• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Student checklist
 Main
 Appendix






Title: Rehabilitation Science Ph.D. program student manual
CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091457/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rehabilitation Science Ph.D. program student manual
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida
Publisher: College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00091457
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

manual ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
    Student checklist
        Page iii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Appendix
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
Full Text



Rehabilitation Science Ph.D. Program

Student Manual


UF


College of Public Health
and Health Professions
Rehabilitation Science
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


2008
http://rehabsci.phhp.ufl.edu/











2008 REHABILITATION SCIENCE PH.D.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Student Checklist

I. Purpose.......................................... ................................ 1

Introduction to the Rehabilitation Science PhD Program

II. Application and Admission.............................. .... ................2

Admission Requirements
Application Deadline

III. Course Requirements........................................................ 3
Specialty Course Work
Emphasis One: Movement Science
Emphasis Two: Communication and Swallowing Science
Emphasis Three: Disability Science
Application and Teaching
Minor in Program
Research Area
Degree Plan
Graduate School Requirements
Supervisory Committee
Period of Concentrated Study
Qualifying Exam
Admission to Candidacy
Dissertation

IV. Health Professions Policy Computer Requirements for Students ......12

V. Rehabilitation Sciences PhD/MPH Non-Traditional Degree Program...14

VI. College Funds for Doctoral Students...........................................21

VII. Responsible Conduct of Research............................................23

VIII. Appendix A Degree Program Plan ..........................................28












University Forms ...................................... ..... 33


Supervisory Committee Appointment Form
Special Supervisory Committee Appointment Form
Graduate Credit Transfer Form
Change of Degree Program Form for Graduate Students
Traveling Scholar Program Form
Joint Degree Program Authorization Form
Admission to Candidacy Form
Degree Application Form
Petition to apply for a Degree After the Deadline
Late Degree Application
Degree Certification Status Verification Form
Report on Thesis or Dissertation and/or Final Examination
University of Florida Graduate School Electronic Thesis and Dissertation
Signature Pages
Survey for Doctoral Students
Student Address Form

X. Appendix C .................................................... ..... .............62
RSD Graduate Faculty
Current RSD Students
RSD Students Who Have Earned Ph.D.


IX. Appendix B







Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Student Checklist
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
NOTE: The student is responsibleforfulfilling all requirements and meeting all deadlines.
What When/Where


Meet with Graduate Coordinator
Margaret Odom in Occupational Therapy with completed
forms received in the orientation packet
New Students: Attend Graduate School and Departmental
Orientation Sessions
Complete payroll and appointment forms for assistantship,
if appropriate
Conditionally Admitted Students: Check Date and Time for
Screening Tests for Language and Writing Program
Meet with Mentor to Determine Courses to register for the
First Semester
Appoint Supervisory Committee -Complete Supervisory
Committee Form see the guide form in this handbook
make appointment with the Graduate Coordinator to enter
committee in the GIMS System
Contact Mentor for possible Transfer of up to 30 Credits fror
M.S. degree Contact the Graduate Coordinator to complete
Transfer of Credit Form for review by the committee
Complete Degree Plan of Study with Mentor

Research Proposal

Ph.D. Qualifying Exam; Written and Oral

Admission to Candidacy for Ph. D.
Contact the Graduate Coordinator for completion of the
Admission to Candidacy Form two weeks prior
date
Obtain Guide for Preparation of Thesis and Dissertation
http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html
Complete Application for Degree Form

First submission of Thesis or Dissertation to the Graduate
School

Dissertation Defense
Contact the Graduate Coordinator two weeks prior for
Room reservation and Final Examination Form
Final Copy of Thesis or Dissertation


Notify Mentor if you will attend commencement two weeks
prior allowing time to order regalia and find a replacement
escort if needed
Exit Interview with Department Chairperson

Return all keys issued by the Department
Provide Graduate Coordinator with a copy of thesis or
dissertation
and change of address form


Upon arrival in the Department of Occupational
Therapy Staff Office #2101

As notified of date, time and place

As notified of date, time and place

Upon arrival

Appointment you set with your mentor

As soon as possible, no later than end of second
semester of equivalent full-time Ph.D. study


a No later than the third semester of Ph.D. study



First semester of Ph.D. study

Meet with Supervisory Committee to complete no
later than end of second semester of Ph.D. study
Taken no sooner than the third semester of graduate
study
Should be made as soon as the qualifying
examination has been passed and a dissertation topic
to is approved by the supervisory committee


Only after Qualifying Exam has been passed

On the web at:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/students/student-forms.html
Check degree application deadline
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/students/critical-dates-and-
deadlines.html
See Deadlines for Doctoral Degrees
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html


Refer to Graduate Editorial Website
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html

Order your academic regalia at the University
Bookstore 352-392-0194
http://www.registrar.ufl.edu/commencement/
Contact the Graduate Coordinator for an appointment
prior to graduation.
Prior to graduation

Prior to graduation


Inform Margaret Odom if personal contact information changes at miodom(phhp.ufl.edu










REHABILITATION SCIENCE PHD


STUDENT HANDBOOK

COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


This handbook has been developed to assist you in meeting the requirements for the Ph.D. Program in
Rehabilitation Science. Students are also encouraged to refer to the UF Graduate Catalog, which
supersedes this manual if a conflict of information occurs.


I. Purpose

The purpose of the Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Program is to educate/train doctoral students in the
science of rehabilitation. This interdisciplinary program serves doctoral students in occupational therapy,
physical therapy, rehabilitation counseling, speech language pathology and related fields. The program is
designed for individuals to develop skills in teaching, research and service leadership in rehabilitation.

Introduction to the Rehabilitation Science PhD Program

The Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Program in the College of Public Health and Health
Professions at the University of Florida prepares rehabilitation scholars, including skills in research,
teaching, and interdisciplinary teamwork in rehabilitation science. Students design their own specialty
area within the broad categories of 1) movement science, 2) disability science 3) communication and
swallowing science. Upon successful completion of this 90-credit postbaccalaureate program, students
receive their PhD and are well positioned for opportunities in research and higher education.

Most graduates go on to post-doctoral positions or faculty positions at major research universities.
Several issues were considered in designing this doctoral program. In recent decades, life-saving medical
intervention has extended the lives of Americans, increasing the elder population and saving the lives of
individuals of all ages who, heretofore, would have succumbed to disease or injury. At the same time,
these medical advances have resulted in an increased need for rehabilitation services for persons who
survive but have temporary or chronic disabling conditions which interfere with their ability to function.
Consequently, the demand for the training of rehabilitation personnel has dramatically increased in recent
decades as therapies have been needed to assist individuals recover, adjust and adapt to health changes.
The expanded role of rehabilitation personnel has increased the demand for theoretical rationale and
research examination of rehabilitation outcomes and, therefore, increased the need for doctoral programs
in Rehabilitation Science.







II. Application and Admission


Admission Requirements

For admission to the Ph.D. Program, you must:

* Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field that can be applied to research in rehabilitation science
* Have professional/clinical experience in a rehabilitation related area
* Be committed to scholarly work in rehabilitation science
* Be committed to an interdisciplinary educational philosophy and training model

To apply to the Ph.D. program, we require:

* Copy of your University Application for Admission to Graduate School (Remember, you must
also apply to the University).

* Three letters of reference

* A professional goals statement

* Official GRE scores

Policy on GRE Scores: The Educational Testing Service will not mail official GRE scores if the test was
taken more than 5 years ago. The RSD Program will accept GRE scores older than 5 years, but the
applicant must submit the copy of the GRE Scores they received from the Educational Testing Service,
and a notarized statement saying: "The attached GRE Score statement was sent to me by the Educational
Testing Service and has not been altered in any way. The scores of (enter your scores) on this form, are
the actual scores I received when I took the GRE on (date of exam)." A minimum verbal-quantitative total
score of 1000 on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination is required.

* Official transcripts

* Official TOEFL scores (for international students only)

All international students seeking admission to the Graduate School are required to submit a
satisfactory score of at least 550 on the paper-based and 213 on the computer -based TOEFL (Test
of English as a Foreign Language).

Please review the University of Florida Graduate School home page at http://gradschool.ufl.edu/
which lists University admission and application requirements, submit an Application for
Admission to Graduate School form to the Graduate School. For detailed information, review
Admission's web site at http://www.admissions.ufl.edu/. You can apply on-line to the Graduate
School. The Rehabilitation Science Program also requires you to forward copies of the college
materials listed above directly to Dr. William Mann, Program Director, University of Florida,
Rehabilitation Science Program, P.O. Box 100164, Gainesville, FL 32610-0164.



2
Application Deadline:







The Rehabilitation Science Program admits students throughout the year. Students are encouraged to
mail their application materials by March 15 for fall admission, and July 15 for spring admission. For
additional information you may contact:

Dr. William Mann, Ph.D., Program Director wmann(@,phhp.ufl.edu

Dr. Jamie Pomeranz: Coordinator, Concentration in Disability Science pomeranz@phhp.ufl.edu

Dr. Steve Kautz: Coordinator, Concentration in Movement Science skautz(@phhp.ufl.edu

Dr. Jay Rosenbek: Coordinator, Concentration in Communication and Swallowing Science -
jrosenbe@phhp.ufl.edu

Dr. Craig Velozo: Representative, Concentration in Occupational Therapy -
cvelozo@phhp.ufl.edu

More information on submitting an application for Graduate School, financial aid and assistantships can
be found at www.ufl.edu/pstudnts.html.

III. Course Requirements and Previous Graduate Study

The Rehabilitation Science Ph.D. includes 90 semester credits of study at the doctoral level
beyond the bachelor's degree. Up to thirty approved credit hours may be transferred in from one's Master's
degree from another institution, except practice oriented courses, and courses completed more than seven
years ago do not qualify. Most entry level professional masters program courses do not qualify for
transfer, except those that are research or theory base. It is anticipated that a student's period of study will
extend a minimum of three years beyond the master's degree. The following summary divides the
curriculum into three specific areas: Specialty Course Work, Rehabilitation Science Application, and
Research Application.

It is possible to petition for coursework taken more than 7 years ago. You must meet with your primary
advisor or chair of your supervisory committee to review your previous coursework. You may be asked
to provide syllabi, books, and papers from these courses. Your advisor will make a recommendation to
the RSD Steering Committee, and if they approve the request, the Director of the Ph.D. program will
petition the Graduate School. The final decision rests with the Graduate School.








Specialty Course Work


The curriculum includes 50 credits of specialty courses. 18 credits must come from one (or a
combination) of three major emphases in rehabilitation (or other approved emphasis). 32 credits are
elective/minor courses.

Concentration Area One: Movement Science

Movement science, the study of human movement and postural control, serves as the foundation for the
development of evidence-based rehabilitation practices. The converging knowledge from multiple
disciplines is required to examine human movement and postural control. These disciplines include
motor control and learning, anatomy, kinesiology, biomechanics, exercise physiology, muscle physiology,
neurophysiology, and neuroscience. The aim of the research in this area is to develop scientifically-
based assessment and treatment strategies to promote 1) maintenance of movement, 2) restoration of
movement, and 3) compensation for movement loss or dysfunction, secondary to the consequences of
aging, injury, disease, or developmental disorders. Movement science research focuses on the impact of
these processes by the evaluation of impairments, disability (activity), and handicap (participation). The
ultimate goal of research in movement science is to improve the quality of life for individuals who have
movement and postural dysfunctions.


OTH 6415
OTH 6424
OTH 6425
OTH 6426
PHT 6105C
PHT 6125
PHT 6126
PHT 6127C
PHT 6167C
PHT 6236C
PHT 6316
RCS 6255
RCS 6080
PET 6217
PET 6218
PET 6228
PET 6235C
PET 6346C
PET 6347
PET 6355
PET 7365
PET 7368
PET 7386


Evaluation, Treatment, and Prevention of Upper Extremity Injuries in OT (3)
Motor Learning and Motor Control in Occupational Therapy Rehabilitation (3)
Relation of Body Image and Perceptual Dysfunction to Occupation (2-3)
Advanced Neurorehabilitation for Occupational Behavior Deficits (3)
Joint Morphology (3)
Concepts in Clinical Biomechanics (3)
Behavioral and Neural Bases for Movement Dysfunction (3)
Control of Gait and Posture (3)
Applied Neurophysiology for Physical Therapy (3)
Neurological Dysfunction as Applied to Physical Therapy (4)
Neurological Aspects of Orthopedic Rehabilitation (3)
Vocational Assessment and Evaluation in Rehabilitation (3-4)
Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling (3)
Performance Enhancement (3)
Planning Motor Actions (3)
Controlling Motor Actions (3)
Nature and Basis of Motor Performance (3)
Biomechanics of Human Motion (3)
Biomechanical Instrumentation (3)
Physiological Bases of Exercise and Sport Sciences (3)
Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology (3)
Exercise Metabolism (3)
Environmental Stress Exercise Physiology (3)








Concentration Area Two: Communication and Swallowing Science


This concentration area addresses the science of communication and swallowing. Students study
anatomical, physiological and neurological bases of normal and abnormal communication and
swallowing. The psychosocial aspects of communication and swallowing disorders are emphasized.
Within this concentration area students study and address problems at each of the levels in the World
Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health model. Students
can focus their studies on communication and swallowing problems in children and adults.


CLP 5426
CLP 6307
EEX 6051
ELD 6937
EXP 6099
EXP 6609
GMS 6007
GMS 6021
GMS 6022
GMS 6023
GMS 6051
GMS 6077
GMS 6078
GMS 6173
GMS 7706C
GMS 7794
GMS 7795
LIN 6751
PET 6218
PET 6228
PHT 6126
PSB 6067
PSB 7248
PSB 7249
RED 6546
RED 6548
SPA 5211
SPA 5245
SPA 6233
SPA 6410


Introduction to Neuropsychology(3)
Human Higher Cortical Functioning (3)
Teaching Exceptional Children (3)
Seminar: Identification and Remediation of SLD (3)
Survey of Cognition and Sensory Processes (3)
Seminar: Cognition (1)
Fundamental of Neuroscience (1)
Principles in Neuroscience A (1)
Principles in Neuroscience B (1)
Principles in Neuroscience C (1)
Sensory & Motor Systems (1)
Neural Degeneration & Regeneration (1)
Synaptic Function and Plasticity (1)
Stomatognathic System: Form & Fb (2)
Medical Neuroscience (4)
Neuroscience Seminar (1-12)
Special Topics in Neuroscience (1-12)
Seminar in Language and Literacy
Planning Motor Actions (3)
Controlling Motor Actions (3)
Behavioral and Neural Basis for Movement Dysfunction (3)
Human Brain Functions (3)
Neurobehavioral Relations (3)
Seminar: Neural Mechanisms and Behavior (3)
Diagnosing Reading Disabilities
Remediation of Reading Disabilities
Voice Disorders (3)
Communicative Disorders Related to Cleft Lip and Palate (3)
Adult Neurogenic Disorders (3)
Neurophysiology for Speech and Language (3)








Concentration Area Three: Disability Science

Disability Science focuses on the interaction of the individual with a disability and the environment, and
the process of adaptation to disability through the lifespan. Social and behavioral issues in disability
management, mechanisms for facilitating successful community reintegration, and the impact of the
physical and sociocultural environment on disability are explored. Within this concentration area
students investigate approaches that support, guide, teach, and counsel individuals with disabilities, while
addressing aspects of the physical and social environment that can be changed to optimize individual
performance.


