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Group Title: Report ... Dominican customs receivership under the American-Dominican convention ... 1907/08- Together with Summary of commerce ...
Title: Report ... Dominican customs receivership under the American-Dominican convention ... 190708- Together with Summary of commerce ..
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 Material Information
Title: Report ... Dominican customs receivership under the American-Dominican convention ... 190708- Together with Summary of commerce ..
Series Title: Report ... Dominican customs receivership under the American-Dominican convention ... 1907/08- Together with Summary of commerce ...
Physical Description: v. in : plates, tables, diagrs. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dominican Republic -- Oficina del Controller y Receptor General de las Aduanas
United States -- Bureau of Insular Affairs
Publisher: Govt. print. off.
Place of Publication: Washington
Publication Date: 1913-1914
Frequency: annual
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Customs administration -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Tariff -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Dominican Republic
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year irregular. First report covers period from August 1, 1907 to July 31, 1908. Two reports were issued in 1914, one for the fiscal year ending July 31, the other for the period, August 1, to December 31, 1914.
Issuing Body: Submitted to the Bureau of insular affairs, War department, United States of America, by the general receiver of Dominican customs, Santo Domingo, Dominican republic.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091503
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 03909029
lccn - 09009600

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Appendix
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Index
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text






SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT


DOMINICAN CUSTOMS

RECEIVERSHIP

UNDER


The American-Dominican Convention
1907


AUGUST 1, 1913, to JULY 31, 1914



'. "-" ""' '-

.* .' : * : . *. .

""':':.-.'. '"; ":-





OFFICE OF THE
GENERAL RECEIVER
OF DOMINICAN CUSTOMS


SANTO DOMINGO, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC


OCTOBER 1, 1914


3841
071 t-





















LATIN AMERNuk


.*






* *. ..
S..


* .

*












THE AMERICAN-DOMINICAN CONVENTION, 1907.


SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT, DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.
CLARENCE H. BAXTER, GENERAL RECEIVER.


OFFICE OF THE GENERAL RECEIVER,
Santo Domingo, D. R., October 1, 1914.
SIR: On June 9th last, Honorable Walker W. Vick tendered his resig-
nation as General Receiver of Dominican Customs. Transfer of
accountability having been made to me on the 5th of August, I have the
honor to submit herewith, in pursuance of Article 5 and Paragraph IV
of Article 9 of the General Regulations, a general report of all transactions
of the Receivership for the seventh year of the Convention ending July
31, 1914, including such collateral data as have been deemed pertinent
thereto.
I am advised that on the 25th of September a successor to Mr. Vick
was appointed in the person of Honorable Clarence H. Baxter, of
Paterson, New Jersey. I had the honor to receive the appointment of
Deputy General Receiver on the 29th of September, 1913.
THE YEAR'S WORK.
The seventh year of the Convention opened in the midst of a revolu-
tion, and as it was closing another was in progress. The first was
inaugurated during the provisional presidency of Jos6 Bordas Valds,
and ended during the latter part of September, 1913, the revolutionists
having been persuaded to lay down their arms on the promise of the
United States Government that free and equal elections for the presi-
dential electors and members of the constitutional convention would be
guaranteed. During that revolution the ports of Puerto Plata, Sanchez
and Samanh were blockaded by the federal forces.
The largest of the three ports and the second in importance throughout
the Republic, Puerto Plata, was also blockaded during the second
revolution of the year, which had its inception on April 13, the end of
the provisional term of President Bordas; and the custom house was
(3)

f74W









SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


absolutely closed from April 23 until the cessation of hostilities on
August 9. This second blockade was accompanied by a siege of the
city under the leadership of President Bordas himself.
No other one effect of the revolutions accomplished so much towards
the great decrease in the Receivership collections as the blockades of
Puerto Plata. During both revolutions the Government-owned railroad
extending from Puerto Plata to Santiago was out of commission, and
this was true of the only other railroad of the Republic, known as the
Samana and Santiago Railway, which is owned by British capital, and
operated from Sanchez to La Vega, another important town in the Cibao.
These two roads are the only carriers for the richest section of the
Republic.
The second revolution was due to the dissatisfaction of the people
with the Bordas Government, which had been elected to carry out
constitutional reforms and call elections for a definite successor. The
fighting rapidly spread to all parts of the Republic, and even the capital
did not escape. Siege was laid to the city by the revolutionists during
the latter part of the Fiscal year, which was lifted however on the 28th
of August, 1914, after the appointment of the new Provisional President.
On the 18th of August an American Commission, consisting of ex-
Governor J. Franklin Fort, of New Jersey, Honorable Charles Gogswell
Smith, of New Hampshire, and the American Minister, came to present
a plan of conduct locally known as the "Wilson Plan," having been
suggested by the President. The plan proposed the resignation of
Bordas, a general disarmament, the selection of a provisional president
by the chieftains of the several political parties, a reformation of the
election law by the President pro tem., and the calling of elections for
presidential electors and members of the constitutional convention.
Jos6 Bordas, president de facto, resigned, and Doctor Ram6n Baez was
appointed to the office of Provisional President on the 27th of August,
'1914. Efforts are now being made towards the convocation of elections
during the month of October.

THE FINANCIAL EXPERT FOR THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC.
It is estimated that the Bordas administration contracted debts
amounting to $7,000,000 which includes the unpaid salaries of that
period. From July, 1913, until Doctor Baez assumed office, a very small









DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


part of the budget, save the military, was attended to. The funds that
the Government derived from customs receipts were diverted to other
uses, and internal imposts and revenues were hypothecated, and stamps
were sold in enormous quantities. It is worthy of note, however, that
this same administration requested the appointment of a financial expert
for the Republic, which was done at the solicitation of the executive
power of the Government during the latter part of the Dominican Fiscal
Year. Accordingly, President Wilson designated Honorable Carlos M.
Johnston, of Indianapolis, Indiana, for this important post, and he has
been authorized, by virtue of said agreement, to control all further dis-
bursements of the Government, both budgetary and extra-budgetary,
as well as to audit all unliquidated claims, and to devise and put into
effect ways and means of rehabilitating the Government's finances.
The Financial Expert has kindly furnished me with an estimate of the
unliquidated indebtedness of the Dominican Government, which is
incorporated herewith:
Internal Revenue stamps, stamped paper, alcohol and wharf taxes
hypothecated by the Government of former President Bordas.... $3,558,332.90
Civil salaries unpaid....................................... 1,000,000.00
Acknowledgments of old accounts given in exchange for supplies
furnished and services rendered .............................. 2,000,000.00
Floating indebtedness to foreign creditors ....................... 500,000.00
Total .................... ........................... 7,058,332.90

From the hypothecation of the above internal revenues I am informed
that the sum of $463,538.03 was obtained by the Government.

COLLECTIONS.

The total collections for the year amounted to $3,462,163.66, a decrease
of $647,130.46 as compared with the previous year, equivalent to 15.75
per cent. Of this decrease, $578,052.83 corresponded to import duties,
$65,498.87 to export duties, and $6,450.38 to tonnage dues. There was
an increase of $198.78 in personal fees, and $2,672.84 in miscellaneous
customs collections. Despite the political disturbances prevailing
throughout the Republic during most of the year, the total customs
collections have been surpassed only three times, viz., those of the First,
Fifth and Sixth Convention years, the First year exceeding the Seventh
only very slightly. The blockades of the year resulted in the cutting
off of a considerable amount of revenue on account of the impossibility









SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


of effecting customs operations. There were none whatever at the
custom house at Puerto Plata during May, June and July. The port
of Barahona, although insignificant, did no business during June and
July, but still shows an increase of $2,757.77 over last year.
From the tables in Appendix "A," Schedule 7, it will be noted that the
receipts of the land custom houses show an increase over the previous
year of $4,400.28, or, equivalent to 316.4 per cent. The receipts at La
Romana show a gain of $21,053.10, owing to increased traffic at that
port, which is due entirely to the business of the sugar plantation,
Central Romana. While at the remaining ports there was a considerable
decrease in customs receipts, at the capital the shrinkage amounts to
but 3.4 per cent. Although the port of Macoris was not blockaded, nor
was the town taken by the revolutionists, yet the customs receipts
suffered heavily.
The customs revenues fell short of the amount estimated by the
Dominican Government in making up its budget for 1913-1914 by the
sum of $462,049.78. The Government estimated the probable revenue
from July 1, 1913, to June 30, 1914, at $3,910,000 from imports, exports
and port dues, while the actual receipts from these sources for the
Convention year were $3,447,950.22.

GROSS COLLECTIONS BY YEARS.
Gross collections from the First Modus Vivendi Year, April 1, 1905,
to March 31, 1906 ......................................... $2,502,154.31
For the Second Modus Vivendi Year..... ..................... 3,181,763.48
For the four months' period, April 1 to July 31, 1907 (termination
of Modus Vivendi) ........................................ 1,161,426.61
For the First Convention Year, August 1, 1907, to July 31, 1908. ... 3,469,110.69
For the Second Convention Year .................. ............ 3,359,389.71
For the Third Convention Year............................... 2,876,976.17
For the Fourth Convention Year.............................. 3,433,738.92
For the Fifth Convention Year ................................. 3,645,974.79
For the Sixth Convention Year ................................ 4,109,294.12
For the Seventh Convention Year............................. 3,462,163.66
Total.................................. ............ 31,201,992.46

Miscellaneous receipts are not included in the above figures. This
item amounted to $18,579.39, making a grand total of $31,220,571.85
handled by the Receivership. Payments to the Dominican Government
have amounted to $14,681,236.78, while the deposits for the credit of the
Fiscal Agent, New York, for service of the Dominican loan aggregated
$13,189,003.18.









DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


AUDIT OF COLLECTION ACCOUNTS.
The Revision Department of the Receivership has continued to prove
its worth, as will be seen from the following tabulated statement:

Involving short col- Excess collections in-
lections. volving refunds.
Ports.
No. of Amount No. of Amounts
items, collected, items, refunded.

Azua ........................... 24 $172.74 8 $52.31
Barahona.................... ..... 4 2.28 3 12.31
La Romana...................... 35 133.76 21 89.04
Macoris......................... 257 3,046.82 74 693.68
Monte Cristi ..................... 47 409.72 17 89.51
Puerto Plata...................... 107 1,347.90 48 310.69
Saman ................. ........ 77 528.76 24 303.21
Sdnchez ........................ 100 831.59 30 227.34
Santo Domingo................... 223 3,288.53 90 661.88
874 9,762.10 315 2,439.97
Compared with year 1913.......... 1,674 19,692.86 426 3,327.28

This statement would seem to indicate that less errors were discovered
in the Revision Department this year than the previous. This is not
quite true, as there are a considerable number of statements of differences
still outstanding, which have not been paid owing to the critical condi-
tion of commerce that prevailed during the greater part of the year,
especially at Puerto Plata. A further reason is the general falling off
in customs revenues.

DISBURSEMENTS AND DISPOSITION OF FUNDS.
Details of expenditures incurred for operating purposes are contained
in Schedules 10, 11, 12 and 13 of Appendix "A." The first two deal with
the customs service and Receivership as an adjunct thereto, and the
latter two, 12 and 13, with the Revenue Cutter and Frontier Customs
Service. Schedule 14 contains a list of ports, collections and total
expenses of each, and Schedule 15 shows the relative standing of the
ports in point of receipts and cost of collection, with percentages.

