Title: Seminole voice
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00091445/00039
 Material Information
Title: Seminole voice
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Community Media Holdings, LLC
Place of Publication: Oviedo, Fla.
Publication Date: November 13, 2009
Copyright Date: 2010
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Oviedo
United States -- Florida -- Seminole -- Winter Park
Coordinates: 28.659722 x -81.195833 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00091445
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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- November 13 November 26, 2009 |


Oviedo man

crashes

plane


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

An Oviedo Air Force Reserv-
ist is dead after the plane
he was piloting crashed into
the Everglades on Sunday
night.
Edmundo "Ed" Velazquez
was an aircraft mechanic at
Homestead Air Reserve Base,
where he had worked on
planes as sophisticated as
the F-16 fighter jet for more
than 20 years. He had been
deployed to the Middle East
seven times during Opera-
tion Iraqi Freedom.
Family members of the
49-year-old Alafaya Woods
resident said he was alone
in his Aero Commander
100 when it plunged to the
ground just north of 1-75 in
the swampy terrain at the
north end of the Everglades.
He had lifted off less than an
hour earlier from Tamiami
Airport in Kendall, en route
to Ocala for refueling before
traveling to a final destina-
tion in Georgia.
The longtime pilot had
flown the same route many
times before, and was
known to maintain his air-
plane meticulously, leading
to continuing speculation by

> turn to PLANE on A4


0 94922 58042 9


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Oviedo City Councilman Steve Henken and Mayor Mary Lou Andrews won landslides on election day, with the mayor
winning by a 2-to-1 margin. In Longwood, Commissioner Mike Holt lost his re-election bid while Brian Sackett kept his seat.


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

Blowouts across the county
made election night a big
one for three incumbents,
and a shocker for one chal-
lenger.
Oviedo Mayor Mary Lou
Andrews was the big win-


ner on election night, with
69.58 percent of the vote
compared with challenger
Darrell Lopez's 30.42 per-
cent.
"I feel like I've done a lot
of good for the community,
and have a lot more to do,"
Andrews said. "I just wish
there was more of a turn-


out at the polls."
Councilman Steve
Henken, pushing for a third
term, won easily against
two challengers with 64.43
percent. Judith Smith
earned 22.33 percent of
the vote, and recent UCF

> turn to ELECTION on A4


Water rates

increased


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

The Seminole County
Commission gave final
approval to an 11 percent
increase in water and
sewer rates that will take
effect next month.
Residents' December
bills will increase an aver-
age of $6.
Commissioners held
off on a vote that would
allow a second 11 per-
cent increase in October
2010.
This comes after the
county failed to imple-
ment a stormwater assess-
ment fee, after more than
500 residents stood in
opposition to what they
called a "rain tax" at a
September public hear-
ing.
The money collected
from the increase will
pay for infrastructure
improvements required
by federal and state man-
dates and also pay back a
$70 million bond debt.


Gifts of sacrifice to wounded vets


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE
Eleanor McKechnie holds
a red, white and blue knit-
ted blanket in her hands
as she sits at a ring of fold-
ing tables in an otherwise
empty room. A few days
from now this small com-
fort will be in a soldier's
hands in San Diego, but for
now she runs a pale white
hand across it one last time,
and remembers.
Two of her husbands
joined the Army in the
second world war, return-
ing years later with grisly
stories from both sides of
the Atlantic. Her second






14inSanford.all40 8


360 fr or inoraton


husband of eight years, Dr.
Francis McKechnie, worked
to keep men alive. Her
first husband of 54 years,
Donald Lewis, counted the
dead.
She remembers reading
stories on the front page,
of sacrifices thousands of
miles away brought back
to the kitchen table and
delivering the grim real-
ity of the cost of freedom.
Two months from her 90th
birthday now, McKechnie
has watched that sacrifi-
cial reverence wash away,
faded into tattered memo-
ry through six decades and
four wars.
> turn to VET on A5


INDEX
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G~u. Failvn5C:le

~,Lend $
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lijssirleds jr'i c~inles
ALeI I e i s


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK- THE VOICE
Hundreds of blankets and clothes have warmed veterans thanks to Eleanor
McKechnie's small group of volunteers who made all of their gifts by hand.


HIGH 730
Mostly sunny
ivYTj :r: /1:1;!


Free!


g~h






Page A2 November 13 November 26, 2009 Seminole Voice


STHIS WEEK in history


f!l a mass murder-suicide at their agricultural commune in remote
northwestern Guyana. U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan, who had trav-
eled to Jonestown to investigate, was murdered the day before as
She attempted to leave.





Greyhound rescue rescued

SARAH KEZER longer qualified to race and
GUEST REPORTER to educate the public on
how ex-racers make loving
Tombs of ancient Egyptian pets.
pharaohs, filled with the rul- Rising rent costs and the
ers' most precious treasures, thousands of dollars needed
are often found covered in for veterinary care plus a
paintings of their revered strain on the economy put
hounds, a close relative to Harris' center in danger of
the modern greyhound. closing early next year.
Understanding of the "We've been working
respect these creatures once harder to get maybe about
received can be found in the the same amount of dona-
full hearts of those strug- tions," said Harris. The ken-
gling to care for and ensure nel can house 53 dogs but
gracious homes for the his- has cut back to 43 to save
torically honored breed. money.
"They are just different The kennel will be able
from other dogs," said Joan to continue their "labor of
Harris, president of the love," Harris said, because of
board of directors of the a donation from the Sanford
Greater Orlando Chapter, Orlando Kennel Club of
Greyhound Pets of America. $6,500, which will meet the
"There is a serenity and a difference of money needed
peacefulness and an inno- to pay their rent for the next
cence about them no mat- 13 months.
ter what they have gone "This specific donation
through." was above and beyond what
Harris is a full-time volun- we have normally been
teer at the non-profit adop- doing," said Mark Loewe,
tion organization located general manager of the
in Longwood, dedicated to Sanford Orlando Kennel
finding responsible homes PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK- THE VOICE
for greyhounds who are no > turn to GREYHOUND on A6 Dog lovers Gary and Tricia Rose embrace their new pet, Zesty, after adopting the rescued greyhound from a local agency. The
group was on the verge of closing its doors in Longwood before the Sanford Orlando Kennel Club donated $6,500 to save it.





Seminole State opens Center for Public Safety


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

Peeking his head through
a doorway, Tim Benton felt
more than 1,000 degrees
of heat explode in his face.
Then in an instant it was
gone.
In a few minutes, he'll
light a whole building on
fire, as he teaches what not
to do when faced with an
uncontrollable inferno.
But Benton does have
control, as he holds onto a
remote that can ignite entire
rooms with searing flame in
seconds, part of Seminole
State College's Center for
Public Safety, which was
dedicated on Oct. 30.
Taking a tour of the facil-
ity is like walking through
the aftermath of a "Die
Hard" movie. A building is
on fire. A car has its roof torn
clean off another next to
it is burned to a charred car-
cass. Investigators search
for clues near the homicide
scene inside a dark garage,
white chalk outlining a
body on the gray concrete.
Following through laby-
rinthine white corridors of
the center's main building,
a group of visitors stops to
watch paramedics trying to


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Students work to save a baby's life in a simulation at Seminole State College's new Center for Public Safety, which was dedicated in a ceremony on Oct. 30. The facility
boasts courses for all types of public safety professions, teaching paramedics, firefighters and crime scene investigators lifesaving skills in state-of-the-art classrooms.


revive a baby on a stretcher.
Around the corner another
paramedic yells "Clear!" and
sends more than 1,000 volts
through the chest of a heart
attack victim.


