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Seminole voice ( June 28, 2013 )

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Title:
Seminole voice
Physical Description:
Newspaper
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English
Publisher:
Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication:
Oviedo, Fla.
Creation Date:
June 28, 2013
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
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28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00091445:00155

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Material Information

Title:
Seminole voice
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication:
Oviedo, Fla.
Creation Date:
June 28, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates:
28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00091445:00155


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Free bike rentals, apps for your phone and more to get you fit. Healthy Living > 6 Interests > 4 Hurricane season is lagging, but July is when it tends to speed up. Winter Park is running away with the league on a seven-game streak. Athletics > 9 When a snail accidentally becomes super fast, he shoots for his dream of winning the Indy 500. Opening this week: TURBO Calendar > 5 Looking for a kitten? Seminole County Animal Services is overowing with them, and will host an adoption fair and festival this weekend at PetCo in Altamonte Springs. Interests .................................................. 3 Calendar .................................................. 5 Healthy Living .......................................... 6 Athletics .................................................. 9 Tom Carey ............................................. 11 Classifieds ............................................. 12 Gov. Rick Scott helped celebrate continuing construction of the long-awaited Wekiva Parkway with a rally at Wilsons Landing Park in Sanford last week. The 25-mile toll road, which runs through the wildlife haven of the Wekiva River Basin, is the completes the beltway around Orlando. Gov. Scott praised the project, saying, Theres a lot of wild life thats going to be preserved and a lot of land thats going to be preserved and were also go ing to make it easier for people to get to work, to travel and to come down here as tourists. Construction is set to happen Sweating in the afternoon sun on July 12, the day before he knew the verdict that was coming, Tam pa writer Life Malcolm said he feared what would happen next if the words describing the de fendant inside Seminole County Courthouse were not guilty. If George Zimmerman walks, its open season on black people, he said, the day before the verdict was announced. This was a state-sanctioned murder, Sanford resident Alma Pinkney said. The trial of Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch leader who was accused of second degree murder in the shooting death of 17-year-old African-American Trayvon Martin, had in a moment focused attention to racial tension in Sanford and inadvertently res urrected ghosts of the past. Some core facts of the night Martin was shot at point-blank range on Feb. 26, 2012, were not in dispute. Zimmerman followed Martin, who was walking home in the rain after buying candy and iced tea at a nearby convenience store. Zimmerman told police dispatchers that Martin looked suspicious, walking in a hooded sweatshirt with a meandering gait in Zimmermans neighborhood. A minute later Martin was dead. As the Zimmerman trial en tion, America passed an ignomin ious milestone. Sixty-two years earlier, in the town of Cicero, Ill., a mob of 4,000 burned an apartment building to the ground when they discovered a black family had moved into town. A few years before that, Jackie Robinson had broken the minor league baseball color barrier in Daytona Beach. He was supposed to do it in Sanford, but threats of a mob lynching forced him out of town. Three weeks later when he returned to Sanford on a bus for one of the Brooklyn Dodgers mi nor league spring training teams, he only played two innings before Sanfords police chief ordered him Despite judge Debra Nelsons ruling that race should not be discussed in the trial, for many outside it felt the same as racially charged killings in the areas tu multuous past. What happened then is ex actly what happened to Trayvon Martin in 2012, Malcolm said. For James Evans Muhammad, with the New Black Panthers, the verdict of not guilty, read just after 10 p.m. on July 13, added an other bad memory. These young people had nev er experienced an injustice like [in the 1950s-1960s] before, said Mu hammad, the national minister for education of the New Black Pan ther Party. They just got a taste of it. Nationwide protest! a group calling itself the Coalition for Justice for Trayvon shouted into a mass of protestors and media milling in a compound surround ed by low steel barricades and deputies. Many had started gath ering outside the courthouse just as jury deliberations began July 12 to decide Zimmermans fate somewhere between life in prison and total freedom. Thirty-eight hours later, they were still there. The charge against Zimmer man, who admitted to shooting Martin, was second-degree mur der. To the layman its a crime of passion charge; not sinister or Zimmerman verdict sparks outrage Scott rallies for Parkway Governor praises Wekiva Parkway, which cuts through Wekiva Basin, for preserving wildlife ISAAC BABCOCK The Voice PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE VOICE The fate of the Wekiva River was an epicenter of contention for the project. PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE Protestors expressed anger outside Seminole County Courthouse July 13 after George Zimmerman was acquit ted in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Others said that the verdict followed the law regarding self-defense. Please see ZIMMERMAN on page 2 ALLISON OLCSVAY The Voice Please see WEKIVA on page 2

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Page 2 THIS WEEK in history July 21, 1899 Ernest Miller Hemingway, author of For Whom the Bell Tolls and The Old Man and the Sea, is born in Oak Park, Ill. He would complete A Farewell to Arms while living in Key West. The influential American literary icon became known for his straightforward prose and use of understatement. Seminole Voice is published weekly by Turnstile Media Group | POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Seminole Voice | 1500 Park Center Drive, Orlando, FL 32835 Publisher reserves right to edit or refuse all advertisements, announcements, articles and/or letters to the editor. Submission does not guarantee publication. Columnists opinions are made independently of the newspaper. All rights reserved. Seminole Voice 2013 TCraft@TurnstileMediaGroup.com IBabcock@TurnstileMediaGroup.com SWilson@TurnstileMediaGroup.com JGallagher@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Brittni Larson Megan Stokes Tim Freed Allison Olcsvay Kristy Vickery Sandi@ChristianHelp.org SundewGardens@gmail.com KarenMPhillips@bellsouth.net Josh Garrick JoshGarrick9@gmail.com DSheehy@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Legal@FLALegals.com LBaez@TurnstileMediaGroup.com Florida Press Association Oviedo-Winter Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce Seminole Voice is published by Turnstile Media Group. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Orlando, Fla., Turnstile Media Group is also the parent of Golfweek, Golfweek Custom Media, TurfNet, Professional Artist, Winter Park/Maitland Observer, Baldwin Park Living and Turnstile Con nect. CHAIRMAN: Rance Crain PRESIDENT/CEO: Francis X. Farrell VICE PRESIDENTS: Patti Green & Jeff Babineau Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo, Fla. The Artistic Hand Gallery & Studio Gallery: 10am-5pm | Mon-Sat Childrens Classes ages 5+ 6 weeks in Painting & Drawing, Mixed Media or Clay: Hand building or Throwing. Adult & Teen Classes 8 weeks in Painting & Drawing, Jewelry Making, Mosaics, Clay: Hand building & Throwing, or one day workshops in Glass B lowing. (407) 366 7882 Facebook.com/ ArtisticHandGalleryandStudio plotted enough to carry the capital intentional enough that a lesser manslaughter charge doesnt levy enough punishment. For some vocal supporters of Zimmerman, I changed my opinion after watching 90 percent of the trial, Adam Teasley of Deltona said. I believe hes not guilty. Holding a sign that read Not guilty, Zimmerman supporter Susan Vargas described Zimmer man as a man who simply was concerned about his community. for prosecutors and defense at torneys to parse when consider ing identical evidence that they alternately used in favor of their own versions of the night in ques tion. A crucial piece of evidence screaming for help heard during a posing sides as coming from Mar tin or Zimmerman, depending on who was testifying at the time. The jurors apparently had just dict. According to an account by CNNs Anderson Cooper, three jurors originally sought acquittal, two wanted a manslaughter con viction, and one wanted to convict Zimmerman of second-degree murder. The wording of laws had mud dled the idea of culpability for law. In a mix of confusion among scatterings of vocal altercations between supporters of both sides outside the trial, former congres sional hopeful and lawyer Jason Kendall inadvertently found himself in an argument with a Martin supporter, despite both largely agreeing with each other. His point: The law that defended Zimmerman shouldnt exist in the The law is what made it come to this, Kendall said. You your ground. In the wake of the shooting, Gov. Rick Scott had appointed a 19-member task force to exam ine the stand your ground law, which allows deadly force in selfdefense or to prevent potentially deadly crimes. On Feb. 22 that task force recommended that the law remain largely unchanged. The crux of the defenses strat egy focused on self-defense, and whether Zimmerman had needed to defend himself against Martin with deadly force. In the end, after rounds of days deliberating in isolation, the black, all women decided Zim merman had lawfully defended himself. But to many outside the courtroom, lawful was far from just. It makes me ashamed to be a citizen, protestor Keith Mack said. What is my life worth? The reaction outside the court house that night grew more in a swell rather than an explosion of rage that some had predicted. But in other areas, namely New York City and Los Angeles, protests were far more vocal, drawing thousands in the streets calling for justice. Groups even threatened to boycott Florida agriculture and tourism. Musician Stevie Wonder vowed never to perform in Flor ida again until the stand your ground law was repealed. In Orlando Wednesday night, protestors marched in Martins memory. In Sanford, leaders called for calm. Mayor Jeff Triplett said that have made big steps forward to ward peace. After the verdict, in front of the courthouse, New Black Panthers member Muhammad had said thats what he hoped Sanford resi dents would deliver. The best solution is not vio lence, he said. The best solution is rational and clear thinking. ZIMMERMAN | Juror: in the initial vote three wanted to acquit, others split between manslaugher, murder C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE date expected in 2021. The $1.5 billion Parkway proj ect spanning Orange, Lake and Seminole counties is a joint effort between the Florida Department of Transportation, the OrlandoOrange County Expressway Au thority and the Florida Turnpike. Adding to its high price tag is the cost of precautions needed when building in such an environmen tally sensitive area, a point of contention during the Parkways planning. Construction started with two sections of the Parkway near the Orange and Lake County line, late 2014. Sections in Orange County heading north from Apopka be ginning where State Road 429 cur rently ends will soon follow those portions. With design of these sec tions nearing 90 percent comple tion, it will soon be time to begin property acquisition for the right of way, followed by construction. A major portion of the planned Parkway, running through Lake County, entered the design phase this past April. This section will contain four wildlife bridges al lowing animals like the Florida black bear safe passage through the area, which highway authori ties hope will minimize potential accidents. Sections in Seminole County connecting the Parkway to the State Road 417, State Road 46 and Interstate 4 are in the beginning phases of design and will be the last built. The Parkway project, Scott said, is estimated to create over 35,000 jobs in the area as construc tion progresses. The Parkway itself was made possible by the 2004 Wekiva Parkway & Protection Act, which outlined that the Parkways con struction has to limit impact to the environment by elevating the roadway over particularly sen sitive areas. There will also be limited access points to prevent development in fragile conserva tion areas. Seminole County Commission Chairman Bob Dallari said the project also includes new sections of trails in Seminole County thatll extend the Wekiva Trail and con nect to the Cross-Seminole Trail. The trails will eventually con nect from Oviedo all the way to Mt. Dora, providing residents the beauty of the Wekiva Basin while walking or cycling. Its taken a lot of years to get but its been the right thing to happen, Scott said. SEMINOLEVOICE.COM WEKIVA | No word on whether tolls will cost as much as other Central Florida roads C ONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE PHOTO BY ALLISON OLCSVAY THE VOICE Elected ofcials and builders shovel dirt at Wilson Landing, six months after the Wekiva Parkway project began construction. Its set to open in 2021.

