Title: Hometown news (Sebastian, FL)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091497/00029
 Material Information
Title: Hometown news (Sebastian, FL)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publication Date: July 17, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Indian River -- Sebastian
Coordinates: 27.782778 x -80.482222 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091497
Volume ID: VID00029
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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S T SEBASTIAN RIVER AREA






V ol. 6, No. 42 Your Local News and Information Source www.HometownNewsL.com Friday, July 17, 2009
Vol. 6, No. 42 Your Local News and Information Source www.HometownNewsOL.com Friday, July 17, 2009


HOW WEIRD
IS THAT?!
?- SEAN MCCARTHY



pend any time surfing
the Web and you are
bound to find stories
that are just too bizarre to
be true. Here's a sampling,
edited for length. And
remember, just because it's
online doesn't mean it's
true!
From www.sfgate.com:
Man doesn't pay for'Only
God can judge me' tattoo.
God might not be the only
one passing judgment on a
man who skipped out on
paying $200 for a religious
tattoo at a parlor.
From www.msnbc.com:
Cops: Man went naked to
dental appointment. Man
was late for appointment;
he ran when the reception-
ist screamed.
Police say a Connecticut
man was arrested because
he showed up at a dental
office naked. Police say 41-
year-old Christopher Hoff
of Stratford, also was five
days late for his appoint-
ment.
Authorities say Hoff
entered the dentist office
Monday with nothing on. A
startled female receptionist
screamed, and he ran away.
From www.news.aol.com:
Prank leads Florida couple
to trash hotel room.
Authorities say a
prankster persuaded a
married couple to smash
their Florida hotel window
after falsely telling them the
room had a gas leak.
Police say a person
claiming to be a front-desk
clerk at an Orlando hotel
convinced the couple to
break a wall mirror and use
a lamp to punch a hole
through the wall. The
couple also threw a mat-
tress out the window, but a
hotel manager came to the
room before they could
jump.
From
See WEIRD, A2



BIG RIVER


Riverside Children's
Theatre presents an
American classic


PICKLES, PEPPERS

SHow to
make your
own
pickles and
peppers


Friday: Scattered
thunderstorms; high:
90; low: 75; high tide:
5:02 p.m.; low tide:
10:56 p.m.
PL Saturday: Scattered
thunderstorms; high: 90; low: 75; high
tide: 4:59 a.m.; low tide: 11:22 a.m.
Sunday: Scattered thunderstorms; high:
90; low: 75; high tide: 6:07 a.m.; low
tide: 12:23 p.m.
Weather courtesy ofwww.weather.com


Classified B7 Police Report A5
Crossword B6 Star Scopes B1
Obituaries B6 Travel B4
Out &About B1 Viewpoint A6


Early voting for special


election begins July 27


By Jessica Tuggle
jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY For
residents eligible to vote in the Aug.
4 special election, early voting
begins on July 27 and will go
through Aug. 1, election officials
said.
Voters in District 28 will decide
the state senate race between Josue
Larose, a write-in candidate, Joe
Negron, a Republican and Bill
Ramos, a Democrat.
The winner will take the seat of
outgoing Republican Sen. Ken


Inmates


recover


from


swine flu

By Jessica Tuggle
jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
-The 13 inmates at the Indi-
an River County Correctional
Institution who contracted
swine flu earlier this month
have completely recovered,
said Department of Correc-
tions officials.
"All of the cases in the Indi-
an River County Correctional
Institution have cleared up
and the movement restric-
tions have been lifted as of
July 9," said Gretl Plessinger,
Department of Corrections
spokeswoman.
The H1N1 virus affected 13
inmates, but none seriously,
she said.
The inmates who contract-
ed the disease came from dif-
ferent dormitories, but all the
sick inmates were separated
from well inmates and were
basically confined to their
dorm to recover, said Ms.
Plessinger.
Their segregation was in
compliance with Centers for
Disease Control and Preven-
tion rules on correctional
facilities, she said.
"We followed CDC guide-
lines and they were effective,"
said Ms. Plessinger.
"Staff did a great job of pre-
venting the spread of the dis-
ease and there are no new
cases in the prison that we are
aware of," she said.
Symptoms of the swine flu,
or the H1N1 flu virus, are
identical to other flu strains
and include fever, cough, sore
throat, runny or stuffy nose,
body aches, headache, chills
and fatigue, according to the
CDCWeb site.
"It's a virus that is here to
stay," said Michele Kiesel,
director of nursing at Indian
River Health Department.
"It's a novel virus and peo-
ple are susceptible to it, so I
think, like the rest of the
country, we are going to see
more cases come," she said.
The duration of the virus is
approximately one week.
The CDC recommends
people with symptoms of
swine flu stay at home and
minimize contact with others
for seven days or until symp-
toms have been gone for 24
hours, whichever is longer.
Basic cleanliness, such as
hand washing, and covering
the mouth and nose with a
tissue while coughing or
sneezing is encouraged to
reduce spreading the virus.

For more information on
the swine flu, visit
www.cdc.gov/hlnlflu.


Pruitt.
Residents in precincts Nos. 202,
205, 209, 508, 509, 510, 511 and 512
can vote in the special election,
said Leslie Swan, assistant supervi-
sor of elections.
Early voting will take place at the
supervisor of elections office,
located at 4375 43rd Ave., Vero
Beach, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
More than 1,800 absentee ballots
have already been mailed to resi-
dents who have requested them,
said Ms. Swan.
Absentee ballots are still avail-
able by calling the office or by


requesting them
online at the super-
visor of election's 4
Web site.
She cautioned .
that mailed ballots
arriving after Elec-
tion Day will not
be counted.
Residents should take note of
several changes made to polling
locations, Ms. Swan said.
Voter precincts 202 and 205,
which used to be located at the
Environmental Learning Center,
have been moved to the Indian


Shores Community Cen-
ter, which is the same location as
precinct 209.
The community center is located
at 6001 Highway A1A, Indian River
See VOTING, A2


Budding artists


Cliff Partlow/staff photographer
From left, Andrea Subero, 16, of Sebastian, helps Gabrielle Richards and Lauren Harris, both 7, of Fort Pierce, cut
out art for their Eric Carle-style book during summer art camp at the Vero Beach Museum of Art last week. Stu-
dents made their own color and textured paper to cut into figures as pictures for their project.


Helping the n


eedy in Nicaragua


Two area residents are part of Manna Project International


By Jessica Tuggle
jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
- Summer is the best time
for traveling in the minds
of many, but not that many
are willing to travel to a
third-world country and
stay for more than a year.
Amelia Graves and Ian
Rountree, both raised in
Vero Beach, will be serving


13 months in Managua,
Nicaragua, as program
directors for Manna Pro-
ject International, a non-
profit organization estab-
lished in 2004 by young
adults interested in help-
ing developing communi-
ties in poor countries.
Their tasks while there
will involve getting into the
community and working
to build up the community


in various ways.
The mission of MPI is to
foster communities of
young adults and encour-
age them to use their pas-
sions and education in
service to communities in
need, the organization's
Web site says.
"Some of us will teach
English or do public rela-
tions, but we will do what-
ever we are needed to do,"


Library makes summer


programs fun, educational


By Jessica Tuggle
jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUN-
TY- Children can some-
times misunderstand
what a library has to offer
them, so summertime is
a perfect time to demon-
strate the spectrum of
activities available, said
children's librarian Patti
Fuchs.
"During the school
year, there are lots of
things that kids have to
do, so during the sum-
mer, we want to do things
at the library that they


want to do," Ms. Fuchs
said.
On July 10, the Mashed
Potato Players delighted
preschoolers and ele-
mentary-age children at
the Indian River County
Main Library with an
entertaining perform-
ance.
The Mashed Potato
Players took the children
on an adventure to a spe-
cial island filled with
pirates, sailors, explorers
and treasure.
"We have all original
material that we impro-
vise from a scenario,"


said JeffVoegele, a senior
member of the Players for
30 years and a Sebastian
resident.
Kelly Ripp, 6, of Sebast-
ian said her favorite part
of the performance was
watching the transforma-
tion of the characters into
parrots after contracting
"Parrot Fever."
"I really liked when the
guy started acting like a
parrot and making parrot
noises," she said.
Kim Lynn said bringing
Kelly to the special pro-
See LIBRARY, A8


said Ms. Graves.
In Nicaragua, programs
the directors and other
volunteers will get
involved with include
sports and recreation,
math and literacy, health
clinic development and
English classes.
The opportunities for
employment for people in
Nicaragua, both those liv-
See NEEDY, A4


Chamber


promotes


grill night

By Jessica Tuggle
jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com
SEBASTIAN Water-
melons will be the stars at
the second annual Light Up
Your Grill Night, presented
by the Sebastian River Area
Chamber of Commerce.
This is the summer
equivalent of the popular
Light Up the Night event,
where during the holidays,
See CHAMBER, A2


H-5AMERICAN SAVINGS


50% OFF Gift Certificates


ALIVE &
WELL










Hospital breaks


ground on $25


million expansion aL&3


By Jessica Tuggle
jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com
SEBASTIAN Golden
shovels gleamed in the sun
on July 8, as more than 100
people celebrated the
groundbreaking of Sebast-
ian River Medical Center's
55,000-square-foot expan-
sion.
The construction will
include a three-story build-
ing with a new intensive
care unit with 16 beds, 42
private suites and 350 new
parking spaces, said Emily
Holliman, Sebastian River
Medical Center CEO.
"This expansion will help
us meet the growing needs
of our community," said Ms.
Holliman.
Daisy Knowles, director of
marketing, was present at
the groundbreaking and
recalled attending the dedi-
cation of the hospital in
1974.
"I just think about how
much the hospital has
grown over the years," said
Ms. Knowles. "It's very grati-
fying as an employee and as
the community to have a
hospital of this stature
here."
Rep. Debbie Mayfield
commended hospital offi-
cials for moving forward
with the project, even in this
sluggish economy.


"I just think about how
much the hospital has
grown over the years.
It's very gratifying as
an employee and as
the community to
have a hospital of this
stature here."

Daisy Knowlex
director of marketing

"This is going to increase
accessibility and be an eco-
nomic driver to the area,"
she said.
Gary Newsome, president
and CEO of Health Manage-
ment Associates, which
owns the hospital, said he
was proud of the communi-
ty for standing behind the
project.
"It's a real testament that
we have the confidence to
spend $25 million in this
economy," said Mr. New-
some.
The bids for the $25 mil-
lion project are currently
under review, said project
manager Jim Harris of Hel-
man, Hurley, Charvat and
Peacock Architects.
Construction could he
completed as soon as 2011,
he said.


Staff photo by Jessica Tuggle
The sun was shining as the hospital officials and special guests broke ground on the Sebastian River Medical Center
expansion project on July 8. The $25 million project will add 58 new beds. Above: From left, Gary Newsome, president
and CEO of Health Management Associates; Rep. Debbie Mayfield; Rene VanDeVoorde, SRMC board of trustees chair-
man; Emily Holliman, SRMC CEO; Michael Venazio, SRMC board of trustees chief of staff; John McEachern, SRMC CFO;
Josh Putter, HMA senior vice president division five CEO; Mark Spafford, vice president of financial operations and divi-
sion five CFO and Ron Gicca, SRMC COO. Below: A rendering of the hospital expansion upon completion.


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Weird
From page Al
www.weirdnews.about.com
: No Wienermobile at Oscar
Mayer's funeral. In case you
missed it, amid all the
Michael Jackson coverage,
Oscar Mayer, grandson of
the lunch meat icon, died
Monday, July 6. He was 95.
TMZ.com, which has been
ahead of so much of the
Jackson coverage, con-
firmed that Mayer's famous
"Wienermobile" will not
make an appearance at the


NOW 4 t
SERVING...

Romancing
The Stove
by Arlene Borg
the Grammy Guru


'


Recipes
Stories
Archives
and more at...
www.HometownnewsOL.com


funeral.
From www.metro.co.uk:
Woman lights crack pipe on
arrest. A woman who led
police on a high-speed
chase compounded her
troubles after lighting up a
crack pipe as police moved
to arrest her.
And another from
www.news.aol.com: Turtle
invasion shuts JFK runway.
A runway at New York's John
E Kennedy International
Airport was shut down on
July 8, after at least 78
turtles invaded the tarmac.
Ground crews eventually


rounded up the wayward
reptiles, which had crawled
from a nearby bay, and
deposited them back in the
water farther from airport.
But that wasn't enough to
stop the turtle incursion
from disrupting JFK's flight
schedule, and contributed
to delays that reached
nearly 1-1/2 hours.
Sean McCarthy can be
reached at (772) 408-0680 or
WeirdStories@ComputeThis
Online.com (no hyphens).


Christ By-The-Sea United
VotinMethodist Church.
From age AThe church is located at
rompage3755 Highway A1A, Vero
Shores, behind city hall. Beach.
Voting for precincts 508, For more information,
Bethel Creek House, 509, contact the Supervisor of
Beachland Elementary Elections Office at (772) 226-
School and 510, River 3440, or visit www.voteindi-
House, will now be held at anriver.com.


Chamber
From page Al
businesses in the surround-
ing area open their doors to
the community, sharing
treats and business.
Light Up Your Grill Night
will take place Aug. 7, from
5:30 to 8 p.m.
The event will be filled
with food, drinks, give-


aways and a special water-
melon contest.
Residents are invited to
participate in contest for
the best watermelon. The
watermelon could be the
actual juice, filled fruit, a
cake shaped and decorated
like a watermelon or even a
watermelon sculpture, said
Nicole Holbrook, tourism
coordinator
More than 20 businesses
in Sebastian, Roseland and
Wabasso are signed up to
participate in the event.
A map of the participa-
tion locations will be avail-
able at the Sebastian River
Area Chamber of Com-
merce that day, said
Ms.Holbrook.
For more information, call
the chamber at (772) 589-
5969, or visit www.sebas-
tianchamber.com.


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i ,ll 1., .,,11 I .....iiiI. ,i
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a-~B


A2 Sebastian River Area


Friday, July 17, 2009


Hometown News







Friday, July 17, 2009 www.H hometown NewsOL.com Sebastian River Area A3


Raffle


winners


named

For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
TREASURE COAST -
The following were raffle
prize winners at Hometown
News yard sale, held July 11
at HTN headquarters in
Fort Pierce, to benefit
Molly's House. Molly's
House is a nonprofit, resi-
dential facility for families
of patients who are under-
going medical procedures
or treatment on the Trea-
sure Coast.
Family membership to
Heathcote Botanical Gar-
dens: Pat Snyder
Oil change gift certifi-
cate to St. Lucie Battery &
Tire: Mary Cowles
Two VIP passes for 18
holes of golf and cart at
Savanna Club Golf: Tina
Nicholson
Two admission tickets to
McKee Botanical Gardens:
DJ Gardner
$10 gift cards to Wada-
Wash Car Wash: John Ser-
rao, Lisa Brown, Marion
Howard, Amanda Budnik,
Idania Rodriguez and
Louise Duprowski
Gift certificate for a
guided tour for family of
two from Kayaks, Etc.: Ida-
nia Rodriguez
Admission passes to the
Florida Oceanographic
Center: Idania Rodriquez
32-inch flat screen TVs
courtesy ofWal-Mart Distri-
bution Center: Carol and
LarryVan Gorder
Day of Delight gift cer-
tificates worth $75: Ericka
King and N. Kegley
Foursome gift certificate
with cart to PGA Golf Club
in Port St. Lucie: Ron Kiesla
$50 gift certificate to
Mimmo's Scampi Grill in
See WINNERS, A7


Getting splashed


Sebastian River Medical Center's Health Series


Fit for Life

Dr. Patrick Domkowski
Presents

Surgical Weight Loss
Thursday, Aug. 6th, 6:30p.m.
SRMC Dining Room 1
Complimentary Admission
r Refreshments Served
Reservations Necessary
Call 581-2066
SC Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. -5 p.m.


Patrick Domkowski, MD
Board Certified in
General Surgery


Recipient of the
IRC Chamber of Commerce
2008 Industry Appreciation
Large Company of the Year Award.


Cliff Partlow/staff photographer
Eight-year-olds Eric Epsilantis, and Abby Kicklighter of Sebastian, play with the water
canon at the North County Aquatics Center in Sebastian last Thursday. The kids are
part of The Learning Nest's summer program. Known as 'Explorers,' they will spend
their summer doing variety of activities such as skating, boating and going to movies.


Dr. Domkowski also accepts patients
who had the LapBand done
elsewhere and require follow up.


SS Sebastian
River
Medical Center

Setting the Stondard forHospital Care
Since 1974


13695 N. U.S.1, Sebastian (lust North of Roseland Rd.)
www.sebastianrivermedical.com


Visit us

L.,-


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Comprehensive Healthcare. We're There.
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Sebastian
772.589.0270
Vero Beach
772.567.5551


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Friday, July 17, 2009


Sebastian River Area A3


www.H hometown NewsOL.com








A4 Sebastian River Area Hometown News Friday, July 17, 2009


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This photo shows homes built in Managua's city dump, where more than


Photo courtesy of the Manna Project
1,500 people live and work.


Needy
From page Al


ing in poverty and those
who are better off, increase
tremendously when they are
able to communicate effec-
tively in English, instead of
just their native Spanish,
said Ms. Graves.
Nicaragua is the second-
poorest nation in the West-
ern Hemisphere and half of
the population is 18 and
younger.
"The more I go abroad,
the more I realize the
uniqueness and the blessing
that I have for being raised
in this country," said Ms.
Graves.
One of the communities
Cliff Partlow/staff photographer that Manna Project staff and
volunteers work with is La
Amelia Graves introduces a film about the Manna Project Chureca, the city dump,
during a fund-raising dinner at the Heritage Center July 2. which is home for many


families.
An estimated 1,500 peo-
ple, live, eat and sleep on
and surrounded by piles of
refuse from the city.
"They are eating from the
trash, building shacks out of
the trash and burning trash
for fuel, which creates nox-
ious fumes that lead to res-
piratory problems," said Mr.
Rountree.
"The U.S. embassy in
Managua only lets Ameri-
cans go to the dump for
three hours at a time before
making them leave and
these people, they just live
there," he said.
"People there have next to
nothing. It's absolute pover-
ty. Food and water is an
issue and yet when you are
with them, they want you to
eat the food they do have
and sleep on their bed if
they have one," said Ms.


Graves.
"There (are) constant
health issues (living in
garbage) and we are sup-
porting a Nicaraguan clinic
run by Nicaraguan doctors,"
said Ms. Graves.
"The goal there is sustain-
ability. We want to assist
Nicaraguans and we do that
by responding to what they
want and how they want it,
not just our ways," she said.
Mr. Rountree, who stud-
ied political science at Van-
derbilt University in Ten-
nessee, said his passion for
assisting people in dire
need, such as the
Nicaraguans, has caused
him to champion their
cause while at school, and
take a few short trips as a
student, but this trip is a big
step for him.
"I've been talking about
this for a while and I think


it's time that my actions fol-
lowed my words," he said.
The majority of donations
to the charity organization
come through fundraisers
on college campuses, Mr.
Rountree said, but private
donations are gratefully
welcome.
"Even though it may seem
strange to go far away, out
of the country to make a dif-
ference, at the end of the
day, we're all humans and it
benefits everyone if every-
one is doing well," said Ms.
Graves.

For more information
about the Manna Project,
visit their Web site at
http://mannaproject.org.
The site contains more back-
ground information, a blog
updated by volunteers work-
ing in the region and dona-
tion information.


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A4 Sebastian River Area


Friday, July 17, 2009


Hometown News


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Police report im Is B


Editor's note: This is a list
of arrests, not convictions,
and all arrestees are pre-
sumed innocent unless or
until proven guilty in a court
of law.
Sebastian
Police Department

Larry Bass Jr., 28, 1001
Turtle Run Drive, No. 206,
Sebastian, was charged
with unlawful sexual activ-
ity with certain minors.
Bruce A. Reich, 45, 301
Clifford Road, Selinsgrove,
Pa., was charged with pur-
chase and possession of
crack cocaine.
William Sprenkle, 42,
8055 129th St., Roseland,
was charged with posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance, cocaine.
Christopher Thomas
Farless, 24, 665 Vocelle
Ave., Sebastian, was
charged with two counts of
aggravated assault,
domestic violence and a
misdemeanor charge of
battery domestic violence.


Indian River County
Sheriffs Office

Christina Dove, 34, 9931
Old Lakeland Highway,
Dade City, was charged with
tampering with evidence,
possession of cocaine and
violation of probation. She
was on probation for
obstruction of a crime
investigation and posses-
sion of cocaine.
Reylniqua Jaquel Rolle,
17, 639 Fourth Place S.W.,
Vero Beach, was charged
with burglary of a dwelling
while armed and grand theft
of a firearm.
Travis Wayne Mugrauer,
24, 185 18th Ave., Vero
Beach, was charged with
grand theft and giving false
information to a pawnbro-
ker.
Alejandra Alvarado, 21,
170 S. Oak St., Fellsmere,
was charged with aggravat-
ed manslaughter of a child.
George R. Masaitis, 50,
1015 Commerce Ave., Vero
Beach, was charged with
two counts of failure of a sex
offender to report to the


Department of Motor Vehi-
cles.
Ryan Alan Henderson,
22, 45 46th Court, Vero
Beach, was charged with
giving false information to a
pawn broker, third-degree
grand theft and dealing in
stolen property.
Mark E. Fischer, 35, 8266
102nd Court, Vero Beach,
was charged with posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance, Adderal, and misde-
meanor charges of trespass
and stalking.
David Russell Gordon,
59, 5100 College Road, Key
West, was charged with
aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon.
Charlene Cavil, 25, 1426
S.W. Melrose Ave., Port St.
Lucie, was charged with
burglary and misdemeanor
charges of battery, domestic
violence, disorderly intoxi-
cation and two counts of
battery and criminal mis-
chief.
Robert Earl Riley, 54,
4406 31st Ave., Vero Beach,
was charged with corrup-
tion by threat against a pub-
lic servant and a misde-


meanor charge of battery
domestic violence.
DennyW. Burns, 36, 7902
Deland Ave., Fort Pierce, was
charged with fleeing and
eluding law enforcement,
being a habitual traffic
offender and a misde-
meanor charge of failure to
pay child support.
*NicholasVitiello, 42, 1216
43rd Ave., Vero Beach, was
charged with possession of
cocaine and misdemeanor
charges of driving under the
influence, and possession of
marijuana and drug para-
phernalia.
Ryan M. Winsloff, 26,
8346 96 Court, Vero Beach,
was charged with forgery.
McCartney Starkweath-
er, 31, 570 Agnes St., Sebast-
ian, was charged with viola-
tion of probation. She was
on probation for grand theft.
Reason J. Young Jr., 50,
132 Julian Drive, Fort Pierce,
was charged with trespass
after warning, evidencing
prejudice while committing
an offense and a misde-
meanor charge of disorderly
intoxication.
Marcell Felipe Cabrera,


TREASURE COAST 44


CRIME STOPPERS


*B:?ItImcI


26, 365 12th Road, Vero
Beach, was charged with
giving false information to a
law enforcement officer.
*Jamie Leeshawn
Demons, 25, 111 Sixth Court
S.W, Vero Beach, was
charged with giving a false
statement for public aid.
April Michelle Riggins,
36, 1215 12th Court, South-
west, Vero Beach, was
charged with violation of
probation for using a worth-
less check.
Thomas Lee Grimes, 46,
797 Roseland Road, Sebast-
ian, was charged with grand
theft.
Zachary Emrick, 26, 329
15th St. Southwest, Vero


Beach, was charged with
burglary.
Edward Gilbert Becker,
19, 5801 Spanish River Road,
Fort Pierce, was charged
with burglary.
Carla Nancy Salvati, 19,
643 Roseland Road, Sebast-
ian, was charged with third-
degree grand theft.
Ronald Eugene Mustain,
21, 2010 Sunrise Blvd., Fort
Pierce, was charged with
failure to appear in court on
charges of battery on a law
enforcement officer.
Richard Daniel Zoll, 53,
11320 S. Indian River Drive,
Sebastian, was charged with
driving while license perma-
nently revoked.


Mentor dinner planned


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
Youth Guidance needs more than
400 mentors to be matched one-
on-one with a child the agency
serves.
A mentor orientation dinner will
be held in the second floor confer-
ence room of the United Way Cen-
ter, 1836 14th Ave. inVero Beach on
July 21 from 5:30-7 p.m.
This orientation session, an ini-
tiative of the mentor center of the
Children's Services Council of Palm
Beach County, is an opportunity
for prospective and current Youth
Guidance mentors to get support
and information for making men-
toring relationships even more
productive and rewarding.
The sessions are especially
appropriate for persons who want
to explore the possibility of becom-


ing a mentor.
Topics include the mission and
goals of the program, the responsi-
bilities and rewards of mentors,
program demographics and
requirements, confidentiality, and
the qualities of successful mentors.
The program explains practical
techniques and discusses possible
additional training opportunities.
The primary purpose of Youth
Guidance is to "match" each of its
700 at-risk, K-12 children with a
volunteer mentor 17 or older to
spend just a few hours a week with
their assigned child.
The agency is actively seeking
volunteers to serve as mentors,
tutors or occasional volunteers or
to provide regular help in the
office.
There is no cost for the dinner,
but reservations are required.
To make a reservation, call (772)
226-3092.


Organization seeks nominations


for community service award


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com

TREASURE COAST -
United for Families, the
organization that oversees
child-protective services
along the Treasure Coast and
in Okeechobee County, is
taking nominations from the
public for a new award that
recognizes superior commu-
nity service in child welfare.
The Community Service
Award to Stop the Tears will
be presented to an individual
whose contributions of time,
effort or wealth have signifi-
cantly advanced the organiza-
tion's mission to break the
cycle of child abuse.


The award will be presented
Oct. 24, during United for
Families' annual gala, the
Toyota of Stuart Le Bal
Masque.
United for Families has
presented its annual Depen-
dency Case Manager of the
Year award during the event
for the past three years. That
award recognizes the efforts
of social work professionals.
Nominations may come
from anywhere throughout
the four-county area and are
due to United for Families
Sept. 11.
Nomination applications
are available online at
www.unitedforfamilies.org or
by calling 398-2920, Ext. 298.


Applications should include
a narrative describing the
impact of the nominee's
community support and good
works as it relates to child
welfare. The total application
may include supporting
documents, such as letters of
support, and should be no
more than five pages.
United for Families is the
nonprofit organization that
coordinates and oversees
child-welfare services in St.
Lucie, Martin, Indian River
and Okeechobee counties.

For more information, call
(772) 398-2920, Ext. 298, or
visit
www.unitedforfamilies.org.


Society introduces tutoring program for at-risk children


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
- Children's Home Society
of Florida, Treasure Coast
Division, is giving at-risk
children from the commu-
nity a better chance at suc-


ceeding in reading and
math through its inaugural
summer tutoring program.
Thirty-six children and
youth, ages 11-17, particu-
larly those most at risk of
not succeeding in school
or finishing high school,
are participating. The pro-


gram was introduced by
Marta Schneider, CHS's
Indian River County board
chairwoman. It provides
private tutoring, and may
be what the children need
to achieve in life, school
and future employment.
Six certified teachers


from Indian River and districts, are leading the community lunches have
Palm Beach counties, with sessions. been fantastic," said Mrs.
specialties in GED educa- "The support from com- Schneider.
tion and inner city school munity speakers and the


Bruce M. Nigro D.P.M. Podiatrist-Medical Director


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Barefoot Bay, FL 32976
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Friday, July 17, 2009


Sebastian River Area A5


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VIEWPOINT

FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 HOMETOWN NEWS WWW.HOMETOWNNEWSOL.COM


Rants :


Got something to say?

Call the Hometown Rants & Raves line at

(772) 465-5504
or e-mail news@hometownnewsol.com.
Callers are asked to refrain from making slanderous
statements. Statements offact will be checked for
accuracy.


Wasting money on fireworks

I know that I am not the only one who thinks that last
night's fireworks display in downtown were wonderful, but
was it the best way to spend thousands right now?
I do commend all of the event organizers for the support of
our troops, and agree that we should all have celebrated the
birth of country in an overtly patriotic fashion (especially
now), yet I do wonder, would it be more patriotic to forgo the
expense of the pyrotechnicians, additional police and emer-
gency services, vendors, musicians and fuel for all those who
attended?
Could it be patriotic to use the money to perhaps buy cars
for underprivileged individuals who cannot get to job inter-
views because we do not have a reliable public transporta-
tion system?
Pay the rent or mortgages for struggling families?
Buy hurricane-preparedness supply kits for so many of us
who will not be able to afford to prepare for a hurricane at all
this year?
Pay the electric bills for families for those who will lose
electrical services this month because the assistance pro-
grams are so back logged?
Pay the water bills for those who will lose water and sewer
services this month because health and human services can-
not keep up?
Buy families Publix or Winn Dixie gift cards to purchase
$100 worth of food?
Or how about something really creative? Fifty to 1,000 peo-
ple in the county to spend and stimulate our local economy?
Is it really more patriotic to buy gunpowder when our
unemployment rate is so very high here, and the so-called
"stimulus money" may not arrive for months, if at all?

Which hospital?

This is for the person who claims there's a hospital that
serves food. I sure wish I had some of what he's on. There's no
such place.

Prices are smoking

I realize I shouldn't smoke, but I enjoy it. I know that prices
for cigarettes went up, as well.
For two cartons of Benson & Hedges I paid $128 at a local
gas station. At the grocery store, I paid $142. Why is there so
much difference in price?

About jobs

This is in response to why can't felons get ajob. What about
law-abiding citizens getting a job?
In these times, if you don't have a job, you're not going to
get one. And if you have one, hold onto it.

Health care issues

The FDA wants to move aggressively to expand its powers
to control the American health care system, but its past
record does not give us confidence this organization is either
efficient or effective.
The melamine scare is still not under control after almost a
full year, and the FDA now admits tainted infant formula
coming into this country from China has caused 50,000
babies to become ill, some with damaging stones in the kid-
ney and others with kidney failure; not very encouraging.
Editor's note: The ranter refers to the industrial chemical
melamine, which was found in Chinese milk and milk prod-
ucts and sickened thousands of Chinese babies earlier this
year

More on health care

Citizens of Canada and Great Britain have experienced a
decade or more of socialized medicine and they know first
hand what rationing means when they have to wait months
(sometimes, years) to get to see a doctor or gain entrance
into a hospital.
As the U.S. government increasingly cracks down on the
American health care industry, we are already witnessing the
crisis in obstetrical care, as most hospitals are losing money,
many are considering closing their doors and doctors are
avoiding gynecology, a worrisome glimpse into our future.





HIometown News
Published weekly by Hometown News, L.C.,
1102 South U.S. 1, Fort Pierce, FL 34950
Copyright 2009, Hometown News, L.C.
Voted # 1 Community Newspaper in
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CIRCULATION AUDIT BY

VERIFICATION
is e gm w


Park dedicated


Cliff Partlow/staff photographer
Officials from Sebastian, the Florida Inland Navigation District and Indian River County gathered at the Main Street
boat ramp, also knows as Capt. Robert Hardee boat launch last Saturday, to dedicate the new park and accept a
check from FIND for $487,532, which helped pay for the project. From left, Councilwoman Andrea Coy, Mayor
Richard Gillmor, State Rep. Ralph Poppell R-Vero Beach, Councilwoman Dale Simchick, working waterfront commis-
sion member Sal Neglia, city manager Al Minner and Indian River County Commissioner Joe Flescher.


Medical news you can use


Medical news comes
across my desk fast
and furiously.
Here's some news you can
use from health newslet-
ters.


High calcium intakeMultiv s
Multivitamins don't
may offer colon
ca r reduce cancer or
cancer protection heart risk
heart risk


From the Duke University
Medical Center Health-
News, June 2009:
High dietary calcium
intake may reduce the
incidence of colon cancer,
especially for women, but
doesn't seem to affect other
types of cancer.
Higher calcium intake
was associated with lower
incidence of colon cancer
in both men and women,
but the effect was greater
in women, for reasons that
are not clear.
For adults 50 and older,
the recommendation is for
1200 milligrams of calcium
daily, which is the amount
found in three cups of
dairy products and non-
dairy sources including
sardines and green, leafy
vegetables. Talk to your
doctor about calcium
supplements, especially if
you are at risk for osteo-
porosis.


From the Mount Sinai
School of Medicine "Focus
on Healthy Aging" newslet-
ter, May 2009:
A large study conducted
for more than eight years,
has found the long-term
use of multivitamins does
not lessen the risk of
developing common
cancers or heart disease.
The study, one of the
largest ever carried out on
health and diet, found no
significant difference in
risk of these diseases
between users and non-
users.
We spend a lot of money
on these supplements, on
the theory that it couldn't
hurt. Unless your doctor
has told you to take a
multivitamin, take the
money and use it for fresh
fruits and vegetables. You'll
be taking better care of
yourself and your wallet.


Limit alcohol,
caffeine for
restless legs

From the Mount Sinai
School of Medicine "Focus
on Healthy Aging" newslet-
ter, July 2009:
Restless leg syndrome, or
RLS, affects from 5 to 15
percent of the population
and keeps many people
awake. The neurological
disorder is associated with
nerve damage from
diabetes and kidney
disease, as well as iron
deficiency.
Mild cases can be treated
by exercises to work and
stretch muscles, biofeed-
back and rubbing the legs.
Some medications used to
treat Parkinson's disease
may also be prescribed.
If you have RLS, doctors
advise limiting consump-
tion of alcohol and caf-
feine, as both can make
symptoms worse. Try
heating pads and cool
packs in the evening.

Energy drinks high
in sugar, caffeine

From the Mayo Clinic
Health Letter, April 2009:
Many energy drinks


contain high amounts of
caffeine and sugar, as well
as herbal stimulants. They
can lead to serious side
effects including a much
faster heartbeat, irritability,
nervousness, impaired
sleep and nausea.
Large amounts of
caffeine can trigger
abnormal heart rhythms,
which can be life-threaten-
ing, especially if the drinks
are combined with alcohol
or consumed when the
person is dehydrated or
just before playing sports.

Shelley Koppel is unable
to endorse specific treat-
ments for disease. Any
protocols for treatment or
testing she discusses are
accepted standards of
medical practice as
recommended by agencies
such as the American
Academy ofPediatrics or
the American Cancer
Society. When she draws
from personal experience,
those are her experiences
and are not medical
recommendations.
She is the former editor
of "Today's HealthCare"
magazine and a member
of the National Association
of Science Writers. E-mail
questions to skoppel@bell-
south.net.


Explaining the world of Windows


A at in the world is
Windows, anyway?
For veteran
computer users, this will
seem obvious. But for so
many new people who join
the computer revolution
every day, it's a legitimate
question.
Let's start from the
beginning: Every computer
starts out the day as a
dumb, lifeless hunk of
metal, silicon, ceramics and
wires.
When you first wake up a
computer by adding power
to it (turning it on), it comes
to life, completely ignorant
of its surroundings, includ-
ing what kind of hardware
(disk drives, video adapters,
sound cards, modems, etc.)
is attached to it. It (the
central processing unit or
CPU) doesn't know where it
is or what it's supposed to
do.
In a nutshell, when you
first turn your computer on,
it wakes up dumber than a
box of rocks and needs to be
"educated" real quick about
what to do next.
Enter the BIOS.
All computers (desktops,
laptops, towers, etc.) have a
chip planted on the moth-
erboard that tells the CPU
what hardware is attached
to it and how to make use of
that hardware.
The acronym BIOS stands
for "basic input output
system." It is the first thing


r-

p
'
" -"
1^
R


COMPUTE
THIS
SEAN MCCARTHY


the computer looks at to
figure out what to do after
it's turned on.
Some of the things the
BIOS tells the CPU is the
date and time, how much
memory is available and so
much more. But one of the
most critical pieces of
information that the CPU
gets from the BIOS is what
disk to "boot from" and how
to communicate with that
disk.
Once the BIOS loads, tests
the memory and gives the
CPU all the information it
needs to run, the CPU reads
the disk specified, looking
for an operating system.
This is where Windows
comes in.
Windows is the operating
system (or "OS" for short, a
massive set of instructions)
that the CPU loads from the
disk into memory and uses
these instructions to
operate, hence the name.
Without an operating
system, the computer just
sits there. It has no idea how
to function, and there really
is not much you can do with
a machine with no OS
loaded.
You may have noticed


that I keep using the word
"boot." This term may not
be clear to you.
In computer terms,
"booting up" is used to
describe a machine waking
up and loading all the
necessary instructions into
memory so that it can
operate.
In the "old days," comput-
ers were said to be "pulling
themselves up by their boot
straps" when they loaded
their operating instructions,
and the phrase stuck. Now
we just say the machine is
booting up.
When someone says to
"re-boot" the computer, he
or she is simply saying to
shut the machine down and
turn it on again; that causes
the whole boot process to
happen again, or in other
words, it re-boots.
So back to Windows. What
exactly is it? For many
computers, Windows is the
operating system that the
CPU loads from the hard
drive when it wakes up.
Windows is a program that
is in charge of how all the
other programs and devices
installed on the machine
operate. It is also in charge
of how to translate your
commands from the mouse
and keyboard into actions
that you can see on the
display.
Windows is in charge of
all programs loaded on the
machine and makes sure all


of the computer's resources
get distributed to the
programs and devices that
need them.
Windows is also an
example of evolution in
action, as with each pro-
gressive version of the
operating system, it gets
more stable, more feature-
rich and, arguably, easier to
use.
Does everyone really
need Windows? Well, that's
another good and provoca-
tive question. Some
machines use other pro-
grams for operating sys-
tems.
Macintoshes, for
instance, don't run Win-
dows, but an operating
system of their own called
Mac OS. Some of the servers
on the Internet will run
UNIX as an operating
system and many hardcore
computer users swear by
Linux.
Which OS is the best is a
matter of heated debate,
but I look at it like this:
When in Rome, do as the
Romans do. If the majority
of people are running
Windows, that's what I want
to run, regardless of its
flaws. After all, it is far more
universally compatible than
any of the alternatives.
Sean McCarthy fixes
computers. He can be
reached at (772) 408-0680 or
help@ComputeThisOn-
line.com (no hyphens).








