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Seminole voice ( June 28, 2013 )

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Title:
Seminole voice
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
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Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication:
Oviedo, Fla.
Creation Date:
June 28, 2013
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates:
28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00091445:00157

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Material Information

Title:
Seminole voice
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication:
Oviedo, Fla.
Creation Date:
June 28, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates:
28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00091445:00157


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much of what was The Oviedo arrived early in the morning of Aug. 16 to try to save what was already gone. Tony and Patty Nikollajs res taurant raged beyond 1 a.m. By the time hoses started spraying, the steel beams holding the ceil ing had already begun to buckle, melted by the extreme heat of It feels really bad that its gone, said longtime customer Ralph Miller, a friend of the Nikollajs. It seems like [Tony] is holding up OK. The family of longtime res taurateurs created the Diner half a decade ago out of the bones of armed roundabout in Oviedo that funnels cars northeast into rural Seminole County. It looked so much like the old fast food chain that months after it opened Tony said customers were still showing up in the drive-thru for ice cream. A savvy businessman, he already had it on the menu. The restaurant was in busi ness for more than half a decade. an inferno had consumed one of the Nikollajs restaurants. Law rence and Pauls, named for the Nikollajs sons, was mostly a sub shop that caught drivers along the busy west end of State Road 434 in Longwood. Twelve years ago a microwave shorted out and burned the business to the ground. The family later moved to Winter Park to try again, tak ing the name with them. In 2002 the family opened Toninos was named for Tony this time, taking the spot now occupied by Caf Panuzzos. Its in Oviedo that the family would live while they hatched another plan to convert the old DQ into a throwback diner. (The diner) was my life, Tony told WKMG news. Ive been here for eight years. I love the people. For eight years, I never got robbed, nobody stole anything from me. It was like a family-run business, you know, Nikollaj said. The owners did not immediately return calls seeking say what started the blaze, which originated inside the building. The cause right now is listed as undetermined, Oviedo Fire Chief Lars White said, and the investigation is now at the state White said. Theres always a chance there could have been an electrical surge because of light ning. Weve just found no real external signs. Lightning had been reported in Central Florida that night, though not much storm activity had occurred near the Diner. ing very quickly, White said, long after the Nikollajs had gone home for the night. He was pretty shaken, White said of Tony Nikollaj, who Theres no question about it. He was very sincere in his loss. Talking to him the day after ward, he indicated that hed like to open again right there. Time will tell. You just dont know. In the morning light after ward, little seemed untouched en and charred beams. Fire truck No. 44 stood watch in the park ing lot, its shiny red body visible from the other side of the black ened hollow shell. Most of what had been in the building after the family locked up the night before sat ashen inside. Only two tokens were too, but still recognizable. Tony Nikollajs face stared back from one, behind smoke-stained glass, smiling from a framed newspa per page. Fire destroys diner ISAAC BABCOCK The Voice PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE An Oviedo re truck is visible through the burned Oviedo diner Aug. 16. Theres always something new, he paused. Theres always something new. Oviedo police Ofc. Sean Snyder starts his day like most Oviedo residents. He wakes up, dresses himself, eats breakfast, walks his dog, and leaves the house for work. Except for him, the nature of the work hell be doing is largely a mystery. Snyder, 31, is a four-year member of the Oviedo Police Department, and works four 12hour shifts per week. He patrols zone 2, the northeast quadrant of the city. He rides in a 2007 Chevy which luckily he hasnt had to use yet. Snyder has lived in Florida since he was 2, and Oviedo since he was 8. He used to be a store man ager at Albert sons, but he was always drawn to the thrill of stop ping crimes. There was lots of theft there, he said. I hated that I couldnt chase after anyone. One day the urge was so strong that he quit. Hes been on the force ever since. Today, his patrol starts on Mitchell Hammock Road, where the new 60-acre town center Oviedo on the Park is being built. Its a positive addition to the community, yet it reminds him of one of the tougher aspects of his profession. A guy drove back there in his pickup, put a bag over his head, and suffocated himself with car bon dioxide, Snyder said. He rolled up on the lonely scene. His wife called and wanted to meet at the spot with me. She told me his brother killed himself the same way. A day in the life of an Oviedo cop Please see POLICE on page 2 PHOTO BY PHIL WHEEKER Oviedo Ofc. Sean Snyder prepares for takeoff Aug. 10. PHIL WHEEKER The Voice When a homeowner turns off a few light bulbs and eases off on the air conditioning, it can save a few dollars a month. When a school system does the same, it can save millions. Like home consumers, local schools also have to consider energy conservation in their budget cutting strategies. Facility teams in Orange and Seminole County are busy put ting their conservation strategies in place for the new school year to ensure that every energy dollar is well spent. buildings is good for us, its good for the taxpayer and it generates less carbon dioxide, which is better for the environment, said Orange County Public Schools Facilities Manager John Brennan. Orange County In Orange County, savings starts in the kitchen. Brennan said school kitchens are working on overhaul ing procedures to help reduce en Local schools gear up for energy savings Please see SAVINGS on page 2 ALLISON OLCSVAY The Voice