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Page 3 THIS WEEK in human history July 20, 1973 The actor and martial-arts expert Bruce Lee dies in Los Angeles at age 32 from a brain edema possibly caused by a reaction to a prescription painkiller. His film, Enter the Dragon, was released in the United States one month after his death. e only hospital in Seminole County to receive an A safety rating.Everything we do starts with you.As part of Orlando Health, South Seminole Hospital is honored to receive an A Hospital Safety ScoreSM by e Leapfrog Group*. With the integration of Chief Quality Ocers leading initiatives focused on the continued improvement of quality metrics, we will continue to meet e Leapfrog Group standards and ensure extraordinary care and patient satisfaction. Its just one way Orlando Health is putting Seminole County residents rst.*Source: e Leapfrog Group Hospital Safety Score, Spring 2013 13ORS027_SEMINOLE_VOICE_HP4C-F_7-19-PRESS.pdf 1 7/15/13 5:35 PM Augusto Goose Lopez-Torres could still picture the childrens faces from the shanty villages of the Dominican Republic in this head. The memory was still fresh from the Orlando residents mis sion trip weeks before, where he hoped his work in cleaning up the old childrens school had made a difference. Lopez-Torres had seen a lot of poverty in the villages, but what struck him most were the chil drens feet. Small feet that were worn down by the harsh and rocky terrain, which is often lit tered with cans and broken glass. Any shoes that a child did have were often mismatched and sev eral sizes too big stuffed with As he returned to his job at a packaging company, Lopez-Tor res had no idea that his next busi ness venture would put the needy on a better footing. Last May, Lopez-Torres and co-founder Scott Miller launched Complete the Pair, a business that connects job seekers with poten tial employers through meeting invitations in the form of shoes, which are donated to charity af terwards. The Winter Park-based compa ny is partnered with Soles4Souls, a Nashville-based charity that has donated more than 20 million pairs of shoes in more than 130 countries worldwide. The process starts when a job seeker buys a pair of shoes from Complete the Pair, and sends one of them to a prospective employ er. Marked with a redeemable on line code, the shoe comes with di rections to check the Complete the Pair website, where the code can be entered to reveal the prospects bio, resume and personalized message requesting a meeting. Once the two meet, they can mail their shoes back to Complete the Pair with pre-paid mailer bags found inside the shoes. The shoes are then sent to Soles4Souls, who distribute them wherever theyre needed. Were thrilled to partner with Complete the Pair, said Buddy Soles4Souls. This partnership will allow us to help even more people regain their dignity and break the cycle of poverty. The idea for Complete the Pair came to Lopez-Torres four years the Dominican Republic. Trying to get his foot in the door with a potential job prospect, Lopez-Tor res had heard about the practice of giving an employer a meeting enticer to make a connection, but had never tried it himself. He de cided to try it with a pair of shoes, buying a pair of $60 New Balance sneakers. But before he sent off one of the shoes, Lopez-Torres had a change of heart. He remembered the chil dren he saw without shoes, and felt guilty when he realized that these shoes might go to waste. I was literally wasting a pair of shoes to try and land a meeting, and it wasnt certain I would get this meeting, Lopez-Torres said. At the end of the day, even if I got the meeting, what were they going to do with one shoe? Lopez-Torres never sent the shoe. Instead, he began to draft a business model around the idea of connecting people in the busi ness world while contributing to a greater cause. The employer and the prospect could send their shoes off together, making the ness was conducted or not. sends a better message and tells way more about an employee than a paper resume ever could, Miller said. There are hundreds of people that apply for that same job, so youve got to stand out, Miller said. Instead of just printing your resume in fancy paper, youve got to deliver, show that you think outside the box, that youve got a big heart and that theres more where that came from if youre hired. A foot in the door Business combines networking with shoe charity TIM FREED The Voice PHOTO BY TIM FREED THE VOICE Augusto Goose Lopez-Torres and Scott Miller founded a business that con nects job seekers with potential employers through donating to the needy.