RCS 6080
RCS 5245
RCS 6255
RCS 6641
RCS 6931
MHS 6421
MHS 6440
MHS 6409
MHS 6428
CLP 5135

CLP 6344C
CLP 6345
CLP 7317
CLP 7936
CLP 7186
CLP 7934
CLP 7936
DEP 7408
PSB 6067
ELD 6015
ELD 7938
GEY 6646
SYA 7933
SYD 6707
SYO 6405
SYO 6406
SYO 6535
SYO 6806
SYP 6065
SYP 6550
SYP 6735
SYP 6736
SYP 6745


Medical and Psychological Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling (Fall)
Psychosocial and Cultural Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling (Fall)
Vocational & Lifestyle Assessment in Rehabilitation Counseling (Fall)
Applied Case Management & Consultation in Rehab Counseling (Sum)
Special Topics Clinical Supervision (Spring)
Play Therapy
Marriage Counseling
Counseling Older Persons
Multicultural Counseling
Psychological Approaches to Behavioral & Physical Disorders of Childhood and
Adolescence
Lifespan Foundations of Behavioral Health & Illness I
Lifespan Foundations of Behavioral Health & Illness II
Advanced Health Psychology and Behavior Medicine (Requires-
Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine (as a prerequisite)
Diversity in Clinical Psychology
Special Topics in Clinical Psychology
Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine
Clinical Psychology of Aging
Human Brain Function
Foundations in the Field of Specific Learning Disabilities
Seminar: Advanced Topics in Learning Disorders
Issues and Concepts in Gerontology
Aging and Identity
Black and White Americans: Sociological Perspectives
Medical Sociology
Social Factors in Health and Illness
Social Inequality
Gender and Society
Sociology of Human Sexuality
Sociology of Alcohol and Drug Behavior
Sociology of Aging and the Life Course
Sociology of the Aged
Sociology of Death and Survivorship







HSA 5103
HSA 6114
HSA 6125
HSA 6127
HSA 6152C
HSA 6407
HSA 7759
PUP 6006
NGR


Introduction to the US Health Care System
US Health Care Systems
Overview of US Health Delivery & Finance
Managed Care
Health Policy
Health and Disease
Quality and Outcomes in Health Services Research
Policy Evaluation
Aging & Healthcare


Rehabilitation Science Overview and Teaching


Students must complete 10 credits of the following required courses in rehabilitation science application:

RSD 6930 Special Topics: In Rehabilitation Science (1 credit spring)

RSD 6110 Rehabilitation Science Theory & Application I (3 credits fall) This course offers reviews of
the: 1) historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of rehabilitation science, including analysis
of the components, stages, or domains of the disabling-enablin process; 2) selected rehabilitation
research; 3) ethical, funding, and social implications of rehabilitation science; and 4) evolution of
rehabilitation systems in the United States.

Students may petition not to take RSD 6940 Supervised Teaching, based on part teaching experience.
This petition must be forwarded to the RSD program director and include a description of teaching
experience as well as an evaluation of the teaching.



Minor in RSD Program

Students from other UF Doctoral Programs may elect to minor in the Rehabilitation Science Ph.D.
Program. Students must take RSD 6110, the RSD Doctoral Seminar listed as RSD 6930 Special Topics in
Rehabilitation Science, and some combination of supervised research, independent study, and courses
listed under the 3 RSD concentration areas. Students must identify one of the RSD faculty willing to
serve on their dissertation committee, who will also serve as an advisor for the minor.







Research Area


Course work: Students must complete 15 credits of course work in research methods and statistics course
approved; which may include some of the following courses: Courses can be chosen from any College
but should be chosen with input from the major professor and approved by the student's supervisory
committee.

AGG 6830 Grant Writing (2 credits) This course is designed for students to learn how to prepare and
submit grants for research funding. It is recommended that this course be taken no sooner than the fourth
semester of study.

Students must take an introductory statistics course at the graduate level and can choose a number of
options, designed to teach students basic nonparametric and parametric statistics. These are four of
several possible courses:

CLP 6527 and CLP 6528 Research Design and Statistics (6 credits fall and spring)
STA 6126 and STA 6127 Statistical Methods in Social Research I and II (6 credits fall)
EDF 6401 Educational Statistics (3 credits Summer A)
EDF 6403 Quantitative Research Methods in Education (6 credits)

Students are required to take an on-line Epidemiology Course PHC 6717 Theory and Methods in
Public Health Disability Research offered in the summer by Dr. Elena Andresen. This course must
be completed before you receive the Ph.D. Submit your certificate of completion to Margaret
Odom for your student file.

The courses listed below reflect progressive involvement is actual research working with your major
professor.

RSD 6905 Independent Work (1 12 credits)
RSD 6910 Rehabilitation Science Theory and Application I (3 credits)
RSD 7979 Advanced Rehabilitation Research (1 12 credits)
RSD 7980 Doctoral Dissertation (1 15 credits)
A student must enroll for at least 32 semester hours of research application.

Degree Plan

You should meet with your initial faculty advisor during your first semester of study to develop a Degree
Plan (form included in the Appendices). The UF requires that students form a supervisory committee by
the end of their second semester, or the end of the term in which they accumulate 12 or more credit hours.
Your initial faculty advisor may be the chair of your supervisory committee, or you may select, in
collaboration with the faculty, a different RSD Graduate Faculty member. You must meet with the chair
of your supervisory at least once each semester to review your Degree Plan, and make appropriate
revisions. A copy of the revised Plan must be kept on file with your faculty advisor and the Director of
the Ph.D. program.






Ph.D. Rehabilitation Science
Suggested Course Sequence


Year I (27)


Fall (10)
(3) RSD 6110 Rehab Science

(3) Concentration Area Courses

(4) Research Methods/Statistics


Spring (11)
(1) RSD 6930 PhD Seminar


Summer (6)
(6) Concentration Area Courses


(3) RSD 6940 Supervised Teaching

(4) Research Methods/Statistics
(3) Concentration Area Courses


Year II (24)

Fall (9)
(3) Elective


(3) Concentration Area Courses

(3) RSD 6905/6910 Research


Spring (10)
(3) PET 5936 Professional Skills/
Grant Writing

(3) Concentration Area Course

(4) RSD 6905/6910 Research


Summer (6)
(6) Concentration Area


Year III (24)

Fall (9)
(3) Electives


Spring (9)
(3) Electives


Summer (6)
(3) Electives


(6) RSD 6905/7979 Research


(6) RSD 6905/7979 Research


(6) RSD 6905/7979 Research


Year IV (17)

Fall (9)
(3) Electives


Spring (9)
(9) RSD 7980 Dissertation


(6) RSD 7980 Dissertation







Graduate School Requirements


Listed below are some of the important requirements established by the Graduate School that you must
follow to satisfactorily complete your degree program. It is important that you obtain a Graduate School
Catalog, which clearly outlines all degree requirements. This information can also be found on the
University of Florida Graduate School website:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/

* Initial Advisor/Chair of Supervisory Committee

Graduate School requirements regarding composition and appointment of doctoral supervisory
committees will apply. Students will be matched with a particular advisor based upon the student's major
interest upon admittance. The advisor serves as the student's primary mentor until the supervisor
committee is established. The student, in consultation with the chair of their supervisory committee, will
determine appropriate faculty members for the supervisory committee. Approval of committee structure
and completion of concentration requirements will be made by the Director of the Rehabilitation Science
Program in consultation with the RSD Steering Committee.

The student's supervisory committee will be comprised of at least four faculty members, including the
student's advisor who serves as chair. At least one member from the other disciplines within the PhD
program, and at least one member from outside the PhD program, must be included on the committee.
The timelines for establishing the committee will be in accordance with Graduate School guidelines of
two semesters for full time students.

It is possible to have a committee from outside the university. See Appendix B "Instructions for Creating
a Special Appointment."

* Period of Concentrated Study

Students must satisfy the minimum requirements for a period of concentrated study. "Beyond the first 30
hours counted towards the doctoral degree, students must complete 30 hours in residence at the
University of Florida campus or at an approved branch station of the University of Florida agricultural
Experiment Stations or the Graduate Engineering and Research Center".

* Courses and Credits

Undergraduate courses (1000-2999) may not be used as any part of the graduate degree requirements. All
1000- and 2000- level courses may be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis.

Six credits of undergraduate courses (3000-4999) outside the major may count when taken as part of an
approved graduate program.

* Qualifying Exam

The qualifying examination may be taken no sooner than the third semester of graduate study and no later
than the semester prior to completing the dissertation. The examination is prepared and evaluated by the
full supervisory committee. The supervisory committee has the responsibility at this time of deciding
whether the student is qualified to continue work towards the PhD degree.








Successful completion of a written and oral qualifying examination is required of all doctoral students as
they near the completion of their required course work. The examination will consist of the student
preparing 3 review papers on specific topics from within each of the 3 areas of completed course work.
These areas include: (1) Core I -Rehabilitation Research Methods, (2) Core II Rehabilitation Science
Application, and (3) Emphasis with Concentration Area. The student is given one week per topic (total
time of 3 weeks) to develop a written document. Each document should define a given problem or set of
problems dealing with the topic, provide a concise review of literature relevant to the topic, and propose
future research needs to advance the knowledge base within the topic. Each paper will be reviewed by
the
supervisory committee and judged to be satisfactory or unsatisfactory. If any paper is unsatisfactory, the
student will be given written guidelines regarding how to improve the paper. These guidelines will
include specific areas for the student to address in the paper prior to committee re-review. Once all three
papers are judged satisfactory, the student will convene a meeting of the supervisory committee
consisting of at least 4 faculty members. It is the responsibility of the supervisory committee to conduct
the oral examination of the student relevant to the 3 written papers and to decide whether the student is
qualified to continue work toward a PhD degree.

The qualifying examination's purposes are to determine student's (1) understanding of rehabilitation
science, (2) their mastery of specialized course work, and (3) their readiness to complete a dissertation
successfully. The content of the examination will address these three areas. The student's supervisory
committee will address these three areas. The student's supervisory committee will develop questions
that are either specific to each of the three areas or more general and require students to fold their
understanding of rehabilitation science into their discussions of specialized course work, including
research methodology

The time lapse between the oral portion of the qualifying examination and the date of the degree must be
a minimum of two semesters. The semester in which the qualifying examination is passed is counted,
provided that the examination occurs before the midpoint of the term.

A student may request a different format for the qualifying examination. This format must still follow
Graduate School guidelines. The student (and/or the Chair of the Supervisory Committee) must present an
outline of the new format for the qualifying exam to the Director of the RSD program who, with
consultation with graduate coordinators, will determine it's suitability.

* Admission to Candidacy

Approval for admission to candidacy is based on 1) the academic record of the student, 2) the opinion of
the supervisory committee concerning the overall fitness for candidacy, 3) an approved dissertation topic,
and 4) successful completion of the qualifying examination.







* Dissertation


All doctoral candidates are required to prepare and present a dissertation that shows independent
investigation and is acceptable in form and content to the supervisory committee and to the Graduate
School. An oral defense must be satisfactorily completed before the student's supervisory committee. The
student must provide a copy of their dissertation to Dr. William Mann, Ph.D., Program Director along
with the scheduled date and time information of oral defense for announcement. Refer to the 2008-2009
Graduate School on-line catalog http://gradschool.ufl.edu/students/introduction.html for preparation of
the dissertation. Additional assistance in preparing your dissertation (formatting, deadlines, forms, etc.)
can be found at the Graduate School Editorial Office website:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html. Students must take a minimum of 3 dissertation
credits in their final semester of study.

IV. College of Public Health and Health Professions Policy Computer
Requirements for Students

Purpose: To specify computer requirements and student responsibilities regarding computer management
within the College of Public Health and Health Professions Specific Requirements:

1. All students must be in compliance with the University Student Computer Policy.

2. All students must have access to a computer to allow them to complete all Course work and
general curriculum requirements within their designated program in the College of Public Health
and Health Professions. Students may acquire access through the most appropriate option to match
their individual circumstances. These include, but are not limited to, computer purchase, lease,
loan.

3. All students must have access to a computer with the following capabilities:

a. Computer accessibility to the World Wide Web and E-mail
b. Windows Operating Environment
c. Minimum System resources to run all required applications
d. A basic word processing software package
e. A basic statistical software package

4. Students are responsible for knowing how to operate the computer system they choose and the
software packages required.

5. Students are responsible for any repair necessary to their computers and are expected to complete
assignments in a timely manner regardless of the state of repair of their individual computer
systems.







6. It is likely that over the course of a student's program, computer upgrades will be necessary.
Students are responsible for upgrades required for curriculum completion.

7. Individual course work may require additional specialized software not already delineated. In this
case, it is the faculty member's responsibility to insure the software requirements are clearly
delineated on the particular class syllabus. Students are then responsible for acquiring access to
the specialized software necessary to complete specific course requirements.

8. Similar to non-computer based assignments, all work completed by students on the computer must
be the student's own original work. Students may not receive assistance in completing computer-
based assignments unless specifically allowed as part of that assignment. Copying material from
others, such as scanning in others material, copying others files or discs, and/or downloading
material from other sources and claiming it as the student's own work is strictly prohibited.









Rehabilitation Sciences PhD/MPH Non-Traditional Degree Program


The faculties of the Rehabilitation Sciences PhD Program and the Master of Public Health Program in the College
of Public Health and Health Professions have approved a non-traditional PhD/MPH degree program. Under the
non-traditional degree program, a student can obtain both degrees in approximately one year less than it would take
to obtain both degrees if pursued consecutively. Essential criteria relating to the program are as follows:

Admission requirements: Candidates for the program must meet the entrance requirements for and be accepted by
both programs.

Timing: Students may apply to both programs simultaneously, or they may enter one degree program and apply to
the other at a later date. The nontraditional degree program is not open to students who have already earned one
degree.

Documentation: Nontraditional Doctoral/Master's Degree Program Forms 1 and 2 must be submitted to the
Graduate School.

Requirements: A student must satisfy the curriculum requirements for each degree before either degree is awarded.
The MPH program will allow 9 credits of appropriate PhD courses to be credited toward both degrees. The 9
credits selected from the PhD curriculum must be approved by the MPH program upon the recommendation of the
student's supervisory committee.

Reciprocally, non-traditional degree students may receive toward the satisfaction of the PhD degree, not
more than 30 semester credits for courses taken in the MPH curriculum. The Rehabilitation Sciences
PhD Program upon recommendation of the student's supervisory committee must approve appropriate
courses.

