 1160 1380 1270 1460 1460 1336
Ave. 10 i3 T5 1500 7-o 133-

Maricamp, Marion County

0 204 384 420 468 456 386
500 504 468 696 624 76 74
Ave, 3-5 s 3 5 0
Johnson, Marion County
0 375 555 465
500 630 960 -- 795
Ave. *O2 7 -- -- -- 70


I









In these trials a significant increase in peanut yields was obtained from
applications of about 300 pounds of 0-14-14 per acre (0-40-40). In only two
fields (both fine sands with relatively low available potash contents) did the
additional potash further increase yields effectively. The levels of available
K20, in pounds per acre at planting time, were as follows: Bowman 136;
Shepherd 43; Carter 53. All fields were medium to high in available P205*
(Unfortunately the Maricamp field was not sanpled.)

Gypsum applied to the pegging zone at early flowering resulted in increased
peanut yields in four experiments. Two of these, Bowman and Maricamp, could be
considered significant Since the harvest of the Johnson trial was not complete,
it should not be included in this group. The levels of available CaO in pounds
per acre were 221, 380, 400 for Bowman, Shepherd, Carter, respectively, in pre-
fertilization samples. This would indicate that it is not economical to apply
gypsum to peanuts growing on soils containing more than 300 to .00 pounds of
available calcium oxide.

It was interesting to note that in general, peanut plants were darker green
in plots receiving applications of gypsum on soils that were low in available
calcium. However, in the Shepherd Field in early August there was a definite
yellowing of plants in plots receiving both gypsum and fertilizer--regardless of
the fertilizer ratio. However, in this field all plots receiving no gypsum,
regardless of the fertilization, and in plots receiving 500 pounds of gypsum
but no fertilizer, the plants were dark green in color. The reason for this
effect of an application of gypsum to soils fairly high in available calcium on
the appearance of the plant was not determined.









FERTILIZER TRIALS WITH FLUE-CURED TOBACCO


In the fertilizer trials with bright tobacco, all plots received a uniform
application of 1200 pounds per acre of 3-9-9 special tobacco fertilizer. This
base application was split with 600 pounds applied before planting and 600
pounds applied about two weeks after planting. The treatments variation was
accomplished by applying different rates and ratios of nitrogen, phosphorus
and potassium in at top-deasing made about a month after planting, The top-dress
treatments and leaf yields are given in Table 3. None of the fields were
irregated.

The levels of available nutrients in the prefertilization soil samples are
given below:

Lbs. per Acre of Available
Farm P25 K0o CaO M
Carver 17 31 Very low
Perkins 7 31 66 Very low
Osteen 27 57 154 Very low


In only one field did the application of additional phosphorus, above that
applied in the 1200 pounds of 3-9-9 base application (108 pounds of P205) result
in an increase tobacco yield (Table 3). This was in the Perkins field which
contained only 7 pounds of available P205 in the prefertilization soil. Fields
containing 17 or more pounds gave no indication of a response to a phosphorus
application above the basic 108 pounds. Even in the Perkins field, if one compares
treatment 3 with treatment 6, for example, it becomes doubtful that phosphorus
played any part in that increases In other words, it would appear that the
phosphorus contained in 1200 pounds of 3-9-9 is more than adequate even for soils
low in this nutrient. This probably is not too surprising considering the small
uptake of (about 12 pounds) P205 by an average tobacco crop.

On the other hand, definite responses to additional potash are indicated in
the Carver and Perkins fields, which were very low in available K20 and ques-
tionable responses in the Osteen field containing medium amount K20 before
fertilizing. In other words, a top-dress application of up to 72 pounds of K20
in addition to a base application of 1200 pounds of 3-9-9 per acre might be
desirable on many soils. This is a total of 180 pounds of K20 per acre.











Table 3. Cooperative Fertilizer Trials with Flue-Cured Tobacco, 1954
University of Florida Agr. Ext.iService and Agro Exp. Station


*Top-dress Applications 1 field of Tobacco, Pourds er Acre
Pounds Per Acre Carver Perkins Osteen
N P' KO '(Gilchrist Co.) '(Gilchrist Coo) (Lafayette Co.)' Averag.
t .I .
1. 0 -0 0 (7) 1193,5 (7) 4875 (7) 1320.5 1000.5
2. 12 36 36 (6) 852*$5 (3) 6i425 (2) 1204.7 899.9
3. 24 72 72 (2) 1209.0 ? (6) 775,0 (6) 1330,0** 1111.3
0 0 36 (3) 1131.5 (5) 677.5 1 (5) 1448.8 1085,9
5, 0 0 -72 (1) 1147.0 (2) 687,5 (1) 1347.7 f 1060.7
6. 18 0 5 (5) 1426,0 (4) 847. (4) 1186.0 1153.2
7. 18 0 -108 (4) 145$70 t (1) 725,0 t (3) 1462.3 1214.8
1 t I I


All plots received base application of 1200# 3-9-9 half before planting and
half about two weeks after planting.
*m Corrected for stand,
( ) Number indicates relative ratings of tobacco from plots based on color, gum
content, greenleaves, trash, etc.




















