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PAGE 1

University of Florida | Jo urnal of Undergradua te Research | Volume 12, Issue 3 | Summer 2011 1 Megan Lipcsey Featured Scholar Journal of Undergraduate Research Although the statistics are regularly touted in news stories and public service announcements, they are still as shocking as ever: one in four Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in the course of his or her lifetime. More than 1,500 Americans die of cancer every day, meaning that over 700,000 people in this country die of the disease every year. The research into cancer forms the basis of arguably the most important health issue that this country has or will ever face. Recent University of Florida graduate Megan Lipscey has already contributed to the cause of the fight against cancer with her research on Dasatinib, an anti cancer agent, and its effectiveness against sarcoma, a cancer that originates in connective tissues and has the to other cancers (10,660 new cases and 3,820 deaths in the U.S. last year), a patien deteriorate rapidly if the tumor spreads to and invades combat this deadly albeit rare form of cancer cannot be The unique opportunity to engage in this specific cancer research made just a few years earlier to attend the U niversity of F lorida According to Lipscey, her decision came down to two I chose to come to UF because I knew that I would be going the pre medical route and UF has a there was also the draw of staying (relatively) near home. Niceville has a total population of under 13,000 residents posed a few challenges in regards initially had difficulty adjusting to larger class sizes and helped her find a place in her new home; by volunte ering at Shands HealthCare, joining the Microbiology Club, and getting involved with research, Lipscey quickly adjusted to life in Gainesville and at UF. Another factor that helped Lipscey was her clear notion of what she wanted to do in the future a goal she has had science it came time to declare her major, she already had a career path in mind Her decision to major in Microbiology and Cell Science was due to the fact that the curriculum included pathology as well as molecular biology, both subjects that she is deeply interested in. However, her coursework was only the first step in getting inv olved in freshman year, and then did research with an ecosystems discovered that she truly enjoyed spending time in the laboratory, so when the ecosystems ecology project came but hoped to become involved with something related to

PAGE 2

University of Florida | Journal of Undergradua te Research | Volume 12, Issue 3 | Summer 2011 2 As with many UF students who have had work featured in the Journal of Undergraduate Research it was the forging of a strong relationship with a faculty member that allowed Lipscey to take the next crucial steps in her studies. Shortly after finishing up at the ecosystems lab, Dr. Dietmar Siemann, Associate Chairman for Research in the De partment of Radiation Oncology, agreed to become University Scholars Program. At this point passion for science and the field of medicine seemed to cited to be able my research relate to my major, but it also gave me insight as to how drugs are researched and tested before being Lipscey a lso met another mentor in the form of researcher Sharon Lepler. It was Lepler, Lipscey recalls who taught . I was very lucky to have Sharon explain everything to me so patiently and he inspiring and motivating as well as patient is an integral to overwhelming to start working on research in a new lab with unfamiliar and sometimes complicated protocols, very nice and willing to help. Once comfortable in the lab, Lipscey began her research under the guidance of Dr. Siemann, the principal investigator who oversaw the entire project: testing the ef fectiveness of the anti cancer agent Dasatinib on (mouse) prevent the spread of these cancerous cells in particular, which is important because treatment options are more limited after cancer has spread to other organs inhibits the activated forms of two proteins, called Src and the research also revealed other benefits of the drug. In addition to treating sarcoma, Dasatinib could possibly also was completed, Dasatinib had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administ ration for more than one type of In the year since Lipscey graduated, she has continued to work towards achieving her dream of a career in medicine. She has spent time volunteering at the Mt. Sinai Hospital in Miami where she also took the MCAT and is currently applying for medical school. While looking to the future, Lipscey also remembers what her time at UF and in the lab taught her. On e moment in particular embodies the personal growth week setting up an experiment only to realize while gathering the results that something somewhere had gone suspicions were confirmed; she would have to start the enti what exactly had gone wrong. Sharon [ her mentor ] told me By moving on and learning from mistakes that had already been made, Lipscey was able to complete the project. Discussing the events today, she identifies these events as one of the most important in her UF lesson for me [ because ] it applies not only to the scientific Christopher Garland Photo of microscope by mterraza Stock.XCHNG






















/.