RECEIVERSHIP EXPENSES.
The total expenditures of the service amounted to $177,768.63, being
$4,660.45 in excess of the 5 per cent allowance. The proportion of the
cost of collection was 5.13 per cent. The expenses of operating the









SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


service are $24,438.89 higher than last year, due principally to a renewal
of supplies and office equipment, changes in personnel, resignations,
sickness and deaths. The changes in personnel and resignations entailed
overlapping of salaries and payment of accrued leave in money. Notable
examples were the resignations of both the General Receiver and Deputy
General-Receiver. The sickness and death of two employees caused
further expense for medical attendance and the payment of death benefits.
Almost a full supply of blank forms had to be renewed, and there was
also a considerable outlay on account of the purchase of new office
equipment, such as desks, typewriters, interior telephone system, etc.
This latter class of expenditures should really not be charged to operating
expense, but should be placed under the head of Permanent Investment.

SAVINGS AND INNOVATIONS.
As an offset against the increased expenditures, it may be said that the
miscellaneous receipts include an item of $6,841.12, being interest on
the checking deposit which was earned by the Receivership for the first
time in the history of the Convention. Theretofore, the designated
depositary had paid no interest on deposits, with the exception of the
special deposit-"Building Fund." A further saving was effected by
cashing the New York drafts of the Department of Public Works at par.
The Receivership cashed drafts amounting to $411,098.40, the exchange
on which at the rate of three-fourths of one per cent premium would have
amounted to $3,083.24, while the Department of Public Works would
have had to sell these drafts to local banks at a discount of one-half per
cent, viz.-$2,055.49, which latter amount was saved the Government,
as likewise an equal amount in interest, as the Department of Public
Works had been in the habit of securing advances from local bankers
until drafts against the funds in New York for public improvements
could be obtained.
The total amount earned and saved by the ,Receivership for the
benefit of the Government therefore was:
Interest earned .................. $6,841.12
Exchange saved ..................... 3,083.24
Total..................... 9,924.36

besides a saving to the Department of Public Works of exchange and
interest, the former amounting to $2,055.49, and the latter more or less









DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


an equal amount, all of which should be taken into account, as a moral
offset at least, against the operating expenses of the Receivership which
amounted to $177,768.63.
The Receivership should also be given credit for certain innovations
that were made in payments to the Dominican Government, which
considerably reduced the balances on deposit in the name of the General
Receiver, thereby allowing for less interest. Formerly, as the Con-
vention provides, settlement with the Dominican Government was not
made of its share of the customs receipts until the end of the month,
although the money for the Government was usually available by the
middle of the month. Early in the Seventh Convention Year the General
Receiver inaugurated the system of paying over to the Government all
collections that were remitted to the central office as soon as the Con-
vention payments had been satisfied. It thus happened that the Gov-
ernment, as well as the Department of Public Works, was relieved of
the custom of borrowing its own money for more or less than two weeks'
time at a very good rate of interest.
The Government being very hard pushed during the month of Jan-
uary, on the request of its representative in Washington, the State
Department, through official channels, instructed the Receivership to
advance to the Government, before the usual amount was segregated,
a certain amount of money for a certain period during the month.
This plan has been the rule rather than the exception since that time, and
although it has entailed extra work on the Auditing Department and an
extra cost in cablegrams and telegrams, the Receivership has been glad
to be of assistance to the Government. These early advances necessarily
have materially reduced the interest earning feature of the Receivership's
general deposit.
Up to May the 1st, 1914, $149,302.38 had been segregated to the
Sinking Fund, and $66,550.00 of said amount had already been paid
over. As the outlook was not encouraging, and it seemed evident that
the Conventional basis of $3,000,000.00 in collections would not be ex-
ceeded during the calendar year of 1914, it was agreed by the Insular
Bureau to pay over to the Dominican Government $60,000.00 of the
balance. The payment of this amount was conditioned upon a daily
division at the rate of $2,000.00, and audit by the General Receiver of
the expenditures made thereunder by the Government. This plan was









SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


adhered to strictly, vouchers in triplicate having been furnished by the
Dominican Government every day setting forth in detail the amounts
to be disbursed.
A comparison of the collections, total expenses and cost of collection,
showing the unexpended balance of the 5 per cent allowance for the
seven years of the Convention, August 1, 1907, to July 31, 1914, follows:

Year. Collections. Expenses. Cost. Unexended

Per ct.
1907-1908 ........... $3,469,110.69 $127,565.83 3.68 $45,889.70
1908-1909 ........... 3,359,389.71 136,152.04 4.05 31,817.44
1909-1910 ........... 2,876,976.17 137,296.01 4.77 6,552.80
1910-1911 ........... 3,433,738.92 144,164.64 4.20 27,522.30
1911-1912 ........... 3,645,974.79 146,212.95 4.01 36,085.81
1912-1913............ 4,109,294.12 153,329.74 3.73 52,134.96
1913-1914........... 3,462,163.66 177,768.63 5.13 *4,660.45
Grand total for the period ............................... 195,342.56

*Increase over five per cent.
In view of the decrease of the customs revenues and the discouraging
outlook for the ensuing year, a number of economies'have since been
effected by the Receivership in the personnel of the custom houses and
of the central office, and it is expected that the expenses will be within
the 5 per cent allowance, although it will be somewhat difficult on ac-
count of the additional burden placed on the Receivership of the salary
of the newly created office of Financial Expert.

FISCAL AGENCY.
For the service of the Dominican Loan $1,150,000 were remitted to the
Fiscal Agent; the balance of $50,000 to complete the July instalment was
forwarded the early part of August.

NATIONAL CITY BANK.
During the year the amount of $330,000 was paid to the National City
Bank of New York; the July instalment of $30,000 went forward early
in August.
ASSETS OF SINKING FUND.
For the sinking fund the sum of $469,458.34 was remitted during the
year, but subsequently $66,550 were withdrawn from this fund, because,
although during the first three months of the calendar year 1914 the
import and export duties exceeded $250,000 per month, the receipts
fell off so rapidly during the succeeding months, that it became certain










DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 11

that the total receipts during the calendar year would not surpass
$3,000,000, or if they did, the surplus would be inconsiderable.
Below is a statement of the sinking fund for the retirement of the
$20,000,000 Administration Loan of the Dominican Republic, furnished
the Receivership by the Insular Bureau:
RECEIPTS.
From General Receiver, account calendar year-
1908.................................................... $331,757.53
1909 ....................................... ............ 200,000.00
1910................................................... 260,820.90
1911.................................................... 394 ,092 .24
1912....................................... ............ 482 ,772.25
1913.................................................... 782 ,908.34
From interest allowed by Fiscal Agent .......................... 76,863.91
From interest received on bonds purchased ...................... 180,369.34
Total...................... ................... 2,709,584.51
DISBURSEMENTS.
For $2,155,050 customs administration bonds purchased (par value). $2,155,050.00
For premium paid on above bonds ............................. 11,054.87
Cash balance:
In sinking fund .............................. $471,301.14
Due from Fiscal Agent, general account....... 72,178.50
543,479.64

Total ................................................ 2,709,584.51
ASSETS IN SINKING FUND.
$2,155,050 customs administration bonds at par value............ $2,155,050.00
Interest on above bonds, accrued but not collected ............... 44,896.88
Cash balance ................................................ 543,479.64
Total.................................... ........ 2,743,426.52

No payments have been made into this fund for account of the year
1914.
PAYMENTS TO THE DOMINICAN GOVERNMENT.
Schedule No. 8 gives in detail, by months, the payments made to the
Government from its customs revenues for the seventh year under the
Convention. A total of $1,384,928.76 was paid, the average being
$115,410.73 per month, which is the lowest in the history of the Conven-
tion, but it must be remembered that since January 1, 1913, an additional
sum of $30,000 monthly is required for the service of the National City
Bank Loan of $1,500,000, thus reducing the amount available for pay-
ment to the Dominican Government.
This total of $1,384,928.76, which was paid to the Dominican:Govern-
ment, is $362,471.24 less than the previous year, although the falling
off in receipts was $641,424.22, making an apparent discrepancy of
$278,952.98. This is accounted for by the fact that disbursements










SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


decreased in the amount of $322.096.44, under the headings of Sinking
Fund, Building Fund, Refunds of excess collections, and Exchange,
from which must be deducted an increase of expenditures of $201,500.21,
under the headings of Customs Expenses, National City Bank, Refunds,
Articles 180 and X, Personal Fees, Frontier Customs and Revenue
Cutter Services, making the net decrease in expenditures $120,596.23.
To this amount must be added the differences between balances in
transit to the General Receiver on July 31st of the years 1912, 1913 and
1914 aggregating $180,784.27, from which must be deducted the differ-
ences between balances due to the Dominican Government on these same
dates, aggregating $22,427.52, which explains the apparent discrepancy
of $278,952.98. The detailed reconciliation is as follows:
1913-1914. 1912-1913.
Gross collections and miscellaneous
receipts................... ..... $3,471,310.84 $4,112,735.06 $641,424.22
Payments to Dominican Government. 1,384,928.76 1,747,400.00 362,471.24
Apparent difference to account for ............................ 278,952.98
Explained by comparison of Schedule
No. 1 of the two years, as.follows:
Funds in transit to the General Receiver:
July 31, 1913 .................. i02,245.23
31, 1914................... 88,792.27
113,452.96
31, 1913 .................. 202,245.23
31, 1912................... 134,913.92
67,331.31
180,784.27
Balances due the Dominican Government: 180,784.27
July 31, 1914 .................. 19,213.10
31, 1913 .................. 88.24
19,124.86
31, 1912 .................. 3,390.90
31. 1913................... 88.24
3,302.66
22,427.52

158,356.75
Sinking fund....................... 309,713.62 615,269.35 305,555.73
Building fund..................... 24,776.80 35,765.26 10,988.46
Refunds, excess collections .......... 7,474.77 11,603.63 4,128.86
Exchange......................... 12,119.90 13,543.29 1,423.39

480,453.19
Customs expenses.................. 177,768.63 153,329.74 24,438.89
National City Bank ................ 360,000.00 210,000.00 150,000.00
Refunds, Article 180, Customs....... 4,077.07 2,852.87 1,224.20
Frontier Customs Service........... 26,806.72 10,286.61 16,520.11
Revenue Cutter Service............ 41,093.88 32,129.50 8,964.38
Personal Fees...................... 14,213.44 14,013.66 199.78
Refunds, Article X, Tariff........... 2,665.35 2,512.50 152.85

201,500.21


Apparent difference accounted for..............


............ 278,952.98









DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


DISPOSITION OF THE BALANCE OF THE PROCEEDS OF THE NATIONAL CITY
BANK LOAN.
As authorized by Act of Congress approved December 14, 1912, pub-
lished in Official Gazette No. 2358, the Executive Power contracted a
loan with the National City Bank for $1,500,000, for the purpose of
paying off certain floating indebtednesses. The proceeds were dis-
bursed by means of drafts countersigned by the Envoy Extraordinary
and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the
Dominican Republic, or the Secretary of the Legation of the United
States, and the Deputy General Receiver of Dominican Customs.
During the current yearthe balance of this loan, amounting to $11,247.06,
plus an interest item of $128.38, earned up to December 31, 1913, was
disbursed in accordance with the aforesaid act of Congress as follows:
W ar expenses ................................................. $3,288.75
Back salaries ................................................ .. 7,573.17
Expenses in connection with the loan (salaries, printing, etc).......... 513.52
Total................................... .............. 11,375.44

The labor involved in the audit and disbursement of this loan was
performed almost entirely by former Deputy General Receiver, J. H.
Edwards, at the same time fulfilling the important duties of Auditor
for the Receivership, although according to the contract the burden was
placed upon the American Legation. Mr. Edwards received no re-
muneration for these extra services, although the Dominican Govern-
ment's employees that prepared the claims for submission to the Auditor
were compensated from the proceeds of the loan itself.

BUILDING FUND.

