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Title: Department of Physical Therapy student handbook
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Title: Department of Physical Therapy student handbook
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida
Publisher: College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
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Table of Contents
    Title Page
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    Table of Contents
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    Main
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    Appendix
        Page 35
        Page 36
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Full Text




U FT UNIVERSITY of
UFI FLORIDA





DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY
STUDENT HANDBOOK

Policies & Procedures





DPT Classes of 2008 2010


College of Public Health and Health Professions










TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction 3
College of Public Health & Health Professions Mission & Goals 3
Department of Physical Therapy Mission 3
Philosophy of Education 4
Objectives 4-6
Standards 7
General Information
Health Center and College of Health Professions 8
Department Faculty and Staff 9-12
Student Physical Therapy Organization and Officers 12
Building Designation 12
Security 13
Services
Library 13
Bookstore, Eating Facilities, Smoking Policy, Gift Shop, Post Office,
ATM, Newspapers 14
Parking, Lockers, Name Tags, Bulletin Boards, Phones, Visitors 15
Advisement and Counseling 15-16
Professional Meetings 16
Student Responsibilities
Attendance 16-17
Health and Medical Problems, ADA 17-18
Financial Obligations 19
Health Insurance and Immunization 19-20
Housekeeping 20
Dress Standards 20-23
Library Orientation, Computer Access, E-mail Requirement 23-24
Current Contact Information 24
Grading
Grading Scale 25
Professional behavior 25
Academic Progression, Probation, and Dismissal 25-26
Professionalism Progression, Warning, Probation, and Dismissal 26-27
Policies regarding the Clinical Internships 28
(see Appendix A for further information)
Appeal Process and Readmission 29
Academic Honesty 30-31
Awards and Scholarships 32-33
Graduation Banquet, Commencement, Licensure 34

Appendices
A: Clinical Education Philosophy, Policies, and Responsibilities 36-39
Internship Requirements and Service Learning 37
Institution, Facility, and Student Responsibilities 38-39
B: Curriculum Overview 40
Course Descriptions 41-45
C: Student Statement regarding Varicella Vaccination 46
D: Student Excused Absence Request Form 47
E: Expectations for Class Attendance (Summer 2008) 48
F. Department Laptop Use Policy 49
F: Student Statement of Informed Consent 50










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program in the College of Public Health and Health
Professions. Many of the policies and procedures you need to know are included in this manual; others
are included in the UF Student Guide (http://www.dso.ufl.edu/studentguide/). Regardless of whether the
policies and procedures are listed here, you are responsible for your education and behavior, which
includes understanding all University and College policies and procedures that affect your academic
progress and use of University and College resources.

If you ever have questions regarding the DPT program or any other aspect of University life, please do
not hesitate to contact a physical therapy faculty member, the college dean's office, or the appropriate
University office. We are glad you have selected the Department of Physical Therapy and College of
Public Health and Health Professions at the University of Florida to complete your Professional
education, and we will assist you in whatever way we can to help you to be successful. We hope that you
find your college experience enriching, both personally and academically.


College of Public Health & Health Professions

Mission

The mission of the College of Public Health and Health Professions is to preserve, promote, and improve
the health and well being of populations, communities, and individuals. To fulfill this mission, we foster
collaborations among public health and the health professions in education, research, and service.

Goals

Consistent with our mission, the College has three primary goals:
Provide excellent educational programs that prepare graduates to address the multifaceted health
needs of populations, communities, and individuals
Conduct quality research and disseminate findings that are responsive to priority health needs
Serve as active participants and leaders in University, public health, health practice, and health
services communities through collaborative approaches to intervention, professional practice, and
policy


Department of Physical Therapy

Mission

In concert with the mission of the College of Public Health and Health Professions and the University of
Florida, the Department of Physical Therapy is dedicated to excellence in education, research, and
service. The Physical Therapy Department supports this overall mission by educating entry-level
students to become practitioners of evidence-based physical therapy, ready for autonomous
practice through collaboration with other health professionals, engaging in and educating doctoral of
philosophy students to perform basic science and clinical research, and through participation in
professional and community service.










Philosophy of Education


We believe in the right of each individual to have ready access to health care. We endorse promotion of
health, preventative health care, and rehabilitation as major roles in physical therapy. We believe in the
human right of each patient, student, and faculty member to access the best evidence based practice as a
reflection of academic and clinical truth.

We believe that the search for the best evidence based practice should occur in an environment that
fosters growth of the individual, personally and professionally. We believe that learning is a life-long,
on-going activity and we strive to instill in the students responsibility for their education. We support the
faculty in teaching the knowledge and skills necessary for entry into the physical therapy profession using
techniques that stimulate intellectual development. We support the sharing of ideas, values, and
philosophies between patients, students, and faculty. We seek to provide an environment for the
achievement of quality in human actions and the attainment of self-actualization.

Scientific research is recognized as an absolute necessity in our profession to give credence to the content
of physical therapy and to provide the best evidence for clinically based practice. The responsibility for
advancing professional knowledge through research and creative endeavors should permeate faculty
activities and attitudes in such a manner that it is conveyed to the entry-level and post-professional
students through daily classroom and clinical activities.

We support the profession of physical therapy through involvement in its professional organizations. We
believe in serving as guardians; observing, contributing, and shaping the growth of the profession in its
organizational, legislative and societal responsibilities. We strongly advocate faculty and student
participation in patient care, inclusive of pro bono services, and as contributing members of the health
care team. Through serving as role models, the didactic and clinical faculties strive to help students
develop these values and to nurture their desires to be contributing members of society.

Objectives Entry Level Program

STUDENTS
Goal #1: To enroll entry-level students who meet high standards in the areas of academic aptitude,
leadership potential and commitment to a career in physical therapy.

Objective la. To recruit an annual pool of not less than 100 qualified applicants.

Objective lb. To recruit a diverse student pool in terms of life experience, career goals and prior
education.

Objective Ic. To admit students who meet at least the following minimum standards for
admission: overall undergraduate GPA and GPA in pre-requisite courses of 3.0, GRE score of
1000, demonstrated leadership potential and a strong commitment to a career in physical therapy.

Objective Id. To enroll 55 qualified students into the program each year

CURRICULUM
Goal #2. To offer a comprehensive, well-integrated and up-to-date entry-level curriculum that prepares
students to become physical therapists capable of providing excellent services in any physical therapy
environment.

Objective 2a. To provide students with theoretical and clinical education in each of the major
areas of current physical therapy practice.











Objective 2b. To provide students with clinical internships that reflect the teaching mission of the
Department of Physical Therapy.

Objective 2c. To foster a perspective of life-long learning through an emphasis on evidence-based
clinical practice and involvement in rehabilitation research seminars and clinical seminars.

Objective 2d. To review the entry-level curriculum concurrently, by semester, and annually, and,
as needed, revise the curriculum and/or individual courses to ensure that they remain relevant,
well-integrated and consistent with current standards of excellence

FACULTY
Goal #3: To recruit and retain highly regarded and productive faculty who have a mix of credentials and
skills appropriate to the Program's mission.

Objective 3a.To have faculty with diverse backgrounds that teach in their area of content
expertise.

Objective 3b. To selectively appoint adjunct faculty to augment courses offered by Departmental
faculty and to enhance students' exposure to the field of practice.

Objective 3c. To ensure that faculty meet standards of teaching excellence.

Objective 3d. To have faculty who routinely publish articles in top-level refereed journals and
other relevant scholarly venues.

Objective 3e. To have faculty who lead and participate extensively in externally funded
rehabilitation research projects.

Objective 3f To support and develop faculty achievement by creating a scholarly environment,
and through individual mentoring, provision of appropriate resources and annual performance
evaluations.

GRADUATES
Goal #4: To prepare entry-level graduates to meet the dynamic needs of physical therapy healthcare
consumers.
Objective 4a. To prepare graduates to be autonomous practitioners and the authoritative
practitioner in the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders.

Objective 4b. To prepare graduates to be physical therapists that address the unique physical and
psychosocial characteristics of each individual client.

Objective 4c. To prepare graduates to be physical therapists that adhere to state and professional
ethical and legal regulations.

Objective 4d. To prepare graduates to be physical therapists capable of providing safe and
effective physical therapy services in a variety of clinical settings.

Objective 4e. To prepare graduates to be independent problem-solvers and critical thinkers as
evidenced in the classroom and during clinical internships.










ALUMNI
Goal #5: To develop and maintain mutually supportive relationships with alumni of the entry-level
program.

Objective 5a. To establish effective means for distributing information to alumni regarding
program activities and opportunities for involvement.

Objective 5b. To include alumni in program activities including, but not limited to, continuing
education, research projects and pro bono services.

Objective 5c. To provide alumni with opportunities for professional growth through participation
in clinical or classroom education, inclusive of transitional DPT.

Objective 5d. To obtain alumni perspectives regarding curriculum content by means of alumni
input in the annual curriculum review, periodic alumni surveys, and ongoing informal dialogue.

OTHER COMMUNITY AND PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Goal #6: To be active participants and leaders in the University, rehabilitation research and physical
therapy professional communities.

Objective 6a. To play an active role in the University through participation in Department,
College and University activities such as committees and governance.

Objective 6b. To participate in service activities related to the rehabilitation research and physical
therapy professional communities.

Objective 6c. To foster in our students the value of active involvement in community and
professional service organizations.

Objective 6d. To actively involve local physical therapists in the physical therapy curriculum, as
guest lecturers and consultants, and in Department activities such as rehabilitation research
seminars.










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY

STANDARDS

1. The program provides educational experiences based on University policy regarding:

a) tuition
b) course credit necessary to achieve the educational objectives
c) scheduled class time and course work

In doing so, the department considers:

1) appropriateness of cost to student
2) fairness in relating course credit to classwork hours
3) effective and efficient assignment of faculty input

2. Mechanisms for withdrawal and refunds are available to students in compliance with
University policies.

3. Students have recourse through Petition and Appeal Committees in the event that they feel any
unfairness exists in the assignment of final grades.

4. The University Honor Code is applied to all departmental procedures.

5. The department adheres to all safety and health codes and maintains concern for the welfare of
visitors, patients, students and personnel.










DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY
COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH & HEALTH PROFESSIONS




I. GENERAL INFORMATION

A. Health Science Center and College of Public Health and Health Professions Organization

The J. Hillis Miller Health Science Center (HSC) at the University of Florida is composed of six colleges,
the UF Clinics, and the UF Dental Clinic.

