• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 Copyright
 Dedication
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Abstract
 Introduction
 Special events as a fundraising...
 Creating a dine-around model to...
 Marketing and budgetary planning...
 Conclusion
 Appendix
 Reference
 Biographical sketch
 Summary
 Copyright














Group Title: Come for dinner
Title: Come for Dinner: Creating a Self-Sustaining Signature Fundraising Event for the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
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 Material Information
Title: Come for Dinner: Creating a Self-Sustaining Signature Fundraising Event for the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Series Title: Come for dinner
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Harvey, Kelly Connor.
Publisher: College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
 Notes
General Note: Museum Studies terminal project
General Note: Project in lieu of thesis
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091519
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Holding Location: Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 004364264
oclc - 289363230

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Dedication
        Page 3
    Acknowledgement
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Abstract
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Introduction
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Special events as a fundraising tool
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Creating a dine-around model to accomodate the Harn Museum of Art and the Gainesville community
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Marketing and budgetary planning for "Come to Dinner"
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Conclusion
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Appendix
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Reference
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Biographical sketch
        Page 79
    Summary
        Page 80
    Copyright
        Copyright
Full Text





"COME FOR DINNER": CREATING A SELF-SUSTAINING SIGNATURE FUNDRAISING
EVENT FOR THE SAMUEL P. HARN MUSEUM OF ART





















By

KELLY CONNOR HARVEY


A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF ARTS

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2008


































2008 Kelly Connor Harvey

































To my Family: Mom, Dad, Courtney, and Casey









ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

There are many people I must thank for their support and guidance during my graduate

degree pursuits and the development of this thesis project. I would like to begin by thanking my

family for their unconditional love and unwavering support. My parents, sister, grandparents,

aunts, uncles, and cousins never questioned my love for art or museums and understood that my

passion for these things would lead me to where I belong. Their encouragement gave me the

confidence, courage, and strength to follow my dreams.

While at the University of Florida, I have received wonderful support from faculty and

other mentors. I must first thank Dr. Glenn Willumson as the Director of the Museum Studies

program for his advice, guidance, and the confidence he has in me and my project. He made

class engaging and gave freely of his time and advice. I would be amiss if did not next thank my

thesis chair, Dr. Victoria Rovine, for her patience and direction during the development of my

thesis paper. Next, I would also like to thank the other members of my thesis committee, Dr.

Eric Segal, Dixie Neilson, and Phyllis DeLaney. Each member approached my project with

great enthusiasm and provided me with excellent constructive criticism.

I would like to thank fellow graduate student, Aaron Kirker, for designing the invitation

for this project. His creative skills, patience, and professionalism were greatly appreciated.

During my time in Gainesville, I have spent a great deal of time at the Ham Museum of

Art and as a result, my project is explicitly designed to benefit exhibitions at this institution.

Rebecca Nagy, Phyllis DeLaney, Tracy Pfaff, and the rest of the museum staff welcomed,

encouraged, mentored, and truly fostered my development as a museum studies graduate student

and as an emerging profession. For this I will be forever grateful.

Lastly, I would like to thank my kindred spirit and cohort in crime, Kelly O'Neill, and the

friends I have made here at UF. You know who you are. Thank you for all the endless fun we









had, the trouble we caused, the Gator games we cheered at until we were hoarse, the laughter and

tears we shared, and the dreams we helped each other achieve. You have truly been my family

these past three years and have made Gainesville into my home, away from home. Graduate

school has been a journey, and it is one that I wouldn't have wanted to take without each and

every one of you.









TABLE OF CONTENTS

page

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ......................................................................................................... 4

A B ST R A C T ............................................................................................................................... 8

CHAPTER

1 IN TR O D U C TIO N .............................................................................................................. 10

Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art .......................................................................................13
Need for Well-Rounded Fundraising Plan .........................................................................14

2 SPECIAL EVENTS AS A FUNDRAISING TOOL.......................................... .............. 16

Mad Hatter Tea at the Ham Museum of Art...........................................................................16
Advantages of Raising Money through Special Events .................................................17
Disadvantages of Raising Money through Special Events................................... .......... 19
Special Event as "Friend Raiser"......................................................................................22

3 CREATING A DINE-AROUND MODEL TO ACCOMMODATE THE HARN
MUSEUM OF ART AND THE GAINESVILLE COMMUNITY........................................24

Successful Dine-Around Events .......................................................................................25
Vero Beach Museum of Art ......................................................................................25
Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (MOCANoMi) ......................................27
Naples Winter Wine Festival.....................................................................................29
Palm Springs Art Museum ........................................................................................29
Planning Committee's Reaction and Ideas ..................................................................... 31
Determining the Benefit Cause.........................................................................................33
Naming Hosts and Establishing Benefits ....................................................................... 34
Exhibition Circle Membership and Benefits ......................................................................36
Constructing List of Invitees and Setting Ticket Price...................................................37
Reply Cards and Receipt of Payment............................................................................. 37
Stew hardship .................................................................................................................... . 38
E vent E valuation............................................................................................................... 39

4 MARKETING AND BUDGETARY PLANNING FOR "COME FOR DINNER". ..............42

B ud get............................................................................................................................. . 42
M arketing....................................................................................................................... . 43
Invitation D design ....................................................................................................... 45
Branding "Come for Dinner"..................................................................................46
In-House Marketing Tools ........................................................................................47
Verbal Communication as Marketing Tool..................................................................48









5 C O N C LU SIO N .................................................................................................................... 50

APPENDIX

A LETTER OF CORRESPONDENCE TO PLANNING COMMITTEE ...............................52

B QUICK FACTS ABOUT OTHER DINE-AROUND PROGRAMS......................................53

C DINE AROUND FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDAS AND
M IN U T E S..........................................................................................................................54

D PLANNING TIM ETABLE.................................................................................................62

E HOST COMMITMENT AGREEMENT FORM...................................................................65

F EXHIBITION CIRCLE MEMBERSHIP CRITERIA............................................................66

G GUEST LIST LETTER TO BE SENT TO HOSTS ............................................................67

H R SV P C A R D ....................................................................................................................... 68

I SAMPLE OF "COME FOR DINNER" RESERVATION NOTEBOOK................................69

J RESERVATION CONFIRMATION LETTER FOR GUESTS...................................... ..72

K STEWARDSHIP LETTER TO BE SENT TO "COME FOR DINNER" GUESTS ...............73

L INVITATION DESIGN EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR..................................................74

M EXAMPLE OF POSSIBLE EVENT BREAKDOWN AND EARNINGS FOR FUTURE
"COME FOR DINNER" EVENTS ................................................................................76

BIO GRA PH ICA L SKETCH .................................................................................................... 79









Summary of Project Option in Lieu of Thesis
Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida
in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the
Degree of Master of Arts

"COME FOR DINNER": CREATING A SELF-SUSTAINING SIGNATURE FUNDRAISING
EVENT FOR THE SAMUEL P. HARN MUSEUM OF ART

By

Kelly Connor Harvey

May 2008

Chair: Victoria L. Rovine
Major: Museology

Professional fundraisers utilize a diverse range of tools to cultivate sustainable means of

financial support for an organization. One method of attaining funds is through the execution of

well-planned special events. Fundraising special events manifest in a wide variety of forms,

from black-tie galas to backyard raffles, depending upon the organization and the benefit cause.

In researching a variety of special events held for the benefit of fine art museums across the

country, I was introduced to the idea of the "dine-around." This special event concept hinges on

the willingness of individuals to under-write the cost of a ticketed dinner event for the benefit of

an organization.

For this project, I adapted the dine-around concept to fit the needs of the Samuel P. Ham

Museum of Art and the Gainesville community. This thesis project, "Come for Dinner,"

encompasses both the planning of a series of eleven self-sustaining dinner events and the

creation of the Exhibition Circle. All proceeds from the "Come for Dinner" events will benefit

exhibitions at the Harn Museum of Art. These exclusive dinners are inspired by and highlight

current museum exhibitions and will be held monthly at the home of a member of the Exhibition

Circle. In addition, a guest of honor or local art personality will be present at each dinner to









facilitate conversation and entice guests to attend the event. Admittance to the dinners requires

purchase of tickets in advance and membership to the Exhibition Circle requires an additional

donation of $5,000 or greater. This two-tiered fundraising effort is designed to meet the

monetary goal of $100,000 after one complete series of dinner events.

The "Come for Dinner" series is a novel addition to the extensive fundraising efforts of a

variety of organizations that presently occur in the Gainesville community. Due to the close

connection each dinner has to the exhibitions at the Ham, the event will be branded in

connection with the museum, making it the Ham Museum of Art's annual signature fundraising

event. In addition to being a fundraiser, "Come for Dinner" is designed to enhance community

relations through 'friend-raiiiin.' provide publicity and increased visibility for the museum,

introduce the museum to new audiences, and demonstrate the Ham's dedication to producing a

wide variety of challenging, innovative exhibitions.









CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

Professional fundraisers utilize a range of tools to cultivate financial support for an

organization. One method of attaining funds is through the execution of well-planned special

events. Fundraising special events take a wide variety of forms, from black-tie galas to backyard

raffles, depending upon the organization and the benefit cause. In researching a variety of

special events held for the benefit of fine art museums across the country, I encountered the

concept of the "dine-around." This special event concept hinges on the willingness of

individuals to underwrite the cost of a ticketed dinner event for the benefit of an organization.

Dine-arounds take a variety of forms, but there are three common methods. The first

method is to enlist the support of three to five restaurants, each of which prepare one course of a

meal to be served in progressive form with successive courses of the meal being served at

different restaurants during the same evening. The second method is a variation on the first, with

the organizer asking several restaurants with well-known chefs or locally known chefs to

produce one course of a meal to be served at interesting homes, with the participants traveling to

each home for successive courses. The final method involves asking several restaurants to each

stage cooking demonstrations on different nights allowing participants to buy seats or entire

tables at one or more restaurants. All of these methods earn profit for the organization they are

supporting through the sale of tickets to participants who wish to attend the events. These events

are profitable because the restaurants, chefs, and hosts donate their services to the benefit

organization at little to no cost. Thus, the usual financial risk of planning a fundraising special





1Harry A. Freedman and Karen Feldman, Black Tie Optional: A Complete Special Events Resource for Nonprofit
Organizations, (New Jersey: Wiley, John and Sons, Incorporated, 2007), 21.









event is incurred by entities separate from the organization, leaving only the administrative

duties for the organization.

For this project, I adapted the dine-around concept to fit the needs of the Samuel P. Ham

Museum of Art and the Gainesville community. This thesis project, "Come for Dinner,"

encompasses both the planning of a series of eleven self-sustaining dinner events and the

creation of the Exhibition Circle. All proceeds from the "Come for Dinner" events will benefit

exhibitions at the Harn Museum of Art.

These exclusive dinners are inspired by and highlight current museum exhibitions and will

be held monthly at the home of a member of the Exhibition Circle. Membership requirements

for this giving circle and benefits of membership will be explained below. The evenings will be

intimate affairs with eight to twenty seats available per event, with the variance in number being

a result of the host's accommodations. "Invitees to fund-raisers love unusual venues and it may

effect their decision to attend. There's a sense of privilege that comes from being at a retail store

after hours, in a corporate penthouse, or a hard-hat only area."2 Holding the "Come for Dinner"

events at exciting homes and after hours at the museum will hopefully serve as an additional

enticement to RSVP to these events. Admittance to the dinners requires purchasing tickets in

advance for $150 per person. In addition, a guest of honor or local art personality will be present

at each dinner to facilitate conversation and entice guests to attend the event. Because this is the

inaugural year for this event, many of the special guests will be Harn Museum curators or local

artists that have a relationship with the museum. However, in the future guest lecturers and more

diverse personalities could be invited to be guests of honor at "Come for Dinner" events.




2Margot A. Wallace, Museum Branding: How to Create and Maintain Image, Loyalty, and Support, (New York:
AltaMira Press, 2006), 57.









Membership in the Exhibition Circle requires an additional level of commitment and can

be achieved by one of two singular pledges. Potential members of the Exhibition Circle can

either commit to hosting a dinner in the "Come for Dinner" series which involves assuming the

entire cost of the event, or make a minimum donation of $5,000. The dual membership methods

were created so that individuals who exhibit their loyalty to the Harn Museum in a more social

manner could host a dinner, while those who would prefer to remain anonymous or are not

comfortable entertaining guests in their home could make a cash donation that was equivalent to

the amount each host would be spending on a dinner and the donations of their guests (estimated

at approximately $5,000). This two-tiered fundraising effort is designed to meet the monetary

goal of $100,000 after one complete series of dinner events.

The "Come for Dinner" series is a novel addition to the extensive fundraising efforts of a

variety of organizations in the Gainesville community. The museum Administrative and

Development staffs felt that there was a growing need for the Ham Museum of Art to have a

signature fundraising event that would become a brand for the museum, setting its fundraising

events apart from other events in the community. Due to the close association each dinner has to

the exhibitions at the Harn, the event will be branded in connection with the museum, making it

the Ham Museum of Art's annual signature fundraising event. In addition to being a fundraiser,

"Come for Dinner" is designed to enhance community relations through 'friend-raiisinl.'3

provide publicity and increased visibility for the museum, introduce the museum to new




3 Professional fundraisers are always called upon to raise friends. While their job is to raise funds, their first priority
is actually to create relationships. These relationships are then cultivated for donations over time. Friend-raising
events are designed to be inclusive and accessible for as much of the community as possible which almost always
leads to an expansion of the organization's mailing list and donor base for the future. When the community feels
connected to the organization, they are more likely to donate their time or money to the organization. Events like
this increase the organization's relevance to the community thus making it a more sustainable entity.









audiences, and demonstrate the Ham's dedication to producing a wide variety of challenging and

innovative exhibitions.

Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art

The Harn Museum of Art, located at the University of Florida, has 35,675 square feet of

exhibition space in which it displays its extensive collections of African, Ancient American,

Asian, Contemporary, Modern Art, and Photography. Building strong collections in these areas

and producing "a wide variety of challenging, innovative exhibitions and stimulating educational

programs"4 are central to the Harn Museum of Art's mission. The museum created or hosted

approximately sixteen exhibitions in the 2006 2007 fiscal year. The museum's galleries,

curatorial and exhibitions budget for this fiscal year was $210,1595 there is still a great need to

raise funds for exhibitions.

In order to maintain the highly respected level of exhibitions that the Harn produces, it is

essential for the Director of Development to raise funds to supplement the museum's allocated

budget for exhibitions. "Come for Dinner's" goal income of $100,000 will raise one fourth of

the actual exhibition needs for one year.

The Ham Museum of Art is located in the Cultural Plaza at the University of Florida. This

Plaza is home to the Florida Museum of Natural History, The Phillips Center for the Performing

Arts and the Ham Museum of Art. The other two institutions in the Cultural Plaza both have

their own signature annual fundraising events. The Florida Museum of Natural History presents


4 Christine Hale, "Harn Museum of Art Annual Report 2006/2007," InForm, January/February 2008, 1.
Harn Mission Statement: The Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art promotes the power of the arts to inspire and educate
people and enrich their lives. To this purpose the museum builds and maintains exemplary art collections and
produces a wide variety of challenging, innovative exhibitions and stimulating educational programs. As an integral
part of the University of Florida, the museum advances teaching and research and serves as a catalyst for creative
engagement between the university and diverse local, state, national and international audiences.

5 Ibid, 2-13.









a Passport event every year that involves the purchasing of tickets or tables for a set sum of

money along with a silent auction. Tickets for this event are $125 per person. The Phillips

Center for the Performing Arts holds a yearly Gala. Tickets for this event cost between $150 and

$175 per person. The Harn Museum of Art is the only institution that has not developed a

successful reoccurring annual fundraising event to date.

Need for Well-Rounded Fundraising Plan

While fundraising, for some people, is often synonymous with special events,6 a

successful fundraising plan should be multi-faceted and donations should come from a variety of

sources.7 Depending on only special events such as auctions, galas, and dinners for the majority

of an organization's income is, at best, unreliable. It is unwise to place an organization's future

in the hands of a single funding source since the financial situation of the economy fluctuates and

it is plausible that the funding source could vanish, leaving the organization without a reliable

income. Some money should come from individual donors, other money should come from

grants and foundations, still additional money should come from endowments and finally some

should come from special events. With this in mind, I created a thesis project that is a two-tiered

fundraising effort designed to meet the monetary goal of $100,000. The first element of my

project is a series of dinners that will be underwritten and held monthly in Ham Museum

members' homes. This portion of my project is entitled "Come for Dinner" and all proceeds

from ticket sales for these dinners will benefit exhibitions at the Ham Museum of Art. The

second element of my project is the creation of a giving circle that will additionally support

exhibitions through individual gifts of $5,000 or greater.


6 Christine Graham, Keep the Money Coming: A Step-by-Step Guide to Annual Fundraising, rev. ed., (Florida:
Pineapple Press, Inc., 1992), 77.
7 Eugene R. Tempel, Ed., Hank Rosso's Achieve Excellence in Fund Raising, (California: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.,
2003), 27.









I estimate that the proceeds from ticket sales for dinners will be between $19,800 and

$22,200 depending upon how many dinners reach capacity. In order to determine the number of

solicitations for Exhibition Circle memberships to reach the financial goal of $100,000, I

subtracted $22,200 from the goal amount leaving the result of $77,800. This number is then

divided by $5,000 resulting in 15.56 memberships to the Exhibition Circle. In order to reach the

fundraising goal, throughout the course of the year, successful solicitations will need to be made

to sixteen individuals or corporations for $5,000 gifts for inclusion in the Exhibition Circle. The

Development Director presently solicits donors for funds as part of her fundraising plan. With

the creation of this donating opportunity; she will include membership to the Exhibition Circle as

a proposal option for suitable donors.









CHAPTER 2
SPECIAL EVENTS AS A FUNDRAISING TOOL

According to Michael Seltzer, an author of fundraising manuals, "After face-to-face

solicitation, special event fundraising people coming together for a common purpose and

generating revenue is the oldest form of fundraising."1 Individuals come to special events

because they are acquainted with the organization and believe in supporting the cause of that

particular organization. However, it is equally important to introduce an organization to

additional audiences, and many times a well planned and publicized special event can bring new

individuals into contact with an organization and increase the net profit from any one event. The

Harn Museum of Art has experimented with several different fundraising events in its fifteen

year history, but has failed to create a legacy strong enough to become the institution's signature

annual fundraising event. The most recent, unsuccessful fundraising special event was the Mad

Hatter Tea.

Mad Hatter Tea at the Harn Museum of Art

The Mad Hatter Tea was first held in spring of 2005 as the Ham Museum of Art's annual

fundraising special event, and it enjoyed only marginal success. Members of the planning

committee, docents from the Harn Museum of Art, and a local restaurant agreed to sell tickets for

the event. Upon examination of the ticket sale log from this event, ticket sales were not plentiful

and even with at the door sales, the event did not make a profit. Since the museum lost money

on the event, the Development Coordinator at that time suggested the event should only be held

bi-annually.2 As per her suggestion, the event was again planned for the spring of 2007. I



1 Michael Seltzer, Securing your organization's future: a complete guide tofundraising strategies, rev. and exp. ed.,
(New York: Foundation Center, 2001), 179.
2 1 consulted the Harn Museum of Art Development Department's Fundraising Records for Mad Hatter Tea. All
information was contained in a binder for each event. Information included in the binder related to ticket sales,









served as an intern for the Development Department at the Ham Museum of Art during that

spring semester and thus witnessed many of the obstacles and short-comings of this event.

Following my own informal assessment of the event, I believe that the reason it was not

successful a second time was that it did not resonate with the entire museum membership.

Choosing a special event for an institution is difficult as it is important to devise an event that is

of significantly novel and that will also appeal to a broad range of patron ages and interests.3

The event was strategically planned to coincide with Mother's Day, thus providing a selling

point for the purchase of tickets. Yet, very few tickets were sold in advance and only a marginal

number of tickets were sold the day of the event. A tea party event only appeals to a limited

number of the museum's 895 members. The execution of the Mad Hatter Tea did not create a

profit for the museum during two consecutive occasions and so it was removed from all future

fundraising plans.

Advantages of Raising Money through Special Events

The advantages of creating a fundraising special event for a non-profit organization are

raising money, cultivating current and prospective members, expanding the institution's donor

base, increasing the organization's visibility in the community, fostering staff unity, and meeting

an immediate financial need. Each of these benefits will be discussed in turn.

Special events produce income for an organization in many ways including charging

admission, having an unsolicited donation box at the event, building relationships for future

donations, receiving corporate or foundation sponsorships, and soliciting pledges. Additionally,

many organizations I have been involved with supplement their event earnings with auctions,

ticket distribution, marketing, invoices for catering and decorations, pictures of the event, and a written
recommendation from the current Development Coordinator to postpone the event until the year 2007.
3 Harry A Freedman and Karen Feldman, Black Tie Optional: A Complete Special Events Resource for Nonprofit
Organizations, (New Jersey: Wiley, John and Sons, Incorporated, 2007), 1.









raffles, games, and solicitation of donations. It is important to work toward containing the costs

of the event's organization and implementation in order to maximize the profits. Examining

previous events for ticket pricing, total attendance, and total cost will help establish a baseline

budget and contain costs, 4 which will ultimately serve to increase the net income of the event.

The profits from a fundraising special event can be used to meet an immediate need or can be

planned into the yearly budget as overall projected earnings to be used for other specified means.

While generating income for an organization is usually the first goal of holding an event,

there are many additional advantages and goals to be attained from holding a benefit. "Special

events can be effective tools for organizations with well-developed cultivation strategies to

increase giving from contributors, and win support from new sources now and in the future."5

When working toward the goal of future donations, events can cultivate both current and

prospective donors. Often there are members of the community who are very enthusiastic about

the institution, but they are unable to make a significant donation. However, by including these

members of the community in events, it encourages them to make a more significant donation in

the future when they are able, or to continue to make the donation they are able to each year.

This is an example of the before mentioned tactic of "friend-raising." By finding a way to keep

these members of the community engaged with the institution, the event in essence increases

their potential viability as a donor in the future. Benefits like these are often realized much later

in the form of increased level of membership, planned giving,6 or bequests.7




4 Michael Seltzer, Securing your organization's future: a complete guide tofundraising strategies, 180.

5 Ibid.

6 National Society of Fund Raising Executives Institute, Glossary of Fund Raising Terms, (Virginia: The National
Society of Fund Raising Executives, 1986), 75. Planned giving is described as the integration of sound personal,
financial and estate planning concepts with the individual donor's plans for lifetime or testamentary giving. Also
called Deferred giving which is a commitment or gift established legally during the donor's lifetime, but whose









Executing a well-planned fundraising special event can increase the organization's

visibility in the community. The general buzz and media coverage that an upcoming event

creates make an organization's mission and programs become more widely known.8 It is always

in the organization's best interest to publicize their good works and the asset that it is for the

community. Individuals who are not familiar with an organization may attend an event to learn

more about its mission and purpose, or simply to meet other like-minded people. Community

activity and interest in a special event "almost invariably result in new donors of both gifts and

time,"9 ultimately expanding the organization's donor base, network, mailing list, and volunteer

pool.

Disadvantages of Raising Money through Special Events

There are a variety of disadvantages and difficulties related to employing special events

as a tool to raise money for a non-profit institution. First and foremost, special events require

extensive planning time, staff and volunteer time to execute, and an expense budget of their own.

Depending on the size of the non-profit organization, there could be a deficit in one or all of

these entities; i.e. a small staff, few volunteers, no budget, a short timetable.

Staff time is valuable, limited, and unless the institution has a hired special events

professional, the staff does not often have the time to spare to assist in planning a fundraising

special event. To subsidize the small amount of staff time, many non-profits hire party planners,

special events production firms, and fundraising event consultants to assist the organization in


principal benefits usually do not accrue to the charitable recipient until some future time, often after the donor's
death.
7 Ibid, 10. A bequest is defined as a transfer, by will, of personal property such as cash securities, or other tangible
property.
8 Michael Seltzer, Securing your organization's future: a complete guide tofundraising strategies, 181.

9 Ibid, 180.









the production of a special event. While it could be seen as advantageous to outsource the

planning and implementation of a fundraising special event, these services are rendered at a steep

price. "Party Planners are paid to come up with the theme, decorations, talent, menu, and music.

They usually charge a fee plus a 15% to 25% markup on all products and services."10 If an

organization has to sacrifice a large portion of their profit to the planners, one can see how this

would not be the most advantageous manner in which to execute an event. Production firms

should only be used for larger scale events that require outdoor staging, lights, gigantic

projection screen, fireworks, or crowd control. Firms of this nature also "usually come up with a

theme, and work for a fee plus a percentage based on the costs."11 Finally, there are fundraising

consultants. These event consultants, who typically work for a flat consulting fee, "look at the

event from a financial standpoint, making sure the event will raise enough money and keep

expenses to a minimum."12 Outside fundraising event consultants often take care of ordering

invitations, devising a theme for the event and coordinating entertainment along with assisting in

finding possible sponsors. With an outside firm taking care of all logistics, planning, marketing,

and day-of-the-event details, the cost may seem a worthwhile expense, but the decision to hire

consultants needs to be made on a case by case basis for every non-profit organization.

The Ham Museum of Art does not employ a specific staff member to solely supervise the

planning needs of special events. These responsibilities are delegated to the Development

Coordinator, whose other tasks include overseeing the membership program for individual and

corporate members, museum rentals, development of the budget and coordinating


1O Harry A Freedman and Karen Fledman, The Business of Special Events: Fundraising Strategies for ( ...,,I,, ,
Times, (Florida: Pineapple Press, Inc., 1998), 23.
1 Ibid.
12 Ibid.









implementation for member events, managing the budget, and coordinating implementation of

membership materials, and managing and mentoring Development interns.13 Another important

factor in deciding to create a fundraising special event is the budget that the organization has

allocated for such purposes. While it may seem counter-productive, an organization must

frequently spend money in order to raise money. The budget for special events often covers

expenses such as table and chair rentals, security staff fees, catering, beverages, linens and

decorations, entertainment, marketing, and printing costs for invitations and tickets. It is always

hoped that the upfront money will be recovered through the event's profit margin. If the

proceeds from the event are only going to allow the organization to recover their budget and not

to make a profit, then it would be wise to devise a more lucrative event as the organization's

fundraiser.

Special events as fundraisers can be daunting for yet another reason the eminent

possibility of failure. The event can fail for a variety of reasons depending on the goal outcome

for the event. First, if the event raises inadequate funds, leaving the organization at a deficit, then

it is not a success and should be evaluated for the cause of failure before the event is duplicated

in subsequent years. Most often, fundraising special events fail financially because an

organization spends more money planning the event than the event ultimately raises. Second, if

the goal is to bolster community relations and it does not entice the community to attend the

event or support the organization, then the marketing for the event should be re-evaluated before

the event is held again.






