• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Main
 Appendix
 Summary of commerce
 Index














Group Title: Report ... Dominican customs receivership under the American-Dominican convention ... 1907/08- Together with Summary of commerce ...
Title: Report ... Dominican customs receivership under the American-Dominican convention ... 190708- Together with Summary of commerce ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091503/00002
 Material Information
Title: Report ... Dominican customs receivership under the American-Dominican convention ... 190708- Together with Summary of commerce ..
Series Title: Report ... Dominican customs receivership under the American-Dominican convention ... 1907/08- Together with Summary of commerce ...
Physical Description: v. in : plates, tables, diagrs. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dominican Republic -- Oficina del Controller y Receptor General de las Aduanas
United States -- Bureau of Insular Affairs
Publisher: Govt. print. off.
Place of Publication: Washington
Publication Date: August-December 1914
Frequency: annual
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Customs administration -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Tariff -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Dominican Republic
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year irregular. First report covers period from August 1, 1907 to July 31, 1908. Two reports were issued in 1914, one for the fiscal year ending July 31, the other for the period, August 1, to December 31, 1914.
Issuing Body: Submitted to the Bureau of insular affairs, War department, United States of America, by the general receiver of Dominican customs, Santo Domingo, Dominican republic.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091503
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 03909029
lccn - 09009600

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Appendix
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Summary of commerce
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Index
        Page 75
        Page 76
Full Text






REPORT OF THE


EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD

DOMINICAN CUSTOMS
RECEIVERSHIP
UNDER
THE AMERICAN-DOMINICAN CONVENTION OF 1907
FOR THE PERIOD

August 1 to December 31, 1914




TOGETHER WITH

SUMMARY OF COMMERCE FOR 1914
WITH TABULAR STATEMENTS OF COMPARISONS FOR 1913









Submitted to
THE BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
WAR DEPARTMENT
by
THE GENERAL RECEIVER OF DOMINICAN CUSTOMS


A TO DOMINGO, D. R.


APRIL 15, 1915


382
D6Tlr


_ I_ p_
--


"


382,
D6glr
















UNIVERSITY
U N I V -E R S I T Y
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY


i _











FINANCIAL REPORT

OF THE


DOMINICAN CUSTOMS

RECEIVERSHIP

COVERING THE PERIOD FROM


August I to December 31, 1914, inclusive

TOGETHER WITH

SUMMARY OF COMMERCE
FOR THE YEAR 1914


w.


'''
.. ~,.
~ ,~

"^
~"'"
"' ~~


OFFICE OF THE
GENERAL RECEIVER
OF DOMINICAN CUSTOMS
SANTO DOMINGO. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC


APRIL 15, 1915


* *












THE AMERICAN-DOMINICAN CONVENTION, 1907.



EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD REPORT, DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.
CLARENCE H. BAXTER, GENERAL RECEIVER.



OFFICE OF THE GENERAL RECEIVER,
Santo Domingo, D. R., April 15, 1915.
SIR: In accordance with the adoption by the Receivership of the
calendar year as its fiscal period, instead of the so-called Convention
year, from August 1st to July 31st, inclusive, I have the honor to hand
you herewith a general report of all transactions of the Receivership for
the five months ending December 31, 1914, the transactions of the former
portion of said year having been covered in the Seventh Annual Report
of this office. I have incorporated herewith such contemporaneous data
as has been deemed relevant to the financial transactions of the Receiver-
ship during such period.
CURRENT EVENTS.
As the Seventh Annual Report went forward, the provisional govern-
ment had been instituted, and Doctor Ram6n Baez had been installed
as President ad interim, in accordance with the plan of President Wilson,
by the.voluntary retirement of President Bordas, and the selection by
the leaders of all the political parties of a provisional president who, by
decree, should reform the election law and call for an election for a
definite president. This program was followed, and on October 25th,
S 26th and 27th elections were held for the presidency, national assembly
and the constituent assembly. The candida.- for President were Ex-
President Juan Isidro Jim4nes, Ex-President .Horacio Vasquez, Ex-
Delegate for the South, Luis Felipe Vidal, and Ex-Secretary of the
Treasury, Federico Velazquez H. By effecting a combination with Sefior
Velazquez, Ex-President Jimenes was elected a second time to the presi-
dency and took the oath of office before the new congress, as was required
by the new election law, on December 5, 1914:
(3)








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


COLLECTIONS.
The gross collections during the months from August to December,
inclusive, amounted to $1,209,555.54, a decrease of $367,578.89 for the
corresponding period of the year 1913. The cause of the decrease, which
has continued since the last report from this office, is not difficult to
ascertain. There were times of revolutions during both periods, but
although during the early part of the 1914 period peace was declared at
home, yet there had been internal strife for almost five months which,
with its accompanying sieges and blockades, had well played its part
in reducing the purchasing and productive power of the Republic. In
addition, the greatest of wars in history was begun abroad, and at once
Santo Domingo was deprived of two lines of steamers, the Hamburg-
American and the Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, though the
one steamer of the latter has resumed interisland traffic since the German
cruisers have been swept from the American waters. This decrease in
collections has been felt at every port in the Republic save two, Monte
Cristi and S&nchez, both of which have in a measure supplied the Cibao
with cargo that would have entered at Puerto Plata, had it not been for
the suspension of traffic there following the long blockade and the
crippling of the Dominican Central Railway. The decrease in collec-
tions at Puerto Plata, viz., $89,045.25, more than offset the increase at'
the ports of Monte Cristi and Sanchez. At the Capital, Santo Domingo
City, collections fell off'$202,886.21.
Duties derived from imports and exports for the period in question
amounted to $1,053,116.40 and $130,143.65, respectively. There was
thus a decrease of $439,123.80 in collections from import duties; but
during this period duties on products exported amounted to $130,143.65,
or, an increase over the corresponding period of the year 1913 of $78,782.61.
While the international war undoubtedly was a large factor in the de-
crease of import duties, yej, the increase in exportations was due to no
other cause. Cacao, for example, took a leap at the beginning of the war
which it has steadily maintained ever since. %
Items collected under the head of port dues, comprising tonnage,
pilotage, personal fees, etc., yielded an amount equal to $26,295.49 as
compared with $33,533.19 for the corresponding five months of 1913.








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 5

GROSS COLLECTIONS BY YEARS, AND UP TO JANUARY 1, 1915.
Gross collections from the First Modus Vivendi Year, April 1, 1905,
to March 31, 1906.......................................... $2,502,154.31
For the Second Modus Vivendi Year ........................... 3,181,763.48
For the four months' period, April 1 to July 31, 1907 (termination
of M odus Vivendi)..................... ................... 1,161,426.61
For the First Convention Year, August 1, 1907, to July 31, 1908... 3,469,110.69
For the Second Convention Year............... .............. 3,359,389.71
For the Third Convention Year............................... 2,876,976.17
For the Fourth Convention Year............................. 3,433,738.92
For the Fifth Convention Year...................................3,645,974.79
For the Sixth Convention Year ............................ 4,109,294.12
For the Seventh Convention Year................ ......... 3,462,163.66
For the five months' period, August 1, 1914, to January 1, 1915.... 1,209,555.54
Total................................................. 32,411,548.00

Miscellaneous receipts for the five months amounted to $2,781.60
which, added to the total amount accruing from this source theretofore,
i. e., $18,579.16, makes a total of $21,359.76 to January 1, 1915. The
difference between this total and the total given in Appendix B of
$25,215.06 is covered by the redeemed checks of the Banco Nacional,
unpaid, which amount to $3,855.30. The Dominican Government had
received as its share under the Convention the sum of $15,109,805.83,
while the Fiscal Agent of the Convention loan had received $13,689,003.18,
with $50,000 segregated and pending transmittal at the close of Decem-
ber, which went forward the first of the year. .The National City Bank
of New York, on January 1, 1915, had received $720,000 on account of
the $1,500,000 loan of 1912.

DISBURSEMENT AND DISPOSITION OF FUNDS.
Details of expenditures incurred for operating purposes will be found
in Schedules 10, 11, 12 and 13 of Appendix A. The first two deal with
the customs service and the central office of the Receivership, and
numbers 12 and 13 have to do with the Revenue Cutter and Frontier
Customs Service, respectively. Schedule 14 contains a list of ports,
collections and total expenses of each, and Schedule 15 shows the relative
standing of the ports in point of receipts and cost of collection with
percentages for the period.

RECEIVERSHIP EXPENSES.
The total cost of operating the Receivership during the five months
amounted to $74,533.24, or, 6.16 per cent of the amount collected, viz.,
$1,209,555.54. In the conduct of the Receivership proper, including the








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


custom houses, special customs agents and the central office, towards the
expense of which only the five per cent of the gross customs revenues
shall be applied (see General Regulations as set forth in Executive Order
of the President of the United States, July 25, 1907), there has been a
marked policy of retrenchment put into effect since the beginning of the
period under discussion. As will be noted, the total expenditures of
$74,533.24 include an item of $5,199.85, which the General Receiver has
paid for account of the office of the Financial Expert and his salary.
The actual operating expenses of the Receivership for the five months
averaged $13,866.67 per month, which would mean an expense of
$166,400.04 for a year, or, $11,368.59 less than the amount expended
during the Seventh Convention Year. In this connection, let me add
that in continuation of the policy inaugurated during the Seventh
Convention Year of cashing at par drafts of the Department of Public
Works of the Dominican Government against the funds set aside for
that purpose, and of receiving interest on deposits, the Dominican Gov-
ernment was directly saved an expenditure of $298.31, and actually
earned $1,184.58, respectively.

FISCAL AGENCY.
For the service of the Convention Loan, the sum of $500,000 was trans-
mitted to the Guaranty Trust Company as Fiscal Agent of said loan.
There remained unpaid at the end of December the sum of $50,000, which
went forward the first of January, but the extra payment of $50,000 was
made in August on account of July interest.

NATIONAL CITY BANK.
Six payments of $30,000 each were made during this five months'
period in pursuance of the loan contract with the National. City Bank,
the additional $30,000 having been remitted in payment of one install-
ment that remained pending in July.

SINKING FUND.
Segregations for Sinking Fund are based by the Convention on the
total amount of duties from imports and exports during the calendar year,
collections all in excess of $3,000,000 being paid in equal portions to the
Dominican Government and the Fiscal Agency for amortization of the
Dominican Five Per Cent Bonds. The grand total for the calendar year








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


only exceeded the Convention mark very slightly, it being $3,015,332.02,
leaving available for Sinking Fund only $7,666.01, which went forward
shortly after its segregation.

PAYMENTS TO THE DOMINICAN GOVERNMENT.
Schedule No. 8 sets forth the payments made to the Dominican Gov-
ernment from its share of the customs revenues for the period from
August to December, inclusive. A total of $428,569.05 was paid, the
average monthly portion being $85,71$.81. This amount is the lowest
average that the Government has received from its customs revenues
since the Convention was celebrated, but it does not represent the total
amount facilitated by the Receivership and expended by the Government
for its support. On September 16, instructions were received at this
office from the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs to advance an
amount not excedding $5,000 per diem to the provisional government of
Doctor Ram6n Baez, and that the amount at the end of the month that
had been advanced over the amount due from the Government's share
of customs revenues would be reimbursed the General Receiver by drafts
of the Secretary of Finance against the balance of the Convention Loan
that had been set aside for Public Works. This was virtually a loan to
the Dominican Government from its own funds with the approval of the
United States Government. The sums that were advanced by the
Receivership up till January 1, and that were repaid in said manner are
as follows:
September.................... $79,194.17
October: ....................... 132,267.98
SNovember ..................... 58,147.19
December...................... 67,369.11
Total. ................... 336,978.45

During the month of October the advance was increased from $5,000
to $7,000 per diem for a matter of ten days. The advances above
referred to were made to facilitate the provisional government, and under
the implied condition that as soon as the definite government could feel
itself self-supporting from its revenues, customs and internal, by the
aid of certain essential reforms in its budget that were deemed necessary,
the advances would be discontinued. It was finally agreed in March
that such action should be taken beginning April 1, and so it was.








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


In this connection I may be permitted to add that the unliquidated
indebtedness of the Dominican Government, while it is very difficult
to fix as to its total amount, will undoubtedly come very far below the
figures given in the Seventh Annual Report of $7,058,332.90. It is
estimated at this writing that it may conservatively be scaled down to
about $4,500,000.00.
BUILDING FUND.
Unexpended balance of the five per cent allowance segregated-
January, 1911, to April, 1912 ................................. $40,000.00
January, 1912,-to June, 1913 ................ ................ 33,173.36
July, 1913, to August, 1914 ................... .............. 21,822.40
August, 1914, to December, 1914.................. .......... 323.64
Interest accrued on special deposit to December, 1914....... ........ 6,046.30
101,365.70
DISBURSEMENTS.
Purchase, survey and recording of land ............................ $5,974.29
Grading and preparing land for building and construction of new Annex. 5,616.49
Construction and equipment of new Annex......................... 61,205.47
Indemnity payments to beneficiaries of Frank Slothower and H. B.
Schellings. ............................: ..................... 2,453.34
Equipment of office of Receivership Physician ....................... 500.00
Purchase of new revenue cutter ................................... 25,000.00
Balance on hand December 31, 1914 .............................. 616.11
101,365.70
From the above statement it will be readily seen that the Receivership
can not independently carry out any further improvements in the
customs service until collections return to the figures of former years.

REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE.
I submit herewith a table showing the operations of the Revenue
Cutters for the period covered by this report. In addition I beg to say
that these cutters have ceased to perform the functions for which they
were purchased and launched, and if they continue to be operated as
they have been during the past year, not only will they cause an enor-
mous expense to the Government, which will not be compensatory in-
the least, but will impose a great deal of extra labor upon the central
office of the Receivership for work that is foreign to the purposes of the
General Receivership.
It has been suggested heretofore that these boats be transferred to the
Government to be used for transportation purposes, as they have been
used during the past year. It must be admitted that the Government
has need of facilities for coast transportation until highways and railroads








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 9

are'built throughout the Republic. The Receivership is in dire need of
a coastguard service, however, and as the Revenue Cutter Service is
operated at present, it is not and never can be effective in the prevention
of smuggling. All that the Receivership asks in return for these boats,
including the new gasoline launch "Patria," is the amount paid by the
former General Receiver for the latter boat from the Building Fund,
viz., $25,000, with which sum it is respectfully submitted that three
boats can be purchased that will be operated for the Revenue Cutter
Service, and no other, and that will not cost in maintenance and opera-
tion, the three of them, more than $12,000 per annum. The cost of the
service during the last calendar year amounted to $51,076.69.
During the period covered by this report the cutters assisted three
merchant vessels in distress, carried employees of the Public Works
Department in connection with the surveys for new lighthouses, dis-
tributed the American observers at the October elections, in addition
to the carrier and mail service performed at the instance of the Dominican
Government.
Operation of Revenue Cutters for the five months period, August 1, 1914, to
December 31, 1914.

Gasoline Passen- Mail
Cutter. No. of trips. Miles Hours. consumed gers carried
run. (gallons). carried. (sacks).

"Patria"....... 12 4,580 477' 9,194 403 606
N o. 1.......... (Dism antled). .. ..... ................ ..
No. 2.......... 14 1,717 172 1,522 133 171
No. 3 ........... 31 4,124 42'3 3,979 286 235
No.4.......... 36 6,770 622 7,565 576 433
Totals ..... 93 17,191 1,696 22,260 1,398 1,445


FRONTIER CUSTOMS SERVICE.
There is not much to- add to the narrative statement touching condi-
tions on the Haitian frontier that was published in the Seventh Annual
Report of the Receivership; see pages 17 and 18. Suffice it to say that
there have been two more Presidents of Haiti since August 1, which
means a continual revolution on the other side of the border. The
Deputy Receiver for the Land Ports, who also is in command of the
Frontier Guardsmen, made a trip of inspection along the whole frontier
during November and re-established such posts as had been discontinued








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


'during the revolution on the Dominican side. He reports that things
are going as well as possible with the handicaps of a revolution on the
Haitian side and the failure of the Dominican authorities in that section
to enforce the sentences of the courts against the smugglers. Organized
smuggling across the border has ceased. It is only the petty smuggler
that plies his trade, and even he is not always successful. However,
the Dominican Government is powerless to control its officials along the
frontier, and consequently there are about twelve thousand dollars in
fines uncollected, which the custom house officers have no means to
enforce payment of, having done all the law authorizes them to do in
the .premises. The Dominican Government has been appealed to on
frequent occasions to cause these fines to be collected by the proper
officials, but without avail.. Until they be paid, the General Receiver
has not collected "all the customs duties," as stipulated by the American-
Dominican Convdhtion.
THE YEAR'S TRADE.
(Values are in U. S. Currency.)
Value of imports and exports, 1914................... $17,317,794
Value of imports and exports, 1913 ................... 19,742,225
Decrease............................. 2,424,431

It is not surprising that there was a decrease in the combined trade of
the Dominican Republic during the year 1914. Santo Domingo does
not loom large in the trade of the world, but when the total commerce is
affected, as it has been, by the war, she must bear her portion of loss.
This loss, however, of two and one-half millions of dollars, is charged up
on the import side of the ledger, since in spite of a lack of shipping facili-
ties, both from the interior to the domestic ports and from the latter'to
those of foreign countries; there was a slight increase in the value of
exportations over the year 1913. Total value of exportations for the
year 1913 was $10,469,947, while the past year rolled up a total of
$10,588,787. Santo Domingo's loss in combined trade then may be
attributed to a lack of purchasing power, although this may have
diminished slightly owing to little embroglios at home, but vastly more
may it be charged to impossibility of deliveries by the selling nations;
and they will he the greatest losers of all in this decrease of Dominican








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


trade, for Santo Domingo remains among the list of creditor nations,
and with a balance for the year of $3,829,787, on the credit side.
With a tariff that furnishes the Government with ninety per cent of its
revenues, from which ninety per cent only about ten per cent being
derived from duties on exports, naturally, there was a marked decrease
in customs collections for the year, the amount being $3,094,584.77, as
compared with $4,260,162.29 for the year 1913, or, a loss of $1,165,577.52.
The total amount derived from imports and exports during the year was
$3,015,332.02, as against $4,165,816.68, or, a decrease of twenty-seven
per cent.
Dominican trade statistics for the calendar year 1914 will be'found
under Appendix D of this report.