It gives me pleasure to report that the Receivership Annex -has at
last been completed, and the General Receiver, his Deputy, and the
American personnel are comfortably housed therein. A great drawback
that has heretofore prevented the Receivership from retaining for any
length of time the service of capable young Americans has finally been
overcome. Now they have comfortable and homelike living quarters,
and, through the careful saving of the General Receiver of Dominican
Customs, the Dominican Government has a building that will some day
be to it a substantial piece of property that can be used for many
purposes.








SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


From the proportion of five per cent of customs revenues that the
Convention authorized to be expended by the General Receiver for the
"payment of the customs expense of the central office of the Receiver-
ship, its special agents at the several custom houses of the Republic, as
authorized by the General Receiver or other proper authority of the
United States Government," the amount during the first four years of
the Convention, including the two years of the Modus Vivendi, that
was saved and turned over to the Dominican Government equalled
$206,550.71. See Fourth Annual Report, page 11, for detailed state-
ment.
This policy was discontinued during the Fourth Convention Year,
and at the beginning of January, 1911, unexpended balances were
segregated to what is known as the "Building Fund," which drew
interest at six per cent per annum. This was done as a matter of self-
protection for the Receivership, in anticipation of lean years, and with
the idea of assisting the Government in making improvements of various
kinds in the customs service. The operation of the plan has more than
proved the wisdom thereof, for what was formerly a liability has become
an asset.. The Receivership formerly rented'a domicile for the person-
nel at a cost of $90 per month, which did not include lighting, water, and
incidentals. The old house was, as most houses in the Capital, very
insanitary and uncomfortable as a home. There sickness was the rule
rather than the exception, three cases of typhoid fever and several
cases of malaria being recorded during the year, and it was necessary to
keep a trained nurse in almost constant attendance during the Seventh
Convention Year, as well as an American Doctor for the Receivership
during a portion of this time. All of these expenses have been lopped
off, and the American Government's representatives under the Conven-
tion are not suffering any longer the usual hazards of disease in the Tropics,
in addition to the dangers of the revolutions. During the siege of Santo
Domingo, when most Americans retired within the walls of the city or
left for Porto Rico, the new annex, although outside of the city walls, was
constantly occupied by the General Receiver and his assistants, and the
work of the central office within the city went on without interruption.
Almost every night Government outposts near the annex indulged in
hap-hazard firing, and on one occasion several cannon blazed away
in the darkness without the city in the direction of the annex. However,









DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


there were no casualties amongst the personnel, and the building was
only struck by one bullet, so far as is known.
This new policy with reference to the unexpended balances has not
only redounded to the benefit of the Dominican Government, in so far
as the building of the new annex is concerned, but a new revenue cutter
has been purchased and added to the service. Although the Building
Fund was practically exhausted during the past Convention Year, it
is expected that if a rehabilitation of customs revenues will take place
during the Eighth Convention Year, another substantial sum will be set
aside and other good works will be able to be accomplished by the
Receivership. A statement of segregations and disbursements of the
Building Fund is as follows:
Unexpended balance of the five per cent allowance segregated-
January, 1911, to April, 1912 ................................ $40,000.00
January, 1912, to June, 1913 ................................ 33,173.36
July, 1913, to August, 1914.................................. 21,822.40
Interest accrued on special deposit to July 31, 1914 ................. 6,046.30
Total........................... ...................... 101,042.06
DISBURSEMENTS.
Purchase, survey and recording of land ........................... $5,974.29
Grading and preparing land for building and construction of New Annex 5,616.49
Construction and equipment of New Annex (payment not entirely com-
pleted) ..................................................... 56,022.75
Indemnity payments to beneficiaries of Frank Slothower and H. B.
Schellings ................................................... 2,453.34
Equipment of office of Receivership Physician ..................... 500.00
Purchase of new Revenue Cutter ................................ 25,000.00
Balance on hand July 31, 1914 .................................. 5,475.19
Total.................................... ......... 101,042.06

REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE.

It will be seen from the table herewith that two of the revenue cutters
traveled more than ten thousand miles each during the Seventh Conven-
tion Year. This establishes a record for the little vessels, and the total
mileage of the five cutters is also a record as well. We must remember
that Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 are seventy-five feet by ten feet, with a
draft of three feet, and were only guaranteed by the builder for five
years, whereas, they have been in continuous service for eight years,
and two of the vessels are still worth retaining in the service. No. 1
and No. 2 will have to be soon discarded; but during the latter part of the
year a larger boat was purchased at a cost of $25,000, with the funds









16 SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

saved by the Receivership from the five per cent allowance. She has
been named the Patria, at the request of the Government, and has been
in service since June 17, 1914.
Here follows the statement of the operations of the fleet for the year
ending July 31, 1914:

Revenue Number Miles. Hours. Gasoline Passen- Mail.
Cutter. of trips, consumed. gers.

Gallons. Sacks.
Patria............. 8 1,863 183l 3,600 178 104
No. 1............. 26 3,217 351 3,197 173 743
No.2............. 65 8,037 973 8,549 458 126
No. 3............. 68 10,467 1,0461 9,659 807 817
No.4............. 92 10,616 1,2051 11,257 2,350 z55
Total ...... 259 34,200 3,759l 36,262 3,966 2,045

During the year the cutters assisted twelve merchant vessels in distress,
transported upwards of two thousand rifles and one hundred and
eighty-one thousand rounds of ammunition, besides medical supplies
and money for the payment of the Government troops. So far as
transportation goes, this was the best year in the history of the Domin-
ican Revenue Cutter Service as well as the most strenuous, on account of
the political disturbances; and I am pleased to report that there has not
been an accident of any importance nor a single life lost in the service.
During the past revolution the cutters were of inestimable value to the
Government as transport boats, but of less value to the Receivership
and the public in general on that account, although by means of the
cutters we were enabled to keep in communication with the outside
world when all cable service was cut off, by carrying cables to Macoris
from the Capital, from whence they were transmitted by wireless to
Porto Rico, and in carrying mail from steamers and other ports to the
Capital. On several occasions steamers from New York were met by
cutters at Puerto Plata, and the mail for the Capital and southern ports
was transported from said port, thus saving many valuable days for the
trade of Santo Domingo. They were also used in distributing the Porto
Rican "observers" to various points on the Island during the election of
December, 1913.
It is hoped that the use of the boats as transport vessels of war by the
Government will be discontinued. Besides being agrc.-at hindrance to








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


the ordinary work of guarding the coasts, it has also been very danger-
ous; and it is a wonder that no lives have been lost on the cutters. On
numerous occasions the boats have gone to sea with as many as seventy-
five passengers aboard, while there have never been more than two small
rowboats attached to the life saving apparatus.

FRONTIER CUSTOMS SERVICE.
In the fall of 1912 the Frontier Guard was reorganized, at the request
of the Dominican Government and under the direction of the Receiver-
ship, and since that time it has been operated along the Haitian border
in connection with the customs service. This small body of men
patrols one hundred and fifty miles of as wild and uncivilized a district
as exists anywhere at the present day. It has proved very efficient,
although it embraces no more than one-third in number than formerly
and costs the Government but one-half. The guards under Receiver-
ship control can not take part in political activities, while under the
Government they were compelled to.
This year has been more turbulent than ever for the Frontier Customs
Service. With the overthrow of the Haitian Government by the Zamors
early in the year 1914, one revolution came to an end, only for another
to begin, led by Davilmar Theodore and ably assisted by Dosilien.
The latter had fought in both the Haitian and Dominican revolutions
of the past, and was feared by both peoples. With his headquarters at
the village of Ouanaminthe, Haiti, which is directly across the river
from Dajab6n, he terrorized that whole district.
Before the last revolution in Santo Domingo broke out, there was some
little trade in ammunition between the two republics, but when the two
revolutions got in full swing it was carried on more or less freely and
openly in defiance of the Frontier Customs Service. In the south the
Dominican revolutionists did business with the Haitian Government
representatives, and in the north the Dominican revolutionist chieftain
traded first with one side and then with the other. Affairs finally cul-
minated in an attack on the custom house of Comendador by an armed
force of revolutionists. The attack was made in order to divert the
attention of the customs authorities from a large amount of rifles and
ammunition that the Haitians were attempting to smuggle across the
border for the benefit and with the aid of Dominican revolutionists.








SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


On account of the vast superiority in numbers of the revolutionists
over the customs force, the American Inspector of Customs was forced
to abandon the custom house, and under orders from the Deputy Re-
ceiver, he proceeded to Dajab6n and joined forces with the mounted
inspectors there.
Dosilien, the Haitian, repeatedly threatened to attack the custom
house at Dajab6n with his force of revolutionists, more than three
hundred in number, but the Deputy Receiver there, although he had
under his command only about twenty-five men, handled the situation
fearlessly but with tact, and the threatened attack was never realized.
In June, Dosilien and his forces were surprised and he was killed by
Haitian Government troops.
With the custom house at Comendador closed, the custom house
further south, at Neyba, was more or less cut off from communication,
because at this time there was fighting at Barahona and Azua, and the
Capital was under siege. There, as at other land ports, the Inspector of
Customs and his men were harassed in every way by the revolutionist
chieftains, but the custom house remained open and everything possible
was done to prevent the traffic in contraband across the border in that
district.
The only death in the personnel of the guard occurred in this district
during the latter part of July, 1914, when four mounted inspectors sought
to confiscate a quantity of rum and flour that had been smuggled over
the border and was being used at a vaudoux feast in a small community
of Haitians living on the Dominican side. The feast had been in progress
three days, and the participants numbering about about sixty, refused to
give up the contraband. When the inspectors attempted to seize it,
they were attacked by the whole crowd of drunken men and women with
knives and machetes. Fortunately, only one of the inspectors, Martin
P6rez, was killed. The other three succeeded in escaping after killing
half a dozen of the Haitians. When a larger force of inspectors returned
to the scene, the feast was ended and the guests had all departed. The
body of P6rez was identified by a small piece of his uniform that was
found on his arm. His body had been mutilated horribly and then
burned.
Since the organization of the Receivership, two Americans have been
killed while on duty in the Frontier Customs Service, and three wounded,








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


while among the Dominican personnel there have been fourteen who have
lost their lives, and twenty-three who have been wounded.

SPECIAL INSPECTORS.
This important arm of the service has been under a serious handicap
during the year by reason of the. changes in its personnel, as noted else-
where. Another setback has been the reduction of the force from seven
special inspectors to five. One inspector being always on duty in the
central office, this means that only four are available for the regular
service, whereas there should be one in each of the nine ports of the
Republic. The reduction was made necessary because of the decrease
in the customs collections and the consequent reduction of the allowance
for expenses. It is contemplated that the corps of special inspectors
will be enlarged as soon as the customs revenues will permit the increased
expenditures.
The duties of special inspectors have been set forth in other reports,
but at the expense of reiteration let me say that the-special inspector is
the personal representative of the General Receiver at the custom houses.
The General Receiver has always been under the disadvantage of being
unable to appoint and discharge the personnel of the custom houses,
which is entirely Dominican. The positions in the custom houses have
heretofore been rewards for political and revolutionary services, and with
so many changes in the administration of the Government itself there has
been an extraordinary number of changes in the personnel of the custom
houses. To offset this embarrassing feature of the administration of the
Receivership as far as possible the force of special inspectors was organ-
ized, and, of course, Americans were placed in the positions where it was
possible. May I respectfully urge that the policy be continued in the
rehabilitation of this necessary feature of the Dominican Customs
Receivership?
DEATHS AND CHANGES IN PERSONNEL.
The seventh year of the Convention records the death of two of the
oldest employees of the Receivership in point of service, viz., Frank H.
Slothower, who was Deputy Receiver at the port of Monte Cristi, and
H. B. Schellings, who was Special Inspector. Both men had been faith-
ful members of the personnel, and the Receivership has suffered a distinct
loss in their deaths. Mr. Schellings was taken ill toward the end of








SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


August with typhoid fever at the old Receivership Annex, known as the
"Casa del Cord6n," and there he lingered until December 16. He was
given every medical attention that was available in Santo Domingo.
Besides the loss of Special Inspector Schellings by death, four of that
branch of the service resigned therefrom, three having been appointed
within the same Convention year. Two employees of the central office
appointed within the year left the service before the close of the year.
Under the regulations of the Receivership, an officer or employee, on
separation from the service, is entitled to have commuted any leave that
has accrued, at the rate of thirty-five days per year, together with his
traveling expenses to the United, States, if he had been appointed there,
his salary continuing until he arrives at said place. With so many
changes in the personnel, and notably those of the former General
Receiver and Deputy General Receiver, salaries were continually over-
lapping, and a very heavy expense was added to the present adminis-
tration of the Receivership, which it can not be justly held accountable
for. These additional expenses were augmented somewhat by the visits
to Washington of the General Receiver and Deputy General Receiver
on matters affecting the Receivership and the Dominican Republic.

