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Group Title: Bachelor of Health Science program student handbook, University of Florida
Title: Bachelor of Health Science program student handbook
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 Material Information
Title: Bachelor of Health Science program student handbook
Series Title: Bachelor of Health Science program student handbook
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida
Publisher: College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: Fall 2006
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Bibliographic ID: UF00091459
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Full Text


FALL 2006
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

IN TRODU CTION .................. ............................ .. ...... .................. ..
CO LLEG E O V ER V IEW ..................................................... ...............................
Our A cadem ic Program s .............................................................................. 2
O ur O rganization............................................ ...... .......................... .... .2
PHHP Departments, Programs and Contacts ..................................................3
P H HI P C en ters.................................. .................... ........ ................ .. 4
OVERVIEW OF THE HEALTH SCIENCE PROGRAM .............. ...............5
H health Science Track ..... .... .. .. .. ..5................. ............ .. .............. 5
M mission ............ .......... .............. ......... .............. ......... 5
Educational Goals.......................... ....... ........................... .5
C oursew ork ....................................... ............ ................5
Required Courses For Track.............. .. ................. ........................ 6
E le ctiv e s ....................................................... 6
Course Sequence ................................................ ....... .. ........ ..7
Pre-Occupational Therapy Track ............................................. ............... 8
M is sio n ............................... ............. ............................ 8
Educational Goals........................ .. ....... .... ...................... 8
Coursew ork ..................................... .....................9
Required Courses For Track......... ........ ...... ........ .. ............ 9
E le ctiv e s ....................................................... 9
Course Sequence ................................................ ......... .. ........ ..9
Rehabilitative Services Track .......... ................................................10
M issio n ................................................. ............... 1 0
E educational G oals ............................... .......... .. .. .. .. ..... ... ....... 10
Coursework. .............. .................... .......................... ......... 10
Required Courses For Track............................................ ................ 11
E le c tiv e s ........................................................................................... 1 2
C course Sequence ............................................ .. .. .. .......... .. ........ .... 12
Dual Emphasis in Health Science and Rehabilitative Services.......................13
C ourse Sequence ..................................... .... .... ............ ... ........ .. 13
OTHER COURSE INFORMATION...................................................................... 14
P ub lic H health .................................................................................. 14
M inor in Public H health ........................................................ ............. 14
Com bined D egree .................. ............................ .. ..... ................. 14
A approved Plan of Study ......................................................... ............. 14
Course Registration. .................. ............................. .......... .... ........ 14
Transfer of Credit. ............................. .... .. ................. 15
Grading Scale. ......................................................... .................. 15
E xtra C redit ................................................................................................. 16
Evaluation of Faculty and Curriculum ............................................................. 16
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS .................... ............. ...................16
G general R equirem ents .............. ................ ............ ................................ 16
Graduating W ith Honors ....... ............................................. ...................... 17
PR O G R A M PO LIC IE S ......... ................................................................ ............... 17
G atorlink A account ................................. ..... .... ...... .......... .. 17
Com pliance w ith H IPA A ...................................................... ............ 17







Policy Statement On Tolerance And Diversity. .............................................18
Academic Honesty/Recognizing Other's Work .............................................18
A tte n d a n c e ................................................................................................... 1 8
Punctuality ...........................................18
Examinations .................................. .......................... ............18
L ate A ssignm ent P olicy................................................................................... 19
Self-A dvisem ent ......... .. ...................... ................ ....................... 19
A cadem ic Probation ................................... .... .. .......... .... ...... 19
D dropping C courses ......... .................. .. .................. .. ... ... .. 19
A adding C courses .......... ........................................... .. ............ 20
W withdraw als/Leaves O f A absence ................................................ ... .................20
Withdrawals Without Re-Entry To The Program ................................20
Withdrawals With Desired Re-Entry To The Program.........................20
D ism issal From The College.................................... .......................... ......... 21
A p p eals P ro cess............................................. ................ . 2 1
C om puter Policy .................. ..................................... .. ........ .... 22
Use Of College Space.................. ..................................... 23
HEALTH SCIENCE FACULTY ................................... ................................... 23-25
P R O G R A M ST A F F ............................................................................ ....................26
C O L L E G E C O U N C IL ....................................................................... .....................27
HEALTH SCIENCE STUDENT ORGANIZATION (HSSO).................................27
GENERAL PROGRAM REMINDERS ............................................ ............... 28
Identification B adges............ .................................. ........ .... .. . ........... 28
E x p en ses ...................................... .............................. ................ . 2 8
Class Photographs ................ ........................................... .. .... 28
Health Requirements And Immunizations. .................................................. 28
Bloodborne Pathogen Training. ............................................. ............... 29
Bioterrorism .................................... ............................... ........29
D re ss C o d e ................................................................2 9
S m o k in g .....................................................................................2 9
C ell Phones and B eepers......................................................... ............... 29
C A M PU S F A C IL IT IE S ....................................................................... ...................29
HPNP Complex ............................................................ 29
L ib ra ry .................................................................................................... 3 0
B o o k sto re ..................................................................................................... 3 0
C irca C om puter L ab s.......................................................................... .... .... 30
T teaching C enter ............................ .. ........................................ .... . ...... .. 30
Student Health Center At Shands Hospital ................................................. 31
Counseling Center ............................................. ........... ... ... ........ 31
C areer R source C enter.......................................................... ............... 31
F o o d S erv ice ................................................. ................ .. 3 1
Gift Store And Miscellaneous Items ...................................... ...............32
Post O office .............................................................................. .... 32
OTHER GENERAL INFORMATION.......................................................................32
C P R ...........................................................................3 2
N ew paper ............................................................................................... 32
P parking .......................................................................................................32
P h o n e ..................................................................................................... 3 2
O their R sources ............................................................32







A P P E N D IC E S .................................................... ................. 33

A. PLAN OF STUDY- HEALTH SCIENCE TRACK
B. PLAN OF STUDY- PRE-OT TRACK
C. PLAN OF STUDY- REHABILTATIVE SERVICES TRACK
D. PLAN OF STUDY-DUAL EMPHASIS
E. HONORS COURSES/COLLEGE ELECTIVES
F. COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS
G. USE OF COLLEGE AND COMMON HPNP SPACE FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES








INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Bachelor of Health Science (BHS) program in the College of Public Health and Health
Professions. The BHS program offers three tracks health science, pre-occupational therapy (pre-OT),
and rehabilitative services. Throughout this manual, the phrase "health science program" refers to all
three tracks. This handbook has been developed to assist you in learning about our college, the Bachelor
of Health Science program, and resources available to help you have a positive college experience.
Several of the policies and procedures you need to know are included in this manual; others are included
in the UF Undergraduate Catalog and Student Guide. Regardless of whether policies and procedures are
listed here, you are responsible for your education and behavior, which includes understanding all
University and College policies and procedures that affect your academic progress and use of University
and College resources.

If you ever have questions regarding the BHS program or any other aspect of University life, please do
not hesitate to contact a health science program advisor, faculty member, the dean's office, or the
appropriate University office. We are glad you have selected the College of Public Health and Health
Professions to complete your undergraduate education, and we will assist you in whatever way we can to
help you be successful. We hope that you find your college experience enriching, both personally and
academically.


COLLEGE OVERVIEW

The Bachelor of Health Science program is part of the College of Public Health and Health Professions
(PHHP), located in the HPNP Complex. We are one of the largest and most diversified health education
institutions in the nation. Established in 1958, the College of Health Professions was the first college of
its type in the United States dedicated to educating students of many different health professions in an
academic health center. In 2003, the College changed its name to Public Health and Health Professions
to reflect our expanding mission. Public Health and Health Professions is one of six colleges that
comprise the University of Florida Health Science Center. The other colleges are Dentistry, Medicine,
Nursing, Pharmacy, and Veterinary Medicine.

With over 1500 students, the College of Public Health and Health Professions is a national leader in the
education of health professionals. We emphasize the development of intellectual resources and skills that
can help our graduates prosper in today's complex health care delivery systems. In addition, the College
is committed to the development of cutting edge science in areas such as aging and disability,
rehabilitation of central nervous system impairment, behavioral determinants of good health, and health
systems functioning.

The College of Public Health and Health Professions is dedicated to promoting, improving, and
protecting the health of people through education, discovery, and service. The following values are
inherent in the operations of the College:

* excellence scholarship
* collegiality integrity
* innovation *professional satisfaction
* integration of science and practice +collaboration








OUR ACADEMIC PROGRAMS: The College's commitment to excellence in health
education is reflected in the variety of bachelor's, master's and doctoral programs available.

BACHELOR'S LEVEL PROGRAMS DEGREE OFFERED
Health Science program, Health Science track Bachelor of Health Science (BHS)
Health Science program, Pre-OT track Bachelor of Health Science (BHS)
Health Science program, Rehabilitative Services track Bachelor of Health Science (BHS)
MASTER'S LEVEL PROGRAMS DEGREE OFFERED
Health Administration Master of Health Administration (MHA)
Occupational Therapy
Entry Level Master's Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Advanced Master's Master of Health Science (MHS)
Public Health Master of Public Health (MPH)
Rehabilitation Counseling Master of Health Science (MHS)
DOCTORAL LEVEL PROGRAMS DEGREE OFFERED
Audiology Doctor of Audiology (AuD)
Clinical and Health Psychology Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Health Services Research Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Physical Therapy Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
Rehabilitation Science Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS CERTIFICATE OFFERED
Life Care Planning College level certificate
Public Health College level certificate


Four of the college's academic programs involve multiple departments or colleges as part of their core
design. The health science, pre-OT, and rehabilitative services tracks in the BHS program involve
faculty from clinical and health psychology, communicative disorders, health services research,
management and policy, occupational therapy, and rehabilitation counseling. The other two programs
are at the graduate level. They are Rehabilitation Science, which involves faculty from communicative
disorders, clinical and health psychology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and rehabilitation
counseling; and the Master of Public Health program, which is a collaborative effort among multiple
departments and colleges.

OUR ORGANIZATION: The College is comprised of the dean's office, six departments, and eleven
centers. The Health Science track is administered by the dean's office, the pre-OT track is administered
jointly by the dean's office and the Occupational Therapy Department, and the rehabilitative services
track is administered by the Rehabilitation Counseling Department. A summary of departmental and
center contacts is provided on the next page.






PHHP DEPARTMENTS, PROGRAMS, and CONTACTS
Department Brief Description Administrators Phone
Number
Dean's Office administrative offices for the Dean: Robert G. Frank, PhD 273-6214
college; includes staff managing advising, Executive Assoc Dean:
academics, financial aid concerns, budget, Stephanie Hanson, PhD 273-6377
research development, and personnel issues; Asst Dean: Joanne Foss, PhD 273-6135
Oversees health science program Assoc Dean for Academic
Affairs: Mary Peoples-Sheps, 273-6443
PhD
Clinical and Health Psychology Dept. Chair: Ronald Rozensky, PhD 273-6141
offers APA accredited doctoral program with Grad Coordinator: Russell 273-6047
specialty tracks in neuropsychology, health Bauer, PhD
psychology, and pediatric psychology; also
offers APA accredited internship and
postdoctoral fellowships; participates in the
health science program
Communicative Disorders Dept. has both Chair: John C. Rosenbek, Ph.D. 273-6166
speech-language pathology and audiology Grad Coordinator: Alice 273-6543
faculty; offers distance learning doctoral Holmes, PhD
program in audiology and participates in on-
campus AuD program and the RSD program
Health Services Research, Management and Chair: Paul Duncan Ph.D. 273-6072
Policy Dept. offers on campus and executive Student Services Coordinator: 273-6073
programs for working professionals; oversees Barbara Ross, MA
management and policy track in MPH
program; offers health services research
doctoral program; participates in the health
science program
Occupational Therapy Dept. offers an Chair: William Mann, Ph.D. 273-6817
entry level master's program, and advanced Grad Coordinator: Craig Velozo,
master's programs for individuals who already Ph.D.
have an Entry-Level OT degree; participates in Coordinator of Pre-OT track and 273-6128
the health science program and the RSD Director of OT Professional
program Programs: Joanne Foss, Ph.D. 273-6017
Physical Therapy Dept. offers an entry level Chair: Krista Vandenborne, 273-6085
doctoral program; participates in the RSD Ph.D.
program Assistant Chair and Director of 273-6085
Education: Jane Day, Ph.D.
Public Health Program offers MPH in five Program Director: Mary 273-6443
concentration areas; also offers a combined Peoples-Sheps, Ph.D.
degree program, minor, and certificate Asst Director: Mischka Garel, 273-6444
program MPH
Asst Dir for Special Projects: 273-5367
Susan White, Med
Behavioral Science and Community Health Chair: Barbara Curbow, Ph.D. 273-6745
Dept. offers the undergraduate track in Grad Coordinator: Linda Shaw, 273-6745
rehabilitative services and a graduate program Ph.D.
in rehabilitation counseling; participates in the
health science program and the RSD program
Rehabilitation Science offers Ph.D. for Program Director: William 273-6817
students from diverse backgrounds; 3 specialty Mann, Ph.D.
areas available