They're all preparing for
the real deal, as the fully-
functional public safety
training center teaches
them everything from deliv-
ering adrenaline shots to


rappelling down the walls
of a burning building.
"Whether it's a law
enforcement officer, a fire-
fighter, or a paramedic, it's
often a team response,"


Seminole State President
E. Ann McGee said. "That's
also what makes this cen-
ter such a success it's all
about partnership."
> turn to SAFETY on A6





November 13 November 26, 2009 Page A3


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Page A4 November 13 November 26, 2009


Mall needs to be brought back to life


How do you all like this
"taste" of fall weather?
Let's see if it stays as I hate
to think I will be wearing
Bermuda shorts for Turkey
Day dinner. Plus a little
rain would also be nice as
my grass is thirsty. Maybe
I shouldn't say too much
about the weather as today
is Friday the 13th and some
people are superstitious.
Now with the new set of
restrictions for water con-
servation the public can
only water once a week on
certain days according to
you house number we
need all the help we can
get.
My friends and I walk
in the Oviedo Marketplace
mall usually every weekday
morning and, I guess like
most of you all, have seen
once again the closing of
two rather large stores: The
Plaster Cottage and the
bridal store. Never thought
the Bridal store would take
off but thought the Plaster
Cottage for kids would be
a big hit. It is like walking
in a ghostly mall with no
activity around till after 9
a.m., and then there aren't
many people at all even if
you are there at 10 a.m. The
mall will really be a ghost
town when Bed, Bath &


Beyond moves in February.
Let's hope they can bring
back life to our mall.
Today and tomor-
row (Nov. 13 and 14)
Palm Valley is having a
Community Garage Sale
sponsored by the hom-
eowners association
from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The sale is in their club-
house, 3700 E. Palm Valley
Drive. There are 35 tables
reserved by residents to
sell their treasures, which
will mainly consist of small
items and a small amount
of furniture. Items for sale
must fit on or under the
sellers table. There will be
free coffee, Danishes in the
morning for sale as well as
hot dogs, chips and soda
for lunch. This is a twice a
year event (November and
June) as well as twice a year
community flea market
held by the Residents Social
Association (February and
August).
I do hope I will see
everybody at our woman's
club 36th Annual Great
Day in the Country arts and
crafts festival Saturday, Nov.
14 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The event is at the Lawton
elementary school and
groove corner of Broadway
Street and Lake Jessup


Avenue in downtown
Oviedo. We have some-
thing for everybody: food,
drink, our country store,
children's activity area, our
famous bean soup mix, raf-
fle tickets, entertainment,
300-plus crafters, non-prof-
it booths, business booths
and Miss Florida will there
to greet all.
If you need help, ask a
club woman in the red/
white striped shirt and she
will be more than happy
to help you. You can check
out our Web site at www.
greatdayoviedo.org
After you have visited
Great Day in the Country,
for your evening pleasure
come on over to the St.
Luke's Concert starting at
7 p.m., 2021 W. State Road
426, Oviedo. The University
of Central Florida
Symphony Orchestra
will present "Beethoven
Forever" featuring
Beethoven's Symphony
No.6 and Zur Namensfier
Overture, as well as vir-
tuoso Ayako Yonetani,
performing the composer's
Violin Concerto Op.61. Free
admission and if you need
more information, please
call 407-365-3408.
Let's go to the
Barbershop Chorus
Concert at 3 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 15 at Winter
Springs High School, 130
Tuskawilla Road, Winter
Springs. The event "ab-
SALUTE-ly Music 2009",
will feature the Sound of
Sunshine, a female bar-
bershop harmony chorus


directed by Nancy Lewis.
The next general meet-
ing of the Oviedo Historical
Society will be held 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 17 at the
Memorial Building on
Central Avenue, Oviedo.
The meeting is open to the
public.
Festival of Trees starts
Nov. 14 through the 22 at
the Orlando Museum of
Art. 2416 N. Mills Avenue,
Orlando. This is an event
you do not want to miss.
The 23rd annual Festival
of Trees presented by the
Council of 101 will show-
case designer decorated
trees and wreaths, holiday
vignettes, a gift boutique,
Toyland town and special
events. All proceeds benefit
the Orlando Museum of Art.
Admission is $10 for adults,
$6 for children. If you need
more information such as
times to attend, please call
407-896-4231 ext.254.
Black Tie on the Wild
Side, a gala, will be held to
benefit the Central Florida
Zoo 6 p.m. on Saturday,
Nov. 14. The Central Florida
Zoo and Botanical Gardens
are located 3755 N.W.
Highway 17-92 Sanford.
Admission is $150 and you
must be 21 or older. For
more information, call 407-
323-4450.
Winter Vegetable
Gardening is the topic of
discussion for the program
to be held at the Winter
Park Garden Club, 1300
S. Denning Drive, Winter
Park. The guest speaker
for the 6:30 p.m. Program


will be Tom Mac Cubbin.
Admission is free.
Soap Box Derby 8 a.m.
will be held on Saturday,
Nov. 21 at Derby Park, 2199
N. Oregon Avenue, Sanford.
The 13th annual Toys for
Tots Soap Box Derby Race
is open to boys and girls
ages 8 to 17. There will
also be adult and celebrity
races. The entry fee is a
new, unwrapped toy valued
at $55 or more for chil-
dren ages 8-17 and a new
unwrapped toy valued at
$25 or more for adult and
celebrities. Toys will benefit
Toys for Tots. Admission for
spectators is free.
Holiday pottery tour
right here in Oviedo
will be held 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. on Dec. 5 & 6 at
Ann Robinson's studio,
811 Eyrie Drive, Oviedo.
The sixth annual Oviedo
Potters holiday tour and
sale will feature self-guided
tours of clay artists Barbara
Bailey, Mary Loving and
Ann Robinson's studios,
which are within minutes
of downtown Oviedo. Tour
maps will be distributed
at all studios. Admission is
free.
A thought---The trick is
growing up without grow-
ing old.
Casey Stengel


TALK
> TOJANET
Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town by e-mailing
celerystalks@bellsouth.com.