DEPOSITARY VICISSITUDES.
At the beginning of the year the official depositary for the Receivership
was the private banking house of Don Santiago Michelena, who operates
a central bank at the Capital with representatives throughout the prin-
cipal towns of the Republic, and a branch at Puerto Plata. Senior
Michelena had been designated as the official depositary for the Receiv-
ership by the Dominican Government and accepted by the former
General Receiver Pulliam at the inauguration of the Convention. The
General Receiver, in November, 1913, changed the depositary from
Sefior Michelena to the Banco Nacional de Santo Domingo, a corporation
organized under the banking laws of Santo Domingo, but the capital
stock of which was owned and held by foreign stockholders. This
bank agreed to pay interest on general deposits at the rate of two per
cent per annum and to furnish collateral security. Some time later a
general account was opened with the Guaranty Trust Company of New
York, the fiscal agent of the Dominican Loan, which bank agreed to pay
interest on deposits at the rate of three per cent per annum. The Banco
Nacional de Santo Domingo, however, was unable to meet the demands of








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


the large business of the Receivership, and it was decided to change the
depositary in Santo Domingo. Invitations for bids were accordingly
sent out during the month of May to the only three banks of the Republic
viz., the Royal Bank of Canada, the Banco Nacional de Santo Domingo
and the house of Seflor Michelena. The last named banker having
made the highest offer, his bank was designated as the official depositary
in the Dominican Republic by the General Receiver. According to the
new agreement the designated depositary is obliged to place with the
Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs collateral security amounting to
one hundred and fifty thousand dollars.
TARIFF REVISION.
As yet, no occasion has been offered to demonstrate to a Dominican
Congress the views of the Receivership on the necessity of revising the
present tariff. As was stated in the Sixth Annual Report, time is con-
stantly uncovering defects and inconsistencies in the tariff law of Santo
Domingo that it is hoped will be removed at an early date. A deal of
study has been given during the past year to the matter of tariff revision,
and considerable data has been collated by the Statistical Division under
the direction of a Special Inspector, which has verified former assertions
with reference to the necessity of some revision, and which will be of
prime value when the opportunity be offered by the Dominican Congress.
COMMERCE.
Heretofore a comprehensive statement and analysis of foreign trade
for the year 1913 has been compiled and printed for general distribution.
Copies of same may be obtained on application either to the Chief of the
Bureau of Insular Affairs, War Department, or the General Receiver
of Dominican Customs. This statement embraces the first five months
of the seventh year of the Convention. A recapitulation of the imports
and exports taken from said report is copied herewith, together with a
statement of the aggregate foreign trade, comparison being made with the
next preceding calendar year. The European market, which has formerly
purchased a large percentage of Santo Domingo's products, has been
closed by the international war. The United States, as the table shows,
already enjoys more than one-half of the trade with the Dominican Re-
public, but now the latter will perforce have to offer a good portion of
the rest. Her big neighbor of the north has no competition, but there
should be no delay about taking advantage of the offer.










SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


Recapitulation of Imports.

1912. 1913.

Countries.
Value. Percentage Value Percentage
of whole. value of whole.

United States............. $5,100,001 62.06 $5,769,061 62.22
United Kingdom.......... 720,242 8.76 730,191 7.88
Germany................ 1,628,286 19.81 1,677,833 18.10
France.................. 224,912 2.74 274,318 2.96
Spain.................... 149,734 1.82 210,781 2.27
Italy................... 131,356 1.60 173,105 1.87
Cuba..................... 6,578 0.08 7,352 0.08
Puerto Rico.............. 41,901 0.51 62,900 0.67
Other Countries.......... 214,888 2.62 366,737 3.95
Total............. 8,217,898 100.00 9,272,278 100.00

Recapitulation of Exports.

1912. 1913.
Countries.
Value. Percentage Value. Percentage
of whole. ue of whole.

United States............. $7,274,206 58.74 $5,600,768 53.49
United Kingdom.......... 1,242,980 10.04 241,810 2.31
Germany................ 1,774,049 14.32 2,068,384 19.76
France................... 933,212 7.53 887,907 8.48
Italy.................... 26,999 0.22 20,430 0.19
Cuba ................... 15,429 0.12 27,536 0.26
Puerto Rico.............. 48,220 0.39 28,994 0.28
Other Countries.......... 1,069,753 8.64 1,594,118 15.23

Total............. 1-,385,248 100.00 10,469,947 100.00

NOTE: Sugar and Cacao, being shipped generally "subject to order" their actual
final destination often varies.
Aggregate Foreign Trade.

1912. 1913.

Countries.
Amount. Amount. Increases. Decreases. Net
decrease.

United States.... .$12,374,607 $11,369,829 ........... $1,004,778 .........
United Kingdom.. 1,963,222 972,001 ........... 991,221 .........
Germany ........ 3,402,335 3,746,217 $343,882 .....................
France.......... 1,158,124 1,162,225 4,101 .....................
Spain........... 149,734 210,78.1 61,047 .....................
Italy............ 158,355 193,535 35,180 ..................
Cuba............ 22,007 34,888 12,881 .....................
Puerto Rico..... 90,121 91,894 1,773 ............ ........
Other Countries. 1,284,641 1,960,855 676,214 ............ .......

Total..... 20,603,146 19,742,225 1,135,078 1,995,999 $860,921








DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


ANNUAL INSPECTION.

Major Irvin L. Hunt, Assistant to the Chief of the Insular Bureau,
made the annual inspection of the Receivership for the Seventh Con-
vention Year. During his stay in Santo Domingo, from July 11 until
July 23, Major Hunt not only examined the administration of the
central office, the new annex, and the custom house of Santo Domingo,
but he visited several other custom houses on the southern coast and in
the Bay of Samanh. In the port towns, and notably at the Capital, he
met Santo Domingo's representative business men, and was enabled to
sound business in general regarding its opinion of the Receivership.
Major Hunt also had an opportunity to see the effect of the latest revolu-
tion, as the Capital was under siege at the time of his inspection. During
his stay he made some very timely suggestions towards improvements in
the different departments of the Receivership, especially touching the
new annex, for all of which the writer is glad to make of record the grati-
tude of the General Receiver and his assistants.
I take the liberty of annexing to this report copies of the Convention
and the General Regulations Governing the Receivership, marked
Appendix "E."
Respectfully,
JOHN T. VANCE,
Deputy General Receiver.
THE CHIEF,
BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS,
War Department, Washington, D. C.












THE AMERICAN-DOMINICAN CONVENTION-1907.

Seventh Annual Report,
Dominican Customs Receivership.

TWELVE MONTHS PERIOD, AUGUST 1, 1913, TO JULY 31, 1914.


APPENDIX "A."

Customs Collections, Expenditures and Dispositions.
SCHEDULE NO. 1.

Consolidated statement of collections, expenditures and dispositions of funds, Seventh
Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914.
COLLECTIONS.

Gross collections from all sources, all ports ..................... $3,462,163.66
Miscellaneous receipts ...................................... 9,147.18
Balances per account current, July 31, 1913:
In transit to the General Receiver, as per accounts current of
Deputy Receivers .................. ................. 202,245.23
Due the Dominican Government ........................... 88.24
Due credit Building Fund.................................. 63,833.97
Due the Fiscal Agent, account of one-half of surplus calendar
year 1913 .................. ........................ 182,497.10
Total to be accounted for .............................. 3,919,975.38
EXPENDITURES AND DISPOSITIONs.

1. Customs expenses proper, including expenses of the Receivership. $177,768.63
2. Deposited with Fiscal Agent, for service of loan .............. 1,150,000.00
3. Deposited with Fiscal Agent, New York (one-half of revenue
received in excess of $3,000,000, calendar year 1913)...... 402,908.34
4. Deposited with Fiscal Agent, New York (one-half of revenue
received in excess of $3,000,000, calendar year 1914)...... 66,550.00
5. Segregated for transmittal to Fiscal Agent account, one-half of
surplus calendar year 1914 ...................... ..... 22,752.38
6. Deposited with National City Bank of New York account loan
authorized December 14, 1912 ........................ 330,000.00
7. Paid to the Dominican Government...................... 1,384,928.76
8. Balance to credit of Dominican Government, July 31, 1914 ... 19,213.10
9. Building Fund accumulation including interest ............... 5,475.19
10. Building Fund disbursements. ............................. 83,135.58
11. Refunds of duties collected in excess ........................ 7,474.77
12. Refunds of duties, Article X.arff...................... 2,665.35
13. Refunds of surplus. rbeels,:Aii'cle: 1p;.~usteas Law........ 4,077.07
14. Expenses Frontier'.?$_ fdn Service.*'........ ....,......... 26,806.72
15. Operation of RBveirie Citter Service.......... ..... ...... 41,093.88
16. Exchange-p i tiSd transmitted to Fiscal Agent, N1%.Dgrk.... 12,119.90
17. PersorqsJoe'Gssfefunded.by Deputy Receivers........ .*. ... 14,213.44
18. Balanct m transit tq, the:& e eral.'Reiiver,*as per aibynets
ScfiTrnt of Deput. IcIl WSi1 3T 1" 114 ............** 88,792.27
19. Segregated for transmittal'to' Fscar Agent,t for service of loan' 50,000.00
20. Segregated for transmittal to National City Bank of New York
account loan December 14, 1912 ....................... 30,000.00

Total .............. ........................ 3,919,975.38
(25)










SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


SCHEDULE No. 2.

Statement showing gross collections and dispositions made thereof by Deputy Receivers
at the several ports, Seventh Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914.

Personal Balances in Total remit-
Gross fees re- transit to tances received
Ports. collections funded by General by General
S Deputy Receiver Receiver during
Receivers. July 31, 1914. the year.

Azua................ $106,917.38 $961.46 $3,495.01 $105,748.29
Barahona........... 6,363.29 98.05 ............. 6,265.24
Comendador........ 1,149.48 ......................... 1,149.48
D ajab6n............ 2,99z.69 ...................... 2,992.69
La Romana.......... 61,047.70 1,489.04 176.31 61,239.17
Macoris............ 656,720.17 2,734.86 1, 50.63 688,779.28
Monte Cristi........ 122,683.71 2,408.90 3,299.85 125.412.21
Puerto Plata. ....... 703,634 17 1,347.94 2,632.17 744,387.18
Samand............. 75,940.88 1,007.59 246.79 78,156.03
Sanchez............. 507,278.24 1,591.11 24,957.16 545,895.69
Santo Domingo...... 1,215,785.48 2,574.49 52,734.35 1,199,727.45
Tierra Nueva........ 1,650.47 ......................... 1,650.47

13,462,163.66 14,213.44 88,792.27 23,561,403.18

'Gross collections at the ports, see Schedule 4.
2Actual receipts by the General Receiver, see Schedule 3.


SCHEDULE No. 3.