University, College and Health Center Administration
J. Bernard Machen, DDS, Ph.D. UF President
Janie Fouke, Ph.D., Provost
Michael G. Perri, Ph.D., Interim Dean, College of Public Health and Health Professions
Timothy Goldfarb, Chief Executive Officer, Shands Hospital

The College of Public Health and Health Professions is composed of six units, the Chairpersons of these
units are:


Department of Physical Therapy


Department of Communicative Disorders


Department of Clinical and Health
Psychology

Department of Occupational Therapy


Department of Public Health


Department of Behavioral Science &
Community Health

Department of Health Services
Research, Management & Policy

Department of Rehabilitation Science


Krista Vandenborne, PT, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair

John C. Rosenbek, Ph.D.
Clinical Professor and Chair

Russell M. Bauer, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair

William C. Mann, OTR, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair

Mary Peoples-Sheps, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Director of PH Programs

Linda R. Shaw, Ph.D., CRC, LHMC
Associate Professor & Acting Chair

Paul Duncan, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair

William C. Mann, OTR, Ph.D
Director











Department of Physical Therapy Core Faculty (alphabetical order): Further information regarding faculty
specialization and research interests can be found at the Departmental web site: http://pt.phhp.ufl.edu/faculty.html


A. Faculty
Name
Behrman, Andrea, PT, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Specialization: Neuro Rehabilitation

Bishop, Mark, PT, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Specialization: Orthopedics, Biomechanics

Chmielewski, Terese, PT, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Specialization: Biomechanics, Orthopedics

Creel, Gwenda ,PT, M.H.S.
Lecturer & ACCE
Specialization: Clinical Education,
Management, Adult Neuro

Day, Jane A., PT, Ph.D.
Clinical Associate Professor/Assistant Chair
Specialization: Education, Pediatrics, Prosthetics

Fuller, David, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Specialization: Neurophysiology
Respiratory physiology

George, Steve, PT, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Specialization: Orthopedics/Lumbar


Kautz, Steve, Ph.D.
Associate Professor & RSD Program Coord.
Specialization: Biomechanics/Neurophysiology

Light, Kathye, PT, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Specialization: Adult Neuro Rehab, Geriatrics


Martin, Daniel, PT, Ph.D.
Professor
Specialization: Exercise Physiology,
Cardiac Rehabilitation

Miller, Gloria, PT, MA, M.H.S., NCS
Lecturer/Curriculum Coordinator
Specialization: Clinical Education,
Adult Neuro, General Assessment

Patten, Carolynn, PT, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Specialization: Motor Control,
Therapeutic Interventions

Senesac, Claudia, PT, Ph.D., PCS
Clinical Assistant Professor,
Kids on the Move Co-owner
Specialization: Pediatrics & Anatomy


Education
B.S. Furman University
M.S. PT- Duke University
Ph.D. Motor Control University of Florida

B.S., PT Queensland University, Australia
M.H.S. -University of Florida
Ph.D. University of Florida

M.A., PT College of St. Scholastica, MN
Ph.D. Biomechanics and Movement Science University
of Delaware

B.S., PT- University of Florida
M.H.S. PT- University of Florida



B.S.- University of Alabama
M.A.- University of Alabama at Birmingham
Ph.D.- University of Florida


B.S.-
M.S.-
Ph.D.


Miami University of Ohio
SUniversity of Arizona
-University of Arizona


B.S., PT -West Virginia University
M.S. Orthopedic Physical Therapy University of
Pittsburgh
Ph.D.Rehabilitation Science University of Pittsburgh

B.S. Geophysics Michigan State University
M.A. Geophysics University of Texas Austin
Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering University of California

B.S. PT-University of Missouri
M.S. PT- Medical College of Virginia
Ph.D. Kinesiological Studies & Motor Control-
University of Texas

B.S. PE- University of Tennessee
B.S. PT- University of Tennessee
Ph.D. Exercise Physiology-University of Tennessee


B.S. PT- Russell Sage College
M.A. Exercise Physiology University of Central Florida
M.H.S. Neurology University of Florida


B.S. University of Washington
M.S. PT Boston University
Ph.D. Exercise Science University of Massachusetts


B.S. PT University of Florida
M.H.S University of Florida
Ph.D. Rehabilitation Science University of Florida











Thigpen, Mary, PT, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Specialization: Neurorehabilitation,
Motor Behavior, Geriatrics

Krista Vandenborne, PT, Ph.D.
Associate Professor & Chair
Specialization: Muscle Physiology,
Magnetic Imaging, Gene Therapy


B. Clinical/Adjunct Faculty


Chiara, Toni, Ph.D., M.H.S., MSPT
Adjunct Faculty
Specialization: Cardiopulmonary PT


Franceschi, Amy, PT
Adjunct Faculty
Specialization: Cardiopulmonary/Medical
Surgical Disorders

Gilliam, Jeff, PT, OCS
Adjunct Faculty
Specialization: Type 2 diabetes, obesity,
and exercise

Gray, Debra, DPT
Adjunct Faculty
Specialization: Management


Gregory, Chris, PT, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor
Specialization: Exercise


McDonald, Genn6
Clinical Lecturer
Specialization: Women's Health PT, Oncology

Miles, Philip, Ph.D.
Visiting Professor
Specialization: Physiology



Paterson, Cathy, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty
Specialization: Pharmacology

Pettie, Christina, PT
Adjunct Faculty
Specialization: Orthopedics


C. Tacachale/Adiunct Faculty


Arneus, Antonine, PT
Associate in Physical Therapy/Tacachale
Specialization: Geriatrics

Ellison, Debra, PT
Lecturer in Physical Therapy/Tacachale


B.S. PT Medical College of Georgia
M.H.S. Neurology-University of Florida
Ph.D. Health & Human Performance University of
Florida

Licentiate Physical Therapy and Motoric Revalidation
Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
Ph.D. Physical Therapy
Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium



B.S.-Biology California State University
M.S.-Physical Therapy University of Southern California
M.S.-Health Science University of Florida
Ph.D.-Rehabilitation Science University of Florida

B.S. PT University of Florida




B.S. Physical Therapy East Carolina University
M.H.S. University of Florida



B.S. Physical Therapy Wayne State University
M.A. Education University of Wisconsin
DPT Simmons College


B.S. Chemistry/Exercise Science University of Georgia
M.A. Exercise Physiology University of Georgia
M.S. Physical Therapy Texas Woman's University
Ph.D. Physiology University of Georgia

B.S. PT Oakland University



B.S. Biology Juniata College
M.S. Physiology and Biophysics West Virginia
University
Ph.D. Physiology and Biophysics West Virginia
University

B.S. Zoology University of Southern Mississippi
M.S. Zoology University of Southern Mississippi
Ph.D. Pharmacodynamics University of Florida

B.S. Rehabilitation Services University of Florida
B.S. Physical Therapy University of Florida
M.H.S. Health Administration University of Florida



B.H.S M.P.T University of Florida



Certificate in Physical Therapy Northwestern University
B.S., Secondary Education, Math










Fueyo, Eugene, PT
Associate in Physical Therapy/Tacachale
Specialization: Orthopedics

Leslie, Tim, PT
Assistant Program Director/Tacachale

Oren, Jodi, PT
Director of Physical Therapy/Tacachale
Specialization: Pediatrics

Victorian, Karen, PT
Assistant in Physical Therapy
Specialization: Adult Neuro

Emeritus Faculty
Finley, Claudette, M.S., PT
Associate Professor
Specialization: Gross Anatomy,
Injury & Repair-Joint Tissues

Fisher, Norma P., PT, MA.
Associate Professor
Specialization: Kinesiology

Wroe, Martha, PT, MA, FAPTA.
Professor
Specialization: Neuro Rehabilitation

D. Department of Physical Therapy Staff

NAME
Ellen Esparolini
Coordinator, Research Programs

Danielle Sevier
Coordinator, Admin Svcs.

Open
Coordinator, Academic Support Svcs.

Laurie Bialosky
Events, Information Specialist

Cindy Brent
Office Assistant


Kathleen Conture
Program Assistant

Carol Davis
Program Assistant


Gisella Gonzales
Program Assistant


Karen Jaye
PeopleSoft Travel Assistant


B.S. B.H.S., M.P.T. University of Florida
B.S. Zoology


B.H.S. PT University of Florida


B.S. Physical Therapy Boston University
M.A. Pathokinesiology/Developmental Disabilities NYU


B.S. Physical Therapy University of South Alabama




Certificate in PT-Baylor University
B.A.-Stetson University
M.S. Speech Pathology & Audiology- Vanderbilt
University

Certificate in PT-University of Pennsylvania
B.S.-Skidmore College
M.A. Education-University of Florida

Certificate in PT-University of Wisconsin
B.S.- Western State College
M.A.- PT-Stanford University


SPECIALTIES
Admissions processes for RSD program
Administrative contact for Department

Budget
Departmental Administration

Student Admissions & Academic Support


Organizes Academic Symposia, Educational Special
and Research Seminars

Departmental payroll and hiring of personnel


Coordinates Chair's calendar and travel
Assists with admissions process for RSD program


Manages Clinical Affiliations Database
Coordinates Immunization Records
Assists with Student Services

DPT student records and registration
Assists with Student Services


Departmental Travel










Karen Pulkkinen
Grants Specialist


Grants Management


Robert Zettlemoyer
Senior Fiscal Assistant

Student Assistants
Michelle Ditto
Amina Ellison
Courtney Trombetto
Yolanda White


Purchasing and Payables
Department property records

Front Desk


E. Student Physical Therapy Association Officers-Class of 2009
POSITION NAME EMAIL
President Lucas VanEtten vanette l@ufl.edu
Vice President Lindsey Waddell lwaddell@ufl.edu
Secretary Diane Jett djett06@ufl.edu
Treasurer Sara Zajac szajac@ufl.edu

F. Building Designation
The Health Center is composed of six Colleges and the Shands Hospital and Clinics. The abbreviations
used to designate buildings and rooms are:

HPNP- Public Health and Health Professions, Nursing, Pharmacy

CG- Communicore (Bio-Media Services) -north of MSB

MSB- Medical Science Bldg, located on north side of complex (Stetson Hall)

M- Main section building

C- East Wing

SH- Shands Hospital and Clinics, located on Archer Road (south side)

H- Main section of Hospital and connecting wing on MSB

A- Ambulant wing of hospital

D- Dental Sciences Building

Room Designation: The letter preceding the room indicates the building: two numbers indicate the room
if on the ground floor; in a three-number designation, the first number indicates the floor, i.e., H611
Hospital main section, sixth floor, M-228, Medical Science Building, second floor.










SECURITY

You will be provided access to a locker but will need to purchase a combination lock. Please keep your
valuables with you, or in your locker.

The Departmental offices and classrooms are locked from 5:00 p.m. until 7:30 a.m. The HPNP Building
is locked from 7:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. Building doors are not to be propped open.

Access to the building/lab rooms outside of regular hours: Students may access the building with their
GatorOne card. To have access to the PT rooms, students will fill out a form stating reason for room
opening (e.g. study for lab practical in soft tissue), any materials necessary for study sessions (e.g.
goniometers), requested hours. This form is given to the Curriculum Coordinator, Ms. Gloria Miller.
Once this is approved, the form goes to the Curriculum Coordinator who documents use of lab
rooms/conference room for the weekend. Students will need to make arrangements to have lab opened
with Teaching Assistant assigned to course.

The Health Center has limited access from 7:00 p.m. until 7:00 a.m. Six entrances will remain open all
times:

1. Main entrance to the hospital
2. Stetson Hall (Medical Science Building)
3. Dental building doors to west parking lot
4. Emergency Room
5. West loading dock to west parking lot
6. West entrance to Communicore building

During normal working hours, all other doors will be accessible.

Requests for police assistance, escort service, lost or stolen property should be reported to the Control
Center, 392-1111.


G. HEALTH CENTER FACILITIES AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS

1. The Health Center Library is one of the largest medical libraries in the United States. It is located on
the first, second and third floors of the Learning Resources Center. When using the library, you must
have your student I.D. card available since the library is usually limited to use of Health Center personnel
and students. Books and audio-visual instructional materials on reserve for the various professional
courses are in this library and should be requested from the librarian at the reserve desk.

Director: Faith Meakin
Hours: Monday through Thurs. 7:30 a.m. Midnight
Friday 7:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Sunday -1:00 p.m. Midnight

Holiday hours may vary. For an up-to-date schedule, check the library's website at:
http://www.library.health.ufl.edu/information/hours.htm










2. Health Center Campus Shop and Bookstore


The Campus Shop and Bookstore for the Health Center is located in the Medical Science Building,
ground floor (next to the Post Office). This bookstore carries all the texts for PHT courses, and other
student supplies. The Bookstore is also capable of ordering any texts that are "recommended" but not
required by Course Instructors. Title, author, publishing company, and ISBN# are helpful information in
ordering additional texts.