PHHP CENTERS
Center Name Brief Description Director Phone Number
Center for Pediatric Psychology and Family Stephen Boggs, PhD 273-6146
Studies pediatric psychologists, pediatricians, and Dept. of Clinical and Health
students focus on the relationships among health, Psychology
illness, and behavior in children and families
Center for Research in Psychophysiology Peter J. Lang, PhD 392-2439
psychophysiological researchers advance Dept. of Clinical and Health
understanding of behavioral-physiological Psychology
interactions in people - - - -
Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention Peter J. Lang, PhD 392-2439
one of three NIMH Behavioral Science Research Dept. of Clinical and Health
Centers; focuses on how the human brain processes Psychology
emotional stimuli and its resulting expression
Center for Telehealth and Healthcare William Mann, PhD 273-6148
Communications investigators focus on the Dept. of Occupational Therapy
effects of telecommunication technologies in health
care delivery, including quality of life, health
outcomes, cost, and standards of use
Brooks Center for Rehabilitation Studies Robert G. Frank, Ph.D. 273-5744
focuses on the development and evaluation of Dean's Office
rehabilitation methods of service delivery and
rehabilitation-related funding policies
Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Michael E. Robinson, Ph.D. Dept 273-6153
Health dedicated to the investigation and of Clinical and Health
understanding of the experience of pain in humans Psychology
National Rural Behavioral Health Center Ronald Rozensky, Ph.D. (Interim) 273-5125
promotes research, education, and service to Dept. of Clinical and Health
improve the status of behavioral health care for Psychology
rural Americans and to increase access and
utilization of services
Florida Center for Medicaid and the Uninsured Robert G. Frank, Ph.D. 273-6214
dedicated to the improvement of Florida health Dean's Office
care through a multidisciplinary collaboration of
academic and policy making experts
National Older Driver Research and Training William Mann, Ph.D. 273-6817
Center investigators focus on innovative ways Dept. of Occupational Therapy
to meet the continuing needs of senior citizens by
developing new policies, strategies, methods and
tools
Center for Behavioral Health Research in Robert Guenther, Ph.D. 273-6617
Organ Transplantation and Donation Dept. of Clinical and Health
promoting positive health outcomes for patients Psychology
and their families and increasing organ and tissue
donation by encouraging, supporting, and advising
behavioral health researchers
Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center William Mann, Ph.D. 273-6817
(RERC) investigators promote independence and Dept. of Occupational Therapy
quality of life for older people with disabilities
through technology, involving devices that can
make everyday tasks easier to complete
Faculty in the college also co-direct the following centers:
* Craniofacial Center (co-directed by Stephen Boggs, Ph.D.)
* Center for Neuropsychological Studies (co-directed by Eileen Fennell, Ph.D.)








OVERVIEW OF THE HEALTH SCIENCE PROGRAM

The Bachelor of Health Science program is designed for students whose career goals are to work in
health systems or organizations providing health related or general human services to individuals with
health concerns. The BHS program is a two-year, 60-credit curriculum consisting of the junior and
senior years of undergraduate work. The program offers three tracks: health science, pre-OT, and
rehabilitative services. The curriculum for the health science track provides the opportunity for you to
learn foundation skills necessary to succeed in the dynamic health environment. The pre-OT track is a
subspecialty within the health science track and includes all core health science courses plus prerequisite
coursework for the College of Public Health and Health Professions graduate program in OT. The
curriculum for the rehabilitative services track provides the opportunity to focus specifically on the
rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities or others seeking human services to facilitate
successful community integration. The specific core courses for each track are listed under the track
sections below.

+ Degree Awarded for all Tracks: Bachelor of Health Science (BHS)

+ Total # Hours Required for Graduation: 120 (from freshman through senior year)

* Total # Hours Required in the Junior-Senior Year: 60 semester credits of 3000-
level coursework or higher. 2000-level courses taken in the junior-senior years do not count
toward the 60 semester credits of required junior-senior level coursework.


HEALTH SCIENCE TRACK

+ MISSION: To provide an academic foundation in health science for students planning on entering a
health profession and/or working in a health setting.

+ EDUCATIONAL GOALS: Students should be able to demonstrate:

1. Understanding of key components of the U.S. health care system and the latest developments in
health policy.
2. Understanding of different health care disciplines and their contributions to health management.
3. Understanding of common diseases and disabilities and factors affecting their management.
4. Basic skills in critical thinking to facilitate appropriate analysis of health science information.
5. Understanding of core bioethical principles underpinning contemporary health care practice and basic
skills in ethical decision-making.
6. Appropriate communication skills and professional behavior.
7. Sensitivity to basic issues of diversity in health care.

* COURSEWORK: In the health science track, you will complete a combination of core courses (33
hours) and electives (27 hours, including 9 in the college) in order to complete 60 hours of junior-
senior level (3000-level or higher) coursework. The core courses and electives are listed in the next
two tables. You are required to complete all four semesters in which core coursework occurs (Fall
Junior through Spring Senior).







REQUIRED COURSES FOR HEALTH SCIENCE TRACK *
Course Course Title # Of Course Description
Number Credits
HSC 3502 Survey of Diseases 04 Overview of medical and psychosocial
and Disability aspects of chronic diseases and disabilities
HSA 3111 U.S. Health Care 03 Overview of organization, delivery, and
System financing of health services in the U.S.
Topics include health professionals, health
care facilities, financing of health services,
managed care, and current health policy
issues
HSC 4558 Disability 03 Issues in disability management, including
Management occupational health, impact of disability,
treatment strategies and general
rehabilitation process, ADA, workers
compensation, and assistive technology
OTH 3416 Pathophysiology 03 Basic overview of normal and abnormal
physiological changes throughout adulthood
HSC 3661 Therapeutic 02 Understanding basic principles of therapeutic
Communication communication with patients, families, and
Skills the health care team
RCS 4415L Therapeutic 01 Hands-on practice of therapeutic
Communication communication skills based on simulated
Skills Lab patient health care scenarios
HSC 4608L Critical Thinking in 04 Development of critical thinking skills and
Health Care problem solving in the health care
environment
HSC 4184 Leadership Skills 03 Introduction to leadership philosophy,
and Styles assessment of personal leadership style,
development of team work skills with others
with different leadership styles
HSC 3057 Research Methods 04 Emphasis on four aspects of research:
and Issues in Health understanding research principles, evaluating
Care journal articles, applying research findings to
clinical settings, and designing programmatic
evaluation projects
HSC 4653L Ethical and Legal 03 Overview of basic bioethical and legal issues
Issues in the Health in the health professions, including
Professions discussion of contemporary ethical issues
based on actual/composite patient cases
STA 3024 Introduction to 03 Introduction to analysis of variance and
Statistics 2 nonparametric methods
*Please note: There are additional course requirements to graduate Magna Cum Laude or Summa Cum
Laude; please see Graduation Requirements section.


* ELECTIVES: You will take a minimum of 27 hours of electives. Of the 27 hours, 9 hours must be
approved college electives. You can satisfy your college electives' requirement in one of two ways -
you can complete the minor in public health (please see p.14 for details) or you can complete 9 hours







from the college list below. If you select the latter option, you must complete a minimum of three
courses from the list. If your combination of credits is fewer than 9 based on the 3 courses you select and
you do not want to take a fourth course from the list, you may take the College Independent Study
Course (HSC 4905) or Clinical Observation/Health Care Volunteer Work Course (HSC 3801) to equal a
total of 9 credits. The remaining 18 hours are general electives and require no College approval as long
as they are at least 3000 level.


APPROVED ELECTIVES FOR HEALTH SCIENCE TRACK
Students must select a minimum of 9 credits from the electives list below
Course Number Course Name Credits Semester Offered
OTH 3200 Applied Human Development I 03 Fall
OTH 3201 Applied Human Development II 02 Spring
OTH 3413 Applied Kinesiology must be 03 Spring
taken with OTH 4412 & 4412L
OTH 4412 Musculoskeletal Anatomy 03 Spring
OTH 4412L Musculoskeletal Anatomy Lab* 02 Spring
OTH 4314 Psychiatric Disorders 03 Spring
OTH 4418 The Nervous System/Disorders 03 Fall
OTH 4418L The Nervous System/Disorders 02 Fall
Lab*
RCS 4061 Psychosocial Aspects of Rehab 03 Fall
RCS 4451 Rehabilitation Aspects of Substance
Abuse (Senior Level) 03 Spring
RCS 3030 Introduction to Rehabilitation and
Human Services 03 Fall
RCS 4240 Vocational Services in Health,
Rehabilitation and Human Services 03 Spring
PHC 6050** Statistical Methods for Health
Sciences I 03 Fall
PHC 6001** Principles of Epidemiology 03 Fall
PHC 6313** Environmental Health Concepts in
Public Health 03 Spring
PHC 6102** Introduction to Public Health
Administrative Systems 03 Fall
PHC 6406** Psychological, Behavioral, and
Social Issues in Public Health 03 Fall
PSY 4930 Introduction to Clinical Psychology 03 Fall
PSY 4930 Introduction to Pediatric Psychology 03 Fall
PSY 4930 Neuropsychology 03 Spring
PSY 4930 Introduction to Health Psychology 03 Spring
*Lab & Lecture courses must be taken together (OTH 4412 & 4412L) (OTH 4418 & 4418L)
**Only open to seniors).


COURSE SEQUENCE: The program of study for the health science track is listed on the next page.
As you will note, you must take core courses in specific terms. Core courses are offered only once per
year so please be sure you register for the courses during the term offered. If you fail to take a core
course when it is offered, you will delay your graduation by at least one year because the sequence of








core courses is "lock step". This means you must have completed all previous core courses to register
for core courses offered during subsequent terms. College electives also are offered only once per year
but you can take them as either a junior or a senior. You may take general electives in any sequence that
fits your schedule. However, do not wait to complete prerequisites for your career path. The core health
science courses are required in sequence as part of your program and will take priority. Effective
planning on your part will help prevent conflicts and delays toward your ultimate career goal. Your
overall plan of study must be approved by the program director so be sure you discuss all needed
prerequisites as well as college electives. (Please see Approved Plan of Study on p.14 in this document).

HEALTH SCIENCE COURSE SEQUENCE**
Fall Junior Yr. Spring Junior Yr. Fall Senior Yr. Spring Senior Yr.
Survey of Diseases/ Disability Critical Thinking in Ethical and Legal
Disability Management Health Care Issues in the Health
Professions
U.S. Health Care Pathophysiology Leadership Skills and Research Methods and
System Styles Issues in Health Care
Introduction to Therapeutic Electives Electives
Statistics 2* Communication
Skills
Electives Therapeutic Electives Electives
Communication
Skills Lab
*Must be completed by the end of the junior year but can be taken in spring instead of fall
**There are additional requirements to graduate Magna or Summa Cum Laude; please see Graduation
Requirements section.


PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY TRACK

All general health science policies apply to the pre-OT track with the exception of the specific
course requirements. Please ensure you review this entire manual, not just the pre-OT section.

* MISSION: The preoccupational therapy track within the Bachelor of Health Science Program
includes both core health science courses, which are designed to provide foundation skills to work in the
health care environment, and core pre-OT courses, which are designed to provide the background
students need to meet preprofessional coursework eligibility requirements for the entry-level Master's
(MOT) program at UF. While successful completion of this track does not guarantee graduate admission,
it will satisfy all 3000-4000 level OT prerequisites required by the College of Public Health and Health
Professions' MOT program as long as you have earned a C or better in all prerequisite courses.

* EDUCATIONAL GOALS: In addition to the general health science goals stated previously under
the Health Science track, the pre-OT track is designed to prepare students to:

1. Develop the foundational skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to successfully work in a
health care environment in which occupational therapists practice.
2. Acquire knowledge in biological, psychological, and social systems that impact people's
performance in occupational roles.
3. Acquire fundamental skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary to be competitive for graduate
level study in the Entry-Level Master's Program in OT.








