Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
Series Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Southwest Florida Research & Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Southwest Florida Research & Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Immokalee, Fla.
Publication Date: April 2006
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Bibliographic ID: UF00091493
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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IApril 2006


Florida Master Naturalist Program


Newsletter Volume 6, No.2


FMNP 2005 Update

The Florida Master Naturalist Program Statewide Reunion and Awards Ceremony registra-
tion is open! All FMNP Instructors and Graduates (only one module required) are welcome to
attend, but registration is limited, so only one adult guest per registrant please. The event will
be held November 3-5, 2006, at a lakeside training facility (FFA) in Central Florida. This will
be an opportunity to meet Instructors and Graduates from around the state, including myself
and Ginger. There will also be educational presentations, including: Coyotes in Florida: the
Good, Bad, and the Ugly; Sensing Wildlife; Florida Butterflies in their Ecosystems; Know Your
Plant Families; Florida Sharks; Fire in Florida's Ecosystems; Interpretation for Children; and
Interpretation Field Techniques. The Saturday evening award banquet will reward special
achievers. Optional Sunday field trips will allow you to explore some of Central Florida's
unique natural areas and waterways.
There is a $110 registration fee for this event, which includes all meals, a proceedings CD, an
FMNP back pack, and a permanent FMNP name tag. Attendees are responsible for lodging
arrangements and costs. The facility has lodge rooms and villas that accommodate up to 18
persons, which are ideal for chapters and groups. On-site primitive camping is also available
and off-site accommodations are listed on our website. Go to www.MasterNaturalist.org and
click on 2006 FMNP Annual meeting to learn more and to register. See you there!
, Marty Main, FMNP Program Leader


FMNP Instructor Spotlight: Angela Yau, Gainesville

How did you get involved in Environmental Education (EE)?
When I was four years old, I began exploring coastal dunes and the Banana River and told my par-
ents that I wanted to be a naturalist. I've been learning (25 years) about and sharing the wonders
of this state (15 years) ever since.
What is your most memorable EE moment?
While on a canoe trip with middle schoolers on the Santa Fe River, we
challenged the students as to who could identify the animals first.
When we reached a more developed section of the river, the kids asked
why there were fewer animals. I asked them what they thought. It was
the best hour-long discussion of ecology and environmental ethics that I
have ever been privy to. Some kids were really turned around in their
thinking about their impacts-by the other kids! This was interpretation
Sat its best. I led them to the place, did a little teaching, and then let
S the surroundings provoke these young minds into action.
Angela Yau What is your vision for Florida's future?
We need to make our natural resources the top priority in decision making for sustainability and
the economy of Florida that is dependent on healthy systems. Though the future seems bleak,
education and interpretation are our keys to awakening both visitors and residents to the unique
wonders of this state. If we can educate, there may be hope for the long-term future of Florida.


I UNIVERSITY OF
, FLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION


Inside this issue:


Program Update 1

Environmental Education 2
and Conservation Events
Wild Eye, Interpretive 3
Tracks
Honor Roll of Florida 4
Master Naturalists
Class Information, 5
Contacts


Track Trivia
What makes these 6" tracks?










S7


uoQJH nlIg 4iDj :.JMASUV


A







S Spring Environmental Education and Conservation Events

Boyd Hill Nature Park's Riverine Turtle Workshop, 29-30 April, 2006
Florida's Riverine Turtles: Identification, Natural History and Conservation (includes canoeing and snorkeling on Rain-
bow Run, Dunnellon). Join turtle researcher George L. Heinrich. This workshop includes a Saturday morning class-
room session at BHNP's Lake Maggiore Environmental Education Center and Sunday field trip. Limited space is avail-
able (adults only). Contact : (727) 865-6255, e-mail: george@heinrichecologicalservices.com.
Farm and Forest Festival School Day-Morningside Nature Center, Gainesville. April 28th, 8:00am-1:00pm;
April 29th and April 30th, 10:00am-4:00pm. Call 334-2170 or visit www.natureoperations.org
Traditional craftsman and re-enactors let you step back to a turn-of-the-century market day. Live entertainers are
featured near the farm. Artisans will demonstrate their crafts and sell their wares. A variety of authentic southern
food will be available. Bring the whole family. $5.00 Adults, $3.00 Kids 3-12, free kids 0-2.
Earth Expo 2006, Lummus Park, South Beach (8th-10th Streets) Miami Beach, 4/30/2006, 12:00-6:00 p.m.
Contact Information: Heather Porter, 305-673-7000, ext6121, hporter@miamibeachfl.gov
This event will provide a forum for you to engage with sustainable businesses and non-profit green organizations.
Exhibitors provide information on hybrid cars, green investing, energy efficient and water conservation products for
the home, natural cosmetics, organic foods, xeriscape, and native plant demonstrations.
Hog Island Hammock Hike, APRIL 30, Grassy Waters Preserve. Phone: 561-627-8831
Join Master Naturalist Kurt Gebhart for a shaded hike through a hammock ecosystem. Find ferns, orchids, mush-
rooms, plants, and critters. Wear a hat, old close-toed shoes, and long pants. Bring drinking water and sunscreen.
RSVP at least 24 hours prior to program. Ages: 10 years old and up. Time: 9 am- Noon. Fees: $5 adults, $1 kids.
GreenTrends 2006, Florida's Third Annual Green Building Conference & Tradeshow is in Gainesville, FL, May 2 4,
2006. Learn about the products and practices emerging in this movement and network with developers, builders,
architects, and stakeholders. Registration is $295. Go online to: www.greentrends.org/2006/registration.htm.
Florida Master Naturalist Program SW Florida Regional Chapter meeting, May 6th, Naples Preserve.
Charlotte, Lee, Collier, Hendry, and Glades county FMNP Instructors and graduates welcome. 9:30am-3:30pm, lunch
provided. Meet the FMNP program coordinator and students from all over your region. Learn what other FMN grads
are doing in your area and how you can do more, see more, and learn more. Contact: info@masternaturalist.org.
Osceola County Extension Butterfly Gardening, May 6, 9:00am Noon
Greensides Restaurant, Harmony. Call 407-518-2584 to register.
Grow Smart Workshop, Pinellas Technical Education Center. Saturday, May 13, 2006. 8:30 a.m. 3 p.m.
This workshop provides tips and hands-on examples of how you can achieve a beautiful landscape that saves you
time and effort. Call 727-893-2500, ext 1101 for agenda and registration fee information.
The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve is hosting: Managing Visitor Use in Coastal Areas.
Wednesday, May 24, and Thursday, May 25, 2006, 9:00 AM-4:00 PM (Eastern Time) at the St. Joseph Bay State Pre-
serves Center, 3915 County Road C-30A, near Port St. Joe, Florida. This workshop overviews the human dimen-
sions of protected area management, offers examples of visitor use and associated impacts to natural resources, and
demonstrates applications to address the human side of resource management. Presentations will include local ex-
amples and case studies from local natural areas. Registration required; fee $25 (includes lunch and materials).
Registration Deadline is May 12. Contact: Rosalyn Kilcollins at (850)653-8063, or Rosalyn.kilcollins@dep.state.fl.us.
The NAI, Certified Interpretive Guide training will be May 22nd-25th from 8am-5pm daily. 32 hour s. It will be
held in Gainesville at Boulware Springs Waterworks. Contact Angela Yau: yauaf@ci.gainesville.fl.us.
Online description: http://interpnet.com/interpnet/miscpages/programs/ciq faqs.htm

New Educational Media

Central Florida Wildlife Viewing Guide. There are explicit directions to 25 locations from an Interstate
highway in Central Florida and more than 60 color photographs of landmarks and critters you may see. You
can drive to many locations, take a short hike, or bike ride to some others. Enjoy getting outdoors to enjoy
the "wild" side of Central Florida. Go to: www.rogerfulton.com/ecotours/FLBooks/CFL-WLV.htm.


I Volume 6, No.2


Page 2 I








Wild Eye Watch & on:


Southeastern five-lined skink (Eumeces inexpectatus) 8"
Identifiers: brown with five light stripes, blue tail when young
Adaptations: tail breaks off to avoid capture N
Status: most common skink in Florida -
Range: S. New England to N. Florida, west to E. Texas, north to <
Kansas, Wisconsin, and southern Ontario
Habitat: hammocks, urban wood piles, forests
Diet: insects, earthworms, crustaceans, lizards, even small mice
Fun Facts: I
- during spring breeding season, males have orange jaws and cheeks
- female guards her nest eggs
Skinks I i..r I-. Scincidae) tend to have smooth bodies, short legs, and round tails. Many burrow, are usually active during the
day, and Florida species are egg layers. There are 4 species of Eumeces in Florida. The Southeastern five-lined skink lives
throughout the state, while the other 3 species are found mainly in the panhandle. It is most often found on the ground or on
manmade structures, though it sometimes climbs on tree trunks. The wet looking skin and blue tail often frighten people. This
animal is harmless to humans. We recently received a report of a Naples resident whose cat nearly died from ingesting a skink,
but research we found said domestic pets are usually only severely affected by the Broad-headed skink (Eumeces laticeps).






Interpretive Tracks f P d )

Wildlife Viewing: Practice Makes Perfect /
by Heather Stapleton, Education Coordinator .
The goal of wildlife viewing is to observe animals without interrupting their normal activi- b i'
ties. First, focus on looking. Then, learn a few techniques to improve your skills. Successful
wildlife viewing takes practice and knowledge. Wildlife is everywhere, but you won't find r
everything everywhere. Wildlife needs the perfect combination of food, water, shelter, and
space; and, each species has its own preference. Look for and note the subtle differences. For
instance, Snowy Egrets and Great White Egrets perch at different levels in mangroves. As
your knowledge of species preferences increases, locating them becomes easier.

In general, animals are more active in early morning and late evening. Marsh rabbits, bob-
cats, otter, rattlesnakes, skunks, and white tailed deer are best seen at these times. Addi-
tionally, what we consider "bad" weather may make perfect opportunities for watching wild- Fox squirrel, from Archbold Biological
station, "Discovering Florida Scrub."
life. Before a storm, some animals come out to feed. For example, at our center, the same
gopher tortoise regularly comes out right before each storm. Then, after a storm, some animals become active searching out
food.

Motion is a good detecting device. Animals that are running, flying, or swimming are the easiest to spot. But, you can look for
more subtle signs like moving grasses. Get used to looking at color and shape. Your eye may catch a flash of white among green
leaves or a slithering black line through some pine needles. When you stand still and quiet, you can better detect movement -
both with your eyes and your ears. The key to finding and watching wildlife is to do "quiet, active viewing." ( 'i...... a good van-
tage spot and sit for a while. Begin with a general scan of the whole landscape. You may hear birds, frogs, insects, rustling
leaves, or a fish jumping. Many animals depend on the sense of smell to warn them of approaching danger or to tell them of
other animals nearby; can you do the same? A good wildlife detective uses sight, sound, and scent to observe.

Finding animals is never guaranteed, but you can usually find clues about what lives in the area you are studying. Animals
leave a variety of messages for us, such as, nests, webs, burrows, trails, "rubbing spots," chewed or gnawed leaves and branches,
diggings or scratches, tracks, scat, and even food remains. With a little practice, you can become a first-rate wildlife observer.


I Volume 6, No.2


Page 3 1







New Additions to the Honor Role of Florida Master Naturalists

Individuals that completed Coastal, Wetlands, and Uplands modules during Jan-March 2006

To view the complete list of Florida Master Naturalist Graduates: www.MasterNaturalist.org, click on "Student Database"

Florida Freshwater Wetlands Coastal Systems Upland Habitats
Master Naturalist Instructor Organization Instructor Organization Instructor Organization


Constance Alsbrook
Mary Bacon
Sara Cieslak
Joe Corey
Floyd Crawford
Debbie Curry
Debbie Dixon
Kristin Ebersol
Mary Echols
Ronald Echols
Peter Edmond
Jan Eschauzier
Wendy Giunta
Patrick Griffin
Gwen Harris
Russell Hunt
Don Jolly
Joan Keefe
Lisa-Marie Lerner
G. Wesley Lovelace
Al Manasa
Patrick Mann
Janet Martin
Jacqueline McCarry
Barbara Meyer

Herbert Newlands
Dorie-Ann Padgitt
Vance Perkey
Schneeber-
Paula ger
Sham-
George baugh
Mortimer Smedley
Debra J Wilson


Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Palm Beach Extension
Clay/Duval Co. Extension
Rookery Bay NERR
Rookery Bay NERR
Pinellas County Extension
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learn-
ing Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension

Fairchild Tropical Gardens
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learn-
ing Center
Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center


Rookery Bay NERR
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
PalmNet
Duval Co. Extension
Rookery Bay NERR
Rookery Bay NERR
Pinellas County Extension
Rookery Bay NERR
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learning
Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension

Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learning
Center
Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center


Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
FAU's Ctr for Envir. Studies
Clay/Duval Co. Extension
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Pinellas County Extension
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Grassy Waters Preserve
Env Learning Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learning
Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension

Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Camp Bayou Outdoor Learning
Center
Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center


Volume 6, No.2 Pa~e4


I Volume 6, No.2


Page 4 I








Current Course Offerings

Freshwater Wetlands Classes:

July 24-August 4, 2006 (Lee County)

Coastal Systems Classes:

August 19-September 30, 2006 (Palm Beach County)

Upland Habitats Classes:

May 1-29, 2006 (Lee County)

October 2-December 9, 2006 (Palm Beach County)



Go to http://www.MasterNaturalist.org/
Click on "Course Offerings" for:
locations and time schedules.


Florida Master Naturalist Program

Program Leader: Dr. Martin Main,
Program Coordinator: Ginger Alien

Southwest Florida Research and Education Center
2686 State Road 29 North
Immokalee, FL 34142-9515
Phone: 239-658-3400; Fax: 239-658-3469
E-Mail: info@masternaturalist.org
Web:
http://www.MasterNaturalist.org/
http://www.MasterNaturalist.ifas.ufl.edu/

FMNP Newsletter Staff

Editor: Dr. Martin Main
Managing Editor: Ginger Alien
Contributing Editor: Julie Carson
Web Coordinator: Buddy Walker

.. UNIVERSITY OF
"' FLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION


How the FMNP Has Helped Me in My Professional Life
By Anne Sylvester, Wetlands Naturalist and ecotour guide for J.B.
Starkey's Flatwoods Adventures in Odessa, FL

Taking the wetlands module of the FMNP enriched my life both per-
sonally and professionally. Professionally, the course helped me in my
overall presentation of the two-hour tour that I do as a guide on a
working cattle ranch for people of all ages. I already had a broad base
of training and knowledge to be an ecotour guide. I majored in mar-
keting in college. But being a Florida native, I have always had an
interest in Florida's flora and fauna. I educated myself on Florida's
nature through reading, seminars, field guides, classes, field trips with
local Audubon Societies, camping, talking with experts on birds, native
plants, and wildlife. When I was hired as a tour guide by Flat-
woods Adventures in March 1999, I received training which included
the history of the ranch and the Starkey family as well as information
on the history of cattle in Florida, the workings of a Florida cattle op-
eration, cultural history, interpretation, and environmental ethics.

Continuing education is important in any profession, but the FMNP is
much more than that. The Wetlands course I took, through the Pinel-
las County Extension under Jeanne Murphy, was in-depth and all en-
compassing. Not only did I expand my knowledge of Flor-
ida's Freshwater Wetlands, I learned more about how to share my
knowledge. The underlying spirit of the course is learning to share
information with others in a fun and positive manner. That's what
being an ecotour guide is all about! I hope that after spending two
hours with me, my guests will walk away with a deeper appreciation
and respect of our natural world.

The course enabled me to fine-tune my presentation and to more
clearly understand that it's not what my customers learn, (although I
hope everyone learns something new) but that they have a better un-
derstanding of the interconnectedness of the natural world, and our
connection with it, as well as our role as stewards of the land. When I
take guests out into Florida habitats, I try to teach this con-
cept. Sharing this connection is the spirit of what I learned through
the FMNP. Occasionally, I have professional tour groups that I feel
intimidated by. I just think about my experience with the FMNP, take
a deep breath, and proceed with confidence. Whether you are an ecot-
our guide, a biologist, a park ranger, a volunteer, a writer, a school
teacher, or an individual wanting to learn more about Florida to share
with your family; the FMNP offers valuable learning experiences
through classroom and field trips, thought provoking discussions, and
in-depth projects.

To take a tour with Ann, go to: www.flatwoodsadventures.com/.

FMNP Module funding provided by:

-Florida Fish Et Wildlife Conservation Commission
-Southwest Florida Council for Environment Education, Inc. (SWFCEE)
-Florida Sea Grant, University of Florida/IFAS
-Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute
-U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative State Research, Education
- and Extension Service, Renewable Resources Act


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I Volume 6, No.2


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