ELECTION I One Longwood commissioner lost his seat in the Nov. 3 election


< continued from front page
graduate and political new-
comer Jeff Hartzler picked
up 13.25 percent.
Only 2,709 voters cast
their ballots in Oviedo's
election, despite an unusu-
ally high turnout of absen-
tee ballots.
In Longwood a strong
campaign effort by chal-


longer Bob Cortes led to an
upset in the District 3 race,
as he defeated longtime
Commissioner Mike Holt by
gaining 60.54 percent of the
vote to 39.45 percent.
Holt's colleague
Commissioner BrianSackett
won a re-election bid with
60.21 percent versus chal-
lenger John Richardson's


39.79 percent.
Both ballot items were
defeated in Longwood by
broad margins.
Question 1, which would
have eliminated an inde-
pendent committee screen-
ing process before the city
could hire a new manager,
was defeated by a 63.94 per-
cent to 36.06 percent mar-


PLANE I No distress call recieved from plane

< continued from front page According to the Nation- crash. Authorities are con-
authorities as to what could al Transportation Safety tinuing to investigate the
have caused the crash. Board, no distress calls had crash.
been received before the
















O 5 6c3e. to0d7ay

ccu L O7 -563 -7000


gin, keeping that screening
process in place.
Question 2, which would
have deleted City Charter
language that had the police
and fire chiefs reporting
directly to the city admin-


istrator, was also defeated,
by a 59.19 percent to 40.81
percent margin, keeping
that provision in place.
Only 1,599 voters
showed up to the polls in
Longwood.


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Emergencies Seen Same Day!


Seminole Voice










Family fun fest is a win-win for Geneva


By Karen McEnany-Phillips


Nothing empowers us more
than a shot of creativity
driven by a can-do attitude,
sparked by a little success.
Let me share a great local
story that blipped on my
radar screen last week.
It really started last
spring when the Geneva
Elementary PTA hosted a
family movie night for the
first time. Family movie
night means everyone
brings their folding chairs
and blankets and spreads
out on the grassy area near
the school, and a nice man
brings the movie, screen,
projector and popcorn too!
It is kind of like a drive-in
without the cars. It was a
fine event despite the bugs,
humidity and late sunset,
which spurred the thought
that they might revisit the
idea in the fall.
Meanwhile another idea
had been simmering for a


couple of years. You know
that big idea that you know
has potential, but who has
the time to really organize
it, shepherd it to fruition,
and anyway what are we
going to do about this and
that and that?
For Geneva Elementary
PTA it was the Vendor Fair
idea, where those multi-
tasking local parents could
show off their entrepre-
neurial smarts and hope-
fully increase market share.
Two months ago the
planets aligned when
PTA fundraising chairs
Kiersten Berkoben and
Jo-An Stronko agreed to
tackle the project. Timing
was perfect as the Rural
Heritage Center next door
to Geneva Elementary was
now able to host such an
event.
As Principal Dr. Tina
Erwin said, "Why not part-


ner with our neighbors at
the RHC?" Aha! What about
combining the two events?
It's a win-win as it gives
the kids something to do
while the moms are selling
their products and services
and the free family movie
brings the Vendor Fair
more traffic..
OK so we have two legs
but wait a minute what
else can we do...hmmmm?
Let's involve the students!
So each grade level was
invited to come up with a
fundraising idea to raise
money for their classrooms
- like the third-graders
who painted faces and sold
marshmallow launchers
- they raised more than
$300 (OMG). Their money
is going toward funding a
special field trip this year.
Another grade sold pet
rocks: creative little fellows
who sit with you quietly
when you read or think
deep thoughts. Another
grade level sold snow
cones. Plus the vendors
donated part of their prof-
its to the PTA to support
the school.
I stopped by the event
toward the end of the
evening and there were


still a couple hundred
people present, kids run-
ning around giggling as
kids do, many enjoying the
movie with their parents
and siblings. The movie
was "Ice Age: Dawn of the
Dinosaurs" and there was
a wonderful energy in the
air that was truly palpable.
Talk about a win-win-win.
New folks walked
through and fell in love
with the Rural Heritage
Center, which still needs
dozens of volunteers.
Students emerged with a
sense of accomplishment
and a better chance for
future field trips, the PTA
raised money to purchase
a document reader/projec-
tor and our local entrepre-
neurs gained new clients.
Not to mention it was a
fall Friday night spent with
family and friends. How
cool is this!
Thanks to Kiersten
Berkoben and Christine
Wydra who shared the
back story with me and
to Dr. Erwin and Assistant
Principal Michelle Baker
who were on hand and
smiling from ear to ear, so
proud of their students and
their accomplishments.


We love the ongo-
ing partnership between
Geneva Elementary and
the Rural Heritage Center,
which was the Historic
Geneva School. That thread
of community and educa-
tion, the bond between
teachers, students, and
families, continues over
generations.
Kiersten summed it up,
"Geneva is a unique and
supportive community,
and we PTA members are
blessed to be a part of it."
Christine added, "There is
such a feeling of family at
the school; I am constantly
amazed." Unique, support-
ive, amazing...that's Geneva
ushering in a wonderful
new tradition.


TALK e
>TO KAREN
Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002,
kphillips@observernewspapers.
com with "Stetson's Corner" in the
subject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8, 1998. Geneva will never
be the same because of Deputy
Gregory it will be better.


VETERANS I Retirement center's staff and residents knit blankets for the troops


< continued from front page
In 1945 soldiers returned
from "over there" with
heroes' welcomes, but many
of their stories had already
been told in the press. In
Vietnam McKechnie's
daughter Elisabeth served in
the Navy, as American pro-
testers sometimes attacked
soldiers themselves. Now,
she says, the nation's inter-
est is turning the other way.
Staring out past green
curtains toward the gray
skies blowing by, she pauses
for a few seconds.
"Why is it now that our
boys are in the back of the


newspapers?" she asks.
"Back in WWII the whole
country was behind them.
What are we doing for our
boys now?"
A box on the table in
front of her brims beyond
full with colorful striped
cotton and wool, destined
westbound for a wounded
soldier's hospital bed to add
a bit of comfort during a
tortuous recovery from
the trauma of war. The 200
blankets the group has sent
so far act as a bit of a thank
you, she said.
"We just want them to
know that we do care."


Every now and then a
thank you note takes the
3,000-mile trip back to
Agnes Prendergast, who's
knitted nine blankets so
far.
"Agnes told me a story of
a soldier so badly burned
that he couldn't sit up and
had to lay on his stomach,"
McKechnie said. "One of
our blankets covered him."
Then the spritely lithe
woman with a well-coiffed
puff of white hair cracks a
small smile.
"When we put these on
their bed, it makes it their
bed," she said.


Come tomorrow this
room will fill with clicks
and whirring of seven sew-
ing machines joining patch-
work quilts, and two sergers
stitching the final seams as a
team of a dozen readies for
a fond farewell. It's almost
delivery day, with one more
batch of knitted, crocheted
and hand-sewn blankets
ready for the road.
Those days, when
Mayflower Retirement
Community employees and
residents descend upon the
activity room, are like fam-
ily gatherings, she says. As
McKechnie folds a blanket


Tuesday morning, a friend
stops by to drop off anoth-
er, exchanging a few kind
words before shuffling off
down the hallway.
Tomorrow it'll be more
than small talk, as the ladies
pick up their knitting nee-
dles, spin yarn and lend
wistful deference to free-
dom born of sacrifice.
"The people who work
here and the people who
live here we're all work-
ing together for our boys,"
McKechnie said. "We don't
do it for thank you. We do it
for love."