Integration of programs: Students in the PhD program may take MPH courses concurrent with their PhD courses.
However, it is recommended that students devote one year to MPH coursework.

Eligible Grades: MPH courses which are to be credited toward the PhD degree must carry a grade of"B" or higher.
PhD courses which are to be credited toward the MPH degree must carry a grade of "B" or higher.

Degree Award: A student enrolled in the non-traditional degree program will receive each degree upon satisfaction
of that degree's requirements. Upon completion of both degrees it will be noted that the student has graduated from
the Rehabilitation Sciences PhD./MPH. Non-Traditional Degree Program.

Withdrawal: Students who enroll in the non-traditional degree program may withdraw and still complete
one of the degrees.

Appointments: Students in the joint program will be eligible for the graduate teaching assistantships and research
assistantships in the College of Public Health and Health Professions on the same basis as other graduate students,
subject to the guidelines and restrictions set by the College.

Supervisory Committee: To facilitate student progress in the non-traditional program, the student's graduate
supervisory committee will include one MPH faculty member.

Effective Date: The program will begin Fall, 2006.









MPH HEALTH MANAGEMENT AND POLICY 36-Credit CONCENTRATION

I. Public Health Core: 15 hours Credits *Semester
Offered
PHC 6050 Statistical Methods for Health Sciences I 3 F
PHC 6001 Principles of Epidemiology 3 F
PHC 6313 Environmental Health Concepts in Public Health 3 S
PHC 6102 Introduction to Public Health Administrative Systems 3 F
PHC 6406 Psychological, Behavioral, and Social Issues in Public 3 F
Health
II. Concentration Core: 15 hours
HSA 5103 Introduction to U.S. Health Care System 3 F
HSA 5177 Fundamentals of Health Care Finance 3 S
HAS 6118 Health Services Management 3 S
HSA 6152 Overview of U.S. Health Policy (pre-req: prior health 3 S
related coursework)
PHC 61xx Evidence-Based Management of Public Health Programs 3 S
III. Concentration Electives: 3 hours-Students should select 3 credits from list A, B, or C.
Courses from these lists may be mixed (e.g., one policy course and one public health
management course) with approval of the concentration coordinator.
A. Public Health Management
HSA 6342 Human Resource Management 3 F
HSA 6346 Health Economics 3 S
HSA 6177 Health Care Financial Management (pre-req: prior 3 F
finance coursework and instructor permission required)
HSA 6198 Information Mgmt. (instructor permission required) 2 F
HSA 6126 Managed Care (instructor permission required 2 S
HSA 5425 Legal Issues & Health Admin. 2 F
HSA 6163 Health Service Marketing (instructor permission required 2 S
HSA 6755 Quality Management (instructor permission required 2 S
HSA 5455 Ethical Issues 2 S
PHC 6146 Public Health Program Planning and Evaluation 3 ss
PHC 6700 Social & Behavioral Research Methods 3 S
PHC 6112 Assessment & Surveillance 3 S
B. Public Policy
HSA 5455 Ethical Issues 2 S
HSA 5425 Legal Issues & Health Admin. 2 F
PUP 6009 Public Policy Analysis 3 S
PUP 6007 Policy Process 3 S
PUP 6006 Policy Evaluation 3 S
PHA 5263 Pharmaceutical Industry and Public Policy 3
POS 6127 State Government and Politics 3 S, F








C. Pharmacoeconomics
PHA 6250 The Patient in the Drug Use Process 3
PHA 6252 Prescribing and the Medication Use Process 3
PHA 6262 Pharmacoeconomcis and Health Technology Assessment 3
PHA 5263 Pharmaceutical Industry and Public Policy 3
IV. Special Project: 3-6 hours
PHC 6912 Research OR 3-6
or 6946 Internship

*F=Fall; S=Spring; ss=Summer

**Class schedules are subject to change each semester. Students should verify course offerings and contact
appropriate department for permission to register prior to registration.









MPH EPIDEMIOLOGY 36-Credit CONCENTRATION


I. Public Health Core: 15 hours Credits *Semester
Offered
PHC 6050 Statistical Methods for Health Sciences I 3 F
OR
STA 6166 Statistical Methods in Research I 3 F,S
PHC 6001 Principles of Epidemiology 3 F
PHC 6313 Environmental Health Concepts in Public Health 3 S
PHC 6102 Introduction to Public Health Administrative Systems 3 F
PHC 6406 Psychological, Behavioral, and Social Issues in Public Health 3 F
II. Concentration Core: 12 hours
PHC 6000 Epidemiology Research Methods I 3 S
PHC 6003 Epidemiology of Chronic Disease 3 F
PHC 6002 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases 3 ss
PHC 6011 Epidemiology Research Methods II 3 ss
III. Biostatistics Core: 3 hours
STA 6166 Statistical Methods in Research I (Required with core course PHC 3 F,S
6050)
STA 6208 Regression Analysis (Required with core course STA 6166) 3 S
VI. Concentration Electives: 2-3 hours
PHC 6XXX Journal Club 1 F,S
PHC 6XXX Epidemiology Seminar 1 F
PHC XXXX Public Health Grantmanship 2 S
PHC XXXX Epidemiology of Chronic Disease II 3 S
PHC 6XXX Survey Research Methods 3 ss
PHA 6268 Pharmacoepidemiology 3 S
PHC 60XX Measurement in Epidemiology & Outcomes Research 3
PHC 60XX Theory & Measurement in Public Health Disability Research 3
STA 5507 Applied Nonparametric Methods 3 F
V. Special Project: 3-4 hours
PHC 6912 or Research OR 3-6
6946 Internship

*F=Fall; S=Spring; ss=Summer

**Class schedules are subject to change each semester. Students should verify course offerings and contact
appropriate department for permission to register prior to registration.









MPH BIOSTATISTICS 36-Credit CONCENTRATION


I. Public Health Core: 15 hours Credits **Semester
Offered
STA 6166 Statistical methods in Research I 3 F,S
PHC 6001 Principles of Epidemiology 3 F
PHC 6313 Environmental Health Concepts in Public Health 3 S
PHC 6102 Introduction to Public Health Administrative Systems 3 F
PHC 6406 Psychological, Behavioral, and Social Issues in Public Health 3 F
II. Concentration Core: 15 hours
STA 5XXX Regression Analysis 3
STA 5XXX Survival Analysis 3
STA 5325 Mathematical Methods of Statistics I 3
STA 5328 Mathematical Methods of Statistics II 3
PHC 6000 Epidemiology Research Methods I 3
III. Concentration Electives: 3 hours*
STA 5223 Applied Sample Survey Methods 3 S
STA 5503 Categorical Data Methods 3 S
STA 5507 Applied Nonparametric Methods 3 F
STA 5701 Applied Multivariate Methods 3 S-odd
STA 5823 Stochastic Process Methods 3 F
IV. Special Project: 3 hours
PHC 6913 Biostatistics Project 3-6
*Other courses may be substituted or added with the approval of the supervisory committee.

**F=Fall; S=Spring; ss=Summer

**Class schedules are subject to change each semester. Students should verify course offerings and contact
appropriate department for permission to register prior to registration.









MPH SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 36-Credit CONCENTRATION


I. Public Health Core: 15 credits Credits *Semester
Offered
PHC 6050 Statistical Methods for Health Sciences I 3 F
PHC 6001 Principles of Epidemiology 3 F
PHC 6313 Environmental Health Concepts in Public Health 3 S
PHC 6102 Introduction to Public Health Administrative Systems 3 F
PHC 6406 Psychological, Behavioral, and Social Issues in Public Health 3 F
II. Concentration Core: 12 credits
PHC 6700 Social & Behavioral Research Methods 3 S
PHC 6112 Assessment and Surveillance in Public Health 3 S
PHC 6146 Public Health Program Planning and Evaluation 3 F
PHC 6XXX Social and Behavioral Sciences Theory and Application 3 F
III. Concentration Electives: 3 credits
PHC 6XXX Introduction to Health Communications 3 ss
PHC 6XXX Gender, Sexuality and Health 3 F
PHC 6XXX Introduction to International Health 3 F
PHC 6XXX Health Disparities in the United States 3 S
IV. Special Project: 6 credits
PHC 6912 or Research or Internship 6
6946

*F=Fall; S=Spring, ss=summer

**Class schedules are subject to change each semester. Students should verify course offerings and contact
appropriate department for permission to register prior to registration.









MPH ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 36-Credit CONCENTRATION


I. Public Health Core: 15 credits Credits *Semester
Offered
PHC 6050 Statistical Methods for Health Sciences I 3 F
PHC 6001 Principles of Epidemiology 3 F
PHC 6313 Environmental Health Concepts in Public Health 3 S
PHC 6102 Introduction to Public Health Administrative Systems 3 F
PHC 6406 Psychological, Behavioral, and Social Issues in Public Health 3 F
II. Concentration Core: 10 credits
VME 6602 General Toxicology 3 F
VME 6606 Toxic Substances (online-Summer C)(pre-req. VME 6602) 3 ss
VME 6607 Human Health Risk Assessment 4 F
III. Concentration Electives: 5 credits
PHC 6000 Epidemiological Methods I 3 S
PHA 6425 Drug Biotransformation and Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity 3 F
PHA 5521 Neurotoxicology 2
GMS 7593 Functional Genomic Applications in Pharmacology and 3 S
Toxicology
VME 6606 Ecological Risk Assessment 3 S
VME 6603 Advanced Toxicology 3 S-Even
ALS 5106 Food and the Environment 3
ABE 5707C Agricultural Waste Management 3 F
ABE 5815C Food and Bioprocess Engineering Design 3 F
ALS 6933 Topics in Tropical Managed Ecosystems 2-8
ANG 5467 Culture and Nutrition 3
ANG 5700 Applied Anthropology 3
FOS 5205 Current Issues in Food Safety and Sanitation 3 F
FOS 5732 Current Issues in Food Regulations 3 S
FOS 5225C Principles in Food Microbiology 4 S
EES 5207 Environmental Chemistry 3 F
EES 5107 Ecological and Biological Systems 3
EES 6405 Environmental Toxicology 3 S
EES 5245 Water Quality Analysis 3 S
EES 5307 Ecological Engineering 3 S
EES 5415 Environmental Health 3
INR 6352 International Environmental Relations 3
PHC 6309 Environmental Justice Issues in Public Health 3
STA 5507 Applied Nonparametric Methods (prereq: STA 2023, 3032, 3 F
4210, 4322, 6126, 6166)
STA 5823 Stochastic Process Methods (prereq: STA 4321 or 5325) 3 F
STA 5325 Introduction to Probability (pereq: MAC 2313 or equivalent) 3 F, S, ss
V. Special Project: 6 credits
PHC 6912 or Research or Internship 6
6946


*F=Fall; S=Spring; ss=Summer
**Class schedules are subject to change each semester. Students should verify
contact appropriate department for permission to register prior to registration.


course offerings and










V. College Funds for Doctoral Students


Grinter Fellowships

The intent of the Grinter fellowship is to facilitate the recruitment of outstanding students. Therefore only
full-time students entering the degree program for the first time are eligible for this award. Grinter
Fellowship stipends are normally in the $2,000-$4,000 range. Regardless of the size of the stipend, all
fellowships in this program should be identified as "Grinter Fellowships'. Tuition money from the Dean's
Office may accompany this fellowship. Continuation of the Grinter beyond the first year is contingent
upon satisfactory student progress.

Charlotte Liberty Scholarship

The purpose of the scholarship is to benefit needy students that are enrolled in the Health Science Center
Colleges. The scholarship was established in 1993 for this purpose. To be eligible for this you must have
at least 3.6 GPA as undergraduate and must also be a US Citizen. Financial need is based on the student's
University of Florida financial report, which also includes FAFSA. Students also must show potential for
high achievement. The amount of the privately funded scholarship/fellowship that is divided per quarter
is $17,345.87. The number of students that are awarded the scholarship varies per quarter.


Veterans Administration Predoctoral Audiology and Speech-Pathology Fellowship

Three year fellowship with assumption that candidate will graduate at the end of that time. Funding for
the first two years is $9,000; funding for the third year is $18,000. The obligation is for 20 hours of work
per week at a Veterans Administration facility during the first two years and 40 hours per week in year
three.

Additional Veterans Administration Funding may be available, please contact:

Nan Musson, Coordinator Speech Pathology, VAMC 376-1611 Ext. 5607 or nan.musson2@va.com

Maude Rittman, Ph.D., RN, Assistant Director for Career Development, Veterans Administration
Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, 374-6108 or maude.rittman@,med.va.gov

Research Experience Program

This program provides support for one year of graduate study to students affiliated with Historically
Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic serving Institutions and Native-American Serving Colleges
and Universities. Funding is dependent on experience and the obligations for full or part-time work.





21


Research Assistantships (RA)







Many faculty have research grants that support students, (stipend and tuition). RAs typically work 20
hours per week.

College Research Support

The College has a small amount of funds available to support the research activities of the Rehabilitation
Science PhD students. Support will be available, for example, for travel to present your research and seed
money for research:

1. Applications for seed money will be reviewed at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. It
must be clear that the funds are for dissertation research or research that is clearly related to your
eventual dissertation topic. If you wish to apply for these funds then please submit a brief research
proposal, budget, and budget justification.

2. If you are presenting your research at a conference then please submit a copy of your abstract, a
letter that confirms the acceptance of your abstract, together with a travel budget to the RSD
Program Director.

3. It is unlikely that any award will be in excess of $1,000 and may be less depending on
competition, available dollars, and the quality of the application.

Travel Awards for RSD Students

The RSD Program will fund up to 10 students each year to help with costs related to travel and
registration for major regional or national conferences. To qualify for these funds, you must have a paper
accepted for presentation, based on research conducted as part of the RSD Program. Maximum size of
award is $300.00.

Applying for Funds: There will be two cycles, Spring and Fall. Deadlines for applying for funds are
October 1 and February 1. We will consider applications if a paper has been submitted, but not yet
accepted although funding will be contingent on acceptance of the paper. To apply, submit
documentation about the conference (such as registration booklet, preliminary announcement); a copy of
your paper or abstract; brief budget showing how you will use the funds. Submit all paperwork to the
RSD Coordinator (Margaret Odom).






VI. Responsible Conduct of Research


Integrity in Graduate Study. Graduate School Guide Adopted by the Graduate Council and the Graduate
Departments of the University of Florida, June 1, 1990

Introduction

Integrity in scholarly work has received considerable attention in recent years both in academic circles
and in the news. Some notorious cases of fraud have made those in higher education sensitive to this
issue. Some of these cases, especially in the sciences, have surfaced when attempts to replicate work
have failed. In the humanities and social sciences plagiarism assumes greater prominence. Cheating, the
bane of many high school and undergraduate teachers, surfaces as well at the graduate level. Moreover,
in our ever more complex professional world, graduate students may find themselves embroiled in abuses
of confidentiality or conflicts of interest. All five of these problems are of major concern to graduate
students, faculty, and other graduate educators.

