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Focus on Florida: Immunoglobulin-G within lymphoid tissues in the Florida manatee
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091523/00548
 Material Information
Title: Focus on Florida: Immunoglobulin-G within lymphoid tissues in the Florida manatee
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Eichner, Michael
Samuelson, Don
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2011
 Notes
Abstract: The Florida Manatee often inhabits murky, microbial filled riverine waters likely high in potential pathogens. Manatees also inhabit coastal marine ecosystems, which can pose threats to manatee health via increased boat traffic, accumulation of harmful algal blooms, and loss of warm water sources. The Florida manatee demonstrates remarkable healing capabilities and is hypothesized to possess a strong immune system; the true extent currently remains unknown. For this study, mouse anti-manatee immunoglobulin-G (IgG) was used to establish the presence of this class of immunoglobulin in lymphoid tissues with an emphasis on those associated with mucosal immunity. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize IgG from the selected lymphatic tissues. A representative sample of manatee specimens was examined (n=32; male=19, F=13) from different locations around Florida’s coasts and show diversity in approximate age and overall size. Cells showing an IgG presence were evaluated based on red-colored intensity of the cell, which ranged from light to dark. Red tide causes of death show a greater overall average of IgG reactive cells and a greater concentration of reactive cells per observed field. Surprisingly, cold stress deaths follow behind those caused by red tide in both cellular averages and in concentration thereof. Universally, conjunctiva appears to have the largest and most densely populated IgG-positive cells. Although there is a direct correlation of an increase of IgG in red tide death and separately in conjunctival tissues, the concentrations and the sample size were too small for a supportive conclusion at this time.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00091523:00548

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