Megan Lipcsey, Featured Scholar
Journal of Undergraduate Research


Although the statistics are regularly touted in news
stories and public service announcements, they are still as
shocking as ever: one in four Americans will be diagnosed
with cancer in the course of his or her lifetime. More than
1,500 Americans die of cancer every day, meaning that
over 700,000 people in this country die of the disease every
year. The research into cancer forms the basis of arguably
the most important health issue that this country has or will
ever face. Recent University of Florida graduate Megan
Lipscey has already contributed to the cause of the fight
against cancer with her research on Dasatinib, an anti-
cancer agent, and its effectiveness against sarcoma, a
cancer that originates in connective tissues and has the
potential to spread to one's organs. As Lipscey states in her
findings, despite the "fact that sarcomas are rare compared
to other cancers (10,660 new cases and 3,820 deaths in the
U.S. last year), a patient's prognosis and quality of life
deteriorate rapidly if the tumor spreads to and invades
secondary organ sites." The importance of finding a way to
combat this deadly albeit rare form of cancer cannot be
overstated, and this is reflected in Lipscey's work.
The unique opportunity to engage in this specific cancer
research validated Lipscey's decision-made just a few
years earlier-to attend the University of Florida.
According to Lipscey, her decision came down to two
critical factors. "I chose to come to UF because I knew that
I would be going the pre-medical route, and UF has a
strong reputation in academics and research," she says. But
there was also the draw of staying (relatively) near home.
Lipscey admits that she "wanted to remain in Florida to be


close to family and friends." Coming from a small town in
Florida's panhandle-Niceville has a total population of
under 13,000 residents-posed a few challenges in regards
to UF's large student body: "As a freshman," she says, "I
initially had difficulty adjusting to larger class sizes and
finding my niche." Yet the daunting nature of the
university's size also helped her find a place in her new
home; by volunteering at Shands HealthCare, joining the
Microbiology Club, and getting involved with research,
Lipscey quickly adjusted to life in Gainesville and at UF.
Another factor that helped Lipscey was her clear notion
of what she wanted to do in the future-a goal she has had
since childhood. "I have always been interested in anything
science-related," Lipscey recalls, "and I've wanted to
become a doctor for as long as I can remember." So when
it came time to declare her major, she already had a career
path in mind. Her decision to major in Microbiology and
Cell Science was due to the fact that the curriculum
included pathology as well as molecular biology, both
subjects that she is deeply interested in. However, her
coursework was only the first step in getting involved in
campus life. "I started out working as a lab tech after my
freshman year, and then did research with an ecosystems
ecology lab during my junior year," Lipscey recalls. She
discovered that she truly enjoyed spending time in the
laboratory, so when the ecosystems ecology project came
to an end, "I knew that I wanted to continue to do research,
but hoped to become involved with something related to
the medical field."


University of Florida I Journal of Undergraduate Research I Volume 12, Issue 3 I Summer 2011
1


I; ~d







As with many UF students who have had work featured
in the Journal of Undergraduate Research, it was the
forging of a strong relationship with a faculty member that
allowed Lipscey to take the next crucial steps in her
studies. Shortly after finishing up at the ecosystems lab, Dr.
Dietmar Siemann, Associate Chairman for Research in the
Department of Radiation Oncology, agreed to become
Lipscey's mentor; at the same time, she applied to the
University Scholars Program. At this point, Lipscey's
passion for science and the field of medicine seemed to
have found a perfect outlet. "I was very excited to be able
to work in a cancer biology lab," she states. "Not only did
my research relate to my major, but it also gave me insight
as to how drugs are researched and tested before being
approved for treatment." Working in Dr. Siemann's lab,
Lipscey also met another mentor in the form of researcher
Sharon Lepler. It was Lepler, Lipscey recalls, who taught
her "all of the protocols and techniques for my experiments
... I was very lucky to have Sharon explain everything to
me so patiently and help me." To have mentors who are
inspiring and motivating as well as patient is an integral to
a successful research environment. "It can be a little
overwhelming to start working on research in a new lab
with unfamiliar and sometimes complicated protocols,"
Lipscey says, "but everyone in the Siemann lab was always
very nice and willing to help.
Once comfortable in the lab, Lipscey began her research
under the guidance of Dr. Siemann, the principal
investigator who oversaw the entire project: testing the
effectiveness of the anti-cancer agent Dasatinib on (mouse)
sarcoma cells. "My research focused on its ability to
prevent the spread of these cancerous cells in particular,
which is important because treatment options are more
limited after cancer has spread to other organs," Lipscey
states. "The experiments I did showed that Dasatinib


