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Seminole voice ( June 28, 2013 )

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Title:
Seminole voice
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication:
Oviedo, Fla.
Creation Date:
June 28, 2013
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates:
28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00091445:00156

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Seminole voice
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication:
Oviedo, Fla.
Creation Date:
June 28, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates:
28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00091445:00156


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Tammy Benjamin stared down at the white-faced clock she held in her hands the seconds slowly ticking away. She looked back up at the 10 young faces in her small classroom, and gave a the warn ing. Fifteen seconds left, Benja min said. The deepest U.S. can yon is on the border of this state. through study guides, searching for the correct answer among the pages. The children range from ages 10 to 17 and come from different cities across Florida, but all belong in the same class. Theyre well aware of the clock that Benjamin holds, but cant see the invisible clock that counts years instead of hours. A clock that runs out at the age of 18, when the safety net vanishes and the young adults must answer to the law. The children are residents of the Intervention and Assessment Center at Boys Town of Central Florida, an organization that reaches out to children across the state whove suffered from abuse, neglect and broken families ear ly struggles that could send their lives on a path of rebellion, crime and self-destruction. Boys Town of Central Florida in Oviedo aims to keep children between the ages of 10 and 17 on the right path and teach them to be respectable members of soci ety through a number of differ ent programs, including In-Home Family Services, which consults families with children showing behavioral problems, and the In tervention and Assessment Cen ter, which serves as an emergency shelter. Boys Town of Central Florida and its programs help 1,600 to 1,800 children every year whove suffered from abuse and neglect. Our kids really are typi cally victims of the situation that theyre in, said Gregory Zbylut, president and executive director of Boys Town of Central Florida. Theyre born into situations with not a lot of structure. There may be substance abuse going on in their home environment, broken families, physical or sexual abuse and a lot of things happening to them and around them in the en vironment that leads to bad deci sion making and role modeling. The emergency shelter at Boys Town gives children from all dif ferent avenues a temporary envi ronment to stay in. Children on probation, runaways, and chil dren on respite staying away from broken families all call the shelter home, whether its for one night or for several weeks. Children receive meals, a shared bedroom, and a classroom education at the shelter. Class may end in the afternoon, but the students start learning as soon as they wake up; putting behavioral skills into practice like introducing yourself, accepting consequences and following instructions. The center is the only adoles cent emergency shelter in Semi nole County, and serves 300 chil dren a year. We take kids that a lot of peo ple dont want, said Aleundro McCray, program director for the Intervention and Assessment Center. Weve been known to take any kids, because we feel any kid can be helped. The children earn points based on how they do with behavioral skills. These points are used to earn privileges such as going out to the movies or going bowling along County Road 426 would make cheaper, more reliable In ternet available for Geneva El would be part of a larger effort to connect the countys schools, buildings under the same net work. The project goes hand-inhand with the Seminole County school systems transition to computerized testing, meaning that every school needs to be up to speed with the latest technol ogy. Geneva Elementary is one of 12 schools remaining to be con nected, and currently uses a DSL line for its Internet use. The problem with the DSL line is that it gets to be expen sive, Seminole County Com missioner Bob Dallari said. This will reduce their cost and give them the ability to do better test ing. The Board of County Com missioners, as well as the school board, has made a commitment that were trying to get all the schools connected within the next two years. The $1.1 million project spread across around the county. Conduits and pole boxes will be installed above ground that will street. This will reduce the cost for years to come, Dallari said. Fiber is cheaper to operate, its more reliable, and you get more bandwidth. Internet constantly for commu nication with both the county and the community, Dallari said. Life after the clock runs out For county, savings are in the wires Boys Town keeps at-risk children and teens from taking a dangerous path Project would make computer use more reliable, faster, and save hundreds of thousands of dollars TIM FREED The Voice TIM FREED The Voice PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE VOICE Kristen Sweany once needed Boys Town when her family was in trouble, but now she works there as a data analyist. Please see BOYS TOWN on page 2 Please see COMPUTERS on page 2 A film about a humble crop duster who dreams of becoming a great air racer. In theaters: DISNEYS PLANES

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Page 2 THIS WEEK in history On Aug. 22, 1776 The British arrive at Long Island between Gravesend and New Utrecht with 24,000 men, and on Sept. 15 captured New York City. It would remain in British hands until the end of the Revolutionary War. Seminole Voice is published weekly by Turnstile Media Group | POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Seminole Voice | 1500 Park Center Drive, Orlando, FL 32835 Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Seminole Voice 2013 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com TMiller@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery Sandi@ChristianHelp.org SundewGardens@gmail.com KarenMPhillips@bellsouth.net Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com DSheehy@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Legal@FLALegals.com LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Florida Press Association Oviedo-Winter Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce Seminole Voice is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Winter Park/Maitland Observer, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Con nect. CHAIRMAN: Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO: Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS: Patti Green & Jeff Babineau Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo, Fla. as a group. Boys Town of Central Florida hopes that this will help to get rid of negative behaviors that can develop into more rebellious attitudes. Boys Town Family Homes on the programs campus also allows children to stay for long periods of time if their family situation deems it nec essary. Mar ried couples volunteer and live in these homes full-time to look after up to seven chil dren. Other programs bring counsel ing directly to the homes of fami lies. The In-Home Family Services program uses family consultants Family Consultant Justin Col son learned the importance hav Growing up in Brooklyn, N.Y., Colson an Irish gang offered to protect him when he was walking home from school. Before long, the gang was asking him for fa vors. Colson was only 11 years old. It was your typical gang ac tivity, Colson said. If you can think of it, I probably did it. Colson said his mother tried to keep him from fall ing by the wayside, but ultimately the on his life simply because they were with him more often. Time is the most important thing with a child, Colson said. If youre not spending time with your child, someone else is. Some one else is talking to your child. Someone else is instructing your child. Colsons mother later sent him to live with his grandfather, who ultimately turned Colsons life around by keeping him account able for his actions. He moved to Florida several years later after getting his life on track, and has since dedicated his life to helping families stay together, volunteering at a com munity center in DeLand and eventually coming to Boys Town of Central Florida. Boys Town of Central Florida data analyst Kristen Sweany is one of the many alumni who went through the In-Home Family Ser vices program. Sweanys family received InHome Family Services when her sister Victoria was struggling with an eating disorder. Her mother was looking for more stability in the home, which had been thrown off by Victorias condition that forced her to stay at several medi cal facilities to receive treatment. The family started to become dys functional, with Sweanys mother constantly leaving home to take care of Victoria. Thats where the services came in. Not only did it help me with a lot of the behavioral issues that I had, but it helped my mom learn to understand where I was com ing from and learn to teach differ ently, Sweany said. I felt like it made me and my mom closer. In the past three years, Boys Town of Central Florida has put an even greater focus on the par ents. Boys Town of Central Flor idas Common Sense Parenting classes teach parents how to ef fectively and positively respond to their children. ways to address problems such as talking back and not following instructions, it could have a bet ter impact on the child in the long run, Zbylut said. The basic behav ioral skills of following instruc tions and accepting consequences also better prepare the children in Boys Town of Central Florida to be better parents themselves. Heres what we know: these kids are going to have children of their own, Zbylut said. If we dont teach them how to be strong individuals and, in the future, good parents, then theyre going to repeat the cycles of abuse or ne glect that they initially potentially grew up in. C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE BOYS TOWN | Shelter in family crises Anything that enhances com munication is a plus, said Rich ard Creedon, president of the Ge neva Citizens Association. The county has been at work connecting buildings for the past six months. The network cur county buildings, 44 schools, 41 city buildings and the four Semi nole State College campuses. ber in this county for the various people who need it, and in such a way that makes some sense, Seminole County Commissioner John Horan said. The planned expansion would also include connections in the Al tamonte Springs and Longwood areas. One targeted location, Long woods West Branch Library, would save roughly $1,000 a month, said Charles Wetzel, a The county has saved hun dreds of thousands of dollars in connection fees because of the network so far, Wetzel said. Wetzel pointed out that the project should be funded by the Board of County Commissioners plans to speak with Department of Transportation to see if it can move the project ahead sooner This is a continuous on-going effort for the school board and the county to work together to try to trim the budget and give the best product for the least amount of cost to the citizens of the county, Dallari said. COMPUTERS | Just one library could save $1,000 per month C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE Our kids really are typically victims of the situation that theyre in, Gregory Zbylut PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE VOICE When family trouble strikes, beds are waiting to keep kids out of harms way.