FERTILIZER STUDIES WITH SHADE TOBACCO 1954


Preliminary trials with shade-grown cigar wrapper tobacco were conducted

on four farms in Gadsden County during 1954, These preliminary trials were

designed to furnish some basis of interpreting the soil test data and also to

study the effect of fertilizer sources on leaf quality and yield as well as the

possibility of reducing production costs through the use of less expensive sources

of nitrogen and phosphorus These farms were selected as representative of the

soil types used for the production of this crop in Florida. Since the quality

of leaf may influence the income per acre of tobacco as much, or more, than

yield, the treatments included sources of fertilizer materials as well as rates.

Farmers have long used high percentages of relatively expensive organic sources

of nitrogen and phosphorus in their shade tobacco fertilizers.









The following table gives the results of the chemical analyses of soil

samples taken from the four fields before fertilizations and from the different

treatment areas after fertilization and planting:

Treatment Date of Av ailale Soil Nutrients Pounds Per Acre
Number Sampling pH CaO M gO P2 I K20 NO3


Max Fletcher


50
<50
<0o
<50
<$0

<50
<0
<50
<5o
<5o
Very low
Very low
Low
Low
Low

320
216
216
216
349

133
133
183
149
216


216
304
270
355
312

304
2014
297
198
235
250
319
290
326
283

283
3148
355
348
326

348
263
384
283
335


Very low
Medium
Very low
Low
Low

Medium
Very low
Low
Very low
Very low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low

High
Medium-high
Medium-high
High
High

Low-medium
Low
Low
Low
Low


All area
1
2
3
4

1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4

1
2
3
4
5


1/6/54
5/21/54
5/21/54
5/21/54
5/21/54
6/9/54
6/9/4
6/9/4
6/9/54
6/9/54

7A6/54
7/6/54
7/16/54
7/16/54
7/16/54

10/19/A
10/19/54
10/19/54
o1/19/54
10/19/64

12/16/54
12/16/54
12/16/54
12/16/54
12/16/54


5.214
4.35
4.46
4.59
4.68

4.15

4,27
4.27
4.52

4.40
4.50
4.5o
,457
4.52

4.37
4.45
4.64
4.54
4.52

4.78
5.12
5.23
5.28
5.33


210
336
252
470
420

336
140
392
252
294

252
252
336
2914
336

336
221
392
294
336

85
56
140
56
140









Treatment Date of i .'Available Soil Nutrients, Pounds Per Acre
Number Sampling pH I a0 C gO P20g K20 NO3

Leland Bowman


All area
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5


5.84
4664
4.69
L468
44.56
4.846

4.57
4.45
4.72
4.57
5.22

4.77
4.78
4.83
4.77
5.30


595
965
501
700
700
700

743
532
532
470
573
798
615
532
573
700


50

"<50
< 50
<50
<50
<50
<$0


S50
4L 50
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


293
378
225
319
378
283
235
193
211
204
161

241
204
193
225
228


Very low
Medium
Low
Medium
Medium
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Very low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Very low


1/65
5/21/4
5/21/54
5/21/54
5/21/54
5/21/54
6/9/5'4
6/9/54
6/9/54
6/9/54
6/9/54

7/16/S4
7/16/5'4
7/16/54
7/16/54
7/16/54


1/6/541
5/21/54
5/21/5
5/21/54
5/21/54
6/114

6/ll/54
6/11/56

7/16/54

7/16/54
7/16/54


5$85
5,22

5.74

5o10
5e27
5.02
5.47
5$.48
$.47
5.13
5.30


399
965
573
532
885

532
420
392
470
420
470
420
532


110
186
241
225
216

121
173
136
146

167
211
198
186


<0o
v 50
< 5
< 50


Low
Low
Low
Low


Very low
Very low
Very low
Low
Very low

Very low
Low
Very low
Very low

Low
Low
Low
Low


S. D. Rowan


All area
1
2
3
4









Treatment Date of Available Soil Nutrients, Pounds Per Acre
Number Sampling pH Ca0 MgO0 P20... F20- N03