inhibits the activated forms of two proteins, called Src and
FAK in these cells, as well as cellular proliferation." But
the research also revealed other benefits of the drug. In
addition to treating sarcoma, Dasatinib could possibly also
"be used to prevent sarcoma cells from spreading to and
invading secondary organs." By the time the research at UF
was completed, Dasatinib had been approved by the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration for more than one type of
cancer, and was "in phase II clinical trials for advanced
sarcomas."
In the year since Lipscey graduated, she has continued to
work towards achieving her dream of a career in medicine.
She has spent time volunteering at the Mt. Sinai Hospital in
Miami-where she also took the MCAT-and is currently
applying for medical school. While looking to the future,
Lipscey also remembers what her time at UF and in the lab
taught her. One moment in particular embodies the
personal growth she experienced. "I had spent about a
week setting up an experiment only to realize while
gathering the results that something somewhere had gone
horribly wrong," Lipscey says. To her dismay, her
suspicions were confirmed; she would have to start the
entire experiment over again. "I was feeling very frustrated
that I had wasted supplies and time, and I still didn't know
what exactly had gone wrong. Sharon [her mentor] told me
that these things happen occasionally and it wasn't a big
deal." By moving on and learning from mistakes that had
already been made, Lipscey was able to complete the
project. Discussing the events today, she identifies these
events as one of the most important in her UF
undergraduate career. "I think that it was an important
lesson for me [because] it applies not only to the scientific
process, but also to life in general."

-Christopher Garland


Photo of microscope by mterraza, Stock.XCHNG




















University of Florida I Journal of Undergraduate Research I Volume 12, Issue 3 I Summer 2011
2





PAGE 1

University of Florida | J ournal of Undergradua te Research | Volume 12, Issue 3 | Summer 2011 1 Megan Lipcsey Featured Scholar Journal of Undergraduate Research Although the statistics are regularly touted in news stories and public service announcements, they are still as shocking as ever: one in four Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in the course of his or her lifetime. More than 1,500 Americans die of cancer every day, meaning that over 700,000 people in this country die of the disease every year. The research into cancer forms the basis of arguably the most important health issue that this country has or will ever face. Recent University of Florida graduate Megan Lipcsey has already contributed to the cause of the fight against cancer with her research on Dasatinib, an anti cancer agent, and its effectiveness against sarcoma, a cancer that originates in connective tissues and has the Lipcsey states in her to other cancers (10,660 new cases and 3,820 deaths in the U.S. last year), a patien deteriorate rapidly if the tumor spreads to and invades combat this deadly albeit rare form of cancer cannot be overstated, and this is reflected in Lipcsey The unique opportunity to engage in this specific cancer research validated Lipcsey made just a few years earlier to attend the U niversity of F lorida According to Lipcsey her decision came down to two I chose to come to UF because I knew that I would be going the pre medical route and UF has a there was also the draw of staying (relatively) near home. Lipcsey Niceville has a total population of under 13,000 residents posed a few challenges in regards initially had difficulty adjusting to larger class sizes and helped her find a place in her new home; by volunte ering at Shands HealthCare, joining the Microbiology Club, and getting involved with research, Lipcsey quickly adjusted to life in Gainesville and at UF. Another factor that helped Lipcsey was her clear notion of what she wanted to do in the future a goal she has had science Lipcsey it came time to declare her major, she already had a career path in mind Her decision to major in Microbiology and Cell Science was due to the fact that the curriculum included pathology as well as molecular biology, both subjects that she is deeply interested in. However, her coursework was only the first step in getting inv olved in freshman year, and then did research with an ecosystems Lipcsey recalls. She discovered that she truly enjoyed spending time in the laboratory, so when the ecosystems ecology project came but hoped to become involved with something related to