Although many graduate students will have few problems with the ethical decisions involved in
maintaining integrity in their work, others may not see the issues so clearly. Some may even be unaware
of the potential for problems with integrity in graduate study. The Graduate School has prepared these
guidelines for units to be consistent in the event that fraud, plagiarism, cheating, abuses of confidentiality,
or conflicts of interest should arise.

* Fraud

Fraud usually involves the intentional and deliberate misuse of data in order to draw conclusions that may
not be warranted by the evidence. Falsification of results may take one of two forms: 1) fabrication of
data, or 2) omission or concealment of conflicting data for the purpose of misleading other scholars. An
intermediate form, difficult to detect especially in quantitative analyses, occurs when students are sloppy
about categorization. All researchers, irrespective of discipline, can agree that the fabrication of data is
fraudulent, and most will agree that the deliberate omission of conflicting data is also fraudulent. But a
few scholars might argue that one persons conflicting data is another person's irrelevant data. In general,
the best researchers are those who come to terms with any piece of evidence which others may regard as
conflicting. Strong support for a given hypothesis involves disposing of or dealing with alternative
hypotheses.

The best insurance against fraud in graduate student research is the careful and close supervision by the
faculty advisor as well as the examples other members of the academic community provide. The student
should communicate regularly and frequently with his or her major professor. He or she can do so in a
variety of ways by submitting laboratory notebooks for frequent faculty review, by having faculty
monitor the student's reading in the field, by regular progress reports to the faculty advisor, etc. Faculty
should normally expect such communication, and in the absence of faculty initiative graduate students
should instigate dialogues with faculty. Such communication will help the student develop intellectually
and lessen the possibility of fraud. If a student is suspected of fraud, the academic community should
handle the matter forthrightly with a clear regard to the rights of the graduate student so that the career of
a student researcher who may be innocent is not damaged. Similarly, if graduate student fraud is verified,
it must be adjudicated in accordance with established University procedures. The Graduate School will
provide information on those procedures to any interested party.







* Plagiarism

Unlike fraud, which is usually the deliberate creation of false data or results, plagiarism is the use of
another's words, ideas, or creative productions or omission of pertinent material without proper
attribution, i.e., without giving due credit to the original source. Flagrant cases of plagiarism may involve
extensive borrowing of material from articles, books, or creative productions with perhaps only slight
modifications. In such cases penalties are usually severe for the student and would likely result in
expulsion from Graduate School or, if a degree has already been earned, in rescinding of that degree.
Less extensive cases of plagiarism may be either intentional or unintentional (carelessness or ignorance of
the commonly accepted rules) but may also have severe repercussions. In using other people's work, one
must cite that work in the text or, more commonly in footnotes and use either direct quotations or skillful
paraphrasing for all ideas that are not ones own. Since much of the basic information about our
disciplines comes from outside ourselves through a variety of sources common to all that work in a
discipline, it is unnecessary to footnote those facts and ideas, which are, so to speak, in the common
domain of the discipline. Otherwise, we would be footnoting everything we know. But an intimate
familiarity with the literature of the discipline, or a subdiscipline thereof, lets one know when the
distinctive words or ideas of another researcher should be given proper attribution. The fairly common
practice among scientists of citing the previous significant literature relating to the subjects of their
articles or books serves as something of a safeguard against plagiarism, but such reviews of the pertinent
literature are less usual in the humanities.

Every graduate student should have a comprehensive knowledge of what constitutes plagiarism.
Ignorance of the concept of plagiarism on the part of the student is no excuse for resorting to it at the
graduate level, if indeed ignorance is an excuse at the undergraduate level. Graduate students, if any
doubt about the concept, should discuss plagiarism with faculty members. And students should expect
faculty members to demand that they know what constitutes plagiarism. There are problems, however,
not always associated with traditional perceptions of plagiarism. One of these is the danger, when
borrowing from the works of others, of quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing the material in such a way
as to misrepresent what the author is trying to say. A second problem arises when a student is overly
dependent on the work of another, even if the other is cited meticulously. Still another problem is
plagiarizing oneself by submitting the same data or findings in more than one article or by reviewing the
same book in two different journals. And, finally, there is the problem of a graduate student's findings
being used by his or her mentor without proper attribution to the student either in the article or book,
indeed of not giving credit for joint or co-authorship in articles or books where a substantial amount of
the work is done by the student. The student should discuss any perceived problem of this nature with the
faculty member involved, the chair of the department, or, if need be, with the Graduate School.

In nearly all of these instances of plagiarism, or variations thereon, the best preventive is the example and
consultation of the faculty advisor and the rest of the academic community, who should be sensitive to all
of these nuances. Again, as with cases of fraud, University of Florida faculty should handle any suspicion
of plagiarism with due regard to the student's rights, and any detection of plagiarism should be
adjudicated in accordance with established University procedures. The Graduate School will provide
procedural information on request.




24


* Cheating







Cheating at the graduate level may not differ morally from the same action on the undergraduate level,
but many find graduate cheating more reprehensible and the consequences, understandably, more severe.
Academic dishonesty for one whose presence in graduate school declares he or she has opted for the
intellectual life is a serious matter indeed. While cheating in the classroom is covered by regulations
emanating from other parts of the University, cheating on qualifying or preliminary examinations is not.
Such dishonesty, once proven, will at the very least result in failure of the examination and may mean
termination of the student's enrollment.

* Abuses of Confidentiality

Abuses of confidentiality by graduate students can take various forms. Students often have access to
thesis and grant proposals, data, or unpublished papers of other graduate students or faculty members.
Some students use this privileged material in their own research without permission, even though proper
attribution may be made. Such an abuse of confidentiality would include the adaptation into ones own
research of a thesis or dissertation proposal or any unpublished work that one has opportunity to read or
indeed of adopting ideas first floated, and not yet relinquished, by someone else. Another example of the
abuse of confidentiality is that in which the graduate student gains archival or library materials about
living or recently living subjects and uses them in his or her research without permission from the library
or archive or in some cases from the individual. Any research on live subjects can present similar
dilemmas. In some way confidentiality is one of the forms of integrity, which is relatively easy to abuse
and relatively difficult to detect. Once again, as with fraud and plagiarism, the example of the graduate
student's mentor and that of the rest of the academic community is the best preventive.


Confidentiality Statement & Health Information Policy

All Members of the workforce in UF medical components and affiliated entities, including Faculty,
Staff, Students, Volunteers, and Third Parties are Required to Sign UF's Confidentiality
Statement.
All members of the workforce, whether full-time or part-time, temporary or permanent, paid or not paid,
must sign the UF Confidentiality Statement within 5 days of joining the workforce or student body, and
annually thereafter, agreeing to maintain the confidentiality of patient health information created,
received, and maintained by the University of Florida. The online Confidentiality Statement may be
found at:
http://privacy.health.ufl.edu/confidential/index.shtml

The HIPAA Privacy Rule

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) is a broad federal law that is in
part designed to provide national standards for protection of certain health information. As required by
HIPAA, the federal Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) promulgated complex
regulations known as the Privacy Rule, which implement the federal law. Additional information about
The HIPAA Privacy Rule and Disclosures Under State Law may be found at:
http://privacy.health.ufl.edu/traininq/hipaaPrivacy/instructions.shtml






Training


All faculty, staff, students, volunteers, and business associates who work in or for a University of
Florida medical component or an affiliated entity are required to complete specialized training about
privacy and security.
The Staff Office of the Department of Occupational Therapy maintains records of training compliance
for the RSD Students. Training certification is good for at least 12 months from the date on the certificate.
The HIPAA Training may be found at:

http://privacy.health.ufl.edu/training/hipaaPrivacy/instructions.shtml







* Conflict of Interest


Conflicts of interest between graduate students and faculty members may arise in a variety of ways. We
have already alluded to the problems that can occur when the research of a graduate student is
inadequately acknowledged by faculty either by failure to footnote properly or to give co-authorship
credit. But another set of professional interpersonal relationships must be handled with great care if the
integrity of graduate study is to be preserved. As continuing formal education becomes more common
and as academics begin to become involved in the world of business, the possibility of a business
relationship between student and teacher becomes greater. All of us are familiar with the kind of conflict
of interest which may arise through nepotism, that is, when a person serves in an administrative or
supervisory relationship to those who are related to him or her by blood or marriage. Most universities
have rules that try to regulate professional relationships in such cases. Many faculty members are
reluctant to have their own sons, daughters, or spouses take their courses for credit on the grounds that
such students may be perceived by others to have an unfair advantage. A business relationship including
a consulting one must evoke the same kind of caution. And a student should be careful about working for
a company owned or administered by faculty involved in the student's degree work.

Similarly, a student should not date an instructor while the student is enrolled in the instructor's course.
And a student should not ask any instructor to serve as his or her thesis or dissertation director (or
research committee member) if the student is having or has had either an intimate personal relationship, a
family relationship, or business relationship with that instructor.


If such a relationship should develop after a professional one has been established, the student should
expect the instructor to remove him or herself from the professional role. Such a relationship, whether
between a graduate student and a faculty member or between a graduate student acting as an associate
instructor and an undergraduate, constitutes a potential conflict of interest, especially as perceived by
other students and faculty members. Both because of perceptions and because of the possibilities for
exploitation, such relationships should be scrupulously avoided.















APPENDIX A







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS
REHABILITATION SCIENCE DOCTORAL PROGRAM


This form is to be completed by the graduate student and the assigned faculty advisor. It is important to note that the proposed course
work is tentative and may be modified as the student progresses through the program. The Research Committee members need not be
selected until the student has selected a research topic. A copy of this completed form goes to the student and the original is to be
placed in their file.


Name: Phone #: Work #:

Address:

Social Security #: Email Address(s)



SUMMARY OF CREDITS PROPOSED FOR DOCTORAL PROGRAM: 90 Semester Credits

SPECIALTY COURSEWORK MAJOR EMPHASIS

Semester hours at UF + Semester hours elsewhere

REHABILITATION SCIENCE OVERVIEW AND TEACHING

Semester hours at UF + Semester hours elsewhere
RESEARCH AREA

Semester hours at UF + Semester hours elsewhere

Doctoral Dissertation Requirements TOTAL =
RESEARCH COMMITTEE: (Original signatures required)

1) Chair: Date:
2) Co-chair: Date:
3) Outside member: Date:
4) Member: Date:
5) Member: Date:
6) Member: (optional) Date:
7) Member: (optional) Date:


ACCOMPLISHMENTS: (Publications, Awards etc...)


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc












COURSE NO. TITLE ENROLLMENT SEMESTER GRADE
DATE HOURS


COURSE NO. TITLE ENROLLMENT SEMESTER GRADE
DATE HOURS

6110 Rehabilitation Science Theory and
Application I 3 Credits

6930 Special Topics in Rehabilitation Science
1-4 Credits Maximum 9





10 CREDITS


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc













































COURSE NO. TITLE ENROLLMENT SEMESTER GRADE
DATE HOURS









17 CREDITS


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc


COURSE NO. TITLE ENROLLMENT SEMESTER GRADE
DATE HOURS


15 CREDITS







Formal Steps/Work


Process


Student Explores Research Area
and Potential Faculty Advisor


C


Initial Advisor Assigned
Student and Advisor Develop
Program of Study


* Committee Approves
Program of Student
* Coursework in Content Area
* Guided Research
(Independent Study, RA)
* Teaching Skills / Experience
* Advisement in Formulating
Dissertation Area

Prepared by Student's
Committee


4


Research Guidance for
Dissertation


4 Open to University Committee


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc


Figure 1: Typical student path through Ph.D. Rehabilitation Science


I




















APPENDIX B





























33


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc










Graduate School



Supervisory Committee Form

All supervisory (thesis or dissertation) committees are to be entered online through the GIMS
(Graduate Information Management System) website. Use this form as a guide and bring to
the Graduate Coordinator to set up your supervisory committee in GIMS.











































34


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc






/,., UNIVERSITY OF
) FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GRADUATE SCHOOL
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE APPOINTMENT FORM


Under most circumstances, supervisory committees are to be input or updated online by logging on to the Graduate School Information
Management System (GIMS) website (https://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/GIMS/preentrysite.asp). Use this form only if:
* The student has applied for the current semester's graduation, and his or her supervisory committee needs to be appointed or changed.
* The student is requesting a special minor.
* The supervisory committee has a co-chair who does not have a graduate faculty appointment in the student's major department.
This form will be returned to your department for direct input if it does not fall into any of these three special circumstances. For detailed online
information from the UF Graduate School Policy Manual regarding supervisory committee membership, appointments, duties and eligibility,
click here: Supervisory Committee Policy. Incomplete, incorrect or unsigned forms will be returned unprocessed.

Name of person preparing form Campus Mailing Address Campus Telephone Campus E-Mail
POB


Student's UFID Student's Last Name Student's First Name Student's Middle Name



Check one: This form is being submitted for... a new supervisory committee. ] a change in supervisory committee.

Degree Major
Choose a degree: Choose a major:
Concentration (if applicable) Minor (if applicable)
Choose a concentration: Choose a minor:
For master's degrees, indicate thesis, project in lieu of thesis or non-thesis here: Choose a master's degree option:


UFID Name Classification Department
Chair Choose classification: Choose a department or school:
Co-Chair Choose classification: Choose a department or school:
Member Choose classification: Choose a department or school:
Member Choose classification: Choose a department or school:
Member Choose classification: Choose a department or school:
Member Choose classification: Choose a department or school:
External Member* Choose classification: Choose a department or school:
Only required for Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Education committees ** Special Supervisory Committee Appointment Petition form required


SIGNATURES: NEW/CHANGED SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE APPROVAL



Department Chair or Representative Date College Dean or Representative (if required by college) Date







TIME STAMP




Graduate School Dean or Representative Date

SEND THIS FORM VIA CAMPUS MAIL TO: UF GRADUATE SCHOOL STUDENT RECORDS, POB 115500, UF CAMPUS.


Revised 30 June 2003










Special Supervisory Committee Appointments


Please read these instructions before filling out the Special Supervisory Committee
Appointment form.
What is a special supervisory committee appointment?
A special supervisory committee appointment allows someone who does not have graduate
faculty status at the University of Florida to serve on a graduate student's supervisory
committee, such as:
Individuals outside UF with specific expertise applicable to the student's degree program and graduate research.

Tenure-track UF faculty who have not yet qualified for graduate faculty status.

Non-tenure-track UF faculty or staff who do not qualify for graduate faculty status.
Special appointments can serve as regular members on supervisory committees, but they
CANNOT serve as a chair, co-chair, external member or minor representative on a
supervisory committee.
Special appointments are considered on a case-by-case basis.
How do I know whether or not an individual already has graduate faculty status?
You can find out if an individual already has graduate faculty status at UF by:
Logging onto the UF Graduate School Information Management System (GIMS).