Hours: Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

3. Eating Facilities

The Hospital Cafeteria, located on the first floor of the Shands Hospital, is open to the staff, students,
patients and visitors. Located next to the cafeteria is a "Fast Food" area, which features Wendy's and
Pizza Inn. The Sun Terrace is located on the open-air plaza between the Medical Science Building and
Communicore on the first floor and includes sandwiches, salad bar, Chick-fil-A. The hours for Sun
Terrace are 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Vending machines are located in various areas throughout the Health
Center. The HPNP building has a large open area below the main auditorium for both indoor and outdoor
eating and meeting. Vending machines and the Java Hut are available. Eating in these buildings is
limited to the designated areas identified above. No eating or drinking is allowed in the HPNP
classrooms.

4. Smoking

Except in designated areas, the HPNP Building, Shands Hospital and the Health Science Center are non-
smoking areas.

5. Gift Shop

The gift shop is located on the first floor of Shands Hospital adjacent to the main entrance.
Hours: Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. 8:00 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday 1:00 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

6. Post Office

The Post Office is located on the ground floor of the Medical Science Building. It provides full postal
service for staff and students. A mailbox for stamped mail is located outside the main entrance to the
Hospital.

Hours: Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.

7. ATM Machines

One ATM machine is located in the HPNP building on the first floor of the PHHP wing. Three ATM
machines are located in the Health Center. One is on the first floor near the Atrium, the second is located
outside the entrance to the Health Center Credit Union on the ground floor of the hospital, and the third is
located across from the Sun Terrace, near the Foundations Building.

8. Newspapers

Newspapers are located in Shands Hospital lobby, Atrium, and first floor of the Dental wing.










9. Parking


Parking facilities adjacent to the Health Center are limited. Information regarding parking privileges,
regulations, and the purchase of decals can be found at www.parking.ufl.edu.

10. Lockers and public restrooms

Locker space is available for all PT students. Lockers are located on the first floor of the HPNP building
in the hallway of the physical therapy department. The physical therapy department will assign lockers to
students and the students are responsible for providing their own locks.

Restrooms are utilized by patients, students, faculty, and the public.

11. Name Tags

All students are required to purchase and wear photo identification tags (approximately $12.00) for use in
Shands Hospital and the Health Center. These must be worn at all times within the Health Center for
purposes of security and identification. The department will notify you when and where to have your tag
made after the fall term begins.

12. Bulletin Boards

Class bulletin boards are provided for student and faculty use. The student is responsible for checking
these daily for special and general notices and for messages.

13. Telephones/cell phones

Department and faculty telephones are not available for student use. Public phones are available in the
Health Center and Hospital lobbies. The department recognizes that cell phones are necessary for
communication. Students are required to turn phones off during class time as professional respect for
faculty, speakers, and peers.

14. Visitors

Members of your family are always welcome to visit the Department. Pre-arrangement when possible is
a courtesy.

15. Advisement/Counseling

Current student issues
All students are welcome to speak directly with the Assistant Chair at any time. If the Assistant
Chair is not available in the office, making an appointment via e-mail or voice mail is
appropriate. Concerns regarding individual courses should always be taken directly to the
course instructor.

The faculty is accessible to all students in the Department. Students may make an appointment
with a faculty member via e-mail, voice mail, or by directly visiting the office.










Counseling


Professional counseling is available at the Student Health Center for students experiencing
difficulty. The web page of www /,,, / ,/l J ,,lists the variety of services available. These
include counseling services for a variety of problems such as study skills, stress, and test-taking
skills, peer problems, marital stress, women's issues, multicultural concerns, alcohol and
substance abuse, etc. The University Counseling Center is located in Peabody Hall (392-1575).
Initial appointments must be made in person.

16. Participation in professional meetings

There are many opportunities for you to attend district, chapter, national and continuing education
meetings of the American Physical Therapy Association with the faculty, and other students. This will
allow you to start early in your career to increase your knowledge about the profession and influence
decisions about the future of the profession. Each student is required to attend one district, chapter,
or national meeting of the APTA before graduation. Students will be excused from classes to
attend, but are responsible for obtaining any missed classroom materials or information.


II. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

A. Class Attendance

Class attendance is considered to be an important aspect of professional behavior. Your attendance,
promptness, and participation is mandatory at all lectures, labs, clinics, conferences and meetings. If you
are unable to attend class or clinic due to illness or an unexpected situation, you are required to contact
the curriculum office at 273-6085. Secretarial staff will in turn post this information for faculty. Students
are expected to meet with individual instructors to make up assignments.

Tardiness is considered to be unprofessional and disruptive behavior. Therefore, the classroom door will
be locked at the start of class. Students will not be allowed to enter a class late, even if the lecture occurs
in a room with a door that cannot be locked. Tardy students will be allowed to enter the class during
break times, only. It is expected that if you are tardy for any class, you will apologize to the instructor
during the break or immediately after the class. In addition, individual faculty may outline additional
consequences for tardiness in their course syllabi.

The following procedure is for students that wish to miss class time for a "special function" occurring
during an academic semester. Examples of special functions include, but are not limited to, weddings,
birth of a child, conference attendance, job interview, and family reunions. The professional committee
makes the final decision in determining if an event qualifies as a special function and students should
approach the committee if there is a question about an event qualifying. For example, routine
appointments and family vacations are not considered special functions and should be scheduled for
outside of regular class time.

It is the student's responsibility to advance their learning while absent, with the assistance of their
classmates and instructors. First, the student must provide the information requested in the appropriate
template form (Appendix D) to the chair of the professionalism committee at least one (1) month before
the first day the student has proposed to miss class. It is the responsibility of the student to provide the
information earlier if travel arrangements must be made in advance of one month.

The chair of the professionalism committee will then communicate with the appropriate faculty and
professionalism committee members regarding the planned absence. Under normal circumstances, the










chair of the professionalism committee will render a decision within one (1) week of receiving the
request. If the request is approved, the student must provide additional information on how missing class
time will be accounted by completing the second half of the template form.

Specific guidelines for completing the student attendance template form are provided below:

Provide brief (1-2 sentences) description of function/event the student will be attending and
rationale for why student attendance warrants missing class time.
Provide dates that student will be out of classroom.
Provide date of return to classroom.
If approved, provide information on the following details
o Classes and instructors affected
o Fellow student who will be collecting information missed in class (if appropriate)
o How missed assignments and examination will be made up for each class and instructor
o Instructor initial plan indicating his/her approval of the absence and the plan for making
up work due to the absence

Please refer to the Appendix E for specific information on student attendance for 2008 Summer Session.


B. Policy regarding students with health and medical problems

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), accommodations will be made for
students with disabilities in the classroom, the laboratories, and on internships as needed. The student
must contact the individual faculty member and specify required accommodations in writing.
Written and practical examinations will be administered in a manner to promote optimum student
performance. Faculty in charge of clinical internships will make arrangements for clinical
accommodations upon request of the student.

Physical therapy students must meet the essential functions and technical standards required of the
majority of physical therapy positions, unless they have special considerations that the university is able
to accommodate under the "reasonable accommodations" of the ADA. These requirements are necessary
for both the clinical portion of academic courses and clinical internships. The requirements are as
designated below:

Communication skills:
Students must be able to communicate effectively with faculty, peers, coworkers, clients, patients and
other members of the healthcare team. Effective communication includes the ability to receive, interpret,
utilize and disseminate information via verbal, non-verbal, and written communication in a manner that is
comprehensible by colleagues, clients, and laypersons. It is required that students communicate in the
English language at a level consistent with competent professional practice, verbally and in writing
(manual and computer). Students must demonstrate the ability to sensitively and effectively communicate
with individuals with disabilities and/or from different social and cultural backgrounds.

Observation skills:
Students must be able to accurately observe the client's or patient's activity and behavior during
examinations and interventions as well as changes in status such as skin temperature and/or color, heart
rate, facial expression, muscle tone, breath sounds, and breathing rate or pattern. Students must also be
able to accurately observe and interpret demonstrations in the classroom, projected slides or overheads, x-
rays, and monitor dials on equipment.










Psychomotor skills:
Students must be able to develop proficiency in motor skills required for accurate examination,
evaluation, and intervention techniques. The student must demonstrate adequate locomotor ability to
allow them to physically maneuver to and from and within the classroom, lab, and clinical settings in a
timely manner. This includes the ability to quickly respond in emergency situations such as preventing a
patient's fall. Students must be able to safely and effectively manipulate or maneuver another person's
body and/or body parts to perform examination and intervention techniques and emergency procedures
(e.g., transfers, gait training, positioning, mobilization, exercise, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of
tools such as goniometer, blood pressure cuff, stethoscope, etc.). Students must be able to perform
physical therapy examination and intervention procedures in a manner that is consistent with the
American Physical Therapy Association's (APTA) Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Professional
Practice.

Students must be able to perform the physical demands required by the majority of clinical settings in
which physical therapists practice. These physical demands include the ability to:

Continuously (67-100% of workday) utilize gross and fine motor hand coordination with repetitive
motions such as simple and firm grasp tasks requiring manual dexterity.
Frequently (34%-66% of workday) stand, walk, climb stairs, reach, squat, twist, bend and lift and carry
items up to 30 pounds for a distance of at least 30 feet. Also, must be able to exert push/pull forces up to
24 pounds for distances up to 50 feet.
Occasionally (up to 33% of workday) kneel, crawl, and reach above shoulder level, as well as lift and
carry items between 10 and 40 pounds for a distance of at least 30 feet. Also must be able to exert
push/pull forces of up to 30 pounds for distances up to 50 feet.

Cognitive/Intellectual skills:
Students must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze, synthesize, and apply large amounts of
information in a short period of time. Students must be able to understand and apply principles, theory,
and research to physical therapy practice. Students must demonstrate the ability to think critically and
problem-solve. Students must have the ability to accurately self-assess and reflect on their own
performance.

Behavioral/Affective skills:
Students must possess and demonstrate a level of emotional health and maturity that allows the full use of
their intellectual capabilities, the use of good judgment, the ability to effectively handle physically,
emotionally, or intellectually stressful situations. This includes the ability to adjust and adapt to changing
situations or uncertainty in the academic or clinical environment. Students must also demonstrate a
commitment to working with individuals with physical and cognitive deficits from a variety of age
groups, cultures, socioeconomic status, without bias.

If a student is limited or prohibitedfrom performing the essential functions & technical standards
noted above because of injury, illness or pregnancy, the student must request that his/her healthcare
provider complete the "Health/Medical Condition Restrictions Form" outlining the student's current
limitations and the expected timeframe of limitations. Each individual situation will be evaluated to
determine whether the student is able to continue in the clinical/academic portion of the curriculum and
whether reasonable accommodations (short term and/or permanent) can be made.










C. Financial obligations

Full-time internship and part-time clinical experience financial obligations

Students should be prepared for reasonable transportation, lodging and food costs associated with all
internships and half day/full day experiences. Half-day and full-day experiences will be located within a
60-mile radius of Gainesville. Internship placements are determined by computerized matching. There is
no guarantee that the student will be placed in Gainesville or the surrounding area. Approximately 60%
of the placements are outside of Gainesville, with 10-20% of those out of state. Students must purchase
professional liability insurance prior to their clinical experiences. The approximate cost is $15.00 for a
yearly student blanket policy. Students will need liability insurance for all three years in the PT program.

D. Health Insurance/Hospitalization/Infirmary Services

1. Required University immunization:
All students are required to meet the immunization policy of the University of Florida in order to
register. This includes measles, mumps and rubella (MMR). Although there is a record of these
University required immunizations at the university infirmary, the student is required to provide
duplicate documentation in our department.

2. Hepatitis B:
In addition, the University requires all students working with patients to be vaccinated for Hepatitis B
prior to patient contact. You must have completed the three shot series (which takes approximately 6
months) prior to the beginning of Summer term C, 2008. The cost of this immunization is
approximately $155. It is available at cost to students at the Student Infirmary, or the Public Health
Department, or you may elect to initiate the series through your local physician.

3. TB test (PPD):
Students are required to have annual TB tests. The first TB test results must be submitted to our office
by the start of Summer Session, 2008. TB tests are available through the UF Infirmary for $15.00.
Documentation of immunization/results are required prior to your first clinic assignment.