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Page 2 Friday, Aug. 23, 2013 Volume 23, Issue 34 PHONE: 407-563-7000 FAX: 407-563-7099 SEMINOLEVOICE.COM Orlando, FL 32835-5705 PUBLISHER Tracy Craft 407.515.2605 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MANAGING EDITOR Isaac Babcock 407.563.7023 IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sarah Wilson 407.563.7026 SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com DESIGNER Tom Miller 407.563.7032 TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com STAFF WRITERS Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery COLUMNISTS Janet Foley jwfoley75@gmail.com Sandi Vidal Sandi@ChristianHelp.org Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.com Karen Phillips KarenMPhillips@bellsouth.net Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES Deborah Sheehy 407.563.7009 DSheehy@TurnstileMediaGroup.com LEGAL NOTICE ADVERTISING Ashley McBride 407.286.0807 Legal@FLALegals.com SUBSCRIPTIONS/CIRCULATION Luana Baez 407.563.7013 LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com MEMBER OF: Florida Press Association Oviedo-Winter Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce TURNSTILE MEDIA GROUP CHAIRMAN Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS Patti Green & Jeff Babineau USPS #008-093 Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo, Fla. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Seminole Voice, 1500 Park Center Drive Orlando, FL 32835 2013 ergy costs. Kitchen workers are being pro vided with energy saving training and a spreadsheet tool to enable them to calculate their energy consumption. Based on this data, Brennan said, each school will formulate a new savings plan de tailing how they will reduce en ergy usage in the kitchens, such as unplugging less frequently used equipment, working in batches or switching off lights. Following the implementation of these new plans, the facilities department will do energy audits to help keep them on track. Over Orange County Public Schools hopes to save $1 million using this strategy alone. Energy costs can also cool off though centrally controlled ther mostats. Thermostats in Orange County Schools are centrally controlled through the facilities department, requiring individual classrooms and buildings to oper In addition, Orange County Pub lic Schools gets rebates from Duke Energy and the Orlando Utili ties Commission for using more schools such as Walker Middle, Oakridge High, Edgewater High and Aloma Elementary School. We are aiming to increase our year, Brennan said. Seminole County Seminole County Energy Man ager Hector Barbosa said Semi nole County Public Schools are shining light on several new ways for the county to save on electric ity. Starting with the basics, schools are switching from old, high watt age T8 lights to new, lower watt areas where light replacement is lights may be installed over the next year. And at the end of the day, schools will no longer look like cruise ships all lit up in the night. Non-essential parking lot lights will go out after midnight. New programmable ther mostats are also being installed, which Barbosa said will be set at 77 during peak hours and 85 dur ing off hours. Like OCPS, Seminole County Public Schools also receive rebates from Duke Energy for things like programmable ther mostats. Four schools currently have the stalled, four more are under construction and an additional nine schools are planned. According to the En ergy Conservation Task Force, the cumu lative rebate dollars earned since 2007 is $338,123.47. Also, the four-day work week instituted during summer break will continue during winter and spring breaks, allowing schools to save energy on the extra days when buildings are empty. Both Brennan and Barbosa said that more than any individual programs, the cost saving mea sure that will be most effective is simple common sense. Were just doing what any one would do, Barbosa said. Switching off lights when you leave a room, turning off comput ers when you leave for the day, its all just common sense stuff that when you add it up, saves a lot of money. Its not fun, his voice low ered. You know, people have their demons. As he drove, it seemed hard for him to go a couple moments without observing things out loud. Hes always looking around for something that doesnt seem normal. He cruised around the sleepy Lake Charm, where homes as old as 125 years stand, and waved to the residents mowing their lawns or walking their dogs. The next turn was onto De Leon Street, a two-lane, 35 mph road, which had a Friday morning. Dispatch spoke on the radio. Theres an exchange of words and codes, and within seconds the Im pala is speeding down the middle of De Leon Street, sirens scream ing. Someones hurt at the mall, so were gonna go there right now, he said. The 4-mile trip would be better counted in seconds than minutes. Upon arriving at the otherwise empty Macys parking lot, Snyder found an elderly woman shaking so violently that she might fall out of her wheelchair. rescue showed up moments later putting her on a stretcher and en route to the hospital. The woman suffered from Parkinsons and earlier fell out of her chair while shopping. The police helped put her fam ily members at ease, shook hands, and went on with their day. Snyder took off for a quick Yi at a local Vietnamese restau rant they frequent. The two have worked together for years, and have the habit of eating their meals quickly. You know that you could be called in at any moment, Yi said. We dont like making other peo ple do our job. Having the opportunity to help people is Snyders favorite part what he does. Seeing that smile on some ones face makes all the bad parts worth it, he said. When you know you made that persons day better, thats a pretty cool feeling. And while being a police of doubt a dark side of it all. Child are the worst and most emotional affairs, Snyder said. Its sad and unfortunate, but the sun will come up the next day, he said, as he lowered his sunglasses from his forehead. So thats that. Some typical 911 calls in the area are for bank fraud, theft from cars, homes, or construction sites, noise complaints, and deer that get struck by cars. Oviedos crime rate is lower than 82 percent of Florida com munities, according to compiled data in the Florida Department of Law Enforcements 2012 crime report. But theres an exception to that on Harrison Street, which lies to ward the northern city limit. Its a poverty stricken neighborhood where crime is more heavily con centrated. Snyder cracked his car win dows and left to take a stroll down the street. Children sat on their doorsteps racing R/C cars in the summer heat. Men hunched over on the porch of a notorious crack house, cigars behind their ears. Wed like to think our pres ence keeps people from commit ting crimes, he said. We call it prevention through visibility. A few houses that appear di lapidated with boarded windows, Snyder said, were actually local hangouts. They used to have parties down here with almost 400 peo ple, he said. Thats when it re ally gets crazy, at night. The only other zone 2 calls for the day were for a storage unit robbery, which turned out to be a false alarm, and a domestic dis pute. An arrest was made last time a call came in from this house. Their fortune was different today, as the family spoke to the a way to stop their heated argu ments. Leaving a scene like that, where everyone has calmed down is rewarding, Snyder said. Es pecially when you dont have to go back. Several times a day, he passes the Albertsons he started work ing at as a teenager. After he be came a cop, he used to take calls there all the time. It closed a year ago. His handcuffs dangle on the left side of the dashboard as he drives. Tomorrow they could be clenching the wrists of a violent criminal. Today, they stay put. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE SAVINGS | Energy audits alone could save $1 million per year across the district THIS WEEK PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY High-efciency kitchens save money. PHOTO COURTESY OF ORANGE COUNTY SCHOOLS More energy-efcient roofs cut down on cooling. THIS WEEK in history Aug. 26, 1959 The British Motor Corporation launches its newest car, the small, affordable Mark I Mini. The Mini went on to become one of the best-selling British cars in history. At only 10 feet long, the $800 Mini could sit four adults and had a trunk big enough for a reasonable amount of luggage. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE POLICE | Fraud, theft, a seizure at the mall and a deer hit by a car: all in a days work Wounded warrior writer Eric Wright, director of Business Develop ment at Isis Solutions and Results, LLC and a former U.S. Army Sergeant and Paratrooper, was recently nominated to interview and write Wounded Warrior biographies for the Association for the United States Armys (AUSA) quarterly newsletter. Wright was nominated for this editorial position because, as a Service Disabled Veteran, he understands the importance of having a support structure such as the Wounded Warrior Foundation. Having this insight will equip him to best represent the Warriors he interviews for a Hero Story, which will be included in every edition of the AUSA Sunshine Chap ters quarterly newsletter. Re-advocating Joannie Sue Terraglio, 56, of Oviedo, is an advocate for persons with disabilities. She has been reappointed to the Florida Independent Living Council for a term be ginning July 1, 2013, and ending June 30, 2016. Fake Medicare agents The Winter Springs Police Department has received information about a scam you should know. Residents are being con tacted by people claiming to be represen tatives of Medicare requesting sensitive, personal information from the intended victim. Oftentimes, callers are requesting social security numbers or bank account information, etc. in order to make depos its to your account. The police department wants to remind you that legitimate bank ing and medical businesses will not re quest information of this nature from you over the phone, and to please be mind ful of this should you receive a call like the one mentioned above. Report scam activity to us at anytime by calling 407327-1000 so an ofcer can take a report. You may nd additional information about scams by visiting fbi.gov/scams-safety Notes

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Page 3 THIS WEEK in human history Aug. 24, 1873 William Henry Jackson becomes the first person to photograph Colorados elusive Mount of the Holy Cross, providing reliable proof of its existence. Two deep snow-filled ravines at 90-degree angles form a large cross on the steep northeast face of a 14,000-foot mountain peak. Blaine sits on his unmade bed and pores over a notebook the pages filled with his sketch es of black and white roses and graffiti letters. A row of model cars park on a shelf above his headboard. A nearby radio plays top-40 country music hits. The room looks like any other 16-year-old boys bed room, but the twin bed that Blaine sleeps in has not always been his own. Almost 100 miles away from Blaine, another bed remains empty in the house that he called home. Blaine lives in a family home at Boys Town Central Florida, a non-profit organization in Oviedo that seeks to protect and foster growth in children with rebellious attitudes and behav ioral problems teaching them to become productive members of society. The family homes give chil dren a place to stay long-term, away from their permanent homes while they learn impor tant life skills such as following instructions, accepting conse quences and being honest. Rafael and Margarita For estier are the parents here, preparing kids to avoid the rocky road that may have led them here. If we just help one person and get them on the right track, then maybe they can affect somebody else, Margarita said. Nobody gave them a second chance, so we did. The family homes are made up of two assigned parents and about six Boys Town residents. The children are required to do chores, maintain their living space and treat others with respect. Doing so earns the chil dren privileges like a night out at the movies or bowling. Blaine came here two years ago from Palm Coast in Flagler County, sent off by his parents to Boys Town to develop his social skills. Blaine rarely spoke, kept to himself and often stole small items like index cards and pens. He felt judged inside his own home while dealing with those issues, Rafael said. We know that hes go ing to make mistakes, Rafael said. Theres no grudges held against him. Its dealt with and we move on. I think thats what helped him grow with trusting us a little more. The Forestiers have been counseling and reaching out to children like Blaine for years. In 1995, the couple joined Boys Town Central Floridas original emergency shelter in Sanford as shift supervisors, keeping children with suicidal tendencies and histories of selfharm under constant surveil lance. They worked at the shelter until 2000, when they moved to Connecticut with their chil dren and worked in an all-girls behavioral program under the North American Family Insti tute (NAFI). But the methods used in the (NAFI) program were a far cry from the sit-down-and-talk-itout approach that Boys Town took. Girls struggling with drug addiction or past sexual and physical abuse would often be come violent, and would have The home that keeps kids from jail TIM FREED The Voice Seminoles Boys Town to expand services to Orange County PHOTO BY TIM FREED Margarita and Rafael Forestier stand with Blaine, who has turned his life around thanks to Boys Town. The home uses mentors to keep kids and teens from crime. Please see BOYS TOWN on page 4 about how much money Let us help you! Call today!(407)-644-6646www.aSafeHarbor.com Member of Bob Adams President/CEO A SafeHarbor, LLC bob@asafeharbor.comS T OP Worryingyou have for retirement.Instead of being concerned with the value of your retirement account, you should be more concerned with the income that account provides. Income maintains your quality of life so you may live in retirement as you did when you were working. You need to have the income so you can travel, see your grandkids and live whatever retirement dreams you may have. If you would like to see how you can MAXIMIZE YOUR INCOME FOR LIFE call us today. There are options available that most Americans dont know about. Give us one hour to see if we can give you your lifetime. Nows your chance to showcase just how beautiful your community really is. Submit your best photo of the area, and your shot could be featured in the 2014 Seminole Voice calendar!Visit SeminoleVoice.com/Photo for more details and to upload your winning submission. Enter the Seminole Voice Calendar Photo Contest today! CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST

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Page 4 Aug. 23 Aug. 29 2013 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRI DA Y, AUGU S T 23 ADRC Workshop A Closer Look at Dementia Research 2pm-3:30pm Presented by Julie Shatzer, MSW & the Alzheimers & Dementia Resource Center RSVP 407.843.1910 M O N DA Y, AUGU S T 26 Senior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group 10am 12noon August 26th Casino Day The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am-1pm By Appointment Only, 407.949.6714 Presented by Exit Real Estate Results T U ESDA Y, AUGU S T 27 Computer Class: Google Drive & Docs 2pm-3:30pm Presented by McBride Insurance Agency RSVP 407.230.7835 W ED N ESDA Y, AUGU S T 28 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.545.4098 T HUR SDA Y, AUGU S T 29 Health Care Reform 3pm-4:30pm Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407.949.6723 ** We will be closed on Friday, August 30th and Monday, September 2nd. We will re-open on Tuesday, September 3rd.Calendar of Events August 2013 AUG. 23 Love Your Shorts Film Festivals Sum mer Rewind will he held Friday, Aug. 23, at the Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center in Sanford featuring a variety of movies that were screened at the third annual lm festival in February. The lms to be shown at 8 p.m. at the historic 1923 performing arts center, located at 201 S. Magnolia Ave., are by lmmakers from Florida, across the United States and four foreign countries. Visit loveyour shorts.com for more information. AUG. 24 There will be a Beat the Heat Hike at 7:30 a.m. Aug. 24 with the Florida Trail Association at the Lake Proctor Wilder ness Area, located at 920 E. State Road 46 in Geneva. Bring water and bug spray. No pets, please. For more information, contact Joan Jarvis at bluetrail@aol.com or 407-365-6036 Calendar AUG. 23 Lucy Hunnicutt will debut her 18-piece art series A Brief History of the Blues at Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 211 E. First St. in Sanford on Friday, Aug. 23. The open ing reception will be from 6 to 9 p.m. and feature live blues music by Jim Mahoney and The Angels of Mercy. The event coin cides with the monthly Sanford Art Walk. A UG. 24 Macys will partner with Project Walk Orlando to invite customers to partici pate in Macys eighth annual national Shop For A Cause charity shopping event on Saturday, Aug. 24. Customers can purchase shopping passes from Project Walk Orlando now. Macys Shop For A Cause is a unique one-day-only shopping event created to support local charities fundraising efforts, which has helped raise more than $46 million for charities across the country since 2006. Join us at the ninth annual Philips Phile Texas Holdem Poker Tournament on Saturday, Aug. 24, at the Orlando Science Center, 777 E. Princeton St. This premier evening event raises money for the Mus tard Seed of Central Florida. For more information, visit RealRadio.fm Celebrate the kickoff of Central Floridas art and cultural season with the ninth an nual Red Chair Affair on Saturday, Aug. 24. This is your ticket to sample 20132014 season highlights! This extraordi nary evening is held at the Bob Carr Per forming Arts Centre, 401 W. Livingston St., and includes performances from a variety of genres and organizations. Visit redchairproject.com for more info. AUG 28 Its the 28th annual National Kidney Foun dation Rich Salick Pro-Am Surf Festival presented by Ron Jon Surf Shop, coming up this Labor Day weekend at the Cocoa Beach Pier. Its Aug. 26 through Sept. 2. For more information, visit nkfsurf.com or call 1-800-927-9659. Seminole State Colleges Fine Arts Gal lery opens Wednesday Aug. 28 with a new exhibition by Rick Lang, photog rapher and longtime teacher at Winter Parks Crealde School of Art who passed away in July. The photos were taken as Lang traveled the Southeast. Visit semi nolestate.edu/arts for more information. AUG. 30 Seminole Countys Talking Business series will bring Jerry Ross to the Seminole State College Heathrow Cam pus from 9 to 10 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 30. Learn what the National Entrepreneur Center can do to help your business. Visit businessinseminole.com for more info. AUG. 31 Florida Museum of Natural History visi tors will soon have the opportunity to dis cover the states famous coastal waters and deep surng culture in the new ex hibit Surng Florida, opening Satur day, Aug. 31. Visit mnh.u.edu for more information. KIDS BOUNCIN OFF THE WALLS?BRING EM TOBOING!Mon Thurs 3:00 9:30 Fri 3:00 10:00 Sat 10:00 10:00 Sun 10:00 6:00407.542.7844 532 S. Econ Circle Suite 120 Oviedo, FL 32765 www.boingjump.comWe also welcome: Birthday Parties School Fundraisers Corporate Events Back to School Hours Begin Aug. 19! &VEGETABLES FRESH FRUIT W Brian Thomas Produce 110 Geneva Drive, Oviedo, Florida(Across From Ace Hardware) VINE RIPE TOMATOES Family Calendar to be physically restrained by the program staff. The Forestiers couldnt take more than a year there, and left in 2001. After creating a painting business that thrived for several years, the couple once again felt the urge to play a healing role in the lives of children. They moved back to Florida in 2010, and rejoined Boys Town Central Florida to be assigned parents in one of the family homes. And the Forestiers know very well what keeps them coming back. Raised in Me riden, Conn., by his single mother, Rafael grew up way ward himself, falling into a rough crowd that abused and sold drugs. At no more than 16 years old, Rafael was transport ing guns to local gangs. Its a miracle that Im not in jail, Rafael said. It wasnt until his aunt took him to a church youth group that Rafael was able to turn his life around. Lou Papallo of the First Assembly of God church reached out to Rafael, taught him to be accountable for his actions, and later offered him a job to support himself. Rafael learned what it meant to be hard-working man who supported a family, and went on to do just that. Years later, Rafael and his wife were impacting young peoples lives at shelters just as Papallo did with Rafael. Because he changed my life, I want to be able to change oth ers, Rafael said. My wife and I have just been doing it ever since. Rafaels own past experi ences and the dangerous path he once walked have better equipped him to become a men tor to Blaine in dealing with his problems in particular his habit of stealing. Im trying to teach a kid that you dont want to steal, because it could end up into something bigger in your life later and have a bigger conse quence, Rafael said. After two years of living with the Forestiers, Blaine hasnt stolen in months, and now leads other Boys Town residents by example go ing to bed at curfew without question, greeting people with a smile and encouraging other residents to follow rules around the house. Blaine no longer feels judged, and has allowed his personality to shine through. Its better than my actual home, Blaine said. Boys Town focuses much of its resources on counseling and housing local children in Seminole County, but about 30 percent of the Boys Town children are like Blaine, coming from other parts of the state. Last month the organiza tion received a years worth of funding from the Ounce of Prevention Fund of Florida, a non-profit organization that supports prevention programs that benefit children, families and communities. The money will be used to bring Boys Town Central Flori das Common Sense Parenting classes and In-Home Family Services to Orange County, broadening the organizations reach across Central Florida. Boys Town Central Florida hopes that this expansion will help better serve struggling families in the area. In the meantime, the For estiers plan to continue teach ing children the importance of respect and obeying rules, all while giving them a place they can call home. So many people need help, and we havent even scratched the surface, Margarita said. Our house will always be filled. Boys Town Central Florida is currently searching for a new location in Orange County to house the incoming services. C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 BOYS TOWN | Graduate returned to mentor kids to live a less dangerous lifestyle

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Page 5 THIS WEEK in sports history Aug. 23, 1989 As punishment for betting on baseball, Cincinnati Reds manager Pete Rose accepts a settlement that includes a lifetime ban from the game. Rose continued to proclaim his innocence, but in 2004, Rose published My Prison Without Bars, in which he finally confessed to gambling on the Reds. High school football kicks off Friday Tom Carey SundewGardens@gmail.comEvery home should have a garden Experience homegrown gardening: 875 Clark Street,Suite A Oviedo, FL 32765 www.OviedoVision.com 407.366.7655 Fashion Frames Custom Contact Fittings Eye Exams for All Ages Designer & Rx Sunglasses Treatment of Red Eyes In-House Optical Lab Surgery Co-Management Dr. Gary D. McDonald and Dr. Jason R. Wallace Optometric PhysiciansTime for your health eye exam! Oviedos offensive juggernaut time this season Friday night, with one of the most promising squads in the area. Its kickoff classic time, with more than 50 area high schools taking a test run on the gridiron to solidify places in the lineup as players battle for starting spots. And what that means is a chance for some standout per formances for Oviedo, Winter Springs, Hagerty and Lake the same night. Oviedo For Oviedo quarterback and all-around athlete Chris Davis, senior year at the helm of a pro gram he led last year. He recently grabbed an offer from UConns football team, along with a few of his teammates. Returning at running back, compact speedster Jurell Green is set to provide receiving some scholarship offers of his own, along with defensive end Tyree Owens. Davis combined for nearly 1,700 total yards in the air and on the ground, spreading the ball around last season en route to an 11-2 record and regional champi onship appearance. The Lions kick off against Kis simmee Osceola, which went 13-1 last season and lost to Tallahassee 7:30 p.m. Friday. Winter Springs Last year the Bears only won against Hagerty. After that it was all downhill as the Bears fell into a nine-game tailspin from which they wouldnt recover. Theyll have a new man at the helm this year in North Carolina expatriate Rodney Brewington. Hell lead a Bears squad looking to bounce back from a lull thats lasted the past two years, during which they won a combined two games. Theyll hit the gridiron against Deltona, playing host at 7 p.m. Friday. Hagerty The Huskies will have a longtime coaching legend at the helm this year, but hes new to Hagerty. Phil Ziglar led the Boone Braves for more than 20 years. He replaces Nate Gierke, who coached the Huskies to a 2-8 season last year. Jason Driskel will again have the job of stepping into the standing in the position of his brother, University of Florida star quarterback Jeff Driskel. The younger Driskel has struggled in the past two seasons at quarter back, though that could at least partially be blamed on many ac curate passes that were dropped. Will Hagerty receivers have the hands this time around? Find out at 7:30 p.m. at East River. The Falcons were 2-8 last season. Lake Howell The Silver Hawks had prob ably the best second half of a season in more than a decade last year, winning four of their they, as has become a biannual tradition, lost all of their games. Tom Oliver has delivered two of the teams best seasons in a 4-8 last year. Will they be able to carry the momentum? They kick off against St. Cloud at 7:30 p.m. Friday. The Bulldogs went 4-7 last season. Its time to meet the players at UCF Football FanFest, which returns to Knight country this Fri day. The team will shake hands, sign autographs and take photos to get fans pumped up for the season ahead. And with third-year starting quarterback Blake Bortles, an Oviedo High School grad, at the forefront of the Knights offense, the team is looking to build on last seasons momentum. They went 10-4 in 2012, with their biggest loss coming against Big Ten juggernaut Ohio State when they fell 31-16. With the rest of their losses coming off a the Knights were statistically three touchdowns shy of a nearly undefeated season. Though he was just a sopho more last year, Bortles threw for UCF quarterback had done that since 2002. FanFest opens its gates at 5:30 p.m. Friday at Bright House Networks Stadium. Its free and open to the public. Demonstra tions and a team introduction are from 6 to 6:45 p.m. followed by an autograph signing, fan skills session, giant hamster ball races, food and more. ISAAC BABCOCK The Voice ISAAC BABCOCK The Voice Get pumped for UCF football this Friday PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK The Orlando City Lions dominated the Charlotte Eagles on Aug. 17 at the Orlando Citrus Bowl in a 1-0 win to end the United Soccer Leagues Pro season. They host Pittsburgh in the playoffs at 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 24. ORLANDO CITY WINS

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Page 6 VOICES With a new school year looming, parents all over the country are thinking about the achievement-obsessed, ultracompetitive educational environment their children are about to re-enter. From government-mandated standardized test scores to tiger parents to college admissions requirements, kids are facing immense pressure to perform. For many students during the school year, every minute of the day is devoted to school, studying, homework and other neces sary activities ranging from sports to service workto the exclusion of free time and fun. Theres a great deal of fear from parents that their kids just wont be able to compete and kids themselves are at risk of being overwhelmed by whats expected of them. According to author Todd Patkin, this high-stakes, high-pressure achievement kids as we think. We may not only be pushing our children to excelin many cases, were pushing them over the edge too. Of course we want our children to lead them to relentless academic and extra curricular pressure is not the way, says Patkin, author of Finding Happiness: One Mans Quest to Beat Depression and Anxi ety andFinallyLet the Sunshine In. A lot of parents must know its not right that their kids are so overstressed, but they have gotten just as caught up in todays achievement culture as their kids have. Patkin speaks from experienceas a child and teenager he was obsessed with achievement at school and suffered from regular bouts of anxiety that stemmed from his desire for perfection. As an adult, Patkins unhealthy focus on doing and be ing the best caused him to suffer a break down at the age of 36. Since then, he has re-evaluated his priorities as well as what truly makes people happy and unhappy. As the parent of a teenage son, I still have a personal stake in the well-being of Americas students, and I have seen system can be when the emphasis is on outcomes instead of on true education, Patkin points out. So many teens today are under the immense pressure I once feltpressure to succeed, pressure to get the best grades, pressure to be accepted to a good college, and more. Too many of them are burning out and making selfdestructive decisions, and its our respon sibility as parents and citizens to start to force a cultural change in America. Its true: Across our country, theres an epidemic of teens and even pre-teens suffering from anxiety and depression, cutting themselves, and using prescrip tion medications just to get through their day-to-day lives. Also, kids are drinking to excess and doing drugs on the weekends in order to escape this incredible pressure, even if only for one night. Most worrying, according to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, suicide is the third-leading cause of death in the 15to 24-year-old age group. Nearly 16 percent of high school students say that they have seriously considered killing themselves in the past year, and 7.8 percent report hav ing actually attempted it during the same time period. Those realities are absolutely unac ceptable, Patkin insists. If we truly have our childrens well-being at heart, we need to face the fact that forcing them into a mold of perfection isnt working. If we really want our kids to grow up to be ca pable, creative, and inspired problem solv ers, we need to focus less on their scores and grades and more on their happiness. Its not going to be the experts who lead the way on this oneit will be ordinary people changing what we are doing in our homes. If the reality of disengaged kids heading for burnout sounds worryingly familiar to you, this is the school year to start doing things differently. Read on for 10 tips to help you get started: Realize you are doing damage. It goes without saying that parents dont set out to harm their children when they push them to succeedits natural to want your child to realize his or her full potential and take advantage of every oppor tunity. But the truth is that parents high expectations put the most pressure of all on their children. A student who feels a few minutes chagrin at a teachers disappointment might beat himself up for days if mom with his performance. Teens might act like they couldnt care less about their parents, but the truth is that they do want to please experiencing symptoms ranging from stomachaches to severe depression due to the day-to-day stress they encounter helping your child is realizing how your expectations might be affecting him. Accept that not all kids are the same. This fact is pretty obvious, but at times most parents could use the reminder. After all, who hasnt said something along the lines of: Your big sister took pre-calculus her junior year; so should you? Resist the natural tendency to compare your own children to each other, to their classmates, and to your friends children. The most important thing you can do to help your children is to love them for who they are, Patkin shares. Never forget that kids develop at different rates, and that they also have different talents and abilities. No two children are ever going to be alike, and thats a good thing! Our world needs variety and uniqueness. And trust meyour kids will be happy adults only if they too learn to love and be okay with themselves as they are and for who they are. So, Im sorry if you wanted your son to follow in his older brothers footsteps and be a straight-A student as well as a star athlete. If he is not so good at school and prefers the arts, youd better love him for that just as well. Seek balance and happiness. Seeking balance and happiness for your child goes hand-in-hand with letting the little things go. Again, every individual has differ ent strengths and weaknesses, and its important for parents to have a good feel for what these are in their children so that expectations and requirements are reason able. Determine what your childs personal best looks like, Patkin instructs. If your child is putting in a reasonable amount of effort at school, accept that B if its the best he can do in a particular class. Dont push for more. Its funnyif you focus on your teens overall happiness rather than on his report card, hell feel that his life is not overbalanced by stress and hell prob ably learn and achieve more. Get help if it is needed. You had your bad subjects in school, and chances are your child will too. If he or she is really giving this subject or class his or her all but is still too far below the mark, search for ways to get academic help. Even with a parents support, what a child perceives as a failure can have a big impact on her self-esteem. If your child needs academic help, a tutor is certainly a good idea if you can Patkin suggests. You might also ask your childs teacher if she can spend a little ex tra time with her or recommend someone who could give out-of-school help. Getting your child the help she needs can make a world of difference in her performance Teach kids to be easier on themselves. In any given middle or high school, chances are that a majority of students tend to focus much more of their time brooding over the test they bombed than celebrating the one they aced. And as a result of magnify ing what they perceive as failures, these young people reinforce in their minds just how subpar they think they are. If you suspect that your child has a tendency to beat himself up, help him to refocus the way he looks at life. Try to direct your childs attention to all of the things he does well instead of and shortcomings, instructs Patkin. The best way to teach this is to model such behavior. I think that everyonenot just ourselves more compassion and love. The bottom line is, were all humanand thus fallible. So instead of demanding perfec tion from ourselves in every situation, we need to learn to cut ourselves a lot more slack. Discourage overscheduling. Between school, soccer practice, dance class, church, friends, family, community service and more, its easy for kids to become overex tended. In fact, many driven teens have trouble remembering the last weeknight (or weekend!) during which they had a usual for young people to crack under the pressure of what can be 16 (or more)-hour days, and parents often dont recognize the strain until their children become physi cally affected. Outside of whats required of them in school, encourage your kids to focus on ac tivities that bring them the most joy, says Patkin. In the long run, developing their skills in a few things theyre good atand maybe even passionate aboutwill help them much more than trying to do a little of everything and burning out on all of it. If you see your teen starting to become overwhelmed, dont be afraid to say no to the next time commitment request he or she makes. Discuss perceived stress versus what is real. Stress and anxiety are insidious: Once they take root in your mind, they tend to grow and spread. Its all too easy for every waking moment to be consumed by fretting about what might happen or go wrong in the future. Explain to your child that yes, it can be productive to worry a little bit about his upcoming biology test because that worry will prompt him to study and prepare, Patkin suggests. However, point out that its not productiveand actually unhealthyto worry that he might get too many Bs and Cs, which might prevent him from getting into the college he wants, which might prevent him from pursuing a successful career. Its helpful to talk about what reasonable expectations look like for each week, grading period, and year. And be sure to share your own experiences to help your child put his situation into perspective. Help kids work toward the big things. You dont want your kids to make them selves sick over things like end-of-year exams or college applications, but at the same time, they cant ignore these big tasks altogether and live a happy-go-lucky Pollyanna existence. Help them learn to approach major milestones with a plan and a realistic perspective that wont give them ulcers. Its a good idea to sit down with your child at least a few times a year to talk about major changes and goals that are coming down the pike and how best to approach them, Patkin asserts. Until you broach the subject, you might not be aware of how worried your teen is about something. And this is a great opportunity to teach her how to break a big project down into manageable chunks that wont be overwhelming, but will still give her a sense of accomplishment when she com pletes them. Promote exercise. This is extremely im portant! If your child is already involved in a sport or athletic activity, great! It will help him feel more relaxed and stronger, it will improve his sleep, and its also a great natural anti-depressant. If physical activity isnt a big part of your teens life, encour that he enjoys. Exercise is the single most important thing your child, you, or anyone else can do to become less stressed and happier right now, Patkin promises. Exercise is a fantastic energizer, and it actually opens you up to future change by invigorating your mind and body. You might even consider making physical activity a family event! Go for a hike in the mountains, for a swim at the YMCA, or just go for a walk from the quality time together as well as from getting your blood pumping. Encourage spending time with positive people. While no child wants to hear from her parents that shes hanging out with the wrong crowd, you can encourage her to spend time with people who approach life with positive attitudes and healthy perspectives. You must realize that we all tend to be the most time with when it comes to our attitudes and outlooks, Patkin shares. So gently encourage your child to spend time with peers, as well as teachers and other is also something you can model yourself. Stop having gripe-fests at the kitchen table with your own friends if you want your child to spend more time around happy people! Always remember that the ability to cultivate happiness and balance is one of the best possible ways to set your child up for success, Patkin concludes. Yes, per formance and doing ones best are impor tantbut not at the price of your childs well-being. Todd Patkin, author of Finding Happiness: One Mans Quest to Beat Depression and Anxiety andFinallyLet the Sunshine In, Twelve Weeks to Finding Happiness: Boot Camp for Building Happier People, and The Sunny Days Secret: A Guide for Finding Happiness. Todd lives with his wonderful wife Yadira, their amaz ing son, Josh, and two great dogs, Tucker and Hunter. Teaching happier kids TODD PATKIN Guest columnist Developing skills in what kids are good at will help more than burning them out on trying a little of everything.

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Page 7 THIS WEEK in political history Aug. 25, 1950 In anticipation of a crippling strike by railroad workers, President Harry Truman issues an executive order putting Americas railroads under the control of the U.S. Army. The railroad strike lasted for 21 months. He used the same justification for seizing control of steel plants when the United Steel Workers union struck later in the year. This past weekend I was accused of discrimination. I couldnt believe it. I am one of those love-your-neighbor kind of people who pretty much gets along with everyone. This came from a job candi date for one of our positions. She told me that my refusal to meet with her in person was discriminating protected class. What I actually told her was that I did have several candidates who were a closer match to the skills we were look ing for. Since I was responding to her by email, she took the liberty to tell me You shoud several times and proceeded me would not interview them. Recruiters have to discriminate be We get more resumes for candidates than we can possibly interview or hire. I have one position and we have screened it I want to use this example as a reminder to target your search, apply level is a little different), and never tell a recruiter how to do their job if you want to work with their company. It is hard for us to make the choices and take the right risk on candidates, being adversarial is never a good idea. Always be positive. And, while it is OK to ask to be reconsidered, let it go if you are not. Using the right kind of discrimination EMPLOYMENT Ask Sandi An out-of-the-box tent pitched on a ridge with no water source. A frightened teenager hiking in rugged ter rain wearing pajama bottoms. A 40-something-year-old man on foot headed away from his stated destination. It didnt add up for retired Sheriff Mark John, his wife Christa and long time friends Mike and Mary Young. Their wise observations made the critical difference in locating hostage Hannah Anderson and her murderous abductor James DiMaggio, two tiny needles in a vast haystack obvious to the four seniors who had spent some time in this roadless, mountainous area aptly named Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Remember when you were little and you did something shocking, but your grandpa looked down at you, nodded and smiled just a touch? He knew what you were up to, but how he handled it didnt spook you. Fortunately for Hannah, the foursomes experience and wisdom delivered a low key, cohesive, even-handed reaction. Rather than con front DiMaggio they deferred to Johns law enforcement instincts and chose to take ex pedient but careful action. Rural signposts Since the beginning of time families have survived and thrived in primitive environ signs in the woods, mountains, ground and sky. In our own rural environment we notice the details of tracks from tires, hooves, paws and boots. In what direction do they lead? How recent are they? How deep an imprint do they leave? We notice subtle changes in the weather. The wind shifts di rection. The temperature drops. The leaves turn. The clouds gather speed. We watch the animal behavior of our eagles, sandhill cranes and bees. We notice when our turtles bury their eggs a far distance from the river bank. We appreciate the respectful boundaries and proactive self-defense provided by our canine companions, acquired a sense of knowing who should be riding our roads and who appears out of place. To believe or not to believe Believe is now a popular buzzword that seeks to inspire faith in self, in dreams and in the power to achieve. In a world where we are happily inundated with information, where technology multiplies our connections with friends, families, professionals, crazies, celebs, ad men and hackers, the challenge is how to dif ferentiate between the lies and the truths, and learn as Adam how to recognize good and evil. Both sides exist and both use technology for their unique purpose. We must take the time to teach our children and each other to believe not just what we are told, or what we want to hear, but how to read the signs. We must learn from history, the successes and mistakes of those who have gone before us, and by staying vigilant along our chosen paths. More information isnt the measure of our success, but drawing wise conclusions from many types of information is. Will we climb in the car with the hand some stranger or the family friend laden with promises? To believe or not to believe. What does our gut tell us? Geneva Pet Day & Prepare Seminole Saturday, Sept. 7, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. bring your dog or cat to the Geneva Commu Pet Day to receive information about caring for your pet. Some will receive rabies vaccines and vouchers for spay and neuter ing services. Experts and pet food will be available. The event is sponsored by SpayN Save and Dollys Foundation. For more information, contact info@dollysfoundation.org. As we approach peak hur ricane season, register your un listed numbers on the Prepare Seminole website to receive important public service no tices especially in case of power outages. Visit prepareseminole. com To believe or not to believe Stetsons Corner By Karen McEnany-Phillips King Features Weekly ServiceAugust 19, 2013 King Features Weekly ServiceAugust 19, 2013 Sandi Vidal is the executive director for Christian HELP and the Central Florida Employment Council, with more than 10 years of recruiting and human resources experience. For questions, please call 407-834-4022 ( fax 407-260-2949) sandi@ christianhelp.org or mail Ask Sandi C/O Christian HELP, 450 Seminola Blvd., Casselberry, FL 32707. TALK T O SANDI >

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Phone: (407) 6445350 MindGym August 19, 2013 MindGymAugust 19, 2013 Order your classified ad online! At Seminolevoice.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! MindGymAugust 19, 2013 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where is Ascension Island located? 2. MOVIES: What film featured a character called The Dude? 3. ANATOMY: What divides the outer ear from the middle ear in humans? 4. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What does an arctophile collect? 5. TELEVISION: What were the boys names on Home Improvement? 6. ANIMAL KINGDOM: How many teeth does a dog have? 7. HISTORY: What English statesman wrote the 19th-century novel Vivian Gray? 8. GAMES: What is the board-game version of the outdoor game known as Capture the Flag? 9. SCIENCE: Where would you most likely find a Bunsen burner? 10. LANGUAGE: What does the word hiero glyphic mean in the original Greek? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. South Atlantic Ocean; 2. The Big Lebowski; 3. The eardrum; 4. Teddy bears; 5. Mark, Randy and Brad Taylor; 6. 42; 7. Benjamin Disraeli; 8. Stratego; 9. Laboratory; 10. Sacred carving Posting date August 19, 2013 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where is Ascension Island located? 2. MOVIES: What film featured a character called The Dude? 3. ANATOMY: What divides the outer ear from the middle ear in humans? 4. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What does an arctophile collect? 5. TELEVISION: What were the boys names on Home Improvement? 6. ANIMAL KINGDOM: How many teeth does a dog have? 7. HISTORY: What English statesman wrote the 19th-century novel Vivian Gray? 8. GAMES: What is the board-game version of the outdoor game known as Capture the Flag? 9. SCIENCE: Where would you most likely find a Bunsen burner? 10. LANGUAGE: What does the word hiero glyphic mean in the original Greek? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. South Atlantic Ocean; 2. The Big Lebowski; 3. The eardrum; 4. Teddy bears; 5. Mark, Randy and Brad Taylor; 6. 42; 7. Benjamin Disraeli; 8. Stratego; 9. Laboratory; 10. Sacred carving Posting date August 19, 2013 MindGym August 19, 2013