ACCOUNTABLE RETURNS.
Consolidation of the accounts current rendered by the General Receiver at the close of each
month during the Seventh Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 81, 1914.
DEBIT.

Balance due the Dominican Government per account, July 31, 1913.. $88.24
Due the Fiscal Agent from surplus over $3,000,000, calendar year 1913 182,497.10
Balance, credit of Building Fund............................. 63,833.97
Miscellaneous receipts ............................ ..... ... 9,147.18
Actual receipts, customs revenues remitted by Deputy Receivers:
Ports-
Azua................................. $105,748,29
Barahona............................. 6,265.24
Comendador ........................... 1,149.48
Dajab6n .......... .... .,... ..... 2,992.69
La Romana........,. ...;.. ..*,..: *1,239.17
Macorfs .............. *...". .', ..:.. :.~' .8,77 28
Monte Cristi. .... . 125..,41.2. 21
Puerto Platj,.t....*. .................. 744,387 ,
Samana. ,, ,... ....... 78,156.*03..*
Sanchez.. ..... .. ... ..... .:. ::.'.: 45,895.60.-.
Santo i o igo.......*. .* : .. ... :l 1 ,99,727.45 *
Tierra ntieva.......... ..............' 1,650.47 ***
3,561,403.18
Total of account ....................................... 3,816,969.67










DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


CREDIT.

Paid to the Dominican Government, Receipts Nos. 385-396.......
Paid to the Dominican Government on account of annulment of
sinking fund segregation .. ...........................
Deposited with Guaranty Trust Company, New York, for Fiscal
Agency Account, Remittances Nos. 308-9, 312-13, 314-16, 318-19,
322-23, 325, 328, 338, 344, 349, 355, 358,367, 368, 375, 379, 380, 383
Deposited with Guaranty Trust Company, New York, for account
of General Account Dominican Government (one-half of revenue
received in excess of $3,000,000 during the year ending December
31, 1913) Remittances Nos. 307, 310-11, 315-17, 320-21, 324,
326-7, 342 ................ .......................
Transmitted to Fiscal Agent, same account, calendar year 1914,
Remittances Nos. 359, 360, 361 .................. ........
Segregated to apply on same account, calendar year 1914.........
Deposited on account of loan authorized by Act of Congress approved
December 14, 1912, G. 0. 2358, Nos. 7-18.....................
Disbursements, per Abstracts, Form 7:
1. Expense Office of the General Receiver...... $77,727.16
2. Port of Azua........................... 6,897.72
3. Port of Barahona ....................... 2,211.85
4. Port of Comendador ..................... 1,881.39
5. Port of Dajab6n........................ 2,574.25
6. Port of La Romana...................... 5,080.82
7. Port of Macoris ......................... 14,545.24
8. Port of Monte Cristi..................... 7,622.78
9. Port of Puerto Plata .................... 18,364.75
10. Port of Samani ......................... 5,498.36
11. Port of SAnchez ......................... 11,892.32
12. Port of Santo Domingo ................... 22,002.24
13. Port of Tierra Nueva...................... 1,469.75


Disbursements for "account of and authorized by the Dominican
Government per abstracts form 7:


1.
1i
1'
1;


Disbu
Gov
Balan
D
I
B
I


$1,323,421.91
60,000.00

1,150,000.00



402,908.34

66,550.00
22,752.38
330,000.00


4. Refunds of duties collected in excess .................... 7,474.77
5. Refunds of duties, Article X of the Tariff................. 2,665.35
6. Refunds, Article 180, Customs Law. ................... 4,077.07
7. Expenses, Frontier Customs Service .................... 26,806.72
8. Expenses, Revenue Cutter Service....................... 41,093.88
9. Exchange on funds transmitted to Fiscal Agent, New York.. 12,119.90
Disbursements account Building Fund .................. 83,135.58
rsements for account of and authorized by the Dominican
rernment............................................. 1,506.85
ces on hand July 31, 1914:
)ue Fiscal Agent of Dominican Loan ....................... 50,000.00
)ue National City Bank................................ 30,000.00
balance, credit of Building Fund .......................... 5,475.19
)ue the Dominican Government.......................... 19,213.10
Total of account ................................ ........ 3,816,969.67


71 7,768.63










28 SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

SCHEDULE NO. 4.

STATISTICAL RETURNS.

Consolidation of the statements of receipts and expenditures submitted by the General
Receiver at the close of each month during the Seventh Convention Year, Augu.t 1,
1918, to July 31, 1914.
COLLECTIONS.

Gross collections........ .......................... $3,462,163.66
Derived from the following sources:
Import duties.......... .......................... 3,218,511.95
Export duties ... ..... ........... ....... ........ 157,161.26
Port Dues:
Tonnage ...... ................................. 58,097.50
Pilotage............................................. 8,310.44
Interpreters' fees ................. ....................... 1,608.50
Semaphore service ...................................... 1,352.50
Medical officers' fees................ .................... 1,618.50
Fines .............................................. 4,030.28
Coastwise permits ........................................ 850.00
Auction sales ................................... .. 9,299.23
Extra service fees ................ ...................... 1,323.50

3,462,163.66
Gross collections ................. ............ $3,462,163.66
Salaries and expenses, all entry ports 12.89 per cent............... 100,041.47
Salaries and expenses, Office of General Receiver 12.24 per cent.... 77,727.16

Total cost of collecting the revenue '5.13 per cent.......... 177,768.63


DISBURSEMENTS.

Total disbursements for all entry ports..........................
Disbursed as follows:
Customs expense (authorized by the Convention):


Salaries and wages ................ .. ......... $92,546.54
Expendable supplies...................... 250.08
Unexpendable property ................... 1,031.78
Rent, repairs, improvements, etc........... 2,640.52
M miscellaneous ............................ 3,572.55

Total customs expense............... .............
Payment of Personal Fees, etc. (authorized by the
Dominican Government):
Pilotage................................ $8,310.44
Interpreters' Fees ........................ 1,608.50
Semaphore Service ....................... 1,352.50
Medical Officers' Fees..................... 1,618.50
Extra service fees ........................ 1,323.50

Total account of personal fees, etc....................


$114,254.91







100,041.47







14,213.44

114,254.91


'Indicating percentage cost of collection, based on gross collections.











SCHEDULE No. 5.

Statement showing gross collections by months and sources, Seventh Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914, with comparisons of
totals for the previous year, showing increases and decreases.


Port charges. Miscellaneous
Month. Import Export customs Total.
duties, duties.
Tonnage dues. Personal fees. collections.

1913.
August........................... $314,472.06 $19,344.73 $4,985.29 $1,177.83 $1,638.12 $341,618.03
September................. ...... 236,221.70 6,610.93 4,359.93 860.35 931.32 248,984.23
October ......................... 245,358.35 2,738.44 2,983.22 828.87 1,844.74 253,753.62
November ........................ 295,044.71 7,682.28 3,261.92 986.09 1,169.61 308,144.61
December ........................ 401,143.38 14,984.66 5,678.47 1,533.65 1,293.78 424,633.94

1914.
January .......................... 352,830.65 13,865.06 5,804.16 1,557.93 366.92 374,424.72
February......................... 355,119.40 10,347.67 5,983.92 1,420.67 2,448.20 375,319.86
March ........................... 296,224.67 20,217.33 7,782.68 1,758.24 970.16 326,953.08
April............................. 203,132.65 15,043.01 4,924.27 1,380.46 1,850.39 226,330.78
May ............................. 190,884.40 19,173.03 4,795.16 1,055.65 493.65 216,401.89
June ............................ 163,606.11 12,077.34 3,423.79 825.09 571.41 180,503.74
July............................. 164,473.87 15,076.78 4,114.69 828.61 601.21 185,095.16

3,218,511.95 157,161.26 58,097.50 14,213.44 14,179.51 3,462,163.66
Comparison with last year.......... 3,796,564.78 222,660.13 64,547.88 14,014.66 11,506.67 4,109,294.12

Increase .......................... ..... .......... ................ ....... ... 198.78 2,672.84 ..............
Decrease.......................... 578,052.83 65,498.87 6,450.38 .............. ............. 647,130.46
















SCHEDULE NO. 6.

Statement showing collections by ports and sources, Seventh Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914.


Port charges. Miscellaneous
Ports. Import Export customs Total.
duties. duties. collectio
Tonnage dues. Personal fees. collections.


Azua............................ $97,434.97 $5,409.59 $2,630.04 $961.46 $481.32 $106,917.38
Barahona........................ 4,857.90 1,076.87 329.58 98.05 .89 6,363.29
Comendador...................... 667.48 ............................. ............... 482.00 1,149.48
Dajab6n ......................... 998.82 ............................. .............. 1,993.87 2,992.69
La Romana ...................... 48,928.36 7,758.76 2,870.22 1,489.04 1.32 61,047.70
Macoris ......................... 618,403.61 10,836.93 21,920.33 2,734.86 2,824.44 656,720.17
Monte Cristi ..................... 113,488.48 4,789.29 1,866.84 2,408.90 130.20 122,683.71
Puerto Plata ..................... 669,735.56 22,656.05 6,836.72 1,347.94 3,057.90 703,634.17
Samand ......................... 64,421.94 9,029.32 1,120.60 1,007.59 361.43 75,940.88
Sanchez......................... 419,142.58 80,493.22 5,627.68 1,591.11 423.65 507,278.24
Santo Domingo.................. 1,179,467.49 15,111.23 14,895.49 2,574.49 3,736.78 1,215,785.48
Tierra Nueva .................... 964.76 .......................................... 685.71 1,650.47

Total .................... 3,218,511.95 157,161.26 58,097.50 14,213.44 14,179.51 3,462,163.66










DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


SCHEDULE NO. 7.

Statement of gross collections by ports, Seventh Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July
31, 1914, compared with previous year, showing increases and decreases.

Gross collections,
August 1 to July 31-
Ports. Increase. Decrease.

1912-13. 1913-14.


Azua ................ $142,983.38 $106,917.38 ............ $36,066.00
Barahona ........... 3,605.52 6,363.29 $2,757.77 ............
Comendador......... 466.27 1,149.48 683.21 ............
Dajab6n.............. 624.43 2,992.69 2,368.26 ............
La Romana.......... 39,994.60 61,047.70 21,053.10 ............
Macorfs.............. 813,246.05 656,720.17 ........... 156,525.88
Monte Cristi......... 125,706.94 122,683.71 ............ 3,023.23
Puerto Plata......... 1,003,320.29 703,634.17 ............ 299,686.12
Saman .............. 85,547.25 75,940.88 ............ 9,606.37
Sanchez.............. 634,680.28 507,278.24 ............ 127,402.04
Santo Domingo....... 1,258,817.45 1,215,785.48 ............ 43,031.97
Tierra Nueva......... 301.66 1,650.47 1,348.81 ............

4,109,294.12 3,462,163.66 28,211.15 675,341.61
3,462,163.66 .............. ........... 28,211.15

Net decrease.... 647,130.46 ............ ............ 647,130.46
















SCHEDULE No. 8.

Comparative statement by months of amounts actually paid to the Dominican Government from its customs revenue, with totals for each
Convention Year, from August 1, 1908, to July 31, 1914.


Month. 1908-09. 1909-10. 1910-11. 1911-12. 1912-13. 1913-14.


August ......................
September..................
October......................
November....................
December...................
January .....................
February....................
M arch ......................
A pril........................
M ay........................
June ........................
July ........................

Total.................
Average monthly payments....


$136,400.00
166,400.00
163,900.00
160,400.00
146,400.00
135,042.00
122,300.00
190,500.00
156,400.00
156,400.00
156,400.00
156,400.00

1,846,942.00
153,911.83


$166,400.00
142,300.00
68,200.00
68,200.00
68,200.00
102,000.00
112,000.00
91,500.00
168,000.00
184,027.60
131,700.00
106,000.00

1,408,527.60
117,377.30


$207,000.00
111,000.00
120,000.00
250,000.00
50,000.00
178,000.00
130,000.00
149,000.00
238,000.00
199,000.00

390,000.00

2,022,000.00
168,500.00


$180,000.00
170,000.00
9,000.00
255,000.00
33,000.00
228,000.00
170,000.00
228,200.00
138,000.00
195,000.00
175,000.00
185,000.00

1,966,200.00
163,850.00


$146,900.00
122,000.00
183,000.00

257,500.00
166,000.00
143,000.00
129,000.00
112,000.00
181,000.00
140,000.00
167,000.00

1,747,400.00
145,616.67


$102,000.00
122,646.69
143,696.72
110,489.12
162,111.69
155,677.69
130,107.85
169,281.00
77,128.00
130,939.00
58,300.00
22,551.00

1,384,928.76
115,410.73










DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


SCHEDULE NO. 9.

Statement of amounts transmitted to the Fiscal Agent, New York, for service of the
Dominican Loan, under the terms of the Convention, Seventh Convention Year,
August]l, 1913, to July 31, 1914.

Date. Amount. Account of.


1913.
August-
6 .................................
18 ................................ .
22..................................
September-
4................................. .
15 .................................
20 ................... ..............
October-
6 .................................
6 .................................
14........... ... .............. .....
31..................................
November-
8 .................................
13..................................
14..................................
21..................................
December-
11.................................
11..................................
1914.
January-
2 .................................
8 .................................
12 ..................................
30..................................
February-
13..................................
28..................................
March-
6 ................................ .
20..................................
30 .................................
April-
22 ............ ......................
29..................................
30 ...................................
M ay'26..................................
June30. .................................
July-
15..................................
25..................................
31..................................


$100,000.001
50,000.00
50,000.00

75,000.001
50,000.00
50,000.00

50,000.00
20,000.00'
50,000.00
30,000.00'

50;000.00
50,000.00
20,000.00'
10,000.00'

50,000.00
50,000.00


30,000.00'
100,000.00
30,000.001
1,498.401

50,000.00
50,000.00

86,409.'941
50,000.00
50,000.00

50,000.00
50,000.00
66,550.002
100,000.00
50,000.00

50,000.00
25,000.00
25,000.00

1,619,458.34


August, 1913.
Do.


September, 1913.
Do.

October, 1913.

Do.


November, 1913.
Do.



December, 1913.
Do.



January, 1914.



February, 1914.
Do.


March, 1914.
Do.

April, 1914.
Do.

May, 1914.
June, 1914.

Do.
July, 1914.
Do.


'One-half of surplus revenue over $3,000,000 calendar year 1913.
2One-half of surplus revenue over $3,000,000 calendar year 1914.









SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


SCHEDULE No. 10.

Statement showing total expenditures on account of expenses proper of the Customs
Service and Receivership, Seventh Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914.


Salaries of officers and employees..........................
Expendable supplies................ .........................
Unexpendable property ..... ..............................
Supplies and property for issue to the general service ...............
Freight and charges on supplies and property ...............
Expenses of officers traveling under orders:


$146,965.52
1,301.26
1,908.86
6,676.61
483.27


Local....... ........................................ 1,547.67
Foreign. ............................................. 2,275.44
Telegrams and cablegrams .................. .......... ........ 2,483.13
Rent and repairs to buildings................................... 2,832.52
Receivership Annex, including property, rent, etc.............. 5,328.15
Miscellaneous .. ........................................... 3,280.80
Hospital account ............. ................................. 2,685.40

Total expense chargeable as cost of collecting the revenue..... 177,768.63

NOTE.-The percentage of cost of collection to the Dominican Republic, per dollar,
was $0.0513, based on gross collections of the year.




SCHEDULE NO. 11.

Statement showing the total expenses of the Office of the General Receiver, separate and
distinct from the Dominican customs organization, Seventh Convention Year,
August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914.


(These items are included in Schedule No. 10.)
Salaries of officers and employees..................... .........
Expendable supplies .........................................
Unexpendable property .. ..............................
Supplies and property for issue to the general service ...............
Freight and charges on supplies and property ....................
Expenses of officers traveling under orders:
Local........................................... ........
Foreign .................................................
Telegrams and cablegrams....................................
Rent and repairs to buildings ....................................
Equipment of Receivership Annex, including property, rent, repairs, etc.
Hospital account.............................................
M iscellaneous................................................ .


$54,418.98
1,052.73
875.53
6,876.61
157.05

1,022.09
2,127.23
2,387.77
192.00
5,328.15
2,685.40
803.62


Total ........................................ ......... 77,727.16









DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


SCHEDULE NO. 12.

Statement showing the expenditures on account of the Revenue Cutter Service, Seventh
Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914.

Salaries and wages, officers and crews.... .................. $16,541.58
Expendable supplies ........................... ............ 1,626.22
Unexpendable property ........................................ 2,997.23
Ration allowance for crews ..................... ........... 4,490.90
Expenses of officers traveling under orders........................ 990.70
Ships' laundry and kitchen fuel ................................. 359.71
Telegrams and cablegrams... ........... .. .............. 94.24
Repairs to cutters, etc......... ................ ....... 2,924.99
Freight, insurance and landing charges on supplies ................. 681.61
Insurance....... ............................... .... 1,650.00
Miscellaneous ............................................. 1,170.31
27,872.5 gallons of gasoline, including freight, insurance and landing
charges.................................................. 7,566.39
Total....................................... 41,093.88


SCHEDULE NO. 13.

Statement showing the expenditures on account of the Frontier Customs Service, Seventh
Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914.

Salaries, officers and inspectors ...................... ............. $22,208.08
Expendable supplies ......................................... 107.19
Unexpendable property .......................... .... .... 109.10
M maintenance of mounts ......................................... 1,715.49
Clothing allowance .......................................... 433.51
Travel expenses........................................... 1,035.79
Telegrams and cablegrams ................. ... ................ 13.13
Rent and repairs of quarters..................................... 333.82
Freight and transportation charges on supplies ..................... 15.09
M miscellaneous ........................ .......................... 835.52
Total ............................ .. ............... 26,806.72










;5j SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

SCHEDULE No. 14.

Statement showing the gross collections and expenditures by ports, and cost of collection
per dollar, Seventh Convention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 81, 1914.


Gross Total Cost of
Ports. col s ex es. collection
collections expenses per dollar.


Azua............................. $106,917.38 $6,897.72 $0.0645
Barahona ........................ 6,363.29 2,211.85 0.3475
Comendador ..................... 1,149.48 1,881.39 1.6367
Dajab6n......................... 2,992.69 2,574.25 0.8602
La Romana ...............:...... 61,047.70 5,080.82 0.0832
M acoris.......................... 656,720.17 14,545.24 0.0221
Monte Cristi ..................... 122,683.71 7,622.78 0.0621
Puerto Plata ..................... 703,634.17 18,364.75 0.0261
Saman .......................... 75,940.88 5,498.36 0.0724
Sinchez.......................... 507,278.24 11,892.32 0.0234
Santo Domingo .................. 1,215,785.48 22,002.24 0.0180
Tierra Nueva .................... 1,650.47 1,469.75 0.8905

Total...................... 3,462,163.66 100,041.47 0.0289





SCHEDULE No. 15.

Statement showing the relative standing of the entry and interior ports of the Dominican
Republic in point of receipts and cost of collection, with percentages, Seventh Con-
vention Year, August 1, 1913, to July 31, 1914.


Percent-
Relative rank based upon age of Relative rank based upon Cost of
total revenue collected. rtol cost of collection. coll on
revenue per dollar.
collected.

PORTS. PORTS.

1. Santo Domingo......... 35.12 1. Santo Domingo......... $0.0180
2. Puerto Plata ........... 20.32 2. Sanchez .............. 0.0234
3. Macoris................ 18.97 3. Macoris............... 0.0221
4. Sanchez................ 14.65 4. Puerto Plata........... 0.0261
5. Monte Cristi............ 3.55 5. Monte Cristi.......... 0.0621
6. Azua.................. 3.08 6. Azua................. 0.0645
7. Samand ................ 2.19 7. Samana ............... 0.0724
8. La Romana............ 1.77 8. La Romana........... 0.0832
9. Barahona............... 0.19 9. Barahona ............ 0.3475
10. Dajab6n. .............. 0.09 10. Dajab6n.. ,........... 0.8602
11. Tierra Nueva........... 0.04 11. Tierra Nueva......... 0.8905
12. Comendador ........... 0.03 12. Comendador .......... 1.6367

The last three named are the land custom houses along the Haitian border, trans-
actions nominal, work in the main preventive.










DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


APPENDIX "B."

Recapitulation of all financial transactions of the Dominican Customs Receivership
from its commencement, April 1, 1905, to July 31, 1914.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COLLECTIONS, EXPENDITURES AND
DISPOSITIONS OF FUNDS.

Gross collections from all sources..............................$31,201,992.46
Miscellaneous receipts, Office of the General Receiver ............. 18,578.16

Total. . .......... ... ... ................. .......... 31,220,570.62

EXPENDITURES AND DISPOSITIONS.

1. Customs expenses proper, including expenses of the Receivership. $1,269,988.60
2. Deposited with Fiscal Agent, New York, for service of the
Dominican loan ....................................... 13,189,003.18
3. Segregated account one-half surplus, calendar year 1914 ....... 22,752.38
4. Deposited with the National City Bank of New York for service
of the loan authorized December 14, 1912 ................. 540,000.00
5. Paid to the Dominican Government ....................... 14,681,236.78
6. Balance to credit of Dominican Government, July 31, 1914 .... 19,213.10
7. Building Fund accumulation including interest ............... 5,475.19
8. Building Fund disbursements .............................. 95,566.-87
9. Balances in transit from Deputy Receivers to the General Re-
ceivers to the General Receiver, July 31, 1914............. 88,792.27
10. Paid on account of wharf and harbor concessions ............. 171,973.48
11. Refunds of duties collected in excess ................... ..... 74,523.35
12. Refunds, Article X of Tariff ............................... 15,315.88
13. Refunds, Article 180, Customs Law ......................... 9,261.32
14. Establishment and operation of Revenue Cutter Service....... 346,384.55
15. Expenses Frontier Customs Service, inaugurated October, 1912.. 37,093.33
16. Exchange on funds transmitted to Fiscal Agent, New York. ... 97,876.33
17. Personal fees refunded by Deputy Receivers ................. 139,643.44
18. Segregated as internal revenue (discontinued after February,
1908)............................................... 174,495.73.
19. Maintenance of Customs and Frontier Guard (discontinued as a
Receivership dependency, July, 1908)..................... 146,674.84
20. Morris, Milbourn and Thurston settlements................... 15,300.00
21. Segregated and pending transmittal to Fiscal Agency.......... 50,000.00
22. Segregated and pending transmittal to National City Bank.... 30,000.00

Total........................ ....................... 31,220,570.62










SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE


APPENDIX "C."

Dominican customs organization authorized by the national Congress, in effect July 1,
1913. This outlines the customs service. proper as distinct from the Receivership
personnel (Appendix "D"). Salaries and operating expenses of all ports are paid
by the Receivership from its allowance of five per cent of gross collections.

Ports.



Position. 'a

d 0
a 'ammf m


Collectors1..................... 1 1 1 1 21 1 1 1 1 9
First Officials ................. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9
SecondOfficials................ 2 .... 1 1 1 1 2 .... 1 9
Cashiers ......................... 1 ........ 1 .... 1 .... 1 1 5
Liquidators...................... .......... 1 .... 1 .... 1 1 4
Examiners ................... ...... 1 .. 1 . . 1 1 4
Interpreters................... .... ... 1 1 1 1 1 1 7
Chemists ......................................... 1 ........ 1 2
Clerks ................................. ................ ..... 1 2 3
Chief of Inspectors .............. 1 ........ 1 1 1 1 1 1 7
Inspectors....................... 6 3 5 10 -5 12 4 12 12 69
Laborers....................... 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 6 20
Boatmen....................... 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 .... 18
Messengers ..................................... ........... 1 1
Porters.................. .... .. 1 ........ 1 1 1 1 1 1 7

Total.................... 18 8 11 23 17 26 15 25 31 174

'Occupants of this position also serve as Deputy Receivers for and under the
Receivership.
2This post occupied by an American employee, appointed by the Receivership;
appears also in roster of the Receivership, Appendix "D."









APPENDIX "D."

Personnel of the Receivership, including Interventors'designated and appointed Deputy Receivers, as in effect July 31, 1914.

OFFICE OF THE GENERAL RECEIVER, SANTO DOMINGO.


Name. Designation. Nationality. Entered this service.


Walker W Vick ................ .
John T. Vance. ..................
Lorin L. Miner ..................
Andrew Joyner..................
W. 0. Simmons ..................
J. F. Cresser .. ..................
H. H. Neuhauser................
G. D. Miller .....................
O. D. Hoffman ................ ..
P. R. Lynch .....................
L. E. Lavandier .................
B. A. Delgado. ..................
P. A Vidal ......................
Edmundo Cuello ................
J. A. Alberty....................
A. Arredondo ....................
C. Arredondo ....................
F. C Carias ....................
A. Latour ......................
H M aggiolo .. ..................
E. Mejia..,...... ..........
M A. M eja. ................. .
Joseph Burke ....................
John Heyliger ...................
F. Chapman .. ..................
R. I. Carbonell..................
Virginia Diaz ....................
Paul S. Carter ...................


General Receiver ....................
Deputy General Receiver ............
Secretary ...........................
Chief Statistician ..................
Custodian and Supply Officer.........
Assistant to Auditor .................
Clerk to Auditor ....................
Record Clerk .......................
Stenographer and Clerk..............
Superintendent of Annex.............
Translator ........................
Typewriter .........................
.....d o .......................... ...
Clerk, Auditing Department ..........
. ... d o .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . ..
Clerk, Statistical Department.........
..... do.............................
..... do ............................
.....do .......................... ..
..... do ............................
.do .. ...do ............... .........
.....do .............................
Janitor..............................
Night-watchman .................. .
Messenger..........................
..... d o .............................
Charwoman.........................
Purchasing Agent, New York.........


Am erican .......................
.... do.........................
.... do .........................
.....do .........................
American (naturalized) ...........
Am erican.......................
..... d o .........................
.....do ........ ................
American (naturalized)...........
Am erican .......................
Dominican ....................
..... do .........................
..... d o .........................
... .do.........................
... ..do .........................
.... do .........................
..... do ..................... ....
..... do. ......................
..... d o .........................
..... d o .........................
..... d o ...................... ...
......do.........................
Danish subject ..................
Dutch subject ..................
Dominican .....................
... ..do .........................
..... d o .........................
Am erican................... ....


June 16, 1913.
September 29, 1913.
December 27, 1913.
December 27,1913.
May 20, 1907.
August 23, 1913.
August 2, 1913.
September 24,1913.
February 25, 1914.
July 1, 1914.
September 5, 1910.
July 1, 1905.
January 12, 1912.
September 8, 1911.
May 4, 1912.
November 16,1905.
January 1, 1914.
December 8, 1913.
March 9, 1912.
October 19, 1911.
January 27, 1913.
July 2, 1912.
December 28, 1908.
April 1, 1914.
April 11, 1912.
January 15, 1914.
April 13, 1908.
August 1, 1907.


1















OUTSIDE REPRESENTATIVES.


Name. Designation. Station. Nationality. Entered this service.

Julio Senior ................. Special Inspector. ............ Special Duty........ Dutch ................. February 1, 1909.
J. Llaverias.................... do .................... M acoris............ Dominican............. January 1, 1907.
J. M Santana.................... do.................... Santo Domingo.......... do................. May 4, 1912.
N. L. Orme ................. Acting Special Inspector...... Puerto Plata........ American............... January 10, 1914.
J. P. Hollesen ....................do .................... (Unassigned)........ American (naturalized)... February 28, 1914.
S. L. Butler................. .... do................... ... do ... .. ... . do................. M arch 12, 1914.
W H. Yoakum .............. ..... do..................... .....do .................do................. M ay 6, 1914.


LAND PORTS, HAITIAN FRONTIER.


Name. Designation. Station. Nationality. Entered this service.

James J. McLean.. ......... Deputy Receiver in charge... Dajab6n............. American (naturalized)... August 20, 1907.
G. W Lewis................. Inspector................... ... do.............American ............. January 27, 1914.
Miguel Almonte ............. Assistant.................. .....do.............. Dominican ............. July 1, 1908.
J. E. Stott .................. Inspector................... Comendador ....... American............... September 13, 1913.
P. A. Caceres ............... Assistant....................... do.............. Dominican ............. October 1, 1910.
Thomas F. Norris............ Inspector ................... Neyba............. American ............. May 31, 1913.
Natalio Sirett ............... Assistant.................... ....do............. Dominican ............. April 16, 1913.









DEPUTY RECEIVERS, SEA-COAST ENTRY PORTS.


Name. Station. Nationality. Entered this service.

Hernani Garcia ................. Azua ........................... Dominican.. .................. July 20, 1914.
(No Deputy Receiver Barahona.)
Lpido Ricart ................... La Romana. ......................... ....do......................... January 16, 1914.
A. H. Aybar ..................... Puerto Plata....................... .....do........................ November 15, 1913.
Julian Zorilla .................... Saman .......................... .. do..: ..................... November 21,1913.
Julio Coen....................... Snchez............................... do......................... November15, 1913.
R. Alburquerque.................. Macoris.............................. do........................ July 7, 1908.
A. E. Fiallo...................... Santo D om ingo....................... do......................... M ay 11, 1905.
M. E. Beall...................... Monte Cristi........................ American ................... August 25, 1913.

REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE (not including Seamen).


Name. Designation Nationality. Entered this service.

J. R. Troop...................... Captain................... ........ American (naturalized)........... November 6, 1906.
Christian Lied ................. .....do ............................. Norwegian .................... July 27, 1910.
J. F. Nielsen...........................do.................... ........ Dane....................... January 8,1913.
J. E. Simmons.................. .......do............................. Dutch subject .................. July 1, 1914.
Oscar Fagerlund ................. Engineer ........................... Swede.......................... May 14, 1914.
E. F. Johnson ....................... do ............................ Norwegian .................. January 10, 1912.
H M H ogland....................... do............................ ... do...................... October 12, 1912.
L. S. Whipple........................ do............................ American....................... May 8, 1913.
Otto Leoke....................... Assistant Engineer................... Dane......................... June 20, 1914.
L. R. Pimentel. .................. Inspector. .......................... Dominican ................... January 1, 1913.
A. Lapeiretta........................ do.............................. . do........................ November 27, 1908.
M ario R. Bonetti........... .... do.................................. do......................... January 1, 1913.
N atalio R am irez...................... do..................................do ......................... July 1, 1907.










42 SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

Number of employees in Service, July 31, 1914.
Office of the General Receiver ........................... 27
Purchasing Agent in the United States.................... 1
Special Inspectors ..................................... 3
Acting Special Inspectors..:..............: .............. 4
Land Ports, Haitian Frontier........................... 7
Deputy Receivers, Sea-coast Entry Ports................... 8
Revenue Cutter Service, not including seamen............. 13
T otal................. ...... ............... 631
'Exclusive of subordinate employees at the several maritime ports of entry.


APPENDIX "E."
CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE DOMINICAN
REPUBLIC PROVIDING FOR THE ASSISTANCE OF. THE UNITED STATES IN THE
COLLECTION AND APPLICATION OF THE CUSTOMS REVENUES OF THE DOMINICAN
REPUBLIC.


Concluded February 8, 1907.
Ratification advised by Senate, February 25, 1907.
Ratified by President, June 22, 1907.
Ratified by President of the Dominican Republic, June 18, 1907.
Ratifications exchanged at Washington, July 8, 1907.
Proclaimed July 25, 1907.


By the President of the United States of America,
A PROCLAMATION.
Whereas, a convention between the United States of America and the Dominican
Republic providing for the assistance of the United States in the collection and
application of the customs revenues of the Dominican Republic, was concluded and
signed by their respective Plenipotentiaries at the city of Santo Domingo, on the
eighth day of February, one thousand nine hundred and seven, the original of
which convention, being in the English and Spanish languages, is word for word
as follows:
Whereas, during disturbed political conditions in the Dominican Republic debts
and claims have been created, some by regular and some by revolutionary govern-
ments, many of doubtful validity in whole or in part, and amounting in all to over
$30,000,000, nominal or face value;
And whereas, the same conditions have prevented the peaceable and continuous
collection and application of National revenues for payment of interest or principal
of such debts or for liquidation and settlement of such claims; and the said debts
and claims continually increase by accretion of interest and are a grievous burden
upon the people of the Dominican Republic and a barrier to their improvement
and prosperity;
And whereas, the Dominican Government has now effected a conditional adjustment
and settlement of said debts and claims under which all its foreign creditors have
agreed to accept about $12,407,000 for debts and claims amounting to about
$21,184,000 of nominal or face value, and the holders of internal debts or claims
of about $2,028,258 nominal or face value have agreed to accept about $645,827
therefore, and the remaining holders of internal debts or claims on the same basis
as the assents already given will receive about $2,400,000 therefore, which sum the
Dominican Government has fixed and determined as the amount which it will pay
to such remaining internal debt holders; making the total payments under such
adjustment and settlement, including interest as adjusted and claims not yet
liquidated, amount to not more than about $17,000,000;










DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP.