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Page 3 THIS WEEK in human history Aug. 21, 1935 The Swing Era begins with Benny Goodmans triumphant Palomar Ballroom performance in Los Angeles. When his relatively staid arrangements began to lose the young crowd, Goodman pulled out upbeat, syncopated rhythm arrangements to the crowds immense delight and swing was born. I dont just provide care, I provide compassion.Everything I do starts with you.Linda Ager Radiologic Technologist/Mammographer, South Seminole HospitalAs part of Orlando Health, South Seminole Hospitals Womens Imaging Center provides a variety of services from mammograms to bone density screenings at one location thats as inviting and comfortable as your own home. And because we only schedule one person at a time, youll always receive the exible, personalized attention you deserve. South Seminole Hospital is honored to have received an A Hospital Safety Scor eSM by e Leapfrog Group. Schedule your appointment today by calling 407.767.5828.*Source: e Leapfrog Group Hospital Safety Score, Spring 2013 13ORS029_SEMINOLE_VOICE_HP4C_AUG16_PRESS.pdf 1 8/9/13 9:38 AM In a few weeks, many chil dren who crawled or rolled their wheelchairs into summer camp at the Conductive Edu cation Center of Orlando will walk out the door. I absolutely could see the change in them, the amount of progress was visible, tangible, I saw them walk out, said Vicki Briley, education coordinator for CECO. Shes watched a history of success measured in foot steps. Consider it a physical thera py facility on steroids. Instead of tiny increments of therapy, its an immersive process called conductive therapy. Children or even young adults may be pushed in, but once theyre inside CECO, therapists do another kind of pushing. Wheelchairs get left at the door, said Joe Raymond, founder of CECO. Everything is geared toward them having to get independent. Students come in with a range of needs and challenges, which include areas of gross and fine movement, cognition, social skills, emotional develop ment and speech. The conduc tive education system works to address all of these issues, all at the same time. The system has a holistic approach to education, and treats the whole child. So because the childs challenges can significantly affect motiva tion, confidence and personality, conductors what the teachers are called address that with lots of positive reinforcement. The range of programs spans a generation of age groups and care intervals, designed around goals beyond the norm. They offer summer camp, before and after school programs, a program for young children 6 months to 4 years old, and a full-day school for students is in the intensity and the mix ing of therapies to work mind and body at the same time. In a traditional therapeutic or public school situation, a child might get 30 minutes or an hour a couple times a week of individual therapies, such as physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech therapy. You cant see growth that way, Joe said. What makes conductive education unique is that it offers teachings that are very similar and combine them all at once for an entire school day at CECO. That continuity and consistency makes the students much more likely to master and maintain new abilities. Its much more intensive, of teaching and administrative experience in special needs edu cation. From a teaching stand point this is optimal practice. Vicky and Joe Raymond founded the school in 2001, after their son Joseph was born three months early with cerebral palsy. He weighed just a little more than 2 pounds, and both he and Vicky nearly lost their lives during birth. It was a blur, Joe said. I think they thought our son would never make it. Joseph, who is 17 now, en ing the first three years of his life. Doctors didnt see standing, Center helps special kids take rst steps BRITTNI LARSON The Voice The Conductive Education Center of Orlando helps children with cerebral palsy become more independent. PHOTO COURTESY OF CECO An innovative therapy program helps kids learn to walk and builds their minds. Please see FIRST STEPS on page 4

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Page 4 37TH Annual Maitland Rotary Art FestivalOctober 4-6, 2013 Around Beautiful Lake Lily in MaitlandFestival Hours: Friday 6 pm 10 pm, Saturday 10 am 10 pm, Sunday 10 am 5 pm ART the STARSUNDER $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 W h i c h l i n e g i v e s y o u t h e b e s t c h a n c e f o r s u cce s s ? I llustr a tion per iod: 1 -1-2000 thr ough 1-1-2012. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 Index. H i s t o r i c a l perf o r m a n c e o f the S & P 5 0 0 I n d e x s h o u l d not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustr a tion assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. O N E S H OTY o u o n l y h a v e a t r et i r em en t w i ll f a ll6 0% o f A m er i c a n s s h o r t. M ember of(407)-644-6646w w w .aS af eHar b or .c omB ob A dams P r esiden t/CEOA S af eHar bor LL C bob@asaf ehar bor .c om Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. let alone walking, in his future. His life was full of cants. But he does walk, and swim, and bike. He wasnt supposed to be able to eat without a feeding tube, and now he feeds himself. The Raymonds attribute his growth to conductive education. When they saw the system in action, they knew they couldnt keep it to themselves. We cant just do this for our child, Vicky thought. They all deserve to learn. So they used Joes business background to build the non profit, and brought conductors to Winter Park from Hungary, where the system originated. There are a few of its kind in the U.S., but what makes CECO unique still is that theyve integrated special and general education with conductive edu cation. So, for example, a child will have to practice walking to an academic station while counting their steps, where theyll do math by reaching for the blocks that solve the equa tions. They might also incorpo rate a breathing technique. This combines physical and speech teaching by the conductor walking, reaching, counting and breathing with the general education of math. Theres teaching in all movements, said Andrea Berecz-Prewitt, lead conductor at the school. Everything has a purpose and relates to real life. If the student needs to strengthen a particular muscle, there are no lifting weights; instead they do an everyday activity that builds those muscles. CECO has helped many children like Joseph. Brandons parents came to camp hoping he would be able to maneuver his wheelchair; he left walking with a slider. Sophias parents kept hearing what she couldnt do; CECO gave them possibilities. She came in crawling and now walks with canes and can read and write. Everybody is here because they believe these children can do what theyve been told they couldnt do, said Rosene Johnson, executive director for CECO. This program is liter ally watching faith in action. Their successes have led them to want to grow. CECO will be moving to a new build ing nearly three times the size of the current one next January, and Joe said he hopes to build onto that and have a whole campus for CECO students, a training center and curriculum to train conductors here in the U.S. and an adult program to maintain students skills. He guarantees theyll be able to help those older than 22 when his own son reaches that age. Without Joseph, CECO wouldnt be here. Hes the reason why, Joe said. A dozen years later, hun dreds of other footsteps have followed Joseph out the door. FIRST STEPS | Defying medical odds C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 AUG. 17 Take a break from the summer heat Saturday, Aug. 17, from 9 a.m. to noon in the beautiful Little Wekiva River while making a difference in the community! Join us to remove hygrophila, an invasive plant that threatens the waterway. Volunteers must wear closed-toe shoes, and supervision is required for children younger than 12. Gloves, sunscreen and a hat are recommended. Contact Elizabeth Stephens at 407-665-2457 or serv@seminolecounty.gov for more information and to sign-up. Kick off the new school year and learn about some magnicent Birds of Prey at the Back to School Bird Bash Its from 10 a.m. to noon at the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey, 