Clicking your cursor on the "Student's Supervisory Committee Entry" button.
Clicking on the "Graduate Faculty Committee Information" option on the screen that appears.

Entering the individual's name or UFID on the screen that appears, then clicking your cursor on either the
"Submit" (UFID) or "Name Search" (Name) button.
How do I go about petitioning for a special appointment?
First, have the Graduate Coordinator fill out the Special Supervisory Committee Appointment
form completely. If this is a first-time special appointment for the nominee named on
the form, an up-to-date copy of his or her curriculum vitae will be needed to be
attached to the form along with an explanation of the special qualifications this
individual has and how he or she will contribute to your supervisory committee. The
completed and signed form will be forwarded to the UF Graduate School.
The UF Graduate School will review the petition and make a decision. If it is approved, UF
Graduate School Data Management will add the special appointment to your supervisory
committee.













36


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc






:4. UNIVERSITY OF
. FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GRADUATE SCHOOL
SPECIAL SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE APPOINTMENT PETITION


Individuals who do not have graduate faculty status at the University of Florida may serve on a graduate student's supervisory committee by
special appointment petition. To submit such a petition, fill out this form completely and send it to UF Graduate School Data Management.
Incomplete, incorrect or unsigned forms will be returned unprocessed. To find out if an individual already has graduate faculty status:
* Log onto the UF Graduate School Information Management System (GIMS) online (https://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/GIMS/presiteentry).
* Click your cursor on the "Student's Supervisory Committee Entry" button.
* Click on the "Graduate Faculty Committee Information" option on the screen that appears.
* Enter the individual's name or UFID on the screen that appears, then click your cursor on either the "Submit" (UFID) or "Name Search"
(Name) button.
These special appointments are considered on a case-by-case basis. Special appointments can serve as regular members on supervi-
sory committees, but they cannot serve as a chair, co-chair, external member or minor representative on a supervisory committee. If
your petition is approved, UF Graduate School Data Management will add the special appointment to the graduate student's supervisory
committee for you and send you a signed photocopy of this form for your files.

Name of person preparing form Campus Mailing Address Campus Telephone Campus E-Mail
POB

Student's UFID Student's Last Name Student's First Name Student's Middle Name


Student's College Student's Major Student's Degree
Choose a college: Choose a major: Choose a degree:

To prevent there being more than one UFID for the same person, it is your department's responsibility to create a UFID for this spe-
cial appointment nominee if he/she does not already have one. Forms submitted without UFIDs will be returned unprocessed. To
find a person's UFID or create one for someone who does not have one, consult the person in your unit who has been assigned ac-
cess to the Admin Menu on the My UFL (https://my.ufl.edu) website for looking up UFIDs or creating them for your personnel. If you
need help with My UFL, call 392-HELP.

Nominee's UFID Nominee's Last Name Nominee's First Name Nominee's Middle Name


Check one: O This is the individual's first special appointment. O This individual has had previous special appointments.
Justification
Provide a brief explanation as to what special qualifications this individual has and what he or she will contribute to the student's supervisory
committee. If this is a first-time special appointment, attach an up-to-date copy of his or her curriculum vitae to this form.


Committee Chair Signature Date






TIME STAMP
O Approved
O Denied

Graduate School Dean or Representative Date


SEND THIS FORM VIA CAMPUS MAIL TO: UF GRADUATE SCHOOL DATA MANAGEMENT, POB 115500, UF CAMPUS.


Revised 10 October 2003










Graduate Credit Transfer Form
Use this form as a guide to transfer graduate credits from a prior graduate degree (elsewhere
or at UF) and apply them to your program's degree requirements. Bring a copy, front and
back of an original official transcript to the Graduate Coordinator with a list of the courses to
be transferred.















































38


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc






U UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GRADUATE SCHOOL
GRADUATE COURSE CREDIT TRANSFER PETITION


Use this form to petition the UF Graduate School to apply another institution's course credits, eligible UF postbaccalaureate credits, or eligible
UF master's degree credits toward a graduate degree program at the University of Florida. For detailed online information from the UF
Graduate School Policy Manual regarding graduate course credit transfer policies, eligibility and limitations, click here: Transfer of Graduate
Courses and Credits Policy. Fill out this form completely and accurately. Attach a photocopy of the front and the back of the original official
transcript on which the courses and credits are documented. Incomplete, incorrect or unsigned forms will be returned unprocessed.

Name of person preparing form Campus Mailing Address Campus Telephone Campus Fax Campus E-Mail
POB

Student's UFID Student's Last Name Student's First Name Student's Middle Name

What is the student's major department? To what degree would the transfer credits be applied?
Choose a major: Choose a degree:
At what institution were these credits earned? What was the student's classification at the time?


FOR "BLOCK" TRANSFERS OF CREDIT TO DOCTORAL DEGREES (CHECK ONE):
O Review transcripts and apply any eligible credits (up to 30) from previous non-UF master's degree toward doctoral degree requirements.
O Review transcripts and apply all eligible credits from previous UF master's degree toward doctoral degree requirements.

FOR COURSE-BY-COURSE TRANSFERS OF CREDIT TO MASTER'S OR DOCTORAL DEGREES:

Course Course Course Title Credits Grade Term Year
Prefix Number


SIGNATURES


Recommended by:


Supervisory Committee Chair or Department Chair


Approved by:


Date College Dean or Representative (if required by college)


I C A 3R A E FOM CLC HERE.



SFAX LABEL TIME STAMP
O Approved
o Approved
(Internal)
O Denied Graduate School Dean or Representative Date

SEND THIS FORM VIA CAMPUS MAIL TO: UF GRADUATE SCHOOL STUDENT RECORDS, POB 115500, UF CAMPUS.


Revised 8 December 2006


I I _i_


Date










Change of Degree Form


This form is used to change a graduate student's classification (major, department or
college), add another degree program segment to his/her record (for example, a doctorate
along with a master's degree), or admit a current UF graduate student in another program
into your program. This form is only available through the Graduate Information Management
System (GIMS), for the Graduate Coordinator to complete.












































40


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc






UF UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GRADUATE SCHOOL
TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM FORM


PLEASE READ THIS INFORMATION CAREFULLY BEFORE FILLING OUT THIS FORM


The Traveling Scholar Program is designed to give UF graduate
students the opportunity to take special courses or do special re-
search or field work not available on the University of Florida cam-
pus. By mutual consent of UF and the host institution through this
program, a UF graduate student can take courses at the host institu-
tion without having to go through its usual graduate school applica-
tion process or having to meet its admissions requirements. The
student is guaranteed that the course credits earned at the host insti-
tution will count towards his or her UF degree. The reason for want-
ing to study as a traveling scholar must be strictly educational. A
more convenient location for the student is not a valid reason, and
proposed programs based on this reason cannot be approved. Pro-
posed programs that include courses available at UF cannot be ap-
proved either.

This program is not meant to allow a UF graduate student to take a
large amount of course work for his or her UF degree outside of UF.
As a norm, participation is limited to one term only. The maximum
number of credits that can be earned and transferred is 12 unless
the credit is taken through the UF College of Engineering FEEDS
Program, which allows a maximum of 15 credits. In either case, the
student's department or supervisory committee at UF reserves the
right to set its own limits (lower than these 12-credit or 15-credit
maximums), if they see fit. A UF graduate student must be admitted
to and enrolled in a UF graduate program before taking course work
under the Traveling Scholar Program. A student cannot participate
in this program in the last semester of his or her degree program,
because of the delay in receiving official transcripts from the host
institution they may not arrive before degree certification and
graduation.


The Traveling Scholar Program is for study at other institutions inside
Florida's State University System or outside of it, but located in the
United States. It does not cover study outside of the United
States. For traveling scholar programs outside the United States,
go to the UF International Center in 123 Grinter Hall and fill out its
Graduate Academic Advising Form instead of this one.

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Fill out the attached form completely. Please print or type. (You
can fill out this form online and print it from your computer.)
2. Get your supervisory committee chair, department chair and col-
lege dean to approve and sign the form.
3. Take the completed and signed form to UF Graduate School Stu-
dent Records (106 Grinter Hall) for its coordinator's approval and
signature. Allow ample time beforehand for review, approval and
processing of this form.
4. If approved, take the form to the graduate dean of the host non-
UF institution at which you want to study, for his or her approval.
5. If your host institution approves and signs the form, have them
send it to UF Graduate School Student Records (POB 115500,
Gainesville FL 32611-5500). Then you will register for courses
and pay tuition and student fees to the host institution.
6. When you finish the courses at the host institution, go to its regis-
trar's office and request that it mail official sealed transcripts di-
rectly to your department back at UF.
7. Make sure your department receives the transcripts, fills out a
Transfer of Graduate Credit form for you, attaches the original
transcripts to it and sends those documents to UF Graduate
School Student Records (POB 115500) via campus mail.


FLORIDA BOARD OF EDUCATION RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM
6C-6.07 Traveling Scholar Program
1. Purpose. The program will enable a graduate student to take advantage of special resources available on another campus but not avail-
able on his own campus: special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories, and library of collections.
2. Procedure.
A. A traveling scholar is a graduate student who, by mutual agreement of the appropriate academic authorities in both the sponsoring and
hosting institutions, receives a waiver of admission requirements and the application fee of the host institution and a guarantee of
earned resident credits by the sponsoring institution.
B. A traveling scholar must be recommended by his own graduate adviser, who will initiate a visiting arrangement with the appropriate
faculty member of the host institution.
C. After agreement by the student's adviser and the faculty member at the host institution, graduate deans at both institutions will be fully
informed by the adviser and have the authority to approve or disapprove the academic arrangement.
D. A student will register at the host institution and will pay tuition and/or registration fees according to fee schedules established at that
institution.
3. Conditions.
A. Each university retains its full right to accept or reject any student who wishes to study under its auspices.
B. Traveling scholars will normally be limited to one term (semester, trimester, quarter, etc.) on the campus of the host university.
C. Traveling scholars are not entitled to displacement allowance, mileage, or per diem payments. The sponsoring institution, however,
may at its option, continue its financial support of the traveling scholar in the form of fellowships or graduate assistantships, with the
work obligation to be discharged either at the sponsoring or host institution.
4. Information in the University Catalogs. Information about the traveling scholar program should be included in the catalogs of the participat-
ing universities.


From the Florida Statute General Authority 240 042, 240 052 FS Law implemented 240 042, 240 052 FS History Formerly 6C-2 46, 11-18-70, Renumbers 12-16-74






U UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GRADUATE SCHOOL
TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM FORM


Please fill out this form completely and correctly, and obtain all the signatures indicated on it. Incomplete, incorrect or unsigned forms will
be returned unprocessed.

Name of person preparing form Campus Mailing Address Campus Telephone Campus E-Mail
POB


Student's UFID Student's Last Name Student's First Name Student's Middle Name


Mailing Address City State Zip Code


For what reason or purpose does this current active UF student want to participate in the Traveling Scholar Program?



This student will be studying (choose one): O inside the Florida State University System.
O outside the Florida State University System but inside the United States.


Name of Host Institution Term and Year of Attendance For what UF degree program are these credits?

Course Number Course Title Credits


Note: Only a maximum of 12 credits of graduate course work will be transferred. Only letter grades of B or better in course work are acceptable.
SDEPRTEN AN COLG APROA SINTUE


Department
Choose a department or school:


College


Choose a college:


This graduate student is in good standing in our department and college. We will submit a transfer of credit request form with original official
transcripts attached when he/she completes the course work shown above.


Supervisory Committee Chair


Date Department Chair


Date College Dean (if applicable)


This graduate student has been approved to take courses at the institution indicated TIME STAMP
above. The courses listed will be transferred to his/her UF graduate degree program.


Graduate School Dean or Representative Date


This student has my approval to enroll at our university and pursue the courses listed above.


Host Institution's Graduate School Dean or Representative


Date


SEND THIS FORM VIA CAMPUS MAIL TO: UF GRADUATE SCHOOL STUDENT RECORDS, POB 115500, UF CAMPUS.
Revised 29 September 2004


Date






,. UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GRADUATE SCHOOL
JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM AUTHORIZATION FORM


Before this form is submitted, the student must first be admitted to both his/her graduate program and professional program. Use
this form to set up an individual joint degree* classification for a student already admitted to and enrolled in a professional degree pro-
gram who wants to pursue a graduate degree program simultaneously. The student cannot have received either of the degrees indicated
on this form. Approval of a program of study for a joint degree program does not constitute certification of those degrees for gradua-
tion. Do not allow students to fill out and submit this form: it must be filled out by an office staff member and signed by the appro-
priate administrators. Incomplete, incorrect or unsigned forms will be returned unprocessed.
*Not to be confused with a concurrent degree classification, which means a student is enrolling in two graduate degree programs simulta-
neously. (Joint degree = professional degree + graduate degree. Concurrent degree = graduate degree + graduate degree.)

Name of person preparing form Campus Mailing Address Campus Telephone Campus E-Mail
POB

Student UFID Student Last Name Student First Name Student Middle Name



Student Campus Mailing Address Student Telephone Student E-Mail
POB

Student Mailing Address



Professional Program Graduate Program
College
Department
Major
Degree
Concentration
Thesis Option for Graduate Program

Term this joint degree program goes into effect (first term of graduate admission or later):
The number of professional degree program credits shared between the two degree programs is a maximum of 12 credits total.

Student Signature Professional Program Signatures Graduate Program Signatures



Student Date Department Representative Date Department Representative Date


College Representative Date College Representative Date







TIME STAMP


Graduate School Dean or Representative Signature Date

SEND THIS FORM VIA CAMPUS MAIL TO: UF GRADUATE SCHOOL STUDENT RECORDS, POB 115500, UF CAMPUS.


Revised 30 July 2007







Admission to Candidacy Form


This form is used when a doctoral student is ready to change classification and progress into
the final research-and-writing phase of their doctoral degree program. This form is only
available through the Graduate Information Management System (GIMS), by the Graduate
Coordinator. Contact the Graduate Coordinator two weeks prior to the date you plan for
admission to candidacy for the form to be completed for your committee's signatures.
















































44


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc










UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GRADUATE SCHOOL
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FORM


Please do not allow students to fill out and submit this form: it must be filled out by an office staff member and signed by the appropriate personnel.
Incomplete, incorrect or unsigned forms will be returned unprocessed.