PAGE 2

University of Florida | Journal of Undergradua te Research | Volume 12, Issue 3 | Summer 2011 2 As with many UF students who have had work featured in the Journal of Undergraduate Research it was the forging of a strong relationship with a faculty member that allowed Lipcsey to take the next crucial steps in her studies. Shortly after finishing up at the ecosystems lab, Dr. Dietmar Siemann, Associate Chairman for Research in the De partment of Radiation Oncology, agreed to become Lipcsey University Scholars Program. At this point Lipcsey passion for science and the field of medicine seemed to xcited to be able my research relate to my major, but it also gave me insight as to how drugs are researched and tested before being Lipcsey also met another mentor in the form of researcher Sharon Lepler. It was Lepler, Lipcsey recalls who taught . I was very lucky to have Sharon explain everything to me so patiently and h inspiring and motivating as well as patient is an integral to overwhelming to start working on research in a new lab with unfamiliar and sometimes complicated protocols Lipcsey very nice and willing to help. Once comfortable in the lab, Lipcsey began her research under the guidance of Dr. Siemann, the principal investigator who oversaw the entire project: testing the e ffectiveness of the anti cancer agent Dasatinib on (mouse) prevent the spread of these cancerous cells in particular, which is important because treatment options are more limited after cancer has sprea d to other organs Lipcsey inhibits the activated forms of two proteins, called Src and the research also revealed other benefits of the drug In addition to treating sarcoma, Dasatinib could possibly also was completed, Dasatinib had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Adminis tration for more than one type of In the year since Lipcsey graduated, she has continued to work towards achieving her dream of a career in medicine. She has spent time volunteering at th e Mt. Sinai Hospital in Miami where she also took the MCAT and is currently applying for medical school. While looking to the future, Lipcsey also remembers what her time at UF and in the lab taught her. On e moment in particular embodies the personal growt week setting up an experiment only to realize while gathering the results that something somewhere had gone Lipcsey says. To her dismay, her suspicions were confirmed; she would have to start the ent what exactly had gone wrong. Sharon [ her mentor ] told me By moving on an d learning from mistakes that had already been made, Lipcsey was able to complete the project. Discussing the events today, she identifies these events as one of the most important in her UF lesson fo r me [ because ] it applies not only to the scientific Christopher Garland Photo of microscope by mterraza, Stock.XCHNG



PAGE 1

University of Florida | J ournal of Undergradua te Research | Volume 12, Issue 3 | Summer 2011 1 Megan Lipcsey Featured Scholar Journal of Undergraduate Research Although the statistics are regularly touted in news stories and public service announcements, they are still as shocking as ever: one in four Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in the course of his or her lifetime. More than 1,500 Americans die of cancer every day, meaning that over 700,000 people in this country die of the disease every year. The research into cancer forms the basis of arguably the most important health issue that this country has or will ever face. Recent University of Florida graduate Megan Lipcsey has already contributed to the cause of the fight against cancer with her research on Dasatinib, an anti cancer agent, and its effectiveness against sarcoma, a cancer that originates in connective tissues and has the Lipcsey states in her to other cancers (10,660 new cases and 3,820 deaths in the U.S. last year), a patien deteriorate rapidly if the tumor spreads to and invades combat this deadly albeit rare form of cancer cannot be overstated, and this is reflected in Lipcsey The unique opportunity to engage in this specific cancer research validated Lipcsey made just a few years earlier to attend the U niversity of F lorida According to Lipcsey her decision came down to two I chose to come to UF because I knew that I would be going the pre medical route and UF has a there was also the draw of staying (relatively) near home. Lipcsey Niceville has a total population of under 13,000 residents posed a few challenges in regards initially had difficulty adjusting to larger class sizes and helped her find a place in her new home; by volunte ering at Shands HealthCare, joining the Microbiology Club, and getting involved with research, Lipcsey quickly adjusted to life in Gainesville and at UF. Another factor that helped Lipcsey was her clear notion of what she wanted to do in the future a goal she has had science Lipcsey it came time to declare her major, she already had a career path in mind Her decision to major in Microbiology and Cell Science was due to the fact that the curriculum included pathology as well as molecular biology, both subjects that she is deeply interested in. However, her coursework was only the first step in getting inv olved in freshman year, and then did research with an ecosystems Lipcsey recalls. She discovered that she truly enjoyed spending time in the laboratory, so when the ecosystems ecology project came but hoped to become involved with something related to