1101 Audu bon Way, in Maitland. We will have school supply prizes, conservation themed games and activities and our Ambassador Birds will be out for a meet and greet. The event is free for all ages. For more information, visit .audubon.org or call 407-644-0190. AUG. 24 There will be a Beat the Heat Hike at 7:30 a.m. with the Florida Trail As sociation at the Lake Proctor Wilder ness Area, 920 E. State Road 46 in Geneva. Well hike approximately 3 miles, mostly in the shade. The return portion of the loop skirts the lakefront in several places, making for lovely views. Bring water and bug spray. No pets, please. For more information, contact Joan Jarvis at bluetrail@aol. com or 407-365-6036. Calendar AUG. 17 Come for a free evening of old-time music at the Geneva Jam at the Ge neva Community Center, 161 First St. There will be acoustic, bluegrass, old country, and gospel to enjoy. Hamburg ers, sausages and hot-dogs are for sale at a modest cost from 6 to 7 p.m. (or until the food runs out). The music starts around 6:30 p.m. If you play an acoustic instrument, come get a chair up front as room permits. Join Central Florida Community Arts this Saturday as they present their third an nual Summer Classical Series concert, a performance of Mozarts Requiem. Nearly 100 voices, along with a full chamber orchestra, will perform this nal piece of Mozarts work, a powerful musical treasure that was unnished at the time of his death in 1791. Its at 7 p.m. Aug. 17 at the Maitland Presbyte rian Church. Visit cfcarts.com/mozartsrequiem-2013 for more information. The Casselberry Art House offers many exciting classes throughout the year. Lo cated in Casselberry at 127 Quail Pond Circle, the Art House serves the commu nities throughout Seminole County. Aug. 17 is Picasso Portraits. Families will learn how to paint their own faces like Picassos famous works! We will learn about the cubist movement and create a funky family portrait at the same time. Visit casselberry.org/register to sign up or for more information. AUG. 18 A tour and tea at Orlando Museum of Arts A Passion for Collecting event will show you treasures from local col lectors on a tour with Jan Clanton, as sociate curator of adult programs, fol lowed by free tea. Its begins at 1:30 p.m. on Aug. 18 at the Orlando Museum of Art. Visit omart.org for more informa tion. AUG. 21 Florida Hospitals Healthy 100 and Florida Radiology Imaging are offering screening mammograms and free bone mineral density tests. Its from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Aug. 21 at 2008 N. Golden rod Road. RSVP to 407-303-4437. AUG. 23 Alabama native Lucy Hunnicutt will debut her 18-piece art series A Brief History of the Blues at Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 211 E. First St. in Sanford on Friday, Aug. 23. The opening reception will be from 6 to 9 p.m. and feature live blues music by Jim Mahoney and The Angels of Mercy. The event coincides with the monthly Sanford Art Walk. AUG. 24 Join us at the ninth annual Philips Phile Texas Holdem Poker Tournament, Saturday Aug. 24, at the Orlando Sci ence Center, 777 E. Princeton St. This premier evening event raises money for the Mustard Seed of Central Florida, a local furniture and clothing bank that provides for the homeless. The event is hosted by Real Radio 104.1s The Philips Phile, along with local Orlando celebrities. For more information, visit RealRadio.fm ONGOING Greater Life Assembly of Gods Prayer Ministry opens its Oviedo Healing Room at 119 N. Central Ave. at 7 p.m. on Thursdays. For more information, visit greaterlifechurch.com

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OPEN HOUSE Thursday, August 22 11:00 am 6:00 pmRDV Sportsplex8701 Maitland Summit Boulevard Orlando, Florida 32810 FHMG-13-14431Meet the Docs Tour the Practice Mammogram, Screenings on the Healthy 100 Womens Coach FREE Ortho & BMI Screenings Live Band Balloon Artist Photo Booth To RSVP for the Open House and schedule your mammogram & FREE orthopaedic joint screenings on the Womens Health Coach, call 407.200.2759No referring physician prescription necessary.All-in-one day! Maria DeLeon, MDBoard-Certied Family Practice PhysicianMaryam Phillips, MDBoard-Certied Family Practice PhysicianIntroducing an all-in-one practice perfect for someone like you!If youre looking for comprehensive care, this state-of-the-art family medicine practice, located in the beautiful RDV Sportsplex, is the perfect t. Plus, gain information on our new weight loss program. RDV Sportsplex 8701 Maitland Summit Boulevard Orlando, FL 32810 407.200.2759 ofce www.MaitlandFamilyCare.comSAME DAY Appointments AvailableEXTENDED HOURS To Fit Your ScheduleCatered Food FREE RDV Membership Drawing Childcare at Kids Stu

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Page 6 HEALT H Y LIVING ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo www.savannahcourtoviedo.com395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765407-977-8786 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! The air conditioning blows gently through Marie Wallers apartment as she relaxes in her cushioned crme chair, basking To her it feels like a lifetime ago that going outside to stay cool was as common during Florida summers as iced tea. I worked in an office with a round fan beside my desk, and many times at noon I would go home just to take a cold shower, she said. It was not pleasant. Before air conditioning, Cen tral Florida in the summer was an unbearable place to be. In the daytime, parishioners would diligently fan them selves during a Sunday church service. Taking a lesson from local otters, theyd cool off with a swim in a nearby lake. Ninety-year-old Waller said the summer heat got so bad that many Floridians, such as herself, would sleep on their screened-in front porch, known as a sleeping porch. As the summer heat subsided near midnight, a hot house would take far longer to cool than the outside air, even if cool meant just below 80 degrees right before the sun rose again. I would sleep on the day bed out there (on the porch) in the summer sometimes just to stay cool, she said. But one of the good things about growing up here then was everything wasnt covered with concrete, which creates heat, and you didnt have close next-door neighbors. We always had ev ery window in the house open, all night, no one locked doors either; it was a very comfort able time, as far as crime was concerned. Both 91-year-old Eleanor Fisher and her mother were born in a home with no airconditioning, right in the heart of Orlando. Her grandparents moved down to Orlando in 1873, when even electric fans were the stuff of science fiction. Her old two-story Victo rian house was full of open windows and breezeways a bygone feature in many modern homes. In an era where eco-friendly convective cooling has become all the rage among green circles, few remember when it wasnt an efficiencyboosting luxury. Homes would strategically place walls, doors, and windows to let cooler air in and draw hotter air out. Windows of homes from the late 1800s wouldnt just open, theyd raise straight up into the ceiling to create massive wind apertures. And of course screened porches surrounded the perimeter, including the one with the bed. Fisher said one of her favor ite things to do in the summer was to make ice cubes out of orange juice, put them in a glass, sit in front of the fan and eat them with a spoon. She also recalls having large floor and attic fans in homes to keep people cool during these sweltering summers. We had a great big floor fan that sounded as if there were a huge airplane propeller in the house, Fisher said. She and her family would frequently find refuge from the horrific heat at a beach, lake or the springs. But these werent day trips. They were survival vacations to beat the heat. We spent a month at Daytona Beach or a month out at Windermere on a chain of nine lakes, she said. And the swimming was wonderful. Mayflower Retirement Com munity resident B.J. McKee is also a two-generation Florida native, born on the same lot as her mother. My grandmother came with her parents, her brother and her sister, from Macon, Ga., in two covered wagons, she said. And my father started the first bottled-water com pany. And like everyone they al ways had the porch. Although summer sleeping has changed quite a bit for this