+ COURSEWORK: In the pre-OT Health Science track, you will take a combination of Health
Science core courses (33 credits), pre-OT courses (18 credits), and general electives (9 credits) in
order to complete the 60 hours of junior-senior level courses required for graduation. The core health
science courses are described on p.6, and the pre-OT courses are described below.

REQUIRED PREPROFESSIONAL COURSES FOR PRE-OT STUDENTS*
Course Course Title Credits Course Description
Number
OTH 3200 Applied Human 03 Overview of normal human development from
Development I conception through childhood and the
implications for health and rehabilitation
intervention
OTH 3201 Applied Human 02 Overview of normal human development from
Development II adolescence through adulthood and
implications for health and rehabilitation
intervention
OTH 3413 Applied Kinesiology 03 Detailed study of human movement including
anatomical, physiological, and neurological
aspects
OTH 3416 Pathophysiology 03 Basic overview of normal and abnormal
physiological changes throughout adulthood
OTH 4412 Musculoskeletal 03 Comprehensive foundation in the human
Anatomy musculoskeletal system
OTH 4412L Musculoskeletal 02 Lab for OTH 4412. Lab activities involve the
Anatomy Lab study, under supervision, of cadaver
musculoskeletal anatomy
OTH 4418 Nervous System and 03 Comprehensive foundation in neuroanatomy,
Disorders neurophysiology, and neuropathology
OTH 4418L Nervous System and 02 Lab for OTH 4418. Lab activities involve the
Disorders Lab study, under supervision, of cadaver nervous
system anatomy.
*Please note: Only preprofessional OT courses are listed; you also are required to complete all core
health sciences courses.


* ELECTIVES: You will need a minimum of nine hours of general electives to round out your pre-OT
program. You may take college electives not yet completed or UF 3000 level or higher courses to meet
your general electives requirement. You do not need college approval for elective courses. Please keep
in mind, however, that some electives require permission to enroll.

* COURSE SEQUENCE: The program of study for pre-OT students is listed on the next page. All
courses except statistics and electives must be taken in the term indicated because core courses are
offered only once per year; in addition, many serve as prerequisites for courses that follow in the
sequence. Your electives may be taken in any term they are offered, including the summer. You must
achieve a C or better in each OT prerequisite course and have a 3.0 overall GPA in your pre-OT
coursework in your junior year to continue in the pre-OT track in the senior year. (This includes
Pathophysiology [OTH 3416] as a MOT prerequisite.). If you maintain between a 2.0 and 3.0 GPA, you
will be changed to the health science track for your senior year.








PRE-OT HEALTH SCIENCE COURSE SEQUENCE**
Fall Junior Yr. Spring Junior Yr. Fall Senior Yr. Spring Senior Yr.
Survey of Diseases/ Disability Critical Thinking in Ethical and Legal Issues
Disability Management Health Care in the Health Professions

U.S. Health Care Therapeutic The Nervous System Musculoskeletal
System Communication and Disorders Anatomy
Skills
Introduction to Therapeutic The Nervous System Musculoskeletal
Statistics 2* Communication and Disorders Lab Anatomy Lab
Skills Lab
Applied Human Applied Human Leadership Skills and Applied Kinesiology
Development I Development II Styles
Pathophysiology Research Methods and
Issues in Health Care
Elective
Elective Elective Elective Elective
*Must be completed by end of the junior year but can be taken in spring or summer instead of
fall if preferred
**There are additional course requirements to graduate Magna or Summa Cum Laude; please see
Graduation Requirements section


REHABILITATIVE SERVICES TRACK

* MISSION: To prepare graduates to work in a variety of rehabilitation related occupations where they
will advance the independence, integration, and full participation of individuals with disabilities and/or
service needs in the work force and community.

* EDUCATIONAL GOALS: The Rehabilitative Services track within the bachelor of health science
program is designed to prepare students to:

1. Develop skills, knowledge, and values that will enable graduates to provide quality rehabilitation
services.
2. Empower consumers, such as persons with disabilities, in the development of their personal and
vocational resources.
3. Participate as an integral member of multidisciplinary networks providing services to consumers.
4. Develop a commitment to lifelong learning and professional growth.
5. Receive a sound preparation for graduate education in rehabilitation fields.

* COURSEWORK: In the Rehabilitative Services program, you will take a combination of core
courses (31 hours), approved electives (6 hours), and general electives (23 hours) in order to complete 60
hours of junior-senior 3000 (or higher) level coursework. The core courses are listed in the following
table. The approved electives are intended to help you prepare for your specific career goals and ensure
well-rounded training.









REQUIRED COURSES FOR REHABILITATIVE SERVICES TRACK *
Course Course Title # Of Course Description
Number Credits
HSA 3111 U.S. Health Care 03 Overview of organization, delivery, and financing of
System health services in the U.S. Topics include health
professionals, health care facilities, financing of
health services, managed care, and current health
policy issues
HSC 3502 Survey of Diseases and 04 Overview of medical and psychosocial aspects of
Disability chronic diseases and disabilities
RCS 3030 Introduction to 03 An examination of legislative history and social
Rehabilitation and policies as they relate to rehabilitation and human
Human Services services and their impact on persons with
disabilities; exploration of various careers in
rehabilitation and human services
RCS 4061 Psychosocial Aspects 03 Introduction to the psychological, social, and
of Rehabilitation vocational barriers to adjustment and techniques
used by individuals and society to overcome these
hindrances to rehabilitation
HSC 3661 Therapeutic 02 Understanding basic principles of therapeutic
Communication Skills communication with patients, families and the
health care team
RCS 4415L Therapeutic 01 Hands-on practice of therapeutic communication
Communication Skills skills based on simulated patient health care
Lab scenarios
RCS 4240 Vocational Services in 03 Assessment for vocational potential and analysis of
Health, Rehabilitation, occupational settings directed toward training and
and Human Services work entry in health, rehabilitation, and human
services
HSC 3531 Health and Medical 03 Develop a working knowledge of terminology
Terminology related to the human body in health and disease
through descriptive definitions, practical
applications, understanding word roots,
combinations and medical abbreviations.
HSC 4558 Disability Management 03 Issues in disability management, including
occupational health, impact of disability, treatment
strategies and general rehabilitation process, ADA,
workers compensation, and assistive technology
RCS 4800 Rehabilitation and 03 Development of the role of a rehabilitation and
Human Services human services provider in an agency setting
Practicum I
RCS 4930 Special Topics in 03 Case Management techniques in the rehabilitation
Rehabilitation Services process
RCS 4451 Rehabilitation Aspects 03 Rehabilitation counseling implications of alcohol
of Substance Abuse and drug use in society and the workplace.
Emphasis on detection, treatment, and follow-up
services for individuals in the rehabilitation process
*There are additional course requirements to graduate Magna or Summa Cum Laude; please see
Graduation Requirements section.








+ ELECTIVES: You will take a minimum of 29 hours of electives. Of the 29 hours, 6 hours must be
approved college electives. You can satisfy your college electives requirement in one of two ways you
can complete the minor in public health (please see p.14 for details) or you can complete 6 hours from
the approved college list below. If you select the latter option, you must complete a minimum of two
courses from the list. If your combination of credits is fewer than 6 based on the 2 courses you select and
you do not want to take a third course from the list, you may take the College Independent Study Course
(HSC 4905) or Clinical Observation/Health Care Volunteer Work Course (HSC 3801) to equal a total of
6 credits. The remaining 23 hours are general electives and require no College approval as long as they
are at least 3000-level.


APPROVED ELECTIVES FOR REHABILITATIVE SERVICES TRACK
Students must select a minimum of 6 credits from the electives list below
Course Number Course Name Credit Semester Offered
OTH 3200 Applied Human Development I 3 Fall
OTH 3201 Applied Human Development II 2 Spring
OTH 4314 Psychiatric Disorders 3 Spring
OTH 3416 Pathophysiology 3 Spring
RCS 4804 Advanced Rehabilitative Services Practicum II 3 Summer, Fall,
Spring
PHC 6050* Statistical Methods for Health Sciences I 3 Fall
PHC 6001* Principles of Epidemiology 3 Fall
PHC 6313* Environmental Health Concepts in Public 3 Spring
Health
PHC 6102* Introduction to Public Health Administrative 3 Spring
Systems
PHC 6406* Psychological, Behavioral, and Social Issues in 3 Fall
Public Health
PSY 4930 Introduction to Clinical Psychology 3 Fall
PSY 4930 Introduction to Pediatric Psychology 3 Fall
PSY 4930 Neuropsychology 3 Spring
PSY 4930 Introduction to Health Psychology 3 Spring
*Only open to seniors.


*COURSE SEQUENCE: The suggested program of study for the rehabilitative services emphasis is
listed below. Please note that several core courses must be taken in the semester and year indicated.
However, neither approved nor general electives are lock step. Therefore, you may take approved and
general electives in either the junior or senior year. However, your overall plan of study must be
approved by the program director, and you must meet with the program director to make changes to your
agreed upon schedule for core courses and approved electives. (See Approved Plan of Study section later
in this document p.14.)







REHABILITATIVE SERVICES SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE**
Fall Junior Yr. Spring Junior Yr. Fall Senior Yr. Spring Senior Yr.
Introduction to Vocational Services in Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation Aspects of
Rehabilitation and Health, Rehabilitation, Human Services Substance Abuse
Human Services and Human Services Practicum I

Psychosocial Aspects Therapeutic Special Topics in College Electives
of Rehabilitation Communication Skills* Rehabilitative Services
Survey of Diseases Therapeutic Approved Electives General Electives
and Disability* Communication Skills
Lab*
U.S. Health Care Disability Management* General Electives General Electives
System*

Approved Electives Health and Medical General Electives General Electives
Terminology* *
*Courses must be taken in semester listed
**There are additional course requirements to graduate Magna or Summa Cum Laude; please see
Graduation Requirements section
***Offered every semester


DUAL EMPHASIS IN HEALTH SCIENCE AND REHABILITATIVE
SERVICES

Some students have been admitted to both the health science and rehabilitative tracks in the bachelor of
health science program. The course sequence for the dual emphasis is provided below. All health science
program policies related to the academic plan of study apply to the dual emphasis. Please remember that
the health science core courses for the dual emphasis are lock step and must be taken in the term
indicated. However, many of the rehabilitative services courses can be taken either in the junior or senior
year, as noted below by courses without an asterisk.


COURSE SEQUENCE FOR DUAL EMPHASIS TRACK
Fall Junior Yr. Spring Junior Yr. Fall Senior Yr. Spring Senior Yr.
Survey of Diseases/ Disability Critical Thinking in Ethical and Legal Issues in
Disability* Management* Health Care* the Health Professions*
U.S. Health Care Pathophysiology* Leadership Skills and Rehabilitation Aspects of
System* Styles* Substance Abuse*
Introduction to Vocational Services in Rehabilitation and Research Methods and
Statistics 2 Health, Rehabilitation, Human Services Issues in Health Care*
and Human Services Practicum I
Introduction to Therapeutic Special Topics in Elective
Rehabilitation and Communication Skills* Rehabilitation Services
Human Services
Psychosocial Aspects Therapeutic Health and Medical Elective
of Rehab Communication Skills Terminology***
Lab*
*Courses must be taken in semester listed
**There are additional course requirements to graduate Magna or Summa Cum Laude; please see
Graduation Requirements section
***Offered every semester







OTHER COURSE INFORMATION FOR ALL MAJORS


* PUBLIC HEALTH: Public health focuses on health prevention and promotion and disease
amelioration at the community, national, and international levels. There are two opportunities for
students to become involved in the public health program while still undergraduate.

> Minor In Public Health: The public health minor offers you the opportunity to receive graduate
level training while still an undergraduate and to acquire public health knowledge you may not
otherwise obtain in your professional health care training. If you choose the minor in public
health, in your senior year you will take 15 credits of graduate public health coursework in one or
more core areas of public health, including environmental health, epidemiology, biostatistics,
health management and policy, and social and behavioral sciences. While most students will take
one 3-credit course in each of the five core areas, other course combinations are possible. The
coursework required will be determined in consultation with Dr. Hanson. Successful completion
of the public health minor satisfies the 9-credit college elective requirement; the remaining 6
hours count toward general elective credit. For more information, please see the MPH
website www.mph.ufl.edu.

> Combined Degree Program: The college offers a combined degree program between the BHS
and the MPH program. Qualified students take 15 credits of public health coursework in the
senior year that count toward both degrees, saving a semester of time and money in the graduate
program. Students must have senior level standing to take the public health courses. UF
combined degree programs require a 3.2 GPA and 1100 GRE. (Students typically take the GRE
in spring or summer before their senior year). For more information, please refer to the MPH
website www.mph.ufl.edu or contact Dr. Hanson at shanson@phhp.ufl.edu.

* APPROVED PLAN OF STUDY: You must meet with the program director or his or her designee by
the middle of the second term to discuss your overall career goals and select remaining elective
coursework that will help round out your health science program. Pre-OT Health Science students will
meet with Dr. Foss for the development of their plan of study; Rehabilitative Services students and
Health Science students will meet with Dr. Saxon for the development of their plan of study. You and
the appropriate faculty advisor will complete the "Plan of Study" form indicating agreement with your
courseload, elective coursework, and timeline to graduate. (Please see Appendix for a copy of this form.)
This form must be completed by the end of the 8th week of classes in spring term of the junior year. If
you later decide to make changes to your Plan of Study that involve core courses or required electives,
you must meet again with your faculty advisor. Please be sure you receive a copy of your Plan of Study
when it is originally completed and when any changes are made. If you want to change general electives,
you simply need to e-mail your faculty advisor informing him or her of the changes. Please remember
that you are required to graduate upon completion of all bachelor of health science program requirements
and that your graduation term is determined by your plan of study.

> Program extensions require the written permission of the program director and are granted only
under very limited circumstances.

> Electives listed on the plan of study are not guaranteed because courses can fill quickly. Do not
wait until your final term to finish most of your electives. The electives you want to take may not
be available.

* COURSE REGISTRATION: The University will assign you a registration appointment time. You
can register for some college HSC courses, statistics, and general UF electives on line during or after the








time assigned during the regular registration period. You may register on-line in ISIS-Intergrated Student
Information System. Go to the website www.isis.ufl.edu and click on the Registration button. (If you
have questions about your PIN number, click on the PIN information topic in the upper right hand corner
of the screen.) You must have your PIN number to register.

In general, the college will register you for your core courses with prefixes of HSA or HSC and for
college electives with an HSC or OTH prefix. Exceptions to this will be posted on the website or
distributed via gatorlink e-mail. For courses where registration is college controlled, a registration book
will be available in the Student Services Center during a specified time period each semester for you to
sign up for specific college courses. We will inform you via gator link e-mail or on the BHS website
regarding the courses involved before regular registration. You may not sign up anyone except yourself.
If you do so, you will lose your space in the class. Registration will be on a space-available basis. It is
your responsibility to ensure that you are appropriately registered for all coursework. Please remember
to:

1. Plan ahead Check your academic record to be sure that there are no holds that would
prevent you from registering

2. Make sure you have College sign off on your approved electives before you register

3. Make sure that the courses you want to take in other colleges are open to you before you
register (some departments have closed sections that require permission)

4. Register on time; otherwise you will be charged a late fee

5. Follow the registration directions online in the ISIS registration system

6. Double check to be sure you are registered in the correct section for any course that
offers more than one section

7. Make sure you receive confirmation of your registration information

8. Contact a college or program advisor if you have any trouble with your registration (see
Program Staff relevant to your track, p.26)

*TRANSFER OF CREDIT: All core coursework must be taken in the College; transfer credit is not
accepted except in unanticipated extenuating circumstances and then only with the explicit permission of
the program director. Up to 12 credits of general electives (3000 level or higher) as appropriate, may be
transferred from another institution.

+ GRADING SCALE: All tracks in the Bachelor of Health Science program use the following
grading scale:
90-100 A
85-89.9 B+
80-84.9 B
75-79.9 C+
70-74.9 C
65-69.9 D+
60-64.9 D
Below 60 E








* EXTRA CREDIT: Some instructors will incorporate assignments for extra credit to assist students in
raising their point total. However, these assignments are offered only during the course (not after) and
are made available to everyone in the class so that there is equal opportunity for grade enhancement.
Extra credit can enhance the total point value for each course by a maximum of one-half a letter grade
(e.g. 5 points out of 100).

* EVALUATION of FACULTY and CURRICULUM: Student evaluations of courses and faculty
performance provide essential information to identify success as well as areas for improvement. Courses
and curricula are evaluated in several ways:

> Required semester Course and Instructor Evaluations Students' ratings and written comments on
Course and Instructor Evaluations give feedback to individual faculty members about the courses
they teach. These ratings also become part of the faculty member's personnel file and are used by
administrators to evaluate faculty for promotion, tenure, and teaching awards. You are encouraged to
use your ratings and comments to give constructive feedback to faculty while considering the long-
range implications of these ratings and comments.

SRequired student evaluations of the curriculum prior to graduation Ratings of the overall program,
curriculum, and faculty just prior to graduation provide us with information from your perspective as
a student who has completed the entire program.

> Informal feedback Students give faculty informal information as they interact with faculty in and
out of class and through their performance on tests and other assignments.


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:
The semester in which you will graduate is based on your approved plan of study, which reflects the
timeline you have to complete all BHS program requirements. In order to graduate with your Bachelor
of Health Science degree, you must meet the following requirements:

* You must successfully complete 120 semester credit hours.

+ Of the 120 required hours, you must successfully complete 60 hours at the 3000 level or above in
your junior and senior years in the approved health science or rehabilitative services curriculum.

* You must successfully complete all coursework with an overall GPA of 2.0, and no grades lower than
a C in core college coursework.

+ You cannot have any Incomplete grades.

* If you are on probation your graduating term, you must successfully meet the terms of your College
probation contract at least two days prior to graduation.

* You must complete a Bachelor of Health Science program evaluation form (Degree Candidate Exit
Survey) by the last day of classes in your graduating term. This form is located on the BHS website.
This form should be turned in to the Dean's Office, HPNP 4101.







* You must meet all University requirements for graduation.


* You must submit a graduation application to the Registrar's Office, 222 Criser Hall, between 8am
and 5pm at the beginning of the term in which you want to graduate.

GRADUATING WITH HONORS:
The college has three levels of honors: cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude. The
qualifications for each are listed below. The honors designation (at any level) upon graduation will be
reserved for students without honors code violations. This policy applies to honor code violations that
occur at any time at the University of Florida, from freshman through senior year. If you are interested in
graduating with honors and have questions about the process, please talk with Dr. Hanson or Dr. Foss.

Cum Laude:
GPA of at least 3.50 in junior-senior year after admission to the college
Approval of dean's office based on review of overall academic record

Magna Cum Laude and Summa Cum Laude:
GPA of 3.75 for magna cum laude and 3.85 for summa cum laude in junior-senior
year after admission to the college
Completion of the Honors Seminar (HSC 4969) during Spring term of the
Junior year
Completion of the Honors Thesis course (HSC 4970) each semester in which thesis work
occurs. (Students typically register for 3 credits per term.)
Project of high quality by College deadline of graduation term
Approval of dean's office based on review of overall academic record and project


PROGRAM POLICIES

GATORLINK ACCOUNT: Students must have an active GATORLINK e-mail account, which is used
for college and course-specific correspondence. You are responsible for the content of all college
correspondence sent via e-mail. We will not send e-mail to any other account. Do not forward your mail
from an outside account (e.g. AOL, Netscape, etc.) to Gatorlink. Set up your e-mail system so that our
correspondence goes directly to the Gatorlink account. In addition to Gatorlink, all rehabilitative services
track students have mailboxes in the Department of Rehabilitation Counseling. Students should check
their mailbox frequently.

COMPLIANCE WITH HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996):
All students in the College of Public Health and Health Professions with junior standing are required to
complete HIPAA on-line training and to sign a HIPAA Confidentiality Agreement by the mandatory
orientation of the student's term of admission. A copy of your Certificate of Completion and signed
Confidentiality Agreement must be turned in the day of orientation to Robin Shenk in the Dean's Office
(4101 HPNP). The HIPAA training website is located at http://privacy.health.ufl.edu. In addition,
students must complete HIPAA every year they are in the program. If you are a senior in the health
science, pre-OT, or rehabilitative services track, a copy of your Certificate of Completion and signed
Confidentiality Agreement must be turned in by the fifth day of class in the first fall term of the senior
year to Robin Shenk in the Dean's Office (4101 HPNP). Please keep a copy of your HIPAA compliance
documents. Students in noncompliance will have their records flagged immediately. The College will
drop all classes of students remaining in noncompliance by the end of the second week of classes. Please
note: Even if you have completed HIPAA at another institution including Shands Hospital, you must
repeat the on-line training and sign another confidentiality agreement.









POLICY STATEMENT ON TOLERANCE AND DIVERSITY: The health science program is based
on the belief in human dignity and on respect for the individual. Our faculty members support openness
to and tolerance of differences in ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, gender, and disability status, as
well as respect for differing personal, spiritual, religious, and political values. When we share our
personal beliefs inside or outside of the classroom, it is always with the understanding that we value and
respect diversity of background, experience, and opinion. We further believe that embracing and
celebrating such diversity enriches the quality of the educational experiences we provide our students and
enhances our own personal and professional relationships.

ACADEMIC HONESTY/RECOGNIZING OTHERS' WORK: BHS students are bound by the
academic honesty guidelines of the University and the student conduct code summarized in the
Undergraduate Catalog and the Student Guide, which is located on line at the Dean of Students' Affairs
web site www.dso.ufl.edu. The Honor Code states: "We, the members of the University of Florida
community, pledge to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest standards of honesty and integrity."
The following will be placed on exams, course assignments and work submitted for grade/credit: "On my
honor, I have neither given nor received unauthorized help in completing this assignment."

Violations of the code include taking of information, tendering of information, plagiarism, conspiracy,
misrepresentation and bribery. Ignorance of these guidelines is not a defense for violators. Because of
the amount of writing expected of students, it is imperative that you properly reference material you
submit for class. All work cited from other sources (journals, books, lectures, videotapes, web-sites, etc.)
must be referenced. Phrases or sentences taken word-for-word from another source must be placed in
quotation marks, and the page number must immediately follow the statement. Paraphrased work must
include the reference. Permission from the publisher must be obtained when direct quotes exceed a few
paragraphs.

ATTENDANCE: Classroom attendance is expected because you are a professional student. You are
personally responsible for material covered and announcements/changes to course curricula and
assignments announced in class regardless of attendance. If you are sick or have a medical emergency,
you must notify the instructor in advance of the assignment due date or exam and provide a medical
excuse for the date and time period for the absence from the originally scheduled exam for a make up.
Scheduled medical appointments and/or elective medical procedures are not considered medical
emergencies. If you feel that a medical appointment/procedure is warranted that is not a medical
emergency, you must discuss this with the instructor of your class before missing an exam or other
deadline work. If you are unable to attend class because of another type of serious emergency, you must
notify your instructor in advance of missing the due date to be eligible to make up in-class assignments or
examinations.

PUNCTUALITY: You are expected to be on time for class, tests, meetings and for all other assigned
responsibilities. You will not be given additional time if you are late for an assignment/test. If you miss
a quiz because of lateness to class, you will not be allowed to make it up. Attendance will be taken right
at the start time for classes in which instructors incorporate attendance points in grading. You will not
receive attendance credit if you are late for class.

EXAMINATIONS: Examinations are conducted in accordance with the honor system explained in the
Undergraduate Catalog. Any individual changes in the examination schedule will be in accordance with
University policy. (See also Punctuality above.)








LATE ASSIGNMENT POLICY: Assignments are due at the beginning (i.e. starting time) of the class
period. Students coming in late to a class in which an assignment is due will have their assignment grade
penalized. Assignments turned in during the class period in which the assignment is due but after the
class start time will be subject to a grading penalty as specified by the instructor. In addition, any
assignment that is not completed and turned in on time will be subject to a reduction of one grade for
every day late unless an extension has been granted in advance of the due date. Individual instructors
may implement a more restrictive assignment policy. However, the policy must be clearly stated in the
syllabus (or contract for individual study courses) to be enforceable.

SELF-ADVISEMENT: You are responsible for checking the number of credits completed and needed
to graduate from the BHS program and for checking and understanding the accuracy of University
tracking forms. If you have questions about your credits or graduation requirements, please see an
advisor.

ACADEMIC PROBATION: There are two ways in which a student may be placed on academic
probation. First, if your overall GPA drops below a 2.0 for any term during your program, you may be
placed on academic probation. Second, regardless of your GPA, if you receive a grade of E, D, or D+ in
any core course, you are automatically placed on College academic probation. In both cases, you will be
asked to meet with the program director or his or her designee, who will review the terms of your
academic probation with you. You will have the opportunity to review and discuss the probation terms
with the director. Once your questions have been answered, the director will note the terms of the
contract in your file and your understanding of and agreement to the terms required to return to good
academic standing. You are encouraged to take advantage of the resources available from faculty and
staff of the College and University to support your efforts to return to good academic standing. Faculty
in the BHS program are committed to providing appropriate academic support and mentoring to help you
succeed in the College.

If the terms of your probation are met within the time frame established, you will automatically be
returned to good academic standing. If the terms are not met, the terms will either be modified or you
will be dismissed from the college, depending on your situation. If you are dismissed, advisement will be
provided in seeking a new major at the University, if desired.

DROPPING COURSES: Students may drop a maximum of two courses in the bachelor of health
science program in the junior-senior curriculum. These hours can be general electives, approved
electives, or a combination based on the procedures described below. If you exceed the maximum
number of dropped courses allowed without permission, you are subject to dismissal from the college
because excessive withdrawal from coursework is considered failure to meet the terms of your limited
access admission. It is your responsibility to keep track of your dropped hours and to follow appropriate
University procedures for dropping courses by the required deadlines. Even if a faculty member or
staff person mistakenly signs a drop form that results in you exceeding your limit, you will be
considered in violation of the policy regarding dropped hours and subject to dismissal.

> Core Courses: You can not drop core courses because they are sequential. Dropping even one core
course could substantially delay graduation. If dropping a core course becomes unavoidable because
of poor performance, you must do so only with the written permission of the program director. If this
permission is granted, the dropped core coursework will count towards your maximum of two.

> General Electives: You can drop up to two general elective courses based on your eligibility. You
should inform the faculty advisor overseeing your Plan of Study that you intend to drop a general








elective. (E-mail is fine) Once you have informed the faculty advisor of your intention to drop the
course, make sure you complete a drop form if the drop will occur after the end of the regular
drop/add period allowed by the University. Take the form to the Student Services Center and drop it
in the PHHP forms box at the main desk. Your form will be signed by the program director or an
academic advisor in the dean's office (currently Ms. Wanda Washington or Ms. Melissa Jones) by the
next day if there are no concerns. Your form will be available for pick up at the end of the next
business day. You do not need to schedule an appointment if you simply need your form signed.
Please remember that your advisor is not responsible for delivery of your forms. You are responsible
for picking up your signed drop form and taking it to Criser Hall. You will not be contacted by the
advisor after the form is signed.

> Approved Electives: If you are simply dropping one approved elective and replacing it with
another, you can e-mail your faculty advisor to ensure your Plan of Study is updated. Then follow
the steps for general electives. If, on the other hand, you are dropping an approved elective and not
replacing it, you must obtain the permission of the program director and modify your Plan of Study
accordingly if this plan has already been completed. Make sure you receive a copy of the modified
plan as documentation of this approval. If the course will be dropped after the normal drop/add
period for the University, take a drop form with you to your meeting with the program director
because the director's signature must be on this form. (An academic advisor's signature is not
acceptable unless the associate dean or program director has given written permission for this
signature.) Please remember that the combined number of general and approved courses you can
drop cannot exceed two courses.

ADDING COURSES: Students in good academic standing may add general electives or approved
electives as desired following the same procedure to obtain a signature of approval for dropping general
elective courses. However, if the total number of credit hours for a term exceeds 18 credit hours with the
addition of the course of interest, you must first receive the approval of the director, who must sign your
add form. If you are on academic probation, you may not add courses without the permission of the
program director. While you are on probation, it is highly unlikely that course additions will be approved
without simultaneous drops.

WITHDRAWALS/LEAVES OF ABSENCE: We recognize that sometimes students face
unanticipated situations necessitating withdrawal from all coursework. Withdrawal for a semester or
longer period of time is considered to be a withdrawal from the BHS program. The steps you should
follow differ depending upon whether you want to re-enter the program.

> Withdrawals Without Re-Entry To The Program: You need to inform the program director with
a written statement that you are dropping out of the program and are not requesting re-entry. You
would then follow University procedures for withdrawing entirely from the University.

> Withdrawals With Desired Re-Entry To The Program: While you have the right to withdraw
from the University at any time, your place in the BHS program is not guaranteed if you want to be
re-admitted to the University at a later date. You are only permitted to re-enter the health science
program if you have program approval prior to your withdrawal.

You also must meet all University requirements for readmission. If the University re-admits you,
then the decision to allow you to re-enter the health science program is up to the program director and
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. In order to initiate a withdrawal with desired re-entry, follow
the steps below.







1. Meet with your faculty advisor and inform him or her of your situation Your advisor will discuss
possible options short of withdrawal if available/feasible. If your advisor concurs with the
withdrawal with re-entry, proceed with steps 2-4.

2. Provide two letters of documentation in one packet to the program director: (a) a letter from you
requesting the withdrawal, including the reason for withdrawal and when you would like to re-
enter the program; (b) supporting documentation based on reason for withdrawal and as requested
by the program director (e.g. physician or psychologist documentation, etc.)

3. Wait to withdraw until a decision regarding your withdrawal with re-entry has been made. You
will receive letter or e-mail notification from the program director, who also may want to talk
with you or ask for additional information before making a decision.

4. Follow University procedures for withdrawal. Please note that if you withdraw without notifying
the program director, it is highly unlikely that you will be readmitted to the health science
program.

DISMISSAL FROM THE COLLEGE: Students are generally dismissed from the college for one of
three reasons: they fail to meet the terms of their academic probation or do not meet the minimum
academic standards required for progression, they drop a greater number of hours than they are eligible to
drop, or they demonstrate inappropriate behavior or conduct deemed serious enough for dismissal. In all
College-related activities, we expect students to demonstrate appropriate professional behavior, including
respect for all faculty, staff, students, and guests of the College, and adherence to all University and
College policies and procedures. The Standard of Ethical Conduct and Code of Student Conduct are both
included in the University Student Guide (http://www.dso.ufl.edu/STG/). It is your responsibility to be
familiar with all behavior that violates the University guidelines of appropriate behavior. Regardless of
the reason for dismissal, a designated faculty member will take appropriate steps to discuss the reasons
for your dismissal with you prior to the dismissal taking effect according to due process procedures
appropriate to the reason for dismissal. If you are dismissed from the College, you have the right to
appeal the decision to the dean.

APPEALS PROCESS: The appeals process is slightly different depending upon the type of appeal
initiated. There are three types of appeals that will be considered. First, if you believe a poor grade is the
result of discrimination or inappropriate behavior on the part of the instructor, you can appeal the grade
based on inappropriate faculty conduct. You cannot appeal a low grade on the basis of grade alone.
Second, you can appeal a decision regarding dismissal from the college. Third, you can appeal a decision
denying a leave of absence with re-entry. Listed below are the steps you need to take for each type of
appeal.

SInappropriate instructor behavior resulting in an unfair grade:

1. Try to resolve the situation with the course instructor. You must speak with your course
instructor within one month after the last day of the semester in which you received the grade in
question.

2. If you are dissatisfied with the response of the instructor, talk with the department chair. If still
unresolved, file a formal complaint with the program director. Provide a letter explaining your
grievance; be sure to include the course name and number, instructor, grade received, description







of inappropriate conduct, and any potential witnesses to the misconduct. The program director
will interview both you and the faculty member in an attempt to resolve the situation. The
program director will provide you with a written decision. You must appeal to the program
director within two months of the last day of the semester within which you received the grade in
question. The program director must respond within two weeks of receipt of your appeal or
inform you of any reasonable delay. (If the program director is the focus of your grievance,
submit your grievance to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.)

3. If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the decision of the program director, you may submit
your letter of grievance to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within three months after the
end of the semester. The associate dean will investigate your claim following University
procedures for student grievances. At the discretion of the associate dean, a multidisciplinary
faculty committee may be appointed to review your complaint and to provide both you and the
course instructor the opportunity to present your views. The associate dean will provide a written
response to your grievance within three weeks of your appeal or inform you of any reasonable
delay.

4. If you are dissatisfied with the decision of the associate dean, you may appeal the decision to the
Dean of the College, who will resolve the issue or refer you to the appropriate campus unit. You
must appeal within three weeks of the date of the decision letter from the associate dean, and your
appeal should include a copy of your initial grievance letter along with any supplemental material
you want to include. The Dean of the College will respond to you within one month of the date of
the letter from the associate dean or inform you of any reasonable delay.

SAppealing dismissal based on College academic probation/performance:

1. Provide a written statement addressing why you should be re-instated in the college to the
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. This statement should be made within one month of the
date of your dismissal letter and should include any extenuating circumstances leading to your
failure to meet the terms of your probation contract. The associate dean may interview you as well
as the program director and faculty and staff involved in your program prior to a final decision.
You will receive a written decision to your request within three weeks of the date of your appeal
letter.

2. If you are dissatisfied with the decision of the associate dean, you may appeal your dismissal to
the Dean of the College within three weeks of the date of the decision letter by the associate dean.
Provide a copy of your written statement to the dean and set up an appointment to discuss your
situation. The dean's decision is the final college decision, but you have the right to appeal
further through appropriate University channels.

> Appealing dismissal based on misconduct:

1. You are entitled to a hearing by committee if the college believes dismissal is warranted for a
conduct violation. The appropriate procedures depend on the type of violation alleged to have
occurred. Please consult with the UF Director of Student Judicial Affairs in the Dean of Students
Office regarding your rights related to allegations of misconduct.

COMPUTER POLICY: All students must have access to an appropriately equipped computer. Please
review the policy, Computer Requirementsfor Students, listed in the Appendix.







USE OF COLLEGE SPACE: You may use college space, if available, for student activities related to
your academic program and the College Council. Please refer to the policy, Use of College and Common
HPNP Space for Student Activities, provided in the Appendix.


HEALTH SCIENCE FACULTY

The Health Science program includes a multidisciplinary faculty from the College of Public Health and
Health Professions. These faculty bring diverse experience and expertise in health care practice,
research, administration and/or teaching. We are pleased to provide the brief biosketches below so that
you can learn about our core faculty.

RUSSELL BAUER, PhD, ABPP (273-6140, rbauer@phhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Bauer joined the College in 1980. He is a professor in the Department of Clinical and Health
Psychology and serves as the Director of the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program. Dr. Bauer
received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from Pennsylvania State University in 1979 and is board
certified in Clinical Neuropsychology. He currently serves as a member of the Board of Governors for
the International Neuropsychological Society and as secretary of the Board of Directors for the American
Board of Clinical Neuropsychology. Dr. Bauer's areas of interest include adult neuropsychology,
memory disorders, epilepsy, emotion, and functional neuroimaging. Dr. Bauer teaches the critical
thinking course in the health science program.

JOANNE J. FOSS, PhD, OTR/L (273-6017, jfoss@phhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Foss joined the College in 1989. She is a clinical assistant professor and the Director of Professional
Programs in the Department of Occupational Therapy. She also serves as the Assistant Dean for
Academic Affairs. After receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in Occupational Therapy from
Colorado State University in 1974, she practiced as a pediatric OT in Wyoming and New York states.
She earned a Master's Degree in Counseling and Guidance at Syracuse University in 1989. She earned a
Ph.D. at the University of Florida in Higher Education in 2002. Dr. Foss' interests are in pediatric
intervention, specifically infants and toddlers, human development and professional higher education.
Dr. Foss teaches Human Development I and II in the health science pre-OT track.

ROBERT G. FRANK, PhD, ABPP (273-6214, rfrank@phhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Frank joined the College in 1995. He is professor and Dean of the College of Health Professions. Dr.
Frank received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of New Mexico in 1979. He
subsequently joined the faculty of the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Department
of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, where he established the Division of Clinical Health
Psychology and Neuropsychology. From 1991 to 1995, Dr. Frank worked on federal and state health
policy. As a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow, he worked for Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM).
After completing the fellowship, Dr. Frank returned to the University of Missouri where, as assistant to
the dean for health policy, he continued to work on federal and state health policy. He also continued to
work with Senator Bingaman and managed Missouri's state health reform effort, the ShowMe Health
Reform Initiative. He is a Diplomate in Clinical Psychology from the American Board of Professional
Psychology. He also is past president of the Division of Rehabilitation Psychology of the American
Psychological Association and a Fellow in the Divisions of Rehabilitation Psychology and Health
Psychology. He has chaired the American Psychological Association's Committee on Professional
Continuing Education (1997) and its Board of Educational Affairs (2000). In addition to his
administrative responsibilities, Dr. Frank guest lectures in the U.S. Health Care System course in the
health science curriculum and teaches the Honors Seminar.







ROBERT GARRIGUES, PhD, (273-6194, rgarrigu(iphhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Garrigues joined the College in 1971 although he primarily served in the Health Science Center's
Vice President's office as the Chief Financial and Operations Officer until 1998. In 1998, he joined the
College full-time. Dr. Garrigues received his PhD in College and University Administration in 1970.
Although retiring this year, Dr. Garrigues is back by popular demand, serving as an adjunct lecturer. His
interests include health administration, finances, and personnel. Dr. Garrigues teaches the U.S. Health
Care System and the Leadership Skills and Styles courses in the health science program.

STEPHANIE HANSON, PhD, ABPP (273-6377, shanson@phhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Hanson joined the College in 1996 and serves as the Executive Associate Dean. She received her
PhD's in Clinical Psychology and Developmental Psychology from Vanderbilt University in 1986. Dr.
Hanson is board certified in Rehabilitation Psychology and recently stepped down after completing a 4-
year term on the Executive Board of the American Board of Rehabilitation Psychology, which certifies
psychologists in the specialty area of rehabilitation. Dr. Hanson chaired the Social and Ethical
Responsibility Committee for the Division of Rehabilitation Psychology of the American Psychological
Association for 7 years. Dr. Hanson's interests include ethical practice in complex health care delivery
systems, interdisciplinary team functioning, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and clinical and academic
program development. Dr. Hanson oversees administrative aspects of the Health Science program and
co-teaches Therapeutic Communication Skills.

JAMES JOHNSON, PhD, ABPP (273-6144, jjohnson@phhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Johnson joined the College in 1979 after serving on the faculty of the University of Texas Medical
Center and the University of Washington. He is a professor in the Department of Clinical and Health
Psychology. Dr. Johnson received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from Northern Illinois University in
1976 and is board certified in Clinical Child Psychology. He currently serves on the Board of Directors
of the American Academy of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology and is a Past President of the
Section on Clinical Child Psychology of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Johnson's areas of
research interest include Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the relationship between stress and
child and family functioning. Dr. Johnson is the faculty supervisor for the Introduction to Clinical Child
Psychology course in the health science program.

THOMAS R. KERKHOFF, PhD, ABPP (RP) (265-5491 X70168, kerkhtr@shands.ufl.edu)
Dr. Kerkhoff joined the College in 1999. He is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of
Clinical & Health Psychology. He received his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Virginia
Commonwealth University in 1976 and is board certified in Rehabilitation Psychology. He has been on
the faculty of the Ohio State University, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wright
State University, Department of Family Practice and School of Professional Psychology, maintained a
private part-time consulting practice, and is currently based at Shands Rehabilitation Hospital. He has
served as a member of the American Psychological Association Division 22 Rehabilitation Psychology
Committee for Social and Ethical Responsibility for 6 years, and was co-chair for one year. His interests
lie in clinical practice ethics, rehabilitation psychology, neuropsychology, and program
development/consultation. Dr. Kerkhoff teaches the Ethical and Legal Issues course in the health science
program.

JAMIE L. POMERANZ, PhD, CRC (273-6745, ipomeran(iiphhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Pomeranz joined the College in 2005. He is an assistant professor in the Department of
Rehabilitation Counseling. He received his doctorate in Rehabilitation Science from the University of
Florida in 2005. He is a certified rehabilitation counselor. Dr. Pomeranz's areas of interest include life
care planning, psychosocial aspects of disability, and measuring rehabilitation outcomes. Dr. Pomeranz
teaches Psychosocial Aspects of Rehabilitation in the rehabilitative services curriculum.







LORIE G. RICHARDS, PhD, OTR (273-6817, Irichard(ip)hhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Richards joined the College in 2003. She shares a joint appointment with the Department of
Occupational Therapy, and the Veteran's Administration Medical Center. She received her entry-level
OT degree from Elizabethtown College and her Master's degree from Syracuse University. She received
a Ph.D. in Psychology from Syracuse in 1992. Before coming to Gainesville, she held a faculty position
at the University of Kansas Medical Center and served as an Associate Scientist in the Center of Aging at
Kansas. Dr. Richards is currently involved in research projects studying the safety and efficacy of
cortical stimulation in patients with cerebral vascular accidents, the cultural issues of caregiving, the
effects of fatigue, and issues of aging. Dr. Richards' areas of interest include stroke rehabilitation and
recovery, caregiver issues, and aging. She teaches the kinesiology course in the Health Science/pre-OT
track.

JOHN P. SAXON, PhD (273-6745, jsaxon@phhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Saxon joined the College in 1971 and was granted Professor Emeritus status in 2006. He received his
Ph.D. in Counseling and Student Personnel Services and his M.Ed. in Rehabilitation Counseling from the
University of Georgia. Dr. Saxon has over 36 years experience as a Rehabilitation Counselor Educator
and has worked as a psychiatric rehabilitation counselor. Dr. Saxon is a licensed psychologist in the state
of Florida and works with the Rehabilitative Services and the Health Science Program students. He
teaches in both areas.

KIMBERLY SHAW, PhD (273-5270, kshaw(ip)hhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Shaw is a clinical associate professor and the Director of the Pediatric Psychology Inpt Consultation
Program. After receiving her doctoral degree in Pediatric/Clinical Child Psychology from the University
of Miami in 1989 she became the Director of Adolescent Health Psychology at the University Of Miami
School Of Medicine. In 2000 she became the Director of Research and Graduate Training at the
Mailman Segal Institute for Early Childhood studies until joined the College in 2005. Dr Shaw's clinical
and research interests include developmental psychopathology and public health; child and adolescent
health psychology; attachment/ neurobiology of interpersonal experience and emotional regulation as it
impacts health outcomes; infant mental health; family adaptation to chronic stressors.

ORIT SHECHTMAN, PhD, OTR/L (273-6817, oshechtm()phhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Shechtman joined the College in 1995. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of
Occupational Therapy. She received her doctorate in Exercise Physiology from Indiana University in
1988 and her Master's of Health Science in Occupational Therapy from the University of Florida in
1995. She had been a research associate in the Department of Physiology at the University of Florida and
in the Geriatric Research Center at the National Institute on Aging. Dr. Shechtman is board certified in
occupational therapy. Her research interests are exercise physiology, upper extremity injuries, and
ergonomics. Current research projects include upper extremity strength and function in individuals with
spinal cord injury, driving assessments, and sincerity of effort of grip strength in individuals with
cumulative trauma injury. Dr. Shechtman teaches Pathophysiology, Musculoskeletal Anatomy, and
Nervous System and Disorders.

MARY ELLEN YOUNG, PhD, C.R.C. (273-6496, myoung@phhp.ufl.edu)
Dr. Young is a Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health.
Dr. Young has authored or co-authored 20 peer-reviewed publications and has given over 50 professional
presentations. She holds master's and doctoral degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling and Counselor
Education from the University of Georgia. Her postdoctoral research training was at Baylor College of
Medicine in Houston, Texas. Dr. Young's research interests can be broadly defined as the study of
adaptation to disability, especially catastrophic injury or chronic illness. Specific topics of interest
include vocational outcomes, community integration, substance abuse, sexuality, cultural diversity and
minority issues, and abuse and violence in the lives of persons with disabilities.







PROGRAM STAFF


Registration Assistance and Advising

MS. EILEEN PHILLIPS (273-6745, ephillip@phhp.ufl.edu) Ms. Phillips joined the College in 1998.
She is a senior secretary and provides general information and registration assistance for Rehabilitative
Services majors.

MS. MELISSA JONES (273-6400, mjones@phhplufl.edu) Ms. Jones joined the college in 2005
although she has been with the University since 1994. Ms. Jones works in the dean's office and serves as
one of the primary advisors for BHS students.

MS. MARCIA MCLEOD (273-6400, mmcleod@phhp.ufl.edu) Ms. McLeod joined the College in
1990 although she has been with the University since 1981. Ms. McLeod works in the dean's office and
provides assistance to the deans and departmental faculty and staff regarding operational issues and
student tracking. She also is involved with degree certification, junior/senior advising, tracking, and
registration.

MARGARET ODOM (273-6817, modom(~,phhp.ufl.edu) Ms. Odom joined the College in 2000. She
is a Program Assistant in charge of Student Affairs in the Department of Occupational Therapy. She
assists with admissions, registration, and course and fieldwork scheduling for the department graduate
programs. Her primary role in the health science program is to assist pre-OT students with scheduling
and provide OT program information.

MS. WANDA WASHINGTON (273-6400, wanda@phhp.ufl.edu) Ms. Washington is employed by
the Health Science Center Vice President's office but provides academic advising to students in the
Colleges of Public Health and Health Professions, Nursing, and Pharmacy. Ms. Washington has served
the College since 1999 although she has been with the University since 1987. She serves as one of the
primary advisors for BHS students.

Scheduling Appointments

TBA (273-6377) Works in the dean's office as the executive secretary for the Executive Associate Dean.
Is responsible for scheduling appointments with Dr. Hanson.

MS. GERALDINE LEE (273-6209, glee@phhp.ufl.edu) Ms. Lee joined the College in 1996 although
she has worked at the University since 1983. Ms. Lee works in the dean's office as the program assistant
for the Executive Associate Dean. Ms. Lee is responsible for scheduling student appointments with Dr.
Hanson.

MS. ROBIN SHENK (273-6379, rshenk@phhp.ufl.edu) Ms. Shenk joined the College in 2005
although she has worked at the University since 1998. Ms. Shenk is a program assistant in the dean's
office and is responsible for scheduling health science student appointments with Dr. Saxon, for
organizing program materials, and ensuring students receive and return documents required by the dean's
office that relate to program admission and progression.

Financial Assistance

MR. MIKE MENEFEE (273-6202) Mr. Menefee is employed by UF Student Financial Affairs and
has provided services to the College since 1999. He serves as the Coordinator for Student Financial Aid







for the Colleges of Public Health and Health Professions, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Veterinary Medicine.
Mr. Menefee is responsible for reviewing health science and rehabilitative services students' eligibility
for different types and amounts of financial aid.


COLLEGE COUNCIL

The College Council is the primary student organization in the College. The purpose of the Council is to
promote an interdisciplinary approach to health services, enhance community awareness of the different
professions within the College, and organize and participate in community service projects. Money
raised by the Council supports charitable organizations consistent with the College of Public Health and
Health Professions' mission, student education, and future Council projects. The Council works directly
with a faculty advisor and represents students across the different College programs. The health science,
pre-OT, and rehabilitative services students are asked to select representatives for the College Council.
Meetings are held in the College once a month. Officers are currently elected each fall. The 2005-2006
officers are listed below:


OFFICE
President
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Public Relations
Social Chair

Faculty Advisor


NAME
Janet Brishke
Erica Cook
Bridget Carres
Alexis Flores
Amy Benford
Melanie Salamone

Dr. Orit Shechtman


E-MAIL ADDRESS
ibriske@ufl.edu
uf4erica@ufl.edu
bridget3@ufl.edu
rx71988@ufl.edu
amynb@ufl.edu
dancer31@ufl.edu

rspitzna@phhp.ufl.edu


HEALTH SCIENCE STUDENT ORGANIZATION
(HSSO)

The purpose of HSSO is to unify and promote cohesiveness and communication between the junior and
senior classes, and the students and faculty. It provides a forum for students within the program to get to
know each other and learn about their prospective future professions through the student mentoring
program. The HSSO makes available information, opportunities, and service activities within the health
professions throughout the University and community.


OFFICE
President
Co-Vice President
Co-Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Historian

Faculty Advisor


NAME
Alexis Flores
Cherisse Roman
Amy Benford
Janet Brishke
Melanie Salamone
Bridget Carres


E-MAIL ADDRESS
rx71988@ufl.edu
romanc@ufl.edu
amynb@ufl.edu
ibrishke@ufl.edu
dancer 31 ufl.edu
bridget3@ufl.edu


Dr. Orit Shechtman oshechtman(@phhp.ufl.edu







In addition to the College Council and the Health Science Student Organization, the Student
Occupational Therapy Association, the Student Physical Therapy Association, the University
Rehabilitation Association, and other professionally oriented organizations may be of interest. Please
contact the program director for additional information.