ANALYSIS OF THE AGGREGATE TRADE.
The United States, Germany, the United Kingdom and France, in the
order named, occupy the vantage front of trade prestige. But of these
four leading countries, the United States is the only one which does not
show a decided decrease, especially Germany and France. The latter,
by reason of an immense decline in values, surrenders her former place
as third in importance to the United Kingdom. The value of merchan-
dise imported from and shipped to the United States was $13,024,909 in
1914, and in 1913, $11,369,829, a total percentage of seventy-five per cent
of the whole, in 1914, against fifty-seven per cent in 1913.. Germany still
ranks second, but with a most serious slump, descending from the high
total of $3,746,217 in 1913 to $1,746,559 in 1914. The United Kingdom
shows small decrease, going from $972,001 in 1913 to $753,630 last year.
The trade of France declined from $1,162,225 in 1913 to $449,596 in
1914. The only other countries showing gains over 1913 are Italy-
$208,448 against $193,535 for 1913; and Porto Rico, which increased
from $133,783 in 1913, to $225,677 in 1914, a gain of $91,894, or sixty-
eight per cent. The war in Europe undoubtedly has had a large influence
in this shifting of trade sources. The following is a complete tabulated
statistical table showing the entire trade movements for the years 1913-
1914 for all countries, and will be found on the subsequent page.








12 REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD

The following percentages better illustrate the relative importance of
the four leading foreign countries concerned, in the trade of Santo
Domingo.

1914. 1913.
Countries.
Exports. Imports. Exports. Imports.

United States ........................ 80.96 66.17 53.49 62.22
Germany............................. 7.73 13.79 19.76 18.10
United Kingdom ...................... 1.76 8.43 2.31 7.88
France ............................... 2.72 2.40 8.48 2.96

EXPORTS.
Tons. Value.
Sugar (raw) 1914................... 101,429 $4,943,452
1913..................... 78,849 3,650,556
Increase............... ......... 22,580 1,292,896
Sugar cane, 1914 ................... 28,317 62,585
1913 ......................................
Increase........ ..... ........... 28,317 62,585
Kilos.
Sugar molasses, 1914 ................... 17,962,441 93,787
1913................... 12,064,038 60,737
Increase......................... 5,898,403 33,050
The forecast made in the Annual Summaryof 1913, that the sugar crop
of 1914 would,,with normal weather, show an increase, is proven correct
by the above comparative statistics. Not only is the tonnage largely in
excess of any previous exportations, the former record crop having been
that of 1910 with 92,908 tons, but the average price for the year was a
shade better than that of 1913. Had not practically all of the crop been
sold before the beginning of the Europ'ean war, there would have been
a notable increase in values.
Sugar and its, allied product, molasses, with the new La Romana
industry of growing cane and shipping it to Porto Rico, constitute nearly
one-half of the entire export values of the Republic. The combined total
is $5,099,824, while the total exports of the Republic are $10,588,787.
That the cane growing and sugar making industry on a large commer-
cial scale has not only survived, but has flourished and increased during
the past two seasons, with lowest prices on record, is conclusive of the
permanency of the enterprises, of the superior advantages of climate and








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


soil, and of bright prospects for good profits out of the present crop, with
assured higher prices.
Of the $4,943,452 worth of sugar exported, $4,348,346 (or 87 per cent)
was consigned to the United States.
Tons. Value.
Cacao, 1914 ......................... 20,744 $3,896,489
1913......................... 19,470 4,119,955
Increase....................... 1,274 223,466 decrease
Cacao exports surpassed in quantity any previous season, save that
of 1912, which yielded 20,832 tons. The decreased value of an increased
crop over 1913 was due mainly to revolutionary troubles which pre-
vented transportation during the main crop moving season, one principal
port, Puerto Plata, being blockaded, and the chief cacao port, SAnchez,
on account of inability to give regular train service to the interior, was
unable to collect the product for shipment. Immense quantities of
cacao were stored, from which much damage resulted. When the revo-
lution ceased, cacao began to move, but the European war was then
going on. France and Germany have always been large importers of
cacao, and the absence of transportation to these countries for several
months caused a slump in prices to such an extent that shipments to
other countries in September showed a loss of $220,000, as compared
with a like tonnage exported in 1913. Only by December had prices
gone to the average five year price of $203.80 per ton of 1,000 kilograms.
The cacao industry is the largest general one in the Republic, and is being
extended each year, much improvement being noted in the method of
handling and preparing the bean for market. Owing to the delay in
moving the crop until the European war began, the United States
received the entire crop, with the exception of $381,463. 'Of this, only
$224,339 was consigned to Germany, as against $675,233 the year before,
and but $146,852 to France, which took $666,948 valuation in 1913.
England's importations increased from $2,432 to $5,712. The United
States increased from $2,774,670 to $3,515,026, or 79 per cent.
Tons. Value.
Tobacco (leaf), 1914 ........................ 3,705 '$394,224
1913........................ 9,790 1,121,775
SDecrease ............................ 6,085 727,551
In no branch of Agricultural endeavor have the 'revolutions of Santo
Domingo and Haiti, and the European war, been more disastrous than
to the leaf tobacco export industry.








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


Low as are the figures of exports for 1914, at least half of this value
should be credited to the crop of 1913, which could not be exported in
November and December on account of the revolution at that time. The
revolution in a more acute stage in the chief tobacco growing section
tributary to Puerto Plata, during the spring and summer months of 1914,
greatly interfered with the preparation and cultivation of the crop.
Later, when the crop was ready for market, the only former purchaser,
Germany, was at war, and no bottoms were available. Consequently,
nearly the entire crop of 1914 is yet in the hands of the growers and
dealers or factors, who have advanced funds for its cultivation or prepa-
ration for market. For this reason the statistics of exports, while accu-
rate, should be considered in the light of the above facts. Returns for
January, 1915, which are not included in this summary, show that
Europe is beginning to get consignments, and with this avenue of trade
once more open, the crop held in reserve will be disposed of. -
Of the $394,224 crop exported in 1914 Germany had purchased
$300,511 worth before July 1, and up to January 1 had received but
$8,300 worth, half of this being received in July, leaving only about
$5,000 for the entire five months 'following July. The price paid for
Dominican tobacco has always been low because of lack of competition
in buying, lack of care in curing and grading, and sales methods.
The manufacture of cigars and cigarettes is being largely extended,
however, which will contribute to the decrease in exports. The recent
consolidation of two large cigar and cigarette factories at Santiago and
Santo Domingo City into one corporation, with a working capital of
$375,000, indicates a largely increased capacity for domestic manufacture
and distribution.
Tons. Value.
Coffee, 1914............................. 1,832 $345,579
1913... .......................... 1,049 257,076
Increase............................ 783 88,503

More coffee was exported in 1914 than in any previous year, excepting
the record year 1912, the value of which amounted to over half a million
dollars.
The nearest approach of any other year during the past decade was the
crop of 1910, amounting to $323,749.. This denotes continued and suc-
cessful development of this generally diffused native industry. The fine
quality of Dominican coffee has been long recognized in the trade world,








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


especially that grown in the Province of Barahona, commercially classed
as "Barahona," and being distinctly recognized and sold -as a "choice
consumer's" brand.
In 1913 France took the larger share of the crop, as she has usually
done, but in 1914 the United States assumed the lead with $159,118;
France followed with $105,905, while Germany, England and Italy,
increased their importations for 1914 over those of 1913.
Bunches. Value.
Bananas, 1914 .... ..................... 114,142 $57,044
1913 ......................... 592,804 296,386
Decrease ............. ........... 478,662 239,342

The principal commercial export banana plantations near Sosua were
visited by a disastrous hurricane in January, 1914, as mentioned in the
preceding Summary, resulting in a small crop for 1914. 'By reason of
the difficulty of transportation, due to blockade of the port of Puerto
Plata for four months during the shipping season, and special permit
having to be had for transport facilities at Sosua, much of the crop failed
to reach foreign consumers. In the Republic generally, a large crop was
grown, and used locally, bananas and plantains forming a staple diet and
contributing largely towards lowering the high cost of imported bread-
stuffs and fruits.
The United States took the entire amount exported, except the small
quantity of $44 worth which went through the land ports to Haiti.


WOOD.

Mahogany, 1914 ....................
1913 ...... ...............
Decrease.............................
Lignum vitm, 1914 ...................
1913 ....................
Decrease ...........................
Wood (all other), 1914 .............. ..
1913..................
D ecrease............................


Tons.
857
3,218
2,361
1,748
2,217
469


Value.
$14,249
60,913
46,664
16,91b
37,877
20,967
35,305
68,247
S32,942


The immense decrease in exports of the valuable woods of the Domini-
can Republic is explained by the showing of official statistics, that for the
first seven months exports of woods aggregated $57,179. For the five
months since August 1 the entire amount exported has reached only
$9,385, all of this going to the United States. Three of the principal








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


warring nations, England, France and Germany, which have formerly
taken this stock, have simply ceased importing.
Of the imports prior to August 1, England took $26,822, Germany,
$5,666, France, $6,149, Italy and the United States the remaining $19,000.
Kilos. Value.
Beeswax, 1914 ......................... 227,900 $130,290
1913......................... 212,572 118,038
Increase........... ............. 15,328 12,252
Honey, 1914........................ 1,057,670 77,000
1913......................... 1,148,405 88,711
Decrease ... ........... ........ 90,735 11,711

Each year since 1910 either wax or honey increases or decreases in
values of exports. In 1913 honey had the lead for increase, while during
1914 wax goes ahead again.
Kilos. Value.
Cotton, 1914............................ 167,123 $67,830
1913........................ 242,221 85,398
Decrease.......................... 75,098 17,568

Exports of cotton for the past calendar year, while showing consider-
able decrease from the previous season, indicate that the industry has
a place of permanence among the list of exportable Dominican products.
Owing to the European war there was practically no market for, this
cotton when it was ready for shipment, and this trouble, combined with
the low prices, has no doubt caused much of it to be held back; so that
the figures of export can not exactly give the quantity produced. Eng-
land and Germany formerly took nearly all of this cotton, but owing to
the absence of means of shipment to those countries when cotton had to
be moved, nearly all of it was consigned to factors in the United States,
who were already embarrassed with-a big crop of apparently unmarket-
able cotton.
Kilos. Value.
Cocoanuts, 1914 ........................ 992,023 $22,691
1913........................ 958,093 22,023
Increase.......................... 33,930 668
Copra, 1914. ....... ...... 44,146 4,269
1913..................... 65,510 5,629
Decrease....................... 21,364 1,360

Not unlike the relation between honey and wax, are exports of cocoa-
nuts and copra (the dried nut). Increased exports of one may mean a
decrease as to the other. Part of the decrease in shipments of copra,








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 17

however, is due to the fact that the cocoanut oil industry is being devel-
oped at Samanh, where much of this oil is used in domestic soap manu-
facture. This also has decreased the exportation of cocoanuts.
Kilos. Value.
Hides of animals goatskinss), 1914.......... 129,851 $89,768
1913.......... 114,308 88,576
Increase.............. ........... 15,543 1,192
Hides of animals (cattle), 1914.......... 455,191 164,064
1913.......... 426,846 152,496
Increase........ ................... 28,345 11,568

An appreciable increase in exportations of hides and skins of cattle
and goats indicates a larger supply each year of animals for work, for
food, and for milk for local consumption; no milk or fresh meats being
exported, as all are consumed locally. Besides, there are'several tan-
neries located at the various towns and cities, some of these being modern
and extensive establishments, ard much leather is made for use by the
domestic shoe shops and factories.
The United States takes practically all the goatskins, while Germany
and France have been getting most of the hides of cattle. Owing to the
war, neither Germany nor France have imported hides since September 1,
the annual imports of the United States increasing from $11,612 in 1913
to $105,227 in 1914.
The appended table will be found of interest. It not only shows the
sections of the Republic producing the four crops which compose ninety
per cent of its entire exports, but reveals the preponderance of produc-
tion in each locality, of the specific crops of sugar, cacao, coffee or tobacco.


Ports. Cacao. Coffee. Sugar- Tobacco
leaf.

Azua ........................ $80 $26,619 $242,893 ..........
Barahona ................... ............ 19,165 ......................
Comendador. ................................................ $ 66,105
D ajab6n.. ..........................................188 2,244
La Romana .................. 156,231 ......... ............ ..........
M acoris..................... 200,783 22 3,451,273 ..........
Monte Cristi ................. 62,084 20,436 ............ 7,450
Puerto Plata ................. 660,848 77,046 16,840 368,551
Sam an ...................... 187,179 5 .....................
Sinchez ..................... 2,454,458 7,266 ............ 9,874
Santo Domingo............... 174,826 195,020 1,232,258 ..........
Tierra Nueva........................................................
Totals ................. 3,896,489 345,579 4,943,452 394,224








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


BRIEF DETAILS OF OTHER EXPORTS.
The seventeen articles of export character treated of in the foregoing'
paragraphs represent $10,415,534 of the entire exports of 1914, aggre-
gating $10,588,787. Of the remaining products, specially enumerated
in the official tables elsewhere found, are live animals, gums and resins,
raw materials for dye stuffs and drugs, cigars and cigarettes, and vegetable
fibers other than cotton.'
-Exportations of cigars and cigarettes decreased because of the revo- t
lution in Haiti during the entire year, and the same is the case in exporta-
tions of live animals, another border export article. The large percentage
of decrease in gums and resins is evidently due to paucity of transporta-
tion facilities, Germany, England and France having formerly taken the
bulk of such commodities. On the other hand, increased prices for
materials for dyes served to cause a large gain in these crude raw mate-
rials, consequent upon great demand for them, following demoralization
of Germany's exports of finished dyes, immediately after the beginning
of the great war, in Europe. The export takings for 1914 were about
equally divided between the United States and England, the United
States increasing its imports for 1913 of $6,865 to $26,479 in 1914.
England increased from $14,699 in 1913 to $26,391 in 1914.

ALL OTHER EXPORTS.

Under this general head have been classed several products of such
minor value that special statistics are taken from the shippers' manifests.
Among these are included vegetables, fibers like sisal, hemp, etc., and
other small articles not commercially grown, but intermittently shipped
from a tropical country.
The total value of these other exports amounts to $82,428.