generation of ladies, they say theyll never forget the time when there was no on-off switch for comfort. We just tried to deal with the hand we were given, McK ee said. We just didnt know any different back then. Lets face it, relation ships can be tough and some even debilitating. Although relationships are a fundamental aspect of the human experience, our dealings with friends, family members, signifi cant others, co-workers and superiors are often riddled with strife and consternation. In fact, research by Cornell University esti mates that there will be a whopping one million divorces in the United States in 2013 alone. Beyond marital chal lenges, difficult personal and workplace relation ships are far more than a nuisance, as they can cause anxiety, burnout, clinical depression and even physical illness. Whats more, highly toxic workplace affilia tions can undermine your professional success and threaten your livelihood at large. The bottom line is this: the right relationships can propel you to great heights of achievement; the wrong ones will tether you to mediocrity and mire you in disappoint ment. With this in mind, in striving for rewarding connections with others, its essential to evalu ate relationships intel ligently: What makes a great relationship? How do you keep a relation ship great? What are the warning signs of trouble? While its so very easy to blame the other person in a distressed relationship, its far more effective to consider and assess the situation objectively and build your Relational IQ. What is Relational IQ? Relational IQ is the mindset that helps us to better understand and control our personal and professional relationships to maximize happiness and realize life-changing success. Relationships are an art, and most of us lack the skill and mastery to help break or alto gether avoid destruc tive patterns, disrespect, and deception. Far too many people also lack the ability to have productive connections with oth ersthose that help you achieve goals, sharpen your mind, and generally uplift and enrich your life. There are, in fact, fundamental principles for living and interacting with others in the com plex and ever-changing dynamics of todays culture that, if adhered to, can best assure relational success in all aspects of life at home, in social circles, and in business. Choose not to and suffer the consequences. Nay sayers might ask, Is it really possible to mas ter relationships? The answer is an unequivocal yesif youre willing to learn skills and pro actively apply tactical techniques, that is. To help kick-start your Relational IQ so that you can better navigate, and begin to master, your own personal and professional affiliations, here are 10 pitfalls to avoid when seeking a meaningful and genuine relationship that will result in a richer, more fulfilling life: Dont hide: While secret identities might be fun in the movies, a per son who harbors secrets, and hides their fears and beliefs from others will never be able to enjoy an authentic relationship. Survival lessons from the time before A/C Mastering the art of healthy relationships KRISTY VICKERY The Voice VAN MOODY Guest columnist PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON THE OBSERVER Temperature regulation used to depend more on location than electricity, with most Florida residents from the 1930s choosing to sleep outside. 10 donts that destroy life-changing connections at home and work Please see HEALTHY on page 9

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Page 7 Aug. 16 Aug. 22, 2013 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmFRI DA Y, AUGU S T 16 Hosted by M O N DA Y, AUGU S T 19 Presented by Exit Real Estate Results T U ESDA Y, AUGU S T 20 & Bryan & Bryan W ED N ESDA Y, AUGU S T 21 T HUR SDA Y, AUGU S T 22 Calendar of Events August 2013 A shiny red apple laced with hidden poison put Snow White into a long, deep sleep in the forest. If it werent for the dear dwarfs, the story could have had a bad nonDisney ending and Central Florida might have become a very differ ent place. Dangerous bacteria and toxins, the most com mon poisons in our food, can hide in all kinds of food, not just apples. Each year, about 1 in 6 people gets ill from contaminated food. Food-borne illnesses can range from a mild short bout of diarrhea to kidney failure and death. Older and younger, pregnant, and immune-deficient people are the most vulnerable, unable to fight off infections as easily as healthier eaters. If you ingest contaminated food, you might feel nauseated, vomit, have water diarrhea, and fever. You may have stomach pain and cramps. It may hap pen a few hours, days, or weeks after eating the suspect food. Mild symptoms in a healthy person can resolve in a day or so, but contaminated food can severely affect those unable to fight it off, and some of the fortunately rare infections can affect anyone. Seek medical attention if your symptoms are more than mild. Even the most elegant look ing meal can bring microscopic enemies along with dining pleasures. The most common culprits have melodic names that might sound like lovely delicaciessalmonella, escheria coliform (aka e.coli), listeria, vibrio. Improved government oversight of meat production has reduced e. coli infections, but salmonella sends 1 million people to the hospital each year. Listeria and vibrio are rela tively rare but can be deadly. Listeria typically comes from unpasteurized dairy foods and deli meats. Vibrio vulnificus, re lated to the cholera family, can enter the body from contami nated and uncooked seafood, especially from warm waters, such as the Gulf Coast. Fortunately, most of these are rare. The best defense is to be as healthy as you can be. The secret to avoiding exposure to food poisoning is preparation. Keep food clean, store it at the right temperature, and cook thoroughly. Keep food refrigerated. If packing a lunch that cant be refrigerated, include an ice pack big enough to keep the food cold until eaten. The intense Florida heat makes food a growing haven for microbes. Dont thaw food on the coun ter because the outside layer will get too warm and be a great host to bacteria. Bacteria thrive best between 40 and 140 degrees the temps between your refrigerator and your car. Cook food thoroughly, whether on the grill, stove or oven. Thorough cooking can usually kill the culprits. Uncooked chicken and other meat often have some bacteria that can be killed with thor ough cooking. Avoid uncooked eggs, including eggs over easy with runny yokes or raw cookie dough. Careful washing of utensils and countertops used to prepare these foods can pre vent contaminating other foods with the poultrys germs. Leftovers can be tricky. It does not have to smell or look bad to be bad. The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI, cspinet.org) recommends a great -2-4 rule: Dont leave food out longer than two hours (in Florida, less time, unless you keep your AC in the Artic zones), refrigerate it in swallow containers less than 2-inches deep, and use or freeze leftovers before four days (the sooner the better). Know the quality of the food where you are eating away from home. Food safety and restaurants are regulated differ ently by each state. To find out the inspection status of your favorite Florida eateries, go to myfloridalicense.com/dbpr and click on Food and Lodging Inspections. Know your food poisoning dangers Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo Health Action A whole generation of Ameri can girls dreamed of what it would be like to kiss Elvis Pres ley. Not that many got a chance to see their dreams come true. One exception was Dolores Hart. I should let you know that Sis ter Dolores was not a nun as the time, but an actress. This summer, I had the delightful experience of reading about her journey from actress to nun in her memoir, The Ear of the Heart. Disclaimer: I am not Roman Catholic and I am not sure what to make of the cloistered life. Neverthe less, I found Sister Dolores book compelling, not just as reli gious autobiography, but as the tale of transformation of a per sons life from starlet to servant, from Where the Boys Are to no boys at all. Sister Dolores journey was not an easy one. Her strong personality challenged her vow of obedience on more than one occasion. Her friends thought she had lost her mind and tried ev erything possible to return her to sanity. But in spite of trials and doubts, Dolores persevered and eventually became the Prioress of Regina Laudis Monastery in Bethlehem, Conn. Even if one is not particularly religious, Dolores story is fasci nating. Like the stars of today, she was used to being made much of. Landing in the monastery as a novice, she was given the task of digging rocks out of the garden. dont know how much of my hurt came from being treated like a nobody. It would be hard for any one to take, but being someone who had been catered to, fawned over to have to stand in the rain and wait and be given a grubby job that everyone knew full well I didnt want was more than just being ignored. She began to taste the indignity which many face every day of their lives. sion to move from Hollywood to the monastic life, she tried to explain her reasoning to a show business friend: I might have spent years thinking I exist only because I see my picture in the newspaper, because I am Mrs. So-and-So, because I have money rather than knowing that I am because I am related in all my experiences with the forces of life by being obedient to the unifying force that unites them. God is that unifying force. This brings us to the bigger Elvis. Sister Dolores gave up her Hollywood career for her monas tic vocation because of her pas sion for God. Other people might love for God, but an authentic faith calls forth a similar kind of all in commitment that shapes the whole of our lives. Even though Sister Dolores vocation took her out of the spot light, it didnt take her out of life. She played a critical role in mak ing sure the voice of the sisters as women got heard. She helped establish many business im provements in the monastery. She helped establish a community theatre in her region where mon A superstar nun and the bigger Elvis Jim Govatos Reality Lines OF CENTRAL FLORIDA CELEBRATING OVER 25 YEARS SERVING YOUR COMMUNITYBernard S. Zeffren, MD Eugene F. Schwartz, MD Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-CVoted Best Doctors of Central FL, Orlando Magazine for 7 consecutive yearsDiplomates American Board of Allergy and Immunology Evening Hours Available793 Douglas Ave. Altamonte Springs, FL 32714407-862-5824 2 locations in Seminole County7560 Ste. 2064 407-366-7387www.orlandoallergy.com Please see ELVIS on page 9 BeWellWithin

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Nows your chance to showcase just how beautiful your community really is. Submit your best photo of the area, and your shot could be featured in the 2014 Seminole Voice calendar!Visit SeminoleVoice.com/Photo for more details and to upload your winning submission. Enter the Seminole Voice Calendar Photo Contest today! CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST

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Page 9 &VEGETABLES FRESH FRUIT W Brian Thomas Produce 110 Geneva Drive, Oviedo, Florida(Across From Ace Hardware) VINE RIPE TOMATOES 875 Clark Street,Suite A Oviedo, FL 32765 www.OviedoVision.com 407.366.7655 Fashion Frames Custom Contact Fittings Eye Exams for All Ages Designer & Rx Sunglasses Treatment of Red Eyes In-House Optical Lab Surgery Co-Management Dr. Gary D. McDonald and Dr. Jason R. Wallace Optometric PhysiciansTime for your health eye exam! When United Way asked the citizens of the tri-county area what they wanted for their community, the top 10 con cerns of the citizens were less crime and more safe neighbor hoods, affordable health care, reduced youth violence, less drug and alcohol abuse, jobs that pay a living wage, afford able housing, lower high school dropout rates, less family and domestic violence, less hunger and homelessness, and af fordable child care. Wow, an overwhelming list; what can any one of us do to solve these tough problems? But, believe it or not, there is much each of us can do to lessen the impact of these very real problems. How, you ask? Follow along. One feeder stream to these problems is the staggering rate of homeless children in our community. Since the economy collapsed in 2008, Florida and Seminole County has seen rising num bers of impoverished, hungry, homeless children. Since 2006 the number of Floridas home less school-aged children has 2012 according to the Florida Center for Investigative Report ing. These homeless are not strangers; they are our neigh bors. One out of four children goes hungry in our commu nities nationally. Seminole County Public School reports we have 1,461 homeless el ementary children, 416 home less middle school children, but only 227 homeless high school children. Why? The teenag ers drop out to help feed their families. The day they do drop out, they become the poor-intraining for the next generation of homelessness. Homeless children on aver age are 1.6 grades behind other children. Going to school while homless increases the odds of these children having devel opmental delays and learning disabilities by 400 percent. It increases the childrens chances of being emotionally disturbed by 300 percent. Who are these homeless children and where are they? Do you see them or are they invisible in our community? younger than age 8. Why are they homeless? Many families become homeless because they are fleeing domestically violent homes. Single mothers have been priced out of existence by poor living wages, unaf fordable housing and unaf fordable child care. All of us find increasing demands in the work place to become lifelong learners who stay on top of technological changes in our job fields. How can a single parent accomplish that and the demands of daily life? So, what do we do about these problems that feed other problems and affect us all? First, we work together, put our heads together, build capacity and begin problem solving one broken spoke of the wheel at a time. The Early Learning Coalition and fellow agencies are work ing to get affordable childcare for homeless families. There is a waiting list of more than 2,000 children for subsidized childcare. The Seminole County nonprofit agencies, businesses and faith-based community have done a commendable job in schools, and the Red Bag Pro gram (Red BagSeminole.org) distributes food to feed these children and their parents over the weekend. This has lowered the number of children coming in with headaches and stomach aches from going hungry all weekend. Would you donate food to your school for the homeless or to the Red Bag pro gram at your church or civic or ganization? Would you donate new tee shirts, jeans, shoes, hygiene supplies, laundry soap to Families in Transition (seminolehomelesskids.org)? This program within Seminole County Public Schools works toward ensuring that childrens basic needs are met. Would your schools Parent Teacher Association host a collection drive for the homeless? Does your company have a job opening for a homeless parent? Could you donate a new crockpot to the North land Church Family Advocacy Program (FamilyAdvocacyOf fice.com) for a family in a hotel room to eat instead of at the gas station? Would you sign up to be a Dividend at Seminole County Public Schools to tutor a homeless child so they can catch up and be successful? You can package up a cake mix and a can of frosting or make a birthday card, give it to the guidance counselor at your childs school. Give last years prom dress to the high school guidance counselor to give to a homeless child desiring to go to the prom. If you can spare 10 hours a month, become a vol unteer advocate at Northland Churchs Family Advocacy Office to help connect homeless families with school-aged chil dren to social service provid ers. Training is included in the orientation process. Dwight Eisenhower had a favorite quote: The ills of the world would be greatly reduced if a child knew he was indispensable. Seminole County has more than 2,200 schoolaged children who must not be disposed of or aban doned. You have skills. They are all needed. Not only is each of these children indispensable, so are you. To find out more ways to help, call the Families in Transition office at 407-746HomelessKids.org What do we want for our community? TRISH DOBARGANES Guest columnist ELVIS | Leaving fame brought her fortune astery and town combine forces to produce works of art. She is the only Oscar-voting member of the American Academy of Motion Pictures who is also a nun. For more information on Dolo res Hart and her fascinating story, you may pick up a copy of her book, The Ear of the Heart, or visit Regina Laudis website at ti nyurl.com/DoloresHart Rev. Jim Govatos is Senior Pastor at Aloma United Methodist Church in Winter Park. A former atheist, Jim is passionate about helping people understand and experience a living faith in Jesus Christ. Please share your thoughts by emailing him at jimg@ alomazone.org Being real with others and even making yourself vulnerable from time to time can foster tremendous emotional connec tions, including all-important trust, and forge unbreakable bonds. Dont tweak the truth. Studies show that 10 to 30 percent of applicants admit to tweaking their resumes thats certainly no way to start an engagement with a new employer. Whether at work or at home, lying even small white lies will do nothing but undermine and compro mise any relationship. Dont rush and miss critical red flags. Understand that a relationship is a journey with changes in direction, twists and turns, and roadblocks along the way. Its imperative to pass through certain experi ences and navigate through difficulties to learn from these situations and create a healthy outcome. Resist the desire to take shortcuts or race through certain aspects of a relation ship. Even if it is painful or boring, embrace it, knowing that it offers a healthy purpose for the big picture of a relation ship. Dont stay in an unhealthy relationship. Unfortunately, sometimes we make a poor choice and enter into relation ships that will never be healthy no matter what actions are taken. Part of Relational IQ is knowing when and how to end a toxic relationship. Dont forget who and what really matters. The most valu able people in life arent always the most visible. People of true value bring fulfillment, not frustration. All too often, those taken for granted or over looked are veritable lifesavers or ones that silently help us achieve goals, provide encour agement, or offer important insights and connections. Dont accept everyone. The people in your life right now are setting the course for next week, month, year and possibly the rest of your life. Accord ingly, there must be a qualifica tion and selection process for friends and others you choose to surround yourself with. Fundamentally, every rela tionship you have influences your life. There are no neutral relationships; each one lifts you up or weighs you down. Not to be taken lightly, these actions and decisions can make the dif ference between a great, happy life or one that is riddled with disappointment, failure and regret. Field expert Van Moody is the author of The People Factor (an upcoming release by publisher Thomas Nelson) and a motivation al speaker who advises on matters related to relationships as they pertain to friends, family, signifi cant others and the workplace. He is a People Scholar who helps others build their Relational IQ to achieve success at home, in their social circles, and in busi ness. He may be reached online at vanmoody.com C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 HEALTH |

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Page 10 THIS WEEK in sports history Aug. 19, 1909 The first race is held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indiana, now the home of the Indianapolis 500. The tracks surface of crushed rock and tar proved a disaster, breaking up and causing the deaths of two drivers, two mechanics and two spectators. FORECLOSURE DEFENSELAW OFFICE OF TIMOTHY A. MORANCertified Florida Specific Foreclosure Prevention CounselorTel: 407-366-TLAW (8529)www.tmoranlaw.net tim@tmoranlaw.net Fax: 407-366-8528 1750 W. Broadway St., Ste. 118 Oviedo, FL 32765Initial Consultation FREE! 2013 Voted Best Law Firm in Oviedo r f r f n f nn t b n t b t n n f f n rfnr Brandon Staley had told himself hed win the match for the past week. Hed been pre paring for this moment for half his life, and could only imagine himself a champion. He wouldve been surprised if he lost. But Staley wouldnt call it cockiness, hed call it confi dence the type of confidence and conviction it takes to hurl another wrestler over his shoul der and pin him to the ground. Its the 2013 USA Wrestling Junior National Greco Ro man Championship, and the 17-year-old Winter Springs resident is halfway through the most important match of his life so far. Behind by a point, California wrestler Joe Cisneros got the jump on Staley just 30 seconds into the second period, pull ing a high dive take down that pinned Staley to the ground. The state champion wrapped his arms tight around Staleys his waist, and rolled over. Staleys world spun upside down for a second. The blind ing stadium lights of the North Dakota State University arena blurred past his eyes before he hit the bright blue mat facedown and was pinned again. A takedown and a gut wrench for four points. Staley was now down 10-7. A whistle brought the wres tlers to their feet, and the clock continued to wind down as the gladiators struggled to find an angle to throw one another. But when Cisneros hooked his arms up underneath Staleys shoulders, the Winter Springs wrestler saw an angle and took it. Staley pulled down around Cisneros head and threw him to the ground, holding him down in a pin. The throw tied up the score with only 10 seconds left in the match, and earned Staley a fi nal extra point from the judges. By a single point, Staley was a national champion. It was the high point of his wrestling career thus far a career con stantly struggling uphill. For many years, Staley was called undersized for the sport. The national championship title Staley earned in July had been a goal since the beginning. The incoming Winter Springs High School junior first fell in love with wrestling at age 9, when his father took him to a high school wrestling match. By the next month, Staley was on the mat. Brandon just took to it right away, Staleys father Neil said. He was very small, but he was very naturally gifted in the sport. He just seemed to blossom. Staley looked like a wrestler from day one. The 9-year-old was quick and athletic on the mat, allowing him to thrive early on in his career. He joined the Florida Jets wrestling club team under Coach J.D. Robbins, and won a kids wrestling tournament at Manatee High School. Earlier victories encouraged Staley to continue on with the sport, but though his number of wins grew rapidly, Staley himself grew slowly. At the age of 12, Staley weighed 60 pounds, 10 pounds less than his qualifying weight class. While other wrestlers peaked at 70 pounds, Staley was faced with a disadvantage in stature. Staley wrestled anyway; a 10-pound disadvantage wouldnt stop him from competing in the sport that he loved. You just kind of fall in love with it; its hard to explain, Staley said. Its like nothing else. But Staleys confidence took a beating over time, and he began to lose several matches where he was clearly under weight. That year, Staley wrestled in a statewide tournament and The slew of defeats threw Staley harder than any wrestler hed faced, and he eventually left the sport for six months and played baseball in the meantime. It was just frustration, Staley said. It was back when I was growing and was in a weird stage; I wasnt winning anymore. But the sport that gave him joy was something he couldnt stay away from for long no matter how hard he tried. Staley was back on the mat when the season ended. It wouldnt be until Staleys freshman year in high school that he finally got what he, his father and his coaches had been waiting for: a growth spurt that gave him 30 extra pounds. Staleys sophomore year in high school proved to be his best year yet. He went 46-6 and took fourth place in the state finals for his high school. Later that summer, he was in Fargo, N.D., being crowned as a na tional champion. For a coach its always nice You just keep getting better and better and keep climbing that mountain, and he made it,Neil said. Staley will compete again this October in the Super 32 Challenge tournament in North Carolina. Growing into a champion TIM FREED The Voice Winter Springs wrestler wins wrestling nationals after long struggle PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE VOICE Brandon Staley already has a national championship after sophomore year.

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Page 11 THIS WEEK in political history Aug. 20, 1862 New York Tribune editor Horace Greeley publishes a blistering editorial, The Prayer of Twenty Millions, calling on President Abraham Lincoln to declare emancipation for all slaves. Unbeknownst to Greeley, Lincoln was already moving in the direction of emancipation. Though gasoline consumption has de clined over the past few decades, drivers are spending more than ever to fuel their daily transportation. According to the U.S. Energy Information Association, the average American household spent $2,912 on gas last year just less than 4 percent of their pre-tax income. But with some simple changes to your driving habits, you can save a few miles per gallon and cut your spending at the pump. Dont ignore your indicators. When the check engine light comes on, its usually for good reason. Yet many drivers ignore these warnings and their fuel economy suffers. For example, if your cars oxygen sensor isnt operating effectively, you can lose up to 3 miles per gallon (mpg). And one of the most overlooked causes of wasted gas is an imprecise cooling system. Have your auto technician regularly check the cooling system to ensure it isnt run ning too cold, which can cause the cars computer to demand more fuel than it needs. percent. However, new cars only require tune-ups every 100,000 miles so many drivers arent changing them as often. But Check your owners manual for the rec Make sure your gas and oil are man ufacturer-approved. When choosing the right gas and oil for your car, the owners manual should be your guide. Dont opt for oil thats thicker than recommended it can cause your engine to work less true for gas. If your vehicle requires highoctane fuel and you use a less-expensive version, the cars sensors will detect it and youll lose power and fuel economy. Avoid ethanol. The more ethanol in your gas, the less mileage youll get from each tank. Gas stations are required to post that the fuel can contain up to 10% ethanol (but they arent required to post the exact amount of ethanol in the fuel) so some gas stations have less ethanol than others. You can try various stations content and highest mileage. Compare your fuel economy with gas from differ ent stations using a calculator, such as the one at fueleconomy.gov. Ive saved up to lowest amount of ethanol. Pump up the tires. Keep your tires manual, which will include the manufac turers recommended tire pressure. Its a cy by more than 3 percent. Dont speed. As much as we com plain about gas prices, its remarkable how frequently drivers speed off as the brakes at stop signs. Youll be surprised how much gas you can save by driving at moderate speeds and avoiding quick acceleration. Michael Heyman is an instructor/technical team leader at the Orlando campus of Universal Technical Institute, the leading provider of postsecondary education for students seeking careers as professional automotive, diesel, collision repair, motorcycle and marine technician. For more information, visit uti.edu When our children head out to play sports this summer, the pressure to win is so intense; a troubling new local survey athletes say they expect to get hurt as part of the game. Whats even more surprising local kids polled say coaches, teammates and in some cases even their own parents have tried to make them play injured and even suggested they hurt another player. And 69 percent of young athletes who were hurt say they continued to play hurt, and half of them say they hid their injuries so they could play. The just released local survey of children (boys and girls), ages 8 to 14 who play sports reveals: 63 percent say they have been hurt playing sports. game and they expect it. 64 percent say theyre afraid someone will hurt them while playing sports. 11 percent say they were offered gifts or money to hurt another player. The survey was commissioned a youth sports league franchise. The local survey also reveals: 81 percent of those who have been hurt say their teammates/ friends have thought of them as tough, cool, a good player, or even a hero when they played hurt and took one for the team. 42 percent of those hurt say they were called foul names if they sat out while hurt some by their own moms and dads! Names include wuss, wimp, cry baby or mamas boy. Oth er names were given, but were too graphic to print. 29 percent say they are secretly glad when a player on the other team gets hurt. young players to rough-it-up at all cost? 34 percent say their coaches priority is the win over safe play. 16 percent of the respondents said they or their teammates tried to hurt another player. When asked who gave them the idea, percent said their mom or dad, and 11 percent said coaches. Of the 37 per cent of respon dents who said someone made them or tried to make them play a teammate, 41 percent said it was one of their parents. Im concerned about the di rection of youth sports, says Dr. Robert Cantu, renowned neuro surgeon, expert on youth sports safety and acclaimed author of the book, Concussion and our Kids. Over the past 20 years or so its all become so serious. Fun no longer seems to be the main object. Now it seems to be about grooming your child to be a star ... It can be taken to extremes. Across the country, young players are all-too-frequent victims of a sports culture thats turning its back on them, says Mark Hyman, sports journal ist and author of Until It Hurts: Ameri cas Obsession With Youth Sports. With each passing season youth sports seem to stray further and further from their core mis sion of providing healthy, safe and character-building recreation for children. More than Band-Aid solutions: i9 Sports, a national youth sports franchise that focuses on sportsmanship, team work, fair play and fun over winning, has created two solutions to help local parents, coaches and league operators identify youth sports safety issues: i9 Sports 9 Steps to Safe Play i9 Sports created this free, downloadable safety checklist so local parents can make sure their childrens teams follow best safety practices. i9 Sports Youth Sports Safety Survey i9 Sports created this free, downloadable survey so local coaches and/or parents can give children to identify sports they become a big problem. We want the i9 Sports 9 Steps to Safe Play and the i9 Sports Youth Safety Survey to trigger some eye-opening discussions about dangerous behavior on the Brian Sanders, president of i9 Sports. Parents and coaches may be surprised they have as much to learn about sports dangers as the children. Were the adults here. The burden falls on us to direct the focus of youth sports leagues away from cut-throat winning and back to fun, safe play. As life forms go, nematodes are found in every possible habitat on Earth (they even survived the Shuttle Columbia disaster). The thousands of species perform numer ous biological functions necessary to main tain the natural world as we know it. Most are microscopic in size, many are parasitic, our needs, and a few are the bane of my existence. For the limitations of this treatise (and the variety that is most commonly experienced by Central Florida gardeners), we will focus on Tylenchida Meloidogyne species, better known as root-knot nematodes (RKN). RKN are tiny soil worms that thrive in warmer climates. Their three-month life cycle experiences several phases starting with sexual repro duction. Upon hatching from the hundreds of eggs laid each generation, the juveniles experience unfettered life in the soil until they burrow into a plants roots. The ir ritation of the elongating root areas cause cellular enlargement, resulting in recogniz able galls or knots. RKN most commonly survive unfavorable seasonal cycles as either eggs or cysts in the soil. Once a susceptible plant is infected by RKN, moisture and nutrient functions of the roots are damaged, resulting in decreased crop yield. Some plants, includ ing many weed varieties, compensate by over producing leaf mass and appear to be growing normally. I have noticed this effect in my garden. But when the summer heats up, the damage leads to a tendency to wilt, and eventually wither. The RKN are dis creetly reproducing at a fervent pace, and if a green manure crop of compliant weeds was the intention, a future of crop failures is inevitable. New garden spaces that have not yet accumulated this pest may avoid numerous problems, temporarily basking in a case of beginners luck. Soil fumigant chemicals, which are a major contributor to the atmospheric ozone hole over Antarctica, are so environmental ly toxic that they are banned in most coun tries (Florida and California strawberry growers still go begging for exemptions). Luckily, there are a few cultural controls that we can practice at a gardening scale of farming. Not all plants are compliant hosts; marigolds, sunnhemp, or rye grass grown in seasonal rotation between our regular food crops will starve out a genera tion. Some tomato varieties are listed as nematode resistant or cherry tomatoes will produce before the damage reduces crop productivity. There are naturally occurring soil fungi that will devour this pest, best encouraged through natural, organic soil husbandry or a purchased soil amendment. Or take it easy for the summer and leave the garden soil fallow and hermetically mulched for a few months. Getting the most from your tank of gas Nematodes are everywhere New local survey reveals most kids expect to get hurt MICHAEL HEYMAN Guest columnist I9 SPORTS ASSOCIATION Guest columnist When asked who gave them the idea to hurt another player, 23 percent said mom or dad. Tom Carey From my garden to yours Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page and email him at sundewgardens@gmail.com WHO IS CAREY >

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Page 12 The Marketplace SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com SeminoleVoice.com ANNOUNCEMENTS CAKE DECORATING & PASTRY CLASSES: Sofelle Confections offers group and cus tomized classes in all areas of pastry, baking and cake decorating! Contact: Lucy sofelleconfections@bellsouth.net or call (407) 579-1962 www.facebook. com/SofelleConfections Hablamos Espa ol! ANNOUNCEMENTS Winter Park Benefit Shop 140 Lyman Ave, Winter Park needs items to sell: clothing, bedding, jewelry, kitchenware and bric-a brac. Also need ing volunteers. Contact Elizabeth Comer 407-647-8276. Open Tues & Fri at 9:30am; Sat 10am-1pm. All proceeds support childrens programs & the Or lando Blind Association. EDUCATION Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3wks Hands On Training School. Back hoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. National Certification. Lifetime Job Placement As stistance. VA Benefits Eligible. 866-3626497. Medical Office Trainees Needed! Become a Certified Medical Office Assis tant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Di ploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888374-7294. HELP WANTED CAREGIVER for my 104 Year Mother, Winter Park Lovely home Lake Sue. Hours to be ar ranged weekdays 8am-4pm; weekends 8am-10pm. Must lift/transfer (5#) through the day. Light whole meals. Supplemental tube feeding. Housekeep ing/Cleaning. Sedan not SUV take to doctors. Non-smoker. Pet friendly. Quiet house. CNA or comparable. Best Caregiv ing References. 317-506-4400 after 10am. rosemail@comcast.net Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 877-214-3624 Now hiring: Class A-CDL Drivers $2500 Sign -On Bonus, Great Pay, Full Benefits, and Achievable Bonuses! Call us now at 1-800-973-9161 or apply at www.heyl. net Personal Care Workers ($10/hr) and Homemakers ($9.50/hr) Pool positions, Mon Fri, Orange and Seminole County areas. PCW requires current CNA or HHA and CPR certifica tions. In person at 5395 L.B. McLeod Road, Orlando 32811, Fax 407-2922773, E-mail HR@seniorsfirstinc.org Closes 8/21/13 DFWP/EOE/AA/E-Verify MISCELLANEOUS ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)986-1520 or text (347)406-1924; www.davidandreg isadopt.com -Adam B. Sklar FL# 0150789 MISCELLANEOUS Adoption=Love. Nurturing, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Lets help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, tollfree (855)-779-3699. Sklar Law Firm, LLC FL Bar #0150789 Airline Careers begin here! Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Finan cial aid for qualified students. Job place ment assistance. Call AIM 866-3143769. PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Cleanerella Maid Services WE CLEAN FOR YOU!! Commercial and Residential servicing. Call Catherine Adam 321-356-8160. cadam1959@ya hoo.com REAL ESTATE: COMMERCIAL AUCTION August 28th Beech Mountain, NC. Commercial Prop erty; 1.68 +/acres. Former: Ski shop; gift shop; (3) apartments; 10,500 +/sqft. Great location. www.RogersAuc tionGroup.com. 800-442-7906. NCAL#685 For LeaseLakemont @ Howell Branch Attractive new building -professional space for lease @ very competitive rates. Schedule a tour today!! Three suites @1,335 sf!. Frank Ricci, 407-947-5074 Fricci@cfl.rr.com Offices for Rent Winter Park Real Estate Offices for rent (Winter Park/Goldenrod/University). Doc tors office w/5 exam rooms + extra fea tures. Other office units available from 800-3000 SF. New Orleans style bldg; great prices. Call Ann 407-293-1934. an npolasek@cfl.rr.com SANFORD: Free standing retail/office building, 2640 SF, great signage & visibility. Lease for $2800 per month (also for sale). Call John, owner/broker, 407-492-7111 REAL ESTATE: FOR SALE Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3BR/2BA. No renters. 850-3086473. LandHomesExpress.com OWNER MUST SELL! Beautifully wooded homesite located next to crystal clear mountain lake, WISP Ski area and brand new golf Courseonly $79,900. Adjoining lot sold for $249,900. Bank will finance. Call 301-387-8100, x 91 SALES: GARAGE HUGE RUMMAGE SALE! Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 331 Lake Ave., Maitland Friday, Oct. 4th & Saturday, Oct. 5th, 8 am to 4 pm From Hwy. 17-92, go west one block on Lake Ave; church is on the right immediately after railroad tracks. Phone: (407) 6445350 MindGymAugust 12, 2013 MindGymAugust 12, 2013 Order your classified ad online At WPMObserver.com you can create, customize and pay for your ad in one convenient place! ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your honesty might upset some people, but you inevitably win more admirers for having the courage to tell the truth when others are more likely to scram ble for cover. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your efforts to defend your project begin to show favorable results. You should soon be able to win over even the most determined detractors who had lined up against it. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You win praise for your selfless efforts in a very difficult situation. But be careful not to allow your generous nature to be exploited by those who have their own agenda. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A trusted colleague sheds light on a recent spate of puzzling workplace situations. This should give you the information you need to bring to your superiors attention. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A shift in workplace management could be helpful for talented Leos and Leonas who have been waiting to have their accomplishments rewarded by recep tive leadership. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A misunderstanding between you and someone you care for should be corrected immediately. This relation ship is too important to lose over a bruised ego. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A welcome piece of good news helps clear the air in a family situation. A job-related incident also eases as more information provides a clearer focus on the problem. SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) Quick action to heal bruised feelings pays off in a big way. Now youll be able to move forward with your plans without that problem hold ing you back. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your creativity combined with a positive attitude should give you a considerable edge in find ing a way to get around the negativity youve run into. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) That sudden streak of stubbornness could cause some problems. Try to be more open to helpful suggestions and more flexible in making needed changes. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Now that that special relationship appears to be well and truly restored, you can spend more time dealing with those long-needed workplace changes. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A new opportunity sounds promising. But watch out for any conditions that might be attached. Before making a decision, ask that each one be explained in detail. BORN THIS WEEK: You can be distracted by promises of good times, yet you ultimately reach the goals you set for yourself. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Aug. 30, 30 B.C., Cleopatra, queen of Egypt and lover of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, takes her life following the defeat of her forces against Octavian, the future first emperor of Rome. She committed suicide possibly by means of an asp, a poisonous Egyptian serpent and symbol of divine royalty. Aug. 29, 1876, Charles F. Kettering, inventor of the electric selfstarter, is born in Loundonville, Ohio. Ketterings inventions spread far beyond the automotive industry: He helped develop the refrigerant Freon, and took an active role in the medi cal industry, inventing a treatment for venereal disease, an incubator for premature infants and artificial fever therapy. Aug. 27, 1908, future president Lyndon Baines Johnson is born on a farm near Stonewall, Texas. As president, Johnson pushed through the creation of Medicare/Medicaid, Head Start, the Voting Rights Act, the Civil Rights Act and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Aug. 26, 1959, the British Motor Corporation launches its newest car, the small, affordable Mark I Mini. The Mini went on to become one of the best-selling British cars in history. At only 10 feet long, the $800 Mini could sit four adults and had a trunk big enough for a reasonable amount of luggage. Sept. 1, 1964, pitcher Masanori Murakami becomes the first Japanese man to play in U.S. baseballs major leagues. Murakami was a teenage baseball prodigy in Japan, and his lefthanded sidearm delivery proved an asset in the United States. Aug. 28, 1972, the U.S. Air Force gets its first ace designation since the Korean War when Captain Richard S. Ritchie and his backseat er (radar intercept officer), Captain Charles B. DeBellevue, shoot down his fifth MiG near Hanoi. Aug. 31, 1985, Richard Ramirez, the notorious Night Stalk er, is captured and nearly killed by a mob in East Los Angeles, Calif., after being recognized from a photograph shown on television and in newspapers. Ramirez was pulled from the enraged mob by police officers. 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.King Features Weekly ServiceAugust 12, 2013 MindGym August 12, 2013