Seminole voice

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Title:
Seminole voice
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication:
Oviedo, Fla.
Creation Date:
June 28, 2013
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates:
28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00091445:00189


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FRIDAY, MAY 2, 2014 FREE Published weekly SEMINOLEVOICE.COM HOME FOR A HEROINTERESTS, 3Knights tearing up AACDominating Rutgers in a threegame sweep, Knights in control.ATHLETICS, 4Cinco De Mayo? Si!Watch out for the Running of the Chihuahuas this weekend. CULTURE, 5Build a better grow boxHow to grow a garden without the hassles of weather and critters. FROM MY GARDEN TO YOURS, 7CALENDAR . . . . . . . . . ..................... 2 INTERESTS . . . . . . . . . ..................... 3 ATHLETICS . . . . . . . . . ..................... 4 CULTURE . . . . . . . . . . ...................... 5 VOICES . . . . . . . . . . . ........................ 7 CLASSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . .................... 8 CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR . . . ........ B1 Since 1991 | WINNER OF 8 FLORIDA PRESS ASSOCIATION AWARDS | Serving Greater Oviedo/Winter Springs MARK YOUR CALENDARHelp raise money for a local lady battling cancer and have fun with a cookout and festival atmosphere at the same time at the Jolly Gator in Geneva this weekend. MORE IN CALENDAR, PAGE 2USPS 00-093 Publisher statement on page 4. In home delivery by Friday, May 2One Seminole County city could be getting singled out by the public school system as an ongoing lawsuit drags on. Seminole County Public Schools and waste management lawsuit against Winter Springs last November after the city claimed they had breached an exclusive franchise agreement for only Waste Pro to pick up trash. Both parties claimed they had the right to pursue a contract and partnership outside the citys franchise agreement, said Winter Springs City Attorney Anthony Garganese. Trash cans and dumpsters from WCA have been placed at Winter Springs High School, Layer Elementary, Keeth Ele mentary and several other Winter Springs schools. The franchise agreement with Waste Pro dating back to 2006 ing to the school system, Winter Springs Mayor Charles Lacey said. The contract was in direct vi olation of the laws that provide for an exclusive franchise to be given to Waste Pro, Lacey said. A judge awarded the school district and WCA a preliminary injunction last December, pre venting the city from enforcing the ordinance until the case goes through a full trial. We are waiting for the ju dicial system to work its way through the process to bring justice to Winter Springs, Lacey said. But the mayor noted that two other cities in Seminole County have exclusive franchise agreements as well: Lake Mary and Sanford. Seminole County Public Schools continues to honor both their agreements, Lacey said, despite Sanford also exclu sively using Waste Pro. Theyve made the decision to honor their franchise agreements for reasons that are completely unknown, Lacey said. Im still completely mysti chosen to single out the city of Winter Springs and not honor our franchise agreement. Seminole County Public Schools Deputy Superintendent George Kosmac reportedly said at the preliminary injunction A local retired environmental engineer is hoping to inspire a generation of students to save the Earth. Were planting the seeds where they need to be planted in our next generation, said Dan Morrical, creator of Project SavEarth. Morrical, a Winter Springs resident, has shared the pilot program of Project SavEarth with four area schools, including Rainbow Elementary in Winter Springs. The goal is to get young students thinking and caring about the environment, the con servation of natural resources and recycling. We are just now realizing nite, and there are so many other ways that we can change the way we develop our products and the way we use our energy, that we can save our Earth for our future generations, Morrical said. and sixth graders were given current, real-life environmen tal problems at the beginning of the school year and were asked to come up with ways to solve those problems and create a presentation They ranged from change the materials of a product and its packaging to make it recyclable and keep to coming up with alternatives to us ing Earths natural resources. On April 5, the teams headed to the University of Central Florida, where Morrical teamed up with the Depart ment of Diversity and Inclusion at the College of Engineering and Com puter Science to put SavEarth Expo, where the stu dents presented their solutions to save the Earth. Morrical modeled Project SavEarth off of the already suc -Students learn to save EarthFighting over garbageTIM FREED The VoicePHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE VOICEKids learned to improve home efciency and be better stewards of the environment. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE VOICEThe right to exclusively pick up trash has waste companies seething. Please see SAVEARTH on page 2 Please see GARBAGE on page 2Rainbow Elementary uses Project SavEarth to teach critical thinking about the environment Ongoing lawsuit against city raises dirty questions BRITTNI LARSON The Voice

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Page 2 | May 2, 2014 | Seminole Voice THIS WEEK THIS WEEK IN WORLD HISTORY MAY 2, 1933 Although accounts of the Loch Ness Monster date back 1,500 years, the modern legend of the Loch Ness Monster is born in the Inverness Courier newspaper, which related an account of a local couple who claimed to have seen an enormous animal rolling and plunging on the surface. cessful Project CREATE, an engineering education program he started 25 years ago. Both programs are effective because students respond to educational strategies that get them to relate what theyre learn ing to the world around them, said Taru Joshi, the Rainbow Elementary teams gifted teacher and proj ect leader. That was the intent, is to get their creative juices going when you show them that theyre actually able to make a difference with what they learn and that it has real world applications, theyre so much more motivated and excited about doing it because they can go home, tell other people about what theyre doing and its really applicable to helping the world and making a difference, Morrical said. The fourth grade students at Rainbow Elemen tary took their projects very seriously, all spending months on research. One group created a whole model house displaying each area where a family would use chemicals a part of their project on cor rectly using and disposing of chemicals potentially harmful to the environment. Jay Conner wrote lyrics and composed music for a song that he wants to use as another way to reach kids and teach them to take care of their envi ronment. They hope that those who attended the expo learned something from them. When people see our pre sentations and hopefully all the other schools presentations too, theyll realize that theres so much that we need to do to help the save the Earth, said student Presley Sachs. Its on our generation to help the Earth. Anyone can make a change, you just have to start little and go out big, Jay Conner said. Joshi, their teacher, encour ages them to not only think these problems theyve been working on all year, but to go out and do something afterwards. The passion she sees in them gives her the hope that in 20 years saving the Earth wont be something people have to worry about anymore. They take ownership of this now, and Im hop ing that forever it will be with them, she said. They are the ones who are going to do something theyll make the world better. Morrical hopes that he can inspire a few of those students to choose a career that really does help save the Earth one day. PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE VOICEKids eyes were opened about helping their planet thanks to the SavEarth program. For Tickets Call 321.268.1125 Or Visit www.TitusvillePlayhouse.com Presented through special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc Upcoming Events For more info and to register for events go to: www.OviedoWinterSprings.org May 6th Young Executives Networking 5:00 8:00pm, 376 N. Central Ave. Oviedo, FL 32765 Join us for our Grand Opening Celebration of our new Chamber office! We will celebrate with a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony, followed by great food from local restaurants, adult beverages, entertainment, and door prizes! Come meet the Chamber staff, Board of Directors, and Ambassadors. May 8th Chamber Grand Opening 5:30 7:00pm, Spill Wine Bar 1196 Tree Swallow Dr. Suite 1314 April 23rd Bagels & Business 8:00 9:30am, 1700 Oviedo Mall Blvd Oviedo FL 32765 Join us for our monthly morning seminar in the Oviedo Mall Community Room. This month our friends from Fishing Ammo will be speaking about their experience on the hit show Shark Tank! May 14th OBN Luncheon The Oviedo Businesswomen Network (OBN) consists of area businesswomen who meet monthly to exchange information, share contacts and provide a 11:30am 1:00pm, Tuscawilla Country Club Are you a young executive looking for new networking opportunities? Join us for a fun night out once a month with delicious wine and tasty cheese & fruit platters. We plan to meet the first Tuesday of every month at Spill Wine Bar in Winter Springs! GARBAGE | Legal suit still in limboSAVEARTH | Kids learned how to recycle more efficientlyhearing it had been a business decision for the school district to seek another waste management provider, Garganese said. Seminole County Spokesman Michael Lawrence would not comment on the issue due to the ongoing lawsuit. The dispute brought up other concerns in November and De cember while both WCA and Waste Pro had their trash cans on school properties. School principals werent sure which trash cans to use. We had some legitimate con cerns about the health of the stu dents there, because of trash cans blocking other trash cans and not being able to properly collect it, Lacey said. We think the superinten dent, the deputy superintendent and ultimately the school board were derelict in looking out for the health and safety of the stu dents. Garganese said a trial date for the case has yet to be set. CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE MAY 3 On Saturday, May 3, there will be a cancer benet for Linda Bennett, who was in remission from Lymphoma Cancer and was recently told the cancer was back and affecting her brain. The event will in clude a Best Bacon Dish Cook Off, live music, vendor/craft sale, baskets to rafe, Chicken Poop Lotto, 50/50s, and kids fun (bounce house, games, etc.) from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Jolly Gator Fish Camp, 4650 E. State Road 46 in Geneva. Craft/vendor registration for a 10-by-10-space rental is $15. Bacon entries are $5 each and all contestants must register and be at the Jolly Gator by 3 p.m. for judging. Contest includes cash prizes. A BBQ plate will also be available. For registration forms or more info, call Mary at 407-402-3993 or email mconsolato@bellsouth.net On May 3 and 4, beautiful downtown San ford will be transformed into an interac tive art event. The third annual St. Johns River Festival of the Arts will offer visi tors access into the artistic process with over fteen demonstration sites called Art in Action. For more information, visit stjohnsriverartfest.com or call 407-4161779. The Caretakers M.E. annual Poker Run is at 8:30 a.m. May 3 to benet JOSH, Honor Flight and local high school JROTC pro grams. The run starts and ends at Ameri can Legion Post 183 at 2706 Wells Ave. in Fern Park. The group will be rafing off an AR-15 style semi-automatic rie and scope. The rst bike out is at 10 a.m. and last bike in is at 3 p.m. Call 407-3409780 for more information. FAMILY CALENDAR

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Seminole Voice | May 2, 2014 | Page 3 IINt T ERESt T S THIS WEEK IN HUMAN HISTORY MAY Nearly everyone will go through a major life-changing event at some point in their lives, but for wounded warriors transitioning back to civilian life, change is more than just a phase. Retired Army Sgt. First Class Rasche Hall came home with burns to his face and arms, but with a slew of symptoms from the scars no one can see. A veteran of the war in Afghanistan, Hall was deployed twice. On his second, in August 2006, he suffered burns to his face and body during an attack on his unit. Despite his wounds, Hall acted heroically in defense of his fellow soldiers and charged the enemy combatants, ending the attack. For his actions, he received both the Bronze and Silver Stars in ad dition to the Purple Heart. On March 19, Hall and his girl friend, Vina Hewett, who is also an army veteran, took a major they accepted the keys to a mort gage-free home in Casselberry. The home was made available to the couple and their 9-monthold daughter through the partner ship of San Antonio based nonFoundation and Bank of America. Military Warriors program Homes for Wounded Heroes works with major banks to secure vacant properties and completely refurbish them to meet the needs of wounded warriors and their families. The homes are offered for a three-year, mortgage-free period, during which the veterans work with mentors and counselors to and prepare themselves for a full return to civilian life. At the successful conclusion of the three-year period, theyre given the deed to their new home. Hall and Hewett toured their new Casselberry home for the mix service dog Leonidas at their side. Moving slowly from room to room, the veterans struggled to take it all in. This is a blessing beyond comparison; I cant say enough how great this is, said Hall, with a look of wonder on his face. The three-bedroom, two-bath house with a pool and large fam ily room is in a quiet, well-established neighborhood with good schools nearby perfect for a young family. Next-door neighbors Richard and Karen Shore were eager to meet the young couple and came out to meet them at the homecoming celebration, bringing along their young grandsons who wanted to meet the hero. It makes you feel good that people are doing something for the veterans who are giving so much for everyone, said Richard, himself a Navy veteran. We are looking forward to getting acquainted, we feel an almost instant bond with them, Karen said. The partnership between the bank, the new homeowner and Military Warriors is crucial to the success of the program. The ties within their inventory based on house size, neighborhood and school qualities, then spends three to four months completely reno vating the properties. We want to make absolutely sure there are no issues for the veterans to deal with when we turn over the property, Bank of America representative John Moskos said. Veterans can apply for homes that are ready for occupancy through militarywarriors.org or they can submit an open applica tion specifying their location and home needs. the information provided, includ ing veteran discharge, disability status and family needs. Upon ap they must wait to see the interior hand-over ceremony. The veteran and their family are partnered with a mentor who will guide them through the next three years, meeting with them work and school needs and any other questions they may have. During this time they will be un help prepare them for full home ownership. As part of the Military Warriors family, they are also encouraged to be active in the veteran commu nity and to meet with other home recipients who are working their way through the program. In this way they can meet with people going through the same process, under the same re strictions, who know what their unique situation is like, Military Warrior volunteer Sally Farrell said. Its about giving them the support they need to succeed. Right off the bat, this makes transitioning so much easier, Hall said. This relieves so much pressure, allowing us to really focus on moving forward. Its a great new start for us, one that I wish every veteran could have. This is amazing for all of us, and especially this little girl, said Hall, hugging his baby daughter.Building a home for a heroALLISON OLCSVAY The VoicePHOTOS BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE VOICEArmy Sgt. Rasche Hall received the Bronze and Silver Stars for heroism in war. Now he has a place to call home. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA CELEBRATING OVER 25 YEARS SERVING YOUR COMMUNITYBernard S. Zeffren, MD Eugene F. Schwartz, MD Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-CVoted Best Doctors of Central FL, Orlando Magazine for 7 consecutive yearsDiplomates American Board of Allergy and Immunology Evening Hours Available793 Douglas Ave. Altamonte Springs, FL 32714407-862-5824 2 locations in Seminole County7560 Ste. 2064 407-366-7387www.orlandoallergy.com FORECLOSURE DEFENSELAW OFFICE OF TIMOTHY A. MORANCertified Florida Specific Foreclosure Prevention CounselorTel: 407-366-TLAW (8529)www.tmoranlaw.net tim@tmoranlaw.net Fax: 407-366-8528 1750 W. Broadway St., Ste. 118 Oviedo, FL 32765Initial Consultation FREE! 2013 Voted Best Law Firm in Oviedo

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Page 4 | May 2, 2014 | Seminole Voice AAtT HLEt T Ic C S THIS WEEK IN SPORTS HISTORY MAY The UCF Knights blasted into the NCAA Top 25 with a convinc ing sweep of Rutgers just after nearly doing the same to Louis ville the week before. Three different Knights had two RBI apiece in the game that vaulted them to 28-16 on the year and 15-3 in the American Athletic Conference. In that game, which half of two innings, they went on a wild hitting streak that gave them eight runs in their last four in only needed one swing of the bat to send the ball into the afternoon ing two in a wild four-run eighth inning. Zach Rodgers would strike out the side to end the game. For the Knights, who pulled even further away at the top of the AAC standings, a one-game con ference break ended their home stand against North Florida on Wednesday at press time. They head to Houston this weekend for a three-game series against the Cougars, who at 31-12 have the second best overall record in the conference, but have struggled against AAC foes with an 8-7 inconference record. HagertyAfter blasting their way into the regional tournament with a Class 8A District 2 championship, the Huskies hosted Jacksonvilles Sandalwood on Thursday night at press time. An 8-3 trouncing of DeLand gave the Huskies momentum in the district championship game. It was their second win over the Bulldogs this season. Sandalwood entered the regional with an 18-9-1 record. With a win in that game the Huskies will get a chance to face either DeLand again or Mandarin, depending on who wins their play-in game. The next round is Tuesday, with loca tion pending Thursdays results. OviedoA runner-up slot in the district helped the Lions into the regional tournament. They shut out Lake Howell 5-0 before falling in the district championship game. Wednesday night at press time they traveled to Fleming Island With a win the Lions will be in the ner of Winter Springs versus Bu chholz. The next game is Tuesday. Winter SpringsThe Bears won with a shut out and some small ball in their 2-0 district championship defeat of Lyman, thanks to crucial RBI by Pablo Cedeno and Ryan Fair banks. They headed into the re gional tournament at press time Wednesday against Buchholz (1611).Knights still dominatingISAAC BABCOCK The VoicePHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICEThe Knights blasted Rutgers on the baseball eld to make their way deep into the NCAA Top 25 last weekend. Friday, May 2, 2014 Volume 24, Issue 18 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 SEMINOLEVOICE.COMOrlando, FL 32835-5705PUBLISHERTracy Craft407.515.2605TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITORIsaac Babcock 407.563.7023IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.comASSOCIATE EDITORSSarah Wilson 407.563.7026SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.comTim Freed407.563.7054TFreed@TurnstileMediaGroup.comARTS EDITORJosh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.comDESIGNERTom Miller 407.563.7032TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.comSTAFF WRITERSBrittni Larson Megan Stokes Allison Olcsvay Kristy VickeryCOLUMNISTSJanet Foleyjwfoley75@gmail.comSandi VidalSandi@ChristianHelp.orgTom CareySundewGardens@gmail.comKaren PhillipsKarenMPhillips@bellsouth.netADVERTISING SALESDavid Levine407.485.1956DLevine@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLinda Stern407.376.2434LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.comLEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISINGAshley McBride 407.286.0807Legal@FLALegals.comSUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATIONLuana Baez 407.563.7013LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.comMEMBER OF: Florida Press Association Oviedo-Winter Springs Regional Chamber of CommerceTURNSTILE MEDIA GROUPCHAIRMANRance CrainPRESIDENT/CEOFrancis X. FarrellVICE PRESIDENTSPatti Green & Jeff BabineauUSPS #008-093Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo, Fla.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:Seminole Voice, 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Seminole Voice 2014 UNITED AUTO SALES $8,999 Presented by: Friday May 23, Concert 6pm 10pm Sat May 24, Festival 10am 6pm BBQBLOWOUT.orgLocated at

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Seminole Voice | May 2, 2014 | Page 5Now through May 11 The 12th annual Orlando Cabaret Festival at Mad Cow For 18 days, Central Florida gets to celebrate cabaret with some of the worlds great singing artists, including award-winning actor and vocalist Nicholas Rodriguez (May 1, 2 and 3), Tony Award-winning Broadway and TV star Laura Benanti (May 9 and 10), and a dozen other wonderful performers. Call 407-297-8788 or visit orlandocabaret.com for a complete list of performances. Now through May 3 Edward Albees Tony Award-winning The GoatDiDonna Productions, known for tackling controversial theater projects, will present a full stag ing of Edward Albees black Who is Sylvia? Premiered on Broadway in 2002, and winner of the Tony Award for Best Play and Drama Desk Award for Best New Play, Goat explores the extremes of human toler ance when a loving marriage is rocked by an impossible-tounderstand love. Including betrayal, this tragic and sometimes hilarious play questions tolerance. With parental guid ance highly suggested, Goat will be performed through May 3 at the Shakespeare Center. Reserve tickets at 407-328-9005 or visit redchairproject.com for charge card orders. May 3 and 4 CFCArts presents the romantic composers In a program titled Explor ing the World of Romance, the 75-voice CFCArts Classical Choir will be joined by a chamber orchestra as they sing selections from Mozart, Rossini and Schubert. The audience will also experience works by Neo-Romantic composers Randall Thompson and Jean Belmont in a concert to be held May 3 at 7:30 p.m. and May 4 at 2:30 p.m. at St. Johns Lutheran Church at 1600 S. Orlando Ave. in Winter Park. Tickets are an affordable $10, with children age 12 and younger admitted free. Visit cfcarts.comMay 3 to June 1 Keepin it Fresh in Sanford Jeanine Taylor, known for bringing attention and respect to folk art, will present a multi-artist show entitled Keepin It Fresh with a free opening reception on Saturday, May 3, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Coinciding with the St. Johns River Festival of the Arts, Taylor wanted to assemble these artists to demonstrate how well different folk art works together. The four artists are Cecel Allee (Georgia), David Hammock (Alabama), and Phyllis Trager Hyman and Jane Theis (Florida). The Gallery is at 211 E. First St. in Sanford. Call 407-3232774 or visit jtfolkart.comMay 3 MAYSfest 2014 A large student orchestra More than 250 MAYS students will come together to conclude the fourth season of the MAYS Student Orchestras, which includes eight orchestras and three in-school strings programs. The Jonathan May Foundation was granted season with a unique structure that ensures the MAYS Orchestras will always be directed by musicians and educators. The concert will be held on May 3 beginning at 4 p.m. at the Bob Carr PAC in Orlando. Call 1-800-978-0407 or visit MAYSymphony.orgMay 3, 4 and 5 Cinco de Mayo via COCINA 214 When you have a holiday like Cinco de Mayo (Fifth of May in Spanish), I strongly support the good folks at my favorite Tex-Mex restaurant Cocina 214 in their decision to turn one day into a three-day festival. Historically, May 5 marks the victory of the Mexican Army over the French at the Battle of Puebla, but here in Winter Park, it allows Cocina 214 to have ambassadors from Jose Cuervo and Corona serve up drinks. On Sunday, locals can enter their dogs in the annual Running of the Chihuahuas. The party continues on May 5 as the restaurant celebrates with a Patron Ice Luge at 5 p.m. followed by Corona giveaways and Don Julio tequila samples. For details, visit cocina214.comMay 4 The Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra in concert The Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra will conclude its 57th season on May 4 at the Bob Carr PAC with all four of the organizations award-winning youth orchestras performing. Violist Tyler Pacheco (17), a senior at Lake Highland Prep, is in his fourth year as a member of FSYO, this year holding the principal violist position. Mr. movement of the Walton Viola Concerto. In addition, 40 graduating seniors will be recognized for their dedication to classical music. The concert will begin at 4 p.m. For tickets and details, visit fsyo.orgMay 4 ONE NIGHT the fundraiser saves livesThe moment tragedy strikes, the Orlando Regional Medical Centers Level One Trauma Center stands ready to serve. ONE NIGHT is the annual fundraiser that celebrates the Centers commitment to serving Central Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar YOUTH ORCHESTRA Please see CULTURE on page 6 LAURA BENANTI Dr. Gary D. McDonald OPTOMETRIC PHYSICIAN Oviedo VISION Center Fashion Frames Custom Contact Fittings Eye Exams for All Ages Designer & Rx Sunglasses Treatment of Glaucoma Treatment of Red Eyes In-House Optical Lab Surgery Co-Management &VEGETABLES FRESH FRUIT W Brian Thomas Produce 110 Geneva Drive, Old Downtown Oviedo(Across From Ace Hardware) VINE RIPE TOMATOES

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Page 6 | May 2, 2014 | Seminole Voice CULTURE | A classic returns to the Orlando Philharmonic with Verdis La Traviata in the original ItalianFlorida when it matters most through a presentation that brings true trauma care stories to life. ONE NIGHT supports this life-saving resource Central Floridas only Level One Trauma Center. The event includes a champagne reception, a silent auction, dinner, and multimedia program with personal testimonies from trauma survivors. To purchase tickets, visit OneNight SavesLives.comMay 8 Winter Park History Museums opening night Its probably no coincidence that the Winter Park History Museum located so close to the train tracks in Winter Park has announced its next exhibit called Whistle in the Distance: The Trains of Winter Park. The whole family is invited to the opening on May 8, beginning at 5 p.m. Call 407-647-2330 or visit wphistory.org May 9 and 11 The Orlando Philharmonic presents Verdis La Traviata The Orlando Philharmonic has created a series of brilliantly produced operas with the unique idea of placing the orchestra on-stage with the sing ers performing in front of the orchestra. On May 9 at 8 p.m. and May 11 at 2 p.m., the Philharmonic will present Giuseppe Verdis most melodious and pop ular work La Traviata. Sung in Italian with English subtitles, Elizabeth Caballero will perform the role of Violetta, and Brian Jadge will perform as her lover Alfredo. Verdis score contains some of the most beautiful music ever written, says Conductor Christopher Wilkins. Call 407770-0071 or visit orlandophil.orgMay 10 The Chefs Gala for United Way families in Central Florida need help with basic necessities, and the most tasteful way to help United Way help all those thousands of Central Floridians is by purchasing a ticket to the annual Chefs Gala the United Ways signature gala. Food ies and philanthropists come together to sample the creations of our regions top chefs and thanks to the generosity of host Walt Disney World 95 percent of all proceeds go directly to help those in need. From the Cask & Larder to Victoria & Alberts, great chefs from our greatest restaurants help those in need. Email ChefsGala@hfuw. org or call 407-429-2129 for more information.May 11 A friendly reminderThis year Mothers Day falls on Sunday, May 11. Current Dr. Phillips Center launches annual membership campaignThis week, the new Dr. Phillips Center announced its annual membership campaign. As part of the Centers commitment to engage the community in arts for every life, seven giving levels, with memberships starting at $75 and ranging up to $10,000, to special center events to artist meet and greets. Every member will have the ability to purchase tickets for shows presented by the Center before they are offered to the general public. In addition, inaugural season memberships purchased by Nov. 1 will be extended through Nov. 1, 2015. Membership registration and ship CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 KEEPIN IT FRESH LA TRAVIATA CHEFS GALA $45FREE$73Mothers Day Specials Now AvailableIts Your Time, Youve Earned itBe PamperedOviedo Springs Center40MASSAGE The Newest Styles, Coloring & Eye Brow Waxing New Salon Clients (of equal or lesser value) Can not be used with any other offer. One coupon per visit. Expires June 1, 2014. Can not be used with any other offer. One coupon per visit. Expires June 1, 2014. Can not be used with any other offer. One coupon per visit. Expires June 1, 2014. Dr. Ramon Edgardo Lopez, MD Dr. Ramon Edgardo Lopez, MD passed away in Florida on Friday, April 25, 2014 at the age of 79. He was born in Puerto Rico where he studied medicine and later become an orthopedic surgeon. He soon entered the United States military after graduation and spent a year in Korea as an Army surgeon. During military life he and his growing family lived in Maryland and Texas. He was promoted to the rank of LTC while stationed in Texas. After retiring from military service, he established a private medical practice and raised his family. He resided for several years in Illinois, Arkansas and nally in Florida. In Florida he was an orthopedic surgeon for the Veterans Administration Clinic and later went into full retirement. He is survived by his wife, children and grandchildren. His favorite activities included: listening to Latin music and dancing, long trips in large motor homes, ying his private airplane, snowmobiling, vacation cruises, spending time with family and friends, grilling, reading about political gures and events, watching documentaries about past wars. He loved new gadgets and technology. He was a devoted father and had an uncanny ability to determine the global coordinates of any family member even before GPS existed. He was always gracious and humble and would extend help to the needy wherever and whenever he could. In lieu of owers, please make a contribution the American Cancer Society. A memorial service with military Honors will be held on Friday May 2, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM at the National Cremation and Burial Society, 7565 Red Bug Lake Road, Oviedo FL 32765. CHEFS GALA

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Seminole Voice | May 2, 2014 | Page 7 VOIc C ES THIS WEEK IN POLITICAL HISTORY ever, on Feb. 1, 1917, Germany announced the resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare, and the United States formally entered World War I. Living in Florida provides us with constant change and challenges that weed out those plants and animals unable or unwilling to adapt to our crazy weather, unique environment, and burgeoning society. Many experienced gardeners from other zones give up the horticultural arts when faced with the task of wrestling a crop from our sandy soil in the face of extreme conditions whilst trying to cook a mess of col lard greens. Orient using a few practical conveyances and grow a few good things to eat. A framed growing bed, several inches to a foot above existing grade, provides a location able to weather many of the problems faced when trying to grow a crop at our residential homesteads. Framing suggestions include cement blocks and bricks (good material but heavy), pressure treated lumber (toxic), regular lumber (termite bait), redwood or cedar (expensive), tires (no!), bottle wall (broken glass), decking planks of recycled plastic (sustainable but food safe?), and cement board material available at most big-box building suppliers called Hardie Board. The 7inch by 12-foot non-textured pieces primed dull yellow are the most affordable option, but require additional labor to procure and install due to its brittle propensity to bend and break. Shipping tip: cut the long pieces in half at the store. Building a framed bed starts with leveling the site to the subsoil. This muckingout phase of the project is the most labor intensive; removing surface sod and then deep digging the footprint to excavate most of the impeding roots and other debris will test many of our core beliefs. Measure and pull strings to the dimensions of 3to 4-feet-wide and as economically long to accom modate the available space and necessary access. Hammer stakes of 2-foot-long -inch diameter electrical metallic tubing (EMT) every 2 feet along the length of the perimeter. Avoid creating dust by, instead of sawing, scoring and snapping the board to length. Place the Hardie Board inside the stakes and level the lengths and the frame with growing medium. the framing held by the stakes becomes a static whole that will now be a permanent and adaptable food-producing locus. Stupid rainfall totals, arduous temperature extremes, foraging tion, and even aesthetically pleasing appearances are all addressed in one felled swoop. Once established, the only routine mainte nance is adding some compost as the soil retracts. Bet you cant build just one. Chaos control with framed growing beds Tom CareyFrom my garden to yoursTom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page and email him at sundewgardens@gmail.com WHO IS CAREY >On March 14, the city of Oviedo was recognized as a Healthy Weight Com munity Champion along with 36 other Florida communities. The program, organized by the State Surgeon General, aims to recognize efforts from city and county governments in decreasing the prevalence of unhealthy weight in their jurisdictions. Obesity rates in the U.S. increased dramatically over the last 30 years, and obesity is now epidemic in the United States. In Florida, only 35 percent of adults are at a healthy weight. Additionally, six out of 10 children born today will be obese by the time they graduate from high school. For this reason, Floridas State Surgeon General John Armstrong declared healthy weight as a top priority. It is recognized that municipal governments can play an important role in decreasing the prevalence of unhealthy weight in their jurisdictions. Local governments can implement a variety of policies that have been shown to increase physical activity levels and improve nutrition. These best practice policies can encompass different categories such as physical activity, nutrition and leader ship. By implementing policies aligned with the State Health Improvement Plan, local governments promote community environments where the healthy choice is the easier choice. In order to acknowledge that many jurisdictions have already made progress in these types of policy changes, Dr. Armstrong established the Healthy Weight Community Champion Recognition Program to highlight communities for their important efforts. The city of Oviedo already has a number of policies in place supporting the objectives of the Healthy Weight Community Champion Recognition Program. Initiatives range from establishing mixed-use zoning districts, requiring bike racks to be placed in new developments and making sure sidewalks are landscaped properly, among others. The city is proud of the recogni tion and will keep on endorsing and enforcing policies that promote a healthy environment and a healthy community.Oviedo recognized as a Healthy Weight Community Mayor Dominic Persampiere OVIEDO CITY TALK King Features Weekly ServiceApril 28, 2014 EDITORIAL CARTOONS PHOTO BY TOM CAREY THE VOICEGrowing garden beds can help cut down on garden nuisances, but the right materials can help make it more trouble free.

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Page 8 | May 2, 2014 | Seminole Voice SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com Get it delivered to your inbox every week. Visit SeminoleVoice.com and click Subscribe to newsletter The Seminole Voice e-newsletter has community newsOviedo Winter Springs Geneva Chuluota ANNOUNCEMENTSOWN YOUR own Medical Alert Company.Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small invest ment required. Call toll free 1-844-2251200.Retire to Kentuckys BlueGrass Country!Enjoy maintenance free living!BRAND NEW LUXURY HOMES Beautiful 3 BR, 3 BA, 1,800 sf, from the low $200s. Low est price per sq ft in the area! Mild cli mate, low taxes, minutes to shopping, dining, medical & Keeneland Horse Rac ing. Perfect for retirement/2nd home. Call now for details: 877-333-2412, x 121 SugarTreeHomes.comAUTOS2005 Toyota Corolla XRS105k miles $9999. Call United Auto Sales 407-730-35812006 Lexus GX470121k miles $21,999. Call United Auto Sales 407-730-35812007 Toyota FJ Cruiser118k miles $16,999. Call United auto Sales 407-730-3581EDUCATIONAIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial Aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www. FixJets.comNURSING CAREERS begin here -Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 HELP WANTEDDriver Trainees Needed Now!Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624AVERITT EXPRESSNew Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, PostTraining Pay Increase for Students! (De pending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608 Apply @ AverittCareers. com Equal Opportunity Employer Fe males, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Now Hiring OTR CDLA Drivers.New Pay Package and $1500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-978-3791/apply www.heyl.netPROFESSIONAL SERVICEBest Asian massage therapyGrand opening 20% off !!! Buy 3 hour get 1 hour free. Choose your massage from: Swedish/Deep Tissue/Hot Stone/Shiatsu/ Tai/Couples Massage and Chinese Foot Massage. MonSat: 9am-7pm Sun: Ap pointment Only Phone:407-622-1156 www.xmmassage.comLOANS FOR LANDLORDS!We Finance From 5-500 Units. As Low As 5.5 %. 1-4 Fam, Townhome, Condos OK. Contact B2R: 1-855-940-0227 www. B2RFinance.com REAL ESTATE: FOR RENTSANFORD Free standing retail/ office building,2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent(Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra features. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.comREAL ESTATE: FOR SALENEAR BOONE, NC 2+/-ac. tract350ft of rushing streams 3000ft eleva tion private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5263 ext 91 THE MMARKEt T PLAc C E MindGym April 28, 2014 MindGymApril 28, 2014 MindGymApril 28, 2014 MindGym April 28, 2014 MindGym April 28, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceApril 28, 2014 MindGymApril 28, 2014 RowellAuctions.comFor Detailed Property Info Visit RowellAuctions.comWednesday -:May 14th -:2 p.m. (CDT)Bank Owned Real EstateOnline Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute!Auction Site: Hilton Garden Inn, 1144 Airport Blvd., Pensacola, FLCantonment, Jay Milton, Pace, Panama City Beach & Pensacola, FLExcellent Commercial Buildings, Beautiful Acreage Tracts & Commercial & Residential Tracts BANK ORDERED Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE

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A SUPPLEMENT OF THE WINTER PARK-MAITLAND OBSERVER AND SEMINOLE VOICE MAY 2014 Shes been painting for hours, her dining table piled with paints, brushes and can vases, tweaking bird beaks and manage to get everything just painting takes a tumbling husband laughs and comments that her birds have found their Joan Laurenzo has devel oped a bit of an artists tem perament at 77. And shes not the only one. Palm Valley, an age restricted community in Oviedo, is home to a surpris ing amount of talented senior artists. They shared their paint ing skills April 5 at the 13th annual Palm Valley Art Show and Festival, an event open to the public each spring, where residents display and sell their work. For some of them, this is the only opportunity they have, and they are very proud of their work and really want to show everyone else the beauty they see in life around them, said Gladys Caughel, the organizer of the event and a painter herself. The event is packed with artwork made by members of the communitys art club. There are gilded sculptures, painted jazz band silhouettes that dance off the canvas, and Frank Scutt, 71, shows off photographs he took of a sparkling waterfall, and a man he spotted at the University of Central Florida balancing three basketballs on top of each other with a concentrated stare. You want to see a sparkle in the eyes, Scutt says of his portrait work. Some residents have just discovered their artistic tal ents, while others have spent their lives expressing them selves through art. Lin Reilly, 73, talks about her days as the director of the Melbourne Art Center and her paintings that hang all over the world. Art is her life, she said, and some thing she couldnt help doing. Now, tapping into the creative side of her brain takes away pain, and teaching the resi her need to be a part of an artistic community. I didnt do it because I wanted to, I did it because I had to, she said. It was a compulsion, a reason for be ing. Laurenzo, who never imag ined herself as an artist and only began painting last year, paints vibrantly colored birds and violet skies with hazy suns setting into the lake she used to gaze out into when it was her backyard. Many days she spends up to seven hours painting, leaving her husband asking when his dinner table Artists prove creativity doesnt ail with old age PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOREmerging artist Victor Pagan poses with his rst foray into painting on canvas, a portrait of ballerinas mid-dance.Seniors discover the time and talent for art Please see ARTISTS on page 2BRITTNI LARSON Central Florida Senior Its the Best of Both Worlds.Lurene Braswell had long thought that one day The Mayower would be the ideal place for retirement although making the actual move was not on her immediate radar screen. But when her husband passed away, things changed. Encouraged by her daughter, Linda Bailey, who lives in Winter Park, Lurene made the decision to relocate. It was meant to be, she explains. I love my new apartment, and I no longer have the burden of maintaining and cleaning a big house. Mothers right around the corner, but she has her own space, adds Linda. Now she can spend birthdays, holidays and good times with her children and grandchildren. And as a family, we have peace of mind knowing she will always receive the very best in care . its the best of both worlds.If your loved one needed long-term care, what would you do? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407.672.1620. T HE R IGHT DECISION... THE MAYFLOWER RET IREMENT COMMUNITY [ for the whole family ]88141 PR AD WPO 5/2014 Winter Pa rk's Distinctive Retirement Community www.themayflower.com 1620 Mayflower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.

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Page 2 will have food on it instead of paints, she laughed. To me its just very calm ing, and Im not thinking about all of the other problems that you have in life, she said. Im just being taken to this other world of wherever Im painting at that time. Their age makes them bet ter artists their minds hold their histories, and their hands have now learned to share that, said artist Victor Pagan. [You have] experience of life, and to think that all you have seen your whole life, all of a sudden you see it on canvas, and it makes you think back on your youth, think back on hap pier times, he said. We have the time now and we have the drive to do something with our life that will speak to the community, Caughel said, And we want to share. Central Florida SeniorMAY 2014PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ADVERTISING Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Published by Turnstile Media Group 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 P: 407.563.7000 F: 407.563.7099 ARTISTS | Vast life experiences help make them better artists CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ful. Those are words that can apply to downsizing when the time comes for a senior to move to a smaller living space. At the same time, it can be exhilarating. There are numerous web sites about senior downsizing, but they all seem to agree on one thing: Get started early. Beginning months in advance to make the move a gradual process will keep stress to a minimum. Write it down If you plan to give certain treasures to oth ers, make notes about who gets what, or give them the items now. If youre going to hire others to help with the eventual packing and moving, make your intentions clear, espe cially if your things are going in a number of directions. Label everything so there is no confusion about whether things get packed or if theyre going to be picked up. Declutter If you had chil dren who moved out without taking all their gear, it all needs to go, either to the child, a charity or the trash. Your own belongings need to be sorted (heirlooms, expensive jew elry), donations (items in good condition such as clothing and furniture), give to relatives (keepsakes and heirlooms) and throw away (things with no real value that you dont use). Label your piles and boxes so there are no mistakes with valuable items being thrown away by accident. When you absolutely cant decide: Put those belongings in one special box and hold on to them. You can decide later, once the hub bub of the move is over. with helpful information on downsizing: The National Association of Senior Move Managers at nasmm.org/index.cfm. Car ing.com has a number of tips for clearing out. Or Google senior downsizing. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.comDownsizing? Get started early PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIORPam Burtt nds inspiration in orals, creating canvas paintings of all kinds from poppies to tulips. shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. Sunday at 11am at

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Page 3 Maitland Senior Center pro gramsThe Maitland Senior Center is located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. in Maitland, and is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The schedule is subject to change without notice. For more informa tion about these and any other events at the Maitland Senior Center, please call us at 407-539-6251 or visit us on the web at itsmymaitland.com. The Maitland Senior Center will be closed on Monday, May 26, for Memorial Day, and will reopen at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, May 27. Join Audrey every Tuesday in May at 10:30 a.m. for Line Dance Lessons. Class is 1.5 hours and perfect for all levels of dancers. Beginners are always welcome! The cost of the class is $4 to the teacher. Join us every Monday and Friday in May at 1 p.m. to see your favorite movies! Check the calendar online to see what movies are showing in May. Please call to reserve your seat! Join John every Monday, Thursday and Friday in May at 9 a.m. for Yoga. Please wear comfortable clothes and bring your own mat. The cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Join us every Monday in May at 1 p.m. for our Conversational French group. Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Join Esther every Tuesday in May at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes. The cost of the class is $10 per month to the teacher. Please wear a white shirt, black pants, and comfortable shoes. Join us every Tuesday in May at 1 p.m. for our Conversational Spanish group. Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Must be uent in Spanish to participate. Join Sherre every Wednesday in May at 10 a.m. for Instructors Choice. This class is a combo of mat and chair yoga that is great for all levels. The cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat. Join Ty every Wednesday in May at 11 a.m. for Yoga Nidra, a sublime conscious sleep (meditation) class. The cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat, something to cover yourself with (if you tend to get cold), and a small pillow. Join Donna every Thursday in May at 11:30 a.m. for Chair Yoga. The cost of the class is a $2 donation to the teacher. Join Ann every Friday in May for Recorder classes at 12:30 p.m. The lessons are free! Please call the Senior Center at 407-539-6251 for specics on this class. The Maitland Senior Center presents a program for elders on the second Friday of the month that is staffed by counsel ors from S.H.I.N.E. (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders). The program provides free unbiased counseling about Medicare, Medigap, HMOs, Medicaid, prescriptions drug plans, and long-term care. All counseling is rst-come-rstserved. Bring your list of medications or Rx bottles, insurance card and red, white and blue Medicare card. For more information about Elder Affairs programs contact SHINE Program Department of El der Affairs at 4040 Esplanade Way, Suite 270, Tallahassee, FL 32399-7000 or call 1-800-96-ELDER (1-800-963-5337). Or email information@elderaffairs.org or visit FLORIDASHINE.org Call toll free today to schedule an appointment for a FREE Hearing Screening and receive your FREE $100 Dining Card if you have hearing loss. Professional, licensed providers ensure you have the www.hearusa.com*Oers cannot be combined. Excludes previous purchases. 2014 HearUSA, All Rights Reserved. A LIFETIME OF BETTER HEARING! FIRST CLASS CARE WORLD CLASS TECHNOLOGY In addition to the oers on the right, you also receive The Highest Quality Most Comprehensive Care in the Hearing Industry. Receive a FREE 40 TVwith purchase of a pair of Siemens Pure 7mi Hearing AidsOers cannot be combined and expires 5/23/14. Excludes previous purchases. FREE $100 Dining Cardwith a FREE Hearing Screening!Good at over 20,000 restaurants nationwide and 4 online partners. No purchase required. Must have hearing loss. Oers cannot be combined and expires 5/23/14. $100 Call Toll Free: 855.802.5532(On Dr. Phillips Boulevard, near Steinmart and between Stefanos Grill and Kekes restaurant in the Dr. Phillips Marketplace.) 140501 HearUSA May Ad_Central Florida Senior_10.25x8 to run 5-1_02.indd 1 4/10/14 6:11 PM Senior Calendar Please see CALENDAR on page 7 Loud & Clear and FREE Florida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to receive a free amplied phone from the non-prot Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. Cordless and corded phones for persons with mild to severe hearing loss are available at 23 distribution centers statewide. Limit one per customer.CONTA CT YOUR AREA C ENTER FOR DETAILS Center for Independent Living in Central Florida 720 North Denning Drive Winter Park, FL 32789 407-623-1070 (v) 407-623-1185 (tty)Current FTRI clients: If your phone isnt working properly or your hearing has changed, or should you no longer need your phone or are moving out of Florida, call FTRI at 888-554-1151 for assistance.

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407-841-9788

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Page 6 Life is easier with Home Care Services We have the Skill to Heal. The Spirit to Care. Transitional Care Program Philips Personal Medication Dispenser Philips Lifeline Call today to schedule Private Duty Services (407) 691-8206 P h i l i p s P e r s o n a l M e d i c a t i o n D i s p e n s e r The Personal Medication Dispenser assists with medication management Medications are reviewed and pre-filled by a registered nurse, preventing overor undermedication that could lead to a costly re-hospitalization. If youre enrolled in the Department of Veterans Affairs health-care system, you no longer have to report your income. The VA will get that information themselves from the IRS and Social Security. Starting March 2014, youll only have to give your income information if youre applying your renewal form for change of address, next of kin, phone number and so on, using VA Form 1010EZR, which is available online or at your lo cal medical center. Per the news release, the VA will continue to provide nocost care to indigent veterans, veterans with catastrophic medical conditions, veterans with a disability rating of 50 percent or higher, or for condi service-connected. The income limits for copays and prescriptions are all over the map, literally. Income threshold limits for a veteran and family of four can range from $46,440 in Washington County, Maine, to $101,200 in San Francisco, and from $30,200 in McDowell County, W.Va., to $64,000 in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., and all points (and amounts) in between. If your income is over the limit, you still might get help. income. If that doesnt happen, or if your income has gone up, you might be required to pay co-pays for the year theyre reviewing. (Unfortunately you might end up owing money back for previous year copays, as the income informa tion doesnt get to them until July of the following year.) To get more information, go online to www.va.gov/ toll-free at 1-877-222-VETS (8387). Freddy Groves regrets that he cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into his column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.comKeep your care without reporting income

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Page 7 Casselberry adult tness classesBack 2 Basics is a low-impact workout at noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 8:30 a.m. on Saturdays. Its $49.99 a month for unlimited classes. Chair Yoga is at 10 a.m. every Monday and will get you moving again! The cost is $2 per class. Gentle/Restorative Yoga is from 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Sundays. The cost is $10 per class. Senior cit izens discount is $5 per class. For more information, contact Alice Gomes at 609-290-8195 or email alice@imagineyoga.net Yoga Technique is 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Saturdays. The cost is $10 per class. Senior citizens discount is $5 per class. Chairobics is from 11:05 a.m. to noon on Mondays and Wednes days. The class is free. For more information, contact Claudia Laine at 407-718-9066. Tai Chi for Beginners is at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays. For more in formation, contact Eric Raboy at 407-731-9130. The cost is $5 per class or $20 per month. Tai Chi for Intermediates is at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays. For more information, contact Eric Raboy at 407-731-9130. The cost is $5 per class or $20 per month. For more information on classes and registration, contact Mario Algarin at 407-262-7700, ext. 1576, or malgarin@casselberry. org or visit casselberry.org/registerWinter Springs Senior CenterLearn ceramics from a talented group at ceramics class from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays at the Winter Springs Senior Cen ter at 400 N. Edgemon Ave. in Winter Springs. Call 407-3276556 for more information. Have fun and get moving at yoga classes at 10 a.m. every Friday morning. Chair yoga is also available, offering all the benets of traditional yoga. Bingo is Wednesday, Friday and the last Sunday of the month. Lunch is served at 11:45 a.m. followed by Bingo at 1 p.m. There is no bingo prior to the last Sunday of the month. A bridge class meets at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday to help your game. Need to relieve some stress? Need a little me time? Be ginning on Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m., we will start a Guided Meditation class. This will be a 30-minute class. We are ex cited about this class and want to thank Robin Ward for taking the time to offer it. Hope to see you all then!CALENDAR | Need to relieve some stress? Winter Springs is now offering a class in guided meditation CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted

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FRIDAY, MAY 2, 2014 FREE Published weekly SEMINOLEVOICE.COM HOME FOR A HERO INTERESTS, 3 Knights tearing up AAC Dominating Rutgers in a threegame sweep, Knights in control. ATHLETICS, 4 Cinco De Mayo? Si! Watch out for the Running of the Chihuahuas this weekend. CULTURE, 5 Build a better grow box How to grow a garden without the hassles of weather and critters. FROM MY GARDEN TO YOURS, 7 CALENDAR .................... 2 INTERESTS .................... 3 ATHLETICS .................... 4 CULTURE ..................... 5 VOICES ....................... 7 CLASSIFIEDS ................... 8 CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR ....... B1 Since 1991 | WINNER OF 8 FLORIDA PRESS ASSOCIATION AWARDS | Serving Greater Oviedo/Winter Springs MARK YOUR CALENDAR Help raise money for a local lady battling cancer and have fun with a cookout and festival atmosphere at the same time at the Jolly Gator in Geneva this weekend. MORE IN CALENDAR, PAGE 2 USPS 00-093 Publisher statement on page 4. In home delivery by Friday, May 2 One Seminole County city could be getting singled out by the public school system as an ongoing lawsuit drags on. Seminole County Public Schools and waste management lawsuit against Winter Springs last November after the city claimed they had breached an exclusive franchise agreement for only Waste Pro to pick up trash. Both parties claimed they had the right to pursue a contract and partnership outside the citys franchise agreement, said Winter Springs City Attorney Anthony Garganese. Trash cans and dumpsters from WCA have been placed at Winter Springs High School, Layer Elementary, Keeth Ele mentary and several other Win ter Springs schools. The franchise agreement with Waste Pro dating back to 2006 ing to the school system, Winter Springs Mayor Charles Lacey said. The contract was in direct vi olation of the laws that provide for an exclusive franchise to be given to Waste Pro, Lacey said. A judge awarded the school district and WCA a preliminary injunction last December, pre venting the city from enforcing the ordinance until the case goes through a full trial. We are waiting for the ju dicial system to work its way through the process to bring jus tice to Winter Springs, Lacey said. But the mayor noted that two other cities in Seminole County have exclusive franchise agree ments as well: Lake Mary and Sanford. Seminole County Pub lic Schools continues to honor both their agreements, Lacey said, despite Sanford also exclu sively using Waste Pro. Theyve made the decision to honor their franchise agree ments for reasons that are com pletely unknown, Lacey said. Im still completely mysti chosen to single out the city of Winter Springs and not honor our franchise agreement. Seminole County Public Schools Deputy Superintendent George Kosmac reportedly said at the preliminary injunction A local retired environmental engineer is hoping to inspire a generation of students to save the Earth. Were planting the seeds where they need to be planted in our next generation, said Dan Morrical, creator of Project SavEarth. Morrical, a Winter Springs resident, has shared the pilot program of Project SavEarth with four area schools, including Rainbow Elementary in Winter Springs. The goal is to get young students thinking and caring about the environment, the con servation of natural resources and recycling. We are just now realizing nite, and there are so many other ways that we can change the way we develop our products and the way we use our energy, that we can save our Earth for our future generations, Morrical said. and sixth graders were given current, real-life environmen tal problems at the beginning of the school year and were asked to come up with ways to solve those problems and create a presentation They ranged from change the materials of a product and its packaging to make it recyclable and keep to coming up with alternatives to us ing Earths natural resources. On April 5, the teams headed to the University of Cen tral Florida, where Morrical teamed up with the Depart ment of Diversity and Inclusion at the College of Engi neering and Com puter Science to put SavEarth Expo, where the stu dents presented their solutions to save the Earth. Morrical modeled Project SavEarth off of the already suc Students learn to save Earth Fighting over garbage TIM FREED The Voice PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE VOICE Kids learned to improve home efciency and be better stewards of the environment. PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE VOICE The right to exclusively pick up trash has waste companies seething. Please see SAVEARTH on page 2 Please see GARBAGE on page 2 Rainbow Elementary uses Project SavEarth to teach critical thinking about the environment Ongoing lawsuit against city raises dirty questions BRITTNI LARSON The Voice

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Page 2 | May 2, 2014 | Seminole Voice THIS WEEK THIS WEEK IN WORLD HISTORY MAY 2, 1933 Although accounts of the Loch Ness Monster date back 1,500 years, the modern legend of the Loch Ness Monster is born in the Inverness Courier newspaper, which related an account of a local couple who claimed to have seen an enormous animal rolling and plunging on the surface. cessful Project CREATE, an engineering education program he started 25 years ago. Both programs are effective because students respond to educational strategies that get them to relate what theyre learn ing to the world around them, said Taru Joshi, the Rainbow Elementary teams gifted teacher and proj ect leader. That was the intent, is to get their creative juices going when you show them that theyre actually able to make a difference with what they learn and that it has real world applications, theyre so much more motivated and excited about doing it because they can go home, tell other people about what theyre doing and its really applicable to helping the world and making a difference, Morrical said. The fourth grade students at Rainbow Elemen tary took their projects very seriously, all spending months on research. One group created a whole model house displaying each area where a family would use chemicals a part of their project on cor rectly using and disposing of chemicals potentially harmful to the environment. Jay Conner wrote lyrics and composed music for a song that he wants to use as another way to reach kids and teach them to take care of their envi ronment. They hope that those who attended the expo learned something from them. When people see our pre sentations and hopefully all the other schools presentations too, theyll realize that theres so much that we need to do to help the save the Earth, said student Presley Sachs. Its on our generation to help the Earth. Anyone can make a change, you just have to start little and go out big, Jay Conner said. Joshi, their teacher, encour ages them to not only think these problems theyve been working on all year, but to go out and do something afterwards. The passion she sees in them gives her the hope that in 20 years saving the Earth wont be something people have to worry about anymore. They take ownership of this now, and Im hop ing that forever it will be with them, she said. They are the ones who are going to do something theyll make the world better. Morrical hopes that he can inspire a few of those students to choose a career that really does help save the Earth one day. PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE VOICE Kids eyes were opened about helping their planet thanks to the SavEarth program. For Tickets Call 321.268.1125 Or Visit www.TitusvillePlayhouse.com Presented through special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc Upcoming Events For more info and to register for events go to: www.OviedoWinterSprings.org May 6th Young Executives Networking 5:00 8:00pm, 376 N. Central Ave. Oviedo, FL 32765 Join us for our Grand Opening Celebration of our new Chamber office! We will celebrate with a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony, followed by great food from local restaurants, adult beverages, entertainment, and door prizes! Come meet the Chamber staff, Board of Directors, and Ambassadors. May 8th Chamber Grand Opening 5:30 7:00pm, Spill Wine Bar 1196 Tree Swallow Dr. Suite 1314 April 23rd Bagels & Business 8:00 9:30am, 1700 Oviedo Mall Blvd Oviedo FL 32765 Join us for our monthly morning seminar in the Oviedo Mall Community Room. This month our friends from Fishing Ammo will be speaking about their experience on the hit show Shark Tank! May 14th OBN Luncheon The Oviedo Businesswomen Network (OBN) consists of area businesswomen who meet monthly to exchange information, share contacts and provide a 11:30am 1:00pm, Tuscawilla Country Club Are you a young executive looking for new networking opportunities? Join us for a fun night out once a month with delicious wine and tasty cheese & fruit platters. We plan to meet the first Tuesday of every month at Spill Wine Bar in Winter Springs! GARBAGE | Legal suit still in limbo SAVEARTH | Kids learned how to recycle more efficiently hearing it had been a business decision for the school district to seek another waste management provider, Garganese said. Seminole County Spokesman Michael Lawrence would not comment on the issue due to the ongoing lawsuit. The dispute brought up other concerns in November and De cember while both WCA and Waste Pro had their trash cans on school properties. School principals werent sure which trash cans to use. We had some legitimate con cerns about the health of the stu dents there, because of trash cans blocking other trash cans and not being able to properly collect it, Lacey said. We think the superinten dent, the deputy superintendent and ultimately the school board were derelict in looking out for the health and safety of the stu dents. Garganese said a trial date for the case has yet to be set. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE MAY 3 On Saturday, May 3, there will be a can cer benet for Linda Bennett, who was in remission from Lymphoma Cancer and was recently told the cancer was back and affecting her brain. The event will in clude a Best Bacon Dish Cook Off, live music, vendor/craft sale, baskets to rafe, Chicken Poop Lotto, 50/50s, and kids fun (bounce house, games, etc.) from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Jolly Gator Fish Camp, 4650 E. State Road 46 in Geneva. Craft/vendor registration for a 10-by-10-space rental is $15. Bacon entries are $5 each and all contestants must register and be at the Jolly Gator by 3 p.m. for judging. Contest includes cash prizes. A BBQ plate will also be available. For registration forms or more info, call Mary at 407-402-3993 or email mconsolato@bellsouth.net On May 3 and 4, beautiful downtown San ford will be transformed into an interac tive art event. The third annual St. Johns River Festival of the Arts will offer visi tors access into the artistic process with over fteen demonstration sites called Art in Action. For more information, visit stjohnsriverartfest.com or call 407-4161779. The Caretakers M.E. annual Poker Run is at 8:30 a.m. May 3 to benet JOSH, Honor Flight and local high school JROTC pro grams. The run starts and ends at Ameri can Legion Post 183 at 2706 Wells Ave. in Fern Park. The group will be rafing off an AR-15 style semi-automatic rie and scope. The rst bike out is at 10 a.m. and last bike in is at 3 p.m. Call 407-3409780 for more information. FAMILY CALENDAR

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Seminole Voice | May 2, 2014 | Page 3 IN T ERES T S THIS WEEK IN HUMAN HISTORY MAY Nearly everyone will go through a major life-changing event at some point in their lives, but for wounded warriors tran sitioning back to civilian life, change is more than just a phase. Retired Army Sgt. First Class Rasche Hall came home with burns to his face and arms, but with a slew of symptoms from the scars no one can see. A veteran of the war in Af ghanistan, Hall was deployed twice. On his second, in August 2006, he suffered burns to his face and body during an attack on his unit. Despite his wounds, Hall acted heroically in defense of his fellow soldiers and charged the enemy combatants, ending the attack. For his actions, he received both the Bronze and Silver Stars in ad dition to the Purple Heart. On March 19, Hall and his girl friend, Vina Hewett, who is also an army veteran, took a major they accepted the keys to a mort gage-free home in Casselberry. The home was made available to the couple and their 9-monthold daughter through the partner ship of San Antonio based nonFoundation and Bank of America. Military Warriors program Homes for Wounded Heroes works with major banks to secure vacant properties and completely refurbish them to meet the needs of wounded warriors and their families. The homes are offered for a three-year, mortgage-free period, during which the veterans work with mentors and counselors to and prepare themselves for a full return to civilian life. At the successful conclusion of the three-year period, theyre given the deed to their new home. Hall and Hewett toured their new Casselberry home for the mix service dog Leonidas at their side. Moving slowly from room to room, the veterans struggled to take it all in. This is a blessing beyond comparison; I cant say enough how great this is, said Hall, with a look of wonder on his face. The three-bedroom, two-bath house with a pool and large fam ily room is in a quiet, well-estab lished neighborhood with good schools nearby perfect for a young family. Next-door neighbors Richard and Karen Shore were eager to meet the young couple and came out to meet them at the home coming celebration, bringing along their young grandsons who wanted to meet the hero. It makes you feel good that people are doing something for the veterans who are giving so much for everyone, said Richard, himself a Navy veteran. We are looking forward to getting acquainted, we feel an almost instant bond with them, Karen said. The partnership between the bank, the new homeowner and Military Warriors is crucial to the success of the program. The ties within their inventory based on house size, neighborhood and school qualities, then spends three to four months completely reno vating the properties. We want to make absolutely sure there are no issues for the veterans to deal with when we turn over the property, Bank of America representative John Moskos said. Veterans can apply for homes that are ready for occupancy through militarywarriors.org or they can submit an open applica tion specifying their location and home needs. the information provided, includ ing veteran discharge, disability status and family needs. Upon ap they must wait to see the interior hand-over ceremony. The veteran and their family are partnered with a mentor who will guide them through the next three years, meeting with them work and school needs and any other questions they may have. During this time they will be un help prepare them for full home ownership. As part of the Military Warriors family, they are also encouraged to be active in the veteran commu nity and to meet with other home recipients who are working their way through the program. In this way they can meet with people going through the same process, under the same re strictions, who know what their unique situation is like, Military Warrior volunteer Sally Farrell said. Its about giving them the support they need to succeed. Right off the bat, this makes transitioning so much easier, Hall said. This relieves so much pressure, allowing us to really fo cus on moving forward. Its a great new start for us, one that I wish every veteran could have. This is amazing for all of us, and especially this little girl, said Hall, hugging his baby daughter. Building a home for a hero ALLISON OLCSVAY The Voice PHOTOS BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE VOICE Army Sgt. Rasche Hall received the Bronze and Silver Stars for heroism in war. Now he has a place to call home. OF CENTRAL FLORIDA CELEBRATING OVER 25 YEARS SERVING YOUR COMMUNITYBernard S. Zeffren, MD Eugene F. Schwartz, MD Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-CVoted Best Doctors of Central FL, Orlando Magazine for 7 consecutive yearsDiplomates American Board of Allergy and Immunology Evening Hours Available793 Douglas Ave. Altamonte Springs, FL 32714407-862-5824 2 locations in Seminole County7560 Ste. 2064 407-366-7387www.orlandoallergy.com FORECLOSURE DEFENSELAW OFFICE OF TIMOTHY A. MORANCertified Florida Specific Foreclosure Prevention CounselorTel: 407-366-TLAW (8529)www.tmoranlaw.net tim@tmoranlaw.net Fax: 407-366-8528 1750 W. Broadway St., Ste. 118 Oviedo, FL 32765Initial Consultation FREE! 2013 Voted Best Law Firm in Oviedo

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Page 4 | May 2, 2014 | Seminole Voice AT HLE T I C S THIS WEEK IN SPORTS HISTORY MAY The UCF Knights blasted into the NCAA Top 25 with a convinc ing sweep of Rutgers just after nearly doing the same to Louis ville the week before. Three different Knights had two RBI apiece in the game that vaulted them to 28-16 on the year and 15-3 in the American Athletic Conference. In that game, which half of two innings, they went on a wild hitting streak that gave them eight runs in their last four in only needed one swing of the bat to send the ball into the afternoon ing two in a wild four-run eighth inning. Zach Rodgers would strike out the side to end the game. For the Knights, who pulled even further away at the top of the AAC standings, a one-game con ference break ended their home stand against North Florida on Wednesday at press time. They head to Houston this weekend for a three-game series against the Cougars, who at 31-12 have the second best overall record in the conference, but have struggled against AAC foes with an 8-7 inconference record. Hagerty After blasting their way into the regional tournament with a Class 8A District 2 championship, the Huskies hosted Jacksonvilles Sandalwood on Thursday night at press time. An 8-3 trouncing of DeLand gave the Huskies momentum in the district championship game. It was their second win over the Bulldogs this season. Sandalwood entered the re gional with an 18-9-1 record. With a win in that game the Huskies will get a chance to face either DeLand again or Mandarin, depending on who wins their play-in game. The next round is Tuesday, with loca tion pending Thursdays results. Oviedo A runner-up slot in the district helped the Lions into the regional tournament. They shut out Lake Howell 5-0 before falling in the district championship game. Wednesday night at press time they traveled to Fleming Island With a win the Lions will be in the ner of Winter Springs versus Bu chholz. The next game is Tuesday. Winter Springs The Bears won with a shut out and some small ball in their 2-0 district championship defeat of Lyman, thanks to crucial RBI by Pablo Cedeno and Ryan Fair banks. They headed into the re gional tournament at press time Wednesday against Buchholz (1611). Knights still dominating ISAAC BABCOCK The Voice PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE The Knights blasted Rutgers on the baseball eld to make their way deep into the NCAA Top 25 last weekend. Friday, May 2, 2014 Volume 24, Issue 18 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 SEMINOLEVOICE.COM Orlando, FL 32835-5705 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITORS Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Tim Freed 407.563.7054 TFreed@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ARTS EDITOR Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Janet Foley jwfoley75@gmail.com Sandi Vidal Sandi@ChristianHelp.org Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.com Karen Phillips KarenMPhillips@bellsouth.net ADVERTISING SALES David Levine 407.485.1956 DLevine@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: Florida Press Association Oviedo-Winter Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #008-093 Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo, Fla. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Seminole Voice, 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Seminole Voice 2014 UNITED AUTO SALES $8,999 Presented by: Friday May 23, Concert 6pm 10pm Sat May 24, Festival 10am 6pm BBQBLOWOUT.orgLocated at

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Seminole Voice | May 2, 2014 | Page 5 Now through May 11 The 12th annual Orlando Cabaret Festival at Mad Cow For 18 days, Central Florida gets to celebrate cabaret with some of the worlds great sing ing artists, including award-win ning actor and vocalist Nicholas Rodriguez (May 1, 2 and 3), Tony Award-winning Broadway and TV star Laura Benanti (May 9 and 10), and a dozen other wonderful performers. Call 407-297-8788 or visit orlando cabaret.com for a complete list of performances. Now through May 3 Edward Albees Tony Award-winning The Goat DiDonna Productions, known for tackling controversial theater projects, will present a full stag ing of Edward Albees black Who is Sylvia? Premiered on Broadway in 2002, and winner of the Tony Award for Best Play and Drama Desk Award for Best New Play, Goat explores the extremes of human toler ance when a loving marriage is rocked by an impossible-tounderstand love. Including betrayal, this tragic and some times hilarious play questions tolerance. With parental guid ance highly suggested, Goat will be performed through May 3 at the Shakespeare Center. Reserve tickets at 407-328-9005 or visit redchairproject.com for charge card orders. May 3 and 4 CFCArts presents the romantic composers In a program titled Explor ing the World of Romance, the 75-voice CFCArts Classical Choir will be joined by a chamber orchestra as they sing selections from Mozart, Rossini and Schubert. The audience will also experi ence works by Neo-Romantic composers Randall Thompson and Jean Belmont in a concert to be held May 3 at 7:30 p.m. and May 4 at 2:30 p.m. at St. Johns Lutheran Church at 1600 S. Orlando Ave. in Winter Park. Tickets are an affordable $10, with children age 12 and younger admitted free. Visit cfcarts.com May 3 to June 1 Keepin it Fresh in Sanford Jeanine Taylor, known for bringing attention and respect to folk art, will present a multi-artist show entitled Keepin It Fresh with a free opening reception on Saturday, May 3, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Coinciding with the St. Johns River Festival of the Arts, Taylor wanted to assemble these artists to demonstrate how well different folk art works together. The four artists are Cecel Allee (Georgia), David Ham mock (Alabama), and Phyllis Trager Hyman and Jane Theis (Florida). The Gallery is at 211 E. First St. in Sanford. Call 407-3232774 or visit jtfolkart.com May 3 MAYSfest 2014 A large student orchestra More than 250 MAYS students will come together to conclude the fourth season of the MAYS Stu dent Orchestras, which includes eight orchestras and three in-school strings programs. The Jona than May Founda tion was granted season with a unique structure that ensures the MAYS Orches tras will always be directed by musicians and educators. The concert will be held on May 3 beginning at 4 p.m. at the Bob Carr PAC in Orlando. Call 1-800-978-0407 or visit MAYSymphony.org May 3, 4 and 5 Cinco de Mayo via COCINA 214 When you have a holiday like Cinco de Mayo (Fifth of May in Spanish), I strongly support the good folks at my favorite Tex-Mex restaurant Cocina 214 in their decision to turn one day into a three-day festival. Historically, May 5 marks the victory of the Mexican Army over the French at the Battle of Puebla, but here in Winter Park, it allows Cocina 214 to have ambassadors from Jose Cuervo and Corona serve up drinks. On Sunday, locals can enter their dogs in the annual Running of the Chihuahuas. The party continues on May 5 as the res taurant celebrates with a Patron Ice Luge at 5 p.m. followed by Corona giveaways and Don Julio tequila samples. For details, visit cocina214.com May 4 The Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra in concert The Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra will conclude its 57th season on May 4 at the Bob Carr PAC with all four of the organizations award-winning youth orchestras performing. Violist Tyler Pacheco (17), a senior at Lake Highland Prep, is in his fourth year as a member of FSYO, this year holding the principal violist position. Mr. movement of the Walton Viola Concerto. In addition, 40 gradu ating seniors will be recognized for their dedication to classical music. The concert will begin at 4 p.m. For tickets and details, visit fsyo.org May 4 ONE NIGHT the fundraiser saves lives The moment tragedy strikes, the Orlando Regional Medical Centers Level One Trauma Cen ter stands ready to serve. ONE NIGHT is the annual fundraiser that celebrates the Centers com mitment to serving Central Josh Garrick Culture for your calendar YOUTH ORCHESTRA Please see CULTURE on page 6 LAURA BENANTI Dr. Gary D. McDonald OPTOMETRIC PHYSICIAN Oviedo VISION Center Fashion Frames Custom Contact Fittings Eye Exams for All Ages Designer & Rx Sunglasses Treatment of Glaucoma Treatment of Red Eyes In-House Optical Lab Surgery Co-Management &VEGETABLES FRESH FRUIT W Brian Thomas Produce 110 Geneva Drive, Old Downtown Oviedo(Across From Ace Hardware) VINE RIPE TOMATOES

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Page 6 | May 2, 2014 | Seminole Voice CULTURE | A classic returns to the Orlando Philharmonic with Verdis La Traviata in the original Italian Florida when it matters most through a presentation that brings true trauma care stories to life. ONE NIGHT supports this life-saving resource Central Floridas only Level One Trauma Center. The event includes a champagne reception, a silent auction, dinner, and multimedia program with personal testimo nies from trauma survivors. To purchase tickets, visit OneNight SavesLives.com May 8 Winter Park History Museums opening night Its probably no coincidence that the Winter Park History Museum located so close to the train tracks in Winter Park has announced its next exhibit called Whistle in the Distance: The Trains of Winter Park. The whole family is invited to the opening on May 8, beginning at 5 p.m. Call 407-647-2330 or visit wphistory.org May 9 and 11 The Orlando Philharmonic presents Verdis La Traviata The Orlando Philharmonic has created a series of bril liantly produced operas with the unique idea of placing the orchestra on-stage with the sing ers performing in front of the orchestra. On May 9 at 8 p.m. and May 11 at 2 p.m., the Phil harmonic will present Giuseppe Verdis most melodious and pop ular work La Traviata. Sung in Italian with English subtitles, Elizabeth Caballero will perform the role of Violetta, and Brian Jadge will perform as her lover Alfredo. Verdis score contains some of the most beautiful music ever written, says Conductor Christopher Wilkins. Call 407770-0071 or visit orlandophil.org May 10 The Chefs Gala for United Way families in Central Florida need help with basic necessities, and the most tasteful way to help United Way help all those thousands of Central Floridians is by purchasing a ticket to the annual Chefs Gala the United Ways signature gala. Food ies and philanthropists come together to sample the creations of our regions top chefs and thanks to the generosity of host Walt Disney World 95 percent of all proceeds go directly to help those in need. From the Cask & Larder to Victoria & Alberts, great chefs from our greatest restaurants help those in need. Email ChefsGala@hfuw. org or call 407-429-2129 for more information. May 11 A friendly reminder This year Mothers Day falls on Sunday, May 11. Current Dr. Phillips Center launches annual membership campaign This week, the new Dr. Phil lips Center announced its annual membership campaign. As part of the Centers commitment to engage the community in arts for every life, seven giving levels, with memberships starting at $75 and ranging up to $10,000, to special center events to artist meet and greets. Every member will have the ability to purchase tickets for shows presented by the Center before they are offered to the general public. In addition, inaugural season memberships purchased by Nov. 1 will be extended through Nov. 1, 2015. Membership registration and s hip C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 KEEPIN IT FRESH LA TRAVIATA CHEFS GALA $45FREE$73Mothers Day Specials Now AvailableIts Your Time, Youve Earned itBe PamperedOviedo Springs Center40MASSAGE The Newest Styles, Coloring & Eye Brow Waxing New Salon Clients (of equal or lesser value) Can not be used with any other offer. One coupon per visit. Expires June 1, 2014. Can not be used with any other offer. One coupon per visit. Expires June 1, 2014. Can not be used with any other offer. One coupon per visit. Expires June 1, 2014. Dr. Ramon Edgardo Lopez, MD Dr. Ramon Edgardo Lopez, MD passed away in Florida on Friday, April 25, 2014 at the age of 79. He was born in Puerto Rico where he studied medicine and later become an orthopedic surgeon. He soon entered the United States military after graduation and spent a year in Korea as an Army surgeon. During military life he and his growing family lived in Maryland and Texas. He was promoted to the rank of LTC while stationed in Texas. After retiring from military service, he established a private medical practice and raised his family. He resided for several years in Illinois, Arkansas and nally in Florida. In Florida he was an orthopedic surgeon for the Veterans Administration Clinic and later went into full retirement. He is survived by his wife, children and grandchildren. His favorite activities included: listening to Latin music and dancing, long trips in large motor homes, ying his private airplane, snowmobiling, vacation cruises, spending time with family and friends, grilling, reading about political gures and events, watching documentaries about past wars. He loved new gadgets and technology. He was a devoted father and had an uncanny ability to determine the global coordinates of any family member even before GPS existed. He was always gracious and humble and would extend help to the needy wherever and whenever he could. In lieu of owers, please make a contribution the American Cancer Society. A memorial service with military Honors will be held on Friday May 2, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM at the National Cremation and Burial Society, 7565 Red Bug Lake Road, Oviedo FL 32765. CHEFS GALA

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Seminole Voice | May 2, 2014 | Page 7 VOI C ES THIS WEEK IN POLITICAL HISTORY ever, on Feb. 1, 1917, Germany announced the resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare, and the United States formally entered World War I. Living in Florida provides us with con stant change and challenges that weed out those plants and animals unable or unwill ing to adapt to our crazy weather, unique environment, and burgeoning society. Many experienced gardeners from other zones give up the horticultural arts when faced with the task of wrestling a crop from our sandy soil in the face of extreme conditions whilst trying to cook a mess of col lard greens. Orient using a few practi cal conveyances and grow a few good things to eat. A framed growing bed, several inches to a foot above existing grade, provides a location able to weather many of the problems faced when trying to grow a crop at our residential homesteads. Fram ing suggestions include cement blocks and bricks (good material but heavy), pressure treated lumber (toxic), regular lumber (termite bait), redwood or cedar (expen sive), tires (no!), bottle wall (broken glass), decking planks of recycled plastic (sustain able but food safe?), and cement board material available at most big-box building suppliers called Hardie Board. The 7inch by 12-foot non-textured pieces primed dull yellow are the most affordable option, but require additional labor to procure and install due to its brittle propensity to bend and break. Shipping tip: cut the long pieces in half at the store. Building a framed bed starts with level ing the site to the subsoil. This muckingout phase of the project is the most labor intensive; removing surface sod and then deep digging the footprint to excavate most of the impeding roots and other debris will test many of our core beliefs. Measure and pull strings to the dimen sions of 3to 4-feet-wide and as economically long to accom modate the available space and necessary access. Hammer stakes of 2-foot-long -inch diameter electrical metallic tubing (EMT) every 2 feet along the length of the perimeter. Avoid creating dust by, instead of sawing, scoring and snapping the board to length. Place the Hardie Board inside the stakes and level the lengths and the frame with growing medium. the framing held by the stakes becomes a static whole that will now be a permanent and adapt able food-producing locus. Stupid rainfall totals, arduous temperature extremes, foraging tion, and even aesthetically pleas ing appearances are all addressed in one felled swoop. Once estab lished, the only routine mainte nance is adding some compost as the soil retracts. Bet you cant build just one. Chaos control with framed growing beds Tom Carey From my garden to yours Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page and email him at sundewgardens@gmail.com WHO IS CAREY > On March 14, the city of Oviedo was recognized as a Healthy Weight Com munity Champion along with 36 other Florida communities. The program, organized by the State Surgeon General, aims to recognize efforts from city and county governments in decreasing the prevalence of unhealthy weight in their jurisdictions. Obesity rates in the U.S. increased dra matically over the last 30 years, and obe sity is now epidemic in the United States. In Florida, only 35 percent of adults are at a healthy weight. Additionally, six out of 10 children born today will be obese by the time they graduate from high school. For this reason, Floridas State Surgeon General John Armstrong declared healthy weight as a top priority. It is recognized that municipal gov ernments can play an important role in decreasing the prevalence of unhealthy weight in their jurisdictions. Local governments can implement a variety of policies that have been shown to increase physical activity levels and improve nutrition. These best practice policies can encompass different categories such as physical activity, nutrition and leader ship. By implementing policies aligned with the State Health Improvement Plan, local governments promote community environments where the healthy choice is the easier choice. In order to acknowledge that many jurisdictions have already made prog ress in these types of policy changes, Dr. Armstrong established the Healthy Weight Community Champion Recogni tion Program to highlight communities for their important efforts. The city of Oviedo already has a number of policies in place supporting the objectives of the Healthy Weight Community Champion Recognition Program. Initiatives range from establishing mixed-use zoning dis tricts, requiring bike racks to be placed in new developments and making sure side walks are landscaped properly, among others. The city is proud of the recogni tion and will keep on endorsing and enforcing policies that promote a healthy environment and a healthy community. Oviedo recognized as a Healthy Weight Community Mayor Dominic Persampiere OVIEDO CITY TALK King Features Weekly ServiceApril 28, 2014 EDITORIAL CARTOONS PHOTO BY TOM CAREY THE VOICE Growing garden beds can help cut down on garden nuisances, but the right materials can help make it more trouble free.

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Page 8 | May 2, 2014 | Seminole Voice SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com Get it delivered to your inbox every week. Visit SeminoleVoice.com and click Subscribe to newsletter The Seminole Voice e-newsletter has community news Oviedo Winter Springs Geneva Chuluota ANNOUNCEMENTS OWN YOUR own Medical Alert Company. Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small invest ment required. Call toll free 1-844-2251200. Retire to Kentuckys BlueGrass Country! Enjoy maintenance free living!BRAND NEW LUXURY HOMES Beautiful 3 BR, 3 BA, 1,800 sf, from the low $200s. Low est price per sq ft in the area! Mild cli mate, low taxes, minutes to shopping, dining, medical & Keeneland Horse Rac ing. Perfect for retirement/2nd home. Call now for details: 877-333-2412, x 121 SugarTreeHomes.com AUTOS 2005 Toyota Corolla XRS 105k miles $9999. Call United Auto Sales 407-730-3581 2006 Lexus GX470 121k miles $21,999. Call United Auto Sales 407-730-3581 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser 118k miles $16,999. Call United auto Sales 407-730-3581 EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial Aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www. FixJets.com NURSING CAREERS begin here Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 HELP WANTED Driver Trainees Needed Now! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877-214-3624 AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, PostTraining Pay Increase for Students! (De pending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608 Apply @ AverittCareers. com Equal Opportunity Employer Fe males, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are en couraged to apply. Now Hiring OTR CDLA Drivers. New Pay Package and $1500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full bene fits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-978-3791/apply www.heyl.net PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Best Asian massage therapy Grand opening 20% off !!! Buy 3 hour get 1 hour free. Choose your massage from: Swedish/Deep Tissue/Hot Stone/Shiatsu/ Tai/Couples Massage and Chinese Foot Massage. MonSat: 9am-7pm Sun: Ap pointment Only Phone:407-622-1156 www.xmmassage.com LOANS FOR LANDLORDS! We Finance From 5-500 Units. As Low As 5.5 %. 1-4 Fam, Townhome, Condos OK. Contact B2R: 1-855-940-0227 www. B2RFinance.com REAL ESTATE: FOR RENT SANFORD Free standing retail/ office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra fea tures. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.com REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/-ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft eleva tion private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5263 ext 91 THE MARKE T PLA C E MindGym April 28, 2014 MindGymApril 28, 2014 MindGymApril 28, 2014 MindGym April 28, 2014 MindGym April 28, 2014 King Features Weekly ServiceApril 28, 2014 MindGymApril 28, 2014 RowellAuctions.comFor Detailed Property Info Visit RowellAuctions.comWednesday -:May 14th -:2 p.m. (CDT)Bank Owned Real EstateOnline Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute!Auction Site: Hilton Garden Inn, 1144 Airport Blvd., Pensacola, FLCantonment, Jay Milton, Pace, Panama City Beach & Pensacola, FLExcellent Commercial Buildings, Beautiful Acreage Tracts & Commercial & Residential Tracts BANK ORDERED Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE

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A SUPPLEMENT OF THE WINTER PARK-MAITLAND OBSERVER AND SEMINOLE VOICE MAY 2014 Shes been painting for hours, her dining table piled with paints, brushes and can vases, tweaking bird beaks and manage to get everything just painting takes a tumbling husband laughs and comments that her birds have found their Joan Laurenzo has devel oped a bit of an artists tem perament at 77. And shes not the only one. Palm Valley, an age restricted community in Oviedo, is home to a surpris ing amount of talented senior artists. They shared their paint ing skills April 5 at the 13th annual Palm Valley Art Show and Festival, an event open to the public each spring, where residents display and sell their work. For some of them, this is the only opportunity they have, and they are very proud of their work and really want to show everyone else the beauty they see in life around them, said Gladys Caughel, the organizer of the event and a painter herself. The event is packed with artwork made by members of the communitys art club. There are gilded sculptures, painted jazz band silhouettes that dance off the canvas, and Frank Scutt, 71, shows off photographs he took of a sparkling waterfall, and a man he spotted at the University of Central Florida balancing three basketballs on top of each other with a concentrated stare. You want to see a sparkle in the eyes, Scutt says of his portrait work. Some residents have just discovered their artistic tal ents, while others have spent their lives expressing them selves through art. Lin Reilly, 73, talks about her days as the director of the Melbourne Art Center and her paintings that hang all over the world. Art is her life, she said, and some thing she couldnt help doing. Now, tapping into the creative side of her brain takes away pain, and teaching the resi her need to be a part of an artistic community. I didnt do it because I wanted to, I did it because I had to, she said. It was a compulsion, a reason for be ing. Laurenzo, who never imag ined herself as an artist and only began painting last year, paints vibrantly colored birds and violet skies with hazy suns setting into the lake she used to gaze out into when it was her backyard. Many days she spends up to seven hours painting, leaving her husband asking when his dinner table Artists prove creativity doesnt ail with old age PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR Emerging artist Victor Pagan poses with his rst foray into painting on canvas, a portrait of ballerinas mid-dance. Seniors discover the time and talent for art Please see ARTISTS on page 2 BRITTNI LARSON Central Florida Senior Its the Best of Both Worlds.Lurene Braswell had long thought that one day The Mayower would be the ideal place for retirement although making the actual move was not on her immediate radar screen. But when her husband passed away, things changed. Encouraged by her daughter, Linda Bailey, who lives in Winter Park, Lurene made the decision to relocate. It was meant to be, she explains. I love my new apartment, and I no longer have the burden of maintaining and cleaning a big house. Mothers right around the corner, but she has her own space, adds Linda. Now she can spend birthdays, holidays and good times with her children and grandchildren. And as a family, we have peace of mind knowing she will always receive the very best in care . its the best of both worlds.If your loved one needed long-term care, what would you do? Call today, and lets talk about it: 407.672.1620. T HE R IGH T DECISION... THE MAYFLOWER RET IREMENT COMMUNIT Y [ for the whole family ]8 8 1 4 1 P R AD WPO 5/2014 Winter Pa rk's Distinctive R etir ement Community www.themayf lower .com 1620 Mayf lower Court Winter Park, FL 32792 Savannah Court and Cove Excellence in Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation 1301 W. Maitland Blvd. Maitland, FL 32751407-645-3990www.SavannahCourtMaitland.comAssisted Living Facility License No. 8447 Skilled Nursing Facility License No. 1635096 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above. You are always welcome!A Senior Living Community where Hospitality is a Way of Life.

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Page 2 will have food on it instead of paints, she laughed. To me its just very calm ing, and Im not thinking about all of the other problems that you have in life, she said. Im just being taken to this other world of wherever Im painting at that time. Their age makes them bet ter artists their minds hold their histories, and their hands have now learned to share that, said artist Victor Pagan. [You have] experience of life, and to think that all you have seen your whole life, all of a sudden you see it on canvas, and it makes you think back on your youth, think back on hap pier times, he said. We have the time now and we have the drive to do something with our life that will speak to the community, Caughel said, And we want to share. Central Florida Senior MAY 2014 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ADVERTISING Linda Stern 407.376.2434 LStern@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Published by Turnstile Media Group 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835-5705 P: 407.563.7000 F: 407.563.7099 ARTISTS | Vast life experiences help make them better artists C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE ful. Those are words that can apply to downsizing when the time comes for a senior to move to a smaller living space. At the same time, it can be exhilarating. There are numerous web sites about senior downsizing, but they all seem to agree on one thing: Get started early. Beginning months in advance to make the move a gradual process will keep stress to a minimum. Write it down If you plan to give certain treasures to oth ers, make notes about who gets what, or give them the items now. If youre going to hire others to help with the eventual packing and moving, make your intentions clear, espe cially if your things are going in a number of directions. Label everything so there is no confusion about whether things get packed or if theyre going to be picked up. Declutter If you had chil dren who moved out without taking all their gear, it all needs to go, either to the child, a charity or the trash. Your own belongings need to be sorted (heirlooms, expensive jew elry), donations (items in good condition such as clothing and furniture), give to relatives (keepsakes and heirlooms) and throw away (things with no real value that you dont use). Label your piles and boxes so there are no mistakes with valuable items being thrown away by accident. When you absolutely cant decide: Put those belongings in one special box and hold on to them. You can decide later, once the hub bub of the move is over. with helpful information on downsizing: The National Association of Senior Move Managers at nasmm.org/index.cfm. Car ing.com has a number of tips for clearing out. Or Google senior downsizing. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com Downsizing? Get started early PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON CENTRAL FLORIDA SENIOR Pam Burtt nds inspiration in orals, creating canvas paintings of all kinds from poppies to tulips. shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM shadow.indd 1 5/1/12 3:22 PM here should be more to life than maintenance-free living. To learn more about our community in Kissimmee, call (407) 933-1999. Sunday at 11am at

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Page 3 Maitland Senior Center pro grams The Maitland Senior Center is located at 345 S. Maitland Ave. in Maitland, and is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The schedule is subject to change without notice. For more informa tion about these and any other events at the Maitland Senior Center, please call us at 407-539-6251 or visit us on the web at itsmymaitland.com. The Maitland Senior Center will be closed on Monday, May 26, for Memorial Day, and will reopen at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, May 27. Join Audrey every Tuesday in May at 10:30 a.m. for Line Dance Lessons. Class is 1.5 hours and perfect for all levels of dancers. Beginners are always welcome! The cost of the class is $4 to the teacher. Join us every Monday and Friday in May at 1 p.m. to see your favorite movies! Check the calendar online to see what movies are showing in May. Please call to reserve your seat! Join John every Monday, Thursday and Friday in May at 9 a.m. for Yoga. Please wear comfortable clothes and bring your own mat. The cost of the class is $2 to the teacher. Join us every Monday in May at 1 p.m. for our Conversational French group. Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Join Esther every Tuesday in May at 9 a.m. for Tai Chi classes. The cost of the class is $10 per month to the teacher. Please wear a white shirt, black pants, and comfortable shoes. Join us every Tuesday in May at 1 p.m. for our Conversational Spanish group. Spend some time chatting with others and making new friends. Must be uent in Spanish to participate. Join Sherre every Wednesday in May at 10 a.m. for Instructors Choice. This class is a combo of mat and chair yoga that is great for all levels. The cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat. Join Ty every Wednesday in May at 11 a.m. for Yoga Nidra, a sublime conscious sleep (meditation) class. The cost of the class is $5 to the teacher. Please bring a yoga mat, something to cover yourself with (if you tend to get cold), and a small pillow. Join Donna every Thursday in May at 11:30 a.m. for Chair Yoga. The cost of the class is a $2 donation to the teacher. Join Ann every Friday in May for Record er classes at 12:30 p.m. The lessons are free! Please call the Senior Center at 407-539-6251 for specics on this class. The Maitland Senior Center presents a program for elders on the second Friday of the month that is staffed by counsel ors from S.H.I.N.E. (Serving Health In surance Needs of Elders). The program provides free unbiased counseling about Medicare, Medigap, HMOs, Medicaid, prescriptions drug plans, and long-term care. All counseling is rst-come-rstserved. Bring your list of medications or Rx bottles, insurance card and red, white and blue Medicare card. For more information about Elder Affairs programs contact SHINE Program Department of El der Affairs at 4040 Esplanade Way, Suite 270, Tallahassee, FL 32399-7000 or call 1-800-96-ELDER (1-800-963-5337). Or email information@elderaffairs.org or visit FLORIDASHINE.org Call toll free today to schedule an appointment for a FREE Hearing Screening and receive your FREE $100 Dining Card if you have hearing loss. Professional, licensed providers ensure you have the www.hearusa.com*Oers cannot be combined. Excludes previous purchases. 2014 HearUSA, All Rights Reserved. A LIFETIME OF BETTER HEARING! FIRST CLASS CARE WORLD CLASS TECHNOLOGY In addition to the oers on the right, you also receive The Highest Quality Most Comprehensive Care in the Hearing Industry. Receive a FREE 40 TVwith purchase of a pair of Siemens Pure 7mi Hearing AidsOers cannot be combined and expires 5/23/14. Excludes previous purchases. FREE $100 Dining Cardwith a FREE Hearing Screening!Good at over 20,000 restaurants nationwide and 4 online partners. No purchase required. Must have hearing loss. Oers cannot be combined and expires 5/23/14. $100 Call Toll Free: 855.802.5532(On Dr. Phillips Boulevard, near Steinmart and between Stefanos Grill and Kekes restaurant in the Dr. Phillips Marketplace.) 140501 HearUSA May Ad_Central Florida Senior_10.25x8 to run 5-1_02.indd 1 4/10/14 6:11 PM Senior Calendar Please see CALENDAR on page 7 Loud & Clear and FREE Florida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to receive a free amplied phone from the non-prot Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. Cordless and corded phones for persons with mild to severe hearing loss are available at 23 distribution centers statewide. Limit one per customer.CONTA C T YOUR AREA C ENTER FOR DETAILS Center for I ndependen t Living in Central F lorida 720 Nor th Denning Drive Winter Park, FL 32789 407-623-1070 (v) 407-623-1185 (tty)Current FTRI clients: If your phone isnt working properly or your hearing has changed, or should you no longer need your phone or are moving out of Florida, call FTRI at 888-554-1151 for assistance.

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407-841-9788

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Page 6 Life is easier with Home Care Services We have the Skill to Heal. The Spirit to Care. Transitional Care Program Philips Personal Medication Dispenser Philips Lifeline Call today to schedule Private Duty Services (407) 691-8206 P h i l i p s P e r s o n a l M e d i c a t i o n D i s p e n s e r The Personal Medication Dispenser assists with medication management Medications are reviewed and pre-filled by a registered nurse, preventing o veror undermedication that could lead to a costly re -hospitalization. If youre enrolled in the Department of Veterans Affairs health-care system, you no longer have to report your income. The VA will get that information themselves from the IRS and Social Security. Starting March 2014, youll only have to give your income information if youre applying your renewal form for change of address, next of kin, phone number and so on, using VA Form 1010EZR, which is available online or at your lo cal medical center. Per the news release, the VA will continue to provide nocost care to indigent veterans, veterans with catastrophic medical conditions, veterans with a disability rating of 50 percent or higher, or for condi service-connected. The income limits for copays and prescriptions are all over the map, literally. Income threshold limits for a veteran and family of four can range from $46,440 in Washington County, Maine, to $101,200 in San Francisco, and from $30,200 in McDowell County, W.Va., to $64,000 in Fort Wal ton Beach, Fla., and all points (and amounts) in between. If your income is over the limit, you still might get help. income. If that doesnt happen, or if your income has gone up, you might be required to pay co-pays for the year theyre reviewing. (Unfortunately you might end up owing money back for previous year copays, as the income informa tion doesnt get to them until July of the following year.) To get more information, go online to www.va.gov/ toll-free at 1-877-222-VETS (8387). Freddy Groves regrets that he cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into his column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com Keep your care without reporting income

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Page 7 Casselberry adult tness classes Back 2 Basics is a low-impact workout at noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 8:30 a.m. on Saturdays. Its $49.99 a month for unlimited classes. Chair Yoga is at 10 a.m. every Monday and will get you moving again! The cost is $2 per class. Gentle/Restorative Yoga is from 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Sundays. The cost is $10 per class. Senior cit izens discount is $5 per class. For more information, contact Alice Gomes at 609-290-8195 or email alice@imagineyoga.net Yoga Technique is 8:45 to 10 a.m. on Saturdays. The cost is $10 per class. Senior citizens discount is $5 per class. Chairobics is from 11:05 a.m. to noon on Mondays and Wednes days. The class is free. For more information, contact Claudia Laine at 407-718-9066. Tai Chi for Beginners is at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays. For more in formation, contact Eric Raboy at 407-731-9130. The cost is $5 per class or $20 per month. Tai Chi for Intermediates is at 2 p.m. on Tuesdays. For more information, contact Eric Raboy at 407-731-9130. The cost is $5 per class or $20 per month. For more information on classes and registration, contact Mario Algarin at 407-262-7700, ext. 1576, or malgarin@casselberry. org or visit casselberry.org/reg ister Winter Springs Senior Center Learn ceramics from a talented group at ceramics class from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays at the Winter Springs Senior Cen ter at 400 N. Edgemon Ave. in Winter Springs. Call 407-3276556 for more information. Have fun and get moving at yoga classes at 10 a.m. every Friday morning. Chair yoga is also available, offering all the benets of traditional yoga. Bingo is Wednesday, Friday and the last Sunday of the month. Lunch is served at 11:45 a.m. followed by Bingo at 1 p.m. There is no bingo prior to the last Sunday of the month. A bridge class meets at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday to help your game. Need to relieve some stress? Need a little me time? Be ginning on Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m., we will start a Guided Meditation class. This will be a 30-minute class. We are ex cited about this class and want to thank Robin Ward for taking the time to offer it. Hope to see you all then! CALENDAR | Need to relieve some stress? Winter Springs is now offering a class in guided meditation C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 2069 Aloma Ave. Winter Park, FL 32792 762 E. Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701(407) 691-3009 (407) 679-2135 Visit us on the web @ www.binsons.com r fntbt f rtt ftbt bt bnr nr rt b bb f b tb off trtnCoupon redeemable for cash, check or credit card purchases only. Not redeemable for insurance transactions. Excludes custom/special orders & nutritional supplements. May not be combined with any other discounts. Coupon has no cash value. at Winter Park Towers Your room is waiting for you if you need Pain and Symptom Management Hospital Follow-up Complex Treatments, or Crisis Care Referrals 866-742-6655#5019096 www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/cornerstoneMedicare, Medicaid, most commercial insurances accepted

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