Malcolm Smith
All area 1/6/54 5.76 533 50 48 124 Very low
1- 5/21/54 5.01 657 5$0 34 263 Very low
2 5/21/54 4.98 657 < 50 50 186 Very low
3 5/21/54 5.13 615 <50 38 348 Very low
4 5/21/54 4.93 532 < 0 55 216 Very low
1 6/11/54 5.03 532 <50 33 186 Very low
2 6/11/54 4.80 420 < 50 15 105 Very low
3 6/11/54 5.18 392 < 50 15 216 Very low
4 6/11/54 4.63 470 50 40 198 Very low
1 7/16/54 5.20 532 Low 48 161 Low
2 7/16/54 475 470 Low 52 121 Low
3 7/16/54 5.20 420 Low 50 225 Low
4 7/16/54 4.83 4 70 Low 63 143 Low


It is interesting to note the drop in soil pH from a maximum in January to
a minimum in June during the greatest period of plant growth. This drop in soil
reaction took place in all fields but was particularly noticeable in the Fletcher
field. The soil in this field was rather acid before planting (pH 5.24), there-

fore, one ton of dolomite limestone was applied to one-half of the plots while
none was applied to the other half, Two rates of regular tobacco fertilizer
were applied. The normal application of two tons per acre and double this
amount, or four tons per acre. The pH dropped to below 4.5 in all areas, during
the period of greatest plant growth. The ton of dolomite was barely sufficient
to overcome the acidifying effects of the additional two tons of fertilizer
during this period. While the difference in soil reaction (pH) between the four
tons of fertilizer and no limestone treatment and the two tons of fertilizer

plus one ton of limestone was only about 0.3 of a pH unit, this pH change may be

sufficient to influence the growth of the tobacco plant in very acid soils. The
yields given in the next table indicates that the high levels of fertilization
may be harmful without the addition of limestone. Certainly it would appear that









one ton of dolomite is insufficient under these conditions. The highest level

of fertilizer does not appear to be economical.

A review of the yield results from the Bowman trial indicate that an all-

inorganic fertilizer in which ammonium nitrate and superphosphate replaced the

organic sources of nitrogen and phosphorus did not decrease the yield as compared

to regular shade tobacco fertilizer employing a high percentage of organicse

Since quality tests were not conducted on the plots using organic sources no

comparisons can be made. However, since the quality of the second priming was

relatively high on all plots receiving inorganics, these sources would not

appear to effect the quality adversely. Certainly these leads would indicate

the possibility of replacing at least a major part of the organic used in

shade tobacco fertilization with cheaper inorganic sources. However, more closely

controlled experimental work is needed before any conclusion may be drawn.

Increasing the application of phosphorus in the Bowman field from the normal

rate of 140 up to 200 pounds per acre of P205 did not increase the yield.

However, it may have improved the leaf quality slightly. An increase in potash

also failed to increase yields. It is probable that the tentative threshold

values for phosphorus of 70 pounds per acre of P205 and for potassium of 200

pounds of K20 are too high.

Yields were not taken on the trials in the Rowan and Smith farms. Tobacco

on all treatments was good and no differences could be detected visually. How-

ever, two hands of tobacco were kept from each priming of each treatment on

the Rowam farm and from primings 2, 3, and 5 on the Smith farm for quality

determinations consisting of burn test, ash color, and tenderness.







Cooperative Fertilizer Trials with Shade Tobacco
Gadsden County. 1954.


S: : Quality
Fertilizer Treatments : Yield Lbs : Burn :Grade: Crop :
Rates Notes : Per Acre :Test/sec.: Index: Index:


1 360-360-560

2 180-180-280

3 360-360-560
4 180-180-280

5 180-180-280


1 220-200-200

2 220-140-200

3 220-200-200

4 280-200-256

5 220-200-200




1 200-200-300

2 200-140-300

3 300-200-300

4 200-200-300




1 200-170-270

2 200-125-170

3 200-125-270

4 200-170-200


Lime
In


+ 0#

0o#
2000#

2000#

1000#


Fletcher
(Dolomite) 1144

1319

t" 1373
1309
1312

*Bowman (3 primings)


All inorganic sources 1037
t" 1037

Same sources as #1, 1020
except 20-fos
Same as #1 plus KN03 986
sidedress
Regular S.T, 4-4-8, 840
organic N and P

Rowan
Formulated from:

NHjNO3, Super, K2SO4

NH4NO3, 20-fos, K2SO4

NH4NO3, 20-fos, K2S04

Regular ST. 4-5-7 1300
plus CSM
Smith
**Side dress:

250# Super + 700 KN03
234# Urea

700# KNO3
1500# CSM


6.4

8.5

5.4

9.4
6,6

(Second

12.9

14.7

11.7
12.1

















5.9
2.4
4.4


278 319

372 490

270 371
234 307

407 535

Priming)

516

327

475

445














-Grade Index-
(Primings)
(2) (3) (5)
294 511 481
166 358 350

274 360 69


* All plots received a base application of 2000 pounds of CSM. Made before
planting,
** All plots received a base application of 2500 pounds of l-5-7 before planting.
Soils 60 copies




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs