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www.Seriinr�IeVoice.com


Serving Greater Oviedo and Winter Springs for more than 17 years!


December 5- December 11,2008 E-

S- Observer
A Winter Springs playwright gets her 15
minutes of fame in Maitland. >Section B


Give back
Read about local charities worth your
generosity in this season of giving.


Lawton's

life of

service

ends at 102


Kathryn Louise Lawton,
102, a member of one of
the founding families of
Oviedo, died Friday, Nov. 28,
2008. A memorial service
for Lawton will be held at
11 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 9, in
the sanctuary of the First
United Methodist Church
of Oviedo. The family will
host guests for a visitation
service from 10:30 a.m., in
advance of the memorial.
- A family luncheon will
follow the service at the
Oviedo Woman's Club at
414 King St.
A graveside
l service was
held for her
on Wednesday,
Dec. 3, at
the -Oviedo;
Cemetery
Lawt on - West
awton Broadway
Street.
Lawton was born June
13, 1906. She was an 88-year
member of the Methodist
Church and titled a char-
ter member of the Oviedo
Woman's Club, as her moth-
er Lillian Lee Lawton was
pregnant with Kathryn at
the time she helped found
the club.
Kathryn graduated from
Sanford High School, fol-
lowed by Wesleyan College
in Macon, Ga.
Kathryn is survived byher
nephewH.JeanLaney,Eustis,
and his wife Susan, cousins
John and Claire Evans of
Oviedo, William and Louise
Martin of Davidson, N.C.,
John and Dorothy Jones
of Slavia, Rex and Thelma
Clonts of Oviedo, Robert
E. Lee of Oviedo, Don and

> turn to LAWTON on page A4


rY TicD.


Jean Hovey and Gary Bonner join Winter Springs' City Commission on Monday, replacing Robert Miller and Don Gilmore on the dais after an energized campaign season.


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

Winter Springs welcomes Jean
Hovey and Gary Bonner to the City
Commission on Monday with a swear-
ing-in of the newly elected.
Bonner replaces Commissioner
Don Gilmore and Hovey takes
Commissioner Robert Miller's spot.
Here's a look at the journey that got
them here:


Gary Bonner
Bonner said he is inspired to step into
his newest community role.
He said he is invested in his city
already, as an active Rotary Club and
church member, and always knew he
wanted to serve as an elected official.
A love for public service seems to
run in the Bonner family. WHis father,
George, served as a.city councilman
and then as mayor of their home-
town, Palm Beach Gardens.
"That early exposure (to city poli-


tics) generated curiosity," Bonner
said, adding that he always knew he
wanted to run for office himself and
was just waiting for the opportune
time to take on the challenge.
Gary's mother, Rae, said although
her son was quite young, he was
involved in his father's campaign. "He
saw his dad pursue what the citizens
of the town wanted," she said. "His
dad has a strong personality, he's very

> turn to ENTRANCE on page A3


Mall owner gets debt relief


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE

General Growth Properties
has two extra weeks to pay
off its $958 million debt. It
also gets a boost from two
companies that invested in
the Oviedo Marketplace's
owner.
Pershing Square Capital
Management bought more
than 20 million shares, a 7.5
percent stake, and Morgan
Stanley and Co. boosted its
ownership to more than
13 million shares, a 5.1
percent stake, according
to Securities and Exchange
Commission filings.


On Nov. 30, General
Growth announced it had
secured a two-week exten-
sion and that "the parties
are continuing their dis-
cussions on a longer-term
extension," according to a
company press release.
In a November filing
with the SEC, General
Growth Properties warned
that it was uncertain it
would be able to get exten-
sions or refinance its debt
and may have to seek
Chapter 11 bankruptcy
protection, which allows a
company to reorganize or
rehabilitate.


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK -- THE VOICE
A storefront sits vacant in the Oviedo Marketplace mall. The mall's owner informed
the government of its potential bankruptcy, but new investors give hope for its future.


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**************AUTO**ALL FOR ADC 320
2350
WILL CANOVA
UF SMATHERS LIBRARY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


INDEX
Stetson's Corner...............................A4
Celery Stalks .................................... A5
G.O. Family....................................... A8
Cinema........................................... All
Athletics....................................A1 2
Voices ............................................. A14
Classifieds and Games ............. ...... A15
Weather.......................................... A16


__ I~ __~XI_~






Page A2 December 5 - December 11, 2008 The Voice

THIS WEEK in history

.. , i wThe first execution by lethal injection took place at the state
WE* � penitentiary in Huntsville, Texas. Charles Brooks Jr., convicted of
murdering an auto mechanic, received an intravenous injection of
Sodium pentothal, the barbiturate that is known as a "truth serum"
'fI ME (when administered in lesser doses.




Landowner pitches plan for preservation


JENNY ANDREASSON
THE VOICE
About nine acres of land in
the Lake Jesup basin may
be preserved.
The parcel, which backs
up to State Road 434 just
west of DeLeon Street, is
owned by Stan Toledo,
who bought the land
in November 2006 for
$500,000 thinking he had
three acres of developable
land.
"I got a fair price but then
I realized I only got one
acre to develop," he said,
standing before the Winter
Springs City Commission
on Nov. 24. He wanted to
make his plans known.
The parcel, which was
90 percent wooded in 2004
according to a county aerial
view, is just too wet. He said
a previous owner illegally
cut down trees, increasing
the weiland area and leav-
ing him to incur a "severe
fine" from the, St. Johns
River Water Management
District if he developed
more than one acre.
"I'm financially going
broke over this land. I was
misled ... I didn't cut down
all those trees but [St.Johns]
said they didn't care," he
said.
Toledo's land is cur-


rently zoned commercial
with a conservation over-
lay, Senior Planner Eloise
Sahlstrom said. Instead of
developing what little he
can, Toledo wants to put a
conservation easement on
the parcel, setting it aside
for preservation, and then
sell the credits the state
gives him for preserving it.
A mitigation credit is
banked for each acre of
wetland restored or cre-
ated, according to the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
The credit-holder can then
sell those credits to a devel-
oper who wants to develop
wetlands elsewhere.
Toledo hopes to preserve
not just his land, but anoth-
er eight acres of wetlands
owned by neighbor Don
Weaver. Toledo said he is
-negotiating with Weaver to
buy those and has his eye
on an additional 20 acres
also owned by Weaver.
"I would like to expand
to 40 to 45 acres for a gov-
ernment group to buy my
land," Toledo said. "I hope
someday I can just break
even on this parcel."
But Weaver's land has as
much as seven years left on
a lease with a tree farm.
"[Toledo] wants to touch
St. Johns (government


land) north of me and go
through mine to be contig-
uous," Weaver said. But the
lease is set in stone. Once
it's run out, he doesn't
know if he'd even consider
preserving his rural land.
"Who knows after that," he
said. "As I said, I can't do
anything, about that right
now."
Toledo brought the pre-
sentation to the Winter
Springs Commission -
despite his land being out-
side of the city limits - to
inform them, but also to
get the word out that he's
looking for a buyer.
Now is the opportune
time for a private or gov-
ernment group to buy it,
Toledo said. "If a group
waits until the economy
improves then wetland
rights will be much more
valuable and the price per
credit will increase great-
ly."
Toledo said his type
of land is in short sup-
ply, but the stock may
begin to increase
when Constitutional
Amendment 4 takes effect
in 2010. The amendment
will cease taxation of con-
servation land, expected
to be incentive enough to
substantially increase the'
number of designations.


iV Call
,407.628.8500
for home
delivery
or visit us
.. . online!


I.'I 1'- I, HU D DIuun -- - 'r r ['.L
Stan Toledo's land near Lake Jesup, shown here in part, didn't turn out to be what
he expected when he bought it. Now he's hoping to sell it to a preservation group.


- A-


>4 IK GRAND RE-OPENING!
Asi UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP!


"A Furniture Menagerie"
73 Alafaya Woods Blvd. * Alafaya Square * Between Publix & Froggers
A, B )^/? (


I ssVolume 18
- Issue No. 49


:hone 40 7-6Z8500- Seminoleoice.cor - Fax 407-628-4053


. PUBLISHER
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INTERN
Mary Elizabeth Schurrer


The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice is published on Fridays
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Periodicals postage is paid at Oviedo, Florida.


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The Oviedo-Winter Springs Voice publishes on Fridays for readers in Oviedo,
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Published Friday,-
December5, 2008










Tough times squeeze schools


KRISTY VICKERY
THE VOICE

As steep budget cuts take a
toll on Florida school dis-
tricts, the cost of a quality
education is getting harder
to afford.
"We did a $700 mil-
lion cut this year," said
Joie Cadle, Orange County
School Board chairwoman.
"There's not much more
to cut. We are down to the
bone marrow."
With more budget cuts
projected for next year, the
financial outlook for public
education is not promising,
and the hope for improving
the quality of education is
dwindling.
"The quality of education
will certainly be challenged
if we aren't smart with our
budget cuts," School Board
member Daryl Flynn said.
"We have to keep the cuts
from affecting the class-
room."
Although school districts
are doing what they can
to cut back outside of the
classroom, students are still
feeling the affects inside the
classroom, Flynn said.
"Adequate funding allows,
schools to put different'
programs in place that help
students academically,"
Flynn said. "For instance,
computer and science labs,
reading and math coaches,
(and) in-class paraprofes-
sionals are all examples of


programs and positions
that add to the overall
success of a student. More
often than not, these are
the services and positions
that are cut first."
Mike Cahill, president of
Orange County Classroom
Teachers Association, said
the lack of programs in
schools directly impacts a
student's well-being. With
more emphasis on prepar-
ing for tests, such as the
FCAT or SAT, teachers are
losing the creativity they
once had in the class-
rooms.
Despite-the amount of
time and money spent pre-
paring students for tests,
teachers in Orange County
are still not seeing scores
improve.
Throughout the last 10
years, Orange County Public
Schools has spent more
per-student than neighbor-
ing Seminole County, but
have continuously had sig-
nificantly lower SAT scores
than Seminole County,
below even the state and
national averages. The aver-
age critical reading score
for Orange County this year
was 488 - 26 points lower
than Seminole County.
That's eight points lower
than the state average and
14 points lower than the
national average.
Writing and math scores
in Orange County were
also lower. The average
writing score was 469, 23


points lower than Seminole
County, while math in
Orange County averaged 32
points lower.
With the demographic
disparity, though, Cadle
cautions against side-by-
side comparison.
"Comparing Seminole
County public schools
to Orange County public
schools is like comparing
apples to oranges," Cadle
said. "Seminole does not
have the same makeup as
Orange County. We are an
urban school district. Our
poverty levels are differ-
ent."
Although there are
significant differenc-
es between Orange and
Seminole county schools,
both school district officials
agree more funding would
help improve the quality of
education.
Orange County School
Board member Rick Roach
said the county is spend-
ing all it can, but he wor-
ries that's not enough. He
would like to see at least a
10-20 percent increase per
student.
"I think Orange County
schools just don't have
enough [funding] to give
kids all they need," he said.
Seminole County School
Board member Jeanne
Morris said she is also con-
cerned about the quality
of education. She said even
though Seminole County
schools have always done


ARCHIVE PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIE FLETCHER
Educators worry that school funding isn't enough to meet basic needs of students.


well with a lower level of
per-student funding, it is
getting harder and harder.
"You can only cut the
low-hanging fruit once,"*
Morris said.
As 2009 approaches,
school districts grow more
anxious about the state's
$3.5 billion projected bud-
get cut, although they say


they continue to do the best
they can with what they've
got.
"We have the best edu-
cational system, they're
just not funding it," Orange
County's Cahill said. "It's
like giving a mechanic a
hammer and .screwdriver
and telling him to go fix a
car."


ENTRANCE I Hovey praised as a dedicated multitasker with ambition


< continued from the front page

definite, and I think some of those
traits rubbed off on Gary."
Bonner has lived in Winter
Springs since 1992 with his wife,
Leslie, and son, Tyler, 17, a student
at Lake Howell High School. He was
transferred to the area for his job
but decided to make it his perma-
nent home because he enjoys the
city's "pace of life."
He retired from his job as a
Cingular-AT&T executive and now
is a manager of RB Squared, formed
in September with Commissioner
Rick Brown and their campaign
manager Denise Ryser. He is also
a manager of Siana Business and
Phone Accessories with local busi-
nessman Bart Phillips, who owns
419 Metal and Auto Recycling.
When he's not working or vol-


unteering, he's attending his son's
high school baseball and golf games,
walking or biking on the trails, or -
enjoying a day at the beach.
On Monday, his daughter, Ashley,
who is an attorney in Palm Beach
Gardens, will travel to Winter
Springs to swear him into office.
Bob Cameron, Bonner's neigh-
bor of about eight years, said when
Bonner commits to something, he
gets it done. "He cares about the
neighborhood and the community,
and he'll do a thorough and meticu-
lous job."

Jean Hovey
Hovey said her time has come
to make a difference in Winter
Springs.
She, like Bonner, always thought
that she would run for office one
day. "It was a good time to do it," she


said, citing that she didn't have to
* face an incumbent in the election.
Debbie Riggle, a friend of Hovey
for about 11 years, said the com-
missioner-elect is dedicated, hon-
est and a great multitasker. "She's
always worked a full-time job and
she has a large family, then she vol-
unteers. I honestly don't know how
she does it, but she does."
Hovey's hometown is
Bloomington, Minn. Her husband,
Bruce, and she decided to make
Winter Springs their permanent
home 20 years ago because of the
climate and the quality of schools,
she said. They have two grown sons,
Robert and Michael, and two grand-
sons. "I said, 'How about a girl next
time?'" she said with a laugh.
She will be juggling her commis-
sioner duties with that of the Florida
PTA, of which she is president-elect


of a 56-person board. She also
owns her own business in the city,
Jean's Office Assistants, and does
legal work for local firms, including
Michael Jones and Associates.
When she's not working or
attending PTA conventions, she's
trying eateries around town, doing
crafts, or watching baseball on TV.
She is also an avid reader, zoom-
ing through a book or more each
week, she said. She likes every kind
of book from fiction to self-help.
On Monday, Hovey's mother, two
sisters, brother and friends will join
her immediate family at the swear-
ing-in ceremony.
Sandy Traeger, who's been
Hovey's friend for about 25 years
and worked with her in the PTA,
said she's very thorough in what-
ever she does. "She listens well and
tries to see the big picture."


I corcigm


A correction published last
week should have read: A
photograph of the Oviedo High
School homecoming parade that
published in the previous edition
included an erroneous caption.
It should have noted that the
parade photos were taken on
King Street in Oviedo. *.


Knights bring cheer

UCF football cornerback Joe Burnett visits
with Angelina Shalkowitz, 6, at the pediatric
ward of Florida Hospital in Orlando on Friday,
Nov. 28. Angelina was staying at the hospital
because of a bout of asthmatic pneumonia,
but took time to talk and color illustrations with
crayons with the athletes.
This is the third year that the Knights have vis-
ited the hospital on the day after Thanksgiving
to cheer up young patients.


The Voice


December 5 - December 11, 2008 PaeA










Geneva takes charge of its past


E , By Karen McEnany-Phillips


Geneva had some excit-
ing news this year that you
might be unaware of. The
greater Geneva community
has undertaken a project so
significant that it will posi-
tively impact generations
to come.
Earlier this year a non-
profit organization was cre-
ated, The Island and Village
of Geneva Rural Heritage
Center (RHC) incorporated
and secured with 501 (c)
(3) tax exemption status.
The vision is to transform
the historic Old Geneva
Elementary School into a
Rural Heritage Center, a liv-
ing example that will link
local events, community
assets, historical elements,
the latest technology, and
rural character with a
dynamic educational ele-
ment.
Not only will this project
preserve the character and
antiquity ofrural heritage,



LAWTON I Long
life left behind
< continued from the front page

Barbara Shaffer of Oviedo,
Lucille Lawton Dickinson
of Boynton Beach, -and D.
BlaineandCharlotte Mikesell
of Winona Lakes, Ind. Also
surviving is her loyal house-
keeper Pearl Hamilton and
her beloved cat, Precious.
In lieu of flowers, it was
Kathryn's request that
memorials be sent in her
name to the Building Fund
of the First United Methodist
Church of Oviedo at 263
King St., Oviedo, FL 32765.


it will also contribute to
the knowledge base needed
to make informed deci-
sions for the future about
rural issues like natural
lands, cultural diversity and
smart growth. The project's
scope is multifaceted, with
many working parts that
work independently and
together.
Over the next couple
of weeks I'll share with
you some of the priorities
laid out by RHC President
Christopher Stapleton.
Although the RHC build-
ing will be physically
located in Geneva, it will
represent the many rural
communities of Seminole
County. The talent to bring
it to fruition will be drawn
from people not only from
Geneva, but from all over
the county, the state, and
even in other parts of the
country.
The old Geneva


Elementary School build-
ing currently belongs
to the Seminole County
School Board and the legal
and detailed process of
transferring ownership
from the board to the RHC
has been in progress for
several months. The School
Board and Seminole
County have been very
supportive of the proposal
and are working with the
RHC to be sure that all
codes and regulations are
being followed before ren-
ovation begins.
The proposed building
design might include a cor-
ridor honoring the history
of the school including
photographs, memorabilia
and a timeline of events
related to the school, and
a vintage classroom repro-
duced to show the strides
in education between
1910 and the present day.
A hands-on heritage sec-
tion will include interactive
opportunities for visitors to
watch demonstrations and
take classes for individuals,
families and students. Ideas
might include cooking,
carpentry, farming, arts and
crafts, etc.
Touring exhibits may
also find a home at the


RHC showcasing Florida
history as well as provid-
ing a source of revenue.
The wonderful stage and
auditorium area from the
original school will provide
performance opportunities
including music and stories
of rural culture as well as
old time movie features. A
multipurpose hall can be
used for a wide assortment
of activities and displays.
Technology provides an
exciting opportunity for a
Virtual Heritage Laboratory
that will show the many
aspects of rural life unable
to fit in the physical build-
ing as well as involving
local interns and students.
Stay tuned in the next
weeks for more informa-
tion on how you can lend
your talents and resources
to the RHC and what will
be needed to transform the
current building. If you or
someone you know want
to contribute, contact Chris
Stapleton at ruralheritage@
simiosys.com. Stop by the
historic school any Tuesday
evening between 6:30 p.m.
and 8:30 p.m. to see what
is happening and what you
can do to help.
Don't forget the annual
Geneva Community Yard


and Craft Sale on Saturday,
Dec. 6, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Find great gifts for the holi-
days and bargains too from
over .50 booths, includ-
ing clothing, toys, food,
home decorations, tools,
pet accessories, handmade
crafts, books and more. Hot
coffee, snacks and lunch
will also be available for a
nominal price.
The following Saturday,
Dec. 13, is the Christmas
Post Office Sale in the
parking lot from 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Items for sale are
toys, T-shirts, prints, caps,
and books about Geneva
courtesy of the Geneva
Historical and Genealogical
Society.


TALK A E
>T5KAREN
Please share your thoughts about
Geneva at 407-221-7002,
karenp@theoviedovoice.com
with "Stetson's Corner" in the sub-
ject line, or fax 407-349-2800.
Thanks!
This column-is dedicated to
Deputy Sheriff Gene "Stetson"
Gregory, killed in the line of duty
on July 8,1998. Geneva will never
be the same because of Deputy
Gregory - it will be better.


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-1


PageA eeme Dcme 1,20


The Voice


~LLEIY









Better to black out for Black Friday


Wow, my family and I had
a great Turkey Day and we
certainly gave thanks for
the joy of being together
once again. Of course the
common complaint later
on in the day was "I ate too
much." My oldest son Bill
and his wife Donna treated
us to a delicious meal. They
live in Leesburg. I hope
everyone around town was
able to have an enjoyable
Thanksgiving.
Did any of you par-
ticipate in Black Friday? I
didn't - I just rolled over
in bed thinking of all those
crazy people getting up
in the very early a.m. and
running around the malls
looking for great deals.
Perhaps it is because I am
ahead of the game this year,
with only a few gifts to go.
Hope some of you got great
bargains!
It's beginning to look
like Christmas. There
are tents loaded with


Christmas trees to pur-
chase, and Santa has come
. to the Oviedo Marketplace..
Actually, he got a jump on
the season, as he appeared
before Thanksgiving. Now
he'll appear around town
at Oviedo's holiday parade
and tree lighting, held at
4:45 p.m. on Saturday, Dec.
6, and his twin will be arriv-
ing at Winter Springs' holi-
day parade and tree light-
ing on Dec. 6 at the town
center. Wow, Santa has a lot
of brothers!
Coming up: Seminole
Community College
Holiday Pops Concert, 7:30
p.m. on Tuesday evening,
Dec. 9, at SCC, 100 Weldon
Blvd., Sanford. The event
features vocal perfor-
mances by the SCC Concert
Chorale, Community
Chorus and Seminole
Sound, SCC Gospel Choir
and Symphonic Band
and Jazz Ensemble. You
are invited to the recep-


tion after the program.
Admission is free. For more
information, call 407-708-
2040.
Come visit Snow
Mountain in Oviedo from
5-9 p.m. on Saturday,
Dec. 13, at the Oviedo
Gymnasium and Aquatic
Facility, 148 Oviedo Blvd.
Frolic in 55 tons of snow.
Ticket price includes
unlimited rides down the
snow slope, giant slide,
bounce house, winter
snacks, face painting and
entertainment. Cost of
ticket is $5 through Dec.
10 and $10 thereafter. For
more information, please
call 407-971-5568.
Holiday in the Park, a
pre-parade festival with
entertainment and a tal-
ent competition, will be
held from noon to 8 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 14, at Lake
Eola Park, 1 N. Rosalind
Ave., Orlando. Admission is
free.
This might be the ideal
event to attend if you are
an Orlando history buff: Joy
Wallace Dickinson will be
signing her book, "Historic
Photos of Orlando," from
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the
Nieman Marcus store,
4200 Conroy Road, Mall
at the Millenia, Orlando.


Admission is free.
The next general meet-
ing of the Oviedo Woman's
Club will be held 9:30 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 12, at their
clubhouse at 414 King St.,
Oviedo. There will be a
short business meeting and
then the club will be hon-
oring its 50- and 25-year
members, plus installing
several new members. A
guest speaker will give a
15-minute talk on heart
disease in women followed
by a catered lunch. -
Toy drive: The 2008
"Santa Run" by the motor-
cycle officers from each
of the eight law enforce-
ment agencies in Seminole
County benefits infant to
teen girls and boys served
by the Boys Town Central
Florida, especially the dis-
placed youngsters living
in residential homes at
the Boys Town Demetree
Campus in Oviedo. New,
unwrapped gifts of all kinds
are needed for teenagers,
preteens, children, toddlers
and infants. Collection,
boxes are located at the
Oviedo Police Department,
300 Alexandria Blvd., as
well as the police sta-
tions in Winter Springs,
Altamonte Springs,
Casselberry, Lake Mary,


Longwood and Sanford
and all Seminole County
Sheriffs substations, the
sheriffs main headquarters
at 100 Bush Blvd., Sanford,
the Altamorite Springs
Police COPS center in the
Altamonte Mall and the
Oviedo Marketplace mall
COPS Center. Donations
must be received by Dec.
12. Then on Dec. 18, a
contingent of law enforce-
ment motorcycles from
agencies across Seminole
County will escort a motor-
cycle-riding Santa Claus,
starting from the Winter
Springs Police Department
and ending at the Oviedo
Campus of Boys Town
Central Florida. For more
information and details call
407-971-5705.
A thought - "You may
give gifts without caring,
but you can't care without
giving."
- Frank A Clark


TOJANET
Send word to Janet Foley about
events and let her know what's
going on around town by e-mailing
janetf@theoviedovoice.com.


Notes


Dan Kerr, the new director of
Seminole Community College's
Center for Public Safety, assumed
his new position on Nov. 10; he
replaced former director C.J. Hague,
who retired in August. Kerr came to
SCC after 12 years serving as the
police chief of Winter Springs and
previous jobs at a police department
in upstate Virginia.
Along with teaching Criminal
Justice, Fire Science and Emergency
Medical Service at the college, Kerr
hopes to introduce a homeland
security degree. Also, he will become
a member of SCC's Emergency
Response Team when the Center for
Public Safety building opens at the
Sanford-Lake Mary campus in 2009.


Although he has
never taught full
time, Kerr is used
to the classroom
setting. He has
worked as an
adjunct professor at
SCC since 1997 and
Kerr has served on the
school's mCriminal
Justice Academy Advisory Board.
Kerr plans to spend the rest of his
career improving SCC's public safety
programs.As someone who has spent
more than half his life in this field,
his goal is to make sure Seminole
Community College continues to train
students who are ready to hit the
streets as soon as they graduate.


U


V.


Lighting


up the


holidays


Jerry Stuardevant puts the finishing
touches on Winter Springs' tree for the
holiday parade and tree lighting cere-
mony, which starts at 4 p.m. Saturday.
The tree lighting ceremony begins at
6 p.m., featuring a performance by
the Russian Ballet of Orlando, and an
appearance by Santa Claus.


,,


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Where To Dine Out.



'.


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----i- ---'~I- -II


i-


i


The Voice


Dcember 5 - December 11.20 aeA










Stolen credit cards tour the country


BE ON THE LOOKOUT!
Crime, arrests and
public safety news from
the Oviedo Police Department

By Lt. George Ilemsky


The holiday season is
upon us!
Time for good will
and cheer...
But, it is also time
to be aware!

Burglaries
On Nov. 24, a vehicle bur-
glary was reported in the
800 block of Geneva Drive.
The complainant discov-
ered that the left-rear slid-
ing window to his pickup.
truck was shattered, along
with the driver's side win-
dow. Tools of his trade were
among the items to be
reported as missing, includ-
ing a Campbell Hausfeld
paint sprayer, spray gun,
miscellaneous tools, paint
steering drill, ratchet set
and miscellaneous paint
brushes and rollers.
Between the hours of 9
p.m. on Nov. 24 and 4 a.m.


on Nov. 25, four vehicles that
belong to a complainant
were burglarized while they
were parked unlocked at a
wrecker service lot located
on Aulin Avenue. The only
property reported missing
was $150 in cash taken from
one of the unlocked vehi-
cles.
On Nov. 27, a burglary
was reported in the 200
block of Roosevelt Square.
The homeowner reported
that when he arrived at
his home, he found several
closet doors open and the
house in disarray. A Toshiba
Laptop computer and a
Phillips DVD player were
reportedly stolen.

Marketplace thefts
On Nov. 25, a, juvenile was
taken into custody and
issued a. Notice to Appear
for shoplifting a silver neck-


I � I


I Ll


lace from a retail establish-
ment within the Oviedo
Marketplace.
On Nov. 26, a couple of
female juvenileswere caught
shoplifting perfumes from a
retail establishment within
the Oviedo Marketplace.
On Nov. 28, a male juve-
nile was caught shoplift-
ing a necklace from a retail
establishment within the
Oviedo Marketplace.
On Nov. 29, a male juve-
nile was taken into custody
for shoplifting a lighter from
a retail establishment with-
in the Oviedo Marketplace.
Additionally, the subject was
trespassed from the mall for
his actions.

Beware credit card fraud
During this holiday season,
folks like to use their cred-
it and debit cards to make
their shopping experience
more convenient and keep
track of their spending. But
at the same time, criminals
may seize an opportunity
to get your information and
use it for their own illegiti-
mate purposes. Be mindful
of how and to whom you
provide your credit cards.
On Nov. 24, a fraudu-
lent use of a credit card was


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reported whereby the com-
plainant discovered some
unauthorized charges to
her account that occurred
in Pennsylvania.
On Nov. 24, a fraudu-
lent use of a credit card was
reported whereby the com-
plainant discovered some
unauthorized charges to
her account that occurred
in Virginia.
On Nov. 25, a complain-
ant reported that her debit
card had unauthorized
charges on it that were com-
pleted in St. Augustine and
Michigan. The complainant
is still in possession of her
debit card but evidently her
information was accessed. -

Traffic stops lead to pot
On Nov. 26, a traffic stop on
State Road 434 and High
Street resulted in the driver
getting arrested for posses-
sion of marijuana, drug par-
aphernalia and a prescrip-
tion drug.
On Nov. 26, a traffic
stop resulted in the driver
being charged with a sto-
len tag and possession of a
schedule IV drug. The driver
admitted to police that he
stole the tag from one of his
former employer's vehicles


-- ~-~~---`~1~1~----~~~-~---~------


The Voice


because he could not afford
to register his vehicle.
On Nov. 28, a traffic stop
resulted in a couple of juve-
niles being charged. One of
the juveniles was charged
with possession of marijua-
na and the other for driving
without a license.
On Nov. 28, a traffic stop
resulted in a couple of juve-
niles being charged with
possession of marijuana
and narcotics equipment.

Cop talk
With the beginning of the
holiday shopping season
officially here, shoppers are
a bit more active even dur-
ing these lean economic
times. With that being said,
the thieves and opportun-
ists are also picking up the
pace. Let us not be easy tar-
gets and let us all take the
time to use common sense
and secure our property
and just be aware!

"Reputation is made in a
moment. Character is built
in a lifetime."
-James Leggett


PnnpAR prphpr~i -nprmhpr11.200






The Voice December 5 - December 11, 2008 Page A7



THIS WEEK in human history
WEEK


The 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, bring-
ing an end to the era of national prohibition of alcohol. Mississippi,
IESthe last dry state in the Union, ended Prohibition in 1966.



Citrus' open season
AMY KD. TOBIK ness since he was 6 years
THE VOICE M l i old. "They used to take me
out of school to help. I was
Mark Derr is ecstatic when Hollieanna Groves, a citrus the only one who had a job
he sees the UPS truck arrive- packing retailer, is at 540 S. in first grade," Kurt said
h s with a laugh. "We all did,"
at his Miami Beach home .'Orlando Ave. (Highway 17T92) the siblings quickly chimed
every November. He knows in Maitland, Call 407-644-8803 in
his all-time favorite ship- "or visit Hollieanna.com for more Fourteen varieties of cit-
ment has finally arrived. information, rus are produced on nearly
The prized box bears 200 acres of groves located
the Hollieanna Groves logo in the Indian River district,
and is packed with freshly on hand for sampling and FortPierceandOchechobee
picked white grapefruit, available for purchase on- and on land. between
temple oranges and tange- site along with exclusive Sanford and Geneva, Jason
los shipped from Maitland.- Hollieanna jams and mar- said.
It is one of thousands of .,malades. "We focus on specialty
boxes of frtiit that will be The Lingle family has varieties, as opposed to juice
shipped throughout the owned and operated the orangrieties that go towarsed to juice
country during Florida's Hollieanna Groves store juice industry," Alinda said.the
citrus season by the local and packinghouse since juice industry," Alinda said.
business. 1954, when Glenn Lingle The fruit is tree-ripened
A visit to Hollieanna purchased it from the and never placed in cold
Storage.
Groves, located on South Oakley family. Today, Glenn e
GrovesDerr said it's this guar-
Orlando Avenue, is like tak- instills the help of three antee of freshness that has
ing a step back in time. The of his four children, Kurt, kept him as a customer for
scent of fresh citrus wel- Jason and Alinda, to run the close to 30 years. "I have
comes customers as they company. been ruined by them. I
select from the beautifully Kurt, who acts as grower don't even buy fruit locallyhem. I
displayed fruit in large bins for their nearly 20,000 cit- don't even buy fruit locally
. ISAACBABCOCK hl:.,. and convenient mesh bags. rus trees, jokes he has been
A rainbow of citrus colors fills fruit baskets at Hollieanna Groves in Maitland, which Freshly squeezed juice is working in the family busi- > turn to CITRUS on page A9
packs and sells a variety of Florida fruit gifts to customers far and wide.


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G . . a m i For Greater Orlando's Active Families


Family

Calendar


Celebrate the arrival of the
holiday season at Seminole
County's annual St. Lucia Festival.
This free event takes place from
1-4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 13 at
the Museum of Seminole County
History at 300 Bush Blvd. in
Sanford.
There will be performers,
Swedish Christmas music,
replicas of a giant Dala Horse and
Viking ship as well as a Swedish
smorgasbord sampling for your
enjoyment. Swedish gifts and
books will also be on sale.
The St. Lucia Festival is
sponsored by the Museum of
Seminole County History and
the Seminole County Historical
Society. Call the museum at 407-
665-2489 for more information.

Winter Spring's annual holiday
parade and tree lighting will
be held Saturday, Dec. 6. The
parade will begin at 4 p.m. along
Tuskawilla Road and end at the
Winter Springs Town Center with
a tree lighting at 6 p.m. Call 407-
327-6593 for more information.

Oviedo's annual holiday parade
and tree lighting will be held in
Oviedo at 4:45 p.m. on Saturday,
Dec. 6. The event will feature
floats, bands, carolers and the
arrival of Santa. Oviedo-Winter
Springs Chamber of Commerce
members will display their wares
in a holiday expo. The parade will
end at Lawton House at 200 W.
Broadway St. for a tree lighting
ceremony. Call 407-278-4871 for
more information.

Oviedo's Snow Mountain Winter
Fest returns from 5-9 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 13 at the Oviedo
Gymnasium and Aquatic Facility.
Participants will enjoy sled rides
down the mountain, carnival
games, bounce houses, pictures
with Santa, and much more.
The cost for Oviedo residents is
$5 through Dec. 12 and $10 per
person the day of the event. The
cost for non-residents is $6 in
advance, $12 day-of.
Call 407-971-5575 for more
information.

Come join a bicycle ride through
fantasyland on Saturday, Dec.
13. The charity event starts with
registration and a bicycle show
at 4 p.m. and welcomes all age
to participate in a bicycle ride
through Casselberry and Winter
Park. The ride will include a 10-
mile tour of Christmas-decorated
homes and begins at 6 p.m. at
the intersection of State Road
436 and Winter Park Drive. Cost
to ride is $10 in advance or $12
the night of the event. Children
younger than six ride for free. All
children younger than 16 must
wear a helmet and flashers are
recommended. Proceeds will
support New Hope For Kids. Visit
www.NewHopeForKids.org or call
407-331-3059, ext. 10 for more
information.


Helping neighbors in need


AMY K.D. TOBIK
THE VOICE

December is a time of celebration
and giving. It's the time when chil-
dren wait with bated breath for a visit
from jolly ol' Santa, while others look
forward to the nights of Hanukkah
and the honor of lighting the meno-
rah. The holidays often give people a
chance to reconnect with family and
friends, share homemade dinners and
exchange gifts.
But not everyone will be that fortu-
nate this season.
With job layoffs and a sluggish
economy, many local families have
had to make tough choices this sea-
son, from not traveling to see loved
ones to choosing to provide food and
shelter as an alternative to gifts. For
some; there may be very little at all.
While budgets are predicted to be
tight, remember true joy may be found
by making the holidays brighter for
others. Ask members of your church
or synagogue how you can help. Talk
to local 'schools; they often facilitate
requests from families for the basics,
such as underwear and socks, or a
jacket for cooler weather. Coordinate
a mailing to service personnel serv-
ing our country abroad. Spend time
with an older neighbor or friend, who
may be alone and missing family. Any
gift, whether large or small, will make
a world of difference in the life of
someone in need.

Girls and Boys Town
of Central Florida
Girls and Boys Town of Central
Florida Executive Director Greg
Zbylut invites all families to join them
in their Christmas Tree Lighting and
Open House at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec.
9, at Oklahoma Street and State Road
426 in Oviedo. People are asked to
bring unwrapped gifts or gift cards
to contribute to the children in the
program.
The organization provides abused,
abandoned and neglected children
with a safe and caring environment.
Last year, the Girls and Boys Town
of Central Florida and its Oviedo
Demetree campus helped more than
800 children and families.
"This is a great opportunity to cel-
ebrate with our kids and really an
opportunity to teach them about
traditions and the holidays," Zbylut
said. The executive director said he
hopes children will recognize that
the holiday's true meaning centers on
creating friendships and


rHUI Is Y 15AAI UABUUUK - I Ht VUtUL
Christine Wright, a volunteer at Sonshine Community Thrift Store and the HOPE Foundation, stocks food-cans to
be distributed to needy families. The foundation has helped to feed more than 1,000 families per month in Oviedo.


traditions rather than receiving an
abundance of presents.
On Dec. 18, Santa Claus. will be
visiting Boys Town, escorted by law
enforcement motorcycles from agen-
cies across Seminole County. This
year's event is co-hosted by Winter
Springs and Oviedo Police and mem-
bers of the Oviedo Optimist Club,
who are community partners with
both Oviedo Police and Boys Town'
Central Florida.
Requests: New, unwrapped gifts for
teenagers, pre-teens, children, tod-
dlers and infants. Gift cards or cash
donations are also accepted.
Drop-off locations:
Oviedo Police Department, 300
Alexandria Blvd. in Oviedo
Seminole County Sheriffs Office
Main Headquarters, 100 Bush Blvd. in
Sanford
Donations can also be dropped off
at police stations in Winter Springs,
Altamonte Springs, Casselberry,
Lake Mary, Longwood and Sanford;
Seminole County Sheriffs Office sub-
stations, the Altamonte Springs Police
C.O.P.S. Center in the Altamonte Mall
and the Oviedo Police C.O.P.S. Center
at Oviedo Marketplace (by Dillard's).
Deadline: Friday, Dec. 12
Contact: 407-366-3667

HOPE Foundation, The Sonshine
Community Thrift and Food Pantry
Margorie Hoffman, Sonshine Food
Pantry coordinator, said the local
need for donated food has doubled
since the pantry opened behind the
Sonshine Community Thrift shop on
East Broadway in Oviedo a little more
than a year ago.
'"We are feeding over 1,000 fami-
lies a month right now," Hoffman
said. "With the economy tanking and
people having a hard time meeting
their basics in life, being able to get
their food here may mean they can
pay their light bill or their rent."
In light of economic hardships,
the Oviedo City Council and Oviedo
Fire Rescue are conducting a canned
food drive to benefit local families.
Donations may be made at the site or
at one of four holiday drop-off loca-
tions.
"This community is really special
because there are a lot of food pan-
tries that are suffering that do not
have enough to give," Hoffman said.
"The generosity of this community is


very, very touching."
Need: non-perishable food
Oviedo drop-off locations
Fire Station 44 - 42 South Central
Avenue 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Fire Station 46 - 300 Alexandria
Blvd. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Gymnasium and Aquatic Facility -
148 Oviedo Blvd. Sat-Sun 8 a.m. -10
p.m.
Riverside Park - 1600 Lockwood
Blvd. Mon-Friday 8 a.m. - 10 p.m., Sat
8 a.m. - 7 p.m., Sun 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Deadline: Sunday, Dec. 21
Contact: 407-366-3422

Share Your Christmas
Winter Park is partnering with Second
Harvest Food Bank and WESH TV to
collect food to benefit Central Florida
families in need. Decorated Share Your
Christmas barrels can be found at the
Winter Park City Hall, Public Library
and the Public Safety Facility. Winter
Park Mayor David C. Strong and mem-
bers of the city staff will deliver the
collected items to WESH TV.
"The holiday season is a very spe-
cial time in Winter Park and we are
thrilled to host an abundance of
events that have become a part of
family traditions for several genera-
tions," Strong said in a prepared state-
ment. "The spirit of giving is evident
at each of these events by watching
family, friends and loved ones spend
time together to enjoy all that Winter
Park has to offer."
"The city of Winter Park staff works
hard every day to provide our resi-
dents with excellent services," added
City Manager Randy Knight, also in
a prepared statement. "In that same
spirit, we look forward each year to
supporting the Share Your Christmas
food drive. We are very proud of the
amount of donations we contribute
each year and very happy to have the
opportunity to help so many people
in Central Florida."
Need: Canned, non-perishable
food, baby supplies and personal care
necessities
Drop off locations
Winter Park City Hall, 401 S. Park
Ave.
Winter Park Public Library, 460 E.
New England Ave.
Winter Park Public Safety Facility,
500 N. Virginia Ave.

> turn to CHARITY on the next page


Page A8 Dcme eebr1,20


The Voice






eIit DceD0e


Calendar


Come enjoy a holiday concert at St.
Luke's Lutheran Church in Oviedo.
The concert begins at 7 p.m. on Dec.
5 and 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Dec. 6.
and will feature the Brass Band of
Central Florida. Call 407-365-3408
for more information.
Wrap up your Christmas shopping
at St. Luke's 11th Annual Holiday
Gift Fair 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 6. The event will take
place at St. Luke's Lutheran Church
in Oviedo and will display more than
50 exhibits by local craftspeople and
businesses, a bake sale and food
concessions. Admission is free. Visit
stlukes-oviedo.org and see "What's
New" for more information about
the gift fair and to find out about
Christmas tree sales and free Brass
Band of Central Florida concerts
taking place on the same day.
Geneva holds its 9th Annual
Community Yard and Craft Sale
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday,
Dec. 6 at the Geneva Community


Center on 1st Street. The event is
sponsored by the Geneva Historical
and Genealogical Society, Inc. and
will feature over 50 exhibitors with
yard sale bargains and beautiful
crafts for great Christmas gifts. Food
will also be available.
Oviedo High School's annual
Lion Showcase runs Dec. 12-14,
featuring performances by the Lion
Band, Chorus, Drama and Dance
teams, surrounding the audience
from all sides.
Each evening will be capped off
with a stand-still performance of the
Marching Lions' 2008 field show,
The Lady in Red, featuring music
from the opera Carmen. Tickets are
$5.
Showtimes are 7 p.m. Friday and
Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. The
event takes place in the Oviedo High
School Gerald Cassanova Performing
Arts Center.
Call Band Director Dennis
Line at 407-320-4060 for more
information.


CITRUS I Giftcould make you more loved


< continued from page A7
because it is not as good as what I get from
them. Their grapefruit is phenomenal. I
send it to people in New York and they just
rave about it because they have never had
anything like it," Derr said.
"If you send people a half bushel of their
white grapefruit I guarantee they will love
you more than they do already," Derr said
with a laugh.
The Hollieanna Groves candy collec-
tion is also ideal for gift-giving, especially
the basket shaped like the state of Florida
filled with Pecan Log Roll Slices, Creamy
Nougat, Pecan Orangettes, Citrus Candies
and a White Chocolate Alligator. "We've
used the same candy supplier for more for
50 years," Glenn proudly stated.
Jason said the most gratifying aspect
of working at Hollieanna Groves is being
able to see the same people come back
year after year, including multiple genera-
tions. "I get a lot of satisfaction-growing it,
bringing it in here and seeing it packed and
shipped off and having happy customers at
the other end," Jason said.
Alinda added,""I'm proud of the Lingle
name and that we have been in business
for 55 years. I'm proud to be part of some-


Glenn Lingle, far right, and three of his children, (from left)
Jason, Alinda and Kurt, manage Hollieanna Groves.
thing that is second generation - and pos-
sibly third generation," she said.
For Glenn, he said it makes him happy
to see his children work together and fol-
low in his footsteps. "We are in better
shape than most people. Not many people
can stay in business for more than 50 years
without changing the product line," he
said with a laugh.
"I'm proud that they are still here in the
area," Glenn said as he smiled at his adult
children. "I hope this continues with the
grandchildren."


CHARITY I Kiwanis Club stuffs stockings


< continued from the previous page
Deadline: Wednesday, Dec. 10
Contact: 407-599-3506

-Kiwanis Stocking Project 2008
For 10 years, the Kiwanis Club of Oviedo
and Winter Springs has been making
Christmas brighter for local underprivi-
leged children in Seminole County by
providing filled Christmas stockings. This
year, they anticipate needing about 300
12-inch stockings (no glitter) and good-
ies to fill them. Members of the Kiwanis
Builders and Key Clubs will fill the stock-
ings on Sunday, Dec. 14 at the C.O.P.S.
Center located in Oviedo Marketplace.
Volunteers are welcome to come that day
and assist at 2 p.m. and may also drop off
donations. The stockings will be donated
to the Oviedo and Winter Springs police
departments, Salvation Army, shelters
and other local churches.
Volunteer Kathy McDonald, who is
coordinating the 2008 effort, said it's
touching to see the partnership between
Local groups such as key clubs, Girl Scouts,
Cub Scouts, sewing groups and seniors.


"The whole community comes togeth-
er on this project," McDonald said. "It's
wonderful to see these kids working
together." The-children who receive the
stockings would not have any Christmas
without their special delivery, McDonald
explained.
"These kids are doing something for
other children [whom] they do not know
and [whom] they will not get a thank you
from and that's OK," she said. "This is
what it means to serve others; you don't
do something for a reward, you do it
because it is the right this to do. Everyone
pitches in a little bit and at the end there
is a smile."
Need: Small toys, toys from kid's meals,
small toothbrushes, small toothpaste,
small soaps, coloring books, crayons to
fit in stocking
Drop-off locations:
Oviedo Vision Center, 875 Clark St.,
Oviedo, 407-366-7655 for directions
Lockwood Self Storage, 1700 E.
Broadway St., Oviedo
Deadline: Friday, Dec. 12
Contact: 407-349-0757


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December 5 - December 11, 2008 PaeA










Damage to trees: irreversible, avoidable


Here are some truths about
trees that may help you
understand some of the
problems related to trees
planted in your landscape:.
Most trees do not have
taproots. The deep roots
that grow directly beneath
the trunks of some trees
are known as taproots.
Taproots may develop on
some trees in the woods in
well-drained soils. Taproots
generally do not form on
trees planted in urban
landscapes nor do they
develop when the soil is
compacted or the water
table is close to the soil sur-
face. Some oaks and pines
will develop taproots when
planted in sandy, well-
drained soils.
. Roots grow far beyond
the edge of the branches. A
tree growing in the woods
has a root system reach-
ing well beyond the outer
perimeter of its branches,
often to a distance from
the trunk equal to the
tree's height. Roots on trees
and shrubs planted in a
landscape grow to about 3


times the branch spread
within two or three years
after planting.
Most roots are in the
top three feet of soil. The
finer roots are concen-
trated in the top foot of
soil. In well-drained soil,
some roots grow 10 feet or
deeper beneath the trunk.
However, because the
majority of the fine roots
are concentrated in the
top foot of soil, minor soil
disturbances can injure or
remove a large portion of
the absorbing roots on a
-tree. Especially vulnerable
are trees growing near
construction sites.
Injuries inflicted by
heavy equipment dur-
ing construction (or
at any other time) can
cause major and perma-
nent damage to the tree.
Because a tree does not
replace injured tissue
(heal) like an animal does,
a wound or injury to its
trunk, branches or roots
permanently reduces the
tree's capacity to fend off
insects, disease or other


.Florida

Gardening
SBYAL FERRER
SEMINOLE COUNTY URBAN
HORTICULTURIST


potential stresses. Many
roots are destroyed when
heavy equipment oper-
ates over the root system.
Even one pass over the
root system of a tree with
heavy equipment can cause
significant root damage.
Equipment should not be
permitted to operate with-
in the drip line of trees that
are to be saved.
If a tree survives the first
two to four years following
construction, it may still die
from construction-related
injuries. Trees may decline
quickly or slowly after
construction of a build-
ing. Often, branches begin
dying within a year or two
due to severe root dam-
age. The tree may be dead
within three or four years.
However, it is not uncom-
mon for trees to show a
slow decline over a five- to
15-year period. Even if a


tree does not show obvious
signs of decline for many
years, branches may quick-
ly lose leaves and begin a
rapid decline following a
drought period. A year or
two later, the tree may be
dead.
Trees do not heal, but
they are capable of isolat-
ing injured tissue from
healthy wood. When trees
are injured, they do not
.replace the cells lost in the
injury. The swollen callus
tissue developing around
a trunk wound or pruning
scar is simply closing over
the injured tissue, not heal-
ing it. In order to stay alive,
a tree must seal off injured
tissue from its healthy por-
tions. The storage capac-
ity and functions of the
injured parts are forever
lost. Additional injuries
seal off more wood, which
further reduces the sup-


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ply of available energy and
can cause the tree to slowly
starve.
Wound dressings and
pruning paints do not
prevent wood rot. Wound
dressings do not prevent
wood decay behind a prun-
ing cut. They provide no
benefit to the tree. Some
research indicates that
wound dressings actually
promote decay in certain
situations. If pruning paints
or wound dressings are to
be used for cosmetic pur-
poses, apply only a very
thin coat. Only proper
pruning practices prevent
wood rot.
These truths about trees
and tree care come from
the book "Your Florida
Landscape," by Dr. K.
Ruppert and Dr.R. Black,
published by the University
of Florida.


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Page A12 December 5 - December 11, 2008 The Voice



THIS WEEK in sports history

Si In a game against the Miami Dolphins, San Francisco 49er wide
receiver Jerry Rice caught his 101st NFL touchdown, setting a
new record. Rice still holds the record for career touchdowns with
AH ES 208.



Hawks hope to reach old heights


Lake Howell (2-0)
vs. Mainland
7 p.m. on Dec. 9
at Lake Howell High School
4200 Dike Road,
Winter Park

Winter Springs
vs. Lyman
7:30 p.m. on Dec. 10
at Lyman High School
865 S. Ronald Reagan Blvd.,
Longwood


Hagerty (1-0)
vs. Oviedo (2-1)
7:30 p.m. on Dec. 5
at Hagerty High School
3225 Lockwood Blvd.,
Oviedo


New players and a new philosophy greet Lake Howell men's basketball fans this season. A shift in coaching and a change fromoutside shooting has made the team more technical at the post, and has been received well
by the players, according to Coach Jeff Sloey. The team beat Lyman 69-62 Monday - a big departure from the runaway scoring that characterized previous Silver Hawk teams, including the 2007 state champions.


ISAAC BABCOCK
THE VOICE
T he Lake Howell Silver Hawks
were at the top of the state
two years ago. Now, they're
changing everything to try to get
back there.
The boys' basketball team had
clawed its way into the Final Four
for five straight years before finally
winning a state championship in
dramatic fashion, shattering the
state record for point differential in
the championship game..
But since then the Hawks have
suffered the loss of star players, the
sense of inevitability that saw them
to the championship, and the coach
who took them there.
It's rebuild time, and the team
is already starting out strong, but
resembling little of the legendary


team of 2007..
Coming into the 2008-09 season,
they're not ranked No.1 in the state
anymore. They're not even- first in
the district, which has tightened up
this season.
"It's a tough district this year,"
coach Jeff Sloey said. "We're not
first or second this year. We're third
on the list at best. It's an eye-opener
for our guys that it's not going to be
handed to us."
Absent the territorial carte
blanche ceded to them in the past,
the team has found its own way,
with new styles of defense and
offense to make use of a team with
new strengths and weaknesses.
So far it's working. They won
against Lyman Monday night, and
then against New Smyrna Beach.
But they're not winning by the
big blowout numbers like they were


during the era of Coach Reggie
Kohn. Both games they've won this
season were with fewer than 70
points.
"We're more of a control team
offensively and defensively," Sloey
said.
That's a big departure from the
-strong outside shooting teams of
the past, pushed by the mantra of
a shooting-oriented coaching team
that's always been in the family.
"This is only the second year out
of 22 that one of my children hasn't
been at Lake Howell high school,"
assistant coach Steve Kohn said.
Kohn has coached as head or
assistant coach with the team dur-
ing the reign of a basketball fam-
ily dynasty. Two of his sons have
school records painted on the walls.
of the gymnasium. Both have been
Silver Hawk coaches at one time or


another.
The recent departure of Coach
Reggie Kohn, who along with his
father led the boys to their champi-
.onship blowout win, has changed
the team. The only question is if it's
for the better.
"It's definitely different," Steve
Kohn said. "I'm used to coaching
with somebody who thinks just like
me. We don't think alike, but that's
not necessarily a bad thing."
In the process of rebuilding a
dynasty from the ground up, the
Hawks are hoping to keep other
teams off their backs en route to
the playoffs.
"No matter what, the Lake
Howell name is a bull's-eye," Sloey
said. "We can't take any situation
for granted."


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----------------,--~--






December 5 - December 11. 2008 Paae A13


UAB shuts out UCF with five field goals
BABCOCK conference records, along ." .


Nearing the end of the sea-
son with their first win-
ning streak of the year,
the Knights were stopped
short of ending it on a high
note, losing to UAB 15-0 on
Saturday.
"I think we played as
bad as we
could play,"
UCF football
head coach
George s
O'Leary said *"fi
in a post-
game press Seaso
conference.
"I don't Win-lo
know what 4-8 overall,
plays we did
well." Bigg
T h e 31-17
Knights had
ridden into Total yar
town pro- 2
pelledbytwo
road victo-
ries against
Marshall
and Memphis, and seem-
ingly had an easy final game
against the Blazers - who
were the worst team in
the division going into the
game.
That dubious distinc-
tion is now shared by the
Knights, who matched the
Blazers' 4-8 overall and 3-5


with Marshall.
The good side of the
Knights' record had come
largely on a strong defense
that was consistently one
of the top two in the con-
ference. Holding teams out
of the red zone had been


the Knights'
against the


n wrap-up:


ss record:
3-5 conference


est win:
over SMU


ds per game:
229.5


specialty, and
Blazers they
prevented
any touch-
downs.
But they
allowed the
Blazers to
get into field
goal range,
and Swayze
Waters' foot
took care of
the rest. The
Blazer'skick-
er quickly
became the
star of the
game, pro-
viding all of
his team's
points with
five field


goals.
Despite never crossing
the goal line, the Blazers
netted 384 total yards -
nearly double what the
Knights gained.
"Defensively it was prob-
ably the worst game of the
year," O'Leary. said. "We
picked the wrong team not


'r,.I111 ,1 ISAAC BABCOCK - Hr ''I
Blazers quarterback Joe Webb races downfield away from UCF defenders. The Blazers beat the Knights by undermining a tradi-
tionally dominant pass defense, and sealing offensive drives with field goals. The Knights were shut out for the first time all season.


to tackle well."
A Knights' pass defense,
which at one point was in
the top 25 in the nation,
allowed the Blazers to aver-
age more than a first down
for each of their 20 com-
pleted passes. Tackles rare-
ly came before a receiver
had ball in hand, and that
allowed the Blazers to storm
downfield with ease.
Meanwhile, the Knights'.
weaknesses on offense
seemingly conspired to halt
their progress, resulting in
the team's only shutout loss
all season.


A blocked field goal was
the closest they came to a
score, despite moments
of brilliance from fresh-
man quarterback Joe
Weatherford.
At one point, in the
fourth quarter Weatherford
launched into a string of six
straight completions in less
than a minute, taking his
team 40 yards downfield
before losing composure
and ultimately throwing an
interception that ended the
game.
For the senior players,
a Senior Day celebration


ended on a sour note.
"We've had a lot of ups
and downs through the sea-
son," senior defensive back
Joe Burnett said. "It was
a long season for us with
many missed opportuni-
ties."
For the younger Knights,
the promise of a better sea-
son next year lingers on the
horizon.
"We got close, we just
didn't finish," Weatherford
said. "You've just gotta keep
at it."


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I0
I





Page Al4 December 5 - December 11, 2008 - The Voice


THIS WEEK in political history

, President Bill Clinton signed The North American Free Trade
Agreement into law. NAFTA was heavily critcized by Reform
VE Party presidential candidate Ross Perot, who argued that if NAFTA
were passed, Americans would hear a "giant sucking sound" of
SE I American companies fleeing the United States for Mexico.



Get flexible - learn new skills, become more viable

EM PLOY MENT when your world is falling apart? fax it? Read the instructions in the has been in the past.
Where do you turn when resources ad very carefully. Take care and best wishes.
are so limited? Always include a well-written - Sandi
First thing first: Many people cover letter. This will set you apart
identify themselves with their job. from those who don't. There are
San di It may be time to be flexible and great samples on the Internet or
learn a new position. It may also you can find them at the library. TALK R M I
be time to consider taking less Follow up when you can with a >T.OS. NDI
I spoke to a lady yesterday who money if that is all that is available, call or a letter. Again, you need to
said that she was really getting Like the housing market is a buy- set yourself apart from the crowds. Sandi Vidal is the executive director for Christian
depressed because it is so hard to er's market, this is an employer's When you get the interview, this HELP and the Central Florida Employment Council,
find a job. Frustration levels are market. Employers can pick and is your one shot to shine. Be ready! with more than 10 years of recruiting and human
on the rise. Christian HELP actu- choose so you have to treat the job Don't unload on your interviewer, resources experience. Please send questions
ally reached capacity an hour after search process as if it is a job. just be ready to share how you will about employment by fax 407-260-2949, sandi@
being open on the Tuesday before Create a job-search strategy. be an asset to the company christianhelp.org, or mail Ask Sandi C/O Christian
Thanksgiving. This is something Where are you going to apply? Above all, if life becomes too Subjects may include employment search,
that has never happened before in How are you sending your resume? overwhelming, seek professional resumes, networking and promotion opportunities.
17 years of service. Should you apply online? Should counseling. Things will get better Employers: E-mail your job leads to efec@cfec.org
What can you do to stay positive you mail your resume? Should you - life may just be different than it and we will share them with Christian HELP clients.




Letters to

Auto bailout a no-go for ask them to help pay for This year, Honda will open federal Air Transportation Court is about to decide a
small business gold-plated health care a new manufacturing facil- Stabilization Board, landmark case about drug
As Congress wrestles with plans, generous pensions, ity in Indiana, while Kia which helped to support a labels. The question before
the question of what do to and platinum-level retire- and Toyota will open plants restructuring of the airline the Court is whether expert
about the problems with ment benefits they don't next year in Georgia and industry after Sept. 11. Any scientists at the FDA or
Detroit's automakers, they have and can't afford. Mississippi, respectively. public assistance to the Big local juries should have the
should remember one The cost of health care These will be followed in - -Three must come with the final say regarding what's
thing. Small business own- benefits alone is stagger- 2010 by a new Volkswagen same type of rigorous over- written on a prescription
ers are adamant: Don't ask ing. For example, in 2005, plant in Tennessee. sight to ensure that taxpay- drug's warning label.
us to send our tax dollars to Ford spent a record $11 A strong domestic auto ers' interests are protected. If the Court rules against
Detroit to pay for their mis- billion on health care industry is important to And that protection should drug maker Wyeth in a
takes without significant benefits. That same year, the U.S. economy and small be Job One in any debate Vermont lawsuit, drugs
restructuring and effective GM estimated that health businesses. But any tax over this issue. could be required to have
independent oversight, care costs added more dollars given to the com- - Todd Stottlemyer different labels in each
Proposals to provide as than $1,500 to the cost of panics must come with President of the National state. And labels might end
much as $50 billion toithe every new vehicle the com- conditions, starting with Federation of Independent Business up reading like complex
"big three" auto companies pany built. Even under the top-to-bottom scrutiny of Washington, D.C. legal disclaimers.
are a misguided attempt restructured union agree- everything from the effec- Regardless of what the
to bail out companies that ment that goes into effect tiveness of management Remember the importance Supreme Court decides, this
did riot get into this situa- in 2010, the companies to the nature of union and of drug labels case should remind all of
tion because of the current will still pay $15 billion for supplier contracts. Americans have access to us about the importance of
credit crisis, but because of these benefits. The Big Three and the more cutting-edge pharma- carefully reading and fol-
a long series of decisions The costs for workers is autoworkers unions must ceuticals than ever before. lowing the instructions on
that have led these once- higher than average as well. make serious changes if But medicines carry risks, drug labels. There's no bet-
admired corporations to The Big Three's workers' they Want to survive. Once Failing to pay attention to a ter time than the holidays
where they are today. average cost is $73.20 per these costs are reduced, the drug's label can lead to seri- to make sure your loved
While Detroit has been hour, while Toyota's work- price of domestic cars will ous side effects. - ones are doing just that.
shedding American jobs, ers average cost is $48 an come down as well, and Only the Food and - Peter Pitts
small businesses have been hour. The average for all U.S. auto dealers will be Drug Administration has President of the Center for Medicine
creating them. It's unfair American workers is $28.48. more competitive, the authority to approve in the Public Interest
to these entrepreneurs and In the meantime, other We should learn a les- drug labels, but that may Former FDA associate commissioner
small-business owners to automakers are thriving, son from the success of the soon change. The Supreme


Here's what kids at
Winter Springs High
had to say about why
they were honored as
Student of the Week


and Month.


-7


I enjoy helping other
students in indepen-
dent study - phys-
ics is fulfilling and
fun for me.
- Adam G.
18 years old


I'm a freshman and
was honored for my
work in language
strategies. I enjoy
creative writing and
short stories.
- Chinah B.
14 years old


I thank my parents
for pushing me
to work hard and
accomplish things.
I am a Safe School
Ambassador who
helps other kids.
- Esmer T.
17 years old


I love music and v
selected from the
Fine Arts departm
| for my work in ba
and chorus.
- Lindsa
16 years


I am a section leader for the sopra-
nos in our chorus, which I've been
in all four years.
- Nicole Z.
17 years old


SWe would
love


was / tol
entd / fromy

y M.
Sold Youngces!

Call editor Alex Babcock at 407-628-8500
to have The Voice visit your class or group.


0


.5




c
3
0


I


~






eceD mber 5 - December ge A15


The Voice . . . . . . . . . .


SMarketplace


SREALTORS:
Licensed Real Estate Professionals needing
to earn additional income: Become a
part time or full time loan officer. Control
your own closings. Gain access to
hundreds of mortgage programs. Save
your clients thousands of dollars. Call
Maitland Mortgage Lending Company
1407)629-5626
CAREGIVER WANTED
CAREGIVER/Housekeeper wanted for my
100 year old mother at her lovely home -
Lake Sue, Winter Park, Various times day &
night. Call 317 545-5540 after 10 a.m. or
email to rosemail@comcast.net
EXPERIENCED DRIVERS
Experienced Drivers W/Class A CDL, Home
weekends, East Coast Runs, Fruit and
Foliage up and refrigerated back. Call MCT
@ 877-564-6628


WATERBRIDGE TOWNHOUSE 32789
On cul-de-sac near Tennis Courts. Walk to
middle and high school, bus, W.P. hospital,
dog park. $299,900 (was $340,000). Winter
Park Land Co. Realty 407-644-2900


SENIOR APARTMENTS
Winter Park - The Plymouth Apartments:
Studio/1BR Senior Apts, All Utilities Incl.,
Newly Renovated. Rents start at $591. Call
407-644-4551


FOR RENT
Oviedo Office Space, great frontage. 750
to '1,050 sf available. $1,070 to $1,350 per
month. 1401 Broadway St. Contact Megan
at (407) 687-3524.



.. GARAGE SALE
Garage sale 12/5 and 12/6 8am-l2:00.
1017 California Creek Drive off Seminole-
---- ..Creek near Seminole Comm. College
L:~'c -, campus). Furniture, household

GARAGE SALE " ...
rage sale, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
Saturday, Sunday, Dec. 5, 6 and 7. 2310'
Sierra Lane, Maitland. 407-718-0820.
Household items, women's clothes, shoes,
furniture, Christmas items, and much more.


WE BUY

HOUSES!
Sell Your Home
for CASH
On the Day of Your Choice
"As-Is" with NO Repairs!

Call Now:

407-297-8749


HOW TO DETOX FOR
OVERNIGHT RELIEF
Natural herbal patches, overnight
detoxification, pain relief: knees, back, foot,
gout, sciatic, lumbago, carpal tunnel, cancer
treatment. Attach to foot - great night's.
sleep. http://www.ebook-detox-patches.org
(407) 970-1483



Reading volunteers NEEDED - Jackson
Heights Middle School in Oviedo is looking
for adults who are interested in serving as a
Reading Mentor to assist students who are
reading below grade level. Volunteers work
one-on-one with an assigned student before
school for 30 minutes, one or more times
a week through the end of the school year
to build fluency and comprehension skills.
Sessions are from 8:30-9:00 a.m., M-F.
Please contact Connie O'Hanlon for more
information, 407-365-7585.
~ * * S0


HANDYMAN/CARPENTRY
Let me take care of the chores you don't
have time to do - yard work, carpentry,
painting, (whole house or interior rooms),
driveways, repairs, pressure washing, and
more. No job-too small. Local. Prompt.
Affordable. Call Scott at 321 -460-3905.
KITCHEN/BATHROOM SURFACES
Repair and resurface bathtubs, ceramic
tile, vanities, kitchen countertops, cabinets,
appliances and much more. No dust and
dirt and very little down time. Have a new
factory-like finish and save up to four times
the replacement cost. Licensed/insured/.
member BBB. All Surface Technology, 407-
691-0061
CARPENTER
Robert A. Paige. Specializing in finished
carpentry to termite and wood-rot damage.
Interior and exterior. Call me and ask if I can
do your job. References available. 352-552-
6157 A
. NEED HELP WITH
CLEANING, ERRANDS?
Senior citizen seeking part-time house
cleaning, we'll also run errands, grocery
shopping, and doctor's office, etc. 407-838-
8075 or 407-756-2361



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008-CP-2113
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BILLY R. STUTTS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of BILLY R.
STUTTS, deceased, whose date of death was
October 26, 2008, is pending' in the Circuit Court
for Seminole County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 301 N. Park Avenue, Sanford,
Florida 32771-8099. The names and'addresses of
the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having caims or demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be
served must ile their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
SAll other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is
11/28/2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
EVELYN W. CLONINGER
Florida Bar No.: 210382
CLONINGER & FILES
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
1519 W. Broadway
Oviedo, Florida 32765
Telephone: (407) 365-5696
Facsimile: (407) 365-8919
Personal Representative:
MARY EDITH MONTGOMERY
2484 Fort Lane Rd., Geneva, FL 32732-9722
11/28,12/5
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL
- CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-DR-2975
Jasmin McLeod, Petitioner
and
Richard McLeod, Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
TO: (name of Respondent) Richard McLeod
(Respondent's last known address)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on (name
-of Petitioner) Jasmin McLeod, whose address is
460 Meadowood Blvd. Fern Park, Fl. 32730 on
or before December 1, 2008, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at (clerk's address) 301
r . r , F;,i 4. r -,,-Jl',.-, Fi. 1-7--_ ., .:,- . -.. .'."
do so, a default may be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the Clerk of the.
Circuit Court's office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office notified of your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and information. Failure to
comply can'result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated October 27, 2008.
MARYANNE MORSE, CLERK
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Debra A. Jesperson
Deputy Clerk
11/21, 11/28,12/5, 12/12


Your classified

here.

Advertise in
The Marketplace for
as low as $15/week!

Call

407-628-8500


Sit (klas'e fid' ad'ver tfz'ing) Noun. Advertising
Should it be compactly arranged, as in newspaper
.-- 7- --,- --- i - columns, according to subject, under such:
.k i... i Ill ' listings as help wanted and for sale

', . , ,r ,.l� , I. , u l: 2 2 w O O ir .: .ul , . . . - BB O X :N 3 QL O V lS :' <' ' ; .,: L n ;,: . .,i ,, ,, 1
How
, In 3c.
Sl hee - - , ,: ead'
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Sv i 113 .1 : I -- 0 1. t r . I..- .-..I..,







...or suggest your own!

Call 407-628-8500 or e-mail classifieds@observernewspapers.com


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WEATHER
:)U Surs Sunset


730 500
3 p.m. I 6 a.m.
Saturday


TODAY: Mostly sunny, with
a high near 76. Calm wind
becoming east southeast
around 5 mph.


MORNING LOW 50*

DAYTIME HIGH 750

Sunrise Sunset 10% chance Wind
7:04 a.m. 5:28 p.m. of rain WNW 9 mph


0
Sunrise
7:05 a.m.


MORNING LOW 440

DAYTIME HIGH 65�


Sunset 0% chance
5:28 p.m. of rain


Wind
NW11 mph


MORNING LOW 54�

DAYTIME HIGH 68�


Sunrise
7:06 a.m.


Sunset
5:28 p.m.


10% chance
,of rain


Wind
NE 8 mph


SH>.n l,,, . u , ,i , YOUR NAME HERE, FROM YOUR CITY!
Want to see your picture in The Voice? Then e-mail it to editor@
observernewspapers.com. Files should be at least 1MB in size. Please
include as much information about the picture as possible, for example
where the image was taken, what time and who is in it.


NATIONAL


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Los Angeles 49/73 50/73


Houston


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City
Atlanta
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28/50 29/53
20/25 15/31
26/36 30/37


MARINE FORECAST
Cocoa Beach tide schedule
Time Low, High
Saturday 7:21 a.m. 1:11 a.m.
Dec. 6 7:55 p.m. 1:26 p.m.
Sunday 8:24 a.m. 2:13 a.m.
Dec. 7 8:51 p.m. 2:21 p.m.

FLORIDA FORECAST


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Miami
Tampa
Pensacola


Friday Sat.
50/67 46/64
63/76 60/77
55/75 53/75
42/59 39/56


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PageAl 6 December 5 - December 11, 2008


The Voice


THIS WEEK
IN HISTORY
On Dec. 5,1941 the
temperature at Enosburg
Falls soared to 72 degreens
to establish a s*ate record
for Veri-nont 'Or flh.e mon.trll
of December. iThie Kleamer
Channel)


t


JZ











eniorObserver


Volume 18, No. 12


...... ... .....sa.- ).-


WHITNEY HAMRICK
GUEST REPORTER

oning a lifelong, pas-
sion for songs and lyr-
1 ics, a 75-year-old Winter
Springs resident conveys her life
experience of music apprecia-
S- tion and Jewish culture in "Oy
Vay - the Musical," which opens
in Maitland in January.
Elinor Brownstein, the play-
wright, said a performance at
the Schenectady Philharmonic
S Symphony when she was just 5
years old lit the fire that's burned
in her for 70 years.
"I was absolutely enthralled
with the magic of the music and
the magic of all the instruments,"
Brownstein said. "And I kept say-
ing, 'Someday I'm going to play
an instrument.' I kept pulling
my father's arm, 'Can't we get
a piano? .Can't we get a piano?'
Finally, he acquiesced arid got
me a piano. I was just 7 then and
it was wonderful."
Never in her wildest dreams
had Brownstein thought her
musical would be performed
outside her living room until she
met Sandi Lacey, director of "Oy
Vay.''
Brownstein hired Lacey to
transcribe her music from tape
to sheet music. Lacey found
herself humming the score
and encouraged Brownstein
to put on a production. Since
September, Brownstein and
Lacey have taken turns hosting
rehearsals of the four-act play in


their homes.
"It's a surreal
Brownstein said.


experience,"
"As they're


rehearsing I am laughing because
what they are doing with and
what they are ad-libbing, I am
hysterical with how they are
developing their characters and
with their ad-lib, and I'm saying
to.myself, 'Who really wrote this
play?'"
Two of the songs featured in
"OyVay"camefromBrownstein's
first musical, "Miracles," which
has yet to be performed.
The song "Discipline" details
the trials of a mother's resolve
to love her children. The refrain,
similar to a mantra, allows the
mother to remain calm in the
face of the irritation that can
come with raising children.
.:Discipline your children with
lots of love." the song goes.
In a classic upbeat melody,
"Just Disserts" charms ti crav-
ing for sweets; forget drinnff
"Coconut custard, strawberry
shortcake, give me a lemon pie.
Pour on the fudge and scoop out
the whipped cream, and oy vay, I
could die. Forget the meats and
omit the corn and don't serve
me black-eyed peas. Spinach's a
waste and beans have not taste
and I'll have my chocolates
please."
Other songs play with keeping
kosher around the father-in-law,
arguments over a heated game
of mah-jongg, and observations

see PLAYWRIGHT on page B3


PHOTO BY ISAAC BABCOCK- SENIOR OBSHERVERH
When she was 5 years old, Elinor Brownstein, above, saw an orchestral performance, and ever since she
has been enthralled with the magic of music. "Oy Vay - the Musical," a four-act play written by Brownstein,
premieres to the public in Maitland this January and features commentary on life and Jewish culture.


The ABCs of Medicare



Find out which plan fits your needs


It's as simple as ABC: If you or
someone you care for is a se-
nior citizen, it may pay to learn
the Medicare alphabet. Know-
ing how the different parts of
the program work could mean
more money saved and possibly
even better care.
Medicare Parts A and B have
been around since the begin-
ning of Medicare in the 1960s.
Part A covers hospital visits,
skilled nursing facilities and
some home health care. Part
B covers doctor visits, outpa-
tient visits and durable medical
equipment.Together,PartsAand


B are referred to as "traditional"
fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare,
-or sometimes as "Original Medi-
care." It is estimated that FFS
Medicare only covers about 50
percent of the health care costs
incurred by beneficiaries. That
is why some people who choose
FFS Medicare also obtain a Medi-
care Supplemental plan. This
type of health insurance is also
known as Medigap coverage.
Medigap plans do just that -
cover the "gaps" that FFS Medi-
care does not cover. However,
Medigap plans can be extremely
costly. As a result, many seniors


are attracted to the broader cov-
erage and more predictable costs
of Medicare Part C, commonly
called Medicare Advantage.

Extra benefits
Medicare Advantage plans may
offer extra benefits such as vi-
sion and hearing coverage, an-
nual physical and worldwide
emergency coverage, and many
also include coverage for medi-
cations. These plans help with
your coordination of care across
the provider spectrum.

see MEDICARE on page B7


Est. 1990


i


AW--X.-.AmR-
I


-


Cen., tral

lprio da

Senior

Relp� Ine




407-S' -4357







~i.irObserver December 2008


S orObserver

NEWS SENIORS CAN USE, SINCE 1990

Kyle P. Taylor
Publisher
kyle@observernewspapers.com


Alex Babcock
Editor
alexb@observernewspapers.com

Jenny Andreasson
Reporter
jennya@observernewspapers.com


Isaac Babcock
Reporter
isaacb@observernewspapers.com


Amy K.D. Tobik
Reporter
amykdtobik@bellsouth.net


609 Executive Drive, Winter Park, FL 32789

Observer Newspapers is a member of:
*Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
*Maitland Chamber of Commerce
*The Florida Press Association
*Central Florida Press Club


Stephanie Erickson
Designer
stephanie@observernewspapers.com

Jonathan Gallagher
Copy Editor
jgallagher@observernewspapers.com


Tracy Craft
Advertising Sales
tcraft@observernewspapers.com


Pat Lovaglio
Advertising Sales
plovaglio@observernewspapers.com


I 407-628-8500 I WPMObserver.com

Published monthly by Observer Newspapers,
publishers of the:
*Winter Park/Maitland Observer
*Oviedo/Winter Springs Voice


Thepjur ii- i : rjt - ur n I I L' r e V ru..! LV cIIj, j l -rn--lu r TII 'L Or
rraj~l. r(-. r, uLjijj .1 . 'jr ir, i 4* . 3c j i t ia
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%1 ll�-ii c:jr�r 1: ~i-oyrgajh piii *Ib�arE


Beardall Senior Center
800 S. Delaney Ave."
Orlando
407-246-2637


St. Cloud Senior Center
Indiana Ave. & 8th St.
St. Cloud
407-892-2533


Marks Street Senior Center Osceola Senior Center
99 E. Marks St. 1099 Shady Lane
Orlando Kissimmee -
407-245-0921 407-846-8532

Maitland Senior Center Sanford Senior Center
345 S. Maitland Ave. 401 E. Seminole Blvd.
Maitland Sanford
407-539-6251 407-302-1010

RSVP Senior Volunteers Senior Resource Alliance
407-422-1535 407-228-1800


Alzheimer Resource Center Seminole County
4407-843-1910 Better Living for Seniors
407-228-1800


dm - a-


. lb.. .


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We provide a loving home where each member

of our community is honored and valued.

Our family environment provides a true "home"

feel with an attentive and caring staff.


1340 Oxford Road Maitland, Fl 32751 407-339-0389


407-247-8937


www.EnglishEstatesALF.com
License # AL10968


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PLAYWRIGHT I Musical opens Jan. 9


PHOUU BY ISAAG BABGOCK - SENIUH UBStHVtE
"Oy Vay - the Musical," described by Director Sandi Lacey as possessing a "Mel Brooks quality," uses
its four acts to illustrate nuances of Jewish life through songs and scenarios.


< continued from the front page
on how technology influences
children.
"I like that sort of Mel Brooks
quality about it," Lacey said.
"It's funny but it's down-to-
earth. It's a reflection of her
life that mirrors so many lives,
especially women."
"Oy Vay - the Musical" will
be performed at the Maitland


Civic Center from Jan. 9 to 11,
at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday,
and at 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets
will be $10 at the door.
"It's a surreal experience but
I am so excited and I hope the
community will be as excited as
I am when they see the perfor-
mance," Brownstein said. "It's
thrilling. It's my dream come
true."


OFFICIAL MEDICARE ANNOUNCEMENT




"Reviewing my current
prescription drug plan
really opened my eyes."

"My drug plan's monthly
premium changed.
So I compared other
plans and found
- similar coverage at
a better price."

Plans Change. You Change. Take the time
to see if your plan still works for you.
Four Ways to Review and Compare Plans - Get the help you need:
* Call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). Call us
anytime for help by a trained Medicare representative.
* Visit www.medicare.gov. Compare costs, ' My Health.
coverage and more. Get an estimate of your My Medicare.
out-of-pocket costs for the year.
* See the listing of plans in your sc,
2009 Medicare & You handbook
and information sent to you by your plan.
* Talk with local Medicare experts
at your Serving Health Insurance
Needs of Elders program (SHINE). a
Call 850-414-2060 or 800-963-5337. wwwmedicare, ov


Review your plan and act early to avoid any
inconvenience at the pharmacy counter in January.