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Page 4 KIDS BOUNCIN OFF THE WALLS?BRING EM TOBOING!407.542.7844 532 S. Econ Circle Suite 120 Oviedo, FL 32765 www.boingjump.comWe also welcome: Birthday parties Camps Field trips Fundraisers Corporate events FORECLOSURE DEFENSELAW OFFICE OF TIMOTHY A. MORANCertified Florida Specific Foreclosure Prevention CounselorTel: 407-366-TLAW (8529)www.tmoranlaw.net tim@tmoranlaw.net Fax: 407-366-8528 1750 W. Broadway St., Ste. 118 Oviedo, FL 32765Initial Consultation FREE! 2013 Voted Best Law Firm in Oviedo Three named tropical storms have come and gone in the seven weeks since the start of the hurricane sea son on June 1 far behind sched ule compared to predictions. But that doesnt mean the season cant accelerate rapidly in storm count, say forecasters. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted in May that 13 to 20 named storms would form by the end of the six-month-long hurricane season in November. Seven to 11 of those were expected to become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher) including three to six major hurricanes (Category 3, 4, or 5; winds of 111 mph or high er). That predicted range is well above the seasonal average but doesnt come as a surprise to hur ricane forecasters. The past three years have all been tied for hav ing the third most named storms on record at 19, and the numbers are likely to stay high for years to come. People start to think the fore cast is going to be wrong because we havent had many storms yet, meteorologist Scott Spratt of the National Weather Service in Mel bourne said. On a typical year, the third storm doesnt form until around August 13, so were actu ally about a month ahead of what we would normally be. According to Spratt, Earth is in the warm phase of the Atlan tic Multidecadal Oscillation, or AMO. This is a natural phenom enon that causes the Atlantic Oceans water temperature to rise, which in turn creates a conducive environment for tropical storms to form. The warm phase started in 1995 and will not end for at least another decade, as the phases of the AMO usually last 30 to 40 years. This, along with the ab sence of a climate change known as El Nio, led national experts to believe that this will be an active hurricane season. El Nio effectively alters the jet stream in the high altitudes of the atmosphere, Spratt said. This causes a higher level of wind shear which is disruptive to the circulation of hurricanes. While as many as 20 storms are expected to form by the end of the hurricane season, its very will go. Dennis Feltgen, the pub that while its possible to predict a number of tropical storms that will form, there is no way of tell ing how many or where they make landfall until about 5 days in advance. If a hurricane reaches Central Florida this year, residents will need to be most concerned about does. The persistent rain characteris tic of many hurricanes is enough the coastline. So Spratt, who also specializes in warning coordina tion, suggests that if youre in a geographically low spot you will want to relocate a few days before a storm approaches. He also wants Central Florid ians to heed a special warning. Dont try to correlate the strength of the storm to how bad you think damage will be, he said. Even tropical depressions can be very dangerous. In fact, most hurricanes weak reach metropolitan Orlando. In 2004, hurricane Charlie fell from a Category 4 to a Category 1 by the time it reached Orlando yet still caused a considerable amount of damage. This was partly due to the tornadoes produced by the hur ricane. Its notable that residents of Central Florida need to be more concerned about a storm when it approaches from the west or southwest, as Charlie did, because it puts the area at a greater risk for experiencing tornadoes. Spratt said Floridians should be prepared this year. He believes the worst is yet to come, despite the atmosphere being behind compared to national predictions. In a typical year, most storms happen in late August and so on, he said. Its very quiet right now, but dont take that as a false sense of security. Hurricane season behind schedule PHIL WHEEKER The Voice U.S. NAVY PHOTO BY JIM BROOKS Hurricane Dennis batters palm trees and oods parts of Naval Air Station Key Wests Truman Annex on July 9, 2005. The storm passed within 125 miles of the base, pushing winds in excess of 90 mph and dumping more than 7 inches of rain before moving north through the Gulf of Mexico. This season has seen no hurricanes yet. JULY 20 Families will learn how to create their very own scratch-off tickets at the Casselberry Art House on Saturday, July 20. Create an entire ticket from beginning to end just for fun, or give it to someone special for a unique surprise. All supplies are included. For more information or to register, visit casselberry.org/register or contact Emmy Kline at 407-262-7700, ext. 1122, or ekline@casselberry.org Championship Martial Arts will be sponsoring a community safety event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sat urday, July 20, in the Publix shopping center on Broadway and Lockwood. Members of the Oviedo Fire Depart ment will be on site to provide tours of their vehicle, and offer re safety talks by their personnel. Members of the Oviedo Police Department and state police force will also be available to provide additional safety talks and to answer questions. JULY 25 Christian HELPs Christmas in July event will feature delicious food, silent and live auctions, Christmas carolers and business networking. Its from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, July 25, at the Canterbury Retreat and Confer ence Center at 1601 Alafaya Trail in Oviedo. Call 407-834-4022 or email info@christianhelp.org for more in formation. JULY 27 Its registration time from July 1 to 24 for the next Junior Olympic Archery Development Class (JOAD) start ing on Saturday, July 27, at Geneva Archery on 3883 County Road 426. JOAD is open to any youth, ages 8 to 20. Class will start at 9 a.m. Visit genevaarchery.com or call 407-2217764 for more information. Kids R Kids Learning Academy of Oviedo contacted the Kids in Tran sition program to offer to hold a School Supplies Drive for them at their Open House on Saturday, July 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event is at Kids R Kids Learning Academy, 315 Alafaya Woods Blvd. Call 407366-2100 for more information. Ongoing For a limited time this summer, Or lando Science Center will remain open until 9 p.m. on Friday and Sat urday nights. Through Saturday, Aug. 17, guests will have more time to explore four levels of exhibits, watch a Hollywood feature-length lm in the Digital Adventure Theater: A National Geographic Experience, see stars and planets in the Crosby Observatory, and experience our newest traveling exhibits. OSC is Located at 777 E. Princeton St. Call 407-514-2000 for more information. R.E.A.D. Book Club instills a pas sion for reading with a purpose for children in grades four through six in Oviedo and Winter Springs. Meet ings are weekly and cover one book a month. Fundamentals of literature are introduced, including vocabulary, theme, character analysis, compre hension and critical thinking. For more information, please contact Cathy McLarnon at 407-342-0483 or sundance31@bellsouth.net The Winter Springs Farmers Market is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Satur day on State Road 434 and Tuskawilla Road in the Winter Springs Town Cen ter. Visit WinterSpringsFarmersMar ket.com for more information. Send submissions to ibabcock@ turnstilemediagroup.com