Name of person preparing form


Campus Mailing Address


Campus Telephone


Student Last Name


College


Concentration


Minor (If Applicable)


This student is hereby certified as having met all requirements for admission to candidacy for the degree indicated. Approval for admission to candidacy
must be based on: (a) the student's academic record; (b) satisfactory performance on written and oral qualifying exams; and (c) approval of his/her
dissertation topic. Included among these requirements are the following (please check the box or fill in the blank provided):


1. Required: Grade point average of B (3.00) or higher:


2. Required: Qualifying Examination Result:


r r-
Yes No


Passed on


(Date)


r
Failed on


(Date)


3. Required: Dissertation Topic Approval Date (Date)

4. Required: Supervisory Committee Chair Name: UFID:

5. Optional: Title of Dissertation:

6. Optional: If the student is enrolled in Advanced Research (7979), and his/her department wishes to change it to enrollment
in Dissertation Research (7980), please attach a drop/add form for the current term that has been filled out and signed
completely. No retroactive changes will be processed.


Supervisory Committee Member Name


Department


Signature*


Communicative Disorders

*All official supervisory committee members or their designated substitutes must sign this form before it is submitted to the UF Graduate School.


Department Chair or Representative Signature Date


College Dean or Representative Signature Date


TIME STAMP


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc


Student UFID


Degree


Major


Student First and Middle Names


GIMS ID










Degree Application Form
Fill out this form, go to: http://gradschool. rqp.ufl.edu/students/student-forms. htm I, to apply for
graduation and receipt of your degree. Submit it to the UF Office of the Registrar by the
deadline published for the semester in which you plan on graduating. For deadlines, view the
Registrar's Critical Dates Page: http://www.registrar.ufl.edu/.















































46


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc





UF |UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


UFID GatorLink E-Mail Address
Return this form to the Office of the University Registrar by
the deadline to file a degree application, as published in the
university calendar. If you do not graduate this term, a new
application must be filed during your anticipated term of
graduation. If you are eligible to receive multiple degrees, indicate
in the area below and mark the appropriate lines.

Check (V) if applicable: U Receiving 2 different degrees
U Name/Degree correction
Check (V) the degrees) for which you are applying:
Fisher School of Accounting
Bachelor of Science in Accounting U BSAC
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
Bachelor of Science U BSA
M. E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
Bachelor of Science in Building Construction L BSBC
Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Services L BSFES
Warrington College of Business Administration
Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration U BABA
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration U BSBA
College of Dentistry
Doctor of Dental Medicine 0 DMD
College of Design, Construction and Planning
Bachelor of Design 0 BDES
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture U BLAE
College of Education
Bachelor of Arts in Education U BAE
College of Engineering
Bachelor of Science L EGBS
Bachelor of Science (Interdis. Engineering Studies) L BS(IES)
Bachelor of Science (Nuclear Engineering Sciences) O BS(NES)
Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering L BSAE
Bachelor ofSdcenceinAgricultural & Biological Engineering L BSAGE
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering L BSCHE
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering L BSCE
Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering L BSCEN
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science L BSCS
Bachelor of Science in Digital Arts and Sciences L BSDAS
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering L BSEE
Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science L BSES
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering L BSEN
Bachelor of Science in Geomatics L BSGEO
Bachelor of Science in Industrial & Systems Eng. L BSISE
Bachelor of Science in Materials Science & Eng. L BSMSE
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering L BSME
Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering L BSNE
Degrees\degapp.Indd Office of the University Regist


Indicate year and term you are applying to graduate:


Degree Application

U Fall Spring
Year U Summer A (Bachelor's only) L Summer B L Summer C


In the space below, print your name exactly as you want it to appear on your diploma. Please indicate capital and lower-case letters,
spaces between names, and any punctuation or accent marks.


First name


Middle name


Signature


College of Fine Arts
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts in Art Education
Bachelor of Arts in History of Art
Bachelor of Arts in Digital Arts and Sciences
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design
Bachelor of Music
Bachelor of Music in Music Education
School of Forest Resources & Conservation
Bachelor of Science in Forest Resources & Conserv.
Bachelor of Science in Geomatics


L FABA
L BAAED
L BAHA
L BADAR
L BFA
L BFAGRA
L BMUS
L BMUSE

O BSF
O BSGEM


College of Health & Human Performance
Bachelor of Science in Applied Physiology & KinesiologyO BSAPK
Bachelor of Science in Exercise & Sport Sciences O BSESS
Bachelor of Science in Health Education L BSHED
Bachelor of Science in Health Science Education L BSHSE
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education L BSPE
Bachelor of Science in Recreation, Parks & Tourism O BSR
Bachelor of Science in Sport Management J BSSPM
College of Journalism & Communications
Bachelor of Science in Advertising O BSADV
Bachelor of Science in Journalism O BSJ
Bachelor of Science in Public Relations O BSPR
Bachelor of Science in Telecommunication J BSTEL
Fredric G. Levin College of Law
Doctor of Juridical Science in Taxation U SJD
Juris Doctor 0 JD
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
Bachelor of Arts U BA
Bachelor of Science L BS
College of Medicine
Doctor of Medicine L MD
Master of Physician Assistant Studies O MPAS
School of Natural Resources & Environment
Bachelor of Arts U BANRE
Bachelor of Science L BSNRE
College of Nursing
Bachelor of Science in Nursing O BSN
College of Pharmacy
Doctor of Pharmacy O DPH
College of Public Health and Health Professions
Bachelor of Health Science 0 BHS
Doctor of Physical Therapy O DPT
College of Veterinary Medicine
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine L DVM


Last/family name(s)
Graduate School
Doctor of Audiology
Doctor of Education
Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Plant Medicine
Engineer
Master of Accounting
Master of Advertising
Master of Agribusiness
Master of Agriculture
Master of Architecture
Master of Arts
Master of Arts in Education
Master of Arts in Mass Communication
Master of Arts in Teaching
Master of Arts in Urban & Regional Planning
Master of Building Construction
Master of Business Administration
Master of Civil Engineering
Master of Education
Master of Engineering
Master of Exercise and Sport Sciences
Master of Family, Youth and Community Sciences
Master of Fine Arts
Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Master of Forest Resources & Conservation
Master of Health Administration
Master of Health Science
Master of Health Science Education
Master of Interior Design
Master of International Construction Management
Master of Landscape Architecture
Master of Latin
Master of Laws in Comparative Law
Master of Laws in International Taxation
Master of Laws in Taxation
Master of Music
Master of Occupational Therapy
Master of Physical Therapy
Master of Public Health
Master of Science
Master of Science in Architectural Studies
Master of Science in Building Construction
Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Sciences
Master of Science in Health Science Education
Master of Science in Nursing
Master of Science in Pharmacy
Master of Science in Recreational Studies
Master of Science in Statistics
Master of Science in Teaching
Master of Women's Studies
Master of Statistics
Specialist in Education


rar, PO Box 114000, 222 Criser Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000, 352-392-1374 ext. 7229, Fax 352-846-1126


L AUD
L EDD
L PHD
L DPM
L ENG
L MACC
L MADV
L MAB
L MAG
U MARCH
O MA
U MAE
L MAMC
L MAT
L MAURP
L MBC
L MBA
L MCE
L MED
O ME
L MESS
O MFYCS
O MFA
O MFAS
L MFRC
L MHA
L MHS
L MHSE
L MID
L MICM
L MLARCH
L ML
L LLMCL
U LLMIT
U LLMT
O MM
L MOT
L MPT
L MPH
U MS
L MSAS
L MSBC
L MSESS
L MSHSE
L MSNSG
O MSP
O MSRS
O MSSTAT
L MST
U MWS
L MSTAT
L EDS
Rev. 3/06







Late Degree Application Form
If you miss the degree application deadline for the semester in which you planned on
graduating, fill out this form, go to: http://gradschool.ufl.edu/students/student-forms.html to
apply for graduate and receive your degree past deadline. You must submit this form to the
UF Office of the Registrar before the midpoint date of the semester in which you plan on
graduating. Midpoint dates are published in the Critical Dates section of the Graduate
Catalog.














































48


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc






UF |UNIVERSITY of
U FLORIDA


Petition to Apply for a Degree
After the Deadline


If you expect to receive a degree from the University of Florida this term, this request must be
approved by a college representative before your application can be processed by the Office of the
University Registrar. Please refer to the attached sheet for information and instructions.



College Authorization


I hereby certify that


Student name


is authorized to appear on the graduation list for the


UFID


College or school


Name of degree


(year), (term). He/she will be considered a candidate for the above-named degree.


Signature of dean or authorized representative


Date


Please complete the late degree application on the reverse side.


Degrees\latedegpetition.pmd


Office of the University Registrar, P.O. Box 114000,222 Criser Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000, (352) 392-1374, Fax (352) 846-1126


Rev. 6/04






UF |UNIVERSITY of
UFFLORIDA Late Degree Information



To be added to the degree candidate list after the deadline for the current term, you must petition your college
dean's office by the last day of classes. Please follow the instructions below.

Graduate Students

1. Complete the Late Application for Degree. The Graduate School dean's office (106 Grinter Hall) will
approve the application. Graduate students do not have to fill out a petition form. Graduate students who
apply after the mid-point of the term must apply to graduate the following term. Check with the Graduate
School for the late degree application deadline.

2. Please return the approved application to 222 Criser Hall.

All Other Students

1. Complete the Late Application for Degree and a petition form, which is on the back of the late degree
application, and submit the forms to your college dean's office for approval.

2. Please return the approved application to 222 Criser Hall.





Important Information for all Applicants
Please retain this sheet for your reference.

1. If you have been approved by your dean's office as a degree candidate and you plan to participate in the
commencement ceremony, allow twenty-four (24) hours for your application to be processed. Your
degree information must be available electronically on the bookstore file before they can process your
regalia information. Please contact the customer service desk at the UF Bookstore at the Reitz Union for
additional information regarding regalia.

2. Because you are applying after the deadline, there is a possibility that your name will not appear in the
commencement program.

3. Diplomas are ordered after the term is over and are sent to the permanent home address on file
approximately 8-10 weeks after graduation. Please verify your permanent home mailing address using
the address change link on ISIS at www.isis.ufl.edu.


Degrees\latedeginfo.pmd


Office of the University Registrar, P.O. Box 114000,222 Criser Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000, (352) 392-1374, Fax (352) 846-1126


Rev. 6/04





UF |UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


UFID GatorLink E-Mail Address
Return this form to the Office of the University Registrar by
the deadline to file a degree application, as published in the
university calendar. If you do not graduate this term, a new
application must be filed during your anticipated term of
graduation. If you are eligible to receive multiple degrees, indicate
in the area below and mark the appropriate lines.

Check (V) if applicable: U Receiving 2 different degrees
U Name/Degree correction
Check (V) the degrees) for which you are applying:
Fisher School of Accounting
Bachelor of Science in Accounting U BSAC
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
Bachelor of Science U BSA
M. E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
Bachelor of Science in Building Construction L BSBC
Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Services L BSFES
Warrington College of Business Administration
Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration U BABA
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration U BSBA
College of Dentistry
Doctor of Dental Medicine 0 DMD
College of Design, Construction and Planning
Bachelor of Design 0 BDES
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture U BLAE
College of Education
Bachelor of Arts in Education U BAE
College of Engineering
Bachelor of Science L EGBS
Bachelor of Science (Interdis. Engineering Studies) L BS(IES)
Bachelor of Science (Nuclear Engineering Sciences) O BS(NES)
Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering L BSAE
Bachelor ofSdcenceinAgricultural & Biological Engineering L BSAGE
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering L BSCHE
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering L BSCE
Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering L BSCEN
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science L BSCS
Bachelor of Science in Digital Arts and Sciences L BSDAS
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering L BSEE
Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science L BSES
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering L BSEN
Bachelor of Science in Geomatics L BSGEO
Bachelor of Science in Industrial & Systems Eng. L BSISE
Bachelor of Science in Materials Science & Eng. L BSMSE
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering L BSME
Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering L BSNE


Indicate year and term you are applying to graduate:


Late Degree Application

U Fall U Spring
Year U Summer A (Bachelor's only) L Summer B L Summer C


In the space below, print your name exactly as you want it to appear on your diploma. Please indicate capital and lower-case letters,
spaces between names, and any punctuation or accent marks.


First name


Middle name


Signature


College of Fine Arts
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts in Art Education
Bachelor of Arts in History of Art
Bachelor of Arts in Digital Arts and Sciences
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design
Bachelor of Music
Bachelor of Music in Music Education
School of Forest Resources & Conservation
Bachelor of Science in Forest Resources & Conserv.
Bachelor of Science in Geomatics


L FABA
L BAAED
L BAHA
L BADAR
L BFA
L BFAGRA
L BMUS
L BMUSE

O BSF
O BSGEM


College of Health & Human Performance
Bachelor of Science in Applied Physiology & KinesiologyO BSAPK
Bachelor of Science in Exercise & Sport Sciences O BSESS
Bachelor of Science in Health Education L BSHED
Bachelor of Science in Health Science Education L BSHSE
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education L BSPE
Bachelor of Science in Recreation, Parks & Tourism O BSR
Bachelor of Science in Sport Management J BSSPM
College of Journalism & Communications
Bachelor of Science in Advertising O BSADV
Bachelor of Science in Journalism O BSJ
Bachelor of Science in Public Relations O BSPR
Bachelor of Science in Telecommunication J BSTEL
Fredric G. Levin College of Law
Doctor of Juridical Science in Taxation U SJD
Juris Doctor 0 JD
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
Bachelor of Arts U BA
Bachelor of Science L BS
College of Medicine
Doctor of Medicine L MD
Master of Physician Assistant Studies O MPAS
School of Natural Resources & Environment
Bachelor of Arts U BANRE
Bachelor of Science L BSNRE
College of Nursing
Bachelor of Science in Nursing O BSN
College of Pharmacy
Doctor of Pharmacy O DPH
College of Public Health and Health Professions
Bachelor of Health Science 0 BHS
Doctor of Physical Therapy O DPT
College of Veterinary Medicine
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine L DVM


Last/family name(s)
Graduate School
Doctor of Audiology
Doctor of Education
Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Plant Medicine
Engineer
Master of Accounting
Master of Advertising
Master of Agribusiness
Master of Agriculture
Master of Architecture
Master of Arts
Master of Arts in Education
Master of Arts in Mass Communication
Master of Arts in Teaching
Master of Arts in Urban & Regional Planning
Master of Building Construction
Master of Business Administration
Master of Civil Engineering
Master of Education
Master of Engineering
Master of Exercise and Sport Sciences
Master of Family, Youth and Community Sciences
Master of Fine Arts
Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Master of Forest Resources & Conservation
Master of Health Administration
Master of Health Science
Master of Health Science Education
Master of Interior Design
Master of International Construction Management
Master of Landscape Architecture
Master of Latin
Master of Laws in Comparative Law
Master of Laws in International Taxation
Master of Laws in Taxation
Master of Music
Master of Occupational Therapy
Master of Physical Therapy
Master of Public Health
Master of Science
Master of Science in Architectural Studies
Master of Science in Building Construction
Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Sciences
Master of Science in Health Science Education
Master of Science in Nursing
Master of Science in Pharmacy
Master of Science in Recreational Studies
Master of Science in Statistics
Master of Science in Teaching
Master of Women's Studies
Master of Statistics
Specialist in Education


Office of the University Registrar, PO Box 114000, 222 Criser Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000, 352-392-1374 ext. 7229, Fax 352-846-1126


L AUD
L EDD
L PHD
L DPM
L ENG
L MACC
L MADV
L MAB
L MAG
U MARCH
O MA
U MAE
L MAMC
L MAT
L MAURP
L MBC
L MBA
L MCE
L MED
O ME
L MESS
O MFYCS
O MFA
O MFAS
L MFRC
L MHA
L MHS
L MHSE
L MID
L MICM
L MLARCH
L ML
L LLMCL
U LLMIT
U LLMT
O MM
L MOT
L MPT
L MPH
U MS
L MSAS
L MSBC
L MSESS
L MSHSE
L MSNSG
O MSP
O MSRS
O MSSTAT
L MST
U MWS
L MSTAT
L EDS
Rev. 3/06







Degree Certification Status Verification Form
If you need a letter verifying your current degree candidate status, fill out this form, go to:
http://qradschool.ufl.edu/students/student-forms.html and submit it to UF Graduate School
Student Records.


















































52


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc





UF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GRADUATE SCHOOL
DEGREE CANDIDATE STATUS VERIFICATION FORM


How to use this form: the student completes Section A, then has the personnel designated in each of the other sections' headers complete Sections B, C, D
and E. If the letter is for postdoctoral employment at the University of Florida, the student must complete Section F as well. Please be thorough and accurate:
incomplete, incorrect or unsigned forms cannot be processed.