13 Tracy Pfaff, kR cg.iii.ii Development Coordinator Job Description at the Harn Museum of Art," interview by
Kelly Harvey, by phone from Gainesville, FL., 20 February 2008.









Special Event as "Friend Raiser"

While fundraising special events first and foremost are considered successful if they

produce funds for an organization, they are also considered successful if they can act as a

"friend-raiser." Friend-raisers14 are typically events that entice the public and encourage them to

start a relationship with the institution or organization. This relationship can be initiated through

the act of becoming a member, presenting a benefit to the surrounding community such as a

lecture, or signing up to receive a newsletter. Events aimed at fostering more relationships or

raising friends often have a nominal admittance fee or no admittance fee at all. The benefit of

creating a fundraising special event that not only increases museum profit but also increases the

number of relationships the museum has with the community allows the museum to generate a

larger pool of potential future donors. Meaningful and profitable relationships require a

considerable amount of time to cultivate or nurture towards maturity. Building a relationship

between a Development officer and a potential donor is an intricate process. The Development

officer introduces the donor to the organization, invites them to events and programs while

becoming acquainted with the individual. Eventually, after discussions regarding how the

potential donor could partner with the organization, the relationship reaches a point of maturity.

At this point it is appropriate for the Development officer to present the individual with a

donation proposal or solicitation.

While the "Come for Dinner" events charge a significant ticket price of $150 per person,

each event is designed to take place in an intimate setting. The intimate dinner setting with a

special guest will encourage conversation among the guests and will foster meaningful

14 Friend-raising events are designed to be inclusive and accessible for as much of the community as possible which
almost always leads to an expansion of the organization's mailing list and donor base for the future. When the
community feels connected to the organization, they are more likely to donate their time or money to the
organization. Events like this increase the organization's relevance to the community thus making it a more
sustainable entity.










relationships between the museum and the event attendees. Introducing the Ham Museum of Art

to an individual through a non-threatening,15 social environment may craft a more positive image

of the museum than a simple request for donations or attendance at a less-meaningful event.













































15 Museums, especially art museums, are often described by the public as being illLc.inliiii, unapproachable, or
elitist entities. By introducing the Harn Museum of Art to the public through an event like "Come for Dinner" that
does not happen in the building/white cube ,c'lii,. allows the organization to be seen through a personal connection
that does not require extensive art historical knowledge or education, just an appreciation for what the organization
does in the community.









CHAPTER 3
CREATING A DINE-AROUND MODEL TO ACCOMMODATE THE HARN MUSEUM OF
ART AND THE GAINESVILLE COMMUNITY

The first step in determining the suitability of such an event for the Ham was to form a

committee of individuals who are well acquainted with the Ham Museum of Art and with the

Gainesville community at large. With the assistance of the Director of Development at the Ham

Museum of Art, we compiled a list of nine individuals we thought would be interested in

discussing the creation of this benefit event. Members of the committee represent different areas

of the museum constituency including docents, long-time members, respected members of the

community, individuals who have been associated with similar events in the past, and museum

donors. Each committee member received a letter inviting them to become a member of this

planning committee (Appendix A). In the letter, each potential committee member was asked to

contemplate their commitment to planning and realizing this new fundraising endeavor and to

join only if they were able to see the event through to its completion. Members of the

administrative staff, such as the Director of the Harn and Development Coordinator were also

present at these committee meetings. A total of approximately twelve people were present at all

meetings. This number was a helpful number as we were looking to brainstorm in the early

meetings and not simply come to a consensus.1 A larger number of committee members is

conducive for brainstorming since there are many individuals present to share ideas. If reaching

a quick consensus is the goal of meetings, it is better to have a smaller number in the group so

that fewer individuals have to reach agreement.


SHarvard Business School Press, Running Meetings: Expert Solutions to Everyday (h ,, llI ,,. ', (Massachusetts:
Harvard Business School Publishing, 2006), 7. This book describes the Rule of 8-18-1800. If you've got a problem
to solve or a decision to make, then invite no more than eight people. If you want to brainstorm, then you can invite
as many as eighteen people but the author advises not to look for a consensus out of meetings with this many
participants. And lastly, if you want to disseminate information and whip a group of people into a frenzy of
enthusiasm about a product or program then invite as many people as possible, 1800 or more.









At the first committee meeting, I presented the research I had compiled to that point

regarding other museums and non-profit organizations that execute dine-around fundraising

special events. Each member was given a brief breakdown of the event form and earnings for

each of the following successful examples. (Appendix B).

Successful Dine-Around Events

One of the main benefits of such a series of events is that neither the financial nor the

planning responsibilities for each individual event lie with the organization. The organization's

responsibilities are limited to coordinating the logistics of the series of events to ensure that each

event is in-line with its mission, marketing, and handling the receipt of reply cards with payment.

Individual hosts or restaurants agree to underwrite the entire cost of the meal and extraneous

entertaining expenses which saves the organization from spending money upfront and allows the

profit margins to go directly to the selected benefit cause without first having to cover the costs

of the event. By enlisting the various hosts to fully fund the event and take care of all

preparatory measures related to the event, the burden of spending excessive amounts of time

planning an event is lifted from the museum staff's list of responsibilities. This format for

planning a fundraising special event allows the staff to be more efficient with their work time

and saves the museum's staffing resources. Furthermore, it engages the hosts in tangible ways to

promote the events to friends and colleagues and in intangible ways to increase institutional

loyalty.

Vero Beach Museum of Art

The Vero Beach Museum of Art is a 55,412 square foot museum located on Florida's east

coast in Indian River County's twenty-six acre Riverside Park and houses collections in









American and international works of art.2 During a phone interview, Director of Development

Robyn Orzel stated that the Vero Beach Museum of Art has been holding their version of a dine-

around event titled "The Art of Dining" for the past fifteen or sixteen years.3 Typically they hold

twelve events a year in conjunction with their international lecture series that hosts distinguished

speakers in the field of the arts and humanities.4 Nine of the events are dinners and three of the

events are cocktail parties. "The Art of Dining" is marketed as an exclusive VIP dinner in which

guests are able to dine with one of the speakers from the lecture series. According to Robyn

Orzel, the exclusivity of the events helps to sell the tickets to each intimate dinner of twelve to

fourteen people. Tickets for each dinner event cost $150 per person. Over the years, "The Art of

Dining" has gained a favorable reputation, and thus all dinner events sell out every year.

Additionally, the museum coordinates with a member to throw two or three cocktail parties with

larger guest capacities of twenty-five to forty persons each year. These cocktail parties have

taken place at either the home of a museum member or occasionally at an alternative location,

such as a yacht that belongs to a museum member. These less intimate events that do not offer

the benefit of spending the evening with a well-renowned lecturer or artist, cost $125 per person.

For all of these events, the host of the event underwrites the cost and plans every aspect of the

event of the event. The museum's only responsibility is to take reservations for the parties and

provide the guest list to the host one week before the event. Robyn Orzel spoke highly of the





2 Vero Beach Museum of Art, Vero Beach Museum ofArt Home page,
http://www.vbmuseum.org/index.cfm?method=home, last accessed 5 April 2008.
3 Robyn Orzel, I by phone from Gainesville, FL., 28 August 2007.
4 Vero Beach Museum of Art, International Lecture series,
http://www.vbmuseum.org/index.cfm?method=Education.Lecture, last accessed 5 April 2008.









success her institution has seen from this series of events and encouraged implementing such an

event at any art museum.5

When asked about the challenges related to "The Art of Dinning," she stated the challenges

revolved around placating the hosts. Apparently in past years there was miscommunication

between the hosts and the museum. Originally, the hosts kept track of all reservations for their

own parties, but due to the popularity of the events, the hosts started to attempt to save

reservation slots at their dinners for friends. This situation became a sticky one as the saved

reservations were blocking other members who had replied and paid first from attending an

event. So, the museum regained control of the reservation process and instituted a volunteer

liaison position to deliver guest lists to the hosts and to assist with last minute details on the day

of the event. The liaison does not attend the event, but is present in case of a problem. She

stated that instituting this addendum into the process of presenting "The Art of Dining" has cut

down on the challenges and miscommunications.6

Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (MOCANoMi)

The Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami (MOCANoMi) utilizes the dine-around

model for multiple events that support two separate giving groups. MOCA SHAKERS is a

group comprised of "young international patrons (ages twenty one to forty five) who are eager to

explore contemporary art through social and art related events."7 With the goal of raising funds

for exhibitions of emerging artists at MOCA, the MOCA Shakers host an evening of art entitled

"Mystery Dates." Mystery Dates is an evening that begins at the MOCA Goldman Warehouse



5 Robyn Orzel, I 6 Ibid.

7 Miami Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Become a MOCA \i.,I, I membership page,
http://www.mocanomi.org/membership/beashaker.html, last accessed 5 April, 2008.









with a cocktail party and music. While at the Warehouse, the 400 participants discover which

"mystery" dinner location they will travel to next to spend the remainder of the evening. MOCA

art patrons and collectors open their homes as the mystery locations for these evenings and host

dinner parties where the guests are surrounded by the host's art collections. Ticket price for this

event varies with the guests' membership level at MOCANoMi. For members of Shaker level or

above, the ticket price is $150 per person, while non-MOCA Shaker members pay $200 per

person.8 This event alone has the potential to yield between $60,000 and $80,000, depending on

the number of member or non-member participants.

The second benefit event that MOCANoMi produces each year is called "Enchanted

Evenings." This event benefits MOCA's exhibitions, educational, and outreach programs.

According to their events website, "Each year, notable collectors and art patrons open their

homes for Enchanted Evenings of exceptional art, sumptuous cuisine, and intimate conversation.

These unique dinners give MOCA an extraordinary opportunity to introduce contemporary art

aficionados to some of the most dynamic private collections in the U.S. and beyond."9 The

events take place in approximately ten homes a year with 400 total attendees. Tickets are priced

at $600 per person and tables of ten are sold for $6,000. The profits from this event would be

approximately $240,000 if all tickets were sold.

While I was unable to successfully reach a member of the museum staff for comment

regarding either of these events, I believe it is safe to assume that the event is successful and

does not present overwhelming challenges due to the fact that it is replicated each year.




8 Miami Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Annual Benefit Event Support,
http://www.mocanomi.org/membership/events.htm, last accessed 5 April, 2008.
9 Ibid.









Naples Winter Wine Festival

The Naples Winter Wine Festival has been organized and hosted yearly by the Naples

Children and Education Foundation since 2001. While the festival covers three days of activities

and many events other than dinners, I will only focus on the Vintner Dinner portion of their

fundraising plan. All proceeds from the events of the Naples Winter Wine Festival benefit the

Naples Children and Education Foundation. Members of the Ham Museum's National Council

are affiliated with these events and were available for the Director of Development to consult

regarding the development of "Come for Dinner."

The Foundation provides money to a multitude of children's organizations in the South

Florida Region. There are seventeen Vintner Dinners which all occur on one night and take

place at private homes.10 Each host assumes the entire cost of these evenings, including the

presence of a renowned vintner and a famous chef. In order to keep the dinners intimate, seating

is limited to thirty-two persons per dinner for a total of 550 individuals. Tickets for this event

are priced at $7,500 per couple or $20,000 for two couples to attend the same Vintner Dinner. n

This portion of their fundraising event raises approximately $4,125,000.

Palm Springs Art Museum

The Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Springs California is an art museum which holds

collections in Contemporary and American art. The museum's LUEY Parties, which is an

acronym for Let Us Entertain You, is an annual fundraiser. LUEY Parties are comprised of



10 I consulted the 2006 and 2007 Naples Winter Wine Festival invitations as a guide for planning the invitation for
"Come for Dinner." These invitations are very extensive, as the foundation has the budget to create such a
document. Each dinner had a separately designed page with a theme and the planned menu. The menu is presented
as a bound book and mailed to potential participants. I also consulted other dine-around invitations from events in
Evansville, Indiana that were achieved on a smaller scale.
1 Naples Winter Wine Festival, At A Glance, http://www.napleswinefestival.com/factsheet/, last accessed 15 April,
2008.









approximately eighteen parties per year and tickets cost $200 per person. As Scott Schroeder,

the Director of Development at the museum told me in an interview, the parties are very

successful and yield a profit of $70,000 net proceeds. While he could not advise me on the

history of the event or its conception, he verified that the events were successful due to the fact

that there was very little work for the museum. Each year, twenty to thirty people agree to host

an event to benefit the museum. By agreeing to host an event, they are also agreeing to take care

of the planning and financial needs for their event. The Palm Springs Museum publicizes the

LUEY Parties through a booklet that contains all the descriptions of all the events which take

place over a six month period. Reservations are made via a reply card where each guest states

the number of events that they would like to attend, ranking which are the most enticing to them.

Selections for the dinners are made by lottery until all events are full. The museum then notifies

all guests of the dinners they are to attend and sends a list of guests to each host. After dinner

selections have been made, the guests submit their payment.

When asked about the challenges of supporting the LUEY Parties, Scott Schroeder

commented that the most difficult part dealt with donor relations. From a donor relations stand

point, it is difficult to please everyone when assigning guests to events. While the lottery method

ensures that no one receives special treatment for the selection of events, it is inevitable that

someone could be unhappy with their assignments. Additionally, he stated that occasionally, if

the guests do not receive their top choices or do not enjoy the event, they blame the museum.

Regardless of the challenges, he reiterated the success of the LUEY Parties and provided

some advice for the Harn Museum's new implementation of a similar event. He emphasized the

importance of being flexible with the hosts and allowing them to create an event that will have









"sizzle" even if it does not relate directly to the museum since the funds will ultimately benefit

the museum.12

Planning Committee's Reaction and Ideas

Each of the museums in the case studies are located in different geographic locations,

have different membership pools, and specialize in different areas of art or the non-profit world.

The Ham's location and its relationship to the University of Florida make it a distinctive case.

As the University is currently in a critical financial situation, entities under its administrative

umbrella, such as the Harn Museum are required to work harder to raise more financial

support.13 With the assistance of the "Come for Dinner" committee, and much brainstorming,

we adapted the dine-around models from the above case studies into a form that will assist the

Harn Museum of Art in reaching the goal of raising $100,000.

One of the first points to be made concerned the difference in atmosphere between

Gainesville and places such as Miami, Naples, and Vero Beach. Gainesville, with an estimated

population of 122,671 and a median household income of $31,426 does not foster the same

community as the cities in Florida that hosted dine-around events.14 While this was a concern

for some committee members, others did not seem to find Gainesville's economic profile a

problem. These committee members have been involved in dine-around events in other

communities like Asheville, NC and Evansville, IN, which are communities that they described

as being similar to Gainesville in population size and community interests. Upon concluding


12 Scott Schroeder, I< cg.iiilii Dine-Around Events (LUEY PARTIES) at the Palm Springs Art Museum,"
interviewed by Kelly Harvey, by phone from Gainesville, FL., 4 April 2008.
13 Phyllis DeLaney, I State," interview by Kelly Harvey, in person at the Ham Museum of Art, 27 March, 2008.
14 The City of Gainesville Official Website, Gainesville Facts, http://www.cityofgainesville.org/about/, last accessed
8 April, 2008. Population estimate was calculated as of April 2007 by the Bureau of Economic and Business
Research.









that a form of dine-around events could take place successfully in Gainesville, the committee

addressed the potential event venues.

While most dine-around events take place outside the four walls of the organization they

are benefiting, some members of the committee felt that this was not in line with the goals of the

Harn Museum of Art and wished to discuss alternatives. One of the committee members, who

serves as a docent, was concerned that dine-around guests would be missing out on all the Ham

Museum of Art has to offer if they were to attend a fundraising event where they never set foot

in the museum. The Ham's mission statement calls for the museum to "promote the power of

the arts to inspire and educate people and enrich their lives."15 She felt that having these events

at the museum with a "light didactic component" would directly connect the dinner guests to the

museum, leading to greater involvement or increased donations in the future.16 Her argument

was that if the guests couldn't see the products of their generosity, they would be less likely to

donate in the future or to continue to build a relationship with the museum. After much

discussion, it was decided that a connection could be created between event guests and the

museum even if the event did not take place in the building. It was also agreed that a host could

rent the museum as an alternative venue.

Many members of the committee wished to keep the events outside of the museum since

new locations added to the freshness of the "Come for Dinner" idea and encouraged a more

intimate setting. However, compromises were discussed, such as having the event start at the

museum with cocktails and appetizers before the dinner event or creating each dinner to benefit


1Christine Hale, InForm, 1. Refer to the Ham's Mission Statement above

16 As each "Come for Dinner" event will have a special guest and a museum representative present, it further fulfills
the museum's mission of creating stimulating educational programs. Having these individuals present at each event
will engage the guests and encourage them to visit the museum and attend other programming developed by the
Ham Museum of Art.









the purchase of a particular piece of art. For reasons of liability and logistics, it was decided to

not have the guests meet at the Harn before breaking up to attend a dinner event unless

transportation could be supplied for all the guests. The suggestion that the profit from the dinner

events could assist in the purchase of a particular piece of art for the collection sparked highly

creative discussion about exactly what purpose these events should benefit (Appendix C).

Finally, a timeline was developed in order to insure that the project progressed successfully

toward completion in a timely manner (Appendix D).

Determining the Benefit Cause

Individuals are more generous in their donations and are more likely to give a donation at

all if they know how the profits will be used and they are invested in the organization. If a donor

lacks interest in the work of a organization will not donate funds just because they have the

ability to do so. 17 Committee members brainstormed a variety of benefits that the money raised

through "Come for Dinner" events could assist. Ideas included the purchase of a piece of art for

the museum, specific educational programming, the general operation support fund, exhibition

support, and a variety of other causes. The Director of Development presented sections of the

museum's budget to the committee and highlighted the areas that were in need of additional

funds. She spoke about the difficulty of securing sponsorship funds for the exhibitions that the

Harn Museum creates as well as those that they host as traveling exhibitions. Thus, it was

decided that "Come for Dinner" would be presented as a benefit for exhibitions at the Ham

Museum of Art. Through examination of the budget, the Director of Development explained that

she has to raise an average of $100,000 annually to meet the deficit between the budget for




17 Eugene R. Tempel, Ed., Hank Rosso's Achieve Excellence in Fund Raising, (California: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.,
2003), 29.









exhibitions and their actual cost. The committee agreed to set the goal income of $100,000 so

that "Come for Dinner" would meet that need.

Naming Hosts and Establishing Benefits

After determining what specific need the proceeds from "Come for Dinner" would

benefit, we next worked through the challenge of finding individuals who would be willing to

host a dinner for this series. As part of their commitment to the project, each member of the

planning committee was asked to consider hosting an evening at their home. Of the ten members

of the committee who own homes, six agreed to host a dinner during the course of the year. No

one was enthusiastic about hosting an event in December, due to the pressures of the holiday

season. Thus, it was decided that the month of December would be omitted. With eleven

months in the series, and six already filled by the planning committee members, it was only

necessary to find five additional hosts to round out the year of events. In order to expedite the

process of locating the remaining hosts, the committee generated a list of prominent members of

the Gainesville community who had an established connection to the museum, lived in a

remarkable home, or might be interested in participating in a series of events like "Come for

Dinner."

Hosting an evening in the "Come for Dinner" series is a large undertaking both

financially and logistically, thus we determined that each individual or couple should be solicited

for their assistance through a personal visit. During the visit, the potential host would learn

about "Come for Dinner" and the financial plan for reaching the $100,000 goal to benefit

exhibitions at the Ham Museum of Art. Solicitations for funds of any kind are made only after a









relationship has been built between the museum and the individual and has been adequately

cultivated.18

Since I was not responsible for initiating or building relationships with most of the

potential hosts, the personal visits to solicit assistance with this fundraising endeavor were

handled by the Development staff at the Ham Museum of Art. However, I had the opportunity

to conduct a meeting with one of the potential hosts because of the personal relationship I had

with her and her husband. In that meeting, I presented the potential host couple with the concept

of "Come for Dinner" and the goals that the museum hoped to accomplish financially. I brought

a copy of the exhibition schedule for the upcoming year so that I would be able to assist this

potential host in selecting an exhibition to highlight if they agreed to participate. While

discussing the entirety of "Come for Dinner," I made this couple aware of the benefits they

would enjoy as a result of agreeing to become a host. The first benefit any host would receive is

a tax deduction. Hosts can claim their expenses for the dinner event they host on their tax return

as an act of charitable giving. In order to receive this benefit, I advised them that all expenses

had to be documented through receipts or invoices. Secondly, each host would receive "in-kind"

donation credit from the Ham Museum of Art. The donation is categorized as "in-kind" and not

as monetary because the museum does not receive the funds that are spent on the event, it only

benefits from the service of a third party planning and financing the event on the museum's

behalf. The museum will assist them in providing any additionally documentation they may

need for verification of their gift. Finally, each host is granted membership to the Exhibition




18 Richard E. Matheny, Major Gifts: solicitation strategies, (New York: Council of Advancement for Support of
Education, 1999), 54. The entire first section of this book lays out solicitation strategies and a step-by-step method
for conducting prospect research, creating a relationship, setting a goal, getting the appointment, making the ask, and
stewarding that relationship for the future.









Circle which otherwise would require paying a membership fee of $5,000 or more. Membership

to this exclusive giving circle carries other benefits, explained below.

At the conclusion of my meeting with these potential hosts, I presented the couple with a

"Host Commitment Agreement for Dine-Around Events" form that I created for this project.

While the form is not legally binding in any way, it is used as a statement of good faith between

the museum and the hosting party. The form also collects information from the host about the

event they are planning such as the cost of the event, estimated cost per person (for tax deduction

calculations), and a description of the exhibition from which they are drawing inspiration for

their event (Appendix E). This information will be used to generate the text for marketing

materials. Presenting my first fundraising solicitation was a rewarding experience with a

positive outcome as the couple I met with agreed to host an event that is scheduled for the month

of May.

Exhibition Circle Membership and Benefits

I created a chart to explain the criteria for membership to the Exhibition Circle, the goals

the circle will achieve, and the benefits the members receive (Appendix F). As previously stated,

membership is acquired through hosting a dinner or making a minimum donation of $5,000.

Businesses and corporations are also eligible for membership through sponsorship opportunities

or donations of in-kind gifts or services. Regardless of whether an Exhibition Circle member

hosts a dinner or makes a donation of cash or services, all members receive the same benefits.

First, each member is eligible for a tax deduction within the limits of the law and will be

recognized in the museum's annual report. Additionally, the members will be invited to the

museum to exclusively preview upcoming exhibitions. It is possible, if an additional donor can

be identified in the future, that the benefits will grow to include a dinner in their honor. The

Development staff will also steward the members of the Exhibition Circle to ensure that they are









aware of the importance of the financial commitment they made to the Harn Museum of Art and

the appreciation that the institution has for their generosity. Conducting such stewardship is

essential to retaining donors and cultivating them towards larger donations in the future.

Constructing List of Invitees and Setting Ticket Price

Fundraising events usually take place in the organization that is benefiting from the

profits of the event or in a public area. However, since these events are being held off-site in

members' private homes, creating an invitee list proved to be slightly problematic. A number of

planning committee members were concerned about opening their homes to complete strangers,

while others did not have a problem opening up their homes. As a result of the concerns that

were voiced, a few initial security measures were put in place. First, the invitations for the

events will only be mailed to individuals, corporate contacts, or VIPs that are currently in the

museum's membership database. Secondly, the ticket price, set at $150 was considered to be a

deterrent to anyone who might have illegitimate motives for wishing to attend. In addition to

deterring possible trouble-makers, the committee felt that the price of $150 was in line with the

prices of other events in Gainesville, and thus more likely to be accepted by the community.

Finally, the hosts would be given a list of all attendees the week before their dinner for review

(Appendix G).

Reply Cards and Receipt of Payment

The menu invitation will be mailed to the entire membership once at the beginning of the

series. Each invitation will include an RSVP card that allows members to make reservations for

every dinner they wish to attend throughout the entire year (Appendix H). Having only one

mailing for the year reduces the number of invitations that need to be printed, the cost of the

event, and the amount of work for the Development Department staff. The processing of









payments and reserving seats at specified dinners through the following procedure constitutes the

majority of the museum's administrative duties for the "Come for Dinner" events.

Upon receipt of the RSVP card, the Development staff and interns follow a specific

procedure to make certain that each response and payment are processed properly. First, each

individual/couple's reservations, address, contact information, and method of payment need to be

recorded in the "Come for Dinner" Reservations Notebook (Appendix I). If the guest makes

multiple reservations, their contact information must be entered on the proper dinner page.

Second, the guest's Raiser's Edge profile must be updated. The Ham Museum of Art uses

Blackbaud's Raiser's Edge Development software to track their members and gifts made to the

institution. In the Bio 2 tab, the guests' constituency information should be coded as an attendee

of "Come for Dinner" in the 2008 2009 year. My suggestion for this code is CFM0809. This

information is important for the Development staff. They will use this code to track the

constituents who attend this fundraising endeavor for evaluation purposes. Next, the staff

member or intern must process the payment in accordance with University of Florida Foundation

standards, keeping a copy of the report generated by Raiser's Edge in the paper file for "Come

for Dinner." The guests should receive written confirmation in the mail that their reservations

and payment have been received and processed (Appendix J). This correspondence will also

contain the address of the home where the event to which they have replied is being held. The

Membership Coordinator should be kept abreast of all RSVPs in order to track which dinners are

selling out and which dinners need additional marketing.

Stewardship

After an event, it is important to thank each of the guests for attending. This should be

accomplished in two ways. The Ham Museum will have a representative present at all the

events. This representative will assist the host if needed and will help to facilitate conversation









with the guests, encouraging them to deepen their relationship with the museum. The role of the

museum representative will be filled by a member of the Development staff, the Director, a

Curator, or myself. In addition to communicating information about exhibitions at the museum

and membership to the Exhibition Circle, the representative should be on hand with the host to

personally thank each and every guest for attending. No more than a week after the event, a

thank you note should be sent to each guest, thanking them for their donation (Appendix K).

This thank you note should also contain a reminder about the benefits of being a member of the

Exhibition Circle and ways to further their individual support in the future. As there will be

many guests over the course of the year, this letter can be a form letter and not a hand written

one.

The event hosts should not be forgotten in the stewardship process. It is important that

each host also receive a personal thank you from the staff at the museum for the time, effort, and

money they so generously donated to benefit the Harn Museum of Art. As there are only eleven

dinners in a year, either the Director of the museum or the Director of Development should send

a hand-written notes of thanks to each host approximately a week after the event. If the hosts

feel appreciated and valued, it is more likely that they will host another dinner or increase their

donation levels in the future.

Event Evaluation

Evaluation is critical to the measuring the success of any program that a museum

produces. "The classical model of evaluation research focuses on outcomes, asking whether the

exhibition or program satisfied the goals for which it was designed."19 The three types of

evaluation methods for museum programming are front-end evaluation, formative evaluation and


19 Jay Rounds, NIkc.amLc for Measure: Purpose and Problems in Evaluating Exhibitions," Museum News
(Washington D.C.) vol. 80 (July/August 2001): 43.









summative evaluation. Each method of evaluation is deployed at different times throughout the

process of the program's implementation.

Front-end evaluation is carried out before the event happens and is included in the

planning stages. For this event, I instituted a planning committee which voiced the opinions of

the museum's constituencies. The members of this committee are involved with the museum in

a variety of roles, and so were equipped to discuss the implications of launching an event like

"Come for Dinner." The committee helped to shape the event through deciding how many

dinner events should or could feasibly occur in a year, setting an appropriate ticket price, and

deciding upon marketing tools to advertise the event.

Formative evaluation takes place during the planning process and throughout the duration

of the program and is "based on real visitor capabilities and limitations, not hypothetical

audiences."20 This type of evaluation allows the museum to tweak aspects that are not resonating

with the public so that they can be more successful for the latter half of the program. Performing

this sort of evaluation for "Come for Dinner" should be done informally by tracking how many

dinners sell out. If dinners are repeatedly sitting empty, then the museum staff will know that

they need to change the marketing method, work more diligently at selling reservations through

face-to-face solicitation, or find other ways to promote the events.

Summative evaluation takes place after than event or program has already been

implemented. There are many ways to complete such evaluations such as through surveys or

phone interviews. I suggest that before "Come for Dinner" is continued in the 2009 2010 year

that some level of evaluation take place. The quantities to be measured should include profit,



20 Chandler Screven, I m1.11im1 c' Evaluation: Does Your Exhibition Attract and Hold Visitor's Attention? Do
Visitors Know How to Use Your interactive? Do Visitors Understand Your Messages?," Museum Visitor Studies in
the 90s, (London: Science Museum, 1993), 59.









popularity, difficulty of selling tickets, and interest in attending future events. The Development

staff should send out an evaluation survey to each guest to determine if they enjoyed attending

events this year as well as their interest in attending additional events in years to come.

Verifying their motivation for purchasing tickets, be it curiosity, a gift, or philanthropic desire,

might also yield insightful results that will help the Development staff plan for the 2009-2010

"Come for Dinner" series.









CHAPTER 4
MARKETING AND BUDGETARY PLANNING FOR "COME FOR DINNER"

The budget for the fiscal year in which "Come for Dinner" will commence (2008-2009)

was already set and in effect when the museum staff decided to go forward with my project. As

a result, the Development Coordinator and I had to look for additional funding sources in order

to ensure that the event had enough financial backing.

Budget

I have proposed that a small portion of the profits be used to sustain the event annually.

"Come for Dinner" requires very little financial backing from the museum since each host has

agreed to assume the entire cost of the meal they are serving, any entertainment they chose to

hire, table rentals, etc. The only cost which the museum has agreed to cover is the design,

printing, mailing of the invitation and production of marketing materials. As the event gains

popularity, it may be possible to find a donor to cover some of these costs which would further

remove the museum from financial responsibility. Decreasing the museum's financial burden in

planning this year-long event allows for the realization of a higher profit as the proceeds will not

need to cover start-up expenses.

Sponsorships are often given by companies in the form of services or products. This is

known as a gift-in-kind. The Development Coordinator and I brainstormed possibilities for

sponsorship or in-kind donations from local businesses or corporations in response to the

materials needed to make the event a success. We generated a list of helpful services that could

be donated including wine, printing, external advertising, and invitation design.

As we had a small amount of money to hire a designer to create invitations, we did not

need to search for a designer to donate their time and creative services; however, we needed

support for printing materials. Alta Systems is a local printing company which was accepting









grant applications at that time. The Harn Museum Development Department was awarded a

grant of $2,500 in printing and paper costs from the company for the "Come for Dinner"

invitation.

Due to time constraints and with the advice of the Director of Development, I did not

pursue any additional sponsorship opportunities prior to the commencement of the event series.

However, within the course of this inaugural year or subsequent years, it would be advantageous

to seek donation of advertising space in the Gainesville Magazine and wine from one of the local

beverage stores such as Dom's or Southern Spirits for each dinner. The Gainesville Magazine

could include a small story in the social section that highlighted some of the dinners throughout

the year, or could donate space to advertise an upcoming dinner at pre-determined intervals

throughout the year. Local beverage shops could be encouraged to serve as the official vintner

for the "Come for Dinner" events by selecting a special wine to compliment the specific meal

that each host was serving.

Marketing

Many mid-sized museums like the Ham Museum of Art are fortunate enough to have

marketing or public relations departments that develop and produce all museum publications,

invitations, and press releases. Marketing is defined differently in the for-profit and the not-for-

profit worlds. "For-profit marketers will define marketing as: The exchange of something of

value for something you need, thus marketing is an exchange of goods and services for value."1

The profession of marketing, in the non-profit realm such as the museum industry, reflects a

different set of situations and ideals. However, it maintains the ultimate goal of connecting




1 Alan L. Wendroff, Special Events: Proven Strategies for Nonprofit Fundraising, (New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons,
Inc., 2004), 141.









people with an organization through building relationships.2 Marketing for special events

requires the identification of potential attendees, identification of the programs that will be

supported by the event, and what key institutional values are going to be promoted. It is also

essential to consider the various communication vehicles that can be utilized to transmit

marketing materials. Possible vehicles include television, radio, free publications in newspapers

or advertisements. Events like "Come for Dinner" offer an organization the opportunity to

possibly marry members of the community potential supporters with the mission and

objectives of the museum.

Through discussions with the planning committee and members of the museum staff, the

decision was made to first utilize in-house marketing materials. The primary vehicle for

transmitting information about the "Come for Dinner" series and connected Exhibition Circle is

an invitation which will be sent to all current museum members and VIPs. This invitation will

also be made available through a link on the Ham Museum of Art's webpage, enabling anyone

who peruses the site to learn about the event and to purchase tickets. The Director of

Development is currently working with the Gainesville Magazine to cover some of the "Come

for Dinner" events. These events lend themselves nicely to appearing in an "In Good Company"

article for the August issue which would include a story and photos. Coverage of these events

would also fit nicely into the "Seen" section of the magazine, which focuses on events happening

in the Gainesville community. Multiple appearances in the Gainesville Magazine will keep

"Come for Dinner" visible throughout the year, which will hopefully increase ticket sales.

Additionally, announcements regarding upcoming dinners will be placed in InForm, the Ham




2 Fiona McLean, Marketing the Museum, (New York: Routledge, 1997), 1.









Museum's bi-monthly magazine publication. The final method in which the museum will be

advocating and advertising its new signature fundraising event is by word-of- mouth.

Invitation Design

As this is the inaugural year of "Come for Dinner," the museum staff and I decided to mail

invitations for this series of events only to current Harn Museum members. Individuals who

have already made the commitment to be involved with the Harn Museum of Art through

membership might be more likely to attend events that benefit the museum. The mailing list of

potential guests is limited to this finite number of individuals and corporations due to the cost of

printing and mailing invitations. However, it is not mandatory that a guest be a current member

in order to purchase a ticket for any of the events.

In keeping with the idea of "dinner," it was decided that the invitation would be designed

as a menu. This idea was adapted from the very successful Naples Vintner Dinners in which the

invitation features an extensive menu for each of the seventeen dinners that take place on a single

evening. For the "Come for Dinner" invitation, each dinner is presented as an entr6e would be

listed on a restaurant's menu under the heading of the month in which the dinner is to take place

(Appendix L). The Development Department at the Ham was able to provide my project a small

budget to hire a designer to create invitation and marketing materials. Two graphic design

graduate students were contacted to evaluate their interest in collaborating on my project.

I met with the designer selected for this project to discuss the "Come for Dinner"

invitation. We discussed the audience, color scheme, design ideas, number of fonts, amount of

text copy, goals of the project, and a timeline for the project. While the designer was responsible



3 As this project is in partial fulfillment of my master's degree from the University of Florida, I felt strongly about
involving additional student talent in order to afford others the opportunity of working with the Ham Museum of
Art.









for the creative portions of the invitation, I collaborated with members of the Development staff

to create the text that would market the events in the invitation. The completion of the

invitation/marketing tools was one of the most challenging aspects of the project due to the fact

that the invitation serves as the most visible form of promoting "Come for Dinner."

Additionally, the design requires the approval of the Director of the Ham Museum, as well as the

Director of Development, and the endorsement of the committee. Selection of the cover image

occupied a great deal of time and required a number of proofs before the museum staff settled on

an image, based on the theme of silverware. Each piece of silverware in the image is from a

different set with a different pattern, visually representing the variety of dinner events that will

occur throughout the course of the year. If successful, the Ham Museum staff has plans to

continue the "Come for Dinner" event annually, creating a branded fundraising special event that

the community immediately associates with the museum. As a result, the image of the event was

a very crucial design element. The silverware image will be used as the icon for future "Come

for Dinner" events.

Branding "Come for Dinner"

Museums create a brand for themselves in many ways such as through a definitive logo,

their mission, the exhibitions they create, and the programs they develop. In today's market,

cultural institutions like museums use their brand to attract not only visitors but also donors. "A

brand is a distinctive identity that engenders loyalty. Branding consists of creating and

maintaining a body of programs and attitudes that convey a clear promise, encourage familiarity,

and generate ongoing support."4 Through the creation of the signature image of timeless

silverware which can be used for many years in the future, "Come for Dinner" will become a


4 Margot Wallace, Museum Branding: How to Create and Maintain Image, Loyalty, and Support, 1.









brand of its own. The repetition of this image will familiarize the public with the event and the

museum. This constant visibility and familiarity with the "Come for Dinner" event image will

transmit the idea that the museum is reliable and responsible with their donations since the event

has continued to occur for consecutive years and will encourage monetary support.

In-House Marketing Tools

InForm magazine is produced by the Harn Museum of Art's Marketing and Public

Relations staff and is mailed to the museum's membership bi-monthly. The mini publication is a

tool that the museum utilizes to remain connected to their membership constituency. Each

department of the museum is responsible for providing the Marketing department with

information to publish about upcoming events and other news. Information regarding the

opening and closing dates of exhibitions, educational classes, docent lead tours, member parties,

and lecture schedules are printed in each issue.

In order to maintain the visibility of the upcoming dinners, a reminder will be placed in

each issue of InForm. I created the text copy for the first installment of these reminder

announcements. This can be used a template for future InForm publications. Space in the

quarterly publication is limited, so each blurb needs to be concise, but filled with descriptive and

enticing language. Readers will be reminded of RSVP etiquette and given contact information to

make their reservations. Utilizing this communication tool is effective because members are

accustomed to receiving museum updates and news in this manner. Additionally, the museum

will not incur additional expense by using InForm as a marketing tool since it does not require

the design, printing, or mailing of additional material.

Other forms of in-house marketing for the "Come for Dinner" events will occur

electronically. The Ham Museum's marketing department electronically delivers a monthly

news blast to all museum members who have signed up to receive this benefit. News of the









upcoming dinners and the progressive success of the event will be relayed to the membership

through this avenue. Additionally, the Alumni Association has an email blast called the Albert

E. Gator News. Alumni may want to purchase a reservation, so they will be kept abreast of the

upcoming dinner through this avenue. Finally, the invitation and reply card will be available as a

PDF attachment on the Ham Museum's website (www.harn.ufl.edu) to increase its visibility and

allow members access to a back-up copy if they were to misplace their original mailing.

Verbal Communication as Marketing Tool

An event's reputation can be transmitted to the public through non-printed means. The

Harn Museum of Art is fortunate to have many very involved individuals who articulate their

support for the museum to their friends, family, neighbors, and acquaintances. These individuals

make up a task force of volunteers who serve as the face of the institution.5

The docent program at the museum is filled with active and loyal friends of the museum.

Gallery tours are provided to the public by a trained docent every Sunday at 2pm. The Director

of Development has scheduled a meeting to speak with the docents regarding "Come for Dinner"

and the event's importance to the museum's annual fundraising plan. Depending upon the group

of individuals that participates in the tours each week, the docents will be instructed to advise the

tour attendees of opportunities to become involved with the Harn Museum of Art through the

"Come for Dinner" events. Since each dinner is inspired by a current museum exhibition, if a

docent notices that the guests are particularly interested in the exhibition that is being highlighted

in that month's dinner, it would serve both the museum's needs and the patron's interest to

advise them about the opportunity to attend "Come for Dinner."


5 Ibid, 33.









Members of the planning committee, event hosts, museum staff, and volunteers also serve

as broadcasting units for spreading the word about museum events and benefit activities. By

signing on to the planning committee, each member pledged to help fill the seats at each event by

spreading the word about "Come for Dinner." As the hosts have a vested interest in filling their

dinners, they too are committed to discussing the events with their neighbors, friends and

colleagues to ensure the success of the fundraising event. Aligning and energizing your staff,

leadership, and volunteers through a fundraising event works as a benefit for the organization as

well as a helpful marketing tool. Bringing together "all of an organization's constituencies

through their work toward and immediate, shared goal"6 can create a more successful occasion.

The Director of Development has kept the museum staff up to date on the developments of

"Come for Dinner" through presentations at the senior staff meetings and conversations with

other staff members.
























6 Michael Seltzer, Securing your organization's future: a complete guide tofundraising strategies, 181.









CHAPTER 5
CONCLUSION

It is my hope that "Come for Dinner" will grow into a popular, successful event and will

become a well-known and anticipated series of events in the Gainesville community.

Additionally, it is my goal to link this event exclusively to the Harn Museum to Art, creating a

tangible way to raise the visibility, recognition, membership, and donations to the institution and

the exhibitions it produces. Due to the fact that I believe this event will be best marketed

through word of mouth in the community, I estimate that the growth of "Come for Dinner" will

occur in a very organic manner. After attending an event, I believe that it will become a point of

interest for each guest to share with their friends and colleagues. The positive reinforcement that

"Come for Dinner" receives through this mode of communication will spark additional interest,

ticket sales, and ultimately memberships to the Exhibition Circle.

A fundraising special event is one way to connect individuals to an organization and

"Come for Dinner" has the possibility of connecting not only the Gainesville community to the

Ham Museum of Art, but also communities located some distance from the museum. As "Come

for Dinner" proves to be successful, the event can expand and spread outward from the epicenter

of Gainesville.

In my projections, the second phase of "Come for Dinner" should include the

diversification of the events to include luncheons, cocktail parties, and dessert events, which I

have illustrated in a chart with possible earnings (Appendix M). Creating events that are not

strictly dinner affairs allows the hosts more flexibility in their planning creativity and affords the

public with a graduated price scale. The graduated price scale should allow more members of

the community to attend a "Come for Dinner" event if they so desired. This would also allow

local restaurants to provide a benefit evening for the Ham Museum of Art.









The "Come for Dinner" events provide a model that can be transplanted from Gainesville

to another community. This would be a third phase to the growth of "Come for Dinner." The

Director of Development is excited to pursue this growth possibility for the event. As the Ham

Museum of Art is a unit of the University of Florida, it is afforded with the distinct advantage of

being connected to the Alumni Association and the Gator Nation. The Harn Museum of Art's

membership is represented throughout the country in a variety of communities including

University related groups such as Gator Clubs. There are nearly 100 Gator Clubs located across

the country and around the world.1 These clubs could be presented with the opportunity to host

benefit events for the Harn Museum of Art in their communities. For example, during trips to

New York, the Director of Development has explained this new fundraising endeavor to some art

gallery owners who have subsequently offered to hold an event for the local gator club to benefit

the Ham in their gallery. The possibilities for growth are vast and will serve to further expand

the donor base and the visibility of the museum throughout the country.





















1 University of Florida Alumni Association, Gator Clubs, http://www.ufalumni.ufl.edu/gatorclubs/, last accessed 31
March, 2008.









APPENDIX A
LETTER OF CORRESPONDENCE TO PLANNING COMMITTEE



August 6, 2007

Name
Address
Address
Address

Dear

I am very pleased to announce the beginning of a new fundraising project for the Samuel P. Ham
Museum of Art. "Destination: Dinner" will be a series of festive evenings to be held at the
homes of various prominent members of the Gainesville art community. The evenings will
range from a casual back-yard BBQ to an elegant dining experience. Tickets will be sold for
each evening and all proceeds will benefit the Ham. This new and exciting project will become a
permanent signature event for the museum and we are honored to invite you to join the
committee that will plan this inaugural season of dinners.

The first committee meeting will be held on August 29, 2007 at 4pm in the Director's
Conference Room at the Ham. At this meeting we will be presenting you with information from
other institutions who have successfully implemented this sort of project. In addition we will be
looking for your insight regarding ticket price, logistics, naming of possible hosts for dinners and
brainstorming ways to make this an attractive event in Gainesville.

With acceptance of this invitation, I ask that you join with the understanding of the commitment
that you are making to plan and realize this new fundraising endeavor with us. Members of the
community, like you help to make a difference through your active participation. We are very
grateful for all of your assistance, creativity, and support. Thank you in advance for agreeing to
be an active member of this committee.

Please RSVP to Tracy Pfaff at tpfaff@harn.ufl.edu or call 352.392.9826 by August 22nd


Sincerely,



Rebecca M. Nagy
Director









APPENDIX B
QUICK FACTS ABOUT OTHER DINE-AROUND PROGRAMS

Palm Springs Art Museum
http://www.psmuseum.org/ (no info about the event listed on their website at this time)
18 parties per year
-$200 per person
-$70K net proceeds
Party underwritten by host

Vero Beach Museum of Art
http://www.vbmuseum.org/ (no info about the event listed on their website at this time)
Been holding dine-around events for 15- 16 years
Dinners and cocktail parties or other type of event
-9 dinner parties per year in conjunction with their international lecture series
o $150 for dinner (with international guest lecturer)
o 12- 14 people per dinner
2 3 cocktail parties or other events with
o $125 for cocktail party
o 25 40 people
Net proceeds between $ 20 25K
Party underwritten by host

Naples Winter Wine Festival
http://www.napleswinefestival.com/events/
17 parties (all on one night)
-$7.5K per couple or $20K for 2 couples to attend together
Total of 550 individuals
Party underwritten by host

Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami (MOCANoMi)
-www.mocanomi.org
MOCA SHAKERS
o http://www.mocanomi.org/membership/shaker.htm
o Event: Mystery Dates
400 guests
$150 for MOCA Shaker member
$200 for non-member
-Enchanted Evenings
o http://www.mocanomi.org/membership/events.htm
o 10 collectors homes
o 400 attendees
o $600 per person









APPENDIX C
DINE AROUND FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDAS AND MINUTES

Agenda for Meeting #1
Dine Around Fundraising Committee Meeting
August 29, 2007
Harn Classroom
4:00 pm



Greetings and Introductions Rebecca

Project Overview and Purpose Phyllis DeLaney
Kelly Harvey

Discuss Responsibilities of Museum and of Hosts Phyllis DeLaney

Brainstorming Session Group
Potential Hosts
Ticket Sales
Ticket Prices
-Invites
-Where to Advertise
Developing a connection between museum and event (What is the "hook?")

Schedule Next Meeting









Committee Meeting Minutes
August 29, 2007

Attendance:
Rebecca Nagy, Phyllis DeLaney, Tracy Pfaff, Kelly Harvey, Isabel Wolfe, Lisa Gearen, Roy
Hunt, Don Cavanaugh, Ginny Cauthen, Gale Ford, Don Daley, Rosalyn Levy

Topic: New Fundraising Event for the Harn Museum of Art, Dine-Arounds (first meeting)

Phyllis discussed the aspirations of a goal of $100K annually from this event. Also talked about
this event as being a fundraiser first with the potential to be a friendraiser as well.

Kelly gave a brief presentation of research about other successful Dine Around programs in the
country like Palm Springs, CA; Naples, FL; Vero Beach, FL; and Miami, FL.

Lisa expressed concerns that the event would not translate since the Gainesville community is
different from Miami. Discussed ideas about tailoring the event to make the people of the
community feel as though they belonged and bringing the event back to the space at the Ham.
Also brought up ideas about what would entice people to purchase tickets to the dinner such as
spending time with an artist in the galleries.

Ros brought up the topic of the formula for the dining events if they were all held on one night.
Either have one evening where guests could start with a gathering at the museum and divide
from there to the separate homes or publicize the event and have guests reply to one event for the
night.

Other ideas on the formula of the dining events supported having the events on multiple nights
with the hope that some guests would want to RSVP and buy tickets to more than one event.

With this idea the group began to discuss the idea of ticket price. There was a general consensus
from the group of wanting to have one set cost for all dinners so as not to step on the toes of the
hosts.

Don Daley discussed his previous experience with dine around events from his time working in
Asheville, NC. All the dinners were held on one night (approx. 25 parties). The event was used
to raise funds and to make people aware off the arts organizations and the spaces in which they
were housed. He found that people were most comfortable attending a party where a friend
invites them to their home for the evening. Each host set the price for the dinner at their home
or asked for a donation. The goal was not to exclude anyone so people could ask for $20 or
$200, whatever anyone could give. At the end of the evening everyone would converge at one
museum for dessert.

The group discussed whether the model from Asheville, NC takes the adventure out of the event.
Some expressed the concern that they would not want to invite their friends to their home and
then ask for money. That would be uncomfortable. Having strangers in their homes was
perfectly acceptable and maybe even preferred.










It was decided that people could co-host events.


Concern returned to the fact that some members of the group really wanted the guests to have at
least set foot in the museum before they attended a dinner to benefit the museum.

Discussed the appeal that this type of event has to people who like to eat out.

The group expressed the desire to have a cause or a specific purpose for the funds that would be
raised from this event. Such as a new painting, a new building, a specific exhibition.

Maybe each year the theme of the dinners could be centered around the exhibition schedule.
This way the guests can come to the museum and see the results of their donated dollars. There
is a possible aversion to the broad reaching term of "foundation" in Gainesville, so having a
small and narrow focus for the funds would be advantageous. The small/narrow focus can also
give the dinner parties a topic of conversation for the evening.

The next meeting was set for September 20 at 4:00 in the Classroom.









Agenda for Meeting #2


Dine Around Fundraising Committee Meeting
September 20, 2007
Director's Conference Room
4pm


Rebecca Nagy


Review of the Minutes from 8.29.07
Additions and Corrections


Kelly Harvey


Table of Fundraising Goals


Potential Benefit Causes according to the Budget
-Curatorial
Education
-Exhibitions


Brainstorming
-Potential Hosts
-Invites
-Ticket Pricing
Marketing
Starting Date for the events

Set date for next committee meeting


Phyllis DeLaney


Group


Greetings









Committee Meeting Minutes
September 20, 2007

Attendance:
Phyllis DeLaney, Kelly Harvey, Tracy Pfaff, Ginny Cauthen, Isabel Wolfe, Don Cavanaugh,
Roy Hunt, Gale Ford, Rosalyn Levy, Aase Thompson, guest: Courtney Dell

Topic: revisiting the design of fundraising event for the Harn Museum of Art, dine around
concept

Phyllis conducted greetings and introductions for anyone who was absent at the last meeting.
Also, introduced guest, Courtney Dell who is a graduate student in Public Relations who is
taking a class with Kathleen Kelly and will be shadowing Phyllis for a portion of the semester.

Aase- asked for some clarification of the minutes from the previous meeting as she was unable to
attend. What is the contribution of the host? Do they underwrite the event?

Possibility of Southern Spirits donating wine for the dinners.

Roy- Hosting the dinner would be a contribution to the Harn. Expenses would need to be
tracked so that it would be tax deductible. Host would receive gift-in-kind credit from UF.

Aase- discussed the desire to bring guests back to the Ham.

Gale supported doing the dinners on multiple evenings. People who like to eat out may buy
tickets to attend more than one night. Could give tickets as a gift. Shared experience of the
Philharmonic in Evansville, Indiana. Dinners there became and event that people looked
forward to, there were many options of food, and they found that there were people who loved to
host.

Ginny- Discussed the idea of having dinners in collectors' homes.

Phyllis Thought this was not the most optimal idea since it would shrink the number of homes
that would be available for the dinners. Presented the idea of thinking of these events as "the art
of the dinner" as opposed to focusing on the actual art- this can become the "theme" of the hosts'
dinner.

The group discussed the goal sheet that was made by Kelly to show possible earnings

Aase- $300/ person is high for the cost of the dinner. Discussed what the guests would be
receiving at the dinner party. Would there be anything programmatic or educational?

Phyllis- The underlying goal is to hold a benefit for the museum. Benefit is the big message for
these events.

We will need to do a quid pro quo for the dinner hosts and the guests for tax purposes.










Don- Concerned that if the price is too high then we many not be able to get the guests to return
again the following year.

Phyllis Hosts could be involved in the ticket promoting process

Roy Committed to doing a dinner, but does not want to have to round up the guests and ask for
money. Aase agrees.

The objective is to do these events each year.

Phyllis Wants to make sure that people will see the benefit for the amount of money that they
are putting into the event. Hosts as well as ticket holding guests. Adria Starkey who has hosted
dinners like this for a different cause would be happy to talk to the group and answer questions.

Invitations would be mailed out to people and would list events, describe each dinner, and the
theme that each host had selected for their dinner.

Don- Discussed the concern of making the dinners very elaborate. Guests may think that the
museum doesn't need money if the dinners are too lavish.

Rosalyn Discussed the fear that the hard part will be getting guests in the door.

Phyllis What could we do to generate enthusiasm?

Roy Talked about the dinner at Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' home. $150/ person. Previously
they held the dinner for $100/person. If the dinner sells out, then they will do a second one in
February.

Phyllis Gainesville Magazine could probably feature a home a month as a way to generate
excitement for the events.

Discussion moved to ticket price. Can't make it so inexpensive that just anyone can come since
people are opening up their homes. The price needs to be high enough so that it is a benefit.

Don The Gainesville crowd likes to lay low. They aren't the type of people who will be trying
to out-do the other hosts like in other areas where they have dinners like these.

Roy discussed the option of Guest chefs for the party

If you go to the trouble of putting together a nice dinner party like this- is it better to have more
people or less??

Roy Would people rather go to a cocktail party or to a dinner party? Group decides that
dinners are better since they are more conducive to the intimate conversations that we are hoping
to spark.









Phyllis Shey's could maybe host a dinner as a thank you for the hosts.

Aase Concerned that there are so many functions in Gainesville that it would be best if we start
small and then grow the event.

Gale Thinks the better way to start this event is to start it big since the goal is to raise money
for the Ham.

There should be some sort of theme in the food of the d6cor of the event. Maybe there could be
a speaker at the event. At each table have someone from the museum, a local artist, or a
personality of some sort.

There should be no events in December

Aase readdressed the idea of strangers in someone's home. Group thus decides against an AD
in the Gainesville Sun newspaper. So, we will start with our own people. Members. Put insert in
InForm. Maybe Gainesville Magazine.

Gale Since this is the first time that we are trying the event, we should try all different kinds of
options and see what works. Then we can learn and improve for the next year.

How do we keep this event going? What are the starting dates? Earliest we can start is the
beginning of the year.

Harn staff is committed to being a work horse for the project.

Don Tie theme in with the Harn Museum of Art

Invites should allow for guests to put 1st, 2nd and 3rd choices

Idea of a surprise dinner was discussed again. But there is a concern about everyone coming to
the Ham, giving them wine and then sending them out to drive all over town.

A bank or a company could buy a whole party.

Discussed hosting jointly.

Would be best if we could plan 24 months out so that everything is in place.

Time that the Harn Museum of Art has its own identity event.

Themes could stem from a work of art in the Ham's collection. Every Host picks a work of art
as a theme for the dinner and the invite could reflect this. Staff can ID the pieces that we have
copyright for etc. This would be a way to inspire people to come visit the Ham.

Looking for creative idea for the party title.









Next step:
-Get people to decide what month is good to host
-Secure the hosts with availability for 2008
Do Dinners only to start

Marketing for the entire year may be difficult. Can we find a way to do it quarterly?

Promotion is going to the most difficult

Decide on format for the invitation

Wines Dorn's, Southern Spirits to underwrite the drinks for the dinners

After securing hosts need to see how long they would need to plan a party.

Will need about 3 months to get marketing materials together.

Consult Community Events Calendar











APPENDIX D
PLANNING TIMETABLE


Dine-Around Dinners Prospective Timeline


Date to be Task Notes
completed
Finalize list of Hosts and Dates
DECEMBER 3 Currently have 7 committed, need 5 more for 12
o Aase Thompson
o Roy Hunt
o Gale Ford
o Phyllis DeLaney
o Rebecca Nagy
o Dixie Neilson
o Bernie Machen

Meet with Hosts to finalize their individual "theme" and
DECEMBER 11 potential special guests.
signed agreement for hosts containing:
o Contact information
o Address of the host
o Desired theme
o Number of people home can accommodate
o Signed agreement to host party
-Give list of Community Event dates so as not to
conflict
-Go over expectations of hosts and benefits
o Benefit
Gift-in-kind credit for amount of
dinner costs
o Expectations
Host dinner party as a benefit for
the Ham
Catered dinner for 12 20 people

ONGOING Contact Foundation to figure out what portion of the Ticket
(finish before Price is tax deductible
design of invite)
Finalize Ticket Price
DECEMBER 11 There is a benefit in town for a brunch with a ticket
price of $100
(before given to We currently have the price set at $150 a head
invite designer) o At this price, is there a tax benefit for the
ticket holder?
o Will the public be receptive to a raise in
ticket price in subsequent years?


Finalize all donations/sponsors
MID DECEMBER Printing
(before goes to Wine
designer) Invitation design
-Advertising













Determine any Special Guests to attend dinners
MID DECEMBER Contact Karen Conn to see if there are any lecturers
(before goes to who could be invited
designer) Check exhibition Schedule for possible special
guests
Decide if this information should be printed on
invite or just a "surprise"
Current Potential Guests
o New Asian Curator
o Maggie Taylor
o Alfred Browning Parker

Designate the deadlinefor reservations to be put on the
BEFORE GIVEN invitation
TO DESIGNER
Website plan
LAUNCH BY (can we get a graphic design intern???)
THE DATE THAT Put information about reserving tickets on the
INVITATIONS website
ARE SENT OUT Link to the Ham's site
Possibly make an option to buy tickets online
Design invitation
GIVE TO (graphic design intern???)
DESIGNER ASAP Form of invitation
o From looking at the couple of examples
DESIGN that we have, I think a small sized booklet
COMPLETE BY is the best way to go. The back page
JANUARY 3 should be a perforated page that can be
ripped out as the reservation card.
-Explanation of the events: Purpose, What the
money benefits, etc.
SEvery host with date of their dinner
"Theme" of each dinner
Slots per dinner (12-20)
-Reservation instructions
-Reservation form
-No refunds one month prior to event
SSponsors
-Call for questions number, and email (Tracy)
-Website address (if we develop one)

Generate List of Invitees
DECEMBER 17 Need estimate for printing
-Pool from:
o Members from Raiser's Edge
o VIPs from Raiser's Edge
o Corporate members

JANUARY 7 Invitations Printed












Due DECEMBER Put advertising in March/April InForm
1
Send invitation
JANUARY 14 8 weeks prior to first event

Reservation Process
ONGOING Send form to Tracy/Amy
Track in Raiser's Edge
o Get credit for gift (ticket price)
Excel file to record reservations per dinner
Call invitees to confirm receipt of form and
payment and specific reserved space

1 MONTH PRIOR Contact "Special Guests"
(February 14th) Confirm attendance

1 MONTH Call Host with an estimate of attendees
BEFORE EVENT host is thus able to make final catering changes and
(February 14th) rentals

2 WEEKS Call Guests to Remind
BEFORE EVENT Call 2 weeks before event to remind them about the
(February 29th) event. (this will be during non-refundable time)

1 WEEK PRIOR Give final guest list to host
(March 7h)
Call Host
1 DAY BEFORE Make sure there are no problems
(March 13th) Have special events Ham Intern available for them
to help

Around or slightly Event Happens
after MARCH 14
Stewardship
1 WEEK AFTER Tracy or membership coordinator send thank you
EVENT notes to Guests (form letter)
(send by March o Thank them for coming
21s) o Encourage them to attend another event
with in the season of dinners.
Hand written note sent to Host from Phyllis
DeLaney









APPENDIX E
HOST COMMITMENT AGREEMENT FORM

Host Commitment Agreement for Dine-Around Events
Harn Museum of Art
University of Florida

Contact information
Please check the box next to your preferred method of contact after filling in all information
fields below.

Host(s) Name(s)

D Address


Telephone


Email


Hosting Site Information


Number of people your home can accommodate (minimum of 8)

Cost per plate (needed for quid pro quo determination)


Date of event


Time of event


Estimated total cost of event

Event Theme
Please briefly describe the theme of the dinner you plan to host. Include a piece of art or
collecting area from the Ham Museum of Art that you are planning to feature. (Example:
African, Modern, Contemporary, etc.)


I agree to host a dinner party to benefit the Ham Museum of Art's Exhibition Fund. I understand
that I will be personally responsible for the entire cost of the event, including food, rentals, and
any additional costs related to the event.


Signature


Date











APPENDIX F
EXHIBITION CIRCLE MEMBERSHIP CRITERIA

Exhibition Circle Membership Criteria

Need: $100K annually to sustain the Exhibition Program at the Ham Museum of Art
Membership duration: One Year

Membership Gift Total Earnings Method of Benefits and
Options Payment Recognition of Gift
Cost of hosting Earnings from Hosting benefit -Gift-in-kind for the
the benefit ticket sales dinner. No direct amount spent to host
dinner payment to the benefit dinner
Dinner Host 11 dinners, 8 -20 museum. -Recognition in
guests @ $150/per museum's annual report
Preview up-coming
Earnings = Ham exhibitions
$19,800 $22,200 -Annual review past
Ham exhibitions
Name on Exhibition
Circle Plaque on Donor
Wall
In-kind goods Not monetary. Donation of goods. -Gift-in-kind recognition
such as wine or Gain promotional No direct payment to for the amount of goods
Sponsor cheese, etc. for value for the event, the museum donated
the benefit the exhibition -Name on invite as
dinners circle, and the Ham sponsor
Museum of Art -Name on Exhibitions
Circle Donor Wall
-Recognition in
museum's annual report
Preview up-coming
Ham exhibitions
-Annual review past
Ham exhibitions
Must be Remainder of gift pledges Tax deduction in
comparable to money to be earned quarterly payment accordance with the law
the amount to reach goal of one-time payment -Recognition in
hosts are $100K museum's annual report
Outright gift paying Preview up-coming
Needed earnings: Ham exhibitions
Minimum of $77,800 $80,200 -Annual review past
$5,000 Ham exhibitions
Name on Exhibition
Circle Plaque on Donor
Wall









APPENDIX G
GUEST LIST LETTER TO BE SENT TO HOSTS


Date

Name
Address
Address
Address

Dear insert host name

Thank you for hosting a dinner for our Come for Dinner series! Below are your special guests for
that evening.

Name of Guest
Name of Guest
Name of Guest
Name of Guest
Name of Guest
Name of Guest
Name of Guest
Name of Guest
Name of Guest
Name of Guest

As a reminder, insert name of special guest will be attending as the evening's featured
guest. Insert name of Harn representative from the Harn Museum of Art will also join
you for the evening to assist you.

We are so very grateful for your participation in this program and your generosity in opening
your home. Please contact me at 392-9826 x 154 if I may be of further assistance.


Sincerely,

Tracy Pfaff
Development Coordinator












APPENDIX H
RSVP CARD




COME FOR DINNER...
A SERIES OF BENEFIT EVErTS
FOR THEIB (RN CiUSEUM OF -r .r







% mU!.


Reservmions for
Address

Phane number
Dietary resnricdns


April
May
June
July
Angus
September
October
November
January
Fhruary
March


SOLD OUT
M $150 =
x$150 =
S$150 =
S$150 =
$150 =
x$150 =
S$150=
S$150 =
1$150 =
x$150 =


ToIal enclosed amoum $
Cash
Cneci Pavlabl ro the ULuiersv n Flo nda Foundaal
lease charge y VISA MasterCard Discver AmnE
Accounr Number
Exp. Dar

signamre

Aparcin of your kicker price maybe eax deducible within he
limin of he law.

As this is a benefit for the Harn Museum ofArt, we reger tcha rickets
are nurefundable.









APPENDIX I
SAMPLE OF "COME FOR DINNER" RESERVATION NOTEBOOK

"Come for Dinner" Reservations Notebook

Instructions
1. Fill in the reservations for each dinner with the individual or couple's name, the number
of seats, address, and method of payment.
2. Enter all information into Raiser's Edge and code each constituent with "Come for
Dinner" tag in Bio 2 tab.
3. Make 3 copies of checks. 2 copies go to the Foundation, 1 remains in the "Come for
Dinner" record.
4. Run report in Raiser's Edge to mail individuals their reservation confirmation.
5. Mark the reservation entry as being entered in Raiser's Edge and that the confirmation
has been mailed.
6. Notify Membership Coordinator when RSVPs are entered so she can keep note of how
many more seats need to be sold for each dinner


April 2008 (8 reservations)

May 2008 (12 reservations)

June 2008 (12 reservations)

July 2008 (20 reservations)

August 2008 (12 reservations)

September 2008 (16 reservations)

October 2008 (12 reservations)

November 2008 (8 reservations)

January 2009 (14 reservations)

February 2009 (12 reservations)

March 2009 (10 reservations)










April
A Touch of Korea hosted by Roy Hunt
April 16, 2008 at 6:30 pm


Date entered in RE
Date Mailed
Initials

2.


Date entered in RE
Date Mailed
Initials

3.


Date entered in RE
Date Mailed
Initials

4.


Date entered in RE
Date Mailed
Initials

5.


Date entered in RE
Date Mailed
Initials














Date entered in RE
Date Mailed
Initials

7.


Date entered in RE
Date Mailed
Initials

8.


Date entered in RE
Date Mailed
Initials









APPENDIX J
RESERVATION CONFIRMATION LETTER FOR GUESTS



Date

Name
Address
Address
Address

Dear insert name of guest


We have received your request to attend the
that you have decided to Come for Dinner...
Museum of Art.


insert title of dinner event and are so excited
and spend the evening supporting the Harn


No tickets are needed for this event and your reservation is being held at the door. Listed below
is the information you will need for this special evening. Please remember that the suggested
attire is


Date and Time of event

Name of Guest
Address
Address
Address

If you have any additional questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.


See you soon,

Tracy Pfaff
Development Coordinator









APPENDIX K
STEWARDSHIP LETTER TO BE SENT TO "COME FOR DINNER" GUESTS


Date

Name
Address
Address
Address

Dear

Thank you so much for attending an event in our new "Come for Dinner..." series. I greatly
appreciate the support you have shown for exhibitions at the Harn Museum of Art by attending
an event in this series. We at the Harn, hope that you enjoyed yourself and will consider
attending another exciting evening in the future.

I am writing to you because I hope you'll consider taking the next step and take a greater role in
shaping the future of the Ham Museum of Art and further support exhibitions. I'd like to invite
you to become a member of the Exhibition Circle and help us continue to achieve excellence in
the exhibitions we create.

To become a member of this vitally important circle, please return the enclosed reply card today
with your membership gift. As a member of this exclusive circle, you will have the opportunity
to experience a special preview of the upcoming year's exhibitions as well as special viewings
for selected exhibitions before they open to the public, giving you increased access to the Ham
Museum of Art.

If you would like to discuss alternative ways of supporting exhibitions or other programs at the
Harn Museum of Art, please do not hesitate to contact me. I would be happy to discuss fulfilling
your relationship with the museum. 352.392.9826

Thank you in advance for your continued support and I look forward to seeing you at a "Come
for Dinner" event in the future. Your generosity helps us to fulfill our mission to produce a wide
variety of challenging and innovative exhibitions.

Sincerely,


Phyllis DeLaney
Director of Development


















Please complete Ehis response card wih the name under
which youwould like your reservaEon held, along
with how many ill be in yur party for each diner
rervasi. Remember, you can jy mu a ras many
evenings a you like. Seadngis limied and resenvaricns
will be made according to the order in which they
are received. Upon receipt ad confirmadon of yur
reeradon, vou will receive further delai n the mail
regarding the dinners you have chosen so airend
For additional inf mianon please call Tacy Pfaffar
352.392 9M26 ela16.


C


m

c-c!

-e


(OME FoR 'INNER...


A MU5IM OFAIR q


JLnm-r


















LA PRIL SOLD OUT
A Tarak qforei listed #y Ria THan
Aprid 16 2008 at 630pm
Come i DiMnner... meel le newly appoinield COin Curamr o(As2n Art,
Jason sesaer, wuite refna line deoeale fare and endteig onrversaion
about the Asian an mcolection.



Glas Blast oad Mor hosad by Pter and DiieAhema
May 16, 2008 at 630pm
Caome or Dinner mesn Iotal eonlnmr Wtine eDoying an eEmnrtng
evening in temir Ihome BatrtBg a collection of noItaIe su s by aMrtss suc
as PaDl Picasso, Dale asably, Hiram Willams and erry Uelsoann. Enjoy
a glass u owing demOnsraan nd u e inemeRnis bi local gas ari
5Ty Campbeu and Sarah Hinds.
12 sesa are avanable and reservation l be acceptEd untl April 21, 006.
Atdre: Pado CasuaL



CtiringEdgePAfri r A: r. iLcti. sio r-ni i rui .r;li',a rr

Come for Diner. Jan Cramt r of ADicanzax Ai Susan Cooley ir delectable
Norta AMlcan cuisine and stimulating conversation. Learn about ties Haims
reent EIbltaIn coDnemporap y arc acquislions and current ertilson
orfAncan video art Ile dining at te nlome
Reaecca Nagy, ,Drector o e Harn.
12 seats are aabe and reservcadis win be cepted lun L May29, 200.
AWu:t Fay Casual, Attlan lmar opctiona.


JULY
Oceanic Art hosted by Riac anddAoso Thompson
Jvr .11, 20B0 at 6-30pm
Come Mr Dinirer.. meet the Tllorpson an mSusan Cooksey, Crator of
the current ethlila on o Oceanice Art, and view te Thoatqsa collection o
European, an, r e-coammtlan, an a oceanic Ar min prirate sharing
2 seas are aratllabe ani resvaeons ill e accepted mjilJne 18, 200.
AMtre: slanidDressy



teKarendfard Asted by CO sb Adra
Augi t n 2 2008 at &30 pm
in'y FT5~ DRfle d*P hIi ~ .t5tC'. IT rLsj nra ir d ariJ oAL.
S-ltr Ii a LTf Psd& Pt., Li .eJ aarL*[ I ,
exhbittonA rtAsiWTrAi. Itsirdinous 'o dellutid geieir 7es
12 seats are aablable and eseratiM Willbe accepted ounijoly 31, 200.
AEEIu: Pat1o CasuaL


c SEPTEMBER
Afier Hoesri a the Hamn horsd by feTr and LMse Graven
Setemkr 14, 2008 at 630pm
ComeM Fe Dinner.. oam Peter and Lisa Gearem an iNImaII dnner wUe
engoying M0E ambneance oftee Harm, and learn abour he '"ehnld-e -scenes"
waiTrngs o the museum and as prftssatnal staff with special guests Duke
Romiin, Curamr lfloder Art, and Laura Nemers, Registrar.
13 seats are avanam and rerservaIns illbe acceptelUminlAugU 2, 20020
Atire Parry Casual.


OME FOR DINNER...
A SERIES OF BENEFIT EVENTS
AIA TR-E'AR. ;Al' ..4 &L' RT



COMB FOR DINNER... and talk about art Members of
the newly created Exhibitan Cide cordially invite you to
join them for evenings of sauptuous cuisine and appealing
conversation in beautiful homes across Gainesville. Each
of these wonderful evenings will highlight an exhibition or
collection at the Harn and will feature an artist, curator,
or other special guest to spark lively conversation. These
evenings will continue throughout the year, reflecting the
Harms changing exhibitions. The price aofyour reservations
will direcdy benefit exhibitions at the Hamn Please join
us for one evening or several Or, if you feel so inclined,
bu man entire dinner and bring your closest friends. Please
(OM R F 'QR ;NNR ... and know that or mpbarticrsjpan
will make a difference.

The Exkibition Cire is dedicated to supporting and
promoting exhibitions presented by the Harn Museum of
Art Mebership in this circle is offered through annual
donation, or by hosting an evening in the year-lung
COME FOR (TINNB... series. If you are interested in helping
the Ham to fulf its mission of presenting innovative
exhibitions, please call to discuss membership in the Circle












oos-2009 EXHIBITION CRCLEd c4AEMERS


Gearge and Eizabed Bedell
Philip and Phyllis Deaney
Gale andVirginia Ford
Pecer and Lisa Gearen
Roy Hunr
Bob and LisaJerry


Bernie and Chri Machen
Paul and Rebecca Nagy
eer and Dixie Neilbon
franci Savriopoelos
Rachel Tench
Rick and Aase Thompson


OCTOBER
Tet Beat Goe On kastd y Rsead Teak
Ostiob 16 2008 at 630pm
Come leb Dinner.. ieet aitec Alfred BrowIing Patter wtile
ul-1git ao hme De designedL Tis evening is inspired by de
crnrento micatonfr Ptmt karate ssr tg t MtF-Caterg .iffio and
promises tobe an aaientic taste ar mid-centrny Florida.
12 se are available and reservations
will be accepted nl september 26, 2008.
Are: Party Casual



On the edgr ofCantmieormsy Art hostd by
Phipar f d P byllis DeLan y
Aaoemer 12, 200B at ,30 pm
Came mar Dinner.. mnet CTraor ofConEc ptorary ArT
Kerry oner-sMnatlt Egage in discssCioSt bout tile pamag or
contemporary arm eblblMoS and mile curalrts sleIII WtBing WsIM
aroa and caUeccrs.
6 sean are available and reservatons
stIl be accepted uia October 2, 2008.
AWN: Fara Casual-


JANMUARY
A Tast arFlde a hated y Boe and Lisar ry
Jwtay 16, 2009 at 6.30m
Come Kr aitner .. laeet Curatoriormdem Art Dole Ronsin
while telebraliog lorda fdw art and aichittctre, splsed yte
enElcm:iMonrn raen nfrse:e r SinPglAlS-CetfA flu.i
14 seas are avalale and resernaons
wll be accepted l Decemanb 19, 200.
AWare: Plan CasuaL


7BBRUARY
YAtG,. y rvrn i,adJ h G e vf-l.1 F-ij

Come bor Dinner., mee Curaor of Modern Art Dulce Roman Mr an
eveIfng lspred r e e1sibtibao fltriaa adiBtI l:oAMUsTAlrjari-.
Enjoy dlneror 0n lvcingl oleced conmmparary pottery created
i.naee anidPup McCarty wimliE discussing me beaaiy, variet and
innvatin otavmsd c cearamlcs.
12 seats are avaiuabe and reservaons
%woM beaccepted Untljanary 15, 2009S
Anlre: Party Casual.



Eckmiit imea hosted by George oad E a'bifte BtdSl
and Frwotet Stusrope s
MenA 20, 2009 at 630pm
come Mr Dilo er... Jn corin curator itAslan Art ason Steiber
Ior an evening designed to peak wUo Unterest In me 1radtlcos and
arEtstic tla airtimaono inJapaL Inspired by Me emic
faieas snl !mgnArt DeMao 3Sts!ml i, tofts Lev nt sill
be heitB ime Bedells eclectic home.
10 Seats are avaalite atS resenr iots
WIR be Occpd 1no t1 Fenrias' 27,2009.
Aera: Part CasualJapaese access optional









APPENDIX M
EXAMPLE OF POSSIBLE EVENT BREAKDOWN AND EARNINGS FOR FUTURE
"COME FOR DINNER" EVENTS

Cocktail Party

Number of events: 12 cocktail parties

Number of guests per event: approx. 30 guests at each event

Total number of guests: 360 total guests

Ticket Price: $125 per person

360 guests x $125 = $45, 000

Dinner Party

Number of events: 12 dinner parties

Number of guests per event: approx. 12 guests at each event

Total number of guests: 144 total guests

Ticket Price: $300 per person (increase of price)

144 guests x $300 = $43,200

Dessert Party

Number of events: 12 dessert parties

Number of guests per event: approx. 30 guests at each event

Total number of guests: 360 total guests

Ticket Price: $50 per person

360 guests x $50 = $18,000


TOTAL MONEY EARNED:


$45,000 + $43,200 + $18,000 = $106,200









LIST OF REFERENCES


DeLaney, Phyllis. "Regarding Development Activities at the Ham when the University is in a
Critical Financial State." interview by Kelly Harvey, in person at the Harn Museum of
Art, 27 March, 2008.

Freedman, Harry A. and Karen Feldman. Black Tie Optional: A Complete Special Events
Resource for Nonprofit Organizations. New Jersey: Wiley, John and Sons, Inc., 2007.

The Business of Special Events: Fundraising Strategies for Changing Times. Florida:
Pineapple Press, Inc., 1998.

Graham, Christine. Keep the Money Coming: A Step-by-Step Guide to Annual Fundraising, rev.
ed. Florida: Pineapple Press, Inc., 1992.

Hale, Christine. "Ham Museum of Art Annual Report 2006/2007," InForm, January/February
2008.

Harvard Business School Press. Running Meetings: Expert Solutions to Everyday Challenges.
Massachusetts: Harvard Business School Publishing, 2006.

Matheny, Richard E. Major Gifts: solicitation strategies. New York: Council of Advancement
for Support of Education, 1999.

McLean, Fiona. Marketing the Museum. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Miami Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami. Annual Benefit Event Support.
http://www.mocanomi.org/membership/events.htm, last accessed 5 April, 2008.

Miami Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami. Become a MOCA Shaker membership page.
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Naples Winter Wine Festival. At A Glance. http://www.napleswinefestival.com/factsheet/, last
accessed 15 April, 2008.

National Society of Fund Raising Executives Institute. Glossary of Fund Raising Terms.
Virginia: The National Society of Fund Raising Executives, 1986.


Orzel, Robyn. "Regarding Dine-Around Events at the Vero Beach Museum of Art." interviewed
by Kelly Harvey, by phone from Gainesville, FL., 28 August 2007.


Pfaff, Tracy. "Regarding Development Coordinator Job Description at the Ham Museum of
Art." interview by Kelly Harvey, by phone from Gainesville, FL., 20 February 2008.










Rounds, Jay. "Measure for Measure: Purpose and Problems in Evaluating Exhibitions," Museum
News. Washington D.C. vol. 80, July/August 2001.

Schroeder, Scott. "Regarding Dine-Around Events (LUEY PARTIES) at the Palm Springs Art
Museum." interviewed by Kelly Harvey, by phone from Gainesville, FL., 4 April 2008.

Screven, Chandler. "Formative Evaluation: Does Your Exhibition Attract and Hold Visitor's
Attention? Do Visitors Know How to Use Your interactive? Do Visitors Understand
Your Messages?." Museum Visitor Studies in the 90s, London: Science Museum, 1993.

Seltzer, Michael. Securing your organization's future: a complete guide to fundraising strategies,
rev. and exp. ed. New York: Foundation Center, 2001.

Tempel Eugene R., Ed. Hank Rosso's Achieve Excellence in Fund Raising. California: John
Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003.

The City of Gainesville Official Website. Gainesville Facts.
http://www.cityofgainesville.org/about/, last accessed 8 April, 2008.

University of Florida Alumni Association. Gator Clubs.
http://www.ufalumni.ufl.edu/gatorclubs/, last accessed 31 March, 2008.

Vero Beach Museum of Art. International Lecture series.
http://www.vbmuseum.org/index.cfm?method=Education.Lecture, last accessed 5 April
2008.

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Wendroff, Alan L. Special Events: Proven Strategies for Nonprofit Fundraising. New Jersey:
John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2004.









BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Kelly Harvey was born and raised in Clifton, Virginia. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in

Art History and a minor in Spanish from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia in

2005. While pursuing her undergraduate studies, she spent the summer of 2004 studying abroad

in Florence, Italy where she took classes in Italian language, Renaissance Art History, and Italian

Humanism. She matriculated to the University of Florida to begin her Master's degree in the

Museum Studies program in the fall of 2005. During her time as a graduate student at the

University of Florida, Kelly interned in various departments at Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art at

the University of Florida and in the Development Department at the American Federation of Arts

in New York, New York. Ms. Harvey will graduate with her Master of Arts in Museology from

the University of Florida in May of 2008.









"COME FOR DINNER": CREATING A SELF-SUSTAINING SIGNATURE FUNDRAISING
EVENT FOR THE SAMUEL P. HARN MUSEUM OF ART


Kelly Connor Harvey
703.217.6496
Museology
Victoria L Rovine
Master of Arts
May 2008

This thesis explains the motivations for and the process of creating a new signature

fundraising event for the Harn Museum of Art. The event is a two-tiered fundraising effort.

"Come for Dinner" is a series of eleven intimate dinners that will take place throughout the

course of the year. Each dinner will be inspired by an exhibition that is on display at the Harn.

Reservations can be made for $150 per person and all proceeds will benefit exhibitions at the

museum. The Exhibition Circle has been created in conjunction with this fundraising effort as a

giving circle to benefit the same cause. Membership to this exclusive circle requires a minimum

donation of $5,000. This event and giving circle are designed to raise a goal sum of $100,000

annually for exhibitions.







GRANT OF PERMISSION


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Kelly Connor Harvey. Come for Dinner: Creating a Seif-Sustaining Fundraisina Event for
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