4. Health Insurance/Hospitalization:
All students must show documentation of health insurance that provides hospitalization coverage
valid in the event of illness while on full time clinical internships. This requirement must be met
prior to the first full time internship and the student must have proof of this coverage during all full
time internships.

5. CPR certification:
All students are required to have basic CPR certification (for the healthcare provider) by mid term of
Spring 2008. Certification must be kept current.

6. HIV/AIDS Course:
Completion of a 4 hour HIV/AIDS and OSHA Course are required prior to the first full time
internship, Spring 2008. (This will be provided in your academic coursework).

7. Additional requirements:
Each clinical site may have additional criteria that the student must comply with (e.g. current medical
exam, FIT test, background check). Students are reminded that while on clinical internship they must
comply with all university and hospital or clinical policies.
It is the student's responsibility to provide the Program Assistant (primary assignment
Clinical Education) with copies of all medical requirements.











7. Chicken Pox- Must be verified within 2 weeks of starting the first fall term. Students must fill out a
form verifying that they have had chicken pox or the vaccine. The form is located on page 45
(Appendix C).

8. HIPAA 101 Anyone who has a UF GatorOne card must complete this online course, print the
certificate and give to the clinical program assistant. Students will be given information for HIPAA
training during orientation.

9. Anatomical Board Statement of Understanding All GatorOne holders must fill out "Pledge of
Respect". This form will be presented to students during their first session of Functional Anatomy.

E. General Housekeeping and Clean-Up: participation in keeping the classrooms and labs neat and
orderly, as well as participating in the laundering of linens is representative of responsibility and
professional behavior.

Drinking and eating Beverages are allowed in the classroom, and can be consumed under the
following conditions: 1) beverage is in a covered container; and 2) beverage is consumed during lecture
session. Food is allowed in the classroom, and can be consumed under the following conditions: 1) with
explicit permission of the individual faculty during lecture session; and 2) on break time. Beverages and
food are not allowed during laboratory sessions. The faculty will revoke the students' right to have
beverages and food if the classrooms are not kept clean.

General room cleaning All students are expected to clean up after themselves in any classroom area
being utilized. This includes the disposal of beverages, food, trash, newspapers, the cleaning of mats,
plinths, and work areas. In addition, supplies will be provided so that the floors can be swept and the
mats can be cleaned twice per week. The student responsible for ensuring supplies are maintained and
duties performed will be identified in bold type on the schedule. Set-up and clean-up teams will be
assigned by the laundry schedule and explicitly communicated to all students by email and/or the class
syllabus. Students should take the initiative to contact the instructor and/or teaching assistant to
determine set-up/clean-up needs during their assigned weekss.

Linen All students will be assigned to assist with the laundering of linens and lab coats used in anatomy
lab. Washer, dryer, and laundering materials are available in the lab.

Failure to participate in these assigned duties will negatively impact faculty assessment of student
professional behavior.

G. Dress standards

1. General Information:

As a physical therapy student, each of you represents the profession of Physical Therapy. Your
conduct and appearance indicate your respect for the profession and engender in others an image
of physical therapy.

Professional appearance and behavior are expected at all times in the classrooms and laboratories.
Faculty and staff will regularly assess students' professional appearance and behavior with a
standard instrument. The following guidelines are intentionally broad and will be interpreted and
enforced in a manner determined by the faculty of the physical therapy department. Further, the
faculty is free to change these guidelines without prior notice to students although every effort
will be made to provide such notice.











Classes are held in the HPNP Building and the Health Science Center. This means that you will
have considerable contact with patients and their families, the public and other professionals. It is
your responsibility to support the high standards of the Department of Physical Therapy.
Due to the clinical nature of your education and the patient contacts that you will be making, we
ask that your fingernails be clean at all times, and that they be short enough to be invisible when
viewed from the palm of the hand. For the women if nail polish is worn, it should be colorless.
In addition, when in a laboratory or clinical setting, your hair must be of a length or styled in
ways that will prevent it from falling forward over the patients or equipment or supplies. (If your
hair is long, it must be securely fastened at the back of the neck, or worn up).

2. Dress Code:

The student will portray the well-groomed appearance of a responsible health professional. Hair
will be clean and neat, and in the case of both men and women, will not be excessively long. Hats
are not acceptable in the classrooms and laboratories. Exceptions to the dress code will only be
made for religious and cultural reasons. Students not adhering to the dress code will be asked by
the instructor to leave the classroom. Students are then expected to return to the classroom with
proper dress, within a reasonable amount of time.

Improper attire in lecture, clinical, laboratory settings is considered unprofessional. Improper
attire will be reason for exclusion from class, clinic, conferences, seminars, etc. The student will
be responsible for making arrangements to make up time lost due to such an instance. Please do
not place faculty or staff in the embarrassing position of having to ask you to leave due to
improper attire. Disregard for the dress policy will result in documentation on the student's
professional assessment, a written letter in your file, and ultimately, inability to progress in or
expulsion from the physical therapy program.

Lecture Dress

Gender-specific guidelines for lecture dress are as follows:

Men: Shirts must have collars (actual or banded) and sleeves. Shirts must be tucked in unless
they are specifically designed to be untucked and still remain professional in appearance (i.e., not
expose inappropriate skin area at any time). Casual dress slacks are required, while jeans are not
acceptable. Clean tennis or running shoes, or any other closed-toed shoes are required. Jewelry
should be kept to a minimum, both in size and quantity. Nose or eyebrow rings are not
acceptable.

Women: Shirts should have sleeves; however, a "professional looking" sleeveless blouse is
acceptable. Shirts must be tucked in or be clearly designed to be untucked and still remain
professional in appearance (i.e., not expose inappropriate skin area at any time.). Casual dress
slacks are required, while jeans are not acceptable. Closed-toed shoes are required, such as clean
tennis or running shoes. Heels on footwear should be kept to 2" or less. Jewelry should be kept
to a minimum, both in size and quantity. Nose or eyebrow rings are not acceptable.

On days when students have anatomy lab, clean scrubs are acceptable for lecture dress, unless
specifically indicated by the instructor (i.e. for a guest lecturer).










Clinical Affiliation Dress


All students are to be in clinic attire when attending clinics. Students who are participating in
assigned projects in the clinic are to be in clinic attire. You are asked to refrain from visits to the
clinic unless you have specific assignment there.

Most clinicians wear business casual clothes (collared shirts & slacks). You may be asked to
adopt the uniform of the clinic to which you will be assigned. Clean professional closed-toe &
closed-heel shoes are required (no sandals).

No jewelry except a watch, small, conservative, and non-distracting earrings, wedding ring or
engagement ring is to be worn when in uniform. No facial jewelry is allowed when in the clinic
setting. Rings should be removed and secured in a pocket as they may cause discomfort to the
patient.

Excessive perfume or cologne is unacceptable. Even small amounts may be prohibited in the
clinic, as it can be offensive/irritating to patients with allergies/sensitivities.

General Laboratory Dress

Laboratory dress is the same for men and women. Gym or khaki shorts are required; jean shorts
or "cut-offs" are not acceptable. All shorts must have an inseam of 4 inches or more. A UF PT
T-shirt (grey or blue) that allows for modesty and free movement is also required. T-shirts that
are appropriate to wear in lab are only those provided by the department. Any other T-shirt is not
acceptable for wear in lab, even if it has a UF, Physical Therapy or PHHP logo. Women will
need to wear a sports bra, halter-top or a bathing wear top that exposes the scapulae and may be
unfastened at the back.

Athletic shoes with socks are required. Nails (fingers and toes) must be kept clean and trimmed.
Bathing suits may be necessary for some labs where palpation of bony landmarks is required.

Anatomy Laboratory Dress

Participation in anatomy laboratory involves exposure to preserved body parts and chemical
odors. Although regular dress is acceptable, scrubs are the best alternative for anatomy
laboratory. Furthermore, a laboratory coat is required for participation in anatomy laboratory.
The lab coat must be worn over your regular dress or scrubs in anatomy laboratory.

Casual Days

Exceptions to the described dress code will be made for departmentally approved casual days,
some of which can be "theme-based". Students are responsible for generating requests of themes
and dates for casual days through the SPTA president. Then, the chair of the professionalism
committee will approve specific themes and dates for casual days after meeting with the SPTA
president. This procedure must be completed within the first 2 weeks of a new semester.

There are no hard and fast rules for casual days, but all students will be expected to follow the
given parameters for a given day. For example, acceptable attire may include jeans, shorts,
sandals, flip-flops, and/or t-shirts depending on the day. Acceptable themes may include alumni
day, games day, etc. Furthermore, students may use casual days as a way to raise nominal (less
than $6 per student) amounts of money for SPTA sponsored causes or events (i.e. Nicaragua










Project, Pitt-Marquette Challenge, etc.). Students not participating in a given casual day should
adhere to the standards of the lecture and laboratory dress codes, as described in this handbook.

First year students are not eligible for casual days. Casual days are a privilege earned by students
in the 2nd and 3rd year classes, only. Furthermore, students are expected to follow the basic tenets
of professional dress even on casual days. Casual dress should be "casual", but not revealing,
vulgar, or shoddy. The faculty reserves the right to cancel, modify, or revoke casual days as
warranted by student behavior.

Other Dress Code Guidelines

Nametags are required for all practical sessions. Dress (lecture vs. lab) for practical sessions are
at the discretion of the instructor.

In instances when a class has combined sessions (i.e. lecture and lab), it is the discretion of the
instructor whether lecture or lab dress is required. The instructor will provide this information to
the students by class announcement and through the class syllabus.

The dress code will not be enforced during reading days and finals week.

H. Library orientation

Library orientation occurs during orientation day for new students in Physical Therapy and will be
scheduled by the administrative staff.

I. UFL e-mail address

All students are required to have a UFL e-mail address for use with academic coursework and
responsibilities. Students should go to the UF web page www.gatorlink.ufl.edu to set up their gator
link account, access to UF e-mail password, and internet access. E-mail addresses must be first letter
of first name and first seven letters of last name if at all possible. UF e-mail should not be forwarded
to another account, as independent accounts frequently get full and do not allow for the addition of
new e-mails. These policies exist to improve communication between faculty, staff, and students.

It is the responsibility of the student to check e-mail on a daily basis, both when in the academic
program and on internships. There will be no e-mail correspondence between faculty and students
later than 6 pm for requirements for the following day.

J. Computer access

Per University of Florida policy, all students should have individual computer access. Students will
be expected to access computers for:
Course websites, assignments, syllabus, communications
Daily e-mail communication both individually and by group
Web searches
Additional areas as assigned

The faculty of the Department of Physical Therapy recognizes that classroom laptop use has the potential
to enhance learning, as well as to distract from learning. The follow policy outlines student laptop use
during class:










Students are permitted to use personal laptops for class when allowed by the course instructor. The
course instructor reserves the right to prohibit laptop use privileges during class times. Students shall lose
laptop privileges if content becomes disruptive to classmates or if it is used for unrelated course
objectives. The definition of "use unrelated to course objectives" includes, but is not limited to use of
instant messaging, chat rooms, games, surfing the net, etc. Acceptable uses include taking notes,
accessing course-related documents (on or off line), following along with power point documents or class
demonstrations, course-related internet searches, and performing class projects. Students are permitted to
use laptops during breaks and between classes for "use unrelated to course objectives", but this use must
terminate when class resumes.

Students will sign a statement acknowledging understanding of this policy before classroom use of
laptops (see Appendix). This signed form will be kept in their file as record of understanding. Student
violation of this policy will result in that individual's loss of classroom laptop use privilege for the rest of
the time spent in the program.