1-800-MEDICARE
(1-800-633 4227)
TTY 1-877-486-2048


Advertise your business in the Senior Observer!

Call us today at 407-628-8500 and ask for Tracy or Pat.


SeniiorObserver


eceD mber 2008








Beware of bad sleeping pill habits


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SUBSCRIBE TO THE SENIOR OBSERVER FOR THE
LATEST "-NEWS SENIORS CAN USE!"
SUB SC RIB E< B ( 3@E WE1N EWS PAP ER Sa@�L(O


December 2008


SeniorObse~rve'r


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Elderly care deserves careful decisions


More than 1.7 million Florid-
ians care for frail, older loved
-ones - so nearly one in 10
Floridians are caregivers. Yet
millions of other Floridians
have either yet to focus on
the need for long-term care
for loved ones, or
are having trou-
ble finding high-
quality services
for those they
love.
One critical is-
THAMES sue is where your
loved one receives
care, People of all ages who
are frail, ill or disabled and
need help with regular daily
activities, such as dressing,
bathing, preparing meals or
eating, may need long-term
care, but only 3 percent of
Floridians age 35 and above
want to receive long-term
care in nursing home set-
tings. Some 77 percent want
to receive care at home.-
Yet Florida spends 91 per-
cent of Medicaid .long-term
care dollars on nursing home


care, far more than the na-
tional average of 75 percent.
In 2006, the budget for Med-
icaid in Florida was $15 bil-
lion, and two-thirds of this
amount was spent on nurs-
ing homes. Florida ranks 41st
in the nation in achieving


a good balance of
care between com-
munity--based and
nursing-home care.
Boomer children
are worried about
the care of their
older parents, but
unfortunately fewer
than half of adult
children are making


"Even if y
loved on(
require a;
there ar
ways for yi
back to y(
munity ...


specific plans for that care.
The key to creating a specific
plan of care for your loved
ones is talking to them and
strategizing in case of emer-
gency.
According to AARP re-
search, people often underes-
timate the costs of long-term
care-and often think they are
covered by Medicare, when
generally Medicare offers full


coverage for only 20 days of
skilled nursing home care.
In 2006, the average cost of
a nursing home was about
$75,000 per year, while pri-
vate in-home care was about
$20 an hour.
"There is no substitute for
careful advance
our older planning," said Lori
es don't Parham, AARP's
Florida state direc-
ssistance, tor. "Now is the time
e many for boomers and
DU to give other adult chil-
our com- dren to have candid
conversations with
their older loved
ones to help them
protect their ability to choose
how and where they receive
care."
Even if your older loved
ones don't require assistance,
there are many ways for you
to give back to your commu-
nity by assisting older Flo-
ridians who need assistance.
Caregiving provides ways for
individuals to give back to
their community and make a


difference in peoples' lives.
At a recent Tampa event
honoring caregivers, one fea-
tured speaker was Paul Chap-
delaine, caregiver for the late
"Golden Girls" television star
Estelle Getty.
"I feel like my ever-chang-
ing life will always lead me
to be exactly where I am sup-
posed to be," Chapdelaine
said.
"I know for a fact that I have
so much more to learn. I have
life's experiences, and my
Creator, to thank for all that
I am today. It's with courage
and love and laughter that
I plod along, knowing that
I am actively using my gifts
and talents to make a contri-
bution on this planet."
- Judy Thames
Florida's AARP state president

Statistics were taken from a 2006 AARP-
commissioned survey titled "Let us Choose:
A Survey of Floridians Age 35+ on Long-Term
Care Choices."


Topics will include:
*Current Interest Rates * When a reverse mortgage is NOT the answer
Closing costs associated with a reverse mortgage * What is a non-recourse loan?
*Advantages and disadvantages * Safeguards designed to protect the Elderly



4 _:. 2 . o ,

4.j


Litprahnw . 3fd nfrrynninon winl b� available !tjrom Ifl
National C'unciI on iAging and vanmr, Senicrg
Ograiwations Ime program vall Dle vreserUM b~i 3
Iiased 'E4*r~pel in Me inauwtrV
Call Kathy Krijg to RSVP ana [or addliti-nl into-nriarifl


Make Faith House Your Ho

Our Amenities Include:
* Warm Home Cooked Meals * Monitored & Secured
* Housekeeping/ Laundry Environment-
Services * 24-Hour Staffing
* Assistance with Medication * Private & Semiprivate
. and Personal Care Needs Accommodations
. *s" e Scheduled Transportation * Scheduled Day Trips'
Services * Daily Activity Program

.:' Faith House is committed to providing excellent
service in a loving home-like environment.
, ur warm and inviting 13 bed assisted living facility is located -
on Lke Catherine off County Road 419 in Chuluota. - I
At Faith House you can be sure your loved one will receive tender
loving care by our ex-perienced, caring and supportive staff.
Faith House is owned and operated by a registered nurse whose -..
purpose and passion is to provide the elderly with the best quality.
Scare, lo e anesp t - .-


407-366-9961
Chuluota/Oviedo


Advertise your business in the Senior Observer!

Call us today at 407-628-8500 and ask for Tracy or Pat.


321-947-1888
Winter Springs (Opening Soon)


www.wpmobserver.com


SenioisrObserver


December 2008


I;





Senir~bsrve Decmber200


Getting more from (
Medicare doesn't have
to cost you extra.
The right health plan could really
help you save.



AARP� MedicareComplete�


)
a

#


Monthly
health
plan
premium


from SecureHorizons may include:
* Monthly health plan premiums starting at $0.
* Predictable costs for doctor visits and medical services.
* Predictable costs and coverage for almost 1,200 brand name and generic prescription drugs.
* 60,000-plus network pharmacies that accept our Medicare drug plans.

Call SecureHorizons now to reserve a seat at a community meeting or
schedule an in-home appointment. The deadline to enroll is December 31.

^ 1-877-562-7106, TTY: 711
8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time, 7 days a week.
www.AARPMedicareComplete.com
.AARP MedicareComplete"
from SecureHorizons

COME TO A FREE INFORMATIVE COMMUNITY MEETING


12/8 @ 2:30 PM
Panera Bread
696 E. Altamonte Dr.
Alt. Springs, FL

12/4 @ 3:00 PM
Perkins
6425 University Blvd
Winter Park, 32792

12/17 @ 10:00 AM
Clarion Hotel
230 W. State Rd. 436
Alt. Springs, FL


12/3 @ 2:00PM
Best Western - Mt. V
110 S. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park

12/16 @ 10:00AM
Holiday Inn Select
5750 T.G. Lee Blvd.
Orlando, 32822

12/17 @ 10:00 AM
Crown Plaza Orlando
304 W. Colonial Dr
Orlando, 32801


12/17 @ 10:00AM
Best Western
110 S. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park

12/9 @ 3:00 PM
Perkins
6425 University Blvd
Winter Park, 32792

12/11 @ 9:30 AM
Perkins (Rosemont)
5320 N. Org. Blsm. Tr.
Orlando, FL


12/17 @ 2:00PM
Best Western - Mt. V
110 S. Orlando Ave.
Winter Park

12/18 @ 3:00 PM
Perkins.
6425 University Blvd
Winter Park, 32792

12/22 @ 2:30 PM
Panera Bread
696 E. Altamonte Dr.
Alt. Springs, FL.


A UnitedHealthcare' Medicare Solution
A sales representative will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of
persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-877-562-7106, TTY: 711.8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local
time, 7 days a week.
AARP does not make health plan recommendations for individuals. You are strongly encouraged to evaluate your
needs before choosing a health plan. The AARP' MedicareComplete" plans are SecureHorizons' Medicare Advantage
plans insured or covered by an affiliate of UnitedHealthcare, an MA organization with a Medicare contract. AARP is
not an insurer. UnitedHealthcare pays a fee to AARP and its affiliate for use of the AARP trademark and other services.
Amounts paid are used for the general purposes of AARP and its members. The AARP� MedicareComplete" plans are
available to all eligible Medicare beneficiaries, including both members and non-members of AARP.
AARP and its affiliates are not insurance agencies or carriers and do not employ or endorse individual agents.
Limitations, copayments and coinsurance may apply. Benefits may vary by county and plan.


MO~l_08025_0163 21573 VEX0MP33160_00


SeniorObserver


December 2008


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ity Bulletin


The Belles and Beaus Dance
Club hosts its annual Christmas
Dance from 7:30-10 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 17, at the Marks
Street Recreation Complex at
99 E. Marks St. in Orlando. Soft
Touch will perform as guests
enjoy refreshments. Singles and
couples are welcome. The cost
is $5.
Call 407-277-7008 for more
information.


The Maitland Senior Center
presents Alice Friedman and
the Poetry Ensemble of Orlando
at 11:30 a.m. Dec. 9.
At 11:30 a.m. Dec. 16 author
and lecturer. Eva Marie Everson
hosts a presentation about the
Holy Land titled "How I Realized
My Dream."
The Senior Center is at 345 S.
Maitland Ave. Call 407-539-6251
for more information.


The AARP Winter Park Chapter
1047 hosts a Christmas lun-
cheon at noon on Dec. 16 at the
Clarion Hotel, 230 W. State Road
436 in Altamonte Springs. Call
407-295-9120 for more informa-
tion.

VITAS Innovative Hospice Care
of Central Florida needs volun-
teers who can befriend termi-
nally ill patients, provide relief


for weary caregivers, accompany
their pet on Paw Pals visits, visit
with veterans and more.
Call 407-691-4541 or e-mail
central.floridavolunteers@vitas.
com for more information.

The Renaissance Senior Center
hosts a Sock Hop and Holiday
Bash from 7-10 p.m. Friday, Dec.
5, at 3800 Econlockhatchee Trail
in Orlando.


Dress up in your 1950s-era
clothes and compete in contests
for men and women. Ladies, pick
out your '50s-era dress for the
best-dress contest. Men compete
in a best-socks contest.
The cost of admission is a cov-
ered dish and one canned good
to be donated to the for Pathways
Drop-In Center in support of the
mentally ill.


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Frank and Gloria Houghton
know they made the right
decision to move to The
Mayflower. The couple's three
children also agree it was a wise
choice. "They've all visited us
here - and my daughter likes
it so much, she wants to move
in!" says Gloria. "This is the


nicest place I can think of to live,"
she adds. "It simply doesn't
get any better than this."
if you're looking at retirement
living options, take a look at The
Mayflouwer. It's a good plan for
the future.
Call today to secure a spot on
our waiting list.

(407) 672-1620


THE MAYFLOWX'ER
A Plan /O th'e Future
1620 Mayflower Court
Winter Park, Florida 32"92
www.themayflower.com


A good
conversation
should be
heard
and not
seen.




* Do people sound like they are
mumbling?


* Do you find yourself turning up
the volume on the tv?

* Do you frequently ask people to
repeat themselves?

Your journey away from hearing loss begins here!
DOscover hwhkat �o& ne ed to knto
www.OrlandoHears.com -


V4c~~it~c~
~~ASSOCIATE~~


1460 Lake Baldwin Lane
Baldwin Park
407-898-2220


Dr. Melissa Riess


6wu#2d 7xgu. Care. 6cud 2),ffere,7ce.


.. , -* 0


"It Simply Doesn't Get Any
Better Than This."


December 2008


SeniorObjserver


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