Published Friday,
November 13, 2009


etfnjfunolsicc


Volume 19
Issue No. 46


Phone 407-563-7000 SeminoleVoice.com Fax 407-563-7099


PUBLISHER
Kyle Taylor, 407- 563-7009
kyle@''observernewspapers.com
EDITOR
Isaac Babcock. 407-563-7023
isaacb@observernewspapers.com
DESIGNER
Eric Sly.I i,-. : -;,i
-1 iI' I S ij V-iI VI ,-.1HWS .1[,0H 1 ", ,[1
CHIEF REPORTER
Isaac Babcock ,I Wintlr -ri niim'
isaacb,'aobservernewspapers.com
ADVERTISING SALES
Craig Cherry. 352-217-9157
ccherry@observernewspapers.com


The Seminole Voice is published every other Friday
by Community Media Holdings, LLC. USPS #008-093
Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo. Fla.


REPORTERS
Jenny Andreasson- jennya,''observernewspapers.conm
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COLUMNISTS
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Sandi Vidal of Casselberry sandi@'christianhelp.org

COPY EDITORS
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CLASSIFIED LISTINGS
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The Seminole Voice publishes every other Friday for readers in Oviedo.
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Springs and their neighbors.
Seminole Voice began publishing in 1991. Its current owner is Observer Newspa-
pers, which also publishes the Winter Park-Maitland Observer newspaper.
The Seminole Voice is free for a single issue: additional copies are 50c each.


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cycle all in-office paper waste, bottles
and cans.


Seminole Voice


November 13 November 26, 2009 Page A5






Page A6 November 13 November 26, 2009


GREYHOUNDS I Rescue groups all over are suffering from decreased donations


< continued from page 3
Club.
Harris said that she
approached the track
before, asking to rent one
of their empty kennels
for $500 a month but was
turned down, so this dona-
tion was unexpected.
Loewe said that when he
found out that the adop-
NI r~mFIUI


tion center's rent had been
raised and they were facing
a $500 a month shortage, it
was a number they felt they
could help alleviate.
The kennel club provides
donations to several local
charities and greyhound
adoption groups with
money produced during
their Charity Days. During


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
More than 40 dogs await rescue at a Longwood shelter, which has been forced to
downsize due to rising costs and donations, which have failed to keep up.


these two days, the tax pro-
ceeds from racing normally
given to the state are allo-
cated to charity groups.
Almost all the greyhounds
that Harris' group receives
are from kennel clubs. She
works with the dog train-
ers who control where they
end up when their racing
careers are over.
Loewe said that the train-
ers are very invested in their
dogs and care for them con-
stantly. He said that only
when dogs are injured to a
point that they could not
recover are owners faced
with the decision to eutha-
nize.
"We don't think this is
a sport that is inhumane
or else we would not be
involved in it," Loewe said.
Harris said that there are
many groups that cannot
afford to rent kennels but
are working to help adopt
out greyhounds by first plac-
ing them in foster homes.
Judy Shamp, coordinator


of Gold Coast Greyhound
Adoptions, said that the
donations are definite-
ly down and the money
received from grants has
been cut.
Shamp said she likes pro-
viding a chance for these
dogs to find a home because
once they are sent back to
the breeding farms they are
considered livestock and
treated as such.
"I hate to see a breed wast-
ed," Shamp said. "People are
uneducated about them.
They are so easily trained."
Shamp said that their
biggest expenses are travel-
ing costs to move dogs into
homes out of state.
Fundraising, donations
and countless hours of
work put in by dedicated
volunteers are keeping
these organizations afloat
for now as hundreds of dogs
are in need of homes.
"To us it's worth it," said
Harris.


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SAFETY I New Public Safety Center put on demonstrations for visitors


< continued from page 3
Investigators, firefight-
ers and paramedics train
alongside each other -
oftentimes crossing multi-
ple skills as they learn mul-
tiple disciplines of life-sav-
ing techniques. Firefighter
trainees can become certi-
fied as paramedics in the
same building, and they're
learning from real profes-
sionals in the field.


Benton is an 18-year vet-
eran firefighter and a bat-
talion chief for the Sanford
Fire Department. He's also
a teacher in the fire science
program.
"We can show students
what it's like to be in a room
when the smoke explodes
into flame," he said. "This is
as close to real as it gets."
And with the touch of a
button, he can turn off the
fire and continue the les-


son.
When students finish
with the program, they can
immediately work in their
career. Most of the time,
they land right in Central
Florida.
"When any public safety
emergencyarisesinourcom-
munity, you can be assured
that whoever responds is
probably a Seminole State
graduate," McGee said.


PHOTOS BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Students show off crime scene investigation skills during Seminole State's unveiling of its new Center for Public Safety, which teaches and helps certify public safety professionals to ready them for careers.


Free Coney Island Hot Dogs for our

Customers Every Saturday, 9am-5pm


J & B U-Pull-It Auto Parts

10 acres ofAutos for Parts

Entry 17105 E Hwy 50, Bithlo, FL Entry
Fee (407) 568-2131 Fee


The Sign Man

160 East Broadway Phone: (407) 365-3722
PO Box 622143 Fax: (407) 365-7786
Oviedo, FL 32765 www.signman.net
Computerized Laser & Rotary Engraving Picture ID Name Badges
Vinyl Lettered Banners & Signs Self-Inking Rubber Stamps
Magnetic Signs Plaques & Awards Large Format Printing
Phone: (407) 365-3722 Fax: (407) 365-7786
(Located at the base of the Nelson & Co. water tower)


Seminole Voice





The Voice November 13 November 26, 2009 Page A7


THIS WEEK in human history

R Edward Teach, also known as Blackbeard, was killed off North
Carolina's Outer Banks during a bloody battle with the British
| navy. Teach was the most infamous pirate of his day, winning the
popular name of Blackbeard for his long, dark beard, which he
I N T E R E S T S was said to light on fire during battles to intimidate his enemies.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
Seniors competed in the first event of the 35th Golden Age Games on Oct. 31. The event continued the following weekend, through Thursday, Nov. 12, with bowling, golf, horseshoes and swimming.


*IJCLEBRAJITIN.HJJERJ5:YARSSERVING YOURICOMMUITY-I


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Winnie Whidden, MSN, ARNP-C
Voted Best Doctors of Central FL,
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for 7 consecutive years


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Additional offices in Waterford Lakes, Hunters Creek & Orange City


507 N. New York Ave. R-4
Winter Park


Residential and Commerical


Michael Pabalis
pabalismichael@hotmail.com
407-267-3091


I --i


\






Page A8 November 13 November 26, 2009


G.O.


For Greater Orlando's


Family

Calendar


Family Bingo will be held at
Riverside Park, 1600 Lockwood
Blvd, at 7 p.m. on Friday, Nov.
13.
Prizes will be awarded to the
winners of each game. Cost is
$2/card per person with a five
card maximum. Space is limited,
and on a first-come, first-served
basis. For more information call
Riverside Park at 407- 971-
5575.