SE CTION A: STUDENT ]ll 1I1NFRMT1 S
Student Name Student UFID Student Telephone Number Student E-Mail Address

College Major Degree
Choose a college Choose a major Choose a degree
Have you submitted a degree application form for the term in which you are graduating? 0 Yes 0 No
Did you register for the term in which you are graduating? O Yes, for__ (number) credits O No
Do you need this letter to be mailed? 0 Yes, __ (number) copies 0 No
If the letter is to be mailed, please type or print the address here (name, street address, city, state/province, postal code, country):

I understand that this is not certification of my degree. It is verification of my current degree candidate status. Ultimately, it is my responsibility to ensure that I
have satisfied all department, college and university requirements for certification of my degree. I also understand that I must fulfill the final term registration
requirement if I am not cleared prior to the first day of classes.

Student Signature Date



Verification of final term grades for all courses (including special FEEDS, distance learning, module, etc. programs that end prior to the traditional semester calendar):
Course Prefix and Number Grade Instructor Name (Type or Print) Instructor Signature Date








I understand this student has applied for the degree designated in Section A and verify the following:
The student's degree program is... If thesis or dissertation, has the student submitted an acceptable one? The student's program of study is...
O non-thesis. O Yes, final examination date was (type or print) 0 completed.
O project in lieu of thesis. 0 No 0 in progress.
O thesis or dissertation.

Supervisory Committee Chair Signature Date



The dean of the college designated in Section A anticipates this student's degree will be conferred (type or print semester and year).

College Dean Signature Date


O Student made final submission of thesis/dissertation 0 Final examination form is on file and is dated (type or print date)

Editorial Office Personnel Signature Date



Name of Employing Department Effective Starting Date of Employment Official Position Title


FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL USE5ONLY


Graduate School Student Records Personnel Signature


Date


Revised 26 September 2003


Processed by:


I


I







Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) Rights and Permission
Fill out this form, go to: http://qradschool.ufl.edu/students/student-forms.html to establish
release for your electronic thesis or dissertation. Fill out all entries online and print the form
on 100% cotton bond paper. Submit it to the UF Graduate School Editorial Office.
















































54


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc












University of Florida Graduate School

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD)

Rights and Permission

1. Enter and submit on line. 2. Print, sign, and submit to Graduate School Editorial Office

Student Name:

ID#:

Document Type: Master's Thesis Doctoral Dissertation

Document Title:






Student Agreement:

I hereby certify that I have obtained all necessary permission in writing for copyrighted material to be published in my thesis or
dissertation. Further, I certify that I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owners) of any
copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation, allowing distribution as specified below. Copies of all such
permissions are maintained in my files.

I hereby grant to the University of Florida and its employees the nonexclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the
conditions specified below, my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. This is a
license rather than an assignment, and I, therefore, retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis or dissertation. I also
retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.

In addition to the unrestricted display of the bibliographic information and the abstract, I agree that the above mentioned
document be placed in the ETD archive with the following status (choose one of 1, 2, or 3) by checking the appropriate space below):

S1. Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

2. Restrict access to the entire work to the University of Florida and all patrons of its libraries, including interlibrary sharing
and release of doctoral dissertations to UMI. [Please check appropriate time span.] After (_1, 2, _3, _4, _5, _10)
years release my work worldwide unless you receive in writing a request from me to continue restricted access. If I choose
to release the work for worldwide access sooner, I will contact Library Archives, P.O. Box 117007, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611.

3. Secure the entire work for patent and/or proprietary purposes for a period of six months. During this period the copyright
owner also agrees not to exercise her/his ownership rights, including public use in works, without prior authorization from
the University of Florida. At the end of the six-month period, either I or the University of Florida may request an extension
for an additional six months. At the end of the six-month secure period (or its extension, if such is requested), the work will
be handled under option 1 above, unless I request option 2 in writing.

The undersigned agrees to abide by the statements above, and agrees that this approval form updates any and all previous
approval forms submitted heretofore.

Signed:
(student) (date)


(chair)


(date)










Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) Signature Page
Fill out this form, go to: http://gradschool.ufl.edu/students/student-forms.html and submit it to
the UF Graduate School Editorial Office when you are submitting your thesis or dissertation.
Be sure to print it out on 100% cotton bond paper.
















































56


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc











University of Florida Graduate School

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) Signature Page


Student's Name:

This document has been reviewed and accepted by the student's supervisory committee.


Professor's name & title including department


Professor's signature


Chair


Month and Year of Graduation:


College Dean:


Graduate Dean:


(when required by college)

You do not provide this signature. The
Editorial Office will ask the Graduate School
dean to sign later, after commencement.


Name
Title


Name
Title


Name
Title


Name
Title


Name
Title


Name
Title


Name
Title







Exit Survey: Doctoral Degree Students
Fill out this form, go to: http://qradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/exit-survev-doctoral.pdf and submit
it to the UF Graduate School before the end of the semester in which you are graduating with
your doctoral degree.



















































58


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc






Survey for Doctoral Students
University of Florida

Congratulations, you are completing a doctoral degree form the University of Florida! As you are leaving the University,
could you tell us about your educational experiences at UF and your immediate plans for employment? Your answers in
this survey will help us to improve the quality of graduate programs at the university of Florida. Your response will be held
strictly confidential.
Dean of the Graduate School

Name:

UFID:


Experience with Department


1. How satisfied have you been with each of the following in your department?


Departmental advising/guidance
Overall quality of teaching in graduate courses
Dissertation support from doctoral supervisor


Very
Satisfied


(2)

Satisfied


(3)
Somewhat
Satisfied


(4)

Dissatisfied


2. How much support did you receive from your adviser during the following stages?


Preparing for the qualifying examination
Selection of dissertation topic
Writing research proposal
Dissertation research stage
Dissertation writing
Seeking employment


Great Deal


Some


Not Much


None


University Experience

3. What was your best academic experience at the University of Florida?


4. If you could change only one thing at the University of Florida, what would it be?


5. If you were to start your graduate program again would you select (please answer either Yes or No)


A. The same field or specialization? B.


The same dissertation chair?


Continued on other side






Employment

6. What are your immediate professional plans? (check one)


A. I am seeking employment in...
Academia
Government
Business/Industry
Other (please specify)


OF SURVEY. THANK YOU.


I have found acceptable employment.
I am returning to, or continuing in, former/current employment. -GO TO QUESTION 7.
Postdoctoral appointment.
Other (please specify)


7. Employer (check one)

A. U.S. college or university ... Name of institution
Tenure-track position? Yes No
The position is full-time? Yes No
Other (please specify)
B. U.S. junior College, vocational school or training institute
C. U.S. secondary or elementary school or county school system.
G. U.S. federal, state, local, or other area government agency
I. U.S. business or industry
T. U.S. nonprofit organization or private foundation
H. self-employed in the U.S.
K. foreign college, agency, business, or industry
O. other (please specify)


8. Employer Location (check one)


A. Florida


B. out-of-state in the U.S.


C. foreign country


9. What is the primary nature of your immediate professional employment? (check one)

A. research and development
B. teaching
G. research and teaching
C. administration and/or management
D. professional services to individuals
F._ other (please specify)


10. Salary Range (optional)


Less than $12,000 per annum
$12,000 14,999 per annum
$15,000 17,999 per annum
$18,000 20,999 per annum
$21,000 23,999 per annum
$24,000 26,999 per annum
$27,000 29,999 per annum
$30,000 32,999 per annum
$33,000 35,999 per annum


$36,000 38,999 per annum
$39,000 41,999 per annum
$42,000 44,999 per annum
$45,000 49,999 per annum
$50,000 54,999 per annum
$55,000 59,999 per annum
$60,000 79,999 per annum
$80,000 and over per annum


Please return to the Editorial Office, The Graduate School, 160 Grinter Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-203
Revised 9/99







Prior to Graduation Complete and turn this form into the Graduate Coordinator


REHABILITATION SCIENCE DOCTORAL PROGRAM
COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS

STUDENT ADDRESS FORM


PLEASE PRINT OR TYPE


UFID:

STUDENT'S INFORMATION

Mr /Mrs /Ms


(Circle one)


First


Address:


Number/Street


City


E-Mail Address:

Telephone #:


Date of Graduation:

Employer's Name:

Address:






Position Title:


City


Telephone:


E-Mail:


Student's Signature


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc


DATE:


Middle


Last


State


Apt #


Zip Code


State


Zip Code

















APPENDIX C































62


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc









List of RSD Faculty


Department


E-mail Address


Phone Number


Crary, Michael
Gonzalez-Rothi, Leslie
Hall, James
Rosenbek, John



Classen, Sherrilene
Doty, Leilani
Mann, William
Richards, Lorie
Shechtman, Orit
Velozo, Craig



Behrman, Andrea
Bishop, Mark
Chmielewski, Terese
Fuller, David
George, Steven
Gregory, Chris
Horodyski, Marybeth
Kautz, Steve
Light, Kathye
Martin, Danny
Patten, Carolynn
Vandenborne, Krista

Hennessey, Mary
Pomeranz, Jamie
Sawyer, Horace
Shaw, Linda
Young, Mary Ellen


Merlo, Lisa

Levy Charles


Communicative Disorders
Communicative Disorders
Communicative Disorders
Communicative Disorders



Occupational Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Occupational Therapy



Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy
Physical Therapy


Behavioral
Behavioral
Behavioral
Behavioral
Behavioral

Psychiatry


Science
Science
Science
Science
Science


and Community Health
and Community Health
and Community Health
and Community Health
and Community Health


mcrarv/a)rPhhr.ufl.edu
gonzal ka)-neurology.ufl.edu
ihall~phhr.ufl.edu
irosenbe(a)rPhhr.ufl.edu



sclassen(ahhrhhp.ufl.edu
dotyl(a)-neurology.ufl.edu
wmann(a)rPhhr.ufl.edu
Irichard(a)-Phhr.ufl.edu
oshechtm(a)-Phhr.ufl.edu
cvelozo(a)rPhhr.ufl.edu



abehrman(a)-Phhr.ufl.edu
mbishop(ahh hh .ufl.edu
tchmiele(a)rPhhr.ufl.edu
dfuller(a)rPhhr.ufl.edu
sgeorge(a,. hhr.ufl.edu
drewgregarphhp.ufl.edu
horodmb(a)-ortho.ufl.edu
skautz(ahhrhhp.ufl.edu
klightc)hr.ufl.edu
dmartin(a)-Phhr.ufl.edu
patten(a)-Phhr.ufl.edu
kvandenb(a)-Phhr.ufl.edu

mlhennes(a)-Phhr.ufl.edu
romeranzch rjhhp.ufl.edu
hsawyer(a)rPhhr.ufl.edu
Ishawc)hp.ufl.edu
myounqga)rPhhr.ufl.edu


Imerlo(aufl.edu


Veterans Health System


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc


Faculty


273-6161
273-6161
273-6161
273-6161



273-6062
392-3491
273-6817
273-6817
273-6817
273-6817



273-6085
273-6085
273-6085
273-6129
273-6432
273-6085
273-6085
273-6085
273-6085
273-6085
273-6085
273-6085

273-6745
273-6745
273-6745
273-6745
273-6745

392-6698

374-6065


Levv Charles 374-6065- ---- --


nhnrlps l\/vna pri /.qnn\








Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Students


Arpan, Ishu


ishuarpanthakuriufl.edu


Barak, Sharon baraki@phhp.ufl.edu

Beneciuk, Jason beneciuk@ufl.edu

Bowden, Mark mbowden@phhp.ufl.edu

Buckles, Vicky vbl9@phhp.ufl.edu

Bhullar, Amitoj amitojbuhllar@ufl.edu

Choi, Bongsam bongsam@phhp.ufl.edu

Corti, Manuela m.corti@phhp.ufl.edu

Day, Kristen kvday@phhp.ufl.edu

Deoghare, Harshavardhan drharsh@ufl.edu

Deol, Jasjit jdeol@ufl.edu

Fox, Emily ejfox@phhp.ufl.edu

Gill, Jr., Luther lutherg@phhp.ufl.edu

Gonzlez-Rothi, Elisa elisagon@ufl.edu

Heilman, Jillian jheilman@phhp.ufl.edu

Hicks, Eric ehicks@phhp.ufl.edu

Hovis, Patty phovis@phhp.ufl.edu

Huang, Tseng-Tien tseng@ufl.edu

Jayaraman, Arun jarun51@phhp.ufl.edu

Kreider, Consuelo ckreider@phhp.ufl.edu

LaGorio, Lisa llagorio@phhp.ufl.edu

Little, Virginia ginnylittle@ufl.edu

McClung, Jill mcclungj@phhp.ufl.edu

Meegan, Colleen cmeegan@.ufl.edu

Morgan, Matthew roostermorgan@yahoo.com

Patil, Shilpa patilsh@phhp.ufl.edu

Patterson, Tara tpatters@phhp.ufl.edu

Piantieri, Sandra Shp58c@phhp.ufl.edu

Posse, Cristina mcposse@phhp.ufl.edu

Raja, Bhavana rbhavana@ufl.edu

Robinson, Rick krrobinson@nefcom.net


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc









Rogalski, Yvonne rogalski@ufl.edu

Saldana, Pablo pablossaldana@ufl.edu

Sandhu, Milapjit msandhu@phhp.ufl.edu

Sethi, Amit amitseth@phhp.ufl.edu

Smith, Barbara bksmith@phhp.ufl.edu

Spiess, Martina mspiess@ufl.edu

Tweedie, Heather htweedie@ufl.edu

Valencia, Carolina cvalencia@ufl.edu

Vohra, Ravneet ravneet@ufl.edu

Waid-Ebbs, Julia waid@ufl.edu

Wang, Jia-Hwa cassatt@ufl.edu

Wellborn, Melinda wellborn@phhp.ufl.edu

Wen, Pey-Shan pwen@phhp.ufl.edu

Winter, Sandra smwinter@phhp.ufl.edu

Ye, Fan evan1979@ufl.edu

Yu, Nami Nyu81@ufl.edu


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc


Rodriguez, Amy


arodl076*phhp.ufl.edu







University of Florida Graduates
Who Have Earned the Ph.D. in Rehabilitation Science and
Dissertation Titles





Weiying Zhao, Ph.D. Dr. Danny Martin Physical Therapy December 15, 2001

"Mechanisms In The Perceptual And Respiratory-Related Evoked Potential Response To
Inspiratiory Loads."