Friday, July 17, 2009 www.H hometown NewsOL.com Sebastian River Area Al


Skin cancer treatment spares healthy tissue


W th the rate of skin
cancer soaring,
particularly in
Florida, protecting the
health of your skin has never
been more important.
The physicians of Treasure
Coast Dermatology special-
ize in detecting and treating
skin cancer, the most
common type of cancer in
the country.
Drs. Tim loannides and
Jonathan Sanders are
dedicated to providing the
best in patient care.
Treasure Coast Dermatol-
ogy offers both surgical and
non-surgical treatment
options including Mohs
micrographic surgery.
"Mohs surgery is a highly
specialized technique for
precise, minimally invasive
surgical treatment of skin
cancer," said Dr. Ioannides.
"Mohs surgery has the
highest surgical cure rate for
both basal cell carcinoma
and squamous cell carcino-
ma," said Dr. Sanders. "For


basal cell carcinoma, the
technique produces approx-
imately a 99 percent cure
rate."
The Mohs procedure is
named after Frederick Mohs,
a physician who developed
the surgery in the 1930s at
the University ofWisconsin.
It involves removing succes-
sive layers of tissue and
immediately examining
them with a microscope, so
that all roots and extensions
of the cancerous lesion can
be eliminated.
"If cancer cells are still
evident in a layer of tissue,
another thin layer is excised
during the same procedure,"
said Dr. Ioannides. "The
process is repeated until all
the cancerous cells are


removed. In addition to
removing the cancerous cells
in the affected area, this
process preserves as much
healthy tissue as possible
around the site of the
lesion."
"That is the key issue,"
added Dr. Sanders. "This is
the most'tissue-sparing'
procedure for the treatment
of skin cancer. We know we
are not taking out more
tissue than we should, so our
patients will save as much
normal healthy skin as
possible."
Dermatologists who
perform Mohs surgery must
have specialized skills in
dermatology and dermato-
logic surgery.
Training for the Mohs


procedure is available
through select residency
programs, specialized
fellowships and intensive
training courses. Drs.
Ioannides and Sanders are
both certified in Mohs as
fellow members of the
American Society for Mohs
Surgery.
"Mohs surgery is an
outpatient procedure
performed right in the office
under a local anesthetic,"
said Dr. Ioannides. "The
entire Mohs procedure may
take more time than some
other procedures, but it has
the highest cure rate of any
surgical treatment for skin
cancer.
"Most patients find the
higher cure rate and better
results worth the wait."

Drs. Tim loannides and
Jonathan Sanders are board
certified by the American
Board ofDermatology. They
can be reached at (877) 870-
3376(DERM).


Food bank receives donation


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
TREASURE COAST
The Treasure Coast Food
Bank, an organization that
works to eliminate hunger
and reduce food waste in
Indian River, Martin,
Okeechobee and St. Lucie
counties, received a $7,500
donation from the
Wachovia Foundation.
The donation will help
fund the food distribution


Winners
From page A3
Vero Beach: Louise
Duprowski
Four ticket to see the
AAA St. Lucie Mets at Tradi-
tion Field: Rita Zeblin
Custom-designed jewel-


program to approximately
170 agencies in four coun-
ties on the Treasure Coast.
"Some parts of the food
bank's service area have
been hit very hard by sky-
rocketing unemployment
and foreclosure rates,"
said John Meehan, execu-
tive director of The Trea-
sure Coast Food Bank.
"Imagine providing gro-
ceries to 44,000 Treasure
Coast residents every
month and another


ry, courtesy of Julie Cleve-
land, Vero Beach office: Joan
Blake, Idania Rodriguez
Gift certificate for a free
haircut from Rob's World of
Hair: Patricia Alton
Two passes to Lion
Country Safari: Anna
Vasquez
Admission package for


155,000 meals and snacks
for children, seniors, the ill
and impoverished at soup
kitchens and homeless
shelters.
"We are grateful to the
Wachovia Foundation for
giving us some additional
resources to help meet the
nearly 100 percent
increase in demand for
food assistance," he said.
More than 2 million
pounds of food were dis-
tributed to the hungry in


2008, providing approxi-
mately 1.3 million meals.
The Treasure Coast Food
Bank also works with local,
state and national agen-
cies during times of disas-
ter.
"The Wachovia donation
comes at a critical junc-
ture," said Thom Padrick,
food bank board president
For more information,
visit www.treasurecoast-
foodbank.org.


four to Kennedy Space Cen-
ter: Louise Duprowski
Admission passes to the
Brevard Zoo: Louise
Duprowski
$50 gift certificate to
White City Mercantile:
Cheryl Sands
Gift basket to Jungle
Adventures: Rita Zeblin


Sebastian River Home Health

Congestive Heart Failure

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with
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Topic:
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Wednesday, July 22nd
3:00 p.m.
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(Just North of Roseland Road)
For information or reservations,
please call (772) 663-9481

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Board Certified cRiver
Internal Medicine & Cardiology Medical Center
S .t1n 9 the Standard fr Hpitl Care

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Friday, July 17, 2009


Sebastian River Area A7


www.H hometown NewsOL.com


v








AB Sebastian River Area Hometown News Friday, July 17, 2009


Thanks, Hometown News


Rotary gets charter


Hometown News
received the Partnership
award from the Red
Cross North Treasure
Coast chapter on June
24. The award goes to a
news organization that
has gone above and
beyond to keep citizens
informed of hurricane
preparedness issues.
HTN produces the
official Red Cross
Hurricane Guide. From
left: Ray McGowan, Red
Cross board chairman,
Sarah Tippet Ruwe, Red
Cross CEO and Steve
Erlanger, HTN publisher.

Photo courtesy of the
Red Cross


Club sponsors camp scholarships


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
- The Boys & Girls Clubs of
Indian River County recent-
ly received a $3,000 dona-
tion from the Exchange
Club of the Treasure Coast.
The donation will provide
scholarships for 10 children
to attend the Boys & Girls
Club's summer program.
The Boys & Girls Club
offers a wide variety of pro-
grams and activities for
kids, ages 6 to 18 every
weekday during the sum-
mer at its three clubhouse
locations, two inVero Beach
and one in Sebastian.
In addition to participat-
ing in nationally recognized
programs such as SMART
Girls, Passport to Manhood


and Money Matters, mem-
bers are engaged in reading
clubs, arts and crafts,
sports, and games and also
enjoy going on field trips.
The club provides impor-
tant programs in a safe,
positive environment every
day after school and admin-
isters the Youth Volunteer
Corps, a teen community
service outreach program
for youth ages 11-18.
The Exchange Club is an
all-volunteer, national serv-
ice organization for men
and women who are dedi-
cated to preventing child
abuse and helping the com-
munity be a better place to
live and raise children.

For more information, call
(772) 299-7449 or visit
www.bgcirc.org.


Photo courtesy of the Exchange Club
From left: Exchange Club members Eric Menger, Laurie
Collings, Robert Paugh, Kim Prado and David Hooper,
Treasure Coast president and Ronnie Hewett, Boys &
Girls Clubs president. Front row from left: and club
members Elizabeth Friddle, Brittany Heckler, Zion
Mincey and Daniel Christensen.


Clubs and classes


CLUBS

The Sebastian Fishin'
Chic's meet the last Thursday
of the month, at the Sebast-
ian Entertainment Center.
For more information, call
Michelle Barkley, at (772)
473-9462, Kristen Beck, at
(772) 794-9900, or Karen
Hemdon, at (772) 633-2043.
The Mental Health Asso-
ciation in Indian River
County bipolar support
group will meet at the Mental
Health Association offices at
777 37th St., Suite D-105,Vero
Beach, on the second and
fourth Wednesdays of each
month, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Family members and loved


ones are also welcome to
attend. For more informa-
tion, call (772) 569-9788.
Treasure Coast Archeo-
logical Society for Treasure
Hunting and Metal Detect-
ing meets the first Wednes-
day of each month at 7:30
p.m. in the North County
Indian River Library on
County Road 512 in Sebast-
ian. Anyone interested is wel-
come. For more information,
call (321) 388-9047.
Humanists at Barefoot
Bay meets the second Satur-
day of every month at the
South Mainland Library, 7921
Ron Beatty Blvd., Micco, at 2
p.m. All compassionate and
critical thinkers are invited.
For more information, call


(772) 664-0170, or e-mail
downeastggo@bellsouth.ne
t.
TOPS 641: Take Off
Pounds Sensibly, Chapter No.
641 meets every Thursday at
the Roseland Fire Depart-
ment, 129th Court, off Rose-
land Road in Sebastian.
Weigh-in is from 7:45 to 8:30
a.m. and the meeting starts at
8:30 a.m. For information call
(772)-589-8445.
TOPS 470: Take Off
Pounds Sensibly, Micco
Chapter No. 470 meets every
Friday at 10:30 a.m. at the
South Mainland Library, 7921
Ron Beatty Blvd., next to
Barefoot Bay. New members
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call (772) 388-3984.
Rotary Club meets at
12:15 p.m. every Thursday at
Sebastian River Medical Cen-
ter, 13695 U.S. 1, Sebastian.
For more information, call
(772) 360-5837 or visit
www.sebastianrotaryclub.org

Quilting bee: Join the
ladies of Christ the King
Lutheran Church for quilting
the second and fourth
Wednesday of every month
at 9:30 a.m. Christ the King is
located at 1301 Sebastian
Blvd., Sebastian. For more
information, call (772) 589-
7117
Personal Computer
Users Club meets at 7 p.m.
the second Wednesday of
each month at the North
County Library, 1001 County
Road 512, Sebastian. For
more information, call (772)
388-5248.
COPE Support Group:
The Indian River County
Council on Aging with the


Visiting Nurse Association
offers a support group to help
caregivers cope with the day-
to-day care of a loved one.
The group meets the third
Thursday of every month
from 10 to 11 a.m. in the Pres-
byterian Church, 1405
LouisianaAve., Sebastian. For
more information, call (772)
569-0760.
Democratic Club of Bare-
foot Bay: Meets the fourth
Thursday of each month at 7
p.m. in Building D-E at the
golf course in Barefoot Bay.
For more information, call
(772) 664-3895.
Asthmatics meet on
Monday at 4:30 p.m., in the
South Mainland Community
Center, 3700 Allen Ave.,
Micco. Cost is $5 per class.
Chess Club meets the first
and third Monday each
month from 4 to 6 p.m. at the
North Indian River County
Library, 1001 Sebastian Blvd.,
Sebastian. Open to all ages.
American Cancer Soci-
ety, North Indian River, board
of directors meeting is held
on the third Thursday of the
month at noon at Seacoast
National Bank, U.S. 1, Sebas-
tian.
Man-to-Man North Indi-
an River, prostate cancer
support group, meets the first
Tuesday of the month at 7
p.m. at the Sebastian River
Medical Center dining room,
13695 U.S. 1, Sebastian

CLASSES

*The Sebastian Commu-
nity Center, located at 1805
N. Central Ave. in Sebastian
will have the following dance
lessons:
Swing dance lessons will
be held at on the second Sat-
urday of each month, by
instructors Jerry Morrison
and Michele Holm at 7 p.m.
For all levels of dancers.
Open dance follows the les-
son at 8 p.m. Admission is
$10, and includes entry to
the dance that follows.
Snacks will be provided and
water is available for pur-
chase. Beginner swing dance
lessons will be held every
Wednesday night at 7:30
p.m. Intermediate class at
8:30 p.m. No partners neces-
sary. $10 per class or $16 for
both. The Sebastian Com-
munity Center is located at
1805 N. Central Ave., Sebast-
ian.


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
- The Rotary Club Ocean-
side was formally presented
its new charter by Betsy
Owen, Rotary district gover-
nor on May 19.
That same night, Karl M.
Steene, club president, pre-
sented Ms. Owens with a
$1,000 check for the Rotary
International Foundation's
worldwide polio eradication
campaign.
The 23-member club


meets weekly at Indian
River Shores Town Hall at
5:30 p.m. on Tuesday
evening. The meeting for-
mat includes hors d'oeu-
vres, wine and soft drinks,
rather than traditional
luncheon and breakfast or
dinner formats.
Like other Rotary clubs,
the business and profes-
sional members of the club
are dedicated to community
and international service.
For more information, call
(772) 226-2467 or (772) 234-
0408.


Bank partners with


charity for toy drive


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
TREASURE COAST Bank
Atlantic and the Love Doctors
Charities are gearing up for a
Christmas in July toy drive
project.
Through July 31, Treasure
Coast residents are encour-
aged to bring a new,
unwrapped toy to any of the
28 participating branches.
"Last year, the charity pro-
vided toys for more than
9,000 children throughout
the Treasure Coast and South
Florida. We anticipate an
even greater increase in
requests this year and hope


the community will help us
meet our goal," said Rich
Dickerson of the Love Doc-
tors.
In addition to toys, individ-
uals and businesses may
make donations to the chari-
ty's toy drive account at any
Bank Atlantic branch.
"Bank Atlantic has been
extremely accommodating to
the charity and we appreciate
their support. This project
will be an integral part of the
overall success of our 2009
toy distribution," said Terri
May, executive director.
For more information, call
(772) 621-7021 or visit
www.LoveDoctors.org.


Declare independence


from credit card debt


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
TREASURE COAST -
The Consumer Credit
Counseling Service of the
Treasure Coast offers the
following tips to declare
independence from credit
card debt.
Create a budget. Review
how you spend your money
and look for places to make
changes. Small changes
can add up to big savings.
Bring your lunch to work
instead of eating out. Make
a list and stick to it when
you grocery shop. Carpool
when you can to save on
community expenses.
Limit your use of credit.
Think before you buy. "Do I
really need this? Can I pay
for it with cash?" If you
answer no to either ques-
tion, skip the purchase.
Ideally, only use credit as
you would cash, when you
know you can pay the bill
off on-time and in-full.
If you must use credit,
use the card with the low-
est interest rate. Remem-
ber, using a credit card is
like taking out a short-term
loan. If you're not careful to
minimize charges and
make payments on time,
this short-term loan could
become a long-term finan-
cial and credit disaster.
*Use cards with no annu-
al fee. If you don't carry a
balance, get a card with no
annual fee and a 25-day
grace period between the
day of the purchase and the
day the interest meter
starts running. Be sure to
read and understand the
terms of your credit card
agreement. Be aware of
hidden fees that might
impact you.
Don't carry more than
two or three credit cards,
and be careful in choosing
your cards. With the num-


Library
From page Al
gram was a fun experience
for both of them.
"It gets her out of the
house and interacting with
kids and they had a good
message with the treasure
being books and that reading
is important," said Ms. Lynn.
Upcoming special guests
at the Indian River County
Main Library in Vero Beach
include Atlantic Coast The-
atre on July 17, Greg Phillips
magic on July 24, and Brent
Gregory magic on Aug. 14.
The weekly events begin at
10:30 a.m.


ber of offers for credit cards
in the mail today, it is
tempting to sign up for
credit cards you don't really
need. Offers often include
low initial rates to encour-
age you to apply, and rates
jump after an introductory
period.
*Beware of cards offering
cash-back incentives or
special bonuses for signing
up, especially if you aren't
able to pay the balance in
full every month, Offers
that seem too good to be
true usually are.
*Make more than the
minimum payments. Con-
sumers who can't pay their
balance in full each month
should strive to pay more
than the required mini-
mum and reduce or elimi-
nate the debt as quickly as
they can.
Know your limitations,
and accommodate for
them. Nobody ever got
wealthy borrowing money
for gifts, clothes, restau-
rants, entertainment or
travel. If you can't resist the
temptation of having credit
cards and don't want to cut
them up because you may
need them for certain pur-
chases or travel, put the
cards in a plastic bag of
water and put them in the
freezer. The time it takes for
them to "thaw" may be the
time you need to talk your-
self out of an unnecessary
purchase.
CCCS counsels people
who want to reduce their
debt, including those who
may believe they cannot
qualify for a debt manage-
ment program because it
means giving up a credit
card to pay for essential
items, such as food and
gas.
For more information,
call (800) 330-CCCS or visit
www.cccsinc.org or
www.cccsenespanol.org.


The most popular event of
the summer, a visit from
Jupiter's Busch Wildlife Cen-
ter, is a ticketed event for July
31. All the tickets were
snatched up quickly, said
Ms. Fuchs.
The North County Library
in Sebastian also has special
guests on Fridays at 10:30
a.m.
Upcoming performances
include: Musical Madness
with Kevin Lareau on July 17,
Jamie Porter's magic on July
24 and Kidstuff by Melany on
July31.
The musical Kidstuff con-
cert will include a chance for
kids to observe and explore
musical instruments.


A8 Sebastian River Area


Friday, July 17, 2009


Hometown News






Sebastian River Area


Dining &



Entertainmenit
SECTION B WWW.HOMETOWNNEWSOL.COM FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009


Classified

raggi


VERO VIBE
BARBARA
YORESH




Memorial

was fitting

tribute for

Jackson
If "all the world's a
stage," according to
Shakespeare, then
Michael Jackson's last
public appearance, albeit
from the confines of a
gold-plated, flower-
covered casket, was
positively global.
I watched his memorial
farewell held at the Staples
Center in Los Angeles on
TV, along with millions
throughout the world.
I told myself I wouldn't
watch the finale of a week
of media frenzy and
speculation as to what
literally stopped Michael
dead in his tracks follow-
ing strenuous rehearsals
for his upcoming come-
back tour.
But like an auto wreck at
the side of the road, it is
almost impossible not to
look, while at the same
time, feeling guilty revul-
sion.
Watching CBS network
coverage of the event with
host Katie Couric some-
how lent at least a mod-
icum of legitimacy and
gravitas to what could
have easily been a circus.
In the end, what I saw
become as much a cele-
bration of the life of an
iconic entertainer and
devoted father, as it was a
final goodbye to someone
who presented an ever-
changing face to the
world.
If, in life, Michael
Jackson was a bizarre,
Peter Pan-like figure and
accused child molester,
then in death he was
unquestionably one of the
greatest entertainers of all
time and a devoted father,
whose love was extolled by
his 11-year-old daughter
in a heart-wrenching and
unexpected finale to the
two-hour show.
I watched and could not
take my eyes away from
the outpouring of love by
those he knew and
inspired to their own show
business success.
His brother Jermaine's
rendition of "Smile,"
Charlie Chaplin's 1936
song, Michael's favorite,
See VIBE, B3


Homespun

Riverside presents
musical 'Big River'
By Barbara Yoresh
Entertainment writer
The subject is pure Americana: a
Civil War-era adventure on the
mighty Mississippi River taken by a
rapscallion of a boy and a runaway
slave seeking freedom.
Drawn from Mark Twain's classic
tale of "Huckleberry Finn," Riverside
Theatre's Summer Stage '09 presen-
tation of the musical "Big River" is
sure to please the entire family with
homespun entertainment.
"Big River" runs July 24, 25 and 31
at 7:30 p.m. and July 25, 26 and Aug. 1
at 1:30 p.m. in the Anne Morton The-
atre at Riverside Children's Theatre.
Directed by Kevin Quillinan, cho-
reographed by Deborah Quillinan
and musically directed by KarenWig-
gins, the musical represents the pre-
mier quality work by a Summer Stage
cast of area high school and college
students.
The cast is also supported by the
professional staff of Riverside The-
atre, thereby assuring theater goers
an uncommonly high-level theatri-
cal experience.


From left, Nate Carabensh
.. .portrays Huckleberry Fin
S and Timothy Michael
Chastain fills the role of
SJim in the production of
0 'Big River.'














Photo courtesy of
Riverside Theater


Americana onstage
"Big River" features the story of Anne Morton Theatre due to its flexi-
Huck Finn as he travels down the ability. The idea of a raft and a river in
Mississippi with Jim, a slave seeking this flexible space was very appeal-
his freedom. ing," said Linda Downey, education
Twain's story first appeared in 1884 director of Riverside Children's The-
and has been beloved by Americans atre.
ever since. Though the tale recounts "The audience will be amazed at
the issues of slavery and prejudice the transformation of the Anne Mor-
which brought the nation to Civil ton Theatre into the banks of the
War in 1861, it also charts the Mississippi River and other locations
progress that was made in the wake from the story.
of that terrible moment in American "The intimacy of this space will
history. "Big River" examines those put the audience in the middle of the
times in a heartwarming, exciting tale, as Huck and Jim float by on a
way. raft within arm's length," Mr. Quilli-
According to Mr. Quillinan, the nan said.
production "will be packed with While it seems hard to imagine just
vibrant, youthful energy" and how that re-creation can be accom-
include a cast of 37 young perform- polished (though, no doubt, it will),
ers ages 12 through 22. there is another added feature at
"Audiences will love the memo- Riverside Children's Theatre to lend
rable and tuneful score by Roger additional authenticity to Twain's
Miller that evokes classic American tale: Aunt Polly's partially-painted
music styles including folk, country white picket fence.
and gospel," Mr. Quillinan said. What better way to celebrate sum-
Recreating a trip by raft down a mer and re-live one of America's
river certainly poses a staging chal- most enduring tales through music
lenge that theatre personnel were and adventure?


willing to tackle, thanks to their
know-how, as well as the adaptability
of the Anne Morton Theatre.
"It's going to be interesting and I'm
looking forward to it. We made a
decision to stage 'Big River' in the


*:o mo "


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


The Anne Morton Theatre is located
at 3280 Riverside Park Drive next to
Riverside Theatre. For more informa-
tion or to purchase tickets, call (772)
231-6990.


Out & about


FRIDAY, JULY 17-SUNDAY, JULY 18
SRiverside Children's Theatre
production of "Honk, Jr.," an updated
ugly duckling story from the Hans
Christian Anderson classic tale, will be
presented on the Waxlax Stage of
Riverside Theatre, 3280 Riverside Park
Drive in Vero Beach. Directed by Kevin
Quillinan, with music direction by
Deborah Quillinan. Remaining perform-
ances on July 17 are at 7:30 p.m. and
July 18 at 1:30 p.m. The show is suitable
for family audiences of all ages and the
musical is set in the English countryside
and features Ugly, a duckling who
discovers his inner beauty when he
becomes a swan, and other avian and
barnyard creatures. Tickets are $8. For


more information or to reserve tickets,
call the box office at (772) 231-6990 or
visit www.riversidetheatre.com.

THROUGH FRIDAY, JULY 24
Riverside Children's Theatre
summer program for children ages 4-
7, called Beginning Stages, will have an
"It's a Small World" theme for the
weekday enrichment program held
from 9 a.m. to noon. Each week of the
five-week program will salute a different
part of the world through literature and
music. Beginning Stages is an introduc-
tion to the performing arts program,
which uses age-appropriate literature
and music with a showcase perform-
ance for parents each Friday. The fee is


$85 per session and the theatre has
scholarships available. For more
information, call the Riverside Children's
Theatre office at (772) 234-8052.

THROUGH FRIDAY, JULY 31
"Art Goes Green!" at the Artists
Guild Gallery throughout July, as gallery
artists showcase works created from
recycled objects including glue, sticks,
paint, feathers, fabric, hardware and
more. Newly-installed traditional art will
also be on display in a wide array of
mediums and styles. The exhibit is free
and open to the public. The Artists Guild
Gallery is located at 44 Royal Palm Point
See OUT, B2


tooth.


Pri hoEad


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Out
From page B1
in Vero Beach. Summer hours
are Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
and on Saturday from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call (772) 299-1234.
FRIDAY, JULY 24 -
SATURDAY, AUG. 1
SRiverside Children's
Theatre, 3280 Riverside Park
Drive in Vero Beach. "Big
River" will be performed at


Anne Morton Theatre at 7:30
p.m., July 24, 25 and 31;
also at 1:30 p.m. July 25, 26
and Aug. 1. Appropriate for
ages 7 and up. For more
information call (772) 231-
6990 or (772) 234-8052.

SATURDAY, JULY 25-
SUNDAY, JULY26
Auditions for the Vero
Beach Theatre Guild produc-
tion of "Cabaret" will be held
at the theatre, located at 2020
San Juan Ave. in Vero Beach.
Vocalists may audition on
Saturday, July 25 at 11 a.m. for


the roles of Sally Bowles,
emcee and Kit Kat Club
dancers. Dancers may
audition at 2 p.m. (in a venue
to be announced). Vocalists
may also audition on Sunday
at 1 p.m. for the same roles
and dancer auditions set for 4
p.m. at a venue to be
announced. There is an Aug. 2
open call for vocalists at 2 and
6 p.m. On Aug. 9 at 2 p.m.,
there is an open call. Roles
will be filled by 15-20 women
ages 18-70s; 15-18 men, ages
18- 70s; six to eight
female/male dancers ages 18-
30s and ensemble characters,


Rotary Club gets charter


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY The Rotary
Club Oceanside was formally presented its
new charter by Betsy Owen, Rotary district
governor on May 19.
That same night, Karl M. Steene, club
president, presented Ms. Owens with a
$1,000 check for the Rotary International
Foundation's worldwide polio eradication
campaign.


ages 20-70s. The musical will
be directed by Mark Wygonik
and presented Nov. 12-29. For
more information, e-mail
markwygonik@aol.com or call
(772) 562-8300.
FRIDAY, JULY 31
Downtown Friday's
"Summer in the City" will be
held from 3:30-8:30 p.m. on
14th Avenue between 21st
and 23rd Streets in downtown
Vero Beach. The popular street
party will feature a host of
activities, displays, entertain-
See OUT, B3


'C"',


The 23-member club meets weekly at
Indian River Shores Town Hall at 5:30 p.m.
on Tuesday evening. The meeting format
includes hors d'oeuvres, wine and soft
drinks, rather than traditional luncheon
and breakfast or dinner formats.
Like other Rotary clubs, the business
and professional members of the club are
dedicated to community and internation-
al service.
For more information, call (772) 226-
2467 or (772) 234-0408.


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"Copyrighted Material
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~~*--
H81 r-;; <- ** 4 r'


B2 Sebastian River Area


Friday, July 17, 2009


Hometown News


*"*i- VA Oft














I'ometownNews SUPER BUY of the week

Another best-kept coupon seret: maximiJe the math
Another best-kept coupon secret: maximize the match


Last week, I introduced
you to some of the
fun ways shoppers
can make buy one, get one
free sales even more
rewarding. Anytime we can
buy one item and get
another free, we're essen-
tially buying two at half
price each. So how do we
make a half-off sale even
better? With coupons, of
course.
Here's the third "best-


kept secret" of couponing:
use two coupons during a
BOGO sale.
At most stores, you can
use one coupon per
purchase. Even though
you're buying one item and
getting another "free," it's
not truly free. You still have
to go through the act of
"purchasing" it at the
register (the store won't
allow you to just pick up
the "free" jar and take it


home, will they?) If you live
in an area that collects
sales tax on groceries, you
must still pay sales tax on
the "free" item.
So it's best to think of


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BOGO sales as buying two
for the price of one. As
long as you're buying two
items, even if one is full-
price and one is free, you
can use a coupon on each
item you're buying. You're
buying two items, so you
can use two coupons.
Here's an example
illustrating why this is a
great idea.
My grocery store has
organic pasta sauces on
sale for $3, buy one, get
one free. And even though
the register rings them up
as $3 for the first jar and $0
for the second, it is still
possible for me to present
a coupon on each jar for
additional savings.
For this sale, I have two
$1 coupons for the pasta
sauce. Using one coupon
for each jar I purchase
brings my cost down to
just $1 for two jars, or 50
cents each. That's a great


price for any pasta sauce,
especially organic.
Now, many grocery
stores handle BOGO sales
differently. With a sale
such as the one I outlined
above, most stores' regis-
ters will ring the sale as
one $3 jar and one $0 jar.
Other grocery stores may
approach the same BOGO
sale by ringing up each
item at $1.50 each. Either
way, you can still use a
coupon on each item and
get each jar of pasta sauce
for 50 cents.
Are you ready for a
bonus tip? If your store
"splits" BOGO prices into
half for each item, you only
have to buy one of the
items to get it for that
price. So if you only had
one pasta sauce coupon,
you could buy just one jar,
get it for the $1.50 price,
use a $1 coupon on it, and
still take it home for 50


cents.
To determine which way
your store handles BOGO
sales, look at your receipt
the next time you buy
items promoted in a BOGO
sale. If the register rings
one at full price and one at
zero, you must buy two to
receive the price. If it rings
each one at half of full
price, you will be able to
buy just one of the items
involved in the sale and
receive it for half the price
without buying the second
item.

Jill Cataldo, a coupon
workshop instructor, writer
and mother of three, never
passes up a good deal.
Learn more about coupon-
ing at her Web site,
www.super-
couponing.com. E-mail
your own couponing
victories and questions to
jill@ctwfeatures.com.


ADVERTISE HERE

Join Jill each week as she educates Hometown News
Readers how to save with coupons.

ONLY A FEW SPOTS LEFT

CALL 772-569-6767 TODAY


Out
From page B2

ment and food vendors. Admission is
free and there is ample parking in the
vicinity.

SATURDAY, AUG. 1

SThe Vero Beach Art Club has
issued a call to artists for the
successful "Art Trail Tour" set for Dec.
5 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This tour
visits 10 artist's studios and gives
artists an opportunity to meet directly
with art enthusiasts and sell their
artwork. This event kicks off the Vero
Beach Art Club season and is widely
promoted and advertised. The
selection process is open to all
talented artists living in Vero Beach
who meet certain requirements and
who are willing to make their homes
accessible to the public. The applica-
tion fee is $20 and the deadline to
enter is Aug. 1. Those interested may
pick up an application form at the
Vero Beach Art Club offices located at
the Vero Beach Museum of Art at
3001 Riverside Park Drive in Vero
Beach or by calling (772) 231-0303
for more information.


FRIDAY, AUG. 7

The second annual Light Up Your
Grill night is set for 5:30 to 8 p.m.
and presented by the Sebastian River
Area Chamber of Commerce. More
than 20 local businesses in Wabasso,
Sebastian and Roseland will open
their doors to the community, giving
area residents and visitors an
opportunity to visit and enjoy food,
refreshments, prize drawings and
more. There will be a contest for the
best watermelon (eaten or carved!). A
map with participating locations will
be available that afternoon at the
chamber offices, 700 Main St. in
Sebastian. For more information, call
(772) 589-5969.

THROUGH SATURDAY, SEPT. 19

Vero Beach Opera and the
Majestic Theatre present "Met
Summer Encores" in high-definition,
showing of some of the best of the
Metropolitan Opera's programs.
Tickets for each performance are $12
for adults. The summer series line-up
includes "Eugene Onegin" by
Tchaikovsky on July 18; "La Boheme"
by Puccini on Aug. 8; "La Fille Du
Regiment" by Donizetti on Aug. 22;
"Barber of Seville" by Rossini on Sept.


12; and "Madame Butterfly" by
Puccini on Sept. 19. All encore
performances begin at 10 a.m. Tickets
are available at the Majestic Theatre
box office located at 940 14th Lane
off U.S. 1 in Vero Beach. For more
information, call (772) 770-0773.

THROUGH OCT. 25

The Vero Beach Museum of Art
presents "Rooted in Tradition: Art
Quilts from the Rocky Mountain
Quilt Museum" in its Homes Gallery
in an exhibit sponsored by the
Patricia M. Patten endowment. There
is no admission charge to view this
exhibit or any of the museum's other
summer/fall exhibitions. The exhibit
chronicles the history of art quilts
from 1980 to the present in a
movement which brought the quilts
from the bed to the wall. Sixty-four
quilts in the collection reflect the
change from traditional repeated
block designs to more free-spirited,
edgy art forms. The Vero Beach
Museum of Art is located at 3001
Riverside Park Drive in Vero Beach.
For more details, call (772) 231-0707

NOW THROUGH FALL 2009

The Vero Beach Museum of Art


announces free admission to all art
exhibits now through fall. All visitors
are asked to stop at the front visitor's
desk to pick up a complimentary
admission ticket for admission.
Museum hours are Monday through
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
and Sundays from 1-4:30 p.m. The
museum will be closed on Mondays
from Memorial Day through Labor
Day. The Museum of Art is located at
3001 Riverside Park Drive in Vero
Beach. For more information, call
(772) 231-070Z

ART GALLERIES

Artists Guild Gallery, 44 Royal
Palm Pointe, Vero Beach. Hours: 11
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, Saturday
11 a.m.-3 p.m. (772) 299-1234 or
see artistsguildgalleryverobeach.com
for upcoming events.
The Gallery at Windsor, 10680
Belvedere Square, Vero Beach. By
appointment only. (772) 388-4071.
Gallery 14, 1911 14th Ave., Vero
Beach. (772) 562-5525
The Laughing Dog Gallery, 2910
Cardinal Drive, Vero Beach. Open 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday. (772)
234-6711
Lin Roller Menard Gallery, 2919
Cardinal Drive, Vero Beach. (772)


231-5050
Tiger Lily Art Studios and Gallery,
1903 14th Ave., Vero Beach. (772)
778-3443.

BARS AND CLUBS

Bodega Blue, 2115 14th Ave., Vero
Beach.
Capt. Hiram's Resort, 1580 U.S. 1,
Sebastian. For a look at the full
entertainment lineup, visit
www.hirams.com. (772) 589-4345
Earl's Hideaway Lounge and Tiki
Bar, 1405 Indian River Drive, Sebast-
ian. Live Delta Blues music Tuesday
nights by Ernie Southern. (772) 589-
5700, (772) 388-2597 or www.earl-
shideaway.com.
*Kelley's Irish Pub, 484 21st St., B,
Vero Beach, Friday night sing-along in
the piano bar. (772) 567-3838
Long Branch Saloon, 2199
Seventh Ave., Vero Beach. (772) 569-
4075
Marsh Landing, 44 N. Broadway
St, Fellsmere: Folk/acoustic duo
HairPeace every Saturday, 5:30-8:30
p.m. Call for other entertainment
schedules. (772) 571-8622.
Riverside Cafe, 1 Beachland Blvd.,
Vero Beach, Live entertainment. (772)
234-5550
To have your upcoming event listed
here, contact byoresh@yahoo.com.


Vibe
From page B1
was sung with a level of
emotion and vocal skill
that underscored the vast
talent within the Jackson
family.
And it is that talent
which will remain herald-
ed long after the media


hoopla ends and the
postmortem toxicology
reports revealed.
The King of Pop was
bigger than life itself and
yet, during this memorial,
he was characterized in
more earthly ways, which
revealed a supremely-
complex human who
seemed to care as much
about altruism as hedo-


nism.
The soft-spoken, gentle
Michael off-stage under-
went instant metamorpho-
sis on-stage into an edgy
performer whose music
and moves pushed the
envelope beyond anything
which had ever been done
or seen before.
It seemed there were two
Michaels. Perhaps three,


actually, when taking into
account his role as father
to three beautiful children,
born of murky parentage,
but nonetheless totally
embraced and loved by the
entire Jackson clan.
Owen Meany, John
Irving's protagonist in the
novel "A Prayer for Owen
Meany," repeatedly
commented that the


outrageousness of daily
news was "made for
television."
So, too, was this memori-
al to Michael Jackson. His
talent and complex life
seemed almost other-
worldly.
Yet, like us, he was a
person with all the hopes,
fears, joys, sorrows,
failures and triumphs that


mark a mortal life.
He is gone and even that
final resting place remains
a mystery as I write this.
But Michael Jackson will
not be forgotten by those
who were awed by his
talent, even while we
wonder about that man in
the mirror.
Rest in peace, Michael.


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Friday, July 17, 2009


Sebastian River Area B3


www.H hometown NewsOL.com








B4 Sebastian River Area Hometown News Friday, July 17, 2009


StaycatZon


Head south for outdoor surprises


By Samantha Joseph
Joseph@hometownnewsol.com
MARTIN COUNTY It's
always the quiet ones, the
saying goes, that hold the
most surprises. And the
seemingly sleepy towns in
the south of Martin County
seem to prove that point.
Just south of the faster-
paced Stuart center, are
Palm City, Port Salerno
and Hobe Sound, three
small communities brim-
ming with pleasant sur-
prises for adventurous
travelers.
Saddle up in Palm City
for a day of horse riding,
racing and polo at area sta-
bles that offer riding les-
sons, sightseeing tours on
horseback, pony rides for
children and classes to
show visitors how to
befriend, train and care for
the animals.
Sunlight Stable Club
offers picnic lunches, polo
games and instruction,
while Greenridge Stables
caters to novice and expe-
rienced riders at rates
beginning at $25 per hour.
Call them at (772) 781-
5429 and (772) 288-7234
respectively, to arrange
rides around area parks
and preserves.
"There's a whole world of
horses here in their back-
yards, but people aren't
aware of it," said Rozeta
Mahboubi, executive
director of the Martin
County Convention and
Visitors Bureau.
A few miles south, in
Port Salerno, lies one of
the Treasure Coast's
biggest fishing destina-


&5t 4.~~4


File photo
Skateboarding and karting are two popular activities for kids.


tions. Its seafood festival
draws thousands in Janu-
ary, while its manatee
pockets are popular spots
for observing wildlife.
The area's charm
includes a unique service.
"You can go fishing and
bring what you catch to
most of the local restau-
rants, and they'll cook it
for you," Ms. Mahboubi
said. Just call ahead to
check area restaurants.
In Hobe Sound, the lit-
tle-known 78-acre Peck
Lake Park, off Gomez
Avenue and north of
Crossrip Street, features
habitats, trails and educa-
tional kiosks with informa-
tion on the area's history
and wildlife.
"Your prize for complet-
ing the half-mile board-
walk trek is a breathtaking


view of the Intracoastal,"
said Jennifer Ferrari, exec-
utive director of the Hobe
Sound Chamber of Com-
merce.
The chamber's staff is
friendly and organizes
Inside Hobe Sound tours
for residents. Call them at
(772) 546-4724.
The Hobe Sound Nature
Center and Hobe Sound
National Wildlife Refuge,
at 13640 S.E. Federal High-
way, host turtle walks in
June and July, as well as
children's camps and
supervised hands-on
encounters with baby alli-
gators, screech owls,
snakes and other native
animals. Visit www.hobe-
soundnaturecenter. corn.
Set aside a day to take in
Florida's second largest
state park, a sprawling


11,500-acre property.
Jonathan Dickinson State
Park features more than 8
miles of rivers, boat tours,
camping sites, fishing
areas, hiking trails, an
abundance of outdoor
activities and rich tales of
a "wildman," Trapper Nel-
son, who inhabited the
area and lived a rustic life,
wrestling alligators and
"living off the land." Find
out more by calling (772)
546-2771.
Get your adrenaline
pumping with racing les-
sons or watch a meet at the
South Florida Karting
Association. Get their
schedule at www.south-
floridakarting. corn.
Head for a swim or lazy
stroll along the 300-foot
Hobe Sound Public Beach,
which offers ample park-


7m~

I i'~


File photo
Head for a swim or surf at Hobe Sound Public Beach,
which features ample parking, showers, lifeguards and


covered picnic tables.
ing, showers, lifeguards
and covered picnic tables.
Stop by the Blowing
Rocks Preserve for a rare
view of natural geysers
formed from coral rocks
that spew water, creating
natural fountains. The
Nature Conservancy, (561)


744-6668, runs the site.
Call the Martin County
Convention and Visitors
Bureau at (772) 288-5451.
They have brochures and
hotel information, and
staff can readily rattle off a
list of other things to do in
the area.


Use proper


precautions during hot summer months


In case you have yet to
notice, summer is here.
By the feel of things
and the look of my electric
bill, we're in for a smolder-
ing hot one.
Your main concern
when playing any sport in
the summer heat should
be to avoid heat exhaus-
tion, stroke and dehydra-
tion.
Sweating is the most
significant way the body
cools itself to maintain a
safe and stable tempera-
ture.
In humid climates,
sweat doesn't evaporate
easily and our bodies don't


cool as efficiently as
possible. We sweat more
and need to consume
more fluids to help stay
cool and perform optimal-
ly.
It's important that you
drink before you're thirsty.
You'll even play much
better when you're not
constantly looking for the
next water cooler.
Sports drinks, such as
Gatorade and the like,
help replenish your body
with the fluids and elec-
trolytes it loses while
perspiring. These drinks
are also loaded with
carbohydrates to provide


energy your body needs.
Fruits are best for giving
you a boost of long-lasting
energy. Candy bars pro-
vide quick energy, but
their effects diminish just
as quickly. Bananas,
apples or peaches are easy
to carry and eat. Bananas
also help prevent the
buildup of cramp-causing
lactic acid in the muscles,
a frequent occurrence
during exercise.
The most important
concern for yourself and
your playing partners
should be avoiding heat
exhaustion or, even worse,
heat stroke. There are
many ways to do that.
Always wear shorts and
light colored shirts. It may
sound crazy, but wearing
an undershirt will also
help. The undershirt helps
get perspiration away from
your body where it can
evaporate more quickly,
helping the cooling


process.
If you feel too warm at
the turn, stop by the
clubhouse, grab a cold
drink and soak up some
air conditioning.
While hats are great for
keeping the sun off of your
head and face, they will
make you warmer. Your
body discharges most of
its heat through your
head. Medical experts say
as much as 70 percent of
your blood is in your head
at any given time. If your
head is hot, so is the rest
of your body.
Therefore, if your head is
cool, the rest of your body
will be, as well. I like to
take my cap off when I'm
riding along in the cart.
The sun isn't beating down
on me and the breeze
created by the moving cart
helps cool me.
Some people like to take
along an extra towel or
two. They dampen these
towels at every water
cooler and lay them across
the back of their necks or
over their heads when not
hitting a shot, or wipe
their face and arms with
them in an effort to keep


cool.
If you are taking medica-
tion, your body may need
even more assistance to
keep cool. Some medica-
tions interfere with
sweating, putting you at a
greater risk of having a
life-threatening heat
stroke.
Check with your doctor
to see if your medication
could be putting you at
risk and what measures
you should take to lessen
your chances of heat-
induced illness.
If you begin to feel the
effects of extreme thirst:
nausea, dizziness,
headache, elevated
temperature, if your skin
looks pale, your pupils
appear dilated or your
muscles start to cramp,
there is a good chance that
you are suffering from
heat exhaustion.
The best thing to do is
immediately get to a cool
place and rest. Replenish
your body by drinking
large amounts of fluids
and eating generously
salted foods to help your
body return to its normal
balance.


Heat stroke is much
more serious and can
quickly become deadly.
Symptoms of heat stroke
include: hot, dry skin with
a grayish tint, dilated
pupils and a body temper-
ature that may rise to
more than 104 degrees.
Anyone suffering from
heat stroke must be
treated quickly. Immerse
the victim in a cool water
or ice bath and call 911
immediately.
Finally, a step many of
us forget. Remember to
put sunscreen on every
exposed body part. The
effects of sunlight on our
skin can be deadly. Skin
cancer is becoming more
prevalent with the deple-
tion of the Earth's protec-
tive ozone layer. A few
minutes spent putting on
sunscreen could save your
life.
James Stammer has been
an avid golfer and golf
enthusiast for 30 years. He
hosts the Tuesday Night
Golf Show on WPSL 1590-
AM radio station. Contact
him at
jstammer@yahoo.com.


Community calendar


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I TUESDAY, JULY 28

*Sebastian River Medical
Center's Surgical Weight
Loss Support Group will
meet at 6 pm, in the hospi-
tal's Conference Room. If
you are a past surgical
weight loss patient or con-
sidering surgical weight loss
and would like to meet with
actual patients to ask ques-
tions, this is the meeting to
attend. The support group
will be led by Dr. Lynn
Williams, a licensed psy-
chologist who specializes in
the disease of obesity and


bariatric surgery patients.
For reservations or further
information, call 388-4388.
For reservations or more
information, call (772) 388-
4388.

FRIDAY, AUG. 7

*The second annual Light
Up Your Grill Night will be
held from 5:30-8:00 p.m.
sponsored by the Sebastian
River Area Chamber of
Commerce. A map with par-
ticipating locations will be
available that afternoon at
the Sebastian River Area


Chamber of Commerce
located at 700 Main Street in
Sebastian. For more infor-
mation, call the (772) 589-
5969 or (772) 532-9875.

ONGOING EVENTS

*Pelican Island National
Wildlife Refuge host guided
beginning bird watching
tours on Saturdays from 8-
11 a.m. The volunteer-guid-
ed tours will visit Bird's
Impoundment Trail and the
newly reopened Centennial

See CALENDAR, B5


B4 Sebastian River Area


Friday, July 17, 2009


Hometown News


saTfqy


co
r-







www.H hometown NewsOL.com


How about a peck of pickles or pickled peppers?


H ello smart shoppers,
hope you had a good
week.
If you are diabetic, so
many foods are forbidden
to you, such as one of my
favorite snacks: bread and
butter pickles.
If you make them yourself
you can use a sugar substi-
tute. Sugar substitutes work
in all sauces, dressings,
desserts, etc. It's only in
baked goods that you must
use at least half real sugar.
You do know that sugar is
a carbohydrate. Making
your own pickles, the sugar-
free way, means no carbs.
We'll make kosher pickles
and bread and butter
pickles, and if you really
want to work, then do as my
late husband, Bill, did: grow
your own cucumbers and
peppers.
While we're at it, how
about ajardiniere? Love
jarred hot peppers but hate
the price? We'll make them,
too!
The best thing about
making your own pickles is
you can also reduce the salt.
In my opinion, nothing
compares to a real kosher
dill pickle.


Years ago, kosher delis in
New York had huge wooden
barrels filled with pickles.
You would select the one
you wanted and the propri-
etor would reach in with
huge tongs and retrieve it.
Today that's not consid-
ered sanitary, but you can
still get a real kosher pickle
in the refrigerator section of
the supermarket. What
really bothers me is the
price.
Did you know that one
large cucumber will fill the
jar of pickle spears? Here's a
trick to save money. Once
the jar is empty, scrub and
cut a cucumber into spears
and put it in the jar with the
brine. Cover and leave on
the counter overnight; turn
jar over (onto its lid) and let
sit another day. Have a
pickle. If it's just the way
you like it; then refrigerate
the jar.
For bread and butter
pickles, bring the brine to a
boil and add slices of
cucumber; cook as directed
in recipe.
NOTE: To prevent the jars
breaking, always put a
utensil into a glass jar
before pouring in hot


ROMANCING
THE STOVE
with the
Grammy Guru
ARLENE BORG .

liquid.
Enjoy. See you next week.

KOSHER PICKLES
(NIB)
Makes 2 quarts

8-10 small cucumbers,
or 2 large cucumbers,
cut into spears
2 tablespoons kosher
salt
2 whole sprigs fresh dill
Crushed red pepper,
optional
2 tablespoons pickling
spices
4-6 cloves of garlic,
peeled and cut in large
pieces
Cold water
2 one-quart canning
jars

Wash jars in hot water.
Scrub cucumbers and pack
tightly in jars.
Add 1 whole sprig dill, 1
tablespoon salt, 1 table-


spoon pickling spices, half
the garlic and a few shakes
of red pepper to each jar,
pushing ingredients
halfway down. Fill to top
with cold water, leaving a
1/2-inch space.
Cover tightly, turn upside
down and store in a cool
place for a couple of days.
Test a pickle for doneness.
When cured to your liking,
refrigerate the jars.

BREAD AND BUTTER
PICKLES (NIB)
Makes 4 pints
(2 quarts)

4 cups sliced cucum-
bers
4 tablespoon kosher salt
1 small onion, coarsely
chopped
1 cup white vinegar
1 cup sugar or equiva-
lent amount of sugar
substitute
1 teaspoon each of
celery seed and mustard
seed
3/4-teaspoon turmeric

Place cucumbers in cold
water. Add salt and ice
cubes. Soak for at least 1


hour. This will keep them
crisp. Drain.
Meanwhile, place all
remaining ingredients,
except onions, in a
saucepan and bring to a
boil. Add sliced cucumbers
and onions and cook for
about 10 minutes. Place in
clean canning jars, seal and
store.

JARDINIERE (NIB)
Makes 5 to 6 pints

4 cups sliced cucumbers
1 cup sliced onions
4 tablespoons kosher
salt
1 red and 1 green bell
pepper, sliced into rings
1 cup white vinegar
1 cup sugar or equiva-
lent amount of sugar
substitute
1 teaspoon each of
celery seed and mustard
seed
3/4-teaspoon turmeric
2 cinnamon sticks
Place cucumbers, onions
and peppers in cold water.
Add salt and ice cubes.
Soak for 1 hour. Drain.
Place remaining ingredi-
ents in a saucepan and
bring to a boil. Add vegeta-


bles and cook for 10 to 20
minutes, depending on
how crisp you want them.
Discard cinnamon sticks.
Place in clean canning
jars; seal and store.
Cauliflower flowerets,
sliced carrots and any
other vegetable you
choose can be added to the
mix.

PICKLED PEPPERS

To make your own hot or
sweet jarred peppers,
simply prepare a vinegar
wash, 1/2 water, 1/2 white
vinegar. Bring to a boil in a
non-aluminum pan.
Add peppers, whole and
cook until tender-crisp.
Place peppers in jars, pour
in the vinegar wash. Liquid
must come almost to the
top. Prepare additional
wash if necessary.
Cover and store.

When a recipe is not in
my cookbook it will have
(NIB) next to the title.
To order my cookbook,
access past columns or
check out great tips, go to
my Web site, www.romanc-
ingthestove.net.


Tips for discovering the path of great awakenings


Inside the soul of every
living human on earth
lives a sleeping, creative
giant yearning to be set free.
It doesn't have a whole lot
to do with breeding, wealth,
power or prestige. These are
earthly things and are
fleeting. It has everything to
do with turning away from
the quick fixes of the world,
turning within and begin-
ning to follow the inner
path of the heart and soul.
Every one of us in the
human family has access to
this awesome inner light.
The greatest challenge
most of us have in this
world is to stop the war
within ourselves, where the
mind tells us one thing and
the heart tells us another.
The true answers come
when we move toward the
heart.
But go one step further
and begin to listen to and
honor the supreme truth,
which lives in the soul.
These are the gut instincts.


They speak first and always
speak the truth. It's only
when we let our ego or head
get in the way and block or
sidetrack this divine
wisdom and inner truth,
that we begin to break
down at the weakest point.
This can be physical,
mental, emotional, spiritu-
al, financial, self worth or
wherever else we have let
our life force become
focused.
The different hungers,
fears, guilt and sadness we
feel inside is because we are
living by the ways of the
world.
Sooner or later, within
each of us, comes a day of
reckoning, where all the
outer things don't matter


that much anymore.
We have become jaded,
disinterested or are feeling
lost. This is a great place to
be in. It's the point where
we come face to face with
our true self, begin to make
more wise choices and
begin to say no to negative
behavior.
Where are you in life?
When we get to this stage
we are at the turning point.
There are three possibilities
of what we can do when we
arrive at this point.
We can either try to go
back and keep up the
facade of earthly pleasures
or we can keep on with the
present circumstances.
Just know that if we refuse
to make changes, the
universe will make the
changes for us, whether we
like them or not. These are
the swamps, tidal waves
and tsunamis in life. The
only permanent thing in life
is change.
The third possibility is to


begin to turn within and
surrender our earthly will to
the higher will and ask the
universe, by whatever name
we call the higher power, to
take over our life, and give
us signs that relief of all the
earthly stress and confusion
is on the way.
When we get to this point,
where our own lives are
unmanageable, turn a glass
down and know that this is
the turning point on our
way toward "the path of
great awakenings" and a
happier life. We don't have
to be on a recovery path
from drugs, alcohol, food,
gambling, unworthiness or
whatever our own brand of
poison might be. We just
have to surrender our lower
will.
With this surrender, a
long needed peace begins
to come over us. We
become forgiving of
ourselves and others in the
past who berated us. The
inner glow of happiness


begins to shine brighter. We
go to bed happy and we
wake up happier. A healthy
soul is a happy soul. A great
healing is taking place.
Yeah! We have hope again.
The heart opens and love
flows without fear. Trust
and faith come alive. Our
health improves dramati-
cally because of the wise
choices we make in what
we drink, eat, feel, speak
and do.
We feel 21 again with all
the promise of our youth
restored. Ours is a good life.
We did it. It all comes down
to how happy we want to be
and the choices we make.
My greatest wish is that
you make these choices and
find your true greatness and
purpose, today, and for all
your future days to come.
Our divine heritage, you
know, is to live a peaceful,
loving, healthy, abundant,
faithful, joy-filled, creative,
and purposeful life for all
our days. We did it, my


friend. The sweetest news is
the best is yet to come.
Until next time, never
give up on your dream, your
purpose and your passion.
Keep on keeping on. Never
give up.

Special services

James recently created a
low-cost custom water
ionizing system, the foun-
tain of youth. It creates
healthy water at a fraction
of the cost of high-priced
filtering systems. It helps
bring the pH back in
balance in the body.
For readings, astrology
charts and other services,
call (7720 334-9487, e-mail
jtuckxyz@aol.com or write
James Tucker, 4550 N.E.
Indian River Drive, Jensen
Beach, FL 34957.
To read the Spirit Guide
column, visit myhome-
townnews.net and click on
Counseling and advice.


Calendar
From page B4
Trail. The tours will run through
March 2008. No reservations are
required. For more information,
call the refuge at (772) 562-3909,
Ext. 275, or visit fws.gov/pelicanis-
land/events
*Italian-American War Veter-
ans, Post No.3 and Women's Auxil-
iary, located at 2500 15th Ave., Vero
Beach, holds business meetings at
7 p.m., on the second Wednesday
of each month. Social meetings
are held at 6 p.m., on the fourth
Wednesday of the month. New
members welcome. For informa-
tion, call (772) 231-5673 or (772)
770-2558.
*The Vero Beach Railroad Sta-
tion in downtown Vero Beach was
originally built in 1903. It is on the
National Register of Historic
Places, and is open Monday


through Friday from 10 a.m.-4
p.m. Visitors can tour the exhibit
center and get a glimpse of the
local history from prehistoric
times through World War II. There
is a model train display that offers
panoramic views of historical sites
in Indian River County. The Rail-
road Station is located at 2336 14th
Ave., Vero Beach. For more infor-
mation, call (772) 778-3435.
*Indian River County Historical
Society preserves the artifacts,
sites and structures related to Indi-
an River County heritage and
offers maps and directions to sites
of historic interest throughout the
county. The society is housed in a
1903 Vero Beach Train Station,
located at 2336 14th Ave., Vero
Beach, and is open Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m.-1
p.m. For more information, call
(772) 778-3435.
*The Heritage Bluegrass Band
performs every Tuesday night,


from 7:30-10 p.m. There is no
admission charge and donations
are appreciated. Light refresh-
ments are available. The Heritage
Center is located at 2140 14th Ave.,
Vero Beach.
*Vero Beach Museum of Art fea-
tures exhibitions of international,
national and state importance are
shown throughout the year in four
galleries. The museum also hous-
es a gift shop store and is the
largest teaching museum school
in Florida. It is located at 3001
Riverside Park Drive, Vero Beach.
For more information, call (772)
231-0707
*Vero Beach Green Market is
held every Tuesday from 3-7 p.m.
Find plants, fruits and vegetables,
seafood, herbs, coffee, freshly-
made, donuts, hand-milled soaps,
lotions, teas and on occasion, arti-
san sausages and cured meats,
fresh local eggs, homemade dog-
gie treats and much more. The


market is located at the corner of
14th Avenue and 21st Street in
front of the Heritage Centre.
*Guided kayak tours: Visitors
paddle along the Indian River
Lagoon and enjoy nature at its
tropical best. Experience the thrill
of close encounters with dolphins,
manatees and exotic birds. The
guide is a master naturalist and
U.S. Coast Guard captain. Cost is
$47 each for a 2-1/2 hour tour.
Reservations are required. Space
is limited to 12 participants. For
more information call (772) 234-
3436.
*Indian River Citrus Museum
tells the story and preserves the
artifacts, photographs and memo-
rabilia of the pioneers who estab-
lished the most distinguished cit-
rus fruit in the world. Open
Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m.-4
p.m., in the Heritage Center, 2140
14th Ave., Vero Beach. For more
information call (772) 770-2263.


*McKee Botanical Garden is an
18-acre botanical garden listed on
the National Register of Historic
Places and endorsed by the Gar-
den Conservancy. This Florida
hammock offers a diverse botani-
cal collection, as well as several
restored architectural treasures,
the Hall of Giants and Spanish
Kitchen. Self-guided tours are
available Tuesday through Satur-
day from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun-
day from noon-5 p.m. It is closed
Monday and major holidays.
Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for
seniors and $3.50 for children. It is
located at 350 U.S. 1,Vero Beach. It
also has a gift shop, library and
cafr. For more information, call
(772) 794-0601, or www.mckeegar-
den.org.
*McLarty Treasure Museum fea-
tures treasures discovered from
ancient Spanish ships wrecked in


See CALENDAR, B6


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Sebastian River Area B5


Friday, July 17, 2009











Obituaries


Ruth Redstone Callahan

Ruth Redstone Callahan, 94, of
Sebastian, died July 2, 2009.
She was born in Olean, N.Y., and
moved to Vero Beach in 1925.
She graduated from Vero Beach
High School in 1933.
She worked at First Federal Sav-
ings & Loan, Vero Beach for 20
years.
She was a member of First Unit-
ed Methodist Church in Vero
Beach, the Daughters of the Amer-


ican Revolution, Daughters of the
Nile and was treasurer of AARP.
She is survived by three daugh-
ters, Joann, Linda and Paula; two
sisters, Irene and Doris; a brother,
David; six grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 51 years, Paul; her
first husband, Lawrence and seven
brothers.
Donations may be made to VNA
Hospice of Indian River County,
1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL


32960.

Susan Hauser

Susan Hauser, 69, died June 29,
2009.
She was born in Norwalk, Conn.,
and lived in Vero Beach for 20
years.
She was a member of Johns
Island Club, the Red Stick Golf
Club and Quail Valley Country
Club.
She is survived by her husband


of 44 years, Edward; a son, Edward;
a daughter, Anne; a brother,
Michael and a sister, Sarah.
Arrangements by Strunk Funeral
Home and Crematory.

Pieter Willem Kok

PieterWillem Kok, of Sebastian,
died July 2, 2009.
He was born in the Netherlands
and lived in Sebastian since 1998.
He worked for Philips Medical
Systems. He had 14 patents cov-


ering improvements in X-ray
technology.
He is survived by his wife of 53
years, Kitty; five children, Pieter
(Carol), Robert (Laura), John
(Wendy), Enno and Elsa (Brian)
and 12 grandchildren.
Donations may be sent to the
Cleveland Clinic Foundation,
Heart and Vascular Institute, P.O.
Box 931517, Cleveland, OH
44793.
Arrangements by Strunk Funer-
al Home.


Community notes


Group offers help with grief

New Beginnings, a group established to
assist people in resolving their grief over the
death of a loved one, meets every Monday at
7 p.m. at Redeemer Lutheran Church 900
27th Ave., Vero Beach.
New Beginnings is an informal but helpful
experience in grief resolution. People are
invited to attend any or all meetings.
There is no registration and no cost.
For more information, call (772) 465-1100.

Recycle old pill bottles

Bay Street Pharmacy and Home Health
Care and Keep Indian River Beautiful are
providing our local nonprofits with oppor-
tunities to eliminate operational expenses
when possible. By providing reusable items,
from KIRB's ReUse Exchange Center, organi-
zations such as the Humane Society and
HALO can reuse clean prescription bottles
for animals waiting to be adopted.
To ensure that donations are reusable,
remove the label from the prescription bot-
tle and rinse lightly. To drop off prescription
bottles, visit Bay Street Pharmacy & Home
Health Care, located at 7746 Bay St., Sebast-
ian.

Exercise classes offered

Qi gong at Riverview Park in Sebastian,
next to the long dock, Fridays 6:15 p.m. and
Sunday 7 a.m.


Walking qi gong at Wabasso Beach,
where State Roast 510 meets the ocean.
Tuesday and Thursday at 7 p.m.
Qi gong for mind, body and spirit at
Kashi Studio on Roseland Road. Saturday
at 8 a.m., and Tuesday at 10 a.m.
All classes cost $7. For more information,
call (722) 581-2629 or e-mail
namaste52bellsouth.net.

Tips on disaster planning

The Humane Society of Vero Beach and
Indian River County has published a new
brochure on disaster planning for pet own-
ers.
The brochure covers topics including pet
identification, determining if you and your
pets live in a surge zone, pet supplies need-
ed if someone must evacuate with their ani-
mals and how to create a pet first aid kit.
The free brochure can be obtained by visit-
ing the Humane Society at 6230 77th St., Vero
Beach, by calling the shelter at (772) 388-
3331, Ext. 18

Try a water class at aquatic center

The North County Aquatics Center is
offering Aquanautics, a water fitness class,
designed to strengthen and firm muscles,
improve cardio and respiratory function
and increase flexibility.
Other benefits include better balance and
coordination. Participants benefit from the
water with less strain on the bones and


joints. Exercise movements are choreo-
graphed to music. The classes are offered
Tuesday and Thursday, from 10-11 a.m.
Fee is $4 per class or a punch card for
eight classes for $28
For more information, call (772) 581-
7665.

Medical center offers outpatient
nutrition counseling

Do you have diabetes, hypertension or
high cholesterol? Are you interested in los-
ing weight or just interested in improving
your overall health?
Outpatient nutrition counseling is a
one-on-one service provided by licensed,
registered dietitian located in the diagnos-
tic center at Sebastian River Medical Cen-
ter.
To make an appointment, call (772) 589-
5000.

Group posts presentations
to Internet

The Indian River County Extension Ser-
vice now offers presentations on the Inter-
net, created and narrated by agents on
agriculture, environmental horticulture,
pond maintenance, irrigation, 4-H and
storm water pollution. The list of available
presentations will continue to grow.
Visit the Web site
http:/ /indian.ifas.ufl.edu. for updates.


Organization recycles items

Keep Indian River Beautiful is asking local
businesses and individuals to donate
unwanted, reusable materials to the ReUse
Exchange Center.
Items such as Styrofoam egg cartons, craft
supplies, tile (full or broken pieces), cigar
boxes, neckties, clothespins and wine corks
in addition to fabric and paint chip samples
are accepted.
To make a donation, drop off items at the
ReUse Exchange Center in Sebastian on
Tuesday. Re-usable items can also be
dropped off at Habitat for Humanity on U.S.
1 or the Senior Resource Association on 6th
Avenue and 14th Street inVero Beach.
To shop for free, re-usable materials, visit
KIRB's ReUse Exchange Center, located at
1255 Main St., Sebastian, or call (772) 388-
5472.

League meetings scheduled

The La Leche League is a nonprofit organ-
ization whose mission is to help mothers
breastfeed through mother-to-mother sup-
port.
The La Leche League of the Treasure Coast
meets in different locations from Palm City
to Sebastian. Mothers with their nursing
babies, and mothers-to-be, are welcome.
For directions to meetings, or more infor-
mation, call Sophy at (772) 233-1883.

For Hometown News


Tickets available for festival


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com

TREASURE COAST Tickets are on
sale now for the Big Dog Fat Cat Festi-
val, hosted by Fools as One and the
Humane Society of the Treasure Coast.
The festival, to be held July 18 from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. at Halpatiokee Park in
Stuart, will provide a full day of family
entertainment with a barbeque cook-off
and tasting, car show, vendor area,
battle of the bands and more than
$15,000 in cash and prizes.
Tickets are $15. Those 15 and younger


are free. They may be purchased at
www.foolsasone.com/bdfc; at John
Pierson's Toyota of Stuart, 5101 S.E.
Federal Highway; at three locations of
Sonny's Real Pit Bar-B-Q, 1961 S.E.
Federal Highway in Stuart; 10180 S. U.S.
1 in Port St Lucie; and 3120 South U.S. 1
in Fort Pierce; at the HSTC, 4100 S.W.
Leighton Farm Ave. in Palm City and at
all nine Seacoast National Bank loca-
tions in Martin County.
Premium parking is available on site
for an additional $5.
For more information, call (772) 600-
3211 or visit www.foolsasone.com/bdfc.


iF- -""


-r


"Copyrighted Material

I Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"



II I


Bank to collect supplies


For Hometown News
News@hometownnewsol.com
INDIAN RIVER COUNTY
-Seacoast National Bank
will participate in a school
supply drive and serve as
collection locations for com-
munity donations until Aug.
13.
"We are proud to continue


Calendar
From page B5

1715, off of Indian River
County's coast. Open seven
days a week from 10 a.m.-4
p.m. Admission is $1 for
ages 6 years and older.
Located at 13180 A1A, Vero
Beach, north of County
Road 510. For more infor-
mation, call (772) 589-2147.
*Environmental Learning
Center: An elevated board-
walk creates a trail through
a mangrove forest, butterfly
garden, native plant garden,
wet labs and more. Also
there are canoe tours, work-
shops and other activities.
It's open daily, with one-


to support area children in
need of school supplies,"
said Anthony Loupe, retail
regional manager for Sea-
coast in Indian River County.
"Our employees, cus-
tomers and the community
have been very generous
throughout the years in sup-
porting this worthwhile
effort," he said.


hour tours offered through-
out the week. There is no
admission charge. Visitors
can also see the Florida
cracker-style home of poet
Laura Riding Jackson on
Saturday from 9 a.m. to
noon. The center is located
at 255 Live Oak Drive, Vero
Beach, south of the Wabasso
Bridge. For more informa-
tion call (772) 589-5050, or
visit www.elcweb.org.
*ORCA: Enjoy the Oslo
Riverfront Conservation
Area, 350 acres along the
Indian River Lagoon in
southern Indian River
County. The trail system
takes you through a variety
of distinct natural commu-
nities. A canopy of live oaks,


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The Best Selection In Brevard County

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All supplies collected will
be donated to children in
need within the county. Any-
one interested in donating
school supplies can drop
items at any one of eight Sea-
coast branch
offices in Indian River
County.
For locations, visit
www.seacoastbanking.com.


orchids, wild coffee bushes,
mangrove wetlands and
wildlife are part of the expe-
rience. There is a bird
watching observation plat-
form and tower and the
"awesome pine," the largest
slash pine tree in the world.
Park is open daily from
dawn to dusk, with weekly
and monthly-guided nature
walks. There is no admis-
sion charge.
For more information, call
(772) 778-7200, Ext. 173.
*St. Sebastian River
buffer preserve: Hiking, jog-
ging, walking and nature
study are permitted
throughout the preserve,
except in areas posted as
closed or restricted. Access
point is off County Road
512, just west of Sebastian
Middle School. The preserve
is open for daily use only,
except for overnight camp-
ing by permit. Horseback
riding is allowed on
Wednesday.
Contact the preserve office
to make camping reserva-
tions and obtain a permit at
(321) 953-5004.
*Environmental viewing
area gives a close-up view of
manatees and other wildlife
during the winter months.
Limited parking is available;
see signage.
It is west of the Vero Beach
Municipal Power Plant on
Indian River Boulevard,
near the 17th Street Bridge,
in Vero Beach.

To submit a calendar
event, e-mail the informa-
tion to news@hometown-
newsol.com or fax it to (772)
465-5301 or (772) 467-4384.
Information must be
received two weeks prior to
the desired publication date.


For Hometown News


B6 Sebastian River Area


Friday, July 17, 2009


Hometown News


a








Friday, July 17, 2009


www.H hometown NewsOL.com


Sebastian River Area B7


C l Hoiletowri Ne\s 1-800-823-0466
St. Lucie County 772-465-5551
Fax 772-465-5696
Email: classified@HometownNewsOL.com
C classified Logon to www.HometownNewsOL.com



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DEADLINES:
DISPLAY:
Monday 3:00 pm
prior to publication
IN-COLUMN:
Tuesday 9:30 am
prior to publication

WE ACCEPT ALL
AJO

4 ijfil


FAULKNER & Son's Inc.
Will sell the following
vehicles, pursuant to Ch.
713(6)85.9 to the highest
bidder, subject to all tow-
ing, storage, administra-
tive, and miscellaneous
charges, at 801 High
Street, Sebastian, FL at
8:00a.m. on Saturday,
August 8, 2009. These
are cash sales. Pro-
ceeds are due the day of
sales. Storage fees are
accumulative. We re-
serve the right to reject
all bids. 1994 FORD
VIN#1 FMDU34X2RUC67
558, 1995 MAZDA VIN#
1YVGE22D2S5338592
Pub: July 17, 2009




FOUNTAINHEAD
Memorial Park. Palm Bay
Cremation Garden.
Double cemetery niche's.
$3,000 772-663-1960

SUPPORT
OUR
ADVERTISERS!
They make this
all possible!

HOMETOWN

NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466


PALM BAY Fountain
Head Memorial Park,
Niche includes 6"x8"
bronze plate & Fidelity II
urn. $3500 607-844-3749


ADOPTION 866-633-
0397 Unplanned Preg-
nancy? Provide your
baby with a loving, fi-
nancially secure family.
Living/ Medical/Coun-
seling expenses paid.
Social worker on staff.
Call compassionate At-
torney Lauren Feingold
(FL Bar # 0958107) 24/7
ADOPTION 888-812-
3678 Living Expenses
paid. Choose a Loving,
Financially Secure fami-
ly for your child. Caring
& Confidential. (24
hours/ 7 days), Attorney
Amy Hickman, (Lic#
832340)


LIVE YOUR Dream! Run
in the New York City Mar-
athon 2009 with Team for
Kids. Guaranteed entry,
Great Training, VIP
Perks, Help Kids: www.
TFKworldwide .org
646-758-9693

AAAAAA
NEED TOHIRE..-
CALL CLASSIFIED
800-823-0466


- Garage Sales -


SEBASTIAN
SAT JULY 18
9am to 2 pm
472 Joy Haven Dr
Plants, household items,
furniture, collectibles,
toys & bike.
www HometownNewsOL corn


SPECIAL
TIME TO CLEAN UP?
Hold a garage sale, make
money & make someone
happy! Call
1-800-823-0466
to place your ad!


$ CASH FOR GOLD $
We buy Gold, Silver, &
Plat. Get Cash Now!
Highest Payouts Satis-
faction Guaranteed 877-
543-5047
OLD GUITARS Wanted!
Fender, Gibson, Gretsch,
Martin,D'Angelico, Strom-
berg, Rickenbacker, and
Mosrite. Gibson Mando-
lins/ Banjos. 1930's thru
1970's Top Cash Paid!
These brands only
please. 800-401-0440
WANTED DIABETES
Test Strips: Any Kind/Any
Brand. Unexpired. Pay up
to $16 per Box. Shipping
Paid. Call 713-395-1106
or 1-832-620-4497 Ext.11
Visit: www.
Cash4DiabetesTestStrips
.com
WANTED JUNK CARS
Running or not $150 &
up. We pay cash! 24-hrs.
Call 321-631-0111






BIKE RACK Thule, for
car, used once, half price
$100,772-778-4927 IR
CAMERA, DIGITAL,
Toshiba model PDR-2,
new, $40, 772-581-0166
CHAIR, HONEY wicker
with cushions, $125,
772-388-5247 IR
COKE MACHINE, up-
right, $0.50 coin slot,
67"h, 32"w, 30"d, $200
firm, 772-794-6357
COMFORTER SETS, 2
king size, $100 each,
772-584-2956 IR
COMPUTER DESK, nat-
ural wood L- shaped
computer desk, 3 pieces,
$50, 772-360-6343 IR
DRUMS- FOLD up in
case. Great condition.
$200 772-871-9935


DRYER, Apartment size,
with inside filter, runs
good,, use less electric,
45, 772-770-4494
FREEZER, 11 cubic feet,
frost free, upright, like
new, $175,
772-778-2764 SLC
FURNITURE SET, for
porch, white, PVC, with
cushions, very good cond
$170, 772-581-8527 IR
HARRY POTTER items.
Toys, books, mags,
videos, blanket. $100/all.
772-453-3428
PATIO SET, oblong ta-
ble, 6 chairs, green trim &
gold, green pads, $100,
772-664-7775 IR
POWER SUPPLY, Hew-
lett Packard, for lap top,
never used, $30,
772-770-2090 IR
QUILT, from depression
Era, 'String' Quilt, good
condition, $100,
772-567-6231 IR
REFRIGERATOR, MINI,
perfect for dorm room or
screened porch, black,
$50, 772-226-7870 IR
SINK, stainless steel,
kitchen, like new, $25,
Coffee table solid oak,
$100, 772-562-3547
SOFA BED, Queen,
Mauve, black, blue floral,
like new, $200 obo,
772-589-9310 IR
TABLE 84" X 42" glass
top on glass base. $200
772-569-1582 IR
TV, COLOR, RCA, 14"
with comm skip and re-
mote, like new, $30,
772-299-6518 IR
WINE CARRIER, wicker,
with accessories, $10,
pet crate, 18"x12"x15",
$35 772-562-7661 IR


LUMBER LIQUIDA-
TORS Hardwood Floor-
ing, from $.99/Sq.Ft.
Exotics, Oak, Bamboo,
Prefinished & Unfinish-
ed. Bellawood with 50
year prefinish, Plus A
Lot More! We Deliver
Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations 800-356-6746
1-800-FLOORING




BRAND NAMES Kid's
Clothing: 50-70% Off
Store Prices. Use Dis-
count Code: MK6423.
Call 1-808-623-6102.
www.MagicKidsUSA.com

FREE 3D Gamesite For
Kids! www.SavePlanetBI-
ue .com Free to join and
play! Come be a Planet
Blue Saver and have lots
of Fun!




BRAND NEW LAPTOPS
& DESKTOPS Bad Cred-
it, No Credit No Prob-
lem. Small weekly Pay-
ments Order & get
FREE Nintendo Wll sys-
tem! 800-805-0019.

GET A New Computer
brand name laptops &
desktops, Bad or No
credit no problem. Small-
est weekly payments
available. Its yours now!
1-800-932-3721

NEW COMPUTER
You're approved guar-
anteed. Bad credit? No
credit? No problem! No
credit check. Name
brands. Checking ac-
count required. 800-372-
0119. www. BoostCredit.
com Free bonus with
paid purchase.


I


ERECTILE Dysfunction
can be treated safely &
effectively without drugs
or surgery. Covered by
Medicare/Ins! 1-800-815
-1577 ext 1001 www.life-
carediabeticsupplies
.com
SOMA, ULTRAM, Via-
gra, Fioricet & more Pre-
scription Drugs. Doctors
Consultation & Pre-
scription Service includ-
ed. Shipped Fed Ex 1-3
days. 877-628-2375
EasyBudgetUSA.net


**ALL SATELLITE Sys-
tems are not the same.
HDTV programming un-
der $10 per month &
Free HD & DVR systems
for new callers. Call Now!
1-800-799-4935
A NEW Computer Now!
Brand name laptops &
desktops, Bad or No
Credit- No problem small-
est weekly payments
available. It's yours Now!
1-800-804-5010
A NEW Computer Now!
Brand Name. Bad or NO
Credit- No problem.
Smallest weekly pay-
ments available. Call
NOW! 1-800-838-7127
ADOPTION GIVE Your
baby the best in life! Lin-
ing expenses paid. Many
loving, financially secure
couples waiting. Call Jodi
Rutstein Attorney/ Social
Worker who truly cares
about you. 800-852-0041
#133050

Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In The
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
1-800-823-0466


AIRLINES ARE Hiring-
Train for high paying Avi-
ation Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if
qualified Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
1-888-349-5387
AIRLINES ARE Hiring-
Train for high paying Avi-
ation Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if
qualified Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
1-888-349-5387
BRAND NEW Laptops &
Desktops. Bad credit or
No credit- No Problem.
Small weekly payments -
Order & get Free Ninten-
do Wii Game system!
800-932-4501
CHURCH FURNITURE -
Does your church need
Pews, Pulpit set, Baptis-
tery, Steeple, Windows?
Big sale. New cushioned
pews & upholstery for
hard pews. 800-231-8360
www.pewsl .com
DIRECT FREE 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels!
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No Start Up Costs! Local
Installers 800-973-9044
DIRECT FREE 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels!
Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No Start Up Costs! Local
Installers 800-973-9044
DIRECT SATELLITE
Television, Free Equip-
ment, Free 4 Room In-
stallation, Free HD or
DVR Receiver Upgrade.
Packages from $29.99/
mo. Call DIRECT Sat TV
for Details, 888-420-9482


DISH NETWORK'S Best
Offer Ever! Free HD/DVR
$9.99 / month For over
100 All- digital Channels.
Call Now and Receive
$600 Signup Bonus!
866-573-3640
FREE DIRECT 4 Room
System! 265+ Channels
Start $29.99! Free HBO,
Showtime, Starz! 130 HD
Channels! Free DVR/HD!
No start up costs! Direct-
Star TV Local installers!
800-620-0058
HIGH COST of Cable got
you down? Get Dish w/
Free install plans $9.99/
month. 50+ Free HD
Channels! New Custom-
ers only. Call 800-240-
8112
MEMORY FOAM Thera-
peutic Nasa Visco Mat-
tresses Wholesale! T-
$299, F-$349, Q-$399,
K-$499, Adjustables-
$799. Free Delivery, 25
year warranty, 90 Night
Trial, 1-800-ATSLEEP
1-800-287-5337 www.
mattressdr.com
METAL ROOFING &
Steel Buildings. Save $$$
buy direct from manufac-
turer. 20 colors in stock
with trim & Acces. 4 pro-
files in 26 ga. panels.
Carports, house barns,
shop ports. Completely
turn key jobs. All Steel
Buildings, Gibsonton,
Florida. 800-331-8341
www.allsteel-buildings.co
m
NEED TO HIRE?
CALL CLASSIFIED
800-823-0466
MOR


Thanks to all of our readers for submitting your Free ads for
merchandise priced under $200. Reminder: We allow 4 lines
including your phone number. Only 1 ad per week (each ad
runs 2 weeks). All FREE ads must be submitted by mail, fax
or e-mail. And finally, please remember to include your name
and address when submitting your ads. by Monday at 5 pm.


MAIL COUPON TO HOME OFFICE
1102 S. U.S. 1, Fort Pierce, FL 34950
or drop off at:
1020 Old Dixie Hwy, Vero Beach, FL 32960
Fa o 724559


For private party use only Commercial advertising is not eligible 2 ads per month
4 Lines (20 Characters per line)






Your Name
Address
City State Zip
Home Phone Daytime Phone
Mall or Fax Coupon to the Hometown News Office Nearest You' Deadline for Free Ads is Monday at 5 00 pm


Do PHOTOS HELP YOUR ITEMS SELL???


YOU BETCHA!


Call Classified and take advantage of the

special promos we have to help you sell your

items antiques, furniture, pets and more!


Buy 1 week, get 3 weeks FREE!

1-800-823-0466


- PROFESSIONAL SERVICE GUIDE


Sears
CENTRAL COOLING
Systems-Great Financing
Options available on
ENERGY STAR(R)
qualified systems such as
CARRIER(R) &
KENMORE(R)
**see details www.sears
homepro.com/nan
1-877-669-8973
Offer Expires 09/22/09




DEAN'S MOBILE Detail-
ing, My Service Goes To
Where You Are! Est.
1992 321-543-5805





AUTO CEILING
LOOSE?
I come to you.! All Colors.
Joe Gallaher
772-778-4371


JM Electrical Services
Inc. Rock bottom prices.
Top Quality Work. De-
pendable & Reliable We
install Generators! Serv-
ing PB & Treasure Coast.
772-871-2451/561-756-5
495 EC13002266/Lic-lns



ONLINE PHARMACY
Buy Soma, Ultram, Fiori-
cet, Prozac, Buspar,
$71.99 for 90 Qty and
$107 for 180 Qty. Price
Includes Prescription!
We will match any com-
petitor's price! 866-601
-6463 or www.tri-rx.com





BUSHHOG MOWING &
Tractor Services, con-
crete work. Free Est, Re-
liable & dependable.
Lic/ins 772-201-2596
NEED TO HIRE?
CALL CLASSIFIED
800-823-0466


Knight Lawn Mainte-
nance & Tree Service-
Can do the job! Big or
small, to fit your needs!
Lic/Ins Residential or
Commercial. Over 37
years exp. 772-538-6682
TODD OWENS LAWN
CARE. Good service,
reasonable rates. Since
'97, Res/Comm Lic/Ins,
Free Est. 772-589-0214



The hiring of a lawyer is an
important decision that
should not be based solely
on advertisements Before
you decide, ask the lawyer to
send you free written infor-
mation about their qualifica-
tions and experience
Under Florida law.
non-lawyers are permitted to
sell legal forms and kits and
type in the factual informa-
tion provided by their cus-
tomers They may not, how-
ever, give legal advice
WHEEL DEALS!!
SPECIAL RATES
HOMETOWN NEWS
800-823-0466


$99.95 FLORIDA CORP.
$154.95 Florida LLC,
Complete & Includes
State Fees, Company
Book & Seal. Free infor-
mation packet: www.
amerilawyer.com Call toll
free 1-800-603-3900,
Spiegel & Utrera PA. L.
Spiegel, Esq, Miami.
ABORTION NOT an Op-
tion? Consider Adoption.
Its a Wonderful Choice
for an Unplanned Preg-
nancy. Living/Medical
Expenses Paid. Loving
Financially Secure Fami-
lies Await. 877-341-1309
Atty Ellen Kaplan
(#0875228)
Criminal. . DUI. . Per-
sonal Injury . Bank-
ruptcy .Divorce. . Cus-
tody . Real Estate Need
help? Use a Reliable
Source A-A-A Attorney
Referral Service Florida
Bar Compliance Since
1996 freelegalsheild.com
aaaattorneyreferralservic
e.com 800-733-5342
Tell 'em you saw it in
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466


*DIVORCE* Bankruptcy
Starting at $65 *1 Signa-
ture Divorce, *Missing
Spouse Divorce "We
Com to you!" 1-888-
705-7221 Since 1992.





BIKER BOY
INTERNATIONAL
BICYCLES
-,-REE PICKUP
& DELIVERY
New & Used Bicycle
Sales & Repairs
(We Buy Used Bikes)




772-321-9404
915 18th Ave. SW
Vero Beach, FL
NEED TO HIRE?
CALL CLASSIFIED
800-823-0466


CREDIT REPAIR. We
Legally remove bad credit
to help raise credit
scores. Members BBB.
888-687-1300
LLC $141 w/ Free Sin-
gle Member Operating
Agreement Corporation
$83.95 Includes State,
Attorney Fees & Corpo-
rate Kit, Attorney Nick
Spradlin, Tampa, Jack-
sonville, WPB, Bro-
ward, Miami, 877-845-
0621 www.nickspra-
dlin.com
NEW ADT customers-
Free Home Security Sys-
tem! ADT 24/7 Monitor-
ing starting at just
$35.99/ mo. $99 Install
Fee. Call Now! (866)
444-9163 ADT Auth Co
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRY TO
SELL????
Call the best
classified section
on the east coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466


A.A.W Painting, Wallpa-
pering, Pressure Clean-
ing, Handyman Svcs. No
job too big or too small.
Ref Avail. Mike, Owner
Operator 772-321-7220
Lic/Ins



ALL TYPE PUMP
Repair, water filtration.
res/com, 24 hr service &
reasonable 772-618-3600



BEST RATES
Driveways, Decks.....$40.
Homes from ...........$70.
Roofs from .............$150.
Charlie 772-205-9141



METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty
Direct from manufacturer.
30 colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery
available. Gulf Coast
Supply & Manufacturing,
1-888-393-0335
www. gulfcoastsupply.com


ROOF REPAIRS Call 24/
7 Flat Roof & Mobile
Home Specialist. Free
Certified Inspections. Lic/
Ins CCC1327406. All
Florida Weatherproofing
& Construction 877-572
-1019
ROOFING EXPERTS
100% Financing, Free
Estimates. We Finance
Almost Everyone Re-
roof, Repairs, 30yrs
Experience, Home Im-
provement Services
Toll-Free 877-845-6660,
727-530-0412 State Cer-
tified (Lic# CCC058227)



*REDUCE YOUR Cable
Bill!*- Get a 4-room, all
digital satellite system
installed for FREE & Pro-
ramming starting under
20. Free Digital Video
Recorders to new clients.
So call now, 1-800-795-
3579
BEST IN THE AREA!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466


HIGH COST of Cable got
you down? Get Dish w/
Free install plans $9.99/
month. 50+ Free HD
Channels! New Custom-
ers only. Call 800-240-
8112



SWIM SPAS- Swim
Spas, Four Fantastic
models to choose from,
factory direct, wholesale
pricing! Warranty, financ-
ing. Hottubs @ 50% Dis-
counts, Can Deliver. Call
800-304- 9943



SPERO TILE SERVICE-
Free Estimiates. Shower
Pan Specialist.Reset
Loose Tiles. 25 yrs exp.
Professional Prompt &
Reliable. 772-589-6085

Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In The
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
1-800-823-0466


- EMPLOYMENT

-Y141 -"a
450Sals 40 Sles 42 ^ B -- ^ M iscellaneusi^


Be Part Team! ATTENTION: GET PAID
our m to lose weight! 18 more
people needed in this
area to lose up to 30 lbs.
W E'REK IN OR in the next 30 days!
Call 800-956-8785
www.AHealthyUToday.com
SANDPIPER ARCADE
accepting applications for
Attendants & Manager:
Apply in person: 1708
94th Dr. Vero Outlet Mall


We Want the Best in the Business.
Outside advertising sales for the #1
Community paper in the nation.....
Prefer someone with outside sales
experience and the ability to close the sale
Good customer service skills a must!
Protected territories, weekly base salary,
gas and phone allowance plus a
top commission plan.

For an interview, please
forward a resume to
dover@HometownNewsOL.com
Or fax 772-569-6268
eoe we drug tesi


INTERNATIONAL FEL-
LOWSHIP seeks Volun-
teer Host families- For-
eign exchange students
arriving August. Open
your heart! Host aca-
demic year or semester
8 0 0 6 4 7 8 8 3 9
internationalfellowship.or
g.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRYTO
SELL????
Call the best
classified section
on the east coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466


ORGANIZE
RECORDS
Want detail
oriented person
to organize
records.
Flexible hours.
Part-time.
Sebastian
Micco area.

772-663-1000



DRIVERS- Miles &
Freight; Positions avail.
ASAP! CDL-A with Tank-
er required. Top pay, pre-
mium benefits and Much
More! Call or visit us on-
line, 877-484 -3042 www.
oakleytransport .com
TRUCK DRIVERS Want-
ed- Best Pay and Home
Time! Apply Online To-
day over 750 Companies!
One Application, Hun-
dreds of offers! http://
hammerlanejobs.com
NEED TO HIRE?
CALL CLASSIFIED
800-823-0466


- TRAINING & EDU


ATTEND COLLEGE On-
line from Home. *Medical
*Business,*Paralegal,*Co
mputers,*Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial aid if
qualified. 1-800-494-2785
www.CentraOnline.com
ATTEND College Online
from home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Accounting, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available Financial aid if
qualified 1-800-443-5186
www.CenturaOnline.com
ATTEND College Online
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement
assistance, Computer
available. Financial aid if
qualified. 1-800-510-0784
www.CentraOnline.com
ATTEND College Online
from home. Medical,
Business, Paralegal,
Computers, Criminal Jus-
tice, Job placement as-
sistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial aid if
qualified. Call 1-800-494
-3586 www.CenturaOn-
line.com
Call Classified
800-823-0466


AVIATION Maintenance
/Avionics graduate in 14
months. FAA approved;
financial aid if qualified.
Job placement assis-
tance. Call National Avia-
tion Academy today! 800-
659-2080 / NAA.edu
ADULT HIGH School
Diploma at home fast!
Nationally accredited
$399. Easy payment
plan. Free brochure
www.diplomaathome
.com 1-800-470-4723
BODYGUARDS needed
for High Risk/ Internation-
al Contracts. $400 $700
day. Counter Assault
Teams $113K $220K.
615-891-1163 Ext. 523.
www. rlcenterprises.net



Highlight your
ad and
get it sold fast!
Whether Buying
or Selling we are
your total source
for classified!
HOMETOWN NEWS
386-322-5949


CDL Private School -
One on One Tractor
Trailer Training No Exp.
req'd Job Placement.
Earn $35,000 -$50,000
plus benefits, Free Info &
seminar. 1-866-832-7243
www.sageschools.com
EARN YOUR High
School Diploma at Home
in a few short weeks.
Work at your own pace.
First Coast Academy
Nationally Accredited.
Call for Free Brochure.
1-800-658-1180 ext 82
ww.fcahiqhschool.orq
FORCE PROTECTION
SECURITY Details $73K
-$220K!! Kidnapping Pre-
vention $250 $1000 dai-
ly!!! Call 615-891 -1163,
Ext.601 www.rlcenterpris-
es.net




Highlight your
ad and get it
sold fast!
Whether Buying or
Selling we are your
ONE call solution!
HOMETOWN NEWS
800-823-0466


CATIOII


HIGH SCHOOL Diploma
From Home 6-8 weeks.
Accredited. $399.00
Graduate This Summer!
Payment Plan. FreeBro-
chure. 800-264-8330
www.diplomafromhome.
com. Benjamin Franklin
High School.
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Highlight your
ad and get it sold
fast!
Whether Buying
or Selling we are
your total source
for classified!
HOMETOWN NEWS
800-823-0466


Next Class
August 3, 2009
NURSING
ASSISTANT
TRAINING

ACADEMY
1436C Old Dixie Hwy.
Vero Beach Fl 32960
772-564-7190
www.natacademytc.com

ENROLL

TODAY
Day & Evening
nursingtraininga@bellsouth net
Licensed by Florida Commission
for Independent Edcation,
License #3425




5 WeekH~i-J^

ComjpreheniveT~i~s^
Program.^^^fi


CABLE TV for $9.99 per
month for 100 all digital
channels plus 50 HD
channels. First 100 new
customers get free HBO
and Showtime. Call now
866-484-8848. Promo
code 3474
DIRECT FREE 4 Room
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Starts $29.99! Free HBO,
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No start up costs! Local
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Call for Details 888-408-
4254 DIRECTV Author-
ized Dealer
HIGH COST of cable got
you down? Get Dish w/
Free install plans start at
$9.99/ mo Over 50 Free
HD Channels! New
Cust's only Call Free for
full details! 800-606-
9050



Entertainment Center
Modern silver & glass &
48" HDTV, $1200. 2
piece hutch 75"H wood.
$200 772-532-8035
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER solid oak. 6'x 6'
shelves, storage. glass
doors, lights. Exc cond.
$1,100 772-978-7817
MEMORY FOAM All Vis-
co New Thera-Peutic
Mattresses, Member BBB
- 60 night trial, As seen
on TV, High Density 25
year warranty, T/F- $348;
Q-$398; K-$498; Free FL
delivery. Thera- Pedic,
Dormia, # beds, Craft-
matic adjustable. Best
price guaranteed!!
Wholesale showrooms
www.mattressdr.com
1-800-ATSLEEP or 1-
800-287-5337


PHOTOS

ONLINE


ONLY $1.00

PER PHOTO

with your ad

placement!


TO PLACE YOUR AD: EMAIL classified@HometownNewsOL.com
or log onto www.HometownNewsOL.com or Mail or Fax No Phone Calls


ANTIQUE FOR SALE OR


WASHING MACHINE?


e ---~


I I puLIvil








B8 Sebastian River Area


MOBILE HOME ROOF NEW ADT customers-
Experts 100% Financ- Free Home Security Sys-
ing, Free Estimates. We tem! ADT 24/7 Monitor-
Finance Almost Every- ing starting at just
one, Reroof, Repairs, $35.99/ mo. $99 Install
30 years Experience, Fee. Call Now! 866-265-
Home Improvement 4139 ADT Auth Co
Services Toll- Free 877-
845-6660 State Certified
(Lic# CCC058227)
NATIONAL ADVERTIS-
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lion homes with one buy.
Advertise in NANI for only
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about special Real Estate Photos with your ad,
Rates 1-800-823-0466 High Definition Slide
Please Tell Them... Shows and more
I Saw It In VISIT OUR
HOMETOWN NEWS ONLINE SITE
CLASSIFIEDS! wwwHometownNewsOL com
800-823-0466 800-823-0466



-REAL ESJ
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
PUBLISHERS NOTICE P f
All rental and real estate ad-
vertising in the Hometown ORMOND Riverfront
News is subject to the Feder- Tomoka Estates, 4-br/2
al Fair Housing Law which new baths 2-cg, block
makes it illegal to advertise home Concrete seawall,
any preference, limitations or
discrimination based on race, new kitchen, Lg Fl rm,
sex, handicap, familial status $349,900. Priced for fast
or national origin or any in- sale. 386-547-4783
tention to make such prefer-
ence. limitation or dlscrimlna- 075Cn
tion In addition, the Fair
Housing Ordinance prohibits
discrimination based on age,
marital status, sexual onen- VERO BEACH 2/2 con-
tation, gender identity or ex- do, great location. Low
pression We will not not d
knowingly accept any adver- monthly fees. Great
tising which is in violation of shape. $65,000. John
the law All persons are her- King @ RE/Max Crown
by informed that all dwellings Realty (772) 473-6081
are available on an equal
basis I n iL, [


VALUE
LET US HELP YOU
SELL YOUR HOME!
13 Newspapers from
Martin through Volusia.
You choose your market!
Add a photo to your
ad for only $5
1er Daler!
CALL TODAY
Buy 1 week-
get 3 weeks free!!!
1-800-823-0466
Hometown News
Classified
When you want it
RIGHT!!


WESTERN NC Stream
on 2+ Wooded Acres
with an/ easy to Finish
1328 sq.ft. Log Cabin.
Only $84,900. Has Loft,
Covered Porch, Big Deck
and Easy Access. Call
828-286-1666
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRY
TO SELL?
Call the best
classified
section
on the east
coast!
HOMETOWN
NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466
$$$$ $$$$$$$$$$$


Hometown News


LABRADOR PUPS:
Adorable & athletic
AKC/ACA, white/yellow,
& black. Parents on
premises, health cert,
$400/obo 772-473-3193
see photos online at
www. HometownNewsOL.
com ad # 7304
SHIH-TZU PUPPY 14
weeks old. Tri color male,
white, black, brown. First
shots, wormed, $300.
Call Mary 772-287-3580
NEED TO HIRE??
Find the
perfect fit in
Hometown News
800-823-0466
Affordable & Effective



ATE FO



DAYTONA PARK ES-
TATES $95 down $95/
mo. Build now or future.
Streets in, electric in.
Nine lots left! No credit
check. 386-566-7239
TEXAS LAND -0- Down!
20 Acre Ranches, Near
El Paso. Beautiful Moun-
tain Views. Road Access
Surveyed. $15,900. $159/
month. Money Back
Guarantee. Owner Fi-
nancing. 800-843-7537
www.sunsetranches.com




**In House Financing**
MELBOURNE: New Hor-
ton Homes, Singles and
Doubles in Village Glen
an Adult Park From
$33,995 Call for move in
specials like $99 Lot
Rental at 321-806-1240

MELBOURNE MHs


Park Homes for Sale
from $2,000 to $18,000
Base lot rents from $367/mo
FREE cable Also, Empty lots
vall for doublewides or singles
1st month FREE"'


(Adult Park) Park Homes a
from $2000 to $10.000 .
Lot rents $300/mo RV
Sites w/full hookups $15/day
Monthly/Seasonal RV Storage
Sites, $100/mo No hook ups
Park Mgr.
407-283-5277


- REAL ESTATE FO


VERO BEACH 40+ pri-
vate br & bath. Cable,
internet, House privileges
Comm pool. $480/mo
$100 dep. 772-501-7542




RENT NOW
VERO BEACH: Furn &
Unfurn, Annual & Sea-
sonal. 1br-4brs Beach-
side or Mainland. From
$450 to $5500. Many
choices. Paula Rogers &
Associates 772-231-9121
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IN A HURRYTO
SELL????
Call the best
classified section
on the east coast!
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466


80prm mt


MOVHHi]LI








PRESERVE
AT
OSLO

PERFECT PLACE
PERFECT PRICE

2299 10th Ave SW
Vero Beach
Mon Fri 9-6 Sat 10-5
*Income Restrictions Apply
772-978-0799


I0 AI s


Whispering Pines
A Farm Worker
Rental Community
1,2,3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Rental rates starting at $454
(without assistance)
Rental Assistance Available to
qualified households
Must earn a minimum of $3998
annually from agricultural or farm
labor activities
Specially designed units for
handicapped/disabled
Spacious Apartment in Quiet,
Country Setting
Resident responsible for electric,
water sewer, phone & cable TV
Rental Applications available at:
10072 Esperanza Circle, Fellsmere or
Call 772-571-0013
TDD# 1-800-955-8771
9:00 am 5:00 pm, Mon.-Fri.
Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider L



- TRANSPO


1994 BUICK RIVIERA
convertible. Everything
works. Runs great $4000
772-299-7369
El CAMINO 1978 LT1
with headers, Qudra Jet,
700R4 Trans. PS, PB,
A/C. Real nice, Real fast!
$15,900 772-473-2413 IR
see photos online www.
HometownNewsOL.com
ad # 36859
MILITARY JEEPS
1953-54, 1956 & 1966
Parade ready. 772-
597-2999 772-631-5188


BLOWN HEAD Gasket?
State of the art 2-part car-
bon metallic chemical
process. Repair yourself.
100% guaranteed. 1-866-
780-9038 or 1-866-750-
8780 www.RXHPcom
Please Tell Them...
I Saw It In
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466


CHRYSLER Conquest
TSI 1987 138K. Every
thing works. Cold A/C.
Meticulous maintenance
Original owner. $2000/
obo 321-768-9702 see
photo online at www.
HometownNewsOL.com
ad #36814
FORD FIVE HUNDRED
2005, Silver, leather, sun-
roof, climate control, all
power, Michelin hydro-
Edge tires, 59,000 mi, full
Ford Warranty asking
$10,200 772-567-4100
FORD FUSION SE 2008
4700 miles. Silver birch.
6 CD player. Great cond.
Warrantee $13,500 firm.
772-388-8681



AAAA ** Donation Do-
nate your car, Boat or
Real Estate, IRS Tax
deductible. Free Pick up/
Tow any model/ Condi-
tion, Help Under Privi-
leged Children Outreach
Center 800-610-3911


IV I
FORT PIERCE- Virginia
Park Apts. First Month
Free! No application Fee!
No Deposit (w/ approved
credit) 772-464-8522
FORT PIERCE-Large 1,
bedroom apts avail now.
Good area, on Virginia.
$495/mo Call Steve
561-707-9548
SEBASTIAN- Spacious
3/2 bedroom MOVE IN
SPECIAL ONLY $200.
W/D in all units, cable,
water, sewer & more in-
cluded. 772-581-4440
*restrictions apply
*Income restrictions apply
SUNTREE Spacious
3bdrm/2bath 1st floor,
unfurn., incls washer/dry-
er, fridge, stove, dish-
washer. Avail. Now! 6 or
12 month lease, $889/mo
sec. dep. req. Pet Nego.
Call Jeannie for pictures
& info: 321-474-1810
See Photos Online www.
HometownNewsClassifie
ds.com Ad# 44586
VERO BEACH 1912
23rd Ave. Large 1 bdrm,
totally renovated, carpet
& tiles floors $550/mo.
No Pets. 772-643-5929

805Apatmets


Friday, July 17, 2009


- BUSINESS& FINANCIAL


CALL NOW
PALM BAY Restaurant:
Great location, 2000sqft,
All equipment included.
$80,000 321-626-6631
SALES REPS Needed!!
Face Lift Without Sur-
gery Look 3-5 Years
Younger With 1st Appli-
cation! Incredible Oppor-
tunity 75% Commission/
Car Bonus Available.
1-912-585-3154; www.
YourAnswerlsHere.com.
Call Classified
800-823-0466



R SAL



MELBOURNE: Only
$2995 3/2 12'x60' All
New: CHA, vinyl siding,
skirting & concrete drive-
way in Village Glen an
Adult Park. Call
321-806-1240
PALM HARBOR 3br/2ba
HUGE, Loaded On your
lot. 14 houses to choose
from. Starting at $399 per
month. 800-622-2832
TITUSVILLE 2/2 45+
River Forest. '05 Double
wide. Indian River View,
end lot, Upgrades galor.
low lot rent. Insurance
paid through August.
$72,500 712-299-3252
VERO BEACH- Village
Green. 2/2 doublewide
partially furn, new appl's
W/D, shed, carport. Must
see. Clubhse pool
$15,000 772-563-4888



ALABAMA WATER-
FRONT Blow-out! Estate-
sized Lakefront Now only
$39,900. One day, Satur-
day, July 25th (adjoining
lakefront parcel sold for
$92,300 on 4/12/09 oth-
ers available at similar
savings.) Sensible owner
& bank financing. Owner
on-site to ensure All
Lakefronts Sell!!! Best
prices ever Guaranteed!
Call now 866-952-5343,
x108
GREAT NEWS AND
CLASSIFIED ADS!
HOMETOWN NEWS
800-823-0466



RR EN



VERO BEACH 3/1 Cen-
trally located. Section 8
OK. W/D hookups, tile &
hardwd firs. Very clean.
$775/mo 772-321-1689
VERO BEACH 55+ Villa
Mar Furnished 2-br/2-ba.
1st floor. Florida room,
Annual lease. Comm
pool & clbhse. $700/mo
+ security 772-569-2354
VERO BEACH lakeview
3/2/1 furn, all appl. freshly
painted, tile, all
amenities. 5 min to beach
& town. $900/mo
772-321-4045
VERO BEACH- 55+ 1/1
2n floor, privacy,& secur-
ity, Furn. $550/mo + sec.
incl full amenities Walk to
stores. 772-538-8707
VERO BEACH- 55+
Vista Harbor. 1-br/1.5-ba.
Gorgeous view Will
furnish. No pets $550/mo
3 month minimum.
772-633-1417


RENT 10W
VERO BEACH: Call for
specials! 1br from $475,
2br from $600 incl
water/sewer, Tile, New
appl. Near Beach, Park &
Restaurant 772-563-0013

805Apatmets


Heritage Villas

Apartments
RENOVATION CELEBRATION!
Ask About Our Specials
Come Visit & See The Changes-
All New Appliances, New Carpets and More!
Resident Programs, Computer Lab,
Fitness Center is available.
Convenient to schools & shopping yet private.
AFFORDABLE RENTS!
Hurry Before All Rented!
4049 44th Manor Vero Beach
772-562-8023
TDD 1-800-955-8771 =
This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer


STATION


AAAA** DONATION
Donate Your Car, Boat or
Real Estate, IRS Tax
Deductible, Free Pick-Up/
Tow Any Model/Condition
Help Under Privileged
Children. Outreach Cen-
ter. 1-800-928-7566
DONATE YOUR CAR!
"Breast Cancer Survi-
vors" need your Help!
Tax deductible/ Fast,
Free Pick-Up. 888-588-
3662 www.CarsFor-
BreastCancer .org Se ha-
bla espanol.
DONATE YOUR Car,
Truck or Boat to Heritage
For The Blind Free 3 Day
Vacation, Tax Deductible,
Free Towing, All Paper-
work Taken Care Of.
866-905-3801
DONATE YOUR Car.
Free Towing. "Cars for
Kids". Any Condition. Tax
Deductible Outreach
Center. 800-597-9411
Call Classified
800-823-0466


DONATE YOUR CAR...
To the Cancer Fund of
America. Help those suf-
fering with Cancer Today
Free Towing & Tax de-
ductible. 1-800-835-9372
www.cfoa.org


WANTED JAPANESE
Motorcycles Kawasaki,
1970-1980 Z1-900, KZ90
0, KZ1000, S1-250, S2-
250, S2-350, S3- 400,
H1-500, H2-750, Cash
Paid, Free Nationwide
Pick Up 800-772 -1142 or
310-721-0726.
WANTED JAPANESE
Motorcycles Kawasaki,
Z1-900, (KZ900) 1972-
1976, KZ1000 (1976-
1980), KZ1000R (1982-
1983), Z1R, S1-250,
S2-350, S3-400, H1-500,
H2-750, Honda CB750
(1969- 1975), Susuki
GS400, GT380, Cash
Paid, Free Nationwide
Pick Up 800-772-1142 or
310-721-0726.


REDUCE PAYMENTS
today! Reduce Equip-
ment Loans, Bank Loans,
Credit Card Debt & Real
Estate Leases Free Con-
sultation! 46 years expe-
rience Call Now- 800-
590-7930


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
Cash Now!! As seen on
TV. Injury Lawsuit Drag-
ging? Need $500-
500,000++ within 48
hours? Low rates. Apply
now by phone! www.Fast
CaseCash.com 1-800-
568-8321


I



COLORADO RANCH:
BANK FORECLOSURE!
40 Acres, $29,900 War-
ranty Deed. Enjoy 300
Days of Sunshine. Rocky
Mountain Views, Utilities.
Excellent Financing.
Call Today!
1-866-696-5263 x5286
www.ColoradoLandBarga
ins.com
FLORIDA LAKE Bar-
gain! 3+ AC just $49,900
(was $89,900) Nicely
wooded, private lake ac-
cess. Ready to build.
Owner will finance. Only
one- save big. Call now
866-352-2249
FORECLOSURE LAND
1/4 Acre in Florida, "0"
Down $97/month,
Guaranteed Financing.
Cash Price Startinq at
$5,000. 1-877-983- 600
www.FloridaLotsUSA.com

GEORGIA RIVER
FRONT PROPERTY -
5-1/2 acres in Tattnall
County, between Collins
and Lyons on Hwy 292,
good roads, approximate-
ly 200ft frontage on beau-
tiful unsoiled Ohoppee
river, only $55,000 with
10% down and owner fi-
nancing 912-427-7062 or
Cell #912-269-9349
GEORGIA Very Beauti-
ful high and dry lots
cleared and grassed with
beautiful trees in country
setting, located between
Claxton and Lyons on
Hwy 292 $18,000 per
tract with $1000 down
and owner financing or
discount for cash.
912-427-7062 or Cell#
912-269-9349


r


PORT ST. LUCIE West:
Lake Forest PTE 3/2/2
Pvt water setting, Com-
munity pool, walk to
stores, dining, etc.
$965/mo incl. cable/ lawn
maint. Possible lease op-
tion. 772-201-1205
SEBASTIAN 3/2/2 Great
neighborhood. Small pet
OK. No smoking. Tile
thru-out. Scn Pch. $880
/mo. F/S 772-321-4496
SEBASTIAN Barefoot
Bay. Like new 2/2,
carport. All new ceramic
tile, scrn rm $675/mo
772-664-3940/ 473-1392
TN, MOUNTAIN CITY:
Beautiful 4 yr old 3/2/2
bonus room, basement,
w/mountain views, quiet
neighborhood. $350,000
423-727-9840
VERO BEACH Furnished
or unfurnished 2-br
cottage with den totally
refurbished in a great
location for shopping & 5
mins. to beach. New
appliances including
W/D, great backyard &
total privacy Water, lawn
maint & trash pick-up inc.
It's a clean must see. No
pets or smokers.
$895/mo. 772-559-7550


Affordable & reliable
Hometown News
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466

I 1 11 11 -


$ CASH FOR GOLD $
We buy Gold, Silver, &
Plat. Get Cash Now!
Highest Payouts Satis-
faction Guaranteed 877-
543-5047
$$$ ACCESS Lawsuit
Cash Now!!! As seen on
TV. Injury Lawsuit Drag-
ging? Need $500-
500,000++ within 24hrs
after approval? Compare
our lower rates. Call
Now! 1-866-386-3692
Tell'em you saw it in
HOMETOWN NEWS
CLASSIFIED!
800-823-0466


GEORGIA:
UPSON COUNTY
155ACRES $3,250/acre.
Great timberland in-
vestment tract, excellent
hunting, gently rolling,
near Flint River.
478-987-9700
St. Regis Paper Co.

LAND SALE 10 acres
Steinhatchee, FL Starting
at $49,000, $995 down,
$399/ mo! Great Hunting,
Fishing. Near Gulf and
River. Call 352-542 -7835
or cell 352-356 -1099

LAND SALE NOTICE:
VIRGINIA MTNS
Closeout Sale!- 2.5 acres
with pond near stocked
trout stream, near state
park, $29,500, must sell.
Bank financing.
1-866-789-8535

MACON GEORGIA
2,3& 4BR HOMES.
Near 1-75. Move-In-
Ready! Remodeled. New
Carpet/Paint, Cabinets.
Safe Communities,Low
taxes.Starting @ $54,900
Owner Financing -
Low Down No Credit
Check. 706-364-4200

NC MOUNTAINS
2.5ACRE HOMESITE.
Spectacular view.
High altitude. Easily
accessible. Paved road.
Secluded. Bryson City
$39,950.
Owner financing. Call
Owner 1-800-810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com


VERO BEACH- 4009
57th Terr, 3/2/2, large
screen pool in restricted
comm on culde sac. No
traffic great local, option
to buy $1050/mo plus sec
dep. 630-232-9390



INDIAN HARBOUR BCH
3BR/3BA story town-
home, pool, 1 block from
beach. $1250/mo. incl.
cable, min 7 month lease.
F/L/S. 321-223-8705



CONVENIENT STORE
for lease Immokalee.
Please call the following
Voicemail number.
800-828-6979 ext 2236.
Please leave your name
and number. No dupli-
cate calls.








TITUSVILLE 1 Month
FREE! (*with this ad.)
Offices from 150-4000sf
Totally renovated w/view
of Cape Canaveral. Co
Brokers welcome. Call
Miriam at 954-961-0500


Vero Beach 800-10,000 sq. ft.
Office or Showroom
Perfect for Medical, Dance Studio,
Urgent Care, or Dollar Store.
Room for Arcade & Beauty Palor.

"Hi-Traffic Area o
-- Prime Location
-- Reasonable Rents


SPECIAL
37' PILGRIM 2006 Park
Model Trailer 2-br/1-ba
set up in a 55+ retirement
park. $0 down $0 interest
$575 per month, includes
payment on trailer lot and
insurance. $18,000
772-359-5231
305-247-4021
KEYSTONE MONTANA
38.4'. 2007, 5th wheel. 4
slides, dual air, gelcoat
siding. Loaded with
options, very low miles.
Non-smokers. $42,000.
Tow vehicle available.
Call 321-749-0687 see
photos online at
www.HometownNewsOL.
com ad # 36900



DODGE RAM 50 1987
16,700 miles long bed
with top new tires. $1795
See at Oslo Packing 695
S US 1 772-216-0389


$$$GET LAWSUIT Cash
Now Oasis Legal Fi-
nance #1. See us on TV
fastest cash advances on
injury cases within 24/
hrs. Owe nothing if you
lose your case Apply free
call now 1-866-353-9959
BANKRUPTCY $299
plus $399 for Court costs.
Fast, Easy, No Risk, Se-
cure and Proven. Let our
experienced professio-
nals handle your entire
bankruptcy, Guaranteed.
No Additional Fees. Call
Now Toll Free 800-878-
2215. www.SIGNHER-
E.ORG


NC MOUNTAINS
2.5ACRE HOMESITE.
Spectacular view.
High altitude. Easily
accessible. Paved road.
Secluded. Bryson City
$39,950.
Owner financing. Call
Owner 1-800-810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com
NC MOUNTAINS
Cool Summers/Mild
Winters. NEW! E-Z to
finish log cabin shell,
w/loft & basement,
includes acreage
$99,900.
Mountain& waterfront
h o m e s i t e s
$39,000-$99,000. Local
Financing Available!!
828-247-9966(Code41)
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Spectacular 108- acre
NH Lakefront Estate &
Horse Farm. The Most
Amazing Property Availa-
ble Anywhere!
$5,000,000. See website
w/ pictures: www.
ViewWebPage.com/4PY
S or Email: BenDBen-
son@ gmail.com
NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS
LAKE LURE Developer
clearance sale.
Only 23 lots remain in
gated community Shown
by appointment only
Owner financing from
$29,900. 864-909-1035
www.RowelLand.com
NORTH FLA. LAND
Lowest prices in years!
Jefferson County
871 acres, $1995/acre
1084 acres, $1850/acre.
Southern Pine Planta-
tions 352-867-8018


FORECLOSURE De-
fense Avoid foreclosure,
Modify your Loan. Call for
Free Consultation! Law
Offices of Thomas Dvor-
ak, PA. Foreclosure,
Bankruptcy, Tax and
Debt Settle Division.
866 8 11 9790
www.SaveMyHouseFL.co
m
LAWSUIT LOANS?
Cash before your case
settles. Auto, workers
comp. All cases accept-
ed. Fast Approval. $500-
$50,000. 866-709-1100
www.glofin.com
www HometownNewsOL com


S.E. TENN Mtns Land
Discounted 5+ acre
Tracts from $24,900 w/
utilities. MUST SELL!
Ocoee/ Hiwassee River
Area. Large MTN Tracts
from $2250/ acre
800-531-1665 or 931-260
-9435
TENNESSEE LAND Our
Loss, Your Gain- Beauti-
ful 5 acre tracts for
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Vacation &
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