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Page 5 Call to Schedule a Tour! Call to Schedule a Tour!Interactive Whiteboard Technology Affordable Tuition Program / Accepting VPK Small Class Sizes / Ages 2-Grade 8 Extended Care Hours 6:30am-6:30pm Music, Art and Spanish ClassesO PEN H OUSE T OURS OPEN HOUSE TOURS407.324.1144 Towne Center100 Aero Lane, Sanford, FL 32771407.678.0333 University Park10250 University Blvd., Orlando, FL 32871 P A GE P RIVATE S CHOOL Our 105th Year Open House Savings Online visit www.pageschool.com Accredited by:Ai AISF AdvancED-SACS MSA CESS NCPSA Florida Gold Seal of ExcellenceJuly 22-26 9am-11am July 22-26 9am-11am July 27 10am-12pm July 27 10am-12pm $104,000 $108,160 $111,405 $115,861 $119,950 $119,950 $124,748 $129,738 $129,738 $134,928 $131,080 $171,819 $183,846 $225,219 $240,985 $89,861 $78,141 $59,882 $75,679 $82,486 $96,532 $99,939 $61,477 $75,896 $85,597 $85,595 $97,069 $84,961 W h i c h l i n e g i v e s y o u t h e b e s t c h a n c e f o r s u cce s s ? I llustr a tion per iod: 1 -1-2000 thr ough 1-1-2012. Each e xample sho wn assumes $100,000 initial pr emium with no withdr a w als M ar ket v alue based on the S&P 500 Index. H i s t o r i c a l perf o r m a n c e o f the S & P 5 0 0 I n d e x s h o u l d not be c onsider ed a r epr esen ta tion of cur r en t or futur e per f or manc e of the I nde x or of an y annuit y H ypothetical inde x annuit y pr oduc t illustr a tion assumes cr editing method of a 6% annual poin t -t o -poin t cap and annual r eset H ypothetical I nc ome R ider V alue assumes a 7% annual r a t e of r etur n f or inc ome pur poses I llustr a tion v alues r epr esen t g r oss r etur ns A ssumed annuit y r a t es and ac tual hist or ical pr ic es of the S&P 500 I nde x w er e used in this purely hypothetical example for the purpose of illustrating comparitive values and to illustrate how the Interest-Crediting Strategy might have guaranteed. Past performance does not guarantee future results. O N E S H OTY o u o n l y h a v e a t r et i r em en t w i ll f a ll6 0% o f A m er i c a n s s h o r t. M ember of(407)-644-6646w w w .aS af eHar b or .c omB ob A dams P r esiden t/CEOA S af eHar bor LL C bob@asaf ehar bor .c om Illustration period: 12-31-1999 though 12-31-2012According to paycheckforlife.com, three out of ve middle-class Americans entering retirement today are projected to outlive their nancial assets. Learn how to protect your retirement account from losses, maintain upside potential and maximize your lifetime income. Call us today for your PERSONALIZED SAFE MONEY REPORT. &VEGETABLES FRESH FRUIT W Brian Thomas Produce 110 Geneva Drive, Oviedo, Florida(Across From Ace Hardware) VINE RIPE TOMATOES Calendar Notes JULY 20 Come for a free evening of old-time music that you have been hankering for at the Geneva Jam at the Geneva Com munity Center. There will be toe-tapping acoustic music, bluegrass, old country, and some old-fashioned gospel to enjoy. Hamburgers, sausages and hot dogs are for sale from 6 to 7 p.m. The music starts around 6:30 p.m. Call 407-792-0758 for more information. JULY 23 Soon-to-be retirees can learn about Medicare costs, how their retiree health plan will work with Medicare, Medigap plans and prescription drug plans at the SHINE event on Tuesday, July 23, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Orlando Library, 101 E. Central Blvd., Albertson Room. To reg ister, call 407-835-7323. JULY 25 Christian HELPs Christmas in July event will feature delicious food, silent and live auctions, Christmas carolers and busi ness networking. Its from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, July 25, at the Canterbury Retreat and Conference Center at 1601 Alafaya Trail in Oviedo. Call 407-8344022 or email info@christianhelp.org for more information. JULY 26 The Geneva Evergreens is a ministry for all seniors, age 55 years and older, which holds a luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at the Geneva Baptist Church every last Fri day of the month. The church supplies the main dish and everyone brings a covered dish. The church is located at 325 First St. For more information about Evergreen programs and activities, call the Geneva Baptist Church at 407-349-5411 or visit rstbaptistgeneva.com JULY 27 SAFE is a personal awareness and educational program designed to teach women basic safety and awareness skills. The deadline for each class is one week before it starts. The next class is from 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 27, at the Oviedo/Geneva Community Ofce, 1225 E. Broadway St. If you have ques tions, please contact Kali Austin in the Public Affairs Division at 407-665-6700 or via email at kaustin@seminolesheriff. org JULY 29 HOPE is excited to be partnering with The Sharing Center for the annual Kids of HOPE Back to School Bash We antici pate providing 700 disadvantaged chil dren everything they need to start their rst day of school. We will need about 100 volunteers to sort and inventory all the donations starting on Monday, July 29, through Friday, Aug. 2. The Bash is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 3, at 149 E. Broadway St. For more infor mation, call 407-366-3422 or visit hope helps.org ONGOING The Casselberry Art House is offering the adult art class Explorations in Clay on Mondays through Aug. 5, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Casselberry Art House is located at 127 Quail Pond Circle. The class costs $60-$80. No experience is necessary and all supplies are included. There is limited seating, so please preregister online at casselberry.org/register or for more information contact Emmy Kline at ekline@casselberry.org or call 407-262-7700, ext. 1122. The Farmers Market at Oviedo YMCA is every Wednesday at the Oviedo YMCA, 7900 Red Bug Lake Road, from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. or until all the vegetables, fruits and other great items are gone. For more information, contact Kim Lett at klett@ cfymca.org Brain surgery robot In an event that literally moved walls, Florida Hospital Cancer Institute installed the latest invention in non-invasive brain surgery to treat conditions that previously were considered inaccessible or inoper able. Elektas Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion will reduce treatment time, in crease precision, and treat multiple brain lesions in a single treatment session. The machine weighs 25 tons and required the outer wall of the Florida Hospital Cancer Institute to be temporarily removed so the machine could be installed by a crane and a team of several dozen workers. Snap-On Tools will stay NAI Realvest recently negotiated a lease renewal for Suite 1025 with 2,254 square feet in the Vistawilla Ofce Center, locat ed at 1511 E. State Road 434 in Winter Springs. Senior Associate Mary Frances West, CCIM along with Margaret Knize of NAI MLG Commercial negotiated the transaction representing the tenant, Snap-On Tools Company, LLC, the global manufacturer and marketer of tools. The landlord, Vistawilla Ofce Center LLC, was represented by managing partner David McLeod. Grads and scholars Kevin Thompson an aviation manage ment major from Winter Springs earned a bachelors degree at Florida Institute of Technologys spring commencement. Georgia Southern University recently named 2,444 students for excellence in academics to the 2013 spring semester deans list. To be eligible for the deans list, a student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average and carry a minimum of 12 hours for the semester. Donald King of Chuluota made the list. Georgia Southern University also re cently recognized 1,150 students on the 2013 spring semester presidents list. Junior Christopher Martin from Winter Springs, majoring in nance, has been named to the list for excellence in aca demics. Train gets rolling The Florida Department of Transporta tion (FDOT) and All Aboard Florida (AAF) have reached agreement on the terms of a lease for portions of State Road 528 right of way in Central Florida. AAF will use the sections to build and oper ate intercity passenger rail service be tween Orlando and southeast Florida. The terms call for a 50-year lease with an option to renew for another 49 years. AAF will pay FDOT $275,000 per year, adjusting annually for ination the ap praised, fair market value of the lease. The payments are structured to allow AAF an opportunity to get the service built and operating more quickly. Seminole goes mobile Seminole County Government is excited to launch Seminole 311 a mobile phone app that provides access to government services at the touch of a button. Government apps provide infor mation and services when youre on the go. Visit Seminolecounty.gov for more information. Bank on it BankUnited opened a new branch at 510 E. Altamonte Drive in Altamonte Springs. It is the banks third branch to open in Seminole County. The 6,675-square-foot branch offers a full range of commercial and consumer banking services, with four full-service teller stations, four retail bankers, safe deposit boxes and a fullservice drive-up window. The drive-up lane has an ATM machine and a night drop box for after-hours service.

