Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091493/00025
 Material Information
Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
Series Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Southwest Florida Research & Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Southwest Florida Research & Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Immokalee, Fla.
Publication Date: April 2007
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Bibliographic ID: UF00091493
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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IApril 2007


FMNP 2007 Update


FMNP Graduate Update: Kudos to FMNP instructors, graduates and partners we
recently passed the 3,000 mark for FMNP graduates! Keep up the great work!
Annual 2007 FMNP Meeting: Last Year's FMNP annual meeting was a great success and a
lot of fun. We've scheduled this year's annual meeting at the same great location near
Haines City, so save the date for November 9, 10 and 11, 2007. E-mail suggestions for
workshops, field trips, speakers, or booths to info@masternaturalist.org. Thanks!
Controversial topics: Environmental issues are often (usually?) controversial. Conse-
quently, there will be topics discussed in FMNP classes that may invoke strong emotions.
The FMNP provides a rare setting where different opinions may be shared and discussed in
a friendly atmosphere. So, do not be afraid to voice your thoughts in class, but remember
to do so in a manner that demonstrates respect for other opinions and with the goal to
provide and solicit information, not simply convince others of your views. It is not produc-
tive to stew about statements made in class, or to initiate an e-mail campaign to voice
disagreement after the fact. E-mail rarely portrays views or sentiments accurately and is
a poor vehicle for discussion of topics that may evoke strong feelings. So, encourage the
exchange of views in class or you might try what FMNP instructors Vicky and JD
Mendenhall do: They arrange a campfire evening where FMNP students
discuss controversial subjects, which they say has proven to be lively but friendly!
Inzff Marty Main, FMNP Program Leader

FMNP Instructor Spotlight: Karen Pate, Crystal Springs Preserve
How did you get involved in Environmental Education? I enjoy working with people and I love sci-
ence. I have a burning passion to encourage people to
enjoy being outside, to get them to explore natural set-
tings, understand what they are looking at, and inspire
--- them to become life-long learners. I hope everyone I
have the privilege to teach will become passionate about
nature and be empowered to speak up on its behalf. I
believe EE combines the best of all sciences and offers
practical application to human lives. Through hands-on
EE experiences, people learn that they can contribute
and make a difference.
What is your most memorable EE moment?
SI was leading an eco-adventure camp with 15 inner-city
middle school students. When we were snorkeling, a 10-
foot alligator joined us. Amazing to swim with him!
What is your vision for Florida's future?
A renewal of appreciation for the fragile, unique ecosys-
tems that are indigenous to our state and an understand-
ing of how they can be conserved, preserved, protected,
and integrated into new and improved growth management planning. I believe knowledge is power
and that by encouraging educational programs about Florida's wild spaces, we will generate in-
formed citizen scientists that will continue to speak up and stand up to preserve and protect this
paradise.
Karen works in Pasco County Learn more at: Crystalspringspreserve. com


UF UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
IFAS Extension


Inside this issue:


Program Update
Environmental
Education Events
Wild Eye,
Interpretive Tracks
Honor Roll of Florida
Master Naturalists
Class Information,
Graduate Story



Track Trivia
What made these tracks?


oll!powJo papuoq 6 JaMsuy


Florida Master Naturalist Program


Newsletter Volume 7, No.2







Florida Spring Environmental Education and Conservation Events


Southwest
Rookery Bay Reserve, Environmental Learning Center, 300 Tower Road, Naples, May 12, 10 am 3 pm
International Migratory Bird Day: Learn about birds and their incredible annual journeys to and through southwest Florida. $5
adults, FREE for members and kids under 12. May 16, 4:30 pm 6 pm, Citizens and Science Seminar: Learn about issues facing
our local environment. Light refreshments provided. FREE. Early Bird Walks: Experience the sights and sounds of the awakening
swamp with a naturalist guiding you on the boardwalk to look for the early birds. Learn about the birds' life habits and habitats
they occur in at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, 239-348-9151. Tuesday, April 17 (7 -- 10 AM) $11 limit: 12; Saturday, April 21 (7
-- 10 AM) $11 limit: 12

LAKES REGIONAL PARK Address: 7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers. Start Date: 5/5, 6/2, 7/7. Start Time: 8:00 AM, End Time:10:00
AM. Join our Bird Patrol Volunteers for either a guided walk or a guided canoe bird tour! Registration is FREE but you must pre-
register online at www.leeparks.org or call (239)461-7400