PAGE 2

University of Florida | Journal of Undergradua te Research | Volume 12, Issue 3 | Summer 2011 2 As with many UF students who have had work featured in the Journal of Undergraduate Research it was the forging of a strong relationship with a faculty member that allowed Lipcsey to take the next crucial steps in her studies. Shortly after finishing up at the ecosystems lab, Dr. Dietmar Siemann, Associate Chairman for Research in the De partment of Radiation Oncology, agreed to become Lipcsey University Scholars Program. At this point Lipcsey passion for science and the field of medicine seemed to xcited to be able my research relate to my major, but it also gave me insight as to how drugs are researched and tested before being Lipcsey also met another mentor in the form of researcher Sharon Lepler. It was Lepler, Lipcsey recalls who taught . I was very lucky to have Sharon explain everything to me so patiently and h inspiring and motivating as well as patient is an integral to overwhelming to start working on research in a new lab with unfamiliar and sometimes complicated protocols Lipcsey very nice and willing to help. Once comfortable in the lab, Lipcsey began her research under the guidance of Dr. Siemann, the principal investigator who oversaw the entire project: testing the e ffectiveness of the anti cancer agent Dasatinib on (mouse) prevent the spread of these cancerous cells in particular, which is important because treatment options are more limited after cancer has sprea d to other organs Lipcsey inhibits the activated forms of two proteins, called Src and the research also revealed other benefits of the drug In addition to treating sarcoma, Dasatinib could possibly also was completed, Dasatinib had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Adminis tration for more than one type of In the year since Lipcsey graduated, she has continued to work towards achieving her dream of a career in medicine. She has spent time volunteering at th e Mt. Sinai Hospital in Miami where she also took the MCAT and is currently applying for medical school. While looking to the future, Lipcsey also remembers what her time at UF and in the lab taught her. On e moment in particular embodies the personal growt week setting up an experiment only to realize while gathering the results that something somewhere had gone Lipcsey says. To her dismay, her suspicions were confirmed; she would have to start the ent what exactly had gone wrong. Sharon [ her mentor ] told me By moving on an d learning from mistakes that had already been made, Lipcsey was able to complete the project. Discussing the events today, she identifies these events as one of the most important in her UF lesson fo r me [ because ] it applies not only to the scientific Christopher Garland Photo of microscope by mterraza, Stock.XCHNG


Featured Scholar : Megan Lipcsey
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Series Title: Journal of Undergraduate Research
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Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2011
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/i


Megan Lipcsey, Featured Scholar
Journal of Undergraduate Research


Although the statistics are regularly touted in news
stories and public service announcements, they are still as
shocking as ever: one in four Americans will be diagnosed
with cancer in the course of his or her lifetime. More than
1,500 Americans die of cancer every day, meaning that
over 700,000 people in this country die of the disease every
year. The research into cancer forms the basis of arguably
the most important health issue that this country has or will
ever face. Recent University of Florida graduate Megan
Lipcsey has already contributed to the cause of the fight
against cancer with her research on Dasatinib, an anti-
cancer agent, and its effectiveness against sarcoma, a
cancer that originates in connective tissues and has the
potential to spread to one's organs. As Lipcsey states in her
findings, despite the "fact that sarcomas are rare compared
to other cancers (10,660 new cases and 3,820 deaths in the
U.S. last year), a patient's prognosis and quality of life
deteriorate rapidly if the tumor spreads to and invades
secondary organ sites." The importance of finding a way to
combat this deadly albeit rare form of cancer cannot be
overstated, and this is reflected in Lipcsey's work.
The unique opportunity to engage in this specific cancer
research validated Lipcsey's decision-made just a few
years earlier-to attend the University of Florida.
According to Lipcsey, her decision came down to two
critical factors. "I chose to come to UF because I knew that
I would be going the pre-medical route, and UF has a
strong reputation in academics and research," she says. But
there was also the draw of staying (relatively) near home.
Lipcsey admits that she "wanted to remain in Florida to be