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Page 6 F ree bikes, more parks and a web of walking paths will help some Central Florida cities get healthier in the next few months. Healthy Central Florida, a part nership between Florida Hospital and the Winter Park Health Foun dation, recently awarded $25,000 in grants to community partners who are ready to move forward with projects aimed at promoting healthy lifestyles in Winter Park, Eatonville and Maitland. Ten projects were awarded the inaugural Health Innova tion grants of $2,500 each to use in promoting good health at the community level. Many of the projects receiving grants focus on walking or cycling and offer the opportunity for resi dents to feel more connected to their communities. Maitland is focusing on adding marked walking paths through out the city, including one at the that will serve 14,000 employees and local residents. All three communities will klets, mini parks designed to link the communities together and cre ate healthy destinations, headed by the Masters Program in Civic Urbanism at Rollins College. Faith groups are also stepping up to create a guidebook to be used by various churches and re ligious organizations, which out lines healthy practices congrega tions can implement. The City of Winter Park is choosing to focus on two separate increase cycling in the city. During popular community events, Winter Park will continue to host its bike valet program, with improvements such as new bike racks and banners made pos sible by the grant. The program works like a car valet; bike owners check in their cycles with an attendant, knowing that their bikes are secure while they enjoy the festivities at events like the heavily attended Spring and Fall art festivals. The Winter Park Public Library is adding a new bike check out service with its grant, which will enable the Library to purchase seven cruiser style bikes and one tandem bike that patrons will be able to check out for up to a day at a time. Each bike checkout will in clude a helmet, lock, basket and light everything needed to spend the day cruising the city in style healthy style. The library is partnering with Winter Park bike shop Breakaway Bicycles, which will provide the bikes at cost along with mainte good order. New library programs on cycling and bike safety will also roll out when the new service launches. We are very excited to get started on this, said Ruth Edwards, director of the Life long Learning Institute. We are starting small, but we would love to be able to expand it in the fu ture. It will be a great way to help people stay healthy. Dommerich Elementary is us ing their grant to add Walking Safe to their Walk and Roll pro gram to encourage safe walking and biking habits to and from school. Eatonville will use the grant to review the town plans with a goal of increasing the walkability of the com munity. Also in Eatonville, the Macedonia Mission ary Baptist church will be promoting their bike program with helmet give aways. One of the most excit ing new projects that will result from the grants is an app that is being developed by the UCF Institute of Government that will tie many of these programs together by offer ing residents a way to keep track of their healthy new habits and choices. UCF doctoral candidate Mi chelle Gardner, whose studies focus on community engagement through technology, will be devel oping the app. It will be based on a nonmonetary reward system for mak ing healthy choices. If you can get [users] to engage through play, people are much more likely to have fun with it, Gardner said. All the projects are scheduled to launch sometime this fall. It is my goal that we will see a synergy between the grant proj ects, Gardner said. Soon you should be able to check out a bike at the Winter Park Library and use the app to register that healthy choice and get credit for it. 875 Clark Street,Suite A Oviedo, FL 32765 www.OviedoVision.com 407.366.7655 Fashion Frames Custom Contact Fittings Eye Exams for All Ages Designer & Rx Sunglasses Treatment of Red Eyes In-House Optical Lab Surgery Co-Management Dr. Gary D. McDonald and Dr. Jason R. Wallace Optometric PhysiciansTime for your health eye exam! DOCTORS ARE NOW ENROLLING a Clinical Research trial for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. You may qualify to take part in a clinical research study of an investigational medication if: You are 40-80 years of age Have a smoking history of 10 years or moreQUALIFIED PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE: Study-related medical care Study medication Compensation for time and travel Do You Have COPD, Emphysema or Chronic Bronchitis?Take the rst step and see if you qualifyWINTER PARK CLINICAL RESEARCHCall: (321) 246-0223 or (407) 937-1036 HEALT H Y LIVING Communities connect through healthy living ALLISON OLCSVAY The Voice ARCHIVE PHOTO BY REBECCA MALES THE VOICE A recently-complete pedestrian bridge crosses Red Bug Lake Road in Oviedo, allowing walkers, runners and cyclists to connect from Oviedo to Winter Park without leaving the trail. Winter Park Library will soon offer free daily bicycle rentals. And UCF is creating a smartphone app to track healthier habits.

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Page 7 As we drift into the later months of summer vacation and the novelty of all-day freedom slips into routine, you could find your child starting to spend more and more time in front of the TV. Whether vegetating in front of a marathon of their favorite program or caught up in the newest video game, studies find that American children spend an average of three to five hours in front of a television every day. It all pans out to around 15,000 hours by the time they finish high school, an excessive amount by any standard. While the TV can be a source of information and entertainment, as well as a staple in many modern families lifestyles, too much exposure can affect your childs academic achievement, behavior, physical health, and emotional well-being. Research into the detrimental effects of tele vision has been going on for decades. Stud ies have found TV time interfering with the completion of homework or sleeping sched ules, as well as reducing time spent actively reading or playing, which can affect a childs language skills or social development. The violence and debauchery on certain pro grams can increase a childs aggression and skew his/her sense of right and wrong, and the unreal plots, characters, and commercials can unduly influence their perception of the world. On the other hand, the influence of vid eo games on our culture and development is still hotly debated. Your older, internet-savvy gamer child is likely to come up with a myriad of articles pointing out the benefits of video games, claiming that youre out of touch with modern technology. However, the fact of the matter remains that any activity in excess is detrimental to the development of a wellrounded child, regardless of the toted benefits. As with many things, balance and structure is key to a successful summer. Theres no need to ban TV, games, and computer time altogether, nor should you use them as baby sitters when the kids are getting bored and tetchy. Instead, discuss these issues with your children and explain why there needs to be limits on media technology. Try to be fair, al lowing for two or three hours a day if neces sary. The TV can be turned into a positive tool as well, if we are mindful of what our children watch and use the programs to encourage critical thinking. Use commercial time to discuss your childs ideas on the characters and issues they see on screen, prompting them to become engaged and articulate viewers. A Sunny Day Rule is also effective in pro moting balance between active play and pas sive viewing. Children over the age of two need a minimum of one hour of moderate physical activity per day, and summer is the perfect time to be outside. If its a beautiful day out, theres no excuse to be sitting on the sofa! Encourage your children to watch TV as a last resort. They may grumble a bit at first, but after awhile they will learn how to devel op their own activities. This independent play promotes the growth of myelin, a substance that grows along brain cells and promotes lifelong learning and retention of memories. Here at the Tutoring Center, we understand that your child needs independent activity to grow as a person. Our summer classes take only one hour out of their day, twice a week. We use that time to encourage their academic growth and self-confidence, and we hope youll consider us a part of your summertime structure!Is Your Child Becoming a Television Drone? Dr. Peter Ancona Center Director e Tutoring Center, Oviedo 2871 Clayton Crossing Way #1049 Oviedo, FL 32765 407-545-4725 www.Oviedo. TutoringCenter.comWritten by Sofia Puente-Lay ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE 395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765 407-977-8786ALF License No. 9235, 9308, 9307 www.slm.net/SCOviedo1 Signature property of Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo. MEMORY CARE RESIDENCEWhere hospitality is truly a way of life! Savannah Court and Cottage Located on a beautiful campus setting, our two Savannah Court communities provide full assisted living services while Savannah Cottage offers a secured residence for those with memory loss. You are always welcome at Savannah Court and Cottage of Oviedo www.savannahcourtoviedo.com395 Alafaya Woods Blvd., Oviedo, FL 32765407-977-8786 Call us today, stop by for a visit, join us for lunch, or all of the above! In homes throughout Central sistants and home health aides tenderly care for those who need help. They are the lifelines for countless families. They provide the help that a sick, weak, recover ing or disabled person may need for any and all of those daily tasks that are part of daily living: getting out of bed, walking, brushing teeth, shower ing, getting dressed, combing hair, eating, using the restroom, managing medications, laundry, and more. These activities of daily living require physical and mental capabili ties many of us take for granted. For people with limitations, daily living requires the help of another person. Overwhelm ingly, Floridians say they want to stay at home, with help if needed, rather than live in a facil ity. Who are these quiet heroes of help and what preparation do they have for the challenges assistants (CNAs) typically take a course, such as the program offered by Winter Park Tech or several other local schools. They exam and skills test, a back ground check, and maintain continuing education credits. CNAs are regulated by the Florida Board of Nursing, and the state maintains a health license website for consumers to review the license status of a CNA and other health care providers. The state of Florida does not license or certify home health aides (HHAs), but it does license home health agencies that hire HHAs. HHAs have completed 40 hours of training or a com petency evaluation given by the home health agency that has hired them. The agencies verify and conduct background checks on their staff. A query of health care.gov/com pare can show how local home health agencies that provide Medicare services measure up in quality. Nursing reg istries, licensed by the state, also connect caregivers with families. Registries are more like bro kers; the CNAs are independent contractors. Registries check credentials but do not provide other oversight. The agency does not pay workers compensation insurance or taxes. CNAs that contract with a registry are some times called 1099 employees, because the agency issues 1099 tax forms at the end of the year. The work can be hard. The needs of patients can be complex and can change over time. Jobs come and go as the patients health status changes. The best CNAs see giving such help as more than a job it is a calling, rewarding profession. They know they make a difference in the lives of others. Families depend on them for their caring. It is the best job in the world. I love what I do, says Rose Peart, CNA and owner of RoseWayne Health Services, which cares for seniors in our community. She adds, A good CNA is not only knowl edgeable and reliable, but also and medically inquisitive. Physicians, nurse practitio ners, physician associates and therapists are part of the interprofessional health team, but the CNAs are the health providers with the patient day after day. They are the ones that implement the treatment plans, observe daily changes, and provide for the patient. The need for CNAs will likely grow 20 percent in the next 10 years. Will we have enough caregivers? Growing need: Who will care for us? ISTOCK PHOTO Dr. Nancy Rudner Lugo Health Action Maitland resident Nancy Rudner Lugo is a nurse practitioner and president of Health Action, offering workplace health consulting and nurse coaching. Visit www. healthaction.biz WHO IS LUGO > The work can be hard. The needs of patients can be complex and can change over time. Jobs come and go as the patients health status changes.

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Page 8 July 19 July 25, 2013 One Senior Place ... See our full Calendar of Events at OneSeniorPlace.com407.949.6733715 Douglas Avenue Altamonte Springs, FL 32714M-F 8:30am 5pmM O N DA Y, JU L Y 22 SSenior Club Sponsored by Family Physicians Group Every Monday 10am-12noon July 22nd Casino Day July 29th Movie Day featuring Roman Holiday The Real Estate Specialists are IN 10am-1pm (also 29th) Presented by Exit Real Estate Results TU ESDA Y, JU L Y 23 Health Care Reform Workshop 3:30pm-5pm Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407-949-6723 Womens Financial Beliefs-A Workshop for Women 5:30pm-7:30pm Presented by Price Financial Services RSVP 407-339-4500 W ED N ESDA Y, JU L Y 24 Why do hearing aids cost so much? 3pm-4:30pm (also 31st) Presented by Harmony Hearing Centers of America RSVP 407.545.4098 THUR SDA Y, JU L Y 25 Financial Halftime Report 2013 11am or 3pm Presented by Estate and Business Planning Group RSVP 407-389-1122 FRI DA Y, JU L Y 26 ADRC Workshop Senior Survival Issues 2pm-3:30pm Presented by The Law Ofce of Kathleen Flammia RSVP 407-843-1910 THUR SDA Y, JU L Y 31 Medicare Educational Workshop 12:30pm-2pm Presented by Medicare Plan Options RSVP 407-949-9723Calendar of Events July 2013 OF CENTRAL FLORIDA CELEBRATING OVER 25 YEARS SERVING YOUR COMMUNITYBernard S. Zeffren, MD Eugene F. Schwartz, MD Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-CVoted Best Doctors of Central FL, Orlando Magazine for 7 consecutive yearsDiplomates American Board of Allergy and Immunology Evening Hours Available793 Douglas Ave. Altamonte Springs, FL 32714407-862-5824 2 locations in Seminole County7560 Ste. 2064 407-366-7387www.orlandoallergy.com Probate, Wills & Trusts including Elder Law Issues P.A. Practice Areas: Family Law including RemovalAFFORDABLE ADVOCACY WITH A PASSION FOR JUSTICE MENTION THIS AD & RECEIVE A FREE 1-HOUR CONSULTATION, A $100 VALUE!641 W. Fairbanks Avenue, Suite 110 Winter Park, Florida 32789407.622.5020www.LomasLawPA.com Christine Lomas, Esq. Gary Miller, Esq.e hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you ee wrien information about our qualications and experience. Observer Ad-LomasLaw.indd 1 5/14/13 4:14 PM CASSELBERRY ART AND MUSIC PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE Benji Kuriakose and brothers Tony and Tom George of Built to be Broken perform at Casselberrys Art and Music in the Park event on July 12.

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Page 9 THIS WEEK in sports history July 22, 1923 The legendary Washington Senators pitcher Walter Johnson threw his 3,000th strikeout, being the first player to do so in MLB history. It would be 50 years before another pitcher reached the 3,000-strikeout mark. David Duda Elected Director At Citizens Bank Of FloridaOVIEDO Rick Lee, President and Chief Executive Ocer of Citizens Bank of Florida, announced that the Board of Directors has unanimously elected long-time Oviedo business executive David J. Duda to the Board. David serves as President and Chief Executive Ocer of A. Duda & Sons, Inc., an Oviedo-based company founded in 1926 by Slovakian immigrant Andrew Duda. Much like the bank itself, A. Duda & Sons, Inc. was founded with agricultural roots but has evolved over the years into a multi-faceted operation. Today, the company operates throughout the United States not only as a fresh vegetable grower but also as a diversied land company with a wide array of agribusiness and real estate operations. David Duda represents the fourth generation within his family to serve as its President, having joined the company in 1987 as a Business and Systems Analyst. In 2001, Duda was promoted to Chief Financial Ocer and, prior to being named President in 2009 and CEO in 2010, served as Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Ocer. A native of Oviedo, David earned his Master of Business Administration degree in Finance, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Food and Resource Economics, both from the University of Florida. He is a member of the Florida Council of 100 and a past member of the Central Florida Chapter of Financial Executives International. He has served as Chair of the External Advisory Committee for Food & Resource Economics at the University of Floridas College of Agriculture and also served on the Board of Supervisors of the Viera East Community Development District. He is a member of St. Lukes Lutheran Church, and has served as Congregational Vice President and President. In addition, David was a Board member of Orlando Lutheran Academy, including service as Chairman from 2008 until 2010. David and his wife, Carolyn, have three children: Steven, Natalie and Ellen. He counts among his hobbies hunting, shing, traveling and gardening. On behalf of the Board of Directors, I am pleased to welcome David to our leadership team, Lee said. His long tenure as an Oviedo businessman and his understanding of this community and region are exceptional. Its dicult to miss the parallels between Citizens Bank of Florida and A. Duda & Sons, Inc., Lee continued. We both are proud to call Oviedo home and have our roots in agriculture. As the years have passed, we have evolved as a comprehensive, full-service community bank while A. Duda & Sons has diversied and grown across the nation. We hold both David and his company in very high regard, and our bank will be the beneciary of his experience and insights for years to come. 20948 THE TO DO LIST S EMINOL E VOICE 5" x 8" 4C RUN DATE: 7/19/13 AD DUE: 7/16/13 CREATIVE VISION: 7/15/13 mech01 8 1 8 5 0 9 9 6 6 9 IN THEATRES JULY 26 &To enter to win a complimentary pass for two, log on to Gofobo.com/RSVP and enter the code: VOICE84JFMonday, July 22 7:30pm AMC Altamonte invite you to a special advance screening TheToDoListMovie.com facebook.com/ TheToDoListMovie @ToDoListMovie #TheToDoList The Winter Park Diamond Dawgs have streaked to seven straight wins while trying to run away with the league nearing the end of the regular season. But the Lees burg Lightning (17-11) wont let them get away so easily. As of the start of the week both teams were on their longest winning streaks of the season at the same time, adding some drama to the Florida weeks. And in the fracas even the College Park Freedom (8-20) have begun to come around, win ning two straight and coming within two games of the DeLand Suns (10-17), who have rapidly dropped toward the bottom of the league. In their wild seven-win tear the Dawgs (19-9) have had some strange luck in their scheduling, putting them up against the for merly league-leading Orlando Monarchs (16-11) and longtime rival Sanford River Rats (13-15) in all of those games. In their most recent win against Orlando on July 15, it wasnt even close. Four Dawgs shared the Tanner Stanley grabbed the spot light, blasting two doubles in the game. But it wasnt all about extra bases from the batters box; three of the Dawgs took the small ball route and picked up bases on the run, with Daniel Sweet swiping his 15th bag of the season. Brett Nizamoff handled the Monarchs easily, with six strikeouts in six in nings. The Dawgs played three at press time, but will return to the diamond at home at 7 p.m. July 20 against the Leesburg. Sanford hosts College Park at 7 p.m. July 19 at Sanford Memorial Stadium. Top Dawgs bury league in seven-game winning streak ISAAC BABCOCK The Voice PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE Strong pitching from the bullpen has kept the Dawgs in games in July.

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Page 10 THIS WEEK in political history July 22, 1862 President Abraham Lincoln informs his chief advisers and cabinet that he will issue a proclamation to free slaves, but that he will wait until the Union Army has achieved a substantial military victory. The Emancipation Proclamation had less to do with ending slavery than saving the crumbling union. Every year, thousands of Ameri cans get sick with recreational water illnesses (RWIs), which are caused by germs found in places where we swim. These RWIs are caused by germs spread by swallowing, breathing in mists or aerosols, or having contact with contami nated water in swimming pools, hot tubs, water parks, water play areas, interactive fountains, lakes, rivers or oceans. Diarrhea is the most common route of infection for RWI, and it is often caused by germs like Crypto (short for Cryptosporidium), Giardia, norovirus, Shigella, and E. coli O157:H7. Other routes of infec tion for common RWIs include skin, ear, respiratory, eye, neuro logic, and wound infections. Children, pregnant women, and people with weakened im mune systems are most at risk for RWIs, said Dr. Kevin Sherin, Director of the Department of Health in Orange County. Any one who is ill should also avoid swimming until their symptoms have passed. Chlorine and other pool wa ter treatments dont kill germs in stantly, and just one diarrheal in cident can release enough germs into the water that swallowing a mouthful can cause diarrhea lasting up to 2 weeks, said for the Department of Health in Seminole County. To help protect yourself and other swimmers from germs, here are a few simple steps all swimmers can take each time we swim: Dont swim when you have diarrhea. Shower with soap before you start swimming. Take a rinse shower before you get back into the water. Check the chlorine and pH levels before getting into the wa ter. Proper chlorine (1 mg/L or parts per million [ppm]) and pH (7.2.8) levels maximize germkilling power. Parents of young children should take a few extra steps: Take children on bathroom breaks every 60 minutes or check diapers every 30 minutes. Change diapers in the bath room or diaper-changing area and not at poolside where germs can rinse into the water. Remember Think Healthy. Swim Healthy. Be Healthy! For more information about healthy swimming, visit www. cdc.gov/healthyswimming Florida Department of Health in Orange County An inspirational leaders involve ment with righteous endeavors justly deserves the honor and respect history bequeaths them. And what endeavor is more righ teous than growing the food we depend upon for all our meals for all our days? At his home stead in the Virginia moun tains, Thomas Jefferson created the gardens of Monticello as a model for the future of our young coun try. The decentralized agrarian society he pictured has taken an errant turn toward corporate industrial socialism, but we can still draw from the simplicity and practicality Jefferson devel oped in his vegetable garden. More than just introducing new crops, he promulgated ideas that formed the basis of our national psyche. The garden at Monticello is quite large by todays standards, although the modern institutional gardens I have seen sprouting at Central Florida resorts could offer a rough comparable. The terraced south-facing beds were an early insight into local environmental microclimate resourcing. Beyond the subsistence farming of his contemporaries, Jefferson was able to grow enough of a variable selection to savor tropical crops along with the standard North American and European cuisine. Drawing from his international inclinations as secretary of state for George Washington, the elite from all over the world came certain qualities of life in the gastronomic spectrum previously lacking in the new U.S. to discover the myriad of crops he grew in his garden, but Jef ferson popularized many foods we still routinely grow and cook. Okra, brought by the slaves of Africa via the Caribbean tropics, cooked with lima beans, toma toes and peppers (also relatively new to our collective palate), gumbo. Other attributed intro ductions include catsup, French fried potatoes, roasted eggplant, kale, lettuce salads, pumpkin pie and watermelon. Although the term wouldnt become part of our lexicon for another century and then some, Jefferson was an organic gardener. When confronted with pest control problems, he recognized that the feebleness of the crop could be contributing to its attractiveness to insects. Advising for long-term soil improvement to strengthen plant resolve, the Sage of Monticello recommended that the garden be covered in a coating of manure for the winter. Jefferson promoted the industry of market gardening to encourage the creation of sustainable and respectable jobs, communities, family and health. He considered gardening as im portant as writing the Declaration of Independence, founding the University of Virginia, or even the presidency. The greatest ser vice which can be rendered any country is to add an useful plant to its culture. Tom Carey is the owner of Sundew Gardens, a you-pick gardening business in Oviedo. Visit the Sundew Gardens Facebook page and e-mail him at sundewgardens@gmail.com GEOFF WHITE Guest Writer Look for water Mosquitoes require water to breed. Adult mosquitoes lay eggs in stagnant or slow moving water, so dump items in your yard that hold water every 48 hours. Even the smallest amount of water held in a leaf or bottle cap can be enough for mosquitoes to breed. The water held in birdbaths, non-chlorinated wading pools, garbage can lids, and pottery will all attract breeding mosquitoes. Remember to empty the saucers leave water in pet bowls for more than two days. Inspect your home Check window and door screens for holes, and repair or replace them snugly without gaps around the edges, which can let mosqui toes in. Keep gutters clean and unclogged so they wont collect water. Be sure your downspouts drain properly, without leaving puddles in the drainage area. You may need to reroute your down spouts or add extensions to carry water away. Maintain your yard Adult mosquitoes rest during the day, usually on the under sides of veg etation. Make your yard less hos pitable to mosquitoes by mowing your lawn regularly, keeping veg etation away from your homes foundation and clearing away leaves, litter and debris (which are likely to collect water). Repair broken sprinkler heads that leak If you have a swimming pool or pond keep them cleaned, chlori nated and aerated. Isolate Mosquitoes are most active during the early morn ing and late evening. Isolating yourself from mosquitoes during their most active time of day by avoiding outdoor activity during dusk and dawn gives them no option other than to look else where for their next meal. If you have to be outside during these hours, set up large outdoor fans to blow mosquitoes away. The force of air will make it harder for them to land on you. Use of other repellent products, such as citronella candles and mosquito coils, may also be effective if used in windless conditions, but only if you are in very close proximity to them. Treat yourself Apply a DEETbased insect repellent according to the directions on the label and remember to re-apply as directed. Wear a long sleeved shirt and pants to add an extra layer of protection. Although mosquitoes are attracted to your natural body heat and carbon dioxide, light colored clothing may help make you less of a target. Long sleeved shirt and pants help protect your skin. Geoff White is the general manager of HomeTeam Pest Defense Orlando HomeTeam Pest Defense 5 ways to L.I.M.I.T. mosquitoes JOAQUIM ALVES GASPAR Tom Carey From my garden to yours RWI Prevention Week 2013: How we contaminate pools Thomas Jefferson: USAs gardener PHOTO BY TOM CAREY THE VOICE Voice columnist Tom Carey and wife Robin at Monticello, the former home of U.S. President Thomas Jefferson.

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Page 11 Despite the bleakness of the situation with the homeless in the U.S., where e-snap computer snafus have disrupted Housing and Urban Development funding and sequestration cuts budgets everywhere, there are promising practices to be found. In Seminole County, one of the hardest-hit areas, collaborations between governments, universities, nonhave woven relationships, creat ing solutions where few existed. Seminole County has been hard hit because of many reasons, including Floridas high unem ployment rate, its high foreclo sure rate (second in the nation per CBS) and its high number of children. Despite the federal governments rapid rehousing and economic recovery pro grams, the numbers of homeless keep growing. Most of them are children under the age of 8 years old. There are more than 1,100 homeless families in Seminole County, according to the Families Seminole County Public Schools. This number does not capture the big picture because it only counts families with school-age children. Pre-school age siblings and chil dren younger than age 4 are not tracked by FIT nor are families without children or single men and women. Once you learn to see the homeless, the invisible are everywhere, under overpasses, asleep in the libraries, languish ing on bus benches. Sunburnt babies and toddlers cling to bleak women with cardboard signs Seminole County is also hard hit in its lack of resources. There is only one shelter in the county with a total of 40 beds. Some elementary schools have more than 100 homeless children each. The statistics of more than 200 children per grade in elementary school shows dramatic drops to below 100 after the age of 16 be cause of teens dropping out. The seeds of the next generation of poverty are planted when those teens drop out to support their families. Nationally, experts in the the staggering consequences of homelessness on children. They warn of quadruple the prob ability of developmental delays in children because the opening windows of learning cannot be focused on by a stressed out baby with a stressed out, depressed mother. The brains circuits are busy as the infant struggles to adapt to a toxic environment. They warn that mental health issues are tripled, particularly for diagnosis related to trauma, anxiety and depression. Learn ing disabilities and academic delays are reported at 1.5 years of academic loss by each incident of becoming homeless. Some of the elementary schools have more than 200 homeless children each. Predictably the successful school scores on FCAT criteria will be hard hit with that many children whose disordered lives are sucking them down into pov erty and academic failure. Trying to stem the tide of hopelessness they witnessed for the last six years, a handful of people from diverse careers banded together to seek solu tions. A university professor wrote a national AmeriCorps grant in part to help a church lay people to become volunteer case managers, mobilized at the direction of the public schools homeless liaison social worker. ernmental funding, public dona tions and faith-based resources, the basics of life and the building are gathered for each family. Each one teaches one, providing oneon-one mentoring to the parents. All the local resources were put in a database that is user friendly, called Resource Point at Resour cePoint.org undertook two other initiatives. The staff of the Early Learning Coalition, the homeless liaison of the school staff and the Family Advocacy staff created a task force that will be soliciting dona tions of childcare slots from the local childcare providers. Without childcare, parents cannot seek or keep work. There are hundreds of children on the waiting list for the limited governmental fund ing of childcare. Another initiative the Family is a crockpot campaign to teach families to stretch their food stamp dollars while providing nutritionally appropriate meals. For families that lack transporta tion and access to affordable food markets, the junk food diet is often their only viable option. In these dire times of scar city in governmental funding, foundation grants and lean local funding, it is through merging all resources and entities that the job is going to get done. No com munity can afford to have 2,000 plus disenfranchised children going hungry and homeless. The predictable consequences will be heavier demands and more costly interventions in special educa tion, hospitals, mental health facilities, jails and prisons. Hungry, homeless children cannot make learning a priority. Yet it is only through education that these children will escape the trap of poverty. When we want and expect these children to be law-abiding, contributing citi zens, we better have an answer to their question, Where were you when I was hungry and homeless as a child? Our answer needs to be Next to you, helping you succeed. Hats off to the University of Central Floridas Center for land Churchs Family Advocacy Public Schools for a promising families and their community. It is through merging the efforts of government, university, nontions that the enormous task can be done. With the weather heating up, its time to start checking out some dog-friendly beaches with your four-legged friend! For most dogs, getting to run around in the sand, dip into the waves, and fetch balls out of the water is the best day ever! Here are some tips to ensure that you and your dog have a fun and safe beach experi ence: First things rst Check with your local beaches before you pack up the dog, since not all beaches allow them. Depending on the time of year, some beaches allow dogs during the off-season, but summer is a different story. Call ahead or visit the beachs website for informa tion. Its also important, if you whether or not they need to be on leash or if they can roam free. Bring a long leash no matter what, but know ahead of time if there will be an area where a leash isnt necessary. If they dont need to have a leash, only let them be without it if you know for an absolute fact that they will respond to your voice commands. Other dogs, people, certain scents, birds, etc., may catch their attention and cause them to tune you out, which could be a recipe for disaster (no one wants a dog (as well as easily frightened children) will be less dog-friendly than others, so be mindful of who your dog might be approaching to avoid any sort of snafu. Never, ever leave your dog unattended. Even the most welltrained dog can get distracted. Pay extra special attention to your surroundings and any po tential situations that may cause your dog to wander or run off. Follow all of the rules set by the beach. You dont want to be the reason that dogs arent allowed at that particular beach anymore. Pro swimmer or doggie swim vest? If you want to bring your dog to the beach, you probably have a good idea that your furry friend time your dog will be swimming, you may want to read up on his breed just to be sure. For exam ple, Shar-Peis tend to be afraid of water. Obviously there are excep if swimming is characteristic of the breed will be a good indica tor of how enthusiastic (or timid) they might be. When you bring the pup to the water, if he isnt diving right in, take it slow. Dont force your dog to go in. He may feel more comfortable if you head vous or unsure, purchasing a dog life vest to bring with you would be a safe bet. Be wary of temperature extremes Depending on where you are in the country, summer at the beach can bring about two extremes: heat from the sun and a cold, cold ocean. Pay attention to how your dog is acting and responding while hes with you throughout the day, since there could be the potential of either heat stroke or hypothermia (if hes been swim ming his little heart out). Some signs of heat stroke in a dog include: If you think that your dog has heat stroke while youre at the beach, take the following actions immediately: and apply cool (not cold) water all over their body to gradually lower their temperature. towels to the pets head, neck and chest only. amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes. vet. Some signs of hypothermia in a dog include: If you think that your dog has hypothermia while youre at the beach, take the following actions immediately: and blankets that have been warmed by the sun. bottles and leave them out in the sun as this warm water can be applied to your dog to bring his body temperature back up. stopped shivering and has con tinued lethargy, bring him to the nearest vet. As much as we wish, our dogs cant tell us when theyre in pain and not feeling good. The above lists are certainly not all-inclu sive, so if you notice anything out of the ordinary with your dogs behavior, get him out of the ele ments immediately. A few ways to prevent heat stroke is to bring lots of fresh, cool water that they can drink. A spray bottle with cool water that you can spray him down with will also help in temperature regulation. A bonus of having fresh water with you is that you can also clean the sand and salt water from paws, which can cause irritation and dry out those sensitive pads. Also be sure to bring an umbrella that he can hang out under. To make sure that hypother mia doesnt strike, bring lots of towels that you can snuggle him in and remove the excess cold salt water. Not only can this warm him up quicker, it also helps in removing the sand and salt water from his fur so he wont be in danger of shaking off on someone else. The dos and donts of the beach There are hundreds of beaches in the U.S. and Canada that allow dogs, but compared to the num ber of beaches there are, this is a small percentage. Many beaches allowed dogs at one time, but due to careless owners, they had to put a stop to canine patrons. Fol low these rules (in addition to the beachs rules), and youll make sure that you can bring Fido back as many times as he likes. DOG BEACH DONTS: areas on the beach where theyre not allowed. Dunes and grassy areas need to be protected from any sort of environmental dam age that a dog might cause. your sight. Not even once. Paying attention and being proactive will go a long way in protecting you and your dog. The last thing you or someone having a run-in with your dog. leash, beach towels, umbrella, fresh water and doggie sun screen (yes, you can actually get dogs). supplying waste bags, so bring your own and be diligent about cleaning up. No one wants to beach or buried in the sand. DOG BEACH DOS: vaccinations are current and that hes wearing the proper ID. Keep your vets number on hand just in case something happens. your dog will be sure to ruin both his and your experience. beach trip. A couple hours might be just the right amount of time at the beach, depending on your sign of your dog tiring, pack it up and get back on the road. This is exactly why you are both there: to have fun! About TripsWithPets.com TripsWithPets.com is the number one online resource for pet travel. It was named best pet travel site by Consumer Reports! TripsWithPets.com offers resourc es to ensure pets are welcome, happy, and safe when traveling. The website features a directory of pet friendly hotels and accom modations across the U.S. and Canada, airline and car rental pet policies, pet friendly restaurants and beaches, search by route, pet travel tips, pet travel sup plies, along with other pet travel resources. Kim Salerno is the president and founder of TripsWithPets.com. She founded the pet travel site in 2003 and is an expert in the eld of pet travel. Her mission is to ensure that pets are welcome, happy, and safe in their travels. Dog beach outing: tips and dos and donts TRISH DOBARGANES Guest Writer KIM SALERNO Guest Writer Promising practices on the homeless front

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