And whereas, a part of such plan of settlement is the issue and sale of bonds of the
Dominican Republic to the amount of $20,000,000 bearing five per cent interest
payable in fifty years and redeemable after ten years at 102X and requiring
payment of at least one per cent per annum for amortization, the proceeds of said
bonds, together with such funds as are now deposited for the benefit of creditors
from customs revenues of the Dominican Republic heretofore received, after
payment of the expenses of such adjustment, to be applied first to the payment
of said debts and claims as adjusted and, second, out of the balance remaining to the
retirement and extinction of certain concessions and harbor monopolies which
are a burden and hindrance to the commerce of the country and, third, the entire
balance still remaining to the construction of certain railroads and-bridges and
other public improvements necessary to the industrial development of the country;
And whereas, the whole of said plan is conditioned and dependent upon the assistance
of the United States in the collection of customs revenues of the Dominican Republic
and the application thereof so far as necessary to the interest upon and the
amortization and redemption of said bonds, and the Dominican Republic has
requested the United States to give, and the United States is willing to give, such
assistance:
The Dominican Government, represented by its Minister of State for Foreign
Relations, Emiliano Tejera, and its Minister of State for Finance and Commerce,
Federico Velazquez H., and the United States Government, represented by
Thomas C. Diwson, Minister Resident and Consul General of the United States to
the Dominican Republic, have agreed:
I. That the President of the United States shall appoint a General Receiver of
Dominican Customs, who, with such Assistant Receivers and other employees of the
Receivership as shall be appointed by the President of the United States in his dis-
cretion, shall collect all the customs duties accruing at the several customs houses of
the Dominican Republic until the payment or retirement of any and all bonds issued
by the Dominican Government in accordance with the plan and under the limitations
as to terms and amounts hereinbefore recited; and said General Receiver shall apply
the sums so collected, as follows:
First, to paying the expenses of the receivership; second, to the payment of interest
upon said bonds; third, to the payment of the annual sums provided for amortization
of said bonds including interest upon all bonds held in sinking fund; fourth, to the
purchase and cancellation or the retirement and cancellation pursuant to the terms
thereof of any of said bonds as may be directed by the Dominican Government;
fifth, the remainder to be paid to the Dominican Government.
The method of distributing the current collections of revenue in order to accomplish
the application thereof as hereinbefore provided shall be as follows:
The expenses of the receivership shall be paid by the Receiver as they arise. The
allowances to the General Receiver and his assistants for the expenses of collecting
the revenues shall not exceed five per cent unless by agreement between the two
Governments. On the first day of each calendar month the sum of $100,000 shall be
paid over by the Receiver to the Fiscal Agent of the loan, and the remaining collection
of the last preceding month shall be paid over to the Dominican Government, or
applied to the sinking fund for the purchase or redemption of bonds, as the Dominican
Government shall direct.
Provided, That in case the customs revenues collected by the General Receiver
shall in any year exceed the sum of $3,000,000, one-half of the surplus above such sum
of $3,000,000 shall be applied to the sinking fund for the redemption of bonds.
II. The Dominican Government will provide by law for the payment of all customs
duties to the General Receiver and his assistants, and will give to them all needful
aid and assistance and full protection to the extent of its powers. The Government
of the United States will give to the General Receiver and his assistants such protec-
tion as it, may find to be requisite for the performance of their duties.
III. Until the Dominican Republic has paid the whole amount of the bonds of the
debt its public debt shall not be increased except by previous agreement between the
Dominican Government and the United States. A like agreement shall be necessary
to modify the import duties, it being an indispensable condition for the modification
of such duties that. the Dominican Executive demonstrate and that the President of
the United States recognize that, on the basis of exportations and importations to
the like amount and the like character during the two years preceding that in which
it is desired to make such modification, the total net customs receipts would at such
altered rates of duties have been for each of such two years in excess of the sum
$2,000,000 United States gold.










44 SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

IV. The accounts of the General Receiver shall be rendered monthly to the Con-
taduria General of the Dominican Republic and to the State Department of the
United States and shall be subject to examination and verification by the appropriate
officers of the Dominican and the United States Governments.
V. This agreement shall take effect after its approval by the Senate of the United
States and the Congress of the Dominican Republic.
Done in four originals, two being in the English language, and two in' the Spanish,
and the representatives of the high contracting parties, signing them in the city of
Santo Domingo this 8th day of February, in the year of our Lord 1907.
THOMAS C. DAWSON,
EMILIANO TEJERA,
FEDERICO VELAZQUEZ H.
And whereas, the said convention has been duly ratified on both parts, and the rati-
fications of the two governments were exchanged in the city of Washington on the
eighth day of July, one thousand nine hundred and seven;
Now, therefore, be it known that I, Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United
States of America, have caused the said convention to be made public, to the end
that the same and every article and clause thereof may be observed and fulfilled with
good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.
In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the
United States of America to be affixed.
Done at the city of Washington, this 25th day of July in the year of our Lord one
thousand nine hundred and seven, and of the Independence of the United States of
America the one hundred and thirty-second.
[SEAL] THEODORE ROOSEVELT.
By the President:
ROBERT BACON,
Acting Secretary of State.



(Executive Order).
THE WHITE HOUSE,
WASHINGTON, D. C., July 25, 1907.
Whereas, the Convention concluded on the 8th of February, 1907, between the
United States of America and the Dominican Republic has been duly signed and
ratified by the governments of said countries, the following regulations are hereby
promulgated for the government of the customs receivership established thereunder:

GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVER-
SHIP UNDER AND IN PURSUANCE OF THE CONVENTION OF FEBRUARY 8TH, 1907,
BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC.

1. In accordance with the provisions of Article 4 of the Convention, the accounts
of the General Receiver shall be rendered to the Contaduria General of the Dominican
-Republic, and to the State Department of the United States, and referred for exami-
nation and verification to the Bureau of Insular Affairs, which shall have immediate
supervision and control of the receivership, pursuant and subject to such directions
in regard thereto as shall be received from the President directly or through the
Secretary of State.
2. The President of the United States will appoint and fix the salaries of the General
Receiver of Dominican Customs, of the Deputy General Receiver of Dominican
Customs, as well as of all other customs employees under the receivership. In cases
of emergency, provisional appointments and removals for cause may be made in the
discretion of the General Receiver, subject to the approval of the President of the
United States.
3. The accountable bonds to be required by the receivership, except as herein
otherwise provided, shall be fixed by the General Receiver, subject to the approval
of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs.
4. Under the Bureau of Insular Affairs, the General Receiver shall have full charge
and control of the Dominican customs receivership within the scope of the Convention










DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP. 45

of February 8, 1907, between the United States of America and Dominican Republic,
and shall enforce and comply with the provisions thereof. He shall give bond in such
form and amount as may be determined by the Chief of said Bureau.
5: The Deputy General Receiver shall assist the General Receiver in the performance
of his duties and in matters pertaining to the receivership, in such manner as the
General Receiver shall direct, and in the absence or disability of the latter, the
,Deputy General Receiver, shall perform the duties of the General Receiver, and
assume, without formal transfer, the corresponding accountability. The Deputy
General Receiver shall give bond under the same conditions as the General Receiver.
6. The General Receiver shall pay all necessary and authorized expenses of the
receivership as they arise, within the limitations of the Convention. The allowance
not exceeding five per cent "for the expense of collecting the revenues," under
Article I of the Convention, shall be considered as available only for the payment of
the customs expense of the central office of the receivership, its special customs
agents and the several customs houses of the Republic as authorized by the said
General Receiver or other proper authority of the United States Government.
7. All of the expenditures and disbursements of funds handled by the receiver-
ship shall be covered by complete vouchers in duplicate; one copy of each such
voucher shall be retained as a part of the permanent files of the central office of the
receivership, and the other transmitted to the Dominican Government, together with
the corresponding accountable returns.
8. All books, records and accounts of the receivership shall be kept available and
accessible for examination, inspection and audit at any time, by officers designated
for that purpose, in accordance with the Convention, by either the Dominican or the
United States Government. Such books, records and accounts shall constitute
permanent archives of the central'office of the receivership, and shall not be removed
therefrom.
9. The General Receiver, or in his absence, the Deputy General Receiver, shall
submit the following reports to the Bureau of Insular Affairs, and to the Dominican
Government:
I. On the first of each month, or as soon thereafter as practicable, the Accountable
Returns covering all transactions of the receivership during the preceding month.
II. On the first of each month, or as soon thereafter as practicable, a consolidated
report of the receipts and expenditures of the Dominican customs service during the
preceding month, accompanied by the corresponding statement for each entry port
of the Republic separately.
III. For the six months ending June 30th and December 31st of each year, and as
soon as practicable after those dates, statistical reports of the commerce of the
Republic.
IV. At the end of each fiscal year of the receivership, starting from the date upon
which the operations of the receivership begin under the Convention, and as soon
thereafter as practicable, a general report of all transactions of the receivership
during each such year, together with such collateral data and remarks as may be
deemed pertinent theretd.
10. The General Receiver shall prepare and promulgate from time to time such
additional regulations as he may deem necessary for the proper conduct of the service
under his direction. Copies of all such regulations and formal orders issued, shall
be transmitted, as soon as practicable after their issuance to the Bureau of Insular
Affairs, and shall be subject to the approval of the Chief of that Bureau.
11. When deemed necessary, and at least once in each fiscal year, a personal
inspection and examination of all accounts and records of the Receivership shall be
made in Santo Domingo by a representative of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, who
shall file with said Bureau a full report of his findings for such action as may be
required.
12. From and after August 1, 1907, upon which date these regulations shall become
effective, and until such time as the provisions of the Convention, through the
completion of the corresponding financial arrangement, become fully operative, the
General Receiver shall, in his own name as such General Receiver, in a new account,
continue to make the same disposition of the funds received by him as heretofore.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT.










INDEX. S N
NARRATIVE SECTION. UiJic
PAGE.
Annual Inspection ........................... .... .................. P23
Assets of Sinking Fund ..................... ..... 10
Audit of Collection Accounts ..................... ... ............... 7
Building Fund ........................... ...................... 13
Collections..................... .................. .................... 5
Commerce .................... ...... ...... ...... ....... ............ 21
Deaths and Changes in Personnel ................................ ... 19
Depositary Vicissitudes ................................ ..... ..... 20
Disbursement and Disposition of Funds................................. 7
Disposition of the Balance of the Proceeds of the National City Bank Loan .... 13
Fiscal Agency............................................. ... ......................... 10
Frontier Customs Service .............................................. 17
National City Bank .................................................. 10
Payments to the Dominican Government ............................... 11
R eceivership Expens ....... ...................................... 7
Revenue Cut+"- .......................................... 15
Savings an, .............................................. 8
Special Inspectu .. ............................................. 19
Tariff Revision ...... ...... ........................... 21
The Financial Expert for the Dominican Republic ........................ 4
The Year's W ork .. .. ............................................ 3

APPENDIX "A."
Schedule No. 1. Consolidated statement of collections, expenditures and
dispositions of funds, for the year ................. .... 25
Schedule No. 2. Statement showing gross collections and dispositions made
thereof by Deputy Receivers at the several ports, for the
year ................................................ 26
Schedule No. 3. Consolidation of the accounts current rendered by the
General Receiver at the close of each month during the year. 26
Schedule No. 4. Consolidation of the statements of receipts and expenditures
submitted by the General Receiver at the close of each
month during the year .............................. 28
Schedule No. 5. Statement of gross collections by months and sources for the
year with comparisons of totals for the previous year,
showing increases and decreases ....................... 29
Schedule No. 6. Statement of collections by ports and sources, for the year.. 30
Schedule No. 7. Statement of gross collections by ports for the year, com-
pared with the previous year, showing increases and de-
creases.................... ....................... 31
Schedule No. 8. Comparative statement by months of amounts actually paid
to the Dominican Government from its customs revenue,
with totals for.each Convention year, from August 1, 1908,
to July 31, 1914 .................. ......... 32
Schedule No. 9. Statement of amounts transmitted to Fiscal Agent, New
York, for service of the Dominican I under the terms of
the Convention, for the year ......... ................. 33
Schedule No. 10. Statement of total expenditures on account of expenses
proper of the Customs Service and Receivership, for the
year ................................................ 34
Schedule No. 11. Statement of total expenses of the office of the General Re-
ceiver, separate and distinct from the Dominican customs
organization, for the year............................ 34
Schedule No. 12. Statement of expenditures on account of the Revenue Cutter
Service, for the year........................... ....... 35
Schedule No. 13. Statement of expenditures on account of the Frontier
Customs Service, for the year ........................ 35
Schedule No. 14. Statement of gross collections and expenditures by ports,
and cost of collection per dollar, for the year............. 36
Schedule No. 15. Statement showing the relative standing of the entry and
interior ports of the Dominican Republic, in point of receipts
and cost of collection, with percentages, for the year...... 36
(47)






LATIN AMERICA


48 INDEX.

APPENDIX "B."
PAGE.
Recapitulation of all financial transactions of the Dominican Customs
Receivership from its commencement, April 1, 1905, to July
31, 1914. .................................... ... 37

APPENDIX "C."

Dominican Customs organization authorized by the National Congress, in
effect July 1, 1913, as distinct from the Receivership
personnel .... ..................................... 38

APPENDIX "D."

Personnel of the Receivership, including Interventors designated and ap-
pointed Deputy Receivers, as in effect July 31, 1914...... 39

APPENDIX "E."

Copies of the American-Dominican Convention of 1907, and General Regula-
tions governing the Receivership ...................... 42




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