Oviedo Recreation and Parks
will be offering a free movie in
the park at dusk on Saturday, Nov.
14. Come spend an evening with
your family and friends under
the stars enjoying a movie! It's
located at Riverside Park, 1600
Lockwood Blvd., and the movie
is Disney Pixar's "UP" (PG). Bring
your family, blankets and picnic
baskets. Snacks and drinks will
also be available for purchase.
Please call 407-971-5575 for
more information.

American Education Week
will be celebrated during the
week of Nov. 15. The theme
for this year, "Great Public
Schools: A Basic Right and Our
Responsibility," encourages
many creative possibilities for
special events. Sponsors include
the National PTA, National
Education Association, National
School Boards Association,
National Association of School
Administrators, American
Federation of Teachers, Council
of Chief State School Officers,
National School Public Relations
Association, the American Legion,
and the U.S. Department of Labor.
Schools in Seminole County are
celebrating American Education
Week with various activities.
Some of the special events are
as follows:
On Tuesday, Nov. 17 there will
be a teach-in. Volunteer speakers
come into classrooms in every
Seminole County Public School
and share their knowledge
and expertise. This year our
students and teachers will learn
about such careers as nursing,
military, firefighting, TV reporting,
catering, printing, writing, traffic
engineering, photography,
advertising, real estate, and law
enforcement.

The city of Oviedo Recreation
and Parks Department is having
fun days for children kindergarten
through 12 years of age at
Riverside Park, 1600 Lockwood
Blvd. Call 407-971-5575 for more
information. There will be fun,
games, craft and movie-time and
more on those days when school
is out of session. The cost is $30
for Oviedo city Residents, $50 for
non-resident members, and $60
for non-residents. A minimum
of 10 participants are needed to
conduct the program.


PHOTO COURTESY OF LIL' IGUANA CHILDREN'S SAFETY FOUNDATION
Lil' Iguana Children's Safety Foundation was brought to Florida by Chris and Malori Busick in order to teach preventative safety measures to children.


CARMEN CARROQUINO
GUEST REPORTER

Move over Barney and
friends, another reptile is
singing and dancing its way
into the hearts and minds of
local children to teach valu-
able, life-saving lessons.
New to Orlando, Lil'
Iguana Children's Safety
Foundation is a 15-year-
old, non-profit organi-
zation based out of New
Hampshire that promotes,
educates and demonstrates
safety lessons for children 2
to 8 years old.
Through interactive song
and dance DVDs and audi-
ence participation in live
shows, Lil' Iguana teaches
children through 15 pro-
grams the importance of car
and bicycle safety, traveling
with a buddy and knowing
who a stranger is just to
name a few.
Oviedo residents Chris
and Malori Busick, execu-
tive directors of the Lil'
Iguana program in Florida,
say it's a proactive program
that appeals to both chil-
dren and parents in that it
allows parents to learn how
to talk to their children
about the dangers their
children could face, while
giving children the confi-
dence to learn what's right
and what's wrong from a
trusted companion.
"It's always been closing
the barn door after the horse
has gotten out," Malori
said. "It's always been look-
ing for a child after they've
been missing or after some-
thing's happened. The pro-
gram is about teaching


children what to do before
something happens."
As a preventative mea-
sure against the dangerous
situations children are sub-
jected to every day such as
car safety and child preda-
tors, Lil' Iguana provides
a friendly face and cuddly
exterior for children to talk
about their feelings and
learn in a non-threatening
way that the world isn't
always a safe place to live
in.
Malori said it's not about
scaring children into behav-
ing like she was taught, but
about singing songs and
dancing to remember les-
sons that could ultimately
save a child's life.
In a region where chil-
dren go missing and acci-
dental injuries, such as
drownings, occur almost
daily, Malori said the pro-
gram is needed more than
ever in Florida.
"I think Florida's finally
seeing that the problems
of kidnapped children and
things happening have got-
ten to a point that people
thought we'd never reach,"
she said. "It was so sad
when Summer Thompson
went missing because her
mother said she didn't even
know what a stranger was."
The Busicks, who own
Avalon SLC a company
that helps nonprofits with
fundraising, event plan-
ning and advertising -
say as executive directors
of Lil' Iguana they aren't
only about fundraising, but
going out into the commu-
nity and getting their hands
dirty.


Both are currently in the
process of reaching out to
Orlando-area elementary
schools, day cares, church-


es, parents with big back-
yards, and any and all who
want to see and learn from
Lil' Iguana in live action.
Whether it's bringing
the iguana and setting up
a booth to raise money or
just having an informa-
tional presentation of the
program, the Busicks just
want to get the word out,
even if space and funding
are issues. They say it's not
about the amount of chil-
dren in the audience, but
about the amount of infor-
mation that the children
are learning.
"The problem with
schools is a lot of them
don't have the funding to
produce these live shows,"
Chris said. "For them, we
are out there helping them
raise funds because when
one school sees it going on,
then they want it too."
Malori added, "In high
schools you have these great
auditoriums and space to
put on these shows, but in
elementary schools you
get this 'caf6-gyma-torium'
space that isn't conducive
to putting on a show."
To reach many of the
local schools in the area,
Chris is working on a part-
nership with Regal Cinemas
in Oviedo and Waterford
Lakes to hold live shows
in front of the theaters. He
said he hopes to simulcast
the shows to the surround-
ing schools, so they too can
get a glimpse of the "Wiggle-
esque" show that teaches


all of safety lessons through
reggae, pop, country and
R&B songs.
With the Lil' Iguana
program in its infancy in
Florida, the Busicks have
only just begun their work
- they officially became
directors of the Florida pro-
gram in August.
The founder, Jim
Tomaszewski and his wife,
Laurie, wanted to make sure
they were right for the job.
"We've created a pro-
gram that can be done
everywhere," Tomaszewski
said. "Orlando made sense
because of the family envi-
ronment it has, as well as
the number of causalities
that could have been avoid-
ed with Lil' Iguana's teach-
ings."
The Tomaszewskis and
Busicks say they want to
see Lil' Iguana become
a statewide institution in
Florida elementary schools
and then go nationwide.
Bumping Barney and
squeezing SpongeBob from
their top spots of beloved
creatures wouldn't hurt
either.