Southeast
Jonathan Dickinson State Park Ranger NATURE WALK Year-round, Sundays, 9:00 AM Enjoy a ranger-guided walk through pine for-
ests and across Wilson Creek or climb the Hobe Mountain Tower Trail. Bring insect repellent. Trails may sometimes be wet, so wear
appropriate shoes. Check at the ranger station for location. Call (772) 546-2771 for more details.
Central East
Grassy Waters Preserve, Earth Day Open House (10-2) History Canoe/Hike (1:00) Nature Walks (10:30 Et 3:30).
April 21, 8264 Northlake Blvd., West Palm Beach, PHONE: 561-804-4980
Central
May 3, 2007 ( Thursday ) Manatee County, Lawns, 2:00pm 4:00pm, Home Composting
Cost is $10.00, which includes program material and Presto Compost Bin. Instructor is Kurt Rowe. For registration, contact Cheryl
Werner at 941-722-4524. Manatee County Extension Office, 1303 17th St W, Palmetto
Central West
Crystal River Preserve State Park, SENSORY SENSITIVITY GUIDED WALK Available upon request. This walk highlights our 2.5-mile-
long Eco-walk. Participants stop at 10 discovery zones and practice exercising their senses. These skills will help outdoor lovers
appreciate their experiences with a new level of awareness and safety. Call (352) 563-0450 for details.
May 12, 2007 ( Saturday ) 9:00am Noon, Landscape Design Workshop, Hillsborough County Extension 5339 County Road 579 Seff-
ner FL 33584 813-744-5519 Pre-registration is required.
Northwest
Saturday, May 19th @ 7:30 p.m. The Tallahassee Astronomical Society will bring their telescopes to share the night sky up close
with us. Florida Caverns State Park. Follow the park signs to the location. Call (850)482-1228 for more details.
Northeast
May 12, 2007, 11am-1:30pm, Best Management Practices for Florida Friendly Landscape Maintenance. Free program sponsored
by UF Clay County Extension. Those who attend will receive information that should help you achieve a beautiful landscape with a
minimum amount of chemical, water, energy, and time input. Call 269-6355 to register for the class. Middleburg-Clay Hill Library
Meeting Room, 2245 Aster Avenue, Middleburg.

Add your event! We have several calendars for environmental education events. Go to
www.MasterNaturalist.org and click on the Master Naturalist Regional chapter near you. Click the Calendar
of Events link. You may submit new events by click on "Suggest Entry."

Electronic Educational Tools Disclaimer: announcement of educational materials is provided as an informational service and does not constitute
either endorsement or evaluation of products by the Florida Master Naturalist Program or the University of Florida/IFAS.

Adventure Florida: Sarasota Community News. FMNP Instructor Bonnie Samuelsen has published a new community newspaper about
Sarasota area natural areas and news. http://www.AdventureFlorida.com/


I Volume 7, No.2


Page 2 I








Wild Eye Watch f .on:


Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) Body 40", Wingspan 72"
Identifiers: black legs, red crown, light brown body, white cheeks
Adaptations: sharp pointed bill, long legs
Range: throughout N. America
Habitat: marshes, wet prairies, pastures, open woods
Diet: insects, spiders, small mammals, roots, grains
Fun Facts:
- leap with wings spread out during mating dance
- rust color on feathers from iron oxide in soils
The total population of Sandhill cranes is estimated at over 500,000 and it is in-
creasing although some local populations may be declining. Six subspecies have
been described. The three migratory subspecies-Lesser, Greater, and Canadian
Sandhill Cranes-are relatively abundant. Their breeding range is in northern
North America and eastern Siberia, with wintering grounds in the southern United
States and northern Mexico. The other three subspecies-the Mississippi, Florida (G. c. pratensis), and Cuban Sandhill Cranes-exist
as small, non-migratory populations with restricted ranges in the southern United States (Mississippi, Florida, and southern Geor-
gia) and Cuba. The population and range of the non-migratory Sandhill Cranes in the southern United States have diminished due to
hunting, loss of wetlands, and habitat changes. However, the Sandhill Crane has benefited from extensive conservation efforts.
Protected areas have been especially important in efforts to protect the non-migratory subspecies. Large areas of Florida Sandhill
Crane habitat are protected within state parks, preserves, wildlife management areas and private conservation lands.



Interpretive Tracks s& da

Keys to Successful Predator Calling, Adapted from Major L. Boddicker, Ph.D.
The scientific order, Carnivora (flesh-eating mammals) contains the taxonomic families of predators. These
include: dogs, cats, bears, weasels, and raccoons. All of these mammals eat other mammals to one degree or
another. Their eyes, ears, noses, tastes, and touch senses have evolved to that of a predator. Any sound,
smell, sight, taste, or touch that stimulates their food searching behavior will attract them to some degree.
This exercise should be done in small groups with older children, preferably with a biologist, naturalist, ranger
or experienced outdoor guide. Do not attempt to buy calls to call bears or panthers.
1. Use the Predators' Senses to Your Advantage. You can buy a predator call device for about $10 (critrcall, tallyho) that imitates
the sound of a wounded rabbit, mouse squeaks or deer fawn bleats, and it will draw predators to you. Give the predator a nice
comfortable approach path. Line your calling up so the predator can get to you on cleared and safe game trails, and on an ap-
proach that makes it comfortable. Don't try to call animals across an interstate highway. Give a couple of very loud calls at first,
then lower the volume to imitate whimpering prey. But keep in mind that you are imitating a relatively small animal in distress.
The length of each call should be short to imitate the amount of air the distressed animal would be disbursing, i.e., rabbits have
small lungs, and they cannot wail as long as humans. If you are not having much success, vary your call. Pretend you're a wounded
rabbit, or a trapped rabbit trying to free itself, or a rabbit trying to escape the talons of a bird of prey. Use your hand in fast mo-
tion over the end of the call; short puffs into the call will sound like there's a fight occurring. Squeal, squall, squeak, scream, muf-
fle, open it up and let it rip, and so forth. Your calls may also attract large hawks and eagles.
2. Wear dull clothing, nothing reflective, and crouch down low. Carnivores are colorblind, they see in shades of black and
white. Clothing or items that reflect light will put off predators. You can wear 2 colors to break up your outline and sit in a posture
that keeps your profile low and unidentifiable. Position yourself with the wind in your face to carry away your scent and make sure
the area has signs of animal activity (trails, droppings, scrapes, gnawing).
3. Stay quiet during the activity. Call, stop and listen for 20-30 minutes. If you do not call any predators, listen for small mam-
mals (squirrels, rabbits, mice) and birds. Move at least V2 to 1 mile before calling again. Walking and calling is a technique that is
useful in heavy cover and rough terrain where the callers walk Y2 mile down or over ridges and call down into side ravines, into the
wind. If you have to move, do it slowly and methodically, no quick or jerky movements.
4. Triggering other predator senses. When you want to get the predator close enough for a photo then tease its eyes and nose
too. There are great commercial decoys available of rabbits, fawns, turkeys, and deer. You can make your own decoy. White and
black chicken feathers wired or glued together and hung from a low stake are a nice, easy tease; or an old white sock attached to
a cord you reel in as the coyote sees you. Rabbit skins are useful decoys and they can be hung from a stake 5-10 yards away from
the caller.


I Volume 7, No.2


Page 3 1








New Additions to the Honor Role of Florida Master Naturalists

Individuals that completed Coastal, Wetlands, and Uplands modules during January-March 2007

To view the complete list of Florida Master Naturalist Graduates: www.MasterNaturalist.org, click on "Student Database"


Florida
Master Naturalist

Randy Altman
Jackie Barfield
Barbara Beyerl
Priscilla Black
Frank Boswell
Joyce Brumberger
Julia Burch
Cholly Capps
Jessica Christianson
Carol Christy
Jim Darlington

Marion Finck

Terry Floyd
Judi Hildebrandt
Elisabeth Hoffman
John Sudler Hood
Lindsay Hood
Catherine Hurlbut
Ed Johnson
Margery Johnston
Wendy Kahl
Greta Man
Lafayette Miller
Rhea Moss
Russell W. Owens
Kitty Philips
Richard Prince
Jason Robertshaw
Sonya Rose
Raymond Sage
Sid Sewell
Elizabeth Smith
Rebecca Stafford
Rick Testa
Beverley Ward
Jaclyn Webb
Scott Weiss
Roz Williams
Joseph Woodbury
Joel Wooster


Susan


Young


Freshwater Wetlands
Instructor Organization

Duval County Extension Office
Ostego Bay Foundation Inc
Clay County Extension Service
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Clay County Extension Service
Environmental Learning Center
Ostego Bay Foundation
Volusia County Extension
Camp Bayou
Environmental Learning Center
Duval County Extension/
St.Johns Parks
Grassy Waters Preserve
Duval County Extension/
St.Johns Parks
Palm Beach County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Clay County Extension Service
Volusia County Extension
Duval County Extension Office
Environmental Learning Center
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Grassy Waters Preserve
Camp Bayou Outdoor
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Oxbow Eco-Center
Camp Bayou
Crystal Springs Preserve
Volusia County Extension
Clay County Extension Service
Clay County Extension Service
Camp Bayou
Crystal Springs Preserve
Environmental Learning Center
Environmental Learning Center
Volusia County Extension
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Marion County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Volusia County Extension


Coastal Systems
Instructor Organization

Duval County Extension Office
Rookery Bay NERR
The Whitney Lab
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Duval County Extension Office
Environmental Learning Center
Crowley Museum
Volusia County Extension
Camp Bayou
Environmental Learning Center
The Whitney Lab

Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

The Whitney Lab

Palm Beach County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension Service
Pinellas County Extension Service
Duval County Extension Office
Volusia County Extension
Duval County Extension Office
Environmental Learning Center
Pinellas County Extension Service
Pinellas County Extension Service
Palm Beach County Extension
Pinellas County Extension Service
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learning Ctr
Crystal Springs Preserve
Volusia County Extension
The Whitney Lab
Clay County Extension Service
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learning Ctr
The Whitney Lab
Environmental Learning Center
Environmental Learning Center
Volusia County Extension
Rookery Bay NERR
The Whitney Lab
Marine Discovery Center
Marine Discovery Center


Upland Habitats
Instructor Organization

Clay County Extension Service
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Clay County Extension Service
Palm Beach County Extension
Crystal Springs Preserve
Environmental Learning Center
Sarasota County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learning Center
Environmental Learning Center
Volusia County Extension

Palm Beach County Extension
Volusia County Extension

Palm Beach County Extension
Palm Beach County Extension
Pinellas County Extension Service
Pinellas County Extension Service
Clay County Extension Service
Volusia County Extension
Clay County Extension Service
Environmental Learning Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Pinellas County Extension Service
Palm Beach County Extension
Pinellas County Extension Service
Palm Beach County Extension
Oxbow Eco-Center
Historic Spanish Point
Crystal Springs Preserve
Volusia County Extension
Clay County Extension Service
Clay County Extension Service
Crystal Springs Preserve
Marion County Extension
Environmental Learning Center
Environmental Learning Center
Volusia County Extension
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Volusia County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Volusia County Extension


Vo~ue 7,No.2Pa~e


Volume 7, No.2


Page 4 I







Current Course Offerings

Freshwater Wetlands Module
See website

Coastal Systems Module
May 5-June 23, 2007 (Martin County)

May 7-June 25, 2007 (Citrus County)

June 27-July 13, 2007 (Franklin/Leon Co.)


Upland Habitats Module
April 18-May 23, 2007 (Osceola County)


Go to http://www.MasterNaturalist.org/
Click on "Course Offerings" time schedules.
Choose your course and register online.
Florida Master Naturalist Program

Program Leader: Dr. Martin Main,
Program Coordinator: Ginger Allen

Southwest Florida Research and Education Center
2686 State Road 29 North
Immokalee, FL 34142-9515
Phone: 239-658-3400; Fax: 239-658-3469
E-Mail: info@masternaturalist.org

FMNP Newsletter Staff

Editor: Dr. Martin Main
Managing Editor: Ginger Allen
Contributing Editor: Julie Carson
Web Coordinator: Buddy Walker
UF UNIVERSITY of
UFFLORIDA
IFAS Extension


Nature Inspiration by Brian Call

Several years ago, my wife, Laura, found a notice of a Florida
Master Naturalist Freshwater Wetlands class. This class was of
great interest to us because I am a nature photographer with the
desire to lead photo workshops. Having a broader understanding
of the ecosystems that I would be taking people out to photo-
graph in would certainly be a direct benefit to all my workshop
participants, so Laura and I quickly signed up.

Laura and I were also involved with efforts to save the Florida
panther. We were both active board members of the Friends of
the Florida Panther Refuge, so taking the class was a way of
learning more about the various habitats within the panthers'
home range so that we could be more effective advocates for the
survival of the highly endangered cats.

Since taking the Freshwater Wetlands Module, we never imagined
how much of what we learned would play a role in our immedi-
ate future. In addition to the benefits we received listed above,
we have also been tour leaders for Dragonfly Expeditions
(www.dragonflyexpeditions.com) in Miami for the past two years.
The valuable knowledge and insights we gained through the FMNP
have definitely assisted us in being able to inspire the passion
and sense of protection we share for Florida's beautiful and
unique wilderness ecosystems and inhabitants. If our tour partici-
pants go back home and begin to appreciate the natural wilder-
ness areas where they live, we feel we have successfully fulfilled
our leadership roles as Dragonfly nature tour guides as well as
proud graduates of the Florida Master Naturalist Program.
Dwarf Cypress photo by Brian F. Call.


Nature photo tours will be posted on Brian's nature photography
website: http://www.briancallphoto.com/.

FMNP Module funding provided by:

-Florida Fish Et Wildlife Conservation Commission
-Southwest Florida Council for Environment Education, Inc. (SWFCEE)
-Florida Sea Grant, University of Florida/IFAS
-Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute
-U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative State Research, Education


VolumeA 7,xNo.nsion


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I Volume 7, No.2




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