Nancy Silva, Ph.D. Dr. Linda Shaw Rehabilitation Counseling December 15, 2001

"Effect Of Empathy Training Of Masters-Level Counseling Students."

Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Private Practice

Julie Prins, Ph.D. Dr. Linda Shaw Rehabilitation Counseling December 15, 2001

"The Effects Of Spirituality On Coping In Frail Seniors Across Physical Capacity Levels And Living
Situations."

Social Service Director, Oak Hammock, Telephone 352-548-1133

Chien-Hui Huang, Dr. Danny Martin Physical Therapy August 11, 2001
Ph.D.

"Respiratory Sensation In Normal Subjects: The Relationship Between Inspiratory Motor Drive And
Perception During Resistive Loading and Pressure Threshold Loading."



Mark Bishop, Ph.D. Dr. Dennis Brunt Physical Therapy August 10, 2002

"lnterlimb Coordination Of Force Modulation During Gait Termination."

Lecturer, University of Florida, Physical Therapy Department, mbishopDiphhp.ufl.edu

Hyeong Dong Kim, Dr. Dennis Brunt Physical Therapy December 21, 2002
Ph.D.

"The Effect Of Direction Change And Dual Task On Stepping Behavior In Young And Elderly
Adults."


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc












Cynthia Townson, Ph.D. Dr. Mary Ellen Young Rehabilitation Counseling August 09,
2003

"Predictors Of Acute Care Discharge Destinations Of Patients With Primary Diagnosis Of Stroke:
The Influence Of Activities Of Daily Living Skills And Behaviors."

Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Private Practice, Telephone 352-222-8834

Hye Seon Jeon, Ph.D. Dr. Carl Kukulka Physical Therapy August 09,
2003

"Modulating The Soleus Hoffmann Reflex (H-Reflex) During Gait Initiation."

Korean University

Matthew Malcolm, Ph.D. Dr. Kathye Light Physical Therapy December 20, 2003

"The Reliability and Utility of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to AssessActivity-Dependent
Plasticity in Human Stroke"

Assistant Professor, Colorado State University, Department of Occupational Therapy
Email: malcolm2(Scahs.colostate.edu

Elizabeth Hannold, Ph.D. Dr. Mary Ellen Young Rehabilitation Counseling May 1, 2004

"Effects of Locomotor Training On The Psychosocial Adaptation Of Persons With Incomplete
Spinal Cord Injury."

Post Doctorate, VAMC, Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, ehannold(,yahoo.com

Marieke Van Puymbroeck, Dr. Mary Ellen Young Rehabilitation Counseling May 1, 2004
Ph.D

"Predictors Of Quality Of Life In Caregivers At One And Six Months Post Stroke."

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois

David Howard, Ph.D. Dr. Beth Swett Rehabilitation Counseling August 7,2004

"Leisure In The Lives Of Older Men: Coping And Adaptation Following Prostate Cancer Diagnosis
And Treatment."

Assistant Professor, Indiana State University

Katherine Byers, Ph.D. Dr. Craig Velozo Occupational Therapy August 7, 2004

"Testing The Accuracy Of Linking Healthcare Data Across The Continuum of Care"
Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX,
katherine.bversSDttuhsc.edu


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc











Stacy Fritz, Ph.D. Dr. Kathye Light Physical Therapy August 7, 2004

"Functional And Descriptive Predictors Of Outcomes For Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy
For Individuals With Post-Stroke Hemiparesis"

Clinical Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina, Department of Physical Therapy
sfritz(cgwm.sc.edu

Stephen Lussier, Ph.D. Dr. Linda Shaw Rehabilitation Counseling August 7, 2004

"Counselor Perspectives On Suicide And Suicidal Ideation."

Seeking An Academic Position

Tiffany Frimel, Ph.D. Dr. Krista Vandenborne Physical Therapy December 18, 2004

"Adaptations In Skeletal Muscle During Cast Immobilization And Rehabiliatation"

Post-Doctorate, Washington University, frimelt@msnotes.wustl.edu

Neila Donovan, Ph.D. Dr. John Rosenbek Communicative Disorders April 30, 2005

"Extending Dysarthria Research With A Measure Of communicative Effectivenes"

Associate Investigator, VAMC, Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center,
Neila.Conovan(Smed.va.gov

Neeti Pathare, Ph.D. Dr. Krista Vandenborne Physical Therapy April 30, 2005

"Metabolic Adaptations With Limb disuse And Their Impact On Skeletal Muscle Function"

Employed

Emily Plowman, Ph.D. Dr. John Rosenbek Communicative Disorders April 30, 2005

"Reproducibility Of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation For Mapping Swallowing Musculature In The
Human Motor Cortex"

Product Manager, Dysphagia and Small Bowel, E-Z-EM Inc., eplowman@ezem.com

Jamie Pomeranz, Ph.D. Dr. Linda Shaw Rehabilitation Counseling April 30, 2005

"Identifying Critical Constructs And Items Necessary To Examine The Need For Personal Attendant
Care For Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury"

Assistant Professor, Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health, University of
Florida, pomeranz(Sphhp.ufl.edu


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc











Charles Ellis, Ph.D. Dr. John Rosenbek Communicative Disorders August 6, 2005

"The Contribution Of The Basal Ganglia To Expressive Language Performance"

Assistant Professor, Medical University of South Carolina

Arlene Schmid, Ph.D. Dr. Pam Duncan Aging and Geriatric Research August 6, 2005

"Impact Of Post-Stroke Mobility On Activity And Participation"

Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, Indiana University, Half Time Post Doctorate,
Veterans Administration Medical Center arleneschmid(Svahoo.com

Lori Burkhead, Ph.D. Dr. John Rosenbek Communicative Disorders December 17, 2005

"Effect of Jaw and Tongue Position on Suprahyoid Muscle Function During Swallowing"

Evans, Georgia
Christina Dillahunt, Ph.D. Dr. Elizabeth Swett Rehabilitation Counseling December 17, 2005

"Fall Prevention In Elders: A Psychosocial Model To Reduce Brain Injuries"

Program Coordinator, Brain Injury Association of Florida, Inc. tdillahunt (,biaf.org

Michael Justiss, Ph.D. Dr. William Mann Occupational Therapy December 17, 2005

"Development of A Behind-The-Wheel Driving Performance Assessment Of Older Adults"

Assistant Professor, Indiana University, Purdue University at Indianapolis, miustiss(iupui.edu

Dennis McCarthy, Ph.D. Dr. William Mann Occupational Therapy December 17, 2005

"Outcomes Evaluation Of The Assessment Of Driving Related Skills (ADRES) Screening Tool"

Research Assistant Professor, University of Florida, Department of Occupational Therapy,
dmccarth(Sphhp.ufl.edu

Man Soo Ko, Ph.D. Dr. Andrea Behrman Physical Therapy May 6, 2006

"Symmetric Limb Loading: Immediate Effect On Gait Initiation In Persons With Hemiparesis"

Assistant Professor, Physical Therapy Department, University of Texas El Paso

Min Liu, Ph.D. Dr. Krista Vandenborne Physical Therapy May 6, 2006

"Adaptations In Skeletal Muscle Following Spinal Cord Injury And Locomotor Training"

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Physiological Genomics, University of Florida mliu(phhp.ufl.edu


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc










Claudia Senesac Ph.D. Dr. Lorie Richards Occupational Therapy May 6, 2006

"Generalization Of Repetitive Rhythmic Bilateral Training"

Clinical Instructor, University of Florida, Department of Physical Therapy, Public Health and Health
Proffesions csenesac(Sphhp.ufl.edu

Frank Lane, Ph.D. Dr. Linda Shaw Rehabilitation Counseling August 12, 2006

"Police Officer Agreement With Hate Crime Classification: A Prospective Study Of Differences Across
Protected Categories"

Assistant Professor, Institute of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago Illinois,
(312) 567-3500

Chetan Phadke, Ph.D. Dr. Andrea Behrman Physical Therapy August 12, 2006

"Sensori-Motor Effects Of Three Locomotor Training Variables: Body Weight Support, Walking
Environment, and Armswing"

Post -Doctoral Associate, Department of Neuroscience, College of Medicine, Department of Physical
Therapy, Public Health and Health Professions cphadke(,phhp.ufl.edu


Roberta Pineda, Ph.D. Dr. Lorie Richards Occupational Therapy August 12, 2006

"Investigation Of Breastfeeding Practices In The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Before And After An
Intervention Plan"

Staff Scientist, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri

Michelle Woodbury, Ph.D. Dr. Lorie Richards Occupational Therapy August 12, 2006

"Measurement Of Post-Stroke Arm Motor Ability: Examination Of The Measurement Properties Of The
Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity Assessment With An Item Response Theory Measurement Model"

Associate Investigator, Malcolm Randall Veterans Administration Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida
mwoodbur(Sphhp.ufl.edu

Roxanna Bendixen, Ph.D. Dr. William Mann Occupational Therapy December 16, 2006

"Assessment Of A Telerehabilitation And A Telehomecare Program For Veterans With Chronic
Illnesses"

Research, Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Florida,
rbendixe(Sphhp.ufl.edu



Grdat disrDpaten wrdDt


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc








Chad Betters, Ph.D. Dr. Linda Shaw Behavioral Science and Community Health December 16, 2006

"The Psychological Status Of Workers' Compensation Clients And Select Demographic And Forensic
Variables"

Assistant Professor, Rehabilitation Counseling, Winston-Salem State University, North Carolina,
bettersch@wssu.edu

Ying-Chih (Inga) Wang, Ph.D. Dr. Craig Velozo Occupational Therapy May 5, 2007

"Linking The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) And The Minimum Data Set (MDS)"

Postdoctoral Fellow, Sensory Motor Performance Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, inga-
wang@northwestern.edu
Patricia Belchior, Ph.D. Dr. William Mann Occupational Therapy August 14, 2007

"Cognitive Training With Video Games To Improve Driving Skills And Driving Safety Among Older
Adults"

Research Assistant, Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Program, University of Florida
belchior(,phhp.ufl.edu

Yi-Po Chiu, Ph.D. Dr. Kathye Light Physical Therapy December 18, 2007

"Stroke And Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: Use Of Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation To
Examine Quality Of Movement"

Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, Louisiana State University Health Science Center,
New Orleans, Louisiana, vchiul(lsuhsc.edu

Rick Davenport, Ph.D. Dr. William Mann Occupational Therapy December 18, 2007

"Perceived Smart Technology Needs Among Elders With Mobility Impairments: An Ethnographic
Approach"

Post-Doctoral Fellow, Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans
Health System, Gainesville, Florida, nlvtenmt(qmail.com

Harrison Jones, Ph.D. Dr. John Rosenbek Communicative Disorders December 18, 2007

"The Effects Of Deep Brain Stimulation On Speech Motor Planning/Programming In Patients With
Parkinson's Disease"


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc


Grda disrDpatet wr Dt







Arun Jayaraman, Ph.D. Dr. Krista Vandenborne Physical Therapy May 6, 2008

"Skeletal Muscle Adaptations Following Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury and Exercise Training"

Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Northwestern University

Jessica Johnson, Ph.D. Dr. William Mann Occupational Therapy May 6, 2008

"Consumer Response To Home Monitoring: A Survey Of Older Consumers And Informal Care
Providers"

Post-Doctoral Associate, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Florida,
iliohnson(Sphhp.ufl.edu

Leigh Lehman, Ph.D. Dr. Craig Velozo Occupational Therapy May 6, 2008

"Responsiveness Comparison Of Two Upper Extremity Outcomes Measures"

Occupational Therapist, Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital, Greenville, South Carolina

Alfred McDougall, Ph.D. Dr. Linda Shaw Behavioral Health Science May 6, 2008

"Counselors' Knowledge, Skills, And Attitudes Regarding Individuals With Disabilities: Examining
Contract And Attitudes As Predictors Of Knowledge And Skills"



Preeti Nair, Ph.D. Dr. Andrea Behrman Physical Therapy May 6, 2008

"Neuromechanical And Neurophysiological Examination Of Walking With And Without An Ankle Foot
Orthosis In Non-Injured Individuals And Persons With Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury"

Post-Doctoral Fellow, Sensory Motor Performance Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago,
nair@northwestern.edu

Prithvi Shah, Ph.D. Dr. Krista Vandenborne Physical Therapy May 6, 2008

"Magnetic Resonance Characterization Of Skeletal Muscle Adaptations After Incomplete Spinal Cord
Injury"

Chitra Balasubramanian, Ph.D. Dr. Steve Kautz Physical Therapy August 12, 2008

"Quantification Of Asymmetrical Stepping Post-Stroke And Its Relationship To Hemiparetic Walking
Performance"

Assistant Professor, Brooks College of Health, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL,
c.k-balasubramanian(cunf.edu


Joel Bialosky, Ph.D. Dr. Dr. Steve George Physical Therapy August 12, 2008


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc








"Mechanisms Of Manual Therapy"

Clinical Assistant Professor, Physical Therapy Department, University of Florida
bialoskv(yphhp.ufl.edu


Michael Moorhouse, Ph.D. Dr. Linda Shaw Behavioral Health Science August 12, 2008

"Identifying Benchmark Competency Criteria For A Rehabilitation Counseling Supervision Instrument"

Post-Doctoral Associate, Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health, University of
Florida, mmoorhou(Sphhp.ufl.edu


Sergio Romero, Ph.D. Dr. Craig Velozo Occupational Therapy August 12, 2008

"Minimal Detectable Change And Patient Reported Outcomes In Fallsl Rehabilitation"

Post-Doctoral Fellow, Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans
Health System, Gainesville, Florida, sergio.romero(Sva.gov

Megan Witte, Ph.D. Dr. William Mann Occupational Therapy August 12, 2008

"Feasibility Of Machine-Based Prompting For People With Alzheimer's Disease"

Post-Doctoral Associate, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Florida,
mwitte(Sphhp.ufl.edu


2008 Information Handout(Handbook)PhD 2.doc




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs