Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
Series Title: Florida Master Naturalist Program newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Southwest Florida Research & Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Southwest Florida Research & Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Immokalee, Fla.
Publication Date: January 2006
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Bibliographic ID: UF00091493
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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IJanuary 2006


Florida Master Naturalist Program


Newsletter

IVolume 6, No.1


FMNP 2005 Update


Save the Date! We are planning a Florida Master Naturalist Program Statewide Reunion and
Awards Ceremony for all FMNP Instructors and Graduates for November 3-5, 2006. The
event will be held at a rural training facility in Central Florida, and everyone is invited! This
will be an opportunity to meet Instructors and Graduates from around the state, help reward
special achievers, attend workshops, and have fun! We'll provide more details as the date ap-
proaches.
But what about 2005? Our 4th full year of FMNP courses was a good one. The Upland Habitats
module was released, we had fewer hurricanes, and 40 courses were taught and 574 FMNP
Graduate Certificates awarded which raises the total to more than 2,000 since inception of
the FMNP in 2001! FMNP 2005 course evaluations and our annual survey revealed that, based
on a scale of 1-5, the average evaluation scores for all FMNP courses and Instructors were 4.6
and 4.7 (very good-excellent). Also, 98% of our annual survey respondents indicated they
thought the FMNP was a worthwhile and rewarding experience. Kudos to all the dedicated
FMNP Instructors who make this program possible and worthwhile (all 150 of you!)
The surveys also revealed that FMNP courses inspired 98% of survey respondents to share in-
formation about Florida's environment with other people. Kudos to FMNP Graduates for pro-
moting a greater understanding of Florida's environment among others. That is our mission.



FMNP Instructor Spotlight: Laura Greeno

How long have you been an environmental educator (EE)?
At the age of 17, I began a summer internship in the Adirondack Mountains of NY. Ever since

Years to date.
What is your most memorable EE moment?
I was one of the first instructors for the FMNP Freshwater Wetlands
module. It was amazing to watch a group of adults walk through
chest-deep water to experience a marsh and see the connections they
Were making with everything around them. Occasionally, I'll run
into one of my former students and they'll reminisce about that wet
field trip. Making the connections between people and their sur-
Laura Greeno roundings is what environmental education is all about.
What is your vision for Florida's future?
My vision for Florida's future is bleak-a place of isolated conservation lands and community
parks. However, in my past 10 years as a Floridian, I have met many wonderful people who are
doing their best to ensure conservation lands are set aside and who are educating the public
about the carrying capacity of our resources. Hopefully, we can stop the sprawling wave of de-
velopment before it is too late to maintain viable ecosystems and the wildlife dependent upon
them.


j UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION


Inside this issue:


Program Update

Environmental Education
and Conservation Events
Wild Eye, Interpretive
Tracks
Honor Roll of Florida
Master Naturalists
Class Information, e
Contacts


Track Trivia
What makes these tracks?

e/


'it


AapJn 4 pI!M :JaMsuv


A







S Winter Environmental Education and Conservation Events

January 28 & February 11, 10am-12pm. FREE! Plant Clinic by Indian River County Master Gardeners
Trained Master Gardeners are on hand to answer your plant, yard, and weed questions. Drop by the Vero Beach Envi-
ronmental Learning Center to talk with one of these plant experts. No reservations necessary. Call 772-589-5050.

The Seventh Annual Great Air Potato Roundup: Morningside Nature Center, Gainesville, January 28th, 9am-lpm.
Don't be a Couch potato! Come collect Air Potatoes! Join in the fun, come help protect our conservation lands. As
part of Invasive Plant Awareness Week, G.E.A.R. (Gainesville's Ecosystems At Risk), along with the Florida Exotic Pest
Plant Council and other co-sponsors, presents this event. Participants pick up tubers of the invasive air potato
(Dioscorea bulbifera) from local natural areas instead of trash. Participants will receive a FREE T-shirt, and a celebra-
tion festival will follow the roundup and include lots of prizes. Please pre-register at www.natureoperations.org. Call
Gary Paul at 352-334-2009.

Saturday February 4, Lecture Series. The Florida Scrub Jay, 11:00am, Oxbow Eco-center, 5400 NE St. James Drive
Port St. Lucie, FL. email: oxbow@stlucieco.gov, call 772-785-5842.

An Evening with Pete Dunne: Wednesday, February 15th, 7 pm. The Conservancy of Southwest Florida, Naples, will
host a lecture with Pete Dunne. One of America's most celebrated nature writers and author of The Feather Quest,
Mr. Dunne is the founder of the World Series of Birding. The lecture will be followed by a reception and book signing.
Cost: $10 Members, $15 Non-members. Contact: 239-403-4236 or info@conservancy.org for information.

Beginning Birding Classes at the St. Lucie Oxbow Eco-Center. The course includes three Tuesday classes on Febru-
ary 21, February 28, and March 7 from 7:00-9:00 pm. The Saturday after each class, St. Lucie Audubon Society will
take you to birding hotspots to practice your skills. Cost is $30. Space is limited, so register now by contacting Misty
Alderman at 772-785-5842 or aldermam@stlucieco.gov.

February 20th-26th: Gainesville Nature Operations hosts a Regional National Association for Interpretation (NAI) and
Association of Living History, Farms & Agricultural Museums (ALHFAM) Workshop "Parchment to PCs Discover with
Research, Deliver with Resources." The NAI regional workshop will run Monday-Thursday and the ALHFAM workshop
will run Thursday-Sunday. Professionals are welcome to attend the whole week to learn about interpretation, re-
search, and delivery. Call Angela Yau at 352-334-3327 or www.natureoperations.org/Parchment to PC's.html

Drop of Rain Expedition, Corkscrew Audubon Swamp, Naples. Trace the path of rain drops through Southwest Flor-
ida's wild places. First site is Lake Trafford for an airboat ride and a discussion of Corkscrew's headwaters. Then, we'll
hike along Corkscrew Marsh trails. We'll return to Corkscrew Swamp, where participants may stroll the 2.25-mile
boardwalk. Register by calling 239-348-9151, ext. 113. Two programs are offered: Friday, February 24 (9 AM 3:30
PM) Et Friday, March 3. Fee: $50; limit: 10 persons.

Thursday, March 30, 2006, 7:00 8:30pm, Wildflowers of Collier County with local wildflower expert Glen Stacil
Mr. Stacil has co-authored the book "A Guide to Common Wildflowers of Collier County, Florida." Rookery Bay, 300
Tower Rd, Naples, Phone: 239-417-6310.

Saturday, April 1, 2006, 8:30 10:30am, Wildflower Walk Adult Field Outing. Explore the remote areas of Rook-
ery Bay Reserve, Naples, searching for wildflowers with local expert Glen Stacil. A variety of species will be blooming
this time of year, including the dazzling blue lupines! Pre-registration is required, and the group will be car pooling to
the trail head. Rookery Bay, 300 Tower Rd, Naples, Phone: 239-417-6310.


New Educational Media

WildFinder: The World Wildlife Fund has created the WildFinder database, which allows users to find out
where various species live around the world. The information in the database is based on the Fund's 825
ecoregions and currently includes information for birds, reptiles, mammals, and amphibians. The data-
base also includes images and information about threatened status. Go to:
http://www.worldwildlife.org/wildfinder/.


I Volume 6, No. 1


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Wild Eye Watch t& oon:


Florida Rosemary (Ceratiola ericoides) 3-8' high
Identifiers: leaves opposite to whorled, needle-like
Adaptations: tiny flowers, aromatic volatile oils reduce water loss
Status: native, common in some habitats
Range: South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Florida C
Habitat: scrub, coastal dunes i
Fun Facts: A
- not related to culinary rosemary
- dome shape protects plant from wind and blowing sand
Florida rosemary grows on excessively to well-drained sandy soils in Flor-
ida scrub and on mature coastal dunes. It can occur intermixed with scrub
oaks on white sand and is occasional in dry scrub on yellow sand, espe-
cially in previously disturbed areas. The volatile oils produced by the
plant discourage animal browsing except by the emerald moth caterpillar (Nemoria outina). The emerald moth caterpillar re-
sembles a rosemary needle in the spring and a dried rosemary twig in the winter. Florida rosemary releases chemicals that pre-
vent germination of seeds near adult shrubs allelopathyy). When fire kills adult shrubs, rosemary seeds in the sandy soil germi-
nate and grow in the newly opened sunny spot. The fruit is consumed by birds and black bear. Harvester ants and mice eat the
seeds. Florida rosemary also provides nesting sites for several species of song birds, including the federally threatened Florida
Scrub-jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens). In hotter parts of the year, dense stands exude a distinctive honey-like odor.




Interpretive Tracks f d* a)

Phenomenal Phenology
By Heather Stapleton, Vero Beach Environmental Learning Center
Sometimes people claim that Florida does not have seasonal changes. Granted, most trees in Florida
don't produce a beautiful show of color in the fall, and there are no conspicuous seasonal changes. But
there are subtle changes, and to see them you have to be a careful observer. Phenology is the study of
cyclic events of nature life cycles of plants and animals in response to seasonal and climatic changes
in the environment. Recording and comparing the dates of natural events such as bird migration, plant
budding, flowering or fruiting, and insect activities are interesting events to phenologists. Blooming
S.111 i..i... migrating birds, spawning fish, flashing fireflies, thunderstorms, animal mating rituals, a
shrinking pond, birth, and death are all part of natural cycles. Keeping track of cyclical events like
these from year to year and how they relate to the weather patterns is in large part what phenology is
all about. Studying and tracking phenological events can be both entertaining and educational.

For plant life, a specific site (II.. garden or yard) is frequently used. In the Indian River estuary,
scientists monitor the phenology of sea grass beds. Commonly monitored phenological events for plants
are: bud opening, first leaf, first flower, and seed production. Commonly monitored events for animals
are: first singing, egg laying, and life stages of frogs; migration, courting rituals or nesting of birds;
and courting rituals and births of mammals. White Oak (Quercus alba)
University of Florida/IFAS.
One neat thing about personal phenological observations is that anything of interest is fair game.
Many backyard naturalists keep phenological records simply because it's fun to do. Comparing this year's records with last
year's and of past years can be enjoyable and can provide interesting clues as to the effects of weather patterns on the timing of
seasonal events. When you keep good phenological records for many years, they can become important documents, not only for
yourself but also for science some data being used to answer questions about global warming are from phenological records.

To begin noting phenology, you can keep a Nature Notebook and this will help develop your observational skills. You should
learn the basic life-cycle facts about the organism you're observing. After a bit of homework with Nature Notebook in hand, you
will be on your way to recording some phenomenal phenology!



I Volume 6, No. 1


Page 3 1








New Additions to the Honor Role of Florida Master Naturalists

Individuals that completed Coastal, Wetlands, and Uplands modules during Oct.-Dec. 2005.

To view the complete list of Florida Master Naturalist Graduates: www.MasterNaturalist.org, click on "Student Database"


Florida Freshwater Wetlands Coastal Systems Upland Habitats
Master Naturalist Instructor Organization Instructor Organization Instructor Organization


Ken
Cheryl
Rodney
Toni
Leo
Ann

Edie
Laurie
John
Patty
Maryann
Dianne
Emily
Jean
Joe
Hannah
Jennifer
Charles
Cheryl
Robin
Mary Ellen

Margaret
Charles
Jessica
James
Patrick
Gretchen
Gayle
Gwen

Alison
Eleanor
Candace
Barbara

Dawnne
W.
Russell
Don


Acker
Acker
Alexander
Anderson
Arbeznik
Arnold

Blair
Brennan
Brewer
Bruda
Buehn
Busch
Casey
Challis
Corey
Covert
Crawford
Cuidera
Cummins
Dunlap
Durham

England
Everly
Frankovitch
Greene
Griffin
Hanson
Harmon
Harris

Helfrich
Heslin
Hill
Howard

Howarth
Humphreys
Hunt
Jolly


Jones-
Pamela Morton


Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Volusia County Extension
Grassy Waters Preserve
Volusia County Extension

Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Morningside Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Lake County Extension
Env Learning Center


Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Sanibel Captiva Conservation FD.
Volusia County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Rookery Bay/
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Morningside Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Env Learning Center


Crystal River Preserve State Park Volusia County Extension
Crystal River Preserve State Park Crystal River Preserve State Park


Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Morningside Nature Center
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Lake County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Lake County Extension

Glades Botanical Garden
Crystal Springs Preserve
Crystal Springs Preserve
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Volusia County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Duval County Extension & St.
Johns Parks
Grassy Waters Preserve
Lake County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Duval County Extension & St.
Johns Parks
Crystal Springs Preserve
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

Audubon Corkscrew Swamp


Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Morningside Nature Center
Rookery Bay
Volusia County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Crystal River Preserve State Park
Rookery Bay/
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Crystal Springs Preserve
Crystal Springs Preserve
Rookery Bay
Palm Net
Env Learning Center
Marine Discovery Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

The Whitney Lab
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension

Volusia County Extension
Camp Bayou Outdoors
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

Sanibel Captiva Conservation FD.


Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Lee County Parks & Recreation
Volusia County Extension
Grassy Waters Preserve
Volusia County Extension

Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Morningside Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Env Learning Center
Morningside Nature Center
Crystal River Preserve State Park
Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Morningside Nature Center
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Volusia County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Crystal River Preserve State Park

Grassy Waters Preserve
Crystal Springs Preserve
Crystal Springs Preserve
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Volusia County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

Volusia County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Pinellas County Extension

Volusia County Extension
Crystal River Preserve State Park
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

Audubon Corkscrew Swamp


Continued on next page.............


Volume 6, No.1 Pa~e4


I Volume 6, No. 1


Page 4 I








New Additions to the Honor Role of Florida Master Naturalists contain. )

Individuals that completed Coastal, Wetlands, and Uplands modules during Oct.-Dec. 2005.

To view the complete list of Florida Master Naturalist Graduates: www.MasterNaturalist.org, click on "Student Database"


Florida
Master Naturalist
Lynn Kelley
Andrea Kerlinger
Robert Kimzey
Sharon King
Joan Klimm
Knicker-
Ellis bocker
Beth Lahusky
Michael Landis
Sarah T. Lees
Donna Liebelt
Stan Lynch
Sandy Malone
Barbara Markland
Joanne Mason
Emma Mason
Mary McAuliffe
Jacqueline McCarry
Mitch McEwen
Carolyn McKinney
Alden Miller
Patrick Morgan
Jane Muller
Paul Neighbors
Richard Nicole
Gary Ochsenhirt
D. Jody Owens


Margaret
Anne
Raymond
Donna
Susan
D Diane
Rhonda
Alice
Jennifer L.
Katharine
Herbert
Thomas H.
Joanne
Gwenyth
Ann

Neta
Peggy
Alligator
Bob


Pierce
Potter
Presley
Reece
Richards
Roff
Rowe
Seney
Smith
Smith
Southern
Spurlino
Thompson
Turley
Villalobos-
Bell
Yokubonus

Young


Freshwater Wetlands
Instructor Organization
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center

Lake County Extension
Crystal Springs Preserve
Hillsborough County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Duval Co. Ext. & St. Johns Parks
Morningside Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Volusia County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Morningside Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Crystal Springs Preserve

Morningside Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Env Learning Center
The Conservancy of SW FL
Env Learning Center
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Env Learning Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Crystal River Preserve State
The Conservancy of SW FL
Morningside Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Morningside Nature Center
Lake County Extension


Coastal Systems
Instructor Organization
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center

Volusia County Extension
Crystal Springs Preserve
Hillsborough County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Morningside Nature Center
Morningside Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Sanibel Captiva Conservation FD.
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Pinellas County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Rookery Bay
FL Museum of Natural History
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension

Morningside Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
Env Learning Center
Rookery Bay
Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Crystal River Preserve State Park
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Morningside Nature Center
Pinellas County Extension
FL Museum of Natural History
Volusia County Extension


Lake County Extension Volusia County Extension
Duval Co. Ext. & St. Johns Parks The Whitney Lab


Camp Bayou Outdoors


Camp Bayou Outdoors


Upland Habitats
Instructor Organization
Grassy Waters Preserve
Volusia County Extension
Pinellas County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center

Brevard County Parks
Crystal Springs Preserve
Crystal Springs Preserve
Pinellas County Extension
Volusia County Extension
Alachua County Extension
Morningside Nature Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Crystal Springs Preserve
Pinellas County Extension
Lee County Parks & Recreation
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Volusia County Extension
Env Learning Center
Env Learning Center
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Morningside Nature Center
Volusia County Extension
Crystal Springs Preserve

Morningside Nature Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Env Learning Center
Audubon Corkscrew Swamp
Env Learning Center
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Env Learning Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Crystal River Preserve State Park
Crystal Springs Preserve
Morningside Nature Center
Crystal Springs Preserve
Morningside Nature Center
Crystal Springs Preserve

Crystal Springs Preserve
Volusia County Extension

Crystal Springs Preserve


Vo~ue 6,No.1Pa~e


I Volume 6, No. 1


Page 5 I








Current Course Offerings

Freshwater Wetlands Classes:
Clay County (4/3/06-4/29/06)
Osceola County (2/8/06-3/8/06)
Palm Beach County (3/18/06-4/29/06)

Coastal Systems Classes:
Collier County (3/7/06-3/28/06)
Pinellas County (3/3/06-3/31/06)
Volusia County (2/6/06-3/14/06)
Volusia County (2/23/06-3/30/06)

Upland Habitats Classes:
Collier County (4/24/06-5/11/06)
Franklin County(2/18/06-4/8/06)
Marion County (2/25/06-5/20/06)
Martin County (2/8/06-3/8/06)

Go to http://www.MasterNaturalist.org/
Click on "Course Offerings" for:
locations and time schedules.


Florida Master Naturalist Program

Program Leader: Dr. Martin Main,
Program Coordinator: Ginger Allen

Southwest Florida Research and Education Center
2686 State Road 29 North
Immokalee, FL 34142-9515
Phone: 239-658-3400; Fax: 239-658-3469
E-Mail: info@masternaturalist.org
Web:
http://www.MasterNaturalist.org/
http://www.MasterNaturalist.ifas.ufl.edu/

FMNP Newsletter Staff

Editor: Dr. Martin Main
Managing Editor: Ginger Allen
Contributing Editor: Julie Carson
Web Coordinator: Buddy Walker

UNIVERSITY OF
A9 FLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION


How I became a Florida Master Naturalist
By Candy Hill, first published in Florida Trail Magazine
I'm 55 years old and I'm finally getting a handle on what I want to be
when I grow up. I want to do something positive for the environment
of our planet, preferably right here in Florida! I had a good job in the
financial service industry, but it was so demanding, I quit and read a
notice in the newspaper about a Florida Master Naturalist Program
(FMNP). I was thrilled to find a way to get caught up on Florida's
natural systems and signed up for the Coastal module.

I considered myself a self taught naturalist, but the FMNP pulls it all
together in a comprehensive overview while managing to provide
details. We visited Washington Oaks Garden State Park, the UF Whit-
ney Laboratory, and the Indian River lagoon. I never knew that a
horseshoe crab has 9 eyes or that lobsters were being researched to
aid in the development of artificial smelling devices.

I decided the best thing for me to change careers would be to com-
plete all 3 modules, as that would look good on a resume! I was con-
cerned the Wetlands and Uplands modules might not be as fascinat-
ing; I soon realized this was not the case. I took each module in a
different county. I met new people and went on field trips to places I
had never been before. I helped with amphibian and reptile traps in
the Uplands class and waded swamps in the Wetlands class. My 3
final projects included shell identification, scrub plant descriptions,
and a field guide for Florida animal tracks.

On the last day of my final class, I received my "Master" certificate.
I was thrilled but just a little bit sad. I enjoyed the classes, instruc-
tors, topics, fellow students, and exploring new places. But wait,
they are forming a Central FMNP alumni chapter, great. Hopefully, I
can get a job doing what I love, educating others about nature.


Lanay tOOK nis pnoto oi mne -entrat rtoriaa
FMNP Chapter exploring Lyonia Preserve.


FMNP Module funding provided by:

-Florida Fish t Wildlife Conservation Commission
-Southwest Florida Council for Environment Education, Inc. (SWFCEE)
-Florida Sea Grant, University of Florida/IFAS
-Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute
-U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative State Research, Education
- and Extension Service, Renewable Resources Act


Volume 6, No.1 Pa~e6


I Volume 6, No.1


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