close to family and friends." Coming from a small town in
Florida's panhandle-Niceville has a total population of
under 13,000 residents-posed a few challenges in regards
to UF's large student body: "As a freshman," she says, "I
initially had difficulty adjusting to larger class sizes and
finding my niche." Yet the daunting nature of the
university's size also helped her find a place in her new
home; by volunteering at Shands HealthCare, joining the
Microbiology Club, and getting involved with research,
Lipcsey quickly adjusted to life in Gainesville and at UF.
Another factor that helped Lipcsey was her clear notion
of what she wanted to do in the future-a goal she has had
since childhood. "I have always been interested in anything
science-related," Lipcsey recalls, "and I've wanted to
become a doctor for as long as I can remember." So when
it came time to declare her major, she already had a career
path in mind. Her decision to major in Microbiology and
Cell Science was due to the fact that the curriculum
included pathology as well as molecular biology, both
subjects that she is deeply interested in. However, her
coursework was only the first step in getting involved in
campus life. "I started out working as a lab tech after my
freshman year, and then did research with an ecosystems
ecology lab during my junior year," Lipcsey recalls. She
discovered that she truly enjoyed spending time in the
laboratory, so when the ecosystems ecology project came
to an end, "I knew that I wanted to continue to do research,
but hoped to become involved with something related to
the medical field."


University of Florida I Journal of Undergraduate Research I Volume 12, Issue 3 I Summer 2011
1


7!I






As with many UF students who have had work featured
in the Journal of Undergraduate Research, it was the
forging of a strong relationship with a faculty member that
allowed Lipcsey to take the next crucial steps in her
studies. Shortly after finishing up at the ecosystems lab, Dr.
Dietmar Siemann, Associate Chairman for Research in the
Department of Radiation Oncology, agreed to become
Lipcsey's mentor; at the same time, she applied to the
University Scholars Program. At this point, Lipcsey's
passion for science and the field of medicine seemed to
have found a perfect outlet. "I was very excited to be able
to work in a cancer biology lab," she states. "Not only did
my research relate to my major, but it also gave me insight
as to how drugs are researched and tested before being
approved for treatment." Working in Dr. Siemann's lab,
Lipcsey also met another mentor in the form of researcher
Sharon Lepler. It was Lepler, Lipcsey recalls, who taught
her "all of the protocols and techniques for my experiments
... I was very lucky to have Sharon explain everything to
me so patiently and help me." To have mentors who are
inspiring and motivating as well as patient is an integral to
a successful research environment. "It can be a little
overwhelming to start working on research in a new lab
with unfamiliar and sometimes complicated protocols,"
Lipcsey says, "but everyone in the Siemann lab was always
very nice and willing to help.
Once comfortable in the lab, Lipcsey began her research
under the guidance of Dr. Siemann, the principal
investigator who oversaw the entire project: testing the
effectiveness of the anti-cancer agent Dasatinib on (mouse)
sarcoma cells. "My research focused on its ability to
prevent the spread of these cancerous cells in particular,
which is important because treatment options are more
limited after cancer has spread to other organs," Lipcsey
states. "The experiments I did showed that Dasatinib


inhibits the activated forms of two proteins, called Src and
FAK in these cells, as well as cellular proliferation." But
the research also revealed other benefits of the drug. In
addition to treating sarcoma, Dasatinib could possibly also
"be used to prevent sarcoma cells from spreading to and
invading secondary organs." By the time the research at UF
was completed, Dasatinib had been approved by the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration for more than one type of
cancer, and was "in phase II clinical trials for advanced
sarcomas."
In the year since Lipcsey graduated, she has continued to
work towards achieving her dream of a career in medicine.
She has spent time volunteering at the Mt. Sinai Hospital in
Miami-where she also took the MCAT-and is currently
applying for medical school. While looking to the future,
Lipcsey also remembers what her time at UF and in the lab
taught her. One moment in particular embodies the
personal growth she experienced. "I had spent about a
week setting up an experiment only to realize while
gathering the results that something somewhere had gone
horribly wrong," Lipcsey says. To her dismay, her
suspicions were confirmed; she would have to start the
entire experiment over again. "I was feeling very frustrated
that I had wasted supplies and time, and I still didn't know
what exactly had gone wrong. Sharon [her mentor] told me
that these things happen occasionally and it wasn't a big
deal." By moving on and learning from mistakes that had
already been made, Lipcsey was able to complete the
project. Discussing the events today, she identifies these
events as one of the most important in her UF
undergraduate career. "I think that it was an important
lesson for me [because] it applies not only to the scientific
process, but also to life in general."

-Christopher Garland


Photo of microscope by mterraza, Stock.XCHNG




















University of Florida I Journal of Undergraduate Research I Volume 12, Issue 3 I Summer 2011
2




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