filllIguana
For moenfrm tinvii
ww .liigaauar


The Voice





The Voice

Calendar


The Tremont, at 7015 Red Bug
Lake Road in Oviedo, will be
hosting Move for the Cure from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday,
Nov. 14, in support of the
American Cancer Society. Visit
mymoveforacure.com for more
information.
The American Lung
Association's Fight for Air
Climb will be at 8 a.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 14 at the Bank
of America Center. Visit www.
fightforairclimborlando.com or
call 407-425-5864.
From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 14, Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor &
Reed, P.A. along with another
group of volunteers will gather
in Sanford to rebuild the home
of a disabled Operation Iraqi
Freedom servicewoman. Other
volunteers are still needed, and
encouraged to bring their own
yard work tools. Call 407-843-
4600 for more information. The
address is 2404 Adams Court in
Sanford.
The dedication of the Purple
Heart memorial will be at 3 p.m.
on Saturday, Nov. 14, at Lake
Baldwin, 2380 Lake Baldwin
Lane.
At 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 15,
Seminole State College of
Florida, in conjunction with
the Seminole Messiah Choral
Society, will host the free 10th
annual Messiah Sing-Along. in
the Sanford/Lake Mary Campus
Fine Arts concert Hall (building
G). For more information visit
www.seminolestate.edu/arts or
call 407-708-2040.
This Sunday, Nov. 15 is the
"Ride Like an Eagle" bike
run. Presented by SUNNY Radio
105.9, the run is a benefit for
Operation ShoeBox, a charitable
organization that sends items to
troops.
The run will begin atthe Seminole
Harley-Davidson in Sanford and
end at the Steve Miller Band and
George Thorogood show at the
University of Central Florida.
The run is already sold out,
but donations are still being
accepted. For more information,
visit www.sunny1059.com or


call 407-919-1000.
Seminole State College of
Florida's Tuesday Voices, an
open-mic poetry reading series,
continues its season at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 17, in the Sanford/
Lake Mary Campus Multipurpose
Room (building C).
This event is free. For more
information, call 407-708.2691
or e-mail at harrisw@
seminolestate.edu.
The city of Casselberry is
hosting a Calendar Artists'
Night as a kickoff event from
6-8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, at the
Casselberry Art House, 127 Quail
Pond Circle. Come enjoy a free
closing artist reception featuring
these works and get your own
calendar signed by the artists.
Light Up UCF, 50 nights of
music, lights and ice, kicks off on
Friday, Nov. 20 and runs through
Jan. 8 at UCF outside of the UCF
Arena. For more information,
visit lightupucf.com.
The Orange Audubon Society's
November Field Trip to Lake
Lotus Park in Altamonte Springs
will be held Saturday, November
21. We will hike about two miles,
half of whichwill be on sometimes
slippery boardwalks. Meet at
8:40 a.m. at the tram stop in the
Lake Lotus Park off-site parking
lot on Magnolia Homes Road just
south of Maitland Boulevard. It is
free and children are welcome.
Questions? Call 407-851-5416
or visit www.orangeaudubonfl.
org.
Tuskawilla United Methodist
Church, at 3925 Red Bug
Lake Road, will host a free
Thanksgiving Day Feast from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday,
Nov. 26. It will include turkey,
trimmings and desert.
The Gallery on First, at 211 E.
First Street, will host "Holiday
Delights at Gallery on First"
from Friday, Nov. 27 to Dec. 27.
Eleven artists have created one
of a kind, handmade, affordable
gift items and works of art for
the holiday season. There is a
holiday open house on Sunday
Dec. 6 from 2-5 p.m.


November 13 November 26, 2009 Page A9


FOOT BALL

? .-4 01- "


KNIGHTS


CANNED FooD


DRIVEh.


Learning E pr %$S(

Of Winter Park


Your local destination for

Unique and

Educational Toys


Winter Park Village
460 North Orlando Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32789
407.677.8697
Look for the catalog in today's paper!





Page Al0 November 13 November 26, 2009


GAMES I Seniors from all over got a chance to show off their sports skills


< continued from page 7
record.
David and Denise Haga of
Jacksonville find together-
ness in archery, fishing and
camping. David is retired
from the construction
industry, has been an archer
for 55 years and uses a com-
pound release bow. "I like
competing with myself," he
said.
The men wish more
women would join the sport


like petite-framed Barbara
Steffens, 75, from Mulberry
who took up archery four
years ago. Steffens' white
shirt bears her NAA cham-
pionship patch from the
National Games in Colora-
do Springs where she won
first place for the female
Compound Master bow in
her age group.
"I enjoy the challenge,
the exercise and the cama-
raderie," said the retired


nurse, a motorcyclist.
Tim Austin is event direc-
tor for the National and
Florida State Senior Games
and serves on several state
and local archery boards
and advisory committees.
At 71 he understands what
seniors love about sports
in general and archery in
particular. "The magnet
is hitting the middle. It's
also good fellowship and a
real feeling of accomplish-


ment."
John Harmon, 82, of The
Villages has been an archer
for 39 years. Retired from
AT&T in Baltimore as a qual-
ity inspector he also enjoys
horseshoes, bowling and is
drawn to the competitive
fun.
National medal winners
include 87-year-old John
Horwath from The Villag-
es who placed first in the
Compound Finger category


at the 2009 Summer Senior
Games in San Francisco and
Len Brunotte from Rock-
ledge who placed second in
the recurve category
When the competition
ended, the seniors filed out
of the stadium perhaps a
little slower, congratulat-
ing each other on launch-
ing more than 3,000 tour-
nament arrows. Well done
archers, your king would be
proud.


Cinema
Coming Nov. 27


'Old Dogs'


Coming Dec. 4


'Armored'
Coming Dec. 18
Coming Dec. 11 Coming Dec.18







'Avatar'
'Invictus'


875 Clark Street,Suite A
Oviedo, FL 32765


Oviedo


Center


www.OviedoVision.com
407.366.7655


A showcase of this week's releases,
and a look ahead to upcoming movies.


Kids Resal

















q07.5qq.5q37
www cLiepotootied5 cotn


---


I


The Voice





November 13 November 26, 2009 Page All


WEATHER
Sunrise Sunsetg


I E PERTRE:LO IGHLO


530 730
6 a.m. I 3 p.m.


560
6 a.m.
Saturday


TODAY: Mostly sunny, with
a high near 73. Northwest
wind between 10 and 15
mph.


UVINDEX


5
Moderate


MORNING LOW 560
DAYTIME HIGH 800

Sunrise Sunset Clear Wind
6:47 a.m. 5:31 p.m. skies NW 5 mph



MORNING LOW 61 0
DAYTIME HIGH 81

Sunrise Sunset Clear Wind
6:48 a.m. 5:31 p.m. skies NNW 5 mph



MORNING LOW 61 o
DAYTIME HIGH 81

Sunrise Sunset Clear Wind
6:49 a.m. 5:31 p.m. skies NE 5 mph


---- - U. -
I:,IT' Ii 'I: YOUR NAME HERE. FROM YOUR CITY!
Want to see your picture in The Voice? Please e-mail it to editor@
observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB in size. Please
include as much information about tile picture as possible, for example
where tile image was taken, what time and who is in it.