K. Current contact information

All students are responsible for keeping the faculty and administrative staff updated as to their current
information re:
Phone contact: local, cell, and permanent
E-mail address
Address: local and permanent
Person to contact in emergency
Please give this information to Gisella Gonzales, Program Assistant. Please send directly to Ms.
Gonzales at gg74@phhp.ufl.edu.










III. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY
GRADING SYSTEM

A. Grading Scale:
Students must maintain a "B" average (3.0) during the two years of their professional PT
curriculum. Students with a GPA less than a 3.00 in their major will not be able to graduate.

93-100 = A 4.00 grade point
90-92 =A- 3.67 grade point
87-89 =B+ 3.33 grade point
83-86 =B 3.00 grade point
80-82 =B- 2.67 grade point
77-79 =C+ 2.33 grade point
73-76 =C 2.00 grade point
70-72 =C- 1.67 grade point
67-69 =D+ 1.33 grade point
63-66 =D 1.00 grade point
60-62 =D- 0.67 grade point
Below 60 = E 0 grade point

Students are expected to take ALL exams and practical as scheduled, unless prior approval is obtained
from the course instructor. In the event of extraordinary circumstances, the course instructor must be
notified directly and documentation must follow before a make-up may be scheduled and/or excuses
absence will be permitted.

All academic and clinical coursework must be successfully completed in sequence. Failure to complete a
course in sequence may cause a student to wait a full year before resuming the program.

B. Professional Behavior:

Professional Behavior: Professional behavior is critical for a successful transition from the classroom to
the clinical setting. The faculty recognizes the importance of this by incorporating the development and
evaluation of professional behavior into each academic course. All students must attain developmentally
appropriate levels of professionalism on the University of Florida's Professionalism Development Tool
(PDT). Student performance on the PDT will be determined by behaviors in the classroom and lab.
Additional feedback will be provided by peers, instructors, and teaching assistants. Students will use the
PDT to formally self-evaluate their professional behavior and participate in professionalism teams, with
peers, faculty, and clinicians.

Students will attain a level of "beginner" professional behavior by the end of semester 2, just prior to two
semesters of part-time clinical experiences; a level of "developing" professional behavior by the end of
the middle of the fifth semester, just prior to first full time clinical experience, and "entry-level"
professional behavior by the end of semester six, just prior to three full time internships. Failure to do so
will prevent the student from advancing in the curriculum.

C. Academic Progression, Probation, and Dismissal

Academic Progression
Students in the physical therapy program must demonstrate competence in both academic and clinical
components of the curriculum in order to progress. Academic competence is demonstrated through
satisfactory performance in coursework, assignments, and practical exams. Students must pass all safety
requirements on practical exams by 100% in order to progress and must score at least 80% on other










requirements. If a student must repeat a practical exam for any reason, the highest grade the student may
obtain for that exam is 80%. Students may repeat a practical only one time. If a student does not pass on
the second attempt, the student must appeal to the Progressions Committee for a third chance. Failure on a
third chance, if granted, will result in an "E" for the course.

For policy regarding clinical internship courses, please see under that heading on page 28.

Academic Probation

Any student who earns less than a 3.00 cumulative GPA at the conclusion of any semester will be placed
on academic probation. A student receiving academic probation at the end of the semester must meet
with the Assistant Chair during the first week of the subsequent semester to discuss a plan to improve
future performance. If the cumulative GPA is not a 3.0 by the end of the subsequent semester, the student
will be dismissed from the program.

A student who makes a grade of "D" or "D+" in any course must repeat the course for credit the next time
it is offered and will be on probation. The student must receive a grade of "C" or better to progress
academically. If the student receives a grade below a "C" on retake, the student will be dismissed.

A student who makes a subsequent "D" in another course, after a first "D" has been successfully
remediated, will be dismissed from the program.

Any student, who receives an "unsatisfactory" grade in a clinical course graded on an "S-U" basis, will be
placed on probation. A "U" in a course graded on an "S-U" basis is equivalent to a "D". Students may
also be placed on probation in the case of inappropriate professional behavior, inclusive but not limited to
attendance and submission of course assignments. The course instructor of any such student will notify
the Assistant Chair who, in turn, will notify the student in writing of his/her probationary status and
implications of that status.

Academic Dismissal
A student will be dismissed if:
1. An "E" is received in any course
2. Two "Ds" are received
3. Failure to progress in the professional behaviors outlined in the Student Clinical
Performance Instrument (SCPI), given feedback and opportunity to remediate
4. Failure to maintain a 3.0 after 2 semesters

Please see the special rules concerning clinical internship courses in the next section.

D. Professionalism Progression, Warning, Probation, and Dismissal

Professionalism Progression
Students in the physical therapy program must demonstrate competence in professional behavior in order
to progress through the curriculum. This is demonstrated through satisfactory performance in five core
areas: responsibility, communication, stress management, critical thinking, and professional development.
Students must consistently demonstrate professional behavior in each of these areas in order to progress
through the physical therapy curriculum.

Professionalism Warning
A letter of warning will be given to any student who does not demonstrate progression of professional
behavior or entry level professional behavior at the end of any semester. The intent of the letter of
warning is to notify the student of less than satisfactory progress for professional behavior, the specifics










of the behavior(s) that are ineffective, and the potential for probation in subsequent semesters. A student
receiving a letter of warning must immediately meet with the Assistant Chair to discuss a plan to improve
future performance.

Professionalism Probation
Any student who receives 2 letters of warning for professional behavior will be placed on probation. This
student must meet with the Assistant Chair, who will notify the student in writing of his/her probationary
status and implications of that status.

Professionalism Dismissal
A student will be dismissed from the physical therapy program if:
1. A 3rd letter of warning is issued.
2. Failure to progress in the professional behaviors outlined in the checklist has been
consistently documented.









POLICIES REGARDING CLINICAL INTERNSHIP COURSES


Unsatisfactory Performance of Clinical Internship:

A student who performs unsatisfactorily on a clinical internship will be placed on probation. The
Assistant Chair will be notified by the ACCE of any such student and the student will be notified in
writing of the probationary status and implications of that status.

The ACCE will choose one of two ways to deal with unsatisfactory performance of a clinical internship.

If the student has limited skills that are deficient, the ACCE will recommend remediation. Examples of a
limited number of deficient skills include:
Unsatisfactory performance in any ONE of the five critical skills in the Clinical Performance
Instrument (CPI) (1-5)
Failure to meet minimum grading criteria on less than 10% of skills in grading criteria
Remediation will require additional reading, projects, clinical work, etc. Each remedial experience is
specifically tailored to the student's individual deficiencies. During the remedial period, the student will
have an Incomplete ("I") in the clinical internship. The student will take an active role in establishing a
learning contract that clearly outlines satisfactory performance for this remedial period. Both the student
and the ACCE will sign the learning contract as an agreement of the terms of remediation. If the
remediation is completed satisfactorily during the time period designated, the student will receive an "S"
in the clinical internship. If the remediation is not satisfactorily completed, the student will receive a "U".

Students may also receive a "U" (unsatisfactory) in the internship without recommendation for
remediation. Examples of a "U" without recommendation for remediation include:
Failure to meet minimum grading criteria on greater than 10% of skills in grading criteria
Failure of the student to apply feedback given by both clinical instructor (CI) and Academic
Coordinator of Clinical Education (ACCE) on skills identified as deficient at midterm.
Failure to make significant progress on skills identified as deficient at midterm

A student who receives a "U" on a clinical internship will have one, and only one, opportunity to repeat
the internship, provided that the student successfully completes the assigned remedial work (see
remediation above). As above, the student will take an active role in establishing a learning contract that
clearly outlines satisfactory performance for this remedial period. If the remediation is not completed
satisfactorily and in the time period designated, the student will not have the opportunity to repeat the
internship and the student will be dismissed from the program.

The faculty will recommend dismissal of a student from the program on the following grounds:

1) If a student receives a "U" in a repeated clinical internship.
2) If a student receives a "U" in a subsequent clinical internship after having remediated a
prior clinical internship.
3) Failure to progress in the professional behaviors outlined in the Clinical Performance
Instrument (CPI), given feedback and opportunity to remediate.










POLICIES REGARDING THE APPEAL PROCESS AND READMISSION


Appeal Process:

A student who is dismissed from the program for academic or professional reason may exercise the right
to appeal by petition. The petition is directed to the Progression Committee of the Department and is in
the form of a letter stating the reasons the student should be allowed to repeat the course or be reinstated
in the class. This committee will act on the petition and give the recommendation to the Assistant Chair.
The Assistant Chair may uphold the recommendation or overrule the recommendation. If the decision
remains for dismissal, the student may then petition the Chair of the department. If that petition is
unsuccessful, the student may appeal in writing within one week to the College Academic Progression
Committee (APC), chaired by the Associate Dean of the college. The Committee will review both the
Chair's decision and the student's concerns and make a determination about academic or professional
probation/dismissal. In the event the APC does not reach consensus, the Associate Dean will make the
decision. Both the student and Chair have the further right to appeal to the Dean, who, upon appeal, will
review the case in its entirety and make a final college decision concerning academic or professional
probation/dismissal.

Upon successful petition at any of the above steps, and on a space-available basis, the student will be
placed on academic or professional probation and will be allowed to repeat the required course or be
reinstated in the program. Following completion of this course with a grade of C or higher, the student
will continue in the program. If, however, the student again receives a D+ or lower, the student will be
dismissed from the Program.

In the case of professional issues, if the student receives another professional warning, the student will be
dismissed from the program. If a student w ithdra\ s from a Health Professions major, the student will be
offered assistance in choosing another major at the university.










FACULTY'S RESPONSIBILITY TO DETER DISHONESTY


Students are responsible for abiding by the Code of Student Conduct and the Academic Honesty
Guidelines as presented in the University of Florida Student Guide.

Faculty members have been asked by the University President and the Student Court to take preventive
measures to discourage academic dishonesty and the Student Court has stated, "students may also be
called upon to detect academic violations".

Faculty members have been asked by both the administration and students to consider the use of proctors
during examinations. Other recommendations are use of alternate key systems and assurance that
physical security measures are adequate in offices and in reproduction of examination.

Students observing academic dishonesty should report to the faculty member teaching the course who, in
turn, should report to the Dean for Student Judicial Affairs.

The Health Center Student Conduct Standards Committee is a Presidentially appointed committee
comprised of four faculty members and one student member from each of the Health Center Colleges.
Cases of academic dishonesty occurring in the Health Center Colleges are also referred by faculty
members to the Dean for Student Judicial Affairs, P202 Peabody Hall, 392-1261. If, after consultation
with the faculty, it is determined that a hearing is necessary to resolve the allegations against the student,
the committee is convened as follows: three faculty members and one student member from the college of
the accused student and one faculty member from another Health Center college.

Prior to the hearing, the student will be advised of rights and privileges under the Student Conduct Code
by the Office of Student Judicial Affairs. If, after a hearing by the Health Center Student Conduct
Standards Committee, the student is adjudicated guilty, the committee shall recommend one or more
sanctions to the Dean for Student Services, P202 Peabody Hall, who will take final action. Sanctions can
range from Reprimand and a failing grade in the course to Expulsion from the University.

For further information regarding the disciplinary process, consult The Student Guide or contact the
Director of Student Judicial Affairs.

HONOR CODE: Honor Codes have been shown to be effective deterrents to cheating. The Honor Code
is a pledge all students should sign on work submitted for a grade. The Code provides that on all work
submitted for credit by students at the University, the following pledge is either expressed or implied:
"On my honor, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid in doing this assignment".










Academic Honesty Guidelines


The conduct set forth hereinafter constitutes a violation of the Academic Honesty Guidelines. Those
adjudged to have committed such conduct shall be subject to the penalties listed in paragraph XI of the
Student Conduct Code.

ALL OF THE VIOLATIONS BELOW RELATE TO COMPUTER GENERATED CLASS
ASSIGNMENTS, PAPERS, AND EXAMINATIONS, AS WELL AS THOSE ASSIGNMENTS,
PAPERS, AND EXAMINATIONS THAT ARE HANDWRITTEN OR TYPED.

Taking of Information copying graded homework assignments from another student; working together
with another individuals) on a take-home test or homework when not specifically permitted by the
teacher; looking or attempting to look at another student's paper during an examination; looking or
attempting to look at text or notes during an examination when not permitted.

Tendering of Information giving your work to another student to be used or copied; giving someone
answers to exam questions either when the exam is being given or after taking an exam; informing
another person of questions that appear or have appeared on a previous exam; giving or selling a term
paper or other written materials to another student.

Plagiarism copying homework answers from your text to hand in for a grade; quoting text or other
written materials submitted to a teacher when requested by the teacher to present your own work; handing
in a paper as your own work which was purchased from a term paper service; retyping a friend's paper
and handing it in as your own work; taking a paper from fraternity files and handing it in as your own
work; copy sentences directly from a book without giving the author credit.

Conspiracy planning with one or more persons to commit any form of academic dishonesty, including
but not limited to, giving your term paper to another student who you know will plagiarize it.

Misrepresentation having another student do your class assignment and handing it in as your own
work; lying to a teacher to increase your grade; or any other act or omission with intent to deceive a
teacher as to the authorship of oral or written materials submitted or presented to a teacher which would
affect your grade.

Bribery offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting money or any item or service to a teacher or any other
person so as to gain academic advantage for yourself or another.










IV. AWARDS


COLLEGE LEVEL AWARDS & SCHOLARSHIPS
Dean's Scholar Award
This award is given to the most outstanding undergraduate and graduate student scholar in the College of
Public Health and Health Professions. The criteria for this award are outstanding community and
university service and leadership, leadership potential as indicated by participation in professional
organizations, and excelling in clinical, research, or other professionally related activities. Please note
students must have completed at least one year in the program and preference is usually given to
graduating students.

Shands Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship
Shands Auxiliary awards scholarships based upon availability of funds. When given, these awards are for
students who have completed at least one semester in the program and will remain in the program
throughout the calendar year, therefore graduating students are not eligible. Applicants must have a
strong commitment to the ideals and endeavors of his/her chosen profession, demonstrate financial need,
and have average or better grades.

Judson Clements Jr. Scholarship
The Judson Clements Jr. Scholarship is awarded based on available funds, therefore more than one may
be awarded each year. Candidates are those College of Public Health and Health Professions students
who have demonstrated strong leadership qualities through service to their community, school, church,
etc. Consideration is given for demonstrated financial need and current or former residents of Duval
County, Florida are given preference.

DEPARTMENTAL LEVEL AWARDS & SCHOLARSHIPS
Physical Therapy Department Outstanding Scholastic Student Award
The Department of Physical Therapy initiated an award for scholarship in 1972. This award is based on a
student's grade point average in the Physical Therapy entry-level program and is presented at the Physical
Therapy Department Graduation Banquet. The award consists of a certificate and check. The awardee's
name is added to a master plaque that is permanently displayed in the Department of Physical Therapy.

Department of Physical Therapy Martha C. Wroe Outstanding Clinical Performance Award
Outstanding clinical performance is recognized as a highly valued achievement. The faculty recognizes a
student each year that has been supported by all of the clinical preceptors as a deserving recipient. The
award consists of a certificate and check. The awardee's name is added to the master plaque that is
retained in the Department of Physical Therapy.

Julia Conrad Troianowski Scholarship
A $500 scholarship is awarded annually to an outstanding entry-level student with a GPA in physical
therapy coursework of at least 3.65. Additional criteria include excellent clinical skills as demonstrated
on laboratory and practical examinations. The student must also be recognized by his/her colleagues as a
caring, compassionate, & highly principled person of outstanding character. The student must
demonstrate financial need by completing the application form of the College of Public Health and Health
Professions available at http://www.phhp.ufl.edu/education/aid-form.html.










Frederick Family Scholarship
Bill and Mary Ann Frederick established the Frederick Family Scholarship in Physical Therapy to endow
scholarships for students in the physical therapy department. An award of up to $1,500.00 will be given
to a student in the entry-level program. The entry-level student is nominated by his/her peers during the
spring semester. Criteria for selection includes treating others with positive regard, dignity, and respect,
dependability when given responsibilities by peers and faculty, and showing good judgment in decisions
particularly those that have an impact on peers.

The Claudette Finley Scholarship Award
The Claudette Finley Scholarship Award was established by the Class of 1999 in recognition of Ms.
Finley who has taught anatomy for 35 years while a faculty member in the Department of Physical
Therapy. The class initiated this recognition and in consultation with the University of Florida
Foundation established the award and secured contributions from the alumni of this program prior to their
graduation in the Spring of 1999. The award of up to $500.00 will be presented to an entry-level student
annually during their second year in the physical therapy program. Selection of the student will be based
on criteria that include excellence as a student in the anatomy courses, willingness to teach others in the
anatomy courses, demonstrated financial need, and participation in campus and/or community activities.

The Dr. Mark H. Trimble Memorial Scholarship Award
The Dr. Mark H. Trimble Memorial Scholarship Award was established in Dr. Trimble's honor following
his untimely death in February of 2001. Dr. Trimble was an Assistant Professor in the Department of
Physical Therapy from 1994-2001 and taught in the area of orthopedics. This scholarship recognizes a
student who has demonstrated excellence and a strong commitment to the learning and development of
clinical skills in orthopedics and has shown initiative and self-reliance in his or her studies, assignments,
and responsibilities in the entry-level master's program. The award of up to $500.00 will be presented
annually to the student at the end of their second year in the entry-level program.

Student awards and honors are presented at the College of Public Health and Health Professions
Scholarship Convocation held at the end of the spring semester.










V. GRADUATION BANQUET COMMENCEMENT AND LICENSING


GRADUATION BANQUET

The Department of Physical Therapy plans and coordinates a special graduation banquet or brunch at the
completion of the program in the spring semester. At the ceremony, the Barbara C. White Lecture Award
is given to the invited graduation speaker and the graduates are recognized. All scholarship and award
recipients are also recognized at this time. All graduates and their guests are invited to participate.

COMMENCEMENT

The official College of Public Health and Health Professions commencement ceremony for the graduating
students is held at the end of the Spring Semester. All students are encouraged to participate in the
commencement exercises, which includes wearing the cap and gown and the awarding of the clinical
doctoral degree by Department Chair or representative.

PHYSICAL THERAPY LICENSING EXAM

Please note that once you receive your degree, you will become eligible to take the licensure exam. It is
illegal to practice physical therapy without a license, therefore, you must secure a license according to the
requirements of the state in which you wish to begin practicing physical therapy. The Florida State Board
of Physical Therapy regulates licensure in the state of Florida. Other specific requirements for licensure
vary slightly among states. You can begin to explore the requirements for each state by reviewing
information provided on the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy (FSBPT) website
(http://www.fsbpt.org/licensing/index.asp). Please note that these requirements are modified frequently
so you must be sure to get up to date and accurate information at the time of your graduation. The
licensure exam is a computerized exam with criterion referenced scoring, which is the same for all states.

Current licensure and examination fees in the state of Florida are approximately $870.00.










Appendices










Appendix A:


Clinical Education
University of Florida
Department of Physical Therapy
Philosophy and Policies

Philosophy
The clinical education opportunities at the University of Florida are integral parts of the
educational process in that they provide the student with opportunities to integrate clinical
practice with basic science, physical therapy theories, and critical thinking. Clinical education
experiences are designed to allow students to use acquired knowledge, attitudes, psychomotor
skills, and problem solving to attain professional competency. Expectations of initial and
subsequent experiences are structured to build on previous knowledge.

Policy: Competency
The grading criteria, using the Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI), targets the skills to be
mastered on the full time clinical education internships. The grading criteria are clearly defined
to allow students to work independently towards their expectations, utilizing the opportunities
available at that clinical education site. Professional competency for an entry-level therapist is
defined as being effective, consistent, and safe with the skills defined as the minimum criteria.
The skills required of an entry-level ithe/,,i 't involve evaluation and treatment of patients across
a wide spectrum of ages, diagnoses, and health care settings. Sites for entry-level education are
selected and maintained to meet the entry-level needs of the students. Specialization in a specific
area is not an expectation or a desired outcome of entry-level education.

Policy: Clinical settings, sites, and supervision
Clinical education experiences provide the student with opportunities to practice and perform
professional responsibilities with appropriate supervision, professional role modeling, and a
variety of patients and learning experiences. These experiences require effective communication
between clinical and academic faculty, written agreements between the academic institution and
clinical centers outlining responsibilities of each party, and standardized education of clinical
faculty. Clinical centers that demonstrate the aforementioned criteria are recruited and
maintained. All efforts are made to keep consistent clinical centers that have demonstrated a
long-term commitment to clinical education in Physical Therapy and have consistently provided
superior clinical education for the University of Florida. New clinical sites are developed
according to the department's needs for learning experiences and sufficient site numbers.
Students are allowed to request the addition of new sites by following an outlined procedure. All
requests will be reviewed by the faculty and approved or denied by the Clinical Education
Committee.










Clinical Education Requirements

I. INTERNSHIP SELECTION
Each student, over the four, full time internships, must have (1) acute/subacute experience, (1) subacute/
rehab experience, (1) general outpatient experience, and (1) experience in the area of their choice.
Students seeking an internship in sports must have completed a general orthopedic outpatient prior to the
sports internship. Students are not allowed to select internship sites in which 1) they have been employed
or are well known by the staff, or 2) there are family members in employment. Through the use of patient
logs, interviews with the student and the clinical instructor, and available on-site learning experiences, the
ACCE works closely with the individual student to ensure learning experiences across age span and
diagnoses diversity. Through the combination of these experiences, the student is able to meet the
requirements for graduation as recommended by our accreditation agency (CAPTE), which is reflected in
the evaluation tool that the APTA supports, the Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI).

II. CLINICAL EDUCATION SERVICE LEARNING REQUIREMENT

The current version of the "Normative Model of Physical Therapist Professional Education" and the
"Clinical Performance Instrument", both tools developed by the American Physical Therapy Association
(APTA), indicate the need for students to obtain experience in areas that are sometimes difficult to
achieve in the clinical setting. We have found, however, that opportunities for these types of experiences
are abundant within our community and the academic setting. In order to ensure that all students in areas
such as Community Health Promotion, Administrative Activities, and Clinical Research, each student is
required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of service learning in each of these three areas.
Examples of activities in these areas include (but are not limited to):

* Community Health Promotion (Community Health Screenings, Wellness Activities, Pro Bono
Services, etc.)
* Administrative (Planning, budgeting, marketing, developing presentations, organizing materials, etc.)
* Research (Data Collection, Data Analysis, Preparing Poster Presentations, Writing Abstracts, etc.)

The criteria for an activity to qualify for Service Learning Hours are as follows:
1) Must be PT related
2) You cannot be paid for the service
3) Must be a pre-approved activity
4) You must have documented proof that you completed the activity (e.g., a certificate or note signed by
the individual that you assisted with # of hours documented)

Students are welcome to explore and suggest other opportunities to meet these requirements; however, the
activity must be approved by the Clinical Education Committee ahead of time!











University of Florida Clinical Education Policy
Responsibilities of Academic Institution, Clinical Education Center, & Student


1. Responsibilities of the Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Professions

a. To assign to clinical education centers those students who have satisfactorily completed the pre-clinical
phase of their basic physical therapy education and prior supervised clinical education experiences.

b. To select clinical centers that will provide good environments for learning and adequate supervision and
guidance of students.

c. To maintain effective communication between the school and the clinic to facilitate realistic and optimal
pursuance of clinical education. Means of communication includes regular correspondence, telephone
conversations, clinical visits, educational in-services, and consultative meetings.

d. To offer educational opportunities to the clinical instructors that aims toward their continued
improvement in clinical knowledge, supervision, and teaching.

e. To share with the clinical instructors the general responsibilities for planning, executing, and evaluating
the clinical education program. To share with students the general responsibilities for preparation for
and active involvement in seeking educational experiences. The School's faculty accepts the final
responsibility for clinical education.

f To adhere to formal conditions for agreement written in the contract.

2. Responsibilities of the Clinical Education Center

a. To provide medical and physical therapy direction by qualified personnel.

b. To provide guidance and supervision of students by qualified physical therapists.

c. To orient the students) to the physical therapy department, specific types of patients unfamiliar to
students, and a review of methods, policies, and procedures peculiar to the institution such as
appropriate dress, working hours, patient schedules, record-keeping, and approaches to treatment.

d. To provide a variety of educational experiences for the student in regards to types of patients (age,
gender, diagnosis); and evaluation and treatment methods used. Educational experiences should be
appropriate for the setting and in-line with student's grading criteria/level of education.

e. To involve students in record keeping, medical record documentation, educational sessions, and
supervisory opportunities as appropriate for student's level of education.

f. To guide and supervise the students) in their activities according to individual needs and abilities.

g. To provide feedback to the student by performing ongoing informal evaluations of performance. To
discuss concerns with the ACCE as early as possible in the affiliation.

h. To formally evaluate the performance of the student using the CPI at least twice (midterm and final)
during the affiliation. To discuss with the student the results of these evaluations. To send the final
written evaluation to the School.











i. To encourage professional growth of staff and students.


j. To share with the School faculty the general responsibilities for planning, executing, and evaluating the
clinical education program.

k. To adhere to formal conditions for agreement written in the contract.

3. Responsibilities of the Student Physical Therapist

a. To review, understand, and comply with any policies and procedures of the assigned facility before
reporting to assigned site. This will include all information provided to the School, which is located in
the files, and/or material sent to the student by the facility.

b. To observe all department regulations of the clinical facility and the School, inclusive of but not limited
to hours, attendance, dress code, record keeping, and safety regulations.

c. To review and comply with all medical and liability requirements required of the School and the facility.
This includes PPD, immunizations (MMR & Hepatitis B), CPR, liability, current health insurance and
hospitalization, and any additional requirements of the facility (e.g. 3 month PPD, recent medical exam,
first aid class). To produce all documents upon the facility's request.

d. To understand the objectives and grading criteria of the Clinical Education Experience(s) provided by
the School. To seek additional assistance when clarification is needed.

e. To avail oneself of learning experiences offered by each facility and its personnel. To seek and utilize
those experiences necessary to meet grading criteria. To request additional experiences to meet grading
criteria.

f To request guidance and assistance when needed. Students are encouraged to use appropriate chain of
command when seeking assistance. Students are encouraged contact the ACCE when they have
difficulties seeking guidance or assistance in the clinical setting.

g. To review, understand, and utilize properly the evaluation tool for clinical education (CPI). To request
clarification and guidance about the tool before the clinical internship. To answer questions the CI may
have about the school's individual tool (CPI).

h. To discuss performance evaluations with their supervisor (Clinical Instructor) and to improve
performance by the acceptance of just criticism.

i. To demonstrate interest in and loyalty to the clinical education facility.

j. To maintain high quality of performance and ethical conduct befitting a professional physical therapy
student.

k. To complete and return all paperwork required by the School for satisfactory completion of internships.











Appendix B:


DPT Curriculum Overview and Course Descriptions


*PHT 6935 C Physiology for PT
*PHT 6935C Physiology for PT PHT6188C Functional Anatomy II PHT 6770 Musculoskeletal Disorders I 2
Temporary Course Number
S[7 PHT 6218C Therapeutic Modality
PHT 6187C Functional Anatomy I 5 PHT 6189C Examination and Evaluation I3 nT 6218C Therapeutic Modality 2
Interventions in Physical Therapy
PHT 6168C Neuroscience in Physical PHT 6860 ical ]
PHT 6605 Evidence Based Practice I 3 PHT 6168CNeuroscience PHT 6860 Clinical Education I 1
Therapy
PHT6024 Seminar: Professional Issues I 2 PHT 6503 Health Promotion and Wellness P 6302C Principles of Disease 3
Sfor Physical Therapy Practice II

PHT 6502 Health Promotion and Wellness 1 PHT 6207C Basic Clinical Skills II 2 PHT 6352 Pharmacology in Physical
for Physical Therapy Practice I Therapy Practice

HT 6206C Basic Clinical 2 PHT 6152C Exercise Physiology 2 PHT 6186C Motor Control/ Therapeutic 2
Skills I
Exercise I
TOTAL 117 TOTAL 117 TOTAL 113



Semester 4 Yr. 2 Semester 5: Sprg YPHT 6190C Motor Control Therapeutic
PHT 6771 Musculoskeletal Disorders II 4 First 8 weeks:HT 6190C Motor Control Therapeutic 3
Exercise II

PHT 6381C Cardiopulmonary Disorders in 3 PHT 6762C Neurorehabilitation II 3 PHT 6322 Pediatrics in Physical Therapy 4
Physical Therapy


PHT 6070C Radiology and Diagnostic 3 PHT 6527 Professional Issues II PHT 6702C Prosthetics and Orthotics 2
Imaging in Physical Therapy Practice


PHT 6861Clinical Education II 1 PHT 6374 Geriatrics in Physical Therapy 2 HT 6730 Differential Diagnosis in 3
SPhysical Therapy

PHT 6761C Neurorehabilitation I 3 ISecond 8 weeks: I 7
PHT 6608 Evidence Based Practice II 3 PHT 6805 Clinical Education III 6
TOTAL 117 TOTAL 114 TOTAL 12



PHT 6807 Clinical Education IV 6 First 8 weeks:

PHT 6817 Clinical Education V 6 PHT 6823 Clinical Education VI 6

FI Second weeks: I
PHT 6504 Health Promotion and Wellness
I K for Physical Therapy Practice III
I I PHT 6530 Professional Issues III 2
F IPHT 6609 Evidence Based Practice III [2
TOTAL 12 TOTAL 11 PROGRAM TOTAL 113


Semester 1: FaU Yr. 1 1


Semester 2: Spring Yr. 1 1


Semstr : umerYr1











Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Curriculum
Department of Physical Therapy
College of Health Professions
University of Florida


Semester 1 Fall (16 weeks)
PHT6935C: Physiology for Physical Therapy
General human physiology with systems review.

PHT 6187C: Functional Anatomy I
The purpose of this course is to provide a detailed introduction to anatomy of the human body, and the functional
ramifications of that anatomy to human motion. This will include study employing lecture and laboratory sessions
involving regional cadaveric dissection of the upper extremity under the supervision of instructors, and information
onjoint structure and function, forces that effect motion and the resultant kinematics. Emphasis is on the
neuromuscular and musculoskeletal anatomy.

PHT 6605: Evidence Based Practice 1
This course reviews relevant research design and statistical issues to prepare the student to become a critical
consumer of rehabilitation research. The student will be exposed to selected topics on research theory/philosophy,
sampling, research design, descriptive/inferential statistics, power, error, estimation, reliability, validity, and reading
a journal article.

PHT 6024: Professional Issues I
The purpose of this course is to prepare the student in professional practices that will be used throughout the
curriculum and their professional career. This course provides the student with an introduction to the role of the
professional in physical therapy practice. Students are educated about the application of generic skills to the
profession of PT. Topics of application include communication (verbal, nonverbal, and written), individual and
cultural differences, professional behavior and abilities, ethics, legal issues, and responsibility for professional
development.

PHT 6502: Health Promotion and Wellness for Physical Therapy Practice I
This course is designed to initiate an interdisciplinary learning practicum for health professions, pharmacy, dental
and medical students. The central theme of the course is family health over the life cycle. Students will learn to
conceptualize family health beliefs and behavior from a biopsychosocial framework, and they will learn to assess
family health care needs and health care access through a multidisciplinary lens.

PHT 6206C: Basic Clinical Skills I
This course is designed to prepare the student for patient care activities including communication, assessing vital
signs, body mechanics awareness, patient positioning and draping, basic exercise and transfers. Students will
develop these basic skills in a laboratory setting and with case studies prior to practice with patients in authentic
clinical situations in semester three of the program.

Semester 2 Spring (16 weeks)
PHT 6188C: Functional Anatomy II
The purpose of this course is to provide a detailed introduction to anatomy of the human body, and the functional
ramifications of that anatomy to human motion. This will include study employing lecture and laboratory sessions
involving regional cadaveric dissection of the lower extremity and trunk under the supervision of instructors, and
information onjoint structure and function, forces that effect motion and the resultant kinematics. Emphasis is on
the neuromuscular and musculoskeletal anatomy. Using this knowledge the student should be able to analyze
activities regularly observed in the clinic.

PHT 6189C: Examination and Evaluation
The purpose of this course is teaching the student the basic elements of assessment that applies to all patients with a
potential need for physical therapy services. Students will learn the basics of examination and evaluation, selection
of appropriate tests and measures, use of validity, reliability, and best evidence to select tests and measures, and the










use of critical thinking and decision-making to determine the most appropriate intervention and outcomes for all
patients
PHT 6168C: Neuroscience for Physical Therapy
Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, basic neuroscience and evidence based practice for neurological therapeutic
intervention. Course includes lecture, wet specimen anatomy laboratory, utilization of neurological case studies and
review of current scientific literature.

PHT 6503: Health Promotion and Wellness for Physical Therapy Practice II
This course is the follow-up to the interdisciplinary learning practicum for health professions, pharmacy, dental and
medical students, which was initiated in the prior semester. The central theme of this half of the course is
developing wellness plans for individuals or families in the community. Students will learn to assess family health
care needs, seek out community resources, and educate community members on specific issues related to their own
health and well-being.

PHT 6207C: Basic Clinical Skills II
This course is designed to prepare the student for patient care activities including infection control, patient safety
and emergency management, wheelchair and equipment management, gait training and durable medical equipment
prescription. The student will obtain an overview of basic exercise training techniques (strength, flexibility,
endurance, and relaxation) applicable to prevention and wellness services as well as to those populations requiring
rehabilitation or restoration of function due to illness, injury, or chronic disability.

PHT 6152C: Exercise Physiology
The purpose of this course is to understand the physiological mechanisms and organ systems that allow humans to
engage in physical activity and how these systems are changed by chronic activity (training) and disuse.

Semester 3 Summer (13 weeks)
PHT 6770: Musculoskeletal Disorders I
The purpose of this course is to educate students about physical therapy evaluation and treatment for
musculoskeletal disorders of the lower extremity.

PHT 6218C: Therapeutic Modality Interventions in Physical Therapy
This course is an introduction to the management of pain and dysfunction using thermal, electrical and mechanical
modalities used by Physical Therapists in general practice. Lectures will highlight basic scientific rationale for
approaches discussed while laboratory experience and problem solving using patient case studies should enhance the
student's understanding relative to direct patient care.

PHT 6860: Clinical Education I
The purpose of this course is to provide part-time clinical experiences in acute care settings, wound care, ICU, and
outpatient orthopedics as a means for the student to make associations between classroom material and clinical
experiences.

PHT 6302C: Principles of Disease
The purpose of this course is to educate the Physical Therapy student on basic pathology, presentation, signs, and
symptoms related to common diseases/conditions. Conditions that will be discussed are those that may be
encountered by the Physical Therapist in the acute care, sub-acute/rehab, home health care, and outpatient settings.
Course will also highlight evaluation and treatment strategies for patients presenting with these conditions. The
course will begin emphasis on the student's ability to recognize signs/symptoms that may help to differentially
diagnose pathologic conditions from musculoskeletal conditions, and be able to make a referral to an appropriate
physician source for conditions beyond the scope of Physical Therapy treatment. This course provides the
foundation for the "Differential Diagnosis" course that is offered in the following semester.

PHT 6352: Pharmacology in PT Practice
This course provides a study of prescription and/or over-the-counter medications used in the management of a
variety of patient conditions encountered during physical therapy management.

PHT 6186C: Motor Control/Therapeutic Exercise I
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of movement science, offers a framework for understanding
normal and abnormal movement, and includes concepts of kinesiology, neuroscience, physiology, motor control,










and motor learning. The course will integrate theory and basic principles of motor behavior, motor development,
motor control and motor learning as they relate to human motor performance across the lifespan.

Graduate Year 2
Semester 4 Fall (16 weeks)
PHT 6771: Musculoskeletal Disorders II
The purpose of this course is to educate students about physical therapy evaluation and treatment for
musculoskeletal disorders of the spine and upper extremity.

PHT 6381C: Cardiopulmonary Disorders in Physical Therapy
The purpose of this course is to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiopulmonary disease, how to
perform a Physical Therapy evaluation to treat these problems and design, safe and effective rehabilitation programs
for patients with cardiopulmonary disorders.

PHT 6070C: Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging in Physical Therapy Practice
This course is a progression from a basic understanding of plain film principles to a systematic analysis of the spine
and extremities. The student will learn a systematic method of analyzing and integrating imaging findings into the
physical therapy diagnostic process. In addition, the utility of imaging in physical therapy practice will be
emphasized.

PHT 6861: Clinical Education II
The purpose of this course is to provide part-time clinical experiences in outpatient orthopedics as a means for the
student to make associations between classroom material and clinical experiences. Didactic material and clinical
experiences are integrated with information from PHT 6771 Musculoskeletal Disorders II. Students spend a full day
every other week in an outpatient orthopedic clinic.

PHT 6761C: Neurorehabilitation I
This course will provide information concerning neurologic diseases and disorders that are common to clients
evaluated and treated by physical therapists in the acute care setting. From a medical perspective, information will
include disease description, etiology, pathology, clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, medical
management, and precautions or special considerations pertinent to physical therapists. From a physical therapy
perspective, specific standardized assessments, evaluation and treatment strategies, techniques, and approaches will
be addressed.

PHT 6608: Evidence Based Practice II
This course will introduce the student to key concepts of evidence-based rehabilitation science. The first section of
the course reviews basic principles of an evidence-based approach and subsequent sections review issues related to
diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention.

Semester 5 Spring (16 weeks)
First 8 weeks
PHT 6762C: Neurorehabilitation II
This course will provide information concerning neurologic diseases and disorders that are common to
clients evaluated and treated by physical therapists. From a medical perspective, information will include
disease description, etiology, pathology, clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, medical
management, and precautions or special considerations pertinent to physical therapists. From a physical
therapy perspective, specific standardized assessments, evaluation and treatment strategies, techniques,
and approaches will be addressed. The role of the physical therapist will be addressed across treatment
environments and across the time course or progression of the disease (acute through chronic).

PHT 6527: Professional Issues II
This course is designed to build upon the professional behaviors and skills identified in Professional Issues I. As
students continue clinical visits started in Clinical Education I and continued in Clinical Education II, direct
application of topics to currently encountered case studies is addressed. Topics related to skills necessary for taking
responsibility for and providing health care services to the public will be explored in greater depth. This course will
focus on developing skills needed to provide and bill for physical therapy services in a manner that is consistent with
legal and ethical guidelines for clinical practice.











PHT 6374: Geriatrics in Physical Therapy
This course is an overview of the physical and psycho-behavioral aspects of aging in adulthood. Students are
introduced to usual and pathological changes with aging and are challenged to problem solve treatment issues
relevant to the types of older clients they will assist in physical therapy clinical settings. The multidimensional
concerns of our older patients are emphasized, and students are encouraged to develop themselves is strong
generalist physical therapists to serve the needs of our older clientele.

Second 8 weeks
PHT 6805: Clinical Education III
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with their first full time clinical experience that occurs in the
settings of acute care, general orthopedics, or subacute care. This internship is mentored by one or more trained
clinical instructors.

Semester 6 Summer (13 weeks)
PHT 6190C: Motor Control/Therapeutic Exercise II
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a foundation for examining, evaluating, and providing
treatment interventions for individuals who have movement dysfunction secondary to neurological deficits.
Emphasis is placed on understanding normal and impaired movement through discussion of current motor control,
motor learning, and motor development/lifespan theories. This course teaches examination and evaluation of and
interventions for basic functional movement skills and their underlying components such as motor
control/coordination (ability to plan, initiate, sequence, time and grade movements), postural control and balance,
perception and sensation, muscle tone, strength, and biomechanical considerations.

PHT 6322: Pediatrics in Physical Therapy
Normal and abnormal developmental changes over the course of the maturation process with emphasis on selected
medical conditions. Current motor control and motor learning theories applied to therapeutic intervention strategies
for the pediatric population. Lecture and lab sessions.

PHT 6702C: Prosthetics and Orthotics
This course reviews the kinesiological principles of gait analysis. Of importance is the student's ability to detect gait
deviations and compensations. An introduction to prosthetics and orthotics will be provided. Students will be
expected to apply their gait analysis skills when analyzing and understanding the mechanics of gait of amputees and
patients with lower extremity orthosis.

PHT 6730: Differential Diagnosis in Physical Therapy
This course is designed to assist the physical therapy student to develop into a direct access practitioner
able to consider and identify the broad spectrum of conditions and pathologies represented by a
musculoskeletal or neurological complaint. Additionally, patterns of referral to the appropriate healthcare
providers will be discussed and role of the physical therapist as 'collaborator' in the healthcare team
emphasized.

Graduate Year 3
Semester 7 Fall (16 weeks)
PHT 6807: Clinical Education IV
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with their second full time clinical experience that occurs in the
settings of acute care, general OP orthopedics (which must be completed prior to a specialty in orthopedic sports),
inpatient rehabilitation, pediatrics, or a combination thereof. By the end of the curriculum, students MUST have
completed mandatory full time internships in acute care, general orthopedics, and inpatient rehabilitation. The
fourth choice is made by the student and must be approved by the ACCEs. These internships are mentored by one
or more trained clinical instructors.

PHT 6817: Clinical Education V
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with their third full time clinical experience that occurs in the
settings of acute care, general OP orthopedics (which must be completed prior to a specialty in orthopedic sports),
inpatient rehabilitation, pediatrics, or a combination thereof. By the end of the curriculum, students MUST have
completed mandatory full time internships in acute care, general orthopedics, and inpatient rehabilitation. The










fourth choice is made by the student and must be approved by the ACCEs. These internships are mentored by one
or more trained clinical instructors.

Semester 8 Spring (16 weeks)
First 8 weeks
PHT 6823: Clinical Education VI
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with their fourth and final full time clinical experience that
occurs in the settings of acute care, general OP orthopedics (which must be completed prior to a specialty in
orthopedic sports), inpatient rehabilitation, pediatrics, or a combination thereof. By the end of the curriculum,
students MUST have completed mandatory full time internships in acute care, general orthopedics, and inpatient
rehabilitation. The fourth choice is made by the student and must be approved by the ACCEs. These internships are
mentored by one or more trained clinical instructors.

Second 8 weeks
PHT 6504: Health Promotion and Wellness for Physical Therapy Practice III
This course is designed to provide a framework for the student to develop and implement a plan for a community-
based project directed toward improving health awareness in a specific group or population. The skills needed for
identifying community needs, developing a strategic plan and securing resources are reviewed. Students must
implement the plan and report the results of their program within an 8-week timeframe.

PHT 6530: Professional Issues III
This course is designed to build upon the professional behaviors and skills identified in Professional Issues I,& II.
This course will focus on developing business and professional skills needed to begin practicing as a physical
therapist. Topics related to skills necessary for assuming professional responsibility in the areas of advanced
management skills, marketing professional services, and providing consultative services are included. This course
will focus on developing skills needed to successfully secure licensure as a PT, supervise and manage staff and
students, plan and market therapy services, and advocate for legislative changes to state and federal regulations
related to the provision of health care services.

PHT 6609: Evidence 3
This course concludes the department's evidence based sequence by developing skills that assist students in making
clinical decisions that are consistent with the professional literature. The student will gain experience searching the
literature by developing clinical questions in a form compatible with electronic search engines and learning
differences in available electronic databases. The student will also learn how to contribute to the rehabilitation
literature as clinicians by completing modules on case reports and the peer review process.











Appendix C


VARICELLA (CHICKEN POX) CONFIRMATION FORM


I understand that, as a condition for admission to College of Health Professions at the University of
Florida, I am required to have been vaccinated against chicken pox or to have a positive titre. My
signature below verifies that I am certain that I have already had chicken pox or have a positive titre
and do not require vaccination. I understand that falsely representing my vaccination or titre status is
grounds for dismissal from the program.



Name (please print):

Signature:

Date:



Please check your program below:

Audiology:
Clinical and Health Psychology:
Health Administration:
Health Science:
Occupational Therapy:
Physical Therapy:
Public Health:
Rehabilitation Counseling:
Rehabilitation Science:
Rehabilitative Services:
Speech Language Pathology:










Appendix D

Student Petition to Miss Regularly Scheduled Class During Academic Semester

Step #1 To the chair of the professionalism committee:

1. Student Name:

2. Function or Event:

3. Justification for Missing Class:

4. Dates (Missing Class):

5. Return Date:

6. Date to Chair of Professionalism Committee:


Student Signature

Approved by Professionalism Committee
Chair Signature

Not approved by Professionalism Committee
Reason


Date


Date


Step #2 To the individual faculty members:
Student Plan While Missin2 Re2ularly Scheduled Class Time for Approved Event


Class Instructor Note Taker Exams and Plan to Make up Exams and Instructor's
Assignments Missed Assignments Initial











Appendix E:


Expectations of Class Attendance for 2008 Summer Session

Note this is a copy of the email sent to all students from Dr. Jane Day (May 2007)

"The faculty has revised the DPT schedule for next summer and has asked that I send you the information
now so that you may plan accordingly. We will not be taking the university scheduled break from June
23-27. Instead, we will be ending the semester on August 1st instead of August 8th. You will then have
a 3-week break before fall classes begin. So---next summer (2008) classes will begin on May 12th and
end on August 1st with no break in the middle.

Please schedule your vacations, weddings, and other special occasions etc. during this 3-week break.
Thanks for putting this on your calendars now. This was done to give everyone a more meaningful break
and to allow for extended summer vacations that many of you wish to take with families, etc."










Appendix F


Physical Therapy Department Laptop Use Policy

Students are permitted to use personal laptops for class when allowed by the course instructor. The
course instructor reserves the right to prohibit laptop use privileges during class times. Students shall lose
laptop privileges if content becomes disruptive to classmates or if it is used for unrelated course
objectives. The definition of "use unrelated to course objectives" includes, but is not limited to use of
instant messaging, chat rooms, games, surfing the net, etc. Acceptable uses include taking notes,
accessing course-related documents (on or off line), following along with power point documents or class
demonstrations, course-related interest searches, and performing class projects. Students are permitted to
use laptops during breaks and between classes for "use unrelated to course objectives", but this use must
terminate when class resumes.


I have read and understand the University of Florida Department of Physical Therapy's laptop use policy and
will abide by these policies.



Student Printed Name


Student Signature











Appendix G

Student Statement of Informed Consent
Classes of 2008 2010 DPT




I, have received my personal copy of the 2007-2010 "Student Handbook".
print name here

This handbook has been reviewed by me and I understand and am prepared to abide by these policies

and procedures. I also understand the "Responsibilities of the Student" as outlined in Part II of the

Handbook. I understand that if any changes and/or additions are made to this handbook or any other policies

and procedures that affect the Classes of 2008-2010 that I will be notified either in writing or via electronic

mail.



printed name


signature


date




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