GENERAL PROGRAM REMINDERS

IDENTIFICATION BADGES: You must purchase a Gator One card, which is your photo
identification badge. The badge must be obtained through BMS, Biomedical Media Services, a division
of the Office of Academic Technology (C3-3 Communicore). BMS requires an appointment (273-5044).
Make sure you take your acceptance letter from the college and your driver's license or other picture
identification. You must have your Gator One card with you at all times in the Health Science
Center/Shands Hospital complex when involved in student activities.

EXPENSES: In addition to the usual tuition, books, and supplies, you should anticipate the expenses
listed below:

> photo identification badges
> laboratory fees
> vaccinations
> health insurance
Shand-outs and materials for classes and/or presentations
> required computer hardware and software

CLASS PHOTOGRAPHS: We ask that you pose for a group photograph as a representation of your
entering class. Typically the photograph is taken during student orientation.

HEALTH REQUIREMENTS

> IMMUNIZATIONS: In addition to University immunization requirements, all students in the
health science programs must provide proof of immunity to the chicken pox virus. Students must
present medical documentation of immunization or positive titer to the Student Health Care
Center (SHCC). The Titer test needs to be completed before the first day of the term of
admission. The Student Health Care Center offers the Titer test Monday and Tuesday 8:00 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m., Wednesday 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., and Monday through Thursday, 1:00 p.m. to
4:00 p.m. The current cost is $26. In addition, students needing to complete their Hepatitis B
series can do so at the SHCC, if desired. The Student Health Care Center (392-1161) currently
offers the Hepatitis B vaccinations on Monday through Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and
Monday through Thursday, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00.p.m. The current cost is $50 per hepatitis shot for a
total of $150. (Costs are subject to change.)

> TUBERCULOSIS TEST: Health Science students are required to be tested annually for
Tuberculosis (or to provide documentation from a physician that this test is contraindicated). This
TB test needs to be completed by the end of the first week of Fall semester classes. The Student
Health Care Center offers the TB test on Monday through Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
and Monday through Thursday, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The current cost is $15. (Costs are subject
to change.)







SBLOODBORNE PATHOGEN (BBP) TRAINING: BBP Training, required each fall, can be
completed on line at www.phhp.ufl.edu/bahealthsci. You will not be allowed to register for the
next term without completion of this training. This training is required of all Health Science
Center students.

BIOTERRORISM: The following telephone numbers are provided for response to suspicious looking
letters, packages, or other items. If you find something suspicious during the class day, please also notify
the dean's office or your instructor. Do not attempt to open or remove the material.

Internal Contacts:

Director On Call 877-364-1252

Infection Control 265-0284
(Office hours 7:30 am to 5 pm Monday Friday)

Weekends and Nights (Page 877-364-0406 for Infection Control
Director or Shands Operator for Infectious Disease on Call Physician)

Or call 911

DRESS CODE: You are expected to dress in a manner appropriate to the class assignment. In general,
you may dress in casual attire for class. However, you should dress professionally when appropriate to a
site you are visiting or when meeting health representatives as part of your college activities. Please also
be respectful of the diversity of our students in selecting attire.

SMOKING: Smoking is not permitted anywhere in the Health Science Center or HPNP Complex.

CELL PHONES and BEEPERS: Audio ringers on cell phones and beepers must be
DEACTIVATED before entering the classroom. Cell phone use is not permitted during class time.



CAMPUS FACILITIES

HPNP COMPLEX: Most of your classes and the administrative areas for your programs are located in
the HPNP complex. This is a state-of-the-art, wireless facility shared by the Colleges of Public Health
and Health Professions, Nursing, and Pharmacy. The building is located just north of the Communicore
building, the other major facility in which you may have classes. The HPNP complex has 5 floors (G-4),
with the ground floor and a section of the first floor representing common space. The upper floors house
college-specific personnel with Public Health and Health Professions occupying the east wing, Nursing
the middle section and Pharmacy the west wing. The OT department is located on the 2nd floor
(southeast); the Rehabilitation Counseling department (northeast) and Dean's Office (southeast) are
located on the 4th floor.

Class Locations: The majority of your classes will be located on the ground or first floor. In
order to assist you in finding your classes, the layout is as follows:

All classrooms assigned on the ground floor begin with the letter G. All classrooms on the
first floor begin their numbering with a 1.








The numbering continues from east to west with all rooms on the east side of the building
(the Public Health and Health Professions side) beginning with a 1, the central part
(Nursing) beginning with a 2, and the west side (the Pharmacy side), beginning with a 3.
For example, if your classroom is scheduled to be in G300, your classroom location is on
the ground floor on the west side of the building.

The auditorium (1404) is located in the far west part of the building and has a reception
area with tables below it on the ground floor allowing you to study and eat. There are
vending machines and a student bulletin board located in the reception area.

Student Services Center: The Student Services Center is located in the center section of the
ground floor (G205). This is where you will sign up for restricted college courses and find the
academic and financial aid advisors.

Other Services: Vending machines, a bulletin board for posting notices, and a Java Hut are
located in the student reception area (west side of building). Java Hut hours: Monday Friday
7:30 a.m. 2:00 p.m. An ATM and additional vending machines are located on the ground floor
on the east side of the building (College of Public Health and Health Professions side).

LIBRARY: The Health Science Center Library system is one of the largest health science center
libraries in the United States. It is located on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd floors of the Communicore Building.
You must have your Gator One Card available when in the library because some library services are
limited to Health Science Center personnel and students. Books placed on reserve for health science
courses will be on the 2nd floor of the library. There also is a computer lab on the second floor for
conducting literature searches.

Hours: Monday Thursday 7:30 am Midnight
Friday 7:30 am 7:00 pm
Saturday 8:00 am 5:00 pm
Sunday 1:00 pm Midnight

Holiday schedules are posted on the door of the library and published in the independent student
newspaper, The Florida Alligator. Xerox machines are located on the 2nd and 3rd floors of the library.
For additional information, check the brochures available at the library.

BOOKSTORE: The bookstore/convenience store for the Health Science Center is located in the
Medical Sciences Building near the Post Office on the ground floor. This bookstore carries texts for
HSC courses and is open: Monday Friday 8:00 am 5:30 pm.

CIRCA COMPUTER LABS: CIRCA computer labs are open to all UF students for coursework and
personal use. All computer lab users must show a Gator One card. CIRCA computer labs are staffed
with student lab operators who manage lab activity and provide limited software and hardware assistance.
CIRCA staff do not teach classes or help students with their homework. For more information, call
CIRCA Operations at 392-2428.

TEACHING CENTER: The Teaching Center provides students with assistance in written
communication skills, such as developing and organizing papers, building vocabulary, grammar, and
study skills, and GRE preparation. The Center is located in SW Broward Hall. For more information,
call 392-2010.







STUDENT HEALTH CENTER AT SHANDS HOSPITAL: The Student Health Care Center at
Shands is a satellite clinic of the main Student Health Care Center located on Fletcher Drive on campus.
Student Health at Shands offers a variety of clinical services, including primary care, women's health
care, immunizations, and pharmacy services. The clinic is located on the second floor of the Dental
Tower in the Health Science Center. For more information, contact the clinic at 392-0627 or check out
the web site at www.health.ufl.edu/shcc

COUNSELING CENTER: The University Counseling Center, located in Peabody Hall, offers a wide
range of services to assist students with academic, career, or personal questions and concerns. Services
include individual and group counseling and therapy, workshops on a variety of topics, such as building
math confidence, managing stress, and developing effective study skills, and services related to career
development. For more information, contact 392-1575 or check out the web site at www.counsel.ufl.edu

CAREER RESOURCE CENTER: The Career Resource Center provides career planning and
employment assistance to all students and alumni. The Center offers a wide range of seminars on topics
such as interviewing techniques and resume preparation. In addition, the Center contains an extensive
library on different career options, data on economic trends, and facilitates recruitment activities for a
variety of businesses. The Career Resource Center is located on the first floor of the Reitz Union. For
more information, contact 392-1601 or check out the web site at www.crc.ufl.edu

FOOD SERVICE:

, The hospital cafeteria, Wendy's, Pizza Inn and TCBY/Hovan are all located on the first floor of
Shands Hospital.

Mini Mall Food Hours:
Wendy's Monday Sunday 6:00 a.m. 3:00 a.m.

Pizza Inn Monday Sunday 9:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m.

TCBY/Hovan Monday Sunday 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

Cafeteria Hours: Monday Friday
Breakfast 6:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m.
Lunch 10:30 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
Dinner 5:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.

/ Sun Terrace is located in the courtyard near the entrance to the Health Science Center Library and
offers breakfast as well as a variety of sandwiches, drinks, a salad bar, and Chick-Fil-A.

Monday Friday 7:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.

V Beaty Breadbasket, located on Museum Road immediately in front of Beaty Towers, serves
sandwiches, frozen yogurt, and soft drinks.

Monday Friday hours vary by semester

V Reitz Union, located on Museum Road, offers a variety of restaurants, including Wendy's, Subway,
Taco Bell, Noodle Bar, Honu Zone, and I Can't Believe It's Yogurt.


Days and hours vary per food court







GIFT STORE AND MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS: Shands Hospital houses a gift store called the Gift
Stop, which is located on the main floor (first floor) of Shands Hospital adjacent to the main entrance and
elevators. An ATM is also located near the central elevators near the cafeteria. The Reitz Union has
many different shops that carry a variety of items. There are also ATMs located at the Reitz Union each
of these stores has its own business hours.

POST OFFICE: A post office is located on the ground floor of the Medical Sciences Building near the
bookstore. Hours: Monday Friday 8:00 am 3:00 pm.



OTHER GENERAL INFORMATION

CPR: You are encouraged to become CPR certified. CPR certification is offered through the American
Heart Association and the Red Cross. For students' convenience, CPR courses are also regularly offered
at the Student Health Care Center. Call 392-1161 x 4283 for further information.

NEWSPAPER: Newspapers are available in Shands Hospital (near the East Entrance and Northside of
the communicore building) and on Museum road in front of Beaty Towers. The Florida Alligator, the
"unofficial student newspaper," is distributed throughout the campus and can also be found at distribution
points around the Gainesville community. It is published daily during the regular semester schedule.

PARKING: Parking facilities are extremely limited. Therefore, you will be required to park in the area
assigned to you at the time you register your vehicle on campus. Parking decals are available through
UF's Traffic and Parking Division located on the corner of North-South Drive and Mowry Road.

OTHER RESOURCES: There are a variety of other services not represented in this manual that are
available at the University of Florida. Examples include assistance for students with disabilities, legal
services, speech and hearing services, dental care, and recreational facilities. You may consult the
Undergraduate Catalog, the Student Guide, and the University website for descriptions and additional
information. Contact the Office of Student Services, 392-1261, Peabody Hall for your copy of the
Student Guide or check out the web site at www.dso.ufl.edu








APPENDICES


1. PLAN OF STUDY-HEALTH SCIENCE

2. PLAN OF STUDY- PRE-OT HEALTH SCIENCE

3. PLAN OF STUDY-REHABILITATIVE SERVICES

4. PLAN OF STUDY-DUAL EMPHASIS

5. HONORS COURSES/COLLEGE ELECTIVES

6. COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS

7. USE OF COLLEGE AND COMMON HPNP SPACE FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES







COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS
BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE PROGRAM

GRADUATING WITH HONORS

REQUIRED COURSES: All students must successfully complete thefollowing courses to graduate magna cum
laude or summa cum laude. (Please note: Only 3 credits of courses can count toward the 9 credits of college electives.)

HSC 4969 (2 to 3 credits) Honors Seminar
HSC 4970 (1 to 6 credits) Honors Thesis -students must take at least 3 credits and enroll each semester in which they are
working on their project. Students typically will enroll in 6-9 credits of HSC 4970 across 2-3 semesters.

APPROVED COLLEGE ELECTIVES

HEALTH SCIENCE TRACK: APPROVED ELECTIVES
Students must select a minimum of 3 courses and complete a minimum of 9 credits from the following courses


OTH 3200 (3) Applied Human Development I
OTH 3201 (2) Applied Human Development II*
OTH 3413 (3) Applied Kinesiology**
OTH 4314 (3) Psychiatric Disorders
OTH 4412 (3) Musculoskeletal Anatomy
OTH 4412L (2) Musculoskeletal Anatomy Lab***
OTH 4418 (3) The Nervous System and Disorders
OTH 4418L (2) The Nervous System and Disorders Lab***
RCS 4061 (3) Psychosocial Aspects of Rehabilitation
RCS 4451 (3) Rehabilitation Aspects of Substance Abuse
RCS 3030 (3) Introduction to Rehabilitation and Human
Services
RCS 4240 (3) Vocational Services in Health,
Rehabilitation and Human Services


PHC 6050 (3) Statistical Methods for Health Sciences I
PHC 6001 (3) Principles of Epidemiology
PHC 6313 (3) Environmental Health Concepts in Public
Health
PHC 6102 (3) Introduction to Public Health Administrative
Systems
PHC 6406 (3) Psychological, Behavioral, and Social
Issues in Public Health
PSY 4930 (3) Introduction to Clinical Psychology
PSY 4930 (3) Introduction to Pediatric Psychology
PSY 4930 (3) Neuropsychology
PSY 4930 (3) Introduction to Health Psychology


*Human Development II does not require completion of Human Development I
**Students interested in Kinesiology must take Kinesiology with Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Lab (Please note:
Students interested in Anatomy but not Kinesiology can take Anatomy alone)
***Labs must be taken with their corresponding lecture

REHABILITATIVE SERVICES TRACK: APPROVED ELECTIVES
Students must select a minimum of 2 courses and complete a minimum of 6 credits from the following courses


OTH 3200 (3) Applied Human Development I
OTH 3201 (2) Applied Human Development II*
OTH 4314 (3) Psychiatric Disorders
OTH 3416 (3) Pathophysiology
RCS 4804 (3) Advanced Rehabilitative Services
Practicum II
PHC 6050 (3) Statistical Methods for Health Sciences I
PHC 6001 (3) Principles of Epidemiology
PHC 6313 (3) Environmental Health Concepts in
Public Health


PHC 6102 (3) Introduction to Public Health Administrative
Systems
PHC 6406 (3) Psychological, Behavioral, and Social
Issues in Public Health
PSY 4930 (3) Introduction to Clinical Psychology
PSY 4930 (3) Introduction to Pediatric Psychology
PSY 4930 (3) Neuropsychology
PSY 4930 (3) Introduction to Health Psychology


* Human Development II does not require completion of Human Development I







ADDITIONAL COLLEGE ELECTIVES AVAILABLE
(These do not count toward required college approved electives)

HSC 4905 (1 to 4 credits) Individual Work
*HSC 3801 (1 to 4 credits) Clinical Observation/Health Care Volunteer Work (S/U only)
*Requires Memorandum of Understanding







EXAMPLES OF GENERAL ELECTIVES BY TOPIC
(Please note: The list below is noncomprehensive and some courses may not be available. Please
consult the undergraduate catalog and ISIS for a complete course inventory. Discuss specific
course choices with your advisor if you have questions.)


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE AREA COURSES
BCH 4024 (4 ) Introduction to Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
CHM 3217 (4) One Semester Organic Chemistry (prereg: CHM 2046 or CHM 2047 or CHM 2051 and CHM 2046L or
CHM 2047L or consent of instructor)
CHM 3218 (4) Bioorganic Chemistry (prereq. CHM 2111)
CHM 4207 (4) Introduction to Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (prereq: CHM 2210-2211 or equivalent)
CHM 4302L (2) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Lab
EES 3000 (3) Environmental Science and Humanity
MCB 3020 (4) Basic Biology of Microorganisms (Prereq: C or better in BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
or AGR 3033; CHM 2210 or CHM 2200)
MCB 4304 (3) Genetics of Microorganisms ( prereq: MCB 3020, MCB 3020L with C or better; BCH 4024 or CHM
4207)
MEL 4003 ( ) Cell Biology Seminar
PCB 3063 (4) Genetics (prereq. BSC 2011-2011L)

BIOMEDICAL AREA COURSES
AGR 3303 (3) Genetics (Prereq bio, ZOO 2010 and BOT 2010)
ANT 3514C (3) Introduction to Biological Anthropology
ANT 4462 (3) Culture and Medicine
EES 3000 (3) Environmental Science and Humanity
HSC 3531 (3) Health and Medical Terminology
HSC 4905 (V) individual Study in Health Professions
PSB 3004 (3) Introduction to Physiological Psychology
SYO 4400 (3) Medical Sociology (Prereq: SYG 2000)

COMMUNICATION AREA COURSES
LIN 3010 (3) Introduction to Linguistics
SPA 4004 (3) Language Development
SPA 4104 (3) Neural Basis of Communication

GENERAL DIVERSITY AREA COURSES
ANT 3302 (3) Sex Roles: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
ANT 3451 (3) Racial and Cultural Minorities
EEX 3312 (3) Exceptional People in School and Society
HLP 4933 (3) International Topics Study Abroad (offered randomly)

HEALTH AGENCIES/BUSINESS AREA COURSES
HSC 4624 (3) Trends in International Health
MAN 3025 (4) Principles of Management
MAN 3240 (4) Organizations: Structure and Behavior
MAR 3023 (4) Principles of Marketing
PUR 3000 (3) Introduction to Public Relations

NUTRITION AREA COURSES
DIE 3310 (2) Community Nutrition (prereq. HUN 2201)
HUN 3403 (2) Nutrition Through the Life Cycle (Prereq. HUN 2201)







PSYCHOLOGICAL AREA COURSES
CLP 3144 (3) Abnormal Psychology
DEP 3053 (3) Developmental Psychology (prereq. PSY 2013)
DEP 4305 (3) Adolescent Psychology
DEP 4115 (3) Infant Psychology (prereq. DEP 3053)
DEP 4404 (3) Psychology of Aging
EAB 3002 (3) Principles Behavior Analysis
EDF 3110 (3) Human Growth and Development
PPE 3004 (3) Psychology of Personality
SDS 3340 (3) Career and Life Span Planning
SDS 3482 (3) Stress and Anxiety Management
SOP 3004 (3) Social Psychology

SOCIOLOGICAL AREA COURSES
ANT 4403 (3) Environment and Cultural Behavior
ANT 4462 (3) Culture and Medicine
GEO 4431 (3) Residential and Environmental Quality of Life of Elderly Americans
CCJ 3024 (3) Advanced Principles of Criminal Justice
CCJ 3038 (3) Law and Society
GEY 4001 (3) Issues and Concepts in Gerontology
CCJ 4466 (3) Victimology
SYO 3534 (3) Poverty
SYO 4102 (3) American Families
SYO 4180 (3) Families and Work
SYD 3700 (3) Minorities in American Society
SYP 3510 (3) Deviance
SYP 4730 (3) Sociology of Aging and Life Course
SYP 4731 (3) Aging, Self and Society
SYP 4740 (3) Sociology of Death and Suviorship

EXAMPLES OF DISTANCE LEARNING COURSES Students should check the distance learning
website www.fcd.ufl.edu to determine all courses offered and prerequisite requirements:
ADV 3000 (3) Elements of Advertising ISM 3004 (4) Business Computing
ANT 3514 (3) Biological Anthropology MAN 3025 (3) Principles of Management
CCJ 3011 (3) Criminology MAN 3600 (3) Multinational Business Operations
CCJ 3101 (3) Law Enforcement MAR 3023 (3) Basic Marketing Concepts
CCJ 3200 (3) The Courts (Prereq: ECO 2023)
CCJ 3301 (3) Corrections PAD 3003 (3) Public Administration in
CCJ 3664 (3) Victimology American Society
CHD 3220 (3) Child Growth and Development PET4948C (3) Group Exercise Leadership
CLP 3144 (3) Abnormal Psychology (Prereq: PSY 2012) Training
DEP 3053 (3) Developmental Psychology (Prereq: PSY 2012) PPE 3004 (3) Psychology of Personality
EDF 3210 (3) Educational Psychology (Prereq: PSY 2012)
EDF 3604 (3) Social Foundations of Education PUR 3000 (3) Principles of Public Relations
EDF 4430 (3) Measurement and Evaluation in Education SOP 4004 (3) Social Psychology
FIN 3403 (4) Business Finance (Prereq: ACG 2021C)
GEB 3035 (4) Effective Career Management
GEB 3113 (4) Principles of Entrepreneurship (Prereq: ECO 2023)
HSC 3531 (3) Health & Medical Terminology
HSC5536C (3) Health & Medical Terminology
IDS 4900 (3) Law & Society
INP 4004 (3) Industrial Psychology







COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS
POLICY


POLICY NAME: Computer Requirements for Students

EFFECTIVE DATE: Summer B, 1998
REVISION DATE(S): December, 1998
August, 2000
June, 2004

PURPOSE: To specify computer requirements and student responsibilities regarding computer
management within the College of Public Health and Health Professions

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS:

1. All students must be in compliance with the University Student Computer Policy, which took
effect Summer B, 1998.

2. All students must have access to a computer to allow them to complete all coursework and
general curricular requirements within their designated program and to receive academic-related
e-mail in the College of Public Health and Health Professions. Students may acquire access
through the most appropriate option to match their individual circumstances. These include, but
are not limited to, computer purchase, lease, loan, etc.

3. All students must have access to a computer with the following capabilities:

a. Computer accessibility to the World Wide Web
b. Windows Operating Environment
c. Minimum system resources to run all required applications
d. A basic word processing software package

4. In addition to the general College computer capabilities, the following
programs have additional requirements as noted below:

a. Health Science/Rehabilitative Services Microsoft Word and Powerpoint
b. Clinical and Health Psychology: Database management capabilities;
statistical package software, such as SPSS or SAS
c. Health Services Administration: Spreadsheet and presentation
applications capabilities
d. Occupational Therapy: (graduate students only) Basic statistical software package
e. Rehabilitation Counseling: (graduate students only) DOT Lookup II or
equivalent
f. Communicative Disorders: Spreadsheet capabilities.
g. Public Health: Windows 98; Office 97 or higher; spreadsheet capabilities
h. Rehabilitation Science: Database management capabilities; statistical package software,
such as SPSS or SAS

(Note: If one of your programs was not specifically cited, there are no
additional requirements beyond the college computer capabilities already listed.)







5. Students are responsible for knowing how to operate the computer system they choose and the
software packages required.

6. Students are responsible for any repair necessary to their computers and are expected to complete
assignments in a timely manner regardless of the state of repair of their individual computer
systems.

7. It is likely that over the course of a student's program, computer upgrades will be necessary.
Students are responsible for upgrades required for curriculum completion.

8. Individual coursework may require additional specialized software not already delineated. In this
case, it is the faculty member's responsibility to insure the software requirements are clearly
delineated on the particular class syllabus. Students are then responsible for acquiring the
specialized software necessary to complete specific course requirements.

9. Students are responsible for providing faculty with appropriate hard copies of materials generated
via computer technology if required as part of the course assignment. Students are responsible for
the cost of printing these materials.

10. Similar to non-computer based assignments, all work completed by students on the computer
must be the student's own original work. Students may not receive assistance in completing
computer-based assignments unless specifically allowed as part of that assignment. Copying
material from others, such as scanning in others' material, copying others' files or discs, and/or
downloading material from other sources, and claiming it as the student's own work is strictly
prohibited.







COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS
POLICY


POLICY NAME: Use of College and Common HPNP Space for Student Activities

PURPOSE: To provide clear guidelines and delineate responsibilities for determining use of College-
related space for student activities

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 29, 1997
REVISION DATE: June, 2004

PROCEDURE:

1. College space, if available, can be used by students for student activities specifically related to the
College or the discipline of interest. These include activities of the College Council, the HSSO, and
student professional organizations, such as SOTA, SPTA, the University Rehabilitation Association,
and the Alpha Eta Society. College space may also be used for student activities not affiliated with a
student organization as long as the activities are related to the College or discipline of interest.
College space may not be used for student activities unrelated to Public Health and Health
Professions or the specific discipline of interest.

2. The Department Chair or his/her designee is responsible for managing all student space usage
requests associated with the Chair's departmental space and the ground floor of the HPNP Complex
and for ensuring appropriate management of the space by the students. Any concerns regarding space
usage should be resolved by the Chair, with input from the Associate Dean and Dean, if necessary.
The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will oversee student space requests for the Dean's suite.

3. If it is unclear whether an activity is College related/supported, then the Chair should consult with the
Associate Dean and/or Dean.

4. It is the Chair's or his/her designee's responsibility to ensure students leading meetings understand
their obligations in appropriate use of space. Issues to be reviewed with the student leader include,
but are not limited to, permissibility of food and drinks, leaving lights on or off and doors locked or
unlocked upon leaving, room cleanliness/care, use of available equipment such as Xerox machines,
etc. If a Chair has evidence that a particular student or student group has not managed use of the
space in a responsible manner, the Chair may withdraw permission for future use of departmental
space by those students.

5. While every effort will be made to accommodate student requests for College-related meeting space,
academic and college-wide events take priority in space assignments.




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