NATIONAL


Friday Sat. City


Seattle


44/48 41/50


Los Angeles 51/67 51/68


Houston


56/80 63/82


Atlanta
Chicago
New York


Friday Sat.
45/68 56/71
42/60 47/57
44/55 49/56


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low High
Saturday 11:31 a.m. 5:21 a.m.
Nov. 14 11:48 p.m. 5:32 p.m.
Sunday 12:17 a.m. 6:13 a.m.
Nov. 15 5:29 p.m. 6:17 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST
City Friday Sat.
Jacksonville 52/72 55/76
Miami 62/76 64/80
Tampa 55/73 58/80
Pensacola 49/73 51/75

INTERNATIONAL


City
London
Paris
Tokyo


Friday Sat.
51/59 50/57
52/60 48/56
46/57 53/66


Notes


Students and alumni of the Interior
Design Program at Seminole State
College won first place in the Saks
Fifth Avenue annual Key to Fine Dining
event on Thursday, Oct. 15.
Al Sarabasa Jr. has been named to
the board of directors of the Central
Florida Zoo.
The University of Central Florida
Business Incubation Program


recently marked its 10th anniversary.
The decade-long business incubation
effort has helped more than 130
client companies create 1,653 new
jobs and generates more than $190
million annually in local economic
impact.
The Sanford Orlando Kennel Club
donated $35,380 to local charities and
greyhound adoption groups. They had
a set amount of planned donations,
but made one additional donation


to the Greater Orlando Chapter of
Greyhound Pets of America to help
them stay open.
D & A Building Services Inc.
has secured a significant contract
renewal with Highwoods Properties
(NYSE:HIW) for window cleaning and
pressure washing services at thirteen
office properties in Central Florida
ranging from one-story suburban
commerce centers to high-rise


Orlando office buildings.
Casselberry-based Signature
Systems of Florida was nationally
featured in Security Systems News
magazine's November 2009 issue in
an article titled "A Signature Move at
the Right Time."
MMA superstar Din Thomas has
recently accepted an instructor
position at American Top Team,


Longwood.
Seminole County is proud to
announce that it has been awarded
National Accreditation by the
Commission for Accreditation of Park
and Recreation Agencies.
Seminole State College of Florida
has named Bill Lee director of its new
Center for Public Safety.


Fresh Fruit
'Vine Ripe Tomatoes
Vegetables -




"Get Healthy From the Inside Out!"






WINDOW REGULATORS NEW HEADLIGHTS
- NEW TAILIGHTS SIDE MIRRORS HOODS -
FENDERS AND MORE.....

CALLUS TDAY@ 40-568213


THIS WEEK
IN HISTORY
On Nov. 19,1987, show-
ers and thunderstorms
over Florida produced 5.8
inches of rain in six hours
at Cocoa Beach. The
National Weather Summaty


THE VIEW FROM YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS


Seminole Voice









THIS WEEK in political history


atrocities committed during World War II. An international tribunal
conducted the Nuremberg Trials, and charges ranged from crimes
,,. against peace, to crimes of war, to crimes against humanity.



Educate yourself about a potential employer
EMPLOYMENT chances? and you will be a great fit for the able jobs so it is crucial to do every-
First things first, before you company. It is bad, however; to go thing right from the resume to the
A sk even go to the interview, research in thinking that any part of a job is acceptance of the offer.
A S the company online. If you have beneath you or you are overquali- Until next time,
shopped there or eaten there or fled. Even if you are overqualified, -Sandi
*SanCIj stayed there it can also give a refer- if this is a job you want, you need
ence point. Knowing about a com- to give it your best. TALK A Il
pany can give you insights on the Remember the standard dos: ,TO SANDl
So, you made it to the interview best way to answer questions when arrive on time, act politely to Sandi Vidal is the executive director for Christian
once again and you are thinking asked. everyone you come in contact HELP and the Central Florida Employment Council,
this might be the one to offer you Next, go in confident but not with, ask questions, and send a with more than 10 years of recruiting and human
the job. What can you do to be cocky. It is important to feel like thank you note after the interview. resources experience. Please send questions
about employment by fax 407-260-2949, sandi@
more prepared and increase your you are the right person for the job Competition is fierce for avail- christianhelp.org, or mail Ask Sandi C/ Christian
christianhelp.org, or mail Ask Sandi C/O Christian
HELP, 450 Seminola Blvd., Casselberry, FL 32707.




Letter to the Editor Editoral

Remember our veterans for many years. He and my *
During the month of mother instilled in my fam-
November we commemo- ily a deep sense of gratitude .4 0
rate two important nation- to the sacrifices veterans e
al anniversaries: Veteran's had made on our behalf
Day and Thanksgiving. It to protect the freedoms
is not a coincidence that we daily enjoyed. Each
these two days occur in year, as we gather to give
the same month, consid- thanks aroundte he tradi-
ering that as Americans, tional Thanksgiving table,
our greatest blessing is our we remember those brave
freedom, and it is fitting for men and women who have
us to remember those who defended our freedoms and
have fought to protect our paid the ultimate sacrifice,
freedom. The American way and we also remember pyrd Ma al
of life would not exist were those who are away from
it not for our veterans, their families during the
Today, U.S. soldiers holiday. Let us never takeicated Con
are around the world for granted all that our vet-
using their talents and erans sacrifice in order that
strength to defend democ- we may live in a free land.
racy and freedom and I salute the men andProviders
cannot be with their women serving in today's
families and friends during military today's heroes
Thanksgiving this year. This and tomorrow's veterans.
Veteran's and Thanksgiving They have inherited the
Day, it is only right that we defense of our nation and
pay tribute to those whose stand guard in the shadow
sacrifice and selfless service of their predecessors. This
have afforded us the price- Thanksgiving, I encourage
less privileges of freedom, you, as you gather together
democracy and unmatched with friends and family, to
opportunities that we enjoy remember our veterans and
in the United States. the incredible gift that they
Veteran's Day holds a are to our country.
special place in my family.
My father served his coun- -Florida Senate President
try in the military and FBI Jeff Atwater 4 0
0 _


Seniors from
Seminole High School
talk about their
advanced placement
(AP) classes.
S / I like AP psychology
because I am tying
it into medicine to
understand how
everyday things apply
to psychology. I'd like
to go into podiatry.
-Samyak S.
17 years old


Literature is my I really like our envi-
favorite AP class. I ronmental AP class
love to read myster- because we have a
ies and true stories. I cool teacher. I'd like
want to be a doctor- to teach kids about
an obstetrician. I'm animals and the envi-
also studying to be ronment. I'll probably
an EMT. go to FSU and major
-Ebony P. in psychology.
18 years old Ryan E.
17 years old


Literature is my favorite AP class I
love structure and grammar. I'd like
to teach theater arts to middle or high
school students. I like character devel-
opment and literary devices.
-Lauren B.
16 years old

We would
My two favorite AP love
classes are literature to u r
and psychology. I'm
going to major in fro
psychology and go
to medical school. I
think you can relate Voices!
better to patients
when you understand
them.
-Lisbely V. Call editor Isaac Babcock at 407-563-7023
17 years old Voi
to have The Voice visit your class or group.


U


Page Al 2 November 13 November 26, 2009


Seminole Voice


I







November 13 November 26, 2009 Page A13


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Retail Air Conditioning
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Administrative Assistant
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Manager
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Clinical Dietician
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Page Al 4 November 13 November 26, 2009 Seminole Voice




THIS WEEK in sports history

Brazilian soccer great Pele scored his 1,000th professional goal in
a game, against Vasco da Gama in Rio de Janeiro's Maracana sta-
dium. Born Edson Arantes do Nascimento in Tres Coracos, Brazil, in
ATL E T IC 1940, Pele scored 1,282 goals in 1,363 games during his career.