IMPORTS.
Value.
Cotton, and manufactures of, 1914 ................... $1,232,725
1913 .................... 1,880,211
Decrease................................. 647,486

Wearing apparel and textiles of cotton resume their former leading
position as the chief articles of import for local consumption in the
Dominican Republic. The decrease of over half a million dollars from
importations of 1913 is suggestive, however, of the diminished purchasing








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


power of the average Dominican cotton fabric customer, the total of
cotton imports being less than for any one year, since the favorable tariff
rates applied under the Act of 1909. Under spur of these lower duties
and a better classification, cotton imports increased from $925,970 in
1909 to $1,481,344 in 1910, advancing each year until in 1913 they
almost reached the two-million-dollar mark.
American sales for 1914 were in the lead, being followed in the accus-
tomed order, but of reduced proportions, by England and Germany.
Two countries moved up in their cotton fabric consignments owing to
the war in Europe, evidently. These were Italy, increased from $43,234
in 1913 to $52,241 in 1914, while Porto Rico went from $10,948 to
$12,836. The principal trade drops were, United States from $1,040,988
to $671,226; England from $476,914 to $316,221; Germany from $180,897
to $134,822; France from $41,771 to $18,199.
Value.
Iron and steel, and manufactures of, 1914. ...... ...... $839,325
1913............. 1,345,899
Decrease .... ............ ................ 506,574
The very great decrease also in imports of iron and steel advances cotton
manufactures to the leadership, and as the sole occupant of the million-
dollar import class. The general depression of the year in all financial
affairs, added to demoralization on account of the Dominican revolutions,
the European war, etc., combined to produce a cessation of railroad
building and repairing, purchase of rolling stock and building material,
extensions on the sugar estates, and elsewhere throughout the Republic.
Of the total amount, the United States supplied $661,204) England
$113,919, Germany $44,320, the small remainder being divided among
all other countries.
Tons. Value.
Rice, 1914................................ 8,756 $485,776
1913................................ 13,003 736,751
Decrease..... ..................... 4,247 250,975
Reduction in purchase of foreign rice, almost all of which has hereto-
fore been made in Germany, would appear from import statistics to be
due more to deficient transportation facilities from this source of supply
after August 1, than from inability to purchase this cheap staff of food
imports by the Dominicans. This is borne out by the figures, which
show that rice imports up to July 1, covering the first six months, period








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


of the calendar year 1914, had exceeded those for a like period in 1913, a
record year. The average monthly German rice shipments for the first
seven months, up to August 1, were, in round numbers, $35,000. From
August 1 to January 1, five months, they had dropped to an average of
$20,000 a month, making a clear loss of forty-three per cent, as compared
with the spring and summer months during the progress of the Dominican
revolutionary period. The United States and Portb Rican consignments
advanced from August 1 to January 1 to an average of $19,000 per month,
while for the first seven months the average shipments were only $1,000
per month.
It seems possible and probable that all rice that was obtainable in the
United States was imported, which explains the net loss of over a quarter
of a million dollars in purchases in a period of only five months, and that
the demand exceeded the supply, at least of the cheaper grade of rice,
such as Germany supplies.
Of the entire rice imports, Germany furnished $367,913, as compared
with $722,055 for 1913; United States and Porto Rico $99,739 against
$7,465 in 1913, a negligible quantity coming from other countries.
Value.
Provisions: Comprising meat and dairy products, 1914..... $424,455
1913..... 606;790
Decrease ................................ ..... 182,335

.Of the large reduction in meat and dairy supplies, the loss is about
equally divided between the two six-months periods of the year. How-
ever, the first six months loss surpassed the last, since from'January 1 to
July 1 the decrease, compared with the same period in 1913, was $98,705,
and from July 1 to January 1, 1915, it was $83,630. As usual, the
United States furnished the bulk of product with $271,726, Germany
$41,084, and Porto Rico $6,489.
Tons. Value.
Wheat flour, 1914.......................... 6,631 $386,565
1913......................... 7-,225 443,421
Decrease............... ............ 594 56,856

Of the total wheat flour imports of 74,433 barrels, at an invoiced
average value of $5.20 per barrel, the United States continued to supply
practically the whole. The increased supply from Porto Rico was of
American milling, this origin of shipping being due to disarranged trans-








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


portation facilities immediately following the outbreak of the war in
Europe.
Value.
Oils, 1914......................................... $333,700
1913............................. ...... 448,384
Decrease .............. ........... ........ 114,684
The importation of oils for illuminating, manufacturing and food
purposes continues almost exclusively to be made by the United States.
While there was a large decrease in consumption over the previous year,
the United States took even a further lead in the percentage supply, since
out of the total of $333,700 that country furnished oils to the value of
$312,957.
Value.
Wood, and manufactures of, 1914 .................... $276,134
1913. ................... 392,398
Decrease ............. .............. .. .... 116,264
The annual gains of several past years in Dominican use of imported
wood or lumber were checked last year largely on account of a diminished
demand for building materials, similar to the loss in structural iron and
steel for reinforced concrete and steel building materials. There was
also a reduction in importations of manufactured wood articles, such as
furniture, office and school equipment, desks, tables, etc. Of the total
of $276,134 imports the United States furnished $248,284, Germany
$13,494.
Value.
Leather, and manufactures of, 1914 ................... $264,770
1913 .................... 275,530
Decrease..................................... 10,760

This"article showed a very slight decrease as compared with other
articles of import. The leather imported is generally sole leather used
in the domestic shoe factories. For the past year these factories have
been operated only part of the time, causing a decline in leather imports,
but a considerable increase in foreign supplies 9f boots, shoes and other
leather goods. From the United States there was an invoiced value of
$239,188, Germany $11,113, England $6,977, and Spain $3,038.
Value.
Fibers (vegetable), manufactures of, 1914.............. $228,716
1913.............. 281,066
D ecrease................. ................. 52,350








REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


Larger demands for bags in which to export increased crops of sugar,
cacao and coffee prevented a bigger decline in imports of fiber manu-
factures. The principal supply came from the following sources:
United States $129,066, England $34,457, Germany $48,947, and France
$7,959. There were reduced imports from all except the United States,
which made a slight gain over any former consignments.
Value.
Fish and fish products, 1914 ......................... $206,287
1913.......... ............... 237,695
Decrease................. .............. 31,408

As in the past, the United States continues to furnish the dried, canned
and preserved fish consumed in the Republic, its quota for 1914 being
$192,928 out of a total of $206,287. Considering the general financial
depression, that imports of fish surpassed the $200,000 point, which was
never attained until 1913, is evidence of appreciating importance of this
foodstuff.
Value.
Chemicals, drugs and dyes, 1914. .................... $177,920
1913 ..................... 212,834
Decrease................................. 34,914

The showing for imports of this class of goods is not bad, compared
with such heavier percentages of decrease in other lines for 1914. The
larger portion of receipts were for drugs. The United States leads as
principal seller, with $112,784, France second with $25,483, Italy with
$22,110.
Tons. Value.
Coal, 1914............ ................. 22,521 $113,199
1913....................... ....... 22,416 95,771
Increase............... ............ 105 17,428

Coal consumption continues to increase year by year, ascending from
13,719 tons in' 1910 to the larger amount for 1914. More and more
import coal for steaming and manufacturing needs accounts, for the
growth. Of the total tonnage, the United States furnished all except
2,000 tons, England supplying 1,344 tons of the small balance.
Value.
Sugar and confectionery, 1914 ....................... $114,279
1913....................... 163,377

Decrease.................................. 49,098








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


A considerable percentage of the confectionery, and practically all of
the refined sugar used in the Republic, comes from the United States,
the total for.the year being $93,284. England supplied to the value of
$9,355, chiefly confectioneries, France,'Spain and Italy an average of
$2,500 each, of the remainder.
Tons. Value.
Soap, 1914.............................. 1,003 $109,081
1913.............................. 801 86,884
Increase.......................... 202 22,197

The United States continues to supply the bulk of all soaps, having
sold Dominican consumers $105,329 worth in 1914, out of the total
imported value of $109,081. The quantity imported increases each
year, but the large percentage gain over 1913, when almost every other
article shows a loss, is due to the closing of one of the soap factories,
which formerly supplied the local domestic demand for laundry soap..
Liters. Value.
Beer (in bottles), 1914 .............. ...... 599,332 $105,079
1913. ................... 770,801 147,182
Decrease ......... ...... ....... 171,469 42,103
Of imported commodities, none speak more plainly the story of dis-
located foreign trade than the Dominican statistics of bottled beer.
The decreased consumption of this luxury, while evidence of business
depression, and the falling off of German beer consignments, from
$116,392 to $62,440 in 1914, means that for the five months succeeding
August 1 no German beer reached the Republic. The United States
shipments in the meantime increased.from $27,042, for the same period
of 1913, to $35,704 in 1914, and has supplied practically all the bottled
beer imported from September 1 to January 1.
Value.
Metals, and manufactures of, 1914.......... ........... $100,748
1913.................... 69,632
Increase...................... .......... 31,116

Among the few articles of import showing an increase the past year
were metals and their products.. Under this head are embraced copper,
mercury, nickel, aluminum, zinc, lead, and other metals, and alloys
thereof, or manufactures of these basic materials. The advance from
$12,768 in 1910 to more than $100,000 in the "off import year" of 1914
is indicative of marked progress in the people of the Dominican Republic.








24 REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD

The United States supplied $85,866 in value, Germany $8,421, England
$3,281, with small imports from other countries.
Value.
Agricultural implements, 1914; ...................... $110,229
1913...................... 143,418
Decrease................................... 43,189

Heavy purchases of foreign agricultural implements and machinery
in the preceding two years naturally tended to diminish imports, since
much of that secured in former years is still doing service and will be
useful for other seasons.
The imports grew from $39,135 in 1910 to $143,418 in 1913. This
rapid and steady advance in the use of improved farm utensils and field
equipment denote development and that Santo Domingo farmers are
making agricultural strides towards a better crop goal. In the trade,
the United States leads, with $40,011, England second with $33,694,
Germany third with $24,310. The United States lost to England in
sales for 1914, since its shipment of $105,147 in 1913 dropped to $40,011
in 1914. England advanced from $3,780 to $33,964 while Germany lost
but $9,000 from its 1913 shipments of $33,883.
Value.
Paper, and manufactures of, 1914...................... $90,725
1913.................... 125,683
Decrease .................................. 34,958
The decrease of imports of paper and its manufactures was largely
Germany's trade loss, her sales having been reduced from.$52,898 in
1913 to $25,504 for 1914. The United States held her former lead, with
$53,250 for 1914 as against $54,764 in 1913. Spain was third, although
dropping from $7,706 in 1913 to $5,137 for 1914.
Value.
Hats and caps, 1914. ............................. $72,934
1913................................ 89,253
Decrease............... ...................... 16,319

Italy continues largely in the lead of all other countries in hat and cap
supplies, her total for 1914 being $52,417, with the United States second
with $10,091, Porto Rico third with $3,441. The small remainder in
about equal proportions is distributed between France, Germany and
Spain.








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


The foregoing exposition of the eighteen principal articles of import,'
constituting eighty-two per cent of the total import values for 1914,
aggregating $5,549,448, is designed as an edited supplement to the more
detailed enumeration of all of the numerous and varied foreign brought
commodities entering into Dominican consumption, which is published
in statistical tables following. Therein will be found tabulated com-
parisons of values and countries of origin, between the years 1913 and
1914, furnishing a guide to changes by way of increases and decreases in
thd many different groups.
The table herein inserted deals particularly with thirteen of the prin-
cipal groups, epitomizing comparisons with 1913, including percentage
of the total trade, and the percentage of gains and losses for the year to
which it relates.

1914. 1913.

Articles. Percentage Percentage
Value., of total Value. of total
value, value.

Cotton, and manufactures of.... $1,232,725 18.32 $1,880,211 20.18
Iron and steel, and manufac-
I turesof .................. 838,325 12.47 1,345,899 14.52
Rice......................... 485,776 7.21 736,751 7.95
Wheat flour. ................. 386,565 5.74 443,421 4.78
Provisions, meat and dairy
products................. 424,455 6.31 606,790 6.54
Wood, and manufactures of.... 276,134 4.10 392,398 4.22
Oils................. ....... 333,700 4.96 484,388 4.84
Fibers (vegetable), and manu-
facturesof................ 228,716 3.40 281,066 3.03
Leather, and manufactures of. 264,770 3.93 275,530 2.97
Fish, and fish products......... 206,287 3.07 237,695 2.56
Chemicals, drugs and dyes..... 177,920 2.64 212,834 2.30
Vehicles and boats............ 97,847 1.45 183,244 1.98
Agricultural implements....... 100,229 1.49 143,418 1.55


VESSELS INI THE CARRYING TRADE.

Accurate tables in thigh Summary record the registered tonnage, both
foreign and coastwise, of.steamphip anjd sailing craft, and give the
number of vessels .ete'rir t nd:chid:'it ech" port during the twelve-
month. In the r (rier of their importance, Am'eri~aii,.Norwegian, British,
German, Fr~ 'ch, Dutch, Spanislh Cban and Dorinahie !vessels visited
these por -With cargoeE4.tH ,a a. p bcujcts of expt.-:







26 REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD

The established American Steamship Lines brought most of the
imports, especially since September 1, and a much larger proportion of
the exports went to New York and Galveston, for transshipment in the
months following the European war.
Of the exports, a large quantity of sugar is forwarded by Norwegian
specially chartered vessels, and since September 1 a great falling off has
been noted in the carrying trade of British ships, while those of Germany
and France have practically ceased entering West Indian ports.

The alphabetical arrangement 'of the accompanying Summary will
afford full particulars under the several heads briefly discussed above,
also relating to other articles entering into the aggregate foreign trade.
The parallel columns for the two years referred to offer a guide to changes
in volume of commercial transactions of imports and exports within the
separate classes. The importance of the carrying trade is shown
independently.
Respectfully submitted,
C. H. BAXTER,
,General Receiver.
THE CHIEF,
BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS,
War Department, Washington, D. C.


















.













REPORT OF EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD,
DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.
FIVE MONTHS PERIOD, AUGUST 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1914.



APPENDIX "A."

Customs Collections, Expenditures and Dispositions.

SCHEDULE NO. 1.

Consolidated statements of collections, expenditures and disposition of funds, for period
yrom August 1 to December 31, 1914.
COLLECTIONS.
Gross collections from all sources, all ports ...................... $1,209,555.54
Miscellaneous receipts, sundry.................. ............. 2,781.60
Miscellaneous receipts, Banco Nacional checks redeemed.......... 3,855.30
Balances per account current, July 31, 1914:
In transit to the General Receiver, as per accounts current of
Deputy Receivers ................ ................... 88,792.27
Due the Dominican Government ........................... 19,213.10
Due the Fiscal Agent, account of July ...................... 50,000.00
Due the National City Bank, July account.................. 30,000.00
Due the Fiscal Agent, one half of Surplus calendar year 1914..... 22,752.38
Due the Building Fund.................................. 5,475.19
To transfer from Sinking Fund to Fiscal Agent ................:. 66,550.00
To Drafts of Dominican Government on the Convention Fund..... 319,609.34
Balance due from Dominican Government (Convention Fund) on
D ecember 31. .............. .............................. 17,369.11


Total to be accounted for.... .........................

EXPENDITURES AND DISPOSITIONS.
1. Customs expenses proper, including expenses of the Receivership.
2. Deposited with Fiscal Agent for service of loan...............
3. Deposited with National City Bank of New York on account of
loan authorized December 14, 1912 .....................
4. Paid to the Dominican Government, accrued revenue .........
5. Paid to the Dominican Government Convention Fund........
6. Building Fund accumulation including interest...............
7. Building Fund disbursements .... ... .. ....................
'8. Refund of duties collected in excess .........................
9. Refund of duties, Article X, Tariff .........................
10. Refund surplus of proceeds, Article 180 customs law..........
11. Expenses of Frontier Customs Service......................
12. Operation of Revenue Cutter Service.....................
13. Exchange of funds transmitted to Fiscal Agent...............
14. Personal fees refunded by Deputy Receivers .................
15. Balances in transit to the General Receiver as per accounts
current of Deputy Receivers, December 31, 1914 .......
16. Paid for account of Dominican Government, in accordance with
special authority .... ................................
17. Cancelled checks reissued................................
18. Segregated for transmittal to Fiscal Agent for service of loan,
December account..................................

T otal.................................................
(27)


1,835,953.83


$74,533.24
500,000.00
180,000.00
428,569.05
336,978.45
616.11
5,182.72
2,180.52
3,314.33
909.49
13,482.37
23,859.57
971.86
3,680.41
202,419.82

5,471.11
3,784.78

50.000.00

1,835,953.83









REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD


SCHEDULE No. 2.

Statement showing gross collections and dispositions made thereof by Deputy Receivers
at the several ports, from August 1 to December 31, 1914.

Personal Balances in Total remit-
fees re- transit to tances received
Ports, Groens funded by General by General
collections. Deputy Receiver Receiver during
Receivers. Dec. 31, 1914. period.


Azua.................
Barahona............
Comendador.........
Dajab6n.............
La Romana.........
M acoris .............
Monte Cristi .........
Puerto Plata..........
Samana..............
Sinchez ............
Santo Domingo.......
Tierra Nueva.........

Totals.........


$35,541.03
121.89
170.75
375.21
18,027.82
209,828.05
79,332.84
295,286.53
20,465.55
209,471.59
340,438.39
495.89

11,209,555.54


$181.93
4.72

257.18,
758.26
608.49
496.04
225.42
322.66
825.71,

3,680.41


S$11,704.23


1,396.08
37,116.55
6,535.80
53,139.28
2,663.43
43,712.56
46,151.89

202,419.82


'Gross collections at the ports, see Schedule 4.
'Actual receipts by the General Receiver, see Schedule 3.


$27,149.88
117.17
170.75
375.21
16,550.87
173,203.87
75,488.40
244,283.38
17,823.49
190,393.53
346,195.14
495.89

21,092,247.58


SCHEDULE No. 3.

ACCOUNTABLE RETURNS.
Consolidation of the accounts current rendered by the General Receiver at the close of each
month during the period from August 1 to December 31, 1914.


DEBIT.
Balance due the Dominican Government per account, July 31, 1914..
Due the Fiscal Agent of Dominican Loan, account July 1914......
Due the Fiscal Agent from surplus over $3,000,000, calendar year 1914
Due National City Bank....................................
Balance, credit of Building Fund .... .......................
Miscellaneous receipts ...... ........................... .
Actual receipts, customs revenues remitted by Deputy Receivers:
Ports-
Azua.................................'.. $27,149.88
Barahona................... .. ....... 117.17
Comendador............................ 170.75
Dajab6n.......................... 375.21
La Romana .......................... . 16,550.87
M acorfs.................... ............ 173,203.87
M onte Cristi ............................ 75,488.40
Puerto Plata................. .......... 244,283.38
Samand .............................. 17,823.49
Sanchez.......... ....................... 190,393.53
Santo Domingo ......................... 346,195.14
Tierra Nueva............................ 495.89

Transferred from Sinking Fund to Fiscal Agent..................
Drafts received from Dominican Government on Convention Fund.
Balance due from Dominican Government December 31, 1914.....