Knights trampled by Longhorns last week

ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

Flying high on the updraft of a two-game
winning streak, the Knights came crash-
ing down Saturday in Austin, Texas, as the
Longhorns decimated them 35-3.
If that 35-point score seems familiar, it's
because the Longhorns scored the same ..
points in 2007 when the Knights put up 32
to nearly upset them in the Bright House's
football debut. But this time around the
Longhorns' pass defense grounded the
Knights' air game.
For the first time this season UCF (5-4, 1
3-2) was held to less than 100 yards in the
air, with only 76 total in the game. Many of
those came on their first and only score of
the game, when the Knights took the lead
early in the second quarter with a Nick
Cattoi field goal.
That 3-point gap didn't hold the Knights --
over for long, as Texas (9-0) then went on -- -. -
a 35-point scoring spree to take the lead
and run away with it for the rest of the
game.
The tale of the game unraveled in the
total offense category, with Texas gaining
PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
> turn to KNIGHTS on next page Quarterback Brett Hodges may return against Houston after recuperating from injuries sustained against Marshall two weeks ago.


Lions clinch district championship


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK
Lions quarterback Blake Bortles was less of a factor in their district-clinching win, but still passed for 101 yards as his team vanquished local rival Winter Springs Friday night.


IHE VOICE


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

The Oviedo Lions are dis-
trict champions after a
33-13 rout of rival Winter
Springs on Friday, Nov. 13.
The win clinched a sweep
of Class 5A District 3 for the
Lions.
Stew Butler's 128 yards
on the ground, plus his four
rushing touchdowns helped
propel the Lions (8-1, 4-0)
to the big win. But quarter-


back Blake Bortles, who had
shined throughout this sea-
son, was held to 101 yards
in the air by the Bears' pass
defense.
The Lions finish off the
regular season by hosting
Lyman at 7:30 p.m. Friday
fortheirhomecominggame.
Miss Florida and Oviedo
graduate Rachel Todd will
appear at halftime.
The Greyhounds (6-3,
1-2) are coming off a 12-8
loss to Seminole.


The Bears (3-6, 3-1)
clinched a playoff berth by
finishing second in their
district despite only win-
ning three of their nine
games. They'll finish the
regular season with a 7:30
p.m. Friday kickoff in Lake
Mary.
The Rams (5-4, 0-3)
are coming off their sixth
straight loss to Lake Brantley
(6-3, 2-1) who beat them
35-21 last week.
The Patriots unloaded


on the Rams, totaling 552
yards in the game, led by
187 yards in the air by quar-
terback Bryce Bergeron.
Two stellar Patriots rush-
ing performances kept
the Rams on their toes,
with Tion Green running
for 139 yards, and Tyler
Krider gaining 130. Xavier
Youngblood's two massive
receptions picked up 121
yards and two touchdowns
for the Patriots.
The Patriots travel to


Hagerty for an end of the
regular season showdown
at 7:30 p.m. Friday.
The Huskies (2-7, 1-3)
have their first winning
streak of the season after
beating Pine Ridge 21-14 in
Deltona last week.
Lake Howell (3-6, 2-2)
grabbed their third win of
the season with a 17-13 vic-
tory over Evans. They'll fin-
ish out their season at 7:30
p.m. Friday at Seminole.





November 13 November 26, 2009 Page A15


Knights open under shoe controversy


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK THE VOICE
The Knights are building energy leading up to their season opener, but newcomer Marcus Jordan's shoes have led to a lost sponsorship deal after he wore Nikes during an exhibition game.


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE

The UCF men's basketball
team hasn't played an offi-
cial game yet, but they're
already making headlines
thanks to their most prom-
inent player, freshman
Marcus Jordan.


Ce
4


i*
*


0


The son of NBA legend
Michael Jordan brought the
spotlight to UCF's growing
basketball program, but
also brought a problem -
his shoes. He announced
in October that he'd be
wearing his dad's Nikes,
despite UCF having a 7-year
exclusive relationship with
Adidas.


,ntral Florida Fairgrounds
4603 West Colonial Drive (SR50)
Orlando, Florida 32808


On Nov. 4 the Knights
unofficially lost the spon-
sorship deal with Adidas,
which had clothed the
school's sports teams and
was up for contract renew-
al. That became appar-
ent after Jordan wore his
father's Nike Air Jordan
Retro XII during the team's
exhibition game against St.


I,


Friday, December 4 from 10:00 AM 6:00 PM
Saturday, December 5 from 10:00 AM 5:00 PM
Sunday, December 6 from 10:00 AM 3:00 PM


BUY SELL TRADE
52 DEALERS PUBLIC AUCTION (SATURDAY, 5:30PM)
USPS PARTICIPATION SOCIETIES (CSA, CSS, GPS, AND OTHERS)
180 EXHIBIT FRAMES SPONSORED BY FSDA, HOSTED BY CFSC
SHOW CACHET AND CANCEL (LINCOLN)


Contact: Mr. Francis Ferguson 407.493.0956


Leo. Halfway through the
contest an Adidas spokes-
person announced that
UCF had broken the terms
of their exclusivity agree-
ment and they would not
continue their business
relationship.
The Knights won that
game against St. Leo 84-65,
but lost an estimated $3
million sponsorship deal in
the process.
The Knights open the
official season at 7 p.m.
Friday hosting UMass, giv-
ing Jordan his official debut
in a Knights jersey.


Alongside him will play
the second youngest team
in the country, with 13
underclassmen on the ros-
ter. Only three upperclass-
men return to the lineup
this year senior Drew
Speraw and juniors A.J.
Tyler and Taylor Young.
UMass could give UCF a
good opening to their sea-
son. The Minutemen were
12-18 last season. Last sea-
son the Knights finished
17-14 and fell to Memphis
in the Conference USA
championship game.


KNIGHTS I UCF faces Houston at
Nov. 14 homecoming game


< continued from previous page
a massive 537 total while
holding the Knights to only
151.
That weak Knights offen-
sive performance, largely
in the air, came courtesy
of QB Rob Calabrese, who
played his first full game
this season. He completed
10 of 19 passes for 76 yards,
mostly while being chased
by Longhorn tackles that
broke through the Knights'
line to sack Calabrese six
times.
The Knights would only
enter the red zone one time
in the game, converting on
the field goal. But where
they didn't convert were
third downs, going 2-for-12
in the game.
Most of the big yards
would come in the air for


the Longhorns, who used a
lightning-quick offense to
race downfield and score in
only a fewplays. The Knights
actually held possession
of the ball for the majority
of the game, but watched
helplessly as the Longhorns
turned short possessions
into rapid scores.
For the first time this sea-
son the Knights out-rushed
an opponent and lost the
game, as they gained 75
yards on the ground versus
67 by the Longhorns.
The Knights return home
this weekend to face one of
their toughest Conference
USA opponents of the sea-
son, Houston (8-1, 4-1).
That game kicks off at noon,
Saturday. The last time the
Knights played Houston in
2006 they lost 51-31.


-191Lt ON

The Florida State Stamp Show a WSP even
The Florida State Stamp Show a WSP v


4 www.FLOREXStampShow.com

S,"w i-itdr.I


I ub. I/ A. I /. 0 -. qm ,-LA


Seminole Voice


, I

A





Page A16 November 13 November 26, 2009


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Seminole Voice


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