$19,213.10
50,000.00
22,752.38
30,000.00
5,475.19
6,636.90


1,092,247.58
66,550.00
319,609.34
17,369.11


Total of account. .................................... 1,629,853.60








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


CREDIT.
Paid to the Dominican Government, Receipts Nos. 396-405.......
Deposited with Guaranty Trust Company, New York, for Fiscal
Agency Account, Remittances Nos. 385, 388, 390, 393, 397, 400,
403, 404, 405, 408, 410....................................
Deposited on account of loan authorized by act of Congress approved
December 14, 1912, G. O. 2358, Nos. 19-24.................
Disbursements. ner Abstracts. Form 7:


1. Expense Office of the General Receiver ...... $28,413.54
2. Port of Azua.. : ................. ....... 2,793.01
3. Port of Barahona ....................... 1,076.99
4. Port'of Comendador ...................... 435.15
5. Port of Dajab6n........................ 750.40
6. Port of La Romana........... .......... 1,860.80
7. Port of Macoris ......................... 5,550.26
8. Port of Monte Cristi.......... ........... 3,221.59
9. Port of Puerto Plata.............:........ 8,904.71
10. Port of Saman .......................... 2,294.34
11. Port of Sanchez.......................... 5,442.90
12. Port of Santo Domingo................... 8,191.46
13. Port of Tierra Nueva ..................... 398.24
14. Financial Expert..................... ... 5,199.85

Disbursements for account of and authorized by the Dominican
Government, per Abstracts, Form 7:
15. Refunds of duties collected in excess....................
16. Refunds of duties, Article X.of the Tariff ................
17. Refunds, Article 180, Customs Law....................
18. Expenses, Frontier Customs Service ..................
19. Expenses, Revenue Cutter Service......................
20. Exchange on funds transmitted to Fiscal Agent, New York.
Disbursements account Building Fund..................
Disbursements for account of and authorized by the Dominican
Governm ent... ..................................
Cancelled checks reissued ............... .. .......... .......
Balances on hand December 31, 1914:
Due Fiscal Agent of Dominican Loan ..........,............
-Balance credit of Building Fund..... .................

Total of account .......................................


$765,547.50

500,000.00

180,000.00













74,533.24

2,180.52
3,314.33
909.49
13,482.37
23,859.57
971.86
5,182.72

5,471.11
3,784.78
50.000,00
616.11

1,629,853.60









30 REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD

SCHEDULE No. 4.
STATISTICAL RETURNS.
Consolidation of the statements of receipts and expenditures submitted by the General
Receiver at the close of each month during the period August 1 to December 31, 1914.

COLLECTIONS.
Gross collections ........................................... $1,209,555.54
Derived from the following sources:
Import duties ........................................ 1,053,116.40
Export duties...........: ............................... 130,143.65
Port Dues:
Tonnage................... ........ ................... 18,165.24
Pilotage: ................ ........................... 2,103.91
Interpreters' fees......... ............................... 419.50
Semaphore service................... .. .................. 391.50
M medical officers' fees ...................................... 433.50
Fines ................................................ 663.47
Coastwise permits....................................... 200.00
Auction sales .......................................... 3,586.37
Extra service .................. ........................... 332.00
Gross collections.................. ........................ $1,209,555.54

Salaries and expenses, all entry ports 13.38 per cent............... 40,919.85
Salaries and expenses, Office of General Receiver 12.78 per cent....., 33,613.39

Total cost of collecting the revenue '6.16 per cent .......... 74,533.24

DISBURSEMENTS.
Total disbursements for all entry ports......................... $44,600.26
Disbursed as follows:
Customs expense (authorized by the Convention):
Salaries and wages ...................... $38,605.45
Expendable supplies ...................... 7.86
Unexpendable property...... ............. 329.87
Rent, repairs, improvements, etc........... 775.05
Miscellaneous.......................... 1,201.62
Total customs expense.............. .. .... ........ 40,919.85,
Payment of Personal Fees, etc. (authorized by the
Dominican Government):
Pilotage .................................... $2,103.91
Interpreters' Fees. ........................... 419.50
Semaphore Service.......... ................. 391.50
Medical Officers' Fees......................... 433.50
Extra Service fees ............................ 332.00
Total of personal fees, etc .............................. 3,680.41

$44,600.26

'Indicating percentage cost of collection, based on grosh collections.













SCHEDULE No. 5.

Statement showing gross collections by months and sources, August 1, 1914 to December 31, 1914, with cdbmprismn of totals for the previous
period, showing increases and decreases.


1914.
August..............................
September.........................
October.............................
November..........................
December ........................

Totals ..................... ...
Comparison with same period, 1913.....

D ecrease...... ......................
Increase............................


$152,800.67
177,332.05
232,941.82
227,291.73
262,750.13


$13,183.28
28,102.22
42,265.22
26,584.91
20,008.02


$2,389.05
3,412.58
4,208.57
3,592.40
4,562.64


$643.20
653.35
821.91
671.48
890.47


$296.34
760.42
952.58
310.34
2,130.16


$169,312.54
210,260.62
281,190.10
258,450.86
290,341.42


1,053,116.40 130,143.65 18,165.24 3,680.41 4,449.84 1,209,555.54
1,492,240.20 51,361.04 21,268.83 5,386.79 6,877.57 1,577,134.43


439,123.80 ............. 3,103.59 1,706.38 2,427.73
......... .... 78 ,782.61 .............. ... ......... .......... .


367,578.89
.............

















SCHEDULE NO. 6.

Statement showing collections by ports and sources, during the period August 1, 1914 to December 31, 1914.

PIm t E t ort charges. Miscellaneous
Ports. d Iport Export customs Totals.
duties, duties.
Tonnage dues. Personal fees. collections.

Azua ............................... $32,944.00 $1,610.68 $754.42 $181.93 $50.00 $35,541.03
Barahona.......................................... 80.52 36.65 4.72 ............. 121.89
Comendador ....................... 39.21............ .......... ............. .... 131.54 170.75
Dajab6n.................. .......... 294.25 ............. .............. ............. 80.96 375.21
La Romana..................... ..... 14,016.55 2,953.68 800.41 257.18 ............. 18,027.82
Macoris .......................... 198,661.21 3,769.43 6,046.10 758.26 593.05 209,828.05
Monte Cristi......'................... 73,538.69 3,839.91 1,001.24 608.49 344.51 79,332.04
Puerto Plata ........................ 262,324.48 28,449.83 2,985.16 496.04 1,031.02 295,286.53
Saman ............................ 15,806.42 4,148.23 273.65 225.42 -11.83 20,465.55
Sanchez........................... 124,120.14 82,141.51 2,734.58 322.66 152.70 209,471.59
Santo Domingo ..................... 330,930.49 3,149.86 3,533.03 825.71 1,999.30 340,438.39
Tierra Nueva ........................ 440.96 .. .... ................................ 54.93 495.89
Totals......................... 1,053,116.40 130,143.65 18,165.24 3,680.41 4,449.84 1,209,555.54
I -r I I








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 33

SCHEDULE NO. 7.

Statement of gross collections by ports from August 1, 1914 to December 31, 1914, com-
pared with same period previous year, showing increases and decreases.

Gross collections,
August 1 to December 31-
Ports. _______s Increase. Decrease.
1914. 1913.

Azua................. $35,541.03 $55,102.71 ........... $19,561.68
Barahona .............. 121.89 4,395.31 .......... 4,273.42
Comendador........... 170.75 502.93 ........... 332.18
Dajab6n ............... 375.21 1,549.34 ............ 1,174.13
LaRomana............ 18,027.82 31,437.62 ............ 13,409.80
Macoris ............... 209,828.05 286,766.41 ........... 76,938.36
Monte Cristi........... 79,332.84 52,491.52 26,841.32 ...........
Puerto Plata........... 295,286.53 384,331.78 ........... 89,045.25
Saman ................ 20,465.55 32,136.99 ........... 11,671.44
Sanchez ............... 209,471.59 184,368.78 25,102.81 .........
Santo Domingo......... 340,438.39 543,324.60 ........... 202,886.21
Tierra Nueva........... 495.89 726.44 ........... 230.55

Totals........... 1,209,555.54 1,577,134.43 51,944.13 419,523.02
1,209,555.54 ........... 51,944.13

Net decrease.................... 367,578.89 .......... 367,578.89


















SCHEDULE NO. 8.

Comparative statement by months actually paid to the Dominican Government from its customs revenue, with totals for each Convention Year,
including the five months period, from August 1, 1909 to December 31, 1914.

Months. 1909-10. 1910-11. 1911-12. 1912-13. 1913-14. 1914.

August ........................... $166,400.00 $207,000.00 $180,000.00 $146,900.00 $102,000.00 $125,438.43
September.......................... 142,300.00 111,000.00 170,000.00 122,000.00 122,646.69 35,914.90
October............................ 68,200.00 120,000.00 9,000.00 183,000.00 143,696.72 77,732.02
November ............ ............. 68,200.00 250,000.00 255,000.00 .............. 110,489.12 91,852.81
December......................... 68,200.00 50,000.00 33,000.00 257,500.00 162,111.69 97,630.89
January ......................... 102,000.00 178,000.00 228,000.00 166,000.00 155,677.69 ............
February .......................... 112,000.00 130,000.00 170,000.00 143,000.00 130,107.85 ............
March ............................. 91,500.00 149,000.00 228,200.00 129,000.00 169,281.00 ............
April .............................. 168,000.00. 238,000.00 138,000.00 112,000.00 77,128.00 ............
May............................... 184,027.60 199,000.00 195,000.00 181,000.00 130,939.00 ...........
June............................... 131,700.00 ............. 175,000.00 140,000.00 58,300.00 ............
July.................... .......... 106,000.00 390,000.00 185,000.00 167,000.00 22,551.00 ...........

Totals....................... 1,408,527.60 2,022,000.00 1,966,200.00 1,747,400.00 1,384,928.76 428,569.05
Average monthly payments........... 117,377.30 168,500.00 163,850.00 145,616.67 115,410.73 85,713.81









DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 35

SCHEDULE No. 9.

Statement of amounts transmitted to the Fiscal Agent, New York, for service of the
Dominican Loan, under the terms of the Convention, during the
period August 1, 1914 to December 31, 1914.

Date. Amount. Account of.

1914.
August-
8...................... $50,000.00 July, 1914.
31 ....................... 50,000.00 August, 1914.
September- ,
4....................... 16,550.00 Do. *
8........................ 33,450.00 Do.
30........................ 5,805.83 September, 1914.
30..... .................... 79,194.17 Do.
October-
20......................... 50,000.00 September and October, 1914.
31......................... 10,732.02 October, 1914.
31 ....................... 52,267.98 Do.
November-
14 ........................ 2,000.00 Do.
20........................ '50,000.00 November, 1914.
28....................... 12,500.00 Do.
December-
3......................... 8,147.19 Do.
7............... ......... 29,352.81 Do.
19......................... 50,000.00 December, 1914.
500,000.00


SCHEDULE No. 10.

'Statement showing total expenditures on account of expenses proper of the Customs
Service and Receivership, period August 1 to December 31, 1914.


Salaries'of officers and employees.............................
Expendable supplies ...........................................
Unexpendable property ................ ......................
Supplies and property for issue to the general service ...............
Freight and charges on supplies and property ......................
Expenses of officers traveling under orders:
Local.... ................................... ......
Foreign..............................................
Telegrams and cablegrams..................................
Rent and repairs to buildings ..................................
Receivership Annex, operation and maintenance ...................
Hospital account...............................................
Miscellaneous ................................................ .
Salary and expenses of Financial Expert.... .....................


$58,889.29
244.39
408.04
1,479.45
117.02

152.11
674.33
1,288.31
775.05
3,621.20
249.06
1,435.14
5,199.85


Total expense chargeable as cost of collecting the revenue........... 74,533.24

NOTE.-The percentage of cost of collection to the Dominican Republic, per dollar,
was $0.0616, based on gross collections of the five-months period.









a) .REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD

SCHEDULE No. 11.

Statement showing the total expenses of the office of the General Receiver, separate and
distinct from the Dominican customs organization, period August 1
to December 31, 1914.


(These items are included in Schedule No. 10.)
Salaries of officers and employees..............................
Expendable supplies ................ .........................
Unexpendable property.........................................
Supplies and property for issue to the general service ...............
Freight and charges on supplies and property ......................
Expenses of officers traveling under orders:
L ocal .....................................................
Foreign .................................................
Telegrams and cablegrams.....................................
Receivership Annex, operation and maintenance ...................
H hospital account ...............................................
Miscellaneous.'................................ ...............
Salary and expenses of Financial Expert..... : ......... ............


$20,283.84
236.53
78.17
1,479.45
100.12

74.45
613.09
1,070.22
3,621.20
249.06
607.41
5,199.85


Total................................................. 33,613.39


SCHEDULE NO, 12.

Statement showing the expenditures on account of the Revenue Cutter Service, period
August 1 to December 31, 1914.

Salaries and wages, officers and crews ............................ $7,641.60
Expendable supplies. ........................................... 981.34
Unexpendable supplies........................................... 1,377.40
Telegrams and cablegrams............................... ....... 34.83
Repairs to cutters, etc .......................................... 1,685.38
Freight, insurance and landing charges on supplies ................. 56.06
Ships' laundry and kitchen fuel.................................. 140.52
Ration allowance for crews ...................................... 2,177.52
M iscellaneous...: .......................... .... ............. 1,797.17
40,922 gallons of gasoline, including freight, insurance and landing
charges................................................... 7,967.75

Total................................................... 23,859.57


SCHEDULE No. 13.

Statement showing'the expenditures on account of the Frontier Customs Service, period
August 1 to December 81, 1914.

Salaries, officers and inspectors...:............................... $9,763.83
Expendable supplies ............................................ 5.00
Unexpendable property ......................................... 3.00
Maintenance of mounts.......................................... 2,151.25
Clothing allowance ............................................. 281.39
Travel expenses ................................................ 613.07
Rent and repairs of quarters..................................... 120.00
Freight and transportation charges on supplies..................... 38.42
M iscellaieous ................... .................... .. ......... 506.41

Total.................................................. 13,482.37









DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 37

SCHEDULE No. 14.
Statement showing the gross collections and expenditures by ports, and cost of collection
per dollar, period August 1 to December 31, 1914.

Gross Total Cost of
Ports.Gross Total collection
Ports. collections expenses. per dollar.


Azua.............................. $35,541.03 2,793.01 0.0786
Barahona .......................... 121.89 1,076.99 8.8400
Comendador........................ 170.75 435.15 2.5400
Dajab6n. ............................ 375.21 750.40 2.0000
La Romana ........................ 18,027.82 1,860.80 0.1032
Macoris............................ 209,828.05 5,550.26 0.0265
Monte Cristi ....................... 79,332.84 3,221.59 0.0406
Puerto Plata ....................... 295,286.53 8,904.71 0.0302
Samand............................. 20,465.55 2,294.34 0.1121
Sanchez............................ 209,471.59 5,542.90 0.0260
Santo Domingo.............'....... 340,438.39 8,191.46 0.0241
Tierra Nueva ....................... 495.89 398.24 0.8000

Totals......................... 1,209,555.54 40,919.85 0.0338


SCHEDULE No. 15.

Statement showing the relative standing of the entry and interior 'ports of the Dominican
Republic in point of receipts and cost of collection, with percentages
for the period August 1 to December 31, 1914.

Percent-
Relative rank based upon age of Relative rank based upon Cost of
tota total, cost of collection. collection
total revenue collected. re cost of collection. per dollar.
collected.

PORTS. PORTS.

1. Santo Domingo.......... 28.15 1. Santo Domingo........ $0.0241
2. Puerto Plata............. 24.41 2. Sanchez.............. 0.0260
3. Macoris ................ 17.35 3. Macoris............. 0.0265
4. Sanchez................ 17.32 4. Puerto Plata,......... 0.0302
5. Monte Cristi............. 6.56 5. Monte Cristi.......... 0.0406
6. Azua .................. 2.94 6. Azua................. 0.0786
7. Samana ............... 1.69 7. La Romana............ 0.1032
8. LaRomana............. 1.49 8. Saman.............. 0.1120
9. Tierra Nueva........... 0.04 9. Tierra Nueva.......... 0.8000
10. Dajab6n ............... 0.03 10. Dajab6n.............. 2.0000
11. Comendador............ 0.01 11. Comendador .......... 2.5400
12. Barahona............... 0.01 12. Barahona............. 8.8400









38 REPORT, EIGHTH FISCAL PERIOD

SCHEDULE No. 16.

Statement showing amount collected and amount refunded by the Receivership after
revision of liquidations in the Central Ofice during the period
from August 1 to December 81, 1914.

Involving short Excess collections
collections, involving refunds.
Ports.
Number Amounts Number Amounts
of items. collected, of items. refunded.


Azua.............................. 11 $31.73 .................
Barahona .............. ........ .. 2 11.55 ...............
La Romana........................ 1 98.79 ................
M acoris........................... 40 325.04 5 $109.31
Monte Cristi........................ 20 164.82 3 13.79
Puerto Plata.................... 34 499.24 4 124.15
Samand............... .......... 11 51.92 4 32.34
Sdnchez......... .... ....... ...36 555.42 6 309.58
Santo Domingo............................. 189 5,719.01 17 148.31
Totals ................. .. 344 7,457.521 39 737.48








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 39

APPENDIX "B."
Recapitulation of all financial transactions of the Dominican Customs Receivership from
its commencement, April 1, 1905 to December 31, 1914.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COLLECTIONS, EXPENDITURES AND
DISPOSITIONS OF FUNDS.
Gross collections, from all sources. ........ .............. $32,411,548.00
Miscellaneous receipts, office of the General Receiver ............. 25,215.06
Received from Dominican Government drafts on Convention Fund. 319,609.34
Due from Dominican Government, balance account of Convention
Fund, December 31, 1914 ................. ............... 17,369.11
Withdrawn from Sinking Fund .............................. 66,550.00

32,840,291.51

EXPENDITURES AND DISPOSITIONS.

1. Customs expenses proper, including expenses of the Receivership. $1,344,521.84
2. Deposited with Fiscal Agent, New York, for service of the
Dominican Loan... .... ............. 13,689,003.18
3. Deposited with the National City Bank of New York for service
of the loan authorized December 14, 1912................. 720,000.00
4. Paid to the Dominican Government, accrued revenue........ 15,109,805.83
5. Paid to the Dominican Government, Convention Fund........ 336,978.45
6. Building Fund accumulation including interest ............... 616.11
7. Building Fund disbursements ............................. 100,749.59
8. Balances in transit from the Deputy Receivers to the General
Receiver, December 31, 1914 ............................. 202,419.82
9. Paid on account of wharf and harbor concessions ........... 171,973.48
10. Refunds of duties collected in excess ........................ 76,703.87
11. Refunds, Article X of Tariff...... ......................... 18,630.21
12. Refunds, Article 180, Customs Law ........................ 10,170.81
13. Establishment and operation of Revenue Cutter Service....... 370,244.12
14. Expenses Frontier Customs Service, inaugurated October, 1912.. 50,575.70
15. Exchange on funds transmitted to Fiscal Agent, New York .... 98,848.19
16. Personal fees refunded by Deputy Receivers ................ 143,323.85
17. Segregated as internal revenue (discontinued after February,
1908) ................................ . .. 174,495.73
18. Maintenance of Customs and Frontier Guard (discontinued as a
Receivership dependency July, 1908) ...................... 146,674.84
19. Morris, Milbourn and Thurston settlements ................. 15,300.00
20. Paid for account of Dominican Government, in accordance with
special authority ..................................... 5,471.11
21. Cancelled checks reissued............................... 3,784.78
22. Segregated for transmittal to Fiscal Agent for service of Loan,
December account.................................. 50,000.00

32,840,291.51
















SUMMARY OF COMMERCE
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
FOR 1914

With tabulated statements of
Comparisons for 1913


(41)












COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF COMMERCE OF
THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
CALENDAR YEAR 1914.



DOMINICAN EXPORTERS AND IMPORTERS.
Parties interested in Dominican trade and commerce will find
the following list of the prinicpal reputable importers' at the
various ports and interior towns of Santo Domingo of interest,
if not of value:

At the Port of-


Noboa & Recio.
Freites Hermanos.
Rosa Jorge de Terc.
Eugenio Coen.
Nicolds M. Ciccone.


Ocoa.
Central Ansonia.


AZUA.
Rocco Capano.
Salvador Sapeg.
H. Garcia Tejera.
Francisco David Chamac.
Antonio J. Dacak.


SUGAR ESTATE IMPORTERS.
Central Azuano.


SAN JUAN DE LA MAGUANA (TRIBUTARY TO AZUA PORT).
Marrancini Hermanos. Alejandro Cabral.
Flor Marra. Domingo Rodriguezs

OTHER TOWNS TRADING AT AZUA.
San Jos6 de Ocoa. BAnica.
Las Matas. Comendador.
El Cercado.

At the Port of-
BARAHONA.
Antonio Mota. Jos6 Schiffino.
Luis E. Delmonte.

At the Port of-
SAN PEDRO DE MACORIS.
Ihssen Schumacher & Co. Jorge Latuff H.
Macoris Light and Power Co. Hazim Primos.
Jorge Serralles. E. y J. Hazin.
Antonio Parra Alba. Jacobo Merip.
C6sar Iglesias. Francisco Benzo.
Fco. Fremio Reyes. Sucs. Fco. Castillo.
Brugal & Carrion. Domingo Salom6n.









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.

SAN PEDRO DE MACORIs-continued.


Jos6 Armenteros & Co.
Francisco Ferreccio.
Prestol & Co.
Francisco Canepa.
Rivera Guzmdn & Co.
Pedro E. P6rez.
Rosendo Linares.
Gerardo Ruiz.
Sucs. Morey.
O. Giraudy & Co.
*S. A. Ricart.
E. A. Quifiones.
Enrique Rijo.
J. M. Zagluhl.
Miguel Feris.
Koussa & Co.
A. y J. Hach6.


Jos6 Abud.
Ram6n Figueroa.
Fernandez & Acevedo.
Rolando Martinez.
Jaime Segura.
Andres Manzour Hermanos.
Coiscou Hermanos.
Manuel Mallen.
Fco. Castro Molina.
F. A. Campillo.
Kurie Hermanos.
Dumarest Trading Co.
Jaime Oliver.
West India Oil Co.
Noboa & Co.
Koury Zagluhl. *
J. A. Martinez.
Oliva del Guidice & Prota.


SUGAR ESTATE IMPORTERS.


Quisqueya Sugar Co.
Consuelo Sugar Co.
Ingenio Angelina.

At the Port of-

Lembcke & Co.
L. D. Aste & Co.
Julio Grull6n.
George Wassaf.
E. Vda. de Ricardo.
Alvarez & Co.


Ingenio Crist6bal Col6n.
Porvenir Sugar Co.
Santa F6 Plantation & Sugar Co.


MONTE CRISTI.
Rafael Pons.
J. M. Isidor.
C. Arturo Paulino.
Francisco Martinez.
Abel Gonz6lez.


OTHER TOWNS TRADING AT MONTE CRISTI PORT ARE:
Dajab6n. Restauraci6n.
Sabaneta. Santiago de la Cruz.
Copey. Puerto Juanita.
Las Aguas. Guayubin.
Sabana Cruz.

At the Port of-
PUERTO PLATA.


Julio Sim6n & Co.
Augusto Arzeno.
Le6n & Co.
J. M. Battle & Co.
N. P. Hach6 Hermanos.
Divanna, Grisolia & Co.
Pappaterra Hermanos.
V. Vinelli & Co.
Cino Hermanos.
Charles H. Loynaz (General Agent
Clyde Line, more of exporter).
Jos6 Arzeno e Hijos.


Jacobo Marchena.
Brugal & Co.
M. DaCosta G6mez.
H. R. Capestani.
Jos6 Perrota.
A. Barrera.
Moore & Co. (American Corporation,
electric light and power supplies).
West India Oil Co. (American Cor-
poration, branch of Standard Oil
Co.).
E. Zafra & Co.









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


Cibao Region Towns, supplied through Port of Puerto Plata-
MOCA.


Jos6 M. Michel.
Perez Hermanos.
Fenel6n Michel.


Lara & Co.
Imprenta Rojas & Co.
M. M. Sanabia.


SANTIAGO.


A. Sahdala.
Sinencio Sahdala & Hermanos.
Jos6 M. Dumuit.
Jos6 Vega.
Jos6 Sued & Co.
N. D. Helin.
A. L. Penzo.
L. Morales & Co.
Mercedes Benedicto.
A. Malag6n H.
B. H. Dumuit.
T. Virella.
J. M. V. Morel.
Julio de Pefia.
Moore & Co.
U. F. Espaillat.
Farmacia Cambiaso.
N. RomAn.
Pedro GuzmAn e Hijo.
Juan F. Battle.

At the Port of-


M. de Moya, Hijo & Co.
Gineste & Chanel.
Roque Hued Hermano.
Maximiliano Andr.s.
Julio de la Rocha, Hijo & Co.


Battle, Vega & Co.
Nicolds Vega.
Pastoriza & Co.
Campagna Hermanos.
Augusto Espaillat Sues.
Rafael J. Espaillat & Co.
-V. F. Thoman.
F.'Gonzslez & Co.
M. de J. Tavarez Sues.
Jorge Hermanos.
Salom6n Jorge.
Abraham F. Sued.
Enrique de Morel.
Sahdala & Abinador.
Angel Vega.
Manuel-de J. Tavarez S.
Franco Hermanos.
L. S. Oviedo.
M. Valverde.



SANCHEZ.
Alfredo Cirilo L6pez.
Robcrto Senior.
Rosendo Grull6n.
Francisco Benliza.
Moya Hermanos.


Towns supplied from Port of Sanchez-


Jos6 M. Valencia.
Antonio Canaan.
Julio Portolatin.
J. G. Soba.
Francisco Grull6n.
C. J. G6mez.
The La Vega Distilling.
Jos6 M. Berrido.
Luis Bruno.
Batista Hijo.
Rogelio Jimenez.
Silvestre Guzman.
M. Cro. de Moya e Hijo.
-Salom6n Abud & Hermano.
Rafael Franco.
Jos6 A. L ir:,


LA VEGA.
Pio Esteban Lahoz.
J. Morey & Co.
J. Gass6 & Gass6.
Evangelista Cornelio.
Silvestre Guzman Hijo.
Euclides Batista.
Emiliano Espaillat.
Federico Basilis.
Kori & Herrera.
L. Paonesa.
J. R. Sanchez.
Russo Hermanos.
N. Ferndndez.
Arb6s & Font.
Jos6 Garcia R.
Zoilo Garcia.









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


Hermanos Ramis.
Gaetano Pellice e Hijo


Carlos F. de Moya.
B. Grull6n & Co.
Carlos M. Mejia Hijo.
Jos6 F. Guzman.
Gregorio Mateo.
Rafael Sobs.
J. J. Grull6n.
Andr6s Lajam.
Salom6n H. Ieded.
Damian Silva.
Antonio Martinez.
Irene Nolasco.
M. de J. Afil & Co.
Jos6 Isalas.


Jaime Ramis.'
A. Balaguer.
A. Calventi.
Jos6 Canaan.
At the Port of-

Victor Lalane.
B. Sangiovanni.
Antonio Jos&.
Abram Jos6 e Hijo.
Kussa Hermanos.
Paulino Sangiovanni.
G. Beretta & Co.
Alejandre Crime.
At the Port of-

Jacas & Co.
Angel M. Baez.
Gonzalez & Co.
B. Ravelo.
Sues. de J. Delemos.
S. Michelena.
J. Ramirez Bona.
Santiago Lugo.
Salom6n M. Musa.
Jorge Cuesta.
Hohlt & Co.
G6mez & Co.
G6mez & VelAzquez.
Emiliano Espinal.
Jaar Cousins & Co.
Telesforo Alfonseca.
Miguel Garrigosa.


PIMENTEL.
J. & J. Tabar.


SAN FRANCISCO DE MACORIS.
M. de J. Bon6 Hijo & Co.
J. B. Paulino.
F. G. Sim6 & Co.
Antonio Isa N. Dajer.
Betances IIermanos.
Antonio J. Ortega & Co.
Boneli Languasco.
Sues. de M. J. Araujo.
Najib Acra Hermanos.
Melit6n M. Castillo & Co.
Nazario Risek.
Apolinar Casado.
Isaac Kalaf.
Pedro Esmuldoc Hermano.

VILLA RIVAS.
Julio V. Abreu.


SALCEDO.
Julian J. Secin.
Juan B. Rojas.
Elias Hermanos.
Andr6s Lajam.


SAMANA.
Zorahc'Paiewonsky.
Eduardo de Windt.
Huot & Sevez.
Lizie Clark.
Federico Lample.
Alberto F. Santamaria.
Wenceslao Medrano.
Juan Maria Villain.


SANTO DOMINGO.
Jos6 Men6ndez & Co.
M. de J. G6mez.
P. L. Nadal.
J. F. Cassa.
La Industrial & Comercial.
Manuel E. Creales.
Jose Antonio e Hijos.
Najib Azar.
M. Lebr6n Parra.
Jos6 David Lama Hermanos.
Marcos A. G6mez.
F. Baehr & Co.
L. Hernandez Llorent.
R. M. Lepervanche & Co.
Juan A. Read.
Felix Veloz.
Jos6 Manuel Jim6nez.


).









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.

SANTO DOMINGO-continued.


A. Katine Sobrino.
General Industrial Co.
Jorge Debes.
Virgilio G6mez.
Nemen N. Terc.
Andrds Perez.
Jose Colito Garcia.
Armando Bufiols.
Jose Ma. G6mez.
Virgilio Perez.
Mario Abreu & Co.
A. Mejia & Co.
Baquero & Co.
L. Amor.
John Abbes.
Luis A. Abreu.
Ml. D. Galvan.
Pedro A. Polanco.
Pedro Bazil.
J. Anibal Cruz.
Dominican Leather & Shoe Mfg. Co.
Luis A. Serrati.
J. R. Viuda Garcia.
A. Bona & G. Gaz6n.
Pereyra & Pimentol.
J. B. Vicini Burgos.
Francisco Tagliamonte.
West India Oil Co.
Montalvo Hermanos.
Felix E. Soler.
Geo..Pou.
Beneficencia Padre Billini.
Francisco Caro.
Joseph F. Dina.
A. Campora Caro.
M. M. Mokdasy.
Juan Selim.
Viuda de Roques & Co.
Arturo J. Pellerano Alfau.
Daniel G. Marcos.
Gonzalez Hermanos.
Fernandez & Cuerbo Co.
Brea, Ricart & Co.
Soc. Anom. Fibrica de Cigarrillos.
Julio Pou.
Hotel Shanghai.
Francisco Palau.
At the Port of-


Central Romana.
H. Du-Breil G.
Luis Jos6 Ricart & Co.


M. Suarez & Co.
S. A. Iglesias.
Cro. Fernandez & Co.
P. A. Ricart.
M. Pons & Co.
L. Armando de Pool.
Fernindez & Co.
M. Campillo e Hijo.
Ricart & Co.
Nem6n C. Howley.
Elmudesi & Co.
Manuel Men6ndez.
Gabriel & Miguel Lama.
Rafael Mejia H.
R. Months.
Rafael E. Galvan.
Di6genes Mieses & Co.
A. Rodriguez Castro.
Juan VelSzquez.
Polanco Hermanos.
Francisco Noceda.
Abelardo Pifieyro.
Benitez Hermanos.
C. Suarez G6mez.
H. H. Gosling.
Abraham Curiel y Pereyra.
Nicolas Alterio.
Oliva del Guidice y Prota.
A. Lucas Regus.
Antonio Guzmin.
Felix E. Mejia.
Manuel Espinal.
Santo Domingo Amusement Co.
Luis Jiminez Lebr6n.
Dominican Trading Co.
C. Handal Hermanos.
Abraham Selim.
Hoffis Azar.
Ernesto A. Leroux.
Angelo Porcella.
Blandino & Co. (Bani).
C. H. Loynaz-Agbnte Clyde.
Alej. Ricart & Co.
Comp. An6nima Tabacalera.
Felix Garcia Robert.
E. Ripley.


LA ROMANA.
Carl Quentin & Co.
Victor Barrios.
Francisco Beltrdn.


At the Land Ports of Dajabon, Comendador and Tierra
Nueva, on Haitien Border-
Imports .at these borderland ports are principally articles of
dress and household necessities, principally conducted by market
peddlers and Haitien women, who make trips to Haiti and
back periodically.








48 DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


IMPORTS INTO THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, DUR-
ING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1914, SHOWING THE
VALUES AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN,
IN COMPARISON WITH THOSE OF CALENDAR
YEAR 1913.
[Values are in United States Currency.]

January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value:

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS:
United States.... $105,147 $40,011
United Kingdom.. 3,780 33,694
Germany........ 33,883 24,310
France.......... 2 1,936
Spain........... 151 ......
Italy............ 3 ......
Porto Rico....... 1 17
Other Countries... 451 261

Totals....... 143,418 100,229


ANIMALS:
United States....
United Kingdom..
.Cuba............
Porto Rico.......
Other Countries...


Totals.......


$6,884
150
2,300
2,250
1,490


13,074


3,493
100
16,460
1,500


21,553,


BOOKS, MAPS AND OTHER
PRINTED MATTER:
United States.... $10,361 $12,040
United Kingdom.. 76 448
Germany........ 3,200 3,524
France ......... 5,334 2,221
Spain .......... 4,831 1,548
Italy............ 371 167
Cuba............ 460
Porto Rico....... 812 376
Other Countries... 976 443
Totals....... 26,421 20,767
BREADSTUFFS
(Wheat Flour): Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 7,182,456 $440,961 6,569,011 $382,807
Germany...... 67 6 89 7
Porto Rico....... 78 7 62,193 3,748
S Other Countries... 42,795 2,447 25 3
Totals....... 7,225,396 443,421 6,631,318 386,565









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


49


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914.
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

ALL OTHER BREADSTUFFS:
United States.... $76,715 $59,703
United Kingdom.. 1,943 933
Germany......... 3,004 824
France.......... 1,939 2,600
Spain........... 720 420
Italy............ 2,539 3,561
Porto Rico....... 3,594 6,432
Other countries... 1,074 1,832

Totals....... 91,528 76,305


CHEMICALS, DRUGS AND DYES:
United States.... $146,097 $112,784
United Kingdom.. 2,420 1,567
Germany........ 15,152 9,457
France.......... 38,298 25,483
Spain ........... 1,753 772
Italy............ 6,690 22,110
Cuba............ 12 40
Porto Rico....... 635 1,194
Other Countries... 1,777 4,513
Totals....... 212,834 177,920


COAL: Tons. Tons.
United States.... 19,816 $82,186 20,161 $100,885
United Kingdom.. 192 920 1,344 6,382
Germany........ ..... ...... 365 2,440
Porto Rico....... 272 1,722 270 1,538
Other Countries.. 2,136 10,943 381 1,954-
Totals....... 22,416 95,771 22,521 113,199


COTTON, MANUFACTURES OF:
United States.... $1,040,988 $671,226
United Kingdom.. 476,914 316,221
Germany........ 180,897 134,822
France .......... 41,771 18,199
Spain........... 57,398 17,663
Italy............ 43,234 52,241
Cuba............ 40 303
Porto Rico....... 10,948 12,836
Other Countries.. 28,021 9,214
Totals....... 1,880,211 1,232,725









S50


DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, Jnuary 1, 1914.
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

EARTHEN, STONE AND CHINAWARE:
United States.... $4,992 '$4,053
United Kingdom.. 1,567 2,526
Germany........ 34,493 :19,079
France .......... 419 200
Spain........... 199 11,
Italy............ ...... 15
Cuba............ ...... 89
Porto Rico....... 96 121
Other Countries.. 3,732 1,004
Totals....... 45,498 27,098

FIBERS, VEGETABLE; MANU-
FACTURES OF:
United States.... $128,923 $129,066
United Kingdom.. 44,771 34,457
Germany ........ 84,639 48,947
France.....:.... 12,571 7,959
Spain........... 8,002 3,417
Italy............ 1,148 2,304
Cuba............ 63 10
Porto Rico....... 227 847
Other Countries.. 722 1,709
Totals....... 281,066 228,716

FISH, PRESERVED, AND
FISH PRODUCTS:
United States. ... $219,687 $192,928
United Kingdom.. 1,416 1,016
Germany........ 6,260 3,475
France .......... 1,692 1,319
Spain .......... 5,575 2,680
Italy............ 457 172
Cuba............ 20 15
Porto Rico....... 44 3,993
Other Countries.. 2,544 689
Totals....... 237,695 206,287

FRUITS AND NUTS:
United States.... $21,148 $17,457
United Kingdom.. 131 97
Germany........ 1,471 1,691
France.......... 2,269 1,186
Spain. .......... 11,476 5,266
Italy .......... 755 291
Cuba ........... 98 ......
Porto Rico....... 124 316
Other Countries.. 38 46

Totals....... 37,510 26,350









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

GLASS AND GLASSWARE:
United States.... $29,144 $20,005
United Kingdom.. 1,585 1,686
Germany........ 22,189 11,872
France......... 965 1,468
Spain .......... 284 30
Italy............ 213 639
Cuba............ ..... 538
Porto Rico....... 197 370
Other Countries.. 753 1,040

Totals....... 55,330 37,648


GREASE, RESINS, AND CAUSTIC
SODA FOR THE MANUFAC-
TURE OF SOAP: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 803,265 $79,370 742,906 $65,042
United Kingdom.. 13,609 694 6,800 342
Germany........ 40,947 7,630 695 120
France.......... 329 61 14 6
Italy.......... ... ...... 5 4
Porto Rico....... 9,159 1,288 41,278 5,832
.Other Countries.. 76,809 14,946 7,744 861

Totals....... 944,118 103,989 799,442 72,207


GUMS AND RESINS:
United States .... $3,270 $5,332
United Kingdom........ 1
Germany........ 99 168
France ........ 2 ......

Totals....... 3,371 5,501


HATS AND CAPS:
United States ... $11,165 $10,091
United Kingdom.. 504 167
Germany........ 3,478 1,867
France.......... 5,366 2,678
Spain .......... 2,889 646
Italy............ 57,055 52,417
Cuba............ 321 338
Porto Rico....... 4,957 3,441
Other Countries.. 3,518 1,289

Totals....... 89,253 72,934









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

IRON AND STEEL:
United States.... $1,028,079 $661,204
United Kingdom.. 122,614 113,919
Germany ........ 92,546, 44,320
France ......... 8,899 4,516
Spain ......... 5,838 3,949
Italy ............ 398 318
Cuba............ 25 2,008
Porto Rico....... 4,155 2,810
Other Countries.. 83,345 6,281

Totals...... 1,345,899 839,325

JEWELRY, INCLUDING WATCHES
AND CLOCKS:
United States. .. $27,475 $16,516
United Kingdom.. 1,303 279
Germany........ 8,640 4,212
France .......... 2,629 4,189
Spain........... 27 24
Italy............ 15,102 6,957
Cuba............ 182
Porto Rico....... 153 401
Other Countries.. 1,416 959

Totals....... 56,927 33,537

LEATHER AND MANUFACTURES OF:
United States.... $242,509- $239,188
United Kingdom.. 6,465 6,977
Germany........ 17,203 J1,113
France.......... 1,777 1,171
Spain........... 5,425 3,038
Italy............ 146 664
Cuba............ 87 82
Porto Rico....... 1,652 2,346
Other Countries.. 266 191

Totals....... 275,530 264,770

MALT LIQUORS;
BEER IN BOTTLES: Liters. Liters.
United States.... 180,501 $27,042 244,405 $35,704
United Kingdom.. 6,240 1,161 8,895 1,723
Germany:........ 567,713 116,392 312,435 62,440
France.......... 358 203 54 15
Spain........... 1,706 217 ..
Italy............ ...... .. . 792 120
Cuba............' 900 150 1,196 252
Porto Rico....... 151 26 18,123 2,473
Other Countries. 13,232 1,991 13,432 2,352

Totals......... 770,801 147,182 599,332 105,079









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

METALS AND MANUFACTURES OF:
United States ... $52,831 $85,866
United Kingdom.. 1,957 3,281
Germany........ 9,081 8,421
France. ......... 1,782 1,237
Spain........... 566 266
Italy............ 39 182
Cuba............ 23 155
Porto Rico....... 521 316
Other Countries.. 2,832 1,024

Totals....... 69,632 100,748

OILS:
United States.... $384,082 $312,957
United Kingdom.. 13,965 3,484
Germany ....... 4,972 1,550
France. ..... ... 5,943 1,561
Spain........... 30,078 9,334
Italy....... 2,434 1,969.
Porto Rico....... 132 1,979
Other Countries.. 6,778 866

Totals....... 448,384 333,700

PAINTS, PIGMENTS AND COLORS:
United States.... $41,415 $27,546
United Kingdom.. 7,855 4,276
Germany ........ 6,467 3,884
France. ......... 123 56
Spain .......... 67 23
Italy............ 21 25
Cuba............ 35 18
Porto Rico....... 82 131
Other Countries. 8 78

Totals....... 56,073 36,037

PAPER AND MANUFACTURES OF:
United States .... $54,764 $53,250
United Kingdom.. 1,054 743
Germany........ 52,898 25,504
France.......... 4,020 1,464
Spain............ 7,706 5,137
Italy............ 2,480 1,626
Cuba............ 728 44
Porto Rico....... 317 819
Other Countries. 1,716 2,138

Totals....... 125,683 90,725









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1914. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

PERFUMERY AND COSMETICS:
United States.... $6,827 $5,707
United Kingdom.. 1,234 438
Germany........ 3,339 2,296
France ......... 28,963 14,338
Spain ...... 1,081 608
Italy.. ......... 395 159
Cuba........... 1 92
Porto Rico....... 690 436
Other Countries.. 1,246 3,091
Totals....... 43,776 27,165

PROVISIONS, COMPRISING MEAT
AND DAIRY PRODUCTS:
United States.... $356,378 $271,726
United Kingdom.. 1,560 638
Germany........ 87,482 41,084
France. ......... 2,714 2,131
Spain ........... 2,031 683
Italy............ 2,682 2,307
Cuba....... 163 64
Porto Rico....... 187 6,489
Other Countries. 153,593 99,333

Totals....... 606,790 424,455

RICE: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 102,093 $7,465 845,773 $70,405
United Kingdom.. 27,745 1,690 96,814 5,237
Germany........ 12,779,486 722,055 7,258,948 367,913
France.......... 9,000 560 24,432 1,439
Spain ........... 5,215 538 200 20
Italy........... 196 23 692 47
Porto Rico..... ...... ...... 302,455 29,334
Other Countries.. 79,200 4,420 226,676 11,381

Totals....... 13,002,935 736,751 8,755,990 485,776

RUBBER, MANUFACTURES OF:
United States.... $27,309 $22,441
United Kingdom. 60 399
Germany........ 1,165 883
France ......... 1,833 1,179
Spain........... 80 '16
Italy ............ 53 291
Cuba............ 1 36
Porto Rico....... 512 1,550
Other Countries.. 19 296

Totals....... $31,032 $27,091









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

SILK; MANUFACTURES OF:
United States.... $22,628 $14,414
United Kingdom.: 3,294 1,664
Germany........ 20,721 16,644
France.......... 16,670 7,814
Spain........... 2,233 1,068
Italy............ 6,058 3,060
Cuba............ 17 19
Porto Rico....... 3,348 1,061
Other Countries.. 3,631 2,338

Totals....... 78,600 48,082

SOAP: Kilos. Kilos.
United States .... 783,081 $82,583 992,385 $105,329
United Kingdom.: 106 91 65 42
Germany ........ 1,016 612 879 510
France.......... 2,802 1,833 3,465 2,021
Spain........... 25 9 65 13
Italy............ 650 155 288 129
Cuba............ 2 1 4 4
Porto Rico ...... 1,107 329 6,033 857
Other Countries.. 12,801 1,271 280 176

Totals....... 801,590 86,884 1,003,464 109,081

SUGAR AND CONFECTIONERY:
United States.... $141,331 $93,284
United Kingdom.. 8,284 9,355
Germany........ 4,751 2,230
France......... 3,670 2,101
Spain .......... 3,734 3,185
Italy............ 774 2,089
Cuba............ 301
Porto Rico...... 157 882
Other Countries.. 375 1,153

Totals....... 163,377 114,279

UMBRELLAS AND CANES:
United States.... $753 $1,202
United Kingdom.. 3,201 2,594
Germany ....... 2,904 1,239
France .......... 870 220
Spain... ....... 2,991 986
Italy............ 10,293 12,657
Cuba............ 55
Porto Rico....... 46 132
Other Countries.. 120 '194

Totals....... 21,233 19,224









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

VEGETABLES:
United States.... $46,392 $36,219
United Kingdom.. 1,744 880
Germany........ 1,691 680
France.......... 1,841 973
Spain........... 21,045 7,607
Italy............ 632 372
Cuba ............ 1,455 428
Porto Rico....... 9,041 12,808
Other Countries.. 720 655

Totals....... 84,561 60,622

VEHICLES AND BOATS:
United States.... $159,161 $ 87,879
United Kingdom.. 579 321
Germany ........ 459 1,228
France.......... 25 52
Spain........ ..... 1
Italy....... 23 ...
Cuba............ 300 10
Porto Rico....... 5,163 3,873
Other Countries. 17,534 4,483

Totals....... 183,244 97,847

WINES, LIQUORS AND
DISTILLED SPIRITS:
United States.... $1,376 $1,168
United Kingdom. 1,116 508
Germany ........ 21,237 14,758
France .......... 29,127 18,235
Spain ........... 21,707 21,154
Italy ............ 11,314 10,916
Cuba............ 16 65
Porto Rico....... 174 209
Other Countries.. 3,621 4,724

Totals..... 89,688 71,737

WOOD AND MANUFACTURES OF:
United States. ... $349,973 $248,284
United Kingdom.. 206 232
Germany........ 35,357 13,494
France.......... 2,948 2,386
Spain ........... 1,675 1,470
Italy............ 324 411
Cuba............ 36 4,145
Porto Rico....... 1,331 3,893
Other Countries.. 548 1,819

Totals....... 392,398 276,134









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

WOOL AND MANUFACTURES OF:
United States.... $27,401 $13,916
United Kingdom.. 8,025 7,407
Germany ........ 23,227 12,222
France.......... 8,264 3,329
Spain........... 1,047 104
Italy............ 4,071 2,747
Cuba............ 26 36
Porto Rico......: 4,540 1,397
Other Countries.. 1,319 8,911

Totals....... 77,920 50,069

ALL OTHER ARTICLES NOT
ELSEWHERE SPECIFIED:
United States.... $274,249 $221,219
United Kingdom.. 5,862 3,103
Germany........ 48,233 28,614
France.......... 38,935 25,694
Spain........... 9,408 6,557
Italy............ 3,223 4,076
Cuba............ 436 3,547
Porto Rico....... 3,442 2,770
Other Countries.. 6,536 11,940

Totals....... 390,324 307,520


RECAPITULATION OF IMPORTS.

1913. 1914.

Countries. Percentage Percentage
Value. of whole. Value. of whole.

United States........ $5,769,061 62.22 $4,452,347 66.17
United Kingdom...... 730,191 7.88 567,037 8.43
Germany........... 1,677,833 18.10 927,842 13.79
France .............. 274,318 2.96 161,376 2.40
Spain ............... 210,781 2.27 97,696 1.45
Italy.................. 173,105 1.87 185,043 2.75
Cuba.................. 7,352 0.08 12,438 0.18
Porto Rico............ 62,900 0.67 134,487 2.00
Other Countries........ 366,737 3.95 190,741 2.83

Totals.......... 9,272,278 100.00 6,729,007 100.00











58 DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.





IMPORTS INTO THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1914
WITH THOSE OF THE CALENDAR YEAR 1913 (JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31)


ARTICLES.


United
United King- Ger- France. Spain. Italy. Cuba. Porto
States. dom. many.


Agricultural implements............
A nim als ...................... .
Books, maps and other printed matter.
Breadstuffs-
W heatflour....................
All other......................
Chemicals, drugs and dyes..........
C oal ....... .......................
Cotton, manufactures of ............
Earthen, stone and chinaware.......
Fibers, vegetable-manufactures of..
Fish. preserved and fish products.....
Fruits and nuts....................
Glass and glassware ..............
Grease, resins and caustic soda for the
manufacture of soap ............
Gums and resins ........................
Hats and caps ..................
Iron and steel-manufactures of .....
Jewelry, including watches and clocks.
Leather and manufactures of........
Malt liquors; beer in bottles.......
Metals and manufactures of........
Oils .............................
Paints, pigments and colors........
Paper and manufactures of..........
Perfumery and cosmetics.....;....
Provisions, comprising meat and dairy
products ......................
Rice ............... .........
Rubber and manufactures of........
Silk and manufactures of............
Soap ........................
Sugar and confectionery...........
Umbrellas and canes..............
Vegetables........... .. ..........
Vehicles and boats ................
Wines, liquors and distilled spirits .....
Wood and manufactures of..........
Wool and manufactures of.........
All other articles not elsewhere specified
T otals......................


$40,011 $33,694 $24,310 $1,936 ................
3,493 .................. ........... 100
12,040 448 3,524 2,221 1.548 167 .....


382,807 ...... 7
59,703 933 824
112,784 1,567 9,457
100,885 6,382 2,440
671,226 316,221134,822
4,053 2,526 19,079
129,066 34,457 48,947
192,928 1,016 3,475
17,457 97 1,691
20,005 1,686 11,872


2,600 420 3,561
25,483 772 22,110
18,199 17,663 52,241
200 11 15
7,959 3,417 2,304
1,319 2,680 172
1,186 5,266 291
1,468' 30 639


65,042 342 120 6 ..... 4
5,332 1 168 .... ......
10,091 167 1,867 2,678 646 52,417
661,204113,919 44,320 4,516 3,949 318
16,516 279 4,212 4,189 24 6,957
239,188 6,977 11,113 1,171 3.038 664
35,704 1,723 62,440 15 ..... 120
85,866 3,281 8,421 1,237 266 182
312,957 3,484 1,550 1,561 9,334 1,969
27,546 4,276 3,884 56 23 25
53,250 743 25,504 1,464 5,137 1,626
5,707 438 2,296 14,338 608 159


271,726
70,405
22,441
14,414
105.329
93,284
1,202
36,219
87,879
1,168
248,284
13,916
221,219


638 41,084 2,131 683
5,237 367,913 1,439 20
399 883 1,179 16
1,664 16,644 7,814 1,068
42 510 2,021 13
9,355 2,230 2,101 3,185
2,594 1,239 220 986
880 680 973 7,607
321 1,228 52 1
508 14,758 18,23521,154
232 13,494 2,386 1,470
7,407 12,222 3,329 104
3,103 28,614 25,694 6,557


2,307 64
47 .. .
291 36
3,060 19
129 4
2,089 ....
12,657 ....
372 428
...... 10
10,916 65
411 4,145
2,747 36
4,076 3,547


$17
16,460
376
3,748
6,432
1,194
1,538
12,836
121
847
3,993
316
370
5,832
3,441
2,810
401
2,346
2,473
316
1,979
131
819
436
6,489
29,334
1,550
1,061
857
882
132
12,808
3,873
S209
3,893
1,397
2.770


4,452,347 567,037 927,842 161,376 97,696 185,043 12,438 134,487


RECAPITULATION OF IMPORTS.

COUNTRIES.

U united States...................... 4,452,347 ....... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... .....
United Kingdom................... ..... 567,037 ..................................
Germany............... .......... ........ ... 927,842 ........... .................
France .............. .......... ........ ...... ...... 161,376 ......................
Spain.............. .......... ........ ................... 97,696 .................
Italy ............. .......... ........ ...... ...... ...... ..... 185,043 ..... .....
C uba ....................... .... .... .. ...... ...... .... . .. .....12,438 ......
Porto Rico ........... .......... ........ ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... ..... 134,487
Other Countries. ................... ........ ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... ..... .....
Totals....................................................................














DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


SHOWING THE VALUES AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN IN COMPARISON
AND PERCENTAGE OF INCREASES AND DECREASES FOR SAME YEARS.


Percentage of
Amount. 1914. whole. 1914.
Other
countries. Net In- De- Net De-
1914. 1913. Increases. Decreases. Decrease. 1913. 1914. crease, crease. crease.

261 100,229 143,418 ....... 43,189 ....................................
1,500 21,553 13,074 8,479 ........ ...... ...... .. ........ ...... ....
443 20,767 26,421 ....... 5,654 ............... .....................


3' 386,565 443,421
1,832 76,305 91,528
4,513 177,920 212,834
1,954 113,199 95,771
.9,214 1,232,725 1,880,211
1,004 27,098 45,498
1,709 228,716 281,066
689 206,287 237,695
46 26,350 37,510
1,040 37,648 55,330

861 72,207 103,989
...... 5,501 3,371
1,289 72,934 89,253
6,281 839,325 1,345,899
959 33,537 56,927
191 264,770 275,530
2,352 105,079 147,182
1,024 100,748 69,632
866 333,700 448,384
78 36,037 56,073
2,138 90,725 125,683
3,091 27,165 43,776

99,333 424,455 606,790
11.381 485,776 736,751
296 27,091 31,032
2,338 48,082 78,600
176 109,081 86,884
1,153 114,279 163,377
194 19,224 21,233
655 60,622 84,561
4,483 97,847 183,244
4,724 71,737 89,688
1,819 276,134 392,398
8,911 50,069 77,920
11 onn f n7 4ron 9n


17,428









,2,130






31,116










22,197


56,856
15,223
34,914

647,486
18,400,
52,350
31,408
11,160
17,682

31,782

16,319
506,574
23,390
10,760
42,103

114,684
20,036
34,958
16,611

182,335
250.975
3,941
30,518

49,098
2,009
23,939
85,397
17,951
,116,264
27.851
82 8n0


190,741 6,729,007 9,272,278 81,350 2,624,621 2,543,271 ..............................







.... 4,452,347 5,769,061 ....... 1,316,714 ....... 62.22 66.17 3.95 ...... ......
..... 567,037 730,191 ....... 163,154 .. .... 7.88 8.43 0.55 ...... .....
..... 927,842 1,677,833 ....... 749,991 ....... 18.10 13.79 ...... 4.31 ......
..... 161,376 274,318 ...... 112,942 ....... 2.96 2.40 ...... 0.56 ......
... 97,696 210,781 ...... 113,085 ....... 2.27 1.45 ...... 0.82 ......
. 185,043 173,105 11,938 ....... ....... 1.87 2.75 0.88 ...... ......
.. 12,438 7,352 5,086 ....... ....... 0.08 0.18 0.10 ............
. 134,487 62,900 71,587 ....... ....... 0.67 2.00 1.33 ...... ......
190,741 190,741 366,737 ....... 175,996 ....... 3.95 2.83 ...... 1.12 ......

...... 6,729.007 9,272,278 88,611 2,631,882 2,543,271 100.00 100.00 6.81 6.81 27.43


...... ......
...... ......
...... ......


...... ......
...... ......
...... ......
...... ......
...... ......

...... ......

...... ......
...... ......
..... .....
...... .....
...... ......


...... ....
...... ......
...... ......

...... ... e-
...... ......
...... ......
...... ......


...... ......


...... ......
...... ......
...... ......


...... ......
...... ......



...... ......
...... ......
...... ..... I
...... ......

...... ......
...... ......
...... ......


...... ......
...... ......


...... ......

...... ......

...... ......
...... ......
.... ......
...... ......


...... ......
...... ......

...... ......
...... ......
...... ......











60 DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.

TOTAL IMPORTS: BY PORTS, MONTHS AND


PORHT. January. February. larch. April. May. June. July. August.


Azua ...........
Barahona........
Comendador.....
Dajab6n ........
La Romana......
M acoris ..........
Monte Cristi.....
Puerto Plata.....
SamanA..........
SAnchez ..........
Santo Domingo...
Tierra Nueva.....


$19,398 $25,831 $10,967 $15,882 $10,289 $7,944 $11,794 $19,698
1,139 2,308 482 ...................................

19417 19,777 12,817 10,059 6,534 6,324 6,758 8,070
188,436 150,897 119,972 127,587 111,743 68,182 63,069 107,148
28,054 11,362 21,328 17,119 29,339 12,578 22,512 33,946
183,684 216,330 246,104 46,224 ....... ....... ....... 30,579
12,379 9,012 17,971 9,421 8,883 10,031 6,049 3,189
117,728 8 5,258 94,830 108,108 148,629 38,131 72,649 53,061
220,404 232,852 250,071 222,834 189,826 206,341 177,890 144,541


Totals, 1914.... 790,639 753,627 774,543 557,234 505,243 349,531 360,721 400,232
Totals,1913.... 979,062 792,745 749,399 802,875 768,786 707,215 809,009 817,300










DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914. 61

DUTY COLLECTED, 1914 AND 1913.


Sept r. O r. N D Total by ports. Import duties collected.
September. October. November. December.
1914. 1913. 1914. 1913.
$11,860 $11,760 $13,841 $24,599 $183,863 $275,609 $79,339.04 $132,755.50
....... ....... ..... .. 3,929 8,418 1,237.15 4,518.47
....... ....... ....... ....... .. . 414.24 581.77
.. 1,450 918.82 605.87
9,938 864 4,768 36,744 142,070 252,721 35,893.15 54,230.76
115,447 112,437 137,575 130,530 1,433,024 1,897,692 543,574.38 737,559.52
50,763 16,201 26,637 28,459 298,298 280,877 138,076.59 126,500.08
61,025 204,145 147,918 157,823 1,293,832 2,367,539 568,666.30 991,228.79
4,493 3,103 8,872 15,179 108,582 154,856 51,056.06 73,815.43
32,519 77,472 48,039 77,597 954,021 1,030,767 381,287.67 510,117.46
169,311 181,815 160,370 155,103 2,311,388 3,002,349 977,834.52 1,310,407.75
....... ....... ....... ......... .. 1,000.23 596.87
455,356 607,827 548,020 626,034 6,729,007 ......... 2,779,388.15
550,863 663,718 714,615 916,691 ......... 9,272,278 .......... 3,942,918.27
NoTE.-Comendador, Dajab6n and Tierra Nueva (being land ports) where they only collect fines, no
no invoice of value imported is recorded.









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


EXPORTS FROM THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, DUR-
ING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1914, SHOWING THE
VALUES AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES OF DESTI-
NATION IN COMPARISON WITH THOSE OF THE
CALENDAR YEAR 1913.

January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity:. Value.

ANIMALS, LIVESTOCK:
United States ........ $700
Cuba ............,4
Porto Rico....... 7,595 3,959
Other Countries.. 81,610 16,400
Totals....... 97,695 21,059

BANANAS: Bunches. Bunches.
United States.... 591,000 $295,750 114,000 $57,000
Other Countries.. 1,804 636 142 44
Totals....... 592,804 296,386 114,142 57,044

CACAO: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 12,868,952 2,774,670 18,829,857 3,515,026
United Kingdom.. 8,424 2,432 9,520 5,712
Germany........ 3,295,178 675,233 1,113,649 224,339
France.......... 3,295,327 666,948 761,740 146,852
Italy............ ......... ......... 3,988 782
Porto Rico..... .......... ........ 2,561 544
Other Countries 2,946 672 23,202 3,234
Totals....... 19,470,827 4,119,955 20,744,517 3,896,489

NOTE.-Much cacao is exported subject to order, and final destination
varies some from above table.

CHEMICALS, DRUGS AND DYES;
RAW MATERIALS FOR:
United States.... $6,865 $26,479
United Kingdom.. 260 ......
Germany ........ 14,699 26,391
France......... 380 ......
Totals ....... 22,204 52,870

COCOANUTS: Kilos. Kilos.
United States .... 766,273 $19,157 880,122 $21,063
Germany........ 149,273 2,148 100,691 1,331
France.......... 42,547 718 417 30
Porto Rico ....... ...... ...... 3,768 122
Other Countries. ...... ...... 7,025 145
Totals....... 958,093 22,023 992,023 22,691









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.
COFFEE: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 229,727 $56,545 865,640 $159,118
United Kingdom.. 300 80 5,950 1,113
Germany........ 148,709 44,089 241,273 52,756
France........... 566,279 134,584 571,225 105,905
Italy............ 88,585 19,026 121,662 22,451
Cuba............ 11,625 1,924 2,020 420
Porto Rico ....... ...... ...... 8,000 1,600
Other Countries.. 3,697 828 1 16,168 2,216

Totals....... 1,048,922 257,076 1,831,938 345,579
COPRA: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 33,663 $3,332 38,326 $3,778
Germany......... 27,483 2,117 5,820 491
France.......... 4,364 180 .. ... ..

Totals....... 65,510 5,629 44,146 4,269
GuiMS AND RESINS: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 11,050 $4,311 9,033 $2,660
United Kingdom.. 8,288 2,162 3,060 686
Germany ........ 7,437 3,288 .... .....

Totals....... 26,775 9,761 12,093 3,346

HIDES AND SKINS-
Goatskins: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 112,493 $86,921 124,787 $87,093
Germany ........ 215 215 4,014 1,730
Porto Rico....... 1,600 1,440 ...... ......
Other Countires. ...... ...... 1,050 945

Totals....... 114,308 88,576 129,851 89,768
Hides of Cattle: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 28,396 $11,612 286,874 $105,227
United Kingdom.. ...... ...... 187 69
Germany........ 346,310 122,722 145,471 51,676
France........... 49,861 17,432 19,184 6,273
Italy ............ .1,141 275 .....
Other Countries.. 1,138 455 3,475 819

Totals....... 426,846 152,496 455,191 164,064
HONEY: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 44,363 $3,670 303,393 $23,029
United Kingdom.. 14,062 1,180 45,084 1,881
Germany........ 1,001,275 76,909 644,256 47,712,
France........... 72,422 5,412 50,587 3,686
Italy ............ 2,400 220 ...... .....
Porto Rico....... ...... .... 10,500 580
Other Countries.. 13,883 1,320 3,850 112

Totals....... 1,148,405 88,711 1,057,670 77,000









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.

MOLASSES (of sugar): Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 6,130,447 $31,577 8,268,281 $44,276
United Kingdom.. 2,386,000 11,255 8,293,860 41,493
Other Countries.. 3,547,591 17,905 1,400,300 8,018
Totals....... 12,064,038 60,737 17,962,441 93,787

SUGAR (Raw): Kilos. Kilos.
United States.. 47,588,972 $2,193,962 88,117,026 $4,348,346
United Kingdom.. 1,432,337 71,056 1,730,938 85,050
Italy............ 90 8 ........ .........
Other Countries. 29,828,066 1,385,530 11,580,883 510,056
Totals....... 78,849,465 3,650,556 101,428,847 4,943,452

NOTE.-The greater part of Dominican sugar is shipped to the United
States for order, and is eventually sold in Canada and England.

SUGAR CANE: Tons. Tons.
Porto Rico ....... ....... ...... 28,314 $62,575
Other Countries ...... ..... 3 10
Totals....... ...... ...... 28,317 62,585

TOBACCO LEAF: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 129,733 $23,648 58,615 $8,904
Germany. ....... 9,136,274 1,019,602 3,313,992 358,800
France.......... 166,091 18,497 35,678 4,113
Other Countries. 358,300 60,028 297,264 22,407
Totals....... 9,790,398 1,121,775 3,705,549 394,224

CIGARS AND CIGARETTES:
United States.... $33 ...
United Kingdom.. 95 ......
Germany .............. 20
Other Countries. .15,040 7,673
Totals....... 15,168 7,693

VEGETABLE FIBERS-
Cotton: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 2,569 $970 85,720 $35,947
United Kingdom.. 162,113 58,166 49,540 19,816
France.......... 77,489 26,256 31,863 12,067
Other Countries. 50 6 ...... ......
Totals....... 242,221 85,398 167,123 67,830

All other vegetable fibers:
United States ........... $9
Cuba............ $17,102 5,318
Porto Rico....... ....... 528
Totals....... 17,102 5,855









DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


January 1, 1913, January 1, 1914,
to December 31, 1913. to December 31, 1914.
ARTICLES.
Quantity. Value. Quantity. Value.
WAX: Kilos. Kilos.
United States.... 20,501 $12,671 139,614 $83,190
United Kingdom.. ...... ...... 581 257
Germany......... 172,898 95,441 76,503 41,833
France........... 17,932 9,263 6,987 3,120
Other Countries. 1,241 663 4,215 1,890

Totals....... 212,572 118,038 227,900 130,290

WooD--
Mahogany: Tons. Tons.
United States.. 286 $10,477 570 $9,604
United Kingdom.. 2,688 47,163 38 946
Germany........ 81 1,203 33 630
France ......... ...... ...... 53 1,262
Italy ............ ...... ...... 11 160
Other Countries.. 163 2,070 152 1,647

Totals....... 3,218 60,913 857 14,249
Lignum Vitae: Tons. Tons.
United States.... 1,910 $31,620 737 $4,936
United Kingdom.. 112 2,847 803 9,494
Germhany........ 19 267 20 600
France.......... 68 1,331 ...... .....
Italy............ 42 898 ...
Cuba............ 1 20 .... .....
Porto Rico....... 10 144 .........
Other Countries 55 750 188 1,880

Totals....... 2,217 37,877 1,748 16,910
All other woods:
United States .... $19,136 $7,317
United Kingdom.. 25,821 12,582
Germany........ 5,217 3,636
France.......... 5,131 3,987
Italy............ 3 12
Porto Rico....... 12,304 7,691
Other Countries. 635 80

Totals....... 68,247 35,305


ALL OTHER EXPORTS:
United States....
United Kingdom..
Germany ........
France. .........
Cuba...........
Porto Rico.......
Other Countries..

Totals .......


$13,841
19,293
5,234
1,775

7,511
25,970

73,624


$28,860
7,494
6,772
915
1,291
13,591
23,505

82,428









66 DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.

RECAPITULATION OF EXPORTS.
1913. 1914.

Countries. Percentage Percentage
Value. of whole. -Value. of whole.

United States......... $5,600,768 53.49 $8,572,562 80.96
United Kingdom...... 241,810 2.31 186,593 1.76
Germany............. 2,068,384 19.76 818,717 7.73
France .............. 887,907 8.48 288,210 2.72
Italy .............. 20,430 0.19 23,405 0.22
Cuba... ... .... 27,536 0.26 7,029 0.07
Porto Rico............ 28,994 0.28 91,190 0.86
Other Countries...... 1,594,118 15.23 601,081 5.68
Totals.......... 10,469,947 100.00 10,588,787 100.00
NOTE.-Much sugar and cacao are shipped subject to order, and above
figures vary some from final destination.











68 DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


EXPORTS FROM THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1914,
ISON WITH THOSE OF THE CALENDAR YEAR 1913 JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER
/


ARTICLES.


United
United King- Germany.
States. dom.


Animals- live stock ................. $700 ....... ...
Bananas ........................... 57,000 ....... ...
Cacao .............................3,515,026 5,712 22'
Chemicals,drugs and dyes;raw material. 26,479 ....... 26
Cocoanuts................ ...... 21,063 ....... 1
Coffee ............. ............... 159,118 1,113 52
Copra............................. 3,778 .......
Gums and resins. .................... 2,660 686 ...
Goatskins ......................... 87,093 ....... 1
Hides of cattle .................... 105,227 69 51
Honey ............................ 23,029 1,881 47
Molasses (of sugar) .................. 44,276 41,493 ....
Sugar (raw)....................... 4,348,346 85,050 ....
Sugar cane........................ .................
Tobacco leaf... .................... 8,904 ...... 358
Cigars and cigarettes................ ...... .......
Vegetable fibers; cotton............. 35,947 19,816 ....
All other vegetable fibers............. 9 ....... ....
Wax............................. 83,190 257 41
Woods-
Mahogany..................... 9,604 946
Lignum vitae................... 4,936 9,494
All other woods ................ 7,317 12,582 3
All other exports.. ................. 28,860 7,494 6
Totals.......................8,572,562 186,593 818


4,339
i,391
1,331
1,756
491

,730
,676
',712


i,800
20

,833


France. Italy. Cuba. Porto
Rico.


146,852 782
30
30 ......
105,905 22,451


6.273 ......
3,686 ......


4,113 .....

12,067 ......
3,120 ....


..... $3,959
..... 544
..... 122
420 1,600



..... 580

..... 62,575


.53..8 ....
5,318 528


630 1,262 160 ... ....
600 .... ...... .
,636 3,987 12 .... 7,691
,772 915 ...... 1,291 13,591
,717 288,210 23,405 7,029 91,190


RECAPITULATION OF EXPORTS.

COUNTRIES.

United States.......................8,572,562 ....... ..............
United Kingdom ................... ......... 186,593 ............
G erm any .......................... ........ ....... 818,717 ........ ...... .....
France ..................................... ....... ....... 288,210 ..........
Italy ........................ ... ..... ............ ..... ...... . 23,405 .
Cuba...... ........................ ........ ....... ..... ........ ...... 7,029
Porto Rico...................................... ....... ...................
Other Countries. ................... .... ......... ... .. ........ ...... ..


91,190


Totals..................... ................................................


TOTAL EXPORTS: BY PORTS, MONTHS AND


PORTS. January. February. March' April. May. June. July. August.


Azua ......... $17,031
Barahona...... ......
Comendador... 156
Dajab6n....... 2,890
LaRomana... 18,072
Macoris........ 436,897
Monte Cristi .. 17,427
Puerto Plata... 222,003
Saman6........ 21,259
SAnchez........ 116,400
Santo Domingo. 105,044
Tierra Nueva..........


$28,105
614
299
1,480
24,269
557,861
14,342
111,100
20,375
138,571
10,994
906


$45,596
15,774
1,664
349
31,016
,810,994
24,339
184,240
24,474
224,230
388,854
4,705


$165,296
9,379
1,691
401
22,598
562,417
17,087

22,750
178,514
287,811
7,870


$33,050
905

2,993
23,694
571,570

29,429
242,286
128,946
8,292


$29,904


27,317
243,970
24,447
19,237
114,438
453,323


$27,553. $6,510

804
15,146 27,596
319,449 103,830
42,465 38,245
.... . 57,000
12,665 19,525
186,395 132,517
84,503 58,787
3,156 2,842


Totals,1914.. 957,179 908,916 1,756,235 1,275,814-1,041,165 912,636 692,136 446,852
Totals, 1913.. 485,775 875,563 1,090,532 1,251,876 1,503,390 1,939,989 1,260,061 722,635











DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


SHOWING THE VALUES AND PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES OF DESTINATION IN COMPAR-
31) AND PERCENTAGE OF INCREASES AND DECREASES FOR SAME YEARS.

Percentage of
Amount. 1914. whole. 1914.
Other.
countries. Net In- De- Net In-
1914. 1913. Increases. Decreases. Increase. 1913. 1914. crease. crease. crease.
$16,400 $21,059 $97,695 ........ $76,636 ...................................
44 57,044 296,386 ........ 239,342 ..................................
3,234 3,896,489 4,119,955 ........ 223,466 ............... ................
.. 52,870 22,204 30,666 ....................................... ......
145 22,691 22,023 668 ...........................................
2,216 345,579 257,076 88,503 .............................................
. 4,269 5,629 ........ 1,360 ....... ............ ...... .... ..... ...
3,346 9,761 ........ 6,415 ....... .... ... .. ..... .. ...
945 89,768 88,576 1,192 ........ ....... ............ ...... ...... ......
819 164,064 152,496 11,568 ........ ........ ..........
112 77,000 88,711 ........ 11,711 ............. ...... ...... ...... ......
8,018 93,787 60,737 33,050 .............................................
510,056 4,943,452 3,650,5561,292,896 ............................................
10 62,585 ......... 62,585 ........ .................... ...... ...... .....
22,407 394,224 1,121,775 ...,.... 727,551 .....................................
7,673 7,693 15,168........ 7,475 .....................................
. 67,830 85,398 ...... . 17,568 ....... .................. .... .......
5,855 17,102 ........ 11,247 ............. ...... ...... ...... ......
1,890 130,290 118,038 12,252 .............................................
1,647 14,249 60,913 ........ 46,664 .....................................
1,880 16,910 37,877 ........ 20,967 ....................................
80 35,305 68,247 ........ 32,942 .....................................
23,505 82,428 73,624 8,804 .............................................
601,08110,588,787 10,469,947 1,542,184 1,423,344 118,840 .............................






....... 8,572,562 5,600,7682,971,794 ........ ....... 53.49 80.96 27.47 ...... ......
.. 186,593 241,810 ........ 55,217 ....... 2.31 1.76 ...... 0.55 ......
. 818,717 2,068,384 ........1,249,667 ....... 19.76 7.73 ...... 12.03 ......
288,210 887,907 ........ 599,697 ...... 8.48 2.72 ...... 5.76 .....
23,405 20,430 2,975 .....- .... .. 0.19 0.22 0.03 ...... ......
. 7,029 27,536 ........ 20,507 ....... 0.26 0.07 ...... 0.19 ......
91,190 28,994 62,196 ........ ....... 0.28 0.86 0.58 ...... ......
601,081 601,081 1,594,118 ........ 993,037 ....... 15.23 5.68 ...... 9.55 ......
....... 10,588,78710,469,9473,036,9652,918,125 118,840 100.00 100.00 28.08 '28.08 1.13


DUTY COLLECTED, 1914 AND 1913.

Total by ports. Export duties collected.
September. October. November. December.
1914. 1913. 1914. 1913.

$15,878 $12,363 $7,131 $12,991 $401,408 $457,239 $4,509.59 $5,114.78
....... 892 ....... 2,250 29,814 48,434 620.48 1,503.78
....... 794 ....... 1,777 6,381 50,188 .......... ..........
. 483 ....... 6,420 15,820 63,231 .......... ..........
2,166 11,203 ....... 34,185 237,262 191,201 7,927.19 8,674.47
40,889 18,483 28,675 88,923 3,783,958 3,185,961 10,427.63 12,294.51
12,267 39,205 21,708 5,070 256,602 139,025 6,826.79 3,193.39
116,049 239,104 338,269 74,345 1,342,110 2,58&,591 36,634.75 51,658.57
12,737 4,115 16,672 20,727 223,965 207,988 11,240.47 8,890.48
288,163 478,043 119,435 321,967 2,540,959 2,423,972 142,726.53 117,556.23
101,394 8,919 25,599 67,663 1,721,837 1,059,228 15,030.44 14,012.00
....... 522 ....... 378 28,671 57,889 .......... 0.20
589,543 814,126 557,489 636,696 10,588,787 .......... 235,943.87
407,211 104,610 261,091 567,214 .......... 10,469,947 .... ..... 222,898.41








70 DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.

AGGREGATE FOREIGN TRADE.

Net
Countries. Amount, Amount, Increases, Decreases, Decreases,
1913. 1914. 1914. 1914. 1914.

United States. ..$11,369,829 $13,024,909 $1,655,080 .................
United Kingdom. 972,001 753,630 ......... 218,371 .........
Germany....... 3,746,217 1,746,559 ......... 1,999,658 .........
France ......... 1,162,225 449,586 ......... 712,639 .........
Spain. ......... 210,781 97,696 ......... 113,085 ..........
Italy........... 193,535 208,448 14,913 .................
Cuba........... 34,888 19,467 ......... 15,421 .........
Porto Rico...... 91,894 225,677 133,783 .................
Other Countries. 1,960,855 791,822 ......... 1,169,033 .........
Totals...... 19,742,225 17,317,794 1,803,776 4,228,207 $2,424,431

















NUMBER AND TONNAGE OF VESSELS ENGAGED IN THE COASTWISE TRADE BY PORTS, DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1914.


ENTRANCES.
STEAMSHIPS. SAILING VESSELS.
WITH CARGO. IN BALLAST. WITH CARGO. IN BALLAST.


Reg. Reg. Reg. Reg.
No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.
Azua............. 40 34,017 39 30,198 148 5,172 39 2,850
Barahona.......... 22 5 259 3 606 205 3,498 20 758
La Romana....... 95 26:107 34 22,963 290 4,116 112 1,244
Macoris.......... 196 111,939 179 111,121 386 10,608 413 4,932
Monte Cristi...... 40 35,312 10 22,501 67 630 18 126
Puerto Plata....... 23 50,215 19 46,174 202 3,889 96 951
Samana........... 44 99,191 53 37,363 348 6,346 123 1,249
Sgnchez.......... 40 83,954 27 48,390 125 4,192 111 1,164
Santo Domingo.... 142 98,380 120 44,446 594 17,763 308 5,450
Totals...... 642 544,374 484 363,762 2,365 56,214 1,240 18,724


11I


NUMBER AND TONNAGE OF VESSELS ENGAGED IN THE FOREIGN TRAIN


Azua............. ... ....... 12 10,353
Barahona ....... 2 2,164 .. .
La Romana....... 27 23,864 71 39,335
Macoris.......... 29 24,944 26 22,833
Monte Cristi...... 32 67,951 17 18,504
Puerto Plata...... 42 77,260 22 35,068
Samanf,......... 3 5,811 1 75
Sanchez.......... 14 38,225 10 20,930
Santo Domingo.... 101 121,648 53 35,883
Totals...... 250 361,867 212 182,981


1 90 7 852
S .. 6 491
11 1,303 6 119
20 4,403 47 3,123
1 75 35 2,029
13 1,113 9 249
1 14 ..
9 1,116 .. . .....
39 3,783 19 1,454
95 11,897 129 8,317


CLEARANCES.
STEAMSHIPS. SAILING VESSELS.
WITH CARGO. IN BALLAST. WITH CARGO. IN BALLAST. O
Reg. Reg. Reg. Reg. -
No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. !
47 40,306 35 24,791 152 5,369 27 1,180
27 7,132 .... ....... 167 3,055 39 405
28 8,427 125 56,861 94 2,081 308 3,214
97 74,631 271 121,599 422 8,072 473 7,808
41 44,639 22 36,351 83 774 3 14
28 61,931 19 31,712 242 5,223 100 1,153
35 68,012. 43 21,534 337 5,769 146 1,413
31 59,772 45 91,222 239 3,961 139 1,943
211 104,562 45 35,909 718 18,794 190 4:259 '
545 469,412 605 419,979 2,454 53,098 1,425 21,389

DE BY PORTS, DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1914.


2 2,435 9 7,441 20 2,070 .........
.. ....... 9 754 1 76
70 54,633 1 34 11 562 3 826 r
55 42,585 16 14,075 6 2,845 56 5,095
34 56,705 18 16,543 9 1,886 30. 182
18 30,072 7 12,917 11 302 5 46
5 9,938 2 3,373 ..... ...... 2 413


15 35,340 6 14,850 ..... ......
82 105,508 87 54,262 14 1,973
281 337,216 146 123,495 80 10,392


2 381
32 3,909
131 10,928


PORTS.


"-







DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
COMMERCE
1914
$17,317,794.


UNITED


NOTE -
Imports and exports of
money not /nc/lded


BI wAMER/CAN//M/ #


P~m Aelcw wlo-


72






DOMINICAN TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


DOM~IMAN PEUBLIC
COMMERCE
1909- 1914-
Id Z 3 4 16.000000. 8 5 10 1OZ,000.000.








DOMINICAN:TRADE STATISTICS, 1914.


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC.
COMMERCE
1909 -1914

IMPORTS
4 $500,000 41,000,000. *Z,000,900.
'mN ^ ^^ 1111111l


5,000


3l4III l~ahl~hII~~h/~hEI~


1913
O1912
1911
0 1910


EXPORTS
10,000. 15,000


I~EEhI .~ mmmEl


I~eI~-ehII l~h ///hE/I///1


Z5.000.


50.000


75,000 100.000 Tons


1914
1913
<191Z

01910
1909


DARK AREAS
=UNITED rTAT 7Z
PAN AMER/CAA/ UNION


LIGHT ArEAS
other' COUWT~/ES -


20,000 Tons


ItI


a AAI "


I~V II /If- 444.4444444///1/ 1 I I_


: m m m,


I!














INDEX.

NARRATIVE SECTION.
PAGE.
Building Fund ......... ................................. 8
Collections.................................................. 4
Current Events............... ...... ............... 3
Disbursement and Disposition of Funds ........................ 5
Fiscal Agency................................... ......... 6
Frontier Customs Service.................................... 9
National City Bank .... ............................... 6
Payments to the Dominican Gbvernment....................... 7
Receivership Expenses .......................... ........... 5
Revenue Cutter Service .......................... ..... .. ..... 8
Sinking Fund ................ ................. .......... 6
The Year's Trade ........................................... 10
The Year's Trade-Exports ................................. 12
The Year's Trade-Imports .................................. 18
The Year's Trade-Vessels in the Carrying Trade............... 25


Schedule No. 1.

Schedule No. 2.


Schedule No. 3.


Schedule No. 4.


Schedule No. 5.


Schedule No. 6.

Schedule No. 7.


Schedule No. 8.



Schedule No. 9.


APPENDIX "A."
Consolidated Statement of collections, expendi-
tures and dispositions of funds, from August 1 to
December 31, 1914 .........................
Statement showing gross collections and disposi-
tions made thereof by Deputy Receivers at the
several ports, from August 1 to to December 31,
1914................. .....................
Consolidation of the accounts current rendered by
the General Receiver at the close of each month
during the period from August 1 to December 31,
1914 .....................................
Consolidation of the statements of receipts and
expenditures submitted by the General Receiver
at the close of each month during the period from
August 1 to December 31, 1914 ................
Statement showing gross collections by months
and sources, August 1 to December 31, 1914, with
comparisons of totals for the previous period,
showing increases and decreases ...............
Statement showing collections by ports and
sources, during the period August 1 to December
31, 1914 ............. ........... .......
Statement of gross collections by, ports, from
August 1 to December 31, 1914, compared with
same period previous year, showing increases and
decreases. ............... ...................
Comparative statement by months of amounts
actually paid to the Dominican Government from
its customs revenue, with totals for each Conven-
tion Year, including the five months period, from
August 1, 1909 to December 31, 1914...........
Statement of amounts transmitted to the Fiscal
Agent, New York, for the service of the Dominican
Loan, under the terms of the Convention, during
the period August 1 to December 31, 1914......
(75)









76 INDEX.

PAGE.
Schedule No. 10. Statement showing total expenditures on account
of expenses proper of the Customs Service and
Receivership, period August 1 to December 31,
1914....................................... 35
Schedule No. 11. Statement showing the total expenses of the Office
-. of the General Receiver, separate and distinct from
the Dominican Customs organization, period
August 1 to December 31, 1914 ................ 36
Schedule No. 12. Statement showing the expenditures on account of
the Revenue Cutter Service, period August 1 to
December 31, 1914 ........................... 36
Schedule No. 13. Statement showing the expenditures on account of
the Frontier Customs Service, period August 1 to
December 31, 1914............................ 36
Schedule No. 14. Statement showing the gross collections and expen-
ditures by ports, and cost of collection per dollar,
period August 1 to December 31, 1914........... 37
Schedule No. 15. Statement showing the relative standing of the
entry and interior ports of the Dominican Re-
public, in point of receipts and cost of collection,
with percentages for the period August 1 to
December 31, 1914........................... 37
Schedule No. 16. Statement showing amount collected and amount
refunded by the Receivership after revision of liqui-
dations in the Central Office, during the period
from August 1 to December 31, 1914........... 3S
APPENDIX "B."
Recapitulation of all financial transactions of the Dominican Customs
Receivership from its commencement, April 1,
1905, to December 31 1914 ................... 39
SUMMARY OF COMMERCE.
List of Dominican Importers and Exporters..................... 43
Imports compared with 1913 ................................. 48
Imports showing values and countries, comparative .............. 58
Imports by ports compared with 1913.......................... 60
Exports compared with 1913 ............................... 62
Exports showing values and countries, comparative .............. 68
Exports by ports compared with 1913.......................... 68
Number and tonnage of vessels in coastwise trade ............... 71
Number and tonnage of